Host Link Units SYSMAC WAY For Use With C-series Rack PCs

Host Link Units SYSMAC WAY For Use With C-series Rack PCs
SYSMAC WAY
Host Link Units
For Use With C-series Rack PCs
Revised April 2001
No. 6182
OMRON Corporation
Read and Understand this Manual
Please read and understand this manual before using the product. Please consult your OMRON
representative if you have any questions or comments.
Warranty and Limitations of Liability
WARRANTY
OMRON's exclusive warranty is that the products are free from defects in materials and workmanship for a
period of one year (or other period if specified) from date of sale by OMRON.
OMRON MAKES NO WARRANTY OR REPRESENTATION, EXPRESS OR IMPLIED, REGARDING NONINFRINGEMENT, MERCHANTABILITY, OR FITNESS FOR PARTICULAR PURPOSE OF THE
PRODUCTS. ANY BUYER OR USER ACKNOWLEDGES THAT THE BUYER OR USER ALONE HAS
DETERMINED THAT THE PRODUCTS WILL SUITABLY MEET THE REQUIREMENTS OF THEIR
INTENDED USE. OMRON DISCLAIMS ALL OTHER WARRANTIES, EXPRESS OR IMPLIED.
LIMITATIONS OF LIABILITY
OMRON SHALL NOT BE RESPONSIBLE FOR SPECIAL, INDIRECT, OR CONSEQUENTIAL DAMAGES,
LOSS OF PROFITS OR COMMERCIAL LOSS IN ANY WAY CONNECTED WITH THE PRODUCTS,
WHETHER SUCH CLAIM IS BASED ON CONTRACT, WARRANTY, NEGLIGENCE, OR STRICT
LIABILITY.
In no event shall the responsibility of OMRON for any act exceed the individual price of the product on which
liability is asserted.
IN NO EVENT SHALL OMRON BE RESPONSIBLE FOR WARRANTY, REPAIR, OR OTHER CLAIMS
REGARDING THE PRODUCTS UNLESS OMRON'S ANALYSIS CONFIRMS THAT THE PRODUCTS
WERE PROPERLY HANDLED, STORED, INSTALLED, AND MAINTAINED AND NOT SUBJECT TO
CONTAMINATION, ABUSE, MISUSE, OR INAPPROPRIATE MODIFICATION OR REPAIR.
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No. 6182
Application Considerations
SUITABILITY FOR USE
OMRON shall not be responsible for conformity with any standards, codes, or regulations that apply to the
combination of products in the customer's application or use of the products.
At the customer's request, OMRON will provide applicable third party certification documents identifying
ratings and limitations of use that apply to the products. This information by itself is not sufficient for a
complete determination of the suitability of the products in combination with the end product, machine,
system, or other application or use.
The following are some examples of applications for which particular attention must be given. This is not
intended to be an exhaustive list of all possible uses of the products, nor is it intended to imply that the uses
listed may be suitable for the products:
• Outdoor use, uses involving potential chemical contamination or electrical interference, or conditions or
uses not described in this manual.
• Nuclear energy control systems, combustion systems, railroad systems, aviation systems, medical
equipment, amusement machines, vehicles, safety equipment, and installations subject to separate
industry or government regulations.
• Systems, machines, and equipment that could present a risk to life or property.
Please know and observe all prohibitions of use applicable to the products.
NEVER USE THE PRODUCTS FOR AN APPLICATION INVOLVING SERIOUS RISK TO LIFE OR
PROPERTY WITHOUT ENSURING THAT THE SYSTEM AS A WHOLE HAS BEEN DESIGNED TO
ADDRESS THE RISKS, AND THAT THE OMRON PRODUCTS ARE PROPERLY RATED AND INSTALLED
FOR THE INTENDED USE WITHIN THE OVERALL EQUIPMENT OR SYSTEM.
PROGRAMMABLE PRODUCTS
OMRON shall not be responsible for the user's programming of a programmable product, or any
consequence thereof.
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No. 6182
Disclaimers
CHANGE IN SPECIFICATIONS
Product specifications and accessories may be changed at any time based on improvements and other
reasons.
It is our practice to change model numbers when published ratings or features are changed, or when
significant construction changes are made. However, some specifications of the products may be changed
without any notice. When in doubt, special model numbers may be assigned to fix or establish key
specifications for your application on your request. Please consult with your OMRON representative at any
time to confirm actual specifications of purchased products.
DIMENSIONS AND WEIGHTS
Dimensions and weights are nominal and are not to be used for manufacturing purposes, even when
tolerances are shown.
PERFORMANCE DATA
Performance data given in this manual is provided as a guide for the user in determining suitability and does
not constitute a warranty. It may represent the result of OMRON's test conditions, and the users must
correlate it to actual application requirements. Actual performance is subject to the OMRON Warranty and
Limitations of Liability.
ERRORS AND OMISSIONS
The information in this manual has been carefully checked and is believed to be accurate; however, no
responsibility is assumed for clerical, typographical, or proofreading errors, or omissions.
3
iv
Notice:
OMRON products are manufactured for use according to proper procedures by a qualified operator
and only for the purposes described in this manual.
The following conventions are used to indicate and classify precautions in this manual. Always heed
the information provided with them. Failure to heed precautions can result in injury to people or damage to the product.
DANGER
Indicates an imminently hazardous situation which, if not avoided, will result in death or
serious injury.
! WARNING
Indicates a potentially hazardous situation which, if not avoided, could result in death or
serious injury.
! Caution
Indicates a potentially hazardous situation which, if not avoided, may result in minor or
moderate injury, or property damage.
!
OMRON Product References
All OMRON products are capitalized in this manual. The word “Unit” is also capitalized when it refers
to an OMRON product, regardless of whether or not it appears in the proper name of the product.
The abbreviation “Ch,” which appears in some displays and on some OMRON products, often means
“word” and is abbreviated “Wd” in documentation in this sense.
The abbreviation “PLC” means Programmable Controller (Programmable Logic Controller) and is not
used as an abbreviation for anything else.
Visual Aids
The following headings appear in the left column of the manual to help you locate different types of
information.
Note Indicates information of particular interest for efficient and convenient operation
of the product.
1, 2, 3...
1. Indicates lists of one sort or another, such as procedures, checklists, etc.
 OMRON, 1990
All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced, stored in a retrieval system, or transmitted, in any
form, or by any means, mechanical, electronic, photocopying, recording, or otherwise, without the prior written permission of OMRON.
No patent liability is assumed with respect to the use of the information contained herein. Moreover, because OMRON is
constantly striving to improve its high-quality products, the information contained in this manual is subject to change
without notice. Every precaution has been taken in the preparation of this manual. Nevertheless, OMRON assumes no
responsibility for errors or omissions. Neither is any liability assumed for damages resulting from the use of the information contained in this publication.
v
vi
TABLE OF CONTENTS
PRECAUTIONS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
1 Intended Audience . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
2 General Precautions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3 Safety Precautions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
4 Operating Environment Precautions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5 Application Precautions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
SECTION 1
Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
1-1
1-2
1-3
1-4
1-5
1-6
Applicable Units . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
System Configuration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Mounting Host Link Units . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Host Computer Settings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Types of Interfaces . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Wiring RS-232C and RS-422 Cable Connectors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
SECTION 2
Host Link Unit Characteristics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
2-1
2-2
2-3
2-4
C200H Host Link Units . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
C500 (3G2A5) Host Link Units . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
C120 (3G2A6) Host Link Units . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Installing and Removing Host Link Units . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
SECTION 3
Programming . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3-1
3-2
3-3
3-4
Command Levels . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Communications Protocol . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Communications Protocol (C200HS/HX/HG/HE only) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Frame Checksum (FCS) Calculation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
SECTION 4
Commands and Responses . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
4-1
4-2
4-3
4-4
4-5
4-6
4-7
4-8
4-9
4-10
4-11
4-12
4-13
4-14
4-15
4-16
4-17
4-18
4-19
4-20
TEST . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
STATUS READ . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
ERROR READ . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
IR AREA READ . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
HR AREA READ . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
AR AREA READ . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
LR AREA READ . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
TC STATUS READ . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
DM AREA READ . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
FM INDEX READ . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
FM DATA READ . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
PV READ . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
SV READ 1 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
SV READ 2 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
SV READ 3 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
STATUS WRITE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
IR AREA WRITE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
HR AREA WRITE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
AR AREA WRITE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
LR AREA WRITE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
vii
TABLE OF CONTENTS
4-21
4-22
4-23
4-24
4-25
4-26
4-27
4-28
4-29
4-30
4-31
4-32
4-33
4-34
4-35
4-36
4-37
4-38
4-39
4-40
4-41
4-42
4-43
4-44
4-45
4-46
TC STATUS WRITE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
DM AREA WRITE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
FM AREA WRITE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
PV WRITE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
SV CHANGE 1 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
SV CHANGE 2 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
SV CHANGE 3 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
FORCED SET . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
FORCED RESET . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
MULTIPLE FORCED SET/RESET . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
MULTIPLE FORCED SET/RESET STATUS READ . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
FORCED SET/RESET CANCEL . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
PC MODEL READ . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
DM HIGH-SPEED READ . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
ABORT and INITIALIZE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
TRANSMIT (C200HS/HX/HG/HE only) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Response to an Undefined Command . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Response Indicating an Unprocessed Command . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
PROGRAM READ . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
I/O TABLE READ . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
PROGRAM WRITE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
I/O TABLE GENERATE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
I/O REGISTER . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
I/O READ . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Response Code List . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Communications Examples . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
SECTION 5
Error Processing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5-1
5-2
5-3
5-4
Development of an Error-processing Program . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Error Control . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Example Host Computer Program . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Troubleshooting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Appendices
A
B
C
D
Standard Models . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Specifications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
ASCII Conversions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Data Conversion Table . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Glossary . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Index . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Revision History . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
viii
About this Manual:
This manual describes the functions, characteristics, and operating procedures of the Host Link Units
for the C-series building block PCs (Programmable Controllers), i.e., the C120, C200H, C200HS,
C200HX, C200HG, C200HE, C500, C1000H, and C2000H Units.
Section 1 gives a brief overview of the applicable Units and how to connect them into a PC system,
including the settings for the host computer. It also gives details on various interface connections and
how to prepare cables for RS-422 and RS-232C connectors.
Section 2 gives the characteristics of the different Host Link Units which are grouped according to
their model numbers. The information includes their external appearance, the names of the switches
and the functions, the PC operating modes for the various settings, flags, and I/O response times.
Section 3 gives the basics necessary for effective programming. It starts with the full set of instructions and the command levels at which they operate. Communications protocols are outlined, and the
methods for calculating the Frame Checksum (FCS) values is explained.
Section 4 provides the commands and responses for the complete set of instructions covered in this
manual. It also includes a table of error response codes and communications examples using some
of the instructions.
Section 5 details ways of detecting, preventing, and remedying errors that occur in the Host Link systems.
Appendix A provides information on the standard Host Link Unit and Link Adapter models that are
discussed in this manual and gives details for accessories that can be used with the Host Link Units,
such as connector cables and optical fiber interfaces.
Appendix B gives specifications for the Host Link Units and Link Adapters.
Appendix C provides data conversions between ASCII characters and their hex, binary, and decimal
equivalents. It should be noted that the PC always stores ASCII data in its hexadecimal equivalent.
Appendix D lists the data equivalent for hex, binary, BCD, and decimal up to 32dec.
The Glossary gives a comprehensive list of expressions commonly used when dealing with Host Link
Units and Programmable Controllers.
! WARNING Failure to read and understand the information provided in this manual may result in
personal injury or death, damage to the product, or product failure. Please read each
section in its entirety and be sure you understand the information provided in the section
and related sections before attempting any of the procedures or operations given.
ix
PRECAUTIONS
This section provides general precautions for using the Programmable Controller (PC) and related devices.
The information contained in this section is important for the safe and reliable application of the PC. You must read
this section and understand the information contained before attempting to set up or operate a PC system.
1 Intended Audience . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
2 General Precautions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3 Safety Precautions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
4 Operating Environment Precautions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5 Application Precautions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
xi
3
Safety Precautions
1
Intended Audience
This manual is intended for the following personnel, who must also have knowledge of electrical systems (an electrical engineer or the equivalent).
• Personnel in charge of installing FA systems.
• Personnel in charge of designing FA systems.
• Personnel in charge of managing FA systems and facilities.
2
General Precautions
The user must operate the product according to the performance specifications
described in the operation manuals.
Before using the product under conditions which are not described in the manual
or applying the product to nuclear control systems, railroad systems, aviation
systems, vehicles, combustion systems, medical equipment, amusement
machines, safety equipment, and other systems, machines, and equipment that
may have a serious influence on lives and property if used improperly, consult
your OMRON representative.
Make sure that the ratings and performance characteristics of the product are
sufficient for the systems, machines, and equipment, and be sure to provide the
systems, machines, and equipment with double safety mechanisms.
This manual provides information for programming and operating OMRON PCs.
Be sure to read this manual before attempting to use the software and keep this
manual close at hand for reference during operation.
! WARNING It is extremely important that a PC and all PC Units be used for the specified
purpose and under the specified conditions, especially in applications that can
directly or indirectly affect human life. You must consult with your OMRON
representative before applying a PC System to the abovementioned
applications.
3
Safety Precautions
! WARNING Do not attempt to take any Unit apart while the power is being supplied. Doing so
may result in electric shock.
! WARNING Do not touch any of the terminals or terminal blocks while the power is being
supplied. Doing so may result in electric shock.
! WARNING Provide safety measures in external circuits (i.e., not in the Programmable
Controller), including the following items, to ensure safety in the system if an
abnormality occurs due to malfunction of the PC or another external factor
affecting the PC operation. Not doing so may result in serious accidents.
• Emergency stop circuits, interlock circuits, limit circuits, and similar safety
measures must be provided in external control circuits.
• The PC will turn OFF all outputs when its self-diagnosis function detects any
error or when a severe failure alarm (FALS) instruction is executed. As a countermeasure for such errors, external safety measures must be provided to ensure safety in the system.
• The PC outputs may remain ON or OFF due to deposition or burning of the
output relays or destruction of the output transistors. As a countermeasure for
xii
5
such problems, external safety measures must be provided to ensure safety in
the system.
• When the 24-VDC output (service power supply to the PC) is overloaded or
short-circuited, the voltage may drop and result in the outputs being turned
OFF. As a countermeasure for such problems, external safety measures must
be provided to ensure safety in the system.
4
! Caution
Execute online edit only after confirming that no adverse effects will be caused
by extending the cycle time. Otherwise, the input signals may not be readable.
! Caution
Confirm safety at the destination node before transferring a program to another
node or changing contents of the I/O memory area. Doing either of these without
confirming safety may result in injury.
! Caution
Tighten the screws on the terminal block of the AC Power Supply Unit to the
torque specified in the operation manual. The loose screws may result in burning
or malfunction.
Operating Environment Precautions
! Caution
Do not operate the control system in the following locations:
• Locations subject to direct sunlight.
• Locations subject to temperatures or humidity outside the range specified in
the specifications.
• Locations subject to condensation as the result of severe changes in temperature.
• Locations subject to corrosive or flammable gases.
• Locations subject to dust (especially iron dust) or salts.
• Locations subject to exposure to water, oil, or chemicals.
• Locations subject to shock or vibration.
! Caution
Take appropriate and sufficient countermeasures when installing systems in the
following locations:
• Locations subject to static electricity or other forms of noise.
• Locations subject to strong electromagnetic fields.
• Locations subject to possible exposure to radioactivity.
• Locations close to power supplies.
! Caution
5
The operating environment of the PC system can have a large effect on the longevity and reliability of the system. Improper operating environments can lead to
malfunction, failure, and other unforeseeable problems with the PC system. Be
sure that the operating environment is within the specified conditions at installation and remains within the specified conditions during the life of the system.
Application Precautions
Observe the following precautions when using the PC system.
! WARNING Always heed these precautions. Failure to abide by the following precautions
could lead to serious or possibly fatal injury.
xiii
Application Precautions
5
• Always ground the system to 100 Ω or less when installing the Units. Not connecting to a ground of 100 Ω or less may result in electric shock.
• Always turn OFF the power supply to the PC before attempting any of the following. Not turning OFF the power supply may result in malfunction or electric
shock.
• Mounting or dismounting I/O Units, CPU Units, Memory Units, or any other
Units.
• Assembling the Units.
• Setting DIP switches or rotary switches.
• Connecting cables or wiring the system.
• Connecting or disconnecting the connectors.
! Caution
Failure to abide by the following precautions could lead to faulty operation of the
PC or the system, or could damage the PC or PC Units. Always heed these precautions.
• Fail-safe measures must be taken by the customer to ensure safety in the
event of incorrect, missing, or abnormal signals caused by broken signal lines,
momentary power interruptions, or other causes.
• Always use the power supply voltages specified in this manual. An incorrect
voltage may result in malfunction or burning.
• Take appropriate measures to ensure that the specified power with the rated
voltage and frequency is supplied. Be particularly careful in places where the
power supply is unstable. An incorrect power supply may result in malfunction.
• Install external breakers and take other safety measures against short-circuiting in external wiring. Insufficient safety measures against short-circuiting may
result in burning.
• Do not apply voltages to the Input Units in excess of the rated input voltage.
Excess voltages may result in burning.
• Do not apply voltages or connect loads to the Output Units in excess of the
maximum switching capacity. Excess voltage or loads may result in burning.
• Disconnect the functional ground terminal when performing withstand voltage
tests. Not disconnecting the functional ground terminal may result in burning.
• Be sure that all the mounting screws, terminal screws, and cable connector
screws are tightened to the torque specified in this manual. Incorrect tightening torque may result in malfunction.
• Leave the label attached to the Unit when wiring. Removing the label may result in malfunction if foreign matter enters the Unit.
• Remove the label after the completion of wiring to ensure proper heat dissipation. Leaving the label attached may result in malfunction.
• Double-check all wiring and switch settings before turning ON the power supply. Incorrect wiring may result in burning.
• Wire correctly. Incorrect wiring may result in burning.
• Mount Units only after checking terminal blocks and connectors completely.
• Be sure that the terminal blocks, Memory Units, expansion cables, and other
items with locking devices are properly locked into place. Improper locking
may result in malfunction.
• Check the user program for proper execution before actually running it on the
Unit. Not checking the program may result in an unexpected operation.
• Confirm that no adverse effect will occur in the system before attempting any of
the following. Not doing so may result in an unexpected operation.
• Changing the operating mode of the PC.
xiv
5
• Force-setting/force-resetting any bit in memory.
• Changing the present value of any word or any set value in memory.
• Resume operation only after transferring to the new CPU Unit the contents of
the DM Area, HR Area, and other data required for resuming operation. Not
doing so may result in an unexpected operation.
• Do not pull on the cables or bend the cables beyond their natural limit. Doing
either of these may break the cables.
• Do not place objects on top of the cables or other wiring lines. Doing so may
break the cables.
• Use crimp terminals for wiring. Do not connect bare stranded wires directly to
terminals. Connection of bare stranded wires may result in burning.
• When replacing parts, be sure to confirm that the rating of a new part is correct.
Not doing so may result in malfunction or burning.
• Before touching a Unit, be sure to first touch a grounded metallic object in order
to discharge any static built-up. Not doing so may result in malfunction or damage.
xv
SECTION 1
Introduction
This document is designed to introduce the reader to the principles of operation of Host Link Units, their characteristics, and
methods of interfacing them into PC networks. 1-1 Applicable Units lists the PCs that are applicable for each Unit and the type
of connections which can be used.
1-1
1-2
1-3
1-4
1-5
1-6
Applicable Units . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
System Configuration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
1-2-1 Connections . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
1-2-2 System Examples . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Mounting Host Link Units . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Host Computer Settings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Types of Interfaces . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
1-5-1 Optical Interface . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
1-5-2 RS-232C Interface . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
1-5-3 RS-422 Interface . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Wiring RS-232C and RS-422 Cable Connectors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
1-6-1 Preparation for Connecting Shielded Cable to FG . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
1-6-2 Preparation for Connecting Unshielded Cable to FG . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
1-6-3 FG Connection to the Cable’s Shield Wire (RS-422 Interface) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
1-6-4 Wiring . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
1
Section 1-2
System Configuration
1-1
Applicable Units
A Host Link Unit allows a host computer to monitor the operating status and data
areas of the PCs and to control the communications between the PCs and the
controlled system.
One Host Link Unit is required for each PC, and up to 32 PCs can be connected
to a single host computer. The Host Link Units described in this manual are referred to as “Rack-mounting” or “CPU mounting.” A Rack-mounting Host Link
Unit is mounted to an I/O slot of the CPU or Expansion I/O Rack of the building
block PC. A CPU-mounting Host Link Unit is mounted directly to the PC’s CPU.
Different types of Host Link Units, e.g., Rack-mounting and CPU-mounting, can
be combined so that the same PC can be connected to more than one Host Link
Unit. An example of a system using some of these combinations is provided in
1-2 System Configuration, along with other example configurations. Most of
these systems also employ Link Adapters, which are usually used in a system to
branch between Host Link Units, host computers, etc., or to interface wire cables
with optical fiber cables, or to perform both of these functions.
The following table gives the mounting method, types of connectors, and applicable PCs for each of the Host Link Units dealt with in this manual.
Host Link Unit
Mounting Type
Applicable PCs
Connection*
C200H-LK101-PV1***
Rack-mounting
C200H, C200HS, C200HX, C200HG,
and C200HE****
APF/PCF/H-PCF
C200H-LK201-V1***
Rack-mounting
C200H, C200HS, C200HX, C200HG,
and C200HE****
RS-232C
C200H-LK202-V1***
Rack-mounting
C200H, C200HS, C200HX, C200HG,
and C200HE****
RS-422
3G2A5-LK101-PEV1
Rack-mounting
C500, C1000H, and C2000H
APF/PCF/H-PCF
C500-LK103-P**
Rack-mounting
C500, C1000H, and C2000H
APF/PCF/H-PCF
3G2A5-LK101-EV1
Rack-mounting
C500, C1000H, and C2000H
PCF/H-PCF
3G2A5-LK201-EV1
Rack-mounting
C500, C1000H, and C2000H
RS-232C/RS-422
C500-LK103**
Rack-mounting
C500, C1000H, and C2000H
PCF/H-PCF
C500-LK203**
Rack-mounting
C500, C1000H, and C2000H
RS-232C/RS-422
3G2A6-LK101-PEV1
CPU-mounting
CjjH (V1 models), C200H, C120,
C500, C1000H, and C2000H
APF/PCF/H-PCF
3G2A6-LK101-EV1
CPU-mounting
CjjH (V1 models), C200H, C120,
C500, C1000H, and C2000H
PCF/H-PCF
3G2A6-LK201-EV1
CPU-mounting
CjjH (V1 models), C200H, C120,
C500, C1000H, and C2000H
RS-232C
3G2A6-LK202-EV1
CPU-mounting
CjjH (V1 models), C200H, C120,
C500, C1000H, and C2000H
RS-422
*
APF: All-plastic optical fiber cable/PCF: Plastic-clad optical fiber cable/H-PCF: Hard-clad plastic optical fiber cable/
RS-422: RS-422 cable/RS-232C: RS-232C cable
** The C500-LK103(-P) and C500-LK203 can be used with the C500 PC only when the 3G2C3-CPU11-EV1 is used.
*** Reading or writing words in the portion of the EM area expanded by the C200HX/C200HG/C200HE is not possible.
**** C200H Rack-mounting Host Link Units cannot be used with C200HX/HG/HE “-Z-type” PCs or CS1-series PCs.
1-2
System Configuration
The following examples illustrate possible applications of Host Link Units in
wired or optical systems, or both.
Some systems will comprise just one Host Link Unit connected to a single host
computer. This is known as a “single-link” system. Others systems might comprise many Host Link Units connected to a host computer. This configuration is
known as a “multiple-link” system. Although most systems will require only one
2
System Configuration
Section 1-2
host computer, if both Rack-mounting and CPU-mounting Host Link Units are
used together, two host computers can be connected to the same PC, independent of each other. The PC can then execute commands sent from either host
computer.
Up to two of the C500-LK103, C500-LK103-P, and C500-LK203 Rack-mounting
Host Link Units can also be connected, in any combination (including two of the
same Units), to any to a single C1000H, or C2000H PC, allowing up to three host
computers to be connected to these PCs. Control from three host computers is
also available with C200H/HS/HX/HG/HE PCs, where a second Rack-mounting
Host Link Unit can be added on a C200H Expansion I/O Rack. All other PCs are
limited to two Host Link Units. SYSMAC NET Link Units can be combined with
the C500-LK103(-P) and C500-LK203 Rack-mounting Host Link Units when a
C1000H or C2000H PC is used. When combining with a SYSMAC NET Link
Unit, however, only one Rack-mounting Host Link Unit can be used instead of
two.
In all but the third configuration example, Link Adapters are used to branch between system devices, or to convert between different types of cables, or to perform both of these functions. The first part of the Link Adapter model numbers
(3G2A9-) in the examples has been omitted.
1-2-1
Connections
System components can be connected using RS-232C or RS-422 cables, or
both, any of three types of optical fiber cable, or a combination of wired and optical sections. In any system, the maximum length of RS-232C cable is 15 m. The
total length of all RS-422 cable must be no longer than 10 m. RS-232C and
RS-422 cables which are used to connect the Host Link Unit to the host computer are not available from OMRON and must be purchased from an alternative
source.
Maximum lengths for optical fiber cables are determined by the type of cable and
the particular models employed. Models which finish with “-P” in the code number can be set at a length of 20 m for APF cable and 200 m for PCF cable. Models
without the “-P” coding can be set at a maximum length of 800m with PCF cable.
3
Section 1-2
System Configuration
1-2-2
System Examples
Example 1
Serial Multiple-link System with Optical Fiber Cable
Host computer
RS-422 or RS-232C
Link Adapter
3G2A9-AL004-(P)E
Optical fiber
(APF/PCF/H-PCF)
C-series PC
with Optical
Host Link Unit
Optical fiber (APF/PCF/H-PCF)
C-series PC
with Optical
Host Link Unit
C-series PC
with Optical
Host Link Unit
C-series PC
with Optical
Host Link Unit
C-series PC
with Optical
Host Link Unit
As shown above, more than one Host Link Unit can be connected in series using
optical fiber. If, however, any failure (due to power failure, disconnection, etc.)
occurs in one of the Units, the series connection will cause all subsequent Host
Link Units to cease to operate. This can be prevented by using Link Adapters
such as the 3G2A9-AL002-PE Link Adapter shown in the following example.
These Link Adapters bypass any Host Link Unit not connected properly so that
the rest of the system can operate normally.
4
Section 1-2
System Configuration
Example 2
Parallel Multiple-link System with Optical Fiber Cable
Host computer
RS-422C or RS-232C cable
Link Adapter
3G2A9-AL004-(P)E
Optical fiber (APF/PCF/H-PCF)
Link Adapter
Link Adapter
Link Adapter
3G2A9-AL002-PE 3G2A9-AL002-PE 3G2A9-AL002-PE
Link Adapter
3G2A9-AL002-PE
Optical fiber (APF/PCF/H-PCF)
C-series PC
with Optical
Host Link Unit
C-series PC
with Optical
Host Link Unit
C-series PC
with Optical
Host Link Unit
C-series PC
with Optical
Host Link Unit
C-series PC
with Optical
Host Link Unit
Even if a power failure occurs in a Host Link Unit connected to a branch line of a
Link Adapter, signals are still transmitted to the other Host Link Units.
Example 3
Single-link System with RS-232C Cable
In a system where a RS-232C cable connects a Host Link Unit directly to a host
computer, only one Host Link Unit can be connected to that host computer, i.e., it
has a single-link. The following Host Link Units can be used in this type of system:
3G2A5-LK201-EV1, C200H-LK201-V1, C500-LK203, and 3G2A6-LK201-EV1. It
should be noted that the PC onto which the Host Link Unit is mounted could have
another Host Link Unit connected directly or indirectly connected to another host
computer.
Host computer
Host Link Unit
5
Section 1-2
System Configuration
Example 4
Multiple-link System with RS-232C and RS-422 Cable
By using RS-422 cable, more than one Host Link Unit can be connected to the
same host computer to make a multiple-link system.
Host computer
RS-232C cable
Link Adapter
3G2A9-AL004-(P)E
RS-422 cable
Link Adapter
3G2A9-AL001
Link Adapter
3G2A9-AL001
Link Adapter
3G2A9-AL001
Link Adapter
3G2A9-AL001
RS-422 cable
C-series PC
with Host Link
Unit
Example 5
C-series PC
with Host Link
Unit
C-series PC
with Host Link
Unit
C-series PC
with Host Link
Unit
C-series PC
with Host Link
Unit
Multiple-link Multiple-level System
In this example, Rack-mounting and CPU-mounting Host Link Units are combined to control a C500 PC from two host computers. A CPU-mounting Host Link
Unit is also combined with two Rack-mounting Host Link Units (C500-LK103(-P)
or C500-LK203, or both) on another PC, a C1000H or C2000H, to control this PC
from all three host computers. Furthermore, two C200H Rack-mounting Host
Link Units (C200H-LK101-PV1 or C200H-LK202-V1, or both) are combined to
control a C200H/HS/HX/HG/HE PC from a third host computer.
6
Section 1-3
Mounting Host Link Units
All lines connecting to host computers would have to be RS-232C cable. All other lines could be RS-422 cable or optical fiber cable, depending on the particular
Host Link Units and Link Adapters used. Note that the host computer on the upper right is considered to be in a single-link system with the Host Link Unit directly beneath it, despite the fact that other Host Link Units connect the same PC to
other host computers.
Host computer
Host computer
RS-232C
Link Adapter
Link Adapter
Link Adapter
C200H/HS/HX/HG/
HE PC with Rackmounting Host Link
Unit
C200H Expansion
I/O Rack with
Rack-mounting
Host Link Unit
C500 PC with
Rack-mounting and
CPU-mounting
Host Link Unit
Link Adapter
C1000H or C2000H
PC with 2
Rack-mounting and
1 CPU-mounting
Host Link Units
Link Adapter
Host computer
1-3
Mounting Host Link Units
The I/O slots onto which the Host Link Units can be mounted are as follows:
PC
I/O slot
C200H/C200HS/C200HX/C200HG/C200HE
Any*
C500, C1000H
with 3G2A5-BC081,
3G2A5-BC051, or C500-BC031
Backplane
Any of the three slots on the right hand side of the CPU Rack
with C500-BC082, C500-BC052,
C500-BC091, or C500-BC061
Backplane
Any of the five slots on the right hand side of the CPU Rack
slot of the CPU or Expansion I/O Racks
C2000H simplex system with 3G2C5-BC061 Backplane
Any of the slots on the CPU Rack
C2000H duplex system with 3G2C5-BI082 Backplane
Any of the six slots on the Expansion I/O Rack
* If mounted to either of the rightmost slots of the CPU Rack, other peripheral devices, such as the Programming Console,
cannot be mounted.
Note Host Link Unit switches must be set before mounting.
7
Section 1-5
Types of Interfaces
1-4
Host Computer Settings
To establish correct data communications with the Host Link Unit, the communications conditions listed below must match on both the host computer and the
Host Link Unit. For the actual setting of these conditions, refer to the host computer manual.
Transmission Speed
The transmission speed of the Host Link Unit must match that of the host computer. See Section 2 Host Link Unit Characteristics for the setting procedure.
Single-character Data
Format
Set the host computer to the following 11-bit data format (7-bit ASCII):
Number of start bits:
1
Data Length:
7 bits
Even (vertical) parity: 1 bit
Number of stop bits:
2
For the C200H-LK101-PV1, C200H-LK202-V1, C500-LK103(-P), and
C500-LK203 Host Link Units, the following 11-bit format can also be set (8-bit
JIS). Make sure that the host computer and Host Link Unit formats match.
Number of start bits:
1
Data length:
8 bits
Parity (odd or even):
1 bit
Number of stop bits:
1
1-5
Types of Interfaces
The system must be properly interfaced to enable error-free communications.
Use the following information to correctly interface your system.
1-5-1
Optical Interface
In an optical fiber system, the maximum transmission distance varies depending
on the type of optical fiber cable, which in turn depends on the Host Link Unit
model. Refer to the table under in Appendix C for optical fiber cable lengths. Optical fiber cable connectors must be assembled by the user.
The products listed in the following table can be used to interface the
C500-LK203, 3G2A5-LK201-EV1, C200H-LK201-V1, or the 3G2A6-LK201-EV1
Host Link Unit to a host computer.
Product
Model Number
Quantity Required
Miscellaneous
Optical Interface
Z3RN-A-5
2
RS-232C - optical converter interface
Optical Fiber Cable
Z3F2-4DjM*
1
---
AC Adapter
Z3GP-01
1 or 2
For supplying power to optical interface
* When ordering, replace the “j” with the desired cable length: 1, 5, 10, 20, 30, 50, 100, 200, 400, or 500 m, e.g., Z3F2-4D30M
to order a 30 m cable.
Note 1. The optical interface must be provided with a 5 V power supply.
2. To supply 5 V to a Z3RN-A-5 Optical Interface connected on the host computer side of a Host Link Unit (only with C500-LK203 or C200H-LK201-V1 models), set the 5 V supply switch on the back of the Host Link Unit to ON (up).
The normal setting is OFF.
3. When using a 3G2A5-LK201-EV1 or the 3G2A6-LK201-EV1 Host Link Unit,
use the AC adapters to supply 5 V to the Optical Interface on both the Host
Link Unit side and the host computer side.
8
Section 1-5
Types of Interfaces
1-5-2
RS-232C Interface
(For all but C500-LK203 and insulated types.) When using an optical fiber cable
or RS-422 cable, several Host Link Units can be connected to one host computer. When RS-232C cables are used, however, the connection must be made on
a one-to-one basis, or a Link Adapter must be used to convert to RS-422 cable or
optical fiber cable as shown in Examples 1 and 2 in 1-2-2 System Examples (see
also Link Adapters Installation Guide). The table below gives the proper connections for a RS-232C interface.
Signal*
Frame ground
Signal ground
Send data
Receive data
Request to send
Clear to send
Equipment Ready
Send signal element timing 1***
Send signal element timing 2***
Receive timing***
5-V power supply**
Symbol
FG
SG
SD
RD
RS
CS
ER
ST1
ST2
RT
5V
Pin No.
1
7
2
3
4
5
20
24
15
17
14
DSR input not available
FG
FG
SG
SG
SD
SD
RD
RD
RS
RS
CS
CS
Host Link Unit
Host computer
Shielded cable
* Viewed from the Host Link Unit.
** For Optical Interfaces used with the C500-LK203 Host Link Unit.
***For synchronous timing (not available with C200H-LK201-V1Host Link Unit).
The maximum cable length is 15 m. Ground the FG terminals of both the PC and
the host computer at a point that has a resistance of less than 100 Ω.
9
Section 1-5
Types of Interfaces
Interfacing to IBM AT via AL004 Link Adapter
RS232-C
Host Link
Unit
IBM AT
computer
DB-9
FG
1
1
CD
TX
2
2
RX
RX
3
3
TX
RTS
4
8
CTS
CTS
5
7
RTS
SG
7
5
SG
DTR
20
6
DSR
4
DTR
9
RI
Two-wire system, no handshaking.
RS232-C
Host Link
Unit
IBM AT
computer
DB-9
FG
1
1
CD
TX
2
2
RX
RX
3
3
TX
RTS
4
8
CTS
CTS
5
7
RTS
SG
7
5
SG
DTR
20
6
DSR
4
DTR
9
RI
Full handshake configuration.
10
Section 1-5
Types of Interfaces
Interfacing to IBM XT via AL004 Link Adapter
RS232-C
Host Link
Unit
IBM XT
computer
DB-9
FG
1
1
FG
TX
2
3
RX
RX
3
2
TX
RTS
4
5
CTS
CTS
5
4
RTS
SG
7
7
SG
DTR
20
6
DSR
20
DTR
22
RI
Two-wire system, no handshaking.
RS232-C
Host Link
Unit
IBM XT
computer
DB-9
FG
1
1
FG
TX
2
3
RX
RX
3
2
TX
RTS
4
5
CTS
CTS
5
4
RTS
SG
7
7
SG
DTR
20
6
DSR
20
DTR
22
RI
Full handshake configuration.
11
Section 1-5
Types of Interfaces
1-5-3
RS-422 Interface
(For all but C500-LK203 and insulated types) The following table details the pin
connections for a RS-422 interface.
Signal*
Send data A
Send data B
Receive data A
Receive data B
Signal ground
Frame ground
Symbol
SDA
SDB
RDA
RDB
SG
FG
Pin No.
9
5
6
1
3
7
* Viewed from the Host Link Unit.
Termination resistance *
Termination resistance *
Shielded wire
RDB
RDB
RDA
RDA
SDB
SDB
SDA
SDA
SG
SG
FG
1 6
5
9
3
7
FG
1 6 5
SG FG
9
3
7
SG FG
Host Link Unit
Link Adapter 3G2A9-AL004(-P)
* The total termination resistance must be 100 Ω min.
The built-in resistance is 220 Ω.
The maximum cable length is 500 m. Ground the FG terminals on both the PC
and the host computer to a point where the resistance is less than 100 Ω. For
more information, refer to the PC or host computer manuals.
12
Section 1-5
Types of Interfaces
Interfacing to IBM AT via AL004 Link Adapter
IBM AT
DB-9
OMRON 3G2A9-AL004-(P)E
Link Adapter
DB-25
DB-9
RS-422
Host Link Unit
DB-9
CD
1
1
FG
RDB(+) 1
TX
3
2
TX
2
2
RX
2
3
RX
3
3
RTS
7
4
RTS
4
4
CTS
8
5
CTS
SDB(+) 5
5 SDB(+)
SG
5
7
SG
RDA(–) 6
6 RDA(–)
DSR
6
6
DSR
SDA(–) 9
9 SDA(–)
DTR
4
20
DTR
8
8
RI
9
8
CD
7
7
SG
FG
1 RDB(+)
SG
FG
Two-wire system, no hand-shaking.
IBM AT
DB-9
OMRON 3G2A9-AL004-(P)E
Link Adapter
DB-25
DB-9
RS-422
Host Link Unit
DB-9
RI
9
1
FG
RDB(+) 1
XT
3
2
TX
2
2
RX
2
3
RX
3
3
RTS
7
4
RTS
4
4
CTS
8
5
CTS
SDB(+) 5
5 SDB(+)
SG
5
7
SG
RDA(–) 6
6 RDA(–)
DSR
6
6
DSR
SDA(–) 9
9 SDA(–)
DTR
4
20
DTR
8
8
CD
1
8
CD
7
7
SG
FG
1 RDB(+)
SG
FG
Full handshake configuration.
13
Section 1-5
Types of Interfaces
Interfacing to IBM XT via AL004 Link Adapter
IBM XT
DB-25
OMRON 3G2A9-AL004-(P)E
Link Adapter
DB-25
DB-9
RS-422
Host Link Unit
DB-9
FG
1
1
FG
RDB(+) 1
TX
2
2
TX
2
2
RX
3
3
RX
3
3
RTS
4
4
RTS
4
4
CTS
5
5
CTS
SDB(+) 5
5 SDB(+)
DSR
6
6
DSR
RDA(–) 6
6 RDA(–)
SG
7
7
SG
SDA(–) 9
9 SDA(–)
CD
8
8
CD
8
8
DTR
20
20
DTR
7
7
SG
FG
1 RDB(+)
SG
FG
Two-wire system, no hand-shaking.
IBM XT
DB-25
OMRON 3G2A9-AL004-(P)E
Link Adapter
DB-25
DB-9
FG
1
1
FG
RDB(+) 1
TX
2
2
TX
2
2
RX
3
3
RX
3
3
RTS
4
4
RTS
4
4
CTS
5
5
CTS
SDB(+) 5
5 SDB(+)
DSR
6
6
DSR
RDA(–) 6
6 RDA(–)
SG
7
7
SG
SDA(–) 9
9 SDA(–)
CD
8
8
CD
8
8
DTR
20
20
DTR
7
7
SG
FG
Full handshake configuration.
14
RS-422
Host Link Unit
DB-9
1 RDB(+)
SG
FG
Section 1-5
Types of Interfaces
RS-422 Interface (For Insulated C500-LK203)
The table below lists the connections for interfacing a RS-422 cable to an insulated C500-LK203 Host Link Unit.
Signal*
Send data A
Send data B
Receive data A
Receive data B
Frame ground
Frame ground**
Symbol
SDA
SDB
RDA
RDB
FG
FG
Pin No.
9
5
6
1
7
Hood fitting
* Viewed from the Host Link Unit.
** In order to prevent current flow in the shield
wire, make a connection to only one end of it.
Either pin 7 or the hood fitting can be used to
connect the shield wire to the frame ground.
Termination resistance*
Termination resistance*
Shielded wire
RDB
RDB
RDA
RDA
SDB
SDB
SDA
SDA
FG
1 6
5
9
7**
FG
Host Link Unit
1
6 5 9
7
FG
Link Adapter 3G2A9-AL004(-P)
* The total termination resistance must be 100 Ω min.
The built-in resistance is 220 Ω.
** In order to prevent current flow in the shield
wire, make a connection to only one end of it.
Either pin 7 or the hood fitting can be used to
connect the shield wire to the frame ground.
The maximum cable length is 500 m. Ground the FG terminals of both the PC
and the host computer to a point with a resistance of less than 100 Ω. For details,
refer to the PC or host computer manuals.
C500-LK203 Noise Tolerance The RS-422 interface on the C500-LK203 Host Link Unit is insulated to improve
its tolerance to electrical noise. Although the increased tolerance provides better performance under normal operating conditions, the operation ca be affected
in very noisy environments. For this reason the optical C500-LK103(-P) is recommended in situations where noise might be a problem.
15
Section 1-6
Wiring RS-232C and RS-422 Cable Connectors
FG Connections for
Insulated C500-LK203
Host Link Units
In systems which use only the insulated C500-LK203 Host Link Units, connect
the frame ground to the shield wire at the connections to the Host Link Units and
at either end of the connections between Link Adapters. In systems using the
insulated C500-LK203 with other types of Host Link Units, connect the frame
ground to the shield wire at connections to the C500-LK203 Host Link Units and
at both ends of all connections between Link Adapters and between the other
Host Link Units and Link Adapters.
Multiple-link Connections
When connecting a multiple-link system with RS-422 cable, use shielded
twisted pair cables for the Host Link Unit. The total cable length of the entire system must not exceed 500 m. The length of each branch line should be kept to
less than 10 m.
The optical Host Link Units can be used to achieve greater distances in the overall system (see Example 2 in 1-2 System Configuration). If they are connected in
series, however, signals are not transmitted to any Unit that is not supplied with
power, or any other Units beyond it. To avoid any problems with this, signals can
also be distributed through Link Adapter 3G2A9-AL002-PE. To connect the Host
Link Units to the host computer, Link Adapter 3G2A9-AL004-(P)E is necessary
to be able to interface the optical fiber cables and the RS-232C and RS-422
cables.
1-6
Wiring RS-232C and RS-422 Cable Connectors
The following procedures should be followed when wiring RS-232C and RS-422
connectors.
1-6-1
Preparation for Connecting Shielded Cable to FG
The procedures listed below correspond to the following diagrams.
1, 2, 3... 1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
Cut the cable to the required length.
Use a razor blade to cut away the sheath (being careful not to damage the
braiding underneath): 25 mm for RS-422 cable; 40 mm for RS-232C cable.
Use scissors to cut away all but 10 mm of the exposed braiding.
Use wire strippers to remove the insulation from the last 5 mm of each wire.
Move the boot to cut the edge of the sheath and fold the braiding back over
the end of it.
Wrap aluminum foil tape over the top of the braiding on top of the boot for
one and a half turns.
Aluminum foil tape
16
Section 1-6
Wiring RS-232C and RS-422 Cable Connectors
1-6-2
Preparation for Connecting Unshielded Cable to FG
The procedures outlined in the list below correspond to the following diagrams.
1, 2, 3... 1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
Cut the cable to the required length.
Use a razor blade to cut away the sheath: 25 mm for RS-422 cable; 40 mm
for RS-232C cable.
Use scissors to cut away the exposed braiding.
Use wire strippers to remove the insulation from the last 5 mm of all wires.
Wrap insulating tape over the top and end of the the cut sheath.
Electrician’s
tape
Soldering
Observe the following when soldering the prepared wires onto the connectors.
1, 2, 3... 1.
2.
3.
Place heat-shrinking tubes over all wires, far enough away from the end so
as not to interfere with the soldering.
Pre-solder all wires and connector terminals.
Solder wires, inserting 4 mm of the exposed 5 mm of wire into the connector
terminal.
1 mm
Soldering iron
Heat-shrinking tube
(Internal diameter
1.5mm, ȏ=10)
4.
Move the heat-shrinking tubes onto the soldered area and shrink them into
place.
Heat-shrinking tube
17
Section 1-6
Wiring RS-232C and RS-422 Cable Connectors
Hood Assembly
Assemble the hood as shown in the following diagram.
Boot
Aluminum foil tape
ÇÇ
ÇÇ
Hood (FG) connected
to shield wire
1-6-3
Hood (FG) not connected
to shield wire
FG Connection to the Cable’s Shield Wire (RS-422 Interface)
Connection of C500-LK203
Host Link Units
When connecting a Host Link Unit and a Link Adapter, connect the cable’s shield
wire to the Host Link Unit’s FG. Do not connect the shield wire to the Link Adapter’s FG.
When connecting two Link Adapters, connect the cable’s shield wire to either
Link Adapter’s FG.
Host computer
RS-232C
C2000H
(15 m max.)
f
Link Adapter
3G2A9-AL004-(P)E
C500
f C500-LK203
×
×
f
Link Adapter
3G2A9-AL004-E
C1000H
f C500-LK203
×
×
f C500-LK203
f
Link Adapter
3G2A9-AL004-E
Note Just one end of the shield wire is connected to FG to prevent current from
flowing in the shield wire.
f: Connect the shield wire to FG.
×: Do not connect the shield wire to FG.
18
Section 1-6
Wiring RS-232C and RS-422 Cable Connectors
Connection of C500-LK203
with other Host Link Units
When connecting a C500-LK203 and a Link Adapter, connect the cable’s shield
wire to the C500-LK203 Host Link Unit’s FG. Do not connect the shield wire to
the Link Adapter’s FG.
When connecting a Host Link Unit (other than a C500-LK203) and a Link Adapter, connect the both ends of the cable’s shield wire to the FGs. Also connect both
ends to the FG’s when connecting two Link Adapters.
Host computer
RS-232C
(15 m max.)
C2000H
f
Link Adapter
3G2A9-AL004-(P)E RS-422
f
f
C500
f 3G2A5-LK201-EV1
f
Link Adapter
3G2A9-AL001
f
f
C1000H
f 3G2A5-LK201-EV1
f C500-LK203
×
Link Adapter
3G2A9-AL001
Note Just one end of the shield wire is connected to FG to prevent current from
flowing in the shield wire.
f: Connect the shield wire to FG.
×: Do not connect the shield wire to FG.
1-6-4
Wiring
Connection of Optical Host
Link Units
Optical Host Link Units (C200H-LK101-PV1, 3G2A5-LK101-(P)EV1,
C500-LK103(-P), and 3G2A6-LK101-(P)EV1) are connected sequentially with
Optical Fiber Cable. Consequently, Units cannot transmit if they follow a Unit
that is turned off. Branches can be made in the Optical Fiber Cable with a
3G2A9-AL002-(P)E Link Adapter.
When connecting a host computer, a 3G2A9-AL004-(P)E Link Adapter is required to convert Optical Fiber Cable to RS-232C or RS-422.
19
Section 1-6
Wiring RS-232C and RS-422 Cable Connectors
Wiring Example
Host Computer
RS-232C
1
FG
1
RS232C
interface
2
2
SD
3
3
RD
4
4
RS
5
5
CS
6
6
DR
7
7
SG
8
8
CD
20
20
ER
RS-422
9
OR/
switching
circuit
CTS
switching
0V
External
SDA
5
SDB
6
RDA
1
RDB
3
SG
7
FG
0V
0V 0V
Shield
Termination resistance
Transmission
Optical Fiber Cable
200 VAC
5V
C500 CPU Rack
Reception
AC power
supply
24 V
Fuse
100 VAC
LG
FG
Optical Host Link Unit
To next Host Link Unit
Ground
(100 Ω or less)
3G2A9-AL004-(P)E Link Adapter
Be sure to use a wire of at least 1.25 mm2 in thickness.
Use M4 screws for tightening crimp terminals.
Use ring crimp terminals for wiring. Do not connect bare stranded wires directly
to terminal blocks.
! Caution
Tighten the screws on the terminal block of the AC Power Supply Unit to a torque
of 1.2 N⋅m. The loose screws may result in burning or malfunction.
Switch Settings
CTS (CS) Switching (Link
Adapter Settings)
Set to “0 V” when the CTS (Clear-To-Send) signal will usually be ON. Set to “External” when the signal is received externally. This switch is normally set to “0 V.”
Note Always cap unused Optical Connectors. If the connectors are not capped,
ambient light interference can enter the Optical Connectors and cause transmission errors.
20
Section 1-6
Wiring RS-232C and RS-422 Cable Connectors
1:1 Connection of Host
Computer and Host Link
Unit
The following diagram shows a 1:1 connection of a host computer and a Host
Link Unit (C200H-LK202-V1, 3G2A5-LK201-EV1, C500-LK203, or 3G2A6LK202-EV1).
Wiring Example
Host Link Unit
C200H-LK201-V1
3G2A5-LK201-EV1
C500-LK203
3G2A6-LK201-EV1
1
FG
Host computer
1
RS232C
interface
2
2
SD
3
3
RD
4
4
RS
5
5
CS
See note
6
6
7
7
8
RS232C
interface
SG
8
Shield
20
20
ER
Note It is not necessary to connect the RS and CS signals if the CTS switch on the
back of the Host Link Unit is set to 0 V.
Set the I/O port switch on the back of 3G2A5-LK201-EV1/C500-LK203 Host
Link Units to “RS-232C.”
1:N Connection of Host
Computer and Host Link
Unit
Set to 0 V when the CTS (Clear-To-Send) signal will usually be ON. Set to External when the signal is received externally. This switch is normally set to 0 V.
Wiring Example
To a 3G2A9-AL001 Link
Adapter or a Host Link Unit
RS-232C
1 FG
2 SD
3 RD
Host computer
RS232C
interface
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
20
4
5
6
7
8
20
RS
CS
DR
SG
CD
ER
OR
switching
circuit
RS-422 Shield
9 SDA
5 SDB
6 RDA
1 RDB
3 SG
7 FG
0V
External
CTS
Switch
ing
9 5
9
5
6
1
3
7
6 1
3 7
RS422
interface
9
5
6
1
3
7
Host Link Unit
C200H-LK202-V1
3G2A5-LK201-EV1
C500-LK203
3G2A6-LK202-EV1
Shield
9
5
RS6
422
1
interface
3
7
Link Adapter
3G2A9-AL001
0V
0V 0V
Shield
Termination resistance
Transmission
200 VAC
5V
100 VAC
Reception
24 V
AC power
supply
Fuse
LG
FG
Ground
(100 Ω or less)
21
Wiring RS-232C and RS-422 Cable Connectors
Section 1-6
Note Set the I/O port switch on the back of 3G2A5-LK201-EV1/C500-LK203 Host
Link Units to “RS-422.”
Be sure to use a wire of at least 1.25 mm2 in thickness.
Use M4 screws for tightening crimp terminals.
Use ring crimp terminals for wiring. Do not connect bare stranded wires directly
to terminal blocks.
! Caution
22
Tighten the screws on the terminal block of the AC Power Supply Unit to a torque
of 1.2 N⋅m. The loose screws may result in burning or malfunction.
SECTION 2
Host Link Unit Characteristics
This section provides the switch location and setting details for each group of Host Link Units. The Units are grouped according the operating characteristics. C200H Units are dealt with first, followed by C500 and 3G2A5 models, and 3G2A6 models
are included at the end of the section.
For each grouping, labelled pictures of the different models show the positions and names of the switches and connections.
The functions of the switches are then explained. The effects of the Host Link Units and other peripheral devices on the operating mode of the PC System are discussed, followed by a section on the I/O Response Times.
The systems and PCs that apply to each Host Link Unit are given in the table at the beginning of Section 1.
2-1
2-2
2-3
2-4
C200H Host Link Units . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
2-1-1 Nomenclature and External Appearance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
2-1-2 Switch Settings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
2-1-3 Indicators . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
2-1-4 PC Operating Modes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
2-1-5 Restart Bits and Error Flags . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
2-1-6 I/O Response Time . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
C500 (3G2A5) Host Link Units . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
2-2-1 Nomenclature and External Appearance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
2-2-2 Switch Settings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
2-2-3 Indicators . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
2-2-4 PC Operating Modes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
2-2-5 Restart Bits and Error Flags . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
2-2-6 I/O Response Time . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
C120 (3G2A6) Host Link Units . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
2-3-1 Nomenclature and External Appearance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
2-3-2 Switch Settings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
2-3-3 Indicators . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
2-3-4 PC Operating Modes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
2-3-5 Restart Bits and Error Flags . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
2-3-6 I/O Response Time . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Installing and Removing Host Link Units . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
23
Section 2-1
C200H Host Link Units
2-1
2-1-1
C200H Host Link Units
Nomenclature and External Appearance
The following figures give details of switch types, selectors, and connectors for
your Host Link Unit. It will be necessary to refer to these diagrams from time to
time as you read further in the manual, particularly when reading the section on
2-1-2 Switch Settings.
Front Panels
Rear Panels
C200H-LK101-PV1
LK101-PV1
RUN indicator
RCV (receive) indicator
XMT (transmit) indicator
ERROR indicator
Unit number (00 to 31)
SW1
SW2
x10
x1
SW3
Baud rate
SW4 Command level, parity,
and transmission code
Link type
(see p 27)
ON (Single-link
System)
Optical fiber connectors
APF, PCF or H-PCF
OFF (Multiple-link
System)
C200H-LK201-V1
LK201-V1
RUN indicator
RCV (receive) indicator
XMT (transmit) indicator
ERROR indicator
Unit number (00 to 31)
SW1
SW2
x10
x1
SW3
Baud rate
SW4 Command level, parity,
and transmission code
DIP switch
1 and 2 not used.
3: Link type (see p 27)
4: 5-V power supply (see later)
RS-232C
cable connector
24
CTS selector
Section 2-1
C200H Host Link Units
Front Panel
Rear Panel
C200H-LK202-V1
LK202-V1
RUN indicator
RCV (receive)
indicator
XMT (transmit) indicator
ERROR indicator
Unit number (00 to 31)
SW1
SW2
x10
x1
SW3
Baud rate
SW4 Command level, parity,
and transmission code
Termination
resistance switch
(see p 27)
ON
OFF
Link type selector
(see p 27)
ON (Single-link
System)
OFF (Multiple-link
System)
RS-422 connector
2-1-2
Switch Settings
The following information provides details on correct settings for the range of
Host Link Units covered by this manual. Pay particular attention to the RUN/
STOP and MONITOR/NORMAL switches on the C1000H-style cards.
SW1 and SW2
These switches are used to set the Unit number. The same unit number must not
be specified for more than one Unit.
SW3: Baud Rate
The baud rate of the Host Link Unit, as determined by the following switch settings, must match that of the host computer.
SW3
Baud rate
0
300 bps
1
600 bps
2
1,200 bps
3
2,400 bps
4
4,800 bps
5
9,600 bps
6
19,200 bps
7
8
Do not set
9
25
Section 2-1
C200H Host Link Units
SW4: Command Level, Parity and Transmission Code
SW4
Command Level*
0
1
1
1,2
2
1,2,3**
3
Do not set
4
1
5
1,2
6
1,2,3
7
Do not set
8
1
9
1,2
A
1,2,3
B
Do not set
C
1
D
1,2
E
1,2,3
F
Do not set
Parity
Even
Transmission Code
ASCII 7 bit, 2 stop bits
Odd
Even
JIS 8 bit, 1 stop bit
Odd
* See descriptions of Command Levels at the end of this sub-section.
** Use this setting when using LSS (Ladder Support Software)
Mode Selection
C200H Units are automatically set to HOST mode. See 2-1-4 PC Operating
Mode for further details.
26
Section 2-1
C200H Host Link Units
Termination Resistance
When using a RS-422 cable (C200H-LK202-V1 Host Link Units) throughout a
system, the Host Link Unit at each end of the cable system (as detailed in the
following diagram) must have the termination resistances connected by turning
ON the switch on the back of the panel. When this switch is set to ON, a built-in
termination resistance of 220 Ω is connected. When set to OFF, the termination
resistance is disconnected.
Host computer
RS-232C cable
Link Adapter
3G2A9-AL004-(P)E
RS-422 cable
Link Adapter
3G2A9-AL001
Link Adapter
3G2A9-AL001
Link Adapter
3G2A9-AL001
Link Adapter
3G2A9-AL004-(P)E
RS-422 cable
C-series PC
with Host Link
Unit
C-series PC
with Host Link
Unit
C-series PC
with Host Link
Unit
C-series PC
with Host Link
Unit
C-series PC
with Host Link
Unit
Turn the termination resistance ON for these two Host Link Units.
CTS Selector
For RS-232C models (C200H-LK201-V1), the selector is set to 0 V, the
clear-to-send (CTS) signal is continuously ON. When the selector is set to external, the Unit will respond to externally generated CTS signals. This is normally
set to CTS always ON, i.e., the switch is set to ON.
5-V Power Supply Switch
When using a Z3RN-A-5 Optical Interface with an RS-232C Host Link Unit, the
5 V power supply switch should be set to ON; otherwise it should be set to OFF.
On the C200H-LK201-V1, pin 4 on the back-panel DIP switch functions as the
5 V power supply switch.
Link Type Selector
Pin 3 on the back-panel DIP switch of the C200H-LK201-V1 (RS-232C connection), and the Link Type Selector on the rear of the C200H-LK101-PV1 (optical
fiber connection) provide the same functions as described below.
OFF (Single-link):
If set to OFF, the Host Link Unit is connected to the host computer on a
one-to-one basis (see Example 3 and Example 5 under 1-2 System Configuration. The Unit number and Frame Checksum (FCS) settings are not required.
The normal setting is ON (see below).
27
Section 2-1
C200H Host Link Units
ON (Multiple-link):
If set to ON, up to 32 Host Link Units can be connected to one host computer. The
unit number and FCS must be specified, even if only one Host Link Unit is connected to the host computer. When using Ladder Support Software, LSS, the
switch must be set to ON.
Command Levels
1, 2, 3... 1.
2.
3.
Enables data areas to be read and, when the CPU has been correctly set
via the SC (Status Write) command, data can also be written.
Enables program transfers and reading or writing of I/O tables.
I/O READs can be performed and I/O tables can be registered. The Command Level should be set to “1, 2, 3” for running LSS software, program
transfers, etc. Other levels may be used for Systems Control Software,
monitoring, Data Acquisition Software, etc.
Note Commands valid for each level are listed in 3-1 Command Levels.
2-1-3
Indicators
Indicator
Function
RUN
ON when the Unit is operating. Depending on the settings of switches 1 to 4, this
indicator will blink when an error occurs. (See notes.)
RCV
ON when the Host Link Unit is receiving data.
XMT
ON when the Host Link Unit is transmitting data.
ERROR
Goes ON when a transfer error is detected (See note 1.); goes OFF when a new
command is received normally.
Goes ON when an error is detected in communications with the CPU. The RUN
indicator will blink in this case. (See note 2.)
Note 1. Transfer errors include parity, framing, overrun, and FCS errors.
2. Operation of the Unit is stopped when the RUN indicator is OFF or blinking.
Restart the Unit after setting switches 1 to 4 correctly.
3. Refer to 5-4 Troubleshooting for details on correcting the following problems.
• The RUN indicator does not light.
• The Host Link Unit’s RCV indicator does not light when data is transmitted
from the host computer.
• The RCV indicator lights, but the XMT indicator does not.
• The ERROR indicator lights.
• The XMT indicator lights, but the host computer does not receive the data.
2-1-4
PC Operating Modes
The operating mode of the PC depends on the Memory Unit’s Initial Mode setting, the RUN/STOP on the any CPU-mounted Host Link Unit, and the status of
any peripheral device connected to the PC. Refer to the following table for details.
PC Mode on Applying Power with the Host Link Unit Mounted
System configuration
and Host Link Unit setting
With no CPU-mounted device
With CPU-mounting Host Link Unit
With CPU-mounting peripheral device
With Programming Console
28
Memory Unit Initial Mode setting
RUN
STOP
Normal (OFF)
Run (ON)
RUN
RUN
RUN
PROGRAM
PROGRAM
The mode is determined by the mode selector on the Console,
i.e., RUN, MONITOR or PROGRAM.
Section 2-1
C200H Host Link Units
Data Flow
The diagram below shows the flow of data between the system using C200H
Host Link Units, and a Programming Console. As can be seen, the Programming
Console can be used for monitoring, or for writing to the PC System.
Programming Console
Monitoring the PC
Controlling the PC
Host computer
Write data
Read data
PC operation mode,
program and I/O data,
set value and present
value data
FORCED SET/RESET
Program, I/O data,
error, etc.
C-series PC with
Host Link Unit
Controlling PC Start-up
PROGRAM mode cannot be achieved manually when C200H Rack-mounting
Host Link Units are used without a Programming Console or other peripheral device. Programming can be implemented, however, to prevent the PC from
automatically starting when the power is applied. This allows greater control and
the Unit can be started later with a command from the host computer. The
following is an example of a programmed start-up for a C1000H PC.
12800
DIFU(13)
12801
12800
JMP(04)
**
12801
Initialization
JMP(05)
**
END(01)
Appropriate initialization codes must be programmed between JMP(04) and
JME(05). IR area bit 12800 can then be turned on to start PC operation from the
host computer. The PC must be set in MONITOR mode for this to be possible. To
initialize the PC when starting operation, use DIFU with the Always ON Flag; the
Reset Flag cannot be used. Refer to your PC’s operation manual for specific
bits. The PC’s operating mode can then be changed from the host computer after operation has begun. When programming in this fashion, note the following
conditions:
1, 2, 3... 1. Before turning on the IR area bit 12800, set the C200H Host Link Units to
MONITOR mode using the host computer.
2. JMP command numbers must be between 01 and 99 for C200H/HS,
C1000H, and C2000H PCs.
29
Section 2-1
C200H Host Link Units
Sending a RUN Start Command to the PC
The following flowchart shows the computer decision making processes for ensuring that the PC is in RUN mode after start-up.
Power application
Read PC operation
mode.
PC in RUN
mode?
YES
NO
STATUS WRITE
(RUN)
END
2-1-5
Restart Bits and Error Flags
Host Link Units use some of the Special Relay (SR) area and Auxiliary Relay
(AR) area bits of the PC to restart the communications control program of the
Host Link Unit and to indicate the occurrence of communications errors between
the Unit and the computer. The word (Wd) addresses and bit numbers of these
bits are as follows:
SR Wd 253 SR Wd 252
Bit 15 Bit 14 Bit 13
RM* #0
connection
error flag
Bit 10
Bit 9
Bit 8
CM*
restart
bit
CM*
error
flag
Bit 6
Bit 5
RM* #1 RM* #1
connec- HC**
tion error error flag
flag
RM* #0
RM* #1
CPU**
CPU**
error flag error flag
CM*
restart
bit
RM* #0
RM* #1
connection connection
error flag error flag
RM* #1
Transmission ready
(C200HS/
HX/HG/HE
only)
* RM: Rack-mounting Host Link Unit
CM: CPU-mounting Host Link Unit
** HC: Error between the Host Link Unit and the host computer
CPU: Error between the Host Link Unit and the CPU of the PC
30
Bit 7
RM* #0
HC**
error flag
AR Wd 00
AR Wd 24
AR Wd 267
Bit 12 Bit 11
RM* #0
Transmission ready
(C200HS/
HX/HG/HE
only)
Bit 4
Bit 3
Bit 2
Bit 1
Bit 0
Section 2-1
C200H Host Link Units
Host Link Unit Restart Bit
When this bit is turned ON, the Host Link Unit is reset to its initial conditions, as if
the power had just been applied.
! Caution
Do not turn this bit ON in the user program; doing so could cause the memory to
be lost.
Host Link Unit Error Flag
This flag turns ON if a transmission error occurs between the PC and the Host
Link Unit. It turns ON the error indicator on the front of the Unit.
Note 1. When the Host Link Unit Restart bit is turned ON, the Host Link Unit Error
Flag is turned OFF.
2. Set the Host Link Unit to LOCAL mode before force setting or force resetting
an error flag.
3. With all but C200H Rack-mounting Host Link Units, communications between the Host Link Unit and the host computer will not be resumed until the
Restart bit is turned OFF. The initialization process is repeated as long as the
Restart bit is ON.
ON(=1)
Restart bit
OFF(=0)
C200H Units restart.
4. If the error condition does not clear, disconnect and then reconnect the power
to the PC.
Error Location
The following example for a Rack-mounting Host Link Unit with an assigned operating level 0, indicates the process flow used in locating errors.
Start
• CPU doesn’t recognize
Host Link Unit.
Host Link
Unit
connection
error
AR2414
ON?
OFF
• Host Link Unit not
mounted correctly.
• Host Link Unit faulty;
replace it.
ON
Error
between
Host Link
Unit and
PC’s CPU
Error
between
Host Link
Unit and
host
computer
AR0013
OFF?
ON
OFF
operation between CPU
and Host Link Unit.
• Restart Host Link Unit.
OFF
25311
OFF?
• Error in refresh
ON
• Error in
communications data
between Host Link Unit
and host computer.
• Check the command.
END
31
Section 2-1
C200H Host Link Units
2-1-6
I/O Response Time
The processing that determines and the methods for calculating the minimum
and maximum times required from an input on one PC with a Host Link Unit to an
output on another PC with a Host Link Unit are described below. The transfer
between the PCs is handled through a host computer connected to both these
PCs.
Processing and calculations are described by PC model in the first subsection
and for Systems combining C200H/HS/HX/HG/HE and C1000H PC models in
the last subsection. Although more precise equations may be written if required,
those used in the following calculations do not consider fractions of a cycle.
The calculations used in this section assume that all host computer commands
and PC responses require no more than one host link servicing period to complete transmission. To compute response times for situations involving a longer
command and/or response, the number of host link servicing periods (i.e., the
number of cycles) required to complete the command or response would have to
be incorporated into the equations.
In considering response times, it is important to remember the sequence of processing that occurs during the PC cycle. The main factor that affects the response time is the timing of inputs and outputs and of host computer processing
in relation to this sequence.
The following diagram illustrates the setup used in response time calculations
Host computer
Host Link
Unit # 0
PC
Input
cycle time
(50 ms)
Host Link
Unit # 31
PC
cycle time
(30 ms)
x
+
Output
The following equations can be used as required to calculate the minimum and
maximum response times with the C200H. The maximum response time is an
approximation.
Minimum response time =
Input ON delay + Command transmission time + (cycle time of PC for Unit #0 x 3) + Response transmission time + Host computer processing time + Command transmission time + (cycle time of PC for Unit #31
x 3) + Output ON delay
Maximum response time =
Input ON delay + Command transmission time + (cycle time of PC for Unit #0 x 10) + Response transmission time + Host computer processing time + Command transmission time + (cycle time of PC for Unit #31
x 10) + Output ON delay
Combined Systems
When transferring data from one model of PC through a host computer and then
out to a different model of PC, all that is necessary is to combine the first half of
the minimum/maximum equation for the origin PC with the second half of that for
the destination PC. For example, the following equation can be used for the minimum response time when transferring from a C200H/HS/HX/HG/HE to a
C1000H.
Minimum response time =
32
Input ON delay + Command transmission time + (cycle time of PC for Unit #0 x 3) + Response transmission time + Host computer processing time + Command transmission time + Output ON delay
Section 2-2
C500 (3G2A5) Host Link Units
2-2
2-2-1
C500 (3G2A5) Host Link Units
Nomenclature and External Appearance
The following figures give details of switch types, selectors, and connectors for
your Host Link Unit. It will be necessary to refer to these diagrams from time to
time as you read further in the manual, particularly when reading the section on
2-2-2 Switch Settings. These Units are suitable for use with C500, C1000H, and
C2000H PCs.
Front Panels
Rear Panels
C500-LK103(-P)
RUN indicator
RCV (receive) indicator
XMT (transmit) indicator
ERROR indicator
(Parity, framing, overrun, and FCS errors)
3G2A5-LK101-(P)EV1
C500-LK103(-P)
Reset switch
Optical fiber connectors
* APF or PCF can be connected
to the LK103-PEV1.
Only PCF can be connected
to the LK103-EV1.
SW1
3G2A5-LK101-(P)EV1
RUN indicator
SW2
RCV (receive) indicator
XMT (transmit) indicator
ERROR indicator
(Parity, framing, overrun, and FCS errors)
Mode selector
Reset switch
Optical fiber connectors
* APF or PCF can be connected
to the LK101-PEV1.
Only PCF can be connected to
the LK101-EV1.
33
Section 2-2
C500 (3G2A5) Host Link Units
Front Panels
Rear Panels
3G2A5-LK201-EV1
3G2A5-LK201-EV1
RUN indicator
RCV (receive) indicator
XMT (transmit) indicator
ERROR indicator
(Parity, framing, overrun,
and FCS errors)
Mode selector
I/O port selector
RS-422
RS-232C
SW1
Synchronization
selector
Internal
External
Termination
resistance switch
OFF
ON
RS-232C cable connector
See Example 3 in 1-2
System Configuration
for restrictions with RS-232C
cable.
SW2
CTS selector
0V (always ON)
External
RS-422 cable connector
C500-LK203
C500-LK203
RUN indicator
RCV (receive) indicator
XMT (transmit) indicator
ERROR indicator
(Parity, framing, overrun,
and FCS errors)
Reset switch
RS-232C cable connector
See Example 3 in 1-2
System Configuration
for restrictions with RS-232C
cable.
RS-422 cable connector
34
5-V power supply
ON
OFF
I/O port selector
RS-422
RS-232C
Synchronization
selector
Internal
External
SW1
Termination
resistance switch
OFF
ON
SW2
CTS selector
0V (always ON)
External
Section 2-2
C500 (3G2A5) Host Link Units
2-2-2
Switch Settings
The following information provides details on correct settings for the range of
Host Link Units covered by this manual. Pay particular attention to the RUN/
STOP and MONITOR/NORMAL switches on the C1000H-style cards.
SW1
SW1 will perform one of two different functions depending on the Unit. In both
instances, the first five pins are used to set the Unit number as shown below.
Details about SW1 and SW2 settings are included following the diagram.
SW1 C500-LK103(-P)/-LK203 and
3G2A5-LK101-(P)EV1/-LK201-EV1 Host Link Units
MONITOR/NORMAL
selector
(C500 models)
Unit No.
Unit No.
ON
MONITOR
OFF OFF OFF OFF OFF
1
2
3
4
5
0
OFF
NORMAL
OFF OFF OFF OFF ON
1
OFF OFF OFF ON OFF
2
OFF OFF OFF ON
ON
3
OFF OFF ON OFF OFF
4
OFF OFF ON OFF ON
5
OFF OFF ON
ON OFF
6
OFF OFF ON
ON
OR
RUN/STOP
selector
(3G2A5 models)
ON
RUN
OFF
STOP
ON
7
OFF ON OFF OFF OFF
8
OFF ON OFF OFF ON
9
OFF ON OFF ON OFF
10
OFF ON OFF ON
ON
11
OFF ON
ON OFF OFF
12
OFF ON
ON OFF ON
13
OFF ON
ON
ON OFF
14
OFF ON
ON
ON
ON
15
ON OFF OFF OFF OFF
16
ON OFF OFF OFF ON
17
ON OFF OFF ON OFF
18
OFF ON OFF ON
ON OFF OFF ON
19
ON
OFF OFF ON
600bps
ON OFF ON OFF OFF
20
OFF OFF OFF ON
1,200bps
ON OFF ON OFF ON
21
ON
ON
ON OFF 2,400bps
ON OFF ON
ON OFF
22
OFF ON
ON OFF 4,800bps
ON OFF ON
ON
ON
23
ON
ON OFF OFF OFF
24
OFF OFF ON OFF 19,200bps
ON
ON
ON
ON OFF OFF ON
ON
ON OFF ON OFF
26
ON
ON OFF ON
ON
27
ON
ON
ON OFF OFF
28
ON
ON
ON OFF ON
29
ON
ON
ON
ON OFF
30
ON
ON
ON
ON
31
Note
ON
SW2 C500-LK103(-P))/-LK203 and
3G2A5-LK101-(P)EV1/-LK201-EV1
Host Link Units
Command Levels
Baud rate
OFF ON OFF 9,600bps
7
8
Valid levels
OFF OFF --ON
OFF 1
OFF ON
1 and 2
ON
1, 2, and 3
ON
Link Type Selector
OFF: Multiple-link
ON: Single-link
25
Each Unit must be given
a different unit number.
300bps
Parity/Transmission Code Selector
(C500 models)
6
7
Parity
Transmission code
OFF OFF
Even
ASCII 7-bit
OFF ON
Odd
2 stop bits
ON OFF
Even
JIS 8-bit
ON
Odd
1 stop bit
ON
Operating Level
ON: Level 0
OFF: Level 1
35
C500 (3G2A5) Host Link Units
Section 2-2
RUN/STOP Selector
(3G2A5-LK101/-LK201)
When pin 8 is set to RUN (ON), the CPU will start in RUN mode upon power
application. When set to STOP (OFF), the CPU will start operation in PROGRAM mode. (Refer to to the 2-2-4 PC Operation Mode for further details.)
MONITOR/NORMAL
Selector (C500-LK103(-P),
C500-LK203)
When pin 8 is set to MONITOR (ON), the PC will operate in MONITOR mode
upon the application of power. When the pin is set to NORMAL (OFF), the PC is
no longer controlled by the Host Link Unit (i.e., the mode of operation will be determined by other system conditions). Refer to the 2-2-4 PC Operating Mode for
details.
SW2
Operating Level
Set pin 5 of SW2 to OFF (operating level 1) when using a C500 PC and ON (operating level 0) when using the Host Link Unit together with a SYSMAC NET Link
Unit. When using two Rack-mounting Host Link Units, set this pin to ON for one
of the Units, and to OFF for the other.
! Caution
Link Type Selector
Failure to set pin 5 correctly may damage components or prevent operation.
ON (Single-link)
If pin 6 is set to ON, the Host Link Unit is connected to the host computer on a
one-to-one basis (see Example 3 under 1-2 System Configuration). The Unit
number and Frame Checksum (FCS) settings are not required. The normal setting is OFF (see below).
OFF (Multiple-link)
If pin 6 is set to OFF, up to 32 Host Link Units can be connected to one host computer. The unit number and FCS must be specified, even if only one Host Link
Unit is connected to the host computer. When using Ladder Support Software,
LSS, pin 6 must be set to OFF.
Command Levels
1. Enables data areas to be read and, when the CPU has been correctly set via
the SC (Status Write) command, data can also be written.
2: Enables program transfers and reading or writing of I/O tables.
3: I/O reads can be performed and I/O tables can be registered. The Command Level should be set to 1, 2, and 3 for running LSS software, program transfers, etc. Other levels may be used for Systems Control Software, monitoring,
Data Acquisition Software, etc.
Note Commands valid for each level are listed in 3-1 Command Levels.
Mode Selector
The Mode Selector (3G2A5-LK101/201) sets the Host Link Unit in to HOST or
LOCAL mode. In HOST mode, the host computer can set the operating mode of
the PC or write data to its memory. In LOCAL mode, the operating mode is specified by a programming device connected to the PC; such as a Programming
Console. This switch is locked by removing the key with the HOST mode selected. See 2-2-4 PC Operating Mode for further details.
Reset Switch
By pressing the Reset Switch the Host Link Unit is forced to the initial status.
Synchronization Selector
Sets the Host Link Unit to either an internal or external clock. Normally, an internal clock is employed. But, when a synchronization modem with a baud rate of
2,400 bps or higher is used, the external clock setting must be selected.
36
Section 2-2
C500 (3G2A5) Host Link Units
Termination Resistance
When this switch is set to ON, a built-in termination resistance of 220 Ω is connected. When set to OFF, the termination resistance is disconnected. When using a RS-422 cable throughout a system, the Host Link Unit at each end of the
cable system must have the termination resistances connected by turning ON
the switch as detailed in the following diagram. RS-232C systems provide pointto-point connections and do not require a termination resistance.
Host computer
RS-232C cable
Link Adapter
3G2A9-AL004-(P)E
RS-422 cable
Link Adapter
3G2A9-AL001
Link Adapter
3G2A9-AL001
Link Adapter
3G2A9-AL001
Link Adapter
3G2A9-AL001
RS-422 cable
C-series PC
with Host Link
Unit
C-series PC
with Host Link
Unit
C-series PC
with Host Link
Unit
C-series PC
with Host Link
Unit
C-series PC
with Host Link
Unit
Turn the termination resistance ON for these two Host Link Units.
CTS Selector
When the selector is set to 0 V, the clear-to-send (CTS) signal is continuously
ON. When the selector is set to external, the Unit will respond to externally generated CTS signals. This is normally set to CTS always ON, i.e., the switch is set
to ON.
5-V Power Supply Switch
When using a Z3RN-A-5 Optical Interface, the 5 V power supply switch should
be set to ON; otherwise it should be set to OFF.
I/O Port Selector
Sets the Host Link Unit (3G2A5-LK201-EV1 or C500-LK203) to either the
RS-232C or the RS-422 interface.
37
Section 2-2
C500 (3G2A5) Host Link Units
2-2-3
Indicators
Indicator
Function
RUN
ON when the Unit is operating.
RCV
ON when the Host Link Unit is receiving data.
XMT
ON when the Host Link Unit is transmitting data.
ERROR
Goes ON when a transfer error is detected (See note 1.); goes OFF when a new
command is received normally.
Note 1. Transfer errors include parity, framing, overrun, and FCS errors.
2. Refer to 5-4 Troubleshooting for details on correcting the following problems.
• The RUN indicator does not light.
• The Host Link Unit’s RCV indicator does not light when data is transmitted
from the host computer.
• The RCV indicator lights, but the XMT indicator does not.
• The ERROR indicator lights.
• The XMT indicator lights, but the host computer does not receive the data.
2-2-4
PC Operating Modes
The operating mode of the PC depends an the setting of the mode selector on
the Host Link Unit, the RUN/STOP or MONITOR/NORMAL selector on the Host
Link Unit, and the status of any peripheral device connected to the PC. Refer to
the following tables for details.
Host Link Units in C500, C1000H, or C2000H Systems
(Except C500-LK103(-P) and C500-LK203 Host Link Units)
For Rack-mounting Host Link Units set to Host mode, the PC mode on initial
application of power is as set on the Host Link Unit, i.e., RUN if the setting is
RUN, and PROGRAM if the setting is STOP. (RUN/STOP setting is selected via
pin 8 of DIP switch 1 for all models.) If the Host Link Unit is set to LOCAL, start-up
mode will be as shown below.
System configuration and Host Link Unit setting*
No CPU-mounting device
With CPU-mounting Host Link Unit
Rack-mounting Host Link Unit in LOCAL mode
RUN
RUN
RUN
STOP
PROGRAM
With CPU-mounting peripheral device
PROGRAM
With Programming Console**
The mode is determined by the mode selector on the Console,
i.e., RUN, MONITOR or PROGRAM.
* If there is no Rack-mounting Host Link Unit mounted, the data for the Rack-mounting Host Link Unit LOCAL mode applies.
** With the Host Link Unit mode set to HOST, a MODE SET ERR alarm occurs if the Programming Console is set to MONTR or PROG
and RUN is selected on the DIP switch, or if the Programming Console is set to RUN or MONTR with STOP selected.
38
Section 2-2
C500 (3G2A5) Host Link Units
The operating mode can be set from a host computer as long as the Host Link
Unit is set to HOST mode. If the Host Link Unit is set to LOCAL mode, the operating mode cannot be set from the host computer and must be set from the host
computer and must be set from a Peripheral Device, such as the Programming
Console.
C500-LK103(-P) and C500-LK203 Host Link Units
System configuration
Host Link Unit mode
and Host Link Unit setting
MONITOR
NORMAL
No other mounted device
MONITOR
Programming Console
The mode is determined by the mode selector on the Console., i.e.,
RUN, MONITOR, or PROGRAM.
CPU-mounting Host Link Unit
Host Link Unit
RUN
RUN
*
RUN
STOP
MONITOR
PROGRAM
MONITOR
MONITOR**
MONITOR**
NORMAL
MONITOR**
RUN**
MONITOR
PROGRAM
CPU-mounted peripheral device
* A CPU-mounting Host Link Unit must be set to STOP mode when used together with a Rack-mounting Host Link Unit
that is set to MONITOR mode.
** If a Programming Console is also mounted, the mode selector on the Programming Console determines the PC
operating mode.
If a peripheral device other than a CPU-mounting Host Link Unit is attached to
the CPU, the PC’s operating mode is determined by the peripheral device when
the Host Link Unit’s mode selector is set for LOCAL. With the mode selector set
for HOST, the PC’s operating mode is determined by the RUN/STOP selector on
the Host Link Unit.
Unless programming is implemented to prevent starting, if the PC is in RUN
mode, it will begin operation immediately the power is applied. Refer to
Controlling PC Start-up at the end of this subsection for details on programming
methods. These methods do not apply when using a 3G2A5-LK101-(P)EV1 or
3G2A5-LK201-EV1 Host Link Unit.
PC Mode When Mounting a CPU-mounting Host Link Unit with the Power ON
Rack-mounting Host Link Unit*
System configuration
LOCAL
V1
PCs**
Other PCs
Operating mode unchanged
Mounting for the first time
RUN
RUN
STOP
PROGRAM
Remounting (the Host Link Unit has been
mounted before)
HOST
Operating mode unchanged
Operating mode unchanged
* If there is no Rack-mounting Host Link Unit mounted, data for the Rack-mounting Host Link Unit LOCAL mode applies.
** V1 PCs are the C200H/HS/HX/HG/HE, C1000H, C2000H, and any other building-block PC with the suffix “V1” in the
model number.
Data Flow
HOST Mode
The following figures show the flow of data between the system and a Programming Console with the Host Link Unit set in HOST mode. As can be seen, the
Programming Console can be used for monitoring or writing in this mode.
39
Section 2-2
C500 (3G2A5) Host Link Units
Programming Console
Monitoring the PC
Controlling the PC
Host computer
Write data
Read data
PC operation mode,
program and I/O data,
set value and present
value data
FORCED SET/RESET
Program, I/O data,
error, etc.
C-series PC with
Host Link Unit
LOCAL Mode
Programming Console
The following diagram shows the flow of data while the Host Link Unit is in LOCAL mode. Note that in this mode the Programming Console can be used for
monitoring only.
Monitoring the PC
Host computer
Read data
Program, I/O data,
erros, etc.
No write operations from host computer.
C-series PC with
Host Link Unit
C500-LK103(-P) and C500-LK203 Host Link Unit Modes
These Units do not have mode selectors, i.e., PC operating modes can be set,
data can be written, and similar operations can be performed without regard to
HOST/LOCAL mode settings. Data flow is the same as that for HOST mode,
shown above.
Controlling PC Start-up
C500-LK103(-P) and C500-LK203 Host Link Units
PROGRAM mode cannot be achieved manually when these Rack-mounting
Host Link Units are used without a Programming Console or other peripheral device. Programming can be implemented, however, to prevent the PC from
automatically starting when the power is applied. This allows greater control and
the Unit can be started later with a command from the host computer. The
following is an example of a programmed start-up of a C1000H PC.
40
Section 2-2
C500 (3G2A5) Host Link Units
12800
DIFU(13)
12801
12800
JMP(04)
**
12801
Initialization
JMP(05)
**
END(01)
Appropriate initialization codes must be programmed between JMP(04) and
JME(05). IR area bit 12800 can then be turned on to start PC operation from the
host computer. The PC must be set in MONITOR mode for this to be possible. To
initialize the PC when starting operation, use DIFU with the Always ON Flag; the
Reset Flag cannot be used. Refer to your PC’s operation manual for specific
bits. The PC’s operating mode can then be changed from the host computer after operation has begun. When programming in this fashion, note the following
conditions:
1, 2, 3... 1.
2.
3.
Pin 8 of SW1 on C500-LK103(-P) or C500-LK203 Units should be set to
MONITOR. If it is not, use the host computer to change it to the MONITOR
mode before turning on IR area bit 12800.
JMP command numbers must be between 01 and 99 for C200H/HS,
C1000H and C2000H PCs.
This programming example cannot be applied to C500 PCs, which do not
support direct jumps. In this case, use a 3G2A5-LK101-(P)EV1 or
3G2A5-LK201-EV1 Host Link Unit so that the mode can be set manually.
41
Section 2-2
C500 (3G2A5) Host Link Units
Sending a RUN Start Command to the PC
The following flowcharts show the computer decision making processes for ensuring that the PC is in RUN mode after start-up.
3G2A5-LK101-(P)EV1 and 3G2A5-LK201-EV1 Host Link Units
Power application
Read PC operation
mode.
PC in RUN
mode?
YES
NO
Host
Link Unit in
HOST mode?
YES
NO
Set mode to HOST
STATUS WRITE
(RUN)
END
C500-LK103(-P) and C500-LK203 Host Link Units
Power application
Read PC operation
mode.
PC in RUN
mode?
NO
STATUS WRITE
(RUN)
END
42
YES
Section 2-2
C500 (3G2A5) Host Link Units
2-2-5
Restart Bits and Error Flags
Host Link Units use some of the Special Relay (SR) area and Auxiliary Relay
(AR) area bits of the PC to restart the communications control program of the
Host Link Unit and to indicate the occurrence of communications errors between
the Unit and the computer. The word (Wd) addresses and bit numbers of these
bits are as follows:
C500
SR Wd 60
Bit 15 Bit 14 Bit 13
Bit 12 Bit 11
Bit 10
Bit 9
Bit 8
Bit 7
Bit 6
Bit 5
Bit 4
Bit 3
Bit 2
Bit 1
Bit 0
Bit 7
Bit 6
Bit 5
Bit 4
Bit 3
Bit 2
Bit 1
Bit 0
Bit 5
Bit 4
Bit 3
Bit 2
Bit 1
Bit 0
CM*
CM*
restart error
bit
flag
RM*
restart
bit
SR Wd 61
RM*
error
flag
* RM: Rack-mounting Host Link Unit
CM: CPU-mounting Host Link Unit
C1000H and C2000H
SR Wd 253 SR Wd 252
Bit 15 Bit 14 Bit 13
Bit 12 Bit 11
Bit 10
Bit 9
Bit 8
CM*
CM*
restart error
bit
flag
RM*
restart
bit
RM* #1
error
flag
RM* #0
error
flag
* RM: Rack-mounting Host Link Unit
CM: CPU-mounting Host Link Unit
C120
Bit 12 Bit 11
SR Wd 60
Bit 15 Bit 14 Bit 13
Bit 10
Bit 9
Bit 8
Bit 7
Bit 6
CM* CM*
restart error
flag
bit
* CM: CPU-mounting Host Link Unit
Host Link Unit Restart Bit
When this bit is turned ON, the Host Link Unit is reset to its initial conditions, as if
the power had just been applied.
! Caution
Do not turn this bit ON in the user program; doing so could cause the memory to
be lost.
Host Link Unit Error Flag
This flag turns ON if a transmission error occurs between the PC and the Host
Link Unit. It turns ON the error indicator on the front of the Unit.
Note 1. When the Host Link Unit Restart bit is turned ON, the Host Link Unit Error
Flag is turned OFF.
43
Section 2-2
C500 (3G2A5) Host Link Units
2. Set the Host Link Unit to LOCAL mode before force setting or force resetting
an error flag.
3. Communications between the Host Link Unit and the host computer will not
be resumed until the Restart bit is turned OFF. The initialization process is
repeated as long as the Restart bit is ON.
ON(=1)
Restart flag
OFF(=0)
Host Link Unit restarts.
Host Link Unit stops and stands by.
4. If a reset switch is provided, pressing it should reset the Host Link Unit and
clear the error state.
5. If the Unit still won’t reset, disconnect and then reconnect the power to the
PC.
2-2-6
I/O Response Time
The processing that determines and the methods for calculating the minimum
and maximum times required from an input on one PC with a Host Link Unit to an
output on another PC with a Host Link Unit are described below. The transfer
between the PCs is handled through a host computer connected to both these
PCs.
Processing and calculations are described by PC model in the first subsection.
An example combining a C200H/HS/HX/HG/HE PC with a C1000H PC is included in the C200H section. Although more precise equations may be written if
required, those used in the following calculations do not consider fractions of a
cycle.
The calculations used in this section assume that all host computer commands
and PC responses require no more than one host link servicing period to complete transmission. To compute response times for situations involving a longer
command and/or response, the number of host link servicing periods (i.e., the
number of cycles) required to complete the command or response would have to
be incorporated into the equations.
In considering response times, it is important to remember the sequence of processing that occurs during the PC cycle. The main factor that affects the response time is the timing of inputs and outputs and of host computer processing
in relation to this sequence.
The following diagram illustrates the setup used in response time calculations
Host computer
Host Link
Unit # 0
PC
Input
Cycle time
(50 ms)
Host Link
Unit # 31
PC
Cycle time
(30 ms)
x
+
Output
C120 and C500
Although the C120 and C500 equations for the minimum and maximum response times are the same as those for the C1000H and C2000H, the break-
44
Section 2-2
C500 (3G2A5) Host Link Units
down of the CPU’s cycle differs. These groups are thus treated in different sections.
Minimum Response Time
Host computer
The data flow that will produce the minimum response time is shown below. This
flow assumes that all signals and data transmissions are processed as soon as
they occur. The equation for the minimum response time is given below the diagram.
Command/response for Unit # 0
Command/response for Unit # 31
Command
Command
Response
Response
Host computer
processing time
Buffer for Host
Link Unit # 0
CPU reads
input signal
Overseeing
Cycle time
Cycle time
PC for Host
Link Unit # 0
I/O refresh
CPU writes
output signal
Host link service
Buffer for Host
Link Unit # 31
Cycle time
Cycle time
PC for Host
Link Unit # 31
Host link service
I/O refresh
Input
signal
Input ON delay
Output ON delay
Output
signal
I/O response time
Minimum response time =
Input ON delay + Command transmission time + Cycle time of PC for Unit #0 + Response transmission
time + Host computer processing time + Command transmission time + Output ON delay
Maximum Response Time
The data flow that will produce the maximum response time is shown below. Delays over the minimum response time occur because the input to be transferred
through the host computer is received immediately following the I/O refresh period (requiring a wait to the next cycle) and because the command from the host
computer to write the bit to be output from PC for Unit #31 is received immediate-
45
Section 2-2
C500 (3G2A5) Host Link Units
ly following host link servicing (again requiring a wait to the next cycle). The
equation for the maximum response time is given below the diagram.
Command/response for Unit # 0
Command/response for Unit # 31
Command
Host computer
Command
Response
Response
Host computer
processing time
Buffer for Host
Link Unit # 0
Cycle time
Cycle time
PC for Host
Link Unit # 0
I/O refresh
CPU reads
input signal
Buffer for Host
Link Unit # 31
Host link service
CPU writes
output signal
Cycle time
Cycle time
PC for Host
Link Unit # 31
Host link service
Input
signal
Input ON delay
I/O refresh
Output ON delay
Output
signal
I/O response time
Maximum response time =
46
Input ON delay + Command transmission time + (Cycle time of PC for Unit #0 x 2) + Response
transmission time + Host computer processing time + Command transmission time + Cycle time of PC for
Unit #31 + Output ON delay
Section 2-2
C500 (3G2A5) Host Link Units
C1000H and C2000H
Although the C1000H and C2000H equations for the minimum and maximum
response times are the same as those for the 3G2A6 and C500, the breakdown
of the CPU’s cycle differs. These groups are thus treated in different sections.
Minimum Response Time
Host computer
The data flow that will produce the minimum response time is shown below. This
flow assumes that all signals and data transmissions are processed as soon as
they occur. The equation for the minimum response time is given below the diagram.
Command/response for Unit # 0
Command/response for Unit # 31
Command
Command
Response
Response
Host computer
processing time
Buffer for Host
Link Unit # 0
CPU reads
input signal
Cycle time
Cycle time
PC for Host
Link Unit # 0
Input refresh
Output refresh
Host link service
CPU writes
output signal
Host link service
Buffer for Host
Link Unit # 31
Cycle time
Cycle time
PC for Host
Link Unit # 31
Input refresh
Input
signal
Input ON delay
Output refresh
Output ON delay
Output
signal
I/O response time
Minimum response time =
Input ON delay + Command transmission time + Cycle time of PC for Unit #0 + Response transmission
time + Host computer processing time + Command transmission time + Output ON delay
47
Section 2-2
C500 (3G2A5) Host Link Units
Maximum Response Time
The data flow that will produce the maximum response time is shown below. Delays over the minimum response time occur because the input to be transferred
through the host computer is received immediately following the I/O refresh period (requiring a wait to the next cycle) and because the command from the host
computer to write the bit to be output from PC for Unit #31 is received immediately following host link servicing (again requiring a wait to the next cycle). The
equation for the maximum response time is given below the diagram.
Command/response for Unit # 0
Command/response for Unit # 31
Command
Host computer
Command
Response
Response
Host computer
processing time
Buffer for Host
Link Unit # 0
Input refresh
Cycle time
Cycle time
PC for Host
Link Unit # 0
Output refresh
Buffer for Host
Link Unit # 31
CPU reads
input signal
Host link service
Input refresh
CPU writes
output signal
Cycle time
Cycle time
PC for Host
Link Unit # 31
Host link service
Input
signal
Input ON delay
Output refresh
Output ON delay
Output
signal
I/O response time
Maximum response time =
48
Input ON delay + Command transmission time + (Cycle time of PC for Unit #0 x 2) + Response
transmission time + Host computer processing time + Command transmission time + Cycle time of PC for
Unit #31 + Output ON delay
Section 2-3
C120 (3G2A6) Host Link Units
2-3
2-3-1
C120 (3G2A6) Host Link Units
Nomenclature and External Appearance
The following figures give details of switch types, selectors, and connectors for
your Host Link Unit. It will be necessary to refer to these diagrams from time to
time as you read further in the manual, particularly when reading the section on
2-3-2 Switch Settings. These Units can be used with all of the C-series
Rack-mounting PCs. (C120 Host Link Units are sometimes referred to as
3G2A6 Host Link Units.)
Front Panels
3G2A6-LK101-(P)EV1
3G2A6-LK201-EV1
3G2A6-LK-202-EV1
READY indicator
RCV (receive) indicator
XMT (transmit) indicator
ERROR indicator
(Parity, framing,
overrun, and
FCS errors)
RS-422 cable connector
Optical fiber connectors
* APF or PCF can be connected
to the LK101-PEV1.
Only PCF can be connected to
the LK101-EV1.
RS-232C cable connector
See Example 3 in 1-2
System Configuration
for restrictions with
RS-232C cable.
Rear Panels
3G2A6-LK101-(P)EV1
3G2A6-LK201-EV1
3G2A6-LK-202-EV1
SW2
SW1
SW1
SW2
SW1
SW2
SW3
SW3
49
Section 2-3
C120 (3G2A6) Host Link Units
2-3-2
Switch Settings
The following information provides details on correct settings for the range of
3G2A6 Host Link Units covered by this manual.
SW1
For SW1, the first five pins are used to set the Unit number as shown below. Details about SW2 settings are given following the diagram.
SW1
RUN/
STOP
selector
Unit No.
Unit No.
ON
RUN
OFF OFF OFF OFF OFF
1
2
3
4
0
OFF
STOP
OFF OFF OFF OFF ON
1
OFF OFF OFF ON OFF
2
OFF OFF OFF ON
ON
3
OFF OFF ON OFF OFF
4
OFF OFF ON OFF ON
5
OFF OFF ON
ON OFF
6
OFF OFF ON
ON
ON
7
OFF ON OFF OFF OFF
8
OFF ON OFF OFF ON
9
OFF ON OFF ON OFF
10
OFF ON OFF ON
ON
11
OFF ON
ON OFF OFF
12
OFF ON
ON OFF ON
13
OFF ON
ON
ON OFF
14
OFF ON
ON
ON
15
ON
ON OFF OFF OFF OFF
16
ON OFF OFF OFF ON
17
ON OFF OFF ON OFF
18
ON OFF OFF ON
19
ON
SW2
Command levels
7
Baud rate
300bps
ON
ON
OFF OFF ON
600bps
OFF ON
1 and 2
OFF OFF OFF ON
1,200bps
ON
1, 2, and 3
ON
ON
ON OFF
2,400bps
OFF ON
ON OFF
4,800bps
OFF ON OFF
9,600bps
20
ON OFF ON OFF ON
21
OFF OFF ON OFF 19,200bps
ON OFF ON
ON OFF
22
ON OFF ON
ON
23
ON
ON OFF OFF OFF
24
ON
ON OFF OFF ON
25
ON
ON OFF ON OFF
26
ON
ON OFF ON
ON
27
ON
ON
ON OFF OFF
28
ON
ON
ON OFF ON
29
ON
ON
ON
ON OFF
30
ON
ON
ON
ON
31
ON
Note
Valid levels
OFF ON OFF ON
ON OFF ON OFF OFF
ON
8
OFF OFF ---
ON
RUN/STOP Selector
50
5
OFF 1
ON
Link Type Selector
OFF: Multiple-link
ON: Single-link
Each Unit must be given
a different unit number.
Refer to 2-3-4 PC Operating Modes for details.
Section 2-3
C120 (3G2A6) Host Link Units
SW2
Operating Levels
Set pin 5 of SW2 to OFF (operating level 1) when using a C500(F) PC and ON
(operating level 0) when using the Host Link Unit together with a SYSMAC NET
Link Unit. When using two Rack-mounting Host Link Units, set this pin to ON for
one of the Units, and to OFF for the other.
! Caution
Failure to set pin 5 correctly may damage components or prevent operation.
MONITOR/NORMAL Selector When this switch is set to MONITOR, the PC will operate in MONITOR mode
upon the application of power. When the pin is set to NORMAL, the PC is no
longer controlled by the Host Link Unit (i.e., the mode of operation will be determined by other system conditions). Refer to 2-3-4 PC Operating Mode for details.
Link Type Selector
ON (Single-link)
If pin 6 is set to ON, the Host Link Unit is connected to
the host computer on a one-to-one basis (see Example 3 and Example 5 under
1-2 System Configuration. The Unit number and Frame Checksum (FCS) settings are not required. The normal setting is OFF (see below).
OFF (Multiple-link)
If pin 6 is set to OFF, up to 32 Host Link Units can be
connected to one host computer. The unit number and FCS must be specified,
even if only one Host Link Unit is connected to the host computer. When using
Ladder Support Software, LSS, pin 6 must be set to OFF.
Command Level
Pins 7 and 8 on SW2 control the operating command levels according to the following:
1: Enables data areas to be read and, when the CPU has been correctly set via
the SC (Status Write) command, data can also be written.
2: Enables program transfers and reading or writing of I/O tables.
3: I/O reads can be performed and I/O tables can be registered. The Command Level should be set to 1, 2, and 3 for running LSS software, program transfers, etc. Other levels may be used for Systems Control Software, monitoring,
Data Acquisition Software, etc.
Note Commands valid for each level are listed in 3-1 Command Levels.
SW3
3G2A6-LK201-EV1
3G2A6-LK202-EV1
Unused
ON OFF ON OFF
OFF ON OFF ON
ON OFF
OFF ON
Synchronization Selector
Internal synchronization
External synchronization
ON OFF ON OFF ON OFF
ON OFF OFF OFF OFF OFF
Unused
Termination resistance ON
Termination resistance OFF
CTS always ON
External CTS signal
Sets the Host Link Unit to either an internal or external clock. Normally, an internal clock is employed. But, when a synchronization modem with a baud rate of
2,400 bps or higher is used, the external clock setting must be selected.
51
Section 2-3
C120 (3G2A6) Host Link Units
When this switch is set to ON, a built-in termination resistance of 220 Ω is connected. When set to OFF, the termination resistance is disconnected. When using a RS-422 cable throughout a system, the Host Link Unit at each end of the
cable system must have the termination resistances connected by turning ON
the switch as detailed in the following diagram. RS-232C systems provide pointto-point connections and do not require a termination resistance.
Termination Resistance
Host computer
RS-232C cable
Link Adapter
3G2A9-AL004-(P)E
RS-422 cable
Link Adapter
3G2A9-AL001
Link Adapter
3G2A9-AL001
Link Adapter
3G2A9-AL001
Link Adapter
3G2A9-AL004-(P)E
RS-422 cable
C-series PC
with Host Link
Unit
C-series PC
with Host Link
Unit
C-series PC
with Host Link
Unit
C-series PC
with Host Link
Unit
C-series PC
with Host Link
Unit
Turn the termination resistance ON for these two Host Link Units.
CTS Selector
2-3-3
When the selector is set to 0 V, the clear-to-send (CTS) signal is continuously
ON. When the selector is set to external, the Unit will respond to externally generated CTS signals. This is normally set to CTS always ON, i.e., the switch is set
to ON.
Indicators
Indicator
Function
Ready
ON when the power is on and the Unit is ready to transmit.
RCV
ON when the Host Link Unit is receiving data.
XMT
ON when the Host Link Unit is transmitting data.
ERROR
Goes ON when a transfer error is detected (See note 1.); goes OFF when a new
command is received normally.
Note 1. Transfer errors include parity, framing, overrun, and FCS errors.
2. Refer to 5-4 Troubleshooting for details on correcting the following problems.
• The RUN indicator does not light.
• The Host Link Unit’s RCV indicator does not light when data is transmitted
from the host computer.
• The RCV indicator lights, but the XMT indicator does not.
• The ERROR indicator lights.
• The XMT indicator lights, but the host computer does not receive the data.
52
Section 2-3
C120 (3G2A6) Host Link Units
2-3-4
PC Operating Modes
The operating mode of the PC depends an the setting of the mode selector on
the Host Link Unit, the RUN/STOP or MONITOR/NORMAL selector on the Host
Link Unit, and the status of any peripheral device connected to the PC. Refer to
the following tables for details.
C500-LK103(-P), C500-LK203, and 3G2A6 Host Link Units
System configuration
Host Link Unit mode
and Host Link Unit setting
MONITOR
NORMAL
No other mounted device
MONITOR
Programming Console
The mode is determined by the mode selector on the Console., i.e.,
RUN, MONITOR, or PROGRAM.
CPU-mounting Host Link Unit
Host Link Unit
RUN
RUN
*
RUN
STOP
MONITOR
PROGRAM
MONITOR
MONITOR**
MONITOR**
NORMAL
MONITOR**
RUN**
MONITOR
PROGRAM
CPU-mounted peripheral device
* A CPU-mounting Host Link Unit must be set to STOP mode when used together with a Rack-mounting Host Link Unit
that is set in MONITOR mode.
** If a Programming Console is also mounted, the mode selector on the Programming Console determines the PC
operating mode.
If a peripheral device other than a CPU-mounting Host Link Unit is attached to
the CPU, the PC’s operating mode is determined by the peripheral device when
the Host Link Unit’s mode selector is set for LOCAL. With the mode selector set
for HOST, the PC’s operating mode is determined by the RUN/STOP selector on
the Host Link Unit.
Unless programming is implemented to prevent starting, if the PC is in RUN
mode, it will begin operation immediately the power is applied. Refer to
Controlling PC Start-up at the end of this subsection for details on programming
methods.
PC Mode When Mounting a CPU-mounting Host Link Unit with the Power ON
Rack-mounting Host Link Unit*
System configuration
LOCAL
V1 PCs**
Other PCs
Operating mode unchanged
Mounting for the first time
RUN
RUN
STOP
PROGRAM
Remounting (the Host Link Unit has been
mounted before)
HOST
Operating mode unchanged
Operating mode unchanged
* If there is no Rack-mounting Host Link Unit mounted, data for the Rack-mounting Host Link Unit LOCAL mode applies.
** V1 PCs are the C200H/HS/HX/HG/HE, C1000H, C2000H, and any other building-block PC with the suffix “V1” in the
model number.
53
Section 2-3
C120 (3G2A6) Host Link Units
Caution Sticker
The CPU-mounting 3G2A6-LK101-(P)EV1 Host Link Unit is supplied with a caution sticker. The caution sticker should be attached as shown below if the RUN/
STOP selector is set to RUN. This is to avoid the potential danger of the Host
Link Unit being mounted to an unprepared system.
Attach here
Sending a RUN Start Command to the PC
The following flowchart shows the computer decision making processes for ensuring that the PC is in RUN mode after start-up.
Power application
Read PC operation
mode.
PC in RUN
mode?
YES
NO
Host
Link Unit in
HOST mode?
NO
Set mode to HOST
STATUS WRITE
(RUN)
END
54
YES
Section 2-3
C120 (3G2A6) Host Link Units
2-3-5
Restart Bits and Error Flags
Host Link Units use some of the Special Relay (SR) area and Auxiliary Relay
(AR) area bits of the PC to restart the communications control program of the
Host Link Unit and to indicate the occurrence of communications errors between
the Unit and the computer. The word (Wd) addresses and bit numbers of these
bits are as follows:
C120 (3G2A6)
Bit 12 Bit 11
SR Wd 60
Bit 15 Bit 14 Bit 13
Bit 10
Bit 9
Bit 8
Bit 7
Bit 6
Bit 5
Bit 4
Bit 3
Bit 2
Bit 1
Bit 0
CM* CM*
restart error
flag
bit
* CM: CPU-mounting Host Link Unit
Host Link Unit Restart Bit
When this bit is turned ON, the Host Link Unit is reset to its initial conditions, as if
the power had just been applied.
! Caution
Do not turn this bit ON in the user program; doing so could cause the memory to
be lost.
Host Link Unit Error Flag
This flag turns ON if a transmission error occurs between the PC and the Host
Link Unit. The error indicator on the front panel of the Unit lights while this flag is
ON.
Note 1. When the Host Link Unit Restart bit is turned ON, the Host Link Unit Error
Flag is turned OFF.
2. Set the Host Link Unit to LOCAL mode before force setting or force resetting
an error flag.
3. Communications between the Host Link Unit and the host computer will not
be resumed until the Restart bit is turned OFF. The initialization process is
repeated as long as the Restart bit is ON.
ON(=1)
Restart bit
OFF(=0)
Host Link Unit restarts.
Host Link Unit stops and stands by.
4. To reset error condition on the Host Link Unit, disconnect and then reconnect
the power to the PC.
55
Section 2-3
C120 (3G2A6) Host Link Units
2-3-6
I/O Response Time
The processing that determines and the methods for calculating the minimum
and maximum times required from an input on one PC with a Host Link Unit to an
output on another PC with a Host Link Unit are described below. The transfer
between the PCs is handled through a host computer connected to both these
PCs.
Processing and calculations are described by PC model. Although more precise
equations may be written if required, those used in the following calculations do
not consider fractions of a cycle.
The calculations used in this section assume that all host computer commands
and PC responses require no more than one host link servicing period to complete transmission. To compute response times for situations involving a longer
command and/or response, the number of host link servicing periods (i.e., the
number of cycles) required to complete the command or response would have to
be incorporated into the equations.
In considering response times, it is important to remember the sequence of processing that occurs during the PC cycle. The main factor that affects the response time is the timing of inputs and outputs and of host computer processing
in relation to this sequence.
The following diagram illustrates the setup used in response time calculations
Host computer
Host Link
Unit # 0
PC
Input
56
Cycle time
(50 ms)
Host Link
Unit # 31
PC
Cycle time
(30 ms)
x
Output
+
Section 2-3
C120 (3G2A6) Host Link Units
C120 and C500
Although the C120 and C500 equations for the minimum and maximum response times are the same as those for the C1000H and C2000H, the breakdown of the CPU’s cycle differs. These groups are thus treated in different sections.
Minimum Response Time
Host computer
The data flow that will produce the minimum response time is shown below. This
flow assumes that all signals and data transmissions are processed as soon as
they occur. The equation for the minimum response time is given below the diagram.
Command/response for Unit # 0
Command/response for Unit # 31
Command
Command
Response
Response
Host computer
processing time
Buffer for Host
Link Unit # 0
CPU reads
input signal
Overseeing
Cycle time
Cycle time
PC for Host
Link Unit # 0
I/O refresh
Host link service
Buffer for Host
Link Unit # 31
CPU writes
output signal
Cycle time
Cycle time
PC for Host
Link Unit # 31
Host link service
I/O refresh
Input
signal
Input ON delay
Output ON delay
Output
signal
I/O response time
Minimum response time =
Input ON delay + Command transmission time + Cycle time of PC for Unit #0 + Response transmission
time + Host computer processing time + Command transmission time + Output ON delay
57
Section 2-4
Installing and Removing Host Link Units
Maximum Response Time
The data flow that will produce the maximum response time is shown below. Delays over the minimum response time occur because the input to be transferred
through the host computer is received immediately following the I/O refresh period (requiring a wait to the next cycle) and because the command from the host
computer to write the bit to be output from PC for Unit #31 is received immediately following host link servicing (again requiring a wait until the next cycle). The
equation for the maximum response time is given below the diagram.
Command/response for Unit # 0
Command/response for Unit # 31
Command
Host computer
Command
Response
Response
Host computer
processing time
Buffer for Host
Link Unit # 0
Cycle time
Cycle time
PC for Host
Link Unit # 0
I/O refresh
CPU reads
input signal
Buffer for Host
Link Unit # 31
Host link service
CPU writes
output signal
Cycle time
Cycle time
PC for Host
Link Unit # 31
Host link service
Input
signal
Input ON delay
I/O refresh
Output ON delay
Output
signal
I/O response time
Maximum response time =
2-4
Input ON delay + Command transmission time + (Cycle time of PC for Unit #0 x 2) + Response
transmission time + Host computer processing time + Command transmission time + Cycle time of PC for
Unit #31 + Output ON delay
Installing and Removing Host Link Units
This section explains the proper installation and removal of CPU-mounting Host
Link Units.
Note Never install or remove Rack-mounting Host Link Units when the power supply
is on.
Installation of a
Follow the procedure below when installing a CPU-mounting Host Link Unit on a
CPU-mounting Host Link
PC.
Unit
1, 2, 3... 1. Remove the Connecting Cables.
2. Recheck the settings of the DIP switches on the back of the Unit.
In particular, check the RUN/STOP switch. If the switch is set to RUN, the
PC might begin operating when the Host Link Unit is inserted. The PC’s
mode will not change if the switch is set to STOP.
Refer to 2-1-4 PC Operating Modes for details on the Host Link Unit’s effect
on the PC’s mode.
58
Section 2-4
Installing and Removing Host Link Units
3.
4.
Follow the procedure below when removing a CPU-mounting Host Link Unit
from a PC.
Removal of CPU-mounting
Host Link Units
1, 2, 3... 1.
2.
Remove the Connecting Cable.
Remove the Host Link Unit.
When a CPU-mounting Host Link Unit is installed or removed during transmission, a transmission error will occur after removal if the host computer initiated
communications with the affected Unit. The following table describes the appropriate procedure to follow.
Transmission Errors
Event
Connect the Host Link Unit to the PC’s Peripheral Device port and tighten
the mounting screws.
Connect the Connecting Cable and tighten the mounting screws.
Host Link Unit Indicator
Status
Host Computer Status
Corrective Action
Host Link Unit installed.
ERROR indicator lit.
Transmission error occurs.
Retransmit from the host
computer.
Host Link Unit was
removed.
---
Transmission error occurs.
Host Link Unit has been
removed.
---
Transmission error occurs.
Ignore the affected Host
Link Unit’s transmission
error or reconfigure so that
transmission to that Unit will
not be attempted.
It is recommended to prepare a program that processes transmission errors in
order to prevent an error with one Unit from stopping the entire system. Refer to
Section 5 Error Processing for details.
59
SECTION 3
Programming
This section gives the information required for effective programming of the Host Link Units. It lists the commands and responses for Host Link Units. The basic formats for that they can take are described and the data representation explained. 3-1
Command Levels lists all of the commands and responses which apply to Host Link Units and the operation level at which they
operate. Also refer to 3-2 Communications Protocol for basic format information (see also Section 4 Commands and Responses for the command and response formats of each instruction).
3-1
3-2
3-3
3-4
Command Levels . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Communications Protocol . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3-2-1 Block Format . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3-2-2 Block Format With More Than One Frame . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3-2-3 Data Representation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3-2-4 System Checks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3-2-5 Data Transaction Test Program . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Communications Protocol (C200HS/HX/HG/HE only) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3-3-1 Command Timing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Frame Checksum (FCS) Calculation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3-4-1 FCS Calculation Program Example . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
61
Section 3-1
Command Levels
3-1
Command Levels
The following tables give the commands and responses available for the Host
Link Units, the command levels, and the modes in which they are applicable. Details of the command and response formats are given in Section 4 Commands
and Responses.
Level 1
Header
Name
Code
PC Mode
RUN
MNTR
Applicable
PROG
PCs
TS
TEST
Valid
Valid
Valid
All: C120, C200H/HS/
HX/HG/HE, C500,
C1000H, C2000H
MS
STATUS READ
Valid
Valid
Valid
All: C120, C200H/HS/
HX/HG/HE, C500,
C1000H, C2000H
MF
ERROR READ
Valid
Valid
Valid
All: C120, C200H/HS/
HX/HG/HE, C500,
C1000H, C2000H
RR
IR/SR AREA READ
Valid
Valid
Valid
All: C120, C200H/HS/
HX/HG/HE, C500,
C1000H, C2000H
RH
HR AREA READ
Valid
Valid
Valid
All: C120, C200H/HS/
HX/HG/HE, C500,
C1000H, C2000H
RJ
AR AREA READ
Valid
Valid
Valid
H-type: C200H/HS/
HX/HG/HE, C1000H,
C2000H
RL
LR AREA READ
Valid
Valid
Valid
All: C120, C200H/HS/
HX/HG/HE, C500,
C1000H, C2000H
RG
TC STATUS READ
Valid
Valid
Valid
All: C120, C200H/HS/
HX/HG/HE, C500,
C1000H, C2000H
RD
DM AREA READ
Valid
Valid
Valid
All: C120, C200H/HS/
HX/HG/HE, C500,
C1000H, C2000H
RX
FM INDEX READ
Valid
Valid
Valid
C1000H, C2000H
RF
FM DATA READ
Valid
Valid
Valid
C1000H, C2000H
RC
TC PV READ
Valid
Valid
Valid
All: C120, C200H/HS/
HX/HG/HE, C500,
C1000H, C2000H
R#
SV READ 1
Valid
Valid
Valid
All: C120, C200H/HS/
HX/HG/HE, C500,
C1000H, C2000H
R$
SV READ 2
Valid
Valid
Valid
All: C120, C200H/HS/
HX/HG/HE, C500,
C1000H, C2000H
R%
SV READ 3
Valid
Valid
Valid
All: C120, C200H/HS/
HX/HG/HE, C500,
C1000H, C2000H
SC
STATUS WRITE
Valid
Valid
Valid
All: C120, C200H/HS/
HX/HG/HE, C500,
C1000H, C2000H
WR
IR/SR AREA WRITE
Not Valid
Valid
Valid
All: C120, C200H/HS/
HX/HG/HE, C500,
C1000H, C2000H
WH
HR AREA WRITE
Not Valid
Valid
Valid
All: C120, C200H/HS/
HX/HG/HE, C500,
C1000H, C2000H
WJ
AR AREA WRITE
Not valid
Valid
Valid
H-type: C200H(S),
C1000H, C2000H
62
Section 3-1
Command Levels
Header
Code
Name
RUN
PC Mode
MNTR
PROG
Applicable
PCs
WL
LR AREA WRITE
Not Valid
Valid
Valid
All: C120, C200H/HS/
HX/HG/HE, C500,
C1000H, C2000H
WG
TC STATUS WRITE
Not Valid
Valid
Valid
All: C120, C200H/HS/
HX/HG/HE, C500,
C1000H, C2000H
WD
DM AREA WRITE
Not Valid
Valid
Valid
All: C120, C200H/HS/
HX/HG/HE, C500,
C1000H, C2000H
WF
FM AREA WRITE
Not Valid
Valid
Valid
C1000H, C2000H
WC
TC PV WRITE
Not Valid
Valid
Valid
All: C120, C200H/HS/
HX/HG/HE, C500,
C1000H, C2000H
W#
SV CHANGE 1
Not Valid
Valid
Valid
All: C120, C200H/HS/
HX/HG/HE, C500,
C1000H, C2000H
W$
SV CHANGE 2
Not Valid
Valid
Valid
All: C120, C200H/HS/
HX/HG/HE, C500,
C1000H, C2000H
W%
SV CHANGE 3
Not Valid
Valid
Valid
All: C120, C200H/HS/
HX/HG/HE, C500,
C1000H, C2000H
KS
FORCED SET
Not Valid
Valid
Valid
All: C120, C200H/HS/
HX/HG/HE, C500,
C1000H, C2000H
KR
FORCED RESET
Not Valid
Valid
Valid
All: C120, C200H/HS/
HX/HG/HE, C500,
C1000H, C2000H
FK
MULTIPLE FORCED SET/RESET
Not Valid
Valid
Valid
C200H/HS
FR
MULTIPLE FORCED SET/RESET STATUS READ
Not Valid
Valid
Valid
C200H/HS
KC
FORCED SET/RESET CANCEL
Not Valid
Valid
Valid
All: C120, C200H/HS/
HX/HG/HE, C500,
C1000H, C2000H
MM
PC MODEL READ
Valid
Valid
Valid
All: C120, C200H/HS/
HX/HG/HE, C500,
C1000H, C2000H
CR
DM AREA HIGH-SPEED READ
Valid
Valid
Valid
C1000H, C2000H
XZ
ABORT and INITIAL (command only)
Valid
Valid
Valid
All: C120, C200H/HS/
HX/HG/HE, C500,
C1000H, C2000H
IC
Undefined command (response only)
Valid
Valid
Valid
All: C120, C200H/HS/
HX/HG/HE, C500,
C1000H, C2000H
EX
TRANSMIT
Valid
Valid
Not valid
C200HS
Varies
Unprocessed command (response only)
Valid
Valid
Valid
All: C120, C200H/HS/
HX/HG/HE, C500,
C1000H, C2000H
Level 2
Header
Name
Code
PC Mode
RUN
MNTR
Applicable
PROG
PCs
RP
PROGRAM READ
Valid
Valid
Valid
All: C120, C200H/HS/
HX/HG/HE, C500,
C1000H, C2000H
WP
PROGRAM WRITE
Not valid
Not valid
Valid
All: C120, C200H/HS/
HX/HG/HE, C500,
C1000H, C2000H
63
Section 3-2
Communications Protocol
Header
Code
Name
RUN
PC Mode
MNTR
Applicable
PCs
PROG
RI
I/O TABLE READ
Valid
Valid
Valid
All: C120, C200H/HS/
HX/HG/HE, C500,
C1000H, C2000H
MI
I/O TABLE GENERATE
Not valid
Not valid
Valid
All: C120, C200H/HS/
HX/HG/HE, C500,
C1000H, C2000H
Level 3
Header
Name
PC Mode
Code
QQ
3-2
RUN
COMPOUND COMMAND
Valid
MNTR
Valid
Applicable
PROG
Valid
PCs
All: C120, C200H/HS/
HX/HG/HE, C500,
C1000H, C2000H
Communications Protocol
The host computer has initial transmission priority. Data transfer between the
host computer and the Host Link System is, therefore, initiated when the computer sends a command to a PC in the Host Link System.
A set of data in a transmission is called a block. The data block sent from the host
computer to the Host Link System is called a command block. The block sent
from the Host Link System to the computer is called a response block. In a multiple-link communications system, each block starts with a unit number and a
header, and ends with a Frame Checksum (FCS) code and a terminator (: and
CR). In a single-link system, however, each block starts with only a header, and
ends with only a terminator. The terminator in the command block enables the
PC to send a response. The terminator in the response block enables the host
computer to send another command. Examples of communications are included at the end of Section 4 Commands and Responses.
3-2-1
Block Format
@
X
X101
X
X100
Unit no. 00 to 31
X
X
Header
X
Text
X
FCS
*
CR
Terminator
FCS calculation range
A block is usually made up of one unit called a frame, but long blocks of data
(over 131 characters) must be divided into more than one frame before transmission. In a multiple-link system, the first frame can have up to 131 characters,
and subsequent frames can have up to 128 characters. In a single-link system,
however, every frame (the first included) has up to 128 characters. The data
must then be divided into more than one frame when there is a block consisting
of more than 131 characters in a multiple-link system, and of more than 128
characters in a single-link system. In this case, the beginning and intermediate
blocks end with a delimiter (CR), instead of a terminator (:CR).
64
Section 3-2
Communications Protocol
3-2-2
Block Format With More Than One Frame
Multiple-link System
First Frame (131 Characters or Less)
@
X
X101
X
X100
Unit no. 00 to 31
X
X
X
Header
Text no. 1 (123 characters max.)
X
CR
FCS
Delimiter
FCS calculation range
Intermediate Frame(s) (128 Characters or Less)
X
Text no. 2 to M–1 (125 characters max.)
X
FCS
CR
Delimiter
FCS calculation range
Last Frame (128 Characters or Less)
X
Text no. M (124 characters max.)
X
*
FCS
CR
Terminator
FCS calculation range
Single-link System
First Frame (128 Characters or Less)
X
X
Header
CR
Text no. 1 (125 characters max.)
Delimiter
Intermediate Frame(s) (128 Characters or Less)
CR
Text no. 2 to M–1 (127 characters max.)
Delimiter
Last Frame (128 Characters or Less)
*
Text no. M (126 characters max.)
CR
Terminator
65
Section 3-2
Communications Protocol
Sending Commands
To send a command block with more than one frame from the computer, initially
send only the first frame in the block. Do not send the next frame until the host
computer has received the delimiter which should have been sent back from the
PC. Do not separate data from a single word into different frames for any write
command.
Command block
Text
Unit No.
Header
Next frame transmission
enabled
FCS
Terminator
FCS
Terminator
Text
Delimiter
Delimiter
Next frame transmission
enabled
Response
block
To receive a response block consisting of more than one frame from the PC, the
host computer must send the carriage return code (delimiter) to the PC after receiving the delimiter from the PC. This enables the PC to send the next frame.
End frame
FCS
Terminator
FCS
Delimiter
Intermediate
frame
Text
Text
Unit No.
Header
First frame
Text
Delimiter
FCS
Terminator
Text
Unit No.
Header
Host computer
Host Link Unit
Next frame
transmission enabled
Delimiter
Next frame
transmission enabled
Command block
FCS
Delimiter
Receiving Commands
End frame
FCS
Delimiter
Text
FCS
Delimiter
Text
Unit No.
Header
Intermediate frame
Host Link Unit
Host computer
First frame
Response
block
3-2-3
Data Representation
The format examples in this manual apply to multiple-link systems. The explanation for each command/response includes the ranges of the possible data (e.g.,
program instructions to be read, operand values, etc.). The actual data that is
valid for the system depends on the PCs being used. Therefore, it is important
that you check that the program instructions and the data areas (and sizes) are
available for the PCs in your system.
66
Section 3-2
Communications Protocol
Numerical data within a transmission is expressed in hexadecimal, decimal, or
binary format. Refer to the format example of each command for details. The
appropriate range is indicated in the following manner. Conversion tables in Appendix C give data conversions from ASCII to hex, binary, and decimal, and
those in Appendix D give conversions between hex, BCD, binary, and decimal
up to the value 32dec.
Note All ASCII data is stored as hex in the PCs.
Hexadecimal Data
X163
X162
X161
X160
In the above diagram, the elements X163 to X160 indicate that the data is expressed in hexadecimal. Each digit can, therefore, be in the range from 0 (ASCII
48dec, binary 0000) to 9 (ASCII 49dec, binary 1001), or A (ASCII 65dec, binary
1010) to F (ASCII 70dec, binary 1111).
Decimal Data
X103
X102
X101
X100
In this figure, X103 to X100 indicate that the data is expressed in decimal. Each
digit can, therefore, be in the range from 0 (binary 0000) to 9 (binary 1001).
Binary Data
ON/
OFF
X23
ON/
OFF
X22
ON/
OFF
X21
ON/
OFF
X20
In the above figure, the ON/OFF and X23 to X20 indicate that the data is binary.
Each box therefore represents either 0 or 1 as follows:
0 (ASCII 48dec): OFF
1 (ASCII 49dec): ON.
Data Areas
Data area codes must be entered in capital letters and must be 4 characters
wide. Names shorter than 4 characters must be followed by spaces (ASCII
32dec) to make up the 4 characters. Data areas valid for each command are
listed with the command.
A maximum of 29 words of PC data can be sent at the same time. If a command
is used to read or write more than 29 words, the transmission will be divided into
units of 29 words or less each.
Although the C200H/HS/HX/HG/HE, C1000H, and C2000H will complete processing a read or write command in one cycle, other PCs may require up to three
cycles to complete processing for all the data being transferred.
If separate commands are used to read data from a PC, the data may not all
result from the same PC program cycle.
67
Section 3-2
Communications Protocol
3-2-4
System Checks
Prior to an actual data transaction between the Host Link Unit and host computer, check the system by following the nine steps listed below.
1, 2, 3... 1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
3-2-5
Check the settings of the Host Link Unit’s DIP switches and selectors. make
sure the transmission speeds, specified interfaces, and data formats of
both the Host Link Unit and host computer match.
Mount the Host Link Unit to the PC.
Connect the Host Link Unit to the host computer with the proper cable. For
details, refer to Sections 1 Introduction and 2 Host Link Unit Characteristics.
Apply power to the PC and the host computer.
If the ERROR or ALARM indicators on the PC illuminate, rectify the error
and then clear the alarm.
If the Host Link Unit is ready, the RUN indicator will illuminate. Confirm that
this is ready before proceeding.
Prepare and execute a test program on the host computer.
If the data test is completed successfully, the system is operational.
If an error occurs, perform the required error processing as detailed in Section 5 Error Processing.
Data Transaction Test Program
The following program example is designed to send test data to the Host Link
Unit and return it, unaltered, to the host computer. By executing this program, the
transmit and receive data are both displayed on the screen of the host computer.
If the transmit data and the receive data match, the system is operational. The
example uses a multiple-link system, and the program is executed by Host Link
Unit number 0. The following program is for NEC computers. For IBM compatibles, four lines must be changed as shown after the program.
NEC
10 CLOSE #1
20 CLS
30 ON ERROR GOTO *EROPE
40 OPEN ”COM:E73” FOR OUTPUT AS #1 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
50 ’*********************************************
60 *KEYIN
70 INPUT ”TEST DATA INPUT –––––”,TDS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
80 ICS=”@OUTS” . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
90 TS=TCS+TDS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
100 GOSUB *FCSSET . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
110 TXDS=TS+FCSS+”*” . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
120 PRINT TXDS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
130 PRINT #1,TXDS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
140 INPUT #1,RXDS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
150 LINE PRINT RXDS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
160 GOTO *KEYIN
170 ’*********************************************
180 *FCSSET . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
190 L=LEN(TS) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
200 A=0 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
210 FOR J=I TO L
220 TJS=MIDS(TS,J,1)
230 A=ASC(TJS) XOR A
240 NEXT J
250 FCSS=HEXS(A)
68
Opens RS-232C
Test data input
Creation of Unit no. and header code
Creation of test command
Calculation of Frame Checksum
Send data set
Send data display
Transmission
Reception
Receive data display
*
Number of transmit data before FCS
Setting of initial value for EOR calculation
Section 3-3
Communications Protocol (C200HS/HX/HG/HE only)
260
270
280
290
300
310
320
330
IF LEN(FCSS)=1 THEN FCSS=”0”+FCSS
RETURN
’*********************************************
*EROPE
PRINT ”ERL=”;ERL,”ERR=”;ERR . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
CLOSE #1
END . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
’*********************************************
Display of line no. containing error and error no.
Closes RS-232C
* The FCS calculation subroutine starting from statement 180 is for data transmission. The data length L will differ for the response
because the response contains other data such as FCS and *.
To adjust the above program for IBM compatibles replace the following four
lines.
IBM
3-3
30
40
ON ERROR GOTO 300
OPEN “COM:E72” FOR OUTPUT AS#1
100
GOSUB 190
160
GOTO 70
Communications Protocol (C200HS/HX/HG/HE only)
Commands from the PC
The C200HS/HX/HG/HE allows the PC to issue commands to the host computer
under the following conditions. The command makes it possible to send the PC’s
data to the host computer without using any command from the host computer.
1, 2, 3... 1.
2.
The C200HS/HX/HG/HE must be connected to the host computer via a
C200H-LK101-PV1, C200H-LK2jj-V1 Host Link Unit or the peripheral
port of the C200HS/HX/HG/HE’s CPU. Refer to the C200HS Operation
Manual or C200HX/HG/HE Operation Manual for details.
The TRANSMIT (TXD (––)) must be executed from the user ladder-diagram program. Refer to 4-36 TRANSMIT for details.
When the TXD (––) instruction is executed, data is transmitted to the host computer in the following format.
Command Format
@
Unit no.
X101
X100
E
X
Data
FCS
*
CR
Designated data in
ASCII code.
The data (61 bits maximum) specified by the TXD (––) instruction is converted
into ASCII (122 characters maximum) and transmitted. There will be no response from the host computer for the above command.
69
Section 3-3
Communications Protocol (C200HS/HX/HG/HE only)
3-3-1
Command Timing
When the Host Link Unit is receiving a command from the host computer at the
time the execution of the TRANSMIT instruction has been completed, command
transmission to the host computer is possible only after the Host Link Unit completes receiving the command from the host computer. After receiving the command from the host computer, the Host Link Unit starts command transmission
to the host computer. The transmission of a response for the command from the
host computer is possible only after the command transmission to the host computer is completed.
PC Data Transmission
Host computer
Command
Host Link Unit
Command
Response
Transmission Ready Flag 0: 26705
1: 26713
1
0
TXD instruction
received
TXD instruction
completed
When the Host Link Unit is transmitting a response for a command transmitted
from the host computer at the time the execution of the TRANSMIT instruction
has been completed, command transmission to the host computer is possible
only after the Host Link Unit completes transmitting the response to the host
computer. After transmitting the response, the Host Link Unit starts command
transmission to the host computer.
PC Data Reception
Host computer
Command
Host Link Unit
1
0
Response
Command
Transmission Ready Flag 0: 26705
1: 26713
TXD instruction
received
TXD instruction
completed
The transmission flag is ON when a command to the host computer is delivered
from the PC to the Host Link Unit.
70
Section 3-4
Frame Checksum (FCS) Calculation
3-4
Frame Checksum (FCS) Calculation
The Frame Checksum is 8-bit data converted into two ASCII characters. The
8-bit data is the result of an EXCLUSIVE OR sequentially performed between
each character, from the first character in the frame to the last character of the
text in that frame.
@10
RH
00310001
Unit no.
Header
@
0100
Text
58
FCS
* CR
Terminator
0000
XOR
1
0011
0001
XOR
0
0011
0000
XOR
R
0101
0010
:
0
0011
0000
XOR
1
0011
0001
0101
1000
Calculation result
Conversion
to ASCII
0101
0011
0011
5
1000
8
FCS
3-4-1
FCS Calculation Program Example
The following program is an example of how Frame Checksum calculations can
be performed on received data. For an example of a program to calculate the
FCS for Transmit Data, refer to 3-2-4 System Checks.
Transmit/receive data
Number of characters in FCS calculation range.
Receive data contains an FCS, delimiter,
terminator, etc. The ABORT command,
however, does not contain an FCS.
FCS calculation result
Receive FCS data
A space follows the semicolon if the
FCS reception is performed normally. If
it is not performed, ERR is displayed.
Note: in this example, CR (CHR$(13))
is not included in RESPONSE$.
71
SECTION 4
Commands and Responses
This section provides the command and response formats for all of the instructions covered by this manual. A table of the
responses produced for different errors is included in 4-45 Response Code List. Examples of communications between a Host
Link Unit and PC, for several commands, are given at the end of the 4-46 Communications Examples. The levels at which the
commands are applicable are given in table form in 3-1 Command Levels.
4-1
4-2
4-3
4-4
4-5
4-6
4-7
4-8
4-9
4-10
4-11
4-12
4-13
4-14
4-15
4-16
4-17
4-18
4-19
4-20
4-21
4-22
4-23
4-24
4-25
4-26
4-27
4-28
4-29
4-30
4-31
4-32
4-33
4-34
4-35
4-36
4-37
4-38
4-39
4-40
4-41
4-42
4-43
4-44
4-45
4-46
TEST . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
STATUS READ . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
ERROR READ . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
IR AREA READ . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
HR AREA READ . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
AR AREA READ . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
LR AREA READ . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
TC STATUS READ . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
DM AREA READ . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
FM INDEX READ . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
FM DATA READ . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
PV READ . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
SV READ 1 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
SV READ 2 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
SV READ 3 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
STATUS WRITE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
IR AREA WRITE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
HR AREA WRITE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
AR AREA WRITE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
LR AREA WRITE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
TC STATUS WRITE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
DM AREA WRITE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
FM AREA WRITE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
PV WRITE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
SV CHANGE 1 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
SV CHANGE 2 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
SV CHANGE 3 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
FORCED SET . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
FORCED RESET . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
MULTIPLE FORCED SET/RESET . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
MULTIPLE FORCED SET/RESET STATUS READ . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
FORCED SET/RESET CANCEL . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
PC MODEL READ . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
DM HIGH-SPEED READ . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
ABORT and INITIALIZE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
TRANSMIT (C200HS/HX/HG/HE only) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Response to an Undefined Command . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Response Indicating an Unprocessed Command . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
PROGRAM READ . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
I/O TABLE READ . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
PROGRAM WRITE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
I/O TABLE GENERATE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
I/O REGISTER . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
I/O READ . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Response Code List . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Communications Examples . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
73
Section 4-2
STATUS READ
4-1
TEST
Transmits one block of data to the PC and then returns it, unaltered, to the host
computer. Each frame is treated as a block regardless of whether it uses a terminator or delimiter.
Command Format
@
Unit no.
X101
T
S
Any characters (122 max.) other than a carriage return
FCS
*
CR
Any characters (122 max.) other than a carriage return
FCS
*
CR
X100
Response Format
@
Unit no.
X101
T
S
X100
Response if Error Occurs
@
Unit no.
X101
4-2
T
S
X100
Response
code
X161 X160
*
CR
*
CR
STATUS READ
Reads the operating status of the PC.
Command Format
@
Unit no.
X101
M
S
FCS
X100
Response Format
@
Unit no.
X101 X100
M
15
S
14
13
Response
code
X161 X160 X163
12
11
10
9
Status data
X162 X161 X160
Fixed to 16 characters
Duplex System
Active: 1
Standby: 0
1: Error diagnosis in progress
*2
1: FORCED SET/RESET in progress
74
0
0
1
1
0:
1:
0:
1:
*
15
7
1: Start switch is OFF
*1. Only possible for the C2000H
*2. Not possible for the C200H/HS/HX/HG/HE
FCS
Message
1
8
1: Generation of
FALS instruction
*1
1: Duplex
0: Simplex
1: Remote I/O waiting for power application
0
PROGRAM mode
None
RUN mode
MONITOR mode
6
5
4
2
1
0
Not used
*1
Program area
size
None: 0
8 kbytes: 0
16 kbytes: 0
24 kbytes: 0
32 kbytes: 1
48 kbytes: 1
64 kbytes: 1
3
0
0
1
1
0
0
1
0
1
0
1
0
1
0
Program
area
RAM: 1
ROM: 0
CR
Section 4-3
ERROR READ
4-3
ERROR READ
Reads and clears errors in the PC. Also checks whether previous errors have
already been cleared. When both Rack- and CPU-mounting Host Link Units are
used in combination, errors in either type of Unit are indicated in the same manner.
Command Format
@
Unit no.
X101
M
X100
F
Error clear
X101 X100
FCS
CR
*
00: Error is not
cleared
01: Error is cleared
Response Format
@
M
Unit no.
X101 X100
FCS
Response
code
X161 X160
F
Error (second word)
Error (first word)
X163
X162
X161
X160 X163
X162
X161
X160
CR
*
15
14
13
12
11
10
9
FAL, FALS No
8
7
6
5
4
3
2
1
0
1: FALS (CPU stops)
1: END instruction missing (F0)
X161
1: Program error (F3)
1: Host Link Unit transmission error
X160
00
1: RTI instruction error (F4)
$00
1: PC link error
~ 99
~ $99
1: I/O bus error (C0 to 4)
15
1: JMP instruction error (F2)
14
13
12
11
10
9
8
1: Memory error (F1)
7
6
5
4
3
2
1
1: I/O verify error (F7)
0
1: cycle time over (F8)
1: FAL error
1: Duplex bus error
(C2000H only)
Intelligent I/O unit error
(C200H/HS only)
1: Battery failure (F7)
(Data from I/O bus)
0 0: Group 1 (control signal error)
0 1: Group 2 (data bus failure)
1 0: Group 3 (address bus failure)
1: I/O Unit over (E1)
1: I/O setting error (E0)
0
0
0
0
1
1
1
1
0
0
1
1
0
0
1
1
0:
1:
0:
1:
0:
1:
0:
1:
CPU Rack
Expansion I/O Rack 1
Expansion I/O Rack 2
Expansion I/O Rack 3
Expansion I/O Rack 4
Expansion I/O Rack 5
Expansion I/O Rack 6
Expansion I/O Rack 7
1: Remote I/O error
(B0 to 3)
(C1000H, C2000H
only)
75
Section 4-6
AR AREA READ
4-4
IR AREA READ
Reads the contents of the specified number of IR area words, starting from the
specified word.
Command Format
@
Unit no.
X101
R
R
Beginning word
X103
X100
X102
X101
X100
No. of words
X103
X102 X101
FCS
X100
*
CR
Response Format
@
Unit no.
X101
R
*
CR
X100
FCS
4-5
Response
code
X161 X160
R
Data from beginning
Data from second
word
word
X163 X162 X161 X160 X163 X162 X161 X160
HR AREA READ
Reads the contents of the specified number of HR area words, starting from the
specified word.
Command Format
@
Unit no.
X101
R
H
Beginning word
X103
X100
X102
X101
No. of words
X100
X103
X102 X101
FCS
X100
*
CR
Response Format
@
Unit no.
X101
H
*
CR
X100
FCS
4-6
R
Response
Data from beginning
Data from second
code
word
word
X161 X160 X163 X162 X161 X160 X163 X162 X161 X160
AR AREA READ
Reads the contents of the specified number of AR area words, starting from the
specified word.
Command Format
@
Unit no.
X101
76
X100
R
J
Beginning word
X103
X102 X101
No. of words
X100 X103
X102 X101
FCS
X100
*
CR
Section 4-8
TC STATUS READ
Response Format
Unit no.
@
X101
J
*
CR
X100
FCS
4-7
Response
Data from
Data from second
code
beginning word
word
X161 X160 X163 X162 X161 X160 X163 X162 X161 X160
R
LR AREA READ
Reads the contents of the specified number of LR area words, starting from the
specified word.
Command Format
@
Unit no.
X101
R
L
Beginning word
X103
X100
X102
X101
No. of words
X100
X103
X102 X101
FCS
X100
*
CR
Response Format
Unit no.
@
X101
L
*
CR
X100
FCS
4-8
Response
Data from
Data from second
code
beginning word
word
X161 X160 X163 X162 X161 X160 X163 X162 X161 X160
R
TC STATUS READ
Reads the status of the Completion Flags of the specified number of timers/
counters, starting from the specified timer/counter.
Command Format
@
Unit no.
X101
R
G
X100
Beginning
timer/counter
X103 X102 X101
X100 X103
No. of
timers/counters
X102 X101 X100
FCS
*
CR
Response Format
@
Unit no.
X101
X100
R
G
Response
code
X161 X160
ON/
OFF
ON/
OFF
FCS
*
CR
Data from second timer/counter
Data from beginning timer/counter
77
Section 4-10
FM INDEX READ
4-9
DM AREA READ
Reads the contents of the specified number of DM words, starting from the specified word.
Command Format
@
Unit no.
X101
R
D
Beginning word
X100
X103
X102 X101
No. of words
X100 X103
X102 X101
X100
*
FCS
CR
Response Format
@
Unit no.
X101
D
*
CR
X100
FCS
4-10
Response
code
X161 X160
R
Data from beginning
Data from second
word
word
X163 X162 X161 X160 X163 X162 X161 X160
FM INDEX READ
Reads the contents of the specified number of FM index blocks, starting from the
specified block.
Command Format
@
Unit no.
X101
R
X
Beginning block
X103
X100
X102
No. of blocks
X101
X100
X103
X102 X101
*
FCS
X100
CR
Response Format
@
Unit no.
X101 X100
R
Memory
Response
Number of unused
Total number of
type
code
blocks
blocks
X161 X160 X103 X102 X101 X100 X103 X102 X101 X100
X160
X
Repeated for each block
Data
Comments
type
No. per block
X161 X160 X161 X160
*
FCS
CR
X161
If applicable
7
6
5
X160
4
1: Write
protected
0: Not write
protected
1: END block
of PC program
78
0: All RAM
1: First half: RAM
Last half: EEPROM
3
2
1
0
0
0
0
1
1
1
1
0
0
1
1
0
0
1
1
0
0
1
0
1
0
1
0
1
...
...
...
...
No data stored
I/O data
PC program
Comments
. . Undefined
Section 4-12
PV READ
4-11
FM DATA READ
Reads the contents of the specified number of FM blocks, starting from the specified block. The “data type” and “comments per block” information can be added to each block, separated by a delineator, i.e., a comma (,).
Command Format
@
Unit no.
X101
R
F
Beginning block
X103
X100
X102 X101
No. of unused
blocks
X100 X103 X102 X101
*
FCS
X100
CR
Response Format
Repeated for each block
@
Unit no.
X101 X100
R
Comments
Memory Data type
Response
Number of blocks
per block
type
code
X161 X160 X103 X102 X101 X100
X160 X161 X160 X161 X160
F
No. of blocks: 0000, 1000, 2000
If applicable
0: All RAM
1: First half: RAM
Last half: EEPROM
X161
7
6
5
X160
4
3
1: Wrote
protected
0: Not write
protected
1: END block
of PC program
2
1
0
0
0
0
1
1
1
1
0
0
1
1
0
0
1
1
0
0
1
0
1
0
1
0
1
...
...
...
...
No data stored
I/O data
PC program
Comments
. . Undefined
Repeated for each block
Read data
X163 X162 X161
Read data
X163 X162 X161
X160
X160
,
Comments
per block
Read data
X160 X161 X160 X163 X162 X161
Data type
X161
X160
Delineator
(end of
data block)
X163
Read data
X162 X161
,
X160
FCS
*
CR
Delineator
(end of
data block)
4-12
PV READ
Reads the specified number of timer/counter PVs (present values), starting from
the specified timer/counter.
Command Format
@
Unit no.
X101
X100
R
C
X103
Beginning
timer/counter
X102 X101 X100 X103
No. of
timers/counters
X102 X101 X100
FCS
*
CR
79
Section 4-13
SV READ 1
Response Format
@
Unit no.
X101
FCS
4-13
R
C
*
CR
Response
Data from beginning
Data from second
code
timer/counter
timer/counter
1
0
3
2
1
0
3
X16
X16 X10
X10 X10
X10 X10
X102 X101 X100
X100
SV READ 1
Reads the set value (a constant) of the specified timer/counter instruction.
Reads from the beginning of the program and can therefore take up to 20 seconds to produce a response. Refer also to 4-14 SV READ 2 and 4-15 SV READ
3.
Command Format
@
Unit no.
X101
R
TIM/CNT
#
X100
Word address
OP1
OP2
OP3
OP4
OR1
T
T
C
C
T
T
C
T
T
I
I
N
N
M
I
N
M
T
M
M
T
T
S
M
T
H
I
–
H
–
R
–
W
W
W
M
0
0
0
0
OR2 OR3
0
to
1
0
to
5
FCS
*
OR4
0
0
2
0
7
0
1
1
CR
Note 1. Dashes represent spaces.
2. The data in the brackets apply to the C200H, C200HS, C200HX, C200HG,
C200HE, C1000H, and C2000H.
Response Format
@
Unit no.
X101
X100
R
#
Response
Set value
code
X161 X160 X103 X102 X101
FCS
X100
*
CR
If the command is used more than once, the set value of only the first instruction
will be read.
80
Section 4-14
SV READ 2
4-14
SV READ 2
Reads the set value (a constant, or data area and word) of the specified timer/
counter instruction. The timer/counter instruction is designated by its program
address. If the program has more than 9,999 addresses, use SV READ 3, described in the next section.
Command Format
@
R
Unit no.
X101 X100
FCS
$
Address
X103
X102
X101
CR
*
Word address
TIM/CNT
X100
OP1
OP2
OP3
OP4
X103
T
T
C
C
T
T
C
T
T
I
I
N
N
M
I
N
M
T
M
M
T
T
S
M
T
H
I
–
H
–
R
–
W
W
W
M
0
X102 X101 X100
0
0
0
0
to
1
0
to
5
0
0
2
0
7
0
1
1
Note 1. Dashes represent spaces.
2. The data in the brackets apply to the C200H, C200HS, C200HX, C200HG,
C200HE, C1000H, and C2000H.
Response Format
@
Unit no.
X101
FCS
R
$
X100
*
CR
Response
code
X161 X160 OP1
Data area
OP2 OP3
OP4
X103
Set value
X102 X101 X101
C
I
O
– . . . . IR area
L
R
–
– . . . . LR area
H
R
–
– . . . . HR area
A
R
–
– . . . . AR area
D
M
–
– . . . . DM area
D
M
:
– . . . . :DM area
C
O
N
– . . . . Constant
Note: Dashes represent spaces.
81
Section 4-15
SV READ 3
4-15
SV READ 3
Reads the set value (a constant, or data area and word) of the specified timer/
counter instruction. The operation is similar to SV READ 2, but the SV READ 3 is
capable of reading from higher program addresses (up to 6 digits).
Command Format
@
R
Unit no.
X101 X100
Address
%
X105
X104 X103
TIM/CNT
X102 X101
X100 OP1
OP2
OP3
T
T
C
C
T
T
C
T
T
I
I
N
N
M
I
N
M
T
M
M
T
T
S
M
T
H
I
Always 0
Word address
X103
0
0
0
0
X102 X101
0
to
1
0
to
5
FCS
X100
0
0
2
0
7
0
1
1
*
CR
OP4
–
H
–
R
–
W
W
W
M
Note 1. Dashes represent spaces.
2. The data in the brackets apply to the C200H, C200HS, C200HX, C200HG,
C200HE, C1000H, and C2000H.
Response Format
@
Unit no.
X101 X100
FCS
82
R
*
%
CR
Response
code
X161 X160 OP1
Set value
Data area
OP2 OP3
OP4
X103
X102 X101
C
I
O
– . . . . IR area
L
R
–
– . . . . LR area
H
R
–
– . . . . HR area
A
R
–
– . . . . AR area
D
M
–
– . . . . DM area
D
M
:
– . . . . :DM area
C
O
N
– . . . . Constant
Note: Dashes represent spaces.
X101
Section 4-17
IR AREA WRITE
4-16
STATUS WRITE
Changes the operating mode of the PC according to the information entered into
word X160.
Command Format
@
S
Unit no.
X101 X100
C
Mode data
X161
*
FCS
X160
X161
CR
X162
7
6
5
4
3
2
0
0
0
0
0
0
1
0
1
1
0
0: PROGRAM mode
0: MONITOR mode
1: RUN mode
Response Format
@
Unit no.
X101
4-17
S
C
X100
Response
code
X161 X160
FCS
*
CR
IR AREA WRITE
Writes data to the IR area, starting from the specified word. Writing is done word
by word.
Command Format
@
Unit no.
X101
W
X103
X100
FCS
Beginning word
R
*
X102 X101
Data for beginning
Data for second
word
word
X100 X163 X162 X161 X160 X163 X162 X161 X160
CR
Response Format
@
Unit no.
X101 X100
W
R
Response
code
X161 X160
FCS
*
CR
83
Section 4-20
LR AREA WRITE
4-18
HR AREA WRITE
Writes data to the HR area, starting from the specified word. Writing is done word
by word.
Command Format
@
Unit no.
X101
W
X103
X100
*
FCS
Beginning word
H
X102 X101
Data for beginning
Data for second
word
word
X100 X163 X162 X161 X160 X163 X162 X161 X160
CR
Response Format
@
Unit no.
X101
4-19
W
H
X100
Response
code
X161 X160
FCS
*
CR
AR AREA WRITE
Writes data to the AR area, starting from the specified word. Writing is done word
by word.
Command Format
@
Unit no.
X101
W
X103
X100
*
FCS
Beginning word
J
X102 X101
Data for beginning
Data for second
word
word
X100 X163 X162 X161 X160 X163 X162 X161 X160
CR
Response Format
@
Unit no.
X101
4-20
X100
W
J
Response
code
X161 X160
FCS
*
CR
LR AREA WRITE
Writes data to the LR area, starting from the specified word. Writing is done word
by word.
Command Format
@
Unit no.
X101
FCS
84
W
Beginning word
L
X103
X100
*
CR
X102 X101
Data for beginning
Data for second
word
word
X100 X163 X162 X161 X160 X163 X162 X161 X160
Section 4-22
DM AREA WRITE
Response Format
@
X101
4-21
W
Unit no.
L
X100
Response
code
X161 X160
*
FCS
CR
TC STATUS WRITE
Writes the status of the Completion Flags to the TC area, starting form the specified timer/counter.
Command Format
@
Unit no.
X101 X100
W
Timer/Counter
G
X103
X102
X101
X100
ON/
OFF
ON/
OFF
FCS
CR
*
Status of second timer/counter
Status of beginning timer/counter
Beginning timer/counter
0: OFF
1: ON
Response Format
@
4-22
Unit no.
X101 X100
W
G
Response
code
X161 X160
FCS
*
CR
DM AREA WRITE
Writes data to the DM area, starting from the specified word. Writing is done
word by word. If the Program Memory is in an EPROM chip, or if the write enable
switch is set to OFF, the the writing range extends up to DM 0999 only.
Command Format
@
Unit no.
X101
W
X103
X100
FCS
Beginning word
D
*
X102 X101
Data for beginning
Data for second
word
word
X100 X163 X162 X161 X160 X163 X162 X161 X160
CR
Response Format
@
Unit no.
X101
X100
W
D
Response
code
X161 X160
FCS
*
CR
85
Section 4-24
PV WRITE
4-23
FM AREA WRITE
Writes data to a single specified word, or to an entire file memory block.
Command Format
@
Unit no.
X101
W
Number of blocks
F
X103
X100
X102 X101
Comments
Beginning byte
per block
0
1
0
3
X16 X16
X16 X10
X102 X101 X100
Data type
X100 X161
Only even numbers can be specified
(Multiply the number of the beginning
word by two)
0000 to 1999
If applicable
7
6
5
4
3
1: END block *
Write data
X162 X161
X163
X160
1
0
0
1
1
1....I/O data
0....PC program
1....Comments
0
0
0
*The END block of the PC
program, or the last block.
X163
2
Write data
X162 X161
X160
Unit no.
W
FCS
*
CR
Writes a single word, or a full block per command execution.
Response Format
@
X101
4-24
F
X100
Response
code
X161 X160
FCS
*
CR
PV WRITE
Writes PVs (present values) of timers/counters, starting from the specified timer/
counter.
Command Format
@
Unit no.
X101
W
X103
X100
FCS
Beginning word
C
*
X102 X101
Data for beginning
Data for second
word
word
X100 X103 X102 X101 X100 X103 X102 X101 X100
CR
Response Format
@
86
Unit no.
X101 X100
W
C
Response
code
X161 X160
FCS
*
CR
Section 4-25
SV CHANGE 1
4-25
SV CHANGE 1
Changes the set value (constant only) of the specified timer/counter instruction.
Reads from the beginning of the program and therefore take up to 20 seconds to
produce a response. Refer also to 4-26 SV CHANGE 2 and 4-27 SV CHANGE 3.
Command Format
@
Unit no.
W
X101 X100
#
OP2 OP3
T
T
C
C
T
T
C
T
T
I
I
N
N
M
I
N
M
T
Set value
Word address
TIM/CNT
OP1
OP4 OR1
M
M
T
T
S
M
T
H
I
–
H
–
R
–
W
W
W
M
0
0
0
0
OR2 OR3
0
to
1
0
to
5
FCS
OR4 X103 X102 X101 X100
0
0
0
2
0
7
0
9
1
1
0
to
9
0
0
9
9
*
CR
Note 1. Dashes represent spaces.
2. The data in the brackets apply to the C200H, C200HS, C200HX, C200HG,
C200HE, C1000H, and C2000H.
Response Format
@
Unit no.
X101 X100
W
#
Response
code
X161 X160
FCS
*
CR
87
Section 4-26
SV CHANGE 2
4-26
SV CHANGE 2
Changes the set value (a constant, or data area and word) of the specified timer/
counter instruction. The instruction is specified by its program address. If the
program has more than 9,999 addresses, use SV CHANGE 3, described in the
next subsection.
Command Format
@
Unit no.
X101 X100
W
Address
$
X103
X102
X101
TIM/CNT
X100
OP1
T
T
C
C
T
T
C
T
T
Word address
OP2 OP3
I
I
N
N
M
I
N
M
T
M
M
T
T
S
M
T
H
I
OP4
X103
–
H
–
R
–
W
W
W
M
0
0
0
0
X102 X101
0
to
1
0
to
5
X100
0
0
2
0
7
0
1
1
Note 1. Dashes represent spaces.
2. The data in the brackets apply to the C200H, C200HS, C200HX, C200HG,
C200HE, C1000H, and C2000H.
Set value
Data area
OP1
OP2 OP3
OP4
X103
X102 X101
*
FCS
X100
CR
C
I
O
– . . . . IR area
L
R
–
– . . . . LR area
H
R
–
– . . . . HR area
A
R
–
– . . . . AR area
D
M
–
– . . . . DM area
D
M
:
– . . . . :DM area
C
O
N
– . . . . Constant
Note: Dashes represent spaces.
Response Format
@
88
Unit no.
X101 X100
W
$
Response
code
X161 X160
FCS
*
CR
Section 4-27
SV CHANGE 3
4-27
SV CHANGE 3
Changes the set value (a constant, or data area and word) of the specified instruction. The operation is similar to SV CHANGE 2, but SV CHANGE 3 can
change SVs at higher program addresses (up to 5 digits, note that the leftmost,
i.e., the sixth, address bit is always zero).
Command Format
@
Unit no.
X101 X100
W
Address
%
X105
X104
X103
X102
TIM/CNT
X101
X100
Always 0
0
0
0
0
X102 X101
X100 OP1
0
to
1
0
to
5
0
0
2
0
7
0
1
1
C
L
H
A
D
D
C
OP2 OP3
OP4
T
I
M
–
T
I
M
H
C
N
T
–
C
N
T
R
T
M
S
–
T
I
M
W
C
N
T
W
T
M
H
W
T
T
I
M
Note: Dashes represent spaces.
Data area
Number
X103
OP1
Set value
OP2 OP3
OP4
I
R
R
R
M
M
O
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
O
–
–
–
–
:
N
X103
X102 X101
FCS
X100
*
CR
. . . . IR area
. . . . LR area
. . . . HR area
. . . . AR area
. . . . DM area
. . . . :DM area
. . . . Constant
Note 1. Dashes represent spaces.
2. The data in the brackets apply to the C200H, C200HS, C200HX, C200HG,
C200HE, C1000H, and C2000H.
Response Format
@
Unit no.
X101 X100
W
%
Response
code
X161 X160
FCS
*
CR
89
Section 4-29
FORCED RESET
4-28
FORCED SET
Forced sets a bit in an IR, LR, HR, AR, or TC area. Bits need to be force set one at
a time.
Command Format
@
Unit no.
X101 X100
K
Data area
S
OP1
OP2 OP3
Word
OP4
X103
X102 X101
Bit
X100 X101
FCS
X100
*
CR
C
I
O
–...IR area
L
R
–
–...LR area
H
R
–
–...HR area
A
R
–
–...AR area
T
I
M
–
T
I
M
H
C
N
T
–
C
N
T
R
TC area
T
M
S
–
T
I
M
W
C
N
T
W
T
M
H
W
T
T
I
M
Note: Dashes represent spaces.
Response Format
@
Unit no.
X101
4-29
K
S
X100
Response
code
X161 X160
FCS
*
CR
FORCED RESET
Force resets a bit in an IR, LR, HR, AR, or TC area. Bits can only be force reset
one at a time. If an attempt is made to simultaneously force reset more than one
bit, none of the bits will reset.
Command Format
@
Unit
Unit no.
no.
X101 X100
K
Data area
R
OP1
OP2
OP3
Word
OP4
X103
X102 X101
C
I
O
–...IR area
L
R
–
–...LR area
H
R
–
–...HR area
A
R
–
–...AR area
T
I
M
–
T
I
M
H
C
N
T
–
C
N
T
R
T
M
S
–
TC area
T
I
M
W
C
N
T
W
T
M
H
W
T
T
I
M
Note: Dashes represent spaces.
90
Bit
X100 X101
FCS
X100
*
CR
Section 4-30
MULTIPLE FORCED SET/RESET
87Response Format
@
X101
4-30
K
Unit no.
Response
code
X161 X160
R
X100
*
FCS
CR
MULTIPLE FORCED SET/RESET
(C200H, C200HS, C200HX, C200HG, C200HE, and Mini H-type only.) This
command force sets or resets bits in the IR, LR, HR, AR, or TC areas.
Command Format
@
Unit no.
X101 X100
F
Data area
K
OP1
Word
OP2 OP3
OP4
X103
X102
Forced set/reset/data clear
X101
X100
X160
Bit 15
X160 X160
14
13
X160
12
C
I
O
– . . . . IR area
L
R
–
– . . . . LR area
H
R
–
– . . . . HR area
A
R
–
– . . . . AR area
T
I
M
–
T
I
M
H
TC area
C
N
T
–
C
N
T
R
T
T
I
M
Note: Dashes represent spaces.
FCS
...
X160 X160
X160
2
0
1
*
3
0
0
0
0
0
1
CR
2
1
0
0
0
1
1
0
0
1
1
0
0
0
0
0....Ignored
0....Data “0”
1....Data “1”
0....Forced reset
1....Forced set
0....Forced set/reset clear
Response Format
@
Unit no.
X101 X100
F
K
Response
code
X161 X160
FCS
*
CR
91
Section 4-32
FORCED SET/RESET CANCEL
4-31
MULTIPLE FORCED SET/RESET STATUS READ
(C200H, C200HS, C200HX, C200HG, C200HE, and Mini H-type only.) Reads
the forced set or forced reset status of the PC to which the specified Host Link
Unit is mounted. When the operand is a timer/counter instruction (i.e., TIM(SP),
TIMH, CNT(SP), CNTR, or TTIM), only the operands and words being force set/
reset will be read.
Command Format
@
Unit no.
X101
F
R
FCS
CR
*
X100
Response Format
@
F
Unit no.
X101 X100
R
Response
code
X161 X160 0P1
Data area
0P2 0P3
Word
0P4
X103
X102 X101
Forced set/reset status
X100
0/1
Bit 15
C
I
O
–...IR area
L
R
–
–...LR area
H
R
–
–...HR area
A
R
–
–...AR area
T
I
M
–
T
I
M
H
TC area
C
N
T
–
C
N
T
R
T
T
I
M
Note: Dashes represent spaces.
0/1
Bit 1
0/1
,
Data area
0P1 0P2
Word
0/1
0/1
14
13
12
Forced set/reset status
1: Forced set/reset
0: Not forced set/reset
Forced set/reset status
*
FCS
0P3 0P4 X103 X102 X101 X100
CR
0
Delineator
4-32
0/1
Only when applicable
FORCED SET/RESET CANCEL
Cancels all forced set and forced reset bits (including those achieved via MULTIPLE FORCED SET/RESET for the C200H, C200HS, C200HX, C200HG,
C200HE, and Mini H-type).
Command Format
@
Unit no.
X101 X100
K
C
*
FCS
CR
Response Format
@
Unit no.
X101
92
X100
K
C
Response
code
X161 X160
FCS
*
CR
Section 4-34
DM HIGH-SPEED READ
4-33
PC MODEL READ
Reads the model type of the PC.
Command Format
Unit no.
X101 X100
@
M
M
*
FCS
CR
Response Format
@
Unit no.
X101 X100
M
M
Response
PC model
code
code
X161 X160 X161 X160
0
0
0
1
1
1
4-34
1
2
3
0
1
2
FCS
*
CR
C250 or P-type
C500
C120
C1000H
C2000H
C200H/HS/HX/HG/HE
DM HIGH-SPEED READ
(C1000H and C2000H only) Reads a fixed group of eight DM area words at
high-speed. The group of words to be read depends on the Host Link Unit and
the PC as follows:
Host Link Unit
C1000H/C2000H
3G2A5-LK101-(P)EV1
Wd DM 0008 to 0015
3G2A5-LK201-EV1
C500-LK103(-P)
Operating level 0
Wd DM 0008 to 0015
C500-LK203
Operating level 1
Wd DM 0000 to 0007
3G2A6-LK101-(P)EV1
3G2A6-LK201-EV1
3G2A6-LK202-EV1
Wd DM 0016 to 0023
Command Format
@
Unit no.
X101
X100
C
R
FCS
*
CR
Response Format
@
Unit no.
X101
C
R
X100
Data from word n+7
X163
X162 X161
X160
Response
Data from word n
Data from word n+1
code
X161 X160 X163 X162 X161 X160 X163 X162 X161 X160
FCS
*
CR
Word n: Fixed beginning word
Response time is not affected by the operating mode of the PC or the cycle time.
The response transmission begins less than 10 ms after the reception of the
command.
93
Section 4-37
Response to an Undefined Command
4-35
ABORT and INITIALIZE
The ABORT command is used to abort the process being performed by the Host
Link Unit and to then enable reception of the next command. The INITIALIZE
command initializes the transmission control procedure of all the PCs connected to the host computer. Neither command receives a response.
A processing time of 100 ms is required between reception of the ABORT or INITIALIZE commands, and reception of the next command. If INITIALIZE is used
in a single-link system, it will be regarded as undefined.
ABORT Command Format
@
Unit no.
X101 X100
X
Z
*
FCS
CR
INITIALIZE Command Format
*
@
4-36
*
CR
TRANSMIT (C200HS/HX/HG/HE only)
The Host Link Unit will transmit the specified data sent from the PC via the TXD
(––) instruction in ASCII format. When the (TXD(––) instruction is executed in
the ladder diagram, data is transmitted to the host computer in the following format. Refer to the C200HS Operation Manual or C200HX/HG/HE Operation
Manual for further details on the TXD (––) instruction.
Response Format
@
Unit no.
X101
E
X
Data
*
FCS
X100
CR
Data (122 ASCII characters max.)
The data (61 bits maximum) specified in the operands of the TXD (––) instruction
is converted into ASCII (122 characters maximum) and transmitted. There will
be no response required from the host computer for TXD (––) instruction.
4-37
Response to an Undefined Command
This response is sent if the Host Link Unit cannot read the command’s header
code, or if the specified command is not valid for the command level or model of
PC. If this response is received check the header code, command level, and PC
model, then execute the correct command.
Response Format
@
94
Unit no.
X101 X100
I
C
FCS
*
CR
Section 4-40
I/O TABLE READ
4-38
Response Indicating an Unprocessed Command
This response is sent when the Host Link Unit cannot process a command. The
type of error encountered by the Host Link Unit can be identified via the response
code.
Response Format
@
Response
Header code
Unit no.
code
X161 X160
X101 X100
*
FCS
CR
The header code varies according to the command which was sent. The headers of some commands include subheader codes (e.g., I/O REGISTER, I/O
READ, and DM SIZE CHANGE).
4-39
PROGRAM READ
Transmits the contents of the PC program memory.
Command Format
@
Unit no.
X101 X100
R
P
*
FCS
CR
Response Format
@
Unit no.
X101 X100
R
P
Response
code
X161 X160 X161
Program
X160
X161
*
FCS
X160
CR
Memory size
4-40
I/O TABLE READ
Reads the registered I/O table and the actual I/O table (i.e., the I/O Unit configuration connected to the PC).
Command Format
@
Unit no.
X101 X100
R
I
*
FCS
CR
Response Format
@
Unit no.
X101
X100
R
I
Response
Registered
code
I/O table
X161 X160 X161 X160
Registered I/O table
C1000H/C2000H, C200H:
All others:
930
336
Actual I/O table
X161
FCS
X160
*
CR
Actual I/O table
1408 characters
358
95
Section 4-42
I/O TABLE GENERATE
4-41
PROGRAM WRITE
Writes the received program into the PC program memory.
Command Format
@
Unit no.
X101
W
P
Program
X161
X100
X160
X161
FCS
X160
*
CR
Up to maximum memory capacity
Response Format
@
4-42
Unit no.
X101 X100
W
P
Response
code
X161 X160
FCS
*
CR
I/O TABLE GENERATE
Corrects the registered I/O table to match the actual I/O table.
Command Format
Applicable only to C1000H,C2000H
@
Unit no.
X101 X100
M
I
Remote
0
Rack
No.
Remote
1
Rack
No.
Remote
2
Rack
No.
Remote
3
Rack
No.
Remote
4
Rack
No.
Remote
5
Rack
No.
Remote
6
Rack
No.
Remote
7
Rack
No.
FCS
*
CR
0 to 3 0 to 3 0 to 3 0 to 3 0 to 3 0 to 3 0 to 3 0 to 3
Rack number
Note When the Rack number is to remain unspecified, assign an ASCII character other than 0 to 3 to it.
Response Format
@
Unit no.
X101
96
X100
M
I
Response
code
X161 X160
FCS
*
CR
Section 4-43
I/O REGISTER
4-43
I/O REGISTER
Registers the IR, LR, HR, AR, or TC area bit, or the DM word that is to be read via
I/O READ (described in the next subsection). Registered data is retained until
new data is registered, or the power is turned OFF.
Command Format
@
Unit no.
X101
Q
Q
M
OP1
Subheader
code
Data area
,
OP1
Data area
R
X100
OP2 OP3
OP2 OP3
C
L
H
A
T
T
C
C
T
T
C
T
T
D
I
R
R
R
I
I
N
N
M
I
N
M
T
M
O
–
–
–
M
M
T
T
S
M
T
H
I
–
Word
OP4
X103
Word
OP4
X103
X101
Operand
X100
–....IR area
–....LR area
–...HR area
–....AR area
–
H
–
R
TC area
–
W
W
W
M
–....DM area
Operand
X102 X101
X102
X100 OR1
OR1
OR2
,
Delineator
FCS
OR2
*
0
0
:
0
1
:
1
5
C
H
Bit no.
Word
setting
CR
Delineator
Setting Table
Data Area
Bit
Wd
Word
Operand
Response
IR
0000 to max. Wd
00 to 15
ON/OFF status of specified bit
LR
0000 to max. Wd
00 to 15
ON/OFF status of specified bit
HR
0000 to max. Wd
00 to 15
ON/OFF status of specified bit
AR
0000 to max. Wd
00 to 15
ON/OFF status of specified bit
TIM/CNT
0000 to max. Wd
Anything other than “CH”
ON/OFF status of specified bit
IR
0000 to max. Wd
“CH”
Word contents
LR
0000 to max. Wd
“CH”
Word contents
HR
0000 to max. Wd
“CH”
Word contents
AR
0000 to max. Wd
“CH”
Word contents
TIM/CNT
0000 to max. Wd
“CH”
ON/OFF status of Completion Flag and PV
DM
0000 to max. Wd
Any characters
Word contents
The maximum number of data items for the C120 and C500 PCs is 140; and for
the C200H, C200HS, C200HX, C200HG, C200HE, C1000H, C2000H PCs the
maximum is 128. However, the C200H, C200HS, C200HX, C200HG, C200HE,
C1000H, C2000H PCs count the TC area word specification as two items.
The data is registered in the same sequence in which it was specified.
97
Section 4-44
I/O READ
Response Format
@
Unit no.
X101 X100
Q
Q
M
Response
code
X161 X160
R
*
FCS
Subheader
code
4-44
I/O READ
Reads the data specified by I/O REGISTER.
Command Format
@
Unit no.
X101 X100
Q
Q
I
R
*
FCS
CR
Subheader code
Response Format
@
Unit no.
X101 X100
Q
Q
I
R
Response ON/
code
OFF
X161 X160
Subheader code
,
ON/
OFF
,
Read bit status
0: OFF
1: ON
98
Present value
X103
X102 X101
For TIM/CNT status read
,
Read word data
X163
X162 X161
FCS
X160
X100
,
Delineator
*
CR
CR
Section 4-45
Response Code List
4-45
Response Code List
A response code is returned with each response to a command to indicate the
results of executing the command. A response code of 00 indicates that the
command was completed normally. All other response codes indicate errors that
prevented proper command execution and tell something about the cause of the
error.
x161
x160
0
0
Command completed normally.
0
1
Execution was not possible because the PC is in RUN mode. Change the PC mode.
0
2
Execution was not possible because the PC is in MONITOR mode. Change the PC mode.
0
3
Execution was not possible because PROM is mounted. Change the unit to RAM or EEPROM.
0
4
Address overflow (data overflow). Check the program.
0
B
Execution was not possible because the PC is in PROGRAM mode. Change the PC mode.
0
C
Execution was not possible because the PC is in DEBUG mode. Change the PC mode.
0
D
Execution was not possible because the Host Link Unit’s keyswitch is set to LOCAL mode or because the
command was sent to a C2000H CPU that was on standby. Change the mode or send the command to
the active CPU.
1
0
Parity error.
1
1
Framing error (stop bit(s) not detected).
1
2
Overrun (the next command was received too soon).
1
3
FCS error (checksum error).
1
4
Command format error.
1
5
An incorrect data area designation was made for READ or WRITE.
1
6
Instruction not found.
1
8
Frame length error (maximum length exceeded).
1
9
Execution was not possible because of an unexecutable error clear, memory error, EEPROM write disabled, etc.
2
0
I/O table generation was not possible (unrecognized Remote I/O Unit, word overflow, duplicated word
allocation).
2
1
An error occurred in the PC’s CPU.
2
2
The specified Memory Unit does not exist.
2
3
The specified Memory Unit is write-protected.
A
0
Aborted due to parity error in transmit data.
A
1
Aborted due to framing error in transmit data.
A
2
Aborted due to overrun in transmit data.
A
3
Aborted due to FCS (checksum) error in transmit data.
A
4
Aborted due to format error in transmit data.
A
5
Aborted due to entry number data error in transmit data.
A
8
Aborted due to frame length error in transmit data.
B
0
Not executable because the program area is not 16 kbytes.
Other
Description
Remove any possible causes of noise and resend the command.
99
Section 4-46
Communications Examples
4-46
Communications Examples
The following are examples of commands from the host computer (first line) and
the responses that would be given by the Host Link Unit (second line). The arrows indicate the transfer of the right to transmit.
Reading Data from Multiple PC Words (Wd IR 04 to 06) (Normal Completion)
@
1 0
R
R
0
0
0
4
0
0
0
3
4
6
CR
*
FCS
@
1 0
R
R
0
0
F
E
D
C
B
Data in Wd 04
A
9
8
7
6
5
4
4
Data in Wd 05 Data in Wd 06
7
*
FCS
Wd 9000 Specified by Mistake in a DM AREA WRITE Command
@
1 0
W D
9
0
0
0
A
B
C
D
5
F
*
CR
FCS
@
1 0
W D
1
5
5
6
*
CR
FCS
Header Code Destroyed During ERROR READ Operation
@
1 0
(M)(F)
* CR
(Communication Error)
@
1 0
I
C
4
B
FCS
100
*
CR
CR
Section 4-46
Communications Examples
Writing Data into PC Words (“0123” to Wd DM 400 and “FEDC” to Wd DM 401) and Confirming with
DM AREA READ.
@
1 0
W D
0
4
0
0
0
1
2
3
F
E
D
C
5
2
*
CR
FCS
@
1 0
W D
0
0
5
2
*
CR
*
CR
FCS
@
1 0
R
D
0
4
0
0
0 0
0
2
5
1
*
CR
FCS
@
1 0
R D
0
0
0
1
2
3
F E
D
C
5 3
FCS
101
SECTION 5
Error Processing
This section describes errors that can occur in a computer-linked system employing one or more Host Link Units and how to
remedy them.
5-1
5-2
5-3
5-4
Development of an Error-processing Program . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Error Control . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5-2-1 Invalid Processing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5-2-2 Process Interruption . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5-2-3 Time Monitoring . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5-2-4 Retries . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Example Host Computer Program . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Troubleshooting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
103
Section 5-1
Development of an Error-processing Program
5-1
Development of an Error-processing Program
Errors that occur in Host Link systems are classified into the following three categories:
1, 2, 3... 1.
2.
3.
Errors indicated by the Host Link Unit (see 5-4 Troubleshooting).
Errors processed by the PC (see the Restart and Error Flags sub-section
for each group of models in Section 2 Host Link Unit Characteristics).
Errors processed by the host computer (see 5-2 Error Control, 3-2 Communications Protocol, and all of Section 4 Commands and Responses, especially 4-35 ABORT and INITIALIZE, and 4-45 Response Code List).
Programs to monitor communication times and error handling need to be developed on the host computer. Be sure that these include processes that can respond appropriately to errors and other abnormalities from the PC by taking into
consideration the kinds of errors described in the sections listed above. An example of the logic processes that need to be considered is given in the in the
following flow-chart.
Input command.
Send command.
Start timer.
Response?
N
Y
ERROR?
Time
expired?
Y
Y
N
Tries=m?
Process
response.
Y
Timeout
processing
Next command.
Tries=n?
Y
Error processing
104
N
N
N
Section 5-2
Error Control
5-2
Error Control
The host computer is responsible for ensuring system recovery after errors occur in the Host Link Unit.
The Host Link Unit runs the following checks to detect errors:
1, 2, 3... 1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
Parity check
Framing check
Overrun check
Format check
Entry data check (The start word, read word, etc., in the command format.)
Frame Checksum (An Exclusive OR check is performed on all command or
response data, from the unit number to the end of the text.)
Of the above commands, 1 to 3 are performed on a character by character basis.
Checks 4 to 6, however, are performed on each block (frame).
Transmit data in a multiple-link system is checked by means of a parity check
and a Frame Checksum (FCS). The FCS check is not performed in single-link
systems.
5-2-1
Invalid Processing
If the Host Link Unit detects an error in a single-frame command or the first frame
of a command block, it will regard the command as invalid. The command will not
be processed and, after the terminator is received, an error response will be sent
to the host computer. (For details of the error response, refer to 4-38 Response
Indicating an Unprocessed Command.
5-2-2
Process Interruption
If the Host Link Unit detects an error in an intermediate frame, the commands up
to that point will be processed normally. Those following the erroneous frame,
however, will not be processed. After the Host Link Unit has received the terminator of the erroneous block, it responds with a response code that informs the
host computer of the process interruption. (For details, refer to 4-45 Response
Code List.)
5-2-3
Time Monitoring
If the Host Link Unit does not receive a delimiter or terminator, it cannot send a
response to the host computer. Similarly, if the computer does not receive a delimiter or terminator, it cannot transmit further commands to the Host Link Unit. To
allow transmission to alternate smoothly between the computer and the Host
Link Unit, the process times need to be monitored. It is therefore necessary to
have a time-monitoring program on the host computer side. Its purpose is to initiate remedial action if the right to transmit is not transferred quickly enough.
5-2-4
Retries
An error response will be returned to the originating device if the Host Link Unit
detects any communications line data that has been destroyed (e.g., by noise).
If, however, the Unit number has also been lost, no response will be made at all.
It is therefore necessary to have response monitoring and retry processing in the
host computer to check for error responses.
105
Example Host Computer Program
5-3
Section 5-3
Example Host Computer Program
This example program causes arbitrary data to be written from the host computer to DM 0001. A timer is included to retry transmission if the timer times out. An
error message is displayed after 3 time outs.
• OMRON FC-986 Host Computer
Host Link Unit:
C200H-LK101-PV1/LK201-V1/LK202-V1
3G2A5-LK101-(P)EV1/LK201-EV1/LK103(-P)
C500-LK203
3G2A6-LK101-(P)EV1/LK201-EV1/LK202-EV1
10 OPEN ”CQM1:E37NN” AS #1 . . . . . . . . . . . . . Opens RS-232C
20 NG=0:I=0:CNT=0
30 INPUT ”TEST DATA INPUT-----”;TD$ . . Inputs test data.
40 TC$=”@00WD0001”
50 TC$=TC$+TD$
60 GOSUM *FCSSET . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Calculates FCS.
70 TXD$=T$+FCS$+”*”+CHR$(13)
80 PRINT ”TXD$=”;TXD$
90 PRINT #1,TXD$; . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Transmission
100 IF LOC(1)<>0 GOTO 140 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Determines whether data was received.
110 CNT=CNT+1
120 IF CNT=1000 GOTO 1000 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . The value of CNT determines the timer setting.
130 GOTO 100
140 INPUT #1,RXD$
150 R$=MID$(RXD$,6,2)
160 IF R$<>”00” GOTO 2000 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Determines whether communications were completed normally.
170 PRINT ”RXD$=”;RXD$+”
OK”
180 GOTO 20
1000 REM *****TIME UP*****
1005 CNT=0
1020 ER$(NG)=”TIME UP”
1025 NG=NG+1
1030 IF NG=3 GOTO 3000 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Sets 3 retries.
1040 GOTO 80
2000 REM *****ERROR RESPONSE****
2020 ER$(NG)=RXD$+”
NG”
2025 NG=NG+1
2030 IF NG=3 GOTO 3000 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Sets 3 retries.
2040 GOTO 80
3000 REM *****ERROR MESSAGE*****
3010 PRINT ”AN ERROR OCCURRED”
3020 PRINT ”RXD$–1=”;ER$(0)
3030 PRINT ”RXD$–2=”;ER$(1)
3040 PRINT ”RXD$–3=”;ER$(2)
3050 GOTO 20
4000 REM *****FCS CALCULATION*****
4010 *FCSSET
4020 L=LEN(T$)
4030 A=0
4040 FOR J=1 TO L
4050 TJ$=MID$(T$,J,1)
4060 A=ASC(TJ$) XOR A
4070 NEXT J
4080 FCS$=HEX$(A)
106
Section 5-4
Troubleshooting
4090 IF LEN(FCS$)=1 THEN FCS$=”0”+FCS$
4100 RETURN
5-4
Troubleshooting
The following troubleshooting guide outlines the basic steps for remedying the
errors most likely to occur when using Host Link Units.
Problem
Possible Cause
Remedy
Reference
RUN indicator does not
light. (When power is
applied to the Host
Link Unit, and the reset
is released, the indicator should illuminate.)
Power is not applied to the PC.
Faulty contact in the connector between
the PC and the Host Link Unit.
PC is resetting the Host Link Unit.
Host Link Unit is defective.
Apply power to the PC.
Check and repair connections.
Turn the PC OFF, then ON. If
necessary, check the PC for an error
or abnormal reset.
Replace the Host Link Unit.
RCV indicator does not
blink. (When a signal is
input at the receive
connector, the indicator
should blink regardless
of the nature of the signal.)
No signal is being output form the host
computer.
The signal from the host computer is not
reaching the Host Link Unit.
The indicator circuit is defective.
Check the program and output of the Sections 1
host computer.
and 2
Check the wiring:
• Cable not connected?
• Cable damaged?
• Cable incorrectly connected?
• Faulty contact in connector?
If the signal is being transmitted and
received normally, the Host Link Unit
is faulty and needs to be replaced.
XMT indicator does not
illuminate after the
RCV indicator. (If the
Unit number on the
computer side matches
that of the Host Link
Unit, the Host Link Unit
receives the terminator, the CTS signal
then goes ON, and the
Host Link Unit sends
data irrespective of its
nature.)
The unit numbers of the computer and the
Host Link Unit do not match.
The Host Link Unit is not receiving a terminator.
The signal is ignored because the Host
Link Unit cannot correctly read it.
• Transmission speeds of the host computer and the Host Link Unit do not match.
• Incorrect wiring.
• Incorrect setting for the termination resistance.
Parities or transmission codes don’t match.
Error in operating level setting.
Parity error (even parity).
Framing error.
Overrun error.
Occurrence of momentary power failure.
Check the unit number settings.
Check whether the host computer is
outputting a terminator.
Check the settings of the Host Link
Unit and the Link Adapter.
Check the wiring for the CTS signal.
Check the parity or transmission
code settings.
Check the operating level settings.
Section 2
Send correct data. If a momentary
power failure occurs, both the PC
and the Host Link Unit are reset and
initialized. The ERRor indicator will
turn off.
Sections 2
and 3
Although the XMT indicator illuminates, the
Host Link Unit cannot
send a response to the
host computer.
Operation error on the host computer side.
• I/O channel processing error.
• Program error.
The correct signal is not reaching the host
computer.
• Cable damage.
• Incorrect cable wiring.
• Faulty contact in connector.
---
Section 2
RUN
indicator
blinking.
Error indicator
not lit.
Error in unit number, transmission speed,
command level, parity, or transmission
code setting.
Correct the setting and restart the
Host Link Unit.
Section 2
(C200HLK101-PV1/
LK201-V1/
LK202-V1
only)
Error indicator
lit.
Error detected between the Host Link Unit
and CPU.
Turn power off and then back on.
Replace the Host Link Unit.
ERR indicator illuminates.
Section 1
Section 2
107
Appendix A
Standard Models
Product
Host Link Unit
Description
Model Number
C200H Rack-mounting (two per PC) (APF/PCF/H-PCF)
C200H-LK101-PV1
C200H-LK201-V1
C500 Rack-mounting
g ((one per PC))
C500 Rack-mounting (two per PC) (APF/PCF/H-PCF)
C200H-LK202-V1
3G2A5-LK101-PEV1
3G2A5-LK101-EV1
3G2A5-LK201-EV1
C500-LK103-P
C500-LK103
C500-LK203
CPU-mounting (APF/PCF/H-PCF)
3G2A6-LK101-PEV1
3G2A6-LK101-EV1
3G2A6-LK201-EV1
3G2A6-LK202-EV1
Link Adapter
RS-422 (3 connectors)
3G2A9-AL001
Optical (PCF/H-PCF) (3 connectors)
3G2A9-AL002-E
Optical (APF/PCF/H-PCF) (3 connectors)
3G2A9-AL002-PE
Optical (PCF/H-PCF), RS-232C, RS-422 (1 connector each)
3G2A9-AL004-E
Optical (APF/PCF/H-PCF), RS-232C, RS-422 (1 connector each)
3G2A9-AL004-PE
Optical (PCF/H-PCF), optical (AGF) (1 connector each)
3G2A9-AL005-E
Optical (APF/PCF/H-PCF), optical (AGF) (1 connector each)
3G2A9-AL005-PE
Optical (PCF/H-PCF) (1 connector), optical (AGF) (2 connectors)
3G2A9-AL006-E
Optical (APF/PCF/H-PCF) (1 connector), optical (AGF) (2 connectors)
3G2A9-AL006-PE
Optical Interface
(Used to interface C500-LK203, 3G2A5-LK201-EV1, and 3G2A6-LK201-EV1 Host Link Units.)
Product
Optical Interface
Description
Model Number
RS-232C to optical converter
Z3RN-A-5
Optical Fiber Cable 1, 5, 10, 20, 30, 50, 100, 200, 400, or 500 m. (Replace “j” in model number
with the desired cable length)
AC Adapter
Z3F2-4DjM
For Optical Interface power supply.
Z3GP-01
One required for C500-LK203; two for 3G2A5-LK201-EV1 or 3G2A6-LK201-EV1
Host Link Units.
Connecting Cable
RS-422 and RS-232C connecting cables must be provided by the user.
I/O Cables
RS-422 and RS-232C connecting cables must be provided by the user.
Type
RS-232C
RS-422
Connector
Connector cover
Maker
XM2A-2501
XM2S-2511
OMRON
DB-25P
DB-C2-J9
JAE
XM2A-0901
XM2S-0911
OMRON
DE-9E
DE-C1-J6
JAE
109
Appendix A
Standard Models
Plastic Optical Fiber Cable
Host Link Units with the suffix -P in the model number can be extended up to 20 m. The optical connector of
the 3G5A2-PF002 must supplied by the user.
Product
Plastic optical fiber cable
Description
Cable only (without optical connector). Order in multiples
of 5 m (from 5 to 100 m), or in lengths of 200 m or 500 m.
Model Number
3G5A2-PF002
Optical connector A
2 Optical connectors (brown).
For plastic optical fiber cable 8 to 20 m long.
3G5A2-CO001
Optical connector B
2 Optical connectors (black).
For plastic optical fiber cable 8 to 20 m long.
3G5A2-CO002
Plastic optical fiber set
1 m cable with connector ‘A’ attached.
3G5A2-PF101
Hard-clad Plastic Optical Fiber (H-PCF)
Product
Description
Model Number
Hard-clad plastic optical fiber
Two-core optical cord type. Length: 1,000 m; color: black
S3200-HBCB103
(H-PCF)
Two-core optical cord type. Length: 10 m; color: black
S3200-HBCB101
Two-core optical cord type. Length: 50 m; color: black
S3200-HBCB501
Two-core optical cord type. Length: 100 m; color: black
S3200-HBCB102
Two-core optical cord type. Length: 500 m; color: black
S3200-HBCB502
Without tension member type (for fit). Length: 10 m; color: orange
S3200-HCCO101N
Without tension member type (for fit). Length: 50 m; color: orange
S3200-HCCO102N
Without tension member type (for fit). Length: 100 m;
color: orange
S3200-HCCO501N
Without tension member type (for fit). Length: 500 m;
color: orange
S3200-HCCO502N
Without tension member type (for fit) Length: 1,000 m;
color: orange
S3200-HCCO103N
With tension member type (for fit). Length: 10 m; color: black
S3200-HCCB101
With tension member type (for fit) Length: 50 m; color: black
S3200-HCCB501
With tension member type (for fit). Length: 100 m; color: black
S3200-HCCB102
With tension member type (for fit). Length: 500 m; color: black
S3200-HCCB502
With tension member type (for fit). Length: 1,000 m; color: black
S3200-HCCB103
With tension member type (for fit). Length: 10 m; color: orange
S3200-HCCO101
With tension member type (for fit). Length: 50 m; color: orange
S3200-HCCO501
With tension member type (for fit). Length: 100 m; color: orange
S3200-HCCO102
With tension member type (for fit). Length: 500 m; color: orange
S3200-HCCO502
With tension member type (for fit) Length: 1,000 m; color: orange
S3200-HCCO103
Optical connector
SYSMAC BUS or SYSMAC WAY connector
S3200-COCH82
Optical power tester
SYSMAC BUS or SYSMAC WAY optical characteristics measurement power tester
S3200-CAT2820
Head set
SYSMAC BUS or SYSMAC WAY optical power tester head set
S3200-CAT2822
Master fiber set
SYSMAC BUS or SYSMAC WAY optical power tester master
fiber
S3200-CAT2821
Note
110
In the case of SYSMAC WAY and SYSMAC BUS, the maximum available
length between units is 200 m.
Appendix A
Standard Models
Plastic-clad Optical Fiber Cable
Host Link Units with the suffix -P in the model number can be extended up to 200 m by using plastic-clad optical fiber cable. Those without the suffix -P in the model number can be extended up to 800 m.
Cable Type
Indoor
Description
0.1 m, with connector
Operating Environment
Model Number
Operating temperature: –10o to 70oC
1 m, with connector
3G5A2-OF101
2 m, with connector
3G5A2-OF201
3 m, with connector
3G5A2-OF301
5 m, with connector
3G5A2-OF501
10 m, with connector
3G5A2-OF111
20 m, with connector
3G5A2-OF211
30 m, with connector
3G5A2-OF311
40 m, with connector
3G5A2-OF411
50 m, with connector
Indoor/outdoor
Note
3G5A2-OF011
3G5A2-OF511
–10o
to
70oC
1 to 500 m, with connector
(order in multiples of 1 m)
Operating temperature:
501 to 800 m, with connector
(order in multiples of 1 m)
Operating temperature: 0o to 55oC
(Do not expose to direct sunlight)
3G5A2-OF002
Since the optical fiber cable cannot be spliced as easily as ordinary cables
when damaged or extended, be sure to install an adequate length. The cable
lengths above do not include connectors.
Crystal Fiber Cable (AGF)
Crystal fiber cable is not available from OMRON. It must be obtained from an alternative supplier.
111
Appendix B
Specifications
Communications
Communications
2-fiber, half duplex: -LK10j models
4-wire, half duplex: -LK20j models
Synchronization
Start/stop: 1 stop bit (JIS) or 2 bits (ASCII)
Transmission
speed
300, 600, 1,200, 2,400, 4,800, 9,600, or 19,200 bps (switch-selectable)
Character code
ASCII (7 bits) or JIS (8 bits)
Error check
Parity and FCS
Interface*
Optical fiber: -LK10j models
RS-232C, RS-422: -LK20j models
*Model numbers indicate the maximum transmission distance as given in the following tables.
Transmission Distance
Optical Fiber Cables
Model Number
APF
H-PCF
PCF
C200H-LK101-PV1
20 m
100 m
200 m
3G2A5-LK101-PEV1
20 m
100 m
200 m
3G2A6-LK101-PEV1
20 m
100 m
200 m
C500-LK103-P
20 m
100 m
200 m
3G2A5-LK101-EV1
Cannot be connected
200 m
800 m
3G2A6-LK101-EV1
Cannot be connected
200 m
800 m
C500-LK103
Cannot be connected
200 m
800 m
Wire Cables
Model Number
Interface
Transmission Distance
C200H-LK202-V1
RS-422
10 m/branch (500 m total*)
C200H-LK201-V1
RS-232C
15 m
3G2A5-LK201-EV1
RS-232C
15 m
C500-LK203
RS-422
10 m/branch (500 m total*)
3G2A6-LK201-EV1
RS-232C
15 m
RS-422
10 m/branch (500 m total*)
3G2A6-LK202-EV1
*Total in the system.
Weight
C200H-LK101-PV1
C200H-LK201-V1
C200H-LK202-V1
400 g max.
3G2A5-LK101-(P)EV1
3G2A5-LK201-EV1
C500-LK103(-P)
C500-LK203
3G2A6-LK101-(P)EV1
3G2A6-LK201-EV1
3G2A6-LK202-EV1
800 g max.
600 g max.
113
Appendix B
Specifications
Power Consumption
C200H-LK101-PV1
C200H-LK201-V1*
C200H-LK202-V1
0.25 A max. at 5 VDC
3G2A5-LK101-(P)EV1
1 A max. at 5 VDC
3G2A5-LK201-EV1
C500-LK103(-P)
C500-LK203*
3G2A6-LK101-(P)EV1
3G2A6-LK201-EV1
3G2A6-LK202-EV1
*Internal power consumption increases by 0.1 A when using the Z3RN-A-5.
Host Link Unit Dimensions
C200H
All C200H Units have dimensions as given below.
35
117*
100.5
130
Approx. 130**
Approx. 160**
* Including backplane
** Including Connector
114
ÉÉ
ÉÉ
ÉÉ
ÉÉ
ÉÉ
ÉÉ
ÉÉ
ÉÉ
ÉÉ
ÉÉ
Appendix B
Specifications
C500 (3G2A5)
The dimensions for C500 (3G2A5) Units are as given below.
34.5
Approx. 100*
93
250
Approx. 165**
ÉÉ
ÉÉ
ÉÉ
ÉÉ
ÉÉ
ÉÉ
ÉÉ
ÉÉ
ÉÉ
ÉÉ
ÉÉ
ÉÉ
ÉÉ
ÉÉ
ÉÉ
Backplane
* Including Backplane
** Including Backplane and connector
C120 (3G2A6)
The dimensions for C120 (3G2A6) CPU-mounting Units are as detailed in the following diagrams.
CPU
115
Appendix B
Specifications
Link Adapter
The following gives the specifications for Link Adapters suitable for use with the Host Link Units. Care should
be taken to to choose a Link Adapter with the appropriate connections for the Units in the System. Other Link
Adapters may be included in the System in association with other types of Host Link Units (refer to the applicable Host Link Manual or Link Adapter Manual).
Link Adapter
Connection
3G2A9-AL001
Supply voltage
RS-422
RS-422
Power Consumption
Weight
Not required
---
---
250 g
max.
100/200 VAC or
12 to 24 VAC/DC
85 to 132
/170 to 264 VAC or
10.2 to
26.4 VAC/DC
10 VA max.
900 g
max.
110 to 120 VAC/
220 to 240 VAC
94 to 132 VAC
187 to 264 VAC
10 VA max.
1 kg max.
100/200 VAC or
12 to 24 VAC/DC
85 to 132
/170 to 264 VAC
or 10.2 to
26.4 VAC/DC
10 VA max.
1.5 kg
max.
100/200 VAC or
12 to 24 VAC/DC
85 to 132
/170 to 264 VAC
or 10.2 to
26.4 VAC/DC
10 VA max.
1.5 kg
max.
RS-422
3G2A9-AL002-PE
Optical Fiber (APF/PCF/H-PCF)
Optical Fiber
(APF/PCF/
H-PCF)
Optical Fiber
(APF/PCF/
H-PCF)
3G2A9-AL002-E
Operating voltage range
Optical Fiber (PCF/H-PCF)
Optical Fiber
(PCF/
H-PCF)
Optical Fiber
(PCF/
H-PCF)
RS-422
3G2A9-AL004-PE
Optical Fiber
(APF/PCF/
H-PCF)
RS-232C
RS-422
3G2A9-AL004-E
Optical Fiber
(PCF/H-PCF)
3G2A9-AL005-PE
RS-232C
Optical Fiber (APF/PCF/H-PCF)
Optical fiber
(AGF)
3G2A9-AL005-E
Optical Fiber (PCF/H-PCF)
Optical fiber
(AGF)
3G2A9-AL006-PE
Optical Fiber (AGF)
Optical Fiber
(APF/PCF/
H-PCF)
3G2A9-AL006-E
Optical Fiber (AGF)
Optical Fiber
(PCF/
H-PCF)
116
Optical Fiber
(AGF)
Optical Fiber
(AGF)
Appendix B
Specifications
3G2A9-AL001 Link Adapter
Dimensions
Four, 3.5 dia.
74.6 58
63
77
Approx. 100
87
20.5
Cable Wiring
1
1
2
2
3
3
4
4
5
5
6
6
7
7
8
8
9
9
1
2
3
4
5
RS-422
6
7
8
9
Link Adapter 3G2A9-AL001
Applicable Connector
Connector
Cover
Maker
XM2A-0901
XM2S-0911
OMRON
DE-9P
DE-C1-J6
JAE
Three RS-422 connectors are included with the 3G2A9-AL001.
117
Appendix B
Specifications
3G2A9-AL002-(P)E Link Adapter
Dimensions
Fuse
AC power
supply
Repeater Auxiliary power supply
input
in case of power failure
Mounting Holes
43
Power
supply
100VAC
LG FG Repeater
input Auxiliary
power supply
12 to
24 VAC/VDC
200VAC
101
4.5
7
Branch line
Main line
Main line
10 dia.
63
150
Approx. 140
164
178
Main line optical
connector
Branch line
optical
connector
Main line optical
connector
Internal Configuration
Main signal line (APF/PCF/H-PCF)
Branch line (APF/PCF/H-PCF)
Optical
/Electrical
convertor
Optical
/Electrical
convertor
Main signal line (APF/PCF/H-PCF)
Optical
/Electrical
convertor
Auxiliary power supply
12 to 24 VAC/VDC
Switching
circuit
N2
5V
0V
Power
supply
AC power supply
200 VAC
N1
Fuse
H
100 VAC
LG
Ground (100 Ω or less)
FG
Link Adapter 3G2A9-AL002-(P)E
Repeater input
Always short circuit the repeater input terminals.
Power Supply Connection
100 V
200 V
← Ground power line
← Ground power line
← Live power line
← Live power line
The fuse is located on the common side of the power supply, so connect the live AC power line (HOT LINE) to
the common terminal.
118
Appendix B
Specifications
Be sure to use a wire of at least 1.25 mm2 in thickness.
Use M4 screws for tightening crimp terminals.
Use ring crimp terminals for wiring. Do not connect bare stranded wires directly
to terminal blocks.
! Caution
Tighten the screws on the terminal block of the AC Power Supply Unit to a torque
of 1.2 N⋅m. The loose screws may result in burning or malfunction.
Installing the Link Adapter
Use the Link Adapter with a supply of either 100/200 VAC or 12 to 24 VDC/VAC power.
Short circuit the repeater input terminals.
When installing the Link Adapter anywhere it could come into contact with people, be sure to set the Link
Adapter up so that the terminal block won’t be touched accidentally.
Cable Length
Cable
3G2A9-AL002-PE
3G2A9-AL002-E
APF
20 m
Not available
H-PCF
100 m
200 m
PCF
200 m
800 m
Note 1. Always short circuit the repeater input terminals. The Unit will not operate
unless these terminals are shorted.
2. Always cap unused Optical Connectors. If the connectors are not capped,
ambient light interference can enter the Optical Fiber Cable and cause
transmission errors.
3G2A9-AL004-(P)E Link Adapter
Dimensions
Fuse
Terminal block
Mounting Holes
52.5
FUSE 0.3A
POWER
100
VAC
LG FG
200 VAC
120
0V
CTS
External
4.5
ON
Terminator
RS232C
RS422
7
OFF
10 dia.
160
174
63
Approx. 140
188
Be sure to use a wire of at least 1.25 mm2 in thickness.
Use M4 screws for tightening crimp terminals.
Use ring crimp terminals for wiring. Do not connect bare stranded wires directly
to terminal blocks.
! Caution
Tighten the screws on the terminal block of the AC Power Supply Unit to a torque
of 1.2 N⋅m. The loose screws may result in burning or malfunction.
119
Appendix B
Specifications
Internal Configuration
RS-232C
1
FG
2
SD
3
RD
4
RS
5
CS
6
DR
7
SG
8
CD
20
ER
RS-422
9 SDA
OR
/switching
circuit
CTS
Switching
External
5
SDB
6
RDA
1
RDB
3
SG
7
FG
0V
0V
0V 0V
Termination resistance
N2
Transmission
5V
N1
100 VAC
Reception
24 V
AC power supply
200 VAC
H
Fuse
LG
FG
Ground (100 Ω or less)
CTS (CS) Switching
Set to 0 V when the CTS (Clear-To-Send) signal will usually be ON. Set to External when the signal is received externally.
Termination Resistance Setting
Set to ON to connect the internal termination resistance (220 Ω ) and set to OFF to disconnect the internal
termination resistance.
Power Supply Connection
100 V
200 V
← Ground power line
← Ground power line
← Live power line
← Live power line
The fuse is located on the common side of the power supply, so connect the live AC power line (HOT LINE) to
the common terminal.
Be sure to use a wire of at least 1.25 mm2 in thickness.
Use M4 screws for tightening crimp terminals.
Use ring crimp terminals for wiring. Do not connect bare stranded wires directly
to terminal blocks.
! Caution
Tighten the screws on the terminal block of the AC Power Supply Unit to a torque
of 1.2 N⋅m. The loose screws may result in burning or malfunction.
Installing the Link Adapter
When installing the Link Adapter anywhere it could come into contact with people, be sure to set the Link
Adapter up so that the terminal block won’t be touched accidentally.
Never use the Unit when the Terminal Block Cover is off. Be sure that the Terminal Block Cover is securely
attached.
120
Appendix B
Specifications
Cable Length
Cable
3G2A9-AL004-PE
3G2A9-AL004-E
APF
20 m
Not available
H-PCF
100 m
200 m
PCF
200 m
800 m
Always cap unused Optical Connectors. If the connectors are not capped,
ambient light interference can enter the Optical Fiber Cable and cause transmission errors.
Note
3G2A9-AL005-(P)E Link Adapter
Dimensions
Mounting Holes
4.5
47.5
FUSE 0.1A
Power
Auxiliary power supply
7
110
Branch lines
10 dia.
Wiring
Reception Transmission
63
153
164
Approx. 140
178
Internal Configuration
Link Adapter 3G2A9-AL005-(P)E
5V
Power
supply
AC power supply
200 VAC
0V
Fuse
100 VAC
Internal circuit
Auxiliary power supply
12 to 24 VAC/VDC
LG
Ground (100 Ω or less)
FG
Transmission Reception
Branch lines
(APF/PCF/H-PCF)
Reception
Wiring
(AGF)
Transmission
To Link Adapter
To SYSMAC PC
Be sure to use a wire of at least 1.25 mm2 in thickness.
Use M4 screws for tightening crimp terminals.
121
Appendix B
Specifications
Use ring crimp terminals for wiring. Do not connect bare stranded wires directly
to terminal blocks.
! Caution
Tighten the screws on the terminal block of the AC Power Supply Unit to a torque
of 1.2 N⋅m. The loose screws may result in burning or malfunction.
Installing the Link Adapter
Use the Link Adapter with a supply of either 100/200 VAC or 12 to 24 VDC/VAC power.
Use FC connectors for the AGF cables.
Connect the AGF cables correctly to the transmission and reception terminals.
Fuse 0.1A
Power
Auxiliary power supply
Branch lines
Wiring
Reception
Reception
Transmission
Transmission
Cable Length (Max.)
Cable
3G2A9-AL005-PE
3G2A9-AL005-E
APF
20 m
Not available
H-PCF
100 m
200 m
PCF
200 m
800 m
AGF
3 km
3 km
3G2A9-AL006-(P)E Link Adapter
Dimensions
Mounting Holes
4.5
47.5
Fuse 0.1A
Power
Repeater
input Auxiliary power
supply
7
110
Wiring
Branch lines
Reception Transmission
Reception Transmission
153
164
178
122
10 dia.
Wiring
63
Approx. 140
Appendix B
Specifications
Internal Configuration
Link Adapter 3G2A9-AL006-(P)E
5V
AC power
supply
200 VAC
Power
supply
0V
Repeater
input
Fuse
Switching circuit
100 VAC
Auxiliary
power
supply
12 to 24
VAC/VDC
LG
FG
Reception
Transmission
Wiring
(AGF)
To Link
Adapter
Transmission Reception
Reception
Transmission
Wiring
(AGF)
Branch lines
(APF/PCF/H-PCF)
Ground
(100 Ω or
less)
To Link
Adapter
To SYSMAC PC
Be sure to use a wire of at least 1.25 mm2 in thickness.
Use M4 screws for tightening crimp terminals.
Use ring crimp terminals for wiring. Do not connect bare stranded wires directly
to terminal blocks.
! Caution
Tighten the screws on the terminal block of the AC Power Supply Unit to a torque
of 1.2 N⋅m. The loose screws may result in burning or malfunction.
Installing the Link Adapter
Use the Link Adapter with a supply of either 100/200 VAC or 12 to 24 VDC/VAC power.
Short circuit the repeater input terminals.
Use FC connectors for the AGF cables.
Connect the AGF cables correctly to the transmission and reception terminals.
Fuse
Power
Repeater
input Auxiliary power
supply
Wiring
Reception
Transmission
Branch lines
Wiring
Reception
Transmission
Reception
Reception
Transmission Transmission
Cable Length (Max.)
Cable
3G2A9-AL006-PE
3G2A9-AL006-E
APF
20 m
Not available
H-PCF
100 m
200 m
PCF
200 m
800 m
AGF
3 km
3 km
123
Appendix C
ASCII Conversions
This appendix gives data conversions for ASCII characters. The decimal, binary and hexadecimal equivalents
are given. Refer to Appendix D for conversions between binary, hexadecimal, binary-coded hexadecimal, and
decimal data, up to 32dec.
Extended ASCII to Binary and Hexadecimal
The following table gives the conversions for the standard ASCII character set to both binary and hexadecimal. In the Programmable Controller, all ASCII data is stored in it’s hexadecimal equivalent.
Bits 0 to 3
BIN
HEX
0000
0
0001
1
0010
2
0011
3
0100
4
0101
5
0110
6
0111
7
1000
8
1001
9
1010
A
1011
B
1100
C
1101
D
1110
E
1111
F
Bits 4 to 7
0000
0001
0010
0011
0100
0101
0110
0111
1010
1011
1100
1101
1110
1111
0
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
A
B
C
D
E
F
DLE
DC1
DC2
DC3
DC4
NAK
SYN
ETB
CAN
EM
SUB
ESC
FS
GS
RS
US
Space
0
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
:
;
<
=
>
?
@
A
B
C
D
E
F
G
H
I
J
K
L
M
N
O
P
Q
R
S
T
U
V
W
X
Y
Z
[
\
]
^
_
`
a
b
c
d
e
f
g
h
i
j
k
l
m
n
o
p
q
r
s
t
u
v
w
x
y
z
{
|
}
«
~
NUL
SOH
STX
ETX
EOT
ENQ
ACK
BEL
BS
HT
LF
VT
FF
CR
S0
S1
!
"
#
$
%
&
'
(
)
*
+
,
.
/
!
"
#
$
%
&
'
(
)
*
+
,
.
/
0
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
:
;
<
=
>
?
@
A
B
C
D
E
F
G
H
I
J
K
L
M
N
O
P
Q
R
S
T
U
V
W
X
Y
Z
[
\
]
^
_
`
a
b
c
d
e
f
g
h
i
j
k
l
m
n
o
p
q
r
s
t
u
v
w
x
y
z
{
|
}
~
125
Appendix C
ASCII Conversions
ASCII to Decimal
The following table gives the decimal equivalents of the range of English language ASCII characters. The Programmable Controller stores ASCII data in hexadecimal form. Care should be taken when inputting ASCII
data in equivalent forms.
Decimal
ASCII
Decimal
ASCII
Decimal
ASCII
Decimal
Decimal
ASCII
Decimal
Space
ASCII
32
0
48
@
64
P
80
‘
96
p
112
!
33
1
49
A
65
Q
81
a
97
q
113
”
34
2
50
B
66
R
82
b
98
r
114
#
35
3
51
C
67
S
83
c
99
s
115
$
36
4
52
D
68
T
84
d
100
t
116
%
37
5
53
E
69
U
85
e
101
u
117
&
38
6
54
F
70
V
86
f
102
v
118
’
39
7
55
G
71
W
87
g
103
w
119
(
40
8
56
H
72
X
88
h
104
x
120
)
41
9
57
I
73
Y
89
i
105
y
121
*
42
:
58
J
74
Z
90
j
106
z
122
+
43
;
59
K
75
[
91
k
107
{
123
,
44
<
60
L
76
\
92
l
108
|
124
-
45
=
61
M
77
]
93
m
109
}
125
.
46
>
62
N
78
^
94
n
110
«
126
/
47
?
63
O
79
_
95
o
111
~
127
126
ASCII
Appendix D
Data Conversion Table
Decimal
BCD
Hex
Binary
00
0000 0000
00
0000 0000
01
0000 0001
01
0000 0001
02
0000 0010
02
0000 0010
03
0000 0011
03
0000 0011
04
0000 0100
04
0000 0100
05
0000 0101
05
0000 0101
06
0000 0110
06
0000 0110
07
0000 0111
07
0000 0111
08
0000 1000
08
0000 1000
09
0000 1001
09
0000 1001
10
0001 0000
0A
0000 1010
11
0001 0001
0B
0000 1011
12
0001 0010
0C
0000 1100
13
0001 0011
0D
0000 1101
14
0001 0100
0E
0000 1110
15
0001 0101
0F
0000 1111
16
0001 0110
10
0001 0000
17
0001 0111
11
0001 0001
18
0001 1000
12
0001 0010
19
0001 1001
13
0001 0011
20
0010 0000
14
0001 0100
21
0010 0001
15
0001 0101
22
0010 0010
16
0001 0110
23
0010 0011
17
0001 0111
24
0010 0100
18
0001 1000
25
0010 0101
19
0001 1001
26
0010 0110
1A
0001 1010
27
0010 0111
1B
0001 1011
28
0010 1000
1C
0001 1100
29
0010 1001
1D
0001 1101
30
0011 0000
1E
0001 1110
31
0011 0001
1F
0001 1111
32
0011 0010
20
0010 0000
127
Glossary
address
The location in memory where data is stored. For data areas, an address
consists of a two-letter data area designation and a number that designate
the word and/or bit location. For the UM area, an address designates the instruction location (UM area); for the FM area, the block location (FM area),
etc.
AGF
All-glass optical fiber cable, also known as crystal optical fiber cable.
allocation
The process by which the PC assigns certain bits or words in memory for
various functions. This includes pairing I/O bits to I/O points on Units.
AND
A logic operation whereby the result is true if and only if both premises are
true. In ladder-diagram programming the premises are usually ON/OFF
states of bits or the logical combination of such states called execution conditions.
APF
Acronym for all-plastic optical fiber cable.
AR area
A PC data area allocated to flags, control bits, and word bits.
arithmetic shift
A shift operation wherein the carry flag is included in the shift.
ASCII
Short for American Standard Code for Information Interchange. ASCII is
used to code characters for output to printers and other external devices.
ASCII Unit
An Intelligent I/O Unit used to program in BASIC. When connected to an
NSU on a Net Link System, commands can be sent to other nodes.
Backplane
A base onto which Units are mounted to form a Rack. Backplanes provide a
series of connectors for these Units along with wiring to connect them to the
CPU. Backplanes also provide connectors used to connect them to other
Backplanes. In some Systems, different Backplanes are used for different
Racks; in other Systems, Racks differ only according to the Units mounted to
them.
BCD
Short for binary-coded decimal.
BCD calculation
An arithmetic calculation that uses numbers expressed in binary-coded decimal.
binary
A number system where all numbers are expressed to the base 2, i.e., any
number can be written using only 1’s or 2’s. Each group of four binary bits is
equivalent to one hexadecimal digit.
binary calculation
An arithmetic calculation that uses numbers expressed in binary.
binary-coded decimal
A system used to represent numbers so that each four binary bits is numerically equivalent to one decimal digit.
bit
A binary digit; hence a unit of data in binary notation. The smallest unit of
information that can be electronically stored in a PC. The status of a bit is
either ON or OFF. Different bits at particular addresses are allocated to special purposes, such as holding the status input from external devices, while
other bits are available for general use in programming.
129
Glossary
bit address
The location in memory where a bit of data is stored. A bit address must
specify (sometimes by default) the data area and word that is being addressed as well as the number of the bit.
bit designator
An operand that is used to designate the bit or bits of a word to be used by
an instruction.
bit number
A number that indicates the location of a bit within a word. Bit 00 is the rightmost (least-significant) bit; bit 15 is the leftmost (most-significant) bit.
block
Block can refer to one of three aspects of PC operation: a block in the FM
area, a block instruction (program), or a logic block. A block in the FM is the
unit used to transfer data to and from the File Memory Unit and equals 128
words. Refer to block instruction, block program, and logic block for definitions of these.
block instruction
A special class of instruction used within ladder-diagram programming to allow flowchart-like coding, which is often difficult to write with ladder diagrams.
Function codes for block instructions are indicated between pointed parentheses <like this>.
block program
A section of program written within a ladder diagram but based on block instructions. Block programs can also contain some, but not all, of the ladder-diagram instructions.
buffer
A temporary storage space for data in a computerized device.
building-block PC
A PC that is constructed from individual components, or “building blocks.”
With building-block PCs, there is no one Unit that is independently identifiable as a PC. The PC is rather a functional assembly of components.
bus bar
The line leading down the left and sometimes right side of a ladder diagram.
Instruction execution proceeds down the bus bar, which is the starting point
for all instruction lines.
call
A process by which instruction execution shifts from the main program to a
subroutine. The subroutine may be called by an instruction or by an interrupt.
carry flag
A flag that is used with arithmetic operations to hold a carry from an addition
or multiplication operation, or to indicate that the result is negative in a subtraction operation. The carry flag is also used with certain types of shift operations.
clock pulse
A pulse available at a certain bit in memory for use in timing operations. Various clock pulses are available with different pulse widths.
clock pulse bit
A bit in memory that supplies a pulse that can be used to time operations.
Various clock pulse bits are available with different pulse widths, and therefore different frequencies.
condition
An message placed in an instruction line to direct the way in which the terminal instructions, on the right side, are to be executed. Each condition is assigned to a bit in memory that determines its status. The status of the bit assigned to each condition determines, in turn, the execution condition for each
instruction up to a terminal instruction on the right side of the ladder diagram.
130
Glossary
constant
An operand for which the actual numeric value is specified by the user, and
which is then stored in a particular address in the data memory.
control bit
A bit in a memory area that is set either through the program or via a Programming Device to achieve a specific purpose, e.g., a Restart bit is turned
ON and OFF to restart a Unit.
Control System
All of the hardware and software components used to control other devices.
A Control System includes the PC System, the PC programs, and all I/O devices that are used to control or obtain feedback from the controlled system.
controlled system
The devices that are being controlled by a PC System.
control signal
A signal sent from the PC to effect the operation of the controlled system.
counter
Either a dedicated number of digits or words in memory used to count the
number of times a specific process has occurred or a location in memory accessed through a TC bit and used to count the number of times the status of
a bit or an execution condition has changed from OFF to ON.
CPU
An acronym for central processing unit. In a PC System, the CPU executes
the program, processes I/O signals, communicates with external devices,
etc.
CPU Backplane
A Backplane used to create a CPU Rack.
CPU Rack
Part of a building-block PC, the CPU Rack contains the CPU, a power supply, and other Units. With most PCs, the CPU Rack is the only Rack that provides linkable slots.
crystal optical fiber cable
See AGF.
CTS
An acronym for clear-to-send, a signal used in communications between
electronic devices to indicate that the receiver is ready to accept incoming
data.
cycle
The process used to execute a ladder-diagram program. The program is examined sequentially from start to finish and each instruction is executed in
turn based on execution conditions.
cycle time
The time required for a single cycle of the ladder-diagram program.
data area
An area in the PC’s memory that is designed to hold a specific type of data,
e.g., the LR area is designed to hold common data in a PC Link System.
Memory areas that hold programs are not considered data areas.
data area boundary
The highest address available in a data area. When designating an operand
that requires multiple words, it is necessary that the highest address in the
data area is not exceeded.
data sharing
An aspect of PC Link Systems and of Data Links in Net Link Systems in
which common data areas or common data words are created between two
or more PCs.
debug
A process by which a draft program is corrected until it operates as intended.
Debugging includes both removal of syntax errors, as well as fine-tuning of
timing and coordination of control operations.
131
Glossary
decimal
A number system where all numbers are expressed to the base 10. Although
in a PC all data is ultimately stored in binary form, four binary bits are often
used to represent one decimal digit, via a system called binary-coded decimal.
decrement
Decreasing a numeric value.
default
A value assumed and automatically set by the PC when a specific value is
not input by the user. Many devices will assume such default conditions upon
the application of power.
definer
A number used as an operand for an instruction but that serves to define the
instruction itself rather that the data on which the instruction is to operate.
Definers include jump numbers, subroutine numbers, etc.
delimiter
A carriage return (CR) indicating the end of the current frame within a multi-frame block of information. A terminator indicates the end of the block.
destination
The location where data in an instruction is to be placed, as opposed to the
location from which data is to be taken, for use in the instruction. The location
from which data is to be taken is called the source.
differentiated instruction
An instruction that is executed only once each time its execution condition
goes from OFF to ON. Nondifferentiated instructions are executed each cycle
as long as the execution condition stays ON.
differentiation instruction
An instruction used to ensure that the operand bit is never turned ON for
more than one cycle after the execution condition goes either from OFF to
ON for a Differentiate Up instruction or from ON to OFF for a Differentiate
Down instruction.
digit
A unit of storage in memory that consists of four bits.
digit designator
An operand that is used to designate the digit or digits of a word to be used
by an instruction.
distributed control
An automation concept in which control of each portion of an automated system is located near the devices actually being controlled, i.e., control is decentralized and ‘distributed’ over the system. Distributed control is a concept
basic to PC Systems.
DM area
A data area used to hold word data. A word in the DM area cannot be accessed bit by bit.
download
The process of transferring a program or data from a higher-level computer
to a lower-level computer or PC.
Duplex CPU
A CPU arrangement available for a C2000H PC in which there is actually two
CPUs. Each of the CPUs holds the same program and the same data. One
of the CPUs is active and controls current PC operation; the other CPU
serves as a backup and takes over PC operation if the active CPU fails.
Duplex System
A C2000H PC System that uses a Duplex CPU.
Duplex Unit
The Unit that coordinates the CPU activities of a Duplex System.
132
Glossary
electrical noise
Electrical ‘static’ that can disturb electronic communications. The ‘snow’ that
can appear on a TV screen is an example of the effects of electrical noise.
error code
A numeric code output to indicate the existence, and something about the
nature, of an error. Some error codes are generated by the system; others
are defined in the program by the operator.
exclusive OR
A logic operation whereby the result is true if one and only one of the premises is true. In ladder-diagram programming the premises are usually ON/
OFF states of bits, or the logical combination of such states, called execution
conditions.
exclusive NOR
A logic operation whereby the result is true if and only if both of the premises
are true or both of the premises are false. In ladder-diagram programming
the premises are usually ON/OFF states of bits, or the logical combination of
such states, called execution conditions.
exection condition
The ON or OFF status under which an instruction is executed. The execution
condition is determined by the logical combination of conditions on the same
instruction line and up to the instruction being executed.
execution time
The time required for the CPU to execute either an individual instruction or
an entire program.
Expansion I/O Backplane
A Backplane used to create an Expansion I/O Rack.
Expansion I/O Rack
Part of a building-block PC, an Expansion I/O Rack is connected to either a
CPU Rack or another Expansion I/O Rack to increase the number of slots
available for mounting Units.
extended counter
A counter created in a program that counts higher than any of the standard
counters provided by the individual instructions.
extended timer
A timer created in a program that times longer than any of the standard timers provided by the individual instructions.
Factory Intelligent Terminal
A programming device provided with advanced programming and debugging
capabilities to facilitate PC operation. The Factory Intelligent Terminal also
provides various interfaces for external devices, such as floppy disk drives.
fatal error
An error that will stop PC operation and require correction before operation
can be continued.
FCS
Acronym for Frame Checksum.
File Memory
see FM area.
FIT
Abbreviation for Factory Intelligent Terminal.
flag
A dedicated bit in memory that is set by the system to indicate some type of
operating status. Some flags, such as the carry flag, can also be set by the
operator or program.
flicker bit
A bit that is programmed to turn ON and OFF at a specific frequency.
133
Glossary
floating point decimal
A decimal number expressed as a number between 0 and 1 (the mantissa)
multiplied by a power of 10, e.g., 0.538 x 10–5.
Floppy Disk Interface Unit
A Unit used to interface a floppy disk drive to a PC so that programs and/or
data can be stored on floppy disks.
FM area
A memory area located in a File Memory Unit used to store/backup programs
and/or data.
force reset
The process of forcibly turning OFF a bit via a programming device. Bits are
usually turned OFF as a result of program execution.
force set
The process of forcibly turning ON a bit via a programming device. Bits are
usually turned ON as a result of program execution.
Frame Checksum
The result of exclusive ORing all data within the FCS calculation range. Used
to confirm that the correct data is transmitted.
function code
A two-digit number used to input an instruction into the PC.
GPC
Acronym for Graphic Programming Console.
Graphic Programming
Console
A programming device provided with advanced programming and debugging
capabilities to facilitate PC operation. A Graphic Programming Console is
provided with a large display onto which ladder-diagram programs can be
written directly in ladder-diagram symbols for input into the PC without conversion to mnemonic form.
hardware error
An error originating in the hardware structure (electronic components) of the
PC, as opposed to a software error, which originates in software (i.e., programs).
hexadecimal
A number system where all numbers are expressed to the base 16. Although
in a PC all data is ultimately stored in binary form, displays on and inputs
through Programming Devices are often expressed in hexadecimal to facilitate operation. Each group of four binary bits is numerically equivalent to one
hexadecimal digit.
Host Link System
One or more host computers connected to one or more PCs through Host
Link Units so that the host computer can be used to transfer data to, and to
receive data from, the PC(s). Host Link Systems enable centralized management and control of PC Systems.
Host Link Unit
An interface used to connect a PC to a host computer in a Host Link System.
host computer
A computer that is used to transfer data or programs to or receive data or
programs from a PC in a Host Link System. The host computer is used for
data management and overall system control. Host computers are generally
personal or business computers.
HR area
A data area used to store and manipulate data, and to preserve data when
power to the PC is turned OFF.
increment
Increasing a numeric value.
134
Glossary
indirect address
An address whose contents indicates another address. The contents of the
second address will be used as the operand. Indirect addressing is possible
in the DM area only.
initialization error
An error that occurs either in hardware or software during the PC System
startup, i.e., during initialization.
initialize
Part of the startup process whereby some memory areas are cleared, system
setup is checked, and default values are set.
input
The signal coming from an external device into the PC. The term input is often used abstractly or collectively to refer to incoming signals.
input bit
A bit in the IR area that is allocated to hold the status of an input.
input device
An external device that sends signals into the PC System.
input point
The point at which an input enters the PC System. Input points correspond
physically to terminals or connector pins.
input signal
A change in the status of a connection entering the PC. Generally an input
signal is said to exist when, for example, a connection point goes from low to
high voltage or from a nonconductive to a conductive state.
instruction
A direction given in the program that tells the PC of an action to be carried
out, and which data is to be used in carrying out the action. Instructions can
be used to simply turn a bit ON or OFF, or they can perform much more complex actions, such as converting and/or transferring large blocks of data.
instruction block
A group of instructions that is logically related in a ladder-diagram program.
Although any logically related group of instructions could be called an instruction block, the term is generally used to refer to blocks of instructions called
logic blocks that require logic block instructions to relate them to other instructions or logic blocks.
instruction execution time
The time required to execute an instruction. The execution time for any one
instruction can vary with the execution conditions for the instruction and the
operands used within it.
instruction line
A group of conditions that lie together on the same horizontal line of a ladder
diagram. Instruction lines can branch apart or join together to form instruction
blocks.
Intelligent I/O Unit
A Unit, such as an ASCII Unit or Ladder Diagram I/O Unit, that is equipped
with its own CPU and can be programmed.
interface
An interface is the conceptual boundary between systems or devices and
usually involves changes in the way the communicated data is represented.
Interface devices such as NSBs perform operations like changing the coding,
format, or speed of the data.
interlock
A programming method used to treat a number of instructions as a group so
that the entire group can be reset together when individual execution is not
required. An interlocked program section is executed normally for an ON execution condition and partially reset for an OFF execution condition.
135
Glossary
interrupt (signal)
A signal that stops normal program execution and causes a subroutine to be
run.
Interrupt Input Unit
A Rack-mounting Unit used to input external interrupts into a PC System.
inverse condition
see normally closed condition.
I/O capacity
The number of inputs and outputs that a PC is able to handle. This number
ranges from around one hundred for smaller PCs to two thousand for the
largest ones.
I/O Control Unit
A Unit mounted to the CPU Rack in certain PCs to monitor and control I/O
points on Expansion I/O Units.
I/O devices
The devices to which terminals on I/O Units, Special I/O Units, or Intelligent
I/O Units are connected. I/O devices may be either part of the Control System, if they function to help control other devices, or they may be part of the
controlled system.
I/O Interface Unit
A Unit mounted to an Expansion I/O Rack in certain PCs to interface the Expansion I/O Rack to the CPU Rack.
I/O Link
Created in an Optical Remote I/O System to enable input/output of one or
two IR words directly between PCs. The words are input/output between the
PC controlling the Master and a PC connected to the Remote I/O System
through an I/O Link Unit or an I/O Link Rack.
I/O Link Unit
A Unit used with certain PCs to create an I/O Link in an Optical Remote I/O
System.
I/O point
The place at which an input signal enters the PC System, or at which an output signal leaves the PC System. In physical terms, I/O points correspond to
terminals or connector pins on a Unit; in terms of programming, an I/O points
correspond to I/O bits in the IR area.
I/O response time
The time required for an output signal to be sent from the PC in response to
an input signal received from an external device.
I/O table
A table created within the memory of the PC that lists the IR area words allocated to each Unit in the PC System. The I/O table can be created by, or modified from, a Programming Device.
I/O Unit
The most basic type of Unit mounted to a backplane to create a Rack. I/O
Units include Input Units and Output Units, each of which is available in a
range of specifications. I/O Units do not include Special I/O Units, Link Units,
etc.
I/O word
A word in the IR area that is allocated to a Unit in the PC System.
IR area
A data area whose principal function is to hold the status of inputs coming
into the system and that of outputs that are to be set out of the system. Bits
and words in the IR that are used this way are called I/O bits and I/O words.
The remaining bits in the IR area are work bits.
JIS
Acronym for Japanese Industrial Standards.
136
Glossary
jump
A type of programming where execution moves directly from one point in a
program to another, without sequentially executing any instructions inbetween. Jumps are usually conditional on an execution condition.
jump number
A definer used with a jump that defines the points from and to which a jump
is to be made.
ladder diagram (program)
A form of program arising out of relay-based control systems that uses circuit-type diagrams to represent the logic flow of programming instructions.
The appearance of the program is similar to a ladder, and thus the name.
ladder diagram symbol
A symbol used in a ladder-diagram program.
ladder instruction
An instruction that represents the ‘rung’ portion of a ladder-diagram program.
The other instructions in a ladder diagram fall along the right side of the diagram and are called terminal instructions.
Ladder Support Software
A software package that provides most of the functions of the Factory Intelligent Terminal on an IBM AT, IBM XT, or compatible computer.
LAN
An acronym for local area network.
leftmost (bit/word)
The highest numbered bits of a group of bits, generally of an entire word, or
the highest numbered words of a group of words. These bits/words are often
called most-significant bits/words.
Link Adapter
A Unit used to connect communications lines, either to branch the lines or to
convert between different types of cable. There are two types of Link
Adapter: Branching Link Adapters and Converting Link Adapters.
link
A hardware or software connection formed between two Units. “Link” can
refer either to a part of the physical connection between two Units (e.g., optical links in Wired Remote I/O Systems) or a software connection created to
data existing at another location (Network Data Links).
linkable slot
A slot on either a CPU or Expansion I/O Backplane to which a Link Unit can
be mounted. Backplanes differ in the slots to which Link Units can be
mounted.
Link System
A system that includes one or more of the following systems: Remote I/O
System, PC Link System, Host Link System, or Net Link System.
Link Unit
Any of the Units used to connect a PC to a Link System. These are Remote
I/O Units, I/O Link Units, PC Link Units, Host Link Units, and Net Link Units.
load
The processes of copying data either from an external device or from a storage area to an active portion of the system such as a display buffer. Also, an
output device connected to the PC is called a load.
local area network
A network consisting of nodes or positions in a loop arrangement. Each node
can be any one of a number of devices, which can transfer data to and from
each other.
logic block
A group of instructions that is logically related in a ladder-diagram program
and that requires logic block instructions to relate it to other instructions or
logic blocks.
137
Glossary
logic block instruction
An instruction used to locally combine the execution condition resulting from
a logic block with a current execution condition. The current execution condition could be the result of a single condition, or of another logic block. AND
Load and OR Load are the two logic block instructions.
logic instruction
Instructions used to logically combine the content of two words and output
the logical results to a specified result word. The logic instructions combine
all the same-numbered bits in the two words and output the result to the bit of
the same number in the specified result word.
loop
A group of instructions that can be executed more than once in succession
(i.e., repeated) depending on an execution condition or bit status.
LR area
A data area that is used in a PC Link System so that data can be transferred
between two or more PCs. If a PC Link System is not used, the LR area is
available for use as work bits.
LSS
Abbreviation for Ladder Support Software.
main program
All of a program except for the subroutines.
masking
‘Covering’ an interrupt signal so that the interrupt is not effective until the
mask is removed.
Master
Short for Remote I/O Master Unit.
memory area
Any of the areas in the PC used to hold data or programs.
mnemonic code
A form of a ladder-diagram program that consists of a sequential list of the
instructions without using a ladder diagram. Mnemonic code is required to
input a program into a PC when using a Programming Console.
MONITOR mode
A mode of PC operation in which normal program execution is possible, and
which allows modification of data held in memory. Used for monitoring or debugging the PC.
most-significant (bit/word)
See leftmost (bit/word).
NC input
An input that is normally closed, i.e., the input signal is considered to be
present when the circuit connected to the input opens.
nest
Programming one loop within another loop, programming a call to a subroutine within another subroutine, or programming an IF-ELSE programming
section within another IF-ELSE section.
Net Link System
An optical LAN formed from PCs connected through Net Link Units. A Net
Link System also normally contains nodes interfacing computers and other
peripheral devices. PCs in the Net Link System can pass data back and forth,
receive commands from any interfaced computer, and share any interfaced
peripheral device.
Net Link Unit
The Unit used to connect PCs to a Net Link System. The full name is “SYSMAC Net Link Unit.”
Network Service Board
A device with an interface to connect devices other than PCs to a Net Link
System.
138
Glossary
Network Service Unit
A Unit that provides two interfaces to connect peripheral devices to a Net
Link System.
node
One of the positions in a LAN. Each node incorporates a device that can
communicate with the devices at all of the other nodes. The device at a node
is identified by the node number. One loop of a Net Link System (OMRON’s
LAN) can consist of up to 126 nodes. Each node is occupied by a Net Link
Unit mounted to a PC or a device providing an interface to a computer or
other peripheral device.
NO input
An input that is normally open, i.e., the input signal is considered to be present when the circuit connected to the input closes.
noise interference
Disturbances in signals caused by electrical noise.
nonfatal error
A hardware or software error that produces a warning but does not stop the
PC from operating.
normally closed condition
A condition that produces an ON execution condition when the bit assigned
to it is OFF, and an OFF execution condition when the bit assigned to it is
ON.
normally open condition
A condition that produces an ON execution condition when the bit assigned
to it is ON, and an OFF execution condition when the bit assigned to it is
OFF.
NOT
A logic operation which inverts the status of the operand. For example, AND
NOT indicates an AND operation with the opposite of the actual status of the
operand bit.
NSB
An acronym for Network Service Board.
NSU
An acronym for Network Service Unit.
OFF
The status of an input or output when a signal is said not to be present. The
OFF state is generally represented by a low voltage or by non-conductivity,
but can be defined as the opposite of either.
OFF delay
The delay between the time when a signal is switched OFF (e.g., by an input
device or PC) and the time when the signal reaches a state readable as an
OFF signal (i.e., as no signal) by a receiving party (e.g., output device or
PC).
ON
The status of an input or output when a signal is said to be present. The ON
state is generally represented by a high voltage or by conductivity, but can be
defined as the opposite of either.
ON delay
The delay between the time when an ON signal is initiated (e.g., by an input
device or PC) and the time when the signal reaches a state readable as an
ON signal by a receiving party (e.g., output device or PC).
one-shot bit
A bit that is turned ON or OFF for a specified interval of time which is longer
than one cycle.
on-line removal
Removing a Rack-mounted Unit for replacement or maintenance during PC
operation.
139
Glossary
operand
Bit(s) or word(s) designated as the data to be used for an instruction. An operand can be input as a constant expressing the actual numeric value to be
used or as an address to express the location in memory of the data to be
used.
operand bit
A bit designated as an operand for an instruction.
operand word
A word designated as an operand for an instruction.
operating error
An error that occurs during actual PC operation as opposed to an initialization error, which occurs before actual operations can begin.
Optical I/O Unit
A Unit that is connected in an Optical Remote I/O System to provide 8 I/O
points. Optical I/O Units are not mounted to a Rack.
Optical Slave Rack
A Slave Rack connected through an Optical Remote I/O Slave Unit.
OR
A logic operation whereby the result is true if either of two premises is true, or
if both are true. In ladder-diagram programming the premises are usually ON/
OFF states of bits or the logical combination of such states called execution
conditions.
output
The signal sent from the PC to an external device. The term output is often
used abstractly or collectively to refer to outgoing signals.
output bit
A bit in the IR area that is allocated to hold the status to be sent to an output
device.
output device
An external device that receives signals from the PC System.
output point
The point at which an output leaves the PC System. Output points correspond physically to terminals or connector pins.
output signal
A signal being sent to an external device. Generally an output signal is said
to exist when, for example, a connection point goes from low to high voltage
or from a nonconductive to a conductive state.
overseeing
Part of the processing performed by the CPU that includes general tasks required to operate the PC.
overwrite
Changing the content of a memory location so that the previous content is
lost.
parity
Adjustment of the number of ON bits in a word or other unit of data so that
the total is always an even number or always an odd number. Parity is generally used to check the accuracy of data after being transmitted by confirming
that the number of ON bits is still even or still odd.
PC
An acronym for Programmable Controller.
PCB
An acronym for printed circuit board.
PC configuration
The arrangement and interconnections of the Units that are put together to
form a functional PC.
140
Glossary
PCF
Acronym for plastic-clad optical fiber cable.
PC Link System
A system in which PCs are connected through PC Link Units to enable them
to share common data areas, i.e., each of the PCs writes to certain words in
the LR area and receives the data of the words written by all other PC Link
Units connected in series with it.
PC Link Unit
The Unit used to connect PCs in a PC Link System.
PC System
With building-block PCs, all of the Racks and independent Units connected
directly to them up to, but not including the I/O devices. The boundaries of a
PC System are the PC and the program in its CPU at the upper end; and the
I/O Units, Special I/O Units, Optical I/O Units, Remote Terminals, etc., at the
lower end.
peripheral device
Devices connected to a PC System to aid in system operation. Peripheral
devices include printers, programming devices, external storage media, etc.
port
A connector on a PC or computer that serves as a connection to an external
device.
present value
The current value registered in a device at any instant during its operation.
Present value is abbreviated as PV.
printed circuit board
A board onto which electrical circuits are printed for mounting into a computer or electrical device.
Printer Interface Unit
A Unit used to interface a printer so that ladder diagrams and other data can
be printed out.
program
The list of instructions that tells the PC the sequence of control actions to be
carried out.
Programmable Controller
A computerized device that can accept inputs from external devices and generate outputs to external devices according to a program held in memory.
Programmable Controllers are used to automate control of external devices.
Although single-component Programmable Controllers are available, building-block Programmable Controllers are constructed from separate components. Such building-block Programmable Controllers are formed only when
enough of these separate components are assembled to form a functional
assembly, i.e., no one individual Unit is called a PC.
programmed alarm
An alarm given as a result of execution of an instruction designed to generate the alarm in the program, as opposed to one generated by the system.
programmed error
An error arising as a result of the execution of an instruction designed to generate the error in the program, as opposed to one generated by the system.
programmed message
A message generated as a result of execution of an instruction designed to
generate the message in the program, as opposed to one generated by the
system.
Programming Console
The simplest form or programming device available for a PC. Programming
Consoles are available both as hand-held models and as CPU-mounting
models.
141
Glossary
Programming Device
A peripheral device used to input a program into a PC or to alter or monitor a
program already held in the PC. There are dedicated programming devices,
such as Programming Consoles, and there are non-dedicated devices, such
as a host computer.
PROGRAM mode
A mode of operation that allows inputting and debugging of programs to be
carried out, but that does not permit normal execution of the program.
PROM Writer
A peripheral device used to write programs and other data into a ROM for
permanent storage and application.
prompt
A message or symbol that appears on a display to request input from the operator.
PV
Acronym for present value.
Rack
An assembly of various Units on a Backplane that forms a functional unit in a
building-block PC System. Racks include CPU Racks, Expansion I/O Racks,
I/O Racks, and Slave Racks.
refresh
The process of updating output status sent to external devices so that it
agrees with the status of output bits held in memory and of updating input
bits in memory so that they agree with the status of inputs from external devices.
relay-based control
The forerunner of PCs. In relay-based control, groups of relays are interconnected to form control circuits. In a PC, these are replaced by programmable
circuits.
Remote I/O Master Unit
The Unit in a Remote I/O System through which signals are sent to all other
Remote I/O Units. The Remote I/O Master Unit is mounted either to a CPU
Rack or an Expansion I/O Rack connected to the CPU Rack. Remote I/O
Master Unit is generally abbreviated to Master.
Remote I/O Slave Unit
A Unit mounted to a Backplane to form a Slave Rack. Remote I/O Slave Unit
is generally abbreviated to Slave. The operation of a Slave is controlled by a
Master.
Remote I/O System
A system in which remote I/O points are controlled through a Master
mounted to a CPU Rack or an Expansion I/O Rack connected to the CPU
Rack.
Remote I/O Unit
Any of the Units in a Remote I/O System. Remote I/O Units include Masters,
Slaves, Optical I/O Units, I/O Link Units, and Remote Terminals.
remote I/O word
An I/O word allocated to a Unit in a Remote I/O System.
reset
The process of turning a bit or signal OFF or of changing the present value of
a timer or counter to its set value or to zero.
retry
The process whereby a device will re-transmit data which has resulted in an
error message from the receiving device.
return
The process by which instruction execution shifts from a subroutine back to
the main program (usually the point from which the subroutine was called).
142
Glossary
reversible counter
A counter that can be both incremented and decremented depending on the
specified conditions.
reversible shift register
A shift register that can shift data in either direction depending on the specified conditions.
right-hand instruction
Another term for terminal instruction.
rightmost (bit/word)
The lowest numbered bits of a group of bits, generally of an entire word, or
the lowest numbered words of a group of words. These bits/words are often
called least-significant bits/words.
rotate register
A shift register in which the data moved out from one end is placed back into
the shift register at the other end.
RUN mode
The operating mode used by the PC for normal control operations.
scheduled interrupt
An interrupt that is automatically generated by the system at a specific time
or program location specified by the operator. Scheduled interrupts result in
the execution of specific subroutines that can be used for instructions that
must be executed repeatedly for a specified period of time.
self diagnosis
A process whereby the system checks its own operation and generates a
warning or error if an abnormality is discovered.
self-maintaining bit
A bit that is programmed to maintain either an OFF or ON status until set or
reset by specified conditions.
servicing
The process whereby the PC provides data to or receives data from external
devices or remote I/O Units, or otherwise handles data transactions for Link
Systems.
set
The process of turning a bit or signal ON.
set value
The value from which a decrementing counter starts counting down or to
which an incrementing counter counts up (i.e., the maximum count), or the
time from which or for which a timer starts timing. Set value is abbreviated
SV.
shift register
One or more words in which data is shifted a specified number of units to the
right or left in bit, digit, or word units. In a rotate register, data shifted out one
end is shifted back into the other end. In other shift registers, new data (either specified data, zero(s) or one(s)) is shifted into one end and the data
shifted out at the other end is lost.
Simplex CPU
A C2000H PC that uses only a single CPU as opposed to a Duplex CPU.
This term is meaningless with other PCs, which are only available with simplex operation.
Simplex System
A C2000H PC System that uses a Simplex CPU.
Slave
Short for Remote I/O Slave Unit.
Slave Rack
A Rack containing a Remote I/O Slave Unit and controlled through a Remote
I/O Master Unit. Slave Racks are generally located away from the CPU Rack.
143
Glossary
slot
A position on a Rack (Backplane) to which a Unit can be mounted.
software error
An error that originates in a software program.
software protect
A means of protecting data from being changed that uses software as opposed to a physical switch or other hardware setting.
source
The location from which data is taken for use in an instruction, as opposed to
the location to which the result of an instruction is to be written. The latter is
called the destination.
Special I/O Unit
A dedicated Unit that is designed for a specific purpose. Special I/O Units
include Position Control Units, High-speed Counter Units, Analog I/O Units,
etc.
SR area
A data area in a PC used mainly for flags, control bits, and other information
provided about PC operation. The status of only certain SR bits may be controlled by the operator, i.e., most SR bits can only be read.
subroutine
A group of instructions placed after the main program and executed only if
called from the main program or activated by an interrupt.
subroutine number
A definer used to identify the subroutine that a subroutine call or interrupt
activates.
SV
Abbreviation for set value.
switching capacity
The maximum voltage/current that a relay can safely switch on and off.
syntax error
An error in the way in which a program is written. Syntax errors can include
‘spelling’ mistakes (i.e., a function code that does not exist), mistakes in
specifying operands within acceptable parameters (e.g., specifying writeprotected SR bits as a destination), and mistakes in actual application of instructions (e.g., a call to a subroutine that does not exist).
system configuration
The arrangement in which Units in a system are connected.
system error
An error generated by the system, as opposed to one resulting from execution of an instruction designed to generate an error.
system error message
An error message generated by the system, as opposed to one resulting
from execution of an instruction designed to generate a message.
TC area
A data area that can be used only for timers and counters. Each bit in the TC
area serves as the access point for the SV, PV, and Completion flag for the
timer or counter defined with that bit.
TC number
A definer that corresponds to a bit in the TC area and used to define the bit
as either a timer or a counter.
terminal instruction
An instruction placed on the right side of a ladder diagram that uses the final
execution conditions of an instruction line.
terminator
The code comprising an asterisk and a carriage return (* CR) which indicates
the end of a block of data, whether it is a single-frame or multi-frame block.
Frames within a multi-frame block are separated by delimiters.
144
Glossary
timer
A location in memory accessed through a TC bit and used to time down from
the timer’s set value. Timers are turned ON and reset according to their execution conditions.
TM area
A memory area used to store the results of a trace.
transmission distance
The distance that a signal can be transmitted.
TR area
A data area used to store execution conditions so that they can be reloaded
later for use with other instructions.
trace
An operation whereby the program is executed and the resulting data is
stored in TM memory to enable step-by-step analysis and debugging.
transfer
The process of moving data from one location to another within the PC, or
between the PC and external devices. When data is transferred, generally a
copy of the data is sent to the destination, i.e., the content of the source of
the transfer is not changed.
trigger address
An address in the program that defines the beginning point for tracing. The
actual beginning point can be altered from the trigger by defining either a
positive or negative delay.
UM area
The memory area used to hold the active program, i.e., the program that is
being currently executed.
Unit
In OMRON PC terminology, the word Unit is capitalized to indicate any product sold for a PC System. Though most of the names of these products end
with the word Unit, not all do, e.g., a Remote Terminal is referred to in a collective sense as a Unit. Context generally makes any limitations of this word
clear.
unit number
A number assigned to some Link Units and Special I/O Units to facilitate
identification when assigning words or other operating parameters to it.
watchdog timer
A timer within the system that ensures that the cycle time stays within specified limits. When limits are reached, either warnings are given or PC operation is stopped depending on the particular limit that is reached.
Wired Slave Rack
A Slave Rack connected through a Wired Remote I/O Slave Unit.
word
A unit of data storage in memory that consists of 16 bits. All data areas consists of words. Some data areas can be accessed only by words; others, by
either words or bits.
word address
The location in memory where a word of data is stored. A word address must
specify (sometimes by default) the data area and the number of the word that
is being addressed.
word multiplier
A value between 0 and 3 that is assigned to a Master in a Remote I/O System so that words can be allocated to non-Rack-mounting Units within the
System. The word setting made on the Unit is added to 32 times the word
multiplier to arrive at the actual word to be allocated.
work bit
A bit in a work word.
145
Glossary
work word
146
A word that can be used for data calculation or other manipulation in programming, i.e., a ‘work space’ in memory. A large portion of the IR area is
always reserved for work words. Parts of other areas not required for special
purposes may also be used as work words, e.g., LR words not used in a PC
Link or Net Link System.
Index
A
ABORT,
applications, precautions,
AR AREA READ,
AR AREA WRITE,
ASCII, data conversions
decimal,
to binary and hexadecimal,
B
baud rate
See also transmission speed
C200H,
binary data,
C
C120 (3G2A6), Host Link Units, dimensions,
C200H, Host Link Units, dimensions,
C200H Host Link Units,
C500 (3G2A5), Host Link Units, dimensions,
C500 and 3G2A5 Host Link Units,
caution sticker,
channel. See word
character code,
clear-to-send selector
3G2A6,
C200H,
C500/3G2A5,
clock settings
3G2A6,
C500/3G2A5,
command levels,
See also operating level
commands
ABORT,
AR AREA READ,
AR AREA WRITE,
communications examples,
DM AREA READ,
DM AREA WRITE,
DM HIGH-SPEED READ,
ERROR READ,
FM AREA WRITE,
FM DATA READ,
FM INDEX READ,
FORCED RESET,
FORCED SET,
FORCED SET/RESET CANCEL,
HR AREA READ,
HR AREA WRITE,
I/O READ,
I/O REGISTER,
I/O TABLE GENERATION,
I/O TABLE READ,
INITIALIZE,
IR AREA READ,
IR AREA WRITE,
LR AREA READ,
LR AREA WRITE,
MULTIPLE FORCED SET/RESET,
MULTIPLE FORCED SET/RESET STATUS READ,
PC MODEL READ,
PROGRAM READ,
PROGRAM WRITE,
PV READ,
PV WRITE,
STATUS READ,
STATUS WRITE,
SV CHANGE 1,
SV CHANGE 2,
SV CHANGE 3,
SV READ 1,
SV READ 2,
SV READ 3,
TC STATUS READ,
TC STATUS WRITE,
TEST,
TRANSMIT,
commands and responses,
table,
communications
conditions,
examples,
formats,
protocol, C200H,
communications errors
3G2A6,
C200H,
C500/3G2A5,
Connecting Cable, models,
connections,
hard-clad plastic optical fiber cable,
multiple-link,
shield wire to FG, RS-422,
shielded cable,
soldering,
unshielded cable,
connectors, RS–232C and RS–422,
Crystal Fiber Cable (AGF), models,
CTS selector
3G2A6,
C200H,
C500/3G2A5,
cycle time,
147
Index
D
data areas, keying in,
data conversion, table,
data flow
C200H,
C500/3G2A5,
test program example,
CPU-mounting Host Link Units,
external appearance
3G2A6,
C200H,
C500/3G2A5,
F–H
data representation
binary,
decimal,
hexadecimal,
fault diagnosis. See troubleshooting
decimal data,
File Memory INDEX READ,
delimiter, ,
FORCED RESET,
dimensions
Host Link Units,
C120 (3G2A6),
C200H,
C500 (3G2A5),
Link Adapters
3G2A9-AL001,
3G2A9-AL002-(P)E,
3G2A9-AL004-(P)E,
3G2A9-AL005-(P)E,
3G2A9-AL006-(P)E,
FORCED SET,
DM AREA READ,
DM AREA WRITE,
DM HIGH-SPEED READ,
E
error check,
error control,
error flag
3G2A6,
C200H,
C500/3G2A5,
File Memory AREA WRITE,
File Memory DATA READ,
FORCED SET/RESET CANCEL,
Frame Checksum (FCS) calculation, ,
program example,
Hard-clad Plastic Optical Fiber (H-PCF), models,
hexadecimal data,
host computer, example program,
host link, communications protocol,
Host Link Unit, MODE selector, C500/3G2A5,
Host Link Units
3G2A6,
CPU-mounting,
mounting,
removing,
dimensions,
models,
mounting,
HOST mode, C500/3G2A5, ,
HR AREA READ,
HR AREA WRITE,
I
error indicator
3G2A6,
C200H,
C500/3G2A5,
I/O Cable, models,
ERROR READ,
I/O READ,
errors,
communications
3G2A6,
C200H,
C500/3G2A5,
error–processing program,
error-processing program,
invalid processing,
process interruption,
response codes,
transmission
3G2A6,
C200H,
C500/3G2A5,
I/O REGISTER,
148
I/O port selector, C500/3G2A5,
I/O response times
3G2A6,
C200H,
C500/3G2A5,
I/O TABLE GENERATION,
I/O TABLE READ,
indicators
C120 (3G2A6) Host Link Units,
C200H Host Link Units,
C500 (3G2A5) Host Link Units,
INITIALIZE,
Index
installation, precautions,
C500/3G2A5,
interfaces, ,
optical,
RS-232C,
RS-422,
operating mode
3G2A6,
C200H,
C500/3G2A5,
invalid processing,
optical fiber cables, transmission distance,
IR AREA READ,
optical fiber connections
parallel multiple-link system,
serial multiple-link system,
IR AREA WRITE,
optical fiber connectors,
L–M
Link Adapter, , ,
dimensions
3G2A9-AL001,
3G2A9-AL002-(P)E,
3G2A9-AL004-(P)E,
3G2A9-AL005-(P)E,
3G2A9-AL006-(P)E,
models,
specifications,
Optical Interface, models,
P
parallel multiple-link system,
PC MODEL READ,
MODE selector, C500/3G2A5,
PC modes
HOST, C500/3G2A5,
LOCAL, C500/3G2A5, ,
RUN
3G2A6,
C200H,
C500/3G2A5,
STOP
3G2A6,
C500/3G2A5,
modes, C200H,
Plastic Optical Fiber Cable, models,
MONITOR mode
3G2A6,
C500/3G2A5,
Plastic-clad Optical Fiber Cable,
LOCAL mode, C500/3G2A5, , ,
LR AREA READ,
LR AREA WRITE,
MONITOR/NORMAL selector
3G2A6, ,
C500/3G2A5, ,
power consumption,
power supply selector
C200H,
C500/3G2A5,
MULTIPLE FORCED SET/RESET STATUS READ,
precautions,
applications,
general,
operating environment,
safety,
multiple-link connections,
process interruption,
multiple-link multiple-level system,
PROGRAM READ,
multiple-link system,
PROGRAM WRITE,
mounting Host Link Units,
MULTIPLE FORCED SET/RESET,
programming,
N–O
noise tolerance,
nomenclature
3G2A6,
C200H,
C500/3G2A5,
NORMAL mode
3G2A6,
C500/3G2A5,
protocol, host link communications,
PV READ,
PV WRITE,
R
reset switch, C500/3G2A5,
operating environment, precautions,
response
code list,
to an undefined command,
to an unprocessed command,
operating level
3G2A6,
restart and error flags
3G2A6,
149
Index
C200H,
C500/3G2A5,
C200H,
C500/3G2A5,
restart bit, C200H,
SW3, C200H,
restart flag
3G2A6,
C500/3G2A5,
SW4,
switch settings
3G2A6,
C200H,
C500/3G2A5,
CTS (CS) switching,
one-to-one connection,
one-to-N connection,
requirements,
retries,
RUN mode
3G2A6,
C200H,
C500/3G2A5,
RUN start command
3G2A6,
C200H,
C500/3G2A5,
synchronization,
synchronization selector
3G2A6,
C500/3G2A5,
RUN/STOP selector
3G2A6,
C200H,
C500/3G2A5, ,
system checks,
system examples,
multiple-link system,
single-link,
S
T–W
safety precautions. See precautions
serial multiple-link system,
TC STATUS WRITE,
settings, host computer,
single-link system,
single-link/multiple link selector, C500/3G2A5,
single-link/multiple-link
3G2A6,
C200H,
TC STATUS READ,
selector
termination resistance
3G2A6,
C200H,
C500/3G2A5,
terminator, ,
TEST,
soldering,
test, system communications,
specifications
Host Link Units,
Link Adapters,
3G2A9-AL001,
3G2A9-AL002-(P)E,
3G2A9-AL004-(P)E,
3G2A9-AL005-(P)E,
3G2A9-AL006-(P)E,
time monitoring,
STATUS READ,
transmission distance
optical fiber cables,
wire cables,
transmission error
3G2A6,
C200H,
C500/3G2A5,
SV CHANGE 1,
transmission speed,
See also baud rate
C200H,
SV CHANGE 2,
TRANSMIT,
SV CHANGE 3,
troubleshooting,
SV READ 1,
undefined commands,
SV READ 2,
unprocessed commands,
SV READ 3,
weight,
SW1
3G2A6,
C200H,
C500/3G2A5,
wire cables, transmission distance,
STATUS WRITE,
SW2
3G2A6,
150
wire connection
multiple-link system,
optical Units,
single-link system,
wire connectors, ,
Revision History
A manual revision code appears as a suffix to the catalog number on the front cover of the manual.
Cat. No. W143-E1-7
Revision code
The following table outlines the changes made to the manual during each revision. Unless noted, page number refer to the previous version.
Revision code
Date
Revised content
2
March 1990
Converted to standard manual and page formats. The text was rewritten to give extra clarity.
Link Adapters section omitted.
The HR entry in table Level 1 of Section 3-4 now reads RH.
Section 3-6 I/O Response Times has been redrawn for greater clarity.
Appendix C has been split and the specifications for the accessories are now included in Appendix D.
3
April 1991
Layout of manual was restructured for greater clarity. Host Link Unit characteristics have been separated according to Host Link Unit groups. Hard-clad plastic optical fiber added to page 18 and Appendix B.
Page 6: Description of DIP switch pins added to C200H-LK201
Page 11: 1-3 Host Link Unit dimensions has been transferred to App B
Page 14: A single-link system need not be specified if the I/O Port Selector is set to RS-232C.
Page 15: The diagram in the Termination Resistance example has been changed.
Page 20: The Equipment Ready symbol has been changed to DTR and the pin no. for ST corrected
to 24.
Page 31: The data flow diagram for sending a RUN Start Command using 3G2A5 and 3G2A6 models has been corrected.
Page 35: No. of text characters for first and intermediate frames in a multiple-link system have been
corrected to 123 and 125 respectively.
Page 39: Names of the following commands have been changed:
PV AREA READ → PV READ
TC AREA READ → TC STATUS READ
DM AREA READ → Data Memory READ
DM AREA WRITE → Data Memory WRITE
TC AREA WRITE → TC STATUS WRITE
Page 40: Instructions applicable to Mini H-type PCs have been noted.
Pages 49-73: Command and response formats have been corrected and standardized. A Response
Format if Error Occurs has been added to TEST.
Page 5: C2000H-LK201 corrected to C200H-LK201.
Page 7: Table row headings corrected.
Page 93: Old C500 Host Link Units removed.
Page 95: C200-LK201 corrected to C200H-LK201 in 3rd table.
3A
December 1992
Page 11: “For all but C500-LK203 and insulated types” added to 1-5-3 RS-422 Interface.
Page 87: Error Response Code List corrected.
Page 101: Model numbers 3G5A2-C0001 and 3G5A2-C0002 were corrected to 3G5A2-CO001 and
3G5A2-CO002 respectively.
Page 102: Optical fiber cutter removed from table.
4
February 1994
This manual has been extensively revised throughout all sections and appendices. Units C200HLK101-P and C200H-LK201/202 changed to C200H-LK101-PV1 and C200H-LK201-V1/202-V1 respectively; the C200HS PC has been added and the C2000 PC has been removed throughout the
manual. The terms “scan” and “scan time” have been changed to “cycle” and “cycle time” throughout
this manual.
4A
January 1995
Page 36: Text relating to the operating mode added after the second table.
Page 115: Switches shown on the right side of the dimensions diagram corrected.
5
August 1996
SYSMAC α C200HX/HG/HE added throughout the manual.
Pages 25, 26: The link type selector information corrected.
Page 87: Data for Forced Set/Reset Clear corrected to 1000.
Page 112: The table row containing AL004-PE/E corrected.
6
February 2000
7
April 2001
Pages xii and xiii: Updated precautions.
Page 2: Added a note (***) to the table and CjjH (V1 models) to applicable PCs for 3G2A6.
Page 19, 20, 114, 116, 117, 119: Added wire and screw specifications and a caution for tightening
torque.
Page 113: Added a grounding line to the cable wiring illustration.
Page 2: Note added after table.
151
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