Farallon Communications 412 Network Card User Manual

Farallon

Netopia ISDN Modem
User’s Guide
Model 612 for PC Computers
Model 412 for Macintosh Computers
Farallon Communications, Inc.
Copyright notice
Copyright © 1996 Farallon Communications, Inc. v.1096
All rights reserved. Printed in the U.S.A.
This manual and any associated artwork, software, and product designs are
copyrighted with all rights reserved. Under the copyright laws this manual, artwork,
software, and product designs may not be copied, in whole or part, without the
written consent of Farallon Communications. Under the law, copying includes
translation to another language or format.
Farallon Communications, Inc.
2470 Mariner Square Loop
Alameda, CA 94501-1010
U.S.A.
Trademarks
Netopia, Farallon, and the Farallon logo design are trademarks of Farallon
Communications, Inc.
All other product names are the trademarks of their respective owners.
Credits
Portions of this user’s guide were written by Igal Dahari Levy and Robert Remillard.
Portions of this user’s guide were adapted by Igal Dahari Levy. Josie Cerrato edited
this user’s guide.
Part number
For additional copies of this user’s guide, order Farallon part number
6120264-00-03.
Printed on
Recycled Materials
iii
Contents
Chapter 1 — Introduction.......................................................1-1
Netopia ISDN Modem features ................................................ 1-2
Farallon support.................................................................. 1-3
Netopia ISDN Modem package contents .................................. 1-3
Computer system requirements .............................................. 1-4
PC requirements ................................................................. 1-4
Macintosh computer requirements ....................................... 1-4
Cabling requirements .......................................................... 1-5
Chapter 2 — Setting Up ISDN Service ....................................2-1
About ISDN............................................................................ 2-2
ISDN and the Netopia ISDN Modem...................................... 2-2
Terms used in this user’s guide ........................................... 2-5
SPID formats ...................................................................... 2-6
Preparing for an ISDN line....................................................... 2-7
Find an ISDN service provider .............................................. 2-7
Decide on a type of ISDN line............................................... 2-8
Choose a phone line ........................................................... 2-8
Use your ISDN worksheet .................................................... 2-8
Ordering your ISDN line........................................................... 2-9
Contacting the telephone company ..................................... 2-10
General ISDN line configuration .......................................... 2-14
Chapter 3 — Installing the Netopia ISDN Modem ....................3-1
Connecting to a PC................................................................. 3-2
Connecting to a Macintosh computer....................................... 3-4
Connecting analog equipment ................................................. 3-6
iv
Netopia ISDN Modem User’s Guide
Chapter 4 — Configuration using a PC....................................4-1
Configuration using Windows, Windows 95, and Windows NT..... 4-2
Placing calls with Windows................................................. 4-10
Installing the Windows 95 modem driver ............................. 4-10
Placing calls with Windows 95............................................ 4-13
Installing the Windows NT modem driver ............................. 4-16
Placing calls with Windows NT............................................ 4-18
Windows configuration options ........................................... 4-19
Configuration using DOS ....................................................... 4-23
Placing calls with DOS ....................................................... 4-26
Chapter 5 — Configuration using a Macintosh computer .........5-1
Configuration using a Macintosh computer ............................... 5-2
The ISDN Setup application .................................................... 5-5
The Easy Setup window ....................................................... 5-6
The Advanced window.......................................................... 5-9
The Utilities window........................................................... 5-14
The Modem View window ................................................... 5-16
Saving and loading modem settings ................................... 5-18
Quitting the ISDN Setup application .................................... 5-20
Placing calls with a Macintosh computer ................................ 5-20
Chapter 6 — Advanced Features ............................................6-1
Placing calls using AT commands ............................................ 6-2
Using data compression ......................................................... 6-3
Using Multilink PPP ................................................................ 6-4
Storing Multilink Endpoint Identifiers in S registers ................ 6-5
Using PPP authentication protocols ...................................... 6-6
Using Dynamic Bandwidth Allocation........................................ 6-7
Placing a Toll Saver call .......................................................... 6-8
About QuickSelect .................................................................. 6-8
Optimizing serial port performance.......................................... 6-9
PC serial ports.................................................................... 6-9
Macintosh serial ports......................................................... 6-9
Contents
About autobaud ...................................................................
Using the analog device ports ...............................................
Receiving analog calls ..........................................................
Call routing to the analog device ports................................
Receiving data calls .............................................................
v
6-10
6-11
6-12
6-13
6-16
Chapter 7 — Troubleshooting .................................................7-1
Netopia ISDN Modem LEDs..................................................... 7-2
Troubleshooting tips ............................................................... 7-4
Downloading firmware to your ISDN modem ............................. 7-8
From a PC .......................................................................... 7-8
From a Macintosh computer............................................... 7-10
Appendix A — Modem Operation ............................................A-1
Modem basics ....................................................................... A-2
Operating modes................................................................. A-2
The AT command set ........................................................... A-3
Using the modem................................................................ A-5
Modem command summaries ................................................. A-8
AT commands ..................................................................... A-8
S registers........................................................................ A-11
ISDN modem result codes ................................................. A-17
Appendix B — ISDN Events ....................................................B-1
ISDN event cause codes...................................................... B-2
Appendix C — Technical Specifications ..................................C-1
RS-232-D pin assignments................................................... C-3
PC serial cable pin assignments........................................... C-4
Macintosh DIN-8 pin assignments ........................................ C-5
Regulatory notices .............................................................. C-6
Appendix D — About the COM Port Accelerator......................D-1
Installation ............................................................................ D-2
vi
Netopia ISDN Modem User’s Guide
Farallon Technical Support.................................................... TS-1
Before calling Farallon ....................................................... TS-1
Environment profile ........................................................... TS-2
How to reach us................................................................ TS-2
Glossary............................................................................... GL-1
Index ........................................................................................1
Limited Warranty and Limitation of Remedies
1-1
Chapter 1
Introduction
The Netopia ISDN Modem is an external, stand-alone, ISDN
terminal adapter. Using Integrated Services Digital Network (ISDN)
technology, the Netopia ISDN Modem provides high-speed access to
analog and digital services. With the Netopia ISDN Modem, you can
access the Internet, your corporate local area network (LAN), or
another individual computer.
This chapter introduces the Netopia ISDN Modem and its features.
It also explains the requirements for using the Netopia ISDN
Modem.
Netopia
ISDN Modem
D-Cha
B-2
B-1
nnel
TestPower
Internet
or
on-line service

on
Farall
TM
Impa
Analog Modem
3 Com
ct
DTR
RD
SD
B2
B1
D
TEST
PWR
ISDN line
Public telephone
network
Analog or ISDN line
Analog telephone
Analog or ISDN line
Corporate
LAN
Analog and digital network access with the Netopia ISDN Modem
1-2
Netopia ISDN Modem User’s Guide
Netopia ISDN Modem features
You can use the Netopia ISDN Modem to dial into any
ISDN-compliant terminal adapter or router that supports the Point-to
Point (PPP) protocol over ISDN.
The Netopia ISDN Modem comes in two models:
■
Model 612 for use with PC computers
■
Model 412 for use with Macintosh computers
The Netopia ISDN Modem’s features include:
■
Support high-speed digital access using Multilink PPP, Stac
compression, and a high-speed serial port.
■
Dynamic Bandwidth Allocation (DBA).
■
A complete digital network termination (Basic Rate ISDN NT1).
■
Two analog device ports for using analog telephone devices
with the ISDN line and flexible call routing to the two analog
ports.
■
QuickSelect feature to automatically convert asynchronous
Point-to-Point Protocol (PPP) into synchronous (HDLC-based)
PPP.
■
Support for the Password Authentication Protocol (PAP) and the
Challenge Handshake Authentication Protocol (CHAP).
■
Automatic detection and adaptation to the baud rate of your
computer’s serial port (autobaud).
■
Toll Saver 56K permissive dialing, which allows you to place a
data call over an ISDN line set up for voice connections.
■
A comprehensive diagnostic test and LED status display.
■
Netopia ISDN Assistant to configure the switch type and SPID
parameters.
Introduction
1-3
Farallon support
■
Netopia Care Service Program that includes 30 days of
toll-free telephone technical support, lifetime technical support
via e-mail, the World Wide Web, fax, and the Farallon bulletin
board service (BBS). This program also includes a 1-year
warranty that allows you to receive a replacement unit with a
5-day turnaround.
■
Keep it Running, Guaranteed!, an optional 3-year premium
support plan that provides toll-free telephone support and a
next-day product-replacement warranty.
■
Up & Running, Guaranteed!, an optional service program in
which Farallon helps you obtain ISDN and Internet services and
guarantees a successful connection.
Netopia ISDN Modem package contents
The Netopia ISDN Modem package includes:
■
A Netopia ISDN Modem unit (model 612 connects to a PC;
model 412 connects to a Macintosh computer)
■
A power cable with an AC wall transformer
■
A DB-25–to–DB-9 serial cable (model 612 only)
■
A DB-25–to–mini-DIN-8 serial cable (model 412 only)
■
An RJ-11–to–RJ-11 ISDN telephone cable
■
A 3.5" installation diskette with configuration software
■
A Netopia ISDN Modem user’s guide
■
A Getting Started card with an attached phone card
■
Internet access software
1-4
Netopia ISDN Modem User’s Guide
Computer system requirements
Refer to the appropriate section below for information on PC and
Macintosh computer requirements.
PC requirements
Your PC should have the following:
■
A 386, 486, or Pentium processor
■
640 KB of conventional memory
■
MS-DOS 5.0 or later operating system
■
Microsoft Windows 3.1 or later, Windows 95, or Windows NT
■
A hard disk drive with 2 MB of free space
■
An available serial (COM) port equipped with a 16550 universal
asynchronous transmitter. (See the “Optimizing serial port
performance” section on page 6-9 for more information.)
Macintosh computer requirements
Your Macintosh computer must be a Macintosh Plus or later model.
It must have the following:
■
System 7 or later operating system
■
A hard disk drive with 2 MB of free space
■
An available serial port (see the “Optimizing serial port
performance” section on page 6-9 for more information).
Introduction
1-5
Your communications software, such as a PPP client application,
may additionally require:
■
System 7.1 or later
■
A Macintosh computer equipped with a 68020 or later CPU
Cabling requirements
Your package contains a PC or Macintosh serial cable to connect
the Netopia ISDN Modem to your computer.
If your PC computer has a 25-pin serial port, you will need a
DB-9–to–DB-25 adapter. See “RS-232-D pin assignments” on
page C-3 for a description of the pins on the ISDN modem’s
RS-232-D port.
2-1
Chapter 2
Setting Up ISDN Service
This chapter shows you how to set up ISDN service. You will learn
about what ISDN is, how to prepare for setting up an ISDN line, and
how to work with an ISDN service provider. If you already have an
ISDN line, you may still want to read the rest of this chapter to find
the ISDN information needed to properly configure your Netopia
ISDN Modem.
If you opted for the Up & Running, Guaranteed! program, Farallon
will set up ISDN service for you. However, you may still want to read
this chapter to become familiar with basic ISDN concepts.
This chapter is divided into three main sections:
■
A short description of ISDN and definitions of some common
ISDN terms
■
Preparing to order your ISDN line
■
Ordering your ISDN line
2-2
Netopia ISDN Modem User’s Guide
About ISDN
ISDN uses digital technology to connect to the public telephone
network. Using the existing copper wire and public telephone
network infrastructure, ISDN provides for existing voice services
and high-speed, dial-up data service.
Networks using ISDN communicate more efficiently than those
using analog lines. This is due to the relatively low cost of ISDN, the
fact that digital lines are relatively free of the random noise
associated with analog lines, and the high communication speeds
that can be achieved. ISDN Basic Rate Interface (BRI) lines can
reach speeds of up to 128 thousand bits per second (Kbps). A
typical high-speed modem can only send data over an analog line at
up to 28.8 Kbps.
You can convert almost any existing regular telephone line to ISDN
by ordering ISDN service for that line. In most cases, no rewiring is
necessary for the conversion and no special equipment is needed
to use the converted line with your Netopia ISDN Modem. (Keep in
mind that if you convert an analog line to an ISDN line, you will not
be able to directly connect analog devices to the ISDN line in most
cases.)
ISDN and the Netopia ISDN Modem
If you’ve been using an ordinary modem to dial into analog data
services, such as a corporate LAN or online service, you can
continue to do so with your digital ISDN line. Simply connect your
analog modem to one of the analog device ports on the Netopia
ISDN Modem and continue to use your analog devices in the same
fashion as before.
The Netopia ISDN Modem will convert the analog signal to a digital
signal for transmission over the ISDN line in such a way that it can
be retransmitted by the public switched network to an analog
device.
Setting Up ISDN Service
Your computer
Analog modem
PWR TEST D
Analog connection
Digital connection
Analog or digital connection
2-3
B1
B2
SD
RD
DTR
Netopia
Netopia
ISDN Modem
Analog phone
Fax services
Public telephone
network
Internet Service Provider
or online service
Telephone voice
services
Corporate
LAN
Using analog devices with the Netopia ISDN Modem to communicate with
analog voice and data services
2-4
Netopia ISDN Modem User’s Guide
Your computer
PWR TEST D
B1
B2
SD
RD
DTR
Netopia
Netopia
ISDN Modem
Digital connection
ISDN fax service
Public telephone
network
Internet Service Provider
or online service
Corporate
LAN
*Using
the Netopia ISDN Modem to connect to digital voice and data services
* If you choose not to connect any analog devices to the Netopia
ISDN ModemÕs analog device ports, you will be able to connect to
other ISDN devices, but not to analog devices. See the diagrams
above.
Setting Up ISDN Service
2-5
Terms used in this user’s guide
The following ISDN-related terms are used in this user’s guide:
Basic Rate Interface (BRI): BRI is the type of ISDN service you will
order from the ISDN service provider. A BRI ISDN line has two
B channels and a D channel. The B channels carry data at 56 Kbps
or 64 Kbps, and can be used by the applications you use to access
the Internet. The D channel is reserved for call setup and signalling.
B channels
ISDN BRI
D channel
Switch: The massive computer that controls your telephone line
from the telephone company’s local central office. You must know
the type of switch—sometimes referred to as switch
configuration—on your line to properly configure the ISDN modem.
Directory number (DN): The actual phone number associated with
the ISDN line you order (the directory number is also referred to as
the “telephone number” in this user’s guide). Depending on the type
of switch on your line, there may be one directory number for both
B channels, or one for each B channel.
SPID: The Service Profile ID generally looks like the directory
number with some extra digits (the TID) appended to it. The number
of SPIDs received with BRI service can vary from none to two.
TID (Terminal ID): This one- or two-digit number is associated with
the SPID. It’s usually 1 or 01 for the first SPID and 2 or 02 for the
second SPID, but it can vary in form.
If you encounter other unfamiliar terms, check the glossary.
2-6
Netopia ISDN Modem User’s Guide
SPID formats
The exact format of ISDN SPIDs is sometimes a point of confusion.
This is because several formats exist, and some formats allow
variations.
The table below displays the general SPID formats for some of the
types of ISDN switch configurations supported by the Netopia ISDN
Modem. The formats shown are a subset of possible SPID formats,
but in most cases they should work.
In the following table, xxxxxxx represents the directory number
assigned to your ISDN line, and yyy represents your area code.
Switch
SPID format
AT&T 5ESS custom (multipoint)
01xxxxxxx0
National ISDN-1
on AT&T 5ESS
(multipoint)
01xxxxxxx00
National ISDN-1
on Northern
Telecom DMS-100
yyyxxxxxxx100 and yyyxxxxxxx200
or
yyyxxxxxxx0100 and yyyxxxxxxx0200
Note: AT&T 5ESS custom point-to-point switches have no SPIDs
and are not represented in the table above. However, this type of
switch configuration is supported by the Netopia ISDN Modem.
Example SPIDs
If your ISDN line is controlled by a DMS-100 using National ISDN-1,
and your directory numbers are given as (415)234-5678 and
(415)234-5679, your SPIDs are 4152345678100 and
4152345679200. Alternately, your SPIDs can be
41523456780100 and 41523456790200.
Setting Up ISDN Service
2-7
Preparing for an ISDN line
When you order an ISDN line, you will exchange information with the
ISDN service provider about the kind of service you need. The
provider, in turn, will give you some information about your line that
will be useful when you configure your Netopia ISDN Modem.
There are a few things to do before you can order an ISDN line:
■
Find an ISDN service provider
■
Decide on a type of ISDN line
■
Choose a phone line
■
Use your ISDN worksheet
These are explained in the corresponding sections below.
Find an ISDN service provider
ISDN service is typically provided by local telephone companies. In
certain regions, there may be other types of companies providing
ISDN service, such as long distance telephone companies. In this
user’s guide, we’ll refer to the ISDN service providers as telephone
companies.
If you are unsure of who provides ISDN service in your area, start by
contacting your local telephone company (refer to the list of contact
numbers for telephone companies that appears later in this
chapter). Ask for the ISDN service representative or for someone in
the company’s marketing or business services office.
Regardless of who you choose for ISDN service, the basic process
of setting up an ISDN line should be the same.
2-8
Netopia ISDN Modem User’s Guide
Decide on a type of ISDN line
An ISDN line can be configured to carry data only, or both data and
voice.
Choose a phone line
To order an ISDN line, you must either designate an existing
telephone line to be converted, or order a new line to be installed.
There will probably be an additional charge if you add a new ISDN
line. However, if you convert an analog line to an ISDN line, you will
not be able to directly connect analog devices to the ISDN line in
most cases.
Regardless of your choice, make sure there is a wall jack for the line
you choose near where you intend to install your Netopia ISDN
Modem.
Use your ISDN worksheet
The ISDN Worksheet at the end of this chapter (see page 2-18)
contains sections where you can note important information about
your ISDN account. You may want to photocopy the ISDN Worksheet
and fill in the copy.
Note: The ISDN Worksheet is for your convenience only. You may
receive forms containing similar information from your telephone
company. In any case, the ISDN Worksheet is not an application for
an ISDN line nor a substitute for the forms your telephone company
uses.
Fill in section 1 of the worksheet once you find out exactly who you’ll
order your ISDN line from. Fill in as much of section 2 as you can
before calling your telephone company. The information in section 3
can only be filled in after you order your ISDN line.
Setting Up ISDN Service
2-9
Be sure to check the accuracy of the information you enter on the
worksheet. Some of it will be needed later when you configure your
Netopia ISDN Modem.
It’s also a good idea to have the worksheet available if you call
Farallon technical support. The information on the sheet may help a
Farallon technician answer your questions more quickly.
Ordering your ISDN line
This section contains the information you’ll need to successfully
order an ISDN line.
Read this section through before contacting your telephone
company. Then refer to it when you actually order your line.
The first step in ordering your ISDN line is to prepare for the
questions your telephone company may ask, such as:
■
Will you be using an existing telephone line or need a new one?
■
Where is the line located?
■
Who is the contact person at that location?
■
Who will be billed for the line or should this line be added to an
existing account?
■
Should the service (or number) be listed?
Use section 2 of the ISDN Worksheet to record the answers to
these questions before calling your telephone company. Your
telephone company may also ask other questions about the type of
service you want.
2-10
Netopia ISDN Modem User’s Guide
Contacting the telephone company
Below is a list of items that can help you order your ISDN line more
easily. These items correlate with items in section 3 of the ISDN
Worksheet (see page 2-18).
Depending on your situation, some of these items may not apply to
your order, and all of the items may not be dealt with by your
telephone company at the same time. In addition, there may be
other issues you will need to ask the telephone company about.
When an item in this list generates information that should be
entered in your worksheet, be sure to do so.
First, read through this list and become familiar with its contents.
Then call your telephone company and refer to the items in the list
during the ordering process.
1.
Call your telephone company. Refer to the table below for your
telephone company’s phone number.
State
Telephone Number
Alabama
800-858--9413
Alaska
907-561-1221
Arizona
800-898-WORK
Arkansas
800-SWB-ISDN
California
800-4PB-ISDN
Colorado
800-898-WORK
Connecticut
800-430-ISDN
Delaware
800-570-ISDN
Florida
800-858--9413
Georgia
800-858--9413
Hawaii
808-586-3000
Setting Up ISDN Service
State
2-11
Telephone Number
Idaho
800-898-WORK
Iowa
800-898-WORK
Illinois
800-TEAM-DATA
Indiana
800-TEAM-DATA
Kansas
800-SWB-ISDN
Kentucky
800-858--9413; 513-566--9413
Louisiana
800-858--9413
Maine
800-GET-ISDN
Maryland
800-570-ISDN
Massachusetts
800-GET-ISDN
Michigan
800-TEAM-DATA
Minnesota
800-898-WORK
Mississippi
800-858--9413
Missouri
800-SWB-ISDN
Montana
800-898-WORK
Nebraska
800-898-WORK
Nevada
702-333-4811
New Jersey
800-570-ISDN
New Hampshire
800-GET-ISDN
New Mexico
800-898-WORK
New York
800-GET-ISDN; 716-777-1234
North Carolina
800-858--9413
North Dakota
800-898-WORK
2-12
Netopia ISDN Modem User’s Guide
State
Telephone Number
Ohio
800-TEAM-DATA; 513-566--9413
Oklahoma
800-SWB-ISDN
Oregon
800-898-WORK
Pennsylvania
800-570-ISDN
Rhode Island
800-GET-ISDN
South Carolina
800-858--9413
South Dakota
800-898-WORK
Tennessee
800-858--9413
Texas
800-SWB-ISDN
Utah
800-898-WORK
Vermont
800-GET-ISDN
Virginia
800-570-ISDN
Washington
800-898-WORK
Washington DC
800-570-ISDN
West Virginia
800-570-ISDN
Wisconsin
800-TEAM-DATA
Wyoming
800-898-WORK
2.
ISDN line configuration. Your telephone company may have the
Netopia ISDN Modem on a list of supported products that have
been tested with a particular ISDN line configuration. If your
telephone company confirms that the Netopia ISDN Modem is
on that list, then it will know how to set up your line.
Note: If your telephone company does not recognize the
Netopia ISDN Modem, you should read “General ISDN line
configuration” on page 2-14.
Setting Up ISDN Service
3.
4.
2-13
Type of switch configuration used on your line. You must
receive this information from your telephone company to properly configure the Netopia ISDN Modem. The switch should be
one of the types supported by the Netopia ISDN Modem:
■
AT&T 5ESS custom
■
Northern Telecom DMS-100 or Siemens EWSD
■
AT&T 5ESS
Directory numbers and SPID (service profile identifier) numbers. This information may be provided to you at a later time,
after your line has been set up. There may be one or two directory numbers, and one or two SPIDs. If the switch on your line
is an AT&T 5ESS custom point-to-point, you will receive no
SPIDs. It’s very important that you record this information accurately.
Note: Regardless of the number of directory numbers and
SPIDs you receive, your line should be configured to allow the
Netopia ISDN Modem to use both B channels at once.
5.
Circuit ID number. Your line has a unique physical address
called a circuit ID. You should obtain this number from your telephone company and record it on the worksheet. The circuit
number can be useful for locating your line and its associated
circuit in case of a problem.
6.
Long-distance company to be used on your ISDN line. When
the Netopia ISDN Modem makes long distance calls on your
ISDN line, you will be billed by a long distance telephone company. Make sure that you have the long distance company of
your choice.
2-14
Netopia ISDN Modem User’s Guide
General ISDN line configuration
What if your telephone company does not recognize the Netopia
ISDN Modem? You can still use the ISDN Worksheet, but follow
these steps:
1.
Ask for a standard Basic Rate Interface (BRI).
2.
Ask the telephone company representative what type of switch
the company will use for your line: AT&T 5ESS custom, Northern Telecom DMS-100/Siemens EWSD, or AT&T 5ESS. Note
this information on your ISDN Worksheet for later use.
Note: NI-1 can appear on an AT&T 5ESS or a Northern Telecom
DMS-100.
3.
Locate your telephone company’s ISDN switch type in the table
below. Provide the switch parameters to the representative.
Setting Up ISDN Service
2-15
ISDN switch type
ISDN Line
Configuration
Parameter
AT&T 5ESS
Custom
AT&T 5ESS
National ISDN-1
Northern
Telecom
DMS-100
National ISDN-1
Siemens EWSD
National ISDN-1
Line type
Standard (2B+D)
line with
point-to-point
configuration
Standard (2B+D)
National ISDN-1
line
Standard (2B+D)
National ISDN-1
line
Standard (2B+D)
National ISDN-1
line
Line code
2B1Q (no NT1
required)
2B1Q (no NT1
required)
2B1Q (no NT1
required)
2B1Q (no NT1
required)
Interface type
U interface with an
RJ-45 jack
U interface with an
RJ-45 jack
U interface with an
RJ-45 jack
U interface with an
RJ-45 jack
Directory numbers
2*
2*
2
2*
Maximum
terminals
1
1
NA
NA
Maximum B
channels
2
2
2
2
Circuit-switched
voice
2*
2*
NA
NA
Circuit-switched
voice limit
2*
2*
NA
Dynamic
Circuit-switched
voice channel
Any
Any
NA
NA
Circuit-switched
data
2*
2*
NA
NA
Circuit-switched
data and voice
NA
NA
NA
Yes
Circuit-switched
data channel
Any
Any
NA
NA
* The directory number, circuit-switched voice, and circuit-switched voice limit parameters should be
set to 2 to allow both analog device ports to be used simultaneously. If these parameters are set
to 1, the ISDN line can only place or receive one call at a time.
2-16
Netopia ISDN Modem User’s Guide
ISDN switch type
AT&T 5ESS
Custom
AT&T 5ESS
National ISDN-1
Northern
Telecom
DMS-100
National ISDN-1
Siemens EWSD
National ISDN-1
2
2
NA
None
A (basic terminal)
A (basic terminal)
Functional PVC 2
Functional
Display
Yes
Yes
NA
NA
Actual user
Yes
Yes
NA
NA
Voice or data
Both
Both
Both
No
Data option
NA
NA
Lower layer
compatibility
NA
Call appearance
preference
Idle
Idle
NA
NA
Circuit-switched
option
NA
NA
Yes
NA
Bearer restriction
option
NA
NA
No packet mode
data (NOPMD)
Protocol
NA
NA
Functional version
2 (PVC 2)
Functional
SPID suffix
NA
NA
1
1
Terminal Endpoint
Identifier
NA
NA
Dynamic
Dynamic
ISDN Line
Configuration
Parameter
Circuit-switched
data limit
Terminal type
No packet mode
data (NOPMD)
Maximum keys
NA
NA
64
NA
Ring
NA
NA
No
NA
Key system (EKTS)
NA
NA
No
No
Yes*
Yes*
Yes*
Yes*
Flexible Call
Offering (FCO)
* FCO (also referred to as “Additional Call Offering”) allows you to receive an incoming call while a
Multilink PPP call is active. If you do not want this feature, which might cost extra, notify your telephone service provider. Note that FCO is not required.
Setting Up ISDN Service
2-17
4.
Ask the telephone company representative to provide the information you need to fill out section 3 of the worksheet.
5.
Present the ordering information you receive from the telephone company representative to the ISDN line installer or telephone company service representative in your area. Also, make
sure that your local telephone company installer installs a new
or rewires an existing RJ-11 or RJ-45 jack for your ISDN line.
You will connect the Netopia ISDN Modem to this jack using the
RJ-11–to–RJ-11 ISDN telephone cable.
6.
Once your Netopia ISDN Modem is installed and configured, try
to place a call. If the line does not function properly with the
ISDN modem, contact your telephone company and ask them to
reconfigure the line until it works properly.
2-18
Netopia ISDN Modem User’s Guide
ISDN Worksheet
1. Telephone company contact information
Name and address:
_____________________________________________________________
_____________________________________________________________
_____________________________________________________________
Telephone/Fax numbers: _______________________________________
E-mail address: _______________________________________________
2. Your information
Street address where your ISDN line is located:
_____________________________________________________________
_____________________________________________________________
_____________________________________________________________
Contact person at this location, including phone number:
_____________________________________________________________
Is this an existing line or a new line (to be installed)?
__ existing
__ new
Should the number for this line be listed in the telephone company’s directory?
__ no
__ yes
Billing address for your ISDN line:
_____________________________________________________________
_____________________________________________________________
_____________________________________________________________
_____________________________________________________________
Setting Up ISDN Service
2-19
3. ISDN information
ISDN line configuration method used (check one):
__ By product (Netopia ISDN Modem)
__ Other method
Type of switch (check one):
__ AT&T 5ESS custom
__ Northern Telecom DMS-100/Siemens EWSD National ISDN-1
__ AT&T 5ESS
Primary directory number (ID 1): ________________________________
Primary SPID (1): _____________________________________________
Secondary directory number (ID 2): _____________________________
Secondary SPID (2): __________________________________________
B channel data rate: __________________________________________
Circuit ID number: ____________________________________________
Long distance carrier used on ISDN line: _________________________
3-1
Chapter 3
Installing the Netopia ISDN Modem
This chapter describes the installation of the Netopia ISDN Modem.
The installation procedure assumes that you are familiar with PCs or
Macintosh computers. If you are not, refer to the documentation
that accompanied your computer for instructions on hardware
installation and operating system commands.
During installation, refer to the figures below showing the ISDN
modem’s back and front panels. If you encounter difficulties after
installation, refer to Chapter 7, “Troubleshooting.”
9 VDC
.6A MAX
RESET
1
2
RS-232
ISDN U
Back panel of the Netopia ISDN Modem
Netopia ISDN Modem
™
Power Test D
B1
B2
Send Receive Ready
Front panel of the Netopia ISDN Modem, showing all LEDs
3-2
Netopia ISDN Modem User’s Guide
Connecting to a PC
To connect the Netopia ISDN Modem model 612 to a PC:
1.
Turn off the computer and ensure that the Netopia ISDN
Modem is not plugged in.
2.
Connect the 25-pin male end of the ISDN modem’s serial cable
to the port labeled RS-232 on the ISDN modem’s back panel.
3.
Connect the other end of the serial cable to a serial (COM) port
on the back of your PC.
Note: Most COM ports are labeled COM, SERIAL, or RS-232. If
the COM port has a DB-25 connector, use a DB-9–to–DB-25
adapter, which you can purchase from your local computer
parts dealer.
Computer
Wall
Outlet
ISDN
Wall Jack
Netopia
ISDN
Modem
9 VDC
.6A MAX
RESET
1
2
RS-232
ISDN U
FAX
Connecting to the Netopia ISDN Modem
4.
Connect one end of the ISDN cable to the RJ-45 port labeled
ISDN U on the ISDN modem’s back panel.
Installing the Netopia ISDN Modem
Caution!
3-3
Do not connect the ISDN cable to the Netopia ISDN Modem’s
RJ-11 analog device ports (identified by the telephone icon).
These ports are designed for connecting standard analog
telephone equipment.
5.
Caution!
Connect the other end of the ISDN cable to the RJ-11 or RJ-45
ISDN wall jack. An RJ-45 jack will accept your cable’s RJ-11
connector.
Do not connect the ISDN cable to a standard analog telephone
jack or to an external ISDN network termination device (NT1).
Make sure it is connected to an ISDN jack (also called an ISDN
“U” interface).
6.
Connect the ISDN modem’s power cable to the connector
labeled 9VDC on the back panel of the ISDN modem.
7.
Plug the transformer end of the power cable into a standard AC
wall outlet.
The LEDs on the front panel (see the front panel figure on
page 3-1) flash momentarily as the ISDN modem undergoes a
power-up self-test. The Power and D channel LEDs will remain
lit until the configuration parameters are set.
8.
Go to Chapter 4, “Configuration using a PC” to configure the
Netopia ISDN Modem.
3-4
Netopia ISDN Modem User’s Guide
Connecting to a Macintosh computer
To connect the Netopia ISDN Modem model 412 to a Macintosh
computer:
1.
Turn off the computer and ensure that the Netopia ISDN
Modem is not plugged in.
2.
Connect the 25-pin male end of the ISDN modem’s serial cable
to the port labeled RS-232 on the ISDN modem’s back panel.
3.
Connect the other end of the serial cable to the printer or
modem port on the back of the Macintosh computer. For more
information about serial ports, see the “Steps 3 to 6: Selecting
the serial port options” section on page 5-2.
Computer
Wall
Outlet
ISDN
Wall Jack
Netopia
ISDN
Modem
9 VDC
.6A MAX
RESET
1
2
RS-232
ISDN U
FAX
Connecting to the Netopia ISDN Modem
4.
Connect one end of the ISDN cable to the RJ-45 port labeled
ISDN U on the ISDN modem’s back panel.
Installing the Netopia ISDN Modem
Caution!
3-5
Do not connect the ISDN cable to the Netopia ISDN Modem’s
RJ-11 analog device ports (identified by the telephone icon).
These ports are designed for connecting standard analog
telephone equipment.
5.
Caution!
Connect the other end of the cable to the RJ-11 or RJ-45 ISDN
wall jack. An RJ-45 jack will accept your cable’s RJ-11
connector.
Do not connect the ISDN cable to a standard analog telephone
jack or to an external ISDN network termination device (NT1).
Make sure it is connected to an ISDN jack (also called an ISDN
“U” interface).
6.
Connect the Netopia ISDN Modem power cable to the
connector labeled 9VDC on the back panel of the ISDN modem.
7.
Plug the transformer end of the power cable into a standard AC
wall outlet.
The LEDs on the front panel (see the front panel figure on
page 3-1) flash momentarily as the ISDN modem undergoes a
power-up self-test.
8.
Turn on the computer’s power switch and restart.
9.
To configure the Netopia ISDN Modem, see the “Configuration
using a Macintosh computer” section on page 5-2.
3-6
Netopia ISDN Modem User’s Guide
Connecting analog equipment
To connect a touch-tone telephone, answering machine, fax
machine, or external analog modem to the Netopia ISDN Modem:
1.
Turn off the computer and ensure that the Netopia ISDN
Modem is not plugged in.
2.
Insert one RJ-11 connector into one of the analog device ports
on the Netopia ISDN Modem (these ports are labeled with a
telephone icon).
Note: You need to provide an RJ-11 to RJ-11 cable for each
analog device port connection.
3.
Insert the other end of the cable into the appropriate RJ-11 port
on the analog device.
4.
Repeat steps 2 and 3 to connect an additional analog device.
For more information about analog connections, see the “Using
the analog device ports” section on page 6-11.
4-1
Chapter 4
Configuration using a PC
This chapter explains how to configure your Netopia ISDN Modem
using a PC.
You will install the Netopia Windows configuration software and use
it to configure your ISDN modem under Windows, Windows 95, and
Windows NT. You need to install the DOS configuration software and
use it to configure the ISDN modem under DOS.
Topics covered in this chapter include:
■
How to configure your Netopia ISDN Modem and place calls
under Windows, Windows 95, and Windows NT (page 4-2)
■
How to install the modem driver for Windows 95 (page 4-10)
■
How to install the modem driver for Windows NT (page 4-16)
■
How to use the configuration software to test the ISDN
connection and save modem settings (page 4-19)
■
How to configure your ISDN modem and place calls using DOS
(page 4-23)
Important: Configuring your Netopia ISDN Modem using Windows
95 and Windows NT is a two-step process. The first step is to use
the Windows configuration software to define modem settings
(page 4-2). The second step is to install a modem driver in the
operating system you are using (page 4-10 or page 4-16).
4-2
Netopia ISDN Modem User’s Guide
Configuration using Windows, Windows 95, and Windows NT
This section describes how to configure the Netopia ISDN Modem
using Windows, Windows 95, and Windows NT.
Steps 1 to 4:
Installing the software
1.
Insert the Netopia ISDN Modem Configuration Software for DOS
and Windows diskette into an available floppy drive.
2.
Select Run from the File menu (Windows 3.X and Windows NT)
or from the Start menu (Windows 95). (In Windows 3.x and
Windows NT, leave the Run Minimized check box unchecked.) In
the Run dialog box, type
a:setup
The Netopia ISDN Modem Setup dialog box appears.
3.
Click Continue. Another dialog box appears. You can use this
dialog box to specify where you want to install the Netopia files.
By default, the files are installed in the C:\NETOPIA directory. If
you want to install the Netopia files in a different directory,
enter the complete path to the desired location in the Path
field.
Configuration using a PC
4.
4-3
Click Continue to install the files.
A message will appear on the screen and inform you if the
installation was successful. If the installation was not
successful, try running the installation program again.
If you are using Windows 3.x, a dialog box appears and ask if
you want to install a COM port enhancement driver. For
information, see Appendix D, “About the COM Port
Accelerator.” After a successful installation, the Netopia icon
appears in the Netopia window.
4-4
Netopia ISDN Modem User’s Guide
Steps 5 to 9:
Running ISDN Assistant
ISDN Assistant is a program that detects the switch type and
configures the SPID(s). ISDN Assistant automatically runs if it
detects any change to the configuration parameters, for example, if
the ISDN modem is connected to a different ISDN line.
Note: You will need the ISDN telephone or directory numbers from
the configuration parameters you entered on your ISDN worksheet.
For information, see the “Use your ISDN worksheet” section on
page 2-8.
5.
Double-click the Netopia icon. A message appears. If you don’t
want ISDN Assistant to configure your ISDN modem, click the
Cancel button and go on to the “About the configuration dialog
box” section on page 4-6.
6.
If you want to run ISDN Assistant, wait about 30 seconds while
the program configures your switch type. A status message will
appear. Then, after the switch type is configured, the dialog box
for the first telephone number appears.
7.
Enter the telephone number for your ISDN line.
Note: You don’t need to enter delimiters like parentheses “( )”
or hyphens “-”.
Configuration using a PC
4-5
8.
Click Next. A dialog box appears, indicating that the Netopia
ISDN Modem is detecting the SPID for the first telephone number (it takes a minute or two to configure the SPID). After the
SPID is configured, another dialog box appears.
9.
If you have a second telephone number for your ISDN line, enter
it, and then click Next. If you do not have a second telephone
number for your ISDN line, leave the field blank, and then click
Cancel. If you entered a second telephone number, the program
confirms the SPID for the second telephone number and then
displays a dialog box to show the SPID was configured correctly.
Click Finish to continue.
4-6
Netopia ISDN Modem User’s Guide
About the configuration
dialog box
After running ISDN Assistant, the configuration program will
automatically try to detect the COM port to which the Netopia ISDN
Modem is connected.
■
If the program can detect the COM port, the configuration
dialog box appears.
■
If the program cannot detect the COM port, the COM Port
Provisioning dialog box appears. Choose the COM port to which
the ISDN modem is connected. Click Connect. Then the
configuration dialog box appears.
Status area
Message bar
Windows configuration dialog box
A message bar at the bottom of the dialog box provides help for
completing the fields. If you click in a field, the message bar tells
you what information to enter in the field. The message bar also
provides status information about the ISDN modem. For example, a
message will appear if the ISDN modem is disconnected from the
ISDN telephone line.
Configuration using a PC
4-7
The right side of the dialog box shows the ISDN modem’s firmware
version, along with any installed options, such as Multilink PPP. For
information about Multilink PPP, see the “Using Multilink PPP”
section on page 6-4.
Disabled items (items that are dimmed) are not applicable and do
not need to be configured.
A status area below the Help, Tools, Update, and Exit buttons
provides the following ISDN status information:
■
Layer 1 status
■
Service Profile Identifier (SPID) for telephone numbers 1 and 2
■
Terminal Endpoint Identifiers (TEI) 1 and 2 (for information
purposes only)
Check to make sure the switch type and SPID(s) the software
configures match the settings the telephone company gave you.
Step 10:
Configuring call routing
The call routing option (the Phone Port and Phone Port 2 check
boxes in the Number 1 and Number 2 areas) lets you route calls to
analog devices connected to the analog device ports. If you have
more than one telephone number, you can route calls from either
number to Phone Port 1 or Phone Port 2. By default, all the Phone
Port boxes are checked. This allows calls to both ISDN telephone
numbers to simultaneously ring devices attached to both ports. For
more information, see the “Call routing to the analog device ports”
section on page 6-13.
The configuration dialog box lets you configure call routing for Phone
Number 1 and Phone Number 2.
10. Check the box beside the phone port(s) to which you want to
route calls from telephone number 1 and telephone number 2.
Step 11: Configuring the
B channel data rate
You can configure the B channel data rate for 56 or 64 Kbps. The
data rate you select should match your telephone company’s
B channel rate (for information, see the “ISDN Worksheet” section
on page 2-18.) By default, the B channel data rate on the Netopia
ISDN Modem is set at 56 Kbps. If this setting doesn’t match your
telephone company’s rate, you need to change the setting.
4-8
Netopia ISDN Modem User’s Guide
If you select the Toll Saver option in the configuration dialog box, Toll
Saver will be applied to all outgoing ISDN calls. You must disable
the Toll Saver feature to place calls to devices that do not support
this feature.
11. To change the B channel data rate, select either 56, 64, or Toll
Saver for the B Channel Rate. For more information about Toll
Saver, see the “Placing a Toll Saver call” section on page 6-8.
Step 12: Enabling and
disabling Multilink PPP
Multilink PPP allows a maximum digital connection of up to 128
Kbps by virtually linking two 56 Kbps or 64 Kbps B channels.
12. Click in the Multilink check box in the PPP area (lower-right corner) to toggle Multilink PPP. If the box is checked, Multilink PPP
is on. For more information about Multilink PPP, see the “Using
Multilink PPP” section on page 6-4.
Steps 13 to 14:
Completing the
configuration
13. Click the Update button to download the parameters displayed
in the dialog box to your ISDN modem.
14. Check the status area to verify the configuration. If the parameters were configured accurately and the ISDN modem is ready
to send and receive calls, the status area fields should contain
the information shown below. Note that you do not configure
the Terminal Endpoint Identifier (TEI) numbers, they are generated automatically by the telephone company.
■
Layer 1: UP
■
SPID 1: Init
■
TEI 1: Number from 0 to 127
■
SPID 2: Init (if required)
■
TEI 2: Number from 0 to 127 (if required)
Configuration using a PC
4-9
Entering the switch type and SPID parameters
In most cases, ISDN Assistant will enter the information required to
connect to your Netopia ISDN Modem. However, if ISDN Assistant
doesn’t configure your ISDN modem correctly or if you want to enter
information yourself, you can follow the instructions below to enter
configuration information directly into the configuration dialog box.
1.
Select the type of switch, as specified by your telephone company, from the Telephone Company Switch drop-down list.
2.
Click in the Telephone Number field in the Number 1 area and
enter the first telephone (or “directory”) number of your ISDN
line.
3.
Click in the Service Profile Identifier (SPID) field and enter the
corresponding SPID for the telephone number you entered in
the previous step. You should have also received the SPID from
your telephone company. Note that this field scrolls to allow you
to enter as much information as necessary.
4.
If you have a second telephone number associated with your
ISDN telephone line (some telephone companies require two),
check the Enabled box and enter the number and
corresponding SPID in the appropriate fields in the Number 2
area.
5.
Click the Update button to download the parameters listed in
steps 1 through 4 to your ISDN modem.
6.
Check the status area to verify the configuration. If the
parameters were configured accurately and the ISDN modem is
ready to send and receive calls, the status area fields should
contain the information shown in the “Steps 13 to 14:
Completing the configuration” section on page 4-8.
7.
Click Exit to leave the utility.
If the parameters match those of the telephone company’s ISDN
switch, the D channel LED lights up for a few minutes, flashes for
several seconds, and then turns off. If the LED continues to flash or
remains lit, see Chapter 7, “Troubleshooting.”
4-10
Netopia ISDN Modem User’s Guide
If the D channel LED indicates a proper connection to the ISDN
switch by turning off and you are using Windows, you can use your
communications software to establish an ISDN connection. Go to
the next section to place calls using your ISDN modem.
If the D channel LED indicates a proper connection to the ISDN
switch by turning off and you are using Windows 95, to complete
the Windows 95 installation see the “Installing the Windows 95
modem driver” section on page 4-10.
If the D channel LED indicates a proper connection to the ISDN
switch by turning off and you are using Windows NT, to complete the
installation see the “Installing the Windows NT modem driver”
section on page 4-16.
Placing calls with Windows
To place calls using Windows, you can use any standard
communications application that recognizes AT commands.
Note: Most areas require you to dial ISDN calls with 11 digits (for
example, 1-800-555-1212), even for local calls.
Note that you must use Multilink PPP to make calls using two ISDN
B channels. For information. see the “Using Multilink PPP” section
on page 6-4.
Installing the Windows 95 modem driver
If you are using Windows 95, you need to install a modem driver for
your ISDN modem before you can place calls. Follow the
instructions below to install the Windows 95 modem driver.
Note: The serial port speed of most PCs limits the computer’s
maximum data transmission rate. Typically, PCs are limited to a
maximum transmission speed of 115.2 Kbps. However, advanced
serial cards and drivers are available to boost the serial port speed
up to 230.4 Kbps. (For more information, see the “Optimizing serial
port performance” section on page 6-9.)
Configuration using a PC
4-11
1.
From the Start menu, select Settings, then select Control
Panel.
2.
Double-click the Modems icon. The Modems Properties dialog
box appears.
4-12
Netopia ISDN Modem User’s Guide
3.
Click the Add button. The Install New Modem dialog box
appears.
4.
Check the Don’t detect my modem… box to prevent automatic
detection of the Netopia ISDN Modem. Click Next. The dialog
box listing modem manufacturers and modem models appears.
5.
Click Have Disk. The Install From Disk dialog box appears.
6.
Insert the Netopia Modem Configuration Software for DOS and
Windows diskette into the floppy drive. If necessary, enter the
identifier of the drive in which you inserted the diskette. For
example, if the diskette is in drive B, enter B:\. Click OK.
7.
To establish connections up to 115 Kbps, select Netopia ISDN
Modem (Autobaud). To fix connections at 230 Kbps, select
Netopia ISDN Modem (Fixed 230K). Click Next. The COM Port
dialog box appears.
Configuration using a PC
8.
4-13
Select the COM port to which the Netopia ISDN Modem is
physically connected. Click Next. A dialog box appears
indicating setup was successful. Click Finish. The Modems
Properties dialog box appears. Click Close.
This completes the Windows 95 configuration procedure.
If you are using Windows 95, go on to the “Placing calls with
Windows 95” section below for information on how to place a call.
Placing calls with Windows 95
This section describes how to set up connections to various
destinations using the Dial-Up Networking feature of Windows 95.
The Dial-Up Networking feature in Windows 95 is PPP client software
used in a range of corporate LAN-access and internet-access
applications.
Steps 1 to 8: Define the
connection
1.
From the Start menu, select Programs, then Accessories, then
Dial Up Networking. The Dial-Up Networking dialog box appears.
2.
Double-click the Make New Connection icon, and enter a name
for this connection.
4-14
Netopia ISDN Modem User’s Guide
3.
Select a Netopia ISDN Modem driver from the Select a modem
pop-up menu and click Configure. The Netopia ISDN Modem
dialog box appears.
4.
Select the COM port to which the Netopia ISDN Modem is
physically connected.
5.
Select the maximum COM port speed.
6.
Click OK, then click Next. The Make New Connection dialog box
appears.
7.
Enter the area code, telephone number, and country code of
the destination you want to call.
Note: Most areas require you to dial ISDN calls with 11 digits
(for example, 1-800-555-1212), even for local calls.
8.
Click Next, then click Finish. A connection icon representing the
Dial-Up Networking connection you just created appears in the
Dial-Up Networking folder.
Configuration using a PC
Steps 9 to 10:
Placing a call
9.
4-15
To place a call, double-click on a connection icon. The Connect
To dialog box appears.
10. Enter your user name and login password in the appropriate
fields, and then click Connect. (See your Windows 95 documentation for more information about making connections.)
Note: The Dial-Up Networking utility reports the speed of the first
connection only. If you enabled Multilink PPP, click on the modem
icon in the task bar to see the current connection speed.
4-16
Netopia ISDN Modem User’s Guide
Installing the Windows NT modem driver
If you are using Windows NT, you need to install a modem driver for
your ISDN modem before you can place calls. Follow the
instructions below to install the Windows NT modem driver.
Note: The Remote Access Service (RAS) software must be installed
on your system before you install the Windows NT modem driver.
You use RAS to install the modem driver. See your Windows NT
documentation for information on installing RAS.
Installing the Windows NT modem driver
1.
Start up the File Manager.
2.
Locate the Windows NT MODEM.INF file in the
%SYSTEMROOT%\SYSTEM32\RAS directory.
For example, if your root directory is named WINDOWS and is
located on the C:\ drive, the Windows NT MODEM.INF file is in
the following directory:
C:\WINDOWS\SYSTEM32\RAS
3.
Use the Rename command in the File menu to change the
name of the MODEM.INF file to MODEM.ORG.
4.
Locate the MODEM.INF file in the directory in which you
installed the Netopia configuration files. (By default, the file is
installed in the C:\NETOPIA directory.)
5.
Copy the Netopia ISDN Modem file, MODEM.INF, from the Netopia directory to the same directory as the MODEM.ORG file.
(You are replacing the Windows NT MODEM.INF file with the
Netopia MODEM.INF file.)
6.
Open the Main folder in the Program Manager and double-click
the Control Panel icon. The Control Panel folder opens.
Configuration using a PC
4-17
7.
Double-click the Network icon. The Network Settings dialog box
appears.
8.
Select Remote Access Service from the Installed Network Software list box.
9.
Click the Configure button. The Remote Access Setup dialog
box appears.
10. If a modem is already configured and appears in the dialog box,
select the modem in the dialog box and click the Remove button. If no modem appears in the dialog, go to the next step.
11. Click the Add button. The Add Port dialog box appears.
4-18
Netopia ISDN Modem User’s Guide
12. Select the COM port to which the ISDN modem is connected
from the Port pop-up menu and then click OK. The Remote
Access Setup message box appears.
13. Click Cancel to cancel automatic modem detection. The Configure Port dialog box appears.
14. Select Netopia ISDN Modem (Autobaud) for baud rates up to
115 Kbps; select Netopia ISDN Modem (230K) to fix the connection at 230 Kbps.
15. Select Dial out and Receive calls for the Port Usage. Click OK.
The Remote Access Setup dialog box appears.
16. Click Continue.
17. Click OK to exit from the Network Settings dialog box. The Network Settings Change alert dialog box appears.
18. Click the Restart Now button to restart Windows NT.
Once your system restarts, you are ready to start using your
Netopia ISDN Modem. See the section below for information.
Placing calls with Windows NT
If you are using Windows NT, after you configure your Netopia ISDN
Modem and install the Windows NT modem driver, you can use your
communications software to establish an ISDN connection. You can
use any standard communications application that recognizes AT
commands.
Note: Most areas require you to dial ISDN calls with 11 digits (for
example, 1-800-555-1212), even for local calls.
Note that you must use Multilink PPP to make calls using two ISDN
B channels. For information, see the “Using Multilink PPP” section
on page 6-4.
Configuration using a PC
4-19
Windows configuration options
You can use the Netopia Windows configuration program to test your
ISDN switching connection, save and load modem settings, and
download new firmware to your ISDN modem. You can use the
Windows configuration software with Windows, Windows 95, and
Windows NT.
Testing the ISDN switching connection
You can use the diagnostic mode to test your ISDN switching
connection to the telephone company. Typically, you will only need to
do this to troubleshoot communications problems.
For descriptions of the information reported on screen while in
diagnostic mode, see Appendix B, “ISDN Events.”
To use the diagnostic mode:
1.
Start up the Netopia Windows configuration program.
2.
Click the Tools button in the Netopia ISDN Modem window. The
toolbar appears.
4-20
Netopia ISDN Modem User’s Guide
3.
Click the Tests button. The Modem Protocol Trace and Diagnostics windows appear.
4.
Enter a phone number in the Phone Number field. (Make sure
you enter the number associated with an ISDN line.)
5.
Click the Call button. The diagnostic program traces the
progress of the call from the ISDN modem to the destination
and reports information about the call in the Modem Protocol
Trace window.
6.
Click the Exit button to exit from the diagnostic mode.
Configuration using a PC
4-21
Saving modem settings
You can save the current modem settings to a configuration file.
This allows you to save different configurations and then quickly
load the settings from the configuration file and configure the
modem in a particular way. The configuration file contains all the
configuration parameters currently set in the Netopia ISDN Modem.
When you start up the Netopia Windows configuration program, the
ISDN modem’s current settings appear in the Netopia ISDN Modem
window.
To save a configuration file:
1.
Click the Tools button on the Netopia ISDN Modem window. The
toolbar appears.
4-22
Netopia ISDN Modem User’s Guide
2.
Click the Save button on the toolbar. The dialog box used to
save files appears.
3.
Use the dialog box to save the file under the name and in the
location you want. Make sure you use the .cfg extension for the
filename.
Loading modem settings
You can load settings you’ve previously saved in a configuration file
and then use the settings to configure the modem.
To load modem settings:
1.
Click the Tools button on the Netopia ISDN Modem window. The
toolbar appears.
2.
Click the Restore button on the toolbar. The dialog box used to
open documents appears.
3.
Use the dialog box to locate and open the configuration file you
want. A dialog box appears and asks if you want to overwrite
the current modem configuration displayed on screen.
4.
Click the Yes button to continue. Another dialog box appears
and asks if you want to configure the modem with the restored
settings.
5.
Click the Yes button to proceed. The program sends the settings to the modem.
Downloading firmware
For information about downloading new firmware to your ISDN
modem, see the “Downloading firmware to your ISDN modem”
section on page 7-8.
Configuration using a PC
4-23
Configuration using DOS
This section describes how to configure the Netopia ISDN Modem
using DOS.
Steps 1 to 3:
Installing the software
1.
Create a directory on the hard drive. For example, to create a
directory named netopia on your C drive, at the C:\ prompt
type:
md c:\netopia
2.
Insert the Netopia ISDN Modem Configuration Software for DOS
and Windows diskette into the PC’s floppy drive, and copy all
the files from the diskette to the new DOS directory you just
created. To copy all files from the diskette to the directory,
\netopia, at the A:\ prompt type:
copy a:*.* c:\netopia
3.
Change to the directory containing the copied files and type:
install
Steps 4 and 5:
Selecting the COM port
The configuration program launches and presents the Port
Settings screen. Use the Up Arrow and Down Arrow keys to
move the cursor. Use the space bar to select a parameter.
4.
Select the ISDN modem’s COM port. When you select the port,
the standard interrupt (IRQ) associated with that port is
automatically chosen.
Note: The data rate displayed on screen is the speed of
communication between the computer and the Netopia ISDN
Modem.
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Netopia ISDN Modem User’s Guide
5.
Press F10 to connect to the Netopia ISDN Modem via the
chosen COM port. The configuration screen appears.
Step 6:
Selecting the switch type
6.
Move the cursor to the ISDN switch type used by your telephone
company and press the space bar to select it. You should have
received the ISDN switch type from your telephone company.
Steps 7 to 9:
Configuring Phone #1
7.
Move the cursor to the Phone #1 field and enter the first
telephone (or “directory”) number of the ISDN line to which your
Netopia ISDN Modem is connected.
8.
Move the cursor to the SPID #1 field and enter the
corresponding Service Profile Identifier (SPID) for the telephone
number you entered in the previous step. You should have also
received this SPID from your telephone company.
The Route Voice Calls option lets you route calls to analog
telephone devices connected to the analog device ports. By
default, calls to both ISDN telephone numbers ring the devices
connected to both ports simultaneously. If you have more than
one telephone number, you can route calls from the two
numbers to Phone Port 1 or Phone Port 2.
Configuration using a PC
9.
Steps 10 to 12:
Configuring Phone #2
4-25
Move the cursor to the port you want to select (Phone Port 1 or
Phone Port 2, next to the Phone #1 field) and press the space
bar to toggle the check mark on and off. If a check mark
appears next to a phone port, calls on telephone number 1 will
be routed to that port. For more information about call routing,
see the “Call routing to the analog device ports” section on
page 6-13.
10. If you have a second telephone number associated with your
ISDN telephone line (some telephone companies require two),
move the cursor to the Phone #2 field and enter the number.
11. If you entered a number for Phone #2, move the cursor to the
SPID #2 field and enter the corresponding SPID for the second
telephone number. You should have also received this SPID
from your telephone company.
12. If you entered a number for Phone #2, you can also choose to
route calls on the second telephone number. Move the cursor
to Phone Port 1 or Phone Port 2 (next to the Phone #2 field)
and press the space bar to toggle the check mark on and off. If
a check mark appears next to a phone port, calls on telephone
number 2 will be routed to that port.
Step 13:
Enabling Multilink PPP
Steps 14 to 16:
Completing the
Configuration
13. Move the cursor to MLPPP Enabled to turn Multilink PPP on and
off. Press the space bar to toggle the check mark beside this
option on and off. When this option is checked, Multilink PPP is
on. For more information about Multilink PPP, see the “Using
Multilink PPP” section on page 6-4.
14. Confirm that the parameters listed in steps 6 through 13 are
correct.
15. Press F10 to update the information to the Netopia ISDN
Modem.
16. Press Escape to return to the main menu. Once in the main
menu, choose the Exit command to exit from the program.
If the parameters match those of the telephone company’s ISDN
switch, the D channel LED lights for a few minutes, flashes for
several seconds, and then turns off. If the LED continues to flash or
remains lit, see Chapter 7, “Troubleshooting.”
4-26
Netopia ISDN Modem User’s Guide
Placing calls with DOS
If the D channel LED indicates a proper connection to the ISDN
switch, you can place your first call. You can use any standard
communications application that recognizes AT commands.
Note: Most areas require you to dial ISDN calls with 11 digits (for
example, 1-800-555-1212), even for local calls.
Note that you must use Multilink PPP to make calls using two ISDN
B channels. For information, see the “Using Multilink PPP” section
on page 6-4.
5-1
Chapter 5
Configuration using a Macintosh computer
This chapter explains how to configure your Netopia ISDN Modem to
work with Macintosh computers.
Topics covered in this chapter include:
■
How to configure your Netopia ISDN Modem to work with a
Macintosh computer
■
How to place calls with a Macintosh computer
5-2
Netopia ISDN Modem User’s Guide
Configuration using a Macintosh computer
To configure the Netopia ISDN Modem for a Macintosh computer:
Steps 1 to 2:
Installing the software
Steps 3 to 6:
Selecting the serial port
options
1.
Create a folder on your hard disk for the Netopia files and
assign a name to the folder (for example, “Netopia ISDN
Modem”).
2.
Insert the Netopia ISDN Modem Configuration Software for
Macintosh diskette into the diskette drive and copy the files by
selecting them and dragging them to the folder you created.
3.
Open the Netopia ISDN Modem folder and double-click the
ISDN Setup icon. The Communication Setup dialog box
appears.
4.
From the Serial Port pop-up menu, choose the serial port to
which the Netopia ISDN Modem is connected. If you want to
use an alternate serial port device, such as the Port Juggler
from Momentum, be sure to set the port according to the
device manufacturer’s instructions.
Note: Other devices, such as serial expansion cards, may not
work properly with the ISDN Setup application if the devices
require use of the Serial Port Manager or the Comm Toolbox. To
configure the Netopia ISDN Modem using the ISDN Setup
application, attach the ISDN modem directly to the printer or
modem port. You may still be able to use the alternate serial
devices with the ISDN modem and your application software.
Configuration using a Macintosh computer
Steps 7 to 9:
Running ISDN Assistant
5-3
5.
Click the button beside the baud option you want. Select Autobaud 1200 to 115K Baud to allow the software to automatically
determine the maximum communication speed your computer
supports; select Lock Modem onto 230K Baud to communicate
at 230K. If you select the 230K option and your Macintosh
computer does not support 230K communication, a message
will appear to inform you of this and tell you the port will be set
at 57600 Baud.
6.
Click OK to continue, or click Cancel to quit the ISDN Setup
application.
You can use ISDN Assistant to configure your ISDN modem. ISDN
Assistant is a program that detects the switch type and configures
the SPID(s). ISDN Assistant starts up automatically the first time
you configure your ISDN modem or after you make a change to the
configuration parameters, for example, if you connect the ISDN
modem to a different ISDN line.
You will need the ISDN telephone numbers from the configuration
parameters you entered on your ISDN worksheet. For information,
see the “Use your ISDN worksheet” section on page 2-8.
7.
Click Next to run ISDN Assistant. Click Cancel if you don’t want
to run ISDN Assistant.
If you click Cancel, a message appears to inform you the ISDN
modem was not configured. Click Done to continue. To
configure the ISDN modem yourself, see the “The ISDN Setup
application” section on page 5-5.
If you click Next (to run ISDN Assistant), ISDN Assistant
displays a status message as the program attempts to
configure your switch type.
5-4
Netopia ISDN Modem User’s Guide
After the switch type is configured, the dialog box for the first
telephone number appears.
8.
Enter the first telephone number for your ISDN line. Click OK.
After the SPID for the first telephone number is configured, the
dialog box for the second telephone number appears.
9.
If you have a second telephone number for your ISDN line, enter
it, and then click Next. If you do not have a second telephone
number for your ISDN line, leave the field blank, and then click
Done. An Untitled document appears. See the next section.
Configuration using a Macintosh computer
5-5
The ISDN Setup application
The ISDN Setup application has four configuration windows: Easy
Setup, Advanced, Utilities, and Modem View. Each window has its
own labeled tab. To access a configuration window, click on its tab.
The Easy Setup window is always on top when you first open the
ISDN Setup application. In most cases, you’ll only need to use the
Easy Setup window to configure your Netopia ISDN Modem.
The Info area at the bottom of each window displays
context-sensitive help about the control (tab, pop-up menu, data
entry field, and so on) you point to with the mouse pointer.
The ISDN Setup application windows are described in the following
four sections.
5-6
Netopia ISDN Modem User’s Guide
The Easy Setup window
The Easy Setup window appears when you first open the ISDN Setup
application. Use this window to define your:
■
Telephone company’s ISDN switch type
■
B channel Service Profile Identifiers (SPIDs)
■
B channel Directory Numbers (DNs)
■
Call routing preferences
The telephone company installer provides these parameters to you
when your ISDN line is installed.
You also use this window to enable and disable the auto answer
feature.
Configuration using a Macintosh computer
5-7
Note: You can use the ISDN Setup utility for both the Netopia ISDN
Modem Model 411 and 412. The two models support slightly
different features. The software automatically detects which model
you are using and only displays features that apply to that model.
The sections below note the features that are available to only one
of the two models.
If you filled out the ISDN parameters worksheet in Chapter 2, refer
to it now.
Note: If you ran the ISDN Assistant software, the Switch Type, DN,
and SPID will automatically be entered. The instructions below
describe how to manually fill out all the fields in the Easy Setup
Window.
To configure the Easy Setup window:
1.
Choose a switch type from the Switch Type pop-up menu.
2.
In the B1 Channel SPID entry field, enter the SPID associated
with the primary directory number (DN). If the cursor is not in
the B1 Channel SPID entry field, double-click in the field or
press the Tab key until the field is selected.
3.
In the B1 Channel DN entry field, enter the primary DN.
4.
Check the box beside the phone port(s) to which you want to
route calls from telephone number 1. This option lets you route
calls to analog devices connected to the analog device ports.
For information about call routing, see the “Call routing to the
analog device ports” section on page 6-13. (This option is only
available for the Netopia ISDN Modem Model 412.) If you do
not have a secondary SPID and DN, skip steps 5 through 7.
5.
In the B2 Channel SPID entry field, enter the SPID associated
with the secondary directory number (DN).
6.
In the B2 Channel DN entry field, enter the secondary DN.
7.
Check the box beside the phone port(s) to which you want to
route calls from telephone number 2. (This option is only available for the Netopia ISDN Modem Model 412.)
5-8
Netopia ISDN Modem User’s Guide
Note: If you want to change the settings displayed in the
window to the settings currently defined in the Netopia ISDN
modem, click the Revert button. This button is useful if you
make a mistake entering new settings in the window and want
to revert to the old settings.
8.
Check the Enable Auto Answer box to turn on the auto answer
feature. When Enable Auto Answer is active, the ISDN modem
automatically answers incoming data calls. You might want to
use this feature if you have callback set up in your communications software or you want to receive incoming data calls over
your Netopia ISDN Modem.
9.
Click the Set Modem button to configure the Netopia ISDN
Modem with the new settings. Generally, you will only need to
set the parameters in the Easy Setup window once.
Note: The changes you make in the Easy Setup window are not
sent to the ISDN modem until you click the Set Modem button.
When the settings on the Easy Setup and Advanced windows
exactly match the ISDN modem’s settings, the Set Modem
button is disabled.
If the parameters match those registered at the telephone company
ISDN switch, the D channel LED lights for a few minutes, flashes for
several seconds, and then turns off. If the LED continues to flash or
remains lit, see Chapter 7, “Troubleshooting.”
If the D channel LED indicates a proper connection to the ISDN
switch, you can place your first call. Go to the “Placing calls with a
Macintosh computer” section on page 5-20.
Configuration using a Macintosh computer
5-9
The Advanced window
The Advanced window contains three main areas:
■
B Channels
■
Enable Multilink PPP
■
Serial Port
In most cases, you’ll probably only need to modify the Data Rate
setting, which appears in the B Channels area.
Note: The changes you make in the Advanced window are not sent
to the ISDN modem until you click the Set Modem button. When the
settings on the Advanced and Easy Setup windows exactly match
the ISDN modem’s settings, the Set Modem button is disabled.
5-10
Netopia ISDN Modem User’s Guide
B Channels
The B Channels area lets you select options for your two ISDN
B channels.
Data Rate. Choose the B-channel data rate you want from the Data
Rate pop-up menu. The data rate options are 56 Kbps and 64 Kbps
(the two data rates ISDN supports). Not all telephone services
support the 64 Kbps data rate. Select the data rate used by your
telephone company.
Protocol. The Protocol pop-up menu lets you choose the transport
protocol you want. The protocol options are QuickSelect,
Async/Sync PPP Convert, and V.120. In most cases, you should use
the QuickSelect protocol. QuickSelect allows the Netopia ISDN
Modem to automatically detect the protocol in use on the ISDN line
and adapt to that protocol. Also, when QuickSelect is active, the
modem converts asynchronous Point-to-Point (PPP) information into
synchronous (HDLC-based) PPP information. If you select either the
Async/Sync PPP Convert or V.120 protocol, the Netopia ISDN
Modem will only use the selected protocol.
Enable Compression. (This option is only available for the Netopia
ISDN Modem Model 412.) Check the Enable Compression box to
turn on data compression. Data compression is a method of
reducing the size of data without losing any of the information.
Models 412 and 612 of the Netopia ISDN Modem automatically use
Stac data compression to compress data to improve data transfer
times. To take advantage of data compression, the device you are
dialing into must also support data compression. Note that the
Netopia ISDN Modem’s data compression will not be used if data
compression is in use in your communications application. For more
information about data compression, see the “Using data
compression” section on page 6-3.
V.120 Max Frame Size. The V.120 Max Frame Size pop-up menu
lets you specify the maximum number of bytes in a V.120 frame.
V.120 is an alternative transport protocol to PPP. The available
frame sizes range from 240 to 256 bytes. Leave this set at 256
unless your system administrator or Internet Service Provider (ISP)
instructs you to specify a different value.
Configuration using a Macintosh computer
5-11
V.120 Frame Type. The V.120 Frame Type pop-up menu lets you
choose either I or UI as the V.120 frame type. Leave this set at I
unless your system administrator or ISP instructs you to specify UI.
Enable Multilink PPP
The Enable Multilink PPP area lets you enable and disable the
modem’s Multilink PPP and dynamic bandwidth allocation features
and define certain parameters for Multilink PPP. For more
information, see the “Using Multilink PPP” section on page 6-4.
Enable Multilink PPP. Check the Enable Multilink PPP box to turn on
the Multilink PPP feature. When Multilink PPP is on, the Netopia
ISDN Modem can combine two B channels to allow up to 128 Kbps
of data to pass through the ISDN line. You must enable this option
in order to use the Dynamic Bandwidth Allocation feature.
Dynamic Bandwidth Allocation. Check the Dynamic Bandwidth
Allocation box to turn on the Dynamic Bandwidth Allocation feature.
When Dynamic Bandwidth Allocation is on, you can initiate a phone
conversation after you have established a dual B channel
connection. When you initiate the phone conversation, the modem
disconnects one of the B channels and uses it for the voice call. For
more information, see the “Using Dynamic Bandwidth Allocation”
section on page 6-7.
Second DN. (This option is only available for the Netopia ISDN
Modem Model 411.) If necessary, enter a secondary directory
number (DN) in the Second DN field. The Second DN number is the
second number of a destination you call. In most cases, you only
need to enter a second directory number if your telephone company
uses a switch other than an AT&T 5ESS switch or the destination
you are calling does not have its ISDN lines organized in a hunt
group. (A hunt group is a collection of phone lines that can be
accessed by the same phone number.)
5-12
Netopia ISDN Modem User’s Guide
EndPt ID Class. The Endpt (Endpoint) ID Class pop-up menu lets
you choose the method by which an Endpoint ID is assigned. An
Endpoint ID is a number that some hosts use to keep track of a
particular connection. The available Endpoint ID Classes are None,
Locally Assigned, Internet Protocol, IEEE 802.1 MAC, PPP Magic
Number, and Public Switched Net Directory. In most cases, you
should choose Public Switched Net Directory as the Endpoint ID
Class unless your system administrator or ISP tells you to specify
one of the other classes.
Endpoint ID. In most cases, you should leave this field empty and
leave the Endpoint ID Class set to its default value of 5 (Public
Switched Network Directory Number). With these default settings,
the ISDN modem will later automatically fill in the Endpoint Identifier
with telephone number 1 (DN1). If your endpoint identifier class is
not 5, obtain the identifier from your Internet Service Provider and
enter it in this field.
CHAP Blocking. Check the CHAP Blocking box to disable the CHAP
authentication feature. If this box is checked, the Netopia ISDN
Modem will use PAP for authentication. If you are using Multilink
PPP, you must check this box to block CHAP authentication.
Serial Port
The Serial Port area lets you specify options for flow control, carrier
detect (CD) control, and data terminal ready (DTR) control.
Flow Control. Use the Flow Control pop-up menu to choose the flow
control option set up in your communications program. Flow control
affects the flow of information between your workstation and the
Netopia ISDN Modem. The available flow control options are None,
XON/XOFF (software handshake), and RTS/CTS (Request to
Send/Clear to Send). RTS/CTS is a hardware handshake protocol.
In most cases, you should choose RTS/CTS unless your system
administrator or ISP tells you to specify one of the other options.
Configuration using a Macintosh computer
5-13
CD Control. Use the CD (Carrier Detect) Control pop-up menu to
control how the modem handles the carrier signal. The available
options are Always On, On After Connect, and Temp Off At
Disconnect.
Always On. Carrier detect remains on at all times.
On After Connect. Carrier detect follows the state of the carrier from
the remote system. Carrier detect turns on when a connection is
established and turns off when the connection is terminated. In
most cases, you should choose this option unless your system
administrator or ISP tells you to specify one of the other options.
Temp Off at Disconnect. Carrier detect temporarily turns off and
then turns back on when you disconnect from a remote system.
DTR Control. The DTR (Data Terminal Ready) Control options define
how the modem handles DTR signals from your workstation. The
options are Ignore DTR from Host, Enter Command State, and Hang
Up.
Ignore DTR from Host. The modem ignores DTR signals from your
workstation. In most cases, you should choose this option unless
your system administrator or ISP tells you to specify one of the other
options.
Enter Command State. The Netopia ISDN Modem automatically
enters the command state (the state in which it responds to AT
commands) when it detects an on-off DTR transition.
Hang Up. The modem hangs up (disconnects from the remote
system) and then automatically enters the command state when
DTR changes from on to off.
5-14
Netopia ISDN Modem User’s Guide
The Utilities window
You can use the Utilities window to do the following:
■
Test the ISDN switching connection to the telephone company
■
Restore the modem’s original factory settings
■
Update the modem with new firmware
Testing the ISDN switching connection
You can use the diagnostic mode to test your ISDN switching
connection to the telephone company. Typically, you will only need to
do this to troubleshoot communications problems.
For descriptions of the information reported on screen while in
diagnostic mode, see Appendix B, “ISDN Events.”
Configuration using a Macintosh computer
5-15
Note: When you enter diagnostic mode, you cannot perform other
tasks, such as quitting the program or activating other windows,
until you exit from diagnostic mode.
To use the diagnostic mode:
1.
Check the Set Diagnostic Mode box in the Utilities window.
2.
Type a phone number in the Dial No. field. (Make sure you type
the number associated with an ISDN line.)
3.
Click the Dial button. The diagnostic program traces the
progress of the call from the ISDN modem to the destination
and reports information about the call in the Results window.
4.
Click the Hang Up button to hang up the line.
5.
Uncheck the Set Diagnostic Mode box to exit from the diagnostic mode.
Restoring the factory settings
If you experience problems, you might want to restore the Netopia
ISDN Modem’s factory default settings. When you do this, most of
the Netopia ISDN Modem’s settings (including most of the settings
defined in the Advanced window) are returned to their original
factory defaults. The settings defined in the Easy Setup window (the
switch type and the B channel SPIDs and directory numbers) are not
reset to their factory defaults. In addition, the settings in S register
60 (B Channels Data Rate), 80 (Enable Multilink PPP), 82 (Multilink
PPP Endpoint ID Class), and 84 (CHAP control) are also not reset.
These settings are retained until you change them. For a summary
of factory default settings, see Appendix A, “Modem Operation.”
If you configured the ISDN modem with different settings, when you
click the Restore Factory Settings button, the ISDN Setup program
displays a dialog box that allows you to choose to save your current
modem settings. For information on saving settings, see the
“Saving modem settings” section on page 5-18.
Updating the ISDN modem’s Firmware
For information about updating the ISDN modem’s firmware, see the
“Downloading firmware to your ISDN modem” section on page 7-8.
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Netopia ISDN Modem User’s Guide
The Modem View window
The Modem View window displays detailed information about the
ISDN modem’s current configuration. You can also use this window
to display the S registers associated with each setting. For
information about S registers, see Appendix A, “Modem Operation.”
The information in this window is updated each time you click the
Modem View tab.
Note: The settings displayed in the Modem View window may differ
from the settings in the Easy Setup and Advanced windows if you
have changed any Easy Setup or Advanced settings but haven’t sent
them to the ISDN modem by clicking the Set Modem button.
Configuration using a Macintosh computer
5-17
The default view of the Modem View window displays the following
information:
■
Firmware version number
■
Switch type
■
B-channel directory numbers and SPIDs
■
Call routing and auto answer settings
■
B-channels setup
■
Multilink PPP settings
■
Serial port control settings
■
Miscellaneous connection options
■
Read-only registers’ contents
■
Product identification information
Displaying Modem Register information
Check the Show Modem Registers box to display the modem
registers associated with the modem settings. For example, if Show
Modem Registers is active, the register associated with the B1
channel directory number (S register 51) appears next to the B1 DN
value.
5-18
Netopia ISDN Modem User’s Guide
Saving and loading modem settings
You can save the current modem settings to a configuration file.
This allows you to save different configurations and then quickly
load the settings from the configuration file and configure the
modem in a particular way. The configuration file contains the
information that appears in the Modem View window, including the
modem register information.
Saving modem settings
To save a configuration file:
1.
Click the Set Modem button to update the ISDN modem with
any changes you’ve made in the Easy Setup and Advanced windows.
2.
Choose the Save command from the File menu. (The Save command is only active when the settings in the Easy Setup and
Advanced windows match the settings defined in the modem.)
The dialog box used to save documents appears.
3.
Use the dialog box to save the file with the name and location
you want. The name you assigned to the file appears in the window’s title bar.
4.
After you’ve saved the settings to a configuration file, use the
Save command to write the current modem settings to the current configuration file.
Saving a copy of a configuration file
To save a copy of a configuration file:
1.
Save the configuration file. (Refer to the previous section.)
2.
Choose the Save As command from the File menu. The dialog
box used to save files appears.
3.
Use the dialog box to save the file with the name and location
you want. If you want to save the copy in the same place as the
original document, type a unique name for the copy.
Configuration using a Macintosh computer
5-19
Note: You can read a saved configuration file using a text editor
such as SimpleText or Notepad. However, if you make any changes
to the file using a text editor, the ISDN Setup application will not be
able to open the modified file.
Loading modem settings
You can load settings you’ve saved in a configuration file and then
use the settings to configure the modem.
One way to load the settings is to double-click the icon of the
configuration file that contains the settings you want. The ISDN
Setup application starts up and opens the selected file.
To load modem settings while ISDN Setup is running:
1.
Choose the Open command from the File menu. The dialog box
used to open files appears.
2.
Use the dialog box to locate and open the modem configuration
file you want.
3.
After you’ve loaded the settings, if necessary, click the Easy
Setup tab in the ISDN Setup application to display the Easy
Setup window, then click the Set Modem button to send the
settings to the modem.
The name of the current configuration file appears in the window’s
title bar.
5-20
Netopia ISDN Modem User’s Guide
Quitting the ISDN Setup application
After you’ve configured your ISDN modem:
1.
Choose Quit from the File menu. If you’ve changed the configuration settings without updating the ISDN modem and/or saving
the settings to a modem settings document, an alert dialog box
appears.
Depending on whether or not you’ve updated the ISDN modem
or saved the settings, the dialog box will give you one or more
of the following options:
2.
■
Update the ISDN modem with the new settings
■
Save the new settings in the configuration file
■
Exit from the application and do one, both, or none of the
above actions
Click the appropriate buttons to specify what you want to do
before you exit from the program.
Placing calls with a Macintosh computer
After you configure your Netopia ISDN Modem using the Macintosh
configuration software, you can use your communications software
to establish an ISDN connection. You can use any standard
communications application that recognizes AT commands.
Examples of compatible communications applications include Apple
Remote Access (ARA), MicroPhone, or PPP client software, such as
InterPPP or FreePPP.
Note: Most areas require you to dial ISDN calls with 11 digits (for
example, 1-800-555-1212), even for local calls.
Note that you must use Multilink PPP to make calls using two ISDN
B channels. For information, see the “Using Multilink PPP” section
on page 6-4.
6-1
Chapter 6
Advanced Features
This chapter illustrates how to use the advanced features available
in your Netopia ISDN Modem.
This chapter covers the following topics:
■
Placing calls using AT commands
■
Using Multilink PPP
■
Using PPP authentication protocols
■
Using the analog device ports
■
Receiving data calls
■
Receiving analog calls
The Netopia ISDN Modem uses AT commands and S registers for
call management. See Appendix A, “Modem Operation,” for
instructions on use of the AT command set and a tabular summary
of the AT command lines.
6-2
Netopia ISDN Modem User’s Guide
Placing calls using AT commands
Your communications software can communicate with the Netopia
ISDN Modem using standard AT commands. To configure your
software, select a Hayes-compatible modem configuration, such as
“generic modem,” if no special setting is available for the Netopia
ISDN Modem. Refer to your communications software
documentation for more details.
When you place a call from a PC or Macintosh computer, the
Netopia ISDN Modem recognizes the AT command ATD to dial a
digital ISDN data call. Depending on the setting of S register 60,
56 Kbps (default) or 64 Kbps B channel transmission speeds are
used. Correct examples of outgoing circuit-switched ISDN modem
commands with dial strings are shown below.
■
Dialing with spaces: AT D 1 908 555 7891
■
Dialing without spaces: ATD19085557891
■
Making a Toll Saver (Switched 56) call: ATDD 19085551234
Note: All outgoing calls can be forced to be Toll Saver calls by
setting S register 61 to 1.
Enter ATS61=1
Note: Most areas require you to dial ISDN calls with 11 digits
(for example, 1-800-555-1212), even for local calls.
■
Making a Multilink PPP call using two numbers:
ATD19085557891 & 19085555555
You need to use Multilink PPP to make a call using two ISDN
B channels with the Netopia ISDN Modem. See the “Using Multilink
PPP” section later in this chapter for details.
Advanced Features
6-3
Using data compression
Compression is a method of reducing the size of data without losing
any of the information. Models 412 and 612 of the Netopia ISDN
Modem automatically use Stac data compression to compress data
to improve data transfer times.
The following check modes are negotiable: None, One Byte
Sequence Number, and Extended. The mode is automatically
negotiated when a PPP call is placed to another device that
supports the compression control protocol. Generally, Extended is
the preferred mode. The amount of compression depends on the
type of file being transferred. For example, a text file compresses
better than a binary (application or executable) file.
Compression is enabled by default. If you enable compression on
the ISDN modem and your application uses compression,
compression will be disabled in the ISDN modem.
You can use compression in dual B channel Multilink PPP
connections and single B channel connections. By using
compression on a single B channel, you can achieve performance
rivaling a two B channel connection at a fraction of the cost.
Because telephone and Internet providers often base charges on
the number of B channels used, the Netopia ISDN Modem’s
compression feature, which is not available in most other ISDN
terminal adapters, lets you achieve nearly the throughput of a two B
channel connection at the price of a single B channel connection.
Compression is negotiated between your ISDN modem and the
device to which you are placing the Multilink PPP call. To take
advantage of data compression, the device you are dialing into must
also support data compression. If the other device does not
support compression, compression will not be implemented.
6-4
Netopia ISDN Modem User’s Guide
Using Multilink PPP
The Netopia ISDN Modem supports Multilink PPP, which can link the
two ISDN B channels and allow a maximum digital connection of
128 Kbps. Multilink PPP is enabled by default.
If want to use Multilink PPP, make sure:
■
Multilink PPP is turned on in the Netopia ISDN Modem.
■
The serial port of your PC or Macintosh computer supports a
data transmission rate of at least 115.2 Kbps and you’ve set
the port speed in your communications software to the
maximum available data rate.
■
Both the telephone company service and the Internet Service
Provider (ISP) or LAN dial-in service support two B channel
connections.
■
Both you and the destination you are calling are using software
that supports PPP, such as Dial-Up Networking in Windows 95
or InterPPP and FreePPP in the Macintosh operating system.
The following registers control Multilink PPP and are set by your
configuration software:
■
S register 80 enables or disables Multilink PPP operation
■
S registers 82 and 83 control Multilink configuration
■
S register 70 controls Dynamic Bandwidth Allocation (DBA) in
Multilink mode
By default, the Netopia ISDN Modem dials the same number for
both Multilink PPP channels. If the destination requires a different
telephone number to establish a second Multilink PPP channel, then
you must include this second telephone number in the dial string.
The ampersand character (&) is used to dial two telephone
numbers: for example, ATD19085557891 & 19085555555
Note: If you are using a Macintosh computer and a Model 411
Netopia ISDN Modem, start up the ISDN Setup application and
enter the second telephone number (DN) in the Second DN field in
the Advanced window. (For more information, see the “Second DN”
section on page 5-11.)
Advanced Features
6-5
By default, the ISDN modem makes calls using the 2 B channels.
Note that there may be cost implications to the use of two B
channels. Check your usage rates with your service providers, such
as the telephone company, Internet Service Provider, or online
service provider.
Storing Multilink Endpoint Identifiers in
S registers
Some Multilink PPP implementations require the use of a Multilink
PPP option called the Multilink Endpoint Identifier. The Multilink
Endpoint Identifier is a number that the Netopia ISDN Modem uses
to distinguish its Multilink PPP calls to a remote router from other
Multilink PPP calls. The default Multilink Endpoint Identifier for the
ISDN modem is the first B Channel’s directory number (as entered
in S register 51). The Multilink Endpoint Identifier must be unique in
order to identify the ISDN modem’s PPP call. This Multilink Endpoint
Identifier also identifies the Multilink session and allows the remote
router to add or subtract B Channels to that Multilink PPP session
when the ISDN modem requests it.
You probably won’t need to change the default settings for the
S registers that control the Multilink Endpoint Identifier (S registers
82 and 83) unless otherwise specified by your systems
administrator or ISP. The defaults are S82=5 (Public Switched
Network Directory Number) and S83=(initially empty). (If you have
S82 set to the default value of 5, leave S83 empty. The ISDN
modem will later automatically fill in S83 with the directory number
entered in S register 51.) If you do change the Multilink Endpoint
Identifier, however, make sure the number you specify is a “unique”
number to the equipment you are dialing into so the equipment will
not confuse your Multilink PPP call with another call.
6-6
Netopia ISDN Modem User’s Guide
■
S register 82 stores the Multilink Endpoint Identifier Class
value. Valid class values are listed in Appendix A, “Modem
Operation.”
■
S register 83 stores the actual Multilink Endpoint Identifier.
Note: This option is not required in most cases, so these
registers typically do not have to be changed. Your system
administrator or Internet Service Provider will provide you with a
Multilink Endpoint Identifier if it is required.
Using PPP authentication protocols
The Point-to-Point protocol (PPP), when used with Dial-Up
Networking, FreePPP, and other software, allows for authentication
of users dialing into hosts or routers. While the connection between
a user and host is being established, the host may request
authentication before the link is established. In addition, the host
will request a certain type of authentication: typically Password
Authentication Protocol (PAP) or Challenge Handshake
Authentication Protocol (CHAP). PAP verifies the user’s plain text ID
and password. CHAP is a stronger authentication method. It uses
encryption and may repeatedly verify the user’s ID any time during
the connection.
In response to the host’s request, the client software indicates
whether or not it supports the same type of authentication. If it
does not support the same type of authentication, it may request an
alternative type of authentication. (For example, if the host requests
CHAP, but the client software only supports PAP, the client software
will request PAP.) After establishing a type of authentication, the
process of verifying the user begins.
Both PAP and CHAP are built into the Netopia ISDN Modem and are
configured by your PPP software. To enable CHAP using Windows 95
Dial-Up Networking, check the Require encrypted password box in
the Server Types dialog box.
Advanced Features
6-7
Note: You cannot use CHAP when you make Multilink PPP calls.
CHAP is disabled by default, so this should not be a problem.
However, if CHAP is enabled, before you make a Multilink PPP call,
you must disable CHAP by sending the command, ATS84=1, to the
ISDN modem using your communications application. If you are
using a Macintosh computer, use the ISDN Setup application to turn
off CHAP. For information, see the “CHAP Blocking” section on
page 5-12.
Using Dynamic Bandwidth Allocation
The ISDN modem supports Dynamic Bandwidth Allocation (DBA).
When Dynamic Bandwidth Allocation is enabled (by default), you can
place an analog (voice) call from a device that is attached to one of
the analog device ports while a Multilink PPP call is active. The ISDN
modem will automatically use one of the B channels for the analog
call. Once the analog call ends, the ISDN modem automatically
reestablishes that channel for Multilink PPP operation. Your voice
call will be billed at ISDN rates because the signal is carried over
your ISDN line.
Note: If you are on the receiving end of a Multilink PPP call and you
place a voice call, one of the B channels will be used for the voice
call. However, when the voice call is finished, the B channel used for
the voice call cannot be returned to the Multilink PPP call. The B
channel can only be returned to the call if you initiated the Multilink
PPP call.
6-8
Netopia ISDN Modem User’s Guide
Placing a Toll Saver call
The Toll Saver feature allows you to place a data call using a voice
channel, thereby saving the extra cost often associated with placing
a data call. By combining the Toll Saver feature with the Netopia
ISDN Modem’s built-in data compression, you can transfer up to
128 Kbps of data for the cost of a single voice call.
Note: To place a Toll Saver call, the device you are dialing into must
be capable of generating the 3.1 kHz tone necessary for disabling
the echo cancellers on the line. Also, check with your Internet
Service Provider to verify that this feature (also called “56
permissive calls”) is supported.
To manually dial a Toll Saver call, send the following AT command to
the Netopia ISDN Modem:
ATDD <telephone number>
for example: ATDD 14085551234
To configure the ISDN modem to send all outgoing calls as Toll
Saver calls, set S register 61 to 1.
About QuickSelect
The ISDN modem’s QuickSelect feature automatically converts
asynchronous Point-to-Point Protocol (PPP) into synchronous
(HDLC-based) PPP. This allows for connections to communication
servers and routers that have Basic Rate Interface (BRI) ISDN,
Primary Rate Interface (PRI) ISDN, or T1 access lines.
Using the Netopia ISDN Modem’s QuickSelect feature, you do not
have to manually select the proper protocol for each ISDN call. With
QuickSelect enabled, the ISDN modem automatically detects and
uses the required protocol. QuickSelect is enabled by default.
Advanced Features
6-9
Optimizing serial port performance
The serial port speed of most PC and Macintosh computers limits
the computer’s maximum data transmission rate. Typically, PCs and
Macintosh computers are limited to a maximum transmission speed
of 115.2 Kbps. However, advanced serial cards and drivers are
available to boost the serial port speed up to 230.4 Kbps.
PC serial ports
For sustained performance at data rates higher than 57.6 Kbps,
Farallon recommends that your PC’s serial COM port be equipped
with a 16550 universal asynchronous receiver/transmitter (UART).
To determine what type of UART is installed in your PC, type msd at
the DOS prompt to run the Microsoft Diagnostic Program.
You can use software utility tools to optimize the performance and
reliability of the serial port through the 16550 UART. Recommended
tools include WFXCOM.DRV, available on a number of BBS and ftp
sites, or TurboCom, available from Pacific CommWare, Inc., of
Ashland, Oregon (541-482-2744).
Macintosh serial ports
Macintosh models equipped with 680x0 processors are generally
limited to serial port speeds of 57.6 Kbps. Power Macintosh and AV
models equipped with Apple’s GeoPort technology can generally
support serial speeds of 115.2 Kbps or higher. For optimal
performance, Farallon recommends installing Apple’s Serial DMA
extension, version 2.02 or later, which requires Macintosh System
7.5 or later. If you are using System 7.5.3 or later, the correct
version of the serial driver is already installed in your system and
you do not need to add this extension. For more information about
serial connections, see the “Configuration using a Macintosh
computer” section on page 5-2.
6-10
Netopia ISDN Modem User’s Guide
About autobaud
Autobaud automatically detects your computer’s serial port current
data rate, up to 115.2 Kbps (autobaud does not support 230.4
Kbps transmissions).
To set the baud rate to the maximum speed of 230.4 Kbps, first
make sure your computer’s serial port and your communications
software support 230.4 Kbps transmission speed. Then send the
following command to the Netopia ISDN Modem: AT $B 230400.
Change the setting of your application program to 230400 bps. If
you are using a Macintosh computer, start up the ISDN Setup
application and set the baud rate to 230.4 Kbps. (For more
information, see the “Configuration using a Macintosh computer”
section on page 5-2.)
If you are using the Windows configuration program, autobaud must
be enabled to access the Netopia ISDN Modem configuration dialog
box. If the baud rate is set to a specific rate (such as 230.4 Kbps),
you will not be able to access the configuration dialog box.
Before you set the ISDN modem to a specific baud rate, make sure
the configuration dialog box parameters are set correctly. To return
to autobaud mode, set the baud rate of your communications
program to the baud rate you defined for the ISDN modem and then
send the following AT command: AT$B0. This sets the ISDN modem
to autobaud. If you are still unable to access the configuration
dialog box, press and hold down the “a” key on the keyboard and
press the RESET key on the back of the ISDN modem. Hold the “a”
key down until the ISDN modem comes back on line and then
release the key.
Advanced Features
6-11
Using the analog device ports
If you have analog touch-tone telephones, answering machines, fax
machines, external analog modems, or other analog telephone
devices, you can connect them to the two RJ-11 modular jacks on
the Netopia ISDN Modem. The two ports are located above the
telephone icon on the back panel of the ISDN modem.
The Netopia ISDN Modem does not support pulse-dialing (rotary)
telephones.
To place an analog call, simply take the telephone handset or
external fax machine off the hook, wait for a dial tone, and dial the
destination telephone number. Similarly, to use an analog modem,
connect the analog modem to one of the analog device ports and
use the modem the same way as if it were connected to a regular
phone line. See the next section for information about receiving
analog calls.
Note: The Netopia ISDN Modem is designed to operate with
telephones that are compatible with the original AT&T 2500
touch-tone telephone standard. You may operate up to three
compatible touch-tone devices per analog device port using modular
telephone cable of up to 200 feet in length. Although the ISDN
modem may function satisfactorily at longer cable distances with
more than two attached telephones, proper operation at longer
cable distances is not guaranteed in all situations.
Some telephone equipment, most notably speaker phones that
draw large amounts of power, may not work at all on the ISDN
modem’s analog device ports. These devices do not conform to the
power specification of the AT&T 2500 touch-tone telephone
standard, and their operation is not guaranteed.
6-12
Netopia ISDN Modem User’s Guide
Receiving analog calls
The Netopia ISDN Modem can receive incoming analog calls, such
as calls from an ordinary fax machine or pay phone. The ISDN
modem will direct the call to devices connected to the two analog
ports.
You can receive an analog call under the following scenarios:
■
If you are using one B channel for a digital data call (such as a
connection to your Internet Service Provider), you can receive
an analog telephone call on the other B channel.
■
If you are using one B channel for a digital data call, and
someone calls the number associated with the B channel you
are using, the incoming analog call will receive a busy signal
unless your local switch is an AT&T 5ESS switch. An AT&T 5ESS
switch will let the incoming analog call roll over to the available
B channel.
You cannot receive an analog call:
■
When you are using both of the B channels for two analog calls,
an analog call and a digital data call, or for a Multilink PPP
digital data call.
Note: An option called Flexible Call Offering (FCO) or Additional
Call offering (ACO), which is included in the ISDN service from
some telephone companies, allows you to receive an incoming
call while a dual-channel Multilink PPP call is in progress.
Advanced Features
6-13
Call routing to the analog device ports
Because ISDN supports two independent B channels, you can use
each channel separately. You can use the Netopia configuration
software to route calls on telephone numbers 1 and 2 to specific
analog device ports. By default, incoming calls to ISDN telephone
numbers 1 and 2 ring both analog device ports simultaneously.
Using the Netopia configuration software, check the box beside the
phone port(s) to which you want to route calls from telephone
number 1 and telephone number 2. In the configuration software,
the analog device ports are called Phone Port 1 and Phone Port 2.
Example
You might want to use call routing to exclusively assign a telephone
number to a device. For example, suppose you have an analog
telephone attached to Phone Port 1 and a fax machine attached to
Phone Port 2. To route incoming calls from telephone number 1 to
the telephone and calls from telephone number 2 to the fax
machine, you would do the following in the Netopia configuration
software. In the Number 1 area, check the Phone Port 1 check box
and uncheck the Phone Port 2 check box (this routes incoming calls
on telephone number 1 to Phone Port 1). In the Phone Number 2
area, uncheck the Phone Port 1 check box and check the Phone
Port 2 check box (this routes incoming calls on telephone number 2
to Phone Port 2).
ISDN
Wall Jack
Phone Numbers 1 & 2
Netopia
ISDN
Modem
9 VDC
.6A MAX
RESET
1
2
RS-232
ISDN U
Phone #1
Port 1
Port 2
FAX
Phone #2
Port 1
Analog devices connected to analog phone ports
Port 2
6-14
Netopia ISDN Modem User’s Guide
If both ports are selected for a telephone number, incoming calls
ring devices attached to both ports simultaneously.
If you have only one phone number for your ISDN line and two
analog devices connected to the analog device ports, check the
Phone Port 1 and Phone Port 2 boxes in the Number 1 area. Calls
to telephone number 1 will ring both devices, allowing you to answer
the call on either device. Note, however, because you have only one
telephone number, you cannot place or receive more than one call
at a time.
For information on configuring call routing on a PC, see “Step 10:
Configuring call routing” on page 4-7. For information on configuring
call routing on a Macintosh computer, see “The Easy Setup window”
on page 5-6.
The table below shows how the call routing settings you specify in
the Netopia configuration software determine how incoming calls on
phone number 1 and phone number 2 are routed to the two analog
device ports (Port 1 and Port 2). (If the box beside the port is
checked, calls are routed to that port.)
Advanced Features
Phone Number and
Port Selections
Phone #1
Phone #2
Port 1
Port 1
Phone #1
Phone #2
Port 1
Port 1
Phone #1
Phone #2
Port 1
Port 1
Phone #1
Phone #2
Port 1
Port 1
Phone #1
Phone #2
Port 1
Port 1
Phone #1
Phone #2
Port 1
Port 1
Phone #1
Phone #2
Port 1
Port 1
Phone #1
Phone #2
Port 1
Port 1
Phone #1
Phone #2
Port 1
Port 1
Phone #1
Phone #2
Port 1
Port 1
Phone #1
Phone #2
Port 1
Port 1
Phone #1
Phone #2
Port 1
Port 1
Phone #1
Phone #2
Port 1
Port 1
Phone #1
Phone #2
Port 1
Port 1
Phone #1
Phone #2
Port 1
Port 1
Phone #1
Phone #2
Port 1
Port 1
6-15
Analog Port Receiving Call
Phone #1
Port 2 Calls routed to Phone Port
Port 2 (default)
Port 2 Calls routed to Phone Port
Port 2
Port 2 Calls routed to Phone Port
Port 2
Port 2 Calls routed to Phone Port
Port 2
Port 2 Calls routed to Phone Port
Port 2
Port 2 Calls routed to Phone Port
Port 2
Port 2 Incoming calls blocked
Port 2
Port 2 Calls routed to Phone Port
Port 2
Port 2 Calls routed to Phone Port
Port 2
Port 2 Incoming calls blocked
Port 2
Port 2 Calls routed to Phone Port
Port 2
Port 2 Calls routed to Phone Port
Port 2
Port 2 Incoming calls blocked
Port 2
Port 2 Calls routed to Phone Port
Port 2
Port 2 Calls routed to Phone Port
Port 2
Port 2 Incoming calls blocked
Port 2
Phone #2
1 or 2
Calls routed to Phone Port 1 or 2
(default)
1 only
Calls routed to Phone Port 2 only
2 only
Calls routed to Phone Port 1 only
1 only
Incoming calls blocked
2 only
Incoming calls blocked
1 or 2
Incoming calls blocked
Calls routed to Phone Port 1 only
1 only
Calls routed to Phone Port 1 only
1 or 2
Incoming calls blocked
Calls routed to Phone Port 2 only
2 only
Calls routed to Phone Port 2 only
1 or 2
Calls routed to Phone Port 2 only
Calls routed to Phone Port 1 or 2
1 only
Calls routed to Phone Port 1 or 2
2 only
Calls routed to Phone Port 1 or 2
Incoming calls blocked
6-16
Netopia ISDN Modem User’s Guide
Receiving data calls
The Netopia ISDN Modem can receive incoming circuit-switched
data calls from other Netopia ISDN Modems or from ISDN devices
and Switched 56 equipment.
■
If you are using one B channel, and you receive a data call on
the number associated with the other B channel, the incoming
data call will ring through.
■
If you are using one B channel, and you receive a data call on
the number associated with the B channel you are using, the
incoming data call will receive a busy signal unless your local
switch is an AT&T 5ESS switch. An AT&T 5ESS switch will let
the incoming data call roll over to the available B channel.
■
If both B channels are in use, you cannot receive a data call.
7-1
Chapter 7
Troubleshooting
This chapter explains how to isolate and solve problems
encountered with the Netopia ISDN Modem. Problems may stem
from incorrect option settings or improper installation.
Topics covered in this chapter include:
■
Information about the Netopia ISDN Modem LEDs
■
Tips on troubleshooting problems
■
Instructions on how to download new firmware to your Netopia
ISDN Modem
Note: There are no user-serviceable parts inside your Netopia ISDN
Modem. Unauthorized opening of the unit will void the warranty.
7-2
Netopia ISDN Modem User’s Guide
Netopia ISDN Modem LEDs
The Netopia ISDN Modem’s five LEDs are described in the table
below.
LED
Color
Power
Green
Description
Power Indicator. Lit when power is on and remains lit as long as power is
available from the AC wall transformer plugged into the electrical outlet.
Self-Test/Status. Flashes when the ISDN modem is executing its power-up
self-test or a user-initiated reset.
Test
Green
■
If the results of the self-test or reset are normal, the LED goes off.
■
If the result of the self-test is abnormal and a fault is detected, the LED
remains lit but does not flash.
D Channel/Status. Provides information about the physical ISDN interface
and D channel status.
D
■
If the physical ISDN interface establishes synchronization and the ISDN
D channel signaling procedures are not properly established, the LED
flashes. Once the physical ISDN interface and D channel signaling are
synchronized, the LED goes off.
■
If the physical ISDN interface is not synchronized or is disconnected,
this LED remains lit.
■
If the physical interface establishes synchronization and the ISDN
D channel signaling procedures are not properly established, the LED
flashes.
Green
B-1 Channel Indicator. The activity state of the B-1 channel. Green indicates
a data call. Yellow indicates an analog (voice) call.
B1
Yellow
or
green
■
If a call is in a dialing state, the LED flashes.
■
When a call is active, the LED stays lit. (The color of the LED (green or
yellow) indicates if the call is a data call or an analog call.)
■
When the call is disconnected, the LED goes off.
Troubleshooting
LED
Color
7-3
Description
B-2 Channel Indicator. The activity state of the B-2 channel. Green indicates
a data call. Yellow indicates an analog (voice) call.
B2
Yellow
or
green
■
If a call is in a dialing state, the LED flashes.
■
When a call is active, the LED stays lit. (The color of the LED (green or
yellow) indicates if the call is a data call or an analog call.)
■
When the call is disconnected, the LED goes off.
Send
Green
Send Data. Indicates that information is being transmitted over the serial
data port from the computer to the ISDN modem.
Receive
Green
Receive Data. Indicates that information is being transmitted over the serial
data port to the computer from the ISDN modem.
Ready
Green
Data Terminal Ready. Indicates that communication between the ISDN
modem and the computer has been established.
7-4
Netopia ISDN Modem User’s Guide
Troubleshooting tips
Before you call Farallon’s technical support for assistance, check
the following:
1.
The power supply is connected and the Power LED is on.
2.
Press the Reset button on the Netopia ISDN Modem and
observe the Test LED.
During the power-up self-test, the Test LED flashes.
3.
■
If the Test LED goes off after the test has been completed,
the test has been successful.
■
If the Test LED flashes and remains lit for more than a few
minutes, there is an internal failure. Notify Farallon that the
Netopia ISDN Modem has failed the self-test, and order a
replacement. (See the “Farallon Technical Support”
chapter for information on contacting Farallon.)
Verify that the ISDN cable is connected to the ISDN modem,
and make sure it is connected to the ISDN wall jack.
The Netopia ISDN Modem will not operate if connected to an
analog telephone wall jack. Make sure that the ISDN modem is
connected directly to the ISDN wall outlet without connection to
any intermediate telephone equipment (an NT1 device is not
required with this ISDN modem).
4.
Make sure that the cables provided by Farallon or a Farallon
authorized reseller are in good condition and show no evidence
of wear or other physical damage.
If damage is apparent after close inspection, contact Farallon
or your reseller for replacement cables.
5.
Monitor the status of the D channel LED.
■
If you are connected to a live ISDN line, the D channel LED
remains lit for up to a few minutes after the power-up
self-test, then begins to flash.
When the D channel LED flashes, it indicates that the ISDN
signal is present.
Troubleshooting
7-5
When the D channel LED goes out, it indicates that a valid
communication channel has been established and you can
make calls.
■
If the D channel LED remains lit for more than a few
minutes, it is likely that there is a poor physical connection
to the local telephone company.
This fault can be caused by a cable connected to one of
the analog device ports instead of the ISDN jack, a damaged cable, a broken wire, a damaged connector, a nonstandard U interface (proprietary AMI line coding), or a
problem within the telephone company network. If the telephone wires at your site appear to be satisfactory, call your
local telephone company for repair of telephone company
equipment and troubleshooting assistance.
■
If the D channel LED flashes for more than a few minutes
without going out, there is probably a mismatch between
the settings of the ISDN line and the Netopia ISDN Modem
configuration.
Check the switch type, Service Profile Identifier (SPID)
entry, and the phone number in the ISDN modem software
configuration utility.
If your switch type, SPID, and phone number are entered
properly and the D channel LED continues to flash without
going out, call your telephone company, verify that you
have been given the correct SPID and phone number, and
ask whether the ISDN line is Point-to-Point. If the ISDN line
is Point-to-Point, be sure to NOT include the SPID in the
configuration.
Also verify that the telephone company has configured the
ISDN line properly for the Netopia ISDN Modem. (For information, see the “General ISDN line configuration” section
on page 2-14.) If the D channel LED does not go out after
these verifications, call Farallon technical support for line
configuration and troubleshooting assistance.
7-6
Netopia ISDN Modem User’s Guide
■
If the D channel LED goes out, the ISDN modem is ready to
place and receive calls.
If you have a standard analog telephone attached to one of
the ISDN modem’s analog device ports, you can place a
voice call in the normal fashion. You should have the ability
to obtain a dial tone, enter digits, and connect to your destination. While the voice call is being placed, either the B-1
or B-2 LED flashes yellow. Once the voice call is connected
and the other party picks up the phone, the B-1 or B-2 LED
that was flashing now remains lit until the call is disconnected.
If you do not hear a dial tone or cannot establish a call on
either telephone port, there is most likely a problem with
the configuration of your ISDN line or one of your two
B channels. Call the telephone company and have it verify
that you have been given the correct SPID and telephone
number and that your line is configured for circuit-switched
voice and data service.
6.
Monitor the B-1 and B-2 LEDs.
Data calls typically involve more interactions than voice calls.
Your computer, applications software, or the remote destination
can prevent establishment of a data connection. If you are able
to establish a two B channel data connection, your Netopia
ISDN Modem is most likely functioning correctly.
■
If you are unable to establish a data connection, carefully
monitor the B-1 and B-2 LEDs while attempting a data
connection. While establishing the data connection, the
B-1 and B-2 LEDs flash green. They then remain green
once the data connection is established.
■
If neither of the B-1 or B-2 LEDs flashes green, check to
make sure that your computer is turned on and
operational, that your Netopia ISDN Modem cable is
properly connected and not damaged, and that your
application software has sent an AT dial command in the
proper format.
Troubleshooting
7-7
Depending upon the location of the destination you are
dialing, there may be an incompatible local or toll telephone company. Though this is uncommon, if you suspect
a telephone company problem when dialing local or toll
data connections, contact your local telephone company
and have it verify that you can dial a data call to the destination telephone number.
7.
8.
If you are able to establish a data connection, in which the B-1
or B-2 green LED remains lit and you receive a CONNECT message at your application software, but you are unable to send
data, then it is possible that:
■
There is a difference in the local and remote B channel
data rates.
■
There is a mismatch in the data communications protocols
(such as the IP address and configuration).
■
There is an interoperability mismatch between the local
and remote applications.
■
Make sure that the local and remote data applications
have communication capability and are properly configured.
Once you have verified that communication capability
exists, make sure that the B channel call data rate is the
same as the remote destination B channel call data rate.
The default B channel call data rate used by the ISDN
modem is 56 Kbps. Under some circumstances, you may
need to increase the B channel call data rate to 64 Kbps at
both ends of the connection.
Use the diagnostics function available in the Windows and Macintosh versions of the configuration software to test your ISDN
connection. For PCs, see the “Testing the ISDN switching connection” section on page 4-19. For Macintosh computers, see
the “Testing the ISDN switching connection” section on
page 5-14.
7-8
Netopia ISDN Modem User’s Guide
If you have gone through the troubleshooting tips and still are
unable to resolve the problem, contact Farallon technical
support. (See the “Farallon Technical Support” chapter for
information on contacting Farallon.) Make sure you have your
Netopia access card when you call.
Downloading firmware to your ISDN modem
Your ISDN modem is user-upgradeable. As recommended by
Farallon technical support, you may need to download the latest
firmware to your ISDN modem. You can use the following procedure
to download the updated firmware to your ISDN modem.
From a PC
Use the Netopia Windows configuration software to update the
firmware under Windows, Windows 95, or Windows NT. Use the DOS
configuration program to update the firmware under DOS. The first
two steps are the same for Windows and DOS.
1.
Download the latest firmware file from the Farallon FTP site
(ftp.farallon.com) or obtain an upgrade diskette from Farallon.
2.
Copy the firmware file to the directory on your computer that
holds the Netopia configuration program.
Using Windows, Windows 95, or Windows NT
3.
Start up the Netopia Windows configuration program. The
Netopia ISDN Modem window appears.
4.
Click the Tools button. The toolbar appears.
5.
Click the Firmware button. The Firmware dialog box appears.
6.
Select the firmware file that you copied to your computer and
click OK to start the download to the Netopia ISDN Modem.
Troubleshooting
Caution!
7-9
If the firmware download is interrupted or does not seem to
complete properly, do not reset or disconnect the ISDN modem, as
this may damage the memory chip inside the ISDN modem. If the
serial cable is disconnected or your computer crashes, reconnect
the cable or restart the computer and try to download the firmware
again.
Using DOS
When you download the firmware from DOS, make sure you perform
the download directly from DOS, not from a DOS shell prompt inside
Windows.
3.
Change to the directory that contains the Netopia software you
copied from the Netopia ISDN Modem Configuration Software
for DOS and Windows disk. For information about copying the
Netopia software, see the “Configuration using DOS” section
on page 4-23.
4.
At the system prompt, type:
install
and press Enter.
5.
Use the Up Arrow and Down Arrow keys to choose the Firmware
Upgrade command from the Main Menu. Press Enter.
The program displays the Farallon Netopia Binary files in the
current directory.
6.
If necessary, use the Up Arrow and Down Arrow keys to select
the binary file that contains the latest firmware. Press Enter. A
message box appears.
7.
Press the F10 function key to continue the upgrade.
The download takes several minutes. When the download is
complete, select Exit.
7-10
Netopia ISDN Modem User’s Guide
Caution!
If the firmware download is interrupted or does not seem to
complete properly, do not reset or disconnect the ISDN modem, as
this may damage the memory chip inside the ISDN modem. If the
serial cable is disconnected or your computer crashes, reconnect
the cable or restart the computer and try to download the firmware
again.
From a Macintosh computer
To download firmware from your Macintosh computer to your ISDN
modem:
Caution!
1.
Obtain the latest firmware file from the Farallon FTP site,
(ftp.farallon.com), or obtain an upgrade diskette from Farallon.
2.
Copy the firmware file to the folder on your computer that contains the Netopia ISDN Setup application. (Do not rename this
file.)
3.
Start up the ISDN Setup application.
4.
Click the Utilities tab to display the Utilities window.
5.
Click the Update Firmware button.
6.
Select the firmware file that you copied to your computer.
7.
Click the Open button. A message box appears and allows you
to confirm the download.
8.
Click the Update Firmware button. A status dialog box appears
and shows the progress of the update. The download will take
several minutes.
If the firmware download is interrupted or does not seem to
complete properly, do not reset or disconnect the ISDN modem, as
this may damage the memory chip inside the ISDN modem. If the
serial cable is disconnected or your computer crashes, reconnect
the cable or restart the computer and try to download the firmware
again.
A-1
Appendix A
Modem Operation
Your communications software will handle most, if not all, of the
Netopia ISDN Modem operations; however, there may be
circumstances where you will want to access the ISDN modem
directly. This appendix covers modem basics and operating the
Netopia ISDN modem manually from the keyboard. At the end of this
chapter is a summary of AT commands, S registers, and result
codes.
A-2
Netopia ISDN Modem User’s Guide
Modem basics
A modem provides computer-to-computer communications over
telephone lines. It acts like a telephone by dialing and answering
calls. Your Netopia ISDN Modem uses digital technology to connect
to the public telephone network. Yet, like analog modems, you use
standard AT commands to communicate with the ISDN modem.
Operating modes
Command mode allows the Netopia ISDN Modem to accept
operating commands and configuration settings from the keyboard.
The ISDN modem enters command mode when:
■
Power is applied (hardware reset)
■
No carrier is detected
■
The ISDN modem's carrier is lost
■
The escape sequence (+++) is issued
In online mode, the Netopia ISDN Modem is “on-line” and sends any
data it receives from your computer out to the remote ISDN device.
The ISDN modem attempts to go into online mode when:
■
The AT dial command ATD is issued for originating a call
■
The AT answer command ATA is issued for answering a call
The escape sequence (+++) allows you to switch from online mode
to command mode without breaking an established connection with
a remote ISDN device. The ATO command returns the ISDN modem
to online mode.
Modem Operation
A-3
The AT command set
All instructions to a modem are sent using AT commands—
commands that begin with the letters AT. The AT tells the modem,
“Attention! A command is coming.” In the AT command set, the AT
is followed by one or more commands and ends when you press the
Return key. Pressing the Return key tells the modem that the
command string is complete and should be executed. AT commands
are normally issued by your communications software, but you can
also send them directly from your keyboard. Refer to your
communications software manual for information on how to issue
the AT commands in command mode.
Using AT commands
Follow these steps to use AT commands:
1.
Launch your communications software. Be sure your communications software is in terminal mode.
2.
Be sure the ISDN modem is in command mode so that it interprets your commands.
When your computer is powered on, the ISDN modem
automatically starts in command mode. If you have recently
used the ISDN modem to make a call and have not yet
disconnected, type +++ to switch to command mode.
3.
Type
AT <commands>
Then press the Return key.
After completing its tasks, the Netopia ISDN Modem sends a
message, called a result code, to the screen.
Result codes
After a command is sent and executed, the Netopia ISDN Modem
sends a “result code” back to the computer. The result code tells
the computer if the command was successfully executed and may
include other information. For example, OK or ERROR may appear
A-4
Netopia ISDN Modem User’s Guide
on the screen after command execution. You may select the form of
result codes sent by the ISDN modem (ATV0 or ATV1), or you may
issue the ATQ1 command and disable the result codes. If the ISDN
modem’s result code settings are turned off, you will not see the
result codes on your computer screen.
Command parameters
Many of the AT commands require you to specify a value along with
the AT command in order to clarify the command function. For
example, ATV is the command for selecting the result code format.
When issuing a command with a parameter, type the value after the
AT command, for example ATV0 (this command enables short form
result codes).
S registers
The S registers control how the modem responds to your phone line
and computer. Generally, it is not necessary to alter register values
when you are using communications software. The software
controls the registers as you issue commands. However, direct
access to the S registers allows you to customize and control your
modem for every application.
Modem Operation
A-5
Using the modem
To ensure that your ISDN modem is operating correctly, run your
communications software and make sure the ISDN modem is in
command mode. The modem does not need to be connected to a
phone line for these tests.
■
Type AT and press the Return key. If you get the OK response,
you are in command mode and talking to your modem.
■
Type AT\S and press the Return key. This command shows the
modem's active profile of command settings.
Resetting the modem
You can do a “soft reset” of the modem by typing in ATZ and
pressing the Return key. This recalls the stored parameters and
resets all modem registers. A “modem register” is a variable setting
which is entered into the modem's memory and defines a specific
modem setting. A “hard reset” is done by disconnecting the ISDN
modem, waiting a few seconds, and connecting it again.
Placing a call
To place a call, use the dial command (ATD). This command is
followed by a “dial string” which includes the telephone number. The
dial string can hold a maximum of 40 characters (not including the
two AT characters and spaces). Valid dial string characters are 0–9
and dial modifiers. The modem ignores invalid characters. A dial
string may also include modem commands, which must be added
after the AT and before the D command.
A-6
Netopia ISDN Modem User’s Guide
Here's a dial string example:
AT V1 D 14085551212 <Enter>
AT
Attention
V1
Turn on long form reporting so the result
codes will show words instead of numbers
D
Dial an ISDN digital connection to the
telephone number that follows
14085551212
Telephone number
<Enter>
Pressing the Enter or Return key sends the
command to the Netopia ISDN Modem
Answering a call
Your ISDN modem can answer a call automatically, or you can
manually instruct the modem to answer the line when it rings.
Manual answering. When an incoming call is detected, the RING
result code will appear on the computer screen. By typing ATA and
pressing the Return key, you instruct the modem to answer an
incoming call manually. Your modem then attempts to connect to
the remote modem. If the two modems are compatible, your modem
receives a carrier signal from the remote modem, and a CONNECT
response appears on the screen.
Automatic answering. You may use the modem to answer
incoming calls automatically. Enable auto-answer by setting S
register O to 1 (ATS0=1). Your ISDN modem can answer incoming
calls unattended if you have the proper communications software,
such as bulletin board software or an electronic mail system.
Disabling auto-answer. You can disable auto-answer by setting the
value of S register O to the default 0 (ATS0=0). When the modem
first receives power, is reset, or the factory settings are recalled,
the S registers return to the stored settings. When SO=0, your
modem sends the RING result code to your computer screen when
an incoming call is detected, but it does not answer the call
automatically.
Modem Operation
A-7
Hanging up
To disconnect the modem from the phone line, type +++ to enter
command mode, then type ATH and press the Return key.
Clearing the command buffer
The command buffer acts as memory, storing up to 40 command
characters in a single command line. If you get an ERROR response,
try typing AT to clear the buffer. The ISDN modem should return the
OK response indicating that it is ready for new commands.
A-8
Netopia ISDN Modem User’s Guide
Modem command summaries
This section contains lists of the AT modem commands, S registers,
and result codes for the Netopia ISDN modem.
Many of the AT commands require you to specify a value along with
the AT command in order to clarify the command function. When
issuing a command with a parameter, type the value after the AT
command. For example, ATV is the command for selecting the result
code format. To enable short form result codes, type the following
command in your communications program, ATV0.
AT commands
The following table summarizes the AT command set for the Netopia
ISDN Modem.
Command
Description
AT
Gets the attention of your Netopia ISDN Modem.
All commands begin with AT.
A
Answers an incoming call.
$B
Sets the baud rate,
0 — autobaud (default).
Other settings are 1200, 2400, 4800,
9600, 19200, 38400, 57600, and 115200.
Note: Autobaud does not exceed 115200.
To use 230400 baud, you must send the
command AT $B230400 to the modem.
Modem Operation
Command
A-9
Description
%C
Compression. When enabled, compresses data to
improve data transfer times using the Stac
compression method. The following check modes
are available–None, One Byte Sequence Number,
Extended. Extended is the preferred method.
%C0 disables compression.
%C2 enables compression.
&C
Serial port CD control
&C0 forces CD to remain on at all times.
&C1 forces CD to follow the state of carrier from
the remote system. CD turns on after
CONNECT message is sent to host (default).
&C2 forces CD to remain on except temporarily
after disconnect.
D
Dials an outgoing 56/64 Kbps circuit-switched
digital connection.
DD
Dials an outgoing Toll Saver (56 Kbps permissive)
connection.
&D
DTR control
&D0 causes ISDN modem to ignore DTR from
host.
&D1 causes ISDN modem to enter command
state on detecting on-off transition of DTR.
&D2 causes ISDN modem to hang up current
calls upon on-off transition of DTR and
prepares serial port to accept AT command
at any speed (default).
E
AT command echo
E0
disables the echo of AT commands back to
the host computer.
E1
enables the echo of AT commands to the
host computer (default).
A-10
Netopia ISDN Modem User’s Guide
Command
Description
&F
Restores all factory default settings.
H
Hangs up the current connection.
I
Identification
I0
displays the product and options ID.
I1
displays the flash memory checksum.
I3
displays the modem model, interface type,
firmware revision number, firmware release
date, and boot version number.
O
Enter connect state. Causes the ISDN modem to
go out of command mode into online mode.
Q
Result code control
Q0 enables the output of result codes (default).
Q1 disables the output of result codes.
Q2 disables the output of result codes in
answer mode only.
\Q
Serial port flow control
\Q0 disables flow control.
\Q1 enables bidirectional XON/XOFF software
flow control.
\Q3 enables bidirectional RTS/CTS hardware
flow control (default).
%R
Provides an output list of all S registers.
%S
Displays internal manufacturing control number.
Sn?
Reads a specific S register setting.
Sn=
Writes to a specific S register.
\S
Reads the status of any parameters that have
been modified through AT commands.
Modem Operation
Command
A-11
Description
\T
Link inactivity timer
\T0 disables inactivity timer (default).
\Tn link inactivity timer in minutes. The ISDN
modem automatically disconnects the call if
no activity is sensed within n (n = 1–255)
minutes.
V
Result code format
V0
enables short form result codes.
V1
enables long form result codes (default).
&W
Stores the configuration of all S registers that are
not part of the ISDN modem’s initial configuration
set.
Z
Reset. Disconnects all calls in progress and
performs a complete ISDN modem system reset.
+++
Causes ISDN modem to enter the command state
if it is currently in the online state.
%V
Displays Netopia ISDN Modem firmware version.
S registers
The Netopia ISDN Modem supports the S registers listed in the
following table. All S registers except S register 0 are the Netopia
ISDN Modem’s extended registers.
An asterisk next to an S register indicates the S register value is
stored in non-volatile memory and is not cleared or returned to the
default value if the Netopia ISDN Modem is powered down.
To define an S register value, use the following format: ATS?=XX, ?
represents the S register and XX is the desired S register setting.
A-12
Netopia ISDN Modem User’s Guide
For example, to enable Auto Answer, enter the following using your
communications application: ATS0=1.
Register
0
Description
Auto Answer
0 — Disabled (default)
1 — Enabled
50*
ISDN Switch Signaling Type
0 — Unknown
1 — AT&T 5ESS Custom
3 — NI-1/AT&T 5ESS
6 — NI-1/NTI DMS 100 or Siemens EWSD
51*
Phone #1
52*
Phone #1 Service Profile ID (SPID)
53*
Phone #2 (if required by your carrier)
54*
Phone #2 Service Profile ID (SPID)
(if required by your carrier)
55
Terminal Endpoint Identifier 1 (TEIs)
Stores the first TEI assigned by the switch if a second
directory number is required by your carrier. A value of
255 indicates no TEI has been assigned. This field is
read-only.
56
Terminal Endpoint Identifier 2 (TEI)
Stores the second TEI assigned by the switch. A value
of 255 indicates no TEI has been assigned. This field
is read-only.
Modem Operation
Register
A-13
Description
57
Terminal Initialization State for SPID 1
Indicates the status of the first TEI using SPID 1. This
field is read-only.
0 — Netopia ISDN Modem has not attempted
initialization
1 — Netopia ISDN Modem has initialized
successfully using SPID 1
2 — Netopia ISDN Modem has failed initialization
using SPID 1
58
Terminal Initialization State for SPID 2
Indicates the status of the second TEI using SPID 2.
This information is provided only if your carrier
requires a second directory number. This field is
read-only.
0 — Netopia ISDN Modem has not attempted
initialization
1 — Netopia ISDN Modem has initialized successfully
using SPID 2
2 — Netopia ISDN Modem has failed initialization
using SPID 2
59
U Interface Status
This field is read-only.
0 — U interface is not synchronized with the switch
1 — U interface is synchronized and ready
60*
61
B Channel Data Rate
56 — 56 Kbps (default)
64 — 64 Kbps
Outgoing Call Type
0 — Follow dial modifiers (default)
1 — Switched 56 (Toll Saver)
2 — ISDN
A-14
Netopia ISDN Modem User’s Guide
Register
63*
Description
Incoming Voice Call Routing
Default: 15
Bit
0
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
Phone #1
Calls blocked
Calls routed to
Phone Port 1 only
Calls routed to
Phone Port 2 only
Calls routed to
Phone Port 1 or 2
Calls blocked
Calls routed to
Phone Port 1 only
Calls routed to
Phone Port 2 only
Calls routed to
Phone Port 1 or 2
Calls blocked
Calls routed to
Phone Port 1 only
Calls routed to
Phone Port 2 only
Calls routed to
Phone Port 1 or 2
Calls blocked
Calls routed to
Phone Port 1 only
Calls routed to
Phone Port 2 only
Calls routed to
Phone Port 1 or 2
(default)
Phone #2
Calls blocked
Calls blocked
Calls blocked
Calls blocked
Calls routed to
Phone Port 1 only
Calls routed to
Phone Port 1 only
Calls routed to
Phone Port 1 only
Calls blocked
Calls routed to
Phone Port 2 only
Calls routed to
Phone Port 2 only
Calls routed to
Phone Port 2 only
Calls routed to
Phone Port 2 only
Calls routed to
Phone Port 1 or 2
Calls routed to
Phone Port 1 or 2
Calls routed to
Phone Port 1 or 2
Calls routed to
Phone Port 1 or 2
(default)
Modem Operation
Register
A-15
Description
65
ISDN Caller ID for Voice Calls on Phone Port 1
Displays the phone number of an incoming voice call
on Phone Port 1. This field is read-only.
66
ISDN Caller ID for Voice Calls on Phone Port 2
Displays the phone number of an incoming voice call
on Phone Port 2. This field is read-only.
67
ISDN Caller ID for Data Calls
Displays the phone number of an incoming data call.
This field is read-only.
70
Dynamic Bandwidth Allocation
0 — DBA disabled
1 — DBA enabled (default)
71
B Channel Protocol
0 — QuickSelect (default)
1 — Async-Sync PPP conversion
2 — V.120
73
V.120 Frame Type
0 — I frame (default)
1 — UI frame
74
V.120 Maximum Frame Size (range 240–256)
256 — Maximum frame size of 256 is used (default)
248 — Maximum frame size of 248 is used
(for AdTran compatibility, use 253)
75
Delay in answering incoming calls
0 — no delay (default)
1 — two second delay (use for Windows NT)
80*
Multilink PPP
0 — Disable
1 — Enable (default)
A-16
Netopia ISDN Modem User’s Guide
Register
Description
82*
Multilink PPP Endpoint Identifier Class
If required, this information is provided by your
Internet Service Provider.
1 — Locally Assigned Address
2 — Internet Protocol (IP) Address
3 — IEEE 802.1 Globally Assigned MAC Address
4 — PPP Magic-Number Block
5 — Public Switched Network Directory Number
(default; uses number entered in S51)
83*
Multilink PPP Endpoint Identifier
(up to 20 characters).
By default, telephone number 1 is sent because the
endpoint identifier is class 5. If your endpoint identifier
class is not 5, obtain the identifier from your Internet
Service Provider and enter it in this register.
84
CHAP control
0 — CHAP not blocked
1 — CHAP blocked (default)
Modem Operation
A-17
ISDN modem result codes
The following table lists the Netopia ISDN Modem result codes.
#
Verbose
0
OK
2
RING
3
Meaning
The most recent command or action was
successfully completed.
An incoming call is present and no AT
Answer command is outstanding.
NO CARRIER The most recent call attempts did not
establish a call or the physical ISDN
interface is not operational.
4
ERROR
The most recent command or action was
not successfully completed.
7
BUSY
The most recent call attempt did not
connect because the remote destination
was busy.
8
NO ANSWER
5
CONNECT
1200
The serial port connection is 1200 bps.
10
CONNECT
2400
The serial port connection is 2400 bps.
11
CONNECT
4800
The serial port connection is 4800 bps.
12
CONNECT
9600
The serial port connection is 9600 bps.
13
CONNECT
7200
The serial port connection is 7200 bps.
Indicates the location you are calling is not
responding.
A-18
Netopia ISDN Modem User’s Guide
#
Verbose
Meaning
14
CONNECT
12000
The serial port connection is 12000 bps.
15
CONNECT
14400
The serial port connection is 14400 bps.
16
CONNECT
19200
The serial port connection is 19200 bps.
17
CONNECT
38400
The serial port connection is 38400 bps.
18
CONNECT
57600
The serial port connection is 57600 bps.
19
CONNECT
115200
The serial port connection is 115200 bps.
20
CONNECT
230400
The serial port connection is 230400 bps.
56
CARRIER
56000
The ISDN modem connection is 56000 bps.
57
CARRIER
56000P
The 56000 bps permissive ISDN modem
connection is 56000 bps.
64
CARRIER
64000
The ISDN modem connection is 64000 bps.
B-1
Appendix B
ISDN Events
This is a complete list of the ISDN events that can appear when you
run the Netopia configuration software in diagnostic mode. The text
that actually appears on screen is shown in bold, followed by a brief
explanation and the parameters associated with the event.
Clear Confirmation Received: Received clear confirmation from the
switch. Associated parameter: called directory number.
Clear Indication Received: Received clear indication from the
switch. Associated parameter: called directory number. Secondary
associated parameter: cause code.
Connection Confirmed: Received connect confirmation for connect
request sent to the switch. Associated parameter: called directory
number.
Connect Indication Received: Received connect indication for call
request sent to the switch. Associated parameter: called directory
number.
Disconnect Indication Received: Received disconnect indication
from the switch. Associated parameter: called directory number.
Secondary associated parameter: cause code.
Setup Indication Received: Received call indication from the
switch. Associated parameter: called directory number.
Setup Request Issued: Call request was sent to the switch.
Associated parameter: called directory number.
Connect Requested: Connect request for the received call was sent
to the switch. Associated parameter: called directory number.
B-2
Netopia ISDN Modem User’s Guide
Clear Request Issued: Clear request was sent to the switch.
Associated parameter: called directory number.
Disconnect Requested: Disconnect request was sent to the
switch. Associated parameter: called directory number. Secondary
associated parameter: cause code.
ISDN event cause codes
These codes appear as associated (secondary) parameters in some
of the ISDN events.
Cause No. 1: unallocated (unassigned number). The destination
requested by the calling user cannot be reached because, although
the number is in a valid format, it is not currently assigned
(allocated).
Cause No. 2: no route to specified transit network. The
equipment sending this cause has received a request to route the
call through a particular transit network which it does not recognize.
The equipment sending this cause does not recognize the transit
network either because the transit network does not exist or
because that particular network, while it does exist, does not serve
the equipment which is sending this cause.
This cause is supported on a network-dependent basis.
Cause No. 3: no route to destination. The called user cannot be
reached because the network through which the call has been
routed does not serve the destination.
This cause is supported on a network-dependent basis.
Cause No. 6: channel unacceptable. The most recently identified
channel is not acceptable to the sending entity for use in this call.
Cause No.7: call awarded and being delivered in an established
channel. The user has been awarded the incoming call, and the
incoming call is being connected to a channel already established to
that user for similar calls (for example, packet-mode X.25 virtual
calls).
Cause No. 16: normal call clearing. The call is being cleared
because one of the users involved in the call has requested that the
call be cleared.
ISDN Events
B-3
Under normal situations, the source of this cause is not the
network.
Cause No. 17: user busy. The called user has indicated the
inability to accept another call.
It is noted that the user equipment is compatible with call.
Cause No. 18: no user responding. The user does not respond to a
call establishment message with either an alerting or connect
indication within the prescribed period of time allocated (defined in
Recommendation Q.931 by the expiration of either timer T303 or
T310).
Cause No. 19: no answer from user (user alerted). The user has
provided an alerting indication but has not provided a connect
indication within a prescribed period of time.
This cause is not necessarily generated by Q.931 procedures but
may be generated by internal network timers.
Cause No. 21: call rejected. The equipment sending this cause
does not wish to accept this call, although it could have accepted
the call because the equipment is neither busy nor incompatible.
Cause No. 22: number changed. The called party number
indicated by the calling user is no longer assigned. The new called
party number may optionally be included in the diagnostic field. If a
network does not support this capability, Cause No. 1 shall be
used.
Cause No. 26: non-selected user clearing. The user has not been
awarded the incoming call.
Cause No. 27: destination out of order. The destination indicated
by the user cannot be reached because the interface to the
destination is not functioning correctly. The term “not functioning
correctly” indicates that a signaling message was unable to be
delivered to the remote user, for example, a physical layer or data
link layer failure exists at the remote user’s site, or the user
equipment is off-line.
Cause No. 28: invalid number format (address incomplete). The
called user cannot be reached because the called party number is
not a valid format or is not complete.
B-4
Netopia ISDN Modem User’s Guide
Cause No. 29: facility rejected. A facility requested by the user
can not be provided by the network.
Cause No. 30: response to STATUS INQUIRY. This cause is
included in the STATUS message when the reason for generating the
STATUS message was the prior receipt of a STATUS INQUIRY
message.
Cause No. 31: normal, unspecified. This cause is used to report a
normal event only when no other cause in the normal class applies.
Cause No. 34: no circuit/channel available. There is no
appropriate circuit/channel presently available to handle the call.
Cause No. 38: network out of order. The network is not functioning
correctly and the condition is likely to last a relatively long period of
time. Immediately re-attempting the call is not likely to be
successful.
Cause No. 41: temporary failure. The network is not functioning
correctly and the condition is not likely to last a long period of time.
The user may wish to try another call attempt almost immediately.
Cause No. 42: switching equipment congestion. The switching
equipment generating this cause is experiencing a period of high
traffic.
Cause No. 43: access information discarded. The network could
not deliver access information (user-to-user information, low-layer
compatibility, high-layer compatibility, or a sub-address, depending
on what was indicated in the diagnostic) to the remote user as
requested.
Note that the particular type of access information discarded is
optionally included in the diagnostic.
Cause No. 44: requested circuit/channel not available. The
circuit or channel indicated by the requesting entity can not be
provided by the other side of the interface.
Cause No. 47: resource unavailable, unspecified. This cause is
used to report a resource unavailable event only when no other
cause in the resource unavailable class applies.
Cause No 49: Quality of Service not available. The requested
Quality of Service, as defined in Recommendation X.213, cannot be
ISDN Events
B-5
provided, for example, throughput or transit delay cannot be
supported.
Cause No. 50: requested facility not subscribed. The requested
supplementary service could not be provided by the network
because the user has not completed the necessary administrative
arrangements with the user’s supporting networks.
Cause No 57: bearer capability not authorized. The user has
requested a bearer capability implemented by the equipment which
generated this cause but the user is not authorized to use the
capability.
Cause No. 58: bearer capability not presently available. The user
has requested a bearer capability implemented by the equipment
which generated this cause but the capability is not available at this
time.
Cause No 63: service or option not available, unspecified. This
cause is used to report a service- or option-not-available event only
when no other cause in the service- or option-not-available class
applies.
Cause No. 65: bearer capability not implemented. The equipment
sending this cause does not support the bearer capability
requested.
Cause No. 66: channel type not implemented. The equipment
sending this cause does not support the channel type requested.
Cause No. 69: requested facility not implemented. The equipment
sending this cause does not support the requested supplementary
service.
Cause No. 70: only restricted digital information bearer capability
is available. A device has requested an unrestricted bearer service
but the device sending this cause only supports the restricted
version of the requested bearer capability.
Cause No. 79: service or option not implemented, unspecified.
This cause is used to report a service- or option-not-implemented
event only when no other cause in the service- or
option-not-implemented class applies.
B-6
Netopia ISDN Modem User’s Guide
Cause No. 81: invalid call reference value. The equipment
sending this cause has received a message with a call reference
which is not currently in use on the user-network interface.
Cause No. 82: identified channel does not exist. The equipment
sending this cause has received a request to use a channel not
activated on the interface for a call. For example, this cause is
generated if a user has subscribed to the channels numbered from
1 to 12 on a primary rate interface and the user equipment or the
network attempts to use channels 13 through 23.
Cause No. 83: a suspended call exists, but this call identity does
not. A call resume has been attempted with a call identity which
differs from that in use for any presently suspended call(s).
Cause No. 84: call identity in use. The network has received a
call-suspend request. The call-suspend request contained a call
identity (including the null call identity) which is already in use for a
suspended call within the domain of interfaces over which the call
might be resumed.
Cause No. 85: no call suspended. The network has received a call
resume request with a call identity information element which
presently does not indicate any suspended call within the domain
interfaces over which calls may be resumed.
Cause No. 86: call having the requested call identity has been
cleared. The network has received a call resume request with a call
identity information element which once indicated a suspended call,
however, that suspended call was cleared while suspended (either
by a network time-out or by a remote user).
Cause No. 88: incompatible destination. The equipment sending
this cause has received a request to establish a call that has a
low-layer compatibility, high-layer compatibility, or other compatibility
attribute (for example, data rate) which cannot be accommodated.
Cause No. 91: invalid transit network selection. A transit network
identification was received which is of an incorrect format as
defined in Annex C/Q.931.
Cause No. 95: invalid message, unspecified. This cause is used
to report an invalid message event only when no other cause in the
invalid-message class applies.
ISDN Events
B-7
Cause No. 96: mandatory information element is missing. The
equipment sending this cause has received a message which is
missing an information element which must be present in the
message before that message can be processed.
Cause No. 98: message not compatible with call state or message type non-existent or not implemented. The equipment
sending this cause has received a message such that the
procedures do not indicate that this is a permissible message to
receive while in the call state, or a STATUS message was received
indicating an incompatible call state.
Cause No. 99: information element non-existent or not implemented. The equipment sending this cause has received a
message which includes information elements not recognized
because the information element identifier is not defined or it is
defined but not implemented by the equipment sending the cause.
However, the information element is not required to be present in
the message in order for the equipment sending the cause to
process the message.
Cause No. 100: invalid information element contents. The
equipment sending this cause has received an information element
which it has implemented, however, one or more of the fields in the
information element is coded in such a way that it has not been
implemented by the equipment sending this cause.
Cause No 101: message not compatible with call state. A
message has been received which is incompatible with the call
state.
Cause No. 102: recovery on timer expiry. A procedure has been
initiated by the expiration of a timer in association with Q.931 error
handling procedures.
Cause No. 111: protocol error, unspecified. This cause is used to
report a protocol error event only when no other cause in the
protocol-error class applies.
Cause No. 127: interworking, unspecified. There has been
interworking with a network which does not provide causes for
actions it takes, thus, the precise cause for a message which is
being sent cannot be ascertained.
C-1
Appendix C
Technical Specifications
Physical dimensions
Dimensions:
8.66" (w) x 5.44" (d) x 1.56" (h)
(22cm x 13.8cm x 4cm)
Specifications for Connectors
Computer port:
RS-232-D with DB-25 connector
Analog device ports:
Two RJ-11 modular jacks, support
three analog devices (including
phone, fax, modem, and answering
machine) per port within 200' (61m)
ISDN port:
ISDN BRI (2B+D) with integrated NT1
“U” interface
Power requirements
Power input:
9V DC (external power adapter)
Power brick output:
9V DC @ 600mA
Environmental operating range
Operating temperature:
50° to 122° F (10° to 50° C)
Storage temperature:
-40° to 149° F (-40° to 65° C)
Relative storage humidity:
Up to 90% non-condensing
C-2
Netopia ISDN Modem User’s Guide
Agency approvals
UL listed
FCC Part 15, Class B
Bellcore NI-1
CSA approved
ISDN support
ISDN protocol support:
Multilink PPP (Point-to-Point
Protocol), Async PPP to Sync PPP
conversion, ANSI V.120
ISDN switch support:
North American National ISDN-1
(NI-1), AT&T and Northern Telecom
custom ISDN signaling,
circuit-switched voice and
circuit-switched data
ISDN modem software:
Software pre-loaded on internal flash
memory with configuration software
provided; software is field-upgradeable via download to internal flash
memory
Compression support:
Stac compression that conforms to
the IETF drafts.
Technical Specifications
C-3
RS-232-D pin assignments
The asynchronous RS-232-D port on the ISDN modem, labeled
RS232, is a standard DB-25 female connector. The ISDN modem
asynchronous port pin assignments, shown in the following table,
conform to standard definitions for data communications equipment
(DCE).
Pin #
Pin Name
Signal Direction
1
Shield Ground (GND)
—
2
Send Data (SD)
To ISDN modem
3
Receive Data (RD)
From ISDN modem
4
Request to Send (RTS)
To ISDN modem
5
Clear to Send (CTS)
From ISDN modem
6
Data Set Ready (DSR)
From ISDN modem
7
Signal Ground (GND)
—
8
Carrier Detect (DCD)
From ISDN modem
18
Local Loopback
From ISDN modem
20
Data Terminal Ready (DTR)
To ISDN modem
21
Remote Loopback
To ISDN modem
22
Ring Indicator (R)
From ISDN modem
C-4
Netopia ISDN Modem User’s Guide
PC serial cable pin assignments
The DB-25 male to DB-9 female pin assignments for the PC serial
cable are given below.
DB--9
Pin #
Pin Name
DB-25
Pin #
1
Data Carrier Detect (DCD)
8
2
Receive Data (RD)
3
3
Send Data (SD)
2
4
Data Terminal Ready (DTR)
20
5
Signal Ground (GND)
7
6
Data Set Ready (DSR)
6
7
Request to Send (RTS)
4
8
Clear to Send (CTS)
5
9
Ring Indicator (R)
22
—
Shield
1
Technical Specifications
C-5
Macintosh DIN-8 pin assignments
The DB-25 male to 8-pin DIN male pin assignments for the
Macintosh serial cable are given below.
DIN-8
Pin #
Pin Name
DB-25
Pin #
1
Data Terminal Ready (DTR)
20, 4
2
Clear to Send (CTS)
5
3
Send Data (SD)
2
4, 8
Signal Ground (GND)
7
5
Receive Data (RD)
3
7
Data Carrier Detect (DCD)
8
C-6
Netopia ISDN Modem User’s Guide
Regulatory notices
FCC Class B certification statement
Farallon Communications, Inc.
FCC ID: DF63C882
Ringer Equivalent Number (REN) 3 per analog port up to 200 feet on
AWG 26 or heavier wiring
Made in U.S.A.
This device complies with Part 15 of the FCC Rules. Operation is
subject to the following two conditions:
1.
This device may not cause harmful interference, and
2.
This device must accept any interference received, including
interference that may cause undesired operation.
WARNING: This equipment has been tested and found to comply
with the limits for a Class B digital device, pursuant to Part 15 of
the FCC Rules, and the Canadian Department of Communications
Equipment Standards entitled, “Digital Apparatus,” ICES-003.
These limits are designed to provide reasonable protection against
harmful interference in a residential installation. This equipment
generates, uses and can radiate radio frequency energy and, if not
installed and used in accordance with the instructions, may cause
harmful interference to radio communications. However, there is no
guarantee that interference will not occur in a particular installation.
If this equipment does cause harmful interference to radio or
television reception, which can be determined by turning the
equipment off and on, the user is encouraged to try to correct the
interference by one or more of the following measures:
■
Reorient or relocate the receiving antenna.
■
Increase the separation between the equipment and receiver.
■
Connect the equipment into an outlet on a circuit different from
the one which the receiver is connected to.
■
Consult the dealer or an experienced radio/TV technician for
help.
Technical Specifications
C-7
The user may find the following booklet prepared by the Federal
Communications Commission helpful:
The Interference Handbook
This booklet is available from the U.S. Government Printing Office,
Washington, D.C. 20402. Stock No. 004-000-00345-4.
Note: In order to maintain compliance with the limits of a Class B
digital device, Farallon requires that you use quality interface cables
when connecting to this device. Changes or modifications not
expressly approved by Farallon could void the user’s authority to
operate this equipment. Refer to the manual for specifications on
cabling types.
Canadian notice
The Industry Canada label identifies certified equipment. This
certification means that the equipment meets certain telecommunications network protective, operation, and safety requirements. The
Department does not guarantee the equipment will operate to the
users’ satisfaction.
Before installing this equipment, users should ensure that it is
permissible to be connected to the facilities of the local telecommunications company. The equipment must also be installed using an
acceptable method of connection. In some cases, the inside wiring
associated with a single-line individual service may be extended by
means of a certified connector assembly. The customer should be
aware that compliance with the above conditions may not prevent
degradation of service in some situations.
Repairs to certified equipment should be made by an authorized
Canadian maintenance facility designated by the supplier. Any
repairs or alterations made by the user to this equipment, or
equipment malfunctions, may give the telecommunications
company cause to request the user to disconnect the equipment.
Users should ensure for their own protection that the electrical
ground connections of the power utility, telephone lines, and
internal metallic water pipe system, if present, are connected
together. This precaution may be particularly important in rural
areas.
C-8
Netopia ISDN Modem User’s Guide
Caution!
Users should not attempt to make electrical ground connections by
themselves, but should contact the appropriate inspection authority
or an electrician, as appropriate.
D-1
Appendix D
About the COM Port Accelerator
*The
Microkey Switchboard7 Comm Port Accelerator, when installed
on a PC with a 16550 UART-based serial port, will provide a reliable
and consistent throughput of 115 Kbps to your Netopia ISDN
Modem. For Windows 3.1 and 3.11 users wishing to achieve even
higher serial port speeds, Switchboard7 will reliably provide 230
Kbps throughput when a 16650 UART-based serial COM port is
present.
Microkey Communications Systems, Inc., a Vancouver, BC based
software vendor specializes in the area of data communications.
Microkey has developed a family of applications that leverage the
untapped potential of ISDN Customer Premise Equipment.
Microkey recognized the importance of providing enhanced serial
port performance for the majority of users who wish to use serially
attached, high-speed communication devices. The Windows device
drivers, and device drivers from other third parties, are not capable
of sustaining a high enough throughput to consistently drive these
external devices at their maximum performance levels.
The Switchboard is comprised of three components:
s7comm.drv
replaces comm.drv
s7vdc.386
replaces *vdc(vcd.386)
s7combuf.386
replaces *commbuf(commbuf.386)
* This information is provided by Microkey Communications
Systems, Inc. Phone: (212) 779-1898
WWW Site: www.microkey.com
D-2
Netopia ISDN Modem User’s Guide
Installation
The Microkey Switchboard7 installation process is initiated by the
Netopia ISDN Modem installation process. Switchboard7
determines the operating system running on your computer. If it
determines that you are running Windows 3.1 or Windows 3.11, the
Switchboard7 installation process continues and the installation
program displays the appropriate dialog box. If you are running
Windows 95 or NT, the Switchboard7 installation process is
bypassed because these operating systems are shipped with
high-speed COM port drivers from Microsoft.
To ensure that your system is properly optimized, you should
remove any existing serial port device drivers before you install your
Switchboard7 Comm Port Accelerator. The installation program will
search for and remove some of the most common third-party COM
port drivers configured in your SYSTEM.INI file. If any of these
drivers are discovered, the following message will be displayed on
screen, “A version of “Driver Name” was found. This installation will
replace it. Do you wish to replace it? YES/NO.””
If you respond with “YES,” the old drivers will be removed from the
SYSTEM.INI file. The installation program will automatically create a
backup of your old SYSTEM.INI file.
Enter YES to continue the installation. If you enter NO, the
installation will be aborted and the following message will be
displayed on screen, “User has cancelled Installation.”
When the installation is finished, the follow message will be
displayed, “High speed Drivers Installed. “SYSTEM,INI” Modified.
Current “SYSTEM.INI” BACKED UP TO “SYSTEM.XXX”
Click OK. The following message will be displayed. “INSTALLATION
COMPLETE. RESTART WINDOWS TO ACTIVATE INSTALLED DRIVERS.
Restart Windows to complete the installation.
If there is a problem during the installation, you will receive the
following error message, “ERROR DURING INSTALLATION, ERROR
CODE XX.” If you see this message, record the error code listed in
the message, locate the corresponding error code in the error
codes table below, and take the corrective action associated with
the error code.
About the COM Port Accelerator
Error
Code
Problem
D-3
Corrective Action
1001
Cannot find or copy
“s7comm.drv”
Check the Netopia directory to
make sure the files listed in the
error message are present and
rerun the installation program.
1002
Cannot find or copy
“s7vcd.drv”
1003
Cannot find or copy
“s7combuf.drv”
1004
Cannot create backup
“SYSTEM.INI”
Rerun the installation program.
1005
Cannot remove *vcd from
SYSTEM.INI
An unknown third-party device
driver may exist on your system.
Call Farallon technical support.
1006
Cannot remove *combuff
from SYSTEM.INI
1007
Cannot remove comm.drv
from SYSTEM.INI
1008
Cannot configure SYSTEM.INI
for “s7comm.drv”
1009
Cannot configure SYSTEM.INI
for “s7vcd.drv”
1010
Cannot configure SYSTEM.INI
for “s7combuf.drv”
Rerun the installation program
and/or call Farallon technical
support.
D-4
Netopia ISDN Modem User’s Guide
Error
Code
Problem
1021
Cannot remove
TURBOVCD.386 from
SYSTEM.INI
1022
Cannot remove TURBOBUF
from SYSTEM.INI
Corrective Action
Remove the referenced file
manually and/or call Farallon
technical support.
TS-1
Farallon Technical Support
Farallon Communications is committed to providing its customers
with reliable products and documentation, backed by excellent
technical support.
Before calling Farallon
Look in this user’s guide for a solution to your problem. You may find
a solution in Chapter 7, “Troubleshooting,” or in other sections. If
you cannot find a solution, complete the Environment Profile below
before calling Farallon.
To contact Farallon, use the Technical Support Access Card (a
telephone calling card) attached to the Getting Started card
included with the Netopia ISDN Modem.
Alternately, you can use the contact information given below.
Note: Subscribers to Farallon’s Up & Running, Guaranteed!
program, see the Up & Running, Guaranteed! User’s Guide for
information about obtaining technical support.
TS-2
Netopia ISDN Modem User’s Guide
Environment profile
■
Locate the ISDN modem’s model number, product serial
number, and firmware version. The serial number and the
model number are on the back of the Netopia ISDN Modem.
(The model number is also printed on the title page of this
user’s guide.) The firmware version appears on the
configuration software’s main screen.
Model number: _________________________
Serial number: _________________________
Firmware version: _______________________
■
What kind of computer do you have?
______________________________________
How to reach us
We can help you with your problem more effectively if you have
completed the Environment Profile in the previous section. If you
contact us by telephone, please be at the site of the problem and
prepared to reproduce it and to try some troubleshooting steps.
When you are prepared, contact Farallon Customer Service by
telephone, fax, or mail:
Phone: (800) 782-6449
Fax: (510) 814-5023
Farallon Communications, Inc.
Customer Service
2470 Mariner Square Loop
Alameda, California 94501
U.S.A.
You can also contact us via the Internet:
info@farallon.com
Farallon Technical Support
TS-3
Farallon BBS
Farallon Bulletin Board Service: (510) 865-1321
You can also contact the Farallon Bulletin Board Service over your
ISDN line. This allows you to test your ISDN connection and also
download information from the BBS.
Farallon BBS ISDN line: (510) 864-5562 or (510) 864-5563
FAX-Back
This service provides technical notes which answer the most
commonly asked questions, and offers solutions for many common
problems encountered with Farallon products.
FAX-Back: (510) 814-5040
Internet information resources
Product information can be found on the Internet at the following
addresses:
Anonymous FTP: ftp.farallon.com/pub
World Wide Web: http://www.farallon.com
Outside of the United States and Canada
If you are not located in the United States or Canada, you can get
service locally by contacting your nearest Farallon reseller or
distributor. For a worldwide list of our distributors, contact Farallon
directly.
GL-1
Glossary
5ESS: This is a digital switch used by many telephone companies
and designed by AT&T. This switch provides both voice, data, and
ISDN services and is capable of running either Custom or National
ISDN (NI-1) software.
56 Kbps: The speed of an ISDN call when going between LATA
boundaries without the use of out-of-band signaling. See also SS7.
64 Kbps: The speed of an ISDN call when going between LATA
boundaries with the use of out-of-band signaling. See also SS7.
asynchronous: A method of data transmission in which data is sent
at irregular intervals. Start and stop bits signal the beginning and
end of a transmission.
autobaud: feature that automatically detects the baud rate of your
computer’s serial port and matches the ISDN modem’s baud rate to
that rate.
B channel: Bearer channel. A 56 Kbps or 64 Kbps ISDN channel
which is used in both the Basic Rate Interface and Primary Rate
Interface and carries a voice or data call. The 56 Kbps or 64 Kbps
limitation depends on the use of in-band or out-of-band signaling.
Bellcore: Bell Communications Research. Bellcore was part of Bell
Laboratories before the breakup of AT&T and plays a leading role in
developing ISDN standards.
BRI: Basic Rate Interface. An ISDN interface consisting of three full
duplex channels: two 64 Kbps B Channels and one 16 Kbps D
Channel (2B+D). The 2B+D U Interface requires a single
twisted-pair of wires and carries no voltage or dial-tone.
CHAP: Challenge Handshake Authentication Protocol. A method of
security which involves an exchange of encrypted passwords to
verify the user.
GL-2
Netopia ISDN Modem User’s Guide
CPE: Customer Premise Equipment. This is the ISDN equipment
provided by the customer to connect to an ISDN line. The Netopia
ISDN Modem is considered Customer Premise Equipment.
D channel: Delta channel. A 16 Kbps or 64 Kbps ISDN interface
which carries signaling messages to control the B channels. It can
also carry data in the form of X.25.
DEMARC: Demarcation Point. This is the point on the customer
premises where the line from the telephone company meets the
customer’s wiring. From this point, the customer is responsible for
the remaining in-house wiring.
DMS-100: This is a digital switch used by many telephone
companies and designed by Northern Telecom. This switch provides
voice, data, and ISDN services and is capable of running either
Custom or National ISDN (NI-1) software.
DN: Directory Number. This is the ISDN telephone number and is
required to call another ISDN site or Internet Service Provider.
DNS: Domain Name Server. This is a computer that resolves
Internet names (timbuktu.farallon.com) to IP Addresses
(163.176.4.43) to communicate over the Internet.
Dynamic Bandwidth Allocation: A feature that allows you to place a
voice call from a device that is attached to one of the analog device
ports while a Multilink PPP call is active. When you initiate the
phone conversation, the modem disconnects one of the B channels
and uses it for the voice call.
IP: Internet Protocol. See TCP/IP.
ISDN: Integrated Services Digital Network. This is a high-speed
digital line providing a fast and reliable connection to the Internet
through the Netopia ISDN Modem.
ISP: Internet Service Provider. This is a company that provides ISDN
access, directory numbers, and TCP/IP addresses for connecting
the Netopia ISDN Modem to the Internet.
Glossary
GL-3
LATA: Local Access Transport Area. A LATA defines the historical
boundary within which most Local Exchange Carriers (see also LEC)
can provide end-to-end multi-switch service. If the called party is
inside a different LATA than the call originator, the affected LECs
may need to pass off the call to a long distance carrier (like AT&T,
MCI, or Sprint). There are currently 198 LATAs in the United States,
Puerto Rico, Guam, and the Virgin Islands.
LEC: Local Exchange Carrier. A telephone company affiliate of a
Regional Bell Operating Company or an independent telephone
company, such as Southern New England Telephone (SNET), GTE, or
hundreds of others.
Multilink PPP: A feature that allows a maximum digital connection
of 128 Kbps by virtually linking two 56 Kbps or 64 Kbps B channels.
NI-1: National ISDN-1. Defined by Bellcore, National ISDN (NI-1) is
an agreement among telephone companies and Customer Premise
Equipment vendors to jointly provide the first phase of
standards-based ISDN. National ISDN is a collection of standards to
allow Customer Premise Equipment to work across different
telephone company switches using the Basic Rate Interface.
NT1: Network Termination 1. A customer-owned device that
connects to the U Interface and is responsible for the physical and
electrical termination of the ISDN line. An NT1 is built into the
Netopia ISDN Modem.
packet: A package of data. The data is usually in binary format and
organized in a particular way for transmission. Each packet
generally contains address information, the data being sent, and
error-checking information.
PAP: Password Authentication Protocol. A method of security which
involves an exchange of a plain text user ID and password to verify
the user.
POP: Point of Presence. The location to which telephone companies
and Internet Service Providers have an access point for services.
PPP: Point-to-Point Protocol. A link control protocol used for
transmission of multi-protocol data over synchronous or
asynchronous serial links.
GL-4
Netopia ISDN Modem User’s Guide
SPID: Service Profile ID. This is an alphanumeric string provided by
your telephone company that uniquely identifies the services
required by the Netopia ISDN Modem. Depending on the type of
switch you are connecting to, you may have one, two, or no SPIDs.
SS7: Signaling System 7. An out-of-band signaling network required
for 64 Kbps end-to-end connectivity between Local Access Transport
Area (LATA) boundaries. Without SS7, an ISDN call would be limited
to 56 Kbps.
switch: A general term describing telephone company equipment in
a central office that directs calls to the appropriate destination.
ISDN-capable switches include the DMS-100 or 5ESS.
switched 56: A circuit-switched service that allows 56 Kbps
communications, generally for the price of a voice call.
synchronous: A method of data transmission that is controlled by a
master clock. The clock establishes the intervals in which data is
sent.
terminal adapter: A device that converts digital signals for use with
ISDN equipment.
T-1: A digital connection with a maximum throughput of 1.5 Mbps.
T-1 lines are often used to connect LANs.
Terminal Endpoint Identifier (TEI): A unique number used to identify
B channels so they can be linked together using Multilink PPP.
TCP/IP: Transmission Control Protocol/Internet Protocol. A family
of protocols developed for the reliable interchange of computer
information between any two addressable computers residing on
the Internet. It creates the appearance of a dedicated wire between
the two applications.
U Interface: User Interface. This is the interface provided by the
telephone company to which you connect your Netopia ISDN
Modem. It consists of two wires (one pair) and carries no voltage or
dialtone.
V.120: A rate adaption scheme that converts transmission rates
from a range of 50 bps–19.2 Kbps to the B channel’s 56 Kbps or
64 Kbps.
IN-1
Index
Numerics
56K permissive dialing see Toll Saver
A
Advanced window 5-9 to 5-12
agency approvals C-2
analog
calls 6-12
connecting equipment 3-6
device ports 3-6, 6-11, C-1
Async-Sync PPP conversion
see B channel Protocol, Protocol menu
AT commands 6-2, A-1 to A-11
authentication 6-6
see also PAP, CHAP
auto answer 5-8, A-12
autobaud 6-10
B
B channels 2-5, 5-10, 6-16, GL-1
Data Rate 4-7, A-13
Protocol A-15
Basic Rate Interface (BRI) 2-5
baud-rate detection
see autobaud
C
cabling requirements 1-5
call routing 4-7, 5-7, 6-13, A-14
calls
placing 6-1 to 6-16
receiving 6-12
cause codes B-2 to B-7
CD Control 5-13
CHAP 6-6, GL-1
blocking 5-12
circuit ID number 2-13
communications software 6-2
compression 5-10, 6-3
configuration
file 4-21, 5-18
for Macintosh computers 5-1 to 5-20
for PCs 4-1 to 4-26
options 4-19 to 4-22, 5-9 to 5-12
parameters 4-2 to 4-10, 5-6 to 5-12
software 4-1 to 5-20
connections
specifications C-1
testing the ISDN connection 4-19 to 4-20,
5-14 to 5-15
to a Macintosh computer 3-4 to 3-5
to a PC 3-2 to 3-3
connectors C-1
D
Data Rate 5-10
default settings, restoring 5-15
diagnostics
LEDs 7-2 to 7-3
testing the ISDN connection 4-19 to 4-20,
5-14 to 5-15
digital (data) calls 6-2
directory number, defined 2-5
DOS configuration 4-23 to 4-26
downloading firmware 7-8 to 7-10
DTR Control 5-13, A-9
Dynamic Bandwidth Allocation 5-11, 6-7, A-15
see also Multilink PPP
IN-2
Netopia ISDN Modem User’s Guide
E
Easy Setup window 5-6 to 5-8
Enable Auto Answer 5-8
Endpoint ID 5-12
Endpoint ID Class 5-12
events B-1 to B-2
exit see quit the ISDN Setup application
F
factory settings 5-15
firmware
downloading 7-8 to 7-10
updating 7-8 to 7-10
Flow Control 5-12
I
indicators see LEDs
installation
connecting to a Macintosh computer 3-4 to
3-5
connecting to a PC 3-2 to 3-3
using Windows NT 4-16 to 4-18
Windows 95 driver 4-10
ISDN
about ISDN 2-2
cause codes B-2 to B-7
circuit ID 2-13
configuration requirements 2-12 to 2-17
events B-1 to B-2
features 1-2
finding a service provider 2-7
general line configuration 2-14
ordering service 2-9
Setup application 4-2 to 4-10, 4-19 to 422, 4-23 to 4-26, 5-2 to 5-20
SPID 2-5
switch configuration type 2-13
switch types 2-15, 2-16
testing the ISDN connection 4-19 to 4-20,
5-14 to 5-15
TID 2-5
type of line 2-8
worksheet 2-8, 2-18
ISDN Assistant 4-4 to 4-5, 5-3 to 5-4
L
LEDs 7-2 to 7-3
loading settings
from a Macintosh computer 5-19
from Windows 4-22
long distance calls 2-13
M
Macintosh
configuration 5-1 to 5-20
placing calls 5-20
system requirements 1-4
testing the ISDN connection 5-14
modem
driver 4-10
registers 6-5, A-11 to A-16
see also Multilink PPP, placing calls
result codes A-17 to A-18
Modem Protocol Trace window 4-20
modem settings
loading 4-22, 5-18
saving 4-21, 5-18
Multilink Endpoint Identifiers 6-5
Multilink PPP
enabling 4-8, 5-11
Endpoint Identifier 6-5, A-16
Endpoint Identifier Class A-16
see also Dynamic Bandwidth Allocation 6-7
using 6-4
Index
N
Netopia ISDN Modem
features 1-2
installing 3-1 to 3-6
package contents 1-3
specifications C-1
P
package contents 1-3
PAP 6-6, GL-3
PC
configuration 4-1 to 4-26
system requirements 1-4
physical dimensions C-1
pin assignments
DB-9 C-4
DIN-8 C-5
RS-233-D C-3
placing calls 4-13, 5-20, 6-2
power requirements C-1
PPP 6-4, 6-6
authentication 6-6
client software 5-20
Magic Number 5-12, A-16
Multilink 4-8, 6-4
see also Protocol menu
Protocol menu 5-10
protocol support C-2
Q
QuickSelect 5-10, 6-8, A-15
quit the ISDN Setup application
from a Macintosh computer 5-20
from DOS 4-25
from Windows 4-9
R
receiving analog calls 6-12
registers 6-2, 6-4, 6-5, A-11 to A-16
regulatory notices C-6 to C-8
IN-3
requirements
cabling 1-5
Macintosh 1-4
PC 1-4
restore factory settings 5-15
result codes A-17 to A-18
RS-232-D port C-3
S
S registers 6-2, 6-4, 6-5, A-11 to A-16
Second DN field 5-11
security
see CHAP, PAP
serial port
CD control A-9
flow control A-10
optimizing performance 6-9
RS-232-D C-3
see also cabling requirements,
connections to a Macintosh computer,
connections to a PC, and system
requirements
Serial Port menu 5-2
Service Profile ID, see SPID
settings
loading 4-22, 5-19
saving 4-21, 5-18
Setup application
DOS 4-23 to 4-26
Macintosh 5-2 to 5-20
Windows 4-2 to 4-10, 4-19 to 4-22
Windows NT 4-16 to 4-18
specifications C-1 to C-5
SPID
correct format 2-6
defined 2-5
example 2-6
Stac data compression 6-3
IN-4
Netopia ISDN Modem User’s Guide
switch
defined 2-5
type of configuration 2-13
Switched 56 see Toll Saver calls
system requirements
Macintosh 1-4
PC 1-4
T
Terminal Endpoint Identifiers (TEIs) A-12
Terminal ID (TID) 2-5
testing the ISDN connection
from a Macintosh computer 5-14
from a PC 4-19 to 4-20
Toll Saver calls 4-8, 6-8, A-9
troubleshooting
solving problems 7-1 to 7-10
testing the ISDN connection 4-19 to 4-20,
5-14 to 5-15
U
update the firmware
from a Macintosh computer 7-10
using DOS 7-9
using Windows 7-8
Utilities window 5-14
V
V.120
Frame Type 5-11, A-15
Max Frame Size 5-10, A-15
protocol A-15
W
Windows
configuration options 4-19 to 4-22
configuring the device under 4-2 to 4-10
placing calls 4-10
saving settings 4-21 to 4-22
Windows 95
configuration options 4-19 to 4-22
configuring the device under 4-2 to 4-10
installing the modem driver 4-10 to 4-13
placing calls 4-13 to 4-15
saving settings 4-21 to 4-22
Windows NT
configuration options 4-19 to 4-22
configuring the device under 4-2 to 4-10
installing the modem driver 4-16 to 4-18
placing calls 4-18
worksheet, ISDN 2-8, 2-18
Limited Warranty and Limitation of Remedies
Farallon warrants to you, the end user, that the Netopia™ ISDN
Modem (the “Product”) will be free from defects in materials and
workmanship under normal use for a period of one (1) year from
date of purchase. Farallon’s entire liability and your sole remedy
under this warranty during the warranty period is that Farallon shall,
at its option, either repair the Product or refund the original
purchase price of the Product.
In order to make a claim under this warranty you must comply with
the following procedure:
1.
Contact Farallon Customer Service within the warranty period to
obtain a Return Materials Authorization (“RMA”) number.
2.
Return the defective Product and proof of purchase, shipping
prepaid, to Farallon with the RMA number prominently displayed
on the outside of the package.
If you are located outside of the United States or Canada, please
contact your dealer in order to arrange for warranty service.
THE ABOVE WARRANTIES ARE MADE BY FARALLON ALONE, AND
THEY ARE the ONLY WARRANTIES MADE BY ANYONE REGARDING
THE ENCLOSED PRODUCT. Farallon and its licensor(s) make no
other warranties, express or implied, including without limitation the
implied warranties of merchantability and fitness for a particular
purpose, regarding the enclosed product. Except as otherwise
expressly provided above, Farallon and its licensor(s) do not
warrant, guarantee or make any representation regarding the use or
the results of the use of the product in terms of its correctness,
accuracy, reliability, currentness, or otherwise. The entire risk as to
the results and performance of the product is assumed by you. The
exclusion of implied warranties is not permitted by some states or
jurisdictions, so the above exclusion may not apply to you. IN THAT
CASE, ANY IMPLIED WARRANTIES ARE LIMITED IN DURATION TO
NINETY (90) DAYS FROM THE DATE OF DELIVERY OF THE PRODUCT.
There may be other rights that you may have which vary from
jurisdiction to jurisdiction.
REGARDLESS OF WHETHER OR NOT ANY REMEDY SET FORTH
HEREIN FAILS OF ITS ESSENTIAL PURPOSE, in no event will Farallon,
its licensor(s) and the directors, officers, employees or agents of
any of them be liable to you for any consequential, incidental or
indirect damages (including damages for loss of business profits,
business interruption, loss of business information, and the like)
arising out the use or inability to use the product even if Farallon or
its licensor(s) have been advised of the possibility of such
damages. Because some states or jurisdictions do not allow the
exclusion or limitation of liability for consequential or incidental
damages, the above limitations may not apply to you. Farallon and
its licensor(s) liability to you for actual damages from any cause
whatsoever, and regardless of the form of the action (whether in
contract, tort [including negligence], product liability or otherwise),
will be limited to $50.
v.1096