Specifications | Exmark 4500-485 Lawn Mower User Manual

2010
EXPEDITION
EXPEDITION EL
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TABLE
OF
CONTENTS
INTRODUCTION
SECTIONS 1 General Information
2 Electrical
3 Installation Considerations
4 Cargo Mounting Considerations
5 Reference Information
NOTE: The descriptions and specifications contained in this manual were in effect at the time this
manual was approved for printing. Ford Motor Company reserves the right to discontinue models at
any time, or change specifications or design without notice and without incurring any obligation.
All rights reserved. Reproduction by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopying,
recording, or by any information storage and retrieval system or translation in whole or part is not
permitted without written authorization from Ford Motor Company.
Copyright © 2009, Ford Motor Company
SECTION 0
Introduction
Contents
Introduction.......................................................................................0-1
2010 Expedition SSV Modifiers Guide, 07/2009
Introduction
0-1
Introduction
Ford Motor Company has assembled this Expedition Special Service Vehicle (SSV) Modifiers
Guide to assist vehicle modifiers in producing safe and quality products. Ford believes that safety
and quality come first.
This book is divided into topics pertinent to modifiers of vehicles. Reference is made to the current
Ford Expedition Workshop Manual for appropriate service procedures, torque specifications,
component separation clearances and other standard information that is common with the
unmodified vehicle. Specifications that are unique to the guide are designated.
This modifiers guide is not a ‘‘how-to’’ book; it should be used as a checklist to help make sure
that certain important steps in the modification process are considered. While Ford is providing this
information to assist modifiers, it does not warrant the products, methods, materials or the
workmanship of the modifier. Nor does it warrant against failures that result from the modification
of a vehicle.
Following the guidelines contained in this guide does not assure individual modifiers that the
products they modify comply with U.S. Federal or Canadian Motor Vehicle Safety Standards in
effect at the time of the modification. The guidelines set forth are based on engineering analyses
of typical vehicles. If followed, the modifier’s efforts in certifying vehicles to applicable standards
should be aided. Compliance testing that may be required for certification of specific vehicle
configurations or construction is, however, the sole responsibility of the individual modifier.
2010 Expedition SSV Modifiers Guide, 07/2009
SECTION 1
General Information
Contents
Section 1: General Information ........................................................1-1
Important Safety Notice................................................................1-1
Warnings, Notices and Notes ...................................................1-1
Making Safety Devices and Elements Inoperative...................1-2
Special Service Vehicle (SSV) Definition.....................................1-3
Identification Codes ......................................................................1-5
Good Practices .............................................................................1-9
Process and Quality Assurance Systems ................................1-9
Quality Assurance .....................................................................1-9
Minimum and Maximum Screw Sizes ......................................1-9
New Vehicle Storage....................................................................1-9
Tire Pressure Monitoring System (TPMS) Principles of
Operation ..................................................................................1-11
Ambient Temperature Change and Tire Pressure.....................1-12
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General Information
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Section 1: General Information
Important Safety Notice
Note: The descriptions and specifications contained in this guide were in effect at the time this
manual was approved for printing. Ford Motor Company reserves the right to discontinue
models at any time, or change specifications or design without notice and without incurring
obligation.
Appropriate repair methods and procedures are essential for the safe, reliable operation of all
motor vehicles as well as the personal safety of the individual doing the work. This manual
provides general directions and guidelines for performing modifications to the Expedition Special
Service Vehicle (SSV). Following them will help assure reliability.
There are numerous variations in procedures, techniques, tools and parts for modifying vehicles,
as well as in the skill of the individual doing the work. This manual cannot possibly anticipate all
such variations and provide advice or cautions as to each. Accordingly, anyone who departs from
the instructions provided in this manual must first establish that he compromises neither his
personal safety nor the vehicle integrity by his choice of methods, tools or parts.
Warnings, Notices and Notes
As you read through this guide, you will come across WARNINGS, NOTICES and NOTES. Each
one is there for a specific purpose. WARNINGS remind you to be especially careful in those areas
where carelessness can cause you personal injury. NOTICES are given to prevent you from
making an error that could damage the vehicle. NOTES give you added information that will help
you to complete a particular procedure.
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General Information
Section 1: General Information
The following list contains some general warnings that you should follow when you work on a
vehicle.
WARNING:
• Always wear safety glasses for eye protection.
• Use safety stands whenever a procedure requires you to be under the vehicle.
• Make sure that the ignition switch is always in the OFF position, unless otherwise
required by the procedure.
• Set the parking brake when working on the vehicle. The gear selector should be set in
PARK unless instructed otherwise for a specific operation. Place wood blocks (4 in x 4 in
or larger) against the front and rear surfaces of the tires to help prevent the vehicle from
moving.
• Operate the engine only in a well-ventilated area to avoid the danger of carbon monoxide
poisoning.
• Keep yourself and your clothing away from moving parts when the engine is running,
especially the drive belts.
• To reduce the risk of serious burns, avoid contact with hot metal parts such as the
radiator, exhaust manifold, tailpipe, catalytic converter and muffler.
• Do not smoke while working on a vehicle.
• To reduce the risk of injury, always remove rings, watches, loose hanging jewelry and
loose clothing before beginning to work on a vehicle.
• When it is necessary to work under the hood, keep hands and other objects clear of the
radiator fan blades.
• Failure to follow these instructions may result in personal injury.
Making Safety Devices and Elements Inoperative
The vehicle contains many safety features required by Federal or Canadian Motor Vehicle Safety
Standards. These features, which include the key-in-ignition chime and brake lights, should never
be disabled or modified.
Section 30122 of 49 USC states that ‘‘A manufacturer, distributor, dealer or motor vehicle repair
business may not knowingly make inoperative any part of a device or element of design installed
on or in a motor vehicle or motor vehicle equipment in compliance with an applicable motor vehicle
safety standard prescribed under this chapter unless the manufacturer, distributor, dealer or repair
business reasonably believes the vehicle or equipment will not be used (except for testing or a
similar purpose during maintenance or repair) when the device or element is inoperative.’’
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General Information
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Section 1: General Information
Special Service Vehicle (SSV) Definition
Special Service Vehicles (SSV) are offered to fill the special needs of police agencies that a
standard patrol car can not.
SSV Standard Package Deletes
Item
Floor console
Floor mats
Fog lamps
Third-row seat
Standard Equipment
System
Powertrain/Functional
Exterior
Description
5.4L SOHC 3V V8 Engine
6-speed automatic O/D transmission
Non-limited slip axle (3.73 ratio)
Multi-link independent rear suspension
P265/70R17 BSW A/S tires (4x2 only)
P265/70R17 OWL ON/OFF road tires (4x4 only)
Front skid plates only (4x2)
Front, transfer case and gas tank skid plates (4x4 only)
Tire pressure monitoring system (TPMS)
Variable assist power rack and pinion steering
17-in steel wheels (Expedition only)
17-in aluminum wheels (Expedition EL only)
Autolamps
Body-color body-side cladding, front/rear fascia and wheel lip moldings
Black door handles
Fog lamps
Black grille
Dual beam complex reflector headlamps
Keyless entry keypad
Black, heated power mirrors with security approach lamps
Privacy glass
Remote keyless entry with 2 key fobs (4 buttons each)
Black roof rails
Step bars (4x2 only)
Tow hooks (4x4 only)
Trailer towing — integrated class III receiver with 4-pin connector
(Continued)
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General Information
Section 1: General Information
Standard Equipment
System
Interior
Safety/Security
Description
Second and third row coat hooks
Second row map lights
Manual A/C with auxiliary climate controls
AM/FM single CD, 6-premium speakers (160-watts peak), driver adjusted speed
compensated volume, partitioned audio, rear seat controls and MP3 capability
Color-keyed assist handles
Auxiliary audio input jack in instrument panel
Cargo organizer (Expedition EL only)
Column shifter
Dome light
Vinyl floor covering
Vinyl jack stowage cover
Electrochromatic day/night auto-dimming rearview mirror
Overhead console with map lights, single sunglasses holder and conversation mirror
Power door locks and windows with one-touch DOWN driver side window
First row low back cloth captain’s chairs with 2-way adjustable headrests, 6-way
power driver with power lumbar, passenger manual recline
Second row vinyl 40/20/40 seats without armrest or cupholder
Color-keyed, leather-wrapped steering wheel with tilt and speed control switches
Sunvisors with dual auxiliary blades and illuminated mirrors
AdvanceTrac® with Roll Stability Control (RSC®)
Driver and passenger passive restraint air bags
Rear door child safety locks
Lower anchors and tethers for children system in rear outboard seats
Power disc brakes with 4-wheel anti-lock system and brake assist
Personal Safety SystemTM
Perimeter alarm
Safety Canopy®
Side intrusion door beams
Side thorax air bags
Securilock® passive anti-theft system (PATS)
S.O.S. post-crash alert
Miscellaneous Options (See sales brochure for complete list of available options)
Item
XLT Comfort Group (52C)
Convenience Package (50C)
(requires XLT Comfort
Group)
Heavy-Duty Trailer Tow
Package (536)
Technical Package (17T)
(requires XLT Comfort
Group)
Description
Overhead console with map lights, sunglasses holder, front auxiliary climate controls
and conversation mirror
Second row map lights
Illuminated visor vanity mirrors
Power-adjustable pedals
Power rear quarter windows
Universal garage door opener
Reverse sensing system
Class IV hitch receiver
Four- and 7-pin connectors
Heavy-duty auxiliary transmission oil cooler and radiator
Electronic brake wiring kit
Auto-dimming rearview mirror
Keyless-enty keypad
Heated sideview mirrors
(Continued)
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General Information
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Section 1: General Information
Miscellaneous Options (See sales brochure for complete list of available options)
Item
Exterior Options
Seat Options
Description
Daytime running lamps (43D)
Engine block heater (41H)
Heated sideview mirrors (54H)
Running boards (4x4 only) (186)
First row 40/60 split bench cloth with power adjustable driver’s seat (M)
Second row 40/20/40 split bench cloth (N/A with 875 third row seat) (21F)
Second and third row bench cloth (requires 574 rear aux A/C and heat)1 (21S)
Third row 60/40 split bench vinyl (requires 574 rear aux A/C and heat)2 (875)
Identification Codes
Vehicle Certification (VC) Label
The upper portion of the vehicle certification (VC) label contains the manufacturer name, the
month and year of manufacture, the certification statement and the vehicle identification number
(VIN). It also includes the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) and the gross axle weight rating
(GAWR), as well as tire size and pressure ratings. The VC label is located on the left-hand front
door edge.
1, 2 Standard on EL SSV
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General Information
Section 1: General Information
Vehicle Certification (VC) Label Code Positions
Position
Description
1
Exterior paint code
2
Region code
3
District Special Order
(DSO)
4
Wheelbase code
5
Interior trim code
6
Tape/paint pinstripe code
7
Radio code
8
Axle code
9
Transmission code
10
Spring code
11
Powertrain calibration
information
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General Information
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Section 1: General Information
1. Exterior Paint Color Code
The first set of numbers/letters listed indicate the vehicle primary body color code. The second set
of letters/numbers listed (if applicable) indicate a 2-tone or accent body color code.
• DX — Dark Blue Pearl
• UG — White Platinum
• UH — Tuxedo Black Metallic
• UJ — Sterling Gray Metallic
• UK — Royal Red
• UX — Ingot Silver Metallic
• YZ — Oxford White
4. Wheelbase Code
• 119 — 3,023 mm (119 in) wheelbase
• 131 — 3,327 mm (131 in) wheelbase
5. Interior Trim Code
The interior trim colors are:
Trim Type
• 1 — Verona leather (2-tone), 40/40 Captain’s chairs — Expedition
• 2 — Verona leather, 40/40 Captain’s chairs — Expedition
• 3 — Verona leather, 40/40 Captain’s chairs with accent — Expedition
• 4 — Verona leather, Eddie Bauer — Expedition
• 5 — Aniline leather (perforated), King Ranch — Expedition
• F — Cloth Captain’s chair — Expedition
• M — Cloth 40/60 split bench seat — Expedition
• T — Premium/Soho leather, 40/60 Captain’s chairs — Navigator
Interior Trim Color
• C — Camel Tan
• L — Medium Light Stone
• W — Charcoal Black
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General Information
Section 1: General Information
7. Radio Type
• 1 — AM/FM stereo with in-dash, 6-disc CD changer and clock
• F — AM/FM stereo CD player, navigation system and clock
• S — Premium electric AM/FM stereo CD player
• T — Premium AM/FM stereo with in-dash CD changer and clock
• U — Premium AM/FM stereo with in-dash, 6-disc CD changer and THX® speaker system
• X — AM/FM stereo with in-dash, CD changer and navigation system
8. Axle Ratio Code
The axle ratios are:
• 15 — 3.31 ratio, non-limited slip
• 16 — 3.73 ratio, non-limited slip
• H6 — 3.73 ratio, limited slip
10. Spring Code
Front Springs
• AA — 5L14-3C098-AB
• BB — 5L14-3C098-BB
• CC — 3L1J-18B036-AA
• DD — 5L74-3C098-AC
• FF — 3L14-18B036-BA
• HH — 3L14-18B036DA
Rear Springs
• 11 — 4L14-18W00-AA
• 33 — 5L14-5A965-BB
• 44 — 5L14-5A965-AB
• 55 — 4L1J-18W002-AA
• 66 — 5L74-5A965-AB
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General Information
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Section 1: General Information
11. Powertrain Calibration Information
Powertrain calibration information is printed in the lower right corner of the VC label. Only the base
calibration information is printed. Revision levels will not appear. Powertrain calibration information
is limited to a maximum of 5 characters per line on the VC label. Calibration identification
consisting of more than 5 characters will wrap to the second line on the VC label.
Good Practices
Process and Quality Assurance Systems
A formalized Process and Quality Assurance system may be helpful in consistently producing
high-quality products. An overview of some of the key items for such a system are outlined in this
section.
Quality Assurance
Completed Unit Sign-Off: All control items should be inspected with a written sign-off. All labels
should be inspected and signed off, including verification that the information on the labels is
correct. All appropriate systems should be checked for leaks. A road test should be performed to
verify that all systems are operating correctly. All systems and functions that were provided by
Ford should be checked to make sure that they function correctly after the build process.
The modifier’s Process and Quality Assurance Systems should also make sure that appropriate
training is provided to the employees.
Minimum and Maximum Screw Sizes
When installing aftermarket equipment, avoid using fasteners that are too long for the application
or are in an area which might damage vehicle components, including wiring, brake lines, fuel tank
and lines, powertrain components, exhaust system and suspension. Details for mounting
equipment in the trunk, as well as appropriate fasteners, can be found in Section 4, Cargo
Mounting Considerations.
New Vehicle Storage
New Vehicle Storage — General
• Vehicles should be stored in a dry, ventilated place, and protected from sunlight, if possible.
• If vehicles are stored outside, maintenance against rust and damage, as described below, is
recommended.
NOTICE: Keep all rubber parts free from oil and solvents. Damage to rubber parts can
occur.
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General Information
Section 1: General Information
New Vehicle Storage — Body
• Wash vehicle thoroughly to remove dirt, grease, oil, tar or mud from exterior surfaces and
underside of front fender.
• Periodically wash vehicles stored in exposed locations.
• Touch up exposed raw or primed metal to provide rust protection.
• Cover chrome and stainless steel parts with a thick coat of auto wax to prevent discoloration.
Rewax as necessary when the vehicle is washed.
• Lubricate all hood, door hinges and latches with a light grade oil.
• Cover the interior soft trim to prevent fading.
New Vehicle Storage — Engine
• Start the engine every 15 days. Run it at fast idle until it reaches normal operating temperature.
• With foot on brake pedal (and brake applied), shift the transmission into all gears while the
engine is running.
New Vehicle Storage — Fuel System
• Regularly move vehicles short distances to mix fuel anti-oxidation agents.
NOTICE: During extended periods of vehicle storage (60 days or more), gasoline may
deteriorate due to oxidation. This can damage rubber and other polymers in the fuel system
and may clog small orifices. A commercially available gasoline fuel stabilizer (Sta-Bil or
equivalent) should be added to gasoline-powered vehicles whenever actual or expected
storage periods exceed 60 days. The manufacturer’s instructions packaged with the product
should be followed. The vehicle should then be operated at an idle speed to circulate the
additive throughout the fuel system.
New Vehicle Storage — Tires
Most high-performance tires are made with nylon overlay.
As such, the following steps should be taken to avoid flat spotting when the vehicles are not used
for a period of time.
• Store the vehicles with 44 psi in the tires. If the cars are to be driven, the air pressure should be
reduced to recommended operating pressure and then increased back up to 44 psi when
returned to storage.
• If the vehicle is stored for periods longer than 30 days, it should be moved several feet at least
once during each 30-day period, so that a different portion of the tread contacts the ground.
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General Information
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Section 1: General Information
Tire Pressure Monitoring System (TPMS) Principles of Operation
The tire pressure monitoring system (TPMS) monitors the air pressure of all 4 regular road tires.
The tire pressure sensors, attached to each rim by a metal band located in the drop well, transmit
via a 315 Mhz radio frequency signal to the internal antenna of the smart junction box (SJB).
These transmissions are sent approximately every 60 seconds when the vehicle speed exceeds
32 km/h (20 mph). The SJB compares the tire pressure data against a low-pressure limit. If the
module determines that the tire pressure has fallen below this limit, the module communicates this
on the vehicle network to the instrument cluster (IC) and illuminates the TPMS indicator solid. If
there is a system malfunction, the TPMS indicator flashes for 70 seconds and then goes solid.
This vehicle, as delivered by Ford Motor Company, conforms to Standard FMVSS138, Tire
Pressure Monitoring Systems.
This system may not function if any of the following components are removed, relocated or
modified in any way:
• OEM wheels and tires
• Tire pressure sensors, cradles and bands
• SJB
• SJB software and calibrations
• IC
• IC software and calibrations
• Instrument panel wiring
• Wheel bases greater than originally released
Certain modifications could cause reduced system performance, including the complete loss of
TPMS functionality. This may include:
• Non-OEM wheels or tires
• The addition of steel carcass or run-flat tires
• Removal of tire pressure sensors, cradles or bands
• Modification of the recommended tire pressure
• Modifications to the mounting location of the SJB
• Modifications or re-location of the harness supplying the SJB and IC modules
• Addition of metallic structures, such as prisoner partitions, may affect the signal strength of the
sensors and could interfere or prevent the SJB from hearing the sensors
• Addition of intended or unintended transmitters to the vehicle may affect the signal strength of
the sensors or interfere SJB internal antenna
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General Information
Section 1: General Information
The TPMS, as delivered from the Ford Motor Company, complies with part 15 of the FCC rules
and with RS-210 of Industry Canada. Operation is subject to the following 2 conditions:
• This device may not cause harmful interference
• This device must accept any interference received, including interference that may cause
undesired operation.
Ambient Temperature Change and Tire Pressure
NOTICE: Do not inflate tire higher than maximum pressure stamped on tire sidewall.
Premature tire wear or damage to the tire may result.
Tire pressures fluctuate with temperature changes. For this reason, tire pressure must be set to
specification when tires are at outdoor ambient temperatures. If the vehicle is allowed to warm up
to shop temperatures, and the outside temperature is less than shop temperature, the tire inflation
pressure must be adjusted accordingly.
If the tires are inflated to specification at shop temperatures, and the vehicle is moved outdoors
when the outdoor ambient temperature is significantly lower, the tire pressure may drop enough to
be detected by the tire pressure monitoring system (TPMS) and activate the TPMS warning lamp.
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General Information
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Section 1: General Information
As the ambient temperature decreases by 6°C (10°F), tire pressure decreases 7 kPa (1 psi).
Adjust the tire pressure by 7 kPa (1 psi) for each 6°C (10°F) ambient temperature drop as
necessary to keep the tire at the specified vehicle certification (VC) label pressure. Refer to the
following tables to adjust the tire pressure indoors for colder outside temperatures.
2010 Expedition SSV Modifiers Guide, 07/2009
SECTION 2
Electrical
Contents
Section 2: Electrical .........................................................................2-1
Electrical Basics ...........................................................................2-1
Electrical Systems Management ..................................................2-2
Generator Output..........................................................................2-2
Charging Margins .........................................................................2-2
Vehicle Component Electrical Loads........................................2-2
Typical Police Equipment .........................................................2-3
PCM — Red Area ........................................................................2-4
Disabling Brake Lights..................................................................2-4
Auxiliary Power Point (12V DC) ...................................................2-4
General Guidelines .......................................................................2-4
Splices and Repairs ...................................................................2-14
How To Change Option Content................................................2-19
Rear Power Window Disable .....................................................2-20
Wiring Reference Information.....................................................2-20
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Electrical
2-1
Section 2: Electrical
Electrical Basics
Inside a vehicle, electricity is supplied through powered wires (commonly called ‘‘hot’’ wires),
comparable to the pressurized supply pipes of a plumbing system. At various points along the
wires are outlets in the form of lights, switches and receptacles. Turning on a light switch is
somewhat like opening a faucet to let water run — an electric current flows through the hot wire to
make the light glow. Once the electricity has done its work, its potential drops to zero, just as
water loses pressure after flowing through a sink or laundry tub. The electrical system has ‘‘drains’’
— which are the ground wires that return the current to its source just as a plumbing system has
drain pipes through which water runs into the sewer mains or the ground.
The light or equipment powered by the current, technically called the load, can be compared to a
water wheel that remains motionless until a stream of water causes it to turn. A load may be one
of 2 kinds. The first consists of a resistance — a material that permits the passage of electric
current, but only with difficulty, and thereby creates heat. The tungsten filament of an incandescent
bulb is resistance; so is the heating element of an electric heater of a coffee pot. A load may also
be an inductance — typically a motor with windings of copper wire, in which the magnetic fields
generated by the current create motion. At any moment, the demand on an electrical system
depends on the number of loads in operation and their consumption of energy, just as demand on
a water system depends on how many faucets are opened and how wide they are opened.
The mechanics and physical fittings of the system are simple. Current moves throughout the
vehicle in wires of different sizes, according to the current a circuit may have to carry. Power is
supplied directly to equipment through connectors.
Electrical Terms
VOLT is the unit of electrical potential, equal to the difference of electrical potential between 2
points on a circuit.
AMPERE is the unit used to measure the amount of current - that is, the number of electrically
charged particles called electrons - that flows past a given point on a circuit each second. It is
similar to measuring the amount of water flowing through a pipe at any given point. The larger the
pipe is, the more water that can flow past the point per second. Similarly, the bigger the wire is,
the more current that can flow through it at any given point. Current that has lost its voltage still
has amperage as it completes the circuit and returns to the battery.
WATT is the unit of power. It indicates that rate at which a device converts electric current to
another form of energy, either heat or motion, or to put it another way, the rate at which a device
consumes energy.
The relationship of volts, amperes and watts to one another is expressed in a simple equation that
enables you to make any calculations you may need for correct and safe electrical modifications to
the vehicle. Volts x amperes = watts. If the current is at 12 volts and a device requires 4 amperes
of current, the equation will read 12 volts x 4 amperes = 48 watts.
To figure the current needed for a device rated in watts, turn the equation around: watts/volts =
amperes. For example, if you have a piece of equipment, such as a communications radio, that
uses 120 watts: 120 watts/12 volts = 10 amperes.
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2-2
Electrical
Section 2: Electrical
Electrical Systems Management
Care must be given in deciding what equipment should be installed into a police vehicle given the
power demands of the equipment and the power available from the vehicle. A power load strategy
should be developed to minimize the risk of running out of power. Examine the proposed
equipment for vehicle installation. Add up the current requirements. If the current requirements
exceed what the vehicle can reasonably be expected to be able to provide, the battery will begin
discharging to provide the power to the equipment that the generator is unable to provide. After
some period of time, the vehicle will shut off as the battery voltage decreases to a level that
cannot sustain vehicle operation.
There are alternatives that can be considered to minimize system electrical overload. Consider
the current requirements of equipment before it is purchased and installed. Modern light bars and
radios use a fraction of the current than units made as recently as 1996. As the light bar is the
most power intensive unit installed on most police vehicles, considerable attention should be given
to its current requirements. Changes in officer habits while in the field can make a difference as
well. When a vehicle is sitting at an accident scene and no one is in the car, the A/C can be
turned off until the officer is ready to get back into the vehicle. The A/C is among the largest
current users of non-police equipment. As such, it can impact available power for other uses as
well.
Generator Output
On the Expedition Special Service Vehicle (SSV), the generator is controlled by the PCM.
The Expedition SSV has a 150-amp generator.
• Generator amp output.
— Maximum output for the Expedition SSV is 150 amps
• Generator drive ratio, determined by generator pulley size.
— 2.96:1
Charging Margins
Generator output varies with engine speed and ambient temperature. The worst case for police
vehicles is when the vehicle is idling for long periods of time on a very hot day. Lower engine
speeds while idling, coupled with high underhood temperatures that may approach 93°C (200°F),
combine to minimize power output from the generator. At the same time, electrical demand on the
vehicle is often at its highest because the A/C loads are added to the usual electrical loads
experienced in emergency situations.
Vehicle Component Electrical Loads
Vehicle component electrical loads are shown in the table below. Not all features are powered all
the time, so actual vehicle loads on the power supply system will vary.
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Electrical
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Section 2: Electrical
Component
Amps
Base
Miscellaneous Base Loads
16.5
Cooling
Cooling Fan (electric fan clutch)
2.2
Climate Control
A/C Clutch
3.5
A/C Fan-to-Face — High Speed
18.9
A/C Fan-to-Face — M/H Speed
13.4
Heater Fan-to-Foot — M/H Speed
12.5
Auxiliary Blower — M/H Speed
8.5
Auxiliary Blower — High Speed
9.5
Lighting
Exterior and Instrument Panel Lamps
(non-dimmable)
7.5
Headlamps — Low Beam
6.4
Headlamps — High Beam
(incremental)
7.1
Brake Lights (with CHMSL)
10.7
Heated Features
Heated Rear Windows
21.9
Other
Radio
3.0
Front Wiper
3.5
Rear Wiper
1.5
Typical Vehicle Load = 80 - 110 Amps
Typical Police Equipment
Loads for equipment commonly found on police vehicles are shown in the table below. Not all
equipment will be operating at the same time, so actual loads on the power supply system will
vary.
Component
Amps
Communications Radio
4.0 (8.0 w/mic active)
Mobile Data Transmitter
3.0
Light Bar
28-43
Light Bar with All Internal
Accessory Lights Activated
36-63
Spot Lights (each)
7.8
Alley Lights (each)
1.0
Radar
0.8
Camcorder
0.5
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2-4
Electrical
Section 2: Electrical
PCM — Red Area
NOTICE: DO NOT make electrical connections to vehicle electrical systems not specifically
designed for police equipment installations. Damage to the electrical system can occur.
Do not install any components into the PCM or PCM harness. Connecting into this system may
affect engine and transmission operation. As an example: connection of aftermarket electrical
equipment into the brake light circuit or any other circuit which is connected to the PCM, anti-lock
brake computer, air bag system or any other vehicle system will cause vehicle malfunction.
Disabling Brake Lights
Do not disable the brake light circuits for any reason. For additional information, refer to Section 1:
General Information in this guide.
Auxiliary Power Point (12V DC)
NOTICE: Do not plug optional accessories into the cigar lighter socket (if equipped).
Incorrect use of the lighter/socket can cause damage not covered by the warranty.
NOTICE: Power outlets are designed for accessory plugs only. Do not insert any other
object in the power outlet as this will damage the outlet and blow the fuse. Do not hang any
type of accessory or accessory bracket from the plug. Incorrect use of the power outlet can
cause damage not covered by the warranty.
The auxiliary power point is located on the instrument panel. Do not use the power point for
operating the cigar lighter element (if equipped). To prevent the fuse from being blown, do not use
the power point(s) over the vehicle capacity of 12V DC/180W. If the power point or cigar lighter
socket is not working, a fuse may have blown. To prevent the battery from being discharged, do
not use the power point longer than necessary when the engine is not running. Always keep the
power point caps closed when not being used.
General Guidelines
• Provide circuit protection (fuses) for all wiring. The fuse rating should not exceed either the rated
wiring current capacity or the total current requirements for all the add-on components on the
circuit. Install fuses as close to the point of tapped power as possible.
• Document all revisions to the electrical system and place with the vehicle Owner’s Literature.
Color code and/or label all revisions or additions to wiring.
• Provide protective covering in all areas that could be damaged during normal equipment
installations.
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Section 2: Electrical
• Disconnect the negative battery cable of vehicles stored on site to reduce the possibility of
draining the battery by lights or other equipment.
• Do not allow control panels attached to the instrument panel to protrude into the driver and
passenger air bag deployment zones. For additional information, refer to Section 5: Reference
Information in this guide.
• Do not install switches and gauges in the driver or passenger knee impact areas.
• Inspect all Ford gauges, lights and switches for correct operation after instrument panel work is
performed.
• Correctly secure all wiring relocated or removed while working behind the instrument panel to
prevent chafing, squeaks and rattles.
• Provide adequate retention for wiring harnesses so that they are clear of bolts, corners or edges
which could abrade the wires during normal vehicle operation.
• Anticipate misrouted wiring situations and protect all wiring from penetration by screws and raw
edges.
• Weather seal all electrical connectors exposed to the elements.
• Do not use quick splice connectors or wire nuts.
• Install the fuse panel so fuses are readily accessible.
• Make sure that connections are easily accessible for assembly and service.
• Make sure submersible connectors do not lose their seals under extreme assembly conditions
such as bending wires 90 degrees immediately after the connector.
• Whenever using connectors, use a socket (female) connector on the electrical source side and a
plug (male) connector on the electrical load side to reduce the possibility of a short circuit when
disconnected.
• Air bag restraint systems must remain intact as received from Ford Motor Company. Before
modifications are done to the vehicle, the system must be disarmed by following the instructions
provided in the current Expedition Workshop Manual.
• Adherence to the above guidelines is not to be construed as approval by Ford Motor Company
of any specific revisions or additions to the vehicle’s original electrical system.
Keep-Alive Memory (KAM) Power
The electronic engine and transmission control modules require battery power to be supplied at all
times to maintain the keep-alive memory (KAM). Keep this in mind when installing load disconnect
switches or solenoids.
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Section 2: Electrical
Equipment Grounding Guidelines
• Do not ground the body to the transmission or transmission crossmember. Ground accessories
to the chassis or the vehicle battery.
• Splicing into circuitry relating to the electronic engine and/or transmission control systems is not
acceptable because of the adverse effect on the electronic system operation.
• Adequately protect electrical connections exposed to the elements.
Wire Insulation
• Polyvinyl Chloride (PVC), rated at 90°C (194°F), is the standard wire insulation that is acceptable
for inside body use, but is not acceptable for underhood/underbody wiring.
• Hypalon insulation should be used on links only (Ford Specification ESB-M1L54-A).
• Cross-linked Polyethylene (XPLPE or SXL), rated at 135°C (275°F), is the required insulation for
underhood/underbody applications (Ford Specification ESB-M1L123-A).
• GXL can be used as an alternate wire (Ford Specification ESB-M7L85B) as long as the
concentricity specifications are met. To provide a water-resistant seal in conjunction with crimp
connectors, a Duraseal crimp connector is recommended since it is designed to account for
outside wire diameter that is smaller than the present SXL wire.
Terminals and Connectors
Connector Types
• Submersible (sealed) — A connector that is capable of being immersed in water.
• Weather-resistant — A connector that will retain its sealing and connection qualities while being
exposed to adverse weather conditions.
• Duraseal crimp — A supplier trade name for a sealed wiring repair or splice.
When a connection is not defined (typical situation — harness-to-harness connectors), the
following suggestions should be implemented:
• Determine the connector type. If it will be located in a hostile environment, use a submersible
(sealed) connector; if not, use an open connector. A hostile environment is defined as being
exposed to water and/or salt accumulation and/or high temperatures (for example, underhood,
exterior panels and footwells). Use in-line connectors with secondary locks to prevent the
terminal from being pushed out.
— Do not use single wires smaller than 14-gauge in a 2-way or larger weather-resistant
connector (the very large style), since the wire may break during disengagement.
— Use Hypalon, XLPE or Elexar insulation in submersible connectors to maintain sealing
integrity. PVC is not acceptable because it cold flows and allows setting in a deformed
pattern, therefore compromising the integrity of the seal.
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Section 2: Electrical
• Determine the terminal type. Base your decision on wire gauge, current carrying capacity,
connector type and insulation type.
— Use non-detent low insertion force terminals whenever possible.
— Do not use low insertion force female terminals in weather-resistant connectors.
— Analyze circuit requirements (signal levels, current, voltage) to determine the correct plating
material (such as gold). Use of non-plated terminals is not recommended.
— Do not use plugs to seal holes in micropin connector grommets. It is very easy to forget to
insert them during manufacturing and ruin the seal. Use a grommet with only the necessary
number of holes or use dummy wires at least 600 mm (24 in) long.
— Fully align connectors prior to terminal connection — terminal cavities should have minimum
tolerance to prevent terminals from floating, bending or pin push-out during
mating/engagement.
— Make sure connectors of similar type and color are identifiable to the operator to eliminate
crossed connections and minimize assembly time. Avoid using similar types and colors of
connectors close together.
— Be sure that connectors have positive locking devices that allow easy installation with a low
insertion force and easy removal. The connector snap should be easily felt and heard.
— Eliminate the use of edgeboard, tang-type and molded-over connectors. The use of
blade-type weather-resistant connectors is restricted to high-current applications which cannot
be handled by submersible connectors.
Circuit Protection and Electrical Load
• Modification to existing vehicle wiring should be done only with caution and careful consideration
of effects on the completed vehicle electrical system. Anticipated circuitry should be studied to
determine the required circuit protection and to avoid feedback loops.
• Added circuitry must be protected either by a base vehicle fuse or circuit breaker, or by a similar
device supplied by the modifier.
• When adding loads to a base vehicle-protected circuit, make sure that the total electrical load
through the base vehicle fuse or circuit breaker is less than the device’s load rating.
• Use 80% of the fuse rating to determine maximum steady state load to reduce nuisance fuse
failures.
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Electrical
Section 2: Electrical
• Use 135% of the fuse rating when sizing wiring to protect the circuit in the event of an overload.
Fuses will last for 1 hour at 135% of their rating.
— Total current draw is the sum of the base vehicle’s circuit current requirement (measured with
an ammeter) and the anticipated add-on component current requirements.
— Never increase the rating of a factory installed fuse or circuit breaker.
— If the total electrical load including additional electrical components, on any circuit, is less
than the fuse protection rating or the capacity of some limiting component (switch, relay), the
items to be added can be connected directly to that circuit. The headlamp switch circuits
should never have additional lighting or electrical components directly connected.
— Added devices that exceed the current capabilities of the factory-installed system are best
controlled through the use of a relay or separate switch. The coil of the relay can be fed from
the circuit in the factory harness (now acting as a signal circuit) with added wiring providing
feeds to the added electrical device. The relay selection is important and depends on current
requirements, number of cycles expected in the relay lifetime, whether the relay is to be
operated intermittently or for long periods of time and whether the relay is exposed to
weather conditions or is installed in a protected area. When the current requirements of a
circuit exceed the capacity of an available relay, the load should be reduced or divided
through the use of additional relays.
Wire Protection Requirements
General Notes
• Anticipate problems and design accordingly. Try to anticipate what could go wrong and modify
your designs to address any adverse impact.
• Review all connector applications and electrical systems to determine the need for solder,
grease, weather-resistant or sealed connectors. Make sure components and wire insulation are
compatible with greased connectors (important for long-term durability).
• Make sure that drip loops or other means are provided to prevent water leakage into the vehicle
through wiring assemblies that pass through the dash panel.
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Section 2: Electrical
• Use greased or sealed connectors in floor pan troughs which are subject to moisture coming
through the carpeting.
• Use XLPE insulation for uncovered runs that exceed 305 mm (12 in).
Electrical Protection
• Correctly route wires away from noise-generating wires or components. However, if routing near
noisy wires or plugging into noisy components is unavoidable, additional protection must be
designed into the harness.
• Shielding — Electro Magnetic Interference (EMI) — Consider shielding if you must route close to
high-current or noisy circuits. Use shielded wire and ground one side. Seal all splices in wire
assemblies that use bare coaxial shielding (braid or tape) for EMI suppression, and insulate or
tape over all shielding ends that terminate near any open connectors. This prevents splice and
terminal shorts to the shielding. Minimize the length of conductors which extend beyond the
shield. Failure to do this reduces the effectiveness of the shield.
• Spike suppression, in general, is accomplished by connecting a diode or resistor-diode
combination across the terminals of the noisy component. The diode should be sufficiently close
to the component (both electrically and physically) so that inductive spikes are clamped off.
Make sure the diode is connected with the correct polarity.
Correct routing and retention will reduce the likelihood of chafing or pinching. When this ideal
routing is unattainable, the following additional protection is needed:
Mechanical/Environmental Protection
• Tape — Tape is the most basic means of protection. It contains the wires in a loose bundle and
provides limited environmental protection. It does not protect against chafing and pinching.
— Kendall Polyken Fiberglass Base Tape (Ford Specification ESB-M3G38-A) is used for engine
compartment applications. This durable tape provides against cut-through and abrasion
commonly found in underhood applications.
— Polyken 267 is a substitute tape that may be used in lower temperature areas of the engine
compartment (apron area).
• Convolute - Use convolute for all underhood/underbody applications or when increased
temperature, abrasion or pinch resistance is required. Convoluted tubing comes in different
diameters and materials to accommodate different temperature ranges and harness sizes.
— Use polyethylene convolute when abrasion is the only consideration; this convolute is
adequate up to 96°C (205°F) maximum. Use nylon convolute when underhood/underbody or
abrasion and temperature are considerations; nylon convolute is adequate up to 177°C
(350°F) maximum.
— On all engine-mounted wiring or bend points, use vinyl tape on the outside of the convolute
to prevent wiring from looping out. This tape must be able to withstand temperatures 135°C
(275°F) or higher.
— Tape convolute junctions with abrasion-resistant tape (Polyken 267, fiberglass).
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Electrical
Section 2: Electrical
• Scroll — Similar to convolute, but without the ridges. Scroll is used where harness rigidity is
required, especially for maintaining critical locator dimensions. Use scroll for short lengths only,
as it is quite inflexible.
Note: This is not meant to be an all-inclusive list of methods for physically protecting the wires.
There are other means of protection available that are not listed.
Grommets and Sealing Requirements
Any additional wiring routed through sheet metal must pass through a grommet that both seals the
opening and locates the wire(s). Two-piece grommets (rubber with plastic inserts) are
recommended to facilitate installation and retention.
• Locate grommets so they are accessible for correct seating (achieved by pulling) in sheet metal
holes.
• Ramp grommets at the insertion end to facilitate installation and sealing.
• Be sure that the direction of the hole punch is in the direction of grommet seating and the hole is
burr-free.
• Make sure the grommet molding compound will adhere to the harness to prevent slippage.
• Make sure the grommet will withstand the environment (temperature, splash).
• Be sure that holes are large enough to allow the installation of the harness without causing
circuit damage.
• Use adhesive tape on main trunks or branches with at least a 50% overlap to prevent wicking
through grommets. Be certain to diaper-wrap the takeouts.
Wire Routing
WARNING: Do not place electrical component attachments or ground screws adjacent
to vehicle fuel tanks, fuel filler pipes, fuel lines, fuel vapor lines or carbon canisters. Failure
to follow these instructions may result in personal injury in the event of a collision.
Wire harness routing should conform to the following:
• Protect wires routed through holes in sheet metal or castings with a grommet whether or not
conduit is used (see figure below).
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Section 2: Electrical
• Route wires to avoid metal edges, screws, trim fasteners and abrasive surfaces. When such
routing is not possible, use protective devices (shields, caps) to protect the wires. Cover metal
edges with a protective shield and fasten the wiring within 76 mm (3 in) on each side of the
edge (see figure below).
• Route wires to provide at least 76 mm (3 in) of clearance to moving parts in their extreme
movement location, unless positively fastened and protected by a conduit.
• Avoid wire routing without conduit in areas where temperatures exceed 82°C (180°F). Minimum
clearance of 152 mm (6 in) should be maintained from exhaust system components. Heat
insulation and heat shields must be used on the wires routed in high temperature areas.
• Make certain that all underhood or underbody wiring is cross-linked polyethylene high
temperature insulation wire with a 135°C (275°F) minimum rating, consistent with SAE
specification J1128 Type SXL wire. Normal PVC wire must not be used in underhood or
underbody applications.
• Make sure all ground locations are readily accessible for installation, service and verification.
• Do not place ground attachments in high-splash areas.
• Do not route underbody wiring over the exhaust system.
• Underhood/underbody wiring must be routed in conduit for protection. Minimum conduit rating is
177°C (350°F).
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Electrical
Section 2: Electrical
Wire Retention and Routing
Use the following criteria to determine the location of retainers:
• Size and weight of wire bundle.
• Holes with poor accessibility that prevent installation of locators.
• Movement of wires that can result in abrasion, squeaks and rattles.
• When wiring is routed between 2 members where relative motion can occur, the wiring should be
secured to each member with enough wire slack to allow flexing without damaging the wire.
• Wiring exposed to weather must provide a drip loop to prevent moisture from being conducted
into the device through the wire connection (see figure below).
• Avoid routing wires into areas exposed to wheel splash. When such routing cannot be avoided,
adequate clipping and/or protective shields are required to protect the wires from stone and ice
damage. Allow adequate slack in wiring between the engine and stationary components to
compensate for engine roll.
• Avoid routing wires under the frame side members or at points lower than the bottom frame
flange.
• Use plastic ‘‘zip’’ straps for ‘‘bundling’’ only (securing to other wires).
• The wire retainers and grommets installed by the assembly plant are usually designed to
accommodate only the Ford-installed wires. Additional wiring or tubing should be retained by
additional clips. When added wires or tubes are routed through sheet metal panels, new holes
with correct wire protection and sealing must be used.
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Section 2: Electrical
For retainer screws, the following guidelines apply:
• Avoid using fasteners that are too long for the application or are in an area which might damage
vehicle components, including wiring, brake lines, fuel tank and lines, powertrain components,
exhaust system and suspension.
• Do not use pointed screws for attachments. Also check that screws used in the vicinity of the
wiring are blunt-ended.
• To minimize the potential for wiring shorts, do not use drill point screws. Trim components
(including wiring shields) should use pin-type attachments instead of screws.
• Always check areas that screws protrude into for verification that an interference condition to
other components does not exist.
• Make sure that retainers used are capable of withstanding the environment over the vehicle’s life
expectancy.
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Electrical
Section 2: Electrical
Splices and Repairs
For quality splicing and to reduce potential problems, the following guidelines are recommended:
• Stagger the splices within a harness to reduce increased harness diameter. Splice only on
straight areas as installed, not on bends.
• Strip wire ends making sure that individual conductor strands are not damaged.
• When soldering, make sure an adequate mechanical joint exists before applying solder. Use only
resin-core solder. Acid-core solder should not be used since it may result in corrosion.
• For crimp joints, use butt-type metal barrel fasteners and the correct tool at the appropriate
setting for the wire size (such as Motorcraft® Crimp Tool S-9796) specifically designed for this
type of work.
• Make sure splice joints are adequately sealed and insulated. In an outside environment, use
Duraseal butt connectors or equivalent. A durable substitute splice joint can be achieved by
using a bare metal barrel, crimping, flow-soldering and covering with shrink tubing. Quality
electrical tape can be used inside the vehicle, but is not recommended for an outside
environment.
• Be sure that the new wire is not a lesser gauge than its original mating wire.
Recommended Splicing Method — Solder (For 16 AWG and Smaller Diameter Wire
Only)
1. Disconnect the battery ground cable.
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Section 2: Electrical
2. Strip wires to appropriate length.
3. Install heat shrink tubing.
4. Twist the wires together.
5. Note: Use resin-core mildly-activated (RMA) solder. Do not use acid-core solder.
Solder wires together.
6. Note: Wait for solder to cool before moving wires.
Bend wire 1 back in a straight line.
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Section 2: Electrical
7. Note: Overlap tubing on both wires.
Evenly position heat shrink tubing over wire repair.
8. Use a shielded heat gun to heat the repaired area until adhesive flows out of both ends of the
heat shrink tubing.
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Section 2: Electrical
9. Reconnect the battery ground cable.
Sealed Connectors
Ford Part Number
Part Name
Class
E6FZ-14488-A
Butt Connector
Gauge: 18-22, Color: Red
C
E6FZ-14488-B
Butt Connector
Gauge: 14-16, Color: Blue
C
E6FZ-14488-C
Butt Connector
Gauge: 10-12, Color: Yellow
C
Heat Shrinkable Tubing (Heat Shrink) (Ford Specification ESB-M99D56-A2)
Heat shrinkable tubing is available in various diameters for different splice sizes and
configurations. When shrunk, it forms a small, flexible hermetic seal.
Other methods (tape, PVC mold) do not provide a hermetic seal and are not recommended. Splice
balancing is critical with heat shrink insulation. If the splice is extremely unbalanced (more circuits
on one side than the other), heat shrink insulation will not provide a correct seal. Evaluate the use
of double terminals instead of splices where practical in these situations.
Recommended Splicing Method — Crimp (For 1022 AWG Diameter Wire to Like Wire
Diameter)
1. Disconnect the battery ground cable.
2. Strip wires to appropriate length.
3. Install heat shrink tubing.
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Electrical
Section 2: Electrical
4. Select the appropriate wire slice for the wires to be spliced from Rotunda Wire Splice Kit
164-R5903.
5. Note: Rotunda 164-R5901 Pro-Crimper supplied with the wire splice kit is the only tool that
can be used with these splices.
Identify the appropriate chamber on the Rotunda Pro-Crimper by matching the wire size on the
dies with the wire size stamped on the butt splice.
(1) Cavity
(2) Indenter
6. Crimp the connector.
(1) Center one end of the wire splice in the appropriate crimping chamber.
(2) Insert stripped wire into the barrel.
(3) Holding the wire in place, squeeze the tool handles until ratchet releases.
7. Repeating Step 6, crimp the other half of the splice.
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Section 2: Electrical
8. Check for acceptable crimp.
(1) Crimp should be centered on each end of the butt splice.
(2) Wire insulation does not enter butt splice.
(3) Wire is visible through inspection hole of splices.
9. Evenly position supplied heat shrink tubing over wire repair.
10. Use shielded heat gun to heat the repaired area until adhesive flows out of both ends of the
heat shrink tubing.
11. Reconnect the battery ground cable.
How To Change Option Content
Courtesy Lamp Disable (Dark Mode)
Move the panel dimmer control to the full down position, past detent, to prevent the interior lights
from illuminating when the doors are opened.
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Section 2: Electrical
Rear Power Window Disable
The rear power windows of the Expedition SSV can be disabled by disconnecting the rear window
motor connectors (C701 [LH] and C801 [RH]). These connectors are located inside the door,
behind the door trim panel. While they are disabled, the master window control switch will not
control the rear windows. Refer to Expedition Wiring Diagrams Manual for additional power window
wiring information.
Wiring Reference Information
Ordering Information
To obtain information about ordering complete copies of Ford or Lincoln/Mercury publications, call
1-800-782-4356.
Available publications include Workshop Manuals, Wiring Diagrams, PC/ED Manuals and Owner’s
Literature.
In addition, a publications order form can be obtained by writing to: Ford Publications, c/o Helm
Inc., P.O. Box 07150, Detroit, MI 48207.
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SECTION 3
Installation Considerations
Contents
Section 3: Installation Considerations..............................................3-1
Mobile Radio Installation Guidelines ............................................3-1
General Information ..................................................................3-1
Spotlight Installation Location.......................................................3-4
Push Bumpers ..............................................................................3-5
Siren and Grille Lights..................................................................3-6
Partition Installation Guidelines ....................................................3-6
Safety Belt Retractor and Side Impact Sensor ........................3-7
Console Design and Installation...................................................3-8
Restraints Control Module (RCM) ............................................3-8
Air Bag Deployment Interference .............................................3-8
Seat Bolts..................................................................................3-9
Driveshaft Clearance ................................................................3-9
Brake Line Clearance ...............................................................3-9
Battery Saver ................................................................................3-9
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Section 3: Installation Considerations
Mobile Radio Installation Guidelines
NOTICE: This information has been prepared for use by persons installing 2-way radio
equipment (transmitters and receivers) in vehicles. It has been prepared in accordance with
current engineering principles and generally accepted practices, using the best information
available at the time of publication. These guidelines are intended to supplement, but not to
be used in place of detailed instructions for such installations which are the sole
responsibility of the manufacturer of the land mobile radio. Since it is not possible to cover
all possible installations of 2-way radio equipment, Ford Motor Company cannot be held
responsible for incidental or consequential damages arising from the use of the information
contained herein. Certain land mobile radios or the way in which they are installed may
affect the vehicle operations such as the performance of the engine and driver information,
entertainment and electrical charging systems. Expenses incurred to protect the vehicle
systems from any adverse effect of any such installation are not the responsibility of Ford
Motor Company.
General Information
Ford Motor Company vehicles are designed and tested for safe operation with correctly installed
and used land mobile/amateur radio communication equipment with up to 100 watt transmitter
power.
Special design considerations are incorporated into all Ford vehicle electronic systems to provide
immunity to radio frequency signals. To maintain compatibility with vehicle electronic systems,
mobile 2-way radio and telephone equipment must be installed correctly by trained personnel,
observing these general guidelines:
• Power connections should be made directly to the battery and fused as close to the battery as
possible. Avoid using cigar lighter or power point receptacles as power sources for radio
communication equipment.
• Antennas for 2-way radios should be mounted on the roof or the rear area of the vehicle. Care
should be used in mounting antennas with magnet bases, since magnets may affect the
accuracy or operation of the compass on vehicles, if so equipped.
• The antenna cable should be high quality, fully shielded coaxial cable, and kept as short as
practical. Avoid routing the antenna cable in parallel with vehicle wiring over long distances.
• Carefully match the antenna and cable to the radio to achieve a low standing wave ratio (SWR)
and to avoid radio frequency currents on the antenna cable shield.
All installations should be checked for possible interference between the communications
equipment and vehicle electronics. Mobile radio equipment with greater than 100 watts output may
require special precautionary measures beyond those outlined in this document.
This pamphlet is provided as a supplement to the radio manufacturer’s installation instructions for
installing communication equipment in Ford vehicles. Additional sources of information are listed
on page 3-4.
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Installation Considerations
Section 3: Installation Considerations
Radio transmitters are regulated by the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) in the United
States. Compliance with FCC regulations is the responsibility of the manufacturer and/or user of
transmitter equipment and not Ford Motor Company.
Installation Guidelines
WARNING: Do not mount any transceiver, microphones, speakers or any other item in
the deployment path of the airbag system. Failure to follow these instructions may result in
personal injury.
Transceiver Location
A transceiver location should be selected that provides a solid mounting point which does not
interfere with the vehicle operator controls and provides adequate ventilation.
Before using screws to mount the transceiver equipment, be sure to check for vehicle wiring under
the carpet or behind the instrument panel which could be pinched, cut or otherwise damaged.
Radio Wiring and Routing
Transceiver power connections should be made directly to the battery and appropriately fused as
close to the battery as possible. A weatherproof fuse holder is recommended. Twist the positive
and negative power leads together to enhance noise immunity.
Use caution when routing wires between the passenger and engine compartments to avoid chafing
or pinching of wires. Use grommets over any exposed sharp edges and strain reliefs to keep wires
in place. Seal all holes to prevent moisture intrusion.
Route and secure all underhood wiring away from mechanical hazards such as exhaust manifolds
and moving parts (steering shaft, throttle linkage, fans, etc.).
Maintain as great a distance as possible between mobile radio power leads and the vehicle’s
electronic modules and wiring. Avoid running power leads in parallel with vehicle wiring over long
distances.
Note: On some Ford vehicles, the rear window contains the entertainment radio antennas (AM
and FM). Avoid using the rear window to mount mobile radio antennas in these vehicles.
Antenna Location and Installation
Permanently installed antennas are preferable over magnetic, glass or body lip mounts for
anything other than for low power or temporary installations. Most of these alternate antennas can
reflect significant power back at the feedpoint; this reflected power could then radiate from the
feedline inside the passenger compartment and be picked up by the vehicle wiring. However, a
magnetic-mount antenna is a good tool for checking the proposed fixed antenna location for
unwanted effects on the vehicle since antenna location is a major factor in these effects.
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Section 3: Installation Considerations
Glass-mounted antennas should be kept as high as possible in the center of the rear window or
windshield. Some vehicles use glass that contains a thin metallic coating for defrosting or to
control solar gain; glass mount antennas may NOT function correctly when mounted on this type
of glass. (Ford Privacy Glass contains such a coating.) Also, refer to the antenna manufacturer’s
recommendations.
If a magnetic mount antenna is used, take care to locate the magnetic base in a location which
avoids interference to the vehicle’s compass mechanism, if so equipped. Also, some Ford vehicles
use non-metallic body panels (decklids, etc.). If metallic backing panels are used, do not block the
reception paths for factory installed antennas, such as Global Position Satellite (GPS) transceivers,
if so equipped.
Note: The installation should be checked periodically for correct SWR and any signs of damage
or deterioration to maintain correct operation with your vehicle.
Antenna Tuning: It is important that the antenna be tuned correctly and reflected power be kept
to less than 10% (VSWR less than 2:1).
Antenna Cable Routing
Always use a high-quality, 1-piece coaxial cable (at least 95% shield coverage). Connector quality
and termination techniques are just as important. The ARRL handbook provides excellent
guidelines for terminating coaxial cables.
The antenna cable should be treated in the same way as the control and power cables. Avoid
sharp edges and pinches and keep the cable as short as possible. Also, avoid routing the antenna
cable in parallel with vehicle wiring over long distances. If it is necessary to cross over wiring,
cross at right angles. (In some cases, additional shielding between the antenna cable and the
vehicle wiring may be helpful.)
Additional Information
Troubleshooting
Should vehicle-radio interaction develop following installation, the source of the problem should be
identified prior to further operation of the vehicle. Most interaction problems can be eliminated by
following these installation guidelines.
Possible causes of vehicle-radio interaction include:
• Antenna location (move antenna to another position)
• Antenna feed line routing (locate as far as possible from vehicle electronics and wiring)
• Inadequate shielding or loose/corroded connectors associated with the antenna feed line
• Mismatched antenna or high SWR
• Power feeds not connected directly to the vehicle battery
• Power feed routing (locate as far as possible from vehicle electronics and wiring)
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Installation Considerations
Section 3: Installation Considerations
If any vehicle radio interaction problems exist after following these guidelines, contact the radio
equipment manufacturer for additional assistance.
Additional Sources of Information
Radio Frequency Interference: How to Find It and Fix It ISBN: 0-87259-375-4, The American
Radio Relay League, Inc. Newington, Connecticut 06111-1494, Phone 203-666-1541 / Fax
203-665-7531
Giving 2-Way Radio Its Voice (booklet) Champion Spark Plug Company, Automotive Technical
Services Dept., P.O. Box 910, Toledo, Ohio 43661
Spotlight Installation Location
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Installation Considerations
3-5
Section 3: Installation Considerations
Item
Description
1
Side curtain tether anchor
bolt hole
2
A-pillar assist handle
bracket lower mounting bolt
hole
3
Center line
4
Spotlight shaft hole
5
Spotlight mount lower bolt
hole
1. Mark a center line between the center of the side curtain tether anchor bolt hole and the
A-pillar assist handle bracket lower mounting bolt hole. Extend the center line past the A-pillar
assist handle bracket lower mounting bolt hole by at least 50 mm (1.97 in).
2. The spotlight shaft hole is to be located 50 mm (1.97 in) above the center of the A-pillar assist
handle bracket lower mounting bolt hole on the marked center line.
3. The spotlight mount lower bolt hole is to be located 14 mm (0.55 in) below the center of the
spotlight shaft hole and 1 mm (0.04 in) forward of the marked centerline.
Push Bumpers
Effect On Air Bag Deployment
Different push bumper designs may each have different deformation characteristics in a crash
situation that may or may not affect the deployment of air bags. Without the benefit of crash tests
on vehicles equipped with push bumpers (there are a number of different styles available), it is the
opinion of Ford Motor Company that installation of some push bumpers could affect the timing of
the air bag deployment. Use of a push bumper that mounts solely to the vehicle’s bumper should
not have a significant effect upon air bag deployment.
Effect On Weight Distribution
The balance and weight distribution of a vehicle is carefully planned to achieve optimal stability
and handling. Push bumpers can change this weight distribution by adding excessive weight to the
front of the vehicle. There are many different styles of push bumpers available. Depending on the
mounting and weight of the push bumper to be installed, it could have an adverse effect on the
handling of a vehicle. Always verify the vehicle ride height after the addition of a push bumper. For
additional information, refer to Section 1: General Information in this guide. Adjust the ride height if
the measurements are not within specifications.
Airflow
The engine cooling system on a vehicle relies on correct airflow through the radiator to keep the
engine at its correct operating temperature. When adding a push bumper to a vehicle, make sure
this airflow is not obstructed, especially when lights and sirens are mounted on the push bumper.
Reduced airflow could put additional strain on the cooling system and shorten the operational life
of related components. During the installation process, keep the placement of components away
from the grille area of the vehicle.
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Installation Considerations
Section 3: Installation Considerations
Siren and Grille Lights
The engine cooling system relies on correct airflow through the radiator to keep the engine at its
correct operating temperature. When adding sirens and grille lights to a vehicle, make sure this
airflow is not obstructed. Reduced airflow could put additional strain on the cooling system and
shorten the operational life of related components. During the installation process, keep the
placement of components away from the grille area of the vehicle.
Partition Installation Guidelines
WARNING: Side curtain deployment drawing are shown in Section 5: Reference
Information. Review the deployment drawings before installing a partition or other
equipment to make sure that there is no deployment interference. Failure to follow these
instructions may result in personal injury.
WARNING: The partition and the installation hardware of the partition must not
interfere with the correct operation of the safety belt, safety belt retractor, side impact
sensor and the safety belt height adjusters. Failure to follow these instructions may result
in personal injury.
WARNING: Installation of prisoner partitions may increase the risk of injury to front
seat occupants if the vehicle is impacted from a high-speed rear-end collision. This risk
should be balanced by the law enforcement agency against the risk of injury to the officer
associated with prisoner transportation. Failure to follow these instructions may result in
personal injury.
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Section 3: Installation Considerations
Safety Belt Retractor and Side Impact Sensor
Item
Description
1
Side impact sensor
2
Front safety belt retractor
The front safety belt retractors are located in the base of the B-pillars. The pretensioner located in
the buckle is referred to as the ‘‘safety belt buckle pretensioner’’. In the event of an air bag
deployment, pretensioners provide improved occupant protection by rapidly removing slack from
the safety belt. Removing slack from the safety belt helps to correctly position the occupant and
allows for maximum effectiveness of the safety belts and the air bags.
• Do not use the safety belt retractor bolts for mounting the partition.
• Do not mount any partition hardware on the B-pillar.
• Do not mount any partition hardware that will interfere with the correct sealing of the door.
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Installation Considerations
Section 3: Installation Considerations
WARNING: The front side impact sensors are located in the front doors. These are
pressure sensors that measure the pressure change in the front door during an impact. Do
not mount anything on or in the door. Do not cut any holes in the door sheet metal, trim or
water seals. Failure to follow this instruction may cause personal injury.
Console Design and Installation
Restraints Control Module (RCM)
WARNING: Do not relocate the restraints control module (RCM) or modify its
installation in any way. Failure to follow these instructions may result in personal injury.
The restraints control module (RCM) is mounted on the center tunnel under carpet (under first row
bench seat if equipped). The RCM orientation is critical for correct operation of the restraint
systems. Do not use the RCM mounting bolts for attachment purposes of any equipment.
Air Bag Deployment Interference
WARNING: Side curtain deployment drawing are shown in Section 5: Reference
Information. Review the deployment drawings before installing a partition or other
equipment to make sure that there is no deployment interference. Failure to follow these
instructions may result in personal injury.
WARNING: Do not place objects or mount equipment in front of the air bag module
cover or in front seat areas that may come in contact with a deploying air bag. Dash, tunnel
or console-mounted equipment should be placed within the specified zone. Dash, tunnel or
console-mounted equipment should not be placed outside of the specified zone. Failure to
follow these instructions may result in personal injury.
WARNING: Do not mount equipment between the side of the front seat and the door
trim that would block deployment of the side air bag. Failure to follow these instructions
may result in personal injury.
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Section 3: Installation Considerations
Driver/passenger air bags affect the way police equipment can be mounted in police vehicles. Any
surfaces that could come into contact with an air bag during deployment must not damage the air
bag or alter its deployment path. Sharp edges, corners or protrusions could damage the nylon air
bag material and reduce the effectiveness of the air bag. Do not mount or place any objects in the
deployment path of an air bag. Air bags must be allowed to fully deploy without restriction. The
deployment of air bags is not compatible with any configuration of police equipment mounting that
places objects in the air bag deployment path. Equipment mounted or placed in the deployment
area of an air bag will reduce the effectiveness of the air bag, damage the air bag and potentially
damage or dislodge the equipment.
Air bag deployment drawings are provided in Section 5: Reference Information. Consult the
drawings before equipment is installed inside the passenger compartment to make sure that the
mounted equipment does not interfere with air bag deployment.
Seat Bolts
NOTICE: Do not install longer seat bolts if reinstalling seats.
The vehicle safety belts and seat assemblies are factory installed in their correct location. Seat
attaching bolts are not to be used as attachment points for any equipment. Any added material
between the seat bolt and the seat frame could have unpredictable effects on the seat bolt torque.
If the safety belts are removed for any reason, all of the appropriate attaching hardware must be
hand started and then tightened to the correct torque specifications as per the workshop manual.
Correct operation must be verified before returning the vehicle to service.
Driveshaft Clearance
When installing police equipment such as a console or other equipment in the console area, it is
important to consider the available clearance between the underbody and the driveshaft. Never
use self-tapping screws and never use screws that are longer than necessary in the console area.
Brake Line Clearance
When installing equipment, it is important to consider the available clearance between the brake
lines and the fastener or component. Any fasteners or static components should allow a minimum
of 15 mm (0.60 in) clearance to the brake lines. Any dynamic components should allow for a
minimum of 19 mm (0.75 in) clearance to the brake lines.
Battery Saver
All Expedition vehicles are equipped with a battery saver feature, which is a function of the smart
junction box (SJB). The battery saver will disrupt power to the courtesy, demand and headlamps
off after 10 minutes, and chimes after 30 minutes. Interior lamps include the dome lamps and the
instrument cluster lamps. Demand lamps include the front map lamp, glove compartment lamp,
luggage compartment lamp and engine compartment lamp. Turning the ignition switch to the RUN
or ACC position will terminate the battery saver feature by disabling the interrupt timers, reinstating
power to the lamps.
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Installation Considerations
Section 3: Installation Considerations
A reset event will set the interior lamps interrupt timer to 0. The reset events for the interior lamps
interrupt timer are: turning on the interior lamps by using the dome lamp switch or opening any
door (as detected by the door ajar switches).
A reset event will set the demand lamps interrupt timer to 0. The reset events for the demand
lamps interrupt timer are: opening the luggage compartment door or opening any door (as
detected by the door ajar switches).
2010 Expedition SSV Modifiers Guide, 07/2009
SECTION 4
Cargo Mounting Considerations
Contents
Section 4: Cargo Mounting Considerations .....................................4-1
Cargo Area Equipment Mounting Guide ......................................4-1
Safety Belt Retractor and Side Impact Sensor (if
equipped).................................................................................4-1
Auxiliary Climate Control System .............................................4-3
Cargo Loading ..............................................................................4-4
Cargo Area Weight.......................................................................4-5
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4-1
Section 4: Cargo Mounting Considerations
Cargo Area Equipment Mounting Guide
NOTICE: When installing equipment, it is important to consider the available clearance
between the brake lines and the fastener or component. Any fasteners or static components
should allow a minimum of 15 mm (0.60 in) clearance to the brake lines. Any dynamic
components should allow for a minimum of 19 mm (0.75 in) clearance to the brake lines.
NOTICE: Inspect behind trim and under the vehicle when determining mounting locations.
Be sure the drill/fasteners will not puncture/touch and will leave adequate clearance from
the fuel tank, fuel lines, brake lines, wiring harnesses, evaporative emissions (EVAP)
canister and the fuel pump shut-off switch as well as other vehicle systems. Refer to
Section 5: Reference Information in this guide for additional illustrations showing the
location of the fuel tank, fuel lines, brake lines and the fuel pump shut-off switch. Damage
to vehicle components may occur.
Be aware of the following component locations when mounting equipment in the cargo area:
• Fuel tank
• Fuel lines
• Brake lines
• Evaporative emissions (EVAP) canister
• Electronic modules
• Wiring harnesses
Safety Belt Retractor and Side Impact Sensor (if equipped)
WARNING: The installation of hardware must not interfere with the correct operation
of the safety belt, safety belt retractor, side impact sensor and the safety belt height
adjusters. Failure to follow these instructions may result in personal injury.
Note: Expedition EL shown, Expedition similar.
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4-2
Cargo Mounting Considerations
Section 4: Cargo Mounting Considerations
Item
Description
1
Side impact sensor
2
Second row safety belt
retractor
3
Third row safety belt
retractor
The second row safety belt retractors are located in the middle of the C-pillars. The third row
safety belt retractors are located in the middle of the D-pillars.
• Do not use the safety belt retractor bolts for mounting the partition.
• Do not mount any hardware on the C-pillar or D-pillars.
• Do not mount any hardware that will interfere with the correct sealing of the door.
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Cargo Mounting Considerations
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Section 4: Cargo Mounting Considerations
WARNING: The rear side impact sensors are located in the C-pillars. The installation
of hardware must not interfere with the correct operation of the rear side impact sensors.
Failure to follow these instructions may result in personal injury.
Auxiliary Climate Control System
Note: Expedition EL shown, Expedition similar.
The auxiliary heater core and evaporator core housing is located behind the passenger side lower
quarter trim panel. Do not mount any equipment to the housing. Do not mount any equipment in a
way that may block the air intake or vents.
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4-4
Cargo Mounting Considerations
Section 4: Cargo Mounting Considerations
Cargo Loading
WARNING: Ford recommends that police equipment be both secured and laterally
aligned. Hard, stiff or sharp objects, especially when not secured or correctly located, pose
a risk to the occupants. Aftermarket organizers that do not adequately deform in
rear-impacts can themselves become injury-producing objects. Failure to follow these
instructions may result in personal injury.
A slogan has been developed to increase police agency awareness of the importance of cargo
packing. Improve police officer safety by implementing a cargo-packing process called ‘‘LOAD
SAFE’’.
LOAD
Lateral
SAFE
Soft
Orientation
And
And
Fixed
Direction
Equipment
Equipment Categories and Placement
WARNING: Gasoline should not be stored in the cargo area at any time, regardless of
container. Failure to follow this instruction may result in personal injury.
It is recognized that a wide variety of equipment is carried in police vehicles as noted above. This
section addresses the inherent risks of various types of equipment in the event of a high-speed
rear impact.
• Carrying Not Recommended —The following items have been observed in police vehicles and
should not be transported in the vehicle cargo area: containers with gasoline, loose ammunition,
loose flares, loose fire extinguisher(s), loose 4-point lug wrenches, loose crowbars, loose axes
and other loose equipment with potential injury capability in collisions.
• Carry With Caution —These items will require special packing or mounting consideration.
Examples include (with proposed orientation): fire extinguisher (fixed), lug wrench 4-point (fixed,
vertical), rolotape measuring wheel (fixed, vertical), safety flares (lateral orientation, in a
container), stop stick (lateral), shovel (lateral, place at rear of cargo area), shotgun and rifle
(lateral, store in case), baton (lateral, place at rear of cargo area), electronic equipment and
ammunition (container). Flares should be placed in a protective storage container (preferably
soft-sided plastic). Flares with spikes attached should be laterally oriented in the cargo area.
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Cargo Mounting Considerations
4-5
Section 4: Cargo Mounting Considerations
• Low Risk Items — These items are soft in feel and pose a low risk of potential injury capability
in collisions. Examples are: a soft camera case, biohazard kit in plastic boxes, gloves, safety
rope, tow strap, traffic cones and sleeves, rain gear, riot gear (soft), emergency blankets,
bullet-resistant vests, tie straps, cloth tape, garment bags, first responder kit, Res-Q-Flo masks
(placed in garment bag), fuses (plastic container), briefcases, notebooks, spray bottles, helmets
and jumper cables.
Cargo Area Weight
The vehicle’s high-speed handling and curb height will become increasingly affected as weight is
added to the cargo area. The more weight that is placed in the cargo area, the more it will change
the ride and handling characteristics of the vehicle. Consider these factors when installing
equipment and placing items in the cargo area of the vehicle.
The vehicle certification (VC) label on the driver door lists a maximum load of 530 kg (1,170 lb)
(Expedition) or 793 kg (1,750 lb) (Expedition EL) (occupants + luggage).
2010 Expedition SSV Modifiers Guide, 07/2009
SECTION 5
Reference Information
Contents
Section 5: Reference Information ....................................................5-1
Engineering Drawings ..................................................................5-1
Air Bag Deployment Interference .............................................5-1
Fuel Lines — Short Wheelbase................................................5-5
Fuel Lines — Long Wheelbase ................................................5-6
Fuel Tank — Cut View, Short Wheelbase ...............................5-7
Fuel Tank — Cut View, Long Wheelbase................................5-8
Fuel Tank — Bottom View, Short Wheelbase .........................5-9
Fuel Tank — Bottom View, Long Wheelbase ........................5-10
Fuel Tank — Top View, Short Wheelbase.............................5-11
Fuel Tank — Top View, Long Wheelbase .............................5-12
Fuel Pump Shut-Off Switch ....................................................5-13
Brake Lines .............................................................................5-13
Technical Specifications .............................................................5-14
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Reference Information
5-1
Section 5: Reference Information
Engineering Drawings
Air Bag Deployment Interference
WARNING: Do not place objects or mount equipment in front of the air bag module
cover or in front seat areas that may come in contact with a deploying air bag, dash, tunnel
or console-mounted equipment should be placed within the specified zone. Failure to follow
these instructions may result in personal injury.
WARNING: Dash, tunnel or console-mounted equipment should not be placed outside
of the specified zone. Failure to follow these instructions may result in personal injury.
WARNING: Do not mount equipment between the side of the front seat to the door
trim that would block deployment of the side air bag. Failure to follow these instructions
may result in personal injury.
Driver/passenger air bags affect the way equipment can be mounted in vehicles. Any surfaces that
could come into contact with an air bag during deployment must not damage the air bag or alter
its deployment path. Sharp edges, corners or protrusions could damage the nylon air bag material
and reduce the effectiveness of the air bag. Do not mount or place any objects in the deployment
path of an air bag. Air bags must be allowed to fully deploy without restriction. The deployment of
air bags is not compatible with any configuration of police equipment mounting that places objects
in the air bag deployment path. Equipment mounted or placed in the deployment area of an air
bag will reduce the effectiveness of the air bag, damage the air bag and potentially damage or
dislodge the equipment.
Some approximate dimensions for air bags, at full inflation, are provided in Figures 1 through 4.
These dimensions are somewhat flexible and represent free-form deployments without the loading
of occupants.
All air bag and equipment mounting zone dimensions are approximate due to different air bag
deployment characteristics.
Mount no equipment between the side of the front seat and the door trim that would block
deployment of the side air bag.
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5-2
Reference Information
Section 5: Reference Information
Figure 1.
(1) 250 mm (9.8 in) from center of air bag door
(2) 325 mm (12.8 in) from center of air bag door
(3) 650 mm (25.6 in)
Figure 2.
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Reference Information
5-3
Section 5: Reference Information
(1) 500 mm (19.7 in)
(2) 300 mm (11.8 in)
(3) 200 mm (8 in)
Figure 3.
No objects should be placed between the air bags due to air bag variability.
(1) 300 mm (11.8 in)
(2) 500 mm (19.7 in)
(3) 260 mm (10.25 in)
(4) 175 mm (7 in)
WARNING: The front side impact sensors are located in the front doors. These are
pressure sensors that measure the pressure change in the front door during an impact. Do
not mount anything on or in the door. Do not cut any holes in the door sheet metal, trim or
water seals. Failure to follow these instructions may result in personal injury.
WARNING: The rear side impact sensors are located in the C-pillars. The installation
of hardware must not interfere with the correct operation of the rear side impact sensors.
Failure to follow these instructions may result in personal injury.
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5-4
Reference Information
Section 5: Reference Information
Figure 4.
The curtain airbag extends from the A-pillar to the D-pillar and from the roof rail to the beltline.
• Do not mount equipment to the B-, C- and D-pillars above the beltline.
• Do not mount equipment to the A-pillar above the beltline except for spotlights. Refer to Section
3: Installation Considerations, Spotlight Installation Location.
• Do not mount equipment on the headliner within 200 mm (8 in) of the side edges.
• Do not mount equipment above the beltline within 200 mm (8 in) of the side glass from the
A-pillar leading edge to the rear edge of the D-pillar.
• Do not mount equipment on the headliner along the siderails.
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Reference Information
5-5
Section 5: Reference Information
Fuel Lines — Short Wheelbase
Item
Description
1
Fuel line
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5-6
Reference Information
Section 5: Reference Information
Fuel Lines — Long Wheelbase
Item
Description
1
Fuel line
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Reference Information
5-7
Section 5: Reference Information
Fuel Tank — Cut View, Short Wheelbase
Item
Description
1
Evaporative emissions hose
2
Fuel tank
3
Fuel line
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5-8
Reference Information
Section 5: Reference Information
Fuel Tank — Cut View, Long Wheelbase
Item
Description
1
Evaporative emissions hose
2
Fuel tank
3
Fuel line
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Reference Information
5-9
Section 5: Reference Information
Fuel Tank — Bottom View, Short Wheelbase
Item
Description
1
Fuel lines
2
Fuel tank
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5-10
Reference Information
Section 5: Reference Information
Fuel Tank — Bottom View, Long Wheelbase
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Reference Information
5-11
Section 5: Reference Information
Item
Description
1
Fuel lines
2
Fuel tank
Fuel Tank — Top View, Short Wheelbase
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5-12
Reference Information
Section 5: Reference Information
Fuel Tank — Top View, Long Wheelbase
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Reference Information
5-13
Section 5: Reference Information
Fuel Pump Shut-Off Switch
Brake Lines
NOTICE: When installing equipment, it is important to consider the available clearance
between the brake lines and the fastener or component. Any fasteners or static components
should allow a minimum of 15 mm (0.60 in) clearance to the brake lines. Any dynamic
components should allow for a minimum of 19 mm (0.75 in) clearance to the brake lines.
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5-14
Reference Information
Section 5: Reference Information
Item
Description
1
Master cylinder
2
Brake booster
3
Brake lines
4
Brake control module
Technical Specifications
Item
Specification
Specification
Make: Ford
Model: Expedition Special Service
Vehicle (SSV)
Sales Code: —
Engine Displacement
Cubic Inches: 330
Liters: 5.4
Fuel System
Sequential Port Fuel Injection
Exhaust
Dual
Horsepower (SAENET)
310 @ 5,000 rpm for gasoline, 320 @ 5,200 rpm for E85 Ethanol
Generator
150 amp
(Continued)
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Reference Information
5-15
Section 5: Reference Information
Item
Specification
Specification
Torque
365 lb-ft @ 3,750 rpm
Battery
750 cca
Compression Ratio
9.8:1
Transmission
Model: 6R80
Type: 6-speed electronic automatic
with lockup torque converter and
overdrive.
Axle Ratio
3.73:1
Gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR)
(4x2)
3,333 kg (7,350 lb) (Expedition) or 3,492 kg (7,700 lb) (Expedition EL)
GVWR (4x4)
3,424 kg (7,550 lb) (Expedition) or 3,583 kg (7,900 lb) (Expedition EL)
Steering
Power Rack and Pinion, variable ratio
Turning circle (curb to curb)
12.4 m (40.8 ft) (Expedition) or 15.0 m (43.9 ft) (Expedition EL)
Tire Size, Load and Speed Rating
P265/70R17 A/S BSW (4x2) or P265/70/R17 A/T OWL (4x4)
Suspension Type (Front)
Independent SLA with ball joint and coil spring
Suspension Type (Rear)
5-bar link with Watts Linkage
Fuel Capacity
Liters: 105.9 (Expedition) or
126.8 (Expedition EL)
Gallons: 28.0 (Expedition) or
33.5 (Expedition EL)
General Measurements
Wheelbase: 3,022 mm (119.0 in)
(Expedition) or 3,327 mm (131.0 in)
(Expedition EL)
Length: 5,245 mm (206.5 in)
(Expedition) or 5,621 mm (221.3 in)
(Expedition EL)
General Measurements
Width: 2,001 mm (78.8 in)
—
General Measurements
Track Width, Front: 1,701 mm
(67.0 in)
Track Width, Rear: 1,706 mm
(67.2 in)
Head Room
First Row
1,005 mm (39.6 in) (Expedition) or 1,003 mm (39.5 in) (Expedition EL)
Second Row
1,010 mm (39.8 in) (Expedition) or 1,008 mm (39.7 in) (Expedition EL)
Third Row (optional)
972 mm (38.3 in) (Expedition) or 965 mm (38.0 in) (Expedition EL)
Leg Room
First Row
1,046 mm (41.2 in)
Second Row
993 mm (39.1 in)
Third Row (optional)
957 mm (37.7 in)
Shoulder Room
First Row
1,605 mm (63.2 in)
Second Row
1,617 mm (63.7 in)
Third Row (optional)
1,318 mm (51.9 in) (Expedition) or 1,704 mm (67.1 in) (Expedition EL)
Hip Room
First Row
1,529 mm (60.2 in)
Second Row
1,521 mm (59.9 in)
Third Row (optional)
1,275 mm (50.2 in) (Expedition) or 1,316 mm (51.8 in) (Expedition EL)
Behind First Row Seat
3.06 cu m (108 cu ft) (Expedition) or 3.70 cu m (130.8 cu ft) (Expedition EL)
Behind Second Row Seat
1.53 cu m (54 cu ft) (Expedition) or 2.42 cu m (85.5 cu ft) (Expedition EL)
Cargo Volume
(Continued)
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5-16
Reference Information
Section 5: Reference Information
Item
Behind Third Row Seat (optional)
Specification
Specification
0.51 cu m (18 cu ft) (Expedition) or 1.21 cu m (42.6 cu ft) (Expedition EL)
EPA Mileage Est. (mpg)
City: 16/Highway: 22
Combined: 18
Mileage Est. (km/L)
City: 6.8/Highway: 9.3
Combined: 7.7
2010 Expedition SSV Modifiers Guide, 07/2009
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