User`s guide | Fujitsu BX620 Network Card User Manual

Before Reading This Manual
Thank you for purchasing the PRIMERGY 1Gbit/s Ethernet I/O Module (hereinafter referred to as
this product or the card).
The card can be installed in the expansion card slot of the Fujitsu server blade to configure the Local
Area Network (LAN) system. This manual explains the 1Gbit/s Ethernet I/O Modules and the LAN
driver (for Windows). Read this manual carefully to handle the product correctly.
For details about the LAN driver, refer to manuals supplied with the server blade or the Fujitsu
PRIMERGY website:
(http://primergy.fujitsu.com)
May, 2007
For Your Safety
This manual contains important information, required to operate this product safely.
Thoroughly review the information in this manual before using this product. Especially note the points under "Safety",
and only operate this product with a complete understanding of the material provided.
This manual should be kept in an easy-to-access location for quick reference when using this product.
High Safety
The Products are designed, developed and manufactured as contemplated or general use, including without limitation,
general office use, personal use, household use, and ordinary industrial use, but are not designed, developed and
manufactured as contemplated for use accompanying fatal risks or dangers that, unless extremely high safety is secured,
could lead directly to death, personal injury, severe physical damage, or other loss (hereinafter "High Safety Required
Use"), including without limitation, nuclear reaction control in nuclear facility, aircraft flight control, air traffic control,
mass transport control, medical life support system, missile launch control in weapon system. You shall not use this
Product without securing the sufficient safety required for the High Safety Required Use. If you wish to use this Product
for High Safety Required Use, please consult with our sales representatives in charge before such use.
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101
Remarks
Warning Descriptions
Various symbols are used throughout this manual. These are provided to emphasize important points
for your safety and that of others. The symbols and their meanings are as follows. Make sure to fully
understand these before reading this manual.
WARNING
Ignoring this symbol could be potentially lethal.
CAUTION
Ignoring this symbol may lead to injury and/or damage this product.
The following symbols are used to indicate the type of warning or cautions being described.
The triangle mark emphasizes the urgency of the WARNING and CAUTION.
Details are described next to the triangle.
A barred circle ( ) warns against certain actions (Do Not).
Details are described next to the circle.
A black circle indicates actions that must be taken.
Details are described next to the black circle.
Symbols
The following are symbols used throughout this manual.
Symbols
Definition
These sections explain prohibited actions and points to note when using this
product. Make sure to read these sections.
These sections explain information needed to operate the hardware and
software properly. Make sure to read these sections.
→
This mark indicates reference pages or manuals.
Entering commands (Keys)
CD-ROM drive names are shown as [CD-ROM drive]. Enter your drive name according to your
environment.
[CD-ROM drive]:\Setup.exe
102
Abbreviations
The following expressions and abbreviations are used to describe the product names used in this
manual.
Product names
Expressions and abbreviations
1Gbit/s Ethernet I/O Module (PG-LND201)
this product
PG-LND201 LAN Driver
LAN driver or the driver
Microsoft® Windows Server® 2003, Standard Edition
Microsoft® Windows Server® 2003, Enterprise Edition
Microsoft® Windows Server® 2003 R2, Standard Edition
Windows Server 2003
Microsoft® Windows Server® 2003 R2, Enterprise Edition
Microsoft® Windows Server® 2003, Standard x64 Edition
Microsoft® Windows Server® 2003, Enterprise x64 Edition
Microsoft® Windows Server® 2003 R2, Standard x64
Edition
Windows Server 2003
x64
Windows
Microsoft® Windows Server® 2003 R2, Enterprise x64
Edition
Microsoft® Windows® 2000 Server
Microsoft® Windows® 2000 Advanced Server
Windows 2000 Server
Red Hat® Enterprise Linux® ES (v.3 for x86)
Red Hat® Enterprise Linux® AS (v.3 for x86)
Red Hat® Enterprise Linux® AS (v.4 for x86)
Red Hat® Enterprise Linux® ES (v.4 for x86)
Red Hat® Enterprise Linux® AS (v.4 for EM64T)
Linux
Red Hat® Enterprise Linux® ES (v.4 for EM64T)
Red Hat® Enterprise Linux® 5 (for x86)
Red Hat® Enterprise Linux® 5 (for Intel64)
PRIMERGY BX620 S3 Server Blade
BX620 S3 Server
Blade
PRIMERGY BX620 S4 Server Blade
BX620 S4 Server
Blade
PRIMERGY BX600 S3 Blade Server System Unit
PRIMERGY BX600 S2 Blade Server System Unit
Switch Blade
Catalyst Blade Switch 3040
Server
Blade
Chassis
Switch Blade
FC Pass-Thru Blade
FC Pass-Thru Blade
FC Switch Blade (PG-FCS103/PG-FCS102)
FC Switch Blade
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Safety
For safe use of this product, it is vital that the following warnings are heeded.
Handling this product
WARNING
• Do not tinker with the product. Doing so may cause fire or electric shock.
• Keep this product away from water. Failure to do so may cause fire or electric
shock.
• When there is lightning nearby, unplug all power cords and external connecting
cords from this product. Failure to do so may cause destruction of the devices
and fire.
CAUTION
• Since this product is delicate, avoid using or storing it under extreme conditions,
such as excessively high or low temperature, high humidity, or in direct sunlight.
Do not bend or damage the card or subject it to extreme shock. Doing so may
cause failure or fire.
Recycle
When scrapping this product, contact an office listed in "Appendix A Contact Information"
(Jpg.195). This product must be disposed of as industrial waste.
Checking the Items Supplied
Before using the product, check that no supplied or attached items are missing.
If any items are missing, contact an office listed in "Appendix A Contact Information" (Jpg.195).
• 1Gbit/s Ethernet I/O Module
• User's Guide (this manual)
• Screw (3 screws)
Intel is a registered trademark of Intel Corporation in the USA.
Microsoft, Windows, and Windows Server are trademarks or registered trademarks of Microsoft
Corporation in the United States and other countries.
Linux is a trademark or registered trademark of Linus Torvalds in the United States and other countries.
Red Hat and all Red Hat-based trademarks and logos are trademarks or registered trademarks of Red
Hat, Inc. in the United States and other countries.
Other product names used are trademarks or registered trademarks of their respective manufacturers.
Other products are copyrights of their respective manufacturers.
All Rights Reserved, Copyright© FUJITSU LIMITED 2007
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Contents
1 1 Gbit/s Ethernet I/O Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 106
1.1
Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
106
1.2
Specifications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
106
1.3
Functionality and Features . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
107
2 Installing a 1Gbit/s Ethernet I/O Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 115
2.1
Installing in a Server Blade . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
116
3 Installing the LAN Driver . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 118
3.1
Installing the Driver Software . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
118
4 Broadcom Gigabit Ethernet Teaming Services . . . . . . . . . . . 119
4.1
Broadcom Gigabit Ethernet Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
4.2
Glossary . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
119
119
4.3
Teaming Concepts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
121
4.4
Teaming Mechanisms . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
130
4.5
Types of Teams . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
133
4.6
Attributes of the Features Associated with Each Type of Team . . . .
136
4.7
Teaming and Other Advanced Networking Properties . . . . . . . . . . .
138
4.8
General Network Considerations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
140
4.9
Event Log Messages . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
151
5 Broadcom Advanced Control Suite 2 (BACS2) . . . . . . . . . . . 156
5.1
BACS2 Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
156
5.2
Installing the BACS2 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
158
5.3
Starting BACS2 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
162
5.4
Setting of BACS2 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
162
5.5
Configuring Teaming . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
176
Appendix A
Contact Information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 195
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1
1 Gbit/s Ethernet I/O Module
This chapter explains the features and specifications of this product.
1.1
Overview
This product is an LAN expansion board exclusive to BX620 S3 Server Blade and BX620 S4 Server
Blade.
This product has 2 LAN controllers, and provides LAN connection completely separate/ independent
of the onboard LAN. The external access is performed via the Switch Blade installed to the network
blade slot 3 or 4 (NET3 or NET4) on the chassis.
`
`
1.2
A server blade installed with this products and a server blade installed with a fibre
channel expansion board cannot be installed to the same chassis.
When a Switch Blade is installed to network blade slot 3 or 4 (NET3 or NET4), a FC
Pass-Thru Blade or FC Switch Blade cannot be installed at the same time.
Specifications
Item
Product ID
Host bus
specifications
External interface
Controller LSI
Applicable model
106
Specifications
PG-LND201
Interface
Data transfer rate
Data transfer system
PCI-Express (x4)
Max. 1 Gbps
Bus master, DMA
1000BASE-T Ethernet (SerDes) Interface
BCM 5708S
BX620 S3 Server Blade
BX620 S4 Server Blade
1.3
Functionality and Features
1.3.1
Functional Description
This product is a new class of Gigabit Ethernet (GbE) converged network interface controller (CNIC) that can simultaneously perform accelerated data networking, storage networking, and highperformance clustering on a standard Ethernet network. The C-NIC offers acceleration for all popular
protocols used in the data center, such as:
• TCP Offload Engine (TOE) for accelerating TCP
`
Offloading technologies are supported when this product is installed in a system with
Windows Server 2003 with Scalable Networking Pack (SNP).
Using the Broadcom teaming software, you can split your network into virtual LANs (VLANs) as
well as group multiple network adapters together into teams to provide network load balancing and
fault tolerance functionality. For details about teaming, refer to " Broadcom Advanced Server
Program (BSAP) Overview" (Jpg.109) in "1.3.3 Teaming Function" (Jpg.109). For a description of
VLANs, refer to "1.3.4 Virtual LAN Function" (Jpg.112). For instructions on configuring teaming
and creating VLANs on Windows operating systems, refer to "1.3.3 Teaming Function" (Jpg.109).
1.3.2
Features
The following is a list of this product features:
• TCP Offload Engine (TOE)
• Single-chip solution
- Standard Ethernet frame size (1518 bytes)
- PCI Express v1.0A, x4
- Full fast-path TCP offload
- Zero copy capable hardware
• Other performance features
- TCP, IP, UDP checksum
- TCP segmentation
• Manageability
- Broadcom Advanced Control Suite2 (BACS2) diagnostic and configuration software suite
- Supports PXE 2.0 specification
- Statistics for SNMP MIB II, Ethernet-like MIB, and Ethernet MIB (IEEE Std 802.3z, Clause
30)
- IPMI support
• Advanced network features
- Jumbo frames (up to 9 KB)
- Virtual LANs
- Flow Control (IEEE Std 802.3x)
- LiveLink™ (supported in both the 32-bit and 64-bit Windows operating systems)
- Logical Link Control (IEEE Std 802.2)
• Layer-2 Priority Encoding (IEEE 802.1p)
1 1 Gbit/s Ethernet I/O Module
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107
•
•
•
•
•
High-speed on-chip RISC processor
Up to 4 classes of service (CoS)
Integrated 96 KB frame buffer memory
Support for multicast addresses via 128 bits hashing hardware function
EM64T processor support
TCP Offload Engine (TOE)
The TCP/IP protocol suite is used to provide transport services for a wide range of applications for
the Internet, LAN, and for file transfer. Without TCP Offload Engine, the TCP/IP protocol suite runs
on the host CPU, consuming a very high percentage of its resources and leaving little resources for
applications. With the use of this product, the TCP/IP processing can be moved to hardware, freeing
the CPU for more important tasks such as application processing.
This product's network adapter's TOE function allows simultaneous operations of up to 1024 fully
offloaded TCP connections. The TOE support on the adapter significantly reduces the host CPU
utilization while preserving the implementation of the operating system stack.
Broadcom Advanced Control Suite 2 (BACS2)
Broadcom Advanced Control Suite 2 (BACS2), a component of the Broadcom teaming software, is
an integrated utility that provides information about each network adapter that is installed in your
system.
The BACS2 also enables you to perform detailed tests, diagnostics, and analysis on each adapter, as
well as to modify property values and view traffic statistics for each adapter. BACS2 is used on a
Windows operating systems to configure teaming and to add VLANs.
108
1.3.3
Teaming Function
Broadcom Advanced Server Program (BSAP) Overview
Broadcom Advanced Server Program (BASP) is the Broadcom teaming software for Windows
Server 2003 and Windows 2000 Server operating systems. BASP runs within the Broadcom
Advanced Control Suite 2 (BACS2) utility.
BASP supports four types of teams for Layer 2 teaming:
• Smart Load Balancing and Failover
• Link Aggregation (802.3ad)
• Generic Trunking (FEC/GEC)/802.3ad-Draft Static
• Smart Load Balancing (Auto-Fallback Disable)
`
Enabling Windows Server 2003 built-in bridging is not advisable when you are using
teaming software.
For more information on network adapter teaming concepts, refer to "4.3 Teaming Concepts"
(Jpg.121).
Load Balancing and Fault Tolerance
Teaming provides traffic load balancing and fault tolerance (redundant adapter operation in the event
that a network connection fails). When multiple Gigabit Ethernet network adapters are installed in the
same system, they can be grouped into teams, creating a virtual adapter.
A team can consist of two to eight network interfaces, and each interface can be designated as a
primary interface or a standby interface (standby interfaces can be used only in a Smart Load
Balancing™ and Failover type of team, and only one standby interface can be designated per SLB
team). If traffic is not identified on any of the adapter team member connections due to failure of the
adapter, cable, switch port, or switch (where the teamed adapters are attached to separate switches),
the load distribution is reevaluated and reassigned among the remaining team members. In the event
that all of the primary adapters are down, the hot standby adapter becomes active. Existing sessions
are maintained and there is no impact on the user.
Types of Teams
The available types of teams for the Windows Server 2003/Windows 2000 Server operating systems
are:
• Smart Load Balancing and Failover
J" Smart Load Balancing™ and Failover"(pg.110)
• Link Aggregation (802.3ad)
J" Link Aggregation (802.3ad)"(pg.110)
• Generic Trunking (FEC/GEC)/802.3ad-Draft Static
J" Generic Trunking (FEC/GEC)/802.3ad-Draft Static"(pg.110)
• SLB (Auto-Fallback Disable)
J" SLB (Auto-Fallback Disable)"(pg.111)
`
E
Link aggregation is not supported in the Blade Server.
1 1 Gbit/s Ethernet I/O Module
109
Smart Load Balancing™ and Failover
Smart Load Balancing™ and Failover is the Broadcom implementation of load balancing based on IP
flow. This feature supports balancing IP traffic across multiple adapters (team members) in a
bidirectional manner. In this type of team, all adapters in the team have separate MAC addresses.
This type of team provides automatic fault detection and dynamic failover to other team member or
to a hot standby member. This is done independently of Layer 3 protocol (IP, IPX, NetBEUI); it
works with existing Layer 2 and 3 switches. No switch configuration (such as trunk, link
aggregation) is necessary for this type of team to work.
`
`
`
If you do not enable LiveLink™ when configuring SLB teams, disabling Spanning Tree
Protocol (STP) at the switch or port is recommended. This minimizes the downtime due to
spanning tree loop determination when failing over. LiveLink mitigates such issues.
IPX balances only on the transmitting side of the team; other protocols are limited to the
primary adapter.
If a team member is linked at 1000 Mbit/s and another team member is linked at 100 Mbit/s,
most of the traffic is handled by the 1000 Mbit/s team member.
Link Aggregation (802.3ad)
This mode supports link aggregation and conforms to the IEEE 802.3ad (LACP) specification.
Configuration software allows you to dynamically configure which adapters you want to participate
in a given team. If the link partner is not correctly configured for 802.3ad link configuration, errors
are detected and noted. With this mode, all adapters in the team are configured to receive packets for
the same MAC address. The outbound load-balancing scheme is determined by our BASP driver. The
team link partner determines the load-balancing scheme for inbound packets. In this mode, at least
one of the link partners must be in active mode.
`
Link aggregation (802.3ad) is not supported in the Blade Server.
Generic Trunking (FEC/GEC)/802.3ad-Draft Static
The Generic Trunking (FEC/GEC)/802.3ad-Draft Static type of team is very similar to the Link
Aggregation (802.3ad) type of team, in that all adapters in the team are configured to receive packets
for the same MAC address. However, the Generic Trunking (FEC/GEC)/802.3ad-Draft Static) type
of team, does not provide LACP or marker protocol support. This type of team supports a variety of
environments in which the adapter link partners are statically configured to support a proprietary
trunking mechanism. For instance, this type of team could be used to support Lucent's OpenTrunk or
Cisco's Fast EtherChannel (FEC). Basically, this type of team is a light version of the Link
Aggregation (802.3ad) type of team. This approach is much simpler, in that there is not a formalized
link aggregation control protocol (LACP). As with the other types of teams, the creation of teams and
the allocation of physical adapters to various teams is done statically through user configuration
software.
The Generic Trunking (FEC/GEC/802.3ad-Draft Static) type of team supports load balancing and
failover for both outbound and inbound traffic.
110
SLB (Auto-Fallback Disable)
The SLB (Auto-Fallback Disable) type of team is identical to the Smart Load Balancing™ and
Failover type of team, with the exception of when the standby member is active, if a primary member
comes back on line, the team continues using the standby member, rather than switching back to the
primary member.
All primary interfaces in a team participate in load-balancing operations by sending and receiving a
portion of the total traffic. Standby interfaces take over in the event that all primary interfaces have
lost their links.
Failover teaming provides redundant adapter operation (fault tolerance) in the event that a network
connection fails. If the primary adapter in a team is disconnected because of failure of the adapter,
cable, or switch port, the secondary team member becomes active, redirecting both inbound and
outbound traffic originally assigned to the primary adapter. Sessions will be maintained, causing no
impact to the user.
Limitations of Smart Load Balancing™ and Failover/SLB (AutoFallback Disable) Types of Teams
Smart Load Balancing™ (SLB) is a protocol-specific scheme. The state of support for IP, IPX, and
NetBEUI protocols is listed below.
Operating System
Failover/
Fallback - All
Broadcom
Failover/
Fallback Multivendor
Load Balance All Broadcom
Load Balance Multivendor
Protocol
IP
IPX
Net
BE
UI
IP
IPX
Net
BE
UI
IP
IPX
Net
BE
UI
IP
IPX
Net
BE
UI
Windows Server 2003
Y
Y
N
Y
N
N
Y
Y
N
Y
N
N
Windows Server 2003
with SNP
Y
Y
N
Y
N
N
Y
Y
N
Y
N
N
Windows 2000 Server
Y
Y
Y
Y
N
N
Y
Y
N
Y
N
N
Y = supported, N = not supported
The Smart Load Balancing™ type of team works with all Ethernet switches without having to
configure the switch ports to any special trunking mode. Only IP traffic is load-balanced in both
inbound and outbound directions. IPX traffic is load-balanced in the outbound direction only. Other
protocol packets are sent and received through one primary interface only. Failover for non-IP traffic
is supported only for network adapters. The Generic Trunking type of team requires the Ethernet
switch to support some form of port trunking mode (for example, Cisco's Gigabit EtherChannel or
other switch vendor's Link Aggregation mode). The Generic Trunking type of team is protocolindependent, and all traffic should be load-balanced and fault-tolerant.
`
If you do not enable LiveLink™ when configuring teams, disabling Spanning Tree Protocol
(STP) at the switch is recommended. This minimizes the downtime due to the spanning tree
loop determination when failing over. LiveLink mitigates such issues.
1 1 Gbit/s Ethernet I/O Module
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LiveLink™
LiveLink™ is a feature of BASP that is available only for the Smart Load Balancing™ type of
teaming. The purpose of LiveLink is to detect link loss beyond the switch and to route traffic only
through team members that have a live link. This function is accomplished though the teaming
software. The teaming software periodically probes (issues a link packet from each team member)
one or more specified target network device(s). The probe target(s) responds when it receives the link
packet. If a team member does not detect the response within a specified amount of time, this
indicates that the link has been lost, and the teaming software discontinues passing traffic through
that team member. Later, if that team member begins to detect a response from a probe target, this
indicates that the link has been restored, and the teaming software automatically resumes passing
traffic through that team member. LiveLink works only with TCP/IP.
LiveLink™ is supported in both 32-bit and 64-bit Windows operating systems. Refer to the Channel
Bonding documentation for similar functionality in Linux Channel Bonding (refer to http://
www.redhat.com/docs/manuals/enterprise/RHEL-3-Manual/ref-guide/s1-modules-ethernet.html).
Teaming and Large Send Offload/Checksum Offload Support
Large Send Offload (LSO) and Checksum Offload are enabled for a team only when all of the
members support and are configured for the feature.
1.3.4
Virtual LAN Function
VLAN Overview
Virtual LANs (VLANs) allow you to split your physical LAN into logical parts, to create logical
segmentation of workgroups, and to enforce security policies for each logical segment. Each defined
VLAN behaves as its own separate network with its traffic and broadcasts isolated from the others,
increasing bandwidth efficiency within each logical group. Up to 64 VLANs (63 tagged and 1
untagged) can be defined for each Broadcom adapter on your server, depending on the amount of
memory available in your system.
VLANs can be added to a team to allow multiple VLANs with different VLAN IDs. A virtual adapter
is created for each VLAN added.
Although VLANs are commonly used to create individual broadcast domains and/or separate IP
subnets, it is sometimes useful for a server to have a presence on more than one VLAN
simultaneously. Broadcom adapters support multiple VLANs on a per-port or per-team basis,
allowing very flexible network configurations.
112
• Example of Servers Supporting Multiple VLANs with Tagging
"• Example of Servers Supporting Multiple VLANs with Tagging" (Jpg.113)" shows an example
network that uses VLANs. In this example network, the physical LAN consists of a switch, two
servers, and five clients. The LAN is logically organized into three different VLANs, each
representing a different IP subnet. The features of this network are described in "• Example VLAN
Network Topology" (Jpg.113).
• Example VLAN Network Topology
Component
Description
VLAN #1
An IP subnet consisting of the Main Server, PC #3, and PC #5. This subnet
represents an engineering group.
VLAN #2
Includes the Main Server, PCs #1 and #2 via shared media segment, and PC
#5. This VLAN is a software development group.
VLAN #3
Includes the Main Server, the Accounting Server and PC #4. This VLAN is
an accounting group.
Main Server
A high-use server that needs to be accessed from all VLANs and IP subnets.
The Main Server has a Broadcom adapter installed. All three IP subnets are
accessed via the single physical adapter interface. The server is attached to
one of the switch ports, which is configured for VLANs #1, #2, and #3. Both
the adapter and the connected switch port have tagging turned on. Because of
the tagging VLAN capabilities of both devices, the server is able to
communicate on all three IP subnets in this network, but continues to
maintain broadcast separation between all of them.
Accounting
Server
Available to VLAN #3 only. The Accounting Server is isolated from all traffic
on VLANs #1 and #2. The switch port connected to the server has tagging
turned off.
PCs #1 and #2
Attached to a shared media hub that is then connected to the switch. PCs #1
and #2 belong to VLAN #2 only, and are logically in the same IP subnet as
the Main Server and PC #5. The switch port connected to this segment has
tagging turned off.
1 1 Gbit/s Ethernet I/O Module
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113
Component
Description
PC #3
A member of VLAN #1, PC #3 can communicate only with the Main Server
and PC #5. Tagging is not enabled on PC #3 switch port.
PC #4
A member of VLAN #3, PC #4 can only communicate with the servers.
Tagging is not enabled on PC #4 switch port.
PC #5
A member of both VLANs #1 and #2, PC #5 has a Broadcom adapter
installed. It is connected to switch port #10. Both the adapter and the switch
port are configured for VLANs #1 and #2 and have tagging enabled.
`
VLAN tagging is only required to be enabled on switch ports that create trunk links to other
switches, or on ports connected to tag-capable end-stations, such as servers or
workstations with Broadcom adapters.
Adding VLANs to Teams
Each team supports up to 64 VLANs (63 tagged and 1 untagged). With multiple VLANs on an
adapter, a server with a single adapter can have a logical presence on multiple IP subnets. With
multiple VLANs in a team, a server can have a logical presence on multiple IP subnets and benefit
from load balancing and failover. For instructions on adding a VLAN to a team, refer to "5.5
Configuring Teaming" (Jpg.176).
`
114
Adapters that are members of a failover team can also be configured to support VLANs.
Because VLANs are not supported for an Intel LOM, if an Intel LOM is a member of a
failover team, VLANs cannot be configured for that team.
2
Installing a 1Gbit/s Ethernet I/O
Module
This chapter explains the installation procedure in the server blade.
WARNING
• When installing or removing this product, make sure to remove the server blade
from the chassis. Failure to do so may cause electric shock.
For details on how to remove the server blade from the chassis, refer to "Blade
Server System Unit Hardware Guide".
CAUTION
• The circuit boards and soldered parts of internal options are exposed. They can
be damaged by static electricity. Before handling them, first touch a metal part of
the server blade to discharge static electricity from your body.
• Do not touch the circuitry on boards or soldered parts. Hold the metallic areas or
the edges of the circuit boards.
• These products are susceptible to static electricity. Place them on conductive
pads or keep them in their packaging as long as they are not necessary.
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2 Installing a 1Gbit/s Ethernet I/O Module
115
2.1
Installing in a Server Blade
`
To connect a 1Gbit/s Ethernet I/O Module to the external LAN (device), it is necessary to
install a Switch Blade or GbE Pass-Thru Blade to network blade slot 3 or network blade slot
4 (NET3 or NET4) of the chassis.
2.1.1
Installation Position of the 1Gbit/s Ethernet I/O
Module
Install the 1Gbit/s Ethernet I/O Module in the expansion board slot in the BX620 S3/BX620 S4
Server Blade.
Expansion board slot
2.1.2
Installation Procedure for the 1Gbit/s Ethernet I/O
Module
1 Turn off the server blade where the 1Gbit/s Ethernet I/O Module
will be installed.
→ "3.3 Turning Off the Server " in "Blade Server System Unit Hardware Guide"
2 Touch a metal part of the chassis to discharge static electricity
from your body.
3 Remove the server blade from the chassis.
→"4.2 Installing Server Blades" in "Blade Server System Unit Hardware Guide"
116
4 Remove the top cover.
→"7.2 Removing and Attaching the Top Cover" in "Server Blade User's Guide"
5 Install the 1Gbit/s Ethernet I/O Module.
Make sure the 1Gbit/s Ethernet I/O Module is securely on the slot.
[Rear]
1Gbit/s Ethernet
I/O Module
Expansion board slot
6 Secure the 1Gbit/s Ethernet I/O Module with the screws.
Secure the 1Gbit/s Ethernet I/O Module with the three screws included with this product.
Screws
7 Attach the top cover.
→"7.2 Removing and Attaching the Top Cover" in "Server Blade User's Guide"
8 Install the server blade to the chassis.
→"4.2 Installing Server Blades" in "Blade Server System Unit Hardware Guide"
E
2 Installing a 1Gbit/s Ethernet I/O Module
117
3
Installing the LAN Driver
This chapter explains how to install the LAN driver.
3.1
Installing the Driver Software
`
Get the LAN driver from the ServerStart CD-ROM included with the BX620 S4 server blade
and install.
If using a LAN driver, refer to the operation manual or help file included with the driver.
Do not use LAN drivers downloaded from Broadcom's online service in the PRIMERGY
server.
Before installing the driver software, verify that the Windows operating system has been
upgraded to the latest version with the latest service pack applied.
To use TCP/IP Offload Engine (TOE), you must have Windows Server 2003 with Scalable
Networking Pack (SNP)
`
`
`
3.1.1
Installing the LAN Drivers
The installer will detect if SNP for Windows Server 2003 is installed on your machine. If it is, the
installer will install the NDIS 5.2 driver, which is necessary in order to use TOE. If SNP for Windows
Server 2003 is not installed on your machine, the installer will install the NDIS 5.1 driver and you
will not be able to use TOE.
1 Insert the ServerStart Disc1 CD-ROM.
2 Execute the following EXE file.
• For Windows Server 2003 x64
\DRIVERS\LAN\Broadcom\Ext\W2K3x64\DrvInst\setup.exe
• For Windows Server 2003
\DRIVERS\LAN\Broadcom\Ext\W2K3\DrvInst\setup.exe
• For Windows Server 2000
\DRIVERS\LAN\Broadcom\Ext\W2K\DrvInst\setup.exe
3 Click [Next].
The installation of the LAN driver is started.
4 Click [Finish].
5 Eject the CD-ROM, and restart the server blade.
118
4
Broadcom Gigabit Ethernet
Teaming Services
This chapter explains the technology and considerations when working with the
network teaming services.
4.1
Broadcom Gigabit Ethernet Overview
The goal of Broadcom teaming services is to provide fault tolerance and link aggregation across a
team of two or more adapters. The information in this manual is provided to assist IT professionals
during the deployment and troubleshooting of system applications that require network fault
tolerance and load balancing.
4.2
Glossary
Item
Definition
ARP
Address Resolution Protocol
BACS
Broadcom Advanced Control Suite
BASP
Broadcom Advanced Server Program (intermediate driver)
DNS
Domain Name Service
G-ARP
Gratuitous Address Resolution Protocol
Generic Trunking
(FEC/GEC)/
802.3ad-Draft
Static
Switch-dependent load balancing and failover type of team in which the
intermediate driver manages outgoing traffic and the switch manages
incoming traffic.
HSRP
Hot Standby Router Protocol
ICMP
Internet Control Message Protocol
IGMP
Internet Group Management Protocol
IP
Internet Protocol
LACP
Link Aggregation Control Protocol
Link Aggregation
(802.3ad)
Switch-dependent load balancing and failover type of team with LACP in
which the intermediate driver manages outgoing traffic and the switch
manages incoming traffic.
LOM
LAN on Motherboard
MAC
Media Access Control
NDIS
Network Driver Interface Specification
NLB
Network Load Balancing (Microsoft)
4 Broadcom Gigabit Ethernet Teaming Services
E
119
Item
120
Definition
PXE
Preboot Execution Environment
RAID
Redundant Array of Inexpensive Disks
Smart Load
Balancing™ and
Failover
Switch-independent failover type of team in which the primary team member
handles all incoming and outgoing traffic while the standby team member is
idle until a failover event (for example, loss of link occurs). The intermediate
driver (BASP) manages incoming/outgoing traffic.
Smart Load
Balancing (SLB)
Switch-independent load balancing and failover type of team, in which the
intermediate driver manages outgoing/incoming traffic.
TCP
Transmission Control Protocol
UDP
User Datagram Protocol
WINS
Windows name service
WLBS
Windows Load Balancing Service
4.3
Teaming Concepts
Storage devices use RAID technology to group individual hard drives. Switch ports can be grouped
together using technologies such as Cisco Gigabit EtherChannel, IEEE 802.3ad Link Aggregation,
Bay Network Multilink Trunking, and Extreme Network Load Sharing. Network interfaces on
servers can be grouped together into a team of physical ports called a virtual adapter.
4.3.1
Teaming and Network Addresses
Network Addressing
To understand how teaming works, it is important to understand how node communications work in
an Ethernet network. This Section is based on the assumption that the reader is familiar with the
basics of IP and Ethernet network communications. The following information provides the concepts
of network addressing used in an Ethernet network.
Every Ethernet network interface in a host platform, such as a computer system, requires a globally
unique Layer 2 address and at least one globally unique Layer 3 address. Layer 2 is the Data Link
Layer, and Layer 3 is the Network layer as defined in the OSI model. The Layer 2 address is assigned
to the hardware and is often referred to as the MAC address or physical address. This address is preprogrammed at the factory and stored in NVRAM on a network interface card or on the system
motherboard for an embedded LAN interface. The Layer 3 addresses are referred to as the protocol or
logical address assigned to the software stack. IP and IPX are examples of Layer 3 protocols. In
addition, Layer 4 (Transport Layer) uses port numbers for each network upper level protocol such as
Telnet or FTP. These port numbers are used to differentiate traffic flows across applications. The
combination of the IP address and the TCP port number is called a socket.
Ethernet devices communicate with other Ethernet devices using the MAC address, not the IP
address. However, most applications work with a host name that is translated to an IP address by a
Naming Service such as WINS and DNS. Therefore, a method of identifying the MAC address
assigned to the IP address is required. The Address Resolution Protocol for an IP network provides
this mechanism. For IPX, the MAC address is part of the network address and ARP is not required.
ARP is implemented using an ARP Request and ARP Reply frame. ARP Requests are typically sent
to a broadcast address while the ARP Reply is typically sent as unicast traffic. A unicast address
corresponds to a single MAC address or a single IP address. A broadcast address is sent to all devices
on a network.
Teaming and Network Addresses
A team of adapters will function as a single virtual network interface, and do not appear to be any
different than a non-teamed adapter to other network devices. A virtual network adapter advertises a
single Layer 2, and one or more Layer 3 addresses. When the teaming driver initializes, it selects one
MAC address from one of the physical adapters that make up the team to be the Team MAC address.
This address is typically taken from the first adapter that gets initialized by the driver. When the
system hosting the team receives an ARP request, it selects one MAC address from among the
physical adapters in the team to use as the source MAC address in the ARP Reply. In Windows
operating systems, the IPCONFIG /all command shows the IP and MAC address of the virtual
adapter and not the individual physical adapters. The protocol IP address is assigned to the virtual
network interface and not to the individual physical adapters.
4 Broadcom Gigabit Ethernet Teaming Services
E
121
For switch-independent teaming modes, all physical adapters that make up a virtual adapter must use
the unique MAC address assigned to them when transmitting data. That is, the frames that are sent by
each of the physical adapters in the team must use a unique MAC address to be IEEE compliant. It is
important to note that ARP cache entries are not learned from received frames, but only from ARP
requests and ARP replies.
4.3.2
Types of Teams
"Available Teaming Types" shows a summary of the teaming types and their classification.
Available Teaming Types
Teaming Type
SwitchDependent*1
Link
Aggregation
Control Protocol
Support
Required on the
Switch
Smart Load Balancing and
Failover
–
–


SLB (Auto-Fallback
Disable)
–
–


Link Aggregation
(802.3ad) *2




Generic Trunking (FEC/
GEC)/802.3ad-Draft
Static

–


Load
Balancing
Failover
*1: Switch must support specific type of team.
*2: Link aggregation is not supported in the Blade Server.
Smart Load Balancing and Failover
The Smart Load Balancing™ and Failover type of team provides both load balancing and failover
when configured for load balancing, and only failover when configured for fault tolerance. This type
of team works with any Ethernet switch and requires no trunking configuration on the switch. The
team advertises multiple MAC addresses and one or more IP addresses (when using secondary IP
addresses). The team MAC address is selected from the list of load balance members. When the
system receives an ARP request, the software-networking stack will always send an ARP Reply with
the team MAC address. To begin the load balancing process, the teaming driver will modify this ARP
reply by changing the source MAC address to match one of the physical adapters.
122
Smart Load Balancing enables both transmit and receive load balancing based on the Layer 3/Layer 4
IP address and TCP/UDP port number. In other words, the load balancing is not done at a byte or
frame level but on a TCP/UDP session basis. This methodology is required to maintain in-order
delivery of frames that belong to the same socket conversation. Load balancing is supported on 2-8
ports. These ports can include any combination of add-in adapters and LAN on Motherboard (LOM)
devices. Transmit load balancing is achieved by creating a hashing table using the source and
destination IP addresses and TCP/UDP port numbers.The same combination of source and
destination IP addresses and TCP/UDP port numbers will generally yield the same hash index and
therefore point to the same port in the team. When a port is selected to carry all the frames of a given
socket, the unique MAC address of the physical adapter is included in the frame, and not the team
MAC address. This is required to comply with the IEEE 802.3 standard. If two adapters transmit
using the same MAC address, then a duplicate MAC address situation would occur that the switch
could not handle.
Receive load balancing is achieved through an intermediate driver by sending gratuitous ARPs on a
client by client basis using the unicast address of each client as the destination address of the ARP
request (also known as a directed ARP). This is considered client load balancing and not traffic load
balancing. When the intermediate driver detects a significant load imbalance between the physical
adapters in an SLB team, it will generate G-ARPs in an effort to redistribute incoming frames. The
intermediate driver (BASP) does not answer ARP requests; only the software protocol stack provides
the required ARP Reply. The receive load balancing is a function of the number of clients that are
connecting to the system through the team interface.
SLB receive load balancing attempts to load balance incoming traffic for client machines across
physical ports in the team. It uses a modified gratuitous ARP to advertise a different MAC address for
the team IP Address in the sender physical and protocol address. This G-ARP is unicast with the
MAC and IP Address of a client machine in the target physical and protocol address respectively.
This causes the target client to update its ARP cache with a new MAC address map to the team IP
address. G-ARPs are not broadcast because this would cause all clients to send their traffic to the
same port. As a result, the benefits achieved through client load balancing would be eliminated, and
could cause out of order frame delivery. This receive load balancing scheme works as long as all
clients and the teamed system are on the same subnet or broadcast domain.
When the clients and the system are on different subnets, and incoming traffic has to traverse a router,
the received traffic destined for the system is not load balanced. The physical adapter that the
intermediate driver has selected to carry the IP flow carries all of the traffic. When the router sends a
frame to the team IP address, it broadcasts an ARP request (if not in the ARP cache). The server
software stack generates an ARP reply with the team MAC address, but the intermediate driver
modifies the ARP reply and send it over a particular physical adapter, establishing the flow for that
session.
The reason is that ARP is not a routable protocol. It does not have an IP header and therefore is not
sent to the router or default gateway. ARP is only a local subnet protocol. In addition, since the GARP is not a broadcast packet, the router will not process it and will not update its own ARP cache.
The only way that the router would process an ARP that is intended for another network device is if it
has Proxy ARP enabled and the host has no default gateway. This is very rare and not recommended
for most applications.
4 Broadcom Gigabit Ethernet Teaming Services
E
123
Transmit traffic through a router will be load balanced as transmit load balancing is based on the
source and destination IP address and TCP/UDP port number. Since routers do not alter the source
and destination IP address, the load balancing algorithm works as intended.
Configuring routers for Hot Standby Routing Protocol (HSRP) does not allow for receive load
balancing to occur in the adapter team. In general, HSRP allows for two routers to act as one router,
advertising a virtual IP and virtual MAC address. One physical router is the active interface while the
other is standby. Although HSRP can also load share nodes (using different default gateways on the
host nodes) across multiple routers in HSRP groups, it always points to the primary MAC address of
the team.
SLB (Auto-Fallback Disable)
This type of team is identical to the Smart Load Balance and Failover type of team, with the
following exception-when the standby member is active, if a primary member comes back on line,
the team continues using the standby member rather than switching back to the primary member. This
type of team is supported only for situations in which the network cable is disconnected and
reconnected to the network adapter. It is not supported for situations in which the adapter is removed/
installed through Device Manager or Hot-Plug PCI.
If any primary adapter assigned to a team is disabled, the team functions as a Smart Load Balancing
and Failover type of team in which auto-fallback occurs.
Link Aggregation (IEEE 802.3ad LACP)
Link Aggregation is similar to Generic Trunking except that it uses the Link Aggregation Control
Protocol to negotiate the ports that will make up the team. LACP must be enabled at both ends of the
link for the team to be operational. If LACP is not available at both ends of the link, 802.3ad provides
a manual aggregation that only requires both ends of the link to be in a link up state. Because manual
aggregation provides for the activation of a member link without performing the LACP message
exchanges, it should not be considered as reliable and robust as an LACP negotiated link. LACP
automatically determines which member links can be aggregated and then aggregates them. It
provides for the controlled addition and removal of physical links for the link aggregation so that no
frames are lost or duplicated. The removal of aggregate link members is provided by the marker
protocol that can be optionally enabled for Link Aggregation Control Protocol (LACP) enabled
aggregate links.
The Link Aggregation group advertises a single MAC address for all the ports in the trunk. The MAC
address of the Aggregator can be the MAC addresses of one of the MACs that make up the group.
LACP and marker protocols use a multicast destination address.
The Link Aggregation control function determines which links may be aggregated and then binds the
ports to an Aggregator function in the system and monitors conditions to determine if a change in the
aggregation group is required. Link aggregation combines the individual capacity of multiple links to
form a high performance virtual link. The failure or replacement of a link in an LACP trunk will not
cause loss of connectivity. The traffic will simply be failed over to the remaining links in the trunk.
`
124
Link aggregation is not supported in the Blade Server.
Generic Trunking
Generic Trunking is a switch-assisted teaming mode and requires configuring ports at both ends of
the link: server interfaces and switch ports. This is often referred to as Cisco Fast EtherChannel or
Gigabit EtherChannel. In addition, generic trunking supports similar implementations by other
switch OEMs such as Extreme Networks Load Sharing and Bay Networks or IEEE 802.3ad Link
Aggregation static mode. In this mode, the team advertises one MAC Address and one IP Address
when the protocol stack responds to ARP Requests. In addition, each physical adapter in the team
uses the same team MAC address when transmitting frames. This is possible since the switch at the
other end of the link is aware of the teaming mode and will handle the use of a single MAC address
by every port in the team. The forwarding table in the switch will reflect the trunk as a single virtual
port.
In this teaming mode, the intermediate driver controls load balancing and failover for outgoing traffic
only, while incoming traffic is controlled by the switch firmware and hardware. As is the case for
Smart Load Balancing, the BASP intermediate driver uses the IP/TCP/UDP source and destination
addresses to load balance the transmit traffic from the server. Most switches implement an XOR
hashing of the source and destination MAC address.
4.3.3
Software Components
Teaming is implemented via an NDIS intermediate driver in the Windows Operating System
environment. This software component works with the miniport driver, the NDIS layer, and the
protocol stack to enable the teaming architecture (refer to "• Process for Selecting a Team Type"
(Jpg.129)). The miniport driver controls the host LAN controller directly to enable functions such as
send, receive, and interrupt processing. The intermediate driver fits between the miniport driver and
the protocol layer multiplexing several miniport driver instances, and creating a virtual adapter that
looks like a single adapter to the NDIS layer. NDIS provides a set of library functions to enable the
communications between either miniport drivers or intermediate drivers and the protocol stack. The
protocol stack implements IP, IPX and ARP. A protocol address such as an IP address is assigned to
each miniport device instance, but when an Intermediate driver is installed, the protocol address is
assigned to the virtual team adapter and not to the individual miniport devices that make up the team.
The Broadcom supplied teaming support is provided by three individual software components that
work together and are supported as a package. When one component is upgraded, all the other
components must be upgraded to supported versions. "• Broadcom Teaming Software Component"
(Jpg.126) describes the three software components and their associated files for supported operating
systems.
E
4 Broadcom Gigabit Ethernet Teaming Services
125
• Broadcom Teaming Software Component
Software
Component
–
Broadcom Name
Windows File Name
Virtual Bus Driver (VBD)
bxvbdx.sys
bxvbda.sys*
Miniport Driver
Broadcom Base Driver
bxnd50x.sys
bxnd51x.sys
bxnd51a.sys*
bxnd52x.sys
bxnd52a.sys*
Intermediate
Driver
Broadcom Advanced Server
Program (BASP)
Baspxp32.sys
Baspw2k.sys
Configuration
User Interface
Broadcom Advanced Control Suite
2 (BACS2)
BACS2
*: For 64-bit systems
4.3.4
Hardware Requirements
The various teaming modes described in this manual place certain restrictions on the networking
equipment used to connect clients to teamed systems. Each type of network interconnect technology
has an effect on teaming as described in the following sections.
• Repeater Hub
A Repeater Hub allows a network administrator to extend an Ethernet network beyond the limits
of an individual segment. The repeater regenerates the input signal received on one port onto all
other connected ports, forming a single collision domain. This means that when a station attached
to a repeater sends an Ethernet frame to another station, every station within the same collision
domain will also receive that message. If two stations begin transmitting at the same time, a
collision occurs, and each transmitting station must retransmit its data after waiting a short
(random) amount of time.
The use of a repeater requires that each station participating within the collision domain operate in
half-duplex mode. Although half-duplex mode is supported for Gigabit Ethernet adapters in the
IEEE 802.3 specification, half-duplex mode is not supported by the majority of Gigabit Ethernet
adapter manufacturers. Therefore, half-duplex mode will not be considered here.
Teaming across hubs is supported for troubleshooting purposes (such as connecting a network
analyzer) for SLB teams only.
• Switching Hub
Unlike a repeater hub, a switching hub (or more simply a switch) allows an Ethernet network to be
broken into multiple collision domains. The switch is responsible for forwarding Ethernet packets
between hosts based solely on Ethernet MAC addresses. A physical network adapter that is
attached to a switch may operate in half-duplex or full-duplex mode.
To support Generic Trunking and 802.3ad Link Aggregation, a switch must specifically support
such functionality. If the switch does not support these protocols, it may still be used for Smart
Load Balancing.
126
• Router
A router is designed to route network traffic based on Layer 3 or higher protocols, although it often
also works as a Layer 2 device with switching capabilities. The teaming of ports connected directly
to a router is not supported.
4.3.5
Configuring Teaming
The Broadcom Advanced Control Suite 2 (BACS2) utility is used to configure teaming in the
supported operating system environments.
The BACS2 utility is designed to run in one of the following 32-bit and 64-bit Windows operating
systems: Microsoft Windows 2000 Server and Windows Server 2003. BACS2 is used to configure
load balancing and fault tolerance teaming, and VLANs. In addition, it displays the MAC address,
driver version, and status information. BACS2 also includes a number of diagnostics tools such as
hardware diagnostics, cable testing, and a network topology test.
4.3.6
Supported Features by Team Type
"Comparison of Team Types" provides a feature comparison across the team types. Use this table to
determine the best type of team for your application. The teaming software supports up to eight ports
in a single team and up to four teams in a single system. The four teams can be any combination of
the supported teaming types, but each team must be on a separate network or subnet.
• Comparison of Team Types
SwitchIndependent
Dynamic Link
Aggregation
(IEEE 802.3ad)
Type of Team
Fault
Tolerance
Load
Balancing
SwitchDependent
Static
Trunking
Function
SLB with
Standby(*1)
SLB
Generic
Trunking
Link Aggregation
Number of ports per
team (same
broadcast domain)
2-8
2-8
2-8
2-8
4
4
4
4
Adapter fault
tolerance
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Switch link fault
tolerance (same
broadcast domain)
Yes
Yes
Switchdependent
Switch-dependent
TX load balancing
No
Yes
Yes
Yes
No
Yes
Yes (performed
by the switch)
Yes (performed by
the switch)
Requires
compatible switch
No
No
Yes
Yes
Heartbeats to check
connectivity
No
No
No
No
Number of teams
RX load balancing
4 Broadcom Gigabit Ethernet Teaming Services
E
127
Type of Team
Fault
Tolerance
Load
Balancing
Function
SLB with
Standby(*1)
SLB
Generic
Trunking
Link Aggregation
Mixed media
(adapters with
different media)
Yes
Yes
Yes (switchdependent)
–
Mixed speeds
(adapters that do not
support a common
speed(s), but can
operate at different
speeds)
Yes
Yes
No
No
Mixed speeds
(adapters that
support a common
speed(s), but can
operate at different
speeds)
Yes
Yes
No (must be the
same speed)
Yes
Load balances TCP/
IP
No
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes(*2)
Yes(*2)
Yes(*2)
Yes(*2)
No
Yes (IPX
outbound
traffic only)
Yes
Yes
Same MAC address
for all team
members
No
No
Yes
Yes
Same IP address for
all team members
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Load balancing by
IP address
No
Yes
Yes
Yes
Load balancing by
MAC address
No
Yes (used for
no-IP/IPX)
Yes
Yes
Mixed vendor
teaming
Load balances nonIP
*1: SLB with one primary and one standby member.
*2: Requires at least one Broadcom adapter in the team.
`
128
SwitchIndependent
Dynamic Link
Aggregation
(IEEE 802.3ad)
SwitchDependent
Static
Trunking
Link aggregation is not supported in the Blade Server.
4.3.7
Selecting a Team Type
The following flow chart provides the decision flow when planning for Layer 2 teaming. The primary
rationale for teaming is the need for additional network bandwidth and fault tolerance. Teaming
offers link aggregation and fault tolerance to meet both of these requirements. Preference teaming
should be selected in the following order: IEEE 802.3ad as the first choice, Generic Trunking as the
second choice, and SLB teaming as the third choice when using unmanaged switches or switches that
do not support the first two options. if switch fault tolerance is a requirement, however, then SLB is
the only choice (refer to "• Process for Selecting a Team Type" (Jpg.129)).
• Process for Selecting a Team Type
Do you need additional
network bandwidth or fault
tolerance?
No
No Teaming
Yes
Yes
Do you need switch
fault tolerance?
No
Are you using a
switch that supports IEEE
802.3ad LACP?
Yes
Set up a Dynamic
Trunking Team
No
Are you using a
switch that supports Static
Trunking (FEC/GEC?)
Yes
Set up a Generic
Trunking Team
No
Set up an SLB
Team
E
4 Broadcom Gigabit Ethernet Teaming Services
129
4.4
Teaming Mechanisms
4.4.1
Architecture
The Broadcom Advanced Server Program (BASP) is implemented as an NDIS intermediate driver
(refer to "• Teaming Across Switches Without an Interswitch Link" (Jpg.141)). It operates below
protocol stacks such as TCP/IP and IPX and appears as a virtual adapter. This virtual adapter inherits
the MAC Address of the first port initialized in the team. A Layer 3 address must also be configured
for the virtual adapter. The primary function of BASP is to balance inbound (for SLB) and outbound
traffic (for all teaming modes) among the physical adapters installed on the system selected for
teaming. The inbound and outbound algorithms are independent and orthogonal to each other. The
outbound traffic for a particular session can be assigned to a given port while its corresponding
inbound traffic can be assigned to a different port.
• Intermediate Driver
TCP/IP
IP/X
NetBEUI
NDIS
Broadcom Intermediate Driver
Virtual NIC Interface #1
Team1
Hash
Physical NIC
Interface #2
Physical NIC
Interface #1
NDIS
130
Miniport Driver Interface #1
Miniport Driver Interface #2
NIC 1
NIC 2
4.4.2
Outbound Traffic Flow
The Broadcom Intermediate Driver manages the outbound traffic flow for all teaming modes. For
outbound traffic, every packet is first classified into a flow, and then distributed to the selected
physical adapter for transmission. The flow classification involves an efficient hash computation over
known protocol fields. The resulting hash value is used to index into an Outbound Flow Hash
Table.The selected Outbound Flow Hash Entry contains the index of the selected physical adapter
responsible for transmitting this flow. The source MAC address of the packets will then be modified
to the MAC address of the selected physical adapter. The modified packet is then passed to the
selected physical adapter for transmission.
The outbound TCP and UDP packets are classified using Layer 3 and Layer 4 header information.
This scheme improves the load distributions for popular Internet protocol services using well-known
ports such as HTTP and FTP. Therefore, BASP performs load balancing on a TCP session basis and
not on a packet-by-packet basis.
In the Outbound Flow Hash Entries, statistics counters are also updated after classification. The loadbalancing engine uses these counters to periodically distribute the flows across teamed ports. The
outbound code path has been designed to achieve best possible concurrency where multiple
concurrent accesses to the Outbound Flow Hash Table are allowed.
For protocols other than TCP/IP, the first physical adapter will always be selected for outbound
packets. The exception is Address Resolution Protocol (ARP), which is handled differently to
achieve inbound load balancing.
4.4.3
Inbound Traffic Flow (SLB Only)
The Broadcom intermediate driver manages the inbound traffic flow for the SLB teaming mode.
Unlike outbound load balancing, inbound load balancing can only be applied to IP addresses that are
located in the same subnet as the load-balancing server. Inbound load balancing exploits a unique
characteristic of Address Resolution Protocol (RFC0826), in which each IP host uses its own ARP
cache to encapsulate the IP Datagram into an Ethernet frame. BASP carefully manipulates the ARP
response to direct each IP host to send the inbound IP packet to the desired physical adapter.
Therefore, inbound load balancing is a plan-ahead scheme based on statistical history of the inbound
flows. New connections from a client to the server will always occur over the primary physical
adapter (because the ARP Reply generated by the operating system protocol stack will always
associate the logical IP address with the MAC address of the primary physical adapter).
Like the outbound case, there is an Inbound Flow Head Hash Table. Each entry inside this table has a
singly linked list and each link (Inbound Flow Entries) represents an IP host located in the same
subnet.
When an inbound IP Datagram arrives, the appropriate Inbound Flow Head Entry is located by
hashing the source IP address of the IP Datagram. Two statistics counters stored in the selected entry
are also updated. These counters are used in the same fashion as the outbound counters by the loadbalancing engine periodically to reassign the flows to the physical adapter.
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4 Broadcom Gigabit Ethernet Teaming Services
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On the inbound code path, the Inbound Flow Head Hash Table is also designed to allow concurrent
access. The link lists of Inbound Flow Entries are only referenced in the event of processing ARP
packets and the periodic load balancing. There is no per packet reference to the Inbound Flow
Entries. Even though the link lists are not bounded; the overhead in processing each non-ARP packet
is always a constant. However, the processing of ARP packets, both inbound and outbound, depends
on the number of links inside the corresponding link list.
On the inbound processing path, filtering is also employed to prevent broadcast packets from looping
back through the system from other physical adapters.
4.4.4
Protocol Support
ARP and IP/TCP/UDP flows are load balanced. If the packet is an IP protocol only, such as ICMP or
IGMP, then all data flowing to a particular IP address will go out through the same physical adapter.
If the packet uses TCP or UDP for the L4 protocol, then the port number is added to the hashing
algorithm, so two separate L4 flows can go out through two separate physical adapters to the same IP
address.
For example, assume the client has an IP address of 10.0.0.1. All IGMP and ICMP traffic will go out
the same physical adapter because only the IP address is used for the hash. The flow would look
something like this:
+)/2 2J[U#FCRVGT +%/2 2J[U#FCRVGT If the server also sends a TCP and UDP flow to the same 10.0.0.1 address, they can be on the same
physical adapter as IGMP and ICMP, or on completely different physical adapters from ICMP and
IGMP. The stream may look like this:
+)/2 2J[U#FCRVGT +%/2 2J[U#FCRVGT 6%2 2J[U#FCRVGT 7&2 2J[U#FCVRGT Or the streams may look like this:
+)/2 2J[U#FCRVGT +%/2 2J[U#FCRVGT 6%2 2J[U#FCRVGT 7&2 2J[U#FCVRGT The actual assignment between adapters may change over time, but any protocol that is not TCP/
UDP based goes over the same physical adapter because only the IP address is used in the hash.
132
4.4.5
Performance
Modern network interface cards provide many hardware features that reduce CPU utilization by
offloading certain CPU intensive operations (J"4.7 Teaming and Other Advanced Networking
Properties"(pg.138)). In contrast, the BASP intermediate driver is a purely software function that
must examine every packet received from the protocol stacks and react to its contents before sending
it out through a particular physical interface. Though the BASP driver can process each outgoing
packet in near constant time, some applications that may already be CPU bound may suffer if
operated over a teamed interface.In such cases, the application may be better suited to taking
advantage of the failover capabilities of the intermediate driver, rather than the load balancing
features. Or it may operate more efficiently over a single physical adapter that provides a particular
hardware feature such as Large Send Offload.
4.5
Types of Teams
4.5.1
Switch-Independent
The Broadcom Smart Load Balancing type of team allows two to eight physical adapters to operate
as a single virtual adapter. The greatest benefit of the SLB type of team is that it operates on any IEEE
compliant switch and requires no special configuration.
Smart Load Balancing and Failover
SLB provides for switch-independent, bidirectional, fault-tolerant teaming and load balancing.
Switch independence implies that there is no specific support for this function required in the switch,
allowing SLB to be compatible with all switches. Under SLB, all adapters in the team have separate
MAC addresses. The load-balancing algorithm operates on Layer 3 addresses of the source and
destination nodes, which enables SLB to load balance both incoming and outgoing traffic.
The BASP intermediate driver continually monitors the physical ports in a team for link loss. In the
event of link loss on any port, traffic is automatically diverted to other ports in the team. The SLB
teaming mode supports switch fault tolerance by allowing teaming across different switchesprovided the switches are on the same physical network or broadcast domain.
• Network Communications
The following are the key attributes of SLB:
- Failover mechanism - Link loss detection.
- Load Balancing Algorithm - Inbound and outbound traffic are balanced through a Broadcom
proprietary mechanism based on L4 flows.
- Outbound Load Balancing using MAC Address - No
- Outbound Load Balancing using IP Address - Yes
- Multivendor Teaming - Supported (must include at least one Broadcom Ethernet adapter as a
team member).
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4 Broadcom Gigabit Ethernet Teaming Services
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• Applications
The SLB algorithm is most appropriate in home and small business environments where cost is a
concern, or with commodity switching equipment. SLB teaming works with unmanaged Layer 2
switches and is a cost-effective way of getting redundancy and link aggregation at the server.
Smart Load Balancing also supports teaming physical adapters with differing link capabilities. In
addition, SLB is recommended when switch fault tolerance with teaming is required.
• Configuration Recommendations
SLB supports connecting the teamed ports to hubs and switches if they are on the same broadcast
domain. It does not support connecting to a router or Layer 3 switches because the ports must be
on the same subnet.
4.5.2
Switch-Dependent
Generic Static Trunking
This mode supports a variety of environments where the adapter link partners are statically
configured to support a proprietary trunking mechanism. This mode could be used to support
Lucent's Open Trunk, Cisco's Fast EtherChannel (FEC), and Cisco's Gigabit EtherChannel (GEC). In
the static mode, as in generic link aggregation, the switch administrator needs to assign the ports to
the team, and this assignment cannot be altered by the BASP, as there is no exchange of the Link
Aggregation Control Protocol (LACP) frame.
With this mode, all adapters in the team are configured to receive packets for the same MAC address.
Trunking operates on Layer 2 addresses and supports load balancing and failover for both inbound
and outbound traffic. The BASP driver determines the load-balancing scheme for outbound packets,
using Layer 4 protocols previously discussed, whereas the team link partner determines the loadbalancing scheme for inbound packets.
The attached switch must support the appropriate trunking scheme for this mode of operation. Both
the BASP and the switch continually monitor their ports for link loss. In the event of link loss on any
port, traffic is automatically diverted to other ports in the team.
• Network Communications
The following are the key attributes of Generic Static Trunking:
- Failover mechanism - Link loss detection
- Load Balancing Algorithm - Outbound traffic is balanced through Broadcom proprietary
mechanism based L4 flows. Inbound traffic is balanced according to a switch specific
mechanism.
- Outbound Load Balancing using MAC Address - No
- Outbound Load Balancing using IP Address - Yes
- Multivendor Teaming - Supported (must include at least one Broadcom Ethernet adapter as a
team member)
• Applications
Generic trunking works with switches that support Cisco Fast EtherChannel, Cisco Gigabit
EtherChannel, Extreme Networks Load Sharing and Bay Networks or IEEE 802.3ad Link
Aggregation static mode. Since load balancing is implemented on Layer 2 addresses, all higher
protocols such as IP, IPX, and NetBEUI are supported. Therefore, this is the recommended
teaming mode when the switch supports generic trunking modes over SLB.
134
• Configuration Recommendations
Static trunking supports connecting the teamed ports to switches if they are on the same broadcast
domain and support generic trunking. It does not support connecting to a router or Layer 3
switches since the ports must be on the same subnet.
Dynamic Trunking (IEEE 802.3ad Link Aggregation)
This mode supports link aggregation through static and dynamic configuration via the Link
Aggregation Control Protocol (LACP). With this mode, all adapters in the team are configured to
receive packets for the same MAC address. The MAC address of the first adapter in the team is used
and cannot be substituted for a different MAC address. The BASP driver determines the loadbalancing scheme for outbound packets, using Layer 4 protocols previously discussed, whereas the
team's link partner determines the load-balancing scheme for inbound packets. Because the load
balancing is implemented on Layer 2, all higher protocols such as IP, IPX, and NetBEUI are
supported. The attached switch must support the 802.3ad Link Aggregation standard for this mode of
operation. The switch manages the inbound traffic to the adapter while the BASP manages the
outbound traffic. Both the BASP and the switch continually monitor their ports for link loss. In the
event of link loss on any port, traffic is automatically diverted to other ports in the team.
• Network Communications
The following are the key attributes of Dynamic Trunking:
- Failover mechanism - Link loss detection
- Load Balancing Algorithm - Outbound traffic is balanced through a Broadcom proprietary
mechanism based on L4 flows. Inbound traffic is balanced according to a switch specific
mechanism.
- Outbound Load Balancing using MAC Address - No
- Outbound Load Balancing using IP Address - Yes
- Multivendor Teaming - Supported (must include at least one Broadcom Ethernet adapter as a
team member)
• Applications
Dynamic trunking works with switches that support IEEE 802.3ad Link Aggregation dynamic
mode using LACP. Inbound load balancing is switch dependent. In general, the switch traffic is
load balanced based on L2 addresses. In this case, all network protocols such as IP, IPX, and
NetBEUI are load balanced. Therefore, this is the recommended teaming mode when the switch
supports LACP, except when switch fault tolerance is required. SLB is the only teaming mode that
supports switch fault tolerance.
• Configuration Recommendations
Dynamic trunking supports connecting the teamed ports to switches as long as they are on the
same broadcast domain and supports IEEE 802.3ad LACP trunking. It does not support connecting
to a router or Layer 3 switches since the ports must be on the same subnet.
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4 Broadcom Gigabit Ethernet Teaming Services
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4.6
Attributes of the Features Associated with
Each Type of Team
The attributes of the features associated with each type of team are summarized below.
• Smart Load BalancingTM
Feature
Attribute
User interface
Broadcom Advanced Control Suite 2 (BACS2)
Number of teams
Maximum 4
Number of adapters per team
Maximum 8
Hot replace
Yes
Hot add
Yes
Hot remove
Yes
Link speed support
Different speeds
Frame protocol
IP
Incoming packet management
BASP
Outgoing packet management
BASP
LiveLink support
Yes
Failover event
Loss of link
Failover time
<500 ms
Fallback time
1.5 s(*1) (approximate)
MAC address
Different
Multivendor teaming
Yes
*1: Make sure that Port Fast or Edge Port is enabled.
• Generic Trunking
Feature
User interface
136
Attribute
Broadcom Advanced Control Suite 2 (BACS2)
Number of teams
Maximum 4
Number of adapters per team
Maximum 8
Hot replace
Yes
Hot add
Yes
Hot remove
Yes
Link speed support
Different speeds(*1)
Frame protocol
All
Incoming packet management
Switch
Outgoing packet management
BASP
Failover event
Loss of link only
Failover time
<500 ms
Fallback time
1.5 s(*2) (approximate)
Feature
Attribute
MAC address
Same for all adapters
Multivendor teaming
Yes
*1: Some switches require matching link speeds to correctly negotiate between trunk
connections.
*2: Make sure that Port Fast or Edge Port is enabled.
• Dynamic Trunking
Feature
Attribute
User interface
Broadcom Advanced Control Suite 2 (BACS2)
Number of teams
Maximum 4
Number of adapters per team
Maximum 8
Hot replace
Yes
Hot add
Yes
Hot remove
Yes
Link speed support
Different speeds
Frame protocol
All
Incoming packet management
Switch
Outgoing packet management
BASP
Failover event
Loss of link only
Failover time
<500 ms
Fallback time
1.5 s(*1) (approximate)
MAC address
Same for all adapters
Multivendor teaming
Yes
*1: Make sure that Port Fast or Edge Port is enabled.
Speeds Supported for Each Type of Team
The various link speeds that are supported for each type of team are listed in "• Link Speeds in
Teaming" (Jpg.137). Mixed speed refers to the capability of teaming adapters that are running at
different link speeds.
• Link Speeds in Teaming
Type of Team
Link Speed
Traffic Direction
Speed Support
SLB
10/100/1000
Incoming/outgoing
FEC
100
Incoming/outgoing
Mixed speed
Same speed
GEC
1000
Incoming/outgoing
Same speed
IEEE 802.3ad
10/100/1000
Incoming/outgoing
Mixed speed
4 Broadcom Gigabit Ethernet Teaming Services
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137
4.7
Teaming and Other Advanced Networking
Properties
Before creating a team, adding or removing team members, or changing advanced settings of a team
member, make sure each team member has been configured in a similar way. Settings to check
include VLANs and QoS Packet Tagging, Jumbo Frames, and the various offloads. Advanced adapter
properties and teaming support are listed below.
• Advanced Adapter Properties and Teaming Support
Adapter Properties
Checksum Offload
Supported by Teaming Virtual Adapter
Yes
IEEE 802.1p QoS Tagging
No
Large Send Offload
Yes (*1)
Jumbo Frames
Yes(*2)
IEEE 802.1Q VLANs
Yes(*3)
Wake on LAN
No
Preboot Execution environment (PXE)
Yes(*4)
*1: All adapters on the team must support this feature. Some adapters may not support this
feature if ASF/IPMI is also enabled.
*2: Must be supported by all adapters in the team.
*3: Only for Broadcom adapters.
*4: As a PXE server only, not as a client.
A team does not necessarily inherit adapter properties. Instead, various properties depend on the
specific capability. For instance, an example would be flow control, which is a physical adapter
property and has nothing to do with BASP, and will be enabled on a particular adapter if the miniport
driver for that adapter has flow control enabled.
`
138
All adapters on the team must support the property listed in "• Advanced Adapter Properties
and Teaming Support" (Jpg.138) in order for the team to support the property.
Checksum Offload
Checksum Offload is a property of the Broadcom network adapters that allows the TCP/IP/UDP
checksums for send and receive traffic to be calculated by the adapter hardware rather than by the
host CPU. In high-traffic situations, this can allow a system to handle more connections more
efficiently than if the host CPU were forced to calculate the checksums. This property is inherently a
hardware property and would not benefit from a software-only implementation. An adapter that
supports Checksum Offload advertises this capability to the operating system so that the checksum
does not need to be calculated in the protocol stack. Checksum Offload is only supported for IPv4 at
this time.
IEEE 802.1p QoS Tagging
The IEEE 802.1p standard includes a 3-bit field (supporting a maximum of 8 priority levels), which
allows for traffic prioritization. The BASP intermediate driver does not support IEEE 802.1p QoS
tagging.
Large Send Offload
Large Send Offload (LSO) is a feature provided by Broadcom network adapters that prevents an
upper level protocol such as TCP from breaking a large data packet into a series of smaller packets
with headers appended to them. The protocol stack need only generate a single header for a data
packet as large as 64 KB, and the adapter hardware breaks the data buffer into appropriately-sized
Ethernet frames with the correctly sequenced header (based on the single header originally provided).
Jumbo Frames
The use of jumbo frames was originally proposed by Alteon Networks, Inc. in 1998 and increased the
maximum size of an Ethernet frame to a maximum size of 9000 bytes. Though never formally
adopted by the IEEE 802.3 Working Group, support for jumbo frames has been implemented in this
product. The BASP intermediate driver supports jumbo frames, provided that all of the physical
adapters in the team also support jumbo frames and the same size is set on all adapters in the team.
IEEE 802.1Q VLANs
In 1998, the IEEE approved the 802.3ac standard, which defines frame format extensions to support
Virtual Bridged Local Area Network tagging on Ethernet networks as specified in the IEEE 802.1Q
specification. The VLAN protocol permits insertion of a tag into an Ethernet frame to identify the
VLAN to which a frame belongs. If present, the 4-byte VLAN tag is inserted into the Ethernet frame
between the source MAC address and the length/type field. The first 2-bytes of the VLAN tag consist
of the IEEE 802.1Q tag type, whereas the second 2 bytes include a user priority field and the VLAN
identifier (VID). Virtual LANs (VLANs) allow the user to split the physical LAN into logical
subparts. Each defined VLAN behaves as its own separate network, with its traffic and broadcasts
isolated from the others, thus increasing bandwidth efficiency within each logical group. VLANs also
enable the administrator to enforce appropriate security and quality of service (QoS) policies. The
BASP supports the creation of 64 VLANs per team or adapter: 63 tagged and 1 untagged. The
operating system and system resources, however, limit the actual number of VLANs. VLAN support
is provided according to IEEE 802.1Q and is supported in a teaming environment as well as on a
single adapter. Note that VLANs are supported only with homogeneous teaming and not in a
multivendor teaming environment. The BASP intermediate driver supports VLAN tagging. One or
more VLANs may be bound to a single instance of the intermediate driver.
4 Broadcom Gigabit Ethernet Teaming Services
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139
Preboot Execution Environment
The Preboot Execution Environment (PXE) allows a system to boot from an operating system image
over the network. By definition, PXE is invoked before an operating system is loaded, so there is no
opportunity for the BASP intermediate driver to load and enable a team. As a result, teaming is not
supported as a PXE client, though a physical adapter that participates in a team when the operating
system is loaded may be used as a PXE client. Whereas a teamed adapter cannot be used as a PXE
client, it can be used for a PXE server, which provides operating system images to PXE clients using
a combination of Dynamic Host Control Protocol (DHCP) and the Trivial File Transfer Protocol
(TFTP). Both of these protocols operate over IP and are supported by all teaming modes.
4.8
General Network Considerations
4.8.1
Teaming Across Switches
SLB teaming can be configured across switches. The switches, however, must be connected together.
Generic Trunking and Link Aggregation do not work across switches because each of these
implementations requires that all physical adapters in a team share the same Ethernet MAC address.
It is important to note that SLB can only detect the loss of link between the ports in the team and their
immediate link partner. SLB has no way of reacting to other hardware failures in the switches and
cannot detect loss of link on other ports.
4.8.2
Switch-Link Fault Tolerance
The diagrams below describe the operation of an SLB team in a switch fault tolerant configuration.
We show the mapping of the ping request and ping replies in an SLB team with two active members.
All servers (Blue, Gray and Red) have a continuous ping to each other. "• Teaming Across Switches
Without an Interswitch Link" (Jpg.141) is a setup without the interconnect cable in place between
the two switches. "• Teaming Across Switches With Interconnect" (Jpg.142) has the interconnect
cable in place, and "• Failover Event" (Jpg.142) is an example of a failover event with the
Interconnect cable in place. These scenarios describe the behavior of teaming across the two switches
and the importance of the interconnect link.
The diagrams show the secondary team member sending the ICMP echo requests (arrow of a dotted
line), while the primary team member receives the respective ICMP echo replies (arrow of a double
line). This illustrates a key characteristic of the teaming software. The load balancing algorithms do
not synchronize how frames are load balanced when sent or received. In other words, frames for a
given conversation can go out and be received on different interfaces in the team. This is true for all
types of teaming supported by Broadcom. Therefore, an interconnect link must be provided between
the switches that connect to ports in the same team.
In the configuration without the interconnect, an ICMP Request from Blue to Gray goes out port
82:83 destined for Gray port 5E:CA, but the Top Switch has no way to send it there because it cannot
go along the 5E:C9 port on Gray. A similar scenario occurs when Gray attempts to ping Blue. An
ICMP Request goes out on 5E:C9 destined for Blue 82:82, but cannot get there. Top Switch does not
have an entry for 82:82 in its CAM table because there is no interconnect between the two switches.
Pings, however, flow between Red and Blue and between Red and Gray.
140
Furthermore, a failover event would cause additional loss of connectivity. Consider a cable
disconnect on the Top Switch port 4. In this case, Gray would send the ICMP Request to Red 49:C9,
but because the Bottom switch has no entry for 49:C9 in its CAM Table, the frame is flooded to all its
ports but cannot find a way to get to 49:C9.
• Teaming Across Switches Without an Interswitch Link
ARP Table:
.100=49:C9
.102=5E:CA
W2K
Blue
SLB Team
192.168.1.101
STOP
Can not ping
W2K3
Gray
SLB Team
192.168.1.102
82:82 (P) 5E:C9
82:83
1
4
5E:CA (P)
1
2
CAM Table:
Eth 1: 82:83 49:C9 (P)
Eth 2: 49:C9
Eth 4: 5E:C9
Top Switch
ARP Table:
.101=82:82
.102=5E:CA
ARP Table:
.100=49:C9
.101=82:82
4
2
49:C8
Bottom Switch
CAM Table:
Eth 1: 82:82
Eth 2: 49:C8
Eth 4: 5E:CA
W2K
Red
SLB Team
192.168.1.100
The addition of a link between the switches allows traffic from/to Blue and Gray to reach each other
without any problems. Note the additional entries in the CAM table for both switches. The link
interconnect is critical for the proper operation of the team. As a result, it is highly advisable to have
a link aggregation trunk to interconnect the two switches to ensure high availability for the
connection.
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4 Broadcom Gigabit Ethernet Teaming Services
141
• Teaming Across Switches With Interconnect
ARP Table:
.100=49:C9
.102=5E:CA
W2K3
Gray
SLB Team
192.168.1.102
W2K
Blue
SLB Team
192.168.1.101
82:82 (P) 5E:C9
82:83
1
24
Top Switch
CAM Table:
Eth 1: 82:83
Eth 2: 49:C9
Eth 4: 5E:C9
Eth 24: 82:82
Eth 24: 49:C8
Eth 24: 5E:CA
Eth 24: A2:12*
5E:CA (P)
1
4
4
24
Bottom Switch
2
CAM Table:
Eth 1: 82:82
Eth 2: 49:C8
Eth 4: 5E:CA
Eth 24: 82:83
Eth 24: 49:C9
Eth 24: 5E:C9
Eth 24: B0:30**
2
49:C9 (P)
ARP Table:
.100=49:C9
.101=82:82
49:C8
W2K
Red
ARP Table:
SLB Team
.101=82:82
192.168.1.100
.102=5E:CA
*Bottom Switch Port24
**Top Switch Port24
MAC Address
MAC Address
"• Teaming Across Switches With Interconnect" (Jpg.142) represents a failover event in which the
cable is unplugged on the Top Switch port 4. This is a successful failover with all stations pinging
each other without loss of connectivity.
• Failover Event
ARP Table:
.100=49:C9
.102=5E:CA
W2K3
Gray
SLB Team
192.168.1.102
W2K
Blue
SLB Team
192.168.1.101
82:82 (P) 5E:C9
82:83
1
24
Top Switch
CAM Table:
Eth 1: 82:83
Eth 2: 49:C9
Eth 24: 82:82
Eth 24: 49:C8
Eth 24: 5E:CA
Eth 24: A2:12*
4
24
Bottom Switch
2
2
49:C9 (P)
ARP Table:
.101=82:82
.102=5E:CA
*Bottom Switch Port24
MAC Address
142
5E:CA (P)
1
4
49:C8
W2K
Red
SLB Team
192.168.1.100
ARP Table:
.100=49:C9
.101=82:82
CAM Table:
Eth 1: 82:82
Eth 2: 49:C8
Eth 4: 5E:CA
Eth 24: 82:83
Eth 24: 49:C9
Eth 24: B0:30**
**Top Switch Port24
MAC Address
4.8.3
Spanning Tree Algorithm
In Ethernet networks, only one active path may exist between any two bridges or switches. Multiple
active paths between switches can cause loops in the network. When loops occur, some switches
recognize stations on both sides of the switch. This situation causes the forwarding algorithm to
malfunction allowing duplicate frames to be forwarded. Spanning tree algorithms provide path
redundancy by defining a tree that spans all of the switches in an extended network and then forces
certain redundant data paths into a standby (blocked) state. At regular intervals, the switches in the
network send and receive spanning tree packets that they use to identify the path. If one network
segment becomes unreachable, or if spanning tree costs change, the spanning tree algorithm
reconfigures the spanning tree topology and re-establishes the link by activating the standby path.
Spanning tree operation is transparent to end stations, which do not detect whether they are connected
to a single LAN segment or a switched LAN of multiple segments.
Spanning Tree Protocol (STP) is a Layer 2 protocol designed to run on bridges and switches. The
specification for STP is defined in IEEE 802.1d. The main purpose of STP is to ensure that you do
not run into a loop situation when you have redundant paths in your network. STP detects/disables
network loops and provides backup links between switches or bridges. It allows the device to interact
with other STP compliant devices in your network to ensure that only one path exists between any
two stations on the network.
After a stable network topology has been established, all bridges listen for hello BPDUs (Bridge
Protocol Data Units) transmitted from the root bridge. If a bridge does not get a hello BPDU after a
predefined interval (Max Age), the bridge assumes that the link to the root bridge is down. This
bridge then initiates negotiations with other bridges to reconfigure the network to re-establish a valid
network topology. The process to create a new topology can take up to 50 seconds. During this time,
end-to-end communications are interrupted.
The use of Spanning Tree is not recommended for ports that are connected to end stations, because by
definition, an end station does not create a loop within an Ethernet segment. Additionally, when a
teamed adapter is connected to a port with Spanning Tree enabled, users may experience unexpected
connectivity problems. For example, consider a teamed adapter that has a lost link on one of its
physical adapters. If the physical adapter were to be reconnected (also known as fallback), the
intermediate driver would detect that the link has been reestablished and would begin to pass traffic
through the port. Traffic would be lost if the port was temporarily blocked by the Spanning Tree
Protocol.
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4.8.4
Topology Change Notice (TCN)
A bridge/switch creates a forwarding table of MAC addresses and port numbers by learning the
source MAC address that received on a particular port. The table is used to forward frames to a
specific port rather than flooding the frame to all ports. The typical maximum aging time of entries in
the table is 5 minutes. Only when a host has been silent for 5 minutes would its entry be removed
from the table. It is sometimes beneficial to reduce the aging time. For example, when a forwarding
link goes to blocking and a different link goes from blocking to forwarding. This change could take
up to 50 seconds. At the end of the STP re-calculation a new path would be available for
communications between end stations. However, because the forwarding table would still have
entries based on the old topology, communications may not be reestablished until after 5 minutes
when the affected ports entries are removed from the table. Traffic would then be flooded to all ports
and re-learned. In this case it is beneficial to reduce the aging time. This is the purpose of a topology
change notice (TCN) BPDU. The TCN is sent from the affected bridge/switch to the root bridge/
switch. As soon as a bridge/switch detects a topology change (a link going down or a port going to
forwarding) it sends a TCN to the root bridge via its root port. The root bridge then advertises a
BPDU with a Topology Change to the entire network.This causes every bridge to reduce the MAC
table aging time to 15 seconds for a specified amount of time. This allows the switch to re-learn the
MAC addresses as soon as STP re-converges.
Topology Change Notice BPDUs are sent when a port that was forwarding changes to blocking or
transitions to forwarding. A TCN BPDU does not initiate an STP recalculation. It only affects the
aging time of the forwarding table entries in the switch.It will not change the topology of the network
or create loops. End nodes such as servers or clients trigger a topology change when they power off
and then power back on.
144
4.8.5
Port Fast/Edge Port
To reduce the effect of TCNs on the network (for example, increasing flooding on switch ports), end
nodes that are powered on/off often should use the Port Fast or Edge Port setting on the switch port
they are attached to. Port Fast or Edge Port is a command that is applied to specific ports and has the
following effects:
• Ports coming from link down to link up will be put in the forwarding STP mode instead of going
from listening to learning and then to forwarding. STP is still running on these ports.
• The switch does not generate a Topology Change Notice when the port is going up or down.
4.8.6
Layer 3 Routing/Switching
The switch that the teamed ports are connected to must not be a Layer 3 switch or router. The ports in
the team must be in the same network.
4.8.7
Teaming with Hubs (for troubleshooting purposes
only)
SLB teaming can be used with 10/100 hubs, but it is only recommended for troubleshooting
purposes, such as connecting a network analyzer in the event that switch port mirroring is not an
option.
4.8.8
Hub Usage in Teaming Network Configurations
Although the use of hubs in network topologies is functional in some situations, it is important to
consider the throughput ramifications when doing so. Network hubs have a maximum of 100 Mbps
half-duplex link speed, which severely degrades performance in either a Gigabit or 100 Mbps
switched-network configuration. Hub bandwidth is shared among all connected devices; as a result,
when more devices are connected to the hub, the bandwidth available to any single device connected
to the hub is reduced in direct proportion to the number of devices connected to the hub.
It is not recommended to connect team members to hubs; only switches should be used to connect to
teamed ports. An SLB team, however, can be connected directly to a hub for troubleshooting
purposes. Other team types can result in a loss of connectivity if specific failures occur and should
not be used with hubs.
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4 Broadcom Gigabit Ethernet Teaming Services
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4.8.9
SLB Teams
SLB teams are the only teaming type not dependant on switch configuration. The server intermediate
driver handles the load balancing and fault tolerance mechanisms with no assistance from the switch.
These elements of SLB make it the only team type that maintains failover and fallback characteristics
when team ports are connected directly to a hub.
SLB Team Connected to a Single Hub
SLB teams configured as shown in "• Team Connected to a Single Hub" (Jpg.146) maintain their
fault tolerance properties. Either server connection could potentially fail, and network functionality is
maintained. Clients could be connected directly to the hub, and fault tolerance would still be
maintained; server performance, however, would be degraded.
• Team Connected to a Single Hub
Laptop
LAN
Desktop
Workstation
Switch
Hub
NIC Team
Server
Generic and Dynamic Trunking (FEC/GEC/IEEE 802.3ad)
FEC/GEC and IEEE 802.3ad teams cannot be connected to any hub configuration. These team types
must be connected to a switch that has also been configured for this team type.
Teaming with Microsoft NLB/WLBS
It is known that the SLB mode of teaming does not work in an NLB unicast environment. It is not
known, however, why the SLB mode should not work in a NLB multicast environment. The SLB
teaming algorithm is mutually exclusive with the NLB unicast mechanism.
146
4.8.10 Troubleshooting Teaming Problems
When running a protocol analyzer over a virtual adapter teamed interface, the MAC address shown in
the transmitted frames may not be correct. The analyzer does not show the frames as constructed by
BASP and shows the MAC address of the team and not the MAC address of the interface transmitting
the frame. It is suggested to use the following process to monitor a team:
• Mirror all uplink ports from the team at the switch.
• If the team spans two switches, mirror the interlink trunk as well.
• Sample all mirror ports independently.
• On the analyzer, use an adapter and driver that does not filter QoS and VLAN information.
Teaming Configuration Tips
When troubleshooting network connectivity or teaming functionality issues, ensure that the following
information is true for your configuration.
• Although mixed-speed SLB teaming is supported, it is recommended that all adapters in a team be
the same speed (either all Gigabit Ethernet or all Fast Ethernet).
• If LiveLink is not enabled, disable Spanning Tree Protocol or enable an STP mode that bypasses
the initial phases (for example, Port Fast, Edge Port) for the switch ports connected to a team.
• All switches that the team is directly connected to must have the same hardware revision, firmware
revision, and software revision to be supported.
• To be teamed, adapters should be members of the same VLAN. In the event that multiple teams are
configured, each team should be on a separate network.
• Do not use the Locally Administered Address on any physical adapter that is a member of a team.
• Remove any static IP address from the individual physical team members before the team is built.
• A team that requires maximum throughput should use LACP or GEC\FEC. In these cases, the
intermediate driver is only responsible for the outbound load balancing while the switch performs
the inbound load balancing.
• Aggregated teams (802.3ad \ LACP and GEC\FEC) must be connected to only a single switch that
supports IEEE 802.3a, LACP or GEC/FEC.
• It is not recommended to connect any team to a hub, as a hub only support half duplex. Hubs
should be connected to a team for troubleshooting purposes only.
• Verify the base (Miniport) and team (intermediate) drivers are from the same release package. The
mixing of base and teaming drivers from different CD releases is not supported.
• Test the connectivity to each physical adapter prior to teaming.
• Test the failover and fallback behavior of the team before placing into a production environment.
• When moving from a nonproduction network to a production network, it is strongly recommended
to test again for failover and fallback.
• Test the performance behavior of the team before placing into a production environment.
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4 Broadcom Gigabit Ethernet Teaming Services
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Troubleshooting Guidelines
Before you call for support, make sure you have completed the following steps for troubleshooting
network connectivity problems when the server is using adapter teaming.
• Make sure the link light is ON for every adapter and all the cables are attached.
• Check that the matching base and intermediate drivers belong to the same release and are loaded
correctly.
• Check for a valid IP Address using the Windows ipconfig command.
• Check that STP is disabled or Edge Port/Port Fast is enabled on the switch ports connected to the
team or that LiveLink is being used.
• Check that the adapters and the switch are configured identically for link speed and duplex.
• If possible, break the team and check for connectivity to each adapter independently to confirm
that the problem is directly associated with teaming.
• Check that all switch ports connected to the team are on the same VLAN.
• Check that the switch ports are configured properly for Generic Trunking (FEC/GEC)/802.3adDraft Static type of teaming and that it matches the adapter teaming type. If the system is configured for an SLB type of team, make sure the corresponding switch ports are not configured for
Generic Trunking (FEC/GEC)/802.3ad-Draft Static types of teams.
Frequently Asked Questions
Question
148
Answer
Under what circumstances is traffic not load
balanced? Why is all traffic not load balanced
evenly across the team members?
The bulk of traffic does not use IP/TCP/UDP or
the bulk of the clients are in a different network.
The receive load balancing is not a function of
traffic load, but a function of the number of
clients that are connected to the server.
What network protocols are load balanced when
in a team?
Broadcom's teaming software only supports IP/
TCP/UDP traffic. All other traffic is forwarded
to the primary adapter.
Which protocols are load balanced with SLB
and which ones are not?
Only IP/TCP/UDP protocols are load balanced
in both directions: send and receive. IPX is load
balanced on the transmit traffic only.
Can I team a port running at 100 Mbps with a
port running at 1000 Mbps?
Mixing link speeds within a team is only
supported for Smart Load Balancing™ teams
and 802.3ad teams.
Can I team a fiber adapter with a copper Gigabit
Ethernet adapter?
Yes with SLB, and yes if the switch allows for it
in FEC/GEC and 802.3ad.
What is the difference between adapter load
balancing and Microsoft's Network Load
Balancing (NLB)?
Adapter load balancing is done at a network
session level, whereas NLB is done at the server
application level.
Question
Answer
Can I connect the teamed adapters to a hub?
Teamed ports can be connected to a hub for
troubleshooting purposes only. However, this
practice is not recommended for normal
operation because the performance would be
degraded due to hub limitations. Connect the
teamed ports to a switch instead.
Can I connect the teamed adapters to ports in a
router?
No. All ports in a team must be on the same
network; in a router, however, each port is a
separate network by definition. All teaming
modes require that the link partner be a Layer 2
switch.
Can I use teaming with Microsoft Cluster
Services?
Yes. Teaming is supported on the public
network only, not on the private network used
for the heartbeat link.
Can PXE work over a virtual adapter (team)?
A PXE client operates in an environment before
the operating system is loaded; as a result,
virtual adapters have not been enabled yet. If
the physical adapter supports PXE, then it can
be used as a PXE client, whether or not it is part
of a virtual adapter when the operating system
loads. PXE servers may operate over a virtual
adapter.
What is the maximum number of ports that can
be teamed together?
Up to eight ports can be assigned to a team.
What is the maximum number of teams that can
be configured on the same server?
Up to four teams can be configured on the same
server.
Why does my team loose connectivity for the
first 30 to 50 seconds after the Primary adapter
is restored (fallback)?
Answer: Because Spanning Tree Protocol is
bringing the port from blocking to forwarding.
You must enable Port Fast or Edge Port on the
switch ports connected to the team or use
LiveLink to account for the STP delay.
Can I connect a team across multiple switches?
Smart Load Balancing can be used with
multiple switches because each physical adapter
in the system uses a unique Ethernet MAC
address. Link Aggregation and Generic
Trunking cannot operate across switches
because they require all physical adapters to
share the same Ethernet MAC address.
How do I upgrade the intermediate driver
(BASP)?
The intermediate driver cannot be upgraded
through the Local Area Connection Properties.
It must be upgraded using the Setup installer.
4 Broadcom Gigabit Ethernet Teaming Services
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149
Question
150
Answer
Can I configure NLB and teaming
concurrently?
Yes, but only when running NLB in a multicast
mode (NLB is not supported with MS Cluster
Services).
Should both the backup server and client
servers that are backed up be teamed?
Because the backup server is under the most
data load, it should always be teamed for link
aggregation and failover. A fully redundant
network, however, requires that both the
switches and the backup clients be teamed for
fault tolerance and link aggregation.
Is there any special configuration required in
the tape backup software or hardware to work
with adapter teaming?
No special configuration is required in the tape
software to work with teaming. Teaming is
transparent to tape backup applications.
How do I know what driver I am currently
using?
In all operating systems, the most accurate
method for checking the driver revision is to
physically locate the driver file and check the
properties.
Can SLB detect a switch failure in a Switch
Fault Tolerance configuration?
No. SLB can only detect the loss of link
between the teamed port and its immediate link
partner. SLB cannot detect link failures on other
ports.
Why does my team lose connectivity for the
first 30 to 50 seconds after the primary adapter
is restored (fall-back after a failover)?
During a fall-back event, link is restored
causing Spanning Tree Protocol to configure the
port for blocking until it determines that it can
move to the forwarding state. You must enable
Port Fast or Edge Port on the switch ports
connected to the team to prevent the loss of
communications caused by STP.
Where do I monitor real time statistics for an
adapter team in a Windows server?
Use the BACS2 to monitor general, IEEE 802.3
and custom counters.
4.9
Event Log Messages
4.9.1
Windows System Event Log messages
The known base and intermediate Windows System Event Log status messages for this product are
listed in "4.9.2 Base Driver (Physical Adapter/Miniport)" (Jpg.151) and "4.9.3 Intermediate Driver
(Virtual Adapter/Team)" (Jpg.153). As a Broadcom adapter driver loads, Windows places a status
code in the system event viewer. There may be up to two classes of entries for these event codes
depending on whether both drivers are loaded (one set for the base or miniport driver and one set for
the intermediate or teaming driver).
4.9.2
Base Driver (Physical Adapter/Miniport)
"• Base Driver Event Log Messages" (Jpg.151) lists the event log messages supported by the base
driver, explains the cause for the message, and provides the recommended action.
• Base Driver Event Log Messages
Message
Number
Message
Cause
Corrective Action
1
Failed to allocate memory
for the device block.
Check system memory
resource usage.
The driver cannot allocate
memory from the
operating system.
Close running applications
to free memory.
2
Failed to allocate map
registers.
The driver cannot allocate
map registers from the
operating system.
Unload other drivers that
may allocate map
registers.
3
Failed to access
configuration information.
Reinstall the network
driver.
The driver cannot access
PCI configuration space
registers on the adapter.
For add-in adapters: reseat
the adapter in the slot,
move the adapter to
another PCI slot, or
replace the adapter.
4
The network link is down.
Check to make sure the
network cable is properly
connected.
The adapter has lost its
connection with its link
partner.
Check that the network
cable is connected, verify
that the network cable is
the right type, and verify
that the link partner (for
example, switch or hub) is
working correctly.
5
The network link is up.
The adapter has
established a link.
Informational message
only.
No action is required.
6
Network controller
configured for 10Mb halfduplex link.
The adapter has been
manually configured for
the selected line speed and
duplex settings.
Informational message
only.
No action is required.
4 Broadcom Gigabit Ethernet Teaming Services
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151
Message
Number
152
Message
Cause
Corrective Action
7
Network controller
configured for 10Mb fullduplex link.
The adapter has been
manually configured for
the selected line speed and
duplex settings.
Informational message
only.
No action is required.
8
Network controller
configured for 100Mb
half-duplex link.
The adapter has been
manually configured for
the selected line speed and
duplex settings.
Informational message
only.
No action is required.
9
Network controller
configured for 100Mb
full-duplex link.
The adapter has been
manually configured for
the selected line speed and
duplex settings.
Informational message
only.
No action is required.
10
Network controller
configured for 1Gb halfduplex link.
The adapter has been
manually configured for
the selected line speed and
duplex settings.
Informational message
only.
No action is required.
11
Network controller
configured for 1Gb fullduplex link.
The adapter has been
manually configured for
the selected line speed and
duplex settings.
Informational message
only.
No action is required.
12
Medium not supported.
The operating system does
not support the IEEE
802.3 medium.
Reboot the operating
system, run a virus check,
run a disk check (chkdsk),
and reinstall the operating
system.
13
Unable to register the
interrupt service routine.
The device driver cannot
install the interrupt
handler.
Reboot the operating
system; remove other
device drivers that may be
sharing the same IRQ.
14
Unable to map IO space.
The device driver cannot
allocate memory-mapped
I/O to access driver
registers.
Remove other adapters
from the system, reduce
the amount of physical
memory installed, and
replace the adapter.
15
Driver initialized
successfully.
The driver has
successfully loaded.
Informational message
only.
No action is required.
16
NDIS is resetting the
miniport driver.
The NDIS layer has
detected a problem
sending/receiving packets
and is resetting the driver
to resolve the problem.
Run BACS2 diagnostics;
check that the network
cable is good.
Message
Number
Message
Cause
Corrective Action
17
Unknown PHY detected.
Using a default PHY
initialization routine.
The driver could not read
the PHY ID.
Replace the adapter.
18
This driver does not
support this device.
Upgrade to the latest
driver.
The driver does not
recognize the installed
adapter.
Upgrade to a driver
version that supports this
adapter.
19
Driver initialization failed.
Unspecified failure during
driver initialization.
Reinstall the driver, update
to a newer driver, run
BACS2 diagnostics, or
replace the adapter.
4.9.3
Intermediate Driver (Virtual Adapter/Team)
The intermediate driver is identified by BLFM regardless of the base driver revision. "• Intermediate
Driver Event Log Messages" (Jpg.153) lists the event log messages supported by the intermediate
driver, explains the cause for the message, and provides the recommended action.
• Intermediate Driver Event Log Messages
Message
Number
Message
Cause
Corrective Action
1
Unable to register with
NDIS.
The driver cannot
register with the NDIS
interface.
Unload any NDIS
drivers.
2
Unable to instantiate the
management interface.
The driver cannot create
a device instance.
Reboot the operating
system.
3
Unable to create
symbolic link for the
management interface.
Another driver has
created a conflicting
device name.
Unload the conflicting
device driver that uses
the name "Blf".
4
Broadcom Advanced
Server Program Driver
has started.
The driver has started.
Informational message
only.
No action is required.
5
Broadcom Advanced
Server Program Driver
has stopped.
The driver has stopped.
Informational message
only.
No action is required.
6
Could not allocate
memory for internal data
structures.
The driver cannot
allocate memory from
the operating system.
Close running
applications to free
memory.
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4 Broadcom Gigabit Ethernet Teaming Services
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Message
Number
154
Message
Cause
Corrective Action
7
Could not bind to
adapter.
The driver could not
open one of the team
physical adapters.
Unload and reload the
physical adapter driver,
install an updated
physical adapter driver,
or replace the physical
adapter.
8
Successfully bind to
adapter.
The driver successfully
opened the physical
adapter.
Informational message
only.
No action is required.
9
Network adapter is
disconnected.
The physical adapter is
not connected to the
network (it has not
established link).
Check that the network
cable is connected,
verify that the network
cable is the right type,
and verify that the link
partner (switch or hub) is
working correctly.
10
Network adapter is
connected.
The physical adapter is
connected to the network
(it has established link).
Informational message
only.
No action is required.
11
Broadcom Advanced
Program Features Driver
is not designed to run on
this version of Operating
System.
The driver does not
support the operating
system on which it is
installed.
Consult the driver
release notes and install
the driver on a supported
operating system or
update the driver.
12
Hot-standby adapter is
selected as the primary
adapter for a team
without a load balancing
adapter.
A standby adapter has
been activated.
Replace the failed
physical adapter.
13
Network adapter does
not support Advanced
Failover.
The physical adapter
does not support the
Broadcom NIC
Extension (NICE).
Replace the adapter with
one that does support
NICE.
14
Network adapter is
enabled via management
interface.
The driver has
successfully enabled a
physical adapter through
the management
interface.
Informational message
only.
No action is required.
Message
Number
Message
Cause
Corrective Action
15
Network adapter is
disabled via
management interface.
The driver has
successfully disabled a
physical adapter through
the management
interface.
Informational message
only.
No action is required.
16
Network adapter is
activated and is
participating in network
traffic.
A physical adapter has
been added to or
activated in a team.
Informational message
only.
No action is required.
17
Network adapter is deactivated and is no
longer participating in
network traffic.
The driver does not
recognize the installed
adapter.
Informational message
only.
No action is required.
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5
Broadcom Advanced Control
Suite 2 (BACS2)
This chapter explains the Broadcom Advanced Control Suite 2 (BACS2).
5.1
BACS2 Overview
BACS2 is an integrated utility that provides useful information about each network adapter that is
installed in your system. BACS2 also enables you to perform detailed tests, diagnostics, and analyses
on each adapter, as well as to view and modify property values and view traffic statistics for each
adapter.
BACS2 contains three panes:
• In the Information/Task pane, users can view available information and perform certain tests, diagnostics, and analysis on a selected device by clicking a specific tab.
• To the left of the Information/Task pane is the Device Name pane, which lists the names of the
individual network adapters and the individual members of teams that have been created.
• A third pane contains the Menu bar.
Broadcom Advanced Server Program (BASP), which runs within Broadcom Advanced Control Suite
2 (BACS2), is used in Expert Mode to configure teams for load balancing, fault tolerance, and virtual
local area networks (VLANs). The Teaming Wizard can also be used to configure teams and VLANs.
BASP functionality is available only on systems that use at least one network adapter.
`
156
Link aggregation is not supported in the Blade Server.
5.1.1
Types of Information Provided by BACS2
BACS2 lists all of the network adapters in your system and provides the following information (if
available) about each adapter:
• Driver Status
• MAC Address
• Link Status
• IP Address
• Memory Address
• Physical Address
• Speed
• Duplex
• Slot No.
• Driver Name
• Driver Version
• Driver Date
• Firmware Version
• ASIC Version
• Bus Type
• Bus No.
• Device No.
• Function No.
• Interrupt Request
• Team Name
• Team Type
• VLAN Name
• VLAN ID
• Properties
The details of a function provided by BACS2 are shown below.
Function
Details
Vital Sign
At-a-glance information on all of the LAN adapters in your system.
J"5.4.1 Vital Sign"(pg.162)
Resources
Shows the resource settings for the selected adapter.
J"5.4.2 Resources"(pg.165)
Hardware
Shows the hardware information for the selected adapter.
J"5.4.3 Hardware"(pg.166)
Advanced
Shows the available properties and their values for the selected adapter.
J"5.4.4 Advanced"(pg.167)
Network Test
Confirms network connectivity to a remote station.
J"5.4.5 Network Test"(pg.170)
Diagnostics
Performs comprehensive diagnostics.
J"5.4.6 Diagnostics"(pg.170)
Statistics
Provides detailed performance statistics for the selected adapter.
J"5.4.7 Statistics"(pg.172)
Resource
Allocations
Displays a pie chart of the allocated TOE, iSCSI, and RDMA connections, as
well as the unallocated and unlicensed resources. Only available with this
product.
`
Licenses
This setting is not supported.
Displays licensing information for the TOE, iSCSI, and RDMA technologies.
Only available with this product.
J"5.4.8 Licenses"(pg.175)
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5 Broadcom Advanced Control Suite 2 (BACS2)
157
5.2
Installing the BACS2
If [Broadcom Control Suite 2] is not displayed in the "Control Panel", install BACS2 according to the
following installation procedures:
`
`
`
Ensure that this product is installed in the Server Blade before installing BACS2.
Before you begin the installation, close all applications, windows, or dialog boxes.
To use TCP/IP Offload Engine (TOE), you must have Windows Server 2003 with Scalable
Networking Pack (SNP)
`
`
158
The installer checks if SNP for Windows Server 2003 is installed on the machine.
If it is installed, the installer installs the NDIS 5.2 driver, which is necessary in order to
use TOE. If SNP for Windows Server 2003 is not installed on the machine,
the installer will install the NDIS 5.1 driver, a user cannot use TOE.
Get the Broadcom Control Suite from the ServerStart CD-ROM included with the
BX620 S4 server blade and install.
If using Broadcom, refer to the operation manual or help file included with the driver.
For Windows Server 2003 x64
1 Start the following EXE file from the ServerStart Disc1 CD-ROM
attached to the BX620 S4.
[CD-ROM drive]: \PROGRAMS\GENERAL\Broadcom\MgmtApps_x64\setup.exe
The installer starts up.
2 Click [Next].
License agreement window appears
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5 Broadcom Advanced Control Suite 2 (BACS2)
159
3 Click "I accept the terms in the license agreement" and click
[Next].
Custom Set up window appears.
4 Click [Next].
Proceed the installation by following the window instructions.
160
For Windows Server 2003, Windows 2000 Server
` If the OS is installed using ServerStart, "BACS2" is already installed with the driver.
If the OS is installed manually, BACS2 will not be installed.
1 Start the following EXE file from the ServerStart Disc1 CD-ROM
attached to the BX620 S4.
[CD-ROM drive]: \PROGRAMS\GENERAL\Broadcom\MgmtApps\setup.exe
The installer starts up.
2 Proceed the installation by following the window instructions.
When the window below appears during the installation procedure, check [BASP] and click
[Next].
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5 Broadcom Advanced Control Suite 2 (BACS2)
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5.3
Starting BACS2
To start BACS2, click "Control Panel" → "Broadcom Control Suite 2".
Click the tab that provides the information of interest or from which to perform a desired test,
diagnostic, analysis, or set adapter properties.
To create a team, from the "Tools" menu, click [Create a Team], which starts the Teaming Wizard.
5.4
Setting of BACS2
5.4.1
Vital Sign
The "Vital Sign" tab shows useful information about 1Gbit/s Ethernet I/O Module, Onboard LAN,
and other network adapters that are installed in your system. Such information includes the link status
of the adapter and network connectivity. To view this information for each network adapter, click the
name of the adapter listed in the "Name" pane.
`
`
Information about Intel LAN card is less comprehensive than the information provided for
this product.
Some information may not be available for all network adapters.
Item
MAC Address
162
Description
This is the physical MAC address that is assigned to the adapter by
the manufacturer. The physical address is never all 0s.
Permanent MAC Address
The unique hardware address assigned to the network adapter.
IP Address
The network address that is associated with the adapter. If the IP
address is all 0s, this means that the associated driver has not been
bound with Internet Protocol (IP).
Item
Driver Status
Description
The status of the adapter driver
Loaded
Normal operating mode. The adapter driver has been loaded by
Windows and is functioning.
Not Loaded
The driver associated with the adapter has not been loaded by
Windows.
Information Not
Available
The value is not obtainable from the driver that is associated with the
adapter.
Driver Name/Version/Date
The file name of the adapter driver.
LiveLink IP Address
The network address of the LiveLink enabled adapter.
Offload Capabilities
The offload capabilities supported by the adapter.
LSO
Large Send Offload prevents an upper level protocol such as TCP
from breaking a large data packet into a series of smaller packets
with headers appended to them.
CO
Checksum Offload allows the TCP/IP/UDP checksums for send and
receive traffic to be calculated by the adapter hardware rather than
by the host CPU.
BASP State
Information about the status of the BASP application. This
information is displayed only when there is a team (J"1.3.3
Teaming Function"(pg.109)).
Network Status
The following network status information is provided.
Item
Description
Link Status
The indicator is green if a link is established. A red indicator means
that a link is not established.
Speed
The link speed of the adapter
Duplex
The duplex mode in which the adapter is operating
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163
Team Status
The team status is indicated by the appearance of the icons representing the team and the team
members. If the adapter icon shows only the adapter, the adapter is connected to a network, but is not
correctly participating in the team, which corresponds to a Not Active BASP state. This condition
does not apply to an adapter that is a standby member of a team. The standby adapter may be working
properly even though it is Not Active.
If the adapter icon shows a superimposed running yellow figure, the adapter is connected and
participating in the team correctly, which corresponds to an Active BASP state.
If the adapter icon shows a superimposed red letter X, the adapter is not connected to the network.
164
5.4.2
Resources
The following information can be checked on the "Resources" tab.
`
Some information may not be available for all network adapters.
Item
Bus Type
Description
The type of input/output (I/O) interconnect used by the adapter
Bridge
The bridge type, which is the PCI-E to PCI-X bridge.
Bridge Lanes
The number of PCI-E lanes connected to the bridge.
Bridge Speed
The clock speed on PCI-E bus.
Slot No
The slot number on the system board occupied by the adapter.
Bus Speed (MHz)
The bus clock signal frequency used by the adapter.
Bus Width (bit)
The number of bits that the bus can transfer at a single time to and from the
adapter.
Bus No
Indicates the number of the bus in which the adapter is installed
Device No
The number assigned to the adapter by the operating system
Function No
The port number of the adapter. For a single-port adapter, the function number
is 0. For a two-port adapter, the function number for the first port is 0, and the
function number for the second port is 1.
Interrupt Request
The interrupt line number that is associated with the adapter. Valid numbers
range from 2 to 25.
Memory Address
The memory mapped address that is assigned to the adapter. This value can
never be 0.
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5.4.3
Hardware
The following information can be checked on the "Hardware" tab.
`
Some information may not be available for all network adapters.
Item
166
Description
ASIC Version
The chip version of the Broadcom adapter (this information is not
available for adapters made by others).
Boot Code 1 Version
The version of boot code 1.
Boot Code 2 Version
The version of boot code 2.
Vendor ID
The vendor ID.
Device ID
The adapter ID.
Subsystem Vendor ID
The subsystem vendor ID.
Subsystem ID
The subsystem ID.
5.4.4
Advanced
The following information can be checked on the "Advanced" tab.
The "Advanced" tab allows you to view and change the values of the available properties of the
selected adapter. The potentially available properties and their respective settings are described
below. To view the value of a property, click the name of the property in the "Property" list. The
property value is displayed in the "Value" box. To change the value, click an item in the "Value" list
or type a new value, as appropriate (selection options are different for different properties).
`
`
`
You must have administrator privileges to change the values for a property.
The list of available properties for your particular adapter may be different.
Some properties may not be available for all network adapters.
Item
802.1p QOS
Description
The 802.1p QOS property enables quality of service, which is an Institute
of Electrical and Electronics Engineering (IEEE) specification that treats
different types of network traffic differently to ensure required levels or
reliability and latency according to the type of traffic. This property is
disabled by default. Unless the network infrastructure supports QoS, do
not enable QoS. Otherwise, problems may occur.
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Item
168
Description
Checksum Offload
Normally, the checksum function is computed by the protocol stack.
When you select one of the Checksum Offload property values (other than
None), the checksum can be computed by the network adapter.
• Rx TCP/IP Checksum
Enables receive TCP/IP/UDP checksum offload.
• Tx TCP/IP Checksum
Enables transmit TCP/IP/UDP checksum offload.
• Tx/Rx TCP/IP Checksum (default)
Enables transmit and receive TCP/IP/UDP checksum offload.
• None
Disables checksum offload.
Flow Control
The Flow Control property enables or disables the receipt or transmission
of PAUSE frames. PAUSE frames enable the network adapter and a
switch to control the transmit rate. The side that is receiving the PAUSE
frame momentarily stops transmitting.
• Auto (default)
PAUSE frame receipt and transmission are optimized.
• Disable
PAUSE frame receipt and transmission are disabled.
• Rx PAUSE
PAUSE frame receipt is enabled.
• Rx/Tx PAUSE
PAUSE frame receipt and transmission are enabled.
• Tx PAUSE
PAUSE frame transmission is enabled.
Large Send Offload
Normally the TCP segmentation is done by the protocol stack. When you
enable the Large Send Offload property, the TCP segmentation can be
done by the network adapter.
• Disable
Disables Large Send Offload
• Enable. (default)
Enables Large Send Offload
Item
Description
Locally Administered
Address
The Locally Administered Address is a user-defined MAC address that is
used in place of the MAC address originally assigned to the network
adapter. Every adapter in the network must have its own unique MAC
address. This locally administered address consists of a 12-digit
hexadecimal number.
• Value
Assigns a unique node address for the adapter
• Not Present (default)
Uses the factory-assigned node address on the adapter
The appropriate assigned ranges and exceptions for the locally
administered address include the following:
• The range is 00:00:00:00:00:01 to FF:FF:FF:FF:FF:FD.
• Do not use a multicast address (least significant bit of the high byte =
1).
• Do not use all 0s or all F's.
Maximum Transfer
Unit
The Maximum Transfer Unit property allows the network adapter to
transmit and receive oversized Ethernet frames that are greater than 1514
bytes, but less than or equal to 9000 bytes in length. This property
requires the presence of a switch that is able to process jumbo frames.
Frame size is set at 1500 bytes by default. To increase the size of the
received frames, increment the byte quantity in 500-byte increments.
Speed & Duplex
The Speed & Duplex property sets the connection speed and mode to that
of the network. Note that Full-Duplex mode allows the adapter to transmit
and receive network data simultaneously.
• 10 Mb Full
Sets the speed at 10 Mbit/s and the mode to Full-Duplex
• 10 Mb Half
Sets the speed at 10 Mbit/s and the mode to Half-Duplex
• 100 Mb Full
Sets the speed at 100 Mbit/s and the mode to Full-Duplex
• 100 Mb Half
Sets the speed at 100 Mbit/s and the mode to Half-Duplex
• Auto
Sets the speed and mode for optimum network connection802.1p QOS
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5.4.5
Network Test
On the "Network Test" tab, you can verify IP network connectivity. This test verifies if the driver is
installed correctly and tests connectivity to a gateway or other specified IP address on the same
subnet. Network Test uses TCP/IP. The network test sends ICMP packets to remote systems and waits
for a response. If a gateway is configured, the test automatically sends packets to that system. If a
gateway is not configured or if the gateway is unreachable, the test prompts you for a destination IP
address.
5.4.6
Diagnostics
On the "Diagnostics" tab, you can perform diagnostic tests on the physical components of a network
adapter. The tests are continuously performed. The number of passes and fails in the "Pass/Fail"
column increments each time the tests are performed. For example, if a test is performed four times
and there are no fails, the value in the "Pass/Fail" column is 4/0. If there were 3 passes and 1 fail,
however, the value in the "Pass/Fail" column is 3/1.
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You must have Windows administrator privileges to perform diagnostics.
The network connection is temporarily lost when these tests are running.
Item
Description
Control Registers
This test verifies the read and write capabilities of the network adapter
registers by writing various values to the registers and verifying the
results. The adapter driver uses these registers to perform network
functions such as sending and receiving information. A test failure
indicates that the adapter may not be working properly.
MII Registers
This test verifies the read and write capabilities of the registers of the
physical layer (PHY). The physical layer is used to control the electrical
signals on the wire and for configuring network speeds such as 1000
Mbit/s.
EEPROM
This test verifies the content of the electrically erasable programmable
read-only memory (EEPROM) by reading a portion of the EEPROM and
computing the checksum. The test fails if the computed checksum is
different from the checksum stored in the EEPROM. An EEPROM image
upgrade does not require a code change for this test.
Internal Memory
This test verifies that the internal memory of the adapter is functioning
properly. The test writes patterned values to the memory and reads back
the results. The test fails if an erroneous value is read back. The adapter
cannot function if its internal memory is not functioning properly.
On-Chip CPU
This test verifies the operation of the internal CPUs in the adapter.
Interrupt
This test verifies that the Network Device Driver Interface Specification
(NDIS) driver is able to receive interrupts from the adapter.
Loopback MAC and
Loopback PHY
These tests verify that the NDIS driver is able to send packets to and
receive packets from the adapter.
Test LED
This test causes all of the port LEDs to blink 5 times for the purpose of
identifying the adapter.
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5.4.7
Statistics
On the "Statistics" tab, you can view traffic statistics for both Broadcom network adapters and
network adapters made by others. Statistical information and coverage are more comprehensive for
Broadcom adapters.
`
Some statistics may not be available for all network adapters.
General Statistics
Item
172
Description
Frames Tx. OK
A count of the frames that were successfully transmitted. This counter is
incremented when the transmit status is reported as Transmit OK.
Frames Rx. OK
A count of the frames that were successfully received. This does not
include frames received with frame-too-long, frame check sequence
(FCS), length, or alignment errors, or frames lost due to internal MAC
sublayer errors. This counter is incremented when the receive status is
reported as Receive OK.
Directed Frames Tx
A count of directed data frames that were successfully transmitted
Multicast Frames Tx.
A count of frames that were successfully transmitted (as indicated by the
status value Transmit OK) to a group destination address other than a
broadcast address.
Broadcast Frames Tx.
A count of frames that were successfully transmitted (as indicated by the
transmit status Transmit OK) to the broadcast address. Frames transmitted
to multicast addresses are not broadcast frames and therefore, are
excluded.
Directed Frames Rx.
A count of directed data frames that were successfully received.
Item
Description
Multicast Frames Rx.
A count of frames that were successfully received and are directed to an
active nonbroadcast group address. This does not include frames received
with frame-too-long, FCS, length, or alignment errors, or frames lost
because of internal MAC sublayer errors. This counter is incremented as
indicated by the Receive OK status.
Broadcast Frames Rx. A count of frames that were successfully received and are directed to a
broadcast group address. This count does not include frames received
with frame-too-long, FCS, length, or alignment errors, or frames lost
because of internal MAC sublayer errors. This counter is incremented as
indicated by the Receive OK status.
Frames Rx. with CRC
Error
The number of frames received with CRC errors.
IEEE 802.3 Statistics
Item
Description
Frames Rx. with
Aligment Error
A count of the frames that were not an integral number of octets in length
and do not pass the FCS check. This counter is incremented when the
receive status is reported as Alignment Error.
Frames Tx. with One
Collision
A count of the frames that were involved in a single collision and were
subsequently transmitted successfully. This counter is incremented when
the result of a transmission is reported as Transmit OK, and the attempt
value is 2.
Frames Tx. with more
than One Collision
A count of the frames that were involved in more than one collision and
were subsequently transmitted successfully. This counter is incremented
when the transmit status is reported as Transmit OK, and the value of the
attempts variable is greater than 2 and less than or equal to the attempt
limit.
Frames Tx. after
Deferral
A count of the frames that were delayed being transmitted on the first
attempt because the medium was busy. The frames involved in any
collision are not counted.
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Custom Statistics
Item
174
Description
Out of Recv. Buffer
The number of times the adapter ran out of Receive Buffer Descriptors.
Frames size less than
64-byte with bad FCS
The number of frames with a size less than 64 bytes with bad FCS.
MAC Rx w/ Pause
Command and
Length = 0
MAC control frames with the pause command and a length equal to 0.
MAC Rx w/ Pause
Command and
Length greater than 0
MAC control frames with the pause command and a length greater than 0.
MAC Rx w/ no Pause
Command
MAC control frames with no pause command.
MAC Sent X-on
MAC Transmit with X-on was on.
MAC Sent X-off
MAC Transmit with X-on was off.
Large Send Offload
Transmit Requests
The number of times the adapter was requested to transmit a packet
performing TCP segmentation.
5.4.8
Licenses
On the "Licenses" tab, you can view the number of connections available for TOE, iSCSI, and
RDMA offload technologies. You can also upgrade your license for additional connections.
`
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The "Licenses" tab is only available for this product.
Not all offload technologies are available with all adapters.
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5.5
Configuring Teaming
The teaming function allows you to group any available network adapters together to function as a
team. Teaming is a method of creating a virtual LAN (a group of multiple adapters that functions as a
single adapter). The benefit of this approach is that it enables load balancing and failover. Teaming is
done through the Broadcom Advanced Server Program (BASP) software. For a comprehensive
description of the technology and implementation considerations of the teaming software, refer to
J"4 Broadcom Gigabit Ethernet Teaming Services"(pg.119)
Teaming can be accomplished by either of the following methods:
• Using the Broadcom Teaming Wizard
J"5.5.2 Creating and Modifying a Team Using the Teaming Wizard"(pg.177)
• Using Expert Mode
J"5.5.3 Using Expert Mode"(pg.186)
If you do not enable LiveLink™ when configuring teams, disabling Spanning Tree Protocol
(STP) at the switch is recommended. This minimizes the downtime due to spanning tree
loop determination when failing over. LiveLink mitigates such issues.
` BASP does not support Microsoft Network Load Balancing (NLB).
` The Large Send Offload (LSO), and Checksum Offload properties are enabled for a team
only when all of the members support and are configured for the feature.
` You must have administrator privileges to create or modify a team.
` The load balance algorithm in a team environment in which members are connected at
different speeds favors members connected with a Gigabit Ethernet link over members
connected at lower speed links (100 Mbps or 10 Mbps) until a threshold is met. This is
normal behavior.
For more details about Teaming, refer to "1.3.3 Teaming Function" (Jpg.109).
`
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Link aggregation is not supported in the Blade Server.
5.5.1
Using the Broadcom Teaming Wizard
You can use the Broadcom Teaming Wizard to create a team, configure an existing team if a team has
already been created, or create a VLAN.
5.5.2
Creating and Modifying a Team Using the Teaming
Wizard
1 On the BACS2 "Tools" menu, click "Create a Team".
`
If you prefer to work without the wizard for now, click [Expert Mode] and then click
[Next]. If you want to always use Expert Mode to create a team, select "Default to
Expert Mode on next start" and then click [Next]. Refer to "5.5.3 Using Expert
Mode" (Jpg.186).
2 To continue using the wizard, click [Next].
3
Type the team name and then click [Next].
• If you want to review or change any of your settings, click [Back].
• Click [Cancel] to discard your settings and exit the wizard.
`
The team name cannot exceed 39 characters, cannot begin with spaces, and
cannot contain any of the following characters: & \ / : * ? < > |
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4 Select the type of team you want to create and then click [Next].
If the team type is an SLB type team, click [Next]. If the team type is not an SLB type team,
then a dialog box appears.
Verify that the network switch connected to the team members is configured correctly for the
team type, click [OK], and continue.
5 From the "Available Adapters" list, click the adapter you want to
add to the team and then click [Add].
Remove team members from the "Team Members" list by clicking the adapter and then
clicking [Remove]. Click [Next].
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There must be at least one network adapter assigned to the team.
The Large Send Offload (LSO) and Checksum Offload (CO) columns indicate if the LSO
and/or the CO properties are supported (Y) or not supported (N) for the adapter. The LSO and
CO properties are enabled for a team only when all of the members support and are
configured for the feature. If this is the case, then the team offload capabilities appear on the
bottom of the screen.
6 If you want to designate one of the adapters as a standby member
(optional), then click "Use the following member as a standby
member".
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7 Select the standby member from the list of adapters.
The Auto-Fallback Disable mode feature allows the team to continue using the standby
member rather than switching back to the primary member if the primary member comes
back online.
To enable this feature, click "Enable Auto-Fallback Disable mode" and then click [Next].
The Auto-Fallback Disable mode feature is enabled, LiveLink cannot be used.
8 If you want to configure LiveLink, click [Yes] and then click [Next].
If you do not want to configure LiveLink, click [No], and click [Next].
9 Set the probe interval (the number of seconds between each
retransmission of a link packet to the probe target) and the
maximum number of probe retries (the number of consecutively
missed responses from a probe target before a failover is
triggered).
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10 Click the probe target at the top of the list, click "Edit Target IP
Address", type the target IP address in the "IP Address" box for
one or all probe targets, and then click [OK]. Click [Next].
`
Only the first probe target is required. You can specify up to three additional probe
targets to serve as backups by assigning IP addresses to the other probe targets.
11 Click a listed team member, click "Edit Member IP Address", and
then type the member IP address in the IP Address box. Repeat
for all listed team members and then click [OK]. Click [Next].
`
All of the member IP addresses must be in the same subnet as the subnet of the
probe targets.
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12 If you want to create a VLAN on the team, click [Yes] and then click
[Next].
If you do not want to create a VLAN to the team, click [No], click [Next], and continue with
the wizard from the "Finish" screen (refer to Step 17 of this procedure).
VLANs enable you to add multiple virtual adapters that are on different subnets. The benefit
of this is that your system can have one network adapter that can belong to multiple subnets.
`
VLANs can only be created when all team members are Broadcom adapters.
13 Type the VLAN name and then click [Next].
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`
The team name cannot exceed 39 characters, cannot begin with spaces, and
cannot contain any of the following characters: & \ / : * ? < > |
14 To tag the VLAN, click "Tagged" and then click [Next].
Otherwise, click "Untagged", click [Next], and continue with the wizard to add additional
VLANs (refer to Step 16 of this procedure).
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15 Type the VLAN tag value and then click [Next].
The value must be between 1 and 4094.
16 Click [Yes] to add another VLAN and then click [Next].
Repeat until you do not want to add any additional VLANs.
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You can define up to 64 VLANs per team (63 VLANs that are tagged and 1 VLAN
that is not tagged). Adding several VLANS may slow down the reaction time of the
Windows interface due to memory and processor time usage for each VLAN. The
degree to which Windows performance may suffer depends on system
configuration.
17 To apply and commit the changes to the team, click "Commit
changes and return to Broadcom Advanced Control Suite 2" and
then click [Finish].
To preview the changes to the team in BACS2, click "Preview changes in Broadcom
Advanced Control Suite 2" and then click [Finish].
The wizard exits and BACS2 opens.
18 Click [Finish] to commit the changes.
Click [Cancel] to discard the changes.
Click the team to view the team's statistics from the "Statistics" tab and the team properties
from the "Team Properties" tab.
Click the VLAN to view the properties of the VLAN from the "Vital Signs" tab.
j
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5.5.3
Using Expert Mode
Use Expert Mode to create a team, modify a team, add a VLAN, and configure LiveLink for a Smart
Load Balance and Failover team. To create a team using the wizard, refer to "5.5.2 Creating and
Modifying a Team Using the Teaming Wizard" (Jpg.177). To switch to the Teaming Wizard from
the BACS2 "Tools" menu, click "Customize". Select the "Default Teaming Mode" tab and select
"Wizard Mode".
Creating a Team
`
Enabling Dynamic Host Configuration Protocol (DHCP) is not recommended for members
of an SLB type of team.
1 Click the BACS2 "Tools" menu → "Create a Team".
The wizard's Welcome screen appears.
2 To work without the wizard, click "Expert Mode".
`
186
If you want to always use Expert Mode to create a team, check "Default to Expert
Mode on next start". Click [Next].
3 Type a team name in the "Enter a name you will use to identify this
team" box, and click the type of team, and then click [Next].
4 Assign any available adapter or adapters to the team by moving
the adapter from the "Available Adapters" list to the "Load Balance
Members" list.
5 Assign any other available adapter or adapters to the team by
moving the adapter from the "Available Adapters" list to the
"Standby Member" list.
`
There must be at least one network adapter assigned to the team.
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6 Click [Yes] when the message is displayed indicating that the
network connection will be temporarily interrupted.
`
`
`
`
The team name cannot exceed 39 characters, cannot begin with spaces, and
cannot contain any of the following characters: & \ / : * ? < > |
Team names must be unique. If you attempt to use a team name more than once,
an error message is displayed indicating that the name already exists.
The maximum number of team members is 8.
When team configuration has been correctly performed, a virtual team adapter
driver is created for each configured team.
• When you create Generic Trunking and Link Aggregation teams, you cannot designate a
standby member.
Standby members work only with Smart Load Balancing and Failover and SLB (AutoFallback Disable) types of teams.
• For an SLB (Auto-Fallback Disable) team, to restore traffic to the load balance members
from the standby member, click the Fallback button on the "Team Properties" tab.
7 Configure the team IP address.
1. Click "Control Panel" → "Network Connections".
2. Right-click the name of the team to be configured, and then click "Properties".
3. On the "General" tab, click "Internet Protocol (TCP/IP)", and then click
"Properties".
4. Configure the IP address and any other necessary TCP/IP configuration for the
team, and then click [OK] when finished.
Modifying a Team
After you have created a team, you can modify the team in the following ways:
• Change the type of team
• Change the members assigned to the team
• Add a VLAN
• Modify a VLAN (using Expert Mode)
• Remove a team or a VLAN (using Expert Mode)
188
The following shows how to modify a team.
1 Click the BACS2 "Tools" menu → "Create a Team".
The wizard Welcome screen appears.
2 Click [Next] to continue modifying a team using the wizard or click
[Expert Mode] to work in Expert Mode.
3 Make the desired changes, and then click [OK].
4 Click [Apply].
5 Click [Yes] when the message is displayed indicating that the
network connection will be temporarily interrupted.
Adding a VLAN
You also can add virtual LANs (VLANs) to a team. This enables you to add multiple virtual adapters
that are on different subnets. The benefit of this is that your system can have one network adapter that
can belong to multiple subnets. With a VLAN, you can couple the functionality of load balancing for
the load balance members, and you can employ a failover adapter.
You can define up to 64 VLANs per team (63 VLANs that are tagged and 1 VLAN that is not
tagged). VLANs can only be created when all teams members are Broadcom adapters. If you try to
create a VLAN with a non-Broadcom adapter, an error message is displayed.
The following shows how to configure a team with a VLAN.
1 Click the name of the team you want to configure.
2 From the "Team Properties" tab, click [Add VLAN].
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3 Type the VLAN ID and VLAN name, and click [Apply].
`
If you type a VLAN name or ID and the name already exists, an error message is
displayed.
4 Click [Yes] when the message is displayed indicating that the
network connection will be temporarily interrupted.
`
To maintain optimum adapter performance, your system should have 64 MB of system
memory for each of the eight VLANs created per adapter.
Viewing VLAN Properties and Running VLAN Tests
The following shows how to view VLAN properties and to run VLAN tests.
1 Click the name of the VLAN adapter of interest.
2 Click the "Vital Sign" tab to view the properties of the VLAN
adapter.
3 Click the "Network Test" tab to run a network test on the VLAN
adapter.
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Deleting a VLAN
To delete a VLAN, right-click the VLAN and select "Remove VLAN".
1 Click the "Tools" menu → "Configure a Team".
If there is more than one team, click the name of the team that has the VLAN you want to
delete, and then click [OK].
2 Click [Remove VLAN].
3 Click [Apply].
Click [Yes] when the message is displayed indicating that the network connection will be
temporarily interrupted.
`
If you delete a team, any VLANs configured for that team are also deleted.
Configuring LiveLink for a Smart Load Balancing and Failover Team
Read the following notes before you attempt to configure LiveLink.
`
`
`
`
`
Before you begin configuring LiveLink™, review the description of LiveLink. Also verify that
each probe target you plan to specify is available and working. If the IP address of the probe
target changes for any reason, LiveLink must be reconfigured. If the MAC address of the
probe target changes for any reason, you must restart the team. (J"4.8.10 Troubleshooting
Teaming Problems"(pg.147).
A probe target must be on the same subnet as the team, have a valid (not a broadcast,
multicast, or unicast), statically-assigned IP address, and be highly available (always on).
To ensure network connectivity to the probe target, ping the probe target from the team.
You can specify up to four probe targets.
The IP address assigned to either a probe target or team member cannot have a zero as
the first or last octet.
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The following shows how to configure a LiveLink.
1 Right-click the name of the Smart Load Balance and Failover (SLB)
team, and then click "Configure LiveLink".
2 Check the "Enable LiveLink" box.
It is recommended to accept the default values for "Probe interval" (the number of seconds
between each retransmission of a link packet to the probe target) and "Probe maximum
retries" (the number of consecutively missed responses from a probe target before a failover
is triggered).
To specify different values, click the desired probe interval in the "Probe interval (seconds)"
list and click the desired maximum number of probe retries in the "Probe maximum retries"
list.
3 Click the probe target at the top of the list, click "Edit Target IP
Address", type the target IP address for one or all probe targets in
the "IP Address" box, and then click [OK].
`
192
Only the first probe target is required. You can specify up to 3 additional probe
targets to serve as backups by assigning IP addresses to the other probe targets.
4 Click one of the listed team members, click "Edit Member IP
Address", type the member IP address in the "IP Address" box,
and then click [OK].
`
All of the member IP addresses must be in the same subnet as the subnet for the
probe targets.
5 Repeat step 4 for each of the other listed team members.
6 Click [Apply].
Configuring LiveLink in VLAN-tagged Environments
CAUTION
• For the teams with VLANs (on which LiveLink is enabled): to be able to
communicate with the probe target, both the probe target and the team must be
on an untagged VLAN (VLAN ID 0). Otherwise, the team loses connectivity.
1 Ensure that the team has an untagged VLAN (VLAN ID 0).
2 Ensure there is network connectivity between the team and the
probe target on the untagged VLAN.
3 Right-click the name of the SLB team with VLAN(s), and then click
"Configure LiveLink".
4 Click the "Enable LiveLink" box.
5 Click the "desired probe interval" (the number of seconds between
each retransmission of the link packet to the probe target) in the
"Probe interval (seconds)" list.
6 Click the desired maximum number of probe retries in the "Probe
maximum retries" list.
7 Click the probe target at the top of the list, click "Edit Target IP
Address", type the target IP address in the "IP Address" box, and
then click [OK].
`
It is not necessary to specify more than one probe target. If you do want to specify
more than one, for each additional probe target (up to a total of 4), click the next
probe target in the list, type the target IP address in the "IP Address" box, and then
click [OK].
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8 Click one of the listed team members, click "Edit Member IP
Address", type the member IP address in the "IP Address" box,
and then click [OK].
`
All of the member IP addresses must be in the same subnet as the subnet for the
probe targets.
9 Repeat step 8 for each of the other listed team members.
10 Click [Apply].
Viewing the Team Properties and Statistics
The following shows how to view the team properties and statistics.
1 Click the name of the newly created team.
2 Click the "Statistics" tab to view the team statistics.
Saving and Restoring a Configuration
The following shows how to save a configuration.
1 Click the "File" menu → "Team Save As".
2 Type the path and file name of the new configuration file, and then
click "Save".
A .bcg extension is added. The configuration file is a text file that can be viewed by any text
editor. The file contains information about both the adapter and the team configuration.
The following shows how to restore a configuration.
1 Click the "File" menu → "Team Restore".
2 Click the name of the file to be restored, and then click [Open].
`
If necessary, go to the folder where the file is located.
3 Click [Apply].
4 Click [Yes] when the message is displayed indicating that the
network connection will be temporarily interrupted.
If a configuration is already loaded, a message is displayed that asks if you want to save your
current configuration.
Click [Yes] to save the current configuration. Otherwise, the configuration data that is
currently loaded is lost.
194
Appendix A Contact
Information
• Australia:
Fujitsu Australia Limited
Tel: +61-2-9776-4555
Fax: +61-2-9776-4556
Address: 2 Julius Avenue (Cnr Delhi Road) North Ryde, Australia N.S.W. 2113
• China:
Fujitsu (China) Holdings Co., Ltd.
Tel: +86-21-5292-9889
Fax: +86-21-5292-9566
Address: 18F, Citic Square, 1168 West Nanjing Road Shanghai, China 200041
• Hong Kong:
Fujitsu Hong Kong Limited
Tel: +852-2827-5780
Fax: +852-2827-4724
Address: 10/F., Lincoln House, 979 King's Road Taikoo Place, Island East, Hong Kong
• Indonesia:
PT. Fujitsu Systems Indonesia Offices Headquarters
Tel: +62-21-570-9330 (Hunting)
Fax: +62-21-573-5150
Address: Wisma Kyoei Prince 10th Floor Jl. Jend. Sudirman Kav 3-4 Jakarta,
Indonesia 10220
• Korea:
Fujitsu Korea Ltd.
Tel: +82-2-3787-6000
Fax: +82-2-3787-6066
Address: Susong Tower Building, 83-1 Susong-Dong Jongno-Gu, Seoul,
Republic of Korea 110-140
• Malaysia:
Fujitsu (Malaysia) Sdn. Bhd.
Tel: +60-3-8318-3700
Fax: +60-3-8318-8700
Address: 1st Floor, No.3505 Jalan Technokrat 5 63000 Cyberjaya, Selangor Darul Ehsan Malaysia
• Philippines:
Fujitsu Philippines, Inc.
Tel: +63-2-812-4001
Fax: +63-2-817-7576
Address: 2nd Floor, United Life Building, A. Arnaiz Legaspi Village, Makati, Metro
Manila Philippines
Appendix A Contact Information
E
195
• Singapore:
Fujitsu Asia Pte. Ltd.
Tel: +65-6777-6577
Fax: +65-6771-5502
Address: 20, Science Park Road, #03-01 TeleTech Park, Singapore Science Park II,
Singapore 117674
• Taiwan:
Fujitsu Taiwan Limited
Tel: +886-2-2311-2255
Fax: +886-2-2311-2277
Address: 19F, No.39, Section 1, Chung hwa Road Taipei, Taiwan
• Thailand:
Fujitsu Systems Business (Thailand) Ltd.
Tel: +66-2-500-1500
Fax: +66-2-500-1555
Address: 12th Floor, Olympia Thai Tower, 444 Rachadapisek Road Samsennok, Huaykwang,
Bangkok, Thailand 10310
• Vietnam:
Fujitsu Vietnam Limited
Tel: +84-4-831-3895
Fax: +84-4-831-3898
Address: Unit 802-8th floor, Fortuna Tower Hanoi 6B Lang ha Street, Ba dinh District, Hanoi
Socialist Republic of Vietnam
• United States:
Fujitsu Computer Systems Corporation
Tel: +1-800-831-3183
Fax: +1-408-496-0575
Address: 1250 East Arques Avenue, Sunnyvale, CA USA 94088-3470
For the latest information, refer to the Fujitsu PRIMERGY website (http://primergy.fujitsu.com).
196
PRIMERGY
LAN 拡張ボード(1Gbps)
(PG-LND201)
取扱説明書
1Gbit/s Ethernet I/O Module
(PG-LND201)
User’s Guide
B7FY-2091-01-00
発行日
発行責任
2007 年 5 月
富士通株式会社
Issued on
Issued by
May, 2007
FUJITSU LIMITED
Printed in Japan
● 本書の内容は、改善のため事前連絡なしに変更することがあります。
● 本書に記載されたデータの使用に起因する、第三者の特許権およびその他の
権利の侵害については、当社はその責を負いません。
● 無断転載を禁じます。
● 落丁、乱丁本は、お取り替えいたします。
• The contents of this manual may be revised without prior notice.
• Fujitsu assumes no liability for damages to third party copyrights or other rights
arising from the use of any information in this manual.
• No part of this manual may be reproduced in any form without the prior written
permission of Fujitsu.
• Any manual which has missing pages or which is incorrectly collated will be
replaced.
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