Dell 4200 Personal Computer User Manual

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_______________
Information in this document is subject to change without notice.
 1997 Dell Computer Corporation. All rights reserved.
Reproduction in any manner whatsoever without the written permission of Dell Computer Corporation is strictly forbidden.
Trademarks used in this text: Dell, the DELL logo, and PowerEdge are registered trademarks and DellWare is a registered service mark of Dell
Computer Corporation; Intel, Pentium, and LANDesk are registered trademarks of Intel Corporation; Microsoft, Windows NT, and MS-DOS are
registered trademarks of Microsoft Corporation; 3Com is a registered trademark of 3Com Corporation.
Other trademarks and trade names may be used in this document to refer to either the entities claiming the marks and names or their products.
Dell Computer Corporation disclaims any proprietary interest in trademarks and trade names other than its own.
December 1997
P/N 17088
Safety Instructions
U
se the following safety guidelines to help protect
your computer system from potential damage and to
ensure your own personal safety. See the Preface in this
guide for information about the notational conventions
used in this manual, including the distinction between
warnings, cautions, and notes.
Before You Begin
Observe the following warnings while servicing this
system:
ADVARSEL: Dette system kan have mere end et
strømforsyningskabel. For at reducere risikoen for
elektrisk stød, bør en professionel servicetekniker
frakoble alle strømforsyningskabler, før systemet
serviceres.
VAROITUS: Tässä järjestelmässä voi olla useampi
kuin yksi virtajohto. Sähköiskuvaaran pienentämiseksi ammattitaitoisen huoltohenkilön on
irrotettava kaikki virtajohdot ennen järjestelmän
huoltamista.
WARNING: The power supplies in this computer
system produce high voltages and energy hazards,
which can cause bodily harm. Only trained service
technicians are authorized to remove the computer
covers and access any of the components inside the
computer.
WARNING: This system may have more than one
power supply cable. To reduce the risk of electrical
shock, a trained service technician must disconnect
all power supply cables before servicing the system.
ADVARSEL! Det er mulig at dette systemet har
mer enn én strømledning. Unngå fare for støt: En
erfaren servicetekniker må koble fra alle strømledninger før det utføres service på systemet.
VARNING: Detta system kan ha flera nätkablar.
En behörig servicetekniker måste koppla loss alla
nätkablar innan service utförs för att minska
risken för elektriska stötar.
v
When Working Inside the
WARNING
Computer
There is a danger of a new battery exploding if it is
incorrectly installed. Replace the battery only with
the same or equivalent type recommended by the
manufacturer. Discard used batteries according to
the manufacturer’s instructions.
Before taking the covers off of the computer, perform the
following steps in the sequence indicated:
1.
Turn off the computer and any peripherals.
2.
Disconnect the computer and peripherals from
their power sources. Also, disconnect any telephone or telecommunications lines from the
computer.
Doing so reduces the potential for personal injury or
shock.
3.
Touch an unpainted metal surface on the computer chassis, such as the power supply, before
touching anything inside the computer.
While you work, periodically touch an unpainted
metal surface on the computer chassis to dissipate
any static electricity that might harm internal
components.
In addition, take note of these safety guidelines when
appropriate:
•
•
•
vi
To help avoid possible damage to the system board,
wait 5 seconds after turning off the system before
removing a component from the system board or disconnecting a peripheral device from the computer.
When you disconnect a cable, pull on its connector
or on its strain-relief loop, not on the cable itself.
Some cables have a connector with locking tabs; if
you are disconnecting this type of cable, press in on
the locking tabs before disconnecting the cable. As
you pull connectors apart, keep them evenly aligned
to avoid bending any connector pins. Also, before
you connect a cable, make sure both connectors are
correctly oriented and aligned.
Handle components and cards with care. Don’t touch
the components or contacts on a card. Hold a card by
its edges or by its metal mounting bracket. Hold a
component such as a microprocessor chip by its
edges, not by its pins.
Protecting Against Electrostatic
Discharge
Static electricity can harm delicate components inside the
computer. To prevent static damage, discharge static electricity from your body before you touch any of the
computer’s electronic components, such as the microprocessor. You can do so by touching an unpainted metal
surface on the computer chassis.
As you continue to work inside the computer, periodically touch an unpainted metal surface to remove any
static charge your body may have accumulated.
You can also take the following steps to prevent damage
from electrostatic discharge (ESD):
•
When unpacking a static-sensitive component from
its shipping carton, do not remove the component’s
antistatic packing material until you are ready to
install the component in the computer. Just before
unwrapping the antistatic packaging, be sure to discharge static electricity from your body.
•
When transporting a sensitive component, first place
it in an antistatic container or packaging.
•
Handle all sensitive components in a static-safe area.
If possible, use antistatic floor pads and workbench
pads.
The following caution may appear throughout this document to remind you of these precautions:
CAUTION: See “Protecting Against Electrostatic
Discharge” in the safety instructions at the front of
this guide.
When Using the Computer
•
If your computer has a voltage selection switch on
the power supply, be sure the switch is set to match
the alternating current (AC) power available at your
location:
To help prevent electric shock, plug the computer
and peripheral power cables into properly grounded
power sources. These cables are equipped with
three-prong plugs to ensure proper grounding. Do
not use adapter plugs or remove the grounding prong
from a cable. If you must use an extension cable, use
a three-wire cable with properly grounded plugs.
•
— 115 volts (V)/60 hertz (Hz) in most of North and
South America and some Far Eastern countries
such as Japan, South Korea, and Taiwan
To help protect the computer system from sudden,
transient increases and decreases in electrical power,
use a surge suppressor, line conditioner, or uninterruptible power supply (UPS).
•
Be sure nothing rests on the computer system’s
cables and that the cables are not located where they
can be stepped on or tripped over.
•
Do not push any objects into the openings of the
computer. Doing so can cause fire or electric shock
by shorting out interior components.
•
Keep the computer away from radiators and heat
sources. Also, do not block cooling vents. Avoid
placing loose papers underneath the computer, and
do not place the computer in a closed-in wall unit or
on a rug.
System
As you use the computer system, observe the following
safety guidelines:
•
— 230 V/50 Hz in most of Europe, the Middle
East, and the Far East
•
Be sure the monitor and attached peripherals are
electrically rated to operate with the AC power available in your location.
vii
viii
Preface
About This Guide
This guide provides information about installing, configuring, and troubleshooting the hardware and software
components of the Dell PowerEdge Cluster. This document addresses the use of two PowerEdge 4200 server
systems and one or two PowerEdge Scalable Disk System 100 (SDS 100) storage systems in the PowerEdge
Cluster. Dell plans future clustering products that will
incorporate other products in the Dell server family. User
documentation specific to those systems will be available
as new cluster products are released.
•
Chapter 3, “Configuring the Cluster Software,”
describes the software configuration options that
must be specified to properly set up the cluster
system.
•
Chapter 4, “Running Applications on a Cluster” provides general information about running applications
on the PowerEdge Cluster.
•
Chapter 5, “Troubleshooting,” provides information
to help you troubleshoot problems with the cluster’s
installation and configuration.
•
Appendix A, “Upgrading to a Cluster Configuration,” provides specific information to service
technicians about upgrading existing system hardware and software to a cluster configuration.
•
Appendix B, “Stand-Alone and Rack Configurations,” lists the Dell-supported stand-alone and rack
configurations and provides instructions for installing the network switch in a rack.
•
Appendix C, “Cluster Data Sheet,” provides a form
for gathering and recording important information
about your PowerEdge Cluster.
•
Appendix D, “PowerEdge Cluster Configuration
Matrix,” describes the configuration matrix form,
which is used to record information about the cluster
hardware such as service tag numbers and types of
adapters installed in the cluster node PCI slots.
•
Appendix E, “Regulatory Compliance,” lists the
regulatory standards with which the PowerEdge
Cluster has been tested and certified for compliance.
•
Appendix F, “Safety Information for Technicians,”
provides important safety warnings about electrostatic discharge (ESD).
This guide addresses two audience levels:
•
•
Users and system installers who will perform general
setup, cabling, and configuration of the PowerEdge
Cluster
Trained service technicians who will perform more
extensive installations such as firmware upgrades
and installation of required expansion cards
This guide identifies the appropriate audience for each
topic being discussed.
The chapters and appendixes in this guide are summarized as follows:
•
•
Chapter 1, “Getting Started,” provides an overview
of the PowerEdge Cluster and outlines the steps for
installing a new PowerEdge Cluster system or modifying an existing PowerEdge system into a
PowerEdge Cluster.
Chapter 2, “Cabling the Cluster Hardware,” provides
instructions for properly cabling the system hardware components.
ix
•
Appendix G, “Warranties and Return Policy,”
describes the warranty information pertaining to the
system.
Other Documentation You May
Need
Expandable RAID Controller User’s Guide, Dell
PowerEdge Expandable RAID Controller Client
User’s Guide, Dell PowerEdge Expandable RAID
Controller General Alert Server User’s Guide, and
Dell PowerEdge Expandable RAID Controller Battery Backup Module User’s Guide.
•
Documentation for the Microsoft Windows NT
Server Enterprise Edition operating system is
included with the system if you ordered the operating system software from Dell. This documentation
describes how to install (if necessary), configure,
and use the operating system software.
•
Documentation is included with any options you
purchase separately from the system. This documentation includes information that you need to
configure and install these options in the Dell
computer.
•
Technical information files—sometimes called
“readme” files—may be installed on the hard-disk
drive to provide last-minute updates about technical
changes to the system or advanced technical reference material intended for experienced users or
technicians.
You may need to reference the following documentation
when performing the procedures in this guide:
•
•
•
The Dell PowerEdge 4200 Systems User’s Guide,
which describes system features and technical specifications, small computer system interface (SCSI)
device drivers, the System Setup program, software
support, and the system configuration utility.
The Dell PowerEdge SDS 100 Storage System
Installation and Service Guide, which provides
installation and operation instructions for the
PowerEdge SDS 100 storage system.
The Intel LANDesk Server Manager software,
which includes a CD containing the server manager
software and the following documents: LANDesk
Server Manager Setup Guide, LANDesk Server
Manager User’s Guide, LANDesk Server Control
Installation and User’s Guide, and LANDesk Server
Monitor Module Installation and User’s Guide.
•
The Dell Hardware Instrumentation Package for
Intel LANDesk Server Manager User’s Guide, which
provides installation and configuration procedures as
well as the alert messages issued by this server management software.
•
The Using the Dell Server Assistant CD document,
which provides instructions for using the Dell Server
Assistant CD.
You may also have one or more of the following
documents:
•
The Dell PowerEdge Rack-Mountable Solutions
Installation Guide, Dell PowerEdge 4xxx and 6xxx
Systems Rack Kit Installation Guide, and Dell
PowerEdge SDS 100 Storage System Rack Installation
Guide, which provide detailed instructions for installing the cluster components in a rack.
•
The following documents accompany the Dell
PowerEdge Expandable Redundant Array of Inexpensive Disks (RAID) Controller: Dell PowerEdge
x
NOTE: Documentation updates are sometimes included
with the system to describe changes to the system or software. Always read these updates before consulting any
other documentation because the updates often contain information that supersedes the information in the other
documents.
Notational Conventions
The following subsections list notational conventions
used in this document.
Warnings, Cautions, and Notes
Throughout this guide, there may be blocks of text
printed in bold type within boxes or in italic type. These
blocks are warnings, cautions, and notes, and they are
used as follows:
WARNING: A WARNING indicates the potential
for bodily harm and tells you how to avoid the
problem.
CAUTION: A CAUTION indicates either potential damage to hardware or loss of data and tells
you how to avoid the problem.
•
Examples: autoexec.bat and c:\windows
•
NOTE: A NOTE indicates important information that
helps you make better use of the computer system.
Typographical Conventions
The following list defines (where appropriate) and illustrates typographical conventions used as visual cues for
specific elements of text throughout this document:
•
Keycaps, the labeling that appears on the keys on a
keyboard, are enclosed in angle brackets.
Key combinations are a series of keys to be pressed
simultaneously (unless otherwise indicated) to perform a single function.
•
•
Commands presented in lowercase bold are for reference purposes only and are not intended to be typed
when referenced.
Screen text is text that appears on the screen of your
monitor or display. It can be a system message, for
example, or it can be text that you are instructed to
type as part of a command (referred to as a command
line). Screen text is presented in the Courier New
font.
Example: The following message appears on your
screen:
Example: “Use the format command to . . . ”
In contrast, commands presented in the Courier New
font are part of an instruction and intended to be
typed.
Example: “Type format a: to format the diskette
in drive A.”
Command lines consist of a command and may
include one or more of the command’s possible
parameters. Command lines are presented in the
Courier New font.
Example: del c:\myfile.doc
Example: <Ctrl><Alt><Enter>
•
Syntax lines consist of a command and all its
possible parameters. Commands are displayed in
lowercase bold; variable parameters (those for which
you substitute a value) are displayed in lowercase
italics; constant parameters are displayed in lowercase bold. The brackets indicate items that are
optional.
Example: del [drive:] [path] filename [/p]
Example: <Enter>
•
Filenames and directory names are presented in
lowercase bold.
No boot device available
Example: “Type md c:\dos and press <Enter>.”
•
Variables are placeholders for which you substitute a
value. They are presented in italics.
Example: SIMMn (where n represents the SIMM socket
designation)
xi
xii
Contents
Chapter 1
Getting Started . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-1
PowerEdge Cluster Components. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-1
Minimum System Requirements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-2
Basic Installation Procedure . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-3
Adding Peripherals Required for Clustering . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-4
Setting Up the Cluster Hardware . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-5
Cabling the Cluster Hardware . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-5
Updating System BIOS/Firmware for Clustering . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-5
Setting Up the Shared Storage Subsystem Hard-Disk Drives . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-6
Setting Up the Internal SCSI Hard-Disk Drives . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-6
Installing and Configuring Windows NT Server Enterprise Edition. . . . . . . . . . 1-6
Installing and Configuring the Microsoft Cluster Server Software . . . . . . . . . . . 1-6
Installing PowerEdge Cluster Applications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-6
Checking the System . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-6
Chapter 2
Cabling the Cluster Hardware. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-1
Cluster Cabling . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-1
One Shared Storage Subsystem Cabled to a Cluster. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-1
Two SDS 100 Storage Systems Cabled to a Single RAID Controller . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-3
Two SDS 100 Storage Systems Cabled to Dual RAID Controllers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-4
SMB Cabling. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-5
NIC Cabling . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-5
Power Cabling . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-7
Mouse, Keyboard, and Monitor Cabling. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-7
Disconnecting SCSI Cables While the Cluster Is Running. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-7
xiii
Chapter 3
Configuring the Cluster Software . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-1
Low-Level Software Configuration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Important System Warning . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
SCSI Host Adapter IDs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Disabling a RAID Controller BIOS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
RAID Level for the Shared Storage Subsystem(s) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
RAID Level for the Internal Hard-Disk Drives (Optional). . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
High-Level Software Configuration. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Installing Intel LANDesk Server Manager . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Choosing a Domain Model . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Static IP Addresses . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
IPs and Subnet Masks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Configuring Separate Networks on a Cluster . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Changing the IP Address of a Cluster Node . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Naming and Formatting Shared Drives. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Driver for the RAID Controller. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Updating the NIC Driver. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Adjusting the Paging File Size and Registry Sizes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Verifying the Cluster Functionality . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
1 x 8 Mode on the SDS 100 Storage System . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
SCSI Controller IDs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Cluster Domain . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
RAID Controller Driver . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Shared Storage Subsystem Drive Letters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Cluster Network Communications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Cluster Service . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Availability of Cluster Resources . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Uninstalling Microsoft Cluster Server . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Removing a Node From a Cluster . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Setting Up the Quorum Resource . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Using the ftdisk Driver . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Cluster RAID Controller Functionality . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Rebuild Function Does Not Complete After Reboot or Power Loss . . . . . . . . .
Rebuild Rate Not Adjustable on
Cluster-Enabled RAID Controller. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Using the Maximize Feature in PowerEdge RAID Console. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Rebuild Operation in RAID Console . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
xiv
3-1
3-1
3-2
3-2
3-2
3-2
3-3
3-3
3-3
3-3
3-3
3-3
3-4
3-4
3-4
3-5
3-5
3-5
3-5
3-6
3-6
3-6
3-6
3-6
3-7
3-7
3-7
3-7
3-8
3-8
3-8
3-8
3-8
3-8
3-9
Chapter 4
Running Applications on a Cluster . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-1
Setting Up Applications
Software to Run on the Cluster . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-1
Internet Information Server Service . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-1
File Share Service . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-2
Print Spooler Service . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-3
Using the Rediscovery Application in Intel LANDesk. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-4
Running chkdsk /f on a Quorum Disk. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-5
Tape Backup for Clustered Systems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-5
Chapter 5
Troubleshooting. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-1
Appendix A
Upgrading to a Cluster Configuration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A-1
Checking Your Existing Hardware . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .A-1
Adding Expansion Cards for a Cluster Upgrade . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .A-1
Mounting, Cabling, and Configuring the Cluster Hardware . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .A-2
Installing and Configuring the Cluster Software. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .A-3
Upgrading the PowerEdge 4200 Firmware . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .A-3
Upgrading the PowerEdge SDS 100 Storage System Firmware . . . . . . . . . . . . .A-3
Setting the Cluster Mode With BIOS Setup . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .A-3
Installing and Configuring NICs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .A-3
Appendix B
Stand-Alone and Rack Configurations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . B-1
Power Requirements of the PowerEdge Cluster . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .B-1
Supported Stand-Alone Configurations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .B-2
Rack Safety Notices . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .B-2
Kit Installation Restrictions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .B-2
Rack Stabilizer Feet . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .B-2
Supported Rack Configuration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .B-5
Rack-Mounting the Network Switch. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .B-6
Appendix C
Cluster Data Sheet . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . C-1
Appendix D
PowerEdge Cluster Configuration Matrix . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . D-1
xv
Appendix E
Regulatory Compliance. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E-1
Regulatory Standards . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
CE Notice . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Safety Standard . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
EMC Standards . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
E-1
E-1
E-1
E-1
Appendix F
Safety Information for Technicians . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . F-1
Appendix G
Warranties and Return Policy. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . G-1
Limited Three-Year Warranty (U.S. and Canada Only) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . G-1
Coverage During Year One . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . G-1
Coverage During Years Two and Three . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . G-2
General . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . G-2
“Total Satisfaction” Return Policy (U.S. and Canada Only) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . G-2
Index
Figures
Figure 1-1.
Figure 1-2.
Figure 2-1.
Figure 2-2.
Figure 2-3.
Figure 2-4.
Figure 2-5.
Figure 2-6.
Figure 2-7.
Figure A-1.
Figure B-1.
Figure B-2.
Figure B-3.
xvi
PowerEdge Cluster Layout . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-2
Back View of a PowerEdge 4200 Cluster Node . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-5
Cabling a Clustered System With One PowerEdge SDS 100
Storage System. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-2
Cabling Single RAID Controllers to Two PowerEdge SDS 100
Storage Systems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-3
Cabling Dual RAID Controllers to Two PowerEdge SDS 100
Storage Systems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-4
SMB Cable Connected to One SDS 100 Storage System . . . . . . . . . 2-5
SMB Cables Connected to Two SDS 100 Storage Systems . . . . . . . 2-5
Cabling the Network Switch . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-6
PowerEdge Cluster Power Cabling . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-8
Back View of a PowerEdge 4200 Cluster Node . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A-2
Supported Stand-Alone Configurations With One SDS 100
Storage System. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . B-3
Supported Stand-Alone Configurations With Two SDS 100
Storage Systems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . B-4
Supported Rack Configuration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . B-5
Figure B-4.
Figure D-1.
Attaching the Rack-Mounting Hardware on the Network Switch . . .B-6
PowerEdge Cluster Configuration Matrix . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .D-2
Table
Table 5-1.
Troubleshooting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-1
xvii
xviii
Chapter 1
Getting Started
T
he Dell PowerEdge Cluster is an enterprise system
that implements clustering technology based on the
®
®
Microsoft® Windows NT ® Server, Enterprise Edition 4.0
operating system and Microsoft Windows NT Cluster
Server. The Dell PowerEdge Cluster provides the following benefits in meeting the needs of mission-critical
network applications:
•
High availability of system services and resources to
network clients
•
•
•
Redundant storage of application data
•
Failure recovery for cluster applications
Capability to repair, maintain, or upgrade a cluster
server without taking the whole cluster off-line
Sharing of processing and communication work load
between the two servers
The term cluster refers to two or more server systems
(referred to as nodes) that are interconnected with appropriate hardware and software to provide a single point of
continuous access to network services (for example, file
service, database applications, resources, and so on) for
network clients. Each cluster node is configured with
software and network resources that enable it to interact
with the other node to provide a mutual redundancy of
operation and application processing. Because the servers
interact in this way, they appear as a single system to the
network clients.
As an integrated system, the PowerEdge Cluster is
designed to handle most hardware failures and downtime
dynamically. In the event that one of the cluster nodes
fails or experiences downtime, the processing work load
of the failed node switches over (or fails over) to the
remaining node in the cluster. This fail-over capability
enables the cluster system to keep network resources and
applications up and running on the network while the
failed node is taken off-line, repaired, and brought back
online. The overall impact of a node failure to network
operation is minimal.
PowerEdge Cluster Components
The Dell PowerEdge Cluster consists of two Dell PowerEdge 4200 systems (the cluster nodes) equipped with one
or two Dell PowerEdge Expandable redundant array of
inexpensive disks (RAID) Controllers and two network
interface controllers (NICs) to provide a dedicated nodeto-node network interconnection and a regular Ethernet
local area network (LAN) connection. Each server has
shared Ultra/Wide small computer system interface
(SCSI) connections to one or more Dell PowerEdge
Scalable Disk System (SDS 100) storage system(s).
Figure 1-1 shows a layout of the PowerEdge Cluster
components and their interconnections.
Each component of the PowerEdge Cluster has a minimum system requirement. The following section lists and
describes the minimum system requirements for the
PowerEdge Cluster.
Getting Started
1-1
3Com SuperStack II
Switch 3000 TX
PowerEdge 4200
systems (2)
PowerEdge SDS 100
storage systems (1 or 2)
with RAID
Figure 1-1. PowerEdge Cluster Layout
Minimum System Requirements
— Two 4-GB internal SCSI hard-disk drives (three
drives are required for an internal RAID 5
configuration).
NOTE: If you are upgrading an existing system to a
PowerEdge Cluster, check this list to ensure that your
upgrade meets these requirements.
— Two Ethernet NICs, installed in PCI slots 4 and
8. The LAN-connected NIC resides in PCI slot
8, and the node-to-node interconnect NIC occupies slot 4.
The PowerEdge Cluster requires the following minimum
system hardware configuration:
•
Two PowerEdge 4200 systems with the following
configuration:
•
— For the Americas: Two Power Techniques
power strips with Type B plugs, Model P905200
— One or two 233-megahertz (MHz), one or two
266-MHz, or one or two 300-MHz Intel®
Pentium® II microprocessors with at least
512 kilobytes (KB) of level 2 (L2) cache.
— 128 megabytes (MB) of random-access memory
(RAM).
— A minimum of one PowerEdge Expandable
RAID Controller in each PowerEdge system
with 16 MB of single in-line memory module
(SIMM) memory. This controller must have
cluster-specific firmware and must be installed
in Peripheral Component Interconnect [PCI]
slot 7. A second cluster RAID controller can be
added to slot 5, but the first cluster RAID
controller must be installed in slot 7.
1-2
Power cabling and distribution components required:
— For Europe: One or two Marway power distribution units (PDUs), Model MPD-411013 or
two Power Techniques power strips with Type B
plugs, Model P906200
•
One or two SDS 100 storage system(s) for the shared
disk resource with the following configuration:
— Cluster-specific basic input/output system
(BIOS) upgrade for the PowerEdge systems for
turning the SDS 100 storage system backplane
into a 1 x 8 mode (one SCSI channel with up to
eight hard-disk drives) when two RAID controllers are present.
Dell PowerEdge Cluster (PowerEdge 4200) Installation and Troubleshooting Guide
— At least three SCSI hard-disk drives in each
SDS 100 storage system to support RAID 5
functionality. Microsoft Cluster Server currently
supports only the Microsoft Windows NT file
system (NTFS) format for the shared storage
subsystem.
— Two 4-meter (m) SCSI cables for each SDS 100
storage system in the cluster.
•
A 3Com® SuperStack II Switch 3000 TX 8-port
switch and accessories, which includes the
following:
— Four Category 5 unshielded twisted pair (UTP)
Ethernet cables
— Hardware for mounting the network switch in a
Dell Rack-Mountable Solutions enclosure
(optional)
In addition to the preceding hardware components, the
following software components are also required:
•
•
•
•
•
Windows NT Server, Enterprise Edition 4.0 operating system installed on the PowerEdge systems. Two
Windows NT Server Enterprise Edition licenses are
required, plus workstation licenses for all the client
systems running on the network.
Clustering software recovery kits for the customer
environment. These recovery kits are in addition to
the standard file, print, and Internet Information
Server (IIS) resources that are bundled with the
Cluster Server software.
Transmission Control Protocol/Internet Protocol
(TCP/IP) running on the LAN. NetBIOS Extended
User Interface (NetBEUI) and Internet Packet
Exchange/Sequenced Packet Exchange (IPX/SPX)
are not supported.
Cluster requires two alternating current (AC) circuits
with a minimum load capacity of 20 amperes each.
Your installation of the PowerEdge Cluster may be either
a completely new installation or an upgrade of an
existing system. If your PowerEdge Cluster is completely
new, the operating system and some applications may be
installed on your system already. Installation in this case
is a matter of setting up and cabling the hardware, setting
some configuration options, setting network addresses,
and performing checks on the system.
If you are upgrading existing equipment, several additional steps must be performed such as installing
additional NIC and RAID expansion cards, updating
firmware, and installing both the operating system and
cluster software on each cluster node. Hardware installation and updates to firmware should be performed only
by trained service technicians.
The following is a comprehensive list of the steps that
may be required to install a PowerEdge Cluster, whether
it is a new system installation or an upgrade to an existing
system:
1.
For system upgrades, add NICs, RAID controllers, hard-disk drives, and so on to the existing
system hardware to meet the requirements for a
clustered system.
2.
Set up the cluster equipment in either a standalone or rack configuration.
3.
Cable the system hardware for clustering.
4.
For system upgrades, update the existing system
components with cluster-specific firmware.
5.
If not already done, configure the RAID level on
the shared storage subsystem using the PowerEdge Expandable RAID Controller BIOS
configuration utility.
6.
If not already done, partition and format the
hard-disk drives in the shared storage subsystem(s). Also, partition and format any new
hard-disk drives added to the cluster nodes for a
system upgrade.
7.
If not already done, install and/or configure
Windows NT Server Enterprise Edition and the
included Service Pack on each cluster node.
Server Management Agent rediscovery application.
Cluster-specific Windows NT Server driver for the
PowerEdge Expandable RAID Controllers.
Basic Installation Procedure
NOTE: Before installing the PowerEdge Cluster, ensure
that your site power is adequate to handle the power
requirements of the cluster equipment. PowerEdge
Getting Started
1-3
8.
Configure the public and private NIC interconnects in each node and place the interconnects on
separate IP subnetworks.
9.
If not already done, install and/or configure the
Microsoft Cluster Server software on each cluster
node.
10. Check out the functionality of the fully installed
cluster.
11. Install and set up applications.
The following sections briefly describe each of these
steps.
Adding Peripherals Required for
Clustering
NOTE: Hardware installation should be performed only
by trained service technicians.
If you are upgrading your existing hardware to a cluster
configuration, additional peripheral devices and expansion cards need to be added to the system to meet the
minimum cluster requirements listed earlier in this
chapter.
1-4
For example, you need to install a second NIC card to
ensure that the system meets the minimum configuration
of two NIC cards—one card in PCI slot 8 for the public
LAN connection and another card in PCI slot 4 for the
node-to-node interconnection. You also need to add a
cluster-enabled PowerEdge Expandable RAID Controller
for the required shared storage subsystem used by the two
nodes.
NOTE: The first cluster-enabled PowerEdge Expandable
RAID Controller must be installed in PCI slot 7.
Figure 1-2 shows the placement of these devices in a
PowerEdge 4200 system. See Appendix A for further
information about upgrading an existing PowerEdge 4200
system with expansion cards required for clustering.
Additionally, you may need to add hard-disk drives and
another PowerEdge Expandable RAID Controller to the
PowerEdge system if you are configuring the system’s
internal drives as a RAID array. However, this is not a
requirement for clustering. Refer to the Dell PowerEdge
4200 Systems Installation and Troubleshooting Guide for
instructions on installing expansion cards or hard-disk
drives in the PowerEdge 4200 system.
If you are upgrading an existing SDS 100 storage system
to meet the cluster requirements for the shared storage
subsystem, you may need to install additional hard-disk
drives to the shared storage subsystem. The size and
number of drives you add depend on the RAID level you
want to use and the number of hard-disk drives already
present in your system. For information on installing
hard-disk drives in the PowerEdge SDS 100 storage system, refer to the Dell PowerEdge SDS 100 Storage
System Installation and Service Guide.
Dell PowerEdge Cluster (PowerEdge 4200) Installation and Troubleshooting Guide
RJ45 Ethernet connector
node-to-node
interconnected NIC
second cluster-specific RAID
controller (not shown)
standard RAID controller
(optional)
cluster-specific RAID
controller (required)
RAID channel 0
RAID channel 1
LAN-connected NIC
Figure 1-2. Back View of a PowerEdge 4200 Cluster Node
Setting Up the Cluster Hardware
Cabling the Cluster Hardware
The PowerEdge Cluster can be set up in either a freestanding configuration or installed in a Dell
Rack-Mountable Solutions enclosure. Information on
Dell-supported rack configurations for the cluster is provided in Appendix B, “Stand-Alone and Rack
Configurations,” in this guide. Also included in Appendix B are instructions for installing the network switch in
a rack. For instructions on installing all other PowerEdge
Cluster components (including the Apex Outlook Concentrator switch) in a Dell rack, refer to the Dell
PowerEdge Rack-Mountable Solutions Installation
Guide.
After the PowerEdge Cluster hardware is set up, the system must be properly cabled for clustering. Chapter 2,
“Cabling the Cluster Hardware,” provides instructions
for cabling the cluster components.
Updating System BIOS/Firmware for
Clustering
NOTE: BIOS upgrades should be performed only when
instructed by a Dell support technician.
If you are upgrading existing hardware to a PowerEdge
Cluster, the BIOS firmware for the PowerEdge system(s)
and SDS 100 storage system(s) must be updated to support clustering. Appendix A, “Upgrading to a Cluster
Configuration,” provides instructions on performing all
necessary firmware updates.
Getting Started
1-5
Setting Up the Shared Storage
Subsystem Hard-Disk Drives
If your Power-Edge Cluster consists of all new components, the hard-disk drives in the shared storage
subsystem may already be partitioned, formatted, and set
up in a RAID configuration for clustering. If you are
upgrading a shared storage subsystem in an existing system, the shared hard-disk drives must be set up for
clustering as part of the upgrade.
The first step is to configure the RAID level that you will
be using in your cluster. For instructions on setting up a
RAID array, refer to the Dell PowerEdge Expandable
RAID Controller User’s Guide. Then the hard-disk drives
in the shared storage subsystem must be partitioned and
formatted, and drive letters must be assigned to each
drive. For instructions on partitioning and formatting the
shared storage subsystem hard-disk drives, refer to the
Microsoft Windows NT Server Enterprise Edition Administrator’s Guide and Release Notes and the Dell
PowerEdge Expandable RAID Controller User’s Guide.
Chapter 3, “Configuring the Cluster Software,” in this
guide describes how to assign drive letters to the shared
hard-disk drives.
Setting Up the Internal SCSI Hard-Disk
Drives
If you have added new hard-disk drives to your PowerEdge system or are setting up the internal drives in a
RAID configuration, you must configure the RAID, if
applicable, and partition and format the drives before you
can install Windows NT Server Enterprise Edition. For
instructions on partitioning and formatting SCSI harddisk drives, refer to your PowerEdge system User’s
Guide. For instructions on setting up a RAID array, refer
to the Dell PowerEdge Expandable RAID Controller
User’s Guide.
Installing and Configuring Windows NT
Server Enterprise Edition
If it has not already been done, Windows NT Server
Enterprise Edition must be installed on the internal harddisk drives of both cluster nodes.
NOTE: Windows NT Server Enterprise Edition cannot be
run from the shared storage subsystem.
1-6
Cluster-specific device drivers are also installed at this
time. Refer to the Microsoft Windows NT Server Enterprise Edition Administrator’s Guide and Release Notes
for instructions on installing and configuring the operating system and adding cluster-specific device drivers.
Refer to Chapter 3, “Configuring the Cluster Software,”
of this guide for information specific to configuring
Windows NT Server Enterprise Edition on your
PowerEdge Cluster.
Installing and Configuring the Microsoft
Cluster Server Software
Like Windows NT Server Enterprise Edition, the Cluster
Server software must be installed on both cluster nodes if
it has not already been done. Refer to the Microsoft
Windows NT Cluster Server Adminstrator’s Guide for
instructions on installing and configuring the clustering
software. Also refer to Chapter 3, “Configuring the Cluster Software,” for specific information about installing
and configuring Microsoft Cluster Server on your
PowerEdge Cluster.
Installing PowerEdge Cluster
Applications
Additional steps are required to configure applications
software to run on the cluster. Chapter 4 in this guide provides general information about this process and cites
example procedures for setting up the Windows NT
Internet Information Server (IIS) Virtual Root service,
the File Share service, and the Print Spooler service to
run on a cluster.
Chapter 4 also describes the rediscovery application,
which must be run whenever the primary cluster node
fails over to the secondary cluster node. The rediscovery
application enables the secondary cluster node to rediscover and reestablish system management of the SDS
100 storage system(s).
Checking the System
When installation is complete, you should check the
functionality of your cluster system by performing a
number of tests. See “Verifying the Cluster Functionality” in Chapter 3 for specific tests and procedures that
you can perform to check out the cluster.
Dell PowerEdge Cluster (PowerEdge 4200) Installation and Troubleshooting Guide
Chapter 2
Cabling the Cluster Hardware
T
he Dell PowerEdge Cluster must be installed and
cabled correctly to ensure that the cluster functions properly. This chapter instructs you on how to cable your
system hardware for a cluster configuration.
Information about configuring your PowerEdge Cluster
is provided in Chapter 3, “Configuring the Cluster
Software.”
For instructions on installing the Microsoft Windows NT
Server Enterprise Edition operating system and the
Microsoft clustering software, refer to the Microsoft
Windows NT Server Enterprise Edition Administrator’s
Guide and Release Notes and the Microsoft Windows NT
Cluster Server Administrator’s Guide. For installation
and configuration information specific to the Dell
PowerEdge 4200 systems or the Dell PowerEdge
Scalable Disk System 100 (SDS 100) storage system,
refer to the Dell documentation for those systems.
Cluster Cabling
•
Category 5 Ethernet cables are connected from each
of the network interface controllers (NICs) in each
PowerEdge system to the 3Com switch.
•
Power cables are connected according to the safety
requirements for your region:
— For customers in the Americas: Power cables
for the cluster components are routed through
two Power Techniques power strips. The primary power supplies of the cluster components
are all cabled to one power strip, and the redundant power supplies on the components are all
cabled to the second power strip. Each power
strip is connected, via Type B plugs and connectors, to a separate alternating current (AC)
circuit, each with a minimum power capacity of
20 amperes (amps).
— For customers in Europe: All power cables are
connected to one or two Marway power distribution units (PDUs), Model MPD-411013 or
two Power Techniques power strips with Type B
plugs, Model P906200.
The PowerEdge Cluster consists of two PowerEdge 4200
server systems, one or two PowerEdge SDS 100 storage
systems, a 3Com SuperStack II Switch 3000 TX, and a
pair of power strips or a single power distribution unit,
depending on how the system is configured. These components are interconnected as follows:
The following sections describe each of these cabling
procedures.
•
Cabled to a Cluster
•
A 4-meter (m) small computer system interface (SCSI)
cable is connected from the RAID controller in each
PowerEdge system to the SDS 100 storage system(s).
A system management bus (SMB) cable is connected from the SMB connector on one of the two
PowerEdge systems (preferably the system designated as Node 1 or the primary node) to the SMB
connector on the SDS 100 storage system.
One Shared Storage Subsystem
Use the following procedure to connect your cluster
system to a single SDS 100 storage system. Refer to
Figure 2-1 for a diagram of the cabling scheme.
CAUTION: Do not turn on the PowerEdge 4200
systems or the SDS 100 storage system(s) until all
cabling is complete.
Cabling the Cluster Hardware
2-1
ultra-high density connector
Ultra/Wide SCSI connections
from channel 0 on each
cluster-enabled RAID controller
68-pin connectors (2)
PowerEdge SDS 100 storage system
Figure 2-1. Cabling a Clustered System With One PowerEdge SDS 100 Storage System
1.
Connect the 68-pin connector on the 4-m SCSI
cable to SCSI connector A on the back of the SDS
100 storage system, and tighten the retaining
screws.
3.
Connect the 68-pin connector on the second 4-m
SCSI cable to SCSI connector B on the back of
the SDS 100 storage system, and tighten the
retaining screws.
2.
Connect the ultra-high density (UHD) connector
of the SCSI cable to the channel 0 connector (the
rightmost connector) on the cluster RAID controller in the first PowerEdge server, and tighten
the retaining screws.
4.
Connect the UHD connector of the second SCSI
cable to the channel 0 connector on the cluster
RAID controller in the second PowerEdge server,
and tighten the retaining screws.
NOTES: On clusters with a single SDS 100 storage
system, either server system can be connected to
either storage system SCSI connector.
NOTE: If the SDS 100 storage system is ever
disconnected from the cluster, it must be reconnected
to the same controller channels on the RAID controllers to operate properly.
Be sure to securely tighten the retaining screws on
the SCSI connectors to ensure a reliable connection.
2-2
Dell PowerEdge Cluster (PowerEdge 4200) Installation and Troubleshooting Guide
Two SDS 100 Storage Systems
Cabled to a Single RAID Controller
Connecting the cluster to two SDS 100 storage systems is
similar to connecting to a single SDS 100 storage system.
Ultra/Wide SCSI connections
from channel 1 on each
RAID controller
First, connect the channel 0 connector of each PowerEdge Expandable RAID Controller to the back of the first
storage system, as described in the preceding section.
Then connect the channel 1 connector of each RAID controller to the second storage system (see Figure 2-2).
ultra-high density connector
Ultra/Wide SCSI connections from
channel 0 on each RAID controller
68-pin connectors (2 on each
PowerEdge SDS 100 storage system)
Figure 2-2. Cabling Single RAID Controllers to Two PowerEdge SDS 100 Storage Systems
Cabling the Cluster Hardware
2-3
Two SDS 100 Storage Systems
Cabled to Dual RAID Controllers
To cable cluster nodes with dual RAID controllers to two
SDS 100 storage systems, connect the channel 0 connector of each RAID controller of the primary node (or the
first node) to the “A” connectors on the back of each storage system, and connect the channel 0 connectors of the
secondary node’s RAID controllers to the “B” connectors
on each storage system (see Figure 2-3).
ultra-high density connector
NOTE: On clusters with multiple SDS 100 storage systems, the channel 0 connectors of the two RAID
controllers must be connected to one storage system, and
the channel 1 connectors must be connected to the second storage system. If the connections are ever removed,
you must reconnect the cables as they were connected
previously. To help ensure that the same storage system is
attached to the same channels, tagging or color-coding
the cables is recommended.
Ultra/Wide SCSI connections from
channel 0 on each RAID controller
68-pin connectors (2 on each
PowerEdge SDS 100 storage system)
Figure 2-3. Cabling Dual RAID Controllers to Two PowerEdge SDS 100 Storage Systems
2-4
Dell PowerEdge Cluster (PowerEdge 4200) Installation and Troubleshooting Guide
SMB Cabling
The SMB connector enables a host PowerEdge system to
provide system-level management of the storage
system(s).
chain connects to the SMB connector on the
PowerEdge system’s back panel. The second
storage system connects the SMB cable from its
connector labeled “IN” to the connector labeled
“OUT” on the first storage system’s back panel.
NOTE: The SDS 100 storage system is connected to only
one of the two PowerEdge systems in the cluster.
To install the SMB cable, use the following procedure:
1.
SMB cables (2)
Connect one end of the SMB cable (supplied with
the storage system) to the SMB connector labeled
“IN” on the storage system’s back panel.
Both connectors on the SMB cable are identical. The
connectors are keyed for proper insertion.
2.
Connect the other end of the SMB cable to the
SMB connector on the first PowerEdge system or
to the SMB connector of the first storage system.
•
If you are connecting only one storage system to
the cluster, connect the SMB cable to the SMB
connector on the first node of the cluster (see
Figure 2-4).
Figure 2-5. SMB Cables Connected to
Two SDS 100 Storage Systems
NIC Cabling
SMB cable
The NICs in the PowerEdge systems provide two network connections on each node—a dedicated network
interconnection between the cluster nodes and a connection to the local area network (LAN). Having two
network interconnections from each PowerEdge system
can provide redundancy at the communications level in
case one of the cluster NICs fails.
The 3Com SuperStack II switch has eight ports available
on its front panel, running at a switched rate of 100 megabits per second (Mbps). All ports on the SuperStack II
switch are functionally identical, so the NIC cables can
be attached to any of the ports in any order. Category 5
unshielded twisted-pair (UTP) cables are provided.
Figure 2-4. SMB Cable Connected to
One SDS 100 Storage System
•
If you are connecting two SDS 100 storage systems to the cluster, link the storage systems in
daisy-chain fashion to the PowerEdge system
(see Figure 2-5). The first storage system in the
Figure 2-6 shows a sample configuration of NIC cabling
where the private node-to-node interconnect (the NICs in
PCI slot 4 of each node) routes through the network
switch, and the LAN NICs connect directly to the public
LAN. Other configurations are possible, including connecting all four NICs to the SuperStack II switch;
however, in this scenario, the switch is a possible single
point of failure.
Cabling the Cluster Hardware
2-5
node-to-node (private)
network connection
LAN connections
to client systems
Figure 2-6. Cabling the Network Switch
2-6
Dell PowerEdge Cluster (PowerEdge 4200) Installation and Troubleshooting Guide
network switch
Power Cabling
Observe the following warnings when connecting the
power cables to your PowerEdge Cluster system:
WARNING: Although each component of the
PowerEdge Cluster meets leakage current safety
requirements, the total leakage current may
exceed the maximum that is permitted when the
components are used together. To meet safety
requirements in the Americas, you must use a
Type B plug and socket connection for the cluster
power to enable the appropriate level of ground
protection. In Europe, you must use one or two
power distribution units (PDUs) or two Type B
plug and socket connections wired and installed
by a qualified electrician in accordance with the
local wiring regulations.
WARNING: Do not attempt to cable the PowerEdge Cluster to electrical power without first
planning the distribution of the cluster’s electrical
load across available circuits. For operation in the
Americas, the PowerEdge Cluster requires two
AC circuits with a minimum capacity of 20 amps
each to handle the electrical load of the system. Do
not allow the electrical load of the system to
exceed 16 amps on either circuit. For operation in
Europe, the PowerEdge Cluster requires two circuits rated in excess of the combined load of the
attached systems. Please refer to the ratings
marked on the back of each cluster component
when determining the total system’s electrical
load.
Figure 2-7 illustrates the proper power cabling of the
PowerEdge Cluster components. Each component of the
cluster must have power supplied by two separate AC
circuits—one circuit to each component power supply.
Therefore, the primary power supplies of all the PowerEdge Cluster components are grouped onto one circuit
and the redundant power supplies are grouped onto
another circuit.
Mouse, Keyboard, and Monitor
Cabling
If you are installing the PowerEdge Cluster in a Dell
Rack-Mountable Solutions cabinet, refer to the Dell
PowerEdge Rack-Mountable Solutions Installation
Guide for instructions on cabling each cluster node’s
mouse, keyboard, and monitor to the Apex Outlook
switch box in the rack. The switch box enables you to use
a single mouse, keyboard, and monitor for both systems.
Disconnecting SCSI Cables
While the Cluster Is Running
If you must disconnect a SCSI cable between a powereddown server and a running SDS 100 storage system, you
should first disconnect the cable from the back of the
SDS 100 and then disconnect the cable from the RAID
controller connector on the cluster node. This helps maintain the integrity of the SCSI signals while removing the
cable.
Cabling the Cluster Hardware
2-7
redundant power supplies on one
AC power strip (or on one AC
power distribution unit [not shown])
primary power supplies on one
AC power strip (or on one AC
power distribution unit [not shown])
Figure 2-7. PowerEdge Cluster Power Cabling
2-8
Dell PowerEdge Cluster (PowerEdge 4200) Installation and Troubleshooting Guide
Chapter 3
Configuring the Cluster Software
T
his chapter provides information about configuring
the Dell PowerEdge Cluster system software. This guide
does not provide instructions for installing the operating
system or the cluster software. Installation instructions
for the operating system are documented in the Microsoft
Windows NT Server Enterprise Edition Administrator’s
Guide and Release Notes. Instructions for installing the
Microsoft clustering software are provided in the
Microsoft Windows NT Cluster Server Adminstrator’s
Guide. The information presented in this chapter serves
as an addendum to the Microsoft documentation.
Before installing the Windows NT Server Enterprise Edition operating system or the Cluster Server software, you
should have your system hardware properly cabled for
clustering. See Chapter 2 in this guide for instructions on
connecting the components of your PowerEdge Cluster.
Important System Warning
The following warning message appears on your screen
whenever you attempt to modify the configuration of the
shared storage subsystem on your cluster using either the
PowerEdge Expandable RAID Controller BIOS configuration utility or the PowerEdge RAID Console utility:
!!!STOP!!!
This operation may change the configuration
of disks and can cause loss of data!
Ensure:
1. Peer server is powered up for its controller NVRAM to be updated. Otherwise,
disk configuration should be read from
disk and saved to controller's NVRAM.
2. The second server must not be configuring the disks.
Low-Level Software
Configuration
Prior to installing Windows NT Server Enterprise Edition, you must make specific low-level software
configurations to the PowerEdge Cluster. Low-level software configurations are settings you make to the system
before the operating system is installed.
The following subsections describe the low-level software settings that must be made to your system to enable
clustering.
3. There is no I/O activity against shared
drives.
The warning appears immediately when you activate the
redundant array of inexpensive disks (RAID) basic input/
output system (BIOS) configuration utility (by pressing
<Ctrl><m> during the system’s power-on self-test
[POST]), or whenever you attempt to perform a datadestructive operation in the PowerEdge RAID Console
utility. Examples of data-destructive operations include
clearing the configuration of the logical drives or changing the RAID level of your shared hard-disk drives.
Configuring the Cluster Software
3-1
This warning alerts you to the possibility of data loss if
certain precautions are not taken to protect the integrity
of the data on your cluster. To prevent the loss of data, be
sure that your cluster meets the following conditions
before you attempt any data-destructive operation on
your shared hard-disk drives:
Disabling a RAID Controller BIOS
•
Be sure the peer server is powered up during the
operation so that its RAID controller nonvolatile random-access memory (NVRAM) can be updated with
the new configuration information. Alternately, if the
peer server is down, you must save the disk configuration to the shared storage subsystem. When you
restart the system later, update the peer server’s
NVRAM from the disk configuration saved to the
shared storage subsystem.
Use the RAID controller BIOS configuration utility to
disable a cluster RAID. Start the utility by pressing
<Ctrl><m> during POST. From the Management Menu,
select Objects, then select Adapter, then select the appropriate adapter (if applicable), and then select Disable
BIOS. Select the Disable BIOS setting if it is listed. If
Enable BIOS is the choice that is offered, the BIOS for
the RAID controller is already disabled.
•
Be sure the peer cluster node is not currently configuring the shared storage subsystem.
•
Be sure that no input/output (I/O) activity occurs on
the shared storage subsystem during the operation.
SCSI Host Adapter IDs
On a small computer system interface (SCSI) bus, each
device must have a unique SCSI identification (ID) number. The default SCSI ID of the RAID controller is 7.
However, with RAID controllers from two cluster nodes
occupying the same bus, the controller in the second cluster node must be set to a different SCSI ID to avoid a
device conflict. Therefore, the RAID controller in the
second cluster node should be set to SCSI ID 10. In addition, because multiple RAID controllers can reside on
each node, all RAID controllers on the second node must
be set specifically to SCSI ID 10.
Use the RAID controller BIOS configuration utility to set
a SCSI ID. Start the utility by pressing <Ctrl><m> during
the system’s POST. From the Management Menu, select
Objects, then select Adapter, then select the appropriate
adapter (if applicable), and then select Initiator ID. If you
are running the utility from the first cluster node, the
SCSI ID should be set to 7. If you are on the second cluster node, change the 7 to 10 and press <Enter>. At the
confirmation prompt, select Yes and then reboot the cluster node by pressing <Ctrl><Alt><Delete>.
3-2
The BIOS for all of the cluster-specific RAID controllers
must be disabled. Only a RAID controller that is controlling the system boot device should have its BIOS
enabled.
RAID Level for the Shared Storage
Subsystem(s)
The RAID level can be set using the RAID controller
BIOS configuration utility. Start the utility by pressing
<Ctrl><m> during POST. The recommended default
RAID level for a cluster with two Dell PowerEdge Scalable Disk System 100 (SDS 100) storage systems is
RAID 1+0. RAID 1+0 is a combination of RAID levels 1
and 0. Data is striped across the SDS 100 drives as in
RAID 0. Each drive is mirrored on the second SDS 100,
as in RAID 1. RAID 1+0 allows high-availability of the
quorum resource, which can be mirrored on hard-disk
drives on both SDS 100 systems.
For cluster systems with a single SDS 100 storage system, the recommended configuration consists of two
logical drives—two of the SDS 100’s hard-disk drives
comprising the first logical drive and the remaining
drives (up to six) comprising the second logical drive.
The first logical drive should be configured for RAID 1
(disk mirroring) and should contain the quorum resource.
The second logical drive should be configured for RAID
5 and should contain application data for the cluster.
RAID Level for the Internal Hard-Disk
Drives (Optional)
Like the RAID level for the shared storage subsystem,
this configuration can also be set using the RAID controller configuration utility. The recommended default
configuration of the internal drives is a RAID 5. Additionally, the default channel for connecting the controller
to the internal drives is channel zero.
Dell PowerEdge Cluster (PowerEdge 4200) Installation and Troubleshooting Guide
High-Level Software
Configuration
When the SCSI drives and RAID levels have been set up,
Windows NT Server Enterprise Edition can be installed
and configured. A number of operating system configurations must be set during the installation to enable clustering.
These configuration requirements are described in the
Microsoft Windows NT Server Enterprise Edition
Administrator’s Guide and Release Notes. The following
subsections briefly discuss these configurations.
Installing Intel LANDesk ® Server
Manager
After installing the Windows NT Enterprise Edition operating system, install LANDesk prior to applying the
Service Pack to your system. Refer to the LANDesk
Server Manager Setup Guide for installation instructions.
IPs and Subnet Masks
For the node-to-node network interface controller (NIC)
connection on the PowerEdge Cluster, the default IP
address 10.0.0.1 is assigned to the first node and the second node is assigned the default address 10.0.0.2. The
default subnet mask is 255.0.0.0.
Configuring Separate Networks on a
Cluster
Two network interconnects are strongly recommended
for a cluster configuration to eliminate any single point of
failure that could disrupt intracluster communication.
Separate networks can be configured on a cluster by
redefining the network segment of the IP address
assigned to the NICs residing in the cluster nodes.
For example, two NICs reside in two cluster nodes. The
NICs in the first node have the following IP addresses
and configuration:
Choosing a Domain Model
NIC1:
Cluster nodes can be set up in three possible configurations: as two stand-alone member servers, as two backup
domain controllers (BDC), or as a primary domain controller (PDC) and a BDC. The first two configurations
require an existing domain for the servers to join. The
PDC/BDC configuration establishes a new domain of
which the one server is the primary domain controller
and the other server is the backup domain controller. Any
of the three configurations can be chosen for clustering,
but the recommended default is having each cluster
server as a member server in an existing domain. This
relieves the cluster nodes from the processing overhead
involved in authenticating the user logon.
IP address:
Default gateway:
Static IP Addresses
IP address:
Default gateway:
The Microsoft Cluster Server software requires one static
Internet Protocol (IP) address for the cluster and one
static IP address for each disk resource group. A static IP
address is an Internet address that a network administrator assigns exclusively to a system or a resource. The
address assignment remains in effect until the network
administrator changes it.
143.166.110.2
143.166.111.3
NIC2
IP address:
Default gateway:
143.166.111.3
143.166.110.2
The NICs in the second node have the following IP
addresses and configuration:
NIC1:
IP address:
Default gateway:
143.166.110.4
143.166.111.5
NIC2
143.166.111.5
143.166.110.4
IP routing is enabled and the subnet mask is
255.255.255.0 on all NICs.
The NIC1s of two machines establish one network segment, and the NIC2s create another. In each system, one
NIC is defined to be the default gateway for the other
NIC.
Configuring the Cluster Software
3-3
When a packet gets sent across the network from a local
client, the source and destination IP addresses of the
packet are inserted in the IP header. The system checks
whether the network ID of the destination address
matches the network ID of the source address. If they
match, the packet is sent directly to the destination computer on the local network. If the network IDs do not
match, the packet is forwarded to the default gateway for
delivery.
Changing the IP Address of a Cluster
Node
NOTE: To change the IP address of a cluster node, the
Cluster Service running on that node must be stopped.
Once the service is stopped, the IP address can be reassigned and the server restarted.
While the node is down, the Cluster Administrator utility
running on the second node indicates that the first node is
down by showing its icon in red. When the node is
restarted, the two nodes reestablish their connection and
the Cluster Administrator changes the node icon back to
blue to show that the node is back online.
Naming and Formatting Shared Drives
4.
In the dialog box, create a partition the size of the
entire drive (the default setting) and click OK.
5.
Click Yes to confirm the partition.
6.
With the pointer on the same icon, right-click and
select Assign Drive Letter from the submenu.
7.
Type the letter you want to assign the drive (for
example, z) and click OK.
8.
Highlight and right-click the drive icon again and
select Commit Changes Now from the submenu.
9.
Click Yes to save the changes.
10. Click Yes to confirm that changes were made.
11. Right-click the drive icon again and select Format
from the submenu.
12. At the dialog box, change the file system to NTFS,
click Quick Format, and click Start.
The NTFS file system format is required for shareddisk resources under Microsoft Cluster Server.
13. Click OK at the warning.
14. Click OK to acknowledge that format is
complete.
15. Click Close to close the dialog box.
The logical drives of the shared storage subsystem must
be assigned drive letters and then formatted as Windows
NT file system (NTFS) drives. The assigned drive letters
must be identical on both cluster nodes.
16. Repeat steps 3 through 15 for each remaining
drive.
NOTE: Because the number of drive letters required by
individual servers in a cluster may vary, it is recommended that the shared drives be named in reverse
alphabetical order beginning with the letter “z.”
When all drives have been assigned drive letters and formatted, the identical drive letters for the shared drives
must be assigned on the second cluster node. To do this,
enter the Disk Administrator on the second cluster node,
right-click each drive, and assign the same drive letter to
each drive that was assigned on the first cluster node.
Use the following procedure to assign drive letters and
format drives:
1.
Click the Start button, point to Programs, point
to Administrative Tools (Common), and click
Disk Administrator.
2.
At the confirmation dialog box, click Yes to enter
a signature on all new physical or logical drives.
3.
Find the disk icon for the first unnamed, unformatted drive, right-click the icon, and select
Create from the submenu.
3-4
17. Close the Disk Administrator dialog box.
Driver for the RAID Controller
The RAID controller driver, pedge.sys, must be version
2.04 or later. Refer to the section in this chapter entitled
“RAID Controller Driver” for instructions on how to verify that this driver is installed.
Dell PowerEdge Cluster (PowerEdge 4200) Installation and Troubleshooting Guide
Updating the NIC Driver
Dell recommends that you use Windows NT NIC driver
version 2.22 or later for the Intel Pro100B network controller. Perform the following procedure on both cluster
nodes to update the NIC driver:
1.
Go to the Control Panel, double-click the Network icon, and click on the Adapters tab.
2.
Highlight one of the adapters and click Update.
3.
In the dialog box, type A:. Place the diskette containing the updated Intel Pro100B driver into
drive A and press <Enter>.
Windows NT installs the NIC driver.
4.
When the driver has been installed, click Close to
exit the Network dialog box.
Adjusting the Paging File Size and
Registry Sizes
To enable adequate system resources for clustering, it is
recommended that you increase the paging file and registry file sizes on the cluster nodes. Set the paging file size
to at least twice the capacity of the system RAM, up to
256 megabytes (MB). For systems with RAM capacities
over 256 MB, set the paging file size at or above the
capacity of the RAM up to the available free space on
your hard-disk drive. Set the registry file size to at least
64 MB. These adjustments can be made prior to applying
the current Windows NT Service Pack.
Use the following procedure to make the paging file and
registry size adjustments on each cluster node:
1.
Go to Control Panel, double-click the System
icon, and click the Performance tab to see the
System Properties dialog box. In the Virtual
Memory group box, click Change.
2.
In the dialog box, set the Paging File maximum
size to 256 MB. Set the Registry File size to 64 MB
and click OK.
3.
When asked to restart the system, click No.
4.
Apply the current Service Pack for Windows NT
Server Enterprise Edition.
Verifying the Cluster
Functionality
To ensure that the PowerEdge Cluster functions properly,
you should perform a series of checks of the system’s
operation and configuration. These checks should be performed to verify that the cluster meets the following
conditions:
•
Each SDS 100 storage system is running in 1 x 8
mode.
•
•
The controller IDs on each shared bus are different.
•
The cluster-specific driver for the RAID controller is
installed on both cluster nodes.
•
The shared disks are assigned identical drive letters
in both cluster nodes.
•
All IP addresses and network names in the cluster
are communicating with each other and the rest of
the network.
•
•
The Cluster Service is running.
All cluster servers and clients are able to log on to
the same domain.
All resources and recovery groups are online.
1 x 8 Mode on the SDS 100 Storage
System
To enable clustering, the SDS 100 storage system must
run in 1 x 8 mode when the two RAID controllers are
connected to the system. You can verify that the backplane is in 1 x 8 mode by using the RAID controller
BIOS configuration utility. Access the RAID configuration utility by pressing <Ctrl> <m> when prompted
during POST. From the Management Menu, select Configure and then select View/Add Configuration. You
should see the same configuration when viewing from
either cluster node, particularly, the same SCSI ID numbers for the hard-disk drives, the same RAID level for the
storage system, the same logical drive configuration, and
so on.
If the storage system appears in 2 x 4 mode, the BIOS
firmware needs to be updated on the SDS 100 storage
system(s). See Appendix A, “Upgrading to a Cluster
Configuration,” for information about updating firmware
on the SDS 100 storage system.
Configuring the Cluster Software
3-5
SCSI Controller IDs
The SDS 100 storage system of the cluster has two RAID
controllers connected to the same channel. In this setup,
each controller must be assigned a unique SCSI ID number. The cluster-specific firmware running on the two
RAID controllers enables two controllers to reside on the
same SCSI channel and operate with unique SCSI ID
numbers.
If you know the version of the firmware that should be
running on the RAID controller, you can verify that it is
present by observing the POST message that appears during start-up that identifies the controller’s firmware
version. Be sure that the POST message pertains to the
RAID controller connected to the shared storage
subsystem.
The SCSI ID numbers on the RAID controllers can be
verified using the RAID controller BIOS configuration
utility. During POST, press <Ctrl> <m> to start the configuration utility. From the Management Menu, select
Objects, then select Adapter, then select the appropriate
adapter (if applicable), and then select Initiator ID. The
SCSI IDs for the two controllers must be different from
each other. The recommended settings are SCSI ID 7 for
the first controller on the channel and SCSI ID 10 for the
second controller on the channel.
Click the Drivers tab and check that the PowerEdge
RAID II Adapters driver shows a status of Started.
Then use Windows NT Explorer to view the
winnt\system32\drivers directory. Right-click the
pedge.sys file, select Properties, and select the Version
tab from the dialog box. Verify that the file version is
2.04 or later.
Shared Storage Subsystem Drive
Letters
The shared hard-disk drives must be assigned the same
drive letters in Windows NT Server Enterprise Edition
running on each cluster node. The drive letters must be
identical across all cluster nodes to ensure that the nodes
have the same view of the file system. To check the drive
letters for the shared storage subsystem(s), run the
Windows NT Disk Administrator utility on one node to
find the drive letters for the shared disk drives and compare the drive letters with those reported by the Disk
Administrator utility on the other cluster node.
Also, the write policy for the cluster-enabled RAID controller will be set to write-through.
If the two systems do not see the same drive letter designation for the shared storage subsystems, the Cluster
Server software was installed incorrectly. To correct this
problem, uninstall the Cluster Server, reassign the drive
letters, and then reinstall the Cluster Server. Refer to
“Uninstalling Microsoft Cluster Server” later in this
chapter for instructions.
Cluster Domain
Cluster Network Communications
On a clustered system, all systems connected to the cluster must belong to a common domain. To check that a
domain has been set up properly for the cluster, start each
server and client of the cluster and verify that each system can log on to the domain. To do this, go to the
Control Panel, double-click on Network, and select the
Identification tab. The domain name will appear in the
domain field.
For proper functioning of the cluster, the two PowerEdge
systems must be able to communicate with one another.
For instance, this communication includes the exchange
of heartbeat messages, whereby the two servers inquire
about each other’s status, or “health,” and acknowledge
all such inquiries.
If the PDC does not reside in the cluster, be sure that the
PDC is running before starting the systems on the cluster.
RAID Controller Driver
To verify that the PowerEdge Expandable RAID
Controller driver is installed and running on the system,
click the Start button, point to Settings, click Control
Panel, and double-click the SCSI Adapters icon.
3-6
To verify network communications between the cluster
nodes, open a command prompt on each cluster node.
Type ipconfig /all at the prompt and press <Enter>
to observe all known IP addresses on each local server.
From each remote computer, issue the ping command to
test the responsiveness of each IP address. Perform the
same check with the cluster IP address and the IP address
for each disk recovery group. Also check the cluster
name and the name of each disk recovery group (if any).
Dell PowerEdge Cluster (PowerEdge 4200) Installation and Troubleshooting Guide
Cluster Service
The Cluster Service performs most of the cluster
functionality, including membership management,
communication management, and fail-over management. When the Cluster Server has been properly
installed, the Cluster Service is started on each node and
is activated automatically in the event that one of the
nodes fails or goes off-line.
To verify that the Cluster Service is running on a cluster
node, click the Start button, point to Settings, and then
click Control Panel. Double-click the Services icon. The
Cluster Service should be indicated in the dialog box.
Check to make sure that the Cluster Service is running on
the second node also.
Availability of Cluster Resources
In the context of clustering, a resource is a basic unit of
fail-over. Applications are made up of resources that are
grouped together for the purposes of recovery. All recovery groups, and therefore their comprising resources,
must be online (or in a ready state) for the cluster to function properly.
To verify that the cluster resources are online, start the
Cluster Administrator on the monitoring node. Click the
Start button, point to Programs, point to Administrative
Tools (Common), and then click Cluster Administrator.
Open a connection to the cluster and observe the running
state of each recovery group. If a group has failed, one or
more of its resources may be off-line.
Troubleshooting the reasons that resources might be failing is beyond the scope of this document, but examining
the properties of each resource and ensuring that the
specified parameters are correct is a first step in this process. In general, if a resource is off-line, it can be brought
online by selecting it, right-clicking it, and choosing
Bring Online from the pull-down menu. For information
about troubleshooting resource failures, refer to the
Microsoft Windows NT Enterprise Edition Administrator’s Guide and Release Notes.
Uninstalling Microsoft Cluster
Server
Before you can uninstall Cluster Server from a node, you
must do the following:
1.
Take all resource groups off-line or move them to
the other node.
2.
Evict the node from the cluster by right-clicking
the node icon in Cluster Administrator and
selecting Evict Node from the menu.
3.
Close Cluster Administrator on the node.
4.
Stop the Cluster Service running on the node.
5.
Uninstall Microsoft Cluster Server using the Add/
Remove Programs utility in the Control Panel
group.
Removing a Node From a Cluster
WARNING: The power supplies in this computer
system produce high voltages and energy hazards,
which can cause bodily harm. Only trained service
technicians are authorized to remove the computer
covers and access any of the components inside the
computer.
WARNING: This system may have more than one
power supply cable. To reduce the risk of electrical
shock, a trained service technician must disconnect
all power supply cables before servicing the system.
When removing a node from a cluster, it is important to
power down the node before removing any of the cluster
cabling. Likewise, when rejoining a node to a cluster, all
cables must be attached before the node is powered up.
Configuring the Cluster Software
3-7
Setting Up the Quorum Resource
A quorum resource is typically a hard-disk drive in the
shared storage subsystem that serves the following two
purposes in a cluster system:
•
Acts as an arbiter between the two nodes to ensure
that the specific data necessary for system recovery
is maintained consistently across the nodes
•
Logs the recovery data sent by the cluster nodes
Only one cluster node can control the quorum resource at
one time, and it is that node that remains running when
the two nodes are unable to communicate with each
other. Once the two nodes are unable to communicate,
the Cluster Service automatically shuts down the node
that does not own the quorum resource.
With one of the cluster nodes down, changes to the
cluster configuration database are logged to the quorum
disk. The purpose of this logging is to ensure that the
node that gains control of the quorum disk has access to
an up-to-date version of the cluster configuration
database.
Because the quorum disk plays a crucial role in the operation of the cluster, the loss of a quorum disk causes the
failure of the Cluster Server. To prevent this type of failure, the quorum resource should be set up on a redundant
array of hard-disk drives in the shared storage subsystem.
Using the ftdisk Driver
Microsoft Cluster Server does not support use of the
Windows NT software-based, fault-tolerance driver
ftdisk with any of the hard-disk drives in the shared storage subsystem. However, ftdisk can be used with the
internal drives of the cluster nodes.
Cluster RAID Controller
Rebuild Function Does Not Complete
After Reboot or Power Loss
If the cluster node is rebooted or power to the node is lost
while a PowerEdge Expandable RAID Controller is
rebuilding a hard-disk drive, the RAID controller terminates the rebuild operation and marks the drive as failed.
This also occurs if the rebuild is performed from the
RAID controller basic input/output system (BIOS) configuration utility and the user exits the utility before the
rebuild completes. This occurs with all versions of the
PowerEdge Expandable RAID Controller firmware on
both standard and cluster-enabled RAID controllers.
If the rebuild fails to complete due to a system restart, the
rebuild must be reinitiated using the RAID Controller
BIOS configuration utility or using the PowerEdge RAID
Console program running in the Windows NT operating
system.
Rebuild Rate Not Adjustable on
Cluster-Enabled RAID Controller
If a hard-disk drive fails in a redundant array, you can
recover the lost data by rebuilding the drive. The rate of
data reconstruction is called the rebuild rate. The rebuild
rate cannot be adjusted in a cluster-enabled RAID controller as it can in a standard RAID controller. The
cluster-enabled RAID controller rebuilds drive information at a default rate.
Using the Maximize Feature in
PowerEdge RAID Console
The Maximize feature of the PowerEdge RAID Console
has the following functional limitations when running in
the PowerEdge Cluster:
•
The Maximize icon at the upper right corner of the
PowerEdge RAID Console is disabled when you
open the program in the PowerEdge Cluster.
•
Whenever the PowerEdge RAID Console is minimized to the task bar, the right-click option to
maximize the application is not available.
•
Whenever the PowerEdge RAID Console is minimized to the task bar and you minimize another
application, the PowerEdge RAID Console maximizes itself automatically.
Functionality
The following subsections describe functional variances
of standard and cluster-enabled PowerEdge Expandable
RAID Controllers operating in a PowerEdge Cluster.
3-8
Dell PowerEdge Cluster (PowerEdge 4200) Installation and Troubleshooting Guide
Rebuild Operation in RAID Console
The following conditions apply to the way PowerEdge
RAID Console handles rebuilds of hard-disk drives in a
cluster environment:
•
When you rebuild a failed drive, RAID Console
shows the status of the drive as Rebuild but may not
display the Rebuild Progress window during the
rebuild process. You can verify that the rebuild is in
operation by observing the activity indicator on the
front panel of the SDS 100 storage system.
•
During a rebuild operation, the RAID Console that
issued the action reserves ownership of the channel
where the failed drive is located until the rebuild is
complete. Likewise if the RAID Console running on
the peer server is simultaneously using that channel,
it will be forced to remain with the adapter that controls the channel until the rebuild is complete. The
RAID Console running on the peer server will not be
able to switch to another adapter.
Configuring the Cluster Software
3-9
3-10
Dell PowerEdge Cluster (PowerEdge 4200) Installation and Troubleshooting Guide
Chapter 4
Running Applications on a Cluster
T
his section provides general information about configuring and running applications software on the
PowerEdge Cluster. To configure applications software,
click the Start button, point to Programs, point to Administrative Tools (Common), and then click Cluster
Administrator. In Cluster Administrator, open a connection to the cluster.
Before you start Cluster Administrator on either cluster
node, make sure the Cluster Service has been started and
a cluster has been formed. You can verify this by using
the Event Viewer and looking for events logged by
ClusSvc. You should see either of the following events:
Microsoft Cluster Server successfully
formed a cluster on this node.
After a resource has been created, it must be brought
online for access by the cluster nodes and clients.
The following subsections outline the creation and setup
of three example cluster resources:
•
•
•
Internet Information Server (IIS) service
File-sharing service
Print-spooling service
These examples are provided here to instruct you in setting up cluster resources using real applications software.
Refer to the Microsoft Windows NT Cluster Server
Administrator’s Guide for more detailed information and
instructions about creating cluster resources.
or
Internet Information Server Service
Microsoft Cluster Server successfully
joined the cluster.
The IIS Virtual Root is one of the Microsoft Cluster
Server resource types that can be used to provide failover capabilities for virtual root directories of IIS version
3.0 or later. The IIS Virtual Root depends on three other
types of resources (disk, Internet Protocol [IP] address,
and network name resources); these resources will be
placed in the same recovery group.
Setting Up Applications
Software to Run on the Cluster
Setting up applications software to run on a cluster means
establishing them as a group of cluster resources. Cluster
resources are created using the New Resource wizard.
The process of creating resources involves the following:
•
•
The type of resource must be specified.
•
The dependencies of the resource must be
determined.
•
The resource-specific parameters must be defined.
The possible owners of the resource must be selected
(the default is both nodes).
The following example procedure describes how to set
up the IIS Virtual Root service. This procedure assumes
that IIS has already been installed.
1.
Start the New Group wizard by right-clicking any
group or resource in the Cluster Administrator,
then point to New, and then select Group from the
submenu.
2.
In the dialog box, type Web Service for the
new group name.
You may also want to select one of the cluster nodes
as the preferred owner of the group.
Running Applications on a Cluster
4-1
3.
Use the New Resource wizard to create a disk
resource. To start the New Resource wizard,
right-click any group or resource, point to New,
and then select Resource from the submenu.
You can also move an existing disk resource from
other groups by right-clicking the disk, pointing to
Change Group, and then selecting Web Service.
4.
In the dialog box, type Web Disk for the new
disk resource name.
5.
Set the Resource Type in the dialog box as Physical Disk. Select both cluster nodes as possible
owners and select a shared disk.
There is no dependency for a physical disk.
NOTE: When a new resource is created, the resource
group is marked off-line. This is normal and does not
indicate a failure. Once the resource is created and
brought online, the group is automatically brought
online as well.
After bringing both the resources and the group online,
users can access the IIS Virtual Root via the following
URL:
http://website/documents
File Share Service
The File Share is a Cluster Server resource type that can
be used to provide fail-over capabilities for file sharing.
Like the IIS Virtual Root, the File Share service also
depends on disk, IP address, and network name
resources; these resources will be placed in the same
recovery group.
The following example procedure describes how to set
up the File Share service:
1.
Use the New Group wizard to create a new group
called “File Share Service.”
You may also want to select one of the cluster nodes
as the preferred owner of the group.
6.
Using the New Resource wizard, create an IP
Address resource called “Web IP.”
2.
7.
Set the Resource Type as IP Address. Select both
nodes as possible owners and then fill in an IP
address and the subnet mask for your public local
area network (LAN).
Use the New Resource wizard to create a disk
resource called “File Share Disk” or move an
existing shared disk resource from other groups.
3.
Set the Resource Type in the dialog box as Physical Disk. Select both cluster nodes as possible
owners and select a shared disk.
There is no dependency for IP addresses.
There is no dependency for a physical disk.
8.
Using the New Resource wizard, create a Network Name resource called “Web NetName.”
4.
Use the New Resource wizard to create an IP
Address resource called “File Share IP.”
9.
Set the Resource Type as Network Name. Select
both nodes as possible owners. Set Web IP as the
dependency for Web NetName. Then type a network name that will be visible to clients (for
example, website).
5.
Set the Resource Type as IP Address. Select both
nodes as possible owners and then fill in an IP
address and the subnet mask for your public
LAN.
10. Use the New Resource wizard to create a IIS Virtual Root resource called “Web IIS Root.”
11. Set the Resource Type as IIS Virtual Root. Select
both nodes as possible owners. Set Web Disk,
Web IP, and Web NetName as the dependencies
for Web IIS Root.
There is no dependency for IP addresses.
6.
Use the New Resource wizard to create a Network
Name resource called “File Share NetName.”
7.
Set the Resource Type as Network Name. Select
both nodes as possible owners. Set File Share IP
as the dependency for File Share NetName. Then
type a network name that will be visible to clients
(for example, sharedfile).
8.
Use the New Resource wizard to create a File
Share resource called “XYZ Files.”
12. Select the WWW tab and fill in the directory and
the alias in the Parameters tab.
For example, you can configure /documents as an
alias for z:\mywebdir.You should also create the
same directory and place Web files there.
4-2
Dell PowerEdge Cluster (PowerEdge 4200) Installation and Troubleshooting Guide
9.
Set the Resource Type as File Share. Select both
nodes as possible owners. Set File Share Disk, File
Share IP, and File Share NetName as the dependencies for XYZ Files. Then type the share name
and share path in the Parameters tab.
For example, you can configure y:\groupfiles as
share name xyzfiles.
5.
There is no dependency for IP addresses.
6.
Use the New Resource wizard to create a Network
Name resource called “Spool NetName.” Set the
Resource Type as Network Name. Select both
nodes as possible owners. Set Spool IP as the
dependency for Spool NetName. Then type a network name that will be visible to clients (for
example, spoolname).
7.
Use the New Resource wizard to create a Print
Spooler resource called “X Print.”
8.
Set the Resource Type as Print Spooler. Select
both nodes as possible owners. Set Spool Disk,
Spool IP, and Spool NetName as the dependencies
for “X Print.” Then type the spool folder in the
Parameters tab (for example, x:\spool).
9.
Bring both resources and the group online.
NOTE: When creating a File Share resource in
Microsoft Cluster Server, do not use “m” as the
share name of the resource. Cluster Server rejects
“m” as a File Share resource name.
After bringing both the resources and the group online,
users can use Windows NT Explorer to map xyzfiles to a
local drive.
Print Spooler Service
The Print Spooler service is a Cluster Server resource
type that can be used to provide fail-over capabilities for
print spooling. Like the IIS Virtual Root and the File
Share service, the Print Spooler service also depends on
disk, IP address, and network name resources; these
resources will be placed in the same resource group.
The following example procedure describes how to set
up the Print Spooler service using a HP LaserJet 5M
printer. The procedure differs slightly for different printers. Make sure that Microsoft TCP/IP Printing has been
installed and the printer is attached to network. Also,
keep the printer's IP address and the Windows NT Server
Enterprise Edition CD available.
1.
2.
3.
Set the Resource Type as IP Address. Select both
nodes as possible owners and then type an IP
address and the subnet mask for your public
LAN.
10. Install the same printer ports and printer drivers
on each cluster node.
a.
Install the printer driver—in this example,
JetAdmin for HP printers—using the installation instructions provided in your printer
documentation.
b.
Use the New Group wizard to create a new group
called “Spool Service.”
After the printer driver is installed, click the
Start button, point to Settings, and click Control
Panel.
c.
Use the New Resource wizard to create a disk
resource called “Spool Disk” or move an existing
shared-disk resource from other groups.
Double-click Printers, and then double-click
Add Printer.
d.
Select My Computer and click Next.
e.
Click Add Port.
f.
Highlight HP JetDirect Port and click New Port.
g.
Either click Search to find the printer or type its
IP address in the TCP/IP Address field and click
Next.
h.
Type a port name, for example sigport, and
click Finish.
i.
Click Close.
Set the Resource Type as Physical Disk. Select
both cluster nodes as possible owners and then
select a shared disk.
There is no dependency for a physical disk.
4.
Use the New Resource wizard to create an IP
Address resource called “Spool IP.”
Running Applications on a Cluster
4-3
j.
Click Cancel to close the Add Printer wizard.
NOTE: Do not add the printer at this point.
Identical printer ports must be set up on both
nodes before the printer can be added.
k.
Repeat steps a through j on the other node. At
step g, if the system cannot find the printer, you
may need to update the HP JetAdmin's printer
directory to include the printer's IP address.
11. Add the printers to the clustered spooler.
a.
On the first cluster node, click the Start button
and click Run.
b.
Type \\spoolname and press <Enter>.
c.
Double-click Printers and then double-click
Add Printer.
d.
Select Remote print server \\spoolname and
click Next.
e.
Select sigport, then select the vendor and model,
and click Next.
f.
Type a printer name, for example, sigprint,
select Shared, and exit the Add Printer wizard.
g.
Click the Start button, point to Settings, and
click Control Panel.
h.
Double-click Printers, and then double-click
Add Printer.
i.
Select Network Printer Server and click Next.
j.
Select \\spoolname\sigprint, click OK, and then
click Finish.
k.
Right-click on the sigprint icon and click
Properties.
l.
Click the Scheduling tab and select Start printing after last page is spooled. Click OK to close.
Using the Rediscovery
Application in Intel LANDesk
If the cluster node that has the system management bus
(SMB) connection to the PowerEdge Scalable Disk System 100 (SDS 100) storage system fails, two actions must
be taken to reestablish management from the remaining
server:
1.
The SMB connection must be reestablished
between the remaining cluster node and the SDS
100. That is, the cable must be physically
removed from the back of the failed node and
connected to the back of the remaining node.
2.
The xover program must be run on the remaining
node (now in charge of managing the SDS 100
storage system) so that the LANDesk console can
rediscover its targets.
The xover application is in the Server Manager installation directory (the default is c:\smm32). It can be run
from the command line or from Windows NT Explorer.
This application allows the secondary PowerEdge server
to start managing the SDS 100 chassis. When the xover
application has discovered the SDS 100, the utility
acknowledges the connection with a message box. Additionally, application logs are entered in the Windows NT
System Event Log by the Dell Baseboard Agent, indicating that the SDS 100 chassis has been discovered.
NOTE: xover can be run in quiet mode by specifying the
-q option. In this case, the utility will not display any
messages unless an error was encountered.
m. Repeat steps g through l on the other node.
4-4
Dell PowerEdge Cluster (PowerEdge 4200) Installation and Troubleshooting Guide
Running chkdsk /f on a Quorum
Tape Backup for Clustered
Disk
Systems
The chkdsk command with the /f (“fix”) option cannot
be run on a device on which an open file handle is active.
The Cluster Service maintains an open handle on the
quorum resource; therefore, chkdsk /f cannot be run on
the hard-disk drive that contains the quorum resource. To
run chkdsk /f on a quorum resource’s hard-disk drive,
move the quorum resource temporarily to another drive
and then run chkdsk /f on the drive that previously stored
the quorum resource. To move the quorum resource,
right-click the cluster name, select Properties, and then
select the Quorum tab. Select another disk as the quorum
disk and press Enter. Upon completion, move the quorum
disk back to the original drive.
Contact your Dell Sales representative for information
about the availability of tape backup solutions and applications software for the Dell PowerEdge Cluster.
Running Applications on a Cluster
4-5
4-6
Dell PowerEdge Cluster (PowerEdge 4200) Installation and Troubleshooting Guide
Chapter 5
Troubleshooting
T
his chapter provides general troubleshooting information for the Dell PowerEdge Cluster. For troubleshooting
information that is specific to the Windows NT Server
Enterprise Edition operating system and the cluster software, refer to the Microsoft Windows NT Cluster Server
Administrator’s Guide.
Table 5-1. Troubleshooting
Problem
Probable Cause
Corrective Action
The cluster server nodes cannot
access the Dell PowerEdge Scalable Disk System 100 (SDS 100)
storage system, or the cluster
software is not functioning with
the storage system.
The SDS 100 storage system
has not been upgraded with
the cluster-specific firmware.
Ensure that the system management bus
(SMB)-connected node on the cluster is running
the cluster-specific firmware. Upgrade the SDS
100 firmware by powering down the cluster and
then starting it up again. During start-up, the
cluster-specific firmware on the node checks the
version of the SDS 100 firmware. If the SDS 100
is found to be running the wrong version of
firmware, the node proceeds to upgrade it automatically with the correct firmware version.
The PowerEdge Expandable RAID Controllers have
the same small computer
system interface (SCSI) ID.
Set the controller in the primary node to SCSI ID
7, and set the controller in the secondary node to
SCSI ID 10. Refer to Chapter 3 for instructions
for setting the SCSI IDs on the nodes.
The SMB connection is lost
when the SMB-connected
node fails and needs to be
reestablished with the secondary node.
Disconnect the SMB cable from the failed node
and connect it to the secondary node. Run the
cluster rediscovery application in LANDesk so
that the fail-over system scans the hard-disk
drives on the shared storage subsystem(s) and
reestablishes system management of the drives.
Refer to Chapter 4 for information on running the
rediscovery application.
System management of the
shared storage subsystem(s) is
not available when the SMBconnected node fails.
Troubleshooting
5-1
Table 5-1. Troubleshooting (continued)
Problem
Probable Cause
Corrective Action
The redundant array of inexpensive disks (RAID) drives in the
SDS 100 storage system are not
accessible by one of the cluster
nodes, or the shared storage
subsystem is not functioning
properly with the cluster
software.
The SCSI cables are loose or
defective, or the cables
exceed the maximum allowable length of 4 meters (m).
Check the cable connections or replace the cable
with a working cable. Ensure that the length of
the cable does not exceed 4 m.
The appropriate clusterspecific PowerEdge
Expandable RAID Controller driver is not running on
the system.
Install the RAID controller driver that came with
your system or cluster upgrade kit. Refer to
Appendix A for instructions on installing the
RAID controller driver.
The RAID controllers connected to a single storage
system are not configured
consistently.
Ensure that the RAID configuration is identical
between the RAID controllers connected to the
storage system.
If the cluster has multiple
SDS 100 storage systems,
the cabling between the
RAID controller and the
storage systems is wrong.
Be sure that the cables attached to the channel 0
connectors on the RAID controllers are connected
to one storage system and the channel 1 RAID
controller cables are connected to the other storage system.
The SCSI cable between the
node and the shared storage
subsystem is faulty or not
connected.
Attach or replace the SCSI cable between the
cluster node and the shared storage subsystem.
A cluster-specific configuration file for the system
configuration utility is
missing from the system.
Install the configuration file update for the system
configuration utility that came with your system
or cluster upgrade kit.
The Cluster Mode setting in
the system configuration
utility is incorrect for a clustered system.
Enter the system configuration utility and change
the Cluster Mode field to Enabled. The Cluster
Mode setting tells the cluster node to download
the cluster firmware to the SDS 100 storage system, which then sets the storage system in 1 x 8
mode. Refer to Appendix A for information on
updating the system configuration utility.
The SDS 100 is not running in
1 x 8 mode.
5-2
Dell PowerEdge Cluster (PowerEdge 4200) Installation and Troubleshooting Guide
Table 5-1. Troubleshooting (continued)
Problem
Probable Cause
Corrective Action
One or more of the SCSI controllers are not detected by the
system.
The controllers have conflicting SCSI IDs.
Change one of the controller SCSI IDs so that the
ID numbers do not conflict. The controller in the
primary node should be set to SCSI ID 7, and the
controller in the secondary node should be set to
SCSI ID 10. Refer to Chapter 3 for instructions
for setting the SCSI IDs on the nodes.
One of the nodes can access one
of the shared hard-disk drives,
but the second node cannot.
The drive letters assigned to
the hard-disk drive differ
between the nodes.
Change the drive letter designation for the shared
hard-disk drive so that it is identical in all nodes.
The SDS 100 storage system
has not been upgraded with
the cluster-specific firmware.
Ensure that the SMB-connected node on the cluster is running the cluster-specific firmware.
Upgrade the SDS 100 firmware by powering
down the cluster and then starting it up again.
During start-up, the cluster-specific firmware on
the node checks the version of the SDS 100 firmware. If the SDS 100 is found to be running the
wrong version of firmware, the node proceeds to
upgrade it automatically with the correct firmware version.
The SCSI cable between the
node and the shared storage
subsystem is faulty or not
connected.
Attach or replace the SCSI cable between the
cluster node and the shared storage subsystem.
Server management functions
are unavailable when both nodes
are functional.
The SMB cable is not connected properly to the SDS
100 storage system(s).
Check the SMB connections. The primary node
should be connected to the first storage system,
and the second storage system (if present) should
be connected to the first storage system. Refer to
Chapter 2 for information about connecting the
SMB cable.
Clients are dropping off of the
network while the cluster is failing over.
The service provided by the
recovery group becomes
temporarily unavailable to
clients during fail-over.
Clients may lose their connection if their attempts to
reconnect to the cluster are
too infrequent or if they end
too soon.
Reconfigure the dropped client to make longer
and more frequent attempts to reconnect back to
the cluster.
Troubleshooting
5-3
Table 5-1. Troubleshooting (continued)
Problem
Probable Cause
Corrective Action
The dialogue box Snmp.exe Entry Point Not Found
appears during system start-up.
The Windows NT system
errantly reports this condition if the Simple Network
Management Protocol
(SNMP) service was
installed after Windows NT
and the Service Pack was
installed.
Reapply the Service Pack that came with
Windows NT Enterprise Edition.
Attempts to connect to a cluster
using Cluster Administrator fail.
The Cluster Service has not
been started, a cluster has
not been formed on the system, or the system has just
been booted and services are
still starting.
Verify that the Cluster Service has been started
and that a cluster has been formed. Use the Event
Viewer and look for the following events logged
by ClusSvc:
Microsoft Cluster Server successfully
formed a cluster on this node.
or
Microsoft Cluster Server successfully
joined the cluster.
If these events do not appear, refer to the
Microsoft Cluster Server Administrator’s Guide
for instructions on setting up the cluster on your
system and starting the Cluster Service.
5-4
Dell PowerEdge Cluster (PowerEdge 4200) Installation and Troubleshooting Guide
Appendix A
Upgrading to a Cluster Configuration
T
his appendix provides instructions for upgrading your
noncluster system to a PowerEdge Cluster if components
of the cluster hardware are already present. To properly
upgrade your system to a PowerEdge Cluster, you must
ensure that your existing hardware components meet the
minimum configuration required for clustering and
acquire the additional hardware and software clustering
components as needed.
NOTES: Dell certifies only PowerEdge Cluster systems
that are configured with the Dell products described
in this Installation and Troubleshooting Guide (see
Chapter 1 for a description of the PowerEdge Cluster
components).
Dell also supports only the certification of Dell PowerEdge Cluster systems that are configured according to
the instructions provided in this guide. Configurations
using non-Dell products, such as server systems, rack
cabinets, and storage systems, have not been approved by
any safety agencies. It is the responsibility of the customer to have such systems evaluated for suitability by a
certified safety agency.
After installing the necessary upgrade hardware, such as
redundant array of inexpensive disk (RAID) controllers
and network interface controllers (NICs), you can begin
to set up and cable the system hardware. When the cluster
hardware has been set up, firmware for the Dell PowerEdge 4200 systems and the PowerEdge Scalable Disk
System 100 (SDS 100) storage system(s) must be
updated for clustering functionality. The final phase of a
PowerEdge Cluster upgrade is the installation and configuration of the Windows NT Server Enterprise Edition
operating system and Cluster Server software.
Checking Your Existing
Hardware
Before you can upgrade your system, you must ensure
that your existing hardware meets the minimum configuration requirements for the Dell PowerEdge Cluster. See
Chapter 1, “Getting Started,” for a list of the components
and minimum system configuration required for the
PowerEdge Cluster. Contact Dell for information on
acquiring the related hardware components and customer
kits that you need for the upgrade.
Chapter 1 also provides an overview of the cluster installation procedure. Refer to this chapter for the proper
order of installation steps.
Adding Expansion Cards for a
Cluster Upgrade
The cluster-enabled PowerEdge Expandable RAID Controller for the shared storage subsystem must be placed in
Peripheral Component Interconnect (PCI) slot 7 of your
PowerEdge server. If you have a second shared storage
subsystem and plan to use a second cluster-enabled
PowerEdge Expandable RAID Controller, install that
RAID controller in PCI slot 5. Thus, two cluster-enabled
RAID controllers in a cluster node occupy PCI slot 7 for
the first cluster-enabled RAID controller and slot 5 for
the second cluster-enabled RAID controller.
After the cluster-enabled RAID controller(s) are
installed, you must disable the basic input/output system
(BIOS) for these controllers. See the “Disabling a RAID
Controller BIOS” in Chapter 3 for instructions.
Upgrading to a Cluster Configuration
A-1
You may choose to install a standard PowerEdge
Expandable RAID Controller as the second RAID
controller in your system instead of a cluster-enabled
RAID controller. This is the configuration you will use if
you plan to set up the internal hard-disk drives in the
cluster node in a RAID array. In this configuration, install
the standard RAID controller in PCI slot 6. Because this
standard RAID controller will handle the system partition
on the cluster node, do not disable this controller’s BIOS.
PCI slots 4 and 8 should be used for the cluster NIC
cards. Use PCI slot 8 for the public local area network
(LAN) and PCI slot 4 for the private node-to-node
network.
Figure A-1 shows the back view of a cluster node with
the two NICs installed in the recommended slot locations, the cluster-enabled PowerEdge Expandable RAID
Controller in PCI slot 7, and a standard PowerEdge
Expandable RAID Controller in PCI slot 6. Slot 5 is
where you would install a second cluster-enabled RAID
controller.
Mounting, Cabling, and
Configuring the Cluster Hardware
When you have acquired all the necessary hardware and
software cluster components, you are then ready to install
and connect the components into a clustered system. If
you are installing the PowerEdge Cluster in a Dell RackMounted Solutions enclosure, refer to Appendix B,
“Stand-Alone and Rack Configurations,” for proper
placement of the PowerEdge Cluster components in the
rack. Instructions are also provided for installing the
3Com network switch in the rack. For further instructions
for mounting Dell equipment in a Dell rack, refer to the
Dell PowerEdge Rack-Mountable Solutions Installation
Guide.
For instructions on cabling the components into a clustered system, see Chapter 2 in this guide.
node-to-node
interconnected NIC
second cluster-specific
RAID controller (not shown)
standard RAID controller
(optional)
cluster-specific RAID
controller (required)
LAN-connected NIC
Figure A-1. Back View of a PowerEdge 4200 Cluster Node
A-2
Dell PowerEdge Cluster (PowerEdge 4200) Installation and Troubleshooting Guide
Installing and Configuring the
Cluster Software
Instructions on installing the Microsoft Windows NT
Server, Enterprise Edition 4.0 operating system and
clustering software are provided in the Microsoft documentation that accompanied the software. Refer to these
documents for information about installing these software components.
Before installing Windows NT Server Enterprise Edition,
be sure to have the NIC and PowerEdge Expandable
RAID Controller driver diskettes handy for installation.
Refer to the Microsoft documentation for information
about installing the device drivers.
Before you can use the cluster software on your cluster
nodes, you must first upgrade the firmware on the PowerEdge systems servers and the SDS 100 storage system(s).
You must also update the system configuration utility
with the cluster configuration file.
Upgrading the PowerEdge 4200
Firmware
cable during the power-on self-test (POST). Upgrade the
SDS 100 firmware by first ensuring that the SMB cable is
connected and then powering down the cluster and then
starting it up again. During start-up, the cluster-specific
firmware on the SMB-connected node checks the version
of the SDS 100 firmware. If the SDS 100 is found to be
running the wrong version of firmware, the node proceeds to upgrade it automatically with the correct
firmware version. Observe the system messages during
POST to verify that the BIOS is downloading to the storage system(s).
Setting the Cluster Mode With BIOS
Setup
Use the following BIOS Setup procedure to enable Cluster Mode on each node on the cluster:
1.
Start the first cluster node and press <F2> during
POST.
The Dell System PowerEdge 4200/xxx Setup screen
appears.
2.
Use the right-arrow key to select the Advanced
menu.
To enable clustering on the PowerEdge system nodes,
both systems must have cluster-specific BIOS firmware
installed. To update the system BIOS for a PowerEdge 4200 system, perform the following steps:
3.
Use the down-arrow key to select the Cluster
option.
4.
Press <Spacebar> to turn on Cluster Mode.
1.
Insert the Customer BIOS Update for Dell PowerEdge 4200 diskette into drive A of the PowerEdge
system and restart the system.
5.
Select the Exit menu, select Save Changes &
Exit, and press <Enter>.
6.
Restart the system.
A message appears stating that the system is ready to
update the BIOS.
7.
Repeat steps 1 through 6 on the second cluster
node.
2.
3.
Type y to upgrade the firmware.
While the BIOS is updating, a series of status messages appears on the screen. Another message
appears when the upgrade is complete.
Installing and Configuring NICs
Repeat steps 1 and 2 on the second PowerEdge
system, if applicable.
The PowerEdge Cluster requires at least two network
interconnects for cluster operation—one network for the
public LAN and one dedicated network for the
node-to-node communications. Having two networks on
the cluster enables fault-tolerance of the cluster’s network communications and enables NIC replacement or
upgrades without losing network connectivity.
Upgrading the PowerEdge SDS 100
Storage System Firmware
The updated PowerEdge system BIOS automatically
downloads the cluster-specific BIOS to the SDS 100 storage system(s) via the system management bus (SMB)
Upgrading to a Cluster Configuration
A-3
NICs installed in the same node must reside on separate
subnetworks. Therefore, the second NIC added to a
cluster node must have a different network Internet Protocol (IP) address than the first NIC on the same node.
6.
For example, if the first NIC in the node had an
address of 143.166.110.2 with a subnet mask of
255.255.255.0, you may enter the following IP
address and subnet mask for the second NIC:
The procedure for adding and setting up a NIC in a cluster node is provided below.
NOTE: The IP addresses used are examples only and are
not representative of actual addresses that should be
used.
This procedure assumes that Windows NT Enterprise
Edition, the current Windows NT Service Pack, and
Cluster Server are installed on both cluster nodes, and the
IP addresses are 143.166.110.2 for the NIC in the first
node and 143.166.110.4 for the NIC in the second node.
The subnet mask for both nodes is 255.255.255.0.
1.
2.
IP Address: 143.166.100.6
Subnet Mask: 255.255.255.0
7.
Click OK, exit the Control Panel, and restart the
node.
8.
At the Windows NT desktop, click the Start button, point to Program, select Administrative Tools
(Common), and then select Cluster Administrator. Click the Network tab and verify that a new
resource called “New Cluster Network” has been
created.
9.
Move the cluster resources over to the second
cluster node and repeat steps 2 through 9 on the
first cluster node.
Move all cluster resources to the first cluster
node.
Refer to the Microsoft Cluster Server Administrator’s Guide for information about moving cluster
resources to a specific node.
Power down the second cluster node and install
the second NIC in that system.
Refer to the User’s Guide for your system for
instructions about installing expansion cards in your
system.
3.
Boot to the Windows NT Server Enterprise Edition operating system.
4.
Click the Start button, point to Settings and then
click Control Panel. Double-click the Network
icon.
5.
Install the driver for the second NIC.
Enter the new NIC’s IP address, making sure that
the network identification (ID) portion of the IP
address is different from the other adapter.
As you did with the second node, be sure to assign
the new NIC with the same subnet as the second NIC
of the second node (for example, 143.166.100.7).
10. In the dialog box, add a new cluster IP address
resource name and assign it the same network
address as the new NIC, but give the resource a
unique host address.
For example, you might assign the following IP
address:
IP Address: 143.166.100.8
Subnet Mask: 255.255.255.0
If the installation and IP address assignments have been
performed correctly, all of the new NIC resources will
appear online and will respond successfully to ping
commands.
A-4
Dell PowerEdge Cluster (PowerEdge 4200) Installation and Troubleshooting Guide
Appendix B
Stand-Alone and Rack Configurations
T
he Dell PowerEdge Cluster can be set up in a floorstanding (stand-alone) configuration or can be mounted
in a Dell Rack-Mountable Solutions enclosure. Certain
rules and parameters must be followed in either case to
ensure that the PowerEdge Cluster is properly configured
and meets safety specifications. Dell supports only
PowerEdge Cluster systems that are configured according to the instructions in this appendix.
NOTES: Dell certifies only PowerEdge Cluster systems
that are configured with the Dell products described
in this Installation and Troubleshooting Guide (see
Chapter 1 for a description of the PowerEdge Cluster
components).
Dell also supports only the certification of Dell PowerEdge Cluster systems that are configured according to
the instructions provided in this guide. Configurations
using non-Dell products, such as server systems, rack
cabinets, and storage systems, have not been approved by
any safety agencies. It is the responsibility of the customer to have such systems evaluated for suitability by a
certified safety agency.
Power Requirements of the
PowerEdge Cluster
Refer to Chapter 2, “Cabling the Cluster Hardware,” for
important information about handling the power requirements of the PowerEdge Cluster.
WARNING: Do not attempt to cable the PowerEdge Cluster to electrical power without first
planning the distribution of the cluster’s electrical
load across available circuits. For operation in the
Americas, the PowerEdge Cluster requires two AC
circuits with a minimum capacity of 20 amperes
(amps) each to handle the electrical load of the system. Do not allow the electrical load of the system
to exceed 16 amps on either circuit. For operation
in Europe, the PowerEdge Cluster requires two circuits rated in excess of the combined load of the
attached systems. Please refer to the ratings
marked on the back of each cluster component
when determining the total system’s electrical load.
WARNING: Although each component of the PowerEdge Cluster meets leakage current safety
requirements, the total leakage current may exceed
the maximum that is permitted when the components are used together. To meet safety
requirements in the Americas, you must use a Type
B plug and socket connection for the cluster power
to enable the appropriate level of ground protection. In Europe, you must use one (or two) power
distribution units (PDUs) or two Type B plug and
socket connections wired and installed by a qualified electrician in accordance with the local wiring
regulations.
Stand-Alone and Rack Configurations
B-1
Supported Stand-Alone
Kit Installation Restrictions
Configurations
Figures B-1 and B-2 show the stand-alone configurations
of the PowerEdge Cluster that Dell supports. These configurations are specified to provide a safe operating
environment for the cluster components.
As evident in the figures, two general rules govern the
stand-alone configurations:
•
The heaviest cluster component must be at the bottom of the stack and the lightest component at the
top.
•
No more than a single PowerEdge Scalable Disk
System 100 (SDS 100) storage system or a single
network switch can be stacked on top of a
PowerEdge server. If stacked alone, the storage
system(s) and network switch may be stacked one on
top of the other with the network switch on top, as
shown in Figure B-2.
NOTE: Placement of the monitor, keyboard, or mouse on
top of the PowerEdge systems or the SDS 100 storage
system(s) is not supported by Dell. Also, Dell does not
support more than one network switch stacked in any
stand-alone configuration of the cluster components.
Rack Safety Notices
Before you begin installing the PowerEdge Cluster
components in your rack, carefully read the safety
precautions and installation restrictions in the following
subsections.
B-2
WARNING: Dell’s server systems are certified as
components for use in Dell’s rack cabinet using the
Dell Customer Rack Kit. The final installation of
Dell servers and rack kits in any other brand of
rack cabinet has not been approved by any safety
agencies. It is the customer’s responsibility to have
the final combination of Dell servers and rack kits
for use in other brands of rack cabinets evaluated
for suitability by a certified safety agency.
This rack kit is intended to be installed in a Dell RackMountable Solutions enclosure by trained service
technicians. If you install the kit in any other rack, be
sure that the rack meets the specifications of the Dell
rack.
Rack Stabilizer Feet
WARNING: Installing a PowerEdge system in a
Dell rack without the front and side stabilizer feet
installed could cause the rack to tip over, resulting
in bodily injury. Therefore, always install the stabilizer feet before installing components in the rack.
Refer to the Dell PowerEdge Rack-Mountable Solutions
Installation Guide provided with the rack for instructions
on installing the stabilizer feet.
WARNING: After installing computers in a rack,
never pull more than one computer out of the rack
on its slides at one time. The weight of more than
one computer extended on slides could cause the
rack to tip over and cause bodily injury.
Dell PowerEdge Cluster (PowerEdge 4200) Installation and Troubleshooting Guide
PowerEdge SDS 100
storage system
network switch
Configuration 1
SDS 100 storage system
network switch
Configuration 2
Figure B-1. Supported Stand-Alone Configurations With One SDS 100 Storage System
Stand-Alone and Rack Configurations
B-3
PowerEdge SDS 100
storage systems (2)
Configuration 1
network switch
optional placement for
the network switch
Configuration 2
Figure B-2. Supported Stand-Alone Configurations With Two SDS 100 Storage Systems
B-4
Dell PowerEdge Cluster (PowerEdge 4200) Installation and Troubleshooting Guide
Supported Rack Configuration
Dell supports one configuration of the Dell PowerEdge
Cluster mounted in a Dell rack. The following list shows
how the cluster components must be placed in this configuration, from the lowest rack position to the highest:
•
Uninterruptible power supply (UPS) (lowest rack
position)
•
•
First PowerEdge system
Keyboard tray and network switch mounted behind
the keyboard tray
•
•
•
•
Apex Outlook switch box
Second PowerEdge system
First PowerEdge SDS 100 storage system
Optional second SDS 100 storage system (highest
rack position)
Figure B-3 illustrates the Dell-supported rack configuration. For instructions on installing the individual
components of the PowerEdge Cluster in a Dell rack,
refer to the Dell PowerEdge Rack-Mountable Solutions
Installation Guide. Instructions on installing the network
switch in a rack are provided in the next section.
optional second
PowerEdge SDS 100
storage system
first PowerEdge SDS
100 storage system
network switch
second PowerEdge system
Apex Outlook switch box
keyboard tray
first PowerEdge system
UPS
Figure B-3. Supported Rack Configuration
Stand-Alone and Rack Configurations
B-5
Rack-Mounting the Network
Switch
For the 3Com Superstack II Switch 3000 TX to be accessible to the network interface controller (NIC) connectors
on each cluster node, the switch must be placed behind
the keyboard tray with the front of the switch facing
toward the back of the rack.
screws (3)
Use the following procedure to install the network switch
in the rack.
CAUTION: Do not connect cables to the network
switch prior to installing the switch in the rack.
1.
If present, remove all self-adhesive pads from the
underside of the network switch.
2.
At the back of the rack along one of the vertical
rails, locate the first square hole right below the
mounting rail for the Apex Outlook switch box
(which connects the mouse, keyboard, and monitor), and install a nut cage in the hole. Moving
downward, skip the second and third holes and
install a nut cage in the fourth hole.
3.
Attach two cage nuts on the back vertical rail on
the other side of the rack directly opposite of the
two cage nuts you just installed.
4.
With the front of the network switch facing you,
position the mounting bracket over the mounting
holes on one side of the switch, as shown in
Figure B-4.
front of
network switch
rack-mounting bracket
Figure B-4. Attaching the Rack-Mounting
Hardware on the Network Switch
5.
Insert three of the screws included with the
mounting hardware and tighten them securely.
6.
Insert the mounting bracket on the opposite side
of the unit.
7.
Position the network switch inside the rack
behind the keyboard tray with the front of the
switch facing toward the back of the rack (see
Figure B-3).
8.
Align the holes on the mounting hardware with
the cage nuts that were installed earlier and
secure them with #10 flat washers and #10-32
screws.
Refer to Chapter 2, “Cabling the Cluster Hardware,” for
instructions on cabling the network switch.
B-6
Dell PowerEdge Cluster (PowerEdge 4200) Installation and Troubleshooting Guide
Appendix C
Cluster Data Sheet
T
he data sheet on the following page is provided for
the system installer to tear out and use to record pertinent
information about the Dell PowerEdge Cluster. Have this
form available when calling Dell Technical Assistance.
Cluster Data Sheet
C-1
C-2
Dell PowerEdge Cluster (PowerEdge 4200) Installation and Troubleshooting Guide
Dell ® PowerEdge® Cluster Installer Data Card and Checklist
Instructions: Before installing the Microsoft® Windows NT® Enterprise Edition operating system with clustering, use this checklist
to gather information and ensure the preparation required for a successful installation. Ensure that all equipment is present and properly cabled and that you know how to install Windows NT Server Enterprise Edition.
Cluster order number: ____________________
Software and Firmware
❑ Dell PowerEdge Expandable RAID Controller cluster firmware revision: ______________________
❑ The Intel Pro100B driver revision is 2.22 or later.
❑ Cluster system configuration utility version: ____________________
❑ Windows NT Server Enterprise Edition revision: __________________
❑ xover.exe revision: ____________________
Pre-Installation Settings
❑ PowerEdge Expandable RAID Controller initiator IDs:
Node 1: ______________ and Node 2: ________________
❑ The cluster RAID controller has been configured for write-through operation.
❑ The RAID level and logical drives are configured and initialized.
❑ Cluster Mode for the Dell PowerEdge 4200 Cluster has been turned on in the system BIOS.
Windows NT Server Settings
❑ The RAID controller drivers are installed.
❑ A 1024-MB partition has been created for the Windows NT Server Enterprise Edition system drive.
❑ License type: _________________ Number: __________________
❑ Network name for this computer: ___________________
❑ Domain type has been chosen (Primary Domain Controller, Backup Domain Controller, or stand-alone).
❑ Administrator user name: _________________
❑ Administrator password: _________________
❑ Network participation has been wired to network.
❑ Microsoft Internet Information Server (IIS) has been installed.
❑ All network adapters have been found and accepted.
❑ Network protocol is TCP/IP only. Uncheck any others.
❑ SNMP service has been added.
❑ DHCP server is not selected.
Cluster Data Sheet
C-3
❑ TCP/IP address for each NIC:
Node 1, NIC 1 __________________ NIC 2 ___________________
Node 2, NIC 1 __________________ NIC 2 ___________________
❑ The subnet masks for NIC 1 and NIC 2 are different. Subnet masks for the NIC 1s should
match. Subnet masks for the NIC 2s should match.
Node 1, NIC 1 __________________ NIC 2 ___________________
Node 2, NIC 1 __________________ NIC 2 ___________________
❑ Domain name: ____________________________
❑ Gopher service is not enabled for IIS.
❑ Drive letters for the SDS 100s:
No. 1 ________ No. 2 _________ No. 3 __________ No. 4 __________
❑ The format of the SDS 100 logical drive is NTFS.
❑ The NIC driver has been updated.
❑ The recommended paging file maximum size is twice the system’s RAM capacity if the
RAM capacity is 256 MB or less, or the paging file size has been set at an amount greater
than the system RAM, up to the amount of free space on the hard-disk drive.
❑ The recommended registry file size is 64 MB.
❑ The OEM NIC driver remains installed after the Service Pack installation.
❑ On Node 2, the drive letter for the SDS 100 is the same as on Node 1.
Microsoft Cluster Service Installation
❑ Cluster name: _____________________________
❑ Domain name: _____________________________
❑ Administrator’s user name: _________________________
❑ Administrator’s password: _________________________
❑ Name of adapter 1 is Public.
❑ Name of adapter 2 is Private.
❑ Cluster IP address: _________________________
❑ Cluster subnet mask (same as Public): ________________________
© Dell Computer Corporation 1997, Rev.1.1
C-4
Dell PowerEdge Cluster (PowerEdge 4200) Installation and Troubleshooting Guide
Appendix D
PowerEdge Cluster Configuration Matrix
T
he Cluster Configuration Matrix form, which is
shown on the following page, is attached to the back of
each cluster node and is used by the system installer to
record important information about the hardware on each
cluster component. Keep these completed forms attached
to their respective cluster components. Have these forms
handy any time you call Dell for technical support.
The form provides fields for the following information:
•
•
•
Form completion date
Unique cluster identification (ID) number
Service tag numbers for each cluster component
•
List of each cluster node’s Peripheral Component
Interconnect (PCI) slots and the adapters installed in
each
•
•
Usage description for each installed adapter
PowerEdge Scalable Disk System 100 (SDS 100)
storage system service tags associated with each
PowerEdge Expandable redundant array of inexpensive disks (RAID) Controller channel
NOTE: Currently, only two PowerEdge SDS 100
storage systems are supported on the PowerEdge
Cluster. Future enhancements will provide support
for up to four SDS 100 storage systems.
PowerEdge Cluster Configuration Matrix
D-1
Dell Computer Corporation
Date:________________________
PowerEdge Cluster Configuration Matrix
Unique Cluster ID: _________________________________
System
PE 4200
PE 4200
Service Tag #
Node Number
Node 1
Node 2
RAID Controller IDD
7
10
SDS 100
SDS 100
SDS 100
SDS 100
Slot #
1
PCI/EISA Slot #
EISA slot 1
2
3
4
EISA slot 2
EISA slot 3
PCI slot 4
(Secondary bus)
PCI slot 5
(Secondary bus)
5
Adapter
Usage
Attachment Instruction
Private NIC
Private Network
Second Cluster
PERC (if applicable)
Shared Drives
Channel 0
Channel 1
6
PCI slot 6
(Primary bus)
Standard PERC
(optional)
Server Drives
Channel 0
Channel 1
7
PCI slot 7
(Primary bus)
First Cluster PERC
(required)
Shared Drives
Channel 0
Channel 1
8
PCI slot 8
(Primary bus)
Public NIC
Public Network
Figure D-1. PowerEdge Cluster Configuration Matrix
D-2
Dell PowerEdge Cluster (PowerEdge 4200) Installation and Troubleshooting Guide
Appendix E
Regulatory Compliance
Regulatory Standards
Dell PowerEdge Cluster has been tested and certified to
the following standards:
•
•
•
•
•
•
EMC Standards
• EN 55022 — “Limits and Methods of Measurement
of Radio Interference Characteristics of Information
Technology Equipment.”
IEC950:1991 + A1:1992 + A2:1993 + A3:1995
NOTE: EN 55022 emissions requirements provide
for two classifications—Class A and Class B. If any
one of the registration labels (on the bottom or back
panel of your computer, on card-mounting brackets,
or on the cards themselves) carries an FCC Class A
rating, the following warning applies to your system.
EN60950:1992 + A1:1993 + A2:1993 + A3:1995
EMKO-TSE (74-SEC) 207/94
Miti Ordinance No. 85
UL1950, 3rd Edition
C22-2 No. 950, 3rd Edition
WARNING: This is a Class A product. In a
domestic environment this product may cause
radio interference in which case the user may
be required to take adequate measures.
CE Notice
Marking by the symbol
indicates compliance of
this Dell system to the Safety and EMC (Electromagnetic
Compatibility) directives of the European Community
(89/336/EEC and 73/23/EEC). Such marking is indicative that this Dell system meets or exceeds the following
technical standards.
Safety Standard
• EN60950:1992 + Amd.1:1993 + Amd.2:1993 —
•
EN 50082-1 — “Electromagnetic compatibility—
Generic immunity standard Part 1: Residential,
commercial, and light industry.”
•
IEC 801-2 — “Electromagnetic compatibility for
industrial-process measurement and control
equipment Part 2: Electrostatic discharge requirements.” — Severity level 3.
•
IEC 801-3 — “Electromagnetic compatibility for
industrial-process measurement and control equipment Part 3: Radiated electromagnetic field
requirements.” — Severity level 2.
•
IEC 801-4 — “Electromagnetic compatibility for
industrial-process measurement and control equipment Part 4: Electrical fast transient/burst
requirements.” — Severity level 2.
“Safety of Information Technology Equipment
including Electrical Business Equipment.”
A “Declaration of Conformity” in accordance with the
preceding standards has been made and is on file at Dell
Products Europe BV, Limerick, Ireland.
Regulatory Compliance
E-1
E-2
Dell PowerEdge Cluster (PowerEdge 4200) Installation and Troubleshooting Guide
Appendix F
Safety Information for Technicians
B
efore you perform any procedures on the PowerEdge
Cluster equipment, read the following warnings for your
personal safety and to prevent damage to the system from
electrostatic discharge (ESD). Refer to the appropriate
system documentation before servicing any system.
WARNING: The components of this cluster system
may have more than one power supply cable. To
reduce the risk of electrical shock, a trained service
technician must disconnect all power supply cables
before servicing any system components.
WARNING FOR YOUR PERSONAL SAFETY
AND PROTECTION OF THE EQUIPMENT:
Before you start to work on a system component,
perform the following steps in the sequence listed:
1.
Turn off the system component.
2.
Disconnect the system component from its
power source(s).
3.
Disconnect any communications cables.
4.
Wear a wrist grounding strap, and clip it to an
unpainted metal surface, such as a part of the
back panel, on the chassis.
5.
If a wrist grounding strap is not available,
touch the fan guard or some other unpainted
metal surface on the back of the chassis to discharge any static charge from your body.
Safety Information for Technicians
F-1
F-2
Dell PowerEdge Cluster (PowerEdge 4200) Installation and Troubleshooting Guide
Appendix G
Warranties and Return Policy
Limited Three-Year Warranty
(U.S. and Canada Only)
Dell Computer Corporation (“Dell”) manufactures its
hardware products from parts and components that are
new or equivalent to new in accordance with industrystandard practices. Dell warrants that the hardware
products it manufactures will be free from defects in
materials and workmanship. The warranty term is three
years beginning on the date of invoice, as described in the
following text.
Damage due to shipping the products to you is covered
under this warranty. Otherwise, this warranty does not
cover damage due to external causes, including accident,
abuse, misuse, problems with electrical power, servicing
not authorized by Dell, usage not in accordance with
product instructions, failure to perform required preventive maintenance, and problems caused by use of parts
and components not supplied by Dell.
This warranty does not cover any items that are in one or
more of the following categories: software; external
devices (except as specifically noted); accessories or
parts added to a Dell system after the system is shipped
from Dell; accessories or parts added to a Dell system
through Dell’s system integration department; accessories or parts that are not installed in the Dell factory; or
DellWare® products. Monitors, keyboards, and mice that
are Dell-branded or that are included on Dell’s standard
price list are covered under this warranty; all other monitors, keyboards, and mice (including those sold through
the DellWare program) are not covered. Batteries for
portable computers are covered only during the initial
one-year period of this warranty.
Coverage During Year One
During the one-year period beginning on the invoice
date, Dell will repair or replace products covered under
this limited warranty that are returned to Dell’s facility.
To request warranty service, you must call Dell’s
Customer Technical Support within the warranty period.
Refer to the chapter titled “Getting Help” in your system
Installation and Troubleshooting Guide to find the appropriate telephone number for obtaining customer
assistance. If warranty service is required, Dell will issue
a Return Material Authorization Number. You must ship
the products back to Dell in their original or equivalent
packaging, prepay shipping charges, and insure the shipment or accept the risk of loss or damage during
shipment. Dell will ship the repaired or replacement
products to you freight prepaid if you use an address in
the continental U.S. or Canada, where applicable. Shipments to other locations will be made freight collect.
NOTE: Before you ship the product(s) to Dell, back up
the data on the hard-disk drive(s) and any other storage
device(s) in the product(s). Remove any removable
media, such as diskettes, CDs, or PC Cards. Dell does
not accept liability for lost data or software.
Dell owns all parts removed from repaired products. Dell
uses new and reconditioned parts made by various manufacturers in performing warranty repairs and building
replacement products. If Dell repairs or replaces a product, its warranty term is not extended.
Warranties and Return Policy
G-1
Coverage During Years Two and Three
During the second and third years of this limited warranty, Dell will provide, on an exchange basis and subject
to Dell’s Exchange Policy in effect on the date of the
exchange, replacement parts for the Dell hardware product(s) covered under this limited warranty when a part
requires replacement. You must report each instance of
hardware failure to Dell’s Customer Technical Support in
advance to obtain Dell’s concurrence that a part should
be replaced and to have Dell ship the replacement part.
Dell will ship parts and prepay the shipping costs if you
use an address in the continental U.S. or Canada, where
applicable. Shipments to other locations will be made
freight collect. Dell will include a prepaid shipping container with each replacement part for your use in
returning the replaced part to Dell. Replacement parts are
new or reconditioned. Dell may provide replacement
parts made by various manufacturers when supplying
parts to you. The warranty term for a replacement part is
the remainder of the limited warranty term.
You will pay Dell for replacement parts if the replaced
part is not returned to Dell. The process for returning
replaced parts, and your obligation to pay for replacement parts if you do not return the replaced parts to Dell,
will be in accordance with Dell’s Exchange Policy in
effect on the date of the exchange.
You accept full responsibility for your software and data.
Dell is not required to advise or remind you of appropriate backup and other procedures.
General
DELL MAKES NO EXPRESS WARRANTIES
BEYOND THOSE STATED IN THIS WARRANTY
STATEMENT. DELL DISCLAIMS ALL OTHER WARRANTIES, EXPRESS OR IMPLIED, INCLUDING
WITHOUT LIMITATION IMPLIED WARRANTIES
OF MERCHANTABILITY AND FITNESS FOR A
PARTICULAR PURPOSE. SOME STATES (OR JURISDICTIONS) DO NOT ALLOW LIMITATIONS ON
IMPLIED WARRANTIES, SO THIS LIMITATION
MAY NOT APPLY TO YOU.
DELL’S RESPONSIBILITY FOR MALFUNCTIONS
AND DEFECTS IN HARDWARE IS LIMITED TO
REPAIR AND REPLACEMENT AS SET FORTH IN
THIS WARRANTY STATEMENT. THESE WARRANTIES GIVE YOU SPECIFIC LEGAL RIGHTS, AND
G-2
YOU MAY ALSO HAVE OTHER RIGHTS, WHICH
VARY FROM STATE TO STATE (OR JURISDICTION).
DELL DOES NOT ACCEPT LIABILITY BEYOND
THE REMEDIES SET FORTH IN THIS WARRANTY
STATEMENT OR LIABILITY FOR INCIDENTAL OR
CONSEQUENTIAL DAMAGES, INCLUDING WITHOUT LIMITATION ANY LIABILITY FOR
PRODUCTS NOT BEING AVAILABLE FOR USE OR
FOR LOST DATA OR SOFTWARE.
SOME STATES (OR JURISDICTIONS) DO NOT
ALLOW THE EXCLUSION OR LIMITATION OF
INCIDENTAL OR CONSEQUENTIAL DAMAGES,
SO THE PRECEDING EXCLUSION OR LIMITATION
MAY NOT APPLY TO YOU.
These provisions apply to Dell’s limited three-year
warranty only. For provisions of any service contract
covering your system, refer to the separate service
contract that you will receive.
If Dell elects to exchange a system or component, the
exchange will be made in accordance with Dell’s
Exchange Policy in effect on the date of the exchange.
NOTE: If you chose one of the available warranty and
service options in place of the standard limited threeyear warranty described in the preceding text, the option
you chose will be listed on your invoice.
T
“ otal Satisfaction” Return Policy
(U.S. and Canada Only)
If you are an end-user customer who bought products
directly from a Dell company, you may return them to
Dell up to 30 days from the date of invoice for a refund of
the product purchase price if already paid. This refund
will not include any shipping and handling charges
shown on your invoice. If you are an organization who
bought the products from Dell under a written agreement
with Dell, there may be different terms for the return of
products under this policy, based on your agreement with
Dell. To return products, you must call Dell Customer
Service (at the telephone number shown in the chapter
titled “Getting Help” in your PowerEdge 4200 Systems
Installation and Troubleshooting Guide) to receive a
Credit Return Authorization Number. You must ship the
products to Dell in their original packaging, prepay
shipping charges, and insure the shipment or accept the
Dell PowerEdge Cluster (PowerEdge 4200) Installation and Troubleshooting Guide
risk of loss or damage during shipment. You may return
software for refund or credit only if the sealed package
containing the diskette(s) or CD(s) is unopened. Returned
products must be in as-new condition, and all of the manuals, diskette(s), CD(s), power cables, and other items
included with a product must be returned with it.
This “Total Satisfaction” Return Policy does not apply to
DellWare products, which may be returned under
DellWare’s then-current return policy.
Warranties and Return Policy
G-3
G-4
Dell PowerEdge Cluster (PowerEdge 4200) Installation and Troubleshooting Guide
Index
A
Apex switch cabling, 2-7
applications
setting up to run on a cluster, 4-1
audience level, ix
B
basic input/output system. See BIOS
BIOS
disabling on a RAID controller, 3-2
C
cabling
disconnecting SCSI cables, 2-7
mouse, keyboard, and monitor, 2-7
NIC, 2-5
SDS 100 storage systems, 2-1, 2-3, 2-4
SMB, 2-5
cautions, x
chapter summaries, ix
chkdsk /f
running on a quorum disk, 4-5
cluster
cabling, 2-1
checking the functionality, 3-5
components, 1-1
cluster (continued)
configuring the software, 3-1
running applications on, 4-1
troubleshooting, 5-1
verifying network communications, 3-6
cluster layout, 1-2
cluster node
adding peripherals, 1-4
back view, 1-5
changing the IP address, 3-4
removing from cluster, 3-7
cluster resources
verifying availability, 3-7
cluster service
verifying operation, 3-7
cluster software
high-level configuration, 3-3
low-level configuration, 3-1
conventions used in text, xi
D
domain
choosing for the cluster, 3-3
verifying operation, 3-6
drive letters
assigning to shared drives, 3-4
Index
1
E
M
electrostatic discharge. See ESD
maximize feature in RAID Console, 3-8
ESD
about, vi
preventing, vi, F-1
Microsoft Cluster Server
uninstalling, 3-7
expansion cards
placement on PCI bus, 1-4, A-1
mouse cabling, 2-7
monitor cabling, 2-7
N
F
File Share service, 4-2
ftdisk driver, 3-8
network
configuring separate networks, 3-3
network communications
verifying, 3-6
network interface controller. See NIC
G
getting started, 1-1
network switch
attaching rack-mounting hardware, B-6
rack-mounting, B-6
IIS, 4-1
NIC
cabling, 2-5
installing, A-3
location on PCI bus, 1-4, A-1
updating the driver, 3-5
installation overview, 1-3
notational conventions, x
internal hard-disk drive
setting the RAID level, 3-2
notes, x
I
Internet Information Server Service. See IIS
IP address
changing for a cluster node, 3-4
requirements for cluster, 3-3
P
paging file size, 3-5
PCI slots
expansion card placement, 1-4, A-1
K
peripherals
adding expansion cards for clustering, 1-4
keyboard cabling, 2-7
2
power requirements, B-1
Dell PowerEdge Cluster (PowerEdge 4200) Installation and Troubleshooting Guide
PowerEdge Cluster
checking the functionality, 3-5
components, 1-1
getting started, 1-1
installation overview, 1-3
layout, 1-2
minimum system requirements, 1-2
rebuild
incomplete, 3-8
operation in RAID Console, 3-9
rate, 3-8
PowerEdge RAID Console
rebuild operation, 3-9
using the maximize feature, 3-8
return policy, G-2
PowerEdge Scalable Disk System 100. See SDS 100
storage system
S
Print Spooler service, 4-3
safety
information for technicians, F-1
notices, B-2
preventing electrostatic discharge, vi
Q
quorum resource
setting up, 3-8
R
rack configuration
Dell-supported, B-5
rack certification, B-2, B-6
safety notices, B-2
stability warnings, B-2, B-6
RAID controller
disabling the BIOS, 3-2
driver, 3-4
functionality, 3-8
location on PCI bus, 1-4, A-1
setting SCSI IDs, 3-2
verifying the driver, 3-6
RAID level
setting for internal hard-disk drives, 3-2
setting for shared storage subsystem, 3-2
rediscovery application, 4-4
registry size, 3-5
SCSI
disconnecting cables, 2-7
SCSI ID
setting, 3-2
verifying, 3-6
SDS 100 storage system
cabling, 2-1, 2-3, 2-4
upgrading the firmware, A-3
verifying operation, 3-5
shared storage subsystem
assigning drive letters, 3-4
setting the RAID level, 3-2
verifying drive letters, 3-6
small computer system interface. See SCSI
SMB
cabling, 2-5
stand-alone configurations
containing one SDS 100 storage system, B-3
containing two SDS 100 storage systems, B-4
Dell-supported, B-2
system configuration utility
updating for clustering, A-3
system management bus. See SMB
system requirements, 1-2
Index
3
T
V
tape backup for clustered systems, 4-5
verifying
1 x 8 mode on shared storage subsystem, 3-5
cluster domain, 3-6
cluster resource availability, 3-7
cluster service operation, 3-7
network communications, 3-6
RAID controller driver, 3-6
SCSI controller IDs, 3-6
shared storage subsystem drive letters, 3-6
troubleshooting
cluster mode failure, 5-2
connecting to a cluster, 5-4
network communications, 5-3
SCSI controllers, 5-3
shared storage subsystem, 5-1, 5-2, 5-3
SNMP service, 5-4
system management bus, 5-1, 5-3
typographical conventions, xi
W
U
warnings, x
upgrading
checking existing hardware, A-1
existing system to a cluster, A-1
installing hardware, A-2
installing software, A-3
PowerEdge 4200 firmware, A-3
SDS 100 storage system firmware, A-3
system configuration utility, A-3
4
warranty information, G-1
working inside the computer
safety precautions, vi, F-1
Dell PowerEdge Cluster (PowerEdge 4200) Installation and Troubleshooting Guide
®
www.dell.com
Printed in the U.S.A.
P/N 17088