User`s guide | Fujitsu M5000 Security Camera User Manual

Administration Guide
SPARC Enterprise
M4000 / M5000 / M8000 / M9000 Servers
English
SPARC® Enterprise
M4000/M5000/M8000/M9000
Servers Administration Guide
Order No. U41680-J-Z816-3-76
Part No. 819-7897-12
November 2007, Revision A
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L’ABSENCE DE CONTREFACON.
Contents
Preface
1.
xvii
Introduction to Server Software and Configuration
XSCF Firmware
1
Solaris OS Software
Software Services
2
3
Preparing for System Configuration
Information Needed
Related Information
Access Control
5
6
7
About Access Control
7
Logging in to the System
XSCF User Accounts
XSCF Passwords
Privileges
4
4
Initial Configuration Tasks
2.
8
8
9
9
XSCF Firmware Update
11
XSCF Shell Procedures for Access Control
▼
1
11
To Log in Initially to the XSCF Console
12
v
▼
To Configure an XSCF Password Policy
▼
To Add an XSCF User Account
▼
To Create a Password for an XSCF User
▼
To Assign Privileges to an XSCF User
▼
To Display the Version of Installed Firmware
Related Information
3.
14
14
14
15
15
16
System Configuration
17
About System Services
17
DSCP Network Between a Service Processor and a Domain
XSCF Network Interfaces
Domain Name Service
LDAP Service
19
21
21
Time Synchronization and NTP Service
SNMP Service
23
25
Additional Services
26
HTTPS Service
26
Telnet Service
26
SMTP Service
26
SSH Service
27
Altitude Setting
27
XSCF Shell Procedures for System Configuration
vi
18
27
▼
To Configure the DSCP Network
▼
To Display DSCP Network Configuration
▼
To Configure the XSCF Network Interfaces
▼
To Configure the XSCF Network Route Information
▼
To Set Or Reset the XSCF Network
▼
To Display XSCF Network Configuration
▼
To Set the Service Processor Host Name and DNS Domain Name
28
29
30
31
31
SPARC Enterprise Mx000 Servers Administration Guide • November 2007
32
32
▼
To Set the Service Processor’s DNS Name Server
▼
To Enable or Disable Use of an LDAP Server for Authentication and
Privilege Lookup 33
▼
To Configure the XSCF as an LDAP Client
▼
To Configure the XSCF as an NTP Client
35
▼
To Configure the XSCF as an NTP Server
35
▼
To Display the NTP Configuration
▼
To Set the Timezone, Daylight Saving Time, Date, and Time Locally on the
Service Processor 36
▼
To Create a USM User Known to the SNMP Agent
37
▼
To Display USM Information for the SNMP Agent
38
▼
To Create a VACM Group
▼
To Create a VACM View
▼
To Give a VACM Group Access to a VACM View
▼
To Display VACM Information for the SNMP Agent
▼
To Configure the SNMP Agent to Send Version 3 Traps to Hosts
▼
To Enable the SNMP Agent
▼
To Display SNMP Agent Configuration
▼
To Enable or Disable the Service Processor HTTPS Service
▼
To Enable or Disable the Service Processor Telnet Service
▼
To Configure the Service Processor SMTP Service
▼
To Enable or Disable the Service Processor SSH Service
▼
To Generate a Host Public Key for SSH Service
▼
To Set the Altitude on the Service Processor
Related Information
4.
34
36
38
38
39
39
40
41
41
42
43
43
43
44
44
45
Domain Configuration
About Domains
33
47
47
Domains and System Boards
Domain Resource Assignment
48
53
Contents
vii
Domain Component List and Logical System Boards
Overview of Steps for Domain Configuration
Domain Configuration Example
Domain Communication
DSCP Network
54
55
55
57
58
Accessing a Domain Console from the Service Processor
Logging in Directly to a Domain
58
DVD Drive or Tape Drive Assignment
Backup and Restore Operations
Dynamic Reconfiguration
58
59
59
XSCF Shell Procedures for Domain Configuration
To Specify the XSB Mode
▼
To Set Up a Domain Component List
▼
To Assign an XSB to a Domain
▼
To Power On a Domain
▼
To Display System Board Status
▼
To Access a Domain From the XSCF Console
▼
To Attach a DVD or Tape Drive While the Solaris OS Is Running
(M8000/M9000 Servers) 62
▼
To Disconnect a DVD or Tape Drive While the Solaris OS Is Running
(M8000/M9000 Servers) 62
60
60
60
61
65
65
Audit Records
66
Audit Events
66
Audit Classes
67
Audit Policy
59
64
Audit Configuration
About Auditing
67
Audit File Tools
viii
59
▼
Related Information
5.
58
68
SPARC Enterprise Mx000 Servers Administration Guide • November 2007
61
XSCF Shell Procedures for Auditing
▼
To Enable or Disable Writing of Audit Records to the Audit Trail
▼
To Configure an Auditing Policy
▼
To Display Whether Auditing is Enabled Or Disabled
▼
To Display Current Auditing Policy, Classes, or Events
Related Information
6.
68
About Log Archiving
Log Archiving Errors
71
74
74
Using the snapshot Tool
74
Solaris OS Procedures for Log Archiving
74
To Configure the Log Archive Host
XSCF Shell Procedures for Log Archiving
74
75
▼
To Enable Log Archiving
▼
To Disable Log Archiving
▼
To Display Log Archiving Configuration and Status
▼
To Display Log Archiving Error Details
75
75
76
76
76
Capacity on Demand
77
About Capacity on Demand
COD Boards
69
71
Archive Host Requirements
Related Information
69
71
Using the Log Archiving Facility
7.
68
69
Log Archiving Facility
▼
68
77
78
COD License Purchase
License Installation
License Allocation
79
79
80
Headroom Management
81
Contents
ix
License Violations
82
XSCF Shell Procedures for Using COD
▼
To Install a COD License
83
▼
To Delete a COD License
83
▼
To Reserve Licenses for Allocation
84
▼
To Increase or Decrease Headroom
85
▼
To Disable Headroom
▼
To Display COD Information
▼
To Display COD License Status
▼
To Display Usage Statistics for COD Resources
Related Information
A.
82
86
86
87
90
Mapping Device Path Names
91
Device Mapping and Logical System Board Numbers
CPU Mapping
89
91
91
CPU Numbering Examples
I/O Device Mapping
93
94
I/O Device Mapping on the M4000 and M5000 Servers
Internal Devices on the M4000 and M5000 Servers
95
I/O Device Mapping on the M8000 and M9000 Servers
Internal Devices on the M8000 and M9000 Servers
Sample cfgadm Output and IOU Device Matrix
Index
x
97
98
SPARC Enterprise M4000 and M5000 Servers
99
SPARC Enterprise M8000 and M9000 Servers
100
Glossary
103
107
SPARC Enterprise Mx000 Servers Administration Guide • November 2007
95
96
Figures
FIGURE 2-1
Location of the Operator Panel MODE Switch on a Midrange Server
12
FIGURE 2-2
Operator Panel on a High-end Server
FIGURE 3-1
Relationship of the Service Processor and the DSCP Network to the Domains
FIGURE 4-1
A Physical System Board in Uni-XSB Mode on an M4000 Midrange Server
FIGURE 4-2
A Physical System Board in Uni-XSB Mode on a High-End Server
FIGURE 4-3
A Physical System Board in Quad-XSB Mode on a Midrange Server
50
FIGURE 4-4
A Physical System Board in Quad-XSB Mode on a High-End Server
50
FIGURE 4-5
Example of XSBs and Solaris Domains on a High-End Server
FIGURE 6-1
Log Archiving
13
18
48
49
52
73
xi
xii
SPARC Enterprise Mx000 Servers Administration Guide • November 2007
Tables
TABLE 1-1
Software Services
3
TABLE 2-1
User Privileges
TABLE 3-1
XSCF Network Interfaces
20
TABLE 3-2
LDAP LDIF File Attributes
22
TABLE 3-3
XSCF and Domain Time Synchronization
TABLE 4-1
Boards, Domains, and Domain ID Numbers
TABLE 4-2
Resource Assignment in Quad-XSB Mode on an M4000 Midrange Server
53
TABLE 4-3
Resource Assignment in Quad-XSB Mode on an M5000 Midrange Server
53
TABLE 4-4
Resource Assignment in Quad-XSB Mode on a High-end Server
TABLE A-1
LSB Numbers and Starting Processor Numbers
TABLE A-2
LSB Numbers and Device Path Values
TABLE A-3
I/O Device Mapping on a Midrange Server
TABLE A-4
Internal Devices and Device Paths on the M4000 and M5000 Servers
TABLE A-5
Internal Devices and Device Paths on the M5000 Server
TABLE A-6
I/O Device Mapping on a High-end Server
TABLE A-7
Internal Devices and Device Paths on a High-end Server
TABLE A-8
cfgadm Device Matrix for Midrange Servers
99
TABLE A-9
cfgadm Device Matrix for High-End Servers
101
10
24
51
54
92
94
95
95
96
96
97
xiii
xiv
SPARC Enterprise Mx000 Servers Administration Guide • November 2007
Code Examples
CODE EXAMPLE 3-1
LDAP Schema
22
CODE EXAMPLE 3-2
Sample LDAP LDIF File Attributes
CODE EXAMPLE 3-3
Sample ntp.conf File for a Domain using XSCF as NTP Server
22
24
xv
xvi
SPARC Enterprise Mx000 Servers Administration Guide • November 2007
Preface
The SPARC Enterprise M4000/M5000/M8000/M9000 Servers Administration Guide
describes the system configuration procedures, which focuses on the initial settings
of the SPARC Enterprise M4000/M5000/M8000/M9000 servers. This document
describes the settings of service processors which embedded in the SPARC
Enterprise M4000/M5000/M8000/M9000 servers and also refers to the settings of
the SolarisTM Operating System, accompanied by the service processors settings.
This document targets at every model of the SPARC Enterprise
M4000/M5000/M8000/M9000 servers; however, in some parts, describes the content
specific to the model, such as the midrange (SPARC Enterprise M4000/M5000)
servers or the high-end (SPARC Enterprise M8000/M9000) servers. Please refer to
the part relevant to the model in use.
To better understand the content of this document, it is recommended to read the
following manuals together.
■
About the hardware:
The SPARC Enterprise M8000/M9000 Servers Overview Guide or the SPARC
Enterprise M4000/M5000 Servers Overview Guide
■
About the eXtended System Control Facility (XSCF) firmware in the service
processor:
SPARC Enterprise M4000/M5000/M8000/M9000 Servers XSCF User’s Guide
SPARC Enterprise M4000/M5000/M8000/M9000 Servers XSCF Reference Manual
This section includes:
■
“Audience” on page xviii“
■
“Structure and Contents of This Manual” on page xviii
■
“SPARC Enterprise Mx000 Servers Documentation” on page xix
■
“Abbreviated References to Other Documents” on page xxi
■
“Models” on page xxii
■
“Text Conventions” on page xxiii
■
“Prompt Notations” on page xxiii
Preface
xvii
■
“Syntax of the Command Line Interface (CLI)” on page xxiv
■
“Software License” on page xxiv
■
“Fujitsu Siemens Computers Welcomes Your Comments” on page xxv
Audience
This manual is intended for users, who administrate SPARC Enterprise
M4000/M5000/M8000/M9000 servers (hereinafter referenced to as XSCF user). The
XSCF user is required to have the following knowledge:
■
SolarisTM Operating System and Unix command
■
SPARC Enterprise M4000/M5000/M8000/M9000 servers and basic knowledge of
XSCF
Structure and Contents of This Manual
This manual is organized as described below:
■
Chapter 1
This chapter provides an introduction to the system software and
configuration.
■
Chapter 2
This chapter describes access control, including log in, user accounts,
passwords, and privileges.
■
Chapter 3
This chapter describes initial configuration of services and networks.
■
Chapter 4
This chapter contains information on domains and domain communication.
■
Chapter 5
This chapter describes auditing functionality.
■
Chapter 6
This chapter describes the log archiving feature.
xviii
SPARC Enterprise Mx000 Servers Administration Guide • November 2007
■
Chapter 7
This chapter covers capacity on demand (COD) and licenses.
■
Appendix A
This appendix contains information on mapping device path names.
Glossary and Index
■
Glossary
The glossary explains the terms used in this manual
■
Index
The index provides keywords and corresponding reference page numbers so
that the reader can easily search for items in this manual as necessary.
SPARC Enterprise Mx000 Servers
Documentation
The manuals listed below are provided for reference..
Book Titles
Order No.
SPARC Enterprise M4000/M5000 Servers Site Planning Guide
U41674-J-Z816-x-76
SPARC Enterprise M8000/M9000 Servers Site Planning Guide
U41685-J-Z816-x-76
SPARC Enterprise Equipment Rack Mounting Guide
U41711-J-Z816-x-76
SPARC Enterprise M4000/M5000 Servers Getting Started Guide
U41719-J-Z816-x-76
SPARC Enterprise M8000/M9000 Servers Getting Started Guide
U41717-J-Z816-x-76
SPARC Enterprise M4000/M5000 Servers Overview Guide
U41675-J-Z816-x-76
SPARC Enterprise M8000/M9000 Servers Overview Guide
U41686-J-Z816-x-76
Important Safety Information for Hardware Systems
U41715-J-Z816-x-76
SPARC Enterprise M4000/M5000 Servers Safety and Compliance Guide
U41676-J-Z816-x-76
SPARC Enterprise M8000/M9000 Servers Safety and Compliance Guide
U41687-J-Z816-x-76
External I/O Expansion Unit Safety and Compliance Guide
U41716-J-Z816-x-76
SPARC Enterprise M4000 Server Unpacking Guide
U41720-J-Z816-x-76
Preface
xix
Book Titles
Order No.
SPARC Enterprise M5000 Server Unpacking Guide
U41728-J-Z816-x-76
SPARC Enterprise M8000/M9000 Servers Unpacking Guide
U41718-J-Z816-x-76
SPARC Enterprise M4000/M5000 Servers Installation Guide
U41677-J-Z816-x-76
SPARC Enterprise M8000/M9000 Servers Installation Guide
U41688-J-Z816-x-76
SPARC Enterprise M4000/M5000 Servers Service Manual
U41678-J-Z816-x-76
SPARC Enterprise M8000/M9000 Servers Service Manual
U41689-J-Z816-x-76
External I/O Expansion Unit Installation and Service Manual
U41679-J-Z816-x-76
SPARC Enterprise M4000/M5000/M8000/M9000 Servers Administration
Guide
U41680-J-Z816-x-76
SPARC Enterprise M4000/M5000/M8000/M9000 Servers XSCF User’s
Guide
U41681-J-Z816-x-76
SPARC Enterprise M4000/M5000/M8000/M9000 Servers XSCF Reference
Manual
U41682-J-Z816-x-76
SPARC Enterprise M4000/M5000/M8000/M9000 Servers Dynamic
Reconfiguration (DR) User’s Guide
U41684-J-Z816-x-76
SPARC Enterprise M4000/M5000/M8000/M9000 Servers Capacity on
Demand (COD) User’s Guide
U41693-J-Z816-x-76
SPARC Enterprise M4000/M5000 Servers Product Notes
U4173x-J-Z816-x-76
SPARC Enterprise M8000/M9000 Servers Product Notes
U4173x-J-Z816-x-76
External I/O Expansion Unit Product Notes
U41740-J-Z816-x-76
Note – "x" in the order number is the version number of the manual.
1. Manuals on the Web
The latest versions of all the SPARC Enterprise Series manuals are available at the
following website. The latest manuals can be downloaded in a batch.
http://manuals.fujitsu-siemens.com/
2. Provided in system
Man page of the XSCF
Note – The man page can be referenced on the XSCF Shell, and it provides the same
content as the SPARC Enterprise M4000/M5000/M8000/M9000 Servers XSCF Reference
Manual.
3. Documentation and Supporting on the Web
xx
SPARC Enterprise Mx000 Servers Administration Guide • November 2007
The latest information about other documents and the supporting of the SPARC Enterprise
series are provided on the website.
a. Message
http://www.fujitsu.com/sparcenterprise/msg/
b. Downloading the firmware program
You can download the latest files of firmware at the following website.
http://www.fujitsu.com/sparcenterprise/firmware/
The following files or document are provided.
i. Firmware program file (XSCF Control Package (XCP) file)
ii. XSCF extension MIB definition file
Note – XSCF Control Package (XCP) : XCP is a package which has the control programs
of hardware that configures a computing system. The XSCF firmware and the OpenBoot
PROM firmware are included in the XCP file.
c. Fault Management MIB (SUN-FM-MIB) definition file
http://src.opensolaris.org/source/xref/onnv/onnvgate/usr/src/lib/fm/libfmd_snmp/mibs/
d. Solaris Operating System Related Manuals
http://docs.sun.com
Abbreviated References to Other
Documents
In this manual, the following abbreviated titles may be used when referring to a
systems manual. The following table lists the abbreviations used in this manual
Preface
xxi
Abbreviated Title
Full Title
Overview Guide
SPARC Enterprise M4000/M5000 Servers Overview Guide
SPARC Enterprise M8000/M9000 Servers Overview Guide
Service Manual
SPARC Enterprise M4000/M5000 Servers Service Manual
SPARC Enterprise M8000/M9000 Servers Service Manual
Installation Guide
SPARC Enterprise M4000/M5000 Servers Installation Guide
SPARC Enterprise M8000/M9000 Servers Installation Guide
XSCF User’s Guide
SPARC Enterprise M4000/M5000/M8000/M9000 Servers XSCF User’s
Guide
XSCF Reference Manual
SPARC Enterprise M4000/M5000/M8000/M9000 Servers XSCF
Reference Manual
Dynamic Reconfiguration
User’s Guide
SPARC Enterprise M4000/M5000/M8000/M9000 Servers Dynamic
Reconfiguration (DR) User’s Guide
Models
The model names used in this manual are as follows.
xxii
Server class
Model name
Midrange
SPARC Enterprise M4000
SPARC Enterprise M5000
High-end
SPARC Enterprise M8000
SPARC Enterprise M9000
SPARC Enterprise Mx000 Servers Administration Guide • November 2007
Text Conventions
This manual uses the following fonts and symbols to express specific types of
information.
Fonts/symbols
Meaning
Example
AaBbCc123
What you type, when contrasted
with on-screen computer output.
This font represents the example of
command input in the frame.
XSCF> adduser jsmith
AaBbCc123
The names of commands, files, and
directories; on-screen computer
output.
This font represents the example of
command input in the frame.
User Name:
Privileges:
Italic
Indicates the name of a reference
manual
See the XSCF User's Guide.
""
Indicates names of chapters,
sections, items, buttons, or menus
See Chapter 2, "Preparation for
Installation."
jsmith
useradm
auditadm
Prompt Notations
The following prompt notations are used in this manual.
Shell
Prompt Notations
XSCF
XSCF>
C shell
machine-name%
C shell super user
machine-name#
Bourne shell and Korn shell
$
Bourne shell and Korn shell
super user
#
OpenBoot PROM
ok
Preface
xxiii
Syntax of the Command Line Interface
(CLI)
The command syntax is described below.
Command syntax
The command syntax is as follows:
■
A variable that requires input of a value must be enclosed in <>.
■
An optional element must be enclosed in [ ].
■
A group of options for an optional keyword must be enclosed in [ ] and delimited
by |.
■
A group of options for a mandatory keyword must be enclosed in {} and
delimited by |.
■
The command syntax is shown in a frame such as this one.
Example:
XSCF> showuser -l
Software License
The function to explain in this manual uses the softwares of GPL, LGPL and others.
For the information of the license, see Appendix E, "Software License Condition" in
SPARC Enterprise M4000/M5000/M8000/M9000 Servers XSCF User’s Guide
xxiv
SPARC Enterprise Mx000 Servers Administration Guide • November 2007
Fujitsu Siemens Computers Welcomes
Your Comments
We would appreciate your comments and suggestions to improve this document.
You can submit your comments by using “Reader's Comment Form” on page xxvi
Preface
xxv
Reader's Comment Form
xxvi
SPARC Enterprise Mx000 Servers Administration Guide • November 2007
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Preface
xxvii
xxviii SPARC Enterprise Mx000 Servers Administration Guide • November 2007
CHAPTER
1
Introduction to Server Software and
Configuration
This chapter provides an overview of the SPARC® Enterprise
M4000/M5000/M8000/M9000 server software and configuration. It has these
sections:
■
XSCF Firmware
■
Solaris OS Software
■
Software Services
■
Preparing for System Configuration
■
Related Information
Note – This manual documents both the midrange (M4000 and M5000) and the
high-end (M8000 and M9000) servers. This manual covers initial system
configuration only. (See “Initial Configuration Tasks” on page 5.) When you have
completed the initial configuration, refer to the SPARC Enterprise
M4000/M5000/M8000/M9000 Servers XSCF User’s Guide for day-to-day system
administration and management tasks.
XSCF Firmware
Your server provides system management capabilities through eXtended System
Controller Facility (XSCF) firmware, pre-installed at the factory on the Service
Processor1 boards.
1. The Service Processor is sometimes referred to as the XSCF Unit, or XSCFU.
1
The XSCF firmware consists of system management applications and two user
interfaces to configure and control them:
■
XSCF Web, a browser-based graphical user interface
■
XSCF Shell, a terminal-based command-line interface
You can access the XSCF firmware by logging in to the XSCF command shell. This
document includes instructions for using the XSCF interface as part of the initial
system configuration. For more information about the XSCF firmware, refer to
Chapter 2 and to the SPARC Enterprise M4000/M5000/M8000/M9000 Servers XSCF
User’s Guide.
XSCF firmware, OpenBoot™ PROM firmware, and power-on self-test (POST)
firmware are known collectively as the XSCF Control Package (XCP).
XSCF firmware has two networks for internal communication. The Domain to
Service Processor Communications Protocol (DSCP) network provides an internal
communication link between the Service Processor and the Solaris domains. The
Inter-SCF Network (ISN) provides an internal communication link between the two
Service Processors in a high-end server.
On a high-end server with two Service Processors, one Service Processor is
configured as active and the other is configured as standby. This redundancy of two
Service Processors allows them to exchange system management information and, in
case of failover, to change roles. All configuration information on the active Service
Processor is available to the standby Service Processor.
Solaris OS Software
The Solaris OS is pre-installed at the factory on one domain by default. Within its
domain, the Solaris OS includes features to manage Solaris OS system capabilities.
Note – The XSCF firmware requires that all domains have the SUNWsckmr and
SUNWsckmu.u packages. Since the Core System, Reduced Network, and Minimal
System versions of the Solaris OS do not automatically install these packages, you
must do so on any domains that do not already have them.
You can install applications on the domains. That process is managed through the
Solaris OS tools. Likewise, any other software management applications that you
prefer to use on the domains must be installed through the Solaris OS tools.
The DSCP network provides an internal communication link between the Service
Processor and the Solaris domains.
2
SPARC Enterprise Mx000 Servers Administration Guide • November 2007
Software Services
TABLE 1-1 contains an overview of XSCF firmware services and networks that are
part of your server, and where they are documented.
TABLE 1-1
Software Services
Service
Description
Access control
Access control includes logging in to the system, user accounts, passwords,
privileges, and XSCF firmware control.
Refer to Chapter 2.
Initial system
configuration
Initial configuration of the services for the Service Processor and the domains,
including DSCP network, XSCF network, DNS name service, LDAP service, NTP
service, HTTPS service, Telnet service, SSH service, SNMP service, and SMTP
service.
Refer to Chapter 3.
Domain configuration
Each domain runs its own copy of the Solaris OS. Domains are managed by the
Service Processor XSCF firmware, and communicate with the Service Processor over
the DSCP network. You can access a domain console from the Service Processor or,
if your system is networked, log in to a domain directly.
Refer to Chapter 4.
Auditing
The auditing function logs all security-related events.
Refer to Chapter 5.
Log archiving
The log archiving function allows you to set up a remote host to automatically
receive and store log data from your server.
Refer to Chapter 6.
Capacity on demand
(COD)
Capacity on Demand is an option that allows you to purchase spare processing
capacity for your server. The spare capacity is provided in the form of one or more
CPUs on COD boards that are installed on your server. To use the CPU processing
capacity, you must purchase a license. The XSCF firmware allows you to set up and
manage COD.
Refer to Chapter 7.
Security
Security is provided through access control (user names, passwords, privileges),
audit logs of security-related events, and various security protocols. Your server is
secure by default. That is, other than setting up user accounts and privileges, no
initial configuration has to be done related to security. For example, no insecure
protocols, such as Telnet, are initially enabled.
Refer to Chapter 2, Chapter 5.
Chapter 1
Introduction to Server Software and Configuration
3
TABLE 1-1
Software Services (Continued)
Service
Description
Fault management
No initial configuration is needed.
• Domain fault management includes CPU, memory, and I/O (PCI/PCIe) nonfatal
errors. All nonfatal errors are reported to the Solaris OS, which will attempt to
take faulty CPUs offline or to retire faulty memory pages. Fatal errors are
generally handled by the Service Processor.
• Service Processor fault management includes fatal CPU, memory, and I/O errors
(the Service Processor will exclude the faulty components upon reboot), as well as
environmental monitoring (power supplies, fan speeds, temperatures, currents)
and the External I/O Expansion Unit.
Refer to the Solaris OS documentation collection.
Hot-replacement
operations
No initial configuration is needed.
PCI cards can be removed and inserted while your server continues to operate. The
Solaris OS cfgadm command is used to unconfigure and disconnect a PCI card.
Refer to the Service Manual; Solaris OS documentation collection.
External I/O Expansion
Unit management
No initial configuration is needed.
The External I/O Expansion Unit is a rack mountable PCI card chassis.
Refer to the External I/O Expansion Unit Installation and Service Manual.
Preparing for System Configuration
This section lists the information needed for initial system configuration and the
initial configuration tasks.
Information Needed
Before you configure the software, have the following available:
■
Access to the Service Processor with the appropriate privileges for your tasks.
More information about access is contained in Chapter 2.
4
■
An unused range of IP addresses for the internal DSCP network between the
Service Processor and the domains.
■
Network configuration information for the Service Processor, including IP
addresses, netmask, DNS server, default route, NFS server.
SPARC Enterprise Mx000 Servers Administration Guide • November 2007
■
The number of domains in your system. By default, there is one domain and its
domain number is 0 (zero). The number of domains could be different from the
default if you specified another number of domains when you ordered your
system.
■
Firmware version information if you are upgrading the XSCF firmware.
■
Information for optional services that you are going to use, such as Lightweight
Directory Access Protocol (LDAP) information for authentication.
Initial Configuration Tasks
Initial configuration requires these tasks:
1. Logging in to the Service Processor with the default log-in name over a serial
connection. You must have physical access to the system.
2. Adding at least one user account with a minimum of one privilege, useradm.
This user with useradm privileges can then create the rest of the user accounts.
3. Configuring the DSCP network.
4. Configuring the XSCF network.
5. Setting the Service Processor time. The Service Processor can be an NTP client, or
an NTP client and NTP server for the domains.
6. Configuring or enabling any optional services you want to use immediately.
These services include Telnet, SNMP, SMTP, LDAP, NTP, HTTPS, DNS, SSH,
domains, log archiving, and COD.
Chapter 1
Introduction to Server Software and Configuration
5
Related Information
For additional information on this chapter’s topics, see:
Resource
Information
man pages (see Note following this table)
fmdump(8), fmadm(8), fmstat(8), version(8),
cfgadm(1M)
Site Planning Guide
Site planning
SPARC Enterprise M4000/M5000/M8000/M9000 Servers
XSCF User’s Guide
System configuration and administration
Solaris OS documentation collection
Solaris OS, including fault management
Service Manual
Hot-replacement operations, fault management
External I/O Expansion Unit Installation and Service
Manual
PCI card chassis
Note – man pages available on the Service Processor are followed by (8), for
example, version(8); they are also available in the SPARC Enterprise
M4000/M5000/M8000/M9000 Servers XSCF Reference Manual. Solaris OS man pages
available on the domains are followed by (1M), for example, cfgadm(1M).
6
SPARC Enterprise Mx000 Servers Administration Guide • November 2007
CHAPTER
2
Access Control
Access control is a way of granting access to the system functions or components
only to those users who have been authenticated by the system and who have
appropriate privileges. Access control depends on the proper configuration of the
general security services provided by the server.
This chapter contains these sections:
■
About Access Control
■
XSCF Shell Procedures for Access Control
■
Related Information
About Access Control
The Service Processor is an appliance. In an appliance model, users or management
agents can access the Service Processor and its components only through authorized
user interfaces. Users and agents cannot access any of the underlying operating
system interfaces, and users cannot install individual software components on the
Service Processor.
These sections provide details on access control:
■
Logging in to the System
■
XSCF User Accounts
■
XSCF Passwords
■
Privileges
■
XSCF Firmware Update
7
Logging in to the System
There are two entities that can be logged in to on the system, a Service Processor and
a Solaris domain.
You initially log in to the Service Processor using a serial connection from a terminal
device. A terminal device can be an ASCII terminal, a workstation, or a PC. For
details on serial port connections, see the Installation Guide for your server or the
SPARC Enterprise M4000/M5000/M8000/M9000 Servers XSCF User’s Guide.
A unique login account with the user name of default exists on the Service
Processor. This account is unique in the following ways:
■
It can never be logged in to using the standard UNIX user name and password
authentication or SSH public key authentication.
■
It can only be logged in to using a procedure that requires physical access to the
system.
■
Its privileges are fixed to be useradm and platadm; you cannot change these
privileges.
■
It cannot be deleted, it has no password, and no password can be set for it.
After initial configuration, you can log in to the Service Processor using a serial
connection or an Ethernet connection. You can redirect the XSCF console to a domain
and get a Solaris console. You can also log in to a domain directly using an Ethernet
connection to access the Solaris OS.
When a user logs in, the user establishes a session. Authentication and user
privileges are valid only for that session. When the user logs out, that session ends.
To log back in, the user must be authenticated once again, and will have the
privileges in effect during the new session. See “Privileges” on page 9 for
information on privileges.
XSCF User Accounts
A user account is a record of an individual user that can be verified through a user
name and password.
When you initially log in to the system, add at least one user account with a
minimum of one privilege, useradm. This user with useradm privileges can then
create the rest of the user accounts. For a secure log in method, enable SSH service.
Refer to “To Enable or Disable the Service Processor SSH Service” on page 43 and to
“To Generate a Host Public Key for SSH Service” on page 44 for more information.
8
SPARC Enterprise Mx000 Servers Administration Guide • November 2007
Note – You cannot use the following user account names, as they are reserved for
system use: root, bin, daemon, adm, operator, nobody, sshd, rpc, rpcuser, ldap,
apache, ntp, admin, and default.
XSCF supports multiple user accounts for log in to the Service Processor. The user
accounts are assigned privileges; each privilege allows the user to execute certain
XSCF commands. By specifying privileges for each user, you can control which
operations each XSCF user is allowed to perform. On its own, a user account has no
privileges. To obtain permission to run XSCF commands and access system
components, a user must have privileges.
You can set up the Service Processor to use an LDAP server for authentication
instead. To use LDAP, the Service Processor must be set up as an LDAP client. For
information about setting up the Service Processor to use the LDAP service, refer to
“LDAP Service” on page 21. If you are using an LDAP server for authentication, the
user name must not be in use, either locally or in LDAP.
XSCF Passwords
User passwords are authenticated locally by default unless you are using an LDAP
server for authentication.
Site-wide policies, such as password nomenclature or expiration dates, make
passwords more difficult to guess. You can configure a password policy for the
system using the setpasswordpolicy command. The setpasswordpolicy
command describes the default values for a password policy.
If you have lost password access to your system, use the procedure “To Log in
Initially to the XSCF Console” on page 12.
Privileges
Privileges allow a user to perform a specific set of actions on a specific set of
components. Those components can be physical components, domains, or physical
components within a domain.
Chapter 2
Access Control
9
The system provides the predefined privileges shown in TABLE 2-1. These are the
only privileges allowed in the server. You cannot define additional privileges.
TABLE 2-1
User Privileges
Privilege
Capabilities
none
None. When the local privilege for a user is set to none, that user has no privileges,
even if privileges for that user are defined in LDAP. Setting a user’s local privilege to
none prevents the user’s privileges from being looked up in LDAP.
useradm
Can
Can
Can
Can
platadm
Can perform all Service Processor configuration other than the useradm and auditadm
tasks.
Can assign and unassign hardware to or from domains.
Can perform domain and Service Processor power operations.
Can perform Service Processor failover operations on systems with more than one
Service Processor.
Can perform all operations on domain hardware.
Can view all platform states.
platop
Can view all platform states.
domainadm
Can perform all operations on hardware assigned to the domain(s) on which this
privilege is held.
Can perform all operations on the domain(s) on which this privilege is held.
Can view all states of the hardware assigned to the domain(s) on which this privilege is
held.
Can view all states of the domain(s) on which this privilege is held.
domainmgr
Can perform domain power operations.
Can view all states of the hardware assigned to the domain(s) on which this privilege is
held.
Can view all states of the domain(s) on which this privilege is held.
domainop
Can view all states of the hardware assigned to the domain(s) on which this privilege is
held.
Can view all states of the domain(s) on which this privilege is held.
auditadm
Can configure auditing.
Can delete audit trail.
auditop
Can view all audit states and the audit trail.
fieldeng
Can perform all operations reserved for field engineers.
10
create, delete, disable, and enable user accounts.
change a user’s password and password properties.
change a user’s privileges.
view all platform states.
SPARC Enterprise Mx000 Servers Administration Guide • November 2007
The domainadm, domainmgr, and domainop privileges must include the domain
number, numbers, or range of numbers to associate with a particular user account.
A user can have multiple privileges, and a user can have privileges on multiple
domains.
User privileges are authenticated locally by default. You can set up the Service
Processor to use an LDAP server for authentication instead. For information about
setting up the Service Processor to use the LDAP service, refer to “LDAP Service” on
page 21.
If no privileges are specified for a user, no local privilege data will exist for that user;
however, the user’s privileges can be looked up in LDAP, if LDAP is being used. If a
user’s privileges are set to none, that user does not have any privileges, regardless
of privilege data in LDAP.
XSCF Firmware Update
The Service Processor firmware can only be updated as an entire image, known as an
XCP image. The image includes the XSCF firmware, OpenBoot PROM firmware,
POST firmware, and miscellaneous files. Only valid images authorized by Sun
Microsystems or Fujitsu can be installed.
The XCP image is installed in the Service Processor flash memory. You need
platadm or fieldeng privilege to update an XCP image. More information on
updating an XCP image is contained in the SPARC Enterprise
M4000/M5000/M8000/M9000 Servers XSCF User’s Guide.
XSCF Shell Procedures for Access
Control
This section describes these procedures:
■
To Log in Initially to the XSCF Console
■
To Add an XSCF User Account
■
To Create a Password for an XSCF User
■
To Configure an XSCF Password Policy
■
To Assign Privileges to an XSCF User
■
To Display the Version of Installed Firmware
Chapter 2
Access Control
11
▼ To Log in Initially to the XSCF Console
This procedure can be used for initial login or for lost password access.
1. Log in to the XSCF console with the default login name from a terminal device
connected to the Service Processor1. You must have physical access to the
system.
serial port log-in prompt: default
You are prompted to toggle the Operator Panel MODE switch (keyswitch) on the
front of the system. The location of the MODE switch on a midrange server is
shown in FIGURE 2-1. The MODE switch on a high-end server is mounted
horizontally rather than vertically, as shown in FIGURE 2-2. The MODE switch has
two positions: Service and Locked.
1. For details on serial port connections, see the Installation Guide for your server or the SPARC Enterprise
M4000/M5000/M8000/M9000 Servers XSCF User’s Guide.
12
SPARC Enterprise Mx000 Servers Administration Guide • November 2007
FIGURE 2-1
Location of the Operator Panel MODE Switch on a Midrange Server
LED status indicators
POWER button
MODE switch
FIGURE 2-2
Operator Panel on a High-end Server
You must toggle the MODE switch within one minute of the login prompt or the
login process times out.
2. Toggle the MODE switch using one of two methods, as follows:
■
If the switch is in the Service position, turn it to the Locked position, leave it there
for at least five seconds, and then turn it back to the Service position. Press the
Enter key.
Chapter 2
Access Control
13
■
If the switch is in the Locked position, turn it to the Service position, leave it there
for at least five seconds, and then turn it back to the Locked position. Press the
Enter key.
When the toggling is successful, you are logged in to the Service Processor shell
as the account default.
XSCF>
As this account has useradm and platadm privileges. you can now configure
the Service Processor or reset passwords.
When the shell session ends, the default account is disabled. When an account is
disabled, it cannot be used to log in at the console. It will then not be possible to
login using this account again except by following this same procedure.
Note – You can use the setupplatform(8) command rather than the following
steps to perform Service Processor installation tasks. For more information, see the
setupplatform(8) man page.
▼ To Configure an XSCF Password Policy
1. Log in to the XSCF console with useradm privileges.
2. Type the setpasswordpolicy command:
XSCF> setpasswordpolicy option
where option can be one or more of the options described in the
setpasswordpolicy(8) man page.
Note – The password policy applies only to users added after the
setpasswordpolicy(8) command has been executed.
3. Verify that the operation succeeded by typing the showpasswordpolicy
command.
14
SPARC Enterprise Mx000 Servers Administration Guide • November 2007
▼ To Add an XSCF User Account
When you add a new user account, the account has no password, and cannot be
used for logging in until the password is set or Secure Shell public key
authentication is enabled for the user.
1. Log in to the XSCF console with useradm privileges.
2. Type the adduser command:
XSCF> adduser user
where user is the user name you want to add. (See the adduser(8) man page for
rules about the user name.) If you do not specify a User ID (UID) number with
the -u UID option, one is automatically assigned, starting from 100.
3. Verify that the operation succeeded by typing the showuser command.
▼ To Create a Password for an XSCF User
Any XSCF user can set his or her own password. Only a user with useradm
privileges can set another user’s password.
1. Log in to the XSCF console with useradm privileges.
2. Type the password command:
XSCF> password
Please enter your password:
See the password(8) man page for rules about passwords. When typed without
an argument, password sets the current user’s password. To set someone else’s
password, include that person’s user name, for example:
XSCF> password user
Please enter your password:
where user is the user name you want to set the password for. You are prompted
to enter, and then reenter, the password.
▼ To Assign Privileges to an XSCF User
1. Log in to the XSCF console with useradm privileges.
Chapter 2
Access Control
15
2. Type the setprivileges command:
XSCF> setprivileges user privileges
where user is the user name to assign privileges for, and privileges is one or more
privileges, separated by a space, to assign to this user. The domainadm,
domainmgr, and domainop privileges must include the domain number,
numbers, or range of numbers to associate with a particular user account; for
example,
XSCF> setprivileges user domainadm@1-4, 6, 9
Valid privileges are listed in TABLE 2-1.
▼ To Display the Version of Installed Firmware
1. Log in to the XSCF console with platadm or fieldeng privileges.
2. Type the version command:
XSCF> version -c xcp
The XCP version number is displayed. Command output example is:
XSCF> version -c xcp
XSCF#0(Active)
XCP0 (Current): 1020
...
16
SPARC Enterprise Mx000 Servers Administration Guide • November 2007
Related Information
For additional information on this chapter’s topics, see:
Resource
Information
man pages
password(8), version(8), adduser(8), deleteuser(8),
enableuser(8), disableuser(8), showuser(8),
setpasswordpolicy(8), setprivileges(8),
showpasswordpolicy(8), setlookup(8), setldap(8), showldap(8)
SPARC Enterprise
M4000/M5000/M8000/M9000 Servers
XSCF User’s Guide
Access control, user accounts, passwords, firmware update
Chapter 2
Access Control
17
CHAPTER
3
System Configuration
This chapter describes how to initially configure system services and internal
networks that enable communication between the components of your server.
This chapter contains these sections:
■
About System Services
■
XSCF Shell Procedures for System Configuration
■
Related Information
About System Services
Your server uses various services to enable communication between its components.
Refer to “Preparing for System Configuration” on page 4 for an overview of initial
service configuration.
These sections provide details on system services:
■
DSCP Network Between a Service Processor and a Domain
■
XSCF Network Interfaces
■
Domain Name Service
■
LDAP Service
■
Time Synchronization and NTP Service
■
SNMP Service
■
Additional Services
17
DSCP Network Between a Service Processor and a
Domain
The Domain to Service Processor Communications Protocol (DSCP) service provides
a secure TCP/IP- and PPP-based communication link between the Service Processor
and each domain. Without this link, the Service Processor cannot communicate with
the domains.
The Service Processor requires one IP address dedicated to the DSCP service on its
side of the link, and one IP address on each domain’s side of the link. The DSCP
service is a point-to-point link between the Service Processor and each domain.
FIGURE 3-1 illustrates this relationship.
.
FIGURE 3-1
Relationship of the Service Processor and the DSCP Network to the Domains
DSCP link
Service
Processor
IP address
First domain
IP address
DSCP link
Second domain
IP address
DSCP link
Third domain
IP address
DSCP link
Fourth domain
IP address
DSCP service is not configured by default. You configure and use the service by
specifying IP addresses for the Service Processor and the domains. The IP addresses
should be nonroutable addresses on the network.
The setdscp command provides an interactive mode that displays a prompt for
each DSCP setting you can configure:
18
■
The network address to be used by the DSCP network for IP addresses
■
The netmask for the DSCP network
■
The Service Processor IP address
■
An IP address for each domain
SPARC Enterprise Mx000 Servers Administration Guide • November 2007
In a system with redundant Service Processors, the standby Service Processor does
not communicate with the domains. In the event of a failover, the newly active
Service Processor assumes the IP address of the failed-over Service Processor.
DSCP includes its own security measures that prohibit a compromised domain from
compromising other domains or the Service Processor.
The DSCP should only be configured when there are no domains running. If you
change the DSCP configuration while a domain is active, you have to power off the
domain before the Service Processor can communicate with it. Refer to Chapter 4 for
more information on domains.
In a typical DSCP configuration, you enter a network address and netmask using the
setdscp command. The system then configures the Service Processor IP address
and any domain IP addresses according to this formula: the Service Processor gets
an IP address that is the network address +1; and each domain gets an IP address
that is the Service Processor IP address, + the domain ID, +1. For example, if you
enter 10.1.1.0 for the network address, and 255.255.255.0 for the netmask, the
showdscp command displays output similar to the following:
XSCF> showdscp
DSCP Configuration:
Network: 10.1.1.0
Netmask: 255.255.255.0
Location
XSCF
Domain #00
Domain #01
Domain #02
Domain #03
...
Address
10.1.1.1
10.1.1.2
10.1.1.3
10.1.1.4
10.1.1.5
This scenario minimizes the range of IP addresses needed for DSCP.
XSCF Network Interfaces
The XSCF network configurable settings include the IP address for the active Service
Processor, IP address for the standby Service Processor, gateway address, netmask,
and network route.
Chapter 3
System Configuration
19
TABLE 3-1 lists the XSCF network interfaces.
TABLE 3-1
XSCF Network Interfaces
XSCF Unit
Interface Name
Description
XSCF Unit 0
(midrange server and highend server)
xscf#0-lan#0
XSCF LAN#0 (external)
xscf#0-lan#1
XSCF LAN#1 (external)
xscf#0-if
Interface between XSCF Units (internal)
xscf#1-lan#0
XSCF LAN#0 (external)
xscf#1-lan#1
XSCF LAN#1 (external)
xscf#1-if
Interface between XSCF Units (internal)
lan#0
Takeover IP address for XSCF LAN#0
lan#1
Takeover IP address for XSCF LAN#1
XSCF Unit 1
(high-end server)
On a high-end server, one Service Processor is configured as active and the other is
configured as standby. The XSCF network between the two Service Processors allows
them to exchange system management information and, in case of failover, to change
roles.
Optionally, a takeover IP address can be set up, which is hosted on the currently
active Service Processor. External clients can use this takeover IP address to connect
to whichever Service Processor is active. Selection of a takeover IP address does not
affect failover.
When you set or change the information related to the XSCF network, including the
Service Processor host name, DNS domain name, DNS server, IP address, netmask,
or routing information, you must make the changes effective in XSCF and reset the
Service Processor. This is done with the applynetwork and rebootxscf
commands.
You configure the XSCF network with these commands:
20
■
setnetwork
■
setroute
■
sethostname (if using DNS)
■
setnameserver (if using DNS)
■
applynetwork
SPARC Enterprise Mx000 Servers Administration Guide • November 2007
Once you have configured the XSCF network, it requires no day-to-day
management.
Domain Name Service
The Domain Name Service (DNS) allows computers on a network to communicate
with each other by using centrally maintained DNS names instead of locally stored
IP addresses. If you configure the Service Processor to use the DNS service, it “joins”
the DNS community and can communicate with any other computer on the network
through its DNS server.
There are no defaults for this service. To configure the Service Processor to use DNS,
you must specify the Service Processor host name, and the DNS server name and IP
address.
You can configure the Service Processor DNS service with these commands:
■
sethostname
■
setnameserver
On a server with dual Service Processors, the domain name is common for both
Service Processors. A host name can be specified for each Service Processor. Setting a
different host name for each Service Processor does not disable failover.
Once you have configured the Service Processor to use the DNS service, it does not
require day-to-day management.
LDAP Service
The LDAP service stores user authentication and privilege settings on a server so
that individual computers on the network do not have to store the settings.
By default, the Service Processor stores user passwords and privileges locally.
Account information for users who have access to the Service Processor are stored
on the Service Processor itself. (Authentication and privilege lookups for the server’s
domains are provided by the Solaris OS.)
However, if you want to have authentication and privilege lookups performed by an
LDAP server, you can set up the Service Processor to be an LDAP client.
The general process for setting up the Service Processor as an LDAP client is:
1. Enable the LDAP service.
2. Provide the LDAP server configuration information:
■
The IP address or hostname, and port, of the primary LDAP directory
Chapter 3
System Configuration
21
■
Optional: The IP address or hostname, and port, of up to two alternative LDAP
directories
■
The distinguished name (DN) of the search base to use for lookup
■
Whether Transport Layer Security (TLS) is to be used
3. Verify that the LDAP service is working.
On the LDAP server, you create an LDAP schema with privilege properties. The
schema contains the following:
CODE EXAMPLE 3-1
LDAP Schema
attributetype ( 1.3.6.1.1.1.1.40 NAME ’spPrivileges’
DESC ’Service Processor privileges’
SYNTAX 1.3.6.1.4.1.1466.115.121.1.26
SINGLE-VALUE )
objectclass ( 1.3.6.1.1.1.2.13 NAME ’serviceProcessorUser’ SUP top
AUXILIARY
DESC ’Service Processor user’
MAY spPrivileges )
You also add the following required attributes for each user on the LDAP server, as
shown in TABLE 3-2.
TABLE 3-2
LDAP LDIF File Attributes
Field Name
Description
spPrivileges
A valid privilege on the Service Processor
homeDirectory
The location of the home directory on the Service Processor:
/scf/home
loginShell
The login shell on the Service Processor: /scf/bin/rbash
uidNumber
The user ID number on the Service Processor. The
uidnumber must be greater than 100. Use the showuser
command to display UIDs.
A sample file entry is:
CODE EXAMPLE 3-2
Sample LDAP LDIF File Attributes
spPrivileges: platadm
homeDirectory: /scf/home
loginShell: /scf/bin/rbash
uidNumber: 150
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SPARC Enterprise Mx000 Servers Administration Guide • November 2007
Refer to the Solaris OS documentation collection for more information on LDAP
servers.
If the LDAP client is configured and enabled on the Service Processor, lookups are
first performed locally, and then through the LDAP server. If you execute the
setprivileges command for a user without specifying privileges, the command
deletes any local privilege data for that user. Subsequently, the user’s privileges will
be looked up in LDAP, if LDAP privilege lookup is enabled. If you specify privilege
as none, that user will have no privileges, regardless of privilege data in LDAP.
These commands manage the Service Processor LDAP service:
■
setlookup
■
setldap
Note that passwords stored in the LDAP repository must use either UNIX crypt or
MD5 encryption schemes.
Once you have configured the Service Processor to use the LDAP service, it does not
require day-to-day management.
Time Synchronization and NTP Service
The Network Time Protocol (NTP) provides the correct timestamp for all systems on
a network by synchronizing the clocks of all the systems. NTP service is provided by
an NTP daemon.
To use the NTP service, the Service Processor can be set up as an NTP client, using
the services of a remote NTP server. The Service Processor also can be set up as an
NTP server, as can an external resource.
Note – Check the Product Notes for your server, which may contain important
information about using the XSCF as NTP server.
Chapter 3
System Configuration
23
TABLE 3-3 shows how the time is synchronized.
TABLE 3-3
XSCF and Domain Time Synchronization
Entity
Primary NTP Server
Time Synchronization Method
XSCF
No connection
The XSCF time is the time in the initial system setting or the
time set with the setdate command.
External NTP server
XSCF operates as an NTP client. The XSCF time is adjusted to
the time of the external NTP server.
XSCF
XSCF operates as the NTP server. The domain time is
adjusted to the time of the XSCF.
External NTP server
The domain time is adjusted to the time of the external NTP
server.
Domain
When domains are powered on, they synchronize their clocks to the NTP server.
If the domain and the Service Processor are using the same time source, one benefit
is that events logged in the Solaris OS and on the Service Processor can be correlated
based on their timestamp; if the domain and Service Processor use different NTP
servers, their times may drift, and correlating log files could become difficult. If you
connect a domain to an NTP server other than the one used by the Service Processor,
be sure both are high-rank NTP servers that provide the same degree of accuracy.
Every NTP server and every NTP client must have an ntp.conf file, in
/etc/inet/ntp.conf. The Service Processor has a default ntp.conf file. If you
are using NTP, you must create an ntp.conf file on each domain.
If you are using the Service Processor as the NTP server for the domains, create an
ntp.conf file on each domain similar to the following:
CODE EXAMPLE 3-3
Sample ntp.conf File for a Domain using XSCF as NTP Server
server ip_address
slewalways yes
disable pll
enable auth monitor
driftfile /var/ntp/ntp.drift
statsdir /var/ntp/ntpstats/
filegen peerstats file peerstats type day enable
filegen loopstats file loopstats type day enable
filegen clockstats file clockstats type day enable
where ip_address is the IP address you configured for the Service Processor on the
DSCP network. To display the Service Processor’s IP address, use the showdscp -s
command.
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SPARC Enterprise Mx000 Servers Administration Guide • November 2007
If you are using an external NTP server for the domains, refer to the xntpd(1M) man
page or to the Solaris OS documentation collection for information on creating the
ntp.conf file for each domain.
SNMP Service
A Simple Network Management Protocol (SNMP) agent can be configured and
enabled on the Service Processor. The Service Processor SNMP agent monitors the
state of the system hardware and domains, and exports the following information to
an SNMP manager:
■
System information such as chassis ID, platform type, total number of CPUs, and
total memory
■
Configuration of the hardware
■
Dynamic reconfiguration information, including which domain-configurable units
are assigned to which domains
■
Domain status
■
Power status
■
Environmental status
The Service Processor SNMP agent can supply system information and fault event
information using public MIBs. SNMP managers, for example, a third-party
manager application, use any Service Processor network interface with the SNMP
agent port to communicate with the agent. The SNMP agent supports concurrent
access from multiple users through SNMP managers.
By default, the SNMP agent uses version 3 (v3) of the SNMP protocol. SNMP v3 is
secure, requiring an authentication protocol, authentication password, and
encryption password. The valid authentication protocols are MD5 and SHA (secure
hash algorithm). You can also configure your server to accept earlier SNMP versions
1 and 2.
The SNMP agent includes the v3 utilities for user management, the User Security
Model (USM), and for view access control, the View Access Control Model (VACM).
You can change the configuration of SNMP agent traps, USM user accounts, and
VACM information.
Initial SNMP v3 configuration includes:
1. Creating USM user information
2. Creating VACM access control information (group, view, and access)
Using VACM requires a basic knowledge of SNMP and MIBs. Refer to the Solaris
System Management Agent Administration Guide and to the SPARC Enterprise
M4000/M5000/M8000/M9000 Servers XSCF User’s Guide for information.
Chapter 3
System Configuration
25
3. Configuring the SNMP agent
4. Enabling the SNMP agent
5. Setting up your SNMP manager application to communicate with the Service
Processor SNMP agent based on the configuration you used for the agent, namely,
user, port, and trap information.
The SNMP agent is active only on the active Service Processor. In the event of
failover, the SNMP agent is restarted on the newly active Service Processor.
Additional Services
This section describes HTTPS, Telnet, SMTP, and SSH services, and altitude settings.
This section does not cover all the optional services and settings for the Service
Processor that you might want to set up and use at a later date. For example, you
can set up mirrored memory mode on the Service Processor using the setupfru
command. Refer to the SPARC Enterprise M4000/M5000/M8000/M9000 Servers XSCF
User’s Guide for information on day-to-day administration and management tasks.
HTTPS Service
Hypertext Transfer Protocol (HTTP) over an authenticated/encrypted connection
allows you to use the XSCF web browser securely. This is called the HTTPS service.
Authentication is provided with a certificate authority and private keys. To use the
HTTPS service, you must enable it, and provide an optional port number. The
default port is 443. To enable HTTPS service, use the sethttps command.
Telnet Service
Telnet service is disabled by default on the Service Processor. To enable it, use the
settelnet command. Telnet provides an alternative for those sites that do not have
ssh.
SMTP Service
Simple Mail Transfer Protocol (SMTP) service is controlled by these commands:
26
■
showsmtp
■
setsmtp
SPARC Enterprise Mx000 Servers Administration Guide • November 2007
The authentication mechanisms allowed by the mail server are pop, smtp-auth, or
none (the default). The SMTP authentications supported are plain and login.
SSH Service
SSH service is disabled by default. To enable it, use the setssh command. A host
public key is required for SSH service.
Altitude Setting
The altitude for your server is 0 meters by default. You can set the altitude using the
setaltitude command. If the altitude is set, any abnormality in the intake air
temperature can be detected quickly. However, even if no altitude is set, any
abnormality in the air temperature, such as the CPU temperature, can still be
detected. The server temperature limits are set to protect the domain hardware, so
this command is logically used before powering on any domain.
XSCF Shell Procedures for System
Configuration
This section describes these procedures:
■
To Configure the DSCP Network
■
To Display DSCP Network Configuration
■
To Configure the XSCF Network Interfaces
■
To Configure the XSCF Network Route Information
■
To Set Or Reset the XSCF Network
■
To Display XSCF Network Configuration
■
To Set the Service Processor Host Name and DNS Domain Name
■
To Set the Service Processor’s DNS Name Server
■
To Enable or Disable Use of an LDAP Server for Authentication and Privilege
Lookup
■
To Configure the XSCF as an LDAP Client
■
To Configure the XSCF as an NTP Client
■
To Display the NTP Configuration
Chapter 3
System Configuration
27
■
To Set the Timezone, Daylight Saving Time, Date, and Time Locally on the Service
Processor
■
To Create a USM User Known to the SNMP Agent
■
To Display USM Information for the SNMP Agent
■
To Create a VACM Group
■
To Create a VACM View
■
To Give a VACM Group Access to a VACM View
■
To Display VACM Information for the SNMP Agent
■
To Configure the SNMP Agent to Send Version 3 Traps to Hosts
■
To Enable the SNMP Agent
■
To Display SNMP Agent Configuration
■
To Enable or Disable the Service Processor HTTPS Service
■
To Enable or Disable the Service Processor Telnet Service
■
To Configure the Service Processor SMTP Service
■
To Enable or Disable the Service Processor SSH Service
■
To Generate a Host Public Key for SSH Service
Note – You can use the setupplatform(8) command rather than the following
steps to perform network installation tasks. For more information, see the
setupplatform(8) man page.
▼ To Configure the DSCP Network
1. Log in to the XSCF console with platadm or fieldeng privileges.
2. Type the setdscp command.
You can use one of two methods, as follows:
■
Use the setdscp command with the -y -i address -m netmask options:
XSCF> setdscp -y -i address -m netmask
For example:
XSCF> setdscp -y -i 10.1.1.0 -m 255.255.255.0
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SPARC Enterprise Mx000 Servers Administration Guide • November 2007
■
Use the setdscp command with no options (interactive mode).
You are prompted to enter all the DSCP IP addresses sequentially. A
command output example of this interactive mode is:
XSCF> setdscp
DSCP network [0.0.0.0] > 10.1.1.0
DSCP netmask [255.0.0.0] > 255.255.255.0
XSCF address [10.1.1.1] > [Enter]
Domain #00 address [10.1.1.2] > [Enter]
Domain #01 address [10.1.1.3] > [Enter]
Domain #02 address [10.1.1.4] > [Enter]
Domain #03 address [10.1.1.5] > [Enter]
Domain #04 address [10.1.1.6] > [Enter]
Domain #05 address [10.1.1.7] > [Enter]
Domain #06 address [10.1.1.8] > [Enter]
Domain #07 address [10.1.1.9] > [Enter]
Domain #08 address [10.1.1.10] > [Enter]
...
Commit these changes to the database (y|n)?
i. For each prompt, press the Enter key to accept the displayed value, or
type a new value followed by the Enter key.
ii. To save your changes, enter Y. To cancel the changes, enter N.
3. Verify the operation with the showdscp command.
▼ To Display DSCP Network Configuration
1. Log in to the XSCF console with platadm, platop, or fieldeng privileges, or
domainadm, domainop, or domainmgr privileges for a specific domain.
Chapter 3
System Configuration
29
2. Type the showdscp command:
XSCF> showdscp
Command output example for a DSCP network of 10.1.1.0 and a DSCP netmask
of 255.255.255.0 is:
XSCF> showdscp
DSCP Configuration:
Network: 10.1.1.0
Netmask: 255.255.255.0
Location
XSCF
Domain #00
Domain #01
Domain #02
Domain #03
...
Address
10.1.1.1
10.1.1.2
10.1.1.3
10.1.1.4
10.1.1.5
▼ To Configure the XSCF Network Interfaces
Settings to configure the XSCF network must be applied to XSCF, and the Service
Processor must be reset, before the settings become effective. See “To Set Or Reset
the XSCF Network” on page 31.
1. Log in to the XSCF console with platadm privileges.
2. Type the setnetwork command:
a. To set the network interface, netmask, and IP address:
XSCF> setnetwork interface [-m addr] address
where interface specifies the network interface to be set, -m addr specifies the
netmask address of the network interface, and address specifies the IP address
of the network interface. If the -m option is omitted, the netmask
corresponding to the IP address is set. Refer to TABLE 3-1 for valid interface
names.
The following example sets the IP address and netmask for the interface
XSCF-LAN#0 on XSCF Unit 1 in a high-end server:
XSCF> setnetwork xscf#1-lan#0 -m 255.255.255.0 192.168.11.10
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SPARC Enterprise Mx000 Servers Administration Guide • November 2007
b. To enable the specified network interface:
XSCF> setnetwork -c [up|down] interface
where -c specifies whether to enable or disable the specified network
interface, and interface specifies the network interface to be enabled.
For additional information on the setnetwork command, including specifying
takeover IP addresses, refer to the setnetwork(8) man page or to the SPARC
Enterprise M4000/M5000/M8000/M9000 Servers XSCF User’s Guide.
3. Verify the operation with the shownetwork command.
▼ To Configure the XSCF Network Route
Information
Settings to configure the XSCF network must be applied to XSCF, and the Service
Processor must be reset, before the settings become effective. See “To Set Or Reset
the XSCF Network” on page 31.
1. Log in to the XSCF console with platadm privileges.
2. Type the setroute command:
XSCF> setroute -c [add|del] -n address [-m address] [-g address] interface
where -c specifies whether to add or delete routing information, -n address
specifies the IP address to which routing information is forwarded, -m address
specifies the netmask address to which routing information is forwarded, -g
address specifies the gateway address, and interface specifies the network interface
to be set with routing information. Refer to TABLE 3-1 for valid interface names.
For additional information on the setroute command, including specifying
takeover IP addresses, refer to the setroute(8) man page or to the SPARC Enterprise
M4000/M5000/M8000/M9000 Servers XSCF User’s Guide.
▼ To Set Or Reset the XSCF Network
When you set or change the Service Processor host name, DNS domain name, DNS
server, IP address, netmask, or routing information, the settings must be applied to
XSCF, and the Service Processor must be reset, before the settings become effective.
1. Log in to the XSCF console with platadm privileges.
Chapter 3
System Configuration
31
2. Type the applynetwork command:
XSCF> applynetwork
The applynetwork command displays the information that has been set for the
XSCF network, and asks you to apply the settings.
3. Execute the rebootxscf command to make the settings effective:
XSCF> rebootxscf
4. Verify the operation with the shownetwork command.
▼ To Display XSCF Network Configuration
1. Log in to the XSCF console.
2. Type the shownetwork command:
XSCF> shownetwork -a | interface
where -a displays information for all XSCF network interfaces, and interface
displays information for a specific XSCF network interface name, in the format
xscf#x-y.
Command output example for the XSCF Unit #0, LAN#1 is:
XSCF> shownetwork xscf#0-lan#1
Link encap:Ethernet HWaddr 00:00:00:12:34:56
inet addr:192.168.10.11 Bcast:192.168.10.255 Mask:255.255.255.0
UP BROADCAST RUNNING MULTICAST MTU:1500 Metric:1
...
▼ To Set the Service Processor Host Name and
DNS Domain Name
1. Log in to the XSCF console with platadm privileges.
2. Type the sethostname command:
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SPARC Enterprise Mx000 Servers Administration Guide • November 2007
a. To set the Service Processor host name:
XSCF> sethostname xscfu hostname
where xscfu can be xscf#0 (XSCF Unit 0) or xscf#1 (XSCF Unit 1 in a highend server); hostname is the host name to be set for the specified Service
Processor (XSCF Unit).
b. To set the Service Processor domain name:
XSCF> sethostname -d domainname
3. To verify the operation, type the showhostname command.
XSCF> showhostname -a | xscfu
where -a displays the host names for all XSCF Units, and xscfu displays
information for a specific XSCF Unit, either xscf#0 or xscf#1.
▼ To Set the Service Processor’s DNS Name Server
1. Log in to the XSCF console with platadm privileges.
2. Type the setnameserver command, followed by one or more IP addresses
separated by a comma:
XSCF> setnameserver ip_address
3. To verify the operation, type the shownameserver command.
XSCF> shownameserver
▼ To Enable or Disable Use of an LDAP Server for
Authentication and Privilege Lookup
1. Log in to the XSCF console with useradm privileges.
Chapter 3
System Configuration
33
2. Type the setlookup command:
XSCF> setlookup -a local|ldap
XSCF> setlookup -p local|ldap
The -a option sets the authentication lookup to either local or in LDAP; the -p
option sets the privileges lookup to either local or in LDAP. When local is
specified, lookup is only done locally; when ldap is specified, lookup is first
done locally, then in LDAP if not found locally.
3. To verify the operation, type the showlookup command.
XSCF> showlookup
▼ To Configure the XSCF as an LDAP Client
Make sure you have added an LDAP privileges schema to the LDAP server, and
attributes for each user on the LDAP server. Refer to CODE EXAMPLE 3-1 and
CODE EXAMPLE 3-2 for information.
1. Log in to the XSCF console with useradm privileges.
2. Type the setldap command:
XSCF> setldap [-b bind] [-B baseDN] [-c certchain] [-p] [-s servers] [t user] -T timeout
where bind is the bind name, baseDN is the base Distinguished Name, certchain is
an LDAP server certificate chain, -p sets the password to use when binding to
the LDAP server (you are prompted for the password), servers sets the primary
and secondary LDAP servers and ports, user tests the server connection and
password for the specified user, and timeout is the maximum amount of time
allowed for an LDAP search before search results are returned. For more
information on LDAP, refer to the setldap(8) man page, to the SPARC Enterprise
M4000/M5000/M8000/M9000 Servers XSCF User’s Guide, and to the Solaris OS
documentation collection.
3. To verify the operation, type the showldap command.
XSCF> showldap
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SPARC Enterprise Mx000 Servers Administration Guide • November 2007
▼ To Configure the XSCF as an NTP Client
If you are using NTP, an ntp.conf file must be created on the domains. Refer to
“Time Synchronization and NTP Service” on page 23 for information. This section
describes how to set the XSCF as an NTP client.
1. Log in to the XSCF console with platadm privileges.
2. Type the setntp command:
XSCF> setntp -c add address
where address is the IP address of the NTP server.
3. Reset the Service Processor with the rebootxscf command to make the
settings effective:
XSCF> rebootxscf
4. To verify the operation, type the showntp command.
XSCF> showntp -a
▼ To Configure the XSCF as an NTP Server
If you are using NTP, an ntp.conf file must be created on the domains. Refer to
“Time Synchronization and NTP Service” on page 23 for information. This section
describes how to set the XSCF as an NTP server.
Note – Check the Product Notes for your server, which may contain important
information about using the XSCF as NTP server.
1. Log in to the XSCF console with platadm privileges.
2. Type the setntp command:
XSCF> setntp -c stratum -i stratum_no
where stratum_no is the stratum value for the NTP server. The default value is 5.
3. Reset the Service Processor with the rebootxscf command to make the
settings effective:
XSCF> rebootxscf
Chapter 3
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35
4. To verify the operation, type the showntp command.
XSCF> showntp -s
▼ To Display the NTP Configuration
1. Log in to the XSCF console.
2. Type the showntp command:
XSCF> showntp {-a | -l | address | -s}
where the -a option displays all the NTP servers configured for use, the -l
option displays time synchroiization information, address is the IP address of the
NTP server for which information is to be displayed, and the -s option displays
the stratum value of the NTP server.
▼ To Set the Timezone, Daylight Saving Time,
Date, and Time Locally on the Service Processor
1. Log in to the XSCF console with platadm or fieldeng privileges.
2. Type the settimezone command:
a. To display the timezones that you can set:
XSCF> settimezone -c settz -a
b. To set the timezone:
XSCF> settimezone -c settz -s timezone
where timezone is the timezone you want to set. For more information on the
settimezone command, including setting Daylight Saving Time, refer to the
settimezone(8) man page or to the Reference Manual.
3. To verify the operation, type the showtimezone command.
XSCF> showtimezone
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SPARC Enterprise Mx000 Servers Administration Guide • November 2007
4. Type the setdate command:
XSCF> setdate -s date
where date is the date and time you want to set. For more information on the
setdate command, refer to the setdate(8) man page or to the Reference Manual.
5. After specifying the date, you are prompted to reset the Service Processor, so
that the date and time become effective. Type Y to reset the Service Processor.
6. To verify the operation, type the showdate command.
XSCF> showdate
▼ To Create a USM User Known to the SNMP
Agent
A USM user known to the SNMP agent is not required to have a regular user
account on the Service Processor.
1. Log in to the XSCF console with platadm privileges.
2. Type the setsnmpusm command.
You can use one of two methods to add USM users, as follows:
■
To add a new user, use the create argument:
XSCF> setsnmpusm create -a authentication_protocol [-p authentication_password]
[-e encryption_password] user
where authentication_protocol is either MD5 or SHA, authentication_password is the
authentication password (must be equal to or greater than 8 characters),
encryption_password is the encryption password, and user is the user name to be
known to the agent for subsequent SNMP communication. If you do not specify
the passwords, you are prompted to enter them.
■
To add a new user with the same settings as an existing user, use the clone
argument:
XSCF> setsnmpusm clone -u clone_user user
where clone_user is a valid user name known to the SNMP agent, and user is the
user name to be created with the same settings as the valid clone_user. Use the
setsnmpusm password command to change either or both passwords for the
cloned user, if desired.
Chapter 3
System Configuration
37
3. To verify the operation, type the showsnmpusm command.
▼ To Display USM Information for the SNMP
Agent
1. Log in to the XSCF console with platadm or platop privileges.
2. Type the showsnmpusm command:
XSCF> showsnmpusm
Command output example is:
XSCF> showsnmpusm
Username
=============
jsmith
sue
Auth Protocol
=============
SHA
MD5
▼ To Create a VACM Group
1. Log in to the XSCF console with platadm privileges.
2. Type the setsnmpvacm command:
XSCF> setsnmpvacm creategroup -u username groupname
where username is a valid user name known to the SNMP agent, and groupname is
the name of the group to create for the specified user for view access.
3. To verify the operation, type the showsnmpvacm command.
▼ To Create a VACM View
1. Log in to the XSCF console with platadm privileges.
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SPARC Enterprise Mx000 Servers Administration Guide • November 2007
2. Type the setsnmpvacm command:
XSCF> setsnmpvacm createview -s OID_subtree [-m OID_Mask] viewname
where OID_subtree is the MIB OID subtree for the view (values start at .1 for the
entire MIB tree, and can be limited to certain portions of the tree by using the
optional OID_Mask), and viewname is the name of the view to create for the SNMP
agent exported MIB information. View access is read-only for the agent.
3. To verify the operation, type the showsnmpvacm command.
▼ To Give a VACM Group Access to a VACM View
1. Log in to the XSCF console with platadm privileges.
2. Type the setsnmpvacm command:
XSCF> setsnmpvacm createaccess -r viewname groupname
where viewname is a valid SNMP agent view, and groupname is a valid SNMP agent
group name.
3. To verify the operation, type the showsnmpvacm command.
▼ To Display VACM Information for the SNMP
Agent
1. Log in to the XSCF console with platadm or platop privileges.
Chapter 3
System Configuration
39
2. Type the showsnmpvacm command:
XSCF> showsnmpvacm
Command output example is:
XSCF> showsnmpvacm
Groups
Groupname
=============
admin
Username
=============
jsmith, bob
Views
View
=============
all_view
Subtree
=======
.1
Mask
======
ff
Type
=========
include
Access
View
=============
all_view
Group
=============
admin
▼ To Configure the SNMP Agent to Send Version 3
Traps to Hosts
1. Log in to the XSCF console with platadm privileges.
2. Type the setsnmp command:
XSCF> setsnmp addv3traphost -u username -r authentication_protocol {-n
engine_id | -i} [-a authentication_password] [-e encryption_password] [-p
trap_port] traphost
where username is a user known to the SNMP agent, authentication_protocol is
either MD5 or SHA, engine_id is the identifier of the local agent sending the trap,
which must match the engine_id expected by the host, -i asks for
acknowledgement from the receiving host, authentication_password is the
authentication password (must be equal to or greater than 8 characters),
40
SPARC Enterprise Mx000 Servers Administration Guide • November 2007
encryption_password is the encryption password, trap_port is the listening port for
the SNMP agent (the default is 161), and traphost is the host name where the
SNMP manager application is running.
If you do not specify the passwords, you are prompted to enter them.
3. To verify the operation, type the showsnmp command.
For additional options with the setsnmp command, including information on
configuring your system to accept SNMP version 1 or 2 traps, refer to the
setsnmp(8) man page.
▼ To Enable the SNMP Agent
1. Log in to the XSCF console with platadm privileges.
2. Type the setsnmp command:
XSCF> setsnmp enable
3. To verify the operation, type the showsnmp command.
Make sure that your SNMP manager application can communicate with the Service
Processor SNMP agent based on the configuration you used for the agent, namely,
user, port, and trap information.
▼ To Display SNMP Agent Configuration
1. Log in to the XSCF console with platadm or platop privileges.
Chapter 3
System Configuration
41
2. Type the showsnmp command:
XSCF> showsnmp
Command output example is:
XSCF> showsnmp
Agent Status:
Agent Port:
System Location:
System Contact:
System Description:
Enabled
161
Unknown
Unknown
Unknown
Trap Hosts:
Hostname
-------host1
Port
---162
SNMP V1/V2c:
Type
---v3
Community String Username Auth Protocol
---------------- -------- -----------n/a
user1
SHA
None
▼ To Enable or Disable the Service Processor
HTTPS Service
1. Log in to the XSCF console with platadm privileges.
2. Optionally, display the current status of the Service Processor HTTPS Service:
XSCF> showhttps
3. Type the sethttps command:
XSCF> sethttps -c function
where function is either enable or disable. The HTTPS service starts
immediately after being enabled, and stops immediately after being disabled.
For additional options with the sethttps command, including information on
certificates and private keys, refer to the sethttps(8) man page or to the SPARC
Enterprise M4000/M5000/M8000/M9000 Servers XSCF User’s Guide.
42
SPARC Enterprise Mx000 Servers Administration Guide • November 2007
▼ To Enable or Disable the Service Processor
Telnet Service
1. Log in to the XSCF console with platadm privileges.
2. Optionally, display the current status of the Service Processor Telnet Service:
XSCF> showtelnet
3. Type the settelnet command:
XSCF> settelnet -c function
where function is either enable or disable. The Telnet service starts
immediately after being enabled, and stops immediately after being disabled.
▼ To Configure the Service Processor SMTP
Service
1. Log in to the XSCF console with platadm privileges.
2. Optionally, display the current status of the Service Processor SMTP Service:
XSCF> showsmtp
3. Type the setsmtp command:
XSCF> setsmtp
You are prompted to enter the name of the SMTP mail server to be used, the port
number to be used (default is port 25), the authentication mechanism (default is
none) and the Reply Address. You must specify a valid email address.
▼ To Enable or Disable the Service Processor SSH
Service
1. Log in to the XSCF console with platadm privileges.
2. Optionally, display the current status of the Service Processor SSH Service:
XSCF> showssh
Chapter 3
System Configuration
43
3. Type the setssh command:
XSCF> setssh -c function
where function is either enable or disable. You must generate a host public key
to use SSH.
▼ To Generate a Host Public Key for SSH Service
1. Log in to the XSCF console with platadm privileges.
2. Type the setssh command:
XSCF> setssh -c genhostkey
For additional options with the setssh command, including information on adding
or deleting user public keys, refer to the setssh(8) man page or to the SPARC
Enterprise M4000/M5000/M8000/M9000 Servers XSCF User’s Guide.
▼ To Set the Altitude on the Service Processor
1. Log in to the XSCF console with fieldeng privileges.
2. Type the setaltitude command:
XSCF> setaltitude -s altitude=value
where value is a unit of meters. The unit of meters is rounded off to the nearest
hundred meters.
3. To verify the operation, type the showaltitude command.
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SPARC Enterprise Mx000 Servers Administration Guide • November 2007
Related Information
For additional information on this chapter’s topics, see:
Resource
Information
man pages
showdscp(8), setdscp(8), shownetwork(8),
setnetwork(8), applynetwork(8),
showhostname(8), sethostname(8), setroute(8),
showroute(8), setdate(8), showdate(8),
showntp(8), setntp(8), xntpd(1M), ntpq(1M),
ntpdate(1M), setnameserver(8),
shownameserver(8), sethostname(8),
showhostname(8), showlookup(8), setlookup(8),
showldap(8), setldap(8), showsnmp(8), setsnmp(8),
setsnmpusm(8), setsnmpvacm(8), showsnmpusm(8),
showsnmpvacm(8), showhttps(8), sethttps(8),
showtelnet(8), settelnet(8), showssh(8),
setssh(8), showsmtp(8), setsmtp(8),
setaltitude(8), showaltitude(8), rebootxscf(8)
SPARC Enterprise M4000/M5000/M8000/M9000 Servers
XSCF User’s Guide
Topics covered in this chapter and additional
information on day-to-day administration
Solaris System Management Agent Administration Guide
SNMP
Chapter 3
System Configuration
45
46
SPARC Enterprise Mx000 Servers Administration Guide • November 2007
CHAPTER
4
Domain Configuration
This chapter describes how to set up and manage domains with XSCF firmware. On
your server, by default from the factory, there is one domain with the Solaris OS
installed, and its Domain Identification Number (DID) is 0 (zero).
This chapter contains these sections:
■
About Domains
■
XSCF Shell Procedures for Domain Configuration
■
Related Information
About Domains
These sections provide details on domain configuration:
■
Domains and System Boards
■
Domain Resource Assignment
■
Domain Component List and Logical System Boards
■
Overview of Steps for Domain Configuration
■
Domain Configuration Example
■
Domain Communication
■
DVD Drive or Tape Drive Assignment
■
Backup and Restore Operations
■
Dynamic Reconfiguration
47
Domains and System Boards
A domain is an independent system resource that runs its own copy of the Solaris
OS. Domains divide a system’s total resources into separate units that are not
affected by each other’s operations. Domains can be used for different types of
processing; for example, one domain can be used to test new applications, while
another domain can be used for production purposes.
The number of physical system boards in your server varies from 1 to 16, depending
on whether you have a midrange or a high-end server. One physical system board
(PSB) consists of 4 CPUs, 32 dual inline memory modules (DIMMs), and I/O. The
I/O varies with the server, and can include PCIe slots, PCI-X slots, and built-in I/O.
To use a PSB in your system, the hardware resources on the board must be logically
divided and reconfigured as eXtended System Boards (XSBs). There are two modes
of XSBs:
■
Uni-XSB
■
A PSB logically undivided and configured into one XSB
■
Contains all the resources on the board: 4 CPUs, 32 DIMMs, and I/O
FIGURE 4-1 shows a PSB in Uni-XSB mode on a midrange server, and FIGURE 4-2
shows a PSB in Uni-XSB mode on a high-end server. The CPU modules and
memory modules are known as the CPU/memory board unit (CMU) and the I/O
devices are contained in the I/O unit (IOU).
48
SPARC Enterprise Mx000 Servers Administration Guide • November 2007
FIGURE 4-1
A Physical System Board in Uni-XSB Mode on an M4000 Midrange Server
Uni-XSB mode
(1 physical system board with
4 CPUs, 32 DIMMs, and I/O)
CMU
IOU
CPU
Memory - 8 DIMMs
I/O device
CPU
Memory - 8 DIMMs
I/O device
CPU
Memory - 8 DIMMs
CPU
Memory - 8 DIMMs
FIGURE 4-2
A Physical System Board in Uni-XSB Mode on a High-End Server
Uni-XSB mode
(1 physical system board with
4 CPUs, 32 DIMMs, and I/O)
CMU
■
IOU
CPU
Memory - 8 DIMMs
I/O device
CPU
Memory - 8 DIMMs
I/O device
CPU
Memory - 8 DIMMs
I/O device
CPU
Memory - 8 DIMMs
I/O device
Quad-XSB
■
A PSB logically divided and configured into four XSBs
■
Each of the four XSBs contains one-quarter of the total board resources: 1 CPU,
8 DIMMs, and I/O. On a midrange server, only two XSBs have I/O.
Chapter 4
Domain Configuration
49
FIGURE 4-3 shows a PSB in Quad-XSB mode on a midrange server, and FIGURE 4-4
shows a PSB in Quad-XSB mode on a high-end server.
The logical dividing between Uni-XSB and Quad-XSB is done using the setupfru
command.
50
SPARC Enterprise Mx000 Servers Administration Guide • November 2007
FIGURE 4-3
A Physical System Board in Quad-XSB Mode on a Midrange Server
Quad-XSB mode
(1 physical system board divided into
2 domains, each with 1 CPU, 8 DIMMs, and I/O)
CMU
IOU
XSB00-0
CPU
Memory - 8 DIMMs
I/O device
XSB00-1
CPU
Memory - 8 DIMMs
I/O device
XSB00-2
CPU
Memory - 8 DIMMs
XSB00-3
CPU
Memory - 8 DIMMs
FIGURE 4-4
A Physical System Board in Quad-XSB Mode on a High-End Server
Quad-XSB mode
(1 physical system board divided into
4 domains, each with 1 CPU, 8 DIMMs, and I/O)
CMU
IOU
XSB00-0
CPU
Memory - 8 DIMMs
I/O device
XSB00-1
CPU
Memory - 8 DIMMs
I/O device
XSB00-2
CPU
Memory - 8 DIMMs
I/O device
XSB00-3
CPU
Memory - 8 DIMMs
I/O device
A domain consists of one or more XSBs. Each domain runs its own copy of the
Solaris OS. A domain must have, at a minimum, 1 CPU, 8 DIMMs, and I/O.
In FIGURE 4-3, one domain (for example, domain 0) must contain XSB 00-0, and the
second domain (for example, domain 1) must contain XSB 00-1, because of the I/O
requirement for a domain. The remaining XSB 00-2 and XSB 00-3 can be assigned to
either domain, or to none.
Chapter 4
Domain Configuration
51
The number of domains allowed depends on which midrange or high-end server
model you have. The default is one domain and the maximum number of domains is
24. Each domain is identified with a domain ID number, with the default domain as
#0.
TABLE 4-1 shows the maximum number of system boards, the maximum number of
domains, and the domain ID number range by server model.
TABLE 4-1
Boards, Domains, and Domain ID Numbers
Server Model
Maximum Physical
System Boards
Maximum Domains
Domain ID Number
Range
M9000 + expansion unit
16
24
0-23
M9000
8
24
0-23
M8000
4
16
0-15
M5000
2
4
0-3
M4000
1
2
0-1
Domains can be set up to include both Uni-XSBs and Quad-XSBs. FIGURE 4-5 shows
two XSBs in Uni-XSB mode (left side of figure) and two XSBs in Quad-XSB mode
(right side of figure) on a high-end server; the partition of these boards into three
Solaris domains is shown by shading.
52
SPARC Enterprise Mx000 Servers Administration Guide • November 2007
FIGURE 4-5
Example of XSBs and Solaris Domains on a High-End Server
CPU
Memory
8 DIMMs
I/O device
CPU
Memory
8 DIMMs
I/O device
CPU
Memory
8 DIMMs
I/O device
CPU
Memory
8 DIMMs
I/O device
CPU
Memory
8 DIMMs
I/O device
CPU
Memory
8 DIMMs
I/O device
CPU
Memory
8 DIMMs
I/O device
CPU
Memory
8 DIMMs
I/O device
CPU
Memory
8 DIMMs
CPU
Memory
8 DIMMs
CPU
Memory
8 DIMMs
CPU
Memory
8 DIMMs
CPU
Memory
8 DIMMs
CPU
Memory
8 DIMMs
CPU
Memory
8 DIMMs
CPU
Memory
8 DIMMs
I/O not needed
I/O not needed
The Solaris OS is installed on a per-domain basis. In the configuration shown in
FIGURE 4-5, there would be three Solaris images, one for each domain.
In high-end servers, the internal disks are available only for the first (top) I/O device
and the third (third from top) I/O device. The second and fourth I/O devices do not
have the capability to have internal hard disks. In midrange servers, the internal
disk is available only for the first (top) I/O device.
Chapter 4
Domain Configuration
53
Domain Resource Assignment
The assignment of CPU modules (CPUM), memory, and I/O to domains in QuadXSB mode is shown in TABLE 4-2, TABLE 4-3 and TABLE 4-4.
TABLE 4-2
XSB
CPU
Memory Board
I/O
00-0
CPUM#0-CHIP#0
MEMB#0
Disks; GbE; PCI#0,
PCI#1, PCI#2
00-1
CPUM#0-CHIP#1
MEMB#1
PCI#3, PCI#4
00-2
CPUM#1-CHIP#0
MEMB#2
None
00-3
CPUM#1-CHIP#1
MEMB#3
None
TABLE 4-3
54
Resource Assignment in Quad-XSB Mode on an M4000 Midrange Server
Resource Assignment in Quad-XSB Mode on an M5000 Midrange Server
XSB
CPU
Memory Board
I/O
00-0
CPUM#0-CHIP#0
MEMB#0
Disks; GbE; IOU#0PCI#0, IOU#0-PCI#1,
IOU#0-PCI#2
00-1
CPUM#0-CHIP#1
MEMB#1
IOU#0-PCI#3, IOU#0PCI#4
00-2
CPUM#1-CHIP#0
MEMB#2
None
00-3
CPUM#1-CHIP#1
MEMB#3
None
01-0
CPUM#2-CHIP#0
MEMB#4
Disks; GbE; IOU#1PCI#0, IOU#1-PCI#1,
IOU#1-PCI#2
01-1
CPUM#2-CHIP#1
MEMB#5
IOU#1-PCI#3, IOU#1PCI#4
01-2
CPUM#3-CHIP#0
MEMB#6
None
01-3
CPUM#3-CHIP#1
MEMB#7
None
SPARC Enterprise Mx000 Servers Administration Guide • November 2007
In TABLE 4-4, the XSB board number xx is in the range of 00-15; the IOU board number
xx is the IOU board number corresponding to the XSB board number. For example, XSB
00-0 has IOU#00-PCI#0.
TABLE 4-4
Resource Assignment in Quad-XSB Mode on a High-end Server
XSB
CPU
DIMMs
I/O
xx-0
CPUM#0
MEM#00A,B
MEM#01A,B
MEM#02A,B
MEM#03A,B
IOU#xx-PCI#0,
IOU#xx-PCI#1
xx-1
CPUM#1
MEM#10A,B
MEM#11A,B
MEM#12A,B
MEM#13A,B
IOU#xx-PCI#2,
IOU#xx-PCI#3
xx-2
CPUM#2
MEM#20A,B
MEM#21A,B
MEM#22A,B
MEM#23A,B
IOU#xx-PCI#4,
IOU#xx-PCI#5
xx-3
CPUM#3
MEM#30A,B
MEM#31A,B
MEM#32A,B
MEM#33A,B
IOU#xx-PCI#6,
IOU#xx-PCI#7
Domain Component List and Logical System
Boards
The domain component list (DCL) identifies the potential resources for a domain. A
single XSB can potentially belong to multiple domains. However, a single XSB can be
assigned only to one specific domain.
XSB numbers are not used in domain configuration, however. The software requires
that each XSB number “map” to a logical system board (LSB) number. Processor
numbers and I/O bridges are based on LSB numbers. Appendix A contains
additional information on LSB and device path names.
Overview of Steps for Domain Configuration
This section applies to domain configuration after installing a new board in the
system.
Chapter 4
Domain Configuration
55
Note – If you create a new domain, you have to install the Solaris OS on the
domain. Refer to the Solaris OS documentation collection for instructions.
Domain configuration typically includes these steps:
1. Log in to the XSCF console with appropriate privileges.
2. Specify the XSB mode, either Uni-XSB or Quad-XSB, using the setupfru
command.
3. Set up information for a domain (the DCL), using the setdcl command. The
DCL identifies the potential resources for a domain.
4. Assign the hardware resources (XSBs) to the domain, using the addboard
command. The DCL must be set up before assigning XSBs to a domain.
5. Power on the domain, using the poweron command.
(Step 5 and Step 6 may be done in reverse order.)
6. Open a console to the domain, using the console command.
7. If this is a new domain, at the OpenBoot PROM prompt, install the Solaris OS.
Refer to the Solaris OS documentation collection for instructions.
8. Set up any services you want to use on the domain, such as NTP. Refer to
Chapter 3 for information on services, including NTP.
Domain Configuration Example
This domain configuration example assumes one PSB in Uni-XSB mode will be set
up in Quad-XSB mode and configured into two domains. The domain configuration
will be:
domain0 = XSB#00-0 + XSB#00-2
domain1 = XSB#00-1 + XSB#00-3
XSCF> setupfru -x 4 sb 0
XSCF> showfru sb 0
Device
sb
Location
00
XSB Mode
Quad
Memory Mirror Mode
no
XSCF> setdcl -d 0 -a 0=00-0
XSCF> setdcl -d 0 -a 1=00-2
56
SPARC Enterprise Mx000 Servers Administration Guide • November 2007
XSCF> addboard -c assign -d 0 00-0 00-2
XSB#00-0 will be assigned to DomainID 0. Continue?[y|n] :y
XSB#00-2 will be assigned to DomainID 0. Continue?[y|n] :y
XSCF> showdcl -v -d 0
DID
LSB
XSB
00
01
02
03
04
05
06
07
08
09
10
11
12
13
14
15
00-0
00-2
-
00
Status
No-Mem
Powered Off
False
False
No-IO
Float
False
False
False
False
Cfg-policy
FRU
XSCF> poweron -d 0
DomainIDs to power on:0
Continue? [y|n] :y
00 :Powered on
XSCF> setdcl -d 1 -a 0=00-1
XSCF> setdcl -d 1 -a 1=00-3
XSCF> addboard -c assign -d 1 00-1 00-3
XSB#00-1 will be assigned to DomainID 1. Continue?[y|n] :y
XSB#00-3 will be assigned to DomainID 1. Continue?[y|n] :y
XSCF> showdcl -v -d 1
DID
LSB
XSB
00
01
02
03
00-1
00-3
-
01
Status
No-Mem
Powered Off
False
False
No-IO
Float
False
False
False
False
Cfg-policy
FRU
Chapter 4
Domain Configuration
57
04
05
06
07
08
09
10
11
12
13
14
15
-
XSCF> poweron -d 1
DomainIDs to power on:1
Continue? [y|n] :y
01 :Powered on
XSCF> showboards -a
XSB
---00-0
00-1
00-2
00-3
DID(LSB)
-------00(00)
01(00)
00(01)
01(01)
Assignment
----------Assigned
Assigned
Assigned
Assigned
Pwr
---y
y
y
y
Conn
---y
y
y
y
Conf
---n
n
n
n
Test
------Passed
Passed
Passed
Passed
Fault
------Normal
Normal
Normal
Normal
XSCF> console -d 0
Connect to Domain#00?[y|n] :y
{0} ok
Domain Communication
Domain communication includes:
58
■
Domain and Service Processor internal communication over the DSCP network
■
Accessing a domain console from the Service Processor
■
Logging in to a domain using an Ethernet connection
SPARC Enterprise Mx000 Servers Administration Guide • November 2007
DSCP Network
The DSCP network establishes a link, using IP addresses, between the Service
Processor and each domain. This link enables communication between the Service
Processor and domains, and the secure transfer of information. Each domain must
have its own IP address, and the Service Processor must have its own IP address.
DSCP is optimized to securely exchange control data such as error reports, fault
events, and time synchronization, between each domain and the Service Processor.
Accessing a Domain Console from the Service Processor
You can log in to the Service Processor and use the console command to access a
particular domain.
Once you have access to the domain console, you will get the standard Solaris
console with associated prompts, based on the configured shell. You will be able to
run all of the normal Solaris command-line interface commands. To run Solaris GUIbased commands, however, you must log in to the domain from a remote
environment, not through the domain console.
Logging in Directly to a Domain
If your server is networked, you can log into a domain directly using standard
Solaris applications, such as telnet, rsh, and rlogin. To ensure a secure
connection, use ssh.
DVD Drive or Tape Drive Assignment
On a midrange server, the optional DVD drive or DAT drive can automatically be
used by the domain on PSB/XSB 00-0.
On a high-end server, the DVD or DAT drives can be used by assigning them to a
specific card port on an I/O unit. The devices are assigned to a specific port on an
I/O unit using the cfgdevice command on the Service Processor, then connected
using the cfgadm command on the Solaris OS. The DVD drives are read-only.
See “To Attach a DVD or Tape Drive While the Solaris OS Is Running
(M8000/M9000 Servers)” on page 62 for instructions. You can also refer to the
SPARC Enterprise M4000/M5000/M8000/M9000 Servers XSCF User’s Guide or to the
cfgadm(1M) and cfgdevice(8) man pages for additional information.
Chapter 4
Domain Configuration
59
Backup and Restore Operations
For domain backup and restore operations, refer to your backup software
documentation for instructions. The Solaris OS documentation collection also
contains information on backup and restore operations.
Dynamic Reconfiguration
Dynamic reconfiguration allows you to add or remove PSBs from system domains
without stopping the Solaris OS. You can use dynamic reconfiguration to
redistribute your system resources by adding or removing system boards as needed
or to replace failed system boards with new ones. For more information, refer to the
Dynamic Reconfiguration User’s Guide and to the Service Manual.
XSCF Shell Procedures for Domain
Configuration
This section describes these tasks:
■
To Specify the XSB Mode
■
To Set Up a Domain Component List
■
To Assign an XSB to a Domain
■
To Power On a Domain
■
To Display System Board Status
■
To Access a Domain From the XSCF Console
▼ To Specify the XSB Mode
1. Log in to the XSCF console with platadm or fieldeng privileges.
2. Type the setupfru command:
XSCF> setupfru -x mode sb location
where mode can be either 1 to specify a Uni-XSB or 4 to specify a Quad-XSB; sb is
the system board device, and location is the location of the device, a number from
0-15.
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SPARC Enterprise Mx000 Servers Administration Guide • November 2007
3. Verify the operation with the showfru command.
▼ To Set Up a Domain Component List
1. Log in to the XSCF console with platadm privileges.
2. Type the setdcl command:
XSCF> setdcl -d domain_id -a lsb=xsb
where domain_id is the domain you are setting the DCL for; lsb is the LSB number;
and xsb is the XSB number.
3. Verify the operation with the showdcl command.
▼ To Assign an XSB to a Domain
1. Log in to the XSCF console with platadm privileges or domainadm privileges
for a specific domain.
2. Type the addboard command:
XSCF> addboard -c assign -d domain_id xsb
where domain_id is the domain to which the XSB is to be assigned; xsb is the XSB
number to be assigned to the domain. For example, to assign XSB00-0 in domain
0, enter:
XSCF> addboard -c assign -d 0 00-0
Once an XSB has been assigned to a domain, that XSB belongs to that domain
until the domain unassigns it.
3. Verify the operation with the showboards -a command.
▼ To Power On a Domain
1. Log in to the XSCF console with platadm or fieldeng privileges or
domainadm or domainmgr privileges for a specific domain.
Chapter 4
Domain Configuration
61
2. Type the poweron command:
XSCF> poweron -d domain_id
where domain_id is the domain you want to power on. Only a user with platadm
or fieldeng privileges can use the -a option to turn on power to all domains.
3. Verify the domain is powered on by opening a console to it, with the console
command.
Refer to “To Access a Domain From the XSCF Console” on page 61.
▼ To Display System Board Status
1. Log in to the XSCF console with platadm, platop, or fieldeng privileges or
domainadm, domainmgr, or domainop privileges for a specific domain.
2. Type the showboards command:
XSCF> showboards -a
▼ To Access a Domain From the XSCF Console
1. Log in to the XSCF console with platadm, platop, or useradm privileges or
domainadm, domainmgr, or domainop privileges for a specific domain.
2. Type the console command:
XSCF> console -d domain_id
where domain_id is the domain you want to access. This command supports both
interactive and read-only connections; the default is a read-write connection.
3. To return to the XSCF console, press the Enter key, then the escape character,
then type a period (.); by default the escape character is the pound sign (#):
% #.
XSCF>
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SPARC Enterprise Mx000 Servers Administration Guide • November 2007
▼ To Attach a DVD or Tape Drive While the
Solaris OS Is Running (M8000/M9000 Servers)
1. If the Volume Management Daemon (vold) is running, stop the daemon:
# /etc/init.d/volmgt stop
2. Log in to the XSCF console with platadm privileges.
3. Type the cfgdevice command:
a. To check the status of current drives:
XSCF> cfgdevice -l
b. To attach a drive:
XSCF> cfgdevice -c attach -p port_no
where port_no is the port number in the specified domain where the device is to
be attached. port_no is specified in the format: IOU number-PCI slot number.
4. Mount the drive by typing the cfgadm command:
# cfgadm -c configure Ap_Id
where Ap_Id is the attachment point of the controller, for example, c0.
5. Restart the Volume Management Daemon (vold) if necessary:
# /etc/init.d/volmgt start
▼ To Disconnect a DVD or Tape Drive While the
Solaris OS Is Running (M8000/M9000 Servers)
1. If the Volume Management Daemon (vold) is running, stop the daemon:
# /etc/init.d/volmgt stop
Chapter 4
Domain Configuration
63
2. Detach the drive by typing the cfgadm command:
# cfgadm -c unconfigure Ap_Id
where Ap_Id is the attachment point of the controller. For example, if the drive is
connected to controller c0, you would type:
# cfgadm -c unconfigure c0::dsk/c0t4d0
# cfgadm -c unconfigure c0::rmt/0
3. Log in to the XSCF console with platadm privileges.
4. Type the cfgdevice command:
a. To check the status of current drives:
XSCF> cfgdevice -l
b. To detach a drive:
XSCF> cfgdevice -f -c detach -p port_no
where port_no is the port number in the specified domain where the device is to
be detached. port_no is specified in the format: IOU number-PCI slot number.
5. Restart the Volume Management Daemon (vold) if necessary:
# /etc/init.d/volmgt start
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SPARC Enterprise Mx000 Servers Administration Guide • November 2007
Related Information
For additional information on this chapter’s topics, see:
Resource
Information
man pages
setupfru(8), showfru(8), setdcl(8), showdcl(8), addboard(8),
moveboard(8), deleteboard(8), showboards(8), xntpd(1M),
showdevices(8), showconsolepath(8), console(8),
sendbreak(8), poweron(8), poweroff(8), reset(8), cfgdevice(8),
cfgadm(1M), setdomainmode(8)
Solaris OS documentation collection
Solaris OS installation; NTP; domains; backup operations
SPARC Enterprise
M4000/M5000/M8000/M9000 Servers
XSCF User’s Guide
Domains
Dynamic Reconfiguration User’s Guide
Domains
Service Manual
Physical component removal; FRUs
Chapter 4
Domain Configuration
65
CHAPTER
5
Audit Configuration
Your server can have multiple domains. Those domains must be as secure as if they
were running on physically separate servers. To help ensure that level of security,
XSCF firmware provides the audit measures described in this chapter.
This chapter contains these sections:
■
About Auditing
■
XSCF Shell Procedures for Auditing
■
Related Information
About Auditing
The server logs all Service Processor events that could be relevant to security, such as
system startup and shutdown, user login and logout, and privilege changes.
An audit record contains information about a single event, what caused it, the time
it occurred, and other relevant information. A collection of audit records that are
linked is called an audit trail. An audit trail can reveal suspicious or abnormal
patterns of system behavior, in addition to identifying which user was responsible
for a particular event.
Auditing is implemented through:
■
Audit Records
■
Audit Events
■
Audit Classes
■
Audit Policy
■
Audit File Tools
65
Audit Records
Audit records are stored in audit files on a 4-megabyte file system on the Service
Processor. You cannot change the size reserved for the audit files, but you can
transfer the files manually to remote storage at any time. You can also configure
auditing for automatic transfers.
Audit files are stored in binary format, although you can export them to XML.
The audit file system switches storage between two partitions. Audit records are
stored in one partition until it becomes full, then new records are stored in the other
partition. Records in a full partition can be moved to a remote location, according to
the audit policy.
If audit policy or network problems impede remote storage, the system generates an
alarm. You can clear space by manually transferring the files to remote storage or by
deleting them. Until you clear space, new records are dropped.
Because local space is limited to 4 megabytes, the partitions fill up quickly. If you do
not configure audit policy to automatically transfer files to remote storage, you will
have to intervene frequently or begin to drop records. If you are unable to maintain
consistent audit trails, the utility of the audit system is limited. Typically, you either
set up sufficient remote space and automatic transfers or disable the audit capability.
Audit Events
Audit events are:
66
■
Changes to the Service Processor configuration, for example, an IP address
change
■
Any request to perform an operation on an object protected by the access control
policy
■
All use of authentication
■
Tests of password strength, for example, tests done by the password command to
check whether a password contains enough non alphabetical characters
■
Modifications to the access control attributes associated with an object, for
example, changes to controls on which domains a board might be in
■
Changes made to user security attributes, for example, password or privileges
■
Reading information from the audit records (including unsuccessful attempts)
■
Modifications to the audit policy
■
Actions taken due to the exceeding of a audit trail size threshold
■
Actions taken due to audit storage failure
■
Modifications made by administrators to the audit trail
SPARC Enterprise Mx000 Servers Administration Guide • November 2007
■
Changes to the time
The minimum data recorded for each event includes:
■
Date and time of the event
■
Type of event
■
Who caused the event
■
Outcome of the event (success or failure)
Audit Classes
Audit classes are categories for grouping and sorting audit events. The server
provides a predefined set of audit classes, for example, log-in events and servicerelated events. You cannot define additional audit classes or change the events in a
class. Refer to the setaudit(8) man page for a list of audit classes.
Audit Policy
Audit policy determines how the auditing feature is implemented at your site. You
can configure the following aspects of auditing:
■
Whether it is enabled or disabled
■
Types of event that are audited
■
Which users have their events audited
■
Remote directories for storing audit records
■
Threshold of local capacity at which a warning is issued
■
Action when both audit partitions are full
The default audit policy is as follows:
■
Auditing is enabled
■
Records are dropped and counted when the audit trail is full
■
All events are enabled for auditing
■
Global user audit policy is set to enabled
■
Per-user audit policy for all users is set to default (that is, enabled)
■
Audit warning thresholds are set at 80 percent and 100 percent full
■
Email warnings are disabled
Chapter 5
Audit Configuration
67
Audit File Tools
You can manage audit files from the Service Processor, using a tool for viewing audit
files. Refer to the viewaudit(8) man page for details on this tool.
XSCF Shell Procedures for Auditing
This section describes these tasks:
■
To Enable or Disable Writing of Audit Records to the Audit Trail
■
To Configure an Auditing Policy
■
To Display Whether Auditing is Enabled Or Disabled
■
To Display Current Auditing Policy, Classes, or Events
▼ To Enable or Disable Writing of Audit Records
to the Audit Trail
1. Log in to the XSCF console with auditadm privileges.
2. Type the setaudit command:
XSCF> setaudit enable|disable
where enable enables writing of audit records, and disable disables writing of
audit records.
▼ To Configure an Auditing Policy
1. Log in to the XSCF console with auditadm privileges.
2. Type the setaudit command:
XSCF> setaudit [-p count|suspend] [-m mailaddr] [-a users=
enable|disable|default] [-c classes={enable|disable}] [-e events=
enable|disable] [-g {enable|disable}] [-t percents]
Refer to the setaudit(8) man page for details on option information.
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SPARC Enterprise Mx000 Servers Administration Guide • November 2007
3. Verify the operation with the showaudit all command:
XSCF> showaudit all
▼ To Display Whether Auditing is Enabled Or
Disabled
1. Log in to the XSCF console with auditadm privileges.
2. Type the showaudit command:
XSCF> showaudit
Auditing: enabled
▼ To Display Current Auditing Policy, Classes, or
Events
1. Log in to the XSCF console with auditadm privileges.
2. Type the showaudit all command:
XSCF> showaudit all
Related Information
For additional information on this chapter’s topics, see:
Resource
Information
man pages
setaudit(8), showaudit(8), viewaudit(8)
SPARC Enterprise M4000/M5000/M8000/M9000 Servers
XSCF User’s Guide
Audit administration
Chapter 5
Audit Configuration
69
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SPARC Enterprise Mx000 Servers Administration Guide • November 2007
CHAPTER
6
Log Archiving Facility
You can set up the Service Processor to automatically archive its log data on a
remote host.
This chapter contains these sections:
■
About Log Archiving
■
Solaris OS Procedures for Log Archiving
■
XSCF Shell Procedures for Log Archiving
■
Related Information
About Log Archiving
The persistent storage space on a Service Processor is limited. A portion of this space
is set aside for logs, such as audit logs and error logs. Due to the limited space, some
logs can grow to the point where old log entries must be overwritten or deleted.
These sections provide details on log archiving:
■
Using the Log Archiving Facility
■
Archive Host Requirements
■
Log Archiving Errors
■
Using the snapshot Tool
Using the Log Archiving Facility
Log archiving increases the storage space available for logs on the Service Processor
by transferring and storing log data on a server known as the archive host.
71
All connections established through log archiving are encrypted. The log archiving
feature provides the ability to use an RSA public key to authenticate the archive
host. You manage this public key on the Service Processor.
By default, log archiving is disabled. To use log archiving, you set up an archive
host, and then enable log archiving on the Service Processor.
When enabled, log archiving periodically uses the secure copy program (scp) to
transfer new log data to the archive host. Log archiving uses ssh to monitor the disk
space consumed by archives. It deletes old archives when necessary, so that the
space consumed by the archives will never exceed user-configurable archive space
limits. However, for security reasons, log archiving does not automatically delete
audit log archives. You can manually delete audit log archives that are no longer
needed.
FIGURE 6-1 illustrates how log archiving works.
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SPARC Enterprise Mx000 Servers Administration Guide • November 2007
FIGURE 6-1
Log Archiving
Archive Host
User Interface
on Archive Host
1
Archive
Directory
4
Service Processor
User Interface
on Service
Processor
2
Log
Archiving
3
Logs
As shown in FIGURE 6-1,
(1) Before enabling log archiving, create an archive directory on the archive host.
There should be a separate archive directory for each system that uses the archive
host. The directory permissions should be set so that only authorized users can
access its contents.
(2) You configure the log archiving feature.
(3) As new data accumulates in logs, log archiving polls log files at fixed intervals
to determine when new data needs to be archived.
(4) Log archiving uses scp to transfer log data to the archive host. It uses ssh to
manage the logs which it previously copied.
Chapter 6
Log Archiving Facility
73
Archive Host Requirements
As the Service Processor keeps track of archive space on the archive host, you should
not store other files in these archive directories.
It is possible to set up the Service Processor so that it uses one of the domains in the
same system as an archive host. However, this configuration does not provide
optimal reliability and serviceability. Typically, a separate, remote server functions as
the archive host.
Log Archiving Errors
The log archiving system handles typical errors by retrying and recording errors in
the Event Log. Possible error causes include archive host downtime, network
outages, and misconfiguration of the Service Processor and/or the archive host. You
can use the showarchiving command to view the details of the last ten archiving
failures, including the first 1000 characters of output from any command that failed.
Using the snapshot Tool
Log data can also be collected and transferred from the Service Processor with the
snapshot command. The snapshot tool does not extend or replace any other
functionality, such as log archiving or logging of information using syslog. Refer to
the snapshot(8) man page for details on this tool.
Solaris OS Procedures for Log Archiving
▼ To Configure the Log Archive Host
1. Select a user account on the server that will be used as the archive host that the
Service Processor will use to log in.
2. Log in to the archive host and create an archive directory.
3. Set the permissions of the archive directory as desired. The Service Processor
log-in account must have read, write, and execute (rwx) permissions.
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SPARC Enterprise Mx000 Servers Administration Guide • November 2007
XSCF Shell Procedures for Log
Archiving
This section describes these tasks:
■
To Enable Log Archiving
■
To Disable Log Archiving
■
To Display Log Archiving Configuration and Status
■
To Display Log Archiving Error Details
▼ To Enable Log Archiving
1. Log in to the XSCF console with platadm privileges.
2. Type the setarchiving command:
XSCF> setarchiving -t user@host:directory -r
where user@host:directory is the user name, log archive host, and directory where
the logs are to be stored, and -r prompts for the password for ssh login. Refer to
the setarchiving man page for additional options.
3. Type the setarchiving enable command:
XSCF> setarchiving enable
After tests indicate the archive host is set up correctly, log archiving is enabled
effective immediately. If the tests fail, you receive an error message that log
archiving was not enabled, and the reason why.
▼ To Disable Log Archiving
1. Log in to the XSCF console with platadm privileges.
2. Type the setarchiving command:
XSCF> setarchiving disable
Chapter 6
Log Archiving Facility
75
▼ To Display Log Archiving Configuration and
Status
1. Log in to the XSCF console with platadm, platop, or fieldeng privileges.
2. Type the showarchiving command:
XSCF> showarchiving
▼ To Display Log Archiving Error Details
1. Log in to the XSCF console with platadm, platop, or fieldeng privileges.
2. Type the showarchiving command:
XSCF> showarchiving -e
The details of the last ten archiving failures will be displayed.
Related Information
For additional information on this chapter’s topics, see:
Resource
Information
man pages
setarchiving(8), showarchiving(8), showlogs(8),
snapshot(8)
SPARC Enterprise M4000/M5000/M8000/M9000 Servers
XSCF User’s Guide
Logs; saving logs to a USB device
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SPARC Enterprise Mx000 Servers Administration Guide • November 2007
CHAPTER
7
Capacity on Demand
This chapter describes how to manage system resources with the Capacity on
Demand (COD) feature of your server.
Note – The COD feature is available only on high-end servers and those midrange
servers designated as COD models. If you have a midrange server that is not a COD
model, the information in this section does not apply.
This chapter contains these sections:
■
About Capacity on Demand
■
XSCF Shell Procedures for Using COD
■
Related Information
For information on ordering and purchasing COD licenses, refer to the COD User’s
Guide for your server.
About Capacity on Demand
Capacity on Demand is an option that allows you to purchase spare processing
resources (CPUs) for your server. The spare resources are provided in the form of
one or more CPUs on COD boards that are installed on your server.
However, to access these COD CPUs, you must first purchase the COD right-to-use
(RTU) licenses for them. Under certain conditions, you can use COD boards before
entering the license information.
Note – The term COD board refers to a COD system board in a high-end server, and
to a single-board COD model midrange server.
77
These sections provide details:
■
COD Boards
■
COD License Purchase
■
License Installation
■
License Allocation
■
Headroom Management
■
License Violations
COD Boards
A COD board is a system board that has been configured at the factory for COD
capability. COD boards come in the same configurations as standard system boards.
The number of CPUs per COD board depends on the configuration of your server.
COD boards are subject to the same limitations for mixed architectures and CPU
speeds as system boards. Likewise, COD board software requirements, such as the
Solaris OS or OpenBoot PROM version, are the same as those of system boards. Your
server can have any combination of COD and system boards. It can even be
configured entirely with COD boards.
Once a COD board has been licensed, you can configure it into domains in the same
way as a system board. Until it has been activated (using licenses or headroom),
however, you cannot configure it into a domain.
COD boards are identified by a special field-replaceable unit (FRU) ID and by a
COD label. Except for their FRU ID, label, and COD capability, once COD boards are
licensed, they are handled by the rest of the hardware and software in exactly the
same way as system boards. COD boards fully support dynamic reconfiguration
operations.
You can order COD boards either when you order your server, in which case they
arrive already installed, or as an option. The SPARC Enterprise M4000 and M5000
servers cannot add option COD boards after shipment from the factory; COD
capability for these two servers must be ordered with the server.
For more information about COD boards and replacing COD boards (fieldreplaceable units, or FRUs) in your server, see the COD User’s Guide and the Service
Manual.
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SPARC Enterprise Mx000 Servers Administration Guide • November 2007
COD License Purchase
The purchase of a COD RTU license entitles you to receive a license key, which
enables the appropriate number of COD processors. A license key can grant access
to multiple RTUs.
A COD license is assigned to a specific server, one license per processor (CPU). All
the licenses assigned to a server are handled as a floating pool of licenses for all the
COD processors installed on that server. For example, if you have a server with two
COD boards with four processors each, but you will only use six of those processors,
all you need is six licenses. Those six licenses can be used by all eight processors, but
only six at a time.
At least 50 license keys can be installed on a your server. A COD license has no
expiration date.
A COD license can be used by any COD processor on the server. However, the
license cannot be moved from one server to another. If COD processors are moved to
another server, the license becomes invalid.
License Installation
A license key is comprised of text lines, which can be added to the COD license
database. A single license key can grant access to multiple RTUs, as specified when
the key is generated.
After you purchase a license, you must install the license keys in the COD license
database. The license database is stored in nonvolatile memory on the Service
Processor. In a system with more than one Service Processor, failover of the COD
license database is supported. COD locks its license keys to the individual Chassis
HostID of the system.
Note – In case the license database is lost or corrupted, make sure you keep copies
of your licenses and license keys.
Chapter 7
Capacity on Demand
79
One way to preserve copies of your licenses and license keys is to save the output of
the showcodlicense -v command. You can cut-and-paste the this output to restore
any lost license keys. For example:
XSCF> showcodlicense -v
Description Ver
Expiration Count
Status
----------- ------------ ---------PROC
01
NONE
3
GOOD
01:803a9241:000000002:0301010100:3:00000000:XXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXX
PROC
01
NONE
2
GOOD
01:803a9241:000000003:0301010100:2:00000000:XXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXX
XSCF>
To restore lost licenses, enter a command similar to the following for each lost
license:
XSCF> addcodlicense
01:803a9241:000000002:0301010100:3:00000000:XXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXX
License Allocation
The XSCF firmware allocates COD licenses automatically on a first-come, firstserved basis. However, you can reserve licenses if you want to make sure a specific
number of COD licenses are allocated to a particular domain.
Licenses are allocated to COD resources either when a domain with a COD board is
powered on or when a new COD board is installed and powered on.
At board power on, the Service Processor determines which processing resources are
in working order and requests licenses for them. The XSCF firmware checks its
license database and current usage, determines which boards are COD boards, and
allocates licenses to their resources. It then tells the Service Processor which
resources to configure into the domain.
The Service Processor configures only the COD resources approved by the XSCF
firmware. Any COD resource that remains unlicensed is not configured into the
domain and is assigned a COD-disabled status.
When you remove a COD board from a domain through a reconfiguration operation,
when a domain containing a COD board is shut down normally, or when the Service
Processor detects a fault and unconfigures a board from the domain, the COD
licenses for the resources on those boards are released and added to the pool of
available licenses.
License allocation does not change during a Service Processor reboot or failover. All
licenses remain allocated to their resources.
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SPARC Enterprise Mx000 Servers Administration Guide • November 2007
You can reserve COD licenses for specific domains by using the setcod command.
After power on, reserved licenses are first allocated to their domains, and then
remaining licenses are allocated on a first-come, first-served basis to the remaining
resources. When a domain is powered off, the reverse happens: first the unreserved
licenses are released to the pool, then the reserved licenses are released.
For example, assume your server had 10 COD licenses and you reserved them for
these domains:
PROC RTUs reserved for domain 0: 4
PROC RTUs reserved for domain 1: 2
PROC RTUs reserved for domain 2: 0
PROC RTUs reserved for domain 3: 0
When the domains were first powered on, four licenses would be assigned to
domain 0 and two licenses to domain 1. The remaining four licenses would be
available on a first-come, first-served basis to all four domains (0, 1, 2, and 3).
Headroom Management
Caution – Before using headroom, be sure to read and understand the relevant
topics in the SPARC Enterprise M4000/M5000/M8000/M9000 Capacity on Demand
(COD) User’s Guide.
Headroom is the capability to use up to four COD processors per server before
entering the license information.
By default, COD resources arrive with headroom disabled. You can use the setcod
command to establish it. However, if all your COD resources are already licensed,
configuring headroom will have no effect. In that case, you need to install additional
COD boards to retain your headroom capacity. You can also reduce or disable
headroom at any time.
While headroom is in use, warning messages appear on the console every four
hours. Once you either deactivate the COD board or obtain a license for the
resources and enter the license keys, the warning messages stop. When a license key
is added, the headroom is automatically reduced by the quantity provided by the
license key.
Chapter 7
Capacity on Demand
81
License Violations
A license violation occurs if more resources are in use than are currently licensed on
the server. These events can cause a license violation:
■
The license database is lost or corrupted while the system is running. This state is
detected on the subsequent reboot.
This situation can be remedied by reentering the missing license keys, using the
addcodlicense command.
■
You delete COD licenses with the force option (deletecodlicense -f) while
the server is still using those licenses.
This could be a valid action in certain cases. For example, you might want to
delete unwanted COD licenses, but want to delay shutting down the domain.
■
You disable headroom while the server is still using those resources.
Once the system detects a license violation, the Service Processor will post a notice
on the server console and ensure that no additional COD resources are brought
online until the violation is corrected. In the meantime, it will not shut down
domains or COD resources.
XSCF Shell Procedures for Using COD
This section describes these tasks:
82
■
To Install a COD License
■
To Delete a COD License
■
To Reserve Licenses for Allocation
■
To Increase or Decrease Headroom
■
To Disable Headroom
■
To Display COD Information
■
To Display COD License Status
■
To Display Usage Statistics for COD Resources
SPARC Enterprise Mx000 Servers Administration Guide • November 2007
▼ To Install a COD License
This procedure installs a COD license and, if headroom is enabled, decreases
headroom to compensate for each new license. This automatic reduction in
headroom is designed to avoid accidental abuse of headroom. You can increase
headroom again manually after installing the COD license. See “To Increase or
Decrease Headroom” on page 85.
1. Log in to the XSCF console with platadm privileges.
2. Type the addcodlicense command:
XSCF> addcodlicense license-signature
where license-signature is the complete COD license key. For example:
XSCF> addcodlicense \
01:84000000:104:0301010100:3:00000000:xxxxxxxxxxxxxxx
3. Verify that the license key was added to the license database by typing the
showcodlicense -r command.
The COD RTU license key that you added should be listed in the
showcodlicense output. See “To Display COD License Status” on page 87.
▼ To Delete a COD License
Before deleting a license, the XSCF firmware determines whether sufficient licenses
are available from the pool of installed licenses plus headroom. If all licenses are in
use and no headroom is available, the operation will fail. You can force the operation
by using the -f option in Step 3, but doing so will overcommit any license
reservations that might be in effect.
1. Log in to the XSCF console with platadm privileges.
2. Verify that you have enough licenses or headroom to cover COD resources
currently in use.
Use the showcodlicense command, as described in “To Display COD License
Status” on page 87. If you do not have sufficient licenses or headroom to
compensate, power off one or more domains or disconnect the appropriate
number of boards.
3. Type the deletecodlicense command:
XSCF> deletecodlicense license-signature
Chapter 7
Capacity on Demand
83
where license-signature is the complete COD license key.
4. Verify that the license key was removed from the license database by typing
the showcodlicense -r command.
The COD RTU license key that you deleted should not be listed in the
showcodlicense output. See “To Display COD License Status” on page 87.
▼ To Reserve Licenses for Allocation
You need to reserve licenses only if you want to make sure a specific number of
COD licenses are allocated to a particular domain.
1. Log in to the XSCF console with platadm privileges.
2. Type the setcod command.
You can use one of two methods, as follows.
■
Use setcod command with the -d domain_id and the license_quantity options:
XSCF> setcod -d domain_id license_quantity
For example:
XSCF> setcod -d 1 4
■
Use the setcod command with no options.
This option allows you to reserve licenses for all domains at once. First, the
number of available licenses (8 in the example below) and the headroom
quantity prompt are displayed:
XSCF> setcod
COD
--PROC RTUs installed: 8
PROC Headroom Quantity (0 to disable, 4 MAX) [0]:
a. Enter a headroom number or press Return to leave the headroom
unchanged.
The following prompts are displayed, in order:
PROC
PROC
PROC
PROC
84
RTUs
RTUs
RTUs
RTUs
reserved
reserved
reserved
reserved
for
for
for
for
domain
domain
domain
domain
0
1
2
3
(6
(6
(4
(4
MAX)
MAX)
MAX)
MAX)
[0]:
[2]:
[0]:
[0]:
SPARC Enterprise Mx000 Servers Administration Guide • November 2007
b. Enter the number of licenses reserved for each domain.
The currently reserved number appear in parentheses. Do not exceed the
number of available licenses. To leave a reservation unchanged, press Return.
3. Verify the allocation with the showcod command.
▼ To Increase or Decrease Headroom
1. Log in to the XSCF console with platadm privileges.
2. Type the setcod command.
You can use one of two methods, as follows.
■
Use setcod command with the headroom option:
XSCF> setcod headroom
where headroom can be a number from 1 to 4. For example:
XSCF> setcod 4
■
Use the setcod command with no options.
If you are not sure of the headroom that is available, enter the setcod command
with no options; the output displays the number of available licenses and the
current headroom quantity (a number from 0 to 4).
XSCF> setcod
COD
--PROC RTUs installed: 8
PROC Headroom Quantity (0 to disable, 4 MAX) [0]:4
WARNING: Using headroom requires you to install license key(s)
within 30 days. Do you agree? [y|n]: y
You are prompted to enter the headroom number. Press Return when finished.
Chapter 7
Capacity on Demand
85
3. Verify the headroom quantity is correct by typing the showcod command.
For example, if you entered 4 as the headroom number, the output would be
similar to:
XSCF> showcod
Chassis HostID: 80d88800
PROC RTUs installed: 8
PROC Headroom Quantity: 4
...
▼ To Disable Headroom
1. Log in to the XSCF console with platadm privileges.
2. Type the setcod command and a headroom number of zero:
XSCF> setcod 0
3. Verify that the headroom is disabled by typing the showcod command.
For example:
XSCF> setcod 0
XSCF> showcod
Chassis HostID: 80d88800
PROC RTUs installed: 8
PROC Headroom Quantity: 0
...
▼ To Display COD Information
1. Log in to the XSCF console with platadm, platop, domainadm, or domainop
privileges, or domainmgr privileges for a specific domain.
86
SPARC Enterprise Mx000 Servers Administration Guide • November 2007
2. Type the showcod command.
The output displays the server’s Chassis HostID, number of licenses (PROC RTUs
installed), headroom quantity, and number of licenses reserved for each
domain. For example:
XSCF> showcod
Chassis HostID: 80e3e446
PROC RTUs installed: 10
PROC Headroom Quantity: 0
PROC RTUs reserved for domain
PROC RTUs reserved for domain
PROC RTUs reserved for domain
PROC RTUs reserved for domain
0:
1:
2:
3:
4
0
0
0
To display COD information only for a specific domain, use the showcod -d
domain_id command, where domain_id can be 0-23 depending on system
configuration.
▼ To Display COD License Status
1. Log in to the XSCF console with platadm or platop privileges.
Chapter 7
Capacity on Demand
87
2. Type the showcodlicense command.
The output displays the resource description, license version number, expiration
date, number of licenses, and license status. For example:
XSCF> showcodlicense
Description
----------PROC
Ver
--01
Expiration
---------NONE
Count
----8
Status
-----GOOD
To display license information in raw key format, use the -r option. For example:
XSCF> showcodlicense -r
01:84000000:104:0301010100:3:00000000:xxxxxxxxxxxxxxx
To display license information in verbose mode, use the -v option. For example:
XSCF> showcodlicense -v
Description Ver
Expiration Count Status
----------- ------------ ----- -----PROC
01
NONE
1 GOOD
01:84000000:000000001:0301010100:1:00000000:xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx
PROC
01
NONE
2 GOOD
01:84000000:000000004:0301010100:2:00000000:xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx
88
SPARC Enterprise Mx000 Servers Administration Guide • November 2007
▼ To Display Usage Statistics for COD Resources
1. Log in to the XSCF console with platadm or platop privileges, or domainadm,
domainop, or domainmgr privileges for a specific domain.
2. Type the showcodusage command.
The output displays a summary of license usage by resource type and for each
domain. For example:
XSCF> showcodusage
Resource
In Use Installed Licensed Status
------------- --------- -------- -----PROC
0
4
0 OK: 0 available
Domain/Resource In Use Installed Reserved
--------------- ------ --------- -------0 - PROC
0
4
0
1 - PROC
0
0
0
2 - PROC
0
0
0
3 - PROC
0
0
0
Unused - PROC
0
0
0
To display usage statistics only for domains or resources, use the
showcodusage -p domain command or the showcodusage -p resource
command. All COD usage information can be displayed with the
showcodusage -p all command.
You can also use the showboards command to identify which board is a COD
board. The output from this command has a column titled “COD”. This column
contains an “n” for a non-COD board or a “y” for a COD board. For example:
XSCF> showboards -v -a
XSB R DID(LSB) Assignment
--- - -------- ---------00-0
SP
Unavailable
01-0
SP
Unavailable
Pwr
--n
n
Conn
---n
n
Conf
---n
n
Test
Fault
------Unknown Normal
Fail
Failed
COD
--n
n
XSCF> showboards -v -a
XSB R DID(LSB) Assignment
--- - -------- ---------00-0 * 00(00)
Assigned
01-0 * 00(04)
Assigned
Pwr
--n
n
Conn
---n
n
Conf
---n
n
Test
Fault
------Unknown Normal
Unknown Normal
COD
--y
y
Chapter 7
Capacity on Demand
89
Related Information
For additional information on this chapter’s topics, see:
Resource
Information
man pages
setcod(8), showboards(8), showcodusage(8),
showcodlicense(8), showcod(8),
addcodlicense(8), deletecodlicense(8)
COD User’s Guide
Ordering COD licenses; additional COD procedures
Service Manual
Physical component removal; FRUs
90
SPARC Enterprise Mx000 Servers Administration Guide • November 2007
APPENDIX
A
Mapping Device Path Names
This appendix describes how to map device path names to physical system devices.
It contains these sections:
■
Device Mapping and Logical System Board Numbers
■
CPU Mapping
■
I/O Device Mapping
Device Mapping and Logical System
Board Numbers
The physical address represents a physical characteristic that is unique to the device.
Examples of physical addresses include the bus address and the slot number. The
slot number indicates where the device is installed.
The logical system board (LSB) number affects both the processor numbering and
the I/O device paths in the server. Physical resources are assigned to LSBs in the
specified domain using the setdcl command. It is the LSB numbers that the Solaris
OS uses.
CPU Mapping
Each LSB has a bank of 32 processor numbers assigned to it. Each processor has two
cores, and each core has two strands.
91
An LSB has four processors as a maximum (when a Uni-XSB is assigned to the LSB);
therefore, an LSB needs 16 processor IDs. Note that 32 IDs are assigned for future
expansion.
TABLE A-1 shows the relationship between LSB numbers and starting processor (proc)
numbers, in hexidecimal/decimal format. The Solaris prtdiag command provides
the LSB numbers and CPU chip numbers in decimal format for components that are
part of the domain.
TABLE A-1
92
LSB Numbers and Starting Processor Numbers
LSB
Number
CPU Chip 0
CPU Chip 1
CPU Chip 2
CPU Chip 3
00
00/00
08/08
10/16
18/24
01
20/32
28/40
30/48
38/56
02
40/64
48/72
50/80
58/88
03
60/96
68/104
70/112
78/120
04
80/128
88/136
90/144
98/152
05
a0/160
a8/168
b0/176
b8/184
06
c0/192
c8/200
d0/208
d8/216
07
e0/224
e8/232
f0/240
f8/248
08
100/256
108/264
110/272
118/280
09
120/288
128/296
130/304
138/312
10
140/320
148/328
150/336
158/344
11
160/352
168/360
170/368
178/376
12
180/384
188/392
190/400
198/408
13
1a0/416
1a8/424
1b0/432
1b8/440
14
1c0/448
1c8/456
1d0/464
1d8/472
15
1e0/480
1e8/488
1f0/496
1f8/504
SPARC Enterprise Mx000 Servers Administration Guide • November 2007
CPU Numbering Examples
This section contains examples of CPU numbering, using the output of the
showboards command on the Service Processor, and the output of the prtdiag
command on a domain.
XSCF> showboards -a
XSB
---00-0
00-1
00-2
00-3
01-0
01-1
01-2
01-3
DID(LSB)
-------00(00)
00(01)
00(04)
00(05)
01(00)
01(09)
01(06)
01(07)
Assignment
----------Assigned
Assigned
Assigned
Assigned
Assigned
Assigned
Assigned
Assigned
Pwr
---y
y
y
y
y
y
y
y
Conn
---y
y
y
n
y
y
n
n
Conf
---y
y
y
n
y
y
n
n
Test
------Passed
Passed
Passed
Passed
Passed
Passed
Passed
Passed
Fault
-------Normal
Normal
Normal
Normal
Normal
Normal
Normal
Normal
domain_0# prtdiag -v
...
==================================== CPUs ====================================
LSB
--00
01
04
05
CPU
Chip
---0
1
2
3
CPU
ID
-------------------0,
1,
2,
3
40, 41, 42, 43
144, 145, 146, 147
184, 185, 186, 187
Run
MHz
---2150
2150
2150
2150
L2$
MB
--4.0
4.0
4.0
4.0
CPU
Impl.
----6
6
6
6
CPU
Mask
---129
129
129
129
==============================================================================
domain_1# prtdiag -v
...
==================================== CPUs ====================================
LSB
--00
09
06
CPU
Chip
---0
1
2
CPU
ID
-------------------0,
1,
2,
3
296, 297, 298, 299
208, 209, 210, 211
Run
MHz
---2150
2150
2150
L2$
MB
--4.0
4.0
4.0
Appendix A
CPU
Impl.
----6
6
6
CPU
Mask
---129
129
129
Mapping Device Path Names
93
07
3
248, 249, 250, 251
2150
4.0
6
129
==============================================================================
I/O Device Mapping
I/O device paths are dictated by which LSB the I/O unit is assigned to.
The M4000 and M5000 servers have only one I/O controller on the I/O unit (IOU).
For an XSB in Uni-XSB mode, all I/O is on XSB#xx-0. For an XSB in Quad-XSB mode,
internal resources, the PCI-X slot, and two PCIe slots are on XSB#xx-0, and two PCIe
slots are on XSB#xx-1.
The M8000 and M9000 servers have two I/O controllers; therefore, each XSB can
have two PCIe slots assigned to it.
TABLE A-2 shows the LSB numbers and the corresponding device path values that are
used in I/O device mapping on the server.
TABLE A-2
94
LSB Numbers and Device Path Values
LSB Number
Device Path Value
00
No value
01
1
02
2
03
3
04
4
05
5
06
6
07
7
08
8
09
9
10
a
11
b
12
c
SPARC Enterprise Mx000 Servers Administration Guide • November 2007
TABLE A-2
LSB Numbers and Device Path Values (Continued)
LSB Number
Device Path Value
13
d
14
e
15
f
I/O Device Mapping on the M4000 and M5000
Servers
TABLE A-3 shows the device mapping on a midrange server. In the device path, x is
LSB-dependent, and is assigned a value as shown in TABLE A-2.
TABLE A-3
I/O Device Mapping on a Midrange Server
Slot
Host Bus Adapter Slot Type
OpenBoot PROM Device Path
IOU Slot 0
PCI-X
/pci@x0,600000/pci@0/pci@8/pci@0,1
IOU Slot 1
PCIe
/pci@x0,600000/pci@0/pci@9
IOU Slot 2
PCIe
/pci@x1,700000
IOU Slot 3
PCIe
/pci@x2,600000
IOU Slot 4
PCIe
/pci@x3,700000
Internal Devices on the M4000 and M5000 Servers
The internal M4000/M5000 devices, which are located at the XSB location 00-0 or 010 (regardless of Uni-XSB or Quad-XSB mode), are shown in TABLE A-4 and TABLE A-5.
In the device path, x is LSB-dependent, and is assigned a value as shown in
TABLE A-2.
TABLE A-4
Internal Devices and Device Paths on the M4000 and M5000 Servers
XSB 00-0/IOU
0 Accessible Internal
Devices (M4000/M5000)
Device Physical Location
OpenBoot PROM Device Path
Network Port 0
IOU
/pci@x0,600000/pci@0/pci@8/pci@0/network@2
Network Port 1
IOU
/pci@x0,600000/pci@0/pci@8/pci@0/network@2,1
HD0
System
/pci@x0,600000/pci@0/pci@8/pci@0/scsi@1/disk@0
Appendix A
Mapping Device Path Names
95
TABLE A-4
Internal Devices and Device Paths on the M4000 and M5000 Servers (Continued)
XSB 00-0/IOU
0 Accessible Internal
Devices (M4000/M5000)
Device Physical Location
OpenBoot PROM Device Path
HD1
System
/pci@x0,600000/pci@0/pci@8/pci@0/scsi@1/disk@1
CD/DVD
System
/pci@x0,600000/pci@0/pci@8/pci@0/scsi@1/disk@3
DAT
System
/pci@x0,600000/pci@0/pci@8/pci@0/scsi@1/tape@2
TABLE A-5
Internal Devices and Device Paths on the M5000 Server
XSB 01-0/IOU
1 Accessible Internal
Device (M5000)
Device Physical Location
OpenBoot PROM Device Path
Network Port 0
IOU
/pci@x0,600000/pci@0/pci@8/pci@0/network@2
Network Port 1
IOU
/pci@x0,600000/pci@0/pci@8/pci@0/network@2,1
HD2
System
/pci@x0,600000/pci@0/pci@8/pci@0/scsi@1/disk@0
HD3
System
/pci@x0,600000/pci@0/pci@8/pci@0/scsi@1/disk@1
I/O Device Mapping on the M8000 and M9000
Servers
TABLE A-6 shows the device mapping on a high-end server. In the PCIe device path,
x is LSB-dependent, and is assigned a value as shown in TABLE A-2. xx is the XSB
number and is in the range from 00-15.
TABLE A-6
I/O Device Mapping on a High-end Server
PCIe Slot
Uni-XSB*
Quad-XSB\
OpenBoot PROM PCIe Device Pathd
IOU Slot 0
xx-0
xx-0
pci@x0,600000
IOU Slot 1
xx-0
xx-0
pci@x1,700000
IOU Slot 2
xx-0
xx-1
pci@x2,600000
IOU Slot 3
xx-0
xx-1
pci@x3,700000
IOU Slot 4
xx-0
xx-2
pci@x4,600000
96
SPARC Enterprise Mx000 Servers Administration Guide • November 2007
TABLE A-6
I/O Device Mapping on a High-end Server (Continued)
PCIe Slot
Uni-XSB*
Quad-XSB\
OpenBoot PROM PCIe Device Pathd
IOU Slot 5
xx-0
xx-2
pci@x5,700000
IOU Slot 6
xx-0
xx-3
pci@x6,600000
IOU Slot 7
xx-0
xx-3
pci@x7,700000
* xx is the XSB number, in the range of 00-15.
\ xx is the XSB number, in the range of 00-15.
d x is LSB-dependent, and is assigned a value as shown in TABLE A-2.
Internal Devices on the M8000 and M9000 Servers
The IOUA is a PCIe Host Bus Adapter that provides access to internal devices when
installed at specific locations. The IOUA contains two 1Gb Ethernet ports on the card
(“on-board”). When the IOUA is installed at specific locations, it also provides access
to storage located on the IOU, as well as platform DVD/DAT resources at the
locations shown in TABLE A-7. In the PCIe device path, x is LSB-dependent, and is
assigned a value as shown in TABLE A-2. xx is the XSB number and is in the range
from 00-15. nn is the number associated with the PSB to which the DVD or DAT
device is attached, as further explained in the table footnote.
TABLE A-7
Internal Devices and Device Paths on a High-end Server
PCIe Slot
UniXSB*
QuadXSB\
OpenBoot PROM
PCIe Device
Pathd
IOU Slot 0
xx-0
xx-0
pci@x0,600000
IOU Slot 1
xx-0
xx-0
pci@x1,700000
IOU Slot 2
xx-0
xx-1
pci@x2,600000
OpenBoot PROM IOUA HBA On-board, IOU, and Platform Accessible
Devices\
.../pci@0,1/network@1 (IOUA HBA On-board BGE Port 0)
.../pci@0,1/network@1,1 (IOUA HBA On-board BGE Port 1)
.../pci@0/scsi@1/disk@0 (IOU HD0; SCSI Target 0)
.../pci@0/scsi@1/disk@1 (IOU HD1; SCSI Target 1)
.../pci@0/scsi@1/disk@4 (Platform CD/DVD at cfgdevice port
nn-0; SCSI Target 4)
.../pci@0/scsi@1/tape@5 (Platform DAT at cfgdevice port nn-0;
SCSI Target 5)
.../pci@0,1/network@1 (IOUA HBA On-board BGE Port 0)
.../pci@0,1/network@1,1 (IOUA HBA On-board BGE Port 1)
.../pci@0/scsi@1/disk@4 (Platform CD/DVD at cfgdevice port
nn-2; SCSI Target 4)
.../pci@0/scsi@1/tape@5 (Platform DAT at cfgdevice port nn-2;
SCSI Target 5)
Appendix A
Mapping Device Path Names
97
TABLE A-7
Internal Devices and Device Paths on a High-end Server (Continued)
PCIe Slot
UniXSB*
QuadXSB\
OpenBoot PROM
PCIe Device
Pathd
OpenBoot PROM IOUA HBA On-board, IOU, and Platform Accessible
Devices\
IOU Slot 3
xx-0
xx-1
pci@x3,700000
.
IOU Slot 4
xx-0
xx-2
pci@x4,600000
.../pci@0,1/network@1 (IOUA HBA On-board BGE Port 0)
.../pci@0,1/network@1,1 (IOUA HBA On-board BGE Port 1)
.../pci@0/scsi@1/disk@0 (IOU HD2; SCSI Target 0)
.../pci@0/scsi@1/disk@1 (IOU HD3; SCSI Target 1)
.../pci@0/scsi@1/disk@4 (Platform CD/DVD at cfgdevice port
nn-4; SCSI Target 4)
.../pci@0/scsi@1/tape@5 (Platform DAT at cfgdevice port nn-4;
SCSI Target 5)
IOU Slot 5
xx-0
xx-2
pci@x5,700000
IOU Slot 6
xx-0
xx-3
pci@x6,600000
IOU Slot 7
xx-0
xx-3
pci@x7,700000
.../pci@0,1/network@1 (IOUA HBA On-board BGE Port 0)
.../pci@0,1/network@1,1 (IOUA HBA On-board BGE Port 1)
.../pci@0/scsi@1/disk@4 (Platform CD/DVD at cfgdevice port
nn-6; SCSI Target 4)
.../pci@0/scsi@1/tape@5 (Platform DAT at cfgdevice port nn-6;
SCSI Target 5)
* xx is the XSB number, in the range of 00-15.
\ xx is the XSB number, in the range of 00-15.
d x is LSB-dependent, and is assigned a value as shown in TABLE A-2.
\ nn is the number associated with the PSB to which the DVD or DAT device is attached, as follows:
for an M8000 server, nn is in the range of 0-3; for an M9000 server, nn is in the range of 0-7; for an M9000 server plus expansion unit, nn
is in the range of 0-15.
Sample cfgadm Output and IOU Device Matrix
This section contains:
98
■
Sample output for the command cfgadm -s "select=class(pci)" on an
unpopulated server. As you connect devices, the cfgadm output will change to
reflect the device type and connection status on your server.
■
The device matrix for midrange and for high-end servers, when the IOU is
configured as part of a domain. I/O portions of the IOU resources may be in
different domains.
SPARC Enterprise Mx000 Servers Administration Guide • November 2007
SPARC Enterprise M4000 and M5000 Servers
SPARC Enterprise M4000 Server sample output:
# cfgadm -s "select=class(pci)"
Ap_Id
Type
iou#0-pci#0
unknown
iou#0-pci#1
unknown
iou#0-pci#2
unknown
iou#0-pci#3
unknown
iou#0-pci#4
unknown
Receptacle
empty
empty
empty
empty
empty
Occupant
unconfigured
unconfigured
unconfigured
unconfigured
unconfigured
Condition
unknown
unknown
unknown
unknown
unknown
Occupant
unconfigured
unconfigured
unconfigured
unconfigured
unconfigured
unconfigured
unconfigured
unconfigured
unconfigured
unconfigured
Condition
unknown
unknown
unknown
unknown
unknown
unknown
unknown
unknown
unknown
unknown
SPARC Enterprise M5000 Server sample output:
# cfgadm -s "select=class(pci)"
Ap_Id
Type
iou#0-pci#0
unknown
iou#0-pci#1
unknown
iou#0-pci#2
unknown
iou#0-pci#3
unknown
iou#0-pci#4
unknown
iou#1-pci#0
unknown
iou#1-pci#1
unknown
iou#1-pci#2
unknown
iou#1-pci#3
unknown
iou#1-pci#4
unknown
TABLE A-8
Receptacle
empty
empty
empty
empty
empty
empty
empty
empty
empty
empty
cfgadm Device Matrix for Midrange Servers
PCI Slot #
PCI Slot Type
IOU#0 (M4000/M5000)
IOU#1 (M5000)
0
PCI-X
iou#0-pci#0
iou#1-pci#0
1
PCIe
iou#0-pci#1
iou#1-pci#1
2
PCIe
iou#0-pci#2
iou#1-pci#2
3
PCIe
iou#0-pci#3
iou#1-pci#3
4
PCIe
iou#0-pci#4
iou#1-pci#4
Appendix A
Mapping Device Path Names
99
SPARC Enterprise M8000 and M9000 Servers
SPARC Enterprise M8000 Server sample output:
# cfgadm -s "select=class(pci)"
Ap_Id
Type
iou#1-pci#0
unknown
iou#1-pci#1
unknown
iou#1-pci#4
unknown
iou#1-pci#5
unknown
iou#1-pci#6
unknown
iou#1-pci#7
unknown
100
Receptacle
empty
empty
empty
empty
empty
empty
SPARC Enterprise Mx000 Servers Administration Guide • November 2007
Occupant
unconfigured
unconfigured
unconfigured
unconfigured
unconfigured
unconfigured
Condition
unknown
unknown
unknown
unknown
unknown
unknown
SPARC Enterprise M9000 Server sample output:
# cfgadm -s "select=class(pci)"
Ap_Id
Type
iou#0-pci#0
unknown
iou#0-pci#1
unknown
iou#0-pci#2
unknown
iou#0-pci#3
unknown
iou#0-pci#4
unknown
iou#0-pci#5
unknown
iou#0-pci#6
unknown
iou#0-pci#7
unknown
iou#3-pci#0
unknown
iou#3-pci#1
unknown
iou#3-pci#2
unknown
iou#3-pci#3
unknown
TABLE A-9
Receptacle
empty
empty
empty
empty
empty
empty
empty
empty
empty
empty
empty
empty
Occupant
unconfigured
unconfigured
unconfigured
unconfigured
unconfigured
unconfigured
unconfigured
unconfigured
unconfigured
unconfigured
unconfigured
unconfigured
Condition
unknown
unknown
unknown
unknown
unknown
unknown
unknown
unknown
unknown
unknown
unknown
unknown
cfgadm Device Matrix for High-End Servers
PCI Slot #
PCI Slot Type
IOU#0
IOU#1
IOU#n*
0
PCIe
iou#0-pci#0
iou#1-pci#0
iou#n-pci#0
1
PCIe
iou#0-pci#1
iou#1-pci#1
iou#n-pci#1
2
PCIe
iou#0-pci#2
iou#1-pci#2
iou#n-pci#2
3
PCIe
iou#0-pci#3
iou#1-pci#3
iou#n-pci#3
4
PCIe
iou#0-pci#4
iou#1-pci#4
iou#n-pci#4
5
PCIe
iou#0-pci#5
iou#1-pci#5
iou#n-pci#5
6
PCIe
iou#0-pci#6
iou#1-pci#6
iou#n-pci#6
7
PCIe
iou#0-pci#7
iou#1-pci#7
iou#n-pci#7
* n is the IOU number.
Appendix A
Mapping Device Path Names
101
102
SPARC Enterprise Mx000 Servers Administration Guide • November 2007
Glossary
audit
audit class
audit event
audit file
The collection of data about the use of system resources. Auditing provides a
record of security-related system events.
A grouping of audit events. Audit classes provide a way to select a group of
events to audit.
A security-related system action that is audited. Events are grouped into
classes.
An audit log where audit records are stored.
audit policy
A set of auditing options that an administrator can enable or disable. These
options include which events will be recorded and whether to record certain
kinds of audit data. The options also include whether to suspend audible
actions when the audit trail is full.
audit record
Audit data that is stored in an audit file. An audit record describes a single
audit event. Each audit record is composed of audit tokens.
audit trail
authentication
authorization
A set of audit logs that have been recorded by the server. The audit trail can be
analyzed with the use of audit tools.
A method by which a server validates and authorizes a user or function to
access or use the server.
The ability to perform an operation, act, or function with a computer resource
(for example, run, modify, or show).
The means by which the ability is explicitly enabled or restricted in some way.
Capacity on Demand
(COD)
COD
An option that provides additional CPU processing resources when needed.
These additional CPUs are provided on COD CPU boards that are installed in
the server. To access the COD CPUs, you must purchase the COD right-to use
(RTU) licenses for them.
See Capacity on Demand (COD).
103
domain
A set of one or more system boards that acts as a separate system capable of
booting the operating system and running an operating system independently
of any other domains. Domains that share a system are characteristically
independent of each other.
Each domain is based on the logical system board that is assigned to it.
Further, each domain is electrically isolated into hardware partitions, which
ensures that any failure in one domain does not affect the other domains in the
server.
Domain - SP
Communication
Protocol (DSCP)
DSCP
dynamic
reconfiguration (DR)
Protocol which provides a user-level to user-level TCP/IP sockets type
communication between the Service Processor and a domain. This
communication occurs over a mailbox type of communication provided by
other software components.
See Domain - SP Communication Protocol (DSCP).
Enables logical attachment and detachment of system boards to and from the
system without causing system downtime. This is the process of physically
installing or removing a system board while the Solaris OS is running.
Enables boards to be electrically isolated (deleteboard) from a domain so
they can be physically removed from the system or added to a different
domain; or to be electrically reattached (addboard) so they can be inserted
into a running server or assigned to a different domain.
environmental
monitoring
eXtended system board
(XSB)
eXtended System
Control Facility
(XSCF)
failover
104
The monitoring done through a large number of sensors that monitor
temperature, voltage, and current. The Service Processor software polls devices
in a timely manner and makes the environmental data available. The Service
Processor shuts down various components to prevent damage.
eXtended System Board combines the hardware resources of a physical system
board. The SPARC Enterprise servers can generate one or four XSB(s) from one
physical system board: Uni-XSB and Quad-XSB.
The software that runs on the Service Processor and provides control and
monitoring functions for the system platform.
Process by which the active Service Processor transfers control to the standby
Service Processor or the standby Service Processor takes control over from the
active Service Processor. In either case, the previously standby Service
Processor becomes the active and the active Service Processor becomes the
standby.
SPARC Enterprise Mx000 Servers Administration Guide • November 2007
field-replaceable unit
(FRU)
FRU
hostid
I/O unit
(IOU)
Lightweight Directory
Access Protocol
(LDAP)
log
log archive
logical system board
(LSB)
LSB
A part that can be replaced by field engineers when servicing the server.
See field-replaceable unit (FRU).
Unique system identifier.
The I/O unit, which is common to midrange and high-end servers, monitors
I/O events and supports PCIe. Further, the midrange server supports PCI-X
cards. The PCI cards must first be inserted in a PCI cassette. The I/O unit for
the midrange servers supports up to five PCI cassettes: four PCIe cassettes
(upper four slots) and one PCI-X cassette (lowest slot).
Protocol for accessing information directories. LDAP is based on the standards
contained within the X.500 standard, but is significantly simpler.
File containing a record of system activity.
Repository for log files.
The unit of grouping for memory, CPU and I/O, which is visible to software.
The physical system board (PSB) or eXtended system board (XSB) assigned
with the system board number on the domain is recognized as the logical
system board. One domain consists of a maximum of 16 logical system boards.
These can be a combination of XSBs and PSBs.
See logical system board (LSB).
privileges
Specific permissions granted to users who belong to assigned groups. XSCF
users can have any one or more of the following privileges: platform
administrator, platform operator, domain administrator, domain operator, user
administrator, audit administrator, audit operator, and field engineer
privileges.
Quad-XSB
The divided system board configured with the hardware resource on a physical
system board, which is segmented into four. See eXtended system board.
Service Processor
Uni-XSB
XCP
XSCF Control Package
(XCP)
A small system, that operates with an independent processor and directs the
system startup, reconfiguration, and fault diagnosis, plus giving access to the
domain(s). This is where the system management software (XSCF) runs.
The system board with the undivided hardware resource on a PSB.
See XSCF Control Package (XCP).
Runs on the Service Processor and contains XSCF, POST, and OpenBoot PROM
firmware.
Glossary
105
XSB
XSCF
106
See eXtended system board (XSB).
See eXtended System Control Facility (XSCF).
SPARC Enterprise Mx000 Servers Administration Guide • November 2007
Index
A
addboard command, 55, 60
addcodlicense command, 82, 83
adduser command, 14
altitude, 27
applynetwork command, 20, 32
auditing, 65 to 69
B
back up, domain, 59
C
Capacity on Demand, see COD
certificate, 26, 34, 42
cfgadm command, 4, 58, 62, 63, 98
cfgdevice command, 58, 62, 63
Chassis HostID, 79
clock, 23
COD, 77 to 90
boards, 78
headroom, 81, 82, 83, 85, 86, 87
license database, 79
license violation, 82
right-to-use (RTU) licenses, 79 to 90
commands
addboard, 55, 60
addcodlicense, 82, 83
adduser, 14
applynetwork, 20, 32
cfgadm, 4, 58, 62, 63, 98
cfgdevice, 58, 62, 63
console, 55, 58, 61
deletecodlicense, 82, 83
password, 15
poweron, 55, 61
prtdiag, 92, 93
rebootxscf, 35
rlogin, 58
rsh, 58
setaltitude, 27, 44
setarchiving, 75
setaudit, 68
setcod, 81, 84, 85, 86
setdate, 24, 37
setdcl, 55, 60, 91
setdscp, 18, 19, 28
sethostname, 20, 21, 32
sethttps, 26, 42
setldap, 23, 34
setlookup, 23, 34
setnameserver, 20, 21, 33
setnetwork, 20, 30
setntp, 35
setpasswordpolicy, 9, 14
setprivileges, 15, 23
setroute, 20, 31
setsmtp, 27, 43
setsnmp, 40, 41
setsnmpusm, 37
setsnmpvacm, 38, 39
setssh, 27, 44
settelnet, 26, 43
settimezone, 36
setupfru, 26, 49, 55, 59
showaltitude, 44
107
showarchiving, 74, 76
showaudit, 69
showboards, 60, 61, 89, 93
showcod, 85, 86, 87
showcodlicense, 83, 84, 88
showcodusage, 89
showdate, 37
showdcl, 60
showdscp, 19, 25, 29, 30
showfru, 60
showhttps, 42
showldap, 34
showlookup, 34
shownetwork, 31, 32
showntp, 35, 36
showpasswordpolicy, 14
showsmtp, 27, 43
showsnmp, 41, 42
showsnmpusm, 38
showsnmpvacm, 38, 39, 40
showssh, 43
showtelnet, 43
showtimezone, 36
showuser, 14, 22
snapshot, 74
telnet, 58
version, 16
console
access to a domain, 58, 61
escape character, 61
console command, 55, 58, 61
CPU module, 48, 91
D
DAT drive, 58
date, 23, 35, 36
deletecodlicense command, 82, 83
device path name mapping, 91
DIMMs, 48, 52
DNS, 3, 21, 32 to 33
domain
and COD licenses, 78, 80, 83, 84, 87, 89
backup and restore operations, 59
configuring, 47 to 64
console access to, 58
DCL, 54, 55, 60
DVD or DAT drive, 58
108
log in, 8, 58
power on, 60
resource assignment, 53
DSCP network, 18 to 19, 58
DVD drive, 58
dynamic reconfiguration, 59
E
escape character, 61
/etc/inet/ntp.conf file, 24
eXtended system board, see XSB
F
failover, 2, 10, 19, 20, 21, 26, 79, 80
fault management, 4, 25
FRU ID, 78
H
host name, 21, 33
host public key, 27, 44
hot replacement, 4
HTTPS, 3, 26, 42
I
I/O, 4, 48, 53, 58, 91
IOU (I/O unit), 53, 94
IP address, 4, 18 to 23, 58, 66
K
keyswitch, 12
L
LDAP, 3, 9, 10, 21 to 23, 33 to 34
licenses, COD, see COD
log in, 8, 12, 58
logical system board, see LSB
logs
archiving, 71
audit, 65
LSB, 54, 60, 91 to 94
M
man pages, 6
see also commands
mapping
SPARC Enterprise Mx000 Servers Administration Guide • November 2007
CPU, 91
I/O device, 91
memory, 26, 48, 53
MIB, 25, 26, 39
mirrored memory mode, 26
MODE switch, 12
N
netmask, 4, 19
NTP, 3, 23 to 25, 35 to ??, 35 to 36, 55
ntp.conf file, 24
P
password
LDAP, 23, 34
lost, 9, 12
policy, 9, 14
XSCF, 9, 14
password command, 15
PCIe slot, 48, 94
poweron command, 55, 61
private key, 26, 42
privileges, 9 to 11, 15
prtdiag command, 92, 93
PSB, 48
public key, 27, 44
R
rebootxscf command, 35
restore, domain, 59
rlogin command, 58
rsh command, 58
S
scp program, 72
security
auditing, 65
authentication, 8, 10
by default, 3
LDAP, 21, 33
MD5 encryption, 23
privileges, 8, 10
public key, 72
SSH, 3, 8, 14, 73
Telnet, 3
UNIX crypt, 23
Service Processor
defined, 2
log in, 8
set date and time, 23, 35, 36
setaltitude command, 27, 44
setarchiving command, 75
setaudit command, 68
setcod command, 81, 84, 85, 86
setdate command, 24, 37
setdcl command, 55, 60, 91
setdscp command, 18, 19, 28
sethostname command, 20, 21, 32
sethttps command, 26, 42
setldap command, 23, 34
setlookup command, 23, 34
setnameserver command, 20, 21, 33
setnetwork command, 20, 30
setntp command, 35
setpasswordpolicy command, 9, 14
setprivileges command, 15, 23
setroute command, 20, 31
setsmtp command, 27, 43
setsnmp command, 40, 41
setsnmpusm command, 37
setsnmpvacm command, 38, 39
setssh command, 27, 44
settelnet command, 26, 43
settimezone command, 36
setupfru command, 26, 49, 55, 59
showaltitude command, 44
showarchiving command, 74, 76
showaudit command, 69
showboards command, 60, 61, 89, 93
showcod command, 85, 86, 87
showcodlicense command, 83, 84, 88
showcodusage command, 89
showdate command, 37
showdcl command, 60
showdscp command, 19, 25, 29, 30
showfru command, 60
showhttps command, 42
showldap command, 34
Index
109
showlookup command, 34
shownetwork command, 31, 32
showntp command, 35, 36
showpasswordpolicy command, 14
showsmtp command, 27, 43
showsnmp command, 41, 42
showsnmpusm command, 38
showsnmpvacm command, 38, 39, 40
showssh command, 43
showtelnet command, 43
showtimezone command, 36
showuser command, 14, 22
SMTP, 3, 26
snapshot command, 74
SNMP, 3, 25 to 26, 37 to 42
Solaris OS, 2, 8, 48, 52, 55, 58, 59
SSH, 3, 8, 14, 26, 27, 43, 58, 73
syslog function, 74
XSCF network, 20 to 21
T
tape drive, 58
Telnet, 3, 26, 43
telnet command, 58
temperature, 27
time, 23, 35, 36
U
UID number, 14, 22
update, XCP, 11
user
UID number, 14, 22
XSCF account, 8 to 15
XSCF password, 9, 14
XSCF privileges, 8 to 15
user public key, 44
V
version command, 16
vold daemon, 62, 63
X
XCP image, 2, 11
XSB, 48 to 60, 94
XSCF firmware, defined, 1
110
SPARC Enterprise Mx000 Servers Administration Guide • November 2007
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