Specifications | D-Link DGL-4300 Network Router User Manual

Table of Contents
Contents
Package Contents ................................................................................ 6
Minimum System Requirements .............................................................. 6
Introduction ....................................................................................... 7
Features and Benefits ........................................................................... 8
Hardware Overview .............................................................................. 9
Connections ........................................................................................................ 9
LEDs ................................................................................................................. 10
Wireless Basics ................................................................................ 11
Standards-based Technology ............................................................................ 12
Installation Considerations ................................................................................ 12
Using the Configuration Interface ........................................................... 13
Basic ................................................................................................................. 13
Wizard ......................................................................................................... 13
Internet Connection Setup Wizard.......................................................... 14
Wireless Security Setup Wizard ............................................................. 16
WAN ............................................................................................................ 18
Modes .................................................................................................... 18
Advanced .......................................................................................... 19
Static WAN Mode ................................................................................... 20
DHCP WAN Mode .................................................................................. 20
PPPoE WAN Mode ................................................................................. 21
LAN ............................................................................................................. 21
LAN Settings .......................................................................................... 21
DHCP ........................................................................................................... 22
DHCP Settings ....................................................................................... 22
Number of Dynamic DHCP Clients ......................................................... 22
Add Static DHCP Client .......................................................................... 23
Static DHCP Client List ........................................................................... 23
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Table of Contents
Wireless ...................................................................................................... 24
Basic Wireless Settings .......................................................................... 24
Wireless Security Mode ............................................................................... 25
WEP ....................................................................................................... 25
WPA-Personal ........................................................................................ 26
WPA-Enterprise...................................................................................... 26
Advanced .......................................................................................................... 27
Virtual Server............................................................................................... 27
Add/Edit Virtual Server ........................................................................... 28
Virtual Servers List ................................................................................ 28
Special Applications .................................................................................... 29
Application Level Gateway (ALG) Configurations ................................... 29
Add/Edit Special Applications Rule .............................................................. 30
Special Applications Rules List .................................................................... 30
Gaming ........................................................................................................ 31
Add/Edit Game Rule ............................................................................... 31
Game Rules List ..................................................................................... 31
GameFuel™ ................................................................................................. 32
GameFuel™ Setup .................................................................................. 32
Add/Edit GameFuel™ Rule...................................................................... 33
GameFuel Rules List .............................................................................. 33
Routing........................................................................................................ 34
Add/Edit Route ....................................................................................... 34
Route List .............................................................................................. 34
Access Control ............................................................................................ 35
Enabled .................................................................................................. 35
Add/Edit Access Control Rule ................................................................ 35
Access Control Rules List ...................................................................... 36
Web Filter .................................................................................................... 36
Add/Edit Web Site .................................................................................. 36
Allowed Web Site List ............................................................................ 36
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Table of Contents
Mac Address Filters ..................................................................................... 37
Filter Settings ......................................................................................... 37
Add MAC Address .................................................................................. 37
MAC Address List .................................................................................. 37
Firewall ........................................................................................................ 38
Firewall Settings ..................................................................................... 38
Inbound Filters ............................................................................................ 39
Add/Edit Inbound Filter Rule .................................................................. 39
Inbound Filter Rules List ........................................................................ 39
Configuring an Inbound Filter Rule ........................................................ 40
Advanced Wireless ...................................................................................... 41
Advanced Wireless Settings ................................................................... 41
Tools ................................................................................................................. 42
Admin .......................................................................................................... 42
Password ............................................................................................... 42
Administration ....................................................................................... 42
Save and Restore Configuration ............................................................. 42
Time ............................................................................................................ 43
Time Configuration ................................................................................ 43
Set the Date and Time ............................................................................ 43
Schedules .................................................................................................... 44
Add/Edit Schedule Rule .......................................................................... 44
Schedule Rules List ............................................................................... 44
Syslog ......................................................................................................... 45
Email ........................................................................................................... 45
Email Settings ........................................................................................ 45
Email Log When Full or on Schedule ..................................................... 45
System ........................................................................................................ 46
System Commands ................................................................................ 46
Firmware ..................................................................................................... 47
Firmware Information ............................................................................ 47
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Firmware Upgrade.................................................................................. 47
Firmware Upgrade Notification Options ................................................. 47
Dynamic DNS .............................................................................................. 48
Status................................................................................................................ 49
Device Info .................................................................................................. 49
General .................................................................................................. 49
WAN....................................................................................................... 49
LAN ........................................................................................................ 49
Wireless LAN ......................................................................................... 50
Wireless ...................................................................................................... 50
Routing........................................................................................................ 50
Logs ............................................................................................................ 51
Log Options ........................................................................................... 51
Log Details ............................................................................................. 51
Statistics...................................................................................................... 51
Network Traffic Stats .............................................................................. 51
LAN Statistics ........................................................................................ 52
WAN Statistics ....................................................................................... 52
Wireless Statistics.................................................................................. 52
Active Sessions ........................................................................................... 52
Appendix ........................................................................................ 53
Securing Your Network ..................................................................................... 53
Glossary ............................................................................................................ 55
Technical Specifications ...................................................................... 65
Contacting Technical Support ................................................................ 67
Warranty......................................................................................... 68
Registration ..................................................................................... 72
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Package Contents
Package Contents
„
D-Link® DGL-4300 GamerLounge™ Gaming Router
„
Detachable Antenna
„
Cat5 Ethernet Cable
„
Power Adapter (5.0V, 2.5A)
„
CD-ROM with Manual
„
Quick Installation Guide
„
Vertical Stands
„
Rubber Feet
D-Link® DGL-4300 Gaming Router
CD-ROM with Manual
Power Adapter
Ethernet Cable
Detachable Antenna
Rubber Feet
Vertical Stands
Note: Using a power supply with a different voltage than the one included with your product
will cause damage and void the warranty for this product.
If any of the above items are missing, please contact your reseller.
Minimum System Requirements
„
Ethernet-Based Cable or DSL Modem
To Change Default Settings
„ PC with
„ 1.2GHz Processor
„ 256MB Memory
„ CD-ROM Drive
„ Ethernet Adapter with TCP/IP Protocol Installed
„ Windows® XP/2000/Me or Mac® OS X v10.3/v10.2/v10.1
„ Internet Explorer v6 or Netscape® Navigator v7
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Introduction
Introduction
The D-Link GamerLounge™ DGL-4300 High-Speed Wireless Gaming Router is an 802.11g highperformance, wireless router that supports high-speed wireless networking and is designed to provide
maximum gaming performance.
With top-notch maximum wireless signal rates of up to 108Mbps1 and Gigabit Ethernet support for
10/100/1000Mbps LAN connections, rest assured enough bandwidth is available for all your gaming
needs.
The DGL-4300 incorporates GameFuel™ Technology designed to provide the uninterrupted and
flawless gaming experience serious online gamers expect.
The DGL-4300’s high-performance CPU supports up to 1000 concurrent connections, making it
ideal for P2P applications and multiplayer interactivity.
1
Maximum wireless signal rate derived from IEEE Standard 802.11a/11b/11g specifications. Actual data throughput will
vary. Network conditions and environmental factors lower actual data throughput rate.
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Features and Benefits
Features and Benefits
„
Loaded with game-centric features boasting maximum flexibility for configuration and performance
„
Designed for the Gamers Network
„
GameFuel Priority powered platform delivers fully-loaded features boosting network efficiency
and performance
„
Enhanced wireless technology for optimal range and connectivity – up to 108Mbps1
„
High-Performance CPU – ideal for P2P applications and multiplayer interactivity
„
Automatically prioritizes and intelligently manages network traffic to better execute bandwidthsensitive applications such as VoIP and multimedia streaming
„
Enables multi-tasking between other applications without degradation in game connection
„
Pre-configured ports to accommodate up to 256 policies for games and applications
„
Customizable settings to add or modify new applications or game configurations
„
New firmware upgrade notification keeps your D-Link Gaming Router up-to-date
„
Next Generation hardware with one Fast Ethernet 10/100 WAN port and four Gigabit Ethernet
10/100/1000 auto-sensing LAN ports
„
Shamelessly attractive chassis – chrome-plated front panel, hypnotizing blue LEDs
„
5dBi high-gain antenna for exceptional wireless signal
„
Smooth GUI design for seamless device management
„
Protect your wireless data with both Wi-Fi Protected Access (WPA) and 128-bit Wired Equivalent
Privacy (WEP)
„
Integrated Stateful Packet Inspection (SPI) firewall and Network Address Translation (NAT) firewall
help protect against hackers, wardrivers, and other unauthorized users
„
Create versatile Access Control policies to control network access based on time, date, websites,
and/or applications
„
Disable SSID Broadcast and MAC Filtering features help increase your level security to protect
against unauthorized access to your wireless network
„
Supports Virtual Private Network (VPN) pass-through to create a secure connection to your day
job
1
Maximum wireless signal rate derived from IEEE Standard 802.11a/11b/11g specifications. Actual data throughput will
vary. Network conditions and environmental factors lower actual data throughput rate.
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Hardware Overview
Hardware Overview
Connections
All Ethernet Ports (WAN and LAN) are auto MDI/MDIX, meaning you
can use either a straight-through or a crossover Ethernet cable.
Antenna Connector
for wireless antenna
Receptor for the
Power Adapter
Auto MDI/MDIX LAN ports
automatically sense the cable type
when connecting to Ethernet-enabled
computers.
The Auto MDI/MDIX WAN port
is the connection for the Ethernet
cable to the Cable or DSL
modem.
9
Pressing the Reset Button
restores the router to its
original factory default
settings.
D-Link Systems, Inc.
Hardware Overview
LEDs
LOCAL NETWORK LEDs
A solid light indicates a connection to an
Ethernet-enabled computer on ports 1-4.
This LED blinks during data transmission
WLAN LED
This LED will blink to indicate activity on the
wireless network
POWER LED
A solid light indicates a proper
connection to the power supply
WAN LED
A solid light indicates connection on the WAN port.
This LED blinks during data transmission
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Wireless Basics
Wireless Basics
D-Link wireless products are based on industry standards to provide easy-to-use and compatible
high-speed wireless connectivity within your home, business, or on public access wireless networks.
D-Link wireless products will allow you access to the data you want, when and where you want it. You
will be able to enjoy the freedom that wireless networking brings.
A WLAN is a cellular computer network that transmits and receives data with radio signals instead of
wires. WLANs are used increasingly in both home and office environments, and public areas such as
airports, coffee shops and universities. Innovative ways to utilize WLAN technology are helping people
to work and communicate more efficiently. Increased mobility and the absence of cabling and other
fixed infrastructure have proven to be beneficial for many users.
Wireless users can use the same applications they use on a wired network. Wireless adapter cards
used on laptop and desktop systems support the same protocols as Ethernet adapter cards.
People use wireless LAN technology for many different purposes:
Mobility - Productivity increases when people have access to data in any location within the operating
range of the WLAN. Management decisions based on real-time information can significantly improve
worker efficiency.
Low Implementation Costs – WLANs are easy to set up, manage, change and relocate. Networks
that frequently change can benefit from WLANs ease of implementation. WLANs can operate in
locations where installation of wiring may be impractical.
Installation and Network Expansion - Installing a WLAN system can be fast and easy and can
eliminate the need to pull cable through walls and ceilings. Wireless technology allows the network to
go where wires cannot go - even outside the home or office.
Scalability – WLANs can be configured in a variety of topologies to meet the needs of specific
applications and installations. Configurations are easily changed and range from peer-to-peer networks
suitable for a small number of users to larger infrastructure networks to accommodate hundreds or
thousands of users, depending on the number of wireless devices deployed.
Inexpensive Solution - Wireless network devices are as competitively priced as conventional Ethernet
network devices.
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Wireless Basics
Standards-based Technology
The DGL-4300 Wireless Broadband Router utilizes the new 802.11g standard.
The IEEE 802.11g standard is an extension of the 802.11b standard. It increases the data rate up to
54Mbps within the 2.4GHz band, utilizing OFDM technology.
This means that in most environments, within the specified range of this device, you will be able to
transfer large files quickly or even watch a movie in MPEG format over your network without noticeable
delays. This technology works by transmitting high-speed digital data over a radio wave utilizing
OFDM (Orthogonal Frequency Division Multiplexing) technology. OFDM works by splitting the radio
signal into multiple smaller sub-signals that are then transmitted simultaneously at different frequencies
to the receiver. OFDM reduces the amount of crosstalk (interference) in signal transmissions.
The DGL-4300 is backwards compatible with 802.11b devices. This means that if you have an existing
802.11b network, the devices in that network will be compatible with 802.11g devices at speeds of
up to 11Mbps in the 2.4GHz range.
Installation Considerations
The D-Link DGL-4300 lets you access your network, using a wireless connection, from virtually
anywhere within its operating range. Keep in mind, however, that the number, thickness and location
of walls, ceilings, or other objects that the wireless signals must pass through, may limit the range.
Typical ranges vary depending on the types of materials and background RF (radio frequency) noise
in your home or business. The key to maximizing wireless range is to follow these basic guidelines:
„
Keep the number of walls and ceilings between the DGL-4300 and other network devices to a
minimum - each wall or ceiling can reduce your D-Link wireless product’s range from 3-90 feet
(1-30 meters). Position your devices so that the number of walls or ceilings is minimized.
„
Be aware of the direct line between network devices. A wall that is 1.5 feet thick (.5 meters), at a
45-degree angle appears to be almost 3 feet (1 meter) thick. At a 2-degree angle it looks over 42
feet (14 meters) thick! Position devices so that the signal will travel straight through a wall or
ceiling (instead of at an angle) for better reception.
„
Building Materials can impede the wireless signal - a solid metal door or aluminum studs may
have a negative effect on range. Try to position wireless devices and computers with wireless
adapters so that the signal passes through drywall or open doorways and not other materials.
„
Keep your product away (at least 3-6 feet or 1-2 meters) from electrical devices or appliances
that generate extreme RF noise.
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Using the Configuration Interface
Using the Configuration Interface
The Configuration Interface can be accessed from your Web browser. Open up your Web browser
and type http://192.168.0.1 in the address field and press Enter. The Configuration Interface login
screen will appear. By default, there is no password. Click on the Log In button to access the
Configuration main screen.
Basic
The Basic settings tab contains the Setup Wizards, Internet connection, and network setting options.
Wizard
The Wizard screen contains two wizards that assist you with the configuration of your D-Link® Gaming
Router.
Basic > Wizard
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Wireless Basics
Internet Connection Setup Wizard
The Internet Connection Setup Wizard will assist you with connecting your D-Link® Gaming Router to
the Internet. The step by step guide will prompt you for the necessary information to get you connected.
The Internet Connection Setup Wizard guides you through the following basic router setup steps:
To begin, click on the Launch Internet Connection Setup Wizard button.
„ The Welcome To The D-Link Setup Wizard screen appears, click Next to continue.
„ Step 1: Set Your Password prompts you to enter a password for the Web-based configuration
interface. You must also enter the password in the Verify Password prompt.
„ Step 2: Select Your Time Zone prompts you to select your time zone from the pull-down menu.
„ Step 3: Configure Your Internet Connection prompts you to select your Internet Service Provider
from the pull-down menu. If your Internet Service Provider is not listed or you do not know who it
is, you can select the connection type manually.
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Wireless Basics
Depending upon your Internet Service Provider or the type of connection you selected in the previous
step, one of three screens will appear. If you are unsure of any of the information, please contact your
Internet Service Provider (ISP) for details.
„
DHCP Connection (Dynamic IP Address) requires you to enter the MAC address of the computer
that was originally connected to your broadband modem. If you are using that computer, click on
the Clone Your PC’s MAC Address button and the MAC address is automatically copied. If your
ISP requires you to enter a Host Name, please do so.
„
Set Username and Password Connection (PPPoE) prompts you to enter your Username and
Password. You must also verify the Password. If your ISP requires a Service Name entry, please
enter it here.
„
Set Static IP Address Connection prompts you to enter the IP address, Subnet Mask, Gateway
Address, Primary and Secondary DNS address information.
„
Setup Complete will appear after all of the settings have been entered. Click Connect to save
your settings and reboot the router.
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Using the Configuration Interface
Wireless Security Setup Wizard
The Wireless Security Setup Wizard will assist you with setting up your wireless network. The step by
step guide will ask you for the necessary information to secure your wireless network. The Wireless
Security Setup Wizard guides you through the following steps:
To begin, click on the Launch Wireless Security Setup Wizard button.
„ The Welcome To The D-Link Wireless Security Setup Wizard screen appears, click Next to
continue.
„ Step 1: Name Your Wireless Network prompts you to enter a wireless network name for your
network. This name is also referred to as SSID. For security purposes, it is highly recommended
that you do not use the default name.
„ Step 2: Select A Channel for your Wireless Network prompts you to select the channel that
will be used by your router to communicate to wireless devices.
„ Step 3: Secure Your Wireless Network prompts you to select the level of security that you want
to use on your wireless network.
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D-Link Systems, Inc.
Using the Configuration Interface
Depending upon your selection in Step 3, you will see one of the following screens.
„
Step 4: Set Your Wireless Security Password prompts you to enter a wireless security password
between 2 and 20 characters in length.
„ If you selected Better security in step 3, this screen will appear providing you your pre-shared
key information.
„ If you selected Good security in step 3, this screen will appear providing you your WEP key
information.
„ If you selected None security in step 3, this screen will appear providing you your wireless
network name.
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D-Link Systems, Inc.
Using the Configuration Interface
WAN
The WAN section is where your Internet Connection mode is selected. Your Internet Service Provider
(ISP) determines the type of connection that you use.
Modes
There are three connection modes to choose from as shown below. If you are unsure of your connection
settings, contact your Internet Service Provider (ISP) and you can enter the necessary information
on the QIG or print this page and write the settings for future reference.
Primary DNS Server: _____._____._____._____
Secondary DNS Server: _____._____._____._____
„ Static: Used when your ISP provides you a set IP address that does not change. The IP information
is manually entered in your IP configuration settings.
IP Address: _____._____._____._____
Subnet Mask: _____._____._____._____
Default Gateway: _____._____._____._____
„ DHCP: A method of connection where the ISP assigns your IP address when your computer
requests one from the ISP’s server. Some ISP’s require you to make some settings on your side
before your computer can connect to the Internet.
Basic > WAN
Host Name:______________________
„ PPPoE: A method of connection that requires you to enter a Username and Password (provided
by your Internet Service Provider) to gain access to the Internet.
Username:______________________
Password:______________________
Service Name (Optional):______________________
All three modes have some common configuration options. The Primary and Secondary DNS Server
settings are required for Static configurations and optional for DHCP and PPPoE configurations. The
Advanced options on the following page can be modified for any of the three connection modes.
You should be able to get the Primary DNS and Secondary DNS Servers settings from your router
configuration settings, ISP, or your network administrator. Only the primary DNS server address is
required, though it is best to have both the primary and secondary addresses.
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D-Link Systems, Inc.
Using the Configuration Interface
Advanced
The Advanced options apply to all WAN modes.
MTU:
The MTU (Maximum Transmission Unit) is a parameter that determines the
largest packet size (in bytes) that the router will send to the WAN. If LAN
devices send larger packets, the router will break them into smaller packets.
Ideally, you should set this to match the MTU of the connection to your ISP.
Typical values are 1500 bytes for an Ethernet connection and 1492 bytes
for a PPPoE connection. If the router’s MTU is set too high, packets will be
fragmented downstream. If the router’s MTU is set too low, the router will
fragment packets unnecessarily and in extreme cases may be unable to
establish some connections. In either case, network performance can suffer.
Use the Default MTU:
This option is enabled by default allowing the router to select the typical
MTU settings for the selected WAN interface. If this option is unchecked, the
router will use the value assigned in the MTU field.
WAN Port Speed:
The WAN Port Speed is set to auto by default. If you have trouble connecting
the WAN port, you can select the connection type (10 or 100Mbps).
Respond to WAN Ping:
This option is disabled by default. By disabling the WAN ping, the router will
not respond to requests from a ping command received via the Internet.
Pinging public WAN IP addresses is a common method used by hackers to
test whether your WAN IP address is valid.
MAC Cloning Enabled:
Some ISP’s may check your computer’s MAC address. Each networking
device has it’s own unique MAC address defined by the hardware
manufacturer. Some ISP’s record the MAC address of the network adapter
in the computer used to initially connect to their service. The ISP will then
only grant Internet access to requests from a computer with this particular
MAC address. The D-Link router has a different MAC address than the
computer that initially connected to the ISP. To resolve this problem, enable
this option.
MAC Address:
When MAC Cloning is enabled, you can enter in a MAC address manually
in this field or click the Clone Your Computer’s MAC Address button.
Clone Your PC’s MAC
Address:
When this button is clicked, the WAN port will use the MAC Address of the
network adapter in the computer that you are using to access the router.
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Basic > WAN > Advanced
D-Link Systems, Inc.
Using the Configuration Interface
Static WAN Mode
Used when your ISP provides you a set IP address that does not change. The IP information is
manually entered in your IP configuration settings.
IP Address:
Input the IP Address provided from your router configuration settings, ISP
or network administrator.
Subnet Mask:
Input the Subnet mask provided from your router configuration settings, ISP
or network administrator.
Default Gateway:
Input the Gateway address provided from your router configuration settings,
ISP or network administrator.
DHCP WAN Mode
Basic > WAN > Static
A method of connection where the ISP assigns your IP address when your computer requests one
from the ISP’s server. Some ISP’s require you to make some settings on your side before your
computer can connect to the Internet.
Host Name:
Some ISP’s may check your computer’s HOST name. The HOST name
identifies your system to the ISP’s server. This way they know your computer
is eligible to receive an IP address. In other words, they know that you are
paying for their service.
DHCP Connection:
The Release button will release the current IP address of the router. The
Renew button will request an IP address.
Basic > WAN > DHCP
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D-Link Systems, Inc.
Using the Configuration Interface
PPPoE WAN Mode
A method of connection that requires you to enter a Username and Password (provided by your
Internet Service Provider) to gain access to the Internet.
Username:
The username that you use to login to your Internet connection.
Password:
Enter the password associated with your username.
Verify Password:
Service Name:
Reconnect Mode:
Retype the password for verification.
If your ISP requires a service name, enter it here.
Typically PPPoE connections are not always on. The D-Link Router allows
you to set the connection mode:
• Always on: A connection to the Internet is always maintained.
Basic > WAN > PPPoE
• On demand: A connection to the Internet is made as needed.
• Connect Manually: You have to open up the Web-based management
interface and click the Connect button manually any time that you wish to
connect to the Internet.
Maximum Idle Time:
Defines how long the machine can be idle before the PPPoE connection is
disconnected.
PPPoE Connection:
The Disconnect button will immediately terminate any active connection.
Note: These buttons become enabled after the router has been rebooted
with the PPPoE mode selected.
LAN
Your internal network settings are configured based on the IP Address and Subnet Mask assigned in
this section. The IP address is also used to access this Web-based management interface. It is
recommended that you use the default settings if you do not have an existing network.
LAN Settings
IP Address:
Default Subnet Mask:
RIP Announcement:
Gateway Metric:
The IP address of the router on the local area network. The local network
settings are based on the address assigned here.
The subnet mask of your router on the local area network.
Used with multiple routers to broadcast routing information.
This option is used if you have multiple routers.
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Basic > LAN
D-Link Systems, Inc.
Using the Configuration Interface
DHCP
The DHCP section is where you configure the built-in DHCP Server to assign IP addresses to the
computers and other devices on your local area network.
DHCP Settings
DHCP Server Enabled:
Once your D-Link Router is properly configured and this option is enabled,
the DHCP Server function will assign your network devices the necessary
information to connect to the LAN and Internet. This eliminates the need to
manually configure each device on your network with IP settings.
Note: The devices on your network must have TCP/IP bound to the Ethernet
connection with the “DHCP” or “Obtain an IP address automatically” option
enabled.
DHCP IP Address
Range:
This option defines the range of addresses available for the Router to assign
to your internal network. If you have any devices using static IP addresses,
be sure the addresses do not fall within the range defined here. A Static IP
address is one that is entered in manually on the device.
Example:
Your D-Link Router uses an IP address of 192.168.0.1. You’ve assigned a
computer designated as a Web server with a static IP address of 192.168.0.2.
You’ve assigned another computer designated as an FTP server with a
static IP address of 192.168.0.3. The starting IP address for your DHCP
server needs to be 192.168.0.4 or above.
DHCP Lease Time:
Basic > DHCP
The amount of time a computer may have an IP address before it is required
to renew the lease. The lease functions just as a lease on an apartment
would. The initial lease designates the amount of time before the lease
expires. If the tenant wishes to retain the address when the lease expires
then a new lease is established. If the lease expires and the address is no
longer needed, then another tenant may use the address.
Number of Dynamic DHCP Clients
In this section, you can see what LAN devices are currently leasing IP addresses. The DHCP Client
table displays the number of clients that are receiving an IP address from the router. The computer
name, MAC address, and IP address assigned to each computer are displayed here as well. You can
Revoke IP addresses in this section. The revoke option allows you to tale away a leased IP address
from a client. This feature is useful for freeing up addresses when the client table is full or nearly full.
Be sure to only revoke addresses from devices that are no longer needed on the network.
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D-Link Systems, Inc.
Using the Configuration Interface
Add Static DHCP Client
Static DHCP Clients receive the same IP address all the time. This is almost the same as if a device
has a static IP address except that it must still actually request an IP address from the D-Link Router.
The D-Link Router will provide the device the same IP address all the time. Servers on your network
should either use a static IP address or this option. To input the MAC address of your system, enter it
in manually or connect to the D-Link Router’s Web-Management interface from the system and click
the Copy Your PC’s MAC Address button.
A MAC address is usually located on a sticker on the bottom of a network device. The MAC address
is comprised of twelve digits. Each pair of hexadecimal digits are usually separated by dashes or
colons such as 00-0D-88-11-22-33 or 00:0D:88:11:22:33. If your network device is a computer and
the network card is already located inside the computer, you can connect to the D-Link Router from
the computer and use the Copy Your PC’s MAC Address option to enter the MAC address.
Example: You have an FTP server that you want to share files over the Internet. You can connect to
the D-Link Router from the computer designated as the FTP server.
1. Enter a designated IP address somewhere between the Starting IP and Ending IP addresses.
2. Click the Copy Your PC’s MAC Address button and the D-Link Router will detect the MAC
address and enter it automatically.
3. The computer name can be entered in for reference but is not required.
4. Click the OK button and then click on the Save Settings button at the top of the page.
The IP address will now only be assigned to the designated computer and it will always receive the
same IP address as long as it uses the same Ethernet adapter.
Note: If you replace the Ethernet adapter in a computer that is using Static DHCP, you will need to
Copy the PC’s MAC Address again because every Ethernet adapter has a unique MAC address. The
same goes for any network device. If you replace a network device such as a print server, you will
need to input the MAC address of the new print server into the Static DHCP configuration.
Static DHCP Client List
Entries on this list can be enabled/disabled by toggling the Enable checkbox. Entries can be modified
by clicking on the paper and pencil icon. To delete an entry, click on the trash can icon. After you’ve
completed all modifications or deletions, you must click the Save Settings button at the top of the
page to save your changes. The router must reboot before new settings will take effect. You will be
prompted to Reboot the Device or Continue. If you need to make additional settings changes, click
Continue. If you are finished with your configuration settings, click the Reboot the Device button.
23
D-Link Systems, Inc.
Using the Configuration Interface
Wireless
The wireless section is used to configure the wireless settings for your D-Link Router. Please note
that changes made on this section may also need to be duplicated on your Wireless Client.
Basic Wireless Settings
Wireless Radio
Enabled:
This option turns off and on the wireless connection feature of the router. If
this is not enabled, you cannot connect using a wireless network adapter.
Wireless Network
Name:
When you are browsing for available wireless networks, this is the name
that will appear in the list (unless Visibility Status is set to Invisible, see
below). This name is also referred to as the SSID.
Visibility Status:
The Invisible option allows you to hide your wireless network. When this
option is set to Visible, your wireless network name is broadcast to anyone
within the range of your signal. If you’re not using encryption then they could
connect to your network. When Invisible mode is enabled, you must enter
the Wireless Network Name (SSID) manually to connect to the network.
Channel:
Basic > Wireless
Select the channel with the clearest signal.
Transmission Rate:
By default the transmission rate will automatically select the fastest rate.
You have the option of selecting the speed if necessary.
802.11 Mode:
If all of your devices can connect in 802.11g Mode then leave the setting at
802.11g only. If you have some devices that are 802.11b than you can
change the mode to Mixed.
Super G™ Mode:
Super G Turbo Modes must use channel 6 for transmission and 802.11
Mode must be set to 802.11g.
• Super G without Turbo: Performance enhancing features such as
Packet Bursting, FastFrames, and Compression.
• Super G with Static Turbo: Mode is not backwards compatible with
non-Turbo (legacy) devices. Static turbo mode is always on and is only
enabled when all devices on the wireless network are Super G with
Static Turbo enabled.
• Super G with Dynamic Turbo: Mode is backwards compatible with
non-Turbo (legacy) devices. Dynamic Turbo mode is only enabled when
all devices on the wireless network are Super G with Dynamic Turbo
enabled.
24
D-Link Systems, Inc.
Using the Configuration Interface
Wireless Security Mode
To protect your privacy, use the wireless security mode to configure the wireless security features.
This device supports three wireless security modes including: WEP, WPA-Personal, and WPAEnterprise. WEP is the original wireless encryption standard. WPA provides a higher level of security.
WPA-Personal does not require an authentication server. The WPA-Enterprise option does require a
RADIUS authentication server.
WEP
A method of encrypting data for wireless communication intended to provide the same level of privacy
as a wired network. WEP is not as secure as WPA encryption. To gain access to a WEP network, you
must know the key. The key is a string of characters that you create. When using WEP, you must
determine the level of encryption. The type of encryption determines the key length. 128-bit encryption
requires a longer key than 64-bit encryption. Keys are defined by entering in a string in HEX
(hexadecimal - using characters 0-9, A-F) or ASCII (American Standard Code for Information
Interchange – alphanumeric characters) format. ASCII format is provided so you can enter a string
that is easier to remember. The ASCII string is converted to HEX for use over the network. Four keys
can be defined so that you can change keys easily. A default key is selected for use on the network.
Example:
64-bit hexadecimal keys are exactly 10 characters in length.
(12345678FA is a valid string of 10 characters for 64-bit encryption)
128-bit hexadecimal keys are exactly 26 characters in length.
(456FBCDF123400122225271730 is a valid string of 26 characters for 128-bit encryption)
64-bit ASCII keys are exactly 5 characters in length
(DMODE is a valid string of 5 characters for 64-bit encryption)
128-bit ASCII keys are exactly 13 characters in length
(2002HALOSWIN1 is a valid string of 13 characters for 128-bit encryption)
25
D-Link Systems, Inc.
Using the Configuration Interface
WPA-Personal
This option uses Wi-Fi Protected Access with a Pre-Shared Key (PSK).
Pre-Shared Key:
The key is entered as a pass-phrase of up to 63 characters in ASCII format
at both ends of the wireless connection. The pass-phrase cannot be shorter
than 8 characters. The pass-phrase is used to generate session keys that
are unique for each wireless client.
Cipher Type:
The encryption algorithm used to secure the data communication. TKIP
(Temporal Key Integrity Protocol) provides per packet key generation and is
based on WEP. AES (Advanced Encryption Standard) is a very secure block
based encryption.
Group Key Update
Interval:
The amount of time before the group key used for broadcast and multicast
data is changed.
WPA-Enterprise
This option works with a RADIUS server to authenticate wireless clients. Wireless clients should
have established the necessary credentials before attempting to authenticate to the Server through
the Gateway. Furthermore, the RADIUS Server may need to be configured to allow this Gateway to
authenticate users.
Cipher Type:
Group Key Update
Interval:
Authentication
Timeout:
RADIUS Server IP
Address:
RADIUS Server Port:
RADIUS Server Shared
Secret:
MAC Address
Authentication:
The method in which the pre-shared key is changed.
The amount of time before the group key used for broadcast and multicast
data is changed.
Amount of time before a client is required to re-authenticate.
The IP address of the authentication server.
The port number used to connect to the authentication server.
A passphrase that must much with the authentication server.
If this is selected then the user will need to connect from the same computer
whenever logging into the wireless network.
26
D-Link Systems, Inc.
Using the Configuration Interface
Advanced
The Advanced options allow you to configure a variety of advanced features including ports, application
priority, Internet access, filters, and advanced wireless settings.
Virtual Server
The Virtual Server option gives Internet users access to services on your LAN. This feature is useful
for hosting online services such as FTP, Web, or Game Servers. For each Virtual Server, you define
a public port on your router for redirection to an internal LAN IP Address and port.
Example: You are hosting a Web Server on a PC that has Private IP Address of 192.168.0.50 and
your ISP is blocking Port 80.
1. Name the Virtual Server Rule (ex. Web Server)
2. Enter in the IP Address of the machine on your LAN – 192.168.0.50
3. Enter the Private Port as [80]
4. Enter the Public Port as [8888]
5. Select the Protocol - TCP
6. Ensure the schedule is set to Always
7. Check the Add Rule to add the settings to the Virtual Server List
8. Repeat these steps for each Virtual Server Rule you wish to add. After the list is complete, click
Save Settings at the top of the page.
Advanced > Virtual Server
With this Virtual Server Rule all Internet traffic on Port 8888 will be redirected to your internal web
server on port 80 at IP Address 192.168.0.50.
27
D-Link Systems, Inc.
Using the Configuration Interface
Add/Edit Virtual Server
Virtual Server Rule:
IP Address:
Protocol:
Name of the virtual server, such as Web Server.
The IP address of the system on your internal network that will provide the
virtual service, such as 192.168.0.50.
Select the protocol used by the service.
Private Port:
The port that will be used on your internal network.
Public Port:
The port that will be accessed from the Internet.
Schedule:
Select a schedule for when this rule is in effect. If you do not see the schedule
you need in the list of schedules, go to the Tools -> Schedules screen and
create a new schedule.
Save:
Saves the new rule or modified existing rule to the Rules list. When you are
done editing the settings, you must click the Save Settings button at the top
of the page to make the changes effective and permanent.
Virtual Servers List
Entries on this list can be enabled/disabled by toggling the Enable checkbox. Entries can be modified
by clicking on the paper and pencil icon. To delete an entry, click on the trash can icon. After you’ve
completed all modifications or deletions, you must click the Save Settings button at the top of the
page to save your changes. The router must reboot before new settings will take effect. You will be
prompted to Reboot the Device or Continue. If you need to make additional settings changes, click
Continue. If you are finished with your configuration settings, click the Reboot the Device button.
28
D-Link Systems, Inc.
Using the Configuration Interface
Special Applications
The Special Application section is used to open single or multiple ports on your router when the
router senses data sent to the Internet on a ‘trigger’ port or port range. Special Applications rules
apply to all computers on your internal network.
Application Level Gateway (ALG) Configurations
Here you can enable or disable ALG’s. Some protocols and applications require special handling of
the IP payload to make them work with network address translation (NAT). Each ALG provides
special handling for a specific protocol or application. A number of ALGs for common applications are
enabled by default.
PPTP:
Allows multiple machines on the LAN to connect to their corporate network
using PPTP protocol.
IPSec VPN:
Allows multiple VPN clients to connect to their corporate network using IPSec.
Some VPN clients support traversal of IPSec through NAT. This ALG may
interfere with the operation of such VPN clients. If you are having trouble
connecting with your corporate network, try turning this ALG off. Please
check with the system adminstrator of your corporate network whether your
VPN client supports NAT traversal.
RTSP:
Allows applications that use Real Time Streaming Protocol to receive
streaming media from the internet. QuickTime and Real Player are some of
the common applications using this protocol.
FTP:
Allows FTP clients and servers to transfer data across NAT. Refer to the
Advanced -> Virtual Server page if you want to host an FTP server.
NetMeeting:
Allows Microsoft NetMeeting clients to communicate across NAT. Note that
if you want your buddies to call you, you should also set up a virtual server
for NetMeeting. Refer to the Advanced -> Virtual Server page for information
on how to set up a virtual server.
SIP:
Allows devices and applications using VoIP (Voice over IP) to communicate
across NAT. Some VoIP applications and devices have the ability to discover
NAT devices and work around them. This ALG may interfere with the
operation of such devices. If you are having trouble making VoIP calls, try
turning this ALG off.
MMS:
Allows Windows Media Player, using MMS protocol, to receive streaming
media from the internet.
L2TP:
Allows multiple machines on the LAN to connect to their corporate network
using the L2TP protocol.
29
Advanced > Special Applications
D-Link Systems, Inc.
Using the Configuration Interface
Add/Edit Special Applications Rule
The Special Application section is used to open single or multiple ports on your router when the
router senses data sent to the Internet on a “trigger” port or port range. Special Applications rules
apply to all computers on your internal network.
Rule Name:
Trigger Port Range:
Trigger Port Protocol:
Input Port Range:
Enter a name for the Special Application Rule, for example Game App,
which will help you identify the rule in the future. You can also select from a
list of common applications, and the remaining configuration values will be
filled in accordingly.
Enter the outgoing port range used by your application.
Select the outbound protocol used by your application.
Enter the port range that you want to open up to Internet traffic.
Input Port Protocol:
Select the protocol used by the Internet traffic coming back into the router
through the opened port range.
Schedule:
Select a schedule for when this rule is in effect. If you do not see the schedule
you need in the list of schedules, go to the Tools -> Schedules screen and
create a new schedule.
Save:
Saves the new rule or modified existing rule to the Rules list. When you are
done editing the settings, you must click the Save Settings button at the top
of the page to make the changes effective and permanent.
Special Applications Rules List
Entries on this list can be enabled/disabled by toggling the Enable checkbox. Entries can be modified
by clicking on the paper and pencil icon. To delete an entry, click on the trash can icon. After you’ve
completed all modifications or deletions, you must click the Save Settings button at the top of the
page to save your changes. The router must reboot before new settings will take effect. You will be
prompted to Reboot the Device or Continue. If you need to make additional settings changes, click
Continue. If you are finished with your configuration settings, click the Reboot the Device button.
30
D-Link Systems, Inc.
Using the Configuration Interface
Gaming
The Gaming section is used to open multiple ports or a range of ports in your router and redirect data
through those ports to a single PC on your network. This feature allows you to enter ports in various
formats:
Add/Edit Game Rule
Rule Name:
Give the Gaming Rule a name that is meaningful to you, such as Game
Server. You can also select from a list of pre-defined rules for many popular
games. If you have any trouble with pre-defined rules, verify whether the
port values have changed since the list was created. You also must fill in the
IP address field.
IP Address:
Enter the local network IP address of the system hosting the game server,
such as 192.168.0.50.
TCP Ports To Open:
Enter the TCP ports to open, such as 6159-6180, 99
UDP Ports To Open:
Enter the UDP ports to open, such as 6159-6180, 99
Schedule:
Select a schedule for when this rule is in effect. If you do not see the schedule
you need in the list of schedules, go to the Tools -> Schedules screen and
create a new schedule.
Save:
Saves the new rule or modified existing rule to the Rules list. When you are
done editing the settings, you must click the Save Settings button at the top
of the page to make the changes effective and permanent.
Advanced > Gaming
Game Rules List
Entries on this list can be enabled/disabled by toggling the Enable checkbox. Entries can be modified
by clicking on the paper and pencil icon. To delete an entry, click on the trash can icon. After you’ve
completed all modifications or deletions, you must click the Save Settings button at the top of the
page to save your changes. The router must reboot before new settings will take effect. You will be
prompted to Reboot the Device or Continue. If you need to make additional settings changes, click
Continue. If you are finished with your configuration settings, click the Reboot the Device button.
31
D-Link Systems, Inc.
Using the Configuration Interface
GameFuel™
The GameFuel™ option helps improve your network gaming performance by prioritizing applications.
By default the GameFuel settings are disable and application priority is not automatically classified.
GameFuel™ Setup
Enable GameFuel:
This option is disabled by default. Enable this option for better performance
and experience with online games and other interactive applications, such
as VoIP.
Automatic
Classification:
This option is enabled by default when the GameFuel option is enabled.
This option will allow your router to automatically determine which programs
should have network priority.
Dynamic
Fragmentation:
This option should be enabled when you have a slot Internet uplink. It helps
to reduce the impact that large low priority network packets can have on
more urgent ones.
Max. IP Fragment
Size:
If Dynamic Fragmentation is enabled, you can fine tune the fragment size.
The default value is 576. Select a smaller size if you have a slow uplink and
VoIP quality is not optimal; select a larger size for faster uplinks.
Uplink Speed:
The speed at which data can be transferred from the router to your ISP. This
is determined by your ISP. ISP’s often speed as a download/upload pair. For
example, 1.5Mbits/284Kbits. Using this example, you would enter 284.
Alternatively you can test your uplink speed with a service such as
www.dslreports.com.
32
Advanced > GameFuel
D-Link Systems, Inc.
Using the Configuration Interface
™
Add/Edit GameFuel Rule
Automatic classification should be adequate for most applications. GameFuel rules identify a specific
message flow and assign priority to that flow.
Name:
Priority:
Protocol:
Create a name for the rule that is meaningful to you.
The priority of the message flow is entered here. O receives the highest
priority (most urgent) and 255 receives the lowest priority.
The protocol used by the messages.
Source IP Range:
The rule applies to a flow of messages whose LAN-side IP address is within
the range set here.
Source Port Range:
The rule applies to a flow of messages whose LAN-side port number is
within the range set here.
Destination IP Range:
The rule applies to a flow of messages whose WAN-side IP address is
within the range set here.
Destination Port
Range:
The rule applies to a flow of messages whose WAN-side port number is
within the range set here.
Save:
Saves the new rule or modified existing rule to the Rules list. When you are
done editing the settings, you must click the Save Settings button at the top
of the page to make the changes effective and permanent.
GameFuel Rules List
Entries on this list can be enabled/disabled by toggling the Enable checkbox. Entries can be modified
by clicking on the paper and pencil icon. To delete an entry, click on the trash can icon. After you’ve
completed all modifications or deletions, you must click the Save Settings button at the top of the
page to save your changes. The router must reboot before new settings will take effect. You will be
prompted to Reboot the Device or Continue. If you need to make additional settings changes, click
Continue. If you are finished with your configuration settings, click the Reboot the Device button.
33
D-Link Systems, Inc.
Using the Configuration Interface
Routing
Add/Edit Route
Adds a new route to the IP routing table or edits an existing route.
Enable:
Destination IP:
Specifies whether the entry will be enabled or disabled.
The IP address or network that the packets will be attempting to access
Note: 192.168.1.0 with a Netmask of 255.255.255.0 means traffic will be
routed to the entire 192.168.1.x network.
Netmask:
Used to specify which portion of the Destination IP signifies the network
trying to be accessed and which part signifies the host that the packets will
be routed to
Note: 255.255.255.255 is used to signify only the host that was entered in
the Destination IP field.
Gateway:
Specifies the next hop to be taken if this route is used. A gateway of 0.0.0.0
implies there is no next hop, and the IP address matched is directly connected
to the router on the interface specified: LAN or WAN.
Interface:
Specifies the interface, LAN or WAN, that the IP packet must use to transit
out of the router when this route is used.
Metric:
The amount of hops it will take to reach the Destination IP or network. A
hop is considered to be traffic passing through a router from one network to
another. If there is only one router between your network and the Destination
network, then the Metric value would be 1.
Save:
Saves the new rule or modified existing rule to the Rules list. When you are
done editing the settings, you must click the Save Settings button at the top
of the page to make the changes effective and permanent.
Advanced > Routing
Route List
This section shows the current routing table entries. Certain required routes are predefined and
cannot be changed. Entries on this list that can modified can be enabled/disabled by toggling the
Enable checkbox. Editable entries can be modified by clicking on the paper and pencil icon. To delete
an editable entry, click on the trash can icon. After you’ve completed all modifications or deletions,
you must click the Save Settings button at the top of the page to save your changes. The router must
reboot before new settings will take effect. You will be prompted to Reboot the Device or Continue.
If you need to make additional settings changes, click Continue. If you are finished with your
configuration settings, click the Reboot the Device button.
34
D-Link Systems, Inc.
Using the Configuration Interface
Access Control
The Access Control section allows you to control access in and out of your network. Use this feature
as Parental Controls to only grant access to approved sites, limit web access based on time or dates,
and/or block access from applications like P2P utilities or games.
Enabled
By default the Access Control feature is disabled. If you enable Access Control, every device on the
LAN must either have a static IP address (that is one that is not in the DHCP range) or must be in the
Static DHCP Client List (see Basic > DHCP).
When Access Control is disabled, every device on the LAN is permitted to access the Internet.
However, if you enable Access Control, every device on the LAN that needs to access the Internet
must have an Access Control rule that explicitly permits it to access the Internet. Devices that do not
have an Access Control Rule cannot access the Internet. When Access Control is enabled, the
options below will appear:
Add/Edit Access Control Rule
Advanced > Access Control
Policy Name:
Create a name for this access control policy that is meaningful to you. Typically
this would be a system name or user name such as Rob’s PC.
Machine IP Address:
The local network IP address of the machine that you want the access
control rule to apply to. Example: 192.168.0.50. Make sure that this is a
static IP address or the system is in the static DHCP Client list (See Basic >
DHCP).
Schedule:
Select a schedule of times when you want the policy to apply. If you do not
see the schedule you need in the list of schedules, go to the Tools >
Schedules screen and create a new schedule.
Apply Web Filter:
With this option enabled, the specified system will only have access to the
Web sites listed in the Web filter section.
Log Internet Access:
If this option is enabled, all of the Web sites visited by the specified machine
will be logged.
Filter Ports:
By clicking the Filter Ports >> button you can specify that the rule enables
access only to specific IP addresses and ports.
Save:
Saves the new or edited access control rule in the Access Control Rules
List. Repeat the process, creating an Access Control Rule for each of the
devices on your LAN that needs access to the Internet. When finished
updating Access Control Rules, you must still click the Save Settings button
at the top of the page to make changes effective and permanent.
35
D-Link Systems, Inc.
Using the Configuration Interface
Access Control Rules List
This section shows the current Access Control rules. Any device that does not have a rule, cannot
access the Internet. Entries can be modified by clicking on the paper and pencil icon. To delete an
entry, click on the trash can icon. After you’ve completed all modifications or deletions, you must click
the Save Settings button at the top of the page to save your changes. The router must reboot before
new settings will take effect. You will be prompted to Reboot the Device or Continue. If you need to
make additional settings changes, click Continue. If you are finished with your configuration settings,
click the Reboot the Device button.
Web Filter
The Web Filter section is where you add the Web site to be used for Access Control.
Add/Edit Web Site
This field is where you can add Web sites to the Allowed Web List. The Allowed Web List is used for
systems that have the Web filter option enabled in Access Control.
Enable:
Entries in the Allowed Web Site List can be activated or deactivated with
this checkbox. New entries are activated by default.
Web Site:
Enter the URL (address) of the web site that you want to allow (such as
google.com). Enter the most inclusive domain name. For instance, entering
dlink.com will give you access to www.dlink.com and support.dlink.com. Do
not enter the http:// preceding the URL.
Advanced > Web Filter
Note: Many web sites construct pages with images and content from other
web sites. Access will be forbidden if you do not enable all of the web sites
used to construct a page. For example, to access my.yahoo.com, you must
enable access to yahoo.com, yimg.com, and doubleclick.net.
Save:
Saves the new or modified Allowed Web Site in the Allowed Web Site List.
When you are done editing the settings, you must click the Save Settings
button at the top of the page to make the changes effective and permanent.
Allowed Web Site List
This section lists the currently allowed web sites. Entries can be modified by clicking on the paper
and pencil icon. To delete an entry, click on the trash can icon. After you’ve completed all modifications
or deletions, you must click the Save Settings button at the top of the page to save your changes.
The router must reboot before new settings will take effect. You will be prompted to Reboot the
Device or Continue. If you need to make additional settings changes, click Continue. If you are
finished with your configuration settings, click the Reboot the Device button.
36
D-Link Systems, Inc.
Using the Configuration Interface
Mac Address Filters
The MAC (Media Access Controller) Address filter section is used to control network access based
on the MAC Address of the network adapter. A MAC address is a unique ID assigned by the
manufacturer of a networking device. This feature can be configured to ALLOW or DENY network/
Internet access.
Filter Settings
MAC Filter Enabled:
When this is enabled, depending on the mode selected, computers are
granted or denied network access based on their MAC address.
Mode:
When Allow is selected, only computers with MAC addresses listed in the
MAC Address List are granted network access. When Deny is selected, any
computer with a MAC address listed in the MAC Address List
Filter Wireless Clients:
When this is selected, the MAC address filters will be applied to wireless
network clients.
Filter Wired Clients:
When this is selected, the MAC address filters will be applied to wired network
clients.
Advanced > MAC Address Filter
Add MAC Address
Enable:
MAC address entries are activated or deactivated with this checkbox.
MAC Address:
Enter the MAC address of the desired computer or connect to the router
from the desired computer and click Copy Your PC’s MAC Address button.
Save:
Saves the new or modified MAC address in the MAC Address List. When
you are done editing the settings, you must click the Save Settings button at
the top of the page to make the changes effective and permanent.
MAC Address List
This section lists the current MAC address filters. Entries can be modified by clicking on the paper
and pencil icon. To delete an entry, click on the trash can icon. After you’ve completed all modifications
or deletions, you must click the Save Settings button at the top of the page to save your changes.
The router must reboot before new settings will take effect. You will be prompted to Reboot the
Device or Continue. If you need to make additional settings changes, click Continue. If you are
finished with your configuration settings, click the Reboot the Device button.
37
D-Link Systems, Inc.
Using the Configuration Interface
Firewall
A firewall protects your network from the outside world. The D-Link Gaming Router offers a firewall
type functionality. The SPI feature helps prevent cyber attacks. Sometimes you may want a computer
exposed to the outside world for certain types of applications. If you choose to expose a computer,
you cam enable DMZ. DMZ is short for Demilitarized Zone. This option will expose the chosen computer
completely to the outside world.
Firewall Settings
Enable SPI:
Enable DMZ:
SPI (Stateful Packet Inspection, also known as dynamic packet filtering)
helps to prevent cyber attacks by tracking more state per session. It validates
that the traffic passing through the session conforms to the protocol. When
SPI is enabled, the extra state information will be reported on the Status >
Active sessions page.
Advanced > Firewall
If an application has trouble working from behind the router, you can expose
one computer to the Internet and run the application on that computer.
Note: Placing a computer in the DMZ may expose that computer to a variety
of security risks. Use of this option is only recommended as a last resort.
DMZ IP Address:
Specify the IP address of the computer on the LAN that you want to have
unrestricted Internet communication. If this computer obtains it’s IP address
automatically using DHCP, be sure to make a static reservation on the Basic
> DHCP page so that the IP address of the DMZ machine does not change.
After you’ve completed all modifications or deletions, you must click the Save Settings button at the
top of the page to save your changes. The router must reboot before new settings will take effect. You
will be prompted to Reboot the Device or Continue. If you need to make additional settings changes,
click Continue. If you are finished with your configuration settings, click the Reboot the Device
button.
38
D-Link Systems, Inc.
Using the Configuration Interface
Inbound Filters
The Inbound Filters option is an advanced method of controlling data received from the Internet. With
this feature you can configure inbound data filtering rules that control data based on IP Address,
Protocol, and/or Port.
The Inbound Filter option is best suited for custom applications. For most applications you should use
Virtual Server, Special Applications, or the Gaming section to create rules that will allow applications
to communicate through the router.
Add/Edit Inbound Filter Rule
Enable:
Enables inbound filtering.
Name:
Enter a name for the rule that is meaningful to you.
Action:
The rule can be set to either allow or deny applicable messages.
Source IP Range:
Protocol:
Defines the range of Internet addresses this rule applies to.
Select the protocol used for this rule.
Source Port Range:
Enter the range of ports that this rule applies to.
Public Port Range:
Enter the range of WAN side ports associated with the servers on the LAN
that this rule applies to.
Schedule:
Select a schedule for the times when this rule should be in effect. If you do
not see the schedule you need in the list of schedules, go to the Tools >
Schedules screen and create a new schedule.
Log:
Check this option if you want the router to add an entry to the log whenever
a rule is enforced.
Save:
Saves the new rule or modified existing rule to the Rules list. When you are
done editing the settings, you must click the Save Settings button at the top
of the page to make the changes effective and permanent.
Advanced > Inbound Filters
Inbound Filter Rules List
This section lists the current Inbound Filter rules. Entries can be modified by clicking on the paper
and pencil icon. To delete an entry, click on the trash can icon. After you’ve completed all modifications
or deletions, you must click the Save Settings button at the top of the page to save your changes.
The router must reboot before new settings will take effect. You will be prompted to Reboot the
Device or Continue. If you need to make additional settings changes, click Continue. If you are
finished with your configuration settings, click the Reboot the Device button.
39
D-Link Systems, Inc.
Using the Configuration Interface
Configuring an Inbound Filter Rule
When the Rule List is empty or none of the rules are enabled, all inbound data that corresponds to a
connection that originated from inside the router or which corresponds to a Virtual Server, Gaming,
or Special Application Rule is ALLOWED by default.
When rules are configured, the router compares incoming data packets against the rules in the list. It
is very important to understand that the router examines each rule one by one in the order that they
are listed in the Rule list until it finds a match. The packet will either be DENIED (Dropped) or ALLOWED.
Once a match has been made, no further rules will be examined for that packet. If no rules match the
data packet, it is ALLOWED. This means that to allow only a specific subset of traffic usually requires
more than one rule to be entered.
Example:
You have configured a game server, using the Advanced > Gaming page, to play HALO: Combat
Evolved with some friends. You would like to limit the access to your network and server to specific
times of the day and only to your friends.
Next you would define a schedule on the Tools > Schedule page, called Gametime, which specifies
a schedule of Friday and Saturday between 7PM and 11PM.
All of your friends use the same service provider and have IP addresses 67.150.220.117,
67.150.231.43, and 67.150.231.75. You have an option of defining a set of rules to match each one of
these addresses individually or you may just decide that using an IP range that covers all of them is
sufficient for your needs.
The first rule is to configure a DENY rule that will catch all of the traffic that arrives on these ports but
does not match data from the sources you want to have access to your network. It is important to
enter the DENY rule first since all subsequent rules will be added higher in the list and will be checked
first. It should look similar to the figure on the right.
Notice that it covers all Source IP Address, Source Ports, and Times (Always), but is specifically tied
to the Public Ports defined in the Game Rule List. This is because you do not want to accidentally
block traffic for other applications. It is a good idea to turn on the log for this rule so that you can check
in the log for anything that is filtered inappropriately.
Next configure the ALLOW rules. In the example on the right, two rules are used to cover the three IP
addresses.
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D-Link Systems, Inc.
Using the Configuration Interface
Advanced Wireless
Advanced Wireless Settings
Fragmentation
Threshold:
This setting should remain at its default setting of 3200. If you experience a
high packet error rate, you may slightly adjust your “Fragmentation” value
somewhere in the between the recommended range of 256 to 3200. Setting
the Fragmentation value too low may result in poor performance.
RTS Threshold:
This setting should remain at its default setting of 3200. If you encounter
inconsistent data flow, only minor modifications to the value are
recommended.
Beacon Period:
Beacons are packets sent by a wireless router to synchronize wireless
devices. Specify a Beacon Period value between 20 and 1000. The default
value is set to 100 milliseconds.
DTIM Interval:
The default value is set to 1. Valid settings are between 1 and 255. A DTIM
is a countdown informing clients of the next window for listening to broadcast
and multicast messages. When the wireless router has buffered broadcast
or multicast messages for associated clients, it sends the next DTIM with a
DTIM Interval value. Wireless clients hear the beacons and awaken to receive
the broadcast and multicast messages.
802.11d Enable:
This enables 802.11d opration. 802.11d is a wireless specification developed
to allow implementation of wireless networks in countries that cannot use
the 802.11 standard. This feature should only be enabled if you are in a
country that requires it.
WDS Enable:
When WDS is enabled, this access point functions as a wireless bridge and
is able to wirelessly communicate with other AP’s via WDS links.
Advanced > Advanced Wireless
Note: WDS is incompatible with WPA. Both features cannot be used at the
same time. A WDS link is bidirectional so this AP must know the MAC address
(creates the WDS link) of the other AP, and the other AP must have a WDS
link back to this AP (the router).
WDS AP MAC Address:
Specifies one-half of the WDS link. The other AP must also have the MAC
address of this AP (the router) to create the WDS link back to the router.
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D-Link Systems, Inc.
Using the Configuration Interface
Tools
Admin
The Admin option is used to set a password for access to the Web-based management. By default
there is no password configured. It is highly recommended that you create a password to keep your
new router secure.
Password
Password:
Enter a password the will grant access to the Web-based management
interface.
Administration
Gateway Name:
Remote Management:
Remote Management
Server Port:
Admin Idle Timeout:
The name of the router can be changed here.
Enabling this allows you to manage the router from anywhere with an Internet
connection.
Tools > Admin
The port that will be accessed from the Internet.
The amount of time before the administration session is closed when there
is no activity. Note: This applies to local or remote administration.
Save and Restore Configuration
Save Settings:
Restore Settings:
This option allows you to save the router configuration to a file on your
computer. Be sure to save the configuration before performing a firmware
upgrade.
Use this option to load previously saved router configuration settings.
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D-Link Systems, Inc.
Using the Configuration Interface
Time
The Time Configuration option allows you to configure, update, and maintain the correct time on the
internal system clock. From this section you can set the time zone that you are in and set the Time
Server. Daylight Saving can also be configured to automatically adjust the time when needed.
Time Configuration
Time Zone:
Daylight Saving Enable:
Daylight Saving Offset:
Select your local time zone from pull down menu.
Check this option if your location observes daylight saving time.
Select the time offset if your location observes daylight saving time.
Tools > Time
Synchronize time with
NTP server:
Select this option if you want the router’s clock synchronized to a Time
Server over the Internet. If you are using schedules or logs, this is the best
way to ensure that the schedules and logs are kept accurate
NTP Server:
Select a Time Server for synchronization. You can type in the address of a
time server or select one from the list. If you have trouble using one server,
select another.
Set the Date and Time
If you do not have the NTP Server option in effect, you can either manually set the time for your
router here or you can click the Copy Your Computer’s Time Settings button to copy the time from the
computer you are using (Note: Be sure the computer’s time is set correctly).
Note: If the router loses power for any reason, it cannot keeps its clock running and will not have the
correct time when it is started again. To maintain the correct time for schedules and logs, either you
must enter the correct time after you restart the router or you must enable the NTP Server option.
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D-Link Systems, Inc.
Using the Configuration Interface
Schedules
Schedules can be created for use with enforcing rules. For example, if you want to restrict web access
to Mon-Fri from 3pm to 8pm. You could create a schedule selecting Mon, Tue, Wed, Thu, and Fri and
enter a Start Time of 3pm and End Time of 8pm.
Add/Edit Schedule Rule
Schedule Name:
Name the schedule, such as Weekday rule.
Day(s):
Place a checkmark in the boxes for the desired days or select the All Week
radio button to select all seven days of the week.
All Day:
Select this option if you want this schedule in effect all day for the selected
day(s).
Start Time:
If you don’t use the All Day option, then you enter in the time here. The start
time is entered in two fields. The first box is for the hour and the second box
is for the minute. Email events are triggered only by the start time.
Tools > Schedules
End Time:
The end time is entered in the same format as the start time. The hour in the
first box and the minutes in the second box. The end time is used for most
other rules, but is not used for email events.
Save:
Saves the new or modified Schedule in the Schedule Rules List. When you
are done editing the settings, you must click the Save Settings button at the
top of the page to make the changes effective and permanent.
Schedule Rules List
This list displays all of the currently defined schedules. Entries can be modified by clicking on the
paper and pencil icon. To delete an entry, click on the trash can icon. After you’ve completed all
modifications or deletions, you must click the Save Settings button at the top of the page to save your
changes. The router must reboot before new settings will take effect. You will be prompted to Reboot
the Device or Continue. If you need to make additional settings changes, click Continue. If you are
finished with your configuration settings, click the Reboot the Device button.
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D-Link Systems, Inc.
Using the Configuration Interface
Syslog
This section allows you to archive your log files to a Syslog Server.
Archive to Syslog:
Syslog Server IP
Address:
Enable this option to output the router logs to a Syslog Server on your network.
Enter the IP address of the Syslog Server.
Tools > Syslog
Email
The Email feature can be used to send the system log files, router alert messages, and firmware
update notification to your email address.
Email Settings
Enable Email
notification:
When this option is enabled, router activity logs are e-mailed to a designated
email address.
From Email address:
This email address will appear as the sender when you receive a log file or
firmware upgrade notification via email.
To Email address:
Enter the email address where you want the email sent.
SMTP Server Address:
Enter the SMTP server address for sending email.
Enable Authentication:
If your SMTP server requires authentication, select this option.
Account Name:
Password:
Verify Password:
Tools > Email
Enter your account for sending email.
Enter the password associated with the account.
Re-type the password associated with the account.
Email Log When Full or on Schedule
On Log Full:
On Schedule:
Schedule:
When this option is selected, logs will be sent via email when the log is full.
Selecting this option will send the logs via email according to schedule.
This option is enabled when On Schedule is selected. You can select a
schedule from the list of defined schedules. To create a schedule, go to
Tools > Schedules.
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D-Link Systems, Inc.
Using the Configuration Interface
System
The System Settings section allows you to reboot the device or restore the router to the factory default
settings. Restoring the unit to the factory default settings will erase all settings including any rules that
you’ve created.
System Commands
Tools > System
Reboot the Device:
This will restart the router. Useful for restarting when you are not near the
device.
Restore all Settings to
the Factory Defaults:
This option will restore all configuration settings back to the factory defaults.
Any settings that have not been saved will be lost. If you want to save your
router configuration settings, you can do so from the Admin page.
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D-Link Systems, Inc.
Using the Configuration Interface
Firmware
The Firmware Upgrade section can be used to update your router to the latest firmware code to
improve functionality and performance. To check for the latest firmware, click the Check Online Now
button. If you would like to be notified when new firmware is released, place a checkmark in the box
next to Email Notification of Newer Firmware Version.
Firmware Information
This section displays the Current Firmware Version and the Latest Firmware Version. To verify the
latest firmware version, the gaming router checks the Internet. To check for the latest version, click
the Check Online Now for Latest Firmware Version button.
Firmware Upgrade
To upgrade the firmware, follow these steps:
Tools > Firmware
1. Click the [Browse] button to locate the D-Link upgrade file on your computer.
2. Once you have found the file to be used, click the Upload button below to start the firmware
upgrade process.
3. Wait for the router to reboot
4. Confirm updated firmware revision on status page
Current Firmware Version: 2.37
Firmware Date: Mon, 23 Feb 2004
Firmware Upgrade Notification Options
Automatically Check
Online for Latest
Firmware Version:
When this option is enabled, your router will check online periodically to
see if a newer version of the firmware is available.
Email Notification of
Newer Firmware
Version:
When this option is enabled, an email will be sent to the email address
configured in the email section whenever new firmware is available.
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D-Link Systems, Inc.
Using the Configuration Interface
Dynamic DNS
The DDNS feature allows you to host a server (Web, FTP, Game Server, etc…) using a domain name
that you have purchased (www.whateveryournameis.com) with your dynamically assigned IP address.
Most broadband Internet Service Providers assign dynamic (changing) IP addresses. Using a DDNS
service provider, your friends can enter in your domain name to connect to your server no matter
what your IP address is.
Dynamic DNS
Enabled:
Enable this option only if you have purchased your own domain name and
registered with a dynamic DNS service provider.
Tools > Dynamic DNS
Server Address:
Host Name:
Select a dynamic DNS service provider from the pull-down list.
Enter your host name.
Username or Key:
Enter the username or key provided by your service provider.
Password or Key:
Enter the password or key provided by your service provider.
Verify Password or
Key:
Timeout:
Re-type the password or key provided by your service provider.
The time between periodic updates to the Dynamic DNS, if your dynamic IP
address has not change. The timeout period is entered in hours.
Note: Option will disable it self if Username and Password or keys are incorrect.
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D-Link Systems, Inc.
Using the Configuration Interface
Status
The Status items are mainly informational.
Device Info
The Device Info page displays your Router settings. Options cannot be modified from this page.
General
Time:
Firmware Version:
Displays the time and date that the router is set to.
Displays the currently loaded firmware version.
WAN
Connection Type:
The Internet connection type that is being used.
MAC Address:
The MAC address that is seen over the Internet.
IP Address:
Subnet Mask:
Default Gateway:
Primary DNS Server:
Secondary DNS Server:
The IP address being used on the WAN port.
The subnet mask used on the WAN port.
Status > Device Info
The default gateway of the WAN port.
The Primary DNS Server address.
The Secondary DNS Server address.
LAN
MAC Address:
The MAC address displayed for your local area network.
IP Address:
The IP address of the router on your local area network.
Subnet Mask:
The subnet mask of the router on your local area network.
DHCP Server:
Indicates if the router is acting as a DHCP server on the local area network.
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D-Link Systems, Inc.
Using the Configuration Interface
Wireless LAN
Wireless Radio:
MAC Address:
Network Name (SSID):
Channel:
Turbo Mode:
Security Type:
Indicates whether wireless networking is on or off.
The MAC address displayed for your wireless network.
The Network Name, also referred to as SSID, of your wireless network.
The channel being used by the router for broadcasting on the wireless
network.
Indicates whether Turbo Mode is enabled or disabled.
Indicates the type of wireless security being used.
Wireless
This screen displays the number of wireless clients that are connected to the router, the MAC address
of each system connecting wirelessly, and the IP address of each system connecting wirelessly.
Routing
This page displays the routing details configured for the router.
A gateway value of 0.0.0.0 means there is no next hop. The IP address is directly connected to the
router on the interface specified, LAN or WAN. A value of 0.0.0.0 in both the destination IP and
netmask means that this is the default route.
Status > Routing
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D-Link Systems, Inc.
Using the Configuration Interface
Logs
The router automatically logs (records) events of possible interest in it’s internal memory. If there isn’t
enough internal memory for all events, logs of older events are deleted but logs of the latest events
are retained. The Logs option allows you to view the router logs. You can define what types of events
you want to view and the level of the events to view. This router also has external Syslog Server
support so you can send the log files to a computer on your network that is running a Syslog utility.
Log Options
What to View:
You can select the types of messages that you want to display from the log.
Firewall & Security, System, and Router Status messages can be selected.
View Levels:
There are three levels of message importance: Informational, Warning, and
Critical. Select the levels that you want displayed in the log.
Apply Log Settings
Now:
Will filter the log results so that only the selected options appear.
Status > Logs
Log Details
Refresh:
Clear:
Email Now:
Updates the log details on the screen so it displays any recent activity.
Clears all of the log contents.
This option will send a copy of the router log to the email address configured
in the Tools > Email screen.
Save Log:
This option will save the router to a log file on your computer.
Statistics
Network Traffic Stats
Refresh Statistics:
Clear Statistics:
Updates the screen with the latest router statistics.
Clears all of the values on the screen.
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D-Link Systems, Inc.
Using the Configuration Interface
LAN Statistics
Sent:
The number of packets transmitted to the local area network.
Received:
The number of packets received from the local area network.
TX Packets Dropped:
The number of transmit packets dropped on the local area network.
RX Packets Dropped:
The number of receive packets dropped on the local area network.
Collisions:
Errors:
The number of collisions on the local area network.
The number of errors occuring on the local area network.
WAN Statistics
Sent:
The number of packets transmitted to the Internet.
Received:
The number of packets received from the Internet.
TX Packets Dropped:
The number of transmit packets sent to the WAN port that were dropped.
RX Packets Dropped:
The number of receive packets sent to the WAN port that were dropped.
Collisions:
Errors:
The number of collisions involving packets intended for the WAN port.
The number of errors occuring with packets intended for the WAN port.
Wireless Statistics
Sent:
Received:
TX Packets Dropped:
Errors:
The number of packets sent to the wireless network.
The number of packets received from the wireless network.
The amount of transmit packets dropped.
The number of errors relating to packets to/from the wireless network.
Active Sessions
The Active Session page displays the full details of active sessions to your router.
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D-Link Systems, Inc.
Using the Configuration Interface
Appendix
Securing Your Network
1. Change Admin Password
Changing the password to access your new router is the first step in securing your network. This can
done through the Wizard or on the Admin Page of the Tools tab. There is no password by default and
hackers will know this when trying to access your network. Make sure that the password you choose
is not commonly known or something that is easy to guess such as your last name or your pet’s
name. Try using a combination of letters and numbers to deter intruders from hacking into your
network. Your private information should be kept private.
2. Disable DHCP and use Static IP addresses or Use Static DHCP and limit scope to the
amount of users on your network.
In the event that an intruder manages to gain access to your network, having DHCP enabled makes
it easier for the intruder to access other computers on your network. There are two methods for
getting around this. One is to disable DHCP and use static IP addressing on all the devices connected
to your network. This would mean that the intruder would have to know what IP network your devices
are on in order to access them. The second way is to change the scope of the DHCP server to only
include enough IP addresses for the devices in your network. You can then use the Static DHCP
feature of the router to assign an IP address to each device on your network. Static DHCP still
dynamically assigns an IP address to your network devices but only allows for those defined devices
to obtain an IP address.
3. Change the default LAN IP address
Change the default LAN IP address from 192.168.0.1 to an alternate IP address. There are 3 ranges
of IP addresses that have been reserved for use on Private Networks.
10.0.0.0
- 10.255.255.255 (10.0.0.0/8)
172.16.0.0
- 172.31.255.255 (172.16.0.0/12)
192.168.0.0
- 192.168.255.255 (192.168.0.0/16)
D-Link routers use 192.168.0.1 as their default LAN IP address. Choosing an alternate IP address
lessens the probabilty of an intruders knowing what IP network your devices are on.
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Using the Configuration Interface
4. Changing the Wireless Network Name (SSID - used for wireless devices only)
It is always a good idea to change the wireless network name (SSID) from the default value. Leaving
it in the default state is usually a good indication to intruders that all settings (including security) are
probably defaults. This setting identifies your wireless network. Make sure that the name you choose
is not commonly known or something that is easy to guess. Try using a combination of letters and
numbers to add complexity to it.
5. Set the Visibility Status to Invisible
Wireless routers typically broadcast the wireless network name (SSID) to users attempting to connect
to a wireless network. By setting the Visibility Status to Invisible, all devices attempting to connect to
the router will need to know the wireless network name (SSID) in order to connect.
6. Enable WPA Personal or Enterprise
Along with changing the wireless network name and setting the visibility status to invisible, we highly
recommended that you enable some sort of encryption feature. There are different methods of securing
wireless transmissions, but the most effective is WPA-Personal and WPA-Enterprise. WPA-Personal
is easier to configure but does not offer the extensive level of security that WPA Enterprise does. If
you have the infrastructure to support WPA Enterprise, we recommend that you use this method. If
not, then WPA-Personal will suffice.
7. Set up MAC Filtering
Each networking device (router, access point, wireless card, etc.) on a network contains a unique
hexadecimal number that identifies that specific product. This number is referred to as a MAC address.
MAC filtering allows you to create a list of the MAC address of each device on your network and only
allows these specific devices to associate with your network. With this feature enabled, devices
attempting to connect to your network with a MAC address that is not in the list you created, will be
denied access.
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Appendix
Glossary
A
Access Control List - ACL. Database of network devices that are allowed to access resources on the network.
Access Point - AP. Device that allows wireless clients to connect to it and access the network
Ad-hoc network - Peer-to-Peer network between wireless clients
Address Resolution Protocol - ARP. Used to map MAC addresses to IP addresses so that conversions can
be made in both directions.
ADSL - Asymmetric Digital Subscriber Line
Advanced Encryption Standard - AES. Government encryption standard
Alphanumeric - Characters A-Z and 0-9
Antenna - Used to transmit and receive RF signals.
AppleTalk – A set of Local Area Network protocols developed by Apple for their computer systems
AppleTalk Address Resolution Protocol – AARP. Used to map the MAC addresses of Apple computers to
their AppleTalk network addresses, so that conversions can be made in both directions.
Application layer - 7th Layer of the OSI model. Provides services to applications to ensure that they can
communicate properly with other applications on a network.
ASCII - American Standard Code for Information Interchange. This system of characters is most commonly
used for text files
Attenuation – The loss in strength of digital an analog signals. The loss is greater when the signal is being
transmitted over long distances.
Authentication –To provide credentials, like a Password, in order to verify that the person or device is really
who they are claiming to be
Automatic Private IP Addressing - APIPA. An IP address that a Windows computer will assign itself when it
is configured to obtain an IP address automatically but no DHCP server is available on the network
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Appendix
B
Backward Compatible - The ability for new devices to communicate and interact with older legacy devices to
guarantee interoperability
Bandwidth - The maximum amount of bytes or bits per second that can be transmitted to and from a network
device
Basic Input/Output System – BIOS. A program that the processor of a computer uses to startup the system
once it is turned on
Baud – Data transmission speed
Bit rate – The amount of bits that pass in given amount of time
bit/sec – bits per second
BOOTP – Bootstrap Protocol. Allows for computers to be booted up and given an IP address with no user
intervention
Bottleneck – A time during processes when something causes the process to slowdown or stop all together
Broadband – A wide band of frequencies available for transmitting data
Broadcast – Transmitting data in all directions at once
Browser – A program that allows you to access resources on the web and provides them to you graphically
C
Cable modem – A device that allows you to connect a computer up to a coaxial cable and receive Internet
access from your Cable provider
CardBus – A newer version of the PC Card or PCMCIA interface. It supports a 32-bit data path, DMA, and
consumes less voltage
Carrier Sense Multiple Access/Collision Avoidance – CSMA/CA
Carrier Sense Multiple Access/Collision Detect – CSMA/CD
CAT 5 – Category 5. Used for 10/100 Mbps or 1Gbps Ethernet connections
Client – A program or user that requests data from a server
Collision – When do two devices on the same Ethernet network try and transmit data at the exact same time.
Cookie – Information that is stored on the hard drive of your computer that holds your preferences to the site
that gave your computer the cookie
CSMA/CA – Carrier Sense Multiple Access/Collision Avoidance
CSMA/CD – Carrier Sense Multiple Access/Collision Detection
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Appendix
D
Data – Information that has been translated into binary do that it can be processed or moved to another device
Data Encryption Standard – Uses a randomly selected 56-bit key that must be known by both the sender and
the receiver when information is exchanged
Data-Link layer – The second layer of the OSI model. Controls the movement of data on the physical link of
a network
Database – Organizes information so that it can be managed updated, as well as easily accessed by users or
applications.
DB-25 – A 25 ping male connector for attaching External modems or RS-232 serial devices
DB-9 – A 9 pin connector for RS-232 connections
dBd - decibels related to dipole antenna
dBi - decibels relative to isotropic radiator
dBm - decibels relative to one milliwatt
Decrypt – To unscramble an encrypted message back into plain text
Default – A predetermined value or setting that is used by a program when no user input has been entered for
this value or setting
Demilitarized zone – DMZ. A single computer or group of computers that can be accessed by both users on
the Internet as well as users on the Local Network, but that is not protected by the same security as the Local
Network.
DHCP – Dynamic Host Configuration Protocol. Used to automatically assign IP addresses from a predefined
pool of addresses to computers or devices that requests them
Digital certificate – An electronic method of providing credentials to a server in order to have access to it or
a network
Direct Sequence Spread Spectrum – DSSS. Modulation technique used by 802.11b wireless devices
DNS – Domain Name System. Translates Domain Names to IP addresses
DOCSIS – Data Over Cable Service Interface Specifications. The standard interface for cable modems
Domain name – A name that is associated with an IP address
Download – To send a request from one computer to another and have the file transmitted back to the requesting
computer
DSL – Digital Subscriber Line. High bandwidth Internet connection over telephone lines
Duplex – Sending and Receiving data transmissions at the sane time
Dynamic DNS service – DDNS is provided by companies to allow users with Dynamic IP addresses to obtain
a Domain Name that will always by linked to their changing IP address. The IP address is updated by either
client software running on a computer or by a router that supports DDNS, whenever the IP address changes
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Appendix
Dynamic IP address – IP address that is assigned by a DHCP server and that may change. Cable Internet
providers usually use this method to assign IP addresses to their customers.
E
EAP – Extensible Authentication Protocol
Email – Electronic Mail is a computer-stored message that is transmitted over the Internet
Encryption – Converting data into cyphertext so that it cannot be easily read
Enterprise – Large organizations that use computers
Ethernet – The most widely used technology for Local Area Networks.
F
Fiber optic – A way of sending data through light impulses over glass or plastic wire or fiber
File server – A computer on a network that stores data so that the other computers on the network can all
access it
File sharing – Allowing data from computers on a network to be accessed by other computers on the network
will different levels of access rights
Firewall – A device that protects resources of the Local Area Network from unauthorized users outside of the
local network
Firmware – Programming that is inserted into a hardware device that tells it how to function
Fragmentation – Breaking up data into smaller pieces to make it easier to store
FTP – File Transfer Protocol. Easiest way to transfer files between computers on the Internet
Full-duplex – Sending and Receiving data at the same time
G
Gain – The amount an amplifier boosts the wireless signal
Gateway – A device that connects your network to another, like the internet
Gbps – Gigabits per second
Gigabit Ethernet – Transmission technology that provides a data rate of 1 billion bits per second
Graphical user interface – GUI
H
H.323 – A standard that provides consistency of voice and video transmissions and compatibility for
videoconferencing devices
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Appendix
Half-duplex – Data cannot be transmitted and received at the same time
Hashing – Transforming a string of characters into a shorter string with a predefined length
Hexadecimal – Characters 0-9 and A-F
HomePNA – Networking over telephone lines
HomeRF – Networking standard that combines 802.11b and DECT (Digital Enhanced Cordless
Telecommunication) that provides speeds up to 1.6 Mbps and a distance of 150 ft using a Frequency Hopping
transmission method
Hop – The action of data packets being transmitted from one router to another
Host – Computer on a network
HTTP – Hypertext Transfer Protocol is used to transfer files from HTTP servers (web servers) to HTTP clients
(web browsers)
HTTPS – HTTP over SSL is used to encrypt and decrypt HTTP transmissions
Hub – A networking device that connects multiple devices together
I
ICMP – Internet Control Message Protocol
IEEE – Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers
IETF – Internet Engineering Task Force
IGMP – Internet Group Management Protocol is used to make sure that computers can report their multicast
group membership to adjacent routers
IIS – Internet Information Server is a WEB server and FTP server provided by Microsoft
IKE – Internet Key Exchange is used to ensure security for VPN connections
Infrastructure – In terms of a wireless network, this is when wireless clients use an Access Point to gain
access to the network
Internet – A system of worldwide networks which use TCP/IP to allow for resources to be accessed from
computers around the world
Internet Explorer – A World Wide Web browser created and provided by Microsoft
Internet Protocol – The method of transferring data from one computer to another on the Internet
Internet Protocol Security – IPsec provides security at the packet processing layer of network communication
Internet Service Provider – An ISP provides access to the Internet to individuals or companies
Interoperability – The ability for products to interact with other products without much customer interaction
Intranet – A private network
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Appendix
Intrusion Detection – A type of security that scans a network to detect attacks coming from inside and
outside of the network
IP – Internet Protocol
IP address – A 32-bit number, when talking about Internet Protocol Version 4, that identifies each computer
that transmits data on the Internet or on an Intranet
IPsec – Internet Protocol Security
IPv6 – Internet Protocol Version 6 uses 128-bit addresses and was developed to solve the problem that we
face of running our of IP version 4 addresses
IPX – Internetwork Packet Exchange is a networking protocol developed by Novel to enable their Netware
clients and servers to communicate
ISP – Internet Service Provider
J
Java – A programming language used to create programs and applets for web pages
K
Kbps – Kilobits per second
Kbyte - Kilobyte
Kerberos – A method of securing and authenticating requests for services on a network
L
LAN – Local Area Network
Latency – The amount of time that it takes a packet to get from the one point to another on a network. Also
referred to as delay
LED - Light Emitting Diode
Legacy – Older devices or technology
Local Area Network – A group of computers in a building that usually access files from a server
M
MAC address – A unique hardware address for devices on a Local Area Network
MDI – Medium Dependent Interface is an Ethernet port for a connection to a straight-through cable
MDIX - Medium Dependent Interface Crossover, is an Ethernet port for a connection to a crossover cable
Megabit - Mb
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Megabyte - MB
Megabits per second - Mbps
MIB – Management Information Base is a set of objects that can be managed by using SNMP
Modem – A device that Modulates digital signals from a computer to an analog signal in order to transmit the
signal over phone lines. It also Demodulates the analog signals coming from the phone lines to digital signals
for your computer
MPPE – Microsoft Point-to-Point Encryption is used to secure data transmissions over PPTP connections
MTU – Maximum Transmission Unit is the largest packet that can be transmitted on a packet-based network
like the Internet
Multicast – Sending data from one device to many devices on a network
N
NAT – Network Address Translation allows many private IP addresses to connect to the Internet, or another
network, through one IP address
NetBEUI – NetBIOS Extended User Interface is a Local Area Network communication protocol. This is an
updated version of NetBIOS
NetBIOS – Network Basic Input/Output System
Netmask – Determines what portion of an IP address designates the Network and which part designates the
Host
NetWare – A Server Software developed by Novell
Network Interface Card – A card installed in a computer or built onto the motherboard that allows the computer
to connect to a network
Network later – The third layer of the OSI model which handles the routing of traffic on a network
Network Time Protocol – Used to synchronize the time of all the computers in a network
NIC – Network Interface Card
NTP – Network Time Protocol
O
OFDM – Orthogonal Frequency-Division Multiplexing is the modulation technique for both 802.11a and 802.11g
OSI – Open Systems Interconnection is the reference model for how data should travel between two devices
on a network
OSPF – Open Shortest Path First is a routing protocol that is used more than RIP in larger scale networks
because only changes to the routing table are sent to all the other routers in the network as opposed to
sending the entire routing table at a regular interval, which is how RIP functions
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P
Password - A sequence of characters that is used to authenticate requests to resources on a network
Personal Area Network – The interconnection of networking devices within a range of 10 meters
Physical layer – The first layer of the OSI model. Provides the hardware means of transmitting electrical
signals on a data carrier
PoE – Power over Ethernet is the means of transmitting electricity over the unused pairs in a category 5
Ethernet cable
POP 3 – Post Office Protocol 3 is used for receiving email
PPP – Point-to-Point Protocol is used for two computers to communicate with each over a serial interface, like
a phone line
PPPoE – Point-to-Point Protocol over Ethernet is used to connect multiple computers to a remote server over
Ethernet
PPTP – Point-to-Point Tunneling Protocol is used for creating VPN tunnels over the Internet between two
networks
Preamble – Used to synchronize communication timing between devices on a network
Q
QoS – Quality of Service
R
RADIUS – Remote Authentication Dial-In User Service allows for remote users to dial into a central server and
be authenticated in order to access resources on a network
Rendezvous – Apple’s version of UPnP, which allows for devices on a network to discover each other and be
connected without the need to configure any settings
Repeater – Retransmits the signal of an Access Point in order to extend it’s coverage
RIP – Routing Information Protocol is used to synchronize the routing table of all the routers on a network
RJ-11 – The most commonly used connection method for telephones
RJ-45 - The most commonly used connection method for Ethernet
RS-232C – The interface for serial communication between computers and other related devices
RSA – Algorithm used for encryption and authentication
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S
Samba – A freeware program that allows for resources to be shared on a network. Mainly used in Unix based
Operating Systems
Server – A computer on a network that provides services and resources to other computers on the network
Session key – An encryption and decryption key that is generated for every communication session between
two computers
Session layer – The fifth layer of the OSI model which coordinates the connection and communication between
applications on both ends
Simple Mail Transfer Protocol – Used for sending and receiving email
Simple Network Management Protocol – Governs the management and monitoring of network devices
SMTP – Simple Mail Transfer Protocol
SNMP – Simple Network Management Protocol
SOHO – Small Office/Home Office
SPI – Stateful Packet Inspection
SSH – Secure Shell is a command line interface that allows for secure connections to remote computers
SSID – Service Set Identifier is a name for a wireless network
Stateful inspection – A feature of a firewall that monitors outgoing and incoming traffic to make sure that only
valid responses to outgoing requests for incoming packets are allowed to pass though the firewall
Subnet mask – Determines what portion of an IP address designates the Network and which part designates
the Host
T
TCP – Transmission Control Protocol
TCP/IP – Transmission Control Protocol/Internet Protocol
TFTP – Trivial File Transfer Protocol is a utility used for transferring files that is simpler to use than FTP but with
less features
Throughput – The amount of data that can be transferred in a given time period
Traceroute – A utility displays the routes between you computer and specific destination
U
UDP – User Datagram Protocol
UNC – Universal Naming Convention allows for shares on computers to be identified without having to know
what storage device it’s on
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Unicast – Communication between a single sender and receiver
Universal Plug and Play – A standard that allows network devices to discover each other and configure
themselves to be a part of the network
UPnP – Universal Plug and Play
URL – Uniform Resource Locator is a unique address for files accessible on the Internet
UTP – Unshielded Twisted Pair
V
Virtual LAN Virtual Private Network – A secure tunnel over the Internet to connect remote offices or users to their company’s
network
VLAN – Virtual LAN
Voice over IP – Sending voice information over the Internet as opposed to the PSTN
VoIP – Voice over IP
W
Wake on LAN – Allows you to power up a computer though it’s Network Interface Card
WAN – Wide Area Network
Web browser – A utility that allows you to view content and interact will all of the information on the World Wide
Web
WEP – Wired Equivalent Privacy is security for wireless networks that is supposed to be comparable to that of
a wired network
Wi-Fi – Wireless Fidelity
Wi-Fi Protected Access – An updated version of security for wireless networks that provides authentication
as well as encryption
Wide Area Network - A network spanning a large geographical area or consisting of more than one LAN.
Wireless ISP – A company that provides a broadband Internet connection over a wireless connection
Wireless LAN – Connecting to a Local Area Network over one of the 802.11 wireless standards
WISP – Wireless Internet Service Provider
WLAN – Wireless Local Area Network
Y
Yagi antenna – A directional antenna used to concentrate wireless signals on a specific location
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Technical Specifications
Hardware Interface
• 4 x 10/100/1000 Auto-Sensing Gigabit Ethernet LAN Ports
• 1 x 10/100 Auto-Sensing Fast Ethernet
WAN Port
• D-Link 108G Wireless Technology
Software Features
• GameFuel™ Priority – Technology
• Up to 256 Firewall Port Configurations
• Access Control Policies (Parental Controls)
• Internal and External System Logging
• Static / Dynamic Routing
• Oversized NAT table
• Email Alerts
• Wireless Distribution System (WDS)
Dimensions
• L = 7.5 inches (190.5mm)
• W = 4.6 inches (116.84mm)
• H = 1.375 inches (35mm)
Security
• WPA-Enterprise
• WPA-Personal
• 64/128-bit WEP
• MAC Filtering
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External Antenna Type
• 1 - 5dBi detachable antenna
Standards
• IEEE 802.11g
• IEEE 802.11b
• IEEE 802.3
• IEEE 802.3u
LEDs
• Power
• WAN
• WLAN (Wireless Connection)
• LAN
Wireless Signal Rates1 with Automatic Fallback
• D-Link 108G: 108Mbps
• 54Mbps · 48Mbps
• 36Mbps · 24Mbps
• 18Mbps · 12Mbps
• 11Mbps · 9Mbps
• 6Mbps · 5.5Mbps
• 2Mbps · 1Mbps
Power Input
• External Power Supply DC 5V, 2.5A
Warranty
• 1-Year
1
Maximum wireless signal rate derived from IEEE Standard 802.11g specifications. Actual data
throughput will vary. Network conditions and environmental factors lower actual data throughput rate.
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Contacting Technical Support
You can find software updates and user documentation on the D-Link website.
D-Link provides free technical support for customers within the United States and within Canada for
the duration of the warranty period on this product.
U.S. and Canadian customers can contact D-Link technical support through our web site, or by
phone.
Tech Support for customers within the United States:
D-Link Technical Support over the Telephone:
(877) 453-5465
24 hours a day, seven days a week.
D-Link Technical Support over the Internet:
http://support.dlink.com
email:support@dlink.com
Tech Support for customers within Canada:
D-Link Technical Support over the Telephone:
(800) 361-5265
Monday to Friday 7:30am to 12:00am EST
D-Link Technical Support over the Internet:
http://support.dlink.ca
email:support@dlink.ca
When contacting technical support, please provide the following information:
„ Serial number of the unit
„ Model number or product name
„ Software type and version number
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Appendix
Warranty
Subject to the terms and conditions set forth herein, D-Link Systems, Inc. (“D-Link”) provides this Limited warranty for its product only to the person or
entity that originally purchased the product from:
„
D-Link or its authorized reseller or distributor and
„
Products purchased and delivered within the fifty states of the United States, the District of Columbia, U.S. Possessions or Protectorates, U.S.
Military Installations, addresses with an APO or FPO.
Limited Warranty: D-Link warrants that the hardware portion of the D-Link products described below will be free from material defects in workmanship
and materials from the date of original retail purchase of the product, for the period set forth below applicable to the product type (“Warranty Period”),
except as otherwise stated herein.
1-Year Limited Warranty for the Product(s) is defined as follows:
„
Hardware (excluding power supplies and fans) One (1) Year
„
Power Supplies and Fans One (1) Year
„
Spare parts and spare kits Ninety (90) days
D-Link’s sole obligation shall be to repair or replace the defective Hardware during the Warranty Period at no charge to the original owner or to refund
at D-Link’s sole discretion. Such repair or replacement will be rendered by D-Link at an Authorized D-Link Service Office. The replacement Hardware
need not be new or have an identical make, model or part. D-Link may in its sole discretion replace the defective Hardware (or any part thereof) with
any reconditioned product that D-Link reasonably determines is substantially equivalent (or superior) in all material respects to the defective Hardware.
Repaired or replacement Hardware will be warranted for the remainder of the original Warranty Period from the date of original retail purchase. If a
material defect is incapable of correction, or if D-Link determines in its sole discretion that it is not practical to repair or replace the defective Hardware,
the price paid by the original purchaser for the defective Hardware will be refunded by D-Link upon return to D-Link of the defective Hardware. All
Hardware (or part thereof) that is replaced by D-Link, or for which the purchase price is refunded, shall become the property of D-Link upon replacement
or refund.
Limited Software Warranty: D-Link warrants that the software portion of the product (“Software”) will substantially conform to D-Link’s then current
functional specifications for the Software, as set forth in the applicable documentation, from the date of original retail purchase of the Software for a
period of ninety (90) days (“Warranty Period”), provided that the Software is properly installed on approved hardware and operated as contemplated in
its documentation. D-Link further warrants that, during the Warranty Period, the magnetic media on which D-Link delivers the Software will be free of
physical defects. D-Link’s sole obligation shall be to replace the non-conforming Software (or defective media) with software that substantially conforms
to D-Link’s functional specifications for the Software or to refund at D-Link’s sole discretion. Except as otherwise agreed by D-Link in writing, the
replacement Software is provided only to the original licensee, and is subject to the terms and conditions of the license granted by D-Link for the
Software. Software will be warranted for the remainder of the original Warranty Period from the date or original retail purchase. If a material nonconformance is incapable of correction, or if D-Link determines in its sole discretion that it is not practical to replace the non-conforming Software, the
price paid by the original licensee for the non-conforming Software will be refunded by D-Link; provided that the non-conforming Software (and all
copies thereof) is first returned to D-Link. The license granted respecting any Software for which a refund is given automatically terminates.
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Non-Applicability of Warranty: The Limited Warranty provided hereunder for hardware and software of D-Link’s products will not be applied to and
does not cover any refurbished product and any product purchased through the inventory clearance or liquidation sale or other sales in which D-Link,
the sellers, or the liquidators expressly disclaim their warranty obligation pertaining to the product and in that case, the product is being sold “As-Is”
without any warranty whatsoever including, without limitation, the Limited Warranty as described herein, notwithstanding anything stated herein to the
contrary.
Submitting A Claim: The customer shall return the product to the original purchase point based on its return policy. In case the return policy period
has expired and the product is within warranty, the customer shall submit a claim to D-Link as outlined below:
„ The customer must submit with the product as part of the claim a written description of the Hardware defect or Software nonconformance in sufficient
detail to allow D-Link to confirm the same.
„
The original product owner must obtain a Return Material Authorization (“RMA”) number from the Authorized D-Link Service Office and, if requested,
provide written proof of purchase of the product (such as a copy of the dated purchase invoice for the product) before the warranty service is provided.
„
After an RMA number is issued, the defective product must be packaged securely in the original or other suitable shipping package to ensure that it
will not be damaged in transit, and the RMA number must be prominently marked on the outside of the package. Do not include any manuals or
accessories in the shipping package. D-Link will only replace the defective portion of the Product and will not ship
back any accessories.
„
The customer is responsible for all in-bound shipping charges to D-Link. No Cash on Delivery (“COD”) is allowed. Products sent COD will either be
rejected by D-Link or become the property of D-Link. Products shall be fully insured by the customer. D-Link will not be held responsible for any
packages that are lost in transit to D-Link. The repaired or replaced packages will be shipped to the customer via UPS Ground or any common carrier
selected by D-Link, with shipping charges prepaid. Expedited shipping is available if shipping charges are prepaid by the customer and upon request.
„
Return Merchandise Ship-To Address
USA: 17595 Mt. Herrmann, Fountain Valley, CA 92708
Canada: 2180 Winston Park Drive, Oakville, ON, L6H 5W1
(Visit http://www.dlink.ca for detailed warranty information within Canada)
D-Link may reject or return any product that is not packaged and shipped in strict compliance with the foregoing requirements, or for which an RMA
number is not visible from the outside of the package. The product owner agrees to pay D-Link’s reasonable handling and return shipping charges for
any product that is not packaged and shipped in accordance with the foregoing requirements, or that is determined by D-Link not to be defective or nonconforming.
What Is Not Covered: This limited warranty provided by D-Link does not cover: Products, if in D-Link’s judgment, have been subjected to abuse,
accident, alteration, modification, tampering, negligence, misuse, faulty installation, lack of reasonable care, repair or service in any way that is not
contemplated in the documentation for the product, or if the model or serial number has been altered, tampered with, defaced or removed; Initial
installation, installation and removal of the product for repair, and shipping costs; Operational adjustments covered in the operating manual for the
product, and normal maintenance; Damage that occurs in shipment, due to act of God, failures due to power surge, and cosmetic damage; Any
hardware, software, firmware or other products or services provided by anyone other than D-Link; Products that have been purchased from inventory
clearance or liquidation sales or other sales in which D-Link, the sellers, or the liquidators expressly disclaim their warranty obligation pertaining to the
product. Repair by anyone other than D-Link or an Authorized D-Link Service Office will void this Warranty.
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Disclaimer of Other Warranties: EXCEPT FOR THE LIMITED WARRANTY SPECIFIED HEREIN, THE PRODUCT IS PROVIDED “AS-IS” WITHOUT
ANY WARRANTY OF ANY KIND WHATSOEVER INCLUDING, WITHOUT LIMITATION, ANY WARRANTY OF MERCHANTABILITY, FITNESS FOR
A PARTICULAR PURPOSE AND NON-INFRINGEMENT. IF ANY IMPLIED WARRANTY CANNOT BE DISCLAIMED IN ANY TERRITORY WHERE A
PRODUCT IS SOLD, THE DURATION OF SUCH IMPLIED WARRANTY SHALL BE LIMITED TO NINETY (90) DAYS. EXCEPT AS EXPRESSLY
COVERED UNDER THE LIMITED WARRANTY PROVIDED HEREIN, THE ENTIRE RISK AS TO THE QUALITY, SELECTION AND PERFORMANCE
OF THE PRODUCT IS WITH THE PURCHASER OF THE PRODUCT.
Limitation of Liability: TO THE MAXIMUM EXTENT PERMITTED BY LAW, D-LINK IS NOT LIABLE UNDER ANY CONTRACT, NEGLIGENCE,
STRICT LIABILITY OR OTHER LEGAL OR EQUITABLE THEORY FOR ANY LOSS OF USE OF THE PRODUCT, INCONVENIENCE OR DAMAGES
OF ANY CHARACTER, WHETHER DIRECT, SPECIAL, INCIDENTAL OR CONSEQUENTIAL (INCLUDING, BUT NOT LIMITED TO, DAMAGES FOR
LOSS OF GOODWILL, LOSS OF REVENUE OR PROFIT, WORK STOPPAGE, COMPUTER FAILURE OR MALFUNCTION, FAILURE OF OTHER
EQUIPMENT OR COMPUTER PROGRAMS TO WHICH D-LINK’S PRODUCT IS CONNECTED WITH, LOSS OF INFORMATION OR DATA
CONTAINED IN, STORED ON, OR INTEGRATED WITH ANY PRODUCT RETURNED TO D-LINK FOR WARRANTY SERVICE) RESULTING FROM
THE USE OF THE PRODUCT, RELATING TO WARRANTY SERVICE, OR ARISING OUT OF ANY BREACH OF THIS LIMITED WARRANTY, EVEN
IF D-LINK HAS BEEN ADVISED OF THE POSSIBILITY OF SUCH DAMAGES. THE SOLE REMEDY FOR A BREACH OF THE FOREGOING
LIMITED WARRANTY IS REPAIR, REPLACEMENT OR REFUND OF THE DEFECTIVE OR NON-CONFORMING PRODUCT. THE MAXIMUM
LIABILITY OF D-LINK UNDER THIS WARRANTY IS LIMITED TO THE PURCHASE PRICE OF THE PRODUCT COVERED BY THE WARRANTY.
THE FOREGOING EXPRESS WRITTEN WARRANTIES AND REMEDIES ARE EXCLUSIVE AND ARE IN LIEU OF ANY OTHER WARRANTIES OR
REMEDIES, EXPRESS, IMPLIED OR STATUTORY.
Governing Law: This Limited Warranty shall be governed by the laws of the State of California. Some states do not allow exclusion or limitation of
incidental or consequential damages, or limitations on how long an implied warranty lasts, so the foregoing limitations and exclusions may not apply.
This limited warranty provides specific legal rights and the product owner may also have other rights which vary from state to state.
Trademarks: D-Link is a registered trademark of D-Link Systems, Inc. Other trademarks or registered trademarks are the property of their respective
manufacturers or owners.
Copyright Statement: No part of this publication or documentation accompanying this Product may be reproduced in any form or by any means or
used to make any derivative such as translation, transformation, or adaptation without permission from D-Link Corporation/D-Link Systems, Inc., as
stipulated by the United States Copyright Act of 1976. Contents are subject to change without prior notice. Copyright© 2002 by D-Link Corporation/DLink Systems, Inc. All rights reserved.
CE Mark Warning: This is a Class B product. In a domestic environment, this product may cause radio interference, in which case the user may be
required to take adequate measures.
FCC Statement: This equipment has been tested and found to comply with the limits for a Class B digital device, pursuant to part 15 of the FCC Rules.
These limits are designed to provide reasonable protection against harmful interference in a residential installation. This equipment generates, uses,
and can radiate radio frequency energy and, if not installed and used in accordance with the instructions, may cause harmful interference to radio
communication. However, there is no guarantee that interference will not occur in a particular installation. If this equipment does cause harmful
interference to radio or television reception, which can be determined by turning the equipment off and on, the user is encouraged to try to correct the
interference by one or more of the following measures:
„
Reorient or relocate the receiving antenna.
„
Increase the separation between the equipment and receiver.
„
Connect the equipment into an outlet on a circuit different from that to which the receiver is connected.
„
Consult the dealer or an experienced radio/TV technician for help.
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Appendix
For detailed warranty outside the United States, please contact corresponding local D-Link office.
FCC Caution:
The manufacturer is not responsible for any radio or TV interference caused by unauthorized modifications to this equipment; such modifications could
void the user’s authority to operate the equipment.
(1) The devices are restricted to indoor operations within the 5.15 to 5.25GHz range. (2) For this device to operate in the 5.15 to 5.25GHz range, the
devices must use integral antennas.
This device complies with Part 15 of the FCC Rules. Operation is subject to the following two conditions: (1) This device may not cause harmful
interference, and (2) this device must accept any interference received, including interference that may cause undesired operation.
IMPORTANT NOTE:
FCC Radiation Exposure Statement:
This equipment complies with FCC radiation exposure limits set forth for an uncontrolled environment. The antenna(s) used for this equipment must be
installed to provide a separation distance of at least eight inches (20 cm) from all persons.
This equipment must not be operated in conjunction with any other antenna.
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Appendix
Registration
Product registration is entirely voluntary and failure to complete or return this form will not diminish your warranty rights.
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D-Link Systems, Inc.
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