User`s guide | Enterasys Networks 2000 Switch User Manual

SmartSwitch 2000
User’s Guide
Notice
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Copyright  2000 by Enterasys Networks, Inc. All rights reserved.
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Order Number: 9032167-04 April 2000
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iii
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iv
Contents
Chapter 1
Introduction
Using the SmartSwitch 2000 User’s Guide ............................................................... 1-5
Related Manuals............................................................................................................ 1-6
Software Conventions .................................................................................................. 1-6
Using the Mouse .................................................................................................... 1-7
Common SmartSwitch 2000 Window Fields ..................................................... 1-8
Using Window Buttons......................................................................................... 1-9
Getting Help ................................................................................................................ 1-1 0
Using On-line Help.............................................................................................. 1-10
Accessing On-line Documentation.................................................................... 1-10
Getting Help from the Global Technical Assistance Center .......................... 1-10
Chapter 2
The SmartSwitch 2000 Chassis View
Viewing Chassis Information ...................................................................................... 2-2
Front Panel Information........................................................................................ 2-2
Menu Structure....................................................................................................... 2-4
Port Status Displays..............................................................................................2-11
Selecting a Port Status View.........................................................................2-11
Port Status Color Codes............................................................................... 2-15
The Chassis Manager Window .......................................................................... 2-16
Viewing Hardware Types ................................................................................... 2-17
Device Type ................................................................................................... 2-17
Module Type.................................................................................................. 2-17
Connection Type ........................................................................................... 2-18
Interface Description .................................................................................... 2-18
Viewing I/F Summary Information.................................................................. 2-19
Interface Performance Statistics/Bar Graphs ........................................... 2-20
Viewing Interface Detail .............................................................................. 2-22
Making Sense of Detail Statistics......................................................... 2-24
Using Device Find Source Address .......................................................................... 2-24
Using Device Find Source Address on Ethernet MicroLAN Switches ........ 2-26
Managing the Hub ...................................................................................................... 2-28
Configuring Ports ................................................................................................ 2-28
Configuring Standard Ethernet and FDDI Ports ..................................... 2-29
Configuring Fast Ethernet Ports on First Generation Devices............... 2-30
Setting the Desired Operational Mode............................................... 2-34
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Contents
Configuring Ethernet Ports on Second Generation Devices .................. 2-35
Operational Mode Fields ...................................................................... 2-37
Setting the Desired Operational Mode ............................................... 2-38
Auto Negotiation Technologies ........................................................... 2-39
Setting Advertised Abilities for Auto Negotiation........................... 2-40
Configuring the COM Port.......................................................................... 2-40
Using an Uninterruptable Power Supply (UPS) ...................................... 2-42
Accessing the UPS Window ................................................................. 2-43
Setting the UPS ID ................................................................................. 2-44
Using the Test Option ........................................................................... 2-45
Using the Disconnect Option............................................................... 2-45
Redirecting Traffic on the SmartSwitch 2000 ................................................... 2-45
Priority Configuration......................................................................................... 2-47
Configuring Priority Queuing Based on Receive Port ............................ 2-48
Configuring Priority Queuing Based on MAC-layer Information ........ 2-50
Configuring Priority Queuing Based on Packet Type ............................. 2-53
The System Resources Window ......................................................................... 2-54
Reserving CPU Bandwidth ......................................................................... 2-56
802.1Q VLANs...................................................................................................... 2-57
What is a VLAN? .......................................................................................... 2-57
What is an 802.1Q Port-Based VLAN? ...................................................... 2-58
About 802.1Q VLAN Configuration and Operation ............................... 2-58
Ingress List Operation........................................................................... 2-59
Egress List Operation ............................................................................ 2-59
802.1Q Port Types .................................................................................. 2-59
Configuring Your 802.1Q VLANS ..................................................................... 2-60
Setting VLAN Parameters and Operational Modes ................................ 2-60
Creating and Modifying VLANs......................................................... 2-62
Deleting VLANs .................................................................................... 2-62
Enabling and Disabling VLANs .......................................................... 2-63
Updating VLAN Config Window Information................................. 2-63
Performing Ingress List Configuration...................................................... 2-63
Assigning VLAN Membership to Ports ............................................. 2-65
Setting Port Operational Modes .......................................................... 2-66
Setting Port Frame Discard Formats................................................... 2-66
Updating VLAN Port Config Window Information ........................ 2-66
Performing Egress List Configuration....................................................... 2-66
Building an Egress List ......................................................................... 2-68
Broadcast Suppression ........................................................................................ 2-68
Setting the Device Date and Time...................................................................... 2-71
Enabling and Disabling Ports............................................................................. 2-72
Chapter 3
Alarm Configuration
About RMON Alarms and Events.............................................................................. 3-1
Basic Alarm Configuration .......................................................................................... 3-2
Accessing the Basic Alarm Configuration Window ......................................... 3-3
Viewing Alarm Status .................................................................................... 3-4
Creating and Editing a Basic Alarm.................................................................... 3-6
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Contents
Disabling a Basic Alarm........................................................................................ 3-8
Viewing the Basic Alarm Log............................................................................... 3-9
Advanced Alarm Configuration............................................................................... 3-10
Accessing the RMON Advanced Alarm/Event List ...................................... 3-10
Creating and Editing an Advanced Alarm ...................................................... 3-13
Creating and Editing an Event........................................................................... 3-20
Adding Actions to an Event........................................................................ 3-23
Deleting an Alarm, Event, or Action................................................................. 3-25
Viewing an Advanced Alarm Event Log ......................................................... 3-25
How Rising and Falling Thresholds Work .............................................................. 3-27
Chapter 4
Statistics
Accessing the Statistics Windows............................................................................... 4-1
RMON Statistics ............................................................................................................ 4-2
Viewing Total, Delta, and Accumulated Statistics ............................................ 4-5
Printing Statistics ................................................................................................... 4-6
IF Statistics ..................................................................................................................... 4-6
Chapter 5
Managing Ethernet MicroLAN Switches
Repeater Statistics ......................................................................................................... 5-1
The Statistics Windows ......................................................................................... 5-2
Accessing the Statistics Windows ................................................................ 5-2
Statistics Defined ............................................................................................ 5-4
Using the Total and Delta Option Buttons.................................................. 5-5
Timer Statistics ....................................................................................................... 5-6
Accessing the Timer Statistics Windows ..................................................... 5-6
Setting the Timer Statistics Interval ............................................................. 5-8
Repeater Performance Graphs ............................................................................. 5-8
Accessing the Performance Graph Windows ............................................. 5-9
Configuring the Performance Graphs ........................................................5-11
The Detail Button.......................................................................................... 5-12
Frame Status Breakdown ..................................................................... 5-12
Error Breakdown ................................................................................... 5-12
Alarm Limits................................................................................................................ 5-1 3
Accessing the Alarm Limits Windows ............................................................. 5-13
Configuring Alarms ............................................................................................ 5-18
Setting the Alarm Limits Time Interval..................................................... 5-18
Setting Alarm Limits ........................................................................................... 5-19
Trap Selection............................................................................................................... 5-20
Accessing the Trap Selection Windows ............................................................ 5-20
Trap Definitions.................................................................................................... 5-21
Configuring Traps................................................................................................ 5-23
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Contents
Chapter 6
FDDI Applications
Concentrator Configuration ........................................................................................ 6-2
Connection Policy Window ......................................................................................... 6-6
Station List................................................................................................................... ... 6-8
Stations Panel.......................................................................................................... 6-9
FDDI Performance ...................................................................................................... 6-10
FDDI Statistics ............................................................................................................. 6-12
Setting the FDDI Statistics Poll Rate ................................................................. 6-13
Configuring FDDI Frame Translation Settings ....................................................... 6-13
Information about Ethernet and FDDI Frame Types...................................... 6-14
Ethernet Frames ............................................................................................ 6-15
FDDI Frames.................................................................................................. 6-16
FDDI Frame Translation Options ...................................................................... 6-17
Chapter 7
ATM Configuration
Accessing the ATM Connections Window ................................................................ 7-1
Configuring Connections............................................................................................. 7-4
Adding a New Connection................................................................................... 7-4
Deleting a Connection ........................................................................................... 7-4
Chapter 8
HSIM-W87 Configuration
The T3 Configuration Window ................................................................................... 8-1
The T1 Configuration Window ................................................................................... 8-3
Configuring IP Priority................................................................................................. 8-6
Index
viii
Chapter 1
Introduction
How to use this guide; related guides; software conventions; getting help
Welcome to the SmartSwitch 2000 User’s Guide. We have designed this guide to
serve as a reference for using the SmartSwitch 2000 family of devices. The
SmartSwitch 2000 product family consists of several models of standalone
high-speed network devices. By default, these devices perform traditional
switching (or bridging); each can also be configured to perform prestandard IEEE
802.1Q VLAN switching (a.k.a “port-based VLAN” switching) or SecureFast
switching (activated via Local Management).
The SmartSwitch 2000 family of devices includes:
•
The 2E42-27 and 2E42-27R SmartSwitches, which have a total of 27 ports
consisting of 24 built-in front panel RJ45 ports, two front panel slots for
optional Fast Ethernet Port Interface Modules (FEPIMs) to support an uplink
to 100 Mbps Ethernet backbones or a high speed connection to a local server,
and one additional slot for a High Speed Interface Module (HSIM) which can
provide FDDI, ATM, Gigabit Ethernet, or WAN connectivity depending on the
type of HSIM installed. The only difference between the two devices is that the
2E42-27 supports a single power supply, and the 2E42-27R supports dual,
redundant power supplies.
•
The 2E43-27 and 2E43-27R SmartSwitches, which have a total of 27 ports
consisting of two RJ21 Connectors (which provide 24 switched Ethernet
connections), two front panel slots for optional Fast Ethernet Port Interface
Modules (FEPIMs) to support an uplink to 100 Mbps Ethernet backbones or a
high speed connection to a local server, and one additional slot for a High
Speed Interface Module (HSIM) which can provide FDDI, ATM, Gigabit
Ethernet, or WAN connectivity depending on the type of HSIM installed. The
only difference between the two devices is that the 2E43-27 supports a single
power supply, and the 2E43-27R supports dual, redundant power supplies.
•
The 2E43-51 and 2E43-51R SmartSwitches, which are 48 port MicroLAN
Ethernet switches (4 MicroLANs of 12 ports each, via four RJ21 Telco
connectors) with two front panel slots for optional Fast Ethernet Port Interface
Modules (FEPIMs) to support an uplink to 100 Mbps Ethernet backbones or a
1-1
Introduction
high speed connection to a local server, and one additional slot for a High
Speed Interface Module (HSIM) which can provide FDDI, ATM, Gigabit
Ethernet, or WAN connectivity depending on the type of HSIM installed. The
only difference between the two devices is that the 2E43-51 supports a single
power supply, and the 2E43-51R supports dual, redundant power supplies.
1-2
•
The 2H23-50R SmartSwitch is a 48 port MicroLAN 10/100 Mbps Ethernet
switch (4 separately repeated MicroLANs of 12 ports each, via four RJ21 Telco
connectors). The 2H23-50R also provides two FEPIM slots for uplinks, and
features redundant internal power supplies.
•
The 2H33-37R SmartSwitch is a 36 port MicroLAN 10/100 Mbps Ethernet
switch (3 separately repeated MicroLANs of 12 ports each, via RJ21 Telco
connectors). A single HSIM slot is also provided, as are redundant internal
power supplies.
•
The 2E48-27 and 2E48-27R SmartSwitches, which have a total of 27 ports
consisting of 24 built-in front panel 10Base-FL multimode fiber ST ports, two
front panel slots for optional Fast Ethernet Port Interface Modules (FEPIMs) to
support an uplink to 100 Mbps Ethernet backbones or a high speed connection
to a local server, and one additional slot for a High Speed Interface Module
(HSIM) which can provide FDDI, ATM, Gigabit Ethernet, or WAN
connectivity depending on the type of HSIM installed. The only difference
between the two devices is that the 2E48-27 supports a single power supply,
and the 2E48-27R supports dual, redundant power supplies.
•
The 2E49-27 and 2E49-27R SmartSwitches, which have a total of 27 ports
consisting of 24 built-in front panel 10Base-FL single mode fiber ST ports, two
front panel slots for optional Fast Ethernet Port Interface Modules (FEPIMs) to
support an uplink to 100 Mbps Ethernet backbones or a high speed connection
to a local server, and one additional slot for a High Speed Interface Module
(HSIM) which can provide FDDI, ATM, Gigabit Ethernet, or WAN
connectivity depending on the type of HSIM installed. The only difference
between the two devices is that the 2E49-27 supports a single power supply,
and the 2E49-27R supports dual, redundant power supplies.
•
The 2H252-25R SmartSwitch, which provides 24 10/100 Ethernet ports via
RJ45 connectors, as well as a VHSIM slot, which can accept any oHSIMs or the
VHSIM-G6 Gigabit Ethernet High Speed Interface Module.
•
The 2E253-49R SmartSwitch, which provides 48 Ethernet ports via 4 RJ21 Telco
connectors, redundant internal power supplies, and a single VHSIM slot.
•
The 2H22-08R SmartSwitch, which has a total of eight ports consisting of six
built-in front panel 10/100BaseTX RJ45 ports and two front panel slots for
optional Fast Ethernet Port Interface Modules (FEPIMs) to support an uplink
to 100 Mbps Ethernet backbones or a high speed connection to a local server.
The 2H22-08R supports dual, redundant power supplies.
Introduction
•
The 2H28-08R SmartSwitch, which has a total of eight ports consisting of six
built-in front panel 100BaseFX multimode fiber SC ports and two front panel
slots for optional Fast Ethernet Port Interface Modules (FEPIMs) to support an
uplink to 100 Mbps Ethernet backbones or a high speed connection to a local
server. The 2H28-08R supports dual, redundant power supplies.
•
The 2H253-25R SmartSwitch is a 10/100 Fast Ethernet switch, providing 24
100BaseTX ports via dual RJ21 connectors, and a VHSIM slot. The 2H253-25R
also includes redundant internal power supplies.
•
The 2H258-17R SmartSwitch features 16 100BaseFX MMF (via MT-RJ
connectors) ports, and a single VHSIM slot. The 2H258-17R also includes
redundant internal power supplies.
•
The 2M46-04R SmartSwitch provides two front panel slots for optional Fast
Ethernet Port Interface Modules (FEPIMs) to support an uplink to 100 Mbps
Ethernet backbones or a high speed connection to a local server, and two slots
for High Speed Interface Modules (HSIMs) which can provide FDDI, ATM,
Gigabit Ethernet, or WAN connectivity depending on the type of HSIMs
installed. The 2M46-04R supports dual, redundant power supplies.
Several Fast Ethernet Port Interface Modules (FEPIMs) are available for use with
the various SmartSwitch 2000 models:
•
the FE-100FX, which provides one multi-mode fiber port via an SC connector;
•
the FE-100TX, with one Category 5 UTP RJ45 connector;
•
the FE-100F3, with one single-mode fiber port via an SC connector;
•
and the FE-100S1, S3, and S5, which provide one multi-mode fiber,
single-mode fiber, or long reach single-mode fiber SONET/SDH port, all via
SC connectors.
Two types of High Speed Interface Modules (HSIMs) are available for use with
the various SmartSwitch 2000 models. Each HSIM provides frame translation
between ATM, FDDI, WAN, Gigabit Ethernet, and Ethernet through an on-board
Intel i960 processor:
•
The HSIM-F6 is an FDDI/Ethernet Translator, which can act as a Single
Attached Station (SAS) or Dual Attached Station (DAS) on an external FDDI
ring. FDDI Port Interface Modules (FPIMs) provide a wide range of media
connectivity to the ring. The HSIM-F6 also has full-duplex capability, allowing
for a 200 Mbps connection to another HSIM-F6.
•
The HSIM-A6DP is an Asynchronous Transfer Mode (ATM) HSIM, which
provides an ATM uplink via two media-configurable ATM Port Interface
Modules (APIMs). The dual APIM design allows for a redundant connection
to the uplink, so that if the primary interface fails, the secondary interface will
automatically take over. The HSIM-A6DP acts as an ATM Forum LAN
Emulation Client (LEC) so that it can transfer data between devices on an
802.X LAN supported by the SmartSwitch 2000 and ATM-connected end
stations (or other 802.X end stations) across a high speed ATM Link. The
HSIM-A6DP adheres to the ATM Forum-approved LAN Emulation (LANE)
1-3
Introduction
standard, which defines how end users that rely on existing data
communications technology and protocols can operate over an ATM network
without penalty.
•
NOTE
The HSIM-W6 and HSIM-W84 are Wide Area Networking (WAN) HSIMs,
which can provide uplinks to WAN backbones and allow you to perform
seamless LAN to WAN switching. The HSIM-W6 supports IP and IPX
bridging or routing services, including IP RIP. Multiple WAN connectivity
options are supported, including Sync, T1, E1, D&I, ISDN S/T, DDS, and
HDSL interfaces, through the use of two configurable WAN Physical Interface
Modules (WPIMs). Connectivity is available for Point to Point Protocol (PPP),
as well as Frame Relay and Leased Lines. Each WPIM can act independently,
allowing simultaneous communication, or configured to provide redundant
channels if desired. The HSIM-W84 provides a fixed configuration of four
RJ45 ports for four active T1 interfaces.
The HSIM-W6 and HSIM-W84 are intelligent devices that are functionally identical to
the CSX400. These HSIMs require their own IP addresses, and are managed as individual
devices rather than as part of the device in which they are installed. Refer to the CSX200
and CSX400 User’s Guide for more information
•
The HSIM-W87 is a Wide Area Network (WAN) HSIM that provides LAN to
WAN connectivity for any SmartSwitch that supports high-speed interface
modules (HSIMs). The HSIM-W87 has a DS3 interface (T3), providing up to 28
separate DS1 connections (T1). Refer to Chapter 8, HSIM-W87 Configuration,
for information on configuring an HSIM-W87.
•
The HSIM-G01 and HSIM-G09 are Gigabit Ethernet HSIMs, each of which
provide a single Gigabit Ethernet connection that fully conforms to the IEEE
P802.3z (D3.1) Draft Standard. The HSIM-G01 provides a single 1000Base-SX
(short-wave) multimode fiber optic SC interface, allowing for link distances of
up to 500 meters. The HSIM-G09 provides a single 1000Base-LX (long-wave)
single mode/multimode fiber optic SC interface, allowing for link distances of
up to 3 kilometers.
•
The HSIM-SSA710/20 are Wide Area Networking (WAN) HSIMs that support
up to two ISDN PRI interfaces with up to 24 V.90 56K modem connections.
The HSIM-SSA710/20 are intelligent devices that are managed as individual
devices rather than as part of the device in which they are installed. Before you
can access the device, you must add it to your central node database by
inserting it in an existing List, Tree, or Map View, or by doing a Discover
process (see the User’s Guide for more information). Once it has been added to
your List, Tree, or Map view, you can access and manage the HSIM according
to the information in Chapter 2, The SmartSwitch 2000 Chassis View.
1-4
Introduction
The latest SmartSwitches feature VHSIM slots, which can accept any of the
previously detailed HSIMs or the VHSIM-G6 Gigabit Ethernet High Speed
Interface Module:
•
The VHSIM-G6 is a Gigabit Ethernet module which provides two slots for
GPIMs of various media to offer integrated Gigabit Ethernet uplink capability.
The VHSIM-G6 can accept the GPIM-01, which offers one SC connector for
MMF 1000Base SX Gigabit Ethernet connectivity, the GPIM-09, which offers
one SC connector for MMF or SMF 1000Base LX connectivity, or the GPIM-04,
which offers one ANSI Fibrechannel style-2 connector for 150 Ohm STP
1000Base CX connectivity.
The various SmartSwitch 2000 devices will be collectively referred to as the
SmartSwitch 2000 throughout this user’s guide.
Using the SmartSwitch 2000 User’s Guide
Each chapter in this guide describes one major functionality or a collection of
several smaller functionalities of the SmartSwitch 2000 devices. This guide
contains information about software functions which are accessed directly from
the device icon.
Chapter 1, Introduction, provides a list of related documentation, describes
certain software conventions, and shows you how to contact the Global Technical
Assistance Center.
Chapter 2, The SmartSwitch 2000 Chassis View, describes the visual display of
the SmartSwitch 2000 device and explains how to use the mouse within the
Chassis View; the operation of device-level management functions — including
Device Find Source Address, Port Redirect, Advanced Priority Configuration,
pre-standard 802.1Q port-based VLAN configuration, enabling and disabling
ports and setting device date and time — is also described here. This chapter also
explains how to manage the device by monitoring its system resources,
establishing device-level port priorities, setting up broadcast suppression on the
device, and configuring the device’s front panel COM port and any attached
Uninterruptable Power Supply (UPS).
Chapter 3, Alarm Configuration, describes the Alarm and Event application
windows and how to configure alarms and events for each available interface.
Chapter 4, Statistics, describes the statistics windows available on the port menu
from the Chassis View.
Chapter 5, Managing Ethernet MicroLAN Switches, describes Ethernet
repeater-specific functionality, which you can use to monitor and manage
Ethernet MicroLAN Switches (e.g., the 2E43-51 and 2E43-51R).
Chapter 6, FDDI Applications, describes the FDDI management windows
available when you have an HSIM-F6 installed, including Configuration,
Connection Policy, Station List, and Performance.
Using the SmartSwitch 2000 User’s Guide
1-5
Introduction
Chapter 7, ATM Configuration, describes how to configure Permanent Virtual
Circuits (PVCs) for the ATM interface(s) in the ATM Connections window, which
will be available if you have an HSIM-A6DP module installed in your device.
Chapter 8, HSIM-W87 Configuration, describes the T3, T1, and IP Priority
configuration windows which will be available when an HSIM-W87 is installed.
Related Manuals
The SmartSwitch 2000 User’s Guide is only part of a complete document set
designed to provide comprehensive information about the features available to
you through NetSight Element Manager. Other guides which include important
information related to managing the SmartSwitch 2000 include:
User’s Guide
Tools Guide
Remote Administration Tools User’s Guide
Remote Monitoring (RMON) User’s Guide
Alarm and Event Handling User’s Guide
For more information about the capabilities of the SmartSwitch 2000, consult the
appropriate hardware documentation.
Software Conventions
The NetSight Element Manager device user interface contains a number of
elements which are common to most windows and which operate the same
regardless of which window they appear in. A brief description of some of the
most common elements appears below; note that the information provided here is
not repeated in the descriptions of specific windows and/or functions.
Using the Mouse
This document assumes you are using a Windows-compatible mouse with two
buttons; if you are using a three button mouse, you should ignore the operation of
the middle button when following procedures in this document. Procedures
within the NetSight Element Manager document set refer to these buttons as
follows:
1-6
Related Manuals
Introduction
Left Mouse Button
Right Mouse Button
Figure 1-1. Mouse Buttons
For many mouse operations, this document assumes that the left (primary) mouse
button is to be used, and references to activating a menu or button will not
include instructions about which mouse button to use.
However, in instances in which right (secondary) mouse button functionality is
available, instructions will explicitly refer to right mouse button usage. Also, in
situations where you may be switching between mouse buttons in the same area
or window, instructions may also explicitly refer to both left and right mouse
buttons.
Instructions to perform a mouse operation include the following terms:
•
Pointing means to position the mouse cursor over an area without pressing
either mouse button.
•
Clicking means to position the mouse pointer over the indicated target, then
press and release the appropriate mouse button. This is most commonly used
to select or activate objects, such as menus or buttons.
•
Double-clicking means to position the mouse pointer over the indicated
target, then press and release the mouse button two times in rapid succession.
This is commonly used to activate an object’s default operation, such as
opening a window from an icon. Note that there is a distinction made between
“click twice” and “double-click,” since “click twice” implies a slower motion.
•
Pressing means to position the mouse pointer over the indicated target, then
press and hold the mouse button until the described action is completed. It is
often a pre-cursor to Drag operations.
•
Dragging means to move the mouse pointer across the screen while holding
the mouse button down. It is often used for drag-and-drop operations to copy
information from one window of the screen into another, and to highlight
editable text.
Software Conventions
1-7
Introduction
Common SmartSwitch 2000 Window Fields
Similar descriptive information is displayed in boxes at the top of most
device-specific windows in NetSight Element Manager, as illustrated in
Figure 1-2, below.
Device
Name
IP Address
Location
MAC
Address
Figure 1-2. Sample Window Showing Group Boxes
Device Name
Displays the user-defined name of the device. The device name can be changed
via the System Group window; see the Generic SNMP User’s Guide for details.
IP Address
Displays the device’s IP (Internet Protocol) Address; this will be the IP address
used to define the device icon. IP addresses are assigned via Local Management
for the SmartSwitch 2000; they cannot be changed via NetSight Element Manager.
Location
Displays the user-defined location of the device. The location is entered through
the System Group window; see the Generic SNMP User’s Guide for details.
MAC Address
Displays the manufacturer-set MAC address of the interface through which
NetSight Element Manager is communicating. This address is factory-set and
cannot be altered.
1-8
Software Conventions
Introduction
Informational fields describing the boards and/or ports being modeled are also
displayed in most windows:
Board Number
Displays the number of the board. The SmartSwitch 2000 will always be Board 1.
Port Number
Displays the number of the monitored port.
Uptime
Displays the amount of time, in a X days hh:mm:ss format, that the SmartSwitch
2000 has been running since the last start-up.
Using Window Buttons
The Cancel button that appears at the bottom of most windows allows you to exit
a window and terminate any unsaved changes you have made. You may also
have to use this button to close a window after you have made any necessary
changes and set them by clicking on an OK, Set, or Apply button.
An OK, Set, or Apply button appears in windows that have configurable values;
it allows you to confirm and SET changes you have made to those values. In some
windows, you may have to use this button to confirm each individual set; in other
windows, you can set several values at once and confirm the sets with one click
on the button.
The Help button brings up a Help text box with information specific to the
current window. For more information concerning Help buttons, see Getting
Help, on page 1-9.
The command buttons, for example Bridge, call up a menu listing the windows,
screens, or commands available for that topic.
Any menu topic followed by ... (three dots) — for example Statistics... — calls up
a window or screen associated with that topic.
Getting Help
This section describes two different methods of getting help for questions or
concerns you may have while using NetSight Element Manager.
Using On-line Help
You can use the SmartSwitch 2000 window Help buttons to obtain information
specific to the device. When you click on a Help button, a window will appear
which contains context-sensitive on-screen documentation that will assist you in
Getting Help
1-9
Introduction
the use of the windows and their associated command and menu options. Note
that if a Help button is grayed out, on-line help has not yet been implemented for
the associated window.
From the Help menu accessed from the Chassis View window menu bar, you can
access on-line help specific to the Chassis View window, as well as bring up the
Chassis Manager window for reference. Refer to Chapter 2 for information on the
Chassis View and Chassis Manager windows.
NOTE
All of the online help windows use the standard Microsoft Windows help facility. If you
are unfamiliar with this feature of Windows, you can select Help from the Windows
Start menu, or Help —>How to Use Help from the primary NetSight Element
Manager window.
Accessing On-line Documentation
The complete suite of documents available for NetSight Element Manager can be
accessed via a menu option from the primary window menu bar: Help —>
Online Documents. If you chose to install the documentation when you installed
NetSight Element Manager, selecting this option will launch Adobe’s Acrobat
Reader and a menu file which provides links to all other available documents.
TIP
If you have not yet installed the documentation, the Online Documents option will not
be accessible from the menu file. In order to activate this option, you must run the
setup.exe again to install the documentation component. See the Installation Guide for
details.
Getting Help from the Global Technical Assistance Center
If you need technical support related to NetSight Element Manager, contact the
Global Technical Assistance Center via one of the following methods:
1-10
By phone:
(603) 332-9400
24 hours a day, 365 days a year
By fax:
(603) 337-3075
By mail:
Enterasys Networks
Technical Support
35 Industrial Way
Rochester, NH 03867
By e-mail:
support@enterasys.com
Getting Help
Introduction
FTP:
Login
Password
By BBS:
Modem Setting
ftp.ctron.com (134.141.197.25)
anonymous
your e-mail address
(603) 335-3358
8N1: 8 data bits, 1 stop bit, No parity
Send your questions, comments, and suggestions regarding NetSight
documentation to NetSight Technical Communications via the following address:
Netsight_docs@enterasys.com
To locate product specific information, refer to the Enterasys Web site:
http://www.enterasys.com
NOTE
Getting Help
For the highest firmware versions successfully tested with NetSight Element Manager
2.21, refer to the Readme file available from the NetSight Element Manager 2.2 program
group. If you have an earlier version of firmware and experience problems running
NetSight Element Manager, contact the Global Technical Assistance Center for upgrade
information.
1-11
Introduction
1-12
Getting Help
Chapter 2
The SmartSwitch 2000 Chassis View
Information displayed in the Chassis View window; the Chassis Manager window; Hub management
functions
The SmartSwitch 2000 Chassis View window displays a color-coded graphic
representation of your SmartSwitch 2000. It serves as a single point of access to all
other SmartSwitch 2000 windows and screens, which are discussed at length in
the following chapters.
To access the SmartSwitch 2000 Chassis View window, use one of the following
options:
1. In any map, list, or tree view, double-click on the SmartSwitch 2000 you wish
to manage;
or
1. In any map, list, or tree view, select the SmartSwitch 2000 you wish to
manage.
2. Select Manage—>Node from the primary window menu bar, or select the
Manage Node
toolbar button.
or
1. In any map, list, or tree view, click the right mouse button once to select the
SmartSwitch 2000 you wish to manage and on the resulting menu, select
Manage.
NOTE
HSIMs that have their own IP address (HSIM-W6, HSIM-W84, and HSIM-SSA710/20)
are accessed individually by selecting the HSIM you wish to manage and following the
steps listed above. However, before you can access the device, you must add it to your
central node database by inserting it in an existing List, Tree, or Map View, or by doing a
Discover process (refer to the User’s Guide for more information). Once it has been
added to your List, Tree, or Map view, you can access the HSIM from its individual icon.
2-1
The SmartSwitch 2000 Chassis View
Viewing Chassis Information
The SmartSwitch 2000 Chassis View window (Figure 2-1) provides graphic
representations of the SmartSwitch 2000, including a color-coded port display
which immediately informs you of the current configuration and status of the
switch and its ports.
Figure 2-1. The SmartSwitch 2000 Chassis View Window
By clicking in designated areas of the chassis graphical display (as detailed later
in this chapter), or by using the menu bar at the top of the Chassis View window,
you can access all of the menus that lead to more detailed device-, module-, and
port-level windows.
TIP
When you move the mouse cursor over a management “hot spot” the cursor icon will
change into a “hand”
to indicate that clicking in the current location will bring up a
management option.
Front Panel Information
The areas surrounding the device display area provide the following device
information:
IP
The Internet Protocol address assigned to the SmartSwitch 2000 appears in the
title bar of the Chassis View window; this field will display the IP address you
have used to create the SmartSwitch 2000 icon. IP addresses are assigned via Local
Management.
Connection Status
This color-coded area indicates the current state of communication between
NetSight Element Manager and the SmartSwitch 2000.
•
2-2
Green indicates the SmartSwitch 2000 is responding to device polls (valid
connection).
Viewing Chassis Information
The SmartSwitch 2000 Chassis View
•
Magenta indicates that the SmartSwitch 2000 is in a temporary stand-by mode
while it responds to a physical change in the hub; note that board and port
menus are inactive during this stand-by state.
•
Blue indicates an unknown contact status – polling has not yet been
established with the SmartSwitch 2000.
•
Red indicates the SmartSwitch 2000 is not responding to device polls (device
is off line, or device polling has failed across the network for some other
reason).
UpTime
The amount of time, in a X days hh:mm:ss format, that the SmartSwitch 2000 has
been running since the last start-up.
Port Status
If management for your device supports a variable port display (detailed in Port
Status Displays, on page 2-10), this field will show the display currently in effect.
If only a single port display is available — or if the default view is in effect — this
field will state Default.
MAC
The physical layer address assigned to the interface through which NetSight
Element Manager is communicating. MAC addresses are hard-coded in the
device, and are not configurable.
Boot Prom
The revision of BOOT PROM installed in the SmartSwitch 2000.
Firmware
The revision of device firmware stored in the SmartSwitch 2000’s FLASH PROMs.
Time
The current time, in a 24-hour hh:mm:ss format, set in the SmartSwitch 2000’s
internal clock.
Date
The current date, in an mm/dd/yyyy format, set in the SmartSwitch 2000’s
internal clock.
NOTE
You can set the date and time by using the Edit Device Date and Edit Device Time
options on the Device menu; see Setting the Device Date and Time, on page 2-70, for
details. NetSight Element Manager displays and allows you to set all dates with
four-digit year values.
Viewing Chassis Information
2-3
The SmartSwitch 2000 Chassis View
Menu Structure
By clicking on various areas of the SmartSwitch 2000 Chassis View display, you
can access menus with device-, module-, and port-level options, as well as utility
applications which apply to the device. The following illustration displays the
menu structure and indicates how to use the mouse to access the various menus.
For the Device menu:
• The FDDI Statistics option displays if you
have an HSIM-F6 module installed.
• The ATM Connections option displays if you
have an HSIM-A6DP module installed.
• The VLAN option displays if your device has
been configured to operate in 802.1Q mode.
• The Priority Configuration option displays if
your device supports 802.1P Dynamic
Multicast Filtering/Priority Queuing.
• The UPS option will only appear if your COM
port has been configured for use with an
Uninterruptable Power Supply.
No bridge-related options display in any menu if
the device is running in SecureFast Switching
mode.
Figure 2-2. SmartSwitch 2000 Chassis View Menu Structure
2-4
Viewing Chassis Information
The SmartSwitch 2000 Chassis View
The Device Menu
From the Device Menu at the Chassis View window menu bar, you can access the
following selections:
NOTE
•
Device Type displays a description of the device being modeled. See Viewing
Hardware Types, on page 2-16.
•
Device Find Source Address enables you to determine through which
interface a specified MAC address is communicating by searching the 802.1d
bridge Filtering database. Ethernet MicroLAN switches will also search the
repeater Source Address Table (SAT). If the specified MAC address is located,
a list of interface(s) through which the given address is communicating will be
displayed.
•
Edit Device Time and Edit Device Date allow you to set the SmartSwitch
2000’s internal clock. See Setting the Device Date and Time, on page 2-70.
•
System Group allows you to manage the SmartSwitch 2000 via SNMP MIB II.
Refer to the Generic SNMP User’s Guide for further information.
•
I/F Summary lets you view statistics (displayed both graphically and
numerically) for the traffic processed by each network interface on your
SmartSwitch 2000. See Viewing I/F Summary Information, on page 2-18.
•
VLAN menu option displays in the Device menu if your device is configured
to operate in 802.1Q mode. The windows launched via the VLAN option allow
you to configure and operate port-based VLANs on the device. See 802.1Q
VLANs, on page 2-56, for details.
•
Port Redirector allows you to redirect traffic from one or more interfaces to
another interface on your SmartSwitch 2000; see Redirecting Traffic on the
SmartSwitch 2000, on page 2-44.
•
System Resources displays current physical and logical system resources and
utilizations on your SmartSwitch 2000; see The System Resources Window,
on page 2-53.
•
Broadcast Suppression allows you to monitor broadcast traffic statistics on
each interface and set thresholds to limit broadcast traffic over your
SmartSwitch 2000; see Broadcast Suppression, on page 2-67.
•
Priority Configuration allows you to establish priority packet forwarding for
the SmartSwitch 2000. See Priority Configuration, on page 2-46.
The Priority Configuration menu option only displays for devices that respond to any
of NetSight Element Manager’s queries to the following OIDs:
ctPriorityExtPortStatus, ctPriorityExtMaxNumMACEntries, or
ctPriorityExtNumPktTypeEntries. If your device’s firmware does not respond to these
queries, contact the Global Technical Assistance Center for upgrade information.
•
Com Port Configuration allows you to administratively Enable or Disable and
set the function of the COM Port; see Configuring the COM Port, page 2-39.
Viewing Chassis Information
2-5
The SmartSwitch 2000 Chassis View
NOTE
NOTE
•
Broadcast Suppression allows you to set a threshold on the number of
broadcast packets issued from each port on the SmartSwitch 2000 when it is
operating in traditional switch (bridge) mode. See Broadcast Suppression, on
page 2-67.
•
FDDI Statistics menu option displays if you have an HSIM-F6 installed in
your device. This launches a window which displays traffic-related statistics
for each Station Management (SMT) entity present on an installed HSIM-F6.
See Chapter 6, FDDI Applications, for more information.
•
UPS, which brings up a window that allows you to configure an
Uninterruptable Power Supply attached to your SmartSwitch 2000; see Using
an Uninterruptable Power Supply (UPS), on page 2-41, for details.
The UPS menu option will only be available when the COM Port is administratively set
to UPS in the COM Port Configuration window.
•
Bridge Status opens a window that provides an overview of bridging
information for each port, and allows you to access all other bridge-related
options. Refer to the Bridging chapter in the Tools Guide for more information.
•
Exit closes the SmartSwitch 2000 Chassis View window.
If an HSIM-A6DP is installed in your SmartSwitch 2000, ATM Connections will be
available as an additional Device menu selection. The ATM Connections window is
described in Chapter 7, ATM Configuration.
The Port Status Menu
The Port Status menu allows you to select the status information that will be
displayed in the port text boxes in the Chassis View window:
2-6
•
Status allows you to select one of four status type displays: Bridge, Bridge
Mapping, Admin, or Operator.
•
Load will display the portion of network load processed per polling interval
by each interface, expressed as a percentage of its theoretical maximum load
(10, 100, 155.5, or 1000 Mbps).
•
Errors allows you to display the number of errors detected per polling interval
by each interface, expressed as a percentage of the total number of valid
packets processed by the interface.
•
I/F Mapping will display the interface (if) index associated with each port on
your SmartSwitch 2000 device.
Viewing Chassis Information
The SmartSwitch 2000 Chassis View
•
I/F Speed will display the port’s bandwidth: 10M (megabits) for Ethernet;
100M for Fast Ethernet; 155.5M for ATM; and 1G for Gigabit Ethernet.
•
I/F Type will display the port type of each port on your SmartSwitch 2000, e.g.,
Eth (ethernet-csmacd), ATM, or FDDI.
•
VLAN Mapping displays if your device has been configured to operate in
802.1Q mode. It displays the VLAN ID number associated with each port on
your SmartSwitch 2000.
For Ethernet MicroLAN Switches, the Port Status menu contains the following
options:
•
Load will display the portion of network load processed by each port as a
percentage of the theoretical maximum load of the connected network
segment (10, 100, 155.5, or 1000 Mbps).
•
Port Assignment will display each port’s repeater channel assignment (A-H).
•
Status allows you to select one of three status type displays: Admin/Link,
Admin, or Link.
•
Errors, and Frame Size allow you to display the percentage per port of the
specific Error or Frame Size you select.
For more information on the port display options available via this menu, see Port
Status Displays, on page 2-10.
The Repeater Menu
If you are modeling an Ethernet MicroLAN Switch, the Repeater menu displays,
offering the following options for each repeater segment (A-H) on the device:
•
•
•
•
•
Statistics
Timer Statistics
Performance Graph
Alarm Limits
Trap Selection
Refer to Chapter 5, Managing Ethernet MicroLAN Switches, for information on
these menu selections.
The FDDI Menu
If your SmartSwitch 2000 has an installed HSIM-F6, the FDDI menu displays on
the Chassis View menu bar, with the following options:
•
•
•
•
•
Configuration
Connection Policy
Station List
Performance
Frame Translation
Refer to Chapter 6, FDDI Applications, for information on these menu selections.
Viewing Chassis Information
2-7
The SmartSwitch 2000 Chassis View
The Utilities Menu
The Utilities menu provides access to the MIB Tools utility, which provides direct
access to the SmartSwitch 2000’s MIB information, and to the RMON utility, a
remote monitoring feature that is supported by many intelligent devices. These
selections are also available from the Utilities menu at the top of NetSight
Element Manager’s primary window. Refer to the Tools Guide for a thorough
explanation of the MIB Tools and RMON utilities.
The Help Menu
The Help Menu has three selections:
•
Mibs Supported brings up the Chassis Manager window, described in The
Chassis Manager Window, on page 2-15.
•
Chassis Manager Help brings up a help window with information specifically
related to using the Chassis Manager and Chassis View windows.
•
About Chassis Manager brings up a version window for the Chassis Manager
application in use.
The Module Menu
The Module menu for the SmartSwitch 2000 device provides mostly
bridging-related selections, many of which are also available from the Bridge
Status window:
2-8
•
Module Type brings up a window containing a description of the selected
board; see Viewing Hardware Types, on page 2-16.
•
Bridge Status opens a window that provides an overview of bridging
information for each port, and allows you to access all other bridge-related
options. Refer to the Bridging chapter in the Tools Guide for more information.
•
Broadcast Suppression allows you to set a threshold on the number of
broadcast packets issued from each port on the SmartSwitch 2000 device when
it is operating in traditional switch (bridge) mode. See Broadcast Suppression,
on page 2-67.
•
Frame Translation displays in the Module menu if your SmartSwitch 2000 has
an installed HSIM-F6. Refer to Chapter 6, FDDI Applications, for information
on this menu selection.
•
Device Find Source Address enables you to determine through which
interface a specified MAC address is communicating by searching the 802.1d
bridge Filtering database. Ethernet MicroLAN switches will also search the
repeater Source Address Table (SAT). If the specified MAC address is located,
a list of interface(s) through which the given address is communicating will be
displayed.
•
Performance Graph displays performance between all bridging ports on the
SmartSwitch 2000; see the Bridging chapter in the Tools Guide for more
information.
Viewing Chassis Information
The SmartSwitch 2000 Chassis View
•
Spanning Tree allows you to set bridge parameters when it is operating using
the Spanning Tree Algorithm (STA) – the method that bridges use to decide the
controlling (root) bridge when two or more bridges are in parallel; see the
Bridging chapter in the Tools Guide for more information.
•
SmartTrunk invokes the SmartTrunk Configuration and Status Screen, which
enables you to group interfaces logically to achieve greater bandwidth
between devices, if both devices support the SmartTrunk feature. There is no
limit to the number of ports that can be included in a single “trunk,” nor is
there a limit to the number of trunked “instances” that can be supported. Refer
to the Bridging chapter in the Tools Guide for more information.
•
Filtering Database allows you to monitor and manage bridge forwarding and
filtering across each port of the SmartSwitch 2000; see the Bridging chapter in
the Tools Guide for more information.
•
Duplex Modes allows you to set Duplex Mode operation for standard
Ethernet interfaces on your SmartSwitch 2000; see the Bridging chapter in the
Tools Guide for more information.
•
Enable Bridge enables bridging across the entire SmartSwitch 2000.
•
Disable Bridge disables bridging across the entire SmartSwitch 2000.
The Port Menus
The menu for bridging ports offers the following selections:
•
Connection Type displays a text description of the connection type of the
selected interface. This menu option appears if the device supports the
ctIfConnectionType OID. See Viewing Hardware Types, on page 2-16, for
details.
•
Description displays a text description of the selected port. See Viewing
Hardware Types, on page 2-16, for details.
•
Performance Graph brings up windows that visually display bridging
performance at the selected port; see the Bridging chapter in the Tools Guide
for more information.
•
Source Addressing brings up a window that displays the contents of the
SmartSwitch 2000’s Filtering Database with respect to a selected port. This will
display the source MAC addresses that have been detected by the port as it
forwards data across the network; see the Bridging chapter in the Tools Guide
for more information.
•
I/F Statistics launches a Statistics window, which displays interface statistics
for the port; see the Bridging chapter in the Tools Guide for more information.
•
Configuration launches the configuration window appropriate to the selected
port: for standard Ethernet and FDDI ports, the configuration window allows
you to set the Duplex Mode; for Fast Ethernet and Gigabit Ethernet ports it
allows you to configure a number of different options, including
auto-negotiation. See Configuring Ports, on page 2-27 for details.
Viewing Chassis Information
2-9
The SmartSwitch 2000 Chassis View
•
Alarm Configuration brings up windows that allow you to configure alarms
and events for each available interface; see Chapter 3, Alarm Configuration
for details.
•
Statistics launches the highest level of statistics currently available for the
selected port. For standard Ethernet and Fast Ethernet ports, RMON statistics
will be displayed if the RMON Default MIB component is active; if it has been
disabled, MIB-II interface statistics will display. See Chapter 4, Statistics for
more information.
•
Enable/Disable administratively turns the selected port on or off; see
Enabling and Disabling Ports, on page 2-71, or the Bridging chapter in the
Tools Guide for more information.
Port Status Displays
When you open the Chassis View window, each port will display its Bridging
state (defined below) by default, with the exception of Ethernet MicroLAN
Switches, which will display their Admin/Link status (also defined below) by
default; to change this status display, select one of the options on the Port Status
menu, as described in the following sections.
Selecting a Port Status View
To change the status view of your ports:
1. Click on Port Status on the menu bar at the top of the Chassis View window,
and drag down (and to the right, if necessary) to select the status information
you want to display. The port text boxes will display the appropriate status
information.
Port status view options are:
Status
You can view four port status categories, as follows:
•
•
•
•
NOTES
2-10
Bridge — FWD, DIS, LRN, LIS, BLK, BRK, UNK
Bridge Mapping — the physical interface associated with a bridge port
Admin — ON or OFF
Operator — ON or OFF
The Bridge and Bridge Mapping status modes will not be supported for devices which
have been configured for SecureFast switching. Firmware versions 2.01.05 and above
support the ability to select SecureFast switching; if you have a earlier version of
firmware, contact the Global Technical Assistance Center for upgrade information. The
toggle from traditional bridging to SecureFast switching is performed via Local
Management; see your Local Management documentation for details.
Viewing Chassis Information
The SmartSwitch 2000 Chassis View
If you have selected the Bridge status mode, a port is considered:
•
FWD (Forwarding) if the port is on-line and forwarding packets across the
SmartSwitch 2000 from one network segment to another.
•
DIS (Disabled) if bridging at the port has been disabled by management; no
traffic can be received or forwarded on this port, including configuration
information for the bridged topology.
•
LRN (Learning) if the Forwarding database is being created, or the Spanning
Tree Algorithm is being executed because of a network topology change. The
port is monitoring network traffic, and learning network addresses.
•
LIS (Listening) if the port is not adding information to the filtering database. It
is monitoring Bridge Protocol Data Unit (BPDU) traffic while preparing to
move to the forwarding state.
•
BLK (Blocking) if the port is on-line, but filtering traffic from going across the
SmartSwitch 2000 from one network segment to another. Bridge topology
information will be forwarded by the port.
•
UNK (Unknown) if the interface’s status cannot be determined.
If you have selected the Bridge Mapping status mode, the port display will alter
to show the physical interface index (ifIndex) associated with each front panel
bridge port. For the SmartSwitch 2000 devices, the front panel bridge interfaces
will map directly to each interface’s ifIndex.
If you have selected the Admin status mode, a port is considered:
•
ON if the port is enabled by management and has a valid link.
•
OFF if it has not been enabled or if it has been disabled through management
action.
If you have selected the Operator status mode, a port is considered:
•
ON if the port is currently forwarding packets.
•
OFF if the port is not currently forwarding packets.
Load
If you choose Load, the interface text boxes will display the percentage of
network load processed by each port during the last polling interval. This
percentage reflects the network load generated per polling interval by devices
connected to the port compared to the theoretical maximum load (10, 100, 155.5,
or 1000 Mbps) of the connected network.
Viewing Chassis Information
2-11
The SmartSwitch 2000 Chassis View
Errors
If you choose the Errors mode, the interface boxes will display the percentage of
the total number of valid packets processed by each port during the last polling
interval that were error packets. This percentage reflects the number of errors
generated during the last polling interval by devices connected to that port
compared to the total number of valid packets processed by the port.
NOTES
In NetSight Element Manager, the polling interval is set using the Options window,
accessed via the Tools—>Options option from the primary window’s menu bar. Refer to
the User’s Guide for information on setting device polling intervals.
I/F Mapping
If you choose the I/F Mapping mode, the interface boxes will display the interface
number (ifIndex) associated with each port in the SmartSwitch 2000.
I/F Speed
If you choose the I/F Speed mode, the interface boxes will display the bandwidth
of each individual port on the SmartSwitch 2000: 10M (megabits) for standard
Ethernet; 100M for Fast Ethernet, 155.5 M for ATM; and 1.00 G for Gigabit
Ethernet.
I/F Type
If you choose the I/F Type mode, the interface boxes will display the interface
type of each port on the SmartSwitch 2000, e.g., Eth (ethernet-csmacd), ATM, or
FDDI. Note that there is no type distinction between standard Ethernet, Fast
Ethernet, and Gigabit Ethernet.
Port status view options for an Ethernet MicroLAN Switch are:
Load
If you choose Load, the port text boxes will display the percentage of network
load processed by each port during the last polling interval. This percentage
reflects the network load generated by devices connected to the port compared to
the theoretical maximum load (10, 100, 155.5, or 1000 Mbps) of the connected
network.
Status
You can view three status categories for your ports which reflect six possible
Admin/Link, Admin, or Link Status conditions:
•
•
•
2-12
Admin/Link — ON, OFF, SEG (segmented), or NLK (not linked)
Admin — ON or OFF
Link — LNK (link), NLK (not linked), or N/A (not available)
Viewing Chassis Information
The SmartSwitch 2000 Chassis View
If you have selected the Admin/Link status mode, a port is considered:
•
ON if the port is enabled and has a valid link.
•
OFF if it has not been enabled or if it has been disabled through management
action.
•
SEG (segmented) if the port has been enabled by management and has a valid
connection, but has been segmented by the repeater because 33 consecutive
collisions have occurred on the attached segment, or the collision detector was
on for more than 2.4 µs.
•
NLK (Not Linked) when the port is on, but there is no physical link to the port.
This field is a combination of two status conditions: No Link and Port
Administrative Status On.
If you have selected the Admin status mode, a port is considered:
•
ON if the port is enabled.
•
OFF if the port has been disabled by management.
These conditions do not reflect link status.
If you have selected the Link status mode, a port is considered:
•
LNK (Linked) when a valid link has been established between the port and the
device at the other end of the segment.
•
NLK (Not Linked) when the port is on, but there is no physical link to the port
or the device at the other end of the port’s segment is down.
•
N/A (not available) when NetSight Element Manager cannot determine the
link status for the port.
Viewing Chassis Information
2-13
The SmartSwitch 2000 Chassis View
NOTE
Because BNC thin coax and AUI ports do not support the link feature, the displayed
Admin/Link, Admin, and Link status conditions will not always follow the pattern
described above:
Under Admin/Link status mode, BNC ports will display as ON if there is a valid
connection and the port has been enabled; OFF if the port has been disabled; and SEG if
the port has experienced 33 consecutive collisions or if there is no cable attached. An AUI
port will display as ON if the port has been enabled (regardless of whether or not there is a
valid connection), OFF if the port has been disabled, and SEG if the port has detected 33
consecutive collisions. Note that the Admin/Link status displays for BNC and AUI ports
can be misleading in terms of troubleshooting; be sure to keep in mind that a BNC port
displaying as segmented may only have had its cable disconnected, and an AUI port that
appears to be on and linked may not have any cable attached.
Under Admin status mode, AUI and BNC ports will display as ON if the port has been
enabled, and OFF if it has been disabled; as with other port types, these ON and OFF
conditions indicate nothing about link status.
Under Link status mode, AUI and BNC port display boxes will display N/A, indicating
that NetSight Element Manager is unable to determine their link status.
Port Assignment
If you choose Port Assignment, each port’s status box will display a letter which
designates its current repeater channel assignment (A-H).
Errors or Frame Size
If you choose the Errors or Frame Size modes, additional menus offer the
following options for each mode:
Errors
Total Errors, Collisions, Alignment, CRC, Runts, Giants,
or OOW Collisions
Frame Size
Runts, 64-127, 128-255, 256-511, 512-1023, 1024-1518, or
Giants
The port status boxes will display the percentage for each active port that
represents what portion of that port’s total traffic is of the specific type (Errors or
Frame Sizes) that you selected.
Select one of the Errors options to see what percentage of the total packets
received by each active port during the last polling interval was of the error type
you selected. This percentage reflects the number of errors generated by devices
connected to that port in relation to the total number of packets processed by the
port (errors ÷ [errors + packets]).
Choose the Frame Size option to check on the sizes, in bytes, of frames passing
through your ports. The percentages are calculated just like the Errors selection
described above: the number given represents the number of packets of the
selected size generated by devices connected to that port in relation to the total
number of packets processed. Remember, these percentages are calculated based
on the numbers of packets processed during one polling cycle.
2-14
Viewing Chassis Information
The SmartSwitch 2000 Chassis View
Port Status Color Codes
The Port Status display options —Bridge, Admin, and Operator— incorporate
color coding schemes. For the Admin and Operator Status display options,
green = ON, red = OFF, and blue = N/A (not available). For the Bridge Status
display option, green = forwarding, blue = disabled, magenta = learning and
listening, orange = blocking, red = broken, and gray = unknown.
For all other Port Status selections — Load, Errors, Bridge Mapping, I/F
Mapping, I/F Speed, and I/F Type— color codes will continue to reflect the most
recently selected mode which incorporates its own color coding scheme.
For an Ethernet MicroLAN Switch, three of the port status display options — Port
Assignment, Port Type, and Status — incorporate their own color coding
schemes. For any of the Status display options — Admin/Link, Admin, or Link
— green = ON/LNK, yellow = SEG/NLK, red = OFF, and blue = N/A (not
available). For the Port Assignment display option, Channel A = magenta,
Channel B = olive, Channel C = cyan, Channel D = yellow, Channel E = orange,
Channel F = white, Channel G = green, Channel H = hot pink. For the Port Type
display option, station ports will display as yellow; trunk ports will display as
green.
For all other Ethernet MicroLAN Switch Port Status selections — Load, Errors,
and Frame Size — color codes will continue to reflect the most recently selected
mode which incorporates its own color coding scheme.
The Chassis Manager Window
The SmartSwitch 2000 draws its functionality from a collection of proprietary
MIBs and IETF RFCs, and organizes that MIB data into a series of “components.”
A MIB component is a logical grouping of MIB data, and each group controls a
defined set of objects. For example, SmartSwitch 2000 bridging information is
organized into its own component; more generic device and port information
resides in the chassis component. There is no one-to-one correspondence between
MIBs and MIB components; a single MIB component might contain objects from
several different proprietary MIBs and RFCs.
The Chassis Manager window, Figure 2-3, is a read-only window that displays the
MIBs and the MIB components — and, therefore, the functionality — supported
by the currently monitored device.
1. Select on Help-->Mibs Supported on the menu bar at the top of the Chassis
View window.
Viewing Chassis Information
2-15
The SmartSwitch 2000 Chassis View
The MIBs which provide the
SmartSwitch 2000’s
functionality — both
proprietary MIBs and IETF
RFCs — are listed here.
MIB Components are listed
here; remember, there’s no
one-to-one correspondence
between MIBs and MIB
Components.
Figure 2-3. The Chassis Manager Window
Viewing Hardware Types
In addition to the graphical displays described above, menu options available at
the device and module levels provide specific information about the physical
characteristics of the SmartSwitch 2000.
Device Type
Choosing the Device Type option from the Device menu brings up a window that
describes the management device being modeled:
Figure 2-4. Sample Device Type Windows
2-16
Viewing Chassis Information
The SmartSwitch 2000 Chassis View
Module Type
From the Module menu on the SmartSwitch 2000 Chassis View window, you can
view a description of the SmartSwitch 2000.
1. Click on the SmartSwitch 2000 module index. The Module Menu opens.
2. Select Module Type. A Module Type text box opens, describing the
SmartSwitch 2000.
Figure 2-5. Sample Module Type Windows
Connection Type
If your SmartSwitch 2000 supports the ctIfConnectionType OID, its Port menus
will contain the Connection Type option. Selecting this option will display a
window that describes the selected interface’s connection type.
Figure 2-6. Sample Connection Type Windows
Viewing Chassis Information
2-17
The SmartSwitch 2000 Chassis View
Interface Description
Choosing the Description option from the Port menu brings up a window that
describes the selected interface.
Figure 2-7. Sample Interface Description Windows
Viewing I/F Summary Information
The I/F Summary menu option available from the Device menu lets you view
statistics for the traffic processed by each network interface on your device. The
window also provides access to a detailed statistics window that breaks down
Transmit and Receive traffic for each interface.
To access the I/F Summary window:
1. From the Chassis View, click on the Device option from the menu bar.
2. Click again to select I/F Summary. The I/F Summary window, Figure 2-8,
opens.
Figure 2-8. The I/F Summary Window
2-18
Viewing Chassis Information
The SmartSwitch 2000 Chassis View
The I/F Summary window provides a variety of descriptive information about
each interface on your device, as well as statistics which display each interface’s
performance.
The following descriptive information is provided for each interface:
UpTime
The UpTime field lists the amount of time, in a days, hh:mm:ss format, that the
device has been running since the last start-up.
Index
The index value assigned to each interface on the device.
Type
The type of the interface, distinguished by the physical/link protocol(s) running
immediately below the network layer.
Description
A text description of the interface.
Physical Status
Displays the current physical status — or operational state — of the interface:
Online or Offline.
Logical Status
Displays the current logical status — or administrative state — of the interface:
Up or Down.
Interface Performance Statistics/Bar Graphs
The statistical values (and, where available, the accompanying bar graphs) to the
right of the interface description fields provide a quick summary of interface
performance. You can select the statistical value you want to display and the units
in which you want those values displayed by using the two menu fields directly
above the interface display area, as follows:
1. In the right-most menu field, click on the down arrow and select the unit in
which you wish to display the selected statistic: Load, Raw Counts, or Rate.
NOTE
Bar graphs are only available when Load is the selected base unit; if you select Raw
Counts or Rate, the Bar Graph column will be removed from the interface display.
2. Once you have selected the base unit, click on the down arrow in the left-most
field to specify the statistic you’d like to display. The options available from this
menu will vary depending on the base unit you have selected.
Viewing Chassis Information
2-19
The SmartSwitch 2000 Chassis View
After you select a new display mode, the statistics (and graphs, where applicable)
will refresh to reflect the current choice, as described below.
Raw Counts
The total count of network traffic received or transmitted on the indicated
interface since device counters were last reset. Raw counts are provided for the
following parameters:
In Octets
Octets received on the interface, including framing
characters.
In Packets
Packets (both unicast and non-unicast) received by the
device interface and delivered to a higher-layer protocol.
In Discards
Packets received by the device interface that were
discarded even though no errors prevented them from
being delivered to a higher layer protocol (e.g., to free up
buffer space in the device).
In Errors
Packets received by the device interface that contained
errors that prevented them from being delivered to a
higher-layer protocol.
In Unknown
Packets received by the device interface that were
discarded because of an unknown or unsupported
protocol.
Out Octets
Octets transmitted by the interface, including framing
characters.
Out Packets
Packets transmitted, at the request of a higher level
protocol, by the device interface to a subnetwork address
(both unicast and non-unicast).
Out Discards
Outbound packets that were discarded by the device
interface even though no errors were detected that
would prevent them from being transmitted. A possible
reason for discard would be to free up buffer space in the
device.
Out Errors
Outbound packets that could not be transmitted by the
device interface because they contained errors.
Load
The number of bytes processed by the indicated interface during the last poll
interval in comparison to the theoretical maximum load for that interface type.
Load is further defined by the following parameters:
In Octets
2-20
The number of bytes received by this interface, expressed
as a percentage of the theoretical maximum load.
Viewing Chassis Information
The SmartSwitch 2000 Chassis View
Out Octets
The number of bytes transmitted by this interface,
expressed as a percentage of the theoretical maximum
load.
When you select this option, a Bar Graph field will be added to the interface
display area; this field is only available when Load is the selected base unit.
Rate
The count for the selected statistic during the last poll interval. The available
parameters are the same as those provided for Raw Counts. Refer to the Raw
Counts section, above, for a complete description of each parameter.
Viewing Interface Detail
The Interface Statistics window (Figure 2-9) provides detailed MIB-II interface
statistical information — including counts for both transmit and receive packets,
and error and buffering information — for each individual port interface.
Color-coded pie charts also let you graphically view statistics for both received
and transmitted Unicast, Multicast, Discarded, and Error packets.
To open the Interface Statistics window:
1. In the I/F Summary window, select the interface for which you’d like to view
more detailed statistics.
2. Click on Detail. The appropriate I/F Statistics window, Figure 2-9, opens.
Figure 2-9. Detail Interface Statistics
Viewing Chassis Information
2-21
The SmartSwitch 2000 Chassis View
TIP
You can also access this information via the I/F Statistics option available on the
individual port menus; see Chapter 4, Statistics, for more information.
Three informational fields appear in the upper portion of the window:
Description
Displays the interface description for the currently selected interface.
Address
Displays the MAC (physical) address of the selected interface.
Type
Displays the interface type of the selected port.
The lower portion of the window provides the following transmit and receive
statistics. The first four statistics are also displayed in pie charts.
Unicast
Displays the number of packets transmitted to or received from this interface that
had a single, unique destination address. These statistics are displayed in the pie
chart, color-coded green.
Non-Unicast
Displays the number of packets transmitted to or received from this interface that
had a destination address that is recognized by more than one device on the
network segment. The multicast field includes a count of broadcast packets —
those that are recognized by all devices on a segment. These statistics are
displayed in the pie chart, color-coded dark blue.
Discarded
Displays the number of packets which were discarded even though they
contained no errors that would prevent transmission. Good packets are typically
discarded to free up buffer space when the network becomes very busy; if this is
occurring routinely, it usually means that network traffic is overwhelming the
device. To solve this problem, you may need to re-configure your bridging
parameters, or perhaps re-configure your network to add additional bridges or
switches.
These statistics are displayed in the pie chart, color-coded magenta.
Error
Displays the number of packets received or transmitted that contained errors.
These statistics are displayed in the pie chart, color-coded red.
2-22
Viewing Chassis Information
The SmartSwitch 2000 Chassis View
Unknown Protocol (Received only)
Displays the number of packets received which were discarded because they were
created under an unknown or unsupported protocol.
Packets Received (Received only)
Displays the number of packets received by the selected interface.
Transmit Queue Size (Transmit only)
Displays the number of packets currently queued for transmission from this
interface. The amount of device memory devoted to buffer space, and the traffic
level on the target network, determine how large the output packet queue can
grow before the SmartSwitch 2000 device will begin to discard packets.
Packets Transmitted (Transmit only)
Displays the number of packets transmitted by this interface.
Making Sense of Detail Statistics
The statistics available in this window can give you an idea of how an interface is
performing; by using the statistics in a few simple calculations, it’s also possible to
get a sense of an interface’s activity level:
To calculate the percentage of input errors:
Received Errors /Packets Received
To calculate the percentage of output errors:
Transmitted Errors /Packets Transmitted
To calculate the total number of inbound and outbound discards:
Received Discards + Transmitted Discards
To calculate the percentage of inbound packets that were discarded:
Received Discards /Packets Received
To calculate the percentage of outbound packets that were discarded:
Transmit Discards /Packets Transmitted
NOTE
The Interface Statistics window does not offer Disable or Test options. These options are
available in the Interface Group window, which can be accessed via the System Group
window (select System Group from the Device menu). See to the Generic SNMP
User’s Guide for information on the System Group and Interface Group windows.
Viewing Chassis Information
2-23
The SmartSwitch 2000 Chassis View
Using Device Find Source Address
When you select the Device Find Source Address option, the device’s 802.1d
Filtering database is searched for the specified MAC address. If it is found, the
Component field will display the value “Bridge” indicating that the address was
found on a bridging interface, and the Port Instance field will display the index
number assigned to the bridge port on which the address was located.
NOTE
You may receive an error message stating “Can’t Display Source Address” if a Port
Instance of “0” or “0.0” is reported. This value indicates that the MAC address is
communicating through the backplane instead of through a front panel interface.
To open the Device Find Source Address window:
1. Click on Device in the Chassis View menu bar.
2. Click on Device Find Source Address. The Device Find Source Address
window, as shown in Figure 2-10, opens.
Figure 2-10. Device Find Source Address Window
The Device Find Source Address window displays the following information:
Component
Displays the type of interface through which the specified MAC address is
communicating. This field will report Bridge.
2-24
Using Device Find Source Address
The SmartSwitch 2000 Chassis View
Port Instance
Displays the bridge port index number on which the specified MAC address was
found.
To use the Device Find Source Address window:
1. In the Address Mode field, select the format of the Source Address you wish
to find, either MAC or Canonical.
2. In the Enter Address text box, enter the Source Address you wish to find in
the appropriate XX-XX-XX-XX-XX-XX format.
NOTE
If you enter the MAC format of a specified address, and then click on Canonical,
NetSight Element Manager will do the address conversion for you, from the Ethernet
hexadecimal format to the Token Ring Canonical format. The same is also true if you enter
the Canonical format of a specified address and then select MAC.
3. Click on the Find It! button. A “Processing Request” message opens in the
status bar at the bottom of the window.
If the specified MAC address is located, a list of the interface(s) through which the
given address is communicating displays in the list box. A status message at the
bottom of the window will display the number of interfaces through which the
given MAC address is communicating.
If the specified MAC address cannot be found, a “Source Address not found”
message displays.
NOTE
If the MAC address is entered in an incorrect format, an “Invalid MAC Address.
Enter Valid MAC Address” message displays. Enter the address in the correct
XX-XX-XX-XX-XX-XX hexadecimal format.
Using Device Find Source Address on Ethernet MicroLAN Switches
When you select the Device Find Source Address option on an Ethernet
MicroLAN Switch, a search is made of both the Source Address Table (SAT) and
the 802.1d Filtering database to discover through which interface(s) a specified
source MAC address is communicating. If the MAC address is found, the
interface types “Bridge” and “Enet #” will display in the Component field with
their associated port index number displayed in the Port Instance field.
Using Device Find Source Address
2-25
The SmartSwitch 2000 Chassis View
NOTE
You may receive an error message stating “Can’t Display Source Address” if a Port
Instance of “0” or “0.0” is reported while using the Device Find Source Address feature.
This value indicates that the MAC address is communicating through the backplane
instead of through a front panel interface.
To open the Device Find Source Address window:
1. Click on Device in the Chassis View menu bar.
2. Click to select Device Find Source Address. The Device Find Source
Address window, as shown in Figure 2-10, opens.
Figure 2-11. Device Find Source Address Window
The Device Find Source Address window displays the following information:
Component
Displays the type of interface through which the specified MAC address is
communicating. This field will display Bridge and Enet #, indicating that the
specified MAC address was found on a bridging interface and on an Ethernet
repeater channel.
Port Instance
Displays the port index number associated with the interface on which the
specified MAC address was found. For an address found on a bridging interface,
this field displays the bridge interface index number on which the specified MAC
address was found. For an address found on a repeater port, this field displays
the board (port group) number and the port index number on which the specified
2-26
Using Device Find Source Address
The SmartSwitch 2000 Chassis View
MAC address was found. The board and port index numbers are separated by a
period; for example, a Port Instance of 1.2 refers to board (port group) 1 and port
number 2.
To use the Device Find Source Address window:
1. In the Address Mode field, select the format of the Source Address you wish
to find, either MAC or Canonical.
2. In the Enter Address text box, enter the Source Address you wish to find in
the appropriate XX-XX-XX-XX-XX-XX format.
NOTE
If you enter the MAC format of a specified address, and then click on Canonical,
NetSight Element Manager will do the address conversion for you, from the Ethernet
hexadecimal format to the Token Ring Canonical format. The same is also true if you enter
the Canonical format of a specified address and then select MAC.
3. Click on the Find It! button. A “Processing Request” message displays in the
status bar at the bottom of the window.
If the specified MAC address is located, a list of the interface(s) through which the
given address is communicating displays in the list box. A status message at the
bottom of the window will display the number of interfaces through which the
given MAC address is communicating.
If the specified MAC address cannot be found, a “Source Address not found”
message displays.
Managing the Hub
In addition to the performance and configuration information described in the
preceding sections, the Chassis View also provides you with the tools you need to
configure your device and keep it operating properly. Hub management functions
include setting operating parameters for Ethernet, Fast Ethernet, Gigabit
Ethernet, and COM ports; redirecting traffic; viewing system resources;
performing 802.1Q VLAN configuration; setting broadcast suppression;
configuring port priority; setting device date and time; and enabling and
disabling ports.
Configuring Ports
The Configuration options available for FDDI, Ethernet, Fast Ethernet, Gigabit
Ethernet, and COM ports allow you to configure operating parameters specific to
each port type: for FDDI and standard Ethernet ports, you can set the Duplex
Mode; for Fast Ethernet ports on first generation devices, you can set a variety of
duplex mode and negotiation parameters; for Fast Ethernet and Gigabit Ethernet
ports on second generation devices you can set speed, duplex mode, and flow
Managing the Hub
2-27
The SmartSwitch 2000 Chassis View
control parameters; and for COM ports, you can select the operation you wish the
port to perform, and set any associated speed parameters. FDDI, Ethernet, Fast
Ethernet, and Gigabit Ethernet Port Configuration windows are available from
the Chassis View Port menus (except on Ethernet MicroLAN Switches where they
are available from the Bridge Port menu); the COM Port option is available from
the Device menu.
Configuring Standard Ethernet and FDDI Ports
The Port Configuration window available for both standard Ethernet and FDDI
ports allows you to set an interface to either Standard or Full Duplex Mode. Full
Duplex mode effectively doubles the available wire speed by allowing the
interface to both receive and transmit simultaneously. This window will also
display the mode currently in effect on the selected interface.
To access the Port Configuration Window:
1. From the Chassis View, click to select the port you wish to configure; the Port
Menu will display.
2. Click on Configuration. The Port Configuration window, Figure 2-12, opens.
To access the Port Configuration window on SmartSwitch 2000 Ethernet
MicroLAN Switches:
1. From the Chassis View, click on Device in the menu bar to access the Device
menu.
2. Click on Bridge Status. In the resulting window click on the Bridge Port
button (e.g.,
) to access the Bridge Port menu.
3. Click on Configuration. The Port Configuration window, Figure 2-12, opens.
Figure 2-12. The Port Configuration Window
TIP
2-28
If you select the Configuration option available for a Fast Ethernet interface, an entirely
different window opens; see Configuring Fast Ethernet Ports on First Generation
Devices, on page 2-29, or Configuring Ethernet Ports on Second Generation
Devices, on page 2-34, for information on configuring these ports.
Managing the Hub
The SmartSwitch 2000 Chassis View
WARNING
For standard Ethernet interfaces, Full Duplex should only be enabled on an interface that
has a connection to a single destination address at the other end of the connection (i.e., it is
not a segment with an attached repeater cascading the connection to multiple destination
addresses).
Full Duplex mode disables the collision detection circuitry at the interface, so that both
Transmit and Receive wires can be used simultaneously. With a single destination address
at the other end of the connection (for example, if the connection was to a full duplex
interface on another switching device, or if a single file server was connected to the full
duplex switch port), this essentially doubles the available bandwidth from 10 Mbit/sec to
20 Mbit/sec. Note that the interface at the other end of the connection must also have Full
Duplex enabled at the attached interface.
Full Duplex mode must be disabled if the interface is communicating with multiple
destinations simultaneously (i.e., if a repeater is cascaded from the interface), since
Ethernet relies on Collision Sense for proper operation.
Similarly, an FDDI Full Duplex connection must also only be run point-to-point between
two supporting FDDI interfaces (e.g., another HSIM-F6), since the dual bandwidth is
attained by running data on both primary and secondary paths simultaneously. Since
Full Duplex overrides standard FDDI protocol (and eliminates ring redundancy), it will
not operate in a “ring” configuration, but only as a point-to-point high speed data trunk
between hubs. Note that you must use Local Management to configure your HSIM-F6 for
Full Duplex operation prior to making physical connections. Refer to your Local
Management Guide for more information.
Use the options in this window to select the desired mode:
Standard Mode
In Standard Mode, an interface can only either transmit or receive at any given
time, and must wait for one activity to be completed before switching to the next
activity (receive or transmit). In this mode, standard wire speeds (10 Mbps for
Ethernet, 100 Mbps for FDDI) are available.
Full Duplex
In Full Duplex Mode, an interface can both receive and transmit packets at the
same time, effectively doubling the available wire speed to 20 Mbps (for Ethernet)
or 200 Mbps (for FDDI).
Be sure to click on the Apply button to set your changes; note that the interface’s
current mode can be determined by the field selected in the window.
Configuring Fast Ethernet Ports on First Generation Devices
The SmartSwitch 2000 has two front panel slots (Ports 25 and 26) for Fast Ethernet
Interface Modules: the FE100-TX and FE100-FX. If you have any Fast Ethernet
Interface Modules installed in the front panel slots of your first generation
SmartSwitch 2000 device, the Fast Ethernet Configuration window available for
Managing the Hub
2-29
The SmartSwitch 2000 Chassis View
those ports allows you to both view and set that port’s available modes. All
100Base-TX Fast Ethernet ports can be configured to operate in either standard
Ethernet (10 Mbps) or Fast Ethernet (100 Mbps) mode, and in each mode can be
configured to operate in Full Duplex, effectively doubling the available wire
speed (from 10 to 20 Mbps in standard Ethernet mode, or from 100 to 200 Mbps in
Fast Ethernet mode); 100Base-FX (fiber) ports can be configured to operate in their
standard 100 Mbps mode, or in full duplex mode. This window also displays the
mode currently in effect on the selected interface, and provides some information
(where it is available) about the interface’s link partner.
To access the Fast Ethernet Configuration Window:
1. From the Chassis View, click to select the Fast Ethernet port you wish to
configure; the Port Menu will display.
2. Click on Configuration. The Fast Ethernet Configuration window,
Figure 2-13, opens.
To access the Fast Ethernet Configuration window on SmartSwitch 2000 Ethernet
MicroLAN Switches:
1. From the Chassis View, click on Device in the menu bar to access the Device
menu.
2. Click Bridge Status. In the resulting window click on the Bridge Port button
(e.g.,
) to access the Bridge Port menu.
3. Click Configuration. The Fast Ethernet Configuration window, Figure 2-13,
opens.
Figure 2-13. The Fast Ethernet Port Configuration Window
2-30
Managing the Hub
The SmartSwitch 2000 Chassis View
NOTE
TIP
Auto-Negotiation is not supported by the FE-100FX Fast Ethernet port interface module.
If you launch the window for a port module slot which has no FE module installed, the
Port Type will display as Unknown, the Link State will display No Link, and the rest of
the fields will be blank and/or grayed out.
If you select the Configuration option available for a standard Ethernet or FDDI interface,
or for an Ethernet port on a second generation device, an entirely different window opens;
see Configuring Standard Ethernet and FDDI Ports, on page 2-28, or Configuring
Ethernet Ports on Second Generation Devices, page 2-34, for information on
configuring these ports.
From this window you can manually set the operational mode of the port, or —
for 100Base-TX interfaces — set the port to auto negotiation so that the
appropriate operational mode can be determined automatically. The mode you
set will determine the speed of the port and whether it uses Full Duplex or
Standard Mode bridging.
The following information about the selected Fast Ethernet port is displayed:
Port Type
Displays the port’s type: FE-100TX (for the FE-100TX Fast Ethernet port module),
FE-100FX (for the FE-100FX Fast Ethernet port module), or Unknown (for a port
slot with no module installed).
Link State
Displays the current connection status of the selected port: Link or No Link.
Current Operational Mode
Indicates which of the available operational modes is currently in effect: 10Base-T,
10Base-T Full Duplex, 100Base-TX, 100Base-TX Full Duplex, 100Base-FX, or
100Base-FX Full Duplex. If the port is still initializing, not linked, or if there is no
port module installed in the slot, this field will remain blank.
Desired Operational Mode
Displays the operational mode that you have selected for this port, and allows
you to change that selection. The following operational modes are available for
each port:
Managing the Hub
100Base-TX
Auto Negotiation, 10Base-T, 10BASE-T Full Duplex,
100Base-TX, and 100Base-TX Full Duplex.
100Base-FX
100Base-FX and 100Base-FX Full Duplex
2-31
The SmartSwitch 2000 Chassis View
!
CAUTION
If you choose to select a specific mode of operation (rather than auto-negotiation), you
should be sure that the link partner supports the same mode. Otherwise, no link will be
achieved.
If you select a Full Duplex mode and the link partner supports the same wire speed but not
Full Duplex, a link will be achieved, but it will be unstable and will behave erratically.
If you select Auto-Negotiation, the local node will try to match the mode of the link
partner, even if the link partner is not set to auto-negotiate, and even if the local node
must use a mode which it is not currently advertising.
If Auto Negotiation is the selected mode, the Current Operational Mode field
will indicate which mode was selected by the link partners. See Setting the
Desired Operational Mode, on page 2-33, for more information.
Advertised Abilities
For 100Base-TX ports which have been configured to operate in Auto Negotiation
mode, this field allows you to select which of the operational modes available to
the port can be selected by the negotiating link partners. During Auto
Negotiation, each of the link partners will advertise all selected modes in
descending bandwidth order: 100Base-TX Full Duplex, 100Base-TX, 10Base-T Full
Duplex, and 10Base-T. Of the selected abilities, the highest mode mutually
available will automatically be used. If there is no mode mutually advertised, no
link will be achieved.
If you have selected a specific operational mode for your 100Base-TX port, the
Advertised Abilities do not apply; the selected Advertised Abilities also do not
restrict the local node’s ability to set up a link with a partner who is not currently
Auto-Negotiating.
Auto-Negotiation is not currently supported for 100Base-FX ports.
NOTE
Remote Capabilities
When the local node is set to Auto-Negotiation, this field will display the
advertised abilities of the remote link — even if the remote link is not currently set
to auto-negotiate. Possible values for this field are:
2-32
•
100Base-TX Full Duplex
•
100Base-TX
•
10Base-T Full Duplex
•
10Base-T
Managing the Hub
The SmartSwitch 2000 Chassis View
•
Link Partner does not support auto negotiation — auto negotiation is either
not supported by or is not currently selected on the remote port.
•
Unknown — the link partner’s capabilities could not be determined.
When the local node is not set to Auto-Negotiation, this field will be grayed out,
even if the link partner is set to Auto-Negotiation and is advertising abilities.
Setting the Desired Operational Mode
For any 100Base-TX port, you can specifically choose any one of the four available
operational modes, or you can select Auto-Negotiation mode, which allows the
port to negotiate with its link partner to find the highest mutually available
bandwidth. If you select Auto Negotiation mode, you must also choose which of
the port’s bandwidth capabilities you wish to advertise to the link partner.
TIP
If you select Auto-Negotiation at both ends of a link, be sure at least one
mutually-advertised operational mode is available.
For a 100Base-FX port, the selection process is somewhat simpler; Auto
Negotiation for these ports is not supported at this time, so you need only choose
between 100Base-FX standard mode and 100Base-FX Full Duplex. However, you
must still be sure that both link partners are set to the same operational mode, or
the link will be unstable.
To set your desired operational mode:
1. Click on the Desired Operational Mode combo box to display the menu of
available options; click to select the operational mode you wish to set.
For 100Base-TX ports, the available options are:
10Base-T — 10 Mbps connection, Standard Mode
10Base-T Full Duplex — 10 Mbps connection, Duplex Mode
100Base-TX — 100 Mbps connection, Standard Mode
100Base-TX Full Duplex — 100 Mbps connection, Duplex Mode
Auto Negotiation — the operational mode will be dynamically set based on
the modes selected in the Advertised Abilities field (where both link partners
are auto-negotiating) and the speeds and modes supported by the attached
device.
For 100Base-FX ports, options are:
100Base-FX — 100 Mbps connection, Standard Mode
100Base-FX Full Duplex — 100 Mbps connection, Duplex Mode
Managing the Hub
2-33
The SmartSwitch 2000 Chassis View
2. If you have selected Auto Negotiation (for 100Base-TX ports only), use the
Advertised Abilities field to select the operational capabilities you wish to
advertise to the port’s link partner. If both link partners will be
auto-negotiating, be sure there is at least one mutually-advertised operational
mode, or no link will be achieved.
TIP
The selected Advertised Abilities only come into play when both link partners are
auto-negotiating; if only one link partner is set to auto-negotiate, that node will establish a
link at whatever mode its partner is set to, even if that mode is not currently being
advertised.
3. Click Apply to save your changes. Click Refresh to display the new settings.
It may take a few minutes for mode changes to be completely initialized,
particularly if the link partners must negotiate or re-negotiate the mode; you
may need to refresh the window a few times before current operational data is
displayed.
Configuring Ethernet Ports on Second Generation Devices
The Ethernet Configuration window available for Fast Ethernet and Gigabit
Ethernet ports on second generation devices (e.g., 2H252-25R and 2H258-17R)
allows you to both view and set those ports’ available speed, modes, and flow
control. All second generation devices support the ctEthernetParameters MIB. All
Ethernet ports that return at least one instance for a query of the
ctEtherSupportedDuplex OID will use the Ethernet Configuration window as
shown in Figure 2-14.
All 100Base-TX Fast Ethernet ports can be configured to operate in either standard
Ethernet (10 Mbps) or Fast Ethernet (100 Mbps) mode, and each mode can be
configured to operate in Full Duplex effectively doubling the available wire speed
(from 10 to 20 Mbps in standard Ethernet mode, or from 100 to 200 Mbps in Fast
Ethernet mode). 100Base-FX (fiber) ports can be configured to operate in their
standard 100 Mbps mode, or in Full Duplex mode. 1000Base-SX/LX/CX Gigabit
Ethernet ports are always configured to operate in 1000 Mbps, Full Duplex mode.
This window displays the mode currently in effect on the selected interface, and
provides some information (where it is available) about the interface’s link
partner.
To access the Ethernet Configuration Window:
1. From the Chassis View, click to select the port you wish to configure; the Port
Menu will display.
2. Click on Configuration. The Ethernet Configuration window, Figure 2-13,
opens.
2-34
Managing the Hub
The SmartSwitch 2000 Chassis View
Figure 2-14. The Ethernet Configuration Window
TIP
If you select the Configuration option available for a standard Ethernet or FDDI interface
or for a Fast Ethernet port on a first generation device, an entirely different window opens;
see Configuring Standard Ethernet and FDDI Ports, page 2-28, or Configuring Fast
Ethernet Ports on First Generation Devices, page 2-29, for information on
configuring these ports.
From this window you can manually set the operational mode of the port, or —
for 100Base-TX and 1000Base-SX/LX/CX interfaces — set the port to Auto
Negotiate so that the appropriate operational mode can be determined
automatically. The mode you set will determine the port’s speed, duplex mode,
and flow control.
The window displays the following information about the selected Ethernet port:
Port Type
Displays the port’s type: 100Base-TX RJ-45or RJ71 (for built-in Fast Ethernet ports
and the FE-100TX Fast Ethernet port module), 100Base-FX MMF SC Connector
Managing the Hub
2-35
The SmartSwitch 2000 Chassis View
(for the FE-100FX Fast Ethernet port module), 1000Base-SX/LX/CX (for the
VHSIM-G6 Gigabit Ethernet port module), or Unknown (for a port slot with no
module installed).
Link State
Displays the current connection status of the selected port: Link or No Link.
Remote Auto Signal
Indicates whether the operating mode at the remote end of the link is set to Auto
Negotiate.
Auto Negotiate Config
Indicates whether Auto Negotiate signalling is in progress or has completed.
Possible values for this field are: configuring, complete, disabled, parallel detect
failed, or other.
Auto Negotiate Mode
Use this field to enable or disable Auto Negotiate for the port. If Auto Negotiate is
disabled, the port will use the speed, duplex mode, and flow control settings
specified in the Operational Mode fields. Note that 100-BaseFX ports do not
support Auto Negotiation; they must use the control settings specified in the
Operational Mode fields.
Operational Mode Fields
If the port is not set to Auto Negotiate then the settings in the Operational Mode
fields are used.
!
CAUTION
If you choose to select a specific mode of operation (rather than auto negotiation), you
should be sure that the link partner supports the same mode. Otherwise, no link will be
achieved.
For example, if you select Full Duplex mode and the link partner supports the same wire
speed but not Full Duplex, a link will be achieved, but it will be unstable and will behave
erratically.
If you select Auto-Negotiation, the local node will try to match the mode of the link
partner, even if the link partner is not set to auto-negotiate, and even if the local node
must use a mode which it is not currently advertising.
The Current Operational Mode settings indicate which of the available
operational modes is currently in effect. If Auto Negotiate is the selected mode,
the Current Operational Mode fields will indicate which mode was selected by
the link partner.
The Desired Operational Mode settings display the operational mode that is
currently selected for this port, and allows you to change the selection.
2-36
Managing the Hub
The SmartSwitch 2000 Chassis View
The following operational modes can be specified:
Speed
This field specifies a port speed of 10MB, 100MB, or 1000MB.
Duplex
This field specifies Half Duplex or Full Duplex mode for the port.
Flow Control
Flow control allows Ethernet devices to notify attached devices that congestion is
occurring and that the sending device should stop transmitting until the
congestion can be cleared. There are two commonly used methods of flow control:
Frame-based (operates on Full Duplex links) and Backpressure (operates on Half
Duplex links).
Ports set to Full Duplex mode have frame-based flow control, using pause
control frames. Frame-based flow control options are:
Symmetric
The port is able to both receive and transmit pause control
frames.
Asymmetric RX This option appears only for Gigabit Ethernet ports. The port
will receive pause control frames, but will not transmit its own.
Asymmetric TX This option appears only for Gigabit Ethernet ports. The port is
capable of sending pause control frames, but will not
acknowledge received pause control frames.
Disabled
Disables flow control on the port.
Auto Negotiate Ports configured to operate in auto negotiation mode will only
use pause control frames if the negotiation process determines
that the link partner supports them. Both ends of the link must
support auto negotiation and a common mode of operation.
Ports set to Half Duplex mode use Backpressure flow control. Backpressure flow
control simply asserts the carrier sense signal out the port causing the device
transmitting to detect a collision, stop transmitting data, and send the jam signal.
Backpressure flow control options are enabled or disabled.
Setting the Desired Operational Mode
For any 100Base-TX port, you can configure operational modes, or you can select
Auto Negotiate mode, which allows the port to negotiate with its link partner to
find the highest mutually available bandwidth and flow control. If you select
Auto Negotiate mode, you must also choose which of the port’s bandwidth and
flow control capabilities you wish to advertise to the link partner (refer to Auto
Negotiation Technologies, page 2-38).
Managing the Hub
2-37
The SmartSwitch 2000 Chassis View
100Base-FX ports do not support auto negotiation for bandwidth or flow control
capability, so you must choose between 100Base-FX Half Duplex and 100Base-FX
Full Duplex mode, and set the flow control option. However, you must still be
sure that both link partners are set to the same operational mode, or the link will
be unstable.
For 1000Base-SX/LX/CX ports the speed and duplex modes are always
configured at 1000MB Full Duplex. However, you can select Auto Negotiate
mode, which allows the port to negotiate with its link partner to find the highest
mutually available bandwidth and flow control. If you select Auto Negotiate
mode, you must also choose which of the port’s bandwidth and flow control
capabilities you wish to advertise to the link partner (refer to Auto Negotiation
Technologies, page 2-38).
To set your desired operational mode:
1. Click on the Speed, Duplex, or Flow Control list box to display the menu of
available options; click to select the operational mode you wish to set.
NOTE
If the port you are configuring does not support Flow Control, the Current Mode field will
display “not supported” and the Desired Mode list box will be disabled.
2. Click on the Apply button to save your changes.
Auto Negotiation Technologies
For ports which have been configured to operate in Auto Negotiate mode, this list
box allows you to select which of the operational modes available to the port will
be advertised to the negotiating link partner.
During Auto Negotiation, each of the link partners will advertise all selected
modes. Of the selected modes, the highest mode mutually available will
automatically be used. If there is no mode mutually advertised, no link will be
achieved.
TIP
If you select Auto-Negotiation at both ends of a link, be sure at least one
mutually-advertised operational mode is available.
If you have manually configured specific operational modes for your 100Base-TX
port or if you are configuring a 100Base-FX port, the Auto Negotiation
Technologies list box does not apply.
2-38
Managing the Hub
The SmartSwitch 2000 Chassis View
The Auto Negotiation Technologies list box has the following column headings:
Advertised
This column specifies whether the operational mode listed in the far right column
of the list box will be advertised to the link partner. Only those operational modes
supported by the local port (those with a “yes” listed in the Local column) can be
advertised. Valid values are Enabled (the mode is supported and will be
advertised), Disabled (the mode is supported but will not be advertised), and
“---” (the mode is not supported).
Local
Indicates whether the operational mode listed in the far right column of the list
box is supported by the local port.
Remote
Indicates whether the operational mode listed in the far right column of the list
box is supported by the remote port.
Auto Negotiate Technology
This column lists possible operational modes.
Setting Advertised Abilities for Auto Negotiation
You can determine which operational mode supported by the local port will be
advertised to the negotiating link partner. Of the advertised modes, the highest
mode mutually available will automatically be used.
To advertise an operational mode:
1. In the list box, click on the operational mode of choice.
If the Advertised column had a value of Enabled, it will change to Disabled; a
value of Disabled will change to Enabled. If the Advertised column has a value
of “---”, then the value is not changed.
2. Click Apply to save your changes. Click Refresh button to display the new
settings. It may take a few minutes for mode changes to be completely
initialized, particularly if the link partners must negotiate or re-negotiate the
mode; you may need to refresh the window a few times before current
operational data is displayed.
Configuring the COM Port
You can use the COM Port Configuration window (Figure 2-15) to specify the
functions that will be performed by the RS232 COM port on the SmartSwitch 2000
front panel.
1. Click on Device in the Chassis View menu bar to display the Device menu.
Managing the Hub
2-39
The SmartSwitch 2000 Chassis View
2. Click on Com Port Configuration, and then select Port 1, and release. The
Com Port Configuration window, Figure 2-15, opens.
Figure 2-15. The Com Port Configuration Window
You can use the Com Port Configuration window to set the following operating
parameters:
Com Port Admin
Use this field to administratively enable or disable the COM port.
Com Port Function
Use this field to select the function for which you wish to use the COM port:
2-40
LM
Local Management: select this option if you wish to connect a
terminal to the selected COM port from which to run Local
Management.
UPS
Select this option if you wish to connect an uninterruptable
power supply (UPS) to the selected COM Port. Note that if you
select this option, an additional option — UPS — displays on the
Device menu; use the resulting window to configure specific UPS
settings.
SLIP
Select this option to use the selected COM port as a SLIP
connection for out-of-band SNMP management via direct
connection to a serial port on your network management
workstation. Note that when you configure the port as a SLIP
connection, you must select the desired baud rate in the Speed
Selection field described below.
PPP
Select this option to use the selected COM port as a PPP
connection for out-of-band SNMP management via direct
connection to a serial port on your network management
Managing the Hub
The SmartSwitch 2000 Chassis View
workstation. Note that when you configure the port as a PPP
connection, you must select the desired baud rate in the Speed
Selection field described below.
Speed Selection
If you have configured the selected port as a SLIP or PPP connection, you must
select the appropriate baud rate: 2400, 4800, 9600, or 19,200. Note that this field
will default to Auto-Baud and become unselectable when the Com Port Function
is set to LM or UPS.
TIP
If the COM port you wish to configure is currently set to LM or UPS, the Speed Selection
field will be unavailable until the Com Port Function is set to SLIP or PPP and that
change is applied. Once available, the Speed Selection field will default to the last known
speed setting; use the down arrow to change this setting if necessary, then click the Apply
button again to complete the configuration.
To change the configuration of the selected COM port:
1. Click on
to the right of each field and select the desired setting.
2. Click on the Apply button to save your changes.
Using an Uninterruptable Power Supply (UPS)
Your SmartSwitch 2000 supports the use of a UPS (uninterruptable power supply)
through the COM 1 port. (For more information on the use of a UPS with the
SmartSwitch 2000, consult the SmartSwitch 2000 Installation Manual that was
included when you purchased the unit.) You can view or change the status of the
UPS connected to your SmartSwitch 2000 at the UPS window.
Please note that the UPS menu option will only be available when you have set
the Com Port Function to UPS in the COM Port Configuration, and the UPS
window will only be active if you currently have a UPS attached to your
SmartSwitch 2000 through the appropriate port, and you have correctly set the
Set UPS ID field.
!
Do not set the Set UPS ID field unless you have a UPS attached to the
SmartSwitch 2000, or you will disrupt your use of NetSight Element Manager.
CAUTION
Accessing the UPS Window
At the UPS window, you can configure the UPS ID model type for the
uninterruptable power supply you have attached to the COM port on your
SmartSwitch 2000.
Managing the Hub
2-41
The SmartSwitch 2000 Chassis View
You can also view information concerning the UPS connected to your
SmartSwitch 2000 including:
•
The amount of time that your UPS has been running since the last start-up
•
The line voltage and battery output
•
The actual battery capacity of the UPS (dynamic bar graph)
You can also use a button at the bottom of the window to disconnect your UPS, or
you can use the Test option to initiate a self test of the unit.
To access the UPS window:
1. From the Chassis View window, click on Device in the menu bar to access the
Device menu.
2. Select UPS. The UPS window, Figure 2-16, opens.
Figure 2-16. The UPS Window
UPS ID
Displays the manufacturer and model typecode of the UPS attached to the COM
port of the SmartSwitch 2000. You must assign this typecode for the UPS window
to be active. (See Setting the UPS ID, on page 2-43, for instructions for setting the
typecode for your UPS.) The valid typecodes are:
•
•
•
•
2-42
Model 370
Model 400
Model 600
Model 900
Managing the Hub
The SmartSwitch 2000 Chassis View
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Model 1250
Model 2000
Matrix 3000
Matrix 5000
SU 700
SU 1400
SU 2000XL
Other
UPS Uptime
Displays the number of hours that the UPS has been operating since the last time
it was started up.
Line Voltage
Displays the voltage coming through the line attached to the SmartSwitch 2000.
Battery Output
Displays the amount of battery output voltage.
Battery Capacity
Displays the percentage of remaining battery capacity (100% indicates a fully
charged battery).
Test Results
Displays the result of the last self-test performed by the UPS. The possible test
results are:
Unit OK
The UPS unit is in working order.
Unit Failed
The UPS unit has failed the self-test. Check the
unit for damage or consult your UPS User’s
Manual.
Bad Battery
The UPS unit battery is bad.
No recent test
No UPS self-test has been performed in the last
five minutes.
Unit in test...
Please standby
The UPS is currently in test mode.
Setting the UPS ID
You need to set the UPS ID typecode that indicates the manufacturer and model
of the UPS.
Managing the Hub
2-43
The SmartSwitch 2000 Chassis View
To set the UPS ID:
1. Click on
next to the SET UPS ID text box. A Model number menu
displays. Scroll to highlight the appropriate UPS ID. (Consult the manual that
was included when you purchased your UPS for the correct Model ID
number.)
2. Click OK. The UPS ID you have chosen displays in the text box, and the UPS
window will be active.
If your UPS unit does not function after you have set this ID, check the manual
you received with the UPS to ensure that you have chosen the correct UPS ID. If
you need to change the ID, follow the directions given above.
Using the Test Option
You can use the test option to activate a self-test cycle for your unit. This self-test
will check the viability of your unit and its battery.
To activate the test:
1. Click on the Test button. The unit will begin its self-test. The results of the test
display in the Test Result text box next to the Test button.
Using the Disconnect Option
You can disconnect the UPS attached to your SmartSwitch 2000 through its com
port, as follows:
1. Click on the Disconnect button near the bottom of the UPS window. Your
UPS will now be disconnected.
To reconnect, click OK, or close, then re-open the UPS window.
Redirecting Traffic on the SmartSwitch 2000
The Port Redirect window (Figure 2-17) allows you to redirect traffic from one or
more interfaces directly to another interface — essentially mirroring the traffic at
the “redirect” interface. This feature is useful in that it allows you to use an
external analyzer on the “redirect” port to analyze data, without disturbing the
normal switching operations at the original source ports. The Port Redirect
window displays the interface remap table and allows you to add new entries to
and delete existing entries from this table. When you set a source port to redirect
to a destination port, the destination port will transmit out all packets received or
transmitted on the source port.
2-44
Managing the Hub
The SmartSwitch 2000 Chassis View
To access the Port Redirect window:
1. Click on Device in the Chassis View menu bar to display the Device menu.
2. Click Port Redirector. The Port Redirect window, Figure 2-17, opens.
Figure 2-17. The Port Redirect Window
The current port mappings will be listed in this window. You may add or delete
entries from this window.
To add an entry:
1. Next to the Source Port display box click on
port (Port X) from the drop down list.
and select the desired source
2. Next to the Destination Port display box click on
destination port (Port X) from the drop down list.
and select the desired
3. Click Add to add the redirect pair you have just configured to the list.
The new entry will now be displayed in the Current Active Entries list in this
window and the port traffic will begin to be redirected.
Managing the Hub
2-45
The SmartSwitch 2000 Chassis View
To delete an entry:
1. Highlight the entry line in the current active entries list that you wish to delete.
2. Click Delete to remove the redirect pair you have highlighted from the current
active entries list.
The entry will be deleted from the current active entries list and the traffic from
the source port will not be redirected to the destination port any longer.
Priority Configuration
The SmartSwitch 2000 devices support priority packet forwarding. Priority
packet forwarding lets you designate certain packets to be of higher importance
than others, thereby allowing for the forwarding of these packets before packets
of lower priority. This functionality is essential for time-critical applications —
such as real-time video — on shared networks.
NOTE
The Priority Configuration menu option will only appear in the Device menu for
devices that respond to any of NetSight Element Manager’s queries to the following
OIDs: ctPriorityExtPortStatus, ctPriorityExtMaxNumMACEntries, or
ctPriorityExtNumPktTypeEntries. If your device’s firmware does not respond to these
queries, contact the Global Technical Assistance Center for upgrade information.
Frame priority is enabled by the “tagging” of MAC frames so that they are given a
priority designation when they are forwarded by the SmartSwitch 2000 device —
which is a tag-aware switch (i.e., one that adheres to the IEEE P802.1p and IEEE
P802.1q Draft Standards). Tagging a frame is accomplished by adding a Tag
Header to a frame immediately following its original Destination and Source
MAC address fields (and any routing fields, if present), and then recomputing the
Frame Check Sequence (FCS) appropriately. On receiving such a frame, a
tag-aware switch will read the priority from the tagged portion of the frame,
remove the Tag Header, recompute the FCS, and then direct it to its appropriate
transmission queue.
There are eight priority levels — indicated 0 through 7— available to designate
user priority. Frames tagged with a 0 represent the lowest priority level (or
normal) traffic, and frames tagged with a 7 indicate the highest priority level
traffic.
The SmartSwitch 2000 itself supports two transmission queues: one that is for 0 or
normal priority traffic (or any non-tagged traffic), and a second queue that is
reserved for frames that have been tagged with a priority level of 1 or higher. On
receiving any priority-tagged frames, the SmartSwitch 2000 will forward them
out of the high priority queue before forwarding any frames in the normal
priority queue. However, the SmartSwitch 2000 will tag outgoing frames with the
full range of eight priority levels, so that upon reception, a device that supports
the entire range of priority queuing will forward the frame appropriately.
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Managing the Hub
The SmartSwitch 2000 Chassis View
You can use NetSight Element Manager to configure the criteria that determine
the priority in which frames will be queued for transmission by your SmartSwitch
2000. Several different criteria can be used to determine a frame’s transmission
queue order:
•
The device and port at which the frame was received.
•
The destination and/or source MAC address associated with the frame.
•
A combination of destination and/or source MAC address and the frame’s
protocol type.
•
The frame’s protocol type.
When you configure the transmission queue for a specific frame, an entry is made
in one of three priority tables maintained by the SmartSwitch 2000 device. These
tables are used to determine which transmit queue to use — normal priority or
high priority — when forwarding frames.
•
The ctPriorityExtPortTable maintains priority entries based on a frame’s receive
port.
•
The ctPriorityExtMACTable maintains priority entries based on a frame’s
MAC-layer information.
•
The ctPriorityExtPktTypeTable maintains priority entries based on the frame’s
protocol type.
The following sections discuss how to use the Port Priority Configuration
window, the MAC Based Priority Configuration window, and the Frame Priority
Configuration window to make entries in these transmit priority tables.
Configuring Priority Queuing Based on Receive Port
You can use the Port Priority Configuration window, Figure 2-18, to determine
packet queuing based solely upon the port at which the packet was received. This
allows you to ensure that a connected user or LAN segment will have priority
when frames that were received on that port are queued for transmission.
Managing the Hub
2-47
The SmartSwitch 2000 Chassis View
Highlight a port, then use the
drop-down list box to select a
priority (Normal–7).
Click Apply to set the priority
at the device. Any priority of 1
or higher will allow packets
received at the chosen port to
be forwarded from the higher
priority transmission queue.
Figure 2-18. The Port Priority Configuration Window
NOTES
In the event that an incoming packet received on a designated port already has a priority
associated with it, you can use the ctPriorityExtPortFwdInboundPriority OID to
determine whether the incoming priority should remain intact, or be replaced with the
priority that you have set for the receiving port.
Use the MIB Tools utility suite to set the ctPriorityExtPortFwdInboundPriority OID
to 1 (for the appropriate port instance) if you want the incoming packet to retain its
originally set priority when received by the port; set the OID to 2 if you want the packet to
take the default priority set for the receiving port. Refer to the Tools Guide for
information on using the MIB Tools suite.
To access the Port Priority Configuration window:
1. Click on Device to access the Device menu.
2. Click on Priority Configuration, and then select Port Based from the menu.
The Port Priority Configuration window opens.
The Port Priority Configuration window displays the contents of the
ctPriorityExtPortTable. It has a list box that displays the front panel interfaces
supported by the SmartSwitch 2000 device, along with the slot number occupied
by the module (for the SmartSwitch 2000, the slot number will always be 1), and
any transmit priority that has been assigned to those interfaces.
To assign a transmit priority to a port:
1. Click to highlight the port interface of interest in the Port # column. Each
interface is identified by its MIBII IfIndex.
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Managing the Hub
The SmartSwitch 2000 Chassis View
2. Click on the Transmit Priority drop-down list box, and scroll to select the
desired priority level (Normal–7) for forwarding packets received on the
selected port.
NOTE
Since the SmartSwitch 2000 device has two transmit queues, a priority of Normal will
cause packets received on that port to be forwarded through the lower priority queue, and
any priority of 1 through 7 will cause the packets to be forwarded through the higher
priority queue. However, other tag-aware switches may use the full range of eight priority
queues — so the priority that you assign may have bearing on how the frame is forwarded
when it is received by another device.
3. Click Apply. The defined priority displays next to the port in the Transmit
Priority column.
Configuring Priority Queuing Based on MAC-layer Information
You can use the MAC Based Priority Configuration window, Figure 2-19, to
determine packet queuing based upon the packet’s Source and/or Destination
MAC address, as well as the packet’s frame Type. These priority entries, based on
the frame’s MAC-layer information, are maintained in the ctPriorityExtMACTable.
You can create up to 1024 priority entries for queuing frames based upon on
MAC-layer information.
Click Add to enter a
MAC Address to which
you want to assign a
higher priority
transmission queue.
Select whether you want
the address type to be
destination, source, or
either type.
Determine whether to apply the
priority to all frames with the given
address and SA/DA type, or only
to frames of a specific type.
Finally, select a priority level,
and click Apply.
Figure 2-19. The MAC Based Priority Configuration Window
Managing the Hub
2-49
The SmartSwitch 2000 Chassis View
To access the MAC Based Priority Configuration window:
1. Click on Device to access the Device menu.
2. Click on Priority Configuration, and then select MAC Based from the menu.
The MAC Based Priority Configuration window opens.
The MAC Based Priority Configuration window contains the following
information:
Current Priority Entries
The Current Priority Entries list box displays any MAC-based priority entries that
have been configured for the SmartSwitch 2000 device. It has four columns:
•
MAC Address, which identifies the physical address for which a frame
transmit priority entry has been configured.
•
Address Type, which identifies whether the address of interest is in the source
or destination field, or in both fields, of the frame.
•
Frame Type, which indicates whether all frames with the given address will
have a transmit priority, or whether a specified frame Type will be used in
combination with the address.
•
Priority, which displays the current transmit priority assigned to the entry.
Below the Current Priority Entries list box, several text fields and command
buttons allow you to configure or edit MAC-based priority entries:
MAC Address
This text field allows you to enter a new MAC address that will have a transmit
priority associated with it.
Address Type
This drop-down list box allows you to select whether the given MAC address
must be in the source address portion of the frame (SA), the destination address
portion (DA), or in either portion (SA/DA).
Frame Type
This radio button/text box combination allows you to choose whether All frame
Types with the given address will be given priority, or whether frames of a
Specific type (as defined in the associated text box) will be given priority.
Priority
Priority, which indicates the transmit priority level assigned to the configured
entry.
2-50
Managing the Hub
The SmartSwitch 2000 Chassis View
To assign a transmit priority based on MAC-layer information:
1. Click on the Add button. The entry fields will be activated.
2. Click in the MAC Address text box, and type in the physical address in
XX-XX-XX-XX-XX-XX format, where X is a valid hexadecimal value (A-F or
0-9), for which you want to configure a transmit priority.
3. Click on the Address Type drop-down list box, and select whether you want
the specified address to be in the Source Address portion of the frame (SA),
the Destination Address portion (DA), or in either portion (SA/DA).
4. Specify a Frame Type that you want associated with the frame:
a. Click on the appropriate Frame Type option button: Specific if you want a
certain Frame Type associated with the given MAC address, or All if you
do not care about the Frame Type.
b.
NOTE
If you select Specific, click in the associated text box and type in the
two-byte hexadecimal value for that protocol type (e.g., 0BAD for Banyan
frames).
When creating priority entries, you can specify up to four Frame Types for the same MAC
Address value.
5. Click on the Priority drop-down list box, and scroll to select the desired
priority level — Normal (0)–7 — for forwarding packets received with the
specified MAC-layer information.
NOTE
Since the SmartSwitch 2000 has two transmit queues, a priority of Normal will cause
packets to be forwarded through the lower priority queue, and any priority of 1 through 7
will cause the packets to be forwarded through the higher priority queue.
6. Click Apply. The Current Priority Entries list box will be updated with the
newly created entry.
You can edit an existing address entry by changing the priority currently
associated with the entry. To do so:
1. Highlight the desired entry in the Current Priority Entries list box, and click on
the Edit button. The Priority drop-down list box will be activated. (All other
parameters will remain grayed-out, since they cannot be edited once they are
initially configured).
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The SmartSwitch 2000 Chassis View
2. Click on the Priority drop-down list box, and scroll to select the new priority
level (Normal–7) for forwarding packets received with the specified MAC-layer
information.
3. Click the Apply button. The Current Priority Entries list box will be updated
with the newly edited entry.
To clear a priority entry from the ctPriorityExtMACTable:
1. Highlight the desired entry in the Current Priority Entries list box, and click on
the Delete button. The entry fields will be cleared from the table.
Configuring Priority Queuing Based on Packet Type
You can use the Frame Priority Configuration window, Figure 2-20, to determine
packet queuing based solely upon its Type field data. Frame type entries are
maintained in the ctPriorityExtPktTypeTable. You can configure up to 15 frame
Type priority entries for the device.
Click Add to activate the Frame
Type field, then type in the 2
byte hexadecimal frame Type.
Use the drop-down list box to
select a priority (Normal–7)
associated with that frame Type.
Click Apply to set the priority at
the device. Any priority of 1 or
higher will allow packets
received at the chosen port to
be forwarded from the higher
priority transmission queue.
Figure 2-20. The Frame Priority Configuration Window
To assign a transmit priority based on frame Type information:
1. Click on the Add button. The entry fields will be activated.
2. Click in the Frame Type text box, and type in the 2-byte frame Type in XXXX
format, where X is a valid hexadecimal value (A-F or 0-9), for which you want
to configure a transmit priority (e.g., 8137 for Novell Type 1 frames).
3. Click on the Priority drop-down list box, and scroll to select the desired
priority level (Normal–7) for forwarding packets received with the specified
Type field information.
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NOTE
Since the SmartSwitch 2000 has two transmit queues, a priority of Normal will cause
packets to be forwarded through the lower priority queue, and any priority of 1 through 7
will cause the packets to be forwarded through the higher priority queue.
4. Click Apply. The Frame Type Entries list box will be updated with the newly
created entry.
You can edit an existing frame Type entry by changing its previously assigned
priority.
1. Highlight the desired entry in the Current Priority Entries list box, and click on
the Edit button. The Priorities drop-down list box will be activated (the Frame
Type cannot be edited once it is initially configured).
2. Click on the Priority drop-down list box, and scroll to select the desired
priority level (Normal–7) for forwarding packets received with the specified
frame Type information.
3. Click the Apply button. The Frame Type Priorities Entries list box will be
updated with the newly edited entry.
To clear a priority entry from the ctPriorityExtPktTypeTable:
1. Highlight the desired entry in the Frame Type Priorities Entries list box, and
click on the Delete button. The entry fields will be cleared from the table.
The System Resources Window
The System Resources window displays current physical and logical system
resources and utilization on your SmartSwitch 2000.
To display the System Resources window:
1. Click on Device in the Chassis View menu bar to display the Device menu.
2. Select System Resources. The System Resources window, Figure 2-21,
opens.
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The SmartSwitch 2000 Chassis View
Figure 2-21. The System Resources Window
CPU Type
Displays the type and speed (in mega-hertz) of the CPU (processor) used by the
system.
Flash Memory Installed:
Displays the total amount of installed flash memory (in Mbytes).
Flash Memory Available:
Displays (in Kbytes) the current amount of flash memory that is currently free
and not currently being used for code and data.
DRAM Installed:
Displays the total installed local memory or (DRAM) in Mbytes.
DRAM Available:
Displays (in Kbytes) the current amount of local memory (DRAM) that is
currently free and not currently being used for code and data.
SRAM Installed:
Displays the total amount of shared memory (SRAM) that is installed (in Mbytes).
SRAM Available:
Displays (in Kbytes) the current amount of shared memory (SRAM) that is free
and not currently being used for data.
NVRAM Installed:
Displays (in Kbytes) the total installed non-volatile memory (NVRAM).
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NVRAM Available:
Displays (in Bytes) the current amount of non-volatile memory (NVRAM) that is
free and not currently being used for data.
Current Switch Utilization:
Displays the current load on the switch, which is based on a percentage of
maximum switching capacity of 100%.
Peak Switch Utilization:
Displays the peak percentage of switch load (based on a maximum of 100%) that
has occurred on the switch, since power-up or last reset, along with the time and
date that it occurred. This field can be administratively refreshed, as described
below.
Reset Peak Switch Utilization:
This option allows you to clear the Peak Switch Utilization field.The Peak Switch
Utilization field will immediately display the current switch utilization, and
current date and time.
To reset peak switch utilization:
1. Click on
next to the Reset Peak Switch Utilization field and select Yes
from the drop down list. (The default value is No.)
2. Click on the Apply button to reset the displayed peak switch utilization. Note
that when the window refreshes the value in this field will return to No.
The value displayed as peak switch utilization will be reset to the current
value. The time and date will be reset to the current time and date. These
values will change only if a peak is experienced after this reset, or if you reset
this value again.
NOTE
The default setting for this field is No. While No is selected the peak switch utilization
value will not be reset when you click on the Apply button. You must choose Yes for a
reset to take place.
CPU Management Reservation:
Displays the desired amount of CPU bandwidth reserved for management
purposes: none, limited, or full. Bandwidth that is not reserved for management
will be devoted to switching.
Reserving CPU Bandwidth
Depending on your needs and the main function of your SmartSwitch 2000 you
may wish to change the amount of CPU bandwidth that is currently reserved for
management purposes. The three possible allocations of CPU bandwidth on your
SmartSwitch 2000 are:
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The SmartSwitch 2000 Chassis View
•
none — the SmartSwitch 2000 will reserve all bandwidth for switching;
therefore, if all the bandwidth is needed for switching, management frames
may be dropped.
•
limited — the management of the SmartSwitch 2000 may appear slow while
the SmartSwitch 2000 is at maximum switching load.
•
full — management of the SmartSwitch 2000 is always possible and
management frames will have priority over switched data if full CPU
bandwidth is required (switched frames may be dropped).
To configure the CPU Management Reservation:
1. Next to the CPU Management Reservation field click on
full, or limited from the drop down list.
and select none,
2. Click on the Apply button to set the new CPU management reservation. A
window opens stating the set was successful.
802.1Q VLANs
This section introduces and describes pre-standard IEEE 802.1Q port-based
Virtual Local Area Network (VLAN) technology and the windows used to
configure 802.1Q VLAN-capable devices. SmartSwitch 2000 firmware version
4.00.08 supports the pre-standard IEEE 802.1Q draft specification for port-based
VLANs.
NOTE
For SmartSwitch 2000 firmware versions 4.00.08 and above, HSIM-F6 modules cannot
be installed in a SmartSwitch 2000 that is operating in 802.1Q mode.
What is a VLAN?
A Virtual Local Area Network (VLAN) is a logical group of devices that function
as a single Local Area Network segment (broadcast domain). Devices comprising
a VLAN may be (physically) widely separated, allowing users located in separate
areas or connected to separate ports to belong to a single VLAN group. Users
assigned to a VLAN can send and receive broadcast and multicast traffic as
though they were all physically connected to a single network segment.
VLAN-capable switches isolate broadcast and multicast traffic received from
VLAN groups, and contain broadcasts and multicasts from members of a VLAN
within that group.
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What is an 802.1Q Port-Based VLAN?
Switches that support the pre-standard IEEE 802.1Q draft specification for
port-based VLANs act by classifying frames into VLAN membership. Usually,
VLAN classification is based on tag headers (VLAN tags) in the headers of data
frames. The tag header is inserted into the frame directly after the Source MAC
address field. A four-byte field in the tag header is used as the VLAN identifier.
These VLAN tags are added to data frames by the switch as the frames are
transmitted and/or received by certain ports, and are later used to make
forwarding decisions by the switch and other 802.1Q switches. In the absence of a
VLAN tag, a frame is assigned VLAN membership according to the VLAN
configuration of the switch port that receives the frame.
About 802.1Q VLAN Configuration and Operation
An 802.1Q VLAN is defined by assigning it a unique identification number (the
VLAN ID) and an optional name. The VLAN ID is used to identify data frames
that originate from, and are intended for, the ports assigned to the VLAN. Up to
64 VLANs may be created, with VLAN IDs ranging from 2-4094. VLAN ID 1 is
reserved for the Default VLAN.
Ports on 802.1Q switches are assigned membership in a VLAN by associating a
VLAN ID with each port on the switch. The VLAN ID is combined with the port’s
identification (e.g., device X port X) to form the Port VLAN ID (PVID).
NOTE
When 802.1Q mode is initially activated on a device, all ports are associated with the
Default VLAN (VLAN ID 1). If a VLAN ID has not been assigned to a particular port
on an 802.1Q switch, any frames received from that port will be classified as belonging to
the Default VLAN.
When 802.1Q is implemented for a SmartSwitch 2000 that has an HSIM-A6DP
installed, each LEC will be represented as an individual port which can be easily
assigned membership in a VLAN.
NOTE
For SmartSwitch 2000 firmware version 4.00.08 and above, the number of LECs
supported by the HSIM-A6DP in 802.1Q mode is limited to 32.
Once VLANs have been configured and activated, all frames with unknown
destination addresses (including broadcast, unknown multicast, and unknown
unicast frames) will be contained within the VLAN of their origin. The switch’s
Filtering Database tracks the associations between MAC addresses, VLAN
eligibilities, and port numbers, and is used to make forwarding decisions for
frames. All VLANs share a single Spanning Tree.
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The SmartSwitch 2000 Chassis View
Ingress List Operation
A port’s ingress list specifies the VLAN with which received frames will be
associated. The switch’s Filtering Database tracks the associations between VLAN
eligibilities, MAC addresses, and port numbers.
Untagged frames received by an 802.1Q switch port are classified according to the
VLAN membership of the port that receives the frame.
Tagged frames received by an 802.1Q switch port are classified according to the
VLAN indicated in their tag header. A port may receive a tagged frame that
specifies a VLAN other than the one assigned to the port.
Egress List Operation
Each port’s egress list specifies which VLANs are associated with the port, and
specifies what type of frame (tagged or untagged) to transmit for each particular
VLAN on a port. This information may be statically defined by the user, or
dynamically learned and maintained by the switch’s Filtering Database.
If a port receives a tagged frame that specifies a VLAN other than the one
assigned to the port, the switch will dynamically associate that frame’s source
address and VLAN with the port (i.e., add that frame’s VLAN to the receiving
port’s egress list). Dynamically learned VLANs are subject to the same aging rules
as source addresses (e.g., if a tagged frame belonging to a dynamically learned
VLAN is not received by the port within the switch’s aging time, the transmitting
station’s source address and VLAN will be aged out for that port; no unknown
destination frames belonging to the station’s VLAN will be transmitted through
the port until the VLAN is dynamically learned once again). Only tagged frames
can cause the switch to dynamically change a port’s egress list.
802.1Q Port Types
Each 802.1Q switch port is assigned a mode of operation. Port types include:
1Q Trunk
If VLAN membership is to apply to users across several switches, ports used to
connect 802.1Q-aware devices are configured to use 1Q Trunk mode. In this mode,
all frames (except BPDUs) are transmitted with a tag header included in the
frame, allowing VLAN frames to maintain their VLAN ID across multiple
switches. Any untagged frames received by the port are dropped. 1Q Trunk ports
are configured to be members of all VLANs.
1d Trunk
This mode allows a port to transmit to a traditional (802.1d) switch fabric. These
ports transmit only untagged frames, and the switch expects to receive only
untagged traffic through the port. 1d Trunk ports are configured to be members of
all VLANs. This mode can be used to share a connection among multiple VLANs
(e.g., sharing a server between two or more separate VLANs).
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Hybrid
Hybrid mode (enabled by default) allows a port to receive and transmit both
tagged and untagged frames. In this mode, the port will be a member of its
statically assigned VLAN, as well as any dynamically learned VLANs (remember,
dynamically learned VLANs are subject to the same aging rules as source
addresses).
Configuring Your 802.1Q VLANS
Before you can define and configure 802.1Q port-based VLANs on your device,
you must activate the device’s 802.1Q operational mode; this operation can be
performed using Local Management or the MIB Tools application. Using MIB
Tools, 802.1Q mode can be activated through the Container MIB’s Logical Entry
Table (contLogicalEntryTable). When the 802.1Q component is activated, the device
will automatically reset, and begin operating in 802.1Q mode.
!
CAUTION
Your SmartSwitch 2000 will automatically reset when 802.1Q mode is activated. If you
attempt to activate the 802.1Q component via the MIB Tools application, you may lose
contact with the rest of the chassis once the device resets. We recommend that Local
Management be used to activate 802.1Q mode for SmartSwitch 2000 devices.
Refer to your device’s Local Management documentation for instructions on
activating a device’s 802.1Q operational mode via Local Management. For details
on the MIB Tools application, refer to your Tools Guide.
To set up your 802.1Q port-based VLANs using NetSight Element Manager, you
must first define the desired VLANs using the VLAN Config window
(Figure 2-22), which allows you to assign VLAN IDs and optional VLAN names,
and enable or disable VLANs.
After your VLANs are defined, you may configure the ingress and egress lists for
each port using the VLAN Port Config window (Figure 2-23) and the VLAN
Egress Port Config window (Figure 2-24), respectively.
Setting VLAN Parameters and Operational Modes
802.1Q VLANs are defined using the VLAN Config window, which is accessed
from the Device menu in your switch’s Chassis View. To launch the window:
1. Click on Device in the Chassis View menu bar to display the Device menu.
2. Click on 802.1Q VLAN, and then select 802.1Q VLAN Config. The VLAN
Config window, Figure 2-22, opens.
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The SmartSwitch 2000 Chassis View
Figure 2-22. The VLAN Config Window
The Configured VLANS list box and fields allow you to view, create, modify,
delete, enable, and disable 802.1Q port-based VLANs. The list box displays the
following information about your defined VLANs:
VLAN ID
The VLAN ID is used to identify data frames that originate from, and are
intended for, the ports assigned to the VLAN. Up to 64 VLANs may be created,
with VLAN IDs ranging from 2-4094. The VLAN ID is combined with the port’s
identification (e.g., device X port X) to form the Port VLAN ID (PVID). VLAN ID
1 is reserved for the Default VLAN.
VLAN Name
An optional 32-character VLAN name may be assigned to a created VLAN. The
Default VLAN is assigned the name DEFAULT VLAN, which cannot be changed
or deleted.
Admin Status
This field indicates whether the VLAN is enabled or disabled. Unless Enable is
selected when port-based VLANs are initially defined, they are disabled by
default. The Default VLAN cannot be disabled.
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Creating and Modifying VLANs
The fields immediately below the Configured VLANS list box are used to create
and modify your port-based VLANs. To create a new VLAN:
1. In the VLAN ID field, enter a unique value between 2-4094. VLAN ID 1 is
reserved for the Default VLAN, and cannot be used.
2. If desired, enter a name for the VLAN in the VLAN Name field. VLAN names
must be 32 characters or less.
NOTE
Unless Enable is selected when a port-based VLAN is initially defined, it will be disabled
by default. A new VLAN that is left in a Disabled state will remain disabled until a port
is assigned to it, at which time it will be automatically enabled. If you are changing a
VLAN’s port assignment, the VLAN should be disabled before changing the port
configuration. See Enabling and Disabling VLANs, on page 2-62, for instructions on
disabling VLANs. See Performing Ingress List Configuration, on page 2-62, for
details on completing your VLAN port configuration.
3. Click Apply. The new VLAN will be added to the Configured VLANS list box.
Once a VLAN has been created, its VLAN ID cannot be modified. If you wish to
change a VLAN’s ID, you’ll have to delete the VLAN and create a new entry. See
Deleting VLANs, on page 2-61, for instructions on deleting a VLAN. Attempting
to change a VLAN’s ID will result in the creation of a new VLAN with the same
VLAN name.
To modify an existing VLAN’s name, select its entry in the Configured VLANS
list box. The selected VLAN’s name will be displayed in the VLAN Name field.
Modify the displayed name as outlined in Steps 2-3, above.
Deleting VLANs
The VLAN Config window also allows you to delete VLANs (except for the
Default VLAN, which cannot be deleted). When a VLAN is deleted, any ports
assigned to that VLAN will automatically become members of the Default VLAN.
To delete a VLAN from your 802.1Q switch:
1. Click to select the desired VLAN entry in the Configured VLANS list box.
2. Click Delete. The selected VLAN will be removed from the list box.
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Enabling and Disabling VLANs
NOTE
Unless Enable is selected when a VLAN is initially defined, it is disabled by default. A
new VLAN that is left in a Disabled state will remain disabled until a port is assigned to
it, at which time it will be automatically enabled. If you are changing a VLAN’s port
assignment, the VLAN should be disabled before changing the port configuration. See
Performing Ingress List Configuration, on page 2-62, for details on completing your
VLAN port configuration.
1. Select the desired VLAN entry in the Configured VLANS list box.
2. In the VLAN Admin field, click to select Enable or Disable.
3. Click the Apply button. The selected VLAN will be enabled or disabled,
depending on your selection.
Updating VLAN Config Window Information
Clicking the Refresh button will update the information displayed in the
Configured VLANs list without closing the window.
Performing Ingress List Configuration
802.1Q VLAN port assignment and ingress list configuration operations are
performed using the VLAN Port Config window, which is accessed from the
Device menu in your switch’s Device View. See Ingress List Operation, on
page 2-58 for details on ingress lists. To launch the window:
1. Click on Device in the Chassis View menu bar to display the Device menu.
2. Click on 802.1Q VLAN, and then select 802.1Q VLAN Port Config. The
VLAN Port Config window, Figure 2-23, opens.
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Figure 2-23. The VLAN Port Config Window
The 802.1Q VLAN Port Assignment list box in this window displays the
following information about ports on your 802.1Q switch:
Slot/Port
These fields display the slot and port index for each port on your 802.1Q switch.
For the SmartSwitch 2000, the slot index will always be 1.
VLAN ID
This field displays the VLAN ID of the VLAN to which the port is currently
assigned.
Mode
This field displays the port’s current mode of operation. Port operational modes
include:
Managing the Hub
•
Dot1DTrunk mode, which is used for ports that are to connect to a traditional
(802.1d) switch fabric. These ports transmit only untagged frames. 1d Trunk
ports are configured to be members of all VLANs.
•
Dot1QTrunk mode, which is used for ports used to connect 802.1Q-aware
devices if VLAN membership is to apply to users across several switches.
These ports transmit only tagged frames. 1Q Trunk ports are configured to be
members of all VLANs.
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The SmartSwitch 2000 Chassis View
•
Hybrid mode, which allows a port to receive and transmit both tagged and
untagged frames. In this mode, the port will be a member of its statically
assigned VLAN, as well as any dynamically learned VLANs. Hybrid mode is
enabled by default.
For more information on 802.1Q port operational modes, see 802.1Q Port Types,
on page 2-58.
Discard
This field displays the port’s current frame discard format (discardTagged,
discardUntagged, or noDiscard).
The VLAN ID, Port Operational Mode, and Port Discard fields, below the list
box, allow you to configure your ports as follows:
VLAN ID
This field allows you to associate a selected port with an existing VLAN. See
Assigning VLAN Membership to Ports, on page 2-64, for details on performing
this operation.
Port Operational Mode
This field allows you to assign a mode of operation to a selected port. See Setting
Port Operational Modes, on page 2-65, for details on using this field.
Port Discard
This field allows you to specify the frame discard format (discardTagged,
discardUntagged, or noDiscard) for a selected port. See Setting Port Frame
Discard Formats, on page 2-65, for details on using this field.
Assigning VLAN Membership to Ports
To assign a port on your 802.1Q switch to any of your defined VLANs:
1. In the list box, click to select a port that you wish to assign to a VLAN. The
port’s current VLAN configuration information, including its VLAN ID, will be
displayed in the fields below the list box.
2. In the VLAN ID field, click to select the VLAN ID of the VLAN to which you
wish to assign the selected port.
3. Click the Apply button. The new VLAN assignment will be reflected in the
VLAN Port Config window’s list box for the selected port.
NOTE
2-64
If you assign a port to a VLAN that is in a Disabled state, the VLAN will automatically
be Enabled once the port assignment operation has been completed.
Managing the Hub
The SmartSwitch 2000 Chassis View
Setting Port Operational Modes
To assign a port operational mode (dot1dTrunk, dot1QTrunk, or hybrid) to a port
on your 802.1Q switch:
1. In the VLAN Port Config window’s list box, click to select a port to which you
wish to assign a port operational mode.
2. In the Port Operational Mode field, click to select the desired operational
mode.
3. Click the Apply button. The selected mode will be reflected in the list box for
the selected port.
Setting Port Frame Discard Formats
To assign a frame discard format (discardTagged, discardUntagged, or
noDiscard) to a port on your 802.1Q switch:
1. In the VLAN Port Config window’s list box, click to select a port to which you
wish to assign a frame discard format.
2. In the Port Discard field, click to select the desired frame discard format.
3. Click the Apply button. The selected mode will be reflected in the list box for
the selected port.
Updating VLAN Port Config Window Information
Clicking the Refresh button will update the information displayed in the 802.1Q
VLAN Port Assignment list without closing the window.
Performing Egress List Configuration
802.1Q VLAN switching allows each port on a switch to transmit traffic for any or
all defined VLANs on your network. During egress list configuration, you
determine which VLANs are on each port’s egress list. See Egress List Operation,
on page 2-58 for details on egress lists.
Egress list configuration operations are performed using the VLAN Egress Port
Config window. To launch the window:
1. Click on Device in the Chassis View menu bar to display the Device menu.
2. Click 802.1Q VLAN, and then select 802.1Q VLAN Egress Port Config. The
VLAN Egress Port Config window, Figure 2-24, opens.
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The SmartSwitch 2000 Chassis View
Figure 2-24. The VLAN Egress Port Config Window
The list box at the top of this window is used to select a configured VLAN for
association with your switch’s ports. Clicking on a VLAN will display its
currently associated ports in the lower portion of this window. The list box
displays the following information:
Slot Number
This field displays the slot index for the device being configured.
VID
This field lists the VLAN IDs of the currently configured VLANs on your switch.
Name
This field lists the VLAN names assigned to the currently configured VLANs on
your switch.
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Under the list box there are two groups of check boxes that display the ports on
the switch. A checkmark in the port’s check box indicates that the VLAN selected
in the list box is in the port’s egress list. The two groups are:
Egress Ports
Use these check boxes to add or remove the selected VLAN from the egress list of
one or more ports.
Egress Untagged List
Use these check boxes to allow the ports to transmit untagged frames from the
selected VLAN.
Building an Egress List
1. In the list box at the top of the window, click to select a configured VLAN. The
ports that contain the selected VLAN in their egress lists will be displayed in
the lower portion of the window with checkmarks in their check boxes.
2. To add or remove the selected VLAN from the egress list of one or more ports,
click on the appropriate check box in the Egress Ports group. A checkmark in
a port’s check box indicates that the selected VLAN is in the port’s egress list.
3. To add or remove the ability for a port to transmit both tagged and untagged
frames from the selected VLAN, click to put a checkmark in the appropriate
check box in the Egress Untagged List group. Note that a port check box in
this group will be grayed out until it has been selected in the Egress Ports
group.
4. To apply any changes, click on the Apply button at the bottom of the window.
Broadcast Suppression
You can monitor and suppress the amount of broadcast frames received on each
interface on your SmartSwitch 2000; therefore, protecting your network from
broadcast storms. Specifically, you can monitor the number of frames each
interface is receiving, and set limits on how many of those broadcast frames will
be forwarded to the other interfaces. Once a threshold has been reached on an
interface, broadcast frames will be dropped. From the Broadcast Statistics and
Suppression window, you can set a unique threshold for each interface on a
frames per second basis.
To access the Broadcast Statistics and Suppression window:
1. Click on Device in the Chassis View menu bar to display the Device menu.
or
Click on the SmartSwitch 2000 module index. The Module Menu opens.
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2. Select Broadcast Suppression. The Broadcast Statistics and Suppression
window, Figure 2-25, opens.
Figure 2-25. The Broadcast Statistics and Suppression Window
Port #
This read-only field indicates the number assigned to each interface on the device.
Total RX
Displays the total number of broadcast frames received on the interface since the
device was last initialized.
Peak Rate
The peak rate of broadcast frames (in frames per second) received on the interface
since the device was last initialized or the peak value was administratively reset
through this window.
Time Since Peak
The time (in a days, hh:mm:ss format) that the peak broadcast rate occurred; that
is, the system uptime (MIB-II) at the time the peak occurred. This value will be
reset to 0 days, 00:00:00 when the device is re-initialized or when you
administratively reset the peak values.
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TIP
In order to calculate the time since peak, subtract the value in the Time Since Peak column
from the current sysUpTime displayed as Up Time in the front panel. Please note that the
peak time you calculate will be within 5 minutes of the actual time since peak, as
sysUpTime is polled by default at 3 minute intervals and the broadcast suppression values
are polled by default at 2 minute intervals.
To reset the Peak Rate and Time Since Peak values:
1. Shift-click to select one or more interfaces for which you want to reset the
values.
2. Click on the Reset Peak Rate and Peak Time on Selected Ports: drop-down
list box, and drag to select YES.
3. Click on the Apply button. The Peak Rate and Time Since Peak values will be
reset for the selected interfaces.
Threshold
The maximum number of received broadcast frames that may be forwarded by
this interface to other interfaces on the device. Any number of broadcast frames
received over this threshold will be dropped. The default value for the interface is
near the theoretical maximum frames per second for the interface, i.e., 14,880 for
10Mb Ethernet interface, 148,880 for 100Mb Ethernet or 1,488,800 for Gigabit
Ethernet.
To change the Receive Broadcast Threshold:
1. Shift-click to select one or more interfaces for which you want to change the
broadcast packet threshold.
2. Highlight the value currently in the Receive Broadcast Threshold on
Selected Ports: field and type in a new broadcast threshold value. Allowable
values begin at 10 and proceed in multiples of ten.
NOTE
When you enter a value less than 10, the threshold will default to a value of 0. If you enter
a value that is not a multiple of 10 it will round down to the last multiple of 10, i.e., if you
enter 15 as the new threshold value, the threshold value will be set to 10; if you enter 49 as
the new threshold value, the threshold value will be set to 40.
3. Click on the Apply button. The new threshold will be applied to the selected
interfaces. Any broadcast frames received by the interface exceeding the set
threshold will be dropped.
Managing the Hub
2-69
The SmartSwitch 2000 Chassis View
Setting the Device Date and Time
You can select the Edit Device Time and Edit Device Date options from the menu
to change the date and time stored in the device’s internal clock.
To edit the device time:
1. Click on Device on the Chassis View window menu bar to access the Device
menu. Click Edit Device Time.
2. The following change window, Figure 2-26, opens.
Figure 2-26. The Edit Time Window
3. Enter the new time in a 24-hour hh:mm:ss format, either by highlighting the
field you wish to change and using the up and down arrow buttons, or by
simply entering the new value in the appropriate field.
4. Click on the OK button to save your changes, or on the Cancel button to
cancel.
To edit the device date:
1. Click on Device on the Chassis View window menu bar to access the Device
menu. Click Edit Device Date.
2. The following change window, Figure 2-27, opens.
Figure 2-27. The Edit Date Window
2-70
Managing the Hub
The SmartSwitch 2000 Chassis View
3. Enter the new date in a mm/dd/yyyy format, either by highlighting the field you
wish to change and using the up and down arrow buttons, or by simply
entering the new value in the appropriate field.
4. Click OK to save your changes, or on the Cancel button to cancel.
Enabling and Disabling Ports
When you disable bridging at a port, you disconnect that port’s network from the
bridge entirely. The port does not forward any packets, nor does it participate in
Spanning Tree operations. Nodes connected to the network can still communicate
with each other, but they can’t communicate with the bridge or with other
networks connected to the bridge. When you enable a port, the port moves from
the Disabled state through the Learning and Listening states to the Forwarding
state; bridge port state color codes will change accordingly.
From the Port menus in the SmartSwitch 2000 Chassis View, you can enable and
disable any individual ports:
1. Click on the desired Port index. The Port menu displays.
2. Select Enable to enable the port, or Disable to disable the port. Your port will
now be enabled or disabled as desired.
NOTE
For more information about bridging functions and how to determine the current state of
each bridge port, see the Bridging chapter in the Tools Guide.
From the Module menu in the SmartSwitch 2000 Chassis View, you can enable or
disable bridging at the device level:
1. Click on the Module Index in the chassis display. The Module menu opens.
2. Click on Enable Bridge to restart bridging at the device level, or Disable
Bridge to halt bridging across the entire device.
Managing the Hub
2-71
The SmartSwitch 2000 Chassis View
2-72
Managing the Hub
Chapter 3
Alarm Configuration
Accessing the Basic and Advanced Alarms windows; creating a basic alarm; creating an advanced
alarm; creating events; assigning actions to events; viewing the event log
You can configure alarms and events (and, where appropriate, actions) for each
available interface through the RMON Alarm and Event functionality supported
by your SmartSwitch 2000.
TIP
The Alarm, Event, and Actions windows described in this chapter are identical to those
provided via the RMON utility. For more information about other features of RMON, see
the RMON User’s Guide.
About RMON Alarms and Events
Although Alarms and Events are defined as separate RMON groups, neither one
can function properly without the other: you can define an alarm threshold, but if
it doesn’t point to an event, there will be no indication that the threshold has been
crossed; similarly, you can define an event, but unless it is attached to an alarm
threshold, it won’t be triggered. Each is an essential part of the same notification
process: the alarm defines a set of conditions you want to know about, and the
event determines the means of letting you know those conditions have occurred.
Events are also an integral part of the filter and packet capture functionality: you
can start and stop packet capturing in response to events, or a successful packet
capture can generate its own event.
NetSight Element Manager provides two means for configuring RMON alarms:
using the Basic Alarms window, you can define both rising and falling alarm
thresholds for up to three pre-selected MIB-II variables per interface; based on the
options you select, the application automatically creates the necessary events (to
log alarm occurrences, generate a trap, or both) and — for devices which support
the Actions MIB — adds the requested actions to those events (to enable or
disable bridging at the selected interface).
3-1
Alarm Configuration
Using the Advanced Alarms feature, you can define custom alarms for almost any
MIB-II or RMON object, as long as it is present in the device firmware and its
value is defined as an integer (including counters, timeticks, and gauges). All
aspects of these alarms are user-selectable: thresholds can be established on either
the absolute or delta value for a variable; events can be configured to create a log,
generate a trap, or both; and for Enterasys devices that support the Actions MIB,
events can also be configured to perform any defined SNMP SET or series of SETs
on device objects. The Advanced Alarms feature also allows you to configure any
events you wish to use in conjunction with the Packet Capture functionality. (For
more information on using the Packet Capture feature, see the RMON User’s
Guide included with your software.)
The Basic Alarms feature allows you to assign alarms to any interface type; using
the Advanced Alarms feature, you need only be sure to select variables
appropriate to the interface — Ethernet for Ethernet, Token Ring for Token Ring,
etc. — when defining your alarms.
TIP
You can use the RMON Alarms feature to configure alarms for MIB objects on FDDI,
ATM, and other interfaces that don’t specifically support RMON: the Basic Alarms
window provides MIB II objects as alarm variables; Advanced Alarm configuration allows
you to select any object as an alarm variable, as long as its value is defined as an integer
and you assign the correct instance value. See step 5 on page 3-18 and the Note which
follows it for more information on assigning the correct instance value to an advanced
alarm.
Basic Alarm Configuration
Using the Basic Alarm Configuration application, you can define both rising and
falling alarm thresholds for three selected MIB-II objects: ifInOctets, ifInNUcast,
and ifInErrors. Because these pre-selected objects are not RMON-specific, you can
configure alarms for all interfaces installed in your SmartSwitch 2000 — including
those, like FDDI, for which no specific RMON statistics currently exist.
In addition to configuring separate rising and falling thresholds, you can also
configure your device’s response to an alarm condition: when a threshold is
crossed, the RMON device can create a log of alarm events, send a trap notifying
your management workstation that an alarm condition has occurred, or both; you
can even configure an alarm to enable or disable bridging on the offending port in
response to a rising or falling alarm condition.
TIP
3-2
The Basic Alarm Configuration window combines the three parts of creating a working
alarm — configuring the alarm itself, configuring an event that will announce the
occurrence of an alarm (including assigning any actions), and linking the two — into a
single step, and handles the details transparently. For more information about the
individual steps involved in creating an alarm, see Advanced Alarm Configuration, on
page 3-10.
Basic Alarm Configuration
Alarm Configuration
Accessing the Basic Alarm Configuration Window
To access the RMON Basic Alarm Configuration window:
1. From the Chassis View, click on the appropriate port interface to display the
Port menu.
2. Select Alarm Configuration. The RMON Basic Alarm Configuration window,
Figure 3-1, opens.
Figure 3-1. The RMON Basic Alarm Configuration Window
TIP
You can also access the Alarms function — and the rest of the RMON functionality — by
selecting the RMON option from the Chassis View Utilities menu.
When the window is first launched, no interfaces will be selected, and the Apply,
Disable, and View Log buttons will be grayed out: the Apply and Disable
buttons will activate when an interface is selected; the View Log button will
activate when an interface which has experienced an alarm event is selected. The
presence of an event log is indicated by the double greater-than sign (>>)
displayed to the left of the threshold value that was crossed.
Basic Alarm Configuration
3-3
Alarm Configuration
Viewing Alarm Status
The Basic Alarm Configuration window contains all the fields you need to
configure one or more of the three basic alarms available for each interface
installed in your RMON device:
Kilobits — Total Errors — Broadcasts/Multicasts
Use these fields at the top of the window to change the alarm type whose status is
displayed in the list box. For example, if the Kilobits option is selected, the
information in the list box pertains to the status of the Kilobits alarm type for each
installed interface. Before you configure an alarm or alarms, be sure the
appropriate option is selected here.
The available alarm variables are:
TIP
•
Kilobits (ifInOctets) — tracks the number of octets of data received by the
selected interface. Note that this value has been converted for you from octets
(or bytes) to kilobits (or units of 125 bytes); be sure to enter your thresholds
accordingly. For example, to set a rising threshold of 1250 octets, enter a
threshold value of 10; to set a falling threshold of 625 octets, enter a threshold
value of 5.
•
Total Errors (ifInErrors) — tracks the number of error packets received by the
selected interface.
•
Broadcast/Multicast (ifInNUcast) — tracks the number of non-unicast — that
is, broadcast or multicast — packets received by the selected interface.
The three pre-selected alarm variables are all MIB II variables; this allows you to configure
alarms for any installed interface — even those for which no specific RMON statistics
exist.
Port Number
Provides a sequential indexing of the interfaces installed in your RMON device.
IF Number
Displays the interface number assigned to each available interface.
IF Type
Displays each interface’s type: FDDI, Ethernet, Token Ring, or ATM. Note that
there is no type distinction between standard Ethernet and Fast Ethernet.
Status
Displays the current status of the selected alarm type for each interface: Enabled
or Disabled. Remember, this status refers only to the alarm type which is selected
at the top of the window; each of the other two alarm types can have different
states.
3-4
Basic Alarm Configuration
Alarm Configuration
Log/Trap
Indicates whether or not each alarm has been configured to create a silent log of
event occurrences and the alarms that triggered them, and whether or not each
alarm has been configured to issue a trap in response to a rising or falling alarm
condition. Possible values are log, trap, log&trap, or none.
Polling Interval
Displays the amount of time, in days, hours, minutes, and seconds, over which
the selected alarm variable will be sampled. At the end of the interval, the sample
value will be compared to both the rising and falling thresholds (described
below). You can set any interval up to 24,855 days.
Rising Threshold
Displays the high threshold value set for the selected alarm variable. Values used
to compare to the thresholds are relative, or delta values (the difference between
the value counted at the end of the current interval and the value counted at the
end of the previous interval); be sure to set your thresholds accordingly.
Rising Action
Indicates whether or not a rising alarm occurrence will initiate any actions in
response to the alarm condition: Enable if bridging will be enabled at the selected
interface in response to a rising alarm, Disable if bridging will be disabled at the
selected interface in response to a rising alarm, and None if no actions have been
configured for the selected alarm. Note that the Action fields will be unavailable
for devices configured to operate in SecureFast switching mode.
Falling Threshold
Displays the low threshold value set for the selected alarm variable. Values used
to compare to the thresholds are relative, or delta values (the difference between
the value counted at the end of the current interval and the value counted at the
end of the previous interval); be sure to set your thresholds accordingly.
Falling Action
Indicates whether or not a falling alarm occurrence will initiate any actions in
response to the alarm condition: Enable if bridging will be enabled at the selected
interface in response to a falling alarm, Disable if bridging will be disabled in
response to a falling alarm, and None if no actions have been configured for the
selected alarm. Note that the Action fields will be unavailable for devices
configured to operate in SecureFast switching mode.
TIP
Before you decide whether or not to assign an action to a rising or falling alarm, it is
important to understand something about the hysteresis function built in to the RMON
alarm functionality. See How Rising and Falling Thresholds Work, on page 3-27, for
more information.
Basic Alarm Configuration
3-5
Alarm Configuration
The remainder of the window fields provide the means for configuring alarms for
each available interface. The information provided in this screen is static once it is
displayed; for updated information, click on the Refresh button. Adding or
modifying an alarm automatically updates the list.
Creating and Editing a Basic Alarm
The editable fields at the bottom of the Basic Alarm Configuration window allow
you to configure alarm parameters for each available interface. These fields will
display the parameters used for the most recently configured alarm (no matter
which interfaces are selected in the list box); this allows you to set the same
parameters on multiple interfaces with a single set. Hold down the Shift key
while clicking to select a contiguous group of interfaces; use the Ctrl key to select
any interfaces. To display the alarm parameters for a specific interface,
double-click on that interface.
There is no specific “Enable” function; simply configuring thresholds and/or
actions for an alarm and applying those changes enables the alarm. For more
information on disabling an alarm, see Disabling a Basic Alarm, on page 3-8.
To configure an alarm:
1. At the top of the window, click to select the variable to be used for your alarm:
Kilobits, Total Errors, or Broadcast/Multicast. The display in the list box will
reflect the current status at each interface of the alarm type you have
selected.
2. In the list box, click to highlight the interface (or use shift-click or ctrl-click to
select multiple interfaces) for which you would like to configure an alarm for
the selected variable. Note that the editable fields will display the parameters
assigned to the most recently set alarm; however, any changes you make in
these fields will be set to all selected interfaces.
3. In the Interval field, enter the amount of time, in days, hours, minutes, and
seconds, over which the selected variable will be sampled. At the end of the
interval, the sample value will be compared to both the rising and falling
thresholds. You can assign any time interval up to 24,855 days. If you set an
incorrect time value (e.g., you enter 75 minutes instead of 1 hour, 15 minutes)
you will receive an error message. Click OK and enter the correct time value.
4. In the Alarm field, click to select one or both of the following options:
a. Select Log if you wish to create a silent log of alarm occurrences.
b.
3-6
Select Trap if you want your device to issue a trap in response to each
alarm occurrence.
Basic Alarm Configuration
Alarm Configuration
NOTES
In order for the trap selection to work properly, your SmartSwitch 2000 must be
configured to send traps to your network management station. This is accomplished via
Local Management and the Trap Table; consult your device hardware manual for more
information. If you are monitoring a variable you consider to be critical, we do not
recommend that you select Trap as the only event response; if a trap is lost due to a
collision or other transmission problem, it will not be re-sent.
5. Any value you enter in the Community field will be included in any trap
messages issued by your SmartSwitch 2000 in response to the alarm(s) you
are configuring; this value is also used to direct traps related to this alarm to
the appropriate management workstation(s):
a. If you enter a value in this field, traps related to the associated alarms
will only be sent to the network management stations in the device’s trap
table which have been assigned the same community name (and for
which traps have been enabled). Any IP addresses in the device’s trap
table which have not been assigned the same community string, or which
have been assigned no community string, will not receive traps related to
the alarm(s) you are configuring.
b.
If you leave this field blank, traps related to the associated alarms will
be sent to any network management stations which have been added to
the device’s trap table, and for which traps have been enabled —
regardless of whether or not those IP addresses have been assigned a
community name in the Trap Table.
6. Click in the Rising Threshold field; enter the high threshold value for this
alarm. Compared values are always relative, or delta values (the difference
between the value counted at the end of the current interval and the value
counted at the end of the previous interval); be sure to set your thresholds
accordingly.
When configuring a Kilobits alarm, NetSight Element Manager converts
octets into kilobits (units of 125 bytes, or octets) for you; for example, to set a
rising threshold of 1250 octets, enter a threshold value of 10.
7. In the Rising Action field, click to select the action you want your device to
take in response to a rising alarm: Enable Port, Disable Port, or None. Note
that this action enables and disables only bridging at the specified port, and
not the interface itself.
For more information on how actions are triggered, see How Rising and
Falling Thresholds Work, on page 3-27.
8. Click in the Falling Threshold field; enter the low threshold value for this
alarm. Remember, compared values are always relative, or delta values (the
difference between the value counted at the end of the current interval and
the value counted at the end of the previous interval); be sure to set your
thresholds accordingly.
Basic Alarm Configuration
3-7
Alarm Configuration
When configuring a Kilobits alarm, NetSight Element Manager converts
octets into kilobits (units of 125 bytes, or octets) for you; for example, to set a
falling threshold of 625 octets, enter a threshold value of 5.
9. In the Falling Action field, click to select the action you want your device to
take in response to a falling alarm: Enable Port, Disable Port, or None. Note
that this action enables and disables only bridging at the specified port, and
not the interface itself.
For more information on how actions are triggered, see How Rising and
Falling Thresholds Work, on page 3-27.
TIP
Remember, the Actions fields will be grayed out for devices configured to operate in
SecureFast switching mode, as there is no active bridging component on those interfaces.
10. Click Apply to set your changes. If you have made any errors in configuring
alarm parameters (using an invalid rising or falling threshold, for example, or
neglecting to supply a polling interval), either an error window with the
appropriate message displays, or a beep will sound and the cursor will blink in
the field which contains the error. Correct the noted problem(s), and click
Apply again.
Once you click the Apply button, the configured alarm parameters will be set for
every selected interface, and the alarms will automatically be enabled; the list box
display will also refresh to reflect these changes. To configure additional alarms,
or alarms of a different type, select the appropriate alarm variable at the top of the
window, highlight the appropriate interface(s), and repeat the procedures
outlined above.
Disabling a Basic Alarm
Using the Disable button at the bottom of the window actually performs two
functions: it both disables the alarm and deletes the alarm entry (and its
associated event and action entries) from device memory to help conserve device
resources. In the list box display, the parameters for any “disabled” alarm are
automatically reset to their default values.
1. In the top of the window, click to select the variable for which you wish to
disable an alarm: Kilobits, Total Errors, or Broadcast/Multicast.
2. In the list box display, click to highlight the interface(s) for which you wish to
disable the selected alarm type. (Remember, you can use shift-click to select
a sequential group of interfaces, or ctrl-click to select any group of
interfaces.)
3. Click Disable. The selected alarm type on the selected interface(s) will be
disabled, and the list box display will refresh to reflect those changes.
3-8
Basic Alarm Configuration
Alarm Configuration
Viewing the Basic Alarm Log
If you have selected the “log” response for an alarm, and that alarm’s rising
and/or falling threshold has been crossed, the Basic Alarms application will
create a log of alarm occurrences. If a threshold has been crossed, it will be
preceded in the interface list box display by a double greater-than sign (>>).
Clicking to select an interface which is so marked will activate the View Log
button; selecting the View Log button will launch the appropriate Basic Alarm
Log, Figure 3-2. (Note that selecting more than one interface — even if all selected
interfaces have experienced alarm conditions — will deactivate the View Log
button; you can only view a single alarm log at a time.)
Figure 3-2. Basic Alarm Log
The top portion of the Basic Alarm Log window contains the device information
boxes, as well as the Port Number assigned to the interface that experienced the
alarm condition and the type of alarm that was triggered; the remainder of the
window contains the following information about each alarm occurrence:
Index
TIP
This index number uniquely identifies each occurrence of
a rising or falling event. Note that, since the alarm whose
log is displayed in Figure 3-2 experienced both rising and
falling alarms, there are two sets of event indices: one
which identifies each instance of the rising alarm, and
one which identifies each instance of the falling alarm.
For more information about the relationship between rising and falling alarms and the
hysteresis function that controls the generation of alarm events, see How Rising and
Falling Thresholds Work, on page 3-27.
Time
Basic Alarm Configuration
Indicates the date and time of each event occurrence.
3-9
Alarm Configuration
Description
Provides a detailed description of the condition which
triggered the alarm, including whether it was a Rising or
Falling alarm, the Value which triggered the alarm, and
the configured Threshold that was crossed.
Each log will hold only a finite number of entries, which is determined by the
resources available on the device; when the log is full, the oldest entries will be
replaced by new ones.
Advanced Alarm Configuration
The Basic Alarm Configuration window provides a quick and easy way to set up
some basic alarms for all of the interfaces installed in your SmartSwitch 2000.
However, if you prefer more control over the parameters of the alarms you set (as
well as their associated events and actions) and/or a wider array of choices for
each variable, the Advanced Alarm feature provides a powerful and flexible
means for configuring alarms, events, and actions to suit your particular
networking needs.
Accessing the RMON Advanced Alarm/Event List
To access the RMON Advanced Alarm/Event List window:
1. In the Chassis View, click on the appropriate port interface to display the Port
menu. Click on Alarm Configuration.
2. In the Basic Alarm Configuration window, click on the Advanced button; the
RMON Advanced Alarm/Event List window, Figure 3-3, opens.
3-10
Advanced Alarm Configuration
Alarm Configuration
Figure 3-3. The RMON Advanced Alarm/Event List Window
NOTES
Neither the Alarms or Events list is interface-specific; both will be displayed the same for
every interface. Alarms and events which have been configured via the Basic Alarms
window are not displayed in and cannot be accessed or edited from the Advanced
Alarm/Event List window.
The top portion of the window displays the usual device information boxes; the
remainder of the window contains the Alarms Watch and Events Watch lists, and
the command buttons that allow you to create, edit, and delete entries in those
lists, or refresh the display.
Advanced Alarm Configuration
3-11
Alarm Configuration
The fields in the Alarms Watch display include:
3-12
Index
The index is a number that uniquely identifies each
alarm. Index numbers are user-defined; you can use any
indexing scheme that works for you. These numbers are
permanently assigned to their associated alarms;
however, index numbers made available by the deletion
of existing alarms can be assigned to new alarms, as
needed. Indices 2000 to 3999 are reserved and
unavailable.
Interval
Indicates the amount of time, in seconds, over which the
selected variable will be sampled. At the end of the
interval, the sample value is compared to both the rising
and falling thresholds configured for the alarm.
Sample
Indicates whether the sample value to be compared to
the thresholds is an absolute, or total value — that is, the
total value counted for the selected variable — or a
relative, or delta value — the difference between the
value counted at the end of the current interval and the
value counted at the end of the previous interval.
LoThrshld
Indicates the set value for the low, or falling threshold.
Event #
Indicates the event index number that the falling
threshold points to: this is the event that will be triggered
if the falling threshold is met or crossed. If the value for
this field is zero, no event will be triggered.
HiThrshld
Indicates the set value for the high, or rising threshold.
Event #
Indicates the event index number that the rising
threshold points to: the event that will be triggered if the
rising threshold is met or crossed. If the value for this
field is zero, no event will be triggered.
Status
Indicates the status of the alarm: valid, invalid, or
underCreation. An alarm that is invalid is not functional;
it may be referring to a MIB component that is inactive
(such as the Hosts component), not present, or
unreachable, or it may have been deleted by software but
not yet removed from memory at the device. An alarm
that is underCreation is in the process of being
configured (possibly by another management station),
and should not be modified until its status is valid; if it
never reaches valid status, it will eventually be removed.
Alarm Variable
Indicates the variable that is being watched. You can use
the scroll bar, if necessary, to view the complete name.
Advanced Alarm Configuration
Alarm Configuration
The information provided in this screen is static once it is displayed; for updated
information, click Refresh. Adding or modifying an alarm automatically updates
the list.
The fields in the Events Watch display include:
Index
This is a number that uniquely identifies an entry in the
event table; an index number is assigned when an event
is created. These numbers are extremely important, as
they are the means by which an event is associated with
an alarm or a packet capture filter. As with alarms, these
index numbers are user-defined and can be assigned
according to any indexing scheme that works for you.
Index numbers are permanently assigned to their
associated events; however, numbers made available by
the deletion of existing events can be assigned to new
events, as needed. Indices 2000 to 4999 are reserved and
unavailable.
LastTime
Indicates the last time this event was triggered. Note that
this information is static once it is displayed, and the
LastTime field will not be updated unless you close, then
open, the Alarms/Events window, or click Refresh.
Type
Indicates the type of response that will be generated if
the event is triggered: log, trap, or log & trap. A type of
“none” indicates that occurrences of the event will not be
logged and no trap will be sent; however, note that this
field does not indicate whether or not there are any
actions associated with the selected event.
Description
This is a user-defined text description used to identify
the event and/or the alarm or packet capture that
triggers it.
The Event Log button at the bottom of the screen provides access to the log which
lists the occurrences of an event.
Creating and Editing an Advanced Alarm
The Create/Edit Alarms window (Figure 3-4, following page) allows you to both
create new alarms and edit existing ones. When you click on the Create/Edit
button in the Alarms Watch list, the Create/Edit Alarms window will display the
parameters of the alarm which is currently highlighted in the list. (If no alarms
have yet been configured, a set of default parameters will be displayed.) All of
these parameters are editable: to change an existing alarm, edit any parameter
except the Index value; to create an entirely new alarm, simply assign a new Index
number. The ability to assign index numbers allows you to quickly and easily
create a number of similar alarms without having to close, then re-open the
window or re-assign every parameter.
Advanced Alarm Configuration
3-13
Alarm Configuration
The main Alarm/Event window remains active while the Create/Edit Alarm
window is open; to edit a different alarm (or use its settings as the basis of a new
alarm), simply double-click on the alarm you want to use in the main Alarms
Watch list, and the Create/Edit Alarm window will update accordingly.
To configure an alarm:
1. If you wish to modify an existing alarm or create a new alarm based on the
parameters of an existing one, be sure the alarm of interest is highlighted in
the Alarms Watch list, then click on the Create/Edit button at the top of the
Alarms Watch portion of the RMON Advanced Alarm/Event List. The
Create/Edit Alarms window, Figure 3-4, opens.
If you wish to create an entirely new alarm, it doesn’t matter which existing
alarm (if any) is highlighted when you open the Create/Edit Alarms window;
although the window will, by default, display the parameters of whichever
alarm is currently selected, all parameters are editable and can be configured
as desired.
NOTE
Whether you are modifying an existing alarm or creating a new one is determined solely
by the assignment of the Index number: if you assign a previously unused index number,
a new alarm instance will be created; if you use an existing index number, its associated
alarm will be modified.
Figure 3-4. The RMON Create/Edit Alarms Window
2. In the Owner text box, enter some appropriate text designation for this alarm,
if desired; you may want to use the network manager’s name or phone
number, or the IP or MAC address of the management workstation, to identify
3-14
Advanced Alarm Configuration
Alarm Configuration
the creator of the alarm. Since any workstation can access and change the
alarms you are setting in your SmartSwitch 2000, some owner identification
can prevent alarms from being altered or deleted accidentally. The default
value provided is — <IP address> <(hostname)> <date> <time>, where
<IP address> and <(hostname)> refer to the workstation that created the
alarm and <date> and <time> reflect the date and time of the alarm’s creation.
3. If you are creating a new alarm, use the Index field to assign a unique,
currently unused index number to identify the alarm. Clicking on the Index
button will automatically assign the lowest available number; you can also
click directly in the text box and assign any value you want between 1 and
1,999 and 4,000 and 9,999 (indices 2000 to 3999 are reserved and
unavailable).
NOTE
Clicking on the Index button to select the next available index number will replace the
current Owner string with the default value described above; if the default value is
already in place, the date and time will be updated.
If you wish to modify an existing alarm, enter the appropriate index value,
or double-click on the alarm of interest in the Alarms Watch list (in the main
Alarm/Event window).
TIP
The only thing that determines whether you are modifying an existing alarm or creating a
new one is the assignment of the index number; be sure to assign this value appropriately.
4. To select the Variable to be used for your alarm, use the MIBTree panel
provided on the right side of the window. (For more information about how to
use the MIB Tree panel, see the MIB Tools chapter in the Tools Guide.) The
display will default to the top of the tree (labeled Internet); there are three
ways to locate and/or assign the correct variable:
a. If you know the exact name of the OID whose value you wish to track,
simply enter the name in the Alarm Variable field; to verify that you have
entered the name correctly, click on the Find-> button to move the MIB
Tree display to that OID. (If the MIB Tree display does not adjust to show
the OID you’ve entered, you’ve entered the name incorrectly.)
b.
Use the Radar View panel located just left of the MIB Tree panel to adjust
the MIB Tree display to the part of the tree that contains the variable you
are interested in, then click to open the appropriate folders. (Again, see
the Tools Guide for more details on using the Radar View.)
c.
Use the scroll bars and click to open the appropriate folders in the MIB
Tree panel to locate the object you wish to use; click to select it in the
panel, and its name will automatically be entered in the Alarm Variable
field.
Advanced Alarm Configuration
3-15
Alarm Configuration
TIP
If you don’t know the exact spelling of the OID you wish to use for your alarm variable,
and you can’t find it by searching through the tree, use the MIB Tool Find feature to locate
the OID and determine its exact spelling (and tree location). For more information on the
MIB Tool utility and its Find capabilities, see the MIB Tools chapter in the Tools Guide.
The Find feature is not case-sensitive.
Almost any RMON or MIB-II object can be used as an alarm variable as long
as it is resident in the device firmware and its value is defined as an integer
(including counters, timeticks, and gauges). If you select an invalid object (i.e.,
one whose value is not an integer), the message “!!Can’t set alarm on this
type!!” will display in the Alarm Variable field.
NOTE
If you select an object which is not resident in the device firmware, you will receive a “Set
Failed; ensure variable is readable” message when you try to set your alarm by clicking on
the Apply button. If you are unsure just which objects are resident on your device, and
you find yourself receiving a lot of “Set Failed” messages, you can use the MIB Tools
utility (accessed from the main console window menu bar or from the Chassis View) to
determine which objects are and are not part of your device’s firmware — simply query
the object you are interested in; if the query response comes back empty, the object is not
present (make sure you are using the appropriate community name when making a query,
or you will get no response).
5. Once you have selected the object you wish to use for your alarm variable,
you must assign the appropriate instance value in the Alarm Instance field.
Most RMON objects are instanced by the index number assigned to the table
in which they reside; for example, if you wish to set an alarm on an object
located in an RMON Statistics table, you can determine the appropriate
instance by noting the index number assigned to the table that is collecting
data on the interface you’re interested in. In the case of the default tables,
index numbers often mirror interface numbers; however, if there are multiple
default tables per interface, or if additional tables have been created, this may
not be true. (Table index numbers are assigned automatically as table entries
are created; no two tables — even those on different interfaces — will share
the same table index number.)
If you have selected an object from a table which is indexed by some other
means — for example, by ring number — you must be sure to assign the
instance accordingly. If you’re not sure how a tabular object is instanced, you
can use the MIBTree utility (described in the Tools Guide) to query the object;
all available instances for the object will be displayed. (Host and matrix table
objects — which are indexed by MAC address — require special handling;
see the Note which follows this step.)
If you have selected an object which is not part of a table, you must assign an
instance value of 0.
3-16
Advanced Alarm Configuration
Alarm Configuration
TIP
You can use the MIB Tree panel to determine which objects are tabular and which are not:
objects which are part of a table will descend from a blue folder (which will have a “T” on
it, and a name which will almost always include the word “table”); objects which are not
will descend directly from a yellow folder. (Note: There may be one or more yellow
folders in between the blue folder which contains the table and the leaf object you wish to
use; however, those objects are still part of the table.)
Be sure you define your instance values carefully; if you neglect to set the
instance correctly, you will receive the “Set failed; ensure variable is readable”
error message when you click Apply to set your alarm.
Advanced Alarm Configuration
3-17
Alarm Configuration
NOTE
If you wish to set an alarm on an object whose instance is non-integral — for example, a
Host Table object indexed by MAC address — or on an object with multiple indices, like a
Matrix Table entry (which is indexed by a pair of MAC addresses), you must follow
certain special procedures for defining the instance. For these OIDs, the instance
definition must take the following format:
table index.length(in bytes).instance(in decimal format)
For the first byte of the instance, you must use the index number of the table which
contains the OID you want to track. For example, to set an alarm on an object in the Host
Table, define the first byte of the instance as the index number assigned to the specific Host
Table you want to check. These index numbers are assigned automatically as the table
entries are created; no two tables — even if they are on different interfaces — will share
the same table index number.
Second, you must specify the length, in bytes, of the index you will be using. Again, in the
case of an object in the Host Table, that value would be 6, since Host Table entries are
indexed by MAC address — a six-byte value.
Finally, you must specify the index itself, in decimal format. In the case of a MAC
address, that means you must convert the standard hexadecimal format to decimal format.
To do this, simply multiply the first digit of the two-digit hex number by 16, then add the
value of the second digit. (For hex values represented by alphabetical characters,
remember that a=10, b=11, c=12, d=13, e=14, and f=15.) A hex value of b7, for instance,
is represented in decimal format as 16 x 11 + 7, or 183.
So, for example, the instance for an object in the Hosts group might read as follows:
2.6.0.0.29.170.35.201
where 2=the host table index; 6=the length in bytes of the index to follow; and
0.0.29.170.35.201=the decimal format for MAC address 00-00-1d-aa-23-c9.
For objects with multiple indices — such as objects in a matrix table — you must add
additional length and index information to the instance definition, as illustrated below:
3.6.0.0.29.170.35.201.6.0.0.29.10.20.183
where 3=the matrix table index; 6=the length in bytes of the index to follow;
0.0.29.170.35.201=the decimal format for MAC address 00-00-1d-aa-23-c9; 6=the length
in bytes of the next index; and 0.0.29.10.20.183=the decimal format for MAC address
00-00-1d-0a-14-b7.
Additional instance issues may exist for FDDI objects; if you’re unsure how to assign an
instance, use the MIBTree utility to query the object of interest, and note the appropriate
instancing on the returned values.
6. In the Alarm Interval field, enter the amount of time over which the selected
variable will be sampled. At the end of the interval, the sample value will be
compared to both the rising and falling thresholds. There is no practical limit to
the size of the interval (as the maximum value is 24,855 days 3 hours 14
minutes and 7 seconds — over 68 years!); the default value is 1 minute.
3-18
Advanced Alarm Configuration
Alarm Configuration
7. Since the first sample taken can be misleading, you can use the selections in
the Startup Alarm box to disable either the rising or the falling threshold for
that sample only. If you would like to exclude the falling alarm, select the
Rising option; the first sample taken will only generate a rising alarm, even if
the sample value is at or below the falling threshold. To exclude the rising
alarm, select the Falling option; the first sample will then only generate a
falling alarm, even if the sample value is at or above the rising threshold. If you
wish to receive both alarms as appropriate, select the Both option.
8. Use the selections in the Sample Type box to indicate whether you want your
threshold values compared to the total count for the variable (Absolute), or to
the difference between the count at the end of the current interval and the
count at the end of the previous interval (Delta). Make sure you have set your
thresholds accordingly.
9. Click in the Rising Threshold field; enter the high threshold value for this
alarm.
10. There are two ways to assign an event to your rising threshold: click in the
Rising Event Index text box and enter the number of the event you would like
to see triggered if the rising threshold is crossed; or use the Events Watch list
in the main Alarm/Event window to highlight the desired event, then click on
the Rising Event Index button. Be sure you assign the number of a valid
event or there will be no response if the selected variable meets or crosses
this threshold; assigning an index of zero effectively disables the threshold, as
there will be no indication that it has been crossed.
For more information on how events are triggered, see How Rising and
Falling Thresholds Work, on page 3-27.
11. Click in the Falling Threshold field; enter the low threshold value for this
alarm.
12. There are two ways to assign an event to your falling threshold: click in the
Falling Event Index text box and enter the number of the event you would like
to see triggered if the falling threshold is crossed; or use the Events Watch list
in the main Alarm/Event window to highlight the desired event, then click on
the Falling Event Index button. Again, be sure you assign the number of a
valid event or there will be no response if the selected variable meets or
crosses this threshold; assigning an index of zero effectively disables the
threshold, as there will be no indication that it has been crossed.
For more information on how events are triggered, see How Rising and
Falling Thresholds Work, on page 3-27.
There is no limit to the number of alarms that may be assigned to the same event.
NOTE
Advanced Alarm Configuration
3-19
Alarm Configuration
13. Click Apply to set your changes. If you have made any errors in configuring
alarm parameters (using an invalid value in any field, leaving a field blank, or
selecting an alarm variable which is not resident on the device), an error
window with the appropriate message displays. Correct the noted problem(s),
and click Apply again.
The window remains open so that you may configure additional new alarms or
modify existing ones; remember, you can double-click on any alarm in the Alarms
Watch list in the main Alarm/Event window to display its parameters in the
Create/Edit Alarm window. When you have finished configuring your alarms,
click Cancel to close the window.
Creating and Editing an Event
The Create/Edit Events window (Figure 3-5 on page 3-21) — like the Create/Edit
Alarms window — allows you to both create new events and edit existing ones.
When you click on the Create/Edit button in the Events Watch list, the
Create/Edit Events window will display the parameters of the event which is
currently highlighted in the list. (If no events have yet been configured, a set of
default parameters will be displayed.) All of these parameters are editable: to
change an existing event, edit any parameter except the Index value; to create an
entirely new event, simply assign a new Index number. The ability to assign index
numbers allows you to quickly and easily create a number of similar events
without having to close, then re-open the window or re-assign every parameter.
The main Alarm/Event window remains active while the Create/Edit Event
window is open; to edit a different event (or use its settings as the basis of a new
event), simply double-click on the event you want to use in the main Events
Watch list, and the Create/Edit Event window will update accordingly.
TIP
If the Create/Edit Actions window is also open, it too will update to display the actions
associated with the event currently selected in the main Alarm/Event window. See
Adding Actions to an Event, on page 3-23, for more information on the actions feature.
To configure an event:
1. If you wish to modify an existing event or create a new event based on the
parameters of an existing one, be sure the event of interest is highlighted in
the Events Watch list, then click on the Create/Edit button at the top of the
Events Watch portion of the RMON Advanced Alarm/Event List. The
Create/Edit Events window, Figure 3-5, opens.
If you wish to create an entirely new event, it doesn’t matter which existing
event (if any) is highlighted when you open the Create/Edit Events window;
although the window will, by default, display the parameters of whichever
event is currently selected, all parameters are editable and can be configured
as desired.
3-20
Advanced Alarm Configuration
Alarm Configuration
TIP
Whether you are modifying an existing event or creating a new one is determined solely
by the assignment of the Index number: if you assign a previously unused index number,
a new event instance will be created; if you use an existing index number, its associated
event will be modified.
Figure 3-5. The RMON Create/Edit Events Window
2. If you are creating a new event, use the Index field to assign a unique,
currently unused index number to identify the event. Clicking on the Index
button will automatically assign the lowest available number; you can also
click directly in the text box and assign any value you want between 1 and
1,999 and 5,000 and 9,999 (indices 2000 to 4999 are reserved and
unavailable).
NOTE
Clicking on the Index button to select the next available index number will replace the
current Owner string with the default value; if the default value is already in place, the
date and time will be updated.
If you wish to modify an existing event, enter the appropriate index value,
or double-click on the event of interest in the Events Watch list (in the main
Alarm/Event window).
TIP
The only thing that determines whether you are modifying an existing event or creating a
new one is the assignment of the index number; be sure to assign this value appropriately.
Advanced Alarm Configuration
3-21
Alarm Configuration
3. Click in the Description text box to enter any text description you want to
identify the event. This description displays in the Events Watch window and
help you distinguish among the events you have configured.
4. Any value you enter in the Community field will be included in any trap
messages issued by your SmartSwitch 2000 when this event is triggered; this
value is also used to direct traps related to this event to the appropriate
management workstation(s):
a. If you enter a value in this field, traps related to this event will only be
sent to the network management stations in the device’s trap table which
have been assigned the same community name (and for which traps have
been enabled). Any IP addresses in the device’s trap table which have not
been assigned the same community string, or which have been assigned
no community string, will not receive traps related to the alarm(s) you are
configuring.
b.
If you leave this field blank, traps related to this event will be sent to any
network management stations which have been added to the device’s
trap table, and for which traps have been enabled — regardless of
whether or not those IP addresses have been assigned a community
name in the Trap Table.
5. You can use the Owner text box for administrative or informational purposes;
although the text entered here will not appear on any other screens, you may
want to use the network manager’s name or phone number, or the IP or MAC
address of the management workstation, to identify the owner of the event.
Since any workstation can access and change the events you are setting in
your SmartSwitch 2000, some owner identification can prevent events from
being altered or deleted accidentally. The default value provided is monitor.
6. Use the options in the Event Type field to define how this event will respond
when an associated threshold is crossed:
a. Select the Log option to create a silent log of event occurrences and the
alarms that triggered them. Each event’s log can be viewed by clicking on
the Event Log button at the bottom of the Alarm/Event window. (See
Viewing an Advanced Alarm Event Log, on page 3-25, for more
information.)
b.
NOTES
3-22
Select Trap to instruct the device to send a pair of SNMP traps (one
WARNING, one Normal) to the management station each time the event
is triggered.
In order for the trap selection to work properly, your SmartSwitch 2000 must be
configured to send traps to the management station. This is accomplished via local
management; consult your device hardware manual for more information. If you are
monitoring a variable you consider to be critical, we do not recommend that you select
Trap as the only event response; if a trap is lost due to a collision or other transmission
problem, it will not be re-sent.
Advanced Alarm Configuration
Alarm Configuration
c.
Select both Log and Trap to both log the event occurrence and generate
the traps.
If you select neither option, the event’s occurrences will neither be logged nor
generate traps; unless the event includes an action or a series of actions, this
effectively disables the event (since there will be no indication that it has been
triggered).
NOTE
The Event Type field in the Advanced Alarm/Event List window will display a value of
“none” if neither the Log nor the Trap response has been selected; note, however, that this
field does not indicate whether or not an event has been configured to perform an SNMP
SET or series of SETs via the Actions MIB.
7. For devices which support the Cabletron-proprietary Actions MIB, an Actions
button displays in the Create/Edit Events window; using this feature, you can
configure an SNMP SET or series of SETs that will be performed
automatically when the event is triggered. See Adding Actions to an Event,
below, for more information.
8. Click Apply to set your changes. The window remains open so that you may
configure additional new events or modify existing ones; remember, you can
double-click on any event in the Events Watch list in the main Alarm/Event
window to display its parameters in the Create/Edit Event window (and in the
Create/Edit Actions window, if it’s open). When you have finished configuring
your events, click Cancel to close the window.
Adding Actions to an Event
For devices which support the Cabletron-proprietary Actions MIB, selecting the
Actions button in the Create/Edit Events window opens the Create/Edit Actions
window (Figure 3-6), which allows you to define an SNMP SET or series of SETs
that will be performed automatically when the associated event is triggered.
To add an action or actions to an event:
1. In the Create/Edit Events window, click on the Actions button. The
Create/Edit Actions window, Figure 3-6 (following page), opens.
NOTE
If no Actions button appears in the Create/Edit Events window, the selected RMON
device does not support the Actions MIB. For more information about devices which
support this MIB, contact the Global Technical Assistance Center.
Advanced Alarm Configuration
3-23
Alarm Configuration
Figure 3-6. The RMON Create/Edit Actions Window
2. The index number and description of the event with which the action or
actions will be associated is displayed in the Event: field at the top of the
window. Information in this field is not editable; to assign actions to a different
event, double-click on the correct event in the Events Watch list; both the
Create/Edit Events and Create/Edit Actions windows will update accordingly.
3. The Description field is not currently editable; future releases of NetSight
Element Manager will allow you to assign a descriptive label to each set of
actions.
4. To select the Variable whose value you wish to SET, use the MIB Tree panel
provided on the right side of the window. (For more information about how to
use the MIB Tree panel, see the MIB Tools chapter in the Tools Guide.) Use
the scroll bars and click to open the appropriate folders in the MIB Tree panel
to locate the object you wish you use; click to select it in the panel, and its
name will automatically be entered in the Variable field.
TIP
If you select an invalid OID — that is, one which does not permit write access — the
message !!Can’t set action on this type!! will be displayed in the Variable field.
If you don’t know the exact spelling of the OID you wish to use for your alarm variable,
and you can’t find it by searching through the tree, use the MIB Tool Find feature to locate
the OID and determine its exact spelling (and tree location). For more information on the
MIB Tool utility and its Find capabilities, see the MIB Tools chapter in the Tools Guide.
The Find feature is not case-sensitive.
3-24
Advanced Alarm Configuration
Alarm Configuration
5. Once you have selected the object you wish to set, you must assign the
appropriate instance value in the Instance field. If you’re not sure how the
object you wish to set is instanced, you can use the MIB Tree utility (described
in the Tools Guide) to query it; all available instances for the object will be
displayed.
6. In the Value field, enter the value you wish to set for the selected object.
Again, if you’re not sure what the valid values are for the variable you wish to
set, locate the object in the MIBTree utility and use the Details button to
obtain more information.
7. Once you’ve configured your action, click Add ; the action will be added to the
Action Table list in the lower left corner of the window. Note that the window
remains open so that you may configure additional new actions or modify
existing ones; selecting on any action in the Action Table will display that
action’s parameters in the window and make them available for editing. When
you have finished configuring your actions, click Cancel to close the window.
The Action Table will update automatically each time an action is added or
deleted; use Refresh to update the table at any time.
Deleting an Alarm, Event, or Action
To delete an alarm, event, or action:
1. In the appropriate window, highlight the alarm, event, or action you wish to
remove.
2. Click Delete. A window opens asking you to confirm your selection; click OK
to delete, or Cancel to cancel.
When you delete an event, be sure you edit all alarms that were pointing to that
event, and assign a new valid event to those thresholds; note, too, that deleting an
event automatically deletes its associated actions, as actions cannot exist in the
absence of an association with an event. As a general rule, we recommend that
you do not delete an alarm or event of which you are not the owner.
Viewing an Advanced Alarm Event Log
To view the log of occurrences for any event:
1. Highlight the event for which you wish to view the log, then click on the Event
Log button at the bottom of the Advanced Alarm/Event List window; the Event
Log window, Figure 3-7, opens.
Advanced Alarm Configuration
3-25
Alarm Configuration
Figure 3-7. The Event Log Window
The top portion of the window contains the device information boxes, as well as
the event index number and the event description; the log itself includes the
following fields:
Index
This index number is not the event’s index, but a separate
index that uniquely identifies this occurrence of the
event.
Time
Indicates the date and time of each event occurrence.
Description
Provides a detailed description of the alarm that
triggered the event: whether it was a rising or falling
alarm, the alarm index number, the alarm variable name
and object identifier (OID), the alarmSampleType
(1=absolute value; 2=delta value), the value that
triggered the alarm, the configured threshold that was
crossed, and the event description. Use the scroll bar at
the bottom of the log to view all the information
provided.
Each log will hold only a finite number of entries, which is determined by the
resources available on the device; when the log is full, the oldest entries will be
replaced by new ones.
3-26
Advanced Alarm Configuration
Alarm Configuration
How Rising and Falling Thresholds Work
Rising and falling thresholds are intended to be used in pairs, and can be used to
provide notification of spikes or drops in a monitored value — either of which can
indicate a network problem. To make the best use of this powerful feature,
however, pairs of thresholds should not be set too far apart, or the alarm
notification process may be defeated: a built-in hysteresis function designed to
limit the generation of events specifies that, once a configured threshold is met or
crossed in one direction, no additional events will be generated until the opposite
threshold is met or crossed. Therefore, if your threshold pair spans a wide range
of values, and network performance is unstable around either threshold, you will
only receive one event in response to what may be several dramatic changes in
value. To monitor both ends of a wide range of values, set up two pairs of
thresholds: one set at the top end of the range, and one at the bottom.
TIP
The current version of the Basic Alarms window only allows you to configure a single pair
of thresholds for each alarm variable on each interface; be sure to keep this hysteresis
function in mind when configuring those threshold values.
How Rising and Falling Thresholds Work
3-27
Alarm Configuration
3-28
How Rising and Falling Thresholds Work
Chapter 4
Statistics
Accessing interface statistics from the Chassis View; available statistics windows
Each port menu in the SmartSwitch 2000 Chassis View provides two statistics
selections: Statistics and I/F Statistics. Selecting the Statistics option will launch
the highest level of statistics available for the selected interface: if the interface
supports RMON, the RMON statistics window will display; if the interface does
not support RMON, or if the RMON Default MIB component has been
administratively disabled, the MIB-II I/F statistics window will display. Selecting
the I/F Statistics option will always display MIB-II interface statistics, regardless
of the level of RMON support available or the current administrative status of the
RMON Default MIB component.
TIP
The MIB-II I/F Statistics window is also available for all port interfaces — regardless of
their level of RMON support or the current administrative status of the RMON Default
MIB component — via the I/F Summary window accessed from the Device menu, and via
the I/F Statistics option on the bridge Port menu in the Bridge Status view. For more
information about the I/F Summary window, see Viewing I/F Summary Information,
on page 2-18 of Chapter 2, The SmartSwitch 2000 Chassis View; for more information
about the Bridge Status view, see the Bridge chapter in the Tools Guide.
Accessing the Statistics Windows
1. Click on the desired port index in the Chassis View window. The Port menu
opens.
2. For RMON statistics (where available), click to select Statistics. The RMON
Statistics (Figure 4-1) or MIB-II Interface Statistics (Figure 4-3) window, as
appropriate, opens.
or
For MIB-II interface statistics, click to select I/F Statistics. The MIB-II
Interface Statistics window (Figure 4-3) opens.
4-1
Statistics
NOTE
If the selected interface displays MIB-II I/F Statistics and you were expecting to see
RMON statistics, the RMON Default MIB component may be disabled; see the RMON
User’s Guide for information on how to check (and if necessary, change) the admin
status of the RMON Default MIB component.
RMON Statistics
The RMON Ethernet Statistics window (Figure 4-1) provides a detailed statistical
breakdown of traffic on the monitored Ethernet network. Statistics are provided
in both numerical and graphic format, and include peak values and the date and
time they occurred.
The Errors pie
chart will only be
displayed when the
% of Tot. Errors
option is selected.
Figure 4-1. The Ethernet Statistics Window
The selected interface number and its description are displayed at the top of the
Statistics window. The column on the left side of the window displays each
statistic’s name, total count, and percentage; the column on the right displays the
peak value for each statistic, and the date and time that peak occurred. Note that
peak values are always Delta values; see Viewing Total, Delta, and Accumulated
Statistics, on page 4-5, for more information.
4-2
RMON Statistics
Statistics
Ethernet statistics are:
Bytes
Displays the total number of bytes contained in packets processed on the network
segment. This number includes bytes contained in error packets.
Packets
Displays the total number of packets processed on the network segment. Again,
this number includes error packets.
Drop Events
This field indicates the number of times packets were dropped because the device
could not keep up with the flow of traffic on the network. Note that this value
does not reflect the number of packets dropped, but only the number of times
packets were dropped.
% Load
Displays the network segment load during the sample interval, in hundredths of
a percent; this percentage reflects the network segment load compared to the
theoretical maximum load (10 Mbps) of an Ethernet network.
Packet Type
Multicast
Indicates the number of good packets processed on the network
segment that were destined for more than one address. Note that
this total does not include broadcast packets.
Broadcast
Indicates the number of good packets processed on the network
segment that had the broadcast (FF-FF-FF-FF-FF-FF) destination
address.
Unicast
Indicates the number of good packets processed on the network
segment that were destined for a single address.
The percentages displayed to the right of the numerical values for these fields
indicate what percentage of good packets transmitted on the network segment
were multicast, broadcast, and unicast; these percentages will add up to 100. The
pie chart in the center of the window provides a graphical view of the percentage
breakdown; colors in the pie chart correspond to colors in the percentage display
boxes. Values listed to the right of the pie chart indicat peak delta values recorded
since the statistics screen was launched, and the date and time they occurred.
Problems
CRC/Alignment
RMON Statistics
Indicates the number of packets processed by the
network segment that had a non-integral number of
bytes (alignment error) or a bad frame check sequence
(Cyclic Redundancy Check, or CRC error).
4-3
Statistics
Fragments
Indicates the number of packets processed by the
network segment that were undersized (less than 64
bytes in length; a runt packet) and had either a
non-integral number of bytes (alignment error) or a bad
frame check sequence (CRC error).
Jabbers
Indicates the number of packets processed by the
network segment that were oversized (greater than 1518
bytes; a giant packet) and had either a non-integral
number of bytes (alignment error) or a bad frame check
sequence (CRC error).
Collisions
Indicates the total number of receive (those the device
detects while receiving a transmission) and transmit
(those the device detects while transmitting) collisions
detected on the network segment.
Undersized
Indicates the number of packets processed by the
network segment that contained fewer than 64 bytes
(runt packets) but were otherwise well-formed.
Oversized
Indicates the number of packets processed by the
network segment that contained more than 1518 bytes
(giant packets) but were otherwise well-formed.
In their default state, the percentages displayed to the right of the numerical
values for these fields indicate what percentage of total packets transmitted on
the network segment were of the noted type. If you select the % of Tot. Errors
option by clicking the mouse button in the check box, the percentages will
indicate what percentage of problem, or error, packets transmitted on the
network segment were of the noted type; these percentages will add up to 100.
(The % of Tot. Errors option is active if there is a check mark in the check box.)
The pie chart in the center of the window provides a graphical view of the
selected percentage breakdown; colors in the pie chart correspond to colors in the
percentage display boxes. Values listed to the right of the pie chart indicate peak
delta values recorded since the statistics screen was launched, and the date and
time they occurred.
Frame Size (Bytes) Packets
The Frame Size (Bytes) Packets fields indicate the number of packets (including
error packets) processed by the network segment that were of the noted length,
excluding framing bits but including frame check sequence bits. Packet sizes
counted are:
•
•
•
•
•
•
4-4
64
65-127
128-255
256-511
512-1023
1024-1518
RMON Statistics
Statistics
The percentages displayed to the right of the numerical values for these fields
indicate what percentage of all packets transmitted on the network segment were
of the noted size. Unless the network segment has experienced a significant
number of runts and/or giants (which are not counted in this group), these
percentages will add up to 100. The pie chart in the center of the window provides
a graphical view of the percentage breakdown; colors in the pie chart correspond
to colors in the percentage display boxes. Values listed to the right of the pie chart
indicate peak delta values recorded since the statistics screen was launched, and
the date and time they occurred.
Viewing Total, Delta, and Accumulated Statistics
By using the Total, Delta, and Accum option buttons located at the bottom of
each Statistics window, you can choose whether to view the total statistics count
(since the last time the device was initialized), the statistics count during the last
polling interval, or a fresh accumulation of statistics begun when the Accum
button was selected.
TIP
The statistics windows use the polling interval you have set for the monitored device via
the Device Properties window. See your User’s Guide for more information on setting
the polling interval.
To choose Total, Delta, or Accum:
1. Click on the Total option button; after the completion of the current polling
cycle plus one complete polling cycle, the screen will display the total count of
statistics processed since the entry was created or since the device was last
initialized, whichever is most recent. These totals are updated after each
polling cycle.
2. Click on the Delta option button; after the completion of the current polling
cycle plus two more polling cycles, the screen will display the count of
statistics processed during the last polling interval. These counts will be
refreshed after each polling cycle.
3. Click on the Accum option button; after the completion of the current polling
cycle plus two more polling cycles, the screen will display a fresh cumulative
count of statistics. Note that making this selection does not clear device
counters; you can still re-select Total for the total count since the device was
last initialized.
Switching the statistics displays among Total, Delta, and Accum does not effect
the displayed peak values, as peak values are always Delta values.
NOTE
RMON Statistics
If you reset your device, you must first close, then re-open the Statistics window to refresh
peak values.
4-5
Statistics
To temporarily freeze the statistics display, select the Freeze Stats option; in this
mode, statistics will continue to be collected, but the display will not update. To
resume normal updates, click again to de-select the freeze option.
Printing Statistics
The Print button located at the bottom of the Statistics window allows you to
print the current snapshot of statistical data. When you select Print, a standard
Windows print window like the sample shown in Figure 4-2 opens.
Figure 4-2. Standard Print Window
Adjust printer settings as required, then click the OK button.
IF Statistics
The Interface (IF) Statistics window (Figure 4-3) provides MIB-II interface
statistical information — including counts for both transmit and receive packets,
and error and buffering information — for any port interface on the selected
SmartSwitch 2000.
TIP
4-6
The IF Statistcs window can also be launched from the I/F Statistics option on the
Chassis View port menus; it may also be launched from the Statistics option if the
selected interface does not support RMON or if the RMON Default MIB component has
been administratively disabled. This window is also available for all port interfaces via the
I/F Summary window (see Viewing I/F Summary Information, on page 2-18 of
Chapter 2, The SmartSwitch 2000 Chassis View) or the bridge port menus in the
Bridge Status view (see the Bridge chapter in the Tools Guide).
IF Statistics
Statistics
Figure 4-3. The Interface Statistics Window
Three informational fields appear in the upper portion of the window:
Description
Displays the interface description for the currently selected port: Enet Port.
Address
Displays the MAC (physical) address of the selected port.
Type
Displays the interface type of the selected port: ethernet-csmacd, atm, or fddi.
The lower portion of the window provides the following transmit and receive
statistics; note that the first four statistics are also graphically displayed in the pie
charts.
Unicast
Displays the number of packets transmitted to or received from this interface that
had a single, unique destination address. These statistics are displayed in the pie
chart, color-coded green.
Non-Unicast
Displays the number of packets transmitted to or received from this interface that
had a destination address that is recognized by more than one device on the
network segment. The non-unicast field includes a count of broadcast packets —
those that are recognized by all devices on a segment. These statistics are
displayed in the pie chart, color-coded dark blue.
IF Statistics
4-7
Statistics
Discarded
Displays the number of packets which were discarded even though they
contained no errors that would prevent transmission. Good packets are typically
discarded to free up buffer space when the network becomes very busy; if this is
occurring routinely, it usually means that network traffic is overwhelming the
device. To solve this problem, you may need to re-configure your bridging
parameters, or perhaps re-configure your network to add additional bridges.
These statistics are displayed in the pie chart, color-coded magenta.
Error
Displays the number of packets received or transmitted that contained errors.
These statistics are displayed in the pie chart, color-coded red.
Unknown Protocol (Received only)
Displays the number of packets received which were discarded because they were
created under an unknown or unsupported protocol.
Packets Received (Received only)
Displays the number of packets received by the selected interface.
Transmit Queue Size (Transmit only)
Displays the number of packets currently queued for transmission from this
interface. The amount of device memory devoted to buffer space, and the traffic
level on the target network, determine how large the output packet queue can
grow before the SmartSwitch 2000 will begin to discard packets.
Packets Transmitted (Transmit only)
Displays the number of packets transmitted by this interface.
4-8
IF Statistics
Chapter 5
Managing Ethernet MicroLAN
Switches
Viewing the Statistics, Timer Statistics, and Performance Graph windows; using the repeater, board,
and port Alarm Limits windows; setting alarm limits; link state traps, segmentation traps, and source
address traps
The Repeater menu lets you access windows to monitor and manage repeated
Ethernet networks supported by a SmartSwitch 2000 Ethernet MicroLAN Switch
(e.g., the 2E43-51 or 2E43-51R). Among these windows are repeater, board, and
port statistics windows (including Statistics, Timer Statistics, and Performance
Graph windows), repeater board, and port Alarm Limits windows, and repeater
board, and port Trap Selection windows.
Repeater Statistics
The statistical information collected and stored by your Ethernet MicroLAN
Switch provides you with detailed information about how much traffic your
network (or a segment thereof) is experiencing, including the sizes and types of
packets that make up that traffic, and how much of that traffic comprises packets
which have been badly formed or somehow mangled in transmission. These
statistics can give you a good overall sense of the usage your network, or network
segment, is experiencing.
To help you better understand and track the traffic your network is handling,
NetSight Element Manager provides you with a variety of statistical information
presented in three different formats: Statistics, Timer Statistics, and Performance
Graphs.
TIP
Although you can launch most statistics windows from both the Repeater and Module
menus, the information provided at both levels will be the same, since each “board” on the
Ethernet MicroLAN Switch is equivalent to a repeater channel.
5-1
Managing Ethernet MicroLAN Switches
The Statistics Windows
At the Statistics windows, you can view accumulated statistics and error
breakdowns for each network supported by the Ethernet MicroLAN Switch, and
for each individual module and port. A pie chart graphically depicts these
statistics for quick visual reference.
Statistics displayed in these windows include:
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Active Users
Bytes
Broadcasts
Packets
Collisions (combined Transmit and Receive)
OOW Collisions
Giants
Alignment
CRC Errors
Runts
The pie chart to the right of the statistics text boxes lets you graphically view your
statistics. The colors in the pie chart correspond to the colors for Packets (green),
Collisions (red), and the two error modes: Hard Errors (cyan), and Soft Errors
(yellow).
Accessing the Statistics Windows
To open the Repeater Statistics window:
1. Click on Repeater in the Chassis View menu bar; a menu listing the active
repeater channels opens.
2. Select the appropriate repeater channel (A - H) to reveal the Repeater menu.
3. Click on Statistics. The Repeater Statistics window, Figure 5-1, opens.
5-2
Repeater Statistics
Managing Ethernet MicroLAN Switches
Figure 5-1. The Repeater Statistics Window
To open the board-level Statistics window from the Chassis View window:
1. Click on the appropriate Module Index to display the Module menu.
2. Select the appropriate repeater channel (A - H) to reveal the board-level
Repeater menu.
3. Click on Statistics. The board-level Statistics window opens.
To access the port-level Statistics window:
1. Click on the appropriate Port to display the Port menu.
2. Click on Statistics. The port-level Statistics window opens.
The Module and Port Statistics windows are the same as the Statistics window
displayed in Figure 5-1, except that they display statistics applicable to the
module or port.
Repeater Statistics
5-3
Managing Ethernet MicroLAN Switches
Statistics Defined
The Statistics window displays the statistical counts accumulated since the
Ethernet MicroLAN Module was last reset; the following information is
displayed:
Active Users
Displays the number of users (identified by MAC [Ethernet] address)
communicating via a port on the Ethernet MicroLAN Module. For an individual
port, the number of Active Users can tell you whether the port is supporting a
station or trunk connection.
Bytes
Displays the total number of bytes – including error packets – that have been
processed by the selected repeater, board, or port. Note that this byte count
includes errors.
Broadcasts
Displays the total number of broadcast frames that have been processed by the
repeater, board, or port. Broadcast packets have a single address recognized by
each station on the net; this address is designated in IP address form as
255.255.255.255, or in MAC hexadecimal form as FF-FF-FF-FF-FF-FF. ARP and
RARP requests sent by bridges and routers are broadcast messages.
Packets
Displays the total number of packets processed by the repeater, board, or port.
Again, note that the packet count includes errors.
Collisions
Displays the combined number of transmit and receive collisions detected by the
repeater, board, or port. Transmit collisions are those the Ethernet MicroLAN
Module detects while transmitting a packet, which means the Ethernet
MicroLAN Switch has transmitted one of the colliding packets; receive collisions
are those detected by the Ethernet MicroLAN Switch while it is receiving a
transmission.
Hard Errors
OOW Collisions
Giants
5-4
Displays the number of collisions out of the standard
collision window (51.2 µs) experienced by the repeater,
board, or port. Out-of-window collisions typically
indicate a network design flaw.
Displays the number of giant packets that the repeater,
board, or port has detected. A giant packet exceeds the
maximum Ethernet frame size of 1518 bytes (excluding
the preamble).
Repeater Statistics
Managing Ethernet MicroLAN Switches
Soft Errors
CRC Errors
Displays the total number of packets with CRC (Cyclical
Redundancy Check) errors that the repeater, board, or
port has received from the network. CRC errors occur
when packets are somehow damaged in transit.
Alignment Errors
Displays the total number of misaligned packets received
by the repeater, board, or port. A misaligned packet is
one that contains a non-integral number of bytes (that is,
any unit of bits less than a byte). Alignment errors are
also known as framing errors.
Runts
Displays the number of runt packets that the repeater,
board, or port has received from the network. A runt
packet is one that is less than the minimum Ethernet
frame size of 64 bytes.
Using the Total and Delta Option Buttons
By using the Total and Delta option buttons located at the bottom of the Statistics
windows, you can choose whether to view the total statistics count (Total) or the
statistics count for the last polling interval (Delta).
1. Click on the Total option button; after the completion of the current polling
cycle plus one complete polling cycle, the window will display the total count
of statistics processed since the most recent start-up of the Ethernet
MicroLAN Module.
2. Click on the Delta option button; after the completion of the current polling
cycle plus two more polling cycles, the window will display the count of
statistics processed during the last poll interval. These counts will be
refreshed after each polling interval.
TIP
Repeater Statistics
The statistics windows use the polling interval you have set for the monitored device via
the Device Management page of the Options window, which is launched from the Tools
menu in the NetSight Element Manager primary window menu bar. See your User’s
Guide for more information on setting the Chassis Manager polling interval.
5-5
Managing Ethernet MicroLAN Switches
Timer Statistics
You can use the Timer Statistics windows to gather statistical information
concerning the repeater channels on your Ethernet MicroLAN Module and its
boards and/or ports over a user-set time period. Statistics are displayed both
numerically and graphically, using color-coded, dynamic bar charts. These bar
charts display the elapsed, average, and peak values for percent load, percent
collisions, and percent errors at the repeater, board, or port level. The values are
color-coded as follows:
•
Green (Elapsed) – Indicates the level of activity during the last time interval.
•
Blue (Average) – Indicates the average levels of activity over all timer intervals
since the window was invoked.
•
Magenta (Peak) – Indicates the peak level of activity over all time intervals
since the window was invoked.
The displayed statistics will automatically update using the time interval you
have set; allowable time intervals range from one second to 23 hours/59
minutes/59 seconds. You can also refresh the statistics accumulated in the Timer
Statistics window at any time by clicking the Clear button. This will only reset the
counters at the Timer Statistics window; the statistical counts maintained by the
device are not affected. The time under the Clear button will also update,
indicating the last time that the Timer Statistics window was cleared.
NOTE
The time interval set in the Timer Statistics window functions independently from the
polling interval you have set for the monitored device via the Device Management page
of the Options window.
Accessing the Timer Statistics Windows
To open the repeater-level Timer Statistics window:
1. Click on Repeater in the Chassis View menu bar; a menu listing the active
repeater channels opens.
2. Select the appropriate repeater channel (A - H) to reveal the Repeater menu.
3. Click on Timer Statistics. The Repeater Timer Statistics window, Figure 5-2,
opens.
5-6
Repeater Statistics
Managing Ethernet MicroLAN Switches
Figure 5-2. The Repeater Timer Statistics Window
To open the board-level Timer Statistics window:
1. Click on the appropriate Module Index to display the Module menu.
2. Select the appropriate repeater channel (A - H) to reveal the board-level
Repeater menu.
3. Click on Timer Statistics. The board-level Timer Statistics window opens.
To access the port-level Timer Statistics window:
1. Click on the appropriate Port to display the Port menu.
2. Click on Timer Statistics. The port-level Timer Statistics window opens.
The Board and Port Timer Statistics windows are similar to the Repeater Timer
Statistics window displayed in Figure 5-2, except that they display statistics
applicable to the board or the port.
The Timer Statistics windows display the elapsed, average, and peak values for
the following statistics:
% Load
The percentage of total theoretical load processed by the selected repeater, board,
or port during the user-defined time interval. For standard Ethernet, the total
theoretical load is 10 Mbps.
% Collisions
The percentage of collisions processed by the selected repeater, board, or port
during the user-defined time interval.
Repeater Statistics
5-7
Managing Ethernet MicroLAN Switches
% Errors
The percentage of errors processed by the selected repeater, board, or port during
the user-defined time interval.
Setting the Timer Statistics Interval
To set the Timer Statistics time interval:
1. Click on the clock symbol (
) next to the Interval text box. The New Timer
Interval text box, Figure 5-3, opens.
Figure 5-3. New Timer Interval Text Box
2. Highlight the hour field in the New Timer Interval text box and enter a new
hour or use the arrow keys to the right of the text box to scroll to change the
hour, as desired. The time is given in a 24-hour hh:mm:ss format.
3. Repeat step 2 to change the minutes and seconds fields, as desired.
4. Click OK when you are finished entering new information. The new Time
Interval you have set is now entered.
The Timer Statistics window will refresh to zero, and the new time interval will
take effect immediately.
Repeater Performance Graphs
With the Repeater Performance Graphs, you can use real-time statistics reporting
to see at a glance the amount of traffic going through your Ethernet MicroLAN
Module at the repeater, board, or port level. These windows provide current
statistics both graphically and numerically. The graph has an X axis that indicates
the 60 second interval over which charting occurs continuously, while the Y axis
measures the number of packets or errors that are processed by the selected
repeater, board, or port. The Detail buttons brings up an additional window that
displays a breakdown of the traffic by error type.
You can select the graphing and statistics parameters by using the command
buttons (for Percent Load, Frames, or Errors) and their associated menus. When
you alter a parameter, the new parameter displays on the face of the button, and
the statistics will refresh to zero activity before regenerating.
5-8
Repeater Statistics
Managing Ethernet MicroLAN Switches
Accessing the Performance Graph Windows
To access the repeater-level Performance Graph window:
1. Click on Repeater on the Chassis View menu bar; a menu listing active
repeater channels opens.
2. Select the appropriate repeater channel (A - H) to reveal the Repeater menu.
3. Click on Performance Graph. The Performance Graph window, Figure 5-4,
opens.
Figure 5-4. The Repeater Performance Graph Window
To access the board-level Performance Graph windows:
1. Click on the appropriate Module Index to display the Module menu.
2. Select the appropriate repeater channel (A - H) to reveal the board-level
Repeater menu.
3. Click on Performance Graph. The board-level Performance Graph window
opens.
To access the port-level Performance Graph windows:
1. Click on the appropriate Port in the Chassis View display; the Port menu
opens.
Repeater Statistics
5-9
Managing Ethernet MicroLAN Switches
2. Click on Performance Graph. The port-level Performance Graph window
opens.
The Board and Port Performance Graph windows are similar to the Repeater
Performance Graph window displayed in Figure 5-4, except that they display
statistics applicable to the board or port level.
For each chosen statistic, Performance Graphs display both average and peak
activity, as well as the date and time the peak values were recorded; average
values are also displayed graphically.
The Average statistics are updated every two seconds, as averaged over the
previous four two-second intervals; the graphical display also updates at
two-second intervals. For the first 60 seconds of graphing, you will note the graph
lines extending as each interval’s data is added to the graph. Once the first 60
seconds has passed, the newest data is added at the right edge of the graph, and
the oldest data is scrolled off to the left.
Each Performance Graph window allows you to graph the following statistical
variables:
Percent Load (Green)
Percent Load
Reflects the network load generated by the selected
repeater, board, or port, compared to the theoretical
maximum load (10 Mbits/s) of an Ethernet network.
Active Users
The number of users transmitting or receiving on the
selected repeater, board, or port, as determined by the
current number of Ethernet (MAC) addresses stored in
each port’s Source Address Table.
Nothing
The Percent Load function is not currently measuring
any statistics.
Frames (Blue)
Frames
Nothing
Total Errors (Red)
Total Errors
5-10
The total number of packets (both good and error)
processed by the selected repeater, board, or port.
The Frames scale is not currently measuring any
statistics.
The total number of errors of any kind processed by the
selected repeater, board, or port.
Collisions
The total number of collisions (combined transmit and
receive) detected by the selected repeater, board, or port.
CRC Errors
The total number of packets with CRC (Cyclical
Redundancy Check) errors that the selected repeater,
board, or port has received from the network.
Repeater Statistics
Managing Ethernet MicroLAN Switches
Runt Packets
The number of runt packets detected by the selected
repeater, board, or port. A runt frame is one that is less
than the minimum Ethernet frame size of 64 bytes.
Giant Packets
The number of giant packets detected by the selected
repeater, board, or port. A giant frame exceeds the
maximum Ethernet frame size of 1518 bytes (excluding
the preamble).
Algn. Errors
The number of misaligned packets detected by the
selected repeater, board, or port. Misaligned packets are
those which contain a non-integral number of bytes; they
can result from a MAC layer packet formation problem,
or from a cabling problem that is corrupting or losing
data. Alignment errors are also known as framing errors.
OOW Collns.
The number of collisions out of the standard collision
window (51.2 µs) experienced by the selected repeater,
board, or port. There are two conditions which can cause
this type of error to occur: either the network’s physical
length exceeds IEEE 802.3 specifications, or a node on the
net is transmitting without first listening for carrier sense
(and beginning its illegal transmission more than 51.2 µs
after the first station began transmitting).
Nothing
The Errors scale is not currently monitoring error
packets.
Configuring the Performance Graphs
1. Click on the Percent Load button; select the desired Load mode from the
menu.
2. Click on the Frames button; select the desired Frames mode from the menu.
3. Click on the Total Errors button; select the desired Errors mode from the
menu.
Once you have selected a new mode, it displays in its respective button, and the
Performance Graph and statistics will refresh and begin to measure using the new
mode. To stop monitoring and exit the window, click Cancel.
The Detail Button
The Detail button allows you to view traffic processed by the repeater channel,
board, or port according to general frame status (good, errors, or collisions); it also
allows you to view errors by type. When you click the Detail button, a separate
window appears (Figure 5-5) that displays pie charts and statistics for both frame
status and error type.
Repeater Statistics
5-11
Managing Ethernet MicroLAN Switches
Figure 5-5. Detail Breakdown Window
Frame Status Breakdown
With the Detail Breakdown window, you can see the status of the frames passing
through your each repeater channel and each board and port. The status
conditions and corresponding colors (for both the pie chart and numerical
statistics) are:
•
•
•
Good (Green)
Total Errors (Red)
Collisions (Blue)
Error Breakdown
The Detail Breakdown window also displays the number of error packets
received by a repeater, board, or port. You can view both numerical statistics and
a pie chart breakdown for the following errors (note the corresponding colors):
•
•
•
•
•
5-12
Alignment (Green)
CRC (Red)
Runts (Blue)
Giants (Magenta)
OOW Colls (Maroon)
Repeater Statistics
Managing Ethernet MicroLAN Switches
Alarm Limits
Using the Alarm Limits windows, you can configure alarm limits for the Ethernet
MicroLAN Switch at the repeater, board, and port levels; these alarms will notify
you – via traps sent to NetSight Element Manager’s alarm logging facility – that
your system has experienced a certain percentage of collisions or errors, or a
certain number of specific packet types, within a user-defined time interval. You
can also use the board- and port-level Alarms windows to disable a board or port
in response to an alarm condition.
NOTE
TIP
In order for your device to issue any traps – and in order for your management
workstation to receive those traps – your Ethernet MicroLAN Switch’s trap table must
have been properly configured via Local Management; see the Ethernet MicroLAN Switch
hardware manual for more information.
Although you can access the Alarm Limits window at both the repeater and board levels,
note that setting alarms at those two levels will have the same effect, as each Ethernet
MicroLAN Switch “board” is equivalent to a repeater channel.
Accessing the Alarm Limits Windows
To open the repeater-level Alarm Limits window from the Chassis View:
1. Click on Repeater on the Chassis View menu bar; a menu listing the available
repeater channels opens.
2. Select the appropriate repeater channel (A - H) to reveal the Repeater menu.
3. Click on Alarm Limits. The Repeater Alarm Limits window, Figure 5-6,
opens.
Alarm Limits
5-13
Managing Ethernet MicroLAN Switches
Figure 5-6. The Repeater Alarm Limits Window
To access the board-level Alarm Limits window:
1. Click on the appropriate Module Index to display the Module menu.
2. Select the appropriate repeater channel (A - H), then right to reveal the
board-level Repeater menu.
3. Click on Alarm Limits. The Board Alarm Limits window, Figure 5-7, opens.
5-14
Alarm Limits
Managing Ethernet MicroLAN Switches
Figure 5-7. The Board Alarm Limits Window
To access the port-level Alarm Limits window:
1. Click once on the appropriate Port to display the Port menu.
2. Click on Alarm Limits. The Port Alarm Limits window, Figure 5-8, opens.
When using the Alarm Limits screens to set your alarm thresholds, keep in mind
that repeater-level thresholds will apply to all traffic received by the selected
repeater channel; board-level thresholds will apply only to traffic on the selected
board; and port-level thresholds will apply to traffic on the specific port.
Alarm Limits
5-15
Managing Ethernet MicroLAN Switches
Figure 5-8. Port Alarm Limits Window
The Alarm Limits window displays the following fields:
Collisions
Use the text box in this field to enter the number of collisions per good packet you
wish to allow on the selected repeater, board, or port before an alarm is generated;
allowable values are 1-15. For example, if you enter a value of 1, the alarm will be
generated if the repeater, board, or port experiences an average of one collision
per good packet received during the configured time base (see the explanation for
“within,” below). In terms of percentages, an alarm threshold value of 1 would
generate an alarm if 50% of your packets were collisions (one collision for every
good packet); a threshold value of 15 would generate an alarm if 93.75% of your
packets were collisions (15 collisions for every good packet). Therefore, the lower
you set your threshold value, the lower the percentage of collisions per good
packet you are allowing.
A repeater- or board-level alarm will calculate the number of collisions per good
packet based on all traffic received on the repeater channel; a port-level alarm will
make the calculation based on traffic on the specific port only.
5-16
Alarm Limits
Managing Ethernet MicroLAN Switches
Packets
Use the text box in this field to determine the total number of packets (including
all errors except collisions) that must be processed by the repeater, board, or port
within the user-specified time before an alarm is triggered. Allowable values are 1
32
to Ý 4 billion (2 -1).
Broadcast Packets
Use the text box in this field to determine the number of broadcast packets that
must be processed by the repeater, board, or port within the user-specified time
32
before an alarm limit is reached. Allowable values are 1 to Ý 4 billion (2 -1).
% Errors of Type
Use the text box in this field to determine what percentage of packets received by
the repeater, board, or port within the specified time interval can be errors of the
selected type or types before an alarm is triggered. Allowable values are one to
100; percentages will be calculated based on the number of error packets of all
types selected (all those with an check in their check box). Again, a repeater-level
alarm will count all selected error types received by the repeater channel; a
port-level alarm will count only selected error types received by the individual
port. (Remember, on an Ethernet MicroLAN Switch, a board is equivalent to a
repeater channel.)
You can select any combination of the following error types:
Alarm Limits
CRC Errors
If this check box is selected, all packets with Cyclical
Redundancy Check (CRC) errors will be included in
calculating the overall percentage of errors.
Framing Errors
If this check box is selected, all misaligned packets will
be included in calculating the overall percentage of
errors. A misaligned packet is one with a non-integral
number of bytes; these are also sometimes referred to as
alignment errors.
Runts
If this check box is selected, the number of runt packets
will be included in calculating the overall percentage of
errors. A runt packet is one that is less than the minimum
Ethernet frame size of 64 bytes.
OOW Collisions
If this check box is selected, all collisions out of the
standard collision window (51.2 µs) will be included in
calculating the overall percentage of errors.
Out-of-window collisions are typically caused by faulty
network design.
Giants
If this check box is selected, the number of giant packets
will be included in calculating the overall percentage of
errors. A giant packet exceeds the maximum Ethernet
frame size of 1518 bytes (excluding the preamble).
5-17
Managing Ethernet MicroLAN Switches
within:
This field displays the user-configurable alarm limit timer interval: the amount of
time the selected statistics will be counted before being compared to the
configured thresholds. The allowable values range from 10 seconds to
23 hrs/59 mins/59 secs.
Configuring Alarms
You configure alarms by choosing the alarm you wish to enable, setting the
threshold to the desired level, and selecting a time interval within which that
threshold must occur. You can base the alarms on:
•
•
•
•
Number of collisions per good packet
Number of total packets
Number of broadcast packets
Percentage of error packets
You can also configure board or port alarm limits so that the board or port will be
disabled when an alarm limit is reached.
Setting the Alarm Limits Time Interval
To set the time interval within which the defined alarm thresholds must be
reached in order to trigger an alarm:
1. Click on the clock symbol
next to the within: text box in any one of the
alarm limits windows; the interval you set applies to all configured alarms at
all levels. The Alarm Interval window, Figure 5-9, opens.
Figure 5-9. The Alarm Interval Window
2. Highlight the hour text box and enter a new hour time interval or click the up
and down arrows to change the time.
3. Repeat step 2 to set the minutes and seconds of your new time interval. Valid
settings range from 10 seconds to 23 hours 59 minutes 59 seconds.
4. Click OK. The new Alarm Interval you have set opens in the within: text box.
5. Click Apply at the bottom of the Alarm Limits window to save your changes,
then click on the Cancel button to close the window.
5-18
Alarm Limits
Managing Ethernet MicroLAN Switches
Setting Alarm Limits
To set repeater-, board-, or port-level alarms, first be sure you have opened the
appropriate Alarm Limits window, then follow the steps outlined below:
1. Using the mouse, click and drag to highlight the text box in the alarm field you
wish to configure (Collisions, Packets, Broadcast Packets, or % Errors).
2. Enter the desired threshold value, being sure to keep in mind the units and
range limits described above.
3. Click on the Enable Alarm check box to activate it. (A check box is activated if
there is an check in it.)
4. For board- or port-level alarms only, click on the Allow Board/Port to be
Disabled on Alarm check box if you wish to disable the board or port when
an alarm condition occurs.
NOTES
If you activate the Allow Board/Port to be Disabled on Alarm option, you will have to
manually re-enable the board(s) or port(s) if the alarm is triggered. Resetting the device
will clear the condition by clearing all packet counters, but you will still need to re-enable
the board(s) and/or port(s). On an Ethernet MicroLAN Switch, a board is equivalent to a
repeater channel; use care when selecting the Allow Board to be Disabled on Alarm
option.
5. Repeat steps 1-4 for each type of alarm you wish to configure.
6. Click on the Apply button to save the configuration, then click the Cancel
button to close the window. Be sure to click on the Apply button before
closing the window, or your changes will not be saved.
Your Alarm Limits are now set. Any condition that exceeds these alarm limits will
generate an alarm, and disable that board or port, if so configured. Refer to the
Alarm and Event Handling Guide for information on how to use the alarm
logging facilities to view alarms.
Trap Selection
Cabletron and Enterasys devices are designed to generate traps which indicate
when a repeater port gains or loses a link signal (Link State Traps); when the
repeater segments (disconnects) a port due to collision activity, and when a
segmented port becomes active again (Segmentation Traps); and several traps that
result from changes in a port’s Source Address Table (Source Address Traps). In
some networks, these traps may impart more information than a network
manager wants to see. With the Trap Selection option available from the Repeater,
Board, and Port menus, you can selectively enable and disable these traps.
Any traps issued by the Ethernet MicroLAN Switch displays in NetSight Element
Manager’s alarm logging facility. (Refer to your Alarm and Event Handling Guide
for more details.)
Trap Selection
5-19
Managing Ethernet MicroLAN Switches
NOTE
In order for your device to issue any traps – and in order for your management
workstation to receive those traps – your Ethernet MicroLAN Switch’s trap table must
have been properly configured via Local Management; see the Ethernet MicroLAN Switch
hardware manual or Local Management documentation for more information.
Accessing the Trap Selection Windows
To open the repeater-level Trap Selection window from the Chassis View:
1. Click on Repeater on the Chassis View menu bar. Select the appropriate
repeater to reveal the Repeater menu.
2. Click on Trap Selection. The Repeater Trap Selection window, Figure 5-6,
opens.
At the repeater or board level, a three-state
check box indicates the state of settings for
all ports that are on the repeated network.
The check box will be:
Grayed – If individual port-level settings
have mixed enabled and disabled states for a
given trap.
Checked – If all port trap settings are
enabled for a given trap.
Blank – if all port trap settings are disabled
for a given trap.
Figure 5-10. Repeater Trap Selection Window
To access the board-level Trap Selection window:
1. Click on the appropriate Module Index to display the Module menu.
2. Select the appropriate repeater channel (A - H) to reveal the board-level
Repeater menu.
3. Click on Trap Selection. The Board Trap Selection window opens.
To access the port-level Trap Selection window:
1. Click on the appropriate Port index to display the Port menu.
2. Click on Trap Selection. The Port Trap Selection window opens.
5-20
Trap Selection
Managing Ethernet MicroLAN Switches
The Board Trap Selection window is similar to the Repeater Trap Selection
window displayed in Figure 5-10, and serves the same function (since, for the
Ethernet MicroLAN Switch, a “board” is the equivalent of a repeater channel). If
all port-level trap settings are uniform at the current level of device management
(i.e., a given trap is either set to enabled or disabled for all ports on a repeated
network segment), the check box for a given trap will return with an enabled or
disabled state, as appropriate. If port-level trap settings are mixed at the current
level of management (i.e., a given trap is enabled at some ports and disabled at
other ports on the selected repeater channel), the check box for a given trap will
be grayed, as illustrated above for Link State traps.
When you are changing trap settings at the Repeater or Board level, a check box
that is left gray for a given trap is treated as a “No SET” indicator, so that the
current settings at the individual port level with respect to that trap will not be
overridden when you are changing other trap settings.
The Port Trap Selection window is similar to the other Trap Selection windows;
however the gray mixed-mode will never appear when you first open the
window (since at the port-level, a given trap can only be either enabled or
disabled – not some combination of the two).
You can change trap settings from any level window; however, if you have
established individual trap settings for any ports, remember that enabling and
disabling traps from the repeater- or module-level windows will override those
individual setting. Remember, too, that setting trap selection state at the repeater
and module levels accomplishes the same thing, as each “board” on the Ethernet
MicroLAN Switch is a repeated network.
Trap Definitions
You can enable or disable the following kinds of traps:
Link State Traps
Some Ethernet repeater ports – including RJ45 twisted pair and fiber optic ports –
generate a link signal to monitor the status of their connection with the device at
the other end of the cable segment. If the cable is removed or broken, the port’s
link status goes to “No Link” and the repeater generates a portLinkDown trap.
When a port in a “No Link” condition receives a link signal, the port goes to a
“Link” condition and the repeater generates a portLinkUp trap. Devices at both
ends of the disconnected or broken cable will generate the portLinkDown and
portLinkUp traps, even when only one end of the cable has been removed.
Note that BNC (thin coax), AUI, and transceiver ports do not support a link
signal. BNC ports respond to changes in link status by generating
portSegmenting and portUnsegmenting traps (see description, below); AUI and
transceiver ports do not respond at all to changes in link status (unless the port
has been segmented due to excessive collisions), and will always display as on,
even if no cable is connected.
Trap Selection
5-21
Managing Ethernet MicroLAN Switches
Information included in a Link State trap will include the board number and port
number associated with the trap.
Segmentation Traps
Ethernet repeaters count collisions at each port. If a port experiences 32
consecutive collisions, or if the port’s collision detector is on for more than
2-3 µs, the repeater segments the port to isolate the source of the collisions from
the rest of the network. When the repeater segments a port, it generates a
portSegmenting trap. As soon as a segmented port receives a good packet, the
repeater reconnects the port to the network and generates a portUnsegmenting
trap.
Because they do not support the Link signal, unterminated BNC (thin coax) ports
appear as segmented. When you attach a thin coax cable or a terminator to a port,
the repeater generates a portUnsegmenting trap; when you remove the cable or
terminator, the repeater generates a portSegmenting trap. As mentioned above,
these traps can serve as notification of changes in link status. Note, too, that
devices at both ends of the cable segment will generate the portSegmenting and
portUnsegmenting traps, even if only one end of the cable has been disconnected.
Information included in a Segmentation trap will include the board number and
port number associated with the trap.
Source Address Traps
The Ethernet MicroLAN Switch can issue several different traps in response to
changes in a port’s Source Address Table:
A newSourceAddress trap is generated when a station port – one receiving
packets from no source addresses, or from one or two source addresses – receives
a packet from a source address that is not currently in its source address table.
Information included in this trap includes the module number, port number, and
source address associated with the trap. Trunk ports – those receiving packets
from three or more source addresses – will not issue newSourceAddress traps.
NOTE
Some older repeater devices, and devices with older versions of firmware may include a
slightly different definition of station and trunk status: station ports are defined as those
receiving packets from zero or one source addresses; trunk ports are defined as those
receiving packets from two or more source addresses. If you have any questions about
whether your device or firmware version falls into this older category, or if you would like
information about upgrading your device firmware, contact the Global Technical
Assistance Center.
A sourceAddressTimeout trap is issued anytime a source address is aged out of
the Source Address Table due to inactivity. The trap’s interesting information
includes the module and port index, and the source address that timed out.
PortTypeChanged traps are issued when a port’s topology status changes from
station to trunk, or vice versa. The interesting information includes the module
and port index, and the port’s new topology status.
5-22
Trap Selection
Managing Ethernet MicroLAN Switches
A lockStatusChanged trap is generated when the ports in the hub are locked or
unlocked using the Lock/Unlock Ports option on the Repeater menus; the
interesting information is the new lock status.
PortSecurityViolation and portViolationReset traps are sent in response to
changes related to port locking: if ports are locked, the portSecurityViolation trap
indicates that a new source address has attempted access on one of the ports, and
the ports are being shut down in response; the interesting information is the
module and port index, and the violating address. PortViolationReset traps are
sent when management intervention has re-enabled a port or ports previously
disabled in response to a port security violation; the interesting information is
module and port index.
Configuring Traps
The current status (enabled or disabled) for Link State, Segmentation, and Source
Address traps will always be displayed in the port-level Trap Selection window.
The repeater- and board-level windows will display current settings if they are
uniform; where settings are not uniform at the selected level, the corresponding
check box will be gray.
When you configure traps, keep in mind the hierarchy of levels at which you are
setting traps; for the Ethernet MicroLAN Switch, traps set at the repeater or board
level will override current port-level settings for all ports on that repeater
channel.
TIP
When you are setting repeater- or module-level traps, we recommend that you leave the
gray “No SET” status untouched (especially for Source Addressing Traps) unless you are
sure you want to override port-level settings. With no incoming traps to inform you of a
port security violation, you may have ports that are disabled on your device for no obvious
reason.
To enable or disable the above-described traps:
1. Open the appropriate Trap Selection window.
2. Click on the check box next to the desired trap: Link State, Segmentation,
or Source Address.
An empty check box indicates that the corresponding trap is disabled;
A checked box indicates that the corresponding trap is enabled;
A check box that remains gray indicates that the associated trap will not be set
(to either enabled or disabled), and the current mode of mixed settings at the
port level will be maintained.
Trap Selection
5-23
Managing Ethernet MicroLAN Switches
3. Click Apply. The device will now issue, or stop issuing, the indicated traps to
your management workstation. Keep in mind, however, that no traps will be
issued to your management station unless the Ethernet MicroLAN Switch’s
trap table has been properly configured via Local Management. Consult your
Local Management documentation for more information.
4. Click Cancel to exit the window; note that clicking Cancel before clicking on
the Apply button will close the window without saving any changes.
5-24
Trap Selection
Chapter 6
FDDI Applications
Concentrator configuration; connection policy; station list; concentrator performance; FDDI statistics;
frame translation
The FDDI menu lets you access windows to view a SmartSwitch 2000’s FDDI
configuration, connection policy, station list, and performance with respect to
each Station Management (SMT) entity present on an installed HSIM-F6 High
Speed Interface Module. You can also configure your module’s frame translation
settings using the Frame Translation window.
The Chassis View for a SmartSwitch 2000 with an installed HSIM-F6 will also
offer a FDDI Statistics window, which can be launched from the Device menu.
SMT provides the system management services for the FDDI protocols, including
connection management, node configuration, error recovery, statistics collecting,
and management frame encoding. SMT is comprised of various subcomponent
functions, including Connection Management (CMT) and Ring Management
(RMT); one SMT entity will be present for the ring connected to the HSIM-F6.
NOTE
The FDDI menu and associated management windows will only appear if you have an
HSIM-F6 installed in an Ethernet SmartSwitch.
The windows that provide information about the FDDI ring connected to the
SmartSwitch are:
•
Configuration — This window displays the current configuration and status
of the ring associated with the selected SMT entity.
•
Connection Policy — This window shows the types of connections between
the four FDDI PHY (port) types — A, B, M, and S — that will be allowed by the
SMT entity.
6-1
FDDI Applications
•
Station List — With this window you can see the configuration of the ring on
which the SMT entity resides, including number of nodes, node addresses
(both Canonical and MAC), node class, and current ring topology
•
Performance — This window lets you view the number of frames transmitted
and received on the ring as detected by the selected SMT entity, along with
error and lost frames, and the number of ring initializations.
•
FDDI Statistics — This window allows you to view various traffic-related
statistics for each SMT entity present on the device.
To access FDDI information (except FDDI Statistics):
1. In the Chassis View window, click on the FDDI menu option to display the
FDDI menu. Select the Station Management (SMT) entity that you want to
monitor to reveal the following FDDI menu (Figure 6-1).
Figure 6-1. The FDDI Menus
2. Click on the desired selection. When you select one of these options, the
associated FDDI window will appear.
Note that the title bar of each window will display the index number of the SMT
entity whose information is being displayed.
To access the FDDI Statistics window:
1. In the Chassis View window, click on Device to display the Device menu.
2. Click on FDDI Statistics.
Concentrator Configuration
The Concentrator Configuration window, Figure 6-2, informs you about the
configuration and operating state of the FDDI ring associated with the selected
SMT entity, and displays parameters relating to ring initialization.
6-2
Concentrator Configuration
FDDI Applications
Figure 6-2. The Concentrator Configuration Window
MAC State
This field indicates the current state of the MAC on the FDDI ring associated with
the selected SMT entity. The RMT component of SMT monitors MAC operation
and takes actions necessary to aid in achieving an operational ring. As described
by the FDDI Station Management (SMT) Draft Proposed American National
Standard, RMT occurs on a per-MAC basis and aids in the detection and
resolution of failures, such as stuck beaconing and the presence of duplicate
addresses.
Not Available
There is no MAC on the FDDI ring associated with this
SMT entity, or the selected SMT entity is not attached to
the main ring through the backplane FNB A and B ports.
Ring-Op
The ring is functioning normally. While in this state, the
MAC being managed is part of an operational FDDI ring.
Isolated
SMT has just initialized RMT or RMT has entered this
state during a path test (trace) after ring beaconing; RMT
is not aware of the ring path or state.
Non-Op
The MAC being managed by the selected SMT is
participating in ring recovery; the ring is not operational.
Detect
The claim (beacon) process of the FDDI ring protocol has
exceeded one second. There may be a problem on the
ring; any duplicate address conditions are being
detected. In this state, the ring is still alive, but no data is
being transmitted.
Concentrator Configuration
6-3
FDDI Applications
Non-Op-Dup
The ring is not operational; the address of the MAC
under control of the SMT entity has been found to
duplicate that of another MAC on the ring. The duplicate
address condition prevented ring recovery and
initialization after a claim and beacon process. This state
will not occur unless you are using locally- administered
addresses, as factory-set MAC addresses are guaranteed
to be unique.
Ring-Op-Dup
The ring is operational; however, the address of the MAC
under control of the SMT entity has been found to
duplicate that of another MAC on the ring. Corrective
actions will be attempted before the duplicate address
condition causes ring initialization to fail after the claim
and beacon recovery process. Like Non-Op-Dup, this
state will not occur unless you are using
locally-administered addresses.
Directed
The beacon process did not complete within seven
seconds. The selected SMT has directed the controlled
MAC to send beacon frames to notify the other stations
that a serious problem exists on the ring, and a Trace
state is soon to follow.
Trace
A problem exists on the ring which could not be
corrected during the beaconing process, and a Trace has
been initiated. During a Trace (or Path Test), the SMT
sends a signal that forces its nearest upstream neighbor
to remove from the ring and conduct a self-test. If the
ring does not recover, each subsequent upstream station
will be forced to remove from the ring and conduct
self-tests until the problem has been corrected. While the
test is being conducted, ring management re-enters the
isolated state.
SMT Version
Displays the HSIM-F6’s operational Station Management (SMT) version. SMT
provides the system management services for the FDDI protocols, including
connection management, node configuration, error recovery, and management
frame encoding. SMT frames have a version ID field that identifies the structure
of the SMT frame Info field. The version number is included in the SMT frame so
that a receiving station can determine whether or not its SMT version is able to
communicate with the SMT version of another station. Knowing the version
number allows the stations to handle version mismatches. Each FDDI station
supports a range of SMT versions. The supported version range is identified
within the ietf-fddi MIB by two smtTable attributes: snmpFddiSMTLoVersionId and
snmpFddiSMTHiVersionId. If a received frame is not within the supported version
range, the frame is discarded.
6-4
Concentrator Configuration
FDDI Applications
T-Req. (Requested Target Token Rotation Time)
The token rotation time bid made by the selected SMT entity during ring
initialization. Each station detecting that the ring must be initialized begins a
claim token process and issues a stream of Claim Frames, which negotiate the
value assigned to the Target Token Rotation Time (TTRT). The information field of
these frames contains the issuing station’s bid for the value of TTRT. Each
claiming station inspects incoming Claim frames (from other issuing stations) and
either continues its own bid (and removes the competing Claim Frame from the
ring) or defers (halts transmission of its own bid and repeats the competing bid)
according to the following hierarchy of arbitration:
•
A Claim Frame with the lowest TTRT bid has precedence.
•
If the values of TTRT are equal, the frame with the longest source address
(48 vs. 16 bits) has precedence.
•
If both TTRT value and source address length are equal, the frame with the
highest address has precedence.
The HSIM-F6 is shipped with a T-Req = 83 msec (earlier versions of firmware) or
6 msec (later firmware versions). T-Req is stored within the MIB in units of
nanoseconds (one billionth of a second) rather than milliseconds (one thousandth
of a second); your management application converts nanoseconds to milliseconds
for display purposes. You can use any SNMP Set Request tool to edit the T-Req
value; just remember that you must enter your value in nanoseconds, rather than
milliseconds.
T-Neg. (Negotiated)
The winning time negotiated in the ring initialization sequence.
Concentrator M Ports
This field displays the number of Master (M) ports on the modular concentrator
controlled by the HSIM-F6. A Master port is a port that provides a connection for
Single Attachment Station (SAS) devices to the FDDI network.
Concentrator Non-M Ports
This field displays the number of non-Master ports (A, B, or S ports) on the
modular HSIM-F6 concentrator.
Number of MACs
The number of Media Access Control entities present in the HSIM-F6, indicating
the number of ring port pairs. For the HSIM-F6, this number will be 1.
MAC Path
Indicates which FDDI ring the HSIM-F6 MAC is attached to:
•
Primary 1 indicates that the Primary 1 FDDI ring is being used.
•
Secondary 1 indicates that the Secondary 1 FDDI ring is being used.
•
Primary 2 indicates that the Primary 2 FDDI ring is being used.
Concentrator Configuration
6-5
FDDI Applications
•
Secondary 2 indicates that the Secondary 2 FDDI ring is being used.
•
Local means that the MAC is connected to one or more nodes but is not
connected to the dual ring.
•
Isolated means that the MAC has no connection to the ring or other
concentrator ports.
•
Unknown or ? indicates that your management application cannot determine
the MAC path for the HSIM-F6.
Ring Configuration
The current configuration of the MAC and physical layers of the A and B ports.
Connection Policy Window
The SMT Connection Policy of an FDDI concentrator determines which types of
connections are allowed among the four FDDI port types: A, B, M (Master), and S
(Slave). FDDI protocol forbids Master—>Master connections; all other connection
types are legal, although some are considered to be undesirable.
The Connection Policy window, Figure 6-3, lists potential connection types in a
“Reject X-Y” format, where X represents a port on the HSIM-F6, and Y represents
the attaching node. An checkmark in the check box next to a Connection Policy
indicates that it is an illegal connection.
Figure 6-3. The Connection Policy Window
6-6
Connection Policy Window
FDDI Applications
The following table summarizes the FDDI connection rules:
Table 6-1. FDDI Connection Rules
A
B
S
M
A
V, U
V
V, U
V, P
B
V
V, U
V, U
V, P
S
V, U
V, U
V
V
M
V
V
V
X
V — valid connection
X — illegal connection
U — undesirable (but legal) connection
P — valid, but when both A and B are connected to M ports (a dual-homing
configuration), only the B connection is used.
!
Though technically legal under FDDI connection rules, undesirable connections will
cause a twisted or wrapped ring.
CAUTION
Each device has its own connection policy; however, when two devices attempt to
connect, their combined established connection policies dictate the connections
that will be allowed. In an attempted connection between two nodes, the most
lenient policy will determine whether the connection (as long as it is legal) can be
made. For example, if two FDDI nodes attempt an A—>A connection, and this
connection is not allowed at one FDDI node but allowed at the other, the
connection would be accepted. If the connection policy at both nodes disallows
the connection, the connection will be rejected.
This is a read-only window; you currently cannot edit the HSIM-F6’s connection
policy directly from this window.
Connection Policy Window
6-7
FDDI Applications
TIP
You can use any SNMP Set Request or MIB tool to edit the Connection Policy for your
device by setting the fddimibSMTConnectionPolicy MIB OID (part of the MIBII
FDDI Transmission MIB (RFC1512). fddimibSMTConnectionPolicy is simply a
16-bit integer value (ranging from 32768 to 65535) that corresponds to the connection
policy (in the “Reject X-Y” format, where X represents a port on the FDDI Switch
Module, and Y represents the attaching node).
To set the connection policy for the device, total the bit values corresponding to
the desired connection policy according to the table below, and then use your SNMP
Set Request or Mib tool to set the value for the appropriate SMT index. For example,
to set a connection policy that disallowed the undesirable A-A or B-B connections
you would set the fddimibSMTConnectionPolicy MIB OID to 32,801:
32,768 (reject M-M, required) + 32 (reject B-B) + 1 (reject A-A).
Policy
rejectA-A
rejectA-B
rejectA-S
rejectA-M
rejectB-A
rejectB-B
rejectB-S
rejectB-M
rejectS-A
rejectS-B
rejectS-S
rejectS-M
rejectM-A
rejectM-B
rejectM-S
rejectM-M
Power
20 (1)
21 (2)
22 (4)
23 (8)
24 (16)
25 (32)
26 (64)
27 (128)
28 (256)
29 (512)
210 (1,024)
211 (2,048)
212 (4,096)
213 (8,192)
214 (16,384)
215 (32,768 — a permanently set value for this bit)
Station List
The Station List illustrates the configuration of the HSIM-F6 managed ring,
including number of nodes on the ring, node addresses (both Canonical and
MAC), node class, and ring topology.
The Station List provides the following information about the HSIM-F6 controlled
ring:
Number of Nodes
The number of stations inserted into the FDDI ring to which the HSIM-F6 MAC is
connected.
6-8
Station List
FDDI Applications
Figure 6-4. The Station List Window
Address Mode
Displays the current mode being used to display the addresses of the devices in
the Station List. The two possible modes are Canonical (FDDI) or MAC (Ethernet).
To change the current Address Mode, click on the Address Mode button at the
bottom of the window. The current address mode will change in the Address
Mode field and the Stations panel.
Stations Panel
The Stations Panel displays a list of the stations on the ring to which the selected
SMT is connected, in ring sequence from the MAC, along with each station’s node
class and current topology.
The information displayed in the Station List is static once the window is opened;
for updated information, click on the Refresh button.
If the number of nodes exceeds the panel size, scroll bars will appear in the list
box that will allow you to scroll through the station list to view the node of
interest.
Information provided in the Stations Panel includes:
#
An index number assigned to each station that indicates its position on the ring in
relation to the HSIM-F6. The monitored HSIM-F6 is always 1. Note that stations
are listed in reverse index order, with the HSIM-F6 appearing last on the list.
Station List
6-9
FDDI Applications
MAC Address
Displays the manufacturer-set MAC address of the node inserted into the ring.
MAC addresses are hard-coded into the device and are not configurable.
Node Class
Displays the type of ring device. Possible values are:
Station
Indicates an FDDI node capable of transmitting,
receiving, and repeating data.
Concentrator
Indicates an FDDI node that provides attachment points
to the ring for stations that are not directly connected to
the dual ring.
Topology
Indicates the node’s MAC configuration topology.
Upstream Neighbor
Displays hardware address (in Canonical or MAC format, as currently selected) of
each node’s upstream neighbor.
FDDI Performance
The FDDI Performance window, Figure 6-5, provides graphical and numeric
performance statistics for the HSIM-F6, including:
•
•
•
•
•
Transmit Frames
Receive Frames
Frame Errors
Lost Frames
Ring Ops
Figure 6-5. The Concentrator Performance Window
6-10
FDDI Performance
FDDI Applications
Statistics are displayed in three ways:
•
By count (i.e., the number detected of each for the selected interval).
•
By rate (i.e., the number of each per second, as averaged over the selected
interval).
•
Graphically, as a percentage of each with respect to total network load
processed by the HSIM-F6 during the last interval.
You can view the concentrator performance for three different intervals:
•
Absolute – Counts recorded since the device was last started.
•
Cumulative – Counts recorded since the Concentrator Performance window
was opened.
•
Delta – Counts recorded during a single polling interval that is set for NetSight
Element Manager (refer to the User’s Guide).
To change the interval, click to select the desired radio button in the Count
Display panel in the top right hand corner of the window.
Available statistics are:
Transmit Frames
The number of frames transmitted by the HSIM-F6’s MAC during the selected
interval.
Receive Frames
The number of frames received by the HSIM-F6’s MAC during the selected
interval.
Frame Errors
The number of error frames detected by the HSIM-F6’s MAC during the selected
interval that had not been detected previously by other stations. Error frames may
include frames with an invalid Frame Check Sequence (FCS), with data length
errors, or with internal errors that prevent the MAC from transferring the frame
to the Logical Link Control (LLC) layer.
Lost Frames
The number of frames detected by the HSIM-F6’s MAC during the selected
interval that have an unknown error, so their validity is in doubt. When the
HSIM-F6’s MAC encounters a frame of this type, it increments the Lost Frame
counter and strips the remainder of the frame from the ring, replacing it with idle
symbols.
Ring Ops
The number of times the ring has entered the “Ring Operational” state from the
“Ring Not Operational” state during the selected interval. This counter updates
when the HSIM-F6’s MAC informs Station Management (SMT) of a change in
Ring Operation status.
FDDI Performance
6-11
FDDI Applications
FDDI Statistics
The FDDI Statistics window displays traffic statistics for the HSIM-F6’s SMT
entity, including the number of frames and kilobytes per second (averaged over a
defined poll rate), the peak number of kilobytes per second, and the module’s
bandwidth utilization (expressed as a percentage) for the current poll interval.
To access the FDDI Statistics window:
1. In the Chassis View window, click on Device to display the Device menu.
2. Click on FDDI Statistics. The FDDI Statistics window (Figure 6-6) will appear.
Figure 6-6. The FDDI Statistics Window
The FDDI Statistics window displays the following information for the module:
SMT#
This field displays the index number of Station Management (SMT) entity for the
HSIM-F6.
Frames/sec
The number of frames/second (averaged over the specified poll interval)
transmitted by the indicated SMT.
KBytes/sec
The number of kilobytes/second (averaged over the specified poll interval)
transmitted by the indicated SMT.
Peak KBytes/sec
The peak number of kilobytes/second transmitted by the indicated SMT, as
detected over all polling intervals since monitoring began (i.e., since the FDDI
Statistics window was first opened).
6-12
FDDI Statistics
FDDI Applications
%Util
The percentage of utilization of available bandwidth by the indicated SMT over
the current poll interval; the percentage is calculated by dividing the actual
number of transmitted bytes/sec into the maximum number of bytes/sec that
could be transmitted (125,000,000 bytes/sec potential on a 100 Megabit/second
ring).
Setting the FDDI Statistics Poll Rate
1. Click on the clock symbol (
) next to the Poll Rate (sec) text box. The New
Timer Interval text box, Figure 6-7, will appear.
Figure 6-7. New Timer Interval Text Box
2. Highlight the hour field in the New Timer Interval text box and enter a new
hour value or use the arrow keys to scroll to change the hour, as desired. The
time is given in a 24-hour hh:mm:ss format.
3. Repeat step 2 to change the minutes and seconds fields, as desired.
4. Click OK when you are finished entering new information. The new Poll Rate
you have set is now entered.
The FDDI Statistics window will refresh, and the new time interval will take effect
immediately.
Configuring FDDI Frame Translation Settings
The HSIM-F6 interface must be configured to translate packets from an FDDI
frame format to an Ethernet frame format (and vice versa) when bridging packets
between FDDI and Ethernet networks. The Frame Translation window lets you
set the parameters for frame translation.
To access the FDDI Translation window (Figure 6-8):
1. In the Chassis View window, click on FDDI to display the FDDI menu.
2. Click on Frame Translation.
Configuring FDDI Frame Translation Settings
6-13
FDDI Applications
Figure 6-8. The Frame Translation Window
Information about Ethernet and FDDI Frame Types
There are four frame types which can be transmitted on an IEEE 802.3/Ethernet
network – Ethernet II, Ethernet 802.2, Ethernet 802.3 (or Raw Ethernet), and
Ethernet SNAP; there two frame types which can be transmitted on an FDDI
network: FDDI 802.2 and FDDI SNAP. Each of these frame types is described in
more detail in the sections that follow. Bridges connecting IEEE 802.3/Ethernet
LANs to an FDDI ring have to provide frame translation, as there are addressing
and frame format differences between the two network topology types.
For an Ethernet frame format to be forwarded onto an FDDI network, the Length
(IEEE 802/SNAP) or Type (Ethernet II) field must be removed (along with any
frame padding), an FDDI Frame Control field must be added, the bit-order of the
address fields must be reversed, and the frame’s CRC field must be recomputed.
In most instances, the IEEE 802.3/Ethernet frame format is translated
automatically into the appropriately corresponding FDDI frame format. Ethernet
802.2 frames are translated to FDDI 802.2 frames; Ethernet II frames are translated
to FDDI SNAP frames; non-AppleTalk Ethernet SNAP frames are translated to
FDDI SNAP frames; and AppleTalk Ethernet SNAP frames are translated to FDDI
SNAP frames (AppleTalk format).
However, because Ethernet Raw frames do not have a Type or Length field, and
can’t be automatically translated onto an FDDI network, you must select the
appropriate translation method to an FDDI frame format (for transmitting to
FDDI stations or for bridging back to an Ethernet network).
6-14
Configuring FDDI Frame Translation Settings
FDDI Applications
If the frame is exiting the FDDI ring through another FDDI/Ethernet bridge, the
FDDI frame must be converted back into an IEEE 802.3/Ethernet frame. As there
are four potential Ethernet frame types to which the two FDDI frame types can be
translated, you must determine which translation options you want in effect —
depending on which network protocols and applications are being run on the
destination network.
In addition, there are frame size differences between FDDI (which allows a
maximum frame size of 4500 bytes) and Ethernet frames (1518 byte maximum,
excluding preamble), so FDDI frames may need to be fragmented before being
bridged onto an Ethernet network.
The Frame Translation window lets you set the parameters for frame translation
and fragmentation when Ethernet traffic needs to traverse an FDDI ring. The
frame types that you select for translation will depend on which higher-layer
communications protocols and software you are running on the network
segments connected to your Ethernet-to-FDDI bridge. Each frame type and its
usage is described below.
Ethernet Frames
The HSIM-F6 supports translation of the following four Ethernet frame types:
Ethernet II
Ethernet II is the Novell NetWare designation for the basic Ethernet frame type
(also commonly referred to as Ethernet or Ethernet DIX). This frame format has an
Ethernet II MAC header with a two byte Ethernet Type field. The Type field
contains a protocol ID which indicates the upper layer protocol (e.g., XNS,
DECnet, TCP/IP, etc.) used in the Data field of the packet. Most current
transmission protocols, including TCP/IP, use the Ethernet II frame format, as do
networks running Apple’s AppleTalk 1 protocol and Digital’s DECnet protocol.
Note that the Type field of an Ethernet II frame will always have a decimal value
greater than 1500, so that it can be differentiated from the Length field of Ethernet
802.2 frames (described below).
Ethernet 802.2
The Ethernet 802.2 frame format is the IEEE 802.3 formalization of the original
Ethernet frame format. This frame format is similar to the Ethernet II frame
format, except that the two byte Type field is eliminated and replaced with a two
byte Length field, and an 802.2 LLC header is encapsulated within the 802.3
frame. This LLC header contains the destination and source addressing
information for the LLC frame (DSAP and SSAP), and a one byte Control field
(the LSAP – or LLC Service Access Point value) which provides the frame’s
protocol ID. Ethernet 802.2 packets are differentiated from Ethernet II packets
because the Length field will always have a decimal value of 1500 or less (since
the data field in Ethernet frames cannot be greater than 1500 bytes), and the
Ethernet II Type field will always be greater than 1500 decimal.
Configuring FDDI Frame Translation Settings
6-15
FDDI Applications
This is the default frame type for Novell NetWare software version 3.12 and
beyond; it is also used for OSI packets on IEEE 802.x LAN networks.
Ethernet 802.3 (Ethernet Raw)
The Ethernet 802.3 frame format has an 802.3 MAC layer header (as do Ethernet
802.2 frames); however, it does not contain an 802.2 LLC header. Instead, Novell
IPX is fixed within the packet as the network layer protocol. This frame type – also
known as Raw 802.3 – is the default frame type for Novell NetWare software
before version 3.11. Since these frames do not carry the 802.2 header, they do not
conform to the IEEE 802.3 specification. If you are using the Ethernet 802.3 Raw
frame format, you should consider upgrading your Novell NetWare software to
ensure interoperability with other communications protocols (unless your current
network is not likely to be upgraded, and has no interoperability problems).
IPX packets with checksums which provide data integrity (a feature of newer
Novell NetWare releases) cannot be transmitted on Ethernet 802.3 networks. Note
also that a single Ethernet can carry both Ethernet 802.3 and Ethernet 802.2 traffic
simultaneously. The Novell server software will treat the two frame types as two
logical networks (and function as an IPX router between the two networks).
Ethernet SNAP
To allow for proprietary protocols, such as IBM’s SNA protocol, the Ethernet
SNAP frame was created. This frame format extended the Ethernet 802.2 packet
by improving the frame’s byte alignment, and by allowing further protocol
identification than the one byte LSAP protocol identifier of Ethernet 802.2 frames
(which is reserved for standard protocols). Ethernet SNAP packets have an LSAP
protocol ID of hex AA, indicating that they contain a SNAP (Subnetwork Access
Protocol) packet. A SNAP packet, encapsulated within the Ethernet 802.2 packet,
has a five byte SNAP header which is simply a five byte protocol identifier. The
first three bytes of the header indicate the Organizationally Unique Identifier
(OUI) – or the authority assigning the protocol ID – and the last two bytes indicate
the protocol according to that authority. Note that for most protocols, the OUI is
0-0-0, and the type identifier is the standard Ethernet protocol ID. Although most
Ethernet transport protocols use the Ethernet II frame format, the AppleTalk II
protocol uses Ethernet SNAP (AppleTalk has its own unique OUI).
FDDI Frames
There are two legal FDDI data frame types:
FDDI 802.2
The FDDI 802.2 frame type has two headers: the FDDI header (which includes the
Frame Control field that indicates the class of frame, length of the address field,
and the type of FDDI frame), and the 802.2 header.
FDDI SNAP
The FDDI SNAP frame type has an FDDI header with a Frame Control field that
provides FDDI framing information, and the 802.2 LLC header with FDDI Frame
Control, a SNAP LSAP identifier, and a five byte protocol identifier.
6-16
Configuring FDDI Frame Translation Settings
FDDI Applications
There is no FDDI equivalent for Ethernet 802.3 Raw frames or Ethernet II frames.
Enterasys’ Ethernet/FDDI bridges will automatically translate Ethernet II frames
into FDDI SNAP frames, by identifying it as a SNAP frame in the LLC header,
and inserting a SNAP header with the Ethernet Type field.
By default, Enterasys’ Ethernet-to- FDDI bridges will translate an 802.3 Raw
frame into an FDDI MAC frame – although you can use the FDDI Frame
Translation window to alter the default translation. The FDDI MAC frame is an
FDDI frame type that is defined for internal use by the MAC layer, and which is
not passed to higher layer communications protocols on the datalink layer. Any
802.3 Raw frame translated into FDDI MAC will be recognized as such by other
Ethernet/FDDI bridges inserted in the ring, and will be forwarded onto the target
Ethernet segment as an 802.3 Raw frame.
FDDI Frame Translation Options
The FDDI Translation window lets you select which translation methods you
want enforced when translating frames from an FDDI frame format into an
Ethernet frame format, and when translating Ethernet Raw frames into FDDI
frames. It also lets you choose whether to allow fragmentation of IP datagrams
into smaller datagrams, and enable or disable the Auto Learn Novell Frame
Translation option.
To set frame translation parameters:
1. Click on the selection boxes of interest (described below), and select the
desired translation options.
2. Click Apply to save your new frame translation settings at the device, or click
Cancel to restore the last saved options.
IP Fragmentation
The IP Fragmentation selection box lets you specify frame fragmentation
parameters. FDDI traffic may need to be split, or fragmented, into two, three, or
four smaller frames to be successfully transmitted on an Ethernet network. For
fragmentation to be allowed, the frame must be an FDDI SNAP frame with an
OUI of 00-00-00 (indicating TCP/IP) and an IP protocol type identifier (08-00).
Possible options are Enabled (allow IP fragmentation – the default) or Disabled
(prevent IP fragmentation, and discard frames over 1518 bytes).
Translate all Non-Novell FDDI SNAP frames to
This selection box lets you set the translation parameters for non-Novell FDDI
SNAP frames. Possible options are Ethernet II (the default, which you should use
when bridging to most TCP/IP networks) or Ethernet SNAP (which you should
use when bridging to an AppleTalk environment on Ethernet).
Translate all Ethernet Raw frames to
This selection box lets you set the translation parameters for Ethernet Raw
(Ethernet 802.3) packets. Ethernet Raw frames are used on networks running the
IPX protocol on Novell NetWare versions prior to 3.12. Possible options are FDDI
Configuring FDDI Frame Translation Settings
6-17
FDDI Applications
802.2, FDDI SNAP (generally used when bridging to an AppleTalk environment
on an FDDI ring), or FDDI MAC (the default option, which translates the frame
into an FDDI MAC frame – which will not recognized as a data frame on an FDDI
ring, but will be recognized by an Enterasys Ethernet/FDDI bridge).
Translate all Novell FDDI SNAP frames to
This selection box lets you set the translation parameters for Novell IPX FDDI
SNAP frames. Possible options are Ethernet II (default, for most TCP/IP traffic),
Ethernet SNAP (AppleTalk networks), Ethernet 802.3 (some NetWare 3.12+ or
other networks running an ISO/OSI protocol stack), or Ethernet 802.3 Raw
(NetWare 3.11 and earlier networks).
Translate all Novell FDDI 802.2 frames to
This selection box lets you set the translation parameters for Novell IPX FDDI
802.2 frames. Possible options are Ethernet II, Ethernet SNAP, Ethernet 802.3
(default), or Ethernet 802.3 Raw.
Translate all Novell FDDI MAC frames to
This selection box lets you set the translation parameters for Novell IPX FDDI
MAC frames (i.e., received from a NetWare 3.11 or earlier network, and translated
into FDDI MAC frames). Possible options are Ethernet II (most TCP/IP
networks), Ethernet SNAP (AppleTalk Networks), Ethernet 802.3 (some NetWare
3.12+ and other networks running an ISO/OSI protocol stack), or Ethernet 802.3
Raw (default – NetWare 3.11 or earlier networks).
Auto Learn Novell Frame Translation
Some of Enterasys’ FDDI/Ethernet bridges can automatically learn the
appropriate frame translation type by the source address received at the Ethernet
interface. If this option is enabled, Novell IPX frames destined to a previously
learned source address will be translated to the appropriate frame type for that
address (as determined by its previously transmitted frames). If the destination
address is unknown, the default frame translation will be used for the frame.
Possible options are Enabled or Disabled.
6-18
Configuring FDDI Frame Translation Settings
Chapter 7
ATM Configuration
Viewing connection data; configuring Permanent Virtual Circuits (PVCs); adding and deleting
connection entries
The ATM Connections option is available when you have an HSIM-A6DP
installed and enabled in your SmartSwitch 2000. The ATM HSIM-A6DP provides
the connectivity that allows you to merge ATM network segments with
traditional LAN technologies.
An ATM network uses two types of virtual channels, or circuits: Switched Virtual
Circuits, or SVCs, and Permanent Virtual Circuits, or PVCs. SVCs are created and
dismantled dynamically on an as-needed basis, and require no management
definition; PVCs, however, must be manually configured. The Current ATM
Connections window provides the means for accomplishing these configurations.
Accessing the ATM Connections Window
To access the ATM Connections window from the Chassis View:
1. Click on Device on the Chassis View menu bar to access the Device menu.
2. Click on ATM Connections. The Current ATM Connections window,
Figure 7-1, opens.
7-1
ATM Configuration
Figure 7-1. Current ATM Connections Window
The Current ATM Connections window provides the following information about
the device’s ATM connections:
Connection Data
The Connection Data fields provide the following information about each ATM
interface available on the device:
I/F
Displays the index number assigned to each ATM
interface present on the selected module. The
HSIM-A6DP will provide a single ATM interface,
indexed 27.
Maximum Connections Displays the maximum number of connections allowed
by current device firmware.
Current Configured
Displays the number of Permanent Virtual Circuits, or
PVCs, currently configured.
Settings
The Settings portion of the window contains a list box which displays information
about each of the currently configured PVCs, as well as the fields used to
configure new connections:
I/F
7-2
The device interface on which the PVC was configured.
Accessing the ATM Connections Window
ATM Configuration
VPI
Displays the Virtual Path Identifier assigned to the
connection. Virtual Path Identifiers are used to group
virtual connections, allowing for channel trunking
between ATM switches. Each VPI can be configured to
carry many different channels (designated by VCIs)
between two points.
VCI
Displays the Virtual Channel Identifier assigned to the
connection; allowable values are 0 - 1023 for each VPI.
Each assigned VCI must be unique within its defined
VPI: for example, you can assign a VCI of 14 as many as
four times: once with a VPI of 0, once with a VPI of 1, and
so on. Remember, it is the combined VPI and VCI
designations assigned to a channel that creates the
grouping of virtual connections.
Encapsulation Type
Displays the method used to encapsulate LAN packets
on the selected circuit. Current versions of HSIM-A6DP
firmware use 802.3 VC-based multiplexing for bridging
protocols (designated VC MUX 802.3 Bridged); future
versions will add support for ATM Forum LAN
Emulation and SecureFast Switching. You may also see
some connections assigned a type of “other”; these are
default connections that cannot be modified or deleted.
Status
Displays the current administrative status of the
connection: enabled or disabled. In current versions of
firmware, all connections are enabled by default, and
cannot be disabled.
UpTime
The length of time the selected connection has been
enabled.
Add
Selecting the Add button either adds a new connection or modifies an existing
one, using the parameters entered in the fields below the list box. A confirmation
window opens for both additions and modifications.
Delete
Selecting the Delete button deletes the selected connection; a confirmation
window requires that you confirm the deletion.
Refresh
Selecting Refresh refreshes the connection information displayed in the window.
Accessing the ATM Connections Window
7-3
ATM Configuration
Configuring Connections
Adding a New Connection
To configure new Permanent Virtual Circuits (PVCs), enter the following
information in the text fields which appear just below the settings list box:
1. In the I/F text box, click on the down-arrow to the right of the text field, and
select the interface for which you wish to configure a connection. All available
ATM interfaces will be listed in this menu.
2. In the VPI text box, enter the Virtual Path Identifier you wish to assign to this
connection. Allowable values are 0 to 3; remember, the VPI you assign will be
used to group virtual connections, allowing for channel trunking between ATM
switches.
3. In the VCI text box, enter the Virtual Channel Identifier you wish to assign to
this connection. Allowable values are 0 to 1023 for each VPI. For example,
you could assign the same channel identifier — say, 25 — as many as four
times: once with a VPI of 0, once with a VPI of 1, and so on. Again, remember
that it is the combination of VPI and VCI that will be used to direct cells
through the intermediate switches between the source and destination.
4. In the Encapsulation Type field, click on the down arrow located to the right
of the field, and select the desired encapsulation type. Current versions of
HSIM-A6DP firmware use 802.3 VC-based multiplexing for bridging protocols
(designated VC MUX 802.3 Bridged); future versions will add support for
additional encapsulation methods.
TIP
Selecting any of the other encapsulation types listed in the field’s menu will cause a “Set
Failed” error when you attempt to add the new connection.
5. Click Add to add the new permanent circuit to the ATM interface. The circuit is
automatically enabled, and will remain in place until it is manually removed.
Deleting a Connection
To delete an existing PVC:
1. In the connections list box, click to select the connection you wish to delete.
2. Click Delete. A confirmation window opens, listing the parameters assigned to
the connection and asking you to verify that you wish to delete it. Click on OK
to proceed with the deletion, or on Cancel to cancel.
7-4
Configuring Connections
Chapter 8
HSIM-W87 Configuration
Configuring the T3 interface; configuring T1 connections; setting priority IP Addresses
The HSIM-W87 is a High Speed Interface Module that provides Wide Area
Network (WAN) services. The HSIM has a DS3 interface (T3), providing up to 28
separate DS1 connections (T1). The HSIM-W87 design provides WAN
connectivity to any SmartSwitch that supports HSIM connections.
The HSIM-W87 operates in a switching/bridging mode. With minimal user
configuration, the HSIM-W87 forwards data packets received by the host out the
logical DS1 interfaces (the T1 lines). It will also forward packets received on the
DS1 interfaces to or through the host. Up to 16 IP addresses can be configured for
priority transmission across the HSIM-W87.
The HSIM-W87 is configured using three windows: the T3 Configuration
window, the T1 Configuration window, and the IP Priority Configuration
window. These windows are explained in the following sections.
The T3 Configuration Window
You can set certain variables for the DS3 interface using the T3 Config window. To
access the T3 Config window:
1. Click on the T3 port to access the Port menu. (To determine which port is a
T3, select I/F Type from the Port Status menu. The T3 port will be labeled
“DS-3”.)
2. Select HSIM W87 Config (T3). The T3 Config window, Figure 8-1, opens.
8-1
HSIM-W87 Configuration
Click here to select or
deselect an option
button.
Figure 8-1. The T3 Config Window
The T3 Config window provides the following information about the device’s T3
configuration and allows you to set certain values:
Time Elapsed
Indicates the number of seconds that have elapsed since the beginning of the near
end current error-measurement period. To update this field you must close and
reopen the window.
Valid Intervals
Displays the number of previous near end intervals for which valid data was
collected. The value will be 96 unless the interface was brought online within the
last 24 hours, in which case the value will be the number of complete 15-minute
near end intervals since the interface has been online.
For some firmware versions, the Valid Intervals field may display an incorrect value.
NOTE
8-2
The T3 Configuration Window
HSIM-W87 Configuration
Line Status
This field indicates the line status of the interface. It contains loopback state and
failure state information. Scroll to view all of the status information, if necessary.
T3 Line Type
Select the type of DS3 or C-bit application implementing this interface: M23 or
CbitParity. The type of interface affects the interpretation of the usage and error
statistics.
T3 Loop Back
Select the loopback configuration of the T3 interface. Options are:
No Loop
Not in a loopback state. A device that is not capable of
performing a loopback on the interface will always have this
value.
Payload
The received signal at this interface is looped through the device.
Typically the received signal is looped back for retransmission
after it has passed through the devices’s framing function.
Line Loop
The received signal at this interface does not go through the
device, but is looped back out.
Transmit Clock Source
Select the T3 Transmit Clock Source: Loop-Timing, which indicates that the
recovered receive clock is used as the transmit clock, or Local-Timing, which
indicates that an internal clock source is used.
To change an option in the T3 Config window:
1. In the Line Type, Loop Back, and Transmit Clock Source sections, click to
select the desired option.
2. Click the Apply button to set your changes.
The T1 Configuration Window
You can set certain variables for the DS1 connections using the T1 Config window.
To access the T1 Config window:
1. Click on the appropriate Module Index to access the Module menu.
2. Select HSIM W87 Config (T1). The T1 Config window, Figure 8-2, opens.
The T1 Configuration Window
8-3
HSIM-W87 Configuration
Click here to select
or deselect an
option.
Figure 8-2. The T1 Config Window
At the top of the T1 Config window a list box displays configuration information
for each T1 connection (line). When you highlight a specific T1 line by clicking on
it, the fields below the list box display the current values for that line, and allow
you to change those values.
The following information is displayed for each T1 connection:
T1 Line Number
Displays the unique identifier assigned to each T1 port on the HSIM.
Time Elapsed
Displays the number of seconds that have elapsed since the beginning of the
current error-measurement period. To update this field you must click the
Refresh button or close and reopen the window.
8-4
The T1 Configuration Window
HSIM-W87 Configuration
Valid Intervals
Displays the number of previous intervals for which valid data was collected. The
value will be 96 unless the interface was brought online within the last 24 hours,
in which case the value will be the number of complete 15-minute intervals since
the interface has been online.
T1 Frame Type
Displays the type of service you are using over your T1 line. This value should be
set according to your WAN service provider’s instructions: ESF (Extended Super
Frame DS1) or D4 (AT&T D4 format DS1).
T1 Loop Back
Displays the loopback configuration of the T1 interface. Values are:
No Loop
Not in a loopback state. A device that is not capable of
performing a loopback on the interface will always have this
value.
Payload
The received signal at this interface is looped through the device.
Typically the received signal is looped back for retransmission
after it has passed through the devices’s framing function.
Line Loop
The received signal at this interface does not go through the
device, but is looped back out.
Line Status
This field indicates the line status of the interface. It contains loopback, failure,
received alarms and transmitted alarm information.
T1 Line BuildOut
Displays the value of the Line Buildout setting. This setting controls the amount
of attenuation of the T1 signal. The possible settings are 0 db, -7.5 db, and -15 db.
This field is currently not supported and will appear grayed out.
Transmit Clock Source
Displays the T1 Transmit Clock Source: Loop-Timing, which indicates that the
recovered receive clock is used as the transmit clock, and Local-Timing, which
indicates that an internal clock source is used.
Use the option boxes below the T1 list box to modify your T1 connections:
1. In the list box, click to highlight the T1 connection you wish to configure.
2. In the Frame Type, Loop Back, Line BuildOut, and Transmit Clock Source
sections, click to select the desired option.
3. Click Apply to set your changes. You must click Apply after modifying each
T1 connection.
4. Click Refresh to see your changes reflected in the list box.
The T1 Configuration Window
8-5
HSIM-W87 Configuration
Configuring IP Priority
The IP Priority Configuration window allows you to assign priority transmission
to up to 16 IP addresses communicating across the HSIM-W87.
To access the IP Priority Config window:
1. Click on the appropriate Module Index to access the Module menu.
2. Select IP Priority Config. The IP Priority Config window, Figure 8-3, opens.
Figure 8-3. The IP Priority Config Window
In the IP Priority Config window there several fields and a list box displaying the
current IP addresses that have been configured for priority transmission. The
following information is provided in the window:
Max Entries
This is a read-only field that displays the maximum number (16) of Priority IP
addresses that can be configured.
8-6
Configuring IP Priority
HSIM-W87 Configuration
Number of Entries
Displays the number of Priority IP addresses currently configured. This number
will change each time you add or delete an IP address in the list box.
Below these two fields is a list box displaying the currently configured IP Priority
Addresses. Each address is automatically assigned an Address ID when it is
configured. The lower the ID number, the higher the priority.
IP Priority Queue Status
This read-only field gives you the status (Enabled or Disabled) of IP Priority
configuration. You can change the status using the Enable or Disable buttons.
To configure IP Priority addresses:
1. In the IP Address field, enter the IP Address you want to configure in the
appropriate X.X.X.X format.
2. Click the Add button to add the IP Address to the list box. Remember, you can
configure a maximum of 16 IP addresses.
3. To delete an IP address, click to highlight the desired IP address in the list box
and click the Delete button.
4. To enable or disable IP Priority Address configuration, click on the Enable or
Disable button (in the IP Priority Queue Toggle section) as desired. The
current status is displayed in the IP Priority Queue Status field.
Configuring IP Priority
8-7
HSIM-W87 Configuration
8-8
Configuring IP Priority
Index
Symbols
% Load 4-3
% of Tot. Errors 4-4
Numerics
802.1d 2-59, 2-64
802.1Q 1-1
1d Trunk 2-59, 2-64
1Q Trunk 2-59, 2-64
Default VLAN 2-61
Egress List 2-59
Egress List Configuration 2-66
frame discard format 2-65
Hybrid 2-60, 2-65
Ingress List 2-59
Ingress List Configuration 2-63
Port Discard 2-66
port types 2-59
Tagged frames 2-59
Untagged frames 2-59
VLAN Configuration 2-60
VLAN ID 2-61, 2-64
VLAN name 2-61
802.1Q VLANs 2-57
A
Absolute 6-11
absolute value 3-2, 3-12, 3-19
Accum 4-5
Actions MIB 3-23
Active Users 5-4
Address Mode 6-9
Admin 2-11, 2-12, 2-13, 2-14
Admin/Link 2-11, 2-12, 2-13
Advanced Alarms 3-2
aging time 2-59
Alarm Instance 3-16
alarm limit timer interval 5-18
Alarm Limits
Device or Port 5-19
Time Interval 5-18
alarm log 3-5
alarm status 3-12
alarm threshold 3-1
Alarms
Advanced 3-2
Basic 3-1
Alarms and Events 3-1
Alarms Watch 3-11
Alarms, configuring 5-18
Alignment Errors 5-5, 5-11, 5-17
ATM 7-1
auto-negotiation 2-28
Average values 5-6
B
Bad Battery 2-44
Basic Alarms 3-1
Battery Capacity 2-44
Battery Output 2-44
Board Menus 2-9
Board Number 1-9
Boot Prom, revision 2-3
BPDU 2-59
Bridge 2-11
Bridge Mapping 2-11, 2-12
Bridge status mode 2-12
Broadcast/Multicast 3-4
Broadcasts 2-58, 5-4, 5-17, 5-19
buffer space 2-23, 4-8
Bytes 4-3
C
Cancel button 1-9
channel trunking 7-3
claim token process 6-5
CMT 6-1
Collisions 4-4, 5-4, 5-10, 5-19
Out-of-Window (OOW) 5-4, 5-11, 5-17
Collisions (%) 5-16
Color Codes 2-15
color-coded port display 2-2
Index-1
Index
command buttons 1-9
community names 3-7
in traps 3-7
Concentrator 6-10
Concentrator Configuration window 6-2
Concentrator M Ports 6-5
Concentrator Non-M Ports 6-5
Configuration 6-1
Connection Management 6-1
Connection Policy 6-1
Connection Policy window 6-6
Connection Rules 6-7
Connection Status 2-2
Count 6-11
CRC Errors 5-5, 5-10, 5-17
CRC/Alignment 4-3
Cumulative 6-11
D
Default VLAN 2-61
Delta 4-5, 5-5, 6-11
Delta Values 3-2, 3-5, 3-7, 3-12, 3-19, 4-2
Detect 6-3
Device Date 2-71
Device Menu 2-5
Device Name 1-8
Device Time 2-71
Device Type 2-17
Directed 6-4
Disable Port on Alarm 5-19
Discarded packets 2-23, 4-8
Drop Events 4-3
dual-homing 6-7
Duplex Mode 2-28
E
Egress List 2-59
Egress Ports 2-68
Egress Untagged List 2-68
Elapsed values 5-6
Encapsulation Type 7-3
error type breakdown 5-12
Errors
Alignment 5-5, 5-11, 5-17
CRC 5-5, 5-10, 5-17
Framing 5-5, 5-11, 5-17
Hard 5-4
Soft 5-5
Total 5-10
Index-2
Errors (%) 5-19
by type 5-17
Ethernet 802.2 frame 6-15
Ethernet 802.3 frame 6-16
Ethernet frame formats 6-15
Ethernet II frame 6-15
Ethernet SNAP frame 6-16
event 3-1
event index 3-13
Event Log 3-13
Event Type 3-22
Events Watch 3-11, 3-13
F
falling action 3-5, 3-8
falling alarm threshold 3-1, 3-2
Falling Event Index 3-19
Falling Threshold 3-5, 3-6, 3-8, 3-12, 3-18, 3-19
FDDI 802.2 frame 6-16
FDDI connection rules 6-7
FDDI frame formats 6-16
FDDI Frame Translation window 6-13
FDDI MAC frame 6-17
FDDI Menu 6-2
FDDI Performance window 6-10
Intervals 6-11
Statistics 6-11
FDDI protocol 6-6
FDDI SNAP frame 6-17
Filtering Database 2-58
firmware versions 1-11
Firmware, revision 2-3
Fragments 4-4
Frame Errors 6-11
Frame Priority Configuration window 2-53
Frame Size (Bytes) Packets 4-4
frame status breakdown 5-12
frame translation Options – BRIM-F6 6-17
Frame Translation window 6-13
Framing Errors 5-5, 5-11, 5-17
Freeze Stats 4-6
G
Getting Help 1-10
Giants 5-4, 5-11, 5-17
Gigabit Ethernet 2-35
Global Technical Assistance Center 1-10
Index
H
Hard Errors 5-4
Help button 1-9, 1-10
Help Menu 2-9
HSIM-A6DP 2-58, 7-1
HSIM-F6 6-6, 6-11
HSIM-W87 8-1
hysteresis 3-10, 3-27
Local-Timing 8-3
Location 1-9
lockStatusChanged (trap) 5-23
Log Events 3-22
Log/Trap 3-5
Logical Status 2-20
Loop-Timing 8-3
Lost Frames 6-11
I
M
I/F Summary
interface performance statistics 2-20
I/F Summary window 2-19
IEEE 802.1Q 1-1, 2-57, 2-58
IF Number 3-4
IF Type 3-4
ifInErrors 3-4
ifInNUcast 3-4
ifInOctets 3-4
ingress list 2-59
ingress list configuration 2-63
Interface Detail window 2-22
Interface Statistics window 2-22
IP address 1-8, 2-2
IP Fragmentation 6-17
IP Priority Configuration 8-6
IP Priority Queue 8-7
Isolated 6-3, 6-6
J
Jabbers 4-4
K
Kilobits 3-4
L
LEC 2-58
Line 8-5
Line Loop 8-3, 8-5
Line Status 8-3, 8-5
Line Voltage 2-44
Link 2-13, 2-14
Link State Traps 5-20
LNK (Linked) 2-14
Load 2-21
Local 6-6
Local Management 2-60
MAC Address 1-9, 2-3, 6-10
MAC Based Priority Configuration
window 2-50
creating MAC based priority entries 2-51
MAC Path 6-5
MAC State 6-3
Master 6-6
Max Entries 8-6
menu structure 2-4
MIB components 2-16
MIB II variables 3-4
MIB Tools 2-60
MIB Tree 3-15, 3-24
mouse usage 1-7
Multicast (Non-Unicast) 2-23, 2-58
N
N/A (not available) 2-14
network usage 5-1
newSourceAddress (trap) 5-22
NLK (Not Linked) 2-14
No Loop 8-3, 8-5
No recent test 2-44
Node Class 6-10
Non-Op 6-3
Non-Op-Dup 6-4
Non-Unicast (Multicast) 2-23, 4-7
Not Available 6-3
Number 6-9
Number of MACs 6-5
Number of Nodes 6-8
O
OFF 2-12, 2-14
OK button 1-9
ON 2-12, 2-13
OOW Collisions 5-17
Out-of-Window (OOW) Collisions 5-4, 5-11
Index-3
Index
Oversized 4-4
Owner 3-15, 3-22
P
packet capture
events 3-1
Packet count 5-17
Packet Type 4-3
Packets 4-3, 5-19
Packets Received 2-23, 4-8
Packets Transmitted 2-24, 4-8
Payload 8-3, 8-5
Peak Values 4-2, 4-4, 4-5, 5-6
Percent Load 5-10
Performance 6-2
Permanent Virtual Circuits (PVCs) 7-1
Physical Status 2-20
Polling Interval 3-5
Port Assignment 2-15, 2-63
port display, color codes 2-2
Port Menus 2-10
Port Number 1-9, 3-4
Port Operational Modes 2-66
Port Priority Configuration window 2-48
assigning transmit priority to ports 2-49
Port Status 2-3
Port Status Color Codes 2-15
Port Status Menu 2-7
Port Status Views 2-11
Port VLAN ID 2-58
port-based VLANs 1-1, 2-57
portLinkDown (trap) 5-22
portLinkUp (trap) 5-22
PortSecurityViolation (trap) 5-23
portSegmenting (trap) 5-22
PortTypeChanged (trap) 5-23
portUnsegmenting (trap) 5-22
portViolationReset (trap) 5-23
Primary 1 6-5
Primary 2 6-5
priority packet forwarding 2-47
PVID 2-58, 2-61
R
Rate 2-22, 6-11
Raw 802.3 6-16
Raw Counts 2-21
Readme 1-11
Receive Frames 6-11
Index-4
Refresh button 6-9
Requested Target Token Rotation Time 6-5
Ring Configuration 6-6
Ring Management 6-1
Ring Ops 6-11
Ring-Op 6-3
Ring-Op-Dup 6-4
rising action 3-5, 3-7
rising alarm threshold 3-1, 3-2
Rising Event Index 3-19
Rising Threshold 3-5, 3-6, 3-7, 3-12, 3-18, 3-19
RMON Action
deleting 3-25
RMON Alarm
create/edit 3-13
deleting 3-25
description 3-26
variable 3-15, 3-24
RMON Alarm Event Log 3-25
RMON Alarm/Event list 3-10
RMON Event
create/edit 3-20
deleting 3-25
RMON Thresholds 3-27
RMT 6-1
Runts 5-5, 5-11, 5-17
S
Sample Type 3-19
Second Generation Modules 2-35
Secondary 1 6-5
Secondary 2 6-6
SecureFast switching 1-1
SEG (segmented) 2-14
Segmentation Traps 5-20
Selecting Port Status Views 2-11
Set button 1-9
Slave 6-6
SMT 6-2, 6-3
SMT Version 6-4
Soft Errors 5-5
source address 2-59
Source Address Traps 5-20
sourceAddressTimeout (trap) 5-23
Spanning Tree 2-58
Startup Alarm 3-19
Station 6-10
Station List 6-2
Station Management 6-2
Index
Stations Panel 6-9
Statistics, Ethernet 4-2
Status (alarm) 3-4
Switched Virtual Circuits (SVCs) 7-1
T
T1 Configuration 8-3
T1 Frame Type 8-5
T1 Line BuildOut 8-5
T1 Line Number 8-4
T1 Loop Back 8-5
T3 Configuration 8-1
T3 Line Type 8-3
T3 Loop Back 8-3
Tag Header 2-47, 2-58, 2-59
tagging 2-47
technical support 1-10
Test Results 2-44
threshold pairs 3-27
threshold value 5-19
Time Elapsed 8-2, 8-4
time interval 5-18
Timer Statistics time interval 5-8
T-Neg. 6-5
Topology 6-10
Total 4-5
Total Errors 3-4, 5-10
Trace 6-4
traditional switching (or bridging) 1-1
transmission queue 2-47
Transmit Clock Source 8-3, 8-5
Transmit Frames 6-11
transmit priority levels 2-47
Transmit Queue Size 2-24, 4-8
Trap 3-22
trap selection
current status 5-21
trap table 5-13, 5-20
traps 5-20
T-Req. 6-5
Troubleshooting Guide 5-11
twisted ring 6-7
Unknown 6-6
Unknown Protocol 2-23, 4-8
Up Time 1-9, 2-3, 2-20
UPS ID 2-43
UPS Uptime 2-44
Upstream Neighbor 6-10
Utilities Menu 2-9
V
Valid Intervals 8-2, 8-5
VC MUX 802.3 Bridging 7-3, 7-4
VHSIM 1-5
Virtual Channel Identifier (VCI) 7-3
Virtual Connections, grouping 7-3
Virtual Local Area Network 2-57
Virtual Path Identifier (VPI) 7-3
VLAN 1-1, 2-57, 2-59
VLAN Configuration 2-60
VLAN ID 2-58, 2-59, 2-61, 2-64
VLAN Name 2-61
VLAN port assignment 2-63
VLAN tag 2-58
W
within 5-18
wrapped ring 6-7
U
Undersized 4-4
Unicast 2-23, 2-58, 4-7
Unit Failed 2-44
Unit in test... 2-44
Unit OK 2-44
Index-5
Index
Index-6
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