INSTRUCTIONS
Thank you for purchasing the OLYMPUS OM-3Ti. This durable, lightweight SLR camera incorporates
titanium — a metal that's lighter than aluminum, yet six times stronger — in the camera body. It is a
single lens reflex camera with a mechanical shutter. Features include Multi Spot Metering, OTF Auto
Flash and Super FP Flash Control System. Designed to facilitate serious photography with such
professional-level techniques as daylight synchro-flash photography, the purpose of the OM-3Ti is to
expand the sphere of creative photography. Before using the camera, we recommend that you read this
instruction manual carefully, familiarizing yourself with the operating instructions so you can get the very
best performance and service life from your new camera.
Note: All the components of the Olympus OM-3Ti are carefully designed and their production and assembly is strictly
controlled to enhance the unmatched performance of the system. If any interchangeable lenses, flashes, or
accessories other than Olympus products are used, Olympus cannot be responsible for poor results or damage
of the OM-3Ti.
Correct
Incorrect
Press lightly
1
Operation
Lamp on
Operation order
Lamp blinking
Automatic operation
Single beep
Continuous beep
Attention
TABLE OF CONTENTS
< Preparation before Taking Pictures >
• Dioptric Correction
• Mounting the Lens
5
7
• Loading the Batteries
• Checking the Batteries
9
11
• Loading the Film
• Setting the ISO Film Speed
< Taking Photographs (I) >
13
16
— Center Weighted Average Light Metering —
• Center-Weighted Average
Light Metering
• Rewinding the Film
< Taking Photographs (II) >
— Spot Metering —
• How to Use Spot Metering
25
• How to Clear Spot Metering
28
• How to Use the Multi-Spot Metering
• Highlight Control
• Shadow Control
29
32
35
19
22
< Taking Photographs (III) >
— Flash Photography —
• Taking OTF Auto Flash Photographs
39
• Taking Daylight Synchro-Flash Photographs
(Super FP Flash Mode)
< Taking Photographs (IV) >
— Other Operations —
• Exposure Compensation in the OTF
Auto Flash Mode
42
45
• Bulb Exposure
46
• Using the Viewfinder Illuminator
47
• Changing the Focusing Screen
48
• Changing the Camera Back
• Attaching the Grip
49
50
2
TABLE OF CONTENTS
3
< For Your Creative Photography >
• The Fascinating Results of Creative Exposure
and High-Speed Synchronization
• Center-Weighted Average Light Metering
• OTF Auto Light Metering
< OM SYSTEM >
• Flash Photography
79
53
55
56
• OTF Auto Flash
80
• SPOT Metering (1)
57
• SPOT Metering (2)
• Shooting with One-Point Spot Metering
• Shooting with Multi-Spot Metering
• Sophisticated Multi-Spot Metering
• Highlight Control
• Shadow Control
58
61
63
65
67
69
• Viewfinder Information
71
• Macrophotography
88
• Exposure Compensation
72
• Chart of Photographic Ranges
89
• Depth of Field
72
• Depth of Field Scale
• Preview Button
• Shutter Speeds
73
74
75
• Bulb Exposure
• Multiple Exposures
76
77
•
•
•
•
•
•
• Infrared Photography
77
•Specifications
• Operation of T-Series Flash
80
• Main Specifications of T-Series Flash
81
• Main Specifications of F280
• Using Electronic Flashes Other than the
T-Series Flash Units
• Bounce Flash
• Shooting with a Motor Drive
• Motor Drive Group
82
• Recordata Back 4
87
Macro Photo Units
Finder Group Units
Selection of Filters
Handling Care
Questions and Answers
Description of Controls
82
83
85
86
90
92
95
97
99
104
108
< Preparations before Taking Pictures >
4
Dioptric Correction
The OM-3Ti permits dioptric adjustment according to your eyesight.
1
Remove the body cap.
5
2
Pull out the diopter adjustment knob.
3
Turn and adjust the knob so that the matscreen appears
4
Push the knob back in until it locks.
sharp.
6
Mounting the Lens
1
Remove the rear lens cap.
2
7
Align the red dots and rotate the lens clockwise until it
locks.
3
Remove the front lens cap. (Press in the mount tabs on
the edges of the lens cap parallel with "OLYMPUS").
Removing the Lens
Press the lens release button and turn the lens counterclockwise.
Mounting of a third-party lens can damage the
automatic clear button. This disables the spot
function.
8
Loading the Batteries
Do not use different types of batteries or new and old batteries at the same time. If you are not likely to use
the camera for a long period of time, remove the batteries before putting it away.
1
Remove the battery cover.
9
2
Wipe battery surfaces clean. Make sure that +
signs are facing upwards.
Use two SR44 silver oxide or LR44 alkaline manganese
batteries or one CR-1/3N lithium battery.
10
Checking the Batteries
Always check the batteries after inserting new batteries, when shooting in cold weather, or if the camera has
not been used for a long time.
1
11
Press the BATTERY CHECK button.
2
The battery check indicator lights and the camera beeps to
tell you that the batteries have enough power. As the
battery power weakens, the signals will become
intermittent then vanish completely when they are
exhausted.
12
Loading the Film
1
2
13
Pull up on the rewind knob to open the camera back.
Tear off the top of the film box and insert it into the memo
holder. It will remind you which film you are using.
Insert the cartridge and push down the film rewind
knob. (Always load the film in the shade.)
3
Insert the film leader into the take-up spool.
4
Wind the film and make sure the sprocket teeth catch
both the upper and lower film perforations.
5
Take up the slack by turning the rewind crank
clockwise.
14
6
7
15
Close the camera back until it clicks into place.
Face the camera toward light and take two blind shots.
This will bring the film to the first frame.
Setting the ISO Film Speed
Lift up the outer collar and rotate until the ISO speed
1
appears in the window.
16
2
Align the exposure line A with the index B.
If the exposure compensation dial does not turn to the desired ISO number,
set it once at an intermediate value then repeat the procedure.
17
< Taking Photographs (I) >
— Center-Weighted Average Light Metering —
The OM-3Ti's exposure mode employs center-weighted average light metering. This meets a wide range of
shooting requirements.
18
Center-Weighted Average Light Metering
19
1
Press the shutter release lightly to activate the viewfinder
display.
2
Focus on your subject.
3
Set the bar graph tip to the fixed point between the arrows
by adjusting the aperture and/or shutter speed rings
Fixed point
Bar display
4
The shutter speed you have set will be displayed in the
5
Compose the shot and press the shutter release.
viewfinder.
20
When the subject is too bright, select a faster shutter
speed.
When the subject is too dark, select a slower shutter
speed.
The viewfinder display will go out after about 60 seconds. To turn the display back on
again, touch the shutter release button lightly.
21
Rewinding the Film
1
When the exposure counter indicates the end of your
roll of film.
2
Push the "R" Rewind Release Button.
22
23
3
Fold out the rewind crank and wind it until the film
tension is released.
4
Open the camera back by pulling up on the rewind
knob and remove the film.
< Taking Photographs (II) >
— Spot Metering —
The spot metering system of the OM-3Ti enables you to control the exposure as you like. It insures perfect
exposure of backlighted and high-contrast subjects and expands shooting possibilities for more creative
photography.
24
How to Use Spot Metering
Reference
P 57-62
1
Align the microprism area with the area you want to
measure. (The spot metering range is outlined by the
outer edge of the microprism.)
Spot metering range
25
2
If you move the camera, another
Press the spot button to take a meter reading. You will hear
an electronic sound and the word "SPOT" will appear in the
viewfinder. The metered value is displayed by the
mark.
mark will indicate the exposure value in the center of the frame along with
the spot metered value.
3
Set the bar graph tip to the fixed point between the arrows
by adjusting the aperture and/or shutter speed rings.
26
4
The shutter speed you have set will be displayed in the
5
Press the shutter release to take the picture.
6
The subject will turn out correctly exposed, regardless of
viewfinder.
the brightness of the background.
The spot metering mode is automatically canceled after the shutter
releases or when 60 seconds has passed since it was engaged.
Center-weighted average metering will be restored.
27
How to Clear Spot Metering
1
Set the lever to CLEAR. "SPOT" and
mark will
disappear and the mode will return to center-weighted
average metering.
28
How to Use the Multi-Spot Metering
Spot metering is possible in up to 8 spots.
Reference
P63-66
This sample photo shows a backlighted subject.
29
1
2
3
Take spot metering on the face (first spot)
Take spot metering on the lawn (second spot).
Take spot metering on the building in the background (third
spot).
30
4
Set the bar graph tip to the fixed point between the arrows
5
Compose your picture and press the shutter release.
by adjusting the aperture and/or shutter speed rings.
Exposure is achieved by averaging the brightness of the
three metered points.
To cancel the metered value, operate the clear lever.
31
Highlight Control
If you want to render white objects as white . . .
Reference
P 67-68
In ordinary shooting, white objects will turn out grayish
if the picture is taken in strong brightness over the
entire frame.
32
Take spot metering on the part of the subject which
1
you want to render in white.
2
Press the HI.LIGHT button.
The bar display shows 2-step automatic compensation.
33
3
4
Set the bar graph tip to the fixed point between the arrows
by adjusting the aperture and/or shutter speed rings.
Press the shutter release. Exposure is automatically
corrected to give 2-step overexposure, ensuring that white
objects turn out white.
The highlight control is cleared by pressing the HI.LIGHT button once
again. To cancel the metered value, use the clear lever.
34
Shadow Control
If you want to render black objects in black...
Reference
P 69-70
In ordinary shooting, black objects will turn out grayish
if it is very dark over the entire picture frame.
35
1
Take spot metering on the spot which you want to
render in black.
2
Press the SHADOW button.
The bar display shows 2 ²/³ -step automatic compensation.
36
3
Set the bar graph tip to the fixed point between the arrows
by adjusting the aperture and/or shutter speed rings.
4
Press the shutter release. Exposure is automatically
corrected to give 2²/3-step underexposure, ensuring that
black objects turn out black.
The shadow control is cleared by pressing the SHADOW button once
again. To cancel the metered value, use the clear lever.
37
< Taking Photographs (III) >
— Flash Photography —
38
Taking OTF Auto Flash Photographs
The following describes flash operation procedure when using a T-Series flash.
Reference
P 79-84
39
1
Slide a T-Series flash into the accessory shoe and secure it
with the lock screw.
2
Mount the provided chart on the back of the flash and
switch on its power.
3
Check the indicator.
4
Set the flash mode to TTL AUTO FLASH to take OTF auto
flash photographs. (TTL auto flash and OTF auto flash are
the same function.)
5
Select a shutter speed. The flash synchronization range is
B.1~1/60-sec.
40
6
Select an aperture.
7
Press the shutter release.
8
41
Check the green LED in the viewfinder. If it blinks, the
photograph has been shot with correct exposure. If it is off,
flash strength was insufficient.
Taking Daylight Synchro-Flash Photographs (Super FP Flash Mode)
The following describes flash operation procedure when using the F280. For OTF Auto using the Normal OTF Flash
mode, refer to the F280 instruciton manual.
1
Set the F280's mode to SUPER FP.
2
Set the flash mode selector lever to TTL AUTO FLASH or
X.
Either mode can be used in the Super FP Flash mode.
42
3
4
Select a shutter speed between 1/2000 and 1/60 sec. and
aperture according to the chart on the left.
Press the shutter release and confirm correct exposure by
checking the indicator on the flash. (There is no exposure
confirmation display shown in the viewfinder.)
At temperatures under -10°C (14°F) uneven exposure may
sometimes occur due to temporary degradation of Super FP
Flash function.
43
< Taking Photographs (IV) >
— Other Operations —
44
Exposure Compensation in the OTF Auto Flash Mode
Reference
P72
1
When an exposure compensation is set, the indicator
blinks in the viewfinder.
2
45
After shooting, return the dial to its original position.
Bulb Exposure
Reference
P76
1
Turn and set the shutter speed dial to "B".
2
The shutter will remain open as long as the shutter
The display in the viewfinder disappears.
release button is held depressed.
46
Using the Viewfinder Illuminator
Push the viewfinder illumination button if the viewfinder
display is too dark to read.
1
The illuminator will shut off after 10 sec.
47
Changing the Focusing Screen
Reference
P 92-94
1
Pull down the screen frame.
Pull the lug at top inside the body mount toward you to
swing down the screen frame.
2
To change the focusing screen, use the tweezers
supplied with an optional focasing screen. Push the
frame upward until you hear a click.
48
Changing the Camera Back
The camera back is interchangeable with the Recordata Back 4.
1
Open the camera back. Press down on the camera
back release button and remove the camera back.
Removing
49
Attaching
Attaching the Grip
1
Attach the provided Camera Grip.
When using a motor drive or winder, detach the Grip.
50
< For Your Creative Photography >
52
THE FASCINATING RESULTS OF CREATIVE EXPOSURE AND
HIGH-SPEED SYNCHRONIZATION
By Aklo Kojima
Have you always been satisfied with the resulting images
when using the camera's meter or an automatic exposure
system?
Chances are, most of the time you've been happy with
the results. Occasionally, however, you may have been
disappointed by photographs that didn't turn out as
expected, especially shots with backlighting or other
special lighting conditions, or those shots where you tried
to capture a particular mood or express your own
creativity.
Color reversal films, in particular, allow for only a narrow
latitude of exposure so that in many cases satisfactory
results are not obtained with simple automatic exposure.
Generally speaking, the results given by a camera's light
meter represent exposure values obtained by a metering
system that has been specifically adopted for that
camera. They do not always represent data as the result
of analytical measurement of various conditions such as
the subject's brightness range and distribution as well as
contrast. In actual shooting conditions, however, there is
often a very wide brightness range (luminance range) —
from the brightest spot to the darkest spot in a picture. In
some landscapes, for example, there can be a difference
of as much as 8 exposure values (EV) in the brightness
range of an image, representing a brightness/darkness
ratio of more than 1 : 200. The subject brightness range
53
that a film can reproduce (or an effective exposure range
of a film ) is limited to about 4 - 5 EV. Therefore, in many
cases it is impossible to accurately reproduce the subject
in its entire range on film.
The automatic exposure system (AE) on ordinary
cameras generally selects exposure using an exposure
meter in combination with the film speed. However, if
photography is to be a means of communication, the
photographer must control the tone of the picture in order
to most effectively emphasize the mood and expression
of the subject. To do this, it is necessary to choose the
exact spot on which you want to emphasize the desired
tone and match this spot to the effective exposure range
of a film.
To meet such exposure requirements, the following three
types of exposure are available.
Center-based exposure is the most commonly used type
of exposure. By matching the center of the subject's
brightness range to the center of the film's exposure
range, the subject is reproduced with greater emphasis
on the center-measured tone. If the brightness range is
greater than the range of the film, the extremes will be
ignored.
Shadow-based exposure gives the highest priority to the
shadow area in the subject brightness range. The tone in
the highlight area that is not covered may be ignored.
Highlight-based exposure, on the contrary, gives the
highest priority to the highlight area. This exposure allows
the shadow area to come out somewhat darker.
Advanced photographers oriented for creative
photography base their exposure selection on these
considerations. Measuring the values on several
important spots of the image with a hand-held spot meter,
they have to take all the troublesome and timeconsuming steps necessary to calculate the exposure
mentally. If everything goes well, the image will be
with a wide open aperture can result in out-of-focus
background, the subject can stand out to render a more
dramatic or portrait-like effect.
All these flash capabilities are very attractive to
photographers engaged in creative activities with 35mm
SLRs. Additionally, those flashes with the Super FP
mode have a long emission duration which conventional
flash units don't have. If this is put to good use, it is
possible to create a totally new photographic effect. It all
depends on your creativity.
properly exposed.
The OM-3Ti does all this automatically. Equipped with a
spot metering system and built-in computer, it calculates
the correct exposure value and frees the photographer
from having to make numerous complicated exposure
calculations. Now, with the OM-3Ti camera, it's easy for
everyone to obtain high-precision, "creative" exposure
control.
When combined with a T-Series flash, the OTF direct
light metering function offers total control of flash
strength, eliminating any bothersome calculation of
exposure. When combined with the F280, Super FP flash
control is possible with a high speed shutter. This allows
for daylight synchro, offering the benefits of flash use in
well-lit conditions and daylight synchro shooting of fast-
moving subjects. Moreover, because daylight synchro
54
CENTER-WEIGHTED AVERAGE LIGHT METERING
for its basic light metering system. This system
situations when front-lighting and contrast isn't too strong.
Since the OM-3Ti has a light-receiving element in an
emphasizes measurement of brightness in the center of
the screen, rather than averaging measurement of the
ideal position at the bottom of the mirror box, the amount
of light that arrives at the light-receiving element doesn't
brightness of the entire screen. Thus, the main subject in
change even when the focusing screen is replaced. For
this reason, the OM-3Ti achieves correct light metering
The OM-3Ti uses center-weighted average light metering
the center is unlikely to be insufficiently exposed, even
when the background is too bright or too dark. This
metering system thereby does an excellent job of
handling most ordinary shooting situations — such as
with all focusing screens. Additionally, there is no
adverse effect from rear incidence light through the
eyepiece.
Center-weighted average metering
3-dimensional sensitivity distribution
diagram
55
OTF AUTO LIGHT METERING
The OM-3Ti has manually selectable shutter speeds. But
combined with a T-series flash, the camera also provides
full control of flash lighting via OTF auto light metering.
This system automatically controls flash intensity while
directly metering the flash
lighting being exposed on film.
For this reason, there is no
deviation
between
the
metering area of the flash
sensor and the area actually
exposed.
Moreover,
aperture settings can be used. So advanced techniques
such as multi-flash and bounce-flash are at your
command, and are all fully automatic. Moreover,
troublesome exposure calculation in macro photography
is completely eliminated.
C e n t e r - w e i g h ted
average light metering is
also used in flash
shooting.
all
56
SPOT METERING (1)
This spot metering system measures the brightness of
the central spot of the picture frame (2% of the entire
frame).
The center-weighted average light metering provides
correct exposure for subjects in follow light and in
would also be desirable to express subtle lighting effects
according to the photographer's subject motive. To
realize such sophisticated expressions, fine metering of
various spots on the subject is required. If the "Spot"
button of the OM-3Ti is pressed, the metering mode
pictures having a nearly uniform brightness throughout
the entire frame. Exposure compensation is necessary,
switches to spot metering in which the brightness of the
area (corresponding to the microprism section in the
however, for backlit subjects and in compositions using
special lighting in which there is a difference in brightness
center of the viewfinder) is metered and stored in
between the subject and background. In some cases, it
memory. By using this spot metering, photographers can
control exposure as desired to realize creative
lighting compositions.
Spot
metering
3-dimensional
sensitivity distribution diagram
57
SPOT METERING (2)
To ensure correct operation of the spot metering:
In spot metering, it is necessary to put the area
to be metered in the microprism section. If there
is a brighter spot in the microprism section, than
the intended subject, the metering value will be
affected.
If a lens is changed, the light receiving angle for
spot metering also changes automatically. The
angle is narrower with telephoto lenses, and wider
with wide angle lenses. However, the metering
area seen in the viewfinder does not change.
When a zoom lens is used, Spot Metering on the
telephoto side permits metering in narrower range
and that on the wide angle side in a wider range,
thus allowing the users to choose the metering
range freely.
Spot metering area
58
When you point the camera at the main subject and
press the spot button, the camera will measure the
brightness of the area where you position the outer edge
of the microprism and hold it in memory. This metered
value is kept in memory even if the camera angle is
changed afterwards. So you can recompose the shot in
whatever way you want.
Exposure selection can be achieved by simple operation
of the aperture and shutter speed rings after choosing
your favorite composition.
After the shot, spot metering is automatically disengaged
and center-weighted average light metering is restored.
When you want to cancel the input value immediately,
Spot metering
operate the clear lever. Even without doing so, input
value will automatically be canceled 60 seconds later.
Framing
59
60
SHOOTING WITH ONE-POINT SPOT METERING
This is partial metering of only one point on the picture
frame. Correct exposure is obtained by simply pressing
the spot button. We will give a simple example to explain
when one-point spot metering is used. If a backlighted girl
is exposed on averaged light metering, the expressions in
her face will not be clear because it comes out entirely
underexposed under the effect of sunlight. For correct
exposure of her face, it is recommended to make a onepoint spot metering on it. Conventional exposure
operations based on the photographer's experiences and
guesswork have thus been completely eliminated to
61
facilitate exposure compensation in backlight. As soon as
the spot button is pressed, the brightness of the spot area
is locked. So you can frame your picture as you like.
To clear the input value, operate the clear lever.
62
SHOOTING WITH MULTI-SPOT METERING
This is a partial metering of two or more spots on the
picture frame. It can be used to determine exposure by
taking into account various spots that differ in brightness.
The picture above shows an example in which the
exposure of the background should also be considered
while taking care to prevent underexposure of a girl. The
first spot metering is made on her face by bringing it in
the microprism section. Then the second spot metering is
made on her dress by directing the camera. Exposure is
determined from the average of the two metered values
to meet the photographer's requirement. It is also
possible to input more than two points in the same
63
procedure. Metering is possible as many times as you
want, but the spot metering allows only up to eight points
to be stored in memory. If more than eight points are
input, the last eight points are stored as a basis for
determining the exposure value.
64
SOPHISTICATED MULTI-SPOT METERING
The OM-3Ti's multi-spot metering system provides
highly sophisticated light measurements. Let us take
an example in the picture above. If you want to place
emphasis on the exposure of the girl, taking the
background brightness into consideration, too, you
can take two spot meterings on her face and one spot
metering on the background, for instance. Exposure
is determined from the average of these three values,
with greater emphasis on the girl (a 2:1 lighting ratio).
With this system, photographers can weight their
exposures so as to make sure the prime subject is
exposed properly and the secondary subject is con65
sidered. This is now done without guesswork, in a
straightforward easy to understand manner.
66
HIGHLIGHT CONTROL
The Highlight button enables white objects to come
out white. It is very useful for copy work and shooting light or white subjects on the whole. After spot
metering is made on the white subject, then press the
Highlight button. The exposure value needed for
rendering it in true white will be automatically calculated and set.
In the example picture, the brightest spot of the
tableware has been metered on spot metering. Pressing the Highlight button increases exposure and
provides the correct overall exposure to make the
tableware white and not a dullish gray.
67
If the Highlight button is pressed again after the
"highlight control" is once set up, only the "highlight
control" is released and the camera returns to spot
metering. To reset center-weighted averaging light
metering, operate the Clear lever.
*lf the Highlight button is pressed after several spots
have been measured the exposure value for the
brightest spot only will be adjusted.
68
SHADOW CONTROL
The Shadow button enables black objects to accurately come out black. It is very useful for shooting
dark or blackish subjects on the whole.
After a spot metering is made on the black subject,
then press the Shadow button. The exposure value
needed for rendering it in a rich black will thus be
automatically calculated.
In the example picture, the deep shadow area beside
the dial has been inputted. As a result, the black
portion comes out "black" without being grayish. By
using this function, it is possible to express subtle
tone variations on the dark area which would be
69
ignored in ordinary photography because they would
appear as a dark gray without detail.
If the Shadow button is pressed again after the
"shadow control" is already activated, only the
"shadow control" is released and the camera returns
to spot metering. To reset center-weighted averaging
light metering, operate the Clear lever.
*lf the Shadow button is pressed after several spot
inputs, the exposure value for the darkest spot only
will be adjusted.
70
VIEWFINDER INFORMATION
The OM-3Ti shows shooting information clearly on a
large liquid crystal display so that you can concentrate
your attention on the subject in the viewfinder. When
shooting with center-weighted average light metering or
with spot metering, correct exposure can be obtained
simply by aligning the bar displays with the fixed point by
manipulating the aperture and shutter-speed rings. Ease
of use is further enhanced since the bar display moves in
the same direction as the aperture ring rotates. The
viewfinder displays various information as shown below:
recharged. It blinks when the shot has been correctly
exposed [when the camera is used with a T-Series flash
or the F280 (Normal OTF mode) ]. In addition, the entire
bar display blinks if you are out of the camera's light
metering range.
The light metering range of the OM-3Ti is as shown in the
chart below.
Light Metering Range with 50mm F1.2
(Aperture setting)
Note: In actual shooting circumstances, displays will not appear
simultaneously as shown.
Fixed point
Shutter speed
This is a fixed point for correct exposure.
The
selected shutter speed.
The analog display of the
metered value is shown by bar.
In the Spot mode,
SPOT appears and input metered value and luminance
value during metering is indicated by dot.
HI.LIGHT
71
turns on when the highlight button is pressed.
SHADOW turns on when the shadow button is
pressed.
+- blinks during exposure compensation.
The green LED goes on after the flash has been
(Shutter speed)
EXPOSURE COMPENSATION
The OM-3Ti also permits exposure compensation with
the exposure compensation dial in OTF auto flash
shooting. If the background is brighter than the subject,
turn the dial and set it to a (+) side position. The amount
of exposure is double on (+1) position, and four times on
(+2) position. If the background is darker than the
subject, turn the dial and set it to a (-) position.
If the compensation dial is turned, the +/- display in the
viewfinder blinks. The bar graph display shifts according
to the amount of compensation.
DEPTH OF FIELD
Depth of field is the area of acceptable sharpness in front of
and behind the subject in focus. As you get closer to your
subject or as you open your lens (e.g. from F16 to F2.8) the
depth of field becomes shallower. By stopping your lens
down (e.g. from F2.8 to F16) or getting farther away from
your subject this depth of field can be increased.
The table below shows that when the camera-to-subject
distance is 3m, the depth of field at F16 ranges from 1.93m
to 6.93m.
As you press the preview button, looking through the view-
finder, you can ascertain the actual depth of field.
Depth of Field Table (50mm F1.8 lens)*
Circle of least confusion 1/30mm
72
DEPTH OF FIELD SCALE
The double series of numbers engraved on the depth of
field scale represent F stops: F4, F8 and F16. Once you
between the marks for the F/stop you have selected will
have acceptable sharpness.
have focused on your subject, all objects within the
distance range indicated on the lens distance scale
73
• For other lenses, see the lens instruction manual.
PREVIEW BUTTON
When you wish to see which objects fall
within the acceptable zone of sharpness
(depth of field), press the preview button
on your lens. The diaphragm of the lens
will stop down to the preset F stop
enabling you to see the depth of field in
the viewfinder.
CAUTION: If you jerk the preview button while
depressing the shutter release button halfway down
the shutter might be released.
74
SHUTTER SPEEDS
This camera offers various possibilities for visual
expression by changing the shutter speed.
High shutter speeds can be used to "freeze" a
moving subject to give sharp definition of the image.
Shutter speeds of 1/2000 ~ 1/500 sec. can "stop" the
movement of a considerably fast moving subject. A
shutter speed of about 1 /250 sec. will be enough to
shoot a child at play, if he is not moving too quickly.
There are two methods for giving dynamic expressions. The first one is to blur out the movement of the
subject itself, thereby creating a moving image. The
second one is to pan the camera according to the
movement of the subject. While the background is
blurred, the subject is sharply defined to create a
75
moving image.
*ln using slow shutter speeds, it is necessary to guard
against camera shake. We will suggest a very
practical method for choosing shutter speeds.
Generally, shutter speeds of which denominator
value is larger than the focal length value of the lens
used are good for preventing camera shake. If you
are using a 50mm lens, for example, shutter speeds
of 1/60 sec. or higher are best; and if you are using
a 200mm lens, shutter speeds of 1/250 sec. or
higher are best.
BULB EXPOSURE
When an extended shutter speed is required, as in stellar
photography and night-scene shooting, use the B (bulb)
mode. Almost no battery power will be consumed in this
setting. Automatic control of flash strength by the OTF
auto metering function is also possible in this mode.
However, the green LED in the viewfinder won't light.
Note: Use of a tripod and cable release is recommended for bulb
shooting.
76
MULTIPLE EXPOSURES
INFRARED PHOTOGRAPHY
By tripping the shutter several times on the same
frame, multiple images are produced on the same
frame.
This is how to do:
After the first exposure is ended, erect the rewind
crank and turn it clockwise as far as it will go to
take up film slack.
While holding both the rewind knob and rewind
button with your fingers to prevent them from
moving, wind the film advance lever.
In fact, the film is not wound and the shutter is
cocked by this operation.
Press the shutter release as you would do normally, and double exposure will occur.
By repeating the steps
and
, the frame will
be exposed as many times as you want. However,
the frame counter advances each time the shutter
release is pressed.
After ending the multiple exposure, put the front
lens cap on and make a blind shot.
Note: The frame may shift slightly.
When shooting infrared pictures with infrared film
and a red filter, the point of focus will slightly differ if
you focus visually. The amount of shift varies with the
lens and a red line or red dot is marked on the lens'
depth of field scale to compensate for it. First, focus
the lens without a red filter on as you would do
normally. Next, read that distance on the distance
scale and shift it opposite the infrared mark, then put
on a red filter and shoot. (The above picture shows
the distance at infinity.)
78
FLASH PHOTOGRAPHY
photographic applications. Electronic flash is especially useful in unfavorable lighting situations,
ensuring easy, error-free picture taking. In dim light,
for example, without an electronic flash you will have
to use slow shutter speed with a risk of causing
camera shake and blurred pictures. Under the illumination of a flourescent lamp or incandescent lamp,
the picture often does not come out with correct
colors because it lacks proper color balance. Electronic flash solves all these problems.
The electronic flash can also be used in daylight as
fill-in light for backlighted subjects or subjects with
too strong a contrast as well as for freezing a fast
moving subject.
Because the OM-3Ti provides full control of T-series
flashes, there is no operation required on the flash
side such as setting the film speed and aperture,
mode switchover, and exposure compensation. Since
The OTF auto light metering system can measure
the light that the film, no exposure error occurs due
to the difference in covering range of the flash's light
receptor and picture frame. You can not only take
flash pictures in the auto and manual modes, but also
Electronic flash is very similar to daylight. As it is
well balanced for daylight type color films that are
most popular, the electronic flash is used for various
79
use sophisticated techniques such as bounce, diffuse,
ultra close-ups, and multi-lamp flash with ease in a
fully automatic mode.
OTF AUTO FLASH
OPERATION OF T-SERIES FLASH
With a T-series flash on the camera, the flash mode will
automatically switch according to the camera mode.
If you take pictures in the auto mode, set the camera's
mode lever to "TTL AUTO FLASH". When the green LED
turns on in the viewfinder, the flash is ready for firing.
Shoot using 1/60-sec. or slower shutter speed. If you take
pictures in the manual mode, set the camera's mode
lever to "X" and select 1/60-sec. or slower shutter speed.
Flash strength is always at full emission. For more
information, refer to the flash's instruction manual.
<OTF AUTO FLASH MODE>
± exposure compensation possible.
The required quantity of light is also adjusted
depending on the amount of compensation.
Lights up when the flash
is fully charged; blinks on
correct flash firing
80
MAIN SPECIFICATIONS OF T-SERIES FLASH
Guide Number
ISO 100m
(ISO 100 ft.)
Electronic
Flash T32
32
(104)
Coverage Angle
Flash Duration
53° vertical,
1/40,000 —
74° horizontal
1/1,000 sec.
40° vertical,
Electronic
Flash T20
20
(66)
58° horizontal
1/40,000—
1/1,000 sec.
T28 Macro
28
(92)
53° vertical,
74° horizontal
1/40,000—
1/1,000 sec.
T28 Macro
Twin Flash 1
Single 28 (92)
53° vertical
74° horizontal
(Single)
1/1,000 sec.
T10 Ring
Flash 1
10
(33)
80°
1/40,000—
1/330 sec.
Single Flash 1
T8 Ring
Flash 2
Twin 22 (72)
8
(26)
80°
Number
of
flashes
Dimensions
(less batteries)
Weight
100 — 500 with
81(H)x70(W)x
AA-size alkaline
104(D) mm
batteries
320 gr.
68(H)x57(W)x
77(D) mm
160 gr.
73(H) x 50(W) x
120—500 with
AA-size alkaline
batteries
1/40,000—
1/40,000—
1/330 sec.
100—500 with
AA-size
32(D) mm
110gr.
73(H)x50(W)x
32(D) mm
210 gr.
86ø x18 mm
95 gr.
alkaline
batteries
91ø X18.5 mm
(T Power
Control 1)
110gr.
(Reflector 1:
200ø x 32 mm
80 gr.)
(Reflector 2:
150ø x 32 mm,
40 gr.)
81
MAIN SPECIFICATIONS OF
F280
Guide number (ft.)
Coverage angle
Number of flashes
Flash Duration
28 [ISO 100 meters at Normal
(92)
OTF Flash]
53° vertical, 74° horizontal
80 — 6,000 with
AA-size alkaline batteries
Super FP Flash mode:
1/25 sec.
Normal OTF Flash mode:
1/40,000 — 1/1 ,000 sec.
Dimensions
Weight
110(H) x 68(W) x 71(D)mm
250 gr. (less batteries)
USING ELECTRONIC FLASHES
OTHER THAN THE T-SERIES
FLASH UNITS
Mount the flash on the accessory shoe.
If you are using a flash that has no direct contact,
connect the flash synchro cord to the synchro
terminal.
Set the film speed on the flash.
Set the shutter speed ring to 1 /60 sec.
If the flash has an AUTO/MANUAL switching
device, set it to either AUTO or MANUAL.
Determine the aperture and set it on the camera.
If you are using an auto flash, set the desired F
stop on the flash unit and then set the aperture
ring to this F stop.
If you are using a manual flash, calculate the
aperture by the following formula or using the
flash's calculator panel and set it with the camera's
aperture ring. (ISO 100m/ft.)
Aperture =
Flash guide number
Flash-to-subject distance (m/ft.)
82
BOUNCE FLASH
The T32 has an adjustable flash head that tilts as much
as 90° up and 15° down. When combined with the Power
Bounce Grip 2, angle can be adjusted up to 90° up, 20°
down, 240° horizontally, and 60° to the camera side.
Bounce flash is possible in the OTF Auto Flash mode
with or without the Power Bounce Grip 2.
Electronic Flash T32
Power Bounce Grip 2
83
84
SHOOTING WITH A MOTOR DRIVE
Shooting with a motor drive is very exciting because it
enables you to capture your subject in a critical moment
by making several shots in a second.
The high speed OM System motor drive has achieved an
extremely compact and lightweight design to take full
advantage of its ease of operation and high
maneuverability. Motor Drive 2 is the 5-frames-persecond high speed motor drive with a built-in computer. It
is equipped with an LCD display of the number of frames
and the operating procedure and also permits motorized
rewind when it is attached to the OM-3Ti.
In addition, the Winder 2 is also available, which offers
both single-frame exposures and sequential exposures
on dial switching.
The OM System's outstanding maneuverability and
operability are ideal for shooting dynamic sports photos
and documentary press photos. Various accessories can
be connected by a direct contact.
Motor Drive 1 can also be used, but motorized
• The
rewind is impossible.
85
MOTOR DRIVE GROUP
Selection of Motor Units
•Motor Drive 2. if you want to shoot very fast moving
subjects such as a dashing animal or a racing car
driving at full speed, the Motor Drive 2 is the best
choice because it permits continuous shooting at a
high speed of up to five frames a second. This quick
shooting capability will often allow you to catch a
dramatic instant.
•Winder 2. The Winder 2 is very helpful for shooting
impressive moments such as sports scenes and
children at play. As it permits continuous shooting at
a rate of up to 2.5 frames a second, you will not miss
a decisive moment.
Selection of Power Sources
•For the Motor Drive 2, the following two power
units are available: a small, lightweight and portable
flat-type rechargeable power unit, M.15V Ni-Cd
Control Pack 2, and a grip-type battery power unit,
M 18V Control Grip 2, which provides added stability
when used with a telephoto lens.
•The Winder 2 has a self-contained power supply,
but an external power units is also available:
M.6V Power Pack 1.
Remote Control System
• Winder 2 allows you to remote-control the camera using
the dedicated remote cord. Tripping the shutter without
camera shake makes it very useful for shooting wild birds
and animals, macro-photography and photomicrography.
• M.Quartz Remote Controller 1 is provided with an
electronic counter which allows you to trigger the camera
and check operation via an LCD display from a remote
location. It can also be used to switch between singleframe and continuous shooting modes. You can select an
interval from 0.5 seconds to 24 hours between shots
photographed in continuous mode.
• M.Remote Cord 1.2m/5m connects the Winder 2 with
the camera.
86
RECORDATA BACK 4
Interchangeable camera back for data imprinting.
Data imprinting is possible in the following forms:
(1) Year—month —day (Japanese date description),
(2) Month—day—year (American date description),
(3) Day—month —year (European date description),
(4) Hour—minute, (5) Counter (additive type), (6)
Classification number up to 6 digits. Provided with an
imprint clear switch to be used when data imprinting
is unnecessary. This Recordata Back can also be used
as a clock which indicates the hour, minute and
second via a Time Button.
Control panel cover
Battery Check/
Time button
87
Display window
Record switch
MACROPHOTOGRAPHY
The world of macrophotography is filled with marvellous discoveries. However, macrophotography has
been generally considered difficult; calculations of
correct exposure, in particular, have been a difficult
job even for professionals.
Equipped with an OTF auto metering, the OM-3Ti
has solved this problem to always provide correct
exposure, regardless of the magnification and
aperture. All complicated exposure calculations for
multi-lamp flashing are now quite unnecessary.
The OM-3Ti also provides a complete macro system
including a wide choice of macro lenses that offer
excellent life-size and magnified pictures as well as
extension units that enable you to take handheld
macro pictures.
88
CHART OF PHOTOGRAPHIC RANGES
89
MACRO PHOTO UNITS
Simplified Macro System
It allows you to take close-ups up to life size with
ease. With this macro system, you will come upon
unexpected and wonderful discoveries in tiny things
Basic System
This is a complete macro system that permits low to
high magnifications. It will produce a brilliant image
around you such as writing instruments, printed
letters, flowers in a vase, etc.
of the marvelous world of tiny things such as the
geometric beauty of the compound eye of a dragon
fly and close-ups of flowers. An indoor type and
•Close-up Lenses 49mm f = 40mm. Simply screw
outdoor type are available.
them in the front of the standard lens, and you can
take up to 0.63X close-ups.
•Auto Extension Tubes 7, 14 and 25 These
adapters are placed between the lens and camera
Indoor type: This system uses an auto bellows,
macro photo stand, top-light illumination device,
etc. in combination with various macro lenses. It is
suited for taking high-magnification pictures in a
body and available in three thicknesses: 7mm,
room or studio.
14mm and 25mm. They can be used in seven combinations. With the standard lens, you can take up
to 1.1X close-ups.
•Auto Bellows A basic unit that helps you take full
advantage of the system's capabilities with a variety
of lighting units and mounts. The stop-down lever
that lets you use a variety of OM System lenses at
preset aperture or operated in combination with the
double cable release, affords an automatic diaphragm photo function.
•Zuiko Macro 20mm F2 Large-aperture macro
lens designed exclusively for macrophotography.
Combined with the Auto Bellows, it permits magnifications ranging from 4.2X to 16X. Provided with a
helicoid for fine focusing.
90
•Zuiko Macro 38mm F2.8 Bright, high-magnification macro lens designed exclusively for macro
the Telescopic Auto Tube it goes up to life-size, and
the close-up lens is used to extend the range to 2X
photography. Combined with the Auto Bellows, it
permits magnifications ranging from 2.3X to 6.7X.
magnifications.
•Zuiko Macro 135mm F4.5 Shoots from infinity to
life-size with the Auto Bellows, or 0.43X magnifications with the Telescopic Auto Tube, giving long
working distances and minimal perspective distortion. It has a helicoid ring for fine focusing.
•Zuiko Macro 50mm F2 Large-aperture macro lens
which is as fast as a normal lens. Basic design
Provided with a helicoid for fine focusing.
•Macrophoto Stand VST-1W A compact and sturdy
multipurpose stand for solid camera support in
close-up and macrophoto work. Comes with frosted
stage glass for incident light and may be used in
conjunction with Trans-illuminator Base X-DE for
lighting of transparent subjects from beneath.
•Epi-illuminator PM-LSD-W A two-piece lighting
set providing ideal reflected light for macrophoto-
graphy. Moving the filament allows you to change
the position and field of illumination.
Outdoor type: This is a handy and highly manueverable system which includes macro lenses, telescopic
auto extension tube 65—116, etc.
•Telescopic Auto Extension Tube 65-116 With
its variable tube length, this auto extension tube
enables you to change the shooting distance and
magnification freely.
•Zuiko 1:1 Macro 80mm F4 This lens is designed
specifically for life-size reproductions. It functions at
its best at a 1:1 ratio, but gives outstanding images
from 1 /2 to 2X life-size, the range of magnifications
available when used with the Auto Bellows. With
91
magnification 0.1X. Because aberrations are minimized at close and far distances, this lens exhibits
excellent resolution from infinity to as close as
0.24m.
•Zuiko Macro 50mm F3.5 Designed for optimum
performance at 1/10 magnifications, this outstanding lens gives superb results in general purpose
photography at infinity, or for macro subjects as
large as 1/2 life-size.
•Zuiko Macro 90mm F2
This medium-range
telephoto macro lens covers a wide focusing range
from 1/2X close-ups to infinity. With its large
aperture ratio of F2, it provides excellent image
definition in macro photography and promises good
performance at infinity for extended picture-taking
possibilities.
FINDER GROUP UNITS
TYPE
SCREEN
FEATURES
Bright focusing screen newly developed. Suitable for general
photography. Accurate focusing can be achieved especially in
2-4
combination with a fast lens. Suitable for shooting with a lens having a
wide-open aperture of F4 or less.
All matte type
(for most lenses)
(There is a circle showing the spot metering range.)
Bright focusing screen newly developed. Most suitable for normal
photography, like the 1-13. Since the central split-image is encircled by a
2-13
microprism collar and the outer area has a matte surface, the screen can
be used in the same way as the standard 1-1 and 1-3 Screens. When a
lens with a maximum speed of F5.6 or slower is used, the prisms darken
and the focusing must be made on the matte area.
Micro/split Image-matte
type
(for most lenses)
The above screens can also be mounted on the OM-2S/P, 2S, 3, 4, 4Ti and 4T but not on the OM-1, 1N, 2 and 2N.
TYPE
1-1
Microprism-matte
type
(for most lenses)
1-2
Microprism-matte
type
(for standard &
telephoto lenses)
SCREEN
FEATURES
Standard type, suitable for general photography. Fast and accurate
focusing is done on the central microprism spot as well as on the
surrounding matte area. When a lens with a maximum speed of F5.6 or
slower is used, the microprism darkens and focusing must be made on
the matte area.
Suitable for general photography in conjunction with a standard or
telephoto lens. Focusing is done on the microprism spot as well as on the
matte area. When a lens with a maximum speed of F8 or slower is used,
the split prism darkens.
92
TYPE
1-3
Split image-matte
type
(for most lenses)
SCREEN
FEATURES
Suitable for general photography ensuring critical focusing, and ideal for
photographers who prefer the split-field and coincidence type focusing.
When a lens with a maximum speed of F5.6 or slower is used, the split prism
darkens.
Suitable for general photography and ideal for photographers who prefer a
(for most lenses)
view field free from microprism or split prism and for those who are
accustomed to focus using matte area. Also suitable for super telephoto
photography and close-up photography in conjunction with macro lenses and
Auto Bellows.
(There is a circle showing the spot metering range.)
1-5
Microprism-clear
field type
This transparent screen provides an exceptionally bright finder image.
Highly suitable for snapshots using wide angle lenses. The lack of matte
surface means depth-of-field effects cannot be ascertained.
1-4N
All matte type
(for wide angle &
standard lenses)
1-6
Microprism-clear
field type
(for standard &
telephoto lenses)
1-7
Developed primarily for use with super telephoto lenses this clear field screen
Microprism-clear
field type
provides an extremely bright finder image. The micro-prism spot remains
(for super
telephoto lenses)
1-8
All matte type
(for telephoto lenses &
astronomical telescopes)
93
This screen provides an extremely bright finder image. Focusing is done on
the microprism spot. The lack of matte surface means depth-of-field effects
cannot be ascertained.
bright even with a lens whose maximum speed is F11. The lack of matte
surface means depth-of-field effects cannot be ascertained.
This screen is ideal for use with super telephoto lenses of 300mm or more in
focal length, or for astrophotography. The extreme fineness of the matte
surface permits outstanding field definition. More accurate focusing may be
achieved by the use of the Varimagni Finder.
TYPE
1-9
Clear field type
(for endoscopic
photography)
1-10
Checker-matte
type
(for shift lens)
1-11
Cross hairs-matte
type
(for close-up &
macrophotography)
1-12
Cross hairs-clear
field type
(for photomicrography
& macrophotography
greater than life size)
1-13
Microprism/split
image-matte
type
(for most lenses)
1-14
Microprism/split
image-matte
type
(for most lenses)
SCREEN
FEATURES
Designed for use with OLYMPUS fiberoptic endoscopes. This condenser type
screen without fresnel lens requires no focusing when a special adapter
couples the camera with the fiberscope. Exposure is made automatically by
the light supply.
The grid lines engraved on the all-matte surface are used for vertical and horizon-
tal picture alignment. Though originally designed for architectural photography
with the shift lens, it is also suitable for general and super-telephotography, and
close-up/macrophotography with macro lenses and Auto Bellows.
Highly advantageous for close-up and macrophotography with Auto Bellows
and extension tubes. For focusing in low magnification close-up photography,
use the matte area and in macrophotography greater than life size, use the
double cross hairs the same way as with the 1-12.
The transparent screen offers the photographer focusing with an unusually
bright finder image. To focus, first correct your diopter using a dioptric
correction lens or Varimagni Finder so that each line of the double cross hairs
can be seen clearly and separately. Then bring the Spacemen into focus.
Most suitable for normal photography, this screen assures pinpoint focusing. The
central split-image rangefinder is encircled by a microprism collar. Since the outer
area has a matte surface, the screen can be used in the same way as the standard
1-1 and 1-3 Screens. When a lens with a maximum speed of F5.6 or slower is
used, the prisms darken and the focusing must be made on the matte area.
Most suitable for normal photography. The central split-image range finder,
encircled by a microprism collar, is inclined 45 degrees to allow easy focusing on
subjects with vertical or horizontal lines. When a lens with a maximum speed of
F5.6 or slower is used, the prisms darken and focusing must be made on the
matte area. The meter needle gives correct light readings.
94
SELECTION OF FILTERS
With the aperture and shutter, the camera can control
the amount of light, but not the quality of light.
Therefore, it is necessary to filter the light components that are not wanted for visual expressions.
Filters are useful for this purpose.
Filters for color and B&W films
Skylight (1A): For absorbing ultraviolet rays. It yields
natural colors on the part of a subject in the shade
under a blue sky by filtering the light from the sky.
It can be used to protect the lens, but it is not
recommended to use this filter for subjects which are
not affected by ultraviolet rays or a blue sky because
the color balance may be impaired.
L3 (UV): In the open air on a bright day, there are a
lot of ultraviolet rays to which photographic films are
sensitive although they are invisible to the human
eye. Affected by these rays scattering in the air,
distant landscapes may turn out whitish and unclear.
The skylight filter cuts off detrimental ultraviolet rays.
It can always be used for lens protection.
95
ND2/ND4: Neutral gray filter for reducing the light
quantity without affecting the color and contrast.
Use this filter if you want to open the aperture for a
blurred background, or produce special "blur" effects
with a slow shutter speed, or to reduce the light
intensity without increasing the shutter speed on a
reflex telephoto lens which has no aperture control
mechanism. Available in two types: ND2 for reducing
the light intensity by one stop and ND4 for reducing
it by two stops.
C-POL (circularly polarizing filter): For blocking
the light reflected from the surface of glass, water
and tile to take sharp pictures of fish in the water,
subjects behind a show window, etc. It can also be
used as a contrast filter for color pictures of landscapes, because it cuts off the light reflected from
dust or vapor under a blue sky as well as the surface
of leaves and grass. As this is a circularly polarizing
filter it can be used on cameras using a half-mirror
such as the OM-3Ti.
Filters for B&W films
Y48 (Y2): Yellow filter which absorbs ultraviolet,
violet and part of blue light. It decreases the effect of
blue sky and brings out the clouds. It is also useful for
taking distant shots on a bright clear day. with this
filter, the sensitivity of films becomes closer to that
of the human eye so that ordinary shots at close
distance will appear very natural with a slightly
enhanced contrast.
O56 (02): Orange filter which absorbs a wider range
of light (from ultraviolet rays to blue-green light) than
Y48, thus producing an intensified contrast. It can
also be used for infrared film.
R60 (R1): Red filter which absorbs violet, blue, green
light and part of yellow light, thus blocking almost all
light except for red and similar colors. As it produces
a strong contrast effect, distant shots turn out sharp
and crisp while the tone of blue sky weakens. This
filter is indispensable for bringing out the effects of
infrared film.
Filters for color films
A4 (81C): On a cloudy or rainy day, pictures taken on
daylight film tend to appear blueish. This amber film
suppresses blue and produces natural color reproduc-
tion. It can also be used for creating warm and mild
effects intentionally under ordinary light.
B4 (82C): Subjects under morning or evening glow
will turn out reddish if they are taken on daylight film.
This blue filter suppresses red and produces natural
color reproduction. In contrast with A4, it can be
used for bringing out cool, blueish effects under
ordinary light.
96
Handling Care
Take care in handling the camera.
97
Do not use extra force.
Storage Care
Battery Precaution
Guard against high temperature and magnetic fields.
98
QUESTIONS AND ANSWERS (1)
Q: There are sometimes scratches on the film.
A: The cause may be a soiled film passage. The film
compartment may be soiled by film debris
accumulated during long use of the camera. Be sure
to dust off the camera periodically.
Q: How do I store the camera?
A: Remove the camera from its case and store it in a
dry, well-ventilated place. Protect against excess
moisture by using packs of silica gel or other
desiccant in the storage area. Do not store the units
near moth balls or similar volatile chemical materials
to avoid the possibility of damage to metal surfaces.
Q: How can I turn off the beep?
A: Operate the flash mode lever while pressing the
battery check button. You can also turn on the beep
in the same way.
Q: This camera doesn't have a power switch. What
should I do when I don't use the camera?
99
A: The batteries will last for approx. 1 year when the
camera is used under ordinary circumstances. When
the bulb mode is engaged, battery consumption is
further decreased because the circuitry does not
operate even if the shutter release is pressed
accidentally. Remove the batteries when the camera
is not to be used for an extended period of time.
Q: When will spot metering be canceled?
A: (1) When the shutter is released. (2) When the clear
lever is operated. (3) When more than 60 seconds
have elapsed. (4) When the flash mode lever is
operated. (5) When the lens is changed. (6) When a
T-Series flash or the F280 is switched on. (7) When
the shutter speed ring is set to B.
Q: The flash fires even with 1/125-sec. or faster
shutter speed. Can I take a properly exposed
picture?
A: Unless the Super FP mode is engaged, synchro-
nization won't be achieved even if the flash fires.
Select 1/60-sec. or slower shutter speed.
Q: Why did the viewfinder displays disappear
of a luminance mediated between the bar tip and the
adjacent particle, the bar tip will blink.
suddenly?
A: Due to its power-saving design, the OM-3Ti turns off
the displays when no operation occurs for more than
60 seconds. To resume the display, press the shutter
release halfway, press the battery check button fully,
or operate the clear lever.
In actual exposure determinations, however,
variations of light are averaged, causing no problem.
Q: After operating the highlight (or shadow) button, I
have pressed the spot button by error.
A: If the new spot exceeds the highest value (or falls
below the lowest value) that was already input after
the highlight (or shadow) button has been operated,
Q: The tip of the shutter speed display bar blinks
frequently during light metering.
A: This occurs mostly in the case of metering under a
exposure is changed according to that value. At this
time, the bar display shows the calculation result after
showing the highest (or lowest) value again. If the
fluorescent lamp. Though the fluorescent lamp
calculated result is over the display's highest value, or
appears to the human eye as it were lighting
continuously, it is in fact blinking repeatedly at a
under its lowest value, the bar display won't change.
Q: When I used the highlight (shadow) button, the
picture did not come out with the desired colors.
frequency of 50 — 60 cycles a second. Each particle
of the shutter speed bar display represents 1/3 EV.
Therefore, if the luminosity is unstanble or in the case
A: Colors on negative film may sometimes be corrected
automatically in the printing process.
100
QUESTIONS AND ANSWERS (2)
Q: Why won't the shutter release button move when I
press it?
A: The film advance lever may not have been fully
advanced or the film may have come to its end.
Q: Why can't I advance the film?
A: You may have wound the film already. Try pressing
the shutter release button.
Q:
A:
Q:
A:
101
Or, the film may be fully exposed. Check the
exposure counter. If you feel tension on the film
advance lever, DO NOT FORCE IT. Rewind the film.
The rewind crank does not turn when I try to
rewind the film. What should I do?
Press in the rewind button.
Is it normal for the microprism in the center of the
viewfinder to "shimmer" and darken?
Yes, when a lens with a maximum aperture smaller
than F5 is mounted on the camera. It also happens
with other lenses when the depth of field preview
button is pressed.
Q: What type of batteries should I buy?
A: Purchase two SR44 silver-oxide or LR44 alkaline
batteries. Silver-oxide batteries last longer. You can
also use one CR-1/3N lithium battery. Do not use
different types of batteries at the same time (with
MR44, etc.), even when they are of the same size.
Always replace the two batteries at the same time
and do not use an old and a new battery together.
Q: When should I check the batteries?
A: (1) When new batteries are inserted. (2) After the
camera hasn't been used for a long time. (3) Before
beginning a prolonged period of use.
Q: Why can't I set the ISO film speed I need?
A: At the most, 3 stops can be advanced in a single
stroke of the dial. If this is not enough stops, lift up
and rotate the outer collar of the dial unit it stops; then
release the collar and rotate the collar and dial
together until the white line is aligned with the black
index on the pentaprism. Repeat this procedure until
you reach the ISO speed you need.
Q: With ISO 3200,1 made exposure compensation on
halfway position between the f/stop numbers.
Was the film properly exposed?
A: Yes, you can use any in-between settings on the
A: Exposure compensation on the minus side is
impossible at ISO 3200. If you have made it, the ISO
aperture ring to obtain precise exposure.
Q: Can I set shutter speed to a position halfway
between settings?
A: No, the ring has to be clicked into place.
setting value will change. Set the ISO value one
again correctly. The same thing appplies to (+) side
exposure compensation via ISO 6.
Q: In the finished print, a peripheral portion of the
picture is cut, though I framed it inside the
viewfinder.
Q: I want to take pictures with the motor cover
A: In some color prints and color slides, a peripheral
detached even when I am not shooting with the
motor drive, because attaching and detaching it is
quite troublesome.
portion of the picture may be eliminated in the
laboratory. It is recommended, therefore, to leave
some margin in composing your picture.
A: The motor cover should always be attached if you are
not shooting with the motor drive. It will prevent entry
A: Clean the camera using a clean, soft lintless cotton
the minus (-) side.
of dust and exposure to direct light.
Q: I took pictures with the aperture ring set at a
Q: How do I clean the camera and lens?
cloth. Clean the lens only with a hand powered air
blower, antistatic brush or lend tissue. NEVER rub the
102
QUESTIONS AND ANSWERS (3)
lens surfaces with your finger, clothing or other
Other cautions
abrasive material.
Take care not to permit water to enter the camera
when taking pictures in the rain or snow, especially
near seawater spray. After use near the ocean, wipe
• The Recordata Backs 1 and 2 cannot be used.
• The shutter speed range that can be used for motor
the camera surfaces clean and never leave salt
residue on the camera.
Q: Is spot metering possible in the flash mode?
A: No, spot metering is not possible.
Q: I want to use a flash that is not of the T-series and
F280.
A: Set the flash mode to X and select a shutter speed.
The flash synchronization range is B.1~1/60 sec. The
flash ready signal and correct exposure confirmation
will not turn on in the viewfinder. Read the instruction
manual of your flash carefully before using it.
103
drive continuous shooting is 1/2 ~ 1/2000 sec.
• The Motor Drive Socket Cap on the camera side cannot
be stored in the Motor Drive 1 or Winders 1 and 2.
• If you want to use a polarizing filter, always use a
circularly polarizing filter. If other filters are used,
exposure may vary in the case of spot metering.
Description of Controls
Finder Light Window
CLEAR Lever
OTF Auto Cord Socket
Shoulder Strap Eyelet
Lens
Grip Lock Screw
Lens Release Button
Depth of Field Scale
Aperture Ring
Focusing Ring
104
Automatic Clear Button
Accessory Shoe
Shutter Speed Ring
Flash Mode Selector Lever
Viewfinder Illumination Button
HI.LIGHT Button
Rewind Crank
SPOT Metering Button
Rewind Knob
Shutter Release Button
Film Speed
Dial/Exposure
Compensation
Dial
Exposure
Counter
Rewind Release Button
ISO/ASA Film Speed
Window
BATTERY CHECK button
BATTERY CHECK indicator
Dioptric Adjustment Knob
Flash Control Contact
105
Film Advance Lever
SHADOW Button
Viewfinder Display Contact
X Contact
Super FP Contact
Viewfinder Eyepiece Frame
Sprocket
Film Take-up Spool
Film Rewind Shaft
Camera Back Release Pin
Camera Back
Pressure Plate
Film Chamber
Film Cartridge Pressure Spring
Film Guide Pins
Shutter Curtain
Recordata Back Contact
106
Lens Mount Ring
Motor Guide Pin Hole
Flash Synchronization Socket
Tripod Socket
Motor Rewind Coupling Contact
Motor Coupling Terminals
Motor Coupling Socket
Battery Chamber
107
SPECIFICATIONS
Type: Mechanical shutter 35mm SLR camera.
Film format: 24mm x 36mm.
Lens mount: Olympus OM mount.
Shutter: Mechanically controlled cloth focal plane shutter
Film advance: Film advance lever with 130° angle for
one long or several short strokes and pre-advance
angle 30°; motor drive and winder usable.
(horizontal action).
Light metering method: Center-weighted average light
Viewfinder: With dioptric correction; dioptric correction
range +1.0 ~ -3.0 diopters; interchangeable focusing
screens; microprism/split image-matte type screen
metering, switchable to spot metering; spot metering
selectable in 3 modes — multi-spot, highlight-based
and shadow-based methods.
standardized; finder view field: 97% of actual picture
field; magnification 0.84X at infinity with -0.5 diop.
and 50mm lens.
Light metering range: 0 EV - 19 EV (ISO 100, 50mm
F1.2).
Shutter speed range: B.1 ~ 1/2000 sec. (mechanically
Viewfinder information: LCD multi-mode display
controlled).
Flash exposure control: TTL AUTO FLASH (OTF auto
flash) mode: OTF auto flash emission (with T-Series
or F280 flash) — synchronizes with 1/60 sec. or
slower shutter speed. Super FP emission (with F280
flash) — synchronizes with 1/60 ~ 1/2000 sec. X
mode: Super FP emission (with F280 flash) —
synchronizes with 1/60 ~ 1/2000 sec. Manual (with TSeries or F280 flash) — synchronizes with 1/60 sec.
or slower shutter speed.
Connection to flash: Hot shoe (X contact, equipped with
Super FP contract terminal); 5-pin connector for TSeries flash; synchro socket.
Film speed: ISO 6 ~3200.
(60-sec. limiter); built-in illuminator (10-sec. limiter).
Battery check: 3-level display with LED and alarm
sound.
Power source: Two silver oxide batteries SR44, two
alkaline manganese batteries LR44 or one lithium
battery CR-1/3N.
Camera back: Removable hinge type, with memo holder;
interchangeable with Recordata Back 4
Dimensions: 136 x 84 x 50 mm
(5.4 x 3.3 x 2.0 in.) (body alone).
Weight: 510 g (18 oz.) (body alone).
SPECIFICATIONS, DESIGN AND ACCESSORIES ARE
SUBJECT TO CHANGE WITHOUT ANY NOTICE OR
OBLIGATION ON THE PART OF THE
MANUFACTURER.
108
YOUR OM SYSTEM SERIAL NUMBERS
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OM-3Ti Body
LENS
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OLYMPUS OPTICAL CO.,LTD.
San-Ei Building, 22-2, Nishi Shinjuku 1-chome, Shinjuku-ku Tokyo, Japan. Tel. 03-340-2211
OLYMPUS CORPORATION
Crossways Park, Woodbury, New York 11797, U.S.A. Tel. 516-364-3000
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(Premises/Goods delivery) Wendenstrasse 14-16, 20097 Hamburg, Germany. Tel: 040-237730
(Letters) Postfach 10 49 08, 20034 Hamburg, Germany
OLYMPUS OPTICAL CO. (U.K.) LTD.
2-8 Honduras Street, London EC1Y OTX, United Kingdom. Tel. 071-253-2772
0894.
2MM