Emerson Process Management 1500 Satellite Radio User Manual

Configuration and Use Manual
P/N 20002743, Rev. B
October 2006
Micro Motion®
Model 1500 Transmitters
with the Filling and Dosing
Application
Configuration and Use Manual
©2006, Micro Motion, Inc. All rights reserved. ELITE and ProLink are registered trademarks, and MVD and MVD Direct Connect
are trademarks of Micro Motion, Inc., Boulder, Colorado. Micro Motion is a registered trade name of Micro Motion, Inc., Boulder,
Colorado. The Micro Motion and Emerson logos are trademarks and service marks of Emerson Electric Co. All other trademarks
are property of their respective owners.
Contents
Chapter 1
Before You Begin . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1
1.1
1.2
1.3
1.4
1.5
1.6
1.7
1.8
Chapter 2
Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Requirements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
ProLink II configuration upload/download . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Connecting from a PC to a Model 1500 transmitter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5
5
5
6
Flowmeter Startup . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9
3.1
3.2
3.3
3.4
3.5
Chapter 4
1
1
1
1
2
2
3
4
Connecting with ProLink II Software . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5
2.1
2.2
2.3
2.4
Chapter 3
Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Safety . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Version . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Flowmeter documentation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Communication tools. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Planning the configuration. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Pre-configuration worksheet . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Micro Motion customer service . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9
Applying power . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9
Performing a loop test . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10
Trimming the milliamp output . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11
Zeroing the flowmeter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12
3.5.1
Preparing for zero . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13
3.5.2
Zero procedure . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13
Required Transmitter Configuration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15
4.1
4.2
4.3
4.4
Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Characterizing the flowmeter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
4.2.1
When to characterize . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
4.2.2
Characterization parameters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
4.2.3
How to characterize . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Configuring the channels . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Configuring the measurement units . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
4.4.1
Mass flow units . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
4.4.2
Volume flow units . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
4.4.3
Density units . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
4.4.4
Temperature units . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
4.4.5
Pressure units . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Configuration and Use Manual
15
16
16
16
18
19
20
20
21
22
22
22
i
Contents
4.5
4.6
4.7
4.8
Chapter 5
5.5
25
25
26
29
29
Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Recording process variables. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Viewing process variables. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Viewing transmitter status and alarms . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5.4.1
Using the status LED . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5.4.2
Using ProLink II software. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Using the totalizers and inventories . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
31
31
32
32
32
32
33
Optional Transmitter Configuration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 35
6.1
6.2
6.3
6.4
6.5
6.6
6.7
6.8
6.9
6.10
6.11
6.12
6.13
6.14
6.15
ii
22
24
24
24
Using the Transmitter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 31
5.1
5.2
5.3
5.4
Chapter 6
Configuring the mA output . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
4.5.1
Configuring the primary variable . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
4.5.2
Configuring the mA output range (LRV and URV) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
4.5.3
Configuring the AO cutoff . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
4.5.4
Configuring the fault action, fault value, and last
measured value timeout . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
4.5.5
Configuring added damping . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Configuring the discrete output(s). . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Configuring the discrete input . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Establishing a meter verification baseline . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Default values . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Parameter location within ProLink II . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Creating special measurement units. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
6.4.1
About special measurement units . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
6.4.2
Special mass flow unit . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
6.4.3
Special volume flow unit . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
6.4.4
Special unit for gas . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Configuring cutoffs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
6.5.1
Cutoffs and volume flow . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
6.5.2
Interaction with the AO cutoff. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Configuring the damping values . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
6.6.1
Damping and volume measurement . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
6.6.2
Interaction with the added damping parameter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
6.6.3
Interaction with the update rate . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Configuring the update rate . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
6.7.1
Effects of Special mode . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Configuring the flow direction parameter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Configuring events . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Configuring slug flow limits and duration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Configuring fault handling . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
6.11.1
Changing status alarm severity . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
6.11.2
Changing the fault timeout. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Configuring digital communications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
6.12.1
Changing the digital communications fault indicator . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
6.12.2
Changing the Modbus address . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
6.12.3
Changing the RS-485 parameters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
6.12.4
Changing the floating-point byte order. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
6.12.5
Changing the additional communications response delay. . . . . . . . . . . .
Configuring variable mapping . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Configuring device settings. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Configuring sensor parameters. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
35
35
35
35
36
36
37
37
38
38
38
39
39
39
40
40
41
41
45
46
47
47
49
49
49
50
50
51
51
51
52
52
Micro Motion® Model 1500 Transmitters with the Filling and Dosing Application
Contents
Chapter 7
Configuring the Filling and Dosing Application . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 53
7.1
7.2
7.3
7.4
7.5
Chapter 8
53
53
53
56
56
56
59
60
61
62
64
64
65
Using the Filling and Dosing Application . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 67
8.1
8.2
8.3
Chapter 9
About this chapter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
User interface requirements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
About the filling and dosing application. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
7.3.1
Purge . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
7.3.2
Cleaning. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Configuring the filling and dosing application . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
7.4.1
Flow source . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
7.4.2
Filling control options . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
7.4.3
Valve control parameters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Overshoot compensation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
7.5.1
Configuring overshoot compensation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
7.5.2
Standard AOC calibration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
7.5.3
Rolling AOC calibration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
About this chapter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
User interface requirements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Operating the filling and dosing application from ProLink II . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
8.3.1
Using the Run Filler window . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
8.3.2
Using a discrete input . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
8.3.3
Fill sequences with PAUSE and RESUME. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
67
67
67
68
70
72
Pressure Compensation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 77
9.1
9.2
9.3
Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Pressure compensation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
9.2.1
Options. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
9.2.2
Pressure correction factors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
9.2.3
Pressure measurement unit. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Configuration. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
77
77
77
77
78
78
Chapter 10 Measurement Performance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 81
10.1
10.2
10.3
10.4
10.5
10.6
Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Meter validation, meter verification, and calibration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
10.2.1
Meter verification . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
10.2.2
Meter validation and meter factors. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
10.2.3
Calibration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
10.2.4
Comparison and recommendations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Performing meter verification . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
10.3.1
Specification uncertainty limit and test results . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
10.3.2
Additional ProLink II tools for meter verification . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Performing meter validation. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Performing density calibration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
10.5.1
Preparing for density calibration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
10.5.2
Density calibration procedures. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Performing temperature calibration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Configuration and Use Manual
81
81
81
82
82
83
83
85
86
86
87
87
88
90
iii
Contents
Chapter 11 Troubleshooting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 91
11.1
11.2
11.3
11.4
11.5
11.6
11.7
11.8
11.9
11.10
11.11
11.12
11.13
11.14
11.15
11.16
11.17
11.18
11.19
11.20
11.21
11.22
11.23
11.24
11.25
Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 91
Guide to troubleshooting topics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 91
Micro Motion customer service . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 92
Transmitter does not operate . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 92
Transmitter does not communicate . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 92
Zero or calibration failure . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 92
Fault conditions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 92
I/O problems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 93
Transmitter status LED . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 94
Status alarms . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 95
Checking process variables . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 98
Meter fingerprinting. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 101
Troubleshooting filling problems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 101
Diagnosing wiring problems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 102
11.14.1 Checking the power supply wiring . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 102
11.14.2 Checking the sensor-to-transmitter wiring . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 102
11.14.3 Checking grounding. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 102
11.14.4 Checking for RF interference . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 103
Checking ProLink II . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 103
Checking the output wiring and receiving device . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 103
Checking slug flow . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 103
Checking output saturation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 104
Checking the flow measurement unit . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 104
Checking the upper and lower range values. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 104
Checking the characterization. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 105
Checking the calibration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 105
Checking the test points . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 105
11.23.1 Obtaining the test points . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 105
11.23.2 Evaluating the test points. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 105
11.23.3 Excessive drive gain . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 106
11.23.4 Erratic drive gain . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 107
11.23.5 Low pickoff voltage . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 107
Checking the core processor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 107
11.24.1 Checking the core processor LED . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 108
11.24.2 Core processor resistance test . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 109
Checking sensor coils and RTD . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 110
11.25.1 Remote core processor with remote transmitter installation . . . . . . . . . 110
11.25.2 4-wire remote installation. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 112
Appendix A Default Values and Ranges . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 115
A.1
A.2
Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 115
Default values and ranges . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 115
Appendix B Installation Architectures and Components . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 119
B.1
B.2
B.3
B.4
iv
Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Installation diagrams . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Component diagrams . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Wiring and terminal diagrams . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
119
119
119
119
Micro Motion® Model 1500 Transmitters with the Filling and Dosing Application
Contents
Appendix C Menu Flowcharts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 125
C.1
C.2
C.3
Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 125
Version information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 125
Flowcharts. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 125
Appendix D NE53 History . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 129
D.1
D.2
Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 129
Software change history . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 129
Index . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 131
Configuration and Use Manual
v
vi
Micro Motion® Model 1500 Transmitters with the Filling and Dosing Application
1.1
Before You Begin
Chapter 1
Before You Begin
Overview
This chapter provides an orientation to the use of this manual, and includes a pre-configuration
worksheet. This manual describes the procedures required to start, configure, use, maintain, and
troubleshoot the Model 1500 transmitter with the filling and dosing application.
Using ProLink II
1.2
Safety
Safety messages are provided throughout this manual to protect personnel and equipment. Read each
safety message carefully before proceeding to the next step.
1.3
Version
Different configuration options are available with different versions of the components. Table 1-1 lists
the version information that you may need and describes how to obtain the information.
Table 1-1
Obtaining version information
With ProLink II
Transmitter software
View > Installed Options > Software Revision
Core processor software
ProLink > Core Processor Diagnostics > CP SW Rev
1.4
Flowmeter Startup
Component
Flowmeter documentation
Table 1-2 lists documentation sources for additional information.
Table 1-2
Flowmeter documentation resources
Topic
Document
Sensor installation
Sensor documentation
Transmitter installation
Transmitter Installation: Model 1500 and 2500 Transmitters
Required Configuration
Configuration and Use Manual
1
Before You Begin
1.5
Communication tools
Most of the procedures described in this manual require the use of a communication tool. To
configure and use the Model 1500 transmitter with the filling and dosing application, you must use
ProLink II v2.3 or later, or a customer-written program that uses the transmitter’s Modbus interface.
For certain features, ProLink II v2.5 or later is required; this is noted where applicable.
Basic information on ProLink II and connecting ProLink II to your transmitter is provided in
Chapter 2. For more information, see the ProLink II manual, installed with the ProLink II software or
available on the Micro Motion web site (www.micromotion.com).
For information on the transmitter’s Modbus interface, see:
•
Using Modbus Protocol with Micro Motion Transmitters, November 2004, P/N 3600219,
Rev. C (manual plus map)
•
Modbus Mapping Assignments for Micro Motion Transmitters, October 2004, P/N 20001741,
Rev. B (map only)
Both of these manuals are available on the Micro Motion web site.
1.6
Planning the configuration
The pre-configuration worksheet in Section 1.7 provides a place to record information about your
flowmeter (transmitter and sensor) and your application. This information will affect your
configuration options as you work through this manual. Fill out the pre-configuration worksheet and
refer to it during configuration. You may need to consult with transmitter installation or application
process personnel to obtain the required information.
If you are configuring multiple transmitters, make copies of this worksheet and fill one out for each
individual transmitter.
2
Micro Motion® Model 1500 Transmitters with the Filling and Dosing Application
Before You Begin
1.7
Pre-configuration worksheet
Configuration data
Sensor type
… T-Series
… Other
Installation type
… 4-wire remote
… Remote core processor with remote transmitter
Transmitter software
version
Before You Begin
Item
______________________________________
… Standard
… Enhanced
Core processor type
Core processor software
version
______________________________________
Outputs
Channel B (Terminals 23 & 24) Discrete output
… Internal power
… External power
Channel C (Terminals 31 & 32) … Discrete output
… Discrete input
… Internal power
… External power
Channel A (Terminals 21 & 22)
…
…
…
…
Using ProLink II
Assignment
Channel A (Terminals 21 & 22) Milliamp
Process variable ____________________
Primary valve control
Secondary valve control
3-position analog valve control
Channel B (Terminals 23 & 24)
______________________________________
… Active high
… Active low
Channel C (Terminals 31 & 32)
______________________________________
… Active high
… Active low
Measurement units
Mass flow
Flowmeter Startup
______________________________________
Volume flow
______________________________________
Density
______________________________________
Pressure
______________________________________
Temperature
______________________________________
ProLink II version
______________________________________
Required Configuration
Configuration and Use Manual
3
Before You Begin
1.8
Micro Motion customer service
For customer service, phone the support center nearest you:
•
In the U.S.A., phone 800-522-MASS (800-522-6277) (toll-free)
•
In Canada and Latin America, phone +1 303-527-5200
•
In Asia:
•
-
In Japan, phone 3 5769-6803
-
In other locations, phone +65 6777-8211 (Singapore)
In Europe:
-
In the U.K., phone 0870 240 1978 (toll-free)
-
In other locations, phone +31 (0) 318 495 670 (The Netherlands)
Customers outside the U.S.A. can also email Micro Motion customer service at
International.Support@EmersonProcess.com.
4
Micro Motion® Model 1500 Transmitters with the Filling and Dosing Application
2.1
Before You Begin
Chapter 2
Connecting with ProLink II Software
Overview
ProLink II is a Windows-based configuration and management tool for Micro Motion transmitters. It
provides complete access to transmitter functions and data.
This chapter provides basic information for connecting ProLink II to your transmitter. The following
topics and procedures are discussed:
Requirements (see Section 2.2)
•
Configuration upload/download (see Section 2.3)
•
Connecting to a Model 1500 transmitter (see Section 2.4)
Using ProLink II
•
The instructions in this manual assume that users are already familiar with ProLink II software. For
more information on using ProLink II, or for detailed instructions on installing ProLink II, see the
ProLink II software manual, which is automatically installed with ProLink II, and is also available on
the Micro Motion web site (www.micromotion.com).
2.2
Requirements
To use ProLink II with a Model 1500 transmitter with the filling and dosing application, the following
are required:
ProLink II v2.3 or later, for access to the filling and dosing application
•
ProLink II v2.5 or later, for access to meter verification
•
The appropriate signal converter and cables: RS-485 to RS-232 or USB to RS-232
•
2.3
-
For RS-485 to RS-232, the Black Box® Async RS-232 <-> 2-wire RS-485 Interface
Converter (Code IC521A-F) signal converter is available from Micro Motion.
-
For USB to RS-232, the Black Box USB Solo (USB–>Serial) (Code IC138A-R2)
converter can be used.
Flowmeter Startup
•
25-pin to 9-pin adapter (if required by your PC)
ProLink II configuration upload/download
•
Easy backup and restore of transmitter configuration
•
Easy replication of configuration sets
Micro Motion recommends that all transmitter configurations be downloaded to a PC as soon as the
configuration is complete.
Parameters specific to the filling and dosing application are not included in the upload or download.
Configuration and Use Manual
5
Required Configuration
ProLink II provides a configuration upload/download function which allows you to save configuration
sets to your PC. This allows:
Connecting with ProLink II Software
To access the configuration upload/download function:
1. Connect ProLink II to your transmitter as described in this chapter.
2. Open the File menu.
2.4
•
To save a configuration file to a PC, use the Load from Xmtr to File option.
•
To restore or load a configuration file to a transmitter, use the Send to Xmtr from File
option.
Connecting from a PC to a Model 1500 transmitter
ProLink II software can communicate with a Model 1500 transmitter using Modbus protocol on the
RS-485 physical layer. There are two connection types:
•
RS-485 configurable connection
•
SP (service port) non-configurable (standard) connection
Both connection types use the RS-485 terminals (terminals 33 and 34). These terminals are available
in service port mode for 10 seconds after transmitter power-up. After this interval, the terminals revert
to RS-485 mode.
•
To make a service port connection, you must configure ProLink II appropriately and connect
during the 10-second interval after transmitter power-up. Once a service port connection is
made, the terminals will remain in service port mode. You may disconnect and reconnect as
often as required, as long as you continue to use service port mode.
•
To make an RS-485 connection, you must configure ProLink II appropriately, wait for the
10-second interval to expire, then connect. The terminals will now remain in RS-485 mode,
and you may disconnect and reconnect as often as required, as long as you continue to use
RS-485 mode.
•
To change from service port mode to RS-485 mode, or vice versa, you must cycle power to the
transmitter and reconnect using the desired connection type.
To connect a PC to the RS-485 terminals or an RS-485 network:
1. Attach the signal converter to the serial port of your PC, using a 25-pin to 9-pin adapter if
required.
2. To connect to the RS-485 terminals, connect the signal converter leads to terminals 33 and 34.
See Figure 2-1.
3. To connect to an RS-485 network, connect the signal converter leads to any point in the
network. See Figure 2-2.
4. For long-distance communication, or if noise from an external source interferes with the
signal, install 120-ohm, 1/2-watt resistors in parallel with the output at both ends of the
communication segment.
5. Ensure that the transmitter is disconnected from a host PLC.
6
Micro Motion® Model 1500 Transmitters with the Filling and Dosing Application
Connecting with ProLink II Software
Figure 2-1
RS-485 terminal connections to Model 1500
Before You Begin
PC
RS-485/B
RS-485/A
Figure 2-2
RS-485 to RS-232
signal converter
Using ProLink II
25-pin to 9-pin serial port
adapter (if necessary)
RS-485 network connections to Model 1500
RS-485/B
PC
DCS or PLC
RS-485/A
Flowmeter Startup
25-pin to 9-pin serial port
adapter (if necessary)
RS-485 to RS-232
signal converter
Add resistance if necessary
(see Step 4)
•
For service port mode, set Protocol to Service Port, and set COM port to the appropriate
value for your PC. Baud rate, Stop bits, and Parity are set to standard values and cannot
be changed. See Table 2-1.
•
For RS-485 mode, set the connection parameters to the values configured in your
transmitter. See Table 2-1.
Configuration and Use Manual
7
Required Configuration
6. Start ProLink II software. From the Connection menu, click on Connect to Device. In the
screen that appears, specify connection parameters appropriate to your connection:
Connecting with ProLink II Software
Table 2-1
Modbus connection parameters for ProLink II
Connection type
Connection parameter
Configurable (RS-485 mode)
SP standard (service port mode)
Protocol
As configured in transmitter
(default = Modbus RTU)
As configured in transmitter (default = 9600)
As configured in transmitter (default = 1)
As configured in transmitter (default = odd)
Configured Modbus address (default = 1)
COM port assigned to PC serial port
Modbus RTU(1)
Baud rate
Stop bits
Parity
Address/Tag
COM port
38,400(1)
1(1)
none(1)
111(1)
COM port assigned to PC serial port
(1) Required value; cannot be changed by user.
7. Click the Connect button. ProLink II will attempt to make the connection.
8. If an error message appears:
a. Swap the leads between the two terminals and try again.
b. Ensure you are using the correct COM port.
c. If you are in RS-485 mode, you may be using incorrect connection parameters.
-
Connect in service port mode and check the RS-485 configuration. If required, change
the configuration or change your RS-485 connection parameters to match the existing
configuration.
-
If you are unsure of the transmitter’s address, use the Poll button in the Connect
window to return a list of all devices on the network.
d. Check all the wiring between the PC and the transmitter.
8
Micro Motion® Model 1500 Transmitters with the Filling and Dosing Application
3.1
Before You Begin
Chapter 3
Flowmeter Startup
Overview
This chapter describes the procedures you should perform the first time you start the flowmeter. You
do not need to use these procedures every time you cycle power to the flowmeter.
The following procedures are discussed:
Applying power to the flowmeter (see Section 3.2)
•
Performing a loop test on the transmitter outputs (see Section 3.3)
•
Trimming the mA output (see Section 3.4)
•
Zeroing the flowmeter (see Section 3.5)
Note: All ProLink II procedures provided in this chapter assume that your computer is already
connected to the transmitter and you have established communication. All ProLink II procedures also
assume that you are complying with all applicable safety requirements. See Chapter 2 for more
information.
3.2
Using ProLink II
•
Applying power
Before you apply power to the flowmeter, close and tighten all housing covers.
Flowmeter Startup
Turn on the electrical power at the power supply. The flowmeter will automatically perform
diagnostic routines. When the flowmeter has completed its power-up sequence, the status LED will
turn green if conditions are normal. If the status LED exhibits different behavior, an alarm condition is
present (see Section 5.4) or configuration of the filling and dosing application is not complete.
Required Configuration
Configuration and Use Manual
9
Flowmeter Startup
WARNING
Upon transmitter startup or abnormal power reset, any external device
controlled by a discrete output may be momentarily activated.
Upon transmitter startup or abnormal power reset, discrete output states are
unknown. As a result, an external device controlled by a discrete output may
receive current for a brief period.
When using Channel B as a discrete output:
•
You can prevent current flow upon normal startup by setting Channel B polarity
to active low (see Section 4.6).
•
There is no programmatic method to prevent current flow for Channel B upon
abnormal power reset. You must design the system so that a brief current flow to
the external device controlled by Channel B cannot cause negative
consequences.
When using Channel C as a discrete output, there is no programmatic method to
prevent current flow upon either transmitter startup or abnormal power reset. You
must design the system so that a brief current flow to the external device controlled
by Channel C cannot cause negative consequences.
3.3
Performing a loop test
A loop test is a means to:
•
Verify that the mA outupt is being sent by the transmitter and received accurately by the
receiving device
•
Determine whether or not you need to trim the mA output
•
Select and verify the discrete output voltage
•
Read the discrete input
Perform a loop test on all inputs and outputs available on your transmitter. Before performing the loop
tests, ensure that your transmitter terminals are configured for the input/outputs that will be used in
your application (see Section 4.3).
ProLink II is used for loop testing. See Figure 3-1 for the loop test procedure. Note the following:
•
10
The mA reading does not need to be exact. You will correct differences when you trim the mA
output. See Section 3.4.
Micro Motion® Model 1500 Transmitters with the Filling and Dosing Application
Flowmeter Startup
Figure 3-1
ProLink II – Loop test procedure
Before You Begin
ProLink Menu
Test
Fix Milliamp 1
Fix Discrete Out 1
Fix Discrete Out 2
Read Discrete Input
Enter mA value
ON or OFF
Toggle remote input
device
Read output at
receiving device
Verify state at
receiving device
Correct?
Correct?
Yes
Loop test successful
UnFix
Check output wiring
Troubleshoot receiving device
Correct?
Yes
Loop test successful
No
Check input wiring
Troubleshoot input device
Trimming the milliamp output
Trimming the mA output creates a common measurement range between the transmitter and the device
that receives the mA output. For example, a transmitter might send a 4 mA signal that the receiving
device reports incorrectly as 3.8 mA. If the transmitter output is trimmed correctly, it will send a
signal appropriately compensated to ensure that the receiving device actually indicates a 4 mA signal.
Flowmeter Startup
3.4
No
Using ProLink II
Verify Present State LED
at transmitter
Fix mA
You must trim the mA output at both the 4 mA and 20 mA points to ensure appropriate compensation
across the entire output range.
ProLink II is used to trim the mA output. See Figure 3-2 for the mA output trim procedure. Note the
following:
•
Configuration and Use Manual
11
Required Configuration
Any trimming performed on the output should not exceed ± 200 microamps. If more trimming
is required, contact Micro Motion customer support.
Flowmeter Startup
Figure 3-2
ProLink II – mA output trim procedure
ProLink Menu
Calibration
Milliamp Trim 1
4 mA trim
20 mA trim
Read mA output at
receiving device
Read mA output at
receiving device
Next
Next
Enter receiving device
value in Enter Meas
Enter receiving device
value in Enter Meas
Next
Next
Next
No
Read mA output at
receiving device
Equal?
No
Yes
Read mA output at
receiving device
Equal?
Yes
Finish
3.5
Zeroing the flowmeter
Zeroing the flowmeter establishes the flowmeter’s point of reference when there is no flow. The meter
was zeroed at the factory, and should not require a field zero. However, you may wish to perform a
field zero to meet local requirements or to confirm the factory zero.
Note: Do not zero the flowmeter if a high severity alarm is active. Correct the problem, then zero the
flowmeter. You may zero the flowmeter if a low severity alarm is active. See Section 5.4 for
information on viewing transmitter status and alarms.
When you zero the flowmeter, you may need to adjust the zero time parameter. Zero time is the
amount of time the transmitter takes to determine its zero-flow reference point.
•
A long zero time may produce a more accurate zero reference but is more likely to result in a
zero failure. This is due to the increased possibility of noisy flow, which causes incorrect
calibration.
•
A short zero time is less likely to result in a zero failure but may produce a less accurate zero
reference.
The default zero time is 20 seconds. For most applications, the default zero time is appropriate.
You can zero the flowmeter with ProLink II or with the zero button on the transmitter.
If the zero procedure fails, see Section 11.6 for troubleshooting information.
12
Micro Motion® Model 1500 Transmitters with the Filling and Dosing Application
Flowmeter Startup
3.5.1
Preparing for zero
Before You Begin
Additionally, if you have the enhanced core processor and you are using ProLink II to zero the
flowmeter, you can also restore the prior zero immediately after zeroing (e.g., an “undo” function), as
long as you have not closed the Calibration window or disconnected from the transmitter. Once you
have closed the Calibration window or disconnected from the transmitter, you can no longer restore
the prior zero.
To prepare for the zero procedure:
1. Apply power to the flowmeter. Allow the flowmeter to warm up for approximately 20 minutes.
2. Run the process fluid through the sensor until the sensor temperature reaches the normal
process operating temperature.
3. Close the shutoff valve downstream from the sensor.
4. Ensure that the sensor is completely filled with fluid.
Using ProLink II
5. Ensure that the process flow has completely stopped.
CAUTION
If fluid is flowing through the sensor, the sensor zero calibration may be
inaccurate, resulting in inaccurate process measurement.
To improve the sensor zero calibration and measurement accuracy, ensure that
process flow through the sensor has completely stopped.
3.5.2
Zero procedure
To zero the transmitter:
With ProLink II, see Figure 3-3.
•
With the zero button, see Figure 3-4. Note the following:
-
You cannot change the zero time with the zero button. If you need to change the zero time,
you must use ProLink II.
-
The zero button is located on the front panel of the transmitter. To press the zero button,
use a fine-pointed object that will fit into the opening (0.14 in [3.5 mm]). Hold the button
down until the status LED on the front panel begins to flash yellow.
Flowmeter Startup
•
Required Configuration
Configuration and Use Manual
13
Flowmeter Startup
Figure 3-3
ProLink II – Flowmeter zero procedure
ProLink >
Calibration >
Zero Calibration
Modify zero time
if required
Perform Auto Zero
Calibration in Progress
LED turns red
Wait until Calibration in
Progress LED turns green
Red
Calibration
Failure LED
Done
Troubleshoot
Figure 3-4
Green
Zero button – Flowmeter zero procedure
Press ZERO button
Status LED flashes
yellow
Status LED
14
Solid
Red
Solid Green or
Solid Yellow
Troubleshoot
Done
Micro Motion® Model 1500 Transmitters with the Filling and Dosing Application
4.1
Before You Begin
Chapter 4
Required Transmitter Configuration
Overview
This chapter describes the configuration procedures that are usually required when a transmitter is
installed for the first time. The procedures in this chapter should be performed in the order shown in
Figure 4-1.
Required configuration procedures in order
Using ProLink II
Figure 4-1
Characterize the flowmeter
(Section 4.2)
Configure the channels
(Section 4.3)
Configure measurement units
(Section 4.4)
Configure mA output
(Section 4.5)
Configure discrete input(1)
(Section 4.7)
Flowmeter Startup
Configure discrete outputs(1)
(Section 4.6)
(1) Only the input or outputs that have been assigned to
a channel need to be configured.
(2) If the meter verification option has been purchased,
the final configuration step should be to establish a
meter verification baseline (see Section 4.8).
Done(2)
This chapter provides basic flowcharts for each procedure. For more detailed flowcharts, see the
ProLink II flowcharts, provided in Appendix C.
Default values and ranges for the parameters described in this chapter are provided in Appendix A.
Note: All ProLink II procedures provided in this chapter assume that your computer is already
connected to the transmitter and you have established communication. All ProLink II procedures also
assume that you are complying with all applicable safety requirements. See Chapter 2 for more
information.
Configuration and Use Manual
15
Required Configuration
For optional transmitter configuration parameters and procedures, see Chapter 6. For configuration of
the filling and dosing application, see Chapter 7.
Required Transmitter Configuration
4.2
Characterizing the flowmeter
Characterizing the flowmeter adjusts the transmitter to compensate for the unique traits of the sensor
it is paired with. The characterization parameters, or calibration parameters, describe the sensor’s
sensitivity to flow, density, and temperature.
4.2.1
When to characterize
If the transmitter, core processor, and sensor were ordered together, then the flowmeter has already
been characterized. You need to characterize the flowmeter only if the core processor and sensor are
being paired together for the first time.
4.2.2
Characterization parameters
The characterization parameters that must be configured depend on your flowmeter’s sensor type:
“T-Series” or “Other” (also referred to as “Straight Tube” and “Curved Tube,” respectively), as listed
in Table 4-1. The “Other” category includes all Micro Motion sensors except T-Series.
The characterization parameters are provided on the sensor tag. The format of the sensor tag varies
depending on your sensor’s date of purchase. See Figures 4-2 and 4-3 for illustrations of newer and
older sensor tags.
Table 4-1
Sensor calibration parameters
Sensor type
Parameter
T-Series
Other
K1
✓
✓(1)
K2
✓
✓(1)
FD
✓
✓(1)
D1
✓
✓(1)
D2
✓
✓(1)
Temp coeff (DT)(2)
✓
✓(1)
✓(3)
Flowcal
FCF and FT
✓(4)
FCF
✓(5)
FTG
✓
FFQ
✓
DTG
✓
DFQ1
✓
DFQ2
✓
(1)
(2)
(3)
(4)
(5)
16
See the section entitled “Density calibration factors.”
On some sensor tags, shown as TC.
See the section entitled “Flow calibration values.”
Older T-Series sensors. See the section entitled “Flow calibration values.”
Newer T-Series sensors. See the section entitled “Flow calibration values.”
Micro Motion® Model 1500 Transmitters with the Filling and Dosing Application
Required Transmitter Configuration
Figure 4-2
Sample calibration tags – All sensors except T-Series
Older tag
Using ProLink II
Figure 4-3
Before You Begin
Newer tag
Sample calibration tags – T-Series sensors
Newer tag
Older tag
Flowmeter Startup
Density calibration factors
If your sensor tag does not show a D1 or D2 value:
•
For D1, enter the Dens A or D1 value from the calibration certificate. This value is the
line-condition density of the low-density calibration fluid. Micro Motion uses air.
•
For D2, enter the Dens B or D2 value from the calibration certificate. This value is the
line-condition density of the high-density calibration fluid. Micro Motion uses water.
If your sensor tag does not show a K1 or K2 value:
For K1, enter the first 5 digits of the density calibration factor. In the sample tag in Figure 4-2,
this value is shown as 12500.
•
For K2, enter the second 5 digits of the density calibration factor. In the sample tag in
Figure 4-2, this value is shown as 14286.
Required Configuration
•
If your sensor does not show an FD value, contact Micro Motion customer service.
If your sensor tag does not show a DT or TC value, enter the last 3 digits of the density calibration
factor. In the sample tag in Figure 4-2, this value is shown as 4.44.
Configuration and Use Manual
17
Required Transmitter Configuration
Flow calibration values
Two separate values are used to describe flow calibration: a 6-character FCF value and a 4-character
FT value. Both values contain decimal points. During characterization, these are entered as a single
10-character string that includes two decimal points. In ProLink II, this value is called the Flowcal
parameter.
To obtain the required value:
•
For older T-Series sensors, concatenate the FCF value and the FT value from the sensor tag, as
shown below.
Flow FCF X.XXXX
FT X.XX
•
For newer T-Series sensors, the 10-character string is represented on the sensor tag as the FCF
value. The value should be entered exactly as shown, including the decimal points. No
concatenation is required.
•
For all other sensors, the 10-character string is represented on the sensor tag as the Flow Cal
value. The value should be entered exactly as shown, including the decimal points. No
concatenation is required.
4.2.3
How to characterize
To characterize the flowmeter:
1. See the menu flowchart in Figure 4-4.
2. Ensure that the correct sensor type is configured.
3. Set required parameters, as listed in Table 4-1.
Figure 4-4
Characterizing the flowmeter
ProLink Menu
Configuration
Device
· Sensor type
Straight
tube
Curved
tube
Sensor type?
Density
Density
Flow
Flow
T Series Config
18
Micro Motion® Model 1500 Transmitters with the Filling and Dosing Application
Required Transmitter Configuration
4.3
Configuring the channels
CAUTION
Before You Begin
The six input/output terminals provided on the Model 1500 are organized into three pairs. These pairs
are called Channels A, B, and C. The channels should be configured before doing any other I/O
configuration.
Changing the channel configuration without verifying I/O configuration can
produce process error.
When the configuration of a channel is changed, the channel’s behavior will be
controlled by the I/O configuration that is stored for the new channel type, which
may or may not be appropriate for the process. To avoid causing process error:
•
•
Using ProLink II
•
Configure the channels before configuring the I/O.
When changing channel configuration, be sure that all control loops affected by
this channel are under manual control.
Before returning the loop to automatic control, ensure that the channel's I/O is
correctly configured for your process. See Sections 4.5, 4.6, and 4.7.
The outputs and variable assignments are controlled by the channel configuration. Table 4-2 shows
how each channel may be configured and the power options for each channel.
.
Table 4-2
Channel configuration options
Channel
Terminals
Configuration Option
Power
A
21 & 22
mA output (not configurable)
Internal (not configurable)
B
23 & 24
Discrete output 1 (DO1)
Internal or external(1)
C
31 & 32
Discrete output 2 (DO2)
Internal or external(1)
Flowmeter Startup
Discrete input (DI)
(1) If set to external power, you must provide power to the outputs.
To configure the channels, see the menu flowchart in Figure 4-5.
Figure 4-5
Configuring the channels
ProLink Menu
Configuration
Required Configuration
Channel
Channel B
· Type assignment
· Power type
Channel C
· Type assignment
· Power type
Configuration and Use Manual
19
Required Transmitter Configuration
4.4
Configuring the measurement units
For each process variable, the transmitter must be configured to use the measurement unit appropriate
to your application.
To configure measurement units, see the menu flowchart in Figure 4-6. For details on measurement
units for each process variable, see Sections 4.4.1 through 4.4.5.
Figure 4-6
Configuring measurement units
ProLink Menu
Configuration
Flow
· Mass flow units
· Vol flow units
4.4.1
Density
· Dens units
Temperature
· Temp units
Pressure
· Pressure units
Mass flow units
The default mass flow measurement unit is g/s. See Table 4-3 for a complete list of mass flow
measurement units.
If the mass flow unit you want to use is not listed, you can define a special measurement unit for mass
flow (see Section 6.4).
Table 4-3
20
Mass flow measurement units
ProLink II label
Unit description
g/s
Grams per second
g/min
Grams per minute
g/hr
Grams per hour
kg/s
Kilograms per second
kg/min
Kilograms per minute
kg/hr
Kilograms per hour
kg/day
Kilograms per day
mTon/min
Metric tons per minute
mTon/hr
Metric tons per hour
mTon/day
Metric tons per day
lbs/s
Pounds per second
lbs/min
Pounds per minute
lbs/hr
Pounds per hour
lbs/day
Pounds per day
sTon/min
Short tons (2000 pounds) per minute
sTon/hr
Short tons (2000 pounds) per hour
sTon/day
Short tons (2000 pounds) per day
Micro Motion® Model 1500 Transmitters with the Filling and Dosing Application
Required Transmitter Configuration
Table 4-3
Mass flow measurement units continued
Unit description
lTon/hr
Long tons (2240 pounds) per hour
lTon/day
Long tons (2240 pounds) per day
special
Special unit (see Section 6.4)
4.4.2
Before You Begin
ProLink II label
Volume flow units
The default volume flow measurement unit is L/s. See Table 4-4 for a complete list of volume flow
measurement units.
If the volume flow unit you want to use is not listed, you can define a special measurement unit for
volume flow (see Section 6.4).
Table 4-4
Volume flow measurement units
Cubic feet per second
ft3/min
Cubic feet per minute
ft3/hr
Cubic feet per hour
ft3/day
Cubic feet per day
m3/sec
Cubic meters per second
m3/min
Cubic meters per minute
m3/hr
Cubic meters per hour
m3/day
Cubic meters per day
US gal/sec
U.S. gallons per second
US gal/min
U.S. gallons per minute
US gal/hr
U.S. gallons per hour
US gal/day
U.S. gallons per day
mil US gal/day
Million U.S. gallons per day
l/sec
Liters per second
l/min
Liters per minute
l/hr
Liters per hour
mil l/day
Million liters per day
Imp gal/sec
Imperial gallons per second
Imp gal/min
Imperial gallons per minute
Imp gal/hr
Imperial gallons per hour
Imp gal/day
Imperial gallons per day
barrels/sec
Barrels per second(1)
barrels/min
Barrels per minute(1)
barrels/hr
Barrels per hour(1)
barrels/day
Barrels per day(1)
special
Special unit (see Section 6.4)
Required Configuration
ft3/sec
Flowmeter Startup
Unit description
Using ProLink II
ProLink II label
(1) Unit based on oil barrels (42 U.S gallons).
Configuration and Use Manual
21
Required Transmitter Configuration
4.4.3
Density units
The default density measurement unit is g/cm3. See Table 4-3 for a complete list of density
measurement units.
Table 4-5
Density measurement units
ProLink II label
Unit description
SGU
Specific gravity unit (not temperature corrected)
g/cm3
Grams per cubic centimeter
g/l
Grams per liter
g/ml
Grams per milliliter
kg/l
Kilograms per liter
kg/m3
Kilograms per cubic meter
lbs/Usgal
Pounds per U.S. gallon
lbs/ft3
Pounds per cubic foot
lbs/in3
Pounds per cubic inch
degAPI
API gravity
sT/yd3
Short ton per cubic yard
4.4.4
Temperature units
The default temperature measurement unit is degC. See Table 4-6 for a complete list of temperature
measurement units.
Table 4-6
Temperature measurement units
ProLink II label
Unit description
degC
Degrees Celsius
degF
Degrees Fahrenheit
degR
Degrees Rankine
degK
Degrees Kelvin
4.4.5
Pressure units
Configuring the pressure unit is required only if pressure compensation will be implemented. See
Section 9.2.
4.5
Configuring the mA output
The mA output can be used either to report the mass flow or volume flow process variable or to
control a valve for the filling and dosing application.
Configuring the mA output for valve control is discussed in Section 7.4.
Note: If the mA output is configured for valve control, it cannot be used to report alarm status, and
the mA output will never go to fault levels.
22
Micro Motion® Model 1500 Transmitters with the Filling and Dosing Application
Required Transmitter Configuration
Before You Begin
CAUTION
Changing the channel configuration without verifying I/O configuration can
produce process error.
When the configuration of a channel is changed, the channel’s behavior will be
controlled by the configuration that is stored for the new channel type, which may or
may not be appropriate for the process. To avoid causing process error:
•
•
•
Configure the channels before configuring the mA output (see Section 4.3).
When changing the mA output configuration, be sure that all control loops
affected by this output are under manual control.
Before returning the loop to automatic control, ensure that the mA output is
correctly configured for your process.
•
Primary variable
•
Upper range value (URV) and lower range value (LRV)
•
AO (analog output) cutoff
•
AO added damping
•
Fault action and fault value
•
Last measured value timeout
Using ProLink II
If the mA output is used to report mass flow or volume flow, the following parameters must be
configured:
To configure the mA output, see the menu flowchart in Figure 4-7. For details on mA output
parameters, see Sections 4.5.1 through 4.5.5.
Figure 4-7
Configuring the mA output
Flowmeter Startup
ProLink Menu
Configuration
Analog output
Primary variable is
Required Configuration
Process variable measurement
· Lower range value
· Upper range value
· AO cutoff
· AO added damp
· Lower sensor limit
· Upper sensor limit
· Min span
· AO fault action
· Last measured value timeout
Process variable measurement
· Enable 3 position valve
· Analog valve setpoint
· Analog valve closed value
Configuration and Use Manual
23
Required Transmitter Configuration
4.5.1
Configuring the primary variable
The primary variable is the process variable to be reported through the mA output. Table 4-7 lists the
process variables that can be assigned to the mA outputs.
Table 4-7
mA output process variable assignments
Process variable
ProLink II label
Mass flow
Mass Flow Rate
Volume flow
Volume Flow Rate
Note: The process variable assigned to the mA output is always the PV (primary variable).
4.5.2
Configuring the mA output range (LRV and URV)
The mA output uses a range of 4 to 20 mA to represent the assigned process variable. You must
specify:
•
The lower range value (LRV) – the value of the process variable that will be indicated when
the mA output produces 4 mA
•
The upper range value (URV) – the value of the process variable that will be indicated when
the mA output produces 20 mA
Enter values in the measurement units that are configured for the assigned process variable (see
Section 4.4).
Note: The URV can be set below the LRV; for example, the URV can be set to 0 and the LRV can be
set to 100.
4.5.3
Configuring the AO cutoff
The AO (analog output) cutoff specifies the lowest mass flow or volume flow value that will be
reported through the mA output. Any mass flow or volume flow values below the AO cutoff will be
reported as zero.
Note: For most applications, the default AO cutoff is used. Contact Micro Motion customer support
before changing the AO cutoff.
Multiple cutoffs
Cutoffs can also be configured for the mass flow and volume flow process variables (see Section 6.5).
If mass flow or volume flow has been assigned to the mA output, a non-zero value is configured for
the flow cutoff, and the AO cutoff is also configured, the cutoff occurs at the highest setting, as shown
in the following example.
Example
Configuration:
•
mA output: Mass flow
•
AO cutoff: 10 g/sec
•
Mass flow cutoff: 15 g/sec
As a result, if the mass flow rate drops below 15 g/sec, the mA output
will report zero flow.
24
Micro Motion® Model 1500 Transmitters with the Filling and Dosing Application
Required Transmitter Configuration
4.5.4
Configuring the fault action, fault value, and last measured value timeout
Before You Begin
Note: If the mA output is configured for valve control, it cannot be used to report alarm status, and
the mA output will never go to fault levels.
If the transmitter encounters an internal fault condition, it can indicate the fault by sending a
preprogrammed output level to the receiving device. You can specify the output level by configuring
the fault action. Options are shown in Table 4-8.
By default, the transmitter immediately reports a fault when a fault is encountered. You can configure
the transmitter to delay reporting a fault by changing the last measured value timeout to a non-zero
value. During the fault timeout period, the transmitter continues to report its last valid measurement.
Table 4-8
mA output fault actions and values
Fault output value
Upscale
21–24 mA (default: 22 mA)
Downscale
1.0–3.6 mA (default: 2.0 mA)
Internal zero
The value associated with 0 (zero) flow, as determined by URV and LRV values
(1)
Using ProLink II
Fault action
Tracks data for the assigned process variable; no fault action
None
(1) If the mA output fault action is set to None, the digital communications fault action should also be set to None. See
Section 6.12.1.
CAUTION
Setting the fault action to NONE may result in process error due to
undetected fault conditions.
To avoid undetected fault conditions when the fault action is set to NONE, use
some other mechanism such as digital communications to monitor device status.
Configuring added damping
A damping value is a period of time, in seconds, over which the process variable value will change to
reflect 63% of the change in the actual process. Damping helps the transmitter smooth out small,
rapid measurement fluctuations:
•
A high damping value makes the output appear to be smoother because the output must change
slowly.
•
A low damping value makes the output appear to be more erratic because the output changes
more quickly.
Flowmeter Startup
4.5.5
The added damping parameter specifies damping that will be applied to the mA output. It affects the
measurement of the process variable assigned to the mA output, but does not affect other outputs.
Note: Added damping is not applied if the mA output is fixed (i.e., during loop testing) or is reporting
a fault.
Configuration and Use Manual
25
Required Configuration
When you specify a new added damping value, it is automatically rounded down to the nearest valid
value. Note that added damping values are affected by the Update Rate parameter (see Section 6.7).
Required Transmitter Configuration
Multiple damping parameters
Damping can also be configured for the mass flow and volume flow process variables (see
Section 6.6). If one of these process variables has been assigned to the mA output, a non-zero value is
configured for its damping, and added damping is also configured for the mA output, the effect of
damping the process variable is calculated first, and the added damping calculation is applied to the
result of that calculation. See the following example.
Example
Configuration:
•
Flow damping: 1
•
mA output: Mass flow
•
Added damping: 2
As a result:
•
4.6
A change in mass flow will be reflected in the primary mA output
over a time period that is greater than 3 seconds. The exact time
period is calculated by the transmitter according to internal
algorithms which are not configurable.
Configuring the discrete output(s)
Note: Configure the transmitter channels for the required output types before configuring individual
outputs. See Section 4.3.
CAUTION
Changing the channel configuration without verifying I/O configuration can
produce process error.
When the configuration of a channel is changed, the channel’s behavior will be
controlled by the configuration that is stored for the new channel type, which may or
may not be appropriate for the process. To avoid causing process error:
•
•
•
Configure the channels before configuring the discrete output (see Section 4.3).
When changing the discrete output configuration, be sure that all control loops
affected by this output are under manual control.
Before returning the loop to automatic control, ensure that the discrete output is
correctly configured for your process.
The discrete outputs generate two voltage levels to represent ON or OFF states. The voltage levels
depend on the output’s polarity, as shown in Table 4-9. Figure 4-8 shows a diagram of a typical
discrete output circuit.
26
Micro Motion® Model 1500 Transmitters with the Filling and Dosing Application
Required Transmitter Configuration
Table 4-9
Discrete output polarity
Before You Begin
Polarity
Output power supply
Description
Active high
Internal
• When asserted, the circuit provides a pull-up to 15 V.
• When not asserted, the circuit provides 0 V.
External
• When asserted, the circuit provides a pull-up to a site-specific
voltage, maximum 30 V.
• When not asserted, circuit provides 0 V.
Internal
• When asserted, the circuit provides 0 V.
• When not asserted, the circuit provides a pull-up to 15 V.
External
• When asserted, the circuit provides 0 V.
• When not asserted, the circuit provides a pull-up to a site-specific
voltage, to a maximum of 30 V.
Active low
Figure 4-8
Discrete output circuit
Using ProLink II
15 V (Nom)
3.2 Kohm
Out+
Out–
Flowmeter Startup
The discrete outputs can be used to indicate a fault, to indicate filling in progress, or to control the
primary or secondary valves, as described in Table 4-10.
Note: Before you can assign a discrete output to valve control, the Fill Type parameter must be
configured. See Chapter 7 and Figure 7-3.
Required Configuration
Configuration and Use Manual
27
Required Transmitter Configuration
WARNING
Upon transmitter startup or abnormal power reset, any external device
controlled by a discrete output may be momentarily activated.
Upon transmitter startup or abnormal power reset, discrete output states are
unknown. As a result, an external device controlled by a discrete output may
receive current for a brief period.
When using Channel B as a discrete output:
•
You can prevent current flow upon normal startup by setting Channel B polarity
to active low.
•
There is no programmatic method to prevent current flow for Channel B upon
abnormal power reset. You must design the system so that a brief current flow to
the external device controlled by Channel B cannot cause negative
consequences.
When using Channel C as a discrete output, there is no programmatic method to
prevent current flow upon either transmitter startup or abnormal power reset. You
must design the system so that a brief current flow to the external device controlled
by Channel C cannot cause negative consequences.
Table 4-10 Discrete output assignments and output levels
Assignment
Condition
Discrete output level(1)
Primary valve (DO1 only)
Secondary valve (DO2 only)
Open
Site-specific
Closed
0V
Fill in progress (DO2 only)
ON
Site-specific
OFF
0V
Fault indication (DO2 only)
ON
Site-specific
OFF
0V
(1) Voltage descriptions in this column assume that Polarity is set to Active High. If Polarity is set to Active Low, the voltages
are reversed.
To configure the discrete output, see the menu flowchart in Figure 4-9.
Figure 4-9
Configuring the discrete output(s)
ProLink Menu
Configuration
Discrete IO
Discrete output
· DO1 assignment
· DO1 polarity
· DO2 assignment
· DO2 polarity
Discrete input
· DI assignment
28
Micro Motion® Model 1500 Transmitters with the Filling and Dosing Application
Required Transmitter Configuration
4.7
Configuring the discrete input
Before You Begin
Note: Configure the transmitter channels for the required input/output types before configuring the
discrete input. See Section 4.3.
CAUTION
Changing the channel configuration without verifying I/O configuration can
produce process error.
When the configuration of a channel is changed, the channel’s behavior will be
controlled by the configuration that is stored for the new channel type, which may or
may not be appropriate for the process. To avoid causing process error:
•
•
Using ProLink II
•
Configure the channels before configuring the discrete output (see Section 4.3).
When changing the discrete output configuration, be sure that all control loops
affected by this output are under manual control.
Before returning the loop to automatic control, ensure that the discrete output is
correctly configured for your process.
The discrete input is used to initiate a transmitter action from a remote input device. If your
transmitter has been configured for a discrete input, the following actions may be assigned to the
discrete input:
Begin fill
•
End fill
•
Pause fill
•
Resume fill
•
Reset fill total
•
Reset mass total
•
Reset volume total
•
Reset all totals
Note: If the filling and dosing application is active, the Reset All Totals function includes resetting the
fill total.
Flowmeter Startup
•
To configure the discrete input, see the menu flowchart in Figure 4-9.
4.8
Establishing a meter verification baseline
Note: This procedure applies only if your transmitter is connected to an enhanced core processor and
you have ordered the meter verification option. In addition, ProLink II v2.5 or later is required.
Micro Motion recommends performing meter verification several times over a range of process
conditions after the transmitter’s required configuration procedures have been completed. This will
establish a baseline for how widely the verification measurement varies under normal circumstances.
The range of process conditions should include expected temperature, pressure, density, and flow rate
variations.
Configuration and Use Manual
29
Required Configuration
Meter verification is a method of establishing that the flowmeter is performing within factory
specifications. See Chapter 10 for more information about meter verification.
Required Transmitter Configuration
View the trend chart for these initial tests. By default, the specification uncertainty limit is set at
±4.0%, which will avoid false Fail/Caution results over the entire range of specified process
conditions. If you observe a structural integrity variation greater than 4% due to normal process
conditions, you may adjust the specification uncertainty limit to match your process variation. To
avoid false Fail/Caution results, it is advisable to set the specification uncertainty limit to
approximately twice the variation due to the effect of normal process conditions.
In order to perform this baseline analysis, you will need the enhanced meter verification capabilities
of ProLink II v2.5 or later. Refer to the manual entitled ProLink® II Software for Micro Motion®
Transmitters: Installation and Use, P/N 20001909, Rev D or later.
30
Micro Motion® Model 1500 Transmitters with the Filling and Dosing Application
5.1
Using the Transmitter
Chapter 5
Using the Transmitter
Overview
This chapter describes how to use the transmitter in everyday operation. The following topics and
procedures are discussed:
Recording process variables (see Section 5.2)
•
Viewing process variables (see Section 5.3)
•
Viewing transmitter status and alarms, and the alarm log (see Section 5.4)
•
Viewing and using the totalizers and inventories (see Section 5.5)
For information on using the filling and dosing application, see Chapter 8.
Note: All ProLink II procedures provided in this section assume that your computer is already
connected to the transmitter and you have established communication. All ProLink II procedures also
assume that you are complying with all applicable safety requirements. See Chapter 2 for more
information.
5.2
Optional Configuration
•
Recording process variables
Filler Configuration
Micro Motion suggests that you make a record of the process variables listed below, under normal
operating conditions. This will help you recognize when the process variables are unusually high or
low, and may help in fine-tuning transmitter configuration.
Record the following process variables:
•
Flow rate
•
Density
•
Temperature
•
Tube frequency
•
Pickoff voltage
•
Drive gain
For information on using this information in troubleshooting, see Section 11.11.
Using the Filler
Configuration and Use Manual
31
Using the Transmitter
5.3
Viewing process variables
Process variables include measurements such as mass flow rate, volume flow rate, mass total, volume
total, temperature, and density.
To view process variables with ProLink II software:
1. The Process Variables window opens automatically when you first connect to the transmitter.
2. If you have closed the Process Variables window:
a. Open the ProLink menu.
b. Select Process Variables.
5.4
Viewing transmitter status and alarms
You can view transmitter status using the status LED or ProLink II.
The transmitter broadcasts alarms whenever a process variable exceeds its defined limits or the
transmitter detects a fault condition. Using ProLink II, you can view active alarms and you can view
the alarm log. For information regarding all the possible alarms, see Table 11-4.
5.4.1
Using the status LED
The status LED is located on the front panel. This LED shows transmitter status as described in
Table 5-1.
Table 5-1
Transmitter status reported by the status LED
Status LED state
Alarm priority
Definition
Green
No alarm
Normal operating mode
Flashing yellow
No alarm
Zero in progress
Yellow
Low severity alarm
• Alarm condition: will not cause measurement error
• Outputs continue to report process data
• This alarm may indicate “Fill not ready” condition,
e.g., target set to 0, no flow source configured, no
valves configured.
Red
High severity (critical fault) alarm
• Alarm condition: will cause measurement error
• Outputs go to configured fault indicators
5.4.2
Using ProLink II software
To view current status and alarms with ProLink II software:
1. Click ProLink.
2. Select Status. The status indicators are divided into three categories: Critical, Informational,
and Operational. To view the indicators in a category, click on the tab.
32
•
A tab is red if one or more status indicators in that category is on.
•
Within the tabs, current status alarms are shown by red status indicators.
Micro Motion® Model 1500 Transmitters with the Filling and Dosing Application
Using the Transmitter
1. Click ProLink.
2. Select Alarm log. Entries in the alarm log are divided into two categories: High Priority and
Low Priority. Within each category:
•
All currently active alarms are listed, with a red status indicator.
•
All alarms that are no longer active are listed, with a green status indicator.
3. To remove an inactive alarm from the list, click the ACK checkbox, then click Apply.
Using the Transmitter
To view the alarm log:
The alarm log is cleared and regenerated with every transmitter power cycle.
Note: The location of alarms in the Status or Alarm Log window is not affected by the configured
alarm severity (see Section 6.11.1). Alarms in the Status window are predefined as Critical,
Informational, or Operational. Alarms in the Alarm Log window are predefined as High Priority or
Low Priority.
Optional Configuration
5.5
Using the totalizers and inventories
The totalizers keep track of the total amount of mass or volume measured by the transmitter over a
period of time. The totalizers can be viewed, started, stopped, and reset.
The inventories track the same values as the totalizers but can be reset separately. Because the
inventories are reset separately, you can keep a running total of mass or volume across multiple
totalizer resets.
Note: Mass and volume totalizer and inventory values are held across transmitter power cycles. The
fill total is not held across power cycles.
Note: If the Special update rate is configured, no inventories are available. See Section 6.7.
To view the current value of the totalizers and inventories with ProLink II software:
1. Click ProLink.
Table 5-2 shows how you can control the totalizers and inventories using ProLink II software. To get
to the Totalizer Control screen:
1. Click ProLink.
2. Select Totalizer Control.
Filler Configuration
2. Select Process Variables or Totalizer Control.
Note: The fill total can be reset independently from the Run Filler window (see Section 8.3.1). It
cannot be reset independently from the Totalizer window.
Table 5-2
Totalizer and inventory control with ProLink II software
On the totalizer control screen...
Stop the mass and volume totalizers and inventories
Click Stop
Start the mass and volume totalizers and inventories
Click Start
Reset mass totalizer
Click Reset Mass Total
Reset volume totalizer
Click Reset Volume Total
Simultaneously reset all totalizers (mass, volume, and fill)
(1)
Simultaneously reset all inventories (mass and volume)
Using the Filler
To accomplish this
Click Reset
Click Reset Inventories
(1) If enabled in the ProLink II preferences. Click View > Preferences, and set the Enable Inventory Totals Reset checkbox as desired.
Configuration and Use Manual
33
34
Micro Motion® Model 1500 Transmitters with the Filling and Dosing Application
6.1
Using the Transmitter
Chapter 6
Optional Transmitter Configuration
Overview
This chapter describes transmitter configuration parameters that may or may not be used, depending
on your application requirements. For required transmitter configuration, see Chapter 4.
The following configuration parameters and options are described in this chapter:
•
Cutoffs (see Section 6.5)
•
Damping (see Section 6.6)
•
Update rate (see Section 6.7)
•
Flow direction (see Section 6.8)
•
Events (see Section 6.9)
•
Slug flow (see Section 6.10)
•
Fault handling (see Section 6.11)
•
Digital communications settings (see Section 6.12)
•
Variable mapping (see Section 6.13)
•
Device settings (see Section 6.14)
•
Sensor parameters (see Section 6.15)
Filler Configuration
Special measurement units (see Section 6.4)
Optional Configuration
6.2
•
Default values
Default values and ranges for the most commonly used parameters are provided in Appendix A.
6.3
Parameter location within ProLink II
For information on parameter location within the ProLink II interface, see Appendix C.
6.4
Creating special measurement units
If you need to use a non-standard unit of measure, you can create one special measurement unit for
mass flow and one special measurement unit for volume flow.
Using the Filler
Configuration and Use Manual
35
Optional Transmitter Configuration
6.4.1
About special measurement units
Special measurement units consist of:
•
Base unit – A combination of:
-
Base mass or base volume unit – A measurement unit that the transmitter already
recognizes (e.g., kg, m3)
-
Base time unit – A unit of time that the transmitter already recognizes (e.g., seconds, days)
•
Conversion factor – The number by which the base unit will be divided to convert to the
special unit
•
Special unit – A non-standard volume flow or mass flow unit of measure that you want to be
reported by the transmitter
The terms above are related by the following formula:
x [ BaseUnit(s) ] = y [ SpecialUnit(s) ]
x [ BaseUnit(s) ]
ConversionFactor = --------------------------------------------y [ SpecialUnit(s) ]
To create a special unit, you must:
1. Identify the simplest base volume or mass and base time units for your special mass flow or
volume flow unit. For example, to create the special volume flow unit pints per minute, the
simplest base units are gallons per minute:
•
Base volume unit: gallon
•
Base time unit: minute
2. Calculate the conversion factor using the formula below:
1 (gallon per minute)
------------------------------------------------------- = 0.125 (conversion factor)
8 (pints per minute)
Note: 1 gallon per minute = 8 pints per minute
3. Name the new special mass flow or volume flow measurement unit and its corresponding
totalizer measurement unit:
•
Special volume flow measurement unit name: Pint/min
•
Volume totalizer measurement unit name: Pints
Names can be up to 8 characters long.
4. To apply the special measurement unit to mass flow or volume flow measurement, select
Special from the list of measurement units (see Section 4.4.1 or 4.4.2).
6.4.2
Special mass flow unit
To create a special mass flow measurement unit:
1. Specify the base mass unit.
2. Specify the base time unit.
3. Specify the mass flow conversion factor.
4. Assign a name to the new special mass flow measurement unit.
5. Assign a name to the mass totalizer measurement unit.
36
Micro Motion® Model 1500 Transmitters with the Filling and Dosing Application
Optional Transmitter Configuration
Special volume flow unit
Using the Transmitter
6.4.3
To create a special volume flow measurement unit:
1. Specify the base volume unit.
2. Specify the base time unit.
3. Specify the volume flow conversion factor.
4. Assign a name to the new special volume flow measurement unit.
5. Assign a name to the volume totalizer measurement unit.
6.4.4
Special unit for gas
To configure a mass flow special unit that represents standard or normal volume flow rate, you must
calculate the mass flow conversion factor from the density of the gas at a reference temperature,
pressure, and composition.
ProLink II offers a Gas Unit Configurator tool to calculate this mass flow conversion factor. The tool
will automatically update the mass flow conversion factor in the Special Units tab. If ProLink II is
not available, special mass units can be used to set up standard or normal volume flow units for gas
applications.
Optional Configuration
For many gas applications, standard or normal volume flow rate is used as the quasi mass flow rate.
Standard or normal volume flow rate is calculated as the mass flow rate divided by the density of the
gas at a reference condition.
Note: Micro Motion recommends that you do not use the flowmeter to measure actual volume flow of
a gas (volumetric flow at line conditions). If you need to measure actual volume flow, contact Micro
Motion customer support.
CAUTION
Filler Configuration
The flowmeter should not be used for measuring the actual volume of gases.
Standard or normal volume is the traditional unit for gas flow. Coriolis flowmeters
measure mass. Mass divided by standard or normal density yields standard or
normal volume units.
To use the Gas Unit Configurator:
1. Start ProLink II and connect to your transmitter.
2. Open the Configuration window.
3. Click the Special Units tab.
4. Click the Gas Unit Configurator button.
5. Select the Time Unit that your special unit will be based on.
7. Click Next.
Configuration and Use Manual
37
Using the Filler
6. Click a radio button to specify that your special unit will be defined in terms of English Units
or SI (Système International) Units.
Optional Transmitter Configuration
8. Define the standard density to be used in calculations.
•
To use a fixed standard density, click the top radio button, enter a value for standard
density in the Standard Density textbox, and click Next.
•
To use a calculated standard density, click the second radio button and click Next. Then
enter values for Reference Temperature, Reference Pressure, and Specific Gravity on
the next panel, and click Next.
9. Check the values displayed.
6.5
•
If they are appropriate for your application, click Finish. The special unit data will be
written to the transmitter.
•
If they are not appropriate for your application, click Back as many times as necessary to
return to the relevant panel, correct the problem, then repeat the above steps.
Configuring cutoffs
Cutoffs are user-defined values below which the transmitter reports a value of zero for the specified
process variable. Cutoffs can be set for mass flow, volume flow, or density.
See Table 6-1 for cutoff default values and related information. See Sections 6.5.1 and 6.5.2 for
information on how the cutoffs interact with other transmitter measurements.
Table 6-1
Cutoff default values
Cutoff type
Default
Comments
Mass flow
0.0 g/s
Recommended setting: 0.5–1.0% of the sensor’s rated maximum flowrate
Volume flow
0.0 L/s
Lower limit: 0
Upper limit: the sensor’s flow calibration factor, in units of L/s, multiplied by 0.2
Density
0.2 g/cm3
Range: 0.0–0.5 g/cm3
6.5.1
Cutoffs and volume flow
The mass flow cutoff is not applied to the volume flow calculation. Even if the mass flow drops below
the cutoff, and therefore the mass flow indicators go to zero, the volume flow rate will be calculated
from the actual mass flow process variable.
However, the density cutoff is applied to the volume flow calculation. Accordingly, if the density
drops below its configured cutoff value, both the reported density and the reported volume flow rate
will go to zero.
6.5.2
Interaction with the AO cutoff
The mA output also has a cutoff – the AO cutoff. If the mA output is configured for mass or volume
flow:
•
And the AO cutoff is set to a greater value than the mass and volume cutoffs, the flow
indicators will go to zero when the AO cutoff is reached.
•
And the AO cutoff is set to a lower value than the mass or volume cutoff, the flow indicator
will go to zero when the mass or volume cutoff is reached.
See Section 4.5.3 for more information on the AO cutoff.
38
Micro Motion® Model 1500 Transmitters with the Filling and Dosing Application
Optional Transmitter Configuration
Configuring the damping values
A damping value is a period of time, in seconds, over which the process variable value will change to
reflect 63% of the change in the actual process. Damping helps the transmitter smooth out small,
rapid measurement fluctuations.
•
A high damping value makes the output appear to be smoother because the output must change
slowly.
•
A low damping value makes the output appear to be more erratic because the output changes
more quickly.
Using the Transmitter
6.6
When you specify a new damping value, it is automatically rounded down to the nearest valid
damping value. Flow, density, and temperature have different valid damping values. Valid damping
values are listed in Table 6-2.
Before setting the damping values, review Sections 6.6.1 through 6.6.3 for information on how the
damping values interact with other transmitter measurements and parameters.
Table 6-2
Valid damping values
Process variable
Update rate(1)
Valid damping values
Flow (mass and volume)
Normal (20 Hz)
0, .2, .4, .8, ... 51.2
Special (100 Hz)
0, .04, .08, .16, ... 10.24
Normal (20 Hz)
0, .2, .4, .8, ... 51.2
Special (100 Hz)
0, .04, .08, .16, ... 10.24
Not applicable
0, .6, 1.2, 2.4, 4.8, ... 76.8
Density
Temperature
Optional Configuration
For the Model 1500 transmitter with the filling and dosing application, the default damping value for
flow has been set to 0.04 seconds. For most filling and dosing applications, the default flow damping
value is used. Contact Micro Motion customer support before changing the flow damping value.
(1) See Section 6.6.3.
Filler Configuration
6.6.1
Damping and volume measurement
When configuring damping values, be aware that volume measurement is derived from mass and
density measurements; therefore, any damping applied to mass flow and density will affect volume
measurements. Be sure to set damping values accordingly.
6.6.2
Interaction with the added damping parameter
The mA output has a damping parameter – added damping. If damping is configured for flow, the mA
output is configured for mass flow or volume flow, and added damping is also configured for the mA
output, the effect of damping the process variable is calculated first, and the added damping
calculation is applied to the result of that calculation.
See Section 4.5.5 for more information on the added damping parameter.
Using the Filler
Configuration and Use Manual
39
Optional Transmitter Configuration
6.6.3
Interaction with the update rate
Flow and density damping values depend on the configured Update Rate (see Section 6.7). If you
change the update rate, the damping values are automatically adjusted. Damping rates for Special are
20% of Normal damping rates. See Table 6-2.
Note: The specific process variable selected for the Special update rate is not relevant; all damping
values are adjusted as described.
6.7
Configuring the update rate
The update rate is the rate at which the sensor reports process variables to the transmitter. This affects
transmitter response time to changes in the process.
There are two settings for Update Rate: Normal and Special.
•
When Normal is configured, most process variables are polled at the rate of 20 times per
second (20 Hz).
•
When Special is configured, a single, user-specified process variable is reported at a faster
rate, and all others are reported at a slower rate. If you set the update rate to Special, you must
also specify which process variable will be updated at 100 Hz. Polling for some process
variables and diagnostic/calibration data is dropped (see Section 6.7.1), and the remaining
process variables are polled a minimum of 6 times per second (6.25 Hz).
Not all process variables can be used as the 100 Hz variable. Only the following process variables can
be selected:
•
Mass flow rate
•
Volume flow rate
For the Model 1500 transmitter with the filling and dosing application, Special is the default, and the
100 Hz variable is automatically set to the variable configured as the fill flow source (mass flow rate
or volume flow rate).
For filling and dosing applications, Micro Motion recommends:
•
Use Special for all “short” applications (fill duration less than 15 seconds).
•
Use Normal for all “long” applications (fill duration of 15 or more seconds).
For all other applications, Micro Motion recommends using the Normal update rate. Contact Micro
Motion before using the Special update rate for other applications.
Note: If you change the Update Rate setting, the setting for damping is automatically adjusted. See
Section 6.6.3.
40
Micro Motion® Model 1500 Transmitters with the Filling and Dosing Application
Optional Transmitter Configuration
Effects of Special mode
In Special mode:
•
Not all process variables are updated. The process variables listed below are always updated:
Mass flow
-
Volume flow
-
Density
-
Temperature
-
Drive gain
-
LPO amplitude
-
RPO amplitude
-
Status (contains Event 1 and Event 2)
-
Raw tube frequency
-
Mass total
-
Volume total
-
Board temperature
-
Core input voltage
-
Mass inventory
-
Volume inventory
Optional Configuration
-
Using the Transmitter
6.7.1
All other process variables are not polled at all. The omitted process variables will remain at
the values they held before Special mode was implemented.
•
Calibration data is not refreshed.
Micro Motion recommends the following:
If Special mode is required, ensure that all required data is being updated.
•
Do not perform any calibrations while in Special mode.
Configuring the flow direction parameter
Note: If the mA output is configured for valve control, this parameter has no effect.
The flow direction parameter controls how the transmitter reports flow rate and how flow is added to
or subtracted from the totalizers, under conditions of forward flow, reverse flow, or zero flow.
•
Forward (positive) flow moves in the direction of the arrow on the sensor.
•
Reverse (negative) flow moves in the direction opposite of the arrow on the sensor.
Filler Configuration
6.8
•
Options for flow direction include:
Forward
•
Reverse
•
Absolute Value
•
Bidirectional
•
Negate Forward
•
Negate Bidirectional
Configuration and Use Manual
Using the Filler
•
41
Optional Transmitter Configuration
For the effect of flow direction on the mA output:
•
See Figure 6-1 if the 4 mA value of the mA output is set to 0.
•
See Figure 6-2 if the 4 mA value of the mA output is set to a negative value.
For a discussion of these figures, see the examples following the figures.
For the effect of flow direction on totalizers and flow values reported via digital communication,
see Table 6-3.
Effect of flow direction on mA outputs: 4mA value = 0
20
mA output
mA output
20
12
4
-x
Reverse
flow(1)
0
Zero flow
x
Forward
flow(2)
Flow direction parameter:
• Forward
mA output configuration:
• 20 mA value = x
• 4 mA value = 0
To set the 4 mA and 20 mA values,
see Section 4.5.2.
42
20
mA output
Figure 6-1
12
4
-x
Reverse
flow(1)
0
Zero flow
x
Forward
flow(2)
Flow direction parameter:
• Reverse
• Negate Forward
12
4
-x
Reverse
flow(1)
0
Zero flow
x
Forward
flow(2)
Flow direction parameter:
• Absolute value
• Bidirectional
• Negate Bidirectional
(1) Process fluid flowing in opposite direction from flow direction arrow on sensor.
(2) Process fluid flowing in same direction as flow direction arrow on sensor.
Micro Motion® Model 1500 Transmitters with the Filling and Dosing Application
Optional Transmitter Configuration
Effect of flow direction on mA outputs: 4mA value < 0
20
12
4
–x
Reverse
flow(1)
0
Zero flow
x
4
Reverse
flow(1)
0
Zero flow
x
Forward
flow(2)
Flow direction parameter:
• Reverse
• Negate Forward
12
4
–x
Reverse
flow(1)
0
Zero flow
x
Forward
flow(2)
Flow direction parameter:
• Absolute value
• Bidirectional
• Negate Bidirectional
Optional Configuration
Flow direction parameter:
• Forward
Example 1
12
–x
Forward
flow(2)
mA output configuration:
• 20 mA value = x
• 4 mA value = –x
• –x < 0
To set the 4 mA and 20 mA values,
see Section 4.5.2.
mA output
20
mA output
mA output
20
Using the Transmitter
Figure 6-2
(1) Process fluid flowing in opposite direction from flow direction arrow on sensor.
(2) Process fluid flowing in same direction as flow direction arrow on sensor.
Configuration:
•
Flow direction = Forward
•
mA output: 4 mA = 0 g/s; 20 mA = 100 g/s
Filler Configuration
(See the first graph in Figure 6-1.)
As a result:
•
Under conditions of reverse flow or zero flow, the mA output level
is 4 mA.
•
Under conditions of forward flow, up to a flow rate of 100 g/s, the
mA output level varies between 4 mA and 20 mA in proportion to
(the absolute value of) the flow rate.
•
Under conditions of forward flow, if (the absolute value of) the flow
rate equals or exceeds 100 g/s, the mA output will be proportional
to the flow rate up to 20.5 mA, and will be level at 20.5 mA at
higher flow rates.
Using the Filler
Configuration and Use Manual
43
Optional Transmitter Configuration
Example 2
Configuration:
•
Flow direction = Reverse
•
mA output: 4 mA = 0 g/s; 20 mA = 100 g/s
(See the second graph in Figure 6-1.)
As a result:
Example 3
•
Under conditions of forward flow or zero flow, the mA output level
is 4 mA.
•
Under conditions of reverse flow, up to a flow rate of 100 g/s, the
mA output level varies between 4 mA and 20 mA in proportion to
the absolute value of the flow rate.
•
Under conditions of reverse flow, if the absolute value of the flow
rate equals or exceeds 100 g/s, the mA output will be proportional
to the absolute value of the flow rate up to 20.5 mA, and will be
level at 20.5 mA at higher absolute values.
Configuration:
•
Flow direction = Forward
•
mA output: 4 mA = –100 g/s; 20 mA = 100 g/s
(See the first graph in Figure 6-2.)
As a result:
44
•
Under conditions of zero flow, the mA output is 12 mA.
•
Under conditions of forward flow, up to a flow rate of 100 g/s, the
mA output varies between 12 mA and 20 mA in proportion to (the
absolute value of) the flow rate.
•
Under conditions of forward flow, if (the absolute value of) the flow
rate equals or exceeds 100 g/s, the mA output is proportional to
the flow rate up to 20.5 mA, and will be level at 20.5 mA at higher
flow rates.
•
Under conditions of reverse flow, up to a flow rate of 100 g/s, the
mA output varies between 4 mA and 12 mA in inverse proportion
to the absolute value of the flow rate.
•
Under conditions of reverse flow, if the absolute value of the flow
rate equals or exceeds 100 g/s, the mA output is inversely
proportional to the flow rate down to 3.8 mA, and will be level at
3.8 mA at higher absolute values.
Micro Motion® Model 1500 Transmitters with the Filling and Dosing Application
Optional Transmitter Configuration
Effect of flow direction on totalizers and digital communications
Using the Transmitter
Table 6-3
Forward flow(1)
Flow direction value
Flow totals
Flow values via digital comm.
Forward
Increase
Positive
Reverse
No change
Positive
Bidirectional
Increase
Positive
Absolute value
Increase
Positive(2)
Negate Forward
No change
Negative
Negate Bidirectional
Decrease
Negative
Zero flow
Flow totals
Flow values via digital comm.
All
No change
0
Optional Configuration
Flow direction value
Reverse flow(3)
Flow direction value
Flow totals
Flow values via digital comm.
Forward
No change
Negative
Reverse
Increase
Negative
Bidirectional
Decrease
Negative
Absolute value
Increase
Positive(2)
Negate Forward
Increase
Positive
Negate Bidirectional
Increase
Positive
(1) Process fluid flowing in same direction as flow direction arrow on sensor.
(2) Refer to the digital communications status bits for an indication of whether flow is positive or negative.
(3) Process fluid flowing in opposite direction from flow direction arrow on sensor.
Configuring events
An event occurs if the real-time value of a user-specified process variable varies beyond a
user-specified value. Events are used to perform specific actions on the transmitter. For example, the
event can be defined to activate a discrete output if the flow rate is above a specified value. The
discrete output, then, may be configured to close a valve.
Filler Configuration
6.9
Note: Events cannot be used to manage the filling process.
You can define one or two events. You may define the events on a single process variable or on two
different process variables. Each event is associated with either a high or a low alarm.
Configuring an event includes the following steps:
1. Selecting Event 1 or Event 2.
2. Assigning a process variable to the event.
•
Active High – alarm is triggered if process variable goes above setpoint
•
Active Low – alarm is triggered if process variable goes below setpoint
Configuration and Use Manual
Using the Filler
3. Specifying the Event Type:
45
Optional Transmitter Configuration
4. Specifying the setpoint – the value at which the event will occur or switch state (ON to OFF, or
vice versa).
Note: Events do not occur if the process variable equals the setpoint. The process variable must be
greater than (Active High) or less than (Active Low) the setpoint for the event to occur.
Example
Define Event 1 to indicate that the mass flow rate in forward or
backward direction is less than 2 lb/min.
1. Specify lb/min as the mass flow unit.
2. Set Flow Direction to Absolute Value.
3. Select Event 1.
4. Configure:
•
Variable = Mass Flow Rate
•
Type = Active Low
•
Setpoint = 2
ProLink II automatically displays event information on the Informational panel of the Status window
and in the Output Levels window.
6.10
Configuring slug flow limits and duration
Slugs – gas in a liquid process or liquid in a gas process – occasionally appear in some applications.
The presence of slugs can significantly affect the process density reading. The slug flow parameters
can help the transmitter suppress extreme changes in process variables, and can also be used to
identify process conditions that require correction.
Slug flow parameters are as follows:
46
•
Low slug flow limit – the point below which a condition of slug flow will exist. Typically, this
is the lowest density point in your process’s normal density range. Default value is 0.0 g/cm3;
range is 0.0–10.0 g/cm3.
•
High slug flow limit – the point above which a condition of slug flow will exist. Typically, this
is the highest density point in your process’s normal density range. Default value is 5.0 g/cm3;
range is 0.0–10.0 g/cm3.
•
Slug flow duration – the number of seconds the transmitter waits for a slug flow condition
(outside the slug flow limits) to return to normal (inside the slug flow limits). If the transmitter
detects slug flow, it will post a slug flow alarm and hold its last “pre-slug flow” flow rate until
the end of the slug flow duration. If slugs are still present after the slug flow duration has
expired, the transmitter will report a flow rate of zero. Default value for slug flow duration is
0.0 seconds; range is 0.0–60.0 seconds.
Micro Motion® Model 1500 Transmitters with the Filling and Dosing Application
Optional Transmitter Configuration
•
A slug flow alarm is posted immediately.
•
During the slug duration period, the transmitter holds the mass flow rate at the last measured
pre-slug value, independent of the mass flow rate measured by the sensor. All outputs that
report mass flow rate and all internal calculations that include mass flow rate will use this
value.
•
If slugs are still present after the slug duration period expires, the transmitter forces the mass
flow rate to 0, independent of the mass flow rate measured by the sensor. All outputs that
report mass flow rate and all internal calculations that include mass flow rate will use 0.
•
When process density returns to a value within the slug flow limits, the slug flow alarm is
cleared and the mass flow rate reverts to the actual measured value.
Using the Transmitter
If the transmitter detects slug flow:
Note: Raising the low slug flow limit or lowering the high slug flow limit will increase the possibility
that the transmitter will report slug flow.
Optional Configuration
Note: The slug flow limits must be entered in g/cm3, even if another unit has been configured for
density. Slug flow duration is entered in seconds.
Note: If slug flow duration is set to 0, the mass flow rate will be forced to 0 as soon as slug flow is
detected.
6.11
Configuring fault handling
There are four ways that the transmitter can report faults:
•
By setting the mA output to its configured fault level (see Section 4.5.4 )
•
By configuring a discrete output to indicate fault status (see Section 4.6)
•
By setting the digital communications fault indicator (see Section 6.12.1)
•
By posting an alarm to the active alarm log
6.11.1
Filler Configuration
Status alarm severity controls which of these methods is used. For some faults only, fault timeout
controls when the fault is reported.
Changing status alarm severity
Status alarms are classified into three levels of severity. Severity level controls transmitter behavior
when the alarm condition occurs. See Table 6-4.
Table 6-4
Alarm severity levels
Transmitter action
Fault
If this condition occurs, an alarm will be generated and all outputs go to their
configured fault levels. Output configuration is described in Chapter 4.
Informational
If this condition occurs, an alarm will be generated but output levels are not affected.
Ignore
If this condition occurs, no alarm will be generated (no entry is added to the active
alarm log) and output levels are not affected.
You cannot reclassify a Fault alarm, or change another alarm to a Fault alarm. However, alarms can
be reclassified from Informational to Ignore, or vice versa. For example, the default severity level for
the A118 – DO1 Fixed alarm is Information, but you can set it to Ignore.
Configuration and Use Manual
47
Using the Filler
Severity level
Optional Transmitter Configuration
For a list of all status alarms and default severity levels, see Table 6-5. (For more information on
status alarms, including possible causes and troubleshooting suggestions, see Section 11.10.)
Table 6-5
Status alarms and severity levels
Alarm code
ProLink II message
Default
severity
Configurable?
Affected by
fault timeout?
A001
CP EEPROM Failure
Fault
No
No
A002
CP RAM Failure
Fault
No
No
A003
Sensor Failure
Fault
No
Yes
A004
Temp Out of Range
Fault
No
Yes
A005
Mass Flow Overrange
Fault
No
Yes
A006
Characterize Meter
Fault
No
No
A008
Density Out of Range
Fault
No
Yes
A009
Xmtr Initializing
Fault
No
No
A010
Calibration Failure
Fault
No
No
A011
Cal Fail, Too Low
Fault
No
No
A012
Cal Fail, Too High
Fault
No
No
A013
Cal Fail, Too Noisy
Fault
No
No
A014
Transmitter Error
Fault
No
No
A016
Sensor RTD Error
Fault
No
Yes
A017
Meter RTD Error
Fault
No
Yes
A018
EEPROM Failure
Fault
No
No
A019
RAM Failure
Fault
No
No
A020
Cal Factors Missing
Fault
No
No
A021
Sensor Type Incorrect
Fault
No
No
(1)
CP Configuration Failure
Fault
No
No
(1)
CP Totals Failure
Fault
No
No
(1)
CP Program Corrupt
Fault
No
No
(1)
CP Boot Program Fault
Fault
No
No
A026
Xmtr Comm Problem
Fault
No
No
A028
Comm Problem
Fault
No
No
A032
Meter Verification/Outputs In Fault
Fault
No
No
A100
mA 1 Saturated
Info
Yes
No
A101
mA 1 Fixed
Info
Yes
No
A102
Drive Overrange/Partially Full Tube
Info
Yes
No
A103
Data Loss Possible
Info
Yes
No
A104
Cal in Progress
Info
Yes
No
A105
Slug Flow
Info
Yes
No
A107
Power Reset
Info
Yes
No
A108
Event 1 On
Info
Yes
No
A109
Event 2 On
Info
Yes
No
A112
Upgrade Software
Info
Yes
No
A115
External Input Error
Info
Yes
No
A022
A023
A024
A025
(2)
(1)
48
Micro Motion® Model 1500 Transmitters with the Filling and Dosing Application
Optional Transmitter Configuration
Status alarms and severity levels continued
Alarm code
ProLink II message
Default
severity
Configurable?
Affected by
fault timeout?
A118
DO1 Fixed
Info
Yes
No
A119
DO2 Fixed
Info
Yes
No
Meter Verification/Outputs at Last Value
Info
Yes
No
(2)
A131
Using the Transmitter
Table 6-5
(1) Applies only to systems with the standard core processor.
(2) Applies only to systems with the enhanced core processor.
6.11.2
Changing the fault timeout
•
During the fault timeout period, the transmitter continues to report its last valid measurement.
•
The fault timeout applies only to the mA output and discrete output. Fault indication via digital
communications is unaffected.
The fault timeout is not applicable to all faults. See Table 6-5 for information about which faults are
affected by fault timeout.
6.12
Optional Configuration
By default, the transmitter immediately reports a fault when a fault is encountered. For specific faults,
you can configure the transmitter to delay reporting the fault by changing the fault timeout to a
non-zero value. If fault timeout is configured:
Configuring digital communications
The digital communications parameters control how the transmitter will communicate using
Modbus/RS-485 protocol.
The following digital communications parameters can be configured:
Fault indicator
•
Modbus address
•
RS-485 settings
•
Floating-point byte order
•
Additional communications response delay
6.12.1
Filler Configuration
•
Changing the digital communications fault indicator
The transmitter can indicate fault conditions using a digital communications fault indicator. Table 6-6
lists the options for the digital communications fault indicator.
Note: If an output is configured for valve control, the output will never go to fault levels.
Table 6-6
Digital communications fault indicators and values
Fault output value
Upscale
Process variables indicate the value is greater than the upper sensor limit. Totalizers
stop counting.
Downscale
Process variables indicate the value is less than the lower sensor limit. Totalizers stop
counting.
Zero
Flow rates go to the value that represents zero flow, and density and temperature
values are reported as zero. Totalizers stop counting.
Configuration and Use Manual
49
Using the Filler
Fault indicator options
Optional Transmitter Configuration
Table 6-6
Digital communications fault indicators and values continued
Fault indicator options
Fault output value
Not-A-Number (NAN)
Process variables report IEEE NAN and Modbus scaled integers report Max Int.
Totalizers stop counting.
Flow to Zero
Flow rates go to the value that represents zero flow; other process variables are not
affected. Totalizers stop counting.
None (default)
Process variables reported as measured.
6.12.2
Changing the Modbus address
The transmitter’s Modbus address is used by devices on a network to identify and communicate with
the transmitter using Modbus protocol. The Modbus address must be unique on the network. If the
transmitter will not be accessed using Modbus protocol, the Modbus address is not required.
Modbus addresses must be in the range 1–110, inclusive.
If you are connected to the transmitter using an RS-485 connection, and you change the Modbus
address, then:
•
If you are using ProLink II, ProLink II will automatically switch to the new address and retain
the connection.
•
If you are using a different host program, the connection will be broken. You must reconnect
using the new Modbus address.
Note: Changing the Modbus address does not affect service port connections. Service port
connections always use a default address of 111.
6.12.3
Changing the RS-485 parameters
RS-485 parameters control how the transmitter will communicate over its RS-485 terminals. The
following parameters can be set:
•
Protocol
•
Baud rate
•
Parity
•
Stop bits
To enable RS-485 communications with the transmitter from a remote device:
1. Set the transmitter’s digital communications parameters appropriately for your network.
2. Configure the remote device to use the specified parameters.
If you are connected to the transmitter using an RS-485 connection:
•
•
And you change the the baud rate:
-
If you are using ProLink II, ProLink II will automatically switch to the new baud rate and
retain the connection.
-
If you are using a different host program, the connection will be broken. You must
reconnect using the new baud rate.
And you change the protocol, parity or stop bits, all host programs will lose the connection.
You must reconnect using the new settings.
Note: Changing the RS-485 communication settings does not affect service port connections. Service
port connections always use default settings.
50
Micro Motion® Model 1500 Transmitters with the Filling and Dosing Application
Optional Transmitter Configuration
Changing the floating-point byte order
Using the Transmitter
6.12.4
Four bytes are used to transmit floating-point values. For contents of bytes, see Table 6-7.
Table 6-7
Byte contents in Modbus commands and responses
Byte
Bits
Definitions
1
SEEEEEEE
S = Sign
E = Exponent
2
EMMMMMMM
E = Exponent
M = Mantissa
3
MMMMMMMM
M = Mantissa
4
MMMMMMMM
M = Mantissa
Table 6-8
Byte order codes and byte orders
Byte order code
Byte order
0
1–2–3–4
1
3–4–1–2
2
2–1–4–3
3
4–3–2–1
6.12.5
Optional Configuration
The default byte order for the transmitter is 3–4–1–2. You may need to reset byte order to match the
byte order used by a remote host or PLC. Byte order codes are listed in Table 6-8.
Changing the additional communications response delay
The basic unit of delay is in terms of 2/3 of one character time as calculated for the current serial port
baud rate setting and character transmission parameters. This basic delay unit is multiplied by the
configured value to arrive at the total additional time delay. You can specify a value in the range 1 to
255.
6.13
Filler Configuration
Some hosts or PLCs operate at slower speeds than the transmitter. In order to synchronize
communication with these devices, you can configure an additional time delay to be added to each
response the transmitter sends to the remote host.
Configuring variable mapping
The Variable Mapping panel in the Configuration window provides another way to assign the primary
variable (PV). The PV parameter shown on this panel is the same as the Primary Variable parameter
in the Analog Output panel (see Section 4.5): if you change the parameter here, it is automatically
changed in the Analog Output panel, and vice versa.
Configuration and Use Manual
51
Using the Filler
The secondary variable (SV), tertiary variable (TV), and quaternary variable (QV) are not used by the
Model 1500 transmitter with the filling and dosing application, and cannot be changed.
Optional Transmitter Configuration
6.14
Configuring device settings
The device settings are used to describe the flowmeter components. Table 6-9 lists and defines the
device settings.
Table 6-9
Device settings
Parameter
Description
Tag
Also called the “software tag.” Used by other devices on the network to identify this transmitter. The
tag must be unique on the network. Not used in transmitter processing and not required.
Maximum length: 8 characters.
Descriptor
Any user-supplied description. Not used in transmitter processing, and not required.
Maximum length: 16 characters.
Message
Any user-supplied message. Not used in transmitter processing, and not required.
Maximum length: 32 characters.
Date
Any user-selected date. Not used in transmitter processing, and not required.
If you are entering a date, use the left and right arrows at the top of the calendar to select the year and
month, then click on a date.
6.15
Configuring sensor parameters
The sensor parameters are used to describe the sensor component of your flowmeter. They are not
used in transmitter processing, and are not required. The following sensor parameters can be changed:
52
•
Serial number
•
Model number
•
Sensor material
•
Liner material
•
Flange
Micro Motion® Model 1500 Transmitters with the Filling and Dosing Application
7.1
Using the Transmitter
Chapter 7
Configuring the Filling and Dosing Application
About this chapter
This chapter explains how to configure the filling and dosing application on the Model 1500
transmitter. For information on using the filling and dosing application, see Chapter 8.
Optional Configuration
CAUTION
Changing configuration can affect transmitter operation, including filling.
Changes made to filling configuration while a fill is running do not take effect until
the fill is ended. Changes made to other configuration parameters may affect filling.
To ensure correct filling, do not make any configuration changes while a fill is in
progress.
7.2
User interface requirements
ProLink II v2.3 or later is required to configure the filling and dosing application.
Alternatively, configuration can be performed via a customer-written program using the Modbus
interface to the Model 1500 transmitter and the filling and dosing application. Micro Motion has
published the Modbus interface in the following manuals:
Using Modbus Protocol with Micro Motion Transmitters, November 2004, P/N 3600219,
Rev. C (manual plus map)
•
Modbus Mapping Assignments for Micro Motion Transmitters, October 2004, P/N 20001741,
Rev. B (map only)
Both of these manuals are available on the Micro Motion web site.
7.3
Filler Configuration
•
About the filling and dosing application
The filling and dosing application is used to begin flow, then end flow automatically when the target
amount of process fluid has flowed through the sensor. During a fill, flow may be paused and
resumed. A fill may also be ended before the target is reached.
Using the Filler
Configuration and Use Manual
53
Configuring the Filling and Dosing Application
Transmitter outputs change state according to fill status or operator commands. The control system
opens or closes valves in response to the signals from the transmitter. The filling and dosing
application must be configured for the type of valve used for fill control:
•
One-stage discrete – Fill controlled by a single discrete (ON/OFF) valve. The valve opens
completely when the fill begins, and closes completely when the fill target is reached (or the
fill is paused or ended).
•
Two-stage discrete – Fill controlled by two discrete valves: a primary valve and a secondary
valve. One valve must open at the beginning of the fill; the other opens at a user-defined point.
One valve must stay open until the end of the fill; the other closes at a user-defined point. See
Figure 7-1 for illustrations of the different opening and closing options.
•
Three-position analog – Fill controlled by one analog valve which can be fully open, fully
closed, or partially closed. See Figure 7-2 for an illustration of the three-position analog fill.
The Model 1500 filling transmitter provides three outputs which can be used for valve control:
•
Channel B always functions as a discrete output, and can be used to control the primary valve.
•
Channel C can function as a discrete output or a discrete input. When used as a discrete output,
it can be assigned to control the secondary valve.
•
The mA output on Channel A can function as:
-
A discrete output, to control either the primary or secondary valve. When used as a
discrete output, an interposing solid-state relay is required.
-
A three-level output, to control a three-position analog valve. When used as a three-level
output, the 20 mA output level sets the valve to open full, and two user-specified output
levels are used to set the valve to closed and to closed partial.
Note: If Channel A is configured for valve control, the channel cannot be used to report alarm status
and the mA output will never go to fault levels.
Accordingly:
•
A one-stage discrete fill requires either Channel A or Channel B configured to control the
primary valve.
•
A two-stage discrete fill requires any valid pair of Channels A, B, and C configured to control
the primary and secondary valves.
•
A three-position analog fill requires Channel A configured as a three-level output.
Note: See Table 7-1 for detailed information on output options.
54
Micro Motion® Model 1500 Transmitters with the Filling and Dosing Application
Configuring the Filling and Dosing Application
Two-stage discrete fill
Using the Transmitter
Figure 7-1
Open Primary at 0%
Close Primary before Close
Secondary
0% (Begin)
Open Primary
Open
Secondary
Close
Primary
100% (End)
Close Secondary
0% (Begin)
Open Primary
Open
Secondary
Close
Secondary
100% (End)
Close Primary
0% (Begin)
Open Secondary
Open
Primary
Close
Primary
100% (End)
Close Secondary
0% (Begin)
Open Secondary
Open
Primary
Close
Secondary
100% (End)
Close Primary
Open Primary at 0%
Close Primary after Close
Secondary
Optional Configuration
Open Secondary at 0%
Close Primary before Close
Secondary
Open Secondary at 0%
Close Primary after Close
Secondary
Primary valve
Secondary valve
Flow
Filler Configuration
Partial
flow
Three-position analog fill
Full flow
Figure 7-2
0%
(Begin)
Open
Full
Close
Partial
Closed
(100%, End)
Using the Filler
Configuration and Use Manual
55
Configuring the Filling and Dosing Application
7.3.1
Purge
Note: Two-stage discrete filling is not supported if a purge cycle is configured. If this functionality is
required, configure the mA output as a three-level output, to control the fill, and configure Channel C
as a discrete output, to control the purge.
If purge will be performed, one of the following valve control configurations is required:
•
Two discrete outputs (one may be the mA output configured as a discrete output). One must be
assigned to the primary valve and the other must be assigned to the secondary valve. The
primary valve is used to control the fill, and the secondary valve controls the purge.
•
The mA output configured as a three-level output, and Channel C configured as a discrete
output assigned to the secondary valve.
The second discrete output is typically set up to control compressed air or a vacuum. These
techniques are used to clear any process fluid that may be left in the piping from the previous fill.
There are two purge modes: manual and automatic.
•
If Manual is configured, the Begin Purge and End Purge buttons on the Run Filler window
are used to control the purge. The End Fill button also stops a purge.
•
If Auto is configured, the purge starts automatically after the configured Purge Delay, and
continues for the configured Purge Time. The purge may be stopped manually using the End
Fill button.
In both cases, the discrete output assigned to the secondary valve transmits an Open signal when the
purge begins, and transmits a Closed signal when the purge ends. The primary valve remains closed
throughout the purge.
The purge can be stopped at any point, by using the End Purge or End Fill button.
7.3.2
Cleaning
Cleaning does not require any special valve configuration. When cleaning is started, all valves
assigned to the system (except any valves configured for purging, as discussed in the previous section)
are opened; when cleaning is stopped, all valves assigned to the system are closed.
Typically, cleaning involves flowing water or air through the system.
7.4
Configuring the filling and dosing application
To configure the filling and dosing application:
1. Open the ProLink II Configuration window.
2. Click the Filling tab. The panel shown in Figure 7-3 is displayed. In this panel:
a. Configure the flow source (see Section 7.4.1) and click Apply.
b. Configure Fill Type and other filling control options (see Section 7.4.2) and click Apply.
Note: You must configure Fill Type before configuring valve control.
3. Configure valve control as required:
56
•
If you are configuring a one-stage discrete fill, skip this step and continue with Step 6.
•
If you are configuring a two-stage discrete fill, configure Open Primary, Open
Secondary, Close Primary, and Close Secondary (see Section 7.4.3 and Table 7-4),
then click Apply.
Micro Motion® Model 1500 Transmitters with the Filling and Dosing Application
Configuring the Filling and Dosing Application
•
Figure 7-3
If you are configuring a three-position analog fill, configure Open Full and Closed Partial
values (see Section 7.4.3 and Table 7-5), then click Apply.
Filling panel
Using the Transmitter
Note: Either Open Primary or Open Secondary must be set to 0. Either Close Primary or Close
Secondary must be set to 100% (if configured by %) or 0 (if configured by quantity). Settings are
adjusted automatically to ensure that these requirements are met.
Optional Configuration
Filler Configuration
4. Configure transmitter outputs for the requirements of your filling application. Options are
listed in Table 7-1.
To configure Channel B or C as a discrete output, use the Channel Configuration panel in
the ProLink II Configuration window (see Section 4.6). To assign a function to Channel
B or Channel C, use the Discrete IO panel in the ProLink II Configuration window (see
Figure 7-4).
•
To configure Channel A as a discrete output, use the Analog Output panel in the
ProLink II Configuration window (see Figure 7-5). In this panel:
-
Set Primary Variable to Primary Valve or Secondary Valve.
-
Ensure that Enable 3 Position Valve is disabled.
Configuration and Use Manual
57
Using the Filler
•
Configuring the Filling and Dosing Application
•
Table 7-1
To configure Channel A as a three-level output, use the Analog Output panel and:
-
Set Primary Variable to Primary Valve.
-
Ensure that Enable 3 Position Valve is enabled.
-
Specify the Setpoint, which is the mA output level that sets the valve to closed partial.
-
Specify the Closed Value, which is the mA output level that sets the valve to closed
full. This value must be between 0 and 4 mA, and should be set according to the
requirements of the valve.
Output requirements and assignments
Fill type
Output requirements
Options
Assignment
One-stage discrete
One discrete output
Channel A
Primary valve
Channel B
Primary valve
Channel A
Channel C
Primary valve; 3-position valve disabled
Secondary (purge) valve
Channel B
Channel A
Primary valve
Secondary (purge) valve with 3-position valve
disabled
Channel B
Channel C
Primary valve
Secondary(purge) valve
Channel A
Channel C
Primary valve with 3-position valve disabled
Secondary valve
Channel B
Channel A
Primary valve
Secondary valve with 3-position valve disabled
Channel B
Channel C
Primary valve
Secondary valve
One-stage discrete
with purge cycle
Two-stage discrete
Two discrete outputs
Two discrete outputs
Three-position analog
One three-level output
Channel A
Primary valve with 3-position valve enabled
Three-position analog
with purge cycle
One three-level output and
one discrete output
Channel A
Channel C
Primary valve with 3-position valve enabled
Secondary (purge) valve
Figure 7-4
58
Discrete IO panel
Micro Motion® Model 1500 Transmitters with the Filling and Dosing Application
Configuring the Filling and Dosing Application
Analog Output panel
Using the Transmitter
Figure 7-5
Optional Configuration
Filler Configuration
5. If you want to use overshoot compensation, see Section 7.5 for options and configuration
instructions. This applies to both fixed and automatic overshoot compensation (AOC).
6. If Channel C has been configured as a discrete input, you can assign a fill control function to
this channel. See Section 8.3.2.
7.4.1
Flow source
The flow source specifies the flow variable that will be used to measure fill quantity. Select one of the
flow sources defined in Table 7-2.
If you select None, the filling application is automatically disabled.
•
If you select Mass Flow Rate or Volume Flow Rate, that variable will automatically be
defined as the 100 Hz variable, and Update Rate will automatically be set to Special. See
Section 6.7 for more information.
Using the Filler
•
Note: If the filling application is enabled, you should not specify any variable other than the flow
source variable as the 100 Hz variable.
Configuration and Use Manual
59
Configuring the Filling and Dosing Application
Table 7-2
Flow sources
Flow source
Default
None
Description
Fill controller is disabled.
Mass flow rate
✓
Volume flow rate
7.4.2
Mass flow process variable as measured by transmitter
Volume flow process variable as measured by transmitter
Filling control options
The filling control options are used to define the fill process. Filling control options are listed and
defined in Table 7-3.
Table 7-3
Filling control options
Control option
Default
Description
Enable Filling
Option
Enabled
If enabled, the filling application is available for use.
If disabled, the filling application is not available for use. However, it is still
installed on the transmitter.
Count Up
Enabled
Controls how the fill total is calculated and displayed:
• If enabled, fill totals increase from zero to the target value.
• If disabled, fill totals decrease from the target value to zero.
Does not affect fill configuration.
Enable AOC
Enabled
Automatic Overshoot Compensation (AOC) instructs the fill controller to
compensate for the time required to close the valve, using the calculated AOC
coefficient. See Section 7.5 for overshoot compensation options.
Enable Purge
Disabled
If enabled, the secondary valve is used for purging. See Section 7.3.1.
Fill Type
One Stage
Discrete
Specify One Stage Discrete, Two Stage Discrete, or Three Position Analog. See
Section 7.3.
If Purge is enabled, you may not specify Two Stage Discrete. See Section 7.3.1.
Configure By
% Target
Select % Target or Quantity.
• If set to % Target, Open Primary, Open Secondary, Close Primary, and Close
Secondary values are configured as a percentage of the fill target.
• If set to Quantity, Open Primary and Open Secondary are each configured as
a quantity at which the valve should open; Close Primary and Close
Secondary are configured as a quantity that is subtracted from the target.
Fill Target
0.00000 g
Enter the value at which the fill will be complete.
• If Mass Flow Rate was specified for flow source, enter the value in the current
measurement unit for mass. This unit is derived from the mass flow
measurement unit (see Section 4.4.1).
• If Volume Flow Rate was specified for flow source, enter the value in the
current measurement unit for volume. This unit is derived from the volume flow
measurement unit (see Section 4.4.2).
Max Fill Time
0.00000 sec
Enter a value of 0.00000 or any positive number (in seconds). There is no upper
limit. If the fill does not reach the target before this time has elapsed, the fill is
aborted and fill timeout error messages are posted.
If Max Fill Time is set to 0, it is disabled.
Purge Mode
Manual
Select the purge control method:
• Auto: A purge cycle occurs automatically after every fill, as defined by the
Purge Delay and Purge Time parameters.
• Manual: Purge must be started and stopped using the buttons on the Run
Filler window.
Purge must be enabled before Purge Mode can be configured.
Purge Delay
2.00000 sec
Used only if Purge Mode is set to Auto.
Enter the number of seconds that will elapse after a fill is complete before the
purge will begin. At this point, the purge (secondary) valve will be opened
automatically.
60
Micro Motion® Model 1500 Transmitters with the Filling and Dosing Application
Configuring the Filling and Dosing Application
Filling control options continued
Default
Description
Purge Time
1.00000 sec
Used only if Purge Mode is set to Auto.
Enter the purge duration, in seconds. When Purge Time has elapsed, the purge
(secondary) valve will be closed automatically.
AOC Algorithm
Underfill
Select the type of overshoot compensation to be performed:
• Underfill – The actual quantity delivered will never exceed the target quantity.
• Overfill – The actual quantity delivered will never be less than the target
quantity.
• Fixed – The valve will close at the point defined by the target quantity minus
the Fixed Overshoot Comp parameter.
Underfill and Overfill are available only if AOC is enabled.
Fixed is available only if AOC is disabled.
AOC Window
Length
10
For standard AOC calibration, specify the maximum number of fills that will be
run during calibration.
For rolling AOC calibration, specify the number of fills that will be used to
calculate AOC.
Fixed Overshoot
Comp
0.00000
Used only if AOC is disabled and AOC Algorithm is set to Fixed.
Enter the value to be subtracted from the target quantity to determine the point
at which the valve will close. Enter the value in mass or volume units, as
appropriate to the configured flow source.
7.4.3
Valve control parameters
Optional Configuration
Control option
Using the Transmitter
Table 7-3
The valve control parameters are used to open and close the valves at particular points in the fill
process.
•
Valve control parameters for two-stage discrete filling are listed and defined in Table 7-4.
•
Valve control parameters for three-position analog filling are listed and defined in Table 7-5.
Note: Valve control parameters are not used for one-stage discrete filling. In one-stage discrete filling,
the valve opens when the fill is started, and closes when the fill target is reached.
Filler Configuration
Using the Filler
Configuration and Use Manual
61
Configuring the Filling and Dosing Application
Table 7-4
Valve control parameters – Two-stage discrete fill
Flow option
Default
Description
Open Primary
0.00% of target
Enter the quantity or the percent of the target at which the primary valve will
open.
Either Open Primary or Open Secondary must be set to 0. If one of these
parameters is set to a non-zero value, the other is set to 0 automatically.
Before a fill of this type can be started, the primary valve must be assigned to
a discrete output. See Section 7.4, Step 4.
Open
Secondary
0.00% of target
Enter the quantity or the percent of the target at which the secondary valve will
open.
Either Open Primary or Open Secondary must be set to 0. If one of these
parameters is set to a non-zero value, the other is set to 0 automatically.
Before a fill of this type can be started, the secondary valve must be assigned
to a discrete output. See Section 7.4, Step 4.
Close Primary
100.00% of target
Enter the percent of the target, or the quantity to be subtracted from the target,
at which the primary valve will close.(1)
Either Close Primary or Close Secondary must be set to close when the target
is reached. If one of these parameters is set to a value that is not the target,
the other is adjusted accordingly.
Close
Secondary
100.00% of target
Enter the percent of the target, or the quantity to be subtracted from the target,
at which the secondary valve will close.(1)
Either Close Primary or Close Secondary must be set to close when the target
is reached. If one of these parameters is set to a value that is not the target,
the other is adjusted accordinly.
(1) See the definition of Configure By in Table 7-3.
Table 7-5
Valve control parameters – Three-position analog fill
Flow option
Default
Description
Open Full
0.00% of target
Enter the quantity or the percent of the target at which the valve will transition
from partial flow to full flow.
Close Partial
100.00% of target
Enter the percent of the target, or the quantity to be subtracted from the target,
at which the valve will transition from full flow to partial flow.(1)
(1) See the definition of Configure By in Table 7-3.
7.5
Overshoot compensation
Overshoot compensation keeps the actual quantity delivered as close as possible to the fill target by
compensating for the time required to close the valve. Without overshoot compensation, there will
always be some amount of overfill because of the time required for the transmitter to observe that the
target has been reached and send the command to close the valve, and then for the control system and
valve to respond. When overshoot compensation is configured, the transmitter issues the valve close
command before the target is reached. See Figure 7-6.
62
Micro Motion® Model 1500 Transmitters with the Filling and Dosing Application
Configuring the Filling and Dosing Application
Overshoot compensation and flow
Using the Transmitter
Figure 7-6
Overfill
No overshoot compensation
Flow
Target
reached
Transmitter issues
Valve closes
Close valve command
Compensation
factor
Optional Configuration
Overshoot compensation
Flow
Transmitter issues
Valve closes
Target
Close valve command
Three types of overshoot compensation can be configured:
Fixed – The valve will close at the point defined by the target minus the quantity specified in
Fixed Overshoot Comp.
•
Underfill – The valve will close at the point defined by the AOC coefficient calculated during
AOC calibration, adjusted to ensure that the actual quantity delivered never exceeds the target.
(The initial adjusted target is less than the actual target, and moves upward toward the target
during calibration.)
•
Overfill – The valve will close at the point defined by the AOC coefficient calculated during
AOC calibration, adjusted to ensure that the actual quantity delivered is never less than the
target. (The variance of the fills is added to the AOC-adjusted target.)
AOC calibration is required only if Underfill or Overfill is configured. There are two forms of AOC
calibration:
•
Standard – Several fills are run during a special “calibration period.” The AOC coefficient is
calculated from data collected from these fills. See Section 7.5.2 for instructions on the
standard AOC calibration procedure.
•
Rolling – The AOC coefficient is calculated from data collected from the x most recent fills,
where x is the value specified for AOC Window Length. There is no special calibration period.
For example, if AOC Window Length is set to 10, the first AOC coefficient is calculated from
the first ten fills. When the eleventh fill is run, the AOC coefficient is recalculated, based on
the ten most recent fills, and so on. No special calibration procedure is required.
Filler Configuration
•
Using the Filler
Configuration and Use Manual
63
Configuring the Filling and Dosing Application
7.5.1
Configuring overshoot compensation
Fixed overshoot compensation is used if the compensation value is already known. To configure fixed
overshoot compensation:
1. Disable the Enable AOC checkbox in the Filling panel (see Figure 7-3).
2. Set AOC Algorithm to Fixed.
3. Click Apply.
4. Specify the appropriate value for Fixed Overshoot Comp. Enter values in the unit used for
the flow source.
5. Click Apply.
Note: Do not enable the Enable AOC checkbox. The Enable AOC checkbox is enabled only for
underfill or overfill.
To configure automatic overshoot compensation for underfill or overfill:
1. Enable the Enable AOC checkbox in the Filling panel (see Figure 7-3).
2. Set AOC Algorithm to Underfill or Overfill.
3. Set AOC Window Length:
•
If standard AOC calibration will be used, specify the maximum number of fills that will be
used to calculate the AOC coefficient during calibration.
•
If rolling AOC calibration will be used, specify the number of fills that will be used to
calculate the AOC coefficient.
4. Click Apply.
5. If standard AOC calibration will be used, follow the instructions in Section 7.5.2. If rolling
AOC calibration will be used, follow the instructions in Section 7.5.3.
7.5.2
Standard AOC calibration
Note: In common use, the first training fill will always be slightly overfilled because the default
compensation factor is 0. To prevent this, set the AOC Coeff value in the Run Filler window (see
Figure 8-1) to a small positive number. This value must be small enough so that when it is multiplied
by the flow rate, the resulting value is less than the fill target.
To perform standard AOC calibration:
1. Click ProLink > Run Filler. The window shown in Figure 8-1 is displayed.
2. Click Start AOC Cal. The AOC Calibration Active light turns red, and will remain red while
AOC calibration is in progress.
3. Run as many fills as desired, up to the number specified in AOC Window Length.
Note: If you run more fills, the AOC coefficient is calculated from the x most recent fills, where x is the
value specified for AOC Window Length.
4. When the fill totals are consistently satisfactory, click Save AOC Cal.
The AOC coefficient is calculated from the fills run during this time period, and is displayed in the
Run Filler window. This factor will be applied to all subsequent fills while AOC is enabled, until
another AOC calibration is performed.
64
Micro Motion® Model 1500 Transmitters with the Filling and Dosing Application
Configuring the Filling and Dosing Application
•
If equipment has been replaced or adjusted
•
If flow rate has changed significantly
•
If fills are consistently missing the target value
7.5.3
Using the Transmitter
Another AOC calibration is recommended:
Rolling AOC calibration
Note: In common use, the first fill may be slightly overfilled because the default compensation factor
is 0.2. To prevent this, increase the AOC Coeff value in the Run Filler window (see Figure 8-1). This
value must be small enough so that when it is multiplied by the flow rate, the resulting value is less
than the fill target.
To enable rolling AOC calibration:
2. Click Start AOC Cal. The AOC Calibration Active light turns red.
3. Begin filling. Do not click Save AOC Cal. The AOC coefficient is recalculated after each fill,
and the current value is displayed in the Run Filler window.
At any time, you can click Save AOC Cal. The current AOC coefficient will be saved in the
transmitter and used for all overshoot compensation during subsequent fills. In other words, this
action changes the AOC calibration method from rolling to standard.
Optional Configuration
1. Click ProLink > Run Filler. The window shown in Figure 8-1 is displayed.
Filler Configuration
Using the Filler
Configuration and Use Manual
65
66
Micro Motion® Model 1500 Transmitters with the Filling and Dosing Application
8.1
Using the Transmitter
Chapter 8
Using the Filling and Dosing Application
About this chapter
This chapter explains how to use the filling and dosing application on the Model 1500 transmitter. For
information on configuring the filling and dosing application, see Chapter 7.
Optional Configuration
CAUTION
Changing configuration can affect transmitter operation, including filling.
Changes made to filling configuration while a fill is running do not take effect until
the fill is ended. Changes made to other configuration parameters may affect filling.
To ensure correct filling, do not make any configuration changes while a fill is in
progress.
8.2
User interface requirements
ProLink II can be used to operate the filling and dosing application. If desired, a discrete input can be
configured to perform a fill control function.
•
Using Modbus Protocol with Micro Motion Transmitters, November 2004, P/N 3600219,
Rev. C (manual plus map)
•
Modbus Mapping Assignments for Micro Motion Transmitters, October 2004, P/N 20001741,
Rev. B (map only)
Both of these manuals are available on the Micro Motion web site.
8.3
Filler Configuration
Alternatively, the filling and dosing application can be operated by a customer-written program using
the Modbus interface to the Model 1500 transmitter and the filling and dosing application. Micro
Motion has published the Modbus interface in the following manuals:
Operating the filling and dosing application from ProLink II
To operate the filling and dosing application from ProLink II, open the ProLink II Run Filler window
and use the fill control buttons. The following actions may performed:
Beginning, ending, pausing, and resuming a fill
•
Manually starting and stopping a purge
•
Manually starting and stopping a clean
•
Performing standard AOC calibration (see Section 7.5.2)
In addition, the Run Filler window allows you to reset various fill parameters and displays a variety of
fill status information.
Configuration and Use Manual
67
Using the Filler
•
Using the Filling and Dosing Application
Figures 8-3 through 8-7 illustrate the various fill sequences for two-stage discrete filling or threeposition analog filling when the fill is paused and resumed at different points in the fill.
Note: The fill total is not held across a transmitter power cycle.
8.3.1
Using the Run Filler window
The ProLink II Run Filler window is shown in Figure 8-1.
The Fill Setup, Fill Control, AOC Calibration, Fill Statistics, and Fill Data displays and controls are
listed and defined in Table 8-1.
The Fill Status fields show the current status of the fill or the filling application:
•
A green LED indicates that the condition is inactive or the valve is closed.
•
A red LED indicates that the condition is active or the valve is open.
The Fill Status fields are defined in Table 8-2.
Figure 8-1
68
Run Filler window
Micro Motion® Model 1500 Transmitters with the Filling and Dosing Application
Using the Filling and Dosing Application
Run Filler displays and controls
Using the Transmitter
Table 8-1
Description
Fill Setup
Current Total
Displays the running fill total, updated periodically, for the current fill.
This value is not updated between fills. However, if flow is present while a fill is
paused, the value is updated.
Reset Fill Total
Resets the fill total to 0.
Current Target
Displays the target quantity for the current fill.
• To change this value, enter the new target value and click Apply.
• You cannot change the target while a fill is in progress, unless the fill is
paused.
AOC Coeff
Displays the factor used to adjust the target, if AOC is enabled.(1)
• To change this value, enter the new AOC value and click Apply. WARNING:
Writing to this parameter will overwrite any existing AOC calibration results.
• You cannot change the AOC coefficient while a fill is in progress, whether the
fill is currently flowing or is paused.
Begin Filling
Starts the fill.
The fill total is automatically reset before filling begins.
Pause Filling
Temporarily stops the fill.
The fill can be resumed if the fill total is less than the fill target.
Resume Filling
Restarts a fill that has been paused.
Counting resumes from the total at which the fill was paused.
End Filling
Permanently stops the fill or purge.
The fill cannot be resumed.
Begin Purge
Begins a manual purge by opening the secondary valve.
You cannot begin a purge while a fill is in progress.
You cannot begin a fill while a purge is in progress.
End Purge
Ends a manual purge by closing the secondary valve.
Begin Cleaning
Opens all valves (except purge valve) that are assigned to a transmitter output.
Cleaning cannot be started if a fill or purge is in progress.
End Cleaning
Closes all valves that are assigned to a transmitter output.
Start AOC Cal
Begins AOC calibration.
Save AOC Cal
Ends AOC calibration and saves the calculated AOC coefficient.
Fill Control
Filler Configuration
AOC
Calibration
Optional Configuration
Display/Control
Override Blocked Start Enables filling if the fill has been blocked by:
• Slug flow
• A core processor fault
• The last measured flow rate is too high, as indicated by the corresponding
status LED (see Table 8-2).
Reset AOC Flow
Rate(2)
Resets the last measured flow rate to zero, to bypass the condition indicated by
the AOC Flow Rate Too High status LED (see Table 8-2).
If the flow rate is too high, and this is not a one-time condition:
• And you are using standard AOC calibration, try resetting the AOC flow rate
(see below). If this does not clear the condition, repeat AOC calibration.
• And you are using rolling AOC calibration, overriding the blocked start once or
twice should correct the condition.
Using the Filler
Configuration and Use Manual
69
Using the Filling and Dosing Application
Table 8-1
Run Filler displays and controls continued
Display/Control
Description
Fill Statistics
Fill Total Average
Displays the calculated average of all fill totals since fill statistics were reset.
Fill Total Variance
Displays the calculated variance of all fill totals since fill statistics were reset.
Reset Fill Statistics
Resets fill total average and fill total variance to zero.
Fill Time
Displays the number of seconds that have elapsed in the current fill. Seconds
that the fill was paused are not included in the fill time value.
Fill Count
Displays the number of fills that have been performed since fill statistics were
reset. Only completed fills are counted; fills that were ended before the target
was reached are not included in this total. The maximum number is 65535; after
that number has been reached, counting resumes with 1.
Reset Fill Count
Resets the fill counter to zero.
Fill Data
(1) This field displays the result of AOC calibration. If you reset it manually, AOC calibration data is lost. Typically, the only reason to
set it manually is to prevent overfill on the first few fills. See Section 7.5.
(2) Applicable only when AOC Algorithm is set to Underfill.
Table 8-2
Fill Status fields
Status LED
Description
Max Fill Time Exceeded
The current fill has exceeded the current setting for Max Fill Time. The fill is aborted.
Filling In Progress
A fill is currently being performed.
Cleaning In Progress
The Start Clean function has been activated, and all valves assigned to transmitter
outputs are open (except purge valve)
Purge In Progress
A purge has been started, either automatically or manually.
Purge Delay Phase
An automatic purge cycle is in progress, and is currently in the delay period between
the completion of the fill and the start of the purge.
Primary Valve
The primary valve is open. If a three-position analog valve has been configured, the
valve is either open or closed partial.
Secondary Valve
The secondary valve is open.
Start Not Okay
One or more conditions required to start a fill are not met.
AOC Flow Rate Too High
The last measured flow rate is too large to allow the fill to start. In other words, the AOC
coefficient, compensated for the flow rate, specifies that the valve close command
should be issued before the fill has begun. This can happen if the flow rate has
increased significantly with no corresponding change in the AOC coefficient. AOC
calibration is recommended. To adjust the AOC value, you can use the Override
Blocked Start function to run a fill without AOC (see Table 8-1).
AOC Calibration Active
AOC calibration is in progress.
8.3.2
Using a discrete input
If a discrete input is assigned to a fill control function, the function is triggered when the discrete
input is in an ON state.
Table 8-3 lists the fill control functions. To assign a discrete input to trigger a fill function:
1. Ensure that Channel C is configured as a discrete input (see Section 4.3).
2. Open the ProLink II Configuration window and click on the Discrete IO tab. The panel
shown in Figure 8-2 is displayed.
3. Select the fill control function to be triggered. Fill control functions are listed and defined in
Table 8-3.
70
Micro Motion® Model 1500 Transmitters with the Filling and Dosing Application
Using the Filling and Dosing Application
Table 8-3
Fill control functions
Optional Configuration
Discrete IO panel
Using the Transmitter
Figure 8-2
Filler Configuration
ON state actions
Begin fill
• Starts the fill.
• The fill total is automatically reset before filling begins.
End fill
• Permanently stops the fill.
• The fill cannot be resumed.
Pause fill
• Temporarily stops the fill.
• The fill can be resumed if the fill total is less than the fill target.
Resume fill
• Restarts a fill that has been paused.
• Counting resumes from the point at which the fill was paused.
Reset fill total
• Resets fill total to zero.
• Reset cannot be performed while a fill is running or while a fill is paused. Before a fill can be reset,
the fill target must be reached or the fill must be ended.
Note: The Reset All Totals function (see Section 4.7) includes resetting the fill total.
Configuration and Use Manual
71
Using the Filler
Function
Using the Filling and Dosing Application
8.3.3
Fill sequences with PAUSE and RESUME
This section provides illustrations of fill sequences when the fill is paused and resumed at different
points in the process.
Figure 8-3
Fill sequences: Two-stage discrete fill, Open Primary at 0%, Close Primary First
Normal operation
0%
m%
n%
100%
n%
100%
m+x%
n%
100%
n%
Valve behavior with PAUSE/RESUME at x%
x% before Secondary Open
0%
x%
m%
m+x%
x% after Secondary Open,
when m+x% < n%
x%
0%
m%
0%
m%
x%
0%
m%
n%
x% after Secondary Open,
when m+x% > n%
m+x%
100%
m+x%
100%
x% after Primary Close
Configured values
• Open Primary: 0%
• Open Secondary: m%
• Close Primary: n%
72
x%
Legend
• Primary valve
• Secondary valve
• Flow
Micro Motion® Model 1500 Transmitters with the Filling and Dosing Application
Using the Filling and Dosing Application
Fill sequences: Two-stage discrete fill, Open Primary at 0%, Close Secondary first
Using the Transmitter
Figure 8-4
Normal operation
0%
m%
n%
100%
n%
100%
m+x%
n%
100%
n%
Valve behavior with PAUSE/RESUME at x%
x% before Secondary Open
x%
m%
m+x%
Optional Configuration
0%
x% after Secondary Open,
when m+x% < n%
0%
m%
x%
0%
m%
x%
0%
m%
n%
m+x%
100%
m+x%
100%
Filler Configuration
x% after Secondary Open,
when m+x% > n%
x% after Secondary Close
Configuration and Use Manual
Legend
• Primary valve
• Secondary valve
• Flow
Using the Filler
Configured values
• Open Primary: 0%
• Open Secondary: m%
• Close Secondary: n%
x%
73
Using the Filling and Dosing Application
Figure 8-5
Fill sequences: Two-stage discrete fill, Open Secondary at 0%, Close Primary First
Normal operation
0%
m%
n%
100%
n%
100%
n%
100%
Valve behavior with PAUSE/RESUME at x%
x% before Primary Open
0%
x%
m%
m+x%
x% after Primary Open, when
m+x% < n%
0%
m%
0%
m%
x%
m+x%
x% after Primary Open, when
m+x% > n%
x%
n%
m+x%
100%
x% after Primary Close
0%
Configured values
• Open Secondary: 0%
• Open Primary: m%
• Close Primary: n%
74
m%
n%
x%
m+x%
100%
Legend
• Primary valve
• Secondary valve
• Flow
Micro Motion® Model 1500 Transmitters with the Filling and Dosing Application
Using the Filling and Dosing Application
Fill sequences: Two-stage discrete fill, Open Secondary at 0%, Close Secondary First
Using the Transmitter
Figure 8-6
Normal operation
0%
m%
n%
100%
n%
100%
n%
100%
Valve behavior with PAUSE/RESUME at x%
x% before Primary Open
x%
m%
m+x%
Optional Configuration
0%
x% after Primary Open, when
m+x% < n%
0%
m%
0%
m%
x%
m+x%
x%
n%
m+x%
Filler Configuration
x% after Primary Open, when
m+x% > n%
100%
x% after Secondary Close
0%
Configuration and Use Manual
n%
x%
m+x%
100%
Legend
• Primary valve
• Secondary valve
• Flow
Using the Filler
Configured values
• Open Secondary: 0%
• Open Primary: m%
• Close Secondary: n%
m%
75
Using the Filling and Dosing Application
Figure 8-7
Fill sequences: Three-position analog valve
Partial
flow
Full flow
Normal operation
0%
m%
n%
Closed
n%
Closed
Valve behavior with PAUSE/RESUME at x%
x% before Open Full
0%
x%
m+x%
0%
m%
x%
m+x%
0%
m%
n%
x%
x% after Open Full and before
Closed Partial
n%
Closed
x% after Closed Partial
Configured values
• Open Full: m%
• Closed Partial: n%
76
m%
Closed
Micro Motion® Model 1500 Transmitters with the Filling and Dosing Application
9.1
Compensation
Chapter 9
Pressure Compensation
Overview
This chapter defines pressure compensation and describes how to configure it.
9.2
Pressure compensation
The Model 1500 transmitter can compensate for the effect of pressure on the sensor flow tubes.
Pressure effect is defined as the change in sensor flow and density sensitivity due to process pressure
change away from calibration pressure.
Measurement Performance
Note: All procedures provided in this chapter assume that your computer is already connected to the
transmitter and you have established communication. All procedures also assume that you are
complying with all applicable safety requirements. See Chapter 2 for more information.
Note: Pressure compensation is optional. Configure pressure compensation only if required by your
application.
9.2.1
Options
•
If the operating pressure is a known static value, you can enter the external pressure in the
software.
•
If the operating pressure varies significantly, you can use the transmitter’s Modbus interface to
write the current pressure value to the transmitter at appropriate intervals.
Troubleshooting
There are two ways to configure pressure compensation:
Note: If you configure a static pressure value, ensure that it is accurate. If you update the pressure via
Modbus, ensure that the external pressure measurement device is accurate and reliable.
9.2.2
Pressure correction factors
When configuring pressure compensation, you must provide the flow calibration pressure – the
pressure at which the flowmeter was calibrated (which therefore defines the pressure at which there
will be no effect on the calibration factor). Refer to the calibration document shipped with your
sensor. If the data is unavailable, use 20 psi.
•
Flow factor – the percent change in the flow rate per psi
•
Density factor – the change in fluid density, in g/cm3/psi
Configuration and Use Manual
77
Defaults
Two additional pressure correction factors may be configured: one for flow and one for density. These
are defined as follows:
Pressure Compensation
Not all sensors or applications require pressure correction factors. For the pressure correction values
to be used, obtain the pressure effect values from the product data sheet for your sensor, then reverse
the signs (e.g., if the pressure effect is 0.000004, enter a pressure correction factor of –0.000004).
9.2.3
Pressure measurement unit
The default measurement unit for pressure is PSI. In other words, the transmitter expects to receive
pressure data in psi. If you will use a different pressure measurement unit, you must configure the
transmitter to use that measurement unit.
See Table 9-1 for a complete list of pressure measurement units.
Table 9-1
9.3
Pressure measurement units
ProLink II label
Unit description
In Water @ 68F
Inches water @ 68 °F
In Mercury @ 0C
Inches mercury @ 0 °C
Ft Water @ 68F
Feet water @ 68 °F
mm Water @ 68F
Millimeters water @ 68 °F
mm Mercury @ 0C
Millimeters mercury @ 0 °C
PSI
Pounds per square inch
bar
Bar
millibar
Millibar
g/cm2
Grams per square centimeter
kg/cm2
Kilograms per square centimeter
pascals
Pascals
Kilopascals
Kilopascals
Torr @ 0C
Torr @ 0 °C
atms
Atmospheres
Configuration
To enable and configure pressure compensation with ProLink II, see Figure 9-1.
78
Micro Motion® Model 1500 Transmitters with the Filling and Dosing Application
Pressure Compensation
Figure 9-1
Configuring pressure compensation with ProLink II
View >
Preferences
Enable External Pressure
Compensation
Apply
ProLink >
Configuration >
Pressure
Configure pressure unit(1)
Apply
Compensation
Set measurement unit
Enable
Configure
ProLink >
Configuration >
Pressure
Enter Flow factor
Enter Density factor
Enter Cal pressure
(1) See Section 9.2.3.
Dynamic?
Set up pressure
input via Modbus
Measurement Performance
Apply
Static?
Enter External
Pressure
Apply
Done
Note: If at any time you disable pressure compensation, then re-enable it, you must re-enter the
external pressure value.
Troubleshooting
To enable and configure pressure compensation using the Modbus interface, or to write pressure
values to the transmitter using the Modbus interface, see the manual entitled Using Modbus Protocol
with Micro Motion Transmitters, November 2004, P/N 3600219, Rev. C.
Defaults
Configuration and Use Manual
79
80
Micro Motion® Model 1500 Transmitters with the Filling and Dosing Application
10.1
Compensation
Chapter 10
Measurement Performance
Overview
This chapter describes the following procedures:
Meter verification (see Section 10.3)
•
Meter validation and adjusting meter factors (see Section 10.4)
•
Density calibration (see Section 10.5)
•
Temperature calibration (see Section 10.6)
Measurement Performance
•
Note: All procedures discussed in this chapter assume that you have established communication
between ProLink II and the Model 1500 transmitter and that you are complying with all applicable
safety requirements. See Chapter 2 for more information.
Note: For information on zero calibration, see Section 3.5. For information on AOC calibration, see
Chapter 7.
10.2
Meter validation, meter verification, and calibration
The Model 1500 transmitter supports the following procedures for the evaluation and adjustment of
measurement performance:
Meter verification – establishing confidence in the sensor’s performance by analyzing
secondary variables associated with flow and density
•
Meter validation – confirming performance by comparing the sensor’s measurements to a
primary standard
•
Calibration – establishing the relationship between a process variable (flow, density, or
temperature) and the signal produced by the sensor
Troubleshooting
•
To perform meter verification, your flowmeter must use the enhanced core processor and the meter
verification option must have been purchased.
These three procedures are discussed and compared in Sections 10.2.1 through 10.2.4. Before
performing any of these procedures, review these sections to ensure that you will be performing the
appropriate procedure for your purposes.
10.2.1
Meter verification
Defaults
Meter verification evaluates the structural integrity of the sensor tubes by comparing current tube
stiffness to the stiffness measured at the factory. Stiffness is defined as the deflection of the tube per
unit of load, or force divided by displacement. Because a change in structural integrity changes the
sensor’s response to mass and density, this value can be used as an indicator of measurement
performance. Changes in tube stiffness are typically caused by erosion, corrosion, or tube damage.
Notes: To use meter verification, the transmitter must be paired with an enhanced core processor, and
the meter verification option must be purchased for the transmitter.
Configuration and Use Manual
81
Measurement Performance
Meter verification either holds the last output value or causes the outputs to go to the configured fault
values during the procedure (approximately 4 minutes).
Micro Motion recommends that you perform meter verification on a regular basis.
10.2.2
Meter validation and meter factors
Meter validation compares a measurement value reported by the transmitter with an external
measurement standard. Meter validation requires one data point.
Note: For meter validation to be useful, the external measurement standard must be more accurate
than the sensor. See the sensor’s product data sheet for its accuracy specification.
If the transmitter’s mass flow, volume flow, or density measurement is significantly different from the
external measurement standard, you may want to adjust the corresponding meter factor. A meter
factor is the value by which the transmitter multiplies the process variable value. The default meter
factors are 1.0, resulting in no difference between the data retrieved from the sensor and the data
reported externally.
Meter factors are typically used for proving the flowmeter against a weights and measures standard.
You may need to calculate and adjust meter factors periodically to comply with regulations.
10.2.3
Calibration
The flowmeter measures process variables based on fixed points of reference. Calibration adjusts
those points of reference. Three types of calibration can be performed:
•
Zero (see Section 3.5)
•
Density calibration
•
Temperature calibration
Density and temperature calibration require two data points (low and high) and an external
measurement for each. Calibration produces a change in the offset and/or the slope of the line that
represents the relationship between process density and the reported density value, or the relationship
between process temperature and the reported temperature value.
Note: For density or temperature calibration to be useful, the external measurements must be
accurate.
Flowmeters are calibrated at the factory, and normally do not need to be calibrated in the field.
Calibrate the flowmeter only if you must do so to meet regulatory requirements. Contact Micro
Motion before calibrating your flowmeter.
Micro Motion recommends using meter validation and meter factors, rather than calibration, to prove
the meter against a regulatory standard or to correct measurement error.
82
Micro Motion® Model 1500 Transmitters with the Filling and Dosing Application
Measurement Performance
10.2.4
Comparison and recommendations
•
•
-
Meter verification requires approximately four minutes to perform. During these four
minutes, flow can continue (provided sufficient stability is maintained); however, outputs
will not report process data.
-
Meter validation for density does not interrupt the process at all. However, meter
validation for mass flow or volume flow requires process down-time for the length of the
test.
-
Calibration requires process down-time. In addition, density and temperature calibration
require replacing the process fluid with low-density and high density fluids, or
low-temperature and high-temperature fluids.
External measurement requirements
-
Meter verification does not require external measurements.
-
Zero calibration does not require external measurements.
-
Density calibration, temperature calibration, and meter validation require external
measurements. For good results, the external measurement must be highly accurate.
Measurement adjustment
Meter verification is an indicator of sensor condition, but does not change flowmeter
internal measurement in any way.
-
Meter validation does not change flowmeter internal measurement in any way. If you
decide to adjust a meter factor as a result of a meter validation procedure, only the reported
measurement is changed – the base measurement is not changed. You can always reverse
the change by returning the meter factor to its previous value.
-
Calibration changes the transmitter’s interpretation of process data, and accordingly
changes the base measurement. If you perform a zero calibration, you can restore the
factory zero at a later time. You cannot return to the previous zero (if different from the
factory zero), density calibration values, or temperature calibration values unless you have
manually recorded them.
Micro Motion recommends obtaining the meter verification transmitter option and performing meter
verification on a regular basis.
10.3
Troubleshooting
-
Measurement Performance
•
Process interruption
Compensation
When choosing among meter verification, meter validation, and calibration, consider the following
factors:
Performing meter verification
Note: To use meter verification, the transmitter must be paired with an enhanced core processor, and
the meter verification option must be purchased for the transmitter.
The meter verification procedure can be performed on any process fluid. It is not necessary to match
factory conditions. Meter verification is not affected by any parameters configured for flow, density,
or temperature.
•
Maintain a constant temperature and pressure.
•
Avoid changes to fluid composition (e.g., two-phase flow, settling, etc.).
•
Maintain a constant flow. For higher test certainty, reduce or stop flow.
Configuration and Use Manual
Defaults
During the test, process conditions must be stable. To maximize stability:
83
Measurement Performance
If stability varies outside test limits, the meter verification procedure will be aborted. Verify process
stability and retry.
During meter verification, you must choose to fix the outputs at either the configured fault levels or
the last measured value. The outputs will remain fixed for the duration of the test (approximately four
minutes). Disable all control loops for the duration of the procedure, and ensure that any data reported
during this period is handled appropriately.
To perform meter verification, follow the procedure illustrated in Figure 10-1. For a discussion of
meter verification results, see Section 10.2.1. For additional meter verification options provided by
ProLink II, see Section 10.3.2.
Figure 10-1 Meter verification procedure – ProLink II
Tools >
Meter Verification >
Structural Integrity Method
Verify configuration
parameters
View previous test data
Next
Back(1)
Graph of results
Enter optional test data
Next
Next
View report (option to print
or save)
Initialize and start meter
verification
Finish(2)
Start
Fault
configuration
Hold last
value
Progress bar shows
test in progress
Abort
Fail
Abort
Pass
Back
Yes
Next
Rerun
test?
84
No
(1) If the graph was viewed at the beginning of the procedure,
clicking Back here will return to the beginning of the
procedure (along the dotted line).
(2) The results of the meter verification test are not saved
until Finish is clicked.
Micro Motion® Model 1500 Transmitters with the Filling and Dosing Application
Measurement Performance
10.3.1
Specification uncertainty limit and test results
When the test is completed, the result will be reported as Pass, Fail, or Abort:
Pass – The test result is within the specification uncertainty limit. If transmitter zero and
configuration match factory values, the sensor will meet factory specifications for flow and
density measurement. It is expected that meters will pass meter verification every time the test
is run.
•
Fail/Caution – The test result is not within the specification uncertainty limit. Micro Motion
recommends that you immediately re-run the meter verification test. If the meter passes the
second test, the first Fail/Caution result can be ignored. If the meter fails the second test, the
flow tubes may be damaged. Use the knowledge of your process to consider the type of
damage and determine the appropriate action. These actions might include removing the meter
from service and physically inspecting the tubes. At minimum, you should perform a flow
validation (see Section 10.4) and a density calibration (see Section 10.5).
•
Abort – A problem occurred with the meter verification test (e.g., process instability). Check
your process and retry the test.
Measurement Performance
•
Compensation
The result of the meter verification test will be a percent uncertainty of normalized tube stiffness. The
default limit for this uncertainty is ±4.0%. This limit is stored in the transmitter, and can be changed
with ProLink II when optional test parameters are entered. For most installations, it is advisable to
leave the uncertainty limit at the default value.
Troubleshooting
Defaults
Configuration and Use Manual
85
Measurement Performance
10.3.2
Additional ProLink II tools for meter verification
In addition to the Pass, Fail, and Abort result provided by the procedure, ProLink II provides the
following additional meter verification tools:
•
Test metadata – ProLink II allows you to enter a large amount of metadata about each test so
that past tests can be audited easily. ProLink II will prompt you for this optional data during
the test.
•
Visibility of configuration and zero changes – ProLink II has a pair of indicators that show
whether the transmitter’s configuration or zero has changed since the last meter verification
test. The indicators will be green if configuration and zero are the same, and red otherwise.
You can find out more information about changes to configuration and zero by clicking the
button next to each indicator.
•
Plotted data points – ProLink II shows the exact stiffness uncertainty on a graph. This allows
you to see not only whether the meter is operating within specification, but also where the
results fall within the specified limits. (The results are shown as two data points: LPO and
RPO. The trending of these two points can help identify if local or uniform changes are
occurring to the flow tubes.)
•
Trending – ProLink II has the ability to store a history of meter verification data points. This
history is displayed on the results graph. The rightmost data points are the most recent. This
history lets you see how your meter is trending over time, which can be an important way of
detecting meter problems before they become severe. You can view the graph of past results at
either the beginning or the end of the meter verification procedure. The graph is shown
automatically at the end. Click View Previous Test Data to view the graph at the beginning.
•
Data manipulation – You can manipulate the graphed data in various ways by double-clicking
the graph. When the graph configuration dialog is open, you can also export the graph in a
number of formats (including “to printer”) by clicking Export.
•
Detailed report form – At the end of a meter verification test, ProLink II displays a detailed
report of the test, which includes the same recommendations for pass/caution/abort results
found in Section 10.3.1. You have the options of printing the report or saving it to disk as an
HTML file.
More information about using ProLink II to perform meter verification can be found in the ProLink II
manual (ProLink II Software for Micro Motion Transmitters, P/N 20001909, Rev D or later) and in the
on-line ProLink II help system.
Note: Historical data (e.g., previous test results or whether zero has changed) are stored on the
computer on which ProLink II is installed. If you perform meter verification on the same transmitter
from a different computer, the historical data will not be visible.
10.4
Performing meter validation
To perform meter validation, measure a sample of the process fluid and compare the measurement
with the flowmeter’s reported value.
Use the following formula to calculate a meter factor:
ExternalStandard
NewMeterFactor = ConfiguredMeterFactor × ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------ActualTransmitterMeasurement
Valid values for meter factors range from 0.8 to 1.2. If the calculated meter factor exceeds these
limits, contact Micro Motion customer service.
86
Micro Motion® Model 1500 Transmitters with the Filling and Dosing Application
Measurement Performance
Example
250
MassFlowMeterFactor = 1 × ------------------ = 0.9989
250.27
The first mass flow meter factor is 0.9989.
Compensation
The flowmeter is installed and proved for the first time. The flowmeter
mass measurement is 250.27 lb; the reference device measurement is
250 lb. A mass flow meter factor is determined as follows:
One year later, the flowmeter is proved again. The flowmeter mass
measurement is 250.07 lb; the reference device measurement is
250.25 lb. A new mass flow meter factor is determined as follows:
250.25
MassFlowMeterFactor = 0.9989 × ------------------ = 0.9996
250.07
10.5
Measurement Performance
The new mass flow meter factor is 0.9996.
Performing density calibration
Density calibration includes the following calibration points:
•
•
All sensors:
-
D1 calibration (low-density)
-
D2 calibration (high-density)
T-Series sensors only:
-
D3 calibration (optional)
-
D4 calibration (optional)
For T-Series sensors, the optional D3 and D4 calibrations could improve the accuracy of the density
measurement. If you choose to perform the D3 and D4 calibration:
Do not perform the D1 or D2 calibration.
•
Perform D3 calibration if you have one calibrated fluid.
•
Perform both D3 and D4 calibrations if you have two calibrated fluids (other than air and
water).
Troubleshooting
•
The calibrations that you choose must be performed without interruption, in the order listed here.
Note: Before performing the calibration, record your current calibration parameters. If you are using
ProLink II, you can do this by saving the current configuration to a file on the PC. If the calibration
fails, restore the known values.
You can calibrate for density with ProLink II.
10.5.1
Preparing for density calibration
Before beginning density calibration, review the requirements in this section.
Defaults
Sensor requirements
During density calibration, the sensor must be completely filled with the calibration fluid, and flow
through the sensor must be at the lowest rate allowed by your application. This is usually
accomplished by closing the shutoff valve downstream from the sensor, then filling the sensor with
the appropriate fluid.
Configuration and Use Manual
87
Measurement Performance
Density calibration fluids
D1 and D2 density calibration require a D1 (low-density) fluid and a D2 (high-density) fluid. You
may use air and water. If you are calibrating a T-Series sensor, the D1 fluid must be air and the D2
fluid must be water.
CAUTION
For T-Series sensors, the D1 calibration must be performed on air and the D2
calibration must be performed on water.
For D3 density calibration, the D3 fluid must meet the following requirements:
•
Minimum density of 0.6 g/cm3
•
Minimum difference of 0.1 g/cm3 between the density of the D3 fluid and the density of water.
The density of the D3 fluid may be either greater or less than the density of water
For D4 density calibration, the D4 fluid must meet the following requirements:
•
Minimum density of 0.6 g/cm3
•
Minimum difference of 0.1 g/cm3 between the density of the D4 fluid and the density of the
D3 fluid. The density of the D4 fluid must be greater than the density of the D3 fluid
•
Minimum difference of 0.1 g/cm3 between the density of the D4 fluid and the density of water.
The density of the D4 fluid may be either greater or less than the density of water
10.5.2
Density calibration procedures
To perform a D1 and D2 density calibration, see Figure 10-2.
To perform a D3 density calibration or a D3 and D4 density calibration, see Figure 10-3.
88
Micro Motion® Model 1500 Transmitters with the Filling and Dosing Application
Measurement Performance
Figure 10-2 D1 and D2 density calibration – ProLink II
Close shutoff valve
downstream from sensor
Compensation
D1 calibration
D2 calibration
Fill sensor with D1 fluid
Fill sensor with D2 fluid
ProLink Menu >
Calibration >
Density cal – Point 1
ProLink Menu >
Calibration >
Density cal – Point 2
Enter density of D2 fluid
Do Cal
Do Cal
Calibration in Progress
light turns red
Calibration in Progress
light turns red
Calibration in Progress
light turns green
Calibration in Progress
light turns green
Close
Close
Measurement Performance
Enter density of D1 fluid
Done
Figure 10-3 D3 or D3 and D4 density calibration – ProLink II
D3 calibration
Fill sensor with D3 fluid
Troubleshooting
Close shutoff valve
downstream from sensor
D4 calibration
Fill sensor with D4 fluid
ProLink Menu >
Calibration >
Density cal – Point 4
Enter density of D3 fluid
Enter density of D4 fluid
Do Cal
Do Cal
Calibration in Progress
light turns red
Calibration in Progress
light turns red
Calibration in Progress
light turns green
Calibration in Progress
light turns green
Defaults
ProLink Menu >
Calibration >
Density cal – Point 3
Close
Close
Done
Configuration and Use Manual
Done
89
Measurement Performance
10.6
Performing temperature calibration
Temperature calibration is a two-part procedure: temperature offset calibration and temperature slope
calibration. The entire procedure must be completed without interruption.
You can calibrate for temperature with ProLink II. See Figure 10-4.
Figure 10-4 Temperature calibration – ProLink II
Temperature Offset calibration
Temperature Slope calibration
Fill sensor with lowtemperature fluid
Fill sensor with hightemperature fluid
Wait until sensor achieves
thermal equilibrium
Wait until sensor achieves
thermal equilibrium
ProLink Menu >
Calibration >
Temp offset cal
ProLink Menu >
Calibration >
Temp slope cal
Enter temperature of lowtemperature fluid
Enter temperature of hightemperature fluid
Do Cal
Do Cal
Calibration in Progress
light turns red
Calibration in Progress
light turns red
Calibration in Progress
light turns green
Calibration in Progress
light turns green
Close
Close
Done
90
Micro Motion® Model 1500 Transmitters with the Filling and Dosing Application
11.1
Compensation
Chapter 11
Troubleshooting
Overview
This chapter describes guidelines and procedures for troubleshooting the meter. The information in
this chapter will enable you to:
Categorize the problem
•
Determine whether you are able to correct the problem
•
Take corrective measures (if possible)
•
Contact the appropriate support agency
Note: All ProLink II procedures provided in this section assume that your computer is already
connected to the transmitter and you have established communication. All ProLink II procedures also
assume that you are complying with all applicable safety requirements. See Chapter 2 for more
information.
11.2
Measurement Performance
•
Guide to troubleshooting topics
Refer to Table 11-1 for a list of troubleshooting topics discussed in this chapter.
Table 11-1 Troubleshooting topics and locations
Section 11.4
Transmitter does not operate
Section 11.5
Transmitter does not communicate
Section 11.6
Zero or calibration failure
Section 11.7
Fault conditions
Section 11.8
I/O problems
Section 11.9
Transmitter status LED
Section 11.10
Status alarms
Section 11.11
Checking process variables
Section 11.12
Meter fingerprinting
Section 11.13
Troubleshooting filling problems
Section 11.14
Diagnosing wiring problems
Section 11.14.1
Checking the power supply wiring
Section 11.14.2
Checking the sensor-to-transmitter wiring
Section 11.14.3
Checking for RF interference
Section 11.14.4
Checking for RF interference
Section 11.15
Checking ProLink II
Section 11.16
Checking the output wiring and receiving device
Configuration and Use Manual
Defaults
Topic
Troubleshooting
Section
91
Troubleshooting
Table 11-1 Troubleshooting topics and locations continued
11.3
Section
Topic
Section 11.17
Checking slug flow
Section 11.18
Checking output saturation
Section 11.19
Checking the flow measurement unit
Section 11.20
Checking the upper and lower range values
Section 11.21
Checking the characterization
Section 11.22
Checking the calibration
Section 11.23
Checking the test points
Section 11.24
Checking the core processor
Section 11.25
Checking sensor coils and RTD
Micro Motion customer service
To speak to a customer service representative, contact the Micro Motion Customer Service
Department. Contact information is provided in Section 1.8.
Before contacting Micro Motion customer service, review the troubleshooting information and
procedures in this chapter, and have the results available for discussion with the technician.
11.4
Transmitter does not operate
If the transmitter does not operate at all (i.e., the transmitter is not receiving power, or the status LED
is not lit), perform all of the procedures in Section 11.14.
If the procedures do not indicate a problem with the electrical connections, contact Micro Motion
customer service.
11.5
Transmitter does not communicate
If you cannot establish communication with the transmitter:
11.6
•
Check connections and observe port activity at the host (if possible).
•
Verify communications parameters.
•
If all parameters appear to be set correctly, try swapping the leads.
•
Increase the response delay value (see Section 6.12.5). This parameter is useful if the
transmitter is communicating with a slower host.
Zero or calibration failure
If a zero or calibration procedure fails, the transmitter will send a status alarm indicating the cause of
failure. See Section 11.10 for specific remedies for status alarms indicating calibration failure.
11.7
Fault conditions
If the analog or digital outputs indicate a fault condition (by transmitting a fault indicator), determine
the exact nature of the fault by checking the status alarms with ProLink II software. Once you have
identified the status alarm(s) associated with the fault condition, refer to Section 11.10.
92
Micro Motion® Model 1500 Transmitters with the Filling and Dosing Application
Troubleshooting
Some fault conditions can be corrected by cycling power to the transmitter. A power cycle can clear
the following:
Loop test
•
Zero failure
•
Stopped internal totalizer
Compensation
11.8
•
I/O problems
If you are experiencing problems with an mA output, discrete output, or discrete input, use Table 11-2
to identify an appropriate remedy.
Table 11-2 I/O problems and remedies
Possible cause
Possible remedy
No output
Loop test failed
Power supply problem
Check power supply and power supply wiring.
See Section 11.14.1.
Fault condition present if fault
indicators are set to downscale or
internal zero
Check the fault indicator settings to verify
whether or not the transmitter is in a fault
condition. See Section 4.5.4 to check the mA
fault indicator.
If a fault condition is present, see Section 11.7.
Channel not configured for desired
output (Channel B or C only)
Verify channel configuration for associated
output terminals.
Process condition below LRV
Verify process.
Change the LRV. See Section 4.5.2.
Fault condition if fault indicator is set to
internal zero
Check the fault indicator settings to verify
whether or not the transmitter is in a fault
condition. See Section 4.5.4.
If a fault condition is present, see Section 11.7.
Open in wiring
Verify all connections.
Channel not configured for mA
operation
Verify channel configuration.
Bad mA receiving device
Check the mA receiving device or try another
mA receiving device. See Section 11.16.
Bad output circuit
Measure DC voltage across output to verify that
output is active.
mA output < 4 mA
mA output consistently out of
range
Consistently incorrect mA
measurement
Exit output from test mode. See Section 3.3.
Cycle power.
Stop flow and rezero. See Section 3.5.
Fault condition if fault indicator is set to
upscale or downscale
Check the fault indicator settings to verify
whether or not the transmitter is in a fault
condition. See Section 4.5.4.
If a fault condition is present, see Section 11.7.
LRV and URV not set correctly
Check the LRV and URV. See Section 11.20.
Output not trimmed correctly
Trim the output. See Section 3.4.
Incorrect flow measurement unit
configured
Verify flow measurement unit configuration. See
Section 11.19.
Incorrect process variable configured
Verify process variable assigned to mA output.
See Section 4.5.1.
LRV and URV not set correctly
Check the LRV and URV. See Section 11.20.
93
Defaults
Configuration and Use Manual
Output is fixed in a test mode
Zero calibration failure
Troubleshooting
Constant mA output
Measurement Performance
Symptom
Troubleshooting
Table 11-2 I/O problems and remedies continued
Symptom
Possible cause
Possible remedy
mA reading correct at low
currents but wrong at higher
currents
mA loop resistance may be too high
Verify that mA output load resistance is below
maximum supported load (see installation
manual for your transmitter).
Cannot zero with Zero
button
Not pressing Zero button for sufficient
interval
Button must be pressed for 0.5 seconds to be
recognized. Press button until LED starts to
flash yellow, then release button.
Core processor in fault mode
Correct core processor faults and retry.
Cannot connect to terminals Terminals not in service port mode
33 & 34 in service port mode
Cannot establish Modbus
communication on terminals
33 & 34
DI is fixed and does not
respond to input switch
11.9
Terminals are accessible in service port mode
ONLY for a 10-second interval after power-up.
Cycle power and connect during this interval.
Leads reversed.
Switch leads and try again.
Transmitter installed on multidrop
network
All Model 1500 and 2500 devices on network
default to address=111 during 10-second
service port interval. Disconnect or power down
other devices, or use RS-485 communications.
Incorrect Modbus configuration
After 10-second interval on power-up, the
transmitter switches to Modbus
communications. Default settings are:
• Address=1
• Baud rate=9600
• Parity=odd
Verify configuration. Default settings can be
changed using ProLink II v2.0 or higher.
Leads reversed
Switch leads and try again.
Possible internal/external power
configuration error
Internal means that the transmitter will supply
power to the output. External means that an
external pull-up resistor and source are
required. Verify configuration setting is correct
for desired application.
Transmitter status LED
The Model 1500 transmitter includes a LED that indicates transmitter status. See Table 11-3. If the
status LED indicates an alarm condition:
1. View the alarm code using ProLink II.
2. Identify the alarm (see Section 11.10).
3. Correct the condition.
Table 11-3 Model 1500/2500 transmitter status reported by the status LED
Status LED state
Alarm priority
Definition
Green
No alarm
Normal operating mode
Flashing yellow
No alarm
Zero in progress
Yellow
Low severity alarm
• Alarm condition: will not cause measurement error
• Outputs continue to report process data
• May indicate that the fill is not completely
configured
Red
High severity alarm
• Alarm condition: will cause measurement error
• Outputs go to configured fault indicators, unless
the output is configured for valve control
94
Micro Motion® Model 1500 Transmitters with the Filling and Dosing Application
Troubleshooting
11.10 Status alarms
Table 11-4 Status alarms and remedies
Alarm
code
ProLink II label
Possible remedy
A001
CP EEPROM Failure
Cycle power to the flowmeter.
A002
CP RAM Failure
Cycle power to the flowmeter.
Compensation
Status alarm can be viewed with ProLink II. A list of status alarms and possible remedies is provided
in Table 11-4.
The flowmeter might need service. Contact Micro Motion. See Section 1.8.
The flowmeter might need service. Contact Micro Motion. See Section 1.8.
A003
Sensor Failure
Check the test points. See Section 11.23.
Measurement Performance
Check the sensor coils. See Section 11.25.
Check wiring to sensor. See Section 11.14.2.
Check for slug flow. See Section 11.17.
Check sensor tubes.
A004
Temp Out of Range
Check the test points. See Section 11.23.
Check the sensor RTD reading(s). See Section 11.25.
Check wiring to sensor. See Section 11.14.2.
Verify flowmeter characterization. See Section 4.2.
Verify that process temperature is within range of sensor and transmitter.
Contact Micro Motion. See Section 1.8.
A005
Mass Flow Overrange
Check the test points. See Section 11.23.
Check the sensor coils. See Section 11.25.
Verify process.
Troubleshooting
Make sure that the appropriate measurement unit is configured. See
Section 11.19.
Verify 4 mA and 20 mA values. See Section 11.20.
Verify calibration factors in transmitter configuration. See Section 4.2.
Re-zero the transmitter.
A006
Characterize Meter
Check the characterization. Specifically, verify the FCF and K1 values. See
Section 4.2.
If the problem persists, contact Micro Motion. See Section 1.8.
A008
Density Out of Range
Check the test points. See Section 11.23.
Check the sensor coils. See Section 11.25.
Verify process. Check for air in the flow tubes, tubes not filled, foreign material
in tubes, or coating in tubes.
Verify calibration factors in transmitter configuration. See Section 4.2.
Perform density calibration. See Section 10.5.
Xmtr Initializing
Allow the flowmeter to warm up. The error should disappear once the flowmeter
is ready for normal operation.
If alarm does not clear, make sure that the sensor is completely full or
completely empty. Verify sensor configuration and wiring to sensor.
A010
Calibration Failure
If alarm appears during a transmitter zero, ensure that there is no flow through
the sensor, then retry.
Cycle power to the flowmeter, then retry.
Configuration and Use Manual
95
Defaults
A009
Troubleshooting
Table 11-4 Status alarms and remedies continued
Alarm
code
ProLink II label
Possible remedy
A011
Cal Fail, Too Low
Ensure that there is no flow through the sensor, then retry.
Cycle power to the flowmeter, then retry.
A012
Cal Fail, Too High
Ensure that there is no flow through the sensor, then retry.
Cycle power to the flowmeter, then retry.
A013
Cal Fail, Too Noisy
Remove or reduce sources of electromechanical noise, then attempt the
calibration or zero procedure again.
Sources of noise include:
• Mechanical pumps
• Pipe stress at sensor
• Electrical interference
• Vibration effects from nearby machinery
Cycle power to the flowmeter, then retry. See Section 11.22.
A014
Transmitter Error
A016
Sensor RTD Error
Cycle power to the flowmeter.
The transmitter might need service. Contact Micro Motion. See Section 1.8.
Check the test points. See Section 11.23.
Check the sensor coils. See Section 11.25.
Check wiring to sensor. See Section 11.14.2.
Make sure the appropriate sensor type is configured. See Section 4.2.
Contact Micro Motion. See Section 1.8.
A017
Meter RTD Error
Check the test points. See Section 11.23.
Check the sensor coils. See Section 11.25.
Contact Micro Motion. See Section 1.8.
A018
EEPROM Failure
Cycle power to the flowmeter.
The transmitter might need service. Contact Micro Motion. See Section 1.8.
A019
RAM Failure
Cycle power to the flowmeter.
The transmitter might need service. Contact Micro Motion. See Section 1.8.
A020
Cal Factors Missing
Check the characterization. Specifically, verify the FCF value. See Section 4.2.
A021
Sensor Type Incorrect
Check the characterization. Specifically, verify the K1 value. See Section 4.2.
(1)
A022
CP Configuration Failure Cycle power to the flowmeter.
A023(1)
CP Totals Failure
The transmitter might need service. Contact Micro Motion. See Section 1.8.
Cycle power to the flowmeter.
The transmitter might need service. Contact Micro Motion. See Section 1.8.
(1)
A024
CP Program Corrupt
Cycle power to the flowmeter.
The transmitter might need service. Contact Micro Motion. See Section 1.8.
(1)
A025
CP Boot Program Fault
Cycle power to the flowmeter.
The transmitter might need service. Contact Micro Motion. See Section 1.8.
A026
Xmtr Comm Problem
Check the wiring between the transmitter and the core processor (see
Section 11.14.2). The wires may be swapped. After swapping wires, cycle
power to the flowmeter.
Check for noise in wiring or transmitter environment.
Check the core processor LED. See Section 11.24.
Check that the core processor is receiving power. See Section 11.14.1.
Perform the core processor resistance test. See Section 11.24.2.
96
Micro Motion® Model 1500 Transmitters with the Filling and Dosing Application
Troubleshooting
Table 11-4 Status alarms and remedies continued
ProLink II label
Possible remedy
A028
Comm Problem
Cycle power to the flowmeter.
Compensation
Alarm
code
The transmitter might need service or upgrading. Contact Micro Motion. See
Section 1.8.
A032(2)
Meter
Verification/Outputs In
Fault
Meter verification in progress, with outputs set to fault. Allow the procedure to
complete. If desired, abort the procedure and restart with outputs set to last
measured value.
A100
mA 1 Saturated
See Section 11.18.
A101
mA 1 Fixed
Exit mA output trim. See Section 3.4.
Exit mA output loop test. See Section 3.3.
A102
(1)
A103
Drive Overrange/
Partially Full Tube
Excessive drive gain. See Section 11.23.3.
Data Loss Possible
Cycle power to the flowmeter.
Measurement Performance
Check to see if the output has been fixed via digital communication.
Check the sensor coils. See Section 11.25.
View the entire current configuration to determine what data were lost.
Configure any settings with missing or incorrect data.
The transmitter might need service. Contact Micro Motion. See Section 1.8.
A104
Cal in Progress
Allow the flowmeter to complete calibration.
A105
Slug Flow
See Section 11.17.
A107
Power Reset
No action required.
A108
Event 1 On
Be advised of alarm condition.
If you believe the event has been triggered erroneously, verify the Event 1
settings. See Section 6.9.
A109
Event 2 On
Be advised of alarm condition.
A112
Upgrade Software
Contact Micro Motion to get a transmitter software upgrade. See Section 1.8.
Note that the device is still functional.
A118
DO1 Fixed
Exit discrete output loop test. See Section 3.3.
A119
DO2 Fixed
Exit discrete output loop test. See Section 3.3.
Meter
Verification/Outputs at
Last Value
Meter verification in progress, with outputs set to last measured value. Allow
the procedure to complete. If desired, abort the procedure and restart with
outputs set to fault.
(2)
A131
Troubleshooting
If you believe the event has been triggered erroneously, verify the Event 2
settings. See Section 6.9.
(1) Applies only to systems with the standard core processor.
(2) Applies only to systems with the enhanced core processor.
Defaults
Configuration and Use Manual
97
Troubleshooting
11.11 Checking process variables
Micro Motion suggests that you make a record of the process variables listed below, under normal
operating conditions. This will help you recognize when the process variables are unusually high or
low. The meter fingerprinting feature can also provide useful data (see Section 11.12).
•
Flow rate
•
Density
•
Temperature
•
Tube frequency
•
Pickoff voltage
•
Drive gain
For troubleshooting, check the process variables under both normal flow and tubes-full no-flow
conditions. Except for flow rate, you should see little or no change between flow and no-flow
conditions. If you see a significant difference, record the values and contact Micro Motion customer
service for assistance. See Section 1.8.
Unusual values for process variables may indicate a variety of different problems. Table 11-5 lists
several possible problems and remedies.
Table 11-5 Process variables problems and possible remedies
Symptom
Cause
Possible remedy
Steady non-zero flow rate under
no-flow conditions
Misaligned piping (especially in new
installations)
Correct the piping.
98
Open or leaking valve
Check or correct the valve mechanism.
Bad sensor zero
Rezero the flowmeter. See Section 3.5.
Bad flow calibration factor
Verify characterization. See
Section 4.2.
Micro Motion® Model 1500 Transmitters with the Filling and Dosing Application
Troubleshooting
Table 11-5 Process variables problems and possible remedies continued
RF interference
Check environment for RF interference.
See Section 11.14.4.
Wiring problem
Verify all sensor-to-transmitter wiring
and ensure the wires are making good
contact.
Incorrectly grounded 9-wire cable (in
remote core processor with remote
transmitter installations)
Verify 9-wire cable installation. Refer to
Appendix B for diagrams, and see the
installation manual for your transmitter.
Vibration in pipeline at rate close to
sensor tube frequency
Check environment and remove source
of vibration.
Leaking valve or seal
Check pipeline.
Inappropriate measurement unit
Check configuration. See
Section 11.19.
Inappropriate damping value
Check configuration. See Section 4.5.5
and Section 6.6.
Slug flow
See Section 11.17.
Plugged flow tube
Check drive gain and tube frequency.
Purge the flow tubes.
Moisture in sensor junction box
Open junction box and allow it to dry.
Do not use contact cleaner. When
closing, ensure integrity of gaskets and
O-rings, and grease all O-rings.
Mounting stress on sensor
Check sensor mounting. Ensure:
• Sensor is not being used to support
pipe.
• Sensor is not being used to correct
pipe misalignment.
• Sensor is not too heavy for pipe.
Sensor cross-talk
Check environment for sensor with
similar (±0.5 Hz) tube frequency.
Incorrect sensor orientation
Sensor orientation must be appropriate
to process fluid. See the installation
manual for your sensor.
Output wiring problem
Verify wiring between transmitter and
receiving device. See the installation
manual for your transmitter.
Problem with receiving device
Test with another receiving device.
Inappropriate measurement unit
Check configuration. See
Section 11.19.
Inappropriate damping value
Check configuration. See Section 4.5.5
and Section 6.6.
Excessive or erratic drive gain
See Section 11.23.3 and
Section 11.23.4.
Slug flow
See Section 11.17.
Plugged flow tube
Check drive gain and tube frequency.
Purge the flow tubes.
Wiring problem
Verify all sensor-to-transmitter wiring
and ensure the wires are making good
contact.
Erratic non-zero flow rate when flow
is steady
Configuration and Use Manual
99
Defaults
Erratic non-zero flow rate under
no-flow conditions
Troubleshooting
Possible remedy
Measurement Performance
Cause
Compensation
Symptom
Troubleshooting
Table 11-5 Process variables problems and possible remedies continued
Symptom
Cause
Possible remedy
Inaccurate flow rate or fill total
Bad flow calibration factor
Verify characterization. See
Section 4.2.
Inappropriate measurement unit
Check configuration. See
Section 11.19.
Bad sensor zero
Rezero the flowmeter. See Section 3.5.
Bad density calibration factors
Verify characterization. See
Section 4.2.
Bad flowmeter grounding
See Section 11.14.3.
Slug flow
See Section 11.17.
Problem with receiving device
See Section 11.16.
Wiring problem
Verify all sensor-to-transmitter wiring
and ensure the wires are making good
contact.
Problem with process fluid
Use standard procedures to check
quality of process fluid.
Bad density calibration factors
Verify characterization. See
Section 4.2.
Wiring problem
Verify all sensor-to-transmitter wiring
and ensure the wires are making good
contact.
Bad flowmeter grounding
See Section 11.14.3.
Slug flow
See Section 11.17.
Sensor cross-talk
Check environment for sensor with
similar (±0.5 Hz) tube frequency.
Plugged flow tube
Check drive gain and tube frequency.
Purge the flow tubes.
Temperature reading significantly
different from process temperature
RTD failure
Check for alarm conditions and follow
troubleshooting procedure for indicated
alarm.
Disable external temperature
compensation. See Figure C-1.
Temperature reading slightly different
from process temperature
Temperature calibration required
Perform temperature calibration. See
Section 10.6.
Unusually high density reading
Plugged flow tube
Check drive gain and tube frequency.
Purge the flow tubes.
Incorrect K2 value
Verify characterization. See
Section 4.2.
Slug flow
See Section 11.17.
Incorrect K2 value
Verify characterization. See
Section 4.2.
Inaccurate density reading
Unusually low density reading
Unusually high tube frequency
Sensor erosion
Contact Micro Motion. See Section 1.8.
Unusually low tube frequency
Plugged flow tube
Purge the flow tubes.
Unusually low pickoff voltages
Several possible causes
See Section 11.23.5.
Unusually high drive gain
Several possible causes
See Section 11.23.3.
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Micro Motion® Model 1500 Transmitters with the Filling and Dosing Application
Troubleshooting
11.12 Meter fingerprinting
Table 11-6 Meter fingerprinting data
Fingerprint time
Description
Process variables recorded
Current
Present-time values
Factory
Values at time transmitter left factory
Installation
Values at time of first sensor zero
Last zero
Values at time of most recent sensor zero
• Mass flow rate
• Volume flow rate
• Density
• Temperature
• Case temperature
• Live zero
Compensation
The meter fingerprinting feature provides snapshots, or “fingerprints,” of twelve process variables, at
four different points of transmitter operation. See Table 11-6.
• Tube frequency
• Drive gain
• Left pickoff
• Right pickoff
• Board temperature
• Input voltage
To use the meter fingerprinting feature:
1. From the ProLink menu, select Finger Print.
2. Use the Type pulldown list to specify the point in time for which you want to view data.
3. Use the Units pulldown list to specify SI or English units.
The display is updated continuously.
Measurement Performance
For all process variables except Mech Zero, the instantaneous value, 5-minute running average,
5-minute running standard deviation, recorded minimum, and recorded maximum are recorded. For
Mech Zero, only the 5-minute running average and 5-minute running standard deviation are recorded.
Note: Due to the continuous updating, the meter fingerprinting feature can have a negative effect on
other sensor-transmitter communications. Do not open the meter fingerprinting window unless you
plan to use it, and be sure to close it when you no longer need it.
11.13 Troubleshooting filling problems
•
Check the status LED on the transmitter.
-
If it is solid red, the transmitter is in a fault condition and a fill cannot be started. Correct
the fault condition and retry. The cleaning function may be useful.
-
If it is solid yellow, the transmitter is in a low-severity fault condition, such as slug flow, or
the fill flow source, target, or discrete outputs are not correctly configured.
Troubleshooting
If the fill cannot be started:
Note: A fill can be started under some low-severity fault conditions.
If the system is in slug flow, try using the cleaning function, or pulsing fluid through the
sensor by turning the discrete outputs ON and OFF (if the valves are controlled by discrete
outputs). The Test Discrete Output function can be used for this.
•
Ensure that the fill is correctly and completely configured:
A flow source must be specified.
-
A non-zero positive value must be specified for the fill target.
-
All outputs required for valve control must be configured.
Configuration and Use Manual
Defaults
-
101
Troubleshooting
If fill accuracy is unsatisfactory or has changed, or if fill variation is too great:
•
Implement overshoot compensation (if not already implemented).
•
If standard AOC calibration is implemented, repeat the AOC calibration.
•
If rolling AOC calibration is implemented, try increasing the AOC Window Length value.
•
Check for mechanical problems with the valve.
11.14 Diagnosing wiring problems
Use the procedures in this section to check the transmitter installation for wiring problems.
11.14.1
Checking the power supply wiring
To check the power supply wiring:
1. Verify that the correct external fuse is used. An incorrect fuse can limit current to the
transmitter and keep it from initializing.
2. Power down the transmitter.
3. Ensure that the power supply wires are connected to the correct terminals. Refer to
Appendix B for diagrams.
4. Verify that the power supply wires are making good contact, and are not clamped to the wire
insulation.
5. Use a voltmeter to test the voltage at the transmitter’s power supply terminals. Verify that it is
within the specified limits. For DC power, you may need to size the cable. Refer to
Appendix B for diagrams, and see your transmitter installation manual for power supply
requirements.
11.14.2
Checking the sensor-to-transmitter wiring
To check the sensor-to-transmitter wiring, verify that:
•
The transmitter is connected to the sensor according to the wiring information provided in
your transmitter installation manual. Refer to Appendix B for diagrams.
•
The wires are making good contact with the terminals.
If the wires are incorrectly connected:
1. Power down the transmitter.
2. Correct the wiring.
3. Restore power to the transmitter.
11.14.3
Checking grounding
The sensor and the transmitter must be grounded. If the core processor is installed as part of the
sensor, it is grounded automatically. If the core processor is installed separately, it must be grounded
separately. See your sensor and transmitter installation manuals for grounding requirements and
instructions.
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Micro Motion® Model 1500 Transmitters with the Filling and Dosing Application
Troubleshooting
11.14.4
Checking for RF interference
•
Eliminate the RF source. Possible causes include a source of radio communications, or a large
transformer, pump, motor, or anything else that can generate a strong electrical or
electromagnetic field, in the vicinity of the transmitter.
•
Move the transmitter.
•
Use shielded cable for the discrete output.
-
Terminate output cable shielding at the input device. If this is not possible, terminate the
output shielding at the cable gland or conduit fitting.
-
Do not terminate shield inside the wiring compartment.
-
360° termination of shielding is not necessary.
Ensure that you are using the required version of ProLink II. ProLink II v2.3 or later is required for
the Model 1500 transmitter with filling and dosing application. ProLink II v2.5 or later is required for
meter verification, and for some of the features and functions described in this manual.
To check the version of ProLink II:
1. Start ProLink II.
Measurement Performance
11.15 Checking ProLink II
Compensation
If you are experiencing RF (radio frequency) interference on your discrete output, use one of the
following solutions:
2. Open the Help menu.
3. Click About ProLink.
11.16 Checking the output wiring and receiving device
•
Check the output level at the transmitter.
•
Check the wiring between the transmitter and the receiving device.
•
Try a different receiving device.
Troubleshooting
If you receive an inaccurate mA reading, there may be a problem with the output wiring or the
receiving device.
11.17 Checking slug flow
Slugs – gas in a liquid process or liquid in a gas process – occasionally appear in some applications.
The presence of slugs can significantly affect the process density reading. Slug flow limits and
duration can help the transmitter suppress extreme changes in reading.
Note: Default slug flow limits are 0.0 and 5.0 g/cm3. Raising the low slug flow limit or lowering the
high slug flow limit will increase the possibility of slug flow conditions.
If slug limits have been configured, and slug flow occurs:
A slug flow alarm is generated.
•
All outputs that are configured to represent flow rate hold their last “pre-slug flow” value for
the configured slug flow duration.
Configuration and Use Manual
103
Defaults
•
Troubleshooting
If the slug flow condition clears before the slug-flow duration expires:
•
Outputs that represent flow rate revert to reporting actual flow.
•
The slug flow alarm is deactivated, but remains in the active alarm log until it is
acknowledged.
If the slug flow condition does not clear before the slug-flow duration expires, outputs that represent
flow rate report a flow rate of zero.
If slug time is configured for 0.0 seconds, outputs that represent flow rate will report zero flow as
soon as slug flow is detected.
If slug flow occurs:
•
Check process for cavitation, flashing, or leaks.
•
Change the sensor orientation.
•
Monitor density.
•
If desired, enter new slug flow limits (see Section 6.10).
•
If desired, increase slug duration (see Section 6.10).
11.18 Checking output saturation
If an output variable exceeds the upper range limit or goes below the lower range limit, the
applications platform produces an output saturation alarm. The alarm can mean:
•
The output variable is outside appropriate limits for the process.
•
The unit of flow needs to be changed.
•
Sensor flow tubes are not filled with process fluid.
•
Sensor flow tubes are plugged.
If an output saturation alarm occurs:
•
Bring flow rate within sensor limit.
•
Check the measurement unit. You may be able to use a smaller or larger unit.
•
Check the sensor:
•
-
Ensure that flow tubes are full.
-
Purge flow tubes.
For the mA outputs, change the mA URV and LRV (see Section 4.5.2).
11.19 Checking the flow measurement unit
Using an incorrect flow measurement unit can cause the transmitter to produce unexpected output
levels, with unpredictable effects on the process. Make sure that the configured flow measurement
unit is correct. Check the abbreviations; for example, g/min represents grams per minute, not gallons
per minute. See Section 4.4.
11.20 Checking the upper and lower range values
A saturated mA output or incorrect mA measurement could indicate a faulty URV or LRV. Verify that
the URV and LRV are correct and change them if necessary. See Section 4.5.2.
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Micro Motion® Model 1500 Transmitters with the Filling and Dosing Application
Troubleshooting
11.21 Checking the characterization
If you discover that any of the characterization data are wrong, perform a complete characterization.
See Section 4.2.
Compensation
A transmitter that is incorrectly characterized for its sensor might produce inaccurate output values. If
the flowmeter appears to be operating correctly but sends inaccurate output values, an incorrect
characterization could be the cause.
11.22 Checking the calibration
Improper calibration can cause the transmitter to send unexpected output values. If the transmitter
appears to be operating correctly but sends inaccurate output values, an improper calibration may be
the cause.
Measurement Performance
Micro Motion calibrates every transmitter at the factory. Therefore, you should suspect improper
calibration only if the transmitter has been calibrated after it was shipped from the factory.
The calibration procedures in this manual are designed for calibration to a regulatory standard. See
Chapter 10. To calibrate for true accuracy, always use a measurement source that is more accurate
than the meter. Contact Micro Motion customer service for assistance.
Note: Micro Motion recommends using meter factors, rather than calibration, to prove the meter
against a regulatory standard or to correct measurement error. Contact Micro Motion before
calibrating your flowmeter. For information on meter performance, see Chapter 10.
11.23 Checking the test points
Some status alarms that indicate a sensor failure or overrange condition can be caused by problems
other than a failed sensor. You can diagnose sensor failure or overrange status alarms by checking the
meter test points. The test points include left and right pickoff voltages, drive gain, and tube
frequency. These values describe the current operation of the sensor.
Obtaining the test points
To obtain the test points with ProLink II software:
1. Select Diagnostic Information from the ProLink menu.
2. Write down the values you find in the Tube Frequency box, the Left Pickoff box, the Right
Pickoff box, and the Drive Gain box.
11.23.2
Troubleshooting
11.23.1
Evaluating the test points
Use the following guidelines to evaluate the test points:
If the drive gain is unstable, refer to Section 11.23.3.
•
If the value for the left or right pickoff does not equal the appropriate value from Table 11-7,
based on the sensor flow tube frequency, refer to Section 11.23.5.
•
If the values for the left and right pickoffs equal the appropriate values from Table 11-7, based
on the sensor flow tube frequency, record your troubleshooting data and contact Micro Motion
customer service. See Section 1.8.
Configuration and Use Manual
105
Defaults
•
Troubleshooting
Table 11-7 Sensor pickoff values
Sensor(1)
Pickoff value
ELITE Model CMF sensors
3.4 mV peak-to-peak per Hz based on sensor flow tube frequency
Model D, DL, and DT sensors
3.4 mV peak-to-peak per Hz based on sensor flow tube frequency
Model F025, F050, F100 sensors
3.4 mV peak-to-peak per Hz based on sensor flow tube frequency
Model F200 sensors (compact case)
2.0 mV peak-to-peak per Hz based on sensor flow tube frequency
Model F200 sensors (standard case)
3.4 mV peak-to-peak per Hz based on sensor flow tube frequency
Model H025, H050, H100 sensors
3.4 mV peak-to-peak per Hz based on sensor flow tube frequency
Model H200 sensors
2.0 mV peak-to-peak per Hz based on sensor flow tube frequency
Model R025, R050, or R100 sensors
3.4 mV peak-to-peak per Hz based on sensor flow tube frequency
Model R200 sensors
2.0 mV peak-to-peak per Hz based on sensor flow tube frequency
Micro Motion T-Series sensors
0.5 mV peak-to-peak per Hz based on sensor flow tube frequency
CMF400 I.S. sensors
2.7 mV peak-to-peak per Hz based on sensor flow tube frequency
CMF400 sensors with booster amplifiers
3.4 mV peak-to-peak per Hz based on sensor flow tube frequency
(1) If your sensor is not listed, contact Micro Motion. See Section 1.8
11.23.3
Excessive drive gain
Excessive drive gain can be caused by several problems. See Table 11-8.
Table 11-8 Excessive drive gain causes and remedies
Cause
Possible remedy
Excessive slug flow
See Section 11.17.
Plugged flow tube
Purge the flow tubes.
Cavitation or flashing
Increase inlet or back pressure at the sensor.
If a pump is located upstream from the sensor, increase the distance
between the pump and sensor.
Drive board or module failure, cracked flow tube,
or sensor imbalance
Contact Micro Motion. See Section 1.8.
Mechanical binding at sensor
Ensure sensor is free to vibrate.
Open drive or left pickoff sensor coil
Contact Micro Motion. See Section 1.8.
Flow rate out of range
Ensure that flow rate is within sensor limits.
Incorrect sensor characterization
Verify characterization. See Section 4.2.
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Micro Motion® Model 1500 Transmitters with the Filling and Dosing Application
Troubleshooting
11.23.4
Erratic drive gain
Table 11-9
Compensation
Erratic drive gain can be caused by several problems. See Table 11-9.
Erratic drive gain causes and remedies
Cause
Possible remedy
Wrong K1 characterization constant for sensor
Re-enter the K1 characterization constant. See
Section 4.2.
Polarity of pick-off reversed or polarity of drive reversed
Contact Micro Motion. See Section 1.8.
Slug flow
See Section 11.17.
Foreign material caught in flow tubes
Purge flow tubes.
Low pickoff voltage
Measurement Performance
11.23.5
Low pickoff voltage can be caused by several problems. See Table 11-10.
Table 11-10 Low pickoff voltage causes and remedies
Cause
Possible remedy
Faulty wiring runs between the sensor and core processor
Verify wiring. Refer to Appendix B for diagrams, and see
your transmitter installation manual.
Process flow rate beyond the limits of the sensor
Verify that the process flow rate is not out of range of the
sensor.
Slug flow
See Section 11.17.
No tube vibration in sensor
Check for plugging.
Ensure sensor is free to vibrate (no mechanical binding).
Verify wiring.
Test coils at sensor. See Section 11.25.
Eliminate the moisture in the sensor electronics.
The sensor is damaged
Contact Micro Motion. See Section 1.8.
Troubleshooting
Moisture in the sensor electronics
11.24 Checking the core processor
The Core Processor Diagnostics window displays data for many operational variables that are
internal to the core processor. Both current data and lifetime statistics are shown.
To view the core processor data, select Core Processor Diagnostics from the ProLink menu.
From this window:
•
You can reset lifetime statistics by pressing the Reset Lifetime Stats button.
•
You can also change values for electronic offsent, sensor failure timeout, drive P coefficient,
drive I coefficient, target amplitude override, and target frequency. Contact Micro Motion
customer service before changing these values.
Additionally, two core processor procedures are available:
You can check the core processor LED. The core processor has an LED that indicates different
flowmeter conditions. See Table 11-11.
•
You can perform the core processor resistance test to check for a damaged core processor.
Configuration and Use Manual
107
Defaults
•
Troubleshooting
11.24.1
Checking the core processor LED
To check the core processor LED:
1. Maintain power to the transmitter.
2. Remove the core processor lid (see Figure B-2). The core processor is instrinsically safe and
can be opened in all environments.
3. Check the core processor LED against the conditions described in Table 11-11 (standard core
processor) or Table 11-12 (enhanced core processor).
4. To return to normal operation, replace the lid.
Note: When reassembling the meter components, be sure to grease all O-rings.
Table 11-11 Standard core processor LED behavior, meter conditions, and remedies
LED behavior
Condition
Possible remedy
1 flash per second (ON
25%, OFF 75%)
Normal operation
No action required.
1 flash per second (ON
75%, OFF 25%)
Slug flow
See Section 11.17.
Solid ON
Zero or calibration in
progress
If calibration is in progress, no action required. If no calibration is in
progress, contact Micro Motion. See Section 1.8.
Core processor
receiving between 11.5
and 5 volts
Check power supply to transmitter. See Section 11.14.1, and refer to
Appendix B for diagrams.
Sensor not recognized
Check wiring between transmitter and sensor (remote core processor
with remote transmitter installation). Refer to Appendix B for diagrams,
and see your transmitter installation manual.
Improper configuration
Check sensor characterization parameters. See Section 4.2.
Broken pin between
sensor and core
processor
Contact Micro Motion. See Section 1.8.
4 flashes per second
Fault condition
Check alarm status.
OFF
Core processor
receiving less than 5
volts
• Verify power supply wiring to core processor. Refer to Appendix B for
diagrams.
• If transmitter status LED is lit, transmitter is receiving power. Check
voltage across terminals 1 (VDC+) and 2 (VDC–) in core processor.
Normal reading is approximately 14 VDC. If reading is normal,
internal core processor failure is possible. Contact Micro Motion. See
Section 1.8. If reading is 0, internal transmitter failure is possible.
Contact Micro Motion. See Section 1.8. If reading is less than 1 VDC,
verify power supply wiring to core processor. Wires may be switched.
See Section 11.14.1, and refer to Appendix B for diagrams.
• If transmitter status LED is not lit, transmitter is not receiving power.
Check power supply. See Section 11.14.1, and refer to Appendix B
for diagrams. If power supply is operational, internal transmitter,
display, or LED failure is possible. Contact Micro Motion. See
Section 1.8.
Core processor
internal failure
Contact Micro Motion. See Section 1.8.
3 rapid flashes,
followed by pause
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Micro Motion® Model 1500 Transmitters with the Filling and Dosing Application
Troubleshooting
Table 11-12 Enhanced core processor LED behavior, meter conditions, and remedies
Compensation
LED behavior
Condition
Possible remedy
Solid green
Normal operation
No action required.
Flashing yellow
Zero in progress
If calibration is in progress, no action required. If no calibration is in
progress, contact Micro Motion. See Section 1.8.
Solid yellow
Low severity alarm
Check alarm status.
Solid red
High severity alarm
Check alarm status.
Flashing red (80% on,
20% off)
Tubes not full
If alarm A105 (slug flow) is active, see Section 11.17.
Flashing red (50% on,
50% off)
Electronics failed
Contact Micro Motion. See Section 1.8.
Flashing red (50% on,
50% off, skips every
4th)
Sensor failed
Contact Micro Motion. See Section 1.8.
OFF
Core processor
receiving less than 5
volts
• Verify power supply wiring to core processor. Refer to Appendix B for
diagrams.
• If transmitter status LED is lit, transmitter is receiving power. Check
voltage across terminals 1 (VDC+) and 2 (VDC–) in core processor.
If reading is less than 1 VDC, verify power supply wiring to core
processor. Wires may be switched. See Section 11.14.1, and refer to
Appendix B for diagrams. Otherwise, contact Micro Motion (see
Section 1.8).
• If transmitter status LED is not lit, transmitter is not receiving power.
Check power supply. See Section 11.14.1, and refer to Appendix B
for diagrams. If power supply is operational, internal transmitter,
display, or LED failure is possible. Contact Micro Motion. See
Section 1.8.
Core processor
internal failure
Contact Micro Motion. See Section 1.8.
Measurement Performance
Troubleshooting
11.24.2
If alarm A033 (tubes not full) is active, verify process. Check for air in
the flow tubes, tubes not filled, foreign material in tubes, or coating in
tubes.
Core processor resistance test
To perform the core processor resistance test:
1. Power down the transmitter.
2. Remove the core processor lid.
3. Disconnect the 4-wire cable between the core processor and the transmitter (see Figure B-3 or
Figure B-4).
4. Measure the resistance between core processor terminals 3 and 4 (RS-485/A and RS-485/B).
See Figure 11-1. Resistance should be 40 kΩ to 50 kΩ.
5. Measure the resistance between core processor terminals 2 and 3 (VDC– and RS-485/A).
Resistance should be 20 kΩ to 25 kΩ.
6. Measure the resistance between core processor terminals 2 and 4 (VDC– and RS-485/B).
Resistance should be 20 kΩ to 25 kΩ.
Configuration and Use Manual
109
Defaults
7. If any resistance measurements are lower than specified, the core processor may not be able to
communicate with a transmitter or a remote host. Contact Micro Motion (see Section 1.8).
Troubleshooting
To return to normal operation:
1. Reconnect the 4-wire cable between the core processor and the transmitter (see Figure B-3 or
Figure B-4).
2. Replace the core processor lid.
Note: When reassembling the meter components, be sure to grease all O-rings.
Figure 11-1 Core processor resistance test
Standard core processor
Enhanced core processor
40 kΩ –50 kΩ
40 kΩ –50 kΩ
20 kΩ – 25 kΩ
20 kΩ – 25 kΩ
20 kΩ – 25 kΩ
11.25 Checking sensor coils and RTD
Problems with sensor coils can cause several alarms, including sensor failure and a variety of
out-of-range conditions. Testing the sensor coils involves testing the terminal pairs and testing for
shorts to case.
11.25.1
Remote core processor with remote transmitter installation
If you have a remote core processor with remote transmitter (see Figure B-1):
1. Power down the transmitter.
2. Remove the end-cap from the core processor housing.
3. At the core processor, unplug the terminal blocks from the terminal board.
4. Using a digital multimeter (DMM), check the pickoff coils listed in Table 11-13 by placing the
DMM leads on the unplugged terminal blocks for each terminal pair. Record the values.
110
Micro Motion® Model 1500 Transmitters with the Filling and Dosing Application
Troubleshooting
Table 11-13 Coils and test terminal pairs
Compensation
Test terminal pair
Coil
Colors
Numbers
Drive coil
Brown to red
3—4
Left pickoff coil (LPO)
Green to white
5—6
Right pickoff coil (RPO)
Blue to gray
7—8
Resistance temperature detector (RTD)
Yellow to violet
1—2
Lead length compensator (LLC) (all sensors except CMF400 I.S. and T-Series)
Composite RTD (T-Series sensors only)
Fixed resistor (CMF400 I.S. sensors only)
Yellow to orange
1—9
6. Leave the core processor terminal blocks disconnected. At the sensor, remove the lid of the
junction box and test each sensor terminal for a short to case by placing one DMM lead on the
terminal and the other lead on the sensor case. With the DMM set to its highest range, there
should be infinite resistance on each lead. If there is any resistance at all, there is a short to
case.
Measurement Performance
5. There should be no open circuits, i.e., no infinite resistance readings. The LPO and RPO
readings should be the same or very close (± 5 Ω). If there are any unusual readings, repeat the
coil resistance tests at the sensor junction box to eliminate the possibility of faulty cable. The
readings for each coil pair should match at both ends.
7. At the sensor, test terminal pairs as follows:
a. Brown against all other terminals except Red
b. Red against all other terminals except Brown
c. Green against all other terminals except White
d. White against all other terminals except Green
f.
Troubleshooting
e. Blue against all other terminals except Gray
Gray against all other terminals except Blue
g. Orange against all other terminals except Yellow and Violet
h. Yellow against all other terminals except Orange and Violet
i.
Violet against all other terminals except Yellow and Orange
Note: D600 sensors and CMF400 sensors with booster amplifiers have different terminal pairs.
Contact Micro Motion for assistance (see Section 1.8).
There should be infinite resistance for each pair. If there is any resistance at all, there is a short
between terminals.
8. See Table 11-14 for possible causes and solutions.
9. If the problem is not resolved, contact Micro Motion (see Section 1.8).
10. To return to normal operation:
Defaults
a. Plug the terminal blocks into the terminal board.
b. Replace the end-cap on the core processor housing.
c. Replace the lid on the sensor junction box.
Note: When reassembling the meter components, be sure to grease all O-rings.
Configuration and Use Manual
111
Troubleshooting
Table 11-14 Sensor and cable short to case possible causes and remedies
Possible cause
Solution
Moisture inside the sensor junction box
Make sure that the junction box is dry and no corrosion is present.
Liquid or moisture inside the sensor case
Contact Micro Motion. See Section 1.8.
Internally shorted feedthrough (sealed passage
for wiring from sensor to sensor junction box)
Contact Micro Motion. See Section 1.8.
Faulty cable
Replace cable.
Improper wire termination
Verify wire terminations inside sensor junction box. See Micro
Motion’s 9-Wire Flowmeter Cable Preparation and Installation Guide
or the sensor documentation.
11.25.2
4-wire remote installation
If you have a 4-wire remote installation (see Figure B-1):
1. Power down the transmitter.
2. Remove the core processor lid.
Note: You may disconnect the 4-wire cable between the core processor and the transmitter, or leave it
connected.
3. If you have a standard core processor – Loosen the captive screw (2.5 mm) in the center of the
core processor. Carefully remove the core processor from the sensor by grasping it and lifting
it straight up. Do not twist or rotate the core processor.
4. If you have an enhanced core processor – Loosen the two captive screws (2.5 mm) that hold
the core processor in the housing. Gently lift the core processor out of the housing, then
disconnect the sensor cable from the feedthrough pins. Do not damage the feedthrough pins.
CAUTION
If the core processor (feedthrough) pins are bent, broken, or damaged in any
way, the core processor will not operate.
To avoid damage to the core processor (feedthrough) pins:
•
•
Do not twist or rotate the core processor when lifting it.
When replacing the core processor (or sensor cable) on the pins, be sure to
align the guide pins and mount the core processor (or sensor cable) carefully.
5. Using a digital multimeter (DMM), check the pickoff coil resistances by placing the DMM
leads on the pin pairs. Refer to Figure 11-2 (standard core processor) or Figure 11-3 (enhanced
core processor) to identify the pins and pin pairs. Record the values.
112
Micro Motion® Model 1500 Transmitters with the Filling and Dosing Application
Troubleshooting
Figure 11-2 Sensor pins – Standard core processor
Compensation
Right pickoff
(–)
Right pickoff
(+)
Lead length compensator(1)
(+)
Left pickoff
(–)
Resistance temperature detector return /
Lead length compensator
(common)
Left pickoff
(+)
Resistance temperature detector
(+)
Measurement Performance
Drive
(–)
Drive
(+)
(1) LLC for all sensors except T-Series and CMF400 I.S. For T-Series sensors, functions as
composite RTD. For CMF400 I.S. sensors, functions as fixed resistor.
Figure 11-3 Sensor pins – Enhanced core processor
Drive +
Drive –
LLC
Troubleshooting
RTD +
RTD –
Left pickoff +
Left pickoff –
Right pickoff –
Right pickoff +
6. There should be no open circuits, i.e., no infinite resistance readings. The LPO and RPO
readings should be the same or very close (± 5 ohms).
7. Using the DMM, check between each pin and the sensor case. With the DMM set to its highest
range, there should be infinite resistance on each lead. If there is any resistance at all, there is a
short to case. See Table 11-14 for possible causes and solutions.
Defaults
Configuration and Use Manual
113
Troubleshooting
8. Test terminal pairs as follows:
a. Drive + against all other terminals except Drive –
b. Drive – against all other terminals except Drive +
c. Left pickoff + against all other terminals except Left pickoff –
d. Left pickoff – against all other terminals except Left pickoff +
e. Right pickoff + against all other terminals except Right pickoff –
f.
Right pickoff – against all other terminals except Right pickoff +
g. RTD + against all other terminals except LLC + and RTD/LLC
h. LLC + against all other terminals except RTD + and RTD/LLC
i.
RTD/LLC against all other terminals except LLC + and RTD +
Note: D600 sensors and CMF400 sensors with booster amplifiers have different terminal pairs.
Contact Micro Motion for assistance (see Section 1.8).
There should be infinite resistance for each pair. If there is any resistance at all, there is a short
between terminals. See Table 11-14 for possible causes and solutions.
9. If the problem is not resolved, contact Micro Motion (see Section 1.8).
To return to normal operation:
1. If you have a standard core processor:
a. Align the three guide pins on the bottom of the core processor with the corresponding
holes in the base of the core processor housing.
b. Carefully mount the core processor on the pins, taking care not to bend any pins.
2. If you have an enhanced core processor:
a. Plug the sensor cable onto the feedthrough pins, being careful not to bend or damage any
pins.
b. Replace the core processor in the housing.
3. Tighten the captive screw(s) to 6 to 8 in-lbs (0,7 to 0,9 N-m) of torque.
4. Replace the core processor lid.
Note: When reassembling the meter components, be sure to grease all O-rings.
114
Micro Motion® Model 1500 Transmitters with the Filling and Dosing Application
A.1
Compensation
Appendix A
Default Values and Ranges
Overview
This appendix provides information on the default values for most transmitter parameters. Where
appropriate, valid ranges are also defined.
The default values listed here apply to all Version 4.x transmitters using a Version 3.x core processor.
A.2
Default values and ranges
The table below contains the default values and ranges for the most frequently used transmitter
settings.
Table A-1
Measurement Performance
These default values represent the transmitter configuration after a master reset. Depending on how
the transmitter was ordered, certain values may have been configured at the factory.
Transmitter default values and ranges
Setting
Default
Flow
Flow direction
Forward
Flow damping
0.04 sec
Flow calibration factor
1.00005.13
Mass flow units
g/s
Mass flow cutoff
0.0 g/s
Volume flow units
L/s
Volume flow cutoff
0.0 L/s
Mass factor
1.00000
Density factor
1.00000
Volume factor
1.00000
Meter factors
Range
Comments
0.0–51.2 sec
User-entered value is
corrected to nearest lower
value in list of preset values.
For T-Series sensors, this
value represents the FCF and
FT factors concatenated. See
Section 4.2.2.
Recommended setting is
0.5–1.0% of the sensor’s
rated maximum flowrate.
0.0–x L/s
Troubleshooting
Type
x is obtained by multiplying
the flow calibration factor by
0.2, using units of L/s.
Defaults
Configuration and Use Manual
115
Default Values and Ranges
Table A-1
Transmitter default values and ranges continued
Type
Setting
Default
Range
Comments
Density
Density damping
1.6 sec
0.0–51.2 sec
User-entered value is
corrected to nearest lower
value in list of preset values.
Density units
g/cm3
Density cutoff
0.2 g/cm3
D1
0.00000
D2
1.00000
K1
1000.00
K2
50,000.00
FD
0.00000
Temp Coefficient
4.44
Slug flow low limit
0.0 g/cm3
0.0–10.0 g/cm3
3
0.0–10.0 g/cm3
Slug flow
Temperature
0.0–0.5 g/cm3
Slug flow high limit
5.0 g/cm
Slug duration
0.0 sec
0.0–60.0 sec
Temperature damping
4.8 sec
0.0–38.4 sec
Temperature units
Deg C
User-entered value is
corrected to nearest lower
value in list of preset values.
Temperature calibration factor 1.00000T0.0000
Pressure
T-Series sensor
Special units
Pressure units
PSI
Flow factor
0.00000
Density factor
0.00000
Cal pressure
0.00000
D3
0.00000
D4
0.00000
K3
0.00000
K4
0.00000
FTG
0.00000
FFQ
0.00000
DTG
0.00000
DFQ1
0.00000
DFQ2
0.00000
Base mass unit
g
Base mass time
sec
Mass flow conversion factor
1.00000
Base volume unit
L
Base volume time
sec
Volume flow conversion factor 1.00000
Event 1
116
Variable
Density
Type
Low alarm
Setpoint
0.0
Setpoint units
g/cm3
Micro Motion® Model 1500 Transmitters with the Filling and Dosing Application
Default Values and Ranges
Table A-1
Transmitter default values and ranges continued
Setting
Default
Event 2
Variable
Density
Type
Low alarm
Setpoint
0.0
Setpoint units
g/cm3
Update Rate
Update rate
Special
Analog output
Primary variable
Mass flow
LRV
–200.00000 g/s
URV
200.00000 g/s
AO cutoff
0.00000 g/s
AO added damping
0.00000 sec
LSL
–200 g/s
Read-only
USL
200 g/s
Read-only
MinSpan
0.3 g/s
Read-only
Fault action
Downscale
AO fault level – downscale
2.0 mA
1.0–3.6 mA
AO fault level – upscale
22 mA
21.0–24.0 mA
Last measured value timeout
0.00 sec
Mass flow
–200.000 g/s
Volume flow
–0.200 l/s
Mass flow
200.000 g/s
Volume flow
0.200 l/s
URV
Fill
Normal or
Special
Flow source
Mass flow rate
Enable Filling Option
Enabled
Count Up
Enabled
Enable AOC
Enabled
Enable Purge
Disabled
Fill Type
One Stage Discrete
Configure By
% Target
Fill Target
0.00000 g
Max Fill Time
0.00000 sec
Purge Mode
Manual
Purge Delay
2.00000 sec
Purge Time
1.00000 sec
AOC Algorithm
Underfill
AOC Window Length
10
Fixed Overshoot Comp
0.00000
Open Primary
0.00% of target
0.00–100 %
Open Secondary
0.00% of target
0.00–100 %
Close Primary
100.00% of target
0.00–100 %
Close Secondary
100.00% of target
0.00–100 %
Defaults
Configuration and Use Manual
Troubleshooting
Valve control –
Two-stage
discrete fill
Comments
Measurement Performance
LRV
Range
Compensation
Type
117
Default Values and Ranges
Table A-1
Transmitter default values and ranges continued
Type
Setting
Default
Range
Valve control –
Three-position
analog fill
Open Full
0.00% of target
0.00–100 %
Close Partial
100.00% of target
0.00–100 %
Digital comm
Fault setting
None
Floating-point byte order
3–4–1–2
Additional communications
response delay
0
Configured value is multiplied
by 2/3 character time to arrive
at real-time value
Modbus address
1
RS-485 connections only
Protocol
Modbus RTU
RS-485 connections only
Baud rate
9,600
RS-485 connections only
Parity
None
RS-485 connections only
Stop bits
1
RS-485 connections only
118
Comments
Micro Motion® Model 1500 Transmitters with the Filling and Dosing Application
B.1
Diagrams
Appendix B
Installation Architectures and Components
Overview
This appendix provides illustrations of different flowmeter installation architectures and components,
for the Model 1500 transmitter with the filling and dosing application.
Installation diagrams
Transmitter Menus
B.2
Model 1500 transmitters can be installed in two different ways:
•
4-wire remote
•
Remote core processor with remote transmitter
See Figure B-1.
B.3
Component diagrams
In remote core processor with remote transmitter installations, the core processor is installed
stand-alone. See Figure B-2.
B.4
Wiring and terminal diagrams
Figure B-5 shows the transmitter’s power supply terminals.
Figure B-6 shows the output terminals for the Model 1500 transmitter with the filling and dosing
application.
NE53 History
A 4-wire cable is used to connect the core processor to the transmitter. See Figure B-3 (standard core
processor) or Figure B-4 (enhanced core processor).
Index
Configuration and Use Manual
119
Installation Architectures and Components
Figure B-1
Installation architectures
Hazardous area
4-wire remote
Sensor
Core processor
(standard or enhanced)
Safe area
Model 1500 transmitter
(top view)
4-wire cable
Remote core processor with remote transmitter
Model 1500 transmitter
(top view)
Sensor
4-wire cable
Core processor
(standard only)
Junction box
120
9-wire cable
Micro Motion® Model 1500 Transmitters with the Filling and Dosing Application
Installation Architectures and Components
Figure B-2
Remote core processor components
Diagrams
Core processor lid
4 X Cap screws (4 mm)
Conduit opening
for 4-wire cable
Conduit opening
for 9-wire cable
Core processor housing
Mounting bracket
Transmitter Menus
Figure B-3
End-cap
4-wire cable between Model 1500 transmitter and standard core processor
Core processor
terminals
User-supplied or
factory-supplied 4-wire cable
Transmitter terminals for
sensor connection
VDC+ (Red)
RS-485/B (Green)
NE53 History
RS-485/A (White)
VDC– (Black)
Index
Configuration and Use Manual
121
Installation Architectures and Components
Figure B-4
4-wire cable between Model 1500 transmitter and enhanced core processor
User-supplied or
factory-supplied 4-wire cable
Core processor
terminals
Transmitter terminals for
sensor connection
RS-485/A (White)
RS-485/B (Green)
VDC– (Black)
VDC+ (Red)
Figure B-5
Power supply terminals
–
+
Primary power supply
(DC)
122
+
–
Power supply jumper to
other Model 1500/2500
transmitters (optional)
Micro Motion® Model 1500 Transmitters with the Filling and Dosing Application
Installation Architectures and Components
Figure B-6
Terminal configuration
Terminals 31 & 32 (Channel C)
DO2 OR DI
Internal or external power
No communications
Diagrams
Terminals 21 & 22 (Channel A)
mA1 output
Internal power only
Terminals 23 & 24 (Channel B)
DO1
Internal or external power
No communications
Terminals 33 & 34
Service port OR Modbus RS-485
(Modbus RTU or Modbus ASCII)
Transmitter Menus
mA = milliamp
DO = discrete output
DI = discrete input
NE53 History
Index
Configuration and Use Manual
123
124
Micro Motion® Model 1500 Transmitters with the Filling and Dosing Application
C.1
Diagrams
Appendix C
Menu Flowcharts
Overview
This appendix provides the following ProLink II menu flowcharts for the Model 1500 transmitter with
the filling and dosing application:
Top-level menu – Figure C-1
•
Operating menus – Figure C-2
•
Configuration menus – Figures C-3 and C-4
Transmitter Menus
C.2
•
Version information
These menu flowcharts are based on:
•
Transmitter software rev4.4
•
Enhanced core processor software v3.2
•
ProLink II v2.5
Menus may vary slightly for different versions of these components.
C.3
Flowcharts
NE53 History
Figure C-1
ProLink II top-level menu
File
Load from Xmtr to File
Save to Xmtr from File
View
Connection
ProLink
Connect to Device
Disconnect
See Figure C-2
License
Tools
Plug-ins
Data Logger
Gas Unit Configurator
Preferences
· Use External Temperature
· Enable Inventory Totals Reset
· Enable External Pressure Compensation
· Copper RTD
Meter Verification
Options
· ProLink II Language
· Error Log On
Index
Installed options
Note: For information on Data Logger, see the ProLink II manual.
Note: The Reset Inventories option is available only if it has been enabled in the ProLink II Preferences menu.
Configuration and Use Manual
125
Menu Flowcharts
Figure C-2
ProLink II operating menus
ProLink
Configuration
Output Levels
Process Variables
Calibration
· Zero Calibration
· Milliamp Trim 1
· Density Cal – Point 1
· Density Cal – Point 2
· Density Cal – Flowing Density
· Density Cal – Point 3
· Density Cal – Point 4
· Temp Offset Cal
· Temp Slope Cal
Status
Alarm Log
Diagnostic Information
Test
· Fix Milliamp 1
· Fix Discrete Output
· Read Discrete Input
Calibration
Test
Totalizer Control
Core Processor Diagnostics
Finger Print
Run Filler
Totalizer Control
· Reset Mass Total
· Reset Volume Total
· All Totals – Reset
· All Totals – Start
· All Totals – Stop
· Reset Inventories
Fill Setup
· Reset Fill Total
· Current Target
· AOC Coefficient
Fill Control
· Begin Filling
· Pause Filling
· Resume Filling
· End Filling
· Begin Purge
· End Purge
· Begin Cleaning
· End Cleaning
AOC Calibration
· Start AOC Cal
· Save AOC Cal
· Override Blocked Start
· Reset AOC Flow Rate
Reset Fill Statistics
Reset Fill Count
Fill Status
126
Micro Motion® Model 1500 Transmitters with the Filling and Dosing Application
Menu Flowcharts
Figure C-3
ProLink II configuration menu
Diagrams
ProLink Menu
Configuration
Flow
Density
Temperature
Pressure
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
Dens units
Dens damping
Slug high limit
Slug low limit
Slug duration
Low density cutoff
K1
K2
FD
D1
D2
Temp coeff (DT)
Temp units
Temp cal factor
Temp damping
External temperature
Flow factor
Dens factor
Cal pressure
Pressure units
External pressure
Transmitter Menus
Flow direction
Flow damp
Flow cal
Mass flow cutoff
Mass flow units
Vol flow cutoff
Vol flow units
Mass factor
Dens factor
Vol factor
Sensor
Special Units
T Series
Events
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
Event 1
· Variable
· Type
· Setpoint
Sensor s/n
Sensor model num
Sensor matl
Liner matl
Flange
FTG
FFQ
DTG
DFQ1
DFQ2
K3
D3
D4
K4
Event 2
· Variable
· Type
· Setpoint
NE53 History
Base mass unit
Base mass time
Mass flow conv fact
Mass flow text
Mass total text
Base vol unit
Base vol time
Vol flow conv fact
Vol flow text
Vol total text
Gas unit configurator
Index
Configuration and Use Manual
127
Menu Flowcharts
Figure C-4
ProLink II configuration menu continued
ProLink Menu
Configuration
Filling
Analog output
Device
Flow source
Primary variable is
Filling control options
· Enable filling option
· Count up
· Enable AOC
· Enable purge
· Fill type
· Configure by
· Fill target
· Max fill time
· Purge mode
· Purge delay
· Purge time
· AOC algorithm
· AOC window length
· Fixed overshoot comp
Process variable measurement
· Lower range value
· Upper range value
· AO cutoff
· AO added damp
· Lower sensor limit
· Upper sensor limit
· Min span
· AO fault action
· AO fault level
· Last measured value timeout
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
Valve control options
· Enable 3 position valve
· Analog valve setpoint
· Analog valve closed value
Tag
Date
Descriptor
Message
Sensor type
Transmitter serial
Floating pt ordering
Add comm resp delay
Digital comm settings
· Digital comm fault
setting
· Modbus address
Update rate
· Update rate
· 100 Hz variable
Discrete valves for 2 stage filling
· Open primary
· Open secondary
· Close primary
· Close secondary
3 position analog valve
· Open full
· Close partial
Channel
RS-485
Alarm
Discrete IO
Channel B
· Type assignment
· Power type
·
·
·
·
· Alarm severity
Discrete output
· DO1 assignment
· DO1 polarity
· DO2 assignment
· DO2 polarity
Channel C
· Type assignment
· Power type
Protocol
Baud rate
Parity
Stop bits
Variable mapping
· Primary variable
Discrete input
· DI assignment
Note: The DO2 options are available only if Channel C has been configured for discrete output.
Note: The discrete input options are available only if Channel C has been configured for discrete input.
128
Micro Motion® Model 1500 Transmitters with the Filling and Dosing Application
D.1
Diagrams
Appendix D
NE53 History
Overview
This appendix documents the change history of the Model 1500 transmitter software with the filling
and dosing application.
Software change history
Table D-1 describes the change history of the transmitter software. Operating instructions are English
versions.
Table D-1
Transmitter software change history
Date
Software
version
Changes to software
Operating
instructions
04/2005
4.3
Original release
20002743 A
10/2006
4.4
Software expansion
20002743 B
Transmitter Menus
D.2
Added support for enhanced core processor
Added support for batches smaller than 0.01 g
Software adjustment
Master reset automatically enables Special mode
NE53 History
Feature addition
Meter verification availability as an option
Index
Configuration and Use Manual
129
130
Micro Motion® Model 1500 Transmitters with the Filling and Dosing Application
Index
Configuration and Use Manual
131
Index
C
Calibration 81, 82
AOC 62
density calibration procedure 87
failure 92
temperature calibration procedure 90
troubleshooting 105
zero 12
Calibration parameters 16
Channels 19
NE53 History
B
Base mass unit 36
Base time unit 36
Base volume unit 36
Baud rate 50
Black Box 5
Byte order
See Floating-point byte order
Transmitter Menus
A
Added damping 25
Additional communications response delay 51
Alarms
alarm log 33
alarm severity 47
ignoring 47
slug flow 47
status 95
viewing 32
Analog output cutoff
See AO cutoff
AO cutoff 24
AOC
See Overshoot compensation
AOC calibration 62, 63
rolling 65
standard 64
types 63
Autozero 12
See also Zeroing
Characterization
characterization parameters 16
density calibration factors 17
flow calibration parameters 18
how to characterize 18
troubleshooting 105
when to characterize 16
Cleaning 56
Coil, testing resistance 110
Communication
using Modbus 2
using ProLink II 2
Communication tools 2
Configuration
additional communications response delay 51
alarm severity 47
baud rate 50
channels 19
cutoffs 38
damping 39
density measurement unit 22
device settings 52
digital communications fault indicator 49
digital communications parameters 49
discrete input 29
fill control 59
discrete output 26
assignment 28
polarity 28
valve control 57
events 45
fault handling 47
filling and dosing application 56
fill type 56
flow source 56
overshoot compensation 64
valve control 56
floating-point byte order 51
flow direction parameter 41
mA output 22
added damping 25
AO cutoff 24
as discrete output 57
as three-level output 58
fault action 25
last measured value timeout 25
Diagrams
Numerics
100 Hz variable 40
Index
process variable 24
range 24
valve control 57, 58
mass flow measurement unit 20
measurement units 20
special 35
menu flowcharts 125
Modbus address 50
optional parameters and procedures 35
overshoot compensation 58, 64
parity 50
pre-configuration worksheet 2
pressure compensation 78
pressure measurement unit 22
protocol 50
required parameters and procedures 15
RS-485 parameters 50
saving to a file 5
sensor parameters 52
slug flow parameters 46
special measurement units 35
stop bits 50
temperature measurement unit 22
update rate 40
using Modbus 2
using ProLink II 2
valve control 56
variable mapping 51
volume flow measurement unit 21
Configuration files
upload and download 5
Configuration tools 2
Connecting to transmitter
from a host using RS-485 parameters 50
from ProLink II 6
serial port 5
USB port 5
Connection types 6
Conversion factor 36
Core processor
components 121
LED 108
resistance test 109
troubleshooting 107
versions 1
Customer service 4
contacting 92
Cutoffs, configuration 38
132
D
Damping
configuration 39
See also Added damping
Default values 115
Density
calibration factors 17
cutoff 38
factor 77
measurement unit
configuration 22
list 22
Density calibration procedure 87
Device settings, configuration 52
Digital communications parameters,
configuration 49
Discrete input
assignment options 29
configuration 29
fill control 70
troubleshooting 93
Discrete output
assignment options 28
configuration 26
fill control 59
polarity 28
valve control 57
troubleshooting 103
voltage levels 26
Documentation 1
Dosing
See Filling and dosing application
Drive gain
erratic 107
excessive 106
E
Erratic drive gain 107
Events, configuration 45
Excessive drive gain 106
F
Fault action
mA output configuration 25
Fault alarm 47
Fault conditions 92
Fault handling
configuration 47
fault timeout 49
status alarm severity 47
Micro Motion® Model 1500 Transmitters with the Filling and Dosing Application
Index
Index
Configuration and Use Manual
M
mA output
as discrete output 54
as three-level output 54
configuration 22
added damping 25
AO cutoff 24
as discrete output 57
as three-level output 58
fault action 25
last measured value timeout 25
process variable 24
range 24
valve control 57, 58
trimming 11
valve control 54
Mass flow
cutoff 38
measurement unit
configuration 20
list 20
Measurement units
configuration 20
pressure 78
special 35
gas unit 37
mass flow unit 36
volume flow unit 37
troubleshooting 104
Meter factors 82, 86
Meter fingerprinting 101
Meter validation 81, 82, 86
procedure 86
NE53 History
I
Ignore alarm 47
Informational alarm 47
Installation
architectures 120
output terminals 123
power supply terminals 122
sensor wiring 121, 122
terminal configuration options 123
L
Last measured value timeout 25
LED
See Status LED, core processor LED
Loop test 10
Low pickoff voltage 107
LRV
See also Range
troubleshooting 104
Transmitter Menus
G
Grounding, troubleshooting 102
Inventories
definition 33
resetting 33
viewing 33
Diagrams
Fault indicator
digital communications 49
discrete output 28
Fault timeout 49
Fill control
discrete input 59, 70
ProLink II 68
Fill sequences 72
Fill status 70
Fill type
configuration 56
definitions 54
Filling
See Filling and dosing application
Filling and dosing application 53
AOC calibration 62
cleaning 56
configuration 56
fill types 54
filling control options 60
flow source 59
operation 67
overview 53
purge 56
troubleshooting 101
user interface requirements 2, 53, 67
valve control 54, 61
Filling control options 60
Fixed overshoot compensation 63
Floating-point byte order 51
Flow calibration parameters 18
Flow calibration pressure 77
Flow direction parameter, configuration 41
Flow factor 77
Flow source 59
configuration 56
133
Index
Meter verification 81
establishing baseline 29
procedure 83
specification uncertainty limit 85
test results 85
Micro Motion customer service 4, 92
Modbus
address 50
and the filling and dosing application 2, 53, 67
Mode
Special 41
O
One-stage discrete fill 54
Output saturation 104
Output wiring, troubleshooting 103
Output, troubleshooting
discrete output 93
mA output 93
Overfill 63
Overshoot compensation 62
configuration 58
configuring 64
types 63
P
Parity 50
Pickoff voltage 107
Polarity, discrete output configuration 28
Power supply
terminals 122
troubleshooting 102
Power, power-up 9
Pre-configuration worksheet 2
Pressure
measurement unit
configuration 22, 78
list 78
Pressure compensation 77
configuration 78
pressure correction factors 77
Pressure correction factors 77
Pressure effect 77
Primary variable 24, 51
Prior zero 13
Process variable
mA output configuration 24
recording 31
troubleshooting 98
viewing 32
134
ProLink II
and the filling and dosing application 2, 53, 67
configuration upload and download 5
connecting to transmitter 6
fill control 68
loop test 10
menu flowcharts 125
operating the filling and dosing application 67
requirements 5
resetting
inventories 33
totalizers 33
RS-485 connections 7
saving configuration files 5
service port connections 7
trimming the mA output 11
troubleshooting 8, 103
viewing
alarm log 33
inventories 33
status and alarms 32
totalizers 33
zeroing 13
Protocol 50
Purge 56
valve control configuration 56
PV 51
Q
Quaternary variable 51
QV 51
R
Range 24
troubleshooting 104
Receiving device, troubleshooting 103
Recording process variables 31
Remote core processor components 121
Resistance
testing coil 110
testing core processor 109
Response delay
See Additional communications response delay
RF interference, troubleshooting 103
Rolling AOC calibration 63
RS-485 connection 6
RS-485 connections
host program 50
ProLink II 7
RS-485 parameters 50
Micro Motion® Model 1500 Transmitters with the Filling and Dosing Application
Index
NE53 History
Index
Configuration and Use Manual
Transmitter Menus
T
Temperature
measurement unit
configuration 22
list 22
Temperature calibration procedure 90
Tertiary variable 51
Test points, troubleshooting 105
Testing
core processor resistance 109
sensor coil resistance 110
short to case 110
Three-position analog fill 54
Three-position analog valve 54
Totalizers
definition 33
resetting 33
viewing 33
Transmitter
configuration
optional 35
required 15
connecting with ProLink II 6
default values 115
ranges 115
versions 1
Trimming the mA output 11
Troubleshooting
alarms 95
calibration 92, 105
characterization 105
core processor 107
core processor LED 108
core processor resistance test 109
discrete input 93
discrete output 93, 103
erratic drive gain 107
excessive drive gain 106
fault conditions 92
filling and dosing application 101
grounding 102
low pickoff voltage 107
mA output 93
measurement range 104
measurement unit configuration 104
meter fingerprinting 101
output saturation 104
output wiring 103
power supply wiring 102
process variables 98
ProLink II 8, 103
receiving device 103
RF interference 103
sensor coil resistance 110
sensor-to-transmitter wiring 102
short to case 110
slug flow 103
status LED 94
test points 105
transmitter does not communicate 92
transmitter does not operate 92
wiring problems 102
zero failure 92
TV 51
Two-stage discrete fill 54
Diagrams
S
Safety 1
Secondary variable 51
Sensor parameters, configuration 52
Sensor, testing coil resistance 110
Serial port 5
Service port connection 6
Service port connections
ProLink II 7
Short to case test 110
Signal converter 5
Slug flow 103
Slug flow parameters, configuration 46
Slugs, definition 103
Special measurement units 35
base mass unit 36
base time unit 36
base volume unit 36
conversion factor 36
gas unit 37
mass flow unit 36
volume flow unit 37
Special mode 41
Specification uncertainty limit 85
Standard AOC calibration 63
Status alarms 95
Status LED 32, 94
viewing status 94
Status, viewing 32
Stop bits 50
SV 51
135
Index
U
Underfill 63
Update rate
100 Hz variable 40
configuration 40
Special mode 41
URV
See also Range
troubleshooting 104
USB 5
V
Valve control 54, 61
configuration 56
purge requirements 56
Variable assignment, primary variable 24
Variable mapping 51
Versions 1
Viewing
alarms 32
process variables 32
status 32
Volume flow
cutoff 38
measurement unit
configuration 21
list 21
W
Wiring problems 102
Z
Zero button 13
Zeroing 12
failure 92
preparation 13
restoring prior zero 13
with ProLink II 13
with zero button 13
136
Micro Motion® Model 1500 Transmitters with the Filling and Dosing Application
©2006, Micro Motion, Inc. All rights reserved. P/N 20002743, Rev. B
*20002743*
For the latest Micro Motion product specifications, view the
PRODUCTS section of our web site at www.micromotion.com
Micro Motion Inc. USA
Worldwide Headquarters
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T +1 303-527-5200
+1 800-522-6277
F +1 303-530-8459
Micro Motion Europe
Micro Motion Asia
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Micro Motion United Kingdom
Micro Motion Japan
Emerson Process Management Limited
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T
+81 3 5769-6803
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+81 3 5769-6844