Five Ways to Adjust Teaching from the Face-to-Face to Virtual Classroom

Five Ways to Adjust Teaching from the Face-to-Face to Virtual Classroom
Five Ways to Adjust Teaching
from the Face-to-Face to
Virtual Classroom
Saul Carliner, PhD, CTDP
eLearning Fellow
and
Associate Professor, Department of Education
[email protected]
www.saulcarliner.com
Question 1
What is your role?
(In the Chat area, type the number that best describes
your role at Concordia.)
1. 
2. 
3. 
4. 
5. 
6. 
Full-time instructor
Part-time instructor
Teaching Assistant
Administration or staff
Student
Other
Question 2
What is your previous experience with
an online session like this?
(Type your response in the Chat area.)
1.  First time—I’ve never participated in a live online
session like this before (outside of one-to-one
sessions on Skype)
2.  I have previous experience as a participant (student)
in an online session like this.
3.  I have previous experience leading an online
session like this.
1
Question 3
What do you hope to learn in today’s
session?
(Type your response in the Chat area.)
Objectives
After participating in today’s session, you should be able
to:
§  Differentiate a webcast from a live presentation.
§  Familiarize yourself with the software.
§  Describe tactics each for:
§  Starting a course
§  Starting class sessions
§  Structuring class sessions
§  Engaging participants—even large numbers of them.
§  Managing questions
What is the live virtual classroom?
§  Online “spaces” where instructors and students meet
at an assigned time on a regular basis.
§  Feature many similarities to face-to-face classrooms:
§ 
§ 
§ 
§ 
§ 
§ 
Regular meeting times
Specific “locations”
Ability to show slides and other programs
Ability to “write” on the “board”
Ability to interact with students
Ability to divide students into groups and have them
work in teams during class time
2
People often refer to their virtual
classrooms by product name.
§ 
§ 
§ 
§ 
§ 
§ 
Adobe Connect
Centra
Elluminate
GoToMeeting
LiveMeeting
WebEx
How the live virtual classroom differs
from the traditional classroom
§  More structured interaction
§  Pre-programmed polling questions
§  Although the ability to use voice and video exists,
most instructors choose not to use them, so the voice
converation is one way
§  As a result, instructors need to adjust their teaching
techniques
How do you think instructors need to
adjust teaching practices for the live
virtual classroom?
(Type your response in the Chat area.)
3
1. Familiarize yourself with the
software.
2. Start the course with clear,
explicitly stated expectations.
§  Send a note a week in advance with all materials (or
leading to them)
§  Course materials:
§ 
§ 
§ 
§ 
Instructions for entering the online classroom
Attendance requirements
Homework (readings and assignments)
Discussion board requirements (the larger the class,
the more discussions)
§  Optional: Reading guidesheets
2. Start each class session
interactively and with clearly stated
objectives and agendas.
§  Before class starts: initiate a conversation (weather,
holiday plans, anything benign; also entertain course
related questions)
§  Start of class:
§ 
§ 
§ 
§ 
Begin at the appointed time
Polling question as “warm up”
Open question to go deeper
One, the other, or both:
§  Agenda
§  Objectives
§  Hold announcements until the end of class
4
4. Structure sessions like a
newscast, rather than as a lecture.
§ 
§ 
§ 
§ 
§ 
§ 
2 to 5-minute segments
Opening
Topic 1 (presentation and interaction)
Topic 2 (presentation and interaction)
Topic n (presentation and interaction)
Closing
5. Engage participants with a variety
of types of interactions.
For demographics or past
experience, use the polling question.
What is your role?
(In the Chat area, type the number that best describes
your role at Concordia.)
1. 
2. 
3. 
4. 
5. 
6. 
Full-time instructor
Part-time instructor
Teaching Assistant
Administration or staff
Student
Other
5
To promote higher order thinking and
spark discussion, use the “choose an
option” question.
Should the instructors use online learning in this
situation?
Agree
Disagree
Manage the discussion like this.
1.  Ask only for opinions. Require students take a
position.
2.  Ask for explanations of their choices:
§  Less-correct choice first
§  More correct response last
3.  Present concepts and issues to consider when
addressing the situation
4.  Share your response
To promote problem-solving, discuss
homework or assign group work.
6
To gauge understanding, use either
a quiz question or a confusometer.
§  Quiz question: multiple choice, true/false, or similar
§  Confusometer:
1.  I couldn’t tell the difference between live, virtual or
classroom.
2. 
3.  I think I get it but no one has put me to the test yet.
4. 
5.  I could tell you a thing or two
Before moving among subjects,
encourage questions.
To encourage application and
transfer, ask about “take-aways” at
the end of the session.
(It also tells you who was paying attention and what
they heard.)
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Whenever asking questions, pause
to give participants time to reply.
Bonus! Manage the questions in the
back channel.
Respond to questioner by name.
1.  Read the question.
2.  If needed, verify understanding before responding.
(Wait for the participant to acknowledge.)
3.  Respond.
4.  Ask the participant if that answered the question.
And yes—the back channel is
confusing the first time people
encounter it.
8
Questions?
(Type your questions in the Chat area.)
How comfortably can you describe
the characteristics of teaching in th
live virtual classroom?
(Type your response in the Chat area.)
1.  I couldn’t tell the difference between live, virtual or
classroom.
2. 
3.  I think I get it but no one has put me to the test yet.
4. 
5.  I could tell you a thing or two.
How interested are you in teaching in
a live virtual classroom?
(Type your response in the Chat area.)
1.  No way..
2. 
3.  If asked, I would do it. But I am not sure I would
initiate the idea.
4. 
5.  I think it would be a blast! When can I start?
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Take -Aways
Name 1 or 2 insights about teaching online that you’ll
take away from this session.
(Type your response in the Chat area.)
Learn more about the live virtual
classroom.
Experience
Take a webinar.
Read
Hofmann, J. (2003.) The Synchronous
Trainer’s Survival Guide. San
Francisco, CA: Pfeiffer.
Clark, R. C. & Kwinn, A. (2007.) The
New Virtual Classroom: Evidencebased Guidelines for Synchronous eLearning. San Francisco, CA: Pfeiffer.
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