User`s guide | Gateway 610 Personal Computer User Manual

Gateway 840 VT-100
User's Guide
Installing
Getting Help
Contents
1 Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1
Features . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2
Troubleshooting assistance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3
2 Accessing the Configuration Utility . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5
Accessing the utility . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6
Using the VT-100 terminal . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7
Navigating the SATA RAID configuration utility . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9
Menu system . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10
Viewing controller information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13
3 Creating Disk Arrays . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17
Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Understanding arrays . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Terminology . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Optimization and drive selection for RAID 5 arrays . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Creating arrays . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Configuring array read-ahead and writeback cache . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Read-ahead cache . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Writeback cache . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Assigning hot spare drives . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Deleting an array . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Expanding an array . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Adding additional drives . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Adding additional sub-arrays . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Trusting an array . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
18
19
19
21
22
36
36
40
47
50
53
54
57
61
4 Logical Drives . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 63
Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Terminology . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Accessing the LUN configuration menu . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Viewing unassigned free space . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Creating a logical drive . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Expanding a logical drive . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Setting logical drive availability . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Deleteing a logical drive . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Modifying a mapped LUN . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
64
64
66
68
71
75
79
82
85
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5 SAN LUN Mapping . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .89
Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .90
Terminology . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .90
Accessing the SAN LUN mapping configuration menu . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .91
Viewing SAN LUN mappings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .93
Creating a SAN LUN mapping . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .96
Deleting a SAN LUN mapping . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .100
Modifying SAN LUN Mapping . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .103
Viewing connected hosts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .108
6 Advanced Configuration and Management . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .111
Setting rebuild parameters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .112
Enabling/disabling auto rebuild . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .112
Configuring auto hot spare . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .115
Configuring hot spares . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .118
Viewing the list of hot spare drives . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .118
Adding or removing hot spare drives . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .121
Configuring the hardware . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .124
Setting the controller LUN . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .124
Setting the controller port ID . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .127
Controller port data rate . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .130
Setting the RS-232 configuration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .133
Packetized data transfers/QAS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .136
Viewing controller information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .138
Clearing the configuration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .140
7 Additional Configuration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .143
Modifying the configuration name . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .144
Verifying background media . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .147
Including enclosure events in event logs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .150
8 Statistics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .153
Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .154
Viewing all statistics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .155
Dumping data to a text file . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .157
Viewing access statistics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .158
Viewing readahead statistics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .161
Viewing command cluster statistics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .163
Viewing miscellaneous statistics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .165
Viewing access statistics on each logical drive . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .166
Clearing access statistics on each logical drive (LUN) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .170
Clearing all statistics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .170
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9 Event Logs. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 173
Accessing event logs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Controller events . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Drive events . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Controller drive port (host) events . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Enclosure events . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Failed drives . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Clearing event logs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
174
178
184
190
192
195
196
10 Diagnostics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 199
Accessing diagnostics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Using offline diagnostics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Using online diagnostics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Controller maintenance - downloading firmware . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Drive maintenance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Download the firmware from the host . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Checking RAID 5/50 parity . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Tracing commands . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Shutting down the controller . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Dumping diagnostics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
200
202
205
207
211
212
217
220
223
225
11 Optimizing RAID 5 Write Performance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 227
Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Sequential access . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Number of outstanding commands . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Access size . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Access alignment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Using RAID 5 sub-arrays . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Experiencing multiple drive failures . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Promoting faster rebuild . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Summary . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
228
229
229
229
229
230
231
231
232
A Technical Support . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 233
Technical Support . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 234
Telephone numbers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 234
Notices . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 235
Index . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 237
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Introduction
1
This guide provides the operational and reference
information to configure and manage the RAID controllers
installed in your Gateway 840 Series storage system. The
controllers are accessed through a VT-100 terminal using a
menu-based user interface, connected directly to the RAID
controllers.
This guide contains step-by-step procedures to access the
VT-100 terminal utility, as well as perform configuration
functions and enclosure monitoring.
1
Chapter 1: Introduction
Features
Your Gateway 840 has a menu-based software utility designed to configure and
manage the RAID controller in your new storage enclosure. It provides
centralized management to control primary storage assets vital to ensuring
maximum data reliability, network up-time, and system serviceability. It lets
you manage the storage system by accessing the configuration utility locally.
This software guide provides the operational and reference information to
configure and manage the SATA RAID controller installed in your Gateway 840,
using this menu-based user interface.
The following are some of the major features of local RAID configuration utility.
2
■
Simple, straight-forward user interface
■
Menu-based interface that works with a wide range of operating systems
■
Easy access and navigation
■
Host LUN and LUN mapping configuration
■
A comprehensive, non-volatile event log
■
Useful offline or online diagnostics
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Troubleshooting assistance
Troubleshooting assistance
To help troubleshoot problems with your system, the Event Logs chapter, as
well as on-line help, provides a list of all the events that can occur, along with
a suggested cause and action to take. When a warning or error event occurs,
you can review the event log, locate the suspect event, and see “Event Logs”
on page 173 or help section to determine the possible cause or causes and the
suggested action to take. Also see “Diagnostics” on page 199.
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Chapter 1: Introduction
4
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Accessing the
Configuration
Utility
2
This chapter provides information on accessing the
configuration utility. Read this chapter to learn how to:
■
Access the utility
■
Use the VT-100 terminal
■
Navigate the configuration utility
■
View controller information
5
Chapter 2: Accessing the Configuration Utility
Accessing the utility
You can access the SATA RAID controller by using a VT-100 terminal connected
to the RS-232 serial ports on the controller’s rear panel. Configure your terminal
using the procedures described in “Using the VT-100 terminal” on page 7.
Important
6
You can also choose to use StorView Storage
Management software to manage and monitor the
enclosure and SATA RAID Controller. Refer to the Gateway
840 SATA RAID StorView User’s Guide for more
information.
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Using the VT-100 terminal
Using the VT-100 terminal
Access to the RAID controller is accomplished by using its onboard
configuration utility with a VT-100 terminal or terminal emulation connected
to the RS-232 serial port on the controller.
A SATA communication RS-232 cable (provided with the hardware) is used to
connect the terminal to the serial port on the SATA RAID controller.
Configure your host system or terminal RS-232 port to use the following
settings:
Setting
Value
Terminal Emulation
ANSI
Function
Terminal Keys
Fonts
Terminal
Translations
None
Columns
80
Set the communications parameters for the terminal program as follows:
Setting
Value
Baud Rate
115,200
Data Bits
8
Stop Bits
1
Parity
None
Flow Control
None
Connector
COM1 (typically)
To access the RAID controllers:
1
Connect the host terminal to the serial port on the controller using a
null-modem serial cable (use the configuration information in the
preceding tables).
2
Turn on the terminal and the Gateway 840 Series storage system.
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7
Chapter 2: Accessing the Configuration Utility
3
From the computer or terminal connected to the RAID controller, start your
terminal emulation software.
Important
4
Make sure that your terminal emulation software is set to
use the correct COM port on your computer.
From the terminal window, press CTRL + W. The Main Menu opens.
You can now perform all of the functions described in the following chapters.
All steps begin from the Main Menu.
If an event or error occurs, you can review the log for the problem by examining
the event log (see “Event Logs” on page 173).
8
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Navigating the SATA RAID configuration utility
Navigating the SATA RAID
configuration utility
The SATA RAID configuration utility menu system can be navigated using the
keys on your keyboard. The table below describes the primary navigation and
selection methods.
To
Do this
Toggle interface from text-base to
menu-based.
Press CTRL + W keys.
Return to the previous menu or
screen (Exit).
Press the ESC key.
Move the selection.
Press the arrow keys.
Select a menu option.
Press the ENTER key.
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9
Chapter 2: Accessing the Configuration Utility
Menu system
Displays controller information.
Configuration Menu
840 SATA RAID Configuration Utility
Main Menu
Configuration Menu
Controller Information
Statistics
Event Logs
Diagnostics
Enclosure Information
View Configuration
Array Configuration
LUN Configuration
Hot Spare Configuration
Rebuild Parameters
UPS Configuration
Hardware Configuration
Clear Configuration
Additional Configuration
Array Configuration
View Array
Create Array
Delete Array
Expand Array
Array Cache Configuration
View Unused Drives
Advanced Array Configuration
LUN Configuration
LUN Management
SAN LUN Mapping
Controller Information
View Controller
Statistics
View Controller
Event Logs
View Controller
Hot Spare Configuration
View Hot Spare Drive Configuration
Add or Remove Pool and Dedicated Spare
Rebuild Parameters
Auto Rebuild and Set Priority
Auto Hot Spare
Hardware Configuration
Controller LUN
Port ID Settings
Controller Port Data Rate
RS232 Settings
Packetized SCSI/QAS
Diagnostic
Offline Diagnostics
Online Diagnostics
Reset Controller
Shutdown Controller
Diagnostics Dump
Clears All Configurations
Additional Configuration
Modify Configuration Name
Modify Configuration WWN
Backgroun Verification
Log Enclosure Events
10
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Navigating the SATA RAID configuration utility
Menu system (continued)
Displays Array Information
Create Array
Array Configuration Menu
View Array
Create Array
Delete Array
Expand Array
Array Cache Configuration
View Unused Drives
Advanced Array Configuration
Steps through the
create array process.
Select an Array
Delete the Array
Select an Array
Add Drives to the Array
Add Sub-Arrays to Current Array
Read-Ahead Cache
Writeback Cache
Displays the Unused Drives
Initialize Array
Trust Array
LUN Configuration Menu
LUN Management
View Logical Drive
Create Logical Drive
Expand Logical Drive
Set Availability
Delete Logical Drive
View Unassigned Free Space
Modify Mapped LUN Number
LUN Management
SAN LUN Mapping
Displays Spare Drives
Hot Spare Configuration Menu
View Hot Spare Drive Configuration
Add or Remove Pool and Dedicated Spare
Rebuild Parameters Menu
Auto Rebuild and Set Priority
Auto Hot Spare
Select Drive
Add/Remove
Auto Rebuild: Disabled Rebuild Priority: 50%
Auto Hot Spare: Disabled
Hardware Configuration Menu
Controller LUN
Port ID Settings
Controller Port Data Rate
RS232 Settings
Packetized SCSI/QAS
SAN LUN Mapping
View SAN LUN Mappings
Create SAN LUN Mapping
Delete SAN LUN Mapping
Modify SAN LUN Mapping
View Connected Hosts
Controller LUN Number: 000 Current
Controller Port 0 Hard Address: 04
Controller Port 1 Hard Address: 05
Port ID Selection
Set Controller Port 0 Data Rate
Set Controller Port 1 Data Rate
Packetized SCSI/QAS
Enable/Disable
RS232 Setting
115200
57600
38400
19200
9600
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Chapter 2: Accessing the Configuration Utility
Menu system (continued)
Controller Information
View Controller
Displays Controller Parameters
Statistics
View Controller
Event Logs
View Controller
View All Statistics
View Access Statistics
View Readahead Statistics
View Command Clustering Statistics
View Miscellaneous Statistics
Clear Statistics
View Access Statistics On Each Logical Drive
Clear Access Statistics On Each Logical Drive
View All Events
View New Events
View Last 50 Events
View Last Hour Events
View Last 24 Hours Events
View Drive Port Events
View Controller Port Events
View Environment Events
View Failed Drive List
Clear Event Log
12
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Select Logical Drive
View Access Statistics on Port 0
View Access Statistics on Port 1
View Access Statistics on Both Ports
Select Logical Drive
Clear Access Statistics on Port 0
Clear Access Statistics on Port 1
Clear Access Statistics on Both Ports
Viewing controller information
Viewing controller information
Detailed information on the RAID controller is available through the Main
Menu, and includes:
■
Controller World Wide Name (WWN)
■
Firmware information
■
Run-time information
■
Temperature and voltage information
To view controller information:
1
After the controller(s) have completed booting, press CTRL + E, then press
CTRL + W to switch to the menu-based mode. The Main Menu opens.
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Chapter 2: Accessing the Configuration Utility
2
From the Main Menu select Controller Information, then press ENTER. The
Controller Information screen opens.
3
Select the controller you want to examine by using the spacebar to select
the controller, then press ENTER. If only one controller is present, only one
selection is listed.
The following is a brief summary of the information displayed.
14
Item
Description
Controller WWN
An 8-byte unique World Wide Name the controller uses
for identification. This is unique to each controller, and
preprogrammed.
Configuration WWN
An 8-byte World Wide Name the controller uses for
identification to hosts. This can be identical to the
Controller WWN, or can be different.
Config Name
A 64-byte ASCII name used to identify a specific
controller configuration.
www.gateway.com
Viewing controller information
Item
Description
Firmware Revision
The firmware version in use by the controller.
Firmware Date/Time
Date and time of when the firmware was created.
Total Power on Count
The number of times this controller has been power
cycled.
Total Power on Time
The total length of time this controller has been powered
on.
Current Power on Time
The length of time since this controller has last been
powered on or reset.
Current Controller Time
This is the current time on the controller.
Last Configuration Time
This is the time the controller was last configured.
Onboard Temperature
This is the current temperature as measured by the
controller. If this value exceeds predefined limits, an
event will be written into the event log.
Controller Voltage
Current readings for various controller and coprocessor
(if applicable) voltages.
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Chapter 2: Accessing the Configuration Utility
16
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Creating Disk
Arrays
3
This chapter provides information on creating disk arrays.
Read this chapter to learn how to:
■
Understand arrays
■
Create arrays
■
Configure array read-ahead and writeback cache
■
Assign hot spare drives
■
Delete an array
■
Expand an array
■
Trust an array
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Chapter 3: Creating Disk Arrays
Overview
Configuring a RAID system requires some planning to make sure that you define
the correct RAID levels and array options. It may be helpful to refer to the
Topology chapter in the Gateway 840 SATA RAID Enclosure User’s Guide.
This chapter will step you through the process to create the disk arrays. You
will also find sections on deleting arrays, expanding arrays, and assigning hot
spare drives. You are then directed to the next chapter for the procedures to
define the logical drives, which makes the drive array(s) available to the
operating system.
This manual assumes you have a basic understanding of RAID concepts and
terminologies.
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Understanding arrays
Understanding arrays
You can create an array at any time. The table below describes the drive
requirements for each RAID level.
RAID Level
Minimum No. of Drives
Maximum No. of Drives
0
1
12
1
2
12
5
3
12
50
6
12
10 (Mirrored)
4
12
Important
Before you create more than one array, you must be sure
that your host operating system supports multiple Logical
Unit Numbers (LUNs). Most operating systems do support
multiple LUNs, or have an option for it. If your operating
system does not support multiple LUNs, the host will only
be able to see one array at the first disk LUN.
Terminology
The following describes the terminology used when creating and managing
arrays.
Term
Description
Array
A group of drives that are combined together to create a
single large storage area. Up to 64 arrays are supported,
each containing up to 12 drives per array. There is no limit
for the drive size in the arrays.
Chunk Size
This is the amount of data that is written on a single drive
before the controller moves to the next drive in the stripe.
Stripe Size
This is the number of data drives multiplied by the chunk
size.
Cache Flush Array
This is the array that is used to automatically flush cache
data in the situation where power has failed to some of the
drives.
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Chapter 3: Creating Disk Arrays
20
Initialization
RAID 5/50 arrays must have consistent parity before they
can be used to protect data. Initialization writes a known
pattern to all drives in the array. If you choose not to
initialize an array, this is known as a “trusted array” and
any drive failure will result in data corruption. It is possible
to later perform a parity rewrite, which recalculates the
parity based on the current data, thus ensuring the data
and parity are consistent.
Reserved Capacity
In order to allow drives from a different family or
manufacturer to be used as a replacement for a drive in
an array, we recommend that a small percentage of the
drive’s capacity be reserved when creating the array. This
is user selectable, from 0 to 10 percent.
RAID Level 0
RAID 0 is defined as disk striping where data is striped or
spread across one or more drives in parallel. RAID 0 is
ideal for environments in which performance (read and
write) is more important than fault tolerance or you need
the maximum amount of available drive capacity in one
volume. Drive parallelism increases throughput because
all drives in the stripe set work together on every I/O
operation. For greatest efficiency, all drives in the stripe set
must be the same capacity. Because all drives are used
in every operation, RAID 0 allows for single-threaded I/O
only (i.e., one I/O operation at a time). Environments with
many small simultaneous transactions (e.g., order entry
systems) will not get the best possible throughput.
RAID Level 1
RAID 1 is defined as disk mirroring where one drive is an
exact copy of the other. RAID 1 is useful for building a
fault-tolerant system or data volume, providing excellent
availability without sacrificing performance.
RAID Level 5
RAID 5 is defined as disk striping with parity where the
parity data is distributed across with parity all drives in the
volume. Normal data and parity data are written to drives
in the stripe set in a round-robin algorithm. RAID 5 is multi
threaded for both reads and writes because both normal
data and parity data are distributed round-robin. This is
one reason why RAID 5 offers better overall performance
in server applications. Random I/O benefits more from
RAID 5 than does sequential I/O, and writes take a
performance hit because of the parity calculations. RAID
5 is ideal for database applications.
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Understanding arrays
RAID Level 10
RAID 10 is defined as mirrored stripe sets (also known as
RAID 0+1). You can build RAID 10 either directly through
the RAID controller (depending on the controller) or by
combining software mirroring and controller striping (called
RAID 01).
RAID Level 50
This RAID level is a combination of RAID level 5 and RAID
level 0. Individual smaller RAID 5 arrays are striped, to give
a single RAID 50 array. This can increase the performance
by allowing the controller to more efficiently cluster
commands together. Fault tolerance is also increased, as
one drive can fail in each individual array.
Sub-array
In RAID 50 applications, this is the name given to the
individual RAID 5 arrays that are striped together. Each
sub-array has one parity drive.
Optimization and drive selection for RAID 5
arrays
Typical RAID 5 implementations require a number of steps to write the data
to the drives. In order to optimize your system performance based on the type
of writes you expect in your operation, we have provided detailed information
on optimizing the performance using full strip write operations in an appendix
(see “Optimizing RAID 5 Write Performance” on page 227).
If you intend to setup a RAID 5 array and want to consider optimum
performance, you will need to consider the number of drives, parity drives, and
chunk size. You should review the information provided in “Optimizing RAID
5 Write Performance” on page 227. Additional information is provided at the
appropriate step during configuration.
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Chapter 3: Creating Disk Arrays
Creating arrays
Configuring the arrays involves a few basic steps. All configuration parameters
are stored on all hard drives that are members of the specific array. This makes
it possible to remove and replace controllers without requiring any
configuration changes. The configurations can be viewed or modified through
the controller’s RS-232 port.
Important
We recommend that you make notes about the arrays you
create in case you need to duplicate the configuration for
an array. See “Trusting an array” on page 61
Important
When creating arrays and logical drives, make sure that
you are in compliance with the following guidelines:
- Maximum drives per array = 12
- Maximum number of arrays = 64
- Maximum number of logical drives = 512
No changes are made until the configuration is saved, so it is possible to quit
at any time without affecting the current configuration as long as you do not
save those changes. Configuration can be performed while the system is active.
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Creating arrays
To view an array:
1
From the Main Menu, select Configuration Menu, then press ENTER. The
Configuration Menu opens.
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Chapter 3: Creating Disk Arrays
2
From the Configuration Menu, select View Configuration, then press ENTER.
The View Configuration Screen opens.
The following table provides a description of the fields shown on the screen.
Field
Description
No.
Drive number in the array.
Vendor ID
Indicates the manufacturer of the drive.
Product ID
Drive model number.
F/W
Drive firmware version.
Ser. No.
Drive serial number.
Cap.
Drive capacity expressed in GBs.
EN, SL
The enclosure and drive slot number, used for drive
identification.
ST
The drive status, will either be “OK” or “FL.”
3
24
Press ESC to return to the previous screen.
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Creating arrays
To create an array:
1
From the Main Menu, select Configuration Menu, then press ENTER. The
Configuration Menu opens.
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Chapter 3: Creating Disk Arrays
2
To access the Array Configuration Menu, select Array Configuration, then
press ENTER. The Array Configuration Menu opens.
The Array Configuration Menu lets you review, create, delete, or otherwise
modify the active arrays.
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Creating arrays
3
From the Array Configuration Menu, select Create Array, then press ENTER.
The Array Name screen opens.
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Chapter 3: Creating Disk Arrays
28
4
Type a name for the array (using as many as 32 characters), then press
ENTER. The RAID Level screen opens.
5
Highlight the appropriate RAID level, then press ENTER. The Configuration
Type screen opens.
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Creating arrays
6
Select Manual Configuration, then press ENTER. The Select Chunk Size screen
opens.
The available chunk sizes are 64 K, 128 K, and 256 K. This is the amount
of data that is written on a single drive before the controller moves to the
next drive in the stripe.
To achieve optimum RAID 5 write performance you should consider setting
the chunk size based on the specified number of drives for a Full Stripe
Write when configuring RAID 5/50 arrays. See “Optimizing RAID 5 Write
Performance” on page 227 for detailed information.
The primary aim of setting a chunk size is to try to set a stripe size that
allows for full stripe writes. The stripe size is determined by the number
of data drives multiplied times the chunk size, (8 data drives × 64 K chunk
size = 512 strip size).
For maximum performance with RAID 5/50 arrays, you want to do as many
full stripe writes as possible. Typically, Windows NT, Windows 2000, and
Windows 2003 access at 64 K. Therefore, a stripe size of up to 1 MB would
mean the controller has to cluster 16 commands to perform a full stripe
write (actually 17 because of alignment). If you were to use a larger stripe
size, you run the risk of not being able to cluster sufficiently for the
application.
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Chapter 3: Creating Disk Arrays
In cases where you are performing larger writes to the controller, you could
go up to 2 MB for a stripe size, since you have more data to cluster. Never
exceed 2 MB for a stripe size, since the controller cannot cluster over
this size.
We recommend that you keep the stripe size to 1 MB or less for general
use, perhaps increasing it for specific applications. This stripe size is
actually the substripe size in RAID 50 cases. A 4+1 array (4 data and 1 parity
drives) with a 256 K chunk has a 1 MB stripe size, as does an 8+1 array
with 128 K stripe size, and an 8+2, RAID 50 array with 256 K chunk size.
Although 8+1 gives an even stripe size, this does not really matter for an
operating system (OS) that writes in significantly smaller chunks. So, 8+1,
10+1, or 11+1 with a chunk size of 64 K would be fine for an OS that does
64 K writes. If the OS does much larger writes, you may want to increase
the chunk size. With writeback cache enabled, the controller can keep data
and do a full stripe write.
For a single enclosure example - best all around performance:
11+1 with 64 K chunk size would yield a 704 K stripe (11×64=704)
10+2 with 128 K chunk size would yield a 640 K stripe (5×128=640)
When using more drives, 14+2 (64 K), or 12+3 (128 K) should be as
good as 12+4. However, we recommend that it be kept to a minimum
of 4 data drives for a subarray.
For most sequential accesses, the difference may not be too much for
different configurations. However, for large block random writes, it can
help if the stripe size is similar to the I/O size. This lets the controller
perform a partial full stripe write, where it has most of the data for a full
stripe, and can just read some from the drives to complete the stripe.
While Windows NT, Windows 2000, and Windows 2003 do 64 K accesses,
these are not aligned. If the chunk size is 64 K, every access crosses a chunk
boundary and so involves two read/modify/write commands instead of
one. However, since the controller can cluster, this problem is somewhat
offset since the controller usually can cluster sufficiently to do full stripe
writes. If it is a completely random 64 K access on Window NT, Windows
2000, or Windows 2003, a 64 K chunk is not the best. A chunk size of 128 K
or 256 K is better to minimize the number of commands that cross chunk.
Larger chunk sizes should be used if the OS is writing large blocks, or with
large sequential writes where the controller can cluster sufficiently. Always
keep the stripe size below 2 MB.
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Creating arrays
7
Select the desired chunk size from the menu, then press ENTER. The Drive
Selection Menu opens.
8
Select the drives for the new array by doing the following:
The controller will list all the available drives for each attached
enclosure(s). You can choose to add a drive to the array by highlighting
the drive, then pressing the U key. Or you can select all the available drives
by pressing the A key. Remove a drive that has been selected by pressing
the R key, or remove all of the drives selected by pressing the C key.
Tips & Tricks
If you have multiple enclosures, the enclosure you are
viewing is displayed at the top of the page. To move to the
drives in the next enclosure, highlight the last drive in the
column or row and press the right or down arrow key.
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Chapter 3: Creating Disk Arrays
9
To continue, press the CTRL + D keys when you have completed your
selections. The Drive Capacity Reserve screen opens.
Tips & Tricks
32
The drive capacity reserve determines how much drive
capacity to retain for future capacity fluctuations of
replacement drives. (This is not applicable to RAID 0
configurations.) The default is 1%.
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Creating arrays
10
Type the correct value for the drive capacity reserve (percentage), then press
ENTER. The Sub-Array Selection screen opens.
The controller displays the number of available sub-arrays you can choose
from. In this example, the first one is a single sub-array that provides nine
data drives and one parity drive, and the second example is two sub-arrays
that provides two four-drive sub-arrays with one parity drive.
When you create a redundant array, such as a RAID 5 or 50 type, you will
always be creating at least one sub-array comprised of the data drives and
one parity drive. When a sufficient number of drives have been selected
you can choose to make multiple sub-arrays of your array. This provides
the benefits of a quicker recovery from a drive failure since only one of
the smaller sub-arrays is affected.
Tips & Tricks
If this is just one single array with less than five hard drives,
choose the default of one sub-array.
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Chapter 3: Creating Disk Arrays
11
Select the number of sub-arrays required, then press ENTER. The
Initialize/Trust Arrays screen opens.
12
Select Initialize Array, then press ENTER. The Save Configuration screen opens.
For details on trusting arrays, refer to “Trusting an array” on page 61.
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Creating arrays
Important
You must initialize the array before using the logical drives
created from the array.
13
Save the configuration to create the array. Click Yes, then press ENTER. You
will see a message that the configuration is being saved.
14
15
After it has completed the process, press any key to continue.
Continue with setting up the Array Read-Ahead Cache and Writeback
Cache, then go to the Hot Spare drives options.
Tips & Tricks
After you have completed these tasks, go to the next
chapter. Create the logical drives and perform the LUN
assignment to complete the setup. Additionally, for more
control over the logical drives, see “SAN LUN Mapping” on
page 89 and perform your appropriate mappings.
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Chapter 3: Creating Disk Arrays
Configuring array read-ahead and
writeback cache
The following steps will guide you through configuring the read-ahead cache
and writeback cache options for each array. Each array has a different set of
cache settings. Read-ahead cache and writeback cache thresholds work together
to allow fine tuning of the I/O performance. You will need to set these options
for each array you have created.
Read-ahead cache
The Read-Ahead function improves the data retrieval performance by allowing
the controller to read into cache a full stripe of data at one time, which greatly
improves the cache hits. For smaller transfers the Read-Ahead algorithm can
improve performance. If, for example, the stripe size is 256 KB (chunk size
multiplied by the number of data drives) and the host requests 64 KB of data,
when Read-Ahead is enabled, the controller will read in advance a full 256 KB.
When the host request the next 64 KB block, the data will already be in the
cache. Depending on the data patterns for your application, disabling the
read-ahead cache can help load balance the read and write operations, which
can increase performance.
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Configuring array read-ahead and writeback cache
To configure the read-ahead cache:
1
From the Main Menu, select Configuration Menu, then press ENTER. The
Configuration Menu opens.
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Chapter 3: Creating Disk Arrays
38
2
From the Configuration Menu, select Array Configuration, then press ENTER.
The Array Configuration Menu opens.
3
From the Array Configuration Menu, select Array Cache Configuration, then
press ENTER. The Array Cache Configuration Menu opens.
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Configuring array read-ahead and writeback cache
4
From the Array Cache Configuration Menu, select Read-Ahead Cache, then
press ENTER. The Select Array screen opens.
5
6
Press the up or down arrow keys to select an array, then press ENTER.
Press the up and down arrow keys to select a Read-Ahead Cache parameter
to use for the selected array, then press CTRL + D to save the changes.
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Chapter 3: Creating Disk Arrays
The choices are Automatic, Disabled, and four pre-determined sizes. Select
Automatic (the default), and recommended setting. It lets the controller
determine the optimum setting. Disabled will turn off the read-ahead cache.
Choose one of the pre-determined sizes to optimize the read performance
based on your data patterns.
7
Save the configuration changes by selecting Yes, then press
ENTER.
Writeback cache
In a writeback cache operation, data is sent to the controller from the host and
the controller immediately responds to the host confirming the data was
received and written to the media. The host can then send more data. This can
significantly increase performance for host systems that only send a low
number of commands at a time. The controller caches the data, and if more
sequential data is sent from the host, it can cluster the writes together to
increase performance further. If sufficient data is sent to fill a stripe in RAID
5/50 configurations, the controller can perform a full stripe write, which
significantly reduces the write overhead associated with RAID 5/50.
Disabling writeback cache ensures that the data is sent to the drives before status
is returned to the host. With writeback cache enabled, if a short term power
failure occurs, the battery back-up unit provides adequate power to make sure
that cache is written to disk when the power is restored. In duplex operations,
the cache is mirrored to both controllers which provides further redundancy
in the event of a single controller failure.
Mirrored cache is designed for absolute data integrity. The cache in each storage
processor contains both primary cached data for the disk groups it owns, and
a copy of the primary data of the other storage processor. Mirrored cache
ensures that two copies of cache exist on both storage processors, before
confirming to the operating system that the write has been completed.
Below is a table from the Gateway 840 Series User Guide, which list the hold-up
times for data for the battery backup unit.
40
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Configuring array read-ahead and writeback cache
Configuration
Memory Vendor
and Part Number
Measured
Current
Draw
Absolute
Maximum
Backup Time
Expected
Safe
Backup
Time
Main board only
w/256 MB
Kingston
KVR100X72C2/
256
27.9mA
41.2 hours
20.6 hours
Main board
w/256 MB and
Coprocessor
w/256 MB
Kingston
KVR100X72C2/
256
48.3mA
23.8 hours
11.9 hours
Normally, write-intensive operations will benefit through higher performance
when writeback cache is enabled on that array. Read-intensive operations, such
as a streaming server, may not benefit from writeback cache.
The writeback cache is used to optimize the write performance specific to your
data patterns. In general, larger cache sizes will increase the write performance
but can lower simultaneous read performance. The recommended size is 16 MB.
The strategy of write operations results in a completion signal being sent to
the host operating system as soon as the cache receives the data to be written.
The hard drives will receive the data at a more appropriate time in order to
increase controller performance.
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Chapter 3: Creating Disk Arrays
To configure the writeback cache:
1
42
From the Main Menu, select Configuration Menu, then press ENTER. The
Configuration Menu opens.
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Configuring array read-ahead and writeback cache
2
From the Configuration Menu, select Array Configuration, then press ENTER.
The Array Configuration Menu opens.
3
From the Array Configuration menu, select Array Cache Configuration Menu,
then press ENTER. The Array Cache Configuration Menu opens.
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Chapter 3: Creating Disk Arrays
4
44
From the Array Cache Configuration Menu, select Writeback Cache, then
press ENTER. The Writeback Parameters Select Array menu opens.
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Configuring array read-ahead and writeback cache
5
Press the up and down arrow keys to select an array from the list to which
you want to make changes, then press ENTER. The Writeback Cache
Parameters Menu opens.
6
Choose a Writeback Cache parameter to use for the selected array.
Press the up and down arrow keys to select the cache, and the left and
right arrow keys to toggle from Disabled to Enabled, or choose one of the
pre-determined cache threshold sizes (1 MB, 2 MB, 4 MB, 8 MB, 16 MB,
32 MB, 64 MB, 128 MB, or 256 MB).
There are three additional options to an active Write Back Cache: Disable
if a partner controller fails or is missing, Disable if a controller battery fails,
or Disable if the array is in a critical state, (for example, during a rebuild).
Enable the options for your application. For maximum data protection, we
recommend that you enable all three options.
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46
7
Press CTRL + D to save the changes. The Save Configuration screen opens.
8
9
Select Yes to save the configuration changes, then press ENTER.
Press any key to continue.
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Assigning hot spare drives
Assigning hot spare drives
The process of configuring fault tolerant arrays includes assigning drives for
global or dedicated hot spares. In the event of a drive failure, the controller
will use a global hot spare to replace the failed drive in any array. If a dedicated
spare is assigned to the specific array, that array will use its dedicated hot spare.
This step is accomplished through the Hot Spare Configuration menu.
To configure hot spare drives:
1
From the Main Menu, select Configuration Menu, then press
Configuration Menu opens.
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ENTER.
The
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Chapter 3: Creating Disk Arrays
2
From the Configuration menu, press the up or down arrow keys to select
Hot Spare Configuration menu, then press ENTER. The Hot Spare Configuration
Menu opens.
3
To add or remove a hot spare drive, select Add or Remove Pool and Dedicated
Spare, then press ENTER. The Add or Remove Global and Dedicated Spares
screen opens.
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Assigning hot spare drives
4
Press the arrow keys to highlight an available drive to use, then press S to
assign that drive as a dedicated spare. Continue to press S to display the
arrays from which you can assign the dedicated spare.
To add a drive as a pool spare (global), press the arrow keys to highlight
an available drive and press H.
To remove a drive as a hot spare, highlight the subject drive and press R,
or press C to remove all drives in the enclosure that are currently assigned
as spares.
5
6
7
After you make your selection, press CTRL + D to continue.
When you are prompted to save the changes, press Y to save the new hot
spare configurations.
Press any key to continue, then go to the next chapter, “Logical Drives”
on page 63.
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Chapter 3: Creating Disk Arrays
Deleting an array
To delete an array:
1
50
From the Main Menu, select Configuration Menu, then press ENTER. The
Configuration Menu opens.
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Deleting an array
2
From the Configuration Menu, select Array Configuration Menu, then press
ENTER. The Array Configuration Menu opens.
3
From the Array Configuration Menu, select Delete Array, then press ENTER.
The Delete Array screen opens.
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52
4
Press the up and down arrow keys to select the array to delete, then press
ENTER.
5
6
To complete the deletion, select Yes, then press ENTER.
Press any key to continue.
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Expanding an array
Expanding an array
The Expand Array option lets you expand the capacity of your existing array
by adding more drives or adding sub-arrays.
Using a RAID 5 array example, adding more drives to the array lets you increase
the capacity of that array. If you add additional sub-arrays it requires the exact
number of drives to be available for the original sub-array. For example, if you
have an array composed of 4 data drives and 1 parity drive, you must have a
minimum of five drives available to be able to add at least 1 sub-array.
When you view the array configuration information, the RAID type and
number of drives are displayed. These drives are depicted as data drives plus
parity drives. In this example, it would be displayed as “4 Drives (3 +1)” which
indicates the array/sub-array is composed of 4 drives of which 3 are data drives
and 1 is a parity drive. If you were to add 1 sub-array to this particular
configuration, the resulting display would be “8 Drives (6+2)” in which case
you now have 6 data drives and 2 parity drives. Your RAID 5 array now becomes
a RAID 50 array because it’s composed of two sub-arrays, each sub-array has
three data drives and one parity drive.
If you are expanding a RAID 50 array by adding drives to the array, you must
add an equal number of drives to each sub-array.
The process of expanding the array by adding additional sub-arrays allows for
quicker recoveries in the event of a drive failure in any one of the sub-arrays,
and the time required to rebuild the array is significantly shortened.
To add more drives to your existing arrays, refer to “Adding additional drives”
on page 54.
To add more sub-arrays to your existing array, refer to “Adding additional
sub-arrays” on page 57.
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Chapter 3: Creating Disk Arrays
Adding additional drives
To add additional drives:
1
54
From the Main Menu, select Configuration Menu, then press ENTER. The
Configuration Menu opens.
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Expanding an array
2
From the Configuration Menu, select Array Configuration Menu, then press
ENTER. The Array Configuration Menu opens.
3
From the Array Configuration Menu, select Expand Array, then press ENTER.
The Select Array to Expand Menu opens.
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56
4
Press the up and down arrow keys to select an array to expand, then press
ENTER. The Expansion menu opens.
5
From the Expansion menu, select Add a Number of Drives to the Array, then
press ENTER. The Expand Array Drive Selection screen opens.
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Expanding an array
6
Press the up and down arrow keys to select a drive, then press X to mark
that drive for expansion. Continue to select additional drives if necessary,
otherwise press CTRL + D to continue.
You can cancel your selection by highlighting the drive and pressing R,
or remove all selected drives and start again by pressing C.
7
8
When you are prompted to save the changes, select Yes, then press ENTER.
Press any key to continue.
Adding additional sub-arrays
To add additional sub-arrays:
1
From the Main Menu, select Configuration Menu, then press ENTER. The
Configuration Menu opens.
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58
2
From the Configuration menu, select Array Configuration Menu, then press
ENTER. The Array Configuration Menu opens.
3
From the Array Configuration Menu, select Expand Array, then press ENTER.
The Select Array to Expand Menu opens.
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Expanding an array
4
Press the up and down arrow keys to select an array to expand, then press
ENTER. The Expansion Menu opens.
5
Press the up and down arrow keys to select Add a Number of Sub-Arrays to
the Current Array, then press ENTER. The Expand Array Drive Selection screen
opens.
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Chapter 3: Creating Disk Arrays
6
Press the up and down arrow keys to select a drive, then press X to mark
that drive for expansion. Continue to select additional drives if necessary,
otherwise press CTRL + D to continue.
You can cancel your selection by highlighting the drive and pressing R,
or remove all selected drives and start again by pressing C.
7
8
60
When you are prompted to save the changes, select Yes, then press ENTER.
Press any key to continue.
www.gateway.com
Trusting an array
Trusting an array
When you create a RAID 5 or 50 array, you have the option to trust the array.
This option should only be used in environments where you fully understand
the consequences of the function. Trust array option is provided to allow
immediate access to an array for testing application purposes only.
Trust array does not calculate parity across all drives and therefore there is no
known state on the drives. As data is received from the host, parity is calculated
as normal, but it occurs on a block basis. There is no way to guarantee that
parity has been calculated across the entire drive. The parity data will be
inconsistent, so a drive failure within a trusted array will cause data loss.
To trust an array:
1
When creating a RAID 5/50 array, after you have selected the number of
sub-arrays, the Initialize Array/Trust Array menu opens, where you can
Initialize or Trust the array.
2
(Test Purposes Only) Select Trust Array, then press ENTER.
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Chapter 3: Creating Disk Arrays
62
3
You are prompted to save the configuration. Select Yes to save the
configuration, then press ENTER.
4
After the process has completed, press any key to continue.
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Logical Drives
4
This chapter provides information on creating logical
drives. Read this chapter to learn how to:
■
Configure a logical drive
■
Access the LUN configuration menu
■
View unassigned free space
■
Create a logical drive
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Chapter 4: Logical Drives
Overview
A Logical Drive is defined as a region or combination of regions of unused space
on the array(s) which makes the logical drives available to the host operating
systems as a disk. You can create up to 512 logical drives. After an array has
been created, this region is first marked as unassigned. One or more logical
drives can be created in this region or an existing logical drive can be expanded
using this region.
A logical drive can be created or expanded in 1 GB increments with a maximum
total size per drive of 2,198 GBs. This corresponds to the SCSI 32-bit addressing
limitation of 2 TB.
Important
Before you create more than one logical drive, you must
be sure that your host HBA and host operating system is
setup to handle the desired number of logical drives (LUNs
or Logical Unit Numbers). If your operating system does
not support multiple logical drives, the host will only be able
to see the first logical drive.
Important
For Microsoft® Windows® NT there is a limitation of 231
logical drives. A hot fix is available from Microsoft. See
Microsoft Knowledge Base Article-245637.
Terminology
The following table describes the terminology relating to logical drives.
64
Term
Description
Segmentation
Any logical drive can be expanded into any free region, so
it is possible to easily add capacity at any time. There is
no requirement that any additional space be contiguous.
Logical drive segmentation is completely transparent to the
host systems.
Availability
To accommodate hosts with multiple ports and multiple
host systems, you can restrict a logical drive’s availability
to a particular controller port. Access can be enabled or
disabled for each port of each controller.
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Overview
Mapped Logical Drive
Number
Each logical drive is presented to the host system with a
unique LUN. In certain cases (such as after deleting
another logical drive) it may be desirable to change the
number of the logical drive. This can be done at any time,
bearing in mind that any attached host systems may need
to be rebooted or reconfigured to retain access.
Unassigned Free
Space
The controller keeps a map of all the space that is not
assigned to any logical drive. This space is available for
logical drive creation or expansion. Each unassigned
region is individually listed.
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Accessing the LUN configuration
menu
To access the LUN configuration menu:
1
66
From the Main Menu, select Configuration Menu, then press ENTER. The
Configuration Menu opens.
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Accessing the LUN configuration menu
2
From the Configuration Menu, select LUN Configuration, then press ENTER. The
LUN Configuration Menu opens.
The LUN Configuration Menu has two menu options: one for managing logical
drives, which includes utilities for viewing, creating, deleting, and managing
LUNs, and the other is for performing SAN LUN mapping operations. For more
information see “SAN LUN Mapping” on page 89
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Chapter 4: Logical Drives
Viewing unassigned free space
Prior to creating a logical drive, you may want to review the available unassigned
free space. This will help you to identify the unused regions or segments for use during
the creation of your logical drives. Normally with a first time configuration this is
not necessary, since all of the space is unassigned.
To view unassigned free space:
1
68
From the Main Menu, select Configuration Menu, then press ENTER. The
Configuration Menu opens.
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Viewing unassigned free space
2
From the Configuration Menu, select LUN Configuration, then press ENTER.
The LUN Configuration Menu opens.
3
From the LUN Configuration Menu, select LUN Management, then press
ENTER. The LUN Management Menu opens.
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70
4
From the LUN Management Menu, select View Unassigned Free Space, then
press ENTER. The Unassigned Free Space screen opens.
5
Review the free space regions and note them for later use.
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Creating a logical drive
Creating a logical drive
To complete the process of configuring your arrays, you will need to create one or
more logical drives. Creating a logical drive from the available free space regions
presents the logical drive to the host operating system.
To create a logical drive:
1
From the Main Menu, select Configuration Menu, then press ENTER. The
Configuration Menu opens.
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Chapter 4: Logical Drives
72
2
From the Configuration menu, select LUN Configuration, then press ENTER. The
LUN Configuration Menu opens.
3
From the LUN Configuration menu, select LUN Management, then press ENTER.
The LUN Management Menu opens.
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Creating a logical drive
4
From the LUN Management menu, select Create Logical Drive, then press
ENTER. The Select Unused Region Menu opens.
5
Press the up and down arrow keys to select a region you want to use for
the logical drive, then press ENTER. The Number of Logical Drives to create
screen opens.
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Chapter 4: Logical Drives
Important
The number shown as the default is the maximum number
of 1 GB logical drives you can create using the selected
free space region in the previous step. In this case the free
space region was 29 GB which yielded a total of 29, 1 GB
Host logical drives.
6
Press the up and down arrow keys to change the desired number of Host LUNs
to create, then press ENTER. The LUN Size screen opens.
7
Press the up and down arrow keys to change the desired size of the LUN, then
press ENTER.
The value displayed is the default size of the logical drive that can be created
using the number of logical drives set in the previous screen based on the unused
region space. If you are creating an even number of logical drives from an odd
size value the remaining unused space is made available as unused space from
which another separate logical drive can be created. For example, if you have a
fault tolerant array with unused region of 143 GB and you create 2 logical drives
from that unused space, you will have two logical drives each with 71 GBs. After
you create the logical drives and view the unused region you will see the
remaining 1 GB available for use in another logical drive.
8
9
74
When you are prompted to save the configuration, select Yes, then press ENTER.
Press any key to return to the Main Menu.
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Creating a logical drive
Expanding a logical drive
To expand a LUN:
1
From the Main Menu, select Configuration Menu, then press ENTER. The
Configuration Menu opens.
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76
2
From the Configuration menu, select LUN Configuration, then press ENTER. The
LUN Configuration Menu opens.
3
From the LUN Configuration Menu, select LUN Management, then press ENTER.
The LUN Management Menu opens.
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Creating a logical drive
4
From the LUN Management menu, select Expand Logical Drive, then press
ENTER. The Select Logical Drive screen opens.
5
Select a logical drive that you want to expand, then press ENTER. The Unused
Regions For Expansion screen opens.
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78
6
Select the unused region into which you want to expand the logical drive,
then press ENTER. The Expansion Size screen opens.
7
Press the up and down arrow keys to change the value to the desired size,
then press ENTER.
8
When you are prompted to save the configuration, select Yes, then press
ENTER.
9
Press any key to return to the Main Menu.
www.gateway.com
Creating a logical drive
Setting logical drive availability
This option will make a logical drive available to a controller port and
determines whether that logical drive is seen by all or a specific host system
attached to that controller port.
To set logical drive availability:
1
From the Main Menu, select Configuration Menu, then press ENTER. The
Configuration Menu opens.
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Chapter 4: Logical Drives
80
2
From the Configuration menu, select LUN Configuration, then press ENTER.
The LUN Configuration Menu opens.
3
From the LUN Configuration menu, select LUN Management, then press
ENTER. The LUN Management Menu opens.
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Creating a logical drive
4
From the LUN Management Menu, select Set Host LUN Availability, then
press ENTER. The Select Logical Drive for Availability screen opens.
5
From the Select Logical Drive for Availability screen, select a logical drive
that you want to map to another LUN number, then press ENTER. The
Modify the Logical Drive Availability screen opens.
6
From the Modify the Logical Drive Availability screen, select the controller
port to modify. Press ENTER to change the property from Enable to Disable.
7
If necessary, repeat the step to change the availability of the other port.
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Chapter 4: Logical Drives
8
9
10
Press CTRL + D to save the changes.
When prompted to save the configuration, select Yes, then press ENTER.
Press any key to return to the Main Menu.
Deleteing a logical drive
This process will remove an existing logical drive.
To delete a logical drive:
1
82
From the Main Menu, select Configuration Menu, then press ENTER. The
Configuration Menu opens.
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Creating a logical drive
2
From the Configuration menu, select LUN Configuration, then press ENTER.
The LUN Configuration Menu opens.
3
From the LUN Configuration menu, select LUN Management, then press
ENTER. The LUN Management Menu opens.
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84
4
From the LUN Management Menu, select Delete Logical Drive, then press
ENTER. The Select a Logical Drive to Delete screen opens.
5
From the Select a Logical Drive to Delete screen, select the logical drive to
delete, then press ENTER.
6
When you are prompted to save the configuration, select Yes, then press
ENTER.
7
Press any key to return to the Main Menu.
www.gateway.com
Creating a logical drive
Modifying a mapped LUN
This option lets you change the assigned LUN number after the logical drive
has previously been made available.
To modify a LUN number:
1
From the Main Menu, select Configuration Menu, then press ENTER. The
Configuration Menu opens.
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86
2
From the Configuration menu, select LUN Configuration, then press ENTER.
The LUN Configuration Menu opens.
3
From the LUN Configuration menu, select LUN Management, then press
ENTER. The LUN Management Menu opens.
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Creating a logical drive
4
From the LUN Management menu, select Modify Mapped LUN Number, then
press ENTER. The Select a Logical Drive to Modify Mapped Number screen
opens.
5
From the Select a Logical Drive to Modify Mapped Number screen, select
the logical drive whose number you intend to change, then press ENTER.
The Select a New LUN Number screen opens.
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Chapter 4: Logical Drives
88
6
Press the up and down arrow keys to change the logical drive number to
the desired number, then press ENTER.
7
When you are prompted to save the configuration, select Yes, then press
ENTER.
8
Press any key to return to the Main Menu.
www.gateway.com
SAN LUN
Mapping
5
This chapter provides information on SAN LUN mapping.
Read this chapter to learn how to:
■
Access the SAN LUN mapping configuration menu
■
View SAN LUN mappings
■
Create a SAN LUN mapping
■
Delete a SAN LUN mapping
■
Modify a SAN LUN mapping
■
View connected hosts
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Chapter 5: SAN LUN Mapping
Overview
When attaching multiple host systems in a SAN environment, it may be necessary
to more precisely control which hosts have access to which logical drives. In addition
to controlling logical drive availability on a RAID controller on a port-by-port basis,
it is also possible to further restrict access to a specific logical drive. Up to 512 SAN
LUN mappings are supported.
Terminology
The following table describes the terminology relating to SAN LUN Mapping.
90
Term
Description
Node Name
This is an eight-byte hexadecimal number, uniquely identifying
a single host system. It incorporates the World Wide Name
and two additional bytes which are used to specify the format.
Port Name
This is an eight-byte hexadecimal number, uniquely identifying
a single host port. It incorporates the World Wide Name and
two additional bytes which are used to specify the format and
indicate the port number.
Mapping Name
A 32-character name that can be used to help identify the host
system.
Exclusive Access
A logical drive is presented to only one host system. It is not
available to any other host systems.
Read/Write Access
A logical drive will allow both reads and write operations.
Read Only Access
A logical drive will not allow writes.
Mapped LUN
Number
This is the LUN number that a specific logical drive responds
to when accessed by a host. It is not necessary for this to bear
any relation to the LUN number.
Mapping Availability
Which controller ports the mapping is valid for.
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Accessing the SAN LUN mapping configuration menu
Accessing the SAN LUN mapping
configuration menu
To access the SAN LUN mapping configuration menu:
1
From the Main Menu, select the Configuration Menu, then press ENTER. The
Configuration Menu opens.
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Chapter 5: SAN LUN Mapping
2
From the Configuration Menu, select LUN Configuration, then press ENTER. The
LUN Configuration Menu opens.
3
From the LUN Configuration menu, select SAN LUN Mapping, then press ENTER.
The SAN LUN Mapping screen opens.
The SAN LUN Mapping Configuration Menu provides the options for viewing,
creating, deleting, and managing SAN LUNs, and for viewing the host systems
attached to the storage network.
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Viewing SAN LUN mappings
Viewing SAN LUN mappings
To view existing SAN LUN mappings, choose this option.
To view SAN LUN mappings:
1
From the Main Menu, select the Configuration Menu, then press ENTER. The
Configuration Menu opens.
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94
2
From the Configuration menu, select LUN Configuration, then press ENTER. The
LUN Configuration Menu opens.
3
From the LUN Configuration menu, select SAN LUN Mapping, then press ENTER.
The SAN LUN Mapping screen opens.
www.gateway.com
Viewing SAN LUN mappings
4
From the SAN LUN Mapping Menu, select View SAN LUN Mappings, then
press ENTER. The View SAN LUN Mapping screen opens.
In the example above, there are two mappings created. They have an
identical node name but different port names, indicating they are both in
the same host system. The port name is used for the mapping, and access
is only allowed on Port 0 of the controllers. Each Host HBA port can access
one logical drive, exclusively.
The following information is shown on the screen.
■
Mapping Name: This is the name defined by the user when creating
the SAN LUN Mapping. You may use up to 32 ASCII characters.
■
HBA SCSI ID: This is initiator (target) SCSI ID of the host system HBA
port used for the mapping.
■
Port: This is the port of the RAID Controller. The controller has two
ports, and will be listed here as “0” and “1.” They represent “P0” and
“P1” respectively.
■
Description: Below each mapping is a plain language description of
how the Controller LUN is being presented to the host system as, and
what access rights are established for the mapping. These will be
Exclusive, Shared, Read-Only.
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Chapter 5: SAN LUN Mapping
Creating a SAN LUN mapping
To create a SAN LUN mapping:
1
96
From the Main Menu, select the Configuration Menu, then press ENTER. The
Configuration Menu opens.
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Creating a SAN LUN mapping
2
From the Configuration menu, select LUN Configuration, then press ENTER. The
LUN Configuration Menu opens.
3
From the LUN Configuration menu, select SAN LUN Mapping, then press ENTER.
The SAN LUN Mapping screen opens.
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98
4
From the SAN LUN Mapping Menu, select Create SAN LUN Mapping, then press
ENTER. The SAN LUN Mapping Name screen opens.
5
Type a unique name for this mapping (as many as 32 characters), then press
ENTER. The SAN LUN Mapping Configuration screen will open.
www.gateway.com
Creating a SAN LUN mapping
If a LUN is already part of another mapping and is defined as Exclusive,
it will not be available here for selection. If the logical drive was
mapped as Share or Shared Read Only, it will be available.
Important
Microsoft Windows NT, Microsoft Windows 2000, and
Microsoft Windows 2003 do not support a Read Only file
system.
6
When you are prompted to save the configuration, select Yes, then press
ENTER.
7
Press any key to return to the Main Menu.
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Chapter 5: SAN LUN Mapping
Deleting a SAN LUN mapping
To delete a SAN LUN mapping:
1
100
From the Main Menu, select the Configuration Menu, then press ENTER. The
Configuration Menu opens.
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Deleting a SAN LUN mapping
2
From the Configuration Menu, select LUN Configuration, then press ENTER.
The LUN Configuration Menu opens.
3
From the LUN Configuration Menu, select SAN LUN Mapping, then press
ENTER. The SAN LUN Mapping screen opens.
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Chapter 5: SAN LUN Mapping
4
From the SAN LUN Mapping menu, select Delete SAN LUN Mapping, then
press ENTER. The Delete SAN LUN Mapping screen opens.
5
Select a SAN LUN Mapping to be deleted, then press ENTER.
Tips & Tricks
102
SAN LUN Mappings can be deleted in any order without
affecting the other mappings.
6
When you are prompted to save the configuration, select Yes, then press
ENTER.
7
8
Press any key to return to the Main Menu.
Access your host operating system and make the necessary adjustments for
the change in disk(s).
www.gateway.com
Modifying SAN LUN Mapping
Modifying SAN LUN Mapping
It is sometimes necessary to modify some or all of the parameters of a SAN LUN
Mapping. You can change the Mapping Name, Port Name, and the RAID controller
port availability access of the mapping.
This may be necessary if, for example, a host system has an adapter failure and a
new adapter with different Node and Port names (initiator ID for SCSI HBAs) is
installed.
To modify a SAN LUN mapping:
1
From the Main Menu, select the Configuration Menu, then press ENTER. The
Configuration Menu opens.
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Chapter 5: SAN LUN Mapping
2
From the Configuration menu, select LUN Configuration, then press ENTER. The
LUN Configuration Menu opens.
3
From the LUN Configuration menu, select SAN LUN Mapping, then press ENTER.
The SAN LUN Mapping screen opens.
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Modifying SAN LUN Mapping
4
From the SAN LUN Mapping menu, select Modify SAN LUN Mapping, then
press ENTER. The Modify SAN LUN Mapping screen opens.
5
Press the up and down arrow keys to select a SAN LUN Mapping to be
modified, then press ENTER. The Modify SAN LUN Mapping Name screen
opens.
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Chapter 5: SAN LUN Mapping
6
Enter a new SAN LUN mapping name, then press ENTER. The Modify SAN
LUN Mapping Configuration screen opens.
7
Change the parameters for the SAN LUN Mapping. Set the parameters for
the SAN LUN Mapping by using the ENTER key to toggle the type of access
desired (shared, shared read only, exclusive, or NA). Press the left or right
arrow keys to change the LUN number and the up or down arrow keys to
cycle through the logical drives.
If a logical drive is already part of another mapping, and is defined as
Exclusive, it will not be available here for selection. If the logical drive was
mapped as Share or Shared Read Only, it will be available.
Press CTRL + D to move to the next menu.
8
You are presented with modifying the controller LUN for the mapping. You
can choose to leave the property in the automatic mode, or set an exclusive
Controller LUN number for this mapping by choosing User Defined and
entering a new LUN number.
Press ENTER to change the mode. If you selected User Defined, use the up
or down arrow keys to change the Controller LUN number.
Press CTRL + D to move to the next menu.
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Modifying SAN LUN Mapping
9
10
When you are prompted to save the configuration, select Yes, then press
ENTER.
Press any key to return to the Main Menu.
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Chapter 5: SAN LUN Mapping
Viewing connected hosts
Choose this option to view all connected host HBA ports.
To view connected hosts:
1
108
From the Main Menu, select the Configuration Menu, then press ENTER. The
Configuration Menu opens.
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Viewing connected hosts
2
From the Configuration menu, select LUN Configuration, then press ENTER.
The LUN Configuration Menu opens.
3
From the LUN Configuration menu, select SAN LUN Mapping, then press
ENTER. The SAN LUN Mapping screen opens.
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Chapter 5: SAN LUN Mapping
4
From the SAN LUN Mapping Menu, select View Connected Host, then press
ENTER. The View Logged-in Hosts screen opens.
The following table provides an explanation of each of the fields shown
in the display.
110
Field
Description
No.
Host number assigned by the controller. This is used when
creating a SAN LUN Mapping and selecting a host from the
list.
SCSI ID
This is the SCSI ID of the host bus adapter.
www.gateway.com
Advanced
Configuration
and Management
6
This chapter provides information on advanced
configuration and management. Read this chapter to learn
how to:
■
Set rebuild parameters
■
Configure hot spares
■
Configure hardware settings
■
View controller information
■
Clear the configuration
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Chapter 6: Advanced Configuration and Management
Setting rebuild parameters
The Rebuild Parameters menu option lets you enable or disable automatic rebuild
operations, set the rebuild priority, and configure the controller for the auto hot spare
feature.
Enabling/disabling auto rebuild
Whenever a hot spare is created, whether it is a global or dedicated spare (for the
specific array), the automatic rebuild feature is enabled. However, there may be
occasions where it is necessary to manually enable or disable this option.
When enabled, auto regeneration will begin the rebuild cycle when a fault tolerant
array is configured, a hot spare drive is available, and a drive fault occurs.
To enable or disable auto rebuild:
1
112
From the Main Menu select Configuration Menu, then press ENTER. The
Configuration Menu opens.
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Setting rebuild parameters
2
From the Configuration menu, select Rebuild Parameters, then press ENTER.
The Rebuild Parameters menu opens.
3
From the Rebuild Parameters menu, select the Auto Rebuild and Set Priority
option, then press ENTER. The Auto Rebuild and Set Priority menu opens.
From the Auto Rebuild and Set Priority menu you have the option to enable
the automatic rebuild, or set the percent of processor time allocated to a
rebuild operation.
4
Press ENTER to Enable or Disable Auto Rebuild. Then press the up and down
arrow keys to change the rebuild priority value.
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Chapter 6: Advanced Configuration and Management
Important
5
6
7
114
The values range from 10% through 90%. The higher the
value the more processor time is allocated to the rebuild
operation.
Press CTRL + D to save the changes and continue.
When you are prompted to confirm the save, choose Yes, then press ENTER.
Press any key to return to the Main Menu.
www.gateway.com
Setting rebuild parameters
Configuring auto hot spare
This feature lets you configure the controller to automatically start a rebuild
operation when a replacement drive is inserted into the drive slot of the
removed failed drive member. This feature only applies when a dedicated or
pool spare has not been assigned.
To configure an auto hot spare:
1
From the Main Menu select Configuration Menu, then press ENTER. The
Configuration Menu opens.
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Chapter 6: Advanced Configuration and Management
2
From the Configuration Menu, select Rebuild Parameters, then press ENTER. The
Rebuild Parameters Menu opens.
3
From the Rebuild Parameters Menu, select the Auto Hot Spare option, then press
ENTER. The Auto Hot Spare Menu opens.
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Setting rebuild parameters
4
Press ENTER to toggle between Enable or Disable. Enabling this feature will
automatically start a rebuild operation when a replacement drive is inserted into
the drive slot of the removed failed drive member.
5
Press CTRL + D to save the changes or press ESC to cancel and return to the
previous menu.
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Chapter 6: Advanced Configuration and Management
Configuring hot spares
The process of configuring fault tolerant arrays includes assigning drives as global
or dedicated hot spares. In the event of a drive failure that is a member of a fault
tolerant array, the controller will use an assigned global hot spare to replace the failed
drive in any array. If a dedicated spare is assigned to the specific array, that array
will use its dedicated hot spare to replace the failed drive member.
Viewing the list of hot spare drives
To view a list of hot spare drives:
1
118
From the Main Menu select Configuration Menu, then press ENTER. The
Configuration Menu opens.
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Configuring hot spares
2
From the Configuration menu, select Hot Spare Configuration, then press
ENTER. The Hot Spare Configuration menu opens.
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3
120
Select View Hot Spare Drive Configuration, then press ENTER. A list of hot spare
drives opens.
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Configuring hot spares
Adding or removing hot spare drives
To add or remove hot spare drives:
1
From the Main Menu select Configuration Menu, then press ENTER. The
Configuration Menu opens.
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Chapter 6: Advanced Configuration and Management
2
From the Configuration menu, select Hot Spare Configuration, then press ENTER.
The Hot Spare Configuration menu opens.
3
Select Add or Remove Global and Dedicated Spare, then press ENTER. The Add or
Remove Global and Dedicated Spares screen opens.
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Configuring hot spares
4
Press the arrow keys to select an available drive to use:
To add a dedicated spare, press S to assign that drive as a dedicated
spare. Then continue to press S, which displays the arrays from
which you can assign the dedicated spare.
To add a drive as a global spare, press the arrow keys to select an
available drive, then press H key.
To remove a drive as a hot spare, select the drive, then press R, or
press C to remove all drives in the enclosure that are currently
assigned as spares. After the changes have been made, press the CTRL
+ D to continue.
5
When you are prompted to save the changes, press Y to save the new hot
spare configurations.
6
Press any key to continue.
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Configuring the hardware
The hardware configuration menu provides the options to set the Controller LUN,
configure the controller port connection options, set the controller port data rate,
configure the controller’s RS-232 port BAUD rate, and set the Packetized Data
Transfer/QAS option.
Setting the controller LUN
This option lets the you override the automatic feature which causes the Controller
LUN to automatically use the next available data LUN to communicate between
StorView and the SATA RAID Controller. We recommend that this setting remain in
the automatic mode.
Changing this parameter can alleviate a potential issue that some operating systems
have with a controller showing up at the end of the data LUNs.
In the event you have an operating system that is having a problem with the
controller LUN being displayed, select Disabled. This will allow the controller to use
the next available data LUN but not be displayed to the operating system.
If the Controller LUN is required to be at a specific, user-defined LUN, choose the
User Defined option and select from 0-511.
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Configuring the hardware
To configure the controller LUN:
1
From the Main Menu, select Configuration Menu, then press ENTER. The
Configuration Menu opens.
2
From the Configuration Menu, select Hardware Configuration, then press
The Hardware Configuration Menu opens.
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ENTER.
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Chapter 6: Advanced Configuration and Management
3
From the Hardware Configuration Menu, select Controller LUN, then press
ENTER. The Set Controller LUN screen opens.
4
Press ENTER to select the method of Controller LUN assignment.
Important
If you chose User Defined, a specific LUN value is
displayed and selected by the up or down arrow keys.
If you select a LUN number that is used by another device,
the word “Conflict” will appear next to the LUN number.
5
6
7
126
Press CTRL + D to save the changes and continue.
When you are prompted to confirm the save, choose Yes, then press ENTER.
Press any key to return to the Main Menu.
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Configuring the hardware
Setting the controller port ID
The Port ID settings provide you the option to set the SCSI ID for the controller
port. You can use IDs 0-15.
To set the ID for controller ports:
1
From the Main Menu, select Configuration Menu, then press ENTER. The
Configuration Menu opens.
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Chapter 6: Advanced Configuration and Management
128
2
From the Configuration Menu, select Hardware Configuration, then press
ENTER. The Hardware Configuration Menu opens.
3
From the Hardware Configuration Menu, select Port ID Settings, then press
ENTER. The Port ID Menu opens.
4
Press
ENTER
to toggle between Disabled and Enabled.
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Configuring the hardware
The Disabled setting allows for soft addressing. The default IDs for the
controller ports are Port 0 ID 4 and Port 1 ID 5.
Important
5
6
7
IDs can only be changed when there is a RAID
configuration present.
Press CTRL + D to save the changes and continue.
When you are prompted to confirm the save, choose Yes, then press ENTER.
Press any key to return to the Main Menu.
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Chapter 6: Advanced Configuration and Management
Controller port data rate
This option lets you set the data transfer rate of the controller ports.
The settings include 320 MB, 160 MB and 80 MB.
To set the controller port data rate:
1
130
From the Main Menu, select Configuration Menu, then press ENTER. The
Configuration Menu opens.
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Configuring the hardware
2
From the Configuration Menu, select Hardware Configuration, then press
ENTER. The Hardware Configuration Menu opens.
3
From the Hardware Configuration Menu, select Controller Port Data Rate,
then press ENTER. The Control Port Data Rate Menu opens.
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Chapter 6: Advanced Configuration and Management
4
Use the up and down arrow keys to choose a controller port, then press ENTER.
The Host Port Data Rate Options screen opens.
5
Use the up and down arrow keys to select 320MB/sec, 160MB/sec, or 80 MB/sec,
then press ENTER.
6
7
When you are prompted to confirm the change, choose Yes, then press ENTER.
132
Press any key to return to the Main Menu.
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Configuring the hardware
Setting the RS-232 configuration
The RS-232 Settings option provides you with the option to set the BAUD rate
for the controller’s RS-232 port.
To change RS-232 settings:
1
From the Main Menu, select Configuration Menu, then press ENTER. The
Configuration Menu opens.
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134
2
From the Configuration Menu, select Hardware Configuration, then press
ENTER. The Hardware Configuration Menu opens.
3
From the Hardware Configuration Menu, select RS-232 Settings, then press
ENTER. The Baud Rate Selection Menu opens.
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Configuring the hardware
4
Press the up and down arrow keys to select a BAUD rate for the controller
RS-232 port (the default and recommended setting is 115,200), then press
ENTER.
5
When you are prompted to save the configuration, select Yes, then press
ENTER.
6
Press any key to return to the Main Menu.
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Packetized data transfers/QAS
Packetized protocol is provided for transferring commands, status, and data.
The system sends this information in packets that are protected with a CRC.
These packets are also sent synchronously to reduce the protocol overhead. This
option is set Enabled by default for 320 MB/sec data rates, and is required for
320 MB/sec operations.
Tips & Tricks
The default setting of “Enabled” should be valid for most
systems
To set the packetized protocol:
1
136
From the Main Menu, select Configuration Menu, then press ENTER. The
Hardware Configuration Menu opens.
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Configuring the hardware
2
Press the up or down arrow keys to select Packetized Data Transfers Using
QAS, then press ENTER. The Packetized SCSI/QAS screen opens.
3
4
5
6
Press the up or down arrow keys to select Enabled or Disabled.
Press CTRL + D to save the changes and continue.
When you are prompted to confirm the save, choose Yes, then press ENTER.
Press any key to return to the Main Menu.
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Chapter 6: Advanced Configuration and Management
Viewing controller information
This option provides the ability to view detailed information on the SATA RAID
Controller, such as: Controller WWN, Configuration WWN and Name,
Firmware, run-time data and onboard temperature and voltage information.
To view controller information:
1
138
From the Main Menu, select Controller Information, then press ENTER. The
Select Controller Menu opens.
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Viewing controller information
2
From the Controller Information Menu, press the up and down arrow keys
to select a Controller, then press ENTER. The Controller Information screen
opens.
3
Use U and D to scroll up and down through the controller information
displayed.
If you want to capture the information, press P to dump the data to a text
file.
4
Press ESC to return to the previous menu.
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Chapter 6: Advanced Configuration and Management
Clearing the configuration
To clear the configuration:
1
140
From the Main Menu, select Configuration Menu, then press ENTER. The
Configuration Menu opens.
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Clearing the configuration
2
From the Configuration Menu, select Clear Configuration, then press ENTER.
The Clear Configuration Warning opens.
Caution
There is no further warning, clearing the configuration will
erase all data.
3
Press Y to continue and clear all configuration information or N to cancel
this operation
4
Press ESC to return to the Main Menu.
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Additional
Configuration
7
This chapter provides information on additional
configuration. Read this chapter to learn how to:
■
Modify configuration names
■
Modify configuration WWNs
■
Set single controller mode
■
Verify background media
■
Include enclosure events in the event logs
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Chapter 7: Additional Configuration
Modifying the configuration name
To modify the configuration name:
1
144
From the Main Menu select Configuration Menu, then press ENTER. The
Configuration Menu opens.
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Modifying the configuration name
2
From the Configuration menu, select Additional Configuration, then press
ENTER. The Additional Configuration Menu opens.
3
Press the up and down arrow keys to select Modify Configuration Name, then
press ENTER. The Configuration Name screen opens.
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Chapter 7: Additional Configuration
146
4
Press BACKSPACE to delete the existing Configuration Name displayed, type
a new name for your controller’s Configuration (as many as 64 ASCII
characters), then press ENTER to continue.
5
When you are prompted to save the configuration, select Yes, then press
ENTER.
6
Press any key to return to the Main Menu.
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Verifying background media
Verifying background media
This option, when enabled, will automatically verify the media of all drives in
the background. If a media error is detected, the controller can automatically
re-write the data, providing that the array is in a fault tolerant mode.
To verify background media:
1
From the Main Menu select Configuration Menu, then press ENTER. The
Configuration Menu opens.
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Chapter 7: Additional Configuration
2
From the Configuration menu, select Additional Configuration, then press ENTER.
The Additional Configuration Menu opens.
3
From the Additional Configuration Menu, select Background Verification, then
press ENTER. The Background Verification screen opens.
4
5
Press ENTER to toggle between Enabled or Disabled Background Verification.
148
Press CTRL + D to continue and save the changes.
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Verifying background media
6
7
When you are prompted to save the configuration, select Yes, then press ENTER.
Press any key to return to the Main Menu.
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Chapter 7: Additional Configuration
Including enclosure events in
event logs
This option lets you enable or disable whether enclosure events are included
in the Event logs. Enclosure events are those which pertain to the enclosure
components such as cooling fan status, power supply status, and I/O card status.
To include enclosure events:
1
150
From the Main Menu select Configuration Menu, then press ENTER. The
Configuration Menu opens.
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Including enclosure events in event logs
2
From the Configuration menu, select Additional Configuration, then press
ENTER. The Additional Configuration Menu opens.
3
From the Additional Configuration Menu, select Log Enclosure Events, then
press ENTER. The Enclosure Events screen opens.
4
5
Press ENTER to toggle between Enabled or Disabled (SES) enclosure events.
Press CTRL + D to continue and save the changes.
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152
6
When you are prompted to save the configuration, select Yes, then press
ENTER.
7
Press any key to return to the Main Menu.
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Statistics
8
This chapter provides information on statistics. Read this
chapter to learn how to:
■
View all statistics
■
View access statistics
■
View readahead statistics
■
View command cluster statistics
■
View miscellaneous statistics
■
View access statistics on each logical drive
■
Clear access statistics on each logical drive
■
Clear statistics
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Chapter 8: Statistics
Overview
The RAID controller monitors all incoming commands and calculates various
statistics. These statistics are then reported to the controller’s serial interface,
where you can view this data. The statistics monitored include: Command
Count, Command Alignment, Command Size, Readahead Statistics, Write
Clustering Statistics, and RAID 5/50 Write Statistics.
The controller maintains individual access statistics for each LUN and controller
port. These can be useful to help balance the load from the host. Identical
statistics are maintained for both reads and writes.
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Viewing all statistics
Viewing all statistics
To view all statistics:
1
From the Main Menu, select Statistics Menu, then press ENTER. The Select
Controller Statistics Menu opens.
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Chapter 8: Statistics
156
2
From the Select Controller Statistics Menu, select the controller on which
you want to view the statistics, then press ENTER. The Statistics Types screen
opens.
3
From the Statistics Types screen, select View All Statistics, then press ENTER.
The All Statistics screen opens.
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Viewing all statistics
4
Press U to page up, D to page down, and P to dump the information to
a file.
The balance of this chapter covers each statistics group selected, with an
explanation of each item.
Dumping data to a text file
The dump function enables you to write the data to a text file.
To dump data to a text file:
1
2
Click the Transfer list and select Capture Text.
3
Press the P to dump the data.
When a message prompts you to name the file, type a file name and
destination or choose the default name, then click Start.
Tips & Tricks
4
5
You will notice the cursor jumps to the lower-right-corner
of the screen and after completion will return to the
upper-left-corner of the screen.
Click the Transfer list, then select Capture Text > Stop.
Access the text file using a text editor.
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Chapter 8: Statistics
Viewing access statistics
The statistics groups can be viewed all together or individually, as well as on a LUN
(logical drive) or Port basis.
The View Access Statistics screen is accessed by going to the Statistics Types menu (see
“Viewing all statistics” on page 155), then selecting View Access Statistics.
Each time statistics are viewed, the controller first outputs the current time and the
time since it was last reset. The statistics can be reset at any time. This is useful in
determining the access pattern for a particular test or period of time.
158
Statistic
Description
Total Read Commands
This is a count of the total number of read accesses (for
all ports and logical drives) that have occurred since the
controller was first powered on. This value is never reset
and indicates the number of commands that were sent
to the controller from the time it was manufactured.
Total Read Transfer
This is a count of the total number of 512-byte blocks
(for all ports and logical drives) that have been read
since the controller was first powered on. This value is
never reset and indicates the amount of data transferred
by the controller from the time it was manufactured.
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Viewing access statistics
Statistic
Description
Total Read Commands
Since Reset
This is a count of the total number of read accesses that
have occurred since the statistics were reset or the
controller was last powered on.
Total Read Transfer Since
Reset
This is a count of the total number of 512-byte blocks
that have been read since the statistics were reset or
the controller was last powered on.
Alignment
This is the percentage of commands whose address is
aligned on the specified address boundary. The
alignment of a command from a host system is
determined by the command’s address. In an optimal
system, a write of one chunk of data would reside
exactly within a chunk on one disk. However, if this is
not the case, this write will be split up into two separate
writes to two different data drives. This of course will
have a negative effect on performance. To overcome
these problems, you can, with more sophisticated
operating systems, set the access size and alignment
to an optimal value. These statistics can help you to
tune the operating system.
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Chapter 8: Statistics
Statistic
Description
Access Size
This is the percentage of commands of the size
specified. On occasions, an application may specify a
particular access size, but the operating system can
reduce this. This can lead to performance problems. For
example, on Windows NT, Windows 2000, and
Windows 2003 the maximum command size that the
operating system will allow is 1MB. Additionally, some
HBAs further reduce this value by default. However,
some benchmark programs allow a larger access size
to be specified, resulting in misleading results. By
viewing the statistics on the controller, it is possible to
determine the exact size of commands sent by the host,
and so determine whether the results are appropriate.
The access size, in conjunction with the alignment,
gives an indication of how many drives are involved in
an access. For example, consider a RAID 5/50 array
with a chunk size of 64 K. In this case, a 64 K access
with an alignment of 8 K will actually involve 2 data
drives, since it needs to access some data in the first
drive, and the remaining data in the next drive. This is
clearly inefficient, and could be improved by setting the
alignment to 64 K on the operating system. If that is not
possible, using a larger chunk size can help, as this
reduces the number of accesses that span chunks.
Aligning an access on the same value as the access
size will improve performance, as it will ensure that
there are not multi-chunk accesses for commands that
are smaller than a chunk size.
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Viewing readahead statistics
Viewing readahead statistics
If sequential read commands are sent to the controller, it assumes that the commands
that follow can also be sequential. It can then go and perform a read of the data
before the host requests it. This improves performance, particularly for smaller reads.
The size of the readahead is calculated based on the original command size, so the
controller does not read too much data. The controller maintains statistics for all
readahead commands performed.
The View Readahead Statistics screen is accessed by going to the Statistics Types menu
(see “Viewing all statistics” on page 155), then selecting View Readahead Statistics.
Statistic
Description
Readahead Command Hit
Rate
This is the percentage of read command hits versus the
total number of read commands that have been issued.
This gives an indication of the sequential nature of the
data access pattern from the host.
Readahead Command
Efficiency
This is the percentage of the number of read command
hits versus the projected number of readahead
command hits. This is a measure of the efficiency of the
readahead algorithm. A low value means that much of
the data that the controller reads in the readahead
command is not actually requested by the host.
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Chapter 8: Statistics
162
Statistic
Description
Sequential Command
Interval
In determining whether to perform a readahead or not,
the controller will search back in the command queue
whenever it receives a new read command that is not
satisfied by an existing readahead cache buffer. In a
multi threaded operating system, commands from one
thread can be interspersed with commands from
another thread. This requires that the controller not just
check the immediately previous command. The
controller will search back for a number of commands,
to see if the new command is exactly sequential to any
one of these previous commands. If it is, then the
controller determines that the data access pattern is
sequential, and so performs a readahead. These
statistics record the average number of commands the
controller must search back for when it finds a
sequential command match, the maximum number, and
also the percentage for each one of these values. These
give an indication of the multi threaded nature of the
host.
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Viewing command cluster statistics
Viewing command cluster
statistics
To increase performance, the controller can cluster sequential write commands
together to create a larger write command. This results in less commands being
sent to the hard drives. Additionally, if sufficient data is clustered by the
controller, it can perform a a full stripe write for RAID5/50 arrays. This
significantly improves performance. In cases where the host does not send a
sufficient number of outstanding writes, writeback cache can be used to delay
the write to disk, increasing the likelihood of clustering more data.
The View Command Clustering Statistics screen is accessed by going to the
Statistics Types menu (see “Viewing all statistics” on page 155), then selecting
View Command Clustering Statistics.
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Chapter 8: Statistics
Statistic
Description
Write Cluster Rate
This is the percentage of the number of write commands
that are part of a cluster versus the total number of write
commands that have been issued. This gives an
indication of the sequential nature of the data access
pattern from the host and of the performance of the
writeback cache.
RAID 5/50 Partial Command
Cluster Rate
This is the percentage of the number of clustered
commands that wrap around the end of a stripe versus
the total number of clustered commands. This gives an
indication of the alignment of the operating system.
RAID 5/50 Full Stripe Write
Rate
This is the percentage of the amount of data that is
written as a full stripe write versus the total amount of
data written. This gives an indication of the sequential
nature of the data access pattern from the host and of
the performance of the writeback cache, for RAID 5/50
drive ranks.
Command Cluster Interval
In determining whether to cluster write commands, the
controller will search back in the command queue
whenever it receives a new write command. In a multi
threaded operating system, commands from each
thread can be interspersed with commands from
another thread. This requires that the controller not just
check the immediately previous command. The
controller will search back for a number of commands,
to try to determine if the new command is exactly
sequential to any one of these previous commands. If
it is, then the controller determines that it can cluster
these commands.
These statistics record the average and maximum
number of commands the controller must search back
for when it finds a sequential command match and the
percentage for each one of these values.
Command Cluster Count
164
When the controller clusters a write command, it can
cluster a large number of them together. These
statistics record the average and maximum number of
commands the controller clusters and the percentage
for each one of these values.
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Viewing miscellaneous statistics
Viewing miscellaneous statistics
To aid in tuning performance, some additional statistics have been included
for development use under the View Miscellaneous Statistics selection.
The View Miscellaneous Statistics screen is accessed by going to the Statistics Types
menu (see “Viewing all statistics” on page 155), then selecting View
Miscellaneous Statistics.
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Chapter 8: Statistics
Viewing access statistics on each
logical drive
To view access statistics for each logical drive.
1
166
From the Main Menu, select Statistics Menu, then press ENTER. The Select
Controller Statistics Menu opens.
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Viewing access statistics on each logical drive
2
From the Select Controller Statistics Menu, select the controller on which
you want to view the statistics, then press ENTER. The Statistics Types screen
opens.
3
From the Statistics Types screen, select View Access Statistics on Each LUN,
then press ENTER. The Select LUN for Host LUN Statistics screen opens.
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Chapter 8: Statistics
4
168
From the Select LUN for Host LUN Statistics screen, select a LUN on which
to view statistics, then press ENTER. The Select a Port Access to the Host LUN
screen opens.
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Viewing access statistics on each logical drive
5
Select a Controller Port on which to view Statistics (either Port 1, Port 2
or Both Ports), then press ENTER. The View Access Statistics on Each LUN
screen opens.
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Chapter 8: Statistics
Clearing access statistics on each
logical drive (LUN)
To clear the access statistics for each logical drive:
1
Access the View Access Statistics on Each LUN screen (see “Viewing access
statistics on each logical drive” on page 166).
2
3
Select a logical drive on which to clear statistics, then press ENTER.
4
Select Yes to clear the statistics.
Select a Controller Port on which to clear Statistics (either Port 1, Port 2
or Both Ports), then press ENTER.
Clearing all statistics
To clear statistics:
1
170
From the Main Menu, select the Statistics Menu, then press ENTER. The Select
Controller Statistics Menu opens.
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Clearing all statistics
2
From the Select Controller Statistics Menu, select the controller on which
you want to clear the statistics, then press ENTER. The Statistics Types screen
opens.
3
From the Statistics Types screen, select Clear Statistics, then press ENTER.
The Clear Statistics screen opens.
4
Select Yes to clear all statistics, then press ENTER to continue.
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Event Logs
9
This chapter provides information on event logs. Read this
chapter to learn how to:
■
Access event logs
■
Understand controller events
■
Understand drive events
■
Understand controller drive port (host) events
■
Understand enclosure events
■
Understand failed drives
■
Clear event logs
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Chapter 9: Event Logs
Accessing event logs
The RAID controller has a comprehensive, non-volatile event log that can be used
for monitoring controller events and error conditions. The following event types are
logged: Drive Failures and Errors, Controller Failures and Errors, (SES) Enclosure,
Temperature and Voltage Errors.
The maximum event log size is 4096 entries, and older events are overwritten as
necessary. Some repetitive events are appended to previous events, so entries are not
used up unnecessarily. A time stamp accompanies each event, so you can easily
determine when the event happened. The time stamp of both controllers is
synchronized to make the troubleshooting tasks easier.
To access event logs:
1
174
From the Main Menu, select Event Logs Menu, then press ENTER. The Select
Controller Event Log Menu opens.
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Accessing event logs
2
From the Select Controller Event Log Menu, select the controller for which
you want to view the events, then press ENTER. The Event Log Types menu
opens.
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Chapter 9: Event Logs
3
From the Event Log Types menu, select a specific set of events you want to view,
then press ENTER. For example, if you select View All Events, the View All Events
screen opens.
The balance of this chapter covers each Event Log group available, with an
explanation of each item.
The events can be viewed all together or for a specific time period or device.
First, the current time and controller number are displayed, then the events are listed.
You can view a certain type of event, all events, or all events in a certain time frame.
We recommend that you capture the output to a log file, since the number of events
can exceed the terminal program’s buffer.
These options are as follows:
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Event Log
Description
View All Events
This option lists all events. The number of events is
indicated.
View New Events
This lists all events that have occurred since the event
log has last been viewed.
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Accessing event logs
Event Log
Description
View Last 50 Events
This option lists the last 50 events.
View Last Hour/24 Hour
Events
This lists the events that occurred in the specified time.
View Environmental Events
This lists events such as temperature warnings, voltage
level errors, battery errors, etc.
View Failed Drive List
This is a list of drives that the controller has marked as
having failed. These drives have either failed in
operation, or been removed.
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Chapter 9: Event Logs
Controller events
Following is a brief description of events that relate to the controller and
configuration.
Controller Event Messages
Description
Cause
Array xx Cache Disabled
[Reasons]
The controller has disabled
the writeback cache for the
indicated reasons, as
follows:
Disabling of
writeback cache
for the indicated
reasons:
In Preparation For
Shutdown:
The controller has received a
command to disable the
writeback cache in
preparation for shutdown.
■
Battery - The controller has
disabled the cache because
the battery is either not
present or fully charged.
■
■
■
Critical - The controller has
disabled the cache because
the array has become
critical.
A “prepare for
shutdown”
command has
been received by
the controller.
The battery is
not charged or
present.
The array has
become critical.
The UPS has
failed.
Action
■
■
■
■
No action
necessary.
Charge the
backup battery
or re-install the
battery.
Resolve the
array issue and
rebuild the array.
Replace the
failed UPS.
UPS - The controller has
disabled the cache because
a configured UPS has
indicated power has been
removed or communications
has been lost with the UPS.
Array xx Cache
Re-Enabled
The controller has
re-enabled the writeback
cache.
Re-enabling of
writeback cache.
No action
necessary.
Battery Failure
This indicates that the
onboard cache backup
battery (if present) has
failed.
Battery failure.
Replace battery in
the controller.
Battery OK
This indicates that the
onboard cache backup
battery (if present) is fully
charged.
Battery charging
complete.
No action
necessary.
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Controller events
Controller Event Messages
Description
Cause
Action
Battery Charging
This indicates that the
onboard cache backup
battery is charging.
Battery charging
started.
No action
necessary.
Cached Data Lost xxx
Entries, yyy MB
If the controller is powered
off with writeback cache still
present, it is necessary to
flush this data when power is
restored. If power is
removed for an extended
time, the onboard battery will
deplete, and the cached data
will be lost.
Failure of power
for an extended
time with
writeback cache
present.
Check the file
system.
Cntrl x Temp Exceeded: yy
The current internal
controller temperature is
indicated in degrees Celsius.
The controller’s internal
temperature has exceeded
the allowable limit, and the
controller will shut down to
prevent damage to internal
components.
Blocked fan.
Check enclosure
for sufficient air
flow.
The current internal
controller temperature is
indicated in degrees Celsius.
The controller’s internal
temperature is approaching
the maximum allowable limit.
Blocked fan.
Cntrl x Temp Warning: yy
Shutdown will occur at zzC
Failing fan.
Elevated ambient
temperature.
Check for a failed
fan, if found
replace cooling fan
module.
Check the ambient
temperature of the
environment,
decrease the local
ambient
temperature.
Failing fan.
Elevated ambient
temperature.
Check enclosure
for sufficient air
flow.
Check for a failed
fan, if found
replace cooling fan
module.
Check the ambient
temperature of the
environment,
decrease the local
ambient
temperature.
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Controller Event Messages
Description
Cause
Action
Controller x
Failed/Removed
The specified controller has
been removed, or has failed.
Message is generated by the
partner controller.
Failure or removal
of one controller
(partner) in an
Active-Active
configuration.
Replace the
controller.
Controller x Timeout
The specified controller has
not responded in the allotted
time. Message is generated
by the partner controller.
Failure or removal
of one controller
(partner) in an
Active-Active
configuration.
Replace the
controller.
Controller x Present
The specified controller has
been inserted.
Partner controller
has been inserted.
No action
necessary.
Controller x Valid
The specified controller has
passed its selftest and is
now ready (failback).
Partner controller
is ready to fail
back.
No action
necessary.
Controller Failover Started
The process of failing over to
the remaining controller has
started.
Failure or removal
of the partner
controller.
No action
necessary.
Controller Failover
Completed
The process of failing over to
the remaining controller has
completed.
Completion of
failover process.
No action
necessary.
Controller Failback Started
The process of failing back
to a replacement controller
has started.
Partner controller
started failback.
No action
necessary.
Controller Failback
Completed
The process of failing back
to a replacement controller
has completed.
Completion of
failback process.
No action
necessary.
Controller Powered On
The controller has been
powered on or reset.
The controller was
powered on.
No action
necessary.
Controller Powered Off
The controller has been
powered off or removed.
Removal of
controller or
power.
No action
necessary.
Controller Reset
The controller has been
reset either locally or
remotely.
User initiated a
controller reset.
No action
necessary.
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Controller events
Controller Event Messages
Description
Cause
Action
Controller Shutdown
The controller has been
shutdown either locally or
remotely.
User initiated a
controller
shutdown.
No action
necessary.
The controller
temperature was
exceeded and the
controller shut
itself down.
Check for a failed
fan, replace as
needed. Check for
blocked air flow,
correct as needed.
Check for high
ambient
temperature,
reduce the
environments
ambient
temperature.
Controller Selftest Passed
The controller has
completed its power on
selftest.
Selftest
completion on
startup.
No action
necessary.
Controller Selftest Failed
The controller has failed its
power on selftest.
Selftest failure on
startup.
Replace the
controller.
Controller Firmware
Upgraded to version xxxx
The controller’s firmware has
been upgraded to the
indicated version.
User upgraded the
controller
firmware.
No action
necessary.
Configuration Changed
The configuration has been
changed.
A change in the
configuration has
occurred.
If you are using the
Save
Configuration
feature, re-save
your configuration
information - it no
longer matches.
Otherwise no
action is
necessary.
DMA Error
This indicates an internal
error in the controller.
Internal hardware
failure.
Replace the
controller. Contact
Technical Support.
Event Log Cleared
The controller’s event log
has been erased.
You have cleared
the event log.
No action
necessary.
Fatal Watchdog Error
The controller watchdog
timer has detected a fatal
hardware or firmware error.
Internal hardware
or firmware failure.
Replace the
controller. Contact
Technical Support.
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Chapter 9: Event Logs
Controller Event Messages
Description
Cause
Action
Fatal SDRAM ECC
The controller has detected
unrecoverable ECC errors
on the SDRAM, either a
multiple-bit error or
uncorrectable single-bit
error.
Fault SDRAM or
damaged internal
bus.
Replace the
controller. Contact
Technical Support.
Fatal Coprocessor Error
The coprocessor has failed.
Internal hardware
or firmware failure
on the
coprocessor.
Replace the
controller. Contact
Technical Support.
Fatal Host Port x Error
The controller has detected
a fatal error on the indicated
host channel.
Memory or bus
error on the
indicated channel.
Replace the
controller. Contact
Technical Support.
Fatal Drive Port x Error
The controller has detected
a fatal error on the indicated
drive channel.
Memory or bus
error on the
indicated channel.
Replace the
controller. Contact
Technical Support.
Flush Mirrored Cache
Started, xxx Entries, yyy
MB
After failover, mirrored
writeback cache needs to be
flushed to the drives. This
indicates the start of that
process.
Failure or removal
of the partner
controller.
No action
necessary.
Flush Mirrored Cache
Completed
The flushing of mirrored
writeback cache after a
controller failure has
completed.
Completion of
mirrored cache
flushing.
No action
necessary.
Flush Cache Started, xxx
Entries, yyy MB
If the controller is powered
off with writeback cache still
present, it is necessary to
flush this data when power is
restored. This indicates the
start of that process.
Failure of power
with writeback
cache present.
No action
necessary.
Flush Cache Completed
The flushing of writeback
cache after a power failure
has completed.
Completion of
cache flushing.
No action
necessary.
Recovered SDRAM ECC
Error, Address: xxxxxxxx
Bit: yy
The controller has detected
and corrected a single bit
ECC error in the SDRAM.
The address and error bit are
indicated.
SDRAM error.
If it repeats,
replace the
controller.
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Controller events
Controller Event Messages
Description
Cause
Action
Resync Started
A stripe synchronization of a
RAID 5/50 set has started.
This will be done when a
controller fails or when
powered off during a write.
A controller fails or
is powered off
during a RAID
5/50 write
operation.
No action
necessary.
Resync Completed
A stripe synchronization of a
RAID 5/50 set has
completed.
A controller fails or
is powered off
during a RAID
5/50 write
operation.
No action
necessary.
UPS Failure
This indicates that an
attached UPS (if configured)
has failed.
UPS has been
disconnected or
communications
with the UPS has
failed.
Check the UPS
monitoring
connections.
Check the UPS, if
necessary replace
it.
UPS OK
This indicates that an
attached UPS (if configured)
is functioning correctly.
UPS is connected.
No action
necessary.
Voltage Error: Monitored
Voltage: xx.yyV
This indicates that the
specified voltage has
exceeded limits. This is a
serious error, and should be
reported to Technical
Support.
Voltage regulator
hardware failure.
Replace the
controller. Contact
Technical Support.
www.gateway.com
Enclosure 5V or
12V problem in the
power supply.
Replace the
defective power
supply.
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Drive events
These events are related to the drive bus and arrays.
Drive Event Messages
Description
Cause
Action
Array xx Critical
This indicates the specified
array is critical.
Drive removal or
failure.
Replace the hard
drive and rebuild
the array.
Array xx Expansion Started
Expansion of the indicated
array has started.
Expansion has
started.
No action
necessary.
Array xx Expansion
Restarted
Expansion of the indicated
array has restarted, after a
power cycle or
failover/failback.
Expansion has
restarted.
No action
necessary.
Array xx Expansion
Complete
Expansion of the indicated
array has completed.
Expansion has
completed.
No action
necessary.
Array xx Initialization
Started
Initialization of the indicated
array has started.
Initialization has
started.
No action
necessary.
Array xx Initialization
Complete
Initialization of the indicated
array has completed.
Initialization has
completed.
No action
necessary.
Array xx Parity
Check/Rewrite/Check and
Rewrite Started
These events indicate that a
RAID 5/50 Parity Check,
Rewrite or Check and
Rewrite has started.
Parity check
started.
No action
necessary.
Array xx Parity
Check/Rewrite/Check and
Rewrite Completed, yy
Errors
These events indicate that a
RAID 5/50 Parity Check,
Rewrite, or Check and
Rewrite has completed. Any
errors are indicated.
Parity check
completed.
No action
necessary.
Array xx Parity
Check/Rewrite/Check and
Rewrite Aborted, yy Errors
These events indicate that a
RAID 5/50 Parity Check,
Rewrite, or Check and
Rewrite has been stopped.
Any errors up to this point
are indicated.
Parity check
canceled by the
user.
No action
necessary.
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Drive events
Drive Event Messages
Description
Cause
Action
Data Underrun
WWN:xx xx xx xx xx xx Py
OP:zz
The controller has detected
a data underrun from the
indicated drive. This is
caused by the controller
detecting a bad CRC in a
frame, and usually indicates
a link problem, either with
cabling or an enclosure. The
meaning of each field is as
follows:
Signal error.
Check cabling,
Disk I/O card, and
make sure that the
hard drive is
correctly seated.
Drive is busy and
cannot accept any
more commands.
No action
necessary.
Typically because
of a
non-recoverable
media error,
hardware error.
No action
necessary.
WWN: Drive World Wide
Name
P: Drive port number
OP: SCSI command code
Drive Busy
SN:xx xx xx xx xx xx Py
OP:zz
The drive indicated has
returned a Busy status to a
command. The meaning of
each field is as follows:
SN: Serial Number
P: Drive port number
OP: SCSI command code
Drive CC
SN:xx xx xx xx xx xx Py
OP:zz SN:aa EXT:bb QL:cc
The drive indicated has
returned a Check Condition
status to a command. The
meaning of each field is as
follows:
SN: Serial Number
P: Drive port number
OP: SCSI command code
SN: SCSI sense key
EXT: SCSI extended sense
key
QL: SCSI extended sense
key qualifier
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Chapter 9: Event Logs
Drive Event Messages
Description
Cause
Action
Drive CC Failure
SN:xx xx xx xx xx xx A:yy
D:zz
The drive listed has failed
because of an
unrecoverable error. The
meaning of each field is as
follows:
Typically because
of a
non-recoverable
media error or
hardware error.
Replace the hard
drive.
Drive was
inserted.
No action
necessary.
The drive has an
invalid block size.
Replace the hard
drive.
The drive listed has been
marked as failed because of
being removed from the hard
drive enclosure. The
meaning of each field is as
follows:
Drive has been
removed or
bypassed by the
user, or has a
serious hardware
error.
Replace the hard
drive.
SN: Serial Number
Removal of cables
connecting the
enclosures.
SN: Serial Number
A: Array number
D: Drive number in array
Drive Inserted
SN:xx xx xx xx xx xx xx
ID;yyy
The drive indicated has been
inserted. The meaning of
each field is as follows:
SN: Drive World Wide Name
ID: Drive hard ID
Drive Invalid Block Size
(Size) SN:xx xx xx xx xx xx
Py
This indicates that the
specified drive has an invalid
block size, and so cannot be
used. A low level format is
required. The meaning of
each field is as follows:
SN: Serial Number
P:
Drive port number
Size: Current block size (in
hexadecimal). The
controller requires 512
Bytes.
Drive Missing
SN:xx xx xx xx xx xx A:yy
D:z
A: Array number
D: Drive number in array
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Removal of power
to daisy-chained
enclosure(s).
Replace the
cables.
Restore power to
the daisy-chained
enclosure(s).
Drive events
Drive Event Messages
Description
Cause
Action
Drive Rebuild Failure
SN:xx xx xx xx xx xx A:yy
D:zz
Rebuild has failed because
of an unrecoverable error on
another drive in the array.
The meaning of each field is
as follows:
Typically because
of a
non-recoverable
media error or
hardware error.
Backup all data
and restore to a
new array.
Unknown status
returned by the
hard drive.
Contact Technical
Support and
provide them with
a copy of the event
log.
Drive is busy and
cannot accept any
more commands.
No action
necessary.
Drive hardware
error.
Check cabling,
Disk I/O cards,
and make sure the
hard drives are
correctly seated.
Drive error.
Replace the hard
drive.
SN: Serial Number
A: Array number
D: Drive number in array
Drive Status aa
SN:xx xx xx xx xx xx Py
OP:zz
The drive indicated has
returned an unknown status
to a command. The meaning
of each field is as follows:
SN: Serial Number
P: Drive port number
OP: SCSI command code
Drive Task Full
SN:xx xx xx xx xx xx Py
OP:zz
The drive indicated has
returned a Task Full to a
command. The meaning of
each field is as follows:
SN: Serial Number
P: Drive port number
OP: SCSI command code
Drive Timeout
SN:xx xx xx xx xx xx Py
OP:zz
The drive indicated has
timed out for the specified
command. The meaning of
each field is as follows:
SN: Serial Number
P: Drive port number
OP: SCSI command code
Drive Timeout Failure
SN:xx xx xx xx xx xx A:yy
D:zz
The drive listed has failed
because of a timeout. The
meaning of each field is as
follows:
SN: Serial Number
A: Array number
D: Drive number in array
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Chapter 9: Event Logs
Drive Event Messages
Description
Cause
Action
New Drive Rebuild Failure
SN:xx xx xx xx xx xx A:yy
D:zz
Rebuild has failed because
of an unrecoverable error on
the new drive. The meaning
of each field is as follows:
Typically because
of a
non-recoverable
media error, or
hardware error.
Replace new drive
and initiate a
rebuild.
A rebuild was
canceled by the
user.
No action
necessary.
A rebuild has
started.
No action
necessary.
A rebuild has
started.
No action
necessary.
A rebuild has
completed.
No action
necessary.
SN: Serial Number
A: Array number
D: Drive number in array
Rebuild Aborted
A:xx D:yy
A rebuild has been stopped
by the user on the indicated
drive. The meaning of each
field is as follows:
A: Array number
D: Drive number in array
Rebuild Started
SN:xx xx xx xx xx xx A:yy
D:zz
A rebuild has started on the
indicated drive. The
meaning of each field is as
follows:
SN: Serial Number
A: Array number
D: Drive number in array
Rebuild Restarted
SN:xx xx xx xx xx xx A:yy
D:zz
A rebuild has restarted on
the indicated drive. The
meaning of each field is as
follows:
SN: Serial Number
A: Array number
D: Drive number in array
Rebuild Complete A:xx
D:yy
A rebuild has completed on
the indicated drive. The
meaning of each field is as
follows:
A: Array number
D: Drive number in array
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Drive events
Drive Event Messages
Description
Cause
Action
SN:xx xx xx xx xx xx ID:aaa
FW Download Start
Rev:yyyy
The drive listed has started a
firmware upgrade to the
indicated revision. The
meaning of each field is as
follows:
A firmware
upgrade has
started.
No action
necessary.
The firmware
upgrade is
complete.
No action
necessary.
Disk scrubbing
detected an error.
No action
necessary.
SN: Serial Number
ID: Drive Target ID
Rev: New firmware version
SN:xx xx xx xx xx xx ID:aaa
FW Download Complete
The drive listed has
completed a firmware
upgrade. The meaning of
each field is as follows:
SN: Serial Number
ID: Drive Target ID
SN:xx xx xx xx xx xx ID:aaa
Reallocate LBA yyyyyyyy
The controller has
reallocated blocks at the
indicated LBA in the drive.
This is due to a verify failure.
The meaning of each field is
as follows:
SN: Serial Number
ID: Drive Target ID
LBA: Address of reallocated
blocks (hexadecimal)
SATA Device Error: Port
<yyy>
SATA link error.
Drive or SATA link
error.
No action
necessary.
A drive w/SN:<xx xx xx xx
xx xx> has been removed
Drive Removed.
Drive has been
physically
removed.
No action
necessary.
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Chapter 9: Event Logs
Controller drive port (host) events
These events are related to the host side Controller Port.
Controller Port Loop Event
Messages
Description
Cause
Action
CxPx Detected
Power-on/Reset at ID:yyy
LUN:zzz
The specified host has
accessed a logical drive for
the first time, or for the first
time following a reset. The
meaning of each field is as
follows:
First access by a
particular host
after a reset.
No action
necessary.
Host systems logs
into the controller.
No action
necessary.
CxPx: Controller and host
port number
ID: Port ID of the host
LUN: LUN number
accessed
Host Px WWN: yy yy yy yy
yy yy Logged in at ID:zzz
The indicated host system
has logged into the
controller. These events will
only be listed for hosts that
have SAN mappings
created.
P: Host port number
WWN: Host World Wide
Name
ID: Port ID of the Host
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Controller drive port (host) events
Controller Port Loop Event
Messages
Description
Cause
Action
CC to Host ID:xxx LUN:yyy
Pz OP:aa SN:bb EXT:cc
QL:dd
This indicates that an
unrecoverable drive error
has occurred for a particular
command. This may be due
to a drive error in a non fault
tolerant mode, such as RAID
0, or when the array is
already in a degraded mode.
The controller will pass the
status from the drive back to
the host system, to allow the
host recovery mechanisms
to be used. The meaning of
each field is as follows:
Data is not
recoverable.
Backup all data,
and restore to a
new array.
ID: Host ID
LUN: LUN requested
P: Host port number
OP: SCSI command code
SN: SCSI sense key
EXT: SCSI extended sense
key
QL: SCSI extended sense
key qualifier
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Chapter 9: Event Logs
Enclosure events
These events are related to the SES monitored enclosure components.
SES Event Messages
Description
Cause
Action
Encl.yy Power supply zz
OK WWN: xx xx xx xx xx xx
xx xx
The controller has detected
that the indicated power
supply is functioning
correctly.
Normal condition
reported.
No action
necessary.
Encl.yy Power supply zz
Critical WWN: xx xx xx xx
xx xx xx xx
The controller has detected
that the indicated power
supply is not functioning.
The specific power
supply has failed.
Replace the power
supply.
The specific power
supply is powered
off.
Make sure that the
specific power
supply On/Off
button is in the On
position ( l ).
Encl.yy Power supply zz
Not Present
WWN: xx xx xx xx xx xx xx
xx
The controller has detected
that the indicated power
supply is not present.
The power supply
was removed.
Re-insert the
power supply,
connect the power
cord, and power
on the power
supply.
Encl.yy Fan zz OK
WWN: xx xx xx xx xx xx xx
xx
The controller has detected
that the indicated fan is
functioning correctly.
Normal condition
reported.
No action
necessary.
Encl.yy Fan zz Critical
WWN: xx xx xx xx xx xx xx
xx
The controller has detected
that the indicated fan is not
functioning.
A specific fan
failure.
Total fan failure.
Replace the
cooling fan
module.
Cooling fan
module was
removed.
Replace the
cooling fan
module.
Re-inset the
cooling fan
module.
Encl.yy Temp. zz <aa>C
OK WWN: xx xx xx xx xx xx
xx xx
192
The controller has detected
that the indicated
temperature sensor is within
limits.
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Temperature
sensors are
reporting normal
temperatures in
the enclosure.
No action
required.
Enclosure events
SES Event Messages
Description
Cause
Action
Encl.yy Temp. zz <aa>C
Warning WWN: xx xx xx xx
xx xx xx xx
The controller has detected
that the indicated
temperature sensor has
reached a warning limit.
Temperature
sensors are
reporting
enclosure
temperatures have
reached the
threshold of 70°C.
Automatic system
shutdown will
begin.
Make sure that
both cooling fans
are operating
normally. (Replace
if needed.)
If the fans are set
to automatic
speed control,
place the jumper
on the Cooling fan
module circuit
board to force the
fans to high speed.
If the environment
ambient
temperature is
high, reduce the
ambient
temperature.
Make sure that the
airflow is not
blocked or
restricted on the
enclosure.
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Chapter 9: Event Logs
SES Event Messages
Description
Cause
Action
Encl.yy Temp. zz <aa>C
Critical WWN: xx xx xx xx
xx xx xx xx
The controller has detected
that the indicated
temperature sensor has
reached a critical limit.
Temperature
sensors are
reporting
enclosure
temperatures have
reached the
threshold of 50°C.
If the fans are set
to automatic
speed control,
place the jumper
on the cooling fan
module circuit
board to force the
fans to high speed.
If the environment
ambient
temperature is
high, reduce the
ambient
temperature.
Make sure that the
airflow is not
blocked or
restricted on the
enclosure.
Encl.xx Alarm zz is OFF
WWN: yy yy yy yy yy yy
Encl.xx Alarm zz is ON
WWN: yy yy yy yy yy yy
194
All conditions are normal or
the alarm is off.
Alarm is on.
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No condition being
reported.
No action
necessary.
Alarm silenced.
User pressed the
Alarm Silence
button on the front
panel.
A condition
caused the alarm
to sound.
Press the Alarm
Silence button on
the front panel and
isolate the cause
of the alarm.
Failed drives
Failed drives
The controller maintains a list of failed drives. Drives are listed in the following
format:
Failed Drive:xx WWN: yy yy yy yy yy yy
Reason Code
The reason code can be one of the following:
Reason Codes
Reason
Action
Drive Timeout
The drive has either
timed out or been
removed.
Re-insert the hard
drive.
The drive has failed for
the specified
command, with the
indicated SCSI sense
key and extended
sense key.
Replace the hard
drive.
Command: xx Sense Key: yy Ext
Sense: zz
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Replace the hard
drive.
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Chapter 9: Event Logs
Clearing event logs
To clear event logs:
1
196
From the Main Menu, select Event Logs Menu, then press ENTER. The Select
Controller Event Log Menu opens.
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Clearing event logs
2
From the Select Controller Event Log Menu, select the controller for which
you want to clear the event logs, then press ENTER. The Event Log Types
menu opens.
3
From the Event Log Types menu, select Clear Event Log, then press ENTER.
The Clear Event Log screen opens.
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Chapter 9: Event Logs
4
198
From the Clear Event Log screen, select Yes to clear all events on this
controller, then press ENTER. The event log is cleared.
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Diagnostics
10
This chapter provides information on diagnostics. Read this
chapter to learn how to:
■
Access diagnostics
■
Use offline diagnostics
■
Use online diagnostics
■
Controller maintenance - downloading firmware
■
Drive maintenance
■
Shutdown the controller
■
Use a diagnostics dump
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Chapter 10: Diagnostics
Accessing diagnostics
The RAID controller has a comprehensive VT-100 Diagnostics menu. The
following operations can be performed from the diagnostics menu: Download
and Program Operational Firmware, Download and Program Drive Firmware,
RAID 5/50 Parity Check, Command Tracing, Shutting down the controllers, and
capturing the diagnostics data.
To access diagnostics:
1
From the Main Menu, select Diagnostics Menu, then press ENTER. The
Diagnostics Menu opens.
From this menu you can enter offline or online diagnostics, or reset or
shutdown the controller(s).
2
200
From the Diagnostics menu, select the type of diagnostics or controller
operation you want to access, then press ENTER.
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Accessing diagnostics
Important
Offline diagnostics can only be performed when there is
no activity and requires that the enclosure be disconnected
from the host system(s). See “Using offline diagnostics” on
page 202
Online diagnostics can be performed while there is no
activity in progress with the enclosure still connected to the
host with no effect on the controller’s operating status. See
“Using online diagnostics” on page 205
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Chapter 10: Diagnostics
Using offline diagnostics
To view offline diagnostics:
1
Before performing this diagnostic, you must disconnect the host system(s) from
the enclosure.
2
From the Main Menu, select Diagnostics Menu, then press ENTER. The Diagnostics
menu opens.
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Using offline diagnostics
3
From the Diagnostics menu, select Offline Diagnostics, then press Enter. The Offline
Diagnostics menu opens.
4
Press ENTER to continue. The Test Data Pattern screen opens.
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Chapter 10: Diagnostics
5
Select the type of test you want performed. The Read or Write Test screen opens.
6
Select the type of test to perform, the Test Duration screen opens.
7
Type the test duration, in minutes, then press ENTER. The selected test is
performed.
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Using online diagnostics
Using online diagnostics
While the controller is connected to the host, it is possible to perform Controller
Maintenance, Drive Maintenance, RAID 5/50 Parity Check diagnostics, as well as to
shutdown the controllers and perform a diagnostics dump to the terminal window.
To access online diagnostics:
1
From the Main Menu, select Diagnostics Menu, then press ENTER. The Diagnostics
menu opens.
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Chapter 10: Diagnostics
206
2
From the Diagnostics menu, select Online Diagnostics, then press ENTER. The
Online Diagnostics menu opens.
3
From the Online Diagnostics menu, select the online diagnostic test you
want to perform.
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Controller maintenance - downloading firmware
Controller maintenance downloading firmware
There may be an occasion when you need to download new or updated controller
firmware or reload the current firmware. To obtain the firmware, you may need to
download it from the support Web site, or get it from a CD or floppy disk.
To download and program the controller firmware:
1
Access the Online Diagnostics menu (see “To access online diagnostics:” on
page 205).
2
From the Online Diagnostics menu, select Controller Maintenance, then press
ENTER. The Download and Program Controller Firmware screen opens.
3
From the Download and Program Controller Firmware screen, press ENTER to
begin the firmware download and re-program procedure.
At the bottom of the screen, a series of “C” characters will be displayed.
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Chapter 10: Diagnostics
4
When the Cs appear, select Send File from the Transfer list (not shown). The Send
File dialog box opens.
5
Click the browse button and locate the new firmware file (similar to
“W_t006.bin”), select the 1K Xmodem protocol, then click Send. The Xmodem file
send screen opens.
Important
Make sure that the protocol “1K Xmodem” is selected. The
“1K Xmodem” protocol is preferred because of its superior
error detection (CRC vs. checksum).
From the Send screen you can monitor the progress. You can safely stop the
transfer without affecting your existing firmware any time during the transfer
until it has been completed. The upload does not overwrite the firmware during
the upload process. It writes the new code into RAM until completed, then copies
the new firmware code to the EEPROM after verification.
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Controller maintenance - downloading firmware
If you elect to stop a download in progress, make sure that the stop (abort)
command was completed by clicking the Cancel button.
6
After the transfer screen disappears, press ENTER. You are returned to the Main
Menu.
7
8
Restart the controller(s).
From the Main Menu, select Diagnostics menu, then press ENTER. The Diagnostics
menu opens.
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Chapter 10: Diagnostics
9
From the Diagnostics menu, select Reset Controller, then press ENTER. The Select
Controller to Reset menu opens.
10
From the Select Controller to Reset menu, select the controller on which the
firmware was changed, then press ENTER.
11
Select Yes to reset the controller, then press ENTER. Wait while the controller reset
takes place.
The RAID Controller(s) will restart with the new firmware.
Important
210
In duplex mode (dual controllers), the second controller’s
firmware is automatically updated during the restart
procedure.
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Drive maintenance
Drive maintenance
Caution
We recommend that you backup data from any drives
before attempting a download. During the download
process, it is essential that no drives be inserted or
removed, and that power is not switched off. If a drive
firmware download is interrupted, it is possible that the
drive will become unusable. For this reason, the controller
will not download drive firmware in parallel to all drives, but
one drive at a time. In this way, even if a power failure
occurs, the worst case scenario is one drive will be
damaged.
The controller can download firmware to the attached hard drives. Because of the
large number of hard drives on the market, it is essential to use only a Gateway
approved drive firmware file. Different drive manufacturers have different methods
for downloading drive firmware, sometimes requiring vendor-unique utilities to
perform the download. Gateway rigorously tests drive firmware and creates a single
download file that can be used through the controller. This eliminates the problems
associated with host-based utilities and the possibility of permanently damaging a
hard drive by downloading incorrect firmware.
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Chapter 10: Diagnostics
Download the firmware from the host
To download firmware from the host:
1
From the Main Menu, select Diagnostics Menu, then press ENTER. The Diagnostics
menu opens.
2
From the Diagnostics menu, select Online Diagnostics, then press ENTER. The
Online Diagnostics menu opens.
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Drive maintenance
3
From the Online Diagnostics menu, select Drive Maintenance, then press ENTER.
The Drive Firmware Menu opens.
4
From the Drive Firmware Menu, select the Download Drive Firmware to Buffer
transfer method, then press ENTER. At the bottom of the screen a series of “C”
characters will be displayed.
5
When the Cs appear, select Send File from the Transfer list (not shown). The Send
File dialog box opens.
6
Click the browse button and locate the new firmware file (similar to
“hitachi_ggn3.bin”).
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Chapter 10: Diagnostics
7
Select the 1K Xmodem protocol, then click Send. The Xmodem file send
screen opens. You can follow the progress of the download from this
screen.
Read firmware from a drive to the buffer
To read firmware from a drive to a buffer:
1
214
From the Main Menu, select Diagnostics Menu, then press ENTER. The
Diagnostics menu opens.
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Drive maintenance
2
From the Diagnostics menu, select Online Diagnostics, then press ENTER. The
Online Diagnostics menu opens.
3
From the Online Diagnostics menu, select Drive Maintenance, then press ENTER.
The Drive Firmware Menu opens.
4
From the Drive Firmware Menu, select Read Firmware From Drive to Buffer transfer
method, then press ENTER.
5
Select the appropriate firmware from the choices, then press ENTER. The Drive
Firmware menu reopens.
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Chapter 10: Diagnostics
6
Choose one of the available options and press ENTER.
You can download to all supported drives, all supported unused or hot
spare drives, or all supported drives that are not already at this firmware
level.
If any used drives are to be updated, you are warned that if a drive firmware
download is interrupted, it is possible that the drive will become unusable.
For this reason, the controller will not download drive firmware in parallel
to all drives, but one drive at a time.
When downloading drive firmware, the controller first checks the vendor
and product ID of each drive to determine whether the firmware should
be updated, then it updates the drive.
7
216
Turn the enclosure off, then on after a drive firmware download. This will
make sure that the drives use the correct firmware.
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Drive maintenance
Checking RAID 5/50 parity
If an array is not initialized during creation (for example, trusted), or if both
controllers are replaced after the array is turned off with write operations in
progress, you may need to verify the parity data on the array. It is also prudent
to perform this check periodically.
To perform the parity check:
1
From the Main Menu, select Diagnostics Menu, then press ENTER. The
Diagnostics menu opens.
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Chapter 10: Diagnostics
2
From the Diagnostics menu, select Online Diagnostics, then press ENTER. The
Online Diagnostics menu opens.
3
From the Online Diagnostics menu, select RAID 5/50 Parity Check, then press
ENTER. The Parity Check Menu opens.
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Drive maintenance
4
From the select RAID 5/50 Parity Check Menu, select either All RAID 5/50 Arrays
or Specific RAID 5/50 Arrays, then press ENTER. The Parity Check Option Menu opens.
5
From the Parity Check Options Menu, select the parity check options you want
to use.
Parity check options are:
Option
Description
Check Parity
This option reads all the data and parity, calculates the
XOR of the data, and compares it to the parity. If there
is an error, it is displayed.
Rewrite Parity
This option reads all the data, calculates the XOR of the
data, and writes this out as the new parity. This is the
fastest to complete, because it does not have the
overhead of a comparison.
Check and Rewrite Parity
This option reads all the data and parity, calculates the
XOR of the data, and compares it to the parity. Then,
if there is a discrepancy, it writes out the new parity. This
is the slowest to complete, because it has the overhead
of a comparison as well as a rewrite.
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Chapter 10: Diagnostics
When you have selected the required options, press ENTER. The Apply Parity Check
screen opens.
6
From the Apply Parity Check screen, select Yes, then press ENTER. The parity
check starts and the Parity Check Menu returns.
If an error occurs during the check or rewrite, it is displayed on the terminal.
Additionally, an event is entered in the event log upon start and completion.
Tracing commands
You can monitor the commands that a host is sending to the controller. This ability
has a variety of uses.
It can be used to verify that a host is communicating with the controller, or as a
method of debugging a system. All commands that are sent to the controller are
displayed on the terminal screen.
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Drive maintenance
To monitor commands:
1
From the Main Menu, select Diagnostics Menu, then press ENTER. The
Diagnostics menu opens.
2
From the Diagnostics menu, select Online Diagnostics, then press ENTER. The
Online Diagnostics menu opens.
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Chapter 10: Diagnostics
3
From the Online Diagnostics menu, select Target Command Trace Settings,
then press ENTER. The Target Command Trace Settings screen opens.
4
From the Target Command Trace Settings screen, press ENTER to toggle the
command trace to be Enabled or Disabled.
When enabled, all incoming commands will be displayed on the terminal
until the trace mode is disabled.
5
Press ESC to return to the previous menu.
Important
222
The command is on port 1 (T1) from the host with ID 124
(ID:7c) for LUN 0. The command is a SCSI inquiry
command (CDB: 12).
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Shutting down the controller
Shutting down the controller
This option lets you gracefully shutdown the controller. When this method is
used, all cache is written before the controller is shutdown.
To shutdown the controllers:
1
From the Main Menu, select Diagnostics Menu, then press ENTER. The
Diagnostics menu opens.
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Chapter 10: Diagnostics
224
2
From the Diagnostics menu, select Shutdown Controller, then press ENTER.
The Select Controller to Shutdown screen opens.
3
From the Select Controller to Shutdown screen, select a controller you want
to shutdown, then press ENTER. The Shutdown Controller screen opens.
4
From the Shutdown Controller screen, select Yes to shutdown the
controller and return to the Main Menu. The Controller will shutdown.
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Dumping diagnostics
5
To restart the controller, you can either remove and re-insert the RAID
controller in its slot or turn the enclosure off then back on.
Dumping diagnostics
During the process of troubleshooting a problem, it may be helpful to capture
the diagnostics data. The information capture to the terminal screen can then
be saved to an external file for later analysis.
To do a diagnostics dump:
1
From the Main Menu, select Diagnostics Menu, then press ENTER. The
Diagnostics menu opens.
2
From the Diagnostics menu, select Diagnostics Dump, then press ENTER. The
diagnostic data is immediately sent to the terminal window.
3
4
To export the data to a file, press CTRL + W to enter Text Mode.
Select Capture Text from the Transfer list, then type a file name and a
destination (or note the default name and path). Click Start to continue.
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Chapter 10: Diagnostics
5
Repeat steps 1 and 2.
Tips & Tricks
6
7
226
You will notice the cursor jumps to the lower-right-corner
of the screen and after completion will return to the
upper-left-corner of the screen.
Select Capture Text > Stop from the Transfer list.
Access the text file using a text editor.
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Optimizing RAID
5 Write
Performance
A
This chapter provides information on optimizing RAID 5
write performance. Read this chapter to learn how to:
■
Understand optimization parameters
■
Use RAID 5 sub-arrays
■
Promote faster rebuilds
227
Appendix A: Optimizing RAID 5 Write Performance
Introduction
With a typical RAID 5 implementation, there are a number of steps necessary
to write the data to the media. Every write from the host system will typically
generate two XOR operations and their associated data transfers to two drives.
If the accesses are sequential, the parity information will be updated a number
of times in succession. However, if the host writes sufficient data to cover a
complete stripe, the parity data does not need to be updated for each write. It
can be recalculated instead. This operation takes only one XOR operation per
host write, compared to two for a standard RAID 5 write. The number of data
transfers necessary are also reduced, increasing the available bandwidth. This
type of write access is termed a Full Stripe Write.
P (20-23)
C20
C21
C22
C23
Stripe 5
C16
C17
C18
C19
P (16-19)
Stripe 4
C12
C13
C14
P (12-15)
C15
Stripe 3
C8
C9
P (8-11)
C10
C11
Stripe 2
C4
P (4-7)
C5
C6
C7
Stripe 1
P (0-3)
C0
C1
C2
C3
Stripe 0
The table shows the distribution of data chunks (denoted by Cx) and their
associated parity (denoted by P(y-z)) in a RAID 5 array of five drives. An array
is defined as a set of drives, on which data is distributed. An array will have
one RAID level. A chunk is the amount of contiguous data stored on one drive
before the controller switches over to the next drive. This parameter is
adjustable from 64 K to 256 K, and should be carefully chosen to match the
access sizes of the operating system. A stripe is a set of disk chunks in an array
with the same address. In the above example, Stripe 0 consists of C0, C1, C2,
and C3 and their associated parity.
Maximum performance will be achieved when all drives are performing
multiple commands in parallel. To take advantage of a Full Stripe Write, the
host has to send enough data to the controller. This can be accomplished in
two ways. If the host sends one command with sufficient data to fill a stripe,
then the controller can perform a Full Stripe Write. Alternatively, if the host
sends multiple sequential commands, smaller than a stripe size (typically
matching the chunk size), the controller can internally combine these
commands to get the same effect. In the above example, if a 256 K chunk size
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Introduction
is used, then the stripe size is 1MB (4 chunks × 256 K). So, for maximum
performance, the host could either send 5 × 1 MB write commands, or 20 ×
256 K write commands.
The effectiveness of the controller’s ability to perform a Full Stripe Write
depends on a number of parameters.
Sequential access
If the commands sent from the host are not sequential, the controller will not
be able to cluster them together. So, unless each individual access is sufficient
to fill a stripe, a Full Stripe Write will not occur.
Number of outstanding commands
For the controller to successfully cluster commands, there has to be a number
of write commands sent simultaneously. Setting the host to send up to 64
commands should prove adequate. Alternatively, enabling writeback cache will
have a similar effect, as the controller can then cluster sequential commands
even if the host only sends a small number of commands at a time.
Access size
With very small accesses, it is necessary to have a large number of commands
to cluster together to fill up a full stripe. So, the larger the access size the better.
It is best to use an access size that will fill a chunk. Of course, even if a stripe
is not filled up, small sequential writes will still benefit from command
clustering.
Access alignment
The alignment of a command from a host system is determined by the
command’s address. In an optimal system, a write of one chunk of data would
reside exactly within a chunk on one disk. However, if this is not the case, this
write will be split up into two separate writes to two different data drives. This
will have a negative effect on performance. To overcome these problems, you
can, with more sophisticated operating systems, set the access size and
alignment to an optimal value.
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Appendix A: Optimizing RAID 5 Write Performance
To get the highest performance from this system, it is necessary to have a
number of stripes being written in parallel. As the array expands, with more
and more drives, the number of commands (and amount of sequential data)
necessary to do this increases.
P (56-62)
C56
C57
C58
C59
C60
C61
C62
Stripe 8
C49
C50
C51
C52
C53
C54
C55
P (49-55)
Stripe 7
C42
C43
C44
C45
C46
C47
P (42-48)
C48
Stripe 6
C35
C36
C37
C38
C39
P (20-23)
C61
C62
Stripe 5
C28
C29
C30
C31
P (28-34)
C32
C33
C34
Stripe 4
C21
C22
C23
P (21-27)
C24
C25
C26
C27
Stripe 3
C14
C15
P (14-20)
C16
C17
C18
C19
C20
Stripe 2
C7
P (7-13)
C8
C9
C10
C11
C12
C13
Stripe 1
P (0-6)
C0
C1
C2
C3
C4
C5
C6
Stripe 0
In this table we can see that seven chunks of sequential data are necessary to
fill a stripe. To have multiple commands active for all hard drives requires more
data than with five drives. As can be seen, this number will increase as the
number of drives increases. If a large number of drives are used, it can get
difficult to achieve maximum performance, because it becomes more difficult
to cluster a large number of commands to achieve a Full Stripe Write.
Using RAID 5 sub-arrays
The difficulty in realizing the maximum performance possible introduces the
concept of a Sub-Array. Suppose an array consisted of two RAID 5 sets. If these
are then striped, the resulting array would appear as shown in the second of
the following tables. In this case, in order for a Full Stripe Write to be performed,
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Using RAID 5 sub-arrays
it is still only necessary to cluster four write commands together, as opposed
to the seven necessary as indicated below. The array of drives appears as two
separate sub-arrays, each with its own rotating parity.
P (40-43)
C40
C41
C42
C43
P (44-47)
C44
C45
C46
C47
Stripe 5
C32
C33
C34
C35
P (32-35)
C36
C37
C38
C39
P (36-39)
Stripe 4
C24
C25
C26
P (24-27)
C27
C28
C29
C30
P (28-31)
C31
Stripe 3
C16
C17
P (16-19)
C18
C19
C20
C21
P (20-23)
C22
C23
Stripe 2
C8
P (8-11)
C9
C10
C11
C12
P (12-15)
C13
C14
C15
Stripe 1
P (0-3)
C0
C1
C2
C3
P (4-7)
C4
C5
C6
C7
Stripe 0
It can be seen that the more sub-arrays used, the more likely it is for a Full
Stripe Write to occur. We recommend that you use either four or five drives in
a sub-array, for best performance. The following table shows that even with 15
drives, it is still possible to perform Full Stripe Writes, by clustering together 4
chunks of data.
P
C60
C61
C62
C63
P
C64
C65
C66
C67
P
C68
C69
C70
C71
Stripe 5
C48
C49
C50
C51
P
C52
C53
C54
C55
P
C56
C57
C58
C59
P
Stripe 4
C36
C37
C38
P
C39
C40
C41
C42
P
C43
C44
C45
C46
P
C47
Stripe 3
C24
C25
P
C26
C27
C28
C29
P
C30
C31
C32
C33
P
C34
C35
Stripe 2
C12
P
C13
C14
C15
C16
P
C17
C18
C19
C20
P
C21
C22
C23
Stripe 1
P
C0
C1
C2
C3
P
C4
C5
C6
C7
P
C8
C9
C10
C11
Stripe 0
As well as the performance advantage gained from using multiple sub-arrays,
there are a number of other advantages.
Experiencing multiple drive failures
In a configuration with multiple sub-arrays, it is possible for the array to sustain
multiple drive failures, provided that there is only one failure in each sub-array.
Promoting faster rebuild
A rebuild operation must read data and calculate parity from all the remaining
drives in the array. If multiple sub-arrays are used, this means that it is only
necessary to read the data from the remaining drives in the sub-array, not all
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Appendix A: Optimizing RAID 5 Write Performance
of the drives in the array. This increases both the rebuild speed and the speed
of access to missing data, which also has to be recreated from the remaining
drives.
Summary
In summary, for maximum performance using RAID 5, we recommend that you
use four or five drives in a sub-array. If there are more than five drives in a
sub-array, it is better to use a smaller chunk size, say 64 K or 128 K, as this will
lead to more Full Stripe Writes.
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Technical
Support
B
This chapter provides information on troubleshooting.
Read this chapter to learn about:
■
Getting Technical Support
■
Notices
233
Appendix B:
Technical Support
Gateway offers a wide range of customer service, technical support, and
information services.
Telephone numbers
You can access the following services through your telephone to get answers
to your questions:
Resource
Service description
How to reach
Fax on demand
support
Order a catalog of documents on common
problems, then order documents by document
numbers. The documents will be faxed to you.
800-846-4526 (US)
877-709-2951 (Canada)
Gateway’s
fee-based
software tutorial
service
Get tutorial assistance for software issues
billed by the minute.
800-229-1103 (charged to
your credit card)
Gateway
Technical Support
Talk to a Gateway Technical Support
representative about a non-tutorial technical
support question.)
TDD Technical Support (for hearing impaired)
is available:
877-485-1464 (US)
800-846-3609 (Canada
and Puerto Rico)
605-232-2191
(all other countries)
Weekdays 6:00 a.m. - 8:00 p.m. Central Time
800-846-1778 (TDD)
Weekends 6:00 a.m. - 5:00 p.m. Central Time
Sales,
accounting, and
warranty
234
Get information about available systems,
pricing, orders, billing statements, warranty
service, or other non-technical issues.
www.gateway.com
800-846-2000 (US)
888-888-2037 (Canada)
Notices
Notices
Copyright © 2004 Gateway, Inc.
All Rights Reserved
14303 Gateway Place
Poway, CA 92064 USA
All Rights Reserved
This publication is protected by copyright and all rights are reserved. No part of it may be reproduced or
transmitted by any means or in any form, without prior consent in writing from Gateway.
The information in this manual has been carefully checked and is believed to be accurate. However, changes are
made periodically. These changes are incorporated in newer publication editions. Gateway may improve and/or
change products described in this publication at any time. Due to continuing system improvements, Gateway is
not responsible for inaccurate information which may appear in this manual. For the latest product updates,
consult the Gateway Web site at www.gateway.com. In no event will Gateway be liable for direct, indirect, special,
exemplary, incidental, or consequential damages resulting from any defect or omission in this manual, even if
advised of the possibility of such damages.
In the interest of continued product development, Gateway reserves the right to make improvements in this
manual and the products it describes at any time, without notices or obligation.
Trademark Acknowledgments
Gateway and the Black-and-White Spot Design are trademarks or registered trademarks in the U.S. and other
countries. SpotShop, Spotshop.com, and Your:)Ware are trademarks of Gateway, Inc. Intel, Intel Inside logo, and
Pentium are registered trademarks and MMX is a trademark of Intel Corporation. Microsoft, MS, MS-DOS, and
Windows are trademarks or registered trademarks of Microsoft Corporation. All other product names mentioned
herein are used for identification purposes only, and may be the trademarks or registered trademarks of their
respective companies.
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235
Appendix B:
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Index
A
access alignment 229
access size 160, 229
access statistics 158
accessing
configuration utility 5
diagnostics 200
event logs 174
LUN configuration 66
RAID controllers 7
Add or Remove Global and Dedicated
Spares screen 48
adding
additional sub-arrays 57
drives 54
hot spare drives 121
additional configuration 143
advanced configuration 111
alignment 159
Array Cache Configuration Menu 38
arrays 19
cache flush 19
creating 22, 25
deleting 50
expanding 53
Expansion menu 56
initializing 20
maximum number of drives 19
RAID 5 drive selection 21
RAID 5 optimization 21
read-ahead cache 36
reserve capacity 20
terminology 19
trusting 61
understanding 19
viewing 23
writeback cache 36
assigning
logical drives 64
assigning hot spare drives 47
auto hot spare
configuring 115
auto rebuild 112
automated troubleshooting system 234
availability
logical drive 64
B
background media verification 147
C
cache flush array 19
capturing screen dump 157
checking parity 219
chunk size 19
selecting 29
setting 29
clearing
access statistics on each logical drive
170
configuration 140
event logs 196
statistics 170
cluster statistics 163
Command Cluster Count 164
Command Cluster Interval 164
Command Cluster Statistics 163
command tracing 220
communications parameters 7
config name 14
configuration
accessing menu 66
accessing SAN LUN mapping menu
91
advanced 111
clearing 140
logical drive 64
modifying name 144
configuration utility
accessing 5
237
navigating 9
configuration WWN 14
configuring
array writeback cache 36
auto hot spare 115
hot spare drives 47
readahead cache 36
RS-232 port 133
writeback cache 36
connected hosts
viewing 108
controller
accessing 7
downloading firmware 207
enclosure events 150
LUN 124
maintenance 207
shutting down 223
viewing information 13, 138
voltage 15
WWN 13, 14
controller drive port events 190
controller event 178
Battery Charging 179
Battery Failure 178
Battery OK 178
Cache Disabled 178
Cache Re-Enabled 178
Cached Data Lost 179
Cntrl Temp Exceeded 179
Cntrl Temp Warning 179
Configuration Changed 181
Controller Failback Completed 180
Controller Failback Started 180
Controller Failed 180
Controller Failover Completed 180
Controller Failover Started 180
Controller Firmware Upgraded 181
Controller Powered Off 180
Controller Powered On 180
Controller Present 180
Controller Removed 180
Controller Reset 180
238
Controller Selftest Failed 181
Controller Selftest Passed 181
Controller Shutdown 181
Controller Timeout 180
Controller Valid 180
DMA Error 181
Encl Temp Critical 194
Encl Temp OK 192
Encl Temp Warning 193
Event Log Cleared 181
Fan Critical 192
Fan OK 192
Fatal Coprocessor Error 182
Fatal Drive FC Channel Error 182
Fatal Host FC Channel Error 182
Fatal SDRAM ECC 182
Fatal Watchdog Error 181
Flush Cache Completed 182
Flush Cache Started 182
Flush Mirrored Cache 182
Flush Mirrored Cache Started 182
Power Supply Critical 192
Power Supply Not Present 192
Power Supply OK 192
Recovered SDRAM ECC Error 182
Resync Completed 183
Resync Started 183
UPS Failure 183
UPS OK 183
Voltage Error 183
controller port
setting ID 127
Controller Port Data Rate 130
creating
arrays 22, 25
logical drive 71
SAN LUN mapping 96
current controller time 15
current power on time 15
D
date
firmware 15
Delete Array screen 51
deleting
array 50
logical drive 82
SAN LUN mapping 100
diagnostics 199
accessing 200
dumping 225
offline 202
online 205
downloading
firmware 207
firmware from host 212
Drive Capacity Reserve screen 32
Drive Event
FW Download Complete 189
FW Download Start 189
Reallocate LBA 189
drive event 184
Array Critical 184
Array Expansion Complete 184
Array Expansion Restarted 184
Array Expansion Started 184
Array Initialization Complete 184
Array Initialization Started 184
Array Parity Check Canceled 184
Array Parity Check Completed 184
Array Parity Check Started 184
Data Underrun 185
Drive Busy 185
Drive CC 185
Drive CC Failure 186
Drive Inserted 186
Drive Invalid Block Size 186
Drive Missing 186
Drive Rebuild Failure 187
Drive Status 187
Drive Task Full 187
Drive Timeout 187
Drive Timeout Failure 187
New Drive Rebuild Failure 188
Rebuild Aborted 188
Rebuild Complete 188
Rebuild Restarted 188
Rebuild Started 188
drives
adding additional 54
assigning hot spare 47
failed 195
maintenance 211
minimum number 19
selection for RAID 5 arrays 21
dumping
capturing text 157
diagnostics 225
E
enclosure event 150
enclosure events 192
event logs 173
accessing 174
clearing 196
including enclosure events 150
maximum size 174
events
controller 178
controller drive port 190
drive 184
enclosure 192
See also controller event
See also drive event
See also SES event
exclusive access 90
expanding
array 53
logical drive 75
F
failed drives 195
faster rebuild 231
features 2
firmware
date 15
downloading 207
downloading from host 212
revision 15
239
time 15
free space
viewing 68
H
hardware configuration settings 124
Host Event
CC to Host ID 191
Detected Power-on/Reset 190
Logged in at ID 190
host events 190
hot spare configuration 118
hot spare drives
adding 121
configuring 47, 118
removing 121
viewing 118
setting controller 124
See also SAN LUN mappings
LUN Configuration Menu 67
LUN Management Menu 69, 72
M
mapped logical drive number 65
mapped LUN number 90
mapping
availability 90
name 90
maximum number of drives 19
menu
Array Cache Configuration 38
Expansion 56
LUN Configuration 67
LUN Management 69, 72
Writeback Parameters Select Array
I
information
voltage 13
initialization 20
Initialize/Trust Arrays screen 34
L
last configuration time 15
logical drive
availability 64
availibility 64
configuration 64
creating 71
deleting 82
expanding 75
mapped number 65
segmentation 64
setting availability 79
terminology 64
unassigned free space 65, 68
logs
See event logs
LUN
accessing configuration utility 66
modifying mapped 85
240
44
menu system
illustration 10
minimum number of drives 19
miscellaneous statistics 165
modifying
configuration name 144
LUN Availability screen 81
mapped LUN 85
SAN LUN mapping 103
N
name
config 14
navigating configuration utility 9
node name 90
O
offline diagnostics 202
onboard temperature 15
online diagnostics 205
optimizing RAID 5 arrays 21
P
packetized data transfers 136
packetized protocol 136
parameters
communications 7
rebuild 112
parity
checking RAID 5/50 217
performance
optimizing RAID 5 write 227
pool spare (global) 49
Port Data Rate 130
port name 90
Q
QAS 136
R
RAID 5
access alignment 229
access size 229
checking parity 217
drive selection 21
number of outstanding commands
229
optimizing 21
optimizing write performance 227
sequential access 229
sub-arrays 230
write performance 227
RAID 5 arrays
optimizing 21
RAID 5/50
full stripe write rate 164
parity check 217
partial command cluster rate 164
RAID 50
checking parity 217
RAID controllers
accessing 7
RAID level 0 20
RAID level 1 20
RAID level 10 21
RAID level 5 20
RAID level 50 21
RAID Level screen 28
RAID levels 19
read only access 90
read/write access 90
readahead
command efficiency 161
command hit rate 161
statistics 161
readahead cache 36
configuring 36
rebuild parameters 112
removing hot spare drives 121
reserve capacity
array 20
revision
firmware 15
rewriting parity 219
RS-232 port settings 7, 133
run-time information 13
S
SAN LUN mappings 89
configuration menu 91
creating 96
deleting 100
modifying 103
terminology 90
viewing 93
screen 48
Add or Remove Global and
Dedicated Spares 48
Delete Array 51
Drive Capacity Reserve 32
Initialize/Trust Arrays 34
Modify the LUN Availability 81
RAID Level 28
Select a logical drive to delete 84
Select a Logical Drive to Modify
Mapped Number 87
Select Array 39
Select Chunk Size 29
Select LUN for Availability 81
Sub-Array Selection 33
241
SCSI ID
changing controller port 127
segmentation
logical drive 64
Select a Host LUN to Modify Mapped
Number screen 87
Select a Logical Drive to Delete screen 84
Select Array screen 39
Select Chunk Size screen 29
select drives 31
Select Logical Drive for Availability
screen 81
sequential access 229
RAID 5 229
Sequential Command Interval 162
SES event
Alarm is ON 194
Encl Alarm is OFF 194
setting
logical drive availability 79
rebuild parameters 112
RS-232 port 133
shutting down controller 223
size
chunk 19
stripe 19
software
navigating 9
statistics 153
clearing access 170
clearing all 170
viewing access 158
viewing access on each logical drive
166
viewing all 155
viewing command cluster 163
viewing miscellaneous 165
viewing readahead 161
stripe size 19
setting 29
sub-array 21
adding 57
RAID 5 230
242
Sub-Array Selection screen 33
T
telephone numbers 234
temperature
information 13
onboard 15
terminal
VT-100 7
terminology
arrays 19
LUNs 64
SAN LUNs 90
time
current controller 15
firmware 15
last configuration 15
total power on count 15
total power on time 15
Total Read Commands 158
Total Read Commands Since Reset 159
Total Read Transfer 158
Total Read Transfer Since Reset 159
tracing commands 220
troubleshooting 3, 233
trusting array 61
U
unassigned free space
logical drive 65
UPS configuration 141
using RAID 5 sub-arrays 230
V
verifying
background media 147
viewing
access statistics 158
access statistics on each logical drive
166
arrays 23
command cluster statistics 163
connected hosts 108
controller information 13, 138
free space 68
hot spare drives 118
miscellaneous statistics 165
SAN LUN mappings 93
statistics 155
unassigned LUN free space 68
voltage
controller 15
information 13
VT-100 terminal
using 7
W
write cluster rate 164
writeback cache 36
configuring 36, 40
Writeback Parameters Select Array menu
44
WWN
controller 13, 14
243
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244
A MAN NSTOR VT-100 SW GDE R0 1/04
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