Specifications | Furuno MODEL 1622 Radar Detector User Manual

MARINE RADAR
MODEL 1622
C
Your Local Agent/Dealer
9-52, Ashihara -cho,
Nishinomiya, Japan
Telephone:
Telefax:
0 7 9 8 - 6 5 - 2111
0798-65-4200
All rights reserved.
Printed in Japan
P U B . N o . O M E -3 4 5 2 0
(DAMI)
MODEL1622
FIRST
EDITION
J2
:
:
JUN. 199 9
OCT. 7 , 2 0 0 2
SAFETY INSTRUCTIONS
WARNING
WARNING
ELECTRICAL SHOCK HAZARD
Use the proper fuse.
Do not open the equipment.
Fuse rating is shown on the equipment.
Use of a wrong fuse can result in equipment
damage.
Only qualified personnel
should work inside the
equipment.
Keep heater away from equipment.
Turn off the radar power
switch before servicing the
antenna unit. Post a warning sign near the switch
indicating it should not be
turned on while the antenna
unit is being serviced.
Heat can alter equipment shape and melt
the power cord, which can cause fire or
electrical shock.
The useable temperature ranges are
Antenna unit: -25˚C to +70˚C
Display unit: -15˚C to +55˚C
Prevent the potential risk of
being struck by the rotating
antenna and exposure to
RF radiation hazard.
CAUTION
Wear a safety belt and hard
hat when working on the
antenna unit.
WARNING LABEL
The warning label shown below is
attached to the display unit. Do not remove
this label. If the label is peeling off or is
illegible, contact FURUNO for replacement.
Serious injury or death can
result if someone falls from
the radar antenna mast.
Do not disassemble or modify the
equipment.
WARNING
To avoid electrical shock, do not
remove cover. No user-serviceable
parts inside.
Fire, electrical shock or serious injury can
result.
Turn off the power immediately if water
leaks into the equipment or the equipment is emitting smoke or fire.
Name:
Warning Label (1)
Type:
86-003-1011-0
Code No.: 100-236-230
Continued use of the equipment can cause
fire or electrical shock.
i
TABLE OF CONTENTS
INTRODUCTION .......................................................................................iii
SYSTEM CONFIGURATION .....................................................................iv
PRINCIPLE OF OPERATION .....................................................................v
1. OPERATION...........................................................................................1
1.1 Control Description............................................................................................................1
1.2 Indications and Markers ....................................................................................................2
1.3 Turning the Radar On/Off ..................................................................................................3
1.4 Transmitting, Stand-by ......................................................................................................3
1.5 LCD Tone and Brilliance ....................................................................................................3
1.6 Selecting the Range ..........................................................................................................3
1.7 Receiver Sensitivity ...........................................................................................................4
1.8 Suppressing Sea Clutter....................................................................................................4
1.9 Suppressing Rain Clutter...................................................................................................5
1.10 Range Rings ...................................................................................................................5
1.11 Cursor..............................................................................................................................5
1.12 Heading Marker...............................................................................................................6
1.13 Menu Operation...............................................................................................................6
1.14 Control Panel Brilliance ...................................................................................................7
1.15 Measuring the Range ......................................................................................................7
1.16 Measuring the Bearing ....................................................................................................8
1.17 Shifting the Display..........................................................................................................8
1.18 Zoom...............................................................................................................................8
1.19 Target Trails.....................................................................................................................9
1.20 Guard Alarm Zone...........................................................................................................9
1.21 Interference Rejector .....................................................................................................10
1.22 Echo Stretch.................................................................................................................. 11
1.23 Watchman ..................................................................................................................... 11
1.24 Navigation Data.............................................................................................................12
1.25 Displaying Navigation Data During Stand-by .................................................................12
1.26 Echoes in Black or White...............................................................................................13
1.27 Selecting Ranges to Use ...............................................................................................13
2. RADAR OBSERVATION ......................................................................15
2.1 General ...........................................................................................................................15
2.2 False Echoes ..................................................................................................................16
2.3 SART (Search and Rescue Transponder) .......................................................................17
2.4 Racon (Radar Beacon)....................................................................................................19
3. MAINTENANCE, TROUBLESHOOTIING ............................................21
3.1 Maintenance....................................................................................................................21
3.2 Replacing the Fuse .........................................................................................................21
3.3 Troubleshooting...............................................................................................................22
3.4 Magnetron Replacement .................................................................................................22
3.5 Synchro Belt Replacement ..............................................................................................22
SPECIFICATIONS ................................................................................SP-1
INDEX.............................................................................................. Index-1
Declaration of Conformity
ii
INTRODUCTION
• Automatic control of sensitivity and STC for
simplified operation.
A Word to FURUNO Model 1622
Owners
• Targets can be displayed in black on white
background or vice versa, for optimal viewing
under any lighting.
FURUNO Electric Company thanks you for
purchasing the MODEL 1622 Marine Radar. We
are confident you will discover why the
FURUNO name has become synonymous with
quality and reliability.
• On-screen alphanumeric readout of all
operational information.
• Standard features include Display Shift, EBL,
Echo Stretch, Target Trail, Guard Alarm,
Interference Rejector, VRM, Zoom.
For over 50 years FURUNO Electric Company
has enjoyed an enviable reputation for quality
and reliability throughout the world. This
dedication to excellence is furthered by our
extensive global network of agents and dealers.
• Guard zone watches for targets entering (or
exiting) a guard zone.
• Operates on 12V or 24V power and
consumes approx. 35 watts power.
Your radar is designed and constructed to meet
the rigorous demands of the marine
environment. However, no machine can perform
its intended function unless properly installed
and maintained. Please carefully read and
follow the installation, operation and
maintenance procedures set forth in this
manual.
• Position in latitude and longitude, speed, and
range and bearing to a waypoint can be
shown in the bottom text area. (Requires
navigation data input in NMEA 0183 format.)
• Navigation data such as position, water
temperature and depth can be shown during
stand-by. (Requires appropriate sensors.)
We would appreciate feedback from you, the
end-user, about whether we are achieving our
purposes.
• LCD equipped with temperature sensor with
maintains viewability under temperature
change.
Thank you for considering and purchasing
FURUNO.
• Can be connected to Radar Remote Display
FMD-1712.
Features
Your radar has a large variety of functions, all
contained in a rugged plastic case. All controls
respond immediately to the operator’s command
and each time a key is pressed the
corresponding change can be seen on the
screen.
The main features of the MODEL 1622 are
• Daylight viewing radar specially designed for
small craft and sailing yachts.
• Traditional FURUNO reliability and quality in
a compact, light-weight and low-cost radar.
• Compact and light-weight radome antenna
with precision 34 cm center-fed radiator.
• Stepping scanner motor.
• High definition 6-inch LCD display.
iii
SYSTEM CONFIGURATION
ANTENNA UNIT
RSB-0060
SIGNAL CABLE (Select one.)
MJ-A10SPF0003-050 (5 m)
MJ-A10SPF0003-100 (10 m)
MJ-A10SPF0003-150 (15 m)
MJ-A10SPF0003-200 (20 m)
03S9175 (30 m, option for 24 VDC only)
NMEA 0183 Cable
MJ-A6SPF0012-050 (5 m)
MJ-A6SPF0012-100 (10 m)
DISPLAY
UNIT
RDP-125
SOUNDER
SIGNAL CABLE ASSY.
MJ-A10SPF0008-XXX
(supplied with FMD-1712)
(1 m)
RECTIFIER
PR-62
NAVIGATOR
(NMEA 0183)
POWER CABLE
MJ-A3SPF0013-035
SHIP'S MAINS
100/110/115/220/230 VAC
SHIP'S MAINS
12/24 VDC
iv
RADAR REMOTE
DISPLAY
FMD-1712
EXTERNAL
BUZZER
OP03-136
Options shown with
dashed lines.
PRINCIPLE OF OPERATION
Therefore, if one knows the direction in which
the signal is sent out, one knows the direction
from which the echo must return.
What is Radar?
The term RADAR is an acronym meaning RAdio
Detection and Ranging. It is a device which
measures the time it takes for a pulsed signal to
be reflected back from an object.
Radar Wave Speed and
Antenna Rotation Speed
How Ships Determined
Position Before Radar
The speed of the radar waves out to the target
and back again as echoes is extremely fast
compared to the speed of rotation of the
antenna. By the time radar echoes have
returned to the antenna, the amount of antenna
rotation after initial transmission of the radar
pulse is extremely small.
The use of echoes to determine position did not
begin with radar. Ships would sound a short
blast on their whistles, fire a shot, or strike a bell
as an aid to navigation when running in fog near
a rugged shoreline. The time between the
origination of the sound and the returning of the
echo indicated how far the ship was from the
cliffs or the shore. The direction from which the
echo was heard indicated the relative bearing of
the shore.
The Radar Display
Targets are displayed on what is called a Plane
Position Indicator (PPI). This display is
essentially a polar diagram, with the transmitting
ship’s position at the center. Images of target
echoes are received and displayed at their
relative bearings, and at their distance from the
PPI center.
How Radar Determines Range
Radar determines the range to the target by
calculating the time difference between the
transmission of a radar signal and the reception
of the reflected echo. It is a known fact that
radar waves travel at a nearly constant speed of
162,000 nautical miles per second. Therefore
the time required for a transmitted signal to
travel to the target and return as an echo to the
source is a measure of the range to the target.
Note that the echo makes a complete round trip,
but only half the time of travel is needed to
determine the one-way range to the target. This
radar automatically takes this into account in
making the range calculation.
With a continuous display of the images of
targets, the motion of targets is also displayed.
See the figure on the next page for a
comparison of actual situation and radar picture.
How Radar Determines Bearing
The bearing to a target found by the radar is
determined by the direction in which the radar
antenna is pointing when it emits an electronic
pulse and then receives a returning echo. Each
time the antenna rotates pulses are transmitted
in the full 360 degree circle, each pulse at a
slightly different bearing from the previous one.
v
Heading Line
Targets
D
A
B
D
C
A
B
C
Own ship
at center
Own ship
(radar)
(A) Bird's eye view
of situation
(B) Radar picture of (A)
vi
Range and bearing
to a target, relative
to own ship, are
readable on the
screen.
Note: The radar
screen does not
discriminate "bow"
or "stern."
1. OPERATION
1.1 Control Description
TrackDisk
Shifts cursor, EBL,
VRM; selects items
on menus.
Opens/closes
the menu.
MENU
GUARD
HM OFF
Turns EBL
on/off.
RING
Turns VRM on/off.
Press with [EBL] to
turn range rings
on/off.
RANGE
Increases the
range.
EBL
Decreases
the range.
Activates/disables
the guard zone.
Press with [MENU]
to hide heading
marker.
VRM
Adjusts receiver
sensitivity.
GAIN
STC
Suppresses sea
clutter.
Suppresses
rain clutter.
FTC
SHIFT
Shifts the display.
TRAIL
ZOOM
Zoom feature
on/off.
TONE
TX
Echo trails
on/off.
Adjusts LCD tone
and brilliance.
POWER
Toggles between
TRANSMIT and
STAND-BY.
Turns power
on/off.
Figure 1-1 Controls
1
1.2 Indications and Markers
Range
Range ring
interval
Zoom
(flashing)
1.5 NM
0.5
ZOOM
WATCHMAN
3M TRAIL
G (IN)
FTC
ES
IR
Target trails setting
Guard alarm (IN or OUT)
Rain clutter suppressor
Echo stretch
Interference rejector
Watchman
Guard
zone
EBL
Heading line
Cursor
Range rings
VRM
EBL bearing
VRM range
EBL
VRM
45.0˚
1.25 NM
291.5˚
0.73 NM
Figure 1-2 Indications and markers
2
Range and bearing
to cursor
1.3 Turning the Radar On/Off
1.5 LCD Tone and Brilliance
The [POWER] key turns the radar on/off. When
turning on the power, the control panel lights and
the timer displays the time remaining for warm
up of the magnetron (device which transmits
radar pulses), counting down from 1:00 to 0:00.
1. Press the [TONE] key. The dialogue shown
in Figure 1-3 appears.
LOW
▲
TONE: 12
▲ HIGH
Quick Start
Provided that the radar was once in use with
the transmitter tube (magnetron) still warm,
you can turn on the radar into TRANSMIT
status without the one-minute stand-by.
If the power switch has been turned off by
mistake and you want to restart the radar
promptly do the following:
1. Press the [POWER] key not later than five
seconds after power-off.
2. Press the [TX] key. The radar is restored
for full operation.
1.4 Transmitting, Stand-by
After the power is turned on and the magnetron
has warmed up, ST-BY (Stand-By) appears at
the screen center, indicating the radar is ready to
transmit radar pulses.
Press the [TX] key to transmit. Echoes appear in
four levels of digitized video according to echo
strength. Note that when a target is beneath a
marker (VRM, EBL, heading marker, range ring)
the part of the marker where the target lies is
displayed in reverse video.
Note: If you press the [TX] key before the
indication ST-BY appears, the buzzer sounds
and the radar does not transmit pulses.
BRILL: 3
LOW ▼ ▲ HIGH
Figure 1-3 Dialogue for adjustment of
LCD tone and brilliance
2. Press or or the [TONE] key to adjust
tone; ▲ or ▼ to adjust brilliance.
The dialogue for adjustment of tone and
brilliance is automatically erased when there is
no TrackDisk operation for about 10 seconds. To
erase it more quickly, press the [TONE] key after
making the adjustment.
1.6 Selecting the Range
The range selected automatically determines the
range ring interval, the number of range rings
and pulse repetition rate.
Press the [+] or [-] key to select a range. The
range and range ring interval appear at the top
left corner on the screen.
Range
Range ring
interval
6.0 NM
2.0
When you won’t be using the radar for an
extended period, but you want to keep it in a
state of readiness, press the [TX] key to set the
radar in stand-by.
045.0°
3.35 NM
Figure 1-4 Location of range and range
ring interval indications
3
1.7 Receiver Sensitivity
The [GAIN] key adjusts the sensitivity of the
receiver. It works in precisely the same manner
as the volume control of a broadcast receiver,
amplifying the signals received.
You can adjust the sensitivity manually, or let the
unit do it automatically. In either case, the proper
setting is such that the background noise is just
visible on the screen. Adjust the sensitivity on the
highest range since the background noise is
clearer on that range.
If you set up for too little sensitivity, weak echoes
may be missed. On the other hand excessive
sensitivity yields too much background noise;
weak targets may be missed because of the poor
contrast between desired echoes and the
background noise on the display.
Automatic adjustment of sensitivity
1. Press the [GAIN] key once or twice to display
the screen shown in Figure 1-5.
AUTO GAIN MOD
LOW
HIGH
1
2
3
Figure 1-5 Dialogue for automatic
adjustment of gain
Note: The dialogues for adjusting sensitivity are
automatically erased when there is no TrackDisk
operation for 10 seconds. To erase them quicker,
press the [GAIN] key after completing the setting.
1.8 Suppressing Sea Clutter
In rough weather, returns from the sea surface
are received over several miles around own ship
and mask nearby targets. This situation can be
improved by properly using the [STC] key.
If the setting is too low, targets will be hidden in
the clutter, while if it is set too high, both sea
clutter and targets will disappear from the display.
In most cases adjust the key until clutter has
disappeared to leeward, but a little is still visible
windward.
A common mistake is too over-adjust the [STC]
key so that the surface clutter is completely
removed. By setting up for maximum STC effect,
you will see how dangerous this can be; a dark
zone will be created near the center of the
screen, causing a loss of close-in targets. This
dark zone is even more dangerous if the
sensitivity has not been properly adjusted.
Always leave a little surface clutter visible on the
screen. If no clutter is observed (on very calm
waters), turn off the circuit.
2. Press or to set level desired: 1, Low; 2,
Normal; 3, High.
Manual adjustment of sensitivity
1. Transmit the radar on long range.
MAN GAIN MOD
LOW
HIGH
STC adjusted;
sea clutter suppressed
Figure 1-7 Appearance of sea clutter
32
Figure 1-6 Dialogue for manual
adjustment of gain
2. Press the [GAIN] key once or twice to display
the screen shown in Figure 1-6.
3. Press
or
to set level desired. 61 levels
are available.
4
Sea clutter at
screen center
Automatic sea clutter control
1. Press the [STC] key once or twice to show
the dialogue shown in Figure 1-8.
AUTO STC MOD
LOW
HIGH
1
2
3
Figure 1-8 Dialogue for automatic
adjustment of STC
2. Press or
to set level desired: 1, Low; 2,
Normal; 3, High.
Rain clutter
at screen center
FTC adjusted;
rain clutter suppressed
Figure 1-10 Appearance of
rain clutter
1.10 Range Rings
Manual adjustment of sea clutter
control
1. Press the [STC] key once or twice to display
the dialogue shown in Figure 1-9.
MAN STC MOD
LOW
HIGH
32
Figure 1-9 Dialogue for manual
adjustment of STC
2. Press
or
to set level desired. 61 levels
are available.
Note: The dialogues for adjusting STC are
automatically erased when there is no TrackDisk
operation for 10 seconds. To erase them quicker,
press the [STC] key after completing the setting.
The range rings are the concentric circles around
own ship and they provide an estimated of target
range. The selected range scale automatically
determines the number of rings and their interval
is displayed at the upper-left corner on the
screen.
To turn the range rings on or off, press the [EBL]
and [VRM] keys together.
1.11 Cursor
The cursor is always displayed and functions to
measure the range and bearing to a target.
Operate the TrackDisk to place the cursor on the
inside edge of the target for range or center of
the target for bearing. The range and bearing to
the cursor appear at the bottom right corner on
the display.
6.0 NM
2.0
1.9 Suppressing Rain
Clutter
Target
Cursor
In adverse weather, clouds, rain or snow
produce spray-like spurious echoes which impair
target detection over a long distance. These
echoes can be suppressed by turning on the
[FTC] key. FTC appears at the top right corner
on the screen when the FTC circuit is on.
045.0°
3.35 NM
Range and
bearing to
cursor
Figure 1-11 How to measure range and
bearing with the cursor
5
1.12 Heading Marker
The heading marker indicates the ship’s heading and it is the solid line which appears at zero
degrees on the bearing scale.
To temporarily erase the heading marker to look at targets existing dead ahead of own ship, press
the [MENU] and [GUARD] keys together. Release the keys to display the marker again.
1.13 Menu Operation
The menu contains ten functions which normally do not require frequent adjustment in everyday
operation. Basic menu operation is as below.
Basic menu operation
1. Press the [MENU] key to display the menu.
▲
PRESS ▼ / ▲ TO SELECT MENU
ITEM, / ▲ TO CHANGE SETTING.
1
2
3
4
5
6
ECHO STRETCH ON OFF
ON OFF
INT. REJECT
ON OFF
NAV DATA
RVS
NOM
VIDEO
WATCHMAN
OFF 5M 10M 20M
0 1 2 3
DIMMER
Press ▲ or ▼ at page boundaries to
switch between menus.
▲
PRESS ▼ / ▲ TO SELECT MENU
ITEM, / ▲ TO CHANGE SETTING.
7
8
DSPL ON STBY
TRAIL TIME
9 TRAIL BRILL
10 RANGE (NM)
NAV OFF
CONT 30S
1M 3M 6M
LOW HIGH
1/8 1/4 1/2 3/4 1 1.5
2 3 4 6 8 12 16
Default settings in highlight.
Figure 1-12 Menus
2. Press ▲ or ▼ to select item.
3. Press ! or " to select option.
4. Press the [MENU] key to register option and close the menu.
6
Table 1-1 Menu description
Menu Item
Description
1
ECHO STRETCH
Stretches echoes in the range direction.
2
INT. REJECT
Suppresses radar interference.
3
NAV DATA
Turns navigation data on/off.
4
VIDEO
Displays echoes in black or white.
5
WATCHMAN
Selects transmitting interval.
6
DIMMER
Adjusts control panel brilliance.
7
DSPL ON STBY
Turns navigation data display in standby on/off.
8
TRAIL TIME
Select trail time (target echo plotting interval).
9
TRAIL BRILL
Selects echo trail brilliance.
10
RANGE
Selects range to use.
1.14 Control Panel Brilliance
1. Press the [MENU] key.
2. Select DIMMER.
3. Select level desired; 3 is the highest level of
illumination.
Measuring range by VRM
1. Press the [VRM] key to turn on the VRM.
2. Within 10 seconds after turning on the VRM;
that is, while "VRM" is highlighted, press ▲
or ▼ to place the VRM on the inside edge
of the target.
4. Press the [MENU] key.
3. Check the VRM readout at the bottom left
corner on the screen.
1.15 Measuring the Range
To erase the VRM, press and hold down the
[VRM] key until the VRM disappears.
The bearing to a target can be measured by the
range rings, by the cursor and by the VRM
(Variable Range Marker).
Note: The VRM is "frozen" on the display when
the [VRM] key is pressed a second time, or 10
seconds elapses without pressing ▲ or ▼.
When the VRM is fixed on the screen "VRM" is
not highlighted.
Measuring range by the range rings
6.0 NM
Count the number of rings between the center
of the display and the target. Check the range
ring interval and judge the distance of the echo
from the inner edge of the nearest ring.
2.0
Target
Cursor
VRM
VRM 2.42 NM
VRM
range
045.0°
2.42 NM
Cursor
range
Figure 1-13 How to measure range by
the cursor and VRM
7
1.16 Measuring the Bearing
1.17 Shifting the Display
The bearing to a target can be measured by
using the cursor or the EBL.
Your vessel's position can be shifted backward
by 1/3 of the range to increase the forward
range without changing the range or size of
targets.
Measuring bearing by the EBL
1. Press the [EBL] key to turn on the EBL.
Press the [SHIFT] key to turn the shifted display
on/off.
2. Within 10 seconds after turning on the EBL;
that is, while "EBL" is highlighted, press !
or " to bisect the target with EBL.
3. Check the EBL readout at the bottom left
corner on the screen.
Press
[SHIFT]
To erase the EBL, press and hold down the
[EBL] key until the EBL disappears.
Note: The EBL is "frozen" on the screen when
the [EBL] key is pressed a second time, or 10
seconds elapses without pressing ! or ".
When the EBL is fixed on the screen "EBL" is
not highlighted.
Normal display
Shifted display
Figure 1-15 Shifting the display
1.18 Zoom
6.0 NM
2.0
Target
Cursor
EBL
The zoom feature allows you to double the size
of the area between your vessel and any
location within the current range to take a closer
look at an area of interest.
1. Select location with the cursor.
EBL 45.0°
045.0°
3.35 NM
Cursor
bearing
2. Press the [ZOOM] key.
ZOOM on (flashing)
EBL
bearing
ZOOM
Figure 1-14 Measuring bearing by the
cursor and the EBL
Cursor
1) Place cursor
where desired.
Press
[ZOOM]
Cursor
2) Press [ZOOM].
Figure 1-16 Zoom function
3. To turn off the zoom function, press the
[ZOOM] key again.
Note 1: The zoom feature is inoperative when
the display is shifted.
Note 2: Zoom function is not available on 0.125
(1/8) nm range.
8
1.19 Target Trails
1.20 Guard Alarm Zone
Target trails are simulated afterglow of target
echoes that represent their movements relative
to own ship.
The guard alarm allows the operator to set the
desired range and bearing for a guard zone.
When ships, islands, landmasses, etc. violate
the guard zone an audible alarm sounds to call
the operator’s attention. The alarm will sound on
targets entering or exiting the zone depending
on zone status after setting the alarm.
3M TRAIL
Trail time (3 min),
echo trail ON (TRAIL)
CAUTION
* The alarm should not be relied upon as the
sole means for detecting possible collision
situations.
Figure 1-17 Target trails
* STC, FTC and GAIN controls should be
Starting target trail
Press the [TRAIL] key to start the echo trail
function. "TRAIL" and the target trail time
selected appear at the top right corner on the
screen. Then, afterglow starts extending from all
targets.
Canceling target trail
Press the [TRAIL] key to erase target trails and
target trail indications.
Trail time
1. Press the [MENU] key.
2. Select TRAIL TIME (on page 2 of the menu).
3. Select target trail time desired; continuous,
30 seconds, 1, 3 or 6 min as appropriate.
properly adjusted to be sure the alarm
system does not overlook target echoes.
How guard zone type is determined
After the guard zone is set, the radar starts
searching for targets inside the guard zone for
about 8 to 12 seconds. When it finishes
searching it displays the results of the search as
G (IN) or G (OUT), at the top right corner on the
screen.
G (IN): When no target exists in the zone, "G
(IN)" appears. The audible alarm sounds to
targets which enter the guard zone.
G (OUT): When there are targets in the guard
zone, the screen shows "G (OUT)". The audible
alarm sounds on all targets which exist in the
guard zone.
4. Press the [MENU] key.
Trail brilliance
1. Press the [MENU] key.
2. Select TRAIL BRILL (on page 2 of the
menu).
3. Select HIGH or LOW as appropriate.
(a) Inward target alarm
(b) Outward target alarm
Figure 1-18 Inward and outward alarms
4. Press the [MENU] key.
9
Setting a guard zone
Silencing the audible alarm
1. Operate the TrackDisk to place the cursor at
the top left corner of the zone and press the
[GUARD] key.
When a target violates the guard zone, the
target flashes and the audible alarm sounds.
You can silence the audible alarm by pressing
the [GUARD] key. When this is done, GUARD,
displayed in reverse video, replaces G (IN) or G
(OUT) and the guard zone is displayed in
reverse video. This means the audible alarm is
temporarily deactivated. Press the key again to
reactivate the alarm.
2. Operate the TrackDisk to place the cursor at
the bottom right corner of the zone and
press the [GUARD] key.
Asterisk blinking
Guard
zone
to set
* GUARD
Canceling the guard zone and guard
alarm
Drag cursor
here.
Press and hold down the [GUARD] key more
than two seconds to erase the guard zone.
1) Drag cursor to
top left corner of
zone and press
[GUARD].
Mentally create
the guard zone to set.
GUARD
* GUARD
Guard
zone
Drag cursor
here.
1.21 Interference Rejector
Mutual radar interference may occur in the
vicinity of another shipborne radar operating in
the same frequency band (9 GHz). It is seen on
the screen as a number of bright spikes either in
irregular patterns or in the form of usually
curved spoke-like dotted lines extending from
the center to the edge of the picture. This type of
interference can be reduced by activating the
interference rejector circuit. "IR" appears at the
top right corner when the interference rejector
circuit is on.
1. Press the [MENU] key.
Guard zone completed.
2) Drag cursor to
bottom right corner
of zone and press
[GUARD].
Figure 1-19 How to set a guard zone
2. Select INT REJECT.
3. Select ON or OFF.
4. Press the [MENU] key.
3. About 10 seconds later "GUARD" replace
G(IN) or G(OUT).
Note: When the radar range is less than one
half of the guard zone range, the guard zone
disappears and the indication "UP RNG"
replaces G (IN) or G (OUT). If this happens,
raise the range to redisplay the guard zone.
Figure 1-20 Radar interference
10
1.22 Echo Stretch
1.23 Watchman
On long ranges target echoes tend to shrink in
the range direction, making them difficult to see.
On short and medium ranges such as 1.5, 3 and
6 nm range scales, the same sized targets get
smaller on screen as they approach own ship.
This is due to the inherent property of the
radiation pattern produced by the antenna. To
enhance target video, use the echo stretch
feature.
The watchman function periodically transmits
the radar for about one minute to check for
targets in a guard zone. If it finds change in the
zone from the previous transmission it sounds
the audible alarm, cancels the watchman
function and transmits the radar continuously.
This feature is useful when you do not need to
observe the radar continuously but want to be
alerted to radar targets in a specific area,
namely, the guard zone. When the radar starts
transmitting, the buzzer sounds to alert the
operator
Echo stretch
ON
ES
Tx
St-by
1 min
5, 10 or
20 min
Echo
Echo
stretched
in range
direction
Echo stretch OFF
Echo stretch ON
Figure 1-21 Echo stretch
1. Press the [MENU] key.
2. Select ECHO STRETCH.
3. Select ON or OFF.
4. Press the [MENU] key.
ES appears at the top right corner on the screen
when the echo stretch feature is on.
Note 1: Echo stretch magnifies not only small
target pips but also returns from sea surface,
rain and radar interference. For this reason,
make sure that these types of interference have
been sufficiently suppressed before activating
the echo stretch feature.
Note 2: Echo stretch is not available on the
ranges between 0.125 and 0.75 nautical miles.
*
Tx
St-by
1 min
5, 10 or
20 min
*
Watchman * Timer appears and countdowns
starts.
time to Tx when 1:00 remains
in ST-BY.
Figure 1-22 How watchman works
Turning watchman on/off
1. Set a guard zone.
2. Press the [MENU] key.
3. Select WATCHMAN.
4. Select transmitting interval, or turn
watchman off as appropriate.
5. Press the [MENU] key.
"WATCHMAN" appears at the top left corner on
the screen when the watchman function ison.
Note: If no guard zone is set, the buzzer sounds
when the radar starts transmitting to alert the
operator.
Canceling watchman
Press any key at any time. If done while
transmitting, watchman is disabled and the
normal display appears. In stand-by, the timer
appears and counts down from one minute, and
then the radar goes into stand-by.
11
1.24 Navigation Data
With navigation data input in NMEA 0183 format,
navigation data can be displayed at the screen
bottom.
1.25 Displaying Navigation
Data During Stand-by
Navigation data may be displayed during standby (requires external sensors) as follows:
Navigation data includes position, course,
speed, and range and bearing to destination
waypoint (if set on navaid).
1. Press the [MENU] key.
Waypoint is shown on the screen by a “lollipop
mark,” a dashed ring which is connected to the
screen center (own position) by a dashed line.
You may turn it off or on by pressing [FTC] and
[SHIFT] together.
3. Select NAV.
6.0 NM
2. Select DSPL ON STBY.
4. Press the [MENU] key
WP
215.5°M
12.5NM
2.0
CSE
210.5°
Waypoint
mark
SPD
12KT
LL
34°42.25' N
135°24.12' E
TD
36378.1
59096.4
TEMP
18.5°C
WP
LL
EBL
VRM
17.0° M*
2.6 NM
34° 38.99' N
135° 19.22' E
45.0°
2.42 NM
CSE
18.0° M
SPD
4 .3 KT
255.0°
3.35 NM
Bearing and range to waypoint
Bearing shown as magnetic bearing (M)
or true bearing (T)
Own ship position
Figure 1-23 Sample navigation
data display
Turning on the navigation data
display
1. Press the [MENU] key.
2. Select NAV DATA.
3. Select ON.
4. Press the [MENU] key.
12
Course
DEPTH
125M
Speed
Figure 1-24 Sample navigation data
screen shown during stand-by
Note: Nav data can be accepted from two
sources: navigator and video sounder. When
two of the same type of equipment is outputting
data and it is not the same, the two sets of data
are alternately displayed automatically.
Unit of measurement for depth and
water temperature
The unit of measurement for depth and water
temperature (external sensor required) can be
selected with the [EBL] key in the sequence of
Meters/Centigrade, Feet/Fahrenheit,
Fathoms/Centigrade. See notes on next page
for further information.
Note 1: External sensor must be capable of
outputting such data to select it on this radar.
Note 2: A location is blank when there is no
corresponding data.
1.27 Selecting Ranges to Use
This radar has 13 ranges, some you may not
require. You can select the ranges to use as
follows:
Note 3: To receive data from multiple
equipment, all data must be combined into one
data line with a data-mixing device.
1. Press the [MENU] key.
1.26 Echoes in Black or White
4. Press the [MENU] key.
2. Select RANGE (on page 2 of the menu).
3. Select range to use and press the [EBL]
key.
The default setting displays echoes in black on
a white background. However, you may reverse
this arrangement as shown below. Note that the
default setting, echoes in black, is restored
when the power is turned off.
1. Press the [MENU] key.
2. Select VIDEO.
3. Select RVS.
4. Press the [MENU] key.
13
14
2. RADAR OBSERVATION
2.1 General
Minimum and maximum ranges
Minimum range
It should be noted that the detection range is
reduced by precipitation (which absorbs the
radar signal).
Radar resolution
The minimum range is defined by the shortest
distance at which, using a scale of 1.5 or 0.75
nm, a target having an echoing area of 10 m2 is
still shown separate from the point representing
the antenna position.
It is mainly dependent on the pulselength,
antenna height, and signal processing such as
main bang suppression and digital quantization.
It is a good practice to use a shorter range scale
as far as it gives favorable definition or clarity of
picture.
Maximum range
The maximum detecting range of the radar,
Rmax, varies considerably depending on
several factors such as the height of the
antenna above the waterline, the height of the
target above the sea, the size, shape and
material of the target, and the atmospheric
conditions.
Under normal atmospheric conditions, the
maximum range is equal to the radar horizon or
a little shorter. The radar horizon is longer than
the optical one by about 6% because of the
diffraction property of the radar signal. The
Rmax is given in the following equation.
Rmax = 2.2 x ( h1 + h2 )
where Rmax: radar horizon (nautical miles)
h1: antenna height (m)
h2: target height (m)
Radar horizon
Optical horizon
Figure 2-1 Radar horizon
For example, if the height of the antenna above
the waterline is 9 meters and the height of the
target is 16 meters, the maximum radar range
is;
Rmax= 2.2 x ( 9 + 16 ) = 2.2 x (3 + 4) = 15.4 nm
There are two important factors in radar resolution (discrimination): bearing resolution and
range resolution.
Bearing resolution
Bearing resolution is the ability of the radar to
display as separate pips the echoes received
from two targets which are at the same range
and close together. It is proportional to the
antenna length and reciprocally proportional to
the wavelength. The length of the antenna
radiator should be chosen for a bearing
resolution better than 2.5 degrees.
Range resolution
Range resolution is the ability to display as
separate pips the echoes received from two
targets which are on the same bearing and
close to each other. This is determined by
pulselength only. Practically, a 0.08
microsecond pulse offers the discrimination
better than 35 m as do so with all FURUNO
radars.
Test targets for determining the range and
bearing resolution are radar reflectors having an
echoing area of 10 m2.
Bearing accuracy
One of the most important features of the radar
is how accurately the bearing of a target can be
measured. The accuracy of bearing
measurement basically depends on the
narrowness of the radar beam. However, the
bearing is usually taken relative to the ship’s
heading, and thus, proper adjustment of the
heading line at installation is an important factor
in ensuring bearing accuracy. To minimize error
when measuring the bearing of a target, put the
target echo at the extreme position on the
screen by selecting a suitable range.
15
Range measurement
Sidelobe echoes
Measurement of the range to a target is also a
very important function of the radar. Generally,
there are two means of measuring range: the
fixed range rings and the variable range marker
(VRM). The fixed range rings appear on the
screen with a predetermined interval and
provide a rough estimate of the range to a target.
The variable range marker’s diameter is
increased or decreased so that the marker
touches the inner edge of the target, allowing
the operator to obtain more accurate range
measurements.
Every time the radar pulse is transmitted, some
radiation escapes on each side of the beam,
called sidelobes. If a target exists where it can
be detected by the side lobes as well as the
main lobe, the side echoes may be represented
on both sides of the true echo at the same range.
Sidelobes show usually only on short ranges
and from strong targets. They can be reduced
through careful reduction of the gain or proper
adjustment of the [STC] control.
Target A
Target B
(Spurious) Target B
(True)
2.2 False Echoes
Occasionally echo signals appear on the screen
at positions where there is no target or
disappear even if there are targets. They are,
however, recognized if you understand the
reason why they are
displayed. Typical false echoes are shown
below.
Multiple echoes
Multiple echoes occur when a transmitted pulse
returns from a solid object like a large ship,
bridge, or breakwater. A second, a third or more
echoes may be observed on the display at
double, triple or other multiples of the actual
range of the target as shown below. Multiple
reflection echoes can be reduced and often
removed by decreasing the gain (sensitivity) or
properly adjusting the [STC] control.
True
echo
Virtual image
A relatively large target close to your ship may
be represented at two positions on the screen.
One of them is the true echo directly reflected by
the target and the other is a false echo which is
caused by the mirror effect of a large object on
or
close to your ship as shown in the figure below.
If your ship comes close to a large metal bridge,
for example, such a false echo may temporarily
be seen on the screen.
Target ship
;
;;
;;
;;
;
;;
;
;;
;;
;
;;
;
;
;;
;;
;;
;;
Target
Own ship
Figure 2-3 Sidelobe echoes
Own
ship
;
;;
;
;;
;;
;
;;
;;
;;
;
;;
;
;
;;
;;
; True
; echo
;;
;;
;;
Multiple
echo
Figure 2-2 Multiple echoes
Mirror image
of target ship
Figure 2-4 Virtual image
16
False
echo
Shadow sectors
Funnels, stacks, masts, or derricks in the path of
the antenna block the radar beam. If the angle
subtended at the antenna is more than a few
degrees, a non-detecting sector may be
produced. Within this sector targets can not be
detected.
When the range to the SART is reduced to
about 1 nm, the radar display may show also the
12 responses generated during the fast sweeps.
These additional dot responses, which also are
equally spaced by 0.64 nm, will be interspersed
with the original line of 12 dots. They will appear
slightly weaker and smaller than the original
dots.
Screen B: When SART
is close
Screen A: When SART
is distant
Radar
antenna
Echo of SART
Lines of 12 dots
are displayed in
concentric arcs.
Radar antenna
beamwidth
24 NM
Echo of
SART
1.5 NM
Position of
SART
Radar
mast
Own ship's
position
9500 MHz
9200 MHz
Own ship's
position
SART mark
length
7.5 µs
Shadow sector
Sweep time
Position of
SART
Radar receiver
bandwidth
95 µs
Figure 2-5 Shadow sectors
Low speed sweep signal
Sweep start
2.3 SART (Search and Rescue
Transponder)
Note: The SART information below is excerpted
from IMO SN/Circ 197 Operation of Marine
Radar for SART Detection.
A Search and Rescue Transponder (SART)
may be triggered by any X-Band (3 cm) radar
within a range of approximately 8 nm. Each
radar pulse received causes it to transmit a
response which is swept repetitively across the
complete radar frequency band. When
interrogated, it first sweeps rapidly (0.4 µs)
through the band before beginning a relatively
slow sweep (7.5 µs) through the band back to
the starting frequency. This process is repeated
for a total of twelve complete cycles. At some
point in each sweep, the SART frequency will
match that of the interrogating radar and be
within the pass band of the radar receiver. If the
SART is within range, the frequency match
during each of the 12 slow sweeps will produce
a response on the radar display, thus a line of
12 dots equally spaced by about 0.64 nautical
miles will be shown.
High speed sweep signal
Figure 2-6 Appearance of SART signal
on the radar display
General procedure for detecting
SART response
1. Use the range scale of 6 or 12 nm as the
spacing between the SART responses is
about 0.6 nm (1125 m) to distinguish the
SART.
2. Turn off the automatic clutter suppression.
3. Turn off the Interference Rejector.
General remarks on receiving SART
SART range errors
When responses from only the 12 low frequency
sweeps are visible (when the SART is at a
range greater than about 1 nm), the position at
which the first dot is displayed may be as much
as 0.64 nm beyond the true position of the
SART. When the range closes so that the fast
sweep responses are seen also, the first of
these will be no more than 150 meters beyond
the true position.
17
Radar bandwidth
FTC control
This is normally matched to the radar
pulselength and is usually switched with the
range scale and the associated pulselength.
Narrow bandwidths of 3-5 MHz are used with
long pulses on long range and wide bandwidths
of 10-25 MHz with short pulses on short ranges.
This should be used normally (to break up areas
of rain) when trying to detect a SART response
which, being a series of dots, is not affected by
the action of the anti-clutter rain circuitry. Note
that Racon responses, which are often in the
form of a long flash, will be affected by the use
of this control.
Any radar bandwidth of less than 5 MHz will
attenuate the SART signal slightly, so it is
preferable to use a medium bandwidth to ensure
optimum detection of the SART.
Radar side lobes
As the SART is approached, sidelobes from the
radar antenna may show the SART responses
as a series of arcs or concentric rings. These
can be removed by the use of the anti-clutter
sea control although it may be operationally
useful to observe the sidelobes as they may be
easier to detect in clutter conditions and also
they will confirm that the SART is near to the
ship.
Gain
For maximum range SART detection the normal
gain setting for long range detection should be
used, that is, with background noise speckle
visible.
Some sets have automatic/manual anti-clutter
rain control facilities in which case the operator
should switch to manual.
When the range to the SART is reduced to
about 1 nm, the radar display may show also the
12 responses generated during the fast sweeps.
These additional dot responses, which also are
equally spaced by 0.64 nm, will be interspersed
with the original line of 12 dots. They will appear
slightly weaker and smaller than the original
dots.
General procedure for detecting
SART response
1. Use the range scale of 6 or 12 nm as the
spacing between the SART responses is
about 0.6 nm (1125 m) to distinguish the
SART.
2. Turn off the automatic clutter suppression.
3. Turn off the Interference Rejector.
STC control
For optimum range SART detection, this control
should be set to the minimum. Care should be
exercised as wanted target in sea clutter may be
obscured. Note also that in clutter conditions the
first few dots of the SART response may not be
detectable, irrespective of the setting of the
anti-clutter sea control. In this case, the position
of the SART may be estimated by measuring
9.5 nm miles from the furthest dot back towards
own ship.
Some sets have automatic/manual anti-clutter
sea control facilities in which case the operator
should switch to manual.
General remarks on receiving SART
SART range errors
When responses from only the 12 low frequency
sweeps are visible (when the SART is at a
range greater than about 1 nm), the position at
which the first dot is displayed may be as much
as 0.64 nm beyond the true position of the
SART. When the range closes so that the fast
sweep responses are seen also, the first of
these will be no more than 150 meters beyond
the true position.
Radar bandwidth
This is normally matched to the radar
pulselength and is usually switched with the
range scale and the associated pulselength.
Narrow bandwidths of 3-5 MHz are used with
long pulses on long range and wide bandwidths
of 10-25 MHz with short pulses on short ranges.
18
Any radar bandwidth of less than 5 MHz will
attenuate the SART signal slightly, so it is
preferable to use a medium bandwidth to ensure
optimum detection of the SART.
Radar side lobes
As the SART is approached, sidelobes from the
radar antenna may show the SART responses
as a series of arcs or concentric rings. These
can be removed by the use of the anti-clutter
sea control although it may be operationally
useful to observe the sidelobes as they may be
easier to detect in clutter conditions and also
they will confirm that the SART is near to the
ship.
Gain
For maximum range SART detection the normal
gain setting for long range detection should be
used, that is, with background noise speckle
visible.
STC control
For optimum range SART detection, this control
should be set to the minimum. Care should be
exercised as wanted target in sea clutter may be
obscured. Note also that in clutter conditions the
first few dots of the SART response may not be
detectable, irrespective of the setting of the
anti-clutter sea control. In this case, the position
of the SART may be estimated by measuring
9.5 nm miles from the furthest dot back towards
own ship.
FTC control
This should be used normally (to break up areas
of rain) when trying to detect a SART response
which, being a series of dots, is not affected by
the action of the anti-clutter rain circuitry. Note
that Racon responses, which are often in the
form of a long flash, will be affected by the use
of this control.
Some sets have automatic/manual anti-clutter
rain control facilities in which case the operator
should switch to manual.
2.4 Racon (Radar Beacon)
A racon is a radar transponder which emits a
characteristic signal when triggered by a ship’s
radar (usually only the 3 centimeter band). The
signal may be emitted on the same frequency
as that of the triggering radar, in which case it is
superimposed on the ship's radar display
automatically.
The racon signal appears on the PPI as a radial
line originating at a point just beyond the
position of the radar beacon or as a Morse code
signal (figure below) displayed radially from just
beyond the beacon.
Racon
Some sets have automatic/manual anti-clutter
sea control facilities in which case the operator
should switch to manual.
Figure 2-7 Appearance of Racon signal
on the radar display
19
20
3. MAINTENANCE, TROUBLESHOOTING
3.1 Maintenance
Regular maintenance is important for good performance. A maintenance program should be
established and should at least include the items listed in Table 3-1.
Table 3-1 Maintenance program
Period
3 to 6
months
6 months
to 1 year
Item
Check point
Action
Fixing bolts for
antenna unit
Check for corrosion and if
tightly fastened.
Replace corroded bolts. Coat new
bolts with anticorrosive sealant.
Antenna unit
cleanliness
Check for foreign material.
(Foreign material on the
antenna unit can cause a
considerable drop in
sensitivity.)
Clean the antenna unit with a
freshwater-moistened cloth.
Alcohol may be used. Do not use
commercial cleaners to clean the
antenna unit; they can remove
paint and markings.
Antenna unit
cover
Check for cracks. Permanent
damage to the unit’s circuitry
will result if water leaks inside
If a crack is found, it should be
temporarily repaired by using a
small amount of sealing compound
or adhesive. The unit should then
be brought to your dealer for
permanent repairs.
LCD
The LCD will, in time,
accumulate a coating of dust
which tends to dim the picture.
Wipe the LCD gently with a soft
cloth. Do not use commercial
cleaners to clean the LCD; they can
remove paint and markings.
Display unit
connectors
Check for tight connection and
corrosion.
If corroded, see your dealer about
replacement.
3.2 Replacing the Fuse
The fuse (5A) in the power cable protects the equipment against reverse polarity of ship’s mains,
overcurrent, and equipment fault. If the fuse blows, find the cause before replacing it. Never use a
fuse rated for more than 5A, since overfusing can cause serious damage to the equipment and void
the warranty.
21
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SPECIFICATIONS OF MARINE RADAR
MODEL 1622
1. GENERAL
(1) Indication System
PPI Daylight display, raster scan, 4 tones in monochrome
(2) Range, Pulselength (PL) & Pulse Repetition Rate (PRR)
Range (nm)
0.125, 0.25, 0.5, 0.75
1, 1.5, 2
3, 4, 6, 8, 12, 16
Pulse Length
0.12 µs (short)
0.3 µs (medium)
0.8 µs (long)
Pulse Repetition Rate
2100 Hz nominal
1200 Hz nominal
600 Hz nominal
(3) Range Resolution
Better than 50 m
(4) Bearing Discrimination
Within 7.7°
(5) Minimum Range
41 m
(6) Bearing Accuracy
Within 1°
(7) Range Ring Accuracy
0.9 % of range or 8 m, whichever is the greater
2. SCANNER UNIT
(1) Radiator
Micro-strip
(2) Polarization
Horizontal
(3) Antenna Rotation Speed
24 rpm nominal
(4) Radiator Length
34 cm
(5) Horizontal Beamwidth
Less than 6.2°
(6) Vertical Beamwidth
25°
(7) Sidelobe Attenuation
Less than -20 dB
3. TRANSCEIVER MODULE
(1) Frequency
9410 MHz ±30MHz (X band)
(2) Modulation
P0N
(3) Peak Output Power
2.2 kW
(4) Modulator
FET Switching Method
(5) Intermediate Frequency
60 MHz
(6) Tuning
Automatic
(7) Receiver Front End
MIC (Microwave IC)
(8) Bandwidth
7 MHz
(9) Duplexer
Circulator with diode limiter
(10) Time of Heat-up
1-min. approx.
SP - 1
4. DISPLAY UNIT
(1) Picture Tube
6 inch rectangular monochrome LCD
(2) Display Pixels
240(H) x 320(V) dots, Effective radar display area: 240 x 240 dots
(3) Range, Range Interval, Number of Rings
Range (NM)
0.125 0.25
3
4
6
8 12 16
Ring Interval (NM) 0.0625 0.125 0.125 0.25 0.25 0.5 0.5 1
1
2
2
3
4
Number of Rings
4
3
4
4
4
2
(4) Markers
2
0.5
4
0.75
3
1 1.5 2
4
3
4
3
Heading Line, Bearing Scale, Range Rings,
Variable Range Marker (VRM), Electronic Bearing Line (EBL),
Tuning Bar, Cursor, Parallel Cursor, Alarm Zone,
Waypoint Mark (navigation input required),
North Mark (heading sensor input required)
(5) Alphanumeric Indications
Range, Range Ring Interval, Display Mode (HU),
Interference Rejection(IR), Variable Range Marker (VRM),
Electronic Bearing Line (EBL), Stand-by (ST-BY),
Guard Alarm (G(IN), G(OUT), UP RANGE), Echo Stretch (ES),
Range and Bearing to Cursor, Bearing or L/L Position,
Echo Tailing (TRAIL), Trailing Time, Trailing Elapsed Time,
Watchman (WATCHMAN), Zoomed Display (ZOOM),
Navigation Data (navigation input required),
Heading (HDC, heading sensor input required)
(6) Input Data
NMEA0183 (Ver.1.5/2.0)
Own ship’s position:
GGA>RMA>RMC> GLL
Speed:
RMA>RMC>VTG>VBW
Heading (True):
HDT>HDG*1>HDM*1
Heading (Magnetic):
HDM>HDG*1>HDT*1
Course (True):
RMA>RMC>VTG
Course (Magnetic):
VTG>RMA
Waypoint(Range, Bearing): RMB>BWC>BWR
Loran time difference:
RMA>GLC>GTD
Water depth:
DPT >DBK>DBS>DBT
Water temperature:
MTW
*1: calculate by magnetic drift.
5. ENVIRONMENTAL CONDITION
(1) Ambient Temperature
Scanner Unit: -25°C to +70°C
Display Unit: -15°C to +55°C
(2) Relative Humidity
95 % or less at +40°C
SP - 2
(3) Waterproofing
Scanner Unit
IPX6
Display Unit
IPX5
(4) Bearing Vibration
IEC60945
6. POWER SUPPLY
(1) Power Supply
12/24 VDC: 3.2/1.3 A, 35 W approx. (Watchman: 8 W or less)
7. DIMENSIONS AND MASS
See the Outline Drawings
8. COATING COLOR
(1) Display Unit
Panel: N3.0
Chassis: 2.5GY5/1.5
(2) Scanner Unit
Cover: N9.5, Bottom: 2.5PB 3.5/10
9. COMPASS SAFE DISTANCE
(1) Display Unit
Standard: 0.65 m
Steering: 0.50 m
(2) Scanner Unit
Standard: 1.25 m
Steering: 0.95 m
SP - 3
INDEX
B
N
Bearing measurement ......................................8
Nav data ........................................................ 12
C
P
Control description ...........................................1
Cursor ..............................................................5
POWER key .................................................... 3
D
Depth unit ......................................................12
DIMMER key....................................................7
E
EBL (Electronic Bearing Line)...........................8
EBL key ...........................................................8
Echo hue........................................................13
Echo stretch ................................................... 11
F
False echoes..................................................16
FTC..................................................................5
Fuse replacement...........................................21
G
GAIN key .........................................................4
Guard alarm .....................................................9
GUARD key ...................................................10
R
Range
measurement ............................................... 7
minimum and maximum ............................. 15
selection....................................................... 3
Range measurement ....................................... 7
Range rings ..................................................... 5
Ranges to use................................................ 13
S
SART............................................................. 17
Shadow sector ............................................... 17
SHIFT key ....................................................... 8
Sidelobe echoes ............................................ 16
STC key........................................................... 4
Synchro belt replacement............................... 22
T
Heading marker................................................6
Target trails ...................................................... 9
TONE key ........................................................ 3
TRAIL key........................................................ 9
Troubleshooting ............................................. 22
TX key ............................................................. 3
I
V
Indications........................................................2
Interference rejector .......................................10
Virtual image.................................................. 16
VRM (Variable Range Marker) ......................... 7
VRM key.......................................................... 7
H
M
W
Magnetron replacement..................................22
Maintenance ..................................................21
Menu operation ................................................6
Multiple echoes ..............................................16
Watchman ..................................................... 11
Water temperature unit................................... 12
Z
ZOOM key ....................................................... 8
Index-1
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