Fujitsu 9045 Printer User Manual

Printers
Zeilen Matrix Drucker 9045
Line Matrix Printer 9045
4pedloc
April 4, 2000
Installieren, in Betrieb nehmen und Warten
Installation, Startup and Maintenance
55flcab
May 5, 2000
PrintNet® User’s Manual
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PrintNet®User’s Manual
Edition July 2000
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Table of Contents
1 Introduction ............................................... 13
Overview.................................................................................13
What is the PrintNet? .......................................................13
What Special Features are Available? .............................13
Interfaces................................................................................14
10Base2 and 10Base-T ...................................................15
10/100Base-T...................................................................18
Conventions Used In This Manual..........................................20
2 Installation and Configuration ................... 21
Installation ..............................................................................21
Connecting to the Network...............................................21
Configuration Tools ................................................................23
Configuration Using the Printer Control Panel .................23
IPAssign ...........................................................................25
HTML Forms ....................................................................25
Configuration Alternatives ................................................28
3 Windows Configuration............................. 29
Overview.................................................................................29
Windows Environment Description .........................................29
Windows PrintNet Configuration.............................................30
Mandatory ........................................................................30
Optional............................................................................31
Configuration Using IPAssign ..........................................31
Configuration Using ARP .................................................35
Communicating Across Routers.......................................37
Changing Workgroup Names...........................................38
Changing Destination Names ..........................................38
7
Table of Contents
Windows Host Configuration ..................................................40
Windows NT 3.51 Host Setup ..........................................40
Windows NT 4.0 Host Setup ............................................41
Windows 95 Host Setup...................................................46
Printronix Printing System (PPS) Host Setup ..................47
Windows 3.1 Host Setup..................................................48
Windows Troubleshooting Tips ..............................................49
IPAssign Cannot Find the PrintNet ..................................49
PrintNet Cannot Be Found on the Network......................50
HTML Configuration Forms Will Not Display....................50
Errors Occur when Defining an LPR Printer ....................50
Cannot Browse the PrintNet on the Network ...................51
Printer Errors when Printing or No Output .......................51
TCP/IP Access Problem...................................................52
Web Browser/HTTP Problem...........................................54
Windows NT 4.0 Host Setup Problems............................54
4 Unix Configuration .................................... 57
Overview.................................................................................57
Unix Environment Description ................................................57
Unix PrintNet Configuration ....................................................59
Mandatory ........................................................................59
Optional............................................................................59
Using ARP .......................................................................60
Using RARP .....................................................................62
Using BOOTP ..................................................................63
Communicating Across Routers.......................................64
Unix Host Configuration..........................................................65
Manual System V Host Setup ..........................................65
Manual LPR/LPD Host Setup...........................................65
Printing from AIX ..............................................................67
Printing with FTP..............................................................67
Direct Socket Printing.......................................................68
8
Table of Contents
Unix Troubleshooting Tips ......................................................69
PrintNet Cannot be Found on the Network ......................69
Nothing Prints...................................................................70
Stair-Stepped Output .......................................................71
No Form Feed or Extra Page Comes Out........................71
TCP/IP Access Problem...................................................72
5 Novell Configuration ................................. 75
Overview.................................................................................75
Novell Environment Description .............................................76
Novell PrintNet Configuration .................................................77
Using HTML Forms ..........................................................78
Novell Host Configuration.......................................................79
NetWare Version 3.x PSERVER Setup ...........................79
NetWare Version 3.x RPRINTER Setup ..........................81
NetWare Version 4.x PSERVER Setup ...........................83
NetWare Version 4.x RPRINTER Setup ..........................86
Novell Troubleshooting Tips ...................................................88
NetWare 3.x - No PSERVER Connection ........................88
NetWare 4.x - No PSERVER Connection .......................89
6 Novell Configuration for
10/100Base-T Interfaces ........................... 91
Overview.................................................................................91
Novell PrintNet Configuration (10/100Base-T) .......................92
Preferred File Server (NDS and Bindery setups) .............93
Setting Password Security
(NDS and Bindery setups) ...............................................95
Adjusting Polling Time (NDS and Bindery setups)...........97
Changing the PrintNet Name
(NDS and Bindery setups) ...............................................98
Changing the PrintNet Frame Type
(NDS and Bindery setups) .............................................100
9
Table of Contents
Changing the PrintNet Mode
(NDS and Bindery setups) .............................................101
Setting the PrintNet NDS Context (NDS setups) ...........102
Setting the PrintNet Preferred NDS Tree
(NDS setups) .................................................................103
Novell Host Configuration (10/100Base-T)...........................104
NDS PSERVER Setup (Netware 4.x) ............................104
Bindery PSERVER Setup
(Netware 3.x and Netware 4.x) ......................................107
Referencing a Bindery Queue in NDS
(Netware 3.x and Netware 4.x) ......................................107
RPRINTER/NPRINTER Setup
(Netware 3.x and Netware 4.x) ......................................108
Troubleshooting (10/100Base-T)..........................................110
PSERVER Setup ...........................................................110
RPRINTER/NPRINTER Setup .......................................113
Printing Related .............................................................115
7 Monitoring Printers .................................. 119
Implementing Printer Management ......................................119
Agent/Manager Model....................................................119
MIB.................................................................................120
SNMP.............................................................................122
Monitoring Tools ...................................................................122
OS/2 TCP/IP ..................................................................122
Monitoring with AIX NetView/6000.................................122
Setting the SNMP Community Name.............................123
8 Commands.............................................. 125
Command Shell Overview ....................................................125
npsh Access Methods ....................................................125
Main npsh Command Prefixes .......................................125
Getting Command Help..................................................126
10
Table of Contents
Complete Command List ......................................................127
Store Commands ...........................................................127
Set Commands ..............................................................131
List Commands ..............................................................140
Debug Commands .........................................................142
Miscellaneous Commands .............................................144
9 Extra Features ........................................ 147
PrintNet Security...................................................................147
Users and Passwords ....................................................147
TCP Access Lists ...........................................................149
Printer Monitoring and Logging ............................................150
Printer and Print Job Monitoring.....................................150
Printer Logging Through Logpaths.................................151
Downloading Software..........................................................153
Procedure.......................................................................153
PrintNet Naming Schemes ...................................................156
10 Glossary................................................ 157
11
Table of Contents
12
1
Introduction
Overview
This chapter introduces you to the PrintNet™ architecture and special
features, as well as providing information on installation and configuration
tools.
What is the PrintNet?
The PrintNet print server allows you to attach printers on a local area
network (LAN) rather than attaching them directly to a host system.
Following simple configuration steps, these peripherals can be
simultaneously shared with users on the network whether you are using
TCP/IP, NetBIOS over TCP/IP, or IPX (Novell).
The PrintNet package contains a network interface card to attach itself
and the printer to the network.
What Special Features are Available?
The PrintNet offers an extensive list of features including:
•
•
•
•
built-in HTML forms for easy cross-platform configuration
•
WAN-wide communication access
availability of printer manager software
a detailed and easy-to-use command shell built in to the firmware
multi-level configuration security through passwords, permission
levels, and access lists
13
Chapter 1
Interfaces
•
numerous printer logging methods (e.g. automatic email) to record
printer errors and usage
•
remote management through HTML forms, Telnet sessions, “rsh/
rcmd/remsh” commands, SNMP, and pre-defined log methods
•
•
•
extensive built-in troubleshooting tools
•
multiple destinations/queues for versatile printer manipulation and
distinct print setups
•
header and trailer strings to instruct printers on font, pitch, printing,
etc.
•
•
•
•
flexible naming conventions
built-in “telnet” and “ping” clients
configurable memory usage by disabling protocols and destination
services
automatic network connection and frame type sensing
simultaneous printing across all I/O ports and all supported protocols
multiple network protocol support
Interfaces
The PrintNet interfaces with your printer through an Ethernet™ interface
connector. Three Ethernet interfaces are available: 10Base2, 10Base-T
and 10/100Base-T, which supports 10Base-T or 100Base-T LANs. Some
options and indicator switches differ for each Ethernet interface, as
described below.
14
10Base2 and 10Base-T
10Base2 and 10Base-T
The PrintNet interface card at the rear of the printer for the 10Base2 and
10Base-T interfaces has three indicator lights, shown in Figure 1.
Status
Indicators
STAT
ERR
NET
Grn
Red
Grn
OFF
(Default is all
switches OFF,
as shown.)
DIP
Switches
1
2
3
Figure 1. Status Indicator Lights (10Base2 and 10Base-T)
The LED patterns and the respective indications are given in Table 1.
Table 1. LED Pattern Indications
STAT
ERR
NET
Mode
ON
OFF
ON
RAM Test
ON
OFF
OFF
ROM Test
ON
ON
OFF
EEPROM Test
OFF
ON
ON
Network Interface Test
OFF
OFF
ON
PRN1 Test
FLASH
OFF
FLASH
Run Mode
FLASH
ON
FLASH
Auto Reset Mode
FLASH
FLASH
OFF
Firmware Panic
ON
FLASH
ON
Hardware Exception
15
Chapter 1
Interfaces
Operating Modes
The PrintNet has a self test and internally controlled modes. These are:
Power-on Self Test
The power-on self test performs diagnostic tests on the PrintNet
processor, RAM, ROM, EEPROM, parallel ports, and network interface.
The STAT, ERR, and NET LEDs indicate which test is currently in
progress.
Run and Auto Reset Modes
Run Mode is the normal operating state of the PrintNet. Auto Reset mode
is entered when the watchdog timer is triggered and the Print Server
resets itself. In either mode, the STAT LED flashes at a varying rate,
depending on whether the unit IP address is configured. The Run Mode
and Auto Reset Mode indicator descriptions are given in Table 2.
Table 2. Run Mode and Auto Reset Mode Indicator Descriptions
STAT
16
Rate
Indication
OFF
flashes ON once per
second
Normal Mode, IP address
configured
OFF
flashes ON 2.5 times
per second
Monitor Mode, IP address not
configured
ON
flashes OFF 2.5 times
per second
Monitor Mode or Download Mode,
IP address not configured
ON
flashes OFF once per
2 seconds
Download Mode, IP address
configured
10Base2 and 10Base-T
Dipswitches
On the back of the 10Base2 and 10Base-T interfaces, you will find a small
window where you can access three dipswitches labeled 1, 2, and 3 (see
Figure 1). The functions of the dipswitches are explained in Table 3.
Table 3. 10Base2 and 10Base-T Dipswitch Settings
Dipswitch
Comments
1
Reserved. This dipswitch is not for customer use and
should be left in the “off” position.
2
Factory Defaults. With this dipswitch in the “on” position, the unit boots up with its factory default settings
(including the default IP address) as if it were a new unit.
This means the unit uses the factory default settings
rather than the settings stored in EEPROM.
With this dipswitch in the “off” position, the unit boots up
using the settings in EEPROM rather than the default
settings. This dipswitch is in the “off” position from the
factory so the new settings you store will be used.
NOTE: Setting this dipswitch “on” will not clear any
settings you have stored in EEPROM. It simply
boots the unit in a different state with the
settings in EEPROM temporarily ignored.
If you would like to return all the stored settings back to
factory defaults, issue the save default or store tcpip
from default commands at any point. Just remember to
boot the unit with this dipswitch set to “off” so these new
stored settings will be used.
3
Link Integrity Disable. This dipswitch determines
whether link integrity is turned on or off on the unit. For
example, it may be necessary to turn link integrity off if
the unit is connected to an older hub. Link integrity is
only applicable to the 10Base-T interface. The default is
“off.”
17
Chapter 1
Interfaces
10/100Base-T
The PrintNet interface card at the rear of the printer for the 10/100Base-T
interface has two indicator lights, shown in Figure 2.
DIP Switches
1 2
STAT (System Status)
NET (Data to Network)
Figure 2. Status Indicator Lights and Dipswitches (10/100Base-T)
Run and Auto Reset Modes
Run Mode is the normal operating state of the PrintNet. Auto Reset mode
is entered when the watchdog timer is triggered and the Print Server
resets itself. In either mode, the STAT LED flashes at a varying rate,
depending on whether the unit IP address is configured. The Run Mode
and Auto Reset Mode indicator descriptions are given in Table 4.
Table 4. Run Mode and Auto Reset Mode Indicator Descriptions
STAT
18
Rate
Indication
OFF
flashes on once per second
Normal Mode, IP address
configured
OFF
flashes on 2 times per second
IP address not configured
ON
flashes off once per second
Download (MOS)
ON
flashes off twice per second
Error
ON
constantly
Indicates link integrity
ON
flashes off 1/3 second
Flashes off 1/3 second each
time a packet is transmitted
10/100Base-T
Network Indicator
The NET LED displays the status of the network link. When the NET LED
is on, this confirms link integrity. The NET LED flashes off for 1/3 second
when a data packet is being transferred. When the NET LED is off, the
network connection has been severed.
Dipswitches
On the back of the 10/100Base-T interface, you will find a small window
where you can access two dipswitches labeled 1 and 2 (see Figure 2).
The functions of the dipswitches are explained in Table 5.
Table 5. 10/100Base-T Dipswitch Settings
Dipswitch
Comments
1
2
off
off
Normal operation. With both dipswitches in the “off”
position, the PrintNet boots up using the settings in
flash memory rather than the default settings.
on
off
Factory default settings. With the dipswitches in this
configuration, the PrintNet boots up and all settings
stored in flash memory are erased except the Ethernet
address and key value.
off
on
Default IP. With the dipswitches in this configuration,
the PrintNet boots up with factory default settings.
However, the stored settings in flash memory are
intact. Setting dipswitch 2 to “on” does not clear any
settings stored in flash memory; it boots the unit in a
different state with the settings in flash memory
temporarily ignored.
on
on
If the PrintNet is connected to a network with link
integrity and then reset to MOS, a download will be
forced. If the unit is not connected to a network, it will
print a test page.
19
Chapter 1
Conventions Used In This Manual
Conventions Used In This Manual
Command syntax and examples are formatted as follows:
•
The Courier font in boldface indicates commands that you type:
$ ping ftp.CompanyWebsite.com
•
Regular Courier font indicates displayed results:
ftp.CompanyWebsite.com is alive
•
Variable values are shown in italics in command syntax, output, and
in text.
ping ipname
ipname is alive
20
2
Installation and
Configuration
Installation
The PrintNet is unique in that different network connection options are
available upon purchase. The base PrintNet model provides an RJ-45
connector for 10Base-T or 10/100Base-T (UTP) networks. A 10Base2
version of the adapter is also available.
Connecting to the Network
To attach the PrintNet to a network as illustrated in Figure 3, plug the
network cable into the PrintNet connector.
Watch the LEDs in the rear of the printer as they cycle through the power
on self test (see page 15). When the test is complete, the STAT led is
flashing.
21
Chapter 2
Installation
$
$
Network Connector
Figure 3. Physical Setup
22
Configuration Using the Printer Control Panel
Configuration Tools
There are two parts to a PrintNet setup:
1. Configuring the PrintNet so it can be seen on the network. This
involves network related settings (e.g. an IP address within TCP/IP
environments) configured through the built-in command shell, npsh,
or from the control panel.
2. Configuring a host with a new printer so it knows how to send data to
the PrintNet. Just being able to see the printer on the network does
not mean you can automatically print to it. A host has to be told where
to send the data.
NOTE: Some network environments do not require any network settings
to be configured on the PrintNet. However, all network setups
require configuration on the host end.
Configuration Using the Printer Control Panel
The PrintNet settings can be set from the printer control panel. The
procedure is described below.
CAUTION
When the printer is first powered on, the message “ENET IS INIT”
displays on the control panel. This process takes about two
minutes. Make sure not to change the PrintNet settings while this
message is displayed to prevent a loss of PrintNet configuration
information. When the initialization is complete, the message “ENET
IS READY” displays, and the PrintNet settings may be safely
changed from the control panel.
You can set any of three listed parameters from the printer control panel.
These parameters are located in the ETHERNET PARAMS menu. The
available parameters are:
•
•
•
IP Address
Gateway Address
Subnet Mask
23
Chapter 2
Configuration Tools
The procedure for changing any of the parameters is the same. The
procedure for changing the IP Address is given here as an example. Use
the same procedure for the other required parameters. To change the IP
Address parameter:
1. Make sure the printer is on and raise the printer cover.
2. Press the ONLINE key to place the printer in the OFFLINE mode.
3. Unlock the ENTER key. Refer to the Operating Manual for
instructions.
4. Press the LEFT or RIGHT arrow key until the LCD displays
“ETHERNET PARAMS.”
5. Press the DOWN arrow key to access the “IP Address” parameter.
6. Press the DOWN arrow key to view the current IP Address.
7. Press the DOWN arrow key to access the portion of the IP Address to
be changed.
8. Press the LEFT or RIGHT arrow key to select the portion of the IP
Address to be changed.
9. Press the DOWN arrow key.
10. Press the LEFT or RIGHT arrow key to select the desired value.
11. Press the ENTER key to make the selection. An asterisk appears to
the right of the value.
12. Press the UP arrow key and you will be returned to step 8.
13. When you are finished changing parameters, exit the configuration
menus and lock the ENTER key. (Refer to your printer's Operating
Manual for details.)
CAUTION
24
When a change is made from the control panel, the PrintNet is reinitialized. The messages “ENET IS RESET” and “ENET IS INIT”
display on the control panel. This process takes several minutes.
Make sure not to shut the printer off or make further changes to the
PrintNet settings during this initialization period to prevent a loss of
PrintNet configuration information. When the initialization is
complete, the message “ENET IS READY” is displayed.
IPAssign
IPAssign
IPAssign is a Windows utility which helps identify the PrintNet on the
network. IPAssign relies on the TCP/IP protocol to locate PrintNet print
servers so they can be assigned. Relying on TCP/IP as the underlying
protocol, the print server can be assigned an IP address and subnet mask
once it is detected on the network. Once IP address, subnet and gateway
values are assigned, other tools like the HTML configuration forms can be
used to do additional configuration.
Figure 4. IPAssign Sample Interface
HTML Forms
The PrintNet settings can be configured over TCP/IP through a standard
Web browser. The PrintNet Web pages provide a handy way to access
some of the commands built in to the print server.
NOTE: If a router is used, make sure a gateway value is configured.
To access the PrintNet home page:
1. Make sure the print server has an IP address and subnet mask so it is
recognizable on your TCP/IP network.
2. Make sure your network station can successfully “ping” the PrintNet
over the network.
25
Chapter 2
Configuration Tools
3. Direct your Web browser to the Uniform Resource Locator (URL)
“http://IPaddress ” (e.g. “http://192.75.11.9”).
The PrintNet HTML structure is divided into several menus as shown in
Figure 5.
Index/Home
Configuration
Status
Help
About
I/O Port
HTTP
I/O Port
Network
Network
TCP/IP
Windows
Novell
Print Path
Administration
d1prn
d2prn
d3prn
d4prn
Figure 5. PrintNet HTML Structure
NOTE: Online help is available for all HTML pages.
26
System
HTML Forms
Printer Status Screen
Using the printer IPAddress and any standard web browser, you can
check the status of the printer. Figure 6 shows the exact state of the
printer by showing the printer LCD message.
Figure 6. WWW Printer Status Screen
27
Chapter 2
Configuration Tools
Configuration Alternatives
Besides the HTML forms and software provided, the PrintNet internal
command shell, npsh, can also be reached using these methods:
Telnet
A TCP/IP command that helps configure PrintNet settings remotely. A
TCP/IP host starts a Telnet session with the print server and logs in to the
device command shell to alter and view settings.
Example:
telnet 192.75.11.9
Remote Shell
A TCP/IP command that helps configure print server settings remotely. A
TCP/IP host uses this command to remotely execute a single command
on the PrintNet.
Example:
rsh spike list prn
This command remotely executes the npsh command “list prn” on
the PrintNet named spike.
28
3
Windows Configuration
Overview
This chapter details a complete Windows configuration setup including:
1. Identifying the PrintNet on the network using TCP/IP as the
underlying protocol
2. Configuring the PrintNet with its mandatory TCP/IP settings (IP
address and subnet mask)
3. Configuring a new printer on the Windows station
Windows Environment Description
The PrintNet supports network printing under Windows environments by
using TCP/IP. In a Windows NT setup, pure TCP/IP is used as the
network protocol whereas with Windows 95 or Windows 98, NetBIOS
over TCP/IP is used.
Figure 7 shows two of the most common Windows setups you will see
with the PrintNet. The ideal configuration is a network printer defined on
the NT server to be shared by Windows 95 clients. However, any
Windows station can also go directly to the PrintNet.
29
Chapter 3
Windows PrintNet Configuration
Win 95
Win 95
Win 95
Win 95
NT Server
IP Router
Printer
Win 95
Figure 7. Windows Integration
Windows PrintNet Configuration
The IP address and subnet mask are mandatory TCP/IP settings and are
needed before the print server can be detected on the network. There are
also additional settings which are optional. This section offers alternative
methods for configuring your PrintNet in a Windows environment and
mentions some of the more common optional settings available.
Mandatory
Since TCP/IP is used for Windows printing, the PrintNet must be
configured with a minimum of an IP address and subnet mask before it
can be seen on the network.
30
Optional
Optional
Additional settings, like routing entries, can be configured. This allows
communication across subnets when no other router exists.
Configuration of the PrintNet can be done from the printer control panel,
IPAssign, Web browser, or host commands. To configure these options,
see “Configuration Tools” on page 23.
Configuration Using IPAssign
NOTE: You must have the TCP/IP protocol and services enabled on this
windows station first.
To configure an IP address and subnet mask on your PrintNet:
1. Insert the diskette labeled “IPAssign” into the floppy drive.
2. Load the File Manager or WinFile and look under the floppy drive for
an IPAssign self-extracting file.
3. Double click on the IPAssign file to launch the install program.
4. When prompted to install, click on YES to load the InstallShield
Wizard.
5. Answer the prompts throughout the wizard.
6. Once the install process is complete, you will be prompted to view the
“ReadMe” file. Select “Yes” to read this. Close the file when done.
7. Find the new IPAssign program group and double click on the
“IPAssign” icon to load the program.
NOTE: IPAssign will search the network to find the correct device. This
may take several minutes. For larger networks, you may speed
the process by powering the printer off and then on again.
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Chapter 3
Windows PrintNet Configuration
8. At the “IPAssign” main dialogue box that appears, you should see an
entry for your PrintNet appear in the list box. Figure 8 shows an
example screen.
Figure 8. IPAssign Main Screen
9. Once your PrintNet Ethernet Address appears in the list box, select it
and click on ASSIGN.
10. At the “Assign IP” dialogue box that displays next, fill in the IP
address and subnet mask for this PrintNet.
NOTE: You can also assign a default router/gateway entry within this
dialogue box allowing your PrintNet to communicate across
subnets. This is optional.
11. Click SET when done to assign these TCP/IP settings to the PrintNet.
IPAssign will then display two dialogue boxes informing you of its
progress.
12. Once you see the message about successfully assigning the settings,
click OK. These TCP/IP settings are now in the PrintNet current
memory, to be retained until the next power cycle.
32
Configuration Using IPAssign
13. If you want to store the TCP/IP settings into the PrintNet flash
memory via a browser, click on LAUNCH BROWSER at the next
window that displays. This will prevent you from losing the settings
after a power cycle. If not, click “No.”
14. Read the text in the “Configuration Information” window that displays
and click OK to launch your Web browser.
NOTE: If you are returned to the IPAssign main dialogue box, you will be
unable to launch your browser this way. Please load it manually
and go to the URL, “http://PrintNetIPaddress/
networkConf.html” (e.g., “http://192.75.11.9/
networkConf.html”) or use a Telnet server: “Telnet
IP_address.”
15. Once your Web browser is loaded and you are prompted for a “User
ID,” type “root.”
16. At the “Password” prompt, press ENTER since there is no default
password configured and click OK.
17. At the “Network Configuration” HTML form that displays, fill in the
PrintNet IP address under the “IP Address” field. Figure 9 shows an
example configuration form.
18. Click in the field labeled “Subnet Mask” and fill in the PrintNet subnet
mask.
NOTE: If you would like to communicate with the PrintNet from across
routers, you will need to fill in an entry within the “Routing”
section. Please see “Communicating Across Routers” on page 37
for more details.
19. Click on the SUBMIT button when done.
20. Turn the printer off, then on again so the changes take effect, or click
on the “System” link at the top of the “Network Configuration” HTML
form. Once at the “System” form, click on the REBOOT button.
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Chapter 3
Windows PrintNet Configuration
Figure 9. Network Configuration HTML Form
34
Configuration Using ARP
At this point, the TCP/IP settings are stored in flash memory and you
should be able to see the PrintNet on your Windows network. However,
you cannot print to it yet since you have not identified the network printer
to your Windows station. Refer to “Windows Host Configuration” on
page 40 to identify the network printer to the Windows station.
Configuration Using ARP
To configure the PrintNet with its IP settings using a manual “arp”
command:
1. Log on to a Windows station with TCP/IP loaded and located on the
same subnet as the PrintNet.
2. Find the Ethernet address for the PrintNet on the configuration
printout. It must be entered as part of this procedure.
3. Use the “arp” command to add an entry into the Windows station
ARP table for the PrintNet. This is the most common syntax for this
command:
Syntax:
arp -s ipaddress ethernetaddress
Example for Microsoft TCP stacks:
arp -s 192.75.11.9 00:80:72:07:00:60
This example specifies a PrintNet using IP address 192.75.11.9 and
Ethernet address 00:80:72:07:00:60.
4. Check to see if the ARP entry was accepted.
arp -a
You should see an entry in the listed ARP table with the IP address and
Ethernet address specified in Step 3.
5. Try to “ping” this IP address to see if the PrintNet can be seen on
your network.
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Chapter 3
Windows PrintNet Configuration
At this point, you should be able to communicate with the PrintNet from
your local Windows station. This means the print server knows about an
IP address and subnet mask and has these settings in its current
memory. However, if the PrintNet is power cycled, these settings will
disappear unless you store them into flash memory. To do this:
1. Load a Web browser on your Windows station and direct it to the URL
“http://PrintNetIPaddress/networkConf.html”
(e.g., “http://192.75.11.9/networkConf.html”).
NOTE: If prompted for a “User ID” and password first, type “root” for
the ID and press ENTER at the password prompt since there is
no password by default.
2. At the “Network Configuration” HTML form that displays, click in the
field below the “IP Address” heading and type in the IP address for
the PrintNet.
3. Under the “Subnet Mask” heading, enter the PrintNet subnet mask.
NOTE: If you would like to communicate with the PrintNet from across
routers, you will need to fill in an entry within the “Routing”
section. Please see “Communicating Across Routers” on page 37
for more details.
4. Click on the SUBMIT button when done and physically repower the
printer to make the new settings take effect.
36
Communicating Across Routers
Communicating Across Routers
Since Windows environments rely on TCP/IP to communicate with the
PrintNet, crossing routers becomes an issue.
After following one of the PrintNet configuration methods mentioned, you
will most likely only be able to communicate with the print server from the
same subnet. This means any hosts across a router will not be able to
see your PrintNet. In order for hosts across a router to see your PrintNet,
it is best to store a default router/gateway within the print server so that
any packets destined for another subnet get forwarded to this router
automatically. The router (or series of routers) can then take over
ensuring the packets get to their final destination on another subnet on
your network.
To configure a default router/gateway within the PrintNet:
1. Load a Web browser on your Windows station and direct it to the URL
“http://PrintNetIPaddress/networkConf.html”
(e.g., “http://192.75.11.9/networkConf.html”).
NOTE: If prompted for a “User ID” and password first, type in “root” for
the ID and press ENTER at the password prompt since there is
no password by default.
2. At the “Network Configuration” HTML form that displays, click in the
first field below the “Gateway” heading and type in the IP address of
the default router/gateway for the PrintNet subnet.
3. Click on the SUBMIT button when done and physically repower the
print server to make the new settings take effect.
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Chapter 3
Windows PrintNet Configuration
Changing Workgroup Names
Windows environments define groups of related computers as
“workgroups.” By default, the PrintNet belongs to the workgroup called
“WORKGROUP”. However, you may want to change this to suit your
network better. To do this:
1. Load a Web browser on your Windows station and direct it to the URL
“http://PrintNetIPaddress/networkConf.html”
(e.g., “http://192.75.11.9/networkConf.html”).
NOTE: If prompted for a “User ID” and password first, type in “root” for
the ID and press ENTER at the password prompt since there is
no password by default.
2. At the “Network Configuration” HTML form that displays, search for
the “Windows (NetBIOS TCP/IP)” section and highlight the
“Workgroup Name” field.
3. Type in the new workgroup name for the PrintNet.
4. Click on the SUBMIT button when done and physically repower the
print server to make the new settings take effect.
Changing Destination Names
When defining some printers within Windows environments, the PrintNet
requires that you specify a pre-defined destination rather than any name
you would like. For example, when creating a new printer under Windows
NT, you are presented with a screen similar to Figure 10.
Figure 10. Windows NT Print Setup Dialogue Box
38
Changing Destination Names
The first field requires the IP address for the PrintNet and the second field
must be filled in with a valid destination from the print server (e.g., d1prn).
Otherwise, LPR will not be able to access the printer. Table 6 outlines the
default destinations to choose from.
Table 6. PrintNet Default Destinations
Destination
Mapped I/O Port
d1prn
PRN
d2prn
PRN
d3prn
PRN
d4prn
PRN
This name can be changed to something more meaningful using the builtin HTML forms. To do this:
1. Load a Web browser on your Windows station and direct it to the URL
“http://PrintNetIPaddress/destConf.html”
(e.g., “http://192.75.11.9/destConf.html”).
NOTE: If prompted for a “User ID” and password first, type in “root” for
the ID and press ENTER at the password prompt since there is
no password by default.
2. At the “Print Path Configuration” HTML form that displays, select a
destination link from the top of the page to bring up the appropriate
destination form. By default, you should see a line near the top of the
form showing the destinations listed in Table 6.
3. Once the desired destination HTML form displays, highlight the
“Name” field and type in the new name for this destination.
4. Click on the SUBMIT button when done and physically repower the
print server to make the new setting take effect.
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Chapter 3
Windows Host Configuration
Windows Host Configuration
This section covers Windows NT and Windows 95, Windows 3.1 and
Printronix Printing System (PPS) new printer setups.
Windows NT 3.51 Host Setup
To configure a new printer on a Windows NT 3.51 station:
1. Open the “Control Panel.”
2. Double click on “Printers.”
3. Select “Create a Printer” from the “Printer” menu to display the
dialogue box in Figure 11.
Figure 11. Create a Printer Dialogue Box
4. Define a name to represent this print setup and select the appropriate
driver for the printer that will be used in this setup. For printer driver
choose “generic text” or Epson “FX1050” or “Proprinter” based on
print need.
5. Under the “Print To” field, select “Other...”
40
Windows NT 4.0 Host Setup
6. Select “LPR Port” from the list that displays and click OK to bring up a
dialogue box similar to the one found in Figure 12.
Figure 12. Add LPR Compatible Printer Dialogue Box
7. Type in the IP address or host name of the PrintNet in the first field.
8. Type in the name of a pre-defined destination/queue on the PrintNet
in the second field.
NOTE: This name must be a name of an existing destination/queue on
the PrintNet and it must be lowercase by default. You will
probably use “d1prn.”
9. Click OK when done specifying these two fields.
You now have a new network printer which relies on the standard TCP/IP
print protocol, LPD, to print remotely to a printer with the PrintNet.
Windows NT 4.0 Host Setup
This installation procedure assumes that the PrintNet adapter is
configured with the correct IP address, subnet mask and gateway (if
required). In addition, the administrator can “ping” and telnet to the
PrintNet adapter from the server console.
If this is not the case, use the printer front panel or the IPAssign utility to
configure the PrintNet adapter before proceeding.
1. Select “Settings:Printers” from the “Start” menu.
2. Double click on the “Add Printer” icon. The “Add Printer Wizard”
window is displayed.
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Chapter 3
Windows Host Configuration
3. Select “My Computer.”
4. At the next window, click on “Add Port ...”
42
Windows NT 4.0 Host Setup
5. Double click on “LPR Port”. If LPR Port is not listed it means that the
Microsoft TCP/IP Printing service is not installed.
6. In the “Name or address of server providing lpd:” box, enter the IP
address of the PrintNet adapter. In the “Name of printer or print queue
on that server:” box, enter d1prn.
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Chapter 3
Windows Host Configuration
7. Select the “Generic/Text only” printer driver or install the Printronix
P5000 series driver from the Printronix web page at
www.printronix.com. The generic driver is good for troubleshooting
installation problems. The network administrator can always go back
and install the P5000 driver at a later time.
8. In the “Printer Name” box, enter a name for this printer.
44
Windows NT 4.0 Host Setup
9. Determine if the printer is shared with other network users. If it is
shared, the share name and the operating system must be selected.
10. Print a Windows test page.
11. If there are any problems during or after installation, see “Windows
NT 4.0 Host Setup Problems” on page 54.
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Chapter 3
Windows Host Configuration
Windows 95 Host Setup
To configure a new printer on a Windows 95 station:
1. Select “Settings:Printers” from the “Start” menu.
2. Double click on the “Add Printer” icon.
3. Select “Network Printer” from the second window of the “Add Printer”
wizard that loaded.
4. At the next window, click on BROWSE to help fill in the network path
of this printer.
5. At the “Browse for Printer” dialogue box that displays, double click on
the appropriate workgroup containing the PrintNet. By default, the
print server falls under the workgroup, “WORKGROUP.”
6. Continue searching the network until you see the PrintNet name,
“M_xxxxxx”, where “xxxxxx” equals the last six digits of the print
server Ethernet address found when a configuration is printed.
7. Once you see the PrintNet, double click on it to display a list of predefined destinations/queues to choose from.
8. Select a destination/queue that will use “d1prn.”
9. Click OK once you have selected a destination.
10. Back at the network path window, select NEXT since this path should
now be filled in for you.
11. At the next window, select the appropriate print driver and click on
NEXT.
12. Fill in a name for this new network printer at the next window and
decide if you want this to be the default printer. This printer name can
be anything you would like as long as it is unique.
13. When prompted for a test page, select either “Yes” or “No” depending
on the state of the attached printer and click on FINISH.
NOTE: Windows may ask for a disk or CD-ROM to load the appropriate
printer driver to complete this new printer setup.
There should now be a new printer icon within the “Printers” folder. This
new network printer relies on NetBIOS over TCP/IP as the underlying
protocol to print to the PrintNet.
46
Printronix Printing System (PPS) Host Setup
Printronix Printing System (PPS) Host Setup
To configure a PPS LPR port for a printer on a Windows station, you will
need to:
1. Insert the diskette labeled “PPS” into the floppy drive.
2. Load the File Manager or WinFile and look under the floppy drive for
a PPS ZIP file.
3. Double click on the PPS ZIP file to extract all files within it to a
directory on the Windows station.
4. Once extracted to a directory, find the “Setup” file and double click on
this to load the InstallShield Wizard.
5. Answer the prompts throughout the wizard and select “Yes” to restart
your computer at the end.
6. Once your computer is rebooted, open the “Settings:Printers” folder
to view your existing printers.
NOTE: PPS will only work with an existing printer. Therefore, if you do
not have an existing printer that you can alter, create one now
using any port settings you would like. These will be changed in
the following steps.
7. Select the printer that you want to use with PPS and click the right
mouse button to bring up a sub-menu.
8. Select “Properties” from this menu to display the current settings for
this printer.
9. Click on the “Details” tab to display the printer port settings.
10. Click on the ADD PORT button.
11. At the “Add Port” dialogue box that displays, click on the button
labeled “Other.”
12. Click on “TCP/IP Printer Port” within this “Other” list.
13. At the next dialogue box that displays, fill in the host name or IP
address of the PrintNet in the first field.
14. Fill in a valid TCP port number on the PrintNet in the second field.
The choice is 4400 or 9100 for PRN.
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Chapter 3
Windows Host Configuration
15. Click OK when done to return to the “Details” window. You should
now see something relating to “PPS Port” within the “Print to the
following port:” field.
16. Click OK to close this printer properties window.
You now have a new network printer which relies on PPS to print
remotely to a printer off of the PrintNet.
Windows 3.1 Host Setup
If you are running Windows 3.1 stations on your network, you will need to
rely on either TCP/IP or IPX to print to the PrintNet. If IPX is used, you will
have a print queue defined on a Novell file server which your Windows
3.1 stations will send their print jobs to. The PrintNet will then service this
print queue as either a PSERVER or an RPRINTER. Please see Chapter
5, “Novell Configuration” for further details.
If you want to rely on TCP/IP, you will need a third party TCP stack loaded
onto your Windows station since TCP/IP support did not automatically
come with Windows until the introduction of Windows NT and Windows
95. You may also be running a third party stack if you decided not to use
a Microsoft operating system.
Some common TCP stacks are FTP Software's OnNet, NetManager's
Chameleon, and Frontier Technologies' SuperTCP. In each case, they
allow your Windows 3.1 station to communicate with other TCP/IP
devices. This means you can send print jobs to the PrintNet as well.
The most common print method offered with Windows TCP stacks is
LPR/LPD, a multi-platform remote printing protocol used on everything
from PCs to mainframes. The LPR print setup is very simplistic, involving
only two parameters:
1. PrintNet IP address. The IP address or host name of the print server
you want to print to.
2. PrintNet destination/queue. A pre-defined name on the print server
telling the device which I/O port to send the jobs to. The standard
name for the PRN port is “d1prn.”
NOTE: This destination name is case sensitive and by default, all names
are lowercase.
48
IPAssign Cannot Find the PrintNet
Windows Troubleshooting Tips
This section provides information on possible solutions to some standard
configuration errors. If you require technical support, please have as
much of the following information as you can available when you call:
1. What level of software are you running?
2. What type of attachment do you have?
3. What is your host operating system?
4. Give a detailed description of the problem.
5. How often, and when, does the problem occur?
6. Give a detailed description of your network and the components
attached.
Please follow these tips to determine what the problem may be with your
PrintNet configuration.
IPAssign Cannot Find the PrintNet
•
Have you loaded IPAssign onto a Windows station on the same
subnet as the PrintNet? IPAssign cannot see print servers across
routers unless BOOTP broadcast packets can travel from subnet to
subnet.
•
Have you waited several minutes for IPAssign to recognize the
PrintNet or have you repowered the printer to speed this identification
process?
•
Do you have a DHCP, RARP, or BOOTP server running that may be
providing the PrintNet with an IP address upon bootup? If so,
IPAssign is not needed to assign an IP address to the print server.
NOTE: If the PrintNet has an IP address, it will no longer send out a
BOOTP packet. This means IPAssign will not be able to see the
device on the network.
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Chapter 3
Windows Troubleshooting Tips
PrintNet Cannot Be Found on the Network
•
Have you assigned the PrintNet a unique and valid IP address which
corresponds with the other IP addresses on your network? For
example, are you sure no other device is using this IP address?
•
Are you sure you are trying to talk to the PrintNet from a Windows
station on the same subnet? Currently, the print server can only be
seen locally unless you configured a routing entry earlier.
•
If you look at the back of the printer, is the STAT LED flashing once a
second or is it quicker than that? A slower, once-a-second rate tells
you that the print server is in fact configured with an IP address. A
faster rate says it knows nothing about this so you may need to try the
configuration process again.
•
Have you confirmed that the network connection to the PrintNet is
working correctly? Trying different network cables and locations will
help narrow down the problem.
HTML Configuration Forms Will Not Display
•
Can you “ping” the PrintNet from your Windows station? If not,
please refer to “PrintNet Will Not Talk on the Network” above.
•
Have you used the correct URL for the PrintNet home page? It should
be “http://PrintNetIPaddress ”
(e.g., “http://192.75.11.9”).
Errors Occur when Defining an LPR Printer
50
•
Can you “ping” the PrintNet from your Windows NT station? If not,
please refer to “PrintNet Will Not Talk on the Network” above.
•
Did you specify the correct IP address or host name for the PrintNet
in the first field of the “Add LPR Compatible Printer” box?
•
Did you specify a valid destination/queue on the PrintNet in the
second field of the “Add LPR Compatible Printer” dialogue box? If so,
did you also enter it in lowercase letters?
Cannot Browse the PrintNet on the Network
Cannot Browse the PrintNet on the Network
•
Have you looked under the right Windows workgroup? By default, the
PrintNet will be found under “WORKGROUP.”
•
Are you able to browse other Windows stations and devices on the
network from this same station?
•
Has this Windows station been given enough time to update its
registry so it can see this newly added workgroup device? Sometimes
Windows stations can take considerable time, depending on the size
of the network.
Printer Errors when Printing or No Output
•
Is there a large job currently printing taking up all of the printer
resources? Usually when printing from Windows 95 stations, a busy
printer can cause Windows to display a printer error message. This is
because it demands immediate printer attention rather than holding
the data until the printer is ready again. The best way around this is to
use a central spooling station like an NT server.
•
Have you tried restarting the spooler under “Control Panel:Services”?
Sometimes this is needed to get printing started.
NOTE: As a last resort, you may want to reboot the Windows station.
Sometimes this is the only option to completely clear this
situation. The PrintNet usually has nothing to do with this
problem.
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Chapter 3
Windows Troubleshooting Tips
TCP/IP Access Problem
If you can “ping” the printer from a workstation, but you cannot Web
browse, Telnet, or print to the printer through the PrintNet, there may be
an incorrect entry in the TCP access list. In order for this workstation to
use the PrintNet interface in this case, one of two things must happen.
1. The TCP list must have an entry added to grant access to this
workstation.
2. All entries must be deleted from the TCP list to grant all workstations/
hosts access to the above TCP services.
To view the current access list:
Use the printer control panel to access the configuration menu (see the
Operating Manual for configuration menu information). From the
DIAGNOSTICS/Printer Tests menu choose the E-net Test Page. When
the page prints, look under the “TCP ACCESS TABLE” section for the
TCP access list entries.
To add/delete a TCP access list entry, refer to “TCP Access Lists” on
page 149.
NOTE: When the following procedure is used, the TCP access list will be
cleared but all IP addresses will need to be entered again after
the procedure is complete.
To reset all TCP/IP values to the factory defaults when access is
impossible:
1. Obtain a printer configuration printout using the control panel. See the
Operating Manual for configuration menu information.
2. Power off the printer.
3. On the PrintNet Interface, place SWITCH 2 in the down position.
4. Power on the printer and wait for the ONLINE state.
5. On the PrintNet Interface, place SWITCH 2 in the up position.
52
TCP/IP Access Problem
6. From a workstation attached to this network segment, create an ARP
entry. The PrintNet IP address and hardware or MAC address are
needed. At the workstation enter:
arp -s <ipaddress> <MACaddress>
ping <ipaddress>
7. Try to “ping” this IP address to see if the PrintNet can be seen on
your network. If the interface does not respond, verify you are on the
same network segment as the printer and that the ARP entry was
created.
8. Telnet into the PrintNet using the same IP address as above. Log in
as root with no password.
9. At the system prompt, enter:
store tcpip from default
config http on
save
reset
NOTE: This will reset all TCP/IP settings to factory default and reset the
PrintNet.
10. Power the printer off and then back on.
11. Set the IP address, subnet mask, and default gateway parameters to
the desired values.
12. If Web browser access does not work, Telnet into the PrintNet as
root. Enter the following command:
config http on
If you are still experiencing difficulty accessing or browsing the printer,
contact technical support for further assistance.
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Chapter 3
Windows Troubleshooting Tips
Web Browser/HTTP Problem
In some cases you may not be able to browse the printer web page
simply because the PrintNet HTTP may be turned off.
If you cannot “ping” the PrintNet IP address, make sure the IP Address,
subnet mask, and default gateway are set correctly by checking the
Ethernet Parameters menu from the operator panel. See the Operating
Manual for configuration menu information.
If you can “ping” the PrintNet IP address but cannot access the web
pages, perform the following procedure to verify the PrintNet HTTP is
turned on.
1. Telnet into the PrintNet and log in as root with no password.
2. At the system prompt enter the following commands:
config http on
save
reset
3. After approximately 30 seconds, point your browser to the PrintNet IP
address. The printer web pages should now be accessible.
If you are still experiencing difficulty accessing or browsing the printer,
contact technical support for further assistance.
Windows NT 4.0 Host Setup Problems
The installation procedure covered earlier in this chapter assumes that
the PrintNet adapter is configured with the correct IP address, subnet
mask and gateway (if required), and that the administrator can “ping”
and telnet to the PrintNet adapter from the server console. If this is not the
case, use the printer front panel or the IPAssign utility to configure the
PrintNet adapter before proceeding.
The PrintNet installation for Windows NT 4.0 also requires “Microsoft
TCP/IP Printing” service on the server. To install this service, click on the
Network icon in the Control Panel and click on the “Services” tab. Click on
“Add Service” and select “Microsoft TCP/IP printing.”
54
Windows NT 4.0 Host Setup Problems
•
Are you logged in as the “Administrator”?
This installation requires administrator privileges.
•
“LPR port” is not listed in step 5.
Cancel the installation and install Microsoft TCP/IP printing service on
the server.
•
LPR configuration warning during step 6.
The Ethernet cable is not plugged in, or printer is not turned on. This
message is a communication failure between the NT server and the
PrintNet card. Check cabling, IP address settings, gateway, etc.
•
Test page does not print or prints incorrectly.
1. Is the printer online? Re-send test page.
2. The print queue name in step 6 should be “d1prn”; however, the
name can be changed. To verify the queue names, print an
Ethernet Test Page. Refer to your Operating Manual for
information.
3. The Printronix NT print driver requires P-Series emulation active
on the printer. The Generic/Text driver should print in any printer
emulation.
4. Delete then re-install Microsoft TCP/IP Print service on the
server.
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Chapter 3
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Windows Troubleshooting Tips
4
Unix Configuration
Overview
This chapter details a complete Unix setup including:
1. Configuring the PrintNet with its mandatory TCP/IP settings (i.e., IP
address and subnet mask).
2. Configuring the Unix host station with a new printer.
Unix Environment Description
The PrintNet supports network printing under various TCP/IP
environments including all variations of Unix. Printing can come from
multiple hosts directly or through central spooling machines. Figure 13
illustrates this.
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Chapter 4
Unix Environment Description
Linux
XTerm
PC
PC
Solaris
PC
Ultrix
OSF/1
XTerm
IRIX
SparcStation
SunOS 4.1.1
IP Router
SCO
HP-UX
Printer
Figure 13. Unix Integration
58
Mandatory
Unix PrintNet Configuration
There are mandatory settings needed before the print server can be
detected on the network, as well as some additional optional settings.
This section offers alternative methods for configuring your PrintNet and
mentions some of the more common optional settings available.
Mandatory
Since TCP/IP is used, the PrintNet must be configured, at a minimum,
with an IP address and subnet mask before it can be seen on the
network. To configure these options, see “Configuration Tools” on
page 23.
Optional
Additional settings, like routing entries, can be configured allowing for
communication across subnets.
Configuration of the PrintNet can be done from the control panel or
through host commands. To configure these options, see “Configuration
Tools” on page 23.
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Using ARP
To configure the Ethernet Interface with its TCP/IP settings using a
manual “arp” command, the syntax is:
arp -s ipaddress ethernetaddress
For the “aix” command, the syntax is:
aix -s ether ipaddress Mac_address
To use either of these commands:
1. Log on to a Unix station as superuser or root. This station must be
located on the same subnet as the PrintNet since ARP is limited to
subnets.
2. Find the Ethernet address for the PrintNet by printing a configuration
or reading it from the control panel. It must be entered as part of this
procedure.
3. Use the “arp” command to add an entry into the Unix station ARP
table for this PrintNet. Here is the most common syntax for this
command:
arp -s ipaddress ethernetaddress
Example for Microsoft TCP stacks:
arp -s 192.75.11.9 00:80:72:07:00:60
This example specifies a PrintNet using IP address 192.75.11.9 and
Ethernet address 00:80:72:07:00:60.
4. Verify that the ARP entry was properly applied.
arp -a
You should see an entry in the listed ARP table with the IP address and
Ethernet address specified in Step 3.
5. Try to “ping” this IP address to see if the PrintNet can be seen on
your network.
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Using ARP
At this point, you should be able to communicate with the PrintNet from
your local Unix station. This means the printer knows about an IP address
and subnet mask and has these settings in its current memory. However,
if the PrintNet is shut off, these settings will be lost unless you store them
in flash memory, as follows:
1. Load a Web browser on your Unix station and direct it to the URL
“http://PrintNetIPaddress/networkConf.html”
(e.g., “http://192.75.11.9/networkConf.html”).
NOTE: If prompted for a “User ID” and password first, type in “root” for
the ID and press ENTER at the password prompt since there is
no default password.
2. At the “Network Configuration” HTML form that displays, click in the
field below the “IP Address” heading and type in the IP address for
the PrintNet.
3. Under the “Subnet Mask” heading, enter the PrintNet subnet mask.
NOTE: If you would like to communicate with the PrintNet from across
routers, you will need to fill in an entry within the “Routing”
section. Please see “Communicating Across Routers” on page 64
for further details.
4. Click on the SUBMIT button when done and physically repower the
print server to make sure the new settings are in effect.
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Using RARP
RARP allows you to dynamically assign an IP address to the PrintNet
upon bootup. To configure the PrintNet with its TCP/IP settings using
RARP:
1. On your RARP server, make an entry in the /etc/ethers file for the
PrintNet.
Syntax:
ethernetaddress PrintNetIPaddress
Example:
00:80:72:07:00:60 192.75.11.9
2. Start the RARP daemon on the RARP server if not already running. If
it is running, send an HUP signal to it with the “kill” command:
Syntax:
kill -HUP pid
where pid is the process ID of the RARP daemon.
3. Power on the PrintNet so that it immediately sends out an RARP
request. Wait one minute to allow the address assignment process to
complete. You should see the STAT LED on the PrintNet interface
slow down indicating it knows about an IP address to use.
4. Try to “ping” the PrintNet IP address from a local Unix station to see
if it can be seen on your network.
NOTE: You will only be able to communicate with the PrintNet from a
network station on the same subnet as the print server. The
PrintNet needs to be told about a default router/gateway so any
packets that come in from a different subnet can be returned via
this gateway. Please see “Communicating Across Routers” on
page 64 to set this up.
62
Using BOOTP
Using BOOTP
BOOTP allows you to dynamically assign an IP address to the PrintNet
upon bootup. In addition, the BOOTP server can provide additional
details like a default router/gateway address. To configure the PrintNet
with its TCP/IP settings using BOOTP:
1. On your BOOTP server, make an entry in the /etc/bootptab file for the
PrintNet.
Syntax:
PrintNetIPname:\
:sm=netmask:\
:hd=homedirectory:\
:bf=null:\
:gw=defaultgateway:\
:ht=ethernet:\
:ha=ethernetaddress:\
:ip=ipaddress:\
:ts=timeserver:\
:to=timezone:
Example:
spike:\
:sm=255.255.255.0:\
:hd=/usr/null:\
:bf=null:\
:gw=192.75.11.1:\
:ht=ethernet:\
:ha=008072070060:\
:ip=192.75.11.9:\
:ts=192.75.11.7:\
:to=25200:
2. Turn the PrintNet on so that it immediately sends out a BOOTP
request. Wait one minute to allow the IP address assignment process
to complete. You should see the STAT LED, on the PrintNet
interface, slow down indicating it knows about an IP address to use.
3. Try to “ping” the PrintNet IP address from a network station to see if
it can be seen on your network.
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NOTE: You will be able to communicate with the PrintNet from network
stations on different subnets if the print server has been told
about its default router/gateway in the BOOTP response from the
BOOTP server.
Communicating Across Routers
Since Unix environments rely on TCP/IP to communicate with the
PrintNet, crossing routers becomes an issue.
After following one of the PrintNet configuration methods mentioned
(other than the BOOTP method), you will most likely only be able to
communicate with the print server from the same subnet. This means any
host across a router will not be able to see your PrintNet. In order to
communicate across a router, it is best to store a default router/gateway
within the print server so that any packets destined for another subnet get
forwarded to this router automatically. The router (or series of routers)
can then take over ensuring the packets get to their final destination on
another subnet on your network.
To configure a default router/gateway within the PrintNet:
1. Load a Web browser on your Unix station and direct it to the URL
“http://PrintNetIPaddress/networkConf.html”
(e.g., “http://192.75.11.9/networkConf.html”).
NOTE: If prompted for a “User ID” and password first, type in “root” for
the ID and press ENTER at the password prompt since there is
no default password.
2. At the “Network Configuration” HTML form that displays, click in the
first field below the “Gateway” heading and type in the IP address of
the default router/gateway for the PrintNet subnet.
3. Click on the SUBMIT button when done and physically repower the
print server to make sure the new setting is in effect.
64
Manual System V Host Setup
Unix Host Configuration
There may be times when you would prefer to or have to perform the
manual setup steps for a new printer definition. There may also be times
when you require a less common print solution such as direct socket
capabilities. This section covers these additional setups.
Manual System V Host Setup
This setup involves any Unix operating system using System V print
spooling (e.g., SCO, Solaris, HP-UX, DG/UX, etc.). This means an
interface file is used for each defined printer and in the case of any
System V print setup involving a PrintNet, the RSHD protocol is used to
transfer data from the host to the print server.
To manually configure a new System V printer on a Unix station, create a
dummy device file that acts as a locking mechanism between contending
print jobs.
Syntax:
touch /dev/PrintNetname.portname
where PrintNetname is the host or IP name of the print server and
portname is one of its four I/O ports.
Example:
touch /dev/spike.prn
Manual LPR/LPD Host Setup
The PrintNet also supports Unix operating systems which follow a BSD
print system (e.g., SunOS 4.1.x). This means a printcap file is used to
define all printers available on the host and interface scripts are not
commonly used. Instead, LPR/LPD printers are defined.
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To manually configure an LPR/LPD printer on a BSD Unix system:
1. Define an entry for this new printer within the printcap file, /etc/
printcap.
Syntax:
printername:
:sh:pw#80:mx#0:\
:rm=PrintNetname:\
:rp=PrintNetdestination:\
:lp=:\
:sd=/usr/spool/lpd/printername:\
:lf=/usr/spool/lpd/printername/log:\
:af=/usr/spool/lpd/printername/acct:
where printername is any name you would like to give to this new printer,
PrintNetname is the host or IP name of the print server, and
PrintNetdestination is one of the pre-defined destinations/queues on the
device.
Example:
P5000:
:sh:pw#80:mx#0:\
:rm=spike:\
:rp=d1prn:\
:lp=:\
:sd=/usr/spool/lpd/ P5000:\
:lf=/usr/spool/lpd/ P5000/log:\
:af=/usr/spool/lpd/ P5000/acct:
2. Create the spool directory specified by the “sd=” entry in the printcap
entry for this printer.
Example:
touch /usr/spool/lpd/ P5000
3. Create the log and account files specified by the “lf=” and “af=”
entries in the printcap entry for this printer.
Example:
touch /usr/spool/lpd/P5000/log
touch /usr/spool/lpd/P5000/acct
4. Change permissions and ownership on the spool directory and
everything within it.
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Printing from AIX
Example:
chmod -R g+rwX,o+rX /usr/spool/lpd/ P5000
chmod -R daemon.daemon /usr/spool/lpd/ P5000
5. Start the printer daemon for this new printer.
Example:
lpc start P5000
You now have a new printer which relies on LPR/LPD to print to a
PrintNet printer. Use the following command to test printing:
Syntax:
lpr -printername filename
Example:
lpr -P5000 /etc/hosts
Printing from AIX
Version 4.0 and higher of AIX offers LPR/LPD support for network
printing. This means, to set up a new printer under this operating system,
you only need to define these two parameters:
1. PrintNet IP address. The IP address or host name of the print server
you want to print to.
2. PrintNet destination/queue. A pre-defined name on the print server
telling the device which I/O port to send the jobs to. You will most
likely use “d1prn” for the PRN.
Printing with FTP
Print jobs can also be sent to the PrintNet using the File Transfer Protocol
(FTP). To do this:
1. On your network station, change to the directory containing the file
you want to print.
2. Open an FTP session with the PrintNet.
Syntax:
ftp PrintNetIPaddress
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3. Log in as “root.”
4. At the password prompt, press ENTER since there is no default
password.
5. Change to the dest directory.
Syntax:
cd dest
6. List the contents of this directory using the “dir” command and
determine which destination/queue you would like to send the print
job through. Most likely you will select “d1prn” for the PRN port.
7. Change to this destination directory.
Example:
cd d1prn
8. Change the mode to correspond with the type of file you are going to
print. By default, ASCII is set for text-only files but if you need to print
both text and graphics, select binary using the “bin” command.
9. Place the file to be printed within this directory on the PrintNet so it
can be spooled and printed.
Syntax:
put filename
10. Close the FTP session, unless you have more jobs to print.
Syntax:
quit
Direct Socket Printing
Within TCP/IP environments, there are some setups which require the
host to print directly to a TCP port number on the PrintNet, bypassing all
of the higher level destination/queue names. If you run into a setup which
requires this, you will need to define two parameters for a new print setup:
1. PrintNet IP address. The IP address or host name of the print server
you want to print to.
2. PrintNet TCP port number. A pre-defined number for the I/O port on
the print server. 9100 is the default port number.
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PrintNet Cannot be Found on the Network
Though the host will be sending directly to a TCP port number on the
PrintNet, the port numbers are still mapped to destinations/queues in
case there is some type of special processing or logging to be done to the
job. However, the destination name is of no concern in this type of printer
definition. Only the two parameters mentioned above need to be defined
for printing to work.
Unix Troubleshooting Tips
This section provides information on possible solutions to some standard
configuration errors. If you require technical support, please have as
much of the following information available when you call:
1. What level of software are you running?
2. What type of attachment do you have?
3. What is your host operating system?
4. Give a detailed description of the problem.
5. How often, and when, does the problem occur?
6. Give a detailed description of your network and the components
attached.
Please follow these tips to determine what the problem may be with your
PrintNet configuration.
PrintNet Cannot be Found on the Network
•
Have you configured the PrintNet with a unique and valid IP address
which corresponds with the other IP addresses on your network? For
example, are you sure no other device is using this IP address?
•
Are you sure you are trying to talk to the PrintNet from a Unix station
on the same subnet? Currently, the print server can only be seen
locally unless you configured it with a routing entry.
•
If you look at the back of the printer, is the STAT LED flashing once a
second or is it quicker than that? A slower, once-a-second rate tells
you that the print server is in fact configured with an IP address. A
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faster rate says it knows nothing about this so you may need to try the
configuration process again.
•
Have you confirmed that the network connection to the PrintNet is
working correctly? Trying different network cables and locations will
help narrow down the problem.
Nothing Prints
•
Can you “ping” the PrintNet from your Unix station? If not, please
refer to “PrintNet Will Not Talk on the Network,” above.
•
Is the PrintNet able to communicate with the attached printer? To test
this, you can:
1. “telnet” to the print server (e.g., “telnet 192.75.11.9”)
and log in as “root.”
2. Enter the command “start fox prn .”
3. Execute “stop prn” right after starting the test.
This test will send the same text line over and over to the attached
printer.
70
•
Is the job getting stuck in the Unix host queue? If so, check that the
printer is online. If it is, there is a configuration error on the Unix
station so creating a new print setup may be needed.
•
Is the control panel showing any activity to indicate it is receiving
data? If so, but there is nothing printing, check to see if a manual form
feed is needed. Also, ensure that the printer can support the type of
job coming through.
•
Do all jobs fail or just certain ones? For example, is it possible that
jobs from a certain application are the only ones to fail? If so, check
the type of data it sends to make sure it matches the printer
emulation. Check the application printer configuration for mistakes.
•
If you are using System V, was the spooler restarted?
Stair-Stepped Output
Stair-Stepped Output
Stair-stepped output is print which starts at the top left of the page but
every line thereafter starts a little further over to the right. It also refers to
Unix jobs that print one line of text at the top of a page followed by a
series of blank pages.
This kind of output happens only with Unix text jobs if carriage return
insertion is not incorporated into the print setup. The printer may be told to
do a linefeed but the Unix job does not specify anything about a carriage
return to follow this.
To fix this, carriage return insertion must be enabled somewhere in the
print setup. The easiest and most common location is on the PrintNet
itself within the appropriate model. The feature is called “onlcr” and the
command syntax is:
set model modelname stty onlcr
save
For example, if printing to the destination, d1prn, the associated model is
m1. Therefore, the command is:
set model m1 stty onlcr
save
No Form Feed or Extra Page Comes Out
Unix text jobs may also have problems outputting the last page of a job
especially when the BSD Remote (LPD) print method is used. This
means the form feed button has to be pressed on the printer to get this
last page out.
To make this process automatic, tell the PrintNet to handle this task by
setting this feature “on” in the appropriate model. The command syntax is:
set model modelname trailer $FF
save
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For example, if printing to the destination, d2prn, the associated model is
m2. Therefore, the command is:
set model m2 trailer $FF
save
For default destination model mappings of the PrintNet, please see
“PrintNet Naming Schemes” on page 156.
TCP/IP Access Problem
If you can “ping” the printer from a workstation, but you cannot Web
browse, Telnet, or print to the printer through the PrintNet, there may be
an incorrect entry in the TCP access list. In order for this workstation to
use the PrintNet in this case, one of two things must happen.
1. The TCP list must have an entry added to grant access to this
workstation.
2. All entries must be deleted from the TCP list to grant all workstations/
hosts access to the above TCP services.
To view the current access list:
Use the printer control panel to access the configuration menu (see the
Operating Manual for configuration menu information). From the
DIAGNOSTICS/Printer Tests menu choose the E-net Test Page. When
the page prints, look under the “TCP ACCESS TABLE” section for the
TCP access list entries.
To add/delete a TCP access list entry, refer to “TCP Access Lists” on
page 149.
NOTE: When the following procedure is used, the TCP access list will be
cleared but all IP addresses will need to be entered again after
the procedure is complete.
To reset all TCP/IP values to the factory defaults when access is
impossible:
1. Obtain a printer configuration printout using the control panel. See the
Operating Manual for configuration menu information.
2. Power off the printer.
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TCP/IP Access Problem
3. On the PrintNet, place SWITCH 2 in the down position.
4. Power on the printer and wait for the ONLINE state.
5. On the PrintNet, place SWITCH 2 in the up position.
6. From a workstation attached to this network segment, create an ARP
entry. The PrintNet IP address and hardware or MAC address are
needed. At the workstation enter:
arp -s <ipaddress> <MACaddress>
ping <ipaddress>
7. Try to “ping” this IP address to see if the PrintNet can be seen on
your network. If the interface does not respond, verify you are on the
same network segment as the printer and that the ARP entry was
created.
8. Telnet into the PrintNet using the same IP address as above. Log in
as root with no password.
9. At the system prompt, enter:
store tcpip from default
config http on
reset
NOTE: This will reset all TCP/IP settings to factory default and reset the
PrintNet.
10. Power the printer off and then back on.
11. Set the IP address, subnet mask, and default gateway parameters to
the desired values.
12. If Web browser access does not work, Telnet into the PrintNet as
root. Enter the following command:
config http on
If you are still experiencing difficulty accessing or browsing the printer,
contact technical support for further assistance.
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Unix Troubleshooting Tips
5
Novell Configuration
Overview
This chapter details a complete Novell setup, including:
1. Identifying the PrintNet on the network.
2. Configuring the PrintNet with its mandatory print setup settings.
3. Configuring a new print queue on the file server.
For additional information about further options available with the 10/100
Base-T interface, see Chapter 6, “Novell Configuration for 10/100Base-T
Interfaces”.
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Novell Environment Description
Novell Environment Description
The PrintNet supports network printing under Novell environments by
using IPX. It supports all 3.1X versions of NetWare. Figure 14 provides a
Novell setup overview. Version 4.1X is supported under bindery
emulation only.
NetWare
Workstation
NetWare 4.1
File Server
NetWare
Workstation
NetWare 4.1
File Server
NetWare
Workstation
Bridge/Router
NetWare
Workstation
Printer
Figure 14. Novell Integration
76
Novell PrintNet Configuration
Mandatory
Under all Novell environments, the PrintNet does not require any network
settings to make it visible on the network. Simply plug it in to your network
and power it on. However, with a new print queue setup on a Novell file
server, there can be some mandatory settings needed on the PrintNet.
Optional
Additional settings are available to fine-tune the PrintNet’s Novell
functionality. These options include:
•
NDS Context. The NDS context in which the print server object was
created. This option is required if you create the print server object in
a different context from the context the file server object for the file
server that you logged in with is on.
•
NDS Tree. The NDS tree the print server object was created in. This
is only needed if your environment uses more than one NDS tree.
•
Mode. The mode the PrintNet will run in. This can be either auto,
bindery, or NDS. The default is auto so that the PrintNet can
autosense which mode it should run in. See “NetWare Version 4.x
RPRINTER Setup” on page 86 for information on what to do when
using both bindery and NDS file servers at the same time.
•
Preferred File Server. In a bindery setup, this specifies the file
server that the print server object was created on. In an NDS setup,
this specifies a file server(s) that the print server object resides on.
Since NDS is distributed, most administrators will not know which file
server(s) the print server object is actually stored on, so in most NDS
environments this option is not used.
For additional information about these options, see Chapter 6, “Novell
Configuration for 10/100Base-T Interfaces”.
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Using HTML Forms
When defining a new print queue on a Novell file server, a new print
server must be defined to represent the PrintNet. This name must match
the pre-defined name given to the print server. By default, this name is in
the format “M_xxxxxx” where “xxxxxx” equals the last six digits of the
PrintNet Ethernet address found on a configuration printout or control
panel settings under Ethernet parameters, MAC Address
(e.g., M_071C1A).
To use the HTML forms to define a print queue, do the following:
1. Load a Web browser on a network station that can communicate with
the print server over TCP/IP. The command to change the print
server name is:
Syntax:
store pserver name newname
Example to change the name to micro1:
store pserver name micro1
2. Direct your Web browser to URL
“http://PrintNetIPaddress/adminConf.html”
(e.g., “http://192.75.11.9/adminConf.html ”)
NOTE: If prompted for a “User ID” and password first, type in “root” for
the ID and press ENTER at the password prompt since there is
no password by default.
3. At the “Administration Configuration” HTML form that displays,
highlight the field beside the “Name” heading and type in the new
name of the print server.
4. Click on the SUBMIT button when done and physically repower the
printer to make the new setting take effect.
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NetWare Version 3.x PSERVER Setup
Novell Host Configuration
Under all versions of NetWare, both PSERVER and RPRINTER setups
are supported by the PrintNet. Since a PSERVER setup is the most
common, you will find the necessary steps to configure the PrintNet as a
PSERVER shown first. Configuration for RPRINTER and NPRINTER
setup follow the PSERVER information.
NOTE: The PrintNet can service up to four printers on one file server. It
cannot service multiple file servers at one time.
NetWare Version 3.x PSERVER Setup
To configure a print queue on a NetWare 3.1x network:
1. Log on to the Novell file server as supervisor.
2. Enter PCONSOLE.
3. Select “Print Queue Information” from the PCONSOLE Main Menu.
4. Press INSERT to add a new queue to the list of currently defined
queues showing.
5. Type in the name of this new queue when prompted and press
ENTER. This can be any name you would like.
6. Press ESCAPE to return to the Main Menu.
7. Select “Print Server Information” and press ENTER.
8. Press INSERT when the list of existing print servers displays.
9. Type the name of the PrintNet when prompted for a print server name
and press ENTER when done. By default, the PrintNet is named
“M_xxxxxx” where “xxxxxx” equals the last six digits of the print server
Ethernet address found on configuration printouts or reading MAC
address on control panel. (e.g., M_071C1A).
10. Back at the print server list, select this newly defined PrintNet and
press ENTER.
11. Select “Print Server Configuration” from the menu that displays.
12. Select “Printer Configuration” from the next menu to display a list of
configured printers.
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13. Select the first item listed as “NOT INSTALLED” and press ENTER.
14. At the printer configuration window, type in the name for this new
printer. This name must be one of the pre-defined destinations/
queues on the PrintNet. This will normally be “d1prn.”
15. Go to the “Type” field and press ENTER to see the possible choices.
16. Select “Defined Elsewhere” from this list.
17. When done, press ESCAPE and select “Yes” to save the changes to
this new printer.
18. Press ESCAPE again to return to the “Print Server Configuration”
menu.
19. Select “Queues Serviced by Printer.”
20. Select this new printer from the printer list that displays and press
ENTER.
21. At the empty queue list that displays, press INSERT.
22. Select the queue created in step 5 and press ENTER.
23. When prompted for the priority, press ENTER to select the default or
select a priority.
24. Press ESCAPE until back at the PCONSOLE Main Menu.
25. Repower the printer.
26. Wait two minutes and then select “Print Queue Information” from the
PCONSOLE Main Menu.
27. Select this new queue from the menu that displays. Select “Currently
Attached Servers” to see which print server is servicing this queue.
At this point, the PrintNet name (e.g., M_071C1A) should show within this
window. This means the PrintNet knows about this new Novell print
queue it must service as a PSERVER. Therefore, it will poll this queue
regularly looking for jobs to print.
NOTE: The PrintNet can service up to four printers on one file server. It
cannot service multiple file servers at one time.
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NetWare Version 3.x RPRINTER Setup
NetWare Version 3.x RPRINTER Setup
These steps are for Novell environments with Netware 3.x (or earlier) file
servers.
To configure a new RPRINTER on a NetWare 3.x network:
1. Log in to the PrintNet command shell, npsh, as root.
If you have TCP/IP available and this print server already has an IP
address stored within it, you can use the built-in HTML configuration
forms or a Telnet session. Please see “Configuration Tools” on
page 23 for further details. If you have only Novell available, you will
need to use a PC, laptop, or terminal.
NOTE: If you use HTML configuration, you will need to go to the
“Network Configuration” HTML form (i.e.,
“http://PrintNetIPaddress/networkConf.html”;
(e.g., “http://192.75.11.9/networkConf.html”) and
look under the “Novell” section. The settings in the following step
are found there. If using a Telnet session, you will need to
manually execute the commands listed in the next step.
2. Store the RPRINTER settings on the PrintNet. This will refer to an
existing PSERVER.NLM on the file server or to one that you will
create later in these steps.
Syntax:
store rprinter add PSERVERname printernumber
PrintNetdestination
Example for an RPRINTER servicing printer 0 of the PSERVER.NLM
called pserver1 and sending jobs to the PrintNet destination d1prn:
store rprinter add pserver1 0 d1prn
3. Leave this PrintNet login session and log on to the NetWare 3.x file
server as Supervisor.
4. Load a PSERVER.NLM if there is not one loaded already. This will be
the PSERVER that the PrintNet services as an RPRINTER so it must
match the PSERVER name given in step 2.
5. Enter PCONSOLE.
6. Select “Print Queue Information” from the PCONSOLE Main Menu.
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7. Press INSERT to add a new queue to the list of currently defined
queues.
8. Type in the name of this new queue when prompted and press
ENTER. This can be any name you would like.
9. Press ESCAPE to return to the Main Menu.
10. Select “Print Server Information” and press ENTER.
11. Press INSERT when the list of existing print servers displays.
12. Select the print server that you want the PrintNet to service as an
RPRINTER. This is the PSERVER.NLM loaded in step 4.
13. Select “Print Server Configuration” from the menu that displays.
14. Select “Printer Configuration” from the next menu to display a list of
configured printers.
15. Select an item from the list (i.e., either an existing printer name or a
“Not Installed” one) to display the printer configuration window.
16. Assign a name (if not an existing printer) to this printer.
17. At the “Type” field, select “Remote Other/Unknown.”
18. Press ESCAPE to save the changes.
19. Press ESCAPE until back at the “Print Server Configuration” menu.
20. Select “Queues Serviced by Printer” to display a list of defined
printers.
21. Select the printer you just defined and press ENTER.
22. At the list of queues that displays, press INSERT to add a queue to
the list.
23. Select the queue defined and press ENTER.
24. When prompted for a priority, press ENTER to select the default or
select a priority.
25. Press ESCAPE until you have exited PCONSOLE.
26. Reload the PSERVER.NLM that the PrintNet is to service as an
RPRINTER.
27. Repower the PrintNet by turning the printer off and then back on.
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NetWare Version 4.x PSERVER Setup
28. Wait two minutes and then check your PSERVER to see if the
appropriate printer is being serviced. The PSERVER should indicate
that the printer is “Waiting for job.”
At this point, the PrintNet knows to receive any jobs this PSERVER.NLM
has to send to it through the defined printer.
NetWare Version 4.x PSERVER Setup
PrintNet destinations are case sensitive and will not be recognized if they
are typed incorrectly. By default, they are all lower case. If you are setting
up a NetWare 4 environment, the destination must be renamed to
uppercase to match the PCONSOLE entry.
The PrintNet can be used in a NetWare 4 environment with either of the
following options:
•
•
Set the PrintNet up as a PSERVER, replacing a dedicated printer.
Set the PrintNet up as an RPRINTER, interacting with an existing
PSERVER (see page 86).
NOTE: Following a PSERVER setup, bindery emulation is required.
To configure the PrintNet as a PSERVER in a NetWare 4 environment:
1. Log in to the Novell as supervisor.
2. Enter PCONSOLE.
3. Press F4.
4. Select PRINT QUEUES.
5. Press INSERT to add a queue.
6. Type in new queue name and press ENTER.
7. Press ESCAPE.
8. Select PRINT SERVERS.
9. Press INSERT to add the new print server.
10. Type the name of the PrintNet. By default, it is “M_xxxxxx” where
“xxxxxx” equals the last six digits of the Ethernet address
(e.g., M_000BF5).
11. Select this new print server and press ENTER.
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12. Select PRINTERS.
13. Press INSERT to add a printer to the list.
14. Type in the name of one of the default destinations on the unit for the
NAME field and go to the type field.
15. Press ENTER at this field and select DEFINED ELSEWHERE. If
DEFINED ELSEWHERE is not available, choose PARALLEL.
16. Press ENTER on the Print Queues Assigned field.
17. Press INSERT to display all queues; select the one you defined in
step 5 and press ENTER.
18. Select a priority and press ENTER. Priority 1 should be sufficient.
19. Press ESCAPE until you are back to Main Menu.
20. Reboot the Print Server by repowering the printer.
21. Check the CURRENTLY ATTACHED SERVERS and verify the print
server is active.
22. Press ESCAPE until you are out of the PCONSOLE.
Even though the entire print set up is done through PCONSOLE, you may
want to communicate directly with the print server in order to modify
settings, monitor the unit, etc. To communicate with the print server, the
optional host software, npsh.exe, is included. npsh.exe is a DOS
executable program that can be run from a DOS prompt on a NetWare
workstation.
npsh.exe performs the following:
npsh nvplist
Lists all of the PrintNet devices on the network; each name is in the
default format “M_xxxxxx” (where “xxxxxx” equals the last six digits of the
unit Ethernet address). This is regardless of whether it is configured as a
PSERVER or an RPRINTER.
npsh unitname
Starts a Telnet-like session with the named print server, allowing you to
configure, monitor, and troubleshoot the unit with the built-in command
set.
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NetWare Version 4.x PSERVER Setup
npsh unitname command
Initiates a single Command with guest access only to the unit instead of
entering into a complete session.
To communicate with the unit using npsh.exe:
1. From a DOS prompt on a Novell workstation, begin an npsh session
with the unit.
npsh unitname
Starts a Telnet-like session with the named print server with guest
access only.
2. To obtain root access to the unit, type:
supervisor
A standard login screen is displayed prompting you for the login
name and password.
3. Login to the unit as root user.
root
NOTE: Root users require the use of a password as configured in the
unit user list.
4. Enter the password. If this password is not yet set, press enter at the
password prompt. Otherwise, enter the password that is already
stored in the unit.
password
You are now logged in to the unit as a root user and can access any npsh
command on the unit.
NOTE: Because npsh.exe makes use of broadcasts, you may have
problems communicating across a router.
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NetWare Version 4.x RPRINTER Setup
PrintNet can be configured to service both RPRINTER, NDS mode, and
PSERVER, bindery mode.
Use the following procedure to set up an RPRINTER form of attachment
on a 4.x server:
1. PrintNet requires a bindery server login on the 4.1x as the first step to
servicing RPRINTER. This bindery login is necessary for registering
the PrintNet Pserver name; no bindery queues or printers are setup.
Using PCONSOLE, bindery mode, create a bindery printer server
object whose name matches that of the PrintNet at the root context of
the 4.1x box (i.e., M_03092B). After creating the bindery PrintServer
on the 4.1x server, reboot PrintNet and use the debug Novell
pserver command via a Telnet or npsh session, or print the E-net
Test Page out to make sure there is a successful server login.
2. Using either PCONSOLE in NDS mode, or NWADMIN:
a. create an NDS queue (any name you want), or simply use an
existing one;
b. create a print server to use (any valid name, or choose one
already in existence);
c.
create a printer object to use with the print server object you
chose or created, and attach it to the chosen queue;
NOTE: The 4.1x queue name, print server name, and printer object don’t
have to match any PrintNet name; multiple printers can be
defined, but only one print server can be attached to.
Example:
NDS queue name:
NDS print server name:
NDS printer name:
NDS printer name:
86
Finance
Fin_Q
Fin_Prt_1
Accounting_Prt_1
NetWare Version 4.x RPRINTER Setup
3. At a 4.1x console session, if a pserver.nlm session is already running
for Fin_Q, first unload it, then reload it to find the new objects, or,
simply issue load pserver Fin_Q.
If you are successful the print server console screen will show a
“printer status” option. In the “printer status” window, note the
numbers assigned to the printers you created. Assume for our
example that one printer previously existed (number 0), and we are
adding two more, whose numbers became 1, and 2.
NOTE: On the load command you must strictly follow case of the name
(this is not required on PrintNet).
4. Via a Telnet or npsh session create RPRINTER attachments:
store rprinter add Fin_Q 1 d1prn
This command assigns destination d1prn as the RPRINTER 1 service
path.
store rprinter add Fin_Q 2 d4prn
This command assigns destination d4prn as the RPRINTER 2 service
path.
For PrintNet entries, case does not have to be observed. Also, if you
want to change the destination names from d xprn, do so first with the
set dest <dest> name <new name> command, being sure to
use the save command so these reappear after a reboot.
5. Reboot the PrintNet adapter (power the printer off and on, or use the
reset command) so the new RPRINTER service names are
broadcast.
6. Open a Telnet or npsh session and log into PrintNet. Wait a minute or
two, then use the list rprinter command, and you should see
your entries. You could also do this by looking at the connection
status on the 4.1x PSERVER printer status entries.
7. If you add, delete or change RPRINTER entries on PrintNet or 4.1x
console, you should always unload and reload the pserver.nlm
module to register the changes. The PrintNet can be configured and
ready before the pserver.nlm is reloaded, or PrintNet can be reset
after pserver.nlm is reloaded.
8. A web browser can also be used to see the RPRINTER attachments,
etc. and status.
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Novell Troubleshooting Tips
This section provides information on possible solutions to some standard
configuration errors. If you require technical support, please have as
much of the following information available when you call:
1. What level of software are you running?
2. What type of attachment do you have?
3. What is your host operating system?
4. Give a detailed description of the problem.
5. How often, and when, does the problem occur?
6. Give a detailed description of your network and the components
attached.
Please follow these tips to determine what the problem may be with your
PrintNet configuration.
NetWare 3.x - No PSERVER Connection
•
Has the PrintNet been power cycled once the PCONSOLE steps
were completed? This will make the print server boot up and realize
which print queue and file server it needs to service.
•
Is the PrintNet already servicing a queue on another file server? If so,
it cannot service another file server at the same time.
•
When defining a new “print server” within PCONSOLE, did you
use the correct name for the PrintNet (e.g., M_071C1A)? By default, it
only recognizes itself as “M_xxxxxx” where “xxxxxx” equals the last
six digits of its Ethernet address found on the configuration printout.
•
When defining a new “printer name” within PCONSOLE, did you
use a pre-defined destination/queue rather than a name of your own?
By default, the PrintNet only recognizes names like “d1prn.” All
other names will be ignored by the device.
•
Is the PrintNet in Bindery mode as seen under the “list
pserver” output on the device? If servicing only a NetWare 3.x file
server, it must be set to handle Bindery services. The default setting
is Bindery.
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NetWare 4.x - No PSERVER Connection
•
Is there an available NetWare user license for the PrintNet to use
while it acts as a PSERVER? Every PSERVER takes up one user
license since it logs in to the Novell file server.
•
Have you given the connection process some time after repowering
the PrintNet? In larger Novell environments, the file server
identification and connection process can take several minutes.
NetWare 4.x - No PSERVER Connection
•
Has the PrintNet been power cycled once the PCONSOLE steps
were completed? This will make the print server boot up and realize
which print queue and file server it needs to service.
•
Is the PrintNet already servicing a queue on another file server? If so,
it cannot service another file server at the same time.
•
When defining a new “print server” within PCONSOLE, did you
use the correct name for the PrintNet (e.g., M_071C1A)? By default,
it only recognizes itself as “M_xxxxxx” where “xxxxxx” equals the last
six digits of its Ethernet address found on the configuration printout.
•
When defining a new “printer name” within PCONSOLE, did you
use a pre-defined destination/queue rather than a name of your own?
By default, the PrintNet only recognizes names like “ d1prn.” All
other names will be ignored by the device.
•
Is the PrintNet in Bindery mode as seen under the “list
pserver” output on the device? If servicing only a NetWare 4.x file
server, it must be set to handle Bindery services. The default setting
is Bindery.
•
Is there an available NetWare user license for the PrintNet to use
while it acts as a PSERVER? Every PSERVER takes up one user
license since it logs in to the Novell file server.
•
Have you given the connection process some time after repowering
the PrintNet? In larger Novell environments, the file server
identification and connection process can take several minutes.
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Novell Troubleshooting Tips
6
Novell Configuration for
10/100Base-T Interfaces
Overview
This chapter provides additional information for Novell environments
using the 10/100Base-T interface, including:
1. PrintNet Configuration. This section includes: setting the preferred
file server, setting password security, adjusting polling time, changing
the PrintNet name, changing the PrintNet frame type, changing the
PrintNet mode, setting the PrintNet NDS context, and setting the
PrintNet preferred NDS tree.
2. Host Configuration. This section includes: NDS PSERVER setup,
Bindery PSERVER setup, referencing a Bindery queue in NDS, and
RPRINTER/NPRINTER setups.
3. Troubleshooting tips. This section covers PSERVER setups,
RPRINTER/NPRINTER setups, and printing related problems.
The information in this chapter does not apply to Novell environments
using the 10Base-T and 10Base2 interfaces.
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Novell PrintNet Configuration (10/100Base-T)
There are no mandatory Novell settings needed before the print server
can be detected on the network. However, there can be some mandatory
settings needed before a Novell print queue can be serviced by the
PrintNet. These mandatory settings are covered separately for Netware
3.x and 4.x under the Host Configuration heading.
The print server setup in a Novell environment is much simpler than that
required in a TCP/IP one. No addresses, masks, or router entries are
necessary and in most cases, the PrintNet can simply be connected to
the network, turned on, and then configured for printing from a Novell
station through PCONSOLE or Netware Administrator. See Figure 15 for
an example of a Novell network, showing the use of file servers and how
they relate to the print server.
However, there are some optional parameters you may wish to change
such as the preferred file server(s), print server password, polling time,
frame type, print server name, NDS context, and NDS preferred tree. The
following sections describe these optional parameters.
NetWare
Workstation
NetWare 4.1
File Server
NetWare
Workstation
NetWare 4.1
File Server
NetWare
Workstation
Bridge/Router
NetWare
Workstation
Printer
Figure 15. Novell Integration
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Preferred File Server (NDS and Bindery setups)
Preferred File Server (NDS and Bindery setups)
In a bindery setup, the preferred file server specifies the file server that
the print server object was created on. In an NDS setup, it specifies a file
server that the print server object resides on. Since NDS is distributed,
most administrators will not know which file server(s) the print server
object is actually stored on, so in most NDS environments this option is
not used. This feature is useful in a large Novell network so that the
PrintNet does not ignore important file servers. If you are setting up the
PrintNet to work with a Bindery file server, it is a good idea to set a
preferred server on the PrintNet.
To view which file servers the PrintNet does acknowledge at a given time,
use the debug nest fserver command. See Chapter 8, “Commands”,
for more information.
Adding Preferred File Server
HTML Method
1. Load a Web browser on a network station that can communicate with
the print server over TCP/IP.
2. Direct your Web browser to URL:
“http://PrintNetIPaddress/networkConf.html”
(e.g. “http://192.75.11.9/networkConf.html”).
NOTE: If prompted for a “User ID” and password first, type in “root” for
the ID and press ENTER at the password prompt since there’s no
password by default.
3. Look under the “Novell” section and add the name of the preferred file
server in the “File Server” field.
4. Click on the SUBMIT button when done and physically re-power the
print server to make the new settings take effect.
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Manual (Telnet) Method
1. Telnet to the print server. This will bring up a login screen:
telnet ipaddress
NOTE: If prompted for a “User ID” and password first, type in “root” for
the ID and press ENTER at the password prompt since there’s no
password by default.
2. You should now see a prompt displayed that has the PrintNet’s IP
address followed by a colon then root.
ipaddress:root>
3. At the prompt, enter:
store pserver novell fserver add fservername
where fservername is the name of the Novell file server you want to
add as a preferred file server. This adds the specified file server as a
preferred file server on the PrintNet.
4. Reset the unit to ensure the changes take effect.
reset
Removing Preferred File Server
HTML Method
1. Load a Web browser on a network station that can communicate with
the print server over TCP/IP.
2. Direct your Web browser to URL:
“http://PrintNetIPaddress/networkConf.html”
(e.g. “http://192.75.11.9/networkConf.html”).
NOTE: If prompted for a “User ID” and password first, type in “root” for
the ID and press ENTER at the password prompt since there’s no
password by default.
3. Look under the “Novell” section and remove the name of the preferred file server from the “File Server” field.
4. Click on the SUBMIT button when done and physically re-power the
print server to make the new settings take effect.
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Setting Password Security (NDS and Bindery setups)
Manual (Telnet) Method
1. Telnet to the print server. This will bring up a login screen:
telnet ipaddress
NOTE: If prompted for a “User ID” and password first, type in “root” for
the ID and press ENTER at the password prompt since there’s no
password by default.
2. You should now see a prompt displayed that has the PrintNet’s IP
address followed by a colon then root.
ipaddress:root>
3. At the prompt, enter:
store pserver novell fserver del fservername
where fservername is the name of the Novell file server you want to
remove as a preferred file server.
4. Reset the unit to ensure the changes take effect.
reset
Setting Password Security
(NDS and Bindery setups)
Besides the general security measures, a Novell setup provides further
password security. A password can be set on the PrintNet and within your
PCONSOLE or Netware Administrator setup so that when the PrintNet
tries to login to the file server, the passwords are compared.
To set the password on the Novell host for use in a PSERVER setup, you
will need to:
Netware 4.x
1. Login to NetWare Administrator as a user with security equal to
“Admin” on your Novell host.
2. Double click on the print server object you are using for your setup.
This will bring up the print server objects details pages.
3. Select the “Change Password...” button on the “Identification” page.
4. At the prompts, type and re-type the new password. Press OK when
you are finished.
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5. Proceed to the next section to store the password on the PrintNet.
Netware 3.x
1. Enter PCONSOLE as supervisor on your Novell host.
2. Select “Print Server Information” from the main menu.
3. Select the appropriate printer and press ENTER.
4. Select “Change Password.”
5. At the prompts, type and re-type the new password. Press ENTER
when you are finished.
6. Proceed to the next section to store the password on the PrintNet.
Print Server Setup - HTML Method
1. Load a Web browser on a network station that can communicate with
the print server over TCP/IP.
2. Direct your Web browser to URL:
“http://PrintNetIPaddress/networkConf.html”
(e.g. “http://192.75.11.9/networkConf.html”).
NOTE: If prompted for a “User ID” and password first, type in “root” for
the ID and press ENTER at the password prompt since there’s no
password by default.
3. Look under the “Novell” section and add the new password to the
“Pserver Password” field.
NOTE: The passwords entered in Netware Administrator or PCONSOLE
must match the password set on the unit.
4. Click on the SUBMIT button when done and physically re-power the
printer to make the new settings take effect.
Print Server Setup - Manual (Telnet) Method
1. Telnet to the print server. This will bring up a login screen:
telnet ipaddress
NOTE: If prompted for a “User ID” and password first, type in “root” for
the ID and press ENTER at the password prompt since there’s no
password by default.
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Adjusting Polling Time (NDS and Bindery setups)
2. You should now see a prompt displayed that has the PrintNet’s IP
address followed by a colon then root.
ipaddress:root>
3. At the prompt, enter:
store pserver novell passwd password
NOTE: The passwords entered in Netware Administrator or PCONSOLE
must match the password set on the unit.
4. Reset the unit to ensure the changes take effect.
reset
Adjusting Polling Time (NDS and Bindery setups)
To set the poll time the PrintNet will use when checking for new jobs
under a PSERVER setup:
Netware 4.x
1. Login to NetWare Administrator as a user with security equal to
“Admin” on your Novell host.
2. Double click on the printer object you wish to change the poll time for.
This will bring up the printer objects details pages.
3. Click on “Configuration” to display the configuration page.
4. Change the “Service Interval” to the desired number (in seconds).
NOTE: You may also want to change the “Service mode for forms” to
“Change forms as needed”. If you do not do this, the PrintNet will
need to poll the file server twice as much to get all the information
it needs.
5. Re-power the PrintNet by turning the printer off and on to make the
changes take effect.
Netware 3.x
1. Enter PCONSOLE as supervisor on your Novell host.
2. Select “Print Server Information” from the main menu, and press
ENTER.
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3. Select the print server you have been using for your PSERVER setup
and press ENTER. By default this will be “M_xxxxxx” where “xxxxxx”
equals the last six digits of the print server’s Ethernet address found
on the bottom of the device (e.g. “M_091C1A”).
4. Select “Print Server Configuration” from the menu that displays.
5. Select “Printer Configuration” from the next menu to display a list of
configured printers.
6. Select the printer you wish to alter the poll time for and press ENTER.
7. Change the “Sampling Interval” to the desired number (in seconds).
NOTE: You may also want to change the “Service mode for forms” to
“Change forms as needed”. If you do not do this, the PrintNet will
need to poll the file server twice as much to get all the information
it needs.
8. Press ESCAPE and select “Yes” to save the changes to this new
printer.
9. Re-power the PrintNet by turning the printer off and on to make the
changes take effect.
Changing the PrintNet Name
(NDS and Bindery setups)
When defining a new print queue on a Novell file server, a new print
server must be defined to represent the PrintNet. This name must match
the pre-defined name given to the print server. By default, this name is in
the format “M_xxxxxx” where “xxxxxx” equals the last six digits of the
PrintNet’s Ethernet address found on the bottom of the device (e.g.
“M_091C1A”). You must make sure that the print server object that you
are using for your PSERVER setup has the same name as that stored on
the PrintNet. If you need to rename the print server object in Netware
Administrator, please delete the object, and re-create it with the new
name. Netware administrator seems to have some problems with
renaming objects.
NOTE: Changing the name will effect all of the protocols that are running
on the PrintNet.
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Changing the PrintNet Name (NDS and Bindery setups)
HTML Method
1. Load a Web browser on a network station that can communicate with
the print server over TCP/IP.
2. Direct your Web browser to URL:
“http://PrintNetIPaddress/adminConf.html”
(e.g. “http://192.75.11.9/adminConf.html”).
NOTE: If prompted for a “User ID” and password first, type in “root” for
the ID and press ENTER at the password prompt since there’s no
password by default.
3. Look under the “System Information” section and enter the new name
into the “Name” field.
4. Click on the SUBMIT button when done and physically re-power the
printer to make the new settings take effect.
Manual (Telnet) Method
1. Telnet to the print server. This will bring up a login screen:
telnet ipaddress
NOTE: If prompted for a “User ID” and password first, type in “root” for
the ID and press ENTER at the password prompt since there’s no
password by default.
2. You should now see a prompt displayed that has the PrintNet’s IP
address followed by a colon then root.
ipaddress:root>
3. At the prompt, enter:
store pserver name name
4. Reset the unit to ensure the changes take effect.
reset
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Changing the PrintNet Frame Type
(NDS and Bindery setups)
The PrintNet allows the user to store a particular frame type for the unit to
adhere to in a Novell environment.
HTML Method
1. Load a Web browser on a network station that can communicate with
the print server over TCP/IP.
2. Direct your Web browser to URL:
“http://PrintNetIPaddress/networkConf.html”
(e.g. “http://192.75.11.9/networkConf.html”).
NOTE: If prompted for a “User ID” and password first, type in “root” for
the ID and press ENTER at the password prompt since there’s no
password by default.
3. Look under the “Novell” section and go to the “Frame Type” field to
select the appropriate frametype.
4. Click on the SUBMIT button when done and physically re-power the
printer to make the new settings take effect.
Manual (Telnet) Method
1. Telnet to the print server. This will bring up a login screen:
telnet ipaddress
NOTE: If prompted for a “User ID” and password first, type in “root” for
the ID and press ENTER at the password prompt since there’s no
password by default.
2. You should now see a prompt displayed that has the PrintNet’s IP
address followed by a colon then root.
ipaddress:root>
3. At the prompt, enter:
store pserver novell frametype [ethernet2 | 802.3
|802.2 |802.2snap | autosense]
4. Reset the unit to make the changes take effect.
reset
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Changing the PrintNet Mode (NDS and Bindery setups)
Changing the PrintNet Mode
(NDS and Bindery setups)
The PrintNet allows the user to store a particular mode for the unit to
operate in. This will be either NDS, Bindery, or autosense. If autosense is
used, the PrintNet will first attempt to login to an NDS file server and if it
fails it will try to login to a Bindery file server.
NOTE: If you are using both NDS and Bindery file servers in your setup,
make sure the mode is set to auto.
HTML Method
1. Load a Web browser on a network station that can communicate with
the print server over TCP/IP.
2. Direct your Web browser to URL:
“http://PrintNetIPaddress/networkConf.html”
(e.g. “http://192.75.11.9/networkConf.html”).
NOTE: If prompted for a “User ID” and password first, type in “root” for
the ID and press ENTER at the password prompt since there’s no
password by default.
3. Look under the “Novell” section and go to the “Service Type” field to
select the appropriate mode.
4. Click on the SUBMIT button when done and physically re-power the
printer to make the new settings take effect.
Manual (Telnet) Method
1. Telnet to the print server. This will bring up a login screen:
telnet ipaddress
NOTE: If prompted for a “User ID” and password first, type in “root” for
the ID and press ENTER at the password prompt since there’s no
password by default.
2. You should now see a prompt displayed that has the PrintNet’s IP
address followed by a colon then root.
ipaddress:root>
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3. At the prompt, enter:
store pserver novell mode [nds | bindery | auto]
4. Reset the unit to make the changes take effect.
reset
Setting the PrintNet NDS Context (NDS setups)
The PrintNet allows you to store the print server object in any context
within the NDS tree you choose. By default the PrintNet will look for the
print server object in the same context as the file server object it connects
to is stored in.
HTML Method
1. Load a Web browser on a network station that can communicate with
the print server over TCP/IP.
2. Direct your Web browser to URL:
“http://PrintNetIPaddress/networkConf.html”
(e.g. “http://192.75.11.9/networkConf.html”).
NOTE: If prompted for a “User ID” and password first, type in “root” for
the ID and press ENTER at the password prompt since there’s no
password by default.
3. Look under the “Novell” section and enter the new context in the
“NDS Context” field.
4. Click on the SUBMIT button when done and physically re-power the
printer to make the new settings take effect.
Manual (Telnet) Method
1. Telnet to the print server. This will bring up a login screen:
telnet ipaddress
NOTE: If prompted for a “User ID” and password first, type in “root” for
the ID and press ENTER at the password prompt since there’s no
password by default.
2. You should now see a prompt displayed that has the PrintNet’s IP
address followed by a colon then root.
ipaddress:root>
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Setting the PrintNet Preferred NDS Tree (NDS setups)
3. At the prompt, enter:
store pserver novell context context
4. Reset the unit to make the changes take effect.
reset
Setting the PrintNet Preferred NDS Tree
(NDS setups)
The PrintNet supports Novell environments that have multiple trees. If
your environment has more than one tree you may want to set a preferred
tree. By default, the PrintNet will try to login to each tree it finds in turn
until it is successful.
HTML Method
1. Load a Web browser on a network station that can communicate with
the print server over TCP/IP.
2. Direct your Web browser to URL:
“http://PrintNetIPaddress/networkConf.html”
(e.g. “http://192.75.11.9/networkConf.html”).
NOTE: If prompted for a “User ID” and password first, type in “root” for
the ID and press ENTER at the password prompt since there’s no
password by default.
3. Look under the “Novell” section and enter the preferred tree in the
“NDS Preferred Tree” field.
4. Click on the SUBMIT button when done and physically re-power the
printer to make the new settings take effect.
Manual (Telnet) Method
1. Telnet to the print server. This will bring up a login screen:
telnet ipaddress
NOTE: If prompted for a “User ID” and password first, type in “root” for
the ID and press ENTER at the password prompt since there’s no
password by default.
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2. You should now see a prompt displayed that has the PrintNet’s IP
address followed by a colon then root.
ipaddress:root>
3. At the prompt, enter:
store pserver novell tree tree
4. Reset the unit to make the changes take effect.
reset
Novell Host Configuration (10/100Base-T)
This section covers PSERVER and RPRINTER/NPRINTER setups on the
PrintNet. The PrintNet can handle up to eight RPRINTER/NPPRINTER
setups.
Even though the entire print setup is done through Netware Administrator
or PCONSOLE, you may need to communicate directly with the print
server in order to modify settings, monitor the unit, etc.
For Netware 4.x environments, you can obtain a NWAdmn3x snap-in
program called MPAdmin. This snap-in can be used to configure
PSERVER setups as well as additional settings on the PrintNet.
NOTE: NWAdmn3x is only included with Netware 4.11 and higher
releases. If you are using Netware 4.10, you can either upgrade
to Netware 4.11, or go to Novell’s web site and get the patches to
upgrade the Nwadmin program for Netware 4.10 to Nwadmn3x
for Netware 4.11. Alternatively, you can perform the setup without
using MPAdmin.
NDS PSERVER Setup (Netware 4.x)
There are a number of possible ways to configure the PrintNet for use in a
Novell NDS PSERVER setup. These include using the MPAdmin snap-in
for Netware Administrator, using generic print server objects in Netware
Administrator, or by using PCONSOLE. The following steps describe a
setup using generic print server object in Netware Administrator. Setups
using PCONSOLE are less common, and will not be discussed.
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To create a printer/print queue in an NDS environment using Netware
Administrator print server objects, you will need to:
1. Login to NetWare Administrator as a user with security equal to
“Admin” on your Novell host.
2. Click with the right mouse button on a branch in the tree that you
would like to create a print queue object in.
3. Select “Create...” from the menu that pops up to bring up the “New
Object” dialogue.
4. Select “Print Queue” from the “Class of new object” list, and then click
on “OK”.
5. Select “Directory Service Queue”, and type the name of the queue
into the “Print Queue name” field.
6. Fill in the “Print Queue Volume” field by typing in a volume or
browsing for one. Click on “Create” when you’re done.
7. Click with the right mouse button on a branch in the tree that you
would like to create a printer object in.
8. Select “Create...” from the menu that pops up to bring up the “New
Object” dialogue.
9. Select “Printer” from the “Class of new object” list, and then click on
“OK”.
10. Type in the name for the printer in the “Printer name” field.
NOTE: The Printer object name must match one of the destination
names on the PrintNet. This will most likely be d1prn.
In NDS, a printer object can only be attached to one print server object at
a given time as Novell is using the printer object to represent a physical
printer. A physical printer can only be attached to one parallel or serial
port at a time. Thus, if you assign a printer object to another print server
object, the new print server object will “steal” it from the old one (this also
happens with non-PrintNet print server objects).
In order to properly process print jobs sent to the PrintNet, the printer
object created in Novell must refer to the destination on this server and
not to the actual physical printer. On the PrintNet, print jobs must pass
through an extra layer (a “destination”) before being sent on to the printer.
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This destination allows for further processing of the print job before
sending it to the printer.
If you are using multiple print servers, you will have to either rename all
your destinations to ensure that no printer object names conflict or keep
all the printer objects for one print server in a different context than those
for the other print server.
11. Select “Define additional properties” and click on “Create.”
12. Click on “Assignments” in the dialogue that pops up, and then on the
“Add...” button.
13. Select the queue you defined earlier, or browse for a different one.
14. Click on “OK” to assign this queue to this printer.
15. Click on “OK” to close the Printers details dialogue and make the
changes permanent.
16. Click on a branch in the tree (i.e., context) that you would like to
create the PrintNet print server object in.
NOTE: If the context you choose is different than the one the file server
object for the file server you are using is in, you must set the
context on the PrintNet. See “Setting the PrintNet NDS Context
(NDS setups)” on page 102.
17. Click with the right mouse button to bring up a submenu, and choose
“Create...” from this menu.
18. A dialogue titled “New Object” should pop up. In the “Class of new
object” list, select “Print Server” and click on “OK.”
19. Type in the name for the print server in the “Print Server name” field.
By default the name is “M_xxxxxx” where “xxxxxx” equals the last six
digits of the print server’s Ethernet address found on the bottom of
the device (e.g., “M_091C1A”).
NOTE: The name you use here must match the name stored on the
PrintNet. This name can be found by using the “list pserver”
command. See “List Commands” on page 140 for more
information.
20. Select the “Define additional properties” and click on the “Create”
button.
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Bindery PSERVER Setup (Netware 3.x and Netware 4.x)
21. Click on “Assignments” in the dialogue that pops up, and then on the
“Add...” button.
22. Select the printer you created earlier.
23. Click on “OK” to assign this printer to this print server.
24. Click on “OK” to close the printer servers details dialogue and make
the changes permanent.
25. Physically re-power the printer to make the new settings take effect.
Bindery PSERVER Setup
(Netware 3.x and Netware 4.x)
A Bindery PSERVER setup is possible under both Netware 3.x and
Netware 4.x. If you are using Netware 4.x, Bindery emulation is required.
Please consult your Novell manual on how to set up Bindery emulation. A
Bindery setup using PCONSOLE in Netware 3.x is described in “NetWare
Version 3.x RPRINTER Setup” on page 81. The setup using PCONSOLE
in Netware 4.x is described in “NetWare Version 4.x RPRINTER Setup”
on page 86.
Referencing a Bindery Queue in NDS
(Netware 3.x and Netware 4.x)
If you would like to reference a Bindery queue when you perform your
PSERVER setup in NDS, you must create a PSERVER object for the
PrintNet on the file server where the Bindery queue resides. This is
important because in order to service the queue, the PrintNet must log on
to the queue’s file server. Since the queue is not an NDS queue, the
PrintNet can’t login under NDS, so it must login under Bindery.
This will only work if there is a valid PSERVER object on the file server.
This PSERVER object must have the same name that was used for the
NDS setup. By default this will be “M_xxxxxx” where “xxxxxx” equals the
last six digits of the print server’s Ethernet address found on the bottom of
the device (e.g., “M_091C1A”). This PSERVER object does not need to
have any printers or queues assigned to it. Also, when referencing a
Bindery queue in NDS, the Novell Mode on the PrintNet must be set to
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“auto” so that both NDS and Bindery logins are possible. See “Setting the
PrintNet NDS Context (NDS setups)” on page 102.
RPRINTER/NPRINTER Setup
(Netware 3.x and Netware 4.x)
This procedure associates an existing PSERVER with a remote PrintNet
acting as a RPRINTER/NPRINTER in a NetWare 3.x or Netware 4.x
environment. It is the PSERVER’s responsibility to get jobs from the
queue and to pass them off to the PrintNet acting as the remote printer.
Unlike a PSERVER setup, the PrintNet does not deal directly with the
queues.
NOTE: As a RPRINTER/NPRINTER, the print server does not use a
login ID. A non-PrintNet print server such as PSERVER.NLM or
PSERVER.EXE must be running for RPRINTER to operate. Also,
if the PrintNet loses a connection to a PSERVER, it will
automatically reconnect when that server becomes available
again.
The following steps assume that you have created a PSERVER object in
either Netware 3.x or Netware 4.x and have assigned printers and queues
to it. If you have not already done this, do it now. The setup is similar to
creating a PSERVER setup for the PrintNet, except that there are no
restrictions about which names may be used for the print server and
printer objects.
NOTE: Write down the printer number(s) assigned to the printer(s) you
are going to be using for this setup. You will need them in a later
step.
HTML Method
1. Load a PSERVER on your Netware 3.x or Netware 4.x file server
(i.e., issue a load pserver pservername command on the file
server).
NOTE: If it is an NDS PSERVER on a Netware 4.x file server, you must
specify the PSERVER name and context for pservername. For
example:
load pserver .sales_ps.sales.microplex
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RPRINTER/NPRINTER Setup (Netware 3.x and Netware 4.x)
2. Load a Web browser on a network station that can communicate with
the print server over TCP/IP.
3. Direct your Web browser to URL:
“http://PrintNetIPaddress/networkConf.html”
(e.g., “http://192.75.11.9/networkConf.html”).
NOTE: If prompted for a “User ID” and password first, type in “root” for
the ID and press ENTER at the password prompt since there’s no
password by default.
4. Look under the “Novell” section and find a row in the RPRINTER
category.
5. Click on “Enabled” and enter the name used with the PSERVER.NLM
started in step 1 into the “Print Server Name” field.
NOTE: If it is an NDS pserver, only enter the PSERVER name and not
the context (e.g., sales_ps).
6. Enter the printer number of the printer you would like serviced into the
“Printer Number” field, and then select the destination on the PrintNet
you would like to use for output.
7. Repeat steps 4 through 6 for each additional printer you would like to
have serviced.
8. Click on the SUBMIT button when done and physically re-power the
printer to make the new settings take effect.
Manual (Telnet) Method
1. Load a PSERVER on your Netware 3.x or Netware 4.x file server
(i.e., issue a load pserver pservername command on the file
server).
NOTE: If it is an NDS PSERVER on a Netware 4.x file server, you must
specify the pserver name and context for pservername. For
example:
load pserver .sales_ps.sales.printronix
2. Telnet to the print server. This will bring up a login screen:
telnet ipaddress
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NOTE: If prompted for a “User ID” and password first, type in “root” for
the ID and press ENTER at the password prompt since there’s no
password by default.
3. You should now see a prompt displayed that has the PrintNet’s IP
address followed by a colon then root.
ipaddress:root>
4. At the prompt, store the RPRINTER settings on the PrintNet. The
pservername refers to the existing PSERVER.NLM on the file
server created in step 1.
Syntax:
store rprinter add pservername printernumber
PrintNetdestination
Example for an RPRINTER servicing printer 0 of the PSERVER.NLM
called pserver1 and sending jobs to the PrintNet destination d1prn:
store rprinter add pserver1 0 d1prn
NOTE: If it is an NDS pserver, only enter the PSERVER name and not
the context (e.g., sales_ps).
5. Physically re-power the printer to make the new settings take effect.
Wait two minutes and then check your PSERVER to see if the appropriate
printer is being serviced. The printer should display a message such as
“Waiting for job”. At this point, the PrintNet knows to receive any jobs this
PSERVER.NLM has to send to it through the defined printer.
Troubleshooting (10/100Base-T)
PSERVER Setup
If there is no connection with the PrintNet after you have completed the
print setup, there are several things to confirm.
NOTE: The debug information that is mentioned in this section can be
found by either telnet-ing to the PrintNet and issuing the
commands given, or launching a browser to the Novell status
page on the PrintNet (e.g., http://192.168.11.9/
networkNovellStatus.html)
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PSERVER Setup
•
Have you tried repowering the PrintNet? Wait about a minute before
checking to see if it has logged in and attached to a queue.
•
•
Is the network connector fastened tightly to the unit?
•
Is there an available NetWare user license for the PrintNet to utilize
while it acts as a PSERVER? Every PSERVER takes up one user
license since it logs in to the Novell file server.
•
When going through the PSERVER setup steps, did you name the
PrintNet “M_xxxxxx” where “xxxxxx” equals the last six digits of the
Ethernet address? This is the default format of the unit’s name when
it is acting as a PSERVER.
Is the PrintNet already servicing a queue on another file server? If so,
it cannot service another file server at the same time.
NOTE: This “M_xxxxxx” name must have six digits after the “_” so if
necessary, pad out each byte with a zero (0).
•
Has the PrintNet’s name been changed from its default of “M_xxxxxx”
and if so, have you incorporated this new name into your PSERVER
setup?
•
Is there a password set for the Print Server to utilize when it is logging
in to the file server? Make sure the PrintNet’s PSERVER password
matches that of the PSERVER setup or set both places to no
password.
•
When setting the PrintNet up as a PSERVER, did you specify a
destination on the PrintNet (e.g., d1prn) for the printer name and did
you remember this name is case sensitive?
NOTE: PrintNet destinations are case sensitive so they will not be
recognized if they are typed incorrectly. By default, they are all in
lowercase. If you are setting up in a NetWare 4.x environment,
the destination must be renamed to uppercase to match the
PCONSOLE or Netware Administrator entry. Please see set
dest destination name newname on page 132 for
information on changing names.
•
Does the destination you used in your PSERVER setup have the
Novell service enabled? Please see the “Commands” chapter for
information on enabling/disabling services.
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Troubleshooting (10/100Base-T)
•
Try doing a debug nest ipx telnet command on the PrintNet (or
find the “IPX Layer” section on the Novell HTML status page). Check
that a board has been bound to the PrintNet, and that the network
number is correct for your network. If not, you may want to set a
specific frame type for the PrintNet to use. You can find out what
frame type is bound to which board number using the debug nest
odi command (or from the “ODI Layer” section on the Novell HTML
status page).
•
Try a debug nest fserver telnet command (or find the “File
Servers” section on the Novell HTML status page). If no file servers
show up, then there is probably a problem with the network
connection, or the PrintNet is not on a Novell network. Try a debug
nest sap telnet command (or find the “SAP” section on the Novell
HTML status page) to see if the PrintNet is seeing any network
activity.
•
Try a debug nest pserver telnet command (or find the
“PSERVER” section on the Novell HTML status page). Look for a
valid queue under the “EPS QUEUES” section. If the printer field
contains a number and there is a valid file server, but there is no
queue, then you probably made an error in the setup, try again. If it’s
an NDS PSERVER setup, look for a line with the following type of
message “Could not login to NDS Tree <TREE> as
<PSERVER.<CONTEXT>”. This means that either the tree is wrong,
the context stored on the PrintNet for the print server object is wrong,
the print server object password is wrong, or the print server object
name is wrong.
•
Try a debug nest rprinter telnet command (or find the
“RPRINTER” section on the Novell HTML status page). Look for the
following type of line: “(0:ENPReadConfig):[0:213] Destination =
<X>”, where <X> is between 0 and 3. If they all say “Destination =
65536” then the PSERVER setup did not complete properly. If there
was a valid queue under “EPS QUEUES” in the debug nest
pserver command, then the printer name probably doesn’t match
an existing destination name on the PrintNet, or Novell has been
disabled for that destination. If there is a valid “Destination = “ line,
then double check that there is an entry for this number under the
“ENP INFO” section.
RPRINTER/NPRINTER Setup
NOTE: Debug messages for the PSERVER setup are in the RPRINTER
section here because the PSERVER setup on the PrintNet
shares some code with the RPRINTER setup.
•
Try a debug nest logs telnet command (or find the “General
Messages” section on the Novell HTML status page). Look for a valid
entry for the printer. It will look something like this:
“(0:InitSinglePrinter): printer=<X> name=<NAME>”. Then look for the
following lines: “(0:Printf): RemoteMonitor(<X>); printer is” and
“(0:Printf): WAITING_FOR_JOB”. If you see these lines the PrintNet
is set up properly, and the problem points to a setup issue on the
workstation.
•
If the PrintNet has logged in to the file server but has not attached to
the queue, there may be a permission problem. Make sure the
appropriate users have rights to this queue (they should be in the
group “everyone.”) Also, you may have to assign the queue to “root”
so that is available to everyone.
•
Did you rename any objects in Netware Administrator during your
setup? Netware Administrator seems to have a problems renaming
objects. If so, delete everything and start over.
If none of these help your situation, you may want to try the whole setup
again. Completely delete the setup that is giving you trouble and go
through the setup again, following each step carefully.
NOTE: Be sure to reboot the printer before beginning a new setup and
after completing a PSERVER setup. Wait at least a minute for the
Print Server to login and attach to a queue.
RPRINTER/NPRINTER Setup
If there is no connection with the PrintNet after you have completed the
print setup, there are several things to confirm.
NOTE: The debug information that is mentioned in the section can be
found by either telnet-ing to the PrintNet and issuing the
commands given, or launching a browser to the Novell status
page on the PrintNet (e.g., http://192.168.11.9/
networkNovellStatus.html)
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•
Have you tried repowering the printer? Wait about a minute before
checking to see if it has logged in and attached to a queue.
•
•
Is the network connector fastened tightly to the unit?
•
Is there an entry when a list rprinter telnet command is done
on the PrintNet (not found on the Novell HTML status page)? When
the PrintNet is configured as an RPRINTER, this command should
produce the appropriate entry.
•
If the PrintNet has logged in to the file server but has not attached to
the queue, there may be a permission problem. Make sure the
appropriate users have rights to this queue (they should be in the
group “everyone.”) Also, you may have to assign the queue to “root”
so that is available to everyone.
•
Does the destination you used in your RPRINTER setup have the
Novell service enabled? Please see the “Commands” chapter for
information on enabling/disabling services.
•
Try doing a debug nest ipx telnet command on the PrintNet (or
find the “IPX Layer” section on the Novell HTML status page). Check
that a board has been bound to the PrintNet, and that the network
number is correct for your network. If not, you may want to set a
specific frame type for the PrintNet to use. See the PrintNet
Commands section above. You can find out what frame type is bound
to which board number using the debug nest odi command (or
from the “ODI Layer” section on the Novell HTML status page).
•
Try a debug nest sap telnet command (or find the “SAP” section
on the Novell HTML status page) to see if the PrintNet is seeing any
network activity.
•
Try a debug nest rprinter telnet command (or find the
“RPRINTER” section on the Novell HTML status page). Look for an
entry for one of the numbers 4 to 7 under “ENP INFO”. The “dest”
field should match the destination used on the PrintNet. If no entry is
found, check that the destination has the Novell service enabled. If
the “ERROR-CODE” field has an error of 308, make sure no other
RPRINTER setup is servicing this printer object at the same time.
Is the PrintNet already servicing a queue on another file server? If so,
it cannot service another file server at the same time.
Printing Related
Only one RPRINTER connection is allowed to service a
PSERVER.NLM printer.
•
If the PrintNet has logged in to the file server but has not attached to
the queue, there may be a permission problem. Make sure the
appropriate users have rights to this queue (they should be in the
group “everyone.”) Also, you may have to assign the queue to “root”
so that is available to everyone.
If none of these help your situation, you may want to try the whole setup
again. Completely delete the setup that is giving you trouble and go
through the setup again following each step carefully.
NOTE: Be sure to reboot the printer before beginning a new setup and
after completing an RPRINTER setup. Wait at least a minute for
the Print Server to login and attach to a queue.
Printing Related
The job goes to the queue but nothing prints
If nothing is printing, make sure you have a connection to the PrintNet
first. Please see the PSERVER or RPRINTER sections above if you are
having connection-related problems. Otherwise, consider these points
when trying to solve printing problems in a Novell environment:
•
Does the job leave the queue or is it stuck there indefinitely? If it
leaves properly, the problem points to the actual printing mechanism
on your Novell system (e.g., CAPTURE, NPRINT, etc.), to the print
job format, or to the printer itself. Otherwise, review the configuration
steps you’ve already followed.
•
Have you confirmed that you can print from the PrintNet to the printer
ignoring the Novell setup altogether? Please see start fox|tts|
loopb prn on page 145 for a good test.
•
Is anything happening on the printer when the print job is sent?
Sometimes, the print job may have arrived at the printer but be
waiting for a manual form feed. If this is the case, please see “Set
Commands” on page 131 for information on trailer strings.
•
Is the printing mechanism you are using (e.g., CAPTURE, NPRINT,
etc.) configured to service the appropriate queue?
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•
Is the PrintNet configured as the queue’s “Currently Attached
Server”? If not, make sure you have associated the queue and the
printer. See “Novell Host Configuration” on page 79.
•
Is there a hold on the print job? If you select the job from PCONSOLE’s CURRENT PRINT JOB ENTRIES, change the User Hold or
Operator Hold to “no.”
•
If you look in PCONSOLE’s CURRENT QUEUE STATUS within the
PRINT QUEUE INFORMATION menu, is the server configured to
service entries in this queue? It is possible to turn servicing off here.
If you’ve followed the suggestions above and are still having printing
problems, try rebooting the PrintNet. Then either review every step you
took when configuring the PrintNet, or try re-doing the setup, paying
special attention to each step explained in “Novell Host Configuration” on
page 79.
The job prints incorrectly
This category really can be broken down into several sub-categories such
as lost characters, garbled data, extra banner pages, or blank pages at
the end of the job. However, the reason for these mishaps can generally
be traced to the printing mechanism used on your Novell system. These
points should be considered when configuring your print method
(e.g., CAPTURE, NPRINT, etc.):
116
•
•
•
Did you include the No Tabs option?
•
Are you running the latest version of PSERVER (later than 1.22)? If
not, upgrade the PSERVER software.
•
In a PSERVER setup, did you ensure that the printer name
(e.g. d1prn) was set up as “Defined Elsewhere”?
•
Is the timeout option in the CAPTURE command set high enough so
the printer doesn’t time out before the print processing has had a
chance to complete? This can be a problem with graphic jobs.
Did you specify No Banner with PostScript printers?
Did you turn off banner pages and form feeds if this is already taken
care of within an application or on the PrintNet? Doubling up of these
types of print features is easy to do since these options are provided
both on the PrintNet (in a model) and within the print command.
Printing Related
Some other things to consider when garbled data persists are:
•
•
tab expansion (xtab) set on (in a model) with graphic jobs
the correct driver for the printer if printing from within Windows
For additional information on these suggestions or on various Novell
printing mechanisms, please refer to your NetWare user manuals.
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7
Monitoring Printers
Implementing Printer Management
Printer management includes the following tasks:
•
•
•
Monitoring the status of network printers
Responding to alarms
Gathering statistics on printer operations
The three elements of network printer monitoring and management are:
•
•
•
Agent/manager model
MIB, the management information database
SNMP, the protocol used to get management information
Agent/Manager Model
The elements of a monitoring system, MIB and SNMP, are implemented
in an agent/manager model:
•
The manager is a console, workstation, or server on working hubs or
routers which has a global knowledge of NICs and printers.
•
Agents are utilities that reside on devices, such as a NIC, that
respond through SNMP to management requests for information. The
information is stored in a MIB (Management Information Base).
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MIB
A MIB is a management information base that contains information a
device makes available to SNMP. The MIB describes information about
actual objects to be managed and controlled. There are many different
MIBs defined.
Standards of Network Printer MIBs
The Printer MIB is based on the following standards:
•
•
•
System and Interfaces Group MIB (RFC 1213 of March 1991)
Host Resource MIB (RFC 1514 of September 1993)
Printer MIB (RFC 1759 of March 1995)
Components of the Printer MIB
The printer MIB gives the network manager access to most of the
information that is normally accessible through the NIC command set for
configuring the server with SNMP. Some objects identified by this MIB are
not applicable to the NIC.
The complete definition of the Printer MIB is provided in the Printer MIBs
in DOS Format and Printer MIBs in TAR Format, which are shipped with
the NIC. The MIB is provided in a subset of the ASN.1 syntax. The Printer
MIB is composed of the following sections:
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
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General
Cover
Localization
Input
Output
Marker
Media Path
Channel
Interpreter
Console
Alert
MIB
Information Provided by the MIB
The Printer MIB contains the following types of information about network
printers:
Descriptions. Printer configuration, location, and contact.
Status. Current operating status of printers.
Alerts. Reportable events from printers.
General Information about MIBs
For further information on SNMP and MIB, refer to the following:
•
RFC 1155 — Structure and Identification of Management Information
for TCP/IP-based Internets (SMI)
•
RFC 1156 — Management Information Base for Management of
TCP/IP Internets (MIB)
•
•
RFC 1157 — A Simple Network Management Protocol (SNMP)
The Simple Book: An Introduction to Management of TCP/IP-based
Internets
Getting the Latest MIB Information
To obtain the latest copy of these and other RFCs, FTP the files from one
of the following two sources:
Internet:
ftp.isi.edu\internet-drafts
World Wide Web:
http://www.ietf.cnri.reston.va.us/lid-abstracts.html
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SNMP
SNMP is the protocol used to communicate between manager and agent.
Managers request information, usually through automated polling at
specified intervals, and agents respond. Though used primarily on TCP/
IP networks, SNMP can be implemented on other protocols, for example,
IPX.
SNMP is a standard by which a network manager can get statistics and
configuration information from the NICs and other devices on the network.
This is done through a Network Management Station (NMS), such as
NetView.
Monitoring Tools
Many tools can be used to monitor printers with SNMP agents. One of
these tools is NetView. There are also other MIB browsers, which are not
described here.
OS/2 TCP/IP
To get SNMP.EXE to work correctly to browse MIB items, you may need
to delete the following file:
d:\mptn\etc\mib2.tbl
Monitoring with AIX NetView/6000
The AIX NetView/6000 program can manage any IP-addressable device
with an SNMP agent.
NetView/6000 can be used to set a network topology, monitor a network,
diagnose problems, and measure network performance.
Through its MIB Browser, information about the resources affecting an
event (such as an alarm) can be obtained.
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Setting the SNMP Community Name
Setting the SNMP Community Name
The default SNMP read-only community name is “public,” and cannot be
changed.
Change the SNMP R/W community name with the command:
set user passwd snmp com_name
save
where com_name is the new SNMP R/W community name.
The default is no R/W community name.
NOTE: Changing SNMP community names or access rights may hinder
or disable applications that are monitoring your printers.
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8
Commands
Command Shell Overview
The PrintNet comes with an in-depth command shell called “npsh.” It
allows you to manipulate objects like destinations, I/O ports, and models
and provides monitoring and troubleshooting capabilities.
npsh Access Methods
There are many ways this command shell can be accessed:
•
•
•
built in HTML forms
a Telnet session from a TCP/IP host to the PrintNet
a single remote shell command (e.g., rsh, rcmd, remsh) from a TCP/
IP host
Main npsh Command Prefixes
All configurable commands either start with “store” or “set,”
troubleshooting commands usually start with “debug,” and view
commands start with “list.”
NOTE: If the “store” prefix is used, the PrintNet must be repowered to
make the changes take effect. Since “store” affects flash
memory settings only, the print server must reset and read the
new settings now in flash memory.
NOTE: If the “set” prefix is used, a “save” command must be executed
as well so that the new settings are retained after power cycles.
Since “set” only affects the settings in memory, they will be lost
after a power cycle unless they are saved to flash memory.
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Getting Command Help
The PrintNet command shell provides several online help tools. These
include:
“?” Command
Typing “?” when logged in to the command shell will produce a full listing
of all commands available.
Command Prefixes
Typing in the first portion of a command will produce an error message
showing the correct syntax. For example, typing in “store tcpip” will
produce a list of all commands that start with this prefix.
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Store Commands
Complete Command List
This section outlines the entire PrintNet command set including the
command syntax, a description, and in most cases, an example for each
command listed.
NOTE: If you see the word “ifnum ” in any npsh commands, you should
substitute a “1” unless told otherwise. This “1” represents the one
network interface (i.e., Ethernet) supported.
Store Commands
These commands change the settings stored in flash memory and do not
affect the current or working settings in memory. A power cycle is needed
before the stored settings become current.
store ifc ifnum utp [-]li [-]rx
store ifc 1 utp li
Modify the physical UTP interface properties where li enables link
integrity and rx enables the increased receive threshold.
store ifc from default
Set all UTP settings back to factory defaults.
store ifc from current
Store all current UTP settings to flash memory so they are retained
after a power cycle. This ensures all current settings match what is
stored in flash memory.
store pserver opts [[-]jobsecurity] [jobtimeout
seconds]
store pserver opts jobsecurity jobtimeout 5
If jobsecurity is disabled, any user can cancel queued jobs on the
PrintNet including guest users. If jobtimeout is set to some value
other than 0, the PrintNet will only wait this amount of seconds when
getting printer feedback. This is only used if you have a logpath port
and type set on a particular destination.
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store pserver tcpsocket TCPportnumber port
newTCPportnumber
store pserver tcpsocket 4000 port 5000
Change a pre-defined TCPportnumber on the PrintNet to a
newTCPportnumber. The default number is 9100 for prn.
store pserver tcpsocket TCPportnumber dest destination
store pserver tcpsocket 5000 dest d1prn
Assign a pre-defined TCPportnumber to a particular destination on
the PrintNet. Therefore, if you are using a print method that sends
jobs directly to a TCP port number, you still have the option to
process the job data through this destination setting.
store pserver novell passwd password
store pserver novell passwd mplex
Store the password for the PrintNet to use when logging in to a
Novell file server. This password would have to match one set on the
file server.
store pserver novell user name username
store pserver novell user name micro1
Define a username on the PrintNet to be used when it logs into a
Novell file server to find information. This username must match a
user pre-defined on the Novell file server.
store pserver novell user passwd password
store pserver novell user passwd mplex2
Define a password on the PrintNet for the Novell user already
defined. This password must match the one stored on the Novell file
server. Passwords are optional as long as there is not one defined on
the file server for the user.
store pserver novell fserver add|del fileservername
store pserver novell fserver add fs1
Add or remove a server entry on the PrintNet for the Novell file server
it will be servicing.
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Store Commands
store pserver smb workgrp newworkgroupname
store pserver smb workgrp eng
Define a different Windows workgroup as defined by
newworkgroupname for the PrintNet to be visible within. By default,
the print server only comes up within the group called
“WORKGROUP.”
store pserver from default
Set all general print server settings back to factory defaults.
store pserver from current
Store all current general print server settings to flash memory so they
are retained after a power cycle. This ensures all current settings
match what is stored in flash memory.
store rprinter add|del printservername
destination
store rprinter add pserver1 0 d1prn
printernumber
Add or delete the RPRINTER settings on the PrintNet for a Novell
environment. The printservername must be the name of an existing
PSERVER.NLM on your Novell file server. The printernumber is the
printer number within this PSERVER.NLM. The destination is the
queue on the PrintNet where the print jobs will be sent to.
store tcpip ifnum addr IPaddress
store tcpip 1 addr 192.75.11.9
Store the IP address for the PrintNet.
store tcpip ifnum mask netmask
store tcpip 1 mask 255.255.255.0
Store the subnet mask for the PrintNet.
store tcpip ifnum opts [[-]rarp] [[-]bootp] [[-]dhcp]
store tcpip 1 opts -rarp -bootp -dhcp
Enable or disable the automatic RARP, BOOTP or DHCP requests
for IP addresses upon bootup. If you are storing the PrintNet TCP/IP
network settings within the device, you will not need to rely on RARP,
BOOTP or DHCP for new settings.
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store tcpip ifnum frametype [[-]ethernet2]
[[-]802.2snap]
store tcpip 1 frametype ethernet2 802.2snap
Control which frame type(s) is supported with the TCP/IP protocol. By
default, both Ethernet 2 and 802.2snap are enabled but normal TCP/
IP communications rely on Ethernet 2. This setting has no affect on
other supported network protocols (e.g., Novell).
store tcpip route add|del host|net IPaddress ifnum
store tcpip route add net 192.75.12.0 1
store tcpip route del net 192.75.12.9 1
Add or delete a static route to a particular TCP/IP host or subnet
specified by IPaddress so the PrintNet knows how to communicate
with it. Normally one entry for a default router/gateway is all that is
needed for communications between different subnets. Please see
the next command for details.
store tcpip route add|del default routerIPaddress
ifnum
store tcpip route add default 192.75.11.1 1
Store a default router/gateway defined by routerIPaddress so the
PrintNet knows where to direct packets destined for another subnet. It
is easier to store one default entry rather than an entry per remote
host or network as in the previous command.
store tcpip tcp rxwin packets
store tcpip tcp rxwin 2
Determine the receive window size for the PrintNet. Usually the
packets value ranges from 2 to 8 with the lower number allowing for
more simultaneous TCP connections with the print server.
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Set Commands
store tcpip tcp opts [-]keepalive [-]disbufmgmt
store tcpip tcp opts keepalive -disbufmgmt
Controls whether the PrintNet maintains a connection with a host
when data cannot be accepted into its buffer. Normally the keepalive
feature is enabled so when the printer cannot accept data, the print
job connection is maintained and continued once the situation clears.
If disbufmgmt is disabled (i.e., “-”), the PrintNet will not buffer any
data when there is a blocked situation with the printer. Normally it is
best to have both keepalive and disbufmgmt enabled.
store tcpip tcp access [root] add|del IPaddress
store tcpip tcp access add 192.75.11.25
Add or remove an entry from the PrintNet TCP access list defined by
IPaddress. If the list has an entry, only this host can print to and
remotely interact with the print server.
store tcpip proxy add|del targetIPaddress
store tcpip from default
Set all TCP/IP network settings back to factory defaults.
store tcpip from current
Store all current TCP/IP network settings to flash memory so they are
retained after a power cycle. This ensures all current settings match
what is stored in flash memory.
Set Commands
These settings alter the current or working settings in memory only.
Therefore, they will be lost if the PrintNet is power cycled. To ensure this
does not happen, be sure to issue a “save” command so the current
settings get written to flash memory.
set date year month day
set date 1997 02 10
Set the current date noting the four-digit year, the two-digit month
from 1 through 12, and the day being the number in the month. If the
PrintNet is reset, this value will be lost so you will need to set the date
again.
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set dest destination name newname
set dest d1prn name laser
Change the current name of the destination to a new name as
indicated by newname. This newname must be nine characters or
less or it will be truncated. These names are case sensitive.
set dest destination backchannel prn [prn]
set dest d1prn backchannel prn
Establish a return path for printer feedback for a given destination.
Since the PrintNet I/O port is bi-directional, however, you will most
likely use the same I/O port that the destination is currently sending
jobs to.
set dest destination model modelname
set dest d1prn model m4
Associate a model with a destination. Jobs sent to the named
destination are processed according to the options defined in the
named model.
set dest destination logpath logpathname
set dest d1prn logpath l4
Associate a logpath with a destination. Jobs sent to the named
destination are logged according to the settings defined in the
named logpath.
set dest destination service [[-]socket][[-]lpd]
[[-]lpsched] [[-]rprinter] [[-]pserver] [[-]netbios]
[[-]ftpd]
set dest d1prn service -netbios
Set the destination to handle only certain print services. To add a
service, specify the service name. To disable a service, use “-”
before the name. The available services are:
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socket
Direct socket printing via TCP/IP.
lpd
LPR printing with TCP/IP including LPR clients on
any platform.
lpsched
LP or System V printing with TCP/IP.
rprinter
Novell RPRINTER support.
pserver
Novell PSERVER support.
Set Commands
netbios
Windows 95 and Windows for Workgroups printing.
ftpd
Printing using the File Transfer Protocol (FTP) via
TCP/IP.
set dest from default
Set all destination settings back to factory defaults.
set dest from stored
Set all current destination settings to the values stored in flash
memory.
set logpath logpath name newname
set logpath l1 name pagecount
Change the current name of the logpath to a new name as indicated
by newname. This newname must be nine characters or less or it
will be truncated. These names are case sensitive.
set logpath logpath type [[-]job] [[-]user] [[-]pgcnt]
[[-]cksum] [[-]printer] [[-]ioport]
set logpath l2 type job user printer pgcnt
Establish the type of printer and print job logging to be done within
this logpath. The options are:
job
Job ID, username, etc.
user
User ID along with three messages per job about
start and finish.
pgcnt
For total pages printed in a job.
cksum
16-bit checksum value to confirm integrity of data
printed.
printer
For special printer feedback.
ioport
Printer error messages determined through the
parallel port pins.
set logpath logpath port TCPportnumber| email|syslog
set logpath l3 port 2000
Determine where the log information should be sent for a print job or
attached printer. The choices are:
TCPportnumberTCP port number ranging from 1024 to 65000.
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email
Particular user’s email address. This address is set
using the “set sysinfo email
emailname@IPaddress” command.
syslog
A central TCP/IP host running the SYSLOG
daemon. This host is set using the “set sysinfo
syslog IPaddress” command.
set logpath from default
Set all logpath settings back to factory defaults.
set logpath from stored
Set all current logpath settings to the values stored in flash memory.
set model model name newname
set model m1 name landscape
Change the current name of the model to a new name as indicated
by newname. This newname must be nine characters or less or it
will be truncated. These names are case sensitive.
set model model type raw
set model m2 type raw
Set the model type to raw so that it does not process the data
passing through it in any way.
set model model banner [ps|text|auto [after]]
set model m2 banner text
Determine whether a banner page should be added for print jobs
passing through the model mapped destination/queue. auto will
determine which type is needed depending on the type of print job
data passing through. By default, banner pages are added to the front
of the job. If after is set, the banner page will come at the end.
set model model stty [[-]onlcr]
tablength|none]
set model m3 stty onlcr
[[-]descramble] [xtab
Control extra job processing done by the model. The processing
options are:
onlcr
134
Carriage return insertion for Unix text jobs. Adds
carriage returns to text jobs with solitary linefeeds.
This will prevent stair-stepped output or output
running off the right side of the page.
Set Commands
descramble
Automatic descrambling of print jobs passing
through which have been scrambled using
Printronix proprietary scramble Unix utility,
npscramble.
xtab
Tab expansion from 1 to 16 spaces.
set model model trailer trailerstring
set model m7 trailer $FF
Set a trailer string to be sent to the printer at the end of any print jobs
passing through this model. trailerstring can consist of up to nine
elements. An example element is a hexadecimal code (e.g., 0x04) or
a pre-defined variable on the print server (e.g., $FF for a formfeed).
Use “list var” to see all available variables.
set model from default
Set all model settings back to factory defaults.
set model from stored
Set all current model settings to the values stored in flash memory.
set prn [-]autofd
set prn -autofd
Assert or do not assert the AUTOFD line for carriage return insertion.
This only affects printers that support this function such as impact
printers.
set prn flush
set prn flush
Flush the data in the parallel port input and output buffers.
set prn unlock
set prn unlock
Release the access lock on the parallel port.
set prn timeout minutes |none
set prn timeout none
Terminate the print job sent to the parallel port if it is not printed after
the timeout period in minutes expires. The minutes value ranges
from 0 though 255 with 0 indicating no timing out to take place. This is
the default setting and should be fine for most print setups.
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set prn [-]opost
set prn -opost
Allow or disallow output processing on the parallel port such as
carriage return insertion (i.e., onlcr).
set prn [-]onlcr
set prn -onlcr
Enable or disable carriage return insertion on the parallel port. This
may be needed for Unix text jobs coming through with solitary
linefeeds. This feature is almost always set at the model level rather
than the I/O port level though.
set prn xtab tablength |none
set prn xtab none
Set the tabstop width as indicated by tablength. The range is 1
through 16 spaces.
set prn from default
Set all parallel port settings back to factory defaults.
set prn from stored
Set all current parallel port settings to the values stored in flash
memory.
set snmp
To add a user named snmp with root privileges, please follow the
steps below:
1.
Login to the PrintNet as a root user.
2.
Add a user named snmp.
set user add snmp
3.
Set the user type to root.
set user type snmp root
4.
Set the password for the snmp user.
set user passwd snmp snmppassword
5.
Save the changes.
save
The user snmp is now created and snmppassword is the only
community string which will allow write access.
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Set Commands
set snmp manager index ipaddress trap-community
The PrintNet continuously generates traps but unless the trap table is
filled in, no SNMP manager will receive this information. To set the
PrintNet to send traps to a particular SNMP manager, use this
command to add a SNMP manager to the trap table.
index is the idex number of the trap table. ipaddress is the IP
address of the SNMP manager receiving traps. trap-community is
the community string sent along with the trap information.
set sysinfo name newname
set sysinfo name salesprinter
Set a descriptive name defined by newname for PrintNet
identification purposes. This is not used in the operation of the print
server in any way.
set sysinfo location description
set sysinfo location salesdept
Set the physical location of the PrintNet. This is for identification
purposes and is not used in the operation of the print server in any
way.
set sysinfo contact contactname
set sysinfo contact Paul_Harris
Set a person or department to contact in case of print server trouble.
set sysinfo loginfo [-]sys | [-]tcp | [-]ipx | [-]spx
set sysinfo loginfo -sys ipx
Set the PrintNet debugging information type. Usually this information
includes unexpected errors or exceptions from the print server
divided into these groups:
sys
General system messages.
tcp
TCP stack messages.
ipx
IPX stack messages.
spx
SPX stack messages.
NOTE: This is not printer or job logging information.
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set sysinfo logport null|syslog
set sysinfo logport null
Define where the debugging information should be sent to. This can
be sent to an output device off of the PrintNet I/O port or to a central
TCP/IP host running a SYSLOG daemon. To set this host, use the
command “set sysinfo syslog hostIPaddress.”
set sysinfo email emailname@IPaddress
set sysinfo email joe@192.75.11.5
Define the user email address to receive printer and job logging
information from a particular logpath on the PrintNet. emailname is
the host or IP name of the user and IPaddress is the IP address
where the mail is stored on your network.
set sysinfo syslog hostIPaddress
set sysinfo syslog 192.75.11.30
Set the IP address of the host running the SYSLOG daemon. PrintNet
debugging or print job and printer logging information can be sent to
that IP address.
set sysinfo dns DNSserverIPaddress
set sysinfo dns 192.75.11.2
Set your DNS server IP address so the PrintNet can resolve host
names when used with its built-in Telnet and Ping clients.
set sysinfo descramblekey hexvalue
set sysinfo descramblekey 1234
Set the key value used for descrambling print jobs that have passed
through Printronix npscramble utility on a TCP/IP host. This key is a
four-digit hexadecimal value obtained from the host software,
npscramble. Within the npscramble source code, there is a variable
called SR_KEY which contains the default key value. This can be
changed to any four-digit value you would like.
set sysinfo module [[-]novell] [[-]netbios]
set sysinfo module -novell
Enable and disable certain network protocol stacks within the
PrintNet. Sometimes it helps to disable any protocols you are not
using on your network.
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Set Commands
set time hours [minutes [seconds ]]
set time 10 30
Set the current time noting the hours based on the 24-hour system
and the minutes and seconds ranging from 0 through 59. If the
PrintNet is reset, this value will be lost so you will need to set the time
again.
set user add|del username
set user add eng
Add or remove a user on the PrintNet defined by username.
IMPORTANT
Be careful not to delete the root user, or you will be unable to
configure any further settings on the print server. You will have to
go back to factory defaults to correct this problem.
set user passwd username password
set user passwd eng mplex1
Assign a password to a defined user on the PrintNet. This password
must be less than eleven characters.
set user type username root|guest
set user type eng root
Assign root or guest privileges to a particular user defined by
username. Guest permissions allow viewing of settings only. Root
permissions allow complete control of the PrintNet.
set user from default
Set all user settings back to factory defaults.
set user from stored
Set all current user settings to the values stored in flash memory.
set user passwd snmp com_name
Sets the new SNMP R/W community name as the com_name value.
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set var variablename variablestring
set var LANDSCAPE 0x1b 0x26 0x6c 0x31 0x4f
set var FINISH $FF $PCL-RST
Define a new variable to be used in header, trailer, or switch strings
on the PrintNet and call it variablename. variablestring can be a
space-separated list of words, hexadecimal numbers (e.g., 0x04), or
references to other pre-defined variables. It is easiest to make up the
variablestring with hexadecimal values as shown in the example.
NOTE: One variable counts as one element within header and trailer
strings.
NOTE: Defined variables are referenced in strings by placing a “$”
before the variable name (e.g., “set model m1 trailer
$FF”).
set var from default
Set all variable settings back to factory defaults.
set var from stored
Set all current variable settings to the values stored in flash memory.
List Commands
These commands list the current or working settings for a particular
section within the command shell. To view stored settings in flash
memory, you will need to add in “stored” within the beginning of any of
the following commands. For example, “list prn” shows you the
current prn settings but “list stored prn” shows you the settings
sitting in flash memory. Normally these should match.
list arp
List the current ARP table that the PrintNet adheres to in a TCP/IP
network.
list date
List the current date on the PrintNet.
list dest
List the current destination settings (e.g. names and mapped I/O
ports, models, and logpaths).
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List Commands
list diff
List the differences between the current settings and the stored
settings in flash memory. Normally, you want these values to match
so issue a “save” command followed by a “reset.”
list ifc
List the current UTP interface settings (e.g., link integrity).
list key
List the license details and license key number.
list logins
List any active user logins on the PrintNet.
list logpath
List the current logpath settings (e.g., names and mapped
destinations).
list model
List the current model settings (e.g., names and mapped
destinations).
list pserver
List the current general print server settings (e.g., print server name
and Novell mode).
list prn
List the current parallel port setting (e.g., mode).
list rprinter
List any current RPRINTER definitions.
list snmp
List Trap Table containing SNMP Managers.
list sysinfo
List the current PrintNet system information (e.g., contact name and
protocol stacks enabled).
list tcpip
List all current TCP/IP network settings (e.g., IP address and subnet
mask).
list test
List the status of output tests on the I/O ports.
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list time
List the current time on the PrintNet.
list user
List the current user definitions (e.g., user names and types).
list var
List all pre-defined variables including any newly created ones. Any of
these defined variables can be referenced in a string by placing a “ $”
before the variable name (e.g., “set model m1 trailer $FF”).
Debug Commands
The “debug” set of commands help troubleshoot problems that may
occur on the PrintNet. Some of the output may be cryptic but it helps
when troubleshooting.
debug eeprom
List ROM contents.
debug io
List statistics from the I/O port module.
debug ip
List IP stack statistics.
debug lpd
List statistics from the lpd daemon.
debug lpq
List statistics from the queue module.
debug mem
List statistics from the PrintNet memory module.
debug nest fserver
View the Novell file server(s) the PrintNet has acknowledged and
connected to.
debug nest ipx
Determine whether a board has been bound to the PrintNet under
Novell and that the network number is correct for your network.
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Debug Commands
debug nest logs
View miscellaneous Novell log messages.
debug nest odi
Determine what frame type is bonded to which board number under
Novell.
debug nest pserver
View the Novell PSERVER log messages including queues attached
to.
debug nest rprinter
View the Novell PSERVER and RPRINTER log messages and
destinations used on the PrintNet.
debug nest sap
Determine whether the PrintNet is seeing any Novell network activity.
debug netbios
List NetBIOS (i.e., Windows 95 and WfW) statistics.
debug nif
List network interface statistics.
debug novell
List file and print servers.
debug tcp
List TCP stack statistics.
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Chapter 8
Complete Command List
Miscellaneous Commands
These commands do not fall under any specific section of the command
shell but they are used quite frequently.
save [default]
Save the current settings to flash memory so they are available after
power cycles. Sysinfo, destination, model, logpath, variable, user,
and I/O port settings will be saved. If default is specified as well,
factory settings will be saved, overwriting any new settings you have
configured.
reset
Perform a warm boot or hardware reset simulating a power-on reset.
Restores current settings to those stored in flash memory since the
flash memory settings will be read and loaded into memory upon
bootup.
load [default]
Load the settings stored in flash memory and use them as the current
or working settings. If default is specified as well, factory settings will
be loaded.
lpstat [ioport] [jobID]
lpstat prn
Display active and queued jobs and I/O port status for a given ioport
or jobID. Specifying one of these parameters will shorten the output
focusing on the particular I/O port or print job specified.
cancel jobID
cancel d1prn-10
Remove a job from an I/O port queue. Use “lpstat” to find a
particular job ID first.
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Miscellaneous Commands
start fox|tts|loopb prn
start fox prn
Begin a debugging test on one of the I/O ports on the PrintNet. The
tests available are:
fox
A continuous stream of text sent to the attached
printer. This is a good test for troubleshooting
hardware as long as the attached printer supports
text output.
tts
A continuous stream of Gandalf 400C TTScompatible text sent to the attached printer.
loopb
Loopback test. Any input characters from the device
attached to the I/O port is echoed back.
stop prn
stop prn
Stop an output test on an I/O port.
disable ioport|destination
disable prn
Disable an I/O port so that queued jobs are not printed, or disable a
destination so jobs cannot be queued to it.
enable ioport|destination
enable prn
Enable an I/O port so that queued jobs are printed, or enable a
destination so jobs can be queued to it.
close tcp TCPindexnumber
close tcp 3
Force a TCP/IP connection between a TCP/IP host and the PrintNet
to close. The TCPindexnumber can be retrieved from “debug tcp”
output.
ping [-s] hostIPaddress [datasize [packetnumber]]
ping 192.75.11.30
“ping” another TCP/IP host specified by hostIPaddress on the
PrintNet network. datasize is the datagram packet size which
defaults to 64 bytes if no size is included in the syntax and
packetnumber is the number of requests to be sent.
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Complete Command List
NOTE: To use a host or IP name instead of the address, you must have
set the DNS server on the PrintNet. Use the command “set
sysinfo dns...” to do this.
telnet hostIPaddress [escapecharacter]
telnet 192.75.11.35
Start a Telnet session with another TCP/IP host specified by
hostIPaddress on the PrintNet network. If escapecharacter is used,
it resets the key sequence used to exit the Telnet session. It will
return you to the telnet> prompt where you can execute “quit.” Use
the “keycode” command to find out exact escape characters if
needed. The default character is CTRL-].
NOTE: To use a host or IP name instead of the address, you must have
set the DNS server on the PrintNet. Use the command “set
sysinfo dns...” to do this.
chr string
Echo string or redirect string to an I/O port using “chr string >
ioport.”
keycode
Determine the hexadecimal value for a key to be used as the escape
character with the PrintNet built-in “telnet” command.
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9
Extra Features
PrintNet Security
There are TCP access lists available to restrict host connections with the
device.
Users and Passwords
The PrintNet supports two user types:
root
Access to everything within the print server
including all configurable settings.
guest
Ability to list settings only.
Passwords can be set for each user type. However, most often you would
just set a password for the root user to protect the PrintNet configuration.
Guest users cannot alter the print server configuration in any way.
To configure a root password on your PrintNet:
1. Load a Web browser on a network station that can communicate with
the print server over TCP/IP. The commands to set a root password
are:
Syntax:
set user passwd username password
save
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Chapter 9
PrintNet Security
Example:
set user passwd root your_password_for_root
save
2. Direct your Web browser to URL
“http://PrintNetIPaddress/adminConf.html”
(e.g., “http://192.75.11.9/adminConf.html ”).
NOTE: If prompted for a “User ID” and password first, type in “root” for
the user ID and press ENTER at the password prompt since
there is no password by default.
3. At the “Administration Configuration” HTML form that displays, scroll
down to the “Passwords” section.
4. Click within the “Old” field beside the “Root Password” heading and
enter the existing root password. By default, there is no root
password so you can go to the next step without typing anything in
this field.
5. Within the “Root Password” section, click within the “New” field and
enter the new root password.
6. Within the “Root Password” section, click within the “Confirm” field
and enter the new root password again. Remember this is case
sensitive.
7. Click on the SUBMIT button when done and physically repower the
print server to make the new setting takes effect.
From this point on, anytime you log in to the PrintNet as “root,” you will
need to specify this password or your login attempt will fail.
NOTE: To clear this password or change it, use the same “Administration
Configuration” HTML form. Just enter the appropriate “Old”
password and put in the new one (or nothing if you do not want a
root password any longer). The commands directly on the
PrintNet are:
set user from default
save
148
TCP Access Lists
TCP Access Lists
Within TCP/IP environments, the PrintNet can restrict host access to
destinations/queues and remote command (i.e., rsh, rcmd, remsh and
telnet) execution services. This is done using an access list similar in
function to the Unix .rhosts file.
To view the current access list on the print server:
NOTE: Access list settings are not configurable through the HTML forms
provided with the PrintNet.
1. Start a Telnet session with the PrintNet.
Syntax:
telnet PrintNetIPaddress
2. Log in as “root” and press ENTER at the password prompt since
there is no password by default (or your password for your home set).
3. List the current access list.
Syntax:
List tcpip
If the list is empty, all hosts have access to the PrintNet services. If there
are entries in the list, only those hosts specified have access to printing
and remote command execution.
To add and delete access list entries, the commands are:
Syntax:
store tcpip tcp access add|del hostIPaddress|
networkaddress
reset
where hostIPaddress is the IP address of a TCP/IP host on your
network and networkaddress is the address of a subnet on your
network.
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Printer Monitoring and Logging
Example:
store tcpip tcp access add 192.75.11.25
store tcpip tcp access add 192.75.12.0
store tcpip tcp access del 192.75.11.25
reset
NOTE: Although the maximum number of entries in the access list is 10,
each entry can refer to a network rather than a specific host. This
allows all hosts on that specified network to have access plus any
individual hosts specified in the list.
Printer Monitoring and Logging
One of the key aspects of maintaining a computing environment is
monitoring printer status and logging this information to useful places.
The PrintNet allows this through its built-in HTML forms, command set,
and logpaths.
Printer and Print Job Monitoring
To view the current status of an I/O port on the PrintNet, two methods are
available:
1. Selecting the desired I/O port on the “Status” HTML form
(i.e., “http://PrintNetIPaddress/indexStatus.html”;
e.g., “http://192.75.11.9/indexStatus.html”) that
comes with the PrintNet.
2. “lpstat” command directly on the print server once logged in as
“guest” or “root.”
In each case, you are given a description of each I/O port status and a list
of queued jobs. Table 7 describes some of the common terms you may
encounter.
150
Printer Logging Through Logpaths
Table 7. Key Printer Logging Terms
Term
Description
“idle”
There is no job queued for the PrintNet I/O port.
“blocked”
The printer is not allowing the PrintNet to send
data to it. Check that there is not a printer error
and it is online and ready to go.
“waiting”
The PrintNet knows about a print job but is
waiting for the host to send more data or to send
an expected packet.
Printer Logging Through Logpaths
In the PrintNet product manual, destinations are described as logical
queues with associated models and logpaths. Models determine if any
extra processing is needed with the print jobs passing through and
logpaths determine whether any logging is needed for each job.
Each logpath on the PrintNet consists of two parts:
Type
The type of log information to be captured. The
choices are “job” for job ID and username, “user”
for user ID (and three messages per job), “pgcnt”
for total pages printed in a job, “cksum” for file
checksums, “printer” for special printer
feedback, and “ioport” for parallel printer status
messages.
Port
Where this log information will be sent to. The
choices are a TCP port number (e.g., 2000), an
email address (including an alias), or a central host
running a SYSLOG daemon.
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Chapter 9
Printer Monitoring and Logging
To view the current logpath settings on the print server:
1. Load a Web browser on a network station that can communicate with
the print server over TCP/IP or using Telnet (e.g., Telnet “ipaddress”).
The command to view the logpath settings is:
NOTE: If prompted for a “User ID” and password first, type in “root” for
the ID and press ENTER at the password prompt since there is
no password by default.
Syntax:
list logpath
2. Direct your Web browser to URL
“http://PrintNetIPaddress/destConf.html”
(e.g., “http://192.75.11.9/destConf.html ”).
NOTE: If prompted for a “User ID” and password first, type in “root” for
the ID and press ENTER at the password prompt since there is
no password by default.
3. At the “Print Path Configuration” HTML form that displays, select a
destination link (e.g., d1prn) from the top of the page to bring up the
appropriate destination form.
4. Once the desired destination HTML form displays, scroll down to the
“Logpath Type” and “Logpath Port” sections to view the current
logpath settings for this particular destination.
At this point, you can alter any of these settings and then click on the
SUBMIT button to store them into the PrintNet. Remember to repower the
PrintNet to make the settings take effect.
152
Procedure
Downloading Software
Emulation and operating system software must be loaded into flash
memory on the controller board. This software is stored as a compressed
file on a 3.5 inch, double-density floppy diskette. The software can be
downloaded from the host computer to the printer’s flash memory using
PrintNet.
Procedure
1. Make a printout of all saved configurations. (Refer to the Operator’s
Manual.) (Installing new software erases all saved configurations.
You will use the printouts to restore printer configuration.)
2. Set the printer power switch to O (off).
3. On the printer control panel, press and hold down the ONLINE + FF
keys. Without releasing the keys, power the printer on. Continue
holding the ONLINE + FF keys down.
4. When you see “WAITING FOR PROGRAM DOWNLOAD” on the
LCD, release the ONLINE + FF keys.
5. On the host computer, create a temporary directory called “download”
on the c: drive. From an MS-DOS prompt, type:
md c:\download <Return>
6. Insert the emulation or upgrade diskette into diskette drive A (or B) of
the host computer.
7. Make the diskette drive the active drive by typing the following at the
DOS prompt:
A: <Return>
(If the diskette is in drive B, type B: <Return>)
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Chapter 9
Downloading Software
8. Get the name of the compressed file on the diskette by listing the
contents of the diskette; at the DOS prompt type:
DIR <Return>
The compressed file on the diskette takes the form FILENAME.EXE
9. Copy the compressed file to the “download” directory you created in
step 5; at the DOS prompt type:
copy FILENAME.EXE c:\download <Return>
where FILENAME.EXE is the name of the file contained on the
diskette.
10. Make the “download” directory the active directory; at the DOS
prompt, type:
c:\download <Return>
11. Decompress the executable file on the hard drive; at the DOS prompt,
type:
FILENAME.EXE <Return>
This will create a file called FILENAME.PRG inside the “download”
directory.
12. Start the FTP protocol; at the DOS prompt, type:
ftp xxx.xxx.xxx.xxx <Return>
(where xxx.xxx.xxx.xxx represents the IP Address of the printer.)
13. Log in to the printer; at the prompt, type:
root <Return>
You are given a password prompt. The default is no password; at the
password prompt, enter <Return>. If the FTP program requires a
password, contact your system administrator.
154
Procedure
14. Once logged in, type the following sequence at the DOS prompt to
download the FILENAME.PRG file to the printer:
cd dest <Return>
cd d1prn <Return>
bin <Return>
put FILENAME.PRG <Return>
(where FILENAME.PRG is the name of the file decompressed in
step 11.)
15. As the file downloads, the FTP program shows the progress as a
percentage. Once the download is complete, exit out of the FTP
program by typing:
quit <Return>
16. When the new program has successfully loaded into flash memory
and the printer has reset itself, set the printer power switch to O (off).
17. Unplug the AC power cord from the printer.
18. Remove the diskette from the host computer and store it with the
printer.
19. Using the configuration printout(s), reconfigure the printer. (Refer to
the Operating Manual.)
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Chapter 9
PrintNet Naming Schemes
PrintNet Naming Schemes
I/O PORT
DESTINATION
MODEL
LOGPATH
d1prn
m1
l1
d2prn
m2
l2
d3prn
m3
l3
d4prn
m4
l4
PRN
Figure 16. PrintNet Default Names
156
10
Glossary
ARP
Address Resolution Protocol. Associates a
selected IP address with a network device
Ethernet address.
bps
Bits per second.
Centronics
Parallel port interface standard found on most
printers.
daemon
A continuously running process that handles
system-wide functions like print spooling.
default router
Local device that forwards any IP packets
destined for another subnet.
destination
Logical print queue on the PrintNet which hosts
send their print jobs to. There are eight
destinations (two per I/O port) by default.
DHCP
Dynamic Host Configuration Protocol. Allows a
network device to discover its IP address
dynamically upon bootup. The IP address does
not need to be stored within the device itself
permanently.
Download Mode
Refers to the condition of the PrintNet when in a
startup condition, downloading configuration
information.
DNS
Domain Name Server. Host providing responses
to queries for a given host name IP address.
EEPROM
Electrically Erasable/Programmable Read-Only
Memory.
factory defaults
Settings shipped with the PrintNet.
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Chapter 10
158
Factory Settings
S2 jumper position stating all factory default
settings are to be used while the PrintNet is up
and running.
Firmware Panic
Unrecoverable errors detected by the PrintNet
firmware force the Print Server into Firmware
Panic mode. Manually reset the PrintNet to
resume operation.
Flash
Stores firmware code and configurable settings.
Allows for upgrades without replacing hardware
inside the PrintNet.
FTP
File Transfer Protocol. Used for transferring files
from one TCP/IP host to another and used in the
upgrade process.
Hardware Exception
Buss errors, address errors, and illegal
instructions force the PrintNet into this nonoperational mode.
HTML
HyperText Markup Language. Format used for
documents viewable on the World Wide Web.
ifnum
Interface Number. Represents the network
interface. With a PrintNet, this will always be “1”
for Ethernet.
interface script
Unix host filter file that processes the print job
before it is sent over the network to the PrintNet.
I/O port
Port for attaching peripherals to. The PrintNet
provides four: PRN1, PRN2, COM1, COM2.
IP Address
The Internet Protocol Address. A numeric
address such as 123.45.61.23 which identifies a
printer or server in a LAN or WAN.
LAN
Local Area Network.
LED
Light Emitting Diode. The printer has an LED
display which shows the status of the printer to
the operator.
logpath
Determines type of print job and printer logging
needed per job. One logpath is associated with
every destination.
LPD/LPR
Line Printer Daemon. The most common TCP/IP
remote printing protocol that crosses all
hardware utilizing IP.
MIB
Management Information Base. A set of
variables (database) managed by an SNMP
manager application.
model
Defines how a print job should be processed
(e.g., banner pages added, ASCII to PostScript
conversion) as it passes through the PrintNet.
One model is associated with every destination.
NetBIOS
Network Basic Input Output System. Common
interface among PC networks.
Monitor Mode
Refers to the condition of the PrintNet with no
configuration or IP address loaded.
npsh
Extensive built-in command shell within the
PrintNet.
PDF
Portable Document Format. Encodes different
types of documents enabling them to be read
across multiple platforms.
ping
Standard command to test a TCP/IP connection.
(e.g., “ping 192.75.11.9”)
print path
Three-stage path a print job takes when it is sent
from a host to a printer through the PrintNet.
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160
protocol
A set of rules or conventions governing the
exchange of information between computer
systems, or between a printer and a host
computer. For computer printers, a protocol is
the coding convention used to convey and print
data. A printer protocol includes codes for
printing text and graphics, as well as codes
instructing the printer to perform special
operations, and machine-to-machine
communication codes.
PSERVER
Print Server. A Novell print method where the
PrintNet continuously polls the Novell file server
print queue looking for print jobs.
RAM
Random Access Memory. Volatile memory within
the PrintNet that contains current/working
settings. Settings are lost once the power is
removed.
RARP
Reverse Address Resolution Protocol. Allows a
network device to discover its IP address
dynamically upon bootup. The IP address does
not need to be stored within the device itself
permanently.
ROM
Read-Only Memory.
router
A device that forwards IP packets to their
destination. Also called a gateway.
RPRINTER
Remote Printer. A Novell print method where the
PrintNet waits for jobs to be sent to it from a
defined PSERVER.
SNMP
Simple Network Management Protocol. A
standard protocol used to monitor network
devices called “SNMP agents.”
socket
TCP connection between two hosts consisting of
a source and destination TCP port number at
each end.
subnet mask
A binary value used to divide IP networks into
smaller sub-networks or subnets. This mask is
used to help determine whether IP packets need
to be forwarded on to other subnets.
TCP/IP
Transmission Control Protocol/Internet Protocol.
Suite of protocols that act as the base protocol
for the Internet.
TCP port
A logical connection point in the software of a
TCP host or device. When two IP devices talk,
they establish a socket which consists of a
source and destination TCP port number on both
ends.
telnet
Command and protocol to establish a terminal
connection between two hosts on an IP network.
UTP
Unshielded Twisted Pair. A cable used for
telephone and computer-to-computer
connections.
WAN
Wide Area Network.
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162
Index
Symbols
Communicating
Unix, 64
? Command, 126
Windows, 37
A
Configuration
available tools, 25
Access Lists
description, 23
TCP, 149
Connection
Access Methods
to network, 21
npsh, 125
Control Panel Configuration
AIX Printing, 67
gateway address, 23
architecture, 13
C
IP Address, 23
subnet mask, 23
D
Changing
PrintNet name, 78
Command
?, 126
complete list, 127
getting help, 126
Command Prefixes, 126
Command Shell, 125
ways to access, 25
Commands
debug, 142
list, 140
Debug Commands, 142
Diagnostics
10/100Base-T, 18
10Base2 and 10Base-T, 15
Dipswitches
10/100Base-T, 19
10Base2 and 10Base-T, 17
Direct Socket Printing, 68
Document Conventions, 20
Downloading software, 153
E
miscellaneous, 144
npsh, 125
set, 131
Environment Description
Windows, 29
store, 127
163
Index
F
IPAssign
how to use, 31
Features
overview, 25
list of, 13
troubleshooting, 49
formfeeds, 71
L
FTP Printing, 67
G
LED
status, 50
Gateway Address
List Commands, 140
control panel configuration, 23
Getting Help Command, 126
Logging, 150
through logpaths, 151
Guest, 147
M
H
Manual vs Host, 65
Home Page
MIB, 120
PrintNet, 26
Miscellaneous Commands, 144
Host Configuration
Mode
Novell, 79
auto reset, 16, 18
Unix, 65
run, 16, 18
Host Setup
models
Windows 3.1, 48
setting a formfeed, 71
Host vs Manual, 65
setting onlcr, 71
HTML
Monitoring, 150
menu structure, 26
N
overview, 25
I
Naming Scheme, 156
NDS setup, 93
Indicators
10/100Base-T, 18
10Base2 and 10Base-T, 15
Installation
steps, 21
IP Address
control panel configuration, 23
164
NetWare Version 3.x
Novell, 81
NetWare Version 4.x
Novell, 83, 86
Index
printer monitoring
Network
connectors, 21
MIB, 120
HTML form, 33
SNMP, 122
tools, 122
Novell
environments, 76
Printing
Host Configuration, 79
AIx, 67
NetWare 3.x configuration, 79
direct socket, 68
NetWare Version 3.x, 81
NetWare Version 4.x, 83, 86
PrintNet configuration, 77
FTP, 67
PrintNet Configuration
Windows, 30
PrintNet Name
Novell 4.x
troubleshooting, 89
changing, 78
PrintNet Naming Scheme, 156
NPRINTER
PrintNet Security, 147
overview, 79
Printronix Printing System
npsh
main commands, 125
npsh Access Methods, 125
PPS, 47
PSERVER
overview, 79
npsh.exe, 84
O
onlcr, 71
R
Remote Shell
P
overview, 28
Reset Mode, 16, 18
Passwords, 147
setting, 147
PPS
Printronix Printing System, 47
Prefixes
Command, 126
Printer
Root, 147
Routers
Unix, 64
Windows, 37
RPRINTER
overview, 79
Run Mode, 16, 18
logging, 150
monitoring, 150
165
Index
S
TCP/IP access problem, 72
using APR, 60
Security
using ARPR, 62
PrintNet, 147
using BOOTP, 63
Self Test
URL
10/100Base-T, 18
10Base2 and 10Base-T, 15
home page, 26
network configuration form, 33
Set Commands, 131
Users, 147
Setting a Password, 147
Using APR
Shell
Unix, 60
command, 125
Using ARP
SNMP, 122
Windows, 35
Software
Using ARPR
downloading, 153
Store Commands, 127
Subnet Mask
Unix, 62
Using BOOTP
Unix, 63
control panel configuration, 23
W
T
Windows
TCP Access Lists, 149
communicating, 37
TCP/IP Access Problem
environment description, 29
Unix, 72
mandatory configuration, 30
Windows, 52
NT 3.51configuration, 40, 41
Troubleshooting
optional configuration, 31
Novell 4.x, 89
PrintNet configuration, 30
U
Unix
communicating, 64
environments, 57
host configuration, 65
PrintNet configuration, 59
routers, 64
166
routers, 37
TCP/IP access problem, 52
using ARP, 35
Windows ‘ 95, 46
configuration, 46
Windows 3.1
host setup, 48
Windows NT, 40
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