Dell Command Line Interface Network Card User Manual

Dell™ OpenManage™
Server Administrator
Version 5.2
Command Line Interface
User's Guide
w w w. d e l l . c o m | s u p p o r t . d e l l . c o m
Notes and Notices
NOTE: A NOTE indicates important information that helps you make better use of your computer.
NOTICE: A NOTICE indicates either potential damage to hardware or loss of data and tells you how to avoid the problem.
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Information in this document is subject to change without notice.
© 2006 Dell Inc. All rights reserved.
Reproduction in any manner whatsoever without the written permission of Dell Inc. is strictly forbidden.
Trademarks used in this text: Dell, the DELL logo, PowerEdge, and OpenManage are trademarks of Dell Inc.; Microsoft, Windows,
Windows Server, MS-DOS, and Windows NT are registered trademarks of Microsoft Corporation; SUSE is a registered trademark of Novell,
Inc. in the United States and other countries; Red Hat and Red Hat Enterprise Linux are registered trademarks of Red Hat, Inc.; Intel, Pentium,
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are trademarks of Advanced Micro Devices, Inc.; VESA is a registered trademark of Video Electronic Standards Association; UNIX is a registered
trademark of The Open Group in the United States and other countries; OS/2 is a registered trademark of International Business Machines Corporation.
Other trademarks and trade names may be used in this document to refer to either the entities claiming the marks and names or their products.
Dell Inc. disclaims any proprietary interest in trademarks and trade names other than its own.
December 2006
Contents
1
Introduction
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What's New for Version 5.2
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Using CLI Commands from Windows Command Prompts .
Primary CLI Commands
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Success Messages .
Failure Messages . .
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Scripting and Comparing With the CLI
Command Syntax Overview
omhelp: Getting Help With CLI Commands .
Example Help Commands
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omreport: Viewing System Status Using the
Instrumentation Service . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
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Conventions for Parameter Tables .
omreport Command Summary
Help With the omreport Command.
omreport about .
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CLI Error Checking and Error Messages.
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omreport chassis Commands
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omreport chassis . . . . . .
omreport chassis acswitch .
omreport chassis batteries .
omreport chassis bios . . .
omreport chassis biossetup
omreport chassis bmc . . .
omreport chassis currents .
omreport chassis fans . . .
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omreport chassis fancontrol . . .
omreport chassis firmware . . . .
omreport chassis frontpanel . . .
omreport chassis fru . . . . . . .
omreport chassis info . . . . . . .
omreport chassis intrusion . . . .
omreport chassis leds . . . . . .
omreport chassis memory . . . .
omreport chassis nics . . . . . .
omreport chassis ports . . . . . .
omreport chassis processors. . .
omreport chassis pwrsupplies . .
omreport chassis remoteaccess .
omreport chassis slots . . . . . .
omreport chassis temps . . . . .
omreport chassis volts . . . . . .
omreport system Commands .
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omreport system . . . . . . . . .
Commands for Viewing Logs . . .
omreport system alertaction . . .
omreport system assetinfo . . . .
omreport system events . . . . .
omreport system operatingsystem
omreport system pedestinations .
omreport system platformevents .
omreport system recovery . . . .
omreport system shutdown . . . .
omreport system summary . . . .
omreport system thrmshutdown .
omreport system version . . . . .
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omconfig: Managing Components Using the
Instrumentation Service . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
omconfig Command Summary .
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Help With the omconfig Command
omconfig about .
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Conventions for Parameter Tables .
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omconfig chassis
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omconfig preferences
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omconfig preferences cdvformat . .
omconfig preferences dirservice . .
omconfig preferences snmp . . . .
omconfig preferences useraccess .
omconfig system
omconfig system alertaction . . .
Commands for Clearing Logs . . .
omconfig system pedestinations .
omconfig system platformevents .
omconfig system events . . . . .
omconfig system webserver . . .
omconfig system recovery . . . .
omconfig system shutdown . . . .
omconfig system thrmshutdown .
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omconfig chassis biossetup . . .
omconfig chassis bmc . . . . . .
omconfig chassis currents . . . .
omconfig chassis fans . . . . . .
omconfig chassis fancontrol . . .
omconfig chassis frontpanel . . .
omconfig chassis info. . . . . . .
omconfig chassis leds . . . . . .
omconfig chassis memorymode .
omconfig chassis remoteaccess .
omconfig chassis temps . . . . .
omconfig chassis volts . . . . . .
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omconfig system assetinfo: Editing Cost of
Ownership Values . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
omconfig System Asset Info Overview
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User Level Required for Adding Asset Information.
Adding Acquisition Information .
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Example Commands for Adding Acquisition Information
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Adding Depreciation Information
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Adding Extended Warranty Information .
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Example Command for Adding Extended Warranty Information .
Adding Lease Information
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Example Command for Adding Lease Information
Adding Maintenance Information
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Example Command for Adding Maintenance Information
Adding Outsource Information .
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Example Command for Adding Outsource Information.
Adding Owner Information .
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Example Command for Adding Owner Information .
Adding Service Contract Information
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Example Command for Adding Service Information
Adding Support Information
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Example Command for Adding Support Information .
Adding System Information
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Example Command for Adding System Information
Adding Warranty Information
Example Command for Adding Warranty Information
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omreport rac: Viewing Remote Access Controller
Components . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
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Conventions for Parameter Tables .
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omreport rac Command Summary .
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Help With the omreport rac Command
omreport rac authentication .
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Example Command for omreport rac authentication .
omreport rac dialinusers.
omreport rac dialoutusers .
omreport rac network
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Example Commands for Adding Depreciation Information .
Contents
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omreport rac modem .
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omreport rac remote .
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omreport rac snmptraps
omreport rac users .
omreport rac viewcertificate
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omconfig rac: Managing the Remote
Access Controller . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
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Conventions for Parameter Tables .
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omconfig rac Command Summary .
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Help With the omconfig rac Command
omconfig rac authentication .
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omconfig rac dialinusers
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Example Commands
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Local Operating System Authentication . . . . . . .
Example Command for omconfig rac authentication .
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omconfig rac dialoutusers .
Example Commands
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omconfig rac generatecert
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omconfig rac modem .
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omconfig rac network
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Example Command
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omconfig rac snmptraps .
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Example Commands
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omconfig rac remote .
Example Command
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omconfig rac rmdialinuser .
Example Command
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omconfig rac rmdialoutuser .
Example Command
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Contents
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omconfig rac rmsnmptrap
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Example Command
omconfig rac rmuser .
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Example Command
omconfig rac reset .
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omconfig rac uploadcert .
omconfig rac users .
Example Command
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Using the Storage Management Service
CLI Command Syntax .
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Syntax for Required, Optional, and Variable Command Elements
User Privileges for omreport storage and omconfig storage .
omreport Command
omreport Storage Help .
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omconfig Global Commands .
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omconfig Controller Commands .
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omconfig Global Enable Smart Thermal Shutdown
omconfig Global Disable Smart Thermal Shutdown
omconfig Global Rescan Controller. . . . . . . . .
omconfig Rescan Controller . . . .
omconfig Global Rescan Controller.
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omreport Controller Status . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
omreport Global Information (Smart Thermal Shutdown Status)
omreport Battery Status . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
omreport Connector Status . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
omreport Enclosure Status . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
omreport Temperature Probe Status . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
omreport Fan Status . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
omreport Power Supply Status . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
omreport EMM Status . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
omreport Physical Disk Status . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
omreport Virtual Disk Status . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
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omconfig Enable Controller Alarm . . . . . . . .
omconfig Disable Controller Alarm . . . . . . . .
omconfig Quiet Controller Alarm . . . . . . . . .
omconfig Test Controller Alarm . . . . . . . . . .
omconfig Reset Controller Configuration . . . . .
omconfig Create Virtual Disk . . . . . . . . . . .
omconfig Set Controller Rebuild Rate . . . . . .
omconfig Set Background Initialization Rate . . .
omconfig Set Reconstruct Rate . . . . . . . . .
omconfig Set Check Consistency Rate . . . . . .
omconfig Export the Controller Log . . . . . . . .
omconfig Import Foreign Configuration . . . . .
omconfig Import/Recover Foreign Configuration .
omconfig Clear Foreign Configuration . . . . . .
omconfig Set Patrol Read Mode . . . . . . . . .
omconfig Start Patrol Read . . . . . . . . . . . .
omconfig Stop Patrol Read . . . . . . . . . . . .
omconfig Virtual Disk Commands .
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omconfig Blink Virtual Disk . . . . . . . .
omconfig Unblink Virtual Disk . . . . . .
omconfig Initialize Virtual Disk . . . . . .
omconfig Cancel Initialize Virtual Disk . .
omconfig Fast Initialize Virtual Disk . . .
omconfig Slow Initialize Virtualize Disk .
omconfig Cancel Background Initialize .
omconfig Restore Dead Segments . . . .
omconfig Split Mirror . . . . . . . . . . .
omconfig Unmirror . . . . . . . . . . . .
omconfig Assign Dedicated Hot Spare . .
omconfig Unassign Dedicated Hot Spare
omconfig Check Consistency . . . . . . .
omconfig Cancel Check Consistency . . .
omconfig Pause Check Consistency . . .
omconfig Resume Check Consistency . .
omconfig Delete Virtual Disk . . . . . . .
omconfig Format Virtual Disk . . . . . . .
omconfig Reconfiguring Virtual Disks . .
omconfig Change Virtual Disk Policy . . .
omconfig Rename Virtual Disk . . . . . .
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Contents
9
omconfig Physical Disk Commands .
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
omconfig Battery Commands
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omconfig Connector Commands .
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omconfig Rescan Connector
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178
omconfig Enclosure Commands .
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179
omconfig Recondition Battery . . .
omconfig Start Battery Learn Cycle
omconfig Delay Battery Learn Cycle
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
omconfig Enable Enclosure Alarm . . . . . . . . .
omconfig Disable Enclosure Alarm . . . . . . . . .
omconfig Enable Smart Thermal Shutdown . . . .
omconfig Disable Smart Thermal Shutdown . . . .
omconfig Set Enclosure Asset Tag . . . . . . . . .
omconfig Set Enclosure Asset Name. . . . . . . .
omconfig Set Temperature Probe Thresholds . . .
omconfig Reset Temperature Probe Thresholds . .
omconfig Set All Temperature Probe Thresholds .
omconfig Reset All Temperature Probe Thresholds
omconfig Blink . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
10
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omconfig Blink Physical Disk . . . . . . . .
omconfig Unblink Physical Disk. . . . . . .
omconfig Prepare to Remove Physical Disk
omconfig Initialize Physical Disk . . . . . .
omconfig Offline Physical Disk . . . . . . .
omconfig Offline Physical Disk . . . . . . .
omconfig Online Physical Disk . . . . . . .
omconfig Assign Global Hot Spare . . . . .
omconfig Unassign Global Hot Spare . . .
omconfig Rebuild Physical Disk. . . . . . .
omconfig Cancel Rebuild Physical Disk . .
omconfig Remove Dead Segments . . . . .
omconfig Clear Physical Disk . . . . . . . .
omconfig Cancel Clear Physical Disk . . . .
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9
Working With CLI Command Results
Output Options for Command Results
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Controlling Command Output Display. . . . . . .
Writing Command Output to a File . . . . . . . .
Selecting a Format for Your CLI Command Output
Glossary
Index .
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Contents
11
12
Contents
Introduction
Whether you are using the graphical user interface (GUI) or the command line interface (CLI),
Dell™ OpenManage™ Server Administrator performs essential systems management tasks.
The reporting and viewing features allow retrieval of overall health status for systems on your network.
At the component level, you can view information about the voltages, temperatures, current, fan
RPM, memory functioning, and many other critical component details. You see a detailed account of
many relevant cost of ownership (COO) facts about your system in summary view. Version
information for BIOS, firmware, operating system, and all installed software is easy to retrieve.
Configuration features allow the Server Administrator to perform essential tasks described in detail
in the following sections.
NOTE: You can use the CLI instead of the Server Administrator home page, and turn the Server Administrator
Web server off if you have security concerns. The CLI does not use the Web server. Use the omconfig system
webserver action=stop command to turn off the Web server. The Web server starts automatically after a
reboot, so this command must be issued every time a system starts up. See "omconfig system webserver" for
more information.
What's New for Version 5.2
•
Added support for Dell PowerEdge™ 2970 system
•
Added support for Microsoft® Windows Server® 2003 family (x86) (SP2 with Web, Standard, and
Enterprise editions)
•
Added support for Microsoft Windows Server 2003 family (x86_64) (SP2 with Standard, and
Enterprise editions)
•
Added support for Microsoft Windows® Unified Data Storage Server 2003 (x86_64)
•
Added support for Microsoft Windows Server 2003 R2, Datacenter x64 Edition
•
Added support for Red Hat® Enterprise Linux® Version 5 (x86) and (x86_64) systems
•
Added support for NIS, Kerberos, LDAP, and Winbind authentication protocols for Linux
operating systems
•
Added information on features of Intel® and AMD™ processors in the Processor Information page
•
Added a new command in Storage Management: importrecoverforeignconfig
•
Added a new omconfig preferences snmp setting command to configure SNMP Set
Operations
NOTE: SNMP Set Operations are disabled by default in Server Administrator.
Introduction
13
Using CLI Commands from Windows Command Prompts
If you are running the Windows operating system, use the 32-bit command prompt to issue a Server
Administrator CLI command. You can access the 32-bit command prompt by clicking the Start button
and pointing to Programs→ Accessories→ Command Prompt shortcut, or by clicking the Start button and
selecting Run, then typing cmd.exe in the Run dialog box.
Do not type command into the Run dialog box to launch a command line window; this activates the
MS-DOS® emulator command.com, which has environment variable limitations that can cause subtle
problems with the CLI.
Primary CLI Commands
The commands that carry out the functions of Server Administrator are:
•
omconfig
•
omhelp
•
omreport
The omconfig command writes values that you assign to an object's properties. You can specify values for
warning thresholds on components or prescribe what action your system is to take when a certain
warning or failure event occurs. You can also use the omconfig command to assign specific values to your
system's asset information parameters, such as the purchase price of the system, the system's asset tag, or
the system's location.
The omhelp command displays short text help for CLI commands. The shorthand equivalent of omhelp
is the command for which you want help followed by -?. For example, to display help for the omreport
command, type one of the following commands:
omhelp omreport
omreport -?
The omreport command produces reports of your system’s management information.
NOTE: For an overall summary of CLI commands, type omhelp.
14
Introduction
Table 1-1 lists the primary CLI commands used by Server Administrator. This guide contains a section
for each primary command.
Table 1-1.
CLI Commands and Sections in This Guide
Primary CLI
Command
Section Title
Related Sections
omconfig
omconfig: Managing Components Using the
Instrumentation Service
omconfig system assetinfo: Editing
Cost of Ownership Values
omhelp
omhelp: Getting Help With CLI Commands
omreport
omreport: Viewing System Status Using
the Instrumentation Service
omreport rac: Viewing Remote Access
Controller Components
NOTE: omupdate commands are no longer supported in Server Administrator and are replaced by Dell Update
Package or Server Update Utility commands. To update the different components, download the Dell Update Package
and run <package name> /s [/f]. See the Dell Update Packages for Microsoft Windows Operating Systems User’s Guide,
the Dell Update Packages for Red Hat Enterprise Linux User’s Guide, or the Server Update Utility User’s Guide for more
information on corresponding CLI syntax.
Additional useful topics about the CLI include:
•
Working With CLI Command Results
•
Glossary
CLI Error Checking and Error Messages
The CLI checks your commands for correct syntax when you enter them. If you enter a command and the
command is executed successfully, a message displays, stating that your command has been successful.
Success Messages
For a successful omreport command, data about the component displays. When data for the component
displays, your command is successful.
The following omconfig command examples show valid CLI commands and their success messages:
Command:
omconfig chassis temps index=0 warnthresh=default
Message:
Temperature probe warning threshold value(s) set successfully.
Command:
omconfig chassis biossetup attribute=speaker setting=on
Introduction
15
Message:
BIOS setup configured successfully.
Command:
omconfig system assetinfo info=depreciation duration=6
Message:
Asset information set successfully.
Failure Messages
CLI failure messages provide reasons why some commands do not succeed. Some common reasons why
commands fail include syntax errors and components that are not present. Many error messages provide
syntax information that you can use to execute the command successfully.
If you try to execute a command for a component or feature that is not present in your system
configuration, the error message states that the component is not present.
Command:
omreport chassis currents
Example message:
Error! No current probes found on this system.
Command:
omconfig chassis volts index=3 minwarnthresh=3.3000
Example message:
Error! Number with up to 3 digits after decimal point expected, read
3.3000
The value given by the command specifies more than 3 digits after the
decimal point. A valid minimum warning threshold value for volts
contains up to 3 digits after the decimal point.
Type:
omconfig chassis volts index=3 minwarnthresh=3.300
When you enter the revised command with three decimal points, you receive another error message:
Error! This voltage probe min warning threshold must be between
11.400 and 12.480.
Revised command:
omconfig chassis volts index=3 minwarnthresh=11.500
Message:
Voltage probe warning threshold(s) set successfully.
16
Introduction
Scripting and Comparing With the CLI
The Server Administrator CLI allows administrators to write batch programs or scripts to be executed by
the operating system. For an enterprise with many systems, an administrator could write a configuration
script that specified the warning thresholds for each major component of a system and also specified a
set of actions that the administrator wants each system to take in case of a warning or failure event. In
the most critical cases, the administrator could write a script so that the system shuts down to prevent
damage. The administrator could then distribute and execute the script to many managed systems at the
same time. Such a scenario facilitates configuring any number of new systems acquired by a company
and makes implementation of new system administration policies easier across many existing systems
that require reconfiguration.
A similar scenario could be used to populate a large number of newly acquired systems with detailed asset
information. Much of the information would be the same, such as the manufacturer or lessor of the system,
whether support for the system is outsourced, name of the system's insurance company, method of
depreciation, and so on. Any variable that is common to all systems could be scripted, sent to all managed
systems, and executed. Asset information that is unique to a system could be scripted as a group and sent
to that managed node for execution. For example, a script could specify values for all unique variables
such as owner, primary user phone number, asset tag, and so on. Scripts to populate unique values would
set all unique variables at once rather than one by one through the system's command line.
In many cases, the CLI allows a user with a very well-defined task in mind to retrieve information about
the system rapidly. If a user wants to review a comprehensive summary of all system components and
save that summary information to a file for comparison with later system states, the CLI is ideal.
Using CLI commands, administrators can write batch programs or scripts to execute at specific times.
When these programs execute, they can capture reports on components of interest, such as fan RPMs
during periods of high system usage compared with the same measurements at times of lowest system
usage. Command results can be routed to a file for later analysis. Reports can help administrators gain
information that can be used to adjust usage patterns, to justify purchasing new system resources, or to
focus on the health of a problem component.
Command Syntax Overview
Commands vary in complexity. The simplest command has only command level 1. The omhelp
command is a simple command. When you type omhelp, a list of the main CLI commands is displayed.
The next level of complexity includes commands that contain command levels 1 and 2. All of the about
commands are examples of command level 2 complexity. The omconfig about and omreport about
commands cause a very brief summary to display. The summary shows version information for the
systems management software installed on your system; for example, Server Administrator 1.x.
Some commands have command level 1 and command level 2 and one name=value pair. Consider the
following example command that instructs Server Administrator for more details about the environment
for Server Administrator:
omreport about details=true
Introduction
17
Command level 1 is omreport, command level 2 is about, and the name=value pair is
details=true.
Many commands use command level 1, command level 2, and command level 3, but do not require any
parameters (name=value pairs). Most omreport commands are of this type. For example:
omreport system alertaction
causes a list of alert actions that are configured for components on your system to be displayed.
The most complex commands have all three command levels and can have multiple name=value
pairs. An example of two name=value pairs:
omconfig system assetinfo info=depreciation duration=3
An example of nine name=value pairs:
omconfig system assetinfo info=acquisition
purchasecost=<n> waybill=<n> installdate=<mmddyy> purchasedate=
<mmddyy> ponum=<n> signauth=<text>
expensed=<yes | no> costcenter=<text>
In each section, command syntax and other information about commands is formatted with any of the
following fields that apply:
command level 1
18
Introduction
command level 2
command level 3 name=value pair 1
name=value pair 2
omhelp: Getting Help With CLI Commands
The omhelp command and its equivalent, <command> -?, accesses the CLI's detailed help text
interface. You can get help at several levels of detail.
Each fully qualified CLI command may have a variable number of distinct parts: the command
(command level 1), one or more subcommands (command level 2 and command level 3, if present),
and one or more name=value pair(s).
By appending -? (space-dash-question mark) to any command, you can get help on the command.
Example Help Commands
When you type omconfig -?, you get general help about the omconfig command. The help at
this level lists the available subcommands for omconfig:
•
about
•
preferences
•
chassis
•
system
When you type omconfig system -?, CLI help lists all of the subcommands that are available
for omconfig system:
•
alertaction
•
alertlog
•
assetinfo
•
cmdlog
•
esmlog
•
events
•
recovery
•
shutdown
•
thrmshutdown
•
webserver
Figure 2-1 shows the levels of help for a command.
omhelp: Getting Help With CLI Commands
19
Figure 2-1. Different Levels of Help for a Command
You can also parse the omconfig system assetinfo command as follows:
<command level 1 command level 2 command level 3> <name=value pair 1>
[name=value pair 2]
where command levels 1, 2, and 3 are represented by omconfig system assetinfo, name=value pair 1 is
represented by info=depreciation, and name=value pair 2 is represented by method=straightline.
To set your depreciation method to straight line, type:
omconfig system assetinfo info=depreciation method=straightline
The CLI responds with the following message:
Asset information set successfully.
When you type omconfig system assetinfo -?, the help that displays provides information
about assigning values for the name and option fields. Partial results for the request omconfig system
assetinfo -? are as follows:
assetinfo
Set asset information.
For one info value, specify one or more optional parameter(s). Table 2-1 displays the optional parameters
for info=acquisition:
Table 2-1.
20
Optional Parameters
Info Value
Optional parameters
Info=acquisition
purchasecost=<num>
waybill=<num>
installdate=<mmddyy>
purchasedate=<mmddyy>
ponum=<num>
signauth=<text>
expensed=<yes|no>
costcenter=<text>
info=depreciation
method=<text>
duration=<num>
percent=<percent>
unit=<months|years|unknown>
omhelp: Getting Help With CLI Commands
omreport: Viewing System Status Using
the Instrumentation Service
The omreport command allows you to see detailed information about your system components.
You can retrieve summaries for many system components at one time, or you can get details about a
specific component. This chapter shows you how to get reports with the level of detail that you want.
Commands documented in this chapter vary in whether they define the fields that appear in the results of a
particular omreport command. Fields are defined only if they have a special or less familiar use.
As with all other components, you can use omreport to view component status, and omconfig to
manage a component. For information on how to configure components for management,
see "omconfig: Managing Components Using the Instrumentation Service."
Often you can use omreport commands to get information you need to execute an omconfig
command. For example, if you want to edit the minimum temperature for a warning event on a
temperature probe, you need to know the index of the probe you want to configure. You can use
omreport chassis temps to display a list of probes and their indexes.
Conventions for Parameter Tables
When listing the parameters that a command can take, the parameters are listed in alphabetical
order instead of the order in which they appear in the command line interface.
The symbol |, often called pipe, is the logical exclusive or operator. For example, enable | disable
means that you can enable or disable the component or feature, but you cannot simultaneously
enable and disable the component or feature.
omreport Command Summary
NOTE: Although this chapter lists all possible omreport commands, the commands available on your system
depend on your system configuration. The results that display for the omreport command vary from one
system to another. Data displays for installed components only.
NOTE: When a system includes an external chassis, the displayed results vary by operating system.
On SUSE® Linux Enterprise Server and Red Hat® Enterprise Linux® systems, omreport commands display
external chassis information in a separate section after the main chassis information. On Microsoft®
Windows® systems, data about the external chassis does not appear in omreport output.
omreport: Viewing System Status Using the Instrumentation Service
21
Table 3-1 is a high-level summary of the omreport command. The column titled "Command level 1"
shows the omreport command at its most general. "Command level 2" shows the major objects or
components that you can view using omreport (about, chassis, storage, system, and rac). "Command
level 3" lists the specific objects and components for which you can view reports. "User privilege required"
refers to the type of privilege you need to perform the command, where U=User, P=Power User, and
A=Administrator. "Use" is a very general statement about the actions that can be performed using
omreport. More details about syntax and use of the command appear later in this section.
Table 3-1 shows the omreport commands available for about, system, and main system chassis.
For information about viewing storage components, see "omreport: Viewing System Status Using
the Instrumentation Service."
Table 3-1.
Command
level 1
omreport Command Level 1, Level 2, and Level 3
Command Command
level 2
level 3
User
privilege
required
Use
about
U, P, A
Shows version number and properties for the
Server Administrator program.
U, P, A
Displays information for all of the Server
Administrator programs that are installed.
U, P, A
Shows a general status for all main components.
acswitch
U, P, A
Shows failover settings where redundant AC
power lines are supported in a system.
batteries
U, P, A
Shows properties set for batteries.
bios
U, P, A
Shows BIOS facts such as manufacturer, version,
and date last updated.
biossetup
A
Shows BIOS setup properties configured during
system boot.
bmc
U, P, A
omreport
details=true
chassis
Shows general information on remoteaccess.
NOTE: This subcommand will be phased-out in
future releases. It will be replaced by the
subcommand remoteaccess.
22
currents
U, P, A
Shows the status and thresholds for the system
current sensors.
fancontrol
U, P, A
Shows properties set for fan speed.
fans
U, P, A
Shows status and thresholds for system fans.
firmware
U, P, A
Shows firmware properties such as version, date
of last update, and whether the firmware
is updatable.
omreport: Viewing System Status Using the Instrumentation Service
Table 3-1.
Command
level 1
omreport Command Level 1, Level 2, and Level 3 (continued)
Command Command
level 2
level 3
User
privilege
required
Use
frontpanel
U, P, A
Shows whether the front panel button settings,
such as for the Power button and/or Nonmasking
Interrupt (NMI) button (if present on the
system), are enabled or disabled.
fru
U, P, A
Shows the Field Replaceable Unit (FRU)
information.
info
U, P, A
Shows a status summary for main system chassis
components.
intrusion
U, P, A
Shows the status of the system’s intrusion
sensor(s).
leds
U, P, A
Shows the properties you have set for LEDs to
flash under various alert conditions.
memory
U, P, A
Shows properties of your system's memory arrays.
nics
U, P, A
Shows number of NICs installed in your system,
NIC vendor, NIC description, IP address, and
connection status.
ports
U, P, A
Shows properties for your system’s parallel and
serial ports, such as I/O address, IRQ level,
connector type, and maximum speed.
processors
U, P, A
Shows properties of your system’s processors,
including speed, manufacturer, and
processor family.
pwrsupplies
U, P, A
Shows properties of power supplies.
remoteaccess
U, P, A
Shows general information on remote access.
slots
U, P, A
Shows properties of your system’s expansion slots
and other slot types.
temps
U, P, A
Shows the status and thresholds for the system
temperature sensors.
volts
U, P, A
Shows the status and thresholds for the system
voltage sensors.
storage
U, P, A
See "Using the Storage Management Service."
system
U, P, A
Shows a high-level summary of system
components.
omreport: Viewing System Status Using the Instrumentation Service
23
Table 3-1.
Command
level 1
omreport Command Level 1, Level 2, and Level 3 (continued)
Command Command
level 2
level 3
rac
24
User
privilege
required
Use
alertaction
U, P, A
Shows warning and failure threshold values, as
well as actions that have been configured when
an essential component detects a warning or
failure state.
alertlog
U, P, A
Allows the administrator to show the alert log.
assetinfo
U, P, A
Shows cost of ownership information for
your system.
cmdlog
U, P, A
Allows the administrator to show the
command log.
esmlog
U, P, A
Allows the administrator to show the
hardware log.
events
U, P, A
Shows the system’s Simple Network
Management Protocol (SNMP) event settings.
operatingsystem U, P, A
Shows the name and version of your
operating system.
pedestinations
U, P, A
Shows destinations where alerts for platform
events are configured to be sent.
platformevents
U, P, A
Shows the system’s response for each listed
platform event.
recovery
P, A
Shows how your system is configured to respond
to a hung operating system.
shutdown
P, A
Shows how the shutdown action is to be
performed.
summary
U, P, A
Shows key facts for all system components,
including main system chassis, software, and
storage.
thrmshutdown
P, A
Shows what shutdown action, if any, is to be
taken when a temperature warning or failure
condition is detected.
version
U, P, A
Shows a summary for all updatable components
on your system.
U, P, A
See "omreport rac: Viewing Remote Access
Controller Components."
omreport: Viewing System Status Using the Instrumentation Service
Help With the omreport Command
Use the omreport -? command to get a list of the available commands for omreport.
Use omreport <command level 2> -? to get help on the level 2 commands about, chassis, and system.
The following information on omreport system -? applies equally to getting help for the omreport chassis
command.
To see a list of valid commands for omreport system, type:
omreport system -? | more
omreport about
Use the omreport about command to learn the product name and version number of the systems
management application installed on your system. The following is an example output from the
omreport about command:
Product name
Version
Copyright
Company
:
:
:
:
Dell OpenManage Server Administrator
5.x.x
Copyright (C) Dell Inc. 1995-2006. All rights reserved.
Dell Inc.
For even more details about the environment for Server Administrator, type:
omreport about details=true
Server Administrator includes a number of services, each of which has a version number of its own.
The Contains field reports version numbers for the services as well as other useful details. The output
below is an example, and can change depending on your configuration and the version of Server
Administrator that is installed on your system:
Contains:
Instrumentation Service 5.x.x
Storage Management Service 3.x.x
Sun JRE - OEM Installed Version 3.x.x
Secure Port Server 1.x.x
Core Service 1.x.x
Instrumentation Service Integration Layer 1.x.x
Storage Management Service Integration Layer 1.x.x
Server Administrator 5.x.x
omreport: Viewing System Status Using the Instrumentation Service
25
omreport chassis Commands
Use omreport chassis commands to view details for the entire chassis or for a particular component.
omreport chassis
When you type:
omreport chassis
Server Administrator displays a general status for your main system chassis components.
NOTE: When you issue CLI commands to a server module in a modular system, chassis refers only to the server module.
NOTE: As with all output shown in this guide, the following output is an example and may vary depending on your
system configuration.
SEVERITY
: COMPONENT
Ok
: Fans
Critical
: Intrusion
Ok
: Memory
Ok
: Power Supplies
Ok
: Temperatures
Ok
: Voltages
omreport chassis acswitch
Use the omreport chassis acswitch command if your system has redundant AC power lines that are
configured in a failover arrangement. When you type:
omreport chassis acswitch
Server Administrator displays the following output:
AC Failover Switch
AC Switch Redundancy
26
Redundancy Status
: Full
Number of devices required for full
redundancy
: 2
Redundancy Mode
:
Redundancy Configuration
: Input Source Line 1, upon
redundancy restoration, return
to Line 1
omreport: Viewing System Status Using the Instrumentation Service
AC Power Lines
Status
: Ok
Location
: AC Power Line 1
AC Present
: Power Present
Active Source
: Active
Status
: Ok
Location
: AC Power Line 2
AC Present
: Power Present
Active Source
: Not Active
Server Administrator reports values for the Redundancy Status and Redundancy Mode fields.
omreport chassis batteries
Use the omreport chassis batteries command to view battery properties.
omreport chassis bios
Use the omreport chassis bios command to view current BIOS information. When you type:
omreport chassis bios
Server Administrator displays a summary of your system’s BIOS information.
omreport chassis biossetup
Use the omreport chassis biossetup command to view BIOS setup parameters that are normally available
only during system boot.
Type:
omreport chassis biossetup
Table 3-2 displays the BIOS setup parameters that are available:
NOTE: Not all the parameters are displayed. Only those BIOS setup properties that are configured during system
boot are displayed.
omreport: Viewing System Status Using the Instrumentation Service
27
Table 3-2.
BIOS Setup Parameters
Parameters
Description
Bezel
Displays whether the bezel removal intrusion check during system
reboot is enabled or disabled.
Bootsequence
Displays the device that is used to boot the system.
Console Redirection
Displays if the BIOS screen is redirected over a particular serial port
or if it is turned off.
Console Redirection After Boot
Displays whether console redirection after system reboot is enabled
or disabled.
Diskette
Displays whether the diskette is disabled, auto enabled, or read only.
Demand Based Power
Management (DBS)
Displays whether DBS is enabled or disabled on the system.
Dual NIC
Displays whether NIC 1 and NIC 2 with PXE is enabled or disabled.
External Serial Connector
Displays whether the external serial connector is mapped to COM
port 1 or COM port 2 or a Remote Access Device.
Console Redirection Failsafe Baud Displays the setting for console redirection failsafe baud rate.
Rate
28
IDE
Displays whether the drive is enabled or disabled.
IDE Primary Drive 0
Displays whether the device is automatically detected and enabled
or if the device is disabled.
IDE Primary Drive 1
Displays whether the device is automatically detected and enabled
or if the device is disabled.
Intrusion
Displays whether the intrusion check is enabled or disabled during
system boot.
Mouse
Displays whether the mouse is enabled or disabled.
NIC 1
Displays whether the first NIC is enabled (with or without PXE) or
disabled during system boot.
NIC 2
Displays whether the second NIC is enabled (with or without PXE)
or disabled during system boot.
Numlock
Displays whether the keypad can be used as number keys.
Parallel port address
Displays whether the address is located on LPT1, LPT2, and LPT3,
or if it is disabled.
Parallel port mode
Displays the setting associated with the parallel port.
Primary SCSI
Displays whether the device is on or off.
RAID on motherboard
Displays whether RAID-on-motherboard is detected as a RAID
device, a SCSI device, or if the device is disabled during system boot.
omreport: Viewing System Status Using the Instrumentation Service
Table 3-2.
BIOS Setup Parameters (continued)
Parameters
Description
RAID Channel A
Displays whether RAID-on-motherboard Channel A is detected as a
RAID device or a SCSI device.
RAID Channel B
Displays whether RAID-on-motherboard Channel B is detected as a
RAID device or a SCSI device.
SATA
Displays whether the onboard SATA controller is set to ATA mode,
RAID mode, or is disabled.
SATA port
Displays if the SATA port is enabled or disabled.
Secondary SCSI
Displays whether the device is enabled or disabled.
Serial Communications
Displays whether COM port 1 and COM port 2 are enabled or
disabled with or without console redirection.
Serial Port 1
Displays whether serial port 1 is mapped to a COM port, a
COM port 1, a COM port 3, a COM1 BMC, a BMC Serial, a BMC
NIC, a BMC RAC, or is disabled.
Serial Port 2
Displays whether serial port 2 is mapped to a COM port, a
COM port 2, a COM port 4, or is disabled.
Speaker
Displays whether the speaker is on or off.
USB or USBB
Displays whether the USB port is enabled or disabled.
User accessible USB
Displays whether the user-accessible USB port is enabled or disabled.
omreport chassis bmc
NOTE: This command will be phased-out in future releases. It will be replaced by the command omreport chassis
remoteaccess.
Use the omreport chassis bmc command to view baseboard management controller (BMC)
general information.
Type:
omreport chassis bmc
The output from the omreport chassis bmc command lists each of the valid parameters. Table 3-3 shows
the available settings.
omreport: Viewing System Status Using the Instrumentation Service
29
Table 3-3.
omreport chassis bmc
name=value pair
Description
config=advsol
Reports advanced BMC information on a serial over local area network (LAN) connection.
config=nic
Reports BMC information for the LAN.
config=serial
Reports serial port information for BMC.
config=serialoverlan
Reports BMC information on a serial over LAN connection.
config=terminalmode
Reports terminal mode settings for the serial port.
config=user
Reports information on BMC users.
omreport chassis currents
Use the omreport chassis currents command to view current (amperage) probe status and settings.
When you type:
omreport chassis currents index=n
the index parameter is optional. If you do not specify the index, Server Administrator displays a
summary of status, readings, and thresholds set for all current probes present on your system. If you
specify the index, Server Administrator displays a summary for a specific current probe.
omreport chassis fans
Use the omreport chassis fans command to view fan probe status and settings. When you type:
omreport chassis fans index=n
the index parameter is optional. If you do not specify the index, Server Administrator displays a
summary of status, readings, and thresholds set for any fan probes that might be present on your system.
If you specify the index, Server Administrator displays a summary for a specific fan probe.
omreport chassis fancontrol
Use the omreport chassis fancontrol command to see how fan speed is set on your system. Fan speed can
be set to optimize speed for cooling or for quiet operation. Table 3-4 shows the available settings.
Table 3-4.
30
Fan Control Settings
name=value pair
Description
speed=quiet
Set fan speed for quiet operation.
speed=maxcool
Set fan speed for maximum cooling.
omreport: Viewing System Status Using the Instrumentation Service
omreport chassis firmware
Use the omreport chassis firmware command to view current firmware properties. When you type:
omreport chassis firmware
Server Administrator displays a summary of your system’s firmware properties.
omreport chassis frontpanel
Use the omreport chassis frontpanel command to view whether the front panel button control settings,
such as for the Power button and/or Nonmasking Interrupt (NMI) button (if present on the system), are
enabled or disabled.
If the Power button override is present on your system, you can see whether the Power button override is
enabled or not. If enabled, the Power button turns the power to the system On and Off.
If the NMI button is present on your system, you can see whether the NMI button is enabled or not.
The NMI button can be used to troubleshoot software and device errors when using certain
operating systems.
omreport chassis fru
Use the omreport chassis fru command to view the Field Replaceable Unit (FRU) information.
When you type:
omreport chassis fru
Server Administrator displays a summary of your system’s FRU information. This information is
available through the Server Administrator GUI, SNMP, and Common Information Model and is
primarily used to support troubleshooting activities.
omreport chassis info
Use the omreport chassis info command to see a summary of installed component versions.
When you type:
omreport chassis info index=n
the index parameter specifies a chassis number and is optional. If you do not specify the index, Server
Administrator displays summary chassis information for each chassis. If you specify the index, Server
Administrator displays summary information for a specific chassis.
omreport: Viewing System Status Using the Instrumentation Service
31
Depending on your configuration, output may resemble the following example:
Index
: 0
Chassis Name
: Main System Chassis
Host Name
: everglades
Baseboard Management Controller Version
: 1.80
Primary Backplane Version
: 1.01
Sensor Data Record Version
: SDR Version 0.33
Chassis Model
: PowerEdge 1750
Chassis Lock
: Present
Chassis Service Tag
: 8RLNB1S
Chassis Asset Tag
:
Flash chassis indentify LED state
: Off
Flash chassis indentify LED timeout value
: 300
If you run this command on a PowerEdge 1655MC system, the following additional information displays:
•
Server Module Service Tag — The service tag of the server module that you are currently logged into.
(The Chassis Service Tag field indicates the service tag of your PowerEdge 1655MC system chassis.)
•
Server Module Asset Tag — The asset tag of the server module that you are currently logged into.
•
Server Module Location — A number assigned to the server module that indicates its position in the
PowerEdge 1655MC system chassis.
omreport chassis intrusion
Use the omreport chassis intrusion command to find out whether the cover of your system is open or
not. Server Administrator tracks chassis intrusion events because intrusions may indicate an attempt to
steal a system component, or to perform unauthorized maintenance on the system. Type:
omreport chassis intrusion
A message that resembles the following may display:
32
Status
: Ok
Probe Name
: Main chassis intrusion
State
: Chassis is closed
omreport: Viewing System Status Using the Instrumentation Service
omreport chassis leds
Use the omreport chassis leds command to find out whether clear hard drive fault is supported and what
severity level lights up the LED. Type:
omreport chassis leds index=n
The index parameter is optional. If you do not specify the index, Server Administrator displays a
summary of LED information for chassis 0. If you specify the index, Server Administrator displays a
summary for a specific chassis.
The following is an example output:
Flash chassis indentify LED state : Off
Flash chassis indentify LED
timeout value
: 300
omreport chassis memory
Use omreport chassis memory to see details for each memory module slot in your system. If your system
supports redundant memory, this command also displays the status, state, and type of memory
redundancy implemented on your system. Type:
omreport chassis memory index=n
The index parameter is optional. If you do not specify the index, Server Administrator displays
information for all memory on your system. If you specify the index, Server Administrator displays a
summary for a specific memory module.
Output for an occupied memory slot may resemble the following:
Index
Status
Connector Name
Type
Size
:
:
:
:
:
1
OK
DIMM_B
SDRAM-SYNCHRONOUS
256 MB
An unoccupied memory slot still has a connector name. Output for an unoccupied memory slot may
resemble the following:
Index
Status
Connector Name
Type
Size
:
:
:
:
:
2
Unknown
DIMM_D
Not Occupied
Unknown
omreport: Viewing System Status Using the Instrumentation Service
33
If your system supports redundant memory, the redundancy output may resemble the following:
Memory Redundancy
Redundancy Status
Fail Over State
Redundancy Configuration
Attributes
Memory Array 1
Attributes
Memory Array 1
Attributes
Memory Array 1
Attributes
Memory Array 1
Attributes
Memory Array 1
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
Full
Inactive
SpareBank
Location
Proprietary Add-on Card
Use
Unknown
Installed Capacity
1536 MB
Maximum Capacity
12288 MB
Slots Available
12
omreport chassis nics
Use the omreport chassis nics command to view NIC properties. Type:
omreport chassis nics index=n
The index parameter is optional. If you do not specify the index, Server Administrator displays
properties about all NICS on your system. If you specify the index, Server Administrator displays
properties for a specific NIC.
Values display for the following fields: Index (number of the NIC card), IP address, Vendor, Description,
and Connection Status.
omreport chassis ports
Use the omreport chassis ports command to view properties of your system’s parallel and serial ports.
Values display for the following fields: Port Type, External Name, Base I/O Address, IRQ Level,
Connector Type, and Maximum Speed.
Port Type is the detailed type of each system port, from the more general serial, parallel, and USB ports to
the names of ports by device type connected to it, for example, pointing device or keyboard.
External Name is the name of the port, such as serial or parallel, USB, mouse, keyboard, and so on.
Base I/O Address is the starting I/O address expressed in hexidecimal.
IRQ Level is a hardware interrupt on a system. The hardware interrupt signals the system's CPU that an
event has started or ended in a peripheral component such as a modem or printer. When communicated
over a peripheral component interconnect card, the IRQ level is a standard way to identify the type of
device that is sending the interrupt request.
34
omreport: Viewing System Status Using the Instrumentation Service
Connector Type refers to the type of plug or cable and plug that connects two devices together, in this
case, the type of connector that attaches an external device to a system. There are many connector types,
each designed to connect a different device type to a system. Examples include DB-9 Male, AT, Access
Bus, PS/2, and so on.
Maximum Speed is the port speed. Port speed refers to the data transmission rate of an input/output
channel, measured in numbers of bits per second. Serial ports usually have a maximum speed of
115 Kbps and USB version 1.x ports have a maximum speed of 12 Kbps.
omreport chassis processors
Use the omreport chassis processors command to view properties of your system’s processors.
Values display for the following fields: Connector Name, Manufacturer, Processor Family, Processor
Version, Current Speed, External Clock Speed, and State.
Connector Name refers to the name or number of the device that occupies the processor slot in the system.
Manufacturer is the business entity that sells the processor.
Processor Family refers to the type of processor made by a manufacturer such as Intel® Itanium® or
Pentium® III or AMD Opteron™.
Processor Version refers to the model and stepping number of the processor.
Current Speed is the actual processor speed in MHz at system boot time.
External Clock Speed is the speed of the processor's external clock in MHz.
State refers to whether the processor slot is enabled or disabled.
Core Count refers to the number of processors integrated onto one chip.
Capabilities and Cache Properties for a Specific Processor
To learn the cache properties for a processor on a given connector, type:
omreport chassis processors index=n
The index parameter is optional. If you do not specify the index, Server Administrator displays
properties for all processors. If you specify the index, Server Administrator displays properties for a
specific processor.
The following fields are defined for the capabilities present on a particular microprocessor:
For Intel Processor
•
64-bit Support
•
Hyperthreading (HT)
•
Virtualization Technology (VT)
•
Demand-Based Switching (DBS)
•
Execute Disable (XD)
omreport: Viewing System Status Using the Instrumentation Service
35
For AMD™ Processor
•
64-bit Support
•
AMD-V™
•
AMD PowerNow!™
•
No Execute (NX)
The following fields are defined for a cache present on a particular microprocessor. If the cache is internal
to the processor, the fields do not appear in the cache report:
•
Speed
•
Cache Device Supported Type
•
Cache Device Current Type
•
External Socket Name
Fields Reported for Each Cache on a Particular Processor
Status reports whether a specific cache on the processor is enabled or disabled.
Level refers to primary or secondary cache. Primary-level cache is a memory bank built into the processor.
Secondary-level cache is a staging area that feeds the primary cache. A secondary-level cache may be built
into the processor or reside in a memory chip set outside the processor. The internal processor cache is
referred to as a Level 1 (or L1). L2 cache is the external cache in a system with an Intel Pentium
processor, and it is the second level of cache that is accessed. The names L1 and L2 are not indicative of
where the cache is physically located (internal or external), but describe which cache is accessed first
(L1, therefore internal).
Speed refers to the rate that the cache can forward data from main memory to the processor.
Max Size is the maximum amount of memory that the cache can hold in KB.
Installed Size is the actual size of the cache.
Type indicates whether the cache is primary or secondary.
Location is the location of the cache on the processor or on a chip set outside the processor.
A Write Policy describes how the cache deals with a write cycle. In a write-back policy, the cache acts like
a buffer. When the processor starts a write cycle the cache receives the data and stops the cycle.
The cache then writes the data back to main memory when the system bus is available.
In a write-through policy, the processor writes through the cache to main memory. The write cycle does
not complete until the data is stored into main memory.
Associativity refers to the way main memory content is stored on the cache.
36
•
A fully associative cache allows any line in main memory to be stored at any location in the cache.
•
A 4-way set-associative cache directly maps four specific lines of memory to the same four lines of cache.
•
A 3-way set-associative cache directly maps three specific lines of memory to the same three lines of cache.
omreport: Viewing System Status Using the Instrumentation Service
•
A 2-way set-associative cache directly maps two specific lines of memory to the same two lines of cache.
•
A 1-way set-associative cache directly maps a specific line of memory in the same line of cache.
For example, line 0 of any page in memory must be stored in line 0 of cache memory.
Cache Device Supported Type is the type of static random access memory (SRAM) that the device
can support.
Cache Device Current Type is the type of the currently installed SRAM that the cache is supporting.
External Socket Name Silk Screen Name is the name printed on the system board next to the socket.
Error Correction Type identifies the type of error checking and correction (ECC) that this memory can
perform. Examples are correctable ECC or uncorrectable ECC.
This report shows cache information for each cache present on the microprocessor.
omreport chassis pwrsupplies
Use the omreport chassis pwrsupplies command to view properties of your system’s power supplies.
Type:
omreport chassis pwrsupplies index=n
The index parameter is optional. If you do not specify the index, Server Administrator displays
properties for all power supplies in your system. If you specify the index, Server Administrator displays
properties for a specific processor.
For each power supply in the system, values display for the following fields: Status, Location, Type,
Max Wattage, and Online Status.
omreport chassis remoteaccess
NOTE: This command is applicable to Dell™ PowerEdge x8xx and x9xx systems only.
Use the omreport chassis remoteaccess command to view general information on baseboard
management controller (BMC) and remote access control (RAC) if DRAC is installed.
Type:
omreport chassis remoteaccess
The output from the omreport chassis remoteaccess command lists each of the valid parameters.
Table 3-5 shows the available settings.
omreport: Viewing System Status Using the Instrumentation Service
37
Table 3-5.
omreport chassis remoteaccess
name=value pair
Description
config=advsol
Reports advanced BMC or RAC information on a serial over local area
network (LAN) connection.
config=nic
Reports BMC or RAC information for the LAN.
config=serial
Reports serial port information for BMC or RAC.
config=serialoverlan
Reports BMC or RAC information on a serial over LAN connection.
config=terminalmode
Reports terminal mode settings for the serial port.
config=user
Reports information on BMC or RAC users.
omreport chassis slots
Use the omreport chassis slots command to view properties of your system’s slots.
Type:
omreport chassis slots index=n
The index parameter is optional. If you do not specify the index, Server Administrator displays
properties for all of the slots in your system. If you specify the index, Server Administrator displays
properties for a specific slot.
For each slot in the system, values display for the following fields: Index, Slot ID, Adapter, and
Data Bus Width.
Index is the number of the slot in the system.
Slot ID is the silk screen name printed on your system's motherboard next to the slot. Alphanumeric text
uniquely identifies each slot in the system.
Adapter refers to the name and or type of the card that fits into the slot, for example, a storage array
controller, SCSI adapter, or HBA.
Data bus width is the width, in bits, of the information pathway between the components of a system.
Data bus width range is 16 to 64 bits.
omreport chassis temps
Use the omreport chassis temps command to view properties of your system’s temperature probes.
When you type:
omreport chassis temps index=n
The index parameter is optional. If you do not specify the index, Server Administrator displays a
summary of status, readings, and thresholds set for any temperature probes that might be present on
your system. If you specify the index, Server Administrator displays a summary for a specific
temperature probe.
38
omreport: Viewing System Status Using the Instrumentation Service
omreport chassis volts
Use the omreport chassis volts command to view properties of your system’s voltage probes.
When you type:
omreport chassis volts index=n
The index parameter is optional. If you do not specify the index, Server Administrator displays a summary
of status, readings, and thresholds set for any voltage probes that might be present on your system. If you
specify the index, Server Administrator displays a summary for a specific voltage probe.
omreport system Commands
Use the omreport system commands to view logs, to see how shutdown actions are configured, and to
view threshold values, cost of ownership information, and information about how recovery actions
are configured.
omreport system
Use the omreport system command to see a general status for your system components. When you
specify a level 3 command, such as omreport system shutdown, you can get detailed information for one
system component rather than the high level status that you get with omreport system.
Type:
omreport system
If your system has both a main system chassis and at least one direct attached storage device,
Server Administrator may display a summary that resembles the following example.
NOTE: As with all output shown in this guide, the following output is an example and may vary depending on your
system configuration.
SEVERITY
: COMPONENT
Ok
: Main System Chassis
Critical
: Storage
Commands for Viewing Logs
You can use the omreport system command to view logs: the alert log, the command log, and the
hardware or ESM log.
NOTE: If the Alert log or Command log displays invalid XML data (such as when XML data generated for the
selection is not well-formed), clearing the log by typing "omconfig system alertlog action=clear" or "omconfig
system cmdlog action=clear" resolves the issue. If you need to retain the log information for future reference, you
should save a copy of the log before clearing the log. See "Commands for Clearing Logs" for more information about
clearing logs.
omreport: Viewing System Status Using the Instrumentation Service
39
To view the contents of the alert log, type:
omreport system alertlog
To view the contents of the command log, type:
omreport system cmdlog
To view the contents of the ESM log, type:
omreport system esmlog
ESM Log Overall Health Status
When you type omreport system esmlog, the Embedded Systems Management (ESM) report
displays. The first line of the report reflects the overall health of the system hardware. For example,
Health: OK means that less than 80 percent of the space allotted for the esmlog is occupied with
messages. If 80 percent or more of the allotted space for the esmlog is occupied, the following
caution appears:
Health: Non-Critical
If a caution appears, resolve all warning and critical severity conditions, and then clear the log.
omreport system alertaction
Use the omreport system alertaction command to see a summary of alert actions that have been
configured for warning and failure events on your system components. Alert actions determine how
Server Administrator responds when a component has a warning or failure event.
The omreport system alertaction command is useful for viewing which alert actions have been specified
for components. To set an alert action for a component, you must use the omconfig system alertaction
command. See "omconfig: Managing Components Using the Instrumentation Service."
Components and Events for Which You Can View Alert Actions
You can view alert action properties for the following components and events, if the components/events
are present on the system:
40
•
battery warning
•
battery failure
•
chassis intrusion
•
current probe warning
•
current probe failure
•
fan warning
•
fan failure
•
memory pre-failure
•
memory failure
omreport: Viewing System Status Using the Instrumentation Service
•
power supply warning
•
power supply failure
•
degraded redundancy
•
lost redundancy
•
temperature warning
•
temperature failure
•
voltage warning
•
voltage failure
•
processor warning
•
processor failure
•
hardware log warning
•
hardware log full
•
watchdog ASR
omreport system assetinfo
Use the omreport system assetinfo command to see cost of ownership data for the system, such as
acquisition, depreciation, and warranty information. To set any of these fields, you must use the
omconfig system assetinfo command. See "omconfig: Managing Components Using the
Instrumentation Service."
omreport system events
Use the omreport system events command to view the current enabled or disabled SNMP traps.
This command displays a summary of each component in your system for which events can be
generated. For each component, the report shows which severities are set to be reported and which
severities are set not to be reported. The following is an example output for a few components:
omreport system events
Current SNMP Trap Configuration
----------System
----------Settings
Enable: Informational, Warning and Critical
Disable: None
omreport: Viewing System Status Using the Instrumentation Service
41
--------------Power Supplies
---------------Settings
Enable: Informational, Warning and Critical
Disable: None
----------Fans
----------Settings
Enable: Critical
Disable: Informational and Warning
The full report lists the settings for all components in your system for which events can be generated.
To view the status for components of a specific type, use the omreport system events type=<component
name> command. This command displays a summary of each component in your system for which
events can be generated. Table 3-6 shows the events displayed for various component types.
NOTE: Some component types may be unavailable on your system.
Table 3-6.
42
System Events by Component Type
name=value pair
Description
type=accords
Reports events for AC power cords.
type=battery
Reports events for batteries
type=currents
Reports events for fan amperage probes.
type=fanenclosures
Reports events for fan enclosures.
type=fans
Reports events for fans.
type=intrusion
Reports events for chassis intrusion.
type=log
Reports events for logs.
type=memory
Reports events for memory.
type=powersupplies
Reports events for power supplies.
type=redundancy
Reports events for redundancy.
type=temps
Reports events for temperatures.
type=volts
Reports events for voltages.
omreport: Viewing System Status Using the Instrumentation Service
Example Command for Event Type
When you type:
omreport system events type=fans
The following is an example output:
----------Fans
----------Settings
Enable: Critical
Disable: Informational and Warning
omreport system operatingsystem
Use the omreport system operatingsystem command to display operating system information.
omreport system pedestinations
Use the omreport system pedestinations command to view destinations where alerts for platform events
are configured to be sent. Depending on the number of destinations displayed, you can configure a
separate IP address for each destination address.
Type:
omreport system pedestinations
The output from the omreport system pedestinations command lists each of the valid parameters.
NOTE: The actual number of destinations that can be configured on your system may differ.
Table 3-7 shows the available settings.
Table 3-7.
omreport system pedestinations
Output
Attributes
Description
Destination List
Destination Number: Destination1
destination 1: Displays the first
destination.
Destination IP Address: 101.102.103.104
101.102.103.104: IP address of the first
destination.
Destination Number: Destination 2
destination 2: Displays the second
Destination IP Address: 110.120.130.140 destination.
110.120.130.140: IP address of the
second destination.
omreport: Viewing System Status Using the Instrumentation Service
43
Table 3-7.
omreport system pedestinations (continued)
Output
Attributes
Description
Destination Number: Destination 3
destination 3: Displays the third
Destination IP Address: 201.202.203.204 destination.
201:202:203:204: IP address of the third
destination.
Destination Number: Destination 4
destination 4: Displays the fourth
Destination IP Address: 210.211.212.213 destination.
210.211.212.213: IP address of the fourth
destination.
Destination
Configuration
Settings
attribute=communitystring
communitystring: Displays the text
string that acts as a password and is used
to authenticate SNMP messages sent
between the baseboard management
controller (BMC) and the destination
management station.
omreport system platformevents
Use the omreport system platformevents command to view how the system responds for each listed
platform event.
omreport system recovery
Use the omreport system recovery command to see whether there is an action configured for a hung
operating system. You can also view the number of seconds that must elapse before an operating system
is considered to be hung.
omreport system shutdown
Use the omreport system shutdown command to view any pending shutdown actions for your system.
If properties for shutdown are configured, executing this command displays them.
omreport system summary
Use the omreport system summary command to view a comprehensive summary of software and
hardware components currently installed on your system.
44
omreport: Viewing System Status Using the Instrumentation Service
Example Command Output
When you type:
omreport system summary
the output that appears in your CLI window depends on the systems management software, operating
system, and hardware components and options that are installed on your system. The following partial
command results are unique and may not resemble the results for your system’s hardware and
software configuration:
System Summary
-----------------Software Profile
-----------------System Management
Name
: Dell OpenManage Server Administrator
Version
: 5.x.x
Description
: Systems Management Software
Contains:
: Instrumentation Service 5.x.x
: Storage Management Service 3.x.x
: Sun JRE - OEM Installed Version 3.x.x
: Secure Port Server 1.x.x
: Dell OpenManage Core Service 1.x.x
: Instrumentation Service Integration Layer 1.x.x
: Storage Management Service Integration Layer 1.x.x
Operating System
Name
: Microsoft Windows 2000 Server
Version
: Service Pack 3 (Build 2XXX)
System Time
: Fri Sep 20 18:02:52 2XXX
System Bootup Time
: Wed Sep 18 18:37:58 2XXX
omreport: Viewing System Status Using the Instrumentation Service
45
The system summary hardware information includes data values for installed components of the
following types that are present in your system:
System Attributes
•
Host name
•
System location
Main System Chassis
Chassis
•
Chassis model
•
Chassis service tag
•
Chassis lock
•
Chassis asset tag
If you run this command on a PowerEdge 1655MC system, the following additional information displays:
•
Server Module Service Tag — The service tag of the server module that you are currently logged into.
(The Chassis Service Tag field indicates the service tag of your PowerEdge 1655MC system chassis.)
•
Server Module Asset Tag — The asset tag of the server module that you are currently logged into.
•
Server Module Location — A number assigned to the server module that indicates its position in the
PowerEdge 1655MC system chassis.
Processor
The following are listed for each processor in the system:
•
Processor manufacturer
•
Processor family
•
Processor version
•
Current speed
•
Maximum speed
•
External clock speed
•
Voltage
Memory
46
•
Total installed capacity
•
Memory available to the operating system
•
Total maximum capacity
•
Memory array count
omreport: Viewing System Status Using the Instrumentation Service
Memory Array
The following details are listed for each memory board or module in the system (for example, the system
board or the memory module in a given slot number):
•
Location
•
Use
•
Installed capacity
•
Maximum capacity
•
Slots available
•
Slots used
•
ECC type
BIOS
•
Manufacturer
•
BIOS version
•
Release date
•
BIOS firmware information
•
Name
•
BIOS firmware version
Firmware
•
Name
•
Version
Network Interface Card
The following details are listed for each NIC in the system:
•
IP address
•
Subnet mask
•
Default gateway
•
MAC address
Storage Enclosures
The following details are listed for each storage enclosure attached to the system:
•
Name
•
Product ID
omreport: Viewing System Status Using the Instrumentation Service
47
omreport system thrmshutdown
Use the omreport system thrmshutdown command to view which properties, if any, have been
configured for a thermal shutdown action.
The three properties that display for thermal shutdown are disabled, warning, or failure. If the CLI
displays the following message, the thermal shutdown feature has been disabled:
Thermal protect shutdown severity: disabled
If the system is configured to shutdown when a temperature probe detects a warning or failure event, one
of the following messages displays:
Thermal protect shutdown severity: warning
Thermal protect shutdown severity: failure
omreport system version
Use the omreport system version command to list the version numbers of the BIOS, firmware, systems
management software, and operating system that are installed on your system.
Example Command Output
When you type:
omreport system version
the output that appears in your CLI window depends on the version of the BIOS, RAID controllers, and
firmware installed on your system. The following partial command results are unique and may not
resemble the results for your system’s configuration:
Version Report
--------------------Main System Chassis
--------------------Name
: BIOS
Version
: 0.2.16
Updateable : N/A
Name
: BMC
Version
: 0.26
Updateable : N/A
Name
: Primary Backplane
Version
: 1.01
Updateable : N/A
48
omreport: Viewing System Status Using the Instrumentation Service
--------------Software
--------------Name
: Microsoft Windows Server 2003, Enterprise Edition
Version
: 5.2 <Build 3790 : Service Pack 1> <x86>
Updateable : N/A
Name
: Dell Server Administrator
Version
: 5.1.0
Updateable : N/A
omreport: Viewing System Status Using the Instrumentation Service
49
50
omreport: Viewing System Status Using the Instrumentation Service
omconfig: Managing Components Using the
Instrumentation Service
The omconfig command allows you to provide values that define warning events, configure alert
actions, clear logs, and configure system shutdown, as well as allowing you to perform other systems
management tasks.
Examples of omconfig capabilities include the administrator's privilege to clear command, alert, and
hardware logs; the administrator's privilege to configure and execute system shutdown; power user
and administrator's privilege to default or specify values for warning events on current probes, fans,
voltage probes, and temperature probes; power user and administrator's privilege to set alert actions
in the event of a warning or failure event from intrusion, current probes, fans, voltage probes, and
temperature probes.
For information on how to use the omconfig system command to view and to manage cost of ownership
information (assetinfo), see "omconfig system assetinfo: Editing Cost of Ownership Values."
Often you must use the omreport commands to get the information you need to execute an omconfig
command. For example, if you want to edit the minimum temperature for a warning event on a
temperature probe, you need to know the index of the probe you want to configure. You can use the
omreport chassis temps command to display a list of probes and their indexes. For more information
on using the omreport command, see "omreport: Viewing System Status Using the Instrumentation
Service."
Conventions for Parameter Tables
When listing the parameters that a command can take, the parameters are listed in alphabetical
order instead of the order in which they appear in the command line interface.
The symbol |, often called pipe, is the logical exclusive or operator. For example, enable | disable
means that you can enable or disable the component or feature, but you cannot simultaneously
enable and disable the component or feature.
omconfig Command Summary
NOTE: Although this section lists all possible omconfig commands, the commands available on your system
depend on your system configuration. If you try to get help or execute a command for a component that is not
installed on your system, Server Administrator issues a message that the component or feature is not found on
the system.
omconfig: Managing Components Using the Instrumentation Service
51
Table 4-1 is a high-level summary of the omconfig command. The columns titled "Command level 2"
and "Command level 3" list the major arguments that can be used with omconfig. "User privilege
required" refers to the type of privilege you need to perform the command, where U=User, P=Power User,
and A=Administrator. "Use" is a very general statement about the actions that can be performed using
omconfig. More details about syntax and use of the command appear later in this section.
Table 4-1.
Command
level 1
omconfig Command Level 1, Level 2, and Level 3
Command
level 2
Command
level 3
User privilege Use
required
omconfig
about
U, P, A
Shows version number and properties for the
Server Administrator program.
details=true
U, P, A
Displays information for all of the Server
Administrator programs that are installed.
cdvformat
A
Specifies the delimiter for separating data fields
reported in custom delimited format (cdv).
dirservice
A
Configures the Active Directory service.
snmp
A
Sets the SNMP root password. Configures
SNMP Set Operations.
useraccess
A
Determines whether users below the
administrator level are allowed to use Server
Administrator or not.
alertaction
P, A
Determines in advance what actions are to be
taken for warning or failure events on
intrusion, fans, temperatures, voltages, power
supplies, memory, and redundancy.
alertlog
P, A
Allows the administrator to clear the log.
assetinfo
P, A
Enters and edits cost of ownership information
for your system, including values for
depreciation, lease, maintenance, service,
and support.
cmdlog
P, A
Allows the administrator to clear the log.
esmlog
P, A
Allows the administrator to clear the log.
events
P, A
Enables and disables SNMP traps.
preferences
system
pedestinations P, A
52
Sets IP addresses for alert destinations.
omconfig: Managing Components Using the Instrumentation Service
Table 4-1.
Command
level 1
omconfig Command Level 1, Level 2, and Level 3 (continued)
Command
level 2
Command
level 3
User privilege Use
required
platformevents A
Determines the shutdown action, if any, to be
taken for a specific platform event. Also,
enables and disables platform events filter
alert generation.
recovery
P, A
Determines in advance how your system
responds to a hung operating system.
shutdown
A
Allows the administrator to select from several
options when shutting down the system.
thrmshutdown A
Sets the severity level at which a thermal event
triggers a system shutdown.
webserver
A
Starts or stops the Web server.
biossetup
A
Configures behavior of specific system
components that are controlled by the BIOS.
bmc
A
chassis
Configures remote access information.
NOTE: This subcommand will be phased-out in
future releases and replaced by the
subcommand remoteaccess.
currents
P, A
Configures current probe warning thresholds
by default or by value.
fans
P, A
Configures fan probe warning thresholds by
default or by value.
NOTE: You cannot change threshold values on
embedded server management (ESM3) and
Dell™ PowerEdge™ x8xx systems.
fancontrol
P, A
Allows you to optimize fan speed for
maximum cooling or quiet operation.
frontpanel
A
Configures the Power button and Nonmasking
Interrupt (NMI) button if present on
the system.
info
P, A
Allows you to set an initial value for, or to edit
the value for, asset tag or chassis name.
leds
P, A
Specifies when to flash a chassis fault LED or
chassis identification LED, and allows you to
clear the LED for the system's hard drive.
omconfig: Managing Components Using the Instrumentation Service
53
Table 4-1.
Command
level 1
omconfig Command Level 1, Level 2, and Level 3 (continued)
Command
level 2
Command
level 3
User privilege Use
required
memorymode
A
Enables or disables the spare bank and
mirroring memory modes, and also specify
which mode to use.
remoteaccess
A
Configures remote access information.
temps
P, A
Sets warning threshold values by default or
value.
NOTE: You cannot change threshold values on
ESM3 and PowerEdge x8xx systems.
volts
P, A
Sets warning threshold values by default or
value.
NOTE: You cannot change threshold values on
ESM3 and PowerEdge x8xx systems.
storage
See "Using the Storage Management Service."
Help With the omconfig Command
Use the omconfig -? command to get a list of the available commands for omconfig.
Use omconfig <command level 2> -? to get help on the level 2 commands about, chassis, preferences,
and system. The following information on omconfig system -? applies equally to getting help for the
omconfig chassis command.
Use the omconfig system -? command to get a list of the available commands for omconfig system.
Use the omconfig preferences -? command to get a list of the available commands for omconfig
preferences, such as cdvformat, which is the custom delimiter format (cdv). Type the following
command to display the list of delimiter values for the cdv:
omconfig preferences cdvformat -?
Use a command of the form omconfig system <command level 3> -? to get a list of the parameters you
must use to execute a particular omconfig system command. For example, the following commands
produce a list of valid parameters for omconfig system alertaction and omconfig system shutdown:
omconfig system alertaction -?
omconfig system shutdown -?
In the case of the omconfig system alertaction command, you can use various options to prevent all of
the CLI help from scrolling by before you can read it.
54
omconfig: Managing Components Using the Instrumentation Service
To scroll command output one screen at a time, type:
omconfig system alertaction -? | more
where | more allows you to press the spacebar to see the next screen of CLI help output.
To make a file that contains all of the help for the omconfig system alertaction -? command, type:
omconfig system alertaction -? -outa alert.txt
where -outa directs the output of the command to a file called alert.txt.
To read the help for the alertaction command on a Microsoft® Windows®, Red Hat® Enterprise Linux®,
or SUSE® Linux Enterprise Server operating system, type:
more alert.txt
omconfig about
Use the omconfig about command to learn the product name and version number of the systems
management application installed on your system. The following is an example output from the
omconfig about command:
Product name : Dell OpenManage Server Administrator
Version : 5.x.x
Copyright : Copyright (C) Dell Inc.
1995-2006. All rights reserved.
Company : Dell Inc.
For more details about the environment for Server Administrator, type:
omconfig about details=true
Server Administrator includes a number of services, each of which has a version number of its own.
The Contains field reports version numbers for the services and provides other useful details. The output
that follows is an example, and it can change depending on your configuration and the version of Server
Administrator that is available:
Contains:
Instrumentation Service 5.x.x
Storage Management Service 3.x.x
Sun JRE - OEM Installed Version 3.x.x
Secure Port Server 1.x.x
Core Service 1.x.x
Instrumentation Service Integration Layer 1.x.x
Storage Management Service Integration Layer 1.x.x
Server Administrator 5.x.x
omconfig: Managing Components Using the Instrumentation Service
55
omconfig chassis
Use the omconfig chassis commands to default or to set values for current, fan, voltage, and temperature
probes, to configure BIOS behavior during system start up, to clear memory error counts, and to enable
or disable power button control features where system configuration permits.
Use the omconfig chassis -? command to see a list of all omconfig chassis commands.
NOTE: When you issue CLI commands to a server module in a modular system, chassis refers only to the
server module.
omconfig chassis biossetup
Use the omconfig chassis biossetup command to configure system BIOS settings that are normally
available only in your system's BIOS setup boot time settings.
NOTICE: Changing certain BIOS setup options might disable your system or require you to reinstall the
operating system.
NOTE: You must reboot your system before any changes to the BIOS setup options take effect.
NOTE: Not all BIOS setup options are available on every system.
Table 4-2 shows the name=value pairs you can use with this command.
Table 4-2.
BIOS Setup
name=value pair 1
attribute=
name=value pair 2
setting=
Description
attribute=acpwrrecovery
setting=off | last | on
off: System is turned off.
last: System returns to previous state.
on: System is turned on.
attribute=bezel
setting=enable | disable
enable: Enable the bezel removal intrusion check
during system boot.
disable: Disable the bezel removal intrusion check
during system boot.
attribute=bootsequence
setting=diskettefirst | hdonly
| devicelist |cdromfirst
Tells the BIOS which device is used to boot the
system, and the order in which the boot routine is
to check each device.
attribute=conredirect
setting=enable | disable
enable: Redirects the BIOS screen over Serial Port 1.
Keyboard and text output are redirected over
Serial Port 2.
disable: Turns off the BIOS console redirection.
56
omconfig: Managing Components Using the Instrumentation Service
Table 4-2.
BIOS Setup (continued)
name=value pair 1
attribute=
name=value pair 2
setting=
Description
attribute=crab
setting=enable | disable
enable: Enable BIOS console redirection after
system reboot.
disable: Disable BIOS console redirection.
NOTE: The command crab is valid for Dell
PowerEdge x9xx systems only.
attribute=cpuht
setting=enable | disable
enable: Enable logical processor hyper threading.
disable: Disable logical processor hyper threading.
attribute=cpuvt
setting=enable | disable
enable: Enable virtualization.
disable: Disable virtualization.
attribute=dbs
setting=enable | disable
enable: Enables Demand Based Power
Management (DBS) on the system.
disable: Disables DBS on the system.
attribute=diskette
setting=off | auto | writeprotect
off: Disable the diskette drive.
auto: Auto enable the diskette drive.
writeprotect: Do not allow writes. Make the
diskette drive read only.
attribute=dualnic
setting=off | onpxeboth |
onpxenone | onpxenic1 |
onpxenic2
off: The NICs are disabled.
onpxeboth: Both the NICs are PXE enabled.
onpxenone: PXE is not enabled on either of the
NICs.
onpxenic1: PXE is enabled on NIC 1.
onpxenic2: PXE is enabled on NIC 2.
attribute=extserial
setting=com1 | com2 | rad
com1: Maps external serial connector to COM 1.
com2: Maps external serial connector to COM 2.
rad: Maps external serial connector to remote
access device.
attribute=fbr
setting=9600 | 19200 | 57600 |
115200
9600: Sets the console redirection failsafe baud rate
to 9600 bits per second.
19200: Sets the console redirection failsafe baud rate
to 19200 bits per second.
57600: Sets the console redirection failsafe baud
rate to 57600 bits per second.
115200: Sets the console redirection failsafe baud
rate to 115200 bits per second.
omconfig: Managing Components Using the Instrumentation Service
57
Table 4-2.
BIOS Setup (continued)
name=value pair 1
attribute=
name=value pair 2
setting=
Description
attribute=ide
setting=on | off
force=true
on: Enables this device.
off: Disables this device.
force=true: Verification of setting change.
attribute=idepridrv
setting=off | auto
off: Disables the device.
auto: Automatically detect and enable the device.
attribute=intrusion
setting=enable | disable
enable: Enables the intrusion check during system
boot. If the system also has bezel intrusion
checking, then the intrusion option checks for
removal of the bezel of the system.
disable: Disables the intrusion check during
system boot.
attribute=mouse
setting=on | off
on: Enables the mouse.
off: Disables the mouse.
attribute=nic1
setting=enabled | disabled
| enablednonepxe
enabled: Enables the first NIC during system boot
(with PXE on if the system has PXE).
disabled: Disables the first NIC during
system boot.
enablednonepxe: Enables the first NIC during
system boot (with PXE off if the system has PXE).
attribute=nic2
setting=enabled | disabled
| enablednonepxe
enabled: Enables the second NIC during system
boot (with PXE on if the system has PXE).
disabled: Disables the second NIC during system
boot.
enablednonepxe: Enables the second NIC during
system boot (with PXE off if the system has PXE).
attribute=numlock
setting=on | off
on: Use the keypad as number keys.
off: Use the keypad as arrow keys.
attribute=ppaddress
setting=off | lpt1 | lpt2 | lpt3
off: Disable the parallel port address.
lpt1: Locate the device on LPT1.
lpt2: Locate the device onLPT2.
lpt3: Locate the device on LPT3.
58
omconfig: Managing Components Using the Instrumentation Service
Table 4-2.
BIOS Setup (continued)
name=value pair 1
attribute=
name=value pair 2
setting=
Description
attribute=ppmode
setting=at | ps2 | ecp | epp
at: Set the parallel port mode to type AT.
ps2: Set the parallel port mode to type PS/2.
ecp: Set the parallel port mode to type ECP
(extended capabilities port).
epp: Set the parallel port mode to type EPP
(enhanced parallel port).
attribute=primaryscsi
setting=on | off
force=true
NOTICE: If you modify the setting for primary scsi,
romb, romba, or rombb, your system becomes
inoperable until you reinstall the operating system.
on: Enable this device.
off: Disable this device.
force=true: Verification of setting change.
attribute=romb
setting=raid | off | scsi
force=true
raid: Instructs the BIOS to detect RAID-onmotherboard as a RAID device.
off: Disable the device during system boot.
scsi: Instructs the BIOS to detect this device as a
SCSI device.
force=true: Verification of setting change.
attribute=romba
setting=raid | scsi
force=true
raid: Instructs the BIOS to detect RAID-onmotherboard channel A as a RAID device.
scsi: Instructs the BIOS to detect this device as a
SCSI device.
force=true: Verification of setting change.
attribute=rombb
setting=raid | scsi
force=true
raid: Instructs the BIOS to detect RAID-onmotherboard channel B as a RAID device.
scsi: Instructs the BIOS to detect this device as a
SCSI device.
force=true: Verification of setting change.
attribute=sata
setting=off | ata | raid
off: Disables SATA controller.
ata: Sets the onboard SATA controller to ATA mode.
raid: Sets the onboard SATA controller to RAID
mode.
attribute=sataport (0...7) setting=off | auto
or (A...H)
off: Disables the SATA port.
auto: Automatically enable the SATA port.
omconfig: Managing Components Using the Instrumentation Service
59
Table 4-2.
BIOS Setup (continued)
name=value pair 1
attribute=
name=value pair 2
setting=
Description
attribute=secondaryscsi
setting=on | off
on: Enables this device.
off: Disables this device.
attribute=serialcom
setting=off | on |com1 |com2
off: Disables serial communication setting.
on: Enables serial communication setting without
console redirection.
com1: Enables serial communication setting with
console redirection via COM 1.
com2: Enables serial communication setting with
console redirection via COM 2.
attribute=serialport1
setting=off | auto | com1 | com3
| bmcserial | bmcnic | rac |
com1bmc
off: Disables serial port 1.
auto: Maps serial port 1 to a COM port.
com1: Maps serial port 1 to COM port 1.
com3: Maps serial port 1 to COM port 3.
bmcserial: Maps serial port 1 to BMC Serial.
bmcnic: Maps serial port 1 to the Baseboard
Management Controller (BMC) Network
Interface Controller (NIC).
rac: Maps serial port 1 to the Remote Access
Controller (RAC).
com1bmc: Maps serial port 1 to COM port 1 bmc.
NOTE: This command is valid on PowerEdge 1850,
2800, and 2850 systems only.
attribute=serialport2
setting=off | auto | com2 | com4
off: Disables serial port 2.
auto: Maps serial port 2 to a COM port.
com2: Maps serial port 2 to COM port 2.
com4: Maps serial port 2 to COM port 4.
attribute=speaker
setting=on | off
on: Enables the speaker.
off: Disables the speaker.
attribute=uausb
setting=on | backonly | off
on: Enables the user-accessible USB port(s)
backonly: Enables only the user accessible
USB port(s) at the back of the system.
off: Disables the user-accessible USB port(s).
60
omconfig: Managing Components Using the Instrumentation Service
Table 4-2.
BIOS Setup (continued)
name=value pair 1
attribute=
name=value pair 2
setting=
Description
attribute=usb
setting=enabled | disabled
enabled: Enables the USB port(s).
disabled: Disables the USB port(s).
NOTE: Depending on your system’s hardware, only
one of the two attributes usb and usbb is available
for configuring the USB port(s).
attribute=usbb
setting=enabled |
enabledwithbios| disabled
enabled: Enables the USB port(s) during system
boot, without BIOS support.
enabledwithbios: Enables the USB port(s) during
the system boot, with BIOS support.
disabled: Disables the USB port(s) during system
boot.
NOTE: Depending on your system’s hardware, only
one of the two attributes usb and usbb is available
for configuring the USB port(s).
omconfig chassis bmc
NOTE: This command will be phased-out in future releases. It will be replaced by the command omconfig chassis
remoteaccess.
Use the omconfig chassis bmc command to configure:
•
The BMC on a local area network (LAN)
•
The serial port for BMC
•
The BMC on a serial over LAN connection
•
Terminal settings for the serial port
•
Advanced settings for a serial over LAN connection
•
Information on a BMC user
NOTE: You have to enter the user ID to configure user information.
Type:
omconfig chassis bmc
omconfig: Managing Components Using the Instrumentation Service
61
The output from the omconfig chassis bmc command lists each of the available configurations.
Table 4-3 shows the valid parameters:
Table 4-3.
omconfig chassis bmc
name=value pair 1
config=
name=value pair 2
Description
config=advsol
characcuminterval=number
number: Sets the character accumulate interval
in 5 millisecond intervals.
charsendthreshold=number
number: Sets the number of characters. BMC
automatically sends a serial over LAN data
packet that contains this number of characters
as soon as this number of characters (or greater)
has been accepted from the baseboard serial
controller into the BMC.
enable=true | false
true: Enables IPMI over LAN.
config=nic
false: Disables IPMI over LAN.
encryptkey=text
text: Text to encrypt IPMI sessions.
NOTE: The option text is supported only on
PowerEdge x9xx systems.
gateway=gateway
Gateway: Sets a gateway address if you have
selected static as the IP address source for the
BMC LAN interface.
enablenic=true | false
true: Enables the DRAC NIC.
false: Disables the DRAC NIC
NOTE: The option enablenic is supported only on
PowerEdge x9xx systems that have DRAC 5
installed.
IP address=IP
IP: Sets the IP address if you have selected
static as the IP address source for the BMC
LAN interface.
ipsource=static | dhcp |
systemsoftware
static: Static if the IP address of the BMC LAN
interface is a fixed, assigned IP address.
dhcp: DHCP if the source of the IP address of
the BMC LAN interface is the dynamic host
configuration protocol.
systemsoftware: System software if the source
of the IP address of the BMC LAN interface is
from the system software.
NOTE: Not all commands may be supported on
the system.
62
omconfig: Managing Components Using the Instrumentation Service
Table 4-3.
omconfig chassis bmc (continued)
name=value pair 1
config=
name=value pair 2
Description
config=nic
(continued)
nicselection=nic1 | teamednic1nic2 |
dracnic
nic1: Enables NIC 1.
teamednic1nic2: Enables NIC teaming
functionality.
dracnic: Enables DRAC NIC if DRAC 5 is
installed.
NOTE: The option nicselection is supported only
on PowerEdge x9xx systems.
NOTE: If there are multiple embedded NICs on
your system, you can select the NIC teaming
option to share the BMC management traffic
between them.
privilegelevel=administrator | operator administrator: Sets the maximum privilege
| user
level that can be accepted on a LAN channel to
Administrator.
operator: Sets the maximum privilege level that
can be accepted on a LAN channel to Operator.
user: Sets the maximum privilege level that can
be accepted on a LAN channel to User.
subnet=Subnet
subnet: Sets a subnet mask if you have selected
static as the IP address source for the BMC
LAN interface.
vlanenable=true | false
true: Enables the virtual LAN identification.
false: Disables the virtual LAN identification.
vlanid=number
number: Virtual LAN identification in the
range of 1 to 4094.
vlanpriority=number
number: Priority of virtual LAN identification
in the range of 0 to 7.
omconfig: Managing Components Using the Instrumentation Service
63
Table 4-3.
omconfig chassis bmc (continued)
name=value pair 1
config=
name=value pair 2
Description
config=serial
baudrate=9600 | 19200 | 38400 |57600 9600: Sets connection speed to 9600 bits per
| 115200
second.
19200:Sets connection speed to 19200 bits per
second.
38400: Sets connection speed to 38400 bits per
second.
57600: Sets connection speed to 57600 bits per
second.
115200: Sets connection speed to 115200 bits
per second.
NOTE: Baud rates of 9600, 19200, 38400, and
57600 are supported on PowerEdge 1800,1850,
2800, and 2850 systems.
Baud rates of 9600, 19200, and 57600 are
supported on PowerEdge x9xx systems.
Baud rate of 115200 is supported on certain
systems that have a DRAC 5 installed.
flowcontrol=none | rtscts
none: No control over the flow of
communication through the serial port.
rtscts: RTS is ready to send and CTS is clear to
send.
64
omconfig: Managing Components Using the Instrumentation Service
Table 4-3.
omconfig chassis bmc (continued)
name=value pair 1
config=
name=value pair 2
Description
config=serial
(continued)
mode=directbasic | directterminal |
directbasic: Type of messaging used for IPMI
directbasicterminal | modembasic |
messaging over a serial connection.
modemterminal | modembasicterminal directterminal: Type of messaging that uses
printable ASCII characters and allows a limited
number of text commands over a serial
connection.
directbasicterminal: Both basic and terminal
mode messaging over a serial connection.
modembasic: Type of messaging used for IPMI
messaging over a modem.
modemterminal: Type of messaging that uses
printable ASCII characters and that allows a
limited number of text commands over a
modem.
modembasicterminal: Both basic and terminal
messaging over a modem.
NOTE: Not all commands may be supported on
the system.
privilegelevel=administrator | operator administrator: Sets the maximum privilege
| user
level that can be accepted on a serial
connection, to Administrator.
operator: Sets the maximum privilege level that
can be accepted on a serial connection, to
Operator.
user: Sets the maximum privilege level that can
be accepted on a serial connection, to User.
omconfig: Managing Components Using the Instrumentation Service
65
Table 4-3.
omconfig chassis bmc (continued)
name=value pair 1
config=
name=value pair 2
Description
config=serialoverlan
enable=true | false
true: Enables serial over LAN for the BMC.
false: Disables serial over LAN for the BMC.
baudrate=9600 | 19200 | 38400 |
57600 | 115200
9600: Sets the volatile and nonvolatile
connection speed to 9600 bits per second.
19200: Sets the volatile and nonvolatile
connection speed to 19200 bits per second.
38400: Sets the volatile and nonvolatile
connection speed to 38400 bits per second.
57600: Sets the volatile and nonvolatile
connection speed to 57600 bits per second.
115200: Sets the volatile and nonvolatile
connection speed to 115200 bits per second.
NOTE: Baud rates of 9600 and 19200 are
supported on PowerEdge 1800, 1850, 2800, and
2850 systems.
Baud rates of 9600, 19200, and 57600 are
supported on PowerEdge x9xx systems.
Baud rate of 115200 is supported on certain
systems that have a DRAC 5 installed.
privilegelevel=administrator | operator administrator: Sets the maximum privilege
| user
level that can be accepted on a serial over LAN
channel, to Administrator.
operator: Sets the maximum privilege level that
can be accepted on a serial over LAN channel,
to Operator.
user: Sets the maximum privilege level that can
be accepted on a serial over LAN channel, to
User.
config=settodefault
66
Takes the default configuration settings.
omconfig: Managing Components Using the Instrumentation Service
Table 4-3.
omconfig chassis bmc (continued)
name=value pair 1
config=
name=value pair 2
Description
config=terminalmode
deletecontrol=outputdel |
outputbkspspbksp
outputdel: BMC outputs a <del> character
when <bksp> or <del> is received.
outputbkspspbksp: BMC outputs a
<bksp><sp><bksp> character when
<bksp> or <del> is received.
echocontrol=enabled | disabled
enabled: Enables characters to be sent to the
screen.
disabled: Disables characters to be sent to the
screen.
handshakingcontrol=enabled | disabled enabled: Directs the BMC to output a character
sequence that indicates when its input buffer is
ready to accept another command.
disabled: Does not direct the BMC to output a
character sequence that indicates when its
input buffer is ready to accept another
command.
inputlinesequence=cr | null
cr: The console uses <CR> as a new line
sequence.
null: The console uses <NULL> as a new line
sequence.
lineediting=enabled | disabled
enabled: Enables line editing as a line is typed.
disable: Disables line editing as a line is typed.
newlinesequence=none | crlf | null | cr none: BMC does not use a termination
| lfcr | lf
sequence.
crlf: BMC uses <CR-LF> as a new line
sequence when the BMC writes a new line to
the console.
null: BMC uses <Null> as a new line sequence
when the BMC writes a new line to the console.
cr: BMC uses <CR> as a new line sequence
when the BMC writes a new line to the console.
lfcr: BMC uses <LF-CR> as a new line
sequence when the BMC writes a new line to
the console.
lf: BMC uses <LF> as a new line sequence
when the BMC writes a new line to the console.
omconfig: Managing Components Using the Instrumentation Service
67
Table 4-3.
omconfig chassis bmc (continued)
name=value pair 1
config=
name=value pair 2
Description
config=user
id=number enable=true | false
id=number: ID number of the user being
configured.
enable=true: Enables user.
enable=false: Disables user.
id=numberenableserialoverlan=true |
false
id=number: ID number of the user being
configured.
enableserialoverlan=true: Enables
serialoverlan.
enableserialoverlan=false: Disables
serialoverlan.
NOTE: The option enableserialoverlan is
supported only on PowerEdge x9xx systems.
id=number name=text
number: ID number of the user being
configured.
name=text: Name of the user.
id=number newpw=text
confirmnewpw=text
number: ID number of the user being
configured.
newpw=text: New password of the user.
confirmnewpw=text: Confirm new password of
the user.
id=number serialaccesslevel=
administrator | operator | user | none
id=number: ID number of the user being
configured.
serialaccesslevel=administrator: User with an
ID has access privileges of an Administrator for
the Serial Port channel.
serialaccesslevel=operator: User with an ID has
access privileges of an Operator for the Serial
Port channel.
serialaccesslevel=user: User with an ID has
access privileges of a User for the Serial Port
Channel.
serialaccesslevel=none: User with an ID does
not have access privileges for the Serial Port
Channel.
68
omconfig: Managing Components Using the Instrumentation Service
Table 4-3.
omconfig chassis bmc (continued)
name=value pair 1
config=
name=value pair 2
Description
config=user
(continued)
id=user id
id=user id: User ID of the user being
configured.
NOTE: Only RAC groups can be configured. The
option dracusergroup is available only if DRAC 5
is present on the system.
dracusergroup=admin | poweruser |
guest | testalert | custom | none
dracusergroup=admin: Enables the
Administrator User privileges.
dracusergroup=poweruser: Enables the Power
User privileges.
dracusergroup=guest: Enables the Guest User
privileges.
dracusergroup=testalert: Enables the Test
Alert User privileges.
dracusergroup=custom: Enables the Custom
User privileges.
NOTE: See Table 4-4 for more information on the
name=value pair. dracusergroup=custom.
dracusergroup=none: Does not enable User
privileges.
id=number lanaccesslevel=
administrator | operator | user| none
id=number: ID number of the user being
configured.
lanaccesslevel=administrator: User with an ID
has access privileges of an Administrator for the
LAN channel.
lanaccesslevel=operator: User with an ID has
access privileges of an Operator for the LAN
channel.
lanaccesslevel=user: User with an ID has access
privileges of a User for the LAN channel.
lanaccesslevel=none: User with an ID does not
have access privileges for the LAN channel.
omconfig: Managing Components Using the Instrumentation Service
69
Table 4-4.
omconfig chassis bmc config=user id=<user id> dracusergroup=custom
name=value pair 1
config=
name=value pair 2
Description
config=user
id=user id
logindrac= true | false
dracusergroup=custom
configuredrac= true | false
configure users= true | false
clearlogs= true | false
executeservercommands= true | false
accessconsoleredir= true | false
accessvirtualmedia= true | false
testalerts= true | false
omconfig chassis currents
Use the omconfig chassis currents command to set amperage probe warning thresholds. As with other
components, you can view both warning and failure threshold values, but you cannot set failure thresholds.
Your system's manufacturer sets the minimum and maximum failure thresholds.
NOTE: Settable thresholds vary from one system configuration to another.
NOTE: Systems that contain embedded systems management 3 (ESM3) capabilities do not allow you to set
warning threshold values to default values.
Valid Parameters for Current Warning Thresholds
Table 4-5 shows the valid parameters for setting current warning thresholds:
NOTE: The index parameter is optional. If you do not specify the index, Server Administrator displays a summary of
status, readings, and thresholds set for all current probes present on your system. "Current probes are not present
in all systems". If you specify the index, Server Administrator displays a summary for a specific current probe.
Table 4-5.
70
omconfig chassis currents
name=value pair
Description
index=<n>
Number of the probe or probe index (must be specified).
warnthresh=default
Sets minimum and maximum warning thresholds to default.
minwarnthresh=<n>
Minimum warning threshold (3 decimal places).
maxwarnthresh=<n>
Maximum warning threshold (3 decimal places).
omconfig: Managing Components Using the Instrumentation Service
Default Minimum and Maximum Warning Thresholds
If you want to set both the upper and lower current warning threshold values to the recommended
default value, type:
omconfig chassis currents index=0 warnthresh=default
You cannot default one value and set another. In other words, if you default the minimum warning
threshold value, you are also selecting the default value for the maximum warning threshold value.
Specify a Value for Minimum and Maximum Warning Thresholds
If you prefer to specify values for the current probe warning thresholds, you must specify the number of
the probe you are configuring and the minimum and/or maximum warning threshold values. In the
following example, the probe that is being configured is probe 0:
omconfig chassis currents index=0 minwarnthresh=3.310 maxwarnthresh=
3.381
When you issue the command and the system sets the values you specify, the following message appears:
Current probe warning threshold(s) set successfully.
omconfig chassis fans
Use the omconfig chassis fans command to set fan probe warning thresholds. As with other components,
you can view both warning and failure threshold values, but you cannot set failure thresholds.
Your system's manufacturer sets the minimum and maximum failure thresholds.
Valid Parameters for Fan Warning Thresholds
Table 4-6 shows the valid parameters for setting fan warning thresholds:
Table 4-6.
omconfig chassis fans
name=value pair
Description
index=<n>
Number of the probe or probe index (must be specified).
warnthresh=default
Sets minimum and maximum warning thresholds to default.
minwarnthresh=<n>
Minimum warning threshold.
maxwarnthresh=<n>
Maximum warning threshold.
Default Minimum and Maximum Warning Thresholds
NOTE: Systems that contain ESM3, ESM4, and BMC capabilities do not allow you to set warning threshold values
to default values.
If you want to set both the upper and lower fan warning threshold values to the recommended default
value, type:
omconfig chassis fans index=0 warnthresh=default
omconfig: Managing Components Using the Instrumentation Service
71
You cannot default one value and set another. In other words, if you default the minimum warning
threshold value, you are also selecting the default value for the maximum warning threshold value.
Specify a Value for Minimum and Maximum Warning Thresholds
NOTE: Minimum and maximum warning thresholds for the fan probe cannot be set on PowerEdge x8xx and
x9xx systems.
If you prefer to specify values for the fan probe warning thresholds, you must specify the number of the
probe you are configuring and the minimum and/or maximum warning threshold values. In the following
example, the probe that is being configured is probe 0. The first command sets only the minimum
threshold; the second sets minimum and maximum thresholds:
omconfig chassis fans index=0 minwarnthresh=4580
omconfig chassis fans index=0 minwarnthresh=4580 maxwarnthresh=9160
When you issue the command and the system sets the values you specify, the following message appears:
Fan probe warning threshold(s) set successfully.
omconfig chassis fancontrol
Use the omconfig chassis fancontrol command to set fan speed. You can optimize speed for cooling or
for quiet operation. Table 4-7 shows the valid parameters for the command.
Table 4-7.
omconfig chassis fancontrol
name=value pair
Description
speed=quiet
Sets fan speed for quiet operation.
speed=maxcool
Sets fan speed for maximum cooling.
omconfig chassis frontpanel
Use the omconfig chassis frontpanel command to configure the Power button and the Nonmasking
Interrupt (NMI) button and to specify and configure the LCD line number.
NOTE: The Power and NMI buttons can be configured only if present on the system.
Table 4-8 shows the valid parameters for the command.
72
omconfig: Managing Components Using the Instrumentation Service
Table 4-8.
omconfig chassis frontpanel
name=value pair 1
name=value pair 2
Description
lcdindex=<index>
NA
Specify the LCD line number.
config=none | default NA
| custom
none: Set the LCD text to none.
default: Set the LCD text to default.
custom: Set the LCD text to custom.
text=<custom text>
NA
Set the custom text for LCD when config=custom.
nmibutton
enable=true | false
true: Enables the NMI button on the system.
false: Disables the NMI button on the system.
powerbutton
enable=true | false
true: Enables the Power button on the system.
false: Disables the Power button on the system.
omconfig chassis info
Use the omconfig chassis info command to enter an asset tag name for your system and a chassis name
for your system. If your system is a modular one, you can enter asset tag names for modular components
as well. Table 4-9 shows the valid parameters for the command.
Table 4-9.
omconfig chassis info
name=value pair
Description
index=<n>
Number of the chassis whose asset tag or name you are setting.
tag=<text>
Asset tag in the form of alphanumeric text. Letters or numbers
cannot exceed 10 characters.
name=<text>
Name of the chassis.
In the following example, the asset tag for the main system chassis is being set to buildsys:
omconfig chassis info index=0 tag=buildsys
Index 0 always defaults to main system chassis. The following command omits index=n, but
accomplishes the same thing:
omconfig chassis info tag=buildsys
An acceptable command, when executed, results in the following message:
Chassis info set successfully.
For some chassis, you can assign a different name. You cannot rename the main system chassis. In the
example below, the command renames chassis 2 from storscsi1 to storscsia:
omconfig chassis info index=2 name=storscsia
omconfig: Managing Components Using the Instrumentation Service
73
As with other commands, the CLI issues an error message if you do not have a chassis 2 (the main
chassis=0). The CLI allows you to issue commands only for the system configuration you have.
omconfig chassis leds
Use the omconfig chassis leds command to specify when to flash a chassis fault LED or chassis
identification LED and allow you to clear the LED for the system's hard drive. Table 4-10 shows the valid
parameters for the command.
Table 4-10.
omconfig chassis leds
name=value pair 1
name=value pair 2
Description
index=<n>
NA
Number of the chassis where the LED resides (defaults to
chassis 0, main system chassis).
led=fault
severity=warning | critical
Select to flash the LED either when a warning event occurs or
when a critical event occurs.
led=hdfault
action=clear
Sets the number of faults for the hard drive back to zero (0).
led=identify
flash=off | on
Sets the chassis identification LED to off or on. Set the
time-out value for the LED to flash to a number of seconds.
time-out=<n>
omconfig chassis memorymode
Use the omconfig chassis memorymode command to specify the redundancy mode you want to use for
your system’s memory in case of memory errors.
Redundant memory enables a system to switch to other available memory modules if unacceptable errors
are detected in the modules it is currently using. The omconfig chassis memorymode command allows
you to disable redundancy; when you disable redundancy, you instruct the system not to switch to other
available memory modules when the module the system is using begins to encounter errors. If you want
to enable redundancy, you must choose among spare, mirror, and RAID.
Spare mode disables a bank of system memory in which a correctable memory event is detected, enables
the spare bank, and copies all the data from the original bank to the spare bank. Spare bank requires at
least three banks of identical memory; the operating system does not recognize the spare bank.
Mirror mode switches to a redundant copy of memory when an uncorrectable memory event is detected.
After switching to the mirrored memory, the system does not switch back to the original system memory
until the next reboot. The operating system does not recognize half of the installed system memory in
this mode.
RAID mode provides an extra level of memory checking and error recovery at the expense of some
memory capacity.
Table 4-11 shows the valid parameters for the command.
74
omconfig: Managing Components Using the Instrumentation Service
Table 4-11.
omconfig chassis memorymode
name=value pair 1
Description
index=<n>
Number of the chassis where the memory module resides (the default is chassis 0, the
main system chassis).
redundancy=spare |
Spare disables the memory module that has a correctable memory event and copies the
mirror | disabled | raid5 failing module’s data to a spare bank.
Disabled indicates that the system is not to use other available memory modules if
uncorrectable memory events are detected.
Mirror switches the systems to a mirrored copy of the memory if the failing module has
an uncorrectable memory event. In mirror mode, the operating system does not switch
back to the original module until the system reboots.
RAID5 is a method of system memory configuration. This is logically similar to the
RAID 5 mode used in hard drive storage systems. This memory mode gives you an extra
level of memory checking and error recovery at the expense of some memory capacity.
The RAID mode supported is RAID level 5 striping with rotational parity.
omconfig chassis remoteaccess
NOTE: This command is applicable to PowerEdge x8xx and x9xx systems only.
Use the omconfig chassis remoteaccess command to configure:
•
Remote access on a local area network (LAN).
•
The serial port for BMC or RAC, whichever is installed.
•
The BMC or RAC on a serial over LAN connection.
•
Terminal settings for the serial port.
•
Advanced settings for a serial over LAN connection.
•
Information on a BMC or RAC user.
NOTE: You have to enter the user ID to configure user information.
Type:
omconfig chassis remoteaccess
omconfig: Managing Components Using the Instrumentation Service
75
The output from the omconfig chassis remoteaccess command lists each of the available configurations.
Table 4-3 shows the valid parameters:
Table 4-12.
omconfig chassis remoteaccess
name=value pair 1
config=
name=value pair 2
Description
config=advsol
characcuminterval=number
number: Sets the character accumulate
interval in 5 millisecond intervals.
charsendthreshold=number
number: Sets the number of characters. BMC
automatically sends a serial over LAN data
packet that contains this number of
characters as soon as this number of
characters (or greater) has been accepted
from the baseboard serial controller into
the BMC.
enable=true | false
true: Enables IPMI over LAN.
config=nic
false: Disables IPMI over LAN.
encryptkey=text
confirmencryptkey=text
text: Text used for encryption and
confirmation of encryption.
NOTE: The option text is supported only on
PowerEdge x9xx systems.
gateway=Gateway
Gateway: Sets a gateway address if you have
selected static as the IP address source for the
BMC LAN interface.
enablenic=true | false
true: Enables DRAC NIC.
false: Disables DRAC NIC
NOTE: The option enablenic is supported on
PowerEdge x9xx systems that have DRAC 5
installed.
IP address=IP
76
ip: Sets the IP address if you have selected
static as the IP address source for the BMC
LAN interface.
omconfig: Managing Components Using the Instrumentation Service
Table 4-12.
omconfig chassis remoteaccess (continued)
name=value pair 1
config=
name=value pair 2
Description
config=nic
(continued)
ipsource=static | dhcp | systemsoftware static: Static if the IP address of the BMC
LAN interface is a fixed, assigned IP address.
dhcp: DHCP if the source of the IP address of
the BMC LAN interface is the dynamic host
configuration protocol.
systemsoftware: System software if the source
of the IP address of the BMC LAN interface is
from the system software.
NOTE: Not all commands may be supported on
the system.
nicselection=nic1 | teamednic1nic2 |
dracnic
nic1: Enables NIC 1.
teamednic1nic2: Enables NIC teaming
functionality.
dracnic: Enables DRAC NIC if DRAC 5 is
installed.
NOTE: The option nicselection is supported
only on PowerEdge x9xx systems.
privilegelevel=administrator | operator
| user
administrator: Sets the maximum privilege
level that can be accepted on a LAN channel
to Administrator.
operator: Sets the maximum privilege level
that can be accepted on a LAN channel
to Operator.
user: Sets the maximum privilege level that
can be accepted on a LAN channel to User.
subnet=Subnet
subnet: Sets a subnet mask if you have
selected static as the IP address source for the
BMC LAN interface.
omconfig: Managing Components Using the Instrumentation Service
77
Table 4-12.
omconfig chassis remoteaccess (continued)
name=value pair 1
config=
name=value pair 2
Description
config=nic
(continued)
vlanenable=true | false
true: Enables the virtual LAN identification.
config=serial
false: Disables the virtual LAN identification.
vlanid=number
number: Virtual LAN identification in the
range of 1 to 4094.
vlanpriority=number
number: Priority of virtual LAN identification
in the range of 0 to 7.
baudrate=9600 | 19200 | 38400 | 57600 9600: Sets connection speed to 9600 bits
| 115200
per second.
19200:Sets connection speed to 19200 bits
per second.
38400: Sets the volatile and nonvolatile
connection speed to 38400 bits per second.
57600: Sets the volatile and nonvolatile
connection speed to 57600 bits per second.
115200: Sets the volatile and nonvolatile
connection speed to 115200 bits per second.
NOTE: Baud rates of 9600 and 19200 are
supported on PowerEdge 1800, 1850, 2800, and
2850 systems.
Baud rates of 9600, 19200, 38400, and 57600 are
supported on PowerEdge x9xx systems.
Baud rate of 115200 is supported on certain
systems that have a DRAC 5 installed.
flowcontrol=none | rtscts
none: No control over the flow of
communication through the serial port.
rtscts: RTS is ready to send and CTS is clear
to send.
78
omconfig: Managing Components Using the Instrumentation Service
Table 4-12.
omconfig chassis remoteaccess (continued)
name=value pair 1
config=
name=value pair 2
Description
config=serial
(continued)
mode=directbasic | directterminal |
directbasic: Type of messaging used for IPMI
directbasicterminal | modembasic |
messaging over a serial connection.
modemterminal | modembasicterminal directterminal: Type of messaging that uses
printable ASCII characters and that allows a
limited number of text commands over a
serial connection.
directbasicterminal: Both basic and terminal
mode messaging over a serial connection.
modembasic: Type of messaging used for
IPMI messaging over a modem.
modemterminal: Type of messaging that uses
printable ASCII characters and that allows a
limited number of text commands over
a modem.
modembasicterminal: Both basic and
terminal messaging over a modem.
NOTE: Not all commands may be supported on
the system.
privilegelevel=administrator | operator
| user
administrator: Sets the maximum privilege
level that can be accepted on a serial
connection, to Administrator.
operator: Sets the maximum privilege level
that can be accepted on a serial connection,
to Operator.
user: Sets the maximum privilege level that
can be accepted on a serial connection,
to User.
omconfig: Managing Components Using the Instrumentation Service
79
Table 4-12.
omconfig chassis remoteaccess (continued)
name=value pair 1
config=
name=value pair 2
Description
config=serialoverlan
enable=true | false
true: Enables serial over LAN for the BMC.
false: Disables serial over LAN for the BMC.
baudrate=9600 | 19200 | 38400 | 57600 9600: Sets the volatile and nonvolatile
| 115200
connection speed to 9600 bits per second.
19200: Sets the volatile and nonvolatile
connection speed to 19200 bits per second.
38400: Sets the volatile and nonvolatile
connection speed to 38400 bits per second.
57600: Sets the volatile and nonvolatile
connection speed to 57600 bits per second.
115200: Sets the volatile and nonvolatile
connection speed to 115200 bits per second.
NOTE: Baud rates of 9600 and 19200 are
supported on PowerEdge 1800, 1850, 2800, and
2850 systems.
Baud rates of 9600, 19200, and 57600 are
supported on PowerEdge x9xx systems.
Baud rate of 115200 is supported on certain
systems that have a DRAC 5 installed.
privilegelevel=administrator | operator
| user
administrator: Sets the maximum privilege
level that can be accepted on a serial over
LAN channel, to Administrator.
operator: Sets the maximum privilege level
that can be accepted on a serial over LAN
channel, to Operator.
user: Sets the maximum privilege level that
can be accepted on a serial over LAN channel,
to User.
config=settodefault
config=terminalmode
Takes the default configuration settings.
deletecontrol=outputdel |
outputbkspspbksp
outputdel: BMC outputs a <del> character
when <bksp> or <del> is received.
outputbkspspbksp: BMC outputs a
<bksp><sp><bksp> character when
<bksp> or <del> is received.
80
omconfig: Managing Components Using the Instrumentation Service
Table 4-12.
omconfig chassis remoteaccess (continued)
name=value pair 1
config=
name=value pair 2
Description
config=terminalmode
(continued)
echocontrol=enabled | disabled
enabled: Enables characters to be sent to
the screen.
disabled: Disables characters to be sent to
the screen.
handshakingcontrol=enabled | disabled enabled: Directs the BMC to output a
character sequence that indicates when its
input buffer is ready to accept
another command.
disabled: Does not direct the BMC to output
a character sequence that indicates when its
input buffer is ready to accept
another command.
inputlinesequence=cr | null
cr: The console uses <CR> as a new
line sequence.
null: The console uses <NULL> as a new
line sequence.
lineediting=enabled | disabled
enabled: Enables line editing as a line
is typed.
disable: Disables line editing as a line is typed.
newlinesequence=none | crlf | null | cr none: BMC does not use a
| lfcr | lf
termination sequence.
crlf: BMC uses <CR-LF> as a new line
sequence when the BMC writes a new line to
the console.
null: BMC uses <Null> as a new line
sequence when the BMC writes a new line to
the console.
cr: BMC uses <CR> as a new line sequence
when the BMC writes a new line to
the console.
lfcr: BMC uses <LF-CR> as a new line
sequence when the BMC writes a new line to
the console.
lf: BMC uses <LF> as a new line sequence
when the BMC writes a new line to
the console.
omconfig: Managing Components Using the Instrumentation Service
81
Table 4-12.
omconfig chassis remoteaccess (continued)
name=value pair 1
config=
name=value pair 2
Description
config=user
id=number enable=true | false
id=number: ID number of the user
being configured.
enable=true: Enables user.
enable=false: Disables user.
id=numberenableserialoverlan=true |
false
id=number: ID number of the user being
configured.
enableserialoverlan=true: Enables serial
over LAN.
enableserialoverlan=false: Disables serial
over LAN.
NOTE: The option enableserialoverlan is
supported only on PowerEdge x9xx systems.
id=number name=text
number: ID number of the user
being configured.
name=text: Name of the user.
id=number newpw=text
confirmnewpw=text
number: ID number of the user
being configured.
newpw=text: New password of the user.
confirmnewpw=text: Confirm new password
of the user.
id=number serialaccesslevel=
administrator | operator | user | none
id=number: ID number of the user
being configured.
serialaccesslevel=administrator: User with an
ID has access privileges of an Administrator
for the Serial Port channel.
serialaccesslevel=operator: User with an ID
has access privileges of an Operator for the
serial port channel.
serialaccesslevel=user: User with an ID has
access privileges of a User for the
serial port Channel.
serialaccesslevel=none: User with an ID does
not have access privileges for the
serial port channel.
82
omconfig: Managing Components Using the Instrumentation Service
Table 4-12.
omconfig chassis remoteaccess (continued)
name=value pair 1
config=
name=value pair 2
Description
config=user
(continued)
id=number lanaccesslevel=
administrator | operator | user| none
id=number: ID number of the user being
configured.
lanaccesslevel=administrator: User with an
ID has access privileges of an Administrator
for the LAN channel.
lanaccesslevel=operator: User with an ID has
access privileges of an Operator for the
LAN channel.
lanaccesslevel=user: User with an ID has
access privileges of a User for the
LAN channel.
lanaccesslevel=none: User with an ID does
not have access privileges for the
LAN channel.
id=user id
dracusergroup=admin | poweruser |
guest | testalert | custom | none
id=user id: User ID of the user
being configured.
dracusergroup=admin: Enables the
Administrator User privileges.
dracusergroup=poweruser: Enables the
Power User privileges.
dracusergroup=guest: Enables the Guest
User privileges.
dracusergroup=testalert: Enables the Test
Alert user privileges.
dracusergroup=custom: Enables the Custom
User privileges.
NOTE: See Table 4-13 for more information on
the name=value pair. dracusergroup=custom.
dracusergroup=none: Does not enable
user privileges.
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83
Table 4-13.
omconfig chassis remoteaccess config=user id=<user id> dracusergroup=custom
name=value pair 1
name=value pair 2
name=value pair 3
Description
config=user
(continued)
id=user id
logindrac= true | false
true/false: Enables/disables
logging into DRAC.
dracusergroup=custom
configuredrac= true | false true/false: Enables/disables
configuration of DRAC.
configure users= true | false true/false: Enables/disables
configuration of users.
clearlogs= true | false
true/false: Enables/disables
log clearance.
executeservercommands=
true | false
true/false: Enables/disables
execution of server commands.
accessconsoleredir= true |
false
true/false: Enables/disables access
to console redirection.
accessvirtualmedia= true | true/false: Enables/disables access
false
to virtual media.
testalerts= true | false
true/false: Enables/disables
test alerts.
omconfig chassis temps
Use the omconfig chassis temps command to set warning thresholds for temperature probes. As with
other components, you can view both warning and failure threshold values, but you cannot set failure
thresholds. Your system's manufacturer sets the minimum and maximum failure thresholds.
NOTE: Settable thresholds vary from one system configuration to another.
Valid Parameters for Temperature Warning Thresholds
Table 4-14 shows the valid parameters for setting temperature warning thresholds:
Table 4-14.
84
omconfig chassis temps
name=value pair
Description
index=<n>
Number of the probe or probe index (must be specified).
warnthresh=default
Sets minimum and maximum warning thresholds to default.
minwarnthresh=<n>
Minimum warning threshold (1 decimal place).
maxwarnthresh=<n>
Maximum warning threshold (1 decimal place).
omconfig: Managing Components Using the Instrumentation Service
Default Minimum and Maximum Warning Thresholds
NOTE: The capabilities for managing sensors vary by systems.
If you want to set both the upper and lower temperature warning threshold values to the recommended
default value, type:
omconfig chassis temps index=0 warnthresh=default
You cannot default one value and set another. In other words, if you default the minimum warning
threshold value, you are also selecting the default value for the maximum warning threshold value.
Specify a Value for Minimum and Maximum Warning Thresholds
NOTE: In PowerEdge x8xx and x9xx systems, warning threshold for the temperature probe can be set only for the
ambient temperature.
If you prefer to specify values for the temperature probe warning thresholds, you must specify the
number of the probe you are configuring and the minimum and/or maximum warning threshold value.
In the following example, the probe that is being configured is probe 4:
omconfig chassis temps index=4 minwarnthresh=11.2 maxwarnthresh=58.7
When you issue the command and the system sets the values you specify, the following message appears:
Temperature probe warning threshold(s) set successfully.
omconfig chassis volts
Use the omconfig chassis volts command to set voltage probe warning thresholds. As with other
components, you can view both warning and failure threshold values, but you cannot set failure
thresholds. Your system's manufacturer sets the minimum and maximum failure thresholds.
Valid Parameters for Voltage Warning Thresholds
Table 4-15 shows the valid parameters for setting voltage warning thresholds.
NOTE: Settable thresholds vary from one system configuration to another.
Table 4-15.
omconfig chassis volts
name=value pair
Description
index=<n>
Probe index (must be specified).
warnthresh=default
Sets minimum and maximum warning thresholds to default.
minwarnthresh=<n>
Minimum warning threshold (3 decimal places).
maxwarnthresh=<n>
Maximum warning threshold (3 decimal places).
omconfig: Managing Components Using the Instrumentation Service
85
Default Minimum and Maximum Warning Thresholds
NOTE: Systems that contain ESM3 capabilities do not allow you to set warning threshold values to default values.
If you want to set both the upper and lower voltage warning threshold values to the recommended
default value, type:
omconfig chassis volts index=2 warnthresh=default
You cannot default one value and set another. In other words, if you default the minimum warning
threshold value, you are also selecting the default value for the maximum warning threshold value.
Specify a Value for Minimum and Maximum Warning Thresholds
NOTE: Minimum and maximum warning thresholds for the voltage cannot be set on PowerEdge x8xx systems.
If you prefer to specify values for the voltage probe warning thresholds, you must specify the number of
the probe you are configuring and the minimum and/or maximum warning threshold values. In the
following example, the probe that is being configured is probe 0:
omconfig chassis volts index=0 minwarnthresh=1.900 maxwarnthresh=2.250
When you issue the command and the system sets the values you specify, the following message appears:
Voltage probe warning threshold(s) set successfully.
omconfig preferences
Use the omconfig preferences command to set system preferences. On the command line, you can set
the SNMP root password and specify which user levels are able to access Server Administrator. You can
also configure the Active Directory service and SNMP Set Operations.
omconfig preferences cdvformat
You can use the omconfig preferences cdvformat to specify the delimiters for separating data fields
reported in the custom delimited format. The valid values for delimiters are: exclamation, semicolon, at,
hash, dollar, percent, caret, asterisk, tilde, question, colon, comma, and pipe.
The following example shows how to set the delimiter for separating data fields to asterisk:
omconfig preferences cdvformat delimiter=asterisk
omconfig preferences dirservice
You can use the omconfig preferences dirservice command to configure the Active Directory service.
The <productname>oem.ini file is modified to reflect these changes. If the "adproductname" is not
present in the <productname>oem.ini file then a default value will be used. The default value will be
<computername>–<productname>, where <computername> refers to the name of the computer
running Server Administrator and <productname> refers to the name of the product defined in
omprv32.ini. For Server Administrator, it is "omsa".
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omconfig: Managing Components Using the Instrumentation Service
Therefore, for a computer named "myOmsa" running Server Administrator, the default name would be
"myOmsa–omsa". This is the name of Server Administrator defined in Active Directory by using the
snap–in tool. This name must match the name for the application object in Active Directory in order to
find user privileges.
NOTE: This command is applicable only on systems running the Windows operating system.
Table 4-16 shows the valid parameters for the command.
Table 4-16.
Active Directory Service Configuration Parameters
name=value pair
Description
prodname=<text>
Specify the product to which you want to apply the Active Directory configuration
changes. Prodname refers to the name of the product defined in omprv32.ini. For
Server Administrator, it is "omsa".
enable=<true | false>
true: Enables Active Directory service authentication support and the Active
Directory Login option on the login page.
false: Disables Active Directory service authentication support and the Active
Directory Login option on the login page. If the Active Directory Login option is not
present, you can only login to the local machine accounts.
adprodname=<text>
Specify the name of the product as defined in the Active Directory service. This
name links the product with the Active Directory privilege data for user
authentication.
omconfig preferences snmp
Setting the SNMP root password allows administrators to restrict access to SNMP set operations that
allow important systems management interventions. You can configure the SNMP root password
normally (by typing all of the parameters in one command line) or interactively.
Using the omconfig preferences snmp command, you can also configure SNMP Set Operations.
NOTICE: Interactive mode is the more secure method of setting the SNMP root password. In noninteractive mode,
the values you enter for the newpw and confirmnewpw options appear on your system’s monitor when you type
them. In interactive mode, the values you type for passwords are masked.
The parameters for configuring the SNMP root password are the same whether you configure it
interactively or iteratively.
NOTE: If you specify setting=rootpw but do not specify the other name=value pair parameters, you enter
interactive mode, and the command line prompts you for the remaining values.
Table 4-17 shows the valid parameters for the command.
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87
Table 4-17.
SNMP Root Password Parameters
name=value pair
Description
setting=rootpw
Required.
oldpw=<oldpassword>
Enter the old SNMP root password.
newpw=<newpassword>
Sets the new SNMP root password.
confirmnewpw=<newpassword>
Confirms the new SNMP root password.
When you type omconfig preferences snmp setting=rootpw, the system prompts you to
supply values for the required parameters.
When you type omconfig preferences snmp, you must supply all of the parameters in the initial
command line. For example:
omconfig preferences snmp setting=rootpw oldpw=openmanage newpw=
serveradmin confirmnewpw=serveradmin
Table 4-18. SNMP Set Operations Parameters
name=value pair
Description
setting=snmpset
Required
enable=true
Allows SNMP Set Operations
enable=false
Disallows SNMP Set Operations
For example, to disallow SNMP Set Operations use the command:
omconfig preferences snmp setting=snmpset enable=false
NOTE: After executing the command to enable or disable SNMP Set Operations, restart services for the change to
take effect. On systems running supported Microsoft Windows operating systems, restart the Windows SNMP
Service. On systems running supported Red Hat Enterprise Linux and SUSE Linux Enterprise Server operating
systems, restart Server Administrator services by running the srvadmin-services.sh restart
command.
omconfig preferences useraccess
Depending on the policies of your enterprise, you may want to restrict the access that some user levels
have to Server Administrator. The omconfig preferences useraccess command allows you to grant or
withhold the right of Users and Power Users to access Server Administrator.
Table 4-19 shows the valid parameters for the command.
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omconfig: Managing Components Using the Instrumentation Service
Table 4-19.
Enabling User Access for Administrators, Power Users, and Users
Command
Result
Description
omconfig preferences useraccess enable=user
Grants Server
Least restrictive form
Administrator access of user access.
to Users, Power Users,
and Administrators.
omconfig preferences useraccess enable=poweruser
Grants Server
Administrator access
to Power Users and
Administrators.
omconfig preferences useraccess enable=admin
Grants Server
Most restrictive form
Administrator access of user access.
to Administrators only.
Excludes user level
access only.
omconfig system
Use the omconfig system commands to clear logs, determine how various shutdown actions occur, set
initial values or edit values for cost of ownership information, and determine how to respond to a hung
operating system.
omconfig system alertaction
You can use the omconfig system alertaction command to determine how Server Administrator responds
when a component has a warning or failure event.
Defining Alert Actions
An alert action is an action that you can specify for your system to take when specified conditions are
met. Alert actions determine in advance what actions are to be taken for warning or failure events on
intrusion, fans, temperatures, voltages, power supplies, memory, and redundancy.
For example, if a fan probe on your system reads a fan RPM of 300 and your minimum warning threshold
value for that fan probe is 600 RPM, then your system generates a fan probe warning. Alert action
settings determine how persons are notified of this event. For temperature, voltage, and current probe
readings that fall within the warning or failure range, you can also configure alert actions.
Syntax for Setting Alert Actions
Setting an alert action requires two name=value pairs. The first name=value pair is the event type.
The second name=value pair is the action you want to take for this event. For example, in the command:
omconfig system alertaction event=powersupply broadcast=true
the event is a power supply failure and the action is to broadcast a message to all Server
Administrator users.
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89
Available Alert Actions
Table 4-20 shows the alert actions for each component that allows you to configure an alert action
.
Table 4-20.
Alert Actions You Can Set for Warning and Failure Events
Alert Action Setting
Description
alert=true | false
true: Enables your system's console alert. When enabled, the monitor
attached to the system from which you are running Server Administrator
displays a visual alert message.
false: Disables your system's console alert.
broadcast=true | false
true: Enables a message or alert to be broadcast to all users who have an
active Terminal (or Remote Desktop) session (Windows) or to operators
that have an active shell on the local system (Linux).
false: Disables alert broadcasts.
clearall=true
Clears all actions for this event.
execappath=<string>
Sets the fully qualified path and filename of the application you want to
execute in case of an event for the component described in this window.
execapp=false
Disables the executable application.
Components and Events for Which You Can Set Alert Actions
Table 4-21 lists the components and the events for which you can set alert actions. Components are listed in
alphabetical order, except that warning events always precede failure events for a component.
Table 4-21.
90
Events for Which You Can Set Alert Actions
Event Name
Description
event=batterywarn
Sets actions when a battery probe detects a warning value.
event=batteryfail
Sets actions when a battery probe detects a failure value.
event=currentwarn
Sets actions when a current probe detects a warning value.
event=currentfail
Sets actions when a current probe detects a failure value.
event=fanwarn
Sets actions when a fan probe detects a warning value.
event=fanfail
Sets actions when a fan probe detects a failure value.
event=hardwarelogwarn
Sets actions when a hardware log detects a warning value.
event=hardwarelogfull
Sets actions when a hardware log is full.
event=intrusion
Sets actions when a chassis intrusion event is detected.
event=memprefail
Sets actions when a memory probe detects a prefailure value.
event=memfail
Sets actions when a memory probe detects a failure value.
event=powersupply
Sets actions when a power supply probe detects a failure value.
omconfig: Managing Components Using the Instrumentation Service
Table 4-21.
Events for Which You Can Set Alert Actions (continued)
Event Name
Description
event=powersupplywarn
Sets actions when a power supply probe detects a warning value.
event=processorwarn
Sets actions when a processor probe detects a warning value.
event=processorfail
Sets actions when a processor probe detects a failure value.
event=redundegrad
Sets actions when a redundant component becomes inoperative, resulting in
less than full redundancy for that component.
event=redunlost
Sets actions when one or more redundant components become inoperative,
resulting in a lost or a "no redundant components working" condition for
that component.
event=tempwarn
Sets actions when a temperature probe detects a warning value.
event=tempfail
Sets actions when a temperature probe detects a failure value.
event=voltwarn
Sets actions when a voltage probe detects a warning value.
event=voltfail
Sets actions when a voltage probe detects a failure value.
event=watchdogasr
Sets actions that Server Administrator performs on the next system startup
after a watchdog Automatic System Recovery (ASR) is performed for a hung
operating system.
Example Set Alert Action Commands
The examples below are valid example commands. For each successful command issued, the following
message appears:
Alert action(s) configured successfully.
Example Current Probe Actions
To disable system console alert if a current probe detects a warning event, type:
omconfig system alertaction event=currentwarn alert=false
To enable broadcast messages if a current probe detects a failure event, type:
omconfig system alertaction event=currentfail broadcast=true
Example Fan Probe Actions
To generate alerts when a fan probe detects a failure value, type:
omconfig system alertaction event=fanfail alert=true
Example Chassis Intrusion Actions
To clear all alert actions for chassis intrusion, type:
omconfig system alertaction event=intrusion clearall=true
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91
Commands for Clearing Logs
NOTE: For more information about alert messages, see the Dell OpenManage™ Server Administrator Messages
Reference Guide.
You can use the omconfig system command to clear three logs: the alert log, the command log, and the
hardware, or ESM, log.
To clear the contents of the alert log, type:
omconfig system alertlog action=clear
NOTE: Entering an invalid RAC user name may prevent the command log from displaying. Clearing the command
log resolves this condition.
To clear the contents of the command log, type:
omconfig system cmdlog action=clear
To clear the contents of the ESM log, type:
omconfig system esmlog action=clear
omconfig system pedestinations
Use the omconfig system pedestinations command to set IP addresses for alert destinations.
Table 4-22 shows the valid parameters for the command.
NOTE: You can either specify the index and IP address as parameters together OR you can set the community
string as a parameter alone.
Table 4-22.
omconfig system pedestinations
name=Value Pair
Description
destenable=true | false
true: Enables an individual platform event filter destination after a valid IP address
has been set.
false: Disables an individual platform event filter.
92
index=number
Sets the index for the destination.
ipaddress=ip address
Sets the IP address for the destination.
communitystr=text
Sets the text string that acts as a password and is used to authenticate SNMP
messages sent between the BMC and the destination management station.
omconfig: Managing Components Using the Instrumentation Service
omconfig system platformevents
Use the omconfig system platformevents command to configure shutdown action, if any, to be taken for a
specific platform event. You can also enable or disable platform event filter alert generation.
NOTICE: If you set a platform event shutdown action to anything other than "none", your system will forcefully
shutdown when the specified event occurs. This shutdown is initiated by firmware and is carried out without first
shutting down the operating system or any of the applications running on your system.
Table 4-23 shows the valid parameters for the command.
NOTE: Alert settings are mutually exclusive and can be set one at a time only. The action settings are also mutually
exclusive and can be set one at a time only. However, alert and action settings are not mutually exclusive of
each other.
Table 4-23.
Shutdown Action
Shutdown Action
Description
alert=disable
Disables the SNMP alert.
alert=enable
Enables the SNMP alert to be sent.
action=none
Takes no action when the system is hung or has crashed.
action=powercycle
Turns the electrical power to the system off, pauses, turns the power on, and
reboots the system.
action=poweroff
Turns off the electrical power to the system.
action=reboot
Forces the operating system to shut down and initiates system startup,
performs BIOS checks, and reloads the operating system.
Table 4-24 lists the components and the events for which you can set platform events. Components are
listed in alphabetical order, except that warning events always precede failure events for a component.
Table 4-24.
omconfig system platformevents
Event Name
Description
alertsenable=true | false
true: Enables generation of platform event filter alerts.
false: Disables generation of platform event filter alerts.
NOTE: This setting is independent of the individual platform event filter alert settings.
For a platform event filter to generate an alert, both the individual alert and the global
event alert must be enabled.
event=batterywarn
Sets action or enables/disables alert generation when a battery device detects that
the battery is pending a failure condition.
event=batteryfail
Sets action or enables/disables alert generation when a battery device detects that
the battery has failed.
event=discretevolt
Sets action or enables/disables alert generation when a discrete voltage probe
detects that the voltage is too low for proper operation.
omconfig: Managing Components Using the Instrumentation Service
93
Table 4-24.
94
omconfig system platformevents (continued)
Event Name
Description
event=fanfail
Sets action or enables/disables alert generation when a fan probe detects that the
fan is running too slow or not at all.
event=hardwarelogfail
Enables/disables alert generation when a hardware log detects a failure value.
event=intrusion
Sets action or enables/disables alert generation when a chassis has been opened.
event=powerwarn
Sets action or enables/disables alert generation when a power device probe detects
that the power supply, voltage regulator module, or DC to DC converter is
pending a failure condition.
event=powerabsent
Sets action or enables/disables alert generation when a processor probe detects
that the power supply is absent.
event=powerfail
Sets action or enables/disables alert generation when a power device probe detects
that the power supply, voltage regulator module, or DC to DC converter has failed.
event=processorwarn
Sets action or enables/disables alert generation when a processor probe detects
that the processor is running at less than peak performance or speed.
event=processorfail
Sets action or enables/disables alert generation when a processor probe detects
that the processor has failed.
event=processorabsent
Sets action or enables/disables alert generation when a processor probe detects
that the processor is absent.
event=redundegrad
Sets action or enables/disables alert generation when the system’s fans and/or
power supplies become inoperative, resulting in less than full redundancy for that
component.
event=redunlost
Sets action or enables/disables alert generation when the system’s fans and/or
power supplies become inoperative, resulting in a lost or a "no redundant
components working" condition for that component.
event=tempwarn
Sets action or enables/disables alert generation when a temperature probe detects
that the temperature is approaching the maximum high or low limits.
event=tempfail
Sets action or enables/disables alert generation when a temperature probe detects
that the temperature is either too high or low for proper operation.
event=voltfail
Sets action or enables/disables alert generation when a voltage probe detects that
the voltage is too low for proper operation.
event=watchdogasr
Enables or disables alert generation configured by the ASR when the system has
hung or is not responding.
omconfig: Managing Components Using the Instrumentation Service
omconfig system events
Use the omconfig system events command to enable and disable SNMP traps for components on
your system.
NOTE: Not all event types may be present on your system.
There are four parameters in the name=value pair component of the omconfig system events command:
•
source
•
type
•
severity
•
index
Source
At present, source=snmptraps is a required name=value pair because SNMP is currently the only
supported source of event notification for your system’s components.
omconfig system events source=snmptraps
Type
The event type refers to the name of the component(s) involved in the event. Table 4-25 shows the valid
parameters for system event types.
Table 4-25.
System Event Type Parameters
name=value pair
Description
type=accords
Configures events for AC power cords.
type=battery
Configures events for battery.
type=all
Configures events for all device types.
type=currents
Configures events for amperage.
type=fanenclosures
Configures events for fan enclosures.
type=fans
Configures events for fans.
type=intrusion
Configures events for chassis intrusion.
type=log
Configures events for logs.
type=memory
Configures events for memory.
type=powersupplies
Configures events for power supplies.
type=redundancy
Configures events for redundancy.
type=temps
Configures events for temperatures.
type=volts
Configures events for voltages.
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95
Severity
In the context of configuring events, severity determines how severe an event must be before Server
Administrator notifies you of the event for a component type. When there are multiple components of
the same type in the same system chassis, you can also specify whether you want to be notified for event
severity according to the number of the component by using the index=<n> parameter. Table 4-26 shows
the valid severity parameters.
Table 4-26.
System Event Severity Parameters
Command
Result
Description
omconfig system events type=<component name> Enables notification for Least restrictive form of event
severity=info
informational, warning, notification.
and critical events.
omconfig system events type=<component name> Enables notification for Omits informational event
severity=warning
warning and critical
notification, for example, when a
events.
component returns to normal status.
omconfig system events type=<component name> Enables notification for Restrictive form of event
severity=critical
critical events only.
notification.
omconfig system events type=<component name> Disables event
severity=none
notification.
No event notification.
Index
Index refers to the number of an event for a particular component. Index is an optional parameter.
When you omit the index parameter, events are configured for all components of the specified type, such
as all fans. When a system contains more than one fan, for example, you can enable or disable event
notification for a particular fan. An example command is as follows:
omconfig system events type=fan index=0 severity=critical
As a result of the example command, Server Administrator will send an SNMP trap only when the first
fan in the system chassis (index 0) has reached critical fan RPMs.
omconfig system webserver
Use the omconfig system webserver command to start or stop the Web server. Table 4-27 shows the valid
parameters for the command.
Table 4-27.
96
Web Server Configuration Parameters
name=value pair
Description
action=start
Starts the Web server.
action=stop
Stops the Web server.
action=restart
Restarts the Web server.
omconfig: Managing Components Using the Instrumentation Service
omconfig system recovery
Use the omconfig system recovery command to set the action that is to be taken when the operating
system has hung or crashed. You can also set the number of seconds that must pass before the system is
considered to have a hung operating system. Table 4-28 shows the valid parameters for the command.
NOTE: Upper and lower limits for the timer are dependent on your system model and configuration.
Table 4-28.
Recovery Parameters
name=value pair
Description
action=none
Takes no action when the operating system is hung or has crashed.
action=reboot
Shuts down the operating system and initiates system startup, performing BIOS
checks and reloading the operating system.
action=poweroff
Turns off electrical power to the system.
action=powercycle
Turns off electrical power to the system, pauses, turns the power on, and reboots the
system. Power cycling is useful when you want to reinitialize system components
such as hard drives.
timer=<n>
Number of seconds that must pass before a system is considered to have a hung
operating system (from 20 seconds to 480 seconds).
Example Recovery Commands
To set the action on hung operating system detection to powercycle, type:
omconfig system recovery action=powercycle
To set the amount of time that the system must be hung before a recovery action is initiated to 120
seconds, type:
omconfig system recovery timer=120
omconfig system shutdown
Use the omconfig system shutdown command to determine how the system shuts down. During system
shutdown, the default is to shut down the operating system before powering off the system. Shutting down
the operating system first closes down the file system before powering the system down. If you do not
want to shut down the operating system first, you can use the parameter osfirst=false. Table 4-29 shows
the valid parameters for the command.
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97
Table 4-29.
Shutdown Parameters
name=value pair
Description
action=reboot
Shuts down the operating system and initiates system startup, performing BIOS checks
and reloading the operating system.
action=poweroff
Turns the electrical power to the system off.
action=powercycle
Turns the electrical power to the system off, pauses, turns the power on, and reboots the
system. Power cycling is useful when you want to reinitialize system components such as
hard drives.
osfirst=true | false
true: Closes the file system and exits the operating system before shutting down the
system.
false: Does not close the file system or shut down the operating system before shutting
down the system.
Example Shutdown Commands
To set the shutdown action to reboot, type:
omconfig system shutdown action=reboot
To bypass operating system shutdown before the system is powered off, type:
omconfig system shutdown action=reboot osfirst=false
omconfig system thrmshutdown
Use the omconfig system thrmshutdown command to configure a thermal shutdown action. A thermal
shutdown can be configured to occur when a temperature probe detects a temperature probe warning or
failure event.
Table 4-30 shows the valid parameters for the command.
Table 4-30.
Thermal Shutdown Parameters
name=value pair
Description
severity=disabled | warning | failure
disabled: Disable thermal shutdown. An administrator must intervene.
warning: Perform a shutdown when a temperature warning event is
detected. A warning event occurs when any temperature probe inside a
chassis reads a temperature (in degrees Celsius) which exceeds the
maximum temperature warning threshold.
failure: Perform a shutdown when a temperature failure event is
detected.
A failure event occurs when any temperature probe inside a chassis reads
a temperature (in degrees Celsius) that exceeds the maximum
temperature failure threshold.
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omconfig: Managing Components Using the Instrumentation Service
Example Thermal Shutdown Commands
To trigger a thermal shutdown when a temperature probe detects a failure event, type:
omconfig system thrmshutdown severity=failure
To disable thermal shutdown so that an administrator has to initiate an omconfig system shutdown,
type:
omconfig system thrmshutdown severity=disabled
omconfig: Managing Components Using the Instrumentation Service
99
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omconfig: Managing Components Using the Instrumentation Service
omconfig system assetinfo: Editing Cost of
Ownership Values
omconfig System Asset Info Overview
The omconfig system assetinfo command helps you to edit a comprehensive set of parameters that
make up your system's total cost of ownership. This section explains the parameters that can be
reported and configured under the omconfig system assetinfo command.
Using the omconfig system assetinfo command, you can set governing values for configurable
objects. Examples of assetinfo configuration capabilities include setting values for system owner,
purchase price, details of any lease that is in effect, depreciation methods and rates, and location of the
system, warranty and extended warranty duration, outsourcing details, and service level agreement.
User Level Required for Adding Asset Information
Power Users and Administrators can add and edit asset information.
Adding Acquisition Information
Acquisition refers to the facts about a business entity's purchase or lease of a system. Use the
omconfig system assetinfo info=acquisition command to add detailed information about the
purchase or lease of a system. Table 5-1 shows the valid parameters for the command.
Table 5-1. omconfig system assetinfo info=acquisition
Command Command Command name=value pair 1 name=value pair 2
level 1
level 2
level 3
Use
omconfig
system
assetinfo
info=acquisition
costcenter=<text>
The name or code for the
business entity that acquired
the system.
omconfig system assetinfo: Editing Cost of Ownership Values
101
Table 5-1.
omconfig system assetinfo info=acquisition (continued)
Command Command Command name=value pair 1 name=value pair 2
level 1
level 2
level 3
Use
expensed=yes | no
Whether the system is
charged to a specific purpose
or department such as research
and development or sales.
installdate=
<mmddyy>
Date the system was put into
service.
ponum=<n>
Number of the document
that authorized payment for
the system.
purchasecost=<n> Price the owner paid for
the system.
purchasedate=
<mmddyy>
Date the owner purchased
the system.
signauth=<text>
Name of the person who
approved the purchase or the
service call on the system.
waybill=<n>
Receipt from the carrier for
the goods received.
Example Commands for Adding Acquisition Information
To provide a value for an acquisition parameter, type a command of the form: omconfig system assetinfo
info=acquisition <name=value pair 2>. For example, type:
omconfig system assetinfo info=acquisition purchasedate=122101
The following message appears:
Asset information set successfully.
You can enter more than one omconfig system assetinfo command at the same time, as long as all of the
parameters for name=value pair 2 belong to the same name=value pair 1. For example, if you want to
enter more than one parameter value for info=acquisition, use the following example as a syntax guide:
omconfig system assetinfo info=acquisition purchasecost=5000
waybill=123456 installdate=120501 purchasedate=050601 ponum=9999
signauth="John Smith" expensed=yes costcenter=finance
The following message appears:
Asset information set successfully.
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omconfig system assetinfo: Editing Cost of Ownership Values
Adding Depreciation Information
Depreciation is a set of methods for computing the devaluation of your asset over time. For example, the
depreciation of a system that is expected to have a useful life of 5 years would be 20 percent. Use the
omconfig system assetinfo=depreciation command to add details about how your system's depreciation
is to be computed. Table 5-2 shows the valid parameters for the command.
Table 5-2.
omconfig system assetinfo info=depreciation
Command Command Command name=value pair 1 name=value pair 2
level 1
level 2
level 3
Use
omconfig
system
assetinfo
info=depreciation
duration=<n>
Number of years or months over
which a system is depreciated.
method=<text>
Steps and assumptions used to
compute the system's depreciation.
percent=<n>
Portion of 100 that an asset is
devalued or depreciated.
unit=months | years Unit is months or years.
Example Commands for Adding Depreciation Information
To provide a value for a depreciation parameter, type a command of the form: omconfig system assetinfo
info=depreciation <name=value pair 2>. For example, type:
omconfig system assetinfo info=depreciation method=straightline
The following message appears:
Asset information set successfully.
You can enter more than one omconfig system assetinfo command at the same time, as long as all of the
parameters for name=value pair 2 belong to the same name=value pair 1. For an example, see "Example
Commands for Adding Acquisition Information."
omconfig system assetinfo: Editing Cost of Ownership Values
103
Adding Extended Warranty Information
Use the omconfig system extwarranty command to assign values for extended warranty information.
A warranty is a contract between the manufacturer or dealer and the purchaser of a system. The warranty
identifies the components that are covered for repair or replacement for a specified length of time or
usage. The extended warranty comes into force after the original warranty expires. For details on how to
edit warranty values, see "Adding Warranty Information."
Table 5-3 shows the valid parameters for the command.
Table 5-3.
omconfig system assetinfo info=extwarranty
Command Command Command name=value pair 1 name=value pair 2
level 1
level 2
level 3
Use
omconfig
system
assetinfo
info=extwarranty
cost=<cost>
Cost of the extended
warranty service.
enddate=<enddate>
Date the extended warranty
agreement ends.
provider=<provider>
Business entity that provides the
extended warranty service.
startdate=<startdate>
Date the extended warranty
service begins.
Example Command for Adding Extended Warranty Information
To provide a value for an extended warranty parameter, type a command of the form: omconfig system
assetinfo info=extwarranty <name=value pair 2>. For example, type:
omconfig system assetinfo info=extwarranty enddate=012503
The following message appears:
Asset information set successfully.
You can enter more than one omconfig system assetinfo command at the same time, as long as all of the
parameters for name=value pair 2 belong to the same name=value pair 1. For an example, see "Example
Commands for Adding Acquisition Information."
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omconfig system assetinfo: Editing Cost of Ownership Values
Adding Lease Information
A lease is an agreement to pay for the use of a system for a specified period of time. The lessor retains
ownership of the system. Table 5-4 shows the valid parameters for the command.
Table 5-4.
omconfig system assetinfo info=lease
Command Command Command name=value pair 1 name=value pair 2
level 1
level 2
level 3
Use
omconfig
system
assetinfo
info=lease
buyout=<amount>
Amount of money paid to purchase
a system from a lessor.
lessor=<lessor>
Business entity that is leasing the
system out.
multischedule=true |
false
Whether cost of leasing the system
is computed by more than one rate
schedule.
ratefactor=<factor>
Factor used to calculate the lease
payment.
value=<residual>
Fair market value of the system at
the end of the lease period.
Example Command for Adding Lease Information
To provide a value for a lease parameter, type a command of the form: omconfig system assetinfo info=
lease <name=value pair 2>. For example, type:
omconfig system assetinfo info=lease value=4500
The following message appears:
Asset information set successfully.
You can enter more than one omconfig system assetinfo command at the same time, as long as all of the
parameters for name=value pair 2 belong to the same name=value pair 1. For an example, see "Example
Commands for Adding Acquisition Information."
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105
Adding Maintenance Information
Maintenance refers to activities required to keep the system in good working order. Table 5-5 shows the
valid parameters for adding maintenance information.
Table 5-5.
omconfig system assetinfo info=maintenance
Command Command Command name=value pair 1
level 1
level 2
level 3
name=value pair 2
Use
enddate=<enddate>
Date the extended warranty
agreement ends.
provider=<provider>
Business entity providing the
maintenance service.
startdate=<startdate>
Date the maintenance begins.
restrictions=<string>
Activities not covered by the
maintenance contract.
omconfig
system
assetinfo
info=maintenance
Example Command for Adding Maintenance Information
To provide a value for a maintenance parameter, type a command of the form: omconfig system
assetinfo info=maintenance <name=value pair 2>. For example, type:
omconfig system assetinfo info=maintenance startdate=012504
The following message appears:
Asset information set successfully.
You can enter more than one omconfig system assetinfo command at the same time, as long as all of the
parameters for name=value pair 2 belong to the same name=value pair 1. For an example, see "Example
Commands for Adding Acquisition Information."
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omconfig system assetinfo: Editing Cost of Ownership Values
Adding Outsource Information
Outsourcing is the practice of contracting with another business to maintain the system in good working
order. Table 5-6 shows the valid parameters for adding outsource information.
Table 5-6.
omconfig system assetinfo info=outsource
Command Command Command name=value pair 1 name=value pair 2
level 1
level 2
level 3
Use
omconfig
system
assetinfo
info=outsource
levels=<n>
Levels of service offered by the
provider.
problemcomponent=
<component>
System component that
requires maintenance.
providerfee=<providerfee> Amount of money charged for
maintenance.
servicefee=<servicefee>
Amount of money charged for
service.
signauth=<name>
Person who signed or
authorized the service.
Example Command for Adding Outsource Information
To provide a value for an outsource parameter, type a command of the form: omconfig system assetinfo
info=outsource <name=value pair 2>. For example, type:
omconfig system assetinfo info=outsource providerfee=75
The following message appears:
Asset information set successfully.
You can enter more than one omconfig system assetinfo command at the same time, as long as all of the
parameters for name=value pair 2 belong to the same name=value pair 1. For an example, see "Example
Commands for Adding Acquisition Information."
omconfig system assetinfo: Editing Cost of Ownership Values
107
Adding Owner Information
The owner is the party that holds legal property title to the system. Table 5-7 shows the valid parameters
for adding owner information.
Table 5-7.
omconfig system assetinfo info=owner
Command Command Command name=value pair 1 name=value pair 2
level 1
level 2
level 3
Use
omconfig
system
assetinfo
info=owner
insuranceco=<company> Name of the insurance
company that insures the
system.
ownername=<business>
Business entity that owns the
system.
type=owned | leased |
rented
Whether the user of the system
owns, leases, or rents the
system.
Example Command for Adding Owner Information
To provide a value for an owner parameter, type a command of the form: omconfig system assetinfo
info=owner <name=value pair 2>. For example, type:
omconfig system assetinfo info=owner type=rented
The following message appears:
Asset information set successfully.
You can enter more than one omconfig system assetinfo command at the same time, as long as all of the
parameters for name=value pair 2 belong to the same name=value pair 1. For an example, see "Example
Commands for Adding Acquisition Information."
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omconfig system assetinfo: Editing Cost of Ownership Values
Adding Service Contract Information
A service contract is an agreement that specifies fees for preventive maintenance and repair of the
system. Table 5-8 shows the valid parameters for adding contract information.
Table 5-8.
omconfig system assetinfo info=service
Command Command Command name=value pair 1 name=value pair 2
level 1
level 2
level 3
Use
omconfig
system
assetinfo
info=service
renewed=true | false
Whether the service agreement
has been renewed.
type=<string>
Type of service covered by
the contract.
vendor=<business>
Business entity that offers service
on the system.
Example Command for Adding Service Information
To provide a value for a service parameter, type a command of the form: omconfig system assetinfo
info=service <name=value pair 2>. For example, type:
omconfig system assetinfo info=service vendor=fixsystemco
The following message appears:
Asset information set successfully.
You can enter more than one omconfig system assetinfo command at the same time, as long as all of the
parameters for name=value pair 2 belong to the same name=value pair 1. For an example, see "Example
Commands for Adding Acquisition Information."
omconfig system assetinfo: Editing Cost of Ownership Values
109
Adding Support Information
Support refers to technical assistance that the system user can seek when the user desires guidance on
the proper use of a system to perform tasks. Table 5-9 shows the valid parameters for adding
support information.
Table 5-9.
omconfig system assetinfo info=support
Command Command Command name=value pair 1 name=value pair 2 Use
level 1
level 2
level 3
omconfig
system
assetinfo
info=support
automaticfix=
Name of any application used to fix a
<programname> problem automatically.
helpdesk=
<text>
The help desk name or contact
information such as a phone number,
e-mail address, or web site address.
outsourced=true Whether an external business entity
| false
provides technical support or the system
owner's employees provide technical
support.
type=network |
storage
Whether support is for network attached
devices or for storage devices.
Example Command for Adding Support Information
To provide a value for a support parameter, type a command of the form: omconfig system assetinfo
info=support <name=value pair 2>. For example, type:
omconfig system assetinfo info=support outsourced=true
The following message appears:
Asset information set successfully.
You can enter more than one omconfig system assetinfo command at the same time, as long as all of the
parameters for name=value pair 2 belong to the same name=value pair 1. For an example, see "Example
Commands for Adding Acquisition Information."
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omconfig system assetinfo: Editing Cost of Ownership Values
Adding System Information
System information includes the primary user of the system, the phone number for the primary user, and
the system location. Table 5-10 shows the valid parameters for adding system information.
Table 5-10.
omconfig system assetinfo info=system
Command Command Command
level 1
level 2
level 3
name=value
pair 1
name=value pair 2
Use
location=<text>
Location of the system.
primaryphone=<n>
Phone number of the system's
primary user.
primaryuser=<user>
Primary user of the system.
omconfig
system
assetinfo
info=system
Example Command for Adding System Information
To provide a value for a system parameter, type a command of the form: omconfig system assetinfo
info=system <name=value pair 2>. For example, type:
omconfig system assetinfo info=system location=firstfloor
The following message appears:
Asset information set successfully.
You can enter more than one omconfig system assetinfo command at the same time, as long as all of the
parameters for name=value pair 2 belong to the same name=value pair 1. For an example, see "Example
Commands for Adding Acquisition Information."
omconfig system assetinfo: Editing Cost of Ownership Values
111
Adding Warranty Information
Use the omconfig system warranty command to assign values for warranty information. A warranty is a
contract between the manufacturer or dealer and the purchaser of a system. The warranty identifies the
components that are covered for repair or replacement for a specified length of time or usage. For details
on how to edit extended warranty values, see "Adding Extended Warranty Information." Table 5-11
shows the valid parameters for adding warranty information.
Table 5-11.
omconfig system assetinfo info=warranty
Command Command Command name=value pair 1 name=value
level 1
level 2
level 3
pair 2
Use
omconfig
system
assetinfo
info=warranty
cost=<cost>
Cost of the warranty service.
duration=
<duration>
Number of days or months that the
warranty is in force.
enddate=
<enddate>
Date the warranty agreement ends.
unit=days |
months
Whether the number for duration refers to
days or months.
Example Command for Adding Warranty Information
To provide a value for a warranty parameter, type a command of the form: omconfig system assetinfo
info=warranty <name=value pair 2>. For example, type:
omconfig system assetinfo info=warranty unit=days
The following message appears:
Asset information set successfully.
You can enter more than one omconfig system assetinfo command at the same time, as long as all of the
parameters for name=value pair 2 belong to the same name=value pair 1. For an example, see "Example
Commands for Adding Acquisition Information."
112
omconfig system assetinfo: Editing Cost of Ownership Values
omreport rac: Viewing Remote Access
Controller Components
The remote access controller (RAC) is a system component that provides a full set of system
management capabilities. Server Administrator integrates the RAC features into its interface,
allowing users to view and manage the controller from within Dell™ OpenManage™ Server
Administrator and Dell OpenManage IT Assistant.
NOTE: Some features documented may not be available on your system's RAC. For example, dial-up modem
use is supported only on DRAC III.
NOTE: The commands are available only on systems with DRAC III, DRAC III/XT, ERA, and ERA/O (not for
systems with DRAC 4 and DRAC 5).
The omreport rac command enables Server Administrator to display reports on RAC components.
Conventions for Parameter Tables
Parameter tables list input parameters for a command in the order in which they appear in the
command line interface. In "omreport rac: Viewing Remote Access Controller Components," the
parameters are listed in the order in which you must configure them.
The symbol |, often called pipe, is the logical exclusive or operator. For example, enable | disable
means that you can enable or disable the component or feature, but you cannot simultaneously
enable and disable the component or feature.
omreport rac Command Summary
NOTE: Although this section lists all possible omreport rac commands, the commands available on your
system depend on your system configuration. If you try to get help or execute a command for a component that
is not installed on your system, Server Administrator issues a message that the component or feature is not
found on the system.
Table 6-1 is a high-level summary of the omreport rac command. The column titled "Command
level 3" lists the major arguments that can be used with omreport rac. "User privilege required" refers
to the type of privilege you need to perform the command, where U=User, P=Power User, and A=
Administrator. "Use" is a very general statement about the actions that can be performed using the
omreport rac command. More details about syntax and use of the command appear later in
this section.
omreport rac: Viewing Remote Access Controller Components
113
Table 6-1.
Command
level 1
omreport rac Command Level 1, Level 2, and Level 3
Command
level 2
Command
level 3
User
privilege
required
Use
omreport
rac
authentication U, P, A
Enables or disables user access to the RAC based on how
the Administrator has set up each user’s local operating
system user account privileges.
dialinusers
U, P, A
Displays the dial-in user properties.
dialoutusers
U, P, A
Displays the dial-out user properties.
network
U, P, A
Displays the onboard NIC properties.
modem
U, P, A
Displays the onboard modem properties.
remote
U, P, A
Displays the remote features properties.
snmptraps
U, P, A
Displays the SNMP trap properties.
users
U, P, A
Displays the user name properties.
viewcertificate U, P, A
Displays the server or CA certificate.
Help With the omreport rac Command
Use the omreport rac -? command to get a list of the available commands for omreport rac.
omreport rac authentication
Use the omreport rac authentication command to determine whether local operating system
authentication of users is enabled or disabled for the RAC.
The RAC has two methods of authenticating user access: RAC authentication and local operating system
authentication. RAC authentication is always enabled. Administrators can set up specific user accounts
and passwords that allow access to the RAC.
Operating systems also require administrators to define different levels of users and user accounts; each
user level has different privileges. Local operating system authentication on the RAC is an option for
administrators who do not want to define one set of privileges for users in the operating system and a
separate set of users and accounts for the RAC. If you enable local operating system authentication for
the RAC, you enable any user with Administrator status on the operating system to log into the RAC.
114
omreport rac: Viewing Remote Access Controller Components
Example Command for omreport rac authentication
When you type:
omreport rac authentication
the results that display show whether authentication of users for access to the RAC using the operating
system user access definitions is disabled or enabled. For example:
omreport rac authentication
localauthenable=true
omreport rac dialinusers
Use the omreport rac dialinusers command to display the dial-in user property values. Table 6-2 displays
the valid parameters for the command.
Table 6-2.
omreport rac dialinusers
name=value pair
Description
username=<text>
Displays the dial-in user entry whose user name is specified by <text>.
index=<n>
Displays the dial-in user entry whose index is equal to n. The index is usually 0–15,
and specifies one of the 16 user positions on the RAC.
NOTE: The index number corresponds to a user position on the RAC.
omreport rac dialoutusers
The omreport rac dialoutusers command displays the demand dial-out user property values. Table 6-3
displays the valid parameters for the command.
Table 6-3.
omreport rac dialoutusers
name=value pair
Description
ipaddr=<text>
Displays the demand dial-out user entry whose IP address is specified by <text>.
This address is the IP address that the RAC calls back after being contacted by a
demand dial-out user.
index=<n>
Displays the demand dial-out user entry whose index is equal to n. The index is
usually 0 to 15 and specifies one of the 16 user positions on the RAC.
NOTE: The index number corresponds to a user position on the RAC.
omreport rac: Viewing Remote Access Controller Components
115
omreport rac network
Use the omreport rac network command to display the NIC property values.
omreport rac modem
Use the omreport rac modem command to display the onboard modem property values.
omreport rac remote
Use the omreport rac remote command to display the remote features property values.
omreport rac snmptraps
Use the omreport rac snmptraps command to display the SNMP trap property values. Table 6-4 displays
the valid parameters for the command.
Table 6-4.
omreport rac snmptraps
name=value pair
Description
ipaddr=<text>
Displays the trap entry whose IP address is specified by <text>.
index=<n>
Displays the trap entry whose index is equal to n. The index is usually 0 to 15 and
specifies one of the 16 trap positions on the RAC.
NOTE: The index number corresponds to the trap position on the RAC.
omreport rac users
Use the omreport rac users command to display the RAC user name properties. Table 6-5 displays the
valid parameters for the command.
Table 6-5.
116
omreport rac users
name=value pair
Description
username=<text>
Displays the RAC user entry whose user name is specified by <text>.
index=<n>
Displays the RAC user entry whose index is equal to n. The index is usually 0 to 15
and specifies one of the 16 user positions on the RAC.
NOTE: The index number corresponds to the user position on the RAC.
omreport rac: Viewing Remote Access Controller Components
omreport rac viewcertificate
Use the omreport rac viewcertificate command to view the server or certificate authority (CA) certificate
on the RAC. The only parameter you must specify is whether the certificate you want to view is a
CA certificate or a server certificate. Table 6-6 displays the valid parameters for the command.
Table 6-6.
omreport rac viewcertificate
name=value pair
Description
type=server | ca
Indicates whether the certificate you are viewing is a server certificate or a CA certificate.
In the sample output that follows, the subject is the company or organization that is requesting the
certificate signature. The issuer is the organization that is granting the certificate.
The following example is sample output from the command omreport rac viewcertificate type=ca:
Type CA Certificate
Serial l00
Keysize 1024
Valid From DSU+15:34:31
Valid To DSU+15:34:31
Subject CN=test, O=test, OU=test, L=Austin, ST=Texas, C=US,
E=name@company.com
Issuer CN=Thawte Test CA Root, O=Thawte Certification,
OU=TEST TEST TEST, L=San Jose, ST=CA, C=US,
E=name@thawte.com
omreport rac: Viewing Remote Access Controller Components
117
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omreport rac: Viewing Remote Access Controller Components
omconfig rac: Managing the Remote
Access Controller
The omconfig rac command enables you to configure the operational components of the Remote
Access Service (RAS). The CLI command omconfig rac uses the remote access controller (RAC)
software interface to configure these operational components.
NOTE: Some features documented may not be available on your system's RAC. For example, dial-up modem
use is supported only on DRAC III.
NOTE: The commands are available only on systems with DRAC III, DRAC III/XT, ERA, and ERA/O (not for
systems with DRAC 4 and DRAC 5).
For information on how to use Server Administrator to configure other system and main system
chassis components, see "omconfig: Managing Components Using the Instrumentation Service."
For information on how to use the omconfig system command to view and to manage cost of ownership
information (assetinfo), see "omconfig system assetinfo: Editing Cost of Ownership Values."
Often you must use omreport rac commands to get information you need to execute an omconfig rac
command. For information about the omreport rac command, see "omconfig rac: Managing the
Remote Access Controller."
Conventions for Parameter Tables
Parameter tables list input parameters for a command in the order in which you must configure
them instead of the order in which they appear in the command line interface.
The symbol |, often called pipe, is the logical exclusive or operator. For example, enable | disable
means that you can enable or disable the component or feature, but you cannot simultaneously
enable and disable the component or feature.
omconfig rac Command Summary
NOTE: You must reset the remote access controller after execution of each omconfig rac command. After
resetting the remote access controller, you must also wait approximately one minute before executing a
subsequent omconfig rac command.
NOTE: Although this section lists all possible omconfig rac commands, the commands available on your
system depend on your system configuration. If you try to get help or execute a command for a component that
is not installed on your system, Server Administrator issues a message that the component or feature is not
found on this system.
omconfig rac: Managing the Remote Access Controller
119
Table 7-1 is a high-level summary of the omconfig rac command. The column titled "Command level 3"
lists the major arguments that can be used with omconfig rac. "User privilege required" refers to the type
of privilege you need to execute the command, where U=User, P=Power User, and A=Administrator.
"Use" is a very general statement about the actions that can be performed using omconfig rac.
More details about syntax and use of the command appear later in this section.
Table 7-1.
Command
level 1
Command Level 1, Command Level 2, and Command Level 3 Options for omconfig rac
Command
level 2
Command
level 3
User
privilege
required
Use
omconfig
rac
120
authentication A
Sets authentication properties.
dialinusers
A
Sets dial-in user properties.
dialoutusers
A
Sets dial-out user properties.
generatecert
A
Generates an certificate signing request (CSR).
modem
A
Configures modem properties.
network
A
Configures network properties.
snmptraps
A
Sets SNMP trap properties.
remote
A
Configures remote features properties.
rmdialinuser
A
Removes the dial-in user.
rmdialoutuser
A
Removes the dial-out user.
rmsnmptrap
A
Removes the SNMP trap.
rmuser
A
Removes the user.
reset
A
Resets the RAC.
uploadcert
A
Uploads a server or CA certificate.
users
A
Sets user properties.
omconfig rac: Managing the Remote Access Controller
Help With the omconfig rac Command
Use the omconfig rac -? command to get a list of the available commands for omconfig rac.
Use omconfig rac <command level 3> -? to see a list of name=value pairs that you may need to use with
dialinusers, dialoutusers, modem, network, remote, and so on.
Type:
omconfig rac dialinusers -?
The following is an excerpt of the Server Administrator response:
dialinusers Set dial-in user properties.
Valid parameters are:
username=<text:Reqd>
index=<number:0-15>
password=<text>
callbacknumber=<number>
callbacktype=<text>
omconfig rac authentication
Use the omconfig rac authentication command to specify whether you want to enable local operating
system authentication of a system that is seeking to use the remote access interface. To enable local
operating system authentication, type:
omconfig rac authentication localauthenable=true
To disable local operating system authentication, type:
omconfig rac authentication localauthenable=false
Local Operating System Authentication
Use the omconfig rac authentication command to determine whether local operating system
authentication of users is enabled or disabled for the remote access controller.
The RAC has two methods of authenticating user access: RAC authentication and local operating system
authentication. RAC authentication is always enabled. Administrators can set up specific user accounts
and passwords that allow access to the RAC.
Operating systems also require administrators to define different levels of users and user accounts; each
user level has different privileges. Local operating system authentication on the RAC is an option for
administrators who do not want to define one set of privileges for users in the operating system and a
separate set of users and accounts for the RAC. If you enable local operating system authentication for
the RAC, you enable any user with Administrator status on the operating system to log into the RAC.
omconfig rac: Managing the Remote Access Controller
121
Example Command for omconfig rac authentication
When you type:
omconfig rac authentication localauthenable=true
you have configured the RAC to allow access to any user who has Administrator privileges on the
operating system.
When you type:
omconfig rac authentication localauthenable=false
you have configured the RAC to allow access only to users with user names and passwords that are
defined by the RAC administrator.
omconfig rac dialinusers
NOTE: Some features documented may not be available on your system's RAC. For example, dial-up modem use is
supported only on DRAC III.
Use the omconfig rac dialinusers command to specify requirements for each user who is to have dial-in
privileges. The administrator can specify values for a user name, password, and other properties for each
user. Table 7-2 shows the valid parameters for the command.
Table 7-2.
omconfig rac dialinusers
name=value pair
Description
username=<text>
Sets the user name for the point-to-point protocol (PPP) user.
index=<number:0–15>
Sets the dial-in user index to populate with user name, password, and
so on. The index specifies one of the 16 user "positions" on the RAC.
If an index is not specified for an omconfig rac command, the entry is
added to the next available position on the RAC.
If an index is specified for an omconfig rac command and another
entry exists for that position, the key field parameter is used to decide
if the command should be executed. If the key field supplied by the
user matches the key field of the entry on that specific position of the
RAC, the RAC entry is edited. Otherwise, the command fails.
password=<text>
Sets the password for this PPP user.
callbacknumber=<n>
Sets the callback number.
callbacktype=none | preset | usr-specified Sets the type of call back.
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omconfig rac: Managing the Remote Access Controller
Example Commands
The following example sets one name=value pair. Type:
omconfig rac dialinusers username=jdoe
The next example supplies values for all command parameters that you can use with the omconfig rac
dialinusers command. Type:
omconfig rac dialinusers username=jdoe index=0 password=steven70
callbacknumber=4441022 callbacktype=preset
The following message appears:
Command Successful. Please reset RAC card!
omconfig rac dialoutusers
Use the omconfig rac dialoutusers command to specify requirements for each user who is to have
dial-out privileges. The administrator can specify values for a surname, password, IP address, and other
properties for each dial-out user. Table 7-3 shows the valid parameters for the command.
Table 7-3.
omconfig rac dialoutusers
name=value pair
Description
ipaddr=<text>
Sets the IP address, which must be specified in dotted-decimal notation.
index=<number:0–15>
Sets the dial-out user index to populate with user name, password, and so on.
The index specifies one of the 16 user "positions" on the RAC.
If an index is not specified for an omconfig rac command, the entry is added to
the next available position on the RAC.
If an index is specified for an omconfig rac command and another entry exists for
that position, the key field parameter is used to decide if the command should be
executed. If the key field supplied by the user matches the key field of the entry on
that specific position of the RAC, the RAC entry is edited. Otherwise, the
command fails.
username=<text>
Sets the user name for the point-to-point protocol (PPP) dial-out user.
password=<text>
Sets the password for this PPP user.
phonenumber=<n>
Sets the number where you can reach the PPP user.
authtype=any | encrypted
Sets the type of authentication required for this user.
omconfig rac: Managing the Remote Access Controller
123
Example Commands
The following example sets one name=value pair. Type:
omconfig rac dialoutusers ipaddr=14.16.53.18
The following message appears:
Command Successful. Please reset RAC card!
The next example supplies values for all command parameters that you can use with the omconfig rac
dialoutusers command. Type:
omconfig rac dialoutusers ipaddr=14.16.53.18 index=1
username=sustein password=74chaunu phonenumber=4021027
authtype=any
The following message appears:
Command Successful. Please reset RAC card!
omconfig rac generatecert
Use the omconfig rac generatecert command to generate the certificate signing request (CSR) that you
send to a certificate authority (CA). A certificate authority is a business entity that is recognized in the
IT industry for meeting high standards of reliable screening, identification, and other important security
criteria. Examples of CAs include Thawte and VeriSign. After the CA receives your CSR, they review and
verify the information the CSR contains. If the applicant meets the CA’s security standards, the CA
issues a certificate to the applicant that uniquely identifies that applicant for transactions over networks
and on the Internet.
For the purposes of the RAC, you can use the omconfig rac generatecert command to generate a CSR.
Then you send the CSR in your application to the CA; the CA approves the CSR and sends you a
certificate. Then use the omconfig rac uploadcert command to upload the certificate to the RAC.
Uploading your new certificate replaces the default RAC certificate that you received with your RAC.
NOTE: Whenever you have a fully qualified pathname or filename that contains spaces, you must place double
quotation marks around the string. For example, if your update package is located at c:\security
files\certificates\sslcert.cer, you must place the fully qualified path in double quotations because there is a space
between "security" and "files." The following is an example command using the fully qualified path and filename
enclosed in quotation marks.
omconfig rac generatecert file="c:\security
files\certificates\sslcert.cer"
NOTE: Except for the two-letter country code, all other parameter values are strings. Parameters are required only
if indicated (required).
NOTE: This command makes use of the FTP protocol to communicate with the RAC firmware. The command may
fail if firewall software is installed in the system.
Table 7-4 shows required and optional parameters that are used to generate your CSR.
124
omconfig rac: Managing the Remote Access Controller
Table 7-4.
omconfig rac generatecert
name=value pair
Description
commonname=<text>
Enter a unique text string that distinguishes your system from others for which
you may be requesting certificates (required).
countrycode=<text>
Two-letter code representing the country where your system is located.
See ISO Standard 3166 (required).
emailaddress=<text>
The e-mail address of your system.
file=<text>
The absolute pathname or filename (with extension) of the CSR to be generated
(required). If you provide only a filename, the CSR file is placed in your current
working directory.
locality=<text>
City name or other location name where your system is located.
orgname=<text>
Name of your organization (required).
orgunit=<text>
Name of the sub-unit or department in your organization that is applying for the
certificate (required).
state=<text>
Name of your state or province.
Once you have generated the CSR, you can upload the certificate to the RAC using the omconfig rac
uploadcert command.
omconfig rac modem
Use the omconfig rac modem command to configure properties for your RAC’s modem, if present.
Table 7-5 shows the valid parameters for the command.
Table 7-5.
omconfig rac modem
name=value pair
Description
baudrate=<n>
The modem speed in bits per second. The default baud rate is 38400.
initstring=<text>
The required initialization string for your RAC.
dialtype=tone | pulse
Specifies whether the dial type for your modem is tone or pulse.
countrycode=<two-letter country code> Specifies the code for the country where your system is located.
Use the omconfig rac modem command with the countrycode parameter to specify the code for the
country where your system is located, for example:
omconfig rac modem countrycode=US
Table 7-6 shows the country codes that you must use to set this parameter.
omconfig rac: Managing the Remote Access Controller
125
Table 7-6.
126
Country Codes for countrycode Parameter of omconfig rac modem
Country
Country Code
Country
Country Code
Australia
AU
Japan
JA
Austria
AS
Korea
KO
Belgium
BE
Luxembourg
LU
Bulgaria
BU
Mexico
ME
Canada
CA
Netherlands
NE
China
CH
New Zealand
NW
Czech and Slovak Republic
CZ
Norway
NO
Denmark
DE
Philippines
PH
Finland
FI
Poland
PO
France
FR
Portugal
PR
Germany
GE
Russia
RU
Greece
GR
Singapore
SI
Hong Kong
HO
Spain
SP
Hungary
HU
Sweden
SW
India
IN
Switzerland
SZ
Ireland
IR
Taiwan
TA
Israel
IS
United Kingdom
UK
Italy
IT
United States
US
omconfig rac: Managing the Remote Access Controller
omconfig rac network
Use the omconfig rac network command to specify network parameter values. Table 7-7 shows the valid
parameters for the command.
Table 7-7.
omconfig rac network
name=value pair
Description
ipaddr=<text>
Sets the IP address, which must be specified in dotted-decimal notation.
subnetmask=<text>
Sets the subnet mask, which must be specified in dotted-decimal notation.
gateway=<text>
Sets the gateway, which must be specified in dotted-decimal notation.
nicenable=true | false
true: Enables the NIC.
false: Disables the NIC.
dhcpenable=true | false
true: Enables the DHCP.
false: Disables the DHCP.
smtpaddr=<text>
Sets the SMTP address, which must be specified in dotted-decimal notation.
smtpenable=true | false
true: Enables the SMTP.
false: Disables the SMTP.
dialinenable=true | false
true: Enables the dial-in communications.
false: Disables the dial-in communications.
dialindhcpenable=true | false
true: Enables the dial-in dynamic host configuration protocol (DHCP).
false: Disables the dial-in dynamic host configuration protocol (DHCP).
dialinpaddr=<text>
Sets the base IP address, which must be specified in dotted-decimal notation.
dialinauthtype=any | encrypted
Sets the type of authentication required.
Example Command
The following example sets one name=value pair. Type:
omconfig rac network ippaddr=123.169.555.216
The following message appears:
Command Successful. Please reset RAC card!
omconfig rac: Managing the Remote Access Controller
127
omconfig rac snmptraps
Use the omconfig rac snmptraps command to specify the SNMP trap property values. Table 7-8 shows
the valid parameters for the command.
Table 7-8.
omconfig rac snmptraps
name=value pair
Description
ipaddr=<text>
Sets the IP address, which must be specified in dotted-decimal notation.
index=<number:0–15>
Sets the SNMP trap index. The index specifies one of the 16 trap "positions" on the RAC.
If an index is not specified for an omconfig rac command, the entry is added to the
next available position on the RAC.
If an index is specified for an omconfig rac command and another entry exists for that
position, the key field parameter is used to decide if the command should be executed.
If the key field supplied by the user matches the key field of the entry on that specific
position of the RAC, the RAC entry is edited. Otherwise, the command fails.
trapsenable=true | false
true: Enables SNMP traps.
false: Disables SNMP traps.
community=<text>
Sets the community.
Example Commands
The following example sets one name=value pair.
Type:
omconfig rac snmptraps ipaddr=123.166.555.216 index=1 community=dell
The following message appears:
Command Successful. Please reset RAC card!
The next example supplies values for all command parameters that you can use with the omconfig rac
snmptraps command. Type:
omconfig rac snmptraps ipaddr=123.166.555.216 index=0 trapsenable=
true community=dell
The following message appears:
Command Successful. Please reset RAC card!
128
omconfig rac: Managing the Remote Access Controller
omconfig rac remote
Use the omconfig rac remote command to specify the remote features property values. Table 7-9 shows
the valid parameters for the command.
Table 7-9.
omconfig rac remote
name=value pair
Description
floppytftpenable=true | false
true: Enables remote boot.
false: Disables remote boot.
floppytftpipaddr=<text>
Sets the floppy TFTP address.
floppytftppath=<text>
Sets the floppy TFTP path.
fwupdatetftpipaddr=<text>
Sets the firmware TFTP address.
fwupdatetftppath=<text>
Sets the directory path on the TFTP server where the
firmware update images reside.
Example Command
The following example sets one name=value pair.
Type:
omconfig rac remote floppytftpenable=true
The following message appears:
Command Successful. Please reset RAC card!
omconfig rac rmdialinuser
Use the omconfig rac rmdialinuser command to remove a dial-in user. Table 7-10 shows the valid
parameters for the command.
Table 7-10.
omconfig rac rmdialinuser
name=value pair
Description
username=<text>
Specifies the user name of entry which is to be deleted. If no
user name is specified, an index must be specified.
index=<n>
Specifies the index of the entry which is to be deleted. If no
index is specified, a user name must be specified.
omconfig rac: Managing the Remote Access Controller
129
Example Command
The following example sets one name=value pair.
Type:
omconfig rac rmdialinuser username=jdoe
The following message appears:
Command Successful. Please reset RAC card!
omconfig rac rmdialoutuser
Use the omconfig rac rmdialoutuser command to remove a dial-out user. Table 7-11 shows the valid
parameters for the command.
Table 7-11.
omconfig rac rmdialoutuser
name=value pair
Description
username=<text>
Specifies the user name of entry which is to be deleted. If no
user name is specified, an index must be specified.
index=<n>
Specifies the index of the entry which is to be deleted. If no
index is specified, a user name must be specified.
Example Command
The following example sets one name=value pair.
Type:
omconfig rac rmdialoutuser username=jdoe
The following message appears:
Command Successful. Please reset RAC card!
130
omconfig rac: Managing the Remote Access Controller
omconfig rac rmsnmptrap
Use the omconfig rac rmsnmptrap command to remove an SNMP trap. Table 7-12 shows the valid
parameters for the command.
Table 7-12.
omconfig rac rmsnmptrap
name=value pair
Description
ipaddr=<text>
Specifies the IP address of entry which is to be deleted. This value
must be specified in dotted-decimal notation. If no IP address is
specified, an index must be specified.
index=<n>
Specifies the index of the entry which is to be deleted. If no index
is specified, an IP address must be specified.
Example Command
The following example sets one name=value pair.
Type:
omconfig rac rmsnmptrap ipaddr=123.199.152.216
The following message appears:
Command Successful. Please reset RAC card!
omconfig rac rmuser
Use the omconfig rac rmuser command to remove a user. Table 7-13 shows the valid parameters for
the command.
Table 7-13.
omconfig rac rmuser
name=value pair
Description
username=<text>
Specifies the user name of entry which is to be deleted. If no user name is
specified, an index must be specified.
index=<n>
Specifies the index of the entry which is to be deleted. If no index is
specified, a user name must be specified.
Example Command
The following example sets one name=value pair.
Type:
omconfig rac rmuser username=jdoe
The following message appears:
Command Successful. Please reset RAC card!
omconfig rac: Managing the Remote Access Controller
131
omconfig rac reset
Use the omconfig rac reset command to reset the RAC.
omconfig rac uploadcert
Use the omconfig rac uploadcert command to upload the server or CA certificate to the RAC. You must
enter the fully qualified pathname of the certificate and select the type of certificate to upload. The two
types of certificate that you can upload are a server certificate, or a certificate that you can obtain from a
certificate authority (CA). Examples of certificate authorities are Thawte Server CA or VeriSign, Inc.
NOTE: This command makes use of the FTP protocol to communicate with the RAC firmware. The command may
fail if firewall software is installed in the system.
Table 7-14 shows the valid parameters for the command.
Table 7-14.
omconfig rac uploadcert
name=value pair
Description
file=<text>
The absolute pathname (including filename and extension) of
the certificate to be uploaded to the RAC (required).
type=server | ca
Indicates whether the certificate you are uploading is a server
certificate or a CA certificate.
omconfig rac users
Use the omconfig rac users command to specify user property values. Table 7-15 shows the valid
parameters for the command.
Table 7-15.
omconfig rac users
name=value pair
Description
username=<text>
Sets the user name.
index=<number:0–15>
Specifies the index of the entry. The index specifies one of the
16 user "positions" on the RAC.
If an index is not specified for an omconfig rac command, the
entry is added to the next available position on the RAC.
If an index is specified for an omconfig rac command and
another entry exists for that position, the key field parameter is
used to decide if the command should be executed. If the key
field supplied by the user matches the key field of the entry on
that specific position of the RAC, the RAC entry is edited.
Otherwise, the command fails.
userpassword=<text>
132
Sets the password.
omconfig rac: Managing the Remote Access Controller
Table 7-15.
omconfig rac users (continued)
name=value pair
Description
numericpagingenable=true | false
true: Enables numeric paging.
false: Disables numeric paging.
numericpagernumber=<n>
Sets the numeric pager number.
numericpagermsg=<text>
Sets the numeric pager message.
emailpagingenable=true | false
true: Enables e-mail paging.
false: Disables e-mail paging.
emailaddress=<text>
Sets the e-mail address.
emailmsg=<text>
Set the e-mail message.
alphapagingenable=true | false
true: Enables the alpha paging.
false: Disables the alpha paging.
alphanumber=<n>
Sets the alpha number.
alphaprotocol=8N1 | 7E0
Sets the alpha protocol.
alphabaudrate=<n>
Sets the alpha baud rate.
alphapagerid=<n>
Sets the alpha pager ID.
apphacustommsg=<text>
Sets the alpha custom message.
alphapagerpassword=<text>
Sets the alpha pager password.
Example Command
The following example sets one name=value pair. Type:
omconfig rac users username=jdoe
The following message appears:
Command Successful. Please reset RAC card!
omconfig rac: Managing the Remote Access Controller
133
134
omconfig rac: Managing the Remote Access Controller
Using the Storage Management Service
Storage Management has a fully-featured command line interface (CLI) that enables you to perform
all of Storage Management’s reporting, configuration, and management functions from an operating
system command shell. The Storage Management CLI also enables you to script
command sequences.
The Storage Management CLI provides expanded options for the Dell™ OpenManage™ Server
Administrator omreport and omconfig commands. This chapter only documents the omreport and
omconfig commands that apply to Storage Management. See the Dell OpenManage Installation and
Security User's Guide for installation information. See the Storage Management online help and
Dell OpenManage Server Administrator Storage Management User’s Guide for more information on
Storage Management.
CLI Command Syntax
Like all the Server Administrator commands, the omreport and omconfig command syntax consists
of specifying command “levels.” The first command level is the command name: omreport or
omconfig. Subsequent command levels provide a greater degree of specificity regarding the type of
object on which the command will operate or the information that the command will display.
For example, the following omconfig command syntax has three levels:
omconfig storage pdisk
The following table describes these command levels.
Table 8-1. Example Command Levels
Command level 1
Command level 2
Command level 3
omconfig
Use
Specifies the command
storage
Indicates the Server Administrator service (in
this case, Storage Management) that
implements the command
pdisk
Specifies the type of object on which the
command operates
Following the command levels, the omreport and omconfig command syntax may require one or
more name=value pairs. The name=value pairs specify exact objects (such as a specific physical
disk) or options (such as “blink” or “unblink”) that the command will implement.
Using the Storage Management Service
135
For example, the following omconfig command syntax for blinking a physical disk has three levels and
three name=value pairs:
omconfig storage pdisk action=blink controller=id pdisk=<PDISKID>
where PDISKID=<connector:enclosureID:portID | connector:targetID>
In this example, the id in controller=id is the controller number such that controller 1 would be
specified as controller=1.
Syntax for Required, Optional, and Variable Command Elements
The omreport and omconfig commands have multiple name=value pairs. These name=value pairs may
include required, optional, and variable parameters. The following table describes the syntax used to
indicate these parameters.
Table 8-2.
Syntax For Name=Value Pairs For Parameters
Syntax
Description
controller=id
Indicates the controller ID as reported by the omreport storage controller
command. To obtain these values, enter omreport storage controller to display the
controller IDs and then enter omreport storage pdisk controller=id to display the
IDs for the physical disks attached to the controller.
For example, the controller=id parameter might be specified as controller=1.
connector=id
Indicates the connector ID as reported by the omreport command. To obtain this
value, enter omreport storage controller to display the controller IDs and then
enter omreport storage connector controller=id to display the IDs for the
connectors attached to the controller.
For example, the connector=id parameter might be specified as connector=2.
vdisk=id
Indicates the virtual disk ID as reported by the omreport command. To obtain this
value, enter omreport storage controller to display the controller IDs and then
enter omreport storage vdisk controller=id to display the IDs for the virtual disks
on the controller.
For example, the vdisk=id parameter might be specified as vdisk=3.
enclosure=
<ENCLOSUREID>
Indicates a particular enclosure by specifying either enclosure=connector or
enclosure=connector:enclosureID.
To obtain these values, you would enter omreport storage controller to display the
controller IDs and then enter omreport storage enclosure controller=id to display
the IDs for the enclosures attached to the controller.
136
Using the Storage Management Service
Table 8-2.
Syntax For Name=Value Pairs For Parameters (continued)
Syntax
Description
pdisk=<PDISKID>
Indicates a particular physical disk by specifying either connector:targetID or
connector:enclosureID:portID.
To obtain the values for the connector, enclosure, and physical disk (targetID or
portID), you would enter omreport storage controller to display the controller IDs
and then enter omreport storage pdisk controller=id to display the IDs for the
physical disks attached to the controller.
battery=id
Indicates the battery ID as reported by the omreport command. To obtain this
value, enter omreport storage controller to display the controller IDs and then
enter omreport storage battery controller=id to display the ID for the
controller battery.
<>
The caret symbols (< >) enclose variable elements that you must specify.
For example, the name=<string> parameter might be specified as name=
VirtualDisk1.
[]
The bracket symbols ([ ]) indicate optional elements that you can choose to
specify or not.
For example, when creating a virtual disk, the [name=<string>] parameter
indicates that you have the option of specifying the virtual disk name. If you omit
this parameter from the syntax, then a default name for the virtual disk is
chosen for you.
|
The pipe symbol (|) separates two or more options from which one only must
be selected.
For example, when creating a virtual disk, the cachepolicy=d|c indicates that the
cache policy must be specified as either cachepolicy=d or cachepolicy=c.
User Privileges for omreport storage and omconfig storage
Storage Management requires Administrator privileges to use the omconfig storage command. User and
Power User privileges are sufficient to use the omreport storage command.
omreport Command
The following sections provide the omreport command syntax required to display the status of various
storage components.
Using the Storage Management Service
137
omreport Storage Help
The following table provides the omreport storage command syntax.
Table 8-3.
omreport storage help
Command Level 1 Command Level 2 Command Level 3 Use
omreport
storage
Displays a list of storage components for which omreport
commands are available.
pdisk
Displays a list of the omreport storage pdisk parameters for
displaying physical disk information.
vdisk
Displays a list of omreport storage vdisk parameters for
displaying virtual disk information.
controller
Displays a list of the omreport storage controller
parameters for displaying controller information.
enclosure
Displays a list of the omreport storage enclosure
parameters for displaying enclosure information.
connector
Displays a list of the omreport storage connector
parameters for displaying connector information.
battery
Displays a list of the omreport storage battery parameters
for displaying battery information.
globalinfo
Displays a list of the omreport storage globalinfo
parameters for displaying global storage property
information.
omreport Controller Status
Table 8-4.
omreport Controller Commands
Required Command Levels (1, 2, 3) Optional name=value pairs
Use
omreport storage controller
Displays property information for
all controllers attached to the
system.
controller=id
Displays the specified controller
where id is the controller number. and all attached components such
as enclosures, virtual disks,
For example: controller=0
physical disks, and so on.
138
Using the Storage Management Service
omreport Global Information (Smart Thermal Shutdown Status)
Table 8-5.
omreport Global Information Commands
Required Command Levels (1, 2, 3) Optional name=value pairs
Use
omreport storage globalinfo
Displays whether smart thermal
shutdown is enabled or disabled. See
the "omconfig Global Enable Smart
Thermal Shutdown" command for
more information.
omreport Battery Status
Table 8-6.
omreport Battery Commands
Required Command Levels (1, 2, 3) Optional name=value pairs
Use
omreport storage battery
Displays all batteries present on all
controllers on the system. (Some
controllers do not have batteries).
controller=id
where id is the controller
number. For example:
controller=0
Displays the battery on the specified
controller.
omreport Connector Status
Table 8-7.
omreport Connector Commands
Required Command Levels (1, 2, 3) Optional name=value pairs
Use
omreport storage connector
Displays all connectors present on all
controllers on the system.
NOTE: This command works only when
the controller id is specified.
controller=id
where id is the controller
number. For example:
controller=0
Displays the connector on the specified
controller.
Using the Storage Management Service
139
Table 8-7.
omreport Connector Commands (continued)
Required Command Levels (1, 2, 3) Optional name=value pairs
controller=id
where id is the controller
number. For example:
controller=0
Use
Displays information for the specified
connector on the controller.
connector=id
where id is the connector
number. For example:
connector=0
omreport Enclosure Status
Table 8-8.
omreport Enclosure Commands
Required Command Levels (1, 2, 3) Optional name=value pairs
Use
omreport storage enclosure
Displays property information for
all enclosures attached to the
system.
controller=id enclosure=
<ENCLOSUREID>
Displays the specified enclosure
and its components.
where id is the controller number
and the enclosure number. For
example: controller=0
enclosure=2
omreport Temperature Probe Status
Table 8-9.
omreport Temperature Probe Commands
Required Command Levels (1, 2, 3) Optional name=value pairs
and name=value pair
Use
omreport storage enclosure
Displays property information
for all enclosures attached to
the system.
controller=id enclosure=
<ENCLOSUREID>
info=temps
where id is the controller number
and the enclosure number. For
example: controller=0 enclosure=2
140
Using the Storage Management Service
Displays the temperature probes
for the specified enclosure.
Table 8-9.
omreport Temperature Probe Commands
Required Command Levels (1, 2, 3) Optional name=value pairs
and name=value pair
Use
controller=id enclosure=
<ENCLOSUREID>
info=temps index=n
Displays the specified
temperature probe.
where id is the controller number
and the enclosure number and “n” is
the number of a temperature probe.
For example: controller=0
enclosure=2 info=temps index=1
omreport Fan Status
Table 8-10.
omreport Fan Status
Required Command Levels (1, 2, 3) Optional name=value pairs
and name=value pair
Use
omreport storage enclosure
Displays property information for
all enclosures attached to the system.
controller=id enclosure=
Displays the fans for the specified
<ENCLOSUREID> info=fans enclosure.
where id is the controller number
and the enclosure number.
For example: controller=0
enclosure=2
NOTE: For SCSI controllers, the ID
specified in enclosure=
<ENCLOSUREID> is the connector
number and for Serial Attached
SCSI (SAS) controllers, ID is the
connectorNumber:EnclosureIndex.
controller=id enclosure=
<ENCLOSUREID>
info=fans index=n
Displays the specified fan.
where id is the controller number
and the enclosure number and “n”
is the number of a fan.
For example: controller=0
enclosure=2 info=fans index=1
Using the Storage Management Service
141
omreport Power Supply Status
Table 8-11.
omreport Power Supply Commands
Required Command Levels (1, 2, 3) Optional name=value pairs
and name=value pair
Use
omreport storage enclosure
Displays property information for
all enclosures attached to the system.
controller=id enclosure=
<ENCLOSUREID> info=
pwrsupplies
Displays the power supplies for the
specified enclosure.
where id is the controller number
and the enclosure number.
For example: controller=0
enclosure=2
controller=id enclosure=
<ENCLOSUREID> info=
pwrsupplies index=n
Displays the specified power
supply.
where id is the controller number
and the enclosure number and “n”
is the number of a power supply.
For example: controller=0
enclosure=2 info=pwrsupplies
index=1
omreport EMM Status
Table 8-12.
omreport EMM Commands
Required Command Levels (1, 2, 3) Optional name=value pairs
and name=value pair
Use
omreport storage enclosure
Displays property information for
all enclosures attached to the
system.
controller=id enclosure=
<ENCLOSUREID>
info=emms
where id is the controller number
and the enclosure number.
For example: controller=0
enclosure=2
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Displays the enclosure
management modules (EMMs)
for the specified enclosure.
Table 8-12.
omreport EMM Commands (continued)
Required Command Levels (1, 2, 3) Optional name=value pairs
and name=value pair
Use
controller=id enclosure=
<ENCLOSUREID>
info=emms index=n
Displays the specified EMMs.
where id is the controller number
and the enclosure number and “n”
is the number of an EMM.
For example: controller=0
enclosure=2
info=emms index=1
omreport Physical Disk Status
Table 8-13.
omreport Physical Disk Commands
Required Command Levels (1, 2, 3) and Optional name=value pairs
name=value pair
Use
omreport storage pdisk controller=id
Displays all physical disks
attached to the specified
controller.
where id is the controller number. For
example: controller=0
connector=id
Displays all physical disks
attached to the specified
connector on the controller.
where id is the connector
number. For example:
connector=1
vdisk=id
Displays all physical disks
included in the specified virtual
where id is the virtual disk
number. For example: vdisk=1 disk on the controller.
pdisk=connectorID : targetID Displays the specified physical
| connectorID : enclosureID : disk on the specified connector
slotID
on the controller.
where connectorID:targetID is
the connector number and the
physical disk number and
connectorID:enclosureID:slotID
is the connector number,
enclosure number, and slot
number.
For example: pdisk=0:2 or
pdisk=0:1:2
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omreport Virtual Disk Status
Table 8-14.
omreport Virtual Disk Commands
Required Command Levels (1, 2, 3) Optional name=value pairs
Use
omreport storage vdisk
Displays property information for
all virtual disks on all controllers.
controller=id
where id is the controller number.
For example: controller=0.
controller=id vdisk=id
where id is the controller number
and the virtual disk number. For
example: controller=0 vdisk=1.
Displays all virtual disks on the
specified controller.
Displays the specified virtual disk
on the controller.
omconfig Global Commands
The following sections provide the omconfig command syntax required to execute the global commands.
When executed, these commands apply to all controllers. These global commands also correspond to the
global tasks provided by the Storage tree view object’s Information/Configuration subtab.
Table 8-15.
omconfig Global Commands
Required Command Levels (1, 2, 3)
Optional name=value pairs
omconfig storage globalinfo
action=enablests
action=disablests
action=globalrescan
omconfig Global Enable Smart Thermal Shutdown
By default, the operating system and server shut down when the PV220S and PV221S enclosures reach a
critical temperature of 0 or 50° Celsius. If you have implemented connector redundancy on the PV220S
and PV221S enclosures, however, you can specify that only the enclosure and not the operating system
and server be shut down when the enclosure reaches a critical temperature of 0 or 50° Celsius. Specifying
that only the enclosure be shutdown during excessive temperatures is known as Smart Thermal
Shutdown. See the online help for more information.
Use the following omconfig command syntax to enable smart thermal shutdown.
Complete Syntax
omconfig storage globalinfo action=enablests
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Example Syntax
The omconfig command syntax for enabling thermal shutdown does not require that you specify a
controller or enclosure ID. To enable thermal shutdown, enter the following:
omconfig storage globalinfo action=enablests
NOTE: You can use the omreport storage globalinfo command to determine whether smart thermal shutdown is
currently enabled or disabled. The status of smart thermal shutdown is also displayed by the Server Administrator
graphical user interface. To locate this status, select the Storage object and the Information/Configuration tab.
omconfig Global Disable Smart Thermal Shutdown
If you have previously enabled smart thermal shutdown using the omconfig command, you can disable
smart thermal shutdown and return the system to its default setting. When smart thermal shutdown is
disabled, the operating system and the server will shut down when the PV220S and PV221S enclosures
reach a critical temperature of 0 or 50° Celsius.
Use the following omconfig command syntax to disable smart thermal shutdown. This command will
disable smart thermal shutdown for all controllers.
Complete Syntax
omconfig storage globalinfo action=disablests
Example Syntax
The omconfig command syntax for disabling thermal shutdown does not require that you specify a
controller or enclosure ID. To disable thermal shutdown, enter the following:
omconfig storage globalinfo action=disablests
NOTE: You can use the omreport storage globalinfo command to determine whether smart thermal shutdown is
currently enabled or disabled. The status of smart thermal shutdown is also displayed by the Server Administrator
graphical user interface. To locate this status, select the Storage object and the Information/Configuration tab.
omconfig Global Rescan Controller
Use the following omconfig command syntax to rescan all controllers on the system. See the online help
for more information about using this command.
Complete Syntax
omconfig storage globalinfo action=globalrescan
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Example Syntax
The omconfig command syntax for rescanning all controllers on the system does not require that you
specify a controller ID. To do a global rescan of all controllers, enter the following:
omconfig storage globalinfo action=globalrescan
NOTE: Global rescan is not supported on non-RAID SCSI and SAS controllers. You must reboot the system before
Storage Management can see configuration changes on non-RAID SCSI controllers.
omconfig Controller Commands
The following sections provide the omconfig command syntax required to execute controller tasks.
NOTICE: The omconfig storage controller action=resetconfig controller=id resets the controller configuration.
Resetting the controller configuration permanently destroys all data on all virtual disks attached to the controller.
If the system or boot partition resides on these virtual disks, it will be destroyed.
Table 8-16.
omconfig Controller Commands
Required Command Levels (1, 2, 3)
Optional name=value pairs
omconfig storage controller
action=rescan controller=id
action=globalrescan
action=enablealarm controller=id
action=disablealarm controller=id
action=quietalarm controller=id
action=testalarm controller=id
action=resetconfig controller=id [force=yes]
action=createvdisk controller=id raid=<c| r0| r1| r1c| r5| r10|
r50> size=<number | max | min> pdisk=<PDISKID>
[stripesize=< 2kb| 4kb| 8kb| 16kb| 32kb| 64kb| 128kb>]
[cachepolicy=<d | c>] [readpolicy=<ra| nra| ara| rc| nrc>]
[writepolicy=<wb | wt | wc | nwc | fwb>] [name=<string>]
[spanlength=<n>]
action=setrebuildrate controller=id
rate=<0 to 100>
action=setbgirate controller=id
rate=<0 to 100 >
action=setreconstructrate controller=id
rate=<0 to 100>
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Table 8-16.
omconfig Controller Commands (continued)
Required Command Levels (1, 2, 3)
Optional name=value pairs
action=setcheckconsistency controller=id
rate=<0 to 100>
action=exportlog controller=id
action=importforeignconfig controller=id
action=importrecoverforeignconfig controller=id
action=clearforeignconfig controller=id
action=setpatrolreadmode controller=id
mode=manual | auto | disable
action=startpatrolread controller=id
action=stoppatrolread controller=id
omconfig Rescan Controller
Use the following omconfig command syntax to rescan a controller. See the online help for more
information about using this command.
Complete Syntax
omconfig storage controller action=rescan controller=id
where id is the controller ID as reported by the omreport storage controller command.
Example Syntax
For example, to rescan controller 1, enter:
omconfig storage controller action=rescan controller=1
NOTE: The rescan controller is not supported on non–RAID SCSI and SAS controllers. You must reboot the system
before Storage Management can see configuration changes on non-RAID SCSI controllers.
omconfig Global Rescan Controller
The omconfig storage controller action=globalrescan command was supported in previous releases of
Storage Management. This command has been replaced by the omconfig storage globalinfo action=
globalrescan command. When rescanning all controllers on the system and creating CLI scripts, it is
preferable to use the omconfig storage globalinfo action=globalrescan command.
See the online help for more information about using this command.
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147
omconfig Enable Controller Alarm
Use the following omconfig command syntax to enable the controller alarm. See the online help for
more information about using this command.
Complete Syntax
omconfig storage controller action=enablealarm controller=id
where id is the controller ID as reported by the omreport storage controller command.
Example Syntax
For example, to enable the alarm on controller 1, enter:
omconfig storage controller action=enablealarm controller=1
omconfig Disable Controller Alarm
Use the following omconfig command syntax to disable the controller alarm. See the online help for
more information about using this command.
Complete Syntax
omconfig storage controller action=disablealarm controller=id
where id is the controller ID as reported by the omreport storage controller command.
Example Syntax
For example, to disable the alarm on controller 1, enter:
omconfig storage controller action=disablealarm controller=1
omconfig Quiet Controller Alarm
Use the following omconfig command syntax to silence an activated controller alarm. See the online
help for more information about using this command.
Complete Syntax
omconfig storage controller action=quietalarm controller=id
where id is the controller ID as reported by the omreport storage controller command.
Example Syntax
For example, to quiet the alarm on controller 1, enter:
omconfig storage controller action=quietalarm controller=1
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omconfig Test Controller Alarm
Use the following omconfig command syntax to test the functionality of the controller alarm. The alarm
will sound for about two seconds. See the online help for more information about using this command.
Complete Syntax
omconfig storage controller action=testalarm controller=id
where id is the controller ID as reported by the omreport storage controller command.
Example Syntax
For example, to test the alarm on controller 1, enter:
omconfig storage controller action=testalarm controller=1
omconfig Reset Controller Configuration
Use the following omconfig command syntax to reset the controller configuration.
NOTICE: Resetting a configuration permanently destroys all data on all virtual disks attached to the controller. If
the system or boot partition resides on these virtual disks, it will be destroyed. You may receive a warning message
if this command will result in deleting the system or boot partition. However, this warning message is not generated
in all circumstances. You should be certain that you are not deleting the system or boot partition or other vital data
when using this command.
Complete Syntax
omconfig storage controller action=resetconfig controller=id
where id is the controller ID as reported by the omreport storage controller command.
In some circumstances, you may receive a warning message if this command will delete the system or
boot partition. You can override this warning by using the force=yes parameter. In this case, the syntax is
as follows:
omconfig storage controller action=resetconfig controller=id force=
yes
Example Syntax
For example, to reset the configuration on controller 1, enter:
omconfig storage controller action=resetconfig controller=1
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omconfig Create Virtual Disk
The online help provides additional information about creating virtual disks.
The omconfig syntax for creating a virtual disk has several parameters. You must specify the
following parameters:
•
Controller (controller=id)
•
RAID level (raid=<c| r0| r1| r1c| r5| r10| r50>)
•
Size (size=<number | max | min>)
•
Physical disk is specified as either:
pdisk=connector:enclosureID:portID
or
pdisk=connector:targetID
Storage Management supplies default values for any of the other parameters that you do not specify.
Complete Syntax
omconfig storage controller action=createvdisk controller=id raid=<c|
r0| r1| r1c| r5| r10| r50> size=<number | max | min> pdisk=<PDISKID>
[stripesize=< 2kb| 4kb| 8kb| 16kb| 32kb| 64kb| 128kb>] [cachepolicy=<d |
c>] [readpolicy=<ra | nra | ara | rc| nrc>] [writepolicy=<wb| wt| wc| nwc
| fwb>] [name=<string>] [spanlength=<n>]
Parameter Specification for Create and Reconfigure Virtual Disk
The following sections indicate how to specify the omconfig storage controller action=createvdisk
parameters.
controller=id Parameter (Required)
raid=<c| r0| r1| r1c| r5| r10| r50> Parameter (Required)
size=<number | max | min> Parameter (Required)
pdisk=<connector:targetID,connector:targetID,.....> Parameter (Required)
[stripesize=< 2kb| 4kb| 8kb| 16kb| 32kb| 64kb| 128kb>] Parameter (Optional)
[cachepolicy=<d | c>] Parameter (Optional)
[readpolicy=<ra| nra| ara| rc| nrc>] Parameter (Optional)
[writepolicy=<wb| wt| wc| nwc | fwb>] Parameter (Optional)
[name=<string>] Parameter (Optional)
[spanlength=<n>] Parameter (Optional)
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controller=id Parameter (Required)
Specify the controller ID as reported by the omreport storage controller command. For example:
controller=2
raid=<c| r0| r1| r1c| r5| r10| r50> Parameter (Required)
Use the raid=<c| r0| r1| r1c| r5| r10| r50> parameter to specify concatenation or a RAID level for a
virtual disk. Different controllers support different RAID levels. See the online help for information on
the RAID levels a controller supports and for general information about RAID levels and concatenation.
The following table indicates how to specify the raid=n parameter for each RAID level
and concatenation.
Table 8-17.
Raid Level and Concatenation
RAID Level or Concatenation
raid=n Parameter Specification
RAID 0
raid=r0
RAID 1
raid=r1
RAID 5
raid=r5
RAID 10
raid=r10
RAID 50
raid=r50
RAID 1-concatenated
raid=r1c
Concatenation
raid=c
size=<number | max | min> Parameter (Required)
The following table indicates how to specify the size=<number | max | min> parameter.
Table 8-18.
Size Parameter
size=<number | max | min> Parameter
Specification
Description
size=<n>
Use this specification to indicate a specific size for the virtual
disk. The virtual disk size may be specified in b (bytes), m
(megabytes), or g (gigabytes). For example, size=500m indicates
that the virtual disk should be 500 MB.
size=max
To create a virtual disk that is the maximum size possible, specify
size=max. When creating a RAID 50 virtual disk, this parameter
must be specified as size=max.
size=min
To create a virtual disk that is the minimum size possible, specify
size=min.
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PDISKID=<connector:enclosureID:portID | connector:targetID>
Use this parameter to specify the physical disks that will be included in the virtual disk.
When reconfiguring a virtual disk, you must specify all physical disks to be included in the reconfigured
virtual disk. The physical disk specification applies to physical disks that were in the original virtual disk
and will continue to be in the reconfigured virtual disk and to any new physical disks being added to the
reconfigured virtual disk. Some controllers allow you to remove a physical disk from a virtual disk. In this
case, you would not specify the physical disk to be removed.
The pdisk=<PDISKID> parameter indicates a physical disk by specifying either
connector:enclosureID:portID or connector:targetID.
stripesize=< 2kb| 4kb| 8kb| 16kb| 32kb| 64kb| 128kb>] Parameter
(Optional)
Different controllers support different stripe sizes. See the online help for information on which stripe
sizes are supported for a controller. All stripe sizes are specified in kilobytes. For example, when
specifying 128 KB as the stripe size, enter:
stripesize=128kb
[cachepolicy=<d | c>] Parameter (Optional)
Different controllers support different cache policies. See the online help for more information.
The following table indicates how to specify the [cachepolicy=<d | c>] parameter for each of the
cache policies.
Table 8-19.
Cache Policy Parameters
Cache Policy
cachepolicy=d | c Parameter Specification
Direct I/O
cachepolicy=d
Cache I/O
cachepolicy=c
[readpolicy=<ra| nra| ara| rc| nrc>] Parameter (Optional)
Different controllers support different read policies. See the online help for more information.
The following table indicates how to specify the [readpolicy=<ra| nra| ara| rc| nrc>] parameter for
each of the read policies.
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Table 8-20.
Read Policy Paramaters
Read Policy
readpolicy=ra | ara | nra | rc | nrc
Parameter Specification
Read ahead
readpolicy=ra
Adaptive read ahead
readpolicy=ara
No read ahead
readpolicy=nra
Read cache
readpolicy=rc
No read cache
readpolicy=nrc
[writepolicy=<wb| wt| wc| nwc>] Parameter (Optional)
Different controllers support different write policies. See the online help for more information. The
following table indicates how to specify the [writepolicy=<wb| wt| wc| nwc | fwb>] parameter for
each of the write policies.
Table 8-21.
Write Policy Parameters
Write Policy
writepolicy=wb | wt | wc | fwb | nwc
Parameter Specification
Write–back cache
writepolicy=wb
Write–through cache
writepolicy=wt
Write cache
writepolicy=wc
Force write back
writepolicy=fwb
No write cache
writepolicy=nwc
[name=<string>] Parameter (Optional)
Use this parameter to specify a name for the virtual disk. For example:
name=VirtualDisk1
NOTE: The CERC SATA 1.5/2s controller does not allow you to specify a virtual disk name. The virtual disk will be
created with a default name.
[spanlength=<n>] Parameter (Required for RAID 50)
Use this parameter to specify the number of physical disks to be included in each stripe. This parameter
only applies to RAID 50 virtual disks. If you are not creating a RAID 50 virtual disk, do not specify this
parameter. For example:
spanlength=3
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Example Syntax
For example, you may want to create a RAID 5 virtual disk on a PERC 3/QC controller. The online help
will help you understand which read, write, and cache policies are supported by this controller. In this
example, you decide to create a virtual disk with the following read, write, and cache policy:
•
Read-ahead
•
Write–through caching
•
Cache I/O
The virtual disk will be 500 MB with a stripe size of 16 KB. The name of the virtual disk will be vd1 and it
will reside on connector 0 of controller 1. Because the virtual disk will be a RAID 5, it requires at least
three physical disks. In this example, you specify four physical disks. These are physical disks 0 through 3.
To create the virtual disk described in this example, enter:
omconfig storage controller action=createvdisk controller=1 raid=r5
size=500m pdisk=0:0,0:1,0:2,0:3 stripesize=16kb cachepolicy=c
readpolicy=ra writepolicy=wt
The only parameters that require specification are for the controller, RAID level, virtual disk size, and
physical disk selection. Storage Management supplies default values for all other unspecified parameters.
omconfig Set Controller Rebuild Rate
Use the following omconfig command syntax to set the controller rebuild rate:
Complete Syntax
omconfig storage controller action=setrebuildrate controller=id rate=
<0 to 100>
where id is the controller ID as reported by the omreport storage controller command.
Example Syntax
For example, to set the rebuild rate to 50 on controller 1, enter:
omconfig storage controller action=setrebuildrate controller=1 rate=50
omconfig Set Background Initialization Rate
Use the following omconfig command syntax to set the background initialization rate.
Complete Syntax
omconfig storage controller action=setbgirate controller=id rate=<0
to 100>
where id is the controller ID as reported by the omreport storage controller command.
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Example Syntax
For example, to set the background initialization rate to 50 on controller 1, enter:
omconfig storage controller action=setbgirate controller=1 rate=50
omconfig Set Reconstruct Rate
Use the following omconfig command syntax to set the reconstruct rate.
Complete Syntax
omconfig storage controller action=setreconstructrate controller=id
rate=<0 to 100>
where id is the controller ID as reported by the omreport storage controller command.
Example Syntax
For example, to set the reconstruct rate to 50 on controller 1, enter:
omconfig storage controller action=setreconstructrate controller=1
rate=50
omconfig Set Check Consistency Rate
Use the following omconfig command syntax to set the check consistency rate.
Complete Syntax
omconfig storage controller action=setcheckconsistency controller=id
rate=<0 to 100>
where id is the controller ID as reported by the omreport storage controller command.
Example Syntax
For example, to set the check consistency rate to 50 on controller 1, enter:
omconfig storage controller action=setcheckconsistency controller=1
rate=50
omconfig Export the Controller Log
Use the following omconfig command syntax to export the controller log to a text file. For more
information about the exported log file, see the online help.
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Complete Syntax
omconfig storage controller action=exportlog controller=id
where id is the controller ID as reported by the omreport storage controller command.
Example Syntax
For example, to export the log on controller 1, enter:
omconfig storage controller action=exportlog controller=1
By default, the log file is exported to C:\WinNt or C:\Windows for Microsoft® Windows® systems (based
on the Windows version used) and /var/log on all Linux systems.
Depending on the controller, the log file name will be either afa_<mmdd>.log or lsi_<mmdd>.log
where <mmdd> is the month and date. For more information on the controller log file, see the online help.
NOTE: The export log file command is not supported on the PERC 2/SC, 2/DC, 4/IM, CERC ATA 100/4ch, and
CERC SATA 1.5/2s controllers.
omconfig Import Foreign Configuration
Use the following omconfig command syntax to import all virtual disks that reside on physical disks
newly attached to the controller.
Complete Syntax
omconfig storage controller action=importforeignconfig controller=id
where id is the controller ID as reported by the omreport storage controller command.
NOTE: This command is supported only in firmware version 5.0.x.
Example Syntax
For example, to import foreign configurations on controller 1, enter:
omconfig storage controller action=importforeignconfig controller=1
omconfig Import/Recover Foreign Configuration
Use the following omconfig command syntax to import and recover all virtual disks that reside on
physical disks newly attached to the controller.
Complete Syntax
omconfig storage controller action=importrecoverforeignconfig
controller=id
where id is the controller ID as reported by the omreport storage controller command.
NOTE: This command is supported only in firmware version 5.1.1.
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Example Syntax
For example, to import and recover foreign configurations on controller 1, enter:
omconfig storage controller action=importrecoverforeignconfig
controller=1
omconfig Clear Foreign Configuration
Use the following omconfig command syntax to clear or delete all virtual disks that reside on physical
disks that are newly attached to the controller.
Complete Syntax
omconfig storage controller action=clearforeignconfig controller=id
where id is the controller ID as reported by the omreport storage controller command.
Example Syntax
For example, to clear foreign configurations on controller 1, enter:
omconfig storage controller action=clearforeignconfig controller=1
omconfig Set Patrol Read Mode
Use the following omconfig command syntax to set the patrol read mode for the controller.
Complete Syntax
omconfig storage controller action=setpatrolreadmode controller=id
mode=manual|auto|disable
where id is the controller ID as reported by the omreport storage controller command.
Example Syntax
For example, to set the patrol read on controller 1 to manual mode, enter:
omconfig storage controller action=setpatrolreadmode controller=1
mode=manual
omconfig Start Patrol Read
Use the following omconfig command syntax to start the patrol read task on the controller.
Complete Syntax
omconfig storage controller action=startpatrolread controller=id
where id is the controller ID as reported by the omreport storage controller command.
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Example Syntax
For example, to start the patrol read task on controller 1, enter:
omconfig storage controller action=startpatrolread controller=1
NOTE: To be able to start patrol read, the current patrol read mode should be set to "Manual."
omconfig Stop Patrol Read
Use the following omconfig command syntax to stop the patrol read task on the controller.
Complete Syntax
omconfig storage controller action=stoppatrolread controller=id
where id is the controller ID as reported by the omreport storage controller command.
Example Syntax
For example, to stop the patrol read task on controller 1, enter:
omconfig storage controller action=stoppatrolread controller=1
NOTE: To be able to stop patrol read, the current patrol read mode should be set to "Manual."
omconfig Virtual Disk Commands
The following sections provide the omconfig command syntax required to execute virtual disk tasks.
NOTICE: The omconfig storage vdisk action=deletevdisk controller=id vdisk=id command deletes a virtual disk.
Deleting a virtual disk destroys all information including file systems and volumes residing on the virtual disk.
Table 8-22.
omconfig Manage Virtual Disk Commands
Required Command Levels (1, 2, 3) Optional name=value pairs
omconfig storage vdisk
action=checkconsistency controller=id vdisk=id
action=cancelcheckconsistency controller=id vdisk=id
action=pausecheckconsistency controller=id vdisk=id
action=resumecheckconsistency controller=id vdisk=id
action=blink controller=id vdisk=id
action=unblink controller=id vdisk=id
action=initialize controller=id vdisk=id
action=fastinit controller=id vdisk=id
action=slowinit controller=id vdisk=id
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Table 8-22.
omconfig Manage Virtual Disk Commands (continued)
Required Command Levels (1, 2, 3) Optional name=value pairs
action=cancelinitialize controller=id vdisk=id
action=cancelbginitialize controller=id vdisk=id
action=restoresegments controller=id vdisk=id
action=splitmirror controller=id vdisk=id
action=unmirror controller=id vdisk=id
action=assigndedicatedhotspare controller=id vdisk=id pdisk=<PDISKID>
assign=<yes | no>
action=deletevdisk controller=id vdisk=id [force=yes]
action=format controller=id vdisk=id
action=reconfigure controller=id vdisk=id raid=<c | r0 | r1 | r1c | r5 |
r10> size=<size> pdisk=<PDISKID>
action=changepolicy controller=id vdisk=id [readpolicy=<ra | nra | ara | rc
| nrc> | writepolicy=<wb | wt | wc | nwc | fwb> | cachepolicy=<d | c>]
action=rename controller=id vdisk=id
omconfig Blink Virtual Disk
Use the following omconfig command syntax to blink the physical disks included in a virtual disk.
Complete Syntax
omconfig storage vdisk action=blink controller=id vdisk=id
where id is the controller ID and virtual disk ID as reported by the omreport command. To obtain these
values, enter omreport storage controller to display the controller IDs and then enter omreport storage
vdisk controller=ID to display the IDs for the virtual disks attached to the controller.
Example Syntax
For example, to blink the physical disks in virtual disk 4 on controller 1, enter:
omconfig storage vdisk action=blink controller=1 vdisk=4
omconfig Unblink Virtual Disk
Use the following omconfig command syntax to unblink the physical disks included in a virtual disk.
Complete Syntax
omconfig storage vdisk action=unblink controller=id vdisk=id
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where id is the controller ID and virtual disk ID as reported by the omreport command. To obtain these
values, enter omreport storage controller to display the controller IDs and then enter omreport storage
vdisk controller=ID to display the IDs for the virtual disks attached to the controller.
Example Syntax
For example, to blink the physical disks in virtual disk 4 on controller 1, enter:
omconfig storage vdisk action=unblink controller=1 vdisk=4
omconfig Initialize Virtual Disk
Use the following omconfig command syntax to initialize a virtual disk.
Complete Syntax
omconfig storage vdisk action=initialize controller=id vdisk=id
where id is the controller ID and virtual disk ID as reported by the omreport command. To obtain these
values, enter omreport storage controller to display the controller IDs and then enter omreport storage
vdisk controller=ID to display the IDs for the virtual disks attached to the controller.
Example Syntax
For example, to initialize virtual disk 4 on controller 1, enter:
omconfig storage vdisk action=initialize controller=1 vdisk=4
omconfig Cancel Initialize Virtual Disk
Use the following omconfig command syntax to cancel the initialization of a virtual disk.
Complete Syntax
omconfig storage vdisk action=cancelinitialize controller=id vdisk=id
where id is the controller ID and virtual disk ID as reported by the omreport command. To obtain these
values, enter omreport storage controller to display the controller IDs and then enter omreport storage
vdisk controller=ID to display the IDs for the virtual disks attached to the controller.
Example Syntax
For example, to cancel the initialization of virtual disk 4 on controller 1, enter:
omconfig storage vdisk action=cancelinitialize controller=1 vdisk=4
omconfig Fast Initialize Virtual Disk
Use the following omconfig command syntax to fast initialize a virtual disk.
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Complete Syntax
omconfig storage vdisk action=fastinit controller=id vdisk=id
where id is the controller ID and virtual disk ID as reported by the omreport command. To obtain these
values, you would enter omreport storage controller to display the controller IDs and then enter
omreport storage vdisk controller=ID to display the IDs for the virtual disks attached to the controller.
Example Syntax
For example, to fast initialize virtual disk 4 on controller 1, enter:
omconfig storage vdisk action=fastinit controller=1 vdisk=4
omconfig Slow Initialize Virtualize Disk
Use the following omconfig command syntax to slow initialize a virtual disk.
Complete Syntax
omconfig storage vdisk action=slowinit controller=id vdisk=id
where id is the controller ID and virtual disk ID as reported by the omreport command. To obtain these
values, you would enter omreport storage controller to display the controller IDs and then enter
omreport storage vdisk controller=ID to display the IDs for the virtual disks attached to the controller.
Example Syntax
For example, to slow initialize virtual disk 4 on controller 1, enter:
omconfig storage vdisk action=slowinit controller=1 vdisk=4
omconfig Cancel Background Initialize
Use the following omconfig command syntax to cancel the background initialization process on a
virtual disk.
Complete Syntax
omconfig storage vdisk action=cancelbginitialize controller=id
vdisk=id
where id is the controller ID and virtual disk ID as reported by the omreport command. To obtain these
values, enter omreport storage controller to display the controller IDs and then enter omreport storage
vdisk controller=ID to display the IDs for the virtual disks attached to the controller.
Example Syntax
For example, to cancel background initialization on virtual disk 4 on controller 1, enter:
omconfig storage vdisk action=cancelbginitialize controller=1 vdisk=4
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omconfig Restore Dead Segments
Use the following omconfig command syntax to recover data from a RAID 5 virtual disk that has been
corrupted. This task attempts to reconstruct data from a corrupt portion of a physical disk included in a
RAID 5 virtual disk.
Complete Syntax
omconfig storage vdisk action=restoresegments controller=id vdisk=id
where id is the controller ID and virtual disk ID as reported by the omreport command. To obtain these
values, enter omreport storage controller to display the controller IDs and then enter omreport storage
vdisk controller=ID to display the IDs for the virtual disks attached to the controller.
Example Syntax
For example, to restore segments on virtual disk 4 on controller 1, enter:
omconfig storage vdisk action=restoresegments controller=1 vdisk=4
omconfig Split Mirror
Use the following omconfig command syntax to separate mirrored data originally configured as a
RAID 1, RAID 1–concatenated, or RAID 10 virtual disk. Splitting a RAID 1 or RAID 1–concatenated
mirror creates two concatenated nonredundant virtual disks. Splitting a RAID 10 mirror creates two
RAID 0 (striped) nonredundant virtual disks. Data is not lost during this operation.
Complete Syntax
omconfig storage vdisk action=splitmirror controller=id vdisk=id
where id is the controller ID and virtual disk ID as reported by the omreport command. To obtain these
values, enter omreport storage controller to display the controller IDs and then enter omreport storage
vdisk controller=ID to display the IDs for the virtual disks attached to the controller.
Example Syntax
For example, to initiate a split mirror on virtual disk 4 on controller 1, enter:
omconfig storage vdisk action=splitmirror controller=1 vdisk=4
omconfig Unmirror
Use the following omconfig command syntax to separate mirrored data and restore one half of the mirror
to free space. Unmirroring a RAID 1 or RAID 1–concatenated virtual disk results in a single,
nonredundant concatenated virtual disk. Unmirroring a RAID 10 virtual disk results in a single,
nonredundant RAID 0 (striped) virtual disk. Data is not lost during this operation. See the online help
for more information about using this command.
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Complete Syntax
omconfig storage vdisk action=unmirror controller=id vdisk=id
where id is the controller ID and virtual disk ID as reported by the omreport command. To obtain these
values, enter omreport storage controller to display the controller IDs and then enter omreport storage
vdisk controller=ID to display the IDs for the virtual disks attached to the controller.
Example Syntax
For example, to unmirror virtual disk 4 on controller 1, enter:
omconfig storage vdisk action=unmirror controller=1 vdisk=4
omconfig Assign Dedicated Hot Spare
Use the following omconfig command syntax to assign one or more physical disks to a virtual disk as a
dedicated hot spare.
NOTE: The PERC 2/SC, 2/DC, and CERC SATA 1.5/2s controllers do not support dedicated hot spares.
Complete Syntax
omconfig storage vdisk action=assigndedicatedhotspare controller=id
vdisk=id pdisk=<PDISKID> assign=yes
where id is the controller ID and virtual disk ID. The <PDISK> variable specifies the physical disk.
To obtain the values for the controller, virtual disk, and physical disk, enter omreport storage controller
to display the controller IDs and then enter omreport storage vdisk controller=ID and omreport storage
pdisk controller=ID to display the IDs for the virtual disks and physical disks attached to the controller.
Example Syntax
In this example, you are assigning physical disk 3 on connector 0 of controller 1 as a dedicated hot spare
to virtual disk 4. On a Serial Attached SCSI (SAS) controller, the physical disk resides in enclosure 2.
Example for SCSI, SATA, and ATA Controllers:
To assign the dedicated hot spare described in this example, enter:
omconfig storage vdisk action=assigndedicatedhotspare controller=1
vdisk=4 pdisk=0:3 assign=yes
Example for SAS Controllers:
To assign the dedicated hot spare described in this example, enter:
omconfig storage vdisk action=assigndedicatedhotspare controller=1
vdisk=4 pdisk=0:2:3 assign=yes
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omconfig Unassign Dedicated Hot Spare
Use the following omconfig command syntax to unassign one or more physical disks that were previously
assigned as a hot spare to a virtual disk.
Complete Syntax
omconfig storage vdisk action=assigndedicatedhotspare controller=id
vdisk=id pdisk=<PDISKID> assign=no
where id is the controller ID and virtual disk ID. The <PDISK> variable specifies the physical disk.
To obtain the values for the controller, virtual disk, and physical disk, enter omreport storage controller
to display the controller IDs and then enter omreport storage vdisk controller=ID and omreport storage
pdisk controller=ID to display the IDs for the virtual disks and physical disks attached to the controller.
Example Syntax
In this example, you are unassigning physical disk 3 on connector 0 of controller 1 as a dedicated hot
spare to virtual disk 4. On a SAS controller, the physical disk resides in enclosure 2.
Example for SCSI, SATA, and ATA Controllers:
To unassign the dedicated hot spare described in this example, enter:
omconfig storage vdisk action=assigndedicatedhotspare controller=1
vdisk=4 pdisk=0:3 assign=no
Example for SAS Controllers:
To unassign the dedicated hot spare described in this example, enter:
omconfig storage vdisk action=assigndedicatedhotspare controller=1
vdisk=4 pdisk=0:2:3 assign=no
omconfig Check Consistency
Use the following omconfig command syntax to initiate a check consistency on a virtual disk. The check
consistency task verifies the virtual disk’s redundant data.
Complete Syntax
omconfig storage vdisk action=checkconsistency controller=id vdisk=id
where id is the controller ID and virtual disk ID as reported by the omreport command. To obtain these
values, enter omreport storage controller to display the controller IDs and then enter omreport storage
vdisk controller=ID to display the IDs for the virtual disks attached to the controller.
Example Syntax
For example, to run a check consistency on virtual disk 4 on controller 1, enter:
omconfig storage vdisk action=checkconsistency controller=1 vdisk=4
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omconfig Cancel Check Consistency
Use the following omconfig command syntax to cancel a check consistency while it is in progress.
Complete Syntax
omconfig storage vdisk action=cancelcheckconsistency controller=id
vdisk=id
where id is the controller ID and virtual disk ID as reported by the omreport command. To obtain these
values, enter omreport storage controller to display the controller IDs and then enter omreport storage
vdisk controller=ID to display the IDs for the virtual disks attached to the controller.
Example Syntax
For example, to cancel a check consistency on virtual disk 4 on controller 1, enter:
omconfig storage vdisk action=cancelcheckconsistency controller=1
vdisk=4
omconfig Pause Check Consistency
Use the following omconfig command syntax to pause a check consistency while it is in progress. See the
online help for more information.
Complete Syntax
omconfig storage vdisk action=pausecheckconsistency controller=id
vdisk=id
where id is the controller ID and virtual disk ID as reported by the omreport command. To obtain these
values, enter omreport storage controller to display the controller IDs and then enter omreport storage
vdisk controller=ID to display the IDs for the virtual disks attached to the controller.
Example Syntax
For example, to pause a check consistency on virtual disk 4 on controller 1, enter:
omconfig storage vdisk action=pausecheckconsistency controller=1 vdisk=4
omconfig Resume Check Consistency
Use the following omconfig command syntax to resume a check consistency after it has been paused.
Complete Syntax
omconfig storage vdisk action=resumecheckconsistency controller=id
vdisk=id
where id is the controller ID and virtual disk ID as reported by the omreport command. To obtain these
values, enter omreport storage controller to display the controller IDs and then enter omreport storage
vdisk controller=ID to display the IDs for the virtual disks attached to the controller.
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Example Syntax
For example, to resume a check consistency on virtual disk 4 on controller 1, enter:
omconfig storage vdisk action=resumecheckconsistency controller=1
vdisk=4
omconfig Delete Virtual Disk
Use the following omconfig command syntax to delete a virtual disk.
NOTICE: Deleting a virtual disk destroys all information including file systems and volumes residing on the virtual
disk. You may receive a warning message if you attempt to delete the system or boot partition. However, this
warning message is not generated in all circumstances. You should be certain that you are not deleting the system
or boot partition or other vital data when using this command.
Complete Syntax
omconfig storage vdisk action=deletevdisk controller=id vdisk=id
wwon=deletevdisk controller=1 vdisk=4
omconfig Format Virtual Disk
Use the following omconfig command syntax to format a virtual disk.
Complete Syntax
omconfig storage vdisk action=format controller=id vdisk=id
where id is the controller ID and virtual disk ID as reported by the omreport command. To obtain these
values, enter omreport storage controller to display the controller IDs and then enter omreport storage
vdisk controller=ID to display the IDs for the virtual disks attached to the controller.
Example Syntax
For example, to format virtual disk 4 on controller 1, enter:
omconfig storage vdisk action=format controller=1 vdisk=4
omconfig Reconfiguring Virtual Disks
You can reconfigure a virtual disk in order to change the virtual disk’s RAID level or increase its size by
adding physical disks. On some controllers, you can also remove physical disks.
Complete Syntax
omconfig storage vdisk action=reconfigure controller=id vdisk=id
raid=<c| r0| r1| r1c| r5| r10> size=<size> pdisk=<PDISK>
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Example Syntax
For example, to reconfigure virtual disk 4 to a size of 800 MB, use RAID 5 and physical disks 0 through 3
on connector 0 of controller 1. On a SAS controller, the physical disks reside in enclosure 2.
Example for SCSI, SATA, and ATA Controllers:
In this example, enter:
omconfig storage vdisk action=reconfigure controller=1 vdisk=4 raid=r5
size=800m pdisk=0:0,0:1,0:2,0:3
Example for SAS Controllers:
In this example, enter:
omconfig storage vdisk action=reconfigure controller=1 vdisk=4 raid=
r5 pdisk=0:2:0,0:2:1,0:2:2,0:2:3
omconfig Change Virtual Disk Policy
Use the following omconfig command syntax to change a virtual disk’s read, write, or cache policy.
Complete Syntax
omconfig storage vdisk action=changepolicy controller=id vdisk=id
[readpolicy=<ra| nra| ara| rc| nrc> | writepolicy=<wb| wt| wc| nwc> |
cachepolicy=<d | c>]
where id is the controller ID and virtual disk ID as reported by the omreport command. To obtain these
values, enter omreport storage controller to display the controller IDs and then enter omreport storage
vdisk controller=ID to display the IDs for the virtual disks attached to the controller.
For information on the controller-specific read, write, and cache policy, see the online help. For
information on how to specify these parameters using the omconfig command, see the following:
•
[readpolicy=<ra| nra| ara| rc| nrc>] Parameter (Optional)
•
[writepolicy=<wb| wt| wc| nwc | fwb>] Parameter (Optional)
•
[cachepolicy=<d | c>] Parameter (Optional)
Example Syntax
For example, to change the read policy of virtual disk 4 on controller 1 to no-read-ahead, enter:
omconfig storage vdisk action=changepolicy controller=1 vdisk=4
readpolicy=nra
omconfig Rename Virtual Disk
Use the following omconfig command syntax to rename a virtual disk.
NOTE: On a CERC SATA 1.5/2s controller, you cannot change the default name of a virtual disk.
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Complete Syntax
action=rename controller=id vdisk=id name=<string>
where id is the controller ID and virtual disk ID as reported by the omreport command and <string> is the
new name for the virtual disk. To obtain the values for controller ID and virtual disk ID, enter omreport
storage controller to display the controller IDs and then enter omreport storage vdisk controller=ID to
display the IDs for the virtual disks attached to the controller.
Example Syntax
For example, to rename virtual disk 4 on controller 1 to vd4, enter:
omconfig storage vdisk action=rename controller=1 vdisk=4 name=vd4
omconfig Physical Disk Commands
The following sections provide the omconfig command syntax required to execute physical disk tasks.
Table 8-23.
omconfig Physical Disk Commands
Required Command Levels (1, 2, 3) Optional name=value pairs
omconfig storage pdisk
action=blink controller=id pdisk=<PDISKID>
action=unblink controller=id pdisk=<PDISKID>
action=remove controller=id pdisk=<PDISKID>
action=initialize controller=id pdisk=<PDISKID>
action=offline controller=id pdisk=<PDISKID>
action=online controller=id pdisk=<PDISKID>
action=assignglobalhotspare controller=id pdisk=<PDISKID>
assign=<yes|no>
action=rebuild controller=id pdisk=<PDISKID>
action=cancelrebuild controller=id pdisk=<PDISKID>
action=removedeadsegments controller=id pdisk=<PDISKID>
omconfig Blink Physical Disk
You can blink the light (light emitting diode or LED display) on one or more physical disks attached to a
controller. Use the following omconfig command syntax to blink one or more physical disks.
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Complete Syntax
action=blink controller=ID action=blink controller=id pdisk=<PDISKID>
where id is the controller ID. The <PDISK> variable specifies the physical disk.
To obtain these values, enter omreport storage controller to display the controller IDs and then enter
omreport storage pdisk controller=ID to display the IDs for the physical disks attached to the controller.
Example Syntax
In this example, you want to blink physical disk 0 on connector 0 of controller 1. On a SAS controller, the
physical disk resides in enclosure 2.
Example for SCSI, SATA, and ATA Controllers:
To blink the physical disk described in this example, enter:
omconfig storage pdisk action=blink controller=1 pdisk=0:0
Example for SAS Controllers:
To blink the physical disk described in this example, enter:
omconfig storage pdisk action=blink controller=1 pdisk=0:2:0
omconfig Unblink Physical Disk
You can unblink the light (light emitting diode or LED display) on one or more physical disks attached to
a controller. Use the following omconfig command syntax to unblink one or more physical disks.
Complete Syntax
omconfig storage pdisk action=unblink controller=id pdisk=<PDISKID>
where id is the controller ID. The <PDISK> variable specifies the physical disk.
To obtain these values, enter omreport storage controller to display the controller IDs and then enter
omreport storage pdisk controller=ID to display the IDs for the physical disks attached to the controller.
Example Syntax
In this example, you want to unblink physical disk 0 on connector 0 of controller 1. On a SAS controller,
the physical disk resides in enclosure 2.
Example for SCSI, SATA, and ATA Controllers:
To unblink the physical disk described in this example, enter:
omconfig storage pdisk action=unblink controller=1 pdisk=0:0
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Example for SAS Controllers:
To unblink the physical disk described in this example, enter:
omconfig storage pdisk action=unblink controller=1 pdisk=0:2:0
omconfig Prepare to Remove Physical Disk
Use the following omconfig command syntax to prepare a physical disk for removal:
Complete Syntax
omconfig storage pdisk action=remove controller=id pdisk=<PDISKID>
where id is the controller ID. The <PDISK> variable specifies the physical disk.
To obtain these values, enter omreport storage controller to display the controller IDs and then enter
omreport storage pdisk controller=ID to display the IDs for the physical disks attached to the controller.
Example Syntax
In this example, you want to prepare physical disk 3 on connector 0 of controller 1 for removal. On a SAS
controller, the physical disk resides in enclosure 2.
Example for SCSI, SATA, and ATA Controllers:
To prepare to remove the physical disk described in this example, enter:
omconfig storage pdisk action=remove controller=1 pdisk=0:3
Example for SAS Controllers:
To prepare to remove the physical disk described in this example, enter:
omconfig storage pdisk action=remove controller=1 pdisk=0:2:3
omconfig Initialize Physical Disk
Use the following omconfig command syntax to initialize a physical disk.
Complete Syntax
omconfig storage pdisk action=initialize controller=id pdisk=<PDISKID>
where id is the controller ID. The <PDISK> variable specifies the physical disk.
To obtain these values, enter omreport storage controller to display the controller IDs and then enter
omreport storage pdisk controller=ID to display the IDs for the physical disks attached to the controller.
Example Syntax
In this example, you want to initialize physical disk 3 on connector 0 of controller 1. On a SAS controller,
the physical disk resides in enclosure 2.
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Example for SCSI, SATA, and ATA Controllers:
To initialize the physical disk described in this example, enter:
omconfig storage pdisk action=initialize controller=1 pdisk=0:3
Example for SAS Controllers:
To initialize the physical disk described in this example, enter:
omconfig storage pdisk action=initialize controller=1 pdisk=0:2:3
omconfig Offline Physical Disk
Use the following omconfig command syntax to offline a physical disk:
Complete Syntax
omconfig storage pdisk action=offline controller=id pdisk=
connectorID:targetID
where id is the controller ID and connectorID:targetID is the connector number and physical disk
number as reported by the omreport command. To obtain these values, enter omreport storage
controller to display the controller IDs and then enter omreport storage pdisk controller=ID to display
the IDs for the physical disks attached to the controller.
Example Syntax
For example, to offline physical disk 3 on connector 0 of controller 1, enter:
omconfig storage pdisk action=offline controller=1 pdisk=0:3
omconfig Offline Physical Disk
Use the following omconfig command syntax to offline a physical disk:
Complete Syntax
omconfig storage pdisk action=offline controller=id pdisk=<PDISKID>
where id is the controller ID. The <PDISK> variable specifies the physical disk.
To obtain these values, enter omreport storage controller to display the controller IDs and then enter
omreport storage pdisk controller=ID to display the IDs for the physical disks attached to the controller.
Example Syntax
In this example, you want to offline physical disk 3 on connector 0 of controller 1. On a SAS controller,
the physical disk resides in enclosure 2.
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Example for SCSI, SATA, and ATA Controllers:
To offline the physical disk described in this example, enter:
omconfig storage pdisk action=offline controller=1 pdisk=0:3
Example for SAS Controllers:
To offline the physical disk described in this example, enter:
omconfig storage pdisk action=offline controller=1 pdisk=0:2:3
omconfig Online Physical Disk
Use the following omconfig command syntax to bring an offline physical disk back online.
Complete Syntax
omconfig storage pdisk action=online controller=id pdisk=<PDISKID>
where id is the controller ID. The <PDISK> variable specifies the physical disk.
To obtain these values, you would enter omreport storage controller to display the controller IDs and then
enter omreport storage pdisk controller=ID to display the IDs for the physical disks attached to
the controller.
Example Syntax
In this example, you want to bring physical disk 3 on connector 0 of controller 1 back online. On a SAS
controller, the physical disk resides in enclosure 2.
Example for SCSI, SATA, and ATA Controllers:
To bring the physical disk described in this example back online, enter:
omconfig storage pdisk action=online controller=1 pdisk=0:3
Example for SAS Controllers:
To bring the physical disk described in this example back online, enter:
omconfig storage pdisk action=online controller=1 pdisk=0:2:3
omconfig Assign Global Hot Spare
Use the following omconfig command syntax to assign a physical disk as a global hot spare.
Complete Syntax
omconfig storage pdisk action=assignglobalhotspare controller=id
pdisk=<PDISKID> assign=yes
where id is the controller ID. The <PDISK> variable specifies the physical disk.
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To obtain these values, enter omreport storage controller to display the controller IDs and then enter
omreport storage pdisk controller=ID to display the IDs for the physical disks attached to the controller.
Example Syntax
In this example, you want to assign physical disk 3 on connector 0 of controller 1 as a global hot spare.
On a SAS controller, the physical disk resides in enclosure 2.
Example for SCSI, SATA, and ATA Controllers:
To assign the physical disk described in this example as a global hot spare, enter:
omconfig storage pdisk action=assignglobalhotspare controller=1
pdisk=0:3 assign=yes
Example for SAS Controllers:
To assign the physical disk described in this example as a global hot spare, enter:
omconfig storage pdisk action=assignglobalhotspare controller=1
pdisk=0:2:3 assign=yes
omconfig Unassign Global Hot Spare
Use the following omconfig command syntax to unassign a physical disk as a global hot spare.
Complete Syntax
omconfig storage pdisk action=assignglobalhotspare controller=id
pdisk=<PDISKID> assign=no
where id is the controller ID. The <PDISK> variable specifies the physical disk.
To obtain these values, enter omreport storage controller to display the controller IDs and then enter
omreport storage pdisk controller=ID to display the IDs for the physical disks attached to the controller.
Example Syntax
In this example, you want to unassign physical disk 3 on connector 0 of controller 1 as a global hot spare.
On a SAS controller, the physical disk resides in enclosure 2.
Example for SCSI, SATA, and ATA Controllers:
To unassign the physical disk described in this example as a global hot spare, enter:
omconfig storage pdisk action=assignglobalhotspare controller=1
pdisk=0:3 assign=no
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Example for SAS Controllers:
To unassign the physical disk described in this example as a global hot spare, enter:
omconfig storage pdisk action=assignglobalhotspare controller=1
pdisk=0:2:3 assign=no
omconfig Rebuild Physical Disk
Use the following omconfig command syntax to rebuild a failed physical disk. Rebuilding a disk may take
several hours. If you need to cancel the rebuild, use the Cancel Rebuild task. For more information,
see the online help.
Complete Syntax
omconfig storage pdisk action=rebuild controller=id pdisk=<PDISKID>
where id is the controller ID. The <PDISK> variable specifies the physical disk.
To obtain these values, enter omreport storage controller to display the controller IDs and then enter
omreport storage pdisk controller=ID to display the IDs for the physical disks attached to the controller.
Example Syntax
In this example, you want to rebuild physical disk 3 on connector 0 of controller 1. On a SAS controller,
the physical disk resides in enclosure 2.
Example for SCSI, SATA, and ATA Controllers:
To rebuild the physical disk described in this example, enter:
omconfig storage pdisk action=rebuild controller=1 pdisk=0:3
Example for SAS Controllers:
To rebuild the physical disk described in this example, enter:
omconfig storage pdisk action=rebuild controller=1 pdisk=0:2:3
omconfig Cancel Rebuild Physical Disk
Use the following omconfig command syntax to cancel a rebuild that is in progress. If you cancel a
rebuild, the virtual disk remains in a degraded state. See the online help for more information.
Complete Syntax
omconfig storage pdisk action=cancelrebuild controller=id pdisk=
<PDISKID>
where id is the controller ID. The <PDISK> variable specifies the physical disk.
To obtain these values, enter omreport storage controller to display the controller IDs and then enter
omreport storage pdisk controller=ID to display the IDs for the physical disks attached to the controller.
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Example Syntax
In this example, you want to cancel the rebuild or physical disk 3 on connector 0 of controller 1. On a
SAS controller, the physical disk resides in enclosure 2.
Example for SCSI, SATA, and ATA Controllers:
To cancel the rebuild of the physical disk described in this example, enter:
omconfig storage pdisk action=cancelrebuild controller=1 pdisk=0:3
Example for SAS Controllers:
To cancel the rebuild of the physical disk described in this example, enter:
omconfig storage pdisk action=cancelrebuild controller=1 pdisk=0:2:3
omconfig Remove Dead Segments
Use the following omconfig command syntax to recover unusable disk space. See the online help for
more information.
Complete Syntax
omconfig storage pdisk action=removedeadsegments controller=id
pdisk=<PDISKID>
where id is the controller ID. The <PDISK> variable specifies the physical disk.
To obtain these values, enter omreport storage controller to display the controller IDs and then enter
omreport storage pdisk controller=ID to display the IDs for the physical disks attached to the controller.
Example Syntax
In this example, you want to remove dead disk segments on physical disk 3 on connector 0 of controller 1.
On a SAS controller, the physical disk resides in enclosure 2.
Example for SCSI, SATA, and ATA Controllers:
To remove dead segments on the physical disk described in this example, enter:
omconfig storage pdisk action=removedeadsegments controller=1 pdisk=0:3
Example for SAS Controllers:
To remove dead segments on the physical disk described in this example, enter:
omconfig storage pdisk action=removedeadsegments controller=1 pdisk=
0:2:3
omconfig Clear Physical Disk
Use the following omconfig command to clear data or a configuration from a physical disk.
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Complete Syntax
omconfig storage pdisk action=clear controller=id pdisk=<PDISKID>
where id is the controller ID. The <PDISK> variable specifies the physical disk.
To obtain these values, enter omreport storage controller to display the controller IDs and then enter
omreport storage pdisk controller=ID to display the IDs for the physical disks attached to the controller.
Example Syntax
In this example, you want to clear physical disk 3 on connector 0 of controller 1. On a SAS controller, the
physical disk resides in enclosure 2.
Example for SAS Controllers:
To clear the physical disk described in this example, you would enter:
omconfig storage pdisk action=clear controller=1 pdisk=0:2:3
omconfig Cancel Clear Physical Disk
Use the following omconfig command to cancel a clear operation that is in progress on a physical disk.
Complete Syntax
omconfig storage pdisk action=cancelclear controller=id pdisk=<PDISKID>
where id is the controller ID. The <PDISK> variable specifies the physical disk.
To obtain these values, enter omreport storage controller to display the controller IDs and then enter
omreport storage pdisk controller=ID to display the IDs for the physical disks attached to the controller.
Example Syntax
In this example, you want to cancel the clear of physical disk 3 on connector 0 of controller 1. On a SAS
controller, the physical disk resides in enclosure 2.
Example for SAS Controllers:
To cancel the clear of the physical disk described in this example, enter:
omconfig storage pdisk action=cancelclear controller=1 pdisk=0:2:3
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omconfig Battery Commands
The following sections provide the omconfig command syntax required to execute battery tasks.
Table 8-24.
omconfig Battery Commands
Required Command Levels (1, 2, 3) Optional name=value pairs
omconfig storage battery
action=recondition controller=id battery=id
action=startlearn controller=id battery=id
action=delaylearn controller=id battery=id
days=d hours=h
omconfig Recondition Battery
Use the following omconfig command to recondition a controller battery. For more information on
batteries and the recondition process, see the online help.
Complete Syntax
omconfig storage battery action=recondition controller=id battery=id
where id is the controller ID and battery ID as reported by the omreport command. To obtain this value,
enter omreport storage controller to display the controller IDs and then enter omreport storage battery
controller=ID to display the ID for the controller battery.
Example Syntax
For example, to recondition the battery on controller 1, enter:
omconfig storage battery action=recondition controller=1 battery=0
omconfig Start Battery Learn Cycle
Use the following omconfig command to start the battery learn cycle.
Complete Syntax
omconfig storage battery action=startlearn controller=id battery=id
where id is the controller ID and battery ID as reported by the omreport command. To obtain this value,
enter omreport storage controller to display the controller IDs and then enter omreport storage battery
controller=ID to display the ID for the controller battery.
Example Syntax
For example, to start the learn cycle on controller 1, enter:
omconfig storage battery action=startlearn controller=1 battery=0
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177
omconfig Delay Battery Learn Cycle
Use the following omconfig command to delay the battery learn cycle for a specified period of time.
The battery learn cycle can be delayed for a maximum of seven days or 168 hours.
Complete Syntax
omconfig storage battery action=delaylearn controller=id battery=id
days=d hours=h
where id is the controller ID and battery ID as reported by the omreport command. To obtain this value,
enter omreport storage controller to display the controller IDs and then enter omreport storage battery
controller=ID to display the ID for the controller battery.
Example Syntax
For example, to delay the learn cycle for three days and 12 hours on controller 1, enter:
omconfig storage battery action=delaylearn controller=1 battery=0
days=3 hours=12
omconfig Connector Commands
The following sections provide the omconfig command syntax required to execute connector tasks.
Table 8-25.
omconfig Connector Commands
Required Command Levels (1, 2, 3) Optional name=value pairs
omconfig storage connector
action=rescan controller=id connector=id
omconfig Rescan Connector
Use the following omconfig command to rescan a controller connector. This command rescans all
connectors on the controller and is therefore similar to performing a controller rescan.
NOTE: This command is not supported on SAS controllers.
Complete Syntax
omconfig storage connector action=rescan controller=id connector=id
where id is the controller ID and the connector ID as reported by the omreport command. To obtain
these values, enter omreport storage controller to display the controller IDs and then enter omreport
storage connector controller=ID to display the IDs for the connectors attached to the controller.
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Using the Storage Management Service
Example Syntax
For example, to rescan connector 2 on controller 1, enter:
omconfig storage connector action=rescan controller=1 connector=2
omconfig Enclosure Commands
The following sections provide the omconfig command syntax required to execute enclosure tasks.
Table 8-26.
omconfig Enclosure Commands
Required Command Levels (1, 2, 3) Optional name=value pairs
omconfig storage enclosure
action=enablealarm controller=id enclosure=<ENCLOSUREID>
action=disablealarm controller=id enclosure=<ENCLOSUREID>
action=enablests
action=disablests
action=setassettag controller=id enclosure=<ENCLOSUREID>
assettag=<string>
action=setassetname controller=id enclosure=<ENCLOSUREID>
assetname=<string>
action=settempprobes controller=id enclosure=<ENCLOSUREID>
index=id minwarn=n maxwarn=n
action=resettempprobes controller=id enclosure=
<ENCLOSUREID> index=id
action=setalltempprobes controller=id
enclosure=<ENCLOSUREID> minwarn=n
maxwarn=n
action=resetalltempprobes controller=id
enclosure=<ENCLOSUREID>
action=blink controller=id
enclosure=<ENCLOSUREID>
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179
omconfig Enable Enclosure Alarm
Use the following omconfig command syntax to enable the enclosure alarm:
Complete Syntax
omconfig storage enclosure action=enablealarm controller=id
enclosure=<ENCLOSUREID>
where id is the controller ID. The <ENCLOSUREID> variable specifies the enclosure.
Example for SCSI, SATA, and ATA Controllers:
For example, to enable the alarm on the enclosure attached to connector 2 on controller 1, enter:
omconfig storage enclosure action=enablealarm controller=1
enclosure=2
Example for SAS Controllers :
For example, to enable the alarm on enclosure 2 attached to connector 1 on controller 1, enter:
omconfig storage enclosure action=enablealarm controller=1
enclosure=1:2
omconfig Disable Enclosure Alarm
Use the following omconfig command syntax to disable the enclosure alarm.
Complete Syntax
omconfig storage enclosure action=disablealarm controller=id
enclosure=<ENCLOSUREID>
where id is the controller ID. The <ENCLOSUREID> variable specifies the enclosure.
Example for SCSI, SATA, and ATA Controllers:
For example, to disable the alarm on the enclosure attached to connector 2 on controller 1, enter:
omconfig storage enclosure action=disablealarm controller=1
enclosure=2
Example for SAS Controllers:
For example, to disable the alarm on enclosure 2 attached to connector 1 on controller 1, enter:
omconfig storage enclosure action=disablealarm controller=1
enclosure=1:2
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Using the Storage Management Service
omconfig Enable Smart Thermal Shutdown
The omconfig storage enclosure action=enablests command was supported in previous releases of
Storage Management. This command has been replaced by the omconfig storage globalinfo action=
enablests command. When enabling smart thermal shutdown and creating CLI scripts, it is preferable to
use the omconfig storage globalinfo action=enablests command.
See the "omconfig Global Enable Smart Thermal Shutdown" command for more information.
omconfig Disable Smart Thermal Shutdown
The omconfig storage enclosure action=disablests command was supported in previous releases of
Storage Management. This command has been replaced by the omconfig storage globalinfo action=
disablests command. When disabling smart thermal shutdown and creating CLI scripts, it is preferable to
use the omconfig storage globalinfo action=disablests command.
See the "omconfig Global Disable Smart Thermal Shutdown" command for more information.
omconfig Set Enclosure Asset Tag
Use the following omconfig command syntax to specify the enclosure’s asset tag:
Complete Syntax
omconfig storage enclosure action=setassettag controller=id
enclosure=<ENCLOSUREID> assettag=<string>
where id is the controller ID. The <ENCLOSUREID> variable specifies the enclosure.
In this syntax, <string> is a user-specified alphanumeric string.
Example for SCSI, SATA, and ATA Controllers :
For example, to specify the asset tag to encl20 on the enclosure attached to connector 2 on
controller 1, enter:
omconfig storage enclosure action=setassettag controller=1
enclosure=2 assettag=encl20
Example for SAS Controllers :
For example, to specify the asset tag to encl20 on enclosure 2 attached to connector 1 on
controller 1, enter:
omconfig storage enclosure action=setassettag controller=1
enclosure=1:2 assettag=encl20
omconfig Set Enclosure Asset Name
Use the following omconfig command syntax to specify the asset name for an enclosure.
Using the Storage Management Service
181
Complete Syntax
omconfig storage enclosure action=setassetname controller=id
enclosure=<ENCLOSUREID> assetname=<string>
where id is the controller ID. The <ENCLOSUREID> variable specifies the enclosure.
In this syntax, <string> is a user-specified alphanumeric string.
Example for SCSI, SATA, and ATA Controllers :
For example, to specify the asset name to encl43 for the enclosure attached to connector 2 on
controller 1, enter:
omconfig storage enclosure action=setassetname controller=1
enclosure=2 assetname=encl43
Example for SAS Controllers :
For example, to specify the asset name to encl43 for enclosure 2 attached to connector 1 on
controller 1, enter:
omconfig storage enclosure action=setassetname controller=1
enclosure=1:2 assetname=encl43
omconfig Set Temperature Probe Thresholds
Use the following omconfig command syntax to set the minimum and maximum warning temperature
thresholds for a specified temperature probe.
NOTE: This command is not supported on SAS controllers.
Complete Syntax
omconfig storage enclosure action=settempprobes controller=id
enclosure=<ENCLOSUREID> index=id minwarn=n maxwarn=n
where id is the controller ID and the temperature probe ID. The <ENCLOSUREID> variable specifies
the enclosure.
In this syntax, “n” is a user-specified value for the temperature in Celsius.
Example Syntax
For example, you may want to specify the minimum and maximum warning thresholds for temperature
probe 3 to 10 and 40° Celsius.
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Using the Storage Management Service
Example for SCSI, SATA, and ATA Controllers:
In this example, temperature probe 3 resides in the enclosure attached to connector 2 on controller 1.
To set the temperature probe thresholds to 10 and 40° Celsius, enter:
omconfig storage enclosure action=settempprobes controller=1
enclosure=2 index=3 minwarn=10 maxwarn=40
omconfig Reset Temperature Probe Thresholds
Use the following omconfig command syntax to reset the minimum and maximum warning temperature
thresholds back to their default values.
NOTE: This command is not supported on SAS controllers.
Complete Syntax
omconfig storage enclosure action=resettempprobes controller=id
enclosure=<ENCLOSUREID> index=id
where id is the controller ID and the temperature probe ID. The <ENCLOSUREID> variable specifies
the enclosure.
Example Syntax
For example, you may want to reset the thresholds for temperature probe 3 to the default values.
Example for SCSI, SATA, and ATA Controllers:
In this example, temperature probe 3 resides in the enclosure attached to connector 2 on controller 1.
To reset the thresholds for temperature probe 3 to the default values, enter:
omconfig storage enclosure action=resettempprobes controller=1
enclosure=2 index=3
omconfig Set All Temperature Probe Thresholds
Use the following omconfig command syntax to set the minimum and maximum warning temperature
thresholds for all temperature probes in the enclosure.
NOTE: This command is not supported on SCSI RAID controllers.
Complete Syntax
omconfig storage enclosure action=setalltempprobes controller=id
enclosure=<ENCLOSUREID> minwarn=n maxwarn=n
where id is the controller ID. The <ENCLOSUREID> variable specifies the enclosure.
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183
Example Syntax
For example, you may want to specify the minimum and maximum warning thresholds for all
temperature probes to 10 and 40° Celsius.
Example for SAS Controllers
In this example, the temperature probes reside in enclosure 3 attached to connector 2 on controller 1.
To set the thresholds for all temperature probes to 10 and 40° Celsius, enter:
omconfig storage enclosure action=setalltempprobes controller=1
enclosure=2:3 minwarn=10 maxwarn=40
omconfig Reset All Temperature Probe Thresholds
Use the following omconfig command syntax to reset the minimum and maximum warning temperature
thresholds back to their default value for all temperature probes in the enclosure.
NOTE: This command is not supported on SCSI RAID controllers.
Complete Syntax
omconfig storage enclosure action=resetalltempprobes controller=id
enclosure=<ENCLOSUREID>
where id is the controller ID. The <ENCLOSUREID> variable specifies the enclosure.
Example Syntax
For example, you may want to reset the thresholds for all temperature probes in enclosure 2 on
controller 1.
Example for SAS Controllers
In this example, the temperature probes reside in enclosure 3 attached to connector 2 on controller 1.
To reset the thresholds for all temperature probes, enter:
omconfig storage enclosure action=resetalltempprobes controller=1
enclosure=2:3
omconfig Blink
Use the following omconfig command to blink the light-emitting diodes (LEDs) on the enclosure.
Complete Syntax
omconfig storage enclosure action=blink controller=id enclosure=
<ENCLOSUREID>
where id is the controller ID. The <ENCLOSUREID> variable specifies the enclosure.
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Using the Storage Management Service
Example for SCSI, SATA, and ATA Controllers :
For example, to blink the LEDs for the enclosure attached to connector 2 on controller 1, enter:
omconfig storage enclosure action=blink controller=1 enclosure=2
Example for SAS Controllers :
For example, to blink the LEDs for enclosure 3 attached to connector 2 on controller 1, enter:
omconfig storage enclosure action=blink controller=1 enclosure=2:3
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185
186
Using the Storage Management Service
Working With CLI Command Results
Server Administrator Command Line Interface (CLI) users can use command output in various
ways. This section explains how to save command output to a file and how to select a format for your
command results that fits different objectives.
Output Options for Command Results
CLI command output displays to standard output on your system in a command window, in an
X-terminal, or on a screen, depending on your operating system type.
You can redirect command results to a file instead of displaying them to standard output. Saving
command output to a file allows you to use the command output for later analysis or comparison.
Whether you display command results to standard output or have the command results written to a
file, you can format the results. The format you select determines the way the command output is
displayed and the way the command output is written to a file.
Controlling Command Output Display
Each operating system provides a means of controlling the way that command results display to
standard output. The following is a useful command for ensuring that command results do not scroll
by before you can view them. The same command syntax works for the Microsoft® Windows®
command prompt, the Red Hat® Enterprise Linux® terminal, and the SUSE® Linux Enterprise
Server terminal. To display command output with control over scrolling, type the CLI command and
append the pipe symbol followed by more. For example, type:
omreport system summary | more
The multiscreen system summary displays the first screen. When you want to see the next screen of
command output, press the spacebar.
Writing Command Output to a File
When redirecting command results to a file, you can specify a filename (and a directory path if
necessary) to which you want the command results to be written. When specifying the path to
which you want your file to be written, use the appropriate syntax for your operating system.
You can save command results in two ways. You can overwrite any file that has the same name as the
output file you specify, or you can keep adding results of commands to a file of the same name.
Working With CLI Command Results
187
Save Command Results to a File That Can Be Overwritten
Use the -outc option when you want to overwrite data that is stored in previously written files. For
example, at 11:00 A.M. you capture fan probe RPM readings for fan probe 0 on your system and write the
results to a file called fans.txt. You type:
omreport chassis fans index=0 -outc fans.txt
Partial results written to the file are:
Index
Status
Probe Name
Reading
Minimum Warning
Maximum Warning
Minimum Failure
Maximum Failure
Threshold
Threshold
Threshold
Threshold
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
0
OK
System Board Fan 1 RPM
2380RPM
600RPM
5700RPM
500RPM
6000RPM
Four hours later, you repeat the command. You have no interest in the 11:00 A.M. snapshot as written to
fans.txt. You type the same command:
omreport chassis fans index=0 -outc fans.txt
The 3:00 P.M. data overwrites the 11:00 A.M. data in the fans.txt file.
Fans.txt now reads as follows:
Index
Status
Probe Name
Reading
Minimum Warning
Maximum Warning
Minimum Failure
Maximum Failure
Threshold
Threshold
Threshold
Threshold
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
0
OK
System Board Fan 1 RPM
3001RPM
700RPM
5500RPM
500RPM
6000RPM
You cannot refer to the previous command results to compare the earlier fan probe 0 output with the
present output because in using the -outc option, you overwrote the fans.txt file.
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Working With CLI Command Results
Append Command Results to an Existing File
Use the -outa option when you want to append new command results to data stored in a previously
written file. For example, at 11:00 A.M. you capture fan probe RPM readings for fan probe 0 on your
system and write the results to a file called fans.txt. If you want to compare these results with output for
the same probe obtained four hours later, you can use the -outa command to append the new output
to fans.txt.
Type:
omreport chassis fans index=0 -outa fans.txt
Fans.txt now reads as follows:
Index
Status
Probe Name
Reading
Minimum Warning
Maximum Warning
Minimum Failure
Maximum Failure
Index
Status
Probe Name
Reading
Minimum Warning
Maximum Warning
Minimum Failure
Maximum Failure
Threshold
Threshold
Threshold
Threshold
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
0
OK
System Board Fan 1 RPM
2380RPM
600RPM
5700RPM
500RPM
6000RPM
Threshold
Threshold
Threshold
Threshold
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
0
OK
System Board Fan 1 RPM
3001RPM
700RPM
5500RPM
500RPM
6000RPM
You can use a text editor to insert the time that each block of data was captured. In comparing the two
snapshots for fan probe 0, you can see that the second report shows several changes. The reading of fan
RPM has increased by 621 RPM but is still within normal range. Someone has raised the minimum
warning threshold by 200 RPM and has decreased the maximum warning threshold by 2000 RPM.
Selecting a Format for Your CLI Command Output
You can specify a format for your CLI command results. The format determines how the command
output is displayed. If the command results are directed to a file, the format is captured by the file to
which you write your command results.
NOTE: The omconfig command ignores most output format options and returns plain text messages. However, if
you use the xml option, the omconfig command returns XML code.
Working With CLI Command Results
189
The available formats include:
•
List (lst)
•
Semicolon-separated values (ssv)
•
Table (tbl)
•
Raw xml (xml)
•
Custom delimited format (cdv)
Syntax for the formatting option is:
<command> -fmt <format option>
For example, type:
omreport system summary -fmt tbl
where -fmt tbl specifies table format.
You can combine the formatting option with the option to direct output to a file. For example, type:
omreport system summary -fmt tbl -outa summary.txt
where -fmt tbl specifies table format and -outa specifies that you append the command results to a file
called summary.txt.
List (lst)
The default format is lst or list format. Use this format when you want to optimize output for simple
readability. You need to specify a format for your command output only if you want a format other than
lst format.
To see the following example command output in lst format, type:
omreport system summary
No special formatting option is required because list format is the default display format. The network
data part of the example system summary appears as follows:
-------------Network Data
-------------Network Interface Card 0 Data
IP Address: 143.166.152.108
Subnet Mask: 255.255.255.0
Default Gateway: 143.166.152.1
MAC Address: 00-02-b3-23-d2-ca
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Working With CLI Command Results
Table (tbl)
Use the tbl or table formatting option to have your data formatted in table rows and columns. To see the
following example command output in table format, type:
omreport system summary -fmt tbl
The example output displays as follows:
-----------------------------Network Interface Card 0 Data
-----------------------------|
|
|
|
|
ATTRIBUTE| VALUE
IP Address| 143.166.152.108
Subnet Mask| 255.255.255.0
Default Gateway| 143.166.152.1
MAC Address| 00-02-b3-23-d2-ca
Semicolon-separated Values (ssv)
Use the ssv formatting option to deliver output formatted in semicolon-separated Value format.
This format also allows you to import your command output results into a spreadsheet program such as
Microsoft Excel, or into a database program. To see the following example command output in
semicolon-separated value format, type:
omreport system summary -fmt ssv
The example output displays as follows:
-----------------------------Network Data
-----------------------------Network Interface Card 0 Data
IP Address;143.166.152.108
Subnet Mask;255.255.255.0
Default Gateway;143.166.152.1
MAC Address;00-02-b3-23-d2-ca
Raw XML (xml)
Use the xml formatting option to produce output suitable for use by systems management applications
or for input into other applications that use xml. To see the following example command output in raw
xml format, type:
omreport system summary -fmt xml
Working With CLI Command Results
191
The example output displays as follows:
<NICStatus>1</NICStatus><IPAddress>143.166.152.108</IPAddress><Subne
tMask>255.255.255.0</SubnetMask><DefaultGateway>143.166.152.1</Defau
ltGateway><MACAddr>00-02-b3-23-d2-ca</MACAddr>
Custom Delimited Format (cdv)
Use the cdv formatting option to report exported data in custom delimited format. You can specify this
option with any omreport command. For example, to generate a system summary in custom delimited
format, type:
omreport system summary -fmt cdv
You can also set preferences for the custom delimited format with the omconfig command. The valid
values for delimiters are: exclamation, semicolon, at, hash, dollar, percent, caret, asterisk, tilde, question,
colon, comma, and pipe.
The following example shows how to set the delimiter for separating data fields to asterisk:
omconfig preferences cdvformat delimiter=asterisk
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Working With CLI Command Results
Glossary
ASPI
The following list defines or identifies technical terms,
abbreviations, and acronyms used in Dell™ user documents.
ASR
A
Abbreviation for ampere(s).
AC
Advanced SCSI programming interface.
Abbreviation for automatic system recovery. ASR consists
of those procedures that restore the system to running all
properly configured domains after one or more domains
have been rendered inactive due to software or hardware
failures or due to unacceptable environmental conditions.
Abbreviation for alternating current.
asset tag code
AC power switch
An individual code assigned to a computer, usually by
a system administrator, for security or tracking purposes.
A switch with two AC power inputs that provides AC power
redundancy by failing over to a standby AC input in the
event of a failure to the primary AC input.
attribute
Refers to the actions a user can take on a variable value.
Examples include read-only and read-write.
An attribute, or property, contains a specific piece of
information about a manageable component.
Attributes can be combined to form groups. If an
attribute is defined as read-write, it may be defined by
a management application.
adapter card
authentication
access
An expansion card that plugs into an expansion-card
connector on the computer's system board. An adapter
card adds some specialized function to the computer
by providing an interface between the expansion bus
and a peripheral device. Examples of adapter cards
include network cards, sound cards, and SCSI adapters.
ADB
Abbreviation for assign database.
AGP
Abbreviation for accelerated graphics port. A high
performance graphics interface available for Intel®
Pentium® Pro systems.
ASCII
Acronym for American Standard Code for Information
Interchange. A text file containing only characters from
the ASCII character set (usually created with a text
editor, such as Notepad in Microsoft® Windows®) is
called an ASCII file.
ASIC
Acronym for application-specific integrated circuit.
The Server Administrator remote access controller has
two methods of authenticating user access:
RAC authentication and local operating system
authentication. RAC authentication is always enabled.
Administrators can set up specific user accounts and
passwords that allow access to the RAC.
Operating systems also require administrators to define
different levels of users and user accounts; each user
level has different privileges. Local operating system
authentication on the RAC is an option for
administrators who do not want define one set of
privileges for users in the operating system and a
separate set of users and accounts for the RAC. If you
enable local operating system authentication for the
RAC, you enable any user with Administrator status on
the operating system to log into the RAC.
autoexec.bat file
The autoexec.bat file is executed when you boot your
computer (after executing any commands in the
config.sys file). This start-up file contains commands
that define the characteristics of each device connected
to your computer, and it finds and executes programs
stored in locations other than the active directory.
Glossary
193
backup
boot routine
A copy of a program or data file. As a precaution, you
should back up your computer's hard drive on a regular
basis. Before making a change to the configuration of
your computer, you should back up important start-up
files from your operating system.
When you start your computer, it clears all memory,
initializes devices, and loads the operating system.
Unless the operating system fails to respond, you can
reboot (also called warm boot) your computer by
pressing <Ctrl><Alt><Del>; otherwise, you must
perform a cold boot by pressing the reset button or by
turning the computer off and then back on.
baud rate
A measurement of data transmission speed. For
example, modems are designed to transmit data at one
or more specified baud rate(s) through the COM (serial)
port of a computer.
BGA
Abbreviation for Ball Grid Array, an IC package that
uses an array of solder balls, instead of pins, to connect
to a PC board.
bootable diskette
You can start your computer from a diskette. To make
a bootable diskette, insert a diskette in the diskette
drive, type sys a: at the command line prompt, and
press <Enter>. Use this bootable diskette if your
computer does not boot from the hard drive.
bpi
Abbreviation for bits per inch.
binary
A base-2 numbering system that uses 0 and 1 to
represent information. The computer performs
operations based on the ordering and calculation of
these numbers.
bps
Abbreviation for bits per second.
BTU
Abbreviation for British thermal unit.
BIOS
Acronym for basic input/output system. Your
computer's BIOS contains programs stored on a flash
memory chip. The BIOS controls the following:
•
Communications between the microprocessor and
peripheral devices, such as the keyboard and the
video adapter
•
Miscellaneous functions, such as system messages
bit
The smallest unit of information interpreted by your
computer.
BMC
Abbreviation for baseboard management controller,
which is a controller that provides the intelligence in
the IPMI structure.
bus
An information pathway between the components of a
computer. Your computer contains an expansion bus
that allows the microprocessor to communicate with
controllers for all the various peripheral devices
connected to the computer. Your computer also
contains an address bus and a data bus for
communications between the microprocessor and RAM.
byte
Eight contiguous bits of information, the basic data
unit used by your computer.
C
Abbreviation for Celsius.
CA
Abbreviation for certificate authority.
194
Glossary
cache
CIM
A fast storage area that keeps a copy of data or instructions
for quicker data retrieval. For example, your computer's
BIOS may cache ROM code in faster RAM. Or, a diskcache utility may reserve RAM in which to store frequently
accessed information from your computer's disk drives;
when a program makes a request to a disk drive for data
that is in the cache, the disk-cache utility can retrieve
the data from RAM faster than from the disk drive.
Acronym for Common Information Model, which is a
model for describing management information from
the DMTF. CIM is implementation independent,
allowing different management applications to collect
the required data from a variety of sources. CIM
includes schemas for systems, networks, applications
and devices, and new schemas will be added. It provides
mapping techniques for interchange of CIM data with
MIB data from SNMP agents and MIF data from
DMI-compliant systems.
capability
Refers to the actions that an object can perform, or
actions that can be taken on a managed object. For
example, if a card is hot-pluggable, it is capable of being
replaced while the system power is ON.
CIMOM
Acronym for common information model object manager.
CI/O
CDRAM
Acronym for comprehensive input/output.
Abbreviation for cached DRAM, which is a high-speed
DRAM memory chip developed by Mitsubishi that
includes a small SRAM cache.
cm
CD-ROM
CMOS
Abbreviation for compact disc read-only memory. CD
drives use optical technology to read data from CDs.
CDs are read-only storage devices; you cannot write
new data to a CD with standard CD drives.
Acronym for complementary metal-oxide
semiconductor. In computers, CMOS memory chips
are often used for NVRAM storage.
Abbreviation for centimeter(s).
COMn
certificate authority
A certificate authority is an industry-recognized entity
that verifies the identity of an organizations requesting
credentials to identify them to other systems over
networks or the Internet. Before issuing a certificate to
an applicant, the certificate authority requires proof of
identity and other security information.
The device names for the first through fourth serial
ports on your computer are COM1, COM2, COM3,
and COM4. The default interrupt for COM1 and
COM3 is IRQ4, and the default interrupt for COM2
and COM4 is IRQ3. Therefore, you must be careful
when configuring software that runs a serial device so
that you don't create an interrupt conflict.
chip
component
A set of microminiaturized, electronic circuits that are
designed for use as processors and memory in
computers. Small chips can hold from a handful to tens
of thousands of transistors. They look like tiny chips of
aluminum, no more than 1/16" square by 1/30" thick,
which is where the term "chip" came from. Large chips,
which can be more than a half inch square, hold
millions of transistors. It is actually only the top one
thousandth of an inch of a chip's surface that holds the
circuits. The rest of it is just a base.
As they relate to DMI, manageable components are
operating systems, computer systems, expansion cards,
or peripherals that are compatible with DMI. Each
component is made up of groups and attributes that
are defined as relevant to that component.
Glossary
195
config.sys file
CRC
The config.sys file is executed when you boot your
computer (before running any commands in the
autoexec.bat file). This start-up file contains commands
that specify which devices to install and which drivers
to use. This file also contains commands that determine
how the operating system uses memory and controls files.
Abbreviation for cyclic redundancy code, which is a
number derived from, and stored or transmitted with,
a block of data in order to detect corruption.
By recalculating the CRC and comparing it to the value
originally transmitted, the receiver can detect some
types of transmission errors.
controller
CSR
A chip that controls the transfer of data between the
microprocessor and memory or between the
microprocessor and a peripheral device such as a disk
drive or the keyboard.
Abbreviation for certificate signing request. A complex
text file generated by a Web server to identify and
authenticate systems that seek connections to other
systems. The digital signature that is present in every
CSR contributes to secure identification of systems.
control panel
When a remote access controller is present on a system
running Server Administrator, the CSR that comes
with the remote access controller belongs to Dell. If
your company wants to generate its own CSR, you can
request a unique CSR from a certificate authority and
overwrite the Dell CSR.
The part of the computer that contains indicators and
controls, such as the power switch, hard drive access
indicator, and power indicator.
conventional memory
The first 640 KB of RAM. Conventional memory is
found in all computers. Unless they are specially
designed, MS-DOS® programs are limited to running
in conventional memory.
cursor
A marker, such as a block, underscore, or pointer that
represents the position at which the next keyboard or
mouse action will occur.
COO
Acronym for cost of ownership.
DAT
Acronym for digital audio tape.
cooling unit
Sets of fans or other cooling devices in a system chassis.
coprocessor
dB
Abbreviation for decibel(s).
A chip that relieves the computer's microprocessor of
specific processing tasks. A math coprocessor, for
example, handles numeric processing. A graphics
coprocessor handles video rendering. The Intel
Pentium microprocessor for example, includes a built-in
math coprocessor.
dBA
cpi
A program that allows the operating system or some
other program to interface correctly with a peripheral
device, such as a printer. Some device drivers—such as
network drivers—must be loaded from the config.sys
file (with a device= statement) or as memory-resident
programs (usually, from the autoexec.bat file). Others—
such as video drivers—must load when you start the
program for which they were designed.
Abbreviation for characters per inch.
CPU
Abbreviation for central processing unit. See also
microprocessor.
196
Glossary
Abbreviation for adjusted decibel(s).
DC
Abbreviation for direct current.
device driver
DHCP
DMI
Acronym for dynamic host configuration protocol.
A method of configuring a network in which
IP addresses are issued by a server, rather than statically
assigned to each system.
Abbreviation for Desktop Management Interface.
DMI enables the management of your computer
system's software and hardware. DMI collects
information about the system's components, such as
the operating system, memory, peripherals, expansion
cards, and asset tag. Information about the system's
components is displayed as a MIF file.
DIMM
Acronym for dual in-line memory module. A small
circuit board containing DRAM chips that connects to
the system board.
DIN
Acronym for Deutsche Industrie Norm which is the
standards-setting organization for Germany.
A DIN connector is a connector that conforms to one
of the many standards defined by DIN. DIN connectors
are used widely in personal computers. For example,
the keyboard connector for PCs is a DIN connector.
DIP
Acronym for dual in-line package. A circuit board, such
as a system board or expansion card, may contain DIP
switches for configuring the circuit board. DIP switches
are always toggle switches, with an ON position and an
OFF position.
directory
Directories help keep related files organized on a disk
in a hierarchical, “inverted tree” structure. Each disk
has a “root” directory; for example, a C:\> prompt
normally indicates that you are at the root directory of
hard drive C. Additional directories that branch off of
the root directory are called subdirectories.
Subdirectories may contain additional directories
branching off of them.
display adapter
See video adapter.
DMA
Abbreviation for direct memory access. A DMA
channel allows certain types of data transfer between
RAM and a device to bypass the microprocessor.
DMTF
Abbreviation for Distributed Management Task Force,
a consortium of companies representing hardware and
software providers, of which Dell is a member.
dpi
Abbreviation for dots per inch.
DPMS
Abbreviation for Display Power Management Signaling.
A standard developed by the Video Electronics
Standards Association (VESA®) that defines the
hardware signals sent by a video controller to activate
power management states in a monitor. A monitor is
said to be DPMS-compliant when it is designed to
enter a power management state after receiving the
appropriate signal from a computer's video controller.
DRAC
Refers to a remote management capability. See RAC.
DRAM
Acronym for dynamic random-access memory. A
computer's RAM is usually made up entirely of DRAM
chips. Because DRAM chips cannot store an electrical
charge indefinitely, your computer continually
refreshes each DRAM chip in the computer.
drive-type number
Your computer can recognize a number of specific hard
drives. Each is assigned a drive-type number that is
stored in NVRAM. The hard drive(s) specified in your
computer's System Setup program must match the
actual drive(s) installed in the computer. The System
Setup program also allows you to specify physical
parameters (logical cylinders, logical heads, cylinder
number, and logical sectors per pack) for drives not
included in the table of drive types stored in NVRAM.
Glossary
197
DTE
Abbreviation for data terminal equipment. Any device,
such as a computer system, that can send data in digital
form by means of a cable or communications line. The
DTE is connected to the cable or communications line
through a data communications equipment (DCE)
device, such as a modem.
To avoid a configuration conflict when installing an
EISA expansion card, you must use the EISA
Configuration Utility. This utility allows you to specify
which expansion slot contains the card and obtains
information about the card's required system resources
from a corresponding EISA configuration file.
EMC
Abbreviation for Electromagnetic Compatibility.
ECC
Abbreviation for error checking and correction.
EMI
Abbreviation for electromagnetic interference.
ECP
Abbreviation for Extended Capabilities Port.
EMM
EDO
Acronym for extended data output dynamic random
access memory which is a type of DRAM that is faster
than conventional DRAM. EDO RAM can start
fetching the next block of memory at the same time
that it sends the previous block to the CPU.
Abbreviation for expanded memory manager. A utility
that uses extended memory to emulate expanded
memory on computers with an Intel386™ or higher
microprocessor.
EMS
Abbreviation for Expanded Memory Specification.
EEPROM
Acronym for electrically erasable programmable
read-only memory.
EIDE
Abbreviation for enhanced integrated drive electronics.
EIDE devices add one or more of the following
enhancements to the traditional IDE standard:
•
Data transfer rates of up to 16 MB/sec
•
Support for drives other than just hard drives, such
as CD drives
•
Support for hard drives with capacities greater than
528 MB
•
Support for up to two controllers, each with up to
two devices attached
EPP
Abbreviation for Enhanced Parallel Port which
provides improved bidirectional data transmission.
Many devices are designed to take advantage of the
EPP standard, especially devices, such as network or
SCSI adapters that connect to the parallel port of a
portable computer.
EPROM
Acronym for erasable programmable read-only memory.
ERA
Acronym for embedded remote access.
ERA/O
Acronym for embedded remote access option.
EISA
Acronym for Extended Industry-Standard
Architecture, a 32-bit expansion-bus design. The
expansion-card connectors in an EISA computer are
also compatible with 8- or 16-bit ISA expansion cards.
ESD
Abbreviation for electrostatic discharge.
ESM
Acronym for embedded server management.
198
Glossary
expanded memory
FiFO
A technique for accessing RAM above 1 MB. To enable
expanded memory on your computer, you must use an
EMM. You should configure your system to support
expanded memory only if you run application programs
that can use (or require) expanded memory.
Abbreviation for first-in, first-out. In computer
programming, FIFO (first-in, first-out) is an approach
to handling program work requests from queues or
stacks so that the oldest request is handled next
flash bios
expansion bus
Your computer contains an expansion bus that allows
the microprocessor to communicate with controllers
for peripheral devices, such as a network card or an
internal modem.
A PC BIOS that is stored in a flash memory rather than
in a ROM. A flash BIOS chip can be updated in place,
whereas a ROM BIOS must be replaced with a newer chip.
flash memory
A connector on the computer's system board or riser
board for plugging in an expansion card.
A type of EEPROM chip that can be reprogrammed
from a utility on diskette while still installed in a
computer; most EEPROM chips can only be rewritten
with special programming equipment.
extended memory
format
RAM above 1 MB. Most software that can use it, such
as the Windows operating system, requires that
extended memory be under the control of an XMM.
To prepare a hard drive or diskette for storing files. An
unconditional format deletes all data stored on the disk.
expansion-card connector
FPBGA
external cache memory
A RAM cache using SRAM chips. Because SRAM chips
operate at several times the speed of DRAM chips, the
microprocessor can retrieve data and instructions faster
from external cache memory than from RAM.
Acronym for field programmable gate array, a
programmable logic chip (PLD) with a high density
of gates.
FRU
Acronym for field replaceable unit.
F
Abbreviation for Fahrenheit.
ft
Abbreviation for feet.
FAT
Acronym for file allocation table. The file system
structure used by MS-DOS to organize and keep track
of file storage. The Windows NT® operating systems
(and later Windows versions) can optionally use a
FAT file system structure.
FTP
FCC
G
Abbreviation for Federal Communications Commission.
FEPROM
Acronym for Flash Erasable Programmable Read-Only
Memory. Flash memory is a kind of nonvolatile storage
device similar to EEPROM, but the erasing is done only
in blocks or the entire chip.
Abbreviation for file transfer protocol.
g
Abbreviation for gram(s).
Abbreviation for gravities.
GB
Abbreviation for gigabyte(s). A gigabyte equals
1,024 megabytes or 1,073,741,824 bytes.
Glossary
199
graphics coprocessor
hot plug
See coprocessor.
The ability to remove and replace a redundant part
while the system is being used. Also called a "hot spare."
graphics mode
A video mode that can be defined as x horizontal by y
vertical pixels by z colors.
HPFS
Abbreviation for the High Performance File System option
in the Windows NT and later Windows operating systems.
group
As it relates to DMI, a group is a data structure that
defines common information, or attributes, about a
manageable component.
GUI
Acronym for graphical user interface.
h
Abbreviation for hexadecimal. A base-16 numbering
system, often used in programming to identify
addresses in the computer's RAM and I/O memory
addresses for devices. The sequence of decimal
numbers from 0 through 16, for example, is expressed
in hexadecimal notation as: 0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, A,
B, C, D, E, F, 10. In text, hexadecimal numbers are
often followed by h.
Abbreviation for HyperText Transmission Protocol,
Secure. HTTPS is a variant of HTTP used by Web
browsers for handling secure transactions. HTTPS is a
unique protocol that is simply SSL underneath HTTP.
You need to use "https://" for HTTP URLs with SSL,
whereas you continue to use "http://" for HTTP URLs
without SSL.
Hz
Abbreviation for hertz.
ICES
Abbreviation for Interference-Causing Equipment
Standard (in Canada).
ICU
heat sink
A metal plate with metal pegs or ribs that help dissipate
heat. Most microprocessors include a heat sink.
HIP
Abbreviation for Dell OpenManage™ Hardware
Instrumentation Package.
Abbreviation for ISA Configuration Utility.
IDE
Abbreviation for Integrated Device Electronics. IDE is
a computer system interface, used primarily for hard
drives and CDs.
I/O
HMA
Abbreviation for high memory area. The first 64 KB of
extended memory above 1 MB. A memory manager
that conforms to the XMS can make the HMA a direct
extension of conventional memory. See also upper
memory area and XMM.
host adapter
A host adapter implements communication between
the computer's bus and the controller for a peripheral
device. (Hard drive controller subsystems include
integrated host adapter circuitry.) To add a SCSI
expansion bus to your system, you must install or
connect the appropriate host adapter.
200
HTTPS
Glossary
Abbreviation for input/output. The keyboard is an
input device, and a printer is an output device. In
general, I/O activity can be differentiated from
computational activity. For example, when a program
sends a document to the printer, it is engaging in
output activity; when the program sorts a list of terms,
it is engaging in computational activity.
ID
Abbreviation for identification.
IHV
ISA
Acronym for independent hardware vendor. IHVs often
develop their own MIBs for components that
they manufacture.
Acronym for Industry-Standard Architecture. A 16-bit
expansion bus design. The expansion-card connectors
in an ISA computer are also compatible with 8-bit ISA
expansion cards.
interlacing
A technique for increasing video resolution by only
updating alternate horizontal lines on the screen.
Because interlacing can result in noticeable screen flicker,
most users prefer noninterlaced video adapter resolutions.
internal microprocessor cache
An instruction and data cache built in to the
microprocessor. The Intel Pentium microprocessor
includes a 16-KB internal cache, which is set up as an
8-KB read-only instruction cache and an 8-KB
read/write data cache.
IP
The Internet Protocol (IP) is the method or protocol
by which data is sent from one computer to another on
the Internet. Each computer (known as a host) on the
Internet has at least one IP address that uniquely
identifies it from all other computers on the Internet.
IPMI
Abbreviation for Intelligent Platform Management
Interface, which is an industry standard for management
of peripherals used in enterprise computers based on
Intel architecture. The key characteristic of IPMI is
that inventory, monitoring, logging, and recovery
control functions are available independent of the
main processors, BIOS, and operating system.
IPX
Acronym for internetwork packet exchange.
IRQ
Abbreviation for interrupt request. A signal that data
is about to be sent to or received by a peripheral device
travels by an IRQ line to the microprocessor. Each
peripheral connection must be assigned an IRQ
number. For example, the first serial port in your
computer (COM1) is assigned to IRQ4 by default.
Two devices can share the same IRQ assignment, but
you cannot operate both devices simultaneously.
ITE
Abbreviation for information technology equipment.
jumper
Jumpers are small blocks on a circuit board with two or
more pins emerging from them. Plastic plugs
containing a wire fit down over the pins. The wire
connects the pins and creates a circuit. Jumpers provide
a simple and reversible method of changing the
circuitry in a printed circuit board.
JVM
Acronym for Java virtual machine.
K
Abbreviation for kilo-, indicating 1,000.
KB
Abbreviation for kilobyte(s), 1,024 bytes.
KB/sec
Abbreviation for kilobyte(s) per second.
Kbit(s)
Abbreviation for kilobit(s), 1,024 bits.
Kbit(s)/sec
Abbreviation for kilobit(s) per second.
Kerberos
A network authentication protocol that is designed to
provide strong authentication for client/server
applications by using secret-key cryptography.
key combination
A command requiring you to press multiple keys at the
same time. For example, you can reboot your computer
by pressing the <Ctrl><Alt><Del> key combination.
Glossary
201
kg
LPTn
Abbreviation for kilogram(s), 1,000 grams.
The device names for the first through third parallel
printer ports on your computer are LPT1, LPT2,
and LPT3.
kHz
Abbreviation for kilohertz, 1,000 hertz.
LRA
Acronym for local response agent.
LAN
Acronym for local area network. A LAN system is
usually confined to the same building or a few nearby
buildings, with all equipment linked by wiring
dedicated specifically to the LAN.
LS drive
A drive that uses laser servo technology to read LS 120
diskettes that hold up to 120 MB of data as well as
standard 3.5-inch diskettes.
lb
Abbreviation for pound(s).
LSI
Acronym for large-scale integration.
LCC
Acronym for leaded or leadless chip carrier.
LUN
LDAP
Acronym for logical unit number, a code used to select
a specific device among several that share a SCSI ID.
Acronym for Lightweight Directory Access Protocol. A
networking protocol for querying and modifying
directory services running over TCP/IP.
mA
LIF
mAh
Acronym for low insertion force. Some computers use
LIF sockets and connectors to allow devices, such as
the microprocessor chip, to be installed or removed
with minimal stress to the device.
Abbreviation for milliampere-hour(s).
LED
Mb
Abbreviation for light-emitting diode. An electronic
device that lights up when a current is passed
through it.
Abbreviation for megabit.
local bus
On a computer with local-bus expansion capability,
certain peripheral devices (such as the video adapter
circuitry) can be designed to run much faster than they
would with a traditional expansion bus. Some local-bus
designs allow peripherals to run at the same speed and
with the same width data path as the computer's
microprocessor.
Abbreviation for milliampere(s).
math coprocessor
See coprocessor.
MB
Abbreviation for megabyte(s). The term megabyte
means 1,048,576 bytes; however, when referring to hard
drive storage, the term is often rounded to mean
1,000,000 bytes.
MB/sec
Abbreviation for megabytes per second.
Mbps
Abbreviation for megabits per second.
202
Glossary
MBR
MIDI
Abbreviation for master boot record.
Abbreviation for musical instrument digital interface.
MCA
MIF
Abbreviation for Micro Channel Architecture, which is
designed for multiprocessing. MCA eliminates
potential conflicts that arise when installing new
peripheral devices. MCA is not compatible with either
EISA or XT bus architecture, so older cards cannot be
used with it.
Acronym for management information format. A MIF
file contains information, status, and links to
component instrumentation. MIF files are installed
into the MIF database by the DMI service layer. The
content of a MIF is defined by a DTMF working
committee and is published in the form of a MIF
definition document. This document identifies the
groups and attributes that are relevant to
DMI-manageable components.
memory
A computer can contain several different forms of
memory, such as RAM, ROM, and video memory.
Frequently, the word memory is used as a synonym for
RAM; for example, an unqualified statement such as
“a computer with 16 MB of memory” refers to a
computer with 16 MB of RAM.
mm
Abbreviation for millimeter(s).
modem
memory address
A device that allows your computer to communicate
with other computers over telephone lines.
A specific location, usually expressed as a hexadecimal
number, in the computer's RAM.
MOF
memory manager
Acronym for managed object format, which is an ASCII
file that contains the formal definition of a CIM schema.
A utility that controls the implementation of memory
in addition to conventional memory, such as extended
or expanded memory.
mouse
memory module
A small circuit board containing DRAM chips that
connects to the system board.
A pointing device that controls the movement of the
cursor on a screen. Mouse-aware software allows you to
activate commands by clicking a mouse button while
pointing at objects displayed on the screen.
MPEG
MHz
Abbreviation for megahertz.
Acronym for Motion Picture Experts Group. MPEG is
a digital video file format.
MIB
ms
Acronym for management information base. MIB is
used to send detailed status/commands from or to an
SNMP managed device.
Abbreviation for millisecond(s).
MTBF
Abbreviation for mean time between failures.
microprocessor
The primary computational chip inside the computer that
controls the interpretation and execution of arithmetic and
logic functions. Software written for one microprocessor
must usually be revised to run on another
microprocessor. CPU is a synonym for microprocessor.
multifrequency monitor
A monitor that supports several video standards.
A multifrequency monitor can adjust to the frequency
range of the signal from a variety of video adapters.
Glossary
203
mV
NuBus
Abbreviation for millivolt(s).
Proprietary expansion bus used on Apple Macintosh
personal computers.
name
The name of an object or variable is the exact string
that identifies it in an SNMP Management
Information Base (MIB) file, or in a DMI Management
Information Format (MIF) file, or in a CIM
Management Object File (MOF).
NVRAM
NDIS
OEM
Abbreviation for Network Driver Interface Specification.
Acronym for network interface controller.
Abbreviation for original equipment manufacturer.
An OEM is a company that supplies equipment to
other companies to resell or incorporate into another
product using the reseller's brand name.
NIF
OID
Acronym for network interface function. This term is
equivalent to NIC.
Abbreviation for object identifier. An implementationspecific integer or pointer that uniquely identifies
an object.
NIC
Acronym for nonvolatile random-access memory.
Memory that does not lose its contents when you turn
off your computer. NVRAM is used for maintaining the
date, time, and system configuration information.
NIS
Abbreviation for Network Information System. NIS is
a network naming and administration system for
smaller networks. A user at any host can get access to
files or applications on any host in the network with a
single user identification and password.
online access service
A service that typically provides access to the Internet,
e-mail, bulletin boards, chat rooms, and file libraries.
OTP
Abbreviation for one-time programmable.
NMI
Abbreviation for nonmaskable interrupt. A device
sends an NMI to signal the microprocessor about
hardware errors, such as a parity error.
parallel port
An I/O port used most often to connect a parallel
printer to your computer. You can usually identify a
parallel port on your computer by its 25-hole connector.
noninterlaced
A technique for decreasing screen flicker by sequentially
refreshing each horizontal line on the screen.
parameter
A value or option that you specify to a program. A
parameter is sometimes called a switch or an argument.
ns
Abbreviation for nanosecond(s), one billionth of
a second.
NTFS
Abbreviation for the NT File System option in the
Windows NT operating system and later Windows
operating systems.
204
Glossary
partition
You can divide a hard drive into multiple physical
sections called partitions with the fdisk command. Each
partition can contain multiple logical drives.
After partitioning the hard drive, you must format each
logical drive with the format command.
PCI
pixel
Abbreviation for Peripheral Component Interconnect.
A standard for local-bus implementation developed by
Intel Corporation.
A single point on a video display. Pixels are arranged in
rows and columns to create an image. A video
resolution, such as 640 x 480, is expressed as the
number of pixels across by the number of pixels up
and down.
PCMCIA
Personal Computer Memory Card International
Association. An international trade association that has
developed standards for devices, such as modems and
external hard drives, that can be plugged into
portable computers.
PERC
Acronym for Dell PowerEdge™ Expandable RAID
controller.
PLCC
Acronym for plastic leaded chip carrier.
Plug and Play
An industry-standard specification that makes it easier
to add hardware devices to personal computers. Plug
and Play provides automatic installation and
configuration, compatibility with existing hardware,
and dynamic support of mobile computing environments.
peripheral device
An internal or external device—such as a printer, a disk
drive, or a keyboard—connected to a computer.
PME
PGA
Abbreviation for Power Management Event. A PME is
a pin on a peripheral component interconnect that
allows a PCI device to assert a wake event.
Abbreviation for pin grid array, a type of microprocessor
socket that allows you to remove the microprocessor chip.
POST
physical memory array
The physical memory array is the entire physical
memory of a system. Variables for physical memory
array include maximum size, total number of memory
slots on the motherboard, and total number of slots in use.
physical memory array mapped
The physical memory array mapped refers to the way
physical memory is divided. For example, one mapped
area may have 640 KB and the other mapped area may
have between 1 megabyte and 127 megabytes.
PIC
Acronym for programmable interrupt controller.
PIP
Acronym for peripheral interchange program. A CP/M
utility program that was used to copy files.
Acronym for power-on self-test. Before the operating
system loads when you turn on your computer, the
POST tests various system components such as RAM,
the disk drives, and the keyboard.
power supply
An electrical system that converts AC current from the
wall outlet into the DC currents required by the
computer circuitry. The power supply in a personal
computer typically generates multiple voltages.
power unit
A set of power supplies in a system chassis.
ppm
Abbreviation for pages per minute.
PQFP
Abbreviation for plastic quad flat pack, a type of
microprocessor socket in which the microprocessor
chip is permanently mounted.
Glossary
205
probe
PXE
An electronic sensor for measuring a quantity or
determining system state at a particular point within a
system. Server Administrator can monitor temperature,
voltage, fan, memory, current and chassis intrusion probes.
The probes provide a snapshot of the measured quantity
(such as the temperature at a particular place and time)
or state (a chassis intrusion has or has not occurred).
Abbreviation for Pre-boot eXecution Environment.
program diskette set
The set of diskettes from which you can perform a
complete installation of an operating system or
application program. When you reconfigure a program,
you often need its program diskette set.
QFP
Acronym for quad flat pack.
RAC
Acronym for remote access controller. Dell
OpenManage Server Administrator supports all RACs.
These include the DRAC II, DRAC III, DRAC III/XT,
ERA, and ERA/O.
RAID
Acronym for redundant array of independent drives.
protected mode
RAM
An operating mode supported by 80286 or higher
microprocessors, protected mode allows operating
systems to implement:
Acronym for random-access memory. The computer's
primary temporary storage area for program instructions
and data. Each location in RAM is identified by a
number called a memory address. Any information stored
in RAM is lost when you turn off your computer.
•
A memory address space of 16 MB (80286
microprocessor) to 4 GB (Intel386 or higher
microprocessor)
•
Multitasking
•
Virtual memory, a method for increasing addressable
memory by using the hard drive
The Windows NT, Windows 2000, Windows XP,
OS/2®, and UNIX® 32-bit operating systems run in
protected mode. MS-DOS cannot run in protected
mode; however, some programs that you can start from
MS-DOS, such as the Windows operating system, are
able to put the computer into protected mode.
provider
A provider is an extension of a CIM schema that
communicates with managed objects and accesses data
and event notifications from a variety of sources.
Providers forward this information to the CIM Object
Manager for integration and interpretation.
Acronym for Rambus DRAM, a type of memory
(DRAM) developed by Rambus, Inc.
RAMDAC
Acronym for random-access memory digital-to-analog
converter.
RAW
Unprocessed. The term refers to data that is passed
along to an I/O device without being interpreted. In
contrast, cooked refers to data that is processed before
being passed to the I/O device.
It often refers to uncompressed text that is not stored
in any proprietary format. The term comes from UNIX,
which supports cooked and raw modes for data output
to a terminal.
RDRAM
PS
Abbreviation for power supply.
PS/2
Abbreviation for Personal System/2.
206
RAMBUS
Glossary
Acronym for Rambus DRAM. A dynamic RAM chip
technology from Rambus, Inc. Direct RDRAMs are
used in computers. Direct RDRAM chips are housed
in RIMM modules, which are similar to DIMMs but
have different pin settings. The chips can be built with
dual channels, doubling the transfer rate to 3.2 GB/sec.
read-only file
ROM
A read-only file is one that you are prohibited from
editing or deleting. A file can have read-only status if:
Acronym for read-only memory. Your computer
contains some programs essential to its operation in
ROM code. Unlike RAM, a ROM chip retains its
contents even after you turn off your computer.
Examples of code in ROM include the program that
initiates your computer's boot routine and the POST.
•
Its read-only attribute is enabled.
•
It resides on a physically write-protected diskette or
on a diskette in a write-protected drive.
•
It is located on a network in a directory to which the
system administrator has assigned read-only rights
to you.
readme file
A text file included with a software package or hardware
product that contains information supplementing or
updating the documentation for the software or
hardware. Typically, readme files provide installation
information, describe new product enhancements or
corrections that have not yet been documented, and
list known problems or other things you need to be
aware of as you use the software or hardware.
ROMB
Acronym for RAID on motherboard. When a RAID
controller is integrated into a computer’s system board,
the system has ROMB technology.
RPM
Abbreviation for revolutions per minute.
RTC
Abbreviation for real-time clock. Battery-powered
clock circuitry inside the computer that keeps the date
and time after you turn off the computer.
real mode
SAS
An operating mode supported by 80286 or higher
microprocessors, real mode imitates the architecture of
an 8086 microprocessor.
Acronym for Serial Attached SCSI.
refresh rate
SCA
Acronym for single connector attachment.
The rate at which the monitor redraws the video image
on the monitor screen. More precisely, the refresh rate
is the frequency, measured in Hz, at which the screen's
horizontal lines are recharged (sometimes also referred
to as its vertical frequency). The higher the refresh rate,
the less video flicker can be seen by the human eye. The
higher refresh rates are also noninterlaced.
schema
RFI
SCSI
Abbreviation for radio frequency interference.
A collection of class definitions that describes managed
objects in a particular environment. A CIM schema is
a collection of class definitions used to represent
managed objects that are common to every
management environment, which is why CIM is called
the Common Information Model.
Abbreviation for red/green/blue.
Acronym for small computer system interface. An I/O
bus interface with faster data transmission rates than
standard ports. You can connect up to seven devices
(15 for some newer SCSI types) to one SCSI interface.
RIMM
SDMS
Acronym for Rambus In-line Memory Module, which
is the Rambus equivalent of a DIMM module.
Abbreviation for SCSI device management system.
RGB
sec
Abbreviation for second(s).
Glossary
207
SEC
SKU
Abbreviation for single-edge contact.
Acronym for stock keeping unit.
serial port
SMART
An I/O port used most often to connect a modem to
your computer. You can usually identify a serial port
on your computer by its 9-pin connector.
Acronym for Self-Monitoring Analysis Reporting
Technology. A technology that allows hard drives to
report errors and failures to the system BIOS, which
then displays an error message on the screen. To take
advantage of this technology, you must have a
SMART-compliant hard drive and the proper support
in the system BIOS.
settings
Settings are conditions of a manageable object help to
determine what happens when a certain value is
detected in a component. For example, a user can set
the upper critical threshold of a temperature probe to
75 degrees Celsius. If the probe reaches that temperature,
the setting results in an alert being sent to the management
console so that user intervention can be taken. Some
settings, when reached, can trigger a system shutdown
or other response that can prevent damage to the system.
SMBIOS
Acronym for system management BIOS.
SMD
Acronym for surface mount device.
SMTP
service tag number
A bar code label on the computer that identifies it when
you call Dell for customer or technical support.
Acronym for Simple Mail Transfer Protocol, a method
for exchanging e-mail over the internet.
SNMP
SGRAM
Acronym for synchronous graphics RAM.
shadowing
A computer's system and video BIOS code is usually
stored on ROM chips. Shadowing refers to the
performance-enhancement technique that copies
BIOS code to faster RAM chips in the upper memory
area (above 640 KB) during the boot routine.
Abbreviation for Simple Network Management
Protocol. SNMP is an industry-standard interface that
allows a network manager to remotely monitor and
manage workstations.
SODIMM
Acronym for small outline-DIMM. A DIMM module
with a thinner profile due to the use of TSOP chip
packages. SODIMMs are commonly used in
laptop computers.
SIMD
Abbreviation for Single Instruction Multiple Data.
SRAM
SIMM
Abbreviation for static random-access memory.
Because SRAM chips do not require continual refreshing,
they are substantially faster than DRAM chips.
Acronym for single in-line memory module. A small
circuit board containing DRAM chips that connects to
the system board.
SIP
Acronym for single in-line package, which is a type of
housing for electronic components in which the
connecting pins protrude from one side. A SIP is also
called a Single In-line Pin Package (SIPP).
208
Glossary
state
Refers to the condition of an object that can have more
than one condition. For example, an object may be in
the “not ready” state.
status
system configuration information
Refers to the health or functioning of an object. For
example, a temperature probe can have the status
normal if the probe is measuring acceptable temperatures.
When the probe begins reading temperatures that
exceed limits set by the user, it reports a critical status.
Data stored in memory that tells a computer what
hardware is installed and how the computer should be
configured for operation.
system diskette
System diskette is a synonym for bootable diskette.
SVGA
Abbreviation for super video graphics array. VGA and
SVGA are video standards for video adapters with
greater resolution and color display capabilities than
previous standards.
system memory
To display a program at a specific resolution, you must
install the appropriate video drivers and your monitor
must support the resolution. Similarly, the number of
colors that a program can display depends on the
capabilities of the monitor, the video driver, and the
amount of video memory installed in the computer.
A BIOS-based program that allows you to configure
your computer's hardware and customize the computer's
operation by setting such features as password protection
and energy management. Some options in the System
Setup program require that you reboot the computer
(or the computer may reboot automatically) in order
to make a hardware configuration change. Because the
System Setup program is stored in NVRAM, any
settings remain in effect until you change them again.
switch
On a computer system board, switches control various
circuits or functions in your computer system. These
switches are known as DIP switches; they are normally
packaged in groups of two or more switches in a plastic
case. Two common DIP switches are used on system
boards: slide switches and rocker switches. The names
of the switches are based on how the settings (on and off)
of the switches are changed.
syntax
The rules that dictate how you must type a command
or instruction so that the computer understands it.
A variable's syntax indicates its data type.
System memory is a synonym for RAM.
System Setup program
system.ini file
A start-up file for the Windows operating system.
When you start Windows, it consults the system.ini file
to determine a variety of options for the Windows
operating environment. Among other things, the
system.ini file records which video, mouse, and
keyboard drivers are installed for Windows.
Running the Control Panel or Windows Setup program
may change options in the system.ini file. On other
occasions, you may need to change or add options to
the system.ini file manually with a text editor, such
as Notepad.
system board
As the main circuit board, the system board usually
contains most of your computer's integral components,
such as the following:
•
Microprocessor
•
RAM
•
Controllers for standard peripheral devices, such as
the keyboard
•
Various ROM chips
Frequently used synonyms for system board are
motherboard and logic board.
table
In SNMP MIBs, a table is a two dimensional array that
describes the variables that make up a managed object.
termination
Some devices (such as the last device at each end of a
SCSI cable) must be terminated to prevent reflections
and spurious signals in the cable. When such devices
are connected in a series, you may need to enable or
disable the termination on these devices by changing
jumper or switch settings on the devices or by changing
settings in the configuration software for the devices.
Glossary
209
text editor
An application program for editing text files consisting
exclusively of ASCII characters. Windows Notepad is
a text editor, for example. Most word processors use
proprietary file formats containing binary characters,
although some can read and write text files.
text mode
A video mode that can be defined as x columns by y
rows of characters.
threshold values
Systems are normally equipped with various sensors
that monitor temperature, voltage, current, and fan
speed. The sensor's threshold values specify the ranges
(min and max values) for determining whether the
sensor is operating under normal, noncritical, critical
or fatal conditions. Dell-supported threshold values are:
program and leave the TSR program resident in
memory for later use.
TSR programs can sometimes cause memory conflicts.
When troubleshooting, rule out the possibility of such
a conflict by rebooting your computer without starting
any TSR programs.
UART
Acronym for universal asynchronous receiver
transmitter, the electronic circuit that makes up the
serial port.
UDP
Acronym for user datagram protocol.
UL
Abbreviation for Underwriters Laboratories.
•
UpperThresholdFatal
UMB
•
UpperThresholdCritical
Abbreviation for upper memory blocks.
•
UpperThresholdNon-critical
•
Normal
•
LowerThresholdNon-critical
•
LowerThresholdCritical
A fixed width, 16-bit world wide character encoding,
developed and maintained by the Unicode
Consortium.
•
LowerThresholdFatal
upper memory area
time-out
A specified period of system inactivity that must occur
before an energy conservation feature is activated.
tpi
Abbreviation for tracks per inch.
TQFP
Acronym for thin quad flat pack.
unicode
The 384 KB of RAM located between 640 KB and
1 MB. If the computer has an Intel386 or higher
microprocessor, a utility called a memory manager can
create UMBs in the upper memory area, in which you
can load device drivers and memory-resident programs.
UPS
Abbreviation for uninterruptible power supply.
A battery-powered unit that automatically supplies
power to your computer in the event of an
electrical failure.
TSR
Abbreviation for terminate-and-stay-resident. A TSR
program runs “in the background.” Most TSR
programs implement a predefined key combination
(sometimes referred to as a hot key) that allows you to
activate the TSR program's interface while running
another program. When you finish using the TSR
program, you can return to the other application
210
Glossary
USB
Abbreviation for Universal Serial Bus. A USB connector
provides a single connection point for multiple USBcompliant devices, such as mice, keyboards, printers,
and computer speakers. USB devices can also be
connected and disconnected while the system is running.
utility
VGA
A program used to manage system resources—
memory, disk drives, or printers, for example.
Abbreviation for video graphics array. VGA and SVGA are
video standards for video adapters with greater resolution
and color display capabilities than previous standards. To
display a program at a specific resolution, you must install
the appropriate video drivers and your monitor must
support the resolution. Similarly, the number of colors
that a program can display depends on the capabilities of
the monitor, the video driver, and the amount of video
memory installed for the video adapter.
UTP
Abbreviation for unshielded twisted pair.
UUID
Acronym for Universal Unique Identification.
V
Abbreviation for volt(s).
VAC
Abbreviation for volt(s) alternating current.
varbind
An algorithm used to assign an object identifier or OID.
The varbind gives rules for arriving at the decimal prefix
that uniquely identifies an enterprise, as well as the
formula for specifying a unique identifier for the
objects defined in that enterprise's MIB.
variable
A component of a managed object. A temperature
probe, for example, has a variable to describe its
capabilities, its health or status, and certain indexes
that you can use to help you in locating the right
temperature probe.
VCCI
Abbreviation for Voluntary Control Council for
Interference.
VCR
VGA feature connector
On some systems with a built-in VGA video adapter, a
VGA feature connector allows you to add an
enhancement adapter, such as a video accelerator, to
your computer. A VGA feature connector can also be
called a VGA pass-through connector.
video adapter
The logical circuitry that provides—in combination
with the monitor—your computer's video capabilities.
A video adapter may support more or fewer features
than a specific monitor offers. Typically, a video
adapter comes with video drivers for displaying popular
application programs and operating systems in a variety
of video modes.
On some Dell computers, a video adapter is integrated
into the system board. Also available are many video
adapter cards that plug into an expansion-card connector.
Video adapters often include memory separate from
RAM on the system board. The amount of video
memory, along with the adapter's video drivers, may
affect the number of colors that can be simultaneously
displayed. Video adapters can also include their own
coprocessor for faster graphics rendering.
Abbreviation for video cassette recorder.
video driver
VDC
Abbreviation for volt(s) direct current.
VESA
Acronym for Video Electronics Standards Association.
A program that allows graphics-mode application
programs and operating systems to display at a chosen
resolution with the desired number of colors. A
software package may include some “generic” video
drivers. Any additional video drivers may need to match
the video adapter installed in the computer.
Glossary
211
video memory
VLSI
Most VGA and SVGA video adapters include memory
chips in addition to your computer's RAM. The amount
of video memory installed primarily influences the
number of colors that a program can display (with the
appropriate video drivers and monitor capabilities).
Abbreviation for very-large-scale integration.
video mode
vpp
Video adapters normally support multiple text and
graphics display modes. Character-based software
displays in text modes that can be defined as x columns
by y rows of characters. Graphics-based software
displays in graphics modes that can be defined as x
horizontal by y vertical pixels by z colors.
Abbreviation for peak-point voltage.
video resolution
Video resolution—800 x 600, for example—is
expressed as the number of pixels across by the number
of pixels up and down. To display a program at a specific
graphics resolution, you must install the appropriate
video drivers and your monitor must support the
resolution.
virtual memory
A method for increasing addressable RAM by using the
hard drive. For example, in a computer with 16 MB of
RAM and 16 MB of virtual memory set up on the hard
drive, the operating system would manage the system
as though it had 32 MB of physical RAM.
virus
A self-starting program designed to inconvenience you.
Virus programs have been known to corrupt the files
stored on a hard drive or to replicate themselves until
a computer or network runs out of memory.
The most common way that virus programs move from
one computer to another is via “infected” diskettes,
from which they copy themselves to the hard drive.
To guard against virus programs, you should do the
following:
•
Periodically run a virus-checking utility on your
computer's hard drive
•
Always run a virus-checking utility on any diskettes
(including commercially sold software) before
using them
212
Glossary
VLVESA
Acronym for very low voltage enterprise system
architecture.
VRAM
Acronym for video random-access memory. Some
video adapters use VRAM chips (or a combination of
VRAM and DRAM) to improve video performance.
VRAM is dual-ported, allowing the video adapter to
update the screen and receive new image data at the
same time.
VRM
Abbreviation for voltage regulator module.
W
Abbreviation for watt(s).
Wakeup on LAN
The ability for the power in a client station to be turned
on by the network. Remote wake-up enables software
upgrading and other management tasks to be
performed on users' machines after the work day is over.
It also enables remote users to gain access to machines
that have been turned off. Intel calls remote wake-up
"Wake-on-LAN."
WH
Abbreviation for watt-hour(s).
Winbind
A program that allows users in a heterogeneous network
to log in using workstations that have UNIX operating
systems. The program makes workstations using UNIX
functional in Windows domains, by making Windows
appear like UNIX to each UNIX workstation.
win.ini file
XMM
A start-up file for the Windows operating system.
When you start Windows, it consults the win.ini file to
determine a variety of options for the Windows
operating environment. Among other things, the
win.ini file records what printer(s) and fonts are
installed for Windows. The win.ini file also usually
includes sections that contain optional settings for
Windows application programs that are installed on
the hard drive.
Abbreviation for extended memory manager, a utility
that allows application programs and operating systems
to use extended memory in accordance with the XMS.
Running the Control Panel or Windows Setup program
may change options in the win.ini file. On other
occasions, you may need to change or add options to
the win.ini file manually with a text editor such as
Notepad.
write-protected
Read-only files are said to be write-protected. You can
write-protect a 3.5-inch diskette by sliding its writeprotect tab to the open position or by setting the
write-protect feature in the System Setup program.
XMS
Abbreviation for eXtended Memory Specification.
ZIF
Acronym for zero insertion force. Some computers use
ZIF sockets and connectors to allow devices such as the
microprocessor chip to be installed or removed with no
stress applied to the device.
ZIP
A 3.5-inch removable disk drive from Iomega.
Originally, it provided a 100-MB removable cartridges.
The drive is bundled with software that can catalog the
disks and lock the files for security.
A 250-MB version of the Zip drive also reads and writes
the 100-MB Zip cartridges.
Glossary
213
214
Glossary
Index
Symbols
-?
omconfig, 54
omconfig chassis, 56
omconfig rac, 121
omreport, 25
omreport rac, 114
request for help, 19
alertlog
clearing logs, 92
omconfig system, 19, 52
omreport system, 40
arrays
memory, 23, 47
assetinfo
acquisition, 41
omreport system, 41
A
assign dedicated hot spare
omconfig, 163
about
omconfig, 55
assign global hot spare
omconfig, 172
acquisition
information, 101
optional parameters, 20
authentication
omconfig rac, 121
omreport rac, 114
acquisition information
adding, 101
available alert actions, 90
acswitch
omreport chassis, 26
omreport command level 3, 26
B
adapter
omreport chassis slots, 38
alert action
defining, 89
example valid commands, 91
setting, 89
setting events, 90
alertaction
omconfig system, 89
omreport system, 40
background initialization rate
omconfig, 154
base I/O address
omreport chassis ports, 34
battery
ID, 137
omconfig storage, 177
omreport storage, 139
recondition, 177
status, 139
bios
omreport chassis, 27
biossetup
omconfig chassis, 56
omreport chassis, 27
blink
omconfig, 184
blink physical disk
omconfig, 168
bmc
omconfig chassis, 61, 75
omreport chassis, 29, 37
C
cache policy parameters, 152
cache properties
omreport chassis
processors, 35
cancel background initialize
omconfig, 161
cancel check consistency
omconfig, 165
cancel clear physical disk
omconfig, 176
cancel initialize disk
omconfig, 160
cancel rebuild physical disk
omconfig, 174
cdvformat
omconfig preferences, 86
Index
215
216
Index
certificate authority, 124
certificate signing
request, 124
change virtual disk policy
omconfig, 167
chassis
omconfig, 56
chassis fault LED, 74
CLI commands
?, 19
primary commands, 14
Windows command
prompt, 14
cmdlog
omconfig system, 92
omreport system, 40
chassis identification LED, 74
command levels 1,2, and 3
omconfig, 52
chassis information
summary, 31
command levels 1,2,3
omreport, 22
check consistency
omconfig, 164
command syntax overview, 17
check consistency rate
omconfig, 155
clear foreign configuration
omconfig, 157
clear physical disk
omconfig, 175
CLI
clearing logs, 92
error messages, error
checking, 15
CLI command levels 1, 2, and
3 defined, 20
CLI command output, 187
appending command output to
a file, 189
controlling display, 187
formatting output, 189
raw XML format, 191
saving to a file that can be
overwritten, 188
table format, 191
writing to a file, 187
216
Index
commands for clearing
logs, 92
commands for viewing
logs, 39
components
alert actions, 90
event notification, 96
events, 41-42
failure messages, 16
instrumentation service, 51
omreport, 21-22
omreport system, 39
omreport system summary, 24
omreport system version, 24
RAC, 113
SNMP traps, 95
storage, 137
summary, 44
updating, 15
warning and failure
thresholds, 70-71
configure remote access
service, 119
configuring
Active Directory service, 86
network parameter values for
your RAC, 127
RAC to authenticate
users, 121
RAC user access, 121
requirements for RAC dial-in
users, 122
requirements for RAC dial-out
users, 123
SNMP trap property
values, 128
system events, 95
configuring power button,
NMI button, 72
Connector, 139
connector
omconfig storage, 178
connector commands
omconfig, 178
connector name
omreport chassis
processors, 35
connector status
omreport, 139
controller
battery, 139
BMC, 29, 37, 44, 53-54
display IDs, 136
omconfig storage, 146
omreport storage, 138
RAC, 113, 119
SATA, 59
controlling CLI command
output, 187
conventions for command
parameter tables, 21
core count
omreport chassis
processors, 35
CSR
about, 124
generating parameters, 124
user access levels, 120
current speed
omreport chassis
processors, 35
currents
omconfig chassis, 70
omreport chassis, 30
dialinusers
omconfig rac, 122
omreport rac, 115
dialoutusers
omconfig rac, 123
omreport rac, 115
dirservice
omconfig preferences, 86
disable enclosure alarm
omconfig, 180
disable smart thermal
shutdown
omconfig, 181
display IDs, 136-137
display reports
RAC components, 113
D
data bus width
omreport chassis slots, 38
default maximum warning
threshold, 71
default minimum warning
threshold, 71
defining alert actions, 89
E
enable enclosure alarm
omconfig, 180
enable smart thermal
shutdown
omconfig, 181
event name
alert actions, 90
omconfig system
platformevents, 93
event notification
configuring, 95
index, 96
severity, 96
source, 95
type, 95
events
alert actions, 90
classified by component
type, 42
omconfig system, 95
omreport system, 41
SNMP, 24, 52, 95
example command
omconfig rac
rmdialinuser, 130
omconfig rac
rmdialoutuser, 130
omconfig rac
rmsnmptrap, 131
omconfig rac rmuser, 131
omconfig rac snmptraps, 128
delay battery learn cycle
omconfig, 178
enclosure
omconfig storage, 179
omreport storage, 140-142
example help commands, 19
delete virtual disk
omconfig, 166
error checking and error
messages, CLI, 15
delimiters
data fields, 86
error messages, 15
external clock speed
omreport chassis
processors, 35
depreciation information
about, 103
adding, 103
ESM, 40
esmlog
omconfig system, 92
omreport system, 40
extended warranty
information, 104
external name
omreport chassis ports, 34
extwarranty
omconfig system, 104
Index
217
218
Index
F
I
failure messages, 16
import foreign configuration
omconfig, 156
fan status
omreport, 141
fancontrol
omconfig chassis, 72
omreport chassis, 30
fans
omconfig chassis, 71
omreport chassis, 30
index
omreport chassis slots, 38
info
omconfig chassis, 73
omreport chassis, 31
initialize physical disk
omconfig, 170
firmware
omreport chassis, 31
initialize virtual disk
omconfig, 160
format virtual disk, 166
introduction, 13
formatting CLI command
output, 189
intrusion
omreport chassis, 32
frontpanel
omconfig chassis, 72
omreport chassis, 31
IP address
alert destinations, 92
IRQ level
omreport chassis ports, 34
local operating system user
access, 121
M
maintenance
information, 106
adding, 106
manufacturer
omreport chassis
processors, 35
maximum speed
omreport chassis ports, 35
maximum warning
threshold, 71, 85
memory
arrays, 23, 47
omreport chassis, 33
memorymode
omconfig chassis, 74
G
generatecert
omconfig rac, 124
globalinfo
omconfig storage, 144
omreport storage, 139
K
Kerberos, 13
minimum warning
threshold, 71, 85
L
modem
omconfig rac, 125
omreport rac, 116
LDAP, 13
modem property values, 116
H
lease information, 105
help, levels of, 20
leds
omconfig chassis, 74
omreport chassis, 33
hot spare, 163
levels of help for a CLI
command, 20
218
local operating system
authentication, 114, 121
Index
N
name=value pairs
omconfig chassis biossetup, 56
omconfig chassis bmc, 62, 76
omconfig chassis currents, 70
network
omconfig rac, 127
omreport rac, 116
NIC property values, 116
nics
omreport chassis, 34
NIS, 13
NMI button, 31
O
offline physical disk
omconfig, 171
omconfg
cancel initialize virtual
disk, 160
omconfig
-?, 54
about, 55
assign dedicated hot
spare, 163
assign global hot spare, 172
blink physical disk, 168
blink virtual disk, 159
cancel background
initialize, 161
cancel check consistency, 165
cancel rebuild physical
disk, 174
change virtual disk policy, 167
chassis, 56
check consistency, 164
command levels 1,2, and 3, 52
command parameter table
conventions, 51
command summary, 51
create virtual disk, 150
omconfig (continued)
delete virtual disk, 166
disable controller alarm, 148
disable enclosure alarm, 180
disable smart thermal
shutdown, 181
enable controller alarm, 148
enable enclosure alarm, 180
enable smart thermal
shutdown, 181
format virtual disk, 166
getting help, 54
global disable smart thermal
shutdown, 145
global enable smart thermal
shutdown, 144
global rescan controller, 145,
147
initialize physical disk, 170
initialize virtual disk, 160
offline physical disk, 171
online physical disk, 172
pause check consistency, 165
prepare to remove physical
disk, 170
quiet controller alarm, 148
rac, 119
rebuild physical disk, 174
recondition battery, 177
reconfiguring virtual disks, 166
remove dead segments, 175
rename virtual disk, 167
rescan connector, 178
rescan controller, 147
reset controller
configuration, 149
reset temperature probe
thresholds, 183-184
restore dead segments, 162
omconfig (continued)
resume check consistency, 165
set controller rebuild rate, 154
set enclosure asset name, 181
set enclosure asset tag, 181
set temperature probe
thresholds, 182
split mirror, 162
system, 89
test controller alarm, 149
unassign dedicated hot
spare, 164
unassign global hot spare, 173
unblink physical disk, 169
unblink virtual disk, 159
unmirror, 162
omconfig about
details=true, 55
omconfig battery
commands, 177
omconfig channel
commands, 178
omconfig chassis, 56
-?, 56
biossetup, 56
bmc, 61, 75
currents, 70
fancontrol, 72
fans, 71
frontpanel, 72
info, 73
leds, 74
memorymode, 74
temps, 84
volts, 85
omconfig chassis biossetup
name=value pairs, 56
Index
219
220
Index
omconfig chassis bmc
name=value pair, 62, 76
omconfig global
commands, 144
omconfig chassis currents
name=value pairs, 70
omconfig physical disk
commands, 168
omconfig chassis fancontrol
name=value pairs,
parameters, 72
omconfig preferences, 86
cdvformat, 86
dirservice, 86
snmp, 87-88
useraccess, 88
omconfig chassis fans
name=value pairs,
parameters, 71
omconfig chassis frontpanel
name=value pair,
parameters, 73
omconfig chassis info
name=value pair,
parameters, 73
omconfig chassis leds
name=value pairs,
parameters, 74
omconfig chassis
memorymode
name=value pairs,
parameters, 75
omconfig chassis temps
name=value pairs,
paramaters, 84
omconfig chassis volts
name=value pairs,
parameters, 85
omconfig command, 51
omconfig controller
commands, 146
omconfig enclosure
commands, 179
220
Index
omconfig preferences
dirservice
name=value pair,
parameters, 87
omconfig preferences snmp
name=value pairs,
parameters, 88
omconfig rac
-?, 121
authentication, 121
command summary, 119
dialinusers, 122
dialoutusers, 123
generatecert, 124
getting help, 121
modem, 125
network, 127
remote, 129
reset, 132
rmdialinuser, 129
rmdialoutuser, 130
rmsnmptrap, 131
rmuser, 131
snmptraps, 128
uploadcert, 125, 132
users, 132
omconfig rac authentication
example command, 122
omconfig rac dialinusers
name=value pairs,
parameters, 122
omconfig rac dialoutusers
name=value pairs,
parameters, 123
omconfig rac generatecert
name=value pairs,
parameters, 125
omconfig rac modem
name=value pairs,
parameters, 125
omconfig rac network
name=value pairs,
parameters, 127
omconfig rac remote
name=value pairs,
parameters, 129
omconfig rac rmdialinuser
name=value pairs,
parameters, 129
omconfig rac rmdialoutuser
name=value pairs,
parameters, 130
omconfig rac rmsnmptrap
name=value pairs,
parameters, 131
omconfig rac rmuser
name=value pairs,
parameters, 131
omconfig rac snmptraps
name=value pairs,
parameters, 128
omconfig rac uploadcert
name=value pairs,
parameters, 132
omconfig rac users
example command, 133
name=value pairs,
parameters, 132
omconfig rac viewcertificate
name=value pair,
parameters, 117
omconfig storage
battery, 177
connector, 178
controller, 146
enclosure, 179
globalinfo, 144
pdisk, 135, 168
vdisk, 158
omconfig system
alertaction, 89
alertlog, 19, 52, 92
assetinfo, 101
cmdlog, 92
esmlog, 92
events, 95
extwarranty, 104
name=value pairs,
parameters, 95
pedestinations, 92
platformevents, 93
recovery, 97
shutdown, 97
thrmshutdown, 98
webserver, 96
omconfig system assetinfo
info=acquisition, 101-102
info=depreciation, 103
info=extwarranty, 104
info=lease, 105
info=maintenance, 106
info=outsource, 107
info=owner, 108
info=service, 109
info=support, 110
info=system, 111
info=warranty, 112
omconfig system events, 95
omconfig system
extwarranty, 104
omconfig system
pedestinations
name=value pairs,
parameters, 92
omconfig system recovery
name=value pairs,
parameters, 97
omconfig system shutdown
name=value pairs,
parameters, 98
omconfig system
warranty, 112
omconfig system webserver
name=value pairs,
parameters, 96
omconfig virtual disk
commands, 158
omhelp, 14, 19
omreport
-?, 25
about, 25
omreport (continued)
battery status, 139
chassis, 26
command levels 1, 2, 3, 22
command summary, 21
connector status, 139
controller status, 138
EMM status, 142
enclosure status, 140
fan status, 141
getting help, 25
global information, 139
physical disk status, 143
power supply status, 142
system, 39
temperature probe status, 140
virtual disk status, 144
omreport chassis
acswitch, 26
bios, 27
biossetup, 27, 29-30
currents, 30
fancontrol, 30
fans, 30
firmware, 31
frontpanel, 31
fru, 31
info, 31
intrusion, 32
leds, 33
memory, 33
nics, 34
ports, 34
processors, 35
pwrsupplies, 37
slots, 38
temps, 38
volts, 39
Index
221
222
Index
omreport chassis bmc
name=value pairs,
parameters, 30, 38
omreport chassis fancontrol
name=value pairs,
parameters, 30
omreport chassis ports
base I/O address, 34
connector type, 35
external name, 34
IRQ level, 34
maximum speed, 35
port type, 34
omreport chassis processors
cache properties, 35
connector name, 35
core count, 35
current speed, 35
external clock speed, 35
manufacturer, 35
processor family, 35
processor version, 35
state, 35
omreport chassis slots
adapter, 38
data bus width, 38
index, 38
slot ID, 38
omreport rac
-?, 114
authentication, 114
command levels 1, 2, and
3, 114
command summary, 113
dialinusers, 115
dialoutusers, 115
getting help, 114
222
Index
omreport rac (continued)
modem, 116
network, 116
remote, 116
snmptraps, 116
users, 116
viewcertificate, 117
omreport system (continued)
platformevents, 44
recovery, 44
shutdown, 44
summary, 44
thrmshutdown, 48
version, 48
omreport rac authentication
example command, 114
omreport system assetinfo, 41
omreport rac dialinusers
name=value pairs,
parameters, 115
omreport rac dialoutusers
name=value pairs,
parameters, 115
omreport rac snmptraps
name=value pairs,
parameters, 116
omreport rac users
name=value pairs,
parameters, 116
omreport storage
battery, 139
controller, 138
enclosure, 140-142
globalinfo, 139
pdisk, 143
vdisk, 144
omreport system
alertaction, 40
alertlog, 40
assetinfo, 41
cmdlog, 40
esmlog, 40
events, 41
operatingsystem, 43
pedestinations, 43
omreport system
commands, 39
omreport system events
name=value pairs, 42
omrpeort system
components, 39
online physical disk
omconfig, 172
operating system
omreport system, 43
outsource information, 107
owner information, 108
P
parameters for fan warning
thresholds, 71
parameters for setting current
warning thresholds, 70
pause check consistency
omconfig, 165
pdisk, 168
omconfig storage, 135-136
omconfig virtual disk, 150
omreport physical disk, 143
omreport storage, 143
pedestinations
omconfig system, 92
omreport system, 43
read policy parameters, 153
Physical disks in each
stripe, 153
recondition battery
omconfig, 177
platformevents
omconfig system, 93
omreport system, 44
reconfiguring virtual disks
omconfig, 166
port type
omreport chassis ports, 34
ports
omreport chassis, 34
prepare to remove physical
disk, 170
primary CLI command
omconfig, 14
omhelp, 14, 19
omreport, 14
primary CLI commands, 14
processor family
omreport chassis
processors, 35
rebuild physical disk
omconfig, 174
reconstruct rate
omconfig, 155
recovery
omconfig system, 97
omreport system, 44
reset
omconfig rac, 132
reset all temperature probe
thresholds
omconfig, 184
reset the rac, 132
restore dead segments
omconfig, 162
resume check consistency
omconfig, 165
rmdialinuser
omconfig rac, 129
recovery from a hung
operating system, 44
rmdialoutuser
omconfig rac, 130
remote
omconfig rac, 129
omreport rac, 116
rmsnmptrap
omconfig rac, 131
remote access controller, 113
remote features property
values, 116
rmuser
omconfig user, 131
remove a dial-in user, 129
S
processor version
omreport chassis
processors, 35
remove a dial-out user, 130
scripting, 17
remove a user, 131
scripting with the CLI, 17
remove an SNMP trap, 131
separate mirrored data, 162
processors
omreport chassis, 35
remove dead segments
omconfig, 175
pwrsupplies
omreport chassis, 37
rename virtual disk
omconfig, 167
service contract
information, 109
adding, 109
R
RAC authentication
local operating system
authentication, 121
requesting a certificate for
your RAC, 124
rescan connector
omconfig, 178
rescan controllers, 145
set enclosure asset name
omconfig, 181
set enclosure asset tag
omconfig, 181
set temperature probe
thresholds
omconfig, 182-184
Index
223
224
Index
shutdown
omconfig system, 97
omreport system, 44
shutdown action
omconfig system
platformevents, 93
slot ID
omreport chassis slots, 38
slots
omreport chassis, 38
smart thermal shutdown
status, 139
snmp
omconfig preferences, 87
storage management CLI, 135
successful commands, 15
unassign global hot spare
omconfig, 173
summary
omreport system, 44
unblink physical disk
omconfig, 169
support information
adding, 110
unmirror
omconfig, 162
syntax overview
CLI commands, 17
upload the CA certificate to
the RAC, 132
system, 101
uploadcert
omconfig rac, 125, 132
system asset information, 101
system information
adding, 111
SNMP trap property
values, 116
T
SNMP traps, 95
disabling, 95
enabling, 95
table format for CLI
command output, 191
snmptraps
omconfig rac, 128
omreport rac, 116
specify remote features
property values for your
RAC, 129
specify user property
values, 132
split mirror
omconfig, 162
start battery learn cycle
omconfig, 177
state
omreport chassis
processors, 35
storage management, 135
224
Index
temperature probe warning
threshold, 85
temps
omconfig chassis, 84
omreport chassis, 38
thermal shutdown
about, 48
configuring, 98
example commands, 99
uploading a certificate to a
RAC, 124
uploading a certificate to your
RAC, 132
user access to Server
Administrator
administrators only, 89
determining, 89
least restrictive, 89
most restrictive, 89
power users and administrators
only, 89
useraccess
omconfig preferences, 88
users
omconfig rac, 132
omreport rac, 116
thrmshutdown
omconfig system, 98
omreport system, 48
V
U
vdisk
omconfig storage, 158
omreport storage, 144
unassign dedicated hot spare
omconfig, 164
version
omreport system, 48
viewcertificate
omreport rac, 117
viewing alert actions for
specific components and
events, 40
viewing properties for system
temperature probes, 38
viewing properties for system
voltage probes, 39
viewing properties of system
power supplies, 37
viewing properties of system
slots, 38
voltage warning
thresholds, 85
volts
omconfig chassis, 85
omreport chassis, 39
W
warranty
adding, 112
components, 104, 112
omconfig system, 112
webserver
omconfig system, 96
starting and stopping, 96
what’s new, 13
Winbind, 13
Windows command prompts
CLI, 14
write policy parameters, 153
Index
225
226
Index
226
Index