INVERTER ARC WELDER OPERATING MANUAL

INVERTER ARC WELDER OPERATING MANUAL
INVERTER
ARC
WELDER
MODEL 300TSW AC/DC CC
STICK
TIG - Lift Start
HF Start
OPERATING MANUAL
October 10, 2003
Manual No. 430429-511
CONTENTS
SYMBOL LEGEND ............................................................................................................................................................ 5
STATEMENT OF WARRANTY ........................................................................................................................................ 6
1.0 GENERAL INFORMATION......................................................................................................................................... 7
1.01 Notes, Cautions and Warnings ................................................................................................................................ 7
1.02 Important Safety Precautions.................................................................................................................................... 7
1.03 Publications ............................................................................................................................................................. 8
1.04 Note, Attention et Avertissement............................................................................................................................. 9
1.05 Precautions De Securite Importantes....................................................................................................................... 9
1.06 Documents De Reference ...................................................................................................................................... 11
2.0 INTRODUCTION AND DESCRIPTION ................................................................................................................... 13
2.01 Description ............................................................................................................................................................. 13
2.02 Functional Block Diagrams .................................................................................................................................... 14
2.03 Transporting Methods............................................................................................................................................. 14
3.0 Installation Recommendations...................................................................................................................................... 15
3.01 Environment ........................................................................................................................................................... 15
3.02 Location.................................................................................................................................................................. 15
3.03 Electrical Input Connections................................................................................................................................... 16
3.03.01 Electrical Input Requirements ....................................................................................................................... 16
3.03.02 Input Power ................................................................................................................................................... 18
3.03.03 High Frequency Introduction......................................................................................................................... 19
3.03.04 High Frequency Interference ......................................................................................................................... 19
3.04 Specifications ......................................................................................................................................................... 20
3.05 Duty Cycle.............................................................................................................................................................. 21
4.0 OPERATOR CONTROLS ........................................................................................................................................... 23
4.01 Pro-Wave 300TSW Controls.................................................................................................................................. 23
4.02 Weld Process selection for Pro-Wave 300TSW ..................................................................................................... 25
4.03 Weld Parameter Descriptions for Pro-Wave 300TSW ........................................................................................... 26
4.04 Weld Parameters for Pro-Wave 300TSW............................................................................................................... 28
4.05 Power Source Features ........................................................................................................................................... 29
5.0 SET-UP FOR SMAW (STICK) AND GTAW (TIG) .................................................................................................. 31
6.0 SEQUENCE OF OPERATION.................................................................................................................................... 32
6.01 Stick Welding ......................................................................................................................................................... 33
6.02 AC or DC HF TIG Welding ................................................................................................................................... 33
6.02.01 Save-Load Operation..................................................................................................................................... 34
6.02.02 Slope Mode Sequence ................................................................................................................................... 35
6.02.03 Slope Mode with repeat sequence ................................................................................................................. 36
6.02.04 Pulse Controls................................................................................................................................................ 36
7.0 BASIC TIG WELDING GUIDE.................................................................................................................................. 38
7.01 Explanation of “Fluttery Arc” when AC TIG Welding on Aluminum ................................................................... 38
7.02 Electrode Polarity ................................................................................................................................................... 39
7.03 Tungsten Electrode Current Ranges ....................................................................................................................... 39
7.04 Tungsten Electrode Types ...................................................................................................................................... 39
7.05 Guide for Selecting Filler Wire Diameter............................................................................................................... 40
7.06 Shielding Gas Selection.......................................................................................................................................... 40
7.07 TIG Welding Parameters for Low Carbon & Low Alloy Steel Pipe ...................................................................... 40
7.08 Welding Parameters for Aluminum........................................................................................................................ 41
7.09 Welding Parameters for Steel ................................................................................................................................. 41
8.0 Basic Arc Welding Guide............................................................................................................................................. 42
8.01 Electrode Polarity ................................................................................................................................................... 42
8.02 Effects of Stick Welding Various Materials ........................................................................................................... 42
9.0 ROUTINE MAINTENANCE ...................................................................................................................................... 43
10.0 BASIC TROUBLESHOOTING................................................................................................................................. 44
10.01 TIG Welding Problems......................................................................................................................................... 44
10.02 Stick Welding Problems ....................................................................................................................................... 46
10.03 Power Source Problems........................................................................................................................................ 48
11.0 Voltage Reduction Device (VRD).............................................................................................................................. 50
11.01 VRD Specification................................................................................................................................................ 50
11.02 VRD Maintenance ................................................................................................................................................ 50
3
12.0 Power Source Error Codes..........................................................................................................................................51
13.0 PARTS LIST...............................................................................................................................................................54
APPENDIX A.....................................................................................................................................................................60
4
SYMBOL LEGEND
Amperage
STICK (Shielded Metal Arc
SMAW)
Voltage
Pulse Current Function
Hertz (frequency)
Spot Time (GTAW)
SEC
Seconds
Remote Control (Panel/Remote)
%
Percent
Remote Function
DC (Direct Current)
Arc Control (SMAW)
AC (Alternating Current
Gas Post-Flow
Standard Function
Gas Pre-Flow
Slope Function
VRD
Voltage Reduction Device
Circuit
Slope W/Repeat Function
Negative
Spot Function
Positive
Impulse Starting (High
Frequency GTAW)
Gas Input
Touch Start (Lift Start TIG
circuit GTAW)
Gas Output
5
STATEMENT OF WARRANTY
LIMITED WARRANTY: Thermal Arc®, Inc., A Thermadyne Company, hereafter, “Thermal Arc” warrants to customers of its
authorized distributors hereafter “Thermal; Arc” that its products will be free of defects in workmanship or material. Should any
failure to conform to this warranty appear within the time period applicable to the Thermal Arc products as stated below, Thermal Arc
shall, upon notification thereof and substantiation that the product has been stored, installed, operated, and maintained in accordance
with Thermal Arc’s specifications, instructions, recommendations and recognized standard industry practice, and not subject to misuse,
repair, neglect, alteration, or accident, correct such defects by suitable repair or replacement, at Thermal Arc’s sole option, of any
components or parts of the product determined by Thermal Arc to be defective.
THERMAL ARC MAKES NO OTHER WARRANTY, EXPRESS OR IMPLIED. THIS WARRANTY IS EXCLUSIVE AND IN LIEU
OF ALL OTHERS, INCLUDING, BUT NOT LIMITED TO ANY WARRANTY OF MERCHANTABILITY OR FITNESS FOR ANY
PARTICULAR PURPOSE.
LIMITATION OF LIABILITY: Thermal Arc shall not under any circumstances be liable for special, indirect or consequential damages,
such as, but not limited to, lost profits and business interruption. The remedies of the Purchaser set forth herein are exclusive and the
liability of Thermal Arc with respect to any contract, or anything done in connection therewith such as the performance or breach
thereof, or from the manufacture, sale, delivery, resale, or use of any goods covered by or furnished by Thermal Arc whether arising
out of contract, negligence, strict tort, or under any warranty, or otherwise, shall not, except as expressly provided herein, exceed the
price of the goods upon which such liability is based. No employee, agent, or representative of Thermal Arc is authorized to change
this warranty in any way or grant any other warranty.
PURCHASER'S RIGHTS UNDER THIS WARRANTY ARE VOID IF REPLACEMENT PARTS OR ACCESSORIES ARE USED
WHICH IN THERMAL ARC’S SOLE JUDGEMENT MAY IMPAIR THE SAFETY OR PERFORMANCE OF ANY THERMAL ARC
PRODUCT.
PURCHASER'S RIGHTS UNDER THIS WARRANTY ARE VOID IF THE PRODUCT IS SOLD TO PURCHASER BY NONAUTHORIZED PERSONS.
The warranty is effective for the time stated below beginning on the date that the authorized distributor delivers the products to the
Purchaser. Notwithstanding the foregoing, in no event shall the warranty period extend more than the time stated plus one year from
the date Thermal Arc delivered the product to the authorized distributor.
POWER SUPPLIES
POWER SUPPLIES & WIRE FEEDERS
LABOR
MAIN POWER MAGNETICS (STATIC & ROTATING)
3 YEAR
3 YEAR
ORIGINAL MAIN POWER RECTIFIER
3 YEAR
3 YEAR
POWER SWITCHING SEMI-CONDUCTORS & CONTROL PC BOARD
3 YEAR
3 YEAR
ALL OTHER CIRCUITS AND COMPONENTS INCLUDING
1 YEAR
1 YEAR
BUT NOT LIMITED TO, CONTACTORS, RELAYS,
SOLENOIDS, PUMPS, SWITCHES, MOTORS
ENGINES: ENIGINES ARE NOT WARRANTED BY THERMAL ARC, ALTHOUGH MOST ARE WARRANTED BY THE ENGINE
MANUFACTURER, SEE THE ENGINE MANUFACTURES WARRANTY FOR DETAILS.
CONSOLES, CONTROL EQUIPMENT, HEAT
1 YEAR
1 YEAR
PLASMA TORCH AND LEADS, AND REMOTE CONTROLS
180 DAYS
180 DAYS
REPAIR/REPLACEMENT PARTS
90 DAYS
90 DAYS
EXCHANGES, AND ACCESSORY EQUIPMENT
Warranty repairs or replacement claims under this limited warranty must be submitted to Thermal Arc by an authorized Thermal Arc
repair facility within thirty (30) days of purchaser’s notice of any Warranty Claim. No transportation costs of any kind will be paid
under this warranty. Transportation charges to send products to an authorized warranty repair facility shall be the responsibility of the
Purchaser. All returned goods shall be at the Purchaser’s risk and expense. This warranty supersedes all previous Thermal Arc
warranties.
Thermal Arc® is a Registered Trademark of Thermadyne Industries Inc.
Effective April 1, 2002
6
• Use an air-supplied respirator if ventilation is
not adequate to remove all fumes and gases.
1.0 GENERAL INFORMATION
1.01 Notes, Cautions and Warnings
Throughout this manual, notes, cautions, and
warnings are used to highlight important
information. These highlights are categorized as
follows:
NOTE
• The kinds of fumes and gases from the arc
welding/cutting depend on the kind of
metal being used, coatings on the metal, and
the different processes. You must be very
careful when cutting or welding any metals
which may contain one or more of the
following:
Antimony
Arsenic
Barium
Beryllium
Cadmium
Vanadium
An
operation,
procedure,
or
background
information
which
requires additional emphasis or is
helpful in efficient operation of the
system.
CAUTION
Chromium
Cobalt
Copper
Lead
Manganese
Mercury
Nickel
Selenium
Silver
• Always read the Material Safety Data Sheets
(MSDS) that should be supplied with the
material you are using. These MSDSs will
give you the information regarding the kind
and amount of fumes and gases that may be
dangerous to your health.
A procedure which, if not properly
followed, may cause damage to the
equipment.
WARNING
• For information on how to test for fumes and
gases in your workplace, refer to item 1 in
Subsection 1.03, Publications in this manual.
A procedure which, if not properly
followed, may cause injury to the
operator or others in the operating
area.
• Use special equipment, such as water or
down draft welding/cutting tables, to
capture fumes and gases.
• Do not use the welding torch in an area
where combustible or explosive gases or
materials are located.
1.02 Important Safety Precautions
WARNING
• Phosgene, a toxic gas, is generated from the
vapors of chlorinated solvents and cleansers.
Remove all sources of these vapors.
OPERATION
AND
MAINTENANCE
OF
ARC
WELDING EQUIPMENT CAN BE
DANGEROUS AND HAZARDOUS
TO YOUR HEALTH.
ELECTRIC SHOCK
To prevent possible injury, read,
understand and follow all warnings,
safety precautions and instructions
before using the equipment. Call 1800-462-2782 or your local distributor
if you have any questions.
Electric Shock can injure or kill. The arc welding
process uses and produces high voltage electrical
energy. This electric energy can cause severe or
fatal shock to the operator or others in the
workplace.
• Never touch any parts that are electrically
“live” or “hot.”
GASES AND FUMES
Gases and fumes produced during the Arc
welding/cutting process can be dangerous and
hazardous to your health.
• Keep all fumes and gases from the breathing
area. Keep your head out of the welding
fume plume.
7
• Wear dry gloves and clothing. Insulate
yourself from the work piece or other parts
of the welding circuit.
• Repair or replace all worn or damaged parts.
• Extra care must be taken when the workplace
is moist or damp.
• Install and maintain equipment according to
NEC code, refer to item 4 in Subsection 1.03,
Publications.
• Disconnect power source before performing
any service or repairs.
• Read and follow all the instructions in the
Operating Manual.
FIRE AND EXPLOSION
Fire and explosion can be caused by hot slag,
sparks, or the arc weld.
• Be sure there is no combustible or flammable
material in the workplace. Any material that
cannot be removed must be protected.
• Ventilate all flammable or explosive vapors
from the workplace.
ARC WELDING RAYS
Arc Welding/Cutting Rays can injure your eyes
and burn your skin. The arc welding/cutting
process produces very bright ultra violet and infra
red light. These arc rays will damage your eyes
and burn your skin if you are not properly
protected.
• To protect your eyes, always wear a welding
helmet or shield. Also always wear safety
glasses with side shields, goggles or other
protective eye wear.
• Wear welding gloves and suitable clothing to
protect your skin from the arc rays and
sparks.
• Keep helmet and safety glasses in good
condition. Replace lenses when cracked,
chipped or dirty.
• Do not cut or weld on containers that may
have held combustibles.
• Protect others in the work area from the arc
rays. Use protective booths, screens or
shields.
• Provide a fire watch when working in an
area where fire hazards may exist.
• Use the shade of lens as recommended in
Subsection 1.03, item 4.
• Hydrogen gas may be formed and trapped
under aluminum workpieces when they are
cut underwater or while using a water table.
DO NOT cut aluminum alloys underwater
or on a water table unless the hydrogen gas
can be eliminated or dissipated. Trapped
hydrogen gas that is ignited will cause an
explosion.
NOISE
Noise can cause permanent hearing loss. Arc
welding/cutting processes can cause noise levels
to exceed safe limits. You must protect your ears
from loud noise to prevent permanent loss of
hearing.
• To protect your hearing from loud noise,
wear protective ear plugs and/or ear muffs.
Protect others in the workplace.
• Noise levels should be measured to be sure
the decibels (sound) do not exceed safe
levels.
• For information on how to test for noise, see
item 1 in Subsection 1.03, Publications, in
this manual.
8
1.03 Publications
Refer to the following standards or their latest
revisions for more information:
1. OSHA, SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS,
29CFR
1910,
obtainable
from
the
Superintendent
of
Documents,
U.S.
Government Printing Office, Washington, D.C.
20402
2. ANSI Standard Z49.1, SAFETY IN WELDING
AND CUTTING, obtainable from the American
Welding Society, 550 N.W. LeJeune Rd, Miami,
FL 33126
3.
NIOSH, SAFETY AND HEALTH IN ARC
WELDING AND GAS WELDING AND
CUTTING, obtainable from the Superintendent
of Documents, U.S. Government Printing
Office, Washington, D.C. 20402
4. ANSI Standard Z87.1, SAFE PRACTICES FOR
OCCUPATION AND EDUCATIONAL EYE
AND FACE PROTECTION, obtainable from
American National Standards Institute, 1430
Broadway, New York, NY 10018
5. ANSI Standard Z41.1, STANDARD FOR MEN’S
SAFETY-TOE FOOTWEAR, obtainable from
the American National Standards Institute,
1430 Broadway, New York, NY 10018
6. ANSI Standard Z49.2, FIRE PREVENTION IN
THE USE OF CUTTING AND WELDING
PROCESSES, obtainable from American
National Standards Institute, 1430 Broadway,
New York, NY 10018
7.
8.
AWS Standard A6.0, WELDING AND
CUTTING CONTAINERS WHICH HAVE
HELD COMBUSTIBLES, obtainable from
American Welding Society, 550 N.W. LeJeune
Rd, Miami, FL 33126
NFPA Standard 51, OXYGEN-FUEL GAS
SYSTEMS FOR WELDING, CUTTING AND
ALLIED PROCESSES, obtainable from the
National
Fire
Protection
Association,
Batterymarch Park, Quincy, MA 02269
9. NFPA Standard 70, NATIONAL ELECTRICAL
CODE, obtainable from the National Fire
Protection Association, Batterymarch Park,
Quincy, MA 02269
10.
NFPA Standard 51B, CUTTING AND
WELDING PROCESSES, obtainable from the
National
Fire
Protection
Association,
Batterymarch Park, Quincy, MA 02269
11.CGA Pamphlet P-1, SAFE HANDLING OF
COMPRESSED GASES IN CYLINDERS,
obtainable from the Compressed Gas
Association, 1235 Jefferson Davis Highway,
Suite 501, Arlington, VA 22202
12. CSA Standard W117.2, CODE FOR SAFETY IN
WELDING AND CUTTING, obtainable from
the Canadian Standards Association, Standards
Sales, 178 Rexdale Boulevard, Rexdale, Ontario,
Canada M9W 1R3
13.
NWSA booklet, WELDING SAFETY
BIBLIOGRAPHY obtainable from the National
Welding Supply Association, 1900 Arch Street,
Philadelphia, PA 19103
14. American Welding Society Standard AWSF4.1,
RECOMMENDED SAFE PRACTICES FOR
THE PREPARATION FOR WELDING AND
CUTTING OF CONTAINERS AND PIPING
THAT
HAVE
HELD
HAZARDOUS
SUBSTANCES, obtainable from the American
Welding Society, 550 N.W. LeJeune Rd, Miami,
FL 33126
15. ANSI Standard Z88.2, PRACTICE FOR
RESPIRATORY PROTECTION, obtainable
from American National Standards Institute,
1430 Broadway, New York, NY 10018
1.04 Note, Attention et Avertissement
Dans ce manuel, les mots “note,” “attention,” et
“avertissement” sont utilisés pour mettre en relief
des informations à caractère important. Ces mises
en relief sont classifiées comme suit :
9
NOTE
Toute opération, procédure ou
renseignement général sur lequel il
importe d’insister davantage ou qui
contribue
à
l’efficacité
de
fonctionnement du système.
ATTENTION
Toute procédure pouvant résulter
l’endommagement du matériel en cas
de non-respect de la procédure en
question.
AVERTISSEMENT
Toute procédure pouvant provoquer
des blessures de l’opérateur ou des
autres personnes se trouvant dans la
zone de travail en cas de non-respect
de la procédure en question.
1.05 Precautions De Securite
Importantes
AVERTISSEMENT
L’OPÉRATION
ET
LA
MAINTENANCE DU MATÉRIEL
DE SOUDAGE À L’ARC AU JET
DE
PLASMA
PEUVENT
PRÉSENTER DES RISQUES ET
DES DANGERS DE SANTÉ.
Il faut communiquer aux opérateurs et
au personnel TOUS les dangers
possibles. Afin d’éviter les blessures
possibles, lisez, comprenez et suivez
tous les avertissements, toutes les
précautions de sécurité et toutes les
consignes avant d’utiliser le matériel.
Composez le +1-800-462-2782 ou
votre distributeur local si vous avez
des questions.
FUMÉE et GAZ
La fumée et les gaz produits par le procédé de jet
de plasma peuvent présenter des risques et des
dangers de santé.
• Eloignez toute fumée et gaz de votre zone de
respiration. Gardez votre tête hors de la
plume de fumée provenant du chalumeau.
•
Utilisez un appareil respiratoire à
alimentation en air si l’aération fournie ne
permet pas d’éliminer la fumée et les gaz.
• Les sortes de gaz et de fumée provenant de
l’arc de plasma dépendent du genre de métal
utilisé, des revêtements se trouvant sur le
métal et des différents procédés. Vous devez
prendre soin lorsque vous coupez ou soudez
tout métal pouvant contenir un ou plusieurs
des éléments suivants:
antimoine
argent
arsenic
baryum
béryllium
vanadium
cadmium
chrome
cobalt
cuivre
manganèse
mercure
nickel
plomb
sélénium
• Lisez toujours les fiches de données sur la
sécurité des matières (sigle américain
“MSDS”); celles-ci devraient être fournies
avec le matériel que vous utilisez. Les MSDS
contiennent des renseignements quant à la
quantité et la nature de la fumée et des gaz
pouvant poser des dangers de santé.
• Pour des informations sur la manière de
tester la fumée et les gaz de votre lieu de
travail, consultez l’article 1 et les documents
cités à la page 5.
• Utilisez un équipement spécial tel que des
tables de coupe à débit d’eau ou à courant
descendant pour capter la fumée et les gaz.
• N’utilisez pas le chalumeau au jet de plasma
dans une zone où se trouvent des matières
ou des gaz combustibles ou explosifs.
• Le phosgène, un gaz toxique, est généré par la
fumée provenant des solvants et des
produits de nettoyage chlorés. Eliminez
toute source de telle fumée.
CHOC ELECTRIQUE
Les chocs électriques peuvent blesser ou même
tuer. Le procédé au jet de plasma requiert et
produit de l’énergie électrique haute tension. Cette
énergie électrique peut produire des chocs graves,
voire mortels, pour l’opérateur et les autres
personnes sur le lieu de travail.
• Ne touchez jamais une pièce “sous tension”
ou “vive”; portez des gants et des vêtements
secs. Isolez-vous de la pièce de travail ou des
autres parties du circuit de soudage.
• Réparez ou remplacez toute pièce usée ou
endommagée.
10
• Prenez des soins particuliers lorsque la zone
de travail est humide ou moite.
•
Montez et maintenez le matériel
conformément au Code électrique national
des Etats-Unis. (Voir la page 5, article 9.)
• Débranchez l’alimentation électrique avant
tout travail d’entretien ou de réparation.
•
Lisez et respectez toutes les consignes du
Manuel de consignes.
INCENDIE ET EXPLOSION
Les incendies et les explosions peuvent résulter
des scories chaudes, des étincelles ou de l’arc de
plasma. Le procédé à l’arc de plasma produit du
métal, des étincelles, des scories chaudes pouvant
mettre le feu aux matières combustibles ou
provoquer l’explosion de fumées inflammables.
• Soyez certain qu’aucune matière combustible
ou inflammable ne se trouve sur le lieu de
travail. Protégez toute telle matière qu’il est
impossible de retirer de la zone de travail.
• Procurez une bonne aération de toutes les
fumées inflammables ou explosives.
•
Ne coupez pas et ne soudez pas les
conteneurs ayant pu renfermer des matières
combustibles.
• Prévoyez une veille d’incendie lors de tout
travail dans une zone présentant des dangers
d’incendie.
•
Le gas hydrogène peut se former ou
s’accumuler sous les pièces de travail en
aluminium lorsqu’elles sont coupées sous
l’eau ou sur une table d’eau. NE PAS couper
les alliages en aluminium sous l’eau ou sur
une table d’eau à moins que le gas
hydrogène peut s’échapper ou se dissiper.
Le gas hydrogène accumulé explosera si
enflammé.
RAYONS D’ARC DE PLASMA
Les rayons provenant de l’arc de plasma peuvent
blesser vos yeux et brûler votre peau. Le procédé à
l’arc de plasma produit une lumière infra-rouge et
des rayons ultra-violets très forts. Ces rayons d’arc
nuiront à vos yeux et brûleront votre peau si vous
ne vous protégez pas correctement.
• Pour protéger vos yeux, portez toujours un
casque ou un écran de soudeur. Portez
toujours des lunettes de sécurité munies de
parois latérales ou des lunettes de protection
ou une autre sorte de protection oculaire.
• Portez des gants de soudeur et un vêtement
protecteur approprié pour protéger votre
peau contre les étincelles et les rayons de
l’arc.
• Maintenez votre casque et vos lunettes de
protection en bon état. Remplacez toute
lentille sale ou comportant fissure ou
rognure.
• Protégez les autres personnes se trouvant sur
la zone de travail contre les rayons de l’arc
en fournissant des cabines ou des écrans de
protection.
• Respectez le teint de lentille recommandé
dans le article 4, page 5.
• Hydrogen gas may be present under
aluminum workpieces during the cutting
process when being cut underwater or using
a water table. DO NOT cut aluminum
underwater or on a water table unless the
hydrogen gas can be eliminated as the
hydrogen gas may detonate.
BRUIT
Le bruit peut provoquer une perte permanente de
l’ouïe. Les procédés de soudage à l’arc de plasma
peuvent provoquer des niveaux sonores
supérieurs aux limites normalement acceptables.
Vous dú4ez vous protéger les oreilles contre les
bruits forts afin d’éviter une perte permanente de
l’ouïe.
• Pour protéger votre ouïe contre les bruits
forts, portez des tampons protecteurs et/ou
des protections auriculaires. Protégez
également les autres personnes se trouvant
sur le lieu de travail.
• Il faut mesurer les niveaux sonores afin
d’assurer que les décibels (le bruit) ne
dépassent pas les niveaux sûrs.
• Pour des renseignements sur la manière de
tester le bruit, consultez l’article 1, page 5.
1.06 Documents De Reference
Consultez les normes suivantes ou les révisions les
plus récentes ayant été faites à celles-ci pour de
plus amples renseignements :
1.
OSHA, NORMES DE SÉCURITÉ DU
TRAVAIL ET DE PROTECTION DE LA
SANTÉ, 29CFR 1910, disponible auprès du
11
Superintendent
of
Documents,
U.S.
Government Printing Office, Washington,
D.C. 20402
2. Norme ANSI Z49.1, LA SÉCURITÉ DES
OPÉRATIONS
DE
COUPE
ET
DE
SOUDAGE, disponible auprès de la Société
Américaine de Soudage (American Welding
Society), 550 N.W. LeJeune Rd., Miami, FL
33126
3. NIOSH, LA SÉCURITÉ ET LA SANTÉ LORS
DES OPÉRATIONS DE COUPE ET DE
SOUDAGE À L’ARC ET AU GAZ,
disponible auprès du Superintendent of
Documents, U.S. Government Printing
Office, Washington, D.C. 20402
4. Norme ANSI Z87.1, PRATIQUES SURES
POUR LA PROTECTION DES YEUX ET DU
VISAGE AU TRAVAIL ET DANS LES
ECOLES, disponible de l’Institut Américain
des Normes Nationales (American National
Standards Institute), 1430 Broadway, New
York, NY 10018
5. Norme ANSI Z41.1, NORMES POUR LES
CHAUSSURES PROTECTRICES, disponible
auprès de l’American National Standards
Institute, 1430 Broadway, New York, NY
10018
6. Norme ANSI Z49.2, PRÉVENTION DES
INCENDIES LORS DE L’EMPLOI DE
PROCÉDÉS DE COUPE ET DE SOUDAGE,
disponible auprès de l’American National
Standards Institute, 1430 Broadway, New
York, NY 10018
7. Norme A6.0 de l’Association Américaine du
Soudage (AWS), LE SOUDAGE ET LA
COUPE
DE
CONTENEURS
AYANT
RENFERMÉ
DES
PRODUITS
COMBUSTIBLES, disponible auprès de la
American Welding Society, 550 N.W.
LeJeune Rd., Miami, FL 33126
8. Norme 51 de l’Association Américaine pour
la Protection contre les Incendies (NFPA),
LES
SYSTEMES
À
GAZ
AVEC
ALIMENTATION EN OXYGENE POUR LE
SOUDAGE, LA COUPE ET LES PROCÉDÉS
ASSOCIÉS, disponible auprès de la National
Fire Protection Association, Batterymarch
Park, Quincy, MA 02269
9. Norme 70 de la NFPA, CODE ELECTRIQUE
NATIONAL, disponible auprès de la
National
Fire
Protection
Association,
Batterymarch Park, Quincy, MA 02269
10. Norme 51B de la NFPA, LES PROCÉDÉS
DE COUPE ET DE SOUDAGE, disponible
auprès de la National Fire Protection
Association, Batterymarch Park, Quincy, MA
02269
11. Brochure GCA P-1, LA MANIPULATION
SANS RISQUE DES GAZ COMPRIMÉS EN
CYLINDRES,
disponible
auprès
de
l’Association
des
Gaz
Comprimés
(Compressed
Gas
Association),
1235
Jefferson Davis Highway, Suite 501,
Arlington, VA 22202
12. Norme CSA W117.2, CODE DE SÉCURITÉ
POUR LE SOUDAGE ET LA COUPE,
disponible auprès de l’Association des
Normes Canadiennes, Standards Sales, 178
Rexdale Boulevard, Rexdale, Ontario,
Canada, M9W 1R3
13. ivret NWSA, BIBLIOGRAPHIE SUR LA
SÉCURITÉ DU SOUDAGE, disponible
auprès de l’Association Nationale de
Fournitures de Soudage (National Welding
Supply Association), 1900 Arch Street,
Philadelphia, PA 19103
14.
Norme
AWSF4.1
de
l’Association
Américaine
de
Soudage,
RECOMMANDATIONS DE PRATIQUES
SURES POUR LA PRÉPARATION À LA
COUPE
ET
AU
SOUDAGE
DE
CONTENEURS ET TUYAUX AYANT
RENFERMÉ DES PRODUITS DANGEREUX
, disponible auprès de la American Welding
Society, 550 N.W. LeJeune Rd., Miami, FL
33126
15. Norme ANSI Z88.2, PRATIQUES DE
PROTECTION RESPIRATOIRE, disponible
auprès de l’American National Standards
Institute, 1430 Broadway, New York, NY
10018
12
2.0 INTRODUCTION AND DESCRIPTION
2.01 Description
The Thermal Arc™ Model 300TSW is a single/three-phase AC/DC arc welding power sources with
Constant Current (CC) output characteristics. This unit is equipped with a Digital Volt/Amperage Meter,
gas control valve, built in Sloper and Pulser, lift arc starter, and high-frequency arc starter for use with Gas
Tungsten Arc Welding (GTAW), Gas Tungsten Arc Welding-Pulsed (GTAW-P) Gas Tungsten Arc
Welding-Sloped (GTAW-S), and Shielded Metal Arc Welding (SMAW) processes. The source is totally
enclosed in an impact resistant, flame resistant and non-conductive plastic case.
(V)
OCV
5A
300A
(A)
STICK Process
(V)
(V)
OCV
OCV
10V
25A
300A
(A)
5A
LIFT TIG Process
300A
(A)
HF TIG Process
Figure 1. Model 300TSW volt-ampere curve
Note 1
Volt-Ampere curves show the maximum Voltage and Amperage output capabilities of the
welding power source. Curves of other settings will fall between the curves shown.
13
2.02 Functional Block Diagrams
Figure 2 illustrates the functional block diagram of the 300TSW-power supply.
Figure 2. 300TSW Functional Block Diagram
2.03 Transporting Methods
These units are equipped with a handle for carrying purposes.
WARNING 1
ELECTRIC SHOCK can kill. DO NOT TOUCH live electrical parts. Disconnect input
power conductors from de-energized supply line before moving the welding power source.
WARNING 2
FALLING EQUIPMENT can cause serious personal injury and equipment damage.
Lift unit with handle on top of case.
Use handcart or similar device of adequate capacity.
If using a fork lift vehicle, place and secure unit on a proper skid before transporting.
14
3.0 Installation Recommendations
3.01 Environment
The Pro-Wave 300TSW is designed for use in hazardous environments.
Examples of environments with increased hazardous environments are a.
b.
c.
In locations in which freedom of movement is restricted, so that the operator is forced
to perform the work in a cramped (kneeling, sitting or lying) position with physical
contact with conductive parts;
In locations which are fully or partially limited by conductive elements, and in which
there is a high risk of unavoidable or accidental contact by the operator, or
In wet or damp hot locations where humidity or perspiration considerably reduces the
skin resistance of the human body and the insulation properties of accessories.
Environments with hazardous environments do not include places where electrically conductive
parts in the near vicinity of the operator, which can cause increased hazard, have been
insulated.
3.02 Location
Be sure to locate the welder according to the following guidelines:
•
In areas, free from moisture and dust.
•
Ambient temperature between 0 degrees C
to 40 degrees C.
•
In areas, free from oil, steam and •
corrosive gases.
In areas, not subjected to abnormal
vibration or shock.
•
In areas, not exposed to direct sunlight or •
rain.
Place at a distance of 12” (304.79mm) or
more from walls or similar that could
restrict natural airflow for cooling.
WARNING 3
Thermal Arc advises that this equipment be electrically connected by a qualified
electrician.
15
3.03 Electrical Input Connections
WARNING 4
ELECTRIC SHOCK can kill; SIGNIFICANT DC VOLTAGE is present after removal of
input power.
DO NOT TOUCH live electrical parts.
SHUT DOWN welding power source, disconnect input power employing lockout/tagging
procedures. Lockout/tagging procedures consist of padlocking line disconnect switch in open
position, removing fuses from fuse box, or shutting off and red-tagging circuit breaker or other
disconnecting device.
3.03.01 Electrical Input Requirements
Operate the welding power source from a single or three-phase 50/60 Hz, AC power supply. The
input voltage must match one of the electrical input voltages shown on the input data label on the
unit nameplate. Contact the local electric utility for information about the type of electrical
service available, how proper connections should be made, and inspection required.
The line disconnect switch provides a safe and convenient means to completely remove all
electrical power from the welding power supply whenever necessary to inspect or service the unit.
Note 2
These units are equipped with a three-conductor with earth power cable that is connected
at the welding power source end for single or three-phase electrical input power.
Do not connect an input (WHITE, BLACK or RED) conductor to the ground terminal.
Do not connect the ground (GREEN) conductor to an input line terminal.
Refer to figure 3 and:
1. Connect end of ground (GREEN) conductor to a suitable ground. Use a grounding method that
complies with all applicable electrical codes.
2. Connect ends of line 1 (BLACK) and line 2 (WHITE) and line 3 (RED) input conductors to a deenergized line disconnect switch.
3. Use Table 1 and Table 2 as a guide to select line fuses for the disconnect switch.
NOTE: For Single-Phase operation, connect the GREEN, BLACK and WHITE input
conductors. Insolate the RED Conductor, it is not used for Single-phase operation.
16
Input Voltage
208 VAC
230 VAC
460 VAC
Fuse Size
100 Amps
90 Amps
25 Amps
Table 1 Electrical Input Connections
NOTE: Fuse size is based on not more than 200 percent of the rated input amperage of the welding
power source (Based on Article 630, National Electrical Code).
Figure 3. Electrical input connections
17
3.03.02 Input Power
Each unit incorporates an INRUSH circuit and input voltage sensing circuit. When the MAIN
SWITCH is turned on, the inrush circuit provides a pre-charging of the input capacitors. SCR’s in
the Power Control Assembly (PCA) will turn on after the input capacitors have charged to full
operating voltage (after approximately 5 seconds).
Note 3
Note the available input power. Damage to the PCA could occur if 575VAC or higher is
applied.
The following Primary Current recommendations are required to obtain the maximum
welding current and duty cycle from this welding equipment:
Model
Minimum Primary
Current Circuit Size
(Vin/Amps)
208/31
Primary Supply
Lead Size
230/28
8/4 AWG minimum
(Factory Fitted)
3φ
PRO-WAVE 300TSW
Current & Duty Cycle
TIG
STICK
-
300A @ 25%
460/14
-
208/47
-
230/43
-
460/21
-
300A @ 25%
208/67
8/3 AWG minimum
1φ
230/60
300A @ 25%
208/96
-
230/87
-
300A @ 25%
Table 2 – Primary Current Circuit sizes to achieve maximum current
18
3.03.03 High Frequency Introduction
The importance of correct installation of high frequency welding equipment cannot be overemphasized. Interference due to high frequency initiated or stabilized arc is almost invariably
traced to improper installation. The following information is intended as a guide for personnel
installing high frequency welding machines.
Warning
Explosives
The high frequency section of this machine has an output similar to a radio transmitter. The
machine should NOT be used in the vicinity of blasting operations due to the danger of
premature firing.
Computers
It is also possible that operation close to computer installations may cause computer
malfunction.
3.03.04 High Frequency Interference
Interference may be transmitted by a high frequency initiated or stabilized arc-welding
machine in the following ways:
Direct Radiation
Radiation from the machine can occur if the case is metal and is not properly grounded. It
can occur through apertures such as open access panels. The shielding of the high frequency
unit in the Power Source will prevent direct radiation if the equipment is properly grounded.
Transmission via the Supply Lead
Without adequate shielding and filtering, high frequency energy may be fed to the wiring
within the installation (mains) by direct coupling. The energy is then transmitted by both
radiation and conduction. Adequate shielding and filtering is provided in the Power Source.
Radiation from Welding Leads
Radiated interference from welding leads, although pronounced in the vicinity of the leads,
diminishes rapidly with distance. Keeping leads as short as possible will minimize this type
of interference. Looping and suspending of leads should be avoided where possible.
Re-radiation from Unearthed Metallic Objects
A major factor contributing to interference is re-radiation from unearthed metallic objects
close to the welding leads. Effective grounding of such objects will prevent re-radiation in
most cases.
19
3.04 Specifications
Parameter
Rated Output
Amperes
Volts
Duty Cycle
Duty Cycle
300TSW
TIG
STICK
Output Current
TIG
Range
STICK
Open Circuit Voltage
Dimensions
Width
Height
Length
Weight
Output @ Rated Load
Output Amperes
Output Volts
Duty Cycle
KVA
KW
Output @ No Load
KVA
KW
Input Volts Single Phase
208V
230V
Input Volts Three Phase
208V
230V
460V
300
32
25%
300A / 22V @ 25%
190A / 17V @ 60%
150A / 16V @ 100%
300A / 32V @ 25%
190A / 27V @ 60%
150A / 26V @ 100%
5 – 300 (DC)
5 – 300 (AC) @ 60Hz, 50% Cleaning
5 – 300 (DC)
5 – 300 (AC) @ 60Hz, 50% Cleaning
69V
8.27” (210mm)
16.89” (420mm)
17.72” (450mm)
63.8 lb. 29 kg
Three-phase
Single-phase
300A
300A
32V
32V
25%
25%
17
20
12.8
12
0.5
0.13
Amperage Draw @ Rated Load
96
87
47
43
21
No Load Amps
2.5
1.8
1.4
1.1
0.7
Thermal Arc continuously strives to produce the best product possible and therefore reserves the right to change, improve or revise the
specifications or design of this or any product without prior notice. Such updates or changes do not entitle the buyer of equipment
previously sold or shipped to the corresponding changes, updates, improvements or replacement of such items.
20
3.05 Duty Cycle
The duty cycle of a welding power source is the percentage of a ten (10) minute period that it can
be operated at a given output without causing overheating and damage to the unit. If the welding
amperes decrease, the duty cycle increases. If the welding amperes are increased beyond the
rated output, the duty cycle will decrease.
WARNING 5
Exceeding the duty cycle ratings will cause the thermal overload protection circuit to
become energized and shut down the output until the unit has cooled to normal operating
temperature.
CAUTION 1
Continually exceeding the duty cycle ratings can cause damage to the welding power
source and will void the manufactures warranty.
NOTE 4
Due to variations that can occur in manufactured products, claimed performance, voltages, ratings,
all capacities, measurements, dimensions and weights quoted are approximate only. Achievable
capacities and ratings in use and operation will depend upon correct installation, use, applications,
maintenance and service.
21
PAGE LEFT INTENTIONALLY BLANK
22
4.0 OPERATOR CONTROLS
4.01 Pro-Wave 300TSW Controls
Figure 4 – Pro-Wave 300TSW Power Source
1 Control Knob
This control sets the selected weld parameter, rotating it clockwise increases the parameter
and is indicated on the digital meter. Pushing the knob in previews the actual welding
voltage while welding.
2 Remote Control Socket
The 14 pin Remote Control Socket is used to connect remote current control devices to the
welding Power Source. To make connections, align keyway, insert plug, and rotate threaded
collar fully clockwise.
E
A
A B C D E F G H I J K L MN
B
C
L
D
I
N
M
E
5k ohms
J
K
H
G
F
Front view of 14
Socket Receptacle
23
Socket Pin
A
B
C
D
E
G
F,H,I,J,K,L
M
N
Function
Torch Switch Input (24V) to energize weld current.
(connect pins A & B to turn on welding current)
Torch Switch Input (0V) to energize weld current
(connect pins A & B to turn on welding current)
5k ohm (maximum) connection to 5k ohm remote control potentiometer
Zero ohm (minimum) connection to 5k ohm remote control potentiometer
Wiper arm connection to 5k ohm remote control potentiometer
Mains Earth
Not Used F and L used to manually set current control to REMOTE
OK to move current detect signal for robotics applications
OK to move current detect signal for robotics applications
3 Positive Terminal
Welding current flows from the Power Source via heavy duty Dinse type terminal. It is
essential, however, that the male plug is inserted and turned securely to achieve a sound
electrical connection.
4 Negative Terminal
Welding current flows from the Power Source via heavy duty Dinse type terminal. It is
essential, however, that the male plug is inserted and turned securely to achieve a sound
electrical connection.
CAUTION 2
Loose welding terminal connections can cause overheating and result in the male plug
being fused in the bayonet terminal and/or melting of the housing (case).
5 Gas Outlet
The Gas Outlet is a 5/8 18 UNF female gas fitting.
6 ON/OFF Switch
This switch connects the Primary supply voltage to the inverter when in the ON position.
This enables the Power Supply.
WARNING 6
When the welder is connected to the Primary supply voltage, the internal electrical
components maybe at 500V potential with respect to earth.
7 Input Cable
The input cable connects the Primary supply voltage to the equipment.
8 Gas Inlet
The Gas Inlet is a 5/8 18 UNF female gas fitting.
24
4.02 Weld Process selection for Pro-Wave 300TSW
Weld Mode
Weld Process
Selection
STICK
HF
TIG
LIFT
TIG
Yes
Yes
Yes
2T operation in TIG Modes using remote
devices to control contactor & current
No
Yes
Yes
4T operation in TIG Modes with crater fill
using a remote contactor device to control
sequence.
No
Yes
Yes
4T operation in TIG Modes with repeat
operation and crater fill using a remote
contactor device.
No
Yes
No
2T operation spot welding in HF TIG using
a remote contactor device.
No
Yes
Yes
Pulse operation in TIG Modes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Selects AC or DC weld current
STD
SLOPE
REPEAT
SPOT
Description
PULSE ON/OFF
Table 3 – Weld Process selection verses Weld Mode for Pro-Wave 300TSW
25
4.03 Weld Parameter Descriptions for Pro-Wave 300TSW
Figure 5Pro-Wave 300TSW Front Panel with Parameter Description
Parameter
PRE-FLOW
HOT START
INITIAL CUR.
UP SLOPE
PEAK CUR.
WELD
Description
This parameter operates in TIG modes only and is used to get gas to the
weld zone prior to striking the arc, once the torch trigger switch has been
pressed. This control is used to dramatically reduce weld porosity at the
start of a weld.
This parameter operates in all weld modes except Lift TIG mode and is
used to heat up the weld zone in TIG modes or improve the start
characteristics for stick electrodes. e.g. low hydrogen electrodes. It sets
the peak start current on top of the BASE (WELD) current.
e.g. HOT START current = 130 amps when BASE (WELD) = 100 amps &
HOT START = 30 amps
This parameter operates in SLOPE or REPEAT (4T) TIG modes only and
is used to set the start current for TIG. The Start Current remains on until
the torch trigger switch is released after it has been depressed.
This parameter operates in TIG modes only and is used to set the time for
the weld current to ramp up, after the torch trigger switch has been
pressed then released, from INITIAL CUR to PEAK or BASE current
This parameter sets the PEAK weld current when in PULSE mode
This parameter sets the TIG WELD current in STD, SLOPE, REPEAT and
SPOT modes when PULSE is off. This parameter also sets the STICK
weld current.
26
Parameter
BASE
(Background
Current)
SPOT TIME
PULSE WIDTH
Description
This parameter sets the Background current when in Pulse TIG mode.
This parameter sets the duration of the SPOT TIME in HF TIG mode only
This parameter sets the percentage on time of the PULSE FREQUENCY
for PEAK weld current when the PULSE is on.
PULSE FREQ.
This parameter sets the PULSE FREQUENCY when the PULSE is on.
AC FREQUENCY This parameter operates in AC mode only and is used to set the frequency
for the AC weld current.
WAVE BALANCE This parameter is used for aluminum AC TIG mode and is used to set the
penetration to cleaning action for the AC weld current. Generally WAVE
BALANCE is set to 50% for AC STICK welding. The WAVE BALANCE
control changes the ratio of penetration to cleaning action of the AC TIG
welding arc. Maximum weld penetration is achieved when the WAVE
BALANCE control is set to 10%. Maximum cleaning of heavily oxidised
aluminium or magnesium alloys is achieved when the WAVE BALANCE
control is set to 65%.
WAVE BALANCE=50% WAVE BALANCE=10%
50%
10%
(+ )
(-)
50%
Balanced with 50% penetration
and 50% cleaning
DOWN SLOPE
CRATER CUR.
POST-FLOW
65%
(+ )
(-)
WAVE BALANCE=65%
90%
Maximum Penetration and
reduced cleaning
(+ )
(-)
35%
Maximum Cleaning and
reduced penetration
This parameter operates in TIG modes only and is used to set the time for
the weld current to ramp down, after the torch trigger switch has been
pressed, to CRATER CUR. This control is used to eliminate the crater that
can form at the completion of a weld.
This parameter operates in SLOPE or REPEAT (4T) TIG modes only and
is used to set the finish current for TIG. The CRATER Current remains on
until the torch trigger switch is released after it has been depressed.
This parameter operates in TIG modes only and is used to adjust the post
gas flow time once the arc has extinguished. This control is used to
dramatically reduce oxidation of the tungsten electrode.
The SAVE/LOAD buttons are used to save and retrieve a total number of 5
programs into the 300TSW memory.
Table 4 – Weld Parameter Descriptions for Pro-Wave 300TSW
27
4.04 Weld Parameters for Pro-Wave 300TSW
Weld Mode
HF
LIFT
STICK
TIG
TIG
No
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
No
No
Yes
Yes
No
Yes
Yes
No
Yes
Yes
Weld
Parameter
PRE-FLOW
HOT START
INITIAL CUR.
UP SLOPE
PEAK CUR.
WELD CUR
(TIG)
WELD CUR
(STICK)
SPOT TIME
PULSE WIDTH
PULSE FREQ.
Parameter
Range
0.0 to 1.0 sec
0 to 70A
5 to 300A
0 to 15 sec
5 to 300A
Factory
Setting
0.1 sec
20A
30A
1 sec
120A
Incrementa
l Unit
0.1 sec
1A
1A
0.1 sec
1A
5 to 300A
80A
1A
No
Yes
Yes
5 to 300A
80A
1A
Yes
No
No
0.5 to 5.0 sec
15 to 80%
0.5 to 500Hz
2 sec
50%
100.0Hz
No
No
No
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
AC FREQUENCY
WAVE BALANCE
DOWN SLOPE
CRATER CUR.
POST-FLOW
15 to 150Hz
10 to 65%
0 to 25 sec
5 to 300A
0.0 to 60 sec
50Hz
50%
3 sec
30A
10 sec
0.1 sec
1%
See
Table 6
1Hz
1%
0.1 sec
1A
0.1 sec
Yes
Yes
No
No
No
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Table 5 – Weld Parameters for Pro-Wave 300TSW
PULSE FREQ. Range
0.5 to 20Hz
20 to 100Hz
100 to 500Hz
Incremental Unit
0.1Hz
1Hz
5Hz
Table 6 – PULSE FREQ. Range and Incremental Units
28
4.05 Power Source Features
Feature
New Digital Control
Description
• Almost all welding parameters are adjustable.
Touch Panel Switches
• Touch switches eliminate mechanical damage.
Front Control Cover
• Protects front panel controls.
Digital Meter
• Displays selected weld parameter value.
• Displays weld current when welding.
• Displays weld current for 20 seconds after weld
has been completed.
• A selected weld parameter value can be adjusted at
any time even while welding.
Intelligent Fan Control
• The intelligent cooling system is designed to
reduce dust and foreign material build-up, whilst
providing optimum cooling.
• Fan speed reduces approximately 30 seconds after
machine is turned on.
• Fan speed increases when internal components
reaches operating temperature.
ON/OFF switch
Voltage Reduction Device (VRD)
Control Knob
Self Diagnosis Using Error Codes
Save/Load function
• Primary voltage Supply ON/OFF switch located
on rear panel.
Reduces the OCV when the power supply is not in
use. Eliminates the need for add on voltage reducers
and has no effect on arc starting.
• VRD fully complies to IEC 60974-1
• When Stick mode is selected the green VRD light
is ON when not welding and red when welding.
• When in TIG modes VRD is off.
• For the selected weld parameter, rotating the knob
clockwise increases the parameter.
• Rotating the knob counterclockwise decreases the
parameter.
• A selected weld parameter value can be adjusted at
any time even while welding.
• Pushing the knob in displays actual arc voltage.
• An error code is displayed on the Digital Meter
when a problem occurs with Primary supply
voltage or internal component problems. Refer to
troubleshooting guide.
• A total number of 5 programs can be saved into the
300TSW memory.
SAVE the Current Weld Parameters into Memory
• Press the SAVE button
• Select a memory location by rotating the control
29
Feature
Description
knob, 1 to 5 is displayed on the meter.
• After selecting the desired memory location (ie 1 to
5), press the right scroll button and the machine will
give a beep to confirm the weld parameters from the
control panel are saved.
LOAD (retrieve) a Program to Control Panel
• Press the LOAD button.
• Select a memory location by rotating the control
knob, 1 to 5 is displayed on the meter.
After selecting the desired memory location (ie 1 to
5), press the right scroll button and the machine will
give a beep to confirm the weld parameters are loaded
onto the control panel.
30
5.0 SET-UP FOR SMAW (STICK) AND GTAW (TIG)
Conventional operating procedures apply when using the Welding Power Source, i.e. connect work
lead directly to work piece and electrode lead is used to hold electrode. Wide safety margins
provided by the coil design ensure that the Welding Power Source will withstand short-term
overload without adverse effects. The welding current range values should be used as a guide
only. Current delivered to the arc is dependent on the welding arc voltage, and as welding arc
voltage varies between different classes of electrodes, welding current at any one setting would
vary according to the type of electrode in use. The operator should use the welding current range
values as a guide, then finally adjust the current setting to suit the application.
Figure 6 – 300TSW AC/DC Set-up
WARNING 7
Before connecting the work clamp to the
work and inserting the electrode in the
electrode holder make sure the Primary
power supply is switched off.
CAUTION 3
Remove any packaging material
prior to use. Do not block the air
vents at the front or rear or sides of
the Welding Power Source.
CAUTION 4
DO NOT change the Weld Mode or
Weld Process Mode until after
POST-FLOW time has finished.
31
6.0 SEQUENCE OF OPERATION
NOTE: Scroll Buttons are used to select the parameters to be set. The
LED’s show which function is being adjusted on the weld sequence graph.
Refer to Symbols Table located in the front of the manual for Symbol
descriptions.
1
9
2
8
7
3
4
5
6
Figure 7 - 300TSW Front Panel
1. Pulse function – Pressing this button enables the TIG current pulse functions.
2. Remote Current function – Pressing this buttons enables remote current functions.
3. TIG Mode Functions – Pressing this button scrolls through the output TIG function modes
(Standard, Slope, Slope w/repeat, Spot).
4. Digital LED display – Welding amperage and parameter values are displayed in this window.
Internal warnings such as over temperature, low or high input voltage applied are signaled to the
operator by a warning sound and error message on the screen.
5. Save/Load Buttons – by using the Save & Load buttons the operator can easily save up to 5
welding parameter programs.
6. Control knob – allows the operator to adjust the output amperage within the entire range of the
power source and sets each parameter value.
7. Process Button – This button selects between STICK, HF TIG and Lift TIG mode.
8. Scroll Buttons – used to select the parameters to be set. The LED’s show which function is
being adjusted on the Sequence Graph.
9. AC/DC Button – Selects between AC or DC welding output.
32
6.01 Stick Welding
• Connect work lead to negative terminal
• Connect electrode lead to positive terminal
• Switch machine on
• Set AC or DC weld current. If AC is selected then set AC FREQ to 60Hz & WAVE
BALANCE to 50%.
• Connect remote control device if required
Use the Scroll Buttons to move to the parameter to be set. The LED will show which
function is being adjusted on the weld sequence graph. Use the control knob to adjust each
parameter.
• Set HOT START
• Set WELD current
Commence welding
6.02 AC or DC HF TIG Welding
Connect work lead to positive terminal
• Connect TIG torch to negative terminal
• Switch machine on
• Set AC or DC weld current. If AC is selected then set AC FREQ & WAVE BALANCE
• Connect a remote control device. A remote control device is required for use during
LIFT TIG and HF TIG operation. See section 4.01, section 2 “Remote Control Socket”,
for complete details of the remote device.
Use the Scroll Buttons to move to the parameter to be set. The LED will show which
function is being adjusted on the weld sequence graph. Use the control knob to adjust each
parameter.
• Set PRE-FLOW time
• Set HOT START current
• Set POST-FLOW time
• Set WELD current
• Set POST-FLOW time
Slope Mode Parameters if required
• Set INTIAL CUR current
• Set UP SLOPE time
• Set (WELD) PEAK CUR current
• Set BASE current
• Set DOWN SLOPE time
• Set CRATER CUR current
Pulse Mode parameters if required
• Set PULSE WIDTH % for PEAK CURRENT
• Set PEAK CURRENT
• Set PULSE FREQ
Commence welding
33
6.02.01 Save-Load Operation
A total number of 5 programs can be saved into the 300TSW memory
SAVE the Current Weld Parameters into Memory
• Press the SAVE button
• Select a memory location by rotating the control knob, 1 to 5 is displayed on the meter
• After selecting the desired memory location (ie 1 to 5), press the right scroll button and the machine
will give a beep to confirm the weld parameters from the control panel are saved.
•
LOAD (retrieve) a Program to Control Panel
• Press the LOAD button
• Select a memory location by rotating the control knob, 1 to 5 is displayed on the meter After
selecting the desired memory location (ie 1 to 5), press the right scroll button and the machine give a
beep to confirm the weld parameters are loaded onto the control panel
34
6.02.02 Slope Mode Sequence
Switch
Closed
Initial
Current
Switch
Open
Up
Slope
Switch
Closed
Weld Current
Down
Slope
Switch
Open
Final
Current
Postflow
Preflow
Note 5
Slope function operates with a Remote ON/OFF device only.
1) To start Slope sequence Close remote switch contacts. Once the welding arc is established the
Power Source will maintain initial current setting as long as the remote switch contacts are
closed.
a) In the HF TIG mode, after Preflow time High Frequency is present at the torch. When the
torch is positioned close to the work the welding current will transfer to the work and
establish the arc at the initial current setting.
b) In the Lift TIG mode, after preflow time Lift Start current is present at the torch. When the
electrode is touched to the work and lifted off, the welding arc is established at the initial
current setting.
2) Open Remote Switch – current increases to weld current. Once welding arc has reached weld
current the power source will maintain weld current as long as the remote switch contacts are
open.
3) Close Remote Switch – Welding current decreases to final current setting. Once final welding
current is reached the power source will maintain final current setting as long as the remote
switch contacts are closed.
4) Open Remote Switch – Welding arc stops and post flow begins.
35
6.02.03 Slope Mode with repeat sequence
The repeat function is operated during the down slope cycle of the Slope Sequence and is active
through the down slope period only. During the down slope period by opening the Remote Switch
contacts the current will increase back to weld current. Within the Down Slope period the repeat
function can be operated as many times as desired. To continue slope cycle and end slope sequence
close remote switch contacts and allow weld current to reach final current setting. Once final current
setting is reached opening the Remote Switch again will turn off the welding arc and post flow
begins.
6.02.04 Pulse Controls
(Pulse Width)
(Pulse Frequency)
(Peak Current)
(Base)
Background
Current
The Pulse controls are used primarily to control heat input. Pulse offers a number of advantages as
follows:
1)
2)
3)
4)
5)
Control puddle – size and fluidity (especially out of position).
Increase penetration
Travel speed control
Better consistent quality
Distortion on lighter or thinner materials.
Pulse-current provides a system in which the welding current continuously changes between two
levels. During the periods of Peak current, heating and fusion takes place, and during the
background (base) current periods, cooling and solidification take place. Pulse Width is the time in
one cycle the current stays at the peak current setting. Pulse Frequency measured in Hertz is the
number of cycles per second the current travels between peak and background current settings. It is
as if the foot rheostat were moved up and down to increase and decrease the welding current on a
regular basis. The faster you moved the foot rheostat up and down the faster the frequency.
36
PAGE LEFT INTENTIONALL BLANK
37
7.0 BASIC TIG WELDING GUIDE
7.01 Explanation of “Fluttery Arc” when AC TIG Welding on Aluminum
The following will assist in understanding the phenomenon of Arc Flutter, also referred to as Arc
Rectification.
The basic thesis is that the fluttering is caused by lack of oxide in the weld pool.
The oxide layer on the plate reduced the energy for electron emission. Electron emission from the
weld pool (DC+) causes the oxide layers to be disrupted, the so-called “cleaning action”.
However once the cleaning action has produced a mirror surface weld pool the effect of the oxide
is limited because the oxide layer has disappeared. This makes electron emission from the weld
pool more difficult and increases the chance of arc instability.
This idea is supported by the observation that once fluttering starts it can be made to stop by
working the arc away from the mirror weld pool to an area of oxide coated material. As soon as
this is done the arc settles back to a stable condition. So while the arc is “consuming” oxide
coated plate the instability does not occur. But once the arc is stationary, the pool thoroughly
“cleaned” by election emission, the fluttering begins.
Tests conducted on various types of AC TIG power sources, Fluttery Arc is not confined to one
type of power source or it’s design, both conventional and inverter types suffer from the same
problem.
AC TIG on aluminum
The Problem: Arc appears unstable and pulses or flutters. ie. appears to rapidly change welding
current.
Conditions that accentuate arc flutter:
Conditions that minimizes arc flutter:
• Cold work piece,
• Preheat the work piece,
• Very short arc length,
• Increase the arc length,
• Weld pool crater about 0.39” to 0.47”
(10 to 12mm) diameter,
• Introduce filler rod material to the
weld pool which introduces oxides.
• Arc field in one spot to produce
“mirror” clean weld pool,
• Move the weld pool around to
introduce oxides to the weld pool.
• Increased cleaning action.
ie. Prolonged oxide emission from a
stationary weld pool increases the
likelihood of arc flutter,
• Decrease the cleaning action by
turning the WAVE BALANCE to below
50% or move the weld pool around.
• Accentuated when tungsten running
near its current capacity, ie. Molten
ball on end.
• Use a larger tungsten electrode.
Table 7 – Reduction of Arc Flutter
Conclusion:
Fluttery arc in AC TIG is a physical phenomenon independent of machine design.
38
7.02 Electrode Polarity
Connect the TIG torch to the - / TORCH terminal and the work lead to the + / WORK
terminal for direct current straight polarity. Direct current straight polarity is the most widely
used polarity for DC TIG welding. It allows limited wear of the electrode since 70% of the
heat is concentrated at the work piece.
7.03 Tungsten Electrode Current Ranges
Electrode Diameter
AC Current (Amps)
DC Current (Amps)
0.040” (1.0mm)
30 – 70
30 – 60
1/16” (1.6mm)
60 – 95
60 – 115
3/32” (2.4mm)
125 – 150
100 – 165
1/8” (3.2mm)
130 – 225
135 – 200
5/32” (4.0mm)
190 – 280
190 – 280
3/16” (4.8mm)
250 – 340
250 – 340
Table 8 – Current ranges for varies tungsten electrode sizes
7.04 Tungsten Electrode Types
Electrode Type
(Ground
Finish)
Thoriated 2%
Zirconated 1%
Ceriated 2%
Welding Application
Features
Color
Code
DC welding of mild steel,
stainless steel and copper.
Excellent arc starting, Long
life, High current carrying
capacity.
Red
High quality AC welding of
aluminium, magnesium and
their alloys.
Self cleaning, Long life,
Maintains balled end, High
current carrying capacity.
White
AC & DC welding of mild
steel, stainless steel, copper,
aluminium, magnesium and
their alloys
Longer life, More stable arc,
Easier starting, Wider current
range, Narrower more
concentrated arc.
Table 9 – Tungsten electrode types
39
Grey
7.05 Guide for Selecting Filler Wire Diameter
Filler Wire Diameter
AC Current Range
(Amps)
DC Current Range
(Amps)
1/16” (1.6 mm)
30-95
20 - 90
3/32” (2.4 mm)
125-160
65 - 115
1/8” (3.2 mm)
180-240
100 - 165
3/16” (4.8 mm)
220-320
200-350
Table 10 – Filler wire selection guide
NOTE 6
The filler wire diameter specified in the above table is a guide only, other diameter
wires may be used according to the welding application
7.06 Shielding Gas Selection
Shielding Gas
Argoshield is a registered trademark of BOC Gases
Limited.
Alloy
Aluminium & alloys
Carbon Steel
Stainless Steel
Nickel Alloy
Copper
Titanium
Welding Argon, Argoshield 80T, 81T
Welding Argon
Welding Argon, Argoshield 71T, 80T, 81T
Welding Argon, Argoshield 71T
Welding Argon, Argoshield 81T
Welding Argon, Argoshield 80T, 81T
Table 11 – Shielding gas selection
7.07 TIG Welding Parameters for Low Carbon & Low Alloy Steel Pipe
Electrode Type &
Diameter
Current Range DC
Amperes
Filler Rod for
Root Pass
Thoriated 2%
3/32” (2.4 mm)
120 - 170
Yes
Thoriated 2%
3/32” (2.4 mm)
100 - 160
Yes
Thoriated 2%
3/32” (2.4 mm)
90 - 130
No
Joint Preparation
Table 12 – TIG welding parameters for low carbon & low alloy steel pipe
40
7.08 Welding Parameters for Aluminum
Base Metal
Thickness
AC Current for
Aluminum
Tungsten
Electrode
Diameter
0.040”
30-45
35-50
0.040”
1.0mm
1/16”
1.6mm
5-7
Butt/Corner
Lap/ Fillet
40-60
45-70
0.040”
1.0mm
1/16”
1.6mm
5-7
Butt/Corner
Lap/ Fillet
60-85
70-95
1/16”
1.6mm
1/16”
1.6mm
7
Butt/Corner
Lap/ Fillet
125-150
130-160
3/32”
2.4mm
10
Butt/Corner
Lap/ Fillet
180-225
190-240
3/32”
2.4mm
1/8”
3.2mm
1/8”
3.2mm
1/8”
3.2mm
10
Butt/Corner
Lap/ Fillet
240-280
250-320
3/16”
4.8mm
3/16”
4.8mm
13
Butt/Corner
Lap/ Fillet
1.0mm
0.045”
1.2mm
1/16”
1.6mm
1/8”
3.2mm
3/16”
4.8mm
¼”
6.4mm
Filler Rod Argon Gas
Diameter Flow Rate
(if required) Litres/min
Joint Type
Table 13 – AC TIG welding parameters
7.09 Welding Parameters for Steel
Base Metal DC Current DC Current Tungsten
Thickness
for Mild for Stainless Electrode
Steel
Steel
Diameter
35-45
20-30
0.040”
0.040”
40-50
25-35
1.0mm
1.0mm
45-55
30-45
0.045”
0.040”
50-60
35-50
1.2mm
1.0mm
Filler Rod
Diameter
(if required)
Argon Gas
Flow Rate
Liters/min
1/16”
1.6mm
5-7
Butt/Corner
Lap/ Fillet
1/16”
1.6mm
5-7
Butt/Corner
Lap/ Fillet
Joint Type
1/16”
1.6mm
60-70
70-90
40-60
50-70
1/16”
1.6mm
1/16”
1.6mm
7
Butt/Corner
Lap/ Fillet
1/8”
3.2mm
80-100
90-115
65-85
90-110
1/16”
1.6mm
3/32”
2.4mm
7
Butt/Corner
Lap/ Fillet
3/16”
4.8mm
115-135
140-165
100-125
125-150
3/32”
2.4mm
1/8”
3.2mm
10
Butt/Corner
Lap/ Fillet
¼”
6.4mm
160-175
170-200
135-160
160-180
1/8”
3.2mm
5/32”
4.0mm
10
Butt/Corner
Lap/ Fillet
Table 14 – DC TIG welding parameters
41
8.0 Basic Arc Welding Guide
8.01 Electrode Polarity
Stick electrodes are generally connected to the ‘+’ terminal and the work lead to the ‘−’
terminal but if in doubt consult the electrode manufacturers literature.
8.02 Effects of Stick Welding Various Materials
High tensile and alloy steels
The two most prominent effects of welding these steels are the formation of a hardened zone in
the weld area, and, if suitable precautions are not taken, the occurrence in this zone of under-bead
cracks. Hardened zone and under-bead cracks in the weld area may be reduced by using the
correct electrodes, preheating, using higher current settings, using larger electrodes sizes, short
runs for larger electrode deposits or tempering in a furnace.
Manganese steels
The effect on manganese steel of slow cooling from high temperatures is to embrittle it. For this
reason it is absolutely essential to keep manganese steel cool during welding by quenching after
each weld or skip welding to distribute the heat.
Cast Iron
Most types of cast iron, except white iron, are weldable. White iron, because of its extreme
brittleness, generally cracks when attempts are made to weld it. Trouble may also be experienced
when welding white-heart malleable, due to the porosity caused by gas held in this type of iron.
Copper and alloys
The most important factor is the high rate of heat conductivity of copper, making preheating of
heavy sections necessary to give proper fusion of weld and base metal.
Types of Electrodes
Arc Welding electrodes are classified into a number of groups depending on their applications.
There are a great number of electrodes used for specialized industrial purposes which are not of
particular interest for everyday general work. These include some low hydrogen types for high
tensile steel, cellulose types for welding large diameter pipes, etc. The range of electrodes dealt
with in this publication will cover the vast majority of applications likely to be encountered; are all
easy to use and all will work on even the most basic of welding machines.
42
9.0 ROUTINE MAINTENANCE
The only routine maintenance required for the power supply is a thorough cleaning and inspection,
with the frequency depending on the usage and the operating environment.
WARNING 8
Disconnect primary power at the source before opening the enclosure. Wait at least two
minutes before opening the enclosure to allow the primary capacitors to discharge.
To clean the unit, open the enclosure (please refer to the ‘Opening the Enclosure’ section in the
300TSW Service Manual P/N 430429-517) and use a vacuum cleaner to remove any accumulated
dirt and dust. The unit should also be wiped clean, if necessary; with solvents that are
recommended for cleaning electrical apparatus.
CAUTION 5
Do not blow air into the power supply during cleaning. Blowing air into the unit can
cause metal particles to interfere with sensitive electrical components and cause
damage to the unit.
43
10.0 BASIC TROUBLESHOOTING
WARNING 9
There are extremely dangerous voltages and power levels present inside this product. Do
not attempt to open or repair unless you are an Accredited Thermal Arc Service Agent and
you have had training in power measurements and troubleshooting techniques.
If major complex subassemblies are faulty, then the Welding Power Source must be returned to an
Accredited Thermal Arc Service Agent for repair.
The basic level of troubleshooting is that which can be performed without special equipment or
knowledge.
10.01 TIG Welding Problems
Weld quality is dependent on the selection of the correct consumables, maintenance of
equipment and proper welding technique.
Description
Possible Cause
1 Excessive beard
build-up or poor
penetration or poor
fusion at edges of
weld.
Welding current is too low.
Increase weld current and/or
faulty joint preparation.
2 Weld bead too
wide and flat or
undercut at edges
of weld or
excessive burn
through.
Welding current is too high.
Decrease weld current.
3 Weld bead too
small or
insufficient
penetration or
ripples in bead are
widely spaced
apart.
Travel speed too fast.
Reduce travel speed.
4 Weld bead too
wide or excessive
bead build up or
excessive penetration in butt joint.
Travel speed too slow.
Increase travel speed.
5 Uneven leg length
in fillet joint.
Wrong placement of filler
rod.
Re-position filler rod.
44
Remedy
Description
Possible Cause
Remedy
6 Electrode melts
A Electrode is connected to the A Connect the electrode to the
when arc is struck.
‘+’ terminal.
‘−’ terminal.
B WAVE BALANCE is greater B Reduced WAVE BALANCE to
than 50%.
below 50% or increase the
electrode size.
7 Dirty weld pool.
A Electrode contaminated
through contact with work
piece or filler rod material.
B Gas contaminated with air.
A Clean the electrode by
grinding off the contaminates.
B Check gas lines for cuts and
loose fitting or change gas
cylinder.
8 Electrode melts or A No gas flowing to welding
region.
oxidizes when an
arc is struck.
B Torch is clogged with dust.
C Gas hose is cut.
D Gas passage contains
impurities.
E
F
G
H
9 Poor weld finish.
A Check the gas lines for kinks
or breaks and gas cylinder
contents.
B Clean torch.
C Replace gas hose.
D Disconnect gas hose from
torch then raise gas pressure
and blow out impurities.
Gas regulator turned off.
E Turn on.
Torch valve is turned off.
F Turn on.
The electrode is too small for G Increase electrode diameter
the welding current.
or reduce the welding current.
WAVE BALANCE is set
H Reduced WAVE BALANCE to
above 50%.
below 50% or increase the
electrode size.
Inadequate shielding gas.
Increase gas flow or check
gas line for gas flow
problems.
10 Arc flutters during A Tungsten electrode is too
A Select the right size electrode.
TIG welding.
large for the welding current.
Refer to Basic TIG Welding
guide.
B Absence of oxides in the
B Refer Basic TIG Welding
weld pool.
Guide for ways to reduce arc
flutter.
11 Welding arc can
A Work clamp is not connected A Connect the work clamp to
not be established.
to the work piece or the
the work piece or connect the
work/torch leads are not
work/torch leads to the right
welding terminals.
connected to the right
welding terminals.
B Torch lead is disconnected.
B Connect it to the ‘−‘ terminal.
45
Description
Possible Cause
Welding arc can
C Gas flow incorrectly set,
not be established.
cylinder empty or the torch
valve is off.
(Cont.)
12 Arc start is not
smooth.
Remedy
C Select the right flow rate,
change cylinders or turn torch
valve on.
A Tungsten electrode is too
A Select the right size electrode.
large for the welding current.
Refer to Basic TIG Welding
Guide.
B The wrong electrode is being B Select the right electrode
used for the welding job.
type. Refer to Basic TIG
Welding Guide.
C Gas flow rate is too high.
C Select the correct rate for the
welding job.
Refer to Basic TIG Welding
Guide.
D Incorrect shielding gas is
D Select the right shielding gas.
being used.
Refer to Basic TIG Welding
Guide.
E Poor work clamp connection E Improve connection to work
to work piece.
piece.
10.02 Stick Welding Problems
Description
Possible Cause
1 Gas pockets or
A Electrodes are damp.
voids in weld metal B Welding current is too high.
(Porosity).
C Surface impurities such as
oil, grease, paint, etc.
2 Crack occurring in A Rigidity of joint.
weld metal soon
after solidification
commences
B Insufficient throat thickness.
3 A gap is left by
failure of the weld
metal to fill the
root of the weld.
C Cooling rate is too high.
A Welding current is too low.
B Electrode too large for joint.
C Insufficient gap.
D Incorrect sequence.
Remedy
A Dry electrodes before use.
B Reduce welding current.
C Clean joint before welding.
A Redesign to relieve weld joint
of severe stresses or use crack
resistance electrodes.
B Travel slightly slower to allow
greater build up in throat.
C Preheat plate and cool slowly.
A Increase welding current
B Use smaller diameter
electrode.
C Allow wider gap.
D Use correct build-up sequence.
Figure 8 – Example of insufficient gap or incorrect
sequence
46
4 Portions of the
weld run do not
fuse to the surface
of the metal or
edge of the joint.
A Small electrodes used on
heavy cold plate.
B Welding current is too low.
A Use larger electrodes and preheat the plate.
B Increase welding current.
C Wrong electrode angle.
C Adjust angle so the welding
arc is directed more into the
base metal.
D Travel speed of electrode is
D Reduce travel speed of
too high.
electrode.
E Scale or dirt on joint surface. E Clean surface before welding.
Figure 9 – Example of lack of fusion
5 Non-metallic parti- A Non-metallic particles may
cles are trapped in
be trapped in undercut from
the weld metal
previous run.
(slag inclusion).
B Joint preparation too
restricted.
C
D
E
F
A If bad undercut is present,
clean slag out and cover with a
run from a smaller diameter
electrode.
B Allow for adequate
penetration and room for
cleaning out the slag.
Irregular deposits allow slag C If very bad, chip or grind out
to be trapped.
irregularities.
Lack of penetration with slag D Use smaller electrode with
trapped beneath weld bead.
sufficient current to give
adequate penetration. Use
suitable tools to remove all
slag from corners.
Rust or mill scale is
E Clean joint before welding.
preventing full fusion.
Wrong electrode for position F Use electrodes designed for
in which welding is done.
position in which welding is
done, otherwise proper control
of slag is difficult.
Figure 10 – Examples of slag inclusion
47
10.03 Power Source Problems
Description
1 The welding arc
cannot be
established
Possible Cause
Remedy
A The Primary supply voltage A Switch ON the Primary supply
has not been switched ON.
voltage.
B The Welding Power Source B Switch ON the Welding
switch is switched OFF.
Power Source.
C Loose connections internally. C Have an Accredited Thermal
Arc Service Agent repair the
connection.
2 Maximum output
Defective control circuit
Have an Accredited Thermal
welding current can
Arc Service Agent inspect
not be achieved
then repair the welder.
with nominal
Mains supply
voltage.
3 Welding current
Poor work lead connection to
Ensure that the work lead has
reduces when
the work piece.
a positive electrical
welding
connection to the work piece.
4 No gas flow when A Gas hose is cut.
A Replace gas hose.
the torch trigger
B Gas passage contains
B Disconnect gas hose from the
switch is
impurities.
rear of Power Source then
depressed.
raise gas pressure and blow
out impurities.
C Gas regulator turned off.
C Turn gas regulator on.
D Torch trigger switch lead is
D Reconnect lead or repair faulty
disconnected or switch/cable
switch/cable.
is faulty.
48
Description
Possible Cause
5 Gas flow won’t
shut off
Remedy
A Weld Mode (STD, SLOPE,
A Strike an arc to complete the
REPEAT or SPOT) was
weld cycle.
changed before POST-FLOW
OR
gas time had finished.
Switch machine off then on to
reset solenoid valve sequence.
B Gas valve is faulty.
B Have an Accredited Thermal
Arc Service Agent replace gas
valve.
C Gas valve jammed open.
C Have an Accredited Thermal
Arc Service Agent repair or
replace gas valve.
D POST-FLOW control is set to D Reduce POST-FLOW time.
60 sec.
6 The TIG electrode
The Weld Process Mode
Do not change Weld Process
has been
(STICK, HF TIG or LIFT
Mode before the POST-FLOW
contaminated due
TIG) was changed before
gas time had finished.
to the gas flow
POST-FLOW gas time had
shutting off before
finished.
the programmed
POST-FLOW time
has elapsed
49
11.0 Voltage Reduction Device (VRD)
11.01 VRD Specification
Description
VRD Open Circuit Voltage
VRD Resistance
VRD Turn OFF Time
Pro-Wave
300TSW
15.3 to 19.8V
Notes
Open circuit voltage between welding
terminals
148 to 193 ohms The required resistance between welding
terminals to turn ON the welding power
0.2 to 0.3 seconds The time taken to turn OFF the welding
power once the welding current has
stopped
11.02 VRD Maintenance
Routine inspection and testing (power source)
An inspection of the power source, an insulation resistance test and an earth resistance test
shall be carried out.
a) For transportable equipment, at least once every 3 months; and
b) For fixed equipment, at least once every 12 months.
The owners of the equipment shall keep a suitable record of the periodic tests.
Note 7
A transportable power source is any equipment that is not permanently connected and
fixed in the position in which it is operated.
In addition to the above tests and specifically in relation to the VRD fitted to this machine,
the following periodic tests should also be conducted by an accredited Thermal Arc service
agent.
Description
VRD Open Circuit Voltage
VRD Turn ON Resistance
VRD Turn OFF Time
IEC 60974-1 Requirements
Less than 20V; at Vin=230V or 460V
Less than 200 ohms
Less than 0.3 seconds
If this equipment is used in a hazardous location or environments with a high risk of
electrocution then the above tests should be carried out prior to entering this location.
50
4 E04 error code displayed
Output voltage exceeds the
secondary voltage specification.
3 E03 error code displayed
Primary (input) current too high.
2 E02 error code displayed
Temperature sensor TH2 (protects
secondary diodes) is greater than
80ºC for about 1 second.
1 E01 error code displayed
Temperature sensor TH1 (protects
IGBTs) is greater than 80ºC for
about 1 second.
Description
Possible Cause
51
TIG torch cable and/or work
lead are too long or leads
are coiled.
A Primary current is too high
because welding arc is too
long.
B Mains supply voltage is
more than 10% below
nominal voltage.
C Air flow is restricted by
vents being blocked.
A The Welding Power
Source’s duty cycle has
been exceeded.
B Fan ceases to operate.
C Air flow is restricted by
vents being blocked.
A The Welding Power
Source’s duty cycle has
been exceeded.
B Fan ceases to operate.
12.0 Power Source Error Codes
Weld current ceases.
Buzzer sounds constantly.
Switch machine off then on
to reset E03 error.
Weld current ceases.
Buzzer sounds constantly.
Fan operates at max speed.
E02 resets when TH1
decreases to 70ºC for about
30 seconds.
Weld current ceases.
Buzzer sounds constantly.
Fan operates at max speed.
E01 resets when TH1
decreases to 70ºC for about
30 seconds.
Remarks
Reduce the length of the
Weld current ceases.
TIG torch cable and/or work Buzzer sounds constantly.
lead or un-coiled leads.
Switch machine off then on
to reset E04 error.
B Have an Accredited
Thermal Arc Service Agent
or a qualified electrician
check for low Mains
voltage.
A Reduce length of welding
arc.
A Let Power Source cool
down then keep within its
duty cycle.
B Have an Accredited
Thermal Arc Service Agent
investigate.
Unblock vents then let
C Power Source cool down.
A Let Power Source cool
down then keep within its
duty cycle.
B Have an Accredited
Thermal Arc Service Agent
investigate.
C
Unblock vents then let
Power Source cool down.
Remedy
Mains supply voltage is less
than the nominal operating
voltage less 10%.
Mains supply voltage is
down to a dangerously low
level.
When 3 phase machine is
first turned on with the
wrong Primary supply
(input) voltage connected.
Link switch plug not
connected.
The Primary supply (input)
voltage fluctuates and is not
stable.
6 E14 error code displayed
Under mains supply (input) voltage
warning primary capacitors is
reduced for one second.
7 E12 error code displayed
Under mains supply (input) voltage
primary capacitors is reduced for
one second.
8 E81 error code displayed
Wrong Primary supply (input)
voltage connected.
9 E82 error code displayed
Link switch plug not connected.
10 E83 error code displayed
CPU checks mains supply (input)
voltage when the on/off switch on
rear panel of machine is turned ON.
52
Primary supply voltage is
greater than the nominal
voltage plus 10%
Possible Cause
5 E11 error code displayed
Over Primary supply (input)
voltage at primary capacitors is
exceeded for one second.
Description
Have an Accredited
Thermal Arc Service Agent
check connector plug on
input PCB and the Mains
voltage
Have an Accredited
Thermal Arc Service Agent
check connector plug on
input PCB.
Have an Accredited
Thermal Arc Service Agent
or a qualified electrician
check the Mains voltage.
Have an Accredited
Thermal Arc Service Agent
or a qualified electrician
check the Mains voltage
Have an Accredited
Thermal Arc Service Agent
or a qualified electrician
check the Mains voltage.
Have an Accredited
Thermal Arc Service Agent
or a qualified electrician
check the Primary voltage.
Remedy
No weld current is
available.
Buzzer sounds constantly.
Switch machine off then on
to reset E83 error.
No weld current is
available.
Buzzer sounds constantly.
Switch machine off.
No weld current is
available.
Buzzer sounds constantly.
Switch machine off.
Weld current ceases.
Buzzer sounds constantly.
Error code E12
automatically will reset
when the voltage increases.
Weld current available.
Buzzer sounds
intermittently.
Error code E14
automatically will reset
when the voltage increases.
Weld current ceases.
Buzzer sounds constantly.
Error code E11
automatically will reset
when the voltage reduces.
Remarks
53
A Main on/off switch on
machine has been turned
B off.
Mains supply (input)
voltage has been turned off
The Welding Power
Source’s temperature
sensors have malfunctioned.
12 E94 error code displayed
Temperature sensor TH1 for IGBTs
or sensor TH2 for secondary diodes
are open circuit.
14 E99 error code displayed
Mains supply (input) voltage has
been turned off but control circuit
has power from the primary
capacitors.
Memory chip (EEPROM)
error.
Possible Cause
11 E93 error code displayed
Memory chip (EEPROM) on
control PCB can not read/write
weld parameters.
Description
Remarks
Weld current ceases.
Buzzer sounds constantly.
Must switch machine off
B Have an Accredited
Thermal Arc Service Agent then on to reset E99 error.
or a qualified electrician
check the Mains voltage and
fuses.
A Turn on/off switch on.
Have an Accredited
Weld current ceases.
Thermal Arc Service Agent Buzzer sounds constantly.
check or replace the
Switch machine off.
temperature sensors.
Have an Accredited
Weld current ceases.
Thermal Arc Service Agent Buzzer sounds constantly.
check the control PCB.
Switch machine off.
Remedy
Inductor
HF. Unit
HF. Gap
Inductor
FCH
HF.UNIT
L105
Description
Coupling Coil
Remote Socket
Current Sensor
Diode
Diode
Diode
Diode
Diode
Diode
Diode
Fan
DWG. No.
CC
CON1
CT1
D1
D2
D3
D4
D5
D6
D6
FAN
13.0 PARTS LIST
54
Type & Rating
F2A677800 CC
MS3102A20-27S
HC-TN200V4B15M 200A 4V
DFA100BA160
DBA200UA60
DBA200UA60
DBA200UA60
DBA200UA60
DBA200UA60
DBA200UA60
109E5724H507 DC 24V 16.8W
(with Wire)
F2A677600 FCH
HF.UNIT (WK-4840 U02)
U0A601100
1615MRE RING CORE
1
1
1
1
QTY.
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
F2A677600
U0A632200
U0A601100
63200006500
Code No.
F2A677800
U0A727700
11251003000
454180160
4583A0060
4583A0060
4583A0060
4583A0060
4583A0060
4583a0060
U0A738200
10-6771
10-6632
10-6633
10-6538
Order No.
10-6767
10-6768
10-5003
10-6769
10-6629
10-6629
10-6629
10-6629
10-6629
10-6629
10-6770
Printed Circuit Board
Printed Circuit Board
Printed Circuit Board
Printed Circuit Board
Printed Circuit Board
Printed Circuit Board
Printed Circuit Board
Printed Circuit Board
Printed Circuit Board
Printed Circuit Board
Printed Circuit Board
Printed Circuit Board
Printed Circuit Board
Printed Circuit Board
Transistor
Transistor
Transistor
Transistor
PCB2
PCB3
PCB4
PCB5
PCB6
PCB9
PCB10
PCB11
PCB14
PCB15
PCB16
PCB17
PCB18
PCB19
Q1
Q2
Q3
Q4
DWG. No.
Description
PCB1
Printed Circuit Board
13.0 PARTS LIST Continued
55
Type & Rating
QTY.
Code No.
WK-4961 U01 MAIN PCB
1 U0A681600
(with Cable EBA521700)
with Thunder Label
WK-4983 U01 CTL.SOURCE
1 P0A498301
WK-4819 U01 DETECT PCB
1 P0A481901
WK-4984 U01 IGBT DRIVER
1 P0A498401
WK-5157 U05 AC CONTROL
1 P0A515705
WK-5037 U02 AC TIG PANEL
1 P0A503702
WK-4917 U04 FILTER 480V
1 P0A491704
WK-4970 U01 START.PCB
1 P0A497001
WK-4963 U01 2 IGBT PCB
1 P0A496301
WK-5100 U01 DISCHARGE PCB
1 P0A510001
WK-5246 U01 DI. SNUBBER
1 U0A764000
with Thunder Label
WK-5040 U01 C TYPE RELAY
1 P0A504001
WK-5248 U01 GATE PCB-2
1 P0A524801
WK-5248 U01 GATE PCB-2
1 P0A524801
WK-5249 U01 RESISTOR PCB
1 U0A771100
CM100DUS12F-1 600V 100A
1 U0A764100
(with WK-5247 U01)
CM100DUS12F-1 600V 100A
1 U0A764100
(with WK-5247 U01)
GCA200CA60 (with WK-3367 U04)
1 U0A705400
GCA200CA60 (with WK-3367 U04)
1 U0A705400
10-6643
10-6643
10-6856
10-6780
10-6853
10-6853
10-6876
10-6856
10-6773
10-6635
10-6774
10-6846
10-6775
10-6740
10-6776
10-6777
10-6778
10-6852
Order No.
10-6772
Description
Resistor
Resistor
Switch
Switch
Solenoid Valve
Transformer
Transformer
Transformer
Thermistor
Front Panel
Rear Panel
Side Panel
Front Control Cover
Rear Control Cover
Protection Cover
Encoder Cover
PCB Cover
DWG. No.
R2
R3
S1
S2
SOL
T1
T2
T3
TH1,2
13.0 PARTS LIST Continued
56
Type & Rating
ERF20HMJ151 20W 150Ω
JG23V101J
68W 100Ω
DCP-103SR100C-480V 3P
SDKGA4-A-1-A
5505NBR1.5 DC24V 11VA/10W
(with Gas Inlet and PC4-02)
F2A705700 MTR
F2A705700 MTR
F2A869300 300A AC/DC DT
ERTA53D203 (Two-piece group)
E0D004800
E0D004900
E0D006200
J4B570500
JDA173300
E0C299200
EBA514400
E1B547900
1
1
1
1
1
1
2
1
1
1
1
1
QTY.
1
2
1
1
1
F2A705700
F2A705700
F2A869300
U0A733300
E0D004800
E0D004900
E0D006200
J4B570500
U0A728000
E0C299200
EBA514400
E1B547900
Code No.
40310211500
40511000200
25850003700
24704531400
U0A705700
10-6782
10-6782
10-6877
10-6784
10-6785
10-6786
10-6787
10-6788
10-6789
10-6790
10-6791
10-6792
Order No.
10-5081
10-5137
10-6857
10-6781
10-6645
DWG. No.
Description
Name Label
Side Label
VRD Label
Warranty Label
Warning Label 1
Warning Label 2
Output Terminal Label
Gas Input Label
Gas Outlet
C-Ring
Output Terminal
(female)
Input Cable
Input Cable Clamp
Heatsink
Heatsink
Knob
Knob Cap
Control Cover Sheet
Flat Cable
13.0 PARTS LIST Continued
57
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
SOOW AWG8X4C L=3.4m
EBA156800
E1B548900 FIN 1
E1B549000 FIN 2
2628603
3028104
N0B882700
EAA547301
TRAK-BE35-70S
QTY.
2
2
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
2
2
Type & Rating
N4A056400
N4A009200
N4A155900
N4A155800
N0B891300
N0B476400
N4A040600
N4A040700
E5A925600(with PC4-02)
U0A722400
EBA156800
E1B548900
E1B549000
50990001650
50990003400
N0B882700
EAA547301
Code No.
N4A056400
N4A009200
N4A155900
N4A155800
N0B891300
N0B476400
N4A040600
N4A040700
U0A705800
53003000600
26999025900
Ref. Only
10-6795
10-6796
10-6797
10-6798
10-6799
10-6800
10-6668
Order No.
10-6793
10-6657
Ref. Only
Ref. Only
10-5497
10-5496
10-6794
10-6733
10-6659
10-5184
10-6660
DWG. No.
Description
Post11 (S1)
Post2 (Q4)
Post3 (D1,Q1,Q2)
Post421 (D2-6)
Post410
S1 Bus Bar
Transformer Bus Bar 1
Q2,3 Bus Bar 1
Q2,3 Bus Bar 2
Q-(+) Bus Bar
D Bus Bar 2
D Total Bus Bar 1
D Total Bus Bar 3
D Total Bus Bar 4
D Total Bus Bar 5
D Total Bus Bar 6
13.0 PARTS LIST Continued
58
Type & Rating
EBA643600 (M5-M5) 9
EBA425000 (M5)11.4
EBA425100 (M5-M5)23
BSB421
(M4)7.0
4SQ10
ECA321000
EBA365600
EBA429000
EBA429100
EBA501200
EBA364800
ECA129100 D Total Bus Bar 1
ECA129300 D Total Bus Bar 3
ECA129400 D Total Bus Bar 4
ECA129600A D Total Bus Bar 5
ECA129700 D Total Bus Bar 6
QTY.
3
3
9
8
4
3
1
2
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
Code No.
EBA643600
EBA425000
EBA425100
53602020600
53602011500
ECA321000
EBA365600
EBA429000
EBA429100
EBA501200
EBA364800
ECA129100
ECA129300
ECA129400
ECA129600
ECA129700
Order No.
10-6751
10-6801
10-6802
10-6803
10-6867
10-6868
10-6804
10-6806
10-6807
10-6808
10-6810
10-6870
10-6871
10-6872
10-6878
10-6879
DWG. NO.
59
Type & Rating
Clip
#74 NATURAL (Plastic Tab)
Right Chassis
J2C977100
Left Chassis
J2C976800
PCB10 Chassis
JDA013400
Transformer Chassis 2 JDA024800
Transformer Chassis 1 JDA026000
Transformer Hold
JDA064300
Chassis 2
Transformer Sheet
EBA460900
14-Pin Con Cover Set 1070500-20 (with String and Clip)
Nylon Hose
T0425B Nylon Hose L=0.5m
Output Terminal (male) TRAK-SK50
Operating Manual
K1A208900 300TSW
Service Manual
Description
13.0 PARTS LIST Continued
Code No.
606024220
J2C977100
J2C976800
JDA013400
JDA024800
JDA026000
JDA064300
EBA460900
U0A728200
U0A706000
26999025800
K1A208900
QTY.
4
1
1
1
1
1
1
2
1
1
2
1
1
10-6820
10-6821
10-6681
10-2020
430429-511
430429-517
Order No.
10-5259
10-6814
10-6815
10-6816
10-6817
10-6818
10-6819
APPENDIX A
CN2
INTERCONNECT DIAGRAM
PCB1
P
1 2
V1
(TB1)
Q1
C1
TB1
C2E1
G2
E2
E1
G1
G 6
S1
L1
PCB17
CN12
1
2
5
6
PCB7
+ 7
PCB9
1
4
CN2
P
1
CN1
Ti1
INPUT
VG1
VG2
CN1
PGND
CN1
1
2
AC_in
TB11
(TB2)
G1
E1
TB7
TB8
3
D1
L2
4
L3
5
0
R2
PCB16
G2
CN3
TB12
E2
E2
CN13
E
E2
TB2
N
N
G
(TB3)
V2
2
E
C1
TB3
TB4
1
3
5
CN3
PCB18 CN12
3
(TB4)
V3
C1
Q2
CN2
1 2 3
1 2
G4
E4
E3
G3
1
2
5
6
TB13
(TB5)
G1
E1
TB9
TB10
G2
CN3
TB14
E2
E2
(TB6)
CN13
V4
T3
250V
CN21
CN22
1 2 5
1 2 3 4 5
1 2
1 2 5
1 2 3 4 5
1 2
CN118
CN121
CN122
PCB2
+
1
2
3
4
1
2
J
N
M
E
H
G
F
E
1
2
3
4
5
1
3
CN123
CN7 CN8
CN3
CN223
CN5 CN6
CN1
PCB3
PCB4
CN5
CN4
CN7
CN10
CN4
1 2 3 4 5 6
1 2 3 4 5 6
1 2 3
1 2
2 4 3
460V
L
D
CON1
I
CN19
K
CN15
B
60
P+12V B
/TAP200
P+12V A
/L IN K 2 0 0
/LINK400
E3
G3
G4
E4
E1
G1
G2
E2
A B C D E F G H I J K L M N CON1
230V
FAN
1
2
SOL
A
CN18
CN1
AC_in
PGND
CN12
A--Contactor Control +24VDC
B--Contactor Control. Contact Closure to "A"
C--0 to +10VDC Output to Remote Control
D--Remote Control Circuit Common
E--0 to +10VDC Input From Remote Contorol
F--Not Used
G--Chassis Ground
H--Not Used
I--Not Used
J--Not Used
K--Not Used
L--Not Used
M --OK-To-M ove(Curre nt De tect S ignal)
N--OK-To-Move(Current Detect Circuit)
CN23
0V
FRONT
PANEL
250V
0
E
C
1
4
P+12V B
/TAP200
P+12V A
/LINK200
/LINK400
460V
0
230V
VG3
VG4
PCB8
CN2
CN1
CN1
CN1
PCB14
CN1
C2E1
1
3
5
S2
1
5
CN2
PCB19
CN3
V G3
V G4
1
4
V G1
V G2
CN1
AC1
PCB10
1
3
5
E
V1
V2
V3
V4
1
2
CN2
RY +12 V
/RY _ON
PCB15
CN1
1 4 7 10
D5
TB9
S _ DET+
FCH
TB10
CT1
TB8
e
Q3
C1
d
G1
C2E1 C2E1
E1
E1
G7
E7
E8
G8
5
4
2
1
+12V
-12V
I_SENSE
GND
G1
CN1
5
4
2
1
CN1
G5
E5
E6
G6
PCB12
D6
c
a
123
4
C1
PCB13
T1
b
To
OUTPUT
D7
G2
G2
E2
E2
TB6
E2
Q4
TB7
S _ DET-
TB2
TB3
c
CN5
D2
CC
1
2
CN4
TB1
T2
E2
9
8
7
6
4
3
2
1
a
D3
d
e
G5
E5
G7
E7
E6
G6
E8
G8
CC2
CC1
R2
HF.UNIT
D4
CN3
S _ DETS _ DET+
E
1 2 3 4 5 6 7
E
1 3 5 7 9
5 2 1
CN10
CN9
RY +12 V
/RY _ON
TH1
1 2 3 4 5 6 7
1 2 3 4
CN3
CN8
PCB5
1
1
CN17
1
CN2
12
CN5
12
26
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
1
PCB6
26
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
TH2
+1 2V
-1 2 V
I_ S ENS E
GND
CN1
PCB2
CN13
L105
1
2
3
4
CN4
CN7
1
12
12
61
CN6
1
AC2
1
3
AC2
2 5 0V
0V
3
1
AC1
TB5
CN2
TB4
CN1
R1
CN16
b
R3
PCB11
R2
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