Garmin 96 GPS Receiver User Manual

Serial and IR Automation Specifications and
Programming Guide
for iScan VP20, VP30, VP50 and VP50PRO
Revised - December 2007
Document Contents
0
Preface......................................................................................................................... 3
0.1
Information Warranty Statement ........................................................................ 3
0.2
Document Scope and Limitations....................................................................... 4
0.3
Document Conventions....................................................................................... 4
0.3.1
Model Compatibility................................................................................... 4
0.3.2
Product Introduction ................................................................................... 5
0.3.3
VP20 (MM604)........................................................................................... 5
0.3.4
VP30 (MM603)........................................................................................... 6
0.3.5
VP50 (MM605)........................................................................................... 6
0.3.6
VP50PRO (MM606) ..................................................................................... 7
0.4
How does automation work? .............................................................................. 8
0.4.1
Interface Compatibility ............................................................................... 8
0.4.2
How is data encoded in digital form? ......................................................... 8
0.4.3
What is Binary?........................................................................................... 9
0.4.4
What is HEX? ............................................................................................. 9
0.4.5
What is ASCII? ......................................................................................... 10
0.5
A brief dialog about remote controlling a VPxx series video processor .......... 11
0.6
A dialog about input video memories............................................................... 12
1
RS-232 Control ......................................................................................................... 14
1.1
The RS-232 Physical Connection ..................................................................... 14
1.1.1
The Anchor Bay RS-232 Protocol ............................................................ 15
1.1.2
A Dialog on Checksums ........................................................................... 15
1.2
Control Commands ........................................................................................... 15
1.2.1
Example RS-232 Command Packets ........................................................ 20
1.3
Query Commands ............................................................................................. 23
1.4
Responses.......................................................................................................... 24
2
IR Control ................................................................................................................. 27
2.1
The NEC IR Protocol (Factory Remote) .......................................................... 27
2.2
The Anchor Bay IR Protocol (Discrete Control) .............................................. 28
2.2.1
Discrete IR Control Examples .................................................................. 31
3
Automation Command IDs and Values .................................................................... 42
Appendix A – Decimal-Binary-HEX-ASCII Conversion Table
Appendix B – IR Control White-Paper by Barry Gordon
Appendix C – Help and Support
Page 53
Page 59
Page 68
2
0 Preface
Thank you for purchasing a DVDO iScan VPxx Series video processor. We believe
the iScan will become a favorite device in your multimedia presentation system due to
picture quality, ease of use, and the level of control the iScan gives you or your customer
over the processed signal. This document is intended to cover the supplemental control
functionality that is available for the iScan VP20, VP30, VP50, and VP50PRO.
0.1 Information Warranty Statement
The information presented within this guide is known to be accurate at the time of
publication. However, we at Anchor Bay continually strive to improve our products by
offering new functionality and features which may in some cases require modification of
or addition to the information contained within this document. As always, one should
periodically check our website (www.anchorbaytech.com) for updates to our software
and the support documentation. Anchor Bay (Anchor Bay Technologies, Inc.) or its
subsidiaries, agents, and/or investors may not be held liable for technical inaccuracies or
omissions that affect an installed system or device. Responsibility for correct operation
of the iScan product within the installed system lies with the installing or integration
party (i.e. a Home Theater Installer or the end-user or “customer”).
The iScan VPxx video processors are capable of outputting more types of video
signals than many display devices can support. Typically, the menu based user controls
have some safety features that prevent most users from executing a command or function
that would result in a loss of picture or damage to the display device (typically CRTs fall
into this category), or may overwrite settings without any prompt. Direct access to the
control system via discrete commands may circumvent these safeties in some cases.
Careful planning should be used when configuring the iScan within the system to ensure
that it behaves within the design constraints of the installed system and the capabilities of
the installed support hardware. If you have just read this and don’t understand what it
means – PLEASE contact an authorized DVDO product installer for consultation and
installation help. Not getting a picture from the iScan does not necessarily indicate a
failure of the iScan device – the display device may not support the selected output
format, or there may be some other circumstance which would need to be investigated
and remedied to resume viewing operation of the presentation system.
If you are having trouble with this document, or the operation of the iScan VPxx
device, please first refer to the User’s Manual included with your device. If you are still
not able to resolve your issue, please call our Technical Support Hotline 9AM-5PM
Pacific Time, at (U.S. Domestic) 1-866-423-3836 extension 333 or (International) 1(408)-395-4455 extension 333. Alternatively you may contact our support group at
help@anchorbaytech.com.
3
0.2 Document Scope and Limitations
This document will cover the necessary information required to construct and
transmit a serial (RS-232) or Infrared (IR) control signal to a DVDO iScan VPxx model
video processor. These two basic mediums of control, are intended to convey the
intentions of the user or automation system into the processes that operate the iScan.
This document will cover the naming conventions, syntax, electrical specifications, and
some troubleshooting that may be required for implementation in an installed system.
This document will NOT cover specific automation systems such as Crestron, AMX,
Control4, Vantage, Elan, Universal Remote, RTI, Xantec, Niles, Russound, etc., or any
programming within these systems. Correct selection of the automation system is the
responsibility of the installer, and we do not offer troubleshooting for these systems
beyond verification of the correct function of our iScan unit, and protocol confirmation.
This means, if a device is able to communicate with an iScan using another software
platform (i.e. our firmware update procedure), the unit is deemed to be working correctly
and the problem exists beginning at the wiring and proceeding into the code within the
automation platform. In this case, contacting the manufacturer of the automation system
is required.
Anchor Bay recommends contacting the automation system manufacturer before
conducting the installation to see if they have a driver or control module pre-built for our
products. If not, asking them to start work on one will help you (as an installer or enduser) by having their Engineers develop a driver or module that is guaranteed to work
with their hardware (the more requests they get, the higher a priority it will be for them).
If they do not have a complete library, they may have many of our control codes already
in their database. Having this information on-hand will greatly ease the installation of
our products. If they have any questions, please refer them to our support line, we will be
glad to work with them.
0.3 Document Conventions
0.3.1 Model Compatibility
This document is intended to cover the iScan VP20, iScan VP20 with ABT102
daughter card, iScan VP30, iScan VP30 with ABT102 daughter card, the iScan VP50,
and the iScan VP50PRO. This document does not cover the iScan Ultra, iScan HD, or
iScan HD+.
This document is intended to be used with the latest versions of software for each of
the respective models – this is so that the most current features which have been released
are listed, and to encourage our customers to use the latest features and bug-fixes that are
available (we use the latest version to develop from – please do not report any bugs for
old software). Please check our website (www.anchorbaytech.com) for the latest version
of software for your product.
4
0.3.2 Product Introduction
This section is a brief introduction with pictures of each of the models of the iScan
VPxx series – it is only intended as a brief “spotters guide” to iScan units. Please refer to
your product’s user’s manual or our website for more in-depth product information at
www.anchorbaytech.com/products/systems (replacement user’s manuals may be obtained
in PDF form at the same website by clicking on the “support” tab and selecting
“documentation”).
If you are trying to send a command to the iScan and it won’t accept it – make sure
you possess the model you think you have by using this spotter’s guide, and then doublecheck in the command table in the following chapters, that the command is in fact
supported for the model you are attempting to use.
0.3.3 VP20 (MM604)
iScan VP20 Front
iScan VP20 Back
This model is based on our iScan VP30 product, but has one less HDMI input and no
analog RGBHV input or analog video out (RGBHV or Component). This device is
commonly found in entry-level systems where input count is not as critical as getting the
best possible processing with legacy source devices. This device may be further enabled
with our ABT102 Deinterlacing add-on card for even better processing of interlaced SD
content.
5
0.3.4 VP30 (MM603)
iScan VP30 Front
iScan VP30 Back
This model is our high-end entry-level product with the full four HDMI complement,
the RGBHV/Component 3 input and Analog video output – with available options like an
SD-SDI input and the ABT102 Deinterlacing add-on card for exceptional reproduction of
interlaced SD content.
The VP30 also features more in-depth user controls and greater input flexibility,
allowing it to be an excellent addition to a high-end home theater system, corporate
media presentation system, or digital signage applications.
0.3.5 VP50 (MM605)
iScan VP50 Front
iScan VP50 Back
The iScan VP50, like the VP30, includes a wide selection of inputs and user controls,
while further adding our Anchor Bay VRS processing for HD content (1080i
Deinterlacing) and added Gamma adjustment controls.
6
0.3.6 VP50PRO (MM606)
iScan VP50PRO Front
iScan VP50PRO Back
The iScan VP50PRO is the first Video Processor to achieve the THX certification for
Video Processors, setting the benchmark for video processing. This device is also the
first HDMI 1.3 compatible video processor with the same outstanding Anchor Bay VRS
HD and SD content processing algorithms of the preceding models, while adding even
further configuration and calibration controls for ISF calibration and the new HD-SDI
inputs (2x) and 12-volt triggers (2x) for driving external devices like anamorphic lenses
and screen masking. This makes the iScan VP50PRO the ultimate in configurable and
controllable high-end video processing – all of which can be harnessed through the same
automation protocol we have had in the previous models. This makes it easy for systems
integrators to upgrade from one iScan VPxx model to the newest to keep their customer’s
systems at the cutting edge.
7
0.4 How does automation work?
The iScan line of DVDO brand video processors are designed to enable control and
flexibility over various input and output signal configurations – as well as our proprietary
algorithms to improve several aspects of video quality and enable new capabilities that
legacy devices by themselves are not able to achieve. This product has many features
(covered in the User’s Manual) which are intended to make day-to-day use of our video
processing product easier in systems from “simple” up to “complex and fully integrated”
home-theaters, or “corporate/industrial” applications. It is up to the user or system’s
integrator to “turn on” or otherwise set up the unit (and select appropriate auxiliary
hardware) to enable this functionality within a given media presentation system. With
the exception of some automatic functions which are user selectable (at the time of this
writing: Input Selections, Deinterlacing Modes, and Output Profiles), the unit must be
prompted by user action to do a specific function or provide a given signal path.
This user function can be initiated by an external device, like a Home Automation
controller, Control Sequencer, or Learning/Macro-Infrared-Remote-Control. These
execute the “user action” as part of a predefined “routine” or “script”. Home Automation
controllers, sequencers, or macro-remotes can control many devices at once, making a
task like switching from one source device to another on three pieces of equipment occur
with one user input action (this also reduces the amount of remote controls a given
system has on a table). The iScan can accept either RS-232 based serial automation
commands, or infrared remote control commands to enable very precise and “intelligent”
control of the unit’s behavior.
0.4.1 Interface Compatibility
Our devices have been designed to work with industry standardized control systems
based on either “EIA232”-“RS-232C” asynchronous bidirectional serial character data
transfers, or NEC or ABT-proprietary based Infra-Red (IR) one-way serial character data
transfers operating at a 38.38kHz carrier frequency. The control sets for both methods
are based on the same command IDs and control values for the sake of simplicity and
ease of overall protocol mastery.
0.4.2 How is data encoded in digital form?
Digital electronics are very good with math and numbers – but they do not know how
to “think” or talk in human-readable sentences. Because of this, programmers have
created a “look-up-table” of standard characters which humans understand, and
numerical equivalents for those characters which the device understands. There are
several different ways to place characters in a table, and many different geographic
locations which have special characters that need to be encoded. For the sake of
standardization and compatibility, we have selected the UTF-8 standard which is
backwards compatible with the ASCII standard of encoding characters to a numeric table
(ASCII only uses 8-bit values between 0 and 127 - the specifics of these two standards
are not covered, as numerous references for these are available at public libraries or the
internet).
8
0.4.3 What is Binary?
The digital world is all ones and zeros. By placing ones and zeros in a standardized
pattern we can encode data that can be exchanged between multiple devices. The lowest
level of encoding data is “binary notation”. In this notation, a “bit” represents the “true”
or “false” presence of the numeric value at that bit location. Therefore, if the bit
representing a “4” was “true”, one would add the “4” to the total of the “byte” (the total
size of the number). For our systems and the character-set we are using, we have an “8bit” byte (meaning there are 8 value “places” representing numbers that are added to each
other to generate the final number which the “byte” represents).
There are two ways to notate and send binary data – LSB and MSB. These stand for
“Least Significant Bit” and “Most Significant Bit” respectively, and these labels refer to
which bit in a given byte is sent first (basically this means that data can be notated left toright or right-to-left – and the data can be sent with the largest value first, or the smallest
value first). In this document, we will use the standard of notating MSB 8-bit bytes for
sentence (string) construction (largest-to-smallest, left-to-right), and LSB for the
communication scheme (RS-232/IR standards).
As an example, the decimal (“0-9”, “10-19”, etc.) notation number of “65” is:
Bit 7
Bit 6
Bit 5
Bit 4
Bit 3
Bit 2
Bit 1
Bit 0
Value = 128 Value = 64
Value = 32
Value = 16 Value = 8 Value = 4 Value = 2 Value = 1
0
0
0
0
0
0
1
1
If you add: 64 + 1, you get “65”. This is the basis for all future dialog within this guide.
0.4.4 What is HEX?
So you’re probably saying “It’s going to take me forever to figure out how to send
Binary data from a PC to an iScan,” or “Boy, do I have to learn binary notation to use the
iScan Automation Protocol?” Well the short answer is “no”, you will want this basic
ground-work to understand that electronic devices communicate this way – but there is a
short-hand for Binary which you will need to learn. It reduces the characters you have to
type by ¼ (thus you would type only two characters instead of eight to represent an “8-bit
byte”). This is the HEX Notation. HEX is a different “base” number set – where
“binary” has two possibilities for each character (0 and 1), the very familiar “Decimal”
has ten possibilities (0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9), and “Hexadecimal” (or “HEX” for short)
has 16 possibilities (0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, A(10), B(11), C(12), D(13), E(14), F(15)).
This “shorthand” was selected since decimal doesn’t easily calculate into binary (where
each additional bit is a multiplier of two of the previous bit). With HEX, each character
represents a “nybble” of a byte (or four bits). Each “byte” is split into two “nybbles” (a
high nybble and a low nybble), so that a byte can be conveyed using the same MSB
notation with fewer characters to mean the same thing, in a terminal application which
accepts HEX.
9
As an example, using “65” again – the HEX equivalent is “41h”. So what’s the “h” at
the end? There are two commonly accepted ways to identify HEX notation in a sentence
(or “string”). One is with the use of a “0x00” notation, where the two last zeros represent
the two HEX characters, or with “00h” showing that this is a two nybble-byte in HEX
notation. This can get confusing the more you learn – so take a moment to highlight this
section or put a Post-It flag on this page for future reference.
0.4.5 What is ASCII?
Okay, we started this digital primer with the idea that we wanted to send our data
from one place to another in a way that the machines could understand. But now what
happens if we (humans) want to read it? Well back to the ASCII Look-Up-Table concept
that we brushed on at the beginning. If you remember, we replaced a human-readable
character with a number so that the machine can understand it. We use the reverse of that
table replacement to “extract” the data that was transferred from one device to another.
Recall that binary, decimal, and HEX - all represent different ways to write numbers.
ASCII characters represent the Human-readable equivalent of that given number. For
example, again using decimal number “65” (binary number: “00100001”, HEX number
“0x41” or “41h”) – the ASCII table equivalent is a capital “A”. All four of these
numbers mean exactly the same thing to a machine using an ASCII table – capital “A”.
A simple ASCII to HEX conversion table is provided at the end of this document in
Appendix A.
10
0.5 A brief dialog about remote controlling a VPxx
series video processor
Please be honest with yourself and ensure that you have understood the previous
sections. If you’re not confident about how binary = HEX = decimal and relates to
ASCII, then you may want to check out the internet for more information on digital
information technology – or contact our Technical Support Hotline at (U.S. Domestic) 1866-423-3836 extension 333, or (International) 1-408-395-4455 extension 333.
Alternatively you may contact our support by email group at help@anchorbaytech.com.
•
The first thing this writer suggests when learning the following automation protocol –
is to realize that this is a machine talking to another machine – not a human talking to
another human. The automation protocol is written for maximum efficiency, clarity,
and robustness of communication between two machines - all while allowing for
future expansion without requiring us to re-write the protocol every time new
features/products come out (thus commands that work in the new version of software
should work in just about every other previous version/product – which has the exact
same functional control).
•
The second thing this writer suggests is learning and understanding the HEX notation
– and how to convert decimal numbers and basic ASCII characters (0-9 and A-Z
capitals) into HEX notation. The serial interface works in bytes, and understands
numbers – so the closer you can get to understanding this type of communication –
the easier this will be for you.
11
0.6 A dialog about input video memories
Due to the number of inputs and different types of input formats and ever further
numerous types of source devices, we at Anchor Bay added input memories, which allow
the user/system-integrator to configure very specific “effects” for a specific input format
on a specific input connection. This means that a single input can have many different
settings within the same control – just based on the input format that it is receiving.
As an example, at the time of this writing, for HDMI on the VP50PRO we support:
VGA
SVGA
XGA
SXGA
576i-50Hz
576p-50Hz
480i-60Hz
480p-60Hz
720p-50Hz
720p-60Hz
1080i-50Hz
1080i-60Hz
1080p-23.98/24Hz
1080p-25Hz
1080p-50Hz
1080p-59.97/60Hz
Each format has its own memory, with individual picture controls, aspect ratios and
zooms/pans, processing modes, etc. This can easily make the job of setting up an iScan
very involved, as we offer an incredible amount of control over just about every aspect of
the processed signal. We have put in functions to our automation protocol which allow
an automation controller full access to these parameters – so care must be taken to avoid
errors.
Keep in mind that not all inputs support all input types – for example, Composite and
S-Video inputs are limited to 480i-60Hz or 576i-50Hz based on the source and the region
the iScan is used in.
12
This page intentionally left blank
13
1 RS-232 Control
1.1 The RS-232 Physical Connection
RS-232 connections come in several styles which are accepted in the consumer
electronics industry. The most common is the 9-pin D-Subminiature connector found on
the back of most computers, and is the one that we use on the iScan VPxx products.
The female serial port, found on the back panel of an iScan VPxx video processor.
In this interface, there are a few different signals which must be supported. These are
(all pin numbers are for the iScan):
RX – Data Receive (pin 3)
TX – Data Transmit (pin 2)
RTS – Request To Send (pin 8)
CTS – Clear To Send (pin 7)
GND – Signal Ground (pin 5)
We do not use the “DSR – Data Set Ready”, “DTR – Data Terminal Ready”, “CD Carrier Detect” or “RI – Ring Indicator” pins for the iScan VPxx series.
These signals are associated with specific pin numbers based on what type of device
the serial port is attached to. There are two types of serial device Data-TerminalEquipment (DTE) and Data-Communications-Equipment (DCE). A DTE is your
computer or an automation system – basically a controlling device. A DCE is a modem,
or in this case the iScan. Some manufacturers chose to wire their RS-232 port as a DTE,
but we have elected to wire our unit as a DCE. This determines a critical difference in
the serial cable wiring to get the unit to communicate with the automation controller or
PC. If your automation controller is based on a PC, the serial port is likely to be wired as
a DTE port (please check with your automation controller vendor for clarification). This
allows the use of a very common straight-through “extension” cable to be used to
complete the communication connection (like the type which is shipped with the iScan
unit).
When a dissimilar port type is used in a serial connection (for example DTE-to-DCE
or vise versa), a straight-through cable is usually all that is needed. However, when
similar port types are used, a cross-over cable is required (for example DCE-to-DCE or
DTE-to DTE). Please double check the type of connection that you are using before
connecting the cable.
14
1.1.1 The Anchor Bay RS-232 Protocol
In this portion of the document, we will discus the three types of control
communications that occur between the iScan and the controlling device.
1.1.2 A Dialog on Checksums
Checksums are a way for a receiving device to double check the communication that
occurred between the transmitting device and the receiver. In most systems, Checksums
are not needed – however some installations absolutely require them (for example:
industrial control or corporate teleconference systems). If you don’t already know what a
checksum is - you probably will not need it for your application. The system will work
fine in 99.999% of systems without the use of checksums. If you need to use a checksum
due to customer/job requirements, the calculation and checking calculations are provided
in the following sections.
1.2 Control Commands
The “Control Command” is probably why you are reading this document right now.
This is a sequence of data which tells the iScan to do something. Until the controller or
PC sends an instruction to do something, the iScan will happily do its primary job –
processing video.
This writer believes that the easiest way to understand what is occurring is to think of a
“serial command” as a public address announcement you might hear in an airport:
“May I have your attention please, John Doe, please pickup the white courtesy phone
and press 0. Thank you.”
Essentially the same thing is done with an automation control sentence (or string):
“Attention this is a command which is this long and the command controls this
function >>pause<< this is the value I want to set >>pause<< [checksum – optional]
I’m done talking”
Hopefully this looks easy. However please remember, electronics don’t speak in
fancy human readable sentences, they speak in numbers. This is where human-readable
ASCII character look-up-tables and HEX notation come into play, and a lot of confusion
can too. Now in the ASCII table there are some basic “characters” which represent some
of the bold words above:
“Attention” = Start Text or STX in ASCII
>>pause<< = Null or NUL in ASCII
“I’m Done Talking” = End Text or ETX in ASCII
Every ASCII character is a single “byte” (one 8-bit number each) which has been
specified to mean what is shown above. Now remember that the ASCII table is meant to
convert numbers to human readable characters and vise versa.
15
Also, each of the above “characters” has a related HEX notation number to go with it:
“Attention” = Start Text or STX = 0x02 in HEX notation
>>pause<< = Null or NUL = 0x00 in HEX notation
“I’m Done Talking” = End Text or ETX = 0x03 in HEX notation
It is up to the individual programmer to determine which method is easiest to
understand – but if you haven’t chosen your programming style yet, this writer
recommends sticking with HEX notation. One thing that should be avoided at all costs is
mixing HEX notation with ASCII characters – as you may see in the next set of
examples, mixing numbers and ASCII will get you very confused very fast (You’re not a
computer, so you can’t be expected to keep track of it all). This document will be written
from here to the end slanted to illustrate HEX notation, as it demands the use of “bytes”
and is easiest for new-comers to get used to recognizing characters which need to be
converted from human readable text characters to machine readable numbers.
Let’s take another look at that sentence:
“Attention this is a command which is this long and the command controls this
function >>pause<< this is the value I want to set >>pause<< [checksum – optional]
I’m done talking”
Now let’s replace the words we know with the HEX notation equivalents:
“0x02 this is a command which is this long and the command controls this
function 0x00 this is the value I want to set 0x00 [checksum – optional] 0x03”
We at Anchor Bay have specified the byte value for the “is a command” text’s
replacement as a portion of our protocol specification. We have defined a command as
two ASCII characters of “3” and “0”. In HEX notation this comes out to two bytes: 0x33
and 0x30 (these must be in this order!). Note that the “is a command” is represented by
these two bytes (each 8-bits, or two nybbles).
Let’s look at the sentence again, replacing what we know:
“0x02 0x33 0x30 which is this long and the command controls this function
0x00 this is the value I want to set 0x00 [checksum – optional] 0x03”
This gives us enough to have a “wrapper” for all RS-232 control commands:
0x02 0x33 0x30 [length byte 1] [length byte 2] [Command ID byte 1] [Command ID
byte 2] 0x00 [Value x-Bytes] 0x00 [checksum – optional] 0x03
16
Before we start listing Command ID bytes, lets look at the “this long” portion of our
sentence. For this, count the two command ID bytes (count the bytes, don’t add the
values!), add the count of the two NUL bytes (again, don’t add the values), add the count
of the value bytes (this really should sink in now - don’t add the values themselves). This
equals the “byte-count” for the command sentence (string) – we are always counting
bytes. Below is an example of the bytes we want to count:
Byte 1
Command ID 1
Byte 2
Command ID 2
Byte 3
NUL
Byte 4
Value Byte n
Byte 5
NUL
HELPER-RULE: There will always be two command ID bytes and two
NUL bytes – and there should always be at least one value byte for a
command. This means that you should never have a byte count below “5”
for a command. You must also always use two bytes to convey the bytecount value; so an example would be “05” or 0x30 0x35.
For now let’s look at the most simple control of the iScan product – turning its power
“on”. The Command ID for the power control (“controls this function”) is “A” and “1”
– hey, if you were reading this from the beginning you’ll recognize capital “A” as HEX
0x41. The people who wrote the ASCII Look-Up-Tables were nice enough to realize that
humans would occasionally use the table – so they lined up decimal numbers to the 0x30
HEX range (i.e. 0=0x30, 1=0x31, 2=0x32, etc.). This means that the “1” we need is
0x31.
So the command ID bytes for the power control are (in HEX) 0x41 0x31.
Let’s look at the sentence again, replacing what we know now:
“0x02 0x33 0x30 which is this long 0x41 0x31 0x00 this is the value I want to set
0x00 [checksum – optional] 0x03”
Now let’s look at the value we want to set this to – in the table in Section 3 you will
see the commands and the values that are possible. Looking up Power, we see that the
values for OFF and ON are “0” and “1” respectively. We already know how to convert
the “1” to HEX notation and since we do want to turn the unit “on”, this is the value
we’re going to use. “The value” = 0x31.
Let’s look at the sentence again, replacing what we know:
“0x02 0x33 0x30 which is this long 0x41 0x31 0x00 0x31 0x00 [checksum –
optional] 0x03”
If you’ve read this far and understand what’s happening - Great! Now the only things
we are missing are the Checksum and the length-count bytes. Since the checksum must
be the last thing we calculate, we’ll do the length first: Two bytes for command ID + one
byte for NUL + one byte for value + one byte for NUL = 5 bytes or “05”. Converting the
count to HEX notation we get 0x30 and 0x35.
17
Let’s look at the sentence again, replacing what we know now:
“0x02 0x33 0x30 0x30 0x35 0x41 0x31 0x00 0x31 0x00 [checksum – optional] 0x03”
If you recall, unless your application calls for it specifically – YOU DO NOT NEED
A CHECKSUM!!! If your application doesn’t need it, you are done with the sentence
construction (just remove the optional placeholder for the “checksum - optional”):
Let’s look at the sentence again, with out the optional checksum placeholder:
“0x02 0x33 0x30 0x30 0x35 0x41 0x31 0x00 0x31 0x00 0x03”
Now there is one more detail which you will need to figure out about your automation
system: “How or does it accept HEX notation?” Some systems are smart enough to
recognize the “0x” as a prefix for a HEX notation number. Others are not. This writer is
aware of an example application called “RS232 Hex Com Tool” which does not
recognize the “0x” as a prefix. This means that the operator/user/programmer must
determine how to enter the data correctly – due to the broad spectrum of programming
styles across all of the varied automation systems this is not covered in this guide nor is it
the responsibility of Anchor Bay to tell you (the reader). Contact your automation
system vendor for clarification on data entry to their system.
As it happens, in the above examples, the byte itself was highlighted with BOLD
typeface to bring attention to the actual value for the byte. This highlighted data is also
what that particular application expects, with a [space] or [comma] to separate the bytes.
Thus the same “power-on” command would be:
02 33 30 30 35 41 31 00 31 00 03 for “power-on” with no checksum
If you are unsure if the automation computer or other machine is working with the
serial cable, the “RS232 Hex Com Tool” program is available for download (shareware –
free trial for 30 days, purchase for a small fee) on the web at: http://www.rs232pro.com/.
Anchor Bay does not warrant the function of this utility or endorse its purchase – this is
simply a reference to one of many options available for testing. The open-source Tera
Term Pro utility used for upgrading iScan VPxx products is also capable of sending HEX
or ASCII strings with some minor programming – but we do not support this use of the
program and attempts to use Tera Term Pro as an automation controller should only be
taken on by experienced programmers with some basic coding/programming background.
18
The checksum. This is the last part other than the Command ID Table and Value
Table you might need to create a command string. Again, unless your customer/job
requirements demand/specify it – YOU DO NOT NEED A CHECKSUM!! Assuming
that you absolutely need to have a checksum due to a customer/job requirement, the
checksum is fairly easy - add the value of every byte from the beginning of the string (at
STX) to the last “NUL” just before the ETX (0x03). For the “Power On” command, this
would be: 02 33 30 30 35 41 31 00 31 00
So you would add: 0x02 + 0x33 + 0x30 + 0x30 + 0x35 + 0x41 + 0x31 + 0x00 + 0x31
+0x00 = 0x16D
HINT: You can use the scientific calculator in Windows to figure this out in HEX.
Now we only deal with 8-bit values for bytes – and you can see (if you recall the
discussion about nybbles and bytes) that the checksum value is three hex characters or
three “nybbles”. This means the result is a 12-bit value. How we take care of this is very
easy – drop (truncate) the nybbles above the two lowest nybbles. If you do this to the
0x16D value you get 0x6D. If you are writing a software program – an easy way to do
this is to “AND” the checksum value with 0xFF in HEX or “255” in decimal.
If you’ve really been paying attention you’ll remember that the checksum is two
bytes – we made it easy to figure out these two by simply taking the 6 and the D (which
are part of a HEX notation number from our calculation) and using them as ASCII standins. So assume these two characters are ASCII and convert them down to HEX (“6”
becomes 0x36, “D” becomes 0x44). This is a form of data expansion – and is intended to
reduce the possible valid bit patterns which can be expected at these two byte locations to
16 possibilities.
For a last look at turning on the power for the iScan, let’s look at the whole string
including the checksum (underlined):
0x02 0x33 0x30 0x30 0x35 0x41 0x31 0x00 0x31 0x00 0x36 0x44 0x03
That is all there is to Command Packets. If you are still unclear on how this is
supposed to work, or you believe you are doing this correctly, but still have no success
controlling the iScan, please contact our Technical Support group.
19
1.2.1 Example RS-232 Command Packets
This section contains the most commonly requested automation command-type
strings (no checksums are provided):
Power
On
0x02 0x33 0x30 0x35 0x41 0x31 0x00 0x31 0x00 0x03
Off
0x02 0x33 0x30 0x35 0x41 0x31 0x00 0x30 0x00 0x03
Input
Composite 1
0x02 0x33 0x30 0x35 0x41 0x43 0x00 0x31 0x00 0x03
Composite 1
0x02 0x33 0x30 0x35 0x41 0x43 0x00 0x32 0x00 0x03
S-Video 1
0x02 0x33 0x30 0x35 0x41 0x43 0x00 0x33 0x00 0x03
S-Video 2
0x02 0x33 0x30 0x35 0x41 0x43 0x00 0x34 0x00 0x03
Component 1
0x02 0x33 0x30 0x35 0x41 0x43 0x00 0x35 0x00 0x03
Component 2
0x02 0x33 0x30 0x35 0x41 0x43 0x00 0x36 0x00 0x03
Component 3/RGBHV
0x02 0x33 0x30 0x35 0x41 0x43 0x00 0x37 0x00 0x03
HDMI 1
0x02 0x33 0x30 0x35 0x41 0x43 0x00 0x38 0x00 0x03
HDMI 2
0x02 0x33 0x30 0x35 0x41 0x43 0x00 0x39 0x00 0x03
HDMI 3
0x02 0x33 0x30 0x36 0x41 0x43 0x00 0x31 0x30 0x00 0x03
HDMI 4
0x02 0x33 0x30 0x36 0x41 0x43 0x00 0x31 0x31 0x00 0x03
SDI 1
0x02 0x33 0x30 0x36 0x41 0x43 0x00 0x31 0x32 0x00 0x03
SDI 2
0x02 0x33 0x30 0x36 0x41 0x43 0x00 0x31 0x34 0x00 0x03
AUTO Input Select
0x02 0x33 0x30 0x36 0x41 0x43 0x00 0x31 0x33 0x00 0x03
Input Preset (recall – not save)
4x3 Full Frame
0x02 0x33 0x30 0x35 0x43 0x31 0x00 0x31 0x00 0x03
4x3 Letterbox
0x02 0x33 0x30 0x35 0x43 0x31 0x00 0x32 0x00 0x03
16x9 Full Frame
0x02 0x33 0x30 0x35 0x43 0x31 0x00 0x33 0x00 0x03
4x3 Stretch
0x02 0x33 0x30 0x35 0x43 0x31 0x00 0x34 0x00 0x03
20
Preset 1
0x02 0x33 0x30 0x35 0x43 0x31 0x00 0x35 0x00 0x03
Preset 2
0x02 0x33 0x30 0x35 0x43 0x31 0x00 0x36 0x00 0x03
Preset 3
0x02 0x33 0x30 0x35 0x43 0x31 0x00 0x37 0x00 0x03
Preset 4
0x02 0x33 0x30 0x35 0x43 0x31 0x00 0x38 0x00 0x03
Preset 5
0x02 0x33 0x30 0x35 0x43 0x31 0x00 0x39 0x00 0x03
Preset 6
0x02 0x33 0x30 0x36 0x43 0x31 0x00 0x31 0x30 0x00 0x03
Preset 7
0x02 0x33 0x30 0x36 0x43 0x31 0x00 0x31 0x31 0x00 0x03
Preset 8
0x02 0x33 0x30 0x36 0x43 0x31 0x00 0x31 0x32 0x00 0x03
Preset 9
0x02 0x33 0x30 0x36 0x43 0x31 0x00 0x31 0x33 0x00 0x03
Preset 10
0x02 0x33 0x30 0x36 0x43 0x31 0x00 0x31 0x34 0x00 0x03
Deinterlacing Mode
Auto
0x02 0x33 0x30 0x35 0x34 0x39 0x00 0x36 0x00 0x03
Film
0x02 0x33 0x30 0x35 0x34 0x39 0x00 0x30 0x00 0x03
Video
0x02 0x33 0x30 0x35 0x34 0x39 0x00 0x31 0x00 0x03
Forced 3:2
0x02 0x33 0x30 0x35 0x34 0x39 0x00 0x38 0x00 0x03
Forded 2:2
0x02 0x33 0x30 0x36 0x34 0x39 0x00 0x31 0x30 0x00 0x03
2:2 Odd
0x02 0x33 0x30 0x35 0x34 0x39 0x00 0x33 0x00 0x03
2:2 Even
0x02 0x33 0x30 0x35 0x34 0x39 0x00 0x32 0x00 0x03
Game Mode 1
0x02 0x33 0x30 0x35 0x34 0x39 0x00 0x34 0x00 0x03
Game Mode 2
0x02 0x33 0x30 0x35 0x34 0x39 0x00 0x35 0x00 0x03
21
Mosquito Noise Reduction
Off
0x02 0x33 0x30 0x35 0x43 0x41 0x00 0x30 0x00 0x03
Level 1
0x02 0x33 0x30 0x35 0x43 0x41 0x00 0x31 0x00 0x03
Level 2
0x02 0x33 0x30 0x35 0x43 0x41 0x00 0x32 0x00 0x03
Level 3
0x02 0x33 0x30 0x35 0x43 0x41 0x00 0x33 0x00 0x03
Output Display Profile (recall – not save)
Display Profile 1
0x02 0x33 0x30 0x35 0x45 0x30 0x00 0x31 0x00 0x03
Display Profile 2
0x02 0x33 0x30 0x35 0x45 0x30 0x00 0x32 0x00 0x03
Display Profile 3
0x02 0x33 0x30 0x35 0x45 0x30 0x00 0x33 0x00 0x03
Display Profile 4
0x02 0x33 0x30 0x35 0x45 0x30 0x00 0x34 0x00 0x03
Display Profile 5
0x02 0x33 0x30 0x35 0x45 0x30 0x00 0x35 0x00 0x03
Display Profile 6
0x02 0x33 0x30 0x35 0x45 0x30 0x00 0x36 0x00 0x03
Display Profile 7
0x02 0x33 0x30 0x35 0x45 0x30 0x00 0x37 0x00 0x03
Display Profile 8
0x02 0x33 0x30 0x35 0x45 0x30 0x00 0x38 0x00 0x03
Display Profile 9
0x02 0x33 0x30 0x35 0x45 0x30 0x00 0x39 0x00 0x03
Display Profile 10
0x02 0x33 0x30 0x36 0x45 0x30 0x00 0x31 0x30 0x00 0x03
22
1.3 Query Commands
Query commands allow an external device to determine the setting of a given control.
Building on the information presented in the previous section on constructing Command
Packets, we will discuss the method for building a Query Packet. We’ll use the example
of querying the “power” state of the unit (Command ID A1 used in the previous section).
Again, using the example of a sentence, the dialog would be:
“Attention this is a query which is this long and I want to know the setting of this
function >>pause<< [checksum – optional] I’m done talking”
There are some fairly obvious similarities which can be seen between Commands and
Queries. These values are still the same for queries as they are based on ASCII look-up
equivalents:
“Attention” = Start Text or STX = 0x02 in HEX notation
>>pause<< = Null or NUL = 0x00 in HEX notation
“I’m Done Talking” = End Text or ETX = 0x03 in HEX notation
If you recall that the “is a command” bytes are 3 and 0, we have defined “is a query”
bytes as 2 and 0 – or 0x32 and 0x30 in HEX notation. So, looking at the sentence and
replacing what we know, we would get:
“0x02 0x32 0x30 which is this long and I want to know the setting of this function 0x00
[checksum – optional] 0x03”
To query “power”, we use the same command ID found in Section 3, which we used to
set the state – “A” and “1”, or 0x41 and 0x31. Again looking at the sentence and
replacing what we know, we would get:
“0x02 0x32 0x30 which is this long 0x41 0x31 0x00 [checksum – optional] 0x03”
We would then calculate the length (which in this type of packet is always “3” or
0x30 and 0x33 since it must be two bytes). With this value, and if you do not need a
checksum the final packet would be:
“0x02 0x32 0x30 0x30 0x33 0x41 0x31 0x00 0x03”
To calculate the checksum, we take all of the values and add them up, then truncate
the result to an 8-bit number (two nybbles):
0x02 + 0x32 + 0x30 + 0x30 + 0x33 + 0x41 + 0x31 + 0x00 = 0x139
If you truncate the result by only keeping the right most two “nybbles” and you
should get 0x39 – remember these two nybbles are then assumed to be ASCII stand-in
which must be converted to HEX notation (for data expansion). The two bytes for the
checksum would be 0x33 and 0x39 so that your final query packet with checksum would
be:
“0x02 0x32 0x30 0x30 0x33 0x41 0x31 0x00 0x33 0x39 0x03”
23
1.4 Responses
Responses (aka “feedback”) is arguably what really make RS-232 a powerful
interface. As opposed to infrared control, the RS-232 port allows for bi-directional
communication, so that the controlling device can get information from the controlled
unit to make decisions based on the actual state of the unit. Response packets are about
the same as Command or Query packets – with some minor differences is the data they
contain.
First, there are only three types of response the iScan can give (and remember that the
iScan will not just start transmitting data without first being “asked” to do something).
•
•
•
Acknowledge – This means the control you just sent was accepted and valid
Query Response – the value for the control you would have just asked about
Error Response – Something went wrong, this packet you what
Just like “Commands” and “Queries” have two bytes signifying those
communications, these response packets each have their own:
•
•
•
•
•
Command = “3” and “0” or 0x33 and 0x30 in HEX notation
Query = “2” and “0” or 0x32 and 0x30 in HEX notation
Acknowledge Response = “0” and “1” or 0x30 and 0x31 in HEX notation
Query Response = “2” and “1” or 0x32 and 0x31 in HEX notation
Error Response = “0” and “2” or 0x30 and 0x32 in HEX notation
For acknowledge, you will only ever see one packet:
“Attention this is an acknowledge which is this long the data was accepted >>pause<<
the packet was a command >>pause<< [checksum – always included in replies] I’m
done talking”
We won’t spend a great deal of time on the “acknowledge” except replacing the
known items above with the values:
“0x02 0x30 0x31 0x30 0x35 0x31 0x00 0x33 0x30 0x00 0x35 0x43 0x03”
Since you will only ever get an “Acknowledge” packet for a “command”, this is the
only variant you should ever expect (using these exact above values). However should
something go wrong, you will get an error reply:
“Attention this is an Error which is this long this is the Error >>pause<< [checksum –
always included in replies] I’m done talking”
Replacing the items which should be starting to get familiar, we get:
“0x02 0x30 0x32 [count byte 1 0x30] [count byte 2 – either 0x32 or 0x33] [error byte n
(there may be up to two bytes based on the error)] 0x00 [checksum – always included in
replies] 0x03”
The values you may get in an error reply are on the next page.
24
Error “1” – Invalid checksum. This error means either the checksum you sent was
wrong or the transmission was bad due to interference (double check your
checksum calculation or your serial link).
Error “2” – Invalid Incoming Packet ID (i.e. Command = “3”&”0”, Query = “2”&“0”,
others are invalid when sent to the iScan)
Error “3” – Invalid Setting (i.e. Power = “A”&”1”) if you get this error, make sure that
the command is supported by the model you are using.
Error “4” – Range Error (i.e. Power on = “1”, power off = “0”) if you get this error you
tried to set a value to the control which is either out of range or not
supported.
Error “5” – Bad Packet Character (i.e. STX, ETX, NUL) a valid ASCII character value
may have been used in the wrong place – double check your syntax.
Otherwise, ensure that only numbers, or punctuation (“.”, “+”, or “-“) was
used.
Error “6” – Last byte of packet was not received within 100 milliseconds – if this
happens, first make sure that the link is good. Then, ensure that your control
device is waiting for a complete response packet before sending another
packet. If your controller does not “listen” to the flow control pins
(DSR/DTR look at section 2.1) the buffer may over-flow causing bytes to be
lost. If no RS-232 return path is being used, pace your commands to about
10 commands every second.
Error “7” – Unterminated Data Value. This means you missed a “NUL” after a value
and went straight to the “ETX” – check your syntax.
Error “8” – Bad Data – If you get this response, first check your serial link, then check
the table in Section 3 to ensure you sent the right type of value. If you send
a “5E” for a control expecting a number like “1.453”, you will get this type
of error response.
Error “9” – Too many or too few data characters. This error appears if your packet has
the wrong byte counts value, or you don’t have all of the data in the string.
Error “10” – The setting is not writable (i.e. command for “Device Name”), this will be
your response if you attempt to write to a query only Command ID
Error “11” – The packet is larger than the maximum packet size. You should never see
this error – we do not have any controls which are at the time of this writing
even close to the maximum size. If this error comes back – check your
serial link and syntax. If you are transmitting more that 50 bytes in a single
command you are probably doing something wrong!!
25
The query response is the most involved response packet you will get in reply. This
packet can have any data in the “value” bytes (although it will still be ASCII characters in
HEX notation). Note that commands like “Model Name” will reply with text, while
commands which are controlled by numbers will reply with numbers.
The response to a query for power state (if the unit is “on”) would be:
0x02 0x32 0x31 0x30 0x35 0x41 0x31 0x00 0x31 0x00 0x36 0x44 0x03
Working in reverse of building a packet (assuming you read the previous sections),
you should be starting to see patterns:
0x02 = STX, 0x32 = “2”, 0x31 = “1”, 0x30 = “0”, 0x35 = “5”, 0x41 = “A”, 0x31 = “1”,
0x00 = NUL, 0x31 = “1”, 0x00 = NUL, 0x36 = “6”, 0x44 = “D”, 0x03 = ETX
From this you can see:
• The STX which means “Attention”.
• The “2” and “1” which identifies the packet as a query response type.
• A “0” and “5” which shows that the byte count is 5 bytes long.
• An “A” “1” for the command ID which decodes to “Power” in Section 3
• A NUL before the value of the command
• A “1” showing the state to be “On” as decoded in Section 3
• A NUL after the value of the command
• A checksum of “6D” which if we check the math;
0x02 + 0x32 + 0x31 + 0x30 + 0x35 + 0x41 + 0x31 + 0x00 + 0x31 + 0x00 = 16D
and if we truncate the value to only two “nybbles” (or two hex characters) we get
6D which matches the checksum value – showing the checksum and packet is
good.
• An ETX which means “I’m done talking”
26
2 IR Control
We have provided a reprint of Barry Gordon’s paper on IR interfacing in Appendix B at the end of
this document. If you feel the information provided in the next few sections is a bit confusing, please take
a moment to read that document.
2.1 The NEC IR Protocol (Factory Remote)
In this section, we will provide the basic values needed for building a Pronto HEX compatible iScan
factory remote control code. The factory remote strictly adheres to the NEC IR protocol, while the discrete
commands are often too long (more than one byte) or too numerous to fit within one “device code” under
the NEC protocol. For discrete commands, please see the next section. Below we give you the basic items
required to replicate the factory remote buttons. If you are not familiar with the NEC IR protocol, please
take the time to read the article in Appendix B by Barry Gordon on Pronto HEX and NEC IR protocols. :
Carrier Frequency =
Device ID Code =
38.38kHz
0x2084
27
2.2 The Anchor Bay IR Protocol (Discrete Control)
As stated before, the discrete controls may be longer than the NEC protocol will allow. The NEC
protocol only allows for one byte of “control/value” data to be transferred from the remote control to the
controlled device. The Pronto HEX format does not have specific length limits, and since it is a common
interchange format and is fairly easy to use – we have constructed a discrete control command system
based on the RS-232 Command IDs and Values, which may be programmed into an advanced learning
macro remote control which can interpret the Pronto HEX structure.
Note: Not all learning remotes are made equal! Some are limited to NEC compliant codes only and are
incompatible with the discrete functions provided in this section. Check with your installer or remote
reseller to find out if your learning remote is NEC compliant only. Also, your remote must be able to
understand and transmit 38.38kHz IR signals – not every remote or IR repeater system can do this,
again double check with your vendor.
The basic sequence for building a discrete code is very simple:
•
•
•
•
Decide which Command you wish to control and find the “command ID” for that control
Decide what you would like to set the control to and look-up (if necessary) the appropriate value
for that setting on that control
Build the IR command using the below methodology
Test the IR command before leaving the job-site or publishing the codes publicly
The method for building a code is very similar to what you may have already read (in the previous
sections) – if you have not read section 2.1, this is a good time to go back and read it before we really
confuse you. Assuming that you have read and understood the 2.1 section information, here are some fixed
values which you will want to know for discrete Anchor Bay commands (Note: if you “learn” a discrete
function from one remote to another you may get slightly different values – but these may not work
reliably):
Pronto HEX Carrier Frequency of 38.38kHz =
Pronto HEX Start bit pulse width =
Pronto HEX Logic “1” bit pulse width =
Pronto HEX Logic “0” bit pulse width =
Pronto HEX Stop bit Pulse width =
End of defined command string “bit” =
006C
0064 0064
0016 0041
0016 0015
0044 0044
0016 0001
The format for data which must be adhered to is:
0000
Always “zero” to mark the beginning of the code header
006C
Carrier Frequency of 38.38kHz
nnnn
Number of “bit bursts” in the transmission
0000
Always “zero” to mark the end of the code header
0064 0064
Start “bit” (beginning of command transmission)
nnnn nnnn nnnn nnnn nnnn nnnn nnnn nnnn nnnn nnnn nnnn nnnn nnnn nnnn nnnn nnnn 8-bit Command ID
nnnn nnnn nnnn nnnn nnnn nnnn nnnn nnnn nnnn nnnn nnnn nnnn nnnn nnnn nnnn nnnn 8-bit Value byte 1
……………
nnnn nnnn nnnn nnnn nnnn nnnn nnnn nnnn nnnn nnnn nnnn nnnn nnnn nnnn nnnn nnnn 8-bit Value byte n
nnnn nnnn nnnn nnnn nnnn nnnn nnnn nnnn nnnn nnnn nnnn nnnn nnnn nnnn nnnn nnnn 8-bit Checksum
0044 0044
Stop “bit” (end of command transmission)
0016 0001
End of defined command string “bit”
Remember that the bit order we discuss when readin the numbers is MSB – yet when it is written in Pronto
HEX, because the IR transmitter sends out the LSB first, the bits must be flipped from left to right. Let’s
try this with a discrete power “off” command starting on the next page.
28
If you recall from the RS-232 section, the command ID for the power control is “A” and “1”, but if you
look at the Pronto HEX format, the command ID can only be one byte. This is why we made the
Command IDs out of “HEX compatible” naming – so that the same data when represented as a byte will
look very familiar. Thus the HEX byte for controlling power via IR is 0xA1.
If you were to open the calculator program in Windows, and enter this number by selection the “Hex” radio
button in scientific view mode – then by clicking the “Bin” radio button the calculator will automatically
convert it from HEX to binary for you:
You get the result of: 1010 0001 as the binary number for A1.
Remember that you must fip the number left-to-right for IR to work correctly, so you would get: 1000 0101
Since we want to turn this control “off”, we look up the value for off and find that it is “0” or 0x30 in HEX.
Since this value is only a byte – it is the only “value” byte we need to transmit. By using the Windows
calculator, we can convert this to binary: 0011 0000 – then flip it from MSB-to-LSB: 0000 1100
So we have two of the three parts needed to make a control command – the third and last byte to transmit in
this case is the checksum. The checksum is easier in IR than it is in RS-232, one simply adds the command
ID byte value and the setting value(s). For power off, this is 0xA1 + 0x30 = 0xD1. We can again use
Calculator to convert the HEX value to binary: 1101 0001 then flip it from MSB-to-LSB: 1000 1011
Now we have the IR command in binary (we’ll show the command parts for reference):
0000
006C
nnnn
0000
0064 0064
Always “zero” to mark the beginning of the code header
Carrier Frequency of 38.38kHz
Number of “bit bursts” in the transmission
Always “zero” to mark the end of the code header
Start “bit” (beginning of command transmission)
1000 0101
0000 1100
1000 1011
8-bit Command ID of 0xA1
0044 0044
0016 0001
Stop “bit” (end of command transmission)
End of defined command string “bit”
8-bit Value byte 1 of 0x30
8-bit Checksum of 0xD1
29
This writer finds this to be the best step to explain the “bit burst” count in the Pronto HEX format. The
bit burst is every “bit” from the after last “0000” in the header to the last “bit” in the command defenition.
The bits being referred to are in bold and larger above. There is one start bit, 8 command ID bits, 8 value
bits, 8 checksum bits, one stop bit, and an end of string bit. The bit count is then: 1 + 8 + 8 + 8 + 1 + 1 =
27. In the Pronto HEX format this number must be conveyed in a 16-bit HEX notation. You can again use
the Windows calculator to convert this from decimal to HEX: 0x001B.
We’re almost done with this except that in Pronto HEX, every bit must be represented by a “burst pair”
(on-time and off-time). Since we’ve previously defined what these values are for Logic “1” and Logic “2”,
all you need to do now is replace “1”s and “0”s with the appropriate predefined burst pair.
Pronto HEX Logic “1” bit pulse width =
Pronto HEX Logic “0” bit pulse width =
1
0
0
0
0016 0041
0016 0015
0
1
0
1
Command ID of 0xA1
0016 0041 0016 0015 0016 0015 0016 0015 0016 0015 0016 0041 0016 0015 0016 0041 in Pronto HEX
burst pairs
0
0
0
0
1
1
0
0
Value byte 0x30
0016 0015 0016 0015 0016 0015 0016 0015 0016 0041 0016 0041 0016 0015 0016 0015 in Pronto HEX
burst pairs
1
0
0
0
1
0
1
1
Checksum of 0xD1
0016 0041 0016 0015 0016 0015 0016 0015 0016 0041 0016 0015 0016 0041 0016 0041 in Pronto HEX
burst pairs
This makes the final command for discrete power off:
0000
Always “zero” to mark the beginning of the code header
006C
Carrier Frequency of 38.38kHz
001B
Number of “bit bursts” in the transmission (in this case 27 “bits” or HEX 0x001B)
0000
Always “zero” to mark the end of the code header
0064 0064
Start “bit” (beginning of command transmission)
0016 0041 0016 0015 0016 0015 0016 0015 0016 0015 0016 0041 0016 0015 0016 Command ID of 0xA1
0016 0015 0016 0015 0016 0015 0016 0015 0016 0041 0016 0041 0016 0015 0016 0015 Value byte 1 of 0x30
0016 0041 0016 0015 0016 0015 0016 0015 0016 0041 0016 0015 0016 0041 0016 Checksum of 0xD1
0044 0044
Stop “bit” (end of command transmission)
0016 0001
End of defined command string “bit”
Remember that the Pronto HEX string must not have the above descriptive text, extra [ENTER]s, or other
formatting characters. The final CCF command you should end up with is:
0000 006C 001B 0000 0064 0064 0016 0041 0016 0015 0016 0015 0016 0015 0016 0015 0016 0041 0016
0015 0016 0016 0015 0016 0015 0016 0015 0016 0015 0016 0041 0016 0041 0016 0015 0016 0015 0016
0041 0016 0015 0016 0015 0016 0015 0016 0041 0016 0015 0016 0041 0016 0044 0044 0016 0001
We have provided for your reference some of the most common IR commands we have had requested,
beginning in the next section. Since we are constantly adding features and new automation commands – it
will be faster if you learn how to construct these commands yourself, rahter than waiting for enough people
to request codes to be built for you. Of course, if you are having trouble, with this and need a code for an
installation imediately, please do not hesitate to call our Technical Support team.
30
2.2.1Discrete IR Control Examples
Below is a partial list of commonly used discrete commands in Pronto HEX syntax format (Pronto
HEX is a common Home-Automation Interchange format):
Power
On:
0000
0016
0016
0044
006c 001b 0000 0064 0064 0016 0041 0016 0015 0016 0015 0016 0015 0016 0015 0016 0041
0015 0016 0041 0016 0041 0016 0015 0016 0015 0016 0015 0016 0041 0016 0041 0016 0015
0015 0016 0015 0016 0041 0016 0015 0016 0015 0016 0041 0016 0015 0016 0041 0016 0041
0044 0016 0001
Off:
0000
0016
0016
0044
006c 001b 0000 0064 0064 0016 0041 0016 0015 0016 0015 0016 0015 0016 0015 0016 0041
0015 0016 0041 0016 0015 0016 0015 0016 0015 0016 0015 0016 0041 0016 0041 0016 0015
0015 0016 0041 0016 0015 0016 0015 0016 0015 0016 0041 0016 0015 0016 0041 0016 0041
0044 0016 0001
Inputs
Video 1:
0000 006d
0016 0015
0016 0015
0016 0040
0156 0055
0024
0015
0016
0015
0016
0000
0040
0015
0015
00ab
0156
0016
0015
0016
00ab
0015
0040
0040
0016
0015
0016
0015
0015
0015
0015
0015
0016
0016
0015
0016
0015
0015
0040
0040
0015
0016
0016
0015
0040
0015
0015
0040
Video 2
0000 006d
0016 0015
0016 0015
0015 0040
0156 0055
0024
0015
0016
0016
0016
0000
0040
0015
0015
00ab
0156
0016
0015
0015
00ab
0015
0040
0040
0016
0015
0016
0016
0015
0015
0015
0015
0016
0016
0015
0015
0015
0015
0040
0040
0015
0016
0016
0016
0040 0016 0015 0015 0015 0016 0015
0015 0015 0015 0016 0040 0015 0015
0015 0015 0015 0016 0015 0016 0015
003f 0016 0040 0015 0040 0016 06c0
0016
0015
0015
0016
0015
0015
0015
0015
0015
0016
0016
0015
0015
0040
0040
0040
0016
0015
0015
0016
0015
0015
0015
06c0
S-Video 1:
0000 006d 0024 0000 0156 00aa 0016 0015 0016 0015 0015 0040 0016 0015 0015 0015 0016 0015
0016 0015 0015 0040 0016 0015 0015 0015 0016 0015 0016 0015 0015 0015 0016 0040 0015 0015
0016 0015 0016 0015 0015 0040 0016 003f 0016 0040 0015 0015 0016 0015 0016 003f 0016 0015
0016 003f 0016 0015 0016 0015 0015 0015 0016 0040 0015 0040 0016 0015 0015 0040 0016 06c0
0156 0055 0016 00aa
31
S-Video 2:
0000 006d 0024 0000 0156 00ab 0016 0015 0016 0015 0015 0040 0016 0015 0015 0015 0016 0015
0016 0015 0015 0040 0016 0015 0015 0015 0016 0015 0016 0015 0015 0015 0016 0040 0015 0015
0016 0015 0016 0015 0015 0015 0016 0040 0015 0015 0016 0015 0016 0015 0015 0015 0016 0015
0016 003f 0016 0040 0015 0015 0016 0040 0015 0040 0016 003f 0016 0040 0015 0040 0016 06c0 0156
0055 0016 00ab
Component 1:
0000 006d 0024
0016 0015 0015
0016 0015 0016
0015 0015 0016
0156 0055 0016
0000 0156 00ab 0016 0015 0016 0015 0015 0040 0016 0015 0015 0015 0016 0015
0040 0016 0015 0015 0015 0016 0015 0016 0015 0015 0015 0016 0040 0015 0015
003f 0016 0040 0015 0040 0016 003f 0016 0015 0016 0015 0015 0040 0016 0015
0015 0016 0015 0015 0015 0016 0040 0015 0040 0016 0015 0015 0040 0016 06c0
00ab
Component 2:
0000 006d 0022
0016 0015 0015
0016 0015 0016
0015 0040 0016
0000 0156 00ab 0016 0015 0016 0015 0015 0040 0016 0015 0015 0015 0016 0015
0040 0016 0015 0015 0015 0016 0015 0016 0015 0015 0015 0016 0040 0015 0015
0015 0015 0015 0016 0040 0015 0015 0016 0040 0015 0015 0016 0015 0016 0015
003f 0016 0015 0016 003f 0016 0015 0016 003f 0016 0040 0015 0040 0016 00ab
RGBHV/Component 3:
0000 006d 0046 0000 0156 00ab 0016 0015 0016 0015 0015 0040 0016 0015 0015 0015 0016 0015
0016 0015 0015 0040 0016 0015 0015 0015 0016 0015 0016 0015 0015 0015 0016 0040 0015 0015
0016 0015 0016 0015 0015 0040 0016 0015 0015 0040 0016 003f 0016 0015 0016 003f 0016 0015
0016 003f 0016 0015 0016 003f 0016 0015 0016 0015 0015 0040 0016 0015 0015 0040 0016 06c1 0156
0055 0016 0641 0156 00aa 0016 0015 0016 0015 0015 0015 0016 0015 0016 0015 0015 0015 0016
0015 0016 0015 0015 0040 0016 0015 0015 0040 0016 003f 0016 0015 0016 003f 0016 0015 0016
0015 0015 0015 0016 0040 0015 0015 0016 0040 0015 0040 0016 0015 0015 0040 0016 0015 0015
0040 0016 0015 0015 0040 0016 0015 0015 0015 0016 0040 0015 0015 0016 0040 0015 00ab
HDMI 1:
0000 006c 0024 0000 0156 00ac 0016 0015 0016 0015 0015 0040 0016 0015 0015 0015 0016 0015
0016 0015 0015 0041 0016 0015 0015 0015 0016 0015 0016 0015 0015 0015 0016 0040 0015 0015
0016 0015 0016 0015 0015 0041 0016 0040 0016 0015 0016 0040 0016 0015 0016 0040 0016 0015
0016 0040 0016 0015 0016 0015 0015 0041 0016 0015 0015 0041 0016 0015 0015 0040 0016 06cf
0156 0056 0016 00ac
HDMI 2:
0000 006c 0024 0000 0156 00ac 0016 0015 0016 0015 0015 0040 0016 0015 0015 0015 0016 0015
0016 0015 0015 0041 0016 0015 0015 0015 0016 0015 0016 0015 0015 0015 0016 0041 0015 0015
0016 0015 0016 0040 0016 0041 0015 0040 0016 0015 0015 0041 0016 0015 0015 0041 0016 0015
0015 0015 0016 0015 0016 0015 0015 0040 0016 0015 0015 0041 0016 0015 0015 0041 0016 06cf
0156 0056 0016 00ac
HDMI 3:
0000 006c 0024 0000 0156 00ac 0016 0015 0016 0015 0015 0040 0016 0015 0015 0015 0016 0015
0016 0015 0015 0041 0016 0015 0015 0015 0016 0015 0016 0015 0015 0015 0016 0041 0015 0015
0016 0015 0016 0015 0015 0015 0016 0015 0016 0040 0016 0040 0015 0015 0016 0041 0015 0015
0016 0041 0015 0041 0016 0040 0016 0015 0016 0015 0015 0041 0016 0015 0015 0041 0016 06cf
0156 0056 0016 00ac
HDMI 4:
0000 006c 0024 0000 0156 00ac 0016 0015 0016 0015 0015 0040 0016 0015 0015 0015 0016 0015
0016 0015 0015 0041 0016 0015 0015 0015 0016 0015 0016 0015 0015 0015 0016 0041 0015 0015
0016 0015 0016 0040 0016 0015 0016 0015 0015 0040 0016 0040 0016 0015 0016 0040 0016 0015
0016 0015 0015 0041 0016 0040 0016 0015 0016 0015 0015 0040 0016 0015 0015 0041 0016 06cf
0156 0056 0016 00ac
32
SDI:
0000
0016
0016
0016
0055
006d 0024 0000 0156 00ab 0016 0015 0016 0015 0015 0040 0016 0015 0015 0015 0016 0015
0015 0015 0040 0016 0015 0015 0015 0016 0015 0016 0015 0015 0015 0016 0040 0015 0015
0015 0016 0015 0015 0015 0016 0015 0016 0015 0015 0040 0016 0015 0015 0015 0016 0015
003f 0016 0040 0015 0040 0016 003f 0016 0015 0016 003f 0016 0040 0015 0040 0016 06c0 0156
0016 00ab
Auto:
0000 006d
0016 0015
0016 0015
0016 0015
0156 0055
0024
0015
0016
0015
0016
0000 0156 00ab 0016 0015 0016 0015 0015 0040 0016 0015 0015 0015 0016 0015
0040 0016 0015 0015 0015 0016 0015 0016 0015 0015 0015 0016 0040 0015 0015
003f 0016 0040 0015 0015 0016 0040 0015 0015 0016 0015 0016 003f 0016 0015
0015 0016 0040 0015 0015 0016 0040 0015 0040 0016 0015 0015 0040 0016 06c0
00ab
Navigational Keys
Menu:
0000 006d
0016 0015
0016 0015
0016 0015
0156 0055
0024
0015
0016
0016
0016
0000 0156 00ab 0016 0015 0016 0015 0015 0040 0016 0015 0015 0015 0016 0015
0040 0016 0015 0015 0015 0016 0015 0016 0015 0015 0015 0016 0040 0015 0015
003f 0016 0040 0015 0015 0016 0015 0016 0015 0015 0015 0016 0040 0015 0015
0015 0015 0040 0016 003f 0016 0040 0015 0040 0016 0015 0015 0040 0016 06c0
00ab
Exit:
0000
0016
0016
0015
0055
006d
0015
0015
0040
0016
0024
0015
0016
0016
00ab
0000 0156 00ab 0016 0015 0016 0015 0015 0040 0016 0015 0015 0015 0016 0015
0040 0016 0015 0015 0015 0016 0015 0016 0015 0015 0015 0016 0040 0015 0015
0015 0015 0015 0016 0040 0015 0015 0016 0015 0016 0015 0015 0040 0016 0015
003f 0016 0015 0016 003f 0016 0040 0015 0040 0016 0015 0015 0040 0016 06c0 0156
Enter:
0000 006d
0016 0015
0016 0015
0016 0015
0156 0055
0024
0015
0016
0016
0016
0000 0156 00ab 0016 0015 0016 0015 0015 0040 0016 0015 0015 0015 0016 0015
0040 0016 0015 0015 0015 0016 0015 0016 0015 0015 0015 0016 0040 0015 0015
003f 0016 0040 0015 0015 0016 0040 0015 0015 0016 0015 0016 0015 0015 0015
0015 0015 0040 0016 0015 0015 0040 0016 003f 0016 0040 0015 0040 0016 06c0
00ab
Up:
0000
0016
0016
0016
0055
0024
0015
0016
0015
00ab
0000 0156 00ab 0016 0015 0016 0015 0015 0040 0016 0015 0015 0015 0016 0015
0040 0016 0015 0015 0015 0016 0015 0016 0015 0015 0015 0016 0040 0015 0015
003f 0016 0015 0016 0015 0015 0015 0016 0015 0016 0015 0015 0015 0016 0015
0040 0016 003f 0016 0040 0015 0040 0016 003f 0016 0040 0015 0040 0016 06c0 0156
006d
0015
0015
0015
0016
Down:
0000 006d 0024 0000 0156 00ab 0016 0015 0016 0015 0015 0040 0016 0015 0015 0015 0016 0015
0016 0015 0015 0040 0016 0015 0015 0015 0016 0015 0016 0015 0015 0015 0016 0040 0015 0015
0016 0015 0016 0015 0015 0040 0016 0015 0015 0015 0016 0015 0016 0015 0015 0015 0016 0015
0016 003f 0016 0015 0016 003f 0016 0040 0015 0040 0016 003f 0016 0040 0015 0040 0016 06c0 0156
0055 0016 00ab
Left:
0000
0016
0016
0015
0156
006d
0015
0015
0015
0055
0024
0015
0016
0016
0016
0000 0156 00ab 0016 0015 0016 0015 0015 0040 0016 0015 0015 0015 0016 0015
0040 0016 0015 0015 0015 0016 0015 0016 0015 0015 0015 0016 0040 0015 0015
003f 0016 0015 0016 003f 0016 0015 0016 0015 0015 0015 0016 0015 0016 0015
0040 0015 0015 0016 0040 0015 0040 0016 003f 0016 0040 0015 0040 0016 06c0
00ab
33
Right:
0000 006d
0016 0015
0016 0015
0016 0015
0055 0016
0024
0015
0016
0016
00ab
0000 0156 00ab 0016 0015 0016 0015 0015 0040 0016 0015 0015 0015 0016 0015
0040 0016 0015 0015 0015 0016 0015 0016 0015 0015 0015 0016 0040 0015 0015
003f 0016 0040 0015 0015 0016 0015 0016 003f 0016 0015 0016 0015 0015 0015
0015 0015 0040 0016 003f 0016 0015 0016 003f 0016 0040 0015 0040 0016 06c0 0156
Test Patterns
On:
0000
0016
0016
0044
006c 001b 0000 0064 0064 0016 0015 0016 0015 0016 0015 0016 0015 0016 0015 0016 0041
0015 0016 0041 0016 0041 0016 0015 0016 0015 0016 0015 0016 0041 0016 0041 0016 0015
0015 0016 0041 0016 0015 0016 0015 0016 0015 0016 0041 0016 0015 0016 0041 0016 0041
0044 0016 0001
Off:
0000
0016
0016
0044
006c 001b 0000 0064 0064 0016 0015 0016 0015 0016 0015 0016 0015 0016 0015 0016 0041
0015 0016 0041 0016 0015 0016 0015 0016 0015 0016 0015 0016 0041 0016 0041 0016 0015
0015 0016 0015 0016 0015 0016 0015 0016 0015 0016 0041 0016 0015 0016 0041 0016 0041
0044 0016 0001
Test Pattern On/Off:
0000 006c 0024 0000 0156 00ac 0016 0015 0016 0015 0015 0040 0016 0015 0015 0015 0016 0015
0016 0015 0015 0041 0016 0015 0015 0015 0016 0015 0016 0015 0015 0015 0016 0041 0015 0015
0016 0015 0016 0015 0015 0041 0016 0015 0015 0015 0016 0040 0015 0015 0016 0041 0015 0015
0016 0041 0015 0015 0016 0041 0015 0040 0016 0015 0015 0040 0016 0015 0015 0041 0016 06cf
0156 0056 0016 00ac
Previous Test Pattern:
0000 006c 0024 0000 0156 00ac 0016 0015 0016 0015 0015 0040 0016 0015 0015 0015 0016 0015
0016 0015 0015 0041 0016 0015 0015 0015 0016 0015 0016 0015 0015 0015 0016 0040 0015 0015
0016 0015 0016 0040 0016 0041 0015 0015 0016 0041 0015 0041 0016 0015 0015 0015 0016 0015
0016 0015 0015 0015 0016 0041 0015 0015 0016 0015 0016 0040 0016 0040 0015 0040 0016 06cf
0156 0056 0016 00ac
Next Test Pattern:
0000 006c 0026 0000 0156 00ac 0016 0015 0016 0015 0015 0040 0016 0015 0015 0015 0016 0015
0016 0015 0015 0041 0016 0015 0015 0015 0016 0015 0016 0015 0015 0015 0016 0041 0015 0015
0016 0015 0016 0040 0016 0015 0016 0015 0015 0015 0016 0040 0015 0015 0016 0015 0016 0015
0015 0015 0016 0041 0015 0041 0016 0040 0016 0015 0016 0040 0016 0041 0015 0041 0016 06cf
0156 0056 0016 0e60 0156 0056 0016 00ac
User Mode
Advanced:
0000 006c 001b 0000 0064 0064 0016 0041 0016 0015 0016 0041 0016 0015 0016 0015 0016 0015
0016 0015 0016 0041 0016 0015 0016 0041 0016 0015 0016 0015 0016 0041 0016 0041 0016 0015
0016 0015 0016 0041 0016 0041 0016 0041 0016 0015 0016 0041 0016 0041 0016 0015 0016 0041
0044 0044 0016 0001
Normal:
0000 006c 001b 0000 0064 0064 0016 0041 0016 0015 0016 0041 0016 0015 0016 0015 0016 0015
0016 0015 0016 0041 0016 0041 0016 0015 0016 0015 0016 0015 0016 0041 0016 0041 0016 0015
0016 0015 0016 0015 0016 0041 0016 0041 0016 0015 0016 0041 0016 0041 0016 0015 0016 0041
0044 0044 0016 0001
34
Cue
Off:
0000
0016
0016
0044
006c 001b 0000 0064 0064 0016 0015 0016 0015 0016 0015 0016 0041 0016 0015 0016 0041
0015 0016 0015 0016 0015 0016 0015 0016 0015 0016 0015 0016 0041 0016 0041 0016 0015
0015 0016 0015 0016 0015 0016 0015 0016 0041 0016 0041 0016 0015 0016 0041 0016 0015
0044 016 0001
On:
0000
0016
0016
0044
006c 001b 0000 0064 00640016 0015 0016 0015 0016 0015 0016 0041 0016 0015 0016 0041
0015 0016 0015 0016 0041 0016 0015 0016 0015 0016 0015 0016 0041 0016 0041 0016 0015
0015 0016 0041 0016 0015 0016 0015 0016 0041 0016 0041 0016 0015 0016 0041 0016 0015
0044 0016 0001
VCR Mode
On:
0000
0016
0016
0044
006c 001b 0000 0064 0064 0016 0015 0016 0015 0016 0015 0016 0041 0016 0015 0016 0015
0041 0016 0015 0016 0041 0016 0015 0016 0015 0016 0015 0016 0041 0016 0041 0016 0015
0015 0016 0041 0016 0015 0016 0015 0016 0041 0016 0041 0016 0041 0016 0041 0016 0015
0044 0016 0001
Off:
0000
0016
0016
0044
006c 001b 0000 0064 0064 0016 0015 0016 0015 0016 0015 0016 0041 0016 0015 0016 0015
0041 0016 0015 0016 0015 0016 0015 0016 0015 0016 0015 0016 0041 0016 0041 0016 0015
0015 0016 0015 0016 0015 0016 0015 0016 0041 0016 0041 0016 0041 0016 0041 0016 0015
0044 0016 0001
Input Aspect Ratio - Frame:
4:3:
0000
0016
0016
0044
006c 001b 0000 0064 0064 0016 0015 0016 0041 0016 0041 0016 0041 0016 0015 0016 0015
0041 0016 0015 0016 0041 0016 0015 0016 0015 0016 0015 0016 0041 0016 0041 0016 0015
0015 0016 0041 0016 0041 0016 0041 0016 0041 0016 0041 0016 0041 0016 0041 0016 0015
0044 0016 0001
16:9
0000
0016
0016
0044
006c 001b 0000 0064 0064 0016 0015 0016 0041 0016 0041 0016 0041 0016 0015 0016 0015
0041 0016 0015 0016 0015 0016 0041 0016 0015 0016 0015 0016 0041 0016 0041 0016 0015
0015 0016 0015 0016 0015 0016 0015 0016 0015 0016 0015 0016 0015 0016 0015 0016 0041
0044 0016 0001
Input Aspect Ratio Presets
4:3 Full Frame:
0000 006c 001b 0000 0064 0064 0016 0041 0016 0015 0016 0015 0016 0015 0016 0015 0016 0041
0016 0041 0016 0041 0016 0041 0016 0015 0016 0015 0016 0015 0016 0041 0016 0041 0016 0015
0016 0015 0016 0015 0016 0041 0016 0015 0016 0015 0016 0041 0016 0015 0016 0015 0016 0015
0044 0044 0016 0001
Letterbox:
0000 006c 001b 0000 0064 0064 0016 0041 0016 0015 0016 0015 0016 0015 0016 0015 0016 0041
0016 0041 0016 0041 0016 0015 0016 0041 0016 0015 0016 0015 0016 0041 0016 0041 0016 0015
0016 0015 0016 0041 0016 0041 0016 0015 0016 0015 0016 0041 0016 0015 0016 0015 0016 0015
0044 0044 0016 0001
16:9 Full Frame:
0000 006c 001b 0000 0064 0064 0016 0041 0016 0015 0016 0015 0016 0015 0016 0015 0016 0041
0016 0041 0016 0041 0016 0041 0016 0041 0016 0015 0016 0015 0016 0041 0016 0041 0016 0015
0016 0015 0016 0015 0016 0015 0016 0041 0016 0015 0016 0041 0016 0015 0016 0015 0016 0015
0044 0044 0016 0001
35
IAR Preset 1:
0000 006c 001b 0000 0064 0064 0016 0041 0016 0015 0016 0015 0016 0015 0016 0015 0016 0041
0016 0041 0016 0041 0016 0015 0016 0015 0016 0041 0016 0015 0016 0041 0016 0041 0016 0015
0016 0015 0016 0041 0016 0015 0016 0041 0016 0015 0016 0041 0016 0015 0016 0015 0016 0015
0044 0044 0016 0001
IAR Preset 2:
0000 006c 001b 0000 0064 0064 0016 0041 0016 0015 0016 0015 0016 0015 0016 0015 0016 0041
0016 0041 0016 0041 0016 0041 0016 0015 0016 0041 0016 0015 0016 0041 0016 0041 0016 0015
0016 0015 0016 0015 0016 0041 0016 0041 0016 0015 0016 0041 0016 0015 0016 0015 0016 0015
0044 0044 0016 0001
IAR Preset 3:
0000 006c 001b 0000 0064 0064 0016 0041 0016 0015 0016 0015 0016 0015 0016 0015 0016 0041
0016 0041 0016 0041 0016 0015 0016 0041 0016 0041 0016 0015 0016 0041 0016 0041 0016 0015
0016 0015 0016 0041 0016 0041 0016 0041 0016 0015 0016 0041 0016 0015 0016 0015 0016 0015
0044 0044 0016 0001
IAR Preset 4:
0000 006c 001b 0000 0064 0064 0016 0041 0016 0015 0016 0015 0016 0015 0016 0015 0016 0041
0016 0041 0016 0041 0016 0041 0016 0041 0016 0041 0016 0015 0016 0041 0016 0041 0016 0015
0016 0015 0016 0015 0016 0015 0016 0015 0016 0041 0016 0041 0016 0015 0016 0015 0016 0015
0044 0044 0016 0001
User:
0000 006c 001b 0000 0064 0064 0016 0041 0016 0015 0016 0015 0016 0015 0016 0015 0016 0041
0016 0041 0016 0041 0016 0015 0016 0015 0016 0015 0016 0041 0016 0041 0016 0041 0016 0015
0016 0015 0016 0041 0016 0015 0016 0015 0016 0041 0016 0041 0016 0015 0016 0015 0016 0015
0044 0044 0016 0001
Film Mode
Off:
0000
0016
0016
0044
006c 001b 0000 0064 0064 0016 0041 0016 0015 0016 0015 0016 0041 0016 0015 0016 0015
0041 0016 0015 0016 0015 0016 0015 0016 0015 0016 0015 0016 0041 0016 0041 0016 0015
0015 0016 0041 0016 0015 0016 0015 0016 0041 0016 0041 0016 0041 0016 0041 0016 0015
0044 0016 0001
Film Bias:
0000 006c 001b 0000 0064 0064 0016 0041 0016 0015 0016 0015 0016 0041 0016 0015 0016 0015
0016 0041 0016 0015 0016 0041 0016 0015 0016 0015 0016 0015 0016 0041 0016 0041 0016 0015
0016 0015 0016 0015 0016 0041 0016 0015 0016 0041 0016 0041 0016 0041 0016 0041 0016 0015
0044 0044 0016 0001
Auto:
0000 006c 001b 0000 0064 0064 0016 0041 0016 0015 0016 0015 0016 0041 0016 0015 0016 0015
0016 0041 0016 0015 0016 0015 0016 0041 0016 0015 0016 0015 0016 0041 0016 0041 0016 0015
0016 0015 0016 0041 0016 0041 0016 0015 0016 0041 0016 0041 0016 0041 0016 0041 0016 0015
0044 0044 0016 0001
Active Input AR
1.33:1
0000 006c 001b 0000 0064 0064 0016 0015 0016 0015 0016 0015 0016 0015 0016 0041 0016 0015
0016 0041 0016 0015 0016 0041 0016 0015 0016 0015 0016 0015 0016 0041 0016 0041 0016 0015
0016 0015 0016 0041 0016 0015 0016 0015 0016 0015 0016 0015 0016 0015 0016 0015 0016 0041
0044 0044 0016 0001
36
1.55:1
0000 006c 001b 0000 0064 0064 0016 0015 0016 0015 0016 0015 0016 0015 0016 0041 0016 0015
0016 0041 0016 0015 0016 0015 0016 0041 0016 0015 0016 0015 0016 0041 0016 0041 0016 0015
0016 0015 0016 0015 0016 0041 0016 0015 0016 0015 0016 0015 0016 0015 0016 0015 0016 0041
0044 0044 0016 0001
1.66:1
0000 006c 001b 0000 0064 0064 0016 0015 0016 0015 0016 0015 0016 0015 0016 0041 0016 0015
0016 0041 0016 0015 0016 0041 0016 0041 0016 0015 0016 0015 0016 0041 0016 0041 0016 0015
0016 0015 0016 0041 0016 0041 0016 0015 0016 0015 0016 0015 0016 0015 0016 0015 0016 0041
0044 0044 0016 0001
1.78:1
0000 006c 001b 0000 0064 0064 0016 0015 0016 0015 0016 0015 0016 0015 0016 0041 0016 0015
0016 0041 0016 0015 0016 0015 0016 0015 0016 0041 0016 0015 0016 0041 0016 0041 0016 0015
0016 0015 0016 0015 0016 0015 0016 0041 0016 0015 0016 0015 0016 0015 0016 0015 0016 0041
0044 0044 0016 0001
1.85:1
0000 006c 001b 0000 0064 0064 0016 0015 0016 0015 0016 0015 0016 0015 0016 0041 0016 0015
0016 0041 0016 0015 0016 0041 0016 0015 0016 0041 0016 0015 0016 0041 0016 0041 0016 0015
0016 0015 0016 0041 0016 0015 0016 0041 0016 0015 0016 0015 0016 0015 0016 0015 0016 0041
0044 0044 0016 0001
2.35:1
0000 006c 001b 0000 0064 0064 0016 0015 0016 0015 0016 0015 0016 0015 0016 0041 0016 0015
0016 0041 0016 0015 0016 0015 0016 0041 0016 0041 0016 0015 0016 0041 0016 0041 0016 0015
0016 0015 0016 0015 0016 0041 0016 0041 0016 0015 0016 0015 0016 0015 0016 0015 0016 0041
0044 0044 0016 0001
User:
0000 006c 001b 0000 0064 0064 0016 0015 0016 0015 0016 0015 0016 0015 0016 0041 0016 0015
0016 0041 0016 0015 0016 0041 0016 0041 0016 0041 0016 0015 0016 0041 0016 0041 0016 0015
0016 0015 0016 0041 0016 0041 0016 0041 0016 0015 0016 0015 0016 0015 0016 0015 0016 0041
0044 0044 0016 0001
Audio Input
Off:
0000
0016
0016
0044
006c 001b 0000 0064 0064 0016 0015 0016 0041 0016 0015 0016 0041 0016 0015 0016 0015
0041 0016 0015 0016 0015 0016 0015 0016 0015 0016 0015 0016 0041 0016 0041 0016 0015
0015 0016 0015 0016 0041 0016 0015 0016 0041 0016 0041 0016 0041 0016 0041 0016 0015
0044 0016 0001
Audio 1:
0000 006c 001b 0000 0064 0064 0016 0015 0016 0041 0016 0015 0016 0041 0016 0015 0016 0015
0016 0041 0016 0015 0016 0041 0016 0015 0016 0015 0016 0015 0016 0041 0016 0041 0016 0015
0016 0015 0016 0041 0016 0041 0016 0015 0016 0041 0016 0041 0016 0041 0016 0041 0016 0015
0044 0044 0016 0001
Audio 2:
0000 006c 001b 0000 0064 0064 0016 0015 0016 0041 0016 0015 0016 0041 0016 0015 0016 0015
0016 0041 0016 0015 0016 0015 0016 0041 0016 0015 0016 0015 0016 0041 0016 0041 0016 0015
0016 0015 0016 0015 0016 0015 0016 0041 0016 0041 0016 0041 0016 0041 0016 0041 0016 0015
0044 0044 0016 0001
Audio 3:
0000 006c 001b 0000 0064 0064 0016 0015 0016 0041 0016 0015 0016 0041 0016 0015 0016 0015
0016 0041 0016 0015 0016 0041 0016 0041 0016 0015 0016 0015 0016 0041 0016 0041 0016 0015
0016 0015 0016 0041 0016 0015 0016 0041 0016 0041 0016 0041 0016 0041 0016 0041 0016 0015
0044 0044 0016 0001
37
Audio 4:
0000 006c 001b 0000 0064 0064 0016 0015 0016 0041 0016 0015 0016 0041 0016 0015 0016 0015
0016 0041 0016 0015 0016 0015 0016 0015 0016 0041 0016 0015 0016 0041 0016 0041 0016 0015
0016 0015 0016 0015 0016 0041 0016 0041 0016 0041 0016 0041 0016 0041 0016 0041 0016 0015
0044 0044 0016 0001
Analog:
0000 006c 001b 0000 0064 0064 0016 0015 0016 0041 0016 0015 0016 0041 0016 0015 0016 0015
0016 0041 0016 0015 0016 0041 0016 0015 0016 0041 0016 0015 0016 0041 0016 0041 0016 0015
0016 0015 0016 0041 0016 0041 0016 0041 0016 0041 0016 0041 0016 0041 0016 0041 0016 0015
0044 0044 0016 0001
HDMI:
0000 006c 001b 0000 0064 0064 0016 0015 0016 0041 0016 0015 0016 0041 0016 0015 0016 0015
0016 0041 0016 0015 0016 0015 0016 0041 0016 0041 0016 0015 0016 0041 0016 0041 0016 0015
0016 0015 0016 0015 0016 0015 0016 0015 0016 0015 0016 0015 0016 0015 0016 0015 0016 0041
0044 0044 0016 0001
Display Profiles
Profile 1:
0000 006c 001b 0000 0064 0064 0016 0015 0016 0015 0016 0015 0016 0015 0016 0015 0016 0041
0016 0041 0016 0041 0016 0041 0016 0015 0016 0015 0016 0015 0016 0041 0016 0041 0016 0015
0016 0015 0016 0041 0016 0015 0016 0015 0016 0015 0016 0041 0016 0015 0016 0015 0016 0015
0044 0044 0016 0001
Profile 2:
0000 006c 001b 0000 0064 0064 0016 0015 0016 0015 0016 0015 0016 0015 0016 0015 0016 0041
0016 0041 0016 0041 0016 0015 0016 0041 0016 0015 0016 0015 0016 0041 0016 0041 0016 0015
0016 0015 0016 0015 0016 0041 0016 0015 0016 0015 0016 0041 0016 0015 0016 0015 0016 0015
0044 0044 0016 0001
Profile 3:
0000 006c 001b 0000 0064 0064 0016 0015 0016 0015 0016 0015 0016 0015 0016 0015 0016 0041
0016 0041 0016 0041 0016 0041 0016 0041 0016 0015 0016 0015 0016 0041 0016 0041 0016 0015
0016 0015 0016 0041 0016 0041 0016 0015 0016 0015 0016 0015 0016 0041 0016 0015 0016 0015
0044 0044 0016 0001
Profile 4:
0000 006c 001b 0000 0064 0064 0016 0015 0016 0015 0016 0015 0016 0015 0016 0015 0016 0041
0016 0041 0016 0041 0016 0015 0016 0015 0016 0041 0016 0015 0016 0041 0016 0041 0016 0015
0016 0015 0016 0015 0016 0015 0016 0041 0016 0015 0016 0041 0016 0015 0016 0015 0016 0015
0044 0044 0016 0001
User:
0000 006c 001b 0000 0064 0064 0016 0015 0016 0015 0016 0015 0016 0015 0016 0015 0016 0041
0016 0041 0016 0041 0016 0041 0016 0015 0016 0041 0016 0015 0016 0041 0016 0041 0016 0015
0016 0015 0016 0041 0016 0015 0016 0041 0016 0015 0016 0041 0016 0015 0016 0015 0016 0015
0044 0044 0016 0001
Display Profile – Auto
Off:
0000
0016
0016
0044
006c 001b 0000 0064 0064 0016 0041 0016 0041 0016 0041 0016 0015 0016 0015 0016 0041
0041 0016 0041 0016 0015 0016 0015 0016 0015 0016 0015 0016 0041 0016 0041 0016 0015
0015 0016 0041 0016 0041 0016 0041 0016 0015 0016 0041 0016 0015 0016 0015 0016 0015
0044 0016 0001
38
On:
0000
0016
0016
0044
006c 001b 0000 0064 0064 0016 0041 0016 0041 0016 0041 0016 0015 0016 0015 0016 0041
0041 0016 0041 0016 0041 0016 0015 0016 0015 0016 0015 0016 0041 0016 0041 0016 0015
0015 0016 0015 0016 0015 0016 0015 0016 0041 0016 0041 0016 0015 0016 0015 0016 0015
0044 0016 0001
Deinterlacing Modes
Auto:
0000 006c 001b 0000 0064 0064 0016 0041 0016 0015 0016 0015 0016 0041 0016 0015 0016 0015
0016 0041 0016 0015 0016 0015 0016 0041 0016 0041 0016 0015 0016 0041 0016 0041 0016 0015
0016 0015 0016 0041 0016 0041 0016 0041 0016 0041 0016 0041 0016 0041 0016 0041 0016 0015
0044 0044 0016 0001
Film Bias Mode:
0000 006c 001b 0000 0064 0064 0016 0041 0016 0015 0016 0015 0016 0041 0016 0015 0016 0015
0016 0041 0016 0015 0016 0015 0016 0015 0016 0015 0016 0015 0016 0041 0016 0041 0016 0015
0016 0015 0016 0041 0016 0015 0016 0015 0016 0041 0016 0041 0016 0041 0016 0041 0016 0015
0044 0044 0016 0001
Video Mode:
0000 006c 001b 0000 0064 0064 0016 0041 0016 0015 0016 0015 0016 0041 0016 0015 0016 0015
0016 0041 0016 0015 0016 0041 0016 0015 0016 0015 0016 0015 0016 0041 0016 0041 0016 0015
0016 0015 0016 0015 0016 0041 0016 0015 0016 0041 0016 0041 0016 0041 0016 0041 0016 0015
0044 0044 0016 0001
2:2 Even Mode
0000 006c 001b 0000 0064 0064 0016 0041 0016 0015 0016 0015 0016 0041 0016 0015 0016 0015
0016 0041 0016 0015 0016 0015 0016 0041 0016 0015 0016 0015 0016 0041 0016 0041 0016 0015
0016 0015 0016 0041 0016 0041 0016 0015 0016 0041 0016 0041 0016 0041 0016 0041 0016 0015
0044 0044 0016 0001
2:2 Odd Mode
0000 006c 001b 0000 0064 0064 0016 0041 0016 0015 0016 0015 0016 0041 0016 0015 0016 0015
0016 0041 0016 0015 0016 0041 0016 0041 0016 0015 0016 0015 0016 0041 0016 0041 0016 0015
0016 0015 0016 0015 0016 0015 0016 0041 0016 0041 0016 0041 0016 0041 0016 0041 0016 0015
0044 0044 0016 0001
Game Mode 1
0000 006c 001b 0000 0064 0064 0016 0041 0016 0015 0016 0015 0016 0041 0016 0015 0016 0015
0016 0041 0016 0015 0016 0015 0016 0015 0016 0041 0016 0015 0016 0041 0016 0041 0016 0015
0016 0015 0016 0041 0016 0015 0016 0041 0016 0041 0016 0041 0016 0041 0016 0041 0016 0015
0044 0044 0016 0001
Game Mode 2
0000 006c 001b 0000 0064 0064 0016 0041 0016 0015 0016 0015 0016 0041 0016 0015 0016 0015
0016 0041 0016 0015 0016 0041 0016 0015 0016 0041 0016 0015 0016 0041 0016 0041 0016 0015
0016 0015 0016 0015 0016 0041 0016 0041 0016 0041 0016 0041 0016 0041 0016 0041 0016 0015
0044 0044 0016 0001
Buttons from Remote Control:
Information:
0000 006c 0024 0000 0156 00ac 0016 0015 0016 0015 0015 0041 0016 0015 0015 0015 0016 0015
0016 0015 0015 0041 0016 0015 0015 0015 0016 0015 0016 0015 0015 0015 0016 0041 0015 0015
0016 0015 0016 0015 0015 0015 0016 0015 0016 0015 0015 0015 0016 0015 0016 0040 0016 0015
0016 0040 0016 0041 0015 0041 0016 0040 0016 0040 0015 0041 0016 0015 0015 0041 0016 06cf
0156 0056 0016 00ac
39
Curtain:
0000 006d 0024 0000 0156 00ab 0016 0015 0016 0015 0015 0040 0016 0015 0015 0015 0016 0015
0016 0015 0015 0040 0016 0015 0015 0015 0016 0015 0016 0015 0015 0015 0016 0040 0015 0015
0016 0015 0016 0015 0015 0015 0016 0015 0016 003f 0016 0015 0016 0015 0015 0015 0016 0015
0016 003f 0016 0040 0015 0040 0016 0015 0015 0040 0016 003f 0016 0040 0015 0040 0016 06c1 0156
0055 0016 00ab
4:3
0000
0016
0016
0016
0156
006c 0024 0000 0156 00ac 0016 0015 0016 0015 0015 0040 0016 0015 0015 0015 0016 0015
0015 0015 0041 0016 0015 0015 0015 0016 0015 0016 0015 0015 0015 0016 0040 0015 0015
0015 0016 0040 0016 0015 0016 0040 0016 0015 0016 0015 0015 0015 0016 0040 0015 0015
0015 0016 0040 0016 0015 0016 0040 0016 0041 0015 0041 0016 0015 0015 0040 0016 06cf
0056 0016 00ac
16:9
0000
0016
0016
0016
0156
006d
0015
0015
0015
0055
0026
0015
0016
0015
0016
0000 0156 00ab 0016 0015 0016 0015 0015 0040 0016 0015 0015 0015 0016 0015
0040 0016 0015 0015 0015 0016 0015 0016 0015 0015 0015 0016 0040 0015 0015
003f 0016 0040 0015 0040 0016 0015 0015 0015 0016 0015 0016 003f 0016 0015
0015 0016 0015 0016 003f 0016 0040 0015 0040 0016 0015 0015 0040 0016 06c1
0e43 0156 0055 0016 00ab
Aspect:
0000 006c 0026 0000 0156 00ac 0016 0015 0016 0015 0015 0040 0016 0015 0015 0015 0016 0015
0016 0015 0015 0041 0016 0015 0015 0015 0016 0015 0016 0015 0015 0015 0016 0040 0015 0015
0016 0015 0016 0040 0016 0015 0016 0040 0016 0015 0016 0040 0016 0015 0016 0040 0016 0015
0016 0015 0015 0041 0016 0015 0015 0041 0016 0015 0015 0040 0016 0015 0015 0040 0016 06cf
0156 0056 0016 0e60 0156 0056 0016 00ac
Border:
0000 006c 0024 0000 0156 00ac 0016 0015 0016 0015 0015 0040 0016 0015 0015 0015 0016 0015
0016 0015 0015 0041 0016 0015 0015 0015 0016 0015 0016 0015 0015 0015 0016 0041 0015 0015
0016 0015 0016 0040 0016 0041 0015 0015 0016 0015 0016 0040 0016 0015 0016 0040 0016 0015
0016 0015 0015 0015 0016 0041 0015 0040 0016 0015 0015 0040 0016 0015 0015 0041 0016 06cf
0156 0056 0016 00ac
Crop:
0000 006c 0024 0000 0156 00ac 0016 0015 0016 0015 0015 0041 0016 0015 0015 0015 0016 0015
0016 0015 0015 0041 0016 0015 0015 0015 0016 0015 0016 0015 0015 0015 0016 0041 0015 0015
0016 0015 0016 0015 0015 0015 0016 0041 0015 0015 0016 0040 0015 0015 0016 0041 0015 0015
0016 0041 0015 0041 0016 0015 0015 0040 0016 0015 0015 0041 0016 0015 0015 0041 0016 06cf
0156 0056 0016 00ac
Zoom:
0000 006c 0024 0000 0156 00ac 0016 0015 0016 0015 0015 0041 0016 0015 0015 0015 0016 0015
0016 0015 0015 0041 0016 0015 0015 0015 0016 0015 0016 0015 0015 0015 0016 0041 0015 0015
0016 0015 0016 0015 0015 0015 0016 0041 0015 0040 0016 0015 0015 0015 0016 0015 0016 0015
0015 0041 0016 0040 0016 0015 0016 0015 0015 0040 0016 0040 0016 0041 0015 0041 0016 06cf
0156 0056 0016 00ac
Pan:
0000
0016
0016
0016
0156
006c 0026 0000 0156 00ac 0016 0015 0016 0015 0015 0040 0016 0015 0015 0015 0016 0015
0015 0015 0041 0016 0015 0015 0015 0016 0015 0016 0015 0015 0015 0016 0041 0015 0015
0015 0016 0040 0016 0041 0015 0040 0016 0015 0015 0015 0016 0015 0016 0015 0015 0015
0015 0016 0015 0015 0015 0016 0041 0015 0041 0016 0040 0016 0041 0015 0041 0016 06cf
0056 0016 0e60 0156 0056 0016 00ac
Display Profiles:
0000 006c 0024 0000 0156 00ac 0016 0015 0016 0015 0015 0040 0016 0015 0015 0015 0016 0015
0016 0015 0015 0041 0016 0015 0015 0015 0016 0015 0016 0015 0015 0015 0016 0040 0015 0015
0016 0015 0016 0015 0015 0015 0016 0015 0016 0015 0015 0041 0016 0015 0015 0041 0016 0015
0015 0040 0016 0040 0016 0041 0015 0041 0016 0015 0015 0041 0016 0015 0015 0040 0016 06cf
0156 0056 0016 00ac
40
Viewing Modes:
0000 006c 0024 0000 0156 00ac 0016 0015 0016 0015 0015 0040 0016 0015 0015 0015 0016 0015
0016 0015 0015 0041 0016 0015 0015 0015 0016 0015 0016 0015 0015 0015 0016 0041 0015 0015
0016 0015 0016 0040 0016 0015 0016 0015 0015 0015 0016 0040 0015 0015 0016 0041 0015 0015
0016 0015 0016 0040 0016 0041 0015 0041 0016 0015 0015 0040 0016 0015 0015 0041 0016 06cf
0156 0056 0016 00ac
Output Setup:
0000 006c 0024 0000 0156 00ac 0016 0015 0016 0015 0015 0040 0016 0015 0015 0015 0016 0015
0016 0015 0015 0041 0016 0015 0015 0015 0016 0015 0016 0015 0015 0015 0016 0040 0015 0015
0016 0015 0016 0015 0015 0041 0016 0040 0016 0041 0015 0015 0016 0015 0016 0015 0015 0015
0016 0041 0015 0015 0016 0015 0016 0015 0015 0041 0016 0040 0016 0040 0015 0040 0016 06cf
0156 0056 0016 00ac
Configuration:
0000 006c 0024 0000 0156 00ac 0016 0015 0016 0015 0015 0040 0016 0015 0015 0015 0016 0015
0016 0015 0015 0041 0016 0015 0015 0015 0016 0015 0016 0015 0015 0015 0016 0041 0015 0015
0016 0015 0016 0015 0015 0041 0016 0015 0015 0015 0016 0040 0015 0015 0016 0015 0016 0015
0015 0041 0016 0015 0015 0041 0016 0040 0016 0015 0016 0040 0016 0041 0015 0041 0016 06cf
0156 0056 0016 00ac
Picture Control:
0000 006c 0024 0000 0156 00ac 0016 0015 0016 0015 0015 0040 0016 0015 0015 0015 0016 0015
0016 0015 0015 0041 0016 0015 0015 0015 0016 0015 0016 0015 0015 0015 0016 0041 0015 0015
0016 0015 0016 0015 0015 0041 0016 0015 0015 0040 0016 0040 0016 0015 0016 0015 0015 0015
0016 0041 0015 0015 0016 0041 0015 0015 0016 0015 0016 0040 0016 0041 0015 0041 0016 06cf
0156 0056 0016 00ac
Input Adjust:
0000 006c 0026 0000 0156 00ac 0016 0015 0016 0015 0015 0040 0016 0015 0015 0015 0016 0015
0016 0015 0015 0041 0016 0015 0015 0015 0016 0015 0016 0015 0015 0015 0016 0041 0015 0015
0016 0015 0016 0015 0015 0015 0016 0015 0016 0015 0015 0015 0016 0015 0016 0015 0015 0015
0016 0041 0015 0041 0016 0040 0016 0041 0015 0040 0016 0040 0016 0041 0015 0041 0016 06cf
0156 0056 0016 0e60 0156 0056 0016 00ac
Input Aspect Ratio:
0000 006c 0024 0000 0156 00ac 0016 0015 0016 0015 0015 0040 0016 0015 0015 0015 0016 0015
0016 0015 0015 0041 0016 0015 0015 0015 0016 0015 0016 0015 0015 0015 0016 0041 0015 0015
0016 0015 0016 0015 0015 0041 0016 0015 0015 0015 0016 0040 0015 0015 0016 0041 0015 0015
0016 0041 0015 0015 0016 0041 0015 0040 0016 0015 0015 0040 0016 0015 0015 0041 0016 06cf
0156 0056 0016 00ac
41
3 Automation Command IDs and Values
This section beginning on the next page, contains the entire list of Control/Query
commands available with the iScan VPxx line of video processors. The two character
Command ID is in bold-underline (example: A1 for “Power”). The possible values are
given for each control in bold (example: 1.000). We have presented the list in the same
layout as the OSD starting on the next page, to allow for quick location of the control you
are seeking.
Some commands are not supported with certain models, the models which are supported
for a given command or value will be identified with an icon:
or
. If no icon is shown for a value, the icon for the command is correct for the value
as well.
There are some automation functions which are not available as a direct item in the OSD,
these are:
Power – A1
Off - 0
On - 1
Navigation Buttons – A2
Left - 1
Right - 2
Up - 3
Down - 4
Menu - 5
Enter - 6
Exit – 7
Curtain – A4
Open - 0
Closed – 1
Note: This control will not override HDCP
blanking because of a link failure (indicated by
flashing power LED).
Product Name – A8 (QUERY ONLY)
Software Version – A9 (QUERY ONLY)
System Reset – AE (Use value “0”)
42
Complete OSD Menu Tree
Input Select – 4C
Video 1 - 1
Video 2 - 2
S-Video 1 - 3
S-Video 2 - 4
Component 1 - 5
Component 2 - 6
RGBHV/Component - 7
HDMI 1 - 8
HDMI 2 - 9
HDMI 3 - 10
HDMI 4 - 11
SD/HD-SDI 1 - 12
(with SD/HD-SDI module installed)
(with HD-SDI module installed)
SD/HD-SDI 2 - 14
Auto - 13
Input Aspect Ratio (OSD MENU ONLY)
Frame AR – 4E
4:3 - 1
16:9 - 2
Active AR – 50
1.33:1 - 1
1.55:1 - 2
1.66:1 - 3
1.78:1 - 4
1.85:1 - 5
2.35:1 - 6
User - 7
Panorama – A6
On - 1
Off - 0
Zoom (see below)
Horizontal – 40
Range: 1.000-2.000
Vertical – 41
Range: 1.000-2.000
Pan (see below)
Horizontal – 42
Range: 0-100
Vertical – 43
Range: 0-100
43
Borders (see below)
Horizontal – 44
Range: 0-200
Vertical – 45
Range: 0-200
Preset – E1
4:3 Full Frame - 1
Letterbox - 2
16:9 Full Frame - 3
4:3 Stretch - 14
Preset 1 - 4
Preset 2 - 5
Preset 3 - 6
Preset 4 - 7
Preset 5 - 8
Preset 6 - 9
Preset 7 - 10
Preset 8 - 11
Preset 9 - 12
Preset 10 - 13
User - 0
(there is no safety for this function)
Save User to – 53
Preset 1 - 1
Preset 2 - 2
Preset 3 - 3
Preset 4 - 4
Preset 5 - 5
Preset 6 - 6
Preset 7 - 7
Preset 8 - 8
Preset 9 - 9
Preset 10 - 10
Input Adjust (OSD MENU ONLY)
Mosquito Noise Reduction – CA
Off - 0
Low - 1
Medium - 2
High - 3
44
Deinterlacing – 49
Auto - 6
Film Bias Mode - 0
Video Mode - 1
Forced 3:2 Mode - 8
Forced 2:2 Mode - 10
2:2 Even Mode - 2
2:2 Odd Mode - 3
Game Mode 1 - 4
Game Mode 2 - 5
Field-Scale - 9
PReP – B6
Off - 0
On - 1
Cadence Detect – BB
Off - 0
On - 1
Pass Through – A7
Off - 0
On - 1
Overscan – 46
Range: 0-20
Image Shift (see below)
Horizontal - 54
Range: 0-30
Vertical – 47
Range: 0-50
Color Space – 87
RGB - 1
YPbPr - 2
YCbCr 4:2:2 - 3
YCbCr 4:4:4 - 4
Auto - 5
Input Level – F0
Video - 1
PC - 2
VCR Mode – 48
Off - 0
On - 1
Auto - 2
HDMI Config. (see below)
HDCP Mode – 86
Off - 0
On - 1
or
or
or
or
or
or
with ABT102 card
with ABT102 card
with ABT102 card
with ABT102 card
with ABT102 card
with ABT102 card
45
Auto AR – B0
Off - 0
On - 1
Auto Color Space – B1
Off - 0
On - 1
Auto Priority – 81
Range: 1-13
Audio Input – 4A
Audio 1 - 1
Audio 2 - 2
Audio 3 - 3
Audio 4 - 4
Stereo - 5
HDMI - 6
Off - 0
AV Lipsync – 4B
Range: 0-200
Picture Control (OSD MENU ONLY)
Fine Detail – C8
Range: (-100)-(+100)
Edge Enhancement – C9
Range: (-100)-(+100)
Brightness – 21
Range: (-100)-(+100)
Contrast – 22
Range: (-100)-(+100)
Saturation – 23
Range: (-100)-(+100)
Hue – 24
Range: (-100)-(+100)
Y/C Delay – 27
Range: (-100)-(+100)
CUE Correction – 28
Off - 0
On - 1
Auto - 2
46
Configuration (OSD MENU ONLY)
Test Patterns – 80
Off - 0
Frame Geometry - 1
Brightness/Contrast - 2
Checker board - 3
Vertical Lines - 4
Horizontal Lines - 5
Judder - 6
Color8 Bars75 - 7
Color8 Bars100 - 8
Window IRE10 - 9
Window IRE20 - 10
Window IRE30 - 11
Window IRE40 - 12
Window IRE50 - 13
Window IRE60 - 14
Window IRE70 - 15
Window IRE80 - 16
Window IRE90 - 17
Window IRE100 - 18
Gray Ramp - 19
XHatch Coarse - 20
XHatch Fine - 21
Focus - 22
Half B/W - 23
H-Clr7 Bars75 - 24
H-Clr7 Bars100 - 25
H-Clr8 Bars75 - 26
H-Clr8 Bars100 - 27
Black - 35
White - 28
Red - 29
Green - 30
Blue - 31
Cyan - 32
Magenta - 33
Yellow - 34
Auto Standby – 83
Off - 0
On - 1
LED Brightness (OSD MENU ONLY)
Navigation – EC
Range: 0-3
Normal – ED
Range: 0-3
47
User Mode – 85
Normal - 1
Advanced - 2
(Unit will reply with acknowledge, then switch to new baud-rate)
Serial Port Rate – A3
4800bps - 1
9600bps - 2
14400bps - 3
19200bps - 4
38400bps - 5
57600bps - 6
(Use value “0” – there is no safety for this function)
Factory Default – AC
(Use value “0” – there is no safety for this function)
Software Update – AD
12V Trigger Levels (OSD MENU ONLY)
Trigger #1 – B8
Normal - 1
Negative - 2
Trigger #2 – B9
Normal - 1
Negative - 2
Information – A5
Off - 0
On - 1
Output Setup (OSD MENU ONLY)
Analog/Digital – 60
BNC (Analog) - 1
HDMI (Digital) - 2
Format - 61
480p - 1
540p - 2
576p - 3
720p-50 - 4
720p-60 - 5
1080i-50 - 6
1080i-60 - 7
1080p-24 - 37
1080p-25 - 38
1080p-30 – Not Defined Yet
1080p-48 - 30
1080p-50 - 8
1080p-60 - 9
640x480 (VGA) - 10
800x600 (SVGA) - 11
1024x768 (XGA) - 12
1280x1024 (SXGA) - 13
848x480 - 34
852x480 - 14
48
1365x768 - 35
852x576 - 15
1366x768 (1) - 16
1366x768 (2) - 33
1360x768 (1) - 31
1360x768 (2) - 32
1280x768 - 17
1024x1024 - 18
1024x852 - 19
1024x768 - 36
1024x576 - 20
848x600 - 21
1365x1024 - 22
1400x1050 - 23
1400x788 - 24
960x540 - 25
1280x960 - 26
1440x960 - 27
1440x1152 - 28
User - 29
USER RESOLUTION CONTROLS:
Horizontal Shift (OSD MENU ONLY, SET FRONT PORCH AND BACK PORCH)
Horizontal Size – 62
Range: 640-2000 (Limited Pixel clock, must not exceed 180MHz)
Horizontal Front Porch – 63
Range: 0-512 (See VESA timing specifications for guidance)
Horizontal Sync – 64
Range: 0-512 (See VESA timing specifications for guidance)
Horizontal Back Porch – 65
Range: 0-512 (See VESA timing specifications for guidance)
Vertical Shift (OSD MENU ONLY, SET FRONT PORCH AND BACK PORCH)
Vertical Size – 66
Range: 480-2000 (Limited Pixel clock, must not exceed 180MHz)
Vertical Front Porch Range: 0-512 (See VESA timing specifications for guidance)
Vertical Sync Range: 0-512 (See VESA timing specifications for guidance)
Vertical Back Porch Range: 0-512 (See VESA timing specifications for guidance)
49
Aspect Ratio (OSD MENU ONLY)
Display – 6A
4:3 - 1
5:4 - 2
16:9 - 3
2.35:1 - 4
User - 5
Display User Value – 88
Range: 1.00-3.00
Lens – B7
Mode 1 - 1
Mode 1 “Auto” - 2
Mode 2 - 3
None - 0
Screen – 89
4:3 - 1
5:4 - 2
16:9 - 3
2.35:1 - 4
User - 5
Screen User Value – 8A
Range: 1.00-3.00
Image Shift (OSD MENU ONLY)
Vertical – 8C
(some underscan must be set first)
Range: (-30)-(+30)
(some underscan must be set first)
Horizontal – 8D
Range: (-30)-(+30)
Underscan – 8B
Range: 0-100
Sync Type – 6B
Bi-Level - 1
Tri-Level - 2
Composite - 3
+H/+V - 4
+H/-V - 5
-H/+V - 6
-H/-V - 7
Color Space – 6C
RGB - 1
YPbPr - 2
YCbCr 4:2:2 - 3
YCbCr 4:4:4 - 4
When 4:2:2 or 4:4:4
Color Gamut – E5
BT.601 - 1
BT.709 - 2
50
Output Level – E6
Video - 1
PC - 2
Framerate (OSD MENU ONLY)
When input is: 24Hz - NOT YET DEFINED
24Hz Lock - 1
48Hz Lock - 2
60Hz Lock - 3
72Hz Lock - 4
Unlock - 0
24Hz input, Unlocked output framerate – NOT YET DEFINED
Range: 24.00-80.00
When input is: 25Hz - NOT YET DEFINED
25Hz Lock - 1
50Hz Lock - 2
75Hz Lock - 3
Unlock - 0
25Hz input, Unlocked output framerate – NOT YET DEFINED
Range: 24.00-80.00
When input is: 30Hz - NOT YET DEFINED
30Hz Lock - 1
60Hz Lock - 2
Unlock - 0
30Hz input, Unlocked output framerate – NOT YET DEFINED
Range: 24.00-80.00
When input is: 50Hz – 6D
25Hz Lock - 1
50Hz Lock - 2
75Hz Lock - 3
Unlock - 0
50Hz input, Unlocked output framerate –
Range: 24.00-80.00
When input is: 60Hz – 6E
24Hz Lock - 1
48Hz Lock - 2
60Hz Lock - 3
72Hz Lock - 4
Unlock - 0
60Hz input, Unlocked output framerate – 6F
Range: 24.00-80.00
51
Border Level – 4F
Range: (-16)-(+100)
Output Picture Controls (OSD MENU ONLY)
Presets – C4
ISF Day Normal - 1
ISF Day Bright - 2
ISF Night - 3
Preset 1 - 4
Preset 2 - 5
Brightness – C0
Range: (-100)-(+100)
Contrast – C1
Range: (-100)-(+100)
Saturation – C2
Range: (-100)-(+100)
Hue – C3
Range: (-100)-(+100)
HDCP Mode - EA
Off - 0
On - 1
12V Trigger #2 – C7
Lens - 2
On - 1
Off - 0
Audio Select - BA
S/PDIF - 1
HDMI - 2
Display Profile (OSD MENU ONLY)
Select – E0
Profile 1 - 1
Profile 2 - 2
Profile 3 - 3
Profile 4 - 4
Profile 5 - 5
Profile 6 - 6
Profile 7 - 7
Profile 8 - 8
Profile 9 - 9
Profile 10 - 10
(there is no safety for this function)
Save – 52
Range: 1-10
Auto – E7
Off - 0
On - 1
52
Appendix A.
Decimal to Binary to HEX to ASCII Conversion Table
Some ASCII Characters will not be used ever in the iScan communication – these are
grayed out for clarity (the entire list is published for the sake of completion).
Decimal
Binary
(MSB)
0
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29
30
31
32
33
34
35
36
37
38
0000 0000
0000 0001
0000 0010
0000 0011
0000 0100
0000 0101
0000 0110
0000 0111
0000 1000
0000 1001
0000 1010
0000 1011
0000 1100
0000 1101
0000 1110
0000 1111
0001 0000
0001 0001
0001 0010
0001 0011
0001 0100
0001 0101
0001 0110
0001 0111
0001 1000
0001 1001
0001 1010
0001 1011
0001 1100
0001 1101
0001 1110
0001 1111
0010 0000
0010 0001
0010 0010
0010 0011
0010 0100
0010 0101
0010 0110
HEX ASCII
0x00
0x01
0x02
0x03
0x04
0x05
0x06
0x07
0x08
0x09
0x0A
0x0B
0x0C
0x0D
0x0E
0x0F
0x10
0x11
0x12
0x13
0x14
0x15
0x16
0x17
0x18
0x19
0x1A
0x1B
0x1C
0x1D
0x1E
0x1F
0x20
0x21
0x22
0x23
0x24
0x25
0x26
NUL – Null
SOH – Start of Heading
STX – Start of Text
ETX – End of Text
EOT – End of Transmission
ENQ – Enquiry
ACK – Acknowledge
BEL – Bell
BS – Backspace
HT – Horizontal Tab
LF – Line Feed/New Line
VT – Vertical Tab
FF – Form Feed/New Page
CR – Carriage Return
SO – Shift Out
SI – Shift In
DLE – Data Link Escape
DC1 – Device Control 1
DC2 – Device Control 2
DC3 – Device Control 3
DC4 – Device Control 4
NAK – Negative Acknowledge
SYN – Synchronous Idle
ETB – End of Transmission Block
CAN – Cancel
EM – End of Medium
SUB – Substitute
ESC – Escape
FS – File Separator
GS – Group Separator
RS – Record Separator
US – Unit Separator
SPC - Space
!
“
#
$
%
&
53
39
40
41
42
43
44
45
46
47
48
49
50
51
52
53
54
55
56
57
58
59
60
61
62
63
64
65
66
67
68
69
70
71
72
73
74
75
76
77
78
79
80
81
82
83
0010 0111
0010 1000
0010 1001
0010 1010
0010 1011
0010 1100
0010 1101
0010 1110
0010 1111
0011 0000
0011 0001
0011 0010
0011 0011
0011 0100
0011 0101
0011 0110
0011 0111
0011 1000
0011 1001
0011 1010
0011 1011
0011 1100
0011 1101
0011 1110
0011 1111
0100 0000
0100 0001
0100 0010
0100 0011
0100 0100
0100 0101
0100 0110
0100 0111
0100 1000
0100 1001
0100 1010
0100 1011
0100 1100
0100 1101
0100 1110
0100 1111
0101 0000
0101 0001
0101 0010
0101 0011
0x27
0x28
0x29
0x2A
0x2B
0x2C
0x2D
0x2E
0x2F
0x30
0x31
0x32
0x33
0x34
0x35
0x36
0x37
0x38
0x39
0x3A
0x3B
0x3C
0x3D
0x3E
0x3F
0x40
0x41
0x42
0x43
0x44
0x45
0x46
0x47
0x48
0x49
0x4A
0x4B
0x4C
0x4D
0x4E
0x4F
0x50
0x51
0x52
0x53
‘
(
)
*
+
,
.
/
0
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
:
;
<
=
>
?
@
A
B
C
D
E
F
G
H
I
J
K
L
M
N
O
P
Q
R
S
54
84
85
86
87
88
89
90
91
92
93
94
95
96
97
98
99
100
101
102
103
104
105
106
107
108
109
110
111
112
113
114
115
116
117
118
119
120
121
122
123
124
125
126
127
128
0101 0100
0101 0101
0101 0110
0101 0111
0101 1000
0101 1001
0101 1010
0101 1011
0101 1100
0101 1101
0101 1110
0101 1111
0110 0000
0110 0001
0110 0010
0110 0011
0110 0100
0110 0101
0110 0110
0110 0111
0110 1000
0110 1001
0110 1010
0110 1011
0110 1100
0110 1101
0110 1110
0110 1111
0111 0000
0111 0001
0111 0010
0111 0011
0111 0100
0111 0101
0111 0110
0111 0111
0111 1000
0111 1001
0111 1010
0111 1011
0111 1100
0111 1101
0111 1110
0111 1111
1000 0000
0x54
0x55
0x56
0x57
0x58
0x59
0x5A
0x5B
0x5C
0x5D
0x5E
0x5F
0x60
0x61
0x62
0x63
0x64
0x65
0x66
0x67
0x68
0x69
0x6A
0x6B
0x6C
0x6D
0x6E
0x6F
0x70
0x71
0x72
0x73
0x74
0x75
0x76
0x77
0x78
0x79
0x7A
0x7B
0x7C
0x7D
0x7E
0x7F
0x80
T
U
V
W
X
Y
Z
[
\
]
^
_
`
a
b
c
d
e
f
g
h
i
j
k
l
m
n
o
p
q
r
s
t
u
v
w
x
y
z
{
|
}
~
DEL
No ASCII Character at This Value
55
129
130
131
132
133
134
135
136
137
138
139
140
141
142
143
144
145
146
147
148
149
150
151
152
153
154
155
156
157
158
159
160
161
162
163
164
165
166
167
168
169
170
171
172
173
1000 0001
1000 0010
1000 0011
1000 0100
1000 0101
1000 0110
1000 0111
1000 1000
1000 1001
1000 1010
1000 1011
1000 1100
1000 1101
1000 1110
1000 1111
1001 0000
1001 0001
1001 0010
1001 0011
1001 0100
1001 0101
1001 0110
1001 0111
1001 1000
1001 1001
1001 1010
1001 1011
1001 1100
1001 1101
1001 1110
1001 1111
1010 0000
1010 0001
1010 0010
1010 0011
1010 0100
1010 0101
1010 0110
1010 0111
1010 1000
1010 1001
1010 1010
1010 1011
1010 1100
1010 1101
0x81
0x82
0x83
0x84
0x85
0x86
0x87
0x88
0x89
0x8A
0x8B
0x8C
0x8D
0x8E
0x8F
0x90
0x91
0x92
0x93
0x94
0x95
0x96
0x97
0x98
0x99
0x9A
0x9B
0x9C
0x9D
0x9E
0x9F
0xA0
0xA1
0xA2
0xA3
0xA4
0xA5
0xA6
0xA7
0xA8
0xA9
0xAA
0xAB
0xAC
0xAD
No ASCII Character at This Value
No ASCII Character at This Value
No ASCII Character at This Value
No ASCII Character at This Value
No ASCII Character at This Value
No ASCII Character at This Value
No ASCII Character at This Value
No ASCII Character at This Value
No ASCII Character at This Value
No ASCII Character at This Value
No ASCII Character at This Value
No ASCII Character at This Value
No ASCII Character at This Value
No ASCII Character at This Value
No ASCII Character at This Value
No ASCII Character at This Value
No ASCII Character at This Value
No ASCII Character at This Value
No ASCII Character at This Value
No ASCII Character at This Value
No ASCII Character at This Value
No ASCII Character at This Value
No ASCII Character at This Value
No ASCII Character at This Value
No ASCII Character at This Value
No ASCII Character at This Value
No ASCII Character at This Value
No ASCII Character at This Value
No ASCII Character at This Value
No ASCII Character at This Value
No ASCII Character at This Value
No ASCII Character at This Value
No ASCII Character at This Value
No ASCII Character at This Value
No ASCII Character at This Value
No ASCII Character at This Value
No ASCII Character at This Value
No ASCII Character at This Value
No ASCII Character at This Value
No ASCII Character at This Value
No ASCII Character at This Value
No ASCII Character at This Value
No ASCII Character at This Value
No ASCII Character at This Value
No ASCII Character at This Value
56
174
175
176
177
178
179
180
181
182
183
184
185
186
187
188
189
190
191
192
193
194
195
196
197
198
199
200
201
202
203
204
205
206
207
208
209
210
211
212
213
214
215
216
217
218
1010 1110
1010 1111
1011 0000
1011 0001
1011 0010
1011 0011
1011 0100
1011 0101
1011 0110
1011 0111
1011 1000
1011 1001
1011 1010
1011 1011
1011 1100
1011 1101
1011 1110
1011 1111
1100 0000
1100 0001
1100 0010
1100 0011
1100 0100
1100 0101
1100 0110
1100 0111
1100 1000
1100 1001
1100 1010
1100 1011
1100 1100
1100 1101
1100 1110
1100 1111
1101 0000
1101 0001
1101 0010
1101 0011
1101 0100
1101 0101
1101 0110
1101 0111
1101 1000
1101 1001
1101 1010
0xAE
0xAF
0xB0
0xB1
0xB2
0xB3
0xB4
0xB5
0xB6
0xB7
0xB8
0xB9
0xBA
0xBB
0xBC
0xBD
0xBE
0xBF
0xC0
0xC1
0xC2
0xC3
0xC4
0xC5
0xC6
0xC7
0xC8
0xC9
0xCA
0xCB
0xCC
0xCD
0xCE
0xCF
0xD0
0xD1
0xD2
0xD3
0xD4
0xD5
0xD6
0xD7
0xD8
0xD9
0xDA
No ASCII Character at This Value
No ASCII Character at This Value
No ASCII Character at This Value
No ASCII Character at This Value
No ASCII Character at This Value
No ASCII Character at This Value
No ASCII Character at This Value
No ASCII Character at This Value
No ASCII Character at This Value
No ASCII Character at This Value
No ASCII Character at This Value
No ASCII Character at This Value
No ASCII Character at This Value
No ASCII Character at This Value
No ASCII Character at This Value
No ASCII Character at This Value
No ASCII Character at This Value
No ASCII Character at This Value
No ASCII Character at This Value
No ASCII Character at This Value
No ASCII Character at This Value
No ASCII Character at This Value
No ASCII Character at This Value
No ASCII Character at This Value
No ASCII Character at This Value
No ASCII Character at This Value
No ASCII Character at This Value
No ASCII Character at This Value
No ASCII Character at This Value
No ASCII Character at This Value
No ASCII Character at This Value
No ASCII Character at This Value
No ASCII Character at This Value
No ASCII Character at This Value
No ASCII Character at This Value
No ASCII Character at This Value
No ASCII Character at This Value
No ASCII Character at This Value
No ASCII Character at This Value
No ASCII Character at This Value
No ASCII Character at This Value
No ASCII Character at This Value
No ASCII Character at This Value
No ASCII Character at This Value
No ASCII Character at This Value
57
219
220
221
222
223
224
225
226
227
228
229
230
231
232
233
234
235
236
237
238
239
240
241
242
243
244
245
246
247
248
249
250
251
252
253
254
255
1101 1011
1101 1100
1101 1101
1101 1110
1101 1111
1110 0000
1110 0001
1110 0010
1110 0011
1110 0100
1110 0101
1110 0110
1110 0111
1110 1000
1110 1001
1110 1010
1110 1011
1110 1100
1110 1101
1110 1110
1110 1111
1111 0000
1111 0001
1111 0010
1111 0011
1111 0100
1111 0101
1111 0110
1111 0111
1111 1000
1111 1001
1111 1010
1111 1011
1111 1100
1111 1101
1111 1110
1111 1111
0xDB
0xDC
0xDD
0xDE
0xDF
0xE0
0xE1
0xE2
0xE3
0xE4
0xE5
0xE6
0xE7
0xE8
0xE9
0xEA
0xEB
0xEC
0xED
0xEE
0xEF
0xF0
0xF1
0xF2
0xF3
0xF4
0xF5
0xF6
0xF7
0xF8
0xF9
0xFA
0xFB
0xFC
0xFD
0xFE
0xFF
No ASCII Character at This Value
No ASCII Character at This Value
No ASCII Character at This Value
No ASCII Character at This Value
No ASCII Character at This Value
No ASCII Character at This Value
No ASCII Character at This Value
No ASCII Character at This Value
No ASCII Character at This Value
No ASCII Character at This Value
No ASCII Character at This Value
No ASCII Character at This Value
No ASCII Character at This Value
No ASCII Character at This Value
No ASCII Character at This Value
No ASCII Character at This Value
No ASCII Character at This Value
No ASCII Character at This Value
No ASCII Character at This Value
No ASCII Character at This Value
No ASCII Character at This Value
No ASCII Character at This Value
No ASCII Character at This Value
No ASCII Character at This Value
No ASCII Character at This Value
No ASCII Character at This Value
No ASCII Character at This Value
No ASCII Character at This Value
No ASCII Character at This Value
No ASCII Character at This Value
No ASCII Character at This Value
No ASCII Character at This Value
No ASCII Character at This Value
No ASCII Character at This Value
No ASCII Character at This Value
No ASCII Character at This Value
No ASCII Character at This Value
58
Appendix B.
Infrared Control White Paper by Barry Gordon
Note: This article in Sections 2.1 through 2.5 is reprinted with permission from
Barry Gordon. The original article was printed circa 1998, although the information it
contains is still very pertinent. We wish to thank Barry for allowing us to reprint the
article. Anchor Bay is not responsible for the information presented within the below
article.
Infrared Signaling and how it works
Acknowledgments: This document could not have been possible for me to write
without the assistance of a lot of people who contributed their time and effort to helping
me understand the various parts of the ProntoEdit IR display format. I would like to
thank; AHP (A Helpful Person), Jack Schultz, Manu Duarte, Timm, CDecker, and others.
Please pardon my use of the BBS handles, but in many cases that is the only way I know
them.
Warning: This document will give the reader enough information to develop and
hand enter IR codes rather than learning them from a remote. That is not the intent of the
document, merely a byproduct of the knowledge you can gain. Many devices controlled
by IR remotes, in Particular TV’s, have undocumented IR code sequences used for
servicing the equipment by factory trained technicians in possession of detailed service
manuals and test equipment. By causing a service code to be sent to your TV or other
device, you may place it in a state where it no longer operates as desired, or at all. An
example of this might be the resetting of all convergence offsets, or altering the width or
height of the picture. Be careful, if you are not sure of what the outcome might be,
perhaps you should not do it.
IR remotes operate by modulating (turning on and off) an infra red (IR) light
source. When the IR light source (the IR emitter) is "on" it is actually turning itself on
and off thousands of times per second, too fast for the human eye to follow. The rate at
which this occurs is called the carrier frequency. The terminology comes from the
metaphor that the "carrier" carries the "information". This is done to provide a better
transmission system and allow the overall IR system (transmitter and receiver) to operate
in noisy (with respect to light) environments. It is important to understand that the IR
receiver for a given remote is tuned to IR "carrier" frequency for that remote and will
effectively not see IR signals sent on a different carrier frequency such as from other
remotes. [Note: The human eye can never see an infrared transmission, so the concept of
on and off is not with regards to visible light. Some equipment has a "telltale", a little red
light that visibly flashes when the equipment receives IR signals. That is what we can
see]
The "information" is placed on the "carrier" using several different techniques.
The most common technique is Pulse Width Modulation. In Pulse Width Modulation the
duration of the ON (carrier present, light flashing thousands of times per second), or Off
(no light at all coming out of the IR emitter) periods is made to vary. Lets assume,
because this is what is done, that we wish to send numbers representing what key has
59
been pressed (and perhaps even what device this key is for). We first need to simplify the
problem so that we don’t have deal with too many "Pulse widths". We can easily do this
by representing the number in base 2, or binary. (I apologize if this now gets a little
technical, but in reality it already has). In binary there are only two digits to worry about
not ten as in decimal. Therefore we only need to have two distinct "pulse widths". If you
think about it, the periods of on and off will need to alternate. If they didn’t it would be
hard to judge their width. [Note: Other modulation schemes in particular RC5 do not use
PWM. RC5 uses Phase modulation. Luckily for us we never have to decode or figure out
the RC5 patterns because Philips has provided them as pure clean data.] Only one of the
widths needs to vary. Either the width of the ON period or the Width of the Off period.
In summary, IR transmission most often takes place by varying the on off times of
an IR emitter to represent binary numbers according to some well established pattern.
[Note: At this point I am going to assume that the reader has a basic
understanding of the binary numbering system. Not detailed enough to add, subtract or
multiply them, but enough to be able to form the decimal value of a binary number.]
Each manufacturer has the option of deciding just how big a number he wishes to
send to his equipment, and what meaning is given to that number (or numbers) when they
are received. Remember the environment through which the IR signals are passing (the
air) is noisy in a light sense. Bright sunlight, Fluorescent lights, all contribute to the
noise. Some manufacturers add additional "redundant" information such as sending the
numbers twice to ensure that they get to the equipment correctly. Some do not. I will
discuss those details when I discuss some of the more common manufacturer’s products.
The Philips ProntoEdit HEX Format
This discussion is only completely valid for IR transmissions using Pulse Width
Modulation. Keep in mind that the sole purpose of the HEX data is to represent a series
of ON and OFF times for the IR emitter, and when the IR emitter appear to be solidly ON
its is rapidly flashing. The ProntoEdit HEX format uses a pair of numbers to represent an
on/off sequence. We will call this a "Burst Pair" (thanks to AHP). The first digit
represents an ON time and the second an Off time.
The question is how much time? What the burst pair really contains is the number
of cycles of the carrier for which to turn the light on and off. The carrier frequency
therefore acts as the clock (not totally true, but good enough for this discussion). To
illustrate the point, let us assume a carrier frequency of 40 kilohertz (that is 40,000 cycles
per second). This is a very common IR carrier frequency. One cycle of that carrier takes
1/40000 units of time or 25 microseconds. A "burst pair" of 48,24 would turn the IR
emitter on for 48*25 Microseconds, and off for 24*25 microseconds. A "burst Pair" of
24,24 would turn the IR emitter on for 24*25 Microseconds, and off for 24*25
microseconds. Because we are using binary numbers we only have two digits to represent
(0,1) as opposed to decimal where we would need 10 unique burst pair patterns to
represent the 10 decimal digits. We could for example decide the encoding of a "1" will
be represented by having the On period twice as long as the Off period, and a "0" by
60
having them equal. We might choose 48,24 for the "1" and 24,24 for the "0". In fact this
is what Sony has done in its IR remotes. [Note: If you work through the numbers you will
find that Sony IR signaling uses a sequence of 1200 microseconds of light followed by
600 microseconds of no light to represent a "1"; and a sequence of 600 microseconds of
light followed by 600 microseconds of no light to represent a "0"]. In general all IR
equipment is forgiving and operates with in a timing tolerance of +/- 10%.
A full IR key code as encoded in the ProntoEdit Hex display contains three
discrete parts.
Preamble
Burst Pair Sequence 1
Burst Pair Sequence 2
Either one of the burst pair sequences is optional so we will actually have three
different patterns of IR encoding.
Preamble
Preamble
Preamble
Burst Pair Sequence 1
Burst Pair Sequence 1
Burst Pair Sequence 2
Burst Pair Sequence 2
The preamble does not contain Burst Pairs but rather four (4) hexadecimal (HEX,
base 16) numbers, each of which has a precise meaning. I will only discuss them in the
context of Learned IR codes. Each Hex number consists of 4 digits.
The first number is always a zero (0000) it indicates that the IR pattern is raw
data, which means it was learned.
The second number is the frequency of the IR carrier in terms of the Pronto
internal clock. The following formula where N represents the decimal value of this hex
number will give you the frequency of the carrier in Kilohertz: Frequency = 1000000/(N
* .241246)
A Sony remote will usually have a value for N of 103 (this shows as 67 Hex).
Doing the arithmetic we have Freq=1000000/(103*. 241246)= 40,244 or approximately
40,000 cycles per second (well within a tolerance of 40,000 +/- 10%)
The third number is the number of Burst Pairs in Burst Pair Sequence #1. Each
Burst pair consists of two 4 digit Hex numbers representing the On and Off time of that
burst (single binary Bit).
The fourth number is the number of Burst Pairs in Burst Pair Sequence #2.
Burst Pair Sequence #1 starts at word 5 if it is present and is immediately
followed by the digits of Burst Pair Sequence #2 if it is present (word 4>0000). If
Sequence #1 is missing (word 3=0000), then Burst Sequence Number 2 starts at word 5.
61
A Burst Pair Sequence usually looks as follows:
Lead in Burst Pair
Data Burst Pairs
Lead Out Burst Pair
The Lead In Burst pair can be thought of as the hello or wake up burst. It tells the
receiver to start listening (or rather looking) very closely as what is coming. It is usually
of different timing duration than the Burst Pairs in the data part. Technically it is also
used to set the receivers AGC level, a factor related to how much the receiver will
amplify the IR light it sees.
The Lead Out burst pair marks the end of the message and usually has a long OFF
time period to guarantee that two IR messages can’t be sent too close together. It may
actually be incorporated as part of the last data bit if the ON period is what carries the
information (that is, the off time is constant in the data portion and the On time varies
between two values). Once again, Sony does exactly that.
Remember all data in the IR Hex display is in Hex and to properly interpret these
values you must convert them to decimal. Two values should be considered equal if they
are within about 10% of each other. They don’t have to be exactly the same.
[Digression to convert a 4 digit Hex "WXYZ" number to decimal, the following
formula will work W*4096+X*256+Y*16+Z. W,X,Y,Z represent HEX digits in the
range 0-15 where a=10, b=11,c=12,d=13,e=14,f=15. A hex value of 0067 is therefore
16*6+7=103)].
If you understand all of what has been discussed so far you have based the basics
of Binary Signaling 101. Go take a breather.
Before we look at some actual IR codes and their detailed formats, we should
understand why there might be two burst sequences in the code and not always just one.
The first burst sequence is the Once sequence. It is sent if you tap the button on the
Pronto which has learned this code. The second burst sequence is called the Repeat
sequence. It is sent repeatedly as long as you hold the key on the Pronto down. If you
have used an IR remote you already know that all buttons do not "repeat". The two
sequences do not have to be the same. In many cases they are, in others they are not. This
is generally manufacturer dependent.
62
IR Codes
The world of IR remotes has become a commodity world. IR remotes (simple
ones, not the Pronto) are relatively inexpensive. I bought 5, credit card sized, universal
remotes for $10. They are three times as thick as a credit card but the same height and
width. Fits nicely in a shirt pocket. (A true couch potato must NEVER EVER be without
a remote!).
This has happened because there has been a large degree of standardization on the
chips that generate the IR codes and receive them. In fact there are only about 5 or 6 such
chips being used. Sony, Sharp, Toshiba, Philips and NEC are the most popular, with the
NEC one being the most popular of all. The majority of the Asian rim manufacturers
(except for Sony, Sharp, Toshiba, and Philips) use NEC chips and therefore NEC format.
I will discuss the exact coding of two of these systems, Sony and NEC. I believe
Pioneer, Onkyo, Akai, Canon, Goldstar (now LG), Hitachi, Kenwood, NEC, Teac, and
Yamaha all use the NEC chip.
[Note: IR data is always transmitted least significant bit first so the first data bit
sent is lowest order and in a real binary representation it would be the rightmost bit
having a weight of 1.]
SONY IR CODING
Parameter
Decimal Value HEX Value
Carrier Frequency
Unit of Burst Time
Lead In Burst
"1" Burst Pattern
"0" Burst Pattern
Lead Out
40kHz
25 cycles of the carrier
96 24
48 24
24 24
X, 1024
0060 0018
0030 0018
0018 0018
0018 03f6 or 0030 03f6
The lead out pattern in the Sony code is added to the last bit by increasing the off
time. It is NOT a separate burst of data.
Sony data consists of a different number of bits in the message. The first seven
bits (the first seven burst pairs after the lead in burst) always represent the key pressed on
the remote. The next N bits where in is 5, 8, or 13 represents a device code. Older Sony
devices like a TV (no matter what its true model age, it is a device made by Sony for a
long time so it is "old") uses a 12 bit code. A newer one like the DVD S7000 uses a 20 bit
code. Some remotes can control more than 1 device so they can send codes of different
lengths.
Here is an example from a Sony DVD S7000 as it appears in the ProntoEdit Hex
Display
0000 0067 0000 0015 0060 0018 0018 0018 0030 0018 0030
0018 0030 0018 0018 0018 0030 0018 0018 0018 0018 0018 0030
0018 0018 0018 0030 0018 0030 0018 0030 0018 0018 0018 0018
0018 0030 0018 0018 0018 0018 0018 0030 0018 0018 03f6
63
Let us break it up to decipher it.
Preamble
0000 0067 000 0015
Word 1
0 so it is a learned IR code
Word 2
103 decimal which when plugged into the formula
already given yields an IR Carrier frequency of about 40kHz.
Word 3
0000 is the length of the One Time Burst. There is
no one time burst
Word 4
Decimal 21 is the length of the repeat burst. There
are 21 bits (Burst pairs) in this code. The code length is 20
bits plus 1 more pair for the Lead in.
Word 5,6
0060 0018 (96,24 decimal) The lead in Burst . 4
units of on followed by 1 unit of off, where a unit is 600
microseconds
Word 7,8
0018 0018 (24,24 decimal) Burst pair 1, bit 1 = "0"
Word 9,10
0030 0018 (48,24 decimal) Burst Pair 2, bit 2 = "1"
Word 11,12
0030 0018 (48,24 decimal) Burst Pair 3, bit 3 = "1"
Word 13,14
0030 0018 (48,24 decimal) Burst Pair 4, bit 4 = "1"
Word 15,16
0018 0018 (24,24 decimal) Burst Pair 5, bit 5 = "0"
Word 17,18
0030 0018 (48,24 decimal) Burst Pair 6, bit 6 = "1"
Word 19,20
0018 0018 (24,24 decimal) Burst Pair 7, bit 7 = "0"
The above is the function code as transmitted it is 0111010. Reversing the string
so it is a true binary number with the least significant digit on the right we get 0101110
which in decimal is 46.
64
Continuing on to the device code we have:
Word 21,22
0018 0018 (24,24 decimal) Burst Pair 8, bit 1 = "0"
Word 23,24
0030 0018 (48,24 decimal) Burst Pair 9, bit 2 = "1"
Word 25,26
0018 0018 (24,24 decimal) Burst Pair 10, bit 3 = "0"
Word 27,28
0030 0018 (48,24 decimal) Burst Pair 11, bit 4 = "1"
Word 29,30
0030 0018 (48,24 decimal) Burst Pair 12, bit 5 = "1"
Word 31,32
0030 0018 (48,24 decimal) Burst Pair 13, bit 6 = "1"
Word 33,34
0018 0018 (24,24 decimal) Burst Pair 14, bit 7 = "0"
Word 35,36
0018 0018 (24,24 decimal) Burst Pair 15, bit 8 = "0"
Word 37,38
0030 0018 (48,24 decimal) Burst Pair 16, bit 9 = "1"
Word 39,40
0018 0018 (24,24 decimal) Burst Pair 17, bit 10 = "0"
Word 41,42
0018 0018 (24,24 decimal) Burst Pair 18, bit 11 = "0"
Word 43,44
0030 0018 (48,24 decimal) Burst Pair 19, bit 12 = "1"
Word 45,46
0018 03fc (24,24 decimal) Burst Pair 20, bit 13 = "0"
The device code as transmitted is 0101110010010. Reversing the order to make it
a binary number we get 0100100111010. Converting it to decimal we get 2362.
This means that the Sony DVD S7000 has a device code of 2362 and this key has
a function code of 46. This is the discrete Power ON key. If a Sony device has a discrete
Power on Code it is normally 46. Note the dead time on the second half of the last data
burst pair. Sony does not use a unique lead out, but rather adds the inter-message
minimum time to the last data burst’s off period
Sony codes are fairly simple. Sony builds a lot of power into the IR senders, and
good noise rejection in their receivers. They use no redundancy or error checking in the
code
65
NEC IR Code Format
Parameter
Carrier Frequency
Unit of Burst Time
Lead In Burst
"1" Burst Pattern
"0" Burst Pattern
Lead Out
Decimal Value
40kHz
22 cycles of the carrier
341 171
22 96
22 24
22, 1427
HEX Value
0156 00ab
0016 0060
0016 0016
0016 0593
Doing the arithmetic we see that this code uses a base time of 550 microseconds.
The lead in is a unique burst as is the lead out. It is a pulse width modulation system
where the information is carried in the length of the off time with a fixed duration of on
time. The NEC message format is quite a bit more complicated then that of Sony. It is
always a 32-bit code. Which consists of 16 bits of data and 16 bits of error checking.
The code is divided into four 8-bit fields.
Device Code
Device code Compliment
Function Code
Function Code Compliment
A device code will be in the range of 0 to 255 or 256 discrete device codes. The
same is true of the function code. The compliment fields are the 1’s compliment of the
code they represent. The device code and the device code compliment must add up to 255
or else there is an error. The same is true of the function code and the function code
compliment. NEC uses a discrete lead in and a discrete lead out, so the total code length
will take 34 burst pairs to represent as a Burst Pair Sequence.
The following as an example of a Pioneer IR sequence for the CLD79 Elite Laser
Disk Player.
0000 0067 0000 0022 0156 00ab 0016 0060 0016 0060 0016
0060 0016 0016 0016 0060 0016 0016 0016 0060 0016 0016 0016
0016 0016 0016 0016 0016 0016 0060 0016 0016 0016 0060 0016
0016 0016 0060 0016 0060 0016 0016 0016 0060 0016 0016 0016
0016 0016 0060 0016 0060 0016 0060 0016 0016 0016 0060 0016
0016 0016 0060 0016 0060 0016 0016 0016 0016 0016 0016 0016
0593
66
If you work out all of the detailed analysis in a manner similar to that shown for
the Sony you should determine that the carrier frequency is indeed 40kHz, there are 34
total burst pairs in the one burst sequence used, and the burst sequence is repeatable. The
actual 32 bits of data is: 00010101 11101010 01011000 10100111 Looking at the
adjacent fields (1 & 2, 3 & 4) we see they are compliments of each other. A short way of
checking for compliments is that ones become zeros and zeros become ones.
The device code as transmitted is 00010101. Reversing it we get the binary value
10101000. This is the decimal value of 128+32+8=168.
The function code is transmitted as 01011000. Reversing it we get the binary
number 00011010. This is the decimal value 16+8+2=26.
This is the discrete Power On Code for the CLD 79.
Conclusion
Let me once again say thank you to all those who helped me with the deciphering
of these codes. I used to do it for a living but that was for some government agency and
that is a whole other story. All the help made it much faster and much more enjoyable. If
you are interested in finding out more about IR codes search the WWW. Sci.Electronics
FAQ is a good search parameter along with the word "IR code". An article by Scott
Coleman of Xanadu consulting sheds a lot of light on the Sony Control-S protocol. An
excellent article by Juergen Putger describes decoding IR remotes in general. Once you
find a couple of them, they will have links to the others.
67
Appendix C.
Help and Support
Thanks for taking the time to read this document. We have tried to cover in easy-tounderstand terms, every facet of automation the iScan supports – while attempting at
answer every question we’ve ever been asked by customers and installers.
However – if after reading this document you have questions which are left
unanswered, please call or email us to get an answer. We are located in California (U.S
Pacific Time Zone), and run a phone call-center between the hours of 9AM and 5PM.
Please remember that we follow Daylight Savings Time at our office. If you are unable
to reach us with a phone call or it is not convenient to call us, we recommend that you
send us an email.
Our Phone number within the US (Toll-free):
1-866-423-3836 extension 333
Our Phone number outside the U.S. (Toll):
1-(408)-395-4455 extension 333
Our Email address for Technical Support:
help@anchorbaytech.com
Our Mailing Address:
Anchor Bay
983 University Ave.
Building A
Los Gatos, CA 95032
68