UNIT OUTLINE

UNIT OUTLINE
UNIT OUTLINE
Read this document to learn essential details about your unit. It will
also help you to get started with your studies.
BEA300
Microeconomic Theory and Policy
Semester 2, 2014
THIS UNIT IS BEING OFFERED IN
HOBART
Taught by:
Michael Brooks
CRICOS Provider Code: 00586B
BEA300, Microeconomic Theory and Policy
2
Contents
Contact Details ........................................................................................................................................ 3
Unit Description ...................................................................................................................................... 3
Prior Knowledge &/or Skills OR Pre-Requisite Unit(s) ............................................................................ 3
Enrolment in the Unit ............................................................................................................................. 3
When does the unit commence? ............................................................................................................ 3
Intended Learning Outcomes and Generic Graduate Attributes for BEA300......................................... 4
Learning Expectations and Teaching Strategies/Approach .................................................................... 7
Learning Resources ................................................................................................................................. 7
Technical requirements for MyLO ...................................................................................................... 8
Student Feedback via eVALUate ........................................................................................................... 10
Details of Teaching Arrangements ........................................................................................................ 11
Assessment ........................................................................................................................................... 14
Teaching Pattern Per Week .................................................................................................................. 21
Submission of Assessment Items .......................................................................................................... 22
Review of Assessment and Results ....................................................................................................... 24
Further Support and Assistance ............................................................................................................ 25
Academic Misconduct and Plagiarism .................................................................................................. 26
Study Schedule ...................................................................................................................................... 27
BEA300, Microeconomic Theory and Policy
3
Contact Details
Michael Brooks
Unit Coordinator
Campus:
Hobart
Room Number:
405, Commerce Building
Email:
[email protected]
Phone:
03 6226 2286
Consultation:
Friday 9.00 to 10.00 am
Unit Description
This unit forms one of the capstone units of the suite of core economics. In the unit we will
investigate various institutional devices that channel self-interest to the public interest. The
objective is to determine the conditions under which some of the mechanisms generate socially
efficient outcomes. Situations in which the pursuit of self-interest is self-defeating, that is,
institutions that yield outcomes that are not socially optimal, are given extensive treatment. The
unit also provides an introduction to the basic concepts of taxation and justice.
The material is covered by means of an on-going series of student/group presentations, which is
followed by class discussion.
Prior Knowledge &/or Skills OR Pre-Requisite Unit(s)
I am assuming you have understood the material presented in a standard intermediate
microeconomics unit, such as indifference curves, demand theory, cost and production theory.
Be comfortable with treating economic problems using either geometrical or mathematical methods.
The prerequisite units are


BEA141 Quantitative Economic Analysis
BEA200 Intermediate Microeconomics
Enrolment in the Unit
Unless there are exceptional circumstances, students should not enrol in this unit after the end of
week two of semester, as the Tasmanian School of Business and Economics (TSBE) cannot guarantee
that:


any extra assistance will be provided by the teaching team in respect of work covered in the
period prior to enrolment; and
penalties will not be applied for late submission of any piece or pieces of assessment that were
due during this period.
When does the unit commence?
Tuesday of Week 1 of Semester 2 in SB.AX33.L05.511 (SB Comm511 Tutorial Room) for two hours.
The "tutorial" is on Thursday at 11.00am in SB.AX33.LO1.104 (Room 104 Seminar Room).
BEA300, Microeconomic Theory and Policy
4
Intended Learning Outcomes and Generic Graduate Attributes for BEA300
INTENDED LEARNING OUTCOMES
In this unit you will learn:
In assessing this unit I will be looking at your ability to:
Learning Outcome 1
Evaluate the sufficient and necessary grounds for government intervention.
ASSESSMENT
METHODS
DISCIPLINE
LEARNING
OUTCOMES (IF
REQUIRED)
GRADUATE ATTRIBUTE
OUTCOMES
Presentations, questions on tests
and exam
GAK3.1
The assessments and teaching activities in
this unit have been designed to develop the
following graduate attributes in students.
Examine issues and decisions
using the economic way of
thinking
Learning Outcome 2
Analyse rules/institutions and
identify why they work and fail
KNOWLEDGE
COMMUNICATION
Discuss the outcomes expected under anarchy.
Presentations, questions on tests
and exam
GAP3.1
Calculate and interpret pure and mixed strategy equilibria in a simple model of
anarchy.
Presentations, questions on tests
and exam
GAP3.1
Discuss the three Paretian conditions for efficient resource allocation in both
their partial equilibrium and general equilibrium guises.
Presentations, questions on tests
and exam
GAP3.1
Apply demand and supply diagrams and the Edgeworth-Bowley box to various
problems.
Presentations, questions on tests
and exam
GAP3.1
Apply the Edgeworth-Bowley Box to efficient risk allocation.
Presentations, questions on tests
and exam
GAP3.1
Discuss the partial and general equilibrium versions of the Samuelsonian
condition for efficient public goods.
Presentations, questions on tests
and exam
GAP3.1
Apply the Samuelsonian geometry (and the equivalent Marshallian version) to
various public goods problems.
Presentations, questions on tests
and exam
GAP3.1
Explain why markets fail, in particular, in the area of public goods.
Presentations, questions on tests
and exam
GAP3.1
Apply indifference curve analysis to the free-rider problem.
Presentations, questions on tests
and exam
GAP3.1
PROBLEM SOLVING
GLOBAL PERSPECTIVE
SOCIAL PERSPECTIVE
BEA300, Microeconomic Theory and Policy
Discuss the issues associated with the determination of a collective preference.
Learning Outcome 3
5
Presentations, questions
on tests and exam
GAK3.1
GAP3.1
Discuss the incentives of the Clarke preference revelation mechanism.
Presentations, questions
on tests and exam
GAK3.1
GAP3.1
Calculate and interpret a simple incentive compatibility design mechanism.
Presentations, questions
on tests and exam
GAK3.1
GAP3.1
Determine the incidence of a tax.
Presentations, questions
on tests and exam
GAK3.1
GAP3.1
Calculate and interpret the incidence of tax using a tax incidence formula.
Presentations, questions
on tests and exam
GAK3.1
GAP3.1
Learning Outcome 4
Apply the Lindahl model/or and simple majority voting models to various problems.
Presentations, questions
on tests and exam
GAK3.1, GAS2/3.1 and
GAS2/3.2, GAP3.1
Evaluate microeconomic
public policy
Assess the advantages and limitations of benefit taxation (along the private-public
margin).
Presentations, questions
on tests and exam
GAK3.1, GAS2/3.1 and
GAS2/3.2, GAP3.1
Discuss what is an efficient tax (along the private-private margin).
Presentations, questions
on tests and exam
GAK3.1, GAS2/3.1 and
GAS2/3.2, GAP3.1
Apply indifference curve analysis to various problems.
Presentations, questions
on tests and exam
GAK3.1, GAS2/3.1 and
GAS2/3.2, GAP3.1
Demonstrate how the excess burden of taxations affects efficient public goods
supply.
Presentations, questions
on tests and exam
GAK3.1, GAS2/3.1 and
GAS2/3.2, GAP3.1
Contrast efficient public goods supply under various tax bases.
Presentations, questions
on tests and exam
GAK3.1, GAS2/3.1 and
GAS2/3.2, GAP3.1
Assess various entitlement schemes by contrasting income and in-kind subsidies
under various scenarios.
Presentations, questions
on tests and exam
GAK3.1, GAS2/3.1 and
GAS2/3.2, GAP3.1
Use the notions of market failure, government failure and justice to provide various
cases for intervention and non-intervention in the market.
Presentations, questions
on tests and exam
GAK3.1, GAS2/3.1 and
GAS2/3.2, GAP3.1
Discuss the ethical (preference satisfaction and fairness) dimensions of various policy
measures.Assess various ethical viewpoints used by economists in policy debates.
Presentations, questions
on tests and exam
GAK3.1, GAS2/3.1 and
GAS2/3.2, GAP3.1
Analyse the role of
incentives, screening and
aggregation
BEA300, Microeconomic Theory and Policy
Develop and justify in an oral format an argument to an audience
Learning Outcome 5
Communicate economics in
oral and written formats
Report on and defend the presented argument in a written form.
6
Presentations, questions
on tests and exam
GAC3.1 and GAS3.2
Presentations, questions
on tests and exam
GAC3.1 and GAS3.2
BEA300, Microeconomic Theory and Policy
7
Learning Expectations and Teaching Strategies/Approach
The University is committed to a high standard of professional conduct in all activities, and holds its
commitment and responsibilities to its students as being of paramount importance. Likewise, it
holds expectations about the responsibilities students have as they pursue their studies within the
special environment the University offers. The University’s Code of Conduct for Teaching and
Learning states:
Students are expected to participate actively and positively in the teaching/learning
environment. They must attend classes when and as required, strive to maintain steady
progress within the subject or unit framework, comply with workload expectations, and
submit required work on time.
These are some of the expectations we have of you as a student enrolled in this unit:
As a guide, it is expected that during the teaching weeks you will need to allocate at least an average
of 10 hours per week to study in this unit:



3 hours for attendance at the lecture and tutorial,
1 hour reviewing and organising lecture notes, presentation materials
6 hours reading the textbook and other reading.
You will of course need to devote additional time to studying for the in-class test and the final
examination
Work, Health and Safety (OH&S)
The University is committed to providing a safe and secure teaching and learning environment. In
addition to specific requirements of this unit you should refer to the University’s policy at:
www.utas.edu.au/work-health-safety.
Learning Resources
Prescribed Text
A prescribed text is a resource that you must have access to for the purposes of studying this unit.
It is essential that you have ready access to the following prescribed text. Note that weekly readings
will be drawn largely from this text.
Hillman, AL 2009, Public finance and public policy: responsibilities and limitations of government, 2nd
edn, Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, UK.
Recommended Texts
A recommended text is a resource that you can use to broaden your understanding of the topics covered in this unit. You
may also find a recommended text helpful when conducting research for assignments.
Some students find it useful to consult alternative references as part of their study program. Some
useful alternative references are:


Browning, E & Browning, J 1979, Public finance and the price system, Macmillan, New York.
Campbell, DE 1995, Incentives: motivation and the economics of information, Cambridge
University Press, Cambridge.
BEA300, Microeconomic Theory and Policy






8
Cornes, R & Sandler, T 1986, The theory of externalities, public goods, and club goods,
Cambridge University Press, Cambridge.
Cullis, J & Jones, P 2009, Public finance and public choice: analytical perspectives, 3rd edn,
Oxford University Press, Oxford. I will be referring to this text on a number of occasions and
have placed a copy on Reserve.
Head, JG 1974, Public goods and public welfare, Duke University Press, Durham.
Mueller, D 1989, Public choice II: a revised edition of public choice, Cambridge University
Press.
Ng, YK 1979, Welfare economics: introduction and development of basic concepts, Macmillan,
New York.
Usher, D 2003, Political economy, Blackwell Publishing, Malden.
My Learning Online (MyLO)
Access to the MyLO online learning environment unit is required for this unit. The unit has its own
MyLO site.
To log in to MyLO and access this unit, go to: http://www.utas.edu.au/learning-teaching-online .To
access the unit, select BEA300. These instructions will help you to log in for the first time.
For help using MyLO go to http://www.utas.edu.au/learning-teaching-online.
Technical requirements for MyLO
For help and information about setting up your own computer and web browser for MyLO, see:
http://uconnect.utas.edu.au/
While on campus, you can access the University network and MyLO via a laptop computer or other
mobile device. See: http://uconnect.utas.edu.au/uana.htm
MyLO can be accessed via Library computers and in computer labs on campus. See:
http://www.utas.edu.au/it/computing-distributed-systems/computer-labs-facilities-and-locations
For further technical information and help, contact the UTAS Service Desk on 6226 1818 or at
http://www.utas.edu.au/service-desk during business hours.
Learning to use MyLO
When you login to MyLO, you will see a unit called Getting Started with MyLO. Enter the unit to
learn more about MyLO and to practise using its features.
MyLO Expectations
1.
Students are expected to maintain the highest standards of conduct across all modes of
communication, either with staff or with other students. Penalties may be imposed if the Unit
Coordinator believes that, in any instance or mode of communication, your language or
content is inappropriate or offensive. MyLO is a public forum. Due levels of respect,
professionalism and high ethical standards are expected of students at all times.
2.
Submission of assessment tasks via MyLO presumes that students have read, understood and
abide by the requirements relating to academic conduct, and in particular, those requirements
relating to plagiarism. All work submitted electronically is presumed to be “signed-off” by the
BEA300, Microeconomic Theory and Policy
9
student submitting as their own work. Any breach of this requirement will lead to student
misconduct processes.
3.
MyLO is an Internet service for teaching and learning provided by the University. It is
expected that you check your units in MyLO for updates at least once a day.
Using MyLO for BEA300
IMPORTANT!: Before you are provided with access to your unit’s MyLO resources, you must
complete the Student Agreement form. To do this:
1. Access the unit’s MyLO site.
2. Locate the Begin Here folder and click on it to open it. You can find the Begin Here folder by
scrolling down until you see Content Browser OR by clicking on the Content button.
OR
3. Once you have opened the Begin Here folder, click on the Student Agreement file.
OR
4. Read the terms, then check the I agree box. You should now be able to access all available
unit content on MyLO. You only need to do this once in each MyLO unit.
BEA300, Microeconomic Theory and Policy
Student Feedback via eVALUate
At the conclusion of each unit students will be asked to provide online responses to a number of
matters relating to the learning and teaching within that unit. All students are asked to respond
honestly to these questions, as all information received is used to enhance the delivery of future
offerings.
Changes to this Unit Based on Previous Student Feedback
There are no alterations required on the basis of Student Feedback. Last year's students generally
regarded the unit as a positive learning experience.
10
BEA300, Microeconomic Theory and Policy
11
Details of Teaching Arrangements
Lectures
I am expecting you to come together in your assigned group, work on the JiTT questions assigned in
the previous week and present the answer of your assigned question to the class. Most of the
questions will come from the prescribed textbook by Hillman but I will also set some questions that
will require you to read some other material. I have placed the other texts on Reserve in the central
library.
I strongly suggest that you should write up your notes in point form so that you can explain the
answer clearly and succinctly. Some students in the 2008 class had written several pages to a
question and when asked to lead the discussion, could not read through all the notes in order to
divine the answer and offered instead to read out the pages. Needless to say, no one found the
presentation to be informative.
There is also a time limit on each presentation.
You should be prepared also to field questions from me and the other students in the class.
Your answers must attempt to put the concepts in your own words. There is little point in reading
out say Hillman's text verbatim. Copying out the text does not indicate that you understand what is
being said. And if any other student is still struggling with the question after having read the text,
then your recitation of the same passage is not going to resolve that struggle. So “copy and paste”
style answers are not going to win much, if any, reward. In addition, coming up to the white board
with textbook in one hand and trying to work out on the spot which line to draw first as part of your
explanation is not going to receive much, if any, reward either. Many students also draw a complete
diagram on the board and then proceed to explain it. Such a presentation method is poor. Your
answer needs to proceed in logical steps, explaining the important bits along the way. You must also
make sure you actually answer the question. See the group presentation rubric for additional details.
As a result of the employment of student presentations there will not be any formal lectures in this
unit.
Tutorials
In the third hour of each week, I will provide a deeper analysis of some the material covered in the
presentations and material you may have glossed over in your reading and answers. I will try to
explain where a presentation may have gone off track and develop the correct way of thinking about
the issue. And I will offer some discussion of the issues that you have expressed in your JiTT
assignments as being unclear or difficult.
Online Activities
Within one week of the oral presentation the individual presenter should write up the group's
answer to the questions and send me a Word copy of the file. I will read and, if necessary, annotate
the file and then post it on MyLO. It is important to ensure that the document takes into account any
errors that may have been detected in the oral presentation.
The presentation should also conform to all the standards of academic work. Plagiarism is totally
unacceptable. Use the Harvard method to attribute any sources. In past years students have
BEA300, Microeconomic Theory and Policy
12
scanned diagrams out of the text and presented them as their own work. Such activity constitutes a
case of plagiarism. You need to indicate by properly referencing where you have obtained the ideas
that constitute your answer.
Learning Skills and Language Support
The Student Learning and Academic Development Team in the Student Centre works with all
students, domestic and international, to develop academic skills, literacy and English language skills.
More information can be found on this website http://www.utas.edu.au/student-learning/
BEA300, Microeconomic Theory and Policy
13
Communication, Consultation and Appointments
TO KEEP UP WITH ANNOUNCEMENTS REGARDING THIS UNIT
Check the MyLO News tool at least once every two days. The unit News will appear when you first
enter our unit’s MyLO site. Alternatively, click on the News button (towards the top of the MyLO
screen) at any time.
WHEN YOU HAVE AN ISSUE THAT WILL IMPACT ON YOUR STUDIES OR SUBMISSION OF AN
ASSESSMENT TASK
If you have a personal question related to your studies or your grades, please contact us by email.
A NOTE ABOUT EMAIL CORRESPONDENCE
You are expected to check your UTAS email (WebMail) on a regular basis – at least three times per
week. To access your WebMail account, login using your UTAS username and password at
https://webmail.utas.edu.au/.
You are strongly advised not to forward your UTAS emails to an external email service (such as Gmail
or Hotmail). In the past there have been significant issues where this has occurred, resulting in UTAS
being blacklisted by these email providers for a period of up to one month. To keep informed, please
use your UTAS email as often as possible.
I receive a lot of emails. Be realistic about how long it might take for me to respond. Allow me at
least two (2) business days to reply. Staff are not required to respond to emails in which students do
not directly identify themselves, emails which are threatening or offensive, or emails that come from
external (non-UTAS) email accounts.
When you write an email, include the following information. This helps the teacher determine who
you are and which unit you are talking about.
 Family name;
 Preferred name;
 Student ID;
 Unit code (i.e. BEA300)
 Questions
 If your question is about an assessment task, please include the assessment task number
or name.
BEA300, Microeconomic Theory and Policy
14
Assessment
Assessment Schedule
In order to pass this unit you must achieve an overall mark of at least 50% of the total available
marks. Details of each assessment item are outlined below.
Assessment Items
In-class test
Due Date
Teaching week 8 (week
beginning Sept. 8). The
in-class test will be
held in the two-hour
slot of that week.
Value/Weighting
15%
Link to Learning Outcomes
The test will centre on
Learning Outcomes 1-4
In-class Presentation
On-going through the
semester
Within one week of
presenting the group's
answer in class
On-going throughout
the semester
During examination
period.
15%
Learning Outcome 5
5%
Learning Outcome 5
5%
Learning Outcome 5
60%
Learning Outcomes 1- 4
Written Presentation
JiTT Submissions
Examination
BEA300, Microeconomic Theory and Policy
15
Assessment Item 1 – In-class test
Task Description:
In-class test (week 8).
Task Length
100 minutes
Assessment Criteria:
All questions consist of short problems which require you to complete a
series of tasks/actions (e.g., define, explain, sketch a diagram, fill in a table,
and calculate). Marks are assigned to each task. Some examples of
questions, specimen answers and marking guides are provided at the
“Assessment” icon on MyLO. No marks are allocated explicitly for your
clarity of expression or correct use of language. However, poor expression
and setting out of answers can often make it difficult for markers to assess
your economic knowledge and skills which will result in a low mark.
Link to Unit’s
Learning Outcomes:
The test will centre on Learning Outcomes 1-4.
Due Date:
Teaching week 8 (week beginning Sept. 8). The in-class test will be held in the
two-hour slot of that week.
Value:
15%
Assessment Item 2 – In-class Presentation
Task Description:
As indicated I am expecting you to come together in your assigned group,
work on the JiTT questions assigned in the previous week and present the
answer of your assigned question to the class. Most of the questions will
come from the prescribed textbook by Hillman but I will also set some
questions that will require you to read some other material. I have placed the
other texts on Reserve in the central library.
I strongly suggest that you should write up your notes in point form so that
you can explain the answer clearly and succinctly. Some students in the 2008
class had written several pages to a question and when asked to lead the
discussion, could not read through all the notes in order to divine the answer
and offered instead to read out the pages. Needless to say, no one found the
presentation to be informative.
There is also a time limit on each presentation.
You should be prepared also to field questions from me and the other
students in the class.
Your answers must attempt to put the concepts in your own words. There is
little point in reading out say Hillman's text verbatim. Copying out the text
does not indicate that you understand what is being said. And if any other
student is still struggling with the question after having read the text, then
your recitation of the same passage is not going to resolve that struggle. So
“copy and paste” style answers are not going to win much, if any, reward. In
addition, coming up to the white board with textbook in one hand and trying
to work out on the spot which line to draw first as part of your explanation is
not going to receive much, if any, reward either. Many students also draw a
complete diagram on the board and then proceed to explain it. Such a
BEA300, Microeconomic Theory and Policy
16
presentation method is poor. Your answer needs to proceed in logical steps,
explaining the important bits along the way. You must also make sure you
actually answer the question. See the group presentation rubric for
additional details.
Task Length
Each presentation should last no more than 10 minutes --8 minutes for the
presentation and 2 minutes for questions from the floor.
Assessment Criteria:
See the Oral Presentation Rubric on the following page.
NOTE: Free-Rider Problem
In 2012, when the unit was taught one of the groups had a free-rider
problem—some members of the team did not contribute to the team
output. In the event of a dispute between the members of the team I will
examine the work that has been submitted on MyLO and after hearing from
all the relevant parties will make any required adjustments to each
individual’s share of the group mark. In order to be able to monitor each
person’s effort you are required to do all of your inter-group communication
via the MyLO platform in a form where you have a record of what and when
something was written. In the past I set up an individual folder for each
group in MyLO, but the students never used it opting instead to have a
Facebook site for their group. Let me know if you have a problem in setting
up a site. I will not be able to help you with Facebook, but I may have
another solution.
Link to Unit’s
Learning Outcomes:
Learning Outcome 5
Due Date:
On-going through the semester
Value:
15%
BEA300, Microeconomic Theory and Policy
17
Oral Presentation Rubric
Criteria
Content of presentation:
 Solve micro-economic
problems
HD (High Distinction)
80% – 100%
DN (Distinction)
70% - 79%
CR (Credit)
60% - 69%
PP (Pass)
50% - 59%
NN (Fail)
0% - 49%
Problem fully solved with an insightful
and accurate solution.
Problem accurately solved.
Problem mostly solved with a
reasonably accurate solution.
Problem partially solved.
Problem not solved.
Argument developed fully in own
words (aside from jargon)
Nearly all of the argument is
developed in own words/structure
Most of the argument is presented
in own words/structure
Elements of the argument are
offered in own words/structure
Merely repeats exposition offered
in a text
Fields all fair questions
Fields almost all of the fair
questions
Fields most of the fair questions
Makes an attempt to answer the
field the question
Cannot answer any fair question
from the audience
Demonstrate knowledge of the
material
Demonstrate ability to apply the
material to new questions
Findings communicated to
audience in an oral format
Presenter engaged audience through:

eye contact and body language

pitch, volume & tone of voice

fluent speech

real world examples to clarify content
Presenter engaged audience
through:

eye contact

volume of voice

fluent speech

some use of examples
Presenter engaged audience
through:

some eye contact

volume of voice

some fluent speech
Presenter engaged audience
through:

some eye contact

some fluent speech
Group defends solution by
responding to audience
questions
Accurately responds to questions posed by audience and most responses
supported with reference to literature.
Accurately responds to most
questions posed by audience and
some responses supported with
reference to literature.
Accurately responds to some
questions posed by audience.
Some questions posed by audience
responded to but with limited
accuracy.
Assessment Submission Rules:
Rule 1: Presentations will be assessed on what is offered within the time limit, not on what you would have said if you had been granted additional time.
BEA300, Microeconomic Theory and Policy
18
Assessment Item 3 - Written Presentation
Task Description:
Within one week of the oral presentation the individual presenter should
write up the group's answer to the questions and send me a Word copy of
the file. I will read and if necessary annotate the file and then post it on
MyLO. It is important to ensure that the document takes into account any
errors that may have been detected in the oral presentation.
The presentation should also conform to all the standards of academic work.
Plagiarism is totally unacceptable. Use the Harvard method to attribute any
sources. In past years students have scanned diagrams out of the text and
presented them as their own work. Such activity constitutes a case of
plagiarism. You need to indicate by properly referencing where you have
obtained the ideas that constitute your answer.
Task Length
At least twice during the semester.
There are 10 JiTT assignments with 4 questions in each assignment to be
covered over the course of the semester. Based on the student enrolment
numbers at the time of writing this unit outline, there will be 4 groups
consisting of 4 students. Accordingly, all students will do at least two
presentations and write up 2 presentations. At the end of the semester after
everyone has presented two presentations, I will allow volunteers to present
an additional presentation. In order to be fair, I will take the best two
presentation marks for your internal assessment if you should do three
written presentations.
Assessment Criteria:
Written Group Presentation Rubric
Criteria
Communicate economics
in written formats
NN
PP
HD
(0)
(1/2.5)
(2.5/2.5)
1. Did not submit the
presentation
1. Still confused and confusing steps are
present in the argument.
1. Each and every step required to
understand the logic of the argument is
clearly explained.
2. Diagram/maths muddled/diagram
incorrectly drawn or poorly labelled.
2. Engaging and easy to read
diagram/maths.
3. Merely repeats/paraphrases
explanation the text.
3. Argument developed fully in own
words (aside from jargon).
4. No examples offered that would clarify
relevant distinctions, nuances.
4. Original examples offered to illustrate
the answer.
Link to Unit’s
Learning Outcomes:
Learning Outcome 5
Due Date:
Within one week of presenting the group's answer in class
Value:
5%
BEA300, Microeconomic Theory and Policy
19
Assessment Item 4 - JiTT Submissions
Task Description:
In the unit I plan to use the Just in Time Teaching (JITT) technique.
You will be required to read some material before the relevant workshop and
lecture. I will post the questions on MyLO. There will be four questions that
will be covered in the following week's group presentation workshop plus
one evaluative question that is not covered directly in class. You will submit
your answers by Monday 5pm.
It is important to bear in mind that while you will not be assessed on the
content of your answers I will nevertheless form a view of the effort you are
putting into being prepared for the following week's class --I will read your
submissions before the Tuesday class. If you have not made a genuine effort
to answer the question, then you will not receive a score. Note that the
emphasis is on the word effort, you will not be graded on whether what you
have written is correct or false.
The mark here is an incentive to encourage you to participate rather than an
assessment of the content.
Task Length
5 questions on assigned reading
Assessment Criteria:
Late submissions will not be accepted as it is your participation that is being
assessed rather than the content of your submission.
Link to Unit’s
Learning Outcomes:
Learning Outcome 5
Due Date:
On-going throughout the semester
Value:
5%
BEA300, Microeconomic Theory and Policy
20
Assessment Item 5 - Examination
Task Description:
The final examination is a 3-hour comprehensive examination covering LO1LO4 and the written part of LO5. The questions will consist of multiple-part
questions covering the principal concepts covered in the unit. The marks
allocated to the questions vary from one question to another. I will place the
2008 paper on MyLO so that you can have a better idea of the format and of
the exam.
Task Length
180 minutes
Link to Unit’s
Learning Outcomes:
Learning Outcomes 1-4
Due Date:
To be confirmed. Will take place in the Examination Period.
Value:
60%
Your final examination for this unit will be held during the scheduled examination period as
indicated by Student Administration in correspondence to you.
Examinations will normally be scheduled Monday to Saturday inclusive. Examinations may be held
during the day or evening and students should consult the university information which will be made
available towards the end of semester.
You are advised to make any necessary arrangements with employers now for time off during the
examination period to sit this examination. Your participation at the scheduled time is not
negotiable unless there are exceptional circumstances. Note that you will be expected to sit the
examination at your recorded study centre. To find out more go to the Exams Office website:
http://www.utas.edu.au/exams/home.
BEA300, Microeconomic Theory and Policy
21
Teaching Pattern Per Week
Class Time
Activity Description
Details
1. Tuesday
9:00am
Group Presentations
In week 1, I will assign you to a group for the remainder of the semester.
a.
b.
c.
d.
e.
f.
g.
h.
i.
At the beginning of the class I will assign each group one the
questions set in the previous week. The questions will be identical to
the JiTT questions set the previous week.
As a group you will have 6 minutes to discuss your answer and
prepare a presentation.
When called up the entire group should come to the front of the
class. One member of the group will then present the answer to the
entire class.
Over the course of the unit each member of the group must take the
role of the presenter. That is, if group member A presented the
group’s answer in week 2, then member A cannot be the presenter
again until all other group members have played that role.
If I or another member of the class have a question/query regarding
the group’s presentation, then any member of the group can answer
the question. I will give you a moment to confer on the reply.
The presentation will be graded on two criteria; the presentation
itself and the content of the presentation. See assessment rubric
“Oral Presentation Rubric” for additional details.
Each member of the group will receive the mark awarded to the
presenter.
A group cannot decline to do a question.
If the group declines to do the question/or the group is absent from
the class, then the grade awarded for the presentation will be zero.
You will have a maximum of 8 minutes to present your answer.
Written Presentations
a.
b.
c.
Within 7 days of the presentation in the class the student who
presented must send me a Word file of the answer.
I will read and mark the presentation and place a copy of the
annotated file on MyLO.
The presenter will receive an individual mark for the written
presentation. The other group members will not share in that
specific mark.
Late submissions will receive a penalty. See attached rubric for details of
the penalty structure.
2. Tuesday
10:00am
Class Working on a
Problem/Resolving
problems in the
presentations
As an entire class,
a.
b.
3. Thursday
11:00 am
Overview
a.
b.
We will either work on the elements of the questions developing a
solution/resolving problems. Note I will not be posting any of my
solutions to the class workshop material on MyLO. Consequently,
you need to pay attention and contribute to the discussion. That is,
if you are not clear about something that has been said interject
politely. Or,
develop some analytical tools.
In this session I will provide an overview of what we will be covering
in the following week, highlighting things that you should be
concentrating on in your reading or developing some of the theory.
I will examine some of the material you have indicated on your JiTT
questions as being confusing/difficult to understand.
BEA300, Microeconomic Theory and Policy
22
Submission of Assessment Items
Lodging Assessment Items
Assignments must be submitted electronically through the relevant assignment drop box in MyLO.
All assessment items must be handed in by 2.00pm on the due date. Where appropriate, unit
coordinators may also request students submit a paper version of their assignments.
All assignments must have a TSBE Assignment Cover Sheet, which is available as a blank template
from the TSBE website: [http://www.utas.edu.au/business-and-economics/student-resources]. All
assignments must include your name, student ID number, tutorial day/time, and your tutor’s name.
If this information is missing the assignment will not be accepted and, therefore, will not be
marked.
Please remember that you are responsible for lodging your assessment items on or before the due
date and time. We suggest you keep a copy. Even in ‘perfect’ systems, items sometimes go astray.
Late Assessment and Extension Policy
In this Policy
1.
(a) ‘day’ or ‘days’ includes all calendar days, including weekends and public holidays;
(b) ‘late’ means after the due date and time; and
(c) ‘assessment items’ includes all internal non-examination based forms of assessment
2.
This Policy applies to all students enrolled in TSBE Units at whatever Campus or geographical
location.
3.
Students are expected to submit assessment items on or before the due date and time specified
in the relevant Unit Outline. The onus is on the student to prove the date and time of
submission.
4.
Students who have a medical condition or special circumstances may apply for an extension.
Requests for extensions should, where possible, be made in writing to the Unit Coordinator on
or before the due date. Students will need to provide independent supporting documentation
to substantiate their claims.
5.
Late submission of assessment items will incur a penalty of 10% of the total marks possible for
that piece of assessment for each day the assessment item is late unless an extension had been
granted on or before the relevant due date.
6.
Assessment items submitted more than five (5) days late will not be accepted.
7.
Academic staff do NOT have the discretion to waive a late penalty, subject to clause 4 above.
BEA300, Microeconomic Theory and Policy
23
Academic Referencing and Style Guide
In your written work you will need to support your ideas by referring to scholarly literature, works of
art and/or inventions. It is important that you understand how to correctly refer to the work of
others and maintain academic integrity.
Failure to appropriately acknowledge the ideas of others constitutes academic dishonesty
(plagiarism), a matter considered by the University of Tasmania as a serious offence.
The appropriate referencing style for this unit is: the Harvard style. For information on presentation
of assignments, including referencing styles:
http://utas.libguides.com/content.php?pid=27520&sid=199808
BEA300, Microeconomic Theory and Policy
24
Review of Assessment and Results
Review of Internal Assessment
It is expected that students will adhere to the following policy for a review of any piece of
continuous/internal assessment. The term continuous/internal assessment includes any assessment
task undertaken across the teaching phase of any unit (such as an assignment, a tutorial
presentation, and online discussion, and the like), as well as any capstone assignment or take-home
exam.
Within five (5) days of release of the assessment result a student may request a meeting with the
assessor for the purpose of an informal review of the result (in accordance with Academic
Assessment Rule No. 2 Clause 22 – www.utas.edu.au/university-council/universitygovernance/rules). During the meeting, the student should be prepared to discuss specifically the
marks for the section(s) of the marking criteria they are disputing and why they consider their
mark(s) is/are incorrect. The assessor will provide a response to the request for review within five (5)
days of the meeting.
If the student is dissatisfied with the response they may request a formal review of assessment by
the Head of School, with the request being lodged within five (5) days of the informal review being
completed. A Review of Internal Assessment Form must be submitted with the formal review
(http://www.studentcentre.utas.edu.au/examinations_and_results/forms_files/review_of_assessm
ent.pdf).
Review of Final Exam/Result
In units with an invigilated exam students may request a review of their final exam result. You may
request to see your exam script after results have been released by completing the Access to Exam
Script Form, which is available from the TSBE Office, or at the following link –
http://www.utas.edu.au/business-and-economics/student-resources. Your unit coordinator will
then contact you by email within five (5) working days of receipt of this form to go through your
exam script.
Should you require a review of your final result a formal request must be made only after
completing the review of exam script process list above. To comply with UTAS policy, this request
must be made within ten (10) days from the release of the final results (in accordance with
Academic Assessment Rule No. 2 Clause 22 – www.utas.edu.au/university-council/universitygovernance/rules). You will need to complete an Application for Review of Assessment Form, which
can be accessed from
www.studentcentre.utas.edu.au/examinations_and_results/forms_files/review_of_assessment.pdf.
Note that if you have passed the unit you will be required to pay $50 for this review.
The TSBE reserves the right to refuse a student request to review final examination scripts should
this process not be followed.
BEA300, Microeconomic Theory and Policy
25
Further Support and Assistance
If you are experiencing difficulties with your studies or assessment items, have personal or lifeplanning issues, disability or illness which may affect your study, then you are advised to raise these
with your lecturer or tutor in the first instance.
If you do not feel comfortable contacting one of these people, or you have had discussions with
them and are not satisfied, then you are encouraged to contact:
DIRECTOR OF UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS
Name: Mr David Kronenberg
Room: 407, Commerce Building, Sandy Bay
Phone: 03 6226 2280
Email: [email protected]
Students are also encouraged to contact their Undergraduate Student Adviser who will be able to
help in identifying the issues that need to be addressed, give general advice, assist by liaising with
academic staff, as well as referring students to any relevant University-wide support services. Please
refer to the Student Adviser listings at www.utas.edu.au/first-year/student-advisers for your
advisers contact details.
There is also a range of University-wide support services available to students, including Student
Centre Administration, Careers and Employment, Disability Services, International and Migrant
Support, and Student Learning and Academic Support. Please refer to the Current Students website
(available from www.utas.edu.au/students) for further information.
If you wish to pursue any matters further then a Student Advocate may be able to assist.
Information about the advocates can be accessed from www.utas.edu.au/governance-legal/studentcomplaints.
The University also has formal policies, and you can find out details about these policies from the
following link – www.utas.edu.au/governance-legal/student-complaints/how-to-resolve-a-studentcomplaint/self-help-checklist.
BEA300, Microeconomic Theory and Policy
26
Academic Misconduct and Plagiarism
Academic misconduct includes cheating, plagiarism, allowing another student to copy work for an
assignment or an examination, and any other conduct by which a student:
(a) seeks to gain, for themselves or for any other person, any academic advantage or advancement
to which they or that other person are not entitled; or
(b) improperly disadvantages any other student.
Students engaging in any form of academic misconduct may be dealt with under the Ordinance of
Student Discipline. This can include imposition of penalties that range from a deduction/cancellation
of marks to exclusion from a unit or the University. Details of penalties that can be imposed are
available in the Ordinance of Student Discipline – Part 3 Academic Misconduct, see
www.utas.edu.au/universitycouncil/legislation.
Plagiarism is a form of cheating. It is taking and using someone else’s thoughts, writings or
inventions and representing them as your own, for example:
•
•
•
using an author’s words without putting them in quotation marks and citing the source;
using an author’s ideas without proper acknowledgment and citation; or
copying another student’s work.
It also means using ones’ own work from previously submitted assessment items if repeating a unit.
If you have any doubts about how to refer to the work of others in your assignments, please
consult your lecturer or tutor for relevant referencing guidelines, and the academic integrity
resources on the web at http://www.academicintegrity.utas.edu.au/ The intentional copying of
someone else’s work as one’s own is a serious offence punishable by penalties that may range from
a fine or deduction/cancellation of marks and, in the most serious of cases, to exclusion from a unit,
a course, or the University.
The University and any persons authorised by the University may submit your assessable works to
a plagiarism checking service, to obtain a report on possible instances of plagiarism. Assessable
works may also be included in a reference database. It is a condition of this arrangement that the
original author’s permission is required before a work within the database can be viewed.
For further information on this statement and general referencing guidelines, see
www.utas.edu.au/plagiarism/ or follow the link under ‘Policy, Procedures and Feedback’ on the
Current Students homepage.
BEA300, Microeconomic Theory and Policy
Study Schedule
The unit’s content is organised around the following concepts. Note that some of the concepts are
integrated into other areas and therefore do not get separate treatment as such.
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
10.
11.
Incentives
Efficiency
Market failure and government failure
Pure public goods
Externalities
Taxation
Equity
Cost-benefit analysis
Merit goods
Uncertainty
Microeconomic reform
Study Week (18 October – 24 October 2014)
Examination Period (25 October – 11 November 2014)*
27
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