Owner`s manual | Delta Electronics VFD-E Power Supply User Manual

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Owner’s Manual
WARNING – To reduce the risk of fire or electric shock, do not expose this device to rain or moisture.
CAUTION
RISK OF ELECTRIC SHOCK
DO NOT OPEN
ATTENTION: RISQUE DE CHOC ELECTRIQUE NE PAS OUVRIR
CAUTION: TO REDUCE THE RISK OF ELECTRIC SHOCK,
DO NOT REMOVE COVER (OR BACK).
NO USER-SERVICEABLE PARTS INSIDE.
REFER SERVICING TO QUALIFIED SERVICE PERSONNEL.
The lightning flash with arrowhead symbol, within an equilateral triangle, is intended to alert the user to the presence of uninsulated
“dangerous voltage” within the product’s enclosure that may be of
sufficient magnitude to constitute a risk of electric shock to persons.
The exclamation point within an equilateral triangle is intended to
alert the user to the presence of important operating and maintenance (servicing) instructions in the literature accompanying the
product.
INSTRUCTIONS PERTAINING TO A RISK OF FIRE, ELECTRIC SHOCK, OR INJURY TO PERSONS.
IMPORTANT SAFETY INSTRUCTIONS
SAVE THESE INSTRUCTIONS
WARNING – When using electric products, basic precautions should always be followed, including the following:
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
Read these instructions.
Keep these instructions.
Heed all warnings.
Follow all instructions.
Do not use this apparatus near water.
Clean only with a dry cloth.
Do not block any of the ventilation openings. Install in accordance with the manufacturers instructions.
8. Do not install near any heat sources such as radiators, heat registers, stoves, or other apparatus (including amplifiers) that produce heat.
9. Do not defeat safety purpose of the polarized or grounding-type
plug. A polarized plug has two blades with one wider than the
other.
A grounding type plug has two blades and third grounding
prong. The wide blade or the third prong are provided for your
safety. If the provided plug does not fit into your outlet, consult
an electrician for replacement of the obsolete outlet.
10. Protect the power cord from being walked on or pinched particularly at plugs, convenience receptacles, and the point where
they exit from the apparatus.
11. Only use attachments/accessories specified by the manufacturer.
12. Never use with a cart, stand, tripod, bracket, or
table except as specified by the manufacturer, or
sold with the apparatus. When a cart is used,
use caution when moving the cart/apparatus
combination to avoid injury from tip-over.
13. Unplug this apparatus during lightning storms or when unused
for long periods of time.
14. Refer all servicing to qualified service personnel. Servicing is required when the apparatus has been damaged in any way, such
as power-supply cord or plug is damaged, liquid has been
spilled or objects have fallen into the apparatus, the apparatus
has been exposed to rain or moisture, does not operate normally, or has been dropped.
For the U.K.
IMPORTANT: THE WIRES IN THIS MAINS LEAD ARE COLOURED IN ACCORDANCE WITH THE FOLLOWING CODE.
NEUTRAL
BLUE:
BROWN: LIVE
As the colours of the wires in the mains lead of this apparatus may not correspond with the coloured markings identifying
the terminals in your plug, proceed as follows:
The wire which is coloured BLUE must be connected to the terminal which is marked with the letter N or coloured BLACK.
The wire which is coloured BROWN must be connected to the terminal which is marked with the letter L or coloured RED.
Under no circumstances must either of the above wires be connected to the earth terminal of a three pin plug.
The technology used in the G-70 is covered by patents pending in certain countries throughout the world.
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ENGLISH
ENGLISH
Owner’s Manual
ENGLISH
To get the most out of the G-70 and to ensure many years of trouble-free service, we urge you to read through this
Owner’s Manual thoroughly.
To avoid confusion, let’s agree to use the word “button” for all keys on the front panel, and use “key” only when referring to the G-70’s keyboard.
To save space (and time), let us agree to use the word “song” when referring to Standard MIDI Files.
Before using this instrument, carefully read the “Important notes” on p. 11. They provide information concerning the
proper operation of the G-70. Be sure to keep this manual in a safe place for future reference.
Copyright © 2004 ROLAND EUROPE. All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced in any form without the written permission of Roland Europe S.p.a.
ENGLISH
Thank you for purchasing the Roland G-70 Music Workstation. The G-70 is Roland’s most complete arranger keyboard
yet, a collection of all major advantages a Roland instrument can offer: perfect accompaniments, high-class sounds,
the possibility to expand the number of sounds via an optional expansion board (SRX series), a D Beam controller, virtual organ drawbars, professional effects, a Vocal Harmonist, the Cover functions first introduced on Roland’s unique
DisCover 5 keyboard… There’s simply too much to mention in this introduction.
Much care has been taken to facilitate access to all those countless functions, which is why the G-70 comes with a fullcolor touch screen and a user interface that walks you through anything you may want to do with your G-70.
G-70 Music Workstation
Features
Features
Roland’s most comprehensive arranger instrument ever
The G-70 is quite simply a superlative instrument with
the most advanced and best sound generation technology Roland has to offer. It combines Rooland’s Virtual
ToneWheel technology (derived from our successful VK
series) with a superb internal sound source (based on
the acclaimed Fantom-X series) and the possibility to
expand your sound arsenal using a wave expansion
board of Roland’s SRX series.
New interface concept
The G-70 was designed from the ground up to put its
massive array of functions at your fingertips. The fullcolor touch-sensitive screen and the large number of
front-panel buttons usually provide direct access to the
available functions, thus doing away with the need to
wade through countless menus.
Parameters that belong together from a musician’s
point of view are usually located on the same or adjacent display pages, while setting them has been greatly
simplified with respect to earlier arranger instruments.
Cover functions and Makeup Tools for Standard
MIDI Files and Music Styles
Reorchestrating existing Standard MIDI Files and Music
Styles has become a breeze thanks to high-quality Song
and Style Cover presets and an intuitive, instrumentbased, set of MAKEUP TOOLS parameters that allow you
to “revoice” your songs and Styles without spending
hours editing single events.
The structure of Standard MIDI Files can be changed in
real-time thanks to four programmable MARK & JUMP
memories, which allows you to play extended versions
of prerecorded songs.
Adaptive Chord Voicing technology
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The G-70’s Arranger not only boasts a new structure
(with 4 accompaniment levels, 4 Intros and 4 Ending
phrases) but also relies on a more musical real-time
conversion of the chords you play into meaningful
accompaniment phrases. Roland’s patent-applied-for
ACV technology can indeed transpose Music Style parts
in such a way as to eliminate unnatural jumps of
strings lines, piano chords, etc.
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Professional Vocal Harmonist
Another highlight of the G-70 is its Vocal Harmonist
that adds automatic harmonies to your singing, complete with several modes for transforming your (or
someone else’s) voice.
This implies, of course, that you can connect an
optional (Roland DR-10 or DR-20) microphone to the
G-70. Other signal sources (synthesizers, etc.) can also
be connected. Note that a separate EXTERNAL AUDIO IN
part with its own effect section is also provided, allowing you to add external lne-level signals (of a sound
module, CD player, etc.) to your playing.
The signals generated by your singing and/or the Vocal
Harmonist can either be added to the signals of the
MAIN OUTPUT sockets, or transmitted directly to one or
two mixer channels (or additional amplifiers) via the
dedicated VOCAL HARMONIST OUTPUT sockets.
Superfast Recorder and comprehensive 16-track
sequencer
The G-70 provides two approaches for recording new
song material: a Recorder function with a straightforward REC-START-STOP approach and a fully-featured
16-track sequencer with track-based and detailed
microscope editing functions.
Like many other functions on the G-70, the Recorder
interacts with other sections: you can link a song to
each User Program, you can cause any Standard MIDI
File to be transposed automatically to a range that
allows you to sing with ease, the chords of the songs
you play back are recognized automatically and displayed, etc.
Finder functions for songs, Music Styles and User
Programs
Another highlight of the G-70 is the fact that you can
work with an almost unlimited number of songs, Music
Styles and User Programs (in the internal memory, on
memory card or floppy disk). Though there are still
internal Music Styles, you can also work with “CUSTOM”
links to accompaniments in the internal memor or on
memory card, and even select such “external” Styles on
the fly. The same high-speed access system is available
for Standard MIDI Files (songs) and User Programs.
Thanks to the clever Finder databases, the difference
between what’s internal and what resides in an “external” memory has become almost imperceptible.
Play List function
Thanks to the G-70’s Play List function, you can program set lists for your performances. The advantage of
such song chains is that you won’t have to look for the
desired songs on stage.
Furthermore, you can already prepare the next song
while the current one is still running (NEXT SONG function).
D-Beam controller
The G-70 has the acclaimed D-Beam Controller* for
intuitive song and Style playback control and additional
DJ-like effects via movements over an invisible beam of
infrared light. And, of course, the BENDER/MODULATION lever is also there, as are sockets for optional footswitches and an expression pedal.
(* D Beam technology licensed from Interactive Light, Inc.)
G-70 Music Workstation r
Features
…and so much more
Listing all of the G-70’s advantages and functions
would take another ten pages, while you must be dying
to put it through its paces. That is why we would like to
ask you to read this manual from cover to cover. You’ll
find that the G-70 is quite unlike any other instrument
you know.
Have fun!
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G-70 Music Workstation
Using the unit safely
Using the unit safely
Used for instructions intended to alert
the user to the risk of death or severe
injury should the unit be used
improperly.
Used for instructions intended to alert
the user to the risk of injury or material
damage should the unit be used
improperly.
* Material damage refers
other adverse effects
respect to the home
furnishings, as well
animals or pets.
to damage or
caused with
and all its
to domestic
• Before using this instrument, be sure to read the instructions below, and the Owner’s Manual.
.................................................................................................
• Do not open or perform any internal modifications on
the unit.
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• Do not attempt to repair the G-70, or replace parts
within it (except when this manual provides specific
instructions directing you to do so). Refer all servicing to
your retailer, the nearest Roland Service Center, or an
authorized Roland distributor, as listed on the “Information” page.
.................................................................................................
• Never use or store the G-70 in places that are:
• Subject to temperature extremes (e.g., direct sunlight
in an enclosed vehicle, near a heating duct, on top of
heat-generating equipment); or are
• Damp (e.g., baths, washrooms, on wet floors); or are
• Humid; or are
• Exposed to rain; or are
• Dusty; or are
• Subject to high levels of vibration.
.................................................................................................
• This unit should be used only with a rack or stand that
is recommended by Roland.
The
symbol alerts the user to important instructions
or warnings.The specific meaning of the symbol is
determined by the design contained within the
triangle. In the case of the symbol at left, it is used for
general cautions, warnings, or alerts to danger.
The
symbol alerts the user to items that must never
be carried out (are forbidden). The specific thing that
must not be done is indicated by the design contained
within the circle. In the case of the symbol at left, it
means that the unit must never be disassembled.
The ● symbol alerts the user to things that must be
carried out. The specific thing that must be done is
indicated by the design contained within the circle. In
the case of the symbol at left, it means that the powercord plug must be unplugged from the outlet.
• Do not excessively twist or bend the power cord, nor
place heavy objects on it. Doing so can damage the cord,
producing severed elements and short circuits. Damaged
cords are fire and shock hazards!
................................................................................................
• This instrument, either alone or in combination with an
amplifier and headphones or speakers, may be capable of
producing sound levels that could cause permanent
hearing loss. Do not operate for a long period of time at a
high volume level, or at a level that is uncomfortable. If
you experience any hearing loss or ringing in the ears,
you should immediately stop using the unit, and consult
an audiologist.
................................................................................................
• Do not allow any objects (e.g., flammable material, coins,
pins); or liquids of any kind (water, soft drinks, etc.) to
penetrate the unit.
................................................................................................
• In households with small children, an adult should provide supervision until the child is capable of following all
rules essential for the safe operation of the G-70.
................................................................................................
• Protect the unit from strong impact.
(Do not drop it!)
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• Make sure you always have the unit placed in such a way
that it is level and sure to remain stable. Never place it on
stands that could wobble, or on inclined surfaces.
.................................................................................................
• The instrument should only be connected to a power
supply of the type described in the operating instructions, or as marked on the G-70.
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• Do not force the G-70’s power cord to share an outlet
with an unreasonable number of other devices. Be especially careful when using extension cords—the total
power used by all devices you have connected to the
extension cord’s outlet must never exceed the power rating (watts/amperes) for the extension cord. Excessive
loads can cause the insulation on the cord to heat up and
eventually melt through.
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G-70 Music Workstation r
Using the unit safely
• Before using the G-70 in a foreign country, consult with
your retailer, the nearest Roland Service Center, or an
authorized Roland distributor, as listed on the “Information” page.
.................................................................................................
• The G-70 should be located so that its location or position does not interfere with its proper ventilation.
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• This unit for use only with Roland keyboard stand KS-12.
Use with other stands may result in instability and cause
possible injury.
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• Always grasp only the plug on the power-supply cord
when plugging into, or unplugging from, an outlet or
this unit.
.................................................................................................
• Try to prevent cords and cables from becoming entangled. Also, all cords and cables should be placed out of
the reach of children.
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• Never climb on top of, nor place heavy objects on the
unit.
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• Never handle the power cord or its plugs with wet hands
when plugging into, or unplugging from, an outlet or
this unit.
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• If you need to move the instrument, take note of the precautions listed below. Make sure to have a firm grip, to
protect yourself from injury and the instrument from
damage.
• Disconnect the power cord.
• Disconnect all cords coming from external devices.
• Remove the music stand.
.................................................................................................
• Before cleaning the unit, turn off the power and unplug
the power cord from the outlet.
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• Whenever you suspect the possibility of lightning in your
area, disconnect the power cord from the outlet.
.................................................................................................
• Should you remove screws, make sure to put them in a
safe place out of children’s reach, so there is no chance
of them being swallowed accidentally.
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G-70 Music Workstation
Contents
Contents
Features . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4
1. Panel descriptions. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13
Front panel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13
Rear panel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18
Recording with Arranger backing from start to finish . .52
Listening to your song . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .52
Recording without accompaniment. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .53
Adding more parts. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .53
Saving your song . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .55
2. Setting up and demo songs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20
Connections . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20
Switching the G-70 on/off . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21
4. About the Keyboard modes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .56
Arranger, Piano and Organ modes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 56
Split and Whole modes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 57
Internal Memory Protect . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21
Setting the display contrast . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21
Switching off the G-70 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21
Using the SPLIT Keyboard Mode . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .57
Using WHOLE mode . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .57
Switching parts on and off . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .57
Interactive demo of the G-70 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22
The main page . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23
5. Using the performance functions . . . . . . . . . . . . .58
Pitch Bend and Modulation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 58
Transposition . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 58
Important notes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11
3. Quick Start. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24
The general idea . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24
Playing to an automatic accompaniment. . . . . . . . . 25
Professional transitions: Fill In . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 26
Intro & Ending . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 26
Selecting Music Styles . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27
Changing the tempo . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 28
Using the Keyboard parts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 28
Playing with an Upper and/or Lower part . . . . . . . . . . . . 28
Alternating between sounds . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 29
Selecting sounds for the Keyboard parts . . . . . . . . . . . . . 29
Drumming on the keyboard . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 31
Selecting sounds from an SRX expansion board . . . . . . . 32
Using the Harmonic Bars . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 33
If you like a registration… . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 34
About the MANUAL field . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 34
Using just one organ sound and bass pedals . . . . . . . . . . 34
Using effects . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 34
Using a “beat box” with the organ. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 35
Working with the Music Assistant . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 36
If the desired registration is not displayed… . . . . . . . . . . 36
To save time… . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 36
Using the Finder . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 37
Playing back songs (Standard MIDI Files) . . . . . . . . . 38
Quick location of the song you need. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 38
Starting playback . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 39
Other practical playback functions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 39
Using the Song Cover function . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 41
Minus One . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 41
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Vocal Harmonist function . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 42
8
Recording your music . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 52
Setting up. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 42
Adding harmonies to your singing. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 44
Who specifies the harmonies? . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 44
Not convinced so far? . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 44
Voice-FX . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 45
Auto Pitch . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 46
Using the Vocoder. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 46
Talk . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 47
Automatic transposition (Singer Key) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 48
Displaying Lyrics and chord information . . . . . . . . . . . . . 49
Displaying scores. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 51
Setting the transposition interval via the display . . . . . .58
Global Transpose . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .59
Octave. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Key Touch (velocity sensitivity) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Master Tune. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Aftertouch . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
ASSIGN SW buttons . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Using the D Beam Controller . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Using optional footswitches. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
59
60
61
61
62
64
67
FC7 PEDAL. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .67
Hold Footswitch (Sustain) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .68
Foot Switch. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .69
Expression (Foot Pedal). . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .70
Scale Tuning . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 71
Metronome . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 73
6. Additional Arranger/Style functions . . . . . . . . . . .74
Playback functions (Style Control) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 74
Starting a Music Style. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .74
Stopping Music Styles. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .74
About Sync Start & Stop . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .75
Selecting other Style divisions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 75
Other ways of selecting Arranger patterns . . . . . . . . . . . .75
Bass Inversion. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .75
Melody Intelligence . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 76
Using the Style Cover function . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 77
Saving a Music Style with a COVER alteration . . . . . . . . .77
One Touch . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 78
Ignoring certain One Touch settings (Hold) . . . . . . . . . . .79
Programming your own One Touch settings (WRITE) . . .79
More refined Arranger settings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 80
Chord recognition area (ZONE) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .80
Arranger Type (chord mode) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .80
Arranger Hold. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .80
Intro & Ending Alteration. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .81
Dynamic Arranger . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .81
Tempo-related settings (Arranger Options) . . . . . . . 82
Style Tempo . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .82
TEMPO CHANGE (RITARD and ACCELER) . . . . . . . . . . . . . .82
Working with ‘external’ Music Styles . . . . . . . . . . . . 84
Using the CUSTOM memories . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .84
Programming CUSTOM assignments . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .84
Disk User . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .85
G-70 Music Workstation r
Contents
Style Finder: quickly locating Styles. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 86
Quick location of the Style you need. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 86
Editing the Style Finder information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 88
7. Advanced Keyboard part functions . . . . . . . . . . . 90
Upper 3 Split . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 90
Tuning Upper 2: Coarse Tune and Fine Tune . . . . . . 90
Portamento for UP1 and UP2 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 91
Portamento Time. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 91
Portamento Mode: Mono/Poly . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 92
Lower Hold . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 92
Tone Edit: editing Keyboard parts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 93
8. Using the mixer functions & effects . . . . . . . . . . 95
Mixing Keyboard parts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 95
Volume and status of the Style parts . . . . . . . . . . . . 96
Editing the Keyboard effects processors . . . . . . . . . . 97
Reverb for Keyboard parts. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 97
Chorus for Keyboard parts. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 98
Using the multi-effects processor (Multi-FX). . . . . 100
Selecting another MFX type and editing it. . . . . . . . . . .100
Linking Multi-FX type selection to the Upper part
(Upper 1 M-FX Link) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .101
Effects for songs and Styles . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 101
Reverb for Style/Song parts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .102
Chorus for Style/Song parts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .102
Using the individual outputs and audio inputs . . . 103
Output assign (PART OUTPUTS) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .103
Using the audio inputs. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .104
Using the Mastering Tools . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 105
Equalizer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .105
Compressor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .106
Voice and Vocal Harmonist part mixing . . . . . . . . . 107
Saving your modified song or Style . . . . . . . . . . . . 130
11. Editing the Vocal Harmonist parts . . . . . . . . . . . 131
Singer settings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 131
Voice-FX settings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 132
Auto Pitch settings. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 133
Vocoder settings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 134
Small settings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 135
Ensemble settings. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 136
12. More refined song functions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 138
Using the Fade-In/Out function. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 138
Programming MARK & JUMP locations . . . . . . . . . 139
Working with the Song Finder . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 140
Locating files with the Song Finder . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 140
Editing the Song Finder information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 141
Editing an Index . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 143
Play List function . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 145
Programming Play Lists . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Editing Play Lists . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Using Play Lists. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Managing Play Lists. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
145
146
148
148
13. Editing Lyrics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 150
Adding Lyrics to a song . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 150
Exporting Lyrics data as text file . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 152
14. Using the 16-track sequencer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 154
About the sequencer’s main page . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 154
General considerations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 155
Example 1: Recording a song from scratch . . . . . . 155
Preparations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 156
Example 2: Adding tracks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 158
Saving your song . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 159
Reverb, Delay, and Chorus effects . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .107
Editing 16-track songs. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 160
9. Working with User Programs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 111
Saving your settings to a User Program . . . . . . . . . 111
Selecting User Programs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 112
Easy editing and useful functions. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 160
Editing one or several tracks (TRACK EDIT) . . . . . . . . . . 160
Cancel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .112
Choosing User Programs manually . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .113
Selecting User Programs with [DOWN] [UP]. . . . . . . . . .113
Working with the User Program Finder. . . . . . . . . . . . . .113
Quick location of the User Program you need. . . . . . . .114
Selectively loading User Program settings
(User Program Hold) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .115
Automatic functions for User Programs . . . . . . . . . 116
Song Link . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .116
Linking a MIDI Set to a User Program . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .116
User Program Recall . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .117
Editing User Program Finder information. . . . . . . . 117
Editing the User Program Finder information . . . . . . . .118
Editing an Index . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .120
Music Assistant functions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 121
Editing song data using Microscope Edit . . . . . . . . 175
General notes about MICRO EDIT . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 175
Editing events. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 177
Other edit operations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 177
15. Programming Styles (Style Composer) . . . . . . . . 179
Concept . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 179
Recording User Styles from scratch . . . . . . . . . . . . 180
Starting the Style Composer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Clearing the RAM memory (Initialize Style) . . . . . . . . .
Getting ready for the first track . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Recording . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
180
180
181
184
Auditioning your Style and adding more tracks . . 184
Saving your Style. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Programming other parts and divisions . . . . . . . . . . . .
Muting parts while recording others . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Remarks. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
185
185
185
185
Creating new Music Assistant registrations . . . . . . . . . .121
Editing Music Assistant registrations. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .122
Saving a Music Assistant entry . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .122
Copying existing Styles . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 186
10. Song and Style Makeup Tools . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 124
Mixing Song or Style parts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 124
Using the Makeup Tools. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 125
Editing on the fly by recording . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 188
General procedure . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .126
PALETTE. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .127
SOUND EDIT for Tones . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .127
SOUND EDIT for Drum Sets . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .128
DRUM INSTR EDIT . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .128
COMMON . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .129
Starting with all tracks of an existing Style . . . . . . . . . 186
Copying individual Style tracks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 187
Adding notes in realtime . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Adding controller data in realtime . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Adding or changing settings of existing parts . . . . . . .
Expression, Panpot, Reverb, Chorus . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Changing the preset tempo . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
188
188
188
189
190
Style Track Edit functions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 190
9
G-70 Music Workstation
Contents
Editing individual Style events (Style Micro Edit) . 198
General notes about STYLE MICRO EDIT . . . . . . . . . . . . .198
Editing events . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .200
Other edit operations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .200
16. Disk/Media functions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 203
The how-to’s . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 203
Loading data . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 204
Saving data . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 204
Rename functions. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 206
Delete . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 207
Copy. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 208
Format. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 209
17. Archiving data using a computer (USB) . . . . . . . 211
Backing up all data of the G-70 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .213
18. MIDI . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 214
The how-to’s . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 214
Accessing the MIDI functions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .214
Working with presets . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .215
Editing procedure . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .215
Editing MIDI parameters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 216
Keyboard, Style, Song Parts. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .216
MIDI System parameters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .217
MIDI Sets . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 220
Writing a MIDI Set . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .220
Using MIDI Sets . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .220
MIDI Set selection at power-on . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .220
19. Miscellaneous . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 222
Using V-LINK . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 222
General settings. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 223
Touch Screen Beep . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .223
Info . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .223
Initializing the G-70 (Factory Reset) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .224
20. Specifications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 225
21. Appendix . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 227
Installing a wave expansion board. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 227
How to install a wave expansion board . . . . . . . . . . . . .227
Accessing the ‘Patches’ of SRX-series expansion
boards via MIDI . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 228
MFX and IFX types and parameters . . . . . . . . . . . . . 229
22. MIDI Implementation Chart. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 250
23. Chord Intelligence . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 251
r
Index . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 253
10
G-70 Music Workstation r
Important notes
In addition to the items listed under “Using the unit safely” on p. 6, please read and observe the following:
Power supply
• Do not use this instrument on the same power circuit with any
device that will generate line noise (such as an electric motor or
variable lighting system).
• Before connecting the G-70 to other devices, turn off the power
to all units. This will help prevent malfunctions and/or damage to
speakers or other devices.
• Although the LCD and LEDs are switched off when the POWER
switch is switched off, this does not mean that the unit has been
completely disconnected from the source of power. If you need to
turn off the power completely, first turn off the POWER switch,
then unplug the power cord from the power outlet. For this reason, the outlet into which you choose to connect the power cord’s
plug should be one that is within easy reach.
Placement
• Using the G-70 near power amplifiers (or other equipment containing large power transformers) may induce hum. To alleviate
the problem, change the orientation of this instrument or move it
further away from the source of interference.
• This instrument may interfere with radio and television reception.
Do not use it in the vicinity of such receivers.
• Observe the following when using the unit’s floppy disk drive. For
further details, refer to “Before using floppy disks (handling the
floppy disk drive)”.
• Do not place the unit near devices that produce a strong magnetic field (e.g., loudspeakers).
• Install the G-70 on a solid, level surface.
• Do not move the unit or subject it to vibration while the drive is
operating.
• Do not expose the G-70 to direct sunlight, place it near devices
that radiate heat, leave it inside an enclosed vehicle, or otherwise
subject it to temperature extremes. Excessive heat can deform or
discolor the G-70.
• To avoid possible breakdown, do not use the G-70 in a wet area,
such as an area exposed to rain or other moisture.
• Do not allow objects to remain on the keyboard. This can be the
cause of malfunction, such as keys ceasing to produce sound.
Maintenance
• For everyday cleaning wipe the G-70 with a soft, dry cloth or one
that has been slightly dampened with water. To remove stubborn
dirt, use a mild, non-abrasive detergent. Afterwards, be sure to
wipe the instrument thoroughly with a soft, dry cloth.
• Never use benzene, thinner, alcohol or solvents of any kind, to
avoid the possibility of discoloration and/or deformation.
Repairs and data
• Please be aware that all data contained in the instrument’s memory may be lost when it is sent for repairs. In certain cases (such as
when circuitry related to memory itself is out of order), we regret
that it may not be possible to restore the data. Roland assumes no
liability concerning such loss of data.
Additional precautions
• Please be aware that the memory contents can be irretrievably lost
as a result of a malfunction, or the improper operation of the
instrument.
• Use a reasonable amount of care when using the G-70’s buttons,
other controls, and jacks/connectors. Rough handling can lead to
malfunctions.
• Never strike or apply strong pressure to the display.
• When connecting/disconnecting cables, grasp the connector
itself—never pull on the cable. This way you will avoid causing
shorts, or damage to the cable’s internal elements.
• A small amount of heat will radiate from the G-70 during normal
operation. This is perfectly normal.
• To avoid disturbing your neighbors, try to keep the G-70’s volume
at reasonable levels. You may prefer to use headphones, so you do
not need to be concerned about those around you (especially late
at night).
• When you need to transport the G-70, package it in the box
(including padding) that it came in. Otherwise, you will need to use
equivalent packaging materials, or a flightcase.
• Use only the specified expression pedal (EV-5, EV-7; sold separately). By connecting any other expression pedals, you risk causing malfunction and/or damage to the G-70.
About the touch screen
• Wipe off stains on the touch screen using ethanol, but do not
allow the ethanol to soak into the joint of the upper fume and the
bottom glass, for it may otherwise cause peeling or malfunction.
Do not use organic solvents or detergents other than ethyl alcohol
(ethanol).
Before using floppy disks (handling the floppy
disk drive)
• Install the G-70 on a solid, level surface in an area free from vibration. If the unit must be installed at an angle, be sure the installation does not exceed the permissible range: upward, 2°; downward, 18°.
• Avoid using the G-70 immediately after it has been moved to a
location with a level of humidity that is greatly different than its
former location. Rapid changes in the environment can cause condensation to form inside the drive, which will adversely affect the
operation of the drive and/or damage floppy disks. When the unit
has been moved, allow it to become accustomed to the new environment (allow a few hours) before operating it.
• To insert a disk, push it gently but firmly into the drive—it will click
into place. To remove a disk, press the EJECT button firmly. Do not
use excessive force to remove a disk which is lodged in the drive.
• Never attempt to remove a floppy disk from the drive while the
drive is operating (the indicator is lit); damage could result to both
the disk and the drive.
• Remove any disk from the drive before powering up or down.
• To prevent damage to the disk drive’s heads, always try to hold the
floppy disk in a level position (not tilted in any direction) while
inserting it into the drive. Push it in firmly, but gently. Never use
excessive force.
• To avoid the risk of malfunction and/or damage, insert only floppy
disks into the disk drive. Never insert any other type of disk. Avoid
getting paper clips, coins, or any other foreign objects inside the
drive.
Handling floppy disks
• Floppy disks contain a plastic disk with a thin magnetic coating.
Microscopic precision is required to enable storage of large
amounts of data on such a small surface area. To preserve their
integrity, please observe the following when handling floppy disks:
• Never touch the magnetic medium inside the disk.
• Do not use or store floppy disks in dirty or dusty areas.
11
G-70 Music Workstation
Important notes
• Do not subject floppy disks to temperature extremes (e.g., direct
sunlight in an enclosed vehicle). Recommended temperature
range: 10°~50°C (50°~122°F).
• Do not expose floppy disks to strong magnetic fields, such as
those generated by loudspeakers.
• Floppy disks have a “WRITE” tab which can protect the disk from
accidental erasure. It is recommended that the tab be kept in
the PROTECT position, and moved to the WRITE position only
when you wish to write new data onto the disk.
Rear side of the disk
• Do not allow cards to become wet.
• Do not disassemble or modify the cards.
• Never remove the memory card or turn off the power while an
operation –such as reading or writing data, or formatting– is being
performed on the memory card. Doing so can destroy the data on
the memory card and/or render the memory card itself unusable.
• If you affix the write-protect label to the write-protect area of a
SmartMedia™ card, you will not be able to format the card or write
data to it. If you wish to format the card or write data to it, do so
without the label affixed. For details on the write-protect sticker,
refer to the owner’s manual for your memory card.
WRITE
(you can save data to the disk)
Protect tab
PROTECT
(you cannot save data)
• Disks containing important performance data for this instrument should always be locked (have their write protect tab slid
to the PROTECT position) before you insert them into the drive
of another device.
• The identification label should be firmly affixed to the disk. If
the label comes loose while the disk is in the drive, it may be
difficult to remove the disk.
• Put the disk back into its case for storage.
Memory Backup
• If the power to this unit is not switched on for an extended period
of time (about ** months), the contents of memory will be lost, and
the unit will revert to its factory defaults. To avoid the loss of
important data that has been placed in memory, a backup of your
data should be periodically created (see p. 211).
Memory cards usable with the G-70
• The G-70 can use commercially available CompactFlash and
SmartMedia memory cards. You can purchase such cards at a
computer shop or digital camera dealer.
• Memory cards you purchase must meet the following conditions.
• Power supply voltage: 3.3 V
• Capacity: 4, 8, 16, 32, 64, 128, 256, 512MB, 1GB, 2GB, 4GB (2GB
and 4GB only with Microdrive)
• The G-70 cannot use cards of types other than the above.
Before using memory cards
Liability and copyright
• Some data cards are equipped with a PROTECT switch, which when
turned on protects your data from accidental erasure. (The G-70
also has such a switch.) It is recommended that the switch be kept
at the ON position, and switched to OFF only at the times you wish
to write new data onto the card.
• Unauthorized recording, distribution, sale, lending, public performance, broadcasting, or the like in whole or in part, of a work
(musical composition, video, broadcast, public performance, or the
like) whose copyright is held by a third party is prohibited by law.
• Do not use this unit for purposes that could infringe on a copyright held by a third party. Roland assumes no responsibility whatsoever with regard to any infringements of third-party copyrights
arising through your use of this unit.
On
r
• If you attempt to format a card or write data to it when the writeprotect label is affixed, an error message will appear. In that case,
either insert another card or remove the write-protect label.
• At power-on, do not remove/insert a card while the G-70 is updating its internal data (wait until the messages “Song database
checking…” and “User Program database checking…” have disappeared).
• Never turn on the power when a memory card is inserted partway
into the slot. Doing so will damage the data in internal memory.
Off
• This unit’s memory card slot accepts CompactFlash and SmartMedia™ (3.3V) memory cards. Microdrive storage media are compatible. (You need a commercially available adapter plug for
SmartMedia™ cards.)
• Carefully insert the memory Card all the way in—until it is firmly in
place.
• Never touch the terminals of the memory card. Also, avoid getting
the terminals dirty.
• CompactFlash and SmartMedia (3.3V) cards are constructed using
precision components. Handle the cards carefully, paying particular note to the following.
• To prevent damage to the cards from static electricity, be sure
to discharge any static electricity from your own body before
handling the cards.
• Do not touch or allow metal to come into contact with the contact portion of the cards.
• Do not bend, drop, or subject cards to strong shock or vibration.
• Do not keep cards in direct sunlight, in closed vehicles, or other
such locations (storage temperature: –25 to 85°C).
12
• SmartMedia is a trademark of Toshiba Corp.
• Compact Flash and
are trademarks of SanDisk Corporation
and licensed by CompactFlash association. Roland Corporation is
an authorized licensee of the CompactFlash™ and CF logo trademarks.
• All product names mentioned in this document are trademarks or
registered trademarks of their respective owners.
G-70 Music Workstation r
Front panel
1. Panel descriptions
Front panel
Note: You can press and hold most buttons to jump to an associated display page.
D
MASTER
VOLUME
RECORDER
PLAY
LIST
NEXT MINUS
SONG
ONE
16 TRACKS
SEQUENCER
F
A
D BEAM
DEMO
MIN
TOP
MAX
BWD
FWD
PLAY/STOP
REC
DJ GEAR SFX
INST
CTRL
BALANCE
/
B
E
ACCOMP
KEYBOARD
STYLE
8 BEAT
16 BEAT
LIVE
BAND
ROCK
DISCO
DANCE
G
CONTEMP
MARK & JUMP
EXT SOURCE
BALL
ROOM
C
MIN
JAZZ
BLUES
50's & 60's
BOSSA
SAMBA
1
LATIN
2
3
4
WORLD
MAX
A MASTER VOLUME knob
Use this knob to set the G-70’s global output volume
(all sections). The setting of this knob also determines
the volume in the headphones you may have connected.
B BALANCE knob
This knob allows you to set the balance between the
Arranger or song parts (“ACCOMP”) and the solo
sounds (“KEYBOARD”).
C EXT SOURCE knob
Use this knob to set the volume of an audio source (a
synthesizer, MP3 player, etc.) connected to the
EXTERNAL SOURCE sockets on the G-70’s rear panel.
D RECORDER section
[PLAY¥LIST] button: Press this button to access the
display where you can select a list of songs to be
played back, edit existing lists, program new ones,
etc. When the indicator of this button lights, [|√], [º],
[‰], [PLAY÷STOP¥®÷ª] are used to control playback of
the current song. Hold down [PLAY¥LIST] while pressing [MINUS¥ONE] to select the demo mode.
[NEXT≈SONG] button: You can already load a new
song while the current Standard MIDI File is still playing. If you want the Recorder to start playback of the
newly selected song automatically, press this button.
If the [PLAY¥LIST] button lights, this button allows
you to select the next song of the selected chain.
[MINUS≈ONE] button: Press this button to switch off
the part you want to play (or sing) yourself. The part
to be muted is selectable (page 41).
[16-TRACK¥SEQUENCER] button: Press this button to
access the G-70’s sequencer (MIDI recorder). This
sequencer goes way beyond anything you may know
from previous Roland arranger instruments (see
p. 154).
[|√], [º], [‰], [PLAY÷STOP¥®÷ª]: These buttons allow
you to return to the beginning of the current song,
“rewind” or “fast-forward” in one-measure steps, and
to start and stop playback of the selected song.
Press the [REC¥∏] button to record a new song (see
p. 52).
E STYLE section
These buttons allow you to select one of the twelve
Music Style families. The button of the selected family lights.
F D Beam controller
This controller allows you to influence the timbre of
the notes you play, to control song playback, and to
create some unique effects. All you need to do is
move your hand up/down or left/right above the two
“eyes”.
The buttons below it allow you to assign the desired
function to the D Beam controller. See p. 64.
G MARK JUMP section
These buttons ([1]~[4]) allow you to jump to one of
four stored locations inside the currently selected
song. You can program the desired locations for
songs that do not yet contain them.
13
G-70 Music Workstation
Panel descriptions
H
I
J
ASSIGN SW
1
STYLE CONTROL
USER PROGRAM
INTRO
MAIN
END/RIT
BASS
INVERSION
SYNC
START STOP
SET LIST
1
VARIATION
2
3
4
AUTO
FILL IN
START/STOP
1
HOLD
DOWN
UP
2
FADE
IN
CANCEL
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
FADE
OUT
H ASSIGN SW section
[ASSIGN¥SW¥1] and [ASSIGN¥SW¥2] are assignable
buttons. You can use them to directly access frequently used functions that are only available via the
function menu. The ASSIGN SW assignments belong
to the settings that can be written to a User Program.
If you don’t change their assignment, they can be
used to trigger the FADE IN and FADE OUT functions.
I STYLE CONTROL section
Use these buttons to select the desired Music Style
pattern, and to start/stop Music Style playback (see
p. 25).
J USER PROGRAM section
These buttons allow you to select the desired User
Program (registration memory). You can also select
the previous ([DOWN]) or next ([UP]) User Program.
By pressing these two buttons simultaneously, you
leave the User Program environment.
The [HOLD] button allows you to ignore several settings of subsequently loaded User Programs (see
p. 115).
L
MUSIC
ASSISTANT
P
K
LCD
CONTRAST
M
LYRICS & SCORE
SONG
STYLE
MAKEUP
TOOLS
Q
N
EFFECTS
SONG
STYLE
MENU
R
O
DISK & MEDIA
EXIT
S
K LCD CONTRAST knob
Use this knob to adjust the display’s contrast if it is
difficult to read. The display itself is a touch screen
and therefore needs to be clear at all times (so that
you know what you are doing).
r
Note: The display may take some time to warm up. That is why
you may have to change the contrast several times after powering on.
L MUSIC ASSISTANT button
Press this button to access the MUSIC ASSISTANT
environment where you can select Music Style registrations for a given song you want to play. You can
also program your own Music Assistant registrations.
M LYRICS & SCORE button
Press this button if you want the lyrics contained in
the songs to appear in the display. At the same time,
the chords of the notes played by the song parts will
also be displayed. This, however, is information that is
“extracted” (derived) in realtime by the G-70. This
function can even display the notes of the selected
part as a score.
14
N EFFECTS button
This button provides access to the display pages
where you can set the effects parameters of the
G-70’s parts.
O DISK & MEDIA button
Press this button if you wish to save/load data from a
the internal memory, a floppy disk or PCM/CIA card.
You will also find data management functions here,
like deleting files, formatting floppies or cards, etc.
(page 203).
P COVER button
This button provides access to pre-programmed templates that allow you to quickly modify a song’s or
Music Style’s character. Press it once or twice to
select the Song or Style level. See pages 41 and 77.
Q MAKEUP TOOLS button
Press this button to modify the settings of the current song or Music Style, if the pre-programmed
Cover settings do not provide what you’re looking
for. See page 124.
G-70 Music Workstation r
Front panel
R MENU button
Press this button to call up a menu that provides
access to more in-depth G-70 functions you may
only wish to set from time to time.
S EXIT button
Press this button to return to the previously selected
display page, or the G-70’s main page.
T
TYPE
16'
5-1/3'
8'
4'
2-2/3'
U
2'
1-3/5'
1-1/3'
MODE
1'
CHORUS
HARMONIC
BAR
SONG
PART
STYLE
REVERB
VOLUME
EFFECT DBEAM M.INT
MBS
LW 2
LW 1
UP 3
UP 2
T Assignable sliders
These sliders can be used as virtual drawbars (when
the [HARMONIC¥BAR] button lights). In that case,
refer to the footage indications above the sliders for
their specific function (page 33).
TAP
SLOW
FAST
DEFAULT
PAGE
UP 1
The TYPE buttons, finally, are used to select the
parameter that can be changed using the sliders
(reverb or chorus send level, stereo position, or volume).
U TEMPO section
[METRONOME] button: Press this button to switch
the internal metronome on or off.
The remaining buttons allow you to set the tempo of
the metronome, the Arranger or the recorder/
sequencer.
Note: The HARMONIC BAR function is only available for the
following parts: UP1, LW1, and MBS.
Then, there are three buttons that allow you to specify the part group whose settings you want to
change: [PART] (Keyboard parts), [STYLE] (arranger
parts) and [SONG] (recorder parts).
DATA ENTRY
METRO
NOME
PAGE
PANPOT
V
TEMPO
Note: You can press and hold most buttons to jump to an associated display page.
NUMERIC PAD (PUSH)
X
FINDER
SONG
Z
STYLE
VOCAL HARMONIST
TALK
VOICE
VOICE
FX
HARMONY
VOCODER
EFFECTS
INPUT GAIN
OVER
DEC
INC
AUTO
PITCH SINGER
USER PRG
OFF
Y
W
KBD MODE
MAX
SMALL ENSEMBLE
OFF
a
OFF
MAX
MAX
MIN
MAX
TONE
SPLIT
PIANO
WHOLE
VOCAL
E.PIANO
KEYBOARD CHR PERC
ORGAN
ACCORDION A.GUITAR
E.GUITAR
BASS
STRINGS
SRX
EXPANSION
PERCUSS
SFX
DRUMS
HARMONIC
BAR
EASY SETTING
ARR
ORGAN PIANO
V DATA ENTRY section
The dial can be used to set the value of the parameter
field that is currently highlighted. Turn it to scroll
through the available settings. You can also press it
to call up a numeric key pad that allows you to enter
the desired value by pressing the corresponding fields
in the display.
To change the selected value in small steps, press
[DEC] (lower value) or [INC] (higher value). The
[ß][†][®][√] buttons are used to select a parameter for
editing (something you can also do by pressing the
corresponding display field).
While the main page is displayed, the [DATA÷ENTRY]
dial and [DEC]/[INC] buttons also allow you to set the
tempo.
BRASS
SAX
TRUMPET
WIND
SYNTH
PAD
ETHNIC
W EASY SETTING section
This key pad allows you to reconfigure the G-70 by
pressing just one button: [ARR] (use the Arranger in
split mode), [ORGAN] (the name says it all), and
[PIANO] (assign a piano sound to the entire keyboard). See also page 56.
X FINDER section
Press one of these buttons to quickly locate songs
([SONG]), Music Styles ([STYLE]) or User Programs
([USER¥PRG]) in the internal memory (SSD), on floppy
disk or an external memory card. See pages 38, 86
and 113.
Y KBD MODE section
Press the [SPLIT] button if you want to play different
sounds with your left and right hands (page 56). (It is
even possible to add a second split point, see
page 90.)
15
G-70 Music Workstation
Panel descriptions
Press the [WHOLE] button to assign one or several
sounds to the entire keyboard (without a split). See
page 56.
Z VOCAL HARMONIST section
The buttons and knobs in this section are used to set
the Vocal Harmonist function, the microphone level
and the effects applied to the signals received via the
Vocal Harmonist MIC INPUT socket. See page 42.
a TONE section
The TONE buttons allow you to select one of 16 internal Tone families. You can then use the display to
specify the desired sound within that family.
b
The [SRX¥EXPANSION] button is only available after
you install an optional wave expansion board into the
G-70.
Note: SRX sounds can be assigned to the following Keyboard
parts: UP1/2/3, LW1/2, and MBS.
Press the [HARMONIC¥BAR] button to activate the
“Harmonic Bar” section whose sound can be set using
the assignable sliders (T) that double as virtual
drawbars.
c
KEYBOARD PART
ONE TOUCH
d
e
TRANSPOSE
TONE EFFECTS
f
TONE ASSIGN
1
MBS
LW 2
LW 1
UP 3
UP 2
2
3
MULTI MELODY
FX
INTELL
4
UP 1
CANCEL
r
PART ON/OFF
b KEYBOARD PART section
The TONE ASSIGN buttons are used to specify the
Keyboard part you wish to assign a different sound to
page 29. “Keyboard parts” are the parts you can play
yourself. The G-70 contains many other parts that
are played “automatically” by the Arranger or
Recorder.
The PART ON/OFF buttons allow you to switch the
desired Keyboard parts on and off.
c ONE TOUCH section
These buttons allow you to select the desired One
Touch memory. There are four memories per internal
Music Style and the 120 Link memories. They work a
lot like the User Programs, because they assign different sounds and effects settings to the Keyboards
parts and carry out some other changes. See page 78.
d TRANSPOSE section
These buttons allow you to transpose the G-70 up
([]) or down ([ƒ]) in semitone steps. You can also
specify which parts are to be transposed (page 58).
If neither button lights, no manual transposition is
used.
e TONE EFFECTS section
Press the [MULTI¥FX] button to add a different effect
to the Keyboard parts page 100. (This processor is
also available for the D Beam and the MELODY INTELL
parts.)
Press the [MELODY¥INTELLIGENCE] button (so that it
lights) to add an automatic counter-melody (second
and third voice) to your solos or melodies (see p. 76).
16
f V-LINK button
Press this button to take advantage of the G-70’s VLINK functionality for controlling video material via
certain performance functions and the right-most
keys on the G-70’s keyboard. By using V-LINK-compatible video equipment, visual effects can be easily
linked to, and made part of the expressive elements
of a performance. By connecting the G-70 to an
optional Edirol DV-7PR or V-4, you can switch images
in synchronization with music, or use the G-70’s performance functions or right-most keys to switch
clips, control playback speed, etc.
G-70 Music Workstation r
Front panel
g
h
g BENDER/MODULATION lever
When pushed towards the back of the G-70, this
lever will add modulation to the notes of the Keyboard parts you are playing at that time. Move it to
the left or right to temporarily lower or increase the
pitch of the Keyboard part notes you are playing. For
the HARMONIC BAR sounds and the sounds of the
TONE [ORGAN] family, you can use the Modulation
axis to alternate between the fast and slow Rotary
speeds.
i
h Floppy disk drive
This is where you can insert 2DD or 2HD floppy disks
for external storage of your Music Styles, User Programs, Recorder songs, and MIDI Sets. Press the eject
button to remove the disk from the drive.
Note: Do not remove the floppy disk while the G-70 accesses
the disk (to load/save data, etc.). Doing so may damage both
the floppy disk and the drive’s head.
i PHONES socket
The G-70 comes with a headphone socket. Be sure to
connect high-quality headphones to this socket
(Roland RH-200, RH-50 or RH-25, optional).
17
G-70 Music Workstation
Panel descriptions
Rear panel
(left side)
A
B
C
FC7 PEDAL
HOLD
FOOTSWITCH
FOOT
SWITCH
D
E
FOOT
PEDAL
THRU
MIDI
OUT
F
G
H
I
VIDEO
OUTPUT
PCMCIA
IN
INTERNAL MEMORY
PROTECT
A FC7 PEDAL socket
This is where you connect an optional FC-7 footswitch unit that allows you to start, stop, and select
Style divisions by foot. The functions of this foot
switch unit are programmable (and apply to the
entire G-70).
B HOLD FOOTSWITCH socket
An optional DP-2, DP-6, or BOSS FS-5U footswitch
connected to this socket can be used for holding the
Keyboard-part notes. (The Melody Intell part can also
be sustained in this way.) This function is also
referred to as “Sustain” or “Damper”.
C FOOT SWITCH socket
Connecting an optional DP-2, DP-6, or FS-5U to this
socket allows you to control an assignable function
by foot.
D FOOT PEDAL socket
Connect an optional EV-5, EV-7 or BOSS FV-300L
expression pedal to this socket to control the volume
of one or several parts, or another parameter by foot.
E MIDI THRU/OUT/IN sockets
These sockets allow you to connect the G-70 to
external MIDI devices for a variety of applications:
receiving song data in realtime from an external
sequencer, transmitting your playing (and the data of
the song you are playing back) to an external
sequencer, using the G-70 as master keyboard in
your MIDI setup, etc.
Note: The MIDI functions can be accessed via the G-70’s Menu
(page 214). Frequently used MIDI settings can be written and
recalled as “MIDI Sets”.
F USB port
The USB port can be used for archiving purposes and
MIDI data transfer from/to a computer.
G PCMCIA slot
This is where you can insert a memory card (PCMCIA,
CompactFlash, SmartMedia™, or Microdrive). Memory
cards that are not PCMCIA cards can only be inserted
if you use an appropriate adapter (available at your
computer store). See also the precautions on p. 12.
H INTERNAL MEMORY protect switch
This cap hides a switch that allows you to lock ( ,
protect) and unlock ( ) the internal memory. See
page 21.
I VIDEO OUTPUT socket
Connect this socket to the appropriate input of your
TV or monitor. In that case, the lyrics of songs that
contain such information, and the note information
extracted in realtime (page 49) will be displayed on
screen even if the [LYRICS&SCORE] button does not
light (in which case the lyrics, chords and notes no
longer appear in the G-70’s display).
Note: The signal format (PAL or NTSC) can be set via a MENU
function.
(right side)
r
J
K
L
J METRONOME LEVEL knob and OUT socket
The G-70’s metronome signals can be transmitted to
the METRONOME OUT socket. You can connect headphones (Roland RH-200, RH-25 or RH-50) to this
socket. This is useful for a drummer, for example (as
“Click Track”). Use the METRONOME [LEVEL] knob to
set the metronome volume in the headphones.
K EXTERNAL SOURCE/AUDIO IN L/R sockets
This is where you can connect the audio outputs of
an external signal source (CD/MP3 player, synthesizer, etc.). If the source has 1/4” outputs, you either
18
M
N
O
need adapter plugs (1/4”→ RCA/Cinch) or Roland
PJ-1M cables. These inputs are only suitable for linelevel signals.
Note that they are stereo (with a left and right channel). If you only connect one cable to “L” (or “R”), the
signal is only audible on the left (or right) channel.
The volume of the signal received via these inputs
can be set with the C EXT SOURCE knob.
G-70 Music Workstation r
Front panel
L VOCAL HARMONIST section
INPUT switch: If you connect a microphone to the
INPUT socket, set this switch to “MIC”. To try out the
Vocal Harmonist function for other signals (guitar,
external synthesizers & modules, CDs, MDs, etc.), set
this switch to “LINE”.
Note: For the “LINE” setting to work with electric guitars or
basses, you need to connect such instruments to an effects
pedal or rack effect (in bypass mode), and connect the effect’s
output to the INPUT socket.
INPUT socket: This is where you can to connect an
optional microphone (like a Roland DR-10 or DR-20)
or other external signal source you wish to process
using the G-70’s Vocal Harmonist facility. This is a
combo socket to which you can connect either a balanced XLR or unbalanced 1/4” jack. (The socket does
not provide phantom power.)
Note: The INPUT socket is mono.
OUTPUT R & L sockets: If connected to a mixing console, amplifier, etc., these sockets transmit the signal
received via the INPUT socket and processed with the
G-70’s Vocal Harmonist facility. If no jacks are connected here, the Vocal Harmonist signals are transmitted via the OUTPUT sockets (see below).
M OUTPUT section
DIRECT R/L sockets: When you first switch on the
G-70, these audio outputs are not used (all signals
are sent to the MAIN R & L/MONO sockets). You can,
however, assign any desired signal to these sockets
page 103.
MAIN R & L/MONO sockets: These sockets need to
be connected to an external amplifier, mixing consoles, etc. Depending on whether you are also using
the Vocal Harmonist OUTPUT sockets (see above), the
present sockets either transmit only the music generated by the Arranger, Recorder and Keyboard parts,
or both the tone generator’s and Vocal Harmonist’s
signals.
Note: If you can/want to use only one channel on your external amplifier, connect the L/MONO socket to its input. For optimum sound quality, we recommend working in stereo, though.
N POWER ON button
Press this button to switch the G-70 on and off.
O AC socket
This is where you need to connect the supplied power
cord.
19
G-70 Music Workstation
Setting up and demo songs
2. Setting up and demo songs
You must be dying to try out your new G-70 to see what it is capable of. We’ll get to that in a minute. But first we need
to connect it.
Connections
The G-70 does not contain internal speakers. You therefore need to connect it to an external amplifier (Roland’s KC
series, for example), or use optional headphones (Roland RH-25, RH-50, or RH-200, for example).
Be sure to switch off both the G-70 and the external devices you want to connect before making or breaking audio and/
or MIDI connections. If you do not have access to the sound system of the venue where you are performing, ask the local
engineer to set the volume to the minimum level.
Mixing console, keyboard
amplifier, active speakers
—OPTIONAL—
Dynamic microphone (select “MIC”)
Other signal source (select “LINE”)
[Microphone: DR-10 or DR-20]
*Connect the microphone using an
unbalanced mono 1/4” or a balanced XLR jack.
Expression pedal
(EV-5, EV-7)
d
Rolan
CD/MP3 player, etc.
Keyboard amplifier,
active speakers, etc.
Footswitches
(DP-2, DP-6, or
BOSS FS-5U)
Stereo headphones
To wall outlet
r
AC
MAIN
R, L/MONO
DIRECT
R, L
VOCAL
HARMONIST
OUTPUT
VOCAL
HARMONIST
INPUT
EXTERNAL
SOURCE
METRONOME
OUT
FOOT
PEDAL
FOOT
SWITCH
HOLD
FOOTSW.
Stereo headphones
(RH-25, RH-50, or RH-200)
Note: Try to use dynamic microphones whenever possible. You can also connect a condenser microphone, however, provided you use a DI box
(with power supply).
Note: Except for the power cable, all other items shown above are optional. See your Roland dealer for details.
Note: There is no absolute need to connect the Vocal Harmonist OUTPUT sockets. If you don’t, your singing and the Harmonist effects will be
transmitted via the main MAIN sockets (ONLY if you don’t connect anything to the Vocal Harmonist OUTPUT sockets). If you use these connectors, the Vocal Harmonist signals are no longer transmitted to the headphones.
20
G-70 Music Workstation r
Front panel
Switching the G-70 on/off
After connecting the G-70 to the other devices, proceed as follows:
Internal Memory Protect
After unpacking your G-70 –and before switching it on– you
need to defeat the protection of its internal memory (a solidstate hard disk) if you intend to save data in the internal
memory.
• Use a philips screwdriver to loosen the screws, and remove
the plastic cap.
• Slide the INTERNAL MEMORY PROTECT switch to the “ ”
position to unlock the memory.
(To once again lock the internal memory, slide the switch
back to the “ ” position.)
VIDEO
OUTPUT
INTERNAL MEMORY
PROTECT
VIDEO
OUTPUT
INTERNAL MEMORY
PROTECT
Note: Be sure to store the cap and the two screws in a safe
place in case you need them again at a later stage.
Switching on the G-70
(1) Insert the included power cable into the AC inlet and
then plug it into an electrical outlet.
(2) Press the G-70’s [POWER≈ON] button located on the
rear panel to switch it on.
(3) If you connected the G-70 to a mixing console, switch it on now.
(4) Switch on the amplifier, your active speakers, or the keyboard amplifier(s).
(5) Use the MASTER [MASTER¥VOLUME] knob to set the
G-70’s output volume.
MASTER
VOLUME
Setting the display contrast
The information in the LCD display may be difficult to view
after turning on your G-70 or after extended use. Your
viewing angle or the current lighting conditions can also
affect the appearance of the display.
In such cases, use the [LCD≈CONTRAST] knob to the left of
the display to adjust the contrast.
Switching off the G-70
(1) Switch off all external devices.
(2) Use the G-70’s [POWER≈ON] button to switch it off.
21
G-70 Music Workstation
Setting up and demo songs
Interactive demo of the G-70
Your G-70 contains an interactive demo that introduces all of its highlights. It might be a good idea to try it out now. The
demo is self-explanatory, so we’ll just show you how to start and stop it.
(1) Simultaneously press the [PLAY¥LIST] and
[MINUS¥ONE] buttons.
PLAY
LIST
NEXT
SONG
(5) To stop the demo and leave the G-70’s Demo function, press the RECORDER [PLAY÷STOP¥®÷ª] or the
[EXIT] button.
MINUS
ONE
EXIT
DEMO
The display changes to:
(2) If necessary, press the [LANGUAGE] field and select
the language for this interactive demo function.
(Press [CLOSE] if you didn’t mean to select this page.
The current language selection will not change.)
(3) Press the field that provides access to the desired
demo function.
There are 12 sound demo songs, 12 Style demo songs,
1 lyrics & score demo, and one Vocal Harmonist
demo.
(4) If you can barely hear the music, set the [VOLUME]
knob (far left, MASTER section) to a higher level.
MASTER
r
VOLUME
22
G-70 Music Workstation r
Front panel
The main page
When you leave Demo mode (or any other display
page), or if you do not change any of the G-70’s settings, the display looks more or less as follows:
A
D
B
C
G
The TRANSPOSE field H, finally, calls up the display
page where you can transpose one, several or all sections (this depends on the mode you select on that
page). This field duplicates the function of the
TRANSPOSE buttons.
As you see, there is a lot you can control away without having to wade through endless menus.
Note: If the main page does not appear automatically, you can
return to it by pressing the [EXIT] button once or several times.
H
E
F
F
The information shown here depends on the G-70’s
current settings, the data you loaded, etc., but the
above illustration should be fairly close to what you
see on your instrument.
Unlike on previous Roland arranger instruments,
almost all information displayed is assigned to fields
you can press to jump to a different page, set a
parameter or select a parameter for editing.
Pressing field A, for instance, takes you to the
ARRANGER SETTING page. Press B if you want to
change the split point settings.
The [SONG] and [STYLE] buttons C look different and
therefore also behave differently: press one of them
to select the section whose tempo should be displayed. (You can change the tempo value of the
selected section using the [√SLOW][FAST®] and
[TAP¥TEMPO] buttons after stopping playback.) They
do not allow you to switch from Style to Song mode,
however, because that is handled automatically –
depending on whether the [PLAY÷STOP¥®÷ª] or
[START÷STOP] button currently lights.
Note: While on the main page, you can also set the tempo
using the [DATA÷ENTRY] dial and the [DEC]/[INC] buttons.
The fields indicated by D take you to a page where
you can select songs (SONG), Music Styles (STYLE) or
User Programs (USER PROG). These fields have the
same functions as the buttons of the same name in
the FINDER pad.
The OCTAVE button icons E allow you to shift the
tuning of the currently selected Keyboard part (indicated by a red arrow). To select a Keyboard part, press
its TONE ASSIGN button.
The remaining fields F allow you to select the Keyboard part you wish to assign another sound to and
recalls the TONE SELECT page. They duplicate the
functions of the (KEYBOARD PART) TONE ASSIGN
buttons.
The SCALE TUNE field G takes you to a page where
yo can change the tuning of the G-70’s notes (so as
to be able to use Arabic scales, for example).
23
G-70 Music Workstation
Quick Start
3. Quick Start
In this chapter, we will scratch the surface and walk you through its major sections.
The general idea
Your G-70 is several instruments in one. There are
three main sections you can use for playing live.
A Keyboard parts:
This section consists of parts you need to play via the
keyboard, hence the name “Keyboard”. The G-70 provides seven Keyboard parts, six of which can be used
simultaneously: UP1, UP2, UP3, LW1, LW2 and MBS.
“UP” stands for “Upper” and refers to the right half (if
there is a split). “LW” refers to “Lower”, and thus to
the left half. “MBS” is short for “Manual Bass”, i.e. a
monophonic bass part whose notes depend on the
chords you play.
There is no Manual Drum part, because any of the
parts just mentioned can be used to play a Drum Set.
The seventh part, “MELODY INT”, is what computer
buffs would call a “cross-platform part”: it belongs to
the Keyboard section but it is in part controlled by
the Arranger. See “Melody Intelligence” on page 76.
B Arranger/Style section:
Left hand:
Arranger control
Right hand: melody
(Keyboard parts)
r
The Arranger is your backing band. It plays an accompaniment (called Music Style). In a way, the Arranger
works like a drum machine because it uses accompaniment patterns.
Unlike a drum machine, however, you can easily
select the desired pattern while playing play. So you
do not need to program the order in which you
intend to use the patterns. Furthermore, the Arranger
not only provides a rhythm section but also chords,
guitar and synthesizer riffs, and so on. The accompaniment can be transposed in realtime. All you have to
do is play a different chord (usually with your left
hand).
You can add vocals and harmonies to your music
using the Vocal Harmonist function (page 42).
24
C Recorder section:
That’s how it’s called on the front panel, so we’ll stick
to it. This section actually encompasses a 16-track
sequencer, a straightforward MIDI recording function, and a very sophisticated Standard MIDI File
player with a host of all realtime control functions.
G-70 Music Workstation r
Playing to an automatic accompaniment
Playing to an automatic accompaniment
Let us begin with the automatic accompaniment function, which is called “Arranger” and often referred to as
“Style” in the display and on the front panel.
The Arranger is an interactive “playback sequencer” that
provides the accompaniments. These accompaniments
are called “Music Styles”, because the musical phrases
(“patterns”) they play concentrate on a given musical
genre (Rock, Pop, Dance, Waltz, etc.).
The Arranger allows you to transpose the melodic
accompaniment parts (bass, piano, guitar, etc.) simply
by playing chords. In most instances, you will probably
do so with your left hand. Each Music Style comprises
several patterns, so that you can vary the accompaniment by starting with an introduction, using a simple
accompaniment for the verses, a more elaborate one
for the choruses, and by ending your songs with an
“Ending” pattern.
Let us first look at the most important aspects for operating the Arranger:
(1) Connect and switch on the G-70 (see pages 20 and
21).
(2) Press the EASY SETTING [ARR] button.
ARR
(5) Press the [MAIN] button (it lights).
STYLE CONTROL
INTRO
MAIN
END/RIT
BASS
INVERSION
1
VARIATION
2
3
4
AUTO
FILL IN
SYNC
START STOP
(6) Play a chord in the left half of the keyboard (to the
left of the C key below the USER PROGRAM [2]
button), then press the STYLE CONTROL
[START÷STOP] button.
START/STOP
The [START÷STOP] button lights, and the Arranger
starts playing the accompaniment of the currently
selected Music Style (called “Cool Live Band”).
The accompaniment pattern is sounded in the key
that corresponds to the note you played (C). The
name of the corresponding chord is displayed in the
upper left-hand corner of the display:
ORGAN
The button’s indicator lights, and the keyboard is split
into two halves. The left half can be used to play
chords, while you can play melodies in the right half.
(3) If the SYNC [START] button lights (which is probably the case), press it to switch it off.
SYNC
START STOP
(4) Set the [MASTER¥VOLUME] knob to a reasonable
level (e.g. about “1/4”).
MASTER
(7) Play another chord in the left half of the keyboard.
The same pattern is now played in that key. You don’t
even have to play full chords:
• For major chords, playing just the root note is
enough (e.g. “C” for C major, “A” for A major, etc.)
• For minor chords, playing the root note and the third
key to its right will do.
• For seventh chords, playing the root and the second
key to its left is enough.
C major
C minor
Only the key that corresponds to
the chord's name.
Root note + third key to the
right.
VOLUME
C7
Root note + second key to the left.
25
G-70 Music Workstation
Quick Start
Note: The function that takes care of this easy fingering is
called “INTELLIGENT” (page 80). See also p. 251 for a list of
other chords that can be played using this system (augmented,
diminished, etc.).
What you hear now is the “MAIN 1” pattern (the
[MAIN] and VARIATION [1] buttons light). This is the
simplest accompaniment of the selected Music Style.
Let’s listen to the accompaniment your could use for
your choruses:
(8) Press the VARIATION [2] button (the [MAIN] and [1]
buttons light, and [2] flashes).
STYLE CONTROL
INTRO
MAIN
END/RIT
BASS
INVERSION
1
VARIATION
2
3
4
AUTO
FILL IN
SYNC
START STOP
• If you press it on any beat before the last of the current bar, the Arranger plays a Fill-In pattern that lasts
until the end of the current bar. It then changes to
the newly selected pattern (at which point [MAIN]
and the selected numeric VARIATION button light
steadily).
• If you press it on the last beat of the current bar, the
Fill-In will start on the next downbeat and last an
entire bar, after which the Arranger automatically
selects the new pattern.
If you press the same numeric button ([1]~[4]) again,
the Fill-In is played according to the above rules. But
when it finishes, the Arranger returns to the pattern
you had been using up to that point.
(5) Switch off the [AUTO¥FILL¥IN] button if you do not
want the next pattern change to be preceded by a
Fill-In.
Note: The length of a Fill-In can be halved. See “Half Bar on Fill
In” on p. 63, 67 and 69.
At the end of the VARIATION [1] pattern, the VARIATION [2] button lights steadily, and the Arranger plays
a different accompaniment.
(9) Now try out Variations 3 and 4.
Professional transitions: Fill In
So far, we have only used the main accompaniment
patterns (i.e. the phrases that are repeated over and
over until you stop the Arranger).
The various variations can be used for verses (1), second
verses (2), choruses (3 & 4) and other song parts.
Switching between these patterns is a matter of pressing the VARIATION [1]~[4] buttons. Yet, that produces
instant changes of the accompaniment, while “real”
musicians tend to “announce” new song parts by means
of roll in the drums, or slightly different accompaniment notes.
The G-70 allows you to make such “announcements” in
the following way:
(1) Start playback of the MAIN [1] pattern (see above).
(2) Play a chord in the left half of the keyboard.
(3) Press the [AUTO¥FILL¥IN] button (it lights).
Intro & Ending
Now that we’ve got the transitions covered, you may
start wondering how to create more professional intros
for your songs – and how to end them in style. That is
what the [INTRO] and [END/RIT] buttons are for.
While the MAIN patterns keep repeating the same
accompaniment until you select another one, or until
you stop Arranger playback, Fill-Ins (see above), Intros,
and Endings are played only once.
Once the INTRO pattern is finished, the Arranger automatically proceeds with the MAIN [1]~[4] pattern
(depending on which button flashes). At the end of the
Ending pattern, however, the Arranger stops.
(1) Stop Arranger playback by pressing the
[START÷STOP] button (it goes dark).
(2) Play a chord in the left half of the keyboard to
specify the key of the Intro pattern.
(3) Press the [INTRO] and the numeric button [1]~[4]
that corresponds to the Intro pattern you want to
use.
STYLE CONTROL
INTRO
MAIN
END/RIT
BASS
INVERSION
1
VARIATION
2
3
4
AUTO
FILL IN
SYNC
START STOP
STYLE CONTROL
INTRO
r
1
MAIN
VARIATION
2
3
END/RIT
4
BASS
INVERSION
SYNC
START STOP
AUTO
FILL IN
(4) Press a VARIATION [1]~[4] button to select another
MAIN pattern.
The [MAIN] button and the selected VARIATION [1]~[4]
button flash.
What happens now depends on when you press this
button:
26
(4) Press the [START÷STOP] button to start Arranger
playback.
The Arranger plays the introduction of the currently
selected Music Style. If you like, you can now try out
the remaining three Intro patterns by pressing
[INTRO] and [1]~[4]. The number refers to the degree
of complexity.
Note: Do not play while the Intro is running. Most Intro patterns indeed contain chord changes, so that playing different
chords may lead to highly annoying results.
G-70 Music Workstation r
Playing to an automatic accompaniment
During Arranger playback, the [START÷STOP] button
flashes red on the downbeat and green on the
remaining beats of the bars to indicate the tempo.
While the Arranger is stopped, this visual tempo
indication is provided by the [METRONOME] button
(that only flashes in red, though).
(5) Press one of the VARIATION [1]~[4] buttons to
select the pattern that should be played after the
Intro is finished (the button flashes).
By pressing [MAIN] at this stage, you leave the Intro
pattern on the next downbeat (i.e. before the Intro
phrase is finished).
(6) Wait until the selected MAIN pattern is playing,
then press the [END/RIT] button.
STYLE CONTROL
INTRO
MAIN
END/RIT
BASS
INVERSION
1
VARIATION
2
3
4
AUTO
FILL IN
The indicator of that button lights and the display
looks as follows:
The display shows a list of 10 Music Styles available
for the family you selected. If the name of the desired
Style is not displayed…
(2) Use the [PAGE¥1]~[PAGE¥4] fields to switch pages.
SYNC
START STOP
At the end of the current pattern cycle, the Arranger
starts playing the Ending pattern and then stops.
Again, there are four Ending phrases to choose from.
If you don’t press a numeric button [1]~[4] after
switching on [END/RIT], the Arranger automatically
uses the ENDING phrase that corresponds to the
MAIN number you have been using up to that point.
Note: Here again, it would be wiser not to play chords while
the Ending phrase is running.
Note: See “Additional Arranger/Style functions” on p. 74 for
more Arranger functions.
Note: You can also select patterns via the Aftertouch function.
See p. 75.
Selecting Music Styles
So far, we have been using only one Music Style (the
one that is selected automatically at power-on). Here is
how to select a different accompaniment:
(1) Press a button of the STYLE pad to select a Music
Style family.
The number of pages depends on the selected family.
Some families have only one page, while others may
have two, three or four.
(3) Press the field of the Music Style you want to use.
If the Arranger is running while you select another
Style, the new Style starts on the next downbeat.
(4) Press the [EXIT] button to return to the main page.
EXIT
STYLE
8 BEAT
16 BEAT
LIVE
BAND
BALL
ROOM
JAZZ
BLUES
50's & 60's
ROCK
DISCO
DANCE
CONTEMP
BOSSA
SAMBA
LATIN
WORLD
27
G-70 Music Workstation
Quick Start
Changing the tempo
If the accompaniment is too fast (or too slow), here is
how to change the Music Style tempo:
√SLOW
FAST®
DEFAULT
(1) Press [ôSLOW] to decrease the tempo in steps of
one unit.
(2) Press [FAST¥®] to increase the tempo in steps of one
unit.
You can also press the [TAP] button several times to
specify the desired tempo. The new tempo is displayed in the upper right-hand corner of the display:
Using the Keyboard parts
Your G-70 provides six “parts” that allow you to play
different sounds on the keyboard. These parts are
called “Keyboard parts”. Let’s add a live melody to the
accompaniment.
Playing with an Upper and/or Lower part
At power-on, the UP1 part is automatically switched on
and assigned to the entire keyboard. That is because the
G-70 starts up in EASY SETTING “PIANO” mode. The KBD
MODE [WHOLE] button also lights.
(1) Press the PART ON/OFF [UP1] button if it does not
light.
KEYBOARD PART
TONE ASSIGN
MBS LW 2 LW 1
UP 3 UP 2 UP 1
PART ON/OFF
(2) Play a few notes on the keyboard.
The UP1 part’s sound is assigned to the entire keyboard. To assign it to the right half, press the KBD
MODE [SPLIT] button.
The [TAP] button flashes red to indicate the downbeat
(while Arranger playback is stopped). If Arranger
playback is running, the [START÷STOP] button flashes
red on the first and green on the other beats of a bar.
(3) To quickly return to the default tempo, hold down
[√¥SLOW] and simultaneously press [FAST¥®].
SPLIT
You could also press the TONE EFFECTS [MULTI¥FX]
button to add an appropriate effect to the Keyboard
parts you are using (here UP1). See page 100 for
details.
(3) Use the [MASTER¥VOLUME] knob to set the G-70’s
output volume.
MASTER
VOLUME
r
(4) Use the [BALANCE] knob to set the balance
between the song and your live playing.
28
BALANCE
ACCOMP
KEYBOARD
Turn it towards “KEYBOARD” if the notes you play
yourself are too soft. Turn it towards “ACCOMP” if
your playing is too loud with respect to the Arranger
(or song).
G-70 Music Workstation r
Using the Keyboard parts
Note: See page 95 for how to set the balance between the
Keyboard parts.
(5) Press the PART ON/OFF buttons of other Keyboard
Parts you want to add (by “layering” them).
Alternating between sounds
The G-70 allows you to use several sounds simultaneously using the Keyboard parts. Other parts are
played by the Arranger/Styles and are called Style parts.
And finally, there are the Song parts that are controlled
by the Recorder function.
The Keyboard parts can be used together or to quickly
alternate between sounds (or “Tones”, as we call them).
Use the PART ON/OFF buttons to select the part(s) you
want to play.
You can play several sounds simultaneously (which is
called a “layer”) or via separate keyboard zones (“split”).
Below please find an explanation of the Keyboard parts.
(See p. 74 for the Arranger parts.)
• UP1 (Upper1): Upper1 is normally the main solo part
(and switched on automatically in Piano mode).
• UP2: The Upper2 part can be used as additional solo
part to be layered with the Upper1 part, or as an
alternative melody sound.
• UP3: The Upper3 part is yet another solo part that
can be added to UP1 and UP2. It can also be used in
an additional split combination (see p. 90).
• LW1 and LW2: The Lower1 and Lower2 parts can
either be used in the same way as the UP parts (in
WHOLE mode), or be assigned to the left half of the
keyboard (in SPLIT mode).
• MBS: In WHOLE mode, the MBS part is yet another
“normal” part. In SPLIT mode, it supplies a semi-automatic bass line to your left-hand notes if one of the
two LW parts is active. When neither LW button
lights, it behaves like any other Keyboard part.
Note: All Keyboard parts can be used to play drum sounds.
Unlike previous Roland arranger instruments, the G-70 no
longer provides a dedicated “Manual Drums” part.
• MELODY INTELL (Melody Intelligence): This part is
triggered by the Arranger and plays automatic harmonies that are added to the melody you play using
the UP1 part. You cannot play that part yourself. That
explains why its button not part of the KEYBOARD
PART pad (it is one of the two TONE EFFECTS buttons).
You can choose from among 18 harmony types
(page 76).
Selecting sounds for the Keyboard parts
■One Touch
The easiest way to select suitable Tones for the Keyboard parts while working with the Arranger is by
using the ONE TOUCH feature. The One Touch memories are in fact small User Programs. See p. 78 for
details.
(1) Press the desired ONE TOUCH button.
1
There are four One Touch memories per Music Style
(for the 285 internal Styles and 120 CUSTOM memories).
Note: One Touch memories usually switch on the SYNC START
function. If you don’t want the Arranger to start as soon as you
play a note or chord, switch off the [SYNC¥START] button.
(2) Select a Music Style (page 27) and start Arranger
playback by pressing the [START÷STOP] button.
Start playing to the accompaniment. You will notice
that the sounds of all Keyboard parts match the
mood of the selected Music Style.
(3) Select a different Music Style and again play a solo
line.
The active Keyboard part (probably UP1) now uses a
different sound (even Keyboard parts that are off
change sounds).
(4) Press another ONE TOUCH button to use that registration.
(5) Press the same button again if you no longer need
the One Touch setting.
■Choosing sounds manually
The G-70 contains 1,596 Tones (or sounds) and 48
Drum Sets divided over 16 families.
(1) Specify the part you wish to assign another sound
or Drum Set to:
• Press the TONE ASSIGN button of the desired part (so
that it lights).
KEYBOARD PART
TONE ASSIGN
MBS LW 2 LW 1
UP 3 UP 2 UP 1
PART ON/OFF
—or—
29
G-70 Music Workstation
Quick Start
• On the main page, press the row of the part you wish
to assign a different sound to.
The [˚] field is only displayed if there are more than
five pages. Other Tone families have fewer than five
pages. This depends entirely on the Tone family you
select.
(5) Press the field of the desired sound.
(6) Press the [EXIT] button to return to the main page.
EXIT
In this case, the G-70 directly jumps to the TONE
page that contains the currently selected sound.
The red arrow indicates which part is active for Tone
selection (its TONE ASSIGN button also lights).
Note: It is also possible to select sounds for Keyboard parts
that are currently switched off. This allows you to prepare the
next sound(s) while still playing another Keyboard part.
(2) Press a TONE button to select a family and its
“best” sound (the sound already changes at this
stage).
r
See page 33 for the [HARMONIC¥BAR] sounds and
page 32 for the [SRX¥EXPANSION] button.
The display shows a list of Tones available in that
family:
Entries with an [EXP] icon to the right of their name
are sounds that reside on the SRX-series expansion
board you installed. Their names are automatically
assigned to the correct families (and displayed on the
last page of the selected family).
(3) Press the field of the desired sound. If you don’t
like it, press another field.
The last sound you select in each family is memorized
temporarily and will be recalled every time you press
the corresponding TONE button. (That selection can
then be changed by pressing another field.)
(4) If you are still not happy with the Tone, use the
[PAGE¥1]~[PAGE¥5] and [˚] fields to select the corresponding page (if available).
30
Next time you select this TONE family, the G-70
automatically jumps to the page that contains the
last sound you selected (and activates it).
About the G-70’s sounds
Try playing the Tones you select at different velocities
(strengths) to discover the rich nuances that can be
obtained. (See page 60 for details about how to set
the velocity sensitivity.)
There is a “JazzScat” sound (VOCAL family), for example, with three dynamic levels that allow you to
sound “Doo”, “Bub” or “Daow”, simply by hitting the
keys softer or harder. Various guitar Tones provide
hammering-on/bending sounds when you strike the
keys as hard as you can.
Transposing the keyboard to the lowest octave (using
the OCTAVE parameter) sometimes allows you to play
some typical noises (scraping over the strings, hitting
the body of an acoustic guitar, etc.).
■Choosing the sound selection system (Sound Set
Mode)
The Roland engineers figured that you might feel
overwhelmed by the number of Tones available in
each TONE family. That is why the G-70 does not display all the sounds it contains when you switch it on
for the first time. This “restricted” display mode is
called “BEST SELECTION”. In this mode, only the “new”
sounds can be selected.
You may have grown fond of “older sounds” (from
the G and VA series) and wish to select them. In that
case, select “EXTENDED”:
(1) Press the [MENU] button.
MENU
G-70 Music Workstation r
Using the Keyboard parts
(2) Press the [UTILITY] and the [STARTUP] field.
You may have to use the [PAGE¥1]~[PAGE¥5] buttons
to jump to the page that contains the desired Drum
Set. After installing an SRX-series expansion board,
there may also be a [˚] field that allows you to jump
to additioal pages.
(4) Play a few notes on the keyboard.
Every key is assigned to a different drum/percussion
sound. Press the second “C” key from the left (C2) to
sound a bass drum (“kick”), and the white key to its
right (D2) to play a snare sound. Then, try out the
other keys.
IPopKik36
IPopCStk37st
IPopSn38st
IPopGstS39st
IPopSn40st
IPopTomLFl41
IPopHat1_42
IPopTomL43
IPopHat2_44
IPopTomMFl45
IPopHat3_46
IPopTomM47
IPopTomHFl48
IPopCyml2_52
IPopTomH50
The display changes to:
C2
C3
(this is only an example)
(5) Press the [EXIT] button to return to the main page.
EXIT
(3) Press either [BEST¥SELECTION] or [EXTENDED] to
make your choice.
This setting is memorized and used until you change
it again.
Drumming on the keyboard
The G-70 also allows you to play drums and percussion
on the keyboard. If you have ever worked with an older
Roland arranger instrument, you may remember that
there used to be a part called “M.Drums” for playing
percussion phrases. This part no longer exists, because
any of the following Keyboard parts can be used for
drumming: UP1, UP2, UP3, LW1, LW2, and MBS.
(1) Press the TONE ASSIGN button of the part you
want to assign a Drum Set to (the button lights).
(2) Press the TONE [DRUMS] button.
Entries with an [EXP] icon to the right of their name
refer to sounds that reside on the SRX-series expansion board you installed.
(3) Press a field to select another Drum Set.
31
G-70 Music Workstation
Quick Start
Selecting sounds from an SRX expansion board
The G-70 allows you to expand the number of sounds
by installing an optional SRX-series wave expansion
board. This allows you to use the same sounds as owners of a Fantom-X synthesizer.
See “Installing a wave expansion board” on p. 227 for
notes about installing such a board. If your G-70
already contains such a board (because you asked your
Roland dealer to install it when you bought the G-70),
proceed as follows to select one of the “Expansion”
Tones:
(1) Specify the part you wish to assign another sound
to:
• Press the TONE ASSIGN button of the desired part (so
that it lights).
KEYBOARD PART
TONE ASSIGN
MBS LW 2 LW 1
UP 3 UP 2 UP 1
PART ON/OFF
—or—
• On the main page, press the row of the part you wish
to assign a different Tone to.
The display now responds with a list of Tones available on the installed wave expansion board:
Note: The names of the Tones that are displayed depend on
the SRX expansion board you installed.
(3) Press the field of the sound you are interested in. If
you don’t like it, press another field.
(4) If you are still not happy with the Tone, use the
[PAGE¥1]~[PAGE¥5] and [˚] fields to select the corresponding page (if available).
(5) Press the field of the desired Tone.
Alternatively, you can proceed as follows:
• Use the list that came with the expansion board to
locate the number of the “Patch” you would like to
use. The name “Patch” is a concept found on Fantom
and other Roland synthesizers or modules. The G-70’s
equivalent is called “Tone”.
This also allows you to use “Rhythm Sets”, which are
the equivalent of “Drum Sets” on the G-70 (they are
usually located at the end of the list). You cannot,
however, select “Tones” or “Performances”.
• Press the [DATA÷ENTRY] dial. The display now
changes to:
The G-70 directly jumps to the TONE page that contains the currently selected sound.
The red arrow indicates which part is active for Tone
selection (its TONE ASSIGN button also lights).
Note: SRX sounds can be assigned to the following Keyboard
parts: UP1/2/3, LW1/2, and MBS.
r
(2) Press the SRX EXPANSION button.
32
• Pess the [Drum¥Set] field if you want to use the
numeric pad for selecting Drum Sets (the board’s
“Rhythm Sets”). Otherwise, switch it off.
• Enter the number of the “Patch” (sound) you want to
use, then press the [ENTER] field.
If necessary, you can use the [Delete] field to correct
erroneous entries before pressing [ENTER].
The display now jumps to the page that contains the
sound whose number you entered.
Press the [CLOSE] field to leave the numeric pad
without selecting another sound.
G-70 Music Workstation r
Using the Harmonic Bars
(6) Press the [EXIT] button to return to the main page.
EXIT
Next time you select this TONE family, the G-70
automatically jumps to the page that contains the
Tone you selected last.
Using the Harmonic Bars
The G-70 contains a virtual drawbar organ that is
based on Roland’s Virtual Tonewheel technology found
in organs like the VK-8, VK-88, VK-7, VK-8M, etc. This
section can be assigned to three Keyboard parts: UP1,
LW1 and MBS. The remaining Keyboard parts cannot be
used as “virtual organ” (but they can trigger organ
sounds that are part of the “normal” Tones).
(1) Press the EASY SETTING [ORGAN] button.
ARR
ORGAN
The button’s indicator lights and the following parts
are assigned to the keyboard: LOWER 1 (LW1) to the
left, and UPPER 1 (UP1) to the right half.
Left hand:
LOWER 1
Right hand:
UPPER 1
Both parts are assigned a HARMONIC BAR sound.
This is important to remember, because there are also
“sampled organ sounds” that do not provide timbre
control via the sliders.
By pressing the EASY SETTING [ORGAN] button, you
also activate the MODE [HARMONIC¥BAR] button,
which means that the 9 sliders now act as drawbars.
(2) Press the MODE [HARMONIC¥BAR] button.
This is optional if you want to confirm your settings
in the display and save your changes.
(3) Note the “UPPER 1” message in the upper righthand corner.
It means that by moving the sliders below the display,
you change the sound of the right-hand organ
(assigned to the UP1 part).
33
G-70 Music Workstation
Quick Start
This information is confirmed by the TONE ASSIGN
[UP1] button (it lights).
(4) Play a few notes with your right hand and move
the sliders below the display to change the organ
registration.
The numbers appearing on the harmonic bars allow
you to rapidly set the bars to the desired setting. If
you push a (virtual) harmonic bar inward until no
number is visible, its volume will be “0,” and no sound
will be heard. If you pull a harmonic bar all the way
out, the volume will be at the maximum.
Each harmonic bar is assigned to a sine wave (pure
tone) of a set pitch. By mixing these sine waves, you
can create a variety of organ sounds.
(5) If necessary, press the PERCUSSION fields (left side)
to switch the organ percussion on/off and change
its speed and timbre.
Note: When percussion is on, the 1’ pitch will not be produced.
(6) Play a few notes with your left hand.
The organ sound you hear now is assigned to the
LOWER 1 part. To change it, press the TONE ASSIGN
[LW1] button (or the [HARMONIC¥BAR] button next
to the sliders) and move the sliders.
LW 1
Press another numeric field to recall the settings
stored in that memory, in which case the sound
changes.
About the MANUAL field
The [MANUAL] field on the HARMONIC BARS page
allows you to change the organ sound so as to correspond to the current positions of the sliders. This will
change the sound. (After selecting another memory,
their physical positions usually no longer correspond to
the sound you hear.)
Using just one organ sound and bass pedals
As stated earlier, pressing the EASY SETTING [ORGAN]
button creates a split that involves two organ sounds
(UP1 and LW1). This actually simulates a two-manual
instrument.
If you only need one organ sound that is assigned to
the entire keyboard, press the KBD MODE [WHOLE]
button (its indicator must light).
WHOLE
Press PART ON/OFF [LW1] to switch off the LOWER 1
part.
Note: You could connect a PK-5A MIDI pedal to the G-70’s
MIDI IN socket and use it to trigger the MBS (M. BASS) part.
See page 214 for the G-70’s MIDI functions.
r
Using effects
Of course, you can also change the PERCUSSION settings of the LW1 organ part.
(7) Press TONE ASSIGN [UP1] if you need to change the
UPPER 1 part’s registration again.
WARNING: The G-70’s assignable sliders are not
motorized. It is therefore very likely that their physical positions no longer correspond to what you see
on the HARMONIC BARS “UPPER 1” page (and hear).
We recommend quickly moving a slider all the way
up or down before actually setting it to the desired
position.
An organ sound without rotary speaker modulation is
only half an organ sound, right? So let’s have a look at
this and the other effects, because the G-70 provides a
lot more than just a convincing rotary effect.
(1) On the “HARMONIC BARS” page (UPPER 1, LOWER
1, or M.BASS), press the [EFFECTS] field in the upper
left-hand corner.
These effects are shared by all three “organ” sections.
It therefore doesn’t matter on what page you press
the [EFFECTS] field.
If you like a registration…
You can save it to one of the eight memories: press
the [WRITE] field (it “lights”), then one of the numeric
fields [1]~[8].
Note: This only saves the registration of the currently selected
part. You will have to repeat this for the other sections if you
want to save their registrations too.
34
OVERDRIVE: This effect distorts the sound, giving it
an “edge” and making it suitable for hard rock and
similar musical genres. Press the [ON÷OFF] field to
switch this effect on or off. To change the setting,
press the display icon and rotate the [DATA÷ENTRY]
dial (or use the [DEC]/[INC] buttons).
G-70 Music Workstation r
Using the Harmonic Bars
LEAKAGE: On tone wheel organs, the sound of the
note that was pressed is slightly “contaminated” by
audio signals from tone wheels not related to that
note. Formerly, this was seen as a problem, but today
this idiosyncrasy is considered an important element
of the distinctive sound of a traditional instrument.
This parameter allows you to set the level of the
“noise”. To change the setting, press the display icon
and rotate the [DATA÷ENTRY] dial (or use the [DEC]/
[INC] buttons).
(1) Return to the main page by pressing the [EXIT] button.
EXIT
(2) Press the chord field.
PERCUSSION: By selecting “HARD”, you strengthen
the percussion sound. That’s because the organ
sound specified with the harmonic bars becomes
softer. Conversely, you can select “SOFT”, in which
case the volume of the “real” organ sound is raised to
its normal level. Press the switch icon to select your
preferred setting.
ROTARY SOUND: This section contains an on/off
switch for activating or switching off the Rotary
effect. This effect simulates the typical sound modulation generated by a cabinet with rotating loudspeakers. You can also push the BENDER/MODULATION lever towards the rear of the G-70 to change
between the SLOW and FAST speeds of the Rotary
effect. (Or press the lever icon to alternate between
the SLOW and FAST rotation speeds.)
The display now changes to:
Note: The on/off function and alternation between the slow
and fast rotation speeds can be assigned to an ASSIGN SW
button (see p. 62) and/or to a footswitch (see p. 67).
VIBRATO/CHORUS: The vibrato effect cyclically modulates the pitch of organ sounds (which is not the
same as the Rotary effect). The chorus effect mixes
the normal sound of the organ with a sound to which
vibrato has been applied, adding richness and spaciousness to the sound.
Press the [ON÷OFF] field to switch this effect on or
off. To select another effect, press the display icon
and rotate the [DATA÷ENTRY] dial (or use the [DEC]/
[INC] buttons). The possibilities are:
● V-1, V-2, V-3—This applies vibrato (pitch modulation).
Increasing the value will produce a deeper effect.
● C-1, C-2, C-3—This applies chorus to add depth and
spaciousness to the sound. Increasing the value will produce a deeper effect.
(2) Press the [HARMONIC¥BAR] field to return to “HARMONIC BARS” page.
If your G-70 displays a different page, press the
[ARRANGER¥CHORD] field.
(3) Press the [OFF] field in the left column (it turns
blue).
(4) Switch off the [ARRANGER¥HOLD] button icon.
This means that the Arranger no longer “listens” to
the chords you play. All melodic parts of the accompaniment are muted. The drums, however, are still
available.
(5) Press the [START÷STOP] button to start Arranger
playback.
START/STOP
Using a “beat box” with the organ
The only thing that may be missing now is a drum
accompaniment. Whenever you press the EASY SETTING
[ORGAN] button, the G-70’s chord recognition is automatically switched on, so that the Arranger plays entire
accompaniments (including melodic parts). If you only
need a drum accompaniment, here is how to proceed:
Play along using the organ sounds you selected (and
perhaps modified).
See page 27 for how to select another Music Style.
If the accompaniment is too fast (or too slow), here is
how to change the Music Style tempo:
(6) Press [ôSLOW] to decrease the tempo in steps of
one unit. Press [FAST¥®] to increase the tempo in
steps of one unit.
35
G-70 Music Workstation
Quick Start
You can also press the [TAP] button several times in
the rhythm of the desired tempo.
(7) To quickly return to the default tempo, hold down
[√¥SLOW] and simultaneously press [FAST¥®].
(8) If necessary, use the VARIATION [1]~[4] buttons to
vary the drum accompaniment.
(9) Press [START÷STOP] again to stop your “beat box”.
Working with the Music Assistant
The G-70’s Music Assistant is also related to the
Arranger/Style section. It is a collection of registrations
for given songs that select the most appropriate Music
Style and sounds for the Keyboard parts (along with a
whole bunch of other settings).
The G-70 ships with 500 pre-programmed Music Assistant registrations and also allows you to program new
ones.
(1) Press the [MUSIC¥ASSISTANT] button.
MUSIC
ASSISTANT
The display now looks as follows:
(2) If the name of the registration you want to use is
already displayed, press its field.
In the example above, “Crocodile Twist” has been
selected. The G-70 now recalls the settings for this
registration.
(3) Press the [START÷STOP] button to start playback of
the automatically selected Music Style to start
playback.
If the desired registration is not displayed…
• Press the [√][®] fields in the display or rotate the
[DATA÷ENTRY] dial to scroll through the list.
To save time…
r
•
36
•
•
•
There are other ways of locating the registration you
are after. As you see, there are three button icons:
[NAME], [ARTIST] and [GENRE].
Press the [GENRE] field to sort the Music Assistant
entries alphabetically by musical genre. This reshuffles the list.
Press the [ARTIST] field to sort the Music Assistant
entries alphabetically by artist name. This reshuffles
the list.
The genre names disappear and are replaced by the
artists’ names (right column), which are displayed in
alphabetical order.
Press the field of the registration you want to use.
Press the [START÷STOP] button to start playback of
the automatically selected Music Style.
G-70 Music Workstation r
Working with the Music Assistant
Using the Finder
Yet another way of locating the desired registration
goes like this:
(1) On the “Music Assistant” page, press the [FINDER]
field.
Note: If no Music Assistant setting were found, the following
message appears, and no songs are displayed (in which case
you need to press the [ARTIST] or [GENRE] field to display all
songs again):
(6) Press the field of the Music Assistant registration
you need and start playing.
(2) Press [NAME] (registration name), [ARTIST] (artist
name) or [GENRE] (musical genre) to specify which
entry you want to look for.
(3) Enter only as many characters as you think are
necessary to find the registration you are after.
The character string you enter can be used in two
ways (see below).
• Use the [ø] and [˚] fields to select the position for
which you wish to enter a new character.
• Use the alphanumeric keypad to enter the desired
characters. This keypad works exactly like the keypad
of a cellphone: you may have to press an alphanumeric field several times to select the desired character or number.
Note: To return to the previous page without searching for
registrations, press the [Back] field.
Note: To once again display all file names after a search
(which causes only matching entries to be displayed), press one
of the alphabetical sort icons ([NAME], [ARTIST], [GENRE]) on
the “Music Assistant” page.
Note: See “Music Assistant Mark” on p. 119 and “Music Assistant functions” on p. 121 for how to create or edit Music Assistant data.
Note: The Finder makes no distinction between upper- and
lower-case letters.
• The [Delete] field allows you to delete the selected
character. Press and hold it to clear all characters.
• Press [Space] to insert a blank (or the number “0”).
• If you forgot to insert a character, use [ø] or [˚] to
select the position where the missing character
should be inserted. Then press [Insert], followed by the
character you wish to insert.
• If you only want to enter numbers, activate the
[NUM¥LOCK] field.
(4) Decide how the Finder should look for the files:
• Press the [Alphabetic≈Order] field to search for all
entries that start with the characters you entered
(“BEA”, for example). Names that match the specified
criteria will be displayed at the top of the list.
• Press the [Find≈Only] field to have the G-70 search for
names that contain the supplied information. (This
would allow you to also locate a file called “Raggabeat” if you entered “BEA”.)
(5) Press the [FIND] field to start your search.
The display returns to the “Music Assistant” window
and displays the entries that correspond to your
search criteria.
37
G-70 Music Workstation
Quick Start
Playing back songs (Standard MIDI
Files)
Your G-70 contains all kinds of functions for “customizing” the songs you play back via easy-to-use routines.
Let us first look at the playback functions proper.
(1) Press the FINDER [SONG] button.
SONG
You can also press the [SONG] field on the main page
to select songs.
Quick location of the song you need
There are several ways of quickly locating the song you
are after:
■Sorting files
Press the [SONG¥NAME], [ARTIST], [GENRE] or
[FILE¥NAME] field to sort the song files according to
artist names, kind of music (Genre) or file name
(which is usually rather incomprehensible). The right
column now contains the selected entry (only one of
them can be displayed along with the song name).
Continue with step (3) to select the song you want to
listen to.
■Using the Index function
After performing step (2), press the [INDEX] field in
the upper left corner.
The display changes to:
r
The display changes to:
(2) If it isn’t already highlighted, press the
[INTERNAL≈MEMORY] field in the upper right corner.
The G-70 is shipped with a few example songs that
can be used for this example. This function is also
available for songs you record or save to the internal
memory (or a memory card).
The display shows a list of 5 songs (Standard MIDI
Files) per page in the internal memory. If you prefer
to listen to one of your own songs on floppy disk,
insert it into the drive and press the [FLOPPY] field.
To listen to a song on memory card, insert the card
and select [EXTERNAL¥MEMORY], then continue with
step (3).
(3) If the name of the song you want to listen to is
already displayed, press its line.
(4) To display the next 5 songs, press the [˚] field in the
lower right corner.
You can press this field as many times as necessary
(or until it is no longer displayed). You can also use
the [DATA÷ENTRY] dial or the [DEC]/[INC] buttons.
To return to a previous group of 5 songs, press [ø] (or
use the [DATA÷ENTRY] dial, or the [DEC]/[INC] buttons).
38
(5) Press one of the displayed field names to narrow
down your search to songs that belong to the
selected category (“Index”).
The display now returns to the page shown under
step (1) above. This time, however, only the songs
belonging to the selected Index are displayed.
(6) Continue with step (3) to select the song you want
to listen to.
Note: Press the [ALL] field to display all songs in the selected
memory.
■Using Play & Search
If you only know the melody of the desired song,
press the [FINDER] field under step (1).
G-70 Music Workstation r
Playing back songs (Standard MIDI Files)
• Press the [PLAY&SEARCH] field.
It also displays the name of the selected song, the
tempo, and the current measure. You can press the
[SONG] button icon in the upper right-hand corner to
see the song’s tempo. (This value will, however, be
displayed as soon as you start song playback.)
Note: If the message “Too many events” is displayed, the
selected song contains more than that number and cannot be
played back.
(8) Press the [PLAY÷STOP¥®÷ª] button.
• As indicated in the display, play the main theme on
the keyboard. You can play in any key, and the
rhythm doesn’t have to be perfect either (this function just looks for intervals).
• If you played a wrong note, press
[DELETE≈LAST¥NOTE].
• To enter the entire line again, press [∫≈RESET] to erase
the previously entered notes, then play the phrase
again.
• After entering the melody, press the [FIND] field.
The display now returns to step (1) on page 38 and
shows the names of the songs that contain the melody you played.
• Press the field of the song you want to play back.
Note: If no songs were found, the following message appears,
and no file names are displayed (in which case you need to
press the [SONG¥NAME], [ARTIST], [GENRE] or [FILE¥NAME] field
to display all songs again):
PLAY/STOP
Playback of the selected song starts.
(9) If necessary, use [√¥SLOW] and [FAST¥®] to change
the tempo.
You can also press the [TAP] button several times in
the rhythm of the desired tempo.
To quickly return to the default tempo, simultaneously press [√¥SLOW] and [FAST¥®].
(10) Use the MASTER [MASTER¥VOLUME] knob to set
the G-70’s output volume.
MASTER
VOLUME
You can also play to the music using the Keyboard
parts. If necessary, use the [BALANCE] knob to set the
desired balance.
Other practical playback functions
If the G-70 did find one or several matches, the
“FOUND” number will be smaller than the “GLOBAL”
number.
Starting playback
(7) To return to the main page, press [EXIT].
The “main page” is the G-70’s display page that provides a maximum of relevant information and allows
you to select (and change) items you may need during normal operation.
■MARK JUMP
The factory-loaded songs in the G-70’s internal
memory contain four locations (“markers”) you can
jump to right away. For songs that do not yet contain
them, you can program these markers yourself. You
can also edit the locations of existing markers
(page 139).
• Use the MARK & JUMP [1]~[4] buttons to select the
position you want to jump to without stopping or
delaying playback (the indicator of the button you
pressed flashes). Such changes occur at the end of
the current measure (the indicator stop flashing and
lights), which makes more musical sense than jumping when you’re halfway into a measure.
There are four MARK memories. For the factoryloaded songs, they correspond to:
1= verse, 2= chorus, 3= bridge, 4= ending)
39
G-70 Music Workstation
Quick Start
The advantage of these markers is that you can
return to the chorus, for example, if you notice that
the audience wants the song to last a little longer
than originally planned. Markers also allow you to
change the song structure in realtime (by starting
with the bridge, for example).
Note: If you press a MARK & JUMP button almost immediately
after starting song playback, the Recorder may suddenly stop
and the message “Song Scanning” may appear. This can be
solved by reducing the playback tempo so that the G-70 has
enough time to process all MIDI data contained in the song.
■Player (Data Update and Quick Start)
(1) Press the [MENU] button.
MENU
The display changes to:
■Reset, rewind, fast-forward
You can also use the following buttons to jump to
different song locations.
TOP
BWD
FWD
[TOP¥|√] TOP: allows you to return to the beginning of
the current song.
[º] BWD: allows you to rewind one measure at a
time. You can also press and hold this button to
rewind more rapidly.
[‰] FWD: allows you to fast-forward one measure at
a time. You can also press and hold this button to
advance more rapidly.
These buttons are available both during playback and
while playback is stopped.
■Next Song
While the current song is still running, you can
already select the next one to be played back. If you
want it to start automatically, proceed as follows:
• Press the [NEXT≈SONG] button.
MASTER
VOLUME
• Select the desired song using the Song Finder
(page 38).
• As soon as the current song finishes, the next one
starts automatically. There is thus no need to press
[PLAY÷STOP¥®÷ª] again. You could now select
another song.
• Press the [NEXT≈SONG] button again to switch off
this function.
r
Note: Your G-70 also provides a PLAY LIST function for programming sequences of several songs (page 145).
40
(2) Press the [UTILITY], then the [GLOBAL] field.
(3) Use the button icon next to the [BWD÷FWD÷JUMP]
field to specify whether (on) or not (off) SysEx
messages contained in the song you play back are
updated while you fast-forward/rewind or use the
MARK JUMP buttons.
(4) Press the [SONG¥PLAY¥QUICK¥START] field and use
the [DATA÷ENTRY] dial to specify where and how
song playback should begin:
● FROM SECOND BAR—This function causes playback to
start from measure 2 of the selected Standard MIDI File.
This is often useful, because the first bar of most Standard MIDI Files contain SysEx and control change data
that “configure” the G-70’s sound source. Playing back
that measure on stage may lead to a rather long blank,
which you probably want to avoid.
● FROM FIRST NOTE—This is basically the same as the
above, except that playback is started on the first note of
the selected song.
● OFF—Playback start at the very beginning of the song
file (and may thus contain a few silent bars).
G-70 Music Workstation r
Playing back songs (Standard MIDI Files)
Using the Song Cover function
The COVER function provides “masks” that change the
instrumentation of the selected song (or Music Style).
Simply by selecting another preset, you can cause a
Viennese waltz to be played back by a heavy metal
band, etc. Even though the arrangement (rhythm, riffs)
does not change, the songs’ character can be modified
beyond recognition.
(1) Press the [COVER] button once or twice to select
the display page shown below.
Minus One
“Minus One” means that (at least) one part of a song is
not played back. There are at least two applications for
this function:
• it allows you to play the muted parts yourself, on the
keyboard;
• it allows you to sing without doubling by the song
(which may sound odd).
(1) Press and hold the [MINUS≈ONE] button.
MINUS
ONE
The button light and the melody part (track 4) is
muted. If you want to mute other parts (or use
another preset), proceed as follows:
(2) Press and hold the [MINUS≈ONE] button.
MINUS
ONE
(2) Select the parts whose instrumentation you want
to change:
Press the [ALL] field if all instruments should be
replaced.
Press the [DRUM] field if only the drum and percussion instruments should change.
Press the [BASS] field if you’re happy with everything
but the bass line’s sound.
(3) Press one of the six fields in the lower half of the
display to select another preset.
After selecting a preset, you can press [ORIGINAL]
(page 1) to return to the original orchestration.
(4) If none of the displayed presets appeal to you, use
the PAGE [ø][˚] fields at the right to jump to
another page with more presets.
(5) Try out various presets to see how (fast) this concept works.
(6) If you like the new version better than the original
one, you can press the [SAVE] field to save the song
to the internal memory, a memory card or floppy
disk with this information (page 130).
Note: The COVER information is part of the data only the G-70
understands. You can still play back the newly saved version of
this song on another sequencer or SMF player, but the COVER
information will be ignored.
Note: You can also modify the COVER settings yourself (see
p. 125).
The display changes to:
(3) Press one of the three “preset” fields to mute the
corresponding song parts:
Press [MELODY] to mute the melody (you will notice
that the [4] button icon also lights).
Press the [ACCOMP] field to mute everything except
the bass, and drums.
Press the [DRUM&BASS] field to mute the bass and
drum parts ([2] and [10]).
Note: Even the “preset” fields can be used simultaneously. And
the part fields [1]~[16] can be added, too.
(4) To mute other parts “ad lib” (i.e. without taking
advantage of the presets):
• Press the [USER] field. This mutes only [4] (the melody).
• Switch off all parts you don’t want to hear by pressing the [1]~[3] and [5]~[16] fields. Indicator icons of
parts you need must light (the others must be dark).
By pressing one of these fields, you switch off the
active preset.
• To save this customized “Minus” setting in the G-70’s
internal memory, press [CUSTOMIZE].
41
G-70 Music Workstation
Quick Start
The [USER] field lights to indicate that your settings
are now being used.
(5) Press the [EXIT] button to return to the main page.
Your last preset selection (MELODY~USER) will be
used until you select another preset or until you
switch off your G-70.
(6) Press [MINUS≈ONE] again to switch off this function.
Note: You can also switch the Minus One function on/off
using an optional footswitch (page 68).
Vocal Harmonist function
The Vocal Harmonist is another highlight of your G-70.
In fact, it doesn’t just produce harmonies: it can also
transform your voice in various ways. More importantly, its sound quality surpasses by far anything you
may already have tried.
Setting up
Here’s what you need to do to take advantage of the
Vocal Harmonist function:
(1) Connect a dynamic microphone to the INPUT jack
on the G-70’s rear panel.
Set to “MIC”
Examples: Roland DR-10 or DR-20
(2) Set the [INPUT] switch to “MIC”.
You can also connect the (mono) output of other
instruments. In that case, you need to set the switch
to “LINE”.
Set to “LINE”
L/MONO
SPLIT
VOLUME
DUAL
X-DUAL
ON/OFF
PALETTE
SELECT
TRANSPOSE
EDIT
UTILITY
COMBINATION
PALETTE
1
SEQ CTRL
/
2
KEYBOARD MODE
1>Piano 1
Preset:001
PART
LOWER
EXIT
ARPEGGIO
PERFORM
/ TONE
UPPER
USER
/ PRESET
ROM PLAY
CANCEL
5
TONE
VARIATION
6
7
8
9
0
ENTER
LEVEL/PAN
/EFFECT
MIDI/TUNE
KEYBOARD
CONTROL
ARPEGGIO
1
VIBRATO
VALUE
2
FILTER
3
ENVELOPE
4
DRUM
TONE
EDIT
PERFORM
/SYSTEM
Synthesizer, sound module, etc.
(3) Set the [INPUT≈GAIN] knob on the front panel to
“MIN”.
INPUT GAIN
OVER
MIN
MAX
r
Note: If you like, you can connect the Vocal Harmonist OUTPUT sockets to another amp (or additional mixer channels).
42
(4) Press the [SINGER] button (it must light) and switch
off the [VOCODER], [SMALL] or [ENSEMBLE] button.
SINGER
(5) Sing into the microphone and gradually increase
the [INPUT≈GAIN] setting.
G-70 Music Workstation r
Vocal Harmonist function
Set it to the highest possible value, taking care to
avoid that the OVER indicator lights. It would be best
to sing at the level you will be using during your performances.
(6) If your singing is inaudible in the speakers connected to the amp (or the headphones), turn the
[VOICE] knob towards the right (towards “MAX”).
(9) Press the [VOCAL≈EFFECT] field.
Note: If a howling sound (a.k.a. “feedback”) is produced, your
microphone may be pointed at a speaker. Try orienting it differently, or slightly reduce the [VOICE] setting.
(7) Use the [EFFECTS] knob to set the balance between
your original singing and the effects that are
added to your voice.
EFFECTS
OFF
MAX
Note: You can start song playback and sing to it. See “Playing
back songs (Standard MIDI Files)” on p. 38 and “Minus One” on
p. 41 for details.
Compressor, Gate, and effects
Your G-70 provides a compressor effect you might
want to set up now. The compressor reduces volume
peaks and thus “levels out” differences in the microphone signal.
The gate effect, on the other hand can be used to
avoid that background noises cause the Vocal Harmonist, etc., to start working even though you are
not singing.
These two effects are located immediately behind the
MIC INPUT socket and thus applied to the microphone signal before it is processed by the Vocal Harmonist section.
(8) Press and hold the [SINGER] button to jump to the
following page:
(10) If you need the compressor, press the [COMPRESS]
field, so that it lights in blue.
(11) If you also want to use the gate, press the [GATE]
field (it must light in blue).
(12) Press the parameter field whose value you want to
edit and set the desired value with the
[DATA÷ENTRY] dial.
Note: Parameter fields can also be selected using the DATA
ENTRY [√][®][ß][†] buttons.
It is very important that you keep singing while setting the following parameters.
SUSTAIN LEV: Use this parameter to specify how fast
the compressor stops working once the microphone
level drops below the compressor’s threshold. This
should be set in such a way as to avoid unpleasant
level jumps between notes. Set it in combination with
the following parameter to obtain the best possible
result.
OUTPUT LEV: The compressor reduces the dynamics
(level differences) of your singing. This parameter
serves two purposes: it allows you to specify how
strongly your voice should be compressed, and –as
you increase the value– it raises the compressor’s
output volume to make up for the resulting lower
level.
Note: The value “0” means that the compressor is not working.
THRESHOLD: This parameter allows you to set the
level the microphone signal must have in order to be
audible. Softer signals will be muted (suppressed) by
the gate.
(13) Press the [VOICE] field to jump to a page where you
can select different presets, etc. (see below).
(14) Press the [EXIT] button to return to the main page.
EXIT
43
G-70 Music Workstation
Quick Start
Adding harmonies to your singing
Now that your microphone is up and running, let’s look
at the Harmonist effect proper.
The G-70 provides two harmony types: “Small” (1 or 2
additional voices) and “Ensemble” (3 or 4 additional
voices).
(1) Connect your microphone, press the [SINGER] button, set the desired [VOICE] level, and…
(2) …press the [SMALL] button (its indicator must
light).
You already know what the [MALE], [FEMALE], and
[MIX] fields are for. The 10 preset fields in the middle
allow you to select different “voicings” and voice
characters for your choir.
(9) To sing again without automatic harmonies, press
the [SMALL] or [ENSEMBLE] button again (so that
neither of them lights).
Note: Obviously, you do not have to use a song as backing:
you can also play the accompaniment yourself, or use the
Arranger. See page 28 and below.
Who specifies the harmonies?
SMALL
(3) Sing a few notes and listen to the harmonies produced.
(4) If the harmonies are too soft, turn the [HARMONY]
knob towards the right (towards “MAX”).
(5) To try out different harmonizations, press and hold
the [SMALL] button.
(6) Press the [MALE], [FEMALE] or [MIX] field to change
the “GENDER” (voice type) of the harmonies produced.
[MIX] adds both a male and a female voice. This also
changes the available preset options in the center of
the display. If, on the above page, you press GENDER
[FEMALE] for example, the display changes to:
(7) Press one of the preset fields ([BAHIA¥GIRLS], for
example) to select a different harmony type.
(8) Now press and hold the [ENSEMBLE] button (or
press the [ENSEMBLE] field in the display) and sing
again.
This sounds more like a choir, don’t you agree?
Now that you know what the Vocal Harmonist does, let
us briefly look at how it does that. You may have
noticed the [HARMONY≈ASSIGN] field in the lower left
corner of the above display pages.
Its current (default) setting is “AUTO”. This means
that, during song or Arranger playback, the note
information contained in the song data (or played in
the chord recognition area of the keyboard) will be
used for specifying the pitches of the harmony notes
(“Auto Harmony”).
Note: If the song you are playing back contains a “Harmony
track”, the harmonies will be based on those notes. In all other
cases, the harmonies are generated in realtime.
If you stop song playback and play chords on the
keyboard, the note information thus generated is
used for the harmony pitches.
Use the [DATA÷ENTRY] dial to select another setting.
The possibilities are:
Auto
The G-70 uses one of the following systems
(depending on what note information is available).
Keyboard
(all)
Only notes played on the keyboard will be
used for specifying harmony pitches.
Keyboard
Left
Only notes played to the left of the split point
(page 57) will be used for specifying harmony
pitches.
Keyboard
Right
Only notes played to the right of the split
point (page 57) will be used for specifying
harmony pitches.
Song
The note information contained in the song
you are playing back is used.
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Not convinced so far?
44
Just in case you are a little bit disappointed by the Vocal
Harmonist function, here are some tips (and a bonus):
●Use it with song backing
The Harmonist sounds most convincing when used
during song playback. Please bear in mind that transforming your voice in realtime requires quite a few
calculations and that the human voice is one of the
most difficult “signal sources” to recreate with vary-
G-70 Music Workstation r
Vocal Harmonist function
ing pitches. The Vocal Harmonist was fine-tuned to
blend in with Standard MIDI File playback, and that’s
when it sounds most “real”. Try it out, it works!
■Check the following (Gender Voice Input)
(1) Press and hold the [SINGER] button (or press the
[VOICE] field in the display).
The display changes to:
DELAY TIME: Allows you to set a delay between the
moment you start singing and the moment the
vibrato effect kicks in.
(6) Press [EXIT] to leave this page (or [Back] to try out
other “Gender” settings).
Voice-FX
Ever wondered what your voice would sound like if you
were a woman (for men), man (for women), robot or
something else…? You’re about to find out:
(1) Press the [VOICE-FX] button.
VOICE
FX
(2) Press the [MALE] field if you’re a man, or the
[FEMALE] field if you’re a woman.
This is an important clue for the Vocal Harmonist.
After selecting the correct setting, you may find that
the harmonies sound better.
And just in case, you wanted to sound like a somewhat worn-out opera singer…
(3) Press the [VIBRATO] field (indicator icon must
“light”).
Sing a few notes and note the vibrato. If the effect is
not strong enough…
(4) Press the [EDIT] field.
(5) Use the DATA ENTRY [√][®][ß][†] buttons to select
the parameter you wish to edit (or press its field),
and set the desired value with the [DATA÷ENTRY]
dial.
The [VIBRATO] button icon must be blue for the
effect to be noticeable.
Here’s what the parameters mean:
(2) Sing into the microphone and listen to yourself.
(You may have to switch off the [SMALL] or
[ENSEMBLE] button if it lights to hear how this
function works.)
(3) Press and hold the [VOICE-FX] button. The display
now looks as follows:
(4) Press one of the twelve TYPE fields to try out other
possibilities.
(5) For added “strangeness” (or realism), you can press
the [VIBRATO] field (right).
(6) If you feel the general idea is OK, but would like to
fine-tune the effect, press the [EDIT] field at the
bottom edge of the display.
See page 132 for the Edit and Equalizer parameters.
Note: To keep your settings, you must write them to a User
Program.
Note: You can add the [SMALL] or [ENSEMBLE] harmonies to
this effect.
(7) Press the [EXIT] button to return to the main page.
RATE: Sets the speed of the vibrato effect.
DEPTH: Allows you to set the vibrato intensity.
Vibrato is an effect that changes (“modulates”) the
pitch. The higher the DEPTH value, the more outspoken these periodic pitch changes will be.
EXIT
RISE TIME: Allows you to set a swell for the vibrato
effect. This parameter specifies how long it takes
before the DEPTH value is reached – once the Delay
Time is up.
45
G-70 Music Workstation
Quick Start
Auto Pitch
Here’s another interesting effect that can either be
used as gimmick or to ensure that even the flattest of
renditions suddenly sounds in tune. Of course, the voice
will sound somewhat “artificial”, because the emphasis
is on tuning here. However, even if you just speak the
words of a song, it will be sung just the same.
(1) Press the [AUTO≈PITCH] button.
(6) For more refined control over the Auto Pitch voice,
press the [EDIT] field:
AUTO
PITCH
(2) Start song playback and say something into the
microphone (don’t sing).
Sounds like a very popular effect, doesn’t it?
(3) Press and hold the [AUTO≈PITCH] button.
The display changes to:
Though they are not linked to their namesakes on the
Voice-FX Edit page, most parameters on this page will
look familiar. Therefore, please see above for the
explanations of GENDER and VIBRATO RATE,
DEPTH, RISE TIME, and DELAY TIME.
(7) Press the parameter field whose value you want to
edit and set the desired value with the
[DATA÷ENTRY] dial.
Note: Parameter fields can also be selected using the DATA
ENTRY [√][®][ß][†] buttons.
(8) Press the [PORTAMENTO] field to switch on this
effect.
“Portamento” means that the pitch doesn’t change in
clearly defined steps: it produces glides from one
note to the next.
[Portamento Time= 0] “Rough” pitch changes in semitone
steps (normal)
Let us begin with the most important parameter: the
notes that will be used by the AUTO PITCH function.
That is what you specify via the AUTO PITCH ASSIGN
fields.
(4) Set the TRACK value to select a song part.
The “4” setting usually corresponds to the melody
part of a Standard MIDI File, and is thus the most
likely candidate, but feel free to select “1”~”3” or “5”~
”16” to use another part as melody.
If you want to play the melody yourself, press the
[LEFT] or [RIGHT] field (or both) and play the desired
notes, while you speak (or sing) into the microphone.
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Note: Selecting LEFT and/or RIGHT will set the TRACK parameter to “Off”.
Use the OCTAVE parameter to shift the pitch of the
Auto Pitch notes up to 2 octaves up or down.
(5) Press the [VIBRATO] field to add some “wobble” to
the Auto Pitch sound.
This vibrato effect is not linked to the Voice-FX
vibrato, and can thus be set separately (see below).
46
[Portamento Time= 1~127] Pitch glides from one
note to the next
Use the PORTAM TIME parameter to specify the
speed at which those glides are carried out (0~127).
The higher the value, the slower the transitions.
Note: To keep your settings, you must write them to a User
Program.
(9) Press [EXIT] to leave this page (or [Back] to modify
other Auto Pitch settings).
Using the Vocoder
A Vocoder is an effect that combines spoken words
with sounds, thus creating the impression that the
instrument that produces the sounds can talk. As this
relies on complex filtering effects, the character of the
sound used as “carrier” can change dramatically.
G-70 Music Workstation r
Vocal Harmonist function
(1) Press the [VOCODER] button (it must light).
VOCODER
This switches off the [SMALL] or [ENSEMBLE] button
if it was on, because the Vocoder cannot be used
simultaneously with the Harmonist function proper.
(2) Switch on the [SINGER] button.
(3) Stop song playback if it is running.
The Vocoder can also use a song part, but for this
demonstration, we’ll use the keyboard, because it will
help you understand how the Vocoder works.
Note: If you use the Vocoder along with the G-70’s Arranger,
you will probably have to play the melody yourself, because
the Arranger does not contain it (while a Standard MIDI File
does).
(4) Play a chord on the keyboard, hold those notes,
and talk into the microphone.
For obvious reasons, the Vocoder only works if you (a)
talk or sing, and (b) if there is a “musical sound” that
can be processed.
Play various chords and listen to how that affects the
signal generated by the Vocoder.
Note: The Vocoder can produce four voices at once. Playing
more than four notes simultaneously is thus unnecessary.
Note: The Vocoder can be used alongside [SINGER], [VOICE–FX]
or [AUTO≈PITCH].
Again, there are several parameters for customizing
the Vocoder’s behavior:
(5) Press and hold the [VOCODER] button.
The display changes to:
The VOCODER ASSIGN section’s current (default)
setting is “AUTO”. This means that song files indicated as “With MIDI Harmony for Your Vocal Harmony Processor” (with harmony note information on
track 5) automatically switch on the Vocoder. If you
like, you can still add additional chord information by
playing on the keyboard.
If you stop song playback and then play a chord on
the keyboard, the note information thus generated is
used.
If you are using a Standard MIDI File, set the TRACK
value to select a song part (“1”~”16”). As the melody
is usually monophonic (1 note at a time), “4” may not
be the best possible setting. Try to select a track with
several notes.
If you want to play the melody yourself, press the
[LEFT] or [RIGHT] field (or both) and play the desired
notes, while you speak (or sing) into the microphone.
Note: See page 134 for the [EDIT] parameters.
Note: To keep your settings, you must write them to a User
Program.
(7) Press [EXIT] or [Back] to leave this page.
Talk
The Talk function is meant for announcements between
songs: it switches off any other Vocal Harmonist effect
(Voice-FX, Auto Pitch, Singer, Vocoder, Small/Ensemble)
that may be on. Furthermore, it mutes the Vocal Harmonist’s effects processors (Reverb, Chorus, Delay, etc.).
You can, however, add some reverb and/or delay if you
like.
That way, your voice has its normal sound when you
wish or need to address your audience. The Talk function can even be set in such a way that the music (song)
is turned softer, but not muted altogether, while you
are talking.
HINT !! You could combine this with the Chain function
(page 145) and insert a short “announcement tune” between the
actual songs, so that your announcements are easily recognizable. Of course, you could also play the tune yourself.
(1) Press the [TALK] button and speak into the microphone.
TALK
GENDER: These button icons (MALE, FEMALE, MIX)
allow you to change the timbre of the effect so as to
create a masculine, feminine, or mixed character. The
GENDER choice determines which 8 preset settings
are available. There are thus 24 Vocoder presets (8 for
“Male”, 8 for “Female”, and 8 for “Mix”).
The 8 fields in the middle (e.g. [OPERA], [MY≈VOICE],
etc.) specify the voice character. These presets are
based on the parameters you can change on the
“Edit” page (which is unnecessary if you are happy
with one of the presets).
(6) Set the desired “TRACK” value with the
[DATA÷ENTRY] dial.
All Vocal Harmonist transformations are now muted.
This includes the [VOCODER], [SMALL], and
[ENSEMBLE] buttons.
(2) After your announcement, press the [TALK] button
again (to return to the previous “singer” settings)
and sing to the next song.
Here’s what you need to do to change the level of the
background music, and the amount of Reverb and/or
Delay that is added to your speaking voice.
47
G-70 Music Workstation
Quick Start
Note: See page 107 for an in-depth discussion of the effects
settings.
(4) Press the [TUNING], then the [SINGER¥KEY] field.
(3) Press and hold the [TALK] button.
The display changes to:
(4) Press the [MUSIC¥MUTE] field and set the desired
value with the [DATA÷ENTRY] dial.
The smaller the value, the softer the song’s and Keyboard parts’ volume will be. Select “0” if you do not
want the music to be any softer than it already is.
The [REVERB¥SEND] and [DELAY¥SEND] fields allow
you to add some reverb and/or delay to your voice.
While some reverb (values between “10” and “40”, for
example) could be useful, delay should probably only
be used as “effect”, because it tends to blur your
announcements.
Note: See page 107 for details about these effects.
Automatic transposition (Singer Key)
→ Only available for Standard MIDI File playback
Here’s yet another revolutionary function of your G-70:
based on information you select or input, it can change
the key of all songs you play back in realtime, thus
allowing you (or a guest singer) to sing all songs in a
comfortable range. This function is called “Singer Key”.
(1) For the sake of clarity, first select a song (see p. 38)
and press [PLAY÷STOP¥®÷ª] to start playback.
Pay attention to the song’s key.
(2) Press [PLAY÷STOP¥®÷ª] again to stop playback, and
[TOP¥|√] to return to the beginning.
(3) Press the [MENU] button.
This page contains three presets: [ORIGINAL] means
that the song is not transposed, while [MALE] and
[FEMALE] adapt the song’s key to the “typical” range
of a male or female voice.
(5) Press the [MALE] or [FEMALE] field (depending on
whether you’re a man or a woman).
(6) Press the [PLAY÷STOP¥®÷ª] button to start playback.
The song may now be playing in a different key. If it is
not, the melody falls within the “typical” range you
have just selected.
Note: This automatic transposition only works if track/MIDI
channel “4” of the song you play back contains the melody
part.
(7) Press [PLAY÷STOP¥®÷ª] again to stop playback, and
[TOP¥|√] to return to the beginning.
That may still have been too high or too low for comfort… So here comes the best part:
(8) Press one of the USER PRESET fields, and then
[EDIT].
Note: The [EDIT] field only appears after pressing one of the
USER PRESET fields. The latter are four memories where you
can store your own range settings.
MENU
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The display changes to:
48
(9) Press the [HIGHEST] field (if it is not already
selected).
(10) Sing the highest note you can muster effortlessly
(you can sing it several times).
If you connected a microphone, a [CAPTURE] field
appears. Press that field to confirm the note you
want the G-70 to recognize. (This field does not
appear if you enter the pitch via the keyboard.)
If you have no microphone handy, you can also play
this note on the keyboard.
The G-70 recognizes the pitch and displays the name
of the corresponding note.
(11) Press the [LOWEST] field and repeat step (10), taking care to sing your lowest possible note.
G-70 Music Workstation r
Vocal Harmonist function
(12) Press [EXECUTE] to store these settings if you wish
to use them at a later stage.
The display briefly confirms that your settings have
been stored:
(13) Press the [Back] field to return to the page of the
same name.
(14) Press the [RENAME] field to assign a name to your
settings.
The display briefly confirms that your name has been
stored:
(18) Press the [PLAY÷STOP¥®÷ª] button to start playback.
The song may now be playing in a different key. If it is
not, the melody falls within the range you set.
Note: For new songs you load, we recommend saving them
once to the same memory location to speed up the recognition
process of the HIGHEST and LOWEST notes. See page 205 for
how to save songs.
Displaying Lyrics and chord information
Entering names
(15) Use the [ø] and [˚] fields to select the position for
which you wish to enter a new character.
(16) Use the alphanumeric keypad in the right corner to
enter the desired characters.
This keypad works exactly like the keypad of a cellphone: you may have to press an alphanumeric field
several times to select the desired character or number.
• The [A/a] field allows you to switch between uppercase and lowercase characters.
• The [Delete] field allows you to delete the character
indicated by the cursor. Press and hold it to clear all
characters.
• Press [Space] to insert a blank (or the number “0”).
• If you forgot to insert a character, use [ø] or [˚] to
select the position where the missing character
should be inserted. Then press [Insert], followed by the
character you wish to insert.
(17) If you’re happy with the name for your Singer Key
settings, press [EXECUTE].
→ Only available for Standard MIDI File playback
Your G-70 also allows you to view the lyrics (if available) –and even the notes– of the songs in the display.
The Lyrics function was provided to allow you to read
the words of the songs being played back in a karaoke
fashion: the words to sing are highlighted at the right
time. Note that this function is only available for Standard MIDI Files that contain Lyrics data. Ask your dealer
for details.
Apart from the Lyrics, the G-70 also displays the chords,
which may come in handy for a guitarist or bassist with
whom you are playing.
The chord information is usually not contained in a
song as such, but that’s no problem: the G-70 can “calculate” it in realtime and even display it a little ahead of
the “changes”. This also applies to the notes proper that
can be displayed in realtime.
(1) Select a song (page 38).
(2) Press the [LYRICS&SCORE] button.
LYRICS & SCORE
The display changes to:
(3) Start song playback.
49
G-70 Music Workstation
Quick Start
The chord information appears at the bottom of the
screen.
Note: The chord information is calculated in real-time and
may not always be accurate. Also, with chords where the third
has been omitted, no information will be displayed (because it
is impossible to tell whether those are minor or major chords).
Note: You can also add Lyrics data to songs that do not yet
contain them. See page 150 for details.
(4) Press the [ZOOM¥+] button if the lyrics are difficult
to read.
Press [ZOOM¥–] to select the normal size again.
Using an external monitor
Your G-70 also provides a VIDEO OUTPUT socket you
can connect to the video input of a TV screen or monitor. That monitor (or screen) always displays the Lyrics
(if available), even if you –or the G-70– select(s) other
display pages. Scores, on the other hand, are never displayed by the external monitor.
(1) Connect the VIDEO OUTPUT socket to the video
input of the TV set or monitor.
■Changing the color of the lyrics
Apart from enlarging the lyrics (see above), the G-70
also allows you to set the background color and the
color of the lyrics themselves if you don’t feel comfortable with the black-on-white system that is used
by default.
(1) Press the [OPTIONS] field on the page shown above.
(2) Switch on your TV set or monitor and start playback of a song with Lyrics.
If the lyrics and chords do not appear correctly on
the external screen, proceed as follows:
(3) Press the [LYRICS&SCORE] button.
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(2) Proceed as follows:
• You may first want to try one of the COLOR PRESET
fields ([1]~[6]). If none of the factory settings is to
your liking (or if you want to make minor corrections)…
• …press one of the knobs (red, green or blue) in the
LYRICS column and use the [DATA÷ENTRY] dial to
increase or decrease the value.
The changes are reflected in the small display above
the COLOR PRESET button icons.
The system used here corresponds to the RGB color
mixing system, whereby the value “255” for all three
knobs yields the color white (while “0” for all three
corresponds to black). If you have ever worked with a
graphic program, this concept may be familiar to you.
• Press one of the knobs (red, green or blue) in the
BACKGROUND column and use the [DATA÷ENTRY]
dial to increase or decrease the value.
(3) Press the [Back] field to return to the LYRICS page.
50
LYRICS & SCORE
The display changes to:
(4) Press the [OPTIONS] field.
The display changes to:
(5) Press the [PAL] or [NTSC] field to select the desired
setting (or the one that works).
G-70 Music Workstation r
Vocal Harmonist function
Note: If you work with a TV set, do not forget to select the
correct channel (“AV”, or something to that effect, see the
manual that came with your set).
(6) Press the [EXIT] button to return to the main page.
• Do you want see the notes of one song part, or of
two? If you only need one, activate [1¥STAFF]. To see
two parts, activate [2¥STAVES]. In the latter case, the
display changes to:
EXIT
Displaying scores
→ Only available for Standard MIDI File playback, and
only in the G-70’s display.
If you don’t remember the notes of the song you are
about to play, you can ask the G-70 to display them onscreen:
(1) Select a song (page 38).
(2) Press the [LYRICS&SCORE] button.
LYRICS & SCORE
(3) Press the [SCORE] field if it doesn’t “light”.
The display changes to:
(4) Start song playback and watch the display.
(5) Press the [ZOOM¥+] button if the notes are difficult
to read.
Press [ZOOM¥–] to select the normal size again.
Now maybe the way in which the notes are displayed
is not quite right. In that case…
(6) Press the [OPTIONS] button.
• Select the track(s) whose notes should be displayed:
Press the (corresponding) [TRACK] field and use the
[DATA÷ENTRY] dial to select the track.
“STAFF 1” is the upper staff, “STAFF 2” the lower one.
• If you happen to know the key your song is in, press
the [KEY] field and use the [DATA÷ENTRY] dial to
select the correct setting.
This is only necessary to avoid that the score is cluttered up with accidentals (sharps and flats that alter
the notes’ pitch ad hoc).
• Use the
and
fields to specify what clef should
be used for displaying the notes. Press whichever is
more convenient for you (this setting has no effect
on the octave the notes are actually played in – it is
only used for display purposes.
• Use the buttons in the PITCH row to specify how the
note names should be displayed next to the note
symbols:
[OFF] means that the note names are not displayed,
[A,B,C] refers to the Anglo-Saxon/German/Dutch system, while [DO,RE,MI] corresponds to the French/Italian system.
• Use the buttons in the DRUM RANGE row to specify
which notes of the drum track (usually track 10)
should be displayed. [FILTER] means that you will only
see the notes between note numbers 35 and 59.
[FULL], on the other hand, means that you will see all
drum notes.
This setting is only used if you set (one of) the TRACK
field(s) to “10”, or the number of a track that plays a
drum part. Most drum parts only trigger MIDI notes
between numbers 35 and 59.
(7) Press [Back] to see the notes again.
If necessary, you can return to the OPTIONS page to
correct settings you don’t like after all.
There are several things you can decide here:
51
G-70 Music Workstation
Quick Start
Recording your music
(5) Press the [START÷STOP] button to start recording.
You can record your music as “Songs” that can be
saved internally, to a memory card or a floppy disk.
Your singing using the Vocal Harmonist (page 42) is
not recorded.
There are two approaches for recording:
A Recording everything at once
This is the easy approach: you press the [REC¥∏] button, you set the G-70 the way you want it to sound
(with or without Arranger, for example) and you start
playing.
B Recording each track separately
This approach means that you first record a drum
part (for example), then a bass line, followed by a
piano part, etc. For this approach, you need to select
the 16-track Sequencer mode (see p. 154).
It is also possible to combine these two approaches
by first recording most of the parts using approach
(A) and then adding other (or replacing existing)
parts using approach (B).
Let us begin with the easier approach:
Recording with Arranger backing from start to
finish
In this example, you will learn how to record your solo
playing to a Music Style accompaniment, which is also
recorded.
(1) Press the [REC¥∏] button (it flashes).
Note: Whenever you press the [REC¥∏] button and start
recording (see below), the song RAM memory is erased. Be sure
to save the current song data before recording a new song (see
p. 55).
START/STOP
The Recorder now counts in one measure, after
which Arranger playback and recording start.
Note: See page 73 for setting the Count-In function.
(6) Play the Arranger chords with your left hand, and
the melody with your right.
Note: You can also use the G-70’s performance functions for
your melody playing. See page 58 for details.
(7) To stop recording, do one of the following:
• Press the [END/RIT] and a VARIATION [1]~[4] button.
The Arranger will play an ending phrase. When it is
finished, Arranger playback and recording stop.
• Press the [START÷STOP] button. This will stop
Arranger playback and recording.
• Press the [PLAY÷STOP¥®÷ª] button. This will stop
Arranger playback and recording.
Listening to your song
You probably want to listen to your song now. If you
like it, be sure to save it (see “Saving your song” on
p. 55).
(8) Press the RECORDER [TOP¥|√] button.
TOP
(2) Press the EASY SETTING [ARR] button.
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ARR
ORGAN
(3) Select a Music Style (see p. 27) and a sound for
your right hand (see p. 29).
You can also press a ONE TOUCH button and select a
Music Style. In that case, there is no need to select a
sound for your right hand in step (3), because that is
done automatically. See also p. 29.
Switch on additional Keyboard parts by pressing their
PART ON/OFF buttons, if you want to double your
melody by one or several instruments. You can even
work with a second (page 90) split.
Note: Rather than performing the above steps, you could
recall a User Program with the desired settings (page 112).
(4) If you want to start your song with an introduction, press the [INTRO] button and a VARIATION
button [1]~[4].
52
This causes the Recorder to return to the beginning
of your new song.
(9) Press the [PLAY÷STOP¥®÷ª] button to start playback.
Playback of your recording starts.
(10) Press [PLAY÷STOP¥®÷ª] again to stop playback, and
[TOP¥|√] to return to beginning of the song.
If you made a mistake in the Arranger chords and
would like to record that part again, go back to step
(2) above.
G-70 Music Workstation r
Recording your music
Recording without accompaniment
Let us now look at how to start recording without
automatic accompaniment. You can nevertheless star
the Arranger at a later stage (after your ad lib introduction, for example): it will playing in sync with the song
tempo.
(1) Press the [REC¥∏] button (its indicator flashes).
REC
●
Note: Whenever you press the [REC¥∏] button and start
recording (see below), the song RAM memory is erased. Be sure
to save the current song data before recording a new song (see
p. 55).
(2) Press the EASY SETTING [PIANO] button.
ARR
Adding more parts
Here is how to redo part of your recording (one part
you do not like) or to add additional parts to what has
already been recorded.
Let us first have a look at what has been recorded so far
– and where:
We started out with the Arranger, which means that
the following tracks may now contain data (not all
Music Styles use all 8 tracks the Arranger can play back
simultaneously):
Arranger part
Recorder track
ADR
10
ABS
2
ACC1
1
ACC2
3
ACC3
5
ACC4
7
ACC5
8
ACC6
9
ORGAN
If you also recorded one or several Keyboard parts, their
data reside on the following tracks:
(3) Use the [√SLOW][FAST®] buttons, the [TAP] button
or (if the main page is displayed), the [DATA÷ENTRY]
dial to set the desired tempo.
(4) If you want to start Music Style playback at a later
stage, select a Music Style (see p. 27) and a sound
for your solo playing (see p. 29).
Note: Rather than performing the above steps, you could
recall a User Program with the desired settings (page 112).
(5) Press the [PLAY÷STOP¥®÷ª] button to start recording.
PLAY/STOP
The Recorder now counts in one measure, after
which recording starts.
Note: See page 73 for setting the Count-In function.
(6) Start playing.
(7) To start Arranger playback at a later stage, press
the [START÷STOP] button.
(8) If you want to stop Arranger playback before the
end of the song, press either the [END÷RIT] or the
[START÷STOP] button.
This will stop Arranger playback, while recording goes
on. This allows you to improvise without accompaniment.
(9) Press the [PLAY÷STOP¥®÷ª] button to stop recording.
(10) See “Listening to your song”.
Keyboard part
Recorder track
UP1
4
UP2
6
UP3
13
LW1
11
LW2
14
MBS
12
MELODY INT
15
UP1/2/3 and/or LW1/2 can also be used as additional
drum part if you assign it a Drum Set (TONE [DRUMS]
button).
For the following, we will assume that you also
recorded the melody using the UP1 part (track 4) and
that you now want to add some chords using the
LW1 part.
(1) Start by taking note of the track you wish to
(re)record.
See the tables above. For our example, we will use
track 11 (LW1). If you want to redo a part but do not
know what track it has been recorded to, you can
take advantage of the Recorder’s Mute function for
locating it.
(2) Press the RECORDER [16-TRACK¥SEQUENCER] button.
16-TRACK
SEQUENCER
53
G-70 Music Workstation
Quick Start
You have just selected the more detailed recording
function (the “sequencer”). The display changes to:
(8) Press the RECORDER [TOP¥|√] button.
TOP
The colored bars in the right part of the display indicate the tracks that already contain data.
(3) Press the RECORDER [REC¥∏] button.
The sequencer returns to the beginning of the song
(measure “1”).
(9) Press the [PLAY÷STOP¥®÷ª] button.
The sequencer now counts in one measure, after
which recording starts.
Note: See page 73 for setting the Count-In function.
(10) Play the new part.
(11) Press the RECORDER [PLAY÷STOP¥®÷ª] button to
stop recording.
REC
PLAY/STOP
●
The display changes to:
r
The display changes to:
(4) Press the [REC¥TRK] field and use the [DATA÷ENTRY]
dial or the [DEC]/[INC] buttons to select the track
you want to record to.
For our example, select “11”.
Alternatively, press the [REC¥TYPE] field and use the
[DATA÷ENTRY] dial or the [DEC]/[INC] buttons to select
“LW1”. This sets the recording track to “11”‘ and
allows you to use the LW1 part for playing an organ
line (using the harmonic bars), or to assign a Tone of
an optional SRX-series expansion board to the LW1
part.
(5) Assign the desired sound to the track selected for
recording.
See “Selecting sounds for the Keyboard parts” on
p. 29. You can play on the keyboard to check whether
the sound matches the mood of the part you wish to
record.
(6) Specify what should be recorded by activating the
corresponding RECORDING SELECT button icons.
(7) For this example, switch on NOTE, CONTROL
CHANGE, PROGRAM CHANGE and PITCH BEND. See
page 157 for an explanation.
54
The track that contains your new part is highlighted
(left column) for easy identification. It also contains a
horizontal bar to signal that it is no longer empty.
(12) Listen to your song (page 52).
If you like it, save it, if you’re not happy with your
part, go back to “Adding more parts” on p. 53.
In step (3), press the [REC¥MODE] field and use the
[DATA÷ENTRY] dial or the [DEC]/[INC] buttons to select
“Replace” (if that option is not yet selected).
Note: See p. 160 if you want to change just single notes or
other aspects of your song (which is called “editing”).
G-70 Music Workstation r
Recording your music
Saving your song
A song you save to becomes a Standard MIDI File that
can be played back with the G-70, but also with any
other SMF-compatible sequencer.
There are two ways of saving new or edited songs:
• Via the [DISK¥&¥MEDIA] button and the related menu
(see p. 204).
• By pressing the [SAVE] field on the 16-track page.
Note: Whenever you leave the 16-track Sequencer page by
pressing the [EXIT] button, the display shows a “Song has been
changed…” message that asks you whether you want to save
your changes. Press the [YES] field and proceed.
Here, we will show you how to save your song using
the [SAVE] field.
(1) On the 16-track main page, press the [SAVE] field.
The display now responds with:
• Move the cursor to the desired position using [ø] and
[˚].
• Enter the character for that position using the alphanumeric keypad. In many instances, you will have to
press the desired field several times to select the
desired character.
• Use the [A/a] field to alternate between capitals and
small letters.
• Press the [Delete] field to delete the character indicated by the cursor. Press and hold it to clear all
characters.
• Press [Space] to insert a space.
• Press [Insert] to insert a character at the current position. All characters behind this position move one
position further to the right.
(5) Press the [FILE¥NAME] field and enter the file name.
See p. 86 for details. Here, you can only enter 8 characters. All characters will be capitals.
(6) Press the [EXECUTE] field to save your song.
The display tells you that the data are being saved,
after which it returns to the “SAVE SONG” page.
(7) Press the [EXIT] button to return to the main page,
or the RECORDER [16-TRACK¥SEQUENCER] button
to add even more tracks.
(2) Specify where you want to save your song:
• Press the [INTERNAL¥MEMORY] field to select the
G-70’s internal memory as target (this is a 50MB
storage area similar to a hard disk).
• Insert a floppy disk into the drive and press the
[FLOPPY] field.
• Press the [EXTERNAL¥MEMORY] field. This option is
only available if you insert a memory card into the
G-70’s PCMCIA slot.
If your floppy disk or memory card does not seem to
work, try formatting it, then try again. See “Format”
on p. 209.
Note: If you want to save the song under its current name, or
the name assigned by default (“New Song”), you can skip steps
(4)~(5).
You need to give your song two names: a SONG
NAME, and a FILE NAME. The FILE NAME is the name
the G-70 uses for locating the song. The SONG
NAME, on the other hand, is displayed in the Song
Finder.
(3) Press the [SONG¥NAME] button icon.
(4) Enter the name:
55
G-70 Music Workstation
About the Keyboard modes
4. About the Keyboard modes
The KBD MODE setting is the singlemost important parameter of your G-70 because it determines which parts (or Tones)
and sections are available. Though the EASY SETTING buttons set these parameters automatically, you should familiarize
yourself with the KBD MODE concept.
Arranger, Piano and Organ modes
The G-70 has three major keyboard modes:
ARRANGER, PIANO and ORGAN. They can be selected
using the EASY SETTING [ARR] and [PIANO] buttons.
The third mode, ORGAN, configures the G-70 like a
virtual drawbar organ (page 33).
In many instances, pressing [ARR], [PIANO] or
[ORGAN] provides a nice starting point for further
fine-tuning. Select ARR (or ORG) when you need the
automatic accompaniment function and wish to
activate its chord recognition in the left half (see
page 80 for details). Select PIANO to activate PIANO
CHORD recognition.
• SPLIT mode with the split point at the C4. The KBD
MODE [SPLIT] button lights.
SPLIT
• Only the UP1 part is active in the right half of the
keyboard (see page 29 for an explanation of this concept).
• ZONE= LEFT (page 80).
• INTELLIGENT chord recognition (TYPE, page 80).
One button (here [ARR]) therefore allows you to prepare the main parameters for working with the automatic accompaniment (called “Arranger”).
Except for the addition of the LW1 part, the EASY
SETTING [ORGAN] button has the same effect.
Note: Pressing one of these buttons not only selects the
desired Keyboard Mode but also sets a series of other parameters. In some cases, the parts you may have been using up to
that point are suddenly muted. Another important aspect is
that the split point (see below) will be set to “C3” when you
press [ARR] or [ORGAN].
In ARRANGER mode, the keyboard is split into two
halves. The left half is used for playing chords that
the Arranger uses for transposing the Music Style
patterns in realtime. The right half, on the other
hand, can be used for adding a live melody to the
Arranger’s automatic accompaniment. This melody
can be played using the Upper1 (UP1) part. Feel free
to add other parts for creating richer sounds. See
p. 57.
r
Arranger control
UP1
This setting is also used when you press the [ORGAN]
button. In addition, the G-70 switches on the LW1
part that can be played using your left hand:
Arranger control
+ LW1
UP1
The settings affected by the EASY SETTING [ARR] button are:
56
In PIANO mode, the Upper1 part (UP1) is assigned to
the entire keyboard.
Upper 1 (UP1) using a piano sound
•
•
•
•
Later on, you will discover that this way of using the
keyboard is also called Whole, and that you do not
need to work with a piano sound.
The settings affected by the EASY SETTING [PIANO]
button are:
Whole mode with only UP1 active.
The “The Grand X” Tone is assigned to UP1.
Arranger ZONE= WHOLE (page 80). Press the
[START÷STOP] button to start and stop the Arranger.
See page 27 for how to select internal Music Styles.
Arranger TYPE= PIANO STYLE (page 80).
G-70 Music Workstation r
Split and Whole modes
Split and Whole modes
The display now looks more or less as follows:
Using the SPLIT Keyboard Mode
Split means that the keyboard is divided into two
halves. You can use the LW1, LW2, and MBS parts in the
left half, and the UP1, UP2, UP3 parts in the right. (It is
also possible to use an additional split between UP1/
UP2 and UP3, see “Upper 3 Split” on p. 90.)
LW1, LW2, MBS
UP1, UP2, UP3
Here’s how to activate the SPLIT keyboard mode:
(1) Press the KBD MODE [SPLIT] button.
(2) Use the MAIN SPLIT POINT [√][®] fields to select the
new split point.
The setting range is F1~F#7. The orange keys in the
display refer to the right half. As you can see, the
“SPLIT POINT” is the lowest note of the right half.
Note: Your settings can be written to a User Program and
recalled at a later stage. See p. 111.
SPLIT
Using WHOLE mode
(2) Press the PART ON/OFF buttons of the parts (LW2,
LW1, etc.) you want to play via the keyboard and
switch off the parts you do not need.
If a part is on, its button lights.
Whole means that all keys trigger the same part(s).
There is thus no split. You can assign up to six parts
to the entire keyboard: MBS, LW1, LW2, UP3, UP2,
and UP1.
(1) Press the KBD MODE [WHOLE] button.
Note: If you like, you can activate a Hold function for the
LW1/2 parts. That way, briefly pressing the notes to be played
by the LW1/2 parts is enough. The Arranger has a similar function (called ARR Hold). See also “Lower Hold” on p. 92.
Note: If none of the PART ON/OFF buttons lights, the notes
you play on the keyboard will not be audible. (It would, however, be possible to go on controlling the Arranger.)
Note: Your settings can be written to a User Program and
recalled at a later stage. See p. 111.
■Setting the split point
When the [SPLIT] button lights, the keyboard is split in
two halves. The split point is located at the C key
below the brown EFFECT slider. This key is called the
“C4”:
WHOLE
Switching parts on and off
(2) Press the PART ON/OFF buttons of the parts (MBS,
LW2, LW1, etc.) you want to play via the keyboard
and switch off the parts you do not need.
KEYBOARD PART
TONE ASSIGN
MBS LW 2 LW 1
Arranger control
UP 3 UP 2 UP 1
UP1, UP2, UP3
PART ON/OFF
This split point applies both to the chord recognition
area of the Arranger and the SPLIT keyboard mode.
There may be situations where the automatically
assigned range is not what you need. In that case,
you can change the split point:
(1) Press and hold the KBD MODE [SPLIT] button or the
SPLIT field in the display.
SPLIT
—OR—
If a part is on, its button lights.
Note: If none of the PART ON/OFF buttons lights, the notes
you play on the keyboard will not be audible. (It would, however, be possible to go on controlling the Arranger.)
By the way: selecting WHOLE does not mean that the
Arranger is automatically switched off, or can no
longer be used. See “Arranger Type (chord mode)” on
p. 80 for details.
Note: Your settings can be written to a User Program and
recalled at a later stage. See p. 111.
57
G-70 Music Workstation
Using the performance functions
5. Using the performance functions
Let us now have a look at the G-70’s performance
functions. Also called controllers, they allow you to add
expression to your playing, which is a very important
aspect for simulating glissando’s, bendings, and other
changes that will make your melodies even more convincing.
Pitch Bend and Modulation
The BENDER/MODULATION lever to the left of the
G-70’s keyboard can be used to add two kinds of
effects to the Keyboard part notes (Upper, Lower,
M.Bass). You can even use these effects simultaneously
if you like.
(2) Press the TRANSPOSE [≈®] button to transpose the
G-70 up by up to 5 semitones.
Transposition never applies to a part that uses a
Drum Set (or the drum part of a song).
To transpose from the key of C to E, press [≈®] four
times. To transpose from C to G, press [√≈ƒ] five times.
To return to the original setting (no transposition),
simultaneously press and hold [√≈ƒ] and [≈®].
As long as the interval is different from “0”, one of
these buttons lights to signal that the Transpose
function is active.
The transposition interval is indicated on the main
page:
(1) Press the lever towards the rear of the G-70 to add
a vibrato effect (“wobble”) to the notes you are
playing.
MODULATION
Lowers the
pitch
Raises the
pitch
BENDER
The Modulation axis can also be used for switching
between the slow and fast Rotary speeds (for the
HARMONIC BAR and [ORGAN] sounds).
(2) Turn the lever to the left to temporarily lower the
pitch of the notes you are playing. Turn it to the
right to raise the pitch of your notes.
The Pitch Bend interval (“range”) is preset to 2 semitones.
(3) Release the lever if you no longer need the effect.
Transposition
The “–1” refers to a semitone decrease of the pitch, so
that you hear a “B” every time you play a “C”. It also
means that, rather than the “A” you press, you will
hear “G sharp” (or “A flat”). The above setting corresponds to pressing [√≈ƒ] once.
Note: Any interval you set here automatically resets (and thus
overrides) the SINGER KEY transposition (see p. 48). In fact, the
latter is first reset to ORIGINAL, after which the new transposition value is used.
Setting the transposition interval via the display
If you prefer to set the transposition interval via the
touch screen with a nice graphic, here is how to.
(1) Press and hold the TRANSPOSE [√≈ƒ] or [≈®] button,
or press the [TRANSPOSE] field on the main page.
r
If you are used to playing a song in a particular key, the
Transpose function will help you go on playing in that
key while sounding in another one. That way, you can
accompany a singer or instrument without changing
your fingering.
(1) Press the TRANSPOSE [√≈ƒ] button to transpose the
G-70 down by up to 6 semitones.
58
CANCEL
(2) In the display, press the key that corresponds to
the note you would like to hear every time you
play a C.
Note: Selecting “0” means that the transposition is off. Your
setting can, however, be written to a User Program (page 111).
G-70 Music Workstation r
Octave
(3) Press the [KEYBOARD] and/or [SONG] field to switch
it on.
These fields allow you to specify which parts should
be affected by the Transpose setting:
[KEYBOARD]: The Keyboard parts are transposed.
Since the Arranger’s key depends on the notes you
play on the keyboard, the Arranger parts are also
transposed.
(2) Press the [TUNING] field, followed by the
[MASTER¥TUNE] field.
Note: Parts that play Drum Sets are never transposed.
[SONG]: During Recorder playback, only the song
parts during Recorder playback are transposed.
Though it is perfectly possible to switch on both
options, at least one of them must be on. “KEYBOARD” could be useful for transposing only the Keyboard parts so that you can play to a song in “your”
key but sound in the song’s key.
Note: If you also want note messages received via MIDI to be
transposed, you must set “TRANSPOSE RX (On/Off)” on p. 219
to “ON”.
(4) Press the [EXIT] button to return to the main page.
(3) Use the [√≈ƒ] and [≈®] fields to transpose the
G-70’s pitch.
The setting range is –6~0~5 semitones. This setting
applies to all sections and all User Programs.
Octave
The Octave function is another useful parameter that
allows you to change the pitch of the selected part in
octave steps (12 semitones at a time).
EXIT
Global Transpose
There is also a “master transpose control” that alters the
pitch of all sections of the G-70. Its value is added to
the current transposition interval (and the Singer Key
as well as User Program transposition) until you reset it
to “0”, or until you switch off your G-70.
(1) Press the [MENU] button.
You could take advantage of this function for solo parts
where you need the UP1 and UP2 parts to trigger the
same Tone, while UP2 plays one octave above or below
UP1. Another use for this function is to provide access
to the “noises” of the G-70’s new “V” Tones so as to be
able to trigger the scraping, knocking, etc.
This probably only works when you use a Keyboard part
(MBS, LW2, LW1, UP3, UP2, UP1) in WHOLE Keyboard
Mode (page 57). Working in SPLIT mode indeed means
that you can only play the notes up to a certain point
(the split point). For the “noises”, you need to select the
setting “–3”. Note that this also means that you need to
play the “real” notes at the right end of the keyboard,
because the entire part/Tone is transposed down.
MENU
The display changes to:
OCTAVE= 0
C2
C3
OCTAVE= –1
C2
C3
This parameter also comes in handy when you wish
to trigger Drum Set sounds that are not accessible via
the keyboard in its normal state. Remember that
there are 76 keys, while some Drum Sets provide
drum/percussion sounds for all 128 notes supported
by the MIDI standard.
59
G-70 Music Workstation
Using the performance functions
Finally, you may need this parameter when you take
advantage of the UPPER 3 SPLIT function (see p. 90)
to avoid that the UP3 notes are way too high for
what you have in mind.
(1) Use the TONE ASSIGN buttons to select of the Keyboard part you wish to transpose in octave steps.
KEYBOARD PART
TONE ASSIGN
MBS LW 2 LW 1
UP 3 UP 2 UP 1
(2) If the main page is not displayed, press the [EXIT]
button several times until it appears.
(3) Use the OCTAVE [ß][†] fields to set the desired
interval (up to 4 octaves higher or lower.
(4) If necessary, repeat this with the remaining Keyboard parts.
Key Touch (velocity sensitivity)
Of course, the G-70’s keyboard is also velocity sensitive.
This allows you to control the timbre and volume of the
Keyboard parts by varying the force with which you
strike the keys.
(1) Press the [MENU] button.
MENU
(3) Press a field in the PARTS column to select the
Keyboard part whose velocity sensitivity you wish
to change.
(4) Press a field in the CURVE column to set the
desired velocity sensitivity:
[LOW]: Select this setting if you are used to playing
on an electronic organ or if you do not want velocity
changes to bring about major volume changes.
[MID]: Medium velocity sensitivity. The keyboard
responds to velocity changes, but the maximum volume can be obtained more easily than with “HIGH”.
(This is the default setting.)
[HIGH]: Select this setting for maximum expressiveness. Even small variations of the force with which
you strike a key produce audible changes. The tradeoff is, however, that you have to strike the keys
forcefully to achieve the maximum volume.
Velocity switching (Min and Max)
You can also specify the smallest (MIN) and highest
(MAX) velocity values with which you can trigger the
selected part. This is probably only useful when
applied to two Keyboard parts. Do not change these
values if you have no intention of using a “complementary” part because, otherwise, you may start
wondering why the LW1 part, for instance, only
sounds at high or low velocity values.
MIN and MAX can be used effectively for switching
between two Tones simply by striking the keys harder
or softer. Doing so allows you to alternate between
two sounds. Consider the following example:
Part
Min
Max
Sound
UP1
1
105
Bandoneon 2
([ACCORDION], P1)
UP2
106
127
Folk Violin 2 ([STRINGS], P2)
The display changes to:
(2) Press the [SPLIT≈&≈TOUCH] field, followed by the
[KEY¥TOUCH] field.
Both parts must be on. These settings allow you to
trigger the Bandoneon sound with velocity values
between 1 and 105 (low to relatively high velocity),
while velocity values above 106 only trigger the violin. Try it – it sounds spectacular.
There are countless other possibilities, such as using
MIN= 80/MAX= 127 for the MELODY INTELL part
(page 76), so that the automatic harmonies are only
added when you really want to hear them.
(5) Press the [EXIT] button to return to the main page.
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EXIT
60
G-70 Music Workstation r
Master Tune
Master Tune
Aftertouch
This is not really a performance function, but it allows
you to tune your G-70 to acoustic instruments that
cannot be tuned.
The G-70 is equipped with an Aftertouch-sensitive keyboard. Like most instruments supporting Aftertouch, it
generates channel Aftertouch messages, which means
that one Aftertouch value will be transmitted by each
MIDI channel (or part).
(1) Press the [MENU] button.
MENU
The display changes to:
Aftertouch is generated when you press a key even further down after playing a note. The effect obtained is
usually similar to the one you can achieve with the
BENDER/MODULATION lever: you can change the pitch,
modify the volume, intensify the modulation, etc.
In the G-70’s case, however, you can also control the
Arranger and even the Vocal Harmonist.
Aftertouch data are only received by the following
parts: Upper 1/2/3, Lower 1/2, and the Arranger.
(1) Press the [MENU] button.
MENU
(2) Press the [TUNING] field, followed by the
[MASTER¥TUNE] field.
(3) Use the [DATA÷ENTRY] dial to set the desired tuning.
The default value is “440.0”. You can return to this
value by pressing the [440.0Hz] field.
(4) Press the [EXIT] button to return to the main page.
See page 59 for the Global Transpose parameter.
The display changes to:
(2) Press the [SPLIT&TOUCH] field, followed by the
[AFTER¥TOUCH] field.
(3) Press the field of the part whose Aftertouch
response you want to change (it “lights”).
(4) Press the field that corresponds to the function (or
parameter) that should be influenced by the Aftertouch:
Note: Aftertouch only works in one direction (i.e., it generates
either positive or negative values).
● Off—The part in question does not respond to Aftertouch messages.
61
G-70 Music Workstation
Using the performance functions
● Filter Up—The cutoff frequency of the Tone assigned to
the selected part can be raised (so that the sound
becomes brighter).
Note: Depending on the value you set for TVF Cutoff
(page 127), this parameter may have no audible effect. That
is also the case of Tones whose cutoff frequency is already
preset to the maximum value.
● Filter Down—The cutoff frequency of the Tone assigned
to the selected part can be lowered (so that the sound
becomes mellower).
Note: Depending on the value you set for TVF Cutoff
(page 127), this parameter may have no audible effect. That
is also the case of Tones whose cutoff frequency is already
preset to the minimum value.
● Modulation—Select this function if you want the Aftertouch to duplicate the modulation function of the
BENDER/MODULATION lever.
● Pitch Up—By pressing a key even further down, you can
bend the notes up to two semi-tones up.
● Pitch Down—By pressing a key even further down, you
can bend the notes up to two semi-tones down.
● Volume Up—This setting allows you to increase the volume of the selected part using the Aftertouch.
● Volume Down—This setting allows you to decrease the
volume of the selected part using the Aftertouch.
Note: The Aftertouch settings apply to the Keyboard part in
question, so that selecting another sound for such a part
does not mean that the values will be reset to “0”.
■If you press ARRANG
You can also use the Aftertouch functionality for
controlling Arranger playback. If you press the
[ARRANG] field on the SPLIT & TOUCH/AFTER TOUCH
page, the display looks as follows:
● Fill Down—Triggers the Fill-In that takes you to the previous Variation (i.e. from MAIN “2” to “1”). You can use
this function up to three times to jump to the simplest
level (“Variation 1”). If you then use the Aftertouch
again, however, nothing happens. You thus cannot cycle
back to the highest level (“Variation 4”).
● Variation Up—You can cause the Arranger to select the
next Music Style Variation (i.e. to go from MAIN “1” to
“2”). You can use this function up to three times to jump
to the most complex level (“Variation 4”).
● Variation Down—You can cause the Arranger to select
the preceding Music Style Variation (i.e. to go from MAIN
“4” to “3”). This time, however, no Fill-In is played before
the next Variation starts. You can use this function up to
three times to jump to the simplest level (“Variation 1”).
● Intro—The Aftertouch can be used to select the INTRO
pattern of the active Music Style. This selects the Intro of
the currently active Variation level (1~4).
● Ending—The Aftertouch can be used to select the ENDING pattern of the active Music Style. This selects the
Ending phrase of the currently active Variation level (1~
4).
(5) Press the [EXIT] button to return to the main page.
EXIT
ASSIGN SW buttons
The ASSIGN SW buttons [1] and [2] allow you to quickly
access a function you would normally have to select
via the display (which may involve several steps).
At first, ASSIGN SW [1] is used to start a Fade In, while
ASSIGN SW [2] starts a Fade Out. See page 138 for
details.
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Note: Selecting “ARRANG” does not cancel the Aftertouch settings you may have made for the Keyboard parts.
Note: Even Aftertouch messages generated outside the chord
recognition area (see below) will trigger the selected switching
function.
● Off—The Arranger does not respond to Aftertouch messages.
● Fill Up—Triggers the Fill-In that takes you to the next
Variation (i.e. from MAIN “1” to “2”). You can use this
function up to three times to jump to the most complex
level (“Variation 4”). If you then use the Aftertouch
again, however, nothing happens. You cannot cycle back
to the lowest level (“Variation 1”).
● Fill Remain—This also starts a Fill-In but does not switch
to another MAIN pattern.
62
Holding [1] or [2] down for more than a second takes
you to a display page where you can assign other functions to these buttons. The ASSIGN SW functions can be
written to a User Program.
G-70 Music Workstation r
ASSIGN SW buttons
The “display” of the button you pressed and held
already “lights”.
(1) To assign a function to the other button, press its
“display”.
(2) Use the [DATA÷ENTRY] dial or the [DEC]/[INC] buttons to select one of the following functions:
● Off—The ASSIGN SW button in question has no function
at all.
● Rotary HB Slow/Fast—Allows you to select the slow or
fast speed of the Rotary effect. This only works if the
Harmonic Bars are being used by UP1, LW1 and/or MBS.
● Rotary HB On/Off—Allows you to switch the Rotary
effect on (first time) and off (second). This only works if
the Harmonic Bars are being used by UP1, LW1 and/or
MBS.
● Fade In—Fade In is a function you may want to use
occasionally. While it is being performed, the assigned
button ([1] or [2]) flashes. Fading in means that the volume of both the Arranger (Style) and Keyboard parts
gradually increases, giving the impression that you have
been playing for a long time before what you play
becomes audible. The volume is automatically set to zero
and then gradually increased to the value specified with
the [MASTER¥VOLUME] knob. When the Fade In is completed, the indicator of the ASSIGN SW button goes dark.
● Fade Out—Fade Outs are extremely popular in pop
music, and the G-70 allows you to end a song just like
the original. To do so, press the assigned ASSIGN SW
button (it flashes). The volume then gradually decreases
until it reaches zero (indicator lights steadily).
● Scale Upper—Allows you to assign the selected Scale
Tune (see p. 71) setting to the three Upper parts.
● Scale Lower—Allows you to assign the selected Scale
Tune (see p. 71) setting to the three Lower parts.
● Half Bar on Fill In—The ASSIGN SW button allows you
to switch the Half Bar function on and off. Certain pop
songs in 4/4 contain bars that only last two beats. The
usual place for such a bar is between the first and the
second verse. Another favorite position for “halved” bars
is at the end of a chorus or the bridge. Your G-70 allows
you to faithfully reproduce these “anomalies” using this
function. This does not change Style playback right
away. Only when a Fill-In starts will the Half Bar function be activated and play half the number of beats of
the fill you selected.
● Arranger Hold—Allows you to switch the Arranger Hold
function on and off. See p. 80.
● Dynamic Arranger—Allows you to switch the Dynamic
Arranger function on and off. See page 81 for details.
● Arr Chord Off—Allows you to switch the Arranger’s
chord recognition off, in which case only the drum/percussion of the selected Music Style keeps playing (or can
be used). See page 80.
● Arranger RIT Tempo—Allows you to start the Arranger’s
RIT function page 82.
● Arranger ACC Tempo—Allows you to start the
Arranger’s ACC function page 82.
● Reset/Start Tempo—This function allows you have the
Arranger start on the first beat of the currently selected
Music Style pattern when you press the ASSIGN SW button. Use it when you are accompanying a singer or soloist whose timing is a little shaky, and suddenly notice
that the Arranger lags one or two beats behind the
singer/soloist.
● Keyboard Exchange UP2/1—Allows you to switch off
the UP1 part and activate the UP2 part – and vice versa.
Note: If neither UP1 nor UP2 are on when you first press
the ASSIGN SW button, one of them is activated.
● Keyboard Exchange LW2/1—Allows you to switch off
the LW1 part and activate the LW2 – and vice versa.
Note: If neither LW1 nor LW2 are on when you first press
the ASSIGN SW button, one of them is activated.
● MBass/Keyboard Arranger—Allows you to set the
Arranger Chord parameter to “Off” (chord recognition as
well as ABS recognition off, see p. 80) and, at the same
time, select the SPLIT Keyboard mode and activate the
MBS part – and vice versa.
Note: Pressing the ASSIGN SW button you assign this function to does not mean that the Arranger stops. If you
switched on the Arr Hold function (page 80), the last recognized chord will go on sounding, so that your MBS part may
drown in the accompaniment. We therefore suggest you
assign the “Arranger Hold” function (see above) to the other
ASSIGN SW button and use it to switch off the Arranger
Hold function, so that the Arranger only plays the drum
pattern of the selected Music Style.
● Piano/Standard—By pressing the ASSIGN SW button,
you alternate between the Standard and Piano Style
Arranger Chord modes. When the former is selected, the
chord recognition area (page 80) is automatically set to
LEFT. When you switch to Piano Style, the chord recognition area is automatically set to WHOLE. Furthermore,
the Upper 1 part is activated (if it was off).
(3) Press the [EXIT] button to return to the main page.
EXIT
63
G-70 Music Workstation
Using the performance functions
Using the D Beam Controller
The D Beam Controller allows you to control various
aspects of your performance, or to add something to
the music, by moving your hand, head, etc., in the air.
You only need to make sure that you do so over the
two “eyes” and within a 40cm (±16”) range. Your
movements are translated into musical expression.
Let’s first try out the DJ GEAR functions.
(1) Press the D BEAM button that is assigned to the
function you wish to use (here the [DJ¥GEAR] button):
D Beam functions
The D Beam Controller has two sensors that detect
motion (such as your hand or body movements) in
front of it. These “sensed” positions are translated into
MIDI messages that can be assigned to a variety of
parameters.
(1) If you want to assign another function to the D
BEAM without actually selecting it, press and hold
the D BEAM button that is assigned to the function you wish to use.
If you also wish to switch this function on, briefly
press the corresponding button.
This switches on the D Beam controller, while the display changes to:
(2) Start playback of a Music Style (page 25) or song
(page 38).
(3) Move your hand towards and away from the D
Beam’s “eyes”.
There are 4 groups (DJ GEAR, SOUND EFX, INSTRUM.,
and CONTROLS).
(2) Press the field that corresponds to the desired
function (see below).
(3) Use the [DJ≈GEAR], [SOUND≈EFX], [INSTRUM] and
[CONTROLS] fields to select the remaining groups
and assign the desired function as well.
The assignments of all four groups (DJ GEAR, SOUND
EFX, INSTRUM, CONTROLS) will be written to a User
Program (one per group), so that you can also alternate between these groups while playing – and still
use your favorite settings.
r
DJ Gear
What you hear now is the “VinylRPM” effect. Now
let’s do some scratching…
(4) Press the [SCRATCH] field.
(5) Again move your hand towards and away from the
D Beam.
Now you should hear a scratch sound.
Try out some other effects by pressing the
[SOUND¥EFX], [INSTRUMENTS], and [CONTROL] fields
and selecting one of the available options.
(6) Press the [EXIT] button to return to the main page.
64
EXIT
● Vinyl RPM—Allows you to simulate the sound you hear
when manually turning a vinyl record to locate (cue) the
position where you wish to start playback.
● Cutting—This is a very powerful filter effect that allows
you to suppress the high frequencies in a rhythmic way
(like a DJ does sometimes).
● TT Motor—simulates the effect you hear when you suddenly stop a turntable: the playback speed decreases,
while the pitch drops and the sound becomes muffled.
● Scratching—The D Beam Controller can be used for adding scratch noises. You know what that is, don’t you…?
● Tape Rewind—Allows you add the sound you hear when
you rewind a cassette tape without stopping playback
(the music plays backwards and at high speed).
G-70 Music Workstation r
Using the D Beam Controller
Sound EFX
Here, you can select various “noises” to be added to
your music simply by moving your hand over the D
Beam. We will not try to describe them: just try them
out!
If necessary, use the [PAGE¥1]~[PAGE¥3] fields to go
to another page.
Instrum
In this case, the D Beam will play musical notes. The
pitch and chords of those patterns depend on the
notes you play on the keyboard. Please try out the
options on offer. It’s the quickest way to find out
how they sound and work.
If necessary, use the [PAGE¥1] and [PAGE¥2] fields to
switch pages.
Controls
The options on this page allow you to control one of
the G-70’s functions:
● Start/Stop Style—Depending on the current condition
of the Arranger (running or stopped), one move inside
the D Beam’s range stops (or starts) it. A second movement will start (or stop) it again.
● Start/Stop Song—Depending on the current condition
of the Recorder (running or stopped), one move inside
the D Beam’s range stops (or starts) it. A second movement will start (or stop) it again.
● Fade OUT—Fade Outs are extremely popular in pop
music, and the G-70 allows you to end a song just like
the original. To do so, move your hand inside the D
Beam’s range. The volume then gradually decreases until
it reaches zero.
● Auto Fill—Allows you to switch the [AUTO¥FILL¥IN] button (and function) on and off.
● Fill Up—Triggers the Fill-In that takes you to the next
Variation (i.e. from MAIN “1” to “2”). You can use this
function up to three times to jump to the most complex
level (“Variation 4”). If you then use the D Beam again,
however, nothing happens. You thus cannot cycle back
to the lowest level (“Variation 1”).
● Fill Down—Triggers the Fill-In that takes you to the previous Variation (i.e. from MAIN “2” to “1”). You can use
this function up to three times to jump to the simplest
level (“Variation 1”). If you then use the Aftertouch
again, however, nothing happens. You thus cannot cycle
back to the highest level (“Variation 4”).
● ADrum On/Off—This setting allows you to switch the
Arranger’s ADrums part on and off using the D Beam
Controller. There are also combined on/off options (see
below).
● ABass On/Off—This setting allows you to switch the
ABass part on and off using the D Beam Controller.
● Accomp On/Off—This setting allows you to switch the
Accompaniment parts (ACC1~6) on and off using the D
Beam Controller.
● ABs+ADr On/Off—This setting allows you to use the D
Beam for switching on and off the ABass and ADrums
parts.
● ABs Acc On/Off—This setting allows you to use the D
Beam for switching on and off the ABass and ACC1~6
parts.
● ADr Acc On/Off—This setting allows you to use the D
Beam for switching on and off the ADrums and ACC1~6
parts.
● Tempo Up—Select this option to increase the current
Arranger or Recorder tempo. By moving your hand outside the D Beam’s range, you return to the previous
tempo value.
● Tempo Down—Select this option to increase decrease
the current Arranger or Recorder tempo. By moving your
hand outside the D Beam’s range, you return to the previous tempo value.
Note: Options marked with a “º” only apply to the currently
active Keyboard parts.
If necessary, use the [PAGE¥1]~[PAGE¥4] fields to go
to another page.
Note: If you plan to use the D Beam Controller while controlling the Arranger, it is probably a good idea to activate its Hold
function (page 80).
● Pitch Upº—By moving your hand over the D Beam, you
can generate a value between “64” (no Pitch Bend) and
“127” (maximum upward bend). As soon as you move
your hand outside the D Beam’s reach (higher than
±40cm above the “eyes” or further to the left or right),
the value returns to “64” (no Pitch Bend). The maximum
bend interval is two semi-tones.
65
G-70 Music Workstation
Using the performance functions
● Pitch Downº—By moving your hand over the D Beam,
you can generate a value between “64” (no Pitch Bend)
and “0” (maximum downward bend). As soon as you
move your hand outside the D Beam’s reach, the value
returns to “64” (no Pitch Bend).
● D Modulationº—Select this function if you want the D
Beam to duplicate the modulation function of the
Bender/Modulation lever.
● Cut&Reso Upº—(Only for Upper1, 2 and/or 3) By moving
your hand over the D Beam, you can vary the current TVF
Cutoff value (see also p. 127) of the Upper1/2/3 part. The
Resonance parameter will be set to “+63” (maximum),
while the Cutoff frequency can be controlled between
“0” (no change) and “+63” (maximum increase). This
allows you to create some nifty filter effects that are
particularly useful for Dance/Techno music. When you
move your hand outside the D Beam’s range, both Resonance and TVF Cutoff return to their original values
(“0”= no change).
Note: If TVF Cutoff is already set to “+63”, you cannot
increase it using the D Beam Controller. In that case, the following option is probably more useful. Also note that some
Tones already use the highest possible TVF Cutoff value by
default, in which case you cannot add more overtones (by
opening the filter even further).
● Cut&Reso Downº—(Only for Upper1, 2 and/or 3) By
moving your hand over the D Beam, you can vary the
current TVF Cutoff value (see also p. 127) of the Upper1/
2/3 part. The Resonance parameter will be set to “+63”
(maximum), while the Cutoff frequency can be controlled between “0” (no change) and “–64” (lowest possible TVF Cutoff setting). When you move your hand outside the D Beam’s range, both Resonance and TVF Cutoff
return to their original values (“0”= no change).
Note: The TVF Cutoff frequency cannot be lowered if TVF
Cutoff is already set to “–64”.
● Arpeggio Oct 1/2/3—By moving your hand over the D
Beam, you cause the D Beam part to play arpeggios (broken chords) based on the notes extracted from the current song. Depending on the setting you select here, the
notes will be arpeggiated over 1, 2, or 3 octaves.
Note: Do not forget to assign a suitable Tone to the LW2
part, which acts as “D Beam part”.
● Chord Oct 1/2/3—By holding your hand inside the D
Beam’s range, you cause the D Beam part to sound the
notes extracted from the current song. You could use
this function to add syncopated brass or guitar “hits” to
your melody. The velocity value used for playing these
notes is “100”. The number (1, 2, or 3) bears on the
octave of this “added chord”: 1= Ab3~G4, 2= Ab4~G5,
and 3= Ab5~G6. Move your hand outside the D Beam’s
range to stop the D Beam part from sounding the chord.
r
Note: Do not forget to assign a suitable Tone to the LW2
part, which acts as “D Beam part”.
● Minus One—By holding your hand inside the D Beam’s
range, you switch off the parts that can be muted with
the [MINUS¥ONE] button at that time (page 41).
● Rotary Slow/Fast—Allows you to select the slow or fast
speeds of the Rotary effect. This only works, if the Rotary
effect is currently assigned to the Multi-FX.
66
(4) Press the [EXIT] button to return to the main page.
EXIT
G-70 Music Workstation r
Using optional footswitches
Using optional footswitches
FC7 PEDAL
The G-70 allows you to connect an optional FC-7 Foot
Controller to the FC7 PEDAL socket.
FC-7 PEDAL
HOLD
FOOT
FOOTSWITCH SWITCH
FOOT
PEDAL
At first, the switches of this pedal board are assigned
Arranger control functions. You can, however, assign
other functions to these switches.
Note: The FC-7 assignments apply to the G-70 and are not written to individual User Programs. Selecting another User Program
is therefore not enough to reconfigure the FC-7. The assignments
can, however, be saved (along with all User Programs) using “Save
User Program Set” on p. 205.
(1) Press the [MENU] button.
MENU
The display changes to:
(2) Press the [FOOT¥CONTROLLER] field, followed by
the [FC-7] field.
Note: The assigned functions apply to the G-70 as a whole
and are not written to individual User Programs.
(3) Press the pedal field of the footswitch you wish to
assign another function to.
Example: to change the assignment of the second
pedal from the right, press the last-but-one pedal
field.
(4) Use the [DATA÷ENTRY] dial or the [DEC]/[INC] buttons to select the desired function:
● Start/Stop, Intro, Variat 1, Variat 2, Variat 3, Variat 4,
Ending—These are the default functions of the FC-7’s
footswitches (1~7). They duplicate the functions of the
STYLE CONTROL buttons.
● MBass/KBD Arranger—Allows you to set the Arranger
Chord parameter to “Off” (chord recognition as well as
ABS recognition off, see p. 80) and, at the same time,
select the SPLIT Keyboard mode and activate the MBS
part – and vice versa.
Note: Pressing the footswitch you assign this function to
does not mean that the Arranger stops. If you switched on
the Arr Hold function (page 80), the last recognized chord
will go on sounding, so that your MBS part may drown in
the accompaniment. We therefore suggest you assign the
“Arranger Hold” function to an ASSIGN SW button (or
another FC-7 footswitch) and use it to switch off the
Arranger Hold function, so that the Arranger only plays the
drum pattern of the selected Music Style.
● Piano/Standard—You can alternate between Standard
and Piano Style Arranger Chord modes. When the
former is selected, the chord recognition area (page 80)
is automatically set to “LEFT”. When you switch to Piano
Style, the chord recognition area is automatically set to
“WHOLE”. Furthermore, the KBD MODE [WHOLE] button
is switched on and the Upper 1 part is activated (if it was
off).
● Half Bar on Fill In—The assigned footswitch allows you
to switch the Half Bar function on and off. Certain pop
songs in 4/4 contain bars that only last two beats. The
usual place for such a bar is between the first and the
second verse. Another favorite position for “halved” bars
is at the end of a chorus or the bridge. This does not
change Style playback right away. Only when a Fill-In
starts will the Half Bar function be activated and play
half the number of beats of the fill you selected.
● Arr Chord Off—Allows you to switch the Arranger’s
chord recognition off, in which case only the drum/percussion of the selected Music Style keeps playing (or can
be used). See also (page 80).
● Arranger Hold—Allows you to switch the Arranger Hold
function on and off. See p. 80.
● Dynamic Arranger—Allows you to switch the Dynamic
Arranger function on and off. See page 81 for details.
● Arranger RIT Tempo, Arranger ACC Tempo—The
assigned footswitch performs the same function as the
RIT or ACC parameter (page 82).
● Arranger Default Tempo—The assigned FC-7 footswitch
allows you to reset the Arranger tempo to the preset
value (contained in the Music Style itself).
● Reset/Start Tempo—This function allows you have the
Arranger start on the first beat of the currently selected
Music Style pattern when you press the assigned footswitch. Use it when you are accompanying a singer or
soloist whose timing is a little shaky, and suddenly notice
that the Arranger lags one or two beats behind the
singer/soloist.
● Tap Tempo—Same function as the [TAP] button.
● Bass Inversion—Allows you to switch the Bass Inversion
function on and off (page 75).
● Melody Intelligent—Same function as the
[MELODY¥INTELL] button on the G-70’s front panel: it
allows you to switch Melody Intelligence on and off.
● Scale Upper/Scale Lower—Allows you to assign the
selected Scale Tune (see p. 71) setting to the three Upper
parts.
67
G-70 Music Workstation
Using the performance functions
● Scale Lower—Allows you to assign the selected Scale
Tune (see p. 71) setting to the three Lower parts.
● Keyboard Exchange UP2/1—Allows you to switch off
the UP1 part and activate the UP2 part – and vice versa.
Note: If neither UP1 nor UP2 are on when you first press
the footswitch, one of them is activated.
● Keyboard Exchange LW2/1—Allows you to switch off
the LW1 part and activate the LW2 – and vice versa.
Note: If neither LW1 nor LW2 are on when you first press
the footswitch, one of them is activated.
● Punch In/Out—The footswitch can be used to activate
and switch off punch in/out recording using the G-70’s
sequencer (page 157).
● Portamento—Switches the Portamento function
(page 91) on and off.
● Soft, Sostenuto, Hold—The assigned footswitch can be
used as a Soft, Sostenuto, or Sustain (Hold pedal). Note
that “Hold” can also be controlled using a dedicated (but
optional) DP-2, DP-6, or BOSS FS-5U footswitch connected to the HOLD FOOTSWITCH socket.
● Hold Lower1—The footswitch does the same as the
LOWER 1 HOLD function (see also p. 92).
● Hold Lower2—The footswitch does the same as the
LOWER 2 HOLD function (see also p. 92).
● Hold Lower 1–2—The footswitch allows you to switch
the LOWER 1/2 HOLD functions on and off.
● Rotary HB Slow/Fast—Allows you to select the slow or
fast speed of the Rotary effect. This only works if the
Harmonic Bars are being used by UP1, LW1 and/or MBS.
● Rotary HB On/Off—Allows you to switch the Rotary
effect on (first time) and off (second). This only works if
the Harmonic Bars are being used by UP1, LW1 and/or
MBS.
● User Program Up, User Program Down—Allows you to
select the next (“Up”) or previous (“Down”) User Program.
● Play/Stop Song—Starts and stops the Recorder. Same
function as the [PLAY÷STOP¥®÷ª] button.
● Talk—The footswitch performs the same function as the
[TALK] button in the VOCAL HARMONIST section.
● Harmony On/Off—The footswitch allows you to switch
the currently selected HARMONY function ([VOCODER],
[SMALL] or [ENSEMBLE]) on and off. Select this function
if you want to switch the harmonies on for the choruses,
and off for the verses (for example), while playing on the
keyboard.
● Minus One—The footswitch allows you to switch the
Minus-One function on and off. See page 41 for how to
select the option that will be used when the Minus-One
function is on.
Hold Footswitch (Sustain)
Also called “Sustain pedal” or “Damper” pedal, the footswitch you connect to the HOLD FOOTSWITCH socket
allows you to hold the notes you play on the keyboard
in much the same way as on an acoustic piano. Though
you cannot assign other functions to this footswitch,
you can decide when a given part should respond to
these messages.
The Hold function is available for the following parts:
UP1/2/3, LW1/2, and M.Bass, on condition that you
select WHOLE keyboard mode. In SPLIT mode, the sustain pedal’s Hold function only works for the rightmost part. When UP1/2/3 are layered, the Hold effect
applies to those Upper parts. (This applies to the “Auto”
setting.)
You can also specify whether or not the Melody Intelligence function (MELODY INTELL) should respond to
Hold messages.
Note: Do not forget to connect an optional DP-2, DP-6, or BOSS
FS-5U footswitch to the HOLD FOOTSWITCH socket.
(1) Press the [MENU] button.
MENU
The display changes to:
(2) Press the [FOOT¥CONTROLLER] field, followed by
the [HOLD¥FOOTSW.] field.
(5) Press the [EXIT] button to return to the main page.
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EXIT
68
(3) Use the PART fields to select the Keyboard part
whose HOLD setting you want to change.
(4) Use the [DATA÷ENTRY] dial or the [DEC]/[INC] buttons to select the function (“Hold Assign”).
“Auto” means that the part in question only responds
to Hold messages if it is assigned to the right half
(SPLIT) or the entire keyboard (WHOLE). “On” means
that the part in question always responds to Hold
G-70 Music Workstation r
Using optional footswitches
messages, even if it is assigned to the left half of the
keyboard. “Off”, finally, means that the part does not
respond to Hold messages.
(5) If necessary, press another PART field and change
the HOLD ASSIGN setting for the selected part.
(6) Press the [EXIT] button to return to the main page.
EXIT
Foot Switch
An optional DP-2, DP-6, or BOSS FS-5U footswitch connected to the FOOT SWITCH socket can be used to perform various functions. If you do not change the factory setting, this footswitch allows you to start and
stop Arranger playback. The footswitch assignment can
be saved to a User Program.
The default setting is “Start/Stop”, which allows you to
start and stop Arranger playback. Note also the Soft
and Sostenuto options as well as the possibility to
select one of several Hold functions. The footswitch can
only perform one function at a time, though.
(1) Press the [MENU] button.
MENU
The display changes to:
(2) Press the [FOOT¥CONTROLLER] field, followed by
the [FOOT¥SWITCH] field.
(3) Press the field that corresponds to the function
you wish to assign to the footswitch.
If necessary, use the [PAGE¥1]~[PAGE¥3] fields to go
to another page.
● Start/Stop—Starts and stops Arranger playback. Same
function as the [START÷STOP] button.
● Play/Stop—Starts and stops the Recorder and 16-track
sequencer. Same function as the [PLAY÷STOP¥®÷ª] button.
● Intro—Selects the Intro of the current Variation level
(1~4) during Arranger playback. Same function as
[INTRO].
● Ending—Selects the Ending of the current Variation
level (1~4) during Arranger playback.
● Variat 1~4—The footswitch can be used to switch to the
VARIATION level you select here. That Music Style pattern is used from the next downbeat onward.
● Bass Inversion—Allows you to switch the Bass Inversion
function on and off (page 75).
● Arr/M.Bass—Allows you to set the Arranger Chord
parameter to “Off” (chord recognition plus ABS recognition off, see p. 80) and, at the same time, activate the
KBD MODE [SPLIT] button and the MBS part – and vice
versa.
● Piano/Standard—You can alternate between Standard
and Piano Style Arranger Chord modes. When the
former is selected, the chord recognition area (page 80)
is automatically set to “LEFT”. When you switch to Piano
Style, the chord recognition area is automatically set to
“WHOLE”. Furthermore, the KBD MODE [WHOLE] button
is switched on and the Upper 1 part is activated (if it was
off).
● Half Bar on Fill In—The footswitch allows you to switch
the Half Bar function on and off. Certain pop songs in 4/
4 contain bars that only last two beats. The usual place
for such a bar is between the first and the second verse.
This does not change Style playback right away. Only
when a Fill-In starts will the Half Bar function be activated and play half the number of beats of the fill you
selected.
● Arranger Hold—Allows you to switch the Arranger Hold
function on and off. See p. 80.
● Dynamic Arranger—Allows you to switch the Dynamic
Arranger function on and off. See page 81 for details.
● Rotary HB S/F—Allows you to select the slow or fast
speed of the Rotary effect. This only works if the Harmonic Bars are being used by UP1, LW1 and/or MBS.
● Rotary HB On/Off—Allows you to switch the Rotary
effect on (first time) and off (second). This only works if
the Harmonic Bars are being used by UP1, LW1 and/or
MBS.
● Scale Upper—Allows you to assign the selected Scale
Tune (see p. 71) setting to the three Upper parts.
● Scale Lower—Allows you to assign the selected Scale
Tune (see p. 71) setting to the three Lower parts.
● Arr Chord Off—Allows you to switch the Arranger’s
chord recognition off, in which case only the drum/percussion of the selected Music Style keeps playing (or can
be used). See also (page 80).
● User Prg Up, User Prg Down—Allows you to select the
next (“Up”) or previous (“Down”) User Program.
● Punch In/Out—The footswitch can be used to activate
and switch off punch in/out recording using the G-70’s
sequencer (page 157).
● Portamento—Switches the Portamento function
(page 91) on and off.
69
G-70 Music Workstation
Using the performance functions
● Soft, Sostenuto, Hold—The footswitch can be used as a
Soft, Sostenuto, or Sustain (Hold pedal). Note that “Hold”
can also be controlled using a dedicated (but optional)
DP-2, DP-6, or BOSS FS-5U footswitch connected to the
HOLD FOOTSWITCH socket.
● Hold Lower1—The footswitch does the same as the
LOWER 1 HOLD function (see also p. 92).
● Hold Lower2—The footswitch does the same as the
LOWER 2 HOLD function (see also p. 92).
● Hold Lower 1–2—The footswitch allows you to switch
the LOWER 1/2 HOLD functions on and off.
● Talk—The footswitch performs the same function as the
[TALK] button in the VOCAL HARMONIST section.
● Harmony On/Off—The footswitch allows you to switch
the currently selected HARMONY function ([VOCODER],
[SMALL] or [ENSEMBLE]) on and off. Select this function
if you want to switch the harmonies on for the choruses,
and off for the verses (for example), while playing on the
keyboard.
● Minus One—The footswitch allows you to switch the
Minus-One function on and off. See page 41 for how to
select the option that will be used when the Minus-One
function is on.
● Keyboard Exchange UP2/1—Allows you to switch off
the UP1 part and activate the UP2 part – and vice versa.
Note: If neither UP1 nor UP2 are on when you first press the
footswitch, one of them is activated.
● Keyboard Exchange LW2/1—Allows you to switch off
the LW1 part and activate the LW2 part – and vice versa.
Note: If neither LW1 nor LW2 are on when you first press the
footswitch, one of them is activated.
(4) Press the [EXIT] button to return to the main page.
EXIT
The display changes to:
(2) Press the [FOOT¥CONTROLLER] field, followed by
the [FOOT¥PEDAL] field.
(3) Use the ARR PART and KBD PART fields to select
the Arranger or Keyboard part whose setting you
want to change.
(4) Press the [FOOT¥PEDAL¥ASSIGN] field and use the
[DATA÷ENTRY] dial or the [DEC]/[INC] buttons to
select “Expression”.
Select “Off” if the part in question should not
respond to movements of the expression pedal.
(5) Press the [UP] or [DOWN] field and use the
[DATA÷ENTRY] dial or the [DEC]/[INC] buttons to set
the value.
You can also press the [DATA÷ENTRY] dial to call up
the on-screen NUMERIC ENTRY pad.
Expression (Foot Pedal)
An optional EV-5, EV-7 or BOSS FV-300L expression
pedal connected to the FOOT PEDAL socket allows you
to control the volume of all parts by foot. You can
reverse the expression pedal’s effect and specify that
certain parts are not to be controlled by the expression
pedal.
(1) Press the [MENU] button.
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MENU
70
Enter the value you want to use, then press the
[ENTER] field. If necessary, you can use the [Delete]
field to correct erroneous entries before pressing
[ENTER].
[UP] and [DOWN] refer to the volume that is used
when the expression pedal is depressed ([UP], highest
volume) or in the upright position ([DOWN], lowest
volume).
G-70 Music Workstation r
Scale Tuning
● UP/DOWN (0~127)—You do not need to specify “0” for
the DOWN position. Selecting any other value will
reduce the volume of the selected parts up to the
“DOWN” value. Likewise, you do not need to specify
“127” as maximum value (for “UP”).
Note: If you select “Expression”, the DOWN and UP values represent MIDI Expression (CC11) values.
It is perfectly possible to set the DOWN value to “127”
and the UP value to “0”, so that the selected part only
sounds when the Expression pedal is in the upright
position. This can be used for some clever effects:
instead of alternating between UP1 and UP2 by varying your velocity (page 60), which requires a considerable amount of “striking precision”, you could
invert UP2’s response to the expression pedal, so that
UP1 does not sound when UP2 does, and vice versa.
(6) Press the [EXIT] button to return to the main page.
Scale Tuning
Another useful function is called Scale Tuning. It allows
you to use oriental, Asian, and other scales in much the
same way as on an oriental keyboard.
The G-70 contains three memories where you can store
your favorite tunings. These are three global memories
that apply to all User Programs.
(1) Press the [MENU] button.
MENU
The display changes to:
EXIT
(2) Press the [TUNING] field, followed by the
[SCALE¥TUNING] field.
(3) Press a [MEMORY≈1]~[MEMORY≈3] field to select a
Scale Tune memory.
This will change the pitch of the following notes
(“–50” means that the note in question is tuned a
quarter tone down):
Memory 1
Memory 2
Memory 3
E (–50)
B (–50)
E (–50)
A (–50)
C# (–50)
F# (–50)
The pitch of the other notes is left unchanged. The
button icons corresponding to the notes whose pitch
is changed “light” for easy identification.
You will notice that every note can be selected only
once. That is because the value you specify applies to
all notes of the same name. If you change the tuning
of the “C”, that value is added to, or subtracted from,
all Cs (C1, C2, C3, etc.).
71
G-70 Music Workstation
Using the performance functions
If you now returned to the main page, you would
notice that the G-70 alerts you to the fact that the
Scale Tuning function has been switched on (“Off”,
“On”, “Mem 1~3”):
But let us not return to the main page just yet.
(7) Press the [UP¥PARTS] and/or [LW¥PARTS] field to
specify which Keyboard parts are affected by the
Scale Tune settings:
Upper 1/2/3 and/or Lower 1/2. It is perfectly possible
to switch on both fields. If neither of them lights, all
of the G-70’s parts will adopt the Scale Tune setting.
■Storing your new scale
If you think you’ll need that scale in the future, you
should memorize –or “WRITE”– it:
(8) Program the scale you wish to save by switching
the desired notes on or off (see above).
(9) Press the [WRITE] field in the upper left corner of
the display.
The display now looks as follows:
■Changing the pitch of other notes
Changing the pitch of other notes than the ones
already highlighted is a matter of pressing the
desired on-screen buttons in question. And defeating
the pitch change of a note whose button icon “lights”
is as easy as pressing that field again (the button icon
then goes dark).
Press all lit on-screen button icons to switch the
Scale Tuning function off again.
■Customizing the pitch changes
At first, pressing an on-screen button means that its
pitch is lowered by 50 cents (1/4 tone, or “–50”).
There may be situations where you want to raise the
pitch of a note, or select a different tuning:
(4) Press the value field of the note/key whose pitch
you want to change.
(10) Press a [MEMORY≈1]~[MEMORY≈3] field to save
your settings in the corresponding Scale Tune
memory.
The display now responds with the following message and then returns to the Scale Tune page.
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(11) Press the [EXIT] button to return to the main page.
That field now “lights”. As stated earlier, the pitch of
all notes is at first set to “–50” (one quarter tone
down). You can, however, select any value between
“–64” (slightly lower than a quarter tone down) and
“63” (slightly higher than a quarter tone up).
(5) Use the [DATA÷ENTRY] dial or the [DEC]/[INC] buttons to set the desired pitch.
You can also press the [DATA÷ENTRY] dial and enter
the value using the on-screen numeric pad.
If you selected a [MEMORY] field, the “EDIT” message
is displayed to indicate that the stored settings have
changed.
(6) Repeat steps (4) and (5) for the other notes whose
pitch you want to change.
Note: This pitch is only used when the corresponding button
icon lights. Do not forget to switch it on.
72
G-70 Music Workstation r
Metronome
Metronome
The G-70 is equipped with a metronome that can be
used in various situations. To use the metronome, here
is what you need to do:
(1) Press the [METRONOME] button (so that it lights).
METRO
NOME
(2) Start Arranger or song playback, and you will hear
the metronome.
(3) Press the [METRONOME] button again to switch off
the metronome.
Metronome settings
The G-70 also allows you to specify when and how the
metronome should sound:
(1) Press and hold the [METRONOME] button.
The display now looks as follows:
■MODE
Yet another option on the above display page is to
specify when the metronome should sound:
[ALWAYS]: The metronome even counts when playback is stopped. Press this field if you want to hear
the metronome at all times (which is probably only
useful when practising a new song).
[PLAY]: Press this field if the metronome should only
sound while the Arranger or Recorder is playing.
[REC]: Press this field if the metronome should only
sound during song or Music Style recording (see
pages 154 and 179).
■METRONOME INTERNAL
The metronome signal transmitted to the OUTPUT
MAIN and PHONES sockets.
The metronome signal is always sent to the G-70’s
METRONOME OUT socket (rear panel). You can connect headphones to this socket and set the metronome’s volume using the LEVEL knob. This option
may be useful as “click track” for a drummer.
(3) Press the [EXIT] button to return to the main page.
EXIT
Note: When neither the Arranger nor the Recorder/16-track
sequencer is running, the [METRONOME] button flashes to
indicate the current tempo.
(2) Set the available parameters to your liking:
■VOLUME LEVEL
Press the [LOW], [MEDIUM] or [HIGH] field to specify
the metronome’s basic level. The default setting is
[HIGH]. You probably only need to change this setting
after switching [METRONOME¥INTERNAL] off. See
below.
■COUNT IN
This parameter allows you to switch the Count-In
function on (to “1 BAR” or “2 BAR”) or off. When on,
the metronome will count in the specified number of
measures (bars) before the Arranger starts playing.
Note: This count-in is also available when you are using the
Sync Start function. In that case, playing a chord means that
the Arranger only starts after 1 or 2 measures.
[OFF]: The count-in function is off.
[1¥BAR], [2¥BAR]: Whenever you start Arranger playback, the metronome counts in 1 or 2 bars before the
selected Music Style pattern starts playing.
Note: The Count-In function can be used independently of the
metronome. There is thus no need to activate the metronome
in order to hear the count-in.
73
G-70 Music Workstation
Additional Arranger/Style functions
6. Additional Arranger/Style functions
Before telling you even more about the Music Styles, allow us to explain the difference between Music Styles and the
Arranger. The Arranger is a kind of sequencer that plays back the accompaniments you select. Those accompaniments
are always related to a given musical genre (or “style”), and are therefore called “Music Styles”. The G-70’s accompaniments are a lot more than just one pattern that goes on playing until you stop it: they comprise several patterns (or divisions).
Arranger parts
Each accompaniment (or Music Style) consists of up to
eight parts:
ADR: Accompaniment drums. This part takes care of the
rhythm section. It triggers the drum and percussion
sounds of the Drum Set assigned to the ADR part.
ABS: Accompaniment bass. This part plays the bass line
of the Music Style you select.
ACC1~ACC6: These are the melodic accompaniment
parts. Depending on the Music Style you selected, only
a few of them actually play something, which can be
anything from a piano line, a guitar line, an organ line,
etc., to synthesizer chords. Not all ACC parts play
chords, though.
The ABS and ACC1~6 parts rely on the chord or note
information you play in the chord recognition area
(page 80), i.e. the keyboard zone you assign to the
Arranger.
Playback functions (Style Control)
Starting a Music Style
Music Styles can be started in several ways:
(1) Press the EASY SETTING [ARR] button (its indicator
lights).
• Press the [START÷STOP] button (so that it lights) to
start the Arranger right away.
The length of the Intro depends on the Style you
select. At the end of the Intro, the Arranger switches
to the Music Style pattern you selected with the
[MAIN] and one of the VARIATION buttons.
STYLE CONTROL
INTRO
MAIN
END/RIT
BASS
INVERSION
1
VARIATION
2
3
4
AUTO
FILL IN
SYNC
START STOP
Note: The Intro is “renewable”, i.e. you can press the [INTRO]
button again while the Intro is playing. Doing so on the fourth
beat of the first Intro bar, for instance, will retrigger the beginning of the Intro in the second bar.
—OR—
• Press the SYNC [START] button and play a chord (or
just one note in INTELLIGENT mode, see p. 80). In this
case, the Arranger starts as soon as you play a note or
chord in the chord recognition area (see p. 80).
Note: Do not play chord changes while the Intro is running.
Unlike the MAIN patterns, INTRO patterns usually contain
chord changes. Chord recognition is not deactivated during
Intro playback, so that the beginning of a song may jump from
one key to another in a rather unnatural way. This recognition
can be switched off, however, so that you do not have to worry
about it (see “Intro & Ending Alteration” on page 81).
Note: You can also start and stop the Arranger with the D
Beam controller (page 65).
Stopping Music Styles
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START/STOP
If you start the Arranger without playing a chord in
the chord recognition area beforehand, you will only
hear the drums of the selected Music Style. In most
cases, however, the G-70 has already memorized a
chord, so that you will hear the full accompaniment.
—OR—
• Stop playback of the current Style (see below), press
the [INTRO] button (so that it lights), one of the VARIATION [1]~[4] buttons to select the “complexity” of
the introduction, and then the [START÷STOP] button.
This starts Style playback with a musical introduction.
74
There are three ways to stop Style playback:
• Press [START÷STOP] to stop playback right away.
—OR—
• Press the [END/RIT] button (so that it lights) and one
of the VARIATION [1]~[4] buttons to activate the Ending function. The Ending (or coda) pattern will start
at the beginning of the next measure (next downbeat).
Note: Do not play chord changes while the Ending is running.
Unlike the MAIN accompaniments, Ending patterns usually
contain chord changes. Chord recognition is not deactivated
during Intro or Ending playback, so that the ending of a song
may jump from one key to another in a rather unnatural way.
This recognition can be switched off, however, so that you do
not have to worry about it (see p. 81).
—OR—
• Press SYNC [STOP] and release all keys in the chord
recognition area of the keyboard. The accompaniment stops immediately.
G-70 Music Workstation r
Selecting other Style divisions
There is no need to restart Style playback manually if
you also activate SYNC [START] (see above).
Note: You can also use a Fade-Out. See page 138 for details.
You can use fill-ins (transitions) to go from one MAIN
VARIATION pattern to the next by switching on the
[AUTO¥FILL] button before pressing another (or the
same) MAIN VARIATION [1]~[4] button.
About Sync Start & Stop
If you’ve never used an arranger keyboard before, the
status of the SYNC [START] button is the single most
important function to look out for after switching on
your instrument. If it is on, playing just one note on the
keyboard may cause the Arranger to start playing when
you don’t want it to.
STYLE CONTROL
INTRO
MAIN
END/RIT
BASS
INVERSION
1
VARIATION
2
3
4
AUTO
FILL IN
SYNC
START STOP
STYLE CONTROL
INTRO
MAIN
END/RIT
BASS
INVERSION
1
VARIATION
2
3
4
AUTO
FILL IN
SYNC
START STOP
Once you get to know the G-70 a little better, you will
appreciate this function, though.
SYNC START means that the Arranger starts as soon as
you play a note or chord in the chord recognition area
of the keyboard. (If the EASY SETTING [ARR] button
lights, this area is the left half of the keyboard. See
p. 80 for details.)
The G-70 also provides a SYNC STOP button. That
function causes the Arranger to stop playback as soon
as you release all keys in the chord recognition area.
This is great for songs where you need breaks (i.e. one
or several beats of silence).
Note: When you use ONE TOUCH to configure the G-70, SYNC
[START] is switched on.
Selecting other Style divisions
You can “professionalize” your performance with the
Arranger by selecting different accompaniment patterns.
Here’s a quick overview of how the G-70’s Music Styles
are structured:
MAIN VARIATION [1] The simplest of the four basic accompaniment patterns. This pattern is ideal
for the first verse of a song.
MAIN VARIATION [2] A slightly more complex pattern. Consider using it for the second and third
verses.
MAIN VARIATION [3] This pattern could be used for the first
chorus(es).
MAIN VARIATION [4] This is the most complex pattern that
could be used for the final choruses
and/or the bridge.
The numeric button you press flashes until the new
pattern is used (after which the button lights steadily).
The fill-in that is played between the current and the
next VARIATION pattern depends on where you come
from. Each transition from one VARIATION pattern to
another (e.g. from [1] to [2]) is different from the others
(from [2] to [3], from [3] to [4], and from [4] to [1]).
There are three Fill-Ins for the upward direction (called
“Up” by the Style Composer) and three for downward
moves (“Dw”).
Note: You can also press [INTRO] in the middle of a performance.
In that case, the indicator flashes until the end of the current bar
and then lights on the next downbeat to indicate that the
Arranger is playing the introductory pattern.
Other ways of selecting Arranger patterns
You can also switch among Music Style patterns using
the keyboard’s aftertouch function, the ASSIGN SW
buttons or a footswitch. Here are the pattern selection
functions you can assign:
Aftertouch
Fill Up, Fill Down, Fill Remain, Variation Up,
Variation Down, Intro, Ending (page 61)
ASSIGN SW
Half Bar on Fill In (page 63)
D Beam
Fill Up, Fill Down (page 65)
FC-7 PEDAL
Start/Stop, Intro, Variat 1, Variat 2, Variat 3,
Variat 4, Ending (page 67)
Foot Switch
Intro, Ending, Variat 1~4, Half Bar on Fill In
(page 69)
Note: Even aftertouch messages generated outside the chord
recognition area (see p. 80) trigger the selected switching function.
Bass Inversion
The Bass Inversion function allows you to change the
way the Arranger reads the chords you play.
If this function is off, A.BASS part (ABS) plays the root
of the chords that feed the Arranger, while the chords
of the ACCOMP 1~6 parts are voiced in such a way as
to avoid semitone intervals (for complex chords) that
wouldn’t sound very nice.
Bass Inversion gives you more artistic license because
you specify the notes played by the ABS part. Switch on
Bass Inversion for songs that rely on bass rather than
on chord patterns (for example C – C/B – C/Bb, etc.).
75
G-70 Music Workstation
Additional Arranger/Style functions
(1) Press the [BASS¥INVERSION] button (so that it
lights) to switch this function on.
STYLE CONTROL
INTRO
MAIN
END/RIT
BASS
INVERSION
1
VARIATION
2
3
4
AUTO
FILL IN
SYNC
START STOP
(2) Press it again to switch this function off again.
Note: You can also assign this function to an optional footswitch (page 69) or FC-7 See (page 67).
Melody Intelligence
The Arranger can play chords and also add a countermelody to he notes you play. Those automatic harmonies are based on the chords you play in the chord recognition area.
This counter-melody is played by the MELODY INTELL
part. There are 18 harmony types to choose from.
(1) Press the [MELODY¥INTELL] button (so that it
lights).
MELODY
INTELL
This adds a harmony to the notes you play. Do not
forget to switch on the UP1 part (page 57).
(2) To select another harmony type, press and hold the
[MELODY¥INTELL] button until the following page
appears:
(3) Press the field of the desired harmony type (TYPE).
Selecting a Harmony Type also means that the G-70
automatically assigns a suitable sound to the MELODY INTELL part (e.g. a trumpet and sax sounds for
Big Band, etc.).
(4) If the desired option is not displayed, use the
[PAGE¥1]~[PAGE¥3] fields to select another page.
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Note: For “Traditional”, “Latin”, “CntryBallad”, “OctaveType1”,
and “OctaveType2”, only the UP1 part is used. All other Melody
Intelligence Types use both the UP1 and the MELODY INTELL
part, however.
76
You can refine Melody Intelligence control by specifying what velocity value the UP1 notes must have in
order to trigger the MELODY INTEL part. This allows
you to leave the [MELODY¥INTELL] button on at all
times, while only adding harmonies to your solo playing during the choruses by hitting the keys a little
harder.
(5) Use the [DATA÷ENTRY] dial or the [DEC]/[INC] buttons to set the desired “Threshold”.
You can also press the [DATA÷ENTRY] dial and enter
the value using the on-screen numeric pad.
The “Threshold” value represents the lowest velocity
value (between “1” and “127”) the UP1 part must
receive from the keyboard (or via MIDI) in order to
G-70 Music Workstation r
Using the Style Cover function
trigger the MELODY INTELL part. If you don’t need
this switching function, select “Off” (no velocity
value).
(6) Press the [EXIT] button to return to the main page.
(7) Press the [MELODY¥INTELL] button once again to
switch off this automatic harmony function.
Using the Style Cover function
The COVER function provides “masks” that change the
instrumentation of the selected Music Style. Simply by
selecting another preset, you can cause a Viennese
waltz to be played back by a heavy metal band, etc.
Even though the arrangement (rhythm, riffs) does not
change, the Style’s character can be modified beyond
recognition.
(1) Press the [COVER] button once or twice to select
the display page shown below.
Note: You can also modify the COVER settings yourself (see
p. 124).
■Saved Version
The STYLE COVER page contains a [SAVED¥VERSION]
field that works as follows:
There can be three different versions of each Music
Style you use:
[1] The original Music Style without COVER settings. This
version can be selected by pressing the [ORIGINAL]
field on page 1.
[2] The same Music Style with one of the COVER presets
already applied. This version can be saved using the
[SAVE] field. If you save this version, the Music Style in
question will use the COVER settings whenever you
select it using the standard procedure (see p. 27) or the
Style Finder (see p. 86).
[3] A Music Style saved with the [SAVE] field, which you
recall and then alter by selecting another COVER preset (without saving this setting).
In case [3], the [ORIGINAL] field on the STYLE COVER
page temporarily restores the original version with
no COVER data. To return to state [2] after selecting a
different COVER, press the [SAVED¥VERSION] field.
Doing so restores the “original” COVER setting you
saved.
Note: Saving a Music Style with a COVER settings affects all
User Programs that refer to this Style.
Saving a Music Style with a COVER alteration
(2) Select the parts whose instrumentation you want
to change:
• Press the [ALL] field if all instruments should be
replaced.
• Press the [DRUM] field if only the drum and percussion instruments should change.
• Press the [BASS] field if you’re happy with everything
but the bass line’s sound.
(3) Press one of the six fields in the lower half of the
display to select another preset.
If you don’t like any of the presets, press [ORIGINAL]
(page 1) to return to the original orchestration.
(4) If none of the displayed presets appeal to you, use
the PAGE [ø][˚] fields at the right to jump to
another page with different presets.
(5) Try out various presets to see how (fast) this concept works.
(6) If you like the new version better than the original
one, press the [SAVE] field to save the Music Style
to the internal memory, a memory card or floppy
disk (see p. 77).
As stated above, you can decide to change any Music
Style on a more or less permanent basis by saving it
with the last COVER (or STYLE MAKEUP TOOLS, p. 124).
(1) On the STYLE COVER page, select the desired
COVER preset (see above).
(2) Press the [SAVE] field.
The display changes to:
Note: The COVER information is part of the data only the G-70
understands.
77
G-70 Music Workstation
Additional Arranger/Style functions
This page allows you to save the current Style to the
internal memory, a memory card or a floppy disk. It
will be saved along with the COVER settings you
selected.
(3) Press the [EXTERNAL¥MEMORY], [FLOPPY] or
[INTERNAL¥MEMORY] field to select the area where
you want to save the Music Style.
(4) Enter the name for the file.
See page 49. If you are sure you will always use the
selected Style with the COVER preset you selected,
proceed with the next step.
One Touch
You may find yourself using the One Touch function at
regular intervals, because it automates quite a few
tasks. The G-70’s One Touch memories are actually
“miniature User Programs” that go way beyond anything you may know from other arranger instruments.
The ONE TOUCH function makes a number of automatic
settings for you:
Note: The G-70 supports both upper- and lower-case letters
for file names. Choose whichever is more convenient (or
clearer).
(5) Press the [EXECUTE] field to save the data.
If the selected memory area already contains a Music
Style of that name, you are asked whether it is OK to
overwrite it.
• Press the [YES] field to overwrite the file. This replaces
the Music Style in question with the new version.
• Press the [NO] field to return to the SAVE STYLE page,
change the name, then press [EXECUTE] again.
The data are copied and a “Operation Successful”
message confirms the end of the operation.
Note: To reassign the original orchestration to the Style you
just saved, select it, press the [ORIGINAL] field on the STYLE
COVER page, then save it again using the procedure described
above.
Note: If you save an internal Music Style under a different
name, you can no longer select the new version using the
STYLE family buttons (see p. 27). Such “customized” Styles
need to be assigned to a CUSTOM memory (see p. 84) or can be
directly recalled using the Style Finder (see p. 86).
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UP1, UP2, UP3, LW1, LW2, MBS
Harmonic Bar status
UP1, LW1, MBS
Volume
UP1, UP2, UP3, LW1, LW2, MBS
Pan
UP1, UP2, UP3, LW1, LW2, MBS
Reverb Send
UP1, UP2, UP3, LW1, LW2, MBS
Chorus Send
UP1, UP2, UP3, LW1, LW2, MBS
Octave
UP1, UP2, UP3, LW1, LW2, MBS
Tone Edit settings
UP1, UP2, UP3, LW1, LW2, MBS
C1 value
UP1, UP2, UP3, LW1, LW2, MBS
MFX status
UP1
MFX part assign
UP1, UP2, UP3, LW1, LW2, MBS,
MELODY INT, D Beam
Harmonic Bar effect
UP1, LW1, MBS
Part status (on/off)
UP1, UP2, UP3, LW1, LW2, MBS
Main Split
(value)
Upper 3 Split
(value)
Upper 3 Split
(status: on or off)
Bass Inversion
(status: on or off)
Keyboard Mode
SPLIT or WHOLE
Sync Start & Stop
Status
Intro/Ending
(status: on or off)
Pattern level
VARIATION [1]~[4]
(1) Press a ONE TOUCH button.
1
(2)
78
Tone Selection
(3)
(4)
(5)
There are four One Touch memories per Music Style
(for the 285 internal Styles and 120 CUSTOM memories).
Select a Music Style (page 27) and start Arranger
playback (see p. 74).
Play a melody to the accompaniment.
You will notice that the sound of the UP1 (or any
other Keyboard) part matches the style and mood of
the selected Music Style.
Select a different Music Style and again play a solo
line: the active Keyboard part now uses a different
sound.
Press another ONE TOUCH button.
G-70 Music Workstation r
One Touch
(6) Press the same button again if you no longer need
the One Touch setting.
As you see, the One Touch memories apply to all Keyboard parts (which is not the case on older Roland
instruments).
(3) Press the [EXIT] button to return to the main page.
EXIT
Note: If a One Touch memory is being used while you recall a
User Program, the One Touch function is switched off.
■If you select a One Touch memory while another
one is already active
In that case, the G-70 immediately selects of the settings of that memory and thus changes the G-70’s
registration, etc.
Ignoring certain One Touch settings (Hold)
The G-70 provides several “HOLD” options that act as
filters for the functions supported by the One Touch
facility.
(1) Press and hold a ONE TOUCH [1]~[4] button.
The display changes to:
(2) Press the field corresponding to the settings that
should not be loaded when you select another One
Touch memory or Music Style.
As soon as you change a setting, the One Touch field
that corresponds to the last memory you selected is
indicated by means of an asterisk (*). Button icons in
the HOLD column whose indicator lights refer to settings that are not updated:
● TEMPO—The preset tempo of the selected Music Style.
● KBD PART—The current status of the Keyboard parts
(UP1/2/3, LW1/2 and MBS) no longer changes. The on/off
status of the Keyboard parts is one of the parameters
that can be saved to a One Touch memory, as you may
remember. Furthermore, the Split and Upper 3 Split no
longer change.
● INTRO/ENDING—The INTRO or ENDING pattern is no
longer selected when you select Music Styles (even if its
on status has been saved to a One Touch registration).
● MAIN VAR—When you select another Music Style, the
G-70 no longer loads the selection of the MAIN VARIATION [1]~[4] pattern, but goes on using the current pattern.
Programming your own One Touch settings
(WRITE)
The G-70 also allows you to save your own ONE TOUCH
settings for the selected Music Style if none of the four
One Touch memories contains the settings you need.
This may come in handy for CUSTOM Styles (see
page 84) for which there are no “presets”.
These customized One Touch settings are stored in a
special memory area inside the G-70 that is saved to
card or the internal memory whenever you use the
Save User Program Set function (page 205).
(1) Press and hold a ONE TOUCH [1]~[4] button.
The display changes to:
(2) Press the [WRITE] field (it lights in red).
(3) Press the [1]~[4] field that should contain your new
One Touch settings.
The display now shows the following message:
The One Touch memory you chose for writing is
automatically selected.
(4) Press the [EXIT] button to return to the main page.
Press the [ALL] field to switch on all HOLD options.
Press [NONE] to switch all options off.
Note: The One Touch function is switched off whenever you
select a User Program.
Note: The SYNC [START] (page 75) and [INTRO] button are not
automatically switched on when you select a One Touch memory or Music Style while Arranger playback is stopped.
79
G-70 Music Workstation
Additional Arranger/Style functions
More refined Arranger settings
Chord recognition area (ZONE)
Telling the G-70 that you want to use the Arranger is a
matter of pressing the EASY SETTING [ARR] button.
That, however, means that the key of the Music Style
patterns is controlled by the chords you play in the left
half of the keyboard.
You can also tell the Arranger to scan another part of
the keyboard for usable chords. Though LEFT is probably the most popular setting, you can also select RIGHT
to have the Arranger scan the right half of the keyboard. You can even select WHOLE, which means that
the Arranger scans the entire keyboard for usable
chords. If you don’t want the Arranger to “listen” to the
chords you play, choose OFF. In that case, you will only
hear the drum patterns of the Music Styles you select.
The range of the LEFT or RIGHT keyboard area depends
on the main split point (see “Setting the split point” on
page 57).
(1) On the main page, press the [CHORD] field.
Arranger Type (chord mode)
Another important choice is how you want to transmit
note information to the Arranger.
(4) Press the [STANDARD], [PIANO¥STYLE], or
[INTELLIGENT] field.
● STANDARD—This is the normal chord recognition mode.
The melodic accompaniment uses the chords you play in
the chord recognition area (“ZONE”) of the keyboard. If
you play only one note in that area, the accompaniment
plays only that note, i.e. it assumes that you deliberately
chose to omit the third and fifth of your “chord”.
To have the Music Style sound a major, minor or seventh
chord, you only need to play three notes, by the way.
Other, more complex, chords require that you press four
keys.
● PIANO STYLE—This mode works as follows: the Arranger
decodes every chord you play – no matter where you
play it. Causing the Arranger to play another chord
requires that you play at least a triad (i.e. the three notes
that make up a major or minor chord). You can play
more than three chord notes but remember that two
notes won’t cause the Arranger to change the key.
Note: You can also select PIANO STYLE by pressing the EASY
SETTING [PIANO] button.
● INTELLIGENT—Select INTELLIGENT when you want the
Arranger to supply the missing notes of the chord you
play. See p. 251 for a chart of intelligent chords and the
way to play them. The G-70 can handle virtually any
chord you can think of – and playing them requires no
more than three finger(s)! This is probably the mode you
will select most of the time.
(5) Press the [EXIT] button to return to the main page.
You can also select this page by pressing [MENU] button‰[ARRANGER¥SETTINGS]‰[ARRANGER¥CHORD].
The display changes to:
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(2) Press the ZONE [LEFT], [WHOLE], [RIGHT] or [OFF]
field to select the chord recognition area.
(3) Press the [EXIT] button to return to the main page.
Note: The choice you make here also affects the “Arpeggio
Oct” and “Chord Oct” options of the D Beam Controller. See
page 66.
Arranger Hold
The ARRANGER HOLD function sustains the notes you
play in the chord recognition area (“ZONE”) until you
play other notes. At first, this function is switched on,
so that you can briefly play the chord for a given bar
and release all keys in the chord recognition area. If the
[ARRANGER¥HOLD] icon indicator is dark, the melodic
accompaniment (bass and other parts) stops as soon as
you release all keys in the chord recognition area (only
the drums keep playing).
(1) Select the ARRANGER SETTING page (see step (1) of
“Chord recognition area (ZONE)” on p. 80.
Note: When you press the EASY SETTING [ARR] button, the
[LEFT] setting is selected.
Note: “OFF” can also be assigned to an ASSIGN SW button
(page 63) and an optional footswitch (page 67).
80
(2) Press the [ARRANGER¥HOLD] button icon to switch
the function off (dark), or on (lights).
(3) Press the [EXIT] button to return to the main page,
or continue with the next step.
G-70 Music Workstation r
More refined Arranger settings
Intro & Ending Alteration
If you think that the Intro and Ending patterns sound
odd when you start a piece with a rather unusual chord
(“Csus4”, for instance), switch off the ALTERATION function. In that case, the “special” chord is memorized, but
the Intro or Ending uses the normal chord progression
(e.g. C, Am, F, G). If this button icon is on, however, the
chord progression of the selected Intro (or Ending) pattern is adapted to the first chord you play, which may
lead to odd results.
If ALTERATION is off, the Arranger only switches to the
“special” chord (“Csus4” in our example) when the Intro/
Ending is finished.
(1) Select the ARRANGER CHORD page (see step (1) of
“Chord recognition area (ZONE)” on p. 80.
(2) Press the [INTRO¥ENDING¥ALTERATION] button icon
to switch that function off (dark), or on (lights).
(3) Press the [EXIT] button to return to the main page,
or continue with the next step.
Dynamic Arranger
The DYNAMIC ARRANGER function allows you to control the volume and timbre of the Arranger parts via the
way you strike the keys in the chord recognition area
(velocity sensitivity).
(1) Select the ARRANGER CHORD page (see step (1) of
“Chord recognition area (ZONE)” on p. 80.
There are eight Arranger parts: A.DRUMS (the drums),
A.BASS (the bass), and ACCOMP 1~6 (the melodic
accompaniment parts).
(5) Set the desired value with the [DATA÷ENTRY] dial or
the [DEC]/[INC] buttons.
You can specify positive and negative sensitivity values. Positive values mean that the volume of the part
in question increases when you strike the chord recognition area keys harder, while negative values
mean that the volume of the selected Arranger part
increases as your velocity becomes softer.
You could use extreme positive/negative ACCOMP
pairs (i.e. “127” and “–127”) to alternate between
those two lines simply by varying your velocity. One
part would then only be audible when you strike the
keys softly, while the other would only be triggered
by high velocity values.
Subtler settings (i.e. “20” and “–20” for a pair) can
also be effective, of course. Choose “0” for parts
whose volume should not be affected by your velocity values.
(6) Press the [CLOSE] field to return to the ARRANGER
CHORD page.
(7) Press the [EXIT] button to return to the main page.
(2) Press the [DYNAMIC¥ARRANGER] button icon to
switch the Arranger’s velocity sensitivity off (dark),
or on (lights).
This function only becomes meaningful if you also
specify how the various Arranger parts should
respond to your velocity.
(3) Press the [DYNAMIC¥EDIT] field.
The display changes to:
(4) Press the field of the Arranger part whose velocity
sensitivity you wish to change.
81
G-70 Music Workstation
Additional Arranger/Style functions
Tempo-related settings (Arranger
Options)
[PRESET], [AUTO] and [LOCK] allow you to specify
what happens when you select another Style:
If Arranger playback
is stopped when you
select another Style
The G-70 also provides two parameters to allow you to
“play” with the Music Style tempo:
(1) Press the [MENU] button.
MENU
The display changes to:
If the Arranger is running when you select
another Style
PRESET
The Style's preset tempo is loaded.
AUTO
The Arranger loads
the preset tempo of
the new Style
LOCK
The preset tempo of
the new Style is not
loaded. Instead, the
Style will be played at
the current tempo.
The new Style is
played back at the
tempo of the previous
Style.
TEMPO CHANGE (RITARD and ACCELER)
The ACCELER/RITARD parameter allows you to speed
up or slow down the Arranger tempo by the amount
you set here. To use them, you must assign them to
the ASSIGN SW buttons or an optional FC-7.
There are three Ritardando functions: one for all
Style divisions, one for Ending patterns, and one for
Fill-Ins. They all use the TEMPO CHANGE settings on
the following page.
(2) Press the [ARRANGER¥SETTING] field, followed by
the [ARRANGER¥OPTIONS] field.
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Style Tempo
Before telling you what this parameter is for, let us
briefly summarize everything that has already been said
about the tempo:
• Each Music Style has a preset tempo that is recalled
whenever you select that Style, or when you take
advantage of the One Touch function (page 78). The
One Touch function, however, allows you to filter the
tempo setting (by activating [TEMPO], which means
that the preset tempo is no longer loaded automatically).
• On the other hand, you are free to change a Music
Style’s tempo any time. See “Changing the tempo” on
p. 28. That value can be written to a User Program
and will then be set every time you select that User
Program.
• The Style (and also song) tempo is displayed on the
main page.
82
(1) Press the field of the parameter part whose value
you wish to change.
Parameter fields can also be selected using the DATA
ENTRY [√][®] buttons.
(2) Set the desired value with the [DATA÷ENTRY] dial or
the [DEC]/[INC] buttons.
● ACCELER/RITARD—allows you to set the degree (ratio)
by which the tempo changes when the ACCELER or
RITARD function is triggered. Example: if the tempo is
currently q= 100, the value “20%” means that the
tempo falls to q= 80.
(3) Press the first field (ACCELER/RITARD) and use the
[DATA÷ENTRY] dial or the [DEC]/[INC] buttons to
select the ratio by which the tempo should
increase/decrease.
● CPT (15~3825)—Use this parameter to specify how long
a Ritardando/Accelerando should take. In most cases,
one measure (480 CPT, i.e. one measure) is probably the
most musical choice.
G-70 Music Workstation r
Tempo-related settings (Arranger Options)
■Using the Ritardando/Accelerando functions
(4) For general applications (any Style division) proceed as follows:
• Assign the RITARD and ACCELER function:
• Press the [ARRANGER¥SETTING] field, followed by the
[ARRANGER¥OPTIONS] field.
ASSIGN SW buttons: “Arranger RIT Tempo” & “Arranger
ACC Tempo” on p. 63
FC-7 footswitches: “Arranger RIT Tempo, Arranger ACC
Tempo” on p. 67
• Press the [START÷STOP] button to start Style playback.
• Press the assigned button or footswitch. If you assign
two controls, can increase (ACC) and decrease (RIT)
the tempo.
(5) For Ritardandos that apply to Ending patterns proceed as follows:
• Press the [START÷STOP] button to start Style playback.
• Press the [END/RIT] button twice in succession (“double-click”).
• Start Arranger playback and press the [FILL¥RIT] button icon to switch it on.
• Press [MAIN] and a VARIATION] [1]~[4] button.
At the next downbeat, the G-70 plays a Fill-In. The
tempo slows down while the fill is being played. At
the end of the fill, the Style returns to the previously
set tempo (this is called “a tempo”).
(7) Press the [EXIT] button to return to the main page.
STYLE CONTROL
INTRO
MAIN
END/RIT
BASS
INVERSION
1
VARIATION
2
3
4
AUTO
FILL IN
SYNC
START STOP
This selects an Ending pattern and slows down the
tempo according to the ACCELER/RITARD and MEASURE settings. When the Ending phrase is finished
(and Arranger playback stops), the tempo is reset.
(6) For Fill Ritardandos:
The FILL RIT function is suitable for ballads. It causes
the next Fill-In to slow down (“ritardando”). Try using
this function now:
• Switch on the [AUTO¥FILL-IN] button.
STYLE CONTROL
INTRO
MAIN
END/RIT
BASS
INVERSION
1
VARIATION
2
3
4
AUTO
FILL IN
SYNC
START STOP
• Press the [MENU] button.
MENU
83
G-70 Music Workstation
Additional Arranger/Style functions
Working with ‘external’ Music
Styles
Using the CUSTOM memories
The G-70 provides 10 memories per family (i.e. 120
memories in all) that refer to Music Styles in the internal memory (“INTERNAL MEMORY”) or on a memory
card (“EXTERNAL MEMORY”). These memories behave
exactly like the other memories.
In the case of a memory card, however, they only
“work” if the card in question has been inserted into the
PCMCIA slot. Thanks to the G-70’s powerful software,
loading a CUSTOM Style is as swift as working with
internal Styles.
The Music Style referenced by the CUSTOM memory
you select is automatically loaded and copied to the
Disk User memory (see also p. 85). This is a RAM memory whose contents are erased when you switch off the
G-70, and overwritten when you select another CUSTOM memory (or use the Disk User function).
Here’s in a nutshell what happens when you select a
CUSTOM memory. (Even though the drawing may suggest that this takes quite some time, the G-70 performs
these steps in a split second.)
Programming CUSTOM assignments
The G-70 comes with several Music Style examples in
internal memory you could use to try out the following.
Once you start working with your G-70, you will probably copy external Music Styles to the internal memory
and establish CUSTOM links to those.
Note: Use the Copy function (see p. 88) to copy all Styles to the
same card (or the internal memory).
(1) Press a button of the STYLE pad to select a Music
Style family.
STYLE
8 BEAT
16 BEAT
LIVE
BAND
ROCK
DISCO
DANCE
CONTEMP
BALL
ROOM
JAZZ
BLUES
50's & 60's
BOSSA
SAMBA
LATIN
WORLD
That button lights and the display looks as follows:
LIVE
BAND
PAGE 1
CUSTOM
(2) Press the [CUSTOM] field.
You select a Link
memory.
Music Style
(3) Press the field of the memory you wish to assign
another Style to.
The G-70 looks up the name of
the referenced Music Style
DATA
The data are loaded from
card or the internal memory.
DISK
USER
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The Style can be played back.
This memory contains the
Music Style data
When you unpack the G-70, the CUSTOM memories
are empty. So you first need to program your own
references to Music Styles.
84
(4) Press the [EDIT¥CUSTOM] field.
G-70 Music Workstation r
Working with ‘external’ Music Styles
(5) Press the [INTERNAL¥MEMORY] or
[EXTERNAL¥MEMORY] field.
This is necessary to specify whether you want to link
a Style in the internal memory or on a card in the
PCMCIA slot.
(6) Press the field that contains the name of the Music
Style you want to assign to the selected CUSTOM
memory.
If necessary, use the PAGE [ø][˚] fields or the
[DATA÷ENTRY] dial/the [DEC]/[INC] buttons to select
another group of 5 Styles.
Note: If you can’t seem to find the Style you wish to assign,
and if you know it exists in the selected memory area, check
the “FOUND” value. It should indicate the same figure as the
“GLOBAL” entry. You can also use the Finder for locating the
desired Music Style. See p. 86 for details.
Note: It is perfectly possible to use “older” Music Styles with
the G-70. They will be converted automatically to the new
VARIATION [1]~[4] system.
That button lights and the display looks as follows:
(2) Press the [CUSTOM] field.
(3) Press the field of the Music Style you want to use.
(7) Press the [GET¥IT] field.
The G-70 returns to the “STYLE” page where you
came from. The name of the selected Style appears in
the field you selected before pressing the
[EDIT¥CUSTOM] button.
You could now program other assignments if you
wanted to.
Note: CUSTOM assignments are stored internally but they are
not part of the User Programs. Thus, you can “only” program
120 links in all (rather than 120 per User Program).
Note: CUSTOM settings reside in a global memory whose contents are saved together with all User Program Set data
(p. 205). Be sure to save your current settings before loading
an entire User Program Set. Use “Save User Program Set” on
p. 205 for saving the settings.
■Selecting CUSTOM Style memories
The names are important for locating the Styles. If
you change the name of a Music Style that is referenced by one of the CUSTOM memories, the G-70
can no longer find it. Conversely, if you have two
memory cards that both contain a Music Style called
“Reggae1”, even inserting the “wrong” card would
recall a “Reggae1” Style – but it might be the wrong
one (and quite a few other CUSTOM memories might
not recall any Style at all, because the other names
only exist on the “other” card).
(1) Press a button of the STYLE pad to select a Music
Style family.
STYLE
8 BEAT
BALL
ROOM
16 BEAT
JAZZ
BLUES
LIVE
BAND
50's & 60's
ROCK
BOSSA
SAMBA
DISCO
DANCE
LATIN
CONTEMP
WORLD
In some cases, an error message (“File not found”)
displayed at this point means that the card does not
contain the referenced file.
Note: If you do not wish to use the Music Style after all, press
[EXIT]. In that case, the G-70 keeps on using the last Music
Style it did find.
Disk User
You can also load one Music Style directly into the
G-70’s Disk User memory and use it. You could take
advantage of this function whenever none of the CUSTOM memories refer to the Music Style you need for
playing a given piece. As its name implies, you can also
use this function for working with Styles on floppy disk,
in the internal memory or on a memory card.
Note: The Music Style in this memory is only available until you
switch off the G-70 or load another Style. Be aware that selecting
a CUSTOM Style also overwrites the last Disk User Style you
selected.
Note: Unlike the CUSTOM memories, the reference to the
selected Music Style is not remembered (and therefore not
“fixed”).
(1) If necessary, insert the memory card or floppy disk
with the desired Music Style into the slot or disk
drive.
(2) On the STYLE page (see above), press the
[DISK¥USER] field.
85
G-70 Music Workstation
Additional Arranger/Style functions
The display changes to:
Style Finder: quickly locating Styles
The G-70 allows you to have a great many Music Styles
handy: in its internal memory, on a memory card, and
on floppy disks. For the internal memory and the memory card in the PCMCIA slot, there is a powerful Finder
function for quickly locating the Style you need. Here is
how to use this function:
(1) Press the FINDER [STYLE] button.
(3) Press the [EXTERNAL¥MEMORY], [FLOPPY] or
[INTERNAL¥MEMORY] field to select the memory
area that contains the desired Style.
Note: It is perfectly possible to use “older” Music Styles with
the G-70. They will be converted automatically to the new
VARIATION [1]~[4] system.
STYLE
The display changes to:
(4) Press the field that contains the name of the Music
Style you want to load.
(5) If the desired Music Style is not displayed, use [ø][˚]
to select another group of 5 Styles.
You can also use the [DATA÷ENTRY] dial and the
[DEC]/[INC] buttons for selecting other pages with different Music Styles.
Note: The G-70 contains a powerful search engine for quickly
locating the desired Music Style on a card or in the internal
memory (page 86). It is not available for Styles on floppy disk,
however.
The display page does not change when you select
another Style. This was done to allow you… to select
another Music Style.
(6) Start playing with the newly selected Style.
The selection of the DISK USER Style will be written
to a User Program (page 111). The User Program in
question refers to the name and memory area. Next
time you recall such a User Program, the G-70 will
therefore use the referenced Style.
If the Style in question cannot be found, an error
message appears and the G-70 goes on using the
previously selected Style.
(7) Press the [EXIT] button return to the main page.
The name of the selected Style appears in the [STYLE]
field.
“FOUND”: found entries.
“GLOBAL”: total number of songs in that memory area.
(2) Specify the memory area that contains the Style
you need: [EXTERNAL≈MEMORY], [FLOPPY] or
[INTERNAL≈MEMORY].
The G-70 is shipped with several Styles that reside in
its internal memory.
The display shows a list of 5 Styles in the selected
memory area (internal, memory card or floppy disk).
(3) If the name of the Style you want to use to is
already displayed, press its line.
In our example, “%Shuffle” has been selected.
(4) To display the next 5 Styles, press the PAGE [˚] field
in the lower right corner.
You can press this field as many times as necessary
(or until it is no longer displayed).
To return to a previous group of 5 Styles, press [ø].
You can also select the [DATA÷ENTRY] dial and the
[DEC]/[INC] buttons to switch pages.
Quick location of the Style you need
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There are several ways of quickly locating the Style you
are after:
86
■Sorting files
Press the [COUNTRY], [GENRE] or [TEMPO] field to
sort the Music Style files according to country, kind
of music (Genre) or tempo value. The right column
now contains the selected entry (only one of them
can be displayed along with the Style name).
Continue with step (3) to select the Style you want to
use.
G-70 Music Workstation r
Style Finder: quickly locating Styles
If you pressed the [FLOPPY] field, these options are
not available, and the display looks as follows:
The information in these columns are supplied by a
special file in the internal memory or on a memory
card that is called Database.
You can supply the above information for your own
Styles – or change the information of the Styles on
the supplied memory card.
Note: Music Styles you load from floppy disk and then save
to a card or the internal memory are not automatically
modified to include this Database information. You need to
program it yourself. See “Rename” on page 88.
■Using the Index function
The highest hierarchical level of the Style Finder
database is called “Index”. All search operations apply
to the selected Index (and therefore not necessarily
to all files in the internal memory or on a memory
card).
• After performing step (2), press the [INDEX] field in
the upper left corner.
■Searching for Music Styles
The powerful part starts as soon as you press the
[FINDER] field.
Decide what you want to look for
• Press the [STYLE≈NAME] field if you want the G-70 to
look for Style names, then enter the name (or part of
it).
• Press the [COUNTRY] field if you want to look for a
country, then enter the name (or part of it).
• Press the [GENRE] field to locate a specific genre
(Rock’n’Roll, 16-Beat, etc.), then enter the desired
characters.
• Press the [TEMPO] field and enter the tempo value
you are looking for.
Note: It would be a good idea to enter at least 2 characters,
possibly even 3 so as to narrow down your search to a “workable” size.
Search the database
•
•
• Either press the field that corresponds to the desired
Style category, or –if you’re not sure which category
the Style belongs to– press [ALL]. (This may be a safer
bet.)
• Now return to the previous page by pressing [BACK].
The display returns to the page shown under step (1)
above. This time, however, only the Styles belonging
to the selected Index are displayed.
Continue with step (3) to select the Style you want to
use.
•
•
•
•
•
•
The next step is to decide how the Style Finder should
look for files:
Press the [ALPHABETIC≈ORDER] field to search for all
entries that start with the characters you entered
(“BEA”, for example). Files that match the specified
criteria will be displayed at the top of the list.
The order depends on the button icon you activated
([STYLE≈NAME], [COUNTRY], [GENRE], or [TEMPO]).
Press the [SEARCH≈ONLY] field to have the G-70
search the selected entry for files that contain the
supplied information. (This would allow you to also
locate a file called “Raggabeat” if you entered “BEA”.)
See page 49 for how to enter characters.
The [Delete] field allows you to delete the character
indicated by the cursor. Press and hold it to clear all
characters.
Press [Space] to insert a blank (or the number “0”).
If you forgot to insert a character, use [ø] or [˚] to
select the position where the missing character
should be inserted. Then press [Insert], followed by the
character you wish to insert.
To enter numbers without cycling through the characters first, press the [NUM¥LOCK] field. After entering the numbers, switch it off if you need to enter
characters again.
Press the [FIND] field to start your search.
87
G-70 Music Workstation
Additional Arranger/Style functions
Note: If no Styles were found, the following message appears,
and no file names are displayed (in which case you need to
press the [STYLE¥NAME], [COUNTRY], [GENRE] or [TEMPO] field
to display all songs again):
■Rename
This function allows you to change (or supply) the
STYLE NAME, COUNTRY, and/or GENRE information
of the selected Style (the TEMPO value is fixed, but
could be changed using a STYLE COMPOSER function,
p. 190).
• Press the [STYLE≈NAME], [COUNTRY], or [GENRE] field
and enter the desired characters (see p. 49).
You can also rename all three of them.
Note: If you select a Style on floppy disk, only the SONG NAME
and FILE NAME can be edited.
• Press the [EXECUTE] field.
• Press the field of the Style you need and do your
thing.
If the G-70 did find one or several matches, the
“FOUND” number will be smaller than the “GLOBAL”
number.
Editing the Style Finder information
The Finder information is based on search criteria that
needs to be added to Style files. Normal Style files do
not contain them. Adding information to a file is a process we call “editing”.
■Delete
This function allows you to delete the selected Style
from the internal memory area, memory card, or
floppy disk. You should use this as sparsely as possible – and probably never for the internal memory.
Once a Style is gone, there is indeed no way to
restore it. So please be careful and try to forget this
function even exists.
• Press the [DELETE] field. Deleting a Style cannot be
undone, which is why the following question is now
displayed:
Options
As you know, after pressing the FINDER [STYLE] button, the display looks as follows:
[YES] deletes the Style file.
[NO] leaves the file intact and takes you back to the
initial Style Finder page with the song list.
[Back] leaves the file intact and takes you back to the
STYLE LIST page.
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The [OPTIONS] field in the lower left corner provides
access to a display page where you can add database
information. This also works for Styles that already
contain entries you wish to modify.
(1) First select the Style whose database information
you wish to change or edit by pressing its field.
(2) Press the [OPTIONS] field.
(3) Now do one of the following:
88
■Copy
This function allows you to copy the selected Style to
another memory area.
Note: It is perfectly possible to use “older” Music Styles with
the G-70. They will be converted automatically to the new
VARIATION [1]~[4] system.
Even though you can select the files you wish to copy
on this page, there is no need to select a Style prior
to pressing the [OPTIONS] field on the STYLE LIST
page. Be aware, however, that the COPY page only
lists the Music Styles that match the last search criteria you used for the STYLE FINDER.
On the other hand, if you only need to copy certain
Styles on memory card or in the internal memory
area, using the FINDER would be a good idea: it helps
you to avoid too many presses of the PAGE [ø] or [˚]
field. You can also use the [DATA÷ENTRY] dial and the
[DEC]/[INC] buttons.
G-70 Music Workstation r
Style Finder: quickly locating Styles
• On the STYLE OPTIONS page, press the [COPY] field.
• Start by specifying the source that contains the
Style(s) you wish to copy: Press the [FROM] button
icon once or twice to select the memory area.
INT MEMORY:
The G-70’s internal SSD memory area.
FLOPPY DISK:
The floppy disk in the G-70’s drive. Do
not forget to insert it before selecting
this option.
EXT MEMORY:
The memory card in the G-70’s PCMCIA
slot. Do not forget to insert it before
selecting this option.
• Now specify the target you wish to copy the selected
Style(s) to: Press the [TO] button icon once or twice to
select the memory area.
• If the name of the Style you want to copy to is
already displayed, press its line.
You can also select several Styles. In our example,
“%Shuffle” and “%Slow Rock 2” have been selected.
To display the next 5 files, press the [˚] field in the
lower right corner or use the [DATA÷ENTRY] dial.
You can press this field as many times as necessary
(or until it is no longer displayed). To return to a previous group of 5 Styles, press [ø] or use the
[DATA÷ENTRY] dial.
If you need to copy all Styles that are currently displayed (on all available pages) from the FROM to the
TO area, press the [ALL¥FILES] field.
You are asked whether it is OK to overwrite all files
on the destination media (“TO”) that have the same
file names as the files you are about to copy.
(6) Press the [YES] field if it is OK to overwrite files
with the same names on the destination media.
Press the [NO] field if files on the source (“FROM”)
media that have the same name as existing files on
the destination (“TO”) media should not be copied
(only files with “original” names will be copied in that
case).
The data are copied and a “Successful” message confirms the end of the operation.
(7) Press the [EXIT] button to return to the main page.
Note: In some cases, working with the [ALL¥FILES] field may
yield an error message at some stage, because a 2HD disk can
only hold 1.44MB worth of data, while a memory card and the
internal memory area are a lot bigger.
Note: If the target media (memory card or floppy disk) is not
formatted, a message will be displayed that allows you to format it before the Styles are copied.
(4) If you chose “EXT MEMORY” or “FLOPPY DISK” disk
for “TO”, enable the disk’s/card’s write protection
and insert it into the PCMCIA slot or disk drive.
To enable the write protection of a floppy disk, open
the “little window” (see p. 11). See the owner’s manual of the memory card for how to disable its write
protection.
(5) Press the [EXECUTE] field. (Press [Back] if you do not
want to proceed, or to select other files.)
89
G-70 Music Workstation
Advanced Keyboard part functions
7. Advanced Keyboard part functions
Upper 3 Split
On p. 57, you learned how to split the keyboard into a
left half with the LW1, LW2, and possibly also the MBS
part, and a right half with the UP1, UP2 and/or UP3
part.
You can program an additional split between the UP1/
UP2 and the UP3 parts, which is great for playing question-and-answer types of melody lines with a brass
sound for Upper3, for example, and a clarinet or flute
for Upper1. The possibilities are as follows:
See p. 29 for how to assign the desired sound to the
UP3 part.
Note: UP3 SPLIT only works if the UP1 or UP2 part is active. It
is impossible to use an Upper 3 split without using the Upper1
or Upper2 part. If UP1/2/3 are off, the UPPER 3 SPLIT function
is not used.
If you don’t agree with this split point (G5), you can
change it to any note between the F#1 and G7.
Possible range for UPPER 3 SPLIT
LW1
+ LW2
(+ (+
MBS)
LW1
+ LW2
MBS)
(+ (+
Arranger
control)
Arranger
control)
UpperUpper
1 and/or
2
Upper 2
Upper3
Upper
1 and/or
VariPhrase part
The default split point is located at the G5 (lowest note
of the UP3 part).
Note: This function is also available in WHOLE Keyboard Mode.
In effect, the G-70 allows you to play at least three
sounds assigned to three separate keyboard areas. On
top of that, you can select the Arranger’s chord recognition area, i.e. the notes that feed the Arranger
(page 80). Here is how to activate the UPPER 3 SPLIT
function:
(1) On the main page, press the [SPLIT] field.
(3) Use the UPPER 3 SPLIT POINT [ø][˚] fields to set the
desired split point.
Note: If you are satisfied with your split point, you should save
it to a User Program (see p. 111).
(4) Press the [EXIT] button to return to the main page.
The UPPER 3 SPLIT function can be cancelled in several ways:
• Press the [UPPER¥3¥SPLIT] field again so that it “goes
dark”.
• Switch off UP1 and/ or UP2.
• Switch off the UP3 part.
Tuning Upper 2: Coarse Tune and
Fine Tune
The UP2 part can be used as full-fledged solo or melody
sound, or to “fatten” the sound of UP1 (or UP3).
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You can also select this page by pressing
[MENU]‰[SPLIT&TOUCH] field‰[SPLIT¥POINT] field.
The display changes to:
(2) Press the [UPPER¥3¥SPLIT] field so that it “lights”.
The keyboard is split at the G5, with the UP1 and UP2
parts to the left (orange), and the UP3 part to the
right (blue) of this second split point.
90
By layering we mean that every time you press a key in
the right half of the keyboard (in SPLIT mode, p. 57) or
anywhere on the keyboard (WHOLE mode), you trigger
two Tones: the one assigned to UP1 (or UP3) and the
one assigned to UP2. To layer the UP1 (or UP3) and UP2
parts, you need to switch them both on. See page 28
for details.
The following parameters allow you to transpose
(Coarse) or to detune (Fine) the Upper2 part relative to
the Upper1 (or Upper3) part. Though this is also possible when the UP1 (UP3) part is off, detuning or shifting
the UP2 part would not be very meaningful.
You could use COARSE to program an interval of a fifth
(7 semitones) for UP2, which is especially effective for
brass sounds and guitar power chords.
Do not forget to activate both the UP1 (or UP3) and
UP2 parts when you want to take advantage of the
COARSE and FINE parameters. If only the UP2 part is
active, your solos may sound flat.
Note: In WHOLE mode, these parameters can also be used for
layer effects involving the UP2 (which is detuned) and the LW1 or
LW2 part (which are not detuned).
G-70 Music Workstation r
Portamento for UP1 and UP2
The FINE parameter works well when you assign the
same or similar Tones to UP1 (or UP3) and UP2, creating
a kind of natural chorus effect that you could enhance
by panning UP1 (or UP3) to the left and UP2 to the
right (or vice versa, see p. 95). Note that FINE can also
be used for other purposes than creating this chorus
effect.
(1) Press the [MENU] button.
Portamento for UP1 and UP2
Here are two functions that may come in handy for
even more impressive solos involving the UP1 and UP2
parts.
Portamento Time
(1) Press the [MENU] button.
The display changes to:
MENU
The display changes to:
(2) Press the [SPLIT&TOUCH] field, followed by the
[KEYBOARD¥OPTIONS] field.
(2) Press the [SPLIT&TOUCH] field, followed by the
[KEYBOARD¥OPTIONS] field.
“Portamento” means that the pitch doesn’t change in
clearly defined steps: it produces glides from one
note to the next.
[Portamento Time= 0]
“Rough” pitch changes in semitone steps (normal)
(3) Press the [COARSE¥TUNE] field if you want to
change the UP2 part’s pitch in semitone steps.
That field now “lights”.
(4) Set the desired value with the [DATA÷ENTRY] dial or
the [DEC]/[INC] buttons.
“–” means that UP2’s pitch is lowered, while values
without a minus sign mean that UP2’s pitch is shifted
up. A very popular setting for UP1/UP2 layers is “+12”
for UP2, so that it sounds one octave above Upper1
or any other active Keyboard part. (The setting range
for this parameter is –24~24.)
(5) Press the [FINE¥TUNE] field to change UP2’s pitch in
small steps (cents).
(6) Set the desired value with the [DATA÷ENTRY] dial or
the [DEC]/[INC] buttons.
FINE TUNE can be set between “–99” (almost a semitone down) and “99” (almost a semi-tone up).
(7) Press the [EXIT] button to return to the main page.
[Portamento Time= 1~127]
Pitch glides from one note to the next
Instead of jumping in semitone steps (as you would
expect), the pitch glides from one note to the next
whenever the Portamento time is higher than “0”.
The higher the value you set, the slower the glide.
This effect is particularly useful for synthesizer
sounds.
(3) Press the [PORTAMENTO¥TIME] field of the Upper1
(UP1) or Upper2 (UP2) part to select it.
(4) Set the desired value with the [DATA÷ENTRY] dial or
the [DEC]/[INC] buttons.
91
G-70 Music Workstation
Advanced Keyboard part functions
Portamento Mode: Mono/Poly
The G-70 also allows you to set the Upper1 and Upper2
parts to mono(phonic) mode. MONO means that you
can only play one note at a time. You could select this
mode to play a trumpet or woodwind part in a more
natural way. POLY, on the other hand, means that you
can play chords using the selected part.
(5) Press the [MONO] or [POLY] field of the Upper part
whose setting you want to change.
(6) Press the [EXIT] button to return to the main page.
(2) Press the [SPLIT&TOUCH] field, followed by the
[KEYBOARD¥OPTIONS] field.
Note: Portamento and POLY/MONO are not available for the
Harmonic Bar sounds.
Lower Hold
The G-70 is an instrument that allows you to change
many settings in realtime. Because you can trigger the
Lower 1/2 parts and the Arranger simultaneously,
selecting another Music Style pattern usually means
that you have to lift your left hand from the keyboard.
If the LWR Hold function is not active in SPLIT mode,
the Lower (LW) parts stop sounding as soon as you
release all keys in the left area.
If you press a [LOWER¥HOLD] field, however (so that is
its displayed in blue), the notes of the Lower parts go on
sounding until you play other notes in the left keyboard
area.
If both the LW1 (or LW2) and MBS parts are active, the
selected LOWER HOLD function sustains the notes of
both parts.
Note: The LOWER HOLD functions are only available in SPLIT
mode.
(1) Press the [MENU] button.
MENU
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The display changes to:
92
(3) Switch on at least one LW part (its PART ON/OFF
button must light).
(4) Press the [LOWER¥1¥HOLD] or [LOWER¥2¥HOLD]
field to “switch it on”.
You can also switch both HOLD fields on.
(5) Play a short note in the left half of the keyboard,
and release the key.
This note goes on sounding until you press another
note or chord in the left half of the keyboard.
Note: These parameters can also be switched on and off using
the Hold pedal (see p. 68) or an optional footswitch (see p. 70).
(6) Press the [EXIT] button to return to the main page.
EXIT
G-70 Music Workstation r
Tone Edit: editing Keyboard parts
Tone Edit: editing Keyboard parts
Your G-70 allows you to edit certain parameters that
affect the way a Keyboard part sounds when you play
it. These parameters will help you “modify” the parts by
adjusting their brilliance, their modulation speed
(Vibrato Rate), and so on.
The parameters discussed here only apply to the following Keyboard parts: Upper1, Upper2, Upper3,
Lower1, Lower2, M.Bass. Be sure to select the part you
wish to change before actually editing it.
The Harmonic Bar section cannot be edited here (see
page 33 for how to do that).
Assigning another Tone to a Keyboard part resets the
TONE EDIT parameters. Parts are in fact containers in
which you can “put” a Tone and whose sound can be
modified using the parameters described below.
Note: All TONE EDIT parameters are relative parameters whose
values are added to or subtracted from the preset Tone parameter
values. That is why you can specify both positive (“more”) and
negative (“less”) values.
Note: The TONE EDIT settings can be saved to a User Program.
(1) Press the [MENU] button.
The display changes to:
(7) Set the desired value with the [DATA÷ENTRY] dial or
the [DEC]/[INC] buttons. You can also use the
assignable sliders below the display to directly edit
the parameters above them.
Here are the parameters you can edit:
■C1
The function of this parameter depends on the sound
you assigned to the selected part. It may influence
the filter and resonance setting, switch between the
organ sample with the fast and slow Rotary modulation (see the TONE [ORGAN] bank), etc. Here’s an
example: select the “B3 Sermon” sound on page 1 of
the [ORGAN] bank.
Note: The C1 parameter is only available for Tones that are
flagged with an asterisk (*) in the separate Tone list.
If you are working with a sound of an optional SRXseries expansion board you installed, this parameter
may affect other aspects. We therefore suggest you
experiment with the parameter to find out how it
affects the sound and which setting sounds best.
■Modulation (Vibrato)
Vibrato is an effect created by modulating the pitch.
Pitch modulation adds a pleasant “wobble” to the
notes you play. Use the following three parameters if
you think the part in question has too much (or could
use a little more) vibrato.
Note: Some Tones already contain natural (sampled) vibrato
whose depth or speed cannot be changed.
(2) Press the [TONE¥EDIT] field.
(3) Press the field of the Keyboard part you wish to
edit.
Note: Rather than performing steps (1)~(3), you could also
press and hold the corresponding TONE ASSIGN button.
(4) To quickly reset all parameters, press the
[INIT¥ALL¥VALUES] field.
(5) To reset only the selected parameter, press the
[INIT¥SINGLE¥VALUE] field.
(6) To edit one of the displayed parameters, press its
field.
Its “display” is now surrounded by a red frame.
● DELAY [–64~63]—This parameter adjusts the time
required for the vibrato effect to begin. Positive (+) settings increase the time before vibrato will begin, and
negative settings shorten the time.
● DEPTH [-64~63]—This parameter adjusts the intensity
of the pitch modulation. Positive (+) settings mean that
the “wobble” becomes more prominent, while negative
(–) settings make it shallower.
● RATE [-64~63]—This parameter adjusts the speed of the
pitch modulation. Positive (+) settings make the preset
pitch modulation faster, and negative (–) settings make
it slower.
■TVF/TVA ENV(elope)
The volume of an instrument changes over time,
from the moment the note begins to sound to when
it disappears. This change can be indicated on a
graph as shown in the display. The envelope shape is
unique to each instrument, and is an important element in how we distinguish the sounds we hear. The
envelopes of musical instrument sounds can change
depending on how the instrument is played. For
example if a trumpet is played sharply and strongly,
the attack will be quick and the sound will be sharp.
But if a trumpet is played lightly and softly, the
attack will be softer. In order to adjust the attack of a
sound, you can modify the ATTACK parameter of the
envelope.
93
G-70 Music Workstation
Advanced Keyboard part functions
The envelope parameters affect both the volume
(TVA) and the filter (TVF). If the cutoff frequency has
been lowered, it will rise as the envelope rises, and
fall as the envelope falls.
● ATTACK [–64~63]—This parameter adjusts the onset of
the sound. Negative values speed up the attack, so that
the sound becomes more aggressive.
● DECAY [–64~63]—This parameter adjusts the time over
which the sound’s volume and Cutoff frequency fall
from the highest point of the attack down to the sustain
level.
Note: Percussive sounds usually have a sustain level of “0”.
Piano and guitar sounds are in this category. Holding the
keys for a long time will thus have little effect on the duration of the notes you are playing, even if you select a high
value here.
● RELEASE [–64~63]—This parameter adjusts the time
over which the sound will decay after the note is
released until it is no longer heard. The cutoff frequency
will also fall according to this setting.
■TVF (filter)
By modifying the filter settings, you can control the
timbre (tone) of the sound. The G-70 uses Low-Pass
Filters (LPF) that allow only frequencies below the
specified frequency to pass. The frequency where the
filter starts “cutting off” harmonics (or overtones) is
called the “Cutoff Frequency”. By modifying the setting of the cutoff frequency you can make the sound
brighter or darker. The cutoff frequency can change
over time, controlled by the “envelope”.
● RESO [–64~63]—This is a parameter one invariably
associates with a synthesizer. When the Resonance value
is increased, the overtones in the area of the cutoff frequency will be emphasized, creating a sound with a
strong character.
Note: For some sounds, negative (–) RESO settings may produce no noticeable change because the Resonance is
already set to the minimum value.
● CUTOFF [-64~63]—This filter parameter allows you to
make the selected sound darker or brighter. Positive Cutoff settings mean that more overtones will be allowed to
pass, so that the sound becomes brighter. The further
this value is set in the negative direction, the fewer overtones will be allowed to pass, and the sound will become
softer (darker).
Setting
Characteristics of a low-pass filter
Frequency
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Cutoff frequency
Note: For some sounds, positive (+) Cutoff settings will cause
no noticeable change because the preprogrammed Cutoff
parameter is already set to its maximum value.
94
(8) Press the [EXIT] button to return to the main page.
EXIT
G-70 Music Workstation r
Mixing Keyboard parts
8. Using the mixer functions & effects
The MIXER environment does what its name suggests:
it allows you to balance the various Keyboard parts of
your G-70. See page 124 and following for how to
“mix” the song parts.
Your singing and the generated Vocal Harmonist parts
can be “mixed” using the [VOICE] and [HARMONY]
knobs.
About the G-70’s effects
Mixing Keyboard parts
Here’s how to set the balance and other “mix-related”
parameters of the Keyboard parts.
(1) Press the [PART] button (you can also press
[CHORUS÷REVERB] or [PAN÷VOLUME].
PART
The G-70 contains the following effects processors, not
all of which are available for all sections. So please
carefully study the following table:
Section
Effects processors
Remarks
Keyboard Effects
Reverb, Chorus
Same type as Style/Song section, but separate processors.
MFX
Only for the Keyboard parts.
Style/Song Effects
Reverb, Chorus
Shared by these two sections,
but separate from Keyboard
parts.
Mastering Tools
Equalizer, Compressor
Affect all signals transmitted to
the MAIN outputs.
Audio Effects
IFX
Affects the signals received via
the AUDIO IN sockets. Can be
transmitted
Harmonic Bars
Overdrive, Vibrato, Rotary Exclusive to this section.
Speaker
VOICE
Reverb, Delay, Compressor, Gate
Talk, Singer, Auto Pitch, Voice
FX
HARMONY
Reverb, Delay, Chorus
Vocoder, Small, Ensemble
The reason why we are talking about “processors” is
that most of them can be used in various ways (by
selecting a “Type”). The MFX and IFX are the most versatile processors, because they can use one of 84 types,
while other processors provide 8 or 9 possibilities. Only
the Compressor and Gate processors are “dedicated”
effects: they “only” function as Compressor or Gate.
Note: See page 132 for how to set the VOCAL HARMONIST
equalizers.
Note: The effects of the Harmonic Bars sections are covered in
the section “Using effects” on p. 34.
The display changes to:
The MUTE message means that the part in question
is currently not available. You can mute a part by
pressing the instrument icon of the part you wish to
mute. To switch a muted part on, press its instrument
icon (flagged with a MUTE message) again.
(2) Press the [PAN¥POT÷VOLUME] button once or twice
to assign the VOLUME parameter to the sliders.
(The row of the on-screen sliders is displayed in
light gray.)
Note: The slider functions can also be selected by pressing any
control in the desired row (VOLUME, PANPOT, REVERB or CHORUS).
(3) Move the sliders below the display to set the
desired volume for the various Keyboard parts.
(See the names below the sliders – inside the grey
box in the illustration.)
When the position of the assigned slider does not
match the value set for the parameter that is controlled, you first have to move the slider to the position that corresponds to the green dots that surround the knob icon or that are located next to the
fader icon before being able to actually change the
value.
95
G-70 Music Workstation
Using the mixer functions & effects
The D BEAM part refers to the sounds that are generated when you use the D Beam controller after
selecting the DJ GEAR, SOUND EFX or INSTRUMENT
mode (scratches, sound effects, other “noises”). See
page 64 for details.
Note: The left-most slider (EFFECT) does nothing while
“VOLUME” is selected.
(4) After setting these levels, you can use the
[BALANCE] knob to establish the correct balance
between the Keyboard parts and the Recorder/
Arranger.
“Mixing”, as you may know, entails a lot more than
just getting the balances right. It also involves specifying the stereo placement of sounds and the
amount of effect that should be applied. So here we
go…
(5) Press the [PAN¥POT/VOLUME] button again to
assign the PANPOT function to the sliders.
The display page still looks as shown in (2), yet the
emphasized area is shifted to the “PANPOT” row:
(6) Use the 9 sliders below the display to change the
stereo placement of the available parts.
“L63” corresponds to hard left, “0” to dead center,
and “R63” to hard right.
Note: The left-most slider (EFFECT) does nothing while “PAN
POT” is selected.
Note: The slider functions can also be selected by pressing any
control in the desired row (VOLUME, PANPOT, REVERB or CHORUS). You can then use the [DATA÷ENTRY] dial and the [DEC]/
[INC] buttons to directly edit the parameter of the assigned
part. (You can even press the [DATA÷ENTRY] dial and enter the
desired value via the on-screen display.
r
(7) Press the [CHORUS÷REVERB] button once or twice
to assign the REVERB function to the sliders.
This allows you to specify how much reverb should be
applied to the part in question. The effects parameters themselves can be edited on an Effect page (see
below).
Note: At this stage, the EFFECT slider (far left) can be used to
set the output level of the Reverb processor. Setting this
parameter to “0” means that you no longer hear the effect in
question. By contrast, setting the REVERB control of a Keyboard part to “0” means that only the part in question is no
longer processed by the effect, while the remaining Keyboard
parts are.
(8) Press the [CHORUS÷REVERB] button once or twice
to assign the CHORUS function to the sliders.
96
This allows you to specify how much chorus should
be applied to the part in question. The effect parameters themselves can be edited on an Effect page (see
below).
Note: At this stage, the EFFECT slider (far left) can be used to
set the output level of the Chorus processor. Setting this
parameter to “0” means that you no longer hear the effect in
question. By contrast, setting the CHORUS control of a Keyboard part to “0” means that only the part in question is no
longer processed by the effect.
Volume and status of the Style
parts
When you press the [STYLE] button below the display,
the following page appears:
• Use the assignable sliders below the display to set the
volume of the Arranger parts. See “Arranger parts” on
p. 74 for the function of the Arranger parts.
• Use the [ON÷OFF] fields to mute Arranger parts you
do not need.
These settings can saved to a User Program (see
p. 111).
Note: You can also use the MAKEUP TOOLS functions for more
detailed mixing functions (see p. 124).
G-70 Music Workstation r
Editing the Keyboard effects processors
● Room1, Room2—These types simulate the reverb characteristics of a room. The higher the number (1 or 2), the
“bigger” the room becomes.
● Stage1, Stage2—These types simulate the reverb characteristics you get when you perform on a concert stage.
The higher the number (1 or 2), the “bigger” the stage
becomes.
● Hall1, Hall2—These types simulate the reverb of a small
(1) or large (2) concert hall and thus sound much “bigger” than the Room types above.
● Delay—A Delay effect (no reverb). Works a lot like an
echo effect and thus repeats the sounds.
● Pan Delay—This is a stereo version of the above Delay
effect. It creates repetitions that alternate between the
left and right channels.
Editing the Keyboard effects processors
After setting the above parameters, you may find that
even sensible Reverb/Chorus Send values for the Keyboard parts do not yield the expected result.
In that case, you should edit the Reverb and Chorus
settings by pressing the [EFFECTS] button.
On this page, you can switch the REVERB processor
on and off by pressing the [OFF/ON] button icon to
the right of its “display”.
If you only want to select another reverb type, press
the REVERB display and use the [DATA÷ENTRY] dial or
the [DEC]/[INC] buttons to select it. If you also need to
change certain aspects of that effect…
Reverb for Keyboard parts
(1) Press the KEYBOARD EFFECTS REVERB [EDIT] field to
access the Reverb parameters.
The display changes to:
(4)
(5)
•
•
[REVERB LEVEL] allows you to set the output level of
the Reverb processor. Setting this parameter to “0”
means that you no longer hear the effect in question.
If you don’t want to edit the effects parameters, continue with the next step, otherwise jump to step (5).
Press [Back] to return to the display page with the
“modules”.
–OR–
Press the [EXIT] button to return to the main page.
After selecting a reverb type, you may want to
fine-tune some of its parameters. If so, proceed as
follows:
Press the field of the parameter you wish to change
(the number of fields and their meaning depend on
the selected reverb type).
Set the desired value.
Parameter values can be set by turning the
[DATA÷ENTRY] dial, by pressing the [DEC]/[INC] buttons, or by pressing the [DATA÷ENTRY] dial and
using the on-screen numeric pad.
SRV Room/SRV Hall/SRV Plate parameters
(2) Press the [ON] (or [OFF]) field to switch the processor on (icon lights) or off (icon goes dark).
You can also do so on the EFFECTS page (see above).
(3) Press the field of the effect type you wish to use.
The options are:
● SRV Room—This effect simulates the reverb characteristics of a room. The name (“SRV”) refers to Roland’s
SRV-3030, a stand-alone reverb processor, which is also
used by certain Fantom-series synthesizers.
● SRV Hall—Digital simulation of a metal plate that is
sometimes used for creating Reverb effects. Works well
for percussive sounds.
● SRV Plate—Digital simulation of a metal plate that is
sometimes used for creating reverb effects. Works well
for percussive sounds.
● GM2 Reverb—This reverb effect is Roland’s standard
type for GM2-compatible tone generators.
● Pre Delay (0.0~100.0 ms)—Adjusts the delay time
between the direct sound until the reverb sound is
heard. This is used to simulate the distance between the
original signal and the reflective surfaces.
● Time (0~127)—The duration of the reverb signal. The
higher the value, the “longer” the simulated room
becomes.
● Size (1~8)—Determines how the later reverberations are
propagated, which gives the listener important clues
about the height of the simulated room.
● High Cut (160~12500Hz, Bypass)—Adjusts the frequency above which the high-frequency content of the
reverb will be reduced. If you do not want to reduce the
high frequencies, set this parameter to BYPASS.
● Density (0~127)—Density (number) of the reflections.
● Diffusion (0~127)—Adjusts the change in the density of
the reverb over time. The higher the value, the more the
density increases with time. (The effect of this setting is
most pronounced with long reverb times.)
● LF Damp Freq. (50~4000Hz)—Adjusts the frequency
below which the low-frequency content of the reverb
sound will be reduced, or “damped.”
97
G-70 Music Workstation
Using the mixer functions & effects
● LF Damp Gain (-36~0dB)—Adjusts the amount of
damping applied to the frequency range selected with LF
Damp. With a setting of “0,” there will be no reduction of
the reverb’s low-frequency content.
● HF Damp Freq. (4000~12500Hz)—Adjusts the frequency above which the high-frequency content of the
reverb sound will be reduced, or “damped.”
● HF Damp Gain (-36~0dB)—Adjusts the amount of
damping applied to the frequency range selected with
HF Damp. With a setting of “0,” there will be no reduction of the reverb’s high-frequency content.
GM2 Reverb parameters
● Character (Room1, Room2, Room3, Hall1, Hall2, Plate,
Delay, Pan Delay)—Type of reverb.
● Pre LPF (0~7)—Cuts the high frequency range of the
sound coming into the reverb. Higher values will cut
more of the high frequencies.
● Level (0~127)—Output level of reverberation.
● Time (0~127)—Time length of reverberation
● Feedback (0~127)—Adjusts the amount of the delay
sound that is fed back into the effect when the Reverb
Character setting is “Delay” or “Pan Delay”.
(1) Press the [EFFECTS] button.
On this page, you can switch the CHORUS processor
on and off by pressing the [OFF/ON] button icon to
the right of its “display”.
If you only want to select another chorus type, press
the CHORUS display and use the [DATA÷ENTRY] dial
or the [DEC]/[INC] buttons to select it. If you also need
to change certain aspects of that effect…
(2) Press the KEYBOARD EFFECTS CHORUS [EDIT] field
to access the Chorus parameters.
The display changes to:
Parameters of the remaining types
(Room1~Pan Delay)
● Time (0~127)—Time length of reverberation (for
“Room1”~“Hall2”), or delay time (for “Delay” and “PanDelay”).
● HF Damp (200~8000Hz, Bypass)—Adjusts the frequency above which the high-frequency content of the
reverb sound will be cut, or “damped.” If you do not want
to cut the high frequencies, set this parameter to
BYPASS.
● Feedback (0~127)—(Only available for “Pan” and “PanDelay”.) Adjusts the amount of delay feedback.
(6) Press the [EXIT] button to return to the main page.
EXIT
Note: Do not forget to save your settings to a User Program if
you want to keep them.
Chorus for Keyboard parts
r
Chorus broadens the spatial image of the sound and
creates a stereo impression. You can choose from 8
types of Chorus.
98
(3) Press the [ON] (or [OFF]) field to switch the processor on (icon lights) or off (icon goes dark).
You can also do so on the EFFECTS page (see above).
(4) Press the field of the effect type you wish to use.
The options are:
● Chorus1~Chorus3—These are conventional chorus
effects that add spaciousness and depth to the sound.
● Flanger—This is an effect that sounds somewhat like a
jet airplane taking off and landing.
● GM2 Chorus—This reverb effect is Roland’s standard
type for GM2-compatible tone generators.
● Delay—This is a full-fledged delay effect that can be
used instead of a chorus or flanger. As you will see, there
are a lot of parameters to program just the effect you
need.
If you don’t want to edit the effects parameters, continue with the next step, otherwise jump to step (6).
(5) Press [Back] to return to the display page with the
“modules”.
–OR–
Press the [EXIT] button to return to the main page.
(6) After selecting a chorus type, you may want to
fine-tune some of its parameters. If so, proceed as
follows:
• Press the field of the parameter you wish to change
(the number of fields and their meaning depend on
the selected chorus type).
G-70 Music Workstation r
Editing the Keyboard effects processors
Parameter values can be set by turning the
[DATA÷ENTRY] dial, by pressing the [DEC]/[INC] buttons, or by pressing the [DATA÷ENTRY] dial and
using the on-screen numeric pad.
[CHORUS LEVEL] allows you to set the output level of
the Chorus processor. Setting this parameter to “0”
means that you no longer hear the effect in question.
[OUTPUT] allows you to specify where the processor’s
output signal should go: to the MAIN outputs
(“Main”), the Reverb processor (“Rev”) or both
(“Main+Rev”). The latter two options mean that the
chorus signal (i.e. a mix of direct and effect signal) is
also processed by the reverb effect you select.
Chorus 1~3 and Flanger parameters
● Filter Type (Off, LPF, HPF)—This allows you to specify
whether or not the incoming signal should be filtered
before being processed by the chorus. This may be helpful to avoid a cluttered sound image, or to preserve the
“punch” of bass signals. Select “OFF” you don’t need any
filtering. “LPF” cuts the frequency range above the “Cutoff Freq”. “HPF” cuts the frequency range below the
“Cutoff Freq”.
● Cutoff Freq (200~8000Hz)—Basic frequency of the filter. This has no effect if you select “OFF” as filter type.
● Pre Delay (0.0~100.0 ms)—Adjusts the delay time from
the direct sound until the chorus sound is heard.
● Rate Sync (Hz, Note)—Use this parameter to specify
whether (“Note”) or not (“Hz”) the modulation rate
should be synchronized to the Arranger or Recorder
tempo. Depending on your choice, the setting range of
the following parameter refers to a speed (Hz) or a note
value.
● Rate [Hz] (0.05~10.00Hz)
Rate [Note] (1/64T, 1/64, 1/32T, 1/32, 1/16T, 1/32., 1/
16, 1/8T, 1/16., 1/8, 1/4T, 1/8., 1/4, 1/2 T, 1/4., 1/2,
1/1 T, 1/2., 1/1, 2/1 T, 1/1., 2/1)—Specifies the modulation speed. This can be either a frequency (Hz) or a note
value, depending on how you set the “Rate Sync” parameter above. “T” means “triplet” and a “.” refers to a dotted
note. “2/1” means that each cycle takes two measures/
bars. The advantage of working with a note value is that
the chorus will undulate in sync with the current
Arranger or Recorder tempo, which can be used for
musical purposes (to emphasize a rhythmic groove, for
example).
● Depth (0~127)—This parameter sets the depth at which
the chorus sound is modulated. Higher values result in a
more pronounced modulation.
● Phase (0~180 [deg])—Spatial spread of the sound (i.e.
the “stereoness” of the effect).
● Chorus Feedback (0~127)—This parameter sets the
level at which the chorus sound is re-input (fed back)
into the chorus. By using Feedback, a denser Chorus
sound can be created. Higher values result in a greater
feedback level.
GM2 Chorus parameters
● Pre LPF (0~7)—Cuts the high frequency range of the
sound coming into the chorus. Higher values will cut
more of the high frequencies.
● Level (0~127)—Output level of the chorus sound.
● Feedback (0~127)—Adjusts the amount of the chorus
sound that is fed back into the effect.
● Delay (0~127)—Adjusts the delay time from the direct
sound until the chorus sound is heard.
● Rate (0~127)—This parameter sets the speed (frequency) at which the chorus sound is modulated. Higher
values result in faster modulation.
● Depth (0~127)—This parameter sets the depth at which
the chorus sound is modulated. Higher values result in a
more pronounced modulation.
● Reverb Send (0~127)—This parameter sets the amount
of chorus sound that is sent to the Reverb processor. The
value “127” effectively allows you to connect the chorus
and reverb effects in series (Chorus before Reverb). If you
do not want the chorus signal to be processed by the
Reverb effect, set this value to “0”.
Delay parameters
● L/R/C Delay Sync (msec, Note)—Use this parameter to
specify whether (“Note”) or not (“msec”) the delay time
should be synchronized to the Arranger or Recorder
tempo. Depending on your choice, the setting range of
the following parameter refers to a speed (Hz) or a note
value.
● L/R/C Delay [msec] (0~1000ms)
L/R/C Delay [Note] (1/64T, 1/64, 1/32T, 1/32, 1/16T, 1/
32., 1/16, 1/8T, 1/16., 1/8, 1/4T, 1/8., 1/4, 1/2T, 1/4., 1/
2, 1/1T, 1/2., 1/1, 2/1T, 1/1., 2/1)—Specifies the delay
time. This can be either a time value (“msec”) or a note
value, depending on how you set the “Delay Sync”
parameter above. “T” means “triplet” and a “.” refers to a
dotted note. “2/1” means that each repetition comes
after two measures/bars. The advantage of working with
a note value is that the delay effect runs in sync with the
current Arranger or Recorder tempo, which can be used
for musical purposes.
● C Feedback (–98~+98%)—Adjusts the proportion of the
delay sound that is fed back into the effect. Negative (–)
settings invert the phase.
● HF Damp (200~8000Hz, Bypass)—Adjusts the frequency above which sound fed back to the effect will be
cut. If you do not want to cut the high frequencies, set
this parameter to BYPASS.
● L/R/C Level (0~127)—Volume of each delay sound
(there are three: one for the left channel, one for the
center, and one for the right channel).
(7) Press the [EXIT] button to return to the main page.
EXIT
Note: Do not forget to save your settings to a User Program if
you want to keep them.
99
G-70 Music Workstation
Using the mixer functions & effects
Using the multi-effects processor
(Multi-FX)
Your G-70 contains a multi-effects processor that can
be used for processing any Keyboard part you like.
There is a similar multi-functional processor for external audio signals (with the same algorithms), which is
be covered on page 104.
Selecting another MFX type and editing it
The G-70 provides 84 different Multi-FX types, some of
which are combinations of two effects for added flexibility. Here is how to select another Multi-FX type:
(1) Press and hold the [MULTI-FX] button until the display looks as follows:
(1) Press the PART ON/OFF [UP1] button (it must light).
UP 1
(2) Select the “Dist. Guitar” Tone on page 2 of the
[E.GUITAR/BASS].
(3) Play a few notes on the keyboard, and switch the
[MULTI-FX] button on/off to hear the difference.
MULTI
FX
The MFX can be assigned to any of the Keyboard
parts. To do so, proceed as follows:
• Press the [EFFECT] button.
r
• Press the [MFX¥PART¥ASSIGN] field.
• Press the field(s) of the Keyboard part(s) that should
use the selected MFX effect.
Note: There is only one MFX processor that is shared by all
Keyboard parts.
• Press the [EXIT] button to return to the main page.
100
You can also select this page by pressing the [EFFECT]
button→ [MFX] “rack” field and the [EDIT] field. But
the above method is a lot faster.
(2) Press the [ON] (or [OFF]) field to switch the processor on (icon lights) or off (icon goes dark).
You can also do so on the EFFECTS page (see above).
(3) Press the field below “MFX” that displays the name
of the currently selected type.
(4) Select the desired type with the [DATA÷ENTRY] dial
or the [DEC]/[INC] buttons.
Note: Multi-FX type selection can be linked to Tone selection
for the Upper part. See page 101.
The available types are:
1. Thru
2. Stereo EQ
3. Overdrive
4. Distortion
5. Phaser
6. Spectrum
7. Enhancer
8. Auto Wah
9. Rotary
10. Compressor
11. Limiter
12. Hexa-Chorus
13. Trem Chorus
14. Space-D
15. St. Chorus
16. St. Flanger
17. Step Flanger
18. St. Delay
19. Mod. Delay
20. 3 Tap Delay
21. 4 Tap Delay
22. Time Delay
23. 2 Pitch Shifter
24. FBK Pitch
25. Reverb
26. Gate Reverb
27. OD‰ Chorus
28. OD‰ Flanger
29. OD‰ Delay
30. DST‰ Chorus
31. DST‰ Flanger
32. DST‰ Delay
33. EH‰ Chorus
34. EH‰ Flanger
35. EH‰ Delay
36. Chorus‰ DLY
37. Flanger‰ DLY
38. CHO‰ Flanger
39. CHO/Delay
40. Flanger/DLY
41. CHO/Flanger
42. Isolator
43. Low Boost
44. Super Filter
45. Step Filter
46. Humanizer
47. Speaker Sim
48. Step Phaser
49. MLT Phaser
50. Inf. Phaser
51. Ring Modul
52. Step Ring
53. Tremolo
54. Auto Pan
55. Step Pan
56. Slicer
57. VK Rotary
58. 3D Chorus
59. 3D Flanger
60. 3D Step Flgr
61. Band Chorus
62. Band Flanger
63. Band Step Flg
64. VS Overdrive
65. VS Distortion
66. GT Amp Simul
67. Gate
68. Long Delay
69. Serial Delay
70. MLT Tap DLY
71. Reverse DLY
72. Shuffle DLY
73. 3D Delay
74. Long Time DLY
75. Tape Echo
76. LoFi Noise
77. LoFi Comp
78. LoFi Radio
79. Telephone
80. Phonograph
81. Step Pitch
82. Sympa Reso
83. VIB-OD-Rotary
84. Center Canc
To avoid confusion (and too much leafing through
pages), we decided to explain the available parameters elsewhere. See page 229. Here’s how to edit the
parameters:
(5) Press the field of the parameter you wish to
change (the number of fields and their meaning
depend on the selected type).
G-70 Music Workstation r
Effects for songs and Styles
If the required parameter is not displayed, press the
PAGE fields to jump to another page, then press the
appropriate display. (Some effects have only one
parameter page.)
(6) Set the desired value with the [DATA÷ENTRY] dial or
the [DEC]/[INC] buttons.
[REVERB¥SEND] and [CHORUS¥SEND] (upper right corner) allow you to specify how strongly the multieffect’s output signal should be processed by the
Reverb and/or Chorus processor. If you feel that is
unnecessary, set both parameters to “0”.
(7) Press the [EXIT] button to return to the main page.
Effects for songs and Styles
The Arranger and Recorder/16-track Sequencer share
the same effects processors, which is not problem,
because Style playback is impossible while a song is
running, and vice versa.
When you start playback of a song or Music Style, the
Recorder or Arranger sends SysEx data to the two processors, thus reconfiguring within a split second.
Here is how to select different effects for the selected
song or Music Style:
(1) Press the [EFFECTS] button.
Linking Multi-FX type selection to the Upper part
(Upper 1 M-FX Link)
If you like, the G-70 can automatically load the
Multi-FX type that is suited for the Tone you assign to
the UP1 part.
(1) Press the [MENU] button.
MENU
The display changes to:
The effects to look out for are in the STYLE/SONG
EFFECTS row.
On this page, you can switch the REVERB and/or
CHORUS processor off by pressing the [OFF/ON] button icon to the right of its “display”.
If you only need to select another effect type, press
the REVERB or CHORUS display and use the
[DATA÷ENTRY] dial or the [DEC]/[INC] buttons to select
it. If you also need to change certain aspects of that
effect…
(2) Press the [EDIT] button icon next to the STYLE/
SONG EFFECTS “REVERB” or “CHORUS” display.
Important remark
(2) Press the [UTILITY], then the [GLOBAL] field.
The effects settings discussed below are primarily
intended for real-time changes to a Music Style or
song. They are note saved – nor are they saved to a
User Program. When you select a different Music
Style or song (either directly, or via a User Program),
the changes made here are lost. You can, however,
save them (thus “burning” them into the Style or
song) by pressing the [MAKEUP¥TOOLS] button and
the [SAVE] field on the page that appears then (see
p. 130).
(3) Press the [UPPER¥1≈M-FX¥LINK] field to switch it on
(if the G-70 should choose a suitable MFX type for
each Tone you assign to the UP1 part) or off (if you
do not want the MFX to change automatically.
(4) Press the [EXIT] button to return to the main page.
101
G-70 Music Workstation
Using the mixer functions & effects
Reverb for Style/Song parts
Press the field of the effect type you wish to use.
The options are:
● ROOM1, ROOM2, ROOM3—These types simulate the
reverb characteristics of a room. The higher the number
(1, 2, or 3), the “bigger” the room becomes.
● HALL1, HALL2—These types simulate the reverb of a
small (1) or large (2) concert hall and thus sound much
“bigger” than the Room types above.
● PLATE—Digital simulation of a metal plate that is sometimes used for creating reverb effects. Works well for
percussive sounds.
● DELAY—A delay effect (no reverb). Works a lot like an
echo effect and thus repeats the sounds.
● PAN DELAY—This is a stereo version of the above Delay
effect. It creates repetitions that alternate between the
left and right channels.
Press the [REVERB¥LEVEL] field and set the desired
value with the [DATA÷ENTRY] dial or the [DEC]/[INC]
buttons.
This parameter specifies the output level of the
Reverb processor. Setting this parameter to “0”
means that your no longer hear the effect in question. By contrast, setting a REVERB parameter on the
mixer page for Music Styles to “0” means that only
the selected instrument is no longer processed by the
effect, while the remaining instruments are.
Note: See “Mixing Song or Style parts” on p. 124 for details.
Press [Back] to return to the display page with the
“modules”.
–OR–
Press the [EXIT] button to return to the main page.
r
Chorus for Style/Song parts
Chorus broadens the spatial image of the sound and
creates a stereo impression. There are also other
effect types you can choose here.
Press the field of the effect type you wish to use.
● CHORUS1~CHORUS4—These are conventional Chorus
effects that add spaciousness and depth to the sound.
102
● FEEDBACK—This is a chorus with a flanger-like effect
and a soft sound.
This type produces a flanger-like effect and has a soft
sound.
● FLANGER—This is an effect that sounds somewhat like a
jet airplane taking off and landing.
● SHORT DELAY—This is a delay (echo effect) with a short
delay time.
● SHORT DLY FBK—This is a short delay with many
repeats.
Press the [CHORUS¥LEVEL] field and set the desired
value with the [DATA÷ENTRY] dial or the [DEC]/[INC]
buttons.
This parameter specifies the output level of the Chorus processor. Setting this parameter to “0” means
that your no longer hear the effect in question. By
contrast, setting a CHORUS parameter on the mixer
page for Music Styles to “0” means that only the
selected instrument is no longer processed by the
effect, while the remaining instruments are.
Note: See “Mixing Song or Style parts” on p. 124 for details.
Press the [CHO®REV¥SEND] field and set the desired
value with the [DATA÷ENTRY] dial or the [DEC]/[INC]
buttons.
This parameter sets the amount of chorus sound that
is sent to the Reverb processor. The value “127”
effectively allows you to connect the Chorus and
Reverb effects in series (Chorus before Reverb). If you
do not want the chorus signal to be processed by the
reverb effect, set this value to “0”.
Press [Back] to return to the display page with the
“modules”.
–OR–
Press the [EXIT] button to return to the main page.
EXIT
Note: Do not forget to save your type selection to a User Program if you want to keep them.
G-70 Music Workstation r
Using the individual outputs and audio inputs
Using the individual outputs and
audio inputs
Output assign (PART OUTPUTS)
The display changes accordingly. Though the part
names vary, the basic behavior is the same for all
three pages. Let us therefore use the page that contains the Arranger parts (activate the [STYLE] field):
The G-70 is equipped with four outputs grouped into
two pairs: MAIN and DIRECT.
OUTPUT
DIRECT
R
L
R
MAIN
L / MONO
The MAIN sockets are considered the main output,
which is why all parts are assigned to them by default.
In some cases, such as when using the G-70 for multitrack recording, or if a given part should be processed
using an external effects device, you may want to take
advantage of the DIRECT sockets.
The parts assigned to the DIRECT sockets are no longer
processed by the G-70’s effects, nor controlled by the
[MASTER¥VOLUME] knob on the front panel.
Except for the Vocal Harmonist and Audio In parts, all
of the G-70’s parts can be freely assigned to the desired
OUTPUT socket(s).
Here is how to assign a part to the desired output:
(1) Press the [EFFECTS] button.
(4) Press the [MAIN] or [DIRECT] field of a part to assign
it to the corresponding output.
“MAIN” refers to the main outputs (which are stereo),
and “DIRECT” to the sockets of the same name (which
are also stereo).
As you see, both output pairs are stereo, which is
convenient for the MAIN signals. If you wish to send
only one signal to each of the DIRECT outputs, you
may also need to change the following:
Pan for Keyboard parts
• Press the [PART] button.
PART
• Press the [PAN¥POT÷VOLUME] button to assign the
PANPOT parameter to the sliders.
The display changes to:
(2) Press the PART OUTPUTS [EDIT] field.
The display changes to:
• Use the 9 sliders below the display to change the stereo placement of the available parts.
(3) First decide which group contains the part whose
assignment you want to change, then press the
corresponding PART SELECT field:
KBD: The Keyboard parts, D Beam and Melody Intelligence part.
STYLE: The Arranger parts.
SONG: The Recorder parts.
103
G-70 Music Workstation
Using the mixer functions & effects
Especially after assigning a part to a DIRECT output, it
is important to select “L63” for the DIRECT “L” socket,
and “R63” for the “R” socket. All other values mean
that the part in question is connected to both DIRECT
outputs, which may not be what you want.
In other instances, of course, this may just be what
you want, such as when you wish to create an alternate mix of certain parts and transmit their signals in
stereo to an external processor or mixing console.
The display changes to:
Pan for the Style and Song parts
The Pan setting of the Style and Song parts needs to
be set using the Makeup Tools function. See
page 124.
(5) Press the [EXIT] button to return to the main page.
Note: The PART OUTPUTS settings are written to a User Program, thus providing even greater flexibility.
Using the audio inputs
r
Your G-70 sports two EXTERNAL
EXTERNAL SOURCE
AUDIO IN
SOURCE/AUDIO IN sockets to which you
R
L
can connect an external instrument
(sound module) or a CD/MD player.
These RCA/phono sockets accept –10dBu
line-level signals (i.e. you cannot connect a microphone here).
The balance of the audio signals can be set with the
[EXT.¥SOURCE] knob on the front panel. The signals
received via the AUDIO IN sockets can be enhanced by
means of a separate effects processor:
(1) Press the [EFFECTS] button.
On this page, you can switch the AUDIO EFFECTS processor on and off by pressing the [OFF/ON] button
icon to the right of its “display”.
If you only want to select another effect type, press
the IFX display and use the [DATA÷ENTRY] dial or the
[DEC]/[INC] buttons to select it. If you also need to
change certain aspects of that effect…
(2) Press the AUDIO EFFECTS [EDIT] field to access the
IFX parameters.
104
(3) Press the [ON] (or [OFF]) field to switch the processor on (icon lights) or off (icon goes dark).
You can also do so on the EFFECTS page (see above).
(4) Press the field below “IFX” that displays the name
of the currently selected type.
(5) Select the desired type with the [DATA÷ENTRY] dial
or the [DEC]/[INC] buttons.
The available types are:
1. Thru
2. Stereo EQ
3. Overdrive
4. Distortion
5. Phaser
6. Spectrum
7. Enhancer
8. Auto Wah
9. Rotary
10. Compressor
11. Limiter
12. Hexa-Chorus
13. Trem Chorus
14. Space-D
15. St. Chorus
16. St. Flanger
17. Step Flanger
18. St. Delay
19. Mod. Delay
20. 3 Tap Delay
21. 4 Tap Delay
22. Time Delay
23. 2 Pitch Shifter
24. FBK Pitch
25. Reverb
26. Gate Reverb
27. OD‰ Chorus
28. OD‰Flanger
29. OD‰Delay
30. DST‰ Chorus
31. DST‰Flanger
32. DST‰ Delay
33. EH‰ Chorus
34. EH‰ Flanger
35. EH‰ Delay
36. Chorus‰DLY
37. Flanger‰DLY
38. CHO‰ Flanger
39. CHO/Delay
40. Flanger/DLY
41. CHO/Flanger
42. Isolator
43. Low Boost
44. Super Filter
45. Step Filter
46. Humanizer
47. Speaker Sim
48. Step Phaser
49. MLT Phaser
50. Inf. Phaser
51. Ring Modul
52. Step Ring
53. Tremolo
54. Auto Pan
55. Step Pan
56. Slicer
57. VK Rotary
58. 3D Chorus
59. 3D Flanger
60. 3D Step Flgr
61. Band Chorus
62. Band Flanger
63. Band Step Flg
64. VS Overdrive
65. VS Distortion
66. GT Amp Simul
67. Gate
68. Long Delay
69. Serial Delay
70. MLT Tap DLY
71. Reverse DLY
72. Shuffle DLY
73. 3D Delay
74. Long Time DLY
75. Tape Echo
76. LoFi Noise
77. LoFi Comp
78. LoFi Radio
79. Telephone
80. Phonograph
81. Step Pitch
82. Sympa Reso
83. VIB-OD-Rotary
84. Center Canc
To avoid confusion (and too much leafing through
pages), we decided to explain the available parameters elsewhere. See page 229. Here’s how to edit the
parameters:
(6) Press the field of the parameter you wish to
change (the number of fields and their meaning
depend on the selected type).
If the required parameter is not displayed, press the
PAGE fields to jump to another page, then press the
appropriate display. (Some effects have only one
parameter page.)
(7) Set the desired value with the [DATA÷ENTRY] dial or
the [DEC]/[INC] buttons.
[REVERB¥SEND] and [CHORUS¥SEND] allow you to
specify how strongly the multi-effect’s output signal
should be processed by the Reverb and/or Chorus
processor. If you feel that is unnecessary, set both
parameters to “0”.
G-70 Music Workstation r
Using the Mastering Tools
(8) Press the [EXIT] button to return to the main page.
Using the Mastering Tools
The G-70 contains two effects processors that apply to
all sections and parts whose signals are transmitted to
the OUTPUT MAIN sockets.
These processors are collectively called the “Mastering
Tools”, because they allow you to perfect the signal mix
output by the G-70 so as to adapt it to the sound system you are using. Though they are not meant to be
changed for every song you intend to play, switching
settings is relatively easy and could therefore be used to
great effect.
Note: The settings of the MASTERING TOOLS effects are global
parameters that are not saved to individual User Programs. You
can, however, archive them by saving the current User Program
Set to the internal memory or a memory card.
Press the [EFFECTS] button.
You can also do so on the EFFECTS page (see above).
(3) Press the field below “EQUALIZER” that displays the
name of the currently selected preset.
(4) Select the desired equalizer preset with the
[DATA÷ENTRY] dial or the [DEC]/[INC] buttons.
The available presets are:
1. Flat
2. Rock
3. Pop
4. Jazz
5. Classic
6. Standard
7. User
The settings you make on this page can be saved to a
User memory and recalled as and when necessary.
Here’s how to edit the parameters:
(5) Press the field of the parameter you wish to
change.
(6) Set the desired value with the [DATA÷ENTRY] dial or
the [DEC]/[INC] buttons.
● EQ LEVEL (0~127)—Use this parameter to set the equalizer’s input level. This may be necessary when the level of
the signals sent to this processor is so high that the
sound distorts.
Note: Do not set this parameter to “0” if the equalizer is
switched on, because doing so means that the OUTPUT
MAIN sockets transmit no signal whatsoever.
On this page, you can switch the MASTERING TOOLS
processors on and off by pressing the [OFF/ON] button icons to the right of the EQUALIZER and COMPRESSOR “displays”.
If you only want to select another effect type, press
the EQUALIZER or COMPRESSOR display and use the
[DATA÷ENTRY] dial or the [DEC]/[INC] buttons to select
it. If you also need to change certain aspects of that
effect…
Equalizer
(1) Press the EQUALIZER [EDIT] field to access the
parameters of the same name.
The display changes to:
An equalizer has the same function as the BASS, MID
and TREBLE buttons on an amplifier: it allows you to
color the sound or to apply tonal corrections that
help you avoid saturating the speakers.
(2) Press the [ON] (or [OFF]) field to switch the equalizer on (icon lights) or off (icon goes dark).
● EQ GAIN (–15~0~15dB)—Use this parameter to correct
the level at equalizer’s outputs. If the settings of the
remaining parameters lead to a significantly lower level
(which can be checked by switching the Equalizer on and
off for A/B comparisons), select a positive value. If your
settings lead to a significantly higher level, select a negative value. “0” means that the level is neither boosted
nor attenuated.
● HI FREQ HZ (2000, 4000, 8000)—This parameter allows
you to set the cutoff frequency of the high band (this is
a shelving filter).
● HI GAIN DB (–15~15dB)—Use this parameter to set the
level of the selected HI frequency. Positive values boost
(increase the volume of) that frequency. Negative values
cut (attenuate) it.
● MID FREQ HZ (200~8000Hz)—This parameter allows
you to set the cutoff frequency of the middle band (this
is a peaking filter).
● MID Q (0.5, 1, 2, 4, 8)—Use this parameter to specify
the width of the MID FREQ band that you want to boost
or cut. Smaller values mean that neighboring frequencies above/below that value are also affected.
● MID GAIN DB (–15~15dB)—Use this parameter to set
the level of the selected MID frequency. Positive values
boost (increase the volume of) that frequency. Negative
values cut (attenuate) it.
● LO FREQ HZ (200, 400)—This parameter allows you to
set the cutoff frequency of the low band (this is a shelving filter).
● LO GAIN DB (–15~15dB)—Use this parameter to set the
level of the selected LO frequency. Positive values boost
(increase the volume of) that frequency. Negative values
cut (attenuate) it.
(7) To save the settings you have just made (in order
to use them again at a later stage), press the
[WRITE¥USER] field.
105
G-70 Music Workstation
Using the mixer functions & effects
There is only one USER memory. By saving your new
settings, you therefore overwrite the previous ones.
(8) Press the [Back] field if you want to set the compressor, or the [EXIT] button to return to the main page.
Compressor
This is in fact a multi-band compressor/limiter that
allows you to specify the amount of signal compression
for three frequency ranges. A compressor reduces high
levels (peaks) and boosts low levels, smoothing out
fluctuations in volume.
(1) On the EFFECTS page (see above) press the COMPRESSOR [EDIT] field to access the parameters of
the same name.
The display changes to:
(2) Press the [ON] (or [OFF]) field to switch the compressor on (icon lights) or off (icon goes dark).
You can also do so on the EFFECTS page (see above).
(3) Press the field below “COMPRESSOR” that displays
the name of the currently selected preset.
(4) Select the desired preset with the [DATA÷ENTRY]
dial or the [DEC]/[INC] buttons.
The available presets are:
1. Hard Comp
2. Soft Comp
3. Low Boost
4. Mid Boost
5. High Boost
6. Standard
7. User
r
The settings you make on this page can be saved to a
User memory and recalled as and when necessary.
Here’s how to edit the parameters:
(5) Press the field of the parameter you wish to
change.
(6) Set the desired value with the [DATA÷ENTRY] dial or
the [DEC]/[INC] buttons.
● BC LEVEL (0~127)—Use this parameter to set the compressor’s input level. The higher the value, the stronger
the three frequency bands wil be compressed. The value
you set here is thus added to the LEVEL settings of the
three bands. If you set this parameter to “0”, the compressor has no effect on the output signal.
● BC GAIN (–24~0~24dB)—Use this parameter to correct
the level at the compressor’s outputs. If the settings of
the remaining parameters lead to a significantly lower
level (which can be checked by switching the compressor
on and off for A/B comparisons), select a positive value.
If your settings lead to a significantly higher level, select
a negative value. “0” means that the level is neither
boosted nor attenuated.
106
● SPLIT 1 (200~800)/SPLIT 2 (2000~8000)—On other
devices, these parameters are sometimes called the
“cross-over frequency”, i.e. the frequency where two
bands are separated. As the compressor has three bands,
there are two cross-over frequencies you can set: “1”
between the low and mid ranges, and “2” between the
mid and high ranges.
● Lo/Mid/Hi—Because the remaining parameters are the
same for each band, we will only discuss them once. As
you see, each of the three frequency ranges has its own
set of parameters that allow you to specify their behavior. The width of the three band can be set with…
● ATTACK (0~100ms)—Use this parameter to specify how
fast the compressor of the band in question should start
compressing the signal once the level of that band
exceeds the THRSHLD level. Choose a smaller value if you
prefer a compression similar to that of FM radio stations.
Higher values may yield a “snappier” or “funkier” sound.
● RELEASE (50~5000ms)—This parameter allows you to
specify how fast the compressor of the corresponding
band should stop working when the signal level drops
below the THRSHLD value. The “right” setting for this
parameter depends on the RATIO value you select. If the
level jumps between notes are too abrupt (a phenomenon known as “pumping”), increase the value until the
transitions seem a little smoother.
● THRSHLD (–36~0dB)—This parameter allows you to set
the level the frequency band in question must have in
order to trigger its compressor. The lower the value, the
more noticeable the compression will be (flattening out
whatever level differences that may have been there).
● RATIO (1:1.0~1:INF)—use this parameter to specify how
strongly the level of signals that exceed the THRSHLD
level is to be reduced. “1:2.0”, for example means that
the level values in excess of the THRSHLD level are
halved. The “1:INF” is useful if you set THSRHLD to “0dB”,
or thereabout. This produces a limiter effect, which
means that no signal level will never exceed the THRSHLD value. This may help you protect the speakers of
the PA system etc.
● GAIN (–24~+24dB)—This parameter allows you to
establish the desired mix among the three compressor
bands. Choose a negative value to decrease the level, or
a positive one to increase it. Choose “0” for a band that
should not be compressed.
(7) To save the settings you have just made (in order
to use them again at a later stage), press the
[WRITE¥USER] field.
There is only one USER memory. By saving your new
settings, you therefore overwrite the previous ones.
(8) Press the [BACK] field if you want to set the compressor, or the [EXIT] button to return to the main page.
G-70 Music Workstation r
Voice and Vocal Harmonist part mixing
Voice and Vocal Harmonist part
mixing
Your G-70 provides three knobs ([VOICE], [HARMONY],
and [EFFECTS]) that you can use without even bothering about the MIXER environment. That is why there
are no MIXER functions for this section. But the Vocal
Harmonist does have separate effects processors…
Note: For the following, it would be a good idea to set the
[EFFECTS] knob at least to “▼” to hear what you are doing.
(1) Press and hold a button to the right of the [VOICE]
knob or of the [HARMONY] knob.
This takes you to the page of the selected Vocal Harmonist function.
(2) To be able to set the effects, press the
[VOCAL¥EFFECT] field.
Note: When you switch on the [TALK] function, the display
looks a little different, because there is also a [MUSIC¥MUTE]
parameter. See page 47 for details.
(3) Press the field of the parameter you wish to edit,
and set the desired value with the [DATA÷ENTRY]
dial or the [DEC]/[INC] buttons.
VOICE column
● Reverb Send—Allows you to specify how strongly the
currently selected VOICE part should be processed by the
VOICE Reverb processor of the VOCAL HARMONIST section.
● Delay Send—Allows you to specify how strongly the
currently selected VOICE part should be processed by
VOICE Delay of the VOCAL HARMONIST section.
HARMONY column
● Reverb Send—Allows you to specify how strongly the
currently selected HARMONY part should be processed
by the HARMONY Reverb processor (which is a separate
processor).
● Chorus Send—Allows you to specify how strongly the
currently selected HARMONY part should be processed
by the Chorus processor of the VOCAL HARMONIST section. (The VOICE section doesn’t have a chorus effect.)
● Delay Send—Allows you to specify how strongly the
currently selected HARMONY part should be processed
by the HARMONY Delay processor.
(4) Repeat the above for the remaining combinations.
To select a different Harmonist part, switch on its
button. (The name of the currently selected parts
appears below the “VOICE” and “HARMONY” messages.)
Note: All settings for all VOCAL HARMONIST buttons are written to a User Program (page 111).
You can also select this page by pressing the [MENU]
button‰[VOCAL¥HARMONIST] field‰
[VOCAL¥EFFECT] field.
The parts affected by the VOICE section are: SINGER,
VOICE-FX and AUTO PITCH.
→ Processors: Reverb, Delay
Now look at the front panel:
VOICE
OFF
MAX
TALK
VOICE
FX
AUTO
PITCH
SINGER
HARMONY
VOCODER
SMALL ENSEMBLE
OFF
MAX
Only one button of these two sections can be on at
any one time. It therefore makes sense to use one set
of effects processors for the VOICE section and a second for the HARMONY section.
The parts affected by the HARMONY section are:
VOCODER, SMALL and ENSEMBLE. → Processors:
Reverb, Chorus, Delay
(5) Set the MIC INPUT parameters as desired.
As explained under “Compressor, Gate, and effects”
on p. 43, the Compressor and Gate apply to the MIC
INPUT signal before it reaches the VOCAL HARMONIST section.
(6) Press the [EXIT] button to return to the main page,
or continue with the next section to program the
effect processors.
Reverb, Delay, and Chorus effects
Each Vocal Harmonist part can have its own effect settings. These settings change automatically as you press
[TALK], [VOICE–FX], [AUTO≈TUNE], or [SINGER], on the
one hand, and [VOCODER], [SMALL], or [ENSEMBLE] on
the other.
[TALK] can therefore use a short Reverb (“Room”, for
example), while [SINGER] can be processed with the
“Church” algorithm, and so on. Thus, by pressing
[VOICE-FX], you not only select that part and its voice
transformations, but also the reverb and delay settings
you are about to edit.
In fact, the Roland engineers already programmed the
effect parameters for you, so that you only need to
read on if you want to edit those presets yourself.
107
G-70 Music Workstation
Using the mixer functions & effects
Extremely important remark
Before you even consider spending some time with the
Vocal Harmonist effects, you need to change the following parameter. If you don’t, your changes will be
lost as soon as you press another VOCAL HARMONIST
button.
Do not change this setting if you are happy with the
way the effects sound and therefore have no intention
to delve into this matter. The following setting is
remembered even after you switch off your G-70.
(1) Press the [MENU] button.
MENU
And now… the Vocal Harmonist effects
(1) Press and hold a button to the right of the [VOICE]
knob or of the [HARMONY] knob.
This takes you to the page of the selected Vocal Harmonist function.
(2) To be able to edit the effect parameters, press the
[EFFECT¥TYPE] field.
The display changes to:
(2) Press the [UTILITY], then the [GLOBAL] field.
(3) Press the [HARMONIST¥FX¥LINK] button icon.
Switch it on to use the most suitable effect settings
for each preset that can be assigned to the various
parts. Switch it off to leave the last effect settings
you made intact, then go on changing them.
(3) Decide which effect processor you wish to edit:
• To edit a VOICE effect, press the [REVERB] or [DELAY]
field below “VOICE EFFECT”.
• To edit a HARMONY effect, press [REVERB],
[CHORUS], or [DELAY] below “HARMONY EFFECT”.
Only the HARMONY parts (Vocoder, Small, Ensemble)
have a Chorus processor. The parameters and presets
for the Reverb and Delay processors differ between
the VOICE EFFECTS and HARMONY EFFECTS sections.
(4) Press the VOCAL HARMONIST button for which you
want to program the effect and talk/sing into the
microphone while setting the following parameters.
VOICE
r
OFF
108
MAX
TALK
VOICE
FX
AUTO
PITCH
SINGER
HARMONY
VOCODER
SMALL ENSEMBLE
OFF
MAX
If necessary, you can use the [VOICE] or [HARMONY]
knob to temporarily set the volume of the part you
don’t want to hear to “0”.
G-70 Music Workstation r
Voice and Vocal Harmonist part mixing
Reverb
Delay
■Reverb for VOICE EFFECT
■Delay for VOICE EFFECT
• Press the field of the Reverb type you wish to use.
• Press the field of the delay type you wish to use.
Note: The preset you choose affects the settings of the parameters below. Always start by selecting the type and then set the
programmable parameters.
Note: The preset you choose affects the settings of the parameters below. Always start by selecting the type and then set the
programmable parameters.
The names of these types ([STUDIO]~[CHURCH]) are
probably self-explanatory. You may notice that the
reverb character changes as you select different
types.
• Press the field of the parameter you wish to edit, and
set the desired value with the [DATA÷ENTRY] dial or
the [DEC]/[INC] buttons.
The three knob icons allow you to alter the selected
reverb type.
The names of these types ([SLOW]~[SPACE]) are probably self-explanatory. You may notice that the Delay
character changes as you select different types. Also
note that some delays are stereo. [BUBBLE] and
[SPACE] are “special” effects you probably only need
every so often.
• Press the field of the parameter you wish to edit, and
set the desired value with the [DATA÷ENTRY] dial or
the [DEC]/[INC] buttons.
The four knob icons allow you to alter the selected
Delay type.
● WALL TYPE—Allows you to specify the surface of the
walls in the simulated location. This parameter determines the “brightness” and “liveness” of the effect. (Carpet, Wood, Brick, Concrete, Marble)
● REVERB SEND—This parameter reflects the setting on
the “Vocal Effect” page. It was provided so that you do
not need to switch pages while editing the Reverb processor.
● REVERB TIME—Allows you to set the length (duration)
of the reverb effect if you do not agree with the “presetting”.
■Reverb for HARMONY EFFECT
● WALL TYPE—This parameter determines the “brightness”
and “liveness” of the effect. (Carpet, Wood, Brick, Concrete, Marble)
● DELAY SEND—This parameter reflects the setting on the
“Vocal Effect” page. It was provided so that you do not
need to switch pages while editing the Delay processor.
● DELAY TIME—Allows you to set the “time lag” between
the original and the effect signal. Combined with the
“DELAY FBACK” parameter, it sets the speed of the repetitions (echoes).
● DLY®REV SND—This parameter sets the amount of
delay sound that is sent to the Reverb processor. Higher
values mean that the delay portion will be more prominent in the reverb signal. Be careful not to overdo this
effect, because it tends to blur the sound image.
● DLY FBACK—This parameter specifies the number of
times the Delay will repeat. With a value of “0”, the Delay
will not repeat, while higher values increase the number
of repeats. With negative (–) values, the Delay will be fed
back with inverted phase. Negative values are mainly
effective with short delay times.
Except for the presets, this processor works exactly
like its VOICE namesake.
109
G-70 Music Workstation
Using the mixer functions & effects
■Delay for HARMONY EFFECT
The presets on this page are different, while there is
also one more parameter you can set (see above for
the others):
● DLY®CHO SND—Sets the amount of delay sound that
is sent to the Chorus processor. Higher values mean that
the delay portion will be more prominent in the chorus
signal.
Chorus (HARMONY EFFECT)
• Press the field of the chorus type you wish to use.
Note: The preset you choose affects the settings of the parameters below. Always start by selecting the type and then set the
programmable parameters.
r
The names of these types ([SMOOTH]~[CELESTE]) are
probably self-explanatory. You may notice that the
Chorus character changes as you select different
types.
• Press the field of the parameter you wish to edit, and
set the desired value with the [DATA÷ENTRY] dial or
the [DEC]/[INC] buttons.
The three knob icons allow you to alter the selected
Chorus type.
● LOW PASS FILTER—A low-pass filter can be applied to
the sound sent to the Chorus processor to cut the high
frequency range. Higher values will cut more of the high
frequencies, resulting in a mellower chorus sound.
● CHORUS SEND—This parameter reflects the setting on
the “Vocal Effect” page. It was provided so that you do
not need to switch pages while editing the Chorus processor.
● CHO®REV SND—This parameter sets the amount of
Chorus sound that will be sent to the Reverb. Higher values result in more Chorus sound being sent. The value
“90” effectively allows you to connect the Chorus and
Reverb effects in series (Chorus before Reverb). If you do
not wish the Chorus signal to be processed by the Reverb
effect, set this value to “0”.
(5) Press the [EXIT] button to return to the main page.
Note: The first thing to do now is probably to write your settings to a User Program (page 111).
110
Note: For certain parts, there is also an equalizer. See pages
132 and 135 for how to set them.
G-70 Music Workstation r
Saving your settings to a User Program
9. Working with User Programs
The G-70 also provides User Program memories that
allow you to store almost all settings (or registrations)
you make on the front panel and the various display
pages. Additional registrations can be loaded directly
from the internal memory or a memory card.
Before taking a closer look at the User Programs, there
is one thing we have to point out: all settings related to
MIDI must be written to a MIDI Set (page 220).
MIDI settings are not saved to a User Program. The reason for this is simple: You probably need a lot more
memories for your songs than you do for your MIDI
gear. Writing the MIDI settings to a User Program
would slow down the loading process.
Note: You can link a MIDI Set to each User Program, so that the
User Program in question automatically loads the required MIDI
settings.
About the User Program memory structure
Unlike previous Roland instruments, the G-70 no longer
has a fixed area where it stores User Program settings,
so that the number of User Programs is, in fact, unlimited. User Programs can reside in the internal memory
or on a memory card. You can even load them individually using the handy User Program Finder.
To keep this massive amount of information manageable, the G-70 works with User Program Set Lists
(hence the [SET¥LIST] button).
Such lists are what their name suggests: enumerations
of User Program files stored in the same memory area
as the list file itself.
Program (e.g. by selecting another sound for the LW2
part), that change is automatically adopted by all Set
Lists that refer to that User Program.
Saving your settings to a User
Program
It is a good idea to memorize your settings frequently,
even if you still need to do some touching up afterwards.
Those intermediary saves allow you to return to the
previous stage whenever you do not like your last modifications. Try to use the User Programs as “recall buffers” to be able to return to the previously edited settings, discarding only the latest modifications.
(1) Change all settings the way you want to save
them.
(2) Press the USER PROGRAM [SET¥LIST] button.
SET LIST
The display changes to:
User Program list= 8 references x 18 pages
1
PAGE 18
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
The references User
Programs are saved
separately.
PAGE 2
PAGE 1 1
Same system for
pages 2~18.
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
Data File
Data File
Data File
Data File
Data File
Data File
Data File
Data File
(3) Press the [WRITE] field (it lights red).
Internal
memory or
memory
card.
Set Lists are references to User Programs. They do not
contain those registrations. The advantage of User Program Set Lists is that loading a completely different set
of registrations takes less than a second (loading User
Program Sets on an older Roland arranger instrument
took much longer).
This system allows you to prepare one set of User Programs for weddings, another for corporate events, a
third for anniversaries, etc., that may access the same
User Program data here and there. If you change a User
(4) Use the [P] fields and [˚] to select the page (1~18)
where you want to save your registration.
(5) Press a big field [1]~[8] to select the destination
memory.
111
G-70 Music Workstation
Working with User Programs
The display changes to:
The blue field indicates the name of the User Program settings originally assigned to that memory
(here “Rainbow”). If you do not want to overwrite
that memory, press the [CANCEL] field and continue
with step above (3) to select another memory.
(6) Enter a name for your new User Program in the
black field.
At first, the black field contains the name of the settings you are about to save. If you don’t want to use
that name, start by pressing the [Delete] field.
See page 49 for how to enter names. You only need
to do this the first time you save new settings to a
User Program. You can also name your User Program
at a later stage and then save it again.
This name is very important for taking advantage of
the User Program Finder function (page 113).
Use a name that somehow summarizes the purpose
of this User Program. The name of the song you will
use these settings for is probably the most explicit
name you can think of.
It is perfectly possible to program several User Programs for one song. Selecting a User Program is a lot
faster than calling up one of the G-70’s functions,
modifying the settings, etc., while playing. You could
program one User Program for the first part of a
song, another one for the bridge, and a third one for
the closing section. Doing so allows you to “play”
with the effect settings of the various processors, for
example.
(7) Press the [EXECUTE] field.
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Important note
User Programs are not saved in a special area inside
the G-70 but on the media that also contains the list
file you are currently using. The name of that list is
displayed in the upper left corner, next to a yellow
folder icon. The area where your Set is stored appears
in the right corner.
You cannot select a different folder here.
112
If the target memory area (which cannot be chosen
here) already contains a User Program of that name,
you are asked whether it is OK to overwrite it.
• Press the [YES] field to overwrite the file. This replaces
the User Program in question with the new version.
Be aware that the new version will be used by any list
that contains a reference to that file.
• Press the [NO] field to return to the WRITE USER
PROGRAM page, change the name, then press
[EXECUTE] again.
Note: See “Load User Program Set” on p. 204 for how to load
another User Program List.
The data are saved and a message confirms the end
of the operation.
Selecting User Programs
Cancel
For song or Style playback without any customized settings, or whenever you want to start anew, you should
select the “Cancel” User Program. This allows you to
leave User Program mode (i.e. no longer work with the
settings of the last User Program you may have loaded).
These settings can be recalled any time, i.e. even after
selecting a “regular” User Program.
Simultaneously press USER PROGRAM [DOWN] and
[UP].
DOWN
UP
CANCEL
Note: Unless you specified a User Program for the Startup
function (page 117), you can also load the original Cancel settings by powering off your G-70 and turning it back on again.
G-70 Music Workstation r
Selecting User Programs
Choosing User Programs manually
The procedure for selecting User Programs does not follow the usual routine for selecting Music Styles or
sounds. So please carefully read the following.
(1) Press the [USER≈PROGR] field on the main page.
Press the [DATA÷ENTRY] dial and enter the number
(shown at the right edge of a field) using the onscreen numeric pad.
You will notice that each User Program also has a
fixed number that allows you to select it without
“turning pages”.
Sometimes, an asterisk (*) is displayed. This happens
when you change a parameter setting after recalling
a User Program to alert you to the fact that the current settings no longer correspond to the ones you
recalled. If you like them better than the original settings, you must save them again. See page 111.
Note: If the currently displayed User Program was loaded with
the User Program Finder, the G-70 now displays the USER
PROGRAM FINDER page where you can select another registration in the internal memory or on a card a card. To work
with User Programs of the currently active Set List…
Alternatively, press the USER PROGRAM [SET¥LIST]
button.
SET LIST
Note: By pressing the numeric button of the memory with the
asterisk once again, you restore the original settings of that
memory (thus cancelling any changes you have made).
Selecting User Programs with [DOWN] [UP]
The following method is especially useful if you programmed two or more User Programs for a song or if
the User Program sequence corresponds exactly to the
song sequence you are about to play (i.e. settings of the
first song or song part in memory [1] on page “1”, settings of the second song or song part in [2] on page “1”,
etc.).
With [DOWN] or [UP], you always select the preceding
or following User Program.
DOWN
UP
The display changes to:
CANCEL
[UP] Selects the following User Program (for example
[8]/P1 if you selected [7]/P1 before pressing this button).
[DOWN] Selects the preceding User Program (for
example [6]/P1 if you selected [7]/P1 before pressing
this button).
(2) Use the [P] fields and [˚] to select the page (1~18)
where you want to save your registration.
(3) Press a big field [1]~[8] to select the destination
memory.
–OR–
Press a numeric button [1]~[8] to select the corresponding memory (the button you pressed lights).
5
You can also use these buttons without first pressing
[SET¥LIST] to select one of the User Programs on the
last page you selected. If you only press a numeric
button, the page shown above does is not displayed.
–OR–
Note: If you press [UP] after selecting [8]/P18, your G-70 will
call up [1]/P1. Likewise, if you press [DOWN] after selecting [1]/
P1, your G-70 will call up [8]/P18, and so on.
Note: User Programs can also be selected using an optional
footswitch connected to the FOOT SWITCH socket on the rear
panel. See “User Program Up, User Program Down” on p. 68.
Working with the User Program Finder
Your G-70 also allows you to load any User Program
from the internal memory or a memory card, which is
as fast as working with a User Program Set List. As
stated above, any registration you “write” is saved as a
separate User Program file in the memory area that
contains the currently active Set List. All User Programs
referenced by a Set List therefore necessarily reside in
the same memory area as the list itself.
There may be times, however, when somebody from the
audience asks you to play a given song, for which you
did prepare a User Program – but maybe in a completely different Set List. Rather than loading another
113
G-70 Music Workstation
Working with User Programs
list (with 143 references you may not need at all), you
can simply use the Finder to load just that specific User
Program.
A User Program loaded with the Finder resides in a temporary memory (“buffer”) and will be overwritten when
you select another User Program. You can, however,
decide to save it using WRITE so as to include it in the
active Set List. The Finder can therefore also be used for
creating “best of” compilations from various User Program Set Lists.
(1) Press the FINDER [USER≈PRG] button.
USER PRG
The display changes to:
(2) Specify the memory area that contains the User
Program you need: [EXTERNAL≈MEMORY],
[INTERNAL≈MEMORY] or [FLOPPY].
The display shows a list of 5 User Programs in the
selected device (internal memory, card or floppy disk).
To work with a User Program on memory card, insert
the card and select [EXTERNAL¥MEMORY]. To work
with a User Program on floppy disk, insert the disk
and select [FLOPPY].
Note: The G-70 does not support User Programs of the Roland
VA, E, KR, or EM series.
(3) If available, press the field of the User Program you
need.
If the name is not displayed, use PAGE [ø][˚] to go to
a different page, then press the field of the settings
you are interested in.
This page lists the names of all individual User Programs contained on the selected device.
GENRE: The files are sorted alphabetically according
to genre (kind of music).
SONG LINK: User Program files with an active link to a
song file are sorted alphabetically according
to song name.
The right column now contains the selected entry
(only one of them can be displayed along with the
User Program name).
Continue with step (3) to select the User Program
you want to use.
■Using the Index function
The highest hierarchical level of the User Program
Finder database is called “Index”. All search operations apply to the selected Index (and therefore not
necessarily to all files internal memory or on a memory card).
• After performing step (2), press the [INDEX] field in
the upper left corner.
• Either press the field that corresponds to the desired
User Program category, or –if you’re not sure which
category the User Program belongs to– press [ALL].
(This may be a safer bet.)
• Now return to the previous page by pressing [BACK].
The display returns to the page shown under step (1)
above. This time, however, only the User Programs
belonging to the selected Index are displayed.
Continue with step (3) to select the User Program
you want to use.
■To directly locate the desired User Program…
(4) Press the [FINDER] field.
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Quick location of the User Program you need
There are several ways of quickly locating the User Program you are after:
■Sorting files
Press the [USER¥PRG], [STYLE¥LINK], [GENRE] or
[SONG¥LINK] field to sort the User Program files:
USER PRG: The files are sorted alphabetically according
to User Program name.
STYLE LINK: User Program files with an active link to a
MIDI Set are sorted alphabetically according
to Style name.
114
(5) Decide what you want to look for by pressing the
[USER¥PRG], [STYLE¥LINK], [GENRE] or [SONG¥LINK]
button icon.
(6) Decide how the Finder should look for files:
G-70 Music Workstation r
Selecting User Programs
• Press the [ALPHABETIC≈ORDER] field to search for all
entries that start with the characters you entered
(“BEA”, for example). Names that match the specified
criteria will be displayed at the top of the list.
• Press the [SEARCH¥ONLY] field to have the G-70
search for names that contain the supplied information. (This would allow you to also locate a file called
“Raggabeat” if you entered “BEA”.)
Press and hold the [HOLD] button.
HOLD
The display changes to:
(7) Enter only as many characters as you think are
necessary to find the User Program you are after.
The character string you enter can be used in two
ways (see below).
• See page 49 for how to enter names.
Note: There’s is no [A/a] field here, because the Finder makes
no distinction between upper- and lower-case letters.
• To enter numbers without cycling through the characters first, press the [NUM¥LOCK] button icon. After
entering the numbers, switch it off if you need to
enter characters again.
(8) Press the [FIND] field to start your search.
(9) Press the field of the User Program you need and
start playing.
Note: If no User Programs were found, the following message
appears, and no file names are displayed (in which case you
need to press the [USER¥PRG], [STYLE¥LINK], [GENRE] or
[SONG¥LINK] field to display all songs again):
If the G-70 did find one or several matches, the
“FOUND” number will be smaller than the “GLOBAL”
number.
Note: See also “Editing User Program Finder information” on
p. 117 for how to make the Finder functionality even more
powerful.
Selectively loading User Program settings
(User Program Hold)
Your G-70 can keep certain settings of the previous
User Program while selecting another User Program.
That way, you can go on playing with the last sounds
you selected and/or Harmonist settings you made.
(1) If you need a different User Program (whose settings should be used), select it, otherwise…
(2) Press the [SET¥LIST] button and the [HOLD¥SETTINGS]
field.
–OR–
(3) Press the fields that correspond to the settings you
do not want to recall.
● Style —Press this field if the settings related to the
Arranger (Style and Division) should no longer be loaded.
● Song—Press this field if the song (see “Song Link” on
page 116) should no longer be loaded.
● MIDI Set—Press this field if the linked MIDI Set
(page 116) should not be recalled. This allows you to use
a User Program that you originally programmed for a
given MIDI setup with a different MIDI setup. The current MIDI channels, filter settings, etc. (page 214),
remain as they are.
● Tempo—Press this field if the tempo setting contained in
every User Program should be ignored.
● Tone—Press this field to ignore Tone selection for the
Keyboard parts when a different User Program is
recalled.
● Harmonist—Press this field to ignore the various VOICEFX, AUTO TUNE, etc. settings you have made. See “Editing
the Vocal Harmonist parts” on p. 131.
● Transpose—Press this field to ignore the Transpose
(value and mode) contained in every User Program.
● KBD Mode—Press this field to ignore the Keyboard
Mode (Whole/Split) and Arranger Chord settings (Standard/Piano Style, Left/Right, etc.).
Press [ALL] to activate all button icons, and [NONE] to
switch them all off.
Pressing one of the above fields without selecting a
User Program afterwards has no effect. Only when
you select another User Program will the selected
data filter (because that is what the User Program
Hold settings are) start working.
(4) Press the [EXIT] button to return to the main page.
(5) Use the USER PROGRAM [HOLD] button to decide
whether the filters you selected should be used
(button lights) or not (button dark).
115
G-70 Music Workstation
Working with User Programs
Automatic functions for User
Programs
Song Link
This function means that, by recalling a User Program,
you also prepare the associated song. Such songs reside
in the internal memory or on a memory card and must
be available when you load such a User Program for
this system to work. All you need to do, then, is hit the
[PLAY÷STOP¥®÷ª] button to start playback of that song.
Your G-70 only memorizes the song name. If, at the
time you recall such a User Program, that song is not
available, the display will respond with:
If the User Program already contains a link to
another song, which you no longer need, press the
[DELETE¥SONG¥LINK] field. This is not necessary to
establish a new link – it is meant to cancel a link.
(3) Press [MAKE¥NEW¥SONG¥LINK].
The display changes to:
Note: Songs that also contain lyrics information are flagged
by means of an “ ” icon. The note ( ) means that the file in
question also contains Play & Search information.
Remove the memory card (because the internal memory is always available), insert the proper card and
select that User Program again. If you don’t, the G-70
will start playback of the previously loaded song when
you press [PLAY÷STOP¥®÷ª] again.
(1) Press the USER PROGRAM [SET¥LIST] button.
SET LIST
See “Locating files with the Song Finder” on p. 140.
Bear in mind that the song data are not loaded into
the User Program memory.
(4) Press the field of the song you want to link to the
currently selected User Program.
(5) Press the [GET¥IT] field to establish the link to the
song whose name appears on an orange background.
This takes you back to the “User Program” page. The
selection field now contains a small “SONG” message.
On the main page, User Programs with a link to a
song are indicated by means of a paper clip icon.
Linking a MIDI Set to a User Program
The display changes to:
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(2) Press the [SONG¥LINK] field.
116
MIDI Sets are “User Programs for MIDI parameters”.
There are eight such memories (page 220).
If you regularly use the G-70 in different MIDI environments (studio, live, band), preparing three MIDI Sets
and linking them to the User Programs you usually use
in the studio, on stage, etc., can be a time saver. In
other situations, such a link could be dangerous,
because it would reconfigure the G-70’s MIDI parameters without you actually knowing it.
(1) Press the USER PROGRAM [SET¥LIST] button.
The display changes to:
G-70 Music Workstation r
Editing User Program Finder information
(2) Press the [MIDI≈LINK] field.
(3) Press a MIDI Set [1]~[8] field to select the desired
MIDI Set.
To break the link to this MIDI Set, press its field again
(all indicator icons must be dark).
(4) Press [BACK] to return to the User Program selection page, or the [EXIT] button to return to the
main page.
The selection field on the “USER PROGRAM SET LIST”
page now contains a small “MIDI” message. On the
main page, User Programs with a link to a MIDI Set
are indicated by means of a MIDI socket icon.
(2) Press the [UTILITY] field, followed by the [STARTUP]
field.
(3) Press the [USER≈PROGRAM] field and use the
[DATA÷ENTRY] dial to select the User Program to be
recalled when the G-70 is switched on.
(4) Switch on the [RECALL] field.
Switch off this button icon if no User Program should
be recalled when the G-70 is switched on.
If the User Program contains and song and/or MIDI
link, the paper clip and/or MIDI socket icon are displayed.
(5) Press the [EXIT] button to return to the main page.
User Program Recall
Whenever you switch on the G-70, it automatically
selects the “Cancel” mode, i.e. no User Program
(page 112). But maybe you prefer to be operational
right away. In that case, tell the G-70 which User Program it should recall whenever you switch it on:
(1) Press the [MENU] button.
MENU
Editing User Program Finder information
You already know the main aspects of the User Program Finder, so let’s have a more detailed look at it.
The User Program Finder is used for quickly locating the
User Programs you in a given situation. Some information is added automatically to User Programs you save,
while other information needs to be supplied by hand.
Here, we will concentrate on how to prepare that information for real-life use.
(1) Press the FINDER [USER≈PRG] button.
The display changes to:
USER PRG
The display changes to:
(2) Specify the memory area that contains the User
Program whose information you want to change
or expand: [EXTERNAL≈MEMORY],
[INTERNAL≈MEMORY] or [FLOPPY].
117
G-70 Music Workstation
Working with User Programs
The display shows a list of 5 User Programs in the
selected memory area.
The [USER¥PRG], [STYLE¥LINK], [GENRE] and
[SONG¥LINK] fields allow you to sort songs in alphabetical order.
(3) If the name of the User Program you want to use
to is already displayed, press its line.
(4) To display the next 5 User Programs, press the [˚]
field in the lower right corner.
You can press this field as many times as necessary
(or until it is no longer displayed). You also use the
[DATA÷ENTRY] dial and the [DEC]/[INC] buttons.
To return to a previous group of 5 user Programs,
press [ø]. See page 113 for details about locating the
desired User Program.
Editing the User Program Finder information
The Finder information is based on search criteria that
needs to be added to User Program files. Adding information to a file is a process we call “editing”.
User Program Options
The [OPTIONS] field in the lower left corner provides
access to a display page where you can add database
information. This also works for User Program files
that already contain entries you wish to modify.
(1) First select the User Program whose database
information you wish to change or edit by pressing
its field.
(2) Press the [OPTIONS] field.
What happens when you execute?
Before performing the next step, we’d like to inform
you about the consequences of renaming a User Program (USER PRG). From the illustration on page 111,
you may remember that each User Program available
to you is, in fact, a separate file.
You can bundle 144 such files into a User Program
Set List whose “members” can be recalled using the
buttons in the USER PROGRAM pad on the front
panel. Each time you select a memory [1]~[8] on page
P1~18, the G-70 therefore loads the settings of the
file in question. So here’s what happens:
• If you rename a User Program that is referenced by the
currently active Set List, the Set List is updated (and
therefore finds the User Program despite its new name).
• If you rename a User Program that is referenced by
other Set Lists (which you didn’t load), those lists no
longer find the User Program you renamed. Consequently, when you select the memory in question (after
loading the Set List), nothing happens, because that reference no longer works.
• Renaming a User Program that doubles as Music Assistant registration (with the “MA” label, see below) also
affects that registration’s name (which changes accordingly).
• Press the [EXECUTE] field.
■Delete
This function allows you to delete the selected User
Program from the internal memory area or memory
card. You should use this as sparsely as possible.
• Press the [DELETE] field. Deleting a User Program cannot be undone, which is why the following question
is now displayed:
(3) Now do one of the following:
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■Rename
This function allows you to change (or supply) the
USER PRG and GENRE information of the selected
User Program. (STYLE LINK and SONG LINK cannot be
edited in this way. See pages 116 and 116 for how to
do that.)
Note: In the case of a floppy disk, you can only change the
“USER PRG” entry.
[YES] deletes the User Program file.
[NO] leaves the file intact and takes you back to the
initial User Program Finder page with the list.
[Back] leaves the file intact and takes you back to the
USER PROGRAM LIST page.
• Press the [USER≈PRG] or [GENRE] field and enter the
desired characters.
• The [A/a] field allows you to switch between uppercase and lowercase characters.
Note: If a User Program you delete here is assigned to a Set
List, the memory in question no longer refers to a file.
Note: Deleting a User Program that doubles as Music Assistant
registration also discards the Music Assistant entry. For safety
reasons, an error message is displayed in that case.
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G-70 Music Workstation r
Editing User Program Finder information
■Music Assistant Mark
Note: This function is not available for User Programs that
reside on floppy disk.
This option allows you to add an “MA” label to the
selected User Program, which means that its registration settings appear in the Music Assistant list (see
p. 36).
• Press the [MUSIC¥ASSIST¥MARK] field.
Use the familiar Finder functions to locate the User
Programs you want to appear in the Music Assistant
list, then press their fields to add (and again to
remove) the “MA” label.
As you will learn later on, Music Assistant registrations are, in fact, a virtual concept, because they only
exist if there is a User Program file they can refer to.
That explains why deleting a User Program file (see
above) also discards the associated Music Assistant
entry.
■Copy
This function allows you to copy the selected User
Program to another memory area. Be sure to select a
User Program before pressing the [OPTIONS] field on
the USER PROGRAM LIST page. Also bear in mind that
the COPY page only lists User Programs that match
the last search criteria you used for the USER PROGRAM FINDER.
On the other hand, if you only need to copy certain
User Programs on memory card or in the internal
memory, using the FINDER is actually a good idea: it
helps you to avoid too many presses of the PAGE [ø]
or [˚] field.
• On the USER PROGRAM OPTIONS page, press the
[COPY] field.
• Start by specifying the source that contains the User
Program(s) you wish to copy: Press the [FROM] button icon to select the memory area.
INT MEMORY: The G-70’s internal memory.
EXT MEMORY: The memory card in the G-70’s PCMCIA
slot. Do not forget to insert it before selecting this option.
FLOPPY
The floppy disk in the G-70’s PCMCIA slot.
Do not forget to insert it before selecting
this option.
• Now specify the target you wish to copy the selected
song(s) to: Press the [TO] button icon to select the
memory area.
• If the name of the User Program you want to copy is
already displayed, press its line.
You can also select several User Programs.
To display the next 5 files, press the [˚] field in the
lower right corner. You also use the [DATA÷ENTRY]
dial and the [DEC]/[INC] buttons.
You can press this field as many times as necessary
(or until it is no longer displayed). To return to a previous group of 5 songs, press [ø].
If you need to copy all User Programs that are currently displayed (on all available pages), press the
[ALL¥FILES] field.
Note: If the memory card or floppy disk is not formatted, a
message will be displayed that allows you to format it before
the User Programs are copied.
(4) If you chose “EXT MEMORY” or “FLOPPY DISK” for
“TO”, enable the card’s/disk’s write protection and
insert it into the PCMCIA slot or disk drive.
This is also true of a floppy disk you want to work
with. See the owner’s manual of the memory card for
how to disable its write protection.
Note: Not all cards have a write protection function.
(5) Press the [EXECUTE] field. (Press [Back] if you do not
want to proceed, or to select other files.)
You are asked whether it is OK to overwrite all files
on the destination media (“TO”) that have the same
file names as the files you are about to copy.
(6) Press the [YES] field if it is OK to overwrite files
with the same names on the destination media.
Press the [NO] field if files on the source (“FROM”)
media that have the same name as existing files on
the destination (“TO”) media should not be copied
(only files with “original” names will be copied in that
case).
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G-70 Music Workstation
Working with User Programs
The data are copied and a “Function Complete” message confirms the end of the operation.
(7) Press the [EXIT] button to return to the main page.
Editing an Index
All User Programs in the G-70’s internal memory are
already assigned to one of the eight categories. You can
change those assignments and even edit the Index
names. Furthermore, you can copy an Index entry
(along with all its User Program assignments) to a different entry.
(1) Press the FINDER [USER≈PRG] button.
(5) Select the edit function you need by pressing its
field:
■Rename
This function allows you to change the name of the
selected Index.
• Press the [RENAME] field.
USER PRG
• Enter the new name (16 characters). See “Entering
names” on p. 49.
The display changes to:
Note: The [A/a] field allows you to switch between uppercase
and lowercase characters.
• Press the [EXECUTE] field to confirm the new name.
■Edit
This function allows you to assign the desired User
Programs to the selected Index (or to remove existing
User Program assignments).
• After performing step (4) above, press the [EDIT] field.
(2) Specify the memory area: [EXTERNAL≈MEMORY] or
[INTERNAL≈MEMORY].
(3) Press the [INDEX] field in the top left corner.
If the [ALL] field is currently selected, the display
looks as follows:
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The Index Edit functions are only available for “real”
Index categories, so…
(4) Press the field of the Index category you wish to
edit.
120
• Use the [FINDER], [USER¥PRG], [STYLE¥LINK], [GENRE],
and [SONG¥LINK] fields to locate the desired file. See
page 113.
• Press the fields of all User Programs you wish to
assign to the selected Index category.
Selected User Programs are displayed on an orange
background.
To remove a User Program from the selected category, press its orange field, so that it turns gray.
• If necessary, use the PAGE [ø][˚] fields to go to previous or subsequent list pages.
• Press [Back] to confirm your changes and return to
the USER PROGRAM LIST page. Press [EXIT] to return
to the main page and to cancel your changes (which
means that the assignments you have just changed
will be lost).
Note: After 50 modifications (established/defeated assignments), the G-70 performs an automatic confirmation (like
when you press the [Back] field).
G-70 Music Workstation r
Music Assistant functions
■Index Copy
This function allows you to copy one Index category
(along with all its User Program assignments) to a
another category. You could take advantage of this
for merging two categories to free up one category
for new assignments.
Note: There are eight Index categories in all. You cannot create additional categories.
• After performing step (4) above, press the [COPY]
field.
Music Assistant functions
The Music Assistant environment provides several
functions for editing existing and creating new registrations.
Creating new Music Assistant registrations
Music Assistant registrations are always based on a
User Program. In a way, they behave like User Program
Set Lists with only one entry each. Consequently, they
are only references to data that reside elsewhere.
(1) Press the FINDER [USER≈PRG] button.
USER PRG
The display changes to:
• In the left column (SOURCE), press the field whose
assignments you wish to copy to another Index category. You can also use the [ß][†] fields.
• In the right column (DESTINATION), press the field of
the index category you wish to copy the assignments
to. You can also use the [ß][†] fields.
• Now specify how the User Program assignments
should be copied:
Press the [REPLACE] field if the assignments of the
DESTINATION Index should be erased and replaced by
the entries of the selected SOURCE field.
Press [MERGE] if the User Program assignments of
the SOURCE category should be added to the assignments of the DESTINATION Index (the DESTINATION
category will contain more assignments than before).
Your command is briefly confirmed by the display:
Note: No User Program files are copied during this operation.
(6) Press the [Back] field to return to the USER PROGRAM LIST page.
The message “Executing” appears.
(2) Select the internal memory by pressing
[INTERNAL≈MEMORY].
Music Assistant registrations must reside in the
G-70’s internal memory. To use registrations based
on User Programs that are stored on a memory card
or on floppy disk, first copy the User Programs to the
G-70’s internal memory (see p. 119).
(3) Press the [OPTIONS] field, followed by
[MUSIC¥ASSISTANT¥MARK].
Note: Press the [EXIT] button to return to the main page and
cancel your changes.
(4) Use the Finder functions to locate the desired User
Program (see p. 113).
(5) Press the field of a User Program that should
appear in the Music Assistant window.
It is flagged with an “MA” symbol. If you pressed the
wrong field, just press it again to remove the “MA”
symbol.
(6) If necessary, select additional User Programs.
(7) Press the [EXIT] button to return to the main page.
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G-70 Music Workstation
Working with User Programs
Editing Music Assistant registrations
The G-70 also allows you to edit certain aspects of
existing Music Style registrations:
(1) Press the [MUSIC¥ASSISTANT] button.
MUSIC
ASSISTANT
■Deleting Music Assistant entries
The DELETE function allows you to dispose of the
selected Music Assistant registration. Again, this is a
virtual process, because the underlying User Program
does not disappear. (In fact, this operation only
removes the “MA” icon from the Music Assistant
entry.)
• Select the Music Assistant entry you want to discard.
• Press the [DELETE] field. This operation cannot be
undone, which is why the following question is now
displayed:
The display now looks as follows:
(2) Select the Music Assistant entry you want to edit.
(3) Continue with “Renaming Music Assistant registrations” or “Deleting Music Assistant entries”.
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■Renaming Music Assistant registrations
• Press the [OPTIONS] field, followed by the [RENAME]
field if it does not yet “light”.
This function allows you to change (or supply) the
NAME, ARTIST and GENRE information for the
selected Music Assistant registration. “ARTIST” refers
to the person that made the song famous, while
“GENRE” describes the kind of music.
• Press the [NAME], [ARTIST] or [GENRE] field and enter
the desired characters.
See “Entering names” on p. 49. The [A/a] field allows
you to switch between uppercase and lowercase
characters.
The NAME you enter here only refers to the Music
Assistant entry and has no effect on the underlying
User Program whose name does not change.
• Press the [EXECUTE] field to confirm the new name.
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[YES] deletes the Music Assistant entry.
[NO] leaves the entry intact and takes you back to the
initial Finder page with the list.
[Back] leaves the file intact and takes you back to the
MUSIC ASSISTANT LIST page.
Saving a Music Assistant entry
The SAVE function on the MUSIC ASSISTANT LIST page
does two things at once:
• It gathers the settings of all parameters that make up
your current registration and saves them.
• It creates a new User Program and gives it the same
name, or it modifies the existing User Program to
which the Music Assistant entry is referring. (The User
Program can be selected via the User Program Finder
if you like.)
Even though the display page is very similar to the
RENAME page (see above), it thus serves an altogether
different purpose.
This is useful for the following: suppose you started out
with a Music Assistant registration and then switched
on the UP2 part, changed the mixer settings and
selected a different Music Style. If you like the new version better than the previous one, you will probably
want to keep your new version. Hence the SAVE function.
(1) On the MUSIC ASSISTANT LIST page, press the
[SAVE] field.
G-70 Music Workstation r
Music Assistant functions
(2) Press the [NAME], [ARTIST] or [GENRE] field and
enter the desired characters.
See “Entering names” on p. 49. The [A/a] field allows
you to switch between uppercase and lowercase
characters.
(3) Enter names for the remaining button icons, if you
like.
(4) Press the [EXECUTE] field to save settings.
If you are saving your Music Assistant registration
under a new name, the operation is confirmed
(“Completed!”) and the G-70 returns to the MUSIC
ASSISTANT LIST page. (A new User Program is created
along with your Music Assistant registration.)
If the Music Assistant database already contains a
registration entry of the name displayed for NAME,
the following warning appears:
[YES] means that both the original Music Assistant
registration and the underlying User Program are
overwritten and replaced with the new versions.
[NO] leaves the entry intact and takes you back to the
SAVE page where you can enter a different name.
Continue with step (2) above.
(5) Press the [EXIT] button to return to the main page.
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G-70 Music Workstation
Song and Style Makeup Tools
10. Song and Style Makeup Tools
Mixing Song or Style parts
Though accessible via separate buttons, the Style and
song mixers are part of the MAKEUP TOOLS functions.
In this entire chapter, we never refer to tracks or parts
– only instruments. All parameters discussed below are
indeed related to individual sounds (some tracks may
use two or more sounds): if you think “the bass” is too
loud, use the assigned slider and turn it down. If “the
piano” needs more reverb, just add it… It doesn’t get
any easier than that.
Important remark
The parameters discussed in this section are primarily
intended for real-time changes to a Music Style or
song. They are note saved. When you select a different
Music Style or song (either directly, or via a User Program), the changes made here are lost. You can, however, save them (thus “burning” them into the Style or
song) by pressing the [MAKEUP¥TOOLS] button and the
[SAVE] field on the page that appears then (see p. 130).
(1) Press the MODE [SONG] or [STYLE] button below
the display.
The display changes to…
(2) If the icon of the instrument whose settings you
want to change is not displayed, press the MODE
[SONG] or [STYLE] button again.
The number of mixer pages depends on the number
of sound being used in the selected song or Style. In
certain cases, there may be only one page (with fewer
than nine channel strips).
(3) Press the row that corresponds to the setting you
want to change (CHORUS, REVERB, PANPOT, VOLUME).
–OR–
Use the TYPE [CHORUS/REVERB] and
[PANPOT÷VOLUME] buttons to the left of the sliders to select the parameter you want to change.
The row of the selected parameter is displayed with a
light background. You can also press the control icon
of the instrument whose setting you want to change
and then use the [DATA÷ENTRY] dial or the [DEC]/[INC]
buttons to set it. (In that case, the next step is unnecessary.)
The available parameters are relative changes that
are added to or subtracted from the settings stored in
the song or Music Style. The parameters you can set
on this page are:
■Instrument on/off (MUTE)
Press the instrument icon at the top of the channel
strip to switch the corresponding instrument on (no
MUTE message) or off (a MUTE message appears).
■REVERB and CHORUS: effect balance
The CHORUS and REVERB parameters allow you to
specify how strongly the instruments should be processed by the Reverb and/or Chorus effect. The
effects parameters (kind of reverb and chorus, etc.)
can be set on the COMMON (see p. 129) and STYLE/
SONG REVERB & CHORUS pages (see p. 101).
…or:
■PANPOT: stereo placement
Allows you to change the stereo placement of the
instrument assigned to the slider you are using.
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■VOLUME
Allows you to set the volume of the instrument
assigned to the slider you are using.
(4) Use the sliders to change the settings of the instruments that are currently displayed.
Note: Please bear in mind that these changes apply to the
instruments (Tones/Drum Set) in question – not to the entire
track they belong to.
Each mixer channel on the displayed mixer page is
assigned to the slider below it. Thus, the leftmost
channel can be set with the [16’] slider, the second
from the left with the [5-1/3’] slider, and so on.
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G-70 Music Workstation r
Using the Makeup Tools
(5) Press the [EXIT] button to return to the main page.
The display changes to:
EXIT
Using the Makeup Tools
In addition to the Cover functions for songs and Styles
(see pages 41 and 77) that allow you to change song or
Style playback by selecting presets, the G-70 also
boasts a mode where you can customize playback of
the currently selected song or Style. Changes you perform here must be saved if you want them to be permanent.
Important remark
The MAKEUP settings of Standard MIDI Files (songs) are
ignored by the G-70’s 16-track Sequencer. While editing a “made-up” song, you will thus hear (and change)
the original version, which may sound different once
you play it back.
• Select the memory area that contains the song you
want to change: press [INTERNAL≈MEMORY],
[FLOPPY] or [EXTERNAL¥MEMORY].
If you press [FLOPPY] or [EXTERNAL¥MEMORY], insert
the memory card or floppy disk with the desired song
into the slot (or drive). See “Playing back songs (Standard MIDI Files)” on p. 38 for details about selecting
songs.
• Select the song by pressing its field.
■Before changing the MAKEUP TOOLS settings of
a Music Style
• Press a button of the STYLE pad to select a Music
Style family.
STYLE
Before you begin…
There are two sets of MAKEUP functions: one for songs
(Standard MIDI Files) and another for Music Styles.
Because of the striking similarities, we will discuss each
item only once and only point out aspects that behave
differently.
Both environments can be selected via the same button
on the front panel, which is why we recommend you
always look at the information in the top line (“SONG
MAKEUP TOOLS” or “STYLE MAKEUP TOOLS”) before
making any change whatsoever. Here is how to tell
those two environments apart:
STYLE MAKEUP: Light blue bar at the top of the page.
SONG MAKEUP: Orange bar at the top of the page.
8 BEAT
16 BEAT
LIVE
BAND
BALL
ROOM
JAZZ
BLUES
50's & 60's
ROCK
DISCO
DANCE
CONTEMP
BOSSA
SAMBA
LATIN
WORLD
• Use the [PAGE¥1]~[PAGE¥4] fields to switch pages.
The number of pages depends on the selected family.
• Press the field of the Music Style you want to use.
See pages 27 and 86 for details about selecting Music
Styles.
■Before changing the MAKEUP TOOLS settings of
a song
• Press the FINDER [SONG] button.
SONG
You can also press the [SONG] field on the main page
to select songs.
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G-70 Music Workstation
Song and Style Makeup Tools
General procedure
(1) Press the [MAKEUP¥TOOLS] button once or twice.
MAKEUP
TOOLS
SONG
STYLE
This should depend on whether you want to change
the settings of the selected song or Style. The display
changes to:
The [OCTAVE] field disappears (because transposing
the drum part in octave steps doesn’t make sense).
(3) Press the [JUMP≈TO≈1st≈NOTE] field to jump to the
location where the instrument you are about to
change is used.
Playback starts automatically from that point.
If you can barely hear the Tone/Drum Set, press the
[SOLO] field (indicator icon must “light”), then use
[JUMP≈TO≈1st≈NOTE] to jump to the first note of that
instrument. Then press [SOLO] again to switch this
function off.
(4) Use the [MUTE] field to switch the selected instrument off.
The corresponding part is no longer played back. (Just
as a reminder: this setting only applies to the
selected instrument, and thus not necessarily to the
entire track.)
Note: In the case of the drums, you can mute two instrument
groups separately.
…or:
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(If this page is not displayed, press the [PALETTE] field
in the upper left corner.)
All modifications on this page and the related pages
are SysEx data that alter the actual song data (without replacing them). Only the G-70 can read these
data. Other SMF players (and the 16-track Sequencer)
ignore these newly added SysEx data. (There is currently no other instrument capable of reading the
MSE Style format the G-70 uses, so compatibility is
no issue.)
(2) Use the [ø][˚] fields in the lower right corner to
select the instrument you want to edit.
If you select a Drum Set, the display changes to:
(See page 128 for an explanation of the [PERC¥MUTE]
and [DRUM¥MUTE] fields.)
126
(5) Press the long sound name field (next to the
instrument icon) and use the TONE buttons and
the display to select another Tone or Drum Set.
(6) Press the [EXECUTE] button to return to the SONG
MAKEUP TOOLS (or STYLE MAKEUP TOOLS) PALETTE
page.
(7) Press the field of another parameter you want to edit
and use the [DATA÷ENTRY] dial or the [DEC]/[INC] buttons to set the desired value.
You can also press the [DATA÷ENTRY] dial and enter
the value via the on-screen numeric pad.
All parameter values can be positive or negative, so
remember to also use the [+÷–] field.
(8) Press [UNDO¥CHANGES] to reset all parameters on
this page to their saved settings.
(9) To save your changes at this stage, press the [SAVE]
field and see page 130.
G-70 Music Workstation r
Using the Makeup Tools
You can also press another field in the top row to
change yet other parameters before saving your
modified song or Style.
PALETTE
Pressing the [PALETTE] field on any of the MAKEUP
TOOLS pages takes you to the following page where
you can set the most fundamental parameters of the
instruments used by the selected song or Style.
Press the field of the parameter you want to edit and
use the [DATA÷ENTRY] dial or the [DEC]/[INC] buttons
to set the desired value. You can also press the
[DATA÷ENTRY] dial and use the numeric pad.
● VOLUME—The volume of the selected instrument. Negative values decrease the current volume, positive values
increase it.
● PANPOT —Use this parameter to change the stereo
placement of the selected instrument.
Note: In the case of Drum Sets, this setting applies to all
drum/percussion instruments. There is also a parameter that
can be set for certain drum instruments. See page 128.
● REVERB—Use this parameter to set the Reverb Send
Level. The “send level” refers to the amount of the signal
transmitted to the reverb effect – and hence to the
strength (intensity) with which the instrument is processed.
● CHORUS—Use this parameter to set the Chorus Send
Level. The “send level” refers to the amount of the signal
transmitted to the chorus effect – and hence to the
strength (intensity) with which the instrument is processed.
Note: The four parameters discussed so far can also be set
on the SONG/STYLE MAKEUP TOOLS mixer page (see p. 124).
● VELOCITY—This parameter allows you to modify the
velocity range of the instrument in question. “0” means
that the recorded values are left untouched, negative
values reduce all velocity values by the same amount
(leaving differences between notes intact), while positive
settings shift all velocity values in a positive direction.
● OCTAVE—(Only for Tones) Use this parameter to transpose the selected instrument up or down by up to 4
octaves if you think it is too high or too low.
SOUND EDIT for Tones
Pressing the [SOUND≈EDIT] field on any of the
MAKEUP TOOLS pages takes you to the following
page where you can make more refined changes to
the selected sound (see “SOUND EDIT for Drum Sets”
on p. 128 if you selected a Drum Set):
Press the field of the parameter you want to edit and
use the [DATA÷ENTRY] dial or the [DEC]/[INC] buttons
to set the desired value. You can also press the
[DATA÷ENTRY] dial and use the numeric pad.
● CUTOFF—This filter parameter allows you to make the
selected sound darker or brighter. Positive Cutoff settings mean that more overtones will be allowed to pass,
so that the sound becomes brighter. The further this
value is set in the negative direction, the fewer overtones will be allowed to pass, and the sound will become
softer (darker). On page 94 you will find a graphic.
Note: For some sounds, positive (+) Cutoff settings will
cause no noticeable change because the preprogrammed
Cutoff parameter is already set to its maximum value.
● RESO—This is a parameter one invariably associates with
a synthesizer. When the Resonance value is increased,
the overtones in the area of the cutoff frequency will be
emphasized, creating a sound with a strong character.
Note: For some sounds, negative (–) RESO settings may produce no noticeable change because the Resonance is
already set to the minimum value.
The following parameters allow you to set the
sound’s “envelope”. See page 94 for details.
● ATTACK—This parameter adjusts the onset of the sound.
Negative values speed up the attack, so that the sound
becomes more aggressive.
● DECAY—This parameter adjusts the time over which the
sound’s volume and Cutoff frequency fall from the highest point of the attack down to the sustain level.
Note: Percussive sounds usually have a sustain level of “0”.
Piano and guitar sounds are in this category. Holding the
keys for a long time will thus have little effect on the duration of the notes you are playing, even if you select a high
value here.
● RELEASE—This parameter adjusts the time over which
the sound will decay after the note is released until it is
no longer heard. The cutoff frequency will also fall
according to this setting.
Use the following three parameters if you think the
part in question has too much (or could use a little
more) vibrato.
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G-70 Music Workstation
Song and Style Makeup Tools
Note: Some Tones already contain natural (sampled) vibrato
whose depth or speed cannot be changed.
● VB RATE—This parameter adjusts the speed of the pitch
modulation. Positive (+) settings make the preset pitch
modulation faster, and negative (–) settings make it
slower.
● VB DEPTH—This parameter adjusts the intensity of the
pitch modulation. Positive (+) settings mean that the
“wobble” becomes more prominent, while negative (–)
settings make it shallower.
● VB DELAY—This parameter adjusts the time required for
the vibrato effect to begin. Positive (+) settings increase
the time before vibrato will begin, and negative settings
shorten the time.
DRUM INSTR EDIT
If the instrument icon to the left of the sound name
depicts a drum kit, you can also press the
[DRUM¥INSTR¥EDIT] field. Doing so takes you to the
following page where you can make more refined
changes for certain instruments of the selected Drum
Set:
If necessary, press the [SAVE] field to save your settings (page 130).
SOUND EDIT for Drum Sets
If the instrument icon to the left of the sound name
depicts a drum kit, the page selected with
[SOUND¥EDIT] looks as follows. Here, you can edit the
Drum Set as a whole.
Press the field of the parameter you want to edit and
use the [DATA÷ENTRY] dial or the [DEC]/[INC] buttons
to set the desired value. You can also press the
[DATA÷ENTRY] dial and use the numeric pad.
● CUTOFF—Allows you to make the Drum Set (all instruments) brighter (positive values) or darker (negative values). The further this value is set in the negative direction, the fewer overtones will be allowed to pass, and the
sound will become softer (darker).
● RESO—This parameter allows you to add a “synthetic”
character to your Drum Sets (choose a positive value), or
to make it sound more natural.
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• Use the [DRUM≈MUTE] field to suppress (or add) the
drum sounds.
• Use the [PERC¥MUTE] field to suppress (or add) the
percussion sounds.
If necessary, press the [SAVE] field to save your settings (page 130).
128
This page effectively allows you to reconfigure your
Drum Set (but you cannot select sound from another
Set).
Note: The names of the drum/percussion sounds depend on
the currently selected Drum Set. The sounds are usually similar
in nature, however.
• Use the PAGE [ø][˚] to select the drum instrument
you want to replace with a different sound (watch
the icon that appears to the left of this field).
• Use the [DATA÷ENTRY] dial or the [DEC]/[INC] buttons
to select another sound.
The first sounds you can select for a given instrument
are usually variations of the snare, bass drum, etc.
But turning the [DATA÷ENTRY] dial long enough, you
could also select any other sound (even a melodic
one).
Press the field of the parameter you want to edit and
use the [DATA÷ENTRY] dial or the [DEC]/[INC] buttons
to set the desired value.
● VOLUME—Use this parameter to set the volume of the
selected drum instrument.
● PANPOT—Use this parameter to set the stereo placement of the selected drum instrument. “0” means “no
change”, negative values shift the instrument towards
the left, and positive values shift it towards the right.
● REVERB & CHORUS—Use these parameters to set the
reverb or chorus send level of the selected drum instrument. The effects themselves can be changed on the
COMMON page (see below).
● VELOCITY—This parameter allows you to modify the
velocity range of the drum instrument in question. “0”
means that the recorded values are left untouched, a
negative setting reduces all velocity values by the same
amount (leaving variations intact), while a positive setting shifts all velocity values in a positive direction.
G-70 Music Workstation r
Using the Makeup Tools
● PITCH—Use this parameter to tune the selected drum
instrument higher or lower. The main reason for doing
so would be to create a “special effect”, or to make a
snare sound, etc., slightly snappier. “0” means that the
pitch is left unchanged.
If necessary, press the [SAVE] field to save your settings (page 130).
COMMON
After pressing the [COMMON] field on the Palette
page, the display looks as follows. The parameters on
this page apply to the entire song or Music Style –
and do therefore not depend on the kind of sound (or
Drum Set) you selected.
Press the field of the parameter you want to edit and
use the [DATA÷ENTRY] dial or the [DEC]/[INC] buttons
to set the desired value.
● REVERB TYPE—This parameter allows you to specify
what kind of reverb effect you need. The available reverb
types are:
Room1,
Room2,
Room3
These types simulate the reverb characteristics of a room. The higher the number (1 or
2), the “bigger” the room becomes.
Hall1,
Hall2
These types simulate the reverb of a small
(1) or large (2) concert hall and thus sound
much “bigger” than the Room types above.
Plate
Digital simulation of a metal plate that is
sometimes used for creating Reverb effects.
Works well for percussive sounds.
Delay
A Delay effect (no reverb). Works a lot like
an echo effect and thus repeats the sounds.
● CHORUS TYPE—Chorus broadens the spatial image of
the sound and creates a stereo impression. You can
choose from 8 types of Chorus.
Chorus
1~4
These are conventional chorus effects that
add spaciousness and depth to the sound.
Feedback This is a chorus with a flanger-like effect
and a soft sound.
Flanger
This is an effect that sounds somewhat like
a jet airplane taking off and landing.
Short
Delay
This is a full-fledged delay effect that can
be used instead of a chorus or flanger. As
you will see, there are a lot of parameters to
program just the effect you need.
Short DLY This is a short delay with many repeats.
FBK
“Original means that the song or Music Style uses its
own (programmed) chorus settings.
● REVERB LEVEL & CHORUS LEVEL—These parameters
allow you to modify the output level of the Reverb (or
Chorus) processor.
● SONG VOLUME (or STYLE VOLUME)—This parameter
allows you to set the overall volume of the selected song
(or Music Style) if you think it is too soft compared with
other songs (or Music Styles).
● TEMPO—Allows you to change the song’s (or Music
Style’s) tempo (q= 20~250) if you do not agree with the
preset tempo.
● TRANSPOSE (only for songs)—This parameter allows
you to transpose all song parts (except the drums) up to
12 semitones (1 octave) up or down. This value is written
to the song data and used every time you play back this
song.
Pan Delay This is a stereo version of the above Delay
effect. It creates repetitions that alternate
between the left and right channels.
The “Original” setting means that the song or Style uses
its own (programmed) reverb settings.
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G-70 Music Workstation
Song and Style Makeup Tools
Saving your modified song or Style
The changes saved with the following procedure affect
the selected song or Style file directly. They are not part
of the settings that are saved to a User Program.
If you selected the drive that contains the original
version with the same name, the following message
is displayed:
(1) If you are happy with your changes and wish to
preserve them, press the [SAVE] field.
The display changes to…
• Press the [YES] field to overwrite the old version.
Press the [NO] field if you don’t want to overwrite
this song or Style and return to the previous page.
Then enter a different name (or select a different
media).
If the song doesn’t yet exist in the selected memory
area, the data are saved, and the following message
is displayed:
…or:
(2) If necessary, change the song’s or Style’s name.
You only need to do this if you want to preserve the
original version (and only if you want to save the new
version to the same memory area). The edits you have
just performed can only be read by the G-70, and so
are of little use to other SMF players or arranger
instruments.
(3) Specify the memory area that contains the Style or
song you need: [EXTERNAL≈MEMORY], [FLOPPY] or
[INTERNAL≈MEMORY].
(4) Press the [STYLE¥NAME] or [SONG¥NAME] field.
(5) Enter the name (page 49).
(6) Next, press one of the following fields (if necessary)
and enter the following information.
SONG
ARTIST, GENRE, FILE NAME
STYLE
COUNTRY, GENRE
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(7) Press the [EXECUTE] field.
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G-70 Music Workstation r
Singer settings
11. Editing the Vocal Harmonist parts
Apart from the effect settings discussed earlier, there
are also other VOCAL HARMONIST settings that can be
customized. All Vocal Harmonist Parts except the TALK
option provide additional parameters.
Procedure for selecting these pages
Singer settings
When the [SINGER] indicator lights, your solo singing is
output. Press and hold the [SINGER] button to jump to
the following page.
(1) Press the [MENU] button.
MENU
The display changes to:
(2) Press the [VOCAL≈HARMONIST] field.
The display changes to:
(1) Press the [MALE] or [FEMALE] field.
This is an important clue for the HARMONY processor
(Vocoder, Small or Ensemble). It does not change the
character of your live singing, though.
Press the field that corresponds to your voice type.
That way, the added harmony voices will sound even
more convincing.
(2) Press the [VIBRATO] field to add an automatic
Vibrato effect to your singing.
Note that this is probably only useful as gimmick:
your natural vibrato no doubt sounds far more… natural. The Vibrato parameters can be set on the “EDIT”
page.
(3) When you are done, either press the [EXIT] button
to return to the main page, or one of the other
buttons to set those parameters as well.
Note: The [VOCAL≈EFFECT] and [EQUALIZER] fields allow you
to jump to the effect or tone controls.
If you press the [EDIT] field…
…the display looks as follows:
(3) Press [VOICE] or [HARMONY] to specify which section you wish to edit.
(4) In the second row, press the field that corresponds
to the VOCAL HARMONIST part you wish to edit.
You could also press and hold the corresponding button on the front panel.
We suggest connecting a microphone and to sing/
talk while making the following settings.
• Press the field of the parameter you wish to edit and
set the desired value with the [DATA÷ENTRY] dial or
the [DEC]/[INC] buttons.
For the following, the [VIBRATO] button icon must be
on for the effect to be noticeable.
● Vibrato RATE—Sets the speed of the vibrato effect.
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G-70 Music Workstation
Editing the Vocal Harmonist parts
● Vibrato DEPTH—Allows you to set the vibrato intensity.
Vibrato is an effect that changes (“modulates”) the pitch.
The higher the DEPTH value, the more outspoken these
periodic pitch changes will be.
● Vibrato RISE TIME—Allows you to set a swell for the
vibrato effect. This parameter specifies how long it takes
before the DEPTH value is reached – once the Delay Time
is up.
● Vibrato DELAY TIME—Allows you to set a delay between
the moment you start singing and the moment the
vibrato effect kicks in.
Voice-FX settings
When the [VOICE-FX] indicator lights, your original
voice is no longer output by the Vocal Harmonist.
Instead, it will be changed (transformed) according to
the preset you select here.
• Press the [BACK] field to leave this page.
If you press the [EQUALIZER] field…
…the display looks as follows:
This page contains a simple equalizer for the VoiceFX, Auto Pitch and Singer parts.
• Press the field of the parameter you want to edit and
set the desired value with the [DATA÷ENTRY] dial or
the [DEC]/[INC] buttons.
[EQUALIZER] Press this field to switch the equalizer of the
(1) Press and hold the [VOICE-FX] button.
(2) Press one of the 12 fields in the middle to select
the kind of transformation you want.
(3) Press the [VIBRATO] field to add an automatic
vibrato effect to the transformed voice.
The Vibrato parameters can be set on the “EDIT” page.
(4) When you are done, either press the [EXIT] button
to return to the main page, or one of the other
fields to set those parameters as well.
Note: The [VOCAL≈EFFECT] and [EQUALIZER] fields allow you
to jump to the effects or tone controls.
If you press the [EDIT] field…
…the display looks as follows:
corresponding part on or off. The parameter settings of
that column are only used if the [EQUALIZER] indicator icon
lights.
The equalizer can be used for two things: (a) emphasizing a specific frequency range to create a special
effect or make the part more distinguishable; (b) to
reduce the level of frequencies that mask other
sounds or produce a “boomy” sound.
● FREQUENCY Hz—Use this parameter to select the frequency whose level you wish to change with the GAIN
parameter. The smaller the value, the lower the frequency that will be boosted or cut.
● GAIN—This parameter sets the level of the selected frequency. “0” means that the frequency’s level does not
change (no difference between equalizer on and off).
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• Press the [BACK] field to leave this page.
132
Note: Be sure to select the desired preset before pressing the
[EDIT] field and modifying the following parameters.
• Press the field of the parameter you want to edit and
set the desired value with the [DATA÷ENTRY] dial or
the [DEC]/[INC] buttons.
Here’s what the parameters mean:
● GENDER—Allows you to change the timbre of the part.
Negative values produce a “masculine” effect, positive
values add “feminine” qualities.
This parameter should be set in relation to the COARSE
value (if you want to achieve a realistic effect).
● Pitch COARSE—Allows you to transpose the processed
voice signal in semitone steps. “12” corresponds to 1
octave, “24” to 2 octaves.
● Pitch FINE—Allows you to change the tuning of the processed voice in very small (cent) steps.
For the following, the [VIBRATO] indicator icon must
“light” for the effect to be noticeable.
G-70 Music Workstation r
Auto Pitch settings
● Vibrato RATE—Sets the speed of the vibrato effect.
● Vibrato DEPTH—Allows you to set the vibrato intensity.
Vibrato is an effect that changes (“modulates”) the pitch.
The higher the DEPTH value, the more outspoken these
periodic pitch changes will be.
● Vibrato RISE TIME—Allows you to set a swell for the
vibrato effect. This parameter specifies how long it takes
before the DEPTH value is reached – once the Delay Time
is up.
● Vibrato DELAY TIME—Allows you to set a delay between
the moment you start singing and the moment the
vibrato effect kicks in.
(4) When you are done, either press the [EXIT] button
to return to the main page, or one of the other
fields to set those parameters as well.
Note: The [VOCAL≈EFFECT] and [EQUALIZER] fields allow you
to jump to the effects or tone controls.
If you press the [EDIT] field…
…the display looks as follows:
• Press the [Back] field to leave this page.
Note: If you select another preset, the Pitch and Vibrato
parameters on the EDIT page are reset to their factory values.
If you press the [EQUALIZER] field…
…the VOCAL EQUALIZER page appears. It contains a
simple equalizer for the Voice-FX, Auto Pitch and
Singer parts. See p. 132.
Auto Pitch settings
When the [AUTO≈PITCH] indicator lights, only the words
you say are used. The melody added to these words is
generated by the Vocal Harmonist. This is similar to the
Vocoder part, except that Auto Pitch is monophonic
(and thus meant as “solo voice”).
• Press the field of the parameter you want to edit and
set the desired value with the [DATA÷ENTRY] dial or
the [DEC]/[INC] buttons.
Here’s what the parameters mean:
● GENDER—Allows you to change the timbre of the part.
Negative values produce a “masculine” effect, positive
values add “feminine” qualities. This parameter should be
set in relation to the COARSE value (if you want to
achieve a realistic effect).
● PORTAM TIME & [PORTAMENTO]—See page 46.
● PITCH BEND—Press this field (so that it “lights”) if you
want to influence the pitch of the voice effect using the
G-70’s Pitch Bend lever.
● Vibrato RATE, DEPTH, RISE TIME, DELAY TIME—These
are the same parameters as for the Voice-FX part. See
therefore page 133. This time, however, they apply to
the Auto Pitch part.
Note: The [VIBRATO] button icon must “light” for the
Vibrato effect to be noticeable.
• Press the [BACK] field to leave this page.
(1) Press and hold the [AUTO¥PITCH] button.
(2) Press the [VIBRATO] field to add an automatic
vibrato effect to the generated voice.
The Vibrato parameters can be set on the “EDIT” page.
If you press the [EQUALIZER] field…
…the VOCAL EQUALIZER page appears. It contains a
simple equalizer for the Voice-FX, Auto Pitch and
Singer parts. See p. 132.
● OCTAVE—If you are not happy with the register of the
generated voice, you can transpose it up or down by up
to 2 octaves.
(3) Set the desired “TRACK” value with the
[DATA÷ENTRY] dial or the [DEC]/[INC] buttons.
This is where you select the track that should supply
the note information for the melody to be generated.
In most instances “4” is a good choice, because that
track usually contains the melody. This only applies to
Standard MIDI Files you play back using the Recorder.
Note: Use the Minus One function to mute the selected track
if it should not be played alongside the generated vocal part.
See page 41 for details.
Press the [LEFT] and/or [RIGHT] field if you want to
use the melody you play on the keyboard. The
“divide” between LEFT and RIGHT follows the split
point setting (see p. 57).
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G-70 Music Workstation
Editing the Vocal Harmonist parts
Vocoder settings
The Vocoder is related to voices that are added to your
singing (Voice-FX, Auto Pitch or Singer).
When the [VOCODER] indicator lights, “synthetic” harmonies are added to your singing. Unlike the Auto Pitch
function, the Vocoder can generate up to four harmony
voices.
(1) Press and hold the [VOCODER] button.
(2) In the GENDER column (right), press the button
icon that corresponds to the kind of “synthesizer
choir” you want to add to your singing.
Press [MALE] for a darker character, or [FEMALE] if
the Vocoder signals should be reminiscent of female
voices. Press [MIX] to create a mixed “choir”.
The field you press here determines what presets are
available. See also page 46.
As a rule, the Vocoder works as follows: the lowest
note played by the selected song part or yourself is
assigned to “PART 1”, while the highest is assigned to
“PART 4”.
• Press the field of the parameter you want to edit and
set the desired value with the [DATA÷ENTRY] dial or
the [DEC]/[INC] buttons.
● GENDER—Allows you to change the timbre of the part.
Negative values produce a “masculine” effect, positive
values add “feminine” qualities. This parameter should be
set in relation to the COARSE value (if you want to
achieve a realistic effect).
● PANPOT—Allows you to set the placement of the corresponding part in the stereo sound image. This is only
meaningful if you connect the G-70 to a stereo amplifier. “L64” corresponds to hard left, “0” to dead center,
and “R63” to hard right.
● VOLUME—Allows you to set the level of the corresponding part. Be aware that even the maximum value produces no audible effect if the [HARMONY] knob is set all
the way to “OFF”.
■Press the [COMMON] field to jump to the following page.
Note: The [VOCAL≈EFFECT] and [EQUALIZER] fields allow you
to jump to the effects or tone controls.
(3) Set the desired “TRACK” value with the
[DATA÷ENTRY] dial or the [DEC]/[INC] buttons.
This is where you select the track that should supply
the note information for the harmonies to be generated. In most instances “Auto” is a good choice,
because that allows the Vocal Harmonist to pick the
most useful track. This only applies to Standard MIDI
Files you play back using the Recorder.
Press the [LEFT] and/or [RIGHT] field if you want to
use the melody you play on the keyboard. The
“divide” between LEFT and RIGHT follows the split
point setting (see p. 57).
If you press the [EDIT] field…
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…the display looks as follows:
(Press the [SINGLE¥PARTS] field to select this page.)
The note icons next to the PART 1~4 entries indicate
the Vocoder parts that are currently playing. This may
help you to decide which part needs to be corrected.
134
• Press the field of the parameter you want to edit and
set the desired value with the [DATA÷ENTRY] dial or
the [DEC]/[INC] buttons.
• Press the [PORTAM] field to switch this effect on.
“Portamento” means that the pitch doesn’t change in
clearly defined steps: it produces glides from one
note to the next.
● PORTAM. TIME—Use this parameter to specify the speed
at which the glides are carried out. The higher the value,
the slower the transitions.
● RND. TUNING—This parameter allows you to introduce
subtle (or not-so-subtle) pitch inaccuracies usually associated with analog synthesizers. Irrespective of the
choice you make here (Low, Mid, High), the effect will be
noticeable, but never overly dramatic. Select “Off” if you
do not need this effect.
This is not the same as a vibrato effect, because it only
affects the onset of the notes. There is thus no periodic
modulation of the pitch.
● NOTE WRAP—Activate this field if the Vocoder notes
should remain within a “natural” range. If it is off, some
notes may sound too high or too low.
● PITCH BEND—Press this field (so that it “lights”) if you
want to influence the pitch of the voice effect using the
G-70’s Pitch Bend lever.
● OCTAVE—This parameter allows you to transpose the
Vocoder in octave steps.
• Press the [BACK] field to leave this page.
G-70 Music Workstation r
Small settings
If you press the [EQUALIZER] field…
…the display looks as follows:
Press [MALE] for a man’s choir, or [FEMALE] for
female voices. Press [MIX] to create a mixed choir. The
field you press here determines what presets are
available. The preset sets the number of voices (1 or
2) that will be added.
Note: For an optimum effect, be sure to set the GENDER VOICE
INPUT parameter to match your voice type. See page 131.
(3) Set the desired HARMONY ASSIGN value with the
[DATA÷ENTRY] dial or the [DEC]/[INC] buttons.
See “Who specifies the harmonies?” on p. 44.
This page contains a simple equalizer for each separate Vocoder part, as well as an EQ band that applies
to all four voices simultaneously, for added flexibility.
These are connected in series.
• Press the field of the parameter you want to edit and
set the desired value with the [DATA÷ENTRY] dial or
the [DEC]/[INC] buttons.
● EQUALIZER—Press this field to switch all equalizers on
this page on or off. The equalizer can be used for two
things: (a) emphasizing a specific frequency range to
create a special effect or make the part more distinguishable; (b) to reduce the level of frequencies that
mask other sounds or produce a “boomy” sound.
● FREQUENCY HZ—Use this parameter to select the frequency whose level you wish to change with the GAIN
parameter. The smaller the value, the lower the frequency that will be boosted or cut. The ALL PARTS FREQUENCY Hz parameter affects the sound of all four parts
(1~4).
● GAIN dB—This parameter sets the level of the selected
frequency. “0” means that the frequency’s level does not
change (no difference between equalizer on and off). The
ALL PARTS GAIN dB parameter affects the sound of all
four parts (1~4).
• Press the [BACK] field to leave this page.
Small settings
When the [SMALL] indicator lights, two-part harmonies
are added to your singing. Press and hold the button to
select the following page where you can specify what
kinds of voices will be used for these harmonies.
● OCTAVE (–1~1)—This parameter allows you to transpose
the harmony voices one octave up or down. Use it if you
think the arrangement becomes a bit “cluttered”, or to
achieve a special effect.
If you press the [EDIT] field…
(Press the [SINGLE¥PARTS] field to select this page.)
The lowest note played by the selected song part or
yourself is assigned to “Part 1”, while the second is
assigned to “Part 2”.
• Press the field of the parameter you want to edit and
set the desired value with the [DATA÷ENTRY] dial or
the [DEC]/[INC] buttons.
● GENDER—Allows you to change the timbre of the part.
Negative values produce a “masculine” effect, positive
values add “feminine” qualities. This parameter should be
set in relation to the COARSE value (if you want to
achieve a realistic effect).
● PANPOT—Allows you to set the placement of the corresponding part in the stereo sound image. This is only
meaningful if you connect the G-70 to a stereo amplifier. “L64” corresponds to hard left, “0” to dead center,
and “R63” to hard right.
● VOLUME—Allows you to set the level of the corresponding part. Be aware that even the highest value produces
no audible effect if the [HARMONY] knob is set all the
way to “OFF”.
(1) Press and hold the [SMALL] button.
(2) In the GENDER column (right), press the field that
corresponds to the kind of choir you want to add
to your singing.
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G-70 Music Workstation
Editing the Vocal Harmonist parts
Press the [COMMON] field to jump to the following page.
• Press the field of the parameter you want to edit and
set the desired value with the [DATA÷ENTRY] dial or
the [DEC]/[INC] buttons.
• Press the [PORTAM] field to switch this effect on.
“Portamento” means that the pitch doesn’t change in
clearly defined steps: it produces glides from one
note to the next.
● PORTAM. TIME—Use this parameter to specify the speed
at which the glides are carried out. The higher the value,
the slower the transitions.
● RND TUNING—This parameter allows you to introduce
subtle (or not-so-subtle) pitch inaccuracies usually associated with analog synthesizers. Irrespective of the
choice you make here (Low, Mid, High), the effect will be
noticeable, but never overly dramatic. Select “Off” if you
do not need this effect. This is not the same as a vibrato
effect, because it only affects the onset of the notes.
There is thus no periodic modulation of the pitch.
● CHORD INT—This parameter works like the MELODY INT
function of the Arranger section: it even produces harmonies when the source (a song or your playing on the
keyboard) only plays one note.
● PITCH BEND—Press this field (so that it “lights”) if you
want to influence the pitch of the voice effect using the
G-70’s Pitch Bend lever.
• Press the [BACK] field to leave this page.
If you press the [EQUALIZER] field…
…the display looks as follows:
● EQUALIZER—Press this field to switch all equalizers on
this page on or off. The equalizer can be used for two
things: (a) emphasizing a specific frequency range to
create a special effect or make the part more distinguishable; (b) to reduce the level of frequencies that
mask other sounds or produce a “boomy” sound.
● FREQUENCY Hz—Use this parameter to select the frequency whose level you wish to change with the GAIN
parameter. The smaller the value, the lower the frequency that will be boosted or cut. The ALL PARTS FREQUENCY Hz parameter affects the sound of both parts.
● GAIN—This parameter sets the level of the selected frequency. “0” means that the frequency’s level does not
change (no difference between equalizer on and off). The
ALL PARTS GAIN dB parameter affects the sound of all
four parts.
• Press the [BACK] field to leave this page.
Ensemble settings
When the [ENSEMBLE] button lights, four-part harmonies are added to your singing. The associated page
allows you to specify what kinds of voices will be used
for these harmonies.
Press and hold the [ENSEMBLE] button.
With the exception of the fact that up to four voices
are generated, the parameters and fields on this page
work exactly like the “Small” parameters, so please
see above.
Note: When the ENSEMBLE parts are used together with
VOICE-FX or AUTO PITCH, only three harmony voices are available.
Note: The [VOCAL≈EFFECT] and [EQUALIZER] fields allow you
to jump to the effect or tone controls.
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If you press the [EDIT] field…
This page contains a simple equalizer for the SMALL
parts and an EQ band that applies to both voices
simultaneously.
• Press the field of the parameter you want to edit and
set the desired value with the [DATA÷ENTRY] dial or
the [DEC]/[INC] buttons.
136
(Press the [SINGLE¥PARTS] field to select this page.)
See also page 135.
G-70 Music Workstation r
Ensemble settings
If you press the [Common] field…
…the display looks as follows:
See the explanations under “Small settings”.
• Press the [BACK] field to leave this page.
If you press the [EQUALIZER] field…
…the display looks as follows:
This page contains a simple equalizer for the four
ENSEMBLE parts, as well as an EQ band that applies
to all four voices simultaneously for added flexibility.
• Press the field of the parameter you want to edit and
set the desired value with the [DATA÷ENTRY] dial or
the [DEC]/[INC] buttons.
● EQUALIZER—Press this field to switch all equalizers on
this page on or off. The equalizer can be used for two
things: (a) emphasizing a specific frequency range to
create a special effect or make the part more distinguishable; (b) to reduce the level of frequencies that
mask other sounds or produce a “boomy” sound. The ALL
PARTS FREQUENCY Hz parameter affects the sound of all
four parts (1~4).
● FREQUENCY Hz—Use this parameter to select the frequency whose level you wish to change with the GAIN
parameter. The smaller the value, the lower the frequency that will be boosted or cut.
● GAIN—This parameter sets the level of the selected frequency. “0” means that the frequency’s level does not
change (no difference between equalizer on and off for
that particular part, or the overall EQ band).
• Press the [BACK] field to leave this page.
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G-70 Music Workstation
More refined song functions
12. More refined song functions
Let us have a look at additional and more refined functions you can use for song playback. See page 160 for
recording and editing sequencer songs.
The display changes to:
Using the Fade-In/Out function
If you don’t change their assignments, the ASSIGN SW
[1] and [2] buttons allow you to start fade-ins and fadeouts. This function is also available for Style playback.
(2) Press the [FUNCTION], then the [FADE¥IN/OUT] field.
Note: If you did change the assignments of these buttons, see
page 62 for how to select the Fade-In and Fade-Out functions.
Note: Fade-In and Fade-Out can also be assigned to an
optional footswitch, etc.
■Fade-In
Fading in means that the volume of both the song
and Keyboard parts (but neither the Vocal Harmonist
signal, nor your voice) gradually increases, giving the
impression that you have been playing for a long
time before the music becomes audible. The volume
is automatically set to zero and then gradually
increased to the value specified with the
[MASTER¥VOLUME] knob.
• Stop song (or Style) playback and press ASSIGN SW
[1] (it flashes). The volume gradually increases.
As soon as the volume has returned to normal,
ASSIGN SW [1] goes dark.
■Fade-Out
• Start song (or Style) playback and press ASSIGN SW
[2] (it flashes).
The volume gradually decreases until it reaches zero
(the button goes dark). Song or Style playback stops.
Fade-outs are extremely popular in pop music.
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If you think the Fade-In or Fade-Out takes too long,
here’s how to change it:
(1) Press the [MENU] button.
138
MENU
(3) Press the field of the parameter you wish to
change.
Press [TIME≈IN] to change the Fade-In duration (0~20
seconds).
Press [TIME≈OUT] to change the Fade-Out duration
(0~20 seconds).
Press [TIME≈HOLD] to set how long it takes for the
volume to return to the [MASTER¥VOLUME] setting
(0~10 seconds) after completing the fade-out.
(4) Set the desired value with the [DATA÷ENTRY] dial or
the [DEC]/[INC] buttons.
(5) Press the [EXIT] button to return to the main page.
G-70 Music Workstation r
Programming MARK & JUMP locations
Programming MARK & JUMP locations
The supplied songs in the internal memory come with
four locations already memorized that can be selected
by pressing MARK & JUMP [1]~[4] (page 39). When you
select a song that contains such markers, the indicators of the MARK & JUMP buttons light. For songs that
do not contain these indications, the buttons remain
dark.
Editing and programming MARK JUMP locations can be
carried out as follows:
(1) Press and hold a MARK JUMP button [1]~[4].
Press whichever button you like. The display changes
to:
(2) Press the field that corresponds to the MARK JUMP
button for which you wish to program a different
location (1~4).
The following can be done both during playback and
while it is stopped.
(3) Do one of the following:
• Start song playback and press the [WRITE≈MARK]
field. This inserts the number of the current measure
in the field that lights.
–OR–
• Stop playback. Press the [DATA÷ENTRY] dial and use
the on-screen numeric keypad to enter the desired
bar number. Press the [Delete] field of the numeric
pad to dispose of the last number you entered. (You
can also use the [DATA÷ENTRY] dial or the [DEC]/[INC]
buttons.)
Example: if you wanted to enter “14” and then notice
that you pressed the [4] field twice (“144”), press
[Delete] to get rid of the second “4”.
As soon as you enter a new value, an [EDIT] message
appears next to the memory number (see field “3”
above).
• Press the [WRITE¥MARK] field to confirm your setting. The [EDIT] message disappears.
Repeat steps (2)~(3) to program new locations for
the remaining MARK JUMP buttons.
(4) Press the [DELETE¥MARK] field to clear the measure
indication of the selected MARK JUMP button.
The indicators of MARK & JUMP buttons for which a
location has been programmed light.
Pressing a MARK JUMP button for which no measure
location has been entered (and whose indicator
therefore does not light) has no effect.
Want to save time? Here’s the quickest way to program
MARK JUMP locations:
• Select the song you want to program MARK locations
for.
• Select the MARK & JUMP page (see above).
• Press [TOP¥|√] to return to the beginning of the song,
then [PLAY÷STOP¥®÷ª] to start playback.
• Press the [1] field to select it.
• Press the [WRITE¥MARK] field where you want the first
marker to be. This position is memorized.
• Press the [WRITE¥MARK] field where you want the second marker to be.
• Repeat the previous two steps for memories [3] and [4].
• Continue with step (5).
The MARK JUMP locations are additional information
for song files that need to be saved:
(5) Press the [SAVE] field.
(6) Press the [INTERNAL¥MEMORY], [FLOPPY] or
[EXTERNAL¥MEMORY] field to select the save destination.
If you choose FLOPPY or EXTERNAL MEMORY, do not
forget to insert floppy disk or card.
(7) If necessary, change the song’s name.
You only need to do this if you want to preserve the
original version of your song. The MARK JUMP information can only be read by the G-70 (or a
DisCover 5/5M), and is of little use to other sequencers or SMF players: they simply ignore it. So you
might as well save the song under its original name.
Besides, you can also save the song to a different
memory area (card or disk).
See page 49 for how to change the name.
(8) Press the [EXECUTE] field.
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G-70 Music Workstation
More refined song functions
If you selected the memory area that contains the
original version, the following message is displayed:
• Press the [YES] field to overwrite the old version.
Press the [NO] field if you do not want to overwrite
this song and return to the main page. Then enter a
different name (or select a different media).
If the song doesn’t exist in the selected memory area,
the data are saved.
(9) Press the [EXIT] button to return to the main page.
Working with the Song Finder
The Song Finder allows you to quickly locate the songs
you want to play back. You will see in a minute that it is
far more powerful when you work with the internal
memory or memory cards than with floppy disks.
(1) Press the FINDER [SONG] button.
■If you press [INTERNAL¥MEMORY] or
[EXTERNAL¥MEMORY]…
…the display changes to:
“FOUND”: found entries.
“GLOBAL”: total number of songs in that memory area.
The [SONG≈NAME], [ARTIST], [GENRE] and [FILE¥NAME]
fields allow you to sort songs in alphabetical order.
This sorting is determined by the selected category.
(3) If the name of the song you want to use to is
already displayed, press its line.
(4) To display the next 5 songs, press the [˚] field in the
lower right corner.
You can press this field as many times as necessary
(or until it is no longer displayed).
To return to a previous group of 5 songs, press [ø].
(You can also use the [DATA÷ENTRY] dial and the
[DEC]/[INC] buttons to change pages.)
Locating files with the Song Finder
The following is not available for floppy disks.
SONG
You can also press the [SONG] field on the main page.
a) Choose a category (Index)
The highest hierarchical level of the Song Finder
database is called “Index”. All search operations apply
to the selected Index (and therefore not necessarily
to all files in the internal memory or on card).
• Press the [INDEX] field in the top left corner.
The display changes to:
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• Either press the field that corresponds to the desired
song category, or –if you’re not sure which category
the song belongs to– [ALL]. (This may be a safer bet.)
Songs that also contain lyrics information are
flagged by means of a “ ” icon. The note ( ) means
that the file in question also contains Play & Search
information.
(2) Specify the memory area that contains the song
you need: [EXTERNAL≈MEMORY], [FLOPPY] or
[INTERNAL≈MEMORY].
The display shows a list of 5 songs in the selected
memory area.
140
Note: The remaining options on this page (RENAME, EDIT and
COPY) are only available for the specified category
• Press [Back]. The display returns to the page shown
under step (1) above. This time, however, only songs
belonging to the selected Index are displayed.
G-70 Music Workstation r
Working with the Song Finder
b) Select the Finder
The powerful part starts as soon as you press the
[FINDER] field.
• If you forgot to insert a character, use [ø] or [˚] to
select the position where the missing character
should be inserted. Then press [Insert], followed by the
character you wish to insert.
• To enter numbers without cycling through the characters, press the [NUM¥LOCK] field, so that its indicator icon lights. After entering the numbers, switch it
off if you need to enter characters again.
• Press the [FIND] field to start your search.
If the following message appears, the G-70 was
unable to locate any files that match the search criteria:
c) Search the database
The next step is to decide how the Song Finder should
look for the files:
• Press the [ALPHABETIC≈ORDER] field to search for all
entries that start with the characters you entered
(“BEA”, for example). Files that match the specified
criteria will be displayed at the top of the list.
The order depends on the button icon you activated
([SONG≈NAME], [ARTIST], [GENRE], or [FILE¥NAME]).
• Press the [FIND¥ONLY] field to have the G-70 search
the selected column for files that contain the supplied information. (This would allow you to also
locate a file called “Raggabeat” if you entered “BEA”.)
Note: See p. 38 for how to use the Play & Search function.
d) Decide what you want to look for
• Press the [SONG≈NAME] field if you want the G-70 to
look for song names, then enter the name (or part of
it).
• Press the [ARTIST] field if you want to look for an artist’s name, then enter the name (or part of it).
• Press the [GENRE] field to locate a specific genre
(Rock’n’Roll, 16-Beat, etc.), then enter the desired
characters.
• Press the [FILE¥NAME] field if you happen to know the
(usually cryptic) name of the song file, then enter the
desired characters.
In that case all song names are listed (the “xx of yy”
entry lists twice the same number of files).
If the G-70 did find one or several matches, the “xx”
number will be smaller than the “yy” number.
• Press the field of the song you need and do your
thing.
Editing the Song Finder information
The Finder information is based on search criteria that
needs to be added to Standard MIDI Files. Normal Standard MIDI Files files do not contain them.
Note: Some of the following information cannot be entered for
(or read from) files on floppy disk.
Song Options
After pressing the FINDER [SONG] button, the display
looks as follows:
Entering characters
Enter only as many characters as you think are necessary to find the song you are after. The character
string you enter can be used in two ways (see below).
• Use the [ø] and [˚] fields to select the position for
which you wish to enter a new character.
• Use the alphanumeric keypad to enter the desired
characters. This keypad works exactly like the keypad
of a cellphone: you may have to press an alphanumeric field several times to select the desired character or number.
Note: There is no [A/a] field here, because the Finder makes no
distinction between upper- and lower-case letters.
• The [Delete] field allows you to delete the character
indicated by the cursor. Press and hold it to clear all
characters.
• Press [Space] to insert a blank (or the number “0”).
The [OPTIONS] field in the lower left corner provides
access to a display page where you can add database
information. This also works for Standard MIDI Files
that already contain entries you wish to modify.
(1) First select the song whose database information
you wish to edit by pressing its field.
141
G-70 Music Workstation
More refined song functions
(2) Press the [OPTIONS] field.
■P&S Input
You can also add a musical phrase to your songs if
you wish to take advantage of the Play & Search
facility. See page 38 for how to use that facility in a
real-life situation. Here’s how to program the phrase:
Note: This information cannot be entered for files that reside
on a floppy disk. Be sure to copy them to the SSD area or a
memory card (see p. 142) and to edit that copy.
(1) On the SONG OPTIONS page, press the [P&S≈INPUT]
field.
(3) Now do one of the following:
■Rename
This function allows you to change (or supply) the
SONG NAME, ARTIST, GENRE and/or FILE NAME information of the selected song.
• Press the [SONG≈NAME], [ARTIST], [GENRE], or
[FILE¥NAME] field and enter the desired characters.
You can also rename all four of them.
• The [A/a] field allows you to switch between uppercase and lowercase characters.
Note: If you select a song on floppy disk, only the SONG NAME
and FILE NAME can be edited.
• Press the [EXECUTE] field. The “Operation Successful”
message appears to confirm this operation.
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■Delete
This function allows you to delete the selected song
from the internal memory area, memory card, or
floppy disk. You should use this as sparsely as possible. Once a song is gone, there is indeed no way to
restore it. So please be careful and try to forget this
function even exists.
• Press the [DELETE] field. Deleting a song cannot be
undone, which is why the following question is now
displayed:
[YES] deletes the song file.
[NO] leaves the file intact and takes you back to the
initial Song Finder page with the song list.
[Back] leaves the file intact and takes you back to the
SONG LIST page.
Note: If a song you delete here is assigned to a 146
Note: , an error message (“File not found”) is displayed during
playback of that Play List, and playback stops at that step. So
be careful.
142
(2) Play the notes of the most characteristic theme
(the one you’ll most likely play when using Play &
Search for locating this song).
The key and rhythm are of little importance (you
must get the intervals right, though!). The boxes will
display a quarter note for every note you played. Five
“note boxes” thus mean that you played five notes.
(3) If you make a mistake, proceed as follows to correct it:
Press the [DELETE≈LAST≈NOTE] field if you only wish
to correct the last note you entered.
Press [∫¥RESET] to erase all notes you have played so
far. Then play the notes again.
(4) Press the [EXECUTE] field to save this information
(i.e. the selected song file in the internal memory
or on memory card).
Songs for which there is Play & Search information
are flagged with a note symbol ( ) to the left of their
names.
■Copy
This function allows you to copy the selected song to
another memory area. You could use for quickly
copying somebody else’s songs from a memory
card to the internal memory of your G-70 – and
vice versa. It also allows you to copy songs to
another device.
Be sure to select a song before pressing the
[OPTIONS] field on the SONG LIST page. Also bear in
mind that the COPY page only lists songs that match
the last search criteria you used for the SONG
FINDER.
On the other hand, if you only need to copy certain
songs on memory card or in the internal memory,
using the FINDER would be a good idea: it helps you
to avoid too many presses of the PAGE [ø] or [˚] field.
G-70 Music Workstation r
Working with the Song Finder
• On the SONG OPTIONS page, press the [COPY] field.
• Start by specifying the source that contains the
song(s) you wish to copy: Press the [FROM] button
icon once or twice to select the memory area.
INT MEMORY: The G-70’s internal memory.
FLOPPY DISK: The floppy disk in the G-70’s drive. Do not
forget to insert it before selecting this
option.
EXT MEMORY: The memory card in the G-70’s PCMCIA
slot. Do not forget to insert it before selecting this option.
• Now specify the target you wish to copy the selected
song(s) to: Press the [TO] button icon once or twice to
select the memory area.
• If the name of the song you want to copy is already
displayed, press its line. You can also select several
songs.
To display the next 5 files, press the [˚] field in the
lower right corner. You also use the [DATA÷ENTRY]
dial and the [DEC]/[INC] buttons.
You can press this field as many times as necessary
(or until it is no longer displayed). To return to a previous group of 5 songs, press [ø].
If you need to copy all songs that are currently displayed (on all available pages), press the [ALL¥FILES]
field.
Note: In some cases, working with the [ALL¥FILES] field may
yield an error message at some stage, because a 2HD disk can
only hold 1.44MB worth of data, while a memory card and the
internal memory are a lot bigger.
Note: If the target media (memory card or floppy disk) is not
formatted, a message will be displayed that allows you to format it before the songs are copied.
You are asked whether it is OK to overwrite all files
on the destination media (“TO”) that have the same
file names as the files you are about to copy.
(7) Press the [YES] field if it is OK to overwrite files
with the same names on the destination media.
Press the [NO] field if files on the source (“FROM”)
media that have the same name as existing files on
the destination (“TO”) media should not be copied
(only files with “original” names will be copied in that
case).
The data are copied and a “Operation successful”
message confirms the end of the operation.
(8) Press the [EXIT] button to return to the main page.
Editing an Index
You can change the assignments of songs to a category
and even edit the Index names. Furthermore, you can
copy an Index entry (along with all its song assignments) to a different entry.
(1) Press the FINDER [SONG] button.
SONG
You can also press the [SONG] field on the main page
to select songs.
The display changes to:
(5) If you chose “EXT MEMORY” or “FLOPPY DISK” for
“TO”, enable the card’s/disk’s write protection and
insert it into the PCMCIA slot or disk drive.
To enable the write protection of a floppy disk, open
the “little window” (see p. 11). See the owner’s manual of the memory card for how to disable its write
protection.
Note: Not all cards have a write protection function.
(6) Press the [EXECUTE] field. (Press [Back] if you do not
want to proceed, or to select other files.)
(2) Specify the memory area: [EXTERNAL≈MEMORY] or
[INTERNAL≈MEMORY].
(3) Press the [INDEX] field in the top left corner.
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G-70 Music Workstation
More refined song functions
If the [ALL] field is currently selected, the display
looks as follows:
The Index Edit functions are only available for “real”
Index categories, so…
(4) Press the field of the Index category you wish to
edit.
• After performing step (4) above, press the [EDIT] field.
• Use the [FINDER], [SONG≈NAME], [ARTIST], [GENRE],
and [FILE¥NAME] fields to locate the desired file. See
page 140.
• Press the fields of all songs you wish to assign to the
selected Index category.
Selected songs are displayed on an orange background. To remove a song from the selected category, press its orange field, so that it turns gray.
• If necessary, use the PAGE [ø][˚] fields to go to previous or subsequent list pages.
Note: When you change pages, new assignments (or removals)
are automatically updated, which means that the contents of
the selected category changes.
• Press [Back] to return to the SONG LIST page. Press
[EXIT] to return to the main page.
(5) Select the edit function you need by pressing its
field:
■Rename
This function allows you to change the name of the
selected Index.
• Press the [RENAME] field.
■Index Copy
This function allows you to copy one Index category
(along with all its song assignments) to a another
category. You could take advantage of this for merging two categories to free up one category for new
assignments.
Note: There are eight Index categories in all. You cannot create additional categories.
• After performing step (4) above, press the [COPY]
field.
• Enter the new name (12 characters). See “Entering
characters” on p. 141.
Note: The [A/a] field allows you to switch between uppercase
and lowercase characters.
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• Press the [EXECUTE] field to confirm the new name.
■Edit
This function allows you to assign the desired songs
to the selected Index (or to remove existing song
assignments).
144
• In the left column (SOURCE), press the field whose
assignments you wish to copy to another Index category. You can also use the [ß][†] fields.
• In the right column (DESTINATION), press the field of
the index category you wish to copy the assignments
to. You can also use the [ß][†] fields.
• Now specify how the song assignments should be
copied:
Press the [REPLACE] field if the assignments of the
DESTINATION Index should be erased and replaced by
the entries of the selected SOURCE field.
G-70 Music Workstation r
Play List function
Press [MERGE] if the song assignments of the
SOURCE category should be added to the assignments of the DESTINATION Index (the DESTINATION
category will contain more assignments than before).
Note: No song files are copied during this operation.
(6) Press the [Back] field to return to the SONG LIST
page.
Note: Press the [EXIT] button to return to the main page.
Play List function
The Play List function allows you to prepare play lists of
all the songs you want to use during a performance.
The advantage of working with such “chains” is that
you do not need to select files between songs.
Programming Play Lists
• If necessary, insert the memory card that contains
the desired songs into the slot.
The Play List function is only available for songs on
memory card (only one such card at a time) and in
the internal memory. You may therefore have to copy
all desired songs to that area before proceeding. See
page 208 for details.
(1) Press the [PLAY¥LIST] button.
PLAY
LIST
The display looks more or less as follows:
The names refer to Play Lists already available in the
selected memory area.
(2) Specify the memory area you want to work with:
[EXTERNAL≈MEMORY] or [INTERNAL≈MEMORY].
Note: This is your last chance to select the memory area. Be
aware that all songs you wish to assign to a Play List must
reside in the selected memory area (Play Lists can only access
the memory area where they are saved).
(3) Press the [MAKE≈NEW] field in the upper right corner.
You have just created a new Play List, which is still
empty and therefore looks like this:
Play Lists consist of “steps” (up to 99) to which you
can assign one song each.
(4) Press the [SONG¥LIST] field (or the [DATA÷ENTRY]
dial) to jump to the SONG LIST page.
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G-70 Music Workstation
More refined song functions
The display looks more or less as follows:
Note: This only saves the Play List (i.e. the references to existing song files). The songs themselves are not saved, because
that is unnecessary. On the other hand, if you delete a song
(see p. 142) that is referenced by a Play List step, playback
stops at that (empty) step during playback, and the “File not
found” message appears.
The display shows a confirmation message and then
returns to the PLAY LIST page.
(5) Locate the song you wish to assign to step 01.
• If it is already displayed, continue with step (6) below.
• If it is not yet displayed, use the PAGE [ø][˚] fields in
the lower right of the display to change pages. (You
can also use the [DATA÷ENTRY] dial or the [DEC]/[INC]
buttons.)
• You can also use the following fields for narrowing
down your search if you are overwhelmed by the
number of songs (and pages you need to scroll):
[INDEX], [SONG≈NAME], [ARTIST], [GENRE],
[FILE¥NAME] and [FINDER]. See page 140.
(6) Select the song you wish to assign by pressing its
field (so that it is displayed in orange).
(7) Press the [GET¥IT] field.
This takes you to the following page. The song is
assigned to step 01, and step 02 becomes the last one
of your chain (*End*):
(12) Press the [EXIT] button to return to the main page.
That page now looks as follows:
See “Using Play Lists” on p. 148 for how work with
your list. If you need to return to the Play List, either
press the PLAY LIST field in the upper left corner, or
press and hold the [PLAY¥LIST] button.
Editing Play Lists
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The [02≈*End*] field is selected automatically, so you
can assign a song to it right away.
(8) Repeat steps (4)~(7) above to assign a song to this
step.
(9) After compiling your play list, press the [SAVE]
field.
(10) Enter a name (up to 18 characters).
See p. 49 for how to enter names.
(11) Press the [EXECUTE] field to save your list to the
indicated memory area.
146
If, while programming or using a Play List, you notice
that one song is missing from the list, or if you decide
not to use a given song after all, you need to edit your
Play List. Steps (1)~(3) below are only necessary if you
want to edit a different chain than the one you have
just programmed.
(1) Press and hold the RECORDER [PLAY¥LIST] button to
jump to the PLAY LIST page.
(2) Press the field of the chain you wish to edit.
Depending on the number of lists already present in
the selected memory area, you may have to use the
scroll bar (or [DATA÷ENTRY] dial, or the [DEC]/[INC]
buttons).
G-70 Music Workstation r
Play List function
(3) Press the [EDIT] field or the [DATA÷ENTRY] dial.
(4) Proceed as follows to edit your Play List:
■Inserting Chain steps
To add a step and assign a song to it, select the step
that should follow it, then press the [INSERT¥STEP]
field. (Example: to insert a step before step 04, press
the [04] field.)
This takes you to the following display page:
(8) Press the [SAVE] field to save your edited chain.
If the new Play List has the same name as an existing
one, the following message appears:
Press [YES] to replace the old file with your new version. Press [NO] if you want to rename your new Play
List before saving it.
Note: By pressing the [Back] field, you return to the EDIT page.
Note: When you press the [EXIT] button, the following message appears:
(5) Locate the song you wish to assign to the inserted
step.
• If it is already displayed, continue with step (6) below.
• If it is not yet displayed, use the PAGE [ø][˚] fields in
the lower right of the display to change pages.
• You can also use the following fields for narrowing
down your search if you are overwhelmed by the
number of songs (and pages you need to scroll):
[INDEX], [Song≈NAME], [ARTIST], [GENRE], [FILE¥NAME]
and [FINDER]. See page 140.
(6) Select the song you wish to assign by pressing its
field (so that it is displayed in orange).
(7) Press the [GET¥IT] field.
■Editing a step
You can also decide to assign another song to a step
than the one you have been using up to now. To do
so, press the field of the step that needs correcting,
press [SONG¥LIST] and continue with step (5) above.
Press [YES] to return to the main page and delete any changes
you have made up to that point. Press [NO] to return to the
EDIT page (without deleting your changes.)
■Clear ALL
The Play List Edit page contains a [CLEAR≈ALL] field
you can use to remove all steps from the currently
selected Play List. In effect, this means that only the
name is preserved, while the list can/must be programmed again.
■Deleting steps
On the PLAY LIST EDIT page (see left), select the step
you wish to delete and press the [REMOVE¥STEP]
field.
All subsequent steps now move up one entry. Example: if you delete step 04 of a list that contains 10
steps, step 05 becomes 04, step 06 becomes 05, etc.
147
G-70 Music Workstation
More refined song functions
Using Play Lists
Here’s how Play Lists can be used for your performances:
• If necessary, insert the memory card that contains
the list (and songs) you need into the slot.
(1) Press the [PLAY¥LIST] button.
The two fields ([|√√][®®|]) that appear on the main
page during chain playback allow you to navigate in
your play list. The added display shows the name of
the song that is assigned to the currently selected
step.
PLAY
LIST
You can release it as soon as the display looks more
or less as follows:
Use the [|√√] field to select the previous step, and
[®®|] to select the next step. If you do so while playback is running, the previous or next song will be
played back as soon as the current song is finished.
Note: The MARK JUMP buttons are also available during Play
List playback, so feel free to use them (see p. 39).
(2) Use the scrollbar, the [DATA÷ENTRY] dial or the
[DEC]/[INC] buttons to scroll through the Play Lists
(if available and necessary).
(3) Press the field that corresponds to the list you
want to use.
(4) Press the [EXIT] button to return to the main page.
(6) Press [PLAY÷STOP¥®÷ª] again to continue with the
next step.
(7) To switch off the Play List function, press the
[PLAY¥LIST] button (it goes dark).
Selecting another (single) song via the Song Finder or
a User Program with a song link will temporarily
deactivate Play List function. This is signalled by the
flashing [PLAY¥LIST] indicator. When the “external”
song is finished, the Play List function resumes and
the indicator of the [PLAY¥LIST] function lights
steadily.
Note: If Play List playback is stopped at an entry for which
NEXT SONG is not active and if you then select a User Program
with a song link, the Play List function is switched off. Pressing
[PLAY÷STOP¥®÷ª] then starts playback of the song recalled by
the User Program.
EXIT
The [PLAY¥LIST] indicator now lights to indicate that
the Play List function is active.
(5) Press the [PLAY÷STOP¥®÷ª] button to start playback
of your play list.
Managing Play Lists
Play Lists can be renamed and deleted.
• If necessary, insert the memory card that contains
the list you wish to rename or delete into the slot.
(1) Press the [PLAY¥LIST] button.
The display looks more or less as follows:
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PLAY/STOP
At the end of the first song step, the next song is
selected automatically, if the RECORDER
[NEXT≈SONG] button lights. (If you stop playback
halfway into the song, then start it again, the next
step is played back.)
If the [NEXT≈SONG] button does not light, playback
stops at the end of the current step, the next step is
loaded, but playback needs to be started using the
[PLAY÷STOP¥®÷ª] button. (If you stop playback halfway into the song, then start it again, playback continues from the place where you stopped it.)
148
(2) Use the scrollbar or the [DATA÷ENTRY] dial move
through the available Play Lists (if available and
necessary).
(3) Press the field that corresponds to the list you
need.
G-70 Music Workstation r
Play List function
■Renaming a Play List
To change the name of the selected chain, press the
[RENAME] field.
Enter the desired characters (page 49) and press the
[EXECUTE] field. After a brief confirmation, the display returns to the Play List page.
Note: You do not need to save a Play List after renaming it.
■Deleting a Play List
See steps (1)~(3) above, then press the [DELETE] field.
As this may ruin your work, you need to confirm this
command:
You have three options here. Be aware that a deleted
Play List cannot be recalled.
[YES] deletes the list file (but not the Standard MIDI
Files it refers to).
[NO] leaves the list intact and takes you back to the
PLAY LIST page.
[Back] leaves the list intact and takes you back to the
PLAY LIST page, where you could select another Play
List to be deleted.
Note: Even if you delete the selected list, this “only” disposes
of the play list. The Standard MIDI Files assigned to the list are
not deleted and can thus be used in isolation, or assigned to
new/other Play Lists.
149
G-70 Music Workstation
Editing Lyrics
13. Editing Lyrics
Your G-70 contains functions that allow you to add Lyrics to a Standard MIDI File that does not contain them. It is also
possible to edit the Lyrics data of Standard MIDI Files that conform to the Tune 1000 format (as well as other Lyrics formats).
This may come in handy when you keep forgetting the words of a song you wish to use for your performances and want
them to be included in the song file.
The G-70 only allows you to link (“synchronize”) Lyrics
data to the note messages of the loaded Standard MIDI
File. The text data proper must be entered on a Windowscompatible PC (or a Mac and saved as .TXT data for Windows). See right for the supported characters.
Adding Lyrics to a song
The display changes to:
Here’s a step-by-step tour of how to add Lyrics data to
a Standard MIDI File:
(1) Prepare the text file with the lyrics you wish to
associate with a given song.
Use a word processor program on your computer,
taking care to type a return after every line or word
you wish to synchronize separately. The synchronization function (see below) always works with entire
lines of text (i.e. until the following return). In any
case, no line should contain more than 28 characters.
(2) Export the file as .TXT file and save it to a floppy
disk, a memory card the G-70, or transfer it to the
G-70 via USB (see p. 211).
(3) On the G-70, load the song you wish to add Lyrics
to.
See “Playing back songs (Standard MIDI Files)” on
p. 38 for details about selecting songs.
(4) Press the [LYRICS&SCORE] button.
LYRICS & SCORE
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The display changes to:
(5) Press the [OPTIONS] field, followed by the
[TXT¥IMPORT] field.
150
Importing a text file for Lyrics synchronization, or
editing Lyrics data is only possible while song playback is stopped. If you forget to stop playback (by
pressing RECORDER [PLAY÷STOP¥®÷ª]), a “Can’t execute. Song is running.” error message is displayed.
Now, we’re going to import the text file you created
earlier:
(6) Select the memory area that contains the text file
you wish to associate with the Standard MIDI File
in the G-70’s RAM memory: press
[INTERNAL≈MEMORY], [FLOPPY] or
[EXTERNAL¥MEMORY].
If you press [FLOPPY] or [EXTERNAL¥MEMORY], insert
the memory card or floppy disk with the desired song
into the slot (or drive).
(7) Press the line that contains the name of the text
file you want to use.
If you don’t see the desired file name, use the scrollbar, the [DATA÷ENTRY] dial or the [DEC]/[INC] buttons
to select another group of 8 files. (If you still can’t
find the file, it may not end in “.TXT” or not be a text/
ASCII file.)
G-70 Music Workstation r
Adding Lyrics to a song
(8) Press the [EXECUTE] field to load the text file you
selected.
(10) Press The RECORDER [REC¥∏] button (its indicator
flashes).
REC
●
If you now press [BWD] or [FWD], you can go to
another measure without causing the text to follow.
(11) Press the [PLAY÷STOP¥®÷ª] button.
It means that the lyrics of the previously selected
song will be erased. If that’s OK with you, press the
[YES] field. If not, press the [NO] field to return to the
TXT IMPORT page, where the previous lyrics are displayed.
Now you’re all set for the synchronization work:
START/STOP
Playback (and Lyric synchronization recording) starts
and the [REC¥∏] button lights.
(12) On the beat where the first text line should be displayed, press the [TAP] button (front panel).
(This page can also be selected with the
[LYRICS≈SYNCHRO] field.)
This display page should contain the first line of the
text you imported. The function can also be used to
correct the synchronization of Lyrics data contained
in a song you loaded.
Here’s what we’re going to do: every line of the text
you imported can be associated with a given quarter
note of the song. We’ll do this while the song is playing back. Synchronizing text lines is a matter of
pressing the TEMPO [TAP] button on the beats where
the currently selected line should appear during normal playback of the Standard MIDI File. Each press of
the [TAP] button associates the text line below the
arrows (® √) with the quarter note where the button was pressed. The preceding line automatically
scrolls above the (® √) section, while the next line
appears below the arrows.
(9) Press [TOP¥|√] to return to the beginning of the
song or use [BWD] or [FWD] to jump to a measure
that lies a little ahead of the place where the first
line should be displayed during normal operation.
Note: If the song already contains Lyrics, they will follow the
measures (indicated in the upper right-hand corner) when you
press [BWD] or [FWD].
(13) Repeat this at the quarter note where the second
line should be displayed.
(14) Press [TAP] on all beats where the subsequent text
lines should appear.
In places where there are no lyrics to synchronize
(e.g. the bridge or the solo), you can press [FWD] to
quickly jump to the next measures to which you wish
to link a line of text.
(15) Press the [PLAY÷STOP¥®÷ª] button when all Lyrics
data have been synchronized.
(16) If you made a mistake somewhere, you can return
to that measure using [BWD] and start anew from
that position.
In that case, you will need to synchronize all remaining text (even text you already synchronized) until
the end of the song.
151
G-70 Music Workstation
Editing Lyrics
(17) Press the [DISK&MEDIA] button.
DISK & MEDIA
The display changes to:
(21) Press the [EXIT] button to return to the main page.
EXIT
You can also use the above procedure to resynchronize lyrics already contained in the song file (if you
feel the synchronization isn’t perfect). See step (4)
and following on page 150.
Exporting Lyrics data as text file
Here’s what you need to do to export the Lyrics data
contained in a Standard MIDI File as text data. This
may be useful for editing or printing the lyrics using
your computer.
• Press [SAVE], followed by [SONG].
Note: This only works if the Standard MIDI File contains lyrics
data.
(1) Load the song whose Lyrics data you want to
export as text file.
See “Playing back songs (Standard MIDI Files)” on
p. 38 for details about selecting songs.
(2) Press the [LYRICS&SCORE] button.
LYRICS & SCORE
This page allows you to save the current song to the
internal memory, a memory card or a floppy disk. It
will be saved along with the Lyrics data you selected.
(18) Press the [EXTERNAL¥MEMORY], [FLOPPY] or
[INTERNAL¥MEMORY] field to select the area where
you want to save the song.
(19) To save the song under a different name, press
[SONG¥NAME] and enter the desired name. Repeat
this with the [FILE¥NAME] entry.
See page 49. If necessary, you can also supply the
required ARTIST and GENRE information for use with
the SONG FINDER function.
If the display is blank at this point, the selected song
doesn’t contain Lyrics data. It is therefore impossible
to export its Lyrics data.
(3) Press the [OPTIONS] field, followed by the
[TXT¥EXPORT] field.
The display changes to:
r
Note: The G-70 supports both upper- and lower-case letters
for file names. Choose whichever is more convenient (or
clearer).
Note: ARTIST and GENRE are not available for files you save to
floppy disk.
(20) Press the [EXECUTE] field to save the song.
If the selected memory area already contains a song
of that name, you are asked whether it is OK to overwrite it.
• Press the [YES] field to overwrite the file. This replaces
the song in question with the new version.
• Press the [NO] field to return to the SAVE SONG page,
change the name, then press [EXECUTE] again.
A “Operation successful” message confirms the end
of the operation.
152
(4) Name the text file.
This is only necessary if you do not agree with the
suggested name (i.e. the one of the song in question).
See page 49 for how to enter the desired name.
(5) Press the [EXTERNAL¥MEMORY], [FLOPPY] or
[INTERNAL¥MEMORY] field to select the area where
you want to save the text file.
(6) Press the [EXECUTE] field to save the file.
The G-70 returns to the LYRICS page.
G-70 Music Workstation r
Exporting Lyrics data as text file
(7) Press the [EXIT] button to return to the main page.
EXIT
153
G-70 Music Workstation
Using the 16-track sequencer
14. Using the 16-track sequencer
Your G-70 contains a powerful sequencer with a host
of edit functions. We already showed you the basic
procedure for recording songs and adding tracks (see
p. 52). This time around, we will get down to the “nuts
and bolts” of the G-70’s 16-track sequencer. Even so,
you will quickly notice that the 16-track sequencer is as
simple to operate as it is powerful.
When you press the RECORDER
[16-TRACK¥SEQUENCER] button, the display changes
to:
16-TRACK
SEQUENCER
About the sequencer’s main page
Let us first look at the information shown on this page:
The [SOLO] button icon allows you to listen to the
selected track in isolation (it switches off all other
tracks). The selected track is displayed in yellow. To
select another track, simply press its row in the left column of the display. (You can also use the or [ß][†] buttons to select a track.)
The [MUTE] button icon allows you to temporarily
switch off the selected track, which may be useful
when you want to record or edit additional parts without being distracted by already existing parts.
SOLO and MUTE need to be set as follows: First press
the [SOLO] or [MUTE] field, then press the fields of the
tracks you want to solo or mute (you can select several
tracks for either function).
Note: The MUTE function is not available while the SOLO function is on. You can, however, select another track at that time,
which is then played back in isolation. The SOLO function, on the
other hand, can be activated while the MUTE function is on.
Important notes
r
• If you use the 16-track sequencer to edit a song that
already contains Cover modifications, the Cover settings are ignored and erased when you save the
edited version of your song. We therefore recommend saving songs you edit with the 16-track
Sequencer under a different name.
• While in this mode, the [BALANCE] knob does not
allow you to set the balance between the Song and
Keyboard parts (it only affects the volume of the
Song parts).
154
Soloed tracks are flagged with an “S”, while muted
tracks use the letter “M”. The remaining indications in
the second column from the left are:
“q” (note symbol): The track is currently playing. If you
look at the example above, you will notice a white vertical line on top of several horizontal bars. The white
line refers to the current position within the song
(which is also indicated in the “MEAS” field). The bars
indicate that a track contains musical data in that position. Now look again at the illustration: only the tracks
that contain note data at the current position and that
are not muted have the “q” symbol.
If, while the page above is displayed, you press the
RECORDER [REC¥∏] button, track “1” (which is currently
selected) will be flagged with an “R” (for “Record”). Note
that you can only record one track at any one time.
The button icons in the right-most column are:
TRACK EDIT
see page 160
MICRO EDIT
see page 175
MASTER TRACK
see page 171
INITIALIZE SONG
see page 156
G-70 Music Workstation r
General considerations
General considerations
The 16-track sequencer can be used to record sequentially onto 16 tracks (one track after the other). Since
the 16-track sequencer and the Recorder share the
same RAM memory (they are, in fact, different incarnations of the same concept), you can lay down your first
tracks using the Recorder (with or without Arranger),
and then select the 16-track sequencer to add new
tracks or change existing ones. The Recorder allows for
simultaneous multitrack recording, which is not possible with the 16-track Sequencer where you can only
record one track at a time. While you are working with
the 16-track Sequencer, the Arranger is not available.
Example 1: Recording a song from
scratch
Let us now record a song from scratch using the 16track sequencer. If you already played back a song since
switching on the G-70, the s song RAM memory
already contains data we need to erase. (Even if the
G-70’s song RAM memory is still empty, using the INITIALIZE SONG function would be a good idea.) Here is
how to:
(1) Press the RECORDER [16-TRACK¥SEQUENCER] button.
16-TRACK
SEQUENCER
Tracks and MIDI channels
Tracks are assigned to MIDI channels on a 1:1 basis (i.e.
Track 1= MIDI channel 1,… Track 12= MIDI channel 12,
etc.). Since the Keyboard parts have been assigned to
the MIDI channels in such a way as to allow for easy
Minus-One playback using the Recorder (page 38), you
should take a minute to study the table below.
Obviously, if you record a song with Arranger backing,
the respective parts (ADR, ABS, etc.) are recorded onto
the tracks that are assigned to their MIDI channels.
G-70 parts
MIDI
channel
Recorder
Arranger
1 (Piano)
1
—
Accomp 1
2 (Bass)
2
—
A. Bass
3 (Chords)
3
—
Accomp 2
4 (Solo/Melody)
4
Upper1
Upper1
5 Harmony
5
—
Accomp 3
6 (Counter-melody)
6
Upper2
Upper2
7 (Not specified)
7
—
Accomp 4
8 (Not specified)
8
—
Accomp 5
9 (Not specified)
9
—
Accomp 6
10 (Drums)
10
Drums*
A. Drums
11 (Not specified)
11
Lower1
Lower1
12 (Not specified)
12
M.Bass*
M.Bass*
13 (Not specified)
13
Upper3
Upper3
14 (Not specified)
14
Lower2
Lower2
15 (Not Specified)
15
Melody Intell.
Melody Intell.
16 (Not specified)
16
—
—
Track (SMF part)
The display changes to:
(2) Press the [INITIALIZE¥SONG] field.
The display changes to:
(3) If you want the G-70 to set most parameters for
you, press one of the TEMPLATES fields.
Here is what the options mean:
ORCHESTR
Selects orchestral sounds suitable for classical music and film scores.
BAROQUE
Selects orchestral sounds suitable for chamber music.
ROCK
Selects sounds suitable for rock music.
FOLK
Selects sounds suitable for folk music.
COUNTRY
Selects sounds suitable for country music.
[*] The MIDI channel of these parts depends on whether you are
working with the Arranger (page 52) or the Recorder.
There is yet another track, called “MASTER”, that is used
for recording the time signature, the tempo, as well as
general SysEx messages.
ELECTRONIC Selects classical sounds suitable for dance
music.
POP
Selects sound often used in pop arrangements.
155
G-70 Music Workstation
Using the 16-track sequencer
JAZZ
Selects sounds suitable for jazz combos.
ETHNIC
Selects sounds suitable for world music.
(4) Press the following three fields and enter the
desired values using the [DATA÷ENTRY] dial or the
[DEC]/[INC] buttons.
● Tempo—Allows you to specify the initial tempo of the
new song (q= 20~250). Choose a tempo that is comfortable for recording. You can set the final tempo by editing
the MASTER track (see p. 171) or by recording it after
activating the TEMPO REC SW parameter (see p. 157).
● Time Signature BEAT—If your new song uses the 4/4
time signature, there is no need to change this value.
Otherwise, enter the desired time signature (1/2~32/16).
The warning alerts you to the fact that pressing
[EXECUTE] may have disastrous consequences. See
“Saving your song” on p. 159 if you still need to save
your previous song.
■Using two drum tracks
He G-70 allows you to use as many drum tracks as
you like: simply assign a Drum Set to the desired
track and start playing. This requires no particular initialization procedure.
Track 10, however, can only play Drum Sets and
should therefore be used for your main percussion
applications. But feel free to add a “beat box” or
orchestral percussion to a song that also requires a
“regular” drum kit.
(5) Press the [EXECUTE] field to really initialize the
Song RAM memory (which you haven’t done so
far).
The G-70 now initializes the song RAM memory and
jumps to the main 16-track Sequencer page.
Preparations
(6) Press the RECORDER [REC¥∏] button.
REC
●
r
The display changes to:
(7) Press the [REC¥TRK] field and use the [DATA÷ENTRY]
dial or the [DEC]/[INC] buttons to select the track
you want to record to.
156
(8) Press the [REC¥TYPE] field and use the
[DATA÷ENTRY] dial or the [DEC]/[INC] buttons to
specify how the following tracks should behave
(the other tracks are always “GS tracks”):
g
Sound (and tone
generator) of the
selected part.
Song parts
KEYBOARD PART/
MELODY INTELL
Track
Track
If you select “GS” (or if
there is no alternative).
If you select the corresponding part.
Track REC TYPE
1~3
Fixed GS (cannot be changed)
UP1**
4
GS*,
5
Fixed GS (cannot be changed)
6
GS*,
UP2**
7~10 Fixed GS (cannot be changed)
11
GS*,
LW1**
12
GS*,
MBS**
13
GS*,
UP3**
14
GS*,
LW2**
15
GS*,
MELODY INTELL**
16
Fixed GS (cannot be changed)
[*] The track uses sounds of the G-70’s GM2/GS sound source and
is not linked to the Keyboard part shown right.
[**] The track uses the same sound as the Keyboard part it is
linked to. In the case of the UP1, LW1 and MBS parts, this can
also be the corresponding Harmonic Bar part. Keyboard parts can
use an SRX sound (while regular Song parts cannot). The important thing to remember is that whenever you assign a different
sound to the connected Keyboard part, the track in question automatically switches to that sound as well.
(9) Assign the desired sound to the recording track
you selected.
See “Selecting sounds for the Keyboard parts” on
p. 29. You can play on the keyboard to check whether
the sound matches the mood of the part you wish to
record.
(10) Specify how the data will be added to the track
during recording (REC MODE):
Select “Replace” if a track contains data you wish to
replace with new data. This erases all data of the
selected track from the place where you start recording until the end. (“Replace” is selected by default for
empty tracks.)
Select “Mix” to add new notes to the ones already
recorded on the selected track. This recording mode is
particularly useful for recording the rhythm track
(10) because you can first record the bass and snare
drums, then add a few tom hits here and there, and
record the HiHat, for example.
(“Mix” is selected by default for tracks that already
contain data.)
G-70 Music Workstation r
Example 1: Recording a song from scratch
(11) If you don’t want to start and stop recording manually, use the PUNCH fields:
• Press the [PUNCH¥IN] field and use the [DATA÷ENTRY]
dial or the [DEC]/[INC] buttons to specify the measure
where recording should start.
If you start playback a few bars before this position,
the sequencer will activate recording as soon as it
reaches this measure.
• Press the [PUNCH¥OUT] field and use the
[DATA÷ENTRY] dial or the [DEC]/[INC] buttons to set
the number of the measure where recording should
start.
Recording is deactivated when the sequencer reaches
this position. Playback will continue, however and
needs to be stopped using the [PLAY÷STOP¥®÷ª] button.
• To take advantage of the PUNCH IN/OUT function,
you need to switch on the [PUNCH¥IN] and
[PUNCH¥OUT] button icons.
Note: The Punch In/Out function can also be assigned to an
optional FC-7 pedal unit (see p. 68) or a footswitch (see p. 69).
For those applications, there is no need to set the PUNCH IN &
OUT positions beforehand. To this end, you need to press the
[FOOT¥PUNCH¥IN÷OUT] field.
(12) If necessary, press the [OCTAVE] field and set the
required octave transposition (–4~4).
This allows you to record “special noises” (usually
assigned to the lowest notes numbers), like the ones
of fingers sliding over guitar strings, etc., if the sound
assigned to the track provides them.
(13) Specify how long the count-in should be before
recording starts by pressing the [COUNT-IN] field
and using the [DATA÷ENTRY] dial or the [DEC]/[INC]
buttons to select one of the following options:
Off
No count-in: recording starts as soon as you
press the [PLAY÷STOP¥®÷ª] button (while
[REC¥∏] flashes).
1 Meas
Recording starts after a 1-bar count-in.
2 Meas
Recording starts after a 2-bar count-in.
Wait Note Recording starts as soon as you play a note on
the keyboard. (There will be no count-in.)
(14) If you want to record tempo changes, press the
[TEMPO¥REC¥SW] field and use the [DEC]/[INC]
switches to select “On”.
This option allows you to use the TEMPO
[√SLOW][FAST®] buttons and/or [TAP] to vary the
tempo while recording. Those changes are recorded
to the MASTER track.
(15) Press the [INPUT¥QUANTIZE] field and set the
desired resolution.
Quantize corrects the timing of your notes by shifting them to the nearest grid mark. Use the
[DATA÷ENTRY] dial or the [DEC]/[INC] buttons to specify the number of grid marks per measure (i.e., the
Quantize resolution). Here is an example:
1
2
3
4
1
1
2
3
4
1
1
2
3
4
1
This is how you
played it.
1/8
1/16
The setting range is: Off, 1/4, 1/8, 1/8T, 1/16, 1/16T,
1/32, 1/32T and 1/64. As this Quantize function
changes the way in which your notes are recorded,
you may want to select “Off” here. The 16-track
sequencer has a second Quantize function that you
can use more selectively (i.e., for notes that are definitely late/early). See p. 161.
(16) Specify what should be recorded by activating the
corresponding RECORDING SELECT button icons:
RECORDING SELECT
Meaning
NOTE
Only note messages are recorded.
(Pitch Bend, modulation, etc., data
are ignored).
AFTERTOUCH
Aftertouch messages are recorded.
This option should only be activated
if you really wish to record Aftertouch messages.
CONTROL CHANGE Control change messages, including
modulation (CC01), expression
(CC11), etc. (CC00 and CC32 messages also belong to this group.)
PROGRAM CHANGE Program change messages. Only
necessary if a track should use different sounds.
PITCH BEND
Left/right movements of the
BENDER/MODULATION lever.
SYSTEM EXCLUSIVE SysEx messages of the MASTER
track.
(17) Select a the desired sound for your new track.
(18) Select the bar where playback and/or recording
should start:
• Press the RECORDER [TOP¥|√] button to return to the
beginning of the song (measure “1”). –or–
• Use the RECORDER [‰] (or [º]) button to select a
measure slightly ahead of where you want to start
recording (if the [PUNCH¥IN] and [PUNCH¥OUT] button icons are off).
(19) Press the [PLAY÷STOP¥®÷ª] button or play the first
notes (if you selected COUNT IN= “Wait Note”).
Note: The Play/Stop function can also be assigned to the D
Beam controller or an optional footswitch (see “Start/Stop
Song” on p. 65, “Play/Stop Song” on p. 68, “Play/Stop” on
p. 69).
157
G-70 Music Workstation
Using the 16-track sequencer
(20) Play the new part.
(21) Press the RECORDER [PLAY÷STOP¥®÷ª] button to
stop recording.
PLAY/STOP
Example 2: Adding tracks
Here’s how to add a track to a song in the G-70’s Song
RAM memory. This is only meaningful after recording a
song using the Recorder or after playing back a song
on disk. See page 155 for how to start a new song.
Though the following may seem confusing at first, you
will find very quickly that the 16-track Sequencer uses
a very logical structure. Please bear with us and perform all indicated steps to get a feel for the way the
16-track Sequencer “ticks”. Besides, what you learn
here will also come in handy for recording your own
Music Styles.
Note: See also “Easy editing and useful functions” on p. 160 for
some additional functions that are not covered here.
(1) Press the [16-TRACK¥SEQUENCER] button.
16-TRACK
SEQUENCER
The display changes to:
The “Meas” field at the top of the display informs you
about the current measure. The tempo and time signature are displayed next to it. You can use the
RECORDER [º] and [‰] buttons to jump to another
measure, or [TOP¥|√] to return to the beginning of the
song.
(2) Press the RECORDER [REC¥∏] button.
REC
●
r
The display changes to:
158
G-70 Music Workstation r
Example 2: Adding tracks
(3) Press the [REC¥TRK] field and use the [DATA÷ENTRY]
dial or the [DEC]/[INC] buttons to select the track
you want to record to.
(4) Press the [REC¥TYPE] field and use the
[DATA÷ENTRY] dial or the [DEC]/[INC] buttons to
specify how the tracks linked to the Keyboard parts
should behave (see p. 156).
(5) See step (7) and following on page 156 for what to
do now.
(1) Press [YES] to save your changes (and the entire
song). This will take you to the following display
page:
Note: Be sure to select a track that either contains no data or
whose data may be overwritten (“Replace”). If you select REC
MODE= “Mix”, the new data are added to the data already
present on the selected track.
(6) Press the [PLAY÷STOP¥®÷ª] button or play the first
notes (if you selected COUNT IN= “Wait Note”).
PLAY/STOP
Note: The Play/Stop function can also be assigned to the D
Beam controller or an optional footswitch (see “Start/Stop
Song” on p. 65, “Play/Stop Song” on p. 68, “Play/Stop” on
p. 69).
(7) Play the new part.
(8) Press the RECORDER [PLAY÷STOP¥®÷ª] button to
stop recording.
(Press [NO] to return to the main page without saving
the song. This may be a bit dangerous, though.)
If you don’t want to wait until the above warning
(“Song has been changed…”) is displayed automatically, proceed as follows. Using this “manual” Save
function has the advantage that you can save your
song whenever you are happy with your latest
recording or edits. Bear in mind that a power failure
is all it takes to lose your song. Don’t wait until it is
too late…
• Press the [SAVE] field on the 16-track Sequencer’s
main page.
The display now responds with:
Saving your song
The 16-track sequencer uses a special portion of the
G-70’s RAM memory where all editing takes place. To
ensure that you do not forget to save your song after
recording and/or editing it, you are given the opportunity to do so upon leaving the Song Composer page (by
pressing the [EXIT] button):
(2)
•
•
•
Note: The Song RAM memory is erased when you switch off
your G-70.
Note: If you use the 16-track sequencer to edit a song that
already contains Cover modifications, the Cover settings are
ignored and erased when you save the edited version of your
song. We therefore recommend saving such songs under a different name.
You can also select this page by pressing the
[DISK&MEDIA] button→ [SAVE] field→ [SONG] field.
Specify where you want to save your song:
Press the [INTERNAL¥MEMORY] field to select the
G-70’s internal memory as target (this is a 50MB
storage area similar to a hard disk).
Insert a floppy disk into the drive and press the
[FLOPPY] field.
Press the [EXTERNAL¥MEMORY] field. This option is
only available if you connected a memory card to the
G-70’s PCMCIA slot before switching it on.
159
G-70 Music Workstation
Using the 16-track sequencer
You need to give your song two names: a SONG
NAME, and a FILE NAME. The FILE NAME is the one
that allows the G-70 to recognize your song.
Editing 16-track songs
Easy editing and useful functions
After recording a track, you may want to do some
touching up. Here are some easy things you can do. See
“Editing one or several tracks (TRACK EDIT)” on p. 160
for more elaborate functions.
(3) Press the [SONG¥NAME] button icon.
(4) Enter the name:
• Move the cursor to the desired position using [ø] and
[˚].
• Enter the character for that position using the alphanumeric keypad. In many instances, you will have to
press the desired field several times to select the
desired character.
• Use the [A/a] field to alternate between capitals and
small letters.
• Press the [Delete] field to delete the character indicated by the cursor. Press and hold it to clear all
characters.
• Press [Space] to insert a space.
• Press [Insert] to insert a character at the current position. All characters behind this position move one
position further to the right.
(5) Press the [FILE¥NAME] field and enter the file name.
See p. 86 for details. Here, you can enter 18 characters. All characters will be capitals.
(6) If you also want to add Finder information, press
the [ARTIST] and [GENRE] fields and enter the
desired characters.
See “Working with the Song Finder” on p. 140 for
details about the Song Finder.
Note: These two indications are not available for files you save
to floppy disk.
r
(7) Press the [EXECUTE] field to save your song.
The display tells you that the data are being saved,
after which it returns to the “SAVE SONG” page.
(8) Press the [EXIT] or the RECORDER
[16-TRACK¥SEQUENCER] button to return to the
main page.
160
■Muting tracks
Sometimes, when recording rhythmically intricate
parts, it may be necessary to mute already recorded
parts that might distract you. To do so, return to the
16-track Sequencer’s main page, press the [MUTE]
field and then the tracks you don’t want to hear.
Such tracks are flagged with an “M”.
This setting is not saved. Press the [MUTE] field again
to switch off the function.
Note: The MUTE function is not available while the SOLO function is switched on.
■Solo
If you need to listen to a track in isolation, press the
[SOLO] field and the field of the track you want to
solo, and start playback. This mutes all other tracks,
while the selected track is flagged with an “S”. You
can also select the track to be soloed using the [ß][†]
buttons.
Press the [SOLO] field again to switch off the function of the same name.
■Song Cover and Song Makeup Tools
The G-70 does not recognize changes made to a song
using the SONG MAKEUP TOOLS function. The 16track Sequencer only “sees” the original song data –
not the changes introduced by the SONG MAKEUP
TOOLS functions.
Editing one or several tracks (TRACK EDIT)
The TRACK EDIT level of the 16-track Sequencer provides 12 functions: Quantize, Erase, Delete, Copy, Insert,
Transpose, Change Velo, Change Gate Time, Merge, Global Change, Shift Clock and Track XChange. There is also
a MICRO EDIT environment that allows you to add,
delete or change individual events. See page 175 for
details.
Here’s some information that may help you decide
whether to use a TRACK EDIT or the MICRO EDIT function: if you don’t need to see the events you want to
change, choose a TRACK EDIT function. If the TRACK
G-70 Music Workstation r
Editing 16-track songs
EDIT level does not provide the function you need, or if
you want to see the notes, MIDI messages, etc., choose
the MICRO EDIT environment.
Here is how to select these Edit functions:
(1) Load the song you wish to edit (if it does not yet
reside in the G-70’s Song RAM memory).
See p. 38.
(2) Press the RECORDER [16-TRACK¥SEQUENCER] button.
(3) Save your song before continuing by pressing the
[SAVE] field.
That way, you can always return to the original if
your changes do not work out as expected. See “Saving your song” on p. 55 for details. On the “SAVE
SONG” page, press the [Back] field to return to the
16-track Sequencer’s main page.
(4) Press the [TRACK¥EDIT] field in the right column of
the display.
QUANTIZE
Use this function if you chose not to quantize your
music during recording (page 157) and now realize
that the timing is not quite what you expected it to
be. Quantizing after recording has the advantage
that you can first listen to the original and then correct only those notes whose timing is definitely off.
■TRACK (ALL, 1~16)
Allows you to select the track you wish to edit. You can
also select “ALL” here, in which case the operation applies
to all tracks.
■FROM
(5) Press a field in the top two rows to select the
desired TRACK EDIT function.
If, after selecting one of these functions and setting
parameter values, you decide not to execute the
transformation, do not press the [EXECUTE] field.
(6) Select the track(s) you wish to modify.
(7) Select the range (“FROM” and “TO”) for the edit
operation.
The FROM and TO parameters in the left half of the
display allow you to specify the positions (measure/
beat/clock) of the track excerpt you want to change.
Example: to change measures 1~4 of the selected
track, enter the following values:
FROM: BAR= 0001
BEAT= 01
CPT= 000
TO: BAR= 0005
BEAT= 01
CPT= 000
(8) Specify what you want to change and how it
should change: press one of the parameter fields
(to the right of the FROM/TO section) use the
[DATA÷ENTRY] dial, the [DEC]/[INC] buttons, or (for
notes and velocity values) the keyboard.
(9) Confirm the operation by pressing the [EXECUTE]
field.
(10) Press the [Back] field to return to the 16-track
Sequencers main page.
(11) Save your song.
● BAR (1~[last measure of the track or song])—Refers to
the first measure to be edited. By default, the FROM
value is set to the beginning of the selected track(s).
● BEAT (1~[number of beats per bar])—Specifies the
beat position. The number of selectable beats depends
on the time signature in the selected area.
● CPT (1~119)—Refers to the starting CPT position. “CPT”
is short for “Clock Pulse Time”, the smallest unit used by
the G-70. (There are 120 CPTs to every beat of a 4/4 bar.)
Change this setting only if your edit operation should
start after the selected beat.
■TO
By default, the TO position is set to the last event of the
selected track (or the last event of the longest track when
you select “ALL”).
● BAR (1~[last measure of the track or song])—This is
where you specify the bar position of the last measure to
be edited.
● BEAT (1~[number of beats per bar])—Specifies the
beat position. The number of selectable beats depends
on the time signature in the selected area.
● CPT (1~119)—Refers to the last clock that should be
affected by the edit operation. Change this setting only
if your edit operation should not end exactly on the
selected beat.
■FROM NOTE (0 C-~127 G9)
This parameter allows you to set the note (or lower limit of
the note range) to be modified within the specified FROM/
TO time range.
■TO NOTE (0 C-~127 G9)
This parameter allows you to set the upper limit of the note
range to be modified within the specified FROM/TO time
range.
This parameter is not displayed when you select EQUAL,
UNEQUAL, HIGHER or LOWER.
161
G-70 Music Workstation
Using the 16-track sequencer
■Fine-tuning the note range
Before setting “FROM NOTE” (and possibly “TO NOTE”), it
might be a good idea to decide how you want to use the
note indications. Depending on the option you choose, “TO
NOTE” may not even be available, so that setting it beforehand would be a waste of time.
[EQUAL]
ERASE
Only the selected note (note name/note number) will change. (The note can be set using
the TO NOTE field.)
[UNEQUAL] All notes except the one you select will
change. (The note can be set using the TO
NOTE field.)
[HIGHER]
Only notes above the selected one will
change. (The note can be set using the THAN
NOTE field.)
[LOWER]
Only notes below the selected one will
change. (The note can be set using the THAN
NOTE field.)
[INSIDE]
Only the notes between FROM NOTE and TO
NOTE will change.
[OUTSIDE]
Only the notes above FROM NOTE and below
TO NOTE will change.
TO NOTE: 69 (A4) [EQUAL]
Original phrase
FROM NOTE: 72 (C5) [INSIDE]
TO NOTE: 76 (E5)
THAN NOTE: 72 (C5) [HIGHER]
FROM NOTE: 72 (C5) [OUTSIDE]
TO NOTE: 76 (E5)
THAN NOTE: 72 (C5) [LOWER]
q
& cq q
_
■TRACK (ALL, 1~16)
Allows you to select the track you wish to edit. You can
also select “ALL” here, in which case the operation applies
to all tracks except the MASTER track. The MASTER track
can only be selected and edited in isolation. There is also a
separate page for editing the MASTER track (see p. 171).
■FROM
TO NOTE: 69 (A4) [UNEQUAL]
q
ERASE allows you to selectively delete data either
within a specified range of measures, beats or clocks,
or from the entire track(s). When DATA TYPE is set to
“ALL”, ERASE substitutes the required number of rests
for the data you delete, so that you end up with the
equivalent number of blank measures. If you also
want to eliminate the measures themselves, use
DELETE (see below).
”
”
● BAR (1~[last measure of the track or song])—Refers to
the first measure to be edited. By default, the FROM
value is set to the beginning of the selected track(s).
● BEAT (1~[number of beats per bar])—Specifies the
beat position. The number of selectable beats depends
on the time signature in the selected area.
● CPT (1~119)—Refers to the starting CPT position. “CPT”
is short for “Clock Pulse Time”, the smallest unit used by
the G-70. (There are 120 CPTs to every beat of a 4/4 bar.)
Change this setting only if your edit operation should
start after the selected beat.
■RESOLUTION
(1/4, 1/8, 1/8T, 1/16, 1/16T, 1/32, 1/32T, 1/64)
This parameter sets the resolution of the Quantize function. Be sure to always select the value that equals the
shortest note you recorded. Otherwise, your part no longer
sounds the way you played it, because shorter notes are
shifted to the wrong positions.
r
■STRENGTH (0%~100%)
Use this parameter to specify how precise the timing correction should be. “0%” means that the selected RESOLUTION value is not applied (“0% correction”), while “100%”
means that all notes are shifted to the mathematically correct positions.
Maybe first try values between “50%” and “85%” to preserve at least part of the original feel. If that does not provide the expected “degree of correctness”, repeat the operation with the same settings, or select a higher value.
■EXECUTE
Press this field to confirm your settings and edit the data.
162
Erase NOTE From 2.1.0 To 4.1.0
■TO
By default, the TO position is set to the last event of the
selected track (or the last event of the longest track when
you select “ALL”).
● BAR (1~[last measure of the track or song])—This is
where you specify the bar position of the last measure to
be edited.
● BEAT (1~[number of beats per bar])—Specifies the
beat position. The number of selectable beats depends
on the time signature in the selected area.
● CPT (1~119)—Refers to the last clock that should be
affected by the edit operation. Change this setting only
if your edit operation should not end exactly on the
selected beat.
G-70 Music Workstation r
Editing 16-track songs
■DATA TYPE
Allows you to select the data to be erased:
ALL
All parameters listed below.
Note
Only note messages.
P.Bender Pitch Bend data.
Control Control change messages.
Change
Prog. C
Program change messages.
NRPN
Non-registered-parameter-number parameters.
These are parameter control functions of the GS/
GM2 format that are easier to use than SysEx
messages (but basically have the same function).
RPN
Registered-parameter-number parameters. They
work like NRPN messages, except that they are
only understood by GM and GM2-compatible
sound modules.
CAF
Channel Aftertouch messages. If you don’t really
need them, these messages should definitely be
erased, because they use a lot of memory.
■FROM NOTE (0 C-~127 G9)
This parameter is only displayed if DATA TYPE (see above) is
set to “Note”. It allows you to set the note (or lower limit of
the note range) to be modified within the specified FROM/
TO time range. This note can also be selected by pressing
the corresponding key after selecting the FROM NOTE field.
■Fine-tuning the setting range
Before setting “FROM NOTE” (and possibly “TO NOTE”), or
“FROM CC” (and possibly “TO CC”), it might be a good idea
to decide how you want to use the note indications.
Depending on the option you choose, “TO NOTE” or “TO CC”
may not even be available, so that setting it beforehand
would be a waste of time.
[EQUAL]
Only the selected note or value will change.
(The note/value can be set using the TO NOTE/
TO CC field.)
[UNEQUAL] All notes or values except the one you select
will change. (The note/value can be set using
the TO NOTE/TO CC field.)
[HIGHER]
Only notes or values above the selected one
will change. (The note/value can be set using
the THAN NOTE/THAN CC field.)
[LOWER]
Only notes or values below the selected one
will change. (The note/value can be set using
the THAN CC field.)
[INSIDE]
Only the notes or values between FROM NOTE/
FROM CC and TO NOTE/TO CC will change.
[OUTSIDE]
Only the notes or values above FROM NOTE/
FROM CC and below TO NOTE/TO CC will
change.
■EXECUTE
Press this field to confirm your settings and edit the data.
■TO NOTE (0 C-~127 G9)
This parameter allows you to set the upper limit of the note
range to be modified within the specified FROM/TO time
range. This note can also be selected by pressing the corresponding key after selecting the TO NOTE field.
It is not displayed when you select EQUAL, UNEQUAL,
HIGHER or LOWER. See also “Fine-tuning the setting
range”.
■FROM CC (0~127)
This parameter is only displayed if DATA TYPE (see above) is
set to something else than “Note”. It allows you to set the
lower limit of the control change numbers or values to be
modified within the specified FROM/TO time range. This
note can also be selected by pressing the corresponding key
after selecting the FROM NOTE field.
■TO CC (0~127)
This parameter allows you to set the upper limit of the of
the control change numbers or values to be modified
within the specified FROM/TO time range.
It is not displayed when you select EQUAL, UNEQUAL,
HIGHER or LOWER. See also “Fine-tuning the note range”
on p. 162.
163
G-70 Music Workstation
Using the 16-track sequencer
DELETE
COPY
The COPY function allows you to copy one track to
another, or excerpts of one or all tracks to a different
location. The latter is useful if you need to repeat the
chorus several times at the end of the song but do
not feel like recording all those notes.
Unlike the ERASE function, DELETE not only erases
the data but also the measures, beats and/or CPT
units, so that all measures that lie behind the TO
position are shifted towards the beginning of the
track(s). Since DELETE also disposes of the measures
themselves (see the illustration), you cannot choose
the data type to be erased.
Delete From 2.1.0 To 4.1.0
■TRACK (AL, 1~16)
Allows you to select the track you wish to edit. You can
also select “ALL” here, in which case the operation applies
to all tracks.
■FROM
● BAR (1~[last measure of the track or song])—Refers to
the first measure to be edited. By default, the FROM
value is set to the beginning of the selected track(s).
● BEAT (1~[number of beats per bar])—Specifies the
beat position. The number of selectable beats depends
on the time signature in the selected area.
● CPT (1~119)—Refers to the starting CPT position. “CPT”
is short for “Clock Pulse Time”, the smallest unit used by
the G-70. (There are 120 CPTs to every beat of a 4/4 bar.)
Change this setting only if your edit operation should
start after the selected beat.
r
■TO
By default, the TO position is set to the last event of the
selected track (or the last event of the longest track when
you select “ALL”).
● BAR (1~[last measure of the track or song])—This is
where you specify the bar position of the last measure to
be edited.
● BEAT (1~[number of beats per bar])—Specifies the
beat position. The number of selectable beats depends
on the time signature in the selected area.
● CPT (1~119)—Refers to the last clock that should be
affected by the edit operation. Change this setting only
if your edit operation should not end exactly on the
selected beat.
■SRC TRACK (ALL, 1~16)
Allows you to select the track whose data you wish to copy.
■FROM
● BAR (1~[last measure of the track or song])—Refers to
the first measure to be edited. By default, the FROM
value is set to the beginning of the selected track(s).
● BEAT (1~[number of beats per bar])—Specifies the
beat position. The number of selectable beats depends
on the time signature in the selected area.
● CPT (1~119)—This is where you specify the CPT position
of the beginning of the track excerpt to be copied.
Unless you do not need all notes within the last bar, you
should keep the default setting.
■TO
By default, the TO position is set to the last event of the
selected track (or the last event of the longest track when
you select “ALL”).
● BAR (1~[last measure of the track or song])—This is
where you specify the bar position of the last measure to
be edited.
● BEAT (1~[number of beats per bar])—Specifies the
beat position. The number of selectable beats depends
on the time signature in the selected area.
● CPT (1~119)—Refers to the last clock that should be
affected by the edit operation. Change this setting only
if your edit operation should not end exactly on the
selected beat.
■COPY MODE (Replace, Mix)
Allows you to specify how the data should be copied:
● REPLACE—The selected FROM/TO range overwrites the
data (of the destination track) in the area to which the
selected range is copied.
Copy From 2.1.0 To 3.1.0 Into 4.1.0 SRC TRACK= 1/DST TRACK= 1
REPLACE
■EXECUTE
Press this field to confirm your settings and edit the data.
164
MIX
G-70 Music Workstation r
Editing 16-track songs
● MIX—The data in the selected range of the source track
are added to the data on the destination track.
In most instances, “REPLACE” is probably a good choice
when you set DATA TYPE to “ALL” or when you wish to
substitute a given “message cluster” (the use of the
Modulation axis of the lever, for example) for other messages of the same type (thus creating a perfect reproduction of a given control string).
“MIX”, on the other hand, may be useful for adding data
to a number of beats or bars that were not there before,
while keeping the original notes in those places. You can
choose the kind of data to be copied using “DATA TYPE”.
Note: The G-70 has no Undo function. Saving your song
before copying will allow you to load the previous version if
something goes wrong.
■COPY TIMES (1~999)
Sets the number of copies you wish to make. The value “3”
means that you will end up with 3 contiguous copies,
whereby the second copy is placed immediately after the
first, etc.
■DATA TYPE
Allows you to select the data to be copied:
ALL
All parameters listed below.
Note
Only note messages.
P.Bender Pitch Bend data.
Control Control change messages.
Change
Prog. C
Program change messages.
NRPN
Non-registered-parameter-number parameters.
These are parameter control functions of the GS/
GM2 format that are easier to use than SysEx
messages (but basically have the same function).
RPN
Registered-parameter-number parameters. They
work like NRPN messages, except that they are
only understood by GM and GM2-compatible
sound modules.
CAF
Channel Aftertouch messages. If you don’t really
need them, these messages should definitely be
erased, because they use a lot of memory.
When you select “Note”, a FROM NOTE and TO NOTE field
appear that allow you to set the upper and lower limit of the
notes to be copied. (See also “Fine-tuning the setting range”
on p. 163.)
■DST TRACK
This is where you select the track to which you want to
copy the selected data. If you set SRC TRACK to “ALL”, the
DST TRACK setting cannot be changed.
INSERT
INSERT allows you to insert new data and shift data
that lie behind the FROM position further towards
the end of the song (this is the exact opposite of
DELETE). These empty measures can be “filled” using
the COPY function or by recording new phrases in
that area (using PUNCH IN/OUT, for example).
(page 164).
Note: The Insert function does not provide a TO pointer.
Instead, you have to specify the length of the insert using the
FOR values.
■TRACK (ALL, 1~16)
Allows you to select the track you wish to edit. You can
also select “ALL” here, in which case the operation applies
to all tracks.
■FROM
● BAR (1~[last measure of the track or song])—Refers to
the first measure to be edited. By default, the FROM
value is set to the beginning of the selected track(s).
● BEAT (1~[number of beats per bar])—Specifies the
beat position. The number of selectable beats depends
on the time signature in the selected area.
● CPT (1~119)—Refers to the starting CPT position. “CPT”
is short for “Clock Pulse Time”, the smallest unit used by
the G-70. (There are 120 CPTs to every beat of a 4/4 bar.)
Change this setting only if your edit operation should
start after the selected beat.
■FOR
Specifies how many bars, beats, and CPTs are to be inserted.
● BAR, BEAT, CPT—See above.
■TIME SIGNATURE
If TRACK= “ALL”, you can use these fields to set the time
signature of the new measures (1~32 & 2, 4, 8, 16).
■Execute
Press this field to confirm your settings and edit the data.
■INTO
The bar, beat and CPT values of the position the first data
of the source track will be copied to.
■EXECUTE
Press this field to confirm your settings and copy the data.
Note: Though you can also copy data from track 10 (the main
Drum track) to a “music” track, and vice versa, this is only useful if you assign a Drum Set to the selected destination (DST)
track. A drum track indeed sounds odd when played by a piano,
for example (and a piano part is not necessarily suited for
drumming).
165
G-70 Music Workstation
Using the 16-track sequencer
TRANSPOSE
Warning: “0” represents the lowest note the MIDI standard
(and the 16-track sequencer) can handle, while “127” is the
highest note. If you select “127” for note number “74 (D5)”,
for example, the resulting note number would be “201”,
which is impossible. Consequently, the sequencer will subtract “12” from “201” until the result is less than or equal to
“127” – and therefore use the value “117”.
This happens to all notes that would otherwise lie below
“0” or above “127”.
Note: Be careful when applying TRANSPOSE to a drum track
(track 10 or any other track that uses a Drum Set). This results
in a dramatic change of your rhythm section (with a triangle
playing the kick notes, for example).
This function allows you to transpose the notes of
the selected track (non-note data obviously cannot
be transposed).
■TRACK (ALL, 1~16)
Allows you to select the track you wish to transpose. You
can also select “ALL” here, in which case the operation
applies to all tracks. When used with the [EQUAL] option,
TRANSPOSE is also useful for drum tracks. It allows you to
select another snare or kick sound, for example. Most Drum
Sets provide at least two snares, one assigned to note number 38 (D2), and a second assigned to note number 40 (E2).
By entering FROM NOTE= “38”, pressing the [EQUAL] field
and selecting “+2”, you can change your D2 snare to the E2
snare.
■FROM
● BAR (1~[last measure of the track or song])—Refers to
the first measure to be edited. By default, the FROM
value is set to the beginning of the selected track(s).
● BEAT (1~[number of beats per bar])—Specifies the
beat position. The number of selectable beats depends
on the time signature in the selected area.
● CPT (1~119)—Refers to the starting CPT position. “CPT”
is short for “Clock Pulse Time”, the smallest unit used by
the G-70. (There are 120 CPTs to every beat of a 4/4 bar.)
Change this setting only if your edit operation should
start after the selected beat.
■TO
r
By default, the TO position is set to the last event of the
selected track (or the last event of the longest track when
you select “ALL”).
● BAR (1~[last measure of the track or song])—This is
where you specify the bar position of the last measure to
be edited.
● BEAT (1~[number of beats per bar])—Specifies the
beat position. The number of selectable beats depends
on the time signature in the selected area.
● CPT (1~119)—Refers to the last clock that should be
affected by the edit operation. Change this setting only
if your edit operation should not end exactly on the
selected beat.
■VALUE (–127~0~127)
This is where you can set the transposition interval in semitone steps. If you wish to transpose a “C” part to “D”, enter
“2”. As you see, you can transpose the highest possible MIDI
note all the way down to the lowest (and vice versa).
166
■FROM NOTE (0 C-~127 G9)
This parameter allows you to set the note (or lower limit of
the note range) to be modified within the specified FROM/
TO time range.
■TO NOTE (0 C-~127 G9)
This parameter allows you to set the upper limit of the note
range to be modified within the specified FROM/TO time
range.
It is not displayed when you select EQUAL, UNEQUAL,
HIGHER or LOWER. See also “Fine-tuning the setting range”
on p. 163 for details about the six button icons.
■EXECUTE
Press this field to confirm your settings and edit the data.
G-70 Music Workstation r
Editing 16-track songs
CHANGE VELO
This parameter can be particularly useful for velocity
switched sounds: slightly reducing or increasing the overall
velocity, allows you to “shift” all notes to the “other” sound.
Note: Even the highest positive or negative VALUE doesn’t
allow you to go beyond “1” or “127”. There is a reason why “0”
is impossible: that value is used to indicate the end of a note
(note-off). “127”, on the other hand, is the highest velocity
value the MIDI standard can muster. Selecting a high positive
velocity value may thus lead to all notes being played at “127”.
■MAGNIFY (0~200%)
The CHANGE VELO function allows you to modify the
dynamics (called “velocity”) of a track or excerpt.
Increasing the velocity values means that the notes
in question will be louder and brighter than before,
while reducing the velocity values means the opposite. Use this function when you are happy with the
timing of the notes but would like the sound to be
brighter/louder or rounder/softer. You can either
decide to add/subtract a fixed velocity value
(“VALUE”) or to change them proportionally (“MAGNIFY”).
■TRACK (ALL 1~16)
Allows you to select the track you wish to edit. You can
also select “ALL” here, in which case the operation applies
to all tracks.
■FROM
● BAR (1~[last measure of the track or song])—Refers to
the first measure to be edited. By default, the FROM
value is set to the beginning of the selected track(s).
● BEAT (1~[number of beats per bar])—Specifies the
beat position. The number of selectable beats depends
on the time signature in the selected area.
● CPT (1~119)—Refers to the starting CPT position. “CPT”
is short for “Clock Pulse Time”, the smallest unit used by
the G-70. (There are 120 CPTs to every beat of a 4/4 bar.)
Change this setting only if your edit operation should
start after the selected beat.
This parameter works like a “compander” effect (a dynamics
processor that simultaneously acts as compressor and
expander), although it processes MIDI data: by selecting a
value above “100%” you increase the differences between
high and low velocity values in the selected range. Values
below “64” are lowered, while values above “64” are
increased. The result is therefore that the difference
between pianissimo and fortissimo becomes far more pronounced.
MAGNIFY values below “100%” have the opposite effect:
they push all velocity towards the imaginary center of “64”,
thus reducing differences in playing dynamics.
■FROM NOTE (0 C~127 G9)
This parameter allows you to set the note (or lower limit of
the note range) to be modified within the specified FROM/
TO time range.
■TO NOTE (0 C~127 G9)
This parameter allows you to set the upper limit of the note
range to be modified within the specified FROM/TO time
range.
It is not displayed when you select EQUAL, UNEQUAL,
HIGHER or LOWER. See also “Fine-tuning the setting range”
on p. 163 for details about the six button icons.
■EXECUTE
Press this field to confirm your settings and edit the data.
■TO
By default, the TO position is set to the last event of the
selected track (or the last event of the longest track when
you select “ALL”).
● BAR (1~[last measure of the track or song])—This is
where you specify the bar position of the last measure to
be edited.
● BEAT (1~[number of beats per bar])—Specifies the
beat position. The number of selectable beats depends
on the time signature in the selected area.
● CPT (1~119)—Refers to the last clock that should be
affected by the edit operation. Change this setting only
if your edit operation should not end exactly on the
selected beat.
■BIAS (–99~99)
The BIAS parameter allows you to specify by how much the
velocity values should change. Select a positive value to
increase the velocity (the value is added to the velocity
value of the affected notes), or a negative value to
decrease the velocity values (that value is subtracted).
Select “0” if you prefer to work with the MAGNIFY parameter (see below).
167
G-70 Music Workstation
Using the 16-track sequencer
CHANGE GATE TIME
This function allows you to modify the duration of
the notes in the selected time (FROM/TO) and note
(FROM/TO NOTE) ranges. We recommend you only
use this function to shorten notes that suddenly
seem too long when you assign a different sound to
the track in question. You cannot view the duration
of the notes here, which makes editing the data “en
bloc” a little bit hazardous. Use the MICRO EDIT
page to change the duration of individual notes.
■BIAS (CPT) (–4800~4800)
This parameter sets the amount by which the duration (or
gate time) of the selected notes is to change. The shortest
possible GATE TIME value is “1” (used for all drum notes), so
that selecting “–1000” for notes with a GATE TIME value of
“1” in the specified time range still leaves you with the
same value.
■MAGNIFY (0~200%)
Use this parameter rather than BIAS to produce proportional changes to the affected GATE TIME values.
Values below “100%” decrease the duration, while anything above “100%” increases it. Select “100%” if you prefer to work with the BIAS (CPT) parameter (see above).
■EXECUTE
Press this field to confirm your settings and edit the data.
MERGE
After selecting a sound with a slow release (i.e. a
sound that lingers on after all notes have been
released), however, CHANGE GATE TIME will help you
cut the notes down to size and thus avoid undesirable overlaps.
Use this parameter to combine the data of two tracks
(i.e. of all data the two tracks contain – from start to
finish). The combined version can be found on the
destination track (DST). After executing this function,
you could use DELETE to remove all data from the
“SRC” track.
■TRACK (ALL, 1~16)
Allows you to select the track you wish to edit. You can
also select “ALL” here, in which case the operation applies
to all tracks.
■FROM
● BAR (1~[last measure of the track or song])—Refers to
the first measure to be edited. By default, the FROM
value is set to the beginning of the selected track(s).
● BEAT (1~[number of beats per bar])—Specifies the
beat position. The number of selectable beats depends
on the time signature in the selected area.
● CPT (1~119)—Refers to the starting CPT position. “CPT”
is short for “Clock Pulse Time”, the smallest unit used by
the G-70. (There are 120 CPTs to every beat of a 4/4 bar.)
Change this setting only if your edit operation should
start after the selected beat.
r
■TO
By default, the TO position is set to the last event of the
selected track (or the last event of the longest track when
you select “ALL”).
● BAR (1~[last measure of the track or song])—This is
where you specify the bar position of the last measure to
be edited.
● BEAT (1~[number of beats per bar])—Specifies the
beat position. The number of selectable beats depends
on the time signature in the selected area.
● CPT (1~119)—Refers to the last clock that should be
affected by the edit operation. Change this setting only
if your edit operation should not end exactly on the
selected beat.
168
■SRC TRACK (1~16)
Allows you to select the track whose data should be added
to those of the DST track.
■DST TRACK (1~16, except the track selected as
“SRC”)
Use this parameter to specify the track that should contain
a combination of its original data and those of the selected
source track.
■EXECUTE
Press this field to confirm your settings and edit the data.
G-70 Music Workstation r
Editing 16-track songs
GLOBAL CHANGE
● CC32 (---, 0~127, ALL)—This control change is the socalled “LSB” Bank Select message. Select “---” if the current setting must not change.
Note: References to the sounds of an SRX wave expansion
board can be changed by setting CC00 to “93” and CC32 to
the value that lets you access the desired group of sounds.
See page 228 for details.
● PC (---, 1~128, ALL)—Use this parameter to change the
address, a.k.a. program change number, of a sound (e.g.
from “1” to “2”). Select “---” if the current setting must
not change.
■INC/DEC
This function allows you to make quick changes to
certain settings. The change always applies to entire
tracks (you cannot use GLOBAL CHANGE for just a
few measures). Designed to help you prepare a Standard MIDI File, it is a wonderful tool for the following
applications:
• “Upgrading” older Standard MIDI Files to take advantage of the G-70’s new sounds.
• Global changes to the Reverb and/or Chorus Send
values, which is very convenient when you suddenly
notice that the effect is too prominent or not strong
enough.
These are so-called “relative” changes: the positive or negative value you set here will be added to or subtracted from
the original values of the selected track(s). Use these fields
to increase or decrease the existing values for the entire
selected track(s).
● Volume, Expression, Panpot, Reverb, Chorus (–127~
127)—These parameters allow you to add (+) or subtract
(–) a given value to/from the current Volume, Expression,
Pan, Reverb Send or Chorus Send values. This may come
in handy if the realtime changes you recorded turn out
to be too high or too low.
■EXECUTE
Press this field to confirm your settings and edit the data.
■TRACK (ALL, 1~16)
Allows you to select the track you wish to edit. You can
also select “ALL” here, in which case the operation applies
to all tracks.
■INIT VALUE
Press this field to reset all values on this page to their initial
state if you want to start again.
You will notice that there are two kinds of changes that
can be performed on this page: FROM/TO and INC/DEC.
■FROM/TO
Enter the original data value (i.e. the value that is being
used right now by the selected track(s)) in the FROM column. For TO, specify the new value that should replace the
FROM value. This is what we call “absolute” changes: you
don’t add or subtract values, you replace them with other
values. This system is only available for messages that allow
you to select sounds or sound banks, namely:
● CC00 (---, 0~127, ALL)—This control change is the socalled “MSB” Bank Select message. It allows you to select
the Capital Tone (select “0”) of a sound address if you
don’t want to use variations, or to select another variation level. The TO value “CC00= 0” can be useful for
ensuring GM compatibility, which (unlike GM2 or the GS
format) does not support tone variations. Select “---” if
the current setting must not change.
In the Tone lists, you will see that most sounds are variations. The value “8” for CC00 is probably the most popular one (as you would discover if you studied the list of
1596 Tones).
To change any value for CC00 to “8”, for example, enter
“CC00= ALL” for FROM and “CC00= 8” for TO. To change
all occurrences of the CC00 value “8” to another value
(e.g. “16”), enter “8” for FROM and “16” for TO.
Note: To use a sound on the optional SRX-series wave
expansion board you installed, set CC00 to “93” and see
page 228.
169
G-70 Music Workstation
Using the 16-track sequencer
● BAR (1~[last measure of the track or song])—This is
where you specify the bar position of the last measure to
be edited.
● BEAT (1~[number of beats per bar])—Specifies the
beat position. The number of selectable beats depends
on the time signature in the selected area.
● CPT (1~119)—Refers to the last clock that should be
affected by the edit operation. Change this setting only
if your edit operation should not end exactly on the
selected beat.
SHIFT CLOCK
■DATA TYPE
Allows you to select the data to be shifted:
SHIFT CLOCK allows you to shift the notes within the
selected FROM/TO range. It can be used for two
things:
• To correct “slow” notes due to a slow(er) attack.
You may want to use SHIFT CLOCK after assigning a Tone to
a track that has a considerably slower attack than the Tone
you used for recording the part in question. This technique
is frequently used in pop music to “time” 1/16-note string
arpeggios played with a “slow” pad sound. Rather than
have the notes begin at the mathematically correct time
(e.g. 2-1-0), you could shift them to the left (e.g. to 1-4110) of the previous measure, so that the peak volume of
the attack is reached on the next downbeat:
Original positions (slow attack, so
timing seems off)
You could use sequences, etc., as raw material for your
songs. Recording such excerpts via MIDI may cause a slight
delay (e.g. 5 CPT). If that is not acceptable, use SHIFT CLOCK
to “push” all notes to the left (select “–5”). That allows you
to tidy up the timing and still keep any irregularities
(music!) the original may contain because it was not quantized.
■TRACK (ALL, 1~16)
Allows you to select the track you wish to edit. You can
also select “ALL” here, in which case the operation applies
to all tracks.
■FROM
r
All parameters listed below.
Note
Only note messages.
P.Bender Pitch Bend data.
Control Control change messages.
Change
Prog. C
Program change messages.
NRPN
Non-registered-parameter-number parameters.
These are parameter control functions of the GS/
GM2 format that are easier to use than SysEx
messages (but basically have the same function).
RPN
Registered-parameter-number parameters. They
work like NRPN messages, except that they are
only understood by GM and GM2-compatible
sound modules.
CAF
Channel Aftertouch messages. If you don’t really
need them, these messages should definitely be
erased, because they use a lot of memory.
Shift= –5
(timing sounds OK)
• To correct the timing of notes recorded via MIDI
without quantizing them.
● BAR (1~[last measure of the track or song])—Refers to
the first measure to be edited. By default, the FROM
value is set to the beginning of the selected track(s).
● BEAT (1~[number of beats per bar])—Specifies the
beat position. The number of selectable beats depends
on the time signature in the selected area.
● CPT (1~119)—Refers to the starting CPT position. “CPT”
is short for “Clock Pulse Time”, the smallest unit used by
the G-70. (There are 120 CPTs to every beat of a 4/4 bar.)
Change this setting only if your edit operation should
start after the selected beat.
■TO
By default, the TO position is set to the last event of the
selected track (or the last event of the longest track when
you select “ALL”).
170
ALL
When you select “Note”, a FROM NOTE and TO NOTE field
appear that allow you to set the upper and lower limit of the
notes to be copied. (See also “Fine-tuning the setting range”
on p. 163.)
■VALUE (CPT) (–4800~4800)
This parameter sets the amount by which the notes are
shifted. The value refers to CPT units (one CPT= 1/120 q).
Notes on the first beat of the first bar cannot be shifted
further to the left, because that would mean shifting them
to the “0” measure, which doesn’t exist.
■EXECUTE
Press this field to confirm your settings and edit the data.
G-70 Music Workstation r
Editing 16-track songs
The display changes to:
TRACK XCHANGE
TRACK EXCHANGE allows you to move the data of
the source track (left) to the destination track (right),
and –at the same time– the data of the destination
track to the source track, thus replacing the two
tracks.
(3) Press the [MASTER¥TRACK] field in the right column.
■TRACK (1~16)
This is where you select the two tracks to be exchanged.
Obviously, there is no ALL option here.
■TRACK (1~16)
This is where you select the two tracks to be exchanged.
Obviously, there is no ALL option here. This track cannot be
set to the same number as the above.
Note: Be careful when exchanging a drum track and a “musical” track. The result may not be what you had in mind.
This page lists all events already present on the MASTER track. It allows you to modify the existing data,
to delete data you do not need, and to add information that seems to be missing.
Editing the Master Track
The G-70’s sequencer uses one track called “MASTER”
for each song. It is used for recording the time signature, the tempo, as well as general SysEx messages that
apply to all song tracks.
Note: You can only edit the MASTER track of songs that already
exist, so be sure to load a song before attempting to edit its MASTER track.
(1) If necessary, select and load a (different) song.
This is not necessary if you want to edit the song you
have just recorded or played back. See “Working with
the Song Finder” on p. 140 (or page 38) for how to
load a song.
(2) Press the [16-TRACK¥SEQUENCER] button.
16-TRACK
SEQUENCER
To avoid unpleasant surprises, be sure to save your
song before editing the MASTER track.
Note: To leave this page, either press the [Back] field (return to
the sequencer’s main page) or the [EXIT] button (return to the
G-70’s main page).
Editing existing events
The MASTER track of each Standard MIDI File contains at least the following information:
Tempo: This is the “Tempo Change” value located
at 1-01-000. It specifies the song’s tempo.
(It cannot be erased.)
Time signature: This is the “Beat Change” value located at
1-01-000. It specifies the song’s tempo. (It
cannot be erased.)
SysEx: The “SysEx” string located close to the
beginning of the song. It tells the sound
source what format is being used, how
the effects processors should be set
(types, parameter settings), etc.
Song length: The “End of Data” value refers to the position of the last event (which can be
located on any track) and thus to the end
of the song. This value cannot be edited
manually. You can, however, extend the
song by inserting MASTER track events
after this position, by recording additional
data, or by inserting blank measures
(page 165).
171
G-70 Music Workstation
Using the 16-track sequencer
To change information already available on the MASTER track, proceed as follows:
(1) Use the [ß][†] buttons or the [DATA÷ENTRY] dial to
select the list entry you want to edit.
The name of the selected parameter appears in the
upper right-hand corner of the display:
(2) Press the DATA ENTRY [®] button to select the
(first) value.
■Beat Change (Numerator/Denominator)
(Numerator: 1~32/Denominator: 2, 4, 8, 16) Specifies
the song’s time signature. If necessary, you can insert
tempo changes anywhere within the song. After
pressing [®] for the first time, you can specify the
numerator (the number of beats per bar). Press it
again to specify the denominator (the note value of
each beat).
■SysEx
After selecting a “SysEx” line and pressing [®], the display looks more or less as follows:
(3) Modify the value:
• Rotate the [DATA÷ENTRY] dial to set the desired
value. —or—
• Set the value using the [DEC]/[INC] buttons. —or—
• Press the [DATA÷ENTRY] dial and enter the value
using the numeric pad that appears in the display.
If you choose to work with the numeric pad, proceed
as follows:
• Press [Delete] to clear the currently selected figure
(e.g. the “7” of “127”).
• Press the [+10%] or [–10%] field to increase or
decrease the current value by 10%.
• Press [ENTER] to confirm the value.
—or—
Press [CLOSE] to close the numeric pad window without changing the value.
•
•
r
The parameters you can change are:
■Tempo Change (BPM)
(20~250) Specifies the song tempo. If necessary, you
can insert tempo changes anywhere within the song.
This could even be done in real time (using the
TEMPO REC SW parameter) so as to obtain a more
natural result. See page 157.
172
•
•
On this page, you can edit an existing SysEx string.
Use the [√][®] fields to select a byte (a pair of numbers) in the current line, and [ß][†] to change lines.
“SysEx” refers to system-exclusive messages only the
G-70 (or another GS-compatible sound source)
understands. Changing these values requires a thorough understanding of the purpose and structure of
SysEx messages – and that lies beyond the scope of
this manual.
Here are some guidelines, however:
SysEx messages are usually found in the fine print of
an owner’s manual. If not, the manufacturer (or
dealer) can supply a copy of that information.
SysEx messages need to be entered in hexadecimal
format – hence the [A]~[F] fields that are considered
numbers. (“Hexadecimal” means that each group
contains 16 different numbers rather than 10.)
“41” in hexadecimal notation actually represents the
number “66” in decimal notation [(4 x 16) + (2 x 1)].
SysEx messages always start with “F0” (to signal the
beginning of such a message), and end with “F7” (end
of exclusive message).
Some manufacturers (like Roland) use a figure that
allows the user to check whether the SysEx message
is correct. That number is called the “checksum”. If
you don’t know how to calculate it, press the
[AUTO¥SUM] button icon to have the G-70 insert it
for you.
G-70 Music Workstation r
Editing 16-track songs
This is a very important step for Roland tone generators. If the checksum is wrong or missing, the entire
string will be ignored.
The following pop-up appears:
Note: The checksum is only calculated for SysEx strings of a
certain length (more than 7 bytes).
• Use the [0]~[9] and [A]~[F] fields to enter the value for
the selected (white-on-blue) byte. (“A” stands for 11,
“B” for 12, “C” for 13, “D” for 14, “E” for 15, and “F” for
16.)
• Press the [DELETE] field to remove the selected byte.
All subsequent bytes will move one position to the
left.
• Press the [INSERT] field to insert a “00” at the current
position. The originally selected byte –and all subsequent bytes– move one position to the right. You can
then replace the inserted “00” with the value you
need to insert.
• Press the [SEND] field to transmit the SysEx string in
its current state to the tone generator.
This allows you to check the result before confirming
it.
• Press the [EXECUTE] field to confirm your settings
and use the string you entered.
Press [CLOSE] if you don’t want to use the SysEx message after all.
• Switch on the button icons of the events you want to
see in the list (the icons in question must light green).
[TEMPO] refers to tempo events, [BEAT] to time signature changes, and [SYSTEM¥EXCLUSIVE] to SysEx
strings.
• Press [ALL] to switch on all button icons, or [NONE] to
switch them all off, in which case the MASTER TRACK
EDIT list only contains the “End of Data” message,
which is probably not what you need.
• Press [CLOSE] to close the pop-up window without
applying your changes.
■CREATE EVENT
Press this button icon to add a new event to the
MASTER track. The following pop-up appears:
By pressing [EXECUTE] or [CLOSE], you return to the
MASTER TRACK EDIT page.
Press [Back] to return to the 16-track Sequencer’s
main page, or bear with us, for there are still a few
items that need explaining…
Other edit operations
You probably noticed the buttons in the right half of
the MASTER TRACK EDIT page. They allow you to
reduce or expand the number of events of the MASTER track.
• Press the button icon that corresponds to the kind of
event you want to add to the list.
[TEMPO] refers to tempo events, [BEAT] to time signature changes, and [SYSTEM¥EXCLUSIVE] to SysEx
strings.
• Specify the position where your new event should be
inserted by pressing the [BAR] field and entering the
desired value using the [DATA÷ENTRY] dial or the
[DEC]/[INC] buttons.
• Press the [EXECUTE] field to confirm your settings
and add the new event.
Press [CLOSE] to close the pop-up window without
applying your changes.
■VIEW
Press this button icon if the list of MASTER track
events has become so long that finding the events
you wish to edit takes too much time for comfort.
173
G-70 Music Workstation
Using the 16-track sequencer
■ERASE EVENT
• Use the [DATA÷ENTRY] dial to select the event you
want to delete.
• Press the [ERASE¥EVENT] field to erase the selected
event.
Note: Tempo and time signature events located at “1-01-00”
cannot be erased.
■MOVE EVENT
This function allows you to move one or several
events.
• Select the event you want to move. If you want to
move several events, it would be a good idea to select
the first or last event of the series.
Note: For this function, you could take advantage of the VIEW
filter to avoid selecting event types that should remain where
they are. See “VIEW” on p. 173.
Note: Tempo and time signature events located at “1-01-00”
cannot be moved.
• To select several consecutive events, press the
[DATA÷ENTRY] dial while turning it towards the left
(upward direction) or the right (downward direction).
All events selected in this way appear on a blue background.
• Press the [MOVE¥EVENT] button icon. The following
pop-up appears:
• Specify the position to which the first event (in chronological order) of the selected group should be
shifted by pressing the [BAR], [BEAT] and [CPT] fields
and entering the desired value for each unit using
the [DATA÷ENTRY] dial or the [DEC]/[INC] buttons.
• Press the [EXECUTE] field to confirm your settings
and move the event.
Press [CLOSE] to close the pop-up window without
applying your changes.
r
■COPY EVENT
This function allows you to copy one or several
events. Use [PLACE¥EVENT] to insert a copy of those
events at the desired position.
174
Note: For this function, you could take advantage of the VIEW
filter to avoid selecting event types that should not be
included in the copy. See “VIEW” on p. 173.
• To select several consecutive events, press the
[DATA÷ENTRY] dial while turning it towards the left
(upward direction) or the right (downward direction).
All events selected in this way appear on a blue background.
• Press the [COPY¥EVENT] button icon.
The new selection will replace the previous one.
■PLACE EVENT
This function is only available if the sequencer’s clipboard already contains events that you copied using
COPY EVENT. For safety reasons, it would be a good
idea to use this function immediately after copying
events.
Press the [PLACE¥EVENT] button icon. The following
pop-up appears:
• Specify the position where the first event of the
group you copied with [COPY¥EVENT] should be
inserted by pressing the [BAR], [BEAT] and [CPT] fields
and entering the desired value for each unit using
the [DATA÷ENTRY] dial or the [DEC]/[INC] buttons.
• Press the [EXECUTE] field to confirm your settings
and add the new event(s).
Press [CLOSE] to close the pop-up window without
applying your changes.
Note: Events inserted with PLACE EVENT are added to any
events that may already exist in that area. Existing events are
thus not pushed towards the end of the song.
G-70 Music Workstation r
Editing song data using Microscope Edit
Editing song data using Microscope
Edit
Select this mode whenever you need to change just one
aspect of an otherwise perfect Standard MIDI File.
In this section, we will use the word “event” for any
kind of message (identical to MIDI messages that cause
the Recorder to play or set something).
You can only view and edit one track at a time. Therefore, be sure to check the TRACK setting before editing
the events displayed on this page.
(1) Select and load a (different) song.
This is not necessary if you want to edit the song you
have just recorded or played back. Otherwise, see
“Working with the Song Finder” on p. 140 (or
page 38) for how to load a song.
(2) Press the [16-TRACK¥SEQUENCER] button.
16-TRACK
SEQUENCER
General notes about MICRO EDIT
■Position indications
The G-70’s sequencer translates all known musical
techniques and physical effects into MIDI messages
to precisely reproduce the natural behavior of the
instrument that is being simulated.
Each event is executed at a given point in time, which
is why they all have a position indication
(“1-01-119”, for example). The first figure refers to
the bar, the second to the beat within that bar, and
the third to the clock (CPT) between the current beat
and the next. Each beat comprises 120 clocks. The
example cited earlier actually means that the event is
closer to the second beat than to the first.
■Monitoring note events
The 16-track Sequencer can play back note events
you select. This may help you identify the occurrence
you want to edit. Use the speaker icon ( ) to switch
this monitor function on and move the cursor to a
note event to sound that note.
Note: See also the remark after step (1) on the next page.
The display changes to:
■VIEW
Press this button icon if the list of track events has
become so long that finding the events you wish to
edit takes too long or to ensure that only the event
types you need can be selected.
The following pop-up appears:
(3) Press the [MICRO¥EDIT] field in the right column.
(4) Press the [TRACK] field and use the [DATA÷ENTRY]
dial or the [DEC]/[INC] buttons to select the track
you want to edit.
(5) Press the white field (with the events) to be able to
select events using the [DATA÷ENTRY] dial and [ß][†]
buttons.
• Switch on the button icons of the events you want to
see in the list (the icons in question must light in
green).
[CONTROL¥CHANGE] also includes the bank select
messages (CC00 and CC32) that are used for selecting
sounds (along with the program change numbers
that can be filtered separately).
• Press [ALL] to switch on all button icons, or [NONE] to
switch them all off, in which case the MICRO EDIT list
only contains the “End of Data” message, which is
probably not what you need.
• Press [CLOSE] to close the pop-up window without
applying your changes.
175
G-70 Music Workstation
Using the 16-track sequencer
■General procedure
To change information already available on the
selected track, proceed as follows:
(1) Use the [ß][†] buttons or the [DATA÷ENTRY] dial to
select the list entry you want to edit.
The name of the selected parameter appears in the
upper right-hand corner of the display:
After selecting the entire line of a note event, you can
press and hold the [DATA÷ENTRY] dial to play the note
(it will be held until you release the [DATA÷ENTRY] dial).
If you press the [DATA÷ENTRY] dial after selecting
another kind of event (control change, aftertouch, program change, etc.), that value is memorized by the
G-70’s tone generator ad used for the following note
event you play back. To reset such an event, select
another occurrence (with a different value) and press
the [DATA÷ENTRY] dial yet again.
(2) Press the DATA ENTRY [®] button to select the
(first) value.
(3) Modify the value:
• Rotate the [DATA÷ENTRY] dial to set the desired
value. —or—
• Set the value using the [DEC]/[INC] buttons. —or—
• Press the [DATA÷ENTRY] dial and enter the value
using the numeric pad that appears in the display.
r
If you choose to work with the numeric pad, proceed
as follows:
176
• Press the numeric button icons to enter the desired
value. (Use [Delete] to delete the last figure you
entered.)
• Press the [+10%] or [–10%] field to increase or
decrease the current value by 10%.
• Press [ENTER] to confirm the value.
—or—
Press [CLOSE] to close the numeric pad window without changing the value.
(4) Press the DATA ENTRY [®] button to select the next
value and change it.
(5) When you’re done, press the [Back] field to return
to the main Sequencer page and save your song.
The parameters you can change are:
● Note and velocity messages—These messages always
come in pairs (see the illustration of step (2) above). The
first value (“Note Number 127 G9”) refers to the note
itself, and the second (“On Velocity 127”) to the velocity
(playing dynamics).
The MICRO EDIT page adds a third message to that pair
(“65535”). It describes the duration of the note in question. You may remember this value from the TRACK EDIT
environment, where it is called “Gate Time”.
● Control Change—These messages usually add something to the notes being played, like modulation, a different volume, a new stereo position… The G-70 recognizes (and allows you to edit) all available control change
numbers (CC00~127) and displays their “official” name
wherever possible (not all control change numbers have
universally accepted functions). The value can be set
between from “0” to “127”.
● Program Change—These messages are used for selecting sounds within the current bank (1~128).
● Pitch Bend—These messages are used for temporary
changes to the pitch of the notes being played at that
time. Pitch Bend messages can be positive (higher) or
negative (lower). Setting range: –128~128.
● Poly Aftertouch—This refers to aftertouch messages the
G-70’s does not generate (it uses channel aftertouch). Its
sound source recognizes them, however. The difference
between polyphonic aftertouch and channel aftertouch
is that the former is related to a single note, while the
latter applies to all the notes the track is currently playing.
● Channel Aftertouch—See above. These messages are
generated by the G-70’s keyboard.
G-70 Music Workstation r
Editing song data using Microscope Edit
Editing events
Other edit operations
■Editing Pitch Bend messages
Pitch Bend messages can be positive or negative (the
range is –128~128). The value “0” means that the
pitch of notes being played in that area is not altered.
If a Pitch Bend occurrence is not reset to “0” at some
stage, all notes will keep sounding flat when you no
longer want them to.
The buttons in the right half of the MICRO EDIT page
allow you to reduce or expand the number of events of
the track you selected.
■Editing control changes and aftertouch messages
These messages (CC, Poly Aftertouch and Channel
Aftertouch) can be set to the desired value (0~127)
when the corresponding effect is needed – but they
also need to be reset to “0” to avoid unpleasant surprises.
The G-70’s keyboard does not generate Poly Aftertouch messages, but its sound source understands
them. Poly Aftertouch messages are always related to
a given note, which is why you first need to tell the
sequencer which note the event applies to: “0 (C–)”~
“127 (G9)”. Next, specify the desired Aftertouch value
(0~127).
■About the “Note” messages
As stated above, note messages comprise a note
number, a velocity value and a Gate Time value.
Note numbers can be entered the usual way
([DATA÷ENTRY] dial or [DEC]/[INC]) or by pressing the
corresponding key on the keyboard. This is also true
of velocity values.
The range for note messages is “0 (C–)”~“127 (G9)”.
Velocity messages can be set anywhere between “1”
(extremely soft) and “127”. The value “0” cannot be
entered, because it would effectively switch off the
note.
After selecting the Gate Time entry, pressing the
[DATA÷ENTRY] dial calls up the following pop-up:
■CREATE EVENT
Press this button icon to add a new event to the
selected track. The following pop-up appears:
If the position for which you create a new event already
contains other events, the new event is added at the
end of that group.
• Press the button icon that corresponds to the kind of
event you want to add to the list.
Here are the default values that are assigned to
events you create:
Note: Note Number: 60 C4
On Velocity: 100
Gate Time: 60
Control Change: CC01 Modulation, value “0”
Program Change*: Program Change Number “1”
Pitch Bend: “0”
Poly Aftertouch: Note Number: 60 C4
Poly Aftertouch Value: “0”
Channel After- “0”
touch:
The maximum duration a note event can have is
65,535 clocks.
Drum parts usually use the Gate Time value “1” for all
notes. Increasing it to “20”, for example, has no audible effect on the sounds.
[*] “Control Change” also allows you to insert Bank Select messages (CC00 and CC32). Such messages must be located BEFORE
the program change to which they apply. The correct order is
therefore: CC00→ CC32→ PC. Also, it is usually wiser to assign
each of these three values to consecutive CPT positions.
• Specify the position where your new event should be
inserted by pressing the [BAR], [BEAt] and [CPT] fields
and entering the desired value for each unit using
the [DATA÷ENTRY] dial or the [DEC]/[INC] buttons.
• Press the [EXECUTE] field to confirm your settings
and add the new event.
Press [CLOSE] to close the pop-up window without
applying your changes.
177
G-70 Music Workstation
Using the 16-track sequencer
■ERASE EVENT
• Use the [DATA÷ENTRY] dial or the [ß][†] buttons to
select the event you want to delete.
• To select several consecutive events, press the
[DATA÷ENTRY] dial while turning it towards the left
(upward direction) or the right (downward direction).
• Press the [ERASE¥EVENT] button icon to remove the
event you selected.
■COPY EVENT
This function allows you to copy one or several
events. Use [PLACE¥EVENT] to insert a copy of those
events at the desired position.
■MOVE EVENT
This function allows you to move one or several
events.
Note: If the position to which you move the selected event
already contains other events, the moved event is added at the
end of that group.
• Select the event you want to move.
Note: For this function, you could take advantage of the VIEW
filter to avoid selecting event types that should remain where
they are. See “VIEW” on p. 175.
Note: Events located at “1-01-00” cannot be moved further to
the left.
• To select several consecutive events, press the
[DATA÷ENTRY] dial while turning it towards the left
(upward direction) or the right (downward direction).
All events selected in this way appear on a blue background.
• Press the [MOVE¥EVENT] button icon. The following
pop-up appears:
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• Specify the position to which the first event (in chronological order) of the selected group should be
shifted by pressing the [BAR], [BEAT] and [CPT] fields
and entering the desired value for each unit using
the [DATA÷ENTRY] dial or the [DEC]/[INC] buttons.
• Press the [EXECUTE] field to confirm your settings
and move the event.
Press [CLOSE] to close the pop-up window without
applying your changes.
178
Note: For this function, you could take advantage of the VIEW
filter to avoid selecting event types that should not be
included in the copy. See “VIEW” on p. 173.
• To select several consecutive events, press the
[DATA÷ENTRY] dial while turning it towards the left
(upward direction) or the right (downward direction).
All events selected in this way appear on a blue background.
• Press the [COPY¥EVENT] button icon.
The new selection will replace the previous one.
■PLACE EVENT
This function is only available if the sequencer’s clipboard already contains events that you copied using
COPY EVENT. For safety reasons, it would be a good
idea to use this function immediately after copying
events.
Press the [PLACE¥EVENT] button icon. The following
pop-up appears:
• Specify the position where the first event of the
group you copied with [COPY¥EVENT] should be
inserted by pressing the [BAR], [BEAT] and [CPT] fields
and entering the desired value for each unit using
the [DATA÷ENTRY] dial or the [DEC]/[INC] buttons.
• Press the [EXECUTE] field to confirm your settings
and add the new event(s).
Press [CLOSE] to close the pop-up window without
applying your changes.
Note: Events inserted with PLACE EVENT are added to any
events that may already exist in that area. Existing events are
thus not pushed towards the end of the song.
G-70 Music Workstation r
Concept
15. Programming Styles (Style Composer)
Concept
New Styles can be created in two ways:
• By creating new accompaniments from scratch
(page 180).
• By editing existing Styles, which requires that you
copy them and then alter the settings or notes you
do not like (page 186).
Patterns
User Styles and internal Styles are short sequences or
patterns (of four or eight measures) you can select in
realtime. If you have ever worked with a drum machine
or groove box, the pattern concept may sound familiar.
Pattern-based accompaniments usually consist of the
following elements:
• The basic groove, i.e. the rhythm that is the backbone
of the song.
• Several alternatives for the basic groove that keep
the accompaniment interesting and suggest some
kind of “evolution” or “variation”.
• Fill-Ins to announce the beginning of new parts.
• The beginning and ending of a song.
Programming four to eight patterns for a threeminute song is usually enough. Just use them in the
right order to make them suitable for your song.
The G-70 allows you to program 54 different patterns per Style, some of which can be selected via
dedicated buttons (MAIN [1]~[4], etc.). Others are
selected on the basis of the chords you play in the
chord recognition area of the keyboard (major,
minor, seventh).
Looped vs. one-shot
The G-70 uses two kinds of patterns: looped divisions
and one-shot divisions.
■Looped divisions
Looped divisions are accompaniments that are
repeated until you select another division or press
[START÷STOP] to stop Arranger playback. The G-70
provides four programmable looped divisions (MAIN
[1]~[4]).
Looped divisions do not select other divisions when
they are finished: they keep playing until you select
another division by hand (or by foot).
■One-shot divisions
One-shot divisions are only played once and then
select a looped division or stop the Arranger. The
G-70 uses the following one-shot divisions: INTRO
[1]~4, FILL UP [1]~[3], FILL DOWN [1]~[3], and ENDING
[1]~[4].
The division type affects the way in which the respective tracks are played back. Any track of a looped pattern that is shorter than the longest track is repeated
until the longest track is finished.
Here’s how you can take advantage of that: if the
drums play the same notes during four measures
(while the rhythm guitar or piano needs four measures to complete a cycle), recording only one drum
measure is enough, because it is automatically
repeated until the longest track is finished.
Tracks
Unlike a drum machine, a Style not only contains the
rhythm part (drums & percussion) but also a melodic
accompaniment, such as piano, guitar, bass, and strings
lines. That is why the Style divisions work with tracks –
eight to be precise. See also “Arranger parts” on p. 74.
The part-to-track assignment is fixed. You cannot
assign the ADrums part to track 6, for example.
The reason why the ADrums part is assigned to the first
track, and the ABass part to the second is that most
programmers and recording artists start by laying down
the rhythm section of a song.
There are exceptions to this rule, however, so feel free
to start with any other part if that is easier for the Style
you are programming.
Note: Though there are six ACC parts, most Styles only contain
two or three melodic accompaniment lines. In most cases, less
means more, i.e. do not program six melodic accompaniments
just because the G-70 provides that facility. If you listen very
carefully to a CD, you will discover that it is not the number of
instruments you use that makes a song sound “big” but rather the
right notes at the right time.
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G-70 Music Workstation
Programming Styles (Style Composer)
Recording User Styles from scratch
Important remark
User Style recording and editing is carried out in the
G-70’s Style RAM memory. When you leave Style
Composer mode after recording or editing a Style (by
pressing [EXIT]), the display warns you that you need
to save your Style. If you haven’t yet done so, you
should take advantage of this security system.
Press the [YES] field to save your Style to disk (see
page 185 for details), or [NO] if you think that is not
necessary.
Starting the Style Composer
Clearing the RAM memory (Initialize Style)
The first thing we need to do is clear the G-70’s Style
RAM memory, because it is not empty when you select
the STYLE COMPOSER. To record a new User Style, you
must first clear the Style RAM memory:
(3) Press the [INITIALIZE¥STYLE] field in the right column.
The warning alerts you to the fact that pressing
[EXECUTE] (see below) may have disastrous consequences. See “Saving your Style” on p. 185 if you still
need to save your previous Style.
(4) If you want the G-70 to select suitable sounds for
you, press one of the TEMPLATES fields.
Here is what the options mean:
ORCHESTR
Selects orchestral sounds suitable for classical music and film scores.
BAROQUE
Selects orchestral sounds suitable for chamber music.
ROCK
Selects sounds suitable for rock music.
FOLK
Selects sounds suitable for folk music.
COUNTRY
Selects sounds suitable for country music.
(1) Press the [MENU] button.
MENU
The display changes to:
ELECTRONIC Selects classical sounds suitable for dance
music.
POP
Selects sound often used in pop arrangements.
JAZZ
Selects sounds suitable for jazz combos.
ETHNIC
Selects sounds suitable for world music.
‰ If you want to set everything yourself, jump to
“Preparing your own settings” below.
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(2) Press the [STYLE¥COMPOSER] field.
180
■Time signature
Before recording your first track, you must specify
the time signature of your accompaniment. Select 4/
4 for 8- or 16-beat patterns, 3/4 for waltzes, 2/4 for
polkas and 6/8 (or 4/4) for marches. You can also
select more complex time signatures (5/4, 7/4, etc.).
This value needs to be set when you initialize the
Style RAM memory (i.e. now). All Divisions and Modes
use this time signature. You could, however, edit the
patterns at a later stage (see “TIME SIGNAT” on
p. 197) and specify that MAIN [1] should use “4/4”,
MAIN [2] “6/8”, etc.
(5) Set the time signature:
• Press the first [BEAT] field (the numerator) and enter
the desired number of beats using the [DATA÷ENTRY]
dial or the [DEC]/[INC] buttons.
G-70 Music Workstation r
Recording User Styles from scratch
• Press the second [BEAT] field (the denominator) and
enter the duration of each beat using the
[DATA÷ENTRY] dial or the [DEC]/[INC] buttons.
You can also set the tempo (20~250) here, or leave
that for later.
‰Continue with step (6) below.
■Preparing your own settings
If none of the templates matches the settings you
need, press the [MY¥SETUP] field.
(g) Press the second [BEAT] field (the denominator) and
enter the duration of each beat using the [DATA÷ENTRY]
dial or the [DEC]/[INC] buttons.
See “Time signature” above. You can also set the tempo
(20~250) here, or leave that for later.
(6) Press the [EXECUTE] field.
The display returns to the STYLE COMPOSER page,
which only contains the sound assignments you have
just made.
8 possibilities
Can be set for
all 8 tracks
Here, you can prepare the STYLE COMPOSER for the
work at hand by selecting the desired sounds and
setting additional parameters.
Please proceed in the order given here until you have
a firm grasp of the flexibility:
(a) Press the [TRACK] field and use the [DATA÷ENTRY] dial or
the [DEC]/[INC] buttons to select the track whose settings
you want to change.
With the exception of the tempo, all other parameters only
apply to the selected track. There are 8 tracks: ADrum (the
drums), ABass (the bass) and Acc1~6 (melodic accompaniment parts).
(b) Press the [TRACK¥INSTRUMENT] field to jump to the TONE
SELECT page. (You can also press a TONE button to
assign the desired sound to the track.)
The [SRX¥EXPANSION] and [HARMONIC¥BAR] buttons are
not available for Music Style tracks. The ADrums track can
only use Drum Sets (so that only the [DRUMS] button of
the TONE pad is available).
(c) Play a few notes on the keyboard to audition the sound.
(d) If necessary, change the CONTROLS settings by pressing
their fields and using the [DATA÷ENTRY] dial or the [DEC]/
[INC] buttons.
The four fields refer to the following aspects:
Getting ready for the first track
(7) On the STYLE COMPOSER page, press the DIVISION
field and use the [DATA÷ENTRY] dial to select the
Division you want to record (“Intro”, “Main”, “Fill”
or “Ending”).
(8) Press the RECORDER [REC¥∏] button.
REC
●
The display changes to:
EXPRESS Temporary volume changes (CC11).
REVERB
Reverb Send (CC91), i.e. how strongly the
selected track should be processed by the
reverb effect.
PANPOT
The track’s stereo placement (L63~0~R63).
CHORUS Chorus Send (CC93), i.e. how strongly the
selected track should be processed by the chorus effect.
These settings may come in handy to ensure that all ACC1
parts (for example) use the same amount of reverb and are
always located in the right half of the stereo image. You
can also change them later (see p. 189).
(e) Repeat steps (a)~(d) for the remaining tracks, modes and
patterns.
(f) Press the first [BEAT] field (the numerator) and enter the
desired number of beats using the [DATA÷ENTRY] dial or
the [DEC]/[INC] buttons.
181
G-70 Music Workstation
Programming Styles (Style Composer)
Selecting the track, the Mode, and the Division
To keep things easy, let’s start with the drums of the
MAIN [1] pattern.
(9) Press the [REC¥TRACK] field and use the
[DATA÷ENTRY] dial to select the track you wish to
record to.
Select “ADrums”. This causes the display to change as
follows (because there are more options for drum
parts):
Now select a pattern. Let’s start with MAIN [1]:
(10) Press the [REC¥DIVISION] field and use the
[DATA÷ENTRY] dial to select “Main 1”.
■Working with clones
On this page, you can use two clone functions that
allow you to record one part and copy it to up to four
divisions and three modes each. The “=” sign means
that more than one pattern will be recorded.
(11) Use the [REC¥DIVISION¥MODE] field to select the
mode(s).
This parameter allows you to specify whether you are
about to record the accompaniment for major, minor
or seventh chords. If you listen to the Music Styles
prepared by Roland, you will notice that there are
slight differences in the looped patterns – and sometimes striking differences for Intros and Endings, with
completely different phrases. Such variations can be
prepared using the REC DIVISION MODE parameter.
Let us use the following settings, which mean “record
the major pattern and copy it to all MAIN Divisions”.
Thus, by programming one pattern, you will obtain 3
(Major, minor, 7th) x 4 (MAIN 1, 2, 3, 4) = 12 identical
drum patterns!
Tone selection
Another important aspect is Tone selection because
the addresses of the sounds and Drum Set you select
are recorded at the beginning of each division.
(12) Press the [TRACK¥INSTRUMENT] field and select a
Drum Set.
• Use the TONE buttons on the front panel and press
the field of the desired sound. If you don’t like it,
press another field.
• If you are still not happy with the Tone, use the
[PAGE¥1]~[PAGE¥5] and [˚] fields to select the corresponding page (if available).
Note: The [SRX¥EXPANSION] and [HARMONIC¥BAR] buttons
are not available for Music Style tracks. The ADrums track can
only use Drum Sets (so that only the [DRUMS] button of the
TONE pad is available).
Play a few notes on the keyboard to check whether
the sounds of the selected Drum Set are suitable for
the accompaniment you are going to record. Try
other Drum Sets until you find the one that sounds
“right”.
Note: See “Drum Instrument & Pitch” on p. 189 for details
abut the NRPN DRUM and PITCH parameters. These are only
available for ADrum tracks.
Specifying the key (for melodic parts)
If you want to use the accompaniment in a musically
meaningful way, you need to tell the G-70 what key
you are recording in. This is to ensure that the chords
you play during everyday use of your Style with the
G-70’s Arranger lead to the correct realtime transpositions of the selected Division.
The G-70 allows you to record Styles in any key. But
do set the KEY parameter to the right value before
recording.
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Note: The key of the ADrums part cannot be set (because that
doesn’t make sense).
182
(13) Press the [KEY] field and use the [DATA÷ENTRY] dial
or the [DEC]/[INC] buttons to set the key.
If you want to record in F#, set this value to “F#”; to
record in A, you must set this value to “A”, etc.
■Octave
The field next to [KEY] allows you to transpose the
keyboard in octave steps, which may be convenient
for extremely high or low notes – or for using the
special “noises” of certain sounds.
G-70 Music Workstation r
Recording User Styles from scratch
(14) Press the [OCTAVE] field and use the [DATA÷ENTRY]
dial to transpose the keyboard up or down (–4~+4
octaves).
Tempo
(15) The current tempo value may be a bit fast for
recording, so change it by pressing the tempo field
and using the [DATA÷ENTRY] dial or the [DEC]/[INC]
buttons.
The tempo value you set here is recorded and
regarded as preset tempo. You can change it at any
stage in STYLE COMPOSER mode, so start by selecting
a tempo that allows you to record the music the way
you want it to sound.
Specifying the pattern length
Every Style pattern must have a set length. Setting
the MEASURE LENGTH value now will help you avoid
a lot of confusion once you start recording.
The Arranger tends to add blank bars at the end of a
track, which is usually due to the fact that you
stopped recording a little late (i.e. after the last bar
you played). This means that you actually “record” 5
measures instead of 4:
If you press [START÷STOP] after bar 4…
…your Style will look (and sound) like this (5 bars):
Input Quantize
INPUT QUANTIZE is a function that corrects minor
timing problems. It shifts the notes whose timing is
not exactly right to the nearest “correct” unit.
Always select a resolution setting that is fine enough
to accept all note values you play, yet not finer than
the shortest note. If the shortest notes of your
accompaniment are 1/16th-note triplets, set the
INPUT QUANTIZE value to “1/16t”.
(16) Press the [INPUT¥QUANTIZE] field and use the
[DATA÷ENTRY] dial to specify the quantize value.
The preset value, “1/16”, is OK for most situations. If
you do not want quantize your music while recording, set this parameter to “Off”.
You can also quantize the part after recording it
(page 191).
Record mode
(17) Press the [REC¥MODE] field in the lower left corner
and use the DATA ENTRY [DEC]/[INC] buttons to
select the recording mode.
● Replace—Everything you record replaces the data of the
selected track. This mode is automatically selected when
you activate the record function for a track that does
not yet contain data. If you select a track that already
contains data, this parameter is set to “Mix” but could be
changed to “Replace” if you want to overwrite the previous version.
● Mix—The music or data you record are added to the
existing data of the selected track.
Furthermore, in STYLE COMPOSER mode, all patterns
are looped, so that the G-70 keeps playing them back
until you press the [START÷STOP] button. A wrong
number of measures (5 rather than 4, for example) is
very likely to put you off, so do take the time to set
the pattern length before you start recording.
(18) Press the [MEASURE¥LENGTH] field and use the
[DATA÷ENTRY] dial or the [DEC]/[INC] buttons to
select the desired setting.
The setting range is 1~136 (or more, depending on
the time signature) and “Off”. Select “Off” if you
haven’t decided how long the pattern should be. In
that case, its length is set when you stop recording.
It is perfectly possible to specify a different length
value for each track and division.
Note: Even one-shot patterns are looped in STYLE COMPOSER
mode. That is not the case, however, during Arranger playback
(i.e. everyday use of the Styles).
There is one last thing we need to set:
(19) Specify how long the count-in should be before
recording starts by pressing the [COUNT-IN] field
and using the [DATA÷ENTRY] dial or the [DEC]/[INC]
buttons to select one of the following options:
Off: No count-in: recording starts as soon as you
press the [START÷STOP] button (while [REC¥∏]
flashes).
1 Meas: Recording starts after a 1-bar count-in.
2 Meas: Recording starts after a 2-bar count-in.
Wait Note: Recording starts as soon as you play a note on
the keyboard. (There will be no count-in.)
183
G-70 Music Workstation
Programming Styles (Style Composer)
Recording
(20) Press the [START÷STOP] button. Depending on the
count-in setting, the metronome now counts
down, then recording starts.
Auditioning your Style and adding
more tracks
(1) Press the [START÷STOP] button again to listen to
your performance.
The STYLE COMPOSER page contains two fields that
allow you to select the patterns you want to audition.
Here’s how to select them:
Note: You can also start recording using an optional footswitch connected to the FOOT SWITCH jack. See “Start/Stop” on
p. 69.
You could start by playing only the bass drum part. If
you specified the track length (see above) before
recording, the Arranger jumps back to the beginning
of the pattern after the set number of measures. The
second time around you could add the snare drum,
the third time the HiHat, and so on.
When recording another part (ABass~Acc6), do
everything you would do during a live performance.
Feel free to add modulation, Pitch Bend and to use an
optional hold pedal connected to the HOLD FOOTSWITCH jack.
(21) Press [START÷STOP] again to stop recording.
The display changes to:
(2) Press the [MODE] field and use the [DATA÷ENTRY]
dial or the [DEC]/[INC] buttons to select “Major”,
“minor” or “7th”.
Only one mode can be selected for playback.
(3) Press the [DIVISION] field and use the [DATA÷ENTRY]
dial or the [DEC]/[INC] buttons to select one of the
Divisions (Intro 1~4, Main 1~4, Intro 1~4, Fill Dwn
1~3, Fill Up 1~3, End 1~4).
Only one Division can be selected for playback.
If you like your drum part, continue with “Saving
your Style”. If not, record a new version:
(4) Press the [REC¥∏] button to return to the following
page:
(5) Select the Mode and Division you want to redo.
(6) Press the [REC¥MODE] field and select…
Replace: If you want to replace the previous recording
with new data.
Mix: To add notes you forgot to record the first time.
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(7) Continue with step (16) on page 183.
184
G-70 Music Workstation r
Auditioning your Style and adding more tracks
Saving your Style
Make it a habit to save your Styles as frequently as possible. After all, if someone decided to turn off your G-70
now, you would lose everything you have programmed
so far.
(1) Press the [SAVE] field on the STYLE COMPOSER
page.
The display changes to:
This page allows you to save the current Style to the
internal memory, a memory card or a floppy disk.
• Press the [EXTERNAL¥MEMORY], [FLOPPY] or
[INTERNAL¥MEMORY] field to select the area where
you want to save the Music Style.
• Enter the name for the file.
See page 49. If necessary, you can also supply the
required COUNTRY and GENRE information for use
with the STYLE FINDER function (only available if you
select the internal memory or a memory card).
Note: The G-70 supports both upper- and lower-case letters
for file names. Choose whichever is more convenient (or
clearer).
(2) Press the [EXECUTE] field to save the data.
The G-70 returns to the STYLE COMPOSER page.
Programming other parts and divisions
You can now record the second part – probably the
bass. If you’d like to do the guided tour again, return to
page 181. Do not forget to set the key for the bass part
(see “Specifying the key (for melodic parts)” on p. 182).
Once the first Division is finished, you can record other
Divisions. Use the clone function (page 182) to record
several patterns in one go.
Do not forget to record the Fills and the Intro(s)/Ending(s) to complete your Style. Fill-Ins are short transitions (usually one measure) that announce new song
parts. There are two groups of three fills: “Up” 1~3 and
“Dwn” 1~3. “Up” fills are used when you switch on the
[AUTO¥FILL¥IN] button and then press a VARIATION button of a higher number (to go from [1] to [2], for example).
“Dwn” fills are used when you switch on the
[AUTO¥FILL¥IN] button and then press a VARIATION button of a lower number.
Intros are usually used at the beginning of a song, and
End patterns provide professional closing sections.
Note: The ABass part is monophonic. You can only record singlenote patterns.
Muting parts while recording others
After programming a few tracks, you may find that certain parts tend to confuse you. Playing a steady organ
part while listening to a previously recorded syncopated guitar line may indeed be difficult. That is why
the G-70 allows you to mute parts that you do not
want to hear during recording.
(1) On the STYLE COMPOSER page (which should be
displayed now), the [MUTE] field and the lines of
the Style tracks you don’t want to hear. Such
tracks are flagged with an “M”.
(2) Press the [MUTE] field again to switch off the function of the same name.
Note: The on/off status only applies to the STYLE COMPOSER
page. During normal Arranger playback, all tracks that contain
data are played back. Use the Erase function to remove parts
that should not appear in your accompaniments (see p. 192).
■Solo
If you need to listen to a track in isolation, press the
[SOLO] field and the field of the track you want to
solo, and start playback. This mutes all other tracks,
while the selected track is flagged with an “S”. You
can also select the track to be soloed using the [ß][†]
buttons.
Press the [SOLO] field again to switch off the function of the same name.
Remarks
■Working from top to bottom – programming
hints
If you listen carefully to the factory Styles, you will
notice that most divisions are very similar to one
another and that the element of “evolution” or
“amplification” between the various levels is usually
derived from adding instruments to otherwise identical parts. The MAIN [2] division may, for instance, add
an electric guitar to the drums, bass, and organ lines
of the MAIN [1] level, but the drum, bass, and organ
lines of the MAIN [2] level are often identical to those
of the [1] level.
Therefore: always start by recording the most complex accompaniment (e.g. MAIN [4]) while cloning all
other looped divisions (page 182). If you then move
to the MAIN [3] Division and delete the bells and
whistles (page 192), that division already sounds simpler.
The next step would then be to select the MAIN [2]
pattern and delete both the bells and whistles and
the distorted guitar.
185
G-70 Music Workstation
Programming Styles (Style Composer)
Metronome
Copying existing Styles
In Style Composer mode, the metronome sounds
during recording, unless you switch it off using the
TEMPO [METRONOME] button. If you also need the
metronome when listening to what you have just
recorded, select another metronome mode. See
“Metronome settings” on p. 73.
Another way of programming Styles is to use parts
from other Styles. The G-70 allows you to:
Playback in Arranger mode
If, during playback in Arranger mode (i.e. normal
G-70 mode), the Style stops unexpectedly, try different chord modes. Chances are that you only programmed the major division, so that the Arranger
selects an empty pattern when you play a minor or
seventh chord. Remember to always set the Mode
parameter to “M=m=7” until you have come to grips
with the possibilities of the G-70’s Arranger. That
way, those three patterns will sound alike, but at
least you are sure that the Arranger does not stop
when you play a minor or seventh chord.
Note: Save your Music Style before trying it out with the
Arranger.
• Select the desired Style to the Style RAM memory
and edit it.
• Copy the selected Division of one or all tracks.
• Copy just a few notes of an existing part.
• Copy tracks or notes between Divisions.
This allows you to create new Styles by assembling
tracks from different existing Styles.
Note: You cannot copy an ADrums track to another track
(ABass~Acc6). Likewise, the bass part can only be copied to an
A.Bass track. ACC tracks, however, can be copied to whichever
ACC track you like.
Note: If the Style RAM memory already contains new data,
save it before copying. The G-70 has no Undo function. Saving
a Style before copying allows you to revert to the previous version if something goes wrong. See “Saving your Style” on
page 185.
Starting with all tracks of an existing Style
The easiest way to do this is by selecting an internal
Style and edit it.
(1) Select the Style you want to work with (see p. 27).
(2) Press the [MENU] button.
MENU
The display changes to:
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(3) Press the [STYLE¥COMPOSER] field.
186
(4) Change the Style data to your liking.
G-70 Music Workstation r
Copying existing Styles
Copying individual Style tracks
The COPY function can be used to copy individual
tracks, Modes and Divisions to replace existing parts
while keeping the remaining parts of the Style already
in memory.
(1) Press the [TRACK¥EDIT] field on the STYLE COMPOSER page, followed by the [COPY] field.
(5) Repeat this operation with the [MODE] and
[DIVISION] fields to select the Mode (Major, Minor,
7th, ALL) and Division (Int 1~4, Int ALL, Main 1~4,
Main ALL, FDw 1~3, FDw ALL, FUp 1~3, FUp ALL,
End 1~4, End ALL).
(6) Press the [LISTEN] field to listen to the excerpt you
are about to copy.
Note: LISTEN is not available when you select “ALL” for the
MODE or DIVISION fields.
(2) Press the [Source] field.
(3) Select the Style that contains the track(s) to be
copied:
■Selecting an ‘internal’ Style
To use one of the Styles that can be selected via the
front panel, proceed as follows: use the STYLE buttons and the fields in the display to select the desired
Style. The blue field shows the name of the Style
selected as source.
■Selecting an ‘external’ Style
You can also work with a Style saved in the internal
memory area, on a floppy disk or a memory card
(EXTERNAL).
• Press the [DISK¥USER] button icon to jump to the
STYLE FINDER page.
• See “Style Finder: quickly locating Styles” on p. 86 for
the complete procedure.
• Press the field of the Style you need (it appears on an
orange background).
• Press the [GET¥IT] field to return to the STYLE TRACK
EDIT/COPY field.
(4) Press the [TRACK] field and use the [DATA÷ENTRY]
dial or the [DEC]/[INC] buttons to select the track to
be copied.
You can also select “ALL” to copy all tracks of a given
Mode/Division. In that case, the DESTINATION track is
also set to “ALL”.
■FROM
Start by specifying the position of the first event (or
note) to be copied.
(7) Press the [BAR], [BEAT], or [CPT] field in the FROM
row and use the [DATA÷ENTRY] dial or the [DEC]/
[INC] buttons to set the position of the starting
point.
By default, the FROM parameters are set to “Bar 1,
Beat 1, CPT 0”.
■TO
The TO position indicates the end of the excerpt to be
copied. By default, the TO values are set to include
the entire track.
(8) Press the [BAR], [BEAT], or [CPT] field and use the
[DATA÷ENTRY] dial or the [DEC]/[INC] buttons to set
the desired position.
To copy an entire bar, select the beginning of the following bar. Example: to copy bars 1~4 specify “FROM
1-1-0/TO 5-1-0”.
(9) Press [LISTEN] to listen to the excerpt again.
(10) Press the [Destination] field.
■COPY MODE
Copying can be carried out in one of two modes:
Replace: The data in the selected range will be copied and
overwrite all data of the destination track in the
selected source track range.
Mix: The data in the selected range will be added to
any existing data on the destination track.
In either case, the length of the destination track may
change to include all data of the source track.
Note: If the Style RAM memory already contains new data,
save it before copying. The G-70 has no Undo function. Saving
a Style before copying allows you to revert to the previous version if something goes wrong. See “Saving your Style” on
page 185.
(11) Press the [COPY¥MODE] field and use the [DEC]/[INC]
buttons to select “Replace” or “Mix”.
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G-70 Music Workstation
Programming Styles (Style Composer)
(12) Press the [TRACK] field and use the [DATA÷ENTRY]
dial to select the track you wish to copy the data
to.
Note: ADrums data can only be copied to ADrums tracks. Likewise, you can only copy ABass data to other ABass tracks. If
you selected “ALL” for SOURCE [TRACK], this [TRACK] parameter is also set to “ALL”.
■Tone/Drum Set selection
To select another Tone or Drum Set for an existing
Style track, proceed as follows:
(1) Press the RECORDER [REC¥∏] button.
(13) Repeat this operation with the [MODE] and
[DIVISION] fields to select the Mode (Major, Minor,
7th, ALL), and the Division (Intro 1~4, Main 1~4,
Fill Dwn 1~3, Fill Up 1~3, End 1~4, ALL).
Note: A If you selected “ALL” for SOURCE [MODE] or [DIVISION],
this [MODE] or [DIVISION] parameter is also set to “ALL”.
(14) Press the [COPY¥TIMES] field and use the
[DATA÷ENTRY] dial or the [DEC]/[INC] buttons to
specify the number of copies to be made. Select
“1” to the excerpt only once.
(15) Press the [LISTEN] field to listen to the destination
track.
The INTO position indicates where the beginning of
the excerpt will be after the copy operation. To copy
the source data to the beginning of the selected
track, select BAR= “1”, BEAT= “1”, and CPT= “0”.
(16) Press the [BAR], [BEAT], or [CPT] field and use the
[DATA÷ENTRY] dial or the [DEC]/[INC] buttons to set
the target (INTO) position.
(17) Press the [EXECUTE] field to copy the data.
Editing on the fly by recording
Adding notes in realtime
To add notes to an existing part, proceed as follows:
• On the main STYLE COMPOSER page, select the Division you wish to change (page 182).
• Press the RECORDER [REC¥∏] button, press the
[REC¥MODE] field and use the [DATA÷ENTRY] dial or
the [DEC]/[INC] buttons to select “Mix”.
• Select the track, and start recording by pressing the
[START÷STOP] button. Play the notes where you want
them to sound.
Adding controller data in realtime
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To add controller data (modulation, Pitch Bend, Hold,
expression) to an existing part, select REC MODE=
“Mix”. Operate the performance function (BENDER/
MODULATION lever, optional footswitch for Hold data,
optional foot controller for expression data) where
needed.
Adding or changing settings of existing parts
The following operations require that you record in
“Mix” mode without touching the keyboard or controllers, select the track and division whose settings you
wish to change and start recording. Unless you want to
program continuous value changes (Panpot data, for
example), you can stop recording after the first beat.
Static settings are always written at the beginning of
the track in question, so there is no need to record an
entire cycle.
188
(2) Press the [TRACK] field and use the [DATA÷ENTRY]
dial to select the desired the track you wish to
assign another Tone (or Drum Set) to.
If you select the “ADrums” track, the display looks
slightly different:
(3) Select the DIVISION and MODE whose settings you
wish to change, and possibly also all clones
(page 182).
(4) Press the [REC¥MODE] field and use the [DEC]/[INC]
buttons to select “Mix”. (Let us assume that your
part already contains data.)
(5) Select the new Tone (or Drum Set) to be assigned
to the selected track and division by pressing the
[TRACK¥INSTRUMENT] field and using the on-screen
fields and TONE buttons. Finally, press [EXIT] to
return to the page shown above.
Note: See “Drum Instrument & Pitch” for the additional
parameters for the ADrums track (you may want to set them
before performing step (6).
(6) Press [START÷STOP] to start recording.
(7) Press [START÷STOP] again after the first or second
beat (but wait until the count-in, if any, is finished).
This completes sound selection. The new Tone
address replaces the old one.
G-70 Music Workstation r
Editing on the fly by recording
■Drum Instrument & Pitch
The display changes to:
After selecting the “ADrums” track, you can change
the pitch of certain sounds of the selected Drum Set.
The eligible sounds and corresponding note numbers
are:
C#2/37 Side Stick
D2/38 Stand.2 Snare 1
E2/40 Stand 2. Snare 2
F2/41 Low Tom 2
E3/52 Chinese Cymbal
G#3/56 Cowbell
A3/57 Crash Cymbal 2
F4/65 High Timbale
Note: The names of the drum/percussion sounds depend on
the currently selected Drum Set. The sounds are usually similar
in nature, however.
• On the above display page, select the ADrums track.
• Select the division whose settings you wish to
change, and possibly also all clones (page 182).
• Press the [REC¥MODE] field and use the [DEC]/[INC]
buttons to select “Mix”. (Let us assume that your part
already contains data.)
• Press the [NRPN¥DRUM] field and select the drum
sound whose pitch you want to change with the
[DATA÷ENTRY] dial or the [DEC]/[INC] buttons.
• Press the [PITCH] field and use the [DATA÷ENTRY] dial
to set the desired pitch (–64~+63).
You can play on the keyboard to listen to the result.
• Press the [START÷STOP] button to start recording.
• Press [START÷STOP] again after the first or second
beat (but wait until the count-in, if any finished).
Expression, Panpot, Reverb, Chorus
Setting or modifying the Expression, Panpot, Reverb
(Send), and Chorus (Send) parameters is similar to
assigning sounds to existing tracks.
(1) Stop playback of your Style (if it is running).
(2) Press the [MIXER] field on the STYLE COMPOSER
page.
(3) Select the track by pressing its line in the table.
The name of that track appears on a yellow background.
(4) Select the MODE and DIVISION whose settings you
want to change.
(5) Press the [REC] field of the parameters whose settings you want to record.
Only switch this on for settings you want to change.
For safety reasons, you might consider recording one
change at a time.
(6) Press the [EXPRESSION], [PANPOT], [REVERB¥SEND] or
[CHORUS¥SEND] field, depending on the parameter
you want to set.
(7) Use the [DATA÷ENTRY] dial or the [DEC]/[INC] buttons to set the desired value.
The REVERB SEND and CHORUS SEND settings represent Send values and indicate how strongly the track
in question should be processed by the reverb or chorus effect. The effect settings (Type, Character, etc.)
can only be saved to a User Program.
You can create interesting panning effects by slowly
shifting the selected track from left to right (or vice
versa) in the course of a pattern. This is especially
effective for synthesizer or guitar riffs. Continuous
changes mean that you have to keep recording until
the end of the pattern.
(8) Press the RECORDER [REC¥∏] button.
(9) Press the [START÷STOP] button to start recording.
If you are changing a static setting, you can stop
recording on the second beat.
(10) Press [START÷STOP] again to stop recording.
(11) Press the [Back] field to return to the STYLE
COMPOSER page.
About the Mixer
The STYLE MIXER functions can be used in three ways: to
try out settings without recording them during playback,
to record the events available on this page, or to change
some (i.e. not all) of them at a later stage.
For the first approach, start playback of your Style, then
select the STYLE MIXER page, then change the settings.
(They are not recorded and reset when the loop returns to
the beginning.)
For the second approach, stop Style playback, select the
STYLE MIXER page, then proceed with step (3) above.
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G-70 Music Workstation
Programming Styles (Style Composer)
For the third approach (a kind of punch-in), select the
STYLE MIXER page, press RECORDER [REC¥∏], then press
[START÷STOP] to start recording. When you reach the place
where you want to change an already recorded setting,
press the associated [REC] field and modify the value.
Recording will be deactivated at the end of the pattern
(even though playback goes on).
Changing the preset tempo
Here is how to change the preset tempo of your Style:
(1) While on the STYLE COMPOSER page, press the
RECORDER [REC¥∏] button.
There is no need to select a Mode, Division or track,
because the tempo value is shared by all tracks and
patterns.
(2) Press the [TEMPO] field and set the value (20~250)
using the [DATA÷ENTRY] dial or the [DEC]/[INC] buttons.
(3) Press the [START÷STOP] button to record one or two
beats, then press it again to stop recording.
Do not play on the keyboard or use any controllers
connected to the G-70, though!
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Note: The last tempo value you record becomes the Style’s
preset tempo.
190
Style Track Edit functions
All display pages of the Style Track Edit mode have a
[Back] field that allows you to jump to the STYLE COMPOSER page.
The STYLE TRACK EDIT functions are very similar to
those of the 16-track sequencer. If you know how to
use those, you will have little trouble understanding
how the STYLE TRACK EDIT functions work.
Here are a few guidelines for editing your User Style:
(a) Save your Style before continuing. That way, you
can always return to the original if your changes do
not work out as expected. See “Saving your Style”
on p. 185 for details.
(b) Select the track(s) and pattern(s) you wish to modify.
(c) Select the range (FROM and TO) for the edit operation.
(d) Enter what should be changed and how it should be
changed. Press the desired field and use the
[DATA÷ENTRY] dial or the [DEC]/[INC] buttons.
(e) Execute the operation by pressing the [EXECUTE]
field.
(f) Save your Style again.
The STYLE TRACK EDIT level of the STYLE COMPOSER
provides 12 functions: Quantize, Erase, Delete, Copy,
Insert, Transpose, Change Velo, Change Gate Time, Global Change, Shift Clock, Track Length and Time Signat.
There is also a MICRO EDIT environment that allows you
to add, delete or change individual events. See
page 198 for details.
To select one of the STYLE TRACK EDIT functions, proceed as follows:
(1) Load the Style you want to edit (if it does not yet
reside in the G-70’s Style RAM memory).
(2) Press the [MENU] button, then the
[STYLE¥COMPOSER] field.
G-70 Music Workstation r
Style Track Edit functions
(3) Press the [TRACK¥EDIT] field.
(4) Press a field in the top two rows to select the
desired STYLE TRACK EDIT function.
If, after selecting one of these functions and setting
parameter values, you decide not to execute the
transformation, do not press the [EXECUTE] field.
(5) Select the track(s), Mode(s) and Division(s) you
wish to modify.
(6) Select the range (“FROM” and “TO”) for the edit
operation.
The FROM and TO parameters allow you to specify
the positions (measure/beat/clock) of the track
excerpt you want to change.
Example: to change measures 1~4 of the selected
track, enter the following values:
FROM: BAR= 0001
BEAT= 01
CPT= 000
TO: BAR= 0005
BEAT= 01
CPT= 000
(7) Specify what you want to change and how it
should change: press one of the parameter fields
(to the right of the FROM/TO section) use the
[DATA÷ENTRY] dial or the [DEC]/[INC] buttons.
(8) Confirm the operation by pressing the [EXECUTE]
field.
(9) Save your Style.
QUANTIZE
This Quantize function can be used after recording a
part if you don’t feel comfortable with the timing of
what you played. If only certain notes in a given time
range need to be quantized, you should narrow down
the edit range using the FROM/TO parameters.
■TRACK (ADrums~Acc6, ALL)
Allows you to select the track you want to edit. Select “ALL”
to edit all tracks.
■MODE
Allows you to select the mode of the pattern to be edited:
“Major”, “minor” or “7th”.
■DIVISION
Use this parameter to select the Division (or pattern) you
want to edit: Intro 1~4, Main 1~4, Fill Dwn 1~3, Fill Up 1~
3, End 1~4.
■FROM
● BAR (1~[last measure of the track or pattern])—Refers
to the first measure to be edited. By default, the FROM
value is set to the beginning of the selected track(s).
● BEAT (1~[number of beats per bar])—Specifies the
beat position. The number of selectable beats depends
on the time signature in the selected area.
● CPT (1~119)—Refers to the starting CPT position. “CPT”
is short for “Clock Pulse Time”, the smallest unit used by
the G-70. (There are 120 CPTs to every beat of a bar.)
Change this setting only if your edit operation should
start after the selected beat.
■TO
By default, the TO position is set to the last event of the
selected track (or the last event of the longest track when
you select “ALL”).
● BAR (1~[last measure of the track or pattern])—This is
where you specify the last measure to be edited.
● BEAT (1~[number of beats per bar])—Specifies the
beat position. The number of selectable beats depends
on the time signature in the selected area.
● CPT (1~119)—Refers to the last clock that should be
affected by the edit operation. Change this setting only
if your edit operation should not end exactly on the
selected beat.
■FROM NOTE (0 C-~127 G9)
This parameter allows you to set the note (or lower limit of
the note range) to be modified within the specified FROM/
TO time range. The note can also be selected by pressing
the corresponding key after selecting the FROM NOTE field.
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G-70 Music Workstation
Programming Styles (Style Composer)
■TO NOTE (0 C-~127 G9)
This parameter allows you to set the upper limit of the note
range to be modified within the specified FROM/TO time
range. This note can also be selected by pressing the corresponding key after selecting the TO NOTE field.
This parameter is not displayed when you select EQUAL,
UNEQUAL, HIGHER or LOWER.
ERASE
■Fine-tuning the note range
Before setting “FROM NOTE” (and possibly “TO NOTE”), you
can decide how you want to use the note indications.
Depending on the option you choose, “TO NOTE” may not
even be available, so that setting it beforehand would be a
waste of time.
[EQUAL]
Only the selected note (note name/note number) will change. (The note can be set using
the TO NOTE field.)
[UNEQUAL] All notes except the one you select will
change. (The note can be set using the TO
NOTE field.)
[HIGHER]
[LOWER]
Only notes above the selected one will
change. (The note can be set using the THAN
NOTE field.)
Only notes below the selected one will
change. (The note can be set using the THAN
NOTE field.)
[INSIDE]
Only the notes between FROM NOTE and TO
NOTE will change.
[OUTSIDE]
Only the notes above FROM NOTE and below
TO NOTE will change.
See “Fine-tuning the note range” on p. 162 for an illustration.
■RESOLUTION
(1/4, 1/8, 1/8T, 1/16, 1/16T, 1/32, 1/32T, 1/64)
This parameter sets the resolution of the Quantize function. Be sure to always select the value that equals the
shortest note you recorded. Otherwise, your part no longer
sounds the way you played it, because shorter notes are
shifted to the wrong positions.
■STRENGTH (0%~100%)
Use this parameter to specify how precise the timing correction should be. “0%” means that the selected RESOLUTION value is not applied (“0% correction”), while “100%”
means that all notes are shifted to the mathematically correct positions.
■EXECUTE
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Press this field to confirm your settings and edit the data.
192
ERASE allows you to selectively delete data either
within a specified range of measures, beats or clocks,
or from the entire track(s). When DATA TYPE is set to
“ALL”, ERASE substitutes the required number of rests
for the data you delete, so that you end up with the
equivalent number of blank measures. If you also
want to eliminate the measures themselves, use
DELETE (see below).
■TRACK (ADrums~Acc6, ALL)
Allows you to select the track you want to edit. Select “ALL”
to edit all tracks.
■MODE
Allows you to select the mode of the pattern to be edited:
“Major”, “minor” or “7th”.
■DIVISION
Use this parameter to select the Division (or pattern) you
want to edit: Intro 1~4, Main 1~4, Fill Dwn 1~3, Fill Up 1~
3, End 1~4.
■FROM
● BAR (1~[last measure of the track or pattern])—Refers
to the first measure to be edited. By default, the FROM
value is set to the beginning of the selected track(s).
● BEAT (1~[number of beats per bar])—Specifies the
beat position. The number of selectable beats depends
on the time signature in the selected area.
● CPT (1~119)—Refers to the starting CPT position. “CPT”
is short for “Clock Pulse Time”, the smallest unit used by
the G-70. (There are 120 CPTs to every beat of a bar.)
Change this setting only if your edit operation should
start after the selected beat.
■TO
By default, the TO position is set to the last event of the
selected track (or the last event of the longest track when
you select “ALL”).
● BAR (1~[last measure of the track or pattern])—This is
where you specify the last measure to be edited.
● BEAT (1~[number of beats per bar])—Specifies the
beat position. The number of selectable beats depends
on the time signature in the selected area.
● CPT (1~119)—Refers to the last clock that should be
affected by the edit operation. Change this setting only
if your edit operation should not end exactly on the
selected beat.
Note: If you only need to edit one event (or message), we
recommend using the STYLE MICRO EDIT page (page 198).
G-70 Music Workstation r
Style Track Edit functions
■DATA TYPE
Allows you to select the data to be edited.
DELETE
ALL: All parameters listed below.
Note: Only note messages.
Modulat: CC01 messages usually use for adding vibrato
(i.e. use of the BENDER/MODULATION lever).
PanPot: CC10 messages that specify the stereo position.
Express: CC11 messages that are usually used for temporary volume changes. This parameter can
also be edited on the MIXER page (see p. 189).
Reverb: Reverb Send messages (how strongly the part
should be processed by the reverb effect). This
parameter can also be edited on the MIXER
page (see p. 189).
Chorus: Chorus Send messages (how strongly the part
should be processed by the chorus effect). This
parameter can also be edited on the MIXER
page (see p. 189).
Prog. C.: Program change messages, used to select
sounds or Drum Sets. Note: by deleting program change messages you also dispose of
the related CC00 and CC32 (bank select) messages.
P.Bender: Pitch Bend data (i.e. use of the BENDER/MODULATION lever).
NRPN Dr: Changes to the pitch of certain drum instruments. See page 189.
■FROM NOTE (0 C-~127 G9)
This parameter is only displayed if DATA TYPE (see above) is
set to “Note”. It allows you to set the note (or lower limit of
the note range) to be modified within the specified FROM/
TO time range. This note can also be selected by pressing
the corresponding key after selecting the FROM NOTE field.
■TO NOTE (0 C-~127 G9)
This parameter allows you to set the upper limit of the note
range to be modified within the specified FROM/TO time
range. This note can also be selected by pressing the corresponding key after selecting the TO NOTE field.
It is not displayed when you select EQUAL, UNEQUAL,
HIGHER or LOWER. See also “Fine-tuning the note range”
on p. 192.
Unlike to the ERASE function, DELETE also erases the
measures, so that all measures that lie behind the TO
position are shifted towards the beginning of the
track(s). You cannot choose the data type to be
erased.
■TRACK (ADrums~Acc6, ALL)
Allows you to select the track you wish to edit. Select “ALL”
to edit all tracks.
■MODE
Allows you to select the mode of the pattern to be edited:
“Major”, “minor” or “7th”.
■DIVISION
Use this parameter to select the Division (or pattern) you
want to edit: Intro 1~4, Main 1~4, Fill Dwn 1~3, Fill Up 1~
3, End 1~4.
■FROM/TO
FROM refers to the position where the edit operation is to
begin. That position is specified as Bar-Beat-CPT values. TO
designates the position where the edit operation is to end
(Bar-Beat-CPT value). See page 191 for details.
■EXECUTE
Press this field to confirm your settings and edit the data.
COPY
■EXECUTE
Press this field to confirm your settings and edit the
data.
See page 186 for a step-by-step discussion. This
function also allows you to copy tracks from other
Music Styles.
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Programming Styles (Style Composer)
INSERT
TRANSPOSE
INSERT allows you to insert new data and shift data
that lie behind the FROM position towards the end of
the pattern (this is the exact opposite of DELETE). The
empty measures you create can be “filled” using the
COPY function or by recording new phrases in that
area.
Transpose is used to change the pitch of the selected
pattern (the other non-note data obviously cannot
be transposed).
Note: The INSERT function does not provide a TO pointer.
Instead, you have to specify the length of the blank to be
inserted using the FOR values.
■TRACK (ADrums~Acc6, ALL)
Allows you to select the track you want to edit. Select “ALL”
to edit all tracks.
■MODE
Allows you to select the mode of the pattern to be edited:
“Major”, “minor” or “7th”.
■DIVISION
Use this parameter to select the Division (or pattern) you
want to edit: Intro 1~4, Main 1~4, Fill Dwn 1~3, Fill Up 1~
3, End 1~4.
■FROM
● BAR (1~[last measure of the track or pattern])—Refers
to the first measure to be edited. By default, the FROM
value is set to the beginning of the selected track(s).
● BEAT (1~[number of beats per bar])—Specifies the
beat position. The number of selectable beats depends
on the time signature in the selected area.
● CPT (1~119)—Refers to the starting CPT position. “CPT”
is short for “Clock Pulse Time”, the smallest unit used by
the G-70. (There are 120 CPTs to every beat of a bar.)
Change this setting only if your edit operation should
start after the selected beat.
■FOR
Specifies how many bars, beats, and CPTs are to be inserted.
● BAR, BEAT, CPT—See above.
■EXECUTE
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Press this field to confirm your settings and insert the
requested number of bars, beats, and clocks.
194
■TRACK (ADrums~Acc6, ALL)
Allows you to select the track you want to edit. Select “ALL”
to edit all tracks.
When combined with “FROM NOTE” and “TO NOTE” (see
below), TRANSPOSE is also useful for the ADrums track. It
allows you to select another snare or kick sound, for example.
■MODE
Allows you to select the mode of the pattern to be edited:
“Major”, “minor” or “7th”.
■DIVISION
Use this parameter to select the Division (or pattern) you
want to edit: Intro 1~4, Main 1~4, Fill Dwn 1~3, Fill Up 1~
3, End 1~4.
■VALUE (–127~127)
This parameter is used to set the transposition interval in
semi-tone steps. Select “2”, for example, to transpose pattern in “C” to “D”.
Note: Be careful when applying Transpose to the ADrums
track. Transposing all notes of this track leads to dramatic
changes.
■FROM NOTE (0 C-~127 G9)
This parameter allows you to set the note (or lower limit of
the note range) to be modified within the specified FROM/
TO time range. The note can also be selected by pressing
the corresponding key after selecting the FROM NOTE field.
■TO NOTE (0 C-~127 G9)
This parameter allows you to set the upper limit of the note
range to be modified within the specified FROM/TO time
range. This note can also be selected by pressing the corresponding key after selecting the TO NOTE field.
It is not displayed when you select EQUAL, UNEQUAL,
HIGHER or LOWER. See also “Fine-tuning the note range”
on p. 192.
■EXECUTE
Press this field to confirm your settings and edit the data.
G-70 Music Workstation r
Style Track Edit functions
CHANGE VELO
■FROM NOTE/TO NOTE (0 C-~127 G9)
FROM NOTE refers to the lower limit of the note range you
want to change. TO NOTE represents the upper limit. See
also “Fine-tuning the note range” on p. 192.
■EXECUTE
Press this field to confirm your settings and edit the data.
CHANGE GATE TIME
The CHANGE VELO function allows you to modify the
dynamics (called velocity) of a track or excerpt. See
p. 167 for details. Only note events can be changed.
■TRACK (ADrums~Acc6, ALL)
Allows you to select the track you want to edit. Select “ALL”
to edit all tracks.
■MODE
Allows you to select the mode of the pattern to be edited:
“Major”, “minor” or “7th”.
■DIVISION
Use this parameter to select the Division (or pattern) you
want to edit: Intro 1~4, Main 1~4, Fill Dwn 1~3, Fill Up 1~
3, End 1~4.
■FROM/TO
FROM refers to the position where the edit operation is to
begin. That position is specified as Bar-Beat-CPT values. TO
designates the position where the edit operation is to end
(Bar-Beat-CPT value). See page 191 for details.
■BIAS (–99~99)
The BIAS parameter allows you to specify by how much the
velocity values should change. Select a positive value to
increase the velocity (the value is added to the velocity
value of the affected notes), or a negative value to
decrease the velocity values (that value is subtracted).
Select “0” if you prefer to work with the MAGNIFY parameter (see below).
Note: Even the highest positive or negative VALUE doesn’t
allow you to go beyond “1” or “127”. There is a reason why “0”
is impossible: that value is used to indicate the end of a note
(note-off). “127”, on the other hand, is the highest velocity
value the MIDI standard can muster. Selecting a high positive
velocity value may thus lead to all notes being played at “127”.
■MAGNIFY (0~200%)
This parameter works like a “compander” effect (a dynamics
processor that simultaneously acts as compressor and
expander), although it processes MIDI data: by selecting a
value above “100%” you increase the differences between
high and low velocity values in the selected range. Values
below “64” are lowered, while values above “64” are
increased. The result is therefore that the difference
between pianissimo and fortissimo becomes far more pronounced.
MAGNIFY values below “100%” have the opposite effect:
they push all velocity towards the imaginary center of “64”,
thus reducing differences in playing dynamics.
The CHANGE GATE TIME function allows you to modify the duration of the notes in the selected time
(FROM/TO) and note (FROM/TO NOTE) ranges. See
page 168 for details.
■TRACK (ADrums~Acc6, ALL)
Allows you to select the track you want to edit. Select “ALL”
to edit all tracks.
■MODE
Allows you to select the mode of the pattern to be edited:
“Major”, “minor” or “7th”.
■DIVISION
Use this parameter to select the Division (or pattern) you
want to edit: Intro 1~4, Main 1~4, Fill Dwn 1~3, Fill Up 1~
3, End 1~4.
■BIAS (CPT) (–1920~1920)
This parameter sets the amount by which the duration (or gate time) of the selected notes is to change.
The shortest possible GATE TIME value is “1” (used for
all drum notes), so that selecting “–1000” for notes
with a GATE TIME value of “1” in the specified time
range still leaves you with the same value. You cannot use CHANGE GATE TIME to erase notes.
■MAGNIFY (0~200%)
Use this parameter rather than BIAS to produce proportional changes to the affected GATE TIME values. Values
below “100%” decrease the duration, while anything above
“100%” increases it. Select “100%” if you prefer to work
with the BIAS (CPT) parameter (see above).
■FROM NOTE/TO NOTE (0 C-~127 G9)
FROM NOTE refers to the lower limit of the note range you
want to change. TO NOTE represents the upper limit. See
also “Fine-tuning the note range” on p. 192.
■EXECUTE
Press this field to confirm your settings and edit the data.
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G-70 Music Workstation
Programming Styles (Style Composer)
GLOBAL CHANGE
This function allows you to make quick changes to
certain settings. They always apply to entire tracks
(you cannot use GLOBAL CHANGE for just a few measures). You can apply global changes to the four editable Style track parameters (EXPRESS, REVERB, PANPOT and CHORUS) when you notice that the effect is
too prominent or not strong enough.
You can also use it to “upgrade” older Music Styles to
ensure that they use the G-70’s new sounds. Be
aware, however, that Style tracks can neither use
HARMONIC BARS, nor SRX EXPANSION sounds.
■INC/DEC
These are so-called “relative changes”: the positive or negative value you set here is added to or subtracted from the
original values of the selected track(s). Use these fields to
increase or decrease the existing values for the entire
selected track(s).
● Expression, Panpot Reverb, Chorus (–127~127)—These
parameters allow you to add (+) or subtract (–) a given
value to/from the current Expression, Pan, Reverb Send
or Chorus Send values. This may come in handy if the
realtime changes you recorded turn out to be too high
or too low.
■EXECUTE
Press this field to confirm your settings and edit the
data.
SHIFT CLOCK
■TRACK (ADrums~Acc6, ALL)
Allows you to select the track you want to edit. Select “ALL”
to edit all tracks.
■MODE
Allows you to select the mode of the pattern to be edited:
“Major”, “minor”, “7th” or “ALL”.
■DIVISION
Use this parameter to select the Division (or pattern) you
want to edit: Intro 1~4, Main 1~4, Fill Dwn 1~3, Fill Up 1~
3, End 1~4 ALL.
■INIT VALUE
Press this field to reset all values on this page to their initial
state if you want to start again.
There are two kinds of changes that can be performed on
this page: FROM/TO and INC/DEC.
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■FROM/TO
Enter the original data value (i.e. the value that is being
used right now by the selected track(s)) in the FROM column. For TO, specify the new value that should replace the
FROM value. These are “absolute changes”: you don’t add or
subtract values, you replace them with other values. This
system is only available for messages that allow you to
select sounds or sound banks, namely:
● CC00 (---, 0~127, ALL)—This control change is the socalled “MSB” bank select message. It allows you to select
the Capital Tone (select “0”) of a sound address if you
don’t want to use variations, or to select another variation level. Select “---” if the current setting must not
change.
● CC32 (---, 0~127, ALL)—This control change is the socalled “LSB” bank select message. Select “---” if the current setting must not change.
● PC (1~128)—Use this parameter to change the address,
a.k.a. program change number, of a sound (e.g. from “1”
to “2”).
196
SHIFT CLOCK allows you to shift the notes of the
selected FROM/TO range. See page 170 for details.
■TRACK (ADrums~Acc6, ALL)
Allows you to select the track you want to edit. Select “ALL”
to edit all tracks.
■MODE
Allows you to select the mode of the pattern to be edited:
“Major”, “minor” or “7th”.
■DIVISION
Use this parameter to select the Division (or pattern) you
want to edit: Intro 1~4, Main 1~4, Fill Dwn 1~3, Fill Up 1~
3, End 1~4.
■DATA TYPE
Allows you to select the data to be edited. See the list on
page 193.
■VALUE (–1920~1920)
This parameter sets the amount by which the notes are
shifted. The value refers to CPT units (one CPT= 1/120 q).
Note: Notes on the first beat of the first bar cannot be shifted
further to the left (that would mean shifting them to the “0”
measure, which doesn’t exist).
■EXECUTE
Press this field to confirm your settings and edit the data.
G-70 Music Workstation r
Style Track Edit functions
TRACK LENGTH
■EXECUTE
Press this field to confirm your settings and edit the data.
TIME SIGNAT
The TRACK LENGTH function allows you to modify
the length (number of bars, beats, and clocks) of a
pattern after recording. Data that lie outside the
range you decide to keep are discarded.
The various fields display the settings that are currently in effect. Obviously, you only need to specify
different settings for the Mode whose length you
want to change. The white part of the window shows
the current length settings for the selected TRACK
(“ADrums” in the example above) and DIVISION
(“Ending”). The three columns (“MAJOR”, “MINOR”,
“7TH”) refer to the modes. As always, there are only
three lines (1~3) for Fill-Ins.
Note: There is no way to recall the previous version, so be sure
to save your Style before continuing (see p. 185).
■TRACK (ADrums~Acc6, ALL)
Allows you to select the track whose length you wish to
change.
■DIVISION
Use this parameter to select the Division (or pattern) you
want to edit: Intro 1~4, Main 1~4, Fill Dwn 1~3, Fill Up 1~
3, End 1~4.
■‘LENGTH
● BAR—Press this field and use the [DATA÷ENTRY] dial or
the [DEC]/[INC] buttons to set the length of the selected
pattern(s) in steps of one bar. You can also make an
existing track longer by specifying a BAR value that lies
beyond the last notes.
Note: To change the BAR length of all three Modes, “switch
on” all three BAR fields, then set the desired value.
● BEAT (1~[number of beats per bar])—Specifies the
beat position. The number of selectable beats depends
on the time signature in the selected area.
Note: To change the BEAT length of all three Modes, “switch
on” all three BEAT fields, then set the value.
The TIME SIGNAT page allows you to check and set
the time signature of specific or all patterns. The
major, minor, and seventh Modes of a pattern must
always use the same time signature, which is why
you cannot edit them separately.
Use this parameter to specify the time signature of
the selected pattern (DIVISION, see below). The MAIN,
INTRO and ENDING “entities” comprise four variations, which is why there are four TIME SIGN values
you can set using the VARIATION [1]~[4] button icons.
When you select “Fill Up” or “Fill Dwn” for DIVISION,
only three TIME SIGN icons are displayed.
The most commonly used time signatures are: 2/4, 3/
4, 4/4, 6/8, and 12/8. Other values (such as 7/4, 13/8,
etc.) are also possible.
Note: When you change the time signature of an already
recorded pattern, its notes and events are “reshuffled”, so that
you may end up with incomplete measures. None of your data
are deleted, however.
■DIVISION
Use this parameter to select the Division you want to edit:
Intro, Main, Fill Dwn, Fill Up, End.
■VARIATION
Use these button icons to select the pattern you want to
change. If you set DIVISION to “Fill Dwn” or “Fill Up”, there
are only three button icons. You can switch on several or
all button icons if you like. (But you cannot switch off all
four or three).
■EXECUTE
Press this field to confirm the new time signature and
resize the selected pattern(s).
● CPT—This field allows you to “fine-tune” the length. In
most cases, you will probably work with multiples of q
notes (i.e. 120CPT) because 120CPT represent one beat of
an X/4 bar (1/4, 2/4, 3/4, 4/4, etc.).
Note: To change the CPT length of all three Modes, “switch
on” all three CPT fields, then set the value.
■MODE
Use these button icons to choose the Modes to which the
new length setting should apply. You can also switch on
two or all three button icons.
Note: If you set TRACK to “ALL”, all three Modes are selected
automatically (and that cannot be changed).
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G-70 Music Workstation
Programming Styles (Style Composer)
Editing individual Style events
(Style Micro Edit)
The display changes to:
Select this mode if you need to change just one aspect
of an otherwise perfect Music Style.
In this section, we will use the word event for any kind
of message (identical to MIDI messages that cause the
Arranger to play or set something). An event is thus a
command (or instruction) for the Arranger.
You can only view and edit one track at a time. Therefore, be sure to check the TRACK setting before editing
the events displayed on this page.
(1) Select and load a (different) Style.
This is not necessary if you want to edit the Style you
have just recorded. See “Selecting Music Styles” on
p. 27 or “Style Finder: quickly locating Styles” on p. 86
for how to load a Style.
(2) Press the [MENU] button.
(5) Press the [TRACK] field and use the [DATA÷ENTRY]
dial or the [DEC]/[INC] buttons to select the track
you want to edit.
(6) Press the [MODE] field and use the [DATA÷ENTRY]
dial or the [DEC]/[INC] buttons to select the Mode
you want to edit (Major, minor, 7th).
(7) Press the [DIVISION] field and use the [DATA÷ENTRY]
dial or the [DEC]/[INC] buttons to select the Division
you want to edit (MAIN 1~4, Fill Up 1~3, Fill Dwn
1~3, Intro 1~4, Ending 1~4).
MENU
General notes about STYLE MICRO EDIT
Use the [DATA÷ENTRY] dial and [ß][†] buttons to scroll
through the available events.
The display changes to:
(3) Press the [STYLE¥COMPOSER] field.
■Position indications
Sequencers only register “events” whose positions
and distances specify when the notes are to be
sounded or when they should change (i.e. their
“sequence”).
Each event is executed at a given point in time, which
is why they all have a position indication
(“1-01-119”, for example). The first figure refers to
the bar, the second to the beat within that bar, and
the third to the clock (CPT) between the current beat
and the next. Each beat comprises 120 clocks.
■Monitoring note events
The Style Composer can play back the note events
you select. This may help you identify the occurrence
you want to edit. Switch on the speaker icon ( ) and
move the cursor to a note event to hear that note.
■VIEW
Press this button icon if the list of track events has
become so long that finding the events you wish to
edit takes too long. The following pop-up appears:
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(4) Press the [MICRO¥EDIT] field.
198
• Switch on the button icons of the events you want to
see in the list (the button icons in question must light
in green).
G-70 Music Workstation r
Editing individual Style events (Style Micro Edit)
The names of most available options are probably
clear to you, so we won’t explain them. Just one note:
[PROGRAM¥CHANGE] also includes the bank select
messages (CC00 and CC32) that are used for selecting
sounds. See page 200 for the [ALTERATION¥MODE]
message type.
• Press [ALL] to switch on all button icons, or [NONE] to
switch them all off, in which case the STYLE MICRO
EDIT list only contains the “End of Data” message,
which is probably not what you need.
• Press [CLOSE] to close the pop-up window without
applying your changes.
■General procedure
To change information already available on the
selected track, proceed as follows:
(1) Select the TRACK, MODE and DIVISION by pressing
the corresponding fields and using the
[DATA÷ENTRY] dial or the [DEC]/[INC] buttons.
• Press the numeric button icons to enter the desired
value. (Use [Delete] to delete the last figure you
entered.)
• Press the [+10%] or [–10%] field to increase or
decrease the current value by 10%.
• Press [ENTER] to confirm the value.
—or—
Press [CLOSE] to close the numeric pad window without changing the value.
(6) Press the DATA ENTRY [®] button to select the next
value and change it.
(7) When you’re done, press the [Back] field to return
to the main STYLE COMPOSER page, then save your
Style.
The parameters you can change are:
(2) Press anywhere in the white area to assign that
area to the DATA ENTRY section.
(3) Use the [ß][†] buttons or the [DATA÷ENTRY] dial to
select the list entry you want to edit.
The name of the selected parameter appears in the
upper right-hand corner of the display.
(4) Press the DATA ENTRY [®] button to select the
(first) value.
● Note and velocity messages—These messages always
come in pairs. The first value (“Note Number 127 G9”)
refers to the note itself, and the second (“On Velocity
127”) to the velocity (playing dynamics).
The MICRO EDIT page adds a third message to that pair.
It describes the duration of the note in question. You
may remember this value from the TRACK EDIT environment, where it is called “Gate Time”.
● Control Change—These messages usually add something to the notes being played, like modulation, a different volume setting, a new stereo position… The G-70
recognizes (and allows you to edit) all control change
numbers the Arranger uses (CC01, 10, 11, 91, 93) and
displays their “official” name.
Note: CC64 (Hold) events generated by a footswitch connected to the HOLD FOOTSWITCH socket are converted into
the equivalent GATE TIME values at the time of recording.
You therefore need to change the duration of the notes
themselves.
(5) Modify the value:
• Rotate the [DATA÷ENTRY] dial to set the desired
value. —or—
• Set the value using the [DEC]/[INC] buttons. —or—
• Press the [DATA÷ENTRY] dial and enter the value
using the numeric pad that appears in the display.
If you choose to work with the numeric pad, proceed
as follows:
● Program Change—These messages are used to select
sounds within the current bank. As there are only 128
possibilities, these messages are usually preceded by
control changes CC00 and CC32. That’s why the G-70
inserts all three when you use the CREATE EVENT function.
Note: The CC00 value of ADrums tracks cannot be edited.
● Pitch Bend—These messages are used for temporary
changes to the pitch of the notes being played at that
time. Pitch Bend messages can be positive (higher) or
negative (lower). Setting range: –128~128.
● Alteration Mode—This is a new event that allows you to
specify how the notes recorded for a Style track will be
used during Arranger playback. See below for details.
Note: This parameter is not available for ADrums tracks.
199
G-70 Music Workstation
Programming Styles (Style Composer)
● NRPN Dr—This NRPN command is only available for
ADrums tracks. It inserts CC99 value “24”, CC98= “37” as
well as CC06= “64”. While the CC99 value cannot be
changed, the CC98 value can be set to: 37, 38, 40, 41, 52,
56, 57 or 65 (these are note numbers of the drum sounds
whose pitch can be changed). The CC06 value (which
changes the pitch) can be set to 0~127, whereby “64”
means that the pitch remains unchanged.
Editing events
■Editing Pitch Bend messages
Pitch Bend messages can be positive or negative (the
range is –128~128). The value “0” means that the
pitch of notes being played in that area is not altered.
If a Pitch Bend occurrence is not reset to “0” at some
stage, all notes will keep sounding flat when you no
longer want them to.
■Editing control changes
These messages (CC) can be set to the desired value
(0~127) when the corresponding effect is needed –
but they also need to be reset to “0” to avoid
unpleasant surprises.
■About the “Note” messages
As stated above, note messages comprise a note
number, a velocity value and a Gate Time value.
Note numbers can be entered the usual way
([DATA÷ENTRY] dial or [DEC]/[INC]).
The range for note messages is “0 (C–)”~“127 (G9)”.
Velocity messages can be set anywhere between “1”
(extremely soft) and “127”. The velocity value “0” cannot be entered, because it would effectively switch
off the note.
When you select the Gate Time entry, pressing the
[DATA÷ENTRY] dial calls up the following pop-up:
● Degree—This setting refers to the “old” system for realtime conversion of Style track information for Music
Style playback. Based on the fundamentals of the chords
you play during Arranger playback, it often leads to odd
jumps of certain parts.
● Nearest—Refers to a new, more musical, system for realtime note shifts of the Style tracks/parts during Arranger
playback. Let us first look at an illustration:
Recorded strings part
Result with “Degree”
Result with “Nearest”
Chords played in the chord recognition area.
This new system is called “Adaptive Chord Voicing”. The
notes of the melodic Style tracks are compared with the
chords played in the chord recognition area. If the next
chord you play contains the note a given part is already
sounding (based on the previous chord), that note is maintained.
If the new chord does not contain that note, the Style part
in question uses the closest (“Nearest”) note. In the example above, the “G” is closer to the “A” sounded by the
strings part than the “C”. This produces a more musical
behavior than any other system on the market.
Both “Degree” and “Nearest” allow you to specify the note
range (“Limit Low” and “Limit High”) the selected part may
play. Notes that would fall outside that range during
Arranger playback are automatically transposed to values
inside the selected range. Rather than specifying two note
values, you can also choose “Std”, which means that the
G-70 decides automatically when extremely high (or low)
notes need to be shifted down (or up) by one or several
octaves.
Other edit operations
The buttons in the right half of the STYLE MICRO EDIT
page allow you to reduce or expand the number of
events of the track you selected.
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Use the pad to enter the desired duration. Drum parts
usually use the Gate Time value “1” for all notes.
Increasing it to “20”, for example, has no audible
effect on the sounds.
About “Alteration Mode” messages
This message type is only available for melodic Style
tracks (i.e. not for ADrums tracks) and needs to be
inserted by hand (using CREATE EVENT). Style tracks
you only just recorded do not contain it.
It allows you to use a revolutionary system for adapting the recorded note information to a more natural
behavior (also known as “voicing”). There are two
options:
200
G-70 Music Workstation r
Editing individual Style events (Style Micro Edit)
■CREATE EVENT
Press this button icon to add a new event to the
selected track. The following pop-up appears:
If the position for which you create a new event
already contains other events, the new event is added
at the end of that group.
• Press the button icon that corresponds to the kind of
event you want to add to the list.
The meaning of the available message types should
be clear by now. Here are the default values that are
assigned to events you create:
Note: Note Number: 60 C4
On Velocity: 100
Gate Time: 60
Program Change: CC00 Bank Select MSB, value “0”
CC32 Bank Select LSB, value “4”
Program Change Number “1”
(The Bank Select messages are added
automatically: you don’t have to
worry about that.)
Pitch Bend: “0”
• To select several consecutive events, press the
[DATA÷ENTRY] dial while turning it towards the left
(upward direction) or the right (downward direction).
All events selected in this way appear on a blue background.
• Press the [MOVE¥EVENT] button icon. The following
pop-up appears:
• Specify the position to which the first event (in chronological order) of the selected group should be
shifted by pressing the [BAR], [BEAT] and [CPT] fields
and entering the desired value for each unit using
the [DATA÷ENTRY] dial or the [DEC]/[INC] buttons.
• Press the [EXECUTE] field to confirm your settings
and move the event.
Press [CLOSE] to close the pop-up window without
applying your changes.
■COPY EVENT
This function allows you to copy one or several
events. Use [PLACE¥EVENT] to insert a copy of those
events at the desired position.
Alteration Mode: Nearest
Limit Low: Std
Limit High: Std
• Specify the position where your new event should be
inserted by pressing the [BAR], [BEAT] and [CPT] fields
and entering the desired value for each unit using
the [DATA÷ENTRY] dial or the [DEC]/[INC] buttons.
• Press the [EXECUTE] field to confirm your settings
and add the new event.
Press [CLOSE] to close the pop-up window without
applying your changes.
■ERASE EVENT
• Use the [DATA÷ENTRY] dial or [ß][†] buttons to select
the event you want to delete.
• To select several consecutive events, press the
[DATA÷ENTRY] dial while turning it towards the left
(upward direction) or the right (downward direction).
• Press the [ERASE¥EVENT] button icon to remove the
event you selected.
Note: For this function, you could take advantage of the VIEW
filter to avoid selecting event types that should not be
included in the copy. See “VIEW” on p. 198.
• To select several consecutive events, press the
[DATA÷ENTRY] dial while turning it towards the left
(upward direction) or the right (downward direction).
All events selected in this way appear on a blue background.
• Press the [COPY¥EVENT] button icon.
The new selection will replace the previous one.
■MOVE EVENT
This function allows you to move one or several
events to a different position.
Note: If the position to which you move the selected event
already contains other events, the moved event is added at the
end of that group.
• Select the event you want to move.
Note: Events located at “1-01-00” cannot be moved further to
the left.
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G-70 Music Workstation
Programming Styles (Style Composer)
■PLACE EVENT
This function is only available if the Style Composer’s
clipboard already contains events that you copied
using COPY EVENT.
Press the [PLACE¥EVENT] button icon. The following
pop-up appears:
• Specify the position where the first event of the
group you copied with [COPY¥EVENT] should be
inserted by pressing the [BAR], [BEAT] and [CPT] fields
and entering the desired value for each unit using
the [DATA÷ENTRY] dial or the [DEC]/[INC] buttons.
• Press the [EXECUTE] field to confirm your settings
and add the new event(s).
Press [CLOSE] to close the pop-up window without
applying your changes.
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Note: Events inserted with PLACE EVENT are added to any
events that may already exist in that area. Existing events are
thus not pushed towards the end of the song.
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G-70 Music Workstation r
The how-to’s
16. Disk/Media functions
The G-70’s DISK & MEDIA functions allow you to save
edited data and settings to the internal memory, an
external memory card or floppy disk, to save and load
User Program Sets and MIDI Sets, to format various
storage “media”, to delete files, and to copy data.
If you’re still wondering whether to use a floppy disk or
a memory card, consider this:
• Memory cards have a much bigger capacity (up to
4GB) and are more reliable than floppy disks.
• Though you can also use 2DD or 2HD floppies, the
most helpful functions (Song/Style/User Program
Finder, the PLAY LIST function, and automatic song
links to User Programs) are only available for files on
memory card or in the internal memory.
2HD disks have twice the capacity of 2DD disks, so
use 2HDs whenever you can.
(6) Do one of the following (if necessary):
• For [LOAD] operations, press the field that contains
the name of the file you wish to load.
Use the [ø][˚] fields if the desired file is not currently
displayed.
• For [SAVE] operations, enter a name for the file you
are about to save.
• For [DELETE] operations, select the file you wish to
dispose of.
• For [FILE¥COPY] operations, select the file you wish to
copy.
• For other operations, see page 209.
(7) If available, press the [EXECUTE] field.
(8) Press the [EXIT] button to return to the main page.
EXIT
The how-to’s
(1) Press the [DISK&MEDIA] button.
DISK & MEDIA
In the following, we will use the word “media” to refer
to the three memory areas available to the G-70
(internal memory area, floppy disk, memory card).
The display changes to:
(2) If you intend to work with a floppy disk or memory
card, insert it into the drive or slot.
(3) Select the function you need by pressing the corresponding field in the right column.
(4) Select the data type you want to save, load,
rename or delete by pressing one of the big fields.
(5) On the display page that appears now, select the
target media: [INTERNAL¥MEMORY], [FLOPPY] or
[EXTERNAL¥MEMORY] (memory card).
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G-70 Music Workstation
Disk/Media functions
Loading data
The LOAD functions allow you to load Songs, Music
Styles, User Program Sets and MIDI Sets. Songs and
Styles can also be loaded via dedicated functions, which
are explained elsewhere (page 140, 86). The behavior of
those pages is identical to that of the LOAD function, so
we won’t explain those operations again.
■Load MIDI Set
This is where you can load MIDI Set “Sets”. i.e. groups
of 8 MIDI Sets that overwrite the contents of the
internal MIDI Set memories.
(1) Press the [DISK&MEDIA] button.
(2) Press the [LOAD] field, followed by the [MIDI¥SET]
field.
Note: Never remove the floppy disk or memory card while the
operation is in progress. Wait for the confirmation to appear
before returning to business as usual.
■Load User Program Set
This is where you can load User Program “Sets”. As
stated on page 111, such Sets do not contain the
registration data but only references to them. Please
bear in mind that a User Program Set can only refer
to User Programs that reside on the same media as
the Set itself. The name of the selected Set is displayed next to a folder icon on the USER PROGRAM
page that appears when you press the [SET¥LIST] button.
All User Programs (and the songs they refer to) need
to be on-line. That explains why the [FLOPPY] field is
not available here.
Note: The G-70 cannot read User Programs (or Performance
Memories) of older Roland Arranger instruments.
(1) Press the [DISK&MEDIA] button.
(2) Press the [LOAD] field, followed by the
[USER¥PROGRAM¥SET] field.
(3) Select the source media: [INTERNAL¥MEMORY],
[EXTERNAL¥MEMORY] (memory card), or [FLOPPY].
(4) Press the field of the MIDI Set whose data you wish
to load.
If the desired name is not displayed, use the scroll bar
to the right of the list (if available) to scroll further
down.
Note: This function always replaces the contents of all 8 internal MIDI Set memories.
(5) Press the [EXECUTE] field to load the data.
Note: The G-70 does not support MIDI Sets of other Roland
instruments.
Saving data
Note: When saving files to floppy disk whose capacity is too
small for the data you wish to save, the G-70 will display a “DISK
ERROR” message. That does not necessarily mean that the disk is
damaged.
Important remark
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(3) Select the source media: [INTERNAL¥MEMORY] or
[EXTERNAL¥MEMORY] (memory card).
(4) Press the field of the User Program Set data you
wish to load.
If the desired name is not displayed, use the scroll bar
to the right of the list (if available) to scroll further
down.
If you select the media that contains the original version of the file you are about to save, the following
message is displayed:
Note: A Set also contains all GLOBAL parameters (see the list
in the “Parameter Reference” booklet). So be sure to save the
current settings before loading a User Program Set (see “Save
User Program Set”).
(5) Press the [EXECUTE] field to load the data.
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• Press the [YES] field to overwrite the old version.
—or—
• Press the [NO] field if you do not want to overwrite
this file and return to the SAVE page instead. Then,
enter a different name (or select a different media).
Note: Never remove the floppy disk or memory card while the
operation is in progress. Wait for the confirmation to appear
before returning to business as usual.
G-70 Music Workstation r
Saving data
■Save User Program Set
This function allows you to save the Set currently
assigned to the USER PROGRAM buttons. This also
includes all GLOBAL parameters (see the list in the
“Parameter Reference” booklet).
You can also use this function to copy the Set along
with all User Programs (i.e. the registration data) it
refers to from one media to another.
(1) Press the [DISK&MEDIA] button.
(2) Press the [SAVE] field, followed by the
[USER¥PROGRAM¥SET] field.
■Save MIDI Set
After programming 8 MIDI Sets, you may find that
you need a few more and that you have to make
room for the new MIDI Sets. To do so without losing
existing MIDI Sets, you must save the “old” set to the
internal memory, memory card or disk. Even if you do
not program more than 8 MIDI Sets, it is a good idea
to make a backup copy of your MIDI Sets.
This function allows you to save all 8 MIDI Sets as a
set.
(1) Press the [DISK&MEDIA] button.
(2) Press the [SAVE] field, followed by the [MIDI¥SET]
field.
(3) Select the target media: [INTERNAL¥MEMORY] or
[EXTERNAL¥MEMORY] (memory card).
Note: User Program Sets cannot be saved to floppy disk.
(4) Enter the name for the file.
• Use the [ø] and [˚] fields to select the position for
which you wish to enter a new character.
• Use the alphanumeric keypad to enter the desired
characters. This keypad works exactly like the keypad
of a cellphone: you may have to press an alphanumeric field several times to select the desired character or number.
• The [A/a] field allows you to switch between uppercase and lowercase characters.
• The [Delete] field allows you to delete the character
indicated by the cursor. Press and hold it to clear all
characters.
• Press [Space] to insert a blank (or the number “0”).
• If you forgot to insert a character, use [ø] or [˚] to
select the position where the missing character
should be inserted. Then press [Insert], followed by the
character you wish to insert.
Note: The G-70 supports both upper- and lower-case letters
for file names. So choose whichever is more convenient (or
clear).
Note: The G-70 allows you to use long file names, but some
windows are relatively short, so that only part of the names
can be displayed. We therefore suggest using short file names
(maximum 18 characters) whenever possible.
(3) Select the target area: [INTERNAL¥MEMORY],
[FLOPPY] (disk) or [EXTERNAL¥MEMORY] (memory
card).
(4) Enter the name for the file.
See “Save User Program Set”.
Note: The G-70 supports both upper- and lower-case letters
for file names. So choose whichever is more convenient (or
clear).
(5) Press the [EXECUTE] field to save the data.
■Save Song
This page allows you to save the song that is currently in the G-70’s RAM memory. Even if it is not a
newly recorded song, there are several reasons why
you may want to use this function:
• to save the changes you made using the MAKEUP
TOOLS and/or COVER functions (see page 124 and
following);
• to save the newly programmed MARK JUMP locations (see page 139);
• to save a song under a different name or on a different media;
Note: The SONG MAKEUP/COVER and MARK JUMP settings
can only be read by the G-70 and are thus of no use to other
sequencers or SMF players.
(5) Press the [EXECUTE] field to save the data.
Note: Saving User Program Sets may take in excess of 10 minutes (especially if the target media already contains several
sets). This is due to the fact that the Database information
needs to be updated for User Program Finder use. Do not
switch off the G-70 while this operation is in progress.
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G-70 Music Workstation
Disk/Media functions
(1) Press the [DISK&MEDIA] button.
(2) Press the [SAVE] field, followed by the [SONG] field.
(5) Press the [EXECUTE] field to save the data.
Rename functions
Use the Rename functions to change the name of the
selected User Program Set, Style, Song or MIDI Set.
(3) Select the target media: [INTERNAL¥MEMORY],
[FLOPPY] (disk) or [EXTERNAL¥MEMORY] (memory
card).
Select [INTERNAL¥MEMORY] or
[EXTERNAL¥MEMORY] if you wish to take advantage
of the Song Finder function (page 38).
(4) Enter the name for the file.
See page 205.
Note: The G-70 supports both upper- and lower-case letters
for file names. So choose whichever is more convenient (or
clear).
Styles and Songs can also be renamed via their respective Finder. User Program Sets and MIDI Set “sets”,
however, can only be renamed here.
WARNING: Changing the name of a song or Style is
usually dangerous. Song files can be referenced by Play
Lists and User Programs (Link function). If you change
their names here, such songs are no longer loaded
when they should.
Similarly, Music Styles can be assigned to CUSTOM
memories. By changing their name, you also “estrange”
them from the CUSTOM memories that refer to them.
The procedure is the same for all file types you can
rename, so we will describe the steps only once.
(1) Press the [DISK&MEDIA] button.
The display changes to:
(5) Press the [EXECUTE] field to save the data.
■Save Style
This page allows you to save the Style that is currently in the G-70’s RAM memory. Even if it is not a
newly recorded Style, there are other reasons why
you may want to use this function:
• to save the changes you made using the MAKEUP
TOOLS and/or COVER function (see page 124 and following);
• to save a Style under a different name or on a different media;
(1) Press the [DISK&MEDIA] button.
(2) Press the [SAVE] field, followed by the [SONG] field.
(2) If you intend to work with a floppy disk or memory
card, insert it into the drive or slot.
(3) Press the [RENAME] field.
(4) Select the data type you want to rename by pressing its field.
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The display changes to:
(3) Select the target media: [INTERNAL¥MEMORY],
[FLOPPY] (disk) or [EXTERNAL¥MEMORY] (memory
card).
Select [INTERNAL¥MEMORY] or
[EXTERNAL¥MEMORY] if you wish to take advantage
of the Style Finder function (page 86).
(4) Enter the name for the file.
See page 205.
Note: The G-70 supports both upper- and lower-case letters
for file names. So choose whichever is more convenient (or
clear).
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G-70 Music Workstation r
Delete
User Program Set and MIDI Set files only have a file
name you can change. As there is no Finder functionality for such files, the display looks a little different:
(5) Select the media: [INTERNAL¥MEMORY], [FLOPPY] or
[EXTERNAL¥MEMORY] (memory card).
(6) If available, and necessary, use the sorting functions and/or the Finder.
These functions are only available for songs and
Music Styles – and only if you select
[INTERNAL¥MEMORY] or [EXTERNAL¥MEMORY]. See
also pages 37 and 86.
(7) Press the field of the file you want to rename.
The display changes to:
Delete
Use these functions to delete the selected User Program Set, MIDI Set “set”, song or Music Style from the
internal memory, a memory card or floppy disk.
Carefully check whether you selected the right file type
and the right file before pressing [EXECUTE]. Deleted
files cannot be restored.
Also note that MIDI Sets contain 8 different settings,
which means that you may lose a lot more than originally intended. And if you delete a song that is used in a
Play List, that list changes (loses one step), while a User
Program whose Link function you activated no longer
finds the required song.
On the other hand, deleting a User Program Set only
does away with the List – the User Programs it refers to
remain intact.
(1) Press the [DISK&MEDIA] button.
(2) If you intend to work with a floppy disk or memory
card, insert it into the drive or slot.
(3) Press the [DELETE] field.
(4) Select the data type you want to delete by pressing
its field.
The display changes to:
If you selected the RENAME page by accident, press
[Back]. This takes you back to the previously selected
page.
(8) If available (and necessary), press the
[STYLE≈NAME], [COUNTRY]/[ARTIST], [GENRE] or
[FILE¥NAME] field and enter the desired characters.
See page 205 for how to enter characters.
For User Program Set and MIDI Set files, the display
looks as follows:
Note: The G-70 supports both upper- and lower-case letters
for file names. So choose whichever is more convenient (or
clear).
Note: The G-70 allows you to use long file names, but some
windows are relatively short, so that only part of the names
can be displayed. We therefore suggest using short file names
(maximum 18 characters) whenever possible.
(9) Press the [EXECUTE] field to confirm your settings
and rename the file.
Note: Never remove the floppy disk or memory card while the
operation is in progress. Wait for the confirmation to appear
before returning to business as usual.
(10) Press the [EXIT] button to return to the main page.
(5) Select the media: [INTERNAL¥MEMORY], [FLOPPY]
(disk) or [EXTERNAL¥MEMORY] (memory card).
(6) If available, and necessary, use the sorting functions and/or the Finder.
These functions are only available for songs and
Music Styles – and only if you select
[INTERNAL¥MEMORY] or [EXTERNAL¥MEMORY]. See
also pages 37 and 86.
(7) Press the field of the file you want to delete.
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G-70 Music Workstation
Disk/Media functions
The display changes to:
Copy
The G-70 allows you to copy one, several or all files
from one media to another. Files on the selected source
media (FROM) cannot be copied onto the same destination media (TO). Consider using the USB functionality
(see p. 211) when you need to copy from a memory
card (in the G-70) to another memory card (connected
to the computer), for example.
If you selected the DELETE page by accident, press
[Back]. This takes you back to the previously selected
page.
(8) Check again whether you really selected the file
you wanted to delete, then press the [YES] field to
delete the selected file.
Press the [NO] field to return to the DELETE list without deleting the file. You can also press [BACK] to
return to the DELETE list.
(9) Press the [EXIT] button to return to the main page.
(1) Press the [DISK&MEDIA] button.
(2) If you intend to work with a floppy disk or memory
card, insert it into the drive or slot.
(3) Press the [FILE¥COPY] field.
(4) Select the data type you want to rename by pressing its field.
The display changes to:
Note: The DELETE operation cannot be undone.
Note: See page 119 for how to copy individual User Programs.
Here, you can only copy Sets (the List file as well as with the
User Program files it refers to).
If you selected the wrong file type, press [Back] and
try again.
(5) Start by specifying the source that contains the
files you wish to copy: Press the [FROM] button
icon to select the memory area.
INT MEMORY: The G-70’s internal memory area.
EXT MEMORY: The memory card in the G-70’s PCMCIA
slot. Do not forget to insert it before selecting this option.
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FLOPPY DISK: The disk in the G-70’s floppy drive. (User
Program Sets cannot be copied from floppy
disk.)
208
(6) Now specify the target you wish to copy the
selected song(s) to: Press the [TO] button icon to
select the destination media.
Note: FROM and TO cannot be set to the same media (you
cannot copy FROM INTERNAL MEMORY‰ TO INTERNAL MEMORY (or FROM FLOPPY DISK‰ TO FLOPPY DISK).
Note: User Program Sets cannot be copied to floppy disk.
(7) If the name of the file you want to copy is already
displayed, press its line.
G-70 Music Workstation r
Format
You can also select several files by pressing their
fields.
(8) To display the next 5 files, press the [˚] field in the
lower right corner.
You can press this field as many times as necessary
(or until it is no longer displayed). To return to a previous group of 5 files, press [ø].
(9) If you need to copy all files (on all available pages),
press the [ALL¥FILES] field.
Note: If the memory card or floppy disk is not formatted, a
message will be displayed that allows you to format it before
the User Programs are copied.
(10) If you chose “EXT MEMORY” for “TO”, disable the
card’s write protection (if available) and insert it
into the PCMCIA slot. See the owner’s manual of
the memory card for how to disable its write protection.
If you chose “FLOPPY DISK” for “TO”, disable its write
protection (see p. 11) and insert it into the drive.
(11) Press the [EXECUTE] field.
You are asked whether it is OK to overwrite all files
on the destination media (“TO”) that have the same
file names as the files you are about to copy.
(12) Press the [YES] field if it is OK to overwrite files
with the same names on the destination media.
Press the [NO] field if files on the source (“FROM”)
media that have the same name as existing files on
the destination (“TO”) media should not be copied
(only files with “original” names will be copied in that
case).
The data are copied and a message confirms the end
of the operation.
Note: Never remove the floppy disk or memory card while the
operation is in progress. Wait for the confirmation to appear
before returning to business as usual.
(13) Press the [EXIT] button to return to the main page.
Note: If the (remaining) storage capacity is smaller than the
size of the files you wish to copy, the G-70 automatically stops
the operation without displaying a message as soon as the
media is full. Always check the contents of the destination
media immediately after the copy operation to make sure that
all required files have been copied.
Format
This function allows you to format the inserted floppy
disk or memory card. For safety reasons, you cannot
format the internal memory (because it also contains
the G-70’s operating system).
It would be a good idea to also format floppy disks formatted for MS-DOS®, because that speeds up data
access. Memory cards must always be formatted on
the G-70: during formatting, the G-70 indeed also creates a number of folders where your various files will be
stored.
(1) Defeat the disk’s or memory card’s write protection
(if available):
Floppy disk: Close the little “window” (page 11).
Memory card: See its owner’s manual (this depends on
the kind of card you are using).
(2) Insert the floppy disk into the drive, or the memory
card into the PCMCIA slot.
(3) Press the [DISK&MEDIA] button.
(4) Press the [FORMAT] field.
The display changes to:
(5) On the display page that appears now, press the
[EXTERNAL¥MEMORY] or [FLOPPY¥DISK] field.
This obviously depends on whether you inserted a
floppy disk or a memory card.
The display now responds with:
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G-70 Music Workstation
Disk/Media functions
(In the case of a floppy disk, the “External Memory”
message will read “Floppy Disk”, of course.)
(6) Press the [YES] field to format your disk/card.
Press [NO] or [Back] to return to the FORMAT display
page without formatting.
(7) Wait for the confirmation to appear, then press
the [EXIT] button to return to the main page.
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Note: Never remove the floppy disk or memory card while the
operation is in progress. Wait for the confirmation to appear
before returning to business as usual.
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G-70 Music Workstation r
Format
17. Archiving data using a computer (USB)
The G-70’s USB port can be used for exchanging files with a computer or for MIDI communication. Here, we will look at
the archiving function, which are often called “Data storage”. See page 214 for the MIDI functions.
You can transfer the following file types from the internal memory or a memory card to your computer – and
vice versa:
Music Styles
Songs (.SMF files)
The display changes to:
User Programs
.txt files*
[*] These files reside in dedicated folders and should only be put
there, see step (12) below.
The following computers and operating systems are
supported:
IBM PC-compatible: Windows 98SE/Me/2000/XP or later
Apple: MacOS 9.04 or later
(6) Press the [USB¥DATA¥STORAGE] field.
Note: The G-70 does not handle or generate audio files.
Note: The USB cable needed for this connection is optional.
(1) Disconnect the G-70’s USB port from your computer (if it is connected).
(2) (For Windows XP:) If a message asks you to restart
your computer, do as directed.
(3) Switch on the G-70.
(4) Use a USB cable to connect the G-70 to your computer.
THRU
MIDI
OUT
IN
Now you need to specify which memory area should
appear on the computer’s desktop:
(7) Press [Internal¥Memory] or [External¥Memory] (memory card) to establish the connection with your
computer.
Depending on the area you choose, the display now
looks as follows…
To the/a USB port of your
computer.
Note: Always connect the G-70 directly to your computer, or
to a powered USB hub.
(5) Press the [MENU] button.
MENU
…or like this:
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G-70 Music Workstation
Archiving data using a computer (USB)
Note: In this state, all of the G-70’s panel functions are
blocked. You can, however, keep playing the last Keyboard
part(s) you selected. You cannot select other sounds (or parts),
however.
Note: To cancel the connection, press [DISCONNECT] or the
[EXIT] button.
(8) Open the “My Computer” window (Windows).
(9) Check whether your computer found a “G70_SSD”,
“G70_CARD” (or just “Removable Disk”) drive.
(10) Open that drive by double-clicking on its icon.
(11) Open the folder you need.
This depends on whether you want to delete/rename/
add songs, Music Styles, User Programs or text files:
X
Only to computer (and only copy)
X
Please ignore.
Please ignore.
Please ignore.
To and from computer
To and from computer
To and from computer
To and from computer
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X
X
X
X
X
Please ignore.
Only to computer (and only copy)
Only to computer (and only copy)
X
X
To and from computer
Please ignore.
Only to computer (and only copy)
(12) Do one of the following:
• Copy the desired Music Styles from the “Styles” folder
to your computer’s hard disk using drag & drop.
To copy Styles from your computer to the G-70, drag
& drop them over the “Put New Styles Here” folder.
• Copy the desired songs from the “Song” folder to
your computer’s hard disk using drag & drop.
To copy songs from your computer to the G-70, drag
& drop them over the “Put New Songs Here” folder.
• Copy the desired User Programs from the “Userprg”
folder to your computer’s hard disk using drag &
drop.
To copy User Programs from your computer to the
G-70, drag & drop them over the “Put New UserPrograms Here” folder.
To copy User Programs from your computer to the
G-70 and immediately create associated Music Assistant entries, drag & drop them over the “Put New
Music Assistants Here” folder. (That folder is not
available on memory cards, because Music Assistant
entries must always reside in the G-70’s internal
memory.)
• Copy the desired text files from the “Text” folder to
your computer’s hard disk –and vice versa– using
drag & drop.
Note: Never ever remove or rename files via USB (use only the
G-70’s functions to this effect).
212
While data are being transferred, the G-70’s display
looks as follows and all buttons and keys are locked:
Note: Never switch off the G-70 while this message is displayed, because doing so would damage all data in the
selected memory area.
Note: Never sever the USB connection while the red “WRITING” message is displayed (the message shown on the computer screen may disappear earlier but should not be trusted in
this case). Doing so would damage all data in the selected
memory area.
Cautions regarding folders and files
• Only the following types of files can be transferred
between the G-70 and your computer:
Standard MIDI Files (.MID)
Song files with the “.KAR” extension
User Program Files (.UPG)
Music Styles (.STL)
Text files (.TXT) for synchronization with songs (see p. 150)
• Do not move, rename or delete folders of the connected memory area using your computer mouse (or
other commands).
• Never add files to folders flagged with an “X” in the
illustration above.
• Never copy files to the root directory of the G-70’s
internal memory or card – and never rename or
delete files you see there.
• Never format, optimize, or scan the G-70’s memory
area using your computer’s tools.
• The G-70 can only handle filenames consisting of
single-byte alphanumeric characters (i.e. no Russian,
Chinese, Japanese, Korean, etc., names).
• Be sure to only use files whose names do not exceed
32 characters.
• In some cases, the new songs, Styles or User Programs you copied to the associated “Put New… Here”
folder may not be visible to the corresponding Finder
right away. If that occurs, briefly select the “other”
memory area (memory card or internal memory),
then return to the originally selected memory area.
(13) To disconnect the G-70 from your computer:
• Macintosh: Drag the “G70_SSD”, “G70_CARD” (or
“Removable Disk”) icon to the trash.
—OR—
G-70 Music Workstation r
Format
• Windows: Click on the removal icon on the task bar.
Wait until a drop-down menu appears and select the
entry that says something to the effect of “Stop USB
disk G70_SSD” or “Stop USB disk G70_CARD”. You
should now see a window that says something to the
effect of “The USB device XX can now be safely
removed from the system”. Click on the [OK] button.
—THEN—
• Disconnect the USB cable from your computer and
the G-70.
(14) Press the [DISCONNECT] field in the G-70’s display
to return to the CONNECTION MODE page.
(15) Press the [EXIT] button to return to the main page.
Backing up all data of the G-70
You can make a backup copy of all of the G-70’s internal data (or the contents of a memory card) by proceeding as follows:
• Connect the G-70 to your computer.
• On your computer, create a folder named “Backup”
(or any other name).
• Double-click the icon assigned to the G-70’s internal
memory or memory card to open its window.
• Select its entire contents (Ctrl + A or Command + A).
• Drag the selected files to your “Backup” folder icon
and drop them there.
• Wait until all files have been copied.
•
•
•
•
•
•
To send the files back to the G-70 (or its memory
card):
Open the “Backup” folder on your computer hard
disk.
Open the window of the G-70’s internal memory or
memory card.
Arrange the two windows in such a way that you can
drag files from “Backup” to “G70_SSD” or
“G70_CARD”.
Return to the “Backup” folder and select its entire
contents (Ctrl + A or Command + A).
Drag all selected folders to the “G70_SSD” (or
“G70_CARD”) window and release the mouse key.
Wait until the operation is completed.
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G-70 Music Workstation
MIDI
18. MIDI
MIDI is short for “Musical Instrument Digital Interface”. The word refers to many things, the most obvious being a
connector type that is used by musical instruments and other devices to exchange messages relating to the act of
making music.
When you play on the G-70’s keyboard or start song or Style playback, your instrument transmits MIDI data to its MIDI
OUT socket (or to the USB port). If you connect that socket to the MIDI IN socket of another instrument, the external
instrument may play the same notes as one of the G-70’s parts, select sounds, etc.
MIDI is a universal standard, which means that musical data can be sent to and received by instruments of different types
and manufacturers. Furthermore, MIDI allows you to connect your G-70 to a computer or hardware sequencer. (You can
also use the USB port for MIDI applications.)
Connect your G-70 as shown below.
Transmits “MIDI IN” data
External MIDI instrument
The G-70 receives data
External MIDI instrument/computer (*)
G-70
The G-70 transmits data
(*) MIDI communication via the USB port is also possible.
MIDI can simultaneously transmit and receive messages
on 16 channels, so that up to 16 instruments can be
controlled. Nowadays, most instruments –like your
G-70– are multitimbral, which means that they can
play several parts simultaneously with different sounds.
Note: All G-70 parts are set to receive MIDI messages. If they do
not seem to respond to the messages you send from the external
controller, check the MIDI connections and the channel settings
on the G-70.
The how-to’s
Accessing the MIDI functions
Do the following to gain access to the MIDI functions:
(1) Press the [MENU] button.
The display changes to:
The transmit and receive channels of the Keyboard
parts are set as follows:
Recorder track
UP1
4
UP2
6
UP3
13
LW1
11
LW2
14
MBS
12
MELODY INT
15
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Keyboard part
214
(2) Press the [MIDI] field.
(3) Press the OUTPUT [MIDI] or [USB] field to specify
which socket(s) to use for your MIDI applications.
The MIDI and USB options are mutually exclusive: if
you select “USB”, the MIDI sockets are not used, while
MIDI communication via USB is impossible when you
select “MIDI”.
G-70 Music Workstation r
The how-to’s
• The G-70 is supplied with a CD-ROM that contains
the driver files you may need for USB–MIDI applications. Before pressing [USB], you must install the
required drivers on your computer.
See the operating instructions that come with the
CD-ROM.
(4) Do one of the following:
• Press a MIDI SET [1]~[8] field to select a MIDI Set.
• Press the SELECT field that corresponds to the section
whose default settings you want to load. These two
fields can be used instead of a MIDI set.
If you press [Keyboard&Style¥Parts], the Song parts no
longer receive/transmit MIDI messages. If you press
[Song¥Parts], the Keyboard and Style parts no longer
transmit MIDI messages.
• Press the [EDIT] field to gain access to the MIDI
parameters. Next, use the PAGE [ø][˚] fields to select
the part or section whose settings you want to
change.
(5) If you changed some MIDI parameter settings,
press the [WRITE] field to write them to a MIDI Set
(page 220).
(6) Press the [EXIT] button to return to the main page.
internal tone generator – but they are still transmitted
to the MIDI OUT socket (or USB port), and hence to
external MIDI instruments.
Sound source
Sound source
MIDI OUT
MIDI OUT
LOCAL ON
LOCAL OFF
+Style
+ SMF
+Style
+ SMF
When you press one of these fields, the number of the
currently selected MIDI Set is indicated with an asterisk
(*) to signal that the current settings no longer correspond to the written settings. See p. 220 for details
about the MIDI Sets.
Editing procedure
After performing step (7) below, the display changes
(7) Press the [EDIT] field on the first “MIDI” page.
EXIT
Working with presets
The opening “MIDI” page contains two big fields with
preset settings. All you need to do is press them to
restore the default settings for the sections or aspects
in question.
[Keyboard&Style¥Parts]: This field recalls the factory
MIDI settings for the Keyboard parts (UP1/2/3, LW1/2,
MBS, MELODY INT) and the Style parts (ADrum, ABass,
Acc1~6). The most important (and practical) use for this
field is resetting the MIDI transmit/receive channels of
the Keyboard and Arranger parts, and to switch off
MIDI transmission/reception of the Song parts.
Note: This field applies to both reception (RX) and transmission
(TX). The G-70 indeed allows you to set separate TX and RX channels for each part.
[Song¥Parts]: This field restores the factory settings for
the G-70’s Song parts and switches off the MIDI transmission and reception of the Keyboard and Style parts.
MODE [Local¥On]/[Local¥Off]: These settings allow you to
establish or remove the connection between the G-70’s
keyboard/Arranger/Recorder and the internal tone generator.
If you select [Local≈On] (default), playing on the G-70’s
keyboard or playing back a song/Style causes the corresponding notes to sound. If you select [Local≈Off], the
corresponding MIDI messages are no longer sent to the
(8) On the page that appears now, select the section
whose parameters you wish to edit:
Synchronization, general settings
Refers to the Recorder/sequencer parts
Refers to the Style parts
Keyboard parts (including MELODY INTELL)
(9) Use the PAGE [ø][˚] buttons to select the part you
want to edit.
(10) Press the field of the parameter you wish to edit,
and set the desired value with the [DATA÷ENTRY]
dial or the [DEC]/[INC] buttons.
(11) Press the [Back] field and save your MIDI settings to
a Set; –or–
Press the [EXIT] button to return to the main page.
215
G-70 Music Workstation
MIDI
Editing MIDI parameters
Let us briefly look at where to find the part you may
want to edit (use PAGE [ø][˚] to select it):
KEYBOARD
STYLE
SONG
SYSTEM
UP1, 2, 3
LW1, 2
MBS
MELODY INT
ADrums
ABass
Accomp1
Accomp2
Accomp3
Accomp4
Accomp5
Accomp6
Part1~16
Sync
Basic Channel
Style Channel
NTA
V-LINK
Param
Note: Always select the part you want to edit before changing
the remaining parameters.
■SHIFT (–48~48)
This parameter allows you to transpose the note
messages before they are transmitted to an external
MIDI instrument or computer. The maximum possible
transposition is four octaves up (48) or down (–48).
Each step represents a semi-tone.
TX EVENT FILTER
The TX section provides a number of filters that allow
you to specify whether the messages in question
should be transmitted (ON) or not (OFF).
Press the [TX¥EVENT¥FILTER] field to open the following pop-up window:
Keyboard, Style, Song Parts
The Keyboard, Style and Song parts have the same “TX”
(transmission) and “RX” (reception) parameters, so we
will discuss them only once, except where there are significant differences.
Note: Press the [INIT¥SINGLE¥VALUE] field to recall the default
setting for the parameter that is currently selected (whose display
field “lights”).
TX ON, RX ON
These two button icons allow you to specify whether
(lights) or not (dark) the part whose name appears in
the upper left corner should transmit (TX) or receive
(RX) MIDI data.
MIDI TX
■CHANNEL (1~16)
Allows you to assign a MIDI transmit channel to the
selected part. Unless you have a very good reason to
do otherwise, we suggest using the same TX and RX
channel numbers for a part.
r
Note: Assigning the same channel to two or more parts is usually not a very good idea.
■LOCAL
This is where you can disconnect the part from the
internal sound source (“Off”) – or re-establish that
connection (“On”). You can also change the LOCAL
setting of all parts simultaneously using MODE
[Local¥On]/[Local¥Off] on the first MIDI page, which is
a lot faster.
216
Press the [ALL] field to switch all filters on (those
messages are no longer transmitted). Press [NONE] to
switch all filters off. Press [CLOSE] to return to the
page where you came from.
● PROGRAM CHANGE—Program Change and Bank Select
(CC00, CC32) messages. These messages are used to select
Tones and Drum Sets (as well as User Programs, see below).
“Bank Select” messages are control change messages,
which were added when it became clear that the number
of sounds that can be selected using program change messages (128) was no longer sufficient to access all sounds of
a given instrument. (The G-70 boasts over 1,500 sounds.)
● PITCH BENDER—Pitch Bend messages
● MODUL—Modulation messages (CC01)
● VOLUME—Volume messages (CC07)
● PANPOT—Pan(pot) messages (CC10)
● EXPRESSION—Expression messages (CC11)
● HOLDº—Hold (Sustain, Damper) messages (CC64)
● SOSTENUTOº—Sostenuto messages (CC66)
● SOFTº—Soft messages (CC67)
● REVERB—Reverb Send messages (CC91)
● CHORUS—Chorus Send messages (CC93)
● CAFº—Channel aftertouch
● RPNº—Registered parameter number (CC100/101)
● NRPNº—Non-registered parameter number (CC98/99)
● SysExº—SysEx messages (system exclusive)
● CC16º—General purpose controller that allows you to
influence the “C1” parameter (see p. 93).
Note: TX FILTER parameters with a “º” symbol are not available
for Style parts.
G-70 Music Workstation r
Editing MIDI parameters
MIDI RX
■CHANNEL (1~16)
Allows you to assign a MIDI receive channel to the selected
part. The default settings usually work best, but you are
most welcome to change them.
Note: Unless you have a very good reason to do otherwise, we
suggest using the same TX and RX channel numbers for a part.
Note: Assigning the same channel to two or more parts is usually not a very good idea.
■SHIFT (–48~48)
This parameter allows you to transpose the received note
messages before sending them to the G-70’s tone generator. This allows you to change the pitch of the received
MIDI note messages if you are used to playing a song (that
is being received via MIDI) in another key. The maximum
possible transposition is four octaves up (48) and down
(–48). Each step represents a semi-tone.
MIDI System parameters
The following MIDI parameters usually apply to the
G-70 as a whole, even though some of them are rather
specific, as you will notice.
Press the [SYSTEM] field and use the PAGE [ø][˚] fields
to select the page that contains the parameter you
want to edit.
SYNC parameters
The SYNC parameters allow you to specify whether or
not the G-70 should send MIDI real-time messages
when you start the Arranger or Recorder/sequencer.
This allows you to synchronize external instruments
or (software) sequencers with your G-70.
■LIMIT HIGH/LIMIT LOW (C–~G9)
“LIMIT HIGH” and “LIMIT LOW” allow you to set the note
range to be received. If not all note messages received on a
given MIDI channel should be played by the selected G-70
part, set the range to the desired values.
Note: The LOW LIMIT value cannot be higher value than HIGH
LIMIT (and vice versa).
RX EVENT FILTER
The data filters of the RX section allow you to specify
whether (ON) or note (OFF) the messages in question
should be received.
Press the [RX¥EVENT¥FILTER] field to open the following pop-up window:
Just as a reminder: “TX” means “transmit” and “RX”
stands for “receive”.
■SYNC TX
● START/STOP—If you activate this option, the G-70 sends
start or stop messages when you start (or stop) Arranger
(STYLE) or song (SONG) playback. (The Recorder also
transmits “Continue” messages.)
● CLOCK—This option means that the Arranger (STYLE) or
Recorder/sequencer sends MIDI Clock messages that tell
the receiving instrument or MIDI device which tempo to
choose.
● SONG POSITION (only for SONG)—If you switch this
parameter on, the Recorder/sequencer sends Song Position Pointer (SPP) messages that signal the current playback position.
Note: See your sequencer’s, etc., manual to find out
whether it accepts Song Position Pointer messages.
The RX filters are the same as the TX filters. See
page 216 for details.
Press the [Back] field and save your MIDI settings to
a Set; –or–
Press the [EXIT] button to return to the main page.
■SYNC RX
The SYNC RX parameters allow you to specify
whether and how the Arranger (STYLE) and/or
Recorder/sequencer should be synchronized to external sequencers or drum machines. The available
options are:
● Auto—This is a good setting for remote control of song
or Style playback (using a PK-5A dynamic MIDI pedal
board, for example). If the G-70 receives a MIDI Start
message (FA), it waits for Clock messages that specify
the tempo. If those Clock messages are not received (a
PK-5A, for instance, doesn’t send them), the G-70 starts
playback using its internal tempo. If, however, Clock
messages (F8) follow after the Start message, the G-70
uses the external tempo. You can nevertheless go on
using the Recorder/sequencer or Arranger without MIDI
Start/Clock messages, which is not possible when you
select “MIDI”.
217
G-70 Music Workstation
MIDI
● Internal—The Recorder/sequencer (SONG) or Arranger
(STYLE) uses its internal tempo.
● MIDI—Song or Style playback can be started or stopped
with MIDI real-time messages (Start, Stop, Clock)
received from an external clock source.
● Remote—The Recorder/sequencer (SONG) or Arranger
(STYLE) waits for a start message to start playback at its
own tempo. When it receives a stop message, playback
stops. External clock messages are ignored.
BASIC parameters
The Basic channel is used to receive and transmit
Program Change and Bank Select messages for
selecting User Programs, as well as for the reception
and transmission of other kinds of messages that are
not directly related to a specific MIDI channel (such
as the PART SWITCH function, for example). Note
that if you select another channel, messages
intended for the BASIC parameters use might also
cause other parameters to change when you don’t
want them to.
■MIDI TX & TX FILTER
● CHANNEL—Use this parameter to assign a MIDI transmit
channel to the “Basic” channel. If you don’t want these
messages to be transmitted, switch off the [TX¥ON÷OFF]
field.
● PART SWITCH—Whenever you mute or un-mute a part
on the Mixer pages (Keyboard parts) or on the STYLE
MAKEUP TOOLS/VOLUME page, your G-70 sends an
NRPN message that describes your action. Filtering these
messages may be useful to keep your external sequencer
from recording them – or the receiving GS module from
muting the part assigned to that channel.
● USER PRG PC—This parameter is used to filter the transmission of program change and bank select messages
related to User Program selection.
r
■MIDI RX & RX FILTER
● CHANNEL—Use this parameter to assign a MIDI receive
channel to the “Basic” channel. If you don’t want these
messages to be received, switch off the [RX¥ON÷OFF]
field.
● PART SWITCH—Whenever you mute or un-mute a part
on the Mixer pages (Keyboard parts) or on the STYLE
MAKEUP TOOLS/VOLUME page, your G-70 sends an
NRPN message that describes your action. You can keep
the G-70 from responding to such messages to avoid
that external instruments mute its parts.
● USER PRG PC—This parameter is used to filter the
reception of program change and bank select messages
relative to User Program selection.
218
● MASTER VOLUME—This parameter allows you to enable
or disable the reception of Master Volume messages that
would change the G-70’s overall volume. This is an
exclusive message common to all newer MIDI devices.
STYLE parameters
The STYLE channel is used for receiving and transmitting program change and bank select messages that
select Styles, and volume messages that change the
Style’s volume. These two message types can only be
filtered in the RX column (i.e. you can specify
whether or not to receive them).
The MIDI address of a Music Style consists of three
elements: a CC00 number, a CC32 number, and a
program change number. The values assigned to
CC00 and CC32 define the Style, whereas the program change number defines the pattern (Intro, Ending, etc.). See also the “Parameter Reference” booklet
supplied with your G-70.
Sending only a program change number selects
another pattern of the currently active Style. Be
aware, however, that only sending CC00 and CC32
messages (without a program change) has no effect.
Note: When you select another Style on your G-70, it transmits a CC00-CC32-PC cluster on the Style channel, which you
could record using an external sequencer.
■MIDI TX
● CHANNEL—Use this parameter to assign a MIDI transmit
channel to the STYLE function. If you don’t want these
messages to be transmitted, switch off the [TX¥ON÷OFF]
field.
■MIDI RX
● CHANNEL—Use this parameter to assign a MIDI receive
channel to the STYLE function. If you don’t want these
messages to be received, switch off the [RX¥ON÷OFF]
field.
● STYLE PC—Program change and bank select messages
for Style selection. Switch this button icon off if the
G-70 must not select other Styles or patterns.
● STYLE VOLUME—Volume messages relating to the Music
Styles. Switch this button off if the G-70 must not
receive them.
NTA: Note-to-Arranger
NTA notes are only received from an external MIDI
instrument. What you play in the chord recognition
area of the keyboard to feed the Arranger is automatically converted to the corresponding MIDI note
numbers, which are transmitted to external instru-
G-70 Music Workstation r
Editing MIDI parameters
ments. There is thus no need to transmit the note
messages of what you play in the chord recognition
area (the NTA notes).
enable (lights) or disable (dark) the transmission of these
messages.
PARAM
This page contains several parameters that are not
related to one another (the other MIDI pages always
concentrate on one aspect).
■1ST CHANNEL RX/2ND CHANNEL RX
● CHANNEL—NTA notes can be received on two MIDI
channels, so that you could control the G-70’s Arranger
using a MIDIfied accordion (FR-7 or FR-5) or any other
instrument capable of sending note data (or data used to
control the accompaniment) on two channels. Either
channel can be switched off using its [ON÷OFF] field.
Note: You cannot assign the same MIDI channel to 1 & 2
Channel Rx.
■1ST CH LIMIT, 2ND CH LIMIT (C-~G9)
These parameters allow you to set the note range to be
received. If not all note messages of the selected MIDI
channel should be received by the NTA “part”, set the range
to the desired values.
Note: The LOW LIMIT value cannot be higher value than HIGH
LIMIT (and vice versa).
If you select the V-Link part
When you select “V-LINK” on the [SYSTEM] page, the
display changes to:
■PARAMETER
● OCTAVE TX—The OCTAVE TX parameter can be set to
Absolute or Relative. You may have noticed that if you
assign a bass sound to the UP1/2/3 part in SPLIT mode,
the notes are transposed to allow you to play meaningful bass lines using the UP1/2/3 part. “Relative” means
that this internal (and automatic) transposition is translated into note numbers.
In “Absolute” mode, however, the MIDI note number sent
to other instruments will be the one assigned to the key
you press. The advantage of “Absolute” is that you can
play a bass line using an UP part, for example, and double it with a trumpet of an external instrument.
● PART SWITCH—This parameter allows you to specify
whether or not a muted part should go on sending MIDI
messages:
Internal: A muted part can no longer be played via the G-70’s
keyboard or Arranger/Recorder but continues to
send MIDI messages. Selecting “Internal” and muting
a part thus has the same effect as selecting “Local
Off” (see p. 216).
Int+Mid: A muted part can no longer be played via the G-70’s
keyboard or Arranger and no longer sends MIDI
messages.
Here, you can only set TX parameters (because the
G-70 only sends V-LINK messages—it does not
receive them). See page 222 for details about the VLINK functionality.
Note: Press the [INIT¥SINGLE¥VALUE] field to recall the default
setting for the parameter that is currently selected (whose display field “lights”).
● CLIP CONTROL TX—This parameter allows you to set the
MIDI channel (CHANNEL) to be used for the transmission
of these messages. Use the [ON/OFF] field to enable
(lights) or disable (dark) the transmission of these messages.
● COLOR CONTROL TX—This parameter allows you to set
the MIDI channel (CHANNEL) to be used for the transmission of these messages. Use the [ON÷OFF] field to
● TRANSPOSE RX (On/Off)—Use this parameter to specify whether note messages received via MIDI should be
transposed.
■VELOCITY
● VELO TX, VELO RX (On, 1~127)—Your G-70 is equipped
with a velocity-sensitive keyboard and a tone generator
capable of responding to velocity messages. Use the
fields to switch the reception (RX) or transmission (TX) of
velocity messages on or off.
If you don’t select “On”, specify which velocity value to
use instead of the continuous flux. The value you set will
be used for all notes received via MIDI IN/USB (RX) or
sent to MIDI OUT/USB (TX).
■TX FILTER
● SYSEX—Use this parameter to specify whether (button
icon on) or not (off) the G-70 should send SysEx messages. Such messages are not standardized, so that each
manufacturer can use them ad lib for temporary (or per-
219
G-70 Music Workstation
MIDI
manent) changes to the way a part behaves. Effect settings, for instance, can only be changed via SysEx messages.
Such messages may slow down playback on external
MIDI instruments, or yield no effect at all, which is why
you have the option to switch off their transmission in
the first place.
● LYRICS—Use this switch to specify whether the Lyrics
data contained in the songs you play back should be
transmitted via MIDI (button icon on) or not (off).
● DATA CHANGES—This parameter allows you to specify
how the original program changes of the songs you play
back are transmitted via MIDI. The G-70 may change
sound addresses (usually CC00 and CC32 values) so as to
play back all songs with the best possible quality. If you
switch this parameter on, such real-time transformations are also transmitted via MIDI, in which case the
receiving tone generator may drop certain parts (if it
does not support the requested sound bank).
If you switch this parameter off, the original sound
addresses are transmitted to the receiving device. (But
the G-70’s tone generator continues to “enhance” the
songs you play back – this parameter only affects MIDI
transmission to external instruments.)
(4) Press the [EXIT] button to return to the main page.
Using MIDI Sets
(1) Press the [MENU] button.
The display changes to:
(2) Press the [MIDI] field.
■RX FILTER
● SYSEX—Use this parameter to specify whether (button
icon on) or not (off) the G-70 should receive SysEx messages from other devices. See also the explanation
above.
MIDI Sets
MIDI Sets are memories for MIDI settings. The G-70
provides eight MIDI Set memories that you can use
to change your MIDI configuration. You can link a
MIDI Set to a User Program (page 116), and specify
which MIDI Set should be loaded when you switch on
the G-70 (see below). If you need to reset some or all
MIDI parameters to their default values, select
[Keyboard¥&¥Style¥Parts] and/or [Song¥Parts] rather
than a MIDI Set.
Writing a MIDI Set
r
(1) If you are still on one of the EDIT MIDI pages, press
the [Back] field.
If not, press the [MENU] button and the [MIDI] field
on the MENU display page.
(2) Press the [WRITE] field (it lights red).
(3) Press the field that corresponds to the MIDI Set
where you wish to save your MIDI settings ([1]~[8]).
The display returns to the “MIDI” page.
220
(3) Press the [1]~[8] field that corresponds to the MIDI
Set you want to use (the two SELECT button icons
go dark).
You can also select a macro (“SELECT”) and work with
those settings, in which case all eight MIDI Set indicator icons go dark.
(4) Press the [EXIT] button to return to the main page.
MIDI Set selection at power-on
When you switch on the G-70, it automatically selects
default MIDI settings. If they do not match the settings
required for your setup, you can tell the G-70 which
MIDI Set it should recall when you switch it on:
(1) Press the [MENU] button.
The display changes to:
G-70 Music Workstation r
MIDI Sets
(2) Press the [UTILITY] field, followed by the [STARTUP]
field.
(3) Press the [MIDI≈SET] field and use the [DATA÷ENTRY]
dial or the [DEC]/[INC] buttons to select the MIDI
Set to be recalled when the G-70 is switched on.
(4) Switch on the [RECALL] field.
Switch off this button icon if no MIDI Set should be
recalled when the G-70 is switched on.
Note: If the G-70 is also set to recall a User Program that contains a MIDI link, that selection is ignored if the MIDI SET
[RECALL] button is on.
(5) Press the [EXIT] button to return to the main page.
221
G-70 Music Workstation
Miscellaneous
19. Miscellaneous
(2) Press the [V-LINK] button (it lights).
Using V-LINK
■About V-LINK
V-LINK (
) is a function that provides for
the integration of music and visual material. By using
V-LINK-compatible video devices (i.e. an Edirol
DV-7PR), visual effects can be easily linked to, and
made part of the expressive elements of a performance.
By using the G-70 with an Edirol DV-7PR, you can:
• Use the G-70’s keyboard (highest octave) to switch
images (clips). Press and hold a key for longer transitions (“fades”). Briefly press a key for fast transitions.
• Use the BENDER axis of the BENDER/MODULATION
lever to change the playback speed of the picture
material or to select a different color.
(The keys in the highest octave now act as controllers
and no longer play notes.)
If you prefer to work with the following display page,
press and hold the [V-LINK] button.
• Use the D Beam controller to control several effects
(this depends on the function you assign to the D Beam,
see below).
V-Link signals can be transmitted via MIDI OUT or the
USB port.
(1) Connect the G-70’s MIDI OUT socket (or USB port)
to the MIDI IN socket (or USB port) of the external
video processor (or to a UM-1 interface).
MIDI OUT
(You can also use the assignable sliders for V-Link
control if this page is not displayed.)
(3) Use [16’]~[4’] and [2’]~[1’] sliders or the “V-LINK”
keys (highest octave) to manipulate the video pictures in sync with your music.
CLIP
Allows you to select the Edirol DV-7PR’s clips
(or palettes) 1~32. Press the keys in the highest octave to switch clips 1~8.
PALETTE
Allows you to switch between palettes 1~20.
DISSOLVE TIME
Allows you to set the transition speed
between images. The velocity of the keys in
the highest octave can also be used to control the transition speed (but only for the
eight clips that can be selected via the keyboard).
SPEED PLAYBK
Moving the slider upwards speeds up playback, moving it downwards slows down playback. At the center position, playback speed is
normal.
VFX
Allows you to change video effects. This function is not available if the receiving video
processor is already set to “Off”.
Edirol UM-1
REMOTE
Edirol DV-7PR
r
Note: VFX2 is not supported by the
DV-7.
Projector
Monitor
Note: You don’t need a UM-1 interface for a USB connection.
Simply connect the G-70’s USB port to the DV-7PR’s USB port.
Then, switch on the OUTPUT [USB] field on the MIDI page (see
p. 214).
222
BRIGHTNESS
Controls the brightness of the image.
COLOR CB
Allows you to change the color. There are five
steps that can be selected by pressing the
lever several times: green, violet, blue, red,
original clip color.
COLOR CR
Allows you to change the color (green, violet,
blue, red, original clip color).
G-70 Music Workstation r
General settings
D Beam
Allows you to control several effects (this
depends on the function you assign to the D
BEAM):
Vinyl RPM‰ Fade to black + playback speed
Cutting‰ Fade to back
Harp, Marimba, Guitar‰ Fade to white
Chimes‰ Lumin
Seashore‰ Sepia
LoFi‰ Color
Sweep‰ Post
Scratch‰ Color Blue
Explosion‰ Color Red
Gunshot‰ Color Violet
Tempo Up & Down + Pitch Up & Down‰
Playback speed
General settings
Here are several functions that apply to the G-70 as
a whole and haven’t been covered elsewhere in this
owner’s manual.
Touch Screen Beep
The G-70’s display generates a beep sound each time
you press a field. That way, you know when you have
selected parameter. You can switch this beep off if you
find it distracting.
(1) Press the [MENU] button.
The display changes to:
Note: The G-70 does not support the Edirol DV-7PR’s dual
stream mode.
• Press the [INIT¥SINGLE¥VALUE] field to reset the currently selected parameter to its default value.
• Press the [INIT¥ALL¥VALUES] field to reset all parameters to their default values.
(4) Press [V-LINK] again to switch off this function (the
button goes dark).
Note: V-LINK messages are transmitted on MIDI channels 13
and 14.
Note: For details on clips/palettes, dissolve time, color difference signals (Cb/Cr), refer to the Edirol DV-7PR manual.
(2) Press the [UTILITY] field, followed by the [GLOBAL]
field.
(3) Press the [TOUCH¥SCREEN¥BEEP] field to switch this
function on or off.
(4) Press the [Back] field to return to the menu, or the
[EXIT] button to return to the main page.
EXIT
Info
There may be times when you perform with a rented
G-70 (and a memory card that contains all your settings), in which case it is important to quickly confirm
whether the G-70 contains the correct wave expansion
board and which system version it uses. You can also
check the remaining capacity of the internal memory
and memory card:
(1) Press the [MENU] button.
223
G-70 Music Workstation
Miscellaneous
(2) Press the [UTILITY] field, followed by the [INFO] field.
● SRX Expansion Board—Displays the name of the
installed wave expansion board (if available).
● Free Space Internal Memory—Informs you about the
remaining storage capacity of the internal memory.
● Free Space Memory Card—Informs you about the
remaining storage capacity of the inserted memory card.
● Version—Displays the version number of the G-70’s
operating system, along with its creation date and time.
(3) Press the [Back] field to return to the menu, or the
[EXIT] button to return to the main page.
EXIT
Initializing the G-70 (Factory Reset)
r
After working extensively with your G-70, you may
want to recall the original factory settings. Before
doing so, however, it would be a good idea to save your
own settings to a memory card (see p. 204) or to
archive them via USB (see p. 211).
Here is how to initialize your G-70:
(1) Press the [MENU] button.
(2) Press the [UTILITY] field, followed by the
[FACTORY¥RESET] field.
(3) Press the [EXECUTE] field to initialize the G-70, or
the [Back] field to return to the menu if you have
changed your mind. (You can also press the [EXIT]
button to return to the main page.)
The message “Operation successful” informs you that
the G-70 has been initialized.
Note: This operation does not affect the data in the G-70’s
internal memory: the settings in the G-70’s internal memory
(SSD) are not erased – but no longer used by the G-70.
224
G-70 Music Workstation r
General settings
20. Specifications
■ Keyboard:
76 synthesizer-action type keys with aftertouch
■ Sound source:
New WX sound engine
Max polyphony
Tones
SRX expansion board
Multitimbral parts
Effects processors
Compatibility
128 voices
1596 tones in 16 families,
48 Drums Set
1 slot (board optional)
32
8 programmable units:
8x Reverb, 8x Chorus for
Arranger/Recorder/16-track
sequencer
8x Reverb, 8x Chorus for Keyboard parts
84x Multi-FX for Keyboard parts
84x effects for External Audio
Input Effect
Parametric equalizer & multiband compressor
GM2/GS
■ Harmonic Bars:
Adjustable via assignable sliders
Upper1, Lower1
9 harmonic bars (16’, 5-1/3’, 8’,
4’, 2-2/3’, 2’, 1-3/5’,
1-1/3’, 1’)
MBass
2 harmonic bars (16’, 8’)
Percussion
On, Off, 2-2/3’, 4’, Slow, Fast
Effects
Leakage Level, Overdrive,
Vibrato/Chorus (On, Off, V1, C1,
V2, C2, V3, C3), Rotary Speaker
Simulation (Slow/Fast, Motor
on/off via MODULATION lever)
Memories
8x3 (Upper1, Lower1, MBass)
programmable registrations
■ Styles:
285 Styles divided in 12 families
120 programmable links to additional Styles (CUSTOM)
Unlimited access
Internal memory, memory card,
floppy disk (via FINDER database)
Style Cover
30 ALL Covers
18 Drum Covers,
24 Bass Covers
Style Makeup Tools
Instrument-oriented editing
User Style Composer
8 tracks with micro and macro
editing
One Touch
4 programmable registrations
per Style
■ Songs:
Real-time SMF player
4 programmable MARK & JUMP
locations
Song Cover
30 ALL Covers
18 Drum Covers,
24 Bass Covers
Song Makeup Tools
Instrument-oriented editing
Lyrics & chord display, score display
Other functions
PLAY LIST function (99 steps)
NEXT SONG function
Text Import/Export & lyrics synchronization
Song Finder
Manages up to 99,999 songs
Play & Search function
■ Sequencer:
16-track sequencer with micro & macro editing functions
■ Display type & controls
Color 1/4 VGA
Touch-screen with 3D-SG (3D
simulated graphics)
Contrast potentiometer
■ Panel controls:
9 assignable sliders
Alpha-dial with push
Cursor
Harmonic Bar, Mixer
Data entry
6 switches (data entry): INC,
DEC, Up, Down, Right, Left
PITCH BEND/MODULATION lever, D Beam controller (with
macro settings), MASTER VOLUME knob, KEYBOARD/
ACCOMP BALANCE, EXTERNAL SOURCE volume knob
Keyboard Part switches
UP1, UP2, UP3, LW1, LW2, MBS
Tone Assign
UP1, UP2, UP3, LW1, LW2, MBS
■ User Programs:
144 SET LIST references for access via front panel
Unlimited access
Internal memory, memory card,
floppy disk (via FINDER database)
Additional functions
Parameter Hold
Song Link
MIDI Set Link
■ Music Assistant registrations:
500 factory registrations
Unlimited number of programmable entries
■ Vocal Harmonist:
4 presets
2 Harmony modes
Vocoder
Effect processors
Voice
Harmony
Others
Talk, Voice-FX (12 presets), Auto
Pitch, Singer
Small (30 macros), Ensemble (30
macros)
24 presets
Noise Gate, Compressor, Reverb
(9 types), Delay (9 types), programmable
Reverb (9 types), Delay (9 types),
Chorus (9 types), programmable
Adjustable input gain,
Level switch
225
G-70 Music Workstation
Specifications
■ Data storage
Floppy disk drive
Internal memory
Memory card
Type of files managed
■ Other functions:
Keyboard Modes
Easy Setting
Chord voicing
Melody Intelligence
Metronome
Singer Key Adapter
Assignable switches
Miscellaneous
System updates
USB
■ Connections
Headphone sockets
3.5”, 2HD/2DD
Solid State Disk
PCMCIA (Compact Flash, Memory Stick, Smart Media, Microdrive)
Styles, Songs (SMF), User Programs, MIDI Sets, Play List, .txt
files
Split (2 slit points), Whole
Arranger, Organ, Piano
ACV (Adaptive Chord Voicing)
18 types
With headphone output & LEVEL
control
–6~+5 semi-tones (automatic
SMF transposition)
2 (programmable)
Tap Tempo, Sync Start/Stop,
V-Link, interactive demo (in several languages)
Flash memory
Data storage & MIDI communication
r
1x main, 1x metronome (with
LEVEL control)
Pedal & footswitch sockets FC-7 controller (programmable)
HOLD FOOTSWITCH,
FOOT SWITCH (programmable)
FOOT PEDAL
Audio connections
Vocal Harmonist
Input: XLR/TRS phone (balanced/
(with MIC/LINE switch) unbalanced)
Outputs: Separate Left/Right or
added to MAIN
External Source
Audio inputs: Left & Right, line
level (with separate effects processor) (RCA/phono)
Metronome
Output (for headphones),
LEVEL control
MAIN outputs
L/Mono, R (1/4”)
DIRECT outputs
L/Mono, R (1/4”)
Video output
Composite, PAL & NTSC
Independent lyrics and chord
display
Others
PCMCIA slot (CompactFlash, Memory Stick, Smart Media,
Microdrive)
USB port (data storage & MIDI communication)
226
■ General specifications:
Power supply
Dimensions (mm)
Weight
Supplied accessories
100~240V (universal), 29W
1294.5 (W) x 158 (H) x 437 (D)
20.5kg
Owner’s Manual, power cord,
metal music stand, CD-ROM
Options
PK-5A Dynamic MIDI Pedal, FC-7 Foot Controller,
MSA/MSD/MSE series floppy disks (Roland & third-party),
RH-25/50/200 Headphones,
DP-2 Pedal switch, DP-6 Pedal switch (piano type),
BOSS FS-5U Foot Switch,
EV-5/7 Expression pedal, BOSS FV-300L Foot Volume/
Expression Pedal,
KC-150/350/550 Keyboard Amplifiers
Memory cards (third-party manufacturers)
Note: Specifications are subject to change without prior notice.
G-70 Music Workstation r
Installing a wave expansion board
21. Appendix
Installing a wave expansion board
Cautions when installing a wave expansion board
• To avoid the risk of damage to internal components that can be
caused by static electricity, please carefully observe the following
whenever you handle the board.
• Before you touch the board, first grasp a metal object (such as a
water pipe), so you are sure that any static electricity you might
have been carrying has been discharged.
• When handling the board, grasp it only by its edges. Avoid
touching any of the electronic components or connectors.
• Save the bag in which the board was originally shipped, and put
the board back into it whenever you need to store or transport
it.
• Use a Phillips screwdriver that is suitable for the size of the screws.
If an unsuitable screwdriver is used, the head of the screws may be
stripped.
• To remove a screw, rotate the screwdriver counter-clockwise. To
tighten the screws, rotate the screwdriver clockwise.
loosen
tighten
• When installing wave expansion boards, remove only the specified
screws.
• Be careful that the screws you remove do not fall into the interior
of the G-70.
• Do not leave the bottom cover removed. After installation of the
wave expansion board, be sure to replace the cover.
• Be careful not to cut your hand on the opening for installing the
board.
• Do not touch any of the printed circuit pathways or connection
terminals.
• Never use excessive force when installing a circuit board. If it
doesn’t fit properly on the first attempt, remove the board and try
again.
• When circuit board installation is complete, double-check your
work.
• Always turn the unit off and unplug the power cord before
attempting installation of the circuit board.
• Install only the specified circuit board(s) (Roland SRX series).
Remove only the specified screws.
How to install a wave expansion board
(1) Before installing a wave expansion board, turn off
the power of the G-70 and all connected devices,
and disconnect all cables, including the G-70’s
power cable.
(2) On the G-70, remove only the four screws shown
in the following diagram, and detach the cover.
The cover is located on the bottom panel.
Screws to be removed
When turning the unit upside-down, get a bunch of
newspapers or magazines, and place them under the
four corners or at both ends to prevent damage to
the buttons and controls. Always orient the G-70 in
such a way that no buttons or controls get damaged.
When turning the G-70 upside-down, handle with
care to avoid dropping it, or allowing it to fall or tip
over.
(3) Plug the connector of the Wave Expansion Board
into the connector of the slot, and at the same
time insert the board holder through the hole of
the wave expansion board.
Wave expansion board
(SRX series)
Position as
shown before
you install the
board.
Connector
(4) Use the installation tool supplied with the wave
expansion board to turn the holders in the LOCK
direction, so the board will be fastened in place.
Installation tool
LOCK
227
G-70 Music Workstation
Appendix
(5) Use the screws that you removed in step 2 to fasten the cover back in place.
■Checking whether the board is recognized
After installing the wave expansion, check to confirm
that the installed board is recognized correctly.
(1) Turn on the power, as described in “Switching the
G-70 on/off” on p. 21.
(2) Press the [MENU] button and the [UTILITY] field.
(3) Press the [INFO] field to select the following page:
r
Check whether the name of the installed Wave
Expansion Board is displayed.
If “No SRX Card” is displayed next to “SRX Expansion
Board”, the wave expansion board is not recognized.
Re-install the wave expansion board correctly.
(4) Press [EXIT] to return to the main page.
228
Accessing the ‘Patches’ of SRXseries expansion boards via MIDI
As you will notice, the CC00 number is always “93”. The
CC32 value, on the other hand, depends on (i) the board
you installed and (ii) the sound you need.
The MIDI standard can only handle 128 program
change numbers, which is why boards with more than
128 Patches use several consecutive CC32 values.
Patches
CC00
CC32
SRX-1
1~41
93
00
SRX-2
1~50
93
01
SRX-3
1~128
93
02
SRX-4
1~128
93
03
SRX-5
1~128
93
04
SRX-5
129~256
93
05
SRX-5
257~312
93
06
SRX-6
1~128
93
07
SRX-6
129~256
93
08
SRX-6
257~384
93
09
SRX-6
384~448
93
10
SRX-7
1~128
93
11
SRX-7
129~256
93
12
SRX-7
257~384
93
13
SRX-7
385~475
93
14
SRX-8
1~128
93
15
SRX-8
129~256
93
16
SRX-8
257~384
93
17
SRX-8
385~448
93
18
SRX-9
1~128
93
19
SRX-9
129~256
93
20
SRX-9
257~384
93
21
SRX-9
385~414
93
22
SRX-10
1~100
93
23
G-70 Music Workstation r
Appendix | MFX and IFX types and parameters
MFX and IFX types and parameters
1. Thru
The effect processor is bypassed.
2. Stereo EQ
This is a four-band stereo equalizer (low, mid x 2, high). Stereo
signals (like certain piano sounds) are thus not combined to a
mono signal before being processed.
● EQ Low Frequency (200, 400Hz)—Frequency of the low
range you wish to boost or cut.
● EQ Low Gain (–15dB~0~15dB)—Gain of the low range.
Negative values reduce the level.
● EQ High Frequency (2000, 4000, 8000Hz)—Frequency of
the high range you wish to boost or cut.
● EQ High Gain (–15dB~0~15dB)—Gain of the high range.
Negative values reduce the level.
● EQ Mid 1 Frequency (200~8000Hz)—Gain of middle
range 1. This is a parametric EQ band.
● EQ Mid 1 Q (0.5, 1.0, 2.0, 4.0, 8.0)—Width of the middle
range 1. Set a higher value for “Q” to narrow the range to
be boosted or cut.
● EQ Mid 2 Gain (–15dB~0~15dB)—Gain of middle range 2.
● EQ Mid 2 Frequency (200~8000Hz)—Gain of the middle
range 2. This is a parametric EQ band.
● EQ Mid 2 Q (0.5, 1.0, 2.0, 4.0, 8.0)—Width of the middle
range 2. Set a higher value for “Q” to narrow the range to
be boosted or cut.
● EQ Mid 2 Gain (–15dB~0~15dB)—Gain of the middle
range 2.
● Level (0~127)—Output level. Use this parameter to compensate for exaggerated level differences resulting from
the settings you made.
3. Overdrive
Creates a soft distortion similar to that produced by vacuum
tube amplifiers.
● Drive (0~127)—Degree of distortion. Also changes the volume.
● Panpot (L64~0~63R)—Stereo location of the output
sound. This is a mono effect that combines incoming signals. You can, however, place the processed signal anywhere between the left and right channels.
● Amp Simulator Type—Allows you to specify what kind of
guitar amp will be simulated: SMALL: small amp, BUILT-IN:
single-unit type amp, 2-STACK: large double stack amp,
3-STACK: large triple stack amp.
● EQ Low Gain (–15dB~0~15dB)—Gain of the low range.
● EQ High Gain (–15dB~0~15dB)—Gain of the high range.
● Level (0~127)—Output level. Use this parameter to compensate for exaggerated level differences resulting from
the settings you made.
4. Distortion
Produces a more intense distortion than the above. The
parameters are the same as for “3. Overdrive”.
5. Phaser
Adds phase-shifted copy to the original sound and modulates
it.
● Phaser Manual (100~8000Hz)—Adjusts the basic frequency that is modulated by the effect.
● Phaser Rate (0.05~10.0Hz)—Frequency, i.e. modulation
speed.
● Phaser Depth (0~127)—Modulation intensity.
● Phaser Resonance (0~127)—Amount of feedback. Higher
values create a rather more “synthetic character”.
● Phaser Mix Level (0~127)—Level of the phase-shifted
sound with respect to the original signal.
● Panpot (L64~0~63R)—Stereo location of the output
sound. This is a mono effect that combines incoming signals. You can, however, place the processed signal anywhere between the left and right channels.
● Level (0~127)—Output level. Use this parameter to compensate for exaggerated level differences resulting from
the settings you made.
6. Spectrum
Spectrum is a type of filter that modifies the timbre by boosting or cutting the level at specific frequencies.
● Spectrum 250Hz Gain (–15dB~0~15dB)
● Spectrum 500Hz Gain (–15dB~0~15dB)
● Spectrum 1000Hz Gain (–15dB~0~15dB)
● Spectrum 1250Hz Gain (–15dB~0~15dB)
● Spectrum 2000Hz Gain (–15dB~0~15dB)
● Spectrum 3150Hz Gain (–15dB~0~15dB)
● Spectrum 4000Hz Gain (–15dB~0~15dB)
● Spectrum 8000Hz Gain (–15dB~0~15dB)—Gain of each
frequency band.
● Spectrum Band Width Q (0.5, 1.0, 2.0, 4.0, 8.0)—Simultaneously adjusts the width of the adjusted ranges for all the
frequency bands.
● Panpot (L64~0~63R)—Stereo location of the output
sound. This is a mono effect that combines incoming signals. You can, however, place the processed signal anywhere between the left and right channels.
● Level (0~127)—Output level. Use this parameter to compensate for exaggerated level differences resulting from
the settings you made.
7. Enhancer
This effect controls the overtone structure of the high frequencies, adding sparkle and tightness to the sound.
● Enhancer Sens (0~127)—Sensitivity of the enhancer.
● Mix Level (0~127)—Level of the overtones generated by
the enhancer.
● EQ Low Gain (–15dB~0~15dB)—Gain of the low range.
● EQ High Gain (–15dB~0~15dB)—Gain of the high range.
● Level (0~127)—Output level. Use this parameter to compensate for exaggerated level differences resulting from
the settings you made.
8. Auto Wah
This effect controls a filter to create cyclic change in timbre
(an automatic wah effect).
● Auto Wah Filter Type (LPF, BPF)—Type of filter. LPF: the
wah effect is applied over a wide frequency range. BPF: the
wah effect is applied over a narrow frequency range.
● Auto Wah Rate (0.05~10.0Hz)—Frequency, i.e. modulation speed.
229
G-70 Music Workstation
Appendix | MFX and IFX types and parameters
● Auto Wah Depth (0~127)—Modulation intensity.
● Auto Wah Sens (0~127)—Adjusts the sensitivity with
which the filter is controlled.
● Auto Wah Manual (0~127)—Adjusts the center frequency at which the effect is applied.
● Auto Wah Peak (0~127)—Adjusts the amount of the wah
effect that will occur in the range of the center frequency.
Set a higher value to narrow the range to be affected.
● Level (0~127)—Output level. Use this parameter to compensate for exaggerated level differences resulting from
the settings you made.
r
9. Rotary
This effect simulates the sound of the rotary speakers often
used with the electric organs. Since the movement of the
high-range and low-range rotors can be set independently,
the unique type of modulation characteristic of these speakers can be simulated quite closely. This effect is most suitable
for electric organ sounds (of the [ORGAN] bank – the Harmonic Bar section has its own Roary effect).
● Tweeter Slow Rate (0.05~10.0Hz)
● Woofer Slow Rate (0.05~10.0Hz)—Slow speed (SLOW) of
the high- or low-frequency rotor.
● Tweeter Fast Rate (0.05~10.0Hz)
● Woofer Fast Rate (0.05~10.0Hz)—Fast speed (FAST) of the
high- or low-frequency rotor.
● Rotary Speed (Slow, Fast)—Simultaneously switches the
rotational speed of the low-frequency and high-frequency
rotors. SLOW: Slows down the rotation to the “Slow Rate”.
FAST: Speeds up the rotation to the “Fast Rate”.
● Tweeter Acceleration (0~15)
● Woofer Acceleration (0~15)—Adjusts the time it takes the
rotor in question to reach the newly selected speed (“Fast”
or “Slow”). Lower values correspond to slower transistions.
● Tweeter Level (0~127)
● Woofer Level (0~127)—Volume of the rotor in question.
● Separation (0~127)—Spatial dispersion of the sound.
● Level (0~127)—Output level.
10. Compressor
Reduces high levels (peaks) and boosts low levels, smoothing
out fluctuations in volume.
● Compressor Sustain (0~127)—Allows you to specify how
strongly incoming signals should be compressed, which
results in a longer sustain.
● Compressor Attack (0~127)—Sets the speed at which
compression starts.
● Panpot (L64~0~63R)—Stereo location of the output
sound. This is a mono effect that combines incoming signals. You can, however, place the processed signal anywhere between the left and right channels.
● Compressor Post Gain (0, +6, +12, +18dB)—Adjusts the
output gain. Use this parameter to make up for a significant volume loss due to extreme settings.
● EQ Low Gain (–15dB~0~15dB)—Gain of the low range.
● EQ High Gain (–15dB~0~15dB)—Gain of the high range.
● Level (0~127)—Output level.
230
11. Limiter
Compresses signals that exceed the specified level, preventing
distortion from occurring. Unlike a compressor, it does not
boost the level of weaker signals.
● Limiter Threshold (0~127)—Adjusts the volume at which
compression begins.
● Limiter Release (0~127)—Allows you to specify how long
signal compression should remain in effect after the signal
volume falls below the Threshold value.
● Limiter Ratio (1.5:1, 2:1, 4:1, 100:1)—Allows you to specify how strongly volume peaks should be compressed.
Choose “100:1” if the Threshold level must never be
exceeded (which is a true limiting function).
● Panpot (L64~0~63R)—Stereo location of the output
sound. This is a mono effect that combines incoming signals. You can, however, place the processed signal anywhere between the left and right channels.
● Limiter Post Gain (0, +6, +12, +18dB)—Adjusts the output gain. Use this parameter to make up for a significant
volume loss due to extreme settings.
● EQ Low Gain (–15dB~0~15dB)—Gain of the low range.
● EQ High Gain (–15dB~0~15dB)—Gain of the high range.
● Level (0~127)—Output level.
12. Hexa-Chorus
Uses a six-phase chorus (six layers of chorused sound) to create a dense and spatial effect.
● Chorus Pre Delay (0.0~100.0ms)—Adjusts the delay
between the incoming direct signal and the moment when
the chorus starts working.
● Chorus Rate (0.05~10.0Hz)—Frequency, i.e. modulation
speed.
● Chorus Depth (0~127)—Modulation intensity.
● Chorus Pre Delay Deviation (0~20)—Adjusts the differences in Pre Delay between each chorus line (there are six
of them).
● Chorus Depth Deviation (-20~0~20)—Adjusts the difference in modulation depth between each chorus sound.
● Chorus Pan Deviation (0~20)—Adjusts the distribution of
the various chorus line in the stereo image.
0: All chorus sounds are in the center.
20: Each chorus sound will be spaced at 60 degree intervals
relative to the center.
● Balance (D100:0W, D50:50W, D0:100W)—Volume balance between the direct (D) and the effect sound (W).
● Level (0~127)—Output level.
13. Trem Chorus
This is a chorus effect with added Tremolo (cyclic modulation
of volume).
● Chorus Pre Delay (0.0~100.0ms)—Adjusts the delay
between the incoming direct signal and the moment when
the chorus starts working.
● Chorus Rate (0.05~10.0Hz)—Frequency, i.e. modulation
speed.
● Chorus Depth (0~127)—Modulation intensity.
● Tremolo Rate (0.05~10.0Hz)—Modulation frequency of
the tremolo effect.
● Tremolo Separation (0~127)—Allows you to set the level
of the tremolo effect with respect to the chorus modulation.
● Tremolo Phase (0~180 deg)—Spread of the tremolo
effect.
G-70 Music Workstation r
Appendix | MFX and IFX types and parameters
● Balance (D100:0W, D50:50W, D0:100W)—Volume balance between the direct (D) and the effect sound (W).
● Level (0~127)—Output level.
● Balance (D100:0W, D50:50W, D0:100W)—Volume balance between the direct (D) and the effect sound (W).
● Level (0~127)—Output level.
14. Space-D
This is a multiple chorus that applies two-phase modulation
in stereo. It gives no impression of modulation, but produces
a transparent chorus effect.
● Chorus Pre Delay (0.0~100.0ms)—Adjusts the delay
between the incoming direct signal and the moment when
the chorus starts working.
● Chorus Rate (0.05~10.0Hz)—Frequency, i.e. modulation
speed.
● Chorus Depth (0~127)—Modulation intensity.
● Chorus Phase (0~180deg)—Spatial spread of the sound.
● EQ Low Gain (–15dB~0~15dB)—Gain of the low range.
● EQ High Gain (–15dB~0~15dB)—Gain of the high range.
● Balance (D100:0W, D50:50W, D0:100W)—Volume balance between the direct (D) and the effect sound (W).
● Level (0~127)—Output level.
17. Step Flanger
A Step Flanger is a flanger effect with clearly noticeable steps
rather than continuous pitch changes.
● Flanger Pre Delay (0.0~100.0ms)—Adjusts the delay time
from when the direct sound begins until the flanger sound
is heard.
● Flanger Rate (0.05~10.0Hz)—Frequency, i.e. modulation
speed.
● Flanger Depth (0~127)—Modulation intensity.
● Flanger Feedback (–98%~0~98%)—Adjusts the proportion of the flanger sound that is fed back into the effect.
Negative (–) settings will invert the phase.
● Step Rate (0.10~20.0Hz, note)—Rate (period) of pitch
change
● Flanger Phase (0~180deg)—Spatial spread of the sound.
● EQ Low Gain (–15dB~0~15dB)—Gain of the low range.
● EQ High Gain (–15dB~0~15dB)—Gain of the high range.
● Balance (D100:0W, D50:50W, D0:100W)—Volume balance between the direct (D) and the effect sound (W).
● Level (0~127)—Output level.
15. St. Chorus
This is a stereo chorus. A filter is provided so that you can
adjust the timbre of the chorus sound.
● Filter Type (OFF, LPF, HPF)—Type of filter. OFF: no filter is
used. LPF: cuts the frequency range above the Cutoff value.
HPF: cuts the frequency range below the Cutoff value.
● Cutoff Frequency (200~8000Hz)—Basic frequency of the
filter.
● Chorus Pre Delay (0.0~100.0ms)—Adjusts the delay
between the incoming direct signal and the moment when
the chorus starts working.
● Chorus Rate (0.05~10.0Hz)—Frequency, i.e. modulation
speed.
● Chorus Depth (0~127)—Modulation intensity.
● Chorus Phase (0~180 deg)—Spatial spread of the sound.
● EQ Low Gain (–15dB~0~15dB)—Gain of the low range.
● EQ High Gain (–15dB~0~15dB)—Gain of the high range.
● Balance (D100:0W, D50:50W, D0:100W)—Volume balance between the direct (D) and the effect sound (W).
● Level (0~127)—Output level.
16. St. Flanger
This is a stereo flanger. It produces a metallic resonance that
rises and falls like a jet airplane taking off or landing.
● Filter Type (OFF, LPF, HPF)—Type of filter. OFF: no filter is
used. LPF: cuts the frequency range above the Cutoff value.
HPF: cuts the frequency range below the Cutoff value.
● Cutoff Frequency (200~8000Hz)—Basic frequency of the
filter.
● Flanger Pre Delay (0.0~100.0ms)—Adjusts the delay time
from when the direct sound begins until the flanger sound
is heard.
● Flanger Rate (0.05~10.0Hz)—Frequency, i.e. modulation
speed.
● Flanger Depth (0~127)—Modulation intensity.
● Flanger Phase (0~180 deg)—Spatial spread of the sound.
● Flanger Feedback (–98%~0~98%)—Adjusts the proportion of the flanger sound that is fed back into the effect.
Negative (–) settings will invert the phase.
● EQ Low Gain (-15dB~0~15dB)—Gain of the low range.
● EQ High Gain (–15dB~0~15dB)—Gain of the high range.
18. St. Delay
Delay is an effect that allows you repeat the input signal, thus
creating echoes (repetition).
● Delay FBK Mode (Normal, Cross)—Select the way in which
delay sound is fed back into the effect. NORMAL: The left
delay sound will be fed back into the left delay, and the
right delay sound into the right delay. CROSS: The left
delay sound will be fed back into the right delay, and the
right delay sound into the light delay.
● Delay Left (0.0~500.0ms)—Adjust the time from the direct
sound until when the left delay sound is heard.
● Delay Right (0.0~500.0ms)—Adjust the time from the
direct sound until when the right delay sound is heard.
● FBK Phase Left (Normal, Invert)—Select the phase of the
left delay sound. NORMAL: Phase is not changed. INVERT:
Phase is inverted.
● FBK Phase Right (Normal, Invert)—Select the phase of the
left delay sound. NORMAL: Phase is not changed. INVERT:
Phase is inverted.
● Delay Feedback (–98%~0~98%)—Adjusts the amount of
the delay sound that’s fed back into the effect. Negative (–)
settings invert the phase.
● Delay HF Damp (200~8000Hz, Bypass)—Adjusts the frequency above which sound fed back to the effect is filtered
out. If you don’t want to filter out any high frequencies, set
this parameter to BYPASS.
● EQ Low Gain (–15dB~0~15dB)—Gain of the low range.
● EQ High Gain (–15dB~0~15dB)—Gain of the high range.
● Balance (D100:0W, D50:50W, D0:100W)—Volume balance between the direct (D) and the effect sound (W).
● Level (0~127)—Output level.
19. Mod. Delay
This effect adds modulation to the delayed sound, producing
an effect similar to a Flanger.
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● Delay FBK Mode (Normal, Cross)—Select the way in which
delay sound is fed back into the effect. NORMAL: The left
delay sound will be fed back into the left delay, and the
right delay sound into the right delay. CROSS: The left
delay sound will be fed back into the right delay, and the
right delay sound into the light delay.
● Delay Left (0.0~500.0ms)—Adjust the time from the direct
sound until when the left delay sound is heard.
● Delay Right (0.0~500.0ms)—Adjusts the time until the
delay sound is heard.
● Delay Feedback (–98%~0~98%)—Adjusts the amount of
the delay sound that’s fed back into the effect. Negative (–)
settings invert the phase.
● Delay HF Damp (200~8000Hz, Bypass)—Adjusts the frequency above which sound fed back to the effect is filtered
out. If you don’t want to filter out any high frequencies, set
this parameter to BYPASS.
● Modulation Rate (0.05~10.0Hz)—Frequency, i.e. modulation speed.
● Modulation Depth (0~127)—Adjust the depth of the
modulation.
● Modulation Phase (0~180 deg)—Adjust the spatial spread
of the sound
● EQ Low Gain (–15dB~0~15dB)—Gain of the low range.
● EQ High Gain (–15dB~0~15dB)—Gain of the high range.
● Balance (D100:0W, D50:50W, D0:100W)—Volume balance between the direct (D) and the effect sound (W).
● Level (0~127)—Output level.
20. 3 Tap Delay
The Triple Tap Delay produces three delay sounds: center, left
and right.
● Delay Left (200~1000ms, note)—Adjust the time from the
direct sound until when the left delay sound is heard.
● Delay Right (200~1000ms, note)—Adjust the time from
the direct sound until when the right delay sound is heard.
● Delay Center (200~1000ms, note)—Adjust the time delay
from the direct sound until when the center delay sound is
heard.
● Delay Feedback (–98%~0~98%)—Adjusts the amount of
the delay sound that’s fed back into the effect. Negative (–)
settings invert the phase.
● Delay HF Damp (200~8000Hz, Bypass)—Adjusts the frequency above which sound fed back to the effect is filtered
out. If you don’t want to filter out any high frequencies, set
this parameter to BYPASS.
● Delay Level Left (0~127)—Adjust the volume of the left
delay sound.
● Delay Level Right (0~127)—Adjust the volume of the right
delay sound.
● Delay Level Center (0~127)—Adjust the volume of the
center delay sound.
● EQ Low Gain (–15dB~0~15dB)—Gain of the low range.
● EQ High Gain (–15dB~0~15dB)—Gain of the high range.
● Balance (D100:0W, D50:50W, D0:100W)—Volume balance between the direct (D) and the effect sound (W).
● Level (0~127)—Output level.
21. 4 Tap Delay
Delay with four repetition lines.
● Delay 1~4 (200~1000ms, note)—Adjusts the time until
the delay is heard.
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● Delay Level 1~4 (0~127)—Output level of the delay
sound.
● Delay Feedback (–98%~0~98%)—Adjusts the amount of
the delay sound that’s fed back into the effect. Negative (–)
settings invert the phase.
● Delay HF Damp (200~8000Hz, Bypass)—Adjusts the frequency above which sound fed back to the effect is filtered
out. If you don’t want to filter out any high frequencies, set
this parameter to BYPASS.
● Balance (D100:0W, D50:50W, D0:100W)—Volume balance between the direct (D) and the effect sound (W).
● Level (0~127)—Output level.
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22. Time Delay
This effect controls the delay time and pitch in realtime.
Lengthening the delay time will lower the pitch, and shortening it will raise the pitch.
● Delay Time (200~1000ms, note)—Adjusts the time until
the delay is heard.
● Delay Feedback (–98%~0~98%)—Adjusts the amount of
the delay sound that’s fed back into the effect. Negative (–)
settings invert the phase.
● Delay Acceleration (0~15)—Adjusts the time over which
the Delay Time changes from the current setting to a specified new setting. The rate of change for the Delay Time
directly affects the rate of pitch change.
● Delay HF Damp (200~8000Hz, Bypass)—Adjusts the frequency above which sound fed back to the effect is filtered
out. If you don’t want to filter out any high frequencies, set
this parameter to BYPASS.
● Panpot (L64~0~63R)—Stereo location of the output
sound. This is a mono effect that combines incoming signals. You can, however, place the processed signal anywhere between the left and right channels.
● EQ Low Gain (–15dB~0~15dB)—Gain of the low range.
● EQ High Gain (–15dB~0~15dB)—Gain of the high range.
● Balance (D100:0W, D50:50W, D0:100W)—Volume balance between the direct (D) and the effect sound (W).
● Level (0~127)—Output level.
23. 2 Pitch Shifter
A Pitch Shifter changes the pitch of the original sound. This
2-voice effect contains two pitch shifters and adds two transposed copies to the original sound.
● Pitch Shift Mode (1~5)—Higher settings of this parameter
will result in slower response, but steadier pitch.
● Pitch A Coarse (–24~0~+12 semitone)—Adjust the pitch
of Pitch Shift A in semitone steps (–2~+1 octaves).
● Pitch B Coarse (–24~0~+12 semitone)—Adjust the pitch
of Pitch Shift B in semitone steps (–2~+1 octaves).
● Pitch A Fine (–100~0~+100 cent)—Make fine adjustments to the pitch of Pitch Shift A in 2-cent steps (–100~
+100 cents). One cent is 1/100th of a semitone.
● Pitch B Fine (–100~0~+100 cent)—Make fine adjustments to the pitch of Pitch Shift B in 2-cent steps (–100~
+100 cents). One cent is 1/100th of a semitone.
● Pitch A Pre Delay (0.0~500.0ms)—Adjust the time delay
from when the direct sound begins until the Pitch Shift A
sound is heard.
● Pitch B Pre Delay (0.0~500.0ms)—Adjust the time delay
from when the direct sound begins until the Pitch Shift B
sound is heard.
● Pitch A Panpot (L64~0~63R)—Adjust the stereo location
of the Pitch Shift A sound. L64 is far left, 0 is center, and
63R is far right.
● Pitch B Panpot (L64~0~63R)—Adjust the stereo location
of the Pitch Shift B sound. L64 is far left, 0 is center, and
63R is far right.
● Level Balance (A100:0B, A50:50B, A0:100B)—Adjust the
volume balance between the Pitch Shift A and Pitch Shift B
sounds. When set to A100:0B, only the sound of Pitch Shift
A is output; when set to A0:100B, only the sound of Pitch
Shift B is output.
● Balance (D100:0W, D50:50W, D0:100W)—Volume balance between the direct (D) and the effect sound (W).
● Level (0~127)—Output level.
24. FBK Pitch
Pitch Shifter with several echoes.
● Pitch Shift Mode (1~5)—Higher settings of this parameter
will result in slower response, but steadier pitch.
● Pitch Coarse (–24~0~+12 semitone)—Adjust the pitch of
the pitch shifted sound in semitone steps (–2~+1 octaves).
● Pitch Fine (–100~0~+100 cent)—Make fine adjustments
to the pitch of the pitch shifted sound in 2-cent steps (one
cent is 1/100th of a semi tone).
● Pitch Pre Delay (0.0~500.0ms)—Adjust the time delay
from when the direct sound begins until the pitch shifted
sound is heard.
● Pitch Feedback (–98%~0~98%)—Adjust the proportion
(%) of the processed sound that is fed back into the effect.
Negative (-) settings will invert the phase.
● Panpot (L64~0~63R)—Stereo location of the output
sound. This is a mono effect that combines incoming signals. You can, however, place the processed signal anywhere between the left and right channels.
● EQ Low Gain (–15dB~0~15dB)—Gain of the low range.
● EQ High Gain (–15dB~0~15dB)—Gain of the high range.
● Balance (D100:0W, D50:50W, D0:100W)—Volume balance between the direct (D) and the effect sound (W).
● Level (0~127)—Output level.
25. Reverb
A nice Reverb effect.
● Reverb Type (Room 1, Room 2, Stage 1, Stage 2, Hall 1,
Hall 2)—Type of reverb.
Room1: Dense reverb with short decay.
Room2: Sparse reverb with short decay.
Stage1: Reverb with greater late reverberation.
Stage2: Reverb with strong early reflections.
Hall1: Reverb with clear reverberance.
Hall2: Reverb with rich reverberance.
● Reverb Pre Delay (0.0~100.0ms)—Adjusts the delay time
from the direct sound until the reverb sound is heard.
● Reverb Time (0~127)—Time length of reverberation.
● Reverb HF Damp (200~8000Hz, Bypass)—Adjusts the frequency above which sound fed back to the effect is filtered
out. If you don’t want to filter out any high frequencies, set
this parameter to BYPASS.
● EQ Low Gain (–15dB~0~15dB)—Gain of the low range.
● EQ High Gain (–15dB~0~15dB)—Gain of the high range.
● Balance (D100:0W, D50:50W, D0:100W)—Volume balance between the direct (D) and the effect sound (W).
● Level (0~127)—Output level.
26. Gate Reverb
This is a special type of reverb in which the reverberant sound
is cut off before its natural length.
● Reverb Type (Normal, Reverse, Sweep 1, Sweep 2)—Type
of reverb.
NORMAL: Conventional gated reverb.
REVERSE: Backwards reverb.
SWEEP1: The reverberant sound moves from right to left.
SWEEP2: The reverberant sound moves from left to right.
● Reverb Pre Delay (0.0~100.0ms)—Adjusts the delay time
from the direct sound until the reverb sound is heard.
● Reverb Gate Time (5~500ms)—Adjusts the time from
when the reverb is heard until it disappears.
● EQ Low Gain (–15dB~0~15dB)—Gain of the low range.
● EQ High Gain (–15dB~0~15dB)—Gain of the high range.
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● Balance (D100:0W, D50:50W, D0:100W)—Volume balance between the direct (D) and the effect sound (W).
● Level (0~127)—Output level.
27. OD‰ Chorus
This effect connects an Overdrive and a Chorus in series.
(“Series” means that the output signal of the first effect is
also processed by the second).
● Overdrive Drive (0~127)—Degree of distortion. Also
changes the volume.
● Overdrive Panpot (L64~0~63R)—Stereo location of the
overdrive sound.
● Chorus Pre Delay (0.0~100.0ms)—Adjusts the delay
between the incoming direct signal and the moment when
the chorus starts working.
● Chorus Rate (0.05~10.0Hz)—Frequency, i.e. modulation
speed.
● Chorus Depth (0~127)—Modulation intensity.
● Chorus Balance (D100:0W, D50:50W, D0:100W)—Volume balance between the direct sound (D) and the chorus
sound (W).
● Level (0~127)—Output level.
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28. OD‰ Flanger
This effect connects an Overdrive and a Flanger in series.
● Overdrive Drive (0~127)—Degree of distortion. Also
changes the volume.
● Overdrive Panpot (L64~0~63R)—Stereo location of the
overdrive sound.
● Flanger Pre Delay (0.0~100.0ms)—Adjusts the delay time
from when the direct sound begins until the flanger sound
is heard.
● Flanger Rate (0.05~10.0Hz)—Frequency, i.e. modulation
speed.
● Flanger Depth (0~127)—Modulation intensity.
● Flanger Feedback (–98%~0~98%)—Adjusts the proportion of the flanger sound that is fed back into the effect.
Negative (–) settings will invert the phase.
● Flanger Balance (D100:0W, D50:50W, D0:100W)—Volume balance between the direct sound (D) and the flanger
sound (W).
● Level (0~127)—Output level.
29. OD‰ Delay
This effect connects an overdrive and a delay in series.
● Overdrive Drive (0~127)—Degree of distortion. Also
changes the volume.
● Overdrive Panpot (L64~0~63R)—Stereo location of the
overdrive sound.
● Delay Time (0.0~500.0ms)—Adjusts the time until the
delay is heard.
● Delay Feedback (–98%~0~98%)—Adjusts the amount of
the delay sound that’s fed back into the effect. Negative (–)
settings invert the phase.
● Delay HF Damp (200~8000Hz, Bypass)—Adjusts the frequency above which sound fed back to the effect is filtered
out. If you don’t want to filter out any high frequencies, set
this parameter to BYPASS.
● Delay Balance (D100:0W, D50:50W, D0:100W)—Adjusts
the volume balance between the sound that is sent
through the delay (W) and the sound that is not sent
through the delay (D).
● Level (0~127)—Output level.
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30. DST‰ Chorus
This effect connects distortion and a chorus in series.
● Distortion Drive (0~127)—Degree of distortion. Also
changes the volume.
● Distortion Panpot (L64~0~63R)—Stereo location of the
distortion sound.
● Chorus Pre Delay (0.0~100.0ms)—Adjusts the delay
between the incoming direct signal and the moment when
the chorus starts working.
● Chorus Rate (0.05~10.0Hz)—Frequency, i.e. modulation
speed.
● Chorus Depth (0~127)—Modulation intensity.
● Chorus Balance (D100:0W, D50:50W, D0:100W)—Volume balance between the direct sound (D) and the chorus
sound (W).
● Level (0~127)—Output level.
31. DST‰ Flanger
This effect connects distortion and a flanger effect in series.
● Distortion Drive (0~127)—Degree of distortion. Also
changes the volume.
● Distortion Panpot (L64~0~63R)—Stereo location of the
distortion sound.
● Flanger Pre Delay (0.0~100.0ms)—Adjusts the delay time
from when the direct sound begins until the flanger sound
is heard.
● Flanger Rate (0.05~10.0Hz)—Frequency, i.e. modulation
speed.
● Flanger Depth (0~127)—Modulation intensity.
● Flanger Feedback (–98%~0~98%)—Adjusts the proportion of the flanger sound that is fed back into the effect.
Negative (–) settings will invert the phase.
● Flanger Balance (D100:0W, D50:50W, D0:100W)—Volume balance between the direct sound (D) and the flanger
sound (W).
● Level (0~127)—Output level.
32. DST‰ Delay
This effect connects distortion and a delay effect in series.
● Distortion Drive (0~127)—Degree of distortion. Also
changes the volume.
● Distortion Panpot (L64~0~63R)—Stereo location of the
distortion sound.
● Delay Time (0.0~500.0ms)—Adjusts the time until the
delay is heard.
● Delay Feedback (–98%~0~98%)—Adjusts the amount of
the delay sound that’s fed back into the effect. Negative (–)
settings invert the phase.
● Delay HF Damp (200~8000Hz, Bypass)—Adjusts the frequency above which sound fed back to the effect is filtered
out. If you don’t want to filter out any high frequencies, set
this parameter to BYPASS.
● Delay Balance (D100:0W, D50:50W, D0:100W)—Adjusts
the volume balance between the sound that is sent
through the delay (W) and the sound that is not sent
through the delay (D).
● Level (0~127)—Output level.
33. EH‰ Chorus
This effect connects an enhancer and a chorus in series.
● Enhancer Sens (0~127)—Sensitivity of the enhancer.
● Enhancer Mix Level (0~127)—Level of the overtones generated by the enhancer.
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● Chorus Pre Delay (0.0~100.0ms)—Adjusts the delay
between the incoming direct signal and the moment when
the chorus starts working.
● Chorus Rate (0.05~10.0Hz)—Frequency, i.e. modulation
speed.
● Chorus Depth (0~127)—Modulation intensity.
● Chorus Balance (D100:0W, D50:50W, D0:100W)—Volume balance between the direct sound (D) and the chorus
sound (W).
● Level (0~127)—Output level.
34. EH‰ Flanger
This effect connects an enhancer and a flanger in series.
● Enhancer Sens (0~127)—Sensitivity of the enhancer.
● Enhancer Mix Level (0~127)—Level of the overtones generated by the enhancer.
● Flanger Pre Delay (0.0~100.0ms)—Adjusts the delay time
from when the direct sound begins until the flanger sound
is heard.
● Flanger Rate (0.05~10.0Hz)—Frequency, i.e. modulation
speed.
● Flanger Depth (0~127)—Modulation intensity.
● Flanger Feedback (–98%~0~98%)—Adjusts the proportion of the flanger sound that is fed back into the effect.
Negative (–) settings will invert the phase.
● Flanger Balance (D100:0W, D50:50W, D0:100W)—Volume balance between the direct sound (D) and the flanger
sound (W).
● Level (0~127)—Output level.
35. EH‰ Delay
This effect connects an enhancer and a delay in series.
● Enhancer Sens (0~127)—Sensitivity of the enhancer.
● Enhancer Mix Level (0~127)—Level of the overtones generated by the enhancer.
● Delay Time (0.0~500.0ms)—Adjusts the time until the
delay is heard.
● Delay Feedback (–98%~0~98%)—Adjusts the amount of
the delay sound that’s fed back into the effect. Negative (–)
settings invert the phase.
● Delay HF Damp (200~8000Hz, Bypass)—Adjusts the frequency above which sound fed back to the effect is filtered
out. If you don’t want to filter out any high frequencies, set
this parameter to BYPASS.
● Delay Balance (D100:0W, D50:50W, D0:100W)—Adjusts
the volume balance between the sound that is sent
through the delay (W) and the sound that is not sent
through the delay (D).
● Level (0~127)—Output level.
36. Chorus‰ DLY
This effect connects a chorus and a delay in series.
● Chorus Pre Delay (0.0~100.0ms)—Adjusts the delay
between the incoming direct signal and the moment when
the chorus starts working.
● Chorus Rate (0.05~10.0Hz)—Frequency, i.e. modulation
speed.
● Chorus Depth (0~127)—Modulation intensity.
● Chorus Balance (D100:0W, D50:50W, D0:100W)—Volume balance between the direct sound (D) and the chorus
sound (W).
● Delay Time (0.0~500.0ms)—Adjusts the time until the
delay is heard.
● Delay Feedback (–98%~0~98%)—Adjusts the amount of
the delay sound that’s fed back into the effect. Negative (–)
settings invert the phase.
● Delay HF Damp (200~8000Hz, Bypass)—Adjusts the frequency above which sound fed back to the effect is filtered
out. If you don’t want to filter out any high frequencies, set
this parameter to BYPASS.
● Delay Balance (D100:0W, D50:50W, D0:100W)—Adjusts
the volume balance between the sound that is sent
through the delay (W) and the sound that is not sent
through the delay (D).
● Level (0~127)—Output level.
37. Flanger‰ DLY
This effect connects a flanger and a delay in series.
● Flanger Pre Delay (0.0~100.0ms)—Adjusts the delay time
from when the direct sound begins until the flanger sound
is heard.
● Flanger Rate (0.05~10.0Hz)—Frequency, i.e. modulation
speed.
● Flanger Depth (0~127)—Modulation intensity.
● Flanger Feedback (–98%~0~98%)—Adjusts the proportion of the flanger sound that is fed back into the effect.
Negative (–) settings will invert the phase.
● Flanger Balance (D100:0W, D50:50W, D0:100W)—Volume balance between the direct sound (D) and the flanger
sound (W).
● Delay Time (0.0~500.0ms)—Adjusts the time until the
delay is heard.
● Delay Feedback (–98%~0~98%)—Adjusts the amount of
the delay sound that’s fed back into the effect. Negative (–)
settings invert the phase.
● Delay HF Damp (200~8000Hz, Bypass)—Adjusts the frequency above which sound fed back to the effect is filtered
out. If you don’t want to filter out any high frequencies, set
this parameter to BYPASS.
● Delay Balance (D100:0W, D50:50W, D0:100W)—Adjusts
the volume balance between the sound that is sent
through the delay (W) and the sound that is not sent
through the delay (D).
● Level (0~127)—Output level.
38. CHO‰ Flanger
This effect connects a chorus and a flanger in series.
● Chorus Pre Delay (0.0~100.0ms)—Adjusts the delay
between the incoming direct signal and the moment when
the chorus starts working.
● Chorus Rate (0.05~10.0Hz)—Modulation frequency of the
chorus effect.
● Chorus Depth (0~127)—Modulation intensity of the chorus effect.
● Chorus Balance (D100:0W, D50:50W, D0:100W)—Volume balance between the direct sound (D) and the chorus
sound (W).
● Flanger Pre Delay (0.0~100.0ms)—Adjusts the delay time
from when the direct sound begins until the flanger sound
is heard.
● Flanger Rate (0.05~10.0Hz)—Modulation frequency of
the flanger effect.
● Flanger Depth (0~127)—Modulation intensity of the
flanger effect.
● Flanger Feedback (–98%~0~98%)—Adjusts the proportion of the flanger sound that is fed back into the effect.
Negative (–) settings will invert the phase.
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● Flanger Balance (D100:0W, D50:50W, D0:100W)—Volume balance between the direct sound (D) and the flanger
sound (W).
● Level (0~127)—Output level.
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39. CHO/Delay
This effect connects a chorus and a delay in parallel. (“Parallel” means that the input signal is processed by two effects
that do not interact.)
● Chorus Pre Delay (0.0~100.0ms)—Adjusts the delay
between the incoming direct signal and the moment when
the chorus starts working.
● Chorus Rate (0.05~10.0Hz)—Frequency, i.e. modulation
speed.
● Chorus Depth (0~127)—Modulation intensity.
● Chorus Balance (D100:0W, D50:50W, D0:100W)—Volume balance between the direct sound (D) and the chorus
sound (W).
● Delay Time (0.0~500.0ms)—Adjusts the time until the
delay is heard.
● Delay Feedback (–98%~0~98%)—Adjusts the amount of
the delay sound that’s fed back into the effect. Negative (–)
settings invert the phase.
● Delay HF Damp (200~8000Hz, Bypass)—Adjusts the frequency above which sound fed back to the effect is filtered
out. If you don’t want to filter out any high frequencies, set
this parameter to BYPASS.
● Delay Balance (D100:0W, D50:50W, D0:100W)—Adjusts
the volume balance between the sound that is sent
through the delay (W) and the sound that is not sent
through the delay (D).
● Level (0~127)—Output level.
40. Flanger/DLY
This effect connects a flanger and a delay in parallel.
● Flanger Pre Delay (0.0~100.0ms)—Adjusts the delay time
from when the direct sound begins until the flanger sound
is heard.
● Flanger Rate (0.05~10.0Hz)—Frequency, i.e. modulation
speed.
● Flanger Depth (0~127)—Modulation intensity.
● Flanger Feedback (–98%~0~98%)—Adjusts the proportion of the flanger sound that is fed back into the effect.
Negative (–) settings will invert the phase.
● Flanger Balance (D100:0W, D50:50W, D0:100W)—Volume balance between the direct sound (D) and the flanger
sound (W).
● Delay Time (0.0~500.0ms)—Adjusts the time until the
delay is heard.
● Delay Feedback (–98%~0~98%)—Adjusts the amount of
the delay sound that’s fed back into the effect. Negative (–)
settings invert the phase.
● Delay HF Damp (200~8000Hz, Bypass)—Adjusts the frequency above which sound fed back to the effect is filtered
out. If you don’t want to filter out any high frequencies, set
this parameter to BYPASS.
● Delay Balance (D100:0W, D50:50W, D0:100W)—Adjusts
the volume balance between the sound that is sent
through the delay (W) and the sound that is not sent
through the delay (D).
● Level (0~127)—Output level.
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41. CHO/Flanger
This effect connects a chorus and a flanger in parallel.
● Chorus Pre Delay (0.0~100.0ms)—Adjusts the delay
between the incoming direct signal and the moment when
the chorus starts working.
● Chorus Rate (0.05~10.0Hz)—Modulation frequency of the
chorus effect.
● Chorus Depth (0~127)—Modulation intensity of the chorus effect.
● Chorus Balance (D100:0W, D50:50W, D0:100W)—Volume balance between the direct sound (D) and the chorus
sound (W).
● Flanger Pre Delay (0.0~100.0ms)—Adjusts the delay time
from when the direct sound begins until the flanger sound
is heard.
● Flanger Rate (0.05~10.0Hz)—Modulation frequency of
the flanger effect.
● Flanger Depth (0~127)—Modulation intensity of the
flanger effect.
● Flanger Feedback (–98%~0~98%)—Adjusts the proportion of the flanger sound that is fed back into the effect.
Negative (–) settings will invert the phase.
● Flanger Balance (D100:0W, D50:50W, D0:100W)—Volume balance between the direct sound (D) and the flanger
sound (W).
● Level (0~127)—Output level.
42. Isolator
This is an equalizer which cuts the volume greatly, allowing
you to add a special effect to the sound by cutting the volume in varying ranges.
● Boost/Cut Low/Mid/High Level (–60~0~4 [dB])—These
boost and cut each of the High, Middle, and Low frequency
ranges. At -60dB, the sound becomes inaudible. 0dB is
equivalent to the input level of the sound.
● Anti Phase Low Sw (Off, On)—Turns the Anti-Phase function on and off for the Low frequency ranges. When turned
on, the counter-channel of stereo sound is inverted and
added to the signal.
● Anti Phase Low Level (0~127)—Adjusts the level settings
for the Low frequency ranges. Adjusting this level for certain frequencies allows you to lend emphasis to specific
parts. (This is effective only for stereo source.)
● Anti Phase Mid Sw (Off, On)—Turns the Anti-Phase function on and off for the Middle frequency ranges. When
turned on, the counter-channel of stereo sound is inverted
and added to the signal.
● Anti Phase Mid Level (0~127)—Adjusts the level settings
for the Middle frequency ranges. Adjusting this level for
certain frequencies allows you to lend emphasis to specific
parts. (This is effective only for stereo source.)
● Low Boost Sw (Off, On)—Turns Low Booster on/off.
This emphasizes the bottom to create a heavy bass sound.
● Low Boost Level (0~127)—Increasing this value gives you
a heavier low end. Depending on the Isolator and filter settings this effect may be hard to distinguish.
● Level (0~127)—Output level.
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43. Low Boost
Boosts the volume of the lower range, creating powerful
lows.
● Boost Frequency (50~125 [Hz])—Center frequency at
which the lower range will be boosted.
● Boost Gain (0~12 [dB])—Amount by which the lower
range will be boosted.
● Boost Width (Wide, Mid, Narrow)—Width of the lower
range that will be boosted.
● EQ Low Gain (-15dB~0~15dB)—Gain of the low frequency range.
● EQ High Gain (-15dB~0~15dB)—Gain of the high frequency range.
● Level (0~127)—Output level.
44. Super Filter
This is a filter with an extremely sharp slope. The cutoff frequency can be varied cyclically.
● Filter Type (LPF, BPF, HPF, NOTCH)—Filter type. Frequency range that will pass through each filter. LPF: frequencies below the cutoff. BPF: frequencies in the region
of the cutoff. HPF: frequencies above the cutoff. NOTCH:
frequencies other than the region of the cutoff.
● Filter Slope (–12, –24, –36 [dB])—Amount of attenuation
per octave: –36dB: extremely steep, –24dB: steep, –12dB:
gentle.
● Filter Cutoff (0~127)—Cutoff frequency of the filter.
Increasing this value will raise the cutoff frequency.
● Filter Resonance (0~127)—Filter resonance level. Increasing this value will emphasize the region near the cutoff
frequency.
● Filter Gain (0~12 [dB])—Amount of boost for the filter
output.
● Modulation Sw (Off, On)—On/off switch for cyclic
change.
● Modulation Wave (TRI, SQR, SIN, SAW1, SAW2)—How
the cutoff frequency will be modulated: TRI: triangle wave,
SQR: square wave, SIN: sine wave, SAW1: sawtooth wave
(upward), SWA2: sawtooth wave (downward)
● Rate [sync] (Hz, Note)—Use this parameter to specify
whether (“Note”) or not (“Hz”) the modulation rate should
be synchronized to the Arranger or Recorder tempo.
Depending on your choice, the setting range of the following parameter refers to a speed (Hz) or a note value.
● Rate [Hz] (0.05~10.00Hz)—Rate of modulation.
● Rate [note] (musical notes)—Rate parameters can be set
as a note-value of a tempo if you set the “Sync” parameter
above to “Note”. Specify the value of the desired note.
● Depth (0~127)—Depth of modulation.
● Attack (0~127)—Speed at which the cutoff frequency will
change This is effective if Modulation Wave is SQR, SAW1,
or SAW2.
● Level (0~127)—Output level.
45. Step Filter
This is a filter whose cutoff frequency can be modulated in
steps. You can specify the pattern by which the cutoff frequency will change.
● Step 1~16 (0~127)—Cutoff frequency at each step
● Rate [sync] (Hz, Note)—Use this parameter to specify
whether (“Note”) or not (“Hz”) the rate should be synchronized to the Arranger or Recorder tempo. Depending on
your choice, the setting range of the following parameter
refers to a speed (Hz) or a note value.
● Rate [Hz] (0.05~10.00Hz)—Rate of modulation.
● Rate [note] (musical notes)—Rate parameters can be set
as a note-value of a tempo if you set the “Sync” parameter
above to “Note”. Specify the value of the desired note.
● Attack (0~127)—Speed at which the cutoff frequency
changes between steps.
● Filter Type (LPF, BPF, HPF, NOTCH)—Filter type. Frequency range that will pass through each filter. LPF: frequencies below the cutoff. BPF: frequencies in the region
of the cutoff. HPF: frequencies above the cutoff. NOTCH:
frequencies other than the region of the cutoff.
● Filter Slope (–12, –24, –36 [dB])—Amount of attenuation
per octave: –36dB: extremely steep, –24dB: steep, –12dB:
gentle.
● Filter Resonance (0~127)—Filter resonance level. Increasing this value will emphasize the region near the cutoff
frequency.
● Filter Gain (0~12 [dB])—Amount of boost for the filter
output.
● Level (0~127)—Output level.
46. Humanizer
Adds a vowel character to the sound, making it similar to a
human voice.
● Drive Sw (OFF,ON)—Turns Drive on/off.
● Drive (0~127)—Degree of distortion. Also changes the volume.
● Vowel 1 (a, e, i, o, u)
● Vowel 2 (a, e, i, o, u)—Selects the vowel.
● Rate [sync] (Hz, Note)—Use this parameter to specify
whether (“Note”) or not (“Hz”) the rate should be synchronized to the Arranger or Recorder tempo. Depending on
your choice, the setting range of the following parameter
refers to a speed (Hz) or a note value.
● Rate [Hz] (0.05~10.00Hz)—Frequency at which the two
vowels switch.
● Rate [note] (musical notes)—Rate parameters can be set
as a note-value of a tempo if you set the “Sync” parameter
above to “Note”. Specify the value of the desired note.
● Depth (0~127)—Effect depth.
● Input Sync Sw (Off, On)—Determines whether the LFO for
switching the vowels is reset by the input signal (ON) or
not (OFF).
● Input Sync Threshold (0~127)—Volume level at which
reset is applied.
● Manual (0~100)—Point at which Vowel 1/2 switch. 49 or
less: Vowel 1 will have a longer duration. 50: Vowel 1 and 2
will be of equal duration. 50 or more: Vowel 2 will have a
longer duration.
● EQ EQ Low Gain (–15dB~0~15dB)—Gain of the low frequency range.
● EQ EQ High Gain (-15dB~0~15dB)—Gain of the high frequency range.
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● Panpot (L64~0~63R)—Stereo location of the output
sound. This is a mono effect that combines incoming signals. You can, however, place the processed signal anywhere between the left and right channels.
● Level (0~127)—Output level.
47. Speaker Sim
Simulates the speaker type and mic settings used to record
the speaker sound.
● Speaker Type (Small 1, Small 2, Middle, JC-120, Built-In
1, Built-In 2, Built-In 3, Built-In 4, Built-In 5, BG Stack 1,
BG Stack 2, MS Stack 1, MS Stack 2, Metal Stack, 2-Stack,
3-Stack)—Select the type of speaker. The specifications of
each type are as follows. The speaker column indicates the
diameter of each speaker unit (in inches) and the number
of units.
Type
Cabinet
SMALL 1
small open-back enclosure
Speaker
10
Microphone
dynamic mic
SMALL 2
small open-back enclosure
10
dynamic mic
MIDDLE
open back enclosure
12 x 1
dynamic mic
JC-120
open back enclosure
12 x 2
dynamic mic
BUILT IN 1
open back enclosure
12 x 2
dynamic mic
BUILT IN 2
open back enclosure
12 x 2
condenser mic
BUILT IN 3
open back enclosure
12 x 2
condenser mic
BUILT IN 4
open back enclosure
12 x 2
condenser mic
BUILT IN 5
open back enclosure
12 x 2
condenser mic
BG STACK 1
sealed enclosure
12 x 4
condenser mic
BG STACK 2
large sealed enclosure
12 x 4
condenser mic
MS STACK 1
large sealed enclosure
12 x 4
condenser mic
MS STACK 2
large sealed enclosure
12 x 4
condenser mic
METAL STACK large double stack
12 x 4
condenser mic
2-STACK
large sealed enclosure
12 x 4
condenser mic
3-STACK
large sealed enclosure
12 x 4
condenser mic
r
● Mic Setting (1, 2, 3)—Adjusts the location of the mic that
is recording the sound of the speaker. This can be adjusted
in three steps, with the mic becoming more distant in the
order of 1, 2, and 3.
● Mic Level (0~127)—Volume of the microphone.
● Direct Level (0~127)—Volume of the direct sound.
● Level (0~127)—Output level.
48. Step Phaser
The phaser effect will be varied gradually.
● Phaser Mode (4-Stage, 8-Stage,12-Stage)—Number of
stages in the phaser.
● Phaser Manual (0~127)—Adjusts the basic frequency from
which the sound will be modulated.
● Step Rate [sync] (Hz, Note)—Use this parameter to specify
whether (“Note”) or not (“Hz”) the modulation rate should
be synchronized to the Arranger or Recorder tempo.
Depending on your choice, the setting range of the following parameter refers to a speed (Hz) or a note value.
● Step Rate [Hz] (0.05~10.00Hz)—Frequency, i.e. modulation speed.
● Step Rate [note] (musical notes)—Rate parameters can be
set as a note-value of a tempo if you set the “Sync” parameter above to “Note”. Specify the value of the desired note.
● Depth (0~127)—Depth of modulation.
238
● Polarity (Inverse, Synchro)—Selects whether the left and
right phase of the modulation will be the same or the
opposite. INVERSE: The left and right phase will be opposite. When using a mono source, this spreads the sound.
SYNCHRO: The left and right phase will be the same. Select
this when inputting a stereo source
● Resonance (0~127)—Amount of feedback.
● Cross Feedback (–98%~0~+98%)—Adjusts the proportion of the phaser sound that is fed back into the effect.
Negative (-) settings will invert the phase.
● Step Rate [sync] (Hz, Note)—Use this parameter to specify
whether (“Note”) or not (“Hz”) the step rate should be synchronized to the Arranger or Recorder tempo. Depending
on your choice, the setting range of the following parameter refers to a speed (Hz) or a note value.
● Step Rate [Hz] (0.10~20.00Hz)—Rate of the step-wise
change in the phaser effect.
● Step Rate [note] (Musical Notes)—Rate parameters can
be set as a note-value of a tempo if you set the “Sync”
parameter above to “Note”. Specify the value of the desired
note.
● Mix Level (0~127)—Level of the phase-shifted sound.
● EQ Low Gain (–15dB~0~15dB)—Gain of the low frequency range.
● EQ High Gain (-15dB~0~15dB)—Gain of the high frequency range.
● Level (0~127)—Output level.
49. MLT Phaser
Extremely high settings of the phase difference produce a
deep phaser effect.
● Phaser Mode (4-stage, 8-stage, 12-stage, 16-stage, 20stage, 24-stage)—Number of stages in the phaser.
● Phaser Manual (0~127)—Adjusts the basic frequency from
which the sound will be modulated.
● Rate [sync] (Hz, Note)—Use this parameter to specify
whether (“Note”) or not (“Hz”) the modulation rate should
be synchronized to the Arranger or Recorder tempo.
Depending on your choice, the setting range of the following parameter refers to a speed (Hz) or a note value.
● Rate [Hz] (0.05~10.00Hz)—Frequency, i.e. modulation
speed.
● Rate [note] (musical notes)—Rate parameters can be set
as a note-value of a tempo if you set the “Sync” parameter
above to “Note”. Specify the value of the desired note.
● Depth (0~127)—Depth of modulation.
● Resonance (0~127)—Amount of feedback.
● Mix Level (0~127)—Level of the phase-shifted sound.
● Panpot (L64~0~63R)—Stereo location of the output
sound. This is a mono effect that combines incoming signals. You can, however, place the processed signal anywhere between the left and right channels.
● EQ Low Gain (–15dB~0~15dB)—Gain of the low frequency range.
● EQ High Gain (-15dB~0~15dB)—Gain of the high frequency range.
● Level (0~127)—Output level.
50. Inf. Phaser
A phaser that continues raising/lowering the frequency at
which the sound is modulated.
● Mode (1, 2, 3, 4)—Higher values will produce a deeper
phaser effect.
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● Speed (–100~100)—Speed at which to raise or lower the
frequency at which the sound is modulated (+: upward / –:
downward).
● Resonance (0~127)—Amount of feedback.
● Mix Level (0~127)—Level of the phase-shifted sound.
● Panpot (L64~0~63R)—Stereo location of the output
sound. This is a mono effect that combines incoming signals. You can, however, place the processed signal anywhere between the left and right channels.
● EQ Low Gain (–15dB~0~15dB)—Gain of the low frequency range.
● EQ High Gain (-15dB~0~15dB)—Gain of the high frequency range.
● Level (0~127)—Output level.
51. Ring Modul
Ring Modulator is an effect which applies amplitude modulation (AM) to the input signal, producing bell-like sounds. You
can also change the modulation frequency according to the
volume of the sound input to the effects device.
● Frequency (0~127)—Sets the frequency at which modulation will be applied.
● Sens (0~127)—Sets the amount of frequency modulation
applied.
● Polarity—Determines whether the frequency modulation
moves towards higher frequencies (UP) or lower frequencies (DOWN).
● EQ Low Gain—Adjust the low frequency gain (amount of
boost or cut). Positive (+) settings will emphasize (boost)
the low frequency range.
● EQ High Gain—Adjust the high frequency gain (amount of
boost or cut). Positive (+) settings emphasize (boost) the
high frequency range.
● Balance—Sets the volume balance between the direct and
the effect sound. With a setting of D100:0W only the direct
sound will be output, and with a setting of D0:100W the
effect sound will be output.
● Level (0~127)—Output level.
52. Step Ring
This is a ring modulator that uses a 16-step sequence to vary
the frequency at which modulation is applied.
● Step 1~16 (0~127)—Frequency of ring modulation at
each step.
● Rate [sync] (Hz, Note)—Use this parameter to specify
whether (“Note”) or not (“Hz”) the rate should be synchronized to the Arranger or Recorder tempo. Depending on
your choice, the setting range of the following parameter
refers to a speed (Hz) or a note value.
● Rate [Hz] (0.05~10.00Hz)—Rate at which the 16-step
sequence will cycle.
● Rate [note] (musical notes)—Rate parameters can be set
as a note-value of a tempo if you set the “Sync” parameter
above to “Note”. Specify the value of the desired note.
● Attack (0~127)—Speed at which the modulation frequency changes between steps.
● EQ Low Gain (–15dB~0~15dB)—Gain of the low frequency range.
● EQ High Gain (-15dB~0~15dB)—Gain of the high frequency range.
● Balance (D100:0W, D50:50W, D0:100W)—Volume balance between the direct (D) and the effect sound (W).
● Level (0~127)—Output level.
53. Tremolo
Cyclically modulates the volume to add tremolo effect to the
sound.
● Modulation Wave (TRI, SQR, SIN, SAW1, SAW2)—Modulation Wave. TRI: triangle wave, SQR: square wave, SIN: sine
wave, SAW1/2: sawtooth wave.
● Rate [sync] (Hz, Note)—Use this parameter to specify
whether (“Note”) or not (“Hz”) the modulation rate should
be synchronized to the Arranger or Recorder tempo.
Depending on your choice, the setting range of the following parameter refers to a speed (Hz) or a note value.
● Rate [Hz] (0.05~10.00Hz)—Frequency, i.e. modulation
speed.
● Rate [note] (musical notes)—Rate parameters can be set
as a note-value of a tempo if you set the “Sync” parameter
above to “Note”. Specify the value of the desired note.
● Depth (0~127)—Depth to which the effect is applied.
● EQ Low Gain (–15dB~0~15dB)—Gain of the low frequency range.
● EQ High Gain (-15dB~0~15dB)—Gain of the high frequency range.
● Level (0~127)—Output level.
54. Auto Pan
Cyclically modulates the stereo location of the sound.
● Modulation Wave (TRI, SQR, SIN, SAW1, SAW2)—Modulation Wave. TRI: triangle wave, SQR: square wave, SIN: sine
wave, SAW1/2: sawtooth wave.
● Rate [sync] (Hz, Note)—Use this parameter to specify
whether (“Note”) or not (“Hz”) the modulation rate should
be synchronized to the Arranger or Recorder tempo.
Depending on your choice, the setting range of the following parameter refers to a speed (Hz) or a note value.
● Rate [Hz] (0.05~10.00Hz)—Frequency, i.e. modulation
speed.
● Rate [note] (musical notes)—Rate parameters can be set
as a note-value of a tempo if you set the “Sync” parameter
above to “Note”. Specify the value of the desired note.
● Depth (0~127)—Depth to which the effect is applied.
● EQ Low Gain (–15dB~0~15dB)—Gain of the low frequency range.
● EQ High Gain (-15dB~0~15dB)—Gain of the high frequency range.
● Level (0~127)—Output level.
55. Step Pan
This uses a 16-step sequence to vary the panning of the
sound.
● Step 1~16 (L64~0~63R)—Pan at each step.
● Rate [sync] (Hz, Note)—Use this parameter to specify
whether (“Note”) or not (“Hz”) the rate should be synchronized to the Arranger or Recorder tempo. Depending on
your choice, the setting range of the following parameter
refers to a speed (Hz) or a note value.
● Rate [Hz] (0.05~10.00Hz)—Rate at which the 16-step
sequence will cycle.
● Rate [note] (musical notes)—Rate parameters can be set
as a note-value of a tempo if you set the “Sync” parameter
above to “Note”. Specify the value of the desired note.
● Attack (0~127)—Speed at which the pan changes between
steps.
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● Input Sync Sw (Off, On)—Specifies whether an input note
will cause the sequence to resume from the first step of the
sequence (ON) or not (OFF).
● Input Sync Threshold (0~127)—Volume at which an input
note will be detected.
● Level (0~127)—Output level.
r
56. Slicer
By applying successive cuts to the sound, this effect turns a
conventional sound into a sound that appears to be played as
a backing phrase. This is especially effective when applied to
sustain-type sounds.
● Step 1~16 (0~127)—Level at each step.
● Rate [sync] (Hz, Note)—Use this parameter to specify
whether (“Note”) or not (“Hz”) the rate should be synchronized to the Arranger or Recorder tempo. Depending on
your choice, the setting range of the following parameter
refers to a speed (Hz) or a note value.
● Rate [Hz] (0.05~10.00Hz)—Rate at which the 16-step
sequence will cycle.
● Rate [note] (musical notes)—Rate parameters can be set
as a note-value of a tempo if you set the “Sync” parameter
above to “Note”. Specify the value of the desired note.
● Attack (0~127)—Speed at which the level changes
between steps.
● Input Sync Sw (Off, On)—Specifies whether an input note
will cause the sequence to resume from the first step of the
sequence (ON) or not (OFF).
● Input Sync Threshold (0~127)—Volume at which an input
note will be detected.
● Mode (Legato, Slash)—Sets the manner in which the volume changes as one step progresses to the next.
LEGATO: The change in volume from one step’s level to the
next remains unaltered. If the level of a following step is
the same as the one preceding it, there is no change in volume.
SLASH: The level is momentarily set to 0 before progressing
to the level of the next step. This change in volume occurs
even if the level of the following step is the same as the
preceding step.
● Shuffle (0~127)—Timing of volume changes in levels for
even-numbered steps (step 2, step 4, step 6...). The higher
the value, the later the beat progresses.
● Level (0~127)—Output level.
57. VK Rotary
This type provides modified response for the rotary speaker,
with the low end boosted further.
This effect features the same specifications as the VK-7’s
built-in rotary speaker.
● Speed (Slow, Fast)—Rotational speed of the rotating
speaker.
● Brake (Off, On)—Switches the rotation of the rotary
speaker. When this is turned on, the rotation will gradually
stop. When it is turned off, the rotation will gradually
resume.
● Woofer Slow Speed (0.05~10.0Hz)—Low-speed rotation
speed of the woofer.
● Woofer Fast Speed (0.05~10.0Hz)—High-speed rotation
speed of the woofer.
● Woofer Trans Up (0~127)—Adjusts the rate at which the
woofer rotation speeds up when the rotation is switched
from Slow to Fast.
240
● Woofer Trans Down (0~127)—Adjusts the rate at which
the woofer rotation speeds up when the rotation is
switched from Fast to Slow.
● Woofer Level (0~127)—Volume of the woofer.
● Tweeter Slow Speed (0.05~10.0Hz)—Low-speed rotation
speed of the tweeter.
● Tweeter Fast Speed (0.05~10.0Hz)—High-speed rotation
speed of the tweeter.
● Tweeter Trans Up (0~127)—Adjusts the rate at which the
tweeter rotation speeds up when the rotation is switched
from Slow to Fast.
● Tweeter Trans Down (0~127)—Adjusts the rate at which
the tweeter rotation speeds up when the rotation is
switched from Fast to Slow.
● Tweeter Level (0~127)—Volume of the tweeter.
● Spread (0~10)—Sets the rotary speaker stereo image. The
higher the value set, the wider the sound is spread out.
● EQ Low Gain (–15dB~0~15dB)—Gain of the low frequency range.
● EQ High Gain (-15dB~0~15dB)—Gain of the high frequency range.
● Level (0~127)—Output level.
58. 3D Chorus
This applies a 3D effect to the chorus sound. The chorus
sound will be positioned 90 degrees left and 90 degrees right.
● Filter Type (OFF, LPF, HPF)—Type of filter. OFF: no filter is
used. LPF: cuts the frequency range above the Cutoff value.
HPF: cuts the frequency range below the Cutoff value.
● Cutoff Frequency (200~8000Hz)—Basic frequency of the
filter.
● Chorus Pre Delay (0.0~100.0ms)—Adjusts the delay
between the incoming direct signal and the moment when
the chorus starts working.
● Rate [sync] (Hz, Note)—Use this parameter to specify
whether (“Note”) or not (“Hz”) the modulation rate should
be synchronized to the Arranger or Recorder tempo.
Depending on your choice, the setting range of the following parameter refers to a speed (Hz) or a note value.
● Chorus Rate (0.05~10.0Hz)—Frequency, i.e. modulation
speed.
● Rate [note] (musical notes)—Rate parameters can be set
as a note-value of a tempo if you set the “Sync” parameter
above to “Note”. Specify the value of the desired note.
● Chorus Depth (0~127)—Modulation intensity.
● Phase (0~180 deg)—Spatial spread of the sound.
● Output Mode (Speaker, Phones)—Adjusts the method
that will be used to hear the sound that is output to the
OUTPUT jacks. The optimal 3D effect will be achieved if you
select SPEAKER when using speakers, or PHONES when
using headphones.
● EQ Low Gain (–15dB~0~15dB)—Gain of the low frequency range.
● EQ High Gain (-15dB~0~15dB)—Gain of the high frequency range.
● Balance (D100:0W, D50:50W, D0:100W)—Volume balance between the direct (D) and the effect sound (W).
● Level (0~127)—Output level.
59. 3D Flanger
This applies a 3D effect to the flanger sound. The flanger
sound will be positioned 90 degrees left and 90 degrees right.
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Appendix | MFX and IFX types and parameters
● Filter Type (OFF, LPF, HPF)—Type of filter. OFF: no filter is
used. LPF: cuts the frequency range above the Cutoff value.
HPF: cuts the frequency range below the Cutoff value.
● Cutoff Frequency (200~8000Hz)—Basic frequency of the
filter.
● Pre Delay (0.0~100.0ms)—Adjusts the delay time from
when the direct sound begins until the flanger sound is
heard.
● Rate [sync] (Hz, Note)—Use this parameter to specify
whether (“Note”) or not (“Hz”) the modulation rate should
be synchronized to the Arranger or Recorder tempo.
Depending on your choice, the setting range of the following parameter refers to a speed (Hz) or a note value.
● Rate [Hz] (0.05~10.00Hz)—Frequency, i.e. modulation
speed.
● Rate [note] (musical notes)—Rate parameters can be set
as a note-value of a tempo if you set the “Sync” parameter
above to “Note”. Specify the value of the desired note.
● Depth (0~127)—Depth of modulation.
● Phase (0~180 deg)—Spatial spread of the sound.
● Feedback (–98%~0~+98%)—Adjusts the proportion of
the flanger sound that is fed back into the effect. Negative
(–) settings will invert the phase.
● Output Mode (Speaker, Phones)—Adjusts the method
that will be used to hear the sound that is output to the
OUTPUT jacks. The optimal 3D effect will be achieved if you
select SPEAKER when using speakers, or PHONES when
using headphones.
● EQ Low Gain (–15dB~0~15dB)—Gain of the low frequency range.
● EQ High Gain (-15dB~0~15dB)—Gain of the high frequency range.
● Balance (D100:0W, D50:50W, D0:100W)—Volume balance between the direct (D) and the effect sound (W).
● Level (0~127)—Output level.
60. 3D Step Flgr
This applies a 3D effect to the step flanger sound. The flanger
sound will be positioned 90 degrees left and 90 degrees right.
● Filter Type (OFF, LPF, HPF)—Type of filter. OFF: no filter is
used. LPF: cuts the frequency range above the Cutoff value.
HPF: cuts the frequency range below the Cutoff value.
● Cutoff Frequency (200~8000Hz)—Basic frequency of the
filter.
● Pre Delay (0.0~100.0ms)—Adjusts the delay time from
when the direct sound begins until the flanger sound is
heard.
● Step Rate [sync] (Hz, Note)—Use this parameter to specify
whether (“Note”) or not (“Hz”) the modulation rate should
be synchronized to the Arranger or Recorder tempo.
Depending on your choice, the setting range of the following parameter refers to a speed (Hz) or a note value.
● Step Rate [Hz] (0.05~10.00Hz)—Frequency, i.e. modulation speed.
● Step Rate [note] (musical notes)—Rate parameters can be
set as a note-value of a tempo if you set the “Sync” parameter above to “Note”. Specify the value of the desired note.
● Depth (0~127)—Depth of modulation.
● Phase (0~180 deg)—Spatial spread of the sound.
● Feedback (–98%~0~+98%)—Adjusts the proportion of
the flanger sound that is fed back into the effect. Negative
(–) settings will invert the phase.
● Step Rate [sync] (Hz, Note)—Use this parameter to specify
whether (“Note”) or not (“Hz”) the step rate should be synchronized to the Arranger or Recorder tempo. Depending
on your choice, the setting range of the following parameter refers to a speed (Hz) or a note value.
● Step Rate [Hz] (0.10~20.00Hz))—Rate (period) of pitch
change.
● Step Rate [note] (musical notes)—Rate parameters can be
set as a note-value of a tempo if you set the “Sync” parameter above to “Note”. Specify the value of the desired note.
● Output Mode (Speaker, Phones)—Adjusts the method
that will be used to hear the sound that is output to the
OUTPUT jacks. The optimal 3D effect will be achieved if you
select SPEAKER when using speakers, or PHONES when
using headphones.
● EQ Low Gain (–15dB~0~15dB)—Gain of the low frequency range.
● EQ High Gain (-15dB~0~15dB)—Gain of the high frequency range.
● Balance (D100:0W, D50:50W, D0:100W)—Volume balance between the direct (D) and the effect sound (W).
● Level (0~127)—Output level.
61. Band Chorus
A chorus effect that lets you apply an effect independently to
the low-frequency and high-frequency ranges.
● Split Frequency (200~8000Hz)—Frequency at which the
low and high ranges will be divided.
● Low Pre Delay (0.0~100.0ms)—Delay time from when the
original sound is heard to when the low-range chorus
sound is heard.
● Low Rate [sync] (Hz, Note)—Use this parameter to specify
whether (“‘Note”) or not (“Hz”) the low modulation rate
should be synchronized to the Arranger or Recorder tempo.
Depending on your choice, the setting range of the following parameter refers to a speed (Hz) or a note value.
● Low Rate [Hz] (0.05~10.00Hz)—Rate at which the lowrange chorus sound is modulated.
● Low Rate [note] (Musical Notes)—Rate parameters can be
set as a note-value of a tempo if you set the “Sync” parameter above to “Note”. Specify the value of the desired note.
● Low Depth (0~127)—Modulation depth for the low-range
chorus sound.
● Low Phase (0~180 deg)—Spaciousness of the low-range
chorus sound.
● High Pre Delay (0.0~100.0ms)—Delay time from when the
original sound is heard to when the high-range chorus
sound is heard.
● High Rate [sync] (Hz, Note)—Use this parameter to specify whether (“Note”) or not (“Hz”) the high modulation rate
should be synchronized to the Arranger or Recorder tempo.
Depending on your choice, the setting range of the following parameter refers to a speed (Hz) or a note value.
● High Rate [Hz] (0.05~10.00Hz)—Rate at which the highrange chorus sound is modulated
● High Rate [note] (Musical Notes)—Rate parameters can
be set as a note-value of a tempo if you set the “Sync”
parameter above to “Note”. Specify the value of the desired
note.
● High Depth (0~127)—Modulation depth for the highrange chorus sound.
● High Phase (0~180 deg)—Spaciousness of the high-range
chorus sound.
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● Balance (D100:0W, D50:50W, D0:100W)—Volume balance between the direct sound (D) and the chorus sound
(W).
● Level (0~127)—Output level.
62. Band Flanger
A flanger that lets you apply an effect independently to the
low-frequency and high-frequency ranges.
● Split Frequency (200~8000Hz)—Frequency at which the
low and high ranges will be divided.
● Low Pre Delay (0.0~100.0ms)—Delay time from when the
original sound is heard to when the low-range flanger
sound is heard.
● Low Rate [sync] (Hz, Note)—Use this parameter to specify
whether (“‘Note”) or not (“Hz”) the low modulation rate
should be synchronized to the Arranger or Recorder tempo.
Depending on your choice, the setting range of the following parameter refers to a speed (Hz) or a note value.
● Low Rate [Hz] (0.05~10.00Hz)—Rate at which the lowrange flanger sound is modulated.
● Low Rate [note] (Musical Notes)—Rate parameters can be
set as a note-value of a tempo if you set the “Sync” parameter above to “Note”. Specify the value of the desired note.
● Low Depth (0~127)—Modulation depth for the low-range
flanger sound.
● Low Phase (0~180 deg)—Spaciousness of the low-range
flanger sound.
● Low Feedback (–98%~0~+98%)—Proportion of the lowrange flanger sound that is to be returned to the input
(negative values invert the phase).
● High Pre Delay (0.0~100.0ms)—Delay time from when the
original sound is heard to when the high-range flanger
sound is heard.
● High Rate [sync] (Hz, Note)—Use this parameter to specify whether (“Note”) or not (“Hz”) the high modulation rate
should be synchronized to the Arranger or Recorder tempo.
Depending on your choice, the setting range of the following parameter refers to a speed (Hz) or a note value.
● High Rate [Hz] (0.05~10.00Hz)—Rate at which the highrange flanger sound is modulated.
● High Rate [note] (Musical Notes)—Rate parameters can
be set as a note-value of a tempo if you set the “Sync”
parameter above to “Note”. Specify the value of the desired
note.
● High Depth (0~127)—Modulation depth for the highrange flanger sound.
● High Phase (0~180 deg)—Spaciousness of the high-range
flanger sound.
● High Feedback (–98%~0~+98%)—Proportion of the
high-range flanger sound that is to be returned to the
input (negative values invert the phase).
● Balance (D100:0W, D50:50W, D0:100W)—Volume balance between the direct (D) and the effect sound (W).
● Level (0~127)—Output level.
63. Band Step Flg
A step flanger that lets you apply an effect independently to
the low-frequency and high-frequency ranges.
● Split Frequency (200~8000Hz)—Frequency at which the
low and high ranges will be divided.
● Low Pre Delay (0.0~100.0ms)—Delay time from when the
original sound is heard to when the low-range flanger
sound is heard.
242
● Low Rate [sync] (Hz, Note)—Use this parameter to specify
whether (“‘Note”) or not (“Hz”) the low modulation rate
should be synchronized to the Arranger or Recorder tempo.
Depending on your choice, the setting range of the following parameter refers to a speed (Hz) or a note value.
● Low Rate [Hz] (0.05~10.00Hz)—Rate at which the lowrange flanger sound is modulated.
● Low Rate [note] (Musical Notes)—Rate parameters can be
set as a note-value of a tempo if you set the “Sync” parameter above to “Note”. Specify the value of the desired note.
● Low Depth (0~127)—Modulation depth for the low-range
flanger sound.
● Low Phase (0~180 deg)—Spaciousness of the low-range
flanger sound.
● Low Feedback (–98%~0~+98%)—Proportion of the lowrange flanger sound that is to be returned to the input
(negative values invert the phase).
● Low Step Rate [sync] (Hz, Note)—Use this parameter to
specify whether (“Note”) or not (“Hz”) the low step rate
should be synchronized to the Arranger or Recorder tempo.
Depending on your choice, the setting range of the following parameter refers to a speed (Hz) or a note value.
● Low Step Rate [Hz] (0.10~20.00Hz)—Rate at which the
steps will cycle for the low-range flanger sound.
● Low Step Rate [note] (Musical Notes)—Rate parameters
can be set as a note-value of a tempo if you set the “Sync”
parameter above to “Note”. Specify the value of the desired
note.
● High Pre Delay (0.0~100.0ms)—Delay time from when the
original sound is heard to when the high-range flanger
sound is heard.
● High Rate [sync] (Hz, Note)—Use this parameter to specify whether (“Note”) or not (“Hz”) the high modulation rate
should be synchronized to the Arranger or Recorder tempo.
Depending on your choice, the setting range of the following parameter refers to a speed (Hz) or a note value.
● High Rate [Hz] (0.05~10.00Hz)—Rate at which the highrange flanger sound is modulated.
● High Rate [note] (Musical Notes)—Rate parameters can
be set as a note-value of a tempo if you set the “Sync”
parameter above to “Note”. Specify the value of the desired
note.
● High Depth (0~127)—Modulation depth for the highrange flanger sound.
● High Phase (0~180 deg)—Spaciousness of the high-range
flanger sound.
● High Feedback (–98%~0~+98%)—Proportion of the
high-range flanger sound that is to be returned to the
input (negative values invert the phase).
● High Step Rate [sync] (Hz, Note)—Use this parameter to
specify whether (“Note”) or not (“Hz”) the high step rate
should be synchronized to the Arranger or Recorder tempo.
Depending on your choice, the setting range of the following parameter refers to a speed (Hz) or a note value.
● High Step Rate [Hz] (0.10~20.00Hz)—Rate at which the
steps will cycle for the high-range flanger sound.
● High Step Rate (note) Musical Notes—Rate parameters
can be set as a note-value of a tempo if you set the “Sync”
parameter above to “Note”. Specify the value of the desired
note.
● Balance (D100:0W, D50:50W, D0:100W)—Volume balance between the direct (D) and the effect sound (W).
● Level (0~127)—Output level.
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64. VS Overdrive
This is an overdrive that provides heavy distortion.
● Drive (0~127)—Degree of distortion. Also changes the volume.
● Tone (0~127)—Sound quality of the Overdrive effect.
● Amplifier Sw (Off, On)—Turns the Amp Simulator on/off.
● Amplifier Type (Small, Built-In, 2-Stack, 3-Stack)—Type
of guitar amp. SMALL: small amp, BUILT-IN: single-unit
type amp, 2-STACK: large double stack amp, 3-STACK: large
triple stack amp.
● EQ Low Gain (–15dB~0~15dB)—Gain of the low frequency range.
● EQ High Gain (-15dB~0~15dB)—Gain of the high frequency range.
● Panpot (L64~0~63R)—Stereo location of the output
sound. This is a mono effect that combines incoming signals. You can, however, place the processed signal anywhere between the left and right channels.
● Level (0~127)—Output level.
65. VS Distortion
Produces a more intense distortion than the above. The
parameters are the same as for “64. VS Overdrive”.
66. GT Amp Simul
This is an effect that simulates the sound of a guitar amplifier.
● Pre Amp Sw (Off, On)—Turns the amp switch on/off.
● Pre Amp Type (JC-120, Clean Twin, Match Drive, BG
Lead, MS1959I, MS1959II, MS1959I+II, Sldn Lead, Metal
5150, Metal Lead, OD-1, OD-2 Turbo, Distortion, Fuzz)—
Type of guitar amp
● Pre Amp Volume (0~127)—Volume and amount of distortion of the amp.
● Pre Amp Master (0~127)—Volume of the entire pre-amp.
● Pre Amp Gain (Low, Middle, High)—Amount of pre-amp
distortion.
● Pre Amp Bass (0~127)
● Pre Amp Middle (0~127)
● Pre Amp Treble (0~127)—Tone of the bass/mid/treble frequency range.
*Middle cannot be set if “Match Drive” is selected as the Pre
Amp Type.
● Pre Amp Presence (0~127 [Match Drive: –127~0])—
Tone for the ultra-high frequency range.
● Pre Amp Bright (Off, On)—Turning this “On” produces a
sharper and brighter sound.
*This parameter applies to the “JC-120,” “Clean Twin,” and
“BG Lead” Pre Amp Types.
● Speaker Sw (Off, On)—Determines whether the signal
passes through the speaker (ON), or not (OFF).
● Speaker Type (Small 1, Small 2, Middle, JC-120, Built-In
1, Built-In 2, Built-In 3, Built-In 4, Built-In 5, BG Stack 1,
BG Stack 2, MS Stack 1, MS Stack 2, Metal Stack, 2-Stack,
3-Stack)—Select the type of speaker. The specifications of
each type are as follows. The speaker column indicates the
diameter of each speaker unit (in inches) and the number
of units.
Type
Cabinet
Speaker
Microphone
SMALL 1
small open-back enclosure
10
dynamic mic
SMALL 2
small open-back enclosure
10
dynamic mic
MIDDLE
open back enclosure
12 x 1
dynamic mic
JC-120
open back enclosure
12 x 2
dynamic mic
BUILT IN 1
open back enclosure
12 x 2
dynamic mic
BUILT IN 2
open back enclosure
12 x 2
condenser mic
BUILT IN 3
open back enclosure
12 x 2
condenser mic
BUILT IN 4
open back enclosure
12 x 2
condenser mic
BUILT IN 5
open back enclosure
12 x 2
condenser mic
BG STACK 1
sealed enclosure
12 x 4
condenser mic
BG STACK 2
large sealed enclosure
12 x 4
condenser mic
MS STACK 1
large sealed enclosure
12 x 4
condenser mic
MS STACK 2
large sealed enclosure
12 x 4
condenser mic
METAL STACK large double stack
12 x 4
condenser mic
2-STACK
large sealed enclosure
12 x 4
condenser mic
3-STACK
large sealed enclosure
12 x 4
condenser mic
● Mic Setting (1, 2, 3)—Adjusts the location of the mic
that’s capturing the sound of the speaker. This can be
adjusted in three steps, from 1 to 3, with the mic becoming
more distant as the value increases.
● Mic Level (0~127)—Volume of the microphone.
● Direct Level (0~127)—Volume of the direct sound.
● Panpot (L64~0~63R)—Stereo location of the output
sound. This is a mono effect that combines incoming signals. You can, however, place the processed signal anywhere between the left and right channels.
● Level (0~127)—Output level.
67. Gate
Cuts the reverb’s decay according to the volume of the sound
sent into the effect. Use this when you want to create an artificial-sounding decrease in the reverb’s decay.
● Threshold (0~127)—Volume level at which the gate begins
to close
● Mode (Gate, Duck)—Type of gate. GATE: The gate will close
when the volume of the original sound decreases, cutting
the original sound. DUCK (Ducking): The gate will close
when the volume of the original sound increases, cutting
the original sound.
● Attack (0~127)—Adjusts the time it takes for the gate to
fully open after being triggered.
● Hold (0~127)—Adjusts the time it takes for the gate to
start closing after the source sound falls beneath the
Threshold.
● Release (0~127)—Adjusts the time it takes the gate to
fully close after the hold time.
● Balance (D100:0W, D50:50W, D0:100W)—Volume balance between the direct (D) and the effect sound (W).
● Level (0~127)—Output level.
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68. Long Delay
A delay that provides a long delay time.
● Delay Time [sync] (msec, Note)—Use this parameter to
specify whether (“Note”) or not (“msec”) the delay time
should be synchronized to the Arranger or Recorder tempo.
Depending on your choice, the setting range of the following parameter refers to a speed or a note value.
● Delay Time [msec] (0~2600ms)—Adjusts the time until
the delay is heard.
● Delay Time [note] (Musical Notes)—Delay times can be
set as a note-value of a tempo, if you set the “Sync”
parameter above to “msec”. Specify the value of the desired
note.
● Phase (Normal, Inverse)—Phase of the delay (NORMAL:
non-inverted, INVERT: inverted).
● Feedback (–98%~0~+98%)—Adjusts the amount of the
delay sound that’s fed back into the effect. Negative (–)
settings invert the phase.
● Delay HF Damp (200~8000Hz, Bypass)—Adjusts the frequency above which sound fed back to the effect is filtered
out. If you don’t want to filter out any high frequencies, set
this parameter to BYPASS.
● Panpot (L64~0~63R)—Stereo location of the output
sound. This is a mono effect that combines incoming signals. You can, however, place the processed signal anywhere between the left and right channels.
● EQ Low Gain (–15dB~0~15dB)—Gain of the low frequency range.
● EQ High Gain (-15dB~0~15dB)—Gain of the high frequency range.
● Balance (D100:0W, D50:50W, D0:100W)—Volume balance between the direct (D) and the effect sound (W).
● Level (0~127)—Output level.
69. Serial Delay
This delay connects two delay units in series. Feedback can be
applied independently to each delay unit, allowing you to
produce complex delay sounds.
● Delay 1 Time [sync] (msec, Note)—Use this parameter to
specify whether (“Note”) or not (“msec”) the delay 1 time
should be synchronized to the Arranger or Recorder tempo.
Depending on your choice, the setting range of the following parameter refers to a speed (Hz) or a note value.
● Delay 1 Time [msec] (0~1300ms)—Delay time from when
sound is input to delay 1 until the delay sound is heard.
● Delay 1 Time [note] (Musical Notes)—Delay times can be
set as a note-value of a tempo, if you set the “Sync”
parameter above to “msec”. Specify the value of the desired
note.
● Delay 1 Feedback (–98%~0~+98%)—Proportion of the
delay sound that is to be returned to the input of delay 1
(negative values invert the phase).
● Delay 1 HF Damp (200~8000Hz, Bypass)—Frequency at
which the high-frequency content of the delayed sound of
delay 1 will be cut (BYPASS: no cut).
● Delay 2 Time [sync] (msec, Note)—Use this parameter to
specify whether (“Note”) or not (“msec”) the delay 2 time
should be synchronized to the Arranger or Recorder tempo.
Depending on your choice, the setting range of the following parameter refers to a speed (Hz) or a note value.
● Delay 2 Time [msec] (0~1300ms)—Delay time from when
sound is input to delay 2 until the delay sound is heard.
244
● Delay 2 Time [note] (Musical Notes)—Delay times can be
set as a note-value of a tempo, if you set the “Sync”
parameter above to “msec”. Specify the value of the desired
note.
● Delay 2 Feedback (–98%~0~+98%)—Proportion of the
delay sound that is to be returned to the input of delay 2
(negative values invert the phase).
● Delay 2 HF Damp (200~8000Hz, Bypass)—Frequency at
which the high-frequency content of the delayed sound of
delay 2 will be cut (BYPASS: no cut).
● Panpot (L64~0~63R)—Stereo location of the output
sound. This is a mono effect that combines incoming signals. You can, however, place the processed signal anywhere between the left and right channels.
● EQ Low Gain (–15dB~0~15dB)—Gain of the low frequency range.
● EQ High Gain (-15dB~0~15dB)—Gain of the high frequency range.
● Balance (D100:0W, D50:50W, D0:100W)—Volume balance between the direct (D) and the effect sound (W).
● Level (0~127)—Output level.
70. MLT Tap DLY
This effect provides four delays. Each of the Delay Time
parameters can be set to a note length based on the selected
tempo. You can also set the panning and level of each delay
sound.
● Delay Time 1~4 [sync] (msec, Note)—Use this parameter
to specify whether (“Note”) or not (“msec”) the delay time
should be synchronized to the Arranger or Recorder tempo.
Depending on your choice, the setting range of the following parameter refers to a speed or a note value.
● Delay 1~4 Time [msec] (0~2600ms)—Adjusts the time
until Delay 1-4 are heard.
● Delay 1~4 Time [note] (Musical Notes)—Delay times can
be set as a note-value of a tempo, if you set the “Sync”
parameter above to “msec”. Specify the value of the desired
note.
● Delay 1 Feedback (–98%~0~+98%)—Adjusts the amount
of the delay sound that’s fed back into the effect. Negative
(–) settings invert the phase.
● HF Damp (200~8000Hz, Bypass)—Adjusts the frequency
above which sound fed back to the effect is filtered out. If
you don’t want to filter out any high frequencies, set this
parameter to BYPASS.
● Delay 1~4 Panpot (L64~0~63R)—Stereo location of
Delays 1–4.
● Delay 1~4 Level (0~127)—Output level of Delays 1–4.
● EQ Low Gain (–15dB~0~15dB)—Gain of the low frequency range.
● EQ High Gain (-15dB~0~15dB)—Gain of the high frequency range.
● Balance (D100:0W, D50:50W, D0:100W)—Volume balance between the direct (D) and the effect sound (W).
● Level (0~127)—Output level.
71. Reverse DLY
This is a reverse delay that adds a reversed and delayed sound
to the input sound. A tap delay is connected immediately
after the reverse delay.
● Threshold (0~127)—Volume at which the reverse delay
will begin to be applied.
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● Rev Delay Time [sync] (msec, Note)—Use this parameter
to specify whether (“Note”) or not (“msec”) the reverse
delay time should be synchronized to the Arranger or
Recorder tempo. Depending on your choice, the setting
range of the following parameter refers to a speed (Hz) or a
note value.
● Rev Delay Time [msec] (0~1300ms)—Delay time from
when sound is input into the reverse delay until the delay
sound is heard.
● Rev Delay Time [note] (Musical Notes)—Delay times can
be set as a note-value of a tempo, if you set the “Sync”
parameter above to “msec”. Specify the value of the desired
note.
● Rev Delay Feedback (–98%~0~+98%)—Proportion of the
delay sound that is to be returned to the input of the
reverse delay (negative values invert the phase)
● Rev Delay HF Damp (200~8000Hz, Bypass)—Frequency at
which the high-frequency content of the reverse-delayed
sound will be cut (BYPASS: no cut).
● Rev Delay Panpot (L64~0~63R)—Panning of the reverse
delay sound.
● Rev Delay Level (0~127)—Volume of the reverse delay
sound.
● Delay 1 Time [sync] (msec, Note)
● Delay 2 Time [sync] (msec, Note)
● Delay 3 Time [sync] (msec, Note)—Use this parameter to
specify whether (“Note”) or not (“msec”) the delay time
should be synchronized to the Arranger or Recorder tempo.
Depending on your choice, the setting range of the following parameter refers to a speed or a note value.
● Delay 1 Time [msec] (0~1300ms)
● Delay 2 Time [msec] (0~1300ms)
● Delay 3 Time [msec] (0~1300ms)—Adjusts the time until
the delay is heard.
● Delay 1 Time [note] (Musical Notes)
● Delay 2 Time [note] (Musical Notes)
● Delay 3 Time [note] (Musical Notes)—Delay times can be
set as a note-value of a tempo, if you set the “Sync”
parameter above to “msec”. Specify the value of the desired
note.
● Delay 3 Feedback (–98%~0~+98%)—Proportion of the
delay sound that is to be returned to the input of the tap
delay (negative values invert the phase).
● Delay HF Damp (200~8000Hz, Bypass)—Frequency at
which the low-frequency content of the tap delay sound
will be cut (BYPASS: no cut).
● Delay 1 Panpot (L64~0~63R)
● Delay 2 Panpot (L64~0~63R)—Panning of the tap delay
sounds.
● Delay 1 Level (0~127)
● Delay 2 Level (0~127)—Volume of the tap delay sounds.
● EQ Low Gain (–15dB~0~15dB)—Gain of the low frequency range.
● EQ High Gain (-15dB~0~15dB)—Gain of the high frequency range.
● Balance (D100:0W, D50:50W, D0:100W)—Volume balance between the direct (D) and the effect sound (W).
● Level (0~127)—Output level.
72. Shuffle DLY
Adds a shuffle to the delay sound, giving the sound a bouncy
delay effect with a swing feel.
● Delay Time [sync] (msec, Note)—Use this parameter to
specify whether (“Note”) or not (“msec”) the delay time
should be synchronized to the Arranger or Recorder tempo.
Depending on your choice, the setting range of the following parameter refers to a speed or a note value.
● Delay Time [msec] (0~2600ms)—Adjusts the time until
the delay is heard.
● Delay Time [note] (Musical Notes)—Delay times can be
set as a note-value of a tempo, if you set the “Sync”
parameter above to “msec”. Specify the value of the desired
note.
● Shuffle Rate (0~100%)—Adjusts the ratio (as a percentage) of the time that elapses before Delay B sounds relative
to the time that elapses before the Delay A sounds. When
set to 100%, the delay times are the same.
● Acceleration (0~15)—Adjusts the time over which the
Delay Time changes from the current setting to its specified new setting.
● Feedback (–98%~0~+98%)—Adjusts the amount of the
delay sound that’s fed back into the effect. Negative (–)
settings invert the phase.
● HF Damp (200~8000Hz, Bypass)—Adjusts the frequency
above which sound fed back to the effect is filtered out. If
you don’t want to filter out any high frequencies, set this
parameter to BYPASS.
● Panpot A (L64~0~63R)
● Panpot B (L64~0~63R)—Stereo location of Delay A/B.
● Level A (0~127)
● Level B (0~127)—Volume of delay A/B.
● EQ Low Gain (–15dB~0~15dB)—Gain of the low frequency range.
● EQ High Gain (-15dB~0~15dB)—Gain of the high frequency range.
● Balance (D100:0W, D50:50W, D0:100W)—Volume balance between the direct (D) and the effect sound (W).
● Level (0~127)—Output level.
73. 3D Delay
This applies a 3D effect to the delay sound. The delay sound
will be positioned 90 degrees left and 90 degrees right.
● Delay Left Time [sync] (msec, Note)—Use this parameter
to specify whether (“Note”) or not (“msec”) the left delay
time should be synchronized to the Arranger or Recorder
tempo. Depending on your choice, the setting range of the
following parameter refers to a speed or a note value.
● Delay Left Time [msec] (0~2600ms)—Adjust the time
from the direct sound until when the left delay sound is
heard.
● Delay Left Time [note] (Musical Notes)—Delay times can
be set as a note-value of a tempo, if you set the “Sync”
parameter above to “msec”. Specify the value of the desired
note.
● Delay Right Time [sync] (msec, Note)—Use this parameter
to specify whether (“Note”) or not (“msec”) the right delay
time should be synchronized to the Arranger or Recorder
tempo. Depending on your choice, the setting range of the
following parameter refers to a speed or a note value.
● Delay Right Time [msec] (0~2600ms)—Adjust the time
from the direct sound until when the right delay sound is
heard.
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● Delay Right Time [note] (Musical Notes)—Delay times
can be set as a note-value of a tempo, if you set the “Sync”
parameter above to “msec”. Specify the value of the desired
note.
● Delay Center Time [sync] (msec, Note)—Use this parameter to specify whether (“Note”) or not (“msec”) the center
delay time should be synchronized to the Arranger or
Recorder tempo. Depending on your choice, the setting
range of the following parameter refers to a speed or a
note value.
● Delay Center Time (msec) 0~2600 [ms]—Adjust the time
delay from the direct sound until when the center delay
sound is heard.
● Delay Center Time [note] (Musical Notes)—Delay times
can be set as a note-value of a tempo, if you set the “Sync”
parameter above to “msec”. Specify the value of the desired
note.
● Center Feedback (–98%~0~+98%)—Adjusts the amount
of the delay sound that’s fed back into the effect. Negative
(–) settings invert the phase.
● Delay HF Damp (200~8000Hz, Bypass)—Adjusts the frequency above which sound fed back to the effect is filtered
out. If you don’t want to filter out any high frequencies, set
this parameter to BYPASS.
● Left Level (0~127)
● Right Level (0~127)
● Center Level (0~127)—Output level of the delay sound.
● Output Mode (Speaker, Phones)—Adjusts the method
that will be used to hear the sound that is output to the
OUTPUT jacks. The optimal 3D effect will be achieved if you
select SPEAKER when using speakers, or PHONES when
using headphones.
● EQ Low Gain (–15dB~0~15dB)—Gain of the low frequency range.
● EQ High Gain (-15dB~0~15dB)—Gain of the high frequency range.
● Balance (D100:0W, D50:50W, D0:100W)—Volume balance between the direct (D) and the effect sound (W).
● Level (0~127)—Output level.
74. Long Time DLY
A delay in which the delay time can be varied smoothly, and
allowing an extended delay to be produced.
● Delay Time [sync] (msec, Note)—Use this parameter to
specify whether (“Note”) or not (“msec”) the delay time
should be synchronized to the Arranger or Recorder tempo.
Depending on your choice, the setting range of the following parameter refers to a speed or a note value.
● Delay Time [msec] (0~2600ms)—Adjusts the time until
the delay is heard.
● Delay Time [note] (Musical Notes)—Delay times can be
set as a note-value of a tempo, if you set the “Sync”
parameter above to “msec”. Specify the value of the desired
note.
● Delay Acceleration (0~15)—Adjusts the time over which
the Delay Time changes from the current setting to a specified new setting. The rate of change for the Delay Time
directly affects the rate of pitch change.
● Feedback (–98%~0~+98%)—Adjusts the amount of the
delay sound that’s fed back into the effect. Negative (–)
settings invert the phase.
246
● Delay HF Damp (200~8000Hz, Bypass)—Adjusts the frequency above which sound fed back to the effect is filtered
out. If you don’t want to filter out any high frequencies, set
this parameter to BYPASS.
● Panpot (L64~0~63R)—Stereo location of the output
sound. This is a mono effect that combines incoming signals. You can, however, place the processed signal anywhere between the left and right channels.
● EQ Low Gain (–15dB~0~15dB)—Gain of the low frequency range.
● EQ High Gain (-15dB~0~15dB)—Gain of the high frequency range.
● Balance (D100:0W, D50:50W, D0:100W)—Volume balance between the direct (D) and the effect sound (W).
● Level (0~127)—Output level.
75. Tape Echo
A virtual tape echo that produces a realistic tape delay sound.
This simulates the tape echo section of a Roland RE-201
Space Echo.
● Mode (S, M, L, S+M, S+L, M+L, S+M+L)—Combination of
playback heads to use. Select from three different heads
with different delay times. S: short, M: middle, L: long.
● Repeat Rate (0~127)—Tape speed. Increasing this value
will shorten the spacing of the delayed sounds.
● Intensity (0~127)—Amount of delay repeats.
● Bass (–15dB~0~15dB)—Boost/cut for the lower range of
the echo sound.
● Treble (–15dB~0~15dB)—Boost/cut for the upper range
of the echo sound.
● Head S Pan (L64~0~63R)
● Head M Pan (L64~0~63R)
● Head L Pan (L64~0~63R)—Independent panning for the
short, middle, and long playback heads.
● Tape Distortion (0~5)—Amount of tape-dependent distortion to be added. This simulates the slight tonal changes
that can be detected by signal-analysis equipment. Increasing this value will increase the distortion.
● Wow/Flutter Rate (0~127)—Speed of wow/flutter (complex variation in pitch caused by tape wear and rotational
irregularity).
● Wow/Flutter Depth (0~127)—Depth of wow/flutter.
● Echo Level (0~127)—Volume of the echo sound.
● Direct Level (0~127)—Volume of the original sound.
● Level (0~127)—Output level.
76. LoFi Noise
In addition to a lo-fi effect, this adds various types of noise
such as white noise and disc noise.
● LoFi Type (1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9)—Degrades the sound
quality. The sound quality grows poorer as this value is
increased.
● Post Filter Type (OFF, LPF, HPF)—Type of filter. OFF: no filter is used. LPF: cuts the frequency range above the Cutoff
value. HPF: cuts the frequency range below the Cutoff
value.
● Post Filter Cutoff (200~8000, Bypass)—Center frequency
of the filter.
● W/P Noise Type (White, Pink)—Switch between white
noise and pink noise.
● W/P Noise LPF (200~8000, Bypass)—Center frequency of
the low pass filter applied to the white/pink noise (BYPASS:
no cut).
● W/P Noise Level (0~127)—Volume of the white/pink noise.
G-70 Music Workstation r
Appendix | MFX and IFX types and parameters
● Disc Noise Type (LP, EP, SP, RND)—Type of record noise.
The frequency at which the noise is heard depends on the
selected type.
● Disc Noise LPF (200~8000Hz, Bypass)—Adjusts the cutoff
frequency of the low pass filter applied to the record noise.
If you don’t want to filter out any high frequencies, set this
parameter to BYPASS.
● Disc Noise Level (0~127)—Volume of the record noise.
● Hum Noise Type (50Hz, 60Hz)—Frequency of the hum
noise.
● Hum Noise LPF (200~8000Hz, Bypass)—Center frequency
of the low pass filter applied to the hum noise (BYPASS: no
cut).
● Hum Noise Level (0~127)—Volume of the hum noise.
● EQ Low Gain (–15dB~0~15dB)—Gain of the low frequency range.
● EQ High Gain (-15dB~0~15dB)—Gain of the high frequency range.
● Balance (D100:0W, D50:50W, D0:100W)—Volume balance between the direct (D) and the effect sound (W).
● Level (0~127)—Output level.
77. LoFi Comp
This is an effect that intentionally degrades the sound quality
for creative purposes.
● Pre Filter Type (1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6)—Selects the type of filter
applied to the sound before it passes through the Lo-Fi
effect.
● LoFi Type (1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9)—Degrades the sound
quality. The sound quality grows poorer as this value is
increased.
● Post Filter Type (OFF, LPF, HPF)—Type of filter. OFF: no filter is used. LPF: cuts the frequency range above the Cutoff
value. HPF: cuts the frequency range below the Cutoff
value.
● Post Filter Cutoff (200~8000, Bypass)—Basic frequency
of the Post Filter.
● EQ Low Gain (–15dB~0~15dB)—Gain of the low frequency range.
● EQ High Gain (-15dB~0~15dB)—Gain of the high frequency range.
● Balance (D100:0W, D50:50W, D0:100W)—Volume balance between the direct (D) and the effect sound (W).
● Level (0~127)—Output level.
78. LoFi Radio
In addition to a Lo-Fi effect, this effect also generates radio
noise.
● LoFi Type (1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9)—Degrades the sound
quality. The sound quality grows poorer as this value is
increased.
● Post Filter Type (OFF, LPF, HPF)—Type of filter. OFF: no filter is used. LPF: cuts the frequency range above the Cutoff
value. HPF: cuts the frequency range below the Cutoff
value.
● Post Filter Cutoff (200~8000, Bypass)—Basic frequency
of the Post Filter.
● Radio Detune (0~127)—Simulates the tuning noise of a
radio. As this value is raised, the tuning drifts further.
● Radio Noise Level (0~127)—Volume of the radio noise.
● EQ Low Gain (–15dB~0~15dB)—Gain of the low frequency range.
● EQ High Gain (-15dB~0~15dB)—Gain of the high frequency range.
● Balance (D100:0W, D50:50W, D0:100W)—Volume balance between the direct (D) and the effect sound (W).
● Level (0~127)—Output level.
79. Telephone
This effect simulates the tonal character of a telephone transmission.
● Voice Quality (0~15)—Audio quality of the telephone
voice.
● Treble (–15dB~0~15dB)—Bandwidth of the telephone
voice.
● Balance (D100:0W, D50:50W, D0:100W)—Volume balance between the direct (D) and the effect sound (W).
● Level (0~127)—Output level.
80. Phonograph
Simulates a sound recorded on an analog record and played
back on a record player. This effect also simulates the various
types of noise that are typical of a record, and even the rotational irregularities of an old turntable.
● Signal Distortion (0~127)—Depth of distortion.
● Frequency Range (0~127)—Frequency response of the
playback system. Decreasing this value will produce the
impression of an old system with a poor frequency
response.
● Disc Type (LP, EP, SP)—Rotational speed of the turntable.
This will affect the frequency of the scratch noise.
● Scratch Noise Level (0~127)—Amount of noise due to
scratches on the record.
● Dust Noise Level (0~127)—Volume of noise due to dust on
the record.
● Hiss Noise Level (0~127)—Volume of continuous “hiss”.
● Total Noise Level (0~127)—Volume of overall noise.
● Wow (0~127)—Depth of long-cycle rotational irregularity.
● Flutter (0~127)—Depth of short-cycle rotational irregularity.
● Random (0~127)—Depth of indefinite-cycle rotational
irregularity.
● Total Wow/Flutter (0~127)—Depth of overall rotational
irregularity.
● Balance (D100:0W, D50:50W, D0:100W)—Volume balance between the direct (D) and the effect sound (W).
● Level (0~127)—Output level.
81. Step Pitch
A pitch shifter in which the amount of pitch shift is varied by
a 16-step sequence.
● Step 1~16 (–24~0~12 semitones)—Amount of pitch shift
at each step (semitone units)
● Rate [sync] (Hz, Note)—Use this parameter to specify
whether (“Note”) or not (“Hz”) the rate should be synchronized to the Arranger or Recorder tempo. Depending on
your choice, the setting range of the following parameter
refers to a speed (Hz) or a note value.
● Rate [Hz] (0.05~10.00Hz)—Rate at which the 16-step
sequence will cycle.
● Rate [note] (musical notes)—Rate parameters can be set
as a note-value of a tempo if you set the “Sync” parameter
above to “Note”. Specify the value of the desired note.
● Attack (0~127)—Speed at which the amount of pitch shift
changes between steps.
● Gate Time (0~127)—Duration of the pitch shifted sound
at each step.
247
G-70 Music Workstation
Appendix | MFX and IFX types and parameters
r
● Fine (–100~100)—Pitch shift adjustment for all steps (2cent units).
● Delay Time [sync] (msec, Note)—Use this parameter to
specify whether (“Note”) or not (“msec”) the delay time
should be synchronized to the Arranger or Recorder tempo.
Depending on your choice, the setting range of the following parameter refers to a speed or a note value.
● Delay Time [msec] (0~1300ms)—Delay time from the
original sound until the pitch-shifted sound is heard.
● Delay Time [note] (Musical Notes)—Delay times can be
set as a note-value of a tempo, if you set the “Sync”
parameter above to “msec”. Specify the value of the desired
note.
● Feedback (–98%~0~+98%)—Proportion of the pitchshifted sound that is to be returned to the input (negative
values invert the phase).
● EQ Low Gain (–15dB~0~15dB)—Gain of the low frequency range.
● EQ High Gain (-15dB~0~15dB)—Gain of the high frequency range.
● Balance (D100:0W, D50:50W, D0:100W)—Volume balance between the direct (D) and the effect sound (W).
● Level (0~127)—Output level.
82. Sympa Reso
On an acoustic piano, holding down the damper pedal allows
other strings to resonate in sympathy with the notes you
play, creating rich and spacious resonances. This effect simulates these sympathetic resonances.
● Depth (0~127)—Depth of the effect.
● Damper (0~127)—Depth to which the damper pedal is
pressed (controls the resonant sound).
● Pre LPF (16~15000Hz, Bypass)—Frequency of the filter
that cuts the high-frequency content of the input sound
(BYPASS: no cut).
● Pre HPF (16~15000Hz, Bypass)—Frequency of the filter
that cuts the low-frequency content of the input sound
(BYPASS: no cut).
● Peaking Freq (200~8000Hz, Bypass) —Frequency of the
filter that boosts/cuts a specific frequency region of the
input sound.
● Peaking Gain (-15dB~0~15dB)—Amount of boost/cut
produced by the filter at the specified frequency region of
the input sound.
● Peaking Q (0.5, 1.0, 2.0, 4.0, 8.0)—Width of the frequency region boosted/cut by the ‘Peaking Gain’ parameter
(larger values make the region narrower).
● HF Damp (16~15000Hz, Bypass)—Frequency at which the
high-frequency content of the resonant sound will be cut
(BYPASS: no cut).
● LF Damp (16~15000Hz, Bypass)—Frequency at which the
low-frequency content of the resonant sound will be cut
(BYPASS: no cut).
● Lid (6, 5, 4, 3, 2, 1)—This simulates the actual changes in
sound that occur when the lid of a grand piano is set at
different heights.
● EQ Low Frequency (200Hz, 400Hz)—Frequency of the
low-range EQ.
● EQ Low Gain (-15dB~0~15dB)—Amount of low-range
boost/cut.
● EQ Mid Frequency (200~8000Hz) —Frequency of the
midrange EQ.
● EQ Mid Gain (-15dB~0~15dB)—Amount of midrange
boost/cut.
248
● EQ Mid Q (0.5, 1.0, 2.0, 4.0, 8.0)—Width of midrange
(larger values make the region narrower).
● EQ High Frequency (2000Hz, 4000Hz, 8000Hz)—Frequency of the high-range EQ.
● EQ High Gain (-15dB~0~15dB)—Amount of high-range
boost/cut.
● Level (0~127)—Output level.
83. VIB-OD-Rotary
This effect combines an overdrive and a rotary with Vibrato/
Chorus. The vibrato effect cyclically modulates the pitch of
organ sounds (which is not the same as the Rotary effect).
The chorus effect mixes the normal sound of the organ with a
sound to which vibrato has been applied, adding richness and
spaciousness to the sound.
● Vibrato Chorus Switch (Off, On)—Turns the Vibrato Chorus on/off.
● Vibrato Chorus Type (V-1, V-2, V-3, C-1, C-2, C-3)—
V-1, V-2, V-3: This applies vibrato (pitch modulation).
Increasing the value will produce a deeper effect.
C-1, C-2, C-3: This applies chorus to add depth and spaciousness to the sound. Increasing the value will produce a
deeper effect.
● Vibrato Chorus Vintage (‘50, '60, '70)—Tonewheel sounds
of the 1950s, ‘60s and ‘70.
● Vibrato Chorus Level (0~127)—Level of the Vibrato Chorus effect.
● Overdrive Switch (Off, On)—Turns the Overdrive on/off
● Overdrive Drive (0~127)—Degree of distortion
● Overdrive Level (0~127)—Sets the Overdrive output level.
● Rotary Switch (Off, On)—Turns the Rotary on/off.
● Rotary Speed (Slow, Fast)—Rotational speed of the rotating speaker.
● Rotary Woofer Slow Speed (0.05~10.00Hz)—Low-speed
rotation speed of the woofer.
● Rotary Woofer Fast Speed (0.05~10.00Hz)—High-speed
rotation speed of the woofer.
● Rotary Woofer Acceleration (0~15)—Adjusts the time it
takes the rotor woofer to reach the newly selected speed
(“Fast” or “Slow”). Lower values correspond to slower transistions.
● Rotary Woofer Level (0~127)—Sets the woofer level.
● Rotary Tweeter Slow Speed (0.05~10.00Hz)—Low-speed
rotation speed of the tweeter.
● Rotary Tweeter Fast Speed (0.05~10.00Hz)—High-speed
rotation speed of the tweeter.
● Rotary Tweeter Acceleration (0~15)—Adjusts the time it
takes the rotor tweeter to reach the newly selected speed
(“Fast” or “Slow”). Lower values correspond to slower transistions.
● Rotary Tweeter Level (0~127)—Sets the woofer level.
● Rotary Separation (0~127)—Spatial dispersion of the
sound.
● Rotary Level (0~127)—Sets the outpu level of the effect.
G-70 Music Workstation r
Appendix | MFX and IFX types and parameters
84. Center Canc
Removes the sounds that are localized at the center of the
stereo input. This is a convenient way to eliminate a vocal.
● L-R Balance (–50~0~50)—Volume balance of the L (left)
and R (right) channels for removing the sound.
● Range Low (16~15000Hz)—Lower frequency limit of the
band to be removed.
● Range High (16~15000Hz)—Upper frequency limit of the
band to be removed.
249
G-70 Music Workstation
Appendix | MIDI Implementation Chart
22. MIDI Implementation Chart
[Music Workstation]
Model: G-70
Date: November 2004
Version: 1.00
Function...
Transmitted
Remarks
Basic
Channel
Default
Changed
1~16
1~16, Off
1~16
1~16, Off
32 Parts
3 Logical Parts (Basic Channel,
NTA1, NTA2)
Mode
Default
Message
Altered
Mode 3
Mode 3, 4 (M=1)
*****
Mode 3
Mode 3, 4 (M=1)
*2
True Voice
0~127
*****
0~127
0~127
Velocity
Note ON
Note OFF
O
X
After
Touch
Key’s
Ch’s
O
O
Note
Number
Pitch Bend
0,32
1
5
6, 38
7
10
11
16
64
65
66
67
69
71
72
73
74
75
76
77
78
84
91
93
98, 99
100, 101
Control
Change
Program
Change
True #
System Exclusive
r
Recognized
*1
O
X
*1
O
O
*1
*1
O
*1
O
*1
O
O
O
O
O
O
O
O
O
O
O
O
O
O
O
O
O
O
O
O
O
O
O
O
O
O
*1
*1
O
O
O
O
O
O
O
O
O
O
O
O
O
O
O
O
O
O
O
O
O
O
O (Reverb)
O (Chorus)
O
O
*1
*1
O
*****
*1
O
0~127
*1
O
*1
O
*1
*1
*1
*1
*1
*1
*1
*1
*1
*1
*1
*1
System
Common
Song Position Pointer
Song Sel
Tune
O
X
X
*1
X
X
X
System
Real Time
Clock
Commands
O
O
*1
*1
O
O
Aux
Messages
All Sounds Off
Reset All Controllers
Local On/Off
All Notes Off
Active Sensing
Reset
X
X
O
X
O
X
*1
*1
*1
*1
*1
Bank Select
Modulation
Portamento Time
Data Entry
Volume
Panpot
Expression
C1
Hold 1
Portamento
Sostenuto
Soft
Hold 2
Resonance
Realease Time
Attack Time
Cutoff
Decay Time
Vibrato Rate
Vibrato Depth
Vibrato Delay
Portamento Control
Effect 1 Depth
Effect 3 Depth
NRPN LSB, MSB
RPN LSB, MSB
Program Number 1~128
*1
*1
O (120, 126, 127)
O (121)
O
O (123-125)
O
X
Notes
*1 O X is selectable
*2 Recognized as M= 1 even if M≠ 1
Mode 1: OMNI ON, POLY
Mode 3: OMNI OFF, POLY
Mode 2: OMNI ON, MONO
Mode 4: OMNI OFF, MONO
250
*1
*1
*1
*1
*1
*1
*1
*1
*1
*3
O: Yes
X: No
G-70 Music Workstation r
Appendix | Chord Intelligence
23. Chord Intelligence
C
C#
D
E
E
F
CM7
C#M7
DM7
E M7
EM7
FM7
C7
C#7
D7
E 7
E7
F7
Cm
C#m
Dm
E m
Em
Fm
Cm7
C#m7
Dm7
E m7
Em7
Fm7
CmM7
C#mM7
DmM7
E mM7
EmM7
FmM7
Cdim
C#dim
Ddim
E dim
Edim
Fdim
Cm7 ( 5 )
C#m7 ( 5 )
Dm7 ( 5 )
E m7 ( 5 )
Em7 ( 5 )
Fm7 ( 5 )
Caug
C#aug
Daug
E aug
Eaug
Faug
Csus4
C#sus4
Dsus4
E sus4
Esus4
Fsus4
C7sus4
C#7sus4
D7sus4
E 7sus4
E7sus4
F7sus4
C7/13
C#7/13
D7/13
E 7/13
E7/13
F7/13
251
r
G-70 Music Workstation
Appendix | Chord Intelligence
F#
G
A
A
B
B
F#M7
GM7
A M7
AM7
B M7
BM7
F#7
G7
A 7
A7
B 7
B7
F#m
Gm
A m
Am
B m
Bm
F#m7
Gm7
A m7
Am7
B m7
Bm7
F#mM7
GmM7
A mM7
AmM7
B mM7
BmM7
F#dim
Gdim
A dim
Adim
B dim
Bdim
F#m7 ( 5 )
Gm7 ( 5 )
A m7 ( 5 )
Am7 ( 5 )
B m7 ( 5 )
Bm7 ( 5 )
F#aug
Gaug
A aug
Aaug
B aug
Baug
F#sus4
Gsus4
A sus4
Asus4
B sus4
Bsus4
F#7sus4
G7sus4
A 7sus4
A7sus4
B 7sus4
B7sus4
F#7/13
G7/13
A 7/13
A7/13
B 7/13
B7/13
252
G-70 Music Workstation r
Index
Index
Numerics
1 Ch Limit . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 219
1 STAFF . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 51
1/2 Bar . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 73
1/2 Meas. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 183
16-track Sequencer . . . . . . . . . . . . .53, 154
1st Channel Rx . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 219
2 Ch Limit . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 219
2 STAVES. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 51
2nd Channel Rx . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 219
7th . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 184
A
A.Bass . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 75
On/Off. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 65
A/a . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .55, 160
ABS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 74, 75
ABs&ADr On/Off . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 65
Absolute . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 219
ACC . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 67
1~6 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 74
Acc. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 82
Acc&ABs On/Off . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 65
Accomp
Minus-One. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 41
On/Off. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 65
Accompaniment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25, 74
ACV . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .199, 200
Adaptive Chord Voicing . . . . . . . . . . . . . 200
ADR . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 74
ADrum On/Off . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 65
Aftertouch . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 61
Arranger control . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 75
ALL . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 41
FILES . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 209
Alphabetic Order . . . . . . . . 37, 87, 115, 141
Alteration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 81
Intro/Ending . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 81
Mode. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .199, 200
Always. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 73
Arpeggio . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 66
Oct. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 80
Arr
/M.Bass . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 69
Button . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25
Chord Off . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 67
Hold . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 63
ARRANG . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 62
Arranger . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24, 52, 74
Aftertouch . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 75
Chord . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 80
Hold . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 63, 80
Options . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 82
Parts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 74
RIT Tempo . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 63
Using. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25
Arrow . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30, 32
ARTIST . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 36, 38
Assign . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .44, 47
SW . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 62
Asterisk (*). . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 113, 215
Attack . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 94, 106, 127
Audio In . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 104
Author. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 140
Auto. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 82
Fill-In. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .26, 65
Harmony. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 44
Harmony Assign . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 47
Pitch . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 46, 107, 133
Sync. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 217
Tune . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 107
B
Background . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 50
Backup . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 213
Balance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 28
Keyboard parts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 95
Song Makeup Tools . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 124
Bank Select. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 220
Basic . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 218
Bass . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .41, 74
Inversion. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .69, 75
BC
GAIN . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 106
LEVEL. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 106
Beep. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 223
Best Selection . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30
BIAS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 195
Bubble . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 109
BWD. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 40
C
C1. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 93
MIDI . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 216
Cancel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 112
User Program. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 112
Capture . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 48
Category . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .38, 140
CC00 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 169, 196, 220
CC16 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 216
CC32 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 169, 196, 220
Celeste. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 110
Chain . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 145
Change
Gate Time . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 168, 195
Velo . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 167, 195
Channel. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 216, 217
Basic . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 218
Chord. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25
Display . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 49
Int . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 136
Oct. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .66, 80
Chord recognition . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 80
Chorus . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 127
Drum instrument . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 128
Harmonic Bars. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 35
Harmony Effect . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 110
Keyboard parts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 98
Level . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 129
Send . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 104, 107, 110
Song/Style . . . . . . . . . . . . . 102, 124, 129
Style Composer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 189
Vocal Harmonist . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 107
Church. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 109
Clear ALL Steps . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 147
Clip. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 222
Control . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 219
Clock . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 217
Clones . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 182
Coarse
Tune. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 91
Upper2 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 90
Vocal Harmonist . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 132
Color Control . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 219
Colour Preset . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 50
Common . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 129
Compander. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 167
Composer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 52
COMPRESS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 43
Compressor. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 43, 95, 106
Concert . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 109
Connections . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20
Cont . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 217
Contrast . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .14, 21
Controls
D Beam . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 65
Style Composer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 181
Copy
Disk&Media . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 208
Event . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 174, 178, 201
Existing Styles . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 186
Index . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 121, 144
Mode . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 164, 187
Sequencer. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 164
Style . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 187
Styles. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .88, 142
Times . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 188
User Program. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 119
Count-In . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 73
Sequencer. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 157
Style Composer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 183
Country . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 86
Cover
Song . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 41
Style . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 77
CPT . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 197
Create Event. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 177, 201
Custom . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 84
CUSTOMIZE. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 41
Cut&Reso . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 66
253
G-70 Music Workstation
Index
Cutoff . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 66
Freq . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 94
Sound Edit . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .127, 128
Cutting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 64
r
D
D Beam . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 64
V-Link . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 223
D Modulation. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 66
Damper . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .68, 216
Data
Backup . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 213
Storage. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .211, 213
Type. . . . . . . . . . 163, 165, 170, 193, 196
Update . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 40
Database. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 86, 87
Dec. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .169, 196
Decay . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .94, 127
Degree. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 200
Delay . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 97, 98, 102, 129
Send . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 48, 107, 109
Time . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 109
Time (Vibrato) . . . . . . . . . . . 45, 132, 133
VB . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 128
Vocal Harmonist . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 109
Delete . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 160
Disk&Media . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 207
Last Note . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .39, 142
Mark . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 139
Names. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .55, 160
Play List . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 149
Sequencer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 164
Song Finder . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 142
Style . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 88
Style Composer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 193
User Program . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 118
Demo. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22
Depth . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .132, 133
VB . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 128
Vibrato . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 45
Destination. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 187
Detuned . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 110
Direct. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .19, 103
Disconnect . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 212
Disk
/Media . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 203
User. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 84, 85, 187
Display
Beep sound . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 223
Contrast . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21
Dissolve Time . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 222
Division . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .182, 184
DJ Gear . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 64
Down. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 113
Drawbar . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 33
Drum . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 41, 74
& Bass. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 41
Instrument. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 128
Mute . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 128
Two tracks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 156
Drum Set
Note pitch . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 189
Select (User Stl). . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 188
Sound Edit . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 128
254
Drumming . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 31
Dw . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 75
Dynamic
Arranger . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 63, 81
Edit . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 81
Dynamics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 60
E
EASY SETTING . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 28, 33
Edit
Index . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 120, 144
MIDI . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 215
Style . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 188
Effect. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 95
Audio In . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 104
Compressor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 106
Equalizer. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 105
Harmonic Bars. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 34
Keyboard parts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 97
Multi-FX . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 100
Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 95
Song/Styles . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 101
Type. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 108
EFFECTS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .43, 107
END/RIT. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 26
Ending . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .26, 62, 67, 69, 74
Ensemble . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 44, 107, 136
Env
Attack . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 94
Decay . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 94
Release . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 94
Envelope . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .93, 127
EQUAL . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 162, 163, 192
Equalizer . . . . . . . . 105, 132, 135, 136, 137
Vocoder . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 135
Erase
Event. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 178, 201
Sequencer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 162
Style Composer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 192
Event . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 177, 201
Filter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 216
Exchange . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 171
Execute . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 160
EXP. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30
EXPANSION . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 32
Expansion board . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 227
Expression
Pedal . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 70
Style Composer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 189
Extended. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30
External Source . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 104
F
Factory Reset . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 224
Fade . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 63, 65, 138
FAST . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 28, 35
Fast-forward . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 40
FC-7 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 67
FDw . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 187
Feedback . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 102, 109, 129
Female. . . . . . . . . . . . . 44, 45, 48, 134, 135
File
Copy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 208
Name . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 38
Fill. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .26, 75
Down. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 62, 65, 75
Dwn. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 184
Half Bar. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 63, 67, 69
Remain . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 62
Rit value . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 83
Ritardando . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 83
Up . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 62, 65, 75
Filter
MIDI. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 216, 217
Score . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 51
TVF Cutoff . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 94
Up/Down . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 62
Find . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 86
Only. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .37, 141
Finder. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 87
Music Assistant . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 37
Song . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .38, 140
Style . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 86
User Program. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 113
Fine
Tune. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 91
Upper2 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 90
Vocal Harmonist . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 132
Flanger . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 98, 102, 129
Foot
Pedal . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 70
Switch. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 69
Footswitch . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 92
For . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 165, 194
Format. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 209
Frequency Hz . . . . . . . . 132, 135, 136, 137
FROM. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 187
FIRST NOTE. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 40
SECOND BAR . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 40
Front panel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13
Full . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 51
FUp. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 187
FWD . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 40
FX Link . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 108
G
Gain . . . . . . . . . . . . 106, 132, 135, 136, 137
Gate . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .43, 95
Gender. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 132, 133, 134, 135
Voice Input. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 45
Genre. . . . . . . . . . . . . 36, 38, 114, 118, 140
Style . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 86
GET IT. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 85, 116, 187
Global . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 223
Change . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 169, 196
Transpose . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 59
GM2 Reverb . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 98
H
Half Bar . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 63, 67, 69
Hall. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .97, 102, 109, 129
HARD . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 35
Harmonic Bars . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 33
Harmonist. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .42, 115
FX Link. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 108
Harmony . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .76, 107
Assign . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 44, 47, 135
On/Off . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .68, 70
G-70 Music Workstation r
Index
High. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 217
Key Touch. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 60
HIGHER . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 162, 163, 192
HIGHEST . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 48
Hold. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 199
Arranger . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 80
Assign . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 68
Fade In/Out . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 138
Footswitch . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 68
Lower . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 92
Lower1 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 70
Lower2 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 68, 70
One Touch . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 79
Pedal . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 92
Settings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 115
User Program . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 115
Key . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 182
Score Options . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 51
Touch . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 60
Keyboard
&Style Parts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 215
Exchange
LW2/1. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .63, 70
UP2/1 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .63, 70
Functions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 90
Modes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 56
Options . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 91
Part . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 29
Parts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24, 28, 93
Sound selection. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 29
Touch . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 60
Transpose . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 59
I
L
IFX . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 95, 104, 229
Types . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 104
IINSTRUM . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 65
Inc . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .169, 196
Index . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 38, 87, 140
Copy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .121, 144
Edit . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .120, 143
Rename . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 120
User Program . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 114
Info . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 223
Init
All Values . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 93
Single Value. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .93, 216
Value. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .169, 196
Initialize . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 224
Media . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 209
Style . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 180
Insert . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .55, 160
Sequencer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 165
Style Composer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 194
INSIDE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 162, 163, 192
Instrumentation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 41
INSTRUMENTS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 64
Int+Mid. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 219
Intelligence Threshold . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 76
INTELLIGENT. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 80
Internal . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .218, 219
Memory . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 224
Memory Protect . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21
Metronome . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 73
Interval (transposition). . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 58
Into . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .165, 188
Intro. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 26, 62, 67, 69, 74
Intro/Ending. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 79
Alteration. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 81
Inversion. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 75
Language . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22
Large Hall . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 109
LCD Contrast . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21
LEAKAGE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 35
Left. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 80
Length . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 183, 197
Level . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 106
Chorus . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .99, 102
Reverb. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .97, 102
See also Volume
Limit. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 219
Limit High/Low . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 217
Limiter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 106
LINE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 42
Link . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 116
MFX . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 101
Listen . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 187
Live. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 109
Load . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 204
MIDI Set . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 204
User Program Set . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 204
Local . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 216
On/Off . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 215
Lock . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 82
Looped patterns . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 179
Low . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 217
Key Touch. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 60
Pass Filter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 110
Lower. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 163, 192
Hold. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 92
LOWEST . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 48
LW1 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 33
LWR Hold . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 92
Lyrics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 49
&Score . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 49
Color . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 50
Edit . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 150
MIDI . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 220
J
JUMP TO 1st NOTE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 126
K
Karaoke . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 50
KBD Mode. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 28, 56
Hold . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 79
M
MA . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 122
MA (Music Assistant) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 118
MAGNIFY . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 195
Magnify. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 167, 195
Main . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25, 74, 75, 103, 187
VAR . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 79
Main page. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23
Major . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 184
Makeup Tools . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 124
MALE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .44, 48
Male. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 45, 134, 135
Manual . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 34
Drums . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 29
MARK & JUMP . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .39, 139
Master
Track . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 155, 171
Tune. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .59, 61
Volume . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25, 28, 218
Mastering Tools . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 105
Max . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 60
MBass/KBD Arranger. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 67
MBass/Keyboard Arranger . . . . . . . . . . . . 63
MEASURE LENGTH. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 183
MEL INT . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 76
MELODY . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 41
MELODY INTELL . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 29
Melody Intelligence. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 76
For Harmonist . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 136
Merge
16-track . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 156
Copy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 165
Metronome. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 73
Internal . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 73
Mode . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 73
User Style . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 186
MFX . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 95, 100, 229
Link . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 101
Type . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 100
MIC . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 42
INPUT . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 107
Micro Edit . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 175, 198
Microphone . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 42
Mid. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 60
MIDI . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 214
Basic channel. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 218
Channel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 216, 217
Filter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 216, 217
Functions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 214
Parameters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 216, 219
RX . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 216, 217
Set . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 220
Set, Automatic selection . . . . . . . . . . 220
Set, Link to User Program . . . . . . . . . 116
Set, Load . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 204
Set, Save . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 205
Socket icon. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 117
Sync. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 217
Synchronization . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 217
TX. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 216
User Program link . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 116
Min. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 60
Minor. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 184
Minus One . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 41, 66, 68, 70
Mix . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .44, 134, 135, 164
Record. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 183
Style Copy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 187
Mixer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .95, 189
255
G-70 Music Workstation
Index
Mode
Copy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 164
Portamento . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 92
Styles . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 184
Modulation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 58, 62, 93
Monitor. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 50
Mono. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 92
Move Event . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 174, 178, 201
Multi-band compressor . . . . . . . . . . . . . 106
Multi-FX . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 100
Music Assistant . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 36
Create new. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .121, 212
Delete registration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 122
Edit registration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 122
Functions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 121
Rename registration . . . . . . . . . . . . . 122
Save registration. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 122
Music Mute . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 48
Music Style, see Style
Mute . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 124
Drum. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 128
Makeup Tools . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 126
Mixer. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 95
Percussion . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 128
Sequencer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 160
Style Composer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 185
Style parts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 185
My Setup . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 181
N
Name. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 36, 49
File. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 55
Song . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 55
User Program . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 112
Nearest . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 200
Next Song. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 40
Note. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 163, 165, 170
To Arranger . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 218
Wrap . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 134
NRPN. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 163, 165, 170
Dr. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 200
Drum. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 189
NTA . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 218
Num Lock . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 87, 115, 141
r
O
Octave. . . . . . . . . . . . . .23, 59, 66, 127, 133
Auto Pitch . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 46
Harmony . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 135
Sequencer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 157
TX. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 219
User Style. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 182
Vocoder . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 134
OFF. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 40
One Touch . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 29, 78
One-shot patterns . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 179
Options
Arranger . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 82
Song . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 141
Style Finder . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 88
User Program . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 118
Organ . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 33
Oriental Scales. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 71
256
Original . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .48, 129
Cover. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 41
Output. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 214
Assign . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 103
LEV. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 43
USB . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 214
OUTSIDE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 162, 163, 192
OVERDRIVE. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 34
P
P&S Input . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 142
Pad. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 62
PAGE 1~4 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27
Palette. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 127, 222
Makeup Tools. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 126
Pan
Delay . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 102, 109, 129
Keyboard parts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 103
Mixer. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 96
Style/Song . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 104
Panel descriptions. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13
Panpot. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 96, 124, 127
Drum instrument . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 128
Harmonist . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 135
Style Composer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 189
Vocoder . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 134
Paper clip . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 116
Param . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 219
Part
On/off . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 28, 57
Outputs. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 103
Switch. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 218, 219
Patterns . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 179
PBend . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 163, 165, 170
PC. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 169, 196
Pedal . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 70
PERC Mute . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 128
Percussion . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 31, 34, 35
Performance Memory, see User Program
Piano . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 63
Style . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 63, 67, 69, 80
Pitch . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 132
ADrums. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 189
Auto . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .46, 133
Bend . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 58
Bender . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 133, 134, 136
Down . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 62
Down (D Beam) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 66
Drum Instrument . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 129
Drum Set Note . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 189
Up . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 62
Up (D Beam) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 65
Place Event. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 174, 178, 202
Plate . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 102, 129
Play
& Search. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .39, 142
/Stop . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 68, 69
List. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 145
Metronome . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 73
Poly . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 92
Portam . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 134, 136
Portamento . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 69
Upper 1/2 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 91
Preset. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 82
Tempo . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 190
Punch In/Out . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 157
Footswitch . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .68, 69
Q
Quantize
Sequencer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 161
Style Composer . . . . . . . . . . . . . 183, 191
Quarter tone. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 71
Quick Start . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 40
R
Rate . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 131, 133
VB . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 128
Vibrato . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 45
RATIO. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 106
REC
Mode (User Stl) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 183
Type. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 156, 159
Recall. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 117, 221
User Program. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 117
Record
16-track . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 158, 160
Mix. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 183
Replace . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 183
Recorder . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 52
Recording . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 52
Select . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 157
Red arrow . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .30, 32
Redo . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 184
Reflections . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 109, 110
Registrations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 111
Relative . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 219
Release . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 94, 106, 127
Remote . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 218
Remove . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 147
Rename
Disk&Media . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 206
Index . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 120, 144
Song Chain. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 149
Song Finder . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .88, 142
User Prg/Genre . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 118
Replace . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 164
Copy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 164
Record. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 183
User Style . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 187
Reset . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 39, 142, 224
Start Tempo . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .63, 67
Reso . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 127, 128
RESOLUTION. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 192
Resonance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 94
D Beam . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 66
Reverb . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 127
Drum instrument . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 128
Keyboard parts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 97
Level . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 129
Send . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .48, 104, 107, 109
Song/Style . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 124, 129
Style Composer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 189
Style/Song . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 102
Time. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 109
Vocal Harmonist . . . . . . . . . . . . 107, 109
Revolving Bass . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .69, 75
G-70 Music Workstation r
Index
Rewind . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 40
Right . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 80
Rise Time . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 45
Voice FX . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .132, 133
Rit . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 67, 82
Fill (value). . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 83
Tempo. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 82
Value. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 83
Ritardando . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 83
RND Tuning . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .134, 136
Room. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .97, 102, 109, 129
Rotary . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 66
S/F . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 69
Slow/Fast . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 63, 68
Sound . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 35
RX . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .216, 217
Event Filter. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 217
Sync . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 217
Velocity. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 219
S
Save
Chain. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 146
MIDI Set . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 205
Song . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .159, 205
Style . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .185, 206
Style/Song . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 130
User Program . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 111
User Program Set . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 205
Saved Version . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 77
Saving
MIDI Set . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 220
One Touch . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 79
Scale . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 63
Tuning. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 71
Score . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 51
Scratch . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 64
Search Only . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .87, 115
SELECT MIDI . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 215
Sequencer. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .54, 154
Set List . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 111
Shift. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 217
16-track . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 170
Clock . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 196
MIDI . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 216
Short
Delay. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 129
DLY FBK . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .102, 129
Echo . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 109
Singer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .107, 131
Key . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 48
Single
Finger . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 78
Parts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 134
Slow. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 28, 35, 109
Small . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 44, 107, 135
SMF . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 38, 55
Smooth . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 110
Soft . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 35, 68, 70
Solo . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 126, 160, 185
Song . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .38, 39
Balance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 124
Category. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 38
Chorus . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 129
Cover. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 41
Data Changes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 220
Effects. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 124
Finder . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 140
Link . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 116, 118
Link to User Program . . . . . . . . . . . . . 116
Lyrics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 150
Makeup Tools. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 124
Name. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .38, 55
Options . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 141
Parts (MIDI) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 215
Position Pointer. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 217
Reverb. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 129
Save. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .55, 130, 159, 205
Scanning . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 40
Sync. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 217
Tempo . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 129
Track Edit . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 160
Transpose . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .59, 129
Volume . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 129
Sostenuto . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .68, 70
Sound
Edit . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 127, 128
EFX. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .64, 65
Set Mode . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30
Source pattern. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 164
Space. . . . . . . . . . . . 55, 109, 110, 141, 160
Speaker icon. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 198
Specifications. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 225
SPLIT
&TOUCH . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 60
1/2 (Compressor). . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 106
Split
Arranger . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 57
Keyboard Mode . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 57
Lower Hold. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 92
Point . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .57, 90
Upper3 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 90
SRV Reverb . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 97
SRX . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .32, 227
Stage . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 97
Standard . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 63, 67, 69, 80
MIDI File . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .38, 55
Start. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .25, 217
Start/Stop . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25, 67, 69, 74
Song . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 65
Style . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 65
Startup . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 31, 117, 221
Std . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 200
Stereo placement . . . . . . . . . 124, 127, 128
Stop . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 217
Storage . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 213
STRENGTH. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 192
Studio . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 109
Style. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .24, 179
Chorus. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 129
Composer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 179
Control . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 74
Cover. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 77
Custom, programming . . . . . . . . . . . . . 84
Database. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 86
Definition . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 74
Delete . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 88
Discard recording . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 184
Editing. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 188
Effects . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 124
Link . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 114, 118
Makeup Tools. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 124
Micro Edit. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 198
MIDI parameters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 218
Mode select . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 180
Part . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 29
Parts on/off . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 96
PC . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 218
Programming. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 179
Quick location . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 86
Record mode . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 183
Reverb. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 129
Save. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 130, 185, 206
Selecting. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27
Start & Stop . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 74
Tempo . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 129, 183
Track Edit . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 190
Using . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25
Volume . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 129, 218
Sustain . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .68, 92
LEV. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 43
Switch on/off . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21
Sync . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .25, 75
Synchro (Lyrics) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 151
Synchronization. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 217
Sys Exclusive. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 219
SysEx . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 40
Filter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 216
System. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 217
T
Talk. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 47, 68, 70, 107
Reverb. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 109
Tap . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .28, 67
Tempo . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .28, 183
Arranger . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 82
Rit . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 82
Song . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 129, 156
Style . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .35, 129
Style Composer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 190
Synchronization . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 217
Tap. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 67
Up/Down . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 65
User Style . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 183
Threshold . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .43, 76
THRSHLD. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 106
Time
Hold. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 138
In . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 138
Out. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 138
Signat . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 197
Signature . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 156, 180
Times . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 188
257
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TO. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 187
Tone. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 29
Edit . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 93
Map. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .169, 196
Select (User Stl). . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 188
Sound Edit . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 127
Top. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 40
Touch Screen Beep . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 223
Track . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .179, 182
Edit . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .160, 190
Instrument. . . . . . . . . . . . . 181, 182, 188
Length . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 197
Xchange . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 171
Transpose . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23, 58, 59
Automatic . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 48
MIDI parameter. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 216
Octave steps . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 59
RX . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 219
Sequencer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 166
Song . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 129
Style Composer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 194
TT Motor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 64
Tune. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 61, 91
Upper2 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 90
Tuning . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 48, 59, 61
TV screen . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 50
TVF
/TVA. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 93
Cutoff . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 94
Resonance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 94
TX . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 216
Event Filter. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 216
Octave . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 219
Sync . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 217
Velocity. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 219
Type . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 80
U
r
UNDO CHANGES . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 126
UNEQUAL . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 162, 163, 192
Up . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .75, 113
UP1 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 33
UP3
Split. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 90
Update . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 40
Upper1 M-FX Link . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 101
USB . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .211, 213
MIDI . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 214
User . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .105, 106
Minus-One. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 41
Prg. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .118, 205
Prg PC. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 218
258
User Program. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 111
Cancel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 112
Copy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 119
Delete . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 118
Edit Finder . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 117
Filter
KBD Mode . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 115
MIDI Set. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 115
Song. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 115
Style . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 115
Tempo . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 115
Tone selection. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 115
Transpose settings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 115
Transposition . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 115
Finder . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 113
Hold. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 115
Load . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 204
Name . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 112
Options . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 118
Program Change. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 218
Quick location . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 114
Recall . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 117
Rename . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 118
Select . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 112
Select manually. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 113
Set (save) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 205
Song/MIDI Set Link. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 116
Write . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 111
User Style, see Style
V
Value . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 166, 194, 196
Variat 1~4 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 67, 69
Variation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 26
Down . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 62
Up . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 62
VB
Delay . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 128
Depth . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 128
Rate. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 128
Velocity . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 127
Drum instrument . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 128
Melody Intell . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 76
MIDI . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 219
Rx/Tx . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 219
Sensitivity. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 60
Songs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 167
Styles . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 195
Version . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 224
Vibrato . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 35, 45, 93
Auto Pitch . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 133
Singer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .45, 131
Voice-FX . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 132
Video Output . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 50
Vinyl RPM . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 64
VK. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 33
V-Link . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 219, 222
VOCAL EFFECT . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 43
Vocal Harmonist . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .42, 107
Edit . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 131
Effects. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 108
Filter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 115
Vocoder. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 46, 107, 134
Voice . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .43, 107
FX. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 45, 107, 132
Type. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 45
Volume . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .25, 127
Drum instrument . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 128
Knob . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .21, 28
Makeup Tools. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 124
Master. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 218
Mixer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 95
Pedal . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 70
Small . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 135
Song . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 129
Song Makeup. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 124
Style . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 129
Style (MIDI) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 218
Vocoder. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 134
W
Wait Note . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 183
Wall Type . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 109
Wave expansion. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 227
Whole . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 28, 57, 67, 80
Words . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 49
Write
Mark . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 139
MIDI Set . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 220
One Touch . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 79
User . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 105, 106
User Program. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 111
Z
Zone. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .80, 219
For EU Countries
This product complies with the requirements of European Directives EMC 89/336/EEC and LVD 73/23/EEC.
For the USA
FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION
RADIO FREQUENCY INTERFERENCE STATEMENT
This equipment has been tested and found to comply with the limits for a Class B digital device, pursuant to Part 15 of the
FCC Rules. These limits are designed to provide reasonable protection against harmful interference in a residential
installation. This equipment generates, uses, and can radiate radio frequency energy and, if not installed and used in
accordance with the instructions, may cause harmful interference to radio communications. However, there is no guarantee
that interference will not occur in a particular installation. If this equipment does cause harmful interference to radio or
television reception, which can be determined by turning the equipment off and on, the user is encouraged to try to correct the
interference by one or more of the following measures:
– Reorient or relocate the receiving antenna.
– Increase the separation between the equipment and receiver.
– Connect the equipment into an outlet on a circuit different from that to which the receiver is connected.
– Consult the dealer or an experienced radio/TV technician for help.
This device complies with Part 15 of the FCC Rules. Operation is subject to the following two conditions:
(1) This device may not cause harmful interference, and
(2) This device must accept any interference received, including interference that may cause undesired operation.
Unauthorized changes or modification to this system can void the users authority to operate this equipment.
This equipment requires shielded interface cables in order to meet FCC class B Limit.
For Canada
NOTICE
This Class B digital apparatus meets all requirements of the Canadian Interference-Causing Equipment Regulations.
AVIS
Cet appareil numérique de la classe B respecte toutes les exigences du Règlement sur le matériel brouilleur du Canada.
R®
602.00.0055
RES 425-04 Printed in Italy 11-04 G-70 – OM/E
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