Garmin GNS 430(A) GPS Receiver User Manual

GNS 430(A)
Pilot’s Guide and Reference
RECORD OF REVISIONS
Revision Date of Revision
A
12/98
B
4/99
C
6/99
D
7/99
E
4/00
F
7/00
G
5/03
H
5/06
J
6/06
K
2/07
L
10/07
M
05/08
N
08/08
P
12/09
190-00140-00 Rev. P
Description
Initial Release
Update to conform to recent SW changes
Added Addendum
Update for SW 2.10
Update for SW 2.15
Updated Power On, Wind Vector, Crossfill, DME, and Fuel Plan
Added FDE Section, updated per SW 5.01, misc. changes
Changed to 8 inch x 8.5 inch format. Added TERRAIN, misc. changes
Made various layout corrections, no content changes
Updated per Main SW v5.02
Updated per Main SW v5.03
Removed Proximity Advisory info from Section 12
Converted format of figures to accommodate printing process
Added Section 12.2, GTS 8XX Traffic Systems
GNS 430(A) Pilot’s Guide and Reference
i
COPYRIGHT
Copyright © 2009 Garmin Ltd. or its subsidiaries. All rights reserved.
This manual reflects the operation of Main System Software version 5.03 or later. Some differences may be observed when
comparing the information in this manual to other software versions.
Garmin International, Inc., 1200 East 151st Street, Olathe, Kansas 66062 USA
p: 913.397.8200
f: 913.397.8282
Garmin AT, Inc., 2345 Turner Road SE, Salem, Oregon 97302 USA
p: 503.391.3411
f: 503.364.2138
Garmin (Europe) Ltd., Liberty House, Bulls Copse Road, Hounsdown Business Park, Southampton, SO40 9RB, U.K.
p: +44/ (0) 870.8501241
f: +44/ (0) 870.8501251
Garmin (Asia) Corp., No. 68, Jangshu 2nd Road., Shijr, Taipei County, Taiwan
p: 886/2.2642.9199
f : 886/2.2642-9099
Website Address: www.garmin.com
Visit the Garmin website for the latest updates and supplemental information concerning the operation of this and other Garmin
products.
Except as expressly provided herein, no part of this manual may be reproduced, copied, transmitted, disseminated, downloaded or
stored in any storage medium, for any purpose without the express written permission of Garmin. Garmin hereby grants permission
to download a single copy of this manual and of any revision to this manual onto a hard drive or other electronic storage medium to
be viewed for personal use, provided that such electronic or printed copy of this manual or revision must contain the complete text
of this copyright notice and provided further that any unauthorized commercial distribution of this manual or any revision hereto is
strictly prohibited.
Garmin® and AutoLocate® are registered trademarks of Garmin Ltd. or its subsidiaries and may not be used without the express
permission of Garmin.
GNS™, GDL™, GTX™, PhaseTrac12™, and Spell’N’Find™ are trademarks of Garmin Ltd. or its subsidiaries and may not be used
without the express permission of Garmin.
NavData® is a registered trademark of Jeppesen, Inc.
December 2009
ii
190-00140-00 Rev. P
GNS 430(A) Pilot’s Guide and Reference
Printed in the U.S.A.
190-00140-00 Rev. P
TABLE OF CONTENTS
SECTION 1: INTRODUCTION. .......................................... 1-1
1.1 Accessories and Packing List.................................. 1-1
1.2 Key and Knob Functions.......................................... 1-2
1.3 Takeoff Tour................................................................ 1-5
SECTION 2: COM. ................................................................. 2-1
2.1 Communicating using the GNS 430....................... 2-1
SECTION 3: NAV PAGES ................................................... 3-1
3.1
3.2
3.3
3.4
3.5
3.6
3.7
3.8
3.9
Main Page Groups..................................................... 3-1
NAV Page Group........................................................ 3-1
Default NAV Page...................................................... 3-2
Map Page.................................................................... 3-5
TERRAIN Page........................................................... 3-14
NAV/COM Page......................................................... 3-17
Position Page........................................................... 3-19
Satellite Status Page.............................................. 3-22
Vertical Navigation Page....................................... 3-24
SECTION 4: DIRECT-TO NAVIGATION......................... 4-1
4.1 Overview..................................................................... 4-1
SECTION 5: FLIGHT PLANS.............................................. 5-1
5.1 Flight Plan Catalog Page......................................... 5-1
5.2 Active Flight Plan Page............................................ 5-8
SECTION 6: PROCEDURES................................................ 6-1
6.1
6.2
6.3
6.4
SECTION 8: NRST PAGES.................................................. 8-1
8.1
8.2
8.3
8.4
8.5
8.6
8.7
8.8
8.9
NRST Page Group...................................................... 8-1
Nearest Airport Page................................................ 8-4
Nearest Intersection Page....................................... 8-6
Nearest NDB Page..................................................... 8-6
Nearest VOR Page..................................................... 8-7
Nearest User Waypoint Page.................................. 8-8
Nearest Center (ARTCC) Page................................. 8-9
Nearest Flight Service Station (FSS) Page......... 8-10
Nearest Airspace Page........................................... 8-11
SECTION 9: VLOC RECEIVER........................................... 9-1
9.1 VLOC (VOR/LOCALIZER/GLIDESLOPE) Receiver
Operations.......................................................................... 9-1
SECTION 10: AUX PAGES................................................ 10-1
10.1
10.2
10.3
10.4
10.5
AUX Page Group.................................................... 10-1
Flight Planning Page............................................ 10-2
Utility Page........................................................... 10-12
Setup 1 Page........................................................ 10-20
Setup 2 Page........................................................ 10-27
SECTION 11: TERRAIN...................................................... 11-1
11.1 INTRODUCTION....................................................... 11-1
11.2 TERRAIN Page......................................................... 11-3
11.3 TERRAIN Alerts....................................................... 11-4
11.4 Database Information for TERRAIN................... 11-9
Approaches, Departures, and Arrivals.................. 6-1
Non-Precision Approach Operations..................... 6-3
ILS Approaches........................................................ 6-26
Points to Remember for All Approaches........... 6-32
SECTION 12: ADDITIONAL FEATURES...................... 12-1
SECTION 7: WPT PAGES.................................................... 7-1
SECTION 13: FAULT DETECTION & EXCLUSION. . 13-1
7.1 WPT Page Group........................................................ 7-1
7.2 Airport Location Page.............................................. 7-4
7.3 Airport Runway Page............................................... 7-5
7.4 Airport Frequency Page........................................... 7-6
7.5 Airport Approach Page............................................ 7-8
7.6 Airport Arrival Page................................................ 7-11
7.7 Airport Departure Page......................................... 7-13
7.8 Intersection Page.................................................... 7-14
7.9 NDB Page................................................................... 7-15
7.10 VOR Page................................................................. 7-15
7.11 User Waypoint Page............................................. 7-17
190-00140-00 Rev. P
12.1 Traffic Information Service (TIS)........................ 12-1
12.2 GTS 8XX Traffic Systems.................................... 12-11
12.3 Weather Data Link Interface............................ 12-18
13.1 Detection and Exclusion...................................... 13-1
13.2 Pre-Departure Verification of FDE..................... 13-2
SECTION 14: MESSAGES, ABBREVIATIONS, &
NAV TERMS............................................................................. 14-1
14.1 Messages................................................................. 14-1
14.2 Abbreviations......................................................... 14-9
14.3 Navigation Terms................................................ 14-12
Appendix A: Data Card Use...........................................A-1
Appendix B: Specifications. ..........................................B-1
Appendix C: Troubleshooting Q & A. .......................C-1
GNS 430(A) Pilot’s Guide and Reference
iii
WARNINGS,
CAUTIONS, AND NOTES
WARNING: Navigation and terrain separation must NOT be predicated upon the use of the TERRAIN function.
The TERRAIN feature is NOT intended to be used as a primary reference for terrain avoidance and does not
relieve the pilot from the responsibility of being aware of surroundings during flight. The TERRAIN feature is
only to be used as an aid for terrain avoidance and is not certified for use in applications requiring a certified
terrain awareness system. Terrain data is obtained from third party sources. Garmin is not able to independently
verify the accuracy of the terrain data.
WARNING: The terrain data should be used only as an aid for situational awareness. Terrain data must not
be used as the sole basis for decisions or maneuvers to avoid terrain or obstacles. Terrain data must not be
used for navigation.
WARNING: The altitude calculated by GNS 430 GPS receivers is geometric height above Mean Sea Level and
could vary significantly from the altitude displayed by pressure altimeters in aircraft. GPS altitude should never
be used for vertical navigation. Always use pressure altitude displayed by pressure altimeters in the aircraft.
WARNING: The Jeppesen database used in the GNS 430 system must be updated regularly in order to ensure
that its information remains current. Updates are released every 28 days. A database information packet is
included in the GNS 430 package. Pilots using an outdated database do so entirely at their own risk.
WARNING: The basemap (land and water data) must not be used for navigation, but rather only for non navigational situational awareness. Any basemap indication should be compared with other navigation
sources.
WARNING: For safety reasons, GNS 430 operational procedures must be learned on the ground.
WARNING: The United States government operates the Global Positioning System and is solely responsible
for its accuracy and maintenance. The GPS system is subject to changes which could affect the accuracy and
performance of all GPS equipment. Portions of the Garmin GNS 430 utilize GPS as a precision electronic
NAVigation AID (NAVAID). Therefore, as with all NAVAIDs, information presented by the GNS 430 can be
misused or misinterpreted and, therefore, become unsafe.
iv
GNS 430(A) Pilot’s Guide and Reference
190-00140-00 Rev. P
WARNINGS,
CAUTIONS, AND NOTES
WARNING: Use the GNS 430 at your own risk. To reduce the risk of unsafe operation, carefully review and
understand all aspects of the GNS 430 Pilot’s Guide documentation and the GNS 430 Flight Manual Supplement.
Thoroughly practice basic operation prior to actual use. During flight operations, carefully compare indications
from the GNS 430 to all available navigation sources, including the information from other NAVAIDs, visual
sightings, charts, etc. For safety purposes, always resolve any discrepancies before continuing navigation.
CAUTION: The GNS 430 display screen is coated with a special anti-reflective coating that is very sensitive to
skin oils, waxes, and abrasive cleaners. CLEANERS CONTAINING AMMONIA WILL HARM THE ANTI-REFLECTIVE
COATING. It is very important to clean the screen using a clean, lint-free cloth and an eyeglass lens cleaner
that is specified as safe for anti-reflective coatings.
CAUTION: The Garmin GNS 430 does not contain any user-serviceable parts. Repairs should only be made by
an authorized Garmin service center. Unauthorized repairs or modifications could void both the warranty and
the pilot’s authority to operate this device under FAA/FCC regulations.
NOTE: All visual depictions contained within this document, including screen images of the GNS 430 panel and
displays, are subject to change and may not reflect the most current GNS 430 system. Depictions of equipment
may differ slightly from the actual equipment.
NOTE: This device complies with part 15 of the FCC Rules. Operation is subject to the following two conditions:
(1) this device may not cause harmful interference, and (2) this device must accept any interference received,
including interference that may cause undesired operation.
NOTE: Unless otherwise specified within this manual, the term ‘GNS 430’ applies to both the GNS 430 and the
GNS 430A models. Please, note that the difference between these two models is indicated under ‘VHF COM
Performance’ in the Specifications section of this manual (Appendix B).
NOTE: This product, its packaging, and its components contain chemicals known to the State of California to
cause cancer, birth defects, or reproductive harm. This notice is being provided in accordance with California’s
Proposition 65. If you have any questions or would like additional information, please refer to our website at
www.garmin.com/prop65.
190-00140-00 Rev. P
GNS 430(A) Pilot’s Guide and Reference
v
WARRANTY
AVIATION LIMITED WARRANTY
All Garmin avionics products are warranted to be free from defects in materials or workmanship for: two years from the date of
purchase for new Remote-Mount and Panel-Mount products; one year from the date of purchase for new portable products and any
purchased newly-overhauled products; six months for newly-overhauled products exchanged through a Garmin Authorized Service
Center; and 90 days for factory repaired or newly-overhauled products exchanged at Garmin in lieu of repair. Within the applicable
period, Garmin will, at its sole option, repair or replace any components that fail in normal use. Such repairs or replacement will be
made at no charge to the customer for parts or labor, provided that the customer shall be responsible for any transportation cost.
This warranty does not apply to: (i) cosmetic damage, such as scratches, nicks and dents; (ii) consumable parts, such as batteries,
unless product damage has occurred due to a defect in materials or workmanship; (iii) damage caused by accident, abuse, misuse,
water, flood, fire, or other acts of nature or external causes; (iv) damage caused by service performed by anyone who is not an
authorized service provider of Garmin; or (v) damage to a product that has been modified or altered without the written permission of
Garmin. In addition, Garmin reserves the right to refuse warranty claims against products or services that are obtained and/or used
in contravention of the laws of any country.
THE WARRANTIES AND REMEDIES CONTAINED HEREIN ARE EXCLUSIVE AND IN LIEU OF ALL OTHER WARRANTIES, WHETHER
EXPRESS, IMPLIED OR STATUTORY, INCLUDING ANY LIABILITY ARISING UNDER ANY WARRANTY OF MERCHANTABILITY OR FITNESS
FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE, STATUTORY OR OTHERWISE. THIS WARRANTY GIVES YOU SPECIFIC LEGAL RIGHTS, WHICH MAY VARY
FROM STATE TO STATE.
IN NO EVENT SHALL GARMIN BE LIABLE FOR ANY INCIDENTAL, SPECIAL, INDIRECT OR CONSEQUENTIAL DAMAGES, WHETHER
RESULTING FROM THE USE, MISUSE OR INABILITY TO USE THE PRODUCT OR FROM DEFECTS IN THE PRODUCT. SOME STATES DO
NOT ALLOW THE EXCLUSION OF INCIDENTAL OR CONSEQUENTIAL DAMAGES, SO THE ABOVE LIMITATIONS MAY NOT APPLY TO
YOU.
Garmin retains the exclusive right to repair or replace (with a new or newly-overhauled replacement product) the product or software
or offer a full refund of the purchase price at its sole discretion. SUCH REMEDY SHALL BE YOUR SOLE AND EXCLUSIVE REMEDY FOR
ANY BREACH OF WARRANTY.
Online Auction Purchases: Products purchased through online auctions are not eligible for warranty coverage. Online auction
confirmations are not accepted for warranty verification. To obtain warranty service, an original or copy of the sales receipt from the
original retailer is required. Garmin will not replace missing components from any package purchased through an online auction.
International Purchases: A separate warranty may be provided by international distributors for devices purchased outside the
United States depending on the country. If applicable, this warranty is provided by the local in-country distributor and this distributor
provides local service for your device. Distributor warranties are only valid in the area of intended distribution. Devices purchased in
the United States or Canada must be returned to the Garmin service center in the United Kingdom, the United States, Canada, or
Taiwan for service.
To obtain warranty service, contact your local Garmin Authorized Service Center. For assistance in locating a Service Center near you,
visit the Garmin Website at ‘http://www.garmin.com’ or contact Garmin Customer Service at 800-800-1020.
vi
GNS 430(A) Pilot’s Guide and Reference
190-00140-00 Rev. P
SECTION 1
INTRODUCTION
SECTION 1: INTRODUCTION
1.1 Accessories and Packing List
Congratulations on choosing the finest, most advanced
panel mount IFR navigation/communication system
available. The GNS 430 represents Garmin’s commitment
to provide accurate, easy-to-use avionics.
Before installing and getting started with the GNS 430,
please check to see that the package includes the following
items. If any parts are missing or damaged, please contact
a Garmin dealer immediately.
Standard Package:
• GNS 430 Unit
• NavData® Card
The Garmin dealer installs and configures the GNS
430. The GNS 430 is secured in the installation rack
with the proper wiring connections. A Garmin dealer can
answer questions about the installation, such as location
of antennas or any connections to other equipment in the
panel. After installation, the NavData Card and the Terrain
Data Card (if applicable) are installed into the correct slot
on the front of the unit (Appendix A).
NOTE: Help Garmin provide better support by
completing on-line registration. Registration
ensures notification of product updates, new
products, and provides for lost or stolen unit
tracking. Have the serial number of the GNS
430 available and connect to the website (www.
garmin.com). Look for the product registration
link on the home page.
• Terrain Data Card
• Installation Rack
• Connectors
• GPS Antenna
• Pilot’s Guide
• Quick Reference Guide
• Database Subscription Packet
• Warranty Registration Card
• GNS 430 Simulator CD-ROM
190-00140-00 Rev. P
GNS 430(A) Pilot’s Guide and Reference
1-1
SECTION 1
INTRODUCTION
1.2 Key and Knob Functions
Experiment with the unit and refer to the reference
sections for more information.
Data is entered using the large and small knobs.
Experiment with them to become efficient at entering data.
This greatly reduces the amount of time spent operating
the GNS 430 in flight.
The GNS 430 is designed to make operation as simple
as possible. The key and knob descriptions (Figure
1-1) provide a general overview of the primary function(s)
for each key and knob. The takeoff tour (Section 1.3)
is intended to provide a brief overview of the primary
functions of the GNS 430.
1
10
2
3
11
12
13
14
15
7
6
5
4
17
16
9
8
18
Figure 1-1 Keys and Knobs
7
2
COM Power/Volume
VLOC Volume
3
COM Flip-flop
9
4
VLOC Flip-flop
CLR (clear)
Direct-to
10
1
5
6
1-2
8
11
12
RNG (map range)
MENU
ENT (enter)
Small left knob
Large left knob
CDI
GNS 430(A) Pilot’s Guide and Reference
13
OBS
14
17
MSG (message)
FPL (flight plan)
PROC (procedures)
Large right knob
18
Small right knob
15
16
190-00140-00 Rev. P
SECTION 1
INTRODUCTION
Left-hand Keys and Knobs
Right-hand Keys and Knobs
(1) COM Power/Volume Knob – Controls unit power
and communications radio volume. Press momentarily to
disable automatic squelch control.
(2) VLOC Volume Knob – Controls audio volume for
the selected VOR/Localizer frequency. Press momentarily
to enable/disable the ident tone.
(3) COM Flip-flop Key – Used to swap the active and
standby COM frequencies. Press and hold to select
emergency channel (121.500 MHz).
(4) VLOC Flip-flop Key – Used to swap the active and
standby VLOC frequencies (i.e., make the selected standby
frequency active).
(10) Small Left Knob (COM/VLOC) – Used to tune
the kilohertz (kHz) value of the standby frequency for
the communications transceiver (COM) or the VLOC
receiver, whichever is currently selected by the tuning
cursor. Press this knob momentarily to toggle the tuning
cursor between the COM and VLOC frequency fields.
(11) Large Left Knob (COM/VLOC) – Used to tune the
megahertz (MHz) value of the standby frequency for the
communications transceiver (COM) or the VLOC receiver,
whichever is currently selected by the tuning cursor.
(5) CLR Key – Used to erase information, remove map
detail, or to cancel an entry. Press and hold the CLR key
to immediately display the Default NAV Page.
(6) Direct-to Key – Provides access to the direct-to
function, which allows the pilot to enter a destination
waypoint and establishes a direct course to the selected
destination (Section 4).
(7) RNG Key – Allows the pilot to select the desired map
range. Use the up arrow to zoom out to a larger area, or
the down arrow to zoom in to a smaller area.
(8) MENU Key – Displays a context-sensitive list of
options. This options list allows the pilot to access
additional features or make settings changes which relate
to the currently displayed page.
(9) ENT Key – Used to approve an operation or complete
data entry. It is also used to confirm information during
power on.
(17) Large Right Knob – Used to select page groups:
NAV, WPT, AUX, or NRST. With the on-screen cursor
enabled, the large right knob allows the pilot to move
the cursor about the page. The large right knob is also
used to move the target pointer right (turn clockwise) or
left (counterclockwise) when the map panning function
is active.
(18) Small Right Knob – Used to select pages within one
of the groups listed above. Press this knob momentarily
to display the on-screen cursor. The cursor allows the
pilot to enter data and/or make a selection from a list of
options. When entering data, the small knob is used to
select the desired letter or number and the large knob is
used to move to the next character space. The small right
knob is also used to move the target pointer up (turn
clockwise) or down (counterclockwise) when the map
panning function is active.
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GNS 430(A) Pilot’s Guide and Reference
1-3
SECTION 1
INTRODUCTION
NOTE: When the GNS 430 displays a list of
information that is too long for the display
screen, a scroll bar appears along the right-hand
side of the display (Figure 1-2). The scroll bar
graphically indicates the number of additional
items available within the selected category. To
scroll through the list, press the small right knob
to activate the cursor, then turn the large right
knob.
Scroll Bar
Figure 1-2 Scroll Bar
1-4
Bottom Row Keys
(12) CDI Key – Used to toggle which navigation source
(GPS or VLOC) provides output to an external HSI or
CDI.
(13) OBS Key – Selects OBS mode, which retains the
current ‘active to’ waypoint as the navigation reference
even after passing the waypoint (i.e., prevents sequencing
to the next waypoint). Pressing the OBS Key again returns
the unit to normal operation, with automatic sequencing
of waypoints. When OBS mode is selected, the pilot
may set the desired course to/from a waypoint using the
‘Select OBS Course’ pop-up window, or an external
OBS selector on the HSI or CDI.
(14) MSG Key – Used to view system messages and to
alert the pilot to important warnings and requirements.
See Section 14.1 for more information on messages.
(15) FPL Key – Allows the pilot to create, edit, activate,
and invert flight plans, as well as access approaches,
departures, and arrivals. A closest point to flight plan
feature is also made available by pressing the FPL Key.
See Section 5 for more information on flight plans.
(16) PROC Key – Allows the pilot to select and remove
approaches, departures, and arrivals from the flight plan.
When using a flight plan, available procedures for the
departure and/or arrival airport are offered automatically.
Otherwise, the pilot may select the desired airport, then
the desired procedure.
GNS 430(A) Pilot’s Guide and Reference
190-00140-00 Rev. P
SECTION 1
INTRODUCTION
1.3 Takeoff Tour
After becoming familiar with the basics, some suggested
reading within this Pilot’s Guide includes:
Overview
• Flight plan features - Section 5
The Garmin GNS 430 provides the pilot accurate
navigational data and communication capability, along
with non-precision and precision approach certification
in the IFR environment. The takeoff tour is designed to
familiarize the pilot with:
• IFR procedures - Section 6
• Powering up the unit
• Unit settings (configuring the unit to the pilot’s
preferences) - Section 10
If more information is needed, Garmin’s Customer
Service staff is available during normal business hours
(U.S. Central time zone) at the phone and fax numbers
listed on page ii. Garmin can also be reached by mail
(page ii) or at our website address, www.garmin.com.
• Changing frequencies
• Entering data
• Performing a simple direct-to
• Selecting IFR procedures
Powering up the GNS 430
• Using some limited flight plans
In addition, this section briefly covers the Default NAV
Page, the Map Page, and the NAV/COM Page, which are
available as part of the NAV Page Group. These pages are
used for most of the in-flight navigation.
The takeoff tour assumes that the unit and antennas
have been properly installed and that the GNS 430’s
default settings have not been changed. If any of the
factory default settings (position format, units of measure,
selectable fields, etc.) have been changed, the pictures
shown here may not exactly match what is shown on
the GNS 430. Prior to using the GNS 430 for the first
time, Garmin recommends that the aircraft be moved to a
location that is well away from buildings and other aircraft
so the unit can collect satellite data without interruption.
This takeoff tour is intended to provide a brief
introduction of the GNS 430’s major features. Sections
2 through 13 of this manual describe these features, and
others in additional detail. Refer to these sections, as
needed to learn or review the details regarding a particular
feature.
190-00140-00 Rev. P
• Waypoint information pages (database
information) - Section 7
The GNS 430’s power and COM volume are controlled
using the COM Power/Volume Knob at the top left
corner of the unit. Turning it clockwise turns unit power
on and increases the COM radio volume. After turning
the unit on, a welcome page appears briefly while the
unit performs a self test, followed sequentially by the Unit
Type Page (Figure 1-3) and the Software Version Page.
Then (depending on configuration) the Weather Page,
the Traffic Page, the Aviation Data Page, the Land/Terrain/
Obstacles Database Page, and the Situational Awareness
Page are sequentially displayed.
GNS 430(A) Pilot’s Guide and Reference
Figure 1-3 Unit Type Page
1-5
SECTION 1
INTRODUCTION
The Database Versions Page (Figure 1-4) appears
next, which shows the current database information
on the NavData and Terrain Data cards. Database
information highlighted in yellow indicates the database
is not within its effective dates. The NavData database is
updated every 28 days and must be current for approved
instrument approach operations. Information on database
subscriptions is available inside the GNS 430 package.
To ensure that the GNS 430 and any connected
instruments are working properly, check for the following
indications on the CDI/HSI, RMI, external annunciators,
and other connected instruments:
• Course deviation - Half left/no flag
• TO/FROM flag - TO
• Bearing to destination - 135°
• Distance to destination - 10.0 nm
• All external annunciators (if installed) - On
• Glideslope - Half up/no flag
• Time to destination - 4 minutes
• Desired track - 149.5°
• Ground speed - 150 knots
Figure 1-4 Database Versions Page
To acknowledge the database information:
Press the ENT Key.
Instrument Panel Self-test Page
Once the database has been acknowledged, the
Instrument Panel Self-Test Page appears (Figure 1-5).
The Instrument Panel Self-test Page (Figure 1-5)
indicates the currently selected OBS course, fuel capacity
(CAP), fuel on board (FOB), and fuel flow (FF). The fuel
capacity, fuel on board, and fuel flow may be manually
entered if the installation does not include connection to
sensors which automatically provide these figures.
To enter fuel capacity, fuel on board or fuel
flow figures (if not provided by sensors):
1)
Turn the large right knob to select the ‘CAP’,
‘FOB’, or ‘FF’ field.
Figure 1-5 Instrument Panel Self-Test Page
1-6
GNS 430(A) Pilot’s Guide and Reference
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SECTION 1
INTRODUCTION
2)
Turn the small and large right knobs to enter
the desired figure (Figures 1-5 and 1-6) and
press the ENT Key.
To view the Checklists Page:
Turn the large right knob to highlight ‘Go To
Chklist?’ (Figure 1-8) and press the ENT Key.
1)
Figure 1-6 Fuel Flow Selected
The Instrument Panel Self-test Page includes selections
to set fuel on board (FOB) to full capacity and access the
Checklists Page. This allows the pilot to quickly set fuel
to full limits and display any checklists that have been
entered, such as start up or takeoff checklists.
To set fuel on board to full (if not provided
by sensor):
1)
Figure 1-8 ‘Go To Chklist?’ Highlighted
2)
Turn the large right knob to select the desired
checklist, then execute each step (Section
10.3, Utility Page: Checklists) in the selected
checklist.
3)
Once the pilot completes the desired checklist(s),
press the small right knob to return to the
Checklists Page. Press the small right knob
again to return to normal operation on the
Satellite Status Page or the Map Page.
4)
Once instrument operation has been verified
with the Instrument Panel Self-test Page
displayed, press the ENT Key.
Turn the large right knob to highlight ‘Set Full
Fuel?’ (Figure 1-7).
NOTE: The GNS 430 can hold up to nine checklists
with up to 30 entries in each checklist.
Figure 1-7 ‘Set Full Fuel?’ Highlighted
2)
Press the ENT Key and verify that fuel on board
(‘FOB’) now matches the fuel capacity (CAP)
figure. Fuel on board is reduced, over time,
based on the fuel flow (FF) figure.
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GNS 430(A) Pilot’s Guide and Reference
1-7
SECTION 1
INTRODUCTION
Satellite Status Page
The Satellite Status Page (Figure 1-9) appears as the
GNS 430 attempts to collect satellite information.
When an ‘Acquiring’ status is displayed on the Satellite
Status Page, the signal strengths of any satellites received
appear as ‘bar graph’ readings. This is a good indication
that the unit is receiving signals and a position fix is being
determined. Following the first-time use of the GNS 430,
the time required for a position fix varies, usually from
one to two minutes.
‘Searching Sky’ indicates that satellite almanac data is
not available or has expired (if the unit hasn’t been used
for six months or more). This means the unit is acquiring
satellite data to establish almanac and satellite orbit
information, which can take five to ten minutes. The data
is recollected from the first available satellite. The Satellite
Status Page displays a ‘Search Sky’ status, and the message
annunciator (MSG), above the MSG Key also flashes to
alert the pilot of system message, ‘Searching the Sky’.
To view a system message:
Press the MSG Key (Figure 1-10).
The Message Page appears and displays the status or
warning information applicable to the receiver’s current
operating condition.
Figure 1-9 Satellite Status Page
If the unit can only obtain enough satellites for 2D
navigation (no altitude), the unit uses the altitude provided
by the altitude encoder (if one is connected).
The ‘INTEG’ annunciator (bottom left corner of the
screen) indicates that satellite coverage is insufficient to
pass built-in integrity monitoring tests. In the example
above, not enough satellites are being received to determine
a position. The Satellite Status Page shows the ID numbers
for the satellites and the relative signal strength of each
satellite received (as a bar graph reading).
1-8
Figure 1-10 Message Page
To return to the previous page after
viewing a message:
Press the MSG Key again.
NOTE: The GNS 430 utilizes certain software
algorithms to ensure reliable GPS receiver
operation. Receiver Autonomous Integrity
Monitoring (RAIM) and Fault Detection and
Exclusion (FDE) are two examples. These features
allow navigation during Oceanic/Remote legs of
a flight using the GNS 430. For further details,
please refer to Sections 10.3 and 12.
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Selecting COM and VLOC Frequencies
While the GNS 430 is acquiring a position, take a
minute to dial in the active and standby frequencies to
be used for the first phase of the flight. The GNS 430’s
display is divided into separate windows (or screen areas),
including a COM Window, VLOC Window, and the GPS
Window (Figure 1-11).
COM Window
To place the standby communication
frequency in the active field:
Press the COM Flip-flop Key (Figure 1-12).
GPS Window
Active Frequency
Standby Frequency
Figure 1-12 Active Frequency 135.325 MHz
VLOC
Window
Figure 1-11 Standby Frequency 135.325 MHz
To change the standby communication
frequency:
1)
Press the small left knob if needed, to move
the tuning cursor to the COM Window (Figure
1-11).
2)
Turn the large left knob to select the MHz,
and the small left knob to select the kHz of
the desired frequency.
Once the active frequency has been entered, repeat
steps 1 and 2 to enter the standby frequency. After both
communication frequencies have been entered, the COM
Window may be kept ‘hot’ by leaving the cursor on the
standby frequency. Move the cursor to the VLOC Window
by pressing the small left knob.
NOTE: When selecting VLOC frequencies, the
tuning cursor automatically returns to the COM
Window after 30 seconds of inactivity.
To change the standby VLOC frequency:
1)
Press the small left knob if needed, to activate
the tuning cursor in the VLOC Window.
2)
Turn the large left knob to select the MHz,
and the small left knob to select the kHz of
the desired frequency.
To place the standby frequency in the
active field:
Press the NAV Flip-flop Key.
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INTRODUCTION
Page Groups
NAV Pages
Page Groups
NAV Group WPT Group AUX Group NRST Group
see Section 3 see Section 7 see Section 10 see Section 8
• Default NAV Page
• Map Page
• TERRAIN Page
Table 1-1 Page Groups
The bottom right corner of the screen (Figure 1-13)
indicates which page group (Table 1-1) is currently being
displayed, the number of pages available within that group
(indicated by square icons), and the placement of the
current page within that group (indicated by a highlighted
square icon).
In addition to the NAV Page Group, additional page groups
are available for waypoint information (WPT), auxiliary
(AUX) functions such as flight planning or unit settings, and
listings for nearest (NRST) airports or other facilities.
Current Page Group
There are seven pages available under the NAV Page
Group*:
Number of Pages in
Current Page Group
Position of
Current Page
within Current
Page Group
Figure 1-13 Current Page and Page Group
• NAV/COM Page
• Position Page
• Satellite Status Page
• Vertical Navigation Page
The Default NAV Page, the Map Page, and the NAV/
COM Page are used for most of the in-flight navigation.
NOTE: *Eight or nine NAV pages are available
when the GNS 430 installation includes
connection to traffic and/or weather information
sources. See the 400/500 Series Display
Interfaces Pilot’s Guide Addendum, p/n 19000140-10, or Section 12, Additional Features.
To select the NAV Page Group and display
the Default NAV Page:
Press and hold the CLR Key.
To select the desired NAV Page:
Turn the small right knob until the desired
page is displayed.
To select the desired page group:
Turn the large right knob until a page from the
desired page group is displayed (Figure 1-13).
To select the desired page within the page
group:
Turn the small right knob until the desired page
is displayed (Figure 1-13).
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Map Page
After the GNS 430 acquires satellites and computes
a position, the Map Page (Figure 1-14) appears
automatically.
Desired Track
Map Display
Map Range
Present Position
Data Fields
To change the map range, press the up arrow (to zoom
out) or the down arrow (to zoom in) of the RNG (map
range) Key. The current map range is depicted in the
lower left corner of the Map Display.
Direct-to Navigation
The GNS 430 can use direct point-to-point navigation
to provide guidance from takeoff to touchdown, even
in the IFR environment. Once a destination is selected,
the unit provides speed, course, and distance data based
upon a direct course from the present position to the
destination. A destination can be selected from any page
with the Direct-to Key.
To select a direct-to destination:
Figure 1-14 Map Page
The Map Page displays the present position (using an
airplane symbol) relative to nearby airports, VORs, NDBs,
intersections, user waypoints, and airspace boundaries.
The route is displayed as a solid line.
Data fields for destination waypoint (WPT), distance
to waypoint (DIS), desired track (DTK), and ground speed
(GS) appear on the right-hand side of the display. These
fields are user selectable (Section 3.4, Selecting Desired
On-screen Data) to allow the pilot to configure the unit.
Available settings include: altitude, bearing, enroute safe
altitude, estimated time of arrival, minimum safe altitude,
and ground track.
A Map Setup Page is provided to designate the
maximum range at which each map feature appears.
These settings provide an automatic decluttering of the
map (based upon preferences) while adjusting the range.
See Section 14.3 for definitions of these navigation terms.
While viewing the Map Page, the pilot can quickly
declutter and remove many of the background map details
by pressing the CLR Key (repeatedly) until the desired
detail is depicted.
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1)
Press the Direct-to Key. The Select Direct-to
Waypoint Page appears with the destination
field highlighted.
2)
Turn the small right knob to enter the first
letter of the destination waypoint identifier.
The destination waypoint may be an airport,
VOR, NDB, intersection, or user waypoint,
as long as it is in the database or stored in
memory as a user waypoint.
3)
Turn the large right knob to the right to move
the cursor to the next character position.
4)
Repeat steps 2 and 3 to spell out the rest of
the waypoint identifier (Figure 1-15).
Figure 1-15 Direct-to Waypoint Page
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5)
Press the ENT Key to confirm the identifier. The
‘Activate?’ function field is highlighted (Figure
1-16).
The Default NAV Page (Figure 1-17) displays a graphic
course deviation indicator (CDI), the active leg of the flight
plan (as defined by the current ‘from’ and ‘to’ waypoints),
and six user-selectable data fields. The default settings for
these fields are distance to waypoint (DIS), desired track
(DTK), bearing to waypoint (BRG), ground speed (GS),
ground track (TRK), and estimated time enroute (ETE).
See Section 14.3 for definitions of these navigation terms.
To change the data fields:
1)
Figure 1-16 ‘Activate?’ Highlighted
6)
From the Default NAV page, press the MENU
Key and select ‘Change Fields?’ (Figure 1-18).
Press the ENT Key to activate a direct-to course
to the selected destination.
Once a direct-to destination is selected, press and hold
the CLR Key to display the Default NAV Page.
Default NAV Page
During most flights, the Default NAV Page, the Map
Page, and the NAV/COM Page are the primary pages used
for navigation.
To select the Default NAV Page:
Press and hold the CLR Key (Figure
1-17).
Active Leg of
Flight Plan
TO/FROM Flag
Figure 1-18 Default NAV Page Menu
2)
Turn the large right knob to select the data
field to be changed.
3)
Turn the small right knob to display a list of
data options (Figure 1-19).
Course Deviation
Indicator (CDI)
User-selectable
Data Fields
Figure 1-19 ‘Select Field Type’ Window
Figure 1-17 Default NAV Page
4)
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Press the ENT Key to select the desired data
item and return to the Default NAV Page.
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NAV/COM Page
From the Default NAV Page, turn the small right knob
until the NAV/COM Page (Figure 1-20) is displayed.
Departure, Enroute, or
Arrival Airport
Frequency List
A frequency listed on the NAV/COM Page can be
quickly transferred to the standby field of the COM
Window or the VLOC Window. This time-saving process
prevents having to ‘re-key’ a frequency already displayed
elsewhere on the screen.
To select a communication or navigation
frequency:
1)
Press the small right knob to activate the
cursor in the GPS Window.
2)
Turn the large right knob to select the desired
frequency from the list.
3)
Press the ENT Key to transfer the selected
frequency to the standby field in the COM or
VLOC Window. COM frequencies automatically
go to the standby field of the COM Window and
navigation frequencies automatically go to the
standby field of the VLOC Window, regardless
of which window is currently highlighted by
the cursor.
4)
To activate the selected frequency, press the
COM or VLOC Flip-flop Key.
Frequency Type
Figure 1-20 NAV/COM Page
The NAV/COM Page displays the available frequencies
(communications and navigation) for the departure airport,
any enroute airports which are included in the flight plan,
and the final destination airport. When using the directto function, frequencies are listed for the airport nearest to
the starting position and the destination airport.
To display the frequency list for the desired
flight plan or direct-to airport:
1)
Press the small right knob to activate the
cursor on the airport identifier field (in the GPS
Window).
2)
Turn the small right knob to display the list
of airports (departure, arrival, and enroute) for
the flight plan or direct-to. Continue to turn
the small right knob until the desired airport
is selected.
3)
Press the ENT Key to display the frequency list
for the selected airport.
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To display frequencies for a different
airport along the flight plan.
1)
Press the small right knob to highlight the
airport identifier field.
2)
Turn the small right knob to display the list of
airports within the flight plan (Figure 1-21).
IFR Procedures
Once the direct-to or flight plan is confirmed, the whole
range of instrument procedures is available. Departures
(SIDs), arrivals (STARs), and non-precision and precision
approaches are stored within the NavData Card and are
available using the PROC (procedures) Key.
To display the Procedures Page (Figure 1-22), press the
PROC Key.
Figure 1-21 Airport Window
3)
Continue turning the small right knob to select
the desired airport and press the ENT Key.
Figure 1-22 Procedures Page
The steps required to select and activate an approach,
departure, or arrival are identical. This introductory
section shows examples of the steps required to select an
approach, but keep in mind the same process also applies
to departures and arrivals.
To select an approach, departure, or arrival:
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1)
Turn the large right knob to select the desired
option (‘Select Approach?’, ‘Select Arrival?’,
or ‘Select Departure?’) from the Procedures
Page.
2)
Press the ENT Key to display a list of
available procedures for the arrival (when using
approaches or STARs) or departure (when using
SIDs) airport.
3)
Turn the small right knob to select the desired
procedure and press the ENT Key.
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4)
For approaches, a window appears (Figure
1-23) to select the desired initial approach
fix (IAF) or provide a ‘vectors’ option to select
just the final course segment of the approach.
Turn the small right knob to select the desired
option and press the ENT Key. (The ‘vectors’
option extends the final inbound course beyond
the final approach fix, allowing the pilot to
intercept the final course segment beyond its
normal limits.)
Nearest (NRST) Pages
The NRST Page Group provides detailed information
on the nine nearest airports, VORs, NDBs, intersections,
and user-created waypoints within 200 nm of the current
position. In addition, pages are also provided to display
the five nearest center (ARTCC/FIR) and Flight Service
Station (FSS) points of communication, plus alert the
pilot to any nearby special-use or controlled airspaces.
There are eight pages available in the NRST group:
• Nearest Airport Page
• Nearest NDB Page
• Nearest User Waypoint Page
• Nearest FSS Page
• Nearest Intersection Page
• Nearest VOR Page
Figure 1-23 Approach Window
5)
For departures and arrivals, a window appears
to select the desired transition. Turn the small
right knob to select the desired option and
press the ENT Key.
In the flight plan or direct-to, the departure or arrival
airport is replaced with the sequence of waypoints
contained within the selected procedure.
190-00140-00 Rev. P
• Nearest ARTCC Page
• Nearest Airspace Page
The communication frequencies and runway
information may both be examined directly from the
Nearest Airport Page. As discussed earlier for the NAV/
COM Page, the pilot may also place any displayed
frequency into the standby COM or VLOC field by
highlighting the frequency with the cursor and pressing
the ENT Key.
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INTRODUCTION
To display the NRST pages:
1)
If necessary, press and hold the CLR Key to
select the NAV group and display the Default
NAV Page.
2)
Turn the large right knob to select the NRST
Page Group, as indicated by ‘NRST’ appearing
in the lower right corner of the screen.
3)
Turn the small right knob to select the desired
NRST Page.
To view additional information for a nearby
airport:
1)
Press the small right knob to activate the
cursor.
2)
Turn the large right knob to select the desired
airport from the list.
3)
Press the ENT Key to display waypoint (WPT)
information pages for the selected airport
(Figure 1-26).
To display a list of nearby airports:
1)
Turn the large right knob to select the NRST
Page Group and (if needed) the small right
knob to select the Nearest Airport Page (Figure
1-24).
Figure 1-26 Airport Location Page
4)
Figure 1-24 Nearest Airport Page
2)
To scroll through the list, press the small right
knob, then turn the large right knob (Figure
1-25)
To display runway and frequency information,
press the small right knob to remove the
cursor and turn the small right knob to display
the desired information page.
The Nearest Airport Page may be used in conjunction
with the Direct-to Key to quickly set a course to a nearby
facility in an in-flight emergency. Selecting a nearby
airport as a direct-to destination overrides the flight plan
or cancels a previously selected direct-to destination. The
pilot still has the option of returning to the flight plan
by cancelling the direct-to; see Section 4.1, Cancelling
Direct-to Navigation.
Figure 1-25 Scrolling the Nearest Airport List
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To select a nearby airport as a direct-to
destination from the Nearest Airport Page:
1)
From the Nearest Airport Page, press the small
right knob to activate the cursor.
2)
Turn the large right knob to select the desired
airport from the list.
3)
Press the Direct-to Key, the ENT Key twice to
navigate to the nearby airport.
To select a nearby airport as a direct-to
destination from the Airport Information
Page:
1)
Press the Direct-to Key, then press the ENT
Key (Figure 1-27).
Nearest (NRST) Airspace Page
The last page in the NRST group, the Nearest Airspace
Page (Figure 1-28), provides information for up to nine
controlled or special-use airspaces near or in the flight
path. Airspace information appears on this page based on
the same criteria used for airspace alert messages:
• If the projected course will take the aircraft inside
an airspace within the next ten minutes, the
message ‘Airspace ahead -- less than 10 minutes’
appears.
• If the aircraft is within 2 nm of an airspace and the
current course will take it inside of the airspace,
the message ‘Airspace near and ahead’ appears.
• If the aircraft is within 2 nm of an airspace and
the current course will not take it inside of the airspace, the message ‘Near airspace less than 2nm’
appears.
• If the aircraft has entered an airspace, the message
‘Inside airspace’ appears.
Figure 1-27 ‘Activate?’ Highlighted
2)
Press the ENT Key again to navigate to the
nearby airport.
Figure 1-28 Nearest Airspace Page
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INTRODUCTION
By default, airspace alert messages are turned off. When
turned on, the message (MSG) annunciator located directly
above the MSG Key flashes to alert the pilot to the airspace
message. See Section 10.4, Setup 1 Page: Airspace Alarms
for information on enabling airspace alert messages.
To view an airspace alert message:
1)
Press the MSG Key. The Messages Page
appears with the alert message (Figure
1-29).
Flight Plans (FPL)
The GNS 430 lets the pilot create up to 20 flight plans
with up to 31 waypoints in each flight plan. Flight plans
are created, edited, and activated using the FPL Key. The
FPL Page Group includes two pages: the Active Flight Plan
Page and the Flight Plan Catalog Page (Figures 1-30 and
1-31). The Active Flight Plan Page provides information
and editing features for the flight plan currently in use
(referred to as ‘flight plan 00’). The Flight Plan Catalog
Page serves as the main page for creating new flight plans,
as well as editing or activating previously created flight
plans.
Figure 1-29 Messages Page
2)
Press the MSG Key again to return to the
previous display.
Figure 1-30 Active Flight Plan Page
Note that the airspace alerts are based upon threedimensional data (latitude, longitude, and altitude) to
avoid nuisance alerts. The alert boundaries for controlled
airspace are also sectorized to provide complete information
on any nearby airspace. Additional information about a
nearby airspace—such as controlling agency, frequency, and
floor/ceiling limits—is available from the Nearest Airspace
Page (Section 8.9).
To view additional airspace information:
1)
Press the small right knob to activate the
cursor.
2)
Turn the large right knob to select the desired
airspace from the list.
3)
Press the ENT Key to view the airspace
information.
1-18
Figure 1-31 Flight Plan Catalog Page
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Since using flight plans is arguably one of the more
complex features of the GNS 430, it will be discussed only
briefly here, with focus on creating a new flight plan and
activating it to use for navigation. Answers to additional
questions about flight plans not found in this brief
introduction can be found in Section 5, Flight Plans.
7)
Repeat steps 5 and 6, above, until all waypoints
for the flight plan have been entered (Figure
1-33).
To create a new flight plan:
1)
Press the FPL Key.
2)
Turn the small right knob to select the Flight
Plan Catalog Page.
3)
Press the MENU Key to display the Flight Plan
Catalog Page Menu (Figure 1-32).
Figure 1-33 Enter Flight Plan Waypoints
Once the flight plan is created, it may be activated from
the Flight Plan Catalog Page Menu. Activating the flight
plan places it into ‘flight plan 00’ (a copy of it still resides
in the original catalog location) and replaces any flight
plan which currently exists in ‘flight plan 00’.
To activate the new flight plan:
Figure 1-32 Flight Plan Catalog Page Menu
4)
Turn the large right knob to select ‘Create New
Flight Plan?’ and press the ENT Key.
5)
The cursor appears on the first waypoint identifier
field (located directly below ‘WAYPOINT’). Use
the large and small right knobs to enter the
identifier of the first waypoint in the flight plan.
(The small knob is used to select the desired
letter or number and the large knob is used to
move to the next character space.)
6)
Press the ENT Key once the identifier has been
selected. The cursor moves to the next blank
waypoint identifier field.
190-00140-00 Rev. P
1)
Press the MENU Key to display the Flight Plan
Catalog Page Menu.
2)
Turn the small right knob to select ‘Activate
Flight Plan?’ (Figure 1-34) and press the ENT
Key
Figure 1-34 Flight Plan Catalog Page Menu
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1-20
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SECTION 2
COM
SECTION 2: COM
2.1 Communicating using the GNS 430
The GNS 430 features a digitally-tuned VHF COM radio
that provides a seamless transition from communication
to navigation, bringing the two most important functions
in flying together in one panel-mounted unit. The GNS
430’s COM radio operates in the aviation voice band, from
118.000 to 136.975 MHz, in 25 kHz steps (default). For
European operations, a COM radio configuration to allow
for 8.33 kHz steps is also provided (Section 10.5, Setup 2
Page: COM Configuration).
COM Window and Tuning
Communication frequencies are selected with the
tuning cursor in the standby COM frequency field (Figure
2-1), using the small and large left knobs to tune the
desired frequency. The standby frequency always appears
below the active frequency. The active frequency is
the frequency currently in use for transmit and receive
operations.
‘RX’ Receive Indication
Standby COM
Frequency Field
Volume
COM radio volume is adjusted using the COM Power/
Volume Knob. Turn the COM Power/Volume Knob
clockwise to increase volume, or counterclockwise to
decrease volume.
Squelch
The COM radio features an automatic squelch,
providing maximum sensitivity to weaker signals while
rejecting many localized noise sources. The pilot may
wish to override this automatic squelch function when
listening to a distant station or when setting the desired
volume level. The COM Power/Volume Knob allows
the pilot to disable the automatic squelch and keep
the COM audio open continuously. To override the
automatic squelch, press the COM Power/Volume Knob
momentarily. Press the COM Power/Volume Knob again
to return to automatic squelch operation.
190-00140-00 Rev. P
Figure 2-1 ‘RX’ Receive Indication
A frequency may also be quickly selected from the
database by simply highlighting the desired frequency on
any of the main pages and pressing the ENT Key. This
process is referred to as auto-tuning. Once a frequency is
selected in the standby field, it may be transferred to the
active frequency by pressing the COM Flip-flop Key.
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SECTION 2
COM
While receiving a station, an ‘RX’ indication (Figure
2-1) appears in the upper right corner of the COM Window
to the immediate right of ‘COM’. A ‘TX’ indication appears
at this location when transmitting (Figure 2-2).
2)
Turn the large left knob to select the desired
megahertz (MHz) value. For example, the ‘135’
portion of the frequency ‘135.325’.
3)
Turn the small left knob to select the desired
kilohertz (kHz) value. For example, the ‘.325’
portion of the frequency ‘135.325’.
‘TX’ Transmit Indication
4)
NOTE: The active frequency in either window
cannot be accessed directly, only the standby
frequency is highlighted by the tuning cursor.
To make the standby frequency the active
frequency, press the COM Flip-flop Key
(Figure 2-4).
Figure 2-2 ‘TX’ Transmit Indication
NOTE: The tuning cursor normally appears in the
COM Window, unless placed in the VLOC Window
by pressing the small left knob. When the tuning
cursor is in the VLOC Window, it automatically
returns to the COM Window after 30 seconds of
inactivity.
To select a COM frequency:
1)
If the tuning cursor is not currently in the COM
Window, press the small left knob momentarily
(Figure 2-3).
Figure 2-4 Active Frequency of 135.325
The tuning cursor is normally in the COM Window.
To select a VOR/Localizer/ILS frequency, press the small
left knob momentarily to place the cursor in the VLOC
Window. Additional instructions for VOR/localizer/ILS
operations are available in Sections 6 and 9.
Figure 2-3 Standby Frequency of 135.325
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SECTION 2
COM
Auto-Tuning
The GNS 430’s auto-tune feature allows the pilot to
quickly select any database frequency in the GPS Window
as the standby frequency. Any COM frequency displayed
in the GPS Window can be transferred to the standby
COM frequency field, with a minimum of keystrokes
required. The following are some examples of selecting
COM frequencies from some of the main GPS pages.
To display the entire list of frequencies for
a nearby airport and select from that list:
1)
Start with the desired airport highlighted on
the Nearest Airport Page (as described in the
preceding step 3), then press the ENT Key.
2)
Press the small right knob momentarily to
remove the cursor and turn the small right
knob to display the frequency list (Figure
2-6).
To select a COM frequency for a nearby
airport:
1)
Turn the large right knob to select the NRST
Page Group.
2)
Turn the small right knob to display the
Nearest Airport Page (Figure 2-5).
Figure 2-6 Airport Frequencies Page
Figure 2-5 Nearest Airport Page
3)
Press the small right knob momentarily to
place the cursor on the airport identifier field
of the first airport in the list. To select another
airport, turn the large right knob to highlight
the desired airport.
4)
The Nearest Airport Page displays the common
traffic advisory frequency (CTAF) for each listed
airport. To select this frequency, turn the large
right knob to highlight the desired airport’s
CTAF frequency and press the ENT Key to place
the frequency in the standby field of the COM
Window.
190-00140-00 Rev. P
3)
Press the small right knob momentarily to
reactivate the cursor and turn the large right
knob to highlight the desired frequency.
4)
Press the ENT Key to place the highlighted
frequency in the standby COM field.
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SECTION 2
COM
To select a COM frequency for a nearby
flight service station (FSS) or center
(ARTCC):
1)
Turn the large right knob to select the NRST
Page Group.
2)
Turn the small right knob to select the Nearest
Center or Nearest Flight Service Page (Figure
2-7).
To select a COM frequency for any airport
in the flight plan:
1)
Select the NAV/COM Page from the NAV Page
Group. (Section 3.1, or press and hold the CLR
Key, then turn the small right knob until the
NAV/COM Page appears.)
2)
Press the small right knob to place the cursor
on the airport identifier field. To the left of this
field appears ‘Departure’, ‘Enroute’, or ‘Arrival’,
depending on the placement of the displayed
airport within the flight plan.
3)
Turn the small right knob to display a window
(Figure 2-8) listing the airports in the flight
plan. Continue turning the small right knob
to select the desired airport.
Figure 2-7 Nearest ARTCC Page
2-4
3)
Press the small right knob momentarily to
place the cursor on the page.
4)
Turn the large right knob to highlight the
FSS/ARTCC frequency.
5)
Press the ENT Key to place the frequency in
the standby field of the COM Window.
Figure 2-8 NAV/COM Page ‘Airport’ Window
4)
Press the ENT Key to return to the NAV/COM
Page with the frequencies for the selected
airport.
5)
Turn the large right knob to highlight the
desired frequency.
6)
Press the ENT Key to place the highlighted
frequency in the standby COM Window field.
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SECTION 2
COM
To select a COM frequency for any airport
in the database:
1)
Turn the large right knob to select the WPT
Page Group.
2)
Turn the small right knob to select the Airport
Frequencies Page (Figure 2-9).
Emergency Channel
The GNS 430’s emergency channel select provides
a quick method of selecting 121.500 MHz as the
active frequency in the event of an in-flight emergency.
Emergency channel select is available anytime the unit
is on, regardless of GPS or cursor status, or loss of the
display.
To quickly tune and activate 121.500:
Press and hold the COM Flip-flop Key (or COM
Remote Transfer Switch) for approximately two
seconds (Figure 2-10).
Figure 2-9 Airport Frequencies Page
3)
Press the small right knob to place the cursor
on the airport identifier field.
4)
Use the small and large right knobs to enter
the identifier of the desired airport. Press the
ENT Key when finished.
5)
Turn the large right knob to highlight the
desired frequency.
6)
Press the ENT Key to place the highlighted
frequency in the standby COM Window field.
Figure 2-10 Emergency Channel Active
If the COM Remote Transfer switch is used to select the
emergency channel, further changes in COM frequency
will not be possible without momentarily pressing the
COM Remote Tranfer Switch again, or by recycling
power.
190-00140-00 Rev. P
NOTE: Under some circumstances if the COM
system loses communication with the main
system, the radio will automatically tune to
121.500 MHz for transmit and receive, regardless
of the displayed frequency.
GNS 430(A) Pilot’s Guide and Reference
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SECTION 2
COM
Stuck Microphone
As mentioned previously in this section, when the GNS
430 is transmitting, a ‘TX’ indication appears in the COM
Window. If the microphone key is stuck or accidentally
left in the on position; or the microphone continues to
transmit after the key is released, the COM transmitter
automatically times out (ceases transmitting) after 35
seconds of continuous broadcasting. A ‘COM push-totalk key stuck’ message (Figure 2-11) is displayed as long
as the condition continues.
Figure 2-11 Message Page
2-6
GNS 430(A) Pilot’s Guide and Reference
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SECTION 3
NAV PAGES
SECTION 3: NAV PAGES
To select the desired page (from any page):
1)
Press and hold the CLR Key to select the
Default NAV Page. Turn the large right knob
to select the desired page group.
2)
Turn the small right knob to select the desired
page.
3.1 Main Page Groups
The GNS 430’s main pages are divided into four
separate page groups: NAV, WPT, AUX, and NRST
(Table 3-1). Each page group is comprised of multiple
pages. The page groups are selected using the large right
knob. The individual pages are selected using the small
right knob.
Page Groups
NAV Group WPT Group AUX Group NRST Group
7 NAV Pages see Section 7 see Section 10 see Section 8
Table 3-1 Page Groups
The bottom right corner of the screen (Figure 3-1)
indicates which page group is currently being displayed
(e.g., NAV, WPT, AUX, or NRST), the number of screens
available within that group (indicated by the square icons),
and the placement of the current screen within that group
(indicated by a highlighted square icon).
The bottom right corner of the screen is also used to
display the GNS 430’s turn advisories (Turn to 230º’) and
waypont alerts (‘Next DTK 230º’) during flight plan and
approach operations. (See Section 6.)
Position of
Current Page
within Current
Page Group
Current Page Group
Number of Pages in
Current Page Group
NOTE: The NAV Page Group may have eight or
nine NAV pages when the GNS 430 is connected
to Traffic and/or weather information sources.
See Section 12 for more information.
3.2 NAV Page Group
The NAV Page Group includes seven pages (Figure
3-2). While viewing any NAV page, turn the small right
knob to select a different NAV page. The pilot may find
this selection process convenient to cycle between the
Default NAV Page and the Map Page, which are two of
the most frequently used pages. Other pages are provided
for terrain information (if configured for TERRAIN), to
list frequencies for the flight plan, to show the current
position, to display current satellite reception, and to
make vertical navigation settings.
Default NAV
Map
NAV/COM
Position
Satellite Status
VNAV
Figure 3-1 Current Page and Page Group
190-00140-00 Rev. P
TERRAIN
(if configured)
Figure 3-2 NAV Pages
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SECTION 3
NAV PAGES
3.3 Default NAV Page
The first NAV page is the Default NAV Page (Figure
3-3). This page may be quickly selected from any page by
pressing and holding the CLR Key.
Active Leg of Flight Plan
Course Deviation
Indicator (CDI)
TO/FROM Flag
Position of
Current Page
within Current
Page Group
User-selectable
Number of Pages in
Data Fields
Current Page Group
Current Page Group
Figure 3-3 Default NAV Page
The Default NAV Page displays a graphic course
deviation indicator (CDI) across the top of the page. Unlike
the angular limits used on a mechanical CDI coupled to
a VOR or ILS receiver, full scale limits for this CDI are
defined by a GPS-derived distance (0.3, 1.0 or 5.0 nm), as
indicated at both ends of the CDI. By default, the CDI scale
automatically adjusts to the desired limits based upon the
current phase of flight: enroute, terminal area or approach.
The pilot may also manually select the desired scale setting
as outlined in Section 10.4. The graphic CDI shows the
current position at the center of the indicator, relative to
the desired course (the moving course deviation needle).
As with a traditional mechanical CDI, when off course
simply steer toward the needle. The TO/FROM arrow in the
center of the scale indicates whether the aircraft is heading
TO (up arrow) or FROM the waypoint (down arrow).
3-2
NOTE: The GNS 430 always navigates TO a
waypoint unless the OBS switch is set (preventing
automatic waypoint sequencing), or if the aircraft
has passed the last waypoint in the flight plan.
Directly below the CDI appears the active leg of the
flight plan, or the direct-to destination when using the
Direct-to Key. This automatically sequences to the next
leg of the flight plan as each interim waypoint is reached.
If no flight plan or direct-to destination has been selected,
the destination field remains blank.
The symbols in Table 3-2 are used on the Default NAV
Page (directly below the CDI), to depict the ‘active leg’ of
a flight plan or direct to:
Symbol
Description
Direct-to a Waypoint
Course to a Waypoint, or Desired Course
between Two Waypoints
Procedure Turn
Procedure Turn
Vectors-to-Final
DME Arc to the Left
DME Arc to the Right
Left-hand Holding Pattern
Right-hand Holding Pattern
Table 3-2 NAV Page Symbols
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SECTION 3
NAV PAGES
Selecting Desired On-Screen Data
At the bottom of the Default NAV Page there are six
user-definable fields which display the data needed as
the flight progresses (Figure 3-3). By default these fields
display: distance to destination (DIS), desired track
(DTK), bearing to destination (BRG), ground speed (GS),
ground track (TRK), and estimated time enroute (ETE).
However, each of these fields can be customized to display
a different data item. Available data items include:
To select a different data item for any data
field:
1)
Starting with the Default NAV Page, press the
MENU Key to display the Default NAV Page
Menu (Figure 3-4).
• Bearing to destination (BRG)
• Course to steer (CTS)
• Cross track error (XTK)
Figure 3-4 Default NAV Page Menu
• Desired track (DTK)
• Distance to destination (DIS)
2)
The ‘Change Fields?’ option is already
highlighted, so press the ENT Key to select
this option.
3)
Use the large right knob to highlight the data
field to be changed (Figure 3-5).
• Enroute safe altitude (ESA)
• Estimated time of arrival (ETA)
• Estimate time enroute (ETE)
• Fuel flow (FLOW) (when configured)
• Ground speed (GS)
• Ground track (TRK)
• Minimum safe altitude (MSA)
• Track angle error (TKE)
• Vertical speed required (VSR)
If no flight plan or direct-to destination has been
selected, only speed, track, altitude, and minimum safe
altitude data may be displayed. All other data types appear
as blank lines on the Default NAV Page until a destination
is selected.
190-00140-00 Rev. P
Figure 3-5 ‘DIS’ Field Highlighted
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SECTION 3
NAV PAGES
4)
Turn the small right knob to display the list of
available data items (Figure 3-6). Continue
turning the small right knob to select the
desired data item from the list.
Restoring Factory Settings
All data fields settings can be quickly returned to
original factory settings.
To restore all six data fields to factory
default settings:
1)
From the Default NAV Page, press the MENU
Key to display the Default NAV Page Menu.
2)
Turn the large right knob to highlight the
‘Restore Defaults?’ option (Figure 3-7) and
press the ENT Key.
Figure 3-6 Select Field Type Window
5)
Press the ENT Key to select the desired data
item and return to the Default NAV Page.
6)
Press the small right knob momentarily to
remove the cursor from the page.
Figure 3-7 Default NAV Page Menu
Dual Unit Considerations
A ‘Crossfill?’ option is also provided for the Default
NAV Page. This option transfers a direct-to destination
or flight plan to a second Garmin 400 Series unit. See
Section 10.2, Flight Planning: Crossfill for additional
details on using the crossfill option.
3-4
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SECTION 3
NAV PAGES
3.4 Map Page
The second NAV page is the Map Page (Figure 3-8),
which displays the present position using an airplane
symbol, along with nearby airports, NAVAIDS, userdefined waypoints, airspace boundaries, lakes, rivers,
highways, and cities.
Present
Position
Map Display
Data Fields
Table 3-3 lists the symbols used to depict the various
airports and NAVAIDS on the Map Page:
Symbol
Description
Airport with hard surface runway(s); (primary
runway shown)
Airport with soft surface runway(s) only
Private Airfield
Heliport
VOR
VOR/DME
Position of
Current Page
within Current
Page Group
Map Range
Current Page
Group
Number of Pages in
Current Page Group
Figure 3-8 Map Page
Localizer
Intersection
VORTAC
NOTE: If the GNS 430 is unable to determine
a GPS position, the present position (airplane)
symbol does not appear on the Map Page.
Different symbols are used to distinguish between
waypoint types. The identifiers for any on-screen
waypoints can also be displayed. (The identifiers are
enabled by default.) Special-use and controlled airspace
boundaries appear on the map, showing the individual
sectors for Class B, Class C, and Class D airspaces.
190-00140-00 Rev. P
DME
TACAN
NDB
Locator Outer Marker
Table 3-3 Map Page Symbols
The Map Display can be set to 23 different range
settings from 500 feet to 2000 nautical miles (statute and
metric units are also available). The range is indicated
in the lower left-hand corner of the Map Display (Figure
3-8), and represents the top-to-bottom distance covered
by the Map Display.
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SECTION 3
NAV PAGES
To select a map range:
1)
Press the up arrow of the RNG Key to zoom
out to a larger map area.
2)
Press the down arrow of the RNG Key to zoom
in to a smaller map area and more detail.
An autozoom feature is available which automatically
adjusts from an enroute range of 2000 nm through
each lower range, stopping at a range of 1.0 nm when
approaching the destination waypoint. The autozoom
feature is turned on/off from the Map Setup Page (described
in Section 3.4).
The Map Page also displays a background map (or
“basemap”) showing lakes, rivers, coastlines, highways,
railways, and towns. When a map range is selected below
the lower limit at which the map detail was originally
created, an ‘overzoom’ indication appears on the Map
Display, below the range reading (Figure 3-9). The
basemap has limited accuracy, and should not be used
for navigation, but only for non-navigational situational
awareness. Any basemap indication should be compared
against other navigational sources for accuracy. Continuing
to zoom in to lower range settings will cause ‘overzoom’ to
be replaced with ‘no map’ and the geographic detail will
be removed from the Map Display (airport and NAVAID
remain).
Figure 3-9 Overzoom on Map Page
3-6
The ‘Setup Map?’ option (described in Section 3.4)
allows the pilot to define the maximum range at which
each map feature appears. This provides the pilot with
complete control to minimize screen clutter. The pilot
can also quickly remove items from the map using the
CLR Key.
To quickly declutter the Map Display:
Press the CLR Key momentarily (as often as
needed) to select the desired amount of map
detail.
The CLR Key allows the pilot to quickly declutter the
Map Display, providing four levels of map detail. Note the
‘-2’ (‘-1’ and ‘-3’ are also provided) suffix designation in
Figure 3-10, indicating each successive declutter level.
Map Detail Level
Figure 3-10 Detail Level on Map Page
The right-hand side of the Map Page includes four
user-selectable data fields (Figure 3-8). By default, the
displayed data is: destination waypoint name (WPT),
desired track (DTK), distance to destination waypoint
(DIS), and ground speed (GS). Any of these data fields
may be changed to display a different data type, as outlined
in Section 3.4. The four data fields can also be removed
from the map to show a larger map image, as described in
Section 3.4.
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SECTION 3
NAV PAGES
Map Panning
Another Map Page function is panning, which allows the
map to move beyond its current limits without adjusting
the map range. When the panning function is selected (by
pressing the small right knob), a target pointer flashes on
the Map Display (Figure 3-11). A window also appears at
the top of the Map Display showing the latitude/longitude
position of the pointer, plus the bearing and distance to
the pointer from the present position.
Pointer Position
Window
Target Pointer
When the target pointer is placed on an object, the
name of that object is highlighted (even if the name wasn’t
originally displayed on the map). This feature applies to
airports, NAVAIDS, user-created waypoints, roads, lakes,
rivers, almost everything displayed on the map except
route lines.
When an airport, NAVAID, or user waypoint is selected
on the Map Display, information about the waypoint can
be reviewed or the waypoint can be designated as the
direct-to destination.
To review information for an on-screen
airport, NAVAID or user waypoint:
1)
Use the panning function (as described in
the preceding procedure) to place the target
pointer on a waypoint (Figure 3-11).
2)
Press the ENT Key to display the Waypoint
Information Page(s) for the selected waypoint
(Figure 3-12).
Figure 3-11 Panning on Map Page
To select the panning function and pan the
Map Display:
1)
Press the small right knob to activate the
panning target pointer.
2)
Turn the small right knob to move up (turn
clockwise) or down (counterclockwise).
3)
Turn the large right knob to move right (turn
clockwise) or left (counterclockwise).
4)
To cancel the panning function and return to
the present position, press the small right
knob.
190-00140-00 Rev. P
Figure 3-12 Information for On-Screen Waypoint
3)
Press the CLR Key to exit the information
page(s).
GNS 430(A) Pilot’s Guide and Reference
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SECTION 3
NAV PAGES
Map Direct-to
Airspace Information on the Map
To designate an on-screen airport,
NAVAID, or user waypoint as the direct-to
destination:
1)
Use the panning function (‘Map Panning’ in
this section) to place the target pointer on a
waypoint.
2)
Press the Direct-to Key to display the select
Direct-to Waypoint Page, with the selected
waypoint already listed (Figure 3-13).
When a special-use or controlled airspace boundary
appears on the Map Display, the pilot can quickly retrieve
information (such as floor/ceiling limits and controlling
agency) directly from the map.
To view airspace information for an onscreen special-use or controlled airspace:
1)
Use the panning function (‘Map Panning’ in this
section) to place the target pointer on an open
area within the boundaries of an airspace. If
the area is congested and it is difficult to select
an open area, it may be necessary to zoom in
or press the CLR Key to make the selection
easier (Figure 3-14).
Figure 3-13 +MAP Waypoint
3)
Press the ENT Key twice to confirm the selection
and begin navigating to the waypoint.
Figure 3-14 Select Airspace with Target Pointer
The direct-to function can be used anywhere on the
map. If nothing currently exists at the target pointer
location, a new waypoint called ‘+MAP’ (Figure 3-13) is
created at the target pointer location before the direct-to
is initiated.
3-8
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SECTION 3
NAV PAGES
2)
Press the ENT Key to display an options menu
(Figure 3-15).
Map Setup
Many of the GNS 430’s functions are menu driven.
Each of the main pages has an options menu, allowing
customization of the page to the pilot’s preferences and/or
selection of special features which specifically relate to that
page. A Map Page Menu (Figure 3-16) provides additional
settings to customize the Map Page and additional features
related specifically to the Map Page.
To display the Map Page Menu:
Figure 3-15 Map Panning Options Window
3)
‘Review Airspace?’ should already be
highlighted. If not, select it with the small
right knob. Press the ENT Key to display the
Airspace Information Page for the selected
airspace.
4)
To display the COM frequency(ies) for the
controlling agency, turn the large right knob to
highlight ‘Frequencies?’ and press the ENT Key.
Press the CLR Key to return to the Airspace
Information Page.
5)
Press the CLR Key to exit the Airspace
Information Page.
190-00140-00 Rev. P
Press the MENU Key with the Map Page
displayed (Figure 3-16).
Figure 3-16 Map Page Menu
The following options are available: ‘Setup Map?’,
‘Measure Dist?’, ‘Data Fields Off?’, ‘Change Fields?’, and
‘Restore Defaults?’.
‘Setup Map?’ allows configuration of the Map Display
to individual preferences, including map orientation,
land data enable/disable, Jeppesen data enable/disable,
automatic zoom, airspace boundaries, and text size.
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SECTION 3
NAV PAGES
Table 3-4 lists the settings available for each group:
Group
Map
Weather
Traffic
Airport
NAVAID
Waypoint
Line
Control
Airspace
City
Road
Other
Available Settings
Orientation, AutoZoom, Land Data,
Aviation Data
Lightning Mode/Symbol
(when applicable)
Traffic Mode/Symbol/Label
(when applicable)
Large/Medium/Small Airports and
Text
VORs, NDBs, Intersections, and Text
User Waypoints, Waypoint Text,
Flight Plan Wpts
Active Flight Plan, Lat/Long
Controlled Airspace: Class B, C, D
(tower zone)
Special-Use Airspace: Restricted,
MOA, Other
Large/Medium/Small Cities and Text
Freeway, National Highway, Local
Hwy, Local Road
States/Prov, Rivers/Lakes, Railroads,
Wind Vector
Table 3-4
For most entries in Table 3-4, on, off, and range are the
available selections for display of each information type.
3-10
NOTE: Large, medium, and small classifications
are used on the GNS 430 for airports and cities.
Large airports are those with a runway longer
than 8100 feet. Medium airports include those
with a runway longer than 5000 feet or with
a control tower. Large cities are those with
approximate populations greater than 200,000
and medium cities with greater than 50,000.
To change map orientation:
1) From the Map Page Menu, turn the large right
knob to highlight ‘Setup Map?’ (Figure 3-16)
and press the ENT Key.
2) Turn the small right knob to select ‘Map’
(Figure 3-17) and press the ENT Key.
Figure 3-17 Map Setup Window
3)
Turn the large right knob to highlight the
‘Orientation’ field.
4)
Turn the small right knob to select the desired
option.
a) Select ‘DTK up’ to fix the top of the Map Display
to the desired course.
b) Select ‘North up’ to fix the top of the Map
Display to a north heading.
c) Select ‘Track up’ (Figure 3-18) to adjust the
top of the Map Display to the current track
heading.
Figure 3-18 Orientation Window
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SECTION 3
NAV PAGES
5)
Press the ENT Key to accept the selected option
(Figure 3-19).
Figure 3-19 Map Setup Page
The automatic zoom feature automatically adjusts
the map range from 2000 nm through each lower range,
stopping at 1.0 nm when approaching the destination
waypoint.
To enable/disable automatic zoom:
1) From the Map Page Menu, turn the large right
knob to highlight ‘Setup Map?’ and press the
ENT Key.
2)
Turn the small right knob to select ‘Map’ and
press the ENT Key.
3)
Turn the large right knob to highlight the ‘Auto
Zoom’ field.
4)
Turn the small right knob to select ‘On’ or
‘Off’.
5)
Press the ENT Key to accept the selected
option.
To enable/disable the wind vector, all background land data, or all Jeppesen aviation
data:
1) From the Map Page Menu, turn the large right
knob to highlight ‘Setup Map?’ and press the
ENT Key.
2)
3)
Turn the large right knob to highlight the
appropriate field.
4)
Turn the small right knob to select ‘On’ or
‘Off’.
5)
Press the ENT Key to accept the selected
option.
To display airports, NAVAIDs, active flight
plan waypoints, user-created waypoints,
state/provincial boundaries, rivers/lakes,
and cities:
1) From the Map Page Menu, turn the large right
knob to highlight ‘Setup Map?’ and press the
ENT Key.
2)
Turn the small right knob to select the
appropriate group name (per the table on the
preceding page) and press the ENT Key.
3)
Turn the large right knob to highlight the zoom
field for the desired feature.
4)
Turn the small right knob to select the
maximum range at which the feature should
appear on screen (or select ‘Off’ to never
display the selected feature).
5)
Press the ENT Key to accept the selected
option.
6)
Turn the large right knob to highlight the text
field for the desired feature.
7)
Turn the small right knob to select the desired
text size, or select ‘None’ to disable text
descriptions.
8)
Press the ENT Key to accept the selected
option.
Turn the small right knob to select ‘Map’ and
press the ENT Key.
190-00140-00 Rev. P
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NAV PAGES
To display airspace boundaries, highways,
roads, railroad lines, track log data, active
flight plan course lines, and lat/long grid lines:
1) From the Map Page Menu, turn the large right
knob to highlight ‘Setup Map?’ and press the
ENT Key.
2)
Turn the small right knob to select the
appropriate ‘Group’ name (per the table on
the preceding page) and press the ENT Key.
3)
Turn the large right knob to highlight the zoom
field for the desired feature.
4)
Turn the small right knob to select the
maximum range at which the feature should
appear on screen (or select ‘Off’ to never
display the selected feature).
5)
3)
Figure 3-21 Using Pointer to Measure Distance and Bearing
4)
Again, use the small and large right knobs
to place the reference pointer at the desired
location to measure TO. The bearing and
distance from the first reference location
appears at the top of the Map Display.
5)
To exit the ‘Measure Dist?’ option, press the
small right knob.
Press the ENT Key to accept the selected
option.
Distance Measurements
The ‘Measure Dist?’ option provides a quick, easy
method for determining the bearing and distance between
any two points on the Map Display.
To measure bearing and distance between
two points:
1) From the Map Page Menu, turn the large right
knob to highlight ‘Measure Dist?’ (Figure 3-20).
Turn the small and large right knobs to place
the reference pointer at the desired location to
measure FROM and press the ENT Key (Figure
3-21).
Selecting Full Screen Map
The ‘Data Fields Off?’ option provides a full-screen Map
Display (Figure 3-22), without the four data fields along
the right-hand side of the screen. Select this option to
display a larger map area. If this option has been selected
and the data fields are off, ‘Data Fields On?’ appears as an
option instead.
Figure 3-20 Map Page Menu
2)
3-12
Press the ENT Key, an on-screen reference
pointer appears on the Map Display at the
present position.
Figure 3-22 Full Screen Map
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SECTION 3
NAV PAGES
To turn the data fields off/on:
Turn the small right knob to select the type of
data (Figure 3-24) desired to appear on this
field and press the ENT Key.
3)
From the Map Page Menu, turn the large right
knob to highlight ‘Data Fields Off?’ (or ‘Data
Fields On?’) and press the ENT Key.
Selecting Desired On-Screen Data
‘Change Fields?’ allows selection of the data displayed
on the four user-selectable data fields along the right-hand
side of the Map Page. There are 14 available data types,
including bearing to destination, distance to destination,
estimated time of arrival, ground speed, minimum safe
altitude, and track. See Section 14.3 for descriptions of
these (and other) navigation terms.
Figure 3-24 Select Data Field Window
Press the small right knob to remove the
cursor.
4)
To change a data field:
1)
From the Map Page Menu, turn the large right
knob to highlight ‘Change Fields?’ (Figure
3-23) and press the ENT Key.
NOTE: The on-screen traffic information occupies
two data fields, leaving room to display only two
additional data types. Traffic information is only
available when the GNS 430 installation includes
connection to traffic information sources (see
Section 12).
Restoring Factory Settings
‘Restore Defaults?’ resets all four user-selectable data
fields to their original factory default settings.
To restore the factory default settings:
Figure 3-23 Map Page Menu
2)
Turn the large right knob to highlight the data
field to be changed.
From the Map Page Menu, turn the large right
knob to highlight ‘Restore Defaults?’ (Figure
3-25) and press the ENT Key.
Figure 3-25 Map Page Menu
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NAV PAGES
3.5 TERRAIN Page
Red Terrain (Warning - Terrain Above or
Within 100’ Below Aircraft Altitude)
Heading
Indicator
GPS-derived
MSL Altitude
NOTE: The TERRAIN Page does not appear on
GNS 430 units that are not properly equipped
with or configured for TERRAIN. See Section 11
for a full description of TERRAIN functions.
TERRAIN Page
To display the TERRAIN Page, select the NAV Page
Group and turn the small right knob until the TERRAIN
Page is displayed (Figure 3-26 and 3-27). The TERRAIN
Page displays:
• GPS-derived MSL altitude shown in increments
of 20 feet or 10 meters, depending on unit
configuration. The ‘G’ to right of the MSL altitude
display reminds the pilot that altitude is GPSderived.
Position of
Current Page
within Current
Page Group
Current Page Group
Number of Pages in
Current Page Group
Figure 3-26 TERRAIN Page 120˚ View
Yellow Terrain (Caution Black Terrain (No Danger
- Terrain More than
- Terrain Between 100’
and 1000’ Below Aircraft 1000’ Below Aircraft
Altitude)
Altitude)
• Aircraft ground track
• Terrain Range - Indicates the terrain elevation in
colors relative to the aircraft altitude
Range
Marking
Ring
• Range marking rings - (1 nm, 2 nm, 5 nm, 10 nm,
25 nm, 50nm, and 100 nm)
• Heading Indicator - The heading indication on the
TERRAIN Page always displays ‘TRK’ for Trackup, unless there is no valid heading
Figure 3-27 TERRAIN Page 360˚ View
Selectable Display Settings
• Obstacles
The TERRAIN Page has two selectable view settings:
• Potential Impact Points
• 360˚ View - View from above aircraft depicting
surrounding terrain on all sides
• 120˚ View - View of terrain ahead of and 60˚ to
either side of the aircraft flight path (Figure 3-26)
3-14
NOTE: The TERRAIN Page gives a ‘Track Up’
display orientation, as indicated by the ‘TRK’
label shown on the display. This is the only
orientation available on this page.
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SECTION 3
NAV PAGES
To display a 360˚ view:
1)
Select the TERRAIN Page and press the MENU
Key.
2)
Select ‘View 360˚?’ (Figure 3-28).
Aviation information such as airports, VORs, and other
NAVAIDS can be turned on or off from the TERRAIN
Page.
To show or hide aviation data:
1)
Select the TERRAIN Page and press the MENU
Key.
2)
Select ‘Show (or Hide) Aviation Data’ (Figure
3-30) and press the ENT Key. Pressing the CLR
Key when the TERRAIN Page is displayed can
also be used to toggle aviation information on
or off.
Figure 3-28 TERRAIN Page Menu
3)
Press the ENT Key. To switch back to a 120˚
view, repeat step 1, select ‘View 120˚?, and
press the ENT Key.
Seven display ranges are available, allowing for a
more complete view of the surrounding area.
To change the display range:
Figure 3-30 TERRAIN Page Menu
Select the TERRAIN Page and press up or down
on the RNG Key to select the desired range:
1 nm, 2 nm, 5 nm, 10 nm, 25 nm, 50 nm,
100 nm (Figure 3-29).
Display Range Field
Figure 3-29 TERRAIN Display Range
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SECTION 3
NAV PAGES
Inhibit Mode
TERRAIN Symbols
TERRAIN has an inhibit mode that deactivates the
FLTA/PDA visual alerts. Pilots should use discretion when
inhibiting TERRAIN and always remember to enable the
system when appropriate. Only the PDA and FLTA alerts
are disabled in the inhibit mode. See Section 11.3 for
more information on TERRAIN alerts.
To inhibit TERRAIN:
1)
Select the TERRAIN Page and press the MENU
Key. ‘Inhibit Terrain?’ is selected by default
(Figure 3-31).
NOTE: See Section 11.2 for a complete
description of TERRAIN symbology.
The following symbols (Figure 3-33) are used to
represent obstacles and potential impact points on the
Terrain Page.
• Red Symbol - Terrain/Obstacle is above or within
100 feet below the aircraft altitude
• Yellow Symbol - Terrain/Obstacle is between 1000
feet and 100 feet below the aircraft altitude
• Black Symbol - Terrain/Obstacle is more than
1000 feet below the aircraft altitude
Figure 3-31 TERRAIN Page Menu
2)
Press the ENT Key. The ‘TER INHB’ annunciation
is displayed in the TERRAIN annunciator field
when TERRAIN is inhibited (Figure 3-32).
NOTE: Obstacle symbols are shown on display
zoom ranges up to 10 nm.
Unlighted
Obstacles
<1000 feet AGL
Lighted
Obstacles
<1000 feet AGL
Unlighted
Obstacles
>1000 feet AGL
Annunciator Field
Lighted
Obstacles
>1000 feet AGL
Figure 3-32 TERRAIN Annunciator Field
Figure 3-33 TERRAIN Symbols
Enabling TERRAIN:
1)
2)
3-16
Potential
Impact Points
Select the TERRAIN Page and press the MENU
Key. ‘Enable Terrain?’ is selected by default.
Press the ENT Key. The TERRAIN system is
functional again.
NOTE: If an obstacle and the projected flight path
of the aircraft intersect, the display automatically
zooms in to the closest potential point of impact
on the TERRAIN Page.
GNS 430(A) Pilot’s Guide and Reference
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SECTION 3
NAV PAGES
3.6 NAV/COM Page
The NAV/COM (navigation communications) Page
(Figure 3-34) provides a list of the airport communication
and navigation frequencies at the departure, enroute, and
arrival airports. The NAV/COM Page makes selection of
the frequencies needed along the flight plan quick and
convenient. If there is no active flight plan with a departure
airport, the NAV/COM Page displays the frequencies for
the airport nearest the departure position.
Departure, Enroute,
or Arrival Airport
To select a frequency list for a departure,
enroute or arrival airport:
1)
Press the small right knob to activate the
cursor.
2)
Turn the large right knob to place the cursor
on the airport identifier field (top line on the
NAV/COM Page, see Figure 3-33).
3)
Turn the small right knob to select the desired
airport (Figure 3-35) and press the ENT Key.
Assigned Frequency and
Usage Information
(when applicable)
Position of
Current Page
within Current
Page Group
Figure 3-35 Airport Window
Current Page Number of Pages in
Current Page Group
Group
Figure 3-34 NAV/COM Page
Frequency Type
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SECTION 3
NAV PAGES
To scroll through the list of frequencies:
1)
2)
Activate the cursor, if not already active, by
pressing the small right knob.
Turn the large right knob to move the cursor
through the list of frequencies. If there are
more frequencies in the list than can be
displayed on the screen, a scroll bar along the
right-hand side of the screen (Figure 3-36)
indicates which part of the list is currently being
displayed.
If a listed frequency has sector or altitude restrictions,
the frequency is preceded by an ‘Info?’ designation.
To view usage restrictions for a frequency:
1)
Scroll Bar
Turn the large right knob to place the cursor
on the ‘Info?’ designation directly in front of
the desired frequency (Figure 3-37).
Figure 3-37 ‘Info’ Highlighted
2)
Press the ENT Key to display the restriction
information (Figure 3-38).
Figure 3-36 Scroll Bar
3)
To place a frequency in the standby field of the
COM or VLOC Window, highlight the desired
frequency and press the ENT Key.
Some listed frequencies may include designations for
limited usage, as follows:
• ‘TX’ - Transmit only
Figure 3-38 Restriction Information Page
• ‘RX’ - Receive only
• ‘PT’ - Part time frequency
3-18
3)
To return to the NAV/COM Page, press the ENT
Key.
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SECTION 3
NAV PAGES
3.7 Position Page
The Position Page displays the present position (by
default, in latitude and longitude) and altitude. The
Position Page (Figure 3-39) also displays the current
track, ground speed, time, and a reference waypoint field.
These fields are user-selectable to configure the page to
the pilot’s own preferences and current navigation needs.
Graphic Track
Indicator
Present Position
To change the user-selectable data fields:
1)
Press the MENU Key to display the Position
Page Menu (Figure 3-40).
User-selectable
Data Fields
Position of
Current Page
within Current
Page Group
Number of Pages in
Reference
Current
Waypoint Field
Page Group Current Page Group
Figure 3-39 Position Page
The graphic track indicator at the top of the page
indicates the direction the aircraft is heading, or track, only
when moving. The graphic track indicator and the TRK
indication directly below it provide the same information.
Use the graphic track indicator for quick at-a-glance
ground track information. Directly below are three userselectable fields, which by default display track, ground
speed, and altitude. Barometric pressure (BARO) settings
and minimum safe altitude (MSA) can also be displayed in
these fields. MSA is the recommended minimum altitude
within approximately ten miles of the present position.
MSA is calculated from the information contained in the
database and generally takes into account mountains,
buildings, and other permanent features.
190-00140-00 Rev. P
NOTE: Do not rely solely on MSA as an absolute
measure of safe altitude. Consult current area
charts and NOTAMs.
Figure 3-40 Position Page Menu
2)
Turn the large right knob to highlight ‘Change
Fields?’ and press the ENT Key.
3)
Turn the large right knob to highlight the data
field to be changed.
4)
Turn the small right knob to display the list of
available data items (Figure 3-41). Continue
turning the small right knob to select the
desired data item from the list.
Figure 3-41 Select Field Type Window
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SECTION 3
NAV PAGES
5)
Press the ENT Key to select the desired data
item and return to the Position Page.
6)
Press the small right knob momentarily to
remove the cursor from the page.
4)
Turn the small right knob to display the list
of available waypoint types (Figure 3-43).
Continue turning the small right knob to select
the desired data item from the list.
The Position Page also features a reference waypoint
field, located at the bottom of the page, to indicate
bearing and distance to/from a selected waypoint. The
reference waypoint field can display bearing and distance
information for a nearby airport (default), VOR, NDB,
intersection, or user waypoint.
To change the reference waypoint
information:
1)
Press the MENU Key to display the Position
Page Menu.
2)
Turn the large right knob to highlight ‘Change
Fields?’ and press the ENT Key.
3)
Turn the large right knob to highlight the
waypoint type field (bottom left corner of the
page; default setting shows ‘APT’ see Figure
3-42).
Figure 3-43 Category Window
5)
If ‘WPT’ is selected as the waypoint type, any
airport, NAVAID, or user waypoint can be
designated as a reference waypoint. Press the
small right knob, turn the large right knob to
highlight the waypoint identifier field (Figure
3-44), then use the small and large right
knobs to enter the identifier of the desired
waypoint. Press the ENT Key to confirm the
selected waypoints. Press the small right knob
to remove the cursor.
Figure 3-42 Waypoint Type Field Highlighted
Figure 3-44 Reference Waypoint Field Highlighted
3-20
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SECTION 3
NAV PAGES
6)
Press the ENT Key to select the desired type
and return to the Position Page.
7)
To select between ‘bearing FROM’ or ‘bearing
TO’ to the reference waypoint, turn the small
right knob to select the desired bearing
reference (Figure 3-45) and press the ENT
Key.
Restoring Factory Settings
A ‘Restore Defaults?’ option allows all data fields to be
reset to their original factory default settings. This returns
the three user-selectable fields at the top of the page AND
the reference waypoint fields to default settings.
To restore the factory default settings:
1)
Press the MENU Key to display the Position
Page Menu (Figure 3-46).
Figure 3-45 Mode Window
8)
Press the small right knob momentarily to
remove the cursor from the page.
190-00140-00 Rev. P
Figure 3-46 Position Page Menu
2)
Turn the large right knob to highlight ‘Restore
Defaults?’ and press the ENT Key.
GNS 430(A) Pilot’s Guide and Reference
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SECTION 3
NAV PAGES
3.8 Satellite Status Page
The Satellite Status Page provides a visual reference
of GPS receiver functions, including current satellite
coverage, GPS receiver status, and position accuracy.
The Satellite Status Page (Figure 3-47) is helpful in
troubleshooting weak (or missing) signal levels due to
poor satellite coverage or installation problems.
1
2
4
3
As the GPS receiver locks onto satellites, a signal
strength bar appears for each satellite in view, with the
appropriate satellite number (01-32) underneath each
bar. The status of satellite reception is shown as follows:
• No signal strength bars - The receiver is looking
for the satellites indicated.
• Hollow signal strength bars - The receiver has
found the satellite(s) and is collecting data (Figure
3-48).
• Solid signal strength bars - The receiver has
collected the necessary data and the satellite(s) is
ready for use.
• Checkered signal strength bars - Excluded
satellites (Figure 3-47).
5
6
7
8
10
9
Figure 3-47 Satellite Status Page
2
Sky View
Estimated Position Error (EPE) and
Dilution of Precision (DOP)
3
GPS Receiver Status
4
6
Horizontal Uncertainty Level (HUL)
Satellite ID Numbers
Signal Strength Bars
7
Excluded Satellite
8
Current Page Group
9
Number of Pages in Current Page Group
10
Position of Current Page within Current
Page Group
1
5
3-22
The sky view display (at top left corner of the page)
shows which satellites are currently in view, and where
they are. The outer circle of the sky view represents the
horizon (with north at top of the page), the inner circle
45° above the horizon, and the center point directly
overhead.
Figure 3-48 Hollow Signal Strength Bars
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SECTION 3
NAV PAGES
Each satellite has a 30-second data transmission that
must be collected (hollow signal strength bar, see Figure
3-47) before the satellite may be used for navigation
(solid signal strength bar, see Figure 3-46). Once the GPS
receiver has determined the present position, the GNS 430
indicates position, track, and ground speed on the other
navigation pages. The GPS receiver status field (Figure
3-46) also displays the messages listed in Table 3-5 under
the appropriate conditions:
Searching Sky
Acquiring Sat
2D Navigation
3D Navigation
Poor Coverg
Rcvr Not Usbl
AutoLocate
The Satellite Status Page also indicates the accuracy
of the position fix, using Estimated Position Error (EPE),
Dilution of Precision (DOP), and Horizontal Uncertainty
Level (HUL) figures. DOP measures satellite geometry
quality (i.e., number of satellites received and where they
are relative to each other) on a scale from one to ten. The
lowest numbers are the best accuracy and the highest
numbers are the worst. EPE uses DOP and other factors
to calculate a horizontal position error, in feet or meters.
HUL is explained in Section 13.
GPS Receiver Status Messages
The GPS receiver is searching the sky for ANY visible satellites. The
pilot is informed of this status with a ‘Searching the Sky’ message.
The GPS receiver is acquiring satellites for navigation. In this mode,
the receiver uses satellite orbital data (collected continuously from
the satellites) and last known position to determine which satellites
should be in view.
The GPS receiver is in 2D navigation mode. Altitude data is provided
by an altitude serializer.
The GPS receiver is in 3D navigation mode and computes altitude
using satellite data.
The GPS receiver cannot acquire sufficient satellites for navigation.
The GPS receiver is unusable due to incorrect initialization or
abnormal satellite conditions. Turn the unit off and on again.
The GPS receiver is looking for any available satellite. This process
can take up to five minutes to determine a position.
Table 3-5 GPS Receiver Status Messages
190-00140-00 Rev. P
GNS 430(A) Pilot’s Guide and Reference
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SECTION 3
NAV PAGES
3.9 Vertical Navigation Page
AL
IC
G
VI
NA
IO
N
O
PR
TIME AND DISTANCE
TO PROFILE
AT
VER
TIC
AL
LE
CURRENT ALTITUDE
AND POSITION
FI
3
2
RT
1
VE
The GNS 430’s Vertical Navigation Page (the last NAV
page, see Figure 3-49) creates a three-dimensional profile
to provide guidance from the present position and altitude
to a final (target) altitude at a specified location. This is
helpful when descending to a certain altitude near an
airport or climbing to an altitude before reaching a route
or direct-to waypoint (Figure 3-50). Once the profile is
defined, message alerts and additional data on the Default
NAV Page and the Map Page provide guidance to the
pilot.
NOTE: To use the vertical navigation features,
ground speed must be greater than 35 knots
and the pilot must be navigating to a direct-to
destination or using a flight plan.
SPE
ED
RE
QU
IRE
D
TARGET ALTITUDE
AND POSITION
4
DISTANCE TO TARGET
AIRPORT
Figure 3-50 Vertical Navigation Profile
To create a vertical navigation profile
(Figure 3-50):
5
6
7
8
9
Figure 3-49 Vertical Navigation (VNAV) Page
2
Target Altitude
Target Distance
3
Altitude Reference (AGL or MSL)
4
Target Reference
Vertical Speed Desired
Vertical Speed Required
1
5
6
7
8
9
3-24
Current Page Group
Number of Pages in Current Page Group
Position of Current Page within Current
Page Group
1)
Press the small right knob to activate the
cursor.
2)
Turn the large right knob to highlight the
target altitude field.
3)
Turn the small and large right knobs to select
the target altitude (Figure 3-51) and press the
ENT Key.
Figure 3-51 Target Altitude Field Selected
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SECTION 3
NAV PAGES
4)
Turn the small right knob to select ‘Above
Wpt’ (AGL) or ‘MSL’, (Figure 3-52) and press
the ENT Key. ‘Above Wpt’ uses the altitude
of a destination airport as stored in the
Jeppesen NavData Card. ‘MSL’ lets the pilot
set a specific target altitude for any waypoint
category: airport, VOR, NDB, intersection, or
user waypoint.
Figure 3-52 Reference Window
5)
Turn the small and large right knobs to select
a distance from the target reference waypoint
(Figure 3-53) and press the ENT Key. If the
target altitude should occur at the target
reference waypoint, enter a distance of zero.
6)
Turn the small right knob to select ‘Before’
or ‘After’, and press the ENT Key. This setting
designates whether the offset distance defines
a point before the aircraft reaches the target
reference waypoint, or after the aircraft reaches
the waypoint.
7)
When using a flight plan, the target reference
waypoint itself can be specified from the
waypoints contained in the flight plan. By
default, the last waypoint in the flight plan is
selected. To select a different waypoint, turn
the small right knob to select the desired
waypoint and press the ENT Key.
8)
The default profile utilizes a 400 fpm descent
rate. To change the rate, turn the large right
knob to highlight the ‘VS Profile’ field (Figure
3-54) and use the small and large right knobs
to enter a new rate. Press the ENT Key when
finished.
Figure 3-54 VS Profile Field Selected
Figure 3-53 Reference Distance Selected
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SECTION 3
NAV PAGES
With the profile set, the vertical speed required (VSR)
is displayed on the Vertical Navigation Page. Expect the
following to occur when using the vertical navigation
feature:
To disable/enable the vertical navigation
(VNAV) messages:
1)
Press the MENU Key to display the Vertical
Navigation Page Menu (Figure 3-55).
• At one minute prior to reaching the initial descent
point, a message ‘Approaching VNAV Profile’
occurs. The descent (or climb) angle also locks to
prevent changes in speed from altering the profile.
• If selected, the vertical speed required (VSR)
readout on the Default NAV Page and the Map
Page show the desired vertical speed to maintain
the proper descent (or climb) angle.
• At 500 feet above (or below, for a climb) the target
altitude, an ‘Approaching Target Altitude’ message
is provided. The VSR readout on the Default NAV
Page and the Map Page is blanked out, at this
point.
Vertical navigation messages can be turned on or off
(by default the messages are off). Turning the messages
off allows the pilot to keep the previous profile settings,
without having them generate messages when the feature
is not needed.
3-26
Figure 3-55 VNAV Page Menu
2)
With ‘VNAV Messages On?’ highlighted,
press the ENT Key. Or, if the messages are
already on, to turn them off, make sure ‘VNAV
Messages Off?’ is highlighted and press the
ENT Key.
GNS 430(A) Pilot’s Guide and Reference
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SECTION 4
DIRECT-TO NAVIGATION
SECTION 4: DIRECT-TO
NAVIGATION
Use the small and large right knobs to
enter the identifier of the desired destination
waypoint (Figure 4-2).
2)
4.1 Overview
The GNS 430’s direct-to function provides a quick
method of setting a course to a destination waypoint.
Once a direct-to is activated, the GNS 430 establishes a
point-to-point course line (great circle) from the present
position to the selected direct-to destination. Navigation
data on the various NAV pages provides steering guidance
until the direct-to is cancelled or replaced by a new
destination.
Figure 4-2 Waypoint Identifier Field Selected
Press the ENT Key to confirm the selected
waypoint, and press the ENT Key again to
activate the direct-to function (Figure 4-3).
3)
To select a direct-to destination:
1)
Press the Direct-to Key. The Select Direct-to
Waypoint Page appears (Figure 4-1), with the
waypoint identifier field highlighted.
Figure 4-3 ‘Activate?’ Field Highlighted
Figure 4-1 Select Direct-to Waypoint Page
When off course while navigating to a waypoint, the
direct-to function may also be used to re-center the CDI
(HSI) needle and proceed to the same waypoint.
To re-center the CDI (HSI) needle to the
same destination waypoint:
Press the Direct-to Key, followed by the ENT
Key twice.
190-00140-00 Rev. P
NOTE: When navigating an approach with the
missed approach point (MAP) as the current
destination, re-centering the CDI (HSI) needle
with the Direct-to Key cancels the approach.
GNS 430(A) Pilot’s Guide and Reference
4-1
SECTION 4
DIRECT-TO NAVIGATION
Selecting a Destination by Facility Name or
City
3)
In addition to selecting a destination by identifier, the
Select Direct-to Waypoint Page (Figure 4-4) also allows the
pilot to select airports, VORs, and NDBs by facility name
or city location. If duplicate entries exist for the entered
facility name or city, additional entries may be viewed
by continuing to turn the small right knob during the
selection process. See Section 7.1, Duplicate Waypoints
for more information.
Identifier, Symbol,
and Region
Use the small and large right knobs to enter
the facility name or city location of the desired
destination waypoint (Figure 4-5). When
spelling the facility name or city, the GNS 430’s
Spell’N’Find™ feature selects the first entry
in the database based upon the characters
entered up to that point.
Facility Name
Figure 4-5 Facility Name Selected
Flight Plan
Field
Nearest Airport
Field
To select a direct-to destination by facility
name or city:
2)
4-2
Continue turning the small right knob to scroll
through any additional database listings for the
selected facility name or city. The pilot can also
scroll backwards with the small right knob if
the desired waypoint has been scrolled past .
5)
Press the ENT Key to confirm the selected
waypoint, and press the ENT Key again to
activate the direct-to function.
City
Figure 4-4 Select Direct-to Waypoint Page
1)
4)
Press the Direct-to Key. The Select Direct-to
Waypoint Page appears, with the waypoint
identifier field highlighted.
Turn the large right knob to highlight the
facility name (second line) or the city (third
line) field.
Selecting a Destination from the Active Flight
Plan
When navigating an active flight plan, any waypoint
contained in the flight plan may be selected as a direct-to
destination from the Select Direct-to Waypoint Page. See
Section 5, for more information on flight plans.
GNS 430(A) Pilot’s Guide and Reference
190-00140-00 Rev. P
SECTION 4
DIRECT-TO NAVIGATION
To select a direct-to destination from the
active flight plan:
1)
Press the Direct-to Key. The Select Direct-to
Waypoint Page appears, with the waypoint
identifier field highlighted.
2)
Turn the large right knob to highlight the flight
plan (FPL) field (Figure 4-6).
Selecting the Nearest Airport as a Direct-to
Destination
The Select Direct-to Waypoint Page always displays the
nearest airports (from the present position) in the NRST
field. Nearby airports may also be selected as direct-to
destinations using the steps described in Section 8.1.
To select a nearby airport as a direct-to
destination:
1)
Press the Direct-to Key. The Select Direct-to
Waypoint Page appears, with the waypoint
identifier field highlighted.
2)
Turn the large right knob to highlight the
nearest airport (NRST) field.
3)
Turn the small right knob to display a window
showing up to nine nearby airports (Figure 4-8).
Figure 4-6 Highlighted Flight Plan Field
3)
Turn the small right knob to display a window
showing all waypoints in the active flight plan
(Figure 4-7).
Figure 4-8 Nearest Window
4)
Continue turning the small right knob to
scroll through the list and highlight the desired
airport.
5)
Press the ENT Key to confirm the selected
airport, and press the ENT Key again to activate
the direct-to function.
Figure 4-7 FPL (Flight Plan) Window
4)
Continue turning the small right knob to
scroll through the list and highlight the desired
waypoint.
5)
Press the ENT Key to confirm the selected
waypoint, and press the ENT Key again to
activate the direct-to function.
190-00140-00 Rev. P
GNS 430(A) Pilot’s Guide and Reference
4-3
SECTION 4
DIRECT-TO NAVIGATION
Shortcuts
2)
If a list of waypoints is displayed on-screen:
a) Press the small right knob to activate the
cursor.
Shortcuts are available when using the Direct-to Key,
allowing the pilot to bypass the use of the small and large
right knobs to enter the destination waypoint’s identifier.
A direct-to can be performed from any page displaying
a single waypoint identifier (such as the WPT pages for
airports and NAVAIDs). For pages that display a list of
waypoints (e.g., the Nearest Airport Page), the desired
waypoint must be highlighted with the cursor before
pressing the Direct-to Key.
b) Turn the large right knob to highlight the
desired waypoint (Figure 4-10).
Selecting an on-screen waypoint as a
direct-to destination:
1)
If a single airport, NAVAID, or user waypoint is
displayed on-screen (Figure 4-9):
Figure 4-10 Nearest List
c) Press the Direct-to Key followed by the
ENT Key twice.
To select an on-screen waypoint as a directto destination:
1)
If a single airport, NAVAID, or user waypoint is
displayed on-screen: press the Direct-to Key,
then press the ENT Key twice.
2)
If a list of waypoints is displayed on-screen,
press the small right knob to activate the
cursor.
3)
Turn the large right knob to highlight the
desired waypoint.
4)
Press the Direct-to Key followed by the ENT
Key twice.
Figure 4-9 Single Waypoint Displayed
a) Press the Direct-to Key
b) Press the ENT Key twice.
4-4
GNS 430(A) Pilot’s Guide and Reference
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SECTION 4
DIRECT-TO NAVIGATION
Selecting a Direct-to destination from the Map
Page
Direct-to destinations may also be selected from the
Map Page. If no airport, NAVAID, or user waypoint
exists at the desired location, a waypoint named ‘+MAP’
is automatically created at the location of the panning
pointer.
To select a direct-to destination from the
Map Page:
1)
From the Map Page, press the small right knob
to display a panning pointer.
2)
Turn the small and large right knobs to place
the panning pointer at the desired destination
location.
3)
If the panning pointer is placed on an existing
airport, NAVAID or user waypoint, the waypoint
name is highlighted (Figure 4-11). Press the
Direct-to Key and the ENT Key twice to
navigate to the waypoint.
Cancelling Direct-to Navigation
Once a direct-to is activated, the GNS 430 provides
navigation guidance to the selected destination until the
direct-to is replaced with a new direct-to or flight plan,
cancelled, or the unit is turned off.
To cancel a direct-to:
1)
Press the Direct-to Key to display the Select
Direct-to Waypoint Page.
2)
Press the MENU Key to display the Direct-to
Page Menu (Figure 4-12).
Figure 4-12 Select Direct-to Page Menu
3)
With ‘Cancel Direct-to NAV?’ highlighted, press
the ENT Key. If a flight plan is still active, the
GNS 430 resumes navigating the flight plan
along the closest leg.
Figure 4-11 Panning Pointer Placed on Waypoint
4)
If the panning pointer is placed on an open
location, press the Direct-to Key, then press
the ENT Key twice to create a ‘+MAP’ waypoint
and navigate to it.
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SECTION 4
DIRECT-TO NAVIGATION
Specifying a Course to a Waypoint
4)
When performing a direct-to, the GNS 430 sets a direct
great circle course to the selected destination. The course
to the destination can also be manually defined using the
‘CRS’ course field on the Select Direct-to Waypoint Page.
Turn the small and large right knobs to select
the desired course (Figure 4-14) and press the
ENT Key.
To manually define the direct-to course:
1)
Press the Direct-to Key.
2)
Use the small and large right knobs to select
the destination waypoint.
3)
Press the ENT Key to confirm the selected
waypoint, then turn the large right knob
to highlight the course (‘CRS’) field (Figure
4-13).
Figure 4-14 Course Field Selected
5)
Press the ENT Key again to begin navigation
using the selected destination and course.
6)
To re-select a direct course from present
position (or select a new manually-defined
course), simply press the Direct-to Key,
followed by the ENT Key twice.
Figure 4-13 CRS (Course) Field Highlighted
4-6
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SECTION 5
FLIGHT PLANS
SECTION 5: FLIGHT PLANS
The GNS 430 lets the pilot create up to 20 different
flight plans, with up to 31 waypoints in each flight plan.
The Flight Plan Page Group consists of two pages, (Active
Flight Plan Page, Figure 5-1, and Flight Plan Catalog Page,
Figure 5-2) accessed by pressing the FPL Key. The flight
plan pages allow the pilot to create, edit, and copy flight
plans.
5.1 Flight Plan Catalog Page
The Flight Plan Catalog Page allows the pilot to create,
edit, activate, delete, and copy flight plans. Flight plans
numbered from 1 through 19 are used to save flight plans
for future use. ‘Flight plan 00’ is reserved exclusively
for the flight plan currently in use for navigation. When
a flight plan is activated, a copy of the flight plan is
automatically transferred to ‘flight plan 00’, overwriting
any previously active flight plan.
To create a new flight plan:
1)
Press the FPL Key and turn the small right
knob to display the Flight Plan Catalog Page
(Figure 5-2).
2)
Press the MENU Key to display the Flight Plan
Catalog Page Menu (Figure 5-3).
Indicates Current Page
Figure 5-1 Active Flight Plan Page
Figure 5-3 Flight Plan Catalog Page Menu
3)
Turn the large right knob to highlight ‘Create
New Flight Plan?’ and press the ENT Key.
Indicates Current Page
Figure 5-2 Flight Plan Catalog Page
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SECTION 5
FLIGHT PLANS
4)
A blank Flight Plan Page appears for the first
empty storage location (Figure 5-4). Use
the small and large right knobs to enter the
identifier of the departure waypoint and press
the ENT Key.
Figure 5-5 Flight Plan Page
5)
Use the small and large right knobs to enter
the identifier of the new waypoint and press
the ENT Key (Figure 5-6).
Figure 5-4 Flight Plan Page
5)
Repeat step 4 above to enter the identifier for
each additional flight plan waypoint.
6)
Once all waypoints have been entered, press
the small right knob to return to the Flight
Plan Catalog Page.
Figure 5-6 Waypoint Identifier Field Selected
Flight Plan Editing
To add a waypoint to an existing flight
plan:
5-2
1)
Press the FPL Key and turn the small right
knob to display the Flight Plan Catalog Page.
2)
Press the small right knob to activate the
cursor.
3)
Turn the large right knob to highlight the
desired flight plan and press the ENT Key.
4)
Turn the large right knob to select the point to
add the new waypoint. If an existing waypoint
is highlighted, the new waypoint is placed
directly in front of this waypoint (Figure 5-5).
6)
Once all changes have been made, press the
small right knob to return to the Flight Plan
Catalog Page (Figure 5-7).
Figure 5-7 Edited Flight Plan Page
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SECTION 5
FLIGHT PLANS
To delete a waypoint from an existing flight
plan:
A one-line user comment may be added to any flight
plan, which is displayed on the Flight Plan Catalog Page,
next to the flight plan’s number. By default, as the flight
plan is being created, the comment shows the first and last
waypoints in the flight plan.
1)
Press the FPL Key and turn the small right
knob to display the Flight Plan Catalog Page.
2)
Press the small right knob to activate the
cursor.
3)
Turn the large right knob to highlight the
desired flight plan and press the ENT Key.
1)
4)
Turn the large right knob to select the waypoint
to be deleted and press the CLR Key to display
a ‘remove waypoint’ confirmation window.
From the Flight Plan Catalog Page, press the
small right knob to activate the cursor.
2)
Turn the large right knob to highlight the
desired flight plan and press the ENT Key.
5)
With ‘Yes’ highlighted, press the ENT Key to
remove the waypoint.
3)
Turn the large right knob to select the
comment line at the top of the screen.
6)
Once all changes have been made, press the
small right knob to return to the Flight Plan
Catalog Page.
4)
Use the small and large right knobs to enter
the new comment (Figure 5-8). Press the ENT
Key when finished.
To change the comment line for an existing
flight plan:
Figure 5-8 Comment Line Selected
5)
190-00140-00 Rev. P
Once all changes have been made, press the
small right knob to return to the Flight Plan
Catalog Page.
GNS 430(A) Pilot’s Guide and Reference
5-3
SECTION 5
FLIGHT PLANS
Activating Flight Plans
Inverting Flight Plans
Once a flight plan is defined through the Flight Plan
Catalog Page (using the steps outlined previously in this
section), it may be activated for navigation. Activating the
flight plan places it into ‘flight plan 00’ and overwrites any
previous information at that location.
After travelling along a flight plan, the pilot may wish
to reverse the route for navigation guidance back to the
original departure point.
To activate an existing flight plan:
1)
From the Flight Plan Catalog Page, press the
small right knob to activate the cursor.
From the Flight Plan Catalog Page, press the
small right knob to activate the cursor.
2)
2)
Turn the large right knob to highlight the
desired flight plan and press the MENU Key to
display the Flight Plan Catalog Page Menu.
Turn the large right knob to highlight the
desired flight plan and press the MENU Key to
display the Flight Plan Catalog Page Menu.
3)
3)
Turn the large right knob to highlight ‘Activate
Flight Plan?’ and press the ENT Key (Figure
5-9).
Turn the large right knob to highlight ‘Invert &
Activate FPL?’ (Figure 5-10) and press the ENT
Key. The original flight plan remains intact in
its flight plan catalog storage location.
Figure 5-9 Flight Plan Catalog Page Menu
Figure 5-10 Flight Plan Catalog Page Menu
1)
5-4
To activate an existing flight plan in reverse
order:
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SECTION 5
FLIGHT PLANS
Copying Flight Plans
Deleting Flight Plans
To save a flight plan currently located in ‘flight plan
00’, copy it to an open catalog location (1-19) before the
flight plan is cancelled, overwritten, or erased.
When finished with a flight plan, it can easily be
deleted from the Flight Plan Catalog Page or the Active
Flight Plan Page.
To copy a flight plan to another flight plan
catalog location:
1)
2)
3)
To delete a flight plan:
1)
From the Active Flight Plan Page, press the
MENU Key to display the Active Flight Plan
Page Menu.
From the Active Flight Plan Page, press the
MENU Key to display the Active Flight Plan
Page Menu.
2)
From the Flight Plan Catalog Page, press the
small right knob to activate the cursor, turn the
large right knob to highlight the flight plan to
be copied, then press the MENU Key to display
the Flight Plan Catalog Page Menu.
From the Flight Plan Catalog Page, press the
small right knob to activate the cursor, turn
the large right knob to highlight the flight plan
to be deleted, then press the MENU Key to
display the Flight Plan Catalog Page Menu.
3)
Turn the large right knob to highlight ‘Delete
Flight Plan?’ (Figure 5-12) and press the ENT
Key.
Turn the large right knob to highlight ‘Copy
Flight Plan?’ (Figure 5-11) and press the ENT
Key.
Figure 5-12 Flight Plan Catalog Page Menu
Figure 5-11 Flight Plan Catalog Page Menu
4)
By default, the next empty catalog location
is offered. To select a different location, turn
the large right knob to select the flight plan
number, use the small and large right knobs
to enter a different number and press the ENT
Key.
5)
With ‘Yes?’ highlighted, press the ENT Key to
copy the flight plan.
190-00140-00 Rev. P
4)
With ‘Yes?’ highlighted, press the ENT Key to
delete the flight plan.
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5-5
SECTION 5
FLIGHT PLANS
Flight Plan Catalog Options
The following options (some covered on the preceding
pages) are available for the Flight Plan Catalog Page:
• ‘Activate Flight Plan?’ - Allows the pilot to
select the flight plan for navigation guidance, as
described previously in this section.
• ‘Invert & Activate FPL?’ - Allows the pilot to
reverse the highlighted flight plan and select it for
navigation guidance, as described previously in
this section.
Figure 5-13 Flight Plan Catalog Page Menu
2)
Turn the large right knob to select the
‘Method’ field (Figure 5-14).
• ‘Create New Flight Plan?’ - Allows the pilot to
create a new flight plan, as described previously in
this section.
• ‘Crossfill?’ - Allows the pilot to transfer a Directto destination, the active flight plan, any stored
flight plan or user waypoints to a second 400-or
500-series Garmin unit. Some crossfill operations
can be done automatically. If both units are set
to ‘auto’, a change in the direct-to destination or
active flight plan on one unit is seen on the other.
For additional information, see Section 10.2,
Flight Planning Page: Crossfill.
Figure 5-14 Crossfill Page
3)
Turn the small right knob to select ‘Auto’
or ‘Manual’ and press the ENT Key. ‘Auto’
automatically transfers the active flight plan
or Direct-to selection to another 400- or 500series Garmin unit, without user intervention.
4)
If ‘Manual’ is selected: Turn the large right
knob to select the ‘Transfer’ field, then turn
the small right knob to select the type of
information to transfer between units (active
flight plan, flight plan, all user waypoints or
a single user waypoint). When ‘Flight Plan’
or ‘User Waypoint’ is selected, a second field
appears to the immediate right of the ‘Transfer’
field. Use the small and large right knobs to
enter the number of the flight plan or the name
of the user waypoint to be transferred.
To crossfill flight plans between two 400or 500-Series Garmin units:
1)
5-6
Select the ‘Crossfill?’ option from the Flight
Plan Catalog Page Menu (Figure 5-13) and
press the ENT Key.
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190-00140-00 Rev. P
SECTION 5
FLIGHT PLANS
5)
The ‘Cross-side’ field allows the pilot to
designate the sending and receiving units
in a crossfill operation. Turn the large right
knob to select the ‘Cross-side’ field, then turn
the small right knob to select ‘To’ or ‘From’
(Figure 5-15). Press the ENT Key to confirm
the selection.
To delete all flight plans:
1)
Select the ‘Delete All Flight Plans?’ option from
the Flight Plan Catalog Page Menu (Figure
5-16) and press the ENT Key.
Figure 5-16 Flight Plan Catalog Page Menu
Figure 5-15 Transfer Window
6)
2)
A confirmation window appears (Figure 5-17).
With ‘Yes?’ highlighted, press the ENT Key.
Turn the large right knob to highlight ‘Initiate
Transfer?’ and press the ENT Key.
• ‘Copy Flight Plan?’ - Allows the pilot to copy the
selected flight plan to a new flight plan location,
as described previously in this section. The copy
function is useful for duplicating an existing flight
plan before making changes.
• ‘Delete Flight Plan?’ - Allows the pilot to remove
the selected flight plan from memory, as described
previously in this section. Deleting a flight
plan does not delete the individual waypoints
contained in the flight plan from the database or
user waypoint memory.
Figure 5-17 Delete All Flight Plans Window
• ‘Delete All Flight Plans?’ - Allows the pilot to
remove all flight plans from memory.
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SECTION 5
FLIGHT PLANS
• ‘Sort List By Number?’/’Sort List by Comment?’
- Allows the pilot to sort numerically by the flight
plan number or sort alphanumerically based upon
the comment assigned to each flight plan. When
one option is selected, the other option appears
on the Flight Plan Catalog Page Menu.
To sort the catalog listing by number or
comment:
1)
Select the ‘Sort List By Number?’ or ‘Sort List
By Comment?’ option (whichever is currently
displayed) from the Flight Plan Catalog Page
Menu (Figure 5-18) and press the ENT Key.
5.2 Active Flight Plan Page
The Active Flight Plan Page provides information
and editing functions for ‘flight plan 00’, the flight plan
currently in use for navigation. When a direct-to or flight
plan has been activated, the Active Flight Plan Page shows
each waypoint for the flight plan (or a single waypoint
for a direct-to, Figure 5-19), along with the desired track
(DTK) and distance (DIS) for each leg.
Figure 5-19 Active Flight Plan Page
Active Flight Plan Options
Figure 5-18 Flight Plan Catalog Page Menu
The options shown in Table 5-1 are available for the
Active Flight Plan Page.
To access the Active Flight Plan Menu Page:
1)
Press the FPL Key to view the Active Flight Plan
Page.
2)
Press the MENU Key (Figure 5-20).
Figure 5-20 Active Flight Plan Page Menu
5-8
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SECTION 5
FLIGHT PLANS
Activate Leg
Crossfill
Copy Flight Plan
Invert Flight Plan
Delete Flight Plan
Select Approach
Select Arrival
Select Departure
Remove Approach
Remove Arrival
Remove Departure
Closest Point of FPL
Change Fields
Restore Defaults
Active Flight Plan Page Menu Options
Activates/reactivates the flight plan and selects the highlighted leg as the ‘active leg’ (the leg
which is currently used for navigation guidance).
Allows the pilot to transfer the active flight plan between two 400- or 500-series Garmin units
in a dual unit installation. See Section 10.2, Flight Planning: Crossfill for additional information
on this feature.
Copies the active flight plan to a flight plan catalog location, as described previously in this
section. The copy function is useful for duplicating the active flight plan before making changes.
Reverses the active flight plan. See Section 5.1, Activating Flight Plans and Inverting Flight
Plans.
Allows the pilot to remove all waypoints from the selected flight plan, as described previously
in this section. Deleting a flight plan does not delete the waypoints contained in the flight plan
from the database or user waypoint memory.
Allows the pilot to select a published instrument approach for the destination airport, or replace
the current approach with a new selection. (In many cases, it is convenient to select approaches
using the PROC Key as described in Section 6.1.)
Allows the pilot to select a published standard terminal arrival route (STAR) for the destination
airport or replace the current arrival with a new selection (Section 6.1 for information on
selecting arrivals using the PROC Key).
Allows the pilot to select a published standard instrument departure (SID) for the departure
airport or replace the current departure with a new selection. When using a direct-to, the GNS
430 uses the nearest airport as a reference when displaying available departures. See Section
6.1 for information on selecting departures using the PROC Key.
Deletes the currently selected approach from the active flight plan.
Deletes the current STAR from the active flight plan.
Deletes the current SID from the active flight plan.
Calculates the bearing and closest distance that a flight plan passes from a reference waypoint.
May also be used to create a new user waypoint along the flight plan at the location closest to
the reference waypoint.
Allows the pilot to select the desired data items to display on the Active Flight Plan Page, as
described in this Section.
Returns the data items to factory defaults, as described in this Section.
Table 5-1 Active Flight Plan Page Menu Options
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GNS 430(A) Pilot’s Guide and Reference
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SECTION 5
FLIGHT PLANS
The data fields for DTK and DIS are user-selectable and
may be changed to display cumulative distance (CUM) to
each waypoint, estimated time of arrival (ETA), estimated
time enroute (ETE), or enroute safe altitude (ESA).
To change a data field on the Active Flight
Plan Page:
1)
2)
With the Active Flight Plan Page displayed,
press the MENU Key to display the Active Flight
Plan Page Menu.
Turn the large right knob to highlight ‘Change
Fields?’ (Figure 5-21) and press the ENT Key.
To restore factory default settings for data
fields on the Active Flight Plan Page:
1)
With the Active Flight Plan Page displayed,
press the MENU Key to display the Active Flight
Plan Page Menu.
2)
Turn the large right knob to highlight ‘Restore
Defaults?’ and press the ENT Key.
To activate a flight plan along a specific
leg:
1)
Press the small right knob to activate the
cursor and turn the large right knob to
highlight the desired destination waypoint.
2)
Press the MENU Key, and select the ‘Activate
Leg?’ option from the Active Flight Plan Page
Menu (Figure 5-23) and press the ENT Key.
Figure 5-21 Active Flight Plan Page Menu
3)
Turn the large right knob to highlight the field
to be changed.
4)
Turn the small right knob to select the desired
data item (Figure 5-22) and press the ENT
Key.
Figure 5-23 Active Flight Plan Page Menu
3)
A confirmation window appears. With
‘Activate?’ highlighted, press the ENT Key.
Figure 5-22 Select Field Type Window
5)
5-10
Press the small right knob to remove the
cursor.
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SECTION 5
FLIGHT PLANS
To select an approach for a direct-to or
flight plan destination airport:
1)
3)
Choose the ‘Select Approach?’ option from the
Active Flight Plan Page Menu (Figure 5-24) and
press the ENT Key.
A second window appears listing available
transitions (Figure 5-26) for the approach. Turn
the small right knob to highlight the desired
transition waypoint and press the ENT Key.
The ‘Vectors’ option assumes the pilot will
receive vectors to the final course segment
of the approach and will provide navigation
guidance to intercept this final course.
Figure 5-24 Active Flight Plan Page Menu
2)
A window appears listing the available
approaches (Figure 5-25) for the destination
airport. Turn the small right knob to highlight
the desired approach and press the ENT Key.
Figure 5-25 Approach Window
190-00140-00 Rev. P
Figure 5-26 Transitions Window
4)
Turn the large right knob to highlight ‘Load?’
or ‘Activate?’ and press the ENT Key. ‘Load?’
adds the approach to the flight plan without
immediately using the approach for navigation
guidance. This allows the pilot to continue
navigating the original flight plan until cleared
for the approach but keeps the approach
available for quick activation when needed.
5)
For precision approaches, a reminder window
appears indicating that GPS guidance on such
approaches is strictly for monitoring only. To
confirm this reminder, highlight ‘Yes?’ and
press the ENT Key.
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5-11
SECTION 5
FLIGHT PLANS
To select an arrival for a direct-to or flight
plan destination airport:
1)
3)
Select the ‘Select Arrival?’ option from the
Active Flight Plan Page Menu (Figure 5-27)
and press the ENT Key.
A second window appears listing available
transitions (Figure 5-29) for the arrival. Turn
the small right knob to highlight the desired
transition waypoint and press the ENT Key.
Figure 5-29 Transitions Window
Figure 5-27 Active Flight Plan Page Menu
2)
A window appears listing the available arrivals
(Figure 5-28) for the destination airport. Turn
the small right knob to select the desired
arrival and press the ENT Key.
4)
To select a departure for the departure
airport:
1)
Select the ‘Select Departure?’ option from the
Active Flight Plan Page Menu and press the
ENT Key.
2)
A window appears listing the available
departures for the departure airport. Turn
the small right knob to select the desired
departure and press the ENT Key.
3)
A second window appears listing available
transitions for the departure. Turn the small
right knob to highlight the desired transition
waypoint and press the ENT Key.
4)
With ‘Load?’ highlighted, press the ENT Key.
Figure 5-28 Arrivals Window
5-12
With ‘Load?’ highlighted, press the ENT Key.
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SECTION 5
FLIGHT PLANS
To remove an approach, arrival, or
departure from the active flight plan:
1)
Select the ‘Remove Approach?’, ‘Remove
Arrival?’, or ‘Remove Departure?’ option from
the Active Flight Plan Page Menu (Figure 5-30)
and press the ENT Key.
2)
A window appears with the reference waypoint
field highlighted. Use the small and large
right knobs to enter the identifier of the
reference waypoint and press the ENT Key.
3)
A confirmation window appears for the
selected reference waypoint (Figure 5-32).
Press the ENT Key to accept the waypoint.
Figure 5-30 Active Flight Plan Page Menu
2)
A confirmation window appears listing
the procedure to be removed. With ‘Yes?’
highlighted, press the ENT Key.
To determine the closest point, along the
active flight plan, to a selected waypoint:
1)
Select the ‘Closest Point of FPL?’ option from
the Active Flight Plan Page Menu (Figure 5-31)
and press the ENT Key.
Figure 5-32 Closest Point of Flight Plan Window
4)
The GNS 430 displays the bearing (BRG) and
distance (DIST) to the closest point along the
flight plan, from the selected reference waypoint.
To create a user waypoint at this location and
add it to the flight plan, highlight ‘Load?’ and
press the ENT Key. The name for the new user
waypoint is derived from the identifier of the
reference waypoint.
Figure 5-31 Active Flight Plan Page Menu
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SECTION 5
FLIGHT PLANS
Shortcuts
3)
A number of shortcuts are available to save time when
using the Active Flight Plan Page. These shortcuts speed
the process of removing approaches, departures, and
arrivals, and aid in selecting a specific flight plan leg for
navigation guidance.
On the preceding page, options to remove approaches,
departures, and arrivals were introduced. This process
may also be completed using the CLR Key, as follows:
To remove an approach, departure, or
arrival using the CLR Key:
1)
2)
With the Active Flight Plan Page displayed,
press the small right knob to activate the
cursor.
Turn the large right knob to highlight the title
for the approach (Figure 5-33), departure, or
arrival to be deleted. Titles appear in light blue
directly above the procedure’s waypoints.
Press the CLR Key to display a confirmation
window (Figure 5-34).
Figure 5-34 Remove Approach Window
4)
With ‘Yes?’ highlighted, press the ENT Key to
remove the selected procedure.
This same process may also be used to remove
individual waypoints from the active flight plan.
To remove a waypoint using the CLR Key:
1)
With the Active Flight Plan Page displayed,
press the small right knob to activate the
cursor.
2)
Turn the large right knob to highlight the
identifier for the waypoint to be deleted.
Identifiers appear in green text.
3)
Press the CLR Key to display a confirmation
window (Figure 5-35).
Figure 5-33 Highlight Item To Be Deleted
Figure 5-35 Remove Waypoint Window
4)
5-14
With ‘Yes?’ highlighted, press the ENT Key to
remove the selected procedure.
GNS 430(A) Pilot’s Guide and Reference
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SECTION 5
FLIGHT PLANS
The ‘Activate Leg?’ option is discussed previously in
this section, which allows the pilot to specify which leg of
the flight plan is used for navigation guidance. A shortcut
also exists for this operation, using the Direct-to Key.
To activate a specific leg of the active flight
plan:
1)
Press the small right knob to activate the
cursor and turn the large right knob to
highlight the desired destination waypoint
(Figure 5-36).
When using instrument procedures, this feature can be
used not only to activate a specific point-to-point leg, but
to also activate the procedure turn portion of an approach,
follow a DME arc, or activate a holding pattern.
Any approach, departure, or arrival can be reviewed on
the appropriate airport page in the Waypoint Page Group
(Section 7.1).
To review a procedure while viewing a
flight plan page:
1)
With a flight plan page displayed, press the
small right knob to activate the cursor.
2)
Turn the large right knob to highlight the
procedure header (Figure 5-38) and press the
ENT Key to select the WPT Page Group.
Figure 5-36 Destination Waypoint Highlighted
2)
Press the Direct-to Key twice to display an
‘Activate Leg’ confirmation window (Figure
5-37).
Figure 5-38 Procedure Header Highlighted
Figure 5-37 Activate Leg Window
3)
With ‘Activate?’ highlighted, press the ENT
Key.
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Blank Page
5-16
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SECTION 6
PROCEDURES
SECTION 6: PROCEDURES
3)
6.1 Approaches, Departures, and
Arrivals
The GNS 430 allows the pilot to fly non-precision and
precision approaches to airports with published instrument
approach procedures. All available approaches are stored
on the Jeppesen NavData Card, and are automatically
updated when the new card is inserted into the GNS 430.
Subscription information for NavData cards is included in
the GNS 430 package.
The Procedures Page (Figure 6-1) is displayed by
pressing the PROC Key. The Procedures Page provides
direct access to approaches, departures, and arrivals,
based upon the active flight plan or direct-to destination.
In either case, the departure and destination airports must
have published procedures associated with them.
To select an approach, departure, or arrival:
1)
Press the PROC Key to display the Procedures
Page.
2)
Turn the large right knob to highlight ‘Select
Approach?’, ‘Select Departure?’, or ‘Select
Arrival?’ (Figure 6-1) and press the ENT Key.
A window appears listing the available
procedures (Figure 6-2). Turn the large right
knob to highlight the desired procedure
and press the ENT Key. (When a direct-to
destination is selected, departures are offered
for the nearest airport.)
Figure 6-2 Approach Window
4)
A second window appears listing the available
transitions (Figure 6-3). Turn the large right
knob to highlight the desired transition
waypoint and press the ENT Key. The approach
‘Vectors’ option assumes the pilot will receive
vectors to the final course segment of the
approach and will provide navigation guidance
relative to the final approach course.
Figure 6-3 Transitions Window
Figure 6-1 Procedures Page
190-00140-00 Rev. P
GNS 430(A) Pilot’s Guide and Reference
6-1
SECTION 6
PROCEDURES
5)
6)
Turn the large right knob to highlight ‘Load?’
or ‘Activate?’ (approaches only) and press the
ENT Key. (‘Load?’ adds the procedure to the
flight plan without immediately using it for
navigation guidance. This allows the pilot to
continue navigating the original flight plan, but
keeps the procedure available on the Active
Flight Plan Page for quick activation when
needed.)
For precision approaches and some nonprecision approaches, a reminder window
appears indicating that GPS guidance on such
approaches is strictly for monitoring only; use
the VLOC receivers and external CDI (or HSI) for
primary navigation. To confirm this reminder,
highlight ‘Yes?’ and press the ENT Key.
Not all approaches in the database are approved
for GPS use. When selecting an approach, a ‘GPS’
designation to the right of the procedure name (Figure
6-4) indicates the procedure can be flown using the GPS
receiver. Some procedures do not have this designation,
meaning the GPS receiver may be used for supplemental
navigation guidance only. ILS approaches, for example,
must be flown by tuning the VLOC receiver to the proper
frequency and coupling the VLOC receiver to the external
CDI (or HSI).
Once an approach is selected, it may be activated
for navigation from the Procedures Page. Activating
the approach overrides the enroute portion of the active
flight plan, proceeding directly to the approach portion
(for a full approach, directly to the initial approach fix).
Activating the approach also initiates automatic CDI
scaling transition as the approach progresses.
To activate an approach:
1)
Press the PROC Key to display the Procedures
Page (Figure 6-5).
2)
Turn the large right knob to highlight ‘Activate
Approach?’ (Figure 6-5) and press the ENT
Key.
Figure 6-5 Procedures Page
Figure 6-4 ‘GPS’ Designations
6-2
GNS 430(A) Pilot’s Guide and Reference
190-00140-00 Rev. P
SECTION 6
PROCEDURES
Another Procedures Page option allows the pilot to
activate the final course segment of the approach. This
option assumes the pilot will receive vectors to the final
approach fix (FAF) and provides guidance to intercept the
final course, before reaching the FAF.
To activate the approach, with vectors to
final:
1)
Press the PROC Key to display the Procedures
Page.
2)
Turn the large right knob to highlight ‘Activate
Vector-To-Final?’ (Figure 6-6) and press the
ENT Key.
Figure 6-6 Procedures Page
In many cases, it may be easiest to Load the full
approach while still some distance away, enroute to the
destination airport. Later, if vectored to final, use the
steps above to select ‘Activate Vector-To-Final’—which
makes the inbound course to the FAF waypoint active.
Otherwise, activate the full approach using the ‘Activate
Approach?’ option.
190-00140-00 Rev. P
6.2 Non-Precision Approach
Operations
The GNS 430 provides non-precision approach
guidance using its built-in GPS receiver. The GPS receiver
can also be used as a supplemental aid for precision
approaches (and for non-precision localizer-based
approaches), but the localizer and glideslope receivers
must be used for primary approach course guidance.
Approaches designed specifically for GPS are often
very simple and don’t require overflying a VOR or NDB.
Many non-precision approaches have GPS overlays to
let the pilot fly an existing procedure (VOR, VOR/DME,
NDB, RNAV, etc.) more accurately using GPS.
Many overlay approaches are complex (in comparison
to GPS-only approaches). The GNS 430 displays and
provides guidance through each leg of the approach,
automatically sequencing through each of these legs, up
to the missed approach point (MAP). Approaches may
be flown ‘as published’ with the full transition using any
published feeder route or initial approach fix (IAF), or
may be flown with a vectors-to-final transition.
NOTE: The following approach examples are
intended for instructional use only and are not
to be used for navigation.
GNS 430(A) Pilot’s Guide and Reference
6-3
SECTION 6
PROCEDURES
4)
Select Destination
‘Select’ and ‘Load’ the
approach
‘Activate’ the full approach or vectors-to-final,
as appropriate. In some scenarios, it may be
more convenient to immediately activate the
approach and skip the ‘Load’ process outlined
in the preceding step 3. The GNS 430 provides
both options.
Approaches with Procedure Turns
‘Activate’ the
approach
DO NOT USE FOR
NAVIGATION
The procedure turn portion of an approach is stored
as one of the legs of the approach. For this reason, the
GNS 430 requires no special operations from the pilot
(other than flying the procedure turn itself) beyond what
is required for any other type of approach.

Lynchburg (VA) Regional
VOR or GPS Rwy 03


Figure 6-7 Sample Approach
Approach operations on the GNS 430 typically begin
with the same basic steps (refer to Figure 6-7 for the
following steps):
6-4
1)
Select the destination airport using the Directto Key, or as the last waypoint in the active
flight plan.
2)
Choose the ‘Select Approach?’ option from
the Procedures Page (Section 6.1) or from the
Active Flight Plan Page Menu (Section 5.2,
Active Flight Plan Options).
3)
‘Load’ the approach (often while enroute) in
anticipation of its future use. This places the
approach in the active flight plan, but retains
course guidance in the enroute section until
the approach is ‘activated’.
DO NOT USE FOR
NAVIGATION
Figure 6-8 Sample Approach with Procedure Turn
This example uses the VOR Runway 03 approach for
Lynchburg (Virginia) Regional Airport, KLYH, and assumes
a departure from Frederick (Maryland) Municipal Airport,
KFDK.
GNS 430(A) Pilot’s Guide and Reference
190-00140-00 Rev. P
SECTION 6
PROCEDURES
The steps required to set up and fly the approach
are detailed below (refer to Figure 6-8 for the following
steps):
1)
Prior to departing KFDK, the destination (KLYH)
is selected using the Direct-to Key or by
creating a flight plan terminating at Lynchburg
Regional.
2)
While enroute to KLYH, select the ATIS
frequency from the list on the NAV/COM Page
(Section 3.6 and Figure 6-9) and place it in
the standby field of the COM Window. Use
the COM Flip-flop Key to make the ATIS
frequency active.
3)
Figure 6-10 Procedures Page
4)
From the Transitions Window (Figure 6-11),
select LYH VOR (the IAF). Also, select ‘Load?’
to load, but not activate, the approach.
Figure 6-11 Approach and Transitions Windows
Figure 6-9 NAV/COM Page
5)
190-00140-00 Rev. P
Press the PROC Key (Figure 6-10) and select
the ‘VOR 03’ approach using the steps outlined
in Section 6.1.
Press the PROC Key, select ‘Activate Approach?’
and press the ENT Key to activate the
approach.
GNS 430(A) Pilot’s Guide and Reference
6-5
SECTION 6
PROCEDURES
Flying the Procedure Turn


Figure 6-13 CDI Scale at 1.0 nm
2)



DO NOT USE FOR
NAVIGATION
Several miles prior to reaching the IAF (LYH),
the pilot may wish to review the approach
sequence. Press the FPL Key to display the
Active Flight Plan Page. Press the small right
knob, and then turn the large right knob to
review each segment of the approach (Figure
6-14). When finished, press the FPL Key again
to return to the previous page.
Figure 6-12 Sample Approach with Procedure Turn
Refer to Figure 6-12 for the following steps:
1)
6-6
Within 30 nm of the destination airport, the
GNS 430 switches from ‘enroute’ mode to
‘terminal’ mode (as indicated in the lower left
corner of the screen). The switch to terminal
mode is accompanied by a gradual Course
Deviation Indicator (CDI) scale transition from
5.0 to 1.0 nm, full scale deflection (Figure
6-13).
Figure 6-14 Active Flight Plan Page
3)
When approaching the IAF (LYH), a waypoint
alert (‘NEXT DTK 205°’) appears in the lower
right corner of the screen (Figure 6-15). As
the distance (DIS) to the IAF approaches zero,
the alert is replaced by a turn advisory (‘TURN
TO 205°’). Dial the outbound course of 205°
into the CDI (or HSI) using the OBS knob.
GNS 430(A) Pilot’s Guide and Reference
190-00140-00 Rev. P
SECTION 6
PROCEDURES
Refer to Figure 6-16 for the following steps:
6)
Course guidance is provided relative to the
outbound leg from the FAF. No guidance
through the procedure turn itself is given. (The
procedure turn is displayed on the Map Page
and indicated as the active leg on the Default
NAV Page and the Active Flight Plan Page.) The
CDI needle starts moving to the right.
7)
When turning to intercept the inbound course,
the GNS 430 sequences to the inbound leg to
the FAF, the CDI needle swings to the opposite
side to provide proper sensing along the final
course segment and ‘NEXT DTK 025°’ appears
in the lower right corner of the screen (Figure
6-17).
Figure 6-15 Waypoint Alert
4)
Fly the outbound course.
5)
Approximately one minute after passing the
FAF (LYH), the alert message ‘START PROC
TRN’ appears in the lower right corner of the
screen. Initiate the procedure turn at any time
after receiving this alert message.
DO NOT USE FOR
NAVIGATION


Figure 6-17 Sequence to Inbound Leg



Figure 6-16 Terminal Mode
190-00140-00 Rev. P
8)
Turn to the final approach course.
9)
Within 2.0 nm of the FAF (LYH), the GNS 430
switches from terminal mode to ‘approach’
mode. CDI scaling is tightened from 1.0 to
0.3 nm, full scale deflection.
10) When approaching the FAF, a waypoint alert
(‘NEXT DTK 026°’) appears in the lower
right corner. Make any course adjustments
necessary for the final course segment (FAF to
MAP).
GNS 430(A) Pilot’s Guide and Reference
6-7
SECTION 6
PROCEDURES
11) After crossing the FAF, the destination
sequences to the MAP (‘RW03’, the runway
threshold, see Figure 6-18). Fly toward the
MAP.
Figure 6-19 ‘SUSP’ Annunciation
Flying the Missed Approach
Figure 6-18 Sequence to MAP
NOTE: When viewing the Map Page, note that
the final course segment is displayed in magenta
(the active leg of the flight plan always appears
in magenta) and a dashed line extends the course
beyond the MAP. The dashed line is provided for
situational awareness only and should NOT be
used for navigation. Follow the published missed
approach procedures.
12) When approaching the MAP, a waypoint alert
(‘APPRCHING WPT’) appears in the lower right
corner.
13) After crossing the MAP, ‘SUSP’ appears above
the OBS Key (Figure 6-19), indicating that
automatic sequencing of approach waypoints
is suspended at the MAP. A ‘from’ indication
is displayed on the CDI and Default NAV Page,
but course guidance along the final approach
course continues. If a missed approach is
required, use the OBS Key to initiate the missed
approach sequence, as outlined, beginning on
the following page.
6-8
After passing the MAP, if the runway is not in sight
the pilot must execute a missed approach. The GNS 430
continues to give guidance along an extension of the final
course segment (FAF to MAP) until the pilot manually
initiates the missed approach procedure (as mentioned
previously in reference to the ‘SUSP’ advisory).




DO NOT USE FOR
NAVIGATION
Figure 6-20 Sequence to MAP
The OBS Key is used to initiate the missed approach,
as follows (refer to Figure 6-20 for the following steps):
GNS 430(A) Pilot’s Guide and Reference
190-00140-00 Rev. P
SECTION 6
PROCEDURES
Press the OBS Key. The missed approach
holding point (MAHP; in this case ‘SWARM’
intersection) is automatically offered as the
destination waypoint (Figure 6-21).
1)
30° of the inbound course). This allows the
pilot to use standard timing (typically one
minute) to fly the inbound and outbound legs
of the hold.
Figure 6-21 Missed Approach Holding Point
2)
3)
Figure 6-22 ‘Hold Teardrop’ Annunciation
NOTE: In some cases, an additional hold
waypoint is added to the missed approach
sequence. This additional waypoint is used
as an aid in establishing the holding pattern,
especially where the MAP and MAHP are the
same waypoint.
Follow the missed approach procedures, as
published on the approach plate, for proper
climb and heading instructions. The GNS 430
guides the pilot to the holding pattern, along
the 053° radial from LYH VOR.
An alert message in the lower right-hand corner
of the screen recommends entry procedures for
the holding pattern (i.e., ‘HOLD DIRECT’, ‘HOLD
PARALLEL’, or ‘HOLD TEARDROP’, see Figure
6-22). When flying the holding pattern, a timer
appears on the Default NAV Page (Figure 6-23).
The timer automatically resets on the outbound
side of the hold when the aircraft is abeam the
hold waypoint. The timer again resets as the
aircraft turns inbound (within approximately
190-00140-00 Rev. P
Figure 6-23 Hold Timer
4)
The GNS 430 provides course guidance only
on the inbound side of the holding pattern.
When leaving the holding pattern to re-fly
the approach (or another approach) press the
PROC Key to ‘Select Approach?’ or ‘Activate
Approach?’ as previously described. Or, use the
Direct-to Key to select another destination.
GNS 430(A) Pilot’s Guide and Reference
6-9
SECTION 6
PROCEDURES
Flying an Approach with a Hold
3)
Starting where the previous example left off, assume
weather conditions resulted in a missed approach at
Lynchburg Regional. The pilot has decided to divert to
Farmville Regional (KFVX) instead (refer to Figure 6-24
for the following steps).
Press the ENT Key twice.
This time, the pilot selects the GPS runway 21
approach into Farmville Regional. The GPS runway 21
approach begins with a holding pattern at the IAF, BODRY
intersection.
4)
Press the PROC Key and select the ‘GPS 21’
approach. (Figure 6-26, also Section 6.1 for
additional instructions.)
  
DO NOT USE FOR
NAVIGATION
Figure 6-26 Approach Window
5)
Figure 6-24 Approach with Hold
1)
Press the Direct-to Key.
2)
Use the small and large right knobs to enter
the destination airport’s identifier (KFVX)
(Figure 6-25).
From the Transitions Window, select BODRY
intersection as the IAF (Figure 6-27). Also,
select ‘Activate?’ to load and activate the
approach.
Figure 6-27 TRANS ‘Transitions’ Window
6)
Figure 6-25 Select Direct-To Waypoint Page
6-10
Once the approach has been activated, the
Active Flight Plan Page appears (Figure 6-28).
The pilot may review the approach sequence
by pressing the small right knob and turning
the large right knob. Press the FPL Key to
return to the navigation pages.
GNS 430(A) Pilot’s Guide and Reference
190-00140-00 Rev. P
SECTION 6
PROCEDURES
Figure 6-28 Active Flight Plan Page
Figure 6-30 ‘HOLD TEARDROP’ Annunciation
9)




As mentioned in the missed approach example,
the Default NAV Page displays a timer during
the holding pattern (Figure 6-31). The timer
can be used to fly the one minute outbound
portion of the holding pattern. (The holding
pattern is displayed on the Map Page and
indicated as the active leg on the Default NAV
Page and the Active Flight Plan Page.)
DO NOT USE FOR
NAVIGATION
Figure 6-29 Terminal Mode
Figure 6-31 Default NAV Page
Refer to Figure 6-29 for the following steps.
7)
As in the last example, within 30 nm of the
airport, the GNS 430 switches from enroute to
terminal mode, and the CDI scale transitions
from 5.0 to 1.0 nm, full scale deflection.
8)
Just prior to crossing BODRY intersection, a
’HOLD TEARDROP’ alert appears in the lower
right corner of the screen to suggest the proper
holding pattern entry (Figure 6-30). (‘HOLD
DIRECT’ or ‘HOLD PARALLEL’ may be offered
on other similar approaches.)
190-00140-00 Rev. P
10) When crossing the IAF, ‘SUSP’ appears above
the OBS Key (Figure 6-31), indicating that
automatic sequencing of approach waypoints
is temporarily suspended. As the aircraft turns
inbound, ‘SUSP’ is cancelled and the GNS 430
returns to automatic sequencing.
GNS 430(A) Pilot’s Guide and Reference
6-11
SECTION 6
PROCEDURES
NOTE: If the pilot needs to lose extra altitude or
speed by going around the holding pattern again,
press the OBS Key to manually suspend waypoint
sequencing before crossing the holding waypoint
the second time. If this waypoint has already
been passed, re-activate the holding pattern
using the steps described in Section 5.2.
Refer to Figure 6-32 for the following steps.
11) When approaching BODRY intersection, a
waypoint alert (’NEXT DTK 209°’) appears in
the lower right corner of the screen (Figure
6-33).
Figure 6-33 Waypoint Alert
DO NOT USE FOR
NAVIGATION
12) At 2.0 nm from the FAF (DEPOY intersection),
the GNS 430 switches from terminal mode to
approach mode. CDI scaling is tightened from
1.0 to 0.3 nm, full scale deflection.
Figure 6-32 Approach Mode
6-12
GNS 430(A) Pilot’s Guide and Reference
190-00140-00 Rev. P
SECTION 6
PROCEDURES
13) When approaching the FAF, a waypoint alert
(‘NEXT DTK 209°’) appears in the lower
right corner (Figure 6-34). Make any course
adjustments necessary for the final course
segment (FAF to MAP).
15) When approaching the MAP, a waypoint alert
(‘APPRCHING WPT’) appears in the lower right
corner.
16) After crossing the MAP, ‘SUSP’ appears above
the OBS Key (Figure 6-35), indicating that
automatic sequencing of approach waypoints
is suspended at the MAP. A ‘from’ indication
is displayed on the CDI and Default NAV Page,
but course guidance along the final approach
course continues. If a missed approach is
required, use the OBS Key to initiate the
missed approach sequence, as outlined in this
section.
Figure 6-34 Final Approach
14) After crossing the FAF, the destination sequences
to the MAP (‘RW21’, the runway threshold).
With the needle centered, fly toward the MAP,
observing the altitude minimums dictated by
the approach plate. When viewing the Map
Page, note that the final course segment is
displayed in magenta, (the active leg of the
flight plan always appears in magenta) and
a dashed line extends the course beyond the
MAP. Do not follow this extended course.
Instead, follow published missed approach
procedures.
190-00140-00 Rev. P
Figure 6-35 Missed Approach
GNS 430(A) Pilot’s Guide and Reference
6-13
SECTION 6
PROCEDURES
Flying a DME Arc Approach
The GPS overlay for a DME arc approach uses
additional Jeppesen-provided waypoints to define the arc.
These waypoints are indicated by ‘D’ as the first letter in
the waypoint name. This is followed by three numbers
which indicate the radial the waypoint lies on. The last
letter indicates the radius of the arc.
Either of the following may be done to intercept the arc
for a DME arc approach:
This example is based upon a flight from Hutchinson
(Kansas) Municipal (KHUT) to Billard Municipal (KTOP)
in Topeka, Kansas. The VOR/DME runway 22 approach
is selected, along with ‘D258G’ as the IAF (refer to Figure
6-36 for the following steps).
1)
Select Billard Municipal (KTOP) as the
destination via the Direct-to Key or as the
last waypoint in a flight plan (Figure 6-37).
• Follow a specified radial inbound to intercept the
IAF.
• Follow ATC vectors which allow the pilot to
intercept the arc at any point along the arc.
DO NOT USE FOR
NAVIGATION
Figure 6-37 Select Waypoint Page
2)
 
Press the PROC Key (Figure 6-38) and select
the ‘VOR 22’ approach (Figure 6-39) using
the steps outlined in Section 6.1. From the
Transitions Window, select ‘D258G’ as the IAF.
Also, select ‘Load?’ (or ‘Activate?’, if already
cleared for the approach).
Figure 6-36 Enroute Mode
6-14
NOTE: As this manual was being written, the
letter/number DME arc names were being
replaced with standard five-letter intersection
names. Either naming convention may be used
for an approach.
Figure 6-38 Procedures Page
GNS 430(A) Pilot’s Guide and Reference
190-00140-00 Rev. P
SECTION 6
PROCEDURES
Figure 6-41 Procedures Page
Figure 6-39 Approach Window
5)
DO NOT USE FOR
NAVIGATION



When approaching the IAF (D258G), a waypoint
alert (‘NEXT DTK 353°’) appears in the lower
right corner of the screen (Figure 6-42). As the
distance (DIS) to the IAF approaches zero, the
alert is replaced by a turn advisory (‘TURN TO
353°’).



Billard Muni (Topeka, KS)
Figure 6-42 Waypoint Alert
VOR or GPS Rwy 22
Figure 6-40 Terminal Mode
Refer to Figure 6-40 for the following steps.
3)
Within 30 nm of KTOP, the GNS 430 switches
from enroute mode to terminal mode and the
CDI scale transitions from 5.0 to 1.0 nm, full
scale deflection.
4)
If the approach has not yet been activated
(in step 2 above), do so when cleared for the
approach (Figure 6-41).
190-00140-00 Rev. P
6)
Follow the arc, when the course select setting
and desired track differ by more than 10°, a
‘Set course to ###°’ message appears on the
Message Page.
GNS 430(A) Pilot’s Guide and Reference
6-15
SECTION 6
PROCEDURES
7)
The next point in the approach is an intermediate
fix, labeled ‘D025G’. When approaching this
intermediate fix, a waypoint alert (‘NEXT DTK
205°’) appears in the lower right corner of the
screen (Figure 6-43). As the distance to this fix
approaches zero, the alert is replaced by a turn
advisory (‘TURN TO 205°’). Dial this course into
the CDI (or HSI) using the OBS knob.
Refer to Figure 6-44 for the following steps.
DO NOT USE FOR
NAVIGATION


Figure 6-43 Intermediate Approach Fix
8)
At 2.0 nm from the FAF (TOP VOR), the GNS
430 switches from terminal mode to approach
mode. CDI scaling is tightened from 1.0 to 0.3
nm, full scale deflection.
Figure 6-44 Approach Mode
9)
When approaching the FAF, ‘NEXT DTK 214°’
appears in the lower right corner of the screen
(Figure 6-45). Select this course on the CDI (or
HSI) using the OBS knob.
Figure 6-45 Final Approach Fix
6-16
GNS 430(A) Pilot’s Guide and Reference
190-00140-00 Rev. P
SECTION 6
PROCEDURES
10) After crossing the FAF, the destination
sequences to the MAP (‘RW22’, the runway
threshold). With the needle centered, fly
toward the MAP, observing the altitude
minimums dictated by the approach plate.
When viewing the Map Page, note that the final
course segment is displayed in magenta (the
active leg of the flight plan always appears in
magenta) and a dashed line extends the course
beyond the MAP (Figure 6-46).
Figure 6-47 ‘SUSP’ Annunciation
Vectors to Final
Take a second look at the ‘VOR 22’ approach into
Billard Municipal. Instead of following the DME arc, ATC
tells the pilot to expect vectors onto the final approach
course. There are several ways to select ‘vectors to final’
with the GNS 430. The first two options below normally
require the least workload to accomplish:
Figure 6-46 Final Course Segment
11) When approaching the MAP, a waypoint alert
(‘APPRCHING WPT’) appears in the lower right
corner.
12) After crossing the MAP, ‘SUSP’ appears above
the OBS Key (Figure 6-47), indicating that
automatic sequencing of approach waypoints
is suspended at the MAP. A ‘from’ indication
is displayed on the CDI and Default NAV Page,
but course guidance along the final approach
course continues. Do not follow this extended
course. Follow published missed approach
procedures using the OBS Key to initiate the
missed approach sequence, as outlined in
‘Flying the Missed Approach’ in this section.
190-00140-00 Rev. P
• When the approach is first selected, choose
‘VECTORS’ from the Transitions Window.
• Load a full approach (including the IAF from the
Transitions Window) as described in Section 6.1.
When cleared, press the PROC Key and select
‘Activate Vectors-To-Final?’.
• Load the full approach as described in Section
6.1. Use the Direct-to Key (by pressing it twice)
from the Active Flight Plan Page to select the
desired leg of the approach.
GNS 430(A) Pilot’s Guide and Reference
6-17
SECTION 6
PROCEDURES
To select ‘VECTORS’ from the Transitions
Window:
1)
Select Billard Municipal (KTOP) as the
destination, using the Direct-to Key, or as the
last waypoint in a flight plan.
2)
Press the PROC Key and select the ‘VOR 22’
approach using the steps outlined in Section
6.1.
3)
From the Transitions Window, select ‘VECTORS’
(Figure 6-48).
3)
From the Transitions Window, select ‘D258G’
as the IAF (Figure 6-49). Also, select ‘Load?’.
Figure 6-49 Transitions Window
4)
When cleared, press the PROC Key and select
‘Activate Vector-To-Final?’ (Figure 6-50).
Figure 6-48 Transitions Window
4)
Select ‘Load?’ (or ‘Activate?’, if already cleared
for the approach).
To activate vectors-to-final from the
Procedures Page:
1)
Select Billard Municipal (KTOP) as the
destination, using the Direct-to Key or as the
last waypoint in a flight plan.
2)
Press the PROC Key and select the ‘VOR 22’
approach using the steps outlined in Section
6.1.
6-18
Figure 6-50 Procedures Page
Flying the Vectors Approach
With ‘vectors to final’ selected, the CDI needle remains
off center until the aircraft is established on the final
approach course. With the approach activated, the Map
Page displays an extension of the final approach course in
magenta (magenta is used to depict the active leg of the
flight plan) and ‘VTF’ appears as part of the active leg on
the Default NAV Page (as a reminder that the approach
was activated with vectors-to-final).
GNS 430(A) Pilot’s Guide and Reference
190-00140-00 Rev. P
SECTION 6
PROCEDURES
DO NOT USE FOR
NAVIGATION



Figure 6-52 Heading of 025°

4)
ATC instructs the pilot to turn right to a heading
of 115° (Figure 6-53).
Figure 6-51 Terminal Mode
In this example, assume ATC vectors result in a
rectangular course to intercept final, as follows (refer to
Figure 6-51 for the following steps):
1)
Within 30 nm of KTOP, the GNS 430 switches
from enroute mode to terminal mode and the
CDI scale transitions from 5.0 to 1.0 nm, full
scale deflection.
2)
If the approach has not already been activated,
activate the approach (with vectors-to-final).
This allows the GNS 430 to provide guidance
to the final approach course.
3)
ATC instructs the pilot to turn left to a heading
of 025°. This places the aircraft parallel to the
final approach course in the opposite direction
(Figure 6-52). CDI needle deflection is to the
left.
Figure 6-53 Heading of 115°
5)
ATC instructs the pilot to turn right to a heading
of 175° to intercept the final approach course.
When converging with the final approach course
the needle moves toward the center. (In Figure
6-54, the needle has not yet returned to the
on-screen CDI, since the current position is still
1.7 nm right of the final approach course.)
Figure 6-54 CDI Off Scale
190-00140-00 Rev. P
GNS 430(A) Pilot’s Guide and Reference
6-19
SECTION 6
PROCEDURES



Figure 6-57 Waypoint Alert


DO NOT USE FOR
NAVIGATION
Figure 6-55 Approach Mode
Refer to Figure 6-55 for the following steps.
6)
At 2.0 nm from the FAF (TOP VOR), the GNS
430 switches from terminal mode to approach
mode (Figure 6-56). CDI scaling is tightened
from 1.0 to 0.3 nm, full scale deflection.
8)
When crossing the FAF, the destination
sequences to the MAP (‘RW22’).
9)
When approaching the MAP, a waypoint alert
(‘APPRCHING WPT’) appears in the lower right
corner.
10) After crossing the MAP, ‘SUSP’ appears above
the OBS Key (Figure 6-58), indicating that
automatic sequencing of approach waypoints
is suspended at the MAP. A ‘from’ indication
is displayed on the CDI and Default NAV Page,
but course guidance along the final approach
course continues. Do not follow this extended
course. Follow published missed approach
procedures using the OBS Key to initiate the
missed approach sequence, as outlined in this
section.
Figure 6-56 Approach Mode
7)
When approaching the FAF, a waypoint alert
(‘NEXT DTK 214°’) appears in the lower right
corner (Figure 6-57).
Figure 6-58 Final Approach
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SECTION 6
PROCEDURES
Course From Fix Flight Plan Legs
Certain approach, departure, and arrival procedures
in the Jeppesen database contain course from fix flight
plan legs. The GNS 430 is able to load these legs into the
flight plan along with the rest of the procedure data, and
provide navigation along these legs.
There are three different types of course from fix legs:
This example uses the VOR/DME RWY 25 approach into
Palmdale, California (KPMD) and includes a teardrop course
reversal (refer to Figure 6-60 for the following steps).
1)
At the initial approach fix (PMD), a waypoint
alert (‘NEXT DTK 070°’) appears in the lower
right corner of the screen. As the distance to
the IAF approaches zero, the alert is replaced
by a turn advisory (‘TURN TO 070°’). Dial the
outbound course into the CDI (or HSI) using
the OBS knob.
2)
Fly the ‘course from fix to distance’ leg, as
shown on the Active Flight Plan Page and
the Default NAV Page (Figures 6-61 and
6-62). Note the magenta line in Figure 6-62,
which represents the currently active leg of
the approach. The distance (DIS) displayed on
the above screens is TO the ‘D13.0’ point. The
flight plan automatically sequences to the next
leg upon reaching ‘D13.0’.
• Course from fix to distance, or Course from fix to
DME distance
• Course from fix to altitude
• Course from fix to manual sequence
Course from fix to distance legs appear in the flight
plan like normal waypoints, but the destination name
always begins with a ‘D’, followed by a distance in nm
from the waypoint fix (Figure 6-59).
Figure 6-59 Active Flight Plan Page
Palmdale (CA) AF Plant 42
VOR/DME or GPS Rwy 25






Figure 6-61 Default NAV Page


DO NOT USE FOR NAVIGATION
Figure 6-60 KPMD Approach
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GNS 430(A) Pilot’s Guide and Reference
Figure 6-62 Map Page
6-21
SECTION 6
PROCEDURES
3)
At 13.0 nm from the FAF, a waypoint alert
(‘NEXT DTK 265°’) appears in the lower right
corner of the screen. Turn to intercept the final
approach course and watch for the CDI needle
to begin to center.
4)
When approaching the intermediate fix (CF25),
a waypoint alert (‘NEXT DTK 265°’) appears.
5)
Within 2.0 nm of the FAF (THERO), the GNS
430 switches from terminal mode to approach
mode. ‘APR’ appears in the lower left corner
of the screen—replacing ‘TERM’. CDI scaling
is tightened from 1.0 to 0.3 nm, full scale
deflection.
6)
When approaching the FAF, ‘NEXT DTK 265°’
appears in the lower right corner of the
screen.
7)
After crossing the FAF, the destination
sequences to the MAP (MA25).
8)
When approaching the MAP, a waypoint alert
(‘APPRCHING WPT’) appears in the lower right
corner of the screen.
9)
After crossing the MAP, ‘SUSP’ appears
above the OBS Key, indicating that automatic
sequencing of approach waypoints is suspended
at the MAP. If a missed approach is required,
use the OBS Key to initiate the missed
approach sequence, as outlined below.
6-22
Course from fix to altitude legs show the specific target
altitude on the Active Flight Plan Page (Figure 6-63) and
the Default NAV Page (Figure 6-64). The missed approach
sequence for the Palmdale VOR/DME RWY 25 approach
includes a course from fix to altitude leg.
Figure 6-63 Active Flight Plan Page
Figure 6-64 Default NAV Page
GNS 430(A) Pilot’s Guide and Reference
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SECTION 6
PROCEDURES
MISSED APPROACH:
Palmdale (CA) AF Plant 42
VOR/DME or GPS Rwy 25

3)


Fly the outbound course. The Map Page depicts
the flight path extending indefinitely from PMD
VOR (Figure 6-66). The distance (DIS) on the
Default NAV Page, the Map Page, and the
Active Flight Plan Page increases, indicating
the distance back to PMD VOR.

DO NOT USE FOR NAVIGATION
MISSED APPROACH
Climb to 5000’
outbound via PMD VOR
R-282, then climbing
RIGHT turn to 7000’ direct
PMD VOR and hold.
Figure 6-66 Map Page
4)
Upon reaching the desired altitude (5000’),
press the OBS Key to return to automatic leg
sequencing. Confirm that ‘SUSP’ no longer
appears directly above the OBS Key.
5)
An alert (‘NEXT DTK 126°’) appears, providing
guidance to the inbound course (Figure 6-67)
The actual desired track (DTK) depends on
ground speed and distance from PMD VOR.
Intercept and fly the inbound course.
Figure 6-65 Palmdale Missed Approach
In this instance, the leg corresponds to the initial phase
of the missed approach, which reads ‘Climb to 5000’
outbound via PMD VOR R-282’. Refer to Figure 6-65 for
the following steps.
1)
After crossing the MAP, press the OBS Key.
The missed approach sequence is automatically
offered, starting with the course from fix to
altitude leg. The ‘NEXT DTK 282°’ alert appears
in the lower right corner of the screen.
2)
Note that within a few seconds of pressing the
OBS Key to release suspend mode and start
the approach sequence, ‘SUSP’ re-appears
above the OBS Key as the GNS 430 returns
to suspend mode. This is normal when flying
a course from fix to altitude leg and indicates
that automatic leg sequencing is suspended.
190-00140-00 Rev. P
Figure 6-67 Waypoint Alert
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SECTION 6
PROCEDURES
6)
When approaching PMD VOR (the missed
approach holding point), an alert message
in the lower right-hand corner of the screen
recommends the holding pattern entry
procedure (‘HOLD PARALLEL’). When flying
the holding pattern, a timer appears on the
Default NAV Page. The timer automatically
resets on each outbound and inbound portion
of the holding pattern.
7)
Note that the GNS 430 again displays ‘SUSP’
above the OBS Key. Automatic waypoint
sequencing is suspended at the missed
approach holding point. A waypoint alert
(‘APPRCHING WPT’) appears in the lower right
corner of the screen each time the aircraft
approaches PMD VOR in the holding pattern.
8)
When leaving the holding pattern, press the
PROC Key to reactivate the approach, or select
a different approach, or press the Direct-to
Key to select another destination.
Course from fix to manual sequence legs appear on the
Active Flight Plan Page and the Map Page with ‘man seq’
in place of a waypoint identifier. An example of this type
of course leg appears in the COASTAL ONE DEPARTURE
from Westfield, Massachusetts (Barnes Muni). The
example leg corresponds to the departure leg from Barnes
Municipal and appears (as in Figure 6-68) on the Active
Flight Plan Page and the Default NAV Page:
COASTAL ONE DEPARTURE
(CSTL1.CCC)
DEPARTING BARNES MUNI,
Fly assigned heading and altitude
for radar vectors to HFD
VOR. Expect clearance to
requested flight level 10
minutes after departure. From
over HFD VOR, proceed via the HFD R-143 to
Thumb Int,
then via the HTO R-010 to
Yoder Int, then via the CCC
R-057 to CCC VOR.
Then via transition
or assigned
route.




DO NOT USE
FOR NAVIGATION
Figure 6-68 Coastal One Departure
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SECTION 6
PROCEDURES
Refer to Figure 6-68 for the following steps.
1)
3)
Select the departure (CSTL1) from the
Procedures Page, then select the departure
runway, (RW02 in this example, see Figure
6-69) and transition (GEDIC). Refer to Section
6.1 for instructions on selecting departures.
Fly the outbound course. When cleared to
sequence to the next leg, press the OBS Key.
Confirm that ‘SUSP’ no longer appears directly
above the OBS Key. An alert (‘NEXT DTK
186°’) appears in the lower right corner of
the screen (Figure 6-71) to provide guidance
to the next waypoint (HFD VOR). The actual
desired track (DTK) depends on ground speed
and distance from HFD VOR.
Figure 6-69 Runway Window
2)
When departing the airfield, ‘NEXT DTK 026°’
appears in the lower right corner of the screen
and ‘SUSP’ appears directly above the OBS
Key, which indicates the aircraft is now on the
course-from-fix-to-manual-sequence leg. The
distance displayed on the Active Flight Plan
Page, the Default NAV Page (Figure 6-70), and
the Map Page is FROM the waypoint fix (the
departure runway in this example).
Figure 6-71 Waypoint Alert
4)
When the OBS Key is pressed, the GNS 430
automatically sequences to each waypoint
along the remainder of the departure route,
including the selected transition.
Figure 6-70 Default NAV Page
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SECTION 6
PROCEDURES
6.3 ILS Approaches
Precision approaches can be performed with the GNS
430’s built-in VLOC (VOR/localizer/glideslope) receivers.
The GPS receiver can be used for guidance prior to
reaching the final approach fix, but once there, the proper
frequency must be selected on the VLOC Window (left
side of screen) and the CDI output set to ‘VLOC’.
The GNS 430 can be set to automatically switch the
external CDI output from GPS to VLOC as the pilot
intercepts the final approach course. When the ILS
approach is activated, the GNS 430 automatically switches
within 1.2 nm left or right of the final approach course.
This switch can take place anywhere from 2.0 to 15.0 nm
from the FAF.
Figure 6-72 shows multiple locations along the
approach path and the expected CDI selection: GPS or
VLOC. The automatic switch from GPS to VLOC should
occur within the area of the shaded box.
1.2NM
1.2NM
15NM
GPS
VLOC
NOTE: When intercepting the approach course
at a distance less than 2.0 nm from the FAF,
the GNS 430 does not automatically switch the
CDI to VLOC. In this case, press the CDI Key to
manually switch from GPS to VLOC.
GPS
VLOC
2NM
MANUAL
FAF
Figure 6-72 ILS Approach
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SECTION 6
PROCEDURES
The automatic switch from GPS to VLOC occurs
gradually to prevent abrupt CDI changes when coupled
to an autopilot. The CDI selection can also be changed
manually by pressing the CDI Key. Once the switch
from GPS to VLOC has occurred, either automatically or
manually, it does not automatically switch again until the
approach is reactivated or another approach is selected.
To prevent automatic ILS CDI selection, choose the
‘Manual’ ILS CDI setting, as described in Section 10.4
‘CDI Scale/Alarms’. (The factory default setting is ‘Auto’,
which enables the automatic switch to VLOC.)
Flagstaff (AZ) Pulliam
ILS DME Rwy 21


Selecting an ILS Approach
This example uses a flight from Laughlin Bullhead
(Arizona) International to Flagstaff Pulliam (KFLG) and
selects the ILS runway 21 approach. ‘SHUTR’ intersection
is selected as the IAF, which includes an outbound leg and
a procedure turn. Of course, vectors-to-final could also
be selected, as previously described for the non-precision
approach examples (refer to Figure 6-73 for the following
steps).
DO NOT USE FOR
NAVIGATION
Figure 6-73 ILS Approach, Flagstaff
1)
Select Flagstaff Pulliam (KFLG) as the
destination, using the Direct-to Key or as the
last waypoint in a flight plan (Figure 6-74).
Figure 6-74 Select Waypoint
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SECTION 6
PROCEDURES
2)
Press the PROC Key and select the ‘ILS 21’
approach (Figure 6-75) using the steps outlined
in Section 6.1.
Figure 6-75 Approach Window
3)
Flying the ILS Approach
When ‘Activate?’ is selected for an ILS approach,
automatic switching of the external CDI is enabled (unless
turned off from the CDI/Alarms Page). Once established
on the inbound course to the FAF, the external CDI
guidance automatically switches from ‘GPS’ (shown in
green text) to ‘VLOC’ (shown in white text). If the pilot
has forgotten to activate the ILS frequency (step 4 below),
automatic selection of ‘VLOC’ does not occur (refer to
Figure 6-77 for the following steps).
DO NOT USE FOR
NAVIGATION
From the Transitions Window, select ‘SHUTR’
as the IAF (Figure 6-76). Also, select ‘Load?’
(or ‘Activate?’, if already cleared for the
approach).





Figure 6-76 Transitions Window
4)
A reminder message appears, indicating that
GPS can only be used for approach monitoring.
As mentioned, the VLOC receiver must be
used for this approach. Press the ENT Key to
acknowledge the message.
Figure 6-77 Terminal Mode
When an ILS approach is loaded or activated, the ILS
frequency is automatically placed in the standby field of
the VLOC Window. To use this frequency, press the VLOC
Flip-flop Key to place it in the active frequency field.
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SECTION 6
PROCEDURES
1)
Within 30 nm of KFLG, the GNS 430 switches
from enroute mode to terminal mode and the
CDI scale transitions from 5.0 to 1.0 nm, full
scale deflection.
4)
Press the VLOC Flip-flop Key to activate the
ILS frequency. If this step is forgotten, the GNS
430 displays a reminder message (within 3 nm
of the FAF) to activate the ILS frequency.
2)
If the approach has not yet been activated,
(in steps on the preceding page), do so when
cleared for the approach (Figure 6-78).
5)
As the distance (DIS) to the IAF approaches
zero, the alert is replaced by a turn advisory
(‘TURN TO 030°’; see Figure 6-80).
Figure 6-78 Activate Approach
3)
When approaching the IAF (SHUTR), a waypoint
alert (‘NEXT DTK 030°’) appears in the lower
right corner of the screen (Figure 6-79).
Figure 6-80 Turn Advisory
6)
Fly the outbound course.
7)
Approximately one minute past SHUTR
intersection, the alert message ‘START PROC
TRN’ (Figure 6-81) appears in the lower right
corner of the screen (if the pilot has not yet
begun the procedure turn).
Figure 6-79 Waypoint Alert
Figure 6-81 Alert Message
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SECTION 6
PROCEDURES
DO NOT USE FOR
NAVIGATION



Figure 6-83 Waypoint Alert
10) Turn to track the ILS approach course.
Figure 6-82 ILS Approach Course
Refer to Figure 6-82 for the following steps.
8)
Initiate the procedure turn. The GNS 430 does
not provide guidance through the turn. (The
procedure turn is displayed on the Map Page
and indicated as the active leg on the Default
NAV Page and the Active Flight Plan Page.)
9)
After approximately one minute, make a turn
to intercept the ILS. The GNS 430 sequences to
the inbound leg and ‘NEXT DTK 210°’ (Figure
6-83) appears in the lower right corner of the
screen. CDI coupling automatically switches
from the GPS receiver to the VLOC receiver as
the pilot completes the inbound turn. (If the ILS
frequency has not been activated, per step 4,
this automatic CDI switching does not occur.)
NOTE: From this point on, primary navigation
is provided by the VLOC receiver. The pilot may
continue to use the GPS receiver for supplemental
navigation guidance only. ALSO, when using an
external CDI (not an HSI), expect reverse sensing
when flying outbound on the approach course
or when flying a backcourse approach.
11) When approaching the FAF (SHUTR), ‘0.30nm’
appears in the lower left corner of the screen
indicating a CDI scale transition from 1.0 to 0.3
nm, full scale deflection (Figure 6-84). (This
scale transition applies only to the Default NAV
Page’s on-screen CDI, since the external CDI or
HSI is now coupled to the VLOC receiver. GPS
approach mode is not activated for precision
approaches, since the VLOC receiver must be
used for primary navigation.)
Figure 6-84 Final Approach
6-30
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SECTION 6
PROCEDURES
DO NOT USE FOR
NAVIGATION
Figure 6-86 Default NAV Page
Figure 6-87 Map Page
Figure 6-85 Final Approach, Flagstaff
Refer to Figure 6-85 for the following steps.
14) When approaching the MAP, a waypoint alert
(‘APPRCHING WPT’) appears in the lower right
corner.
12) When approaching SHUTR, a waypoint alert
(‘NEXT DTK 210°’) appears in the lower right
corner of the screen (Figure 6-84).
13) After crossing SHUTR, the destination sequences
to the MAP (‘RW21’, the runway threshold, see
Figure 6-86). Fly toward the MAP. (When
viewing the Map Page as in Figure 6-87, note
that the final course segment is displayed
in magenta (the active leg of the flight plan
always appears in magenta), and a dashed
line extends the course beyond the MAP.)
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SECTION 6
PROCEDURES
15) After crossing the MAP, ‘SUSP’ appears above
the OBS Key (Figure 6-88), indicating that
automatic sequencing of approach waypoints
is suspended at the MAP. A ‘FROM’ indication
is displayed on the CDI and Default NAV Page,
but course guidance along the final approach
course continues. Do not follow this extended
course. Follow published missed approach
procedures, using the OBS Key to initiate the
missed approach sequence.
Figure 6-88 ‘SUSP’ Annunciation
6-32
6.4 Points to Remember for All
Approaches
• The GNS 430 is designed to complement printed
approach plates and vastly improve situational
awareness throughout the approach. However,
the pilot must always fly an approach as it appears
on the approach plate.
• The active leg (or the portion of the approach
currently in use) is depicted in magenta on the
Map Page. When flying the approach, the GNS
430 automatically sequences through each leg
of the approach unless ‘SUSP’ appears above
the OBS Key. ‘SUSP’ indicates that automatic
sequencing of approach waypoints is suspended
on the current leg and normally appears at
holding patterns and upon crossing the missed
approach point (MAP).
NOTE: In addition to using the OBS Key to
initiate the missed approach sequence, the
CDI Key may be used to manually switch the
external CDI output to the GPS receiver. ‘GPS’ is
indicated above the CDI Key. If the pilot leaves
the CDI output on ‘VLOC’ and the pilot is using
an external CDI (not an HSI), expect reverse
sensing on the backcourse of the ILS.
GNS 430(A) Pilot’s Guide and Reference
190-00140-00 Rev. P
SECTION 6
PROCEDURES
Points to Remember for Localizer-based
Approaches
• The default factory setting allows the CDI output
to automatically switch from the GPS receiver
to the VLOC receiver. If the ‘ILS CDI Capture’
setting is changed to ‘Manual’, the pilot must
determine when to select GPS or VLOC guidance
during the approach. Remember, VLOC is
required for the final course segment from final
approach fix (FAF) to MAP.
• If the CDI output has not automatically switched
from GPS to ILS by 2.0 nm prior to the FAF, the
pilot must manually switch to the VLOC receiver
by pressing the CDI Key. Verify that ‘VLOC’ is
displayed directly above the CDI Key.
• Automatic switching of CDI output is available
for ILS, localizer, SDF, and LDA approaches.
Automatic CDI switching is not available for
backcourse approaches.
• When flying an approach with the autopilot
coupled, the pilot must monitor system functions
at all times and verify that the autopilot and
external CDI (or HSI) switches to the VLOC
receiver with sufficient time to capture and track
the approach course. Switching to VLOC late
in the approach may not provide the autopilot
enough time to respond and intercept the
approach course prior to the FAF (depending
upon the performance characteristics of the
autopilot and aircraft). In such cases, the pilot
should manually fly the approach or refer to the
documentation provided with the autopilot.
190-00140-00 Rev. P
• When an ILS approach is first selected and
‘loaded’ (or ‘activated’), the ILS frequency is
automatically placed in the standby field. In
order to fly the final course segment of the ILS
approach, the pilot must place the ILS frequency
in the active frequency field by pressing the
VLOC Flip-flop Key. If this is not done, a ‘Select
appropriate frequency for approach’ message
appears within 3.0 nm of the FAF.
• When flying a localizer-based approach (other
than backcourse) with automatic CDI switching
enabled:
1. GPS guidance is used while flying
outbound and on the initial portion of
the procedure turn.
2. VLOC guidance is used on the remainder
of the approach from the time the pilot
turns inbound on the procedure turn.
3. The localizer frequency must be active to
use VLOC guidance.
• When flying a localizer-based approach with
automatic CDI switching disabled:
1. The pilot may select VLOC guidance
at any point on the approach prior to
reaching the FAF.
2. The localizer frequency must be active to
use VLOC guidance.
GNS 430(A) Pilot’s Guide and Reference
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SECTION 6
PROCEDURES
Blank Page
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SECTION 7
WPT PAGES
SECTION 7: WPT PAGES
To quickly select a WPT page:
1)
From any page, press and hold the CLR Key to
select the Default NAV Page (this step may be
skipped if the unit is already displaying any of
the main pages.)
2)
Turn the large right knob to select the WPT
Page Group. ‘WPT’ appears in the lower right
corner of the screen.
3)
Turn the small right knob to select the desired
WPT page.
7.1 WPT Page Group
Section 3.1 introduced the GNS 430’s main page groups
(Table 7-1)—NAV, WPT, AUX, NRST—and described
each page in the NAV group. This second page group
(WPT) provides information for the thousands of airports,
VORs, NDBs, intersections, runways, frequencies, and
procedures stored on the Jeppesen NavData Card. A
WPT page is also provided to display information for up
to 1,000 user-created waypoints.
Page Groups
NAV Group WPT Group AUX Group NRST Group
see Section 3 10 WPT Pages see Section 10 see Section 8
Table 7-1 Page Groups
Airport Location
Airport Runway
Airport Frequency
Airport Approach
Airport Arrival
Airport Departure
Intersection
NDB
VOR
NOTE: The GNS 430 uses International Civil
Aviation Organization (ICAO) identifiers for all
airports. All U.S. airport identifiers which contain
only letters use the prefix ‘K’. For example, Los
Angeles International is KLAX under the ICAO
standard. Other airports, such as Otten Memorial
(3VS), that contain numbers in the identifier, do
not require the ‘K’ prefix. Many foreign countries
use two letter prefixes.
The WPT Page Group includes ten pages (Figure
7-1). While viewing any WPT page, turn the small right
knob to select a different WPT page. The first six pages
provide detailed information for the selected airport:
location, runways, frequencies, approaches, arrivals, and
departures. The last four pages provide information for
intersections, NDBs, VORs, and user-created waypoints.
After a WPT page is selected, information for a waypoint
may be viewed by entering the identifier (or name) of the
desired waypoint. Airports, NDBs, and VORs may be
selected by identifier, facility name, or location (city).
User Waypoint
Figure 7-1 WPT Pages
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SECTION 7
WPT PAGES
To enter a waypoint identifier:
1)
Select the desired WPT page and press the
small right knob to activate the cursor.
2)
Turn the small right knob to select the first
character of the waypoint’s identifier.
3)
Turn the large right knob to select the next
character field.
4)
Turn the small right knob to select the desired
character.
5)
Repeat steps 3 and 4 until the identifier is
selected, then press the ENT Key.
6)
To remove the flashing cursor, press the small
right knob.
5)
Turn the large right knob to select the next
character field.
6)
Repeat steps 4 and 5 until the facility name or
location is selected, then press the ENT Key
(Figures 7-3 and 7-4).
Figure 7-3 Airport Location Page
To enter a waypoint facility name or city
location:
1)
Select the Airport Location Page, NDB Page
or VOR Page from the WPT Page Group (as
described on the preceding page).
2)
Press the small right knob to activate the
cursor.
3)
Turn the large right knob to select the facility
name or location (city) field.
4)
Turn the small right knob to select the desired
character (Figure 7-2).
Figure 7-4 VOR Page
7)
To remove the flashing cursor, press the small
right knob.
Figure 7-2 Airport Location Page
7-2
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SECTION 7
WPT PAGES
Duplicate Waypoints
Once the identifier, facility name, or location is
entered, all six airport pages display information for the
selected airport. When entering an identifier, facility
name, or location, the GNS 430’s Spell’N’Find feature
scrolls through the database, displaying those waypoints
matching the characters that have been entered to that
point. If duplicate entries exist for the entered facility
name or location, additional entries may be viewed
by continuing to turn the small right knob during the
selection process. If duplicate entries exist for an entered
identifier, a Duplicate Waypoint Window appears when
the identifier is selected (by pressing the ENT Key).
To select a facility name or location where
duplicate entries exist:
1)
Select the desired facility name or location,
following the preceding steps under ‘To enter
a waypoint facility name or city location’.
2)
When spelling the facility name or location,
using the small and large right knobs, the GNS
430’s Spell’N’Find feature selects the first entry
(Figure 7-5) in the database based upon the
characters entered up to that point.
knob if the desired facility name or location
has been scrolled past.
Figure 7-6 Second Facility for Albuquerque
4)
Press the ENT Key to select the desired facility
name or location.
5)
To remove the flashing cursor, press the small
right knob.
To select a waypoint identifier from a list
of duplicates:
1)
Select the desired airport or NAVAID identifier
following the preceding steps under ‘To enter
a waypoint facility name or city location’.
2)
A Duplicate Waypoints Window appears (Figure
7-7). Turn the large right knob to select the
desired waypoint and press the ENT Key.
Figure 7-5 First Facility for Albuquerque
Figure 7-7 Duplicate Waypoints Window
3)
Continue turning the small right knob to
scroll through any additional database listings
(Figure 7-6) for the selected facility name or
location. Scroll backwards with the small right
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3)
To remove the flashing cursor, press the small
right knob.
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7.2 Airport Location Page
The Airport Location Page (Figure 7-8) displays the
latitude, longitude, and elevation of the selected airport.
The Airport Location Page also displays facility name and
location, as well as fuel availability, available approaches,
radar coverage, and airspace type.
1
2
4
3
5
6
The following descriptions and abbreviations are
used:
• Type - Usage type: Public, Heliport, Military, or
Private
• Position - Latitude/Longitude (degrees/minutes or
degrees/minutes/seconds), MGRS, or UTM/UPS
• Elevation - In feet or meters
• Fuel - For public-use airports, the available fuel
type(s) are: Avgas (80-87/100LL/100-130/Mogas),
Jet, or None
• Approach - Best available approach: ILS, MLS,
LOC, LDA, SDF, GPS, VOR, RNAV (‘RNV’),
LORAN (‘LOR’), NDB, TACAN (‘TCN’),
Helicopter (‘HEL’), or VFR
• Radar - Radar coverage: Yes or No
7
8
9
10
• Airspace - Control environment: Class B, Class C,
Class D, CTA, TMA, TRSA, or none
Figure 7-8 Airport Location Page
1
Position (Latitude/Longitude)
2
Facility Name and Location (City)
3
Radar Coverage
4
Airport Identifier, Symbol, and Type
5
Field Elevation and Available Fuels
6
Airspace Type
7
Best Available Approach
8
Current Page Group
9
Position of Current Page within Current
Page Group
10
Number of Pages in Current Page Group
7-4
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7.3 Airport Runway Page
The Airport Runway Page (Figure 7-9) displays runway
designations, length, surface type, and lighting for the
selected airport. A map image of the runway layout and
surrounding area is also displayed on the Airport Runway
Page. The map image range appears in the lower left
corner and is adjustable using the RNG Key. For airports
with multiple runways, information for each runway is
available.
Map Image
To display information for each additional
runway:
1)
Press the small right knob to activate the
cursor.
2)
Turn the large right knob to place the cursor
on the runway designation field (Figure 7-9).
3)
Turn the small right knob to display a window
listing all runways for the selected airport
(Figure 7-10).
Airport Identifier, Runway Designations
Symbol, and Type
Position of
Current Page
within Current
Page Group
Runway Length and Width, Current Page
Surface, and Lighting
Group
Figure 7-9 Airport Runway Page
Number of Pages in
Current Page Group
Figure 7-10 Runway Window
4)
Continue turning the small right knob to select
the desired runway.
5)
Press the ENT Key to display information for
the selected runway on the Airport Runway
Page (Figure 7-11).
Figure 7-11 Airport Runway Page
6)
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To remove the flashing cursor, press the small
right knob.
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To adjust the range of the map image:
1)
Press the down arrow of the RNG Key to
display a smaller map area.
Press the up arrow of the RNG Key to display
a larger map area.
The following descriptions and abbreviations are used
on the Airport Runway Page:
2)
• Type - Usage type: Public, Heliport, Military, or
Private
• Surface - Runway surface types include: Hard,
Turf, Sealed, Gravel, Dirt, Soft, Unknown, or
Water
7.4 Airport Frequency Page
The Airport Frequency Page displays radio frequencies
and frequency types for the selected airport, as well as
sector and altitude restrictions (where applicable). If
the selected airport has a localizer-based approach,
the localizer frequency(ies) is also listed on the Airport
Frequency Page (Figure 7-12). The Airport Frequency
Page may be used to quickly select and tune a COM or
VLOC frequency.
Frequency Type Airport Identifier,
Symbol, and Type
Frequency
• Lighting - Runway lighting types include: No
Lights, Part Time, Full Time, Unknown, or
Frequency (for pilot-controlled lighting)
Scroll
Bar
Position of
Current Page
within Current
Page Group
Usage Restrictions
Information
Current Page
Group
Number of Pages in
Current Page Group
Figure 7-12 Airport Frequency Page
To scroll through the frequency list and
tune to a desired frequency on the list:
1)
7-6
Press the small right knob to activate the
cursor.
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2)
Turn the large right knob to scroll through the
list, placing the cursor on the desired frequency
(Figure 7-13). If there are more frequencies in
the list than can be displayed on the screen, a
scroll bar (Figure 7-12) along the right-hand
side of the screen indicates the cursor’s position
within the list.
Some listed frequencies may include designations for
limited usage, as follows:
• ‘TX’ - Transmit only
• ‘RX’ - Receive only
• ‘PT’ - Part time frequency
If a listed frequency has sector or altitude restrictions,
the frequency is preceded by an ‘Info?’ designation.
To view usage restrictions for a frequency:
1)
Turn the large right knob to place the cursor
on the ‘Info?’ designation directly to the left
of the desired frequency (Figure 7-15).
Figure 7-13 Frequency Highlighted
3)
Press the ENT Key to place the selected
frequency in the standby field of the COM or
VLOC Window (Figure 7-14).
Figure 7-15 ‘Info?’ Highlighted
2)
Press the ENT Key to display the restriction
information (Figure 7-16).
Figure 7-14 Frequency Moved to Standby Field
4)
To remove the flashing cursor, press the small
right knob.
Figure 7-16 Restriction Information Page
3)
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To return to the Airport Frequency Page, press
the ENT Key.
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The following descriptions and abbreviations are used
on the Airport Frequency Page:
• Type - Usage type: Public, Heliport, Military, or
Private
• Frequency - Communication frequencies which
may include restrictions:
Approach
Class C
TMA
Arrival
CTA
Terminal
Class B
Departure
TRSA
7.5 Airport Approach Page
The Airport Approach Page (Figure 7-17) shows the
available approach procedures for the selected airport.
Where multiple initial approach fixes (IAFs) and feeder
routes are available, that information may also be
displayed. A map image provides a layout diagram for
each approach and transition.
Airport Identifier,
Symbol, and Type
Map Image
Communication frequencies without restrictions:
ATIS
Center
Control
Multicom
Ramp
Unicom
ASOS
Clearance
Ground
Pre-taxi
Other
Navigation frequencies:
ILS
7-8
LOC
Approach
Procedure
Name
AWOS
Gate
Helicopter
Radar
Tower
Transitions:
IAF’s, Feeder
Routes, and
Vectors-to-Final
Position of Current Page
Current
within Current Page Group
Page Group
Figure 7-17 Airport Approach Page
Number of Pages in
Current Page Group
To scroll through the available approaches
and transitions:
1)
Press the small right knob to activate the
cursor.
2)
Turn the large right knob to place the cursor
on the approach (APR) procedure name field
(Figure 7-17).
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3)
Turn the small right knob to display a window
of available approaches for the selected airport
(Figure 7-18). Continue turning the small right
knob to select the desired approach.
Figure 7-18 Approach Window
4)
Press the ENT Key. The cursor moves to the
transitions (TRANS) field.
5)
Turn the small right knob to display a window
of available transitions (Figure 7-19). Continue
turning the small right knob to select the
desired transition or select ‘VECTORS’ for
guidance only along the final course segment
of the approach.
Press the ENT Key. To remove the flashing
cursor, press the small right knob.
6)
NOTE: Not all approaches in the database
are approved for GPS use. When selecting an
approach, a ‘GPS’ designation to the right of the
procedure name indicates the procedure can be
flown using the GPS receiver. Some procedures
do not have this designation, meaning the
GPS receiver may be used for supplemental
navigation guidance only. ILS approaches, for
example, must be flown by tuning the VLOC
receiver to the proper frequency and coupling
the VLOC receiver to the external CDI (or HSI).
Figure 7-19 Transitions Window
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Airport Approach Page Options
3)
The following options are available for the Airport
Approach Page, by pressing the MENU Key:
‘Load into Active FPL?’ allows the pilot to load the
selected approach into the active flight plan without
activating it. This performs the same operation as selecting
‘Load?’ from the Procedures Page ‘Select Approach?’
option. See Section 6.1.
Turn the large right knob to highlight ‘Load
into Active FPL?’ and press the ENT Key (Figure
7-21).
To load an approach from the Airport
Approach Page:
Figure 7-21 Airport Approach Page Menu
4)
Figure 7-20 Airport Approach Page
1)
Select the desired approach and transition
using the steps outlined in Section 6.1 (Figure
7-20).
2)
Press the MENU Key to display the Airport
Approach Page Menu.
7-10
The Active Flight Plan Page appears. Press the
FPL Key to return to the Airport Procedures
Page.
‘Load and Activate?’ allows the pilot to load the selected
approach into the active flight plan and activate navigation
guidance to the approach transition (Section 6.1).
To load and activate an approach from the Airport
Approach Page, follow the steps above, but select ‘Load
and Activate?’ in step 3.
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7.6 Airport Arrival Page
3)
The Airport Arrival Page (Figure 7-22) shows the
available Airport Standard Terminal Arrival (STAR)
procedures for the selected airport. Where multiple
transitions or runways are associated with the arrival
procedure, that information may also be displayed. A
map image provides a layout diagram for each arrival,
transition, and runway.
Airport Identifier,
Symbol, and Type
Map Image
Arrival
Procedure
Name
Transitions
Runway
associated
with arrival
Position of Current Page
within Current Page Group
Turn the small right knob to display a window
of available arrivals for the selected airport
(Figure 7-23). Continue turning the small right
knob to select the desired arrival.
Current
Page Group
Figure 7-23 Arrivals Window
4)
Press the ENT Key. The cursor moves to the
transitions (TRANS) field.
5)
Turn the small right knob to display a window
of available transitions (Figure 7-24). Continue
turning the small right knob to select the
desired transition.
Number of Pages in
Current Page Group
Figure 7-22 Airport Arrival Page
To scroll through the available arrivals:
1)
Press the small right knob to activate the
cursor.
2)
Turn the large right knob to place the cursor
on the arrival (ARVL) procedure name field
(Figure 7-22).
Figure 7-24 Transitions Window
6)
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Press the ENT Key. The cursor moves to the
runway field.
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7)
Turn the small right knob to display a window
of available runways (Figure 7-25). Continue
turning the small right knob to select the
desired runway. (‘ALL’ may appear in the
runway field, indicating the arrival procedure
applies to all runways. For airports with
parallel runways, ‘B’ may appear at the end of
the runway designation to indicate the arrival
procedure applies to both runways.)
Airport Arrival Page Options
The following option is available for the Airport Arrival
Page, by pressing the MENU Key:
‘Load into Active FPL?’ allows the pilot to load the
selected arrival into the active flight plan. This is identical
to loading an arrival procedure from the Procedures Page,
as described in Section 6.1.
To load an arrival procedure from the
Airport Arrival Page:
1)
Select the desired arrival, transition, and
runway using the steps above.
2)
Press the MENU Key to display the Airport
Arrival Page Menu.
3)
Press the ENT Key to select the ‘Load into
Active FPL?’ option (Figure 7-26).
Figure 7-25 Runway Window
8)
Press the ENT Key. To remove the flashing
cursor, press the small right knob.
Figure 7-26 Airport Arrival Page Menu
4)
7-12
The Active Flight Plan Page appears. Press the
FPL Key to return to the Airport Arrival Page.
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7.7 Airport Departure Page
The Airport Departure Page (Figure 7-27) shows the
available Airport Standard Instrument Departure (SID)
procedures for the selected airport. Where multiple
runways or transitions are associated with the departure
procedure, that information may also be displayed. A
map image provides a layout diagram for each departure,
runway, and transition.
Airport Identifier,
Symbol, and Type
Map Image
Departure
Procedure
Name
Figure 7-28 Departure Window
4)
Press the ENT Key. The cursor moves to the
runway field.
5)
Turn the small right knob to display a window
of available runways (Figure 7-29). Continue
turning the small right knob to select the
desired runway. ‘ALL’ may appear in the
runway field, indicating the departure procedure
applies to all runways. For airports with parallel
runways, ‘B’ may appear at the end of the
runway designation to indicate the departure
procedure applies to both runways.
Runways
associated with
Departure
Transitions
Position of Current Page
within Current Page Group
Current
Page Group
Number of Pages in
Current Page Group
Figure 7-27 Airport Departure Page
To scroll through the available departures:
1)
Press the small right knob to activate the
cursor.
2)
Turn the large right knob to place the cursor
on the departure (DEP) procedure name field
(Figure 7-27).
3)
Turn the small right knob to display a window
of available departures for the selected airport
(Figure 7-28). Continue turning the small right
knob to select the desired departure.
190-00140-00 Rev. P
Figure 7-29 Runway Window
6)
Press the ENT Key. The cursor moves to the
transitions (TRANS) field.
7)
Turn the small right knob to display a window
of available transitions. Continue turning
the small right knob to select the desired
transition.
8)
Press the ENT Key. To remove the flashing
cursor, press the small right knob.
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Airport Departure Page Options
7.8 Intersection Page
The following option is available for the Airport
Departure Page, by pressing the MENU Key:
‘Load into Active FPL?’ allows the pilot to load the
selected departure into the active flight plan. This is
identical to loading a departure procedure from the
Procedures Page, as described in Section 6.1.
The Intersection Page (Figure 7-31) displays the
latitude, longitude, region, and country for the selected
intersection. The Intersection Page also displays the
identifier, radial, and distance from the nearest VOR,
VORTAC, or VOR/DME.
To load a departure procedure from the
Airport Departure Page:
1)
Select the desired departure, runway, and
transition using the steps above.
2)
Press the MENU Key to display the Airport
Departure Page Menu.
3)
Press the ENT Key to select the ‘Load into
Active FPL?’ option (Figure 7-30).
Latitude/Longitude Intersection Identifier Region/
Position
Country
and Symbol
Nearest VOR
and Symbol
Radial and
Distance
from Nearest
VOR
Position of
Current Page
within Current
Page Group
Number of Pages in
Current Page Group
Figure 7-31 Intersection Page
Current Page Group
The following descriptions and abbreviations are
used:
• Position - Latitude/Longitude (degrees/minutes or
degrees/minutes/seconds), MGRS, or UTM/UPS
Figure 7-30 Airport Departure Page Menu
4)
The Active Flight Plan Page appears. Press
the FPL Key to return to the Airport Departure
Page.
• RAD - Radial from nearest VOR in degrees
magnetic or degrees true (depending upon unit
configuration)
• DIS - Distance from nearest VOR, in nautical
miles/statute miles/kilometers (depending upon
unit configuration)
NOTE: The VOR displayed on the Intersection
Page is the nearest VOR, not necessarily the VOR
used to define the intersection.
Intersections may only be selected by identifier, as
described in Section 7.1.
7-14
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7.9 NDB Page
7.10 VOR Page
The NDB Page displays the facility name, city,
region/country, latitude, and longitude for the selected
NDB (Figure 7-32). The NDB Page also displays
the frequency and a weather broadcast indication (if
applicable). As mentioned in Section 7.1, NDBs may be
selected by identifier, facility name, or location (city).
The VOR Page (Figure 7-33) displays the facility
name, city, region/country, magnetic variation, latitude,
and longitude for the selected VOR. The VOR Page also
displays the frequency and a weather broadcast indication
(if applicable).
Latitude/Longitude
Position
NDB Identifier
and Symbol
Latitude/Longitude VOR Identifier
Position
and Symbol
Facility Name,
City, and Region/
Country
Magnetic
Variation
Facility
Name, City,
and Region/
Country
Frequency
and Weather
Broadcast
Indication
Frequency
and Weather
Broadcast
Indication
Position of Current Page
within Current Page Group
Current
Page Group
Number of Pages in
Current Page Group
Figure 7-32 NDB Page
The following descriptions and abbreviations are
used:
• Symbol - See Section 3.4 for a graphic illustration
of available NDB symbols
• Position - Latitude/Longitude (degrees/minutes or
degrees/minutes/seconds), MGRS, or UTM/UPS
• FREQ - Frequency in kilohertz (kHz)
• Wx Brdcst - Weather information is broadcast on
the selected facility’s frequency
Position of Current Page
within Current Page Group
Current
Page Group
Number of Pages in
Current Page Group
Figure 7-33 VOR Page
The following descriptions and abbreviations are
used:
• Symbol - See Section 3.4 for a graphic illustration
of available VOR symbols
• VAR - Magnetic variation in degrees
• Position - Latitude/Longitude (degrees/minutes or
degrees/minutes/seconds), MGRS, or UTM/UPS
• FREQ - Frequency in megahertz (MHz)
• Wx Brdcst - Weather information is broadcast on
the selected facility’s frequency
As mentioned in Section 7.1, VORs may be selected by
identifier, facility name, or location (city). The VOR Page
may also be used to quickly tune the VLOC receiver to the
selected VOR’s frequency.
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To select a VOR frequency from the VOR
Page:
1)
Select the VOR Page from the WPT Page Group,
as described in Section 7.1.
2)
Press the small right knob momentarily to
place the cursor on the VOR identifier field
(Figure 7-34). To select another VOR, use the
small and large right knobs and press the ENT
Key when finished.
3)
Turn the large right knob to highlight the
frequency field (Figure 7-35) and press the ENT
Key to place the frequency in the standby field
of the VLOC Window.
Figure 7-35 Frequency Field Highlighted
4)
To activate the standby VLOC frequency, press
the VLOC Flip-flop Key (Figure 7-36).
Figure 7-34 VOR Identifier Field Selected
Figure 7-36 Activate the Standby Frequency
7-16
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7.11 User Waypoint Page
Creating User Waypoints
In addition to the airport, VOR, NDB, and intersection
information contained in the Jeppesen NavData Card,
the GNS 430 allows the pilot to store up to 1,000 userdefined waypoints. The User Waypoint Page (Figure
7-37) displays the waypoint name (up to five characters
long), identifier, radial from two reference waypoints, and
distance from one reference waypoint, along with the user
waypoint’s latitude/longitude position.
User waypoints may be created from the User
Waypoint Page or the Map Page. To create a new user
waypoint, simply enter its name (identifier) and position,
or reference another waypoint by radial and distance.
Latitude/Longitude
Position
User Waypoint Reference Waypoint
Information
Name
Create/Modify
Action Field
Position of Current Page
within Current Page Group
Current
Page Group
To create a new user waypoint by entering
its latitude/longitude position:
1)
With the User Waypoint Page displayed, press
the small right knob to activate the cursor.
2)
Use the small and large right knobs to enter
a name for the new waypoint (Figure 7-38)
and press the ENT Key. The present position
appears in the position field at the bottom of
the page (Figure 7-39). To create a waypoint at
the present position, turn the large right knob
to highlight ‘Create?’ and skip to step 6.
Number of Pages in
Current Page Group
Figure 7-37 User Waypoint Page
The following descriptions and abbreviations appear
on the User Waypoint Page:
• REF WPT - Reference waypoint identifier (name)
• RAD - Radial from reference waypoint, in degrees
magnetic or degrees true (depending upon unit
configuration)
Figure 7-38 User Waypoint Name Field Selected
• DIS - Distance from reference waypoint, in
nautical miles/statute miles/kilometers (depending
upon unit configuration)
• Position - Latitude/Longitude (degrees/minutes or
degrees/minutes/seconds), MGRS, or UTM/UPS
User waypoints may only be selected by name
(identifier), as described in Section 7.1.
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Figure 7-39 Waypoint Name Field Highlighted
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3)
Turn the large right knob to highlight the
position field at the bottom of the page.
To create a new user waypoint by
referencing an existing waypoint:
4)
Use the small and large right knobs to enter
the position coordinates for the new waypoint
(Figure 7-40).
1)
With the User Waypoint Page displayed, press
the small right knob to activate the cursor.
2)
Use the small and large right knobs to enter
a name for the new waypoint and press the
ENT Key.
3)
Turn the large right knob to highlight the first
reference waypoint (REF WPT) field.
4)
Use the small and large right knobs to enter
the identifier of the reference waypoint. The
reference waypoint can be an airport, VOR,
NDB, intersection, or another user waypoint.
Press the ENT Key to accept the selected
identifier.
5)
The cursor moves to the radial (RAD) field
(Figure 7-41). Use the small and large right
knobs to enter the radial from the reference
waypoint to the new user waypoint. Press the
ENT Key to accept the selected radial.
Figure 7-40 Present Position Field Selected
5)
Press the ENT Key to accept the selected
position.
6)
The cursor moves to ‘Create?’. Press the ENT
Key to add the new waypoint to memory.
7)
Press the small right knob to remove the
flashing cursor.
Figure 7-41 Radial Field Highlighted
6)
7-18
The cursor moves to the distance (DIS) field.
Use the small and large right knobs to enter
the distance from the reference waypoint to
the new user waypoint. Press the ENT Key to
accept the selected distance.
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Turn the large right knob to highlight ‘Create?’
(Figure 7-42) and press the ENT Key.
7)
Creating User Waypoints from the Map Page
The Map Page and panning target pointer (Section 3.4,
Map Panning) provide a quick means of saving the present
position as a user-defined waypoint.
To capture and save the present position as
a user waypoint:
1)
Figure 7-42 ‘Create?’ Highlighted
With the Map Page displayed, press the small
right knob to activate the panning function.
The target pointer appears at the present
position (Figure 7-43).
Press the small right knob to remove the
flashing cursor.
8)
NOTE: The GNS 430 allows the pilot to create
a new user waypoint at a defined radial and
distance from the present position. To reference
the present position, follow the preceding steps,
but press the CLR Key in Step 4. ‘P.POS’ appears
in the reference waypoint (REF WPT) field to
indicate that radial and distance information
references the present position. The second
reference waypoint field (REF WPT) is a temporary
reference only, not a reference that is stored with
the user waypoint. By default, this field displays
a radial from the nearest VOR. However, the pilot
can select any waypoint by identifier to use as
a reference in this field. The GNS 430 can store
user-defined waypoints which are generated
from other equipment in the panel. For example,
an EFIS equipped with joystick inputs can be used
to create user waypoints which (if the installation
supports this) automatically transfer to the GNS
430.
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Figure 7-43 Activate Panning Function
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2)
Press the ENT Key to capture the position
and display the User Waypoint Page (Figure
7-44).
Modifying User Waypoints
To modify an existing waypoint, select that waypoint
on the User Waypoint Page and enter the new position
information directly over the old information.
To modify a user waypoint by changing its
latitude/longitude position:
1)
With the User Waypoint Page displayed, press
the small right knob to activate the cursor.
2)
Use the small and large right knobs to enter
the name of the desired waypoint and press
the ENT Key.
3)
Turn the large right knob to highlight the
position field at the bottom of the page.
4)
Use the small and large right knobs to enter
the new position coordinates (Figure 7-45)
and press the ENT Key to accept the selected
position.
Figure 7-44 User Waypoint Page
3)
4)
A four-digit name is automatically assigned to
the waypoint. To change this name, turn the
large right knob to highlight the name field,
then use the small and large right knobs to
select a new name. Press the ENT Key to
accept the selected name.
The cursor moves to the ‘Create?’ action field.
Press the ENT Key to save the new waypoint.
Figure 7-45 Position Field Selected
7-20
5)
The cursor moves to the ‘Modify?’ action field.
Press the ENT Key to modify the waypoint.
6)
Press the small right knob to remove the
flashing cursor.
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To modify a user waypoint by changing
reference waypoint information:
1)
With the User Waypoint Page displayed, press
the small right knob to activate the cursor.
2)
Use the small and large right knobs to enter
the name of the desired waypoint and press
the ENT Key.
3)
Turn the large right knob to highlight the first
reference waypoint (REF WPT) field, to change
the reference waypoint. Otherwise, continue
turning the large right knob to highlight
the radial (RAD) or distance (DIS) field, as
desired.
4)
Figure 7-47 Radial Field Selected
6)
The cursor moves to the distance (DIS) field
(Figure 7-48). Use the small and large
right knobs to change the distance from the
reference waypoint to the new user waypoint,
if desired. Press the ENT Key to accept the
selected distance.
Use the small and large right knobs to change
the identifier (if desired) of the reference
waypoint (Figure 7-46). The reference waypoint
can be an airport, VOR, NDB, intersection, or
another user waypoint. Press the ENT Key to
accept the selected identifier.
Figure 7-48 Distance Field Selected
7)
The cursor moves to the ‘Modify?’ action field.
Press the ENT Key to modify the waypoint.
8)
Press the small right knob to remove the
flashing cursor.
Figure 7-46 Ref Waypoint Field Selected
5)
The cursor moves to the radial (RAD) field
(Figure 7-47). Use the small and large right
knobs to change the radial from the reference
waypoint, if desired. Press the ENT Key to
accept the selected radial.
190-00140-00 Rev. P
NOTE: If the pilot attempts to modify or delete a
waypoint which is currently a direct-to waypoint
or the current ‘from’ or ‘to’ waypoint in the active
flight plan, the GNS 430 alerts the pilot with the
‘Can’t change an active waypoint’ or ‘Waypoint
is active and can’t be deleted’ message. The
pilot must first cancel the direct-to or remove
the waypoint(s) from the active flight plan before
modifying or deleting the waypoint(s).
GNS 430(A) Pilot’s Guide and Reference
7-21
SECTION 7
WPT PAGES
User Waypoint Page Options
The following User Waypoint Page options are available
by pressing the MENU Key:
‘View User Waypoint List?’ displays a list of all user
waypoints currently stored in memory.
To view a list of all user waypoints:
1)
From the User Waypoint Page, press the MENU
Key to display the User Waypoint Page Menu.
2)
Turn the large right knob to highlight ‘View
User Waypoint List?’ (Figure 7-49) and press
the ENT Key.
Figure 7-50 User Waypoint List Page
4)
Press the small right knob to return to the
User Waypoint Page.
‘Delete User Waypoint?’ allows the pilot to delete the
selected waypoint from memory.
To delete a user waypoint:
Figure 7-49 User Waypoint Page Menu
3)
1)
Select the desired waypoint on the User
Waypoint Page and press the MENU Key to
display the User Waypoint Page Menu.
2)
Turn the large right knob to highlight ‘Delete
User Waypoint?’ (Figure 7-51) and press the
ENT Key.
The top of the User Waypoint List indicates
the total number of user waypoints currently
used and available memory (Figure 7-50). If
more user waypoints are stored than can be
displayed on a single screen, turn the large
right knob to scroll through the User Waypoint
List.
Figure 7-51 User Waypoint Page Menu
‘Crossfill?’ allows the pilot to transfer a user waypoint
to another 400/500-series unit (if installed). Please refer
to Sections 5.1 and 10.1 for detailed information on
crossfill.
7-22
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190-00140-00 Rev. P
SECTION 7
WPT PAGES
User Waypoint List
The User Waypoint List (Figure 7-52) allows the
pilot to review, modify, rename, or delete a selected user
waypoint, or to delete all user waypoints currently stored
in memory. The top of the page shows the number of
waypoints used and available memory.
To review and/or modify a user waypoint
from the User Waypoint List:
1)
Select the User Waypoint List, as described in
this section.
2)
Turn the large right knob to highlight the
desired user waypoint (Figure 7-52).
To rename a user waypoint from the User
Waypoint List:
1)
Select the User Waypoint List, as described in
this section.
2)
Turn the large right knob to highlight the
desired user waypoint.
3)
Use the small and large right knobs to change
the name of the user waypoint (Figure 7-53).
Enter the new name directly over the old name.
Press the ENT Key to accept the new name.
Figure 7-53 User Waypoint Name Selected
Figure 7-52 User Waypoint List Page
3)
Press the ENT Key to display the User Waypoint
Page for the selected waypoint. From this page
the pilot may review all information defining
the waypoint and its position.
4)
To modify the waypoint’s position or reference
waypoint information, follow the steps
described in this section.
5)
To exit the User Waypoint Page, turn the large
right knob to highlight ‘Done?’ and press the
ENT Key.
190-00140-00 Rev. P
4)
A ‘rename waypoint’ confirmation window
is displayed (Figure 7-54). With ‘Yes?’
highlighted, press the ENT Key to rename the
selected user waypoint.
Figure 7-54 Rename Waypoint Window
GNS 430(A) Pilot’s Guide and Reference
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SECTION 7
WPT PAGES
To delete a user waypoint from the User
Waypoint List:
1)
Select the User Waypoint List, as described in
this section.
2)
Turn the large right knob to highlight the
desired user waypoint.
3)
Press the CLR Key to display a ‘delete waypoint’
confirmation window (Figure 7-55).
To delete all user waypoints from memory:
1)
Select the User Waypoint List, as described in
this section.
2)
Press the MENU Key to display a menu for the
User Waypoint List (Figure 7-56).
Figure 7-56 User Waypoint List Page Menu
Figure 7-55 Delete Waypoint Window
4)
With ‘Yes?’ highlighted, press the ENT Key to
delete the selected user waypoint.
3)
With ‘Delete All User Waypoints’ highlighted,
press the ENT Key.
4)
A ‘delete all waypoints’ confirmation window
is displayed (Figure 7-57). With ‘Yes?’
highlighted, press the ENT Key to delete all
user waypoints from memory.
Figure 7-57 Delete All Waypoints Window
7-24
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SECTION 8
NRST PAGES
SECTION 8: NRST PAGES
To quickly select a NRST page:
1)
8.1 NRST Page Group
Section 3.1 introduced the GNS 430’s main page groups
(Table 8-1)—NAV, WPT, AUX, NRST—and described
each page in the NAV group. This fourth page group
(NRST) provides detailed information for the nine nearest
airports, VORs, NDBs, intersections, and user waypoints
within 200 nm of the current position. In addition, the
NRST pages (Figure 8-1) include the five nearest Flight
Service Station (FSS) and center (ARTCC/FIR) points of
communication, plus alerts the pilot to any nearby Special
Use (SUA) or Controlled Airspaces.
Page Groups
NAV Group WPT Group AUX Group NRST Group
see Section 3 see Section 7 see Section 10 8 NRST pages
From any page, press and hold the CLR Key to
select the Default NAV Page (Figure 8-2). This
step may be skipped if any of the main pages
are already displayed.
Figure 8-2 Default NAV Page
2)
Turn the large right knob to select the NRST
Page Group (Figure 8-3). ‘NRST’ appears in
the lower right corner of the screen.
Table 8-1 Page Groups
NRST Airport
NRST Intersection
NRST NDB
Figure 8-3 Nearest Airport Page
NRST VOR
NRST User
NRST Center
3)
Turn the small right knob to select the desired
NRST page.
NRST Flight Service NRST Airspace
Figure 8-1 NRST Pages
190-00140-00 Rev. P
GNS 430(A) Pilot’s Guide and Reference
8-1
SECTION 8
NRST PAGES
Not all nine nearest airports, VORs, NDBs, intersections,
or user waypoints can be displayed on the corresponding
NRST page at one time. The Nearest Airport Page displays
detailed information for three nearest airports, with a scroll
bar along the right-hand side of the page indicating which
part of the list is currently being viewed. The Nearest
Airspace Page displays detailed information for up to
three special use or controlled airspace alerts. The NRST
pages for VORs, NDBs, intersections, and user waypoints
displays five waypoints at a time. The flashing cursor and
large right knob are used to scroll and view the rest of the
waypoints or airspaces in the list.
4)
Press the small right knob to remove the
flashing cursor.
The Nearest ARTCC Page and the Nearest FSS Page
present detailed information for up to five nearby facilities,
displaying only one facility at a time. Again, the additional
information is viewed using the flashing cursor and large
right knob to scroll through the list.
To scroll through the list of nearest
flight service station or center points of
communication:
1)
To scroll through the list of nearest
airports, VORs, NDBs, intersections, user
waypoints, or SUAs:
Select the desired NRST page, using the steps
outlined on the preceding page.
2)
Press the small right knob to activate the
cursor.
1)
Select the desired NRST page, using the steps
outlined on the preceding page.
3)
Turn the small right knob to scroll through the
list (Figure 8-5).
2)
Press the small right knob to activate the
cursor.
3)
Turn the large right knob to scroll through the
list. The scroll bar along the right-hand side
of the page indicates which part of the list is
currently being viewed (Figure 8-4).
Figure 8-5 Nearest FSS Page
Scroll
Bar
4)
Press the small right knob to remove the
flashing cursor.
Figure 8-4 Nearest Airport Page
8-2
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SECTION 8
NRST PAGES
Navigating to a Nearby Waypoint
2)
The NRST pages can be used in conjunction with the
GNS 430’s direct-to function to quickly set a course to a
nearby facility and can provide navigation to the nearest
airport in case of an in-flight emergency.
Press the Direct-to Key to display the select
Direct-to Waypoint Page (Figure 8-7).
To select a nearby airport, VOR, NDB,
intersection, or user waypoint as a directto destination:
1)
Use the flashing cursor to scroll through a NRST
page list (Figure 8-6) and highlight the desired
nearest waypoint, as outlined in Section 8.1.
Figure 8-7 Direct-to Waypoint Page
3)
Press the ENT Key to accept the selected
waypoint’s identifier and press the ENT Key
a second time (Figure 8-8) with ‘Activate?’
highlighted to begin navigating to the selected
waypoint.
Figure 8-6 Nearest VOR Page
Figure 8-8 ‘Activate?’ Highlighted
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SECTION 8
NRST PAGES
8.2 Nearest Airport Page
The Nearest Airport Page displays the identifier, symbol,
bearing, and distance to the nine nearest airports (within
200 nm of the present position). For each airport listed,
the Nearest Airport Page also indicates the best available
approach, common traffic advisory frequency (CTAF),
and the length of the longest runway (Figure 8-9).
Tower or CTAF Airport Identifier Best Available Scroll
Frequency and Symbol, Bearing To, Approach
Bar
Longest Runway and Distance To
The Nearest Airport Page may be used to quickly tune
the COM transceiver to a nearby airport. The selected
frequency is placed in the standby field of the COM
Window and activated using the COM Flip-flop Key.
To quickly tune the common traffic advisory
frequency (CTAF) from the Nearest Airport
Page:
1)
Select the Nearest Airport Page, using the steps
outlined in Section 8.1.
2)
Press the small right knob to activate the
cursor.
3)
Turn the large right knob to scroll through the
list, highlighting the COM frequency associated
with the desired airport (Figure 8-10).
Position of
Current Page
within Current
Page Group
Number of Pages in
Current Page Group
Figure 8-9 Nearest Airport Page
Current Page Group
The Nearest Airport Page can be configured to exclude
shorter runways or undesirable runway surface types,
so that the corresponding airports do not appear on the
list. The pilot may wish to use this feature to exclude
seaplane bases or runway lengths which would be difficult
or impossible to land upon. See Section 10.5, Setup Page
2: Nearest Airport Criteria for additional details.
Figure 8-10 COM Frequency Highlighted
4)
Press the ENT Key to place the selected
frequency in the standby field of the COM
Window (Figure 8-11).
Figure 8-11 Frequency Moved to Standby Field
8-4
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SECTION 8
NRST PAGES
5)
Press the COM Flip-flop Key to activate the
selected frequency (Figure 8-12).
4)
Press the ENT Key to display the Airport
Location Page for the selected airport (Figure
8-14).
Figure 8-12 Frequency Moved to Active Field
6)
Press the small right knob to remove the
flashing cursor.
Figure 8-14 Airport Location Page
5)
Additional communication frequencies, runway information, and more is available from the Nearest Airport
Page by highlighting the identifier of the desired airport
and pressing the ENT Key.
To view additional information for a nearby
airport:
1)
Select the Nearest Airport Page, using the steps
outlined in Section 8.1.
2)
Press the small right knob to activate the
cursor.
3)
Turn the large right knob to scroll through the
list, highlighting the identifier of the desired
airport (Figure 8-13).
To view additional WPT pages for the selected
airport (including the Airport Runway Page and
the Airport Frequency Page) press the small
right knob to remove the flashing cursor. Turn
the small right knob to display the additional
WPT pages (Figure 8-15). When finished, press
the small right knob to return the flashing
cursor to the screen.
Figure 8-15 Additional WPT Page
6)
To return to the Nearest Airport Page, verify
that ‘Done?’ is highlighted by the flashing
cursor and press the ENT Key (or press the
CLR Key).
Figure 8-13 Desired Airport Highlighted
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SECTION 8
NRST PAGES
8.3 Nearest Intersection Page
8.4 Nearest NDB Page
The Nearest Intersection Page (Figure 8-16) displays
the identifier, symbol, bearing, and distance to the nine
nearest intersections (within 200 nm of the present
position).
To view additional information for a nearby intersection,
start from the Nearest Intersection Page and follow the
preceding steps 2 through 4.
The Nearest NDB Page (Figure 8-17) displays the
identifier, symbol, bearing, distance, and frequency to
the nine nearest NDBs (within 200 nm of the present
position).
To view additional information for a nearby NDB, start
from the nearest NDB Page and follow the preceding steps
2 through 4.
Intersection Identifier
and Symbol
Intersection Identifier
and Symbol
Bearing To and
Distance To
Bearing To and
Distance To
NDB
Frequency
Position of
Current Page
within Current
Page Group
Number of Pages in
Current Page Group
Figure 8-16 Nearest Intersection Page
Current Page Group
8-6
Position of
Current Page
within Current
Page Group
Number of Pages in
Current Page Group
Figure 8-17 Nearest NDB Page
Current Page Group
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SECTION 8
NRST PAGES
8.5 Nearest VOR Page
The Nearest VOR Page (Figure 8-18) displays the
identifier, symbol, bearing, and distance to the nine
nearest VORs (within 200 nm of the present position).
For each VOR listed, the nearest VOR Page also indicates
the frequency and may be used to quickly tune the VLOC
receiver to the nearby VOR. The selected frequency is
placed in the standby field of the VLOC Window and
activated using the VLOC Flip-flop Key.
VOR Identifier
and Symbol
VOR
Bearing To and
Distance To Frequency
Scroll
Bar
To quickly tune a VOR’s frequency from the
nearest VOR Page:
1)
Select the nearest VOR Page, using the steps
outlined in Section 8.1.
2)
Press the small right knob to activate the
cursor.
3)
Turn the large right knob to scroll through the
list, highlighting the frequency associated with
the desired VOR (Figure 8-18).
4)
Press the ENT Key to place the selected
frequency in the standby field of the VLOC
Window (Figure 8-19).
Position of
Current Page
within Current
Page Group
Number of Pages in
Current Page Group
Figure 8-18 Nearest VOR Page
Current Page Group
190-00140-00 Rev. P
Figure 8-19 Move Frequency to Standby Field
5)
Press the VLOC Flip-flop Key to activate the
selected frequency.
6)
Press the small right knob to remove the
flashing cursor.
GNS 430(A) Pilot’s Guide and Reference
8-7
SECTION 8
NRST PAGES
To view additional information for a nearby
VOR:
1)
Select the nearest VOR Page, using the steps
outlined in Section 8.1.
2)
Press the small right knob to activate the
cursor.
3)
Turn the large right knob to scroll through the
list, highlighting the identifier of the desired
VOR (Figure 8-20).
8.6 Nearest User Waypoint Page
The Nearest User Waypoint Page (Figure 8-21) displays
the name, bearing and distance to the nine nearest user
waypoints (within 200 nm of the present position).
Waypoint Identifier
and Symbol
Bearing To and
Distance To
Position of
Current Page
within Current
Page Group
Number of Pages in
Current Page Group
Figure 8-21 Nearest User Waypoint Page
Current Page Group
Figure 8-20 Nearest VOR Page
8-8
4)
Press the ENT Key to display the VOR Page for
the selected VOR.
5)
To return to the nearest VOR Page, verify that
‘Done?’ is highlighted by the flashing cursor
and press the ENT Key (or press the CLR
Key).
6)
Press the small right knob to remove the
flashing cursor.
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SECTION 8
NRST PAGES
8.7 Nearest Center (ARTCC) Page
The Nearest Center Page (Figure 8-22) displays the
facility name, bearing to, and distance to the five nearest
ARTCC points of communication (within 200 nm of the
present position). For each ARTCC listed, the Nearest
Center Page also indicates the frequency(ies) and may be
used to quickly tune the COM transceiver to the center’s
frequency. The selected frequency is placed in the standby
field of the COM Window and activated using the COM
Flip-flop Key.
Frequency(ies)
ARTCC Name
2)
Press the small right knob to activate the
cursor.
3)
Turn the large right knob to scroll through
the list, selecting the desired ARTCC (Figure
8-22).
4)
Turn the large right knob to scroll down
the page, highlighting the desired frequency
(Figure 8-23).
Bearing To and
Distance To
Position of
Current Page
within Current
Page Group
Figure 8-23 Frequency Field Highlighted
5)
Number of Pages in
Current Page Group
Figure 8-22 Nearest ARTCC Page
Current Page Group
Press the ENT Key to place the selected
frequency in the standby field of the COM
Window (Figure 8-24).
To quickly tune an ARTCC’s frequency from
the Nearest Center Page:
1)
Select the Nearest Center Page, using the steps
outlined in Section 8.1.
Figure 8-24 Frequency Moved to Standby Field
190-00140-00 Rev. P
6)
Press the COM Flip-flop Key to activate the
selected frequency.
7)
Press the small right knob to remove the
flashing cursor.
GNS 430(A) Pilot’s Guide and Reference
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SECTION 8
NRST PAGES
8.8 Nearest Flight Service Station
(FSS) Page
The Nearest Flight Service Station Page (Figure 8-25)
displays the facility name, bearing to, and distance to the
five nearest FSS points of communication (within 200 nm
of the present position). For each FSS listed, the Nearest
Flight Service Station Page also indicates the frequency(ies)
and may be used to quickly tune the COM transceiver to
the FSS’s frequency. The selected frequency is placed in
the standby field of the COM Window and activated using
the COM Flip-flop Key.
For duplex operations, ‘RX’ and ‘TX’ indications
appears beside the listed frequencies, indicating ‘receive
only’ or ‘transmit only’ frequencies. The associated VOR
is also provided for reference.
FSS Name
VOR Identifier (For
Duplex Operation)
Frequency(ies)
To quickly tune an FSS’s frequency from the
Nearest Flight Service Station Page:
1)
Select the Nearest Flight Service Station Page,
using the steps outlined in Section 8.1 (Figure
8-25).
2)
Press the small right knob to activate the
cursor.
3)
Turn the small right knob to scroll through the
list, selecting the desired FSS (Figure 8-26).
Bearing To and
Distance To
Figure 8-26 FSS Field Selected
4)
Position of
Current Page
within Current
Page Group
Turn the large right knob to scroll down
the page (Figure 8-27), highlighting the
desired frequency (COM frequency[ies] or VOR
frequency for duplex operation).
Current Page Group
Number of Pages in
Current Page Group
Figure 8-25 Nearest FSS Page
Figure 8-27 Frequency Field Highlighted
8-10
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190-00140-00 Rev. P
SECTION 8
NRST PAGES
5)
Press the ENT Key to place the selected
frequency in the standby field of the COM or
VLOC Window (figure 8-28).
8.9 Nearest Airspace Page
The last page in the NRST group, the Nearest Airspace
Page alerts the pilot to as many as nine controlled or
special use airspaces near or in the flight path. Alerts are
provided according to the following conditions:
• If the aircraft’s projected course will take it inside
an airspace within the next ten minutes, the alert
message ‘Airspace ahead -- less than 10 minutes’
appears (Figure 8-29). The Nearest Airspace Page
shows the airspace as ‘Ahead’.
Figure 8-28 Frequency Moved to Standby Field
6)
Press the COM Flip-flop or VLOC Flip-flop
Key, as appropriate, to activate the selected
frequency.
7)
Press the small right knob to remove the
flashing cursor.
Figure 8-29 Airspace Messages
• If the aircraft is within two nautical miles of
an airspace and the current course will take it
inside the airspace, the message ‘Airspace near
and ahead’ appears (Figure 8-29). The Nearest
Airspace Page shows ‘Within 2nm of airspace’.
• If aircraft is within two nautical miles of an
airspace and the current course will not take it
inside the airspace, the message ‘Near airspace less
than 2nm’ appears. The Nearest Airspace Page
shows the airspace as ‘Ahead < 2nm’.
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GNS 430(A) Pilot’s Guide and Reference
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SECTION 8
NRST PAGES
• If the aircraft has entered an airspace, the message
‘Inside Airspace’ appears (Figure 8-30). The
Nearest Airspace Page shows ‘Inside of airspace’.
Message
Airspace
Name Annunciator
Status and
Time to Entry
Position of
Current Page
within Current
Page Group
Number of Pages in
Current Page Group
Figure 8-31 Nearest Airspace Page
Current Page Group
Figure 8-30 Airspace Messages
Note that the airspace alerts are based on threedimensional data (latitude, longitude, and altitude) to
avoid nuisance alerts. The alert boundaries for controlled
airspace are also sectorized to provide complete
information on any nearby airspace. Once one of the
described conditions exists, the message annunciator
flashes, alerting the pilot of an airspace message.
To view additional details for an airspace
listed on the Nearest Airspace Page:
1)
Select the Nearest Airspace Page, using the
steps outlined in Section 8.1 (Figure 8-32).
To view an airspace alert message:
1)
When the message annunciator above the
MSG Key flashes, press the MSG Key.
2)
Press the MSG Key again to return to the
previous page.
Once an airspace alert message appears, detailed
information concerning the specific airspace is provided
on the Nearest Airspace Page (Figure 8-31). The Nearest
Airspace Page displays the airspace name, status (‘Ahead’,
‘Ahead < 2nm’, etc., as described on the preceding
page), and a time to entry (if applicable). By selecting
any airspace name listed on the Nearest Airspace Page,
additional details are provided—including controlling
agency, communication frequencies, and floor/ceiling
limits.
8-12
Figure 8-32 Nearest Airspace Page
2)
Press the small right knob to activate the
cursor.
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SECTION 8
NRST PAGES
3)
Turn the large right knob to scroll through the
list, highlighting the desired airspace (Figure
8-33).
To view and quickly tune the frequency for
a controlling agency:
1)
Follow steps 1 through 4 on the preceding page
to display the Airspace Page (Figure 8-34) for
the desired controlled or special use airspace.
2)
Turn the large right knob to highlight
‘Frequencies?’ and press the ENT Key.
3)
Turn the large right knob to scroll through the
list, highlighting the desired frequency (Figure
8-35).
Figure 8-33 Airspace Highlighted
4)
Press the ENT Key to display the Airspace
Page for the selected nearby airspace (Figure
8-34).
Status and Airspace Name Floor/Ceiling ‘Done?’ Field
(Return to
and Type
Time to Entry
Limits
Previous Page)
Figure 8-35 Frequency Highlighted
4)
Press the ENT Key to place the selected
frequency in the standby field of the COM
Window.
5)
Press the COM Flip-flop Key to activate the
selected frequency (Figure 8-36).
Figure 8-34 Airspace Page
5)
To return to the Nearest Airspace Page, verify
that ‘Done?’ is highlighted by the flashing
cursor and press the ENT Key.
6)
Press the small right knob to remove the
flashing cursor.
Figure 8-36 Frequency Moved to Active Field
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SECTION 8
NRST PAGES
6)
To return to the Airspace Page, turn the large
right knob to highlight ‘Done?’ and press the
ENT Key (or press the CLR Key).
7)
To return to the Nearest Airspace Page, turn
the large right knob to highlight ‘Done?’ and
press the ENT Key (or press the CLR Key).
8)
Press the small right knob to remove the
flashing cursor.
All airspace alert messages, except for prohibited areas,
may be turned on or off from the Airspace Alarms Page.
An altitude buffer is also provided on the Airspace Alarms
Page to provide an extra margin of safety above/below the
published limits (Section 10.4, Setup 1 Page: Airspace
Alarms for additional details).
The Airspace Page displays (and airspace alert messages
are provided for) the following airspace types (Figures
8-37, 8-38, and 8-39):
• Alert
• Caution
• Class B
• Class C
• Class D
• CTA
• Danger
• MOA
• Prohibited
• Restricted
• TMA
• Training
• TRSA
• Unspecified
Figure 8-37 Airspace Page for Class C Airspace
• Warning
The bottom right-hand corner of the Airspace Page
displays the floor and ceiling limits of the airspace.
The following are examples of what may appear as
vertical limits for an airspace:
Figure 8-38 Airspace Page for MOA
• 5000 ft msl (5000 feet mean sea level)
• 5000 ft agl (5000 feet above ground level)
• MSL (at mean sea level)
• NOTAM (Notice to Airmen)
• Unknown
• Unlimited
• See Chart
• Surface
8-14
Figure 8-39 Airspace Page for Prohibited Area
GNS 430(A) Pilot’s Guide and Reference
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SECTION 9
VLOC RECEIVER
SECTION 9: VLOC RECEIVER
9.1 VLOC (VOR/LOCALIZER/GLIDESLOPE)
Receiver Operations
The tuning cursor remains in the COM Window. To
select a VOR/Localizer/ILS frequency, press the small
left knob momentarily to place the cursor in the VLOC
Window.
The GNS 430 includes digitally-tuned VOR/localizer
and glideslope receivers with the desired frequency
selected in the VLOC Window, along the left-hand side of
the display (Figure 9-1). Frequency selection is performed
by pressing the small left knob and turning the small and
large left knobs to select the desired frequency.
NOTE: The tuning cursor normally appears in the
COM Window, unless placed in the VLOC Window
by pressing the small left knob. When the tuning
cursor is in the VLOC Window, it automatically
returns to the COM Window after 30 seconds of
inactivity. The active frequency in either window
cannot be accessed directly–—only the standby
frequency is highlighted by the tuning cursor.
To select a VOR/localizer/ILS frequency:
1)
Figure 9-1 VLOC Window
Ident Audio and Volume
VLOC ident is enabled by pressing the VLOC Volume
Knob. When VLOC ident is enabled, an ‘ID’ indication
appears in the upper right corner of the VLOC Window,
to the immediate right of ‘VLOC’ (Figure 9-1).
VLOC audio volume is adjusted using the VLOC
Volume Knob. Turn the VLOC Volume Knob clockwise
to increase volume, or counterclockwise to decrease
volume.
VLOC Window and Tuning
If the tuning cursor is not currently in the VLOC
Window, press the small left knob momentarily
(Figure 9-2).
Tuning Cursor in
VLOC Window
Figure 9-2 Tuning Cursor in VLOC Window
VLOC frequencies are tuned with the large and small
left knobs when the tuning cursor is in the standby VLOC
frequency field. The standby frequency always appears
below the active frequency. The active frequency is the
frequency currently in use.
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VLOC RECEIVER
2)
Turn the large left knob to select the desired
megahertz (MHz) value. For example, the
‘117’ portion of the frequency ‘117.60’ (Figure
9-3).
Figure 9-3 Select VOR Megahertz Frequency
3)
Turn the small left knob to select the desired
kilohertz (kHz) value. For example, the ‘.80’
portion of the frequency ‘117.80’ (Figure
9-4).
Auto-Tuning
A frequency may also be quickly selected from the
database by simply highlighting the desired frequency on
the VOR Page (Section 7.10) or the Nearest VOR Page
(Section 8.5) and pressing the ENT Key. This process is
referred to as auto-tuning. Once a frequency is selected
in the standby field, it may be transferred to the active
frequency by pressing the VLOC Flip-flop Key. (Autotuning can also be performed from VLOC frequencies
listed on the NAV/COM Page, the Airport Frequency Page,
and the Nearest Flight Service Station Page.)
To select a VLOC frequency from the VOR
Page or Nearest VOR Page:
1)
Select the desired page from the main pages
(as discussed in the preceding paragraph).
2)
Press the small right knob momentarily to
activate the flashing cursor
3)
Turn the large right knob to highlight the
frequency for the desired VOR (Figure 9-5).
Figure 9-4 Select VOR Kilohertz Frequency
4)
9-2
To make the standby frequency the active
frequency, press the VLOC Flip-flop Key.
Figure 9-5 Highlight Frequency
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VLOC RECEIVER
Press the ENT Key to place the frequency in
the standby field of the VLOC Window (Figure
9-6).
4)
To select an approach and automatically
tune the proper VLOC frequency:
1)
Select the destination airport using the Directto Key or as the last waypoint in the active
flight plan.
2)
Press the PROC Key to display the Procedures
Page.
3)
Turn the large right knob to highlight ‘Select
Approach?’ and press the ENT Key (Figure
9-7).
Figure 9-6 Frequency in Standby Field
5)
Press the VLOC Flip-flop Key to activate the
selected frequency.
6)
Press the small right knob to remove the
flashing cursor.
NOTE: For duplex COM operations, the VLOC
receiver may be auto-tuned from the Nearest
Flight Service Station Page. See Section 8.8 for
more info.
When selecting a VOR or ILS approach, manual
tuning of the VLOC receiver is not required. Once the
approach procedure is ‘Loaded’ or ‘Activated’, the GNS
430 automatically places the proper frequency in the
standby field of the VLOC Window. To use this frequency,
press the VLOC Flip-flop Key to activate the frequency.
Additional information on approach procedures is
provided in Section 6.1.
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Figure 9-7 Procedures Page
4)
A window appears listing the available
procedures. Turn the small right knob to
highlight the desired procedure and press the
ENT Key. (When a direct-to destination is
selected, departures are offered for the nearest
airport.)
5)
A second window appears listing available
transitions. Turn the small right knob to
highlight the desired transition waypoint and
press the ENT Key. (The approach ‘Vectors’
option assumes the pilot will receive vectors to
the final course segment of the approach and
will provide navigation guidance to intercept
this final course.)
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VLOC RECEIVER
6)
Turn the large right knob to highlight ‘Load?’
or ‘Activate?’ (Figure 9-8) and press the ENT
Key. (‘Load?’ adds the procedure to the
flight plan without immediately using it for
navigation guidance. This allows the pilot to
continue navigating the original flight plan, but
keeps the procedure available on the Active
Flight Plan Page for quick activation when
needed.)
CDI Key
The GNS 430’s CDI Key is used to couple the GPS
or VLOC receiver to the external CDI (or HSI). When
the external CDI (or HSI) is being driven by the GPS
receiver, ‘GPS’ appears at the bottom left corner of the
page, directly above the CDI Key. When the external CDI
(or HSI) if being driven by the VLOC receiver, ‘VLOC’
appears instead.
To couple the external CDI (or HSI) to the GPS receiver
or VLOC receiver, press the CDI Key to display ‘GPS’ or
‘VLOC’, as desired (Figures 9-9 and 9-10).
Figure 9-8 Highlight ‘Load?’
9-4
7)
For VOR and ILS approaches, the standby field
of the VLOC Window is automatically tuned to
the proper frequency. To activate the frequency
press the VLOC Flip-flop Key. To display VLOC
course information on the external CDI (or
HSI) press the CDI Key and verify that ‘VLOC’
is displayed at the bottom left corner of the
screen, directly above the CLR Key.
8)
For precision approaches and some nonprecision approaches, a reminder window
appears indicating that GPS guidance on such
approaches is strictly for monitoring only—use
the VLOC receivers and external CDI (or HSI) for
primary navigation. To confirm this reminder,
highlight ‘Yes?’ and press the ENT Key.
‘GPS’ Annunciator
Figure 9-9 GPS Coupled to External CDI
‘VLOC’ Annunciator
Figure 9-10 VLOC Coupled to External CDI
NOTE: The external CDI (or HSI) must be coupled
to the VLOC receiver for approaches which are
not approved for GPS. See ILS example in Section
6.3.
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SECTION 10
AUX PAGES
SECTION 10: AUX PAGES
To quickly select an AUX page:
1)
10.1 AUX Page Group
Section 3.1 introduced the GNS 430’s main page groups
(Table 10-1)—NAV, WPT, AUX, NRST—and described
each page in the NAV group. The third page group (AUX)
allows the pilot to change unit settings. The AUX pages
(Figure 10-1) also provide E6B functions, such as trip
planning, fuel planning, density altitude, true airspeed,
and winds aloft calculations.
Page Groups
NAV Group WPT Group AUX Group
see Section 3 see Section 7 4 AUX pages
NRST Group
see Section 8
Figure 10-2 Default NAV Page
2)
Table 10-1 Page Groups
Flight Planning
Utility
From any page, press and hold the CLR
Key to select the Default NAV Page (Figure
10-2). If any of the main pages are already
being displayed, this step may be skipped.
Turn the large right knob to select the AUX
Page Group (Figure 10-3). ‘AUX’ appears in
the lower right corner of the screen.
Setup 1
Setup 2
Figure 10-3 Flight Planning Page
Figure 10-1 AUX Pages
3)
NOTE: The AUX Page Group may have five AUX
pages available when the GNS 430 installation
includes connection to a weather information
source. See Section 10 of this manual for more
information.
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Turn the small right knob to select the desired
AUX page.
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AUX PAGES
10.2 Flight Planning Page
2)
The Flight Planning Page (Figure 10-4) provides access
(via menu options) to E6B functions for fuel planning,
trip planning, density altitude/true airspeed/winds aloft
calculations and a ‘Crossfill’ function to transfer flight
plans/user waypoints to a second GNS 430. When a
menu option is selected, the corresponding page appears
providing additional information and features.
Menu Options (to Select,
Highlight with Cursor and
Press the ENT Key)
Turn the large right knob to select the desired
menu option (Figure 10-5), and press the ENT
Key (Figure 10-6).
Figure 10-5 Density Alt/TAS/Winds Highlighted
Position of
Current Page
within Current
Page Group
Number of Pages in
Current Page Group
Figure 10-4 Flight Planning Page
Current Page Group
Figure 10-6 Density Alt/TAS/Winds Page
To select a menu option from the Flight
Planning Page:
1)
10-2
Press the small right knob momentarily, to
activate the flashing cursor (Figure 10-4).
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AUX PAGES
The following menu options are available:
• Fuel Planning - When equipped with fuel flow
(FF) and/or fuel on board (FOB) sensors, this
option displays current fuel conditions along
the active direct-to or flight plan. The pilot may
also manually enter fuel flow, ground speed (GS)
and (in some instances) fuel on board figures for
planning purposes. Fuel planning figures can be
displayed not only for the currently active flight
plan or direct-to, but also point-to-point between
two specified waypoints and for any programmed
flight plan.
• Trip Planning - Allows the pilot to view desired
track (DTK), distance (DIS), estimated time
enroute (ETE), enroute safe altitude (ESA), and
estimated time of arrival (ETA) information for a
direct-to, point-to-point between two specified
waypoints, or for any programmed flight plan.
NOTE: Point-to-point waypoints, flight plans,
and/or ground speed (default is current GPScalculated ground speed) entered on the Fuel
Planning Page automatically transfers to the Trip
Planning Page, and vice versa.
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• Density Alt/TAS/Winds - Indicates the
theoretical altitude at which the aircraft can
perform depending upon several environmental
conditions, including indicated altitude (IND
ALT), barometric pressure (BARO), and total air
temperature (TAT; the temperature, including the
heating effect of speed, read on a standard outside
temperature gauge). This menu option computes
true airspeed (TAS), based upon the factors
above and the calibrated airspeed (CAS). Also,
this menu option determines winds aloft (the
wind direction and speed) and a head wind/tail
wind component, based upon the calculated
density altitude (DEN ALT), true airspeed, aircraft
heading (HDG), and ground speed.
• Crossfill - Allows the pilot to transfer the active
flight plan, any stored flight plan, a user waypoint,
or all user waypoints between two 400/500-series
Garmin units in a dual-unit installation. See
Section 5.1, Flight Plan Catalog Options and
information following in this section for details.
• Scheduler - Displays reminder messages (such as
‘Change oil’, ‘Switch fuel tanks’, ‘Overhaul’, etc.).
One-time, periodic, and event-based messages
are allowed. One-time messages appear once
the timer expires and reappear each time the
GNS 430 is powered on, until the message is
deleted. Periodic messages automatically reset
to the original timer value, once the message is
displayed. Event-based messages do not use a
timer, but rather a specific date and time.
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AUX PAGES
Flight Planning Page: Fuel Planning
3)
To perform fuel planning operations:
1)
Select ‘Fuel Planning’ from the Flight Planning
Page, using the steps described in Section
10.2.
2)
The current fuel planning ‘mode’ is displayed
at the top of the page (Figure 10-7): ‘POINT TO
POINT’ or ‘FPL’ (for a flight plan). To change
the mode, press the MENU Key to display the
Fuel Planning Page Menu (Figure 10-8) for the
other mode, then press the ENT Key to accept
the other mode.
For point-to-point fuel planning (Figure 10-9),
turn the small and large right knobs to enter
the identifier of the ‘from’ waypoint. Once
the waypoint’s identifier is entered, press the
ENT Key to accept the waypoint. The flashing
cursor moves to the ‘to’ waypoint. Again, turn
the small and large right knobs to enter the
identifier of the ‘to’ waypoint and press the
ENT Key to accept the waypoint. OR,
Figure 10-9 Fuel Planning Page, Point-to-Point
4)
Figure 10-7 Fuel Planning Page
For flight plan fuel planning (Figure 10-10), turn
the small right knob to select the desired flight
plan by number (already stored in memory;
00 is the active flight plan). Turn the large
right knob to highlight the ‘LEG’ field and
turn the small right knob to select the desired
leg of the flight plan, or select ‘Cum’ to apply
fuel planning calculations to the entire flight
plan.
Figure 10-8 Fuel Planning Page Menu
Figure 10-10 Fuel Planning Page Flight Plan
10-4
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AUX PAGES
5)
If the fuel management system does not enter
the data automatically, turn the large right
knob to highlight the fuel on board (FOB) field
(Figure 10-11).
• REQ - Quantity of fuel required
• LFOB - Left-over fuel on board
• LRES - Left-over fuel reserve time
• EFF - Efficiency, expressed in distance per fuel
units (e.g., nautical miles per gallon)
• RNG - Range (distance)
• ENDUR - Flight endurance, or total available
flight time
Figure 10-11 FOB Highlighted
6)
Use the small and large right knobs to enter
the amount of fuel on board. Press the ENT
Key when finished.
7)
The flashing cursor moves to the fuel flow (FF)
field. Use the small and large right knobs to
enter the fuel flow rate. Press the ENT Key
when finished. Note that if a fuel system is
providing current fuel flow, the fuel flow field
defaults to this value.
8)
The flashing cursor moves to the ground speed
(GS) field. Use the small and large right knobs
to enter the ground speed. Press the ENT Key
when finished.
9)
With all variables entered, the following
information is provided (Figure 10-12):
Figure 10-12 REQ Highlighted
10) To re-configure the data fields press the MENU
Key to display the options window (Figure
10-13). Turn the small right knob to highlight
the ‘change fields?’ option. Press the ENT Key
to re-configure the data fields. Turn the large
right knob to select the desired field. Turn
the small right knob to highlight the desired
data. Press the ENT Key to select the data
configuration.
Figure 10-13 Select Field Type Window
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AUX PAGES
Fuel planning figures can be entered and displayed
based upon one of three possible configurations:
3)
• No fuel sensors connected - In this instance fuel
flow is manually entered and is used to calculate
fuel on board. When fuel flow or fuel on board is
manually entered, the figures are retained the next
time the page is displayed (with fuel on board
continuously recalculated).
• Fuel flow sensor installed, but no fuel on board
sensor - Fuel on board is manually entered. Fuel
flow is automatically provided by sensor. If fuel
flow is manually entered (to override the sensor),
it does not affect the FOB figure and is not
retained the next time the page is displayed.
• Fuel flow and fuel on board sensors installed Fuel flow and fuel on board are automatically
provided by sensors. Fuel on board can NOT
be entered manually. Fuel flow can be entered
manually, but does not affect the FOB figure and
is not retained the next time the page is displayed.
Flight Planning Page: Trip Planning
To perform trip planning operations:
1)
Select ‘Trip Planning’ from the Flight Planning
Page, using the steps described in this
section.
2)
The current trip planning ‘leg mode’ is displayed
at the top of the page: ‘POINT TO POINT’ or
‘FPL LEG’ (for a flight plan leg). To change the
leg mode, press the MENU Key to display the
Flight Planning Page Menu for the other leg
mode, then press the ENT Key to accept the
other leg mode.
For point-to-point trip planning, turn the small
and large right knobs to enter the identifier
of the ‘from’ waypoint. Once the waypoint’s
identifier is entered, press the ENT Key to
accept the waypoint. The flashing cursor moves
to the ‘to’ waypoint (Figure 10-14). Again, turn
the small and large right knobs to enter the
identifier of the ‘to’ waypoint and press the
ENT Key to accept the waypoint. OR,
Figure 10-14 Trip Planning Page, Point-to-Point
4)
For ‘flight plan leg’ trip planning, turn the small
right knob to select the desired flight plan
(already stored in memory), by number. Turn
the large right knob to highlight the ‘LEG’ field
(Figure 10-15) and turn the small right knob
to select the desired leg of the flight plan, or
select ‘Cum’ to apply trip planning calculations
to the entire flight plan.
Figure 10-15 Trip Planning Page, Flight Plan Leg
10-6
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AUX PAGES
5)
Turn the large right knob to highlight the
departure time (DEP TIME) field.
6)
Use the small and large right knobs to enter
the departure time. Press the ENT Key when
finished. (Departure time may be entered
in local or UTC time, depending upon unit
settings, see Section 10.4, Setup 1 Page: Date/
Time.)
7)
The flashing cursor moves to the ground speed
(GS) field. Use the small and large right knobs
to enter the ground speed. Press the ENT Key
when finished.
8)
With all variables entered, the following
information is provided (Figure 10-16):
Flight Planning Page: Density Alt/TAS/Winds
To calculate density altitude, true airspeed,
winds aloft:
1)
Select ‘Density Alt/TAS/Winds’ from the Flight
Planning Page (Figure 10-17), using the steps
described at the beginning of this section.
Figure 10-17 Density Alt/TAS/Winds Highlighted
Figure 10-16 Trip Planning Page
• DTK - Desired track or desired course
• DIS - Distance
2)
The flashing cursor highlights the indicated
altitude (IND ALT) field. Use the small and large
right knobs to enter the altitude indicated
on the altimeter. Press the ENT Key when
finished.
3)
The flashing cursor moves to the calibrated
airspeed (CAS) field (Figure 10-18). Use the
small and large right knobs to enter the
airspeed from the airspeed indicator. Press the
ENT Key when finished.
• ETE - Estimated time enroute
• ESA - Enroute safe altitude
• ETA - Estimated time of arrival
Figure 10-18 Calibrated Airspeed Field Selected
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AUX PAGES
4)
The flashing cursor moves to the barometric
pressure (BARO) field. Use the small and large
right knobs to enter the barometric pressure
(altimeter setting). Press the ENT Key when
finished.
5)
The flashing cursor moves to the total air
temperature (TAT) field. Use the small and
large right knobs to enter the temperature.
Press the ENT Key when finished.
6)
The flashing cursor moves to the aircraft
heading (HDG) field. Use the small and large
right knobs to enter the aircraft heading
(Figure 10-19) from the directional gyro or
compass. Press the ENT Key when finished.
Flight Planning Page: Crossfill
Select ‘Crossfill?’ from the Flight Planning Page (Figure
10-20), the Default NAV Page (Figure 10-21), or Active
Flight Plan Page (Figure 10-22), by pressing the MENU
Key, and then scrolling down to ‘Crossfill?’ and pressing
the ENT key.
Figure 10-20 Flight Planning Page
Figure 10-19 Heading Field Highlighted
7)
With all variables entered, the following
information is provided:
Figure 10-21 Default NAV Page Menu
• DEN ALT - Density altitude
• TAS - True airspeed
• WIND - Wind direction and speed
• HEAD/TAIL WIND - Magnitude of head wind or
tail wind component
10-8
NOTE: If the installation includes components
(such as an airdata sensor) to provide any of the
variables above, the Density Alt/TAS/Winds Page
data defaults to the values provided by these
components.
Figure 10-22 Flight Plan Page Menu
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AUX PAGES
• Automatic Operation - If both units are set to
automatic, a change in the active flight plan of
one unit is also be seen in the other. Initiating a
direct-to to a waypoint on one unit also initiates a
direct-to to the same waypoint on the other unit.
If one unit is set for automatic crossfill and the
other is set for manual crossfill, then only the
auto unit automatically sends data to the manual
unit. In this configuration, the auto unit could be
thought of as the master unit.
• Manual Operation - If manual operation is
desired, the pilot must invoke all transfers
from that unit. When a unit is configured for
automatic transfer, a manual transfer can also
be done on command. If either of the messages
‘data transfer error’ or ‘data transfer cancelled’ are
received during an automatic or manual transfer,
the pilot must force another transfer.
Figure 10-23 Crossfill Method Window
3)
NOTE: Crossfill requires both 400 and/or 500
Series units to have the same Jeppesen NavData
database cycle number.
The flashing cursor highlights the transfer data
option (TRANSFER) field (Figure 10-24). Turn
the small right knob to display a window of
available data options (Figure 10-25).
To transfer flight plans or user waypoints
to/from a second 400/500-series unit:
1)
Select ‘Crossfill’ from the Flight Planning Page,
using the steps described at the beginning of
this section.
2)
The flashing cursor highlights the method field.
Turn the small right knob to select ‘Auto’ or
‘Manual’ (Figure 10-23). ‘Auto’ automatically
transfers any selection of (or any change to) a
direct-to destination or active flight plan to a
second 400/500 series Garmin unit.
Figure 10-24 Transfer Field Highlighted
Figure 10-25 Transfer Window
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AUX PAGES
• Active Flight Plan - Transfer the active flight plan
to/from a second 400/500-series Garmin unit in
a dual unit installation. This option is the default
when selecting ‘Crossfill’ from the Active Flight
Plan Page.
8)
The flashing cursor moves to the ‘Initiate
Transfer?’ confirmation field (Figure
10-26). Press the ENT Key to transfer the
selected data.
• Flight Plan - Transfer any stored flight plan
to/from a second 400/500-series unit, by selecting
the flight plan by number. This option is the
default when selecting ‘Crossfill’ from the Flight
Plan Catalog Page. See also Section 5.1, Flight
Plan Catalog Page Options.
• User Waypoints (all) - Transfer all stored user
waypoints to/from a second 400/500-series unit.
• User Waypoint - Transfer the specified user
waypoint to a second 400/500-series unit.
4)
5)
Continue turning the small right knob to select
the desired data option. Press the ENT Key
when finished.
For a stored flight plan (‘Flight Plan’ data
option), the flight plan number field is
highlighted. Turn the small right knob to
select the desired flight plan and press the
ENT Key.
6)
For a specified user waypoint (‘User Waypoint’
data option), the waypoint identifier field is
highlighted. Use the small and large right
knobs to enter the identifier of the desired user
waypoint. Press the ENT Key when finished.
7)
The flashing cursor moves to the ‘CROSS-SIDE’
field. Turn the small right knob to select ‘To’
or ‘From’ and press the ENT Key.
10-10
Figure 10-26 ‘Initiate Transfer’ Highlighted
Flight Planning Page: Scheduler
To enter a scheduled message:
1)
Select ‘Scheduler’ from the Flight Planning Page,
using the steps described in this section.
2)
The flashing cursor highlights the first message
field. If necessary, turn the large right knob
to highlight the first blank message field.
3)
Use the small and large right knobs to enter
the message text. Press the ENT Key when
finished. (The GNS 430 stores up to nine
scheduled messages holding 20 characters
each.)
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4)
The flashing cursor moves to the type field
under the new message (Figure 10-27). Turn
the small right knob to display a window of
available options, (Figure 10-28): Event, One
Time, Periodic. Press the ENT Key to select.
Figure 10-27 Type Field Highlighted
To edit a scheduled message:
1)
Select ‘Scheduler’ from the Flight Planning Page,
using the steps described at the beginning of
this section.
2)
The flashing cursor highlights the first message
field.
3)
To edit the message text, turn the large right
knob to highlight the desired message field.
Use the small and large right knobs to edit the
message text—entering the new text directly
over the old message. Press the ENT Key when
finished.
4)
To edit the time field, turn the large right
knob to highlight the field. Use the small and
large right knobs to edit the new date or
time—entering the new value directly over the
old figure. Press the ENT Key when finished.
To delete a scheduled message:
1)
Select ‘Scheduler’ from the Flight Planning Page,
using the steps described in this section.
2)
The flashing cursor highlights the first message
field. Turn the large right knob to highlight
the desired message field.
3)
Press the CLR Key to delete the message
text, followed by the ENT Key to confirm the
deletion.
Figure 10-28 Type Window
5)
The flashing cursor moves to the time/date
field. Use the small and large right knobs
to set the time or date required before the
message is displayed. Time is entered as
hours/minutes/seconds (hhh:mm:ss). Eventbased messages expire at a specific date and
time. Press the ENT Key when finished.
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AUX PAGES
10.3 Utility Page
2)
The Utility Page (Figure 10-29) provides access (via
‘menu options’) to checklists, a count down/up timer,
trip timers, trip statistics, RAIM (Receiver Autonomous
Integrity Monitoring) prediction, sunrise/sunset time
calculations, software versions, database versions, and
terrain database version information. When a menu
option is selected, the corresponding page appears
providing additional information and features.
NOTE: Scroll down to view the last 3 items
(Software Versions, Database Versions, and
Terrain Database Versions) listed on the Utility
Page.
Turn the large right knob to select the desired
menu option (Figure 10-30), and press the ENT
Key (Figure 10-31).
Figure 10-30 Sunrise/Sunset Highlighted
Menu Options (to Select,
Highlight with Cursor and
Press the ENT Key)
Figure 10-31 Waypoint Field Highlighted
Position of
Current Page
within Current
Page Group
Current Page Group
Number of Pages in
Current Page Group
Figure 10-29 Utility Page
To select a menu option from the Utility
Page:
1)
10-12
Press the small right knob momentarily,
to activate the flashing cursor (Figure
10-29).
The following menu options are available:
• Checklists - Provides up to nine different userdefined checklists containing up to 30 items each.
• Flight Timers - Provides count up/down timers,
plus automatic recording of departure time and
total trip time. Departure and total trip time
recording can be configured to run either any time
GNS 430 power is on, or only when the ground
speed exceeds 30 knots.
• Trip Statistics - Provides readouts for trip
odometers, average speed, and maximum speed.
These readouts are resettable (individually or all
at once) by pressing the MENU Key to display the
Trip Statistics Page Menu.
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• RAIM Prediction - Predicts if GPS coverage is
available for the current location or at a specified
waypoint at any time and date. Receiver
Autonomous Integrity Monitoring (RAIM)
performs checks to ensure that the GNS 430
will have adequate satellite geometry during the
flight. RAIM availability is near 100% in Oceanic,
Enroute, and Terminal phases of flight. Because
the FAA’s TSO requirements for non-precision
approaches specify significantly better satellite
coverage than other flight phases, RAIM may not
be available when flying some approaches. The
GNS 430 automatically monitors RAIM during
approach operations and warns the pilot if RAIM
is not available. In such cases, use the GNS 430’s
VLOC receiver instead for many of the nonprecision and precision approaches stored on the
Jeppesen NavData Card. RAIM prediction helps
the pilot plan for a pending flight to confirm GPS
operation during an approach.
An ‘INTEG’ annunciation at the bottom left
corner of the screen (Figure 10-32) indicates that
satellite coverage is insufficient to pass built-in
(RAIM) tests. When this occurs, the GPS receiver
continues to provide navigation information,
but should not be used for primary navigation
guidance. Use the GNS 430’s VLOC receiver or
another suitable navigation source.
If a ‘WARN’ annunciation appears at the
bottom left corner, GPS satellite coverage may
be sufficient, but the GNS 430 has detected a
position error which exceeds protection limits.
In this condition, all GPS navigation data on the
GNS 430 is disabled. Use the GNS 430’s VLOC
receiver or an alternate navigation source.
• Sunrise/Sunset - Allows the pilot to calculate the
time of sunrise and sunset at any waypoint or the
present position for a specified date.
• Software Versions - Provides software version
information for the operating software within the
GPS receiver, COM transceiver, VOR/localizer
receiver, glideslope receiver, and main processor
board.
• Database Versions - Displays the current Jeppesen
database type and expiration date, along with the
version and type of built-in land database.
• Terrain Database Versions - Displays the current
version and area of coverage of each terrain and
obstacle database. If a database is found to be
missing and/or deficient, the TERRAIN system
fails the self-test and issues a failure message.
Figure 10-32 ‘INTEG’ Annunciation
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Utility Page: Checklists
To execute a checklist:
1)
To create a checklist:
1)
Select ‘Checklist’ from the Utility Page (Figure
10-33), using the steps described at the
beginning of this section (10.3). Press the ENT
Key to display a list of checklists.
With the Checklists Page displayed (Figure
10-34), turn the large right knob to select the
desired checklist and press the ENT Key.
Figure 10-34 Desired Checklist Highlighted
Figure 10-33 Checklists Highlighted
2)
Press the MENU Key to display an options
menu. Turn the large right knob to select
‘Create New Checklist?’ and press the ENT
Key.
3)
Use the small and large right knobs to enter
the name of a checklist. Press the ENT Key
when finished. Up to nine different checklists
can be created and stored in the GNS 430.
4)
Use the small and large right knobs to enter
each checklist item, followed each time by the
ENT Key. (Each checklist may contain up to 30
line items of as much as 16 characters long.)
10-14
2)
As each checklist item is completed, press the
ENT Key to move to the next item on the list
(Figure 10-35).
Figure 10-35 Desired Checklist Item Highlighted
To edit a checklist:
1)
With the Checklists Page displayed, turn the
large right knob to select the desired checklist
and press the ENT Key.
2)
Press the MENU Key to display an options
menu. Select ‘Edit Item?’ and press the ENT
Key, then use the small and large right knobs
to edit each checklist item. Press the ENT Key
when finished.
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To insert a checklist step into an existing
checklist:
1)
With the Checklists Page displayed, turn the
large right knob to select the desired checklist
and press the ENT Key.
2)
Turn the large right knob to highlight the
existing checklist entry which immediately
follows the new checklist step.
3)
Turn the small and large right knobs to enter
the new checklist step. Press the ENT Key when
finished.
Utility Page: Flight Timers
To view, use, or reset the generic timer:
1)
Select ‘Flight Timers’ from the Utility Page
(Figure 10-36), using the steps described at
the beginning of this section (10.3).
To delete a checklist or all checklists:
1)
With the Checklists Page displayed, press the
MENU Key to display an options menu.
2)
Turn the large right knob to select ‘delete
checklist’ or ‘delete all checklists’ and press
the ENT Key to remove the checklist or all
checklists from memory.
Figure 10-36 Flight Timers Highlighted
2)
The flashing cursor highlights ‘Start?’. To start
the generic timer, press the ENT Key. Count up
timers typically begin with this step; however,
for count down timers, to enter a count
direction and time before starting the timer,
see the following steps.
3)
To change the count direction, turn the large
right knob to highlight the count direction
field (Figure 10-37): ‘Down’ or ‘Up’. Turn the
small right knob to select the desired count
direction. Press the ENT Key when finished.
To copy a checklist:
1)
2)
With the Checklists Page displayed and the
desired checklist selected, press the MENU
Key.
Turn the large right knob to select ‘Copy
Checklist? and press the ENT Key to copy
the checklist to an empty checklist memory
location.
To sort the checklists by name or entry:
1)
With the Checklists Page displayed, press the
MENU Key to display an options menu.
2)
Turn the large right knob to select ‘Sort List
By Entry?’ or ‘Sort List By Name?’ and press
the ENT Key.
Figure 10-37 Count Window
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4)
For a count down timer, turn the large right
knob to highlight the time field. Use the small
and large right knobs to enter the count down
time—in hours, minutes, and seconds. Press
the ENT Key when finished.
4)
Press the ENT Key when finished.
5)
To reset the departure time, turn the large right
knob to highlight ‘Reset?’ and press the ENT
Key.
To view, use or reset total trip time:
5)
To stop the generic timer, turn the large right
knob to highlight ‘Stop?’ and press the ENT
Key.
1)
6)
To reset the generic timer, turn the large right
knob to highlight the time field. Press the CLR
Key, followed by the ENT Key.
Select ‘Flight Timers’ from the Utility Page,
using the steps described at the beginning of
this section.
2)
Turn the large right knob to highlight the reset
mode field, under ‘Total Trip Time’. (The reset
mode field indicates ‘Pwr-on’ or ‘GS>30kt’.)
3)
Turn the small right knob to select the desired
reset mode. ‘Pwr-on’ records trip time, in
hours/minutes/seconds, any time the GNS 430
is turned on. ‘GS>30kt’ records trip time any
time the GPS-computed ground speed exceeds
30 knots.
4)
Press the ENT Key when finished.
5)
To reset the total trip time, turn the large right
knob to highlight ‘Reset?’ (Figure 10-39) and
press the ENT Key.
To record or reset the departure time:
1)
Select ‘Flight Timers’ from the Utility Page,
using the steps described at the beginning of
this section (10.3).
2)
Turn the large right knob to highlight the reset
mode field, under ‘Departure Time’. The reset
mode field indicates ‘Pwr-on’ or ‘GS>30kt’.
3)
Turn the small right knob to select the desired
reset mode (Figure 10-38). ‘Pwr-on’ records
a departure time when the GNS 430 is turned
on. ‘GS>30kt’ records a departure time once
the GPS-computed ground speed exceeds 30
knots.
Figure 10-39 ‘Reset?’ Highlighted
Figure 10-38 Reset Mode Window
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Utility Page: Trip Statistics
Utility Page: RAIM Prediction
To reset trip statistics readouts:
1)
Select ‘Trip Statistics’ from the Utility Page
(Figure 10-40), using the steps described at
the beginning of this section.
To predict RAIM availability:
1)
Figure 10-40 Trip Statistics Highlighted
2)
Press the MENU Key to display the Trip
Statistics Page Menu with several reset options
(Figure 10-41):
Select ‘RAIM Prediction’ from the Utility Page
(Figure 10-42), using the steps described at
the beginning of this section.
Figure 10-42 RAIM Prediction Highlighted
2)
The flashing cursor highlights the waypoint field
(Figure 10-43). Use the small and large right
knobs to enter the identifier of the waypoint
at which the pilot wants to determine RAIM
availability. Press the ENT Key when finished.
(To determine RAIM availability for the present
position, press the CLR Key, followed by the
ENT Key.)
Figure 10-41 Trip Statistics Page Menu
• Reset Trip? - Resets trip odometer and average
ground speed readouts
• Reset Max Speed? - Resets maximum speed
readout only
Figure 10-43 RAIM Prediction Page
• Reset Odometer? - Resets odometer readout only
• Reset All? - Resets all trip statistics readouts
3)
Turn the large right knob to select the desired
reset option and press the ENT Key.
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3)
The flashing cursor moves to the arrival date
field. Use the small and large right knobs to
enter the date for which the pilot wants to
determine RAIM availability. Press the ENT
Key when finished.
4)
The flashing cursor moves to the arrival time
field. Use the small and large right knobs to
enter the time for which the pilot wants to
determine RAIM availability. Press the ENT
Key when finished.
5)
The flashing cursor moves to ‘Compute
RAIM?’ (Figure 10-44). Press the ENT Key to
begin RAIM prediction. Once calculations are
complete, the GNS 430 displays one of the
following in the RAIM status field:
Utility Page: Sunrise/Sunset
To calculate sunrise and sunset times at any
waypoint or the present position:
1)
Figure 10-45 Sunrise Sunset Highlighted
2)
The flashing cursor highlights the waypoint
field. Use the small and large right knobs to
enter the identifier of the waypoint at which
the pilot wants to determine sunrise and sunset
times. Press the ENT Key when finished. To
determine sunrise/sunset times for the present
position, press the CLR Key, followed by the
ENT Key.
3)
The flashing cursor moves to the date field
(Figure 10-46). Use the small and large right
knobs to enter the date for which the pilot
wants to determine sunrise and sunset times.
Figure 10-44 ‘Compute RAIM?’ Highlighted
• RAIM Not Available - Satellite coverage is
predicted to NOT be sufficient for reliable
operation during non-precision approaches
• RAIM Available - Satellite coverage is predicted to
be sufficient for reliable operation during all flight
phases, including non-precision approaches
10-18
NOTE: RAIM computations predict satellite
coverage within ±15 minutes of the specified
arrival date and time. Refer to Section 10.4 for
specific information regarding RAIM protection
limits, also refer to Section 13 for FDE (Fault
Detection and Exclusion) information.
Select ‘Sunrise/Sunset’ from the Utility Page,
using the steps described at the beginning of
this section (Figure 10-45).
Figure 10-46 Date Field Highlighted
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4)
Press the ENT Key to calculate sunrise and
sunset times for the selected location and date
(Figure 10-47).
Utility Page: Database Versions
The Database Versions Page (Figure 10-49) displays
the navigation database type and version information as
well as the land database type and version. This page
is for information purposes only—no user functions are
available from this page.
Figure 10-47 Sunrise/Sunset Page
Utility Page: Software Versions
The Software Versions Page (Figure 10-48) displays
software version information for each of the various
subsystems contained within the GNS 430. This page
is for information purposes only—no user functions are
available from this page.
Figure 10-49 Database Versions Page
Utility Page: Terrain Database Versions
The Terrain Database Versions Page (Figure 10-50)
displays the current version and area of coverage of each
terrain and obstacle database. This page is for information
purposes only—no user functions are available from this
page.
Figure 10-48 Software Versions Page
Figure 10-50 Terrain Database Versions Page
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10.4 Setup 1 Page
The Setup 1 Page (Figure 10-51) provides access (via
menu options) to airspace alarms, CDI scale adjustment, an
arrival alarm, units of measure settings, position formats,
map datums, and settings for local or UTC time display.
When a menu option is selected, the corresponding page
appears providing access to the various unit settings.
To select a menu option from the Setup 1
Page:
Menu Options (to Select, Highlight
with Cursor and Press the ENT Key)
Position of
Current Page
within Current
Page Group
Number of Pages in
Current Page Group
Figure 10-51 Setup 1 Page
Current Page Group
1)
Press the small right knob momentarily, to
activate the flashing cursor (Figure 10-51).
2)
Turn the large right knob to select the desired
menu option (Figure 10-52), and press the ENT
Key (Figure 10-53).
Figure 10-52 ‘Units/Mag Var’ Highlighted
10-20
Figure 10-53 Units/Mag Var Page
The following menu options are available:
• ‘Airspace Alarms’ - Allows the pilot to turn the
controlled/special-use airspace message alerts on
or off. This does not affect the alerts listed on the
Nearest Airspace Page or the airspace boundaries
depicted on the Map Page. It simply turns
on/off the warning provided when the aircraft is
approaching or near an airspace.
An altitude buffer is also provided which ‘expands’
the vertical range above or below an airspace. For
example, if the buffer is set at 500 feet, and the aircraft
is more than 500 feet above or below an airspace,
the pilot is not notified with an alert message; if
the aircraft is less than 500 feet above or below an
airspace and projected to enter it, the pilot is notified
with an alert message. The default is 200 feet.
• ‘CDI/Alarms’ - Allows the pilot to define the scale
for the GNS 430’s on-screen course deviation
indicator. The scale values represent full scale
deflection for the CDI to either side (Figure
10-54). The default setting is ‘Auto’. At this
setting, the CDI scale is set to 5 nm during the
enroute/oceanic phase of flight. Within 30 nm
of the destination airport the CDI scale gradually
ramps down to 1.0 nm (terminal area). Likewise
when leaving the departure airport the CDI scale
is set to 1.0 nm and gradually ramps UP to 5 nm
beyond 30 nm (from the departure airport).
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CDI Scales and Corresponding Flight Phases:
Oceanic
CDI Scale/Flight Phase:
Auto (oceanic)
RAIM Protection:
4.0 nm
±5.0 nm or Auto (enroute)
2.0 nm
1.0 nm
0.3 nm
±1.0 nm or Auto (terminal)
±0.3 nm or Auto (approach)
Enroute
Table 10-2 CDI Scales
An ‘auto’ ILS CDI selection allows the GNS 430
to automatically switch the external CDI from
the GPS receiver to the VLOC receiver, when
established on the final approach course (Section
6.3). Or, select ‘manual’ to manually switch the
external CDI connection, as needed.
Terminal
Approach
Figure 10-54 CDI Scales
During approach operations the CDI scale
gradually ramps down even further, to 0.3 nm.
This transition normally occurs within 2.0 nm of
the final approach fix (FAF). If a lower CDI scale
setting is selected (i.e., 1.0 nm or 0.3 nm) the
higher scale settings are not selected during any
phase of flight. For example, if 1.0 nm is selected,
the GNS 430 uses this for the enroute and
terminal phase and ramp down to 0.3 nm during
an approach. Note that the Receiver Autonomous
Integrity Monitoring (RAIM) protection limits
listed in Table 10-2 follow the selected CDI scale
and corresponding modes:
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An arrival alarm, provided on the CDI/Alarms Page,
may be set to notify the pilot with a message when
a user-defined distance to the final destination
(the direct-to waypoint or the last waypoint in a
flight plan) has been reached. Once the aircraft
has reached the set distance (up to 99.9 units), an
‘Arrival at [waypoint]’ message is displayed.
• ‘Units/Mag Var’ - Allows the pilot to configure
the displayed data to standard or metric units
of measure. This setting applies to distance,
speed, altitude, fuel, pressure, and temperature.
Also provides three magnetic variation (heading)
options: True, Auto, or User-defined. If ‘Auto’ is
selected, all track, course and heading information
is corrected to the magnetic variation computed
by the GPS receiver. The ‘True’ setting references
all information to true north, and the ‘User’ setting
corrects information to an user-entered value.
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• ‘Position/Map Datum’ - Configures position
readout information to the desired position
format. The GNS 430 uses the map datum WGS
84. Note that using a map datum that does not
match the charts used by the pilot can result in
significant differences in position information. If
the pilot is using the paper charts for reference
only, the GNS 430 still provides correct navigation
guidance to the waypoints contained in the
database, regardless of the datum differences.
• ‘Date/Time’ - Provides settings for time format
(local or UTC; 12- or 24-hour) and time offset.
The time offset is used to define current local
time. UTC (also called GMT or Zulu) date
and time are calculated directly from the GPS
satellites’ signals and cannot be changed. To use
local time, simply designate the offset by adding
or subtracting the correct number of hours.
2)
Turn the large right knob to highlight the
‘On’/’Off’ field next to the desired airspace
type. ‘Other SUAs’ includes alert, caution,
danger, training, and warning areas.
3)
Turn the small right knob to select ‘On’ or ‘Off’,
as desired (Figure 10-56). Press the ENT Key
to accept the selection.
Figure 10-56 TWR/CTL Zone Alarm Window
4)
To change the altitude buffer, turn the large
right knob to highlight the ‘Altitude Buffers’
field (Figure 10-57). Use the small and large
right knobs to enter the desired buffer
distance. Press the ENT Key when finished.
Setup 1 Page: Airspace Alarms
To set the airspace warning messages or
change the altitude buffer:
1)
Select ‘Airspace Alarms’ from the Setup 1 Page
(Figure 10-55), using the steps described at the
beginning of this section.
Figure 10-57 Buffer Distance Field Selected
Figure 10-55 Airspace Alarms Highlighted
10-22
NOTE: When an approach has been loaded into
the active flight plan, airspace alert messages
are disabled within 30nm of the destination
airport.
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Setup 1 Page: CDI Scale/Alarms
To change the ILS CDI selection:
To change the CDI scale:
1)
Select ‘CDI/Alarms’ from the Setup 1 Page
(Figure 10-58), using the steps described at
the beginning of this section.
1)
Select ‘CDI/Alarms’ from the Setup 1 Page,
using the steps described at the beginning of
this section.
2)
Turn the large right knob to highlight the
‘Auto’/’Manual’ ILS CDI field.
3)
Turn the small right knob to select ‘Auto’ or
‘Manual’, as desired (Figure 10-60). Press the
ENT Key to accept the selection.
Figure 10-58 CDI/Alarms Highlighted
2)
3)
The flashing cursor highlights the ‘Selected CDI’
field. Turn the small right knob to select the
desired CDI scale. The selected scale and any
lower scale settings are used during the various
phases of flight as described at the beginning
of this section.
Figure 10-60 ILS CDI Window
Press the ENT Key to accept the selected scale.
The ‘System CDI’ field displays the CDI scale
currently in use (Figure 10-59). The ‘System
CDI’ setting may differ from the ‘Selected CDI’
depending upon the current phase of flight.
Figure 10-59 Selected CDI Field Highlighted
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To set the arrival alarm and alarm distance:
1)
Select ‘CDI/Alarms’ from the Setup 1 Page,
using the steps described at the beginning of
this section.
2)
Turn the large right knob to highlight the
‘On’/’Off’ field (directly below ‘Arrival Alarm’).
3)
Turn the small right knob to select ‘On’ or ‘Off’,
as desired. Press the ENT Key to accept the
selection.
4)
The flashing cursor moves to the alarm distance
field (to the immediate right of ‘On’ or ‘Off’).
To enter an arrival alarm distance, use the small
and large right knobs to enter the desired
alarm distance. Press the ENT Key when
finished.
NOTE: The CDI scale is always measured in
nautical miles, regardless of the current distance
units of measure selected on the Units/Mag Var
Page.
Setup 1 Page: Units/Mag Var
The flashing cursor highlights the heading
mode field. Turn the small right knob to
select the desired heading mode: Auto, True,
or User (Figure 10-62). Press the ENT Key to
accept the selection. (The heading modes are
described at the beginning of this section.)
Figure 10-62 Heading Mode Window
3)
If ‘User’ is selected, the flashing cursor moves
to the user value field (to the immediate right of
‘User’). Use the small and large right knobs to
enter the desired magnetic variation direction
and value. Press the ENT Key when finished.
To change the units of measure:
To set the magnetic variation:
1)
2)
Select ‘Units/Mag Var’ from the Setup 1 Page
(Figure 10-61), using the steps described at
the beginning of this section.
1)
Select ‘Units/Mag Var’ from the Setup 1 Page,
using the steps described at the beginning of
this section.
2)
Turn the large right knob to highlight the
desired units of measure category (Figure 1063).
Figure 10-61 Units/Mag Var Highlighted
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Figure 10-63 Units Mag/Var Page
The following categories, and corresponding units of
measure, are available:
Figure 10-64 Position/Map Datum Highlighted
2)
• DIS, SPD - Distance and speed in Nautical
(nautical miles/knots), Statute (miles/miles per
hour), or Metric (kilometers/kilometers per hour)
terms
The flashing cursor is on the position format
field (Figure 10-65). Turn the small right knob
to select the desired position format.
• ALT, VS - Altitude and vertical speed in Feet/feet
per minute, Meters/meters per minute, or Meters/
meters per second
• PRESSURE - Barometric pressure in Inches or
Millibars
• TEMP - Temperature in degrees Celsius or
Fahrenheit
• FUEL - Fuel units in Gallons, Imperial Gallons,
Kilograms, Liters, or Pounds
3)
Turn the small right knob to select the desired
units of measure for the selected category.
Press the ENT Key to accept the selection.
Setup 1 Page: Position Format/Map Datum
To change the position format:
1)
Select ‘Position Format/Map Datum’ from the
Setup 1 Page (Figure 10-64), using the steps
described at the beginning of this section.
190-00140-00 Rev. P
Figure 10-65 Position Format Window
The following position formats are available:
• hddd°mm.mmm’ - Latitude and longitude in
degrees and decimal minutes
• hddd°mm’ss.s’ - Latitude and longitude in degrees,
minutes, and decimal seconds
• MGRS - Military Grid Reference System
• UTM/UPS - Universal Transverse Mercator/
Universal Polar Stereographic grids
3)
Press the ENT Key to accept the selected
format.
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To display the map datum:
1)
2)
3)
Select ‘Position Format/Map Datum’ from the
Setup 1 Page, using the steps described at the
beginning of this section.
Continue turning the small right knob to select
the desired time format.
4)
Press the ENT Key to accept the selection.
The WGS 84 map datum is displayed, this field
cannot be changed.
1)
Select ‘Date/Time’ from the Setup 1 Page, using
the steps described at the beginning of this
section.
2)
Turn the large right knob to highlight the time
offset field (Figure 10-68).
To set the local time:
Figure 10-66 WGS 84 Map Datum
Setup 1 Page: Date/Time
Figure 10-68 Time Offset Field Highlighted
To display local time or UTC:
1)
Select ‘Date/Time’ from the Setup 1 Page, using
the steps described at the beginning of this
section.
2)
The flashing cursor highlights the time format
field (Figure 10-67). Turn the small right knob
to display a window of available time formats:
Local 12hr, Local 24hr, or UTC.
3)
Use the small and large right knobs to enter
the desired offset, beginning by entering a
minus (-) or plus (+) sign to indicate whether
the offset is behind UTC or ahead of UTC. In
the United States, all local time offsets use
minus, or behind UTC.
4)
Press the ENT Key to accept the selected
offset.
Figure 10-67 Time Format Window
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Restoring Factory Settings
10.5 Setup 2 Page
When making changes to any Setup 1 Page option, a
‘Restore Defaults?’ menu selection allows the pilot to restore
the original factory settings (for the selected option only).
For example, with the Airspace Alarms Page displayed,
the ‘Restore Defaults?’ option restores all Airspace Alarms
Page settings to the original factory values.
The Setup 2 Page (Figure 10-70) provides access (via
menu options) to display adjustments, parameters which
define the nearest airport search, and COM transceiver
channel spacing. When a menu option is selected, the
corresponding page appears providing access to the
various unit settings.
To restore a Setup 1 option to the original
factory settings:
To select a menu option from the Setup 2
Page:
1)
Select the desired menu option from the
Setup 1 Page, using the steps described at the
beginning of this section.
2)
Press the MENU Key to display the Date/Time
Page Menu (Figure 10-69).
Menu Options (to Select,
Highlight with Cursor and
Press the ENT Key)
Position of
Current Page
within Current
Page Group
Current Page Group
Figure 10-70 Setup 2 Page
Figure 10-69 Date/Time Page Menu
3)
With ‘Restore Defaults?’ highlighted, press the
ENT Key.
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Number of Pages in
Current Page Group
1)
Press the small right knob momentarily, to
activate the flashing cursor (Figure 10-70).
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2)
Turn the large right knob to select the desired
menu option (Figure 10-71), and press the ENT
Key (Figure 10-72).
Figure 10-71 Nearest Airport Criteria Highlighted
• ‘Nearest Airport Criteria’ - Defines the minimum
runway length and surface type used when
determining the nine nearest airports to display
on the Nearest Airport Page. A minimum runway
length and/or surface type may be entered to
prevent airports with small runways, or runways
that are not of appropriate surface, from being
displayed. The default settings are ‘0 feet (or
meters)’ for runway length and ‘any’ for runway
surface type.
• ‘COM Configuration’ - Allows selection of 8.33
kHz or 25.0 kHz COM frequency channel spacing.
NOTE: 8.33 kHz VHF communication frequency
channel spacing is not approved for use in the
United States.
Setup 2 Page: Display
To change the backlighting intensity:
Figure 10-72 Nearest Airport Criteria Page
1)
The following menu options are available:
• ‘Display’ - Allows the pilot to adjust the display for
optimum viewing in any condition. Automatic
backlighting is available which uses a built-in
photocell (at the top left corner of the display
bezel) to make the proper display adjustments
without any user intervention. Automatic contrast
adjustment varies the screen contrast level based
upon current unit temperature. The pilot may
also select manual control of the display contrast
and backlighting of the GNS 430’s display.
10-28
Select ‘Display’ from the Setup 2 Page (Figure
10-73), using the steps described at the
beginning of this section (10.5).
Figure 10-73 Display Highlighted
2)
The flashing cursor highlights the backlight
mode field. Turn the small right knob to select
the desired mode: Auto or Manual (Figure
10-74). Press the ENT Key to accept the
selection.
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SECTION 10
AUX PAGES
Setup 2 Page: Nearest Airport Criteria
To set the minimum runway length and
runway surface:
Figure 10-74 Backlight Mode Window
3)
1)
Select ‘Nearest Airport Criteria’ from the
Setup 2 Page, using the steps described at the
beginning of this section.
2)
The flashing cursor highlights the runway
surface field (Figure 10-76). Turn the small
right knob to select the desired surface. The
following options are available:
If ‘Manual’ is selected, the flashing cursor
moves to the backlight level field. Turn the
small right knob to select the desired level.
Press the ENT Key to accept the selection.
• Any surface
• Hard surfaces only
To change the display contrast:
1)
Select ‘Display’ from the Setup 2 Page, using
the steps described at the beginning of this
section.
2)
Turn the large right knob to highlight the
contrast mode field (Figure 10-75).
• Hard or Soft surfaces
• Water landings only
Figure 10-76 Surface Type Window
3)
Figure 10-75 Contrast Mode Field Highlighted
3)
Turn the small right knob to select the desired
mode: Auto or Manual. Press the ENT Key to
accept the selection.
4)
If ‘Manual’ is selected, the flashing cursor
moves to the contrast level field. Turn the small
right knob to select the desired level. Press
the ENT Key to accept the selection.
190-00140-00 Rev. P
Press the ENT Key to accept the runway surface
selection.
GNS 430(A) Pilot’s Guide and Reference
10-29
SECTION 10
AUX PAGES
4)
The flashing cursor moves to the minimum
runway length field (Figure 10-77). To enter
a different minimum runway length, use the
small and large right knobs to enter the
desired length. Press the ENT Key when
finished.
Restoring Factory Settings
When making changes to any Setup 2 Page option,
a ‘Restore Defaults?’ menu selection restores the original
factory settings (for the selected option).
To restore a Setup 2 option to the original
factory settings:
1)
Select the desired menu option from the
Setup 2 Page, using the steps described at the
beginning of this section.
2)
Press the MENU Key to display the COM Setup
Page Menu (Figure 10-79).
Figure 10-77 Minimum Runway Length Field Selected
Setup 2 Page: COM Configuration
To set the COM channel spacing:
1)
2)
Select ‘COM Configuration’ from the Setup
2 Page, using the steps described at the
beginning of this section.
The flashing cursor highlights the channel
spacing field (Figure 10-78). Turn the small
right knob to select the desired channel
spacing: 8.33 kHz or 25.0 kHz. Press the ENT
Key when finished.
Figure 10-79 COM Setup Page Menu
3)
With ‘Restore Defaults?’ highlighted, press the
ENT Key.
Figure 10-78 Channel Spacing Window
10-30
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190-00140-00 Rev. P
SECTION 11
TERRAIN
SECTION 11: TERRAIN
Limitations
NOTE: Not all GNS 430 units are equipped with
or configured for TERRAIN. See the 400-series
Installation Manual (190-00140-02) for TERRAIN
configuration information.
11.1 INTRODUCTION
Garmin TERRAIN is a non-TSO-C151b-certified
terrain awareness system incorporated into GNS 430
units to increase situational awareness and aid in
reducing controlled flight into terrain (CFIT). TERRAIN
functionality is a standard feature found in GNS 430 units
with main software version 5.01 or above, along with
appropriate hardware upgrades.
Operating Criteria
TERRAIN requires the following to operate properly:
• The system must have a valid 3-D GPS position
solution.
• The system must have a valid terrain/obstacle/
airport terrain database.
190-00140-00 Rev. P
NOTE: The data contained in the TERRAIN
databases comes from government agencies.
Garmin accurately processes and cross-validates
the data but cannot guarantee the accuracy and
completeness of the data.
TERRAIN displays terrain and obstructions relative
to the altitude of the aircraft. The displayed alerts are
advisory in nature only. Individual obstructions may
be shown if available in the database. However, all
obstructions may not be available in the database and
data may be inaccurate. Never use this information for
navigation or to maneuver to avoid obstacles.
Terrain information is based on terrain elevation
information in a database that may contain inaccuracies.
Terrain information should be used as an aid to situational
awareness. Never use it for navigation or to maneuver to
avoid terrain.
TERRAIN uses terrain and obstacle information
supplied by government sources. The data undergoes
verification by Garmin to confirm accuracy of the content,
per TSO-C151b. However, the displayed information
should never be understood as being all-inclusive.
GNS 430(A) Pilot’s Guide and Reference
11-1
SECTION 11
TERRAIN
TERRAIN Alerting
Baro-Corrected Altitude
TERRAIN uses information provided from the GPS
receiver to provide a horizontal position and altitude.
GPS altitude is derived from satellite measurements. GPS
altitude is converted to a mean sea level (MSL)-based
altitude (GPS-MSL altitude) and is used to determine
TERRAIN alerts. GPS-MSL altitude accuracy is affected
by factors such as satellite geometry, but it is not subject
to variations in pressure and temperature that normally
affect pressure altitude devices. GPS-MSL altitude does
not require local altimeter settings to determine MSL
altitude. Therefore, GPS altitude provides a highly
accurate and reliable MSL altitude source to calculate
terrain and obstacle alerts.
TERRAIN utilizes terrain and obstacle databases that
are referenced to mean sea level (MSL). Using the GPS
position and GPS-MSL altitude, TERRAIN displays a 2-D
picture of the surrounding terrain and obstacles relative
to the position and altitude of the aircraft. Furthermore,
the GPS position and GPS-MSL altitude are used to
calculate and “predict” the aircraft’s flight path in relation
to the surrounding terrain and obstacles. In this manner,
TERRAIN can provide advanced alerts of predicted
dangerous terrain conditions. Detailed alert modes are
described later in this section.
Baro-corrected altitude (or indicated altitude) is derived
by adjusting the altimeter setting for local atmospheric
conditions. The most accurate baro-corrected altitude
can be achieved by frequently updating the altimeter
setting to the nearest reporting station along the flight
path. However, because actual atmosphere conditions
seldom match the standard conditions defined by the
International Standard Atmosphere (ISA) model (where
pressure, temperature, and lapse rates have fixed values),
it is common for the baro-corrected altitude (as read from
the altimeter) to differ from the GPS-MSL altitude. This
variation results in the aircraft’s true altitude differing from
the baro-corrected altitude.
11-2
Using TERRAIN
During power-up, the terrain/obstacle database
versions are displayed along with a disclaimer to the pilot.
At the same time, TERRAIN self-test begins. A test failure
is annunciated for TERRAIN as shown in Table 11-4.
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SECTION 11
TERRAIN
11.2 TERRAIN Page
See Section 3.5 for a complete description of the
TERRAIN Page and its operation.
NOTE: If an obstacle and the projected flight path
of the aircraft intersect, the display automatically
zooms in to the closest potential point of impact
on the TERRAIN Page.
TERRAIN Symbols
The symbols and colors in Figure 11-1 and Table
11-1 are used to represent obstacles and potential
impact points on the TERRAIN Page. TERRAIN
uses yellow (caution) and red (warning) to depict
terrain information relative to aircraft altitude.
Each color is associated with an alert severity level.
Terrain graphics and visual annunciations also use
these color assignments.
Potential Impact Point
Terrain above or
within 100 ft
below the aircraft
altitude (Red)
Projected Flight Path
100 ft Threshold
Unlighted Obstacle
1000 ft
Terrain between 100 ft and 1000 ft below the
aircraft altitude (Yellow)
Terrain more than 1000 ft below the aircraft altitude (Black)
Figure 11-1 Terrain Altitude/Color Correlation
Lighted Obstacle
< 1000’
AGL
< 1000’
AGL
Obstacle Symbol
Unlighted Obstacle
> 1000’
AGL
> 1000’
AGL
Potential
Impact
Points
Obstacle Location
Alert Level
Obstacle above or within
100’ below current aircraft
altitude
WARNING
(Red)
Obstacle between 100’ and
1000’ below current aircraft
altitude
CAUTION
(Yellow)
Table 11-1 Terrain/Obstacle Colors and Symbology
190-00140-00 Rev. P
GNS 430(A) Pilot’s Guide and Reference
11-3
SECTION 11
TERRAIN
11.3 TERRAIN Alerts
TERRAIN Alerts are issued when flight conditions
meet parameters that are set within TERRAIN software
algorithms. TERRAIN alerts typically employ either an
ADVISORY or a CAUTION alert severity level, or both.
When an alert is issued, visual annunciations are
displayed.
Annunciations appear in a dedicated field in the lower
left corner of the display (Figure 11-2). Annunciations
are color-coded according to Table 11-2.
Pop-up terrain alerts (Figure 11-3 & 11-4) can also
appear during an alert, but only when the TERRAIN Page
is not displayed.
There are two options when an alert is displayed:
•Press the CLR Key. This acknowledges the
pop-up alert and returns to the currently
viewed page.
•Press the ENT Key. This acknowledges the
pop-up alert and accesses the TERRAIN Page.
TERRAIN Annunciation
Figure 11-3 TERRAIN Advisory Pop-up
Figure 11-2 TERRAIN Annunciation Field
NOTE: TERRAIN Advisory Alerts are displayed
as constant black text on a yellow background;
TERRAIN Caution Alerts are displayed as flashing
black text on a yellow background.
Figure 11-4 TERRAIN Caution Pop-up (Flashing)
11-4
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SECTION 11
TERRAIN
Table 11-2 shows the possible TERRAIN alert types with corresponding annunciations.
Alert Type
Annunciation
TERRAIN Failure
Pop-Up Alert
None
TERRAIN Inhibited
None
TERRAIN Not Available
None
Required Terrain Clearance (RTC) Advisory
Required Terrain Clearance (RTC) Caution
(FLASHING)
(FLASHING)
(FLASHING)
(FLASHING)
(FLASHING)
(FLASHING)
(FLASHING)
(FLASHING)
Imminent Terrain Impact (ITI) Advisory
Imminent Terrain Impact (ITI) Caution
Required Obstacle Clearance (ROC) Advisory
Required Obstacle Clearance (ROC) Caution
Imminent Obstacle Impact (IOI) Advisory
Imminent Obstacle Impact (IOI) Caution
Premature Descent Alert (PDA) Advisory
Table 11-2 TERRAIN Alert Summary
190-00140-00 Rev. P
GNS 430(A) Pilot’s Guide and Reference
11-5
SECTION 11
TERRAIN
Table 11-3 shows system status annunciations that may also be issued:
TERRAIN Page
Annunciation
Alert Type
Pop-Up Alert
TERRAIN System Test Fail
None
TERRAIN Alerting is disabled
None
No GPS position or excessively degraded
GPS signal
None
System Test in progress
None
System Test pass
None
None
Table 11-3 Additional System Annunciations
Forward Looking Terrain Avoidance
The Forward Looking Terrain Avoidance (FLTA) alert is used by TERRAIN and is composed of:
• Reduced Required Terrain Clearance (RTC) and Reduced Required Obstacle Clearance (ROC) -These alerts are
issued when the aircraft flight path is above terrain, yet is projected to come within the minimum clearance
values in Table 11-4. When an RTC or ROC alert is issued, a potential impact point is displayed on the
TERRAIN Page.
• Imminent Terrain Impact (ITI) and Imminent Obstacle Impact (IOI) - These alerts are issued when the
aircraft is below the elevation of a terrain or obstacle cell in the aircraft’s projected path. ITI and IOI alerts are
accompanied by a potential impact point displayed on the TERRAIN Page. The alert is annunciated when the
projected vertical flight path is calculated to come within minimum clearance altitudes in Table 11-4.
During the final approach phase of flight, FLTA alerts are automatically inhibited when the aircraft is below 200
feet AGL while within 0.5 nm of the approach runway or below 125 feet AGL while within 1.0 nm of the runway
threshold.
Phase of Flight
Enroute
Terminal
Approach
Departure
Minimum Clearance
Minimum Clearance
Altitude Level Flight (ft) Altitude Descending (ft)
700
500
350
300
150
100
100
100
Table 11-4 Minimum Terrain and Obstacle Clearance Values for FLTA Alerts
11-6
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SECTION 11
TERRAIN
Premature Descent Alerting
TERRAIN Inhibit
A Premature Descent Alert (PDA) is issued when the
system detects that the aircraft is significantly below the
normal approach path to a runway (Figure 11-5).
PDA alerting begins when the aircraft is within 15 nm
of the destination airport. PDA alerting ends when the
aircraft is either:
TERRAIN also has an inhibit mode that deactivates the
FLTA/PDA visual alerts. Pilots should use discretion when
inhibiting TERRAIN and always remember to enable the
system when appropriate.
Inhibiting TERRAIN:
1)
• 0.5 nm from the runway threshold
OR
Select the TERRAIN Page and press the MENU
Key. ‘Inhibit Terrain?’ is selected by default
(Figure 11-6).
• at an altitude of 125 feet AGL while within 1.0
nm of the threshold.
Height Above Terrain (Feet)
700
600
Figure 11-6 TERRAIN Page Menu
500
2)
400
300
Press the ENT Key. The ‘TER INHB’ annunciation
is displayed in the TERRAIN annunciator field
when TERRAIN is inhibited (Figure 11-7).
“Too Low Terrain”
200
Annunciator Field
100
Runway 1
Threshold
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
Figure 11-7 Annunciator Field
Distance From Destination Airport (nm)
Figure 11-5 PDA Alerting Threshold
190-00140-00 Rev. P
Enabling TERRAIN:
1)
Select the TERRAIN Page and press the MENU
Key. ‘Enable Terrain?’ is selected by default.
2)
Press the ENT Key. The TERRAIN system is
functional again.
GNS 430(A) Pilot’s Guide and Reference
11-7
SECTION 11
TERRAIN
TERRAIN Not Available Alert
TERRAIN requires a 3-D GPS navigation solution
along with specific vertical accuracy minimums. Should
the navigation solution become degraded or if the aircraft
is out of the database coverage area, the annunciation
‘TER N/A’ is generated in the annunciation window and
‘TERRAIN NOT AVAILABLE’ is generated on the TERRAIN
Page (Figure 11-8). When the GPS signal is re-established
and the aircraft is within the database coverage area, the
‘TER N/A’ visual annunciation is removed.
TERRAIN Failure Alert
TERRAIN continually monitors several system-critical
items such as database validity, hardware status, and GPS
status. If the terrain/obstacle database is not available,
‘TER FAIL’ is generated in the annunciation window, and
‘TERRAIN has failed’ is generated on the TERRAIN Page
(Figure 11-9).
Figure 11-9: TERRAIN FAILED Display
Figure 11-8: TERRAIN NOT AVAILABLE Display
11-8
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SECTION 11
TERRAIN
11.4 Database Information for
TERRAIN
General Database Information
Garmin TERRAIN uses terrain and obstacle
information supplied by government sources. The data
undergoes verification by Garmin to confirm accuracy of
the content, per TSO-C151b. However, the displayed
information should never be understood as being allinclusive. Pilots must familiarize themselves with
the appropriate sectional charts for safe flight.
Database Versions
The version and area of coverage of each terrain/obstacle
database is shown on the Terrain Database Versions Page,
located in the AUX Page Group (Figures 11-10 and 11-11,
also Section 10.3). Databases are checked for integrity
at power-up. If a database is found to be missing and/
or deficient, the TERRAIN system fails the self-test and
displays the TERRAIN system failure message (see Table
11-3).
NOTE: The data contained in the terrain and
obstacle databases comes from government
agencies. Garmin accurately processes and
cross-validates the data, but cannot guarantee
the accuracy and completeness of the data.
Figure 11-10 Utility Page
The terrain/obstacle databases are contained on a
datacard which is inserted in the right-most slot of the
GNS 430 units (Appendix A).
NOTE: Obstacles 200’ and higher are included
in the Obstacle Database. It is very important
to note that not all obstacles are necessarily
charted and therefore may not be contained in
the Obstacle Database.
Figure 11-11 Terrain Database Versions Page
190-00140-00 Rev. P
GNS 430(A) Pilot’s Guide and Reference
11-9
SECTION 11
TERRAIN
Database Updates
Terrain/Obstacle Database Areas of Coverage
Terrain/obstacle databases are updated periodically
with the latest terrain and obstacle data. Visit the Garmin
website to check for newer versions of terrain/obstacle
databases (compare database cycle numbers to determine
if a newer version is available). Updated terrain data cards
may be obtained by calling Garmin at one of the numbers
listed in the front of this document.
Table 11-5 lists the area of coverage available in each
database. Regional definitions may change without
notice.
Updating terrain/obstacle databases:
1)
Acquire a new terrain data card from
Garmin.
2)
Turn off the power to the GNS 430.
3)
Remove the old terrain data card from and
insert the new card into the right-most slot of
the GNS 430.
4)
Turn on the GNS 430 and verify that the
TERRAIN system passes self-test.
Database
Coverage Area
Latitudes: N75 to S60
Worldwide (WW)
Longitudes: W180 to E180
Limited to the United States plus
United States (US) some areas of Canada, Mexico,
Caribbean, and the Pacific.
Alaska, Austria, Belgium, Canada*,
Caribbean*, Czech Republic,
Denmark, Estonia, Finland, France,
Germany, Greece, Hawaii, Iceland,
US/Europe
Ireland, Italy, Latvia, Lithuania,
Mexico*, Netherlands, Norway,
Poland, Portugal, Slovakia, Spain,
Sweden, Switzerland, United
Kingdom, United States
* Indicates partial coverage
Table 11-5 Database Coverage Areas
11-10
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190-00140-00 Rev. P
SECTION 12
ADDITIONAL FEATURES
SECTION 12: ADDITIONAL
FEATURES
CAUTION: The Weather Data Link and TIS
information contained in this section is not
intended to replace the documentation that is
supplied with the GDL 49, the GDL 69(A) Data
Link, and the GTX 330 Transponder.
CAUTION: TIS is not intended to be used as a
collision avoidance system and does not relieve
pilot responsibility to ‘see and avoid’ other
aircraft. TIS should not be used for avoidance
maneuvers during Instrument Meteorological
Conditions (IMC) or other times when there is
no visual contact with the intruder aircraft. TIS
is intended only to assist in visual acquisition
of other aircraft in Visual Meteorological
Conditions (VMC). Avoidance maneuvers are
not recommended, nor authorized, as a direct
result of a TIS intruder display or TIS alert.
NOTE: Garmin is not responsible for Mode S
geographical coverage. Operation of the ground
stations is the responsibility of the FAA. Refer
to the Aeronautical Information Manual for a
Terminal Mode S Radar Site Map covering the
U.S.
NOTE: This Section assumes the user has
experience operating the GNS 430 unit and the
Garmin GTX 330 Transponder.
NOTE: TIS and Weather Data Link displays are
available only when GNS 430 units are configured
with the GTX 330 Mode S Transponder and a GDL
49 or GDL 69(A) Data Link Satellite Receiver.
190-00140-00 Rev. P
NOTE: Proximity Advisories and Other Traffic
symbols normally displayed in white may be
displayed in cyan if configured for alternate
traffic color (see the 400 series installation
manual).
12.1 Traffic Information Service (TIS)
This section is written for:
• Garmin GNS 400 Main System Software Version
5.01 and later
• GTX 330/330D Main Software Version 4.01 and
later
Some differences in operation may be observed when
comparing the information in this manual to earlier or
later software versions.
NOTE: This section is written exclusively for
GNS 430 units that are configured with the GTX
330 Mode S Transponder. Refer to the 400/500
Series Display Interfaces Pilot’s Guide Addendum
(190-00140-10) when interfacing with nonGarmin products.
TIS Operation
Traffic Information Service (TIS) provides a graphic
display of traffic advisory information in the cockpit
for non-TCAS equipped aircraft. TIS is a ground-based
service providing relative location of aircraft tracked by
ATC radar within a specified service volume. The TIS
ground sensor uses real-time track reports to generate
traffic notification. TIS Traffic display is available to
aircraft equipped with a Mode S Data Link, such as the
Garmin GTX 330 Transponder. TIS traffic information
from a GTX 330 Transponder can then be displayed on a
GNS 430 unit. Surveillance data includes aircraft tracked
by ATC radar within the coverage volume. Aircraft without
an operating transponder are invisible to TIS.
GNS 430(A) Pilot’s Guide and Reference
12-1
SECTION 12
ADDITIONAL FEATURES
TIS displays up to eight traffic targets within 7 nautical
miles horizontally from 3000 feet below to 3500 feet
above the requesting aircraft (Figure 12-1).
TIS Limitations
3,500 ft
7.0 nm
3,000 ft
Not to Scale
Figure 12-1 TIS Coverage Volume
TIS warns the user with voice and visual traffic
advisories when it predicts an intruder to be a threat.
The user should not start evasive maneuvers using
information from the GNS 430 display or on a traffic
advisory only. The display and advisories are intended
only for assistance in visually locating the traffic, due to
the lack in resolution and coordination ability. The flight
crew should attempt to visually acquire the intruder
aircraft and maintain a safe separation in accordance with
regulatory requirements and good operating practice. If
the flight crew cannot visually acquire the aircraft, they
should contact ATC to obtain any information that may
assist concerning the intruder aircraft. Based on the above
procedures, minor adjustment to the vertical flight path
consistent with air traffic requirements are not considered
evasive maneuvers.
12-2
TIS is not intended to be used as a collision avoidance
system and does not relieve the pilot responsibility to
see and avoid other aircraft. TIS should not be used for
avoidance maneuvers during IMC or other times when
there is no visual contact with the intruder aircraft. TIS
is intended only to assist in visual acquisition of other
aircraft in VMC. No recommended avoidance maneuvers
are provided for, nor authorized, as a direct result of a TIS
intruder display or TIS advisory.
TIS Operational Procedures
NOTE: This section on TIS Limitations is not
comprehensive. Garmin recommends the
user review the TIS Limitations section of the
Aeronautical Information Manual, Section
1-3-5.
NOTE: The main difference between TIS and TCAS
is the source of surveillance data. TCAS uses an
airborne interrogator with a half-second update
rate, while TIS uses the terminal Mode S ground
interrogator and its Data Link to provide about
a 5-second update rate. The range accuracy of
TIS and TCAS is similar.
While TIS is a useful aid to visual traffic avoidance, it
has some system limitations that must be fully understood
to ensure proper use. Many of these limitations are
inherent in secondary radar surveillance. In other words,
the information provided by TIS is no better than that
provided to ATC. TIS only displays aircraft with operating
transponders installed.
TIS relies on surveillance of the Mode S radar, which
is a ‘secondary surveillance’ radar similar to the ATCRBS.
TIS operation may be intermittent during turns or other
maneuvering. TIS is dependent on two-way, line-ofsight communications between the aircraft and the
Mode S radar. When the structure of the client aircraft
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SECTION 12
ADDITIONAL FEATURES
comes between the transponder antenna (usually located
on the underside of the aircraft) and the ground-based
radar antenna, the signal may be temporarily interrupted.
Other limitations and anomalies associated with TIS are
described in the AIM, Section 1-3-5.
TIS is unavailable at low altitudes in many areas
of the U.S., particularly in mountainous regions.
Also, when flying near the “floor” of radar
coverage in a particular area, intruders below
the client aircraft may not be detected by TIS.
TIS information is collected one radar scan prior to
the scan during which the uplink occurs. Therefore, the
surveillance information is approximately 5 seconds old.
In order to present the intruders in a ‘real time’ position,
the TIS ground station uses a predictive algorithm in
its tracking software. This algorithm uses track history
data to extrapolate intruders to their expected positions
consistent with the time of display in the cockpit.
Occasionally, aircraft maneuvering causes this algorithm
to induce errors in the GNS 430 display. These errors
primarily affect relative bearing information and traffic
target track vector (it lags); intruder distance and altitude
remain relatively accurate and may be used to assist “see
and avoid”. Some of the more common examples of these
errors follow:
The preceding errors are relatively rare occurrences
and are corrected within a few radar scans once the course
has stabilized.
Users of TIS can render valuable assistance in the
correction of malfunctions by reporting their observations
of undesirable performance.
Reporters should identify:
• Time of observation
• Location, type, and identity of aircraft
• Condition observed
• Type of transponder, processor, and software in
use
Since TIS performance is monitored by maintenance
personnel rather than ATC, it is suggested that malfunctions
be reported in the following ways:
• By telephone to the nearest Flight Service Station
(FSS) facility.
• By FAA Form 8000-7, Safety Improvement
Report, a postage-paid card designed for this
purpose. These cards may be obtained at FAA
FSS’s, General Aviation District Offices, Flight
Standards District Offices, and General Aviation
Fixed Based Operations.
• When client or intruder aircraft maneuver
excessively or abruptly, the tracking algorithm
may report incorrect horizontal position until the
maneuvering aircraft stabilizes.
• When a rapidly closing intruder is on a course
that crosses the client aircraft course at a shallow
angle (either overtaking or head on) and either
aircraft abruptly changes course within 0.25 nm,
TIS may display the intruder on the wrong side of
the client.
190-00140-00 Rev. P
GNS 430(A) Pilot’s Guide and Reference
12-3
SECTION 12
ADDITIONAL FEATURES
TIS Audio Alerting
The TIS audio alert is generated when the number of
Traffic Advisories (TA) on the GNS 430 display increases
from one scan to the next. For example, when the first
TA appears on the TIS display, the user is alerted audibly.
As long as a single aircraft remains on the TIS display, no
further audio alert is generated. If a second (or more) TA
appears on the display, a new audio alert is sounded.
Limiting TAs reduces “nuisance” alerting due to
proximate aircraft. If the number of TAs on the TIS
display decreases and then increases, a new audio alert
is sounded. A TIS audio alert is also generated when TIS
service becomes unavailable. The volume, pitch, and
duration of the audio alert (including the choice between
a male or female voice) is configured during installation.
Altitude trend is displayed as an up arrow (> +500
fpm), down arrow (< -500 fpm), or no symbol if less than
500 fpm rate in either direction.
The traffic ground track vector protrudes from each
symbol in the approximate direction of travel.
Traffic Type
Traffic Advisory
Symbol
Out-of-Range Traffic Advisory
Other Traffic
Table 12-1 TIS Symbology
‘Own’ (Client)
Aircraft Symbol
Traffic Advisory
(TA) Symbol
‘Other’ (Intruder)
Traffic Symbol
The following TIS audio alerts are available:
• “Traffic” - TIS traffic alert is received.
• “Traffic Not Available” - TIS service is not available
or out of range.
TIS Symbology
TIS traffic is displayed on the GNS 430 unit according
to TCAS symbology on a dedicated Traffic page, and on
the moving Map Page. The symbology is shown in Table
12-1 and Figures 10-2, 10-3, and 10-4. The symbology is
described in Table 12-2. A Traffic Advisory (TA) symbol
appears as a solid yellow circle (or half circle on the outer
range ring if the traffic is outside the range of the dedicated
Traffic Page). Other Traffic is displayed as hollow white
(may be configured as cyan) diamonds.
Altitude deviation from own (client) aircraft altitude is
displayed (in hundreds of feet) for each target symbol. If
traffic is above own aircraft altitude the deviation is shown
above the target next to a ‘+’ symbol. If traffic is below
own aircraft altitude the deviation is shown below the
target next to a ‘-’ symbol.
12-4
Traffic Ground
Track Vector
Figure 12-2 Traffic Page
Out-of-Range Traffic
Advisory (TA) Symbol
Figure 12-3 Out-of Range TA Symbol
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SECTION 12
ADDITIONAL FEATURES
Traffic Page
Altitude
Deviation
Altitude
Trend
Traffic
Type
Traffic Ground
Track Vector
Figure 12-4 Traffic Symbol Components
Traffic Type
Description
Traffic
This symbol (solid yellow circle) is generated
Advisory (TA) when an intruder aircraft approaches on a
course that projects to intercept (defined by
a 0.5 nm horizontal radius and a relative
altitude of ± 500 ft) the pilot’s current
course within 34 seconds.
Out-ofThis solid yellow half circle appears under
Range Traffic the same conditions and has the same
Advisory
urgency as a TA. Its appearance differs from
the TA only to signify that the intruder is
outside of the current range of the Traffic
Page.
Other Traffic This symbol (hollow white diamond)
Symbol
represents traffic detected within the
selected display range that does not meet
the criteria for a TA. (May be configured as
cyan).
Traffic
The target track vector is a short line
Ground Track displayed in 45° increments. The vector
protrudes from each target symbol in the
approximate direction of travel.
Table 12-2 TIS Options
190-00140-00 Rev. P
TIS Traffic data is displayed on the Traffic Page (Figure
12-5) and the Map Page. Unlike other forms of traffic,
TIS traffic does not require heading data to be valid on the
map. If heading is available the Traffic Page is displayed
in heading-up orientation. If it is not available, the Traffic
Page is track-up oriented. Orientation is shown in the
upper portion of the Traffic Page.
Heading or
Track Up Indicator
Figure 12-5 Traffic Page
TIS Traffic Display Status and Pilot Response
• AGE - If traffic data is not refreshed within 6
seconds, an age indicator (e.g., ‘AGE 00:12’) is
displayed in the lower right corner of the display
(when displaying traffic). See Figure 12-6. The
pilot should be aware that the quality of displayed
traffic is reduced in this condition. After another
6 seconds, if data is still not received, the traffic is
removed from the display.
Traffic
Coasting
Banner
and Age
Indicator
Figure 12-6 Traffic Age Indicator and Coasting Banner
GNS 430(A) Pilot’s Guide and Reference
12-5
SECTION 12
ADDITIONAL FEATURES
• DATA FAIL - ‘DATA FAIL’ is displayed when data
is being received from GTX 330 (Figure 12-7),
but there was a failure detected in the data stream.
The pilot should see the installer for corrective
action.
Figure 12-9 ‘No Data’ Message
Figure 12-7 ‘Data Fail’ Message
• FAILED - ‘FAILED’ is displayed when the GTX
330 has indicated it has failed (Figure 12-8). The
pilot should see the installer for corrective action.
• OPER - When the Traffic Page displays OPER in
the upper right hand corner of the display (Figure
12-11), the TIS system is in operational mode and
available to display traffic on the Traffic or Map
Page.
• STANDBY - When the Traffic Page displays
STANDBY (Figure 12-10), the TIS system is in
standby mode and cannot display traffic data.
Figure 12-10 ‘Standby’ Message
Figure 12-8 ‘Failed’ Message
• NO DATA - ‘NO DATA’ is displayed when no data
is being received from the GTX 330 (Figure 12-9).
The pilot should be aware that this status may be
a normal mode of operation in a dual transponder
installation where the GTX 330 with TIS is not the
selected transponder.
12-6
• TRFC CST - The ‘TRFC CST’ (traffic coasting)
banner (located above the ‘AGE’ indicator in
Figure 12-6) indicates that displayed traffic is held
even though the data is stale. The pilot should
be aware that the quality of displayed traffic is
reduced in this condition.
• TRFC RMVD - The ‘TRFC RMVD’ banner (Figure
12-11) indicates that traffic has been removed
from the display due to the age of the data being
too old to ‘coast’ (for the time period of 12-60
seconds from the last receipt of a TIS message).
The pilot should be aware that traffic may be
present but not shown.
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SECTION 12
ADDITIONAL FEATURES
Figure 12-11 Traffic Removed Banner
• UNAVAIL - When a 60 second period elapses with
no data, TIS is considered to be unavailable. This
state is indicated by the text ‘UNAVAIL’ (Figure
12-12). The pilot should be aware that ‘UNAVAIL’
could indicate a TIS coverage limitation due to a
line-of-sight situation, a low altitude condition,
or a result of flying directly over the radar site
providing coverage (cone of silence).
Figure 12-13 Traffic Warning Window
NOTE: The Traffic Warning Window is disabled
when the aircraft ground speed is less than 30
knots or when an approach is active.
Non-Bearing Traffic Advisory (TA) Banner
Traffic is only displayed graphically if aircraft heading
data is available. When heading is not available, Traffic
Advisories are displayed as non-bearing banners. The
banner shown in Figure 12-14 consists of (left to right):
NonBearing
Traffic
Advisory
Banner
Figure 12-12 ‘UNAVAIL’ Message
Figure 12-14 Non-Bearing TA Banner
Traffic Warning Window
• The ‘TA’ annunciation.
When the unit is on any page (other than the NAV
Traffic Page) and a traffic threat is imminent, the Traffic
Warning Window is displayed (Figure 12-13). The Traffic
Warning Window shows a small thumbnail map which
can take the user to the Traffic Page by pressing the ENT
Key, or go back to the previous page by pressing the CLR
Key.
• The distance in miles ‘1.5’, from the client
aircraft’s present position to the intruder aircraft.
• A ‘+’ or ‘-’ symbol indicating whether the intruder
aircraft is above (+) or below (-) the client aircraft.
• The difference in altitude ‘04’ (shown in hundreds
of feet) between the intruder aircraft and the client
aircraft.
• An up or down arrow indicating that the intruder
aircraft is climbing or descending at a rate greater
than 500 fpm.
190-00140-00 Rev. P
GNS 430(A) Pilot’s Guide and Reference
12-7
SECTION 12
ADDITIONAL FEATURES
Traffic Page Display Range
Various display ranges can be selected for optimal
display of TIS traffic information.
TRAFC LBL - Allows the user to select at what
map range the altitude trend arrow and altitude
deviation indicator appear.
Changing the display range on the Traffic
Page:
Press the RNG Key to zoom through the range
selections which are: 12/6 nm, 6/2 nm, and 2
nm.
Map Page
TIS traffic is displayed on the Map Page (Figure 12-15)
in addition to the Traffic Page. When a Traffic Advisory
is active, the Traffic Banner is displayed in the lower right
corner of the Map Page.
Traffic
Advisory
Banner
Figure 12-16 Traffic Mode Selection Window
Configuring TIS traffic on the Map Page:
1)
Turn the small right knob to select the Map
Page.
2)
Press the MENU key. Turn the small right
knob to select ‘Setup Map’?
3)
The flashing cursor highlights the GROUP field.
Turn the small right knob to select ‘Traffic’
(Figure 12-17) and press the ENT Key.
Figure 12-15 Map Page Displaying Traffic
The Traffic Mode Selection Menu (Figure 12-16) allows
the user to choose from the following options:
TRAFC Mode:
• All trfc - All traffic is displayed on the Map Page
• TA/PA - Only traffic and proximity advisories are
displayed on the Map Page (proximity advisories
are not applicable to TIS configuration)
Figure 12-17 Map Setup Window
4)
Turn the large right knob to select the desired
Traffic Mode option. Turn the small right knob
to select the desired option and press the ENT
Key. Repeat the step for Traffic Symbol and
Traffic Label.
5)
Press the CLR Key to return the Map Page.
• TA only - Only traffic advisories are displayed on
the Map Page
TRAFC SMBL - Allows the user to select the map
range at which the traffic symbol(s) and TA text
appear.
12-8
GNS 430(A) Pilot’s Guide and Reference
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SECTION 12
ADDITIONAL FEATURES
Thumbnail Traffic on Map Page
The Map Page can display traffic in a thumbnail format
in any of the top three data fields on the right-hand side
of the Map Page.
Displaying Thumbnail Traffic on the Map
Page:
1)
Turn the small right knob to select the Map
Page.
2)
Press the MENU Key to display the Page
Menu.
Turn the small right knob to select ‘Change
Fields?’ and press the ENT Key.
3)
4)
Select one of the top three configurable fields.
Select ‘TRFC’ from the Select Field Type List and
press the ENT Key. Note that the thumbnail
range defaults to 6 nm and cannot be changed
(Figure 12-18).
Highlighting TIS Traffic Using Map Page
Panning
Another Map Page feature is panning, which allows the
pilot to move the map beyond its current limits without
adjusting the map scale. Press the small right knob to
select the panning function, a target pointer flashes on the
map display. A window appears at the top of the map
display showing the latitude/longitude position of the
pointer, plus the bearing and distance to the pointer from
the present position.
Activating the panning feature and panning
the map display:
1)
Press the small right knob to activate the
panning target pointer.
2)
Turn the small right knob to move up (turn
clockwise) or down (counterclockwise).
3)
Turn the large right knob to move right (turn
clockwise) or left (counterclockwise).
4)
To cancel the panning function and return to
the present position, press the small right
knob.
When the target pointer is placed on traffic, the traffic
range and altitude separation are displayed (Figure 12-19).
Traffic Range and
Altitude Separation
Figure 12-18 Thumbnail Traffic on Map Page
Target Pointer
NOTE: To display thumbnail traffic on the
left-hand side of the display, see Setup 2 Page:
Auxiliary Configuration, in Section 8.5.
Figure 12-19 Traffic Range and Altitude Separation
190-00140-00 Rev. P
GNS 430(A) Pilot’s Guide and Reference
12-9
SECTION 12
ADDITIONAL FEATURES
Power-Up Test
2)
Turn the small right knob to select ‘OPER?’.
The TIS interface performs an automatic test during
power-up.
3)
Press the ENT Key to confirm.
• If the system passes the power-up test, the
Standby Screen appears on the Traffic Page.
• If the system passes the power-up test and the
aircraft is airborne (as determined by system
configuration at the time of installation, see the
installer for detailed criteria information), traffic is
displayable on the Traffic Page in operating mode.
• If the system fails the power-up test, one of the
messages listed in Table 12-3 will be displayed .
See the installer for corrective action if the ‘DATA
FAIL’, or ‘FAILED’ message is displayed.
Message
Description
FAILED
GTX 330 has failed
Data is being received from the GTX 330,
DATA FAIL
but a failure was detected in the datastream
NO DATA Data is not being received from the GTX 330
Table 12-3 Power-up Messages
NOTE: ‘NO DATA’ may be a normal mode of
operation in a dual transponder installation
where the GTX 330 with TIS is not the selected
transponder.
Manual Override
The user can manually switch between standby (STBY)
and operating (OPER) modes of operation to manually
override automatic operation.
Placing the display into operating mode
from the standby mode (to display TIS
traffic):
1)
12-10
Placing the display into standby mode from
operating mode (to stop displaying TIS
traffic):
1)
Press the small right knob to activate the
cursor, and highlight ‘OPER’.
2)
Turn the small right knob to select ‘STBY?’.
3)
Press the ENT Key to confirm.
Flight Procedures
Once the aircraft is airborne (determined by system
configuration at the time of installation) the system
switches from standby mode to operating mode. The
GNS 430 unit displays OPER in the upper right hand
corner of the display and begins to display traffic on the
Traffic or Map Page.
The TIS Traffic Advisory (TA) should alert the crew to
use additional vigilance to identify the intruding aircraft.
Any time the traffic symbol becomes a yellow circle or
a voice warning is announced, conduct a visual search
for the intruder. If successful, maintain visual contact to
ensure safe operation. See pages 10-5, 10-6, and 10-7 for
a description of pilot responses to TIS display messages.
After Landing
Once the aircraft is on ground (determined by system
configuration at the time of installation) the system
switches from operating mode to standby mode. The
GNS 430 unit displays ‘STBY’. As described previously,
both the standby and operating modes can be manually
overridden by the display controls.
Press the small right knob to activate the
cursor, and highlight ‘STBY’.
GNS 430(A) Pilot’s Guide and Reference
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SECTION 12
ADDITIONAL FEATURES
12.2 GTS 8XX Traffic systems
System Description
Introduction
All information in this section pertains to the display and
control of the Garmin GNS 430/GTS 8XX interface, refer to
the 400/500 Series Display Interfaces Pilot’s Guide Addendum
(190-00140-10) when interfacing with non-Garmin products
WARNING: The GTS 8XX interface is intended
for advisory use only to aid the pilot in visually
acquiring traffic. No avoidance maneuvers
should be based solely upon TAS or TCAS I traffic
information. It is the responsibility of the pilot in
command to see and manuever to avoid traffic.
NOTE: This section assumes the user has
experience operating the GNS 430 and the
GTS 8XX.
NOTE: References to the GTS 8XX throughout
this document refer equally to the GTS 800, GTS
820, and GTS 850 unless otherwise noted.
NOTE: TIS is disabled when a GTS 8XX unit is
installed.
The GNS 430 provides an optional display interface for
the GTS 8XX Traffic Advisory (TAS) and Traffic Collision
Avoidance (TCAS I) Systems. The GTS 800 and GTS
820 are TAS systems, the GTS 850 is a TSO-Certified
TCAS I system. The GTS 8XX uses active interrogations of
Mode A/C/S (GTS 820 and GTS 850 only) and Mode A/C
transponders to provide Traffic Advisories to the GNS 430.
The GTS 8XX is an active traffic advisory system that
operates as an aircraft-to-aircraft interrogation device. The
GTS 8XX monitors the airspace surrounding an aircraft,
and advises the flight crew where to look for transponderequipped aircraft that may pose a collision threat. When
the GTS 8XX receives replies to its interrogations, it
computes the responding aircraft’s range, bearing, relative
altitude, and closure rate. The GTS 8XX then determines
the advisory status of the target and sends the location
information and alert status to the GNS 430 for display.
The GTS 800 is capable of tracking up to 45 Mode
A/C/S intruders. The GTS 820/850 is capable of tracking
up to 45 Mode A/C plus 30 Mode S intruders. Up to 30
of the most threatening targets are displayed.
Symbol Traffic Type
Description
A TA (Traffic Advisory) is generated when the GTS 8XX predicts that an intruder aircraft may
Traffic
pose a collision threat. A solid yellow circle represents an intruder aircraft that meets the TA
Advisory (TA) criteria as described in the TA Alerting Conditions section. A TA consists of the traffic symbol
and an aural alert (e.g., “traffic, 12 o’clock, high, 3 miles”).
Out-ofThis solid yellow half circle appears (on the outer range ring) under the same conditions and
Range Traffic has the same urgency as a TA. Its appearance differs from the TA only to signify that the
Advisory
intruder is outside of the current range of the Traffic Page.
Proximity Advisories (PA) are displayed as solid white (may be configured as cyan) diamonds.
Proximity
PAs are defined as traffic within the 6.0-nm range, within ±1200 ft. of altitude separation, and
Advisory (PA)
are not a traffic advisory (TA).
The hollow white (may be confiugred as cyan) diamond represents traffic detected within the
Other Traffic
selected display range that does not meet the criteria for a TA or a PA and does not pose an
Symbol
immediate collision threat.
Table 12-4 TAS/TCAS Symbology
190-00140-00 Rev. P
GNS 430(A) Pilot’s Guide and Reference
12-11
SECTION 12
ADDITIONAL FEATURES
Pilots should be aware of TAS/TCAS system
limitations. If an intruder transponder does not respond
to interrogations due to antenna shading or marginal
transponder performance, it will not be displayed, or
display may be intermittent. Pilots should remain vigilant
for traffic at all times when using TAS/TCAS systems for
non-transponder equipped airplanes or unresponsive
airplanes.
TCAS I Surveillance Volume
Top and bottom mounted antennas allow an active
surveillance range of up to 12 nm (GTS 800) or 40 nm
(GTS 820/850) in the forward direction, and somewhat
reduced ranges to the sides and aft of own aircraft due
to the directional interrogation patterns. Interference
limiting in GTS 820/850 units may automatically reduce
range in high density traffic areas.
TA Alerting Conditions
The GTS 8XX automatically adjusts its TA sensitivity level
(Table 12-5) to reduce the likelihood of nuisance TA alerting
during flight phases likely to be near airports. Sensitivity
Level A (less sensitivity) TA is used when the aircraft’s radar
altimeter (if equipped) indicates own altitude is less than
2000 feet AGL. If no radar altimeter is present, Sensitivity
Level A is active when the landing gear is extended. Level A
is also active when groundspeed is less than 120 knots with
no radar altimeter present in a fixed gear aircraft.
Sensitivity
Level
Intruder
Altitude
Available
A
Yes
A
No
B
Yes
B
No
In all other conditions, Level B (greater sensitivity) TA
sensitivity is used to assess TA threats.
Traffic Symbology
Traffic information from the GTS 8XX is displayed
on the GNS 430 unit using TAS/TCAS symbology (Table
12-4) on a dedicated Traffic page, and on the moving Map
Page. The displayed traffic information generally includes
the relative range, bearing, and altitude of intruder aircraft.
The GTS 8XX also generates aural announcements heard
on the cockpit audio system.
Target altitude relative to own aircraft altitude (relative
altitude) is displayed (in hundreds of feet) for each target
symbol (Figure 12-20). If traffic is above own aircraft altitude
the relative altitude is shown above the target next to a ‘+’
symbol. If traffic is below own aircraft altitude the relative
altitude is shown below the target next to a ‘-’ symbol.
Altitude trend (Figure 12-20) is displayed as an up
arrow (≥ +500 fpm), down arrow (≤ -500 fpm), or no
symbol if less than 500 fpm rate in either direction.
Relative
Altitude
Traffic
Type
Altitude
Trend
Figure 12-20 Traffic Symbol Components
TA Alerting Conditions
Intruder closing rate provides less than 20 seconds of vertical and horizontal separation.
Or:
Intruder range is within 0.2 nm and vertical separation is within 600 feet.
Intruder closing rate is less than 15 seconds.
Intruder closing rate provides less than 30 seconds of vertical and horizontal separation.
Or:
Intruder range is within 0.55 nm and vertical separation is within 800 feet.
Intruder closing rate is less than 20 seconds.
Table 12-5 TA Sensitivity Level and TA Alerting Criteria
12-12
GNS 430(A) Pilot’s Guide and Reference
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SECTION 12
ADDITIONAL FEATURES
Aural Alerts
A TA consists of a displayed traffic symbol (solid yellow
circle) and an aural alert. The aural alert announces
“traffic”, followed by the intruder aircraft’s position,
altitude relative to own aircraft (“high”, “low”, or “same
altitude”), and distance from own aircraft; e.g. “traffic, 12
o’clock, high, 3 miles”.
Figure 12-21 Standby Mode
Self-Test
The GTS 8XX automatically performs a self-test upon
power up. The self-test checks internal parameters and
calibrates components of the GTS 8XX. The self-test can
also be initiated by the user during normal operation.
Check for the following test criteria on the Traffic Page
during power-up:
• If the GTS 8XX passes the power-up test; and
the aircraft both has a squat switch and is on the
ground, the Standby Screen is displayed (Figure
12-21).
• If the GTS 8XX passes the power-up test and the
aircraft both has a squat switch and is airborne,
the Traffic Page is displayed on the 6-nm display
range and in the normal altitude display mode.
• If the GTS 8XX passes the power-up test and the
aircraft does not have a squat switch, the Standby
Screen is displayed (Figure 12-21).
• If the GTS 8XX fails the power-up test (as
indicated by a FAILED screen), the GTS 8XX is
inoperable, see the GTS 8XX Installation Manual
for detailed information on Failure Response.
NOTE: The FAILED message is displayed when
the system detects an error that prohibits further
traffic display operation.
NOTE: When the system is in standby, the
GTS 8XX does not transmit, interrogate, or track
intruder aircraft.
User-initiated Test
In addition to the power-up test, the GTS 8XX performs
self-tests during normal operation. A self-test is performed
once per minute to verify that the antenna is connected.
Also, a calibration is performed at varying intervals based
on time and temperature. A user-initiated test of the
GTS 8XX interface can also be performed. The test criteria
are identical to the power up self-test, although the userinitiated test is concluded by an aural pass/fail message.
NOTE: A user-initiated test can only be performed
when in standby or failed mode.
Performing a user-initiated test:
1) Turn the small right knob to select the Traffic
Page.
2)
From the Traffic Page, press the MENU Key to
display the Page Menu.
3)
Turn the small right knob to select ‘Self
Test?’.
4)
Press the ENT Key, ‘TEST’ is displayed.
Figure 12-22 Self-Test Mode
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SECTION 12
ADDITIONAL FEATURES
Switching Between Standby and Operating
Modes
The unit must be in operating mode for traffic to be
displayed. The ability to switch out of standby into operating
mode on the ground is especially useful for scanning the
airspace around the airport before takeoff. Operating Mode
is confirmed by the display of ‘OPER’ in the upper righthand corner of the Traffic Page (Figure 12-23).
Switching to Operating Mode from Standby
Mode:
1)
Press the small right knob to activate the
cursor and highlight ‘STBY’.
2)
Turn the small right knob to select ‘OPER?’.
3)
Press the ENT Key to confirm and place the
GTS 8XX in operating mode, the GTS 8XX
switches out of standby into the 6-nm display
range.
NOTE: The GTS 8XX will automatically switch out
of standby 8 to 10 seconds after takeoff, which
is determined by ground speed or by a transition
of the aircraft squat switch (if connected).
Switching to Standby Mode from the Traffic
Page:
1)
Press the small right knob to activate the
cursor and highlight ‘OPER’.
2)
Turn the small right knob to select ‘STBY?’.
3)
Press the ENT Key to confirm and place the
GTS 8XX in standby mode.
12-14
NOTE: The GTS 8XX goes into standby mode 24
seconds after landing, which is determined by
ground speed or by a transition of the aircraft
squat switch (if connected). This delay allows
the GTS 8XX to remain out of standby during a
touch-and-go maneuver.
Traffic Page
Traffic can be displayed both on the Map Page (only
if heading is available) and on the Traffic Page (Figure
12-23). The orientation source shown at the top of the
display first uses heading (‘HDG’), then GPS Track (‘TRK’)
if no heading is available, to orient the display.
If the GTS 8XX does not have bearing information for
an active TA, ‘TA’ followed by range, relative altitude, and
altitude trend is displayed in the lower right corner. The
Traffic Banner is displayed if more than one TA with no
bearing info is active, while the TA of most immediate
threat is displayed in text below the banner.
Display Range
Traffic Orientation Source Operating Mode
Traffic Banner
Figure 12-23 Traffic Page
Traffic Advisory
(with no bearing
information)
Traffic Page Display Range
The display range on the Traffic Page can be changed
at any time.
Changing the display range on the Traffic
Page:
•
•
•
•
•
Press the RNG Key to step through the
following range options:
2 nm
2 and 6 nm
6 and 12 nm
12 and 24 nm (GTS 820/850 only)
24 and 40 nm (GTS 820/850 only)
GNS 430(A) Pilot’s Guide and Reference
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SECTION 12
ADDITIONAL FEATURES
Altitude Display Mode
The GTS 8XX has four altitude display modes
(Figure 12-24); Normal (±2,700 ft), Above (-2,700 ft to
+9,000 ft), Below (-9,000 ft to +2,700 ft), and Unrestricted
(±9,900 ft). The GTS 8XX continues to display up to 30
intruder aircraft within its maximum surveillance range,
regardless of the altitude display mode selected.
The selected altitude display mode (Figure 12-25)
is displayed in the upper left-hand corner of the Traffic
Page.
Note: Confirmation is not required, the mode is
changed immediately when using the small right
knob.
Altitude Display Mode
Changing the Altitude Display Mode:
1)
From the Traffic Page, press the small right
knob to activate the cursor and highlight the
current mode (Figure 12-25).
2)
Turn the small right knob to cycle through
the options. The screen changes to display
the traffic detected within the selected
altitude display range. Refer to Figure 12-24
for information regarding altitude display
ranges.
Figure 12-25 “UNR” Selected
3)
Press the small right knob to turn the cursor
off after the selection is made.
+9,900 ft
+9,000 ft
0 ft
Drawing Not to Scale
Above (ABV)
Below (BLW)
Unrestricted (UNR)
0 ft
Normal (NRM)
+2,700 ft
+2,700 ft
-2,700 ft
-9,000 ft
-9,900 ft
Figure 12-24 Altitude Display Modes
190-00140-00 Rev. P
GNS 430(A) Pilot’s Guide and Reference
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SECTION 12
ADDITIONAL FEATURES
Traffic Warning Window
Configuring Traffic Data on the Map Page
When the unit is not on the traffic page and the GTS
issues a Traffic Advisory, the Traffic Warning Window
(Figure 12-26) is displayed, which shows a small
thumbnail map. When the Traffic Warning Window is
displayed, press the ENT Key to display the Traffic Page,
or press the CLR Key to return to the previous page.
Traffic is only displayed on the Map Page if aircraft
heading data is available.
The Traffic Mode setting allows the operator to
choose which traffic type is displayed (all traffic, traffic
and proximity advisories, or traffic advisories only). The
Traffic Symbol and Traffic Label settings determine the
maximum ranges at which these items are displayed.
NOTE: The Traffic Warning Window is disabled
when the aircraft ground speed is less than 30
knots or when an approach is active.
Figure 12-26 Traffic Warning Window
Map Page Traffic Banner
Configuring traffic on the Map Page:
1)
Turn the small right knob to select the Map
Page.
2)
Press the MENU Key to display the Page
Menu.
3)
Turn the small right knob to select ‘Setup
Map?’.
4)
Press the ENT Key. The flashing cursor
highlights the GROUP field.
5)
Turn the small right knob to select ‘Traffic’.
6)
Press the ENT Key (Figure 12-28).
A ‘Traffic’ banner will be displayed in the lower right
corner of the Map Page (Figure 12-27) if the Display
Range setting is beyond the Traffic Symbol setting (Figure
12-28), and a Traffic Advisory is active.
Figure 12-28 Map Setup Menu
Display Range
Traffic Banner
Figure 12-27 Traffic Banner
12-16
7)
Turn the large right knob to select the desired
Traffic Mode option.
8)
Turn the small right knob to select the desired
option.
9)
Press the ENT Key. Repeat steps 7-9 for Traffic
Symbol and Traffic Label.
GNS 430(A) Pilot’s Guide and Reference
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SECTION 12
ADDITIONAL FEATURES
10) Return to the Map Page by pressing the CLR
Key.
Thumbnail Traffic on Map Page
Traffic in a thumbnail format can be displayed in any
of the three data fields on the right side of the Map Page
(Figure 12-29).
Displaying Thumbnail Traffic on the Map
Page
Highlighting Traffic Data Using Map Panning
Another map page function is panning, which allows
changing the map beyond its current limits without
adjusting the map scale. Select the panning function by
pressing the small right knob, a target pointer flashes on
the map display (Figure 12-30). Also a window appears at
the top of the map display showing the latitude/longitude
position of the pointer, and the bearing and distance to
the pointer from the present position.
1)
Turn the small right knob to select the Map
Page.
Selecting the panning function and panning
the map display:
2)
Press the MENU Key to display the Page
Menu.
1)
3)
Turn the small right knob to select ‘Change
Fields?’.
4)
Press the ENT Key.
5)
Turn the large right knob to select one of the
three fields.
6)
Turn the small right knob to select ‘TRFC’ from
the Select Field Type List.
7)
Press the ENT Key. (Figure 12-29)
Press the small right knob to activate the
panning target pointer (Figure 12-30).
Figure 12-30 Panning the Map Display
2)
Turn the small right knob clockwise to move
up, or counterclockwise to move down.
3)
Turn the large right knob clockwise to move
right, or counterclockwise to move left.
4)
Figure 12-29 Thumbnail Traffic on Map Page
Note: The thumbnail range defaults to 6 nm and
cannot be changed.
190-00140-00 Rev. P
To cancel the panning function and return to
the present position, press the small right
knob.
When the target pointer is placed on traffic, the traffic
range and altitude deviation are displayed (Figure 12-30).
The traffic is identified as:
• TA: Traffic Advisory
• PA: Proximity Advisory
• TRFC: Other Traffic
GNS 430(A) Pilot’s Guide and Reference
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SECTION 12
ADDITIONAL FEATURES
12.3 WEATHER DATA LINK INTERFACE
This section is written for:
• Garmin GNS 430 Main System Software Version
5.01 and later
• GDL 49 Main Software Version 2.03 and later
• GDL 69/69A Main Software Version 2.14 and later
Some differences in operation may be observed when
comparing the information in this manual to earlier or
later software versions.
NOTE: This section is written exclusively for
GNS 430 units that are configured with the GDL
49 or GDL 69(A) Data Link Satellite Receiver.
Refer to the 400/500 Series Display Interfaces
Pilot’s Guide Addendum (190-00140-10) when
interfacing with non-Garmin products.
Introduction
GNS 430 units can interface with the GDL 49 or the
GDL 69/69A. The GNS 430 unit provides the display and
control interface for the textual and graphical weather
data link.
Satellite up-linked textual and graphical weather
data is received by the GDL 49 on a request/reply basis.
Transmissions are made using bursts of compressed
data at a rate of 4800 bps. Weather data transmissions
are streamed directly to the GDL 69/69A from the XM
Satellite Radio network.
The following operational differences are noted
between the GDL 69/69A and the GDL 49.
• GDL 49 - NEXRAD and METAR data is collected
by the National Weather Service and disseminated
to Meteorlogix™, a weather information provider.
This data is then delivered to a weather server
in the Echo Flight Message System. With
the weather data on the system, an incoming
customer request is filled, logged, and turned
12-18
around for delivery to ORBCOMM in less than
five seconds (ORBCOMM is a provider of global
messaging services using a constellation of 26
low-Earth orbiting satellites). The message is
relayed from the satellites to the GDL 49 aboard
the aircraft. Once the GDL 49 receives the
message, it is displayed on the GNS 430 unit.
• GDL 69/69A - NEXRAD and METAR data
is collected by the National Weather Service
and disseminated to WxWorks™, a weather
information provider. This data is then delivered
to XM Satellite for rebroadcast. Data from two
XM satellites is then made immediately available
to XM customers. The GDL 69/69A receives
streaming weather data, processes the data, then
sends it to the GNS 430 unit for display.
Functions provided by the Weather Data Link system
include:
• Request for and display of NEXRAD radar
imagery.
• Request for and display of text-based METAR
data.
• Request for and display of a compressed form of
METAR data that allows icon representations at
reporting stations on a moving map indicating
visibility, ceiling, etc.
• Position tracking services are provided through
periodic position report transmissions from the
GNS 430 unit (available with GDL 49 only).
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SECTION 12
ADDITIONAL FEATURES
Weather Products
NEXRAD Limitations
The following weather products are available for
display on the GNS 430 unit via the Weather Data Link
interface:
• NEXRAD Data
• Graphical METAR Data
• Text-based METAR Data
• Graphical Temperature/Dewpoint Data
• Graphical Wind Data
NEXRAD Description
WSR-88D weather surveillance radar or NEXRAD
(NEXt generation RADar) is a Doppler radar system that
has greatly improved the detection of meteorological
events such as thunderstorms, tornadoes, and hurricanes.
An extensive network of NEXRAD stations provides
almost complete radar coverage of the continental United
States, Alaska, and Hawaii. The range of each NEXRAD
station is 124 nautical miles.
NEXRAD Abnormalities
There are possible abnormalities regarding displayed
NEXRAD images. Some, but not all, of those include:
CAUTION: NEXRAD weather data is to be used
for long-range planning purposes only. Due to
inherent delays and relative age of the data
that can be experienced, NEXRAD weather data
cannot be used for short-range avoidance of
weather.
Certain limitations exist regarding the NEXRAD
radar displays. Some, but not all, are listed for the user’s
awareness:
• NEXRAD base reflectivity does not provide
sufficient information to determine cloud layers or
precipitation characteristics (hail vs. rain, etc.).
• NEXRAD base reflectivity is sampled at the
minimum antenna elevation angle. An individual
NEXRAD site cannot depict high altitude storms
at close ranges, and has no information about
storms directly over the site.
• NEXRAD resolution varies, depending on the
amount and complexity of the weather data being
received. The displayed NEXRAD data will reflect
the highest intensity level sampled within a 4 sq
km area (depending on available system memory).
• Ground clutter
• Spurious radar data
• Sun strobes, when the radar antenna points
directly at the sun
• Military aircraft deploy metallic dust (chaff) which
can cause alterations in radar scans
• Interference from buildings or mountains, which
may cause shadows
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SECTION 12
ADDITIONAL FEATURES
NEXRAD Intensity
Colors are used to identify the different NEXRAD echo intensities (reflectivity) measured in dBZ (decibels of Z).
Reflectivity (designated by the letter Z) is the amount of transmitted power returned to the radar receiver. The dBZ values
increase as returned signal strength increases. Precipitation intensity is displayed on the GNS 430 units using colors
represented by the dBZ values listed in Table 12-6.
Display
GDL 49
GREEN
GREEN
YELLOW
RED
dBZ
Rain
(inches/hour)
Snow
(inches/hour)
Atmos
<-10
.00
.00
√
-10
.00
.00
√
√
-5
.00
trace
√
√
0
.00
trace - .05
√
√
GDL 69
YELLOW
RED
Source of NEXRAD Echo
Cloud
5
.00
trace - .10
√
√
10
0 – trace
.10
√
√
15
.01
20
25
30
35
Rain
Snow
Sleet
Hail
Very Light
Light
Light
Light
.1-.2
Light
Light
.02
.2-.3
Light
Light
.05
.3-.5
Light
Light – Medium
.09
.5-.7
Light – Moderate
Moderate
.24
.7-1.0
Moderate
Heavy
√
40
.48
>1 or sleet
Heavy
Heavy
√
45
1.25
>1 or sleet
Heavy
Heavy
√
50
2.5
sleet
Intense
√
√
55
5.7
sleet
Extreme
√
√
60
12.7
65
Extreme
Extreme
70
√
√
Large
75
Large
Table 12-6 NEXRAD Intensity Colors
12-20
NOTE: The information presented in this Pilot’s Guide regarding NEXRAD is not meant to be comprehensive.
The NOAA website (www.noaa.gov) contains complete and detailed information regarding NEXRAD weather
radar operation and theory.
GNS 430(A) Pilot’s Guide and Reference
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SECTION 12
ADDITIONAL FEATURES
Requesting NEXRAD Data
NEXRAD data can be requested from the Data Link
Page or the Map Page.
Requesting NEXRAD data from the Data
Link Page:
1)
Select the Data Link Page from the AUX Page
Group.
2)
Press the small right knob to activate the
cursor. ‘NexRad Request’ is highlighted (Figure
12-31).
Figure 12-31 Data Link Page (GDL 69)
3)
Press the ENT Key. The NEXRAD Request Page
(see Figure 12-32) is displayed.
The NEXRAD Request Page has the following userselectable fields:
• Center - This field allows the pilot to specify
reference points for the request. The following
five options are available for the ‘Center’ field:
♦Current Position - Request NEXRAD data from
the aircraft’s current position.
♦Look Ahead - Request NEXRAD data ahead of
(along) the current route.
♦From ID - Request NEXRAD data from a
specific waypoint identifier. If ‘From ID’ is
selected as the reference point for the request,
the ‘WPT’ field is displayed (in place of
‘Position’). The ‘WPT’ field is used to enter a
waypoint identifier as the reference point for
the request.
♦From Lat/Lon - Request NEXRAD data from
a specific latitude and longitude. This is only
selectable when requesting from the map. The
‘Position’ field displays the position of the map
cursor and cannot be edited.
♦From Flight Plan - Request NEXRAD data from
one of the waypoints in the active flight plan.
This is only selectable when an active Flight
Plan has been selected. The ‘Flight Plan’ field
(displayed in place of ‘Position’) is used to select
which waypoint in the active flight plan to use
as the reference point for the request.
Figure 12-32 NEXRAD Request Page (GDL 69)
• Radius - This field selects a request radius from 50
to 250 nautical miles from the selected position.
• Position (also WPT or Flight Plan) - ‘Current
Posn’-Position is current, ‘Look Ahead’-Position is
look ahead position. ‘From ID’-Position is from
the ID entered into the WPT field. ‘Flight Plan’ is
the ID selected from the active flight plan.
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SECTION 12
ADDITIONAL FEATURES
• Auto Request (GDL 49 Only) - This field is
used to set the time interval for the GDL 49 to
automatically send a NEXRAD data request. The
time options are OFF, 10 min, 15 min, 20 min, 30
min, 45 min, and 1 hour. When an auto request
time is selected, the first request is sent after the
specified time has elapsed from when the field
was set (as opposed to immediately sending a
request).
1)
Select the Map Page.
2)
Press the MENU Key. The Map Page Options
Menu is displayed.
3)
Select ‘Request NEXRAD?’ (Figure 12-33) and
press the ENT Key.
NOTE: It is recommended that the pilot turn the
Auto Request function on by setting it to ‘10 min’
updates. This setting provides best performance
for the GDL 49.
• The ‘Manual Send?’ (GDL 49) or ‘Update
Request?’ (GDL 69) field is used to request
NEXRAD Data.
4)
Use the small and large right knobs to select
the desired data (listed on preceding page)
and the ENT Key to enter the data into the
appropriate fields on the NEXRAD Request
Page.
5)
Select ‘Manual Send?’ or ‘Update Request?’
and press the ENT Key. The request has been
sent. Note that selecting ‘Auto Request’
and pressing the ENT Key does not send the
request until after the auto time period.
6)
Requesting NEXRAD data from the Map
Page:
To exit from the NEXRAD Request Page, press
the small right knob. The Data Link Page is
displayed.
Figure 12-33 Map Page Options Menu
4)
Follow the preceding steps 4 - 6.
NOTE: The pilot may also use the map panning
function to request NEXRAD data at a specific
map position. After panning and selecting a
position on the map, the pilot can press the
MENU Key and request the NEXRAD data.
Data Received Message (GDL 49 Only)
When the request has been answered, the message
annunciator (MSG) flashes to alert the pilot to one of
the following messages depending on the type of data
received:
• New NEXRAD Received
• New Graphic METAR Received
• New Text METAR Received
12-22
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SECTION 12
ADDITIONAL FEATURES
Displaying NEXRAD Data on the Weather Page
To display NEXRAD Data on the Weather
Page:
1)
Select the NAV Weather Page (Figure 12-34)
using the small and large right knobs. When
the GNS 430 unit is configured with the Data
Link interface, the Weather Page is the third
page in the NAV Page Group (it is the fourth
page if a traffic sensor is also configured).
Customizing NEXRAD Data on the Weather
Page
The pilot can customize the NEXRAD data on the
Weather Page from the Page Options Menu.
Customizing the NEXRAD data on the
Weather Page:
1)
From the Weather Page, press the MENU Key
to display the NAV Weather Page Options
Menu.
2)
Select from the following options to customize
the NEXRAD data:
•
View 120°?/View 360°? - There are two
viewing options available, each shown relative
to the position of the aircraft. When the MENU
Key is pressed, the alternate selection is shown.
Use this option to switch between a radar-like,
120° display of the data, and the default 360°
display.
•
Request NEXRAD?/Request METAR? - This
option is a link to either the NEXRAD or METAR
Request Pages, depending on which is currently
displayed on the Weather Page.
•
Display Legend? - This option is a link to the
Weather Legend Page. See the Weather Legend
Page paragraph following in this section.
Figure 12-34 NEXRAD Data on Weather Page
2)
Press the small right knob. The upper left hand
corner field flashes.
3)
Turn small right knob and select ‘NEXRAD’.
4)
Press the small right knob.
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SECTION 12
ADDITIONAL FEATURES
Displaying NEXRAD Data on the Map Page
When NEXRAD data is received, it is displayed on the
Map Page, in addition to the Weather Page and the Default
NAV Page.
Customizing NEXRAD Data on the Map Page
The pilot can customize NEXRAD data on the Map
Page by using the Page Menu.
Customizing the Map Page:
1)
Go to the Map Page in the NAV Page Group.
2)
Press the MENU Key and select ‘Setup Map?’
from the page menu.
3)
Select ‘Weather’ from the GROUP field in the
Map Setup window (Figure 12-35).
Precipitation
Intensity – Map
Configuration
Light Precipitation –
Low
Light Precipitation –
Medium Density
Light Precipitation –
High Density
4)
5)
12-24
Highlight the NEXRAD Symbol field, and use
the small right knob to set the desired map
range at which to overlay NEXRAD data. The
range values are ‘Off’ to 2000 nm miles. Press
the ENT Key for the desired range selection.
Press the CLR Key to go back to the Map
Page.
Highlight the NEXRAD Density field, use the
small right knob to set the density desired
(i.e., the transparency, see Table 12-7) of the
NEXRAD cells. The density values are LOWMED-HIGH. Press the ENT Key to make the
selection then press the CLR Key to go back
to the Map Page.
Color
Green
(sparse dotted area fill)
Green
(dense dotted area fill)
Green
(solid area fill)
Moderate Precipitation
– Low & Medium
Yellow
Density
(dense dotted area fill)
Moderate Precipitation
– High Density
Figure 12-35 Map Setup Window
Pattern
Heavy Precipitation
– Low & Medium
Density
Heavy Precipitation –
High Density
Yellow
(solid area fill)
Red
(dense dotted area fill)
Red
(solid area fill)
Table 12-7 NEXRAD Density Patterns
NOTE: If the pilot changes the NEXRAD Density
and/or NEXRAD Symbol fields, these settings
changes also affect the Weather Page. For
example, if the pilot selects ‘Low’ NEXRAD
Density, both the Weather Page and the Map
Page display the NEXRAD graphics in the ‘Low’
mode.
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SECTION 12
ADDITIONAL FEATURES
The pilot may use the ‘NEXRAD Off?’ and ‘NEXRAD
On?’ fields in the Page Menu (Figure 12-36) to turn off the
display of NEXRAD data from the Map Page.
Once the Airport Location Page is displayed, enter the
identifier for the desired airport. Press the MENU Key. The
options menu appears (Figure 12-37) listing the following
three options:
• Request NEXRAD?
• Request METAR?
• View Text METAR? (if available)
Figure 12-36 Map Page Options Menu
NOTE: If the GNS 430 is configured for
Weather Data Link Interface with a GDL 49 or
GDL 69 , pressing the CLR Key while viewing
the Map Page reduces the NEXRAD density one
incremental step. All NEXRAD data is removed
if the CLR Key is pressed while density is set
to low.
Request Shortcuts
The pilot can quickly select the NEXRAD, METAR, or
Textual METAR Page for a specific airport from the Airport
Location Page.
Three methods of selecting the Airport Location Page:
Figure 12-37 Airport Location Page Options Menu
Highlight the desired option and press the ENT Key.
‘Request NEXRAD?’ and ‘Request METAR?’ options select
the NEXRAD and METAR Request Pages, respectively.
‘View Text METAR?’ selects the Textual METAR Page for
the desired airport, if textual METAR is available for that
airport.
• Use the small and large right knobs to select the
Airport Location Page from the WPT Group of
pages.
• On the Map Page, move the target pointer to highlight an on-screen airport. Press the ENT Key.
• On any page that displays an airport identifier, use
the cursor and highlight the desired airport identifier. Press the ENT Key.
190-00140-00 Rev. P
GNS 430(A) Pilot’s Guide and Reference
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SECTION 12
ADDITIONAL FEATURES
Data Link Request Log Page (GDL 49 Only)
Sending Position Reports (GDL 49 Only)
The Data Link Request Log Page (Figure 12-39) is used
to display the data that was requested. When a request is
received, a check mark is placed in the box.
The Data Link allows for accurate location tracking of
the aircraft by sending the aircraft’s position manually or
automatically to the EchoFlight website (www.EchoFlight.
com) for use by third-party EchoFlight customers.
Viewing the Data Link Request Log Page:
1)
2)
Use the small and large right knobs and select
the Data Link Page from the AUX Group of
pages.
Highlight ‘Data Link Log’ (Figure 12-38) and
press the ENT Key.
Sending the Present Position:
1)
Select the Data Link Page (see preceding step
1).
2)
Highlight ‘Position Report’ (Figure 12-40) and
press the ENT Key.
Figure 12-38 Data Link Page
3)
The Data Link Request Log Page is displayed
(Figure 12-39).
Figure 12-40 Data Link Page
3)
The ‘Position Report’ Page is displayed with the
following six fields:
• Nearest VOR - Nearest VOR identifier
• Distance - The distance from the nearest VOR
• Radial - The radial from the nearest VOR
• Position - Displays the aircraft’s current position expressed in Latitude and Longitude
Figure 12-39 Data Link Request Log Page
12-26
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SECTION 12
ADDITIONAL FEATURES
•
•
Auto Request - This field is used to set the
time interval for the system to automatically
send the position. The time options are OFF,
10 min, 15 min, 20 min, 30 min, 45 min, and
1 hr. When an auto request time is selected,
the first report is sent after the specified
time has elapsed from when the field was
set (as opposed to immediately sending a
report). Note that in order to take advantage
of EchoFlight’s Automatic Weather Delivery
(AWD) service, the time interval must be set
to 15 minutes.
Requesting Graphical METARs
Graphical METAR data can be requested from the Data
Link Page, Map Page, or Airport Page.
Requesting graphical METARs from the
Data Link Page:
1)
Select the Data Link Page from the AUX Page
Group.
2)
Press the small right knob to activate the
cursor. Turn the small right knob and highlight
‘Metar Request’ (Figure 12-42).
Manual Send? - This field is used to send out a
current single position report (Figure 12-41).
Figure 12-42 Data Link Page
3)
Figure 12-41 Position Report Page
Press the ENT Key. The ‘METAR REQUEST’
Page is displayed (Figure 12-43).
Figure 12-43 Metar Request Page
The METAR Request Page has the following userselectable fields:
• Format - This field is used to select between
requesting the raw METAR text (Textual) or
requesting a graphical summary (Graphic) of
several METARs.
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SECTION 12
ADDITIONAL FEATURES
NOTE: Textual METARs can only be requested
by identifier or by flight plan (if the flight plan
contains a METAR station identifier).
• Center - This field allows the pilot to specify
reference points for the request. The following
five options are available for the ‘Center’ field:
♦Current Position - Request METAR data from
the aircraft’s current position.
♦Look Ahead - Request METAR data ahead of
(along) the current route.
♦From ID - Request NEXRAD data from a
specific waypoint identifier. If ‘From ID’ is
selected as the reference point for the request,
the ‘WPT’ field is displayed (in place of
‘Position’). The ‘WPT’ field is used to enter a
waypoint identifier as the reference point for
the request.
♦From Lat/Lon - Request NEXRAD data from
a specific latitude and longitude. This is only
selectable when requesting from the map. The
‘Position’ field displays the position of the map
cursor and cannot be edited.
♦From Flight Plan - Request METAR data from
one of the waypoints in the active flight plan.
This is only selectable when an active Flight
Plan has been selected. The ‘Flight Plan’ field
(displayed in place of ‘Position’) is used to select
which waypoint in the active flight plan to use
as the reference point for the request.
• Radius (Graphical requests only) - This field
selects a request radius from 50 to 250 nm from
the selected position.
12-28
• Position (also WPT or Flight Plan) - ‘Current
Posn’-Position is current, ‘Look Ahead’-Position is
look ahead position. ‘From ID’-Position is from
the ID entered into the WPT field. ‘Flight Plan’ is
the ID selected from the active flight plan.
• Auto Request (GDL 49 Only) - This field is
used to set the time interval for the GDL 49 to
automatically send a NEXRAD data request. The
time options are OFF, 10 min, 15 min, 20 min, 30
min, 45 min, and 1 hour. When an auto request
time is selected, the first request is sent after the
specified time has elapsed from when the field
was set (as opposed to immediately sending a
request).
NOTE: It is recommended that the pilot turn the
Auto Request function ‘on’ by setting it to ‘10 min’
updates. This setting provides best performance
for the GDL 49.
• The ‘Manual Send?’(GDL 49) or ‘Update Request?’
(GDL 69) field is used to request METAR Data.
4)
Use the small and large right knobs to select
the desired data and the ENT Key to enter the
data into the appropriate fields on the METAR
Request Page.
5)
Select ‘Manual Send?’ or ‘Update Request?’
and press the ENT Key. The request has been
sent. Note that selecting ‘Auto Request’
and pressing the ENT Key does not send the
request until after the auto time period.
6)
To exit from the NEXRAD Request Page, press
the small right knob. The Data Link Page is
displayed.
GNS 430(A) Pilot’s Guide and Reference
190-00140-00 Rev. P
SECTION 12
ADDITIONAL FEATURES
Requesting graphical or textual METARs
from the Map Page:
Displaying graphical METARs on the NAV
Weather Page
1)
Select the Map Page.
2)
Press the MENU Key. The Map Page Options
Menu is displayed (Figure 12-44).
Once received, graphical METAR data is displayed on
the NAV Weather Page.
Figure 12-44 Map Page Menu
3)
Select ‘Request METAR’ and press the ENT
Key. The METAR Request Page is displayed.
There are four user-selectable parameter
fields: Format, Center, Radius, and Position
(see preceding pages for detailed information).
Change the request parameters as desired.
4)
Enter the type of desired METAR Data and the
desired radius (graphical requests only).
5)
Select ‘Manual Send?’ or ‘Update Request?’
and press the ENT Key. The request has
been sent. Note that selecting ‘Auto Request’
and pressing the ENT Key does not send the
request until after the auto time period.
6)
To exit from the METAR Request Page, press
the small right knob. The Map Page is
displayed.
190-00140-00 Rev. P
Displaying graphical METARs on the NAV
Weather Page:
1)
Select the NAV Weather Page.
2)
Press the small right knob. The upper left hand
corner field flashes.
3)
Turn small right knob and select ‘METAR’.
4)
Press the small right knob.
Viewing graphical METAR Data for a
specific airport from the Map Page:
1)
Select the Map Page.
2)
Move the target pointer to highlight a desired
airport. Graphical METAR data is displayed for
that airport in a thumbnail image.
NOTE: For the GDL 69/69A, METAR data is
automatically updated every twelve minutes
from the time of initial request.
GNS 430(A) Pilot’s Guide and Reference
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SECTION 12
ADDITIONAL FEATURES
Weather Legend Page
The symbology unique to Graphical METAR, Winds,
and Temperature/Dewpoint data is displayed on the
Weather Legend Page. The Weather Legend is accessed
from the Weather Page.
NOTE: All METAR, Wind, and Temp-Dewpoint
symbols are depicted at the end of this section.
The following symbology is shown for the various
types of data:
For METAR Data:
• Age of Data in Minutes
• Ceiling, Visibility, and Precipitation
• Ceiling, Visual Flight Rules
• Precipitation
Displaying the Weather Legend:
For Wind Data:
1)
• Age of Data in Minutes
Select the Weather Page and activate the
cursor. This selects the weather selection field
in the upper left corner of page.
• Winds
• Wind Gust
2)
Use the small right knob to select METAR,
WINDS, or TEMP/DP.
3)
Press the MENU Key. The Weather Page Menu
is displayed.
• Age of Data in Minutes
Turn the small right knob, highlight ‘Display
Legend’, and press the ENT Key. The Weather
Legend is displayed (Figure 12-45) for the
type of data that was selected. Use the small
right knob and scroll through the various
descriptions for the symbols that are shown.
Press the small right knob to return to the
Weather Page.
Displaying Textual METARs
4)
For Temperature/Dewpoint Data:
• Temperature/Dewpoint
Once received, textual METARs are displayed on the
METARs Text Page.
Selecting the METARs Text Page:
1)
Select the Data Link Page.
2)
Select ‘Textual Metar’.
3)
Press the ENT Key. The Textual METAR Page
(Figure 12-46) is displayed for the airport
selected. The pilot can enter a different
identifier on the Textual METAR Page.
Figure 12-45 Weather Legend Page for METAR Data
Figure 12-46 Textual METAR Page
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SECTION 12
ADDITIONAL FEATURES
Entering an identifier:
1)
2)
2)
Select the Data Link Page. Highlight ‘TEXTUAL
METAR’ and press the ENT Key.
Press the small right knob. The upper left hand
corner data field flashes.
3)
Turn the small right knob and scroll through
the list of four letter identifiers.
Turn the small right knob and select ‘TEMP/
DP’.
4)
Press the small right knob. The Temperature/
Dewpoints are displayed on the NAV Weather
Page.
3)
Highlight the desired identifier and press the
ENT Key.
4)
The text box displays the METAR data for the
selected identifier.
5)
To request an updated graphic or textual
METAR for this airport, press the MENU key
to access the page menu and select ‘Request
METAR?’.
6)
The METAR Request Page is displayed. The
request option is displayed on the Textual
METAR Page.
Displaying Wind Data
Displaying wind data on the NAV Weather
Page:
1)
Select the NAV Weather Page.
2)
Press the small right knob. The upper left hand
corner field flashes.
3)
Turn the small right knob and select
‘WINDS’.
4)
Press the small right knob. The wind icons are
displayed on the NAV Weather Page.
Displaying Temperature/Dewpoints
Temperature/Dewpoints are displayed on the NAV
Weather Page.
Displaying Temperature/Dewpoints on the
NAV Weather Page:
1)
NOTE: See a complete description of all METAR,
Wind, and Temp-Dewpoint symbols at the end
of this section.
Troubleshooting
Although it is the responsibility of the facility that
installed the GDL 49 or GDL 69/69A to correct any
hardware problems, the pilot can perform some quick
troubleshooting steps to find the possible cause of a
failure.
First, ensure that the owner/operator of the aircraft
in which the GDL 49 or GDL 69/69A is installed has
subscribed to Echo Flight or XM Satellite Radio for a
Service Plan, and verify that it has been activated. Perform
a quick check of the circuit breakers to ensure the GDL 49
or GDL 69/69A has power applied. If a failure still exists,
continue to the Data Link Status Page.
The fields on the Data Link Status Page may provide
insight to a possible failure. Information displayed at this
page should be noted and provided to the repair station.
The Connectivity Message table should also provide a
clear indication of any potential internal failures. If no
indications exist, check the circuit breakers and electrical
connections to the GDL 49 or GDL 69/69A, and ensure
the unit has power applied. Repair stations are equipped
to repair the system, should a hardware failure exist.
Select the NAV Weather Page.
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12-31
SECTION 12
ADDITIONAL FEATURES
Monitoring the Data Link
SAT ID/CONNECTIVITY FIELD
The Data Link Status Page provides an indication of
the integrity of the Data Link. The Data Link Page allows
the pilot to monitor the system and determine the possible
cause of a failure.
View the Data Link Status Page:
1)
From the AUX Page Group, select the Data Link
Page.
2)
Highlight ‘Data Link Status’ and press the ENT
Key.
3)
The Data Link Status Page (Figure 12-47) is
displayed.
Figure 12-47 Data Link Status Page
The GDL 49 Datalink Status Page shows the following
fields:
• TX Queue - Shows the number of requests in the
GDL 49’s transmit queue waiting to be sent to the
satellite.
• RX Queue - Shows the number of responses in the
GDL 49’s receive queue waiting to be sent to the
GNS 430.
• Sat ID/Connectivity - Shows the current satellite
in view and also indicates the status of the current
satellite connection. See Table 12-8.
MESSAGE
‘_ _ _’
‘Data Link has
failed’
‘Linked to sat’
‘Satellite in view’
‘Searching...’
DESCRIPTION
RS-232 communication with the GDL
49 has been lost.
There is a disconnect inside the GDL
49.
Can exchange data with the satellite.
Found satellite but have not yet
identified it.
No satellite is currently in view.
Table 12-8 Sat ID/Connectivity Field
• SATCOM Operation - This field indicates the
current activity being performed by the satellite
communicator within the GDL 49. Table 12-9
lists the messages that can be displayed, including
interpretations of the most common ones:
SATCOM OPERATION FIELD
MESSAGE
DESCRIPTION
‘_ _ _’
Unknown task is being performed,
or RS-232 communication with the
GDL 49 has been lost.
‘Idle’
Waiting to perform the next task.
‘Receiving
Receiving a response from the
message’
satellite.
‘Sending message’ Transmitting a message.
‘Sending request’ Transmitting a request to the
satellite.
Table 12-9 SATCOM Operation Field
• SATCOM SER NUM - This field shows the serial
number assigned to the GDL 49’s internal satellite
communicator.
• GDL SW - This field shows the currently installed
software version for the GDL 49.
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SECTION 12
ADDITIONAL FEATURES
The GDL 69 Datalink Status Page shows the following
fields:
• Sat ID/Connectivity - This field shows the current
activation status and signal strength of the XM
Satellite Radio weather service. Table 12-10 lists
the messages that may be shown in the Sat ID
field. Table 12-11 lists the messages that may be
shown in the Sat Connectivity field.
SAT ID FIELD
MESSAGE
DESCRIPTION
‘--’
GDL 69/69A - GNS 430 interface
communications not yet established.
‘-0’, ‘-1’,
‘-’ = Satellite radio service is not activated.
‘-2’, or ‘-3’ Satellite signal quality is indicated by the
numbers 0, 1, 2, or 3; where 0=none,
1=poor, 2=good, and 3=excellent.
‘XM’
GDL 69/69A not yet communicating with
internal satellite radio hardware (normal
during power-up).
‘X0’, ‘X1’, ‘X’ = Satellite radio service activated.
‘X2’, or
Satellite signal quality is indicated by the
‘X3’
numbers 0, 1, 2, or 3; where 0=none,
1=poor, 2=good, and 3=excellent.
CONNECTIVITY FIELD
DESCRIPTION
Indicates a signal quality between 1
and 3.
No satellite is currently in view, signal
quality is ‘0’.
MESSAGE
‘Satellite in
view’
‘Searching...’
Table 12-11 Connectivity Field
• SATCOM Operation - This field always indicates
‘Idle’ for the GDL 69/69A.
• SATCOM SER NUM - The first eight characters of
this field indicate the satellite radio ID number.
A dash separates the satellite radio ID from the
currently installed METAR database version in the
GDL 69/69A.
• GDL SW - This field shows the currently installed
software version for the GDL 69/69A.
Table 12-10 Sat ID Field
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SECTION 12
ADDITIONAL FEATURES
Standard Aviation Forecast Abbreviations
METAR Graphics
The standard aviation forecast abbreviations are listed
in Table 12-12.
The age symbols listed in Table 12-13 are common to
METARs, Winds, and Temperature/Dewpoint graphics:
STANDARD AVIATION FORECAST ABBREVIATIONS
‘+’ – (Heavy)
‘-’ – (Light)
‘/’ – (Missing or separator) Axxxx – Altimeter setting
(xxxx are numbers)
AFT – After
BKN – Broken clouds
BLO – Below
BR – Light fog
CIG – Ceiling
CLR – Sky clear
DZ – Drizzle
FEW – Few clouds
FG – Thick fog
FM – From
FZ – Freezing
G – Gusts
KT – Knots
OBSCD – Obscured
OVC – Overcast clouds
Pxxxx – Hourly Precipitation
(xxxx are numbers)
PRESFR – Pressure falling PRESRR – Pressure rising
rapidly
rapidly
RA – Rain
RMK – Remarks
SCT – Scattered clouds
SLP – Sea Level Pressure
SM – Statue Miles
SN – Snow
TEMPO – Occasionally
Trrn – Terrain
TS – Thunderstorm
VV – Vertical Visibility
METAR, Winds, and Temperature/Dewpoints Age
Graphics
0 - 10 11 - 20 21 - 30 31 - 60 61+ Unknown
minutes minutes minutes minutes minutes (Yellow)
(Green) (Green) (Green) (Green) (Yellow)
Table 12-13 Weather Age Graphics
METARs
Precipitation Graphics
Light
Moderate
(Green)
(Green)
Heavy
(Yellow)
No
Precipitation
Rain
Snow
Unknown
Table 12-12 Forecast Abbreviations
Table 12-14 Precipitation Graphics
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SECTION 12
ADDITIONAL FEATURES
The symbol in Figure 12-48 indicates the ceiling at
KMWM is marginal VFR, with heavy snow and low IFR
visibility. The data age is 31-60 minutes old.
Ceiling and Visibility - Flight Rules
VFR
Marginal VFR
IFR
Low IFR
(green
bars)
(green bars)
(yellow bars) (yellow bars)
Winds
Wind Vector - The wind vector indicates the
direction of the surface wind to the nearest 30˚
increment (e.g. 30˚, 60˚, 90˚, 120˚, etc.).
Wind Speed - In general, the sum of the wind barbs
(see Table 12-16) is the sustained surface wind
speed.
Wind Speed
(Blank)
Short Barb
Long Barb
Table 12-15 Ceiling and Visibility Graphics
Ceiling
Precipitation
Data Age
Table 12-16 Wind Speed Graphics
Visibility
Station Identifier
Figure 12-48 METAR Symbol
Unknown
5 kts
10 kts
≥ 37 kts
(Blank)
G10
(Green)
G11+
(Yellow)
Gust Offset
Gusts are unknown or < 5 kts above
sustained wind speed.
Wind is gusting 5 - 10 kts more than
sustained speed.
Wind is gusting 11 kts or more above its
sustained speed.
Table 12-17 Gust Offset Graphics
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GNS 430(A) Pilot’s Guide and Reference
12-35
SECTION 12
ADDITIONAL FEATURES
To interpret wind speed, add the values of each of the
wind speed barbs. In Figure 12-49, there are two long
barbs (10 knots each) and one short barb (5 knots each).
Thus, the total wind speed is 25 knots. Adding the gust
offset to this figure gives winds gusting to 36 knots. Thus,
the symbol in Figure 12-49 indicates the surface wind at
KFRM is coming from a direction of 300° at a speed of
25 knots, gusting to 36 knots or greater. The data age is
11-20 minutes old.
Gust Offset
Wind Speed
Temperature - Dewpoints
The Temperature-Dewpoint Range symbols (Table
12-18) display the difference between the reported
temperature and dewpoint. Differences are shown in
degrees Fahrenheit.
Temp - Dewpoint Display Ranges
(Blank)
Unknown
11°+
(Green)
7° - 10°
(Green)
Wind Vector
Data Age
0° - 6°
(Yellow)
Table 12-18 Temp-Dewpoint Ranges
Figure 12-49 Wind Symbol
This symbol in Figure 12-50 displays the difference
between the reported temperature and dewpoint as 7-10
degrees Fahrenheit at KSPW.
Temperature
Dewpoint
Figure 12-50 Temp-Dewpoint Symbol
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GNS 430(A) Pilot’s Guide and Reference
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SECTION 13 – FAULT DETECTION
AND EXCLUSION
SECTION 13: FAULT DETECTION
and EXCLUSION
Fault Detection and Exclusion (FDE) is incorporated in
the Garmin GNS 430 main and GPS software version 3.00
and higher. FDE algorithms provide a basis for approval
per the requirements for “GPS as a Primary Means of
Navigation for Oceanic/Remote Operations”, FAA Notice
N8110.60. The oceanic flight phase is used by the GNS
430 when the aircraft is more than 200 nm from the
nearest airport. FDE requires no pilot interaction during
flight; predicting the capability of the GPS constellation to
provide service during a flight is done by the pilot prior
to departure.
13.1 Detection and Exclusion
FDE consists of two distinct parts, fault detection
and fault exclusion. The detection function refers to
the capability to detect a satellite failure which can affect
navigation. Upon detection, the exclusion function
excludes one or more failed satellites and prevents them
from being used during navigation. This allows the
GPS receiver to return to normal performance without
interruption. The process is entirely automated and does
not require pilot interaction during flight. On the Satellite
Status Page, the pilot can view information related to
FDE operation. To enhance safety, FDE functionality
is provided for other phases of flight (non-precision
approach, terminal, enroute). The FDE functionality for
non-oceanic flight phases adheres to the same missed alert
probability, false alert probability, and failed exclusion
probability specified by N8110.60.
Figure 13-1 shows satellite number 9 exclusion during
oceanic phase of flight. No message notifying the user
of exclusion appears. In addition to the EPE and DOP
fields, there is the Horizontal Uncertainty Level (HUL)
field which displays a 99% confidence level that the
aircraft position is within a circle with a radius of the value
displayed in the HUL field.
Oceanic
Mode
Excluded Satellite
(Checkered Pattern)
Horizontal
Uncertainty
Level
Figure 13-1 Satellite Status Page
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13-1
SECTION 13 – FAULT DETECTION
AND EXCLUSION
13.2 Pre-Departure Verification of
FDE
Since FDE is based upon the exclusion of “bad” satellites,
it is necessary to ensure there will be an adequate number
of satellites in the GPS constellation that are still able to
provide a navigation solution. An FDE prediction must be
performed prior to departure for a flight involving:
• Oceanic/Remote operation where GPS is to be the
sole source of navigation per FAA Notice 8110.60
Prior to departure, the operator must use the FDE
Prediction Program supplied with the 400-series Trainer
Software (Figure 13-2) to demonstrate that there are no
outages in the capability to navigate on the specified
route of flight (the FDE Prediction Program determines
whether the GPS constellation is robust enough to provide
a navigation solution for the specified route of flight). The
trainer software and the document “400/500 Series FDE
Prediction Instructions” (190-00643-00) are available on
Garmin’s web site for free download (www.garmin.com).
• U.S. Area Navigation (RNAV) routes, Standard
Instrument Departures (SIDs), or Standard
Terminal Arrival Routes (STARs) if a NOTAM
indicates a GPS satellite (or satellites) is scheduled
to be out-of-service, per FAA AC 90-100 “U.S.
Terminal and En Route Area Navigation (RNAV)
Operations”
Figure 13-2 Garmin 400 Series Trainer Software
13-2
GNS 430(A) Pilot’s Guide and Reference
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SECTION 14 – MESSAGES,
ABBREVIATIONS, & NAV TERMS
SECTION 14: MESSAGES, ABBREVIATIONS, and NAV TERMS
14.1 Messages
The GNS 430 uses a flashing ‘MSG’ annunciator at the bottom of the screen (directly above the MSG Key) to alert
the pilot of any important information or warnings. While most messages are advisory in nature, warning messages may
require pilot intervention.
When the ‘MSG’ annunciator flashes, press the MSG Key to display the message. Press the MSG Key again to return
to the previous page.
The following is a list of available messages and their meanings:
Message
Airspace ahead -- less
than 10 minutes
Airspace near and
ahead
All data referenced to
True North
Description
The GPS-calculated course is projected to enter a special use airspace within 10 minutes.
This message is automatically disabled within 30 nm of an arrival airport, when an approach
is loaded.
The GPS-calculated position is within 2 nm of the boundary of a special use airspace and the
course is projected to enter the airspace within 10 minutes. This message is automatically
disabled within 30 nm of an arrival airport, when an approach is loaded.
The GNS 430 has not detected a NavData Card in the left data card slot.
The GNS 430 is configured to receive altitude serializer data (Icarus, Rosetta, or Shadin) and
it is not being received. Or, the data was being received, but has been interrupted. If a grey
code altitude input is available, it is used instead. If the problem persists, contact a Garmin
dealer and check the installation and installation settings. When this message occurs, no
Altitude input failure
pilot action is required if enough satellites are available for a 3D position fix (provided no
RAIM warnings are present). However, if only a 2D position fix is possible, the pilot should
maintain the GPS altitude within 1,000 feet of pressure altitude by entering the altitude on
the Position Page.
The approach could not transition to ‘active’, at 2 nm or closer to the FAF. Verify that ‘SUSP’
does not appear directly above the OBS Key, indicating the auto waypoint sequencing is
Approach is not active suspended. This message also appears if Receiver Autonomous Integrity Monitoring (RAIM)
has determined that sufficient GPS satellite coverage does not exist for the current phase of
flight (along with a ‘RAIM not available from FAF to MAP’ message).
Approaching target
The current GPS-computed altitude is within 500 feet of the final Vertical Navigation target
altitude
altitude.
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14-1
SECTION 14 – MESSAGES,
ABBREVIATIONS, & NAV TERMS
Approaching VNAV
profile
Arrival at waypoint
[waypoint name]
The aircraft is within one minute of reaching the initial Vertical Navigation descent, or climb,
point.
The aircraft is within the arrival alarm circle for the indicated waypoint. The size of the arrival
alarm circle is defined from the ‘CDI/Alarms’ menu option on the Setup 1 Page.
The pilot has attempted to navigate a flight plan (FPL) with one or more locked waypoints. A
Cannot navigate
waypoint can be ‘locked’ when the NavData Card is replaced and the waypoint(s) does not
locked FPL
exist in the new database.
An attempt has been made to modify the position of the active ‘to’ or ‘from’ waypoint.
Can’t change an active
The GNS 430 does not allow modifications to user waypoints currently being utilized for
waypoint
navigation guidance.
Can’t delete an active An attempt has been made to delete the active ‘to’ or ‘from’ waypoint. The GNS 430 will not
or FPL waypoint
allow the deletion of user waypoints currently being utilized for navigation guidance.
The CDI Key is stuck in the enabled (or pressed) state. Try pressing the CDI Key again to cycle
CDI key stuck
its operation. If the message persists, contact a Garmin dealer for assistance.
The GNS 430 has detected excessive display backlighting temperature. The backlighting has
Check unit cooling
been automatically dimmed to reduce the temperature. Check for adequate ventilation or
check cooling air flow. Contact a Garmin dealer for assistance.
Internal system-to-system communication between the main processor and the COM
COM has failed
transceiver has failed.
Internal system-to-system communication between the main processor and the COM
COM is not responding transceiver has failed. Operational status of the COM transceiver is unknown and the unit
should be returned to a Garmin dealer for service.
The GNS 430 has detected a failure in its communications transceiver. The COM transceiver
COM needs service
may still be usable, but the unit should be returned (at the earliest convenience) to a Garmin
dealer for service.
The external push-to-talk (PTT) switch is stuck in the enabled (or pressed) state. Try pressing
COM push-to-talk key
the PTT switch again to cycle its operation. If the message persists, contact a Garmin dealer
stuck
for assistance.
The remote COM transfer switch is stuck in the enabled (or pressed) state. Try pressing the
COM remote transfer
switch again to cycle its operation. If the message persists, contact a Garmin dealer for
key is stuck
assistance.
The COM Flip-flop Key is stuck in the enabled (or pressed) state. Try pressing the COM FlipCOM transfer key
flop Key again to cycle its operation. If the message persists, contact a Garmin dealer for
stuck
assistance.
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SECTION 14 – MESSAGES,
ABBREVIATIONS, & NAV TERMS
The GNS 430 has detected excessive unit temperature and/or an insufficient voltage level.
The COM transceiver transmit power has been automatically reduced to compensate for the
condition. For excessive temperatures, check for adequate ventilation or check cooling air
flow. If the message persists, contact a Garmin dealer for assistance.
The GNS 430 has detected a problem with the NavData Card. The data is not usable and the
Data card failure
card should be returned to Jeppesen or a Garmin dealer.
An attempt to transfer flight plan data during a unit-to-unit crossfill was cancelled. The host
Data transfer cancelled
unit is busy or unable to communicate. Wait until any previous crossfill operation is complete
(crossfill is busy)
before attempting the transfer again.
An attempt to transfer a single user waypoint during a unit-to-unit crossfill was cancelled.
Data transfer cancelled
No waypoint was specified on the Crossfill Page. Select a user waypoint and attempt the
(data invalid)
transfer again.
An attempt to transfer data during a unit-to-unit crossfill was cancelled. The database
Data transfer cancelled
versions of the two GNS 430s are not identical. If necessary, update the database(s) so they
(version mismatch)
match. Contact Jeppesen or your Garmin dealer for assistance.
Data transfer error,
An error was detected during unit-to-unit crossfill of user data (user waypoints and/or flight
please re-transmit
plans). The data transfer should be attempted again.
Data transfer is
The unit-to-unit crossfill of user waypoint data has finished.
complete
One or more approaches, departures, or arrivals have been modified from their original
published form. When the NavData Card is replaced (database update), the changes in
Database changed,
the new database must be manually verified. This message occurs each time a flight plan
validate user modified
containing a modified procedure (generated from a prior database version) is activated.
procedures
To eliminate the message, re-create the flight plan from the new database, then make the
desired modifications.
GPS position accuracy has been degraded and RAIM is not available. Poor satellite geometry
Degraded accuracy
(or coverage) has resulted in a horizontal DOP greater than 4.0. Additional cross-checking
using another navigation source is required to verify the integrity of the GPS position.
Display backlight
The GNS 430 has detected a failure in the display backlighting. The unit should be taken to
failure
your Garmin dealer for service.
Do not use for
The GNS 430 is in Demo Mode and must not be used for actual navigation.
navigation
COM transmitter
power has been
reduced
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14-3
SECTION 14 – MESSAGES,
ABBREVIATIONS, & NAV TERMS
The flight plan (FPL) was truncated because not enough room existed to insert an approach,
departure, or arrival. This message also appears when an approach has been deleted from
FPL has been truncated a stored flight plan because an approach could not be found. These conditions may occur
upon power up when a database change increases the number of waypoints in, or removes
an approach from, an instrument procedure.
FPL is full - remove
An attempt has been made to add more than 31 waypoints to a flight plan (FPL). The GNS
unnecessary waypoints 430 does not allow more than 31 waypoints per flight plan.
FPL leg will not be
The upcoming flight plan (FPL) leg is too short for smooth waypoint transitions. Expect a
smoothed
rapid change in the CDI.
At least one flight plan (FPL) waypoint is locked because the waypoint has been removed
FPL waypoint is locked from the current NavData Card (database change), the data card is missing, or the data card
has failed.
The position data for one or more flight plan (FPL) waypoints moved at least 0.33 arc
FPL waypoint moved
minutes in the current NavData Card (database change).
FPL waypoint was
At least one flight plan (FPL) waypoint is no longer available when a new NavData Card was
deleted
installed (database change).
The GNS 430 has detected a failure in its glideslope receiver. The glideslope receiver is not
G/S has failed
available and the unit should be returned to a Garmin dealer for service.
Internal system-to-system communication between the main processor and the glideslope
G/S is not responding receiver has failed. Operational status of the glideslope receiver is unknown and the unit
should be returned to a Garmin dealer for service.
The GNS 430 has detected a failure in its glideslope receiver. The glideslope receiver may still
G/S needs service
be usable, but the unit should be returned (at the earliest convenience) to a Garmin dealer
for service.
The GNS 430 has detected a failure in its GPS receiver. The GPS receiver is not available and
GPS has failed
the unit should be returned to a Garmin dealer for service.
Internal system-to-system communication between the main processor and the GPS receiver
GPS is not responding has failed. Operational status of the GPS receiver is unknown and the unit should be
returned to a Garmin dealer for service.
The GNS 430 has detected a failure in its GPS receiver. The GPS receiver may still be usable,
GPS needs service
but the unit should be returned (at the earliest convenience) to a Garmin dealer for service.
GPS stored data was
Satellite almanac, ephemeris and time data have been lost due to a memory battery failure,
lost
system reset, or data expiration (data over six months old).
14-4
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SECTION 14 – MESSAGES,
ABBREVIATIONS, & NAV TERMS
The heading selection on the external HSI’s (or CDI’s) OBS course selector cannot be read
properly. A Garmin dealer may need to check the installation.
A GPS-calculated position lies within the boundaries of a special use airspace. This message
Inside airspace
is automatically disabled within 30 nm of an arrival airport, when an approach is loaded.
A closest point cannot be created from the waypoint entered on the ‘Closest point of flight
Invalid closest pt of
plan’ window. This occurs when the selected waypoint is beyond the limits of all legs in the
FPL
flight plan, too far away, or when a unique waypoint name for the closest point cannot be
created.
Invalid FPL
An attempt was made to modify the final course segment (FAF to MAP) of an instrument
modification
approach. The GNS 430 does not allow the modifications.
An attempt was made to create a user waypoint with an invalid name. The GNS 430 does
Invalid waypoint ident
not allow spaces between characters in the waypoint name.
MAIN processor
The GNS 430 has detected a failure in the main system processor. The GNS 430 is not usable
requires service
and should be taken to a Garmin dealer for service.
The internal battery that sustains user memory is low and should be replaced by a Garmin
Memory battery low
dealer as soon as possible. Failure to do so may result in loss of stored data, including flight
plans, user waypoints, unit settings, and satellite data.
The GPS-calculated position is within 2 nm of a special use airspace boundary, but the
Near airspace -- less
aircraft is not projected to enter the airspace. This message is automatically disabled within
than 2 nm
30 nm of an arrival airport, when an approach is loaded.
The GPS receiver needs altitude input in order to start and/or continue 2D navigation. Select
Need altitude - display the Position Page and verify the altitude reading. If the altitude is in error by more than
position page
500 feet, enter the current altitude as accurately as possible. An inaccurate altitude directly
translate into inaccurate position information.
No altitude data is being received from RS-232 (Serializer: Icarus, Rosetta or Shadin) or grey
code inputs. If the problem persists, contact a Garmin dealer and check the installation
No altitude input is
and installation settings. When this message occurs, no pilot action is required if enough
being received
satellites are available for a 3D position fix (provided no RAIM warnings are present).
However, if only a 2D position fix is possible, the pilot should maintain the GPS altitude
within 1,000 feet of pressure altitude by entering the altitude on the Position Page.
The GNS 430 has detected a failure in the built-in basemap (land data) memory. Land data
No basemap data
does not appear on the Map Page. Other unit functions continue to work normally; however,
available
the GNS 430 should be taken to a Garmin dealer for service at the earliest convenience.
Not receiving input
No data has been received on the ARINC 429 channel 1 connection for a period exceeding
data on 429 Channel 1 five seconds. If the problem persists, the installation should be checked by a Garmin dealer.
Heading input failure
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14-5
SECTION 14 – MESSAGES,
ABBREVIATIONS, & NAV TERMS
Not receiving input
data on 429 Channel 2
Not receiving input
data on 232 Channel 1
No data has been received on the ARINC 429 channel 2 connection for a period exceeding
five seconds. If the problem persists, the installation should be checked by a Garmin dealer.
No data has been received on the RS-232 channel 1 connection for a period exceeding ten
seconds. If the problem persists, the installation should be checked by a Garmin dealer.
The OBS Key is stuck in the enabled (or pressed) state. Try pressing the OBS Key again to
OBS key stuck
cycle its operation. If the message persists, contact a Garmin dealer for assistance.
The GPS receiver cannot acquire a sufficient number of satellites to compute a position and
Poor GPS coverage
provide navigation.
The GNS 430 cannot calculate a position due to abnormal satellite conditions. The unit is
Power down and reunusable until power has been cycled off and back on. Abnormal satellite conditions may
initialize
exist and the pilot may need to use an alternate means of navigation.
Receiver Autonomous Integrity Monitoring (RAIM) has determined that sufficient GPS
satellite coverage does not exist for the current phase of flight. (The CDI/HSI NAV flag also
RAIM is not available
appears.) Select an alternate source for navigation guidance, such as the GNS 430’s VLOC
receiver.
When performing an instrument approach, Receiver Autonomous Integrity Monitoring (RAIM)
RAIM not available
has determined that sufficient GPS satellite coverage does not exist to meet the required
from FAF to MAP
protection limits. Select an alternate source for navigation guidance, such as the GNS 430’s
waypoints
VLOC receiver (for a VOR or localizer-based approach).
Although sufficient GPS satellite coverage may exist, Receiver Autonomous Integrity
Monitoring (RAIM) has determined the information from one or more GPS satellites may
be in error. The resulting GPS position may be in error beyond the limits allowed for the
RAIM position warning
current phase of flight. Cross-check the position with an alternate navigation source. If the
warning occurs during a final approach segment (FAF to MAP), execute the published missed
approach.
Scheduler message The user-entered scheduler message time has expired, and the scheduler message is
[user entered text]
displayed.
The GNS 430 is searching the sky for GPS satellite almanac data or the GPS receiver is in
Searching the sky
AutoLocate Mode. Allow the unit to complete data collection (approximately five minutes)
before turning it off.
Select appropriate
The aircraft is inbound and within 3 nm of the FAF; and the active VLOC frequency does not
frequency for
match the published frequency for the approach. Tune the standby VLOC frequency to the
approach
proper frequency and press the VLOC Flip-flop Key to ‘activate’ the frequency.
14-6
GNS 430(A) Pilot’s Guide and Reference
190-00140-00 Rev. P
SECTION 14 – MESSAGES,
ABBREVIATIONS, & NAV TERMS
The OBS Key was pressed, disabling auto sequencing of waypoints (in a flight plan or
Select auto sequence instrument procedure). The OBS Key should be pressed again to enable auto sequencing,
mode
because 1) no destination waypoint has been selected or 2) the GPS receiver cannot currently
determine its position.
The aircraft is inbound and within 3 nm of the FAF; and the active approach is not a GPSSelect VLOC on CDI for
approved approach. Verify that the VLOC receiver is tuned to the proper frequency and press
approach
the CDI Key to display ‘VLOC’ (directly above the CDI Key).
The course select for the external CDI (or HSI) should be set to the specified course. The
Set course to [###]°
message only occurs when the current selected course is greater than 10° different from the
desired track.
This message appears approximately one minute prior to a turn in one of the following three
conditions: 1) the turn requires a bank angle in excess of 25° in order to stay on course, 2)
Steep turn ahead
the turn requires a course change greater than 175°, or 3) during a DME arc approach the
turn anticipation distance exceeds 90 seconds.
All user waypoints, flight plans, and system settings have been lost due to a memory battery
Stored data was lost
failure or system reset.
Terrain
See Section 11.3 for complete list of TERRAIN related Alerts and Annunciations.
The hardware configuration does not match the terrain software configuration. The
Terrain configuration
operational status of the terrain components is unknown and the unit should be returned to
conflict
a Garmin dealer for service.
Terrain configuration
The software has detected a change in the terrain configuration.
has changed
The terrain functionality self-test has failed. The operational status of the terrain components
Terrain has failed
is unknown and the unit should be returned to a Garmin dealer for service.
Timer has expired
The count down timer has reached zero.
Traffic device needs
Either the TCAD battery or the TCAD interrogation device has failed. If the message persists,
service
contact a Garmin dealer for assistance.
The GNS 430 has detected a failure (during initial power up) in its system configuration.
Unit configuration has
Some system components may be unusable. Try cycling power off and back on. If the
changed
message persists, contact a Garmin dealer for assistance.
User card format
A data card has been inserted, but the format of the card is not recognized.
unknown
The GNS 430 has detected a failure in its VLOC receiver. The VLOC receiver is not available
VLOC has failed
and the unit should be returned to a Garmin dealer for service.
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GNS 430(A) Pilot’s Guide and Reference
14-7
SECTION 14 – MESSAGES,
ABBREVIATIONS, & NAV TERMS
VLOC is not
responding
VLOC needs service
VLOC remote transfer
key is stuck
VLOC transfer key
stuck
Waypoint already
exists
Waypoint(s) have been
replaced
Waypoint memory is
full
14-8
Internal system-to-system communication between the main processor and the VLOC receiver
has failed. Operational status of the VLOC receiver is unknown and the unit should be
returned to a Garmin dealer for service.
The GNS 430 has detected a failure in its VLOC receiver. The VLOC receiver may still be
usable, but the unit should be returned (at the earliest convenience) to a Garmin dealer for
service.
The remote VLOC transfer switch is stuck in the enabled (or pressed) state. Try pressing the
switch again to cycle its operation. If the message persists, contact a Garmin dealer for
assistance.
The VLOC Flip-flop Key is stuck in the enabled (or pressed) state. Try pressing the VLOC
Flip-flop Key again to cycle its operation. If the message persists, contact a Garmin dealer for
assistance.
The name just entered for a user waypoint already exists in memory.
One or more user waypoints were updated during a unit-to-unit crossfill operation.
The pilot has used all 1000 user waypoint locations in the GNS 430’s memory. Delete
unwanted waypoint to make room for new entries.
GNS 430(A) Pilot’s Guide and Reference
190-00140-00 Rev. P
SECTION 14 – MESSAGES,
ABBREVIATIONS, & NAV TERMS
14.2 Abbreviations
CUM Cumulative
The following is a list of abbreviations used on the
GNS 430 and their meanings:
DB Database
ACTV Active
DEN Density
ALT Altitude
DEP Departure
APPRCHING Approaching
DIS Distance
APR Approach
DME Distance Measuring Equipment
APT Airport
DOP Dilution of Precision
ARSPC Airspace
DTK Desired Track
ARTCC Air Route Traffic Control Center
ARVL Arrival
EFF Efficiency
AUX Auxiliary
ELEV Elevation
AVGAS Aviation Grade Gasoline
ENDUR Endurance
AVTN Aviation
ENR Enroute
ENT Enter
BARO Barometric Pressure
EPE Estimated Position Error
BRG Bearing To
ESA Enroute Safe Altitude
ETA Estimated Time of Arrival
ETE Estimated Time Enroute
°C Degree Celsius
C/V COM/VLOC
CAS Calibrated Airspeed
°F Degrees Fahrenheit
CDI Course Deviation Indicator
FDE Fault Detection and Exclusion
CLR Clear
FF Fuel Flow
COM Communications Transceiver
FLOW Total Fuel Flow
CRSR Cursor
FOB Fuel On Board
CTA ICAO Control Area
FPL Flight Plan
CTAF Common Traffic Advisory Frequency
fpm Feet Per Minute
CTR Center (ARTCC)
FREQ Frequency
CTS Course To Steer
FSS Flight Service Station
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GNS 430(A) Pilot’s Guide and Reference
14-9
SECTION 14 – MESSAGES,
ABBREVIATIONS, & NAV TERMS
ft Feet
LOC Localizer
LRES Left-over Fuel Reserve Time
G/S Glideslope
Lrg Large
gl Gallons
lt Liters
GPS Global Positioning System
GS Ground Speed
°M Degrees Magnetic
m Meters
HDG Heading
mb Millibars of Pressure
hg Inches of Mercury
Med Medium
HUL Horizontal Uncertainty Level
MHz Megahertz
HWY Highway
mi Statute Miles
MOA Military Operations Area
ID Identifier
mph Statute Miles Per Hour
ig Imperial Gallons
mpm Meters Per Minute
ILS Instrument Landing System
mps Meters Per Second
IND Indicated
MSA Minimum Safe Altitude
INT Intersection
MSG Message
INTEG Integrity
MSL Mean Sea Level
mul Multicom
kg Kilograms
kHz Kilohertz
NATNL National
km Kilometers
NAV Navigation
kph Kilometers Per Hour
NAVAID Navigational Aid
kt Knots
NDB Non-directional Radio Beacon
nm Nautical Miles
LAT/LON Latitude/Longitude
NRST Nearest
lb Pounds
NUM Number
LCL Local
LFOB Left-over Fuel On Board
OBS Omnibearing Selector
14-10
GNS 430(A) Pilot’s Guide and Reference
190-00140-00 Rev. P
SECTION 14 – MESSAGES,
ABBREVIATIONS, & NAV TERMS
OCN Oceanic
TERM Terminal
TKE Track Angle Error
P.POS Present Position
TMA ICAO Terminal Control Area
PROC Procedure(s)
TRANS Transition
PROV Province
TRFC Traffic
PWR Power
TRK Track (also Ground Track)
TRSA Terminal Radar Service Area
RAD Radial
twr Tower
RAIM Receiver Autonomous Integrity
Monitoring
TX Transmit
REF Reference
uni Unicom
REQ Required/Requirements
UTC Coordinated Universal Time
(also GMT or Zulu)
VAR Variation
VER Version
RESTRICTD Restricted
RNG Range
RX Receive
SID Standard Instrument Departure
VFR Visual Flight Rules
Sml Small
VLOC VOR/Localizer Receiver
SPD Speed
VNAV Vertical Navigation
SQ Squelch
VOL Volume
SRFC Surface
STAR Standard Terminal Arrival Route
VOR VHF (Very High Frequency)
Omnidirectional Radio Range
SUA Special Use Airspace
VS Vertical Speed
VSR Vertical Speed Required
°T Degree True
TACAN Tactical Air Navigation
WPT Waypoint
TAS True Airspeed
WX Weather
TAT Total Air Temperature
TEMP Temperature
XTK Crosstrack Error
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GNS 430(A) Pilot’s Guide and Reference
14-11
SECTION 14 – MESSAGES,
ABBREVIATIONS, & NAV TERMS
14.3 Navigation Terms
The following navigation terms are used on the GNS 430 and in this Pilot’s Guide. Refer to Figures 14-1 and
14-2 for graphic representation of navigation terms.
WPT 2
NORTH
DTK
AL
DIS
IC
RT
VE
I
AT
G
VI
NA
BRG
S
G
TIC
AL
SPE
ED
RE
QU
E
AN
IRE
D
TARGET ALTITUDE
AND POSITION
L
RP
AI
VER
E
K
L
FI
O
PR
CURRENT ALTITUDE
AND POSITION
XT
N
O
TIME AND DISTANCE
TO PROFILE
TRK
DISTANCE TO TARGET
AIRPORT
WPT 1
Figure 14-1 Illustrated NAV Terms
Term
ALT (altitude)
BRG (bearing)
CAS (calibrated
airspeed)
CTS (course to steer)
CUM (cumulative)
DIS (distance)
DOP (dilution of
precision)
DTK (desired track)
EFF (efficiency)
ENDUR (endurance)
14-12
Figure 14-2 Illustrated Vertical NAV Terms
Description
Height above mean sea level (MSL).
The compass direction from the present position to a destination waypoint.
Indicated airspeed corrected for instrument errors.
The recommended direction to steer in order to reduce course error or stay on course. Provides
the most efficient heading to get back to the desired course and proceed along the flight plan.
The total of all legs in a flight plan (cumulative distance).
The ‘great circle’ distance from the present position to a destination waypoint.
A measure of satellite geometry quality on a scale of one to ten (lowest numbers are best,
highest numbers are worst).
The desired course between the active “from” and “to” waypoints.
A measure of fuel consumption, expressed in distance per fuel units (e.g., nautical miles per
gallon).
Flight endurance, or total available flight time based upon available fuel.
GNS 430(A) Pilot’s Guide and Reference
190-00140-00 Rev. P
SECTION 14 – MESSAGES,
ABBREVIATIONS, & NAV TERMS
EPE (estimated
position error)
ESA (enroute safe
altitude)
ETA (estimated time
of arrival)
ETE (estimated time
enroute)
FF (fuel flow)
FOB (fuel on board)
GS (ground speed)
A measure of satellite geometry quality and additional factors, expressed as a horizontal
position error in feet or meters.
The recommended minimum altitude within ten miles, left or right, of the desired course on an
active flight plan or direct-to.
The estimated time at which the aircraft will reach the destination waypoint, based upon
current speed and track.
The time it will take to reach the destination waypoint, from present position, based upon
current ground speed.
The fuel flow rate, expressed in fuel units per time (e.g., gallons per hour).
The total amount of usable fuel on board the aircraft.
The velocity the aircraft is travelling relative to a ground position.
The direction an aircraft is pointed, based upon indications from a magnetic compass or a
HDG (heading)
properly set directional gyro.
Information provided by properly calibrated and set instrumentation in the aircraft panel (e.g.,
IND (indicated)
indicated altitude).
LFOB (left-over fuel
The amount of fuel remaining on board after the completion of a one or more legs of a flight
onboard)
plan (or a direct-to).
LRES (left-over fuel
The amount of fuel remaining on board after the completion of a one or more legs of a flight
reserve)
plan (or a direct-to), expressed in time and based upon a known fuel consumption (flow) rate.
Uses Grid Minimum Off-route Altitudes (Grid MORAs) to determine a safe altitude within ten
miles of the present position. Grid MORAs are one degree latitude by one degree longitude
MSA (minimum safe
in size and clear all reference points within the grid by 1000 feet in areas where the highest
altitude)
reference point is 5000 feet MSL or lower. If the highest reference point is above 5000 feet,
the Grid MORA will clear the highest reference point by 2000 feet.
TKE (track angle
The angle difference between the desired track and the current track. An arrow indicates the
error)
proper direction to turn to reduce TKE to zero.
TRK (track)
The direction of movement relative to a ground position. Also referred to as “ground track”.
VSR (vertical speed
The vertical speed necessary to descend/climb from current position and altitude to a defined
required)
target position and altitude, based upon the current ground speed.
XTK (crosstrack error) The distance the aircraft is off a desired course in either direction, left or right.
190-00140-00 Rev. P
GNS 430(A) Pilot’s Guide and Reference
14-13
SECTION 14 – MESSAGES,
ABBREVIATIONS, & NAV TERMS
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14-14
GNS 430(A) Pilot’s Guide and Reference
190-00140-00 Rev. P
APPENDIX A
DATA CARD USE
Appendix A: Data Card Use
The Jeppesen NavData Card, and the Terrain Data
Card (if applicable) supplied with the GNS 430 can be
installed or removed when the GNS 430 is on or off. If the
NavData Card is not present when the unit is turned on, a
‘No Jeppesen Aviation Database - Limited to user defined
waypoints’ message appears on the Database Confirmation
Page. If the NavData Card is removed during operation,
a ‘Data card removed - Unit will restart in 30 seconds’
warning is displayed. A counter begins to count down
and, if the card is not replaced within 30 seconds, the
GNS 430 automatically re-initializes. Pressing the ENT
Key will manually re-initialize the unit.
NavData
Card Slot
(left-hand slot)
To insert the NavData or Terrain Data Card
(Figure A-2):
1)
Place the card into the appropriate card slot,
with the label facing to the left and the swing
arm handle at the bottom front.
2)
Press the data card into place until it seats on
the internal connector and the front of the card
is flush with the face of the GNS 430 unit.
3)
If the swing arm handle is up, gently lower the
handle and push it into place—flush with the
face of the GNS 430 unit.
Terrain Data
Card Slot
(right-hand slot)
Figure A-2 Data Card Insertion/Removal Detail
Figure A-1 Data Card Slot Locations
190-00140-00 Rev. P
GNS 430(A) Pilot’s Guide and Reference
A-1
APPENDIX A
DATA CARD USE
To remove the NavData or Terrain data card
(Figure A-2):
A-2
1)
Gently press on the tab—using a slight upward
motion—at the front center of the data card.
This partially deploys the swing arm handle.
2)
Rotate the swing arm handle upward (and
outward) until it locks into place, perpendicular
to the face of the GNS 430 unit.
3)
Grasp the top and bottom surfaces of the
swing arm handle between your thumb and
forefinger, and pull directly away from the
face of the GNS 430 unit to remove the data
card.
GNS 430(A) Pilot’s Guide and Reference
190-00140-00 Rev. P
APPENDIX B
SPECIFICATIONS
Appendix B: Specifications
Channels:
PHYSICAL
Unit Size:
6.25’W x 11.00’D x 2.65’H
(159 mm x 279 mm x 67 mm)
Unit Weight:
6.6 pounds installed (3.0 kg)
POWER*
Input:
28 Vdc (early 430, all 430A units)
14/28 Vdc (later 430 units)
Frequency Range: 118.000 MHz to 136.975 MHz
Transmit Power: 10 watts minimum (430)
16 watts minimum (430A)
Frequency Range: 108.00 MHz to 117.95 MHz
LOCALIZER PERFORMANCE
Frequency Range: 108.10 MHz to 111.95 MHz
Temperature:
-20°C to +55°C (operating range)
(-4°F to +131°F)
Humidity:
95% non-condensing
Altitude:
-1,500 ft to 50,000 ft
(-457 m to 15,240 m)
GPS PERFORMANCE
12 parallel channel PhaseTrac12™
Acquisition Time: 12 seconds (warm)
45 seconds (cold)
Update Rate:
Once per second, continuous
Accuracy:
Position - 15 meters (49 ft) RMS
Velocity - 0.1 knot RMS steady state
Dynamics:
999 kts maximum velocity
6g maximum acceleration
190-00140-00 Rev. P
760 (25 kHz spacing)
or 2280 (8.33 kHz spacing)
VOR PERFORMANCE
ENVIRONMENTAL
Receiver:
VHF COM PERFORMANCE
GLIDESLOPE PERFORMANCE
Frequency Range: 329.15 MHz to 335.00 MHz
INTERFACES
ARINC 429; Aviation RS-232; CDI/HSI; RMI
(digital:clock/data); Superflag Out; Altitude
(serial: Icarus, Shadin, Rosetta, or encoded:
Gillham/Greycode); Fuel Sensor; Fuel/Air Data
* Earlier versions of the 430 were designed to be used
with 28 Vdc power only. For questions on a particular
installation, please refer to a Garmin authorized
service center.
GNS 430(A) Pilot’s Guide and Reference
B-1
APPENDIX B
SPECIFICATIONS
Blank Page
B-2
GNS 430(A) Pilot’s Guide and Reference
190-00140-00 Rev. P
APPENDIX C
TROUBLESHOOTING
Appendix C: Troubleshooting
Q&A
This section is designed to answer some of the
common questions regarding the GNS 430’s capabilities
and operation. If there is a problem operating the unit,
read through this appendix and refer to the reference
section noted. If the answer to a particular question is
not covered here, use the index to find the appropriate
section elsewhere in this manual. If, after reading through
the appropriate reference section, the answer cannot be
found , please see an authorized dealer or contact Garmin
directly at the address or phone numbers listed on page
ii. Garmin is dedicated to supporting its products and
customers.
What is RAIM, and how does it affect approach
operations?
RAIM is an acronym for Receiver Autonomous Integrity
Monitoring, a GPS receiver function that performs a
consistency check on all tracked satellites. RAIM ensures
that the available satellite geometry allows the receiver
to calculate a position within a specified protection limit
(4 nm for oceanic, 2 nm for enroute, 1 nm for terminal
and 0.3 nm for non-precision approaches).
During oceanic, enroute, and terminal phases of flight,
RAIM is available nearly 100% of the time. Because of
the tighter protection limit on approaches, there may
be times when RAIM is not available. The GNS 430
automatically monitors RAIM and warns the pilot with an
alert message (Section 13) when it is not available, and
the INTEG annunciator appears at the bottom left corner
of the screen. If RAIM is not available when crossing the
FAF, the pilot must fly the missed approach procedure.
The GNS 430’s RAIM prediction function (Section 13)
also allows the pilot to see whether RAIM is available for a
specified date and time.
190-00140-00 Rev. P
NOTE: If RAIM is not predicted to be available for
the final approach course, the approach does not
become active—as indicated by an ‘Approach is
not active’ message, a ‘RAIM not available from
FAF to MAP’ message, and INTEG annunciator.
Why aren’t there any approaches available for
my flight plan?
Approaches are available for the final destination
airport in a flight plan or as a direct-to (keep in mind
that some VOR/VORTAC identifiers are similar to airport
identifiers). If a destination airport does not have a
GPS approach, the GNS 430 indicates ‘NONE’ for the
available procedures—as listed on the Airport Approach
Page (Figure C-1). For more information on selecting an
approach, see Section 6.1.
Figure C-1 Airport Approach Page
GNS 430(A) Pilot’s Guide and Reference
C-1
APPENDIX C
TROUBLESHOOTING
What happens when I select an approach?
Can I store a flight plan with an approach,
departure, or arrival?
When loading an approach, departure, or arrival into
the active flight plan, a set of approach, departure, or
arrival waypoints is inserted into the flight plan—along
with a header line describing the selected instrument
procedure (Figure C-2). The original enroute portion of
the flight plan remains active, unless the pilot activates
the instrument procedure; which may be done when the
procedure is loaded or at a later time.
Figure C-2 Active Flight Plan Page
Flight plans can also be stored with an approach,
departure, or arrival. Keep in mind that the active flight
plan is erased when the unit is turned off and overwritten
when another flight plan is activated. When storing flight
plans with an approach, departure, or arrival, the GNS
430 uses the waypoint information from the current
database to define the waypoints. If the database is
changed or updated, the GNS 430 automatically updates
the information if the procedure has not been modified.
If an approach, departure, or arrival procedure is no
longer available, the flight plan becomes locked until the
procedure is deleted from the flight plan or the correct
database is installed. For information on loading an
approach, departure, or arrival, see Section 6.1. See
Section 5.1 for instructions on saving and copying flight
plans.
C-2
Can I file slant Golf (‘/G’) using my GPS?
Yes, the pilot may file a flight plan as /G if the GNS
430 is a certified A1 or A2 installation. If flying enroute,
the pilot may file /G with an expired database only after
having verified all route waypoints. Non-precision
approaches may not be flown with an expired database.
See an approved Airplane Flight Manual Supplement for
more information.
What does the OBS key do and when do I use
it?
The OBS Key is used to select manual (OBS mode)
or automatic sequencing of waypoints. Activating OBS
mode (as indicated by an OBS annunciation directly
above the OBS Key) holds the current active to waypoint
as the navigation reference and prevents the GPS from
sequencing to the next waypoint. When OBS mode is
cancelled, automatic waypoint sequencing is selected, and
the GNS 430 automatically selects the next waypoint in
the flight plan once the aircraft has crossed the present
active-to waypoint.
GNS 430(A) Pilot’s Guide and Reference
190-00140-00 Rev. P
APPENDIX C
TROUBLESHOOTING
NORMAL (no ‘OBS’
annunciator)
Automatic sequencing of
waypoints
Change in HSI does not
affect CDI deflection
Always navigates ‘TO’ the
active waypoint
Must be in this mode for
final approach course
OBS
Manual sequencing- ‘holds’
on selected waypoint
Manually select course to
next waypoint from HSI
Indicates ‘TO’ or ‘FROM’
waypoint
Cannot be set for final
approach course or
published holding patterns
When OBS mode is active, the GNS 430 allows the
pilot to select the desired course to/from a waypoint using
the HSI (much like a VOR) and display a to/from flag for
the active-to waypoint. If an external course input is not
available, the pilot may select the OBS course on-screen,
via a ‘Select OBS Course’ pop-up window. With OBS
mode cancelled, the CDI always displays a ‘TO’ indication
for the next waypoint once the aircraft has crossed the
active waypoint (provided the active waypoint is not the
last waypoint). Refer to Section 6.2 for an example using
the OBS Key.
One application for the OBS Key is holding patterns.
The OBS Key is used to suspend waypoint sequencing
and select the desired course along the waypoint side of
the hold. For many approach operations, setting and
resetting of waypoint sequencing is automatic. Holding
patterns that are part of an approach automatically
disable waypoint sequencing, then re-enable waypoint
sequencing after one time around the holding pattern.
A ‘SUSP’ annunciation appears directly above the OBS
Key (Figure C-3) to indicate that automatic waypoint
sequencing is temporarily suspended and course selection
is not available. If more than one trip around the holding
pattern is desired, press the OBS Key to again suspend
waypoint sequencing. An example of this operation is
an approach which begins with a holding pattern at the
initial approach fix (IAF). See Section 6.2, Flying an
Approach with a Hold for more information on the ‘SUSP’
annunciation and approaches with holding patterns.
Figure C-3 ‘SUSP’ Annunciation
190-00140-00 Rev. P
GNS 430(A) Pilot’s Guide and Reference
C-3
APPENDIX C
TROUBLESHOOTING
When should I use the OBS key to return to
auto sequencing, and what happens when I do?
How do I skip a waypoint in an approach,
departure or arrival?
The most common application for using the OBS Key
is the missed approach. The GNS 430 suspends automatic
waypoint sequencing (indicated by a ‘SUSP’ annunciation
directly above the OBS Key; see Figure C-4) when the
aircraft crosses the missed approach point (MAP). This
prevents the GNS 430 from automatically sequencing
to the missed approach holding point (MAHP). If a
missed approach is required, press the OBS Key to return
to automatic waypoint sequencing and sequence the
approach to the MAHP. See Section 6.2, Flying the Missed
Approach for more information on missed approaches.
The GNS 430 allows the pilot to manually select any
approach, departure, or arrival leg as the active leg of the
flight plan. This procedure is performed from the Active
Flight Plan Page by highlighting the desired waypoint and
pressing the Direct-to Key twice, then press the ENT
Key to approve the selection (Figure C-5). The GPS then
provides navigation along the selected flight plan leg, so
be sure to have clearance to that position. See Section 5.2,
Shortcuts for more information.
Figure C-5 Activate Leg Window
Figure C-4 ‘SUSP’ Annunciation
Why won’t my unit automatically sequence to
the next waypoint?
The GNS 430 only sequences flight plan waypoints
when automatic sequencing is enabled (i.e., no ‘OBS’ or
‘SUSP’ annunciation directly above the OBS Key). For
automatic sequencing to occur, the aircraft must also cross
the bisector of the turn being navigated. The bisector is
a perpendicular line between two flight plan legs which
crosses through the waypoint common to both legs.
C-4
How do I fly the GPS with an autopilot and DG
heading bug?
If the installation does not have an HSI, the pilot
should make the course selections on the external CDI’s
OBS knob and the DG heading bug.
GNS 430(A) Pilot’s Guide and Reference
190-00140-00 Rev. P
APPENDIX C
TROUBLESHOOTING
When does turn anticipation begin, and what
bank angle is expected?
When does the CDI scale change, and what
does it change to?
The GNS 430 smooths adjacent leg transitions based
upon a nominal 15º bank angle (with the ability to roll up
to 25º) and provide three pilot cues for turn anticipation:
The GNS 430 begins a smooth CDI scale transition
from the 5.0 nm (enroute/oceanic mode) to the 1.0 nm
(terminal mode) scale 30 nm from the destination airport
(Figure C-7). The CDI scale further transitions to 0.3
nm (approach mode) at 2 nm prior to the FAF during
an active approach. To return the CDI to the 1 nm scale
during a missed approach situation, activate the missed
approach sequence by pressing the OBS Key, as described
in Section 6.2, Flying the Missed Approach. The CDI
scale is also 1.0 nm (terminal mode) within 30 nm of the
departure airport.
1) A waypoint alert (‘NEXT DTK ###°’) flashes in the
lower right corner of the screen 10 seconds before
the turn point (Figure C-6).
MAP
Approach
Figure C-6 CDI at 1 nm Scale
0.3 nm
FAF
2) A flashing turn advisory (‘TURN TO ###°’)
appears in the lower right corner of the screen
when the aircraft is to begin the turn. Set the HSI
to the next DTK value and begin the turn.
2 nm
1 nm
3) The To/From indicator on the HSI (or CDI)
flips momentarily to indicate that the aircraft
has crossed the midpoint of the turn. For
more information on waypoint alerts and turn
advisories, see Sections 6.2 and 6.3.
Terminal
1 nm
1 minute
30 nm
5 nm
Enroute/Oceanic
Figure C-7 CDI Scale Transition
190-00140-00 Rev. P
GNS 430(A) Pilot’s Guide and Reference
C-5
APPENDIX C
TROUBLESHOOTING
Why does my CDI not respond like a VOR when
OBS mode is active?
Unlike a VOR, the CDI scale used on GPS equipment
is based on the cross-track distance to the desired course,
not an angular relationship to the destination (Figure
C-8). Therefore, the CDI deflection on the GPS is
constant regardless of the distance to the destination, and
does not become less sensitive when further away from
the destination. For more information on the CDI scale,
see Section 8.4.
How do I re-select the same approach
or activate a new approach after a missed
approach?
After flying all missed approach procedures, the pilot
may reactivate the same approach for another attempt from
the Procedures Page. Once given clearance for another
attempt, activate the approach from the Procedures Page by
highlighting ‘Activate Approach?’ and pressing the ENT Key.
The GNS 430 provides navigation along the desired course
to the waypoint and rejoins the approach in sequence from
that point on. See Section 4.2, Active Flight Plan Options,
for information on activating a specific flight plan leg.
Activating a new approach for the same
airport:
2 2
nm nm
5 nm
GPS
5 nm
5 nm
5 nm
VOR
Figure C-8 CDI Comparison
What is the correct missed approach
procedure? How do I select the missed
approach holding point?
To comply with TSO specifications, the GNS 430
does not automatically sequence past the MAP. The
active-to waypoint sequences to the first waypoint in the
missed approach procedure when the OBS Key is pressed
after crossing the MAP. All published missed approach
procedures must be followed, as indicated on the approach
plate.
To execute the missed approach procedure prior to the
MAP (not recommended), select the Active Flight Plan
Page, highlight the MAHP, press the Direct-to Key, and
then press the ENT Key twice.
C-6
1)
Press the PROC Key.
2)
Turn the large right knob to highlight ‘Select
Approach?’.
3)
Press the ENT Key.
4)
Turn the large right knob to highlight the new
desired approach.
5)
Press the ENT Key to select the approach, then
select the desired transition.
6)
Highlight ‘Activate?’ at the bottom right corner
of the screen and press the ENT Key to activate
the new approach.
Activating a new approach to a different
airport:
1)
Press the Direct-to Key.
2)
Select the desired airport using the small and
large right knobs.
3)
Press the ENT Key to accept the selected
airport, then follow the steps in the preceding
paragraph to select an approach for the new
airport. See Section 5.1 for more information
on selecting and activating approaches.
GNS 430(A) Pilot’s Guide and Reference
190-00140-00 Rev. P
INDEX
A
C
Abbreviations 7-4, 7-6,7-8, 7-14, 7-15, 7-17, 14-9
Accessories 1-1
Activate an existing flight plan in reverse 5-4
Activate leg 5-10, 5-15, C-4
Activate the approach 6-3, 6-4, 6-10, 6-19, C-6
Activating flight plans 5-4
Active flight plan options 5-8, 5-10–5-13
Active frequency 1-9, 2-1, 2-2, 2-5, 6-28, 6-33, 9-1, 9-2
Active leg 1-12, 3-2, 5-9, 6-7, 6-8, 6-11, 6-13, 6-17, 6-18,
6-21, 6-30, 6-31, 6-32, C-4
Airport Approach Page 7-8, 7-10, C-1
Airport frequencies 2-3, 2-5
Airport Location Page 7-2, 7-4, 8-5
Airport Runway Page 7-5
Airport type 7-4, 7-6, 7-8
Airspace alert messages 1-17, 1-18, 8-14, 10-22
Airspace information 1-17
Altitude 3-19, 3-24, 3-23, 3-25, 14-1, 14-9
Altitude buffer 8-14, 10-20, 10-22
Annunciator 1-8, 1-18, 3-16, 8-12, 11-7, 14-1, C-1, C-3
Approach, best available 7-4
Approach procedures 6-1, 6-8, 6-9, 6-13, 6-17, 6-20, 6-32,
7-8, 9-3, C-6
Arrivals 1-4, 1-14, 1-15, 5-9, 5-12, 5-14, 6-1, 7-1, 7-11, 14-3
Arrival alarm 10-20, 10-21, 10-24, 14-1
Auto-tuning 2-3, 9-2
Automatic sequencing C-3
Automatic squelch 1-3, 2-1
Automatic zoom 3-9, 3-11
Auto request 12-22
AUX Page Group 10-1
Aviation data 3-11, 3-15
CAUTIONS v
CDI Key 1-4, 6-26, 6-32, 6-33, 9-4, 14-2, 14-7
CDI scale 3-2, 6-11, 6-15, 6-19, 6-29, 6-30, 10-20, 10-21,
10-23, 10-24, C-5, C-6
CDI switching 6-33
Ceiling and visibility graphics 12-35
Checklists 1-7, 10-12, 10-14, 10-15
Closest point of flight plan 14-4
CLR Key 1-3
COM Configuration 10-28, 10-30
COM Flip-flop Key 1-3
COM Power/Volume Knob 1-3
COM volume 1-5
COM window 1-9, 1-13, 2-2–2-6, 8-4, 8-9, 8-10, 8-13, 9-1
Contrast 10-28, 10-29
Copying flight plans C-2
Course from fix flight plan 6-21
Creating a flight plan 6-5
Creating user waypoints 7-19
Crossfill 3-4, 5-6, 10-2, 10-3, 10-8, 10-9, 10-10
B
Backlighting 10-28, 14-2, 14-3
Bearing 1-6, 1-11, 1-12, 3-3, 3-7, 3-12, 3-13, 3-20, 3-21,
5-9, 5-13, 8-4, 8-6, 8-7, 8-8, 8-9, 8-10, 14-9, 14-12
Bottom row keys 1-4
190-00140-00 Rev. P
D
Database confirmation page 1-6, A-1
Database subscriptions 1-6
Data fields 1-12, 3-4, 3-6, 3-12, 3-13, 3-19, 3-21, 5-10, 10-5
Data Link Request Log Page 12-26
Data Link Status Page 12-32
Date and time 10-3, 10-11, 10-18, 10-22, C-1
Declutter 1-11, 3-6
Default NAV Page 1-10
Delete user waypoints 14-2
Deleting flight plans 5-5, 5-7
Density altitude 10-1, 10-2, 10-3, 10-7
Departures 1-4, 1-14, 1-15, 5-9, 5-12, 5-14, 6-1, 6-25, 7-1,
7-13, 9-3, 14-3
Departure time 10-7, 10-12, 10-16
Desired track 1-11, 1-12, 3-3, 3-6, 5-8, 6-15, 6-23, 6-25,
10-3, 14-7, 14-12, 14-13
Direct-to Key 1-3
Direct-to navigation 4-5
Display backlighting 14-2, 14-3
GNS 430(A) Pilot’s Guide and Reference
I-1
INDEX
Display contrast 10-28, 10-29
DIS (distance) 1-11, 1-12, 3-3, 3-6, 5-8, 5-10, 6-6, 6-15,
6-21, 6-23, 6-29, 7-14, 7-17, 7-18, 7-21, 10-3, 10-7,
10-25, 14-9, 14-12
DME Arc 3-2, 6-14
DOP 3-22, 3-23, 13-1, 14-3, 14-9, 14-12
Duplex operations 8-10
Duplicate waypoints 7-3
E
Emergency channel select 2-5
ENT Key 1-3
EPE 3-22, 3-23, 13-1, 14-9, 14-12
ETA 3-3, 5-10, 10-3, 10-7, 14-9, 14-13
ETE 1-12, 3-3, 5-10, 10-3, 10-7, 14-9, 14-13
F
FDE (fault detection and exclusion) 1-8, 13-1, 13-2, 14-9
Field elevation 1-3–6, 7-4
Flight phases 10-13, 10-18, 13-1
Flight Planning Page 10-1, 10-2, 10-4, 10-6, 10-7, 10-8
Flight plans 1-4, 1-5, 1-18, 1-19, 4-2, 5-1, 5-6, 5-7, 10-2,
10-3, 10-9, 14-3, 14-5, 14-7, C-2
Flight plan catalog 1-18, 1-19, 5-1–5-9, 6-4
Flight timers 10-12, 10-15, 10-16
Forecast abbreviations 12-34
FPL Key 1-4
Frequency fields 1-3, 1-9, 1-13, 1-15, 1-16, 1-18, 2–2-5, 3-9,
3-17, 3-18, 6-2, 6-5, 6-26, 6-28, 6-29, 6-30, 6-33,
7-6, 7-7, 7-9, 7-15, 7-16, 8-4–8-10, 8-13, 9-1–9-4,
10-28, 14-6, 14-7
Frequency selection 9-1
Fuel planning 10-1–10-4
Ground speed 1-11, 1-12, 3-3, 3-6, 3-13, 3-19, 3-23, 3-24,
6-23, 6-25, 10-3, 10-5, 10-7, 10-12, 10-16, 10-17,
14-13
Ground track 1-11, 1-12, 3-3, 3-19, 14-13
Gust offset graphics 12-35
H
HOLD 6-9, 6-11, 6-24
Hold, in an approach 6-9, 6-23, C-3
Holding pattern 5-15, 6-9–6-12, 6-24, C-3
I
Ident audio 9-1
IFR procedures 1-14
ILS approach 6-26, 6-28, 6-30, 6-33, 9-3
Insert the NavData card A-1
Instrument Panel Self-Test Page 1-6
INTEG annunciator C-1
Intersections 1-11, 1-15, 7-1, 8-1, 8-2, 8-6
Inverting flight plans 5-4
IOI (imminent obstacle impact) 11-5
ITI (imminent terrain impact) 11-5
K
Keys and knobs 1-2, 1-3
Key and knob functions 1-2
L
Land data 1-5, 3-9, 3-11, 14-5
Loading an approach C-2
Local time 10-22, 10-26
Locked waypoints 14-2
G
M
GDL 49 12-18
GDL 69/69A 12-18
Generic timer 10-15, 10-16
GPS receiver status 3-22, 3-23
GPS Window 1-9
Graphic “track” indicator 3-19
Magnetic variation 7-15, 10-21, 10-24
Main page groups 8-1, 10-1
Manual sequence 6-21, 6-24, 6-25
MAP 4-1, 6-3
Map datum 10-20
Map direct-to 3-7
Map orientation 3-9, 3-10
I-2
GNS 430(A) Pilot’s Guide and Reference
190-00140-00 Rev. P
INDEX
Map Page 1-11, 3-5, 3-6, 3-7, 3-9, 3-13, 4-5, 6-7, 6-8, 6-13,
6-17, 6-18, 6-23, 6-30, 7-17, 7-19, 10-20, 14-5
Map page options 3-9
Map panning 3-7
Map range 1-2, 1-3, 1-11, 3-6, 3-7, 3-11
Map setup 3-6
Max speed 10-17
Measurement units 1-5, 10-20, 10-21, 10-24, 10-25
MENU Key 1-3
Messages 1-4, 1-17, 1-18, 3-23, 3-26, 8-14, 10-3, 10-9,
10-10, 10-11, 10-22, 14-1
Message Page 1-8, 1-18, 2-6
METAR 12-18, 12-35
Missed approach 4-1, 6-3, 6-8, 6-9, 6-10, 6-11, 6-13, 6-17,
6-20, 6-22, 6-23, 6-24, 6-32, 14-6, C-1, C-4, C-5, C-6
Mode S 12-1
MSA (minimum safe altitude) 3-3, 3-19, 14-10, 14-13
MSG Key 1-4
N
NAVAID iv, 3-10, 3-20, 14-10
NAV/COM page 1-10, 1-13, 1-15, 2-4, 3-17, 3-18, 6-5
NavData card 1-6, 1-14, 3-25, A-1, A-2
Navigation terms 1-11, 1-12, 3-13, 14-12
NAV Page Group 1-5, 2-4, 3-1
NDB 1-11, 1-15, 3-5, 3-20, 3-25, 6-3, 7-2, 7-4, 7-15, 7-17,
7-18, 7-21, 8-1, 8-3, 8-6, 14-10
Nearest (NRST) Airspace Page 1-17
Nearest (NRST) pages 1-15
Nearest airport criteria 10-28, 10-29
Nearest Airport Page 1-15, 1-16, 1-17, 2-3, 8-2, 8-4, 8-5,
10-28
Nearest airspace 1-15
Nearest ARTCC 1-15, 2-4, 8-9
Nearest FSS 1-15, 8-2, 8-10
Nearest Intersection Page 1-15
Nearest NDB Page 1-15
Nearest User Waypoints Page 1-15
Nearest VOR Page 1-15
NEXRAD 12-18–12-21
NEXRAD Request Page 12-21
NOAA 12-20
Non-bearing traffic advisory 12-7
190-00140-00 Rev. P
NRST Page Group 1-16, 8-1
O
OBS Key 1-4, 6-8, 6-9, 6-11, 6-12, 6-13, 6-17, 6-20,
6-22–6-25, 6-32, 14-1, 14-6, C-2–C-6
Odometer 10-17
Overzoom 3-6
P
Page groups 1-3, 3-1, 8-1, 10-1
PDA (premature descent alert) 11-5
Pointer, panning 3-7, 3-8, 3-12, 4-5, 7-19
Position format 1-5, 10-22, 10-25
Position Page 3-19, 3-20, 3-21, 14-1, 14-5
Power on 1-3, 1-5
Precipitation graphics 12-34
Procedures Page 1-14, 6-1–6-4, 6-18, 7-12, 7-14, 9-3, C-6
Procedure turn 5-15, 6-4, 6-7, 6-27, 6-29, 6-30, 6-33
PROC Key 1-4, 1-14, 5-9, 6-1, 6-2, 6-3, 6-5, 6-9, 6-10, 6-14,
6-17, 6-18, 6-24, 6-28, 9-3, C-6
R
Radar coverage 7-4
RAIM prediction 10-13, 10-17
RAIM protection limits 10-18
Reference waypoint 3-19, 3-20, 3-21, 3-25, 5-9, 5-13, 7-17,
7-18, 7-19, 7-21, 7-23
Remove the NavData Card A-2
Removing approaches 5-14
Rename a user waypoint 7-23
Requesting graphical METARS 12-27
Request METAR 12-25
Request NEXRAD 12-25
RNG Key 1-3, 3-6, 3-15, 7-5, 7-6
Roads 3-7, 3-12
RTC (required terrain clearance) 11-5
Runway information 1-15, 8-5
S
Satellite Status Page 1-8, 3-22, 13-1
Scheduler message 14-6
Scroll bar 1-4, 3-18, 8-4, 8-7
GNS 430(A) Pilot’s Guide and Reference
I-3
INDEX
Select approach 1-14, 5-11, 6-1, 6-4, 6-9, 7-10, 9-3, C-6
Select Arrival 1-14, 5-12, 6-1
Select Departure 1-14, 5-12, 6-1
Self test 1-5
Setup 1 Page 10-20, 10-22, 10-24, 10-25, 10-26
Setup 2 Page 10-27, 10-28, 10-29
Shortcuts 4-4, 5-14
SIDs 1-14, 13-2
Signal strength 1-8, 3-22, 3-23
Sky view 3-22
Software/database version 10-12
Sort list 5-8, 10-15
Specifications v, B-1
Squelch 2-1, 14-11
Standby frequency 1-9, 2-2, 7-16, 8-9, 8-11
STARs 1-14, 13-2
Stuck microphone 2-5
Sunrise/sunset times 10-18
SUSP 6-8, 6-11, 6-13, 6-17, 6-20, 6-22–6-25, 6-32, 14-1,
C-3, C-4
Symbols 3-2, 3-5, 3-16, 7-15
T
Target pointer 3-7, 3-8, 7-19
TAS (Traffic Advisory System) 12-11
TCAS 12-11
Temp-dew point ranges 12-36
TERMS 14-1
TERRAIN i, 1-10, 3-14, 3-15, 3-16, 11-1, 11-5, 11-7
Terrain separation iv
Thumbnail traffic 12-9
Timers 10-12, 10-15
TIS 12-11
Track 1-6, 1-11, 1-12, 3-3, 3-6, 3-10, 3-12, 3-13, 3-19, 3-23,
5-8, 6-15, 6-23, 6-25, 6-30, 6-33, 10-3, 10-7, 10-21,
14-7, 14-12, 14-13
Track (TRK) C-6
Traffic advisory 12-4
Traffic coasting 12-6
Traffic Page 12-5
Traffic Warning Window 12-7
I-4
Transitions 5-11, 5-12, 6-1, 6-5, 6-10, 6-18, 7-8, 7-9, 7-11,
7-13, 9-3, 14-3, C-5
Trip planning 10-1, 10-2, 10-3, 10-6
Trip statistics 10-12, 10-17
True airspeed 10-1, 10-2, 10-3, 10-7
Tuning cursor 1-3, 1-9, 2-1, 2-2, 9-1
Turn advisories C-5
Turn anticipation 14-7, C-5
U
Units of measure 1-5, 10-20, 10-21, 10-24, 10-25
User waypoint list 7-22, 7-23, 7-24
User Waypoint Page 7-17, 7-18, 7-20–7-23, 8-8
Utility Page 10-12, 10-14, 10-17, 10-18, 10-19
V
Vectors-to-final 3-2, 6-17
Vertical navigation 3-24, 14-1, 14-11
Vertical Navigation Page 1-10
VLOC audio 9-1
VLOC Flip-flop Key 1-3, 1-13, 6-29, 6-33, 7-16, 8-7, 8-11,
9-2, 9-3, 9-4, 14-6, 14-8
VLOC volume knob 1-3, 9-1
VLOC window 1-9, 1-13, 2-2, 3-18, 6-26, 6-28, 7-7, 7-16,
8-7, 8-11, 9-1, 9-3, 9-4
Volume 1-3, 1-5, 2-1, 9-1
VORs 1-11, 1-15, 3-10, 3-15, 4-2, 7-1, 7-15, 8-1, 8-2, 8-7
VSR 3-3, 3-26, 14-11, 14-13
W
Waypoint alerts C-5
Waypoint list 7-22, 7-23, 7-24
Waypoint sequencing 3-2, 6-12, 6-24, 14-1, C-2, C-3, C-4
Weather age graphic 12-34
Weather broadcast 7-15
Weather data link 12-1, 12-11
Weather Legend Page 12-30
Winds aloft 10-1, 10-2, 10-3, 10-7
Wind speed graphics 12-35
WPT Page Group 5-15, 7-1, 7-2, 7-16
GNS 430(A) Pilot’s Guide and Reference
190-00140-00 Rev. P
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www.garmin.com
© 2009 Garmin Ltd. or its subsidiaries
190-00140-00 Rev. P