Specifications | Emerson 986269 Outboard Motor User Manual

TITAN II
LARGE AC ELECTRIC MOTORS
The Emerson logo is a trademark and service mark of Emerson Electric Co.
All other marks are the properties of their respective owners.
Emerson Motors
8100 West Florissant Ave.
St. Louis, MO 63136
Phone: 888 637 7333
Fax: 314 553 2087
www.emersonmotors.com
IN234-204B
P/N 986269
HORIZONTAL MOTORS WITH ANTI-FRICTION BEARINGS
INSTALLATION, OPERATION AND MAINTENANCE MANUAL
Rev. 10/02
©Emerson Motor Company, 2002; All Rights Reserved
©Emerson Motor Company, 2002; All Rights Reserved
U.S. ELECTRICAL MOTORS
INSTALLATION AND MAINTENANCE
Safety
SAFETY FIRST
High voltage and rotating parts can cause serious injury or loss of life. Safe installation, operation and
maintenance must be performed by qualified personnel. Familiarization with and adherence to NEMA MG2,
the National Electrical Code, and local codes is recommended. It is important to observe safety precautions
to protect personnel from possible injury. Personnel should be instructed to:
1.
Disconnect all power to motor and accessories prior to initiating any maintenance
or repairs.
2.
Avoid contact with rotating parts.
3.
Act with care in accordance with this manual's prescribed procedures in handling and
installing this equipment.
4.
Be sure unit and accessories are electrically grounded and proper electrical installation wiring and controls are used in accordance with local and national electrical
codes. Refer to "National Electrical Code Handbook" - NFPA No. 70. Employ
qualified electricians.
5.
Be sure equipment is properly enclosed to prevent access by children or other
unauthorized personnel in order to prevent possible accidents.
6.
Be sure shaft key is fully captive before unit is energized.
7.
Provide proper safeguards for personnel against rotating parts and applications involving high inertia loads which can cause overspeed.
8.
Avoid extended exposure to equipment with high noise levels.
9.
Observe good safety habits at all times and use care to avoid injury to yourself or
damage to your equipment.
10.
Be familiar with the equipment and read all instructions thoroughly before installing
or working on equipment.
11.
Observe all special instructions attached to the equipment. Remove shipping
fixtures if so equipped.
12.
Check motor and driven equipment for proper rotation and phase sequence prior to
coupling. Also check if a unidirectional motor is supplied and note proper rotation.
13.
Do not apply power factor correction capacitors to motors rated for operation
with variable frequently drives. Serious damage to the drive will result if capacitors
are placed between the motor and drive. Consult your drive supplier for more
information.
U.S. ELECTRICAL MOTORS
INSTALLATION AND MAINTENANCE
SECTION
Table of Contents
PAGE
SAFETY ........................................................................................................................................................ i
I.
SHIPMENT ...................................................................................................................................... 1
II.
HANDLING ...................................................................................................................................... 1
Ill.
STORAGE ........................................................................................................................................ 2
IV.
INSTALLATION LOCATION ............................................................................................................. 5
V.
FOUNDATION .................................................................................................................................. 5
VI.
INITIAL INSTALLATION .................................................................................................................. 6
1. Coupling or Pulley Installation. ............................................................................................. 6
2. Rough Alignment ................................................................................................................... 6
3. Final Alignment ..................................................................................................................... 6
4. Electrical Connection ............................................................................................................ 7
5. Reversing Rotation ................................................................................................................ 8
6. Initial Start ............................................................................................................................ 8
7. Vibration ................................................................................................................................ 9
VII.
NORMAL OPERATION .................................................................................................................... 9
1. General Maintenance ........................................................................................................... 9
2. Inspection and Cleaning ...................................................................................................... 10
VIII.
DOWELING ................................................................................................................................... 10
IX.
DISASSEMBLY ............................................................................................................................. 11
X.
REASSEMBLY ............................................................................................................................... 11
XI.
LUBRICATION ............................................................................................................................... 12
XII.
RENEWAL PARTS AND SERVICE .............................................................................................. 14
XIII.
CUTAWAY DRAWINGS .................................................................................................................. 15
XIV.
TROUBLESHOOTING .................................................................................................................... 16
XV.
INSTALLATION RECORD .............................................................................................................. 18
U.S. ELECTRICAL MOTORS
INSTALLATION AND MAINTENANCE
I.
Shipment &
Handling
SHIPMENT
Prior to shipment, all Titan-II Motors undergo extensive electrical and mechanical testing, and are thoroughly
inspected. Upon receipt of the motor, carefully inspect the unit for any signs of damage that may have occurred
during shipment. Should such damage be evident, unpack the motor at once in the presence of a claims adjuster
and immediately report all damage and breakage to the transportation company and U.S Electrical Motors.
When contacting U.S Electrical Motors concerning the motor, be sure to include the complete motor identification
number, frame and type which appears on the nameplate (see installation record in this manual).
II.
HANDLING
The equipment needed to handle the motor includes a hoist and spreader bar arrangement of sufficient strength
to lift the motor safely. The spreader bar arrangement should always be employed whenever multiple lifting lugs
or eyebolts are provided (See Figures 1A & 1B). The spreader bar should have the lifting hooks positioned to equal
the span of the eyebolts or lifting lugs. The eyebolts or lifting lugs provided are intended to lift the motor weight only.
See Table 6 for motor weights.
CAUTION
Lifting the motor by means other than specifically noted may result in damage to the
motor or injury to personnel. Note that the eyebolt on the top of WPII enclosure is intended
for lifting the tophat only.
FIGURE 1A
FIGURE 1B
Typical Construction With Two Eyebolts
Typical Construction With Four Lifting Lugs
1
U.S. ELECTRICAL MOTORS
INSTALLATION AND MAINTENANCE
III.
Storage
STORAGE
1. When to put a Motor in Storage.
If a motor is not put into immediate service (one month or less), or if it is taken out of service for a prolonged
period, special storage precautions should be taken to prevent damage. The following schedule is recommended
as a guide to determine storage needs.
(A)
Out of service or in storage less than one month - no special precautions except that space heaters, if
supplied, must be energized at any time the motor is not running.
(B)
Out of service or in storage for more than one but less than six months - store per Items 2 A through 2F,
2H, 3 and 4.
(C)
Out of service or in storage for six months or more - all recommendations.
2. Storage Preparation.
2
(A)
Where possible, motors should be stored indoors in a clean, dry area.
(B)
When indoor storage is not possible, the motors must be covered with a tarpaulin. This cover should
extend to the ground. Do not tightly wrap the motor as this will restrict air flow and result in surface
condensation. Care must also be taken to protect the motor from flood damage or from any harmful
chemical vapors.
(C)
Whether indoors or out, the area of storage should be free from excessive vibration which can cause
bearing damage.
(D)
Precautions should be taken to prevent rodents, snakes, birds, or other small animals from nesting
inside the motors. In areas where they are prevalent, precautions must also be taken to prevent insects,
such as mud dauber wasps, from gaining access to the interior of the motor.
(E)
Inspect the rust preventative coating on all external machined surfaces, including shaft extensions. If
necessary, recoat the surfaces with a rust preventative material such as Rust Veto No. 342 (manufactured
by E. F. Houghton Co.) or an equivalent. The condition of the coating should be checked periodically and
surfaces recoated as needed.
(F)
To prevent moisture accumulation, some form of heating must be utilized to prevent condensation. This
heating should maintain the winding temperature at a minimum of 5°C above ambient. If space heaters
are supplied, they should be energized. If none are available, single phase or "trickle" heating may be
utilized by energizing one phase of the motor winding with a low voltage. Request the required voltage
and transformer capacity from U.S. Electrical Motors. A third option is to use an auxiliary heat source
to keep the winding warm by either convection or blowing warm air into the motor.
(G)
Bearing cavities must be completely filled with lubricant during long term storage. Remove the drain
plug and fill cavity with grease at the grease inlet until it begins to purge from the drain hole then replace
the drain plug. Refer to Section XI "Lubrication" for recommended greases. At approximately 2 month
intervals, a small quantity of grease should be injected into grease fitting with drain plug removed.
Exiting grease should be inspected for moisture and contamination. If moisture or contamination is
present, the motor bearings should be inspected and fresh grease installed.
U.S. ELECTRICAL MOTORS
INSTALLATION AND MAINTENANCE
(H)
Storage
All motors must have the shaft rotated a few turns once a month to maintain a lubricant film on bearing
races.
3. Periodic Maintenance/ Insulation History
The only accurate way to evaluate the condition of the winding insulation is to maintain a history of the
insulation readings. Over a period of months or years these readings will tend to indicate a trend. If a
downward trend develops or if the resistance drops too low, thoroughly clean and dry the windings, retreating
if necessary.
The recommended insulation resistance test is as follows:
(A)
(B)
Using a megohmmeter, with winding at ambient temperature, apply DC voltage (noted below) for 60
seconds and take reading.
Rated Motor Voltage
Recommended DC Test Voltage
600 and less
601 to 1000 incl.
1001 and up
500 VDC
500 to 1000 VDC
500 to 2500 VDC
(2500 VDC optimum)
For comparison the reading should be corrected to a 40°C base temperature.
This may be done by utilizing the following:
R40C = Kt X Rt
Where R40C = insulation resistance (in megohms) corrected to 40°C
Rt = measured insulation resistance (in megohms)
Kt = temperature coefficient (from Graph 1)
GRAPH 1
Winding Temperature °C
(ADAPTED FROM IEEE 43)
Installation Resistance Temperature Coefficient: Kt
3
Storage
U.S. ELECTRICAL MOTORS
INSTALLATION AND MAINTENANCE
(C)
Insulation resistance readings must not drop below the value indicated by the following formula:
Rm = Kv + 1
Rm = minimum insulation, in megohms, at 40°C
Kv = rated motor voltage in kilovolts
(D)
Dielectric Absorption Ratio:
In addition to the individual test reading, a dielectric absorption ratio may be required. The dielectric absorption
ratio is obtained by taking megohmmeter readings at a one minute and ten minute interval or when hand
powered megohmmeters are used, at a thirty second and sixty second interval. The voltage should be the
same as outlined in Part A of this procedure.
The ratio is obtained by dividing the second reading by the first reading and is based on a good insulation
system increasing its resistance when subjected to a test voltage for a period of time.
The ratios are as follows:
10 minute : 1 minute
Dangerous
Poor
Questionable
Fair
Good
Excellent
=
=
=
=
=
=
less than 1.0
1.0 to 1.4
1.5 to 1.9
2.0 to 2.9
3.0 to 4.0
Over 4.0
60 second : 30 second
Poor
Questionable
Fair
Good
Excellent
=
=
=
=
=
less than 1.1
1.1 to 1.24
1.25 to 1.3
1.4 to 1.6
Over to 1.6
If a low insulation resistance reading is obtained in either the individual test or dielectric absorption ratio test,
thoroughly clean and dry the windings. Recheck insulation resistance and dielectric absorption ratio.
NOTE: Slightly lower dielectric absorption ratios may be acceptable when high initial insulation resistance
readings are obtained (1,000 + megohms). Refer any questions to U.S.E.M. Product Service
Department.
For additional information on insulation testing, refer to IEEE Transaction No. 43.
4. Start-up Preparations after Storage.
4
(A)
Motor should be thoroughly inspected and cleaned to restore to an "As Shipped" condition.
(B)
If motor has been in storage for less than 6 months, remove grease drain plugs at each end of the motor.
Remove a small quantity of grease with a scavenger and replace drain plugs. If any moisture or
contamination is evident in the grease, it must be completely changed by disassembling the unit and
repacking per Section XI "Lubrication".
(C)
If motor has been in storage for 6 months or more, grease must be completely changed by disassembling
the unit and repacking per Section XI "Lubrication".
(D)
The winding must be tested to obtain insulation resistance and dielectric absorption ratio as described in
Part 3 of this section.
(E)
If storage has exceeded one year, the U.S.E.M. Quality Assurance Department must be contacted prior
to equipment start-up.
U.S. ELECTRICAL MOTORS
INSTALLATION AND MAINTENANCE
IV.
Installation
Location &
Foundation
INSTALLATION LOCATION
When selecting a location for the motor and driven unit, keep the following items in mind:
1. The location should be clean, dry, well ventilated, properly drained, and provide accessibility for inspection,
lubrication, and maintenance. Ambient vibration should be kept to a minimum. Outdoor installations on Open
Dripproof motors require protection from the elements.
2. The location should also provide adequate space for motor removal without shifting the driven unit.
3. The temperature rise of a standard motor is based on operation at an altitude not higher than 3,300 feet above
sea level. See NEMA MG-1 20.40 for normal service condition.
4. To avoid condensation inside of motor, motors should not be stored or operated in areas subject to rapid
temperature changes unless they are energized or protected by space heaters.
5. The motor should not be installed in close proximity to any combustible material or where flammable gases and/
or dust may be present, unless motor is specifically built for that environment and is U. L. labeled accordingly.
V.
FOUNDATION
Concrete (reinforced as required) makes the best foundation, particularly for large motors and driven units. A
sufficient mass provides rigid support that minimizes deflection and vibration. It may be located on soil, structural
steel, or building floors, provided the total weight (motor, driven unit and foundation) does not exceed the allowable
bearing load of the support. (Allowable bearing loads of structural steel and floors can be obtained from engineering
handbooks; building codes of local communities give the recommended allowable bearing loads for different types of
soil). It is recommended that a fabricated steel base (sole plate) be used between motor feet and foundation. See
Figure 2. Base foot pads should be level and in the same plane.
Grouting
Grouting is the process of firmly securing equipment to a concrete base. This base is a continuation of the main
foundation, designed to dampen any machine vibration present and prevent the equipment from shaking loose
during operation. A serviceable and solid foundation can be laid only by careful attention to proper grouting procedure.
In practical terms, “grout” is a plastic filler which is poured between the motor sole plate and the foundation upon
which it is to operate. Being plastic, it is expected to fill all spaces and cavities before it sets or solidifies and
becomes an integral part of the principal foundation. In order to function properly, the principal foundation should be
allowed to fully set through chemical reaction and dehydration as recommended by the grout manufacturer, prior to
motor installation.
MOTOR
MOUNTING
BOLT
FIGURE 2
MOUNTING
BOLT
SHIMS
GROUT
SOLE PLATE
TYPICAL MOTOR
MOUNTING
ARRANGEMENT
WEDGES
5
U.S. ELECTRICAL MOTORS
INSTALLATION AND MAINTENANCE
VI.
Initial
Installation
INITIAL INSTALLATION
1. Coupling or Pulley Installation
Remove the shaft locking device shipped on motor (as applicable). Wash protective coating from the motor
shaft extension(s) with solvent. Install couplings or pulleys on motor shaft per manufacturers' recommended
fit and mounting practices.
Caution:
Hammering or pounding with a mallet to install couplings or pulleys will
damage bearings.
In belted applications, the driver pulley should be positioned as close to the shaft shoulder as possible to
assure longest bearing life and keep shaft bending moment to a minimum. Take care to ensure that the
inboard edge of the pulley hub does not ride-up on the shaft shoulder blend radius.
Caution:
Belt tension should not exceed the transmission drive manufacturers'
recommendations. Excessive belt tension reduces belt life. Overload due
to overtensioning of belts reduces bearing life and can induce shaft fatigue
failure.
Caution:
Excessive bending movement due to placing of pulley far out on the shaft
extension will reduce bearing life and may lead to shaft fatigue failure.
Caution:
Placing the pulley hub onto shaft against the shaft shoulder blend radius
may cause a large stress riser in the shaft, resulting in shaft fatigue failure.
Prevent this from occurring by using a chamfered spacer ring or chamfering
the end of the hub bore.
2. Rough Alignment
Inspect sole plate mounting pads and bottom of motor feet for dirt or irregularities that would prevent proper
seating. Position and shim the motor such that the coupling hubs are aligned within 1/32" and the motor shaft
is level. The motor shaft must be slightly lower than the driven shaft to allow for final adjustment shims.
3. Final Alignment
Accurate shaft alignment between motor and driven equipment is essential for trouble-free operation. Improper alignment can result in vibration, bearing overload and excessive shaft stresses. Flexible couplings
may not adequately compensate for excessive misalignment.
Whenever aligning a motor to driven equipment, keep the following rules in mind:
– Do not place more than five shims in a shim pack under any one machine foot, as the flexibility of the shim
pack will contribute to a soft foot condition.
– After any corrective adjustment, tighten foot bolts securely and recheck alignment.
– When making shim adjustments, change only one foot at a time.
– Recheck alignment after the motor has been in service for approximately one week and readjust as
necessary.
A. Angular Alignment (See Figure 3A)
Check for angular misalignment of motor to driven unit shaft. (See Figure 3A). Measure distance between
coupling hub faces (with feeler gauges) at four places equally spaced around the outside diameters. Position
motor as necessary to be within the maximum allowable misalignment of .001 in. per foot of coupling radius.
6
Initial
Installation
U.S. ELECTRICAL MOTORS
INSTALLATION AND MAINTENANCE
B. Parallel Alignment (See Figure 3B)
Fasten a dial indicator onto one coupling hub with the indicator button on the cylindrical surface of the
opposite coupling hub. Rotate shafts together and take readings at four points, 90° apart. Relocate motor
until total indicator movement in full rotation does not exceed .002". Transfer indicator to opposite hub and
repeat the parallel alignment procedure. Recheck angular alignment as described in Step A.
FIGURE 3
FLEXIBLE COUPLINGS
MEASURE DISTANCE
BETWEEN FACES
MOTOR
LOAD
FLANGE
FIGURE 3A
ANGULAR MISALIGNMENT
LOAD
MOTOR
FLANGE
FIGURE 3B
PARALLEL ALIGNMENT
C. Soft Foot Check
Check and correct any "soft foot" condition to assure that equal pressure is exerted on each motor foot by the
following shimming procedure. Bolt all motor feet down solidly to the motor bedplate or foundation. Mount the
base of the dial indicator from the motor's foundation, and place and zero out the indicator on the motor shaft
or coupling. Back off one of the take off end bolts and check indicator for change in reading, a .001 inch
reading is maximum. Shim at foot if required and go to other take off end bolt. This procedure should be
repeated on the opposite end until no reading is greater than .001 inches.
D. Hot Alignment
It is possible for motor shaft height to change relative to the driven equipment and this should be compensated
for during the alignment procedure. Recheck parallel alignment (vertical) of coupled drive by repeating after
normal operating temperature is reached. If shimming is changed, repeat alignment procedure to the extent
necessary to assure proper alignment.
4. Electrical Connection
Refer to the motor nameplate for power supply requirements and to the connection diagram for connection
parameters. Be sure connections are tight. Recheck carefully and assure that they agree with the connection
diagram. Insulate all connections with electrical tape to insure that they will not short against each other or
to ground. Be sure the motor is grounded to guard against electrical shock. Refer to the National Electrical
Code Handbook (NFPA No. 70) and to local electrical codes for proper wiring, protection, and wire sizing. Be
sure proper starting equipment and protective devices are used for every motor. For assistance, contact the
motor starter manufacturer. Apply the above precautions to all accessories as well.
7
U.S. ELECTRICAL MOTORS
INSTALLATION AND MAINTENANCE
Initial
Installation
5. Reversing Rotation
The direction of rotation may be reversed by interchanging any two, of the three power phases to the motor
leads. Be sure that the power is off and steps are taken to prevent accidental starting of the motor before
attempting to change any electrical connections.
CAUTION
Some motors have unidirectional ventilating fans. Running such a unit in reverse for any extended
length of time will result in motor damage. On motors that are unidirectional, the direction of rotation
is noted by an arrow mounted above the take-off-shaft and by a warning plate mounted near the main
nameplate. To determine direction of rotation for which leads are connected, apply power momentarily
and observe rotation. Motor should be uncoupled from driven equipment to insure driven equipment
is not damaged by reverse rotation. Motor coupling may require removal or suppport if motor is
operated uncoupled from driven equipment.
6. Initial Start
After installation is completed, but before motor is put in regular service, make an initial start as follows:
A.
Insure that motor and control device connections agree with wiring diagrams.
B.
Insure that voltage, phase and frequency of line circuit (power supply) agree with motor nameplate.
C.
Check insulation resistance according to Section Ill “Storage”, Part 3.
D.
Check all foundation and base bolts to insure that they are tight.
E.
If motor has been in storage, either before or after installation, refer to Section Ill “Storage”, Part 4 for
preparations.
F.
Check for proper or desired rotation. See Part 5 of this section.
G.
Insure that all protective devices are connected and are operating properly.
H.
Run motor at minimum possible load long enough to be certain that no unusual condition develops.
Listen and feel for excessive noise, vibration, clicking or pounding. If any are present, stop motor
immediately. Investigate the cause and correct before putting motor into service. In the case of
vibration, see Part 7 of this section.
CAUTION
Repeated trial starts can overheat the motor (particularly for across-the-line starting)
or the external starting equipment. If repeated trial starts are made, allow sufficient
time between starts to permit heat to be dissipated from windings and controls to
prevent overheating. Refer to Starting Duty Nameplate (if supplied) and NEMA MG112.54, MG1-20.42 and MG1-20.43 for allowable starting frequency and load inertia
(WR2).
8
U.S. ELECTRICAL MOTORS
INSTALLATION AND MAINTENANCE
I.
Normal
Operation
When checks are satisfactory to this point, increase the load slowly up to rated load and check unit for
satisfactory operation.
7. Vibration
Motors are supplied as standard in accordance with NEMA MG-1, section 7, which dictates that motor no-load
vibration when mounted on a resilient base shall not exceed the limits as outlined in the following table:
TABLE 1
NO-LOAD VIBRATION LIMITS
Speed, RPM
3600
1800
1200
900
720
600
Rotational Frequency, Hz
60
30
20
15
12
10
Velocity, Inches per second
peak
0.15
0.15
0.15
0.12
0.09
0.08
If vibration is deemed excessive, check for and correct any misalignment and/or "soft foot" condition per item
3 of this section.
VII.
NORMAL OPERATION
Start the motor in accordance with standard instructions for the starting equipment used. Connected load should
be reduced to the minimum, particularly for reduced voltage starting and/or high inertia connected loads, until the
unit has reached full speed.
1. General Maintenance
Routine maintenance is the best assurance of trouble-free motor operation; it prevents costly shutdown and
repairs. Major elements of a controlled maintenance program include:
A.
B.
Trained personnel who KNOW the work.
Systematic records, which contain at least the following:
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
Complete nameplate data.
Prints (wiring diagrams, certified outline dimensions).
Alignment data (departures from perfect alignment, allowance for temperature).
Winding resistance and temperature.
Results of regular inspection, including vibration and bearing temperature data as applicable.
Documentation of any repairs.
Lubrication data (method of application, type of lubricant used, maintenance cycle by location).
9
U.S. ELECTRICAL MOTORS
INSTALLATION AND MAINTENANCE
Normal Operation
& Doweling
2. Inspection & Cleaning
Stop the motor before cleaning. ( CAUTION: See section on safety, page i). Clean the motor,
inside and outside, regularly. The frequency depends upon actual conditions existing around the motor. Use
the following procedures, as they apply:
A.
Wipe any contaminants from external surfaces of the motor.
B.
Remove dirt, dust, or debris from ventilating air inlets. Use compressed air as necessary. Never allow
dirt to accumulate near air inlets. Never operate motor with air passages blocked or restricted. For
stubborn dirt n tubes of Totally-Enclosed-Tube-Cooled Motors, use a Tool Similar to a shotgun "ramrod".
CAUTION
When using compressed air, always use proper eye protection to prevent
accidental eye injury.
VIII.
C.
Filters in weather protected top hats should be removed and cleaned per filter manufacturer's
recommendations.
D.
Clean motors internally by vacuuming or blowing with clean, dry compressed air. Generally a pressure
not exceeding 30 PSI is recommended.
E.
When dirt and dust are solidly packed, or windings are coated with oil or greasy grime, disassemble the
motor and clean with solvent. Use only high-flash naphtha, mineral spirits, or Stoddard solvent. Wipe
with solvent-dampened cloth, or use suitable soft bristle brush. DO NOT SOAK. Oven dry (150 - 175°F)
solvent cleaned windings thoroughly before reassembly.
F.
After cleaning and drying the windings, check the insulation resistance. Refer to Section III, Part 3 for
procedure.
DOWELING
Doweling the motor (and driven unit) accomplishes the following:
1. Restricts movement of the motor and driven unit.
2. Eases realignment if motor is removed from base.
3. Temporarily restrains the motor, should mounting bolts loosen.
The following procedure for inserting dowel pins is recommended (See Figure 5).
1. Check the alignment after the unit has been in operation approximately one week. Correct if necessary.
2. Drill through motor feet on drive end and into base. Drill diameter must be slightly smaller than the
intended dowel size to allow for reaming operation.
3. Ream holes in the feet and base to the proper diameter for the pins (light press fit). Clean out the chips.
4. Insert dowel pins.
10
U.S. ELECTRICAL MOTORS
INSTALLATION AND MAINTENANCE
IX.
Disassembly
& Reassembly
DISASSEMBLY
See Figure 4 for Bearing Housing Cross Section.
A. Disconnect power. Refer to section on Safety, page i.
B. Remove grills and/or weather protected tophat as required.
C. Remove bearing cap screws.
D. Remove bearing temperature detector probes from brackets as applicable.
E. Remove bracket to stator bolts and remove brackets.
F. If bearings are to be replaced, remove bearings from rotor shaft with a bearing puller. Pull on inner bearing race
to remove bearings without damage.
G. To remove filters on weather protected units for inspection and cleaning, remove end cover and rotate latch.
Slide filter out of tophat assembly.
Hazardous Location Motors: (Underwriter's Laboratories Requirements)
These motors are built to specifications approved by Underwriter's Laboratories. Assembly and inspection is
made by authorized personnel at our factory before the Underwriter's Label is affixed. The Label is void if the
unit is disassembled at other than U.S. Electrical Motors plant of manufacture or a U. S. Electrical Motors
authorized and U.L. approved service shop, unless specific approval for such action is obtained from
Underwriter's Laboratories.
FIGURE 4
FIGURE 5
A
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
X.
BEARING BRACKET
BEARING CAP
BEARING
GREASE FILL FITTING
GREASE DRAIN PLUG
B
REASSEMBLY
A. FILTER ACCESS COVER
(SEE TABLE 5 FOR REQUIRED END
CLEARANCE TO REMOVE FILTER)
B. DOWEL PIN HOLES
A. Clean all machined and mating surfaces on bearing caps, bracket fits, etc.
B. Remove old grease from grease cavities and bearings.
C. Carefully inspect bearings for nicks, dents or any unusual wear patterns. Damaged bearings must be replaced.
D. If motor is supplied with insulated bearing shaft journals, inspect for damage and repair as necesary before
reassembly.
11
U.S. ELECTRICAL MOTORS
INSTALLATION AND MAINTENANCE
Lubrication
E. Reassemble motor by reversing the disassembly procedure in Section IX “Disassembly”. Bearings should
be installed per bearing manufacturer's recommended procedure. Pack bearings with grease per Section XI
"Lubrication".
F. Torque bolts per values in Table 4.
G. Touch up any scratched or chipped paint to protect motor surfaces.
XI.
LUBRICATION
A. Relubrication of Units in Service
Units with grease lubricated bearings are pre-lubricated at the factory and normally do not require initial lubrication.
Relubricating interval depends upon speed, type of bearing and service. Refer to Table 2 for suggested
regreasing intervals. Note that operating environment and application may dictate more frequent lubrication.
Motor must be at rest and electrical controls should be locked open to prevent energizing while motor is being
serviced (Refer to section on Safety, page i). If motor is being taken out of storage, refer to Section III
"Storage". Part 4, for preparation instructions.
To relubricate bearings, remove the drain plug. Inspect grease drain and remove any blockage (caked grease
or foreign particles) with a mechanical probe or scavenger (take care not to damage bearing). Under NO
circumstances should a mechanical probe or scavenger be used while the motor is in operation. Add new
grease at the grease inlet. New grease must be compatible with grease already in the motor (refer to Tables 2
and 3 for compatible greases and replenishment quantities).
CAUTION
Greases of different bases (lithium, polyurea, clay, etc.) may not be compatible when
mixed. Mixing such greases can result in reduced lubricant life and premature bearing
failure. Prevent such intermixing by disassembling motor, removing all old grease
and repacking with new grease per Item B of this section. (Refer to Table 3 for
recommended grease).
Run the motor for 15 to 30 minutes with the drain plug removed to allow purging of any excess grease (to
eliminate the possibility of overgreasing). Shut off unit and replace the drain plug. Put motor back into
operation.
CAUTION
Overgreasing can cause excessive bearing temperatures, premature lubricant
breakdown and bearing failure. Care should be exercised against overgreasing.
B. Change of Lubricant:
Motor must be disassembled as outlined in Section IX "Disassembly".
Remove all old grease from bearings and housings (including all grease fill and drain holes). Inspect and
replace damaged bearings. Fill bearing housings both inboard and outboard of bearing approximately 30 percent
full of new grease. Grease fill fittings should be fully charged with new grease. Inject new grease into bearing
between rolling elements to fill bearing. Remove any excess grease extending beyond the edges of the bearing
races and retainers.
12
U.S. ELECTRICAL MOTORS
INSTALLATION AND MAINTENANCE
Lubrication
Titan II motors are provided as standard with polyurea-based, NLGI Number 2 grease which is interchangeable with any of
the following recommended greases:
TABLE 3
Emerson Motor Co. Approved Greases For Titan II Motors with Antifriction Bearings
MANUFACTURER
DESCRIPTION
U.S. ELECTRICAL MOTORS
CHEVRON U.S.A. INC.
SHELL OIL CO.
EXXON COMPANY U. S. A.
GREASE No. 83343
CHEVRON SRI GREASE No. 2
DOLIUM-R
POLYREX-EM
13
U.S. ELECTRICAL MOTORS
INSTALLATION AND MAINTENANCE
Renewal Parts
and Service
TABLE 4
RECOMMENDED FASTENER TORQUE VALUES
Fastener Size
1/4 - 20 UNC
5/16 - 18 UNC
3/8 - 16 UNC
7/16 - 14 UNC
1/2 - 13 UNC
9/16 - 12 UNC
5/8 - 11 UNC
3/4 - 10 UNC
7/8 - 9 UNC
1 - 8 UNC
1-1/8 - 7 UNC
1-1/4 - 7 UNC
1-3/8 - 6 UNC
1-1/2 - 6 UNC
Torque* (Ft.- Lbs.)
8
17
30
50
75
110
150
260
430
640
800
1120
1460
1940
*Based upon using a dry (unlubricated) Grade 5 fastener
XII.
RENEWAL PARTS AND SERVICE
Parts lists for specific units can be furnished upon request. Parts may be obtained from local U.S. Motors
distributors and authorized service shops, or via the U.S. Motors Distribution Center:
EMERSON MOTOR CO DISTRIBUTION CENTER
3363 MIAC COVE
MEMPHIS, TN 38118
PHONE (901) 794-5500
FAX (901) 366-2661
TABLE 5
MAXIMUM MOTOR WEIGHTS AND FILTER REMOVAL CLEARANCE
FRAME
5006
5008
5010
5012
5810
5811
5812
5813
14
ODP/WPI
3500 lbs.
4100 lbs.
4800 lbs.
5500 lbs.
5400 lbs.
6300 lbs.
7500 lbs.
8600 lbs.
WPII
3800 lbs.
4400 lbs.
5100 lbs.
5800 lbs.
6300 lbs.
7200 lbs.
8400 lbs.
9500 lbs.
WPII FILTER REMOVAL CLEARANCE
24"
29"
36"
44"
41"
45"
50"
55"
Cutaway
Drawings
U.S. ELECTRICAL MOTORS
INSTALLATION AND MAINTENANCE
XIII.
CUTAWAY DRAWINGS
14
11
4
1
14
2
9
6
10
8
5
15
12
13
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
10.
11.
12.
13.
14.
15.
Stator
Rotor
Shaft
Stator Coils
Bearing
Bearing Bracket
Bearing Cap
Grease Drain Plug
Air Deflector
Shaft Seal Slinger
Stator Housing (Frame)
Ventilation Baffles
Terminal Box
Motor Lifting Eyes
Dowel Pin Holes
7
3
ODP/WPI
14
13
15
9
5
10
16
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
10.
11.
12.
13.
14.
15.
16.
17.
Stator
Rotor
Shaft
Stator Coils
Bearing
Bearing Bracket
Bearing Cap
Grease Drain Plug (not shown)
Air Deflector
Shaft Seal Slinger
Stator Housing (Frame)
Terminal Box
Tophat
Tophat Lifting Eye
Air Filter Access Cover
Air Pressure Differential Port
Dowel Pin Holes
7
6
17
12
11
3
2
1
4
WPII
15
U.S. ELECTRICAL MOTORS
INSTALLATION AND MAINTENANCE
XIV.
TROUBLESHOOTING
TROUBLE
Motor will not start
POSSIBLE CAUSE
Does not rotate. Usually line trouble
single phasing at starter.
CORRECTION
Check source of power supply. See
Safety instructions! Check overloads,
controls and fuses. Check voltage,
compare with nameplate voltage.
Rotates but does not come up to
speed. Load too heavy.
Disconnect motor from load to verify if
motor starts without load. Reduce
load-or replace motor with motor of
greater load capacity.
Check input voltage and proper motor
lead connection.
Balance rotor assembly.
Remove rotor assembly and clean
motor.
Replace bearing and regrease per
lubrication section.
Realign motor per initial installation
section.
Excessive motor humming
High voltage
Noise
Clicking
Unbalanced rotor
Contaminants in air gap
Rapid knocking
Bad bearing; contaminated grease
Vibration
Misalignment in coupling or feet
Vibration
"following motor repair"
Fine dust under coupling with rubber
buffers or pins
Bearing overheating
16
Troubleshooting
Vibration in driven equipment
Disconnect motor from driven equipment. See section on safety. Run
motor unconnected and check vibration. If vibration drops dramatically,
then the driven equipment or alignment may be the cause of vibration.
Ambient Vibration
Check base vibration level with motor
stopped.
System natural frequency (resonance)
Rotor out of balance; balance weights
or fans shifted on rotor.
Misalignment
Revise rigidity of motor base structure.
Balance rotor assembly.
Misalignment
Realign couplings, inspect couplings.
See initial installation section.
Realign unit. See initial installation
section.
Excessive tension in belt drive
Reduce belt tension.
Excessive end thrust
Reduce thrust from driven machine.
Recheck alignment. See initial
installation section.
Too much grease in bearing
Relieve bearing cavity of grease to
level specified in lubrication section.
U.S. ELECTRICAL MOTORS
INSTALLATION AND MAINTENANCE
TROUBLE
Motor overheating (Check with
thermocouple or by resistance
methods - do not depend on hand)
POSSIBLE CAUSE
Overload
Troubleshooting
CORRECTION
Measure load; compare with nameplate
rating; check for excessive friction in
motor or complete drive. Reduce load
or replace motor with greater capacity
motor.
Dirt in motor intake or exhaust
openings
Clean motor intake and exhaust areas.
Clean filters or screens if motor is so
equipped. See safety section.
Unbalanced voltage
Check voltage, all phases.
Open stator windings
Disconnect motor from load. Check
idle amps for balance in all three
phases. Check stator resistance in all
three phases for balance. See safety
section.
Over / under voltage
Check voltage and compare to
nameplate voltage.
Ground
Locate with test lamp or insulation
tester and repair.
Improper connections
Recheck connections.
17
Installation
Record
XV.
INSTALLATION RECORD
NAMEPLATE ID #
CUSTOMER ID #
FRAME
TYPE
PHASE
FREQUENCY
DATE OF PURCHASE
HORSEPOWER
RPM
AMPS
DESIGN
DATE INSTALLED
PURCHASED FROM
LOCATION OF MOTOR
DRIVE END BEARING #
INSTALLATION #
OPPOSITE END BEARING #
MOTOR RESISTANCE LINE TO LINE AT TIME OF INSTALLATION
INSULATION TO GROUND READING AT TIME OF INSTALLATION
GRADE & TYPE OF LUBRICANT USED
INSPECTION RECORD
DATE CHECKED
Bearings
Lubrication
Excess Heat
Excess Noise
Speed
Voltage
Amps
Insulation
Cleaning
Alignment
Vibration
Temperature
Insul. Resistance
Condition
18
VOLTAGE
CODE
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