English Language Expectations 2006 Oral Communication

English Language Expectations      2006 Oral Communication
English Language Expectations
2006
Pg. 1 Grade 1
Oral Communication
Overall Expectations
1e1
1. listen in order to understand and respond appropriately in a variety of situations for a variety of
purposes;
1e2
2. use speaking skills and strategies appropriately to communicate with different audiences for a
variety of purposes;
1e3
3. reflect on and identify their strengths as listeners and speakers, areas for improvement, and the
strategies they found most helpful in oral communication situations.
1. Listening to Understand
1e4
Purpose
1.1 identify purposes for listening in a few different situations, formal and informal (e.g., to hear the
sounds of language in songs, chants, and poems; to interact socially with classmates; to enjoy
and understand a story read aloud by the teacher; to follow simple directions in large- and
small-group settings; to exchange ideas with a peer in a paired sharing or small group)
1e5
Active Listening Strategies
1.2 demonstrate an understanding of appropriate listening behaviour by using active listening
strategies in a few different situations (e.g., listen without interrupting and wait their turn to
speak; show that they are paying attention and are interested by looking at the speaker,
nodding, or asking relevant questions)
1e6
Comprehension Strategies
1.3 identify a few listening comprehension strategies and use them before, during, and after listening in
order to understand and clarify the meaning of oral texts, initially with support and direction (e.g.,
use background knowledge, familiar word order, and context to make predictions about content
or vocabulary before listening to an oral text; think about what known words might be related
to the topic; ask questions to check understanding during and after listening; create mental
pictures while listening to a readaloud and draw or talk about what they visualized; retell the
important information presented in a class discussion or a think-pair-share activity)
1e7
Demonstrating Understanding
1.4 demonstrate an understanding of the information and ideas in oral texts by retelling the story or
restating the information, including the main idea (e.g., use time-order words, such as first, then,
next, finally, to retell a story they have heard; restate information from a movie about
community workers, including a topic statement and several supporting details)
1e8
Making Inferences/Interpreting Texts
1.5 use stated and implied information and ideas in oral texts, initially with support and direction, to
make simple inferences and reasonable predictions (e.g., attend to the words being spoken and
also use personal experience and the speaker’s intonation and facial expression to understand
what is being said)
Teacher prompt: “The boy said, ’You broke my airplane!’ What helps you understand how he might
be feeling? What do you think he might do next?”
1e9
Extending Understanding
1.6 extend understanding of oral texts by connecting the ideas in them to their own knowledge and
experience; to other familiar texts, including print and visual texts; and to the world around them
(e.g., make personal connections between their own ideas about a topic and the ideas in an oral
text; identify other texts that have similar elements or content)
Ministry of Education 2006
English Language Expectations
Pg. 2
1e10
Analysing Texts
1.7 identify words or phrases that indicate whether an oral text is fact or fiction, initially with support
and direction (e.g., a personal recount might start “Last year in the summer holidays…” while a
fictional story might start ”Once upon a time…”)
1e11
Point of View
1.8 begin to identify, with support and direction, who is speaking in an oral text and the point of view
expressed by the speaker (e.g., the narrator may be a character in a story or an expert on the
topic of an informational talk; the speaker may be recounting a personal anecdote or sharing a
personal opinion)
Teacher prompts: “Who is telling this story/presenting this information? What words/clues helped you
figure that out?” “What do we know about the speaker?” “How might the story be different if
another character were telling it?”
1e12
Presentation Strategies
1.9 begin to identify some of the presentation strategies used in oral texts and explain how they
influence the audience (e.g., the use of differences in tone and pitch for different characters in a
story; the use of props to engage the audience)
Teacher prompts: “How did the speaker use his/her voice to make you like/not like a character?”
“Why do you think the speaker used the puppets when he was speaking?”
2. Speaking to Communicate
1e13
Purpose
2.1 identify a few purposes for speaking (e.g., to express needs to peers and the teacher; to
establish positive personal and learning relationships with peers; to activate prior knowledge
and make connections before listening; to retell stories and recount personal experiences to the
class; to ask questions or explore solutions to problems in small-group and paired activities; to
share ideas and information that contribute to understanding in large and small groups; to
manipulate the sounds of language in songs, chants, and poems)
1e14
Interactive Strategies
2.2 demonstrate an understanding of appropriate speaking behaviour in a few different situations,
including paired sharing and small- and largegroup discussions (e.g., give other group members
an opportunity to speak; respond positively to the contributions of others; stay on topic and
speak to the point)
1e15
Clarity and Coherence
2.3 communicate ideas and information orally in a clear, coherent manner (e.g., use a logical
framework such as a beginning, middle, and end sequence to retell a story read aloud by the
teacher)
1e16
Appropriate Language
2.4 choose appropriate words to communicate their meaning accurately and engage the interest of their
audience (e.g., choose words relevant to the topic from the full range of their vocabulary,
including new words used regularly in the classroom; use descriptive adjectives to clarify and
add interest to a narrative; use inclusive language that conveys respect for all people)
1e17
Vocal Skills and Strategies
2.5 begin to identify some vocal effects, including tone, pace, pitch, and volume, and use them
appropriately to help communicate their meaning (e.g., increase volume to emphasize important
points or to communicate to a large audience)
1e18
Non-Verbal Cues
2.6 identify some non-verbal cues, including facial expression, gestures, and eye contact, and use them
in oral communications, appropriately and with sensitivity towards cultural differences, to help
convey their meaning
Ministry of Education 2006
English Language Expectations
1e19
Pg. 3
Visual Aids
2.7 use one or more appropriate visual aids (e.g., pictures, photographs, props, puppets, masks) to
support or enhance oral presentations (e.g., use a set of plastic animals during an oral recount
about a visit to a zoo)
3. Reflecting on Oral Communication Skills and Strategies
1e20
Metacognition
3.1 begin to identify, with support and direction, a few strategies they found helpful before, during, and
after listening and speaking
Teacher prompts: “How do you know what to listen for?” “What could you do after you listen to
check and see if you understood what you heard?” “What could you do if you didn’t understand what
you heard?” ”What do you think about before you begin to talk?” “When you are talking, how can
you tell if the audience
understands?” “What could you do to help the audience understand what you are saying?”
1e21
Interconnected Skills
3.2 begin to identify how their skills as viewers, representers, readers, and writers help them improve
their oral communication skills
Teacher prompts: “How do you learn new words that you can use when you are speaking?” “What
words have you learned in the books you are reading that help you understand what you hear or that
you can use while you are speaking?”
Reading
Overall Expectations
1e22
1. read and demonstrate an understanding of a variety of literary, graphic, and informational texts,
using a range of strategies to construct meaning;
1e23
2. recognize a variety of text forms, text features, and stylistic elements and demonstrate understanding
of how they help communicate meaning;
1e24
3. use knowledge of words and cueing systems to read fluently;
1e25
4. reflect on and identify their strengths as readers, areas for improvement, and the strategies they
found most helpful before, during, and after reading.
1. Reading for Meaning
1e26
Variety of Texts
1.1 read a few different types of literary texts(e.g., pattern books, rhymes, books from home, simple
fiction stories), graphic texts (e.g., calendars, environmental print, signs), and informational texts
(e.g., morning messages, strategy charts, instructions, simple non-fiction books, labels)
1e27
Purpose
1.2 identify a few different purposes for reading and choose reading materials appropriate for those
purposes (e.g., picture books for entertainment, information, or reflection; simple factual and
visual texts for information; magazines for entertainment and interest)
Ministry of Education 2006
English Language Expectations
Pg. 4 Grade 1
1e28
Comprehension Strategies
1.3 identify a few reading comprehension strategies and use them before, during, and after reading to
understand texts, initially with support and direction (e.g., activate prior knowledge by
brainstorming about the cover, title page, or topic; describe how they visualize a character or
scene in a text; ask questions about information or ideas presented in a text: I wonder if…?, What
if…? Why did…?; identify important ideas in a text)
Teacher prompt: “What do you think is the most important thing to remember so far about this
text/topic? Why do you think it is important?”
1e29
Demonstrating Understanding
1.4 demonstrate understanding of a text by retelling the story or restating information from the text,
including the main idea (e.g., retell a story or restate facts, including the main idea and
important events, in accurate time order; role-play or dramatize a story or informational text
using puppets or props)
1e30
Making Inferences/Interpreting Texts
1.5 use stated and implied information and ideas in texts, initially with support and direction, to make
simple inferences and reasonable predictions about them
Teacher prompt: “The text tells us that the girl broke her brother’s toy airplane. Think about what you
know about the boy so far. Predict what might happen next. Is there information in the illustration
that can help you make your prediction?”
1e31
Extending Understanding
1.6 extend understanding of texts by connecting the ideas in them to their own knowledge and
experience, to other familiar texts, and to the world around them (e.g., identify personally
significant events in stories, such as losing a tooth or getting a pet; relate information in a text
to previous experiences, other familiar texts, movies, or trips)
Teacher prompts: “What does this text remind you of in your life?” “Now that we have researched
[topic X], what have we learned?” “Does this book remind you of a story that you have been told?”
1e32
Analysing Texts
1.7 identify the main idea and a few elements of texts, initially with support and direction (e.g.,
narrative: characters, setting, problem/solution; information text: introductory statement, facts,
photographs)
1e33
Responding to and Evaluating Texts
1.8 express personal thoughts and feelings about what has been read (e.g., through role playing,
drama, visual arts, music, discussion; by developing a plan to act on issues raised in the text)
Teacher prompts: “How does the ending of this story make you feel?” “Do you think there are
recycling ideas in the text that we could use in our classroom?” “Show me how you were feeling
when…” “What would you say if you were…?”
1e34
Point of View
1.9 begin to identify, with support and direction, the speaker and the point of view presented in a text
and suggest a possible alternative perspective (e.g., dramatize the story, taking on the role of
different characters; create drawings, paintings, or models to represent the perspective of
different characters in a text)
Teacher prompts: “Who is talking in this story? Would the story be different if someone else were
talking?” “What is the author telling us about this topic?”
2. Understanding Form and Style
1e35
Text Forms
2.1 identify and describe the characteristics of a few simple text forms, with a focus on literary texts
such as a simple fictional story (e.g., characters, setting, events, problem/solution), graphic texts
such as a calendar (e.g., names of months and days, a grid, numbers), and informational texts such
as a simple “All About____” book (e.g., labels, headings, pictures)
Ministry of Education 2006
English Language Expectations
Pg. 5
1e36
Text Patterns
2.2 recognize simple organizational patterns in texts of different types and explain, initially with
support and direction, how the patterns help readers understand the texts (e.g., signal words such
as first, second, then, finally help to identify time order or sequence)
1e37
Text Features
2.3 identify some text features (e.g., illustrations, symbols, photographs, title, page number, table
of contents) and explain how they help readers understand texts
Teacher prompts: “How does the title help you understand what you are going to be reading?” “How
does an illustration or photograph help you understand what you are reading?”
1e38
Elements of Style
2.4 identify some simple elements of style, including voice and word choice, and explain, initially with
support and direction, how they help readers understand texts (e.g., descriptive words help the
reader make better mind pictures of the characters or setting in a story)
Teacher prompt: “What words in the text helped you make a picture in your head?”
3. Reading With Fluency
1e39
Reading Familiar Words
3.1 automatically read and understand some high-frequency words and words of personal interest or
significance, in a variety of reading contexts (e.g., the same word in different graphic
representations such as: on the word wall; in shared-, guided-, and independent-reading texts;
on shared- and interactive-writing charts; in personal writing; in a variety of fonts)
1e40
Reading Unfamiliar Words
3.2 predict the meaning of and solve unfamiliar words using different types of cues, including:
• semantic (meaning) cues (e.g., familiar words, phrases, sentences, and visuals that activate
existing knowledge of oral and written language) ;
• syntactic (language structure) cues (e.g., predictable word order, predictable language patterns,
punctuation) ;
• graphophonic (phonological and graphic) cues (e.g., blending and segmenting of individual
sounds in words; visual features of words such as shape and orientation; sound-letter
relationships for initial, final, and medial sounds; onset and rime; common spelling patterns;
words within words)
Teacher prompt (for cross-checking of cues): “It looks right and sounds right, but does it make
sense?”
1e41
Reading Fluently
3.3 read appropriate, familiar texts at a sufficient rate and with sufficient expression to convey the
sense of the text to the reader (e.g., make oral reading of a role in a simple readers’ theatre
script sound like natural speech)
4. Reflecting on Reading Skills and Strategies
1e42
4.1 begin to identify, with support and direction, a few strategies they found helpful before, during, and
after reading
Teacher prompts: “What do you do to get ready to read a new text?” “What do you do if your reading
doesn’t make sense to you?” “When you come to a word you don’t know, what do you do?” “What
strategies help you the most when you are reading?”
Ministry of Education 2006
English Language Expectations
1e43
Pg. 6 Grade 1
Interconnected Skills
4.2 explain, initially with support and direction, how their skills in listening, speaking, writing,
viewing, and representing help them make sense of what they read (e.g., reading a text
independently is easier after hearing it read aloud and/or talking about it in class)
Teacher prompts: “How does listening to someone else read help you become a better reader?” “How
does talking to someone else about what you are reading help you as a reader?” “How does looking
at the illustrations help you make sense of what you are reading?”
Writing
Overall Expectations
1e44
1. generate, gather, and organize ideas and Information to write for an intended purpose and audience;
1e45
2. draft and revise their writing, using a variety of informational, literary, and graphic forms and
stylistic elements appropriate for the purpose and audience;
1e46
3. use editing, proofreading, and publishing skills and strategies, and knowledge of language
conventions, to correct errors, refine expression, and present their work effectively;
1e47
4. reflect on and identify their strengths as writers, areas for improvement, and the strategies they
found most helpful at different stages in the writing process.
1. Developing and Organizing Content
1e48
Purpose and Audience
1.1 identify the topic, purpose, audience, and form for writing, initially with support and direction
(e.g., a personal recount of a past experience, including pictures, to share with family or
friends; an “All About the Seasons”book for the class library; labels and captions for a
pictograph to share findings with a group after a math investigation)
Teacher prompts: “What is your writing about?” “Why are you writing?” “Whom are you writing
for?”
1e49
Developing Ideas
1.2 generate ideas about a potential topic, using a variety of strategies and resources (e.g., ask
questions to identify personal experiences, prior knowledge, and information needs; brainstorm
ideas with the class)
1e50
Research
1.3 gather information to support ideas for writing in a variety of ways and/or from a variety of sources
(e.g., from listening to stories told by family members; from paired sharing with a peer; from
observations; from various texts, including teacher read-alouds, mentor texts, and shared-,
guided-, and independent-reading texts)
1e51
Classifying Ideas
1.4 sort ideas and information for their writing in a variety of ways, with support and direction (e.g.,
by using pictures, labels, key words, hand-drawn or computer graphics, or simple graphic
organizers such as a web, a list, or a five-W’s framework: who, what, when, where, why)
1e52
Organizing Ideas
1.5 identify and order main ideas and supporting details, initially with support and direction, using
simple graphic organizers (e.g., a story ladder, sequence chart) and simple organizational patterns
(e.g., time order: first, then, next, finally; order of importance; beginning, middle, and end)
Ministry of Education 2006
English Language Expectations
1e53
Pg. 7
Review
1.6 determine, after consultation with the teacher and peers, whether the ideas and information they
have gathered are suitable for the purpose (e.g., use pictures and words to explain their material
to a classmate and ask for feedback)
2. Using Knowledge of Form and Style in Writing
1e54
Form
2.1 write short texts using a few simple forms (e.g., a recount of personally significant
experiences; a simple report on topics of interest to the writer and identified in non-fiction
reading; “How to”books identifying the steps in a procedure such as “How to Make
Applesauce”, including pictures, symbols, and words; a story modelled on characters and
events from stories read; their own variation on a familiar poem, chant, or song; a poster for
the classroom)
1e55
Voice
2.2 begin to establish a personal voice in their writing by using pictures and words that convey their
attitude or feeling towards the subject or audience (e.g., use pictures and words that project
interest or enthusiasm)
1e56
Word Choice
2.3 use familiar words and phrases to convey a clear meaning (e.g., some simple, familiar
descriptive adjectives of size, feeling, or colour: The black dog was happy.)
1e57
Sentence Fluency
2.4 write simple but complete sentences that make sense
1e58
Point of View
2.5 begin to identify, with support and direction, their point of view and one possible different point of
view about the topic
Teacher prompts: “How do you feel about this topic?” “How do you think your friend feels about this
topic?” “How can you convey your feelings to your audience?”
1e59
Preparing for Revision
2.6 identify elements of their writing that need improvement, including content, organization, and style,
using feedback from the teacher and peers
Teacher prompts: “Does this writing make sense to you?” “Does it say what you wanted to say?”
1e60
Revision
2.7 make simple revisions to improve the content, clarity, and interest of their written work, using a
few simple strategies (e.g., cut out words or sentences and reorder them to improve clarity;
insert words from oral vocabulary and the class word wall or word webs to clarify meaning
and/or add interest)
1e61
Producing Drafts
2.8 produce revised draft pieces of writing to meet criteria identified by the teacher, based on the
expectations
3. Applying Knowledge of Language Conventions and Presenting Written Work
Effectively
1e62
Spelling Familiar Words
3.1 spell some high-frequency words correctly (e.g., words from their oral vocabulary, the class
word wall, and shared-, guided-, and independent-reading texts)
Ministry of Education 2006
English Language Expectations
Pg. 8 Grade 1
1e63
Spelling Unfamiliar Words
3.2 spell unfamiliar words using a variety of strategies that involve understanding sound-symbol
relationships, word structures, and word meanings (e.g., segment words to identify and record
individual sound-symbol correspondences, including short vowels and simple long-vowel
patterns; listen for rhyming patterns; look for common letter sequences and onset and rime in
frequently used words; make analogies between words that look similar; illustrate words to link
meaning to spelling)
1e64
Vocabulary
3.3 confirm spellings and word meanings or word choice using one or two resources (e.g., find
pictures or words in a picture pictionary; locate words on an alphabetical word wall using first
letter; refer to class-created word webs posted in the classroom)
1e65
Punctuation
3.4 use punctuation to help communicate their intended meaning, with a focus on the use of: a capital
letter at the beginning of a sentence; a period, question mark, or exclamation mark at the end
1e66
Grammar
3.5 use parts of speech appropriately to communicate their meaning clearly, with a focus on the use of:
nouns for names of people, places, and things; the personal subject pronouns I, you, he, she, it,
we, they; verbs to tell what they do and feel; some adjectives; and simple prepositions of place
(e.g., in, on, at, to)
1e67
Proofreading
3.6 proofread and correct their writing using a simple checklist or a few guiding questions posted by
the teacher for reference(e.g., Can I read it? Does it “sound right”? Does it make sense? Are my
word wall words spelled correctly?)
1e68
Publishing
3.7 use some appropriate elements of effective presentation in the finished product, such as print,
different fonts, graphics, and layout (e.g., use drawings, photographs, or simple labels to clarify
text; print legibly; leave spaces between words)
1e69
Producing Finished Works
3.8 produce pieces of published work to meet criteria identified by the teacher, based on the
expectations
4. Reflecting on Writing Skills and Strategies
1e70
Metacognition
4.1 identify some strategies they found helpful before, during, and after writing (e.g., during a
regular writing conference, respond to teacher prompts about what strategies helped at a
specific phase in the writing process; identify strategies used before, during, and after writing
on a class anchor chart; identify a strategy for future use on a strategy bookmark or chart)
Teacher prompts: “What strategy helped you organize your ideas?” “How did you know what words
were missing?” “What helped you know what to do when you finished your first draft?”
1e71
Interconnected Skills
4.2 describe, with prompting by the teacher, how some of their skills in listening, speaking, reading,
viewing, and representing help in their development as writers
Teacher prompts: “How does what you know about reading and different kinds of books help you
when you are writing?” “In what way do you think listening to someone else’s ideas might help you
with your writing?”
1e72
Portfolio
4.3 select pieces of writing they think show their best work and explain the reasons for their selection
Ministry of Education 2006
English Language Expectations
Pg. 9
Media Literacy
Overall Expectations
1e73
1. demonstrate an understanding of a variety of media texts;
1e74
2. identify some media forms and explain how the conventions and techniques associated with them are
used to create meaning;
1e75
3. create a variety of media texts for different purposes and audiences, using appropriate forms,
conventions, and techniques;
1e76
4. reflect on and identify their strengths as media interpreters and creators, areas for improvement, and
the strategies they found most helpful in understanding and creating media texts.
1. Understanding Media Texts
1e77
Purpose and Audience
1.1 identify the purpose and intended audience of some simple media texts (e.g., this movie tells a
story to entertain children; this sign gives information to travellers)
Teacher prompt: “Who would watch/listen to this? Why?”
1e78
Making Inferences/Interpreting Messages
1.2 identify overt and implied messages,
initially with support and direction, in simple media texts(e.g.,
• overt message of a toy advertisement showing two boys playing with a car: This toy is fun;
implied message: This toy is for boys;)
• overt message of a cartoon: the violence here is funny and doesn't hurt anyone; implied message:
violence is acceptable)
Teacher prompt: “Let’s try to think of an advertisement made for a specific audience – for example,
for girls or boys, for mothers, or for teenagers. How do we know that the advertisement is for that
audience?”
1e79
Responding to and Evaluating Texts
1.3 express personal thoughts and feelings about some simple media works (e.g., state whether they
like or dislike a character in a cartoon, song, or movie; draw a picture of the character in a
song)
Teacher prompt: “What do you like/not like about the story told in this movie? What was your
favourite part? How did it make you feel?” “Did the characters in this cartoon use violence to solve
problems? Was the violence funny? Is this a good way to solve problems?”
1e80
Audience Responses
1.4 describe how different audiences might respond to specific media texts
Teacher prompt: “Would your friends or parents like the same songs, movies, stories, games that you
like? Why? Why not?”
1e81
Point of View
1.5 begin to identify, with support and direction, whose point of view is presented in a simple media
text and suggest a possible alternative perspective (e.g., a cartoon told from the point of view of a
mouse might be told from a cat’s viewpoint)
Ministry of Education 2006
English Language Expectations
1e82
Pg. 10
Production Perspectives
1.6 identify, with support and direction, who makes some of the simple media texts with which they are
familiar, and why those texts are produced (e.g., the government has traffic signs made to protect
the safety of travellers and pedestrians; film companies hire manufacturers to produce toys and
other products based on popular children’s movies and television programs to sell to children)
Teacher prompt: “Your doll is the main character from your favourite TV show. Do you think the
same people who make the TV show made the doll, too? Are there any marks on your doll that tell
us who made it?”
2. Understanding Media Forms, Conventions, and Techniques
1e83
Form
2.1 identify some of the elements and characteristics of a few simple media forms (e.g., cartoon:
colour, music, animation; picture book: cover, printed words, pictures)
Teacher prompt: “How are books different from cartoons? How are they the same?”
1e84
Conventions and Techniques
2.2 identify, initially with support and direction, the conventions and techniques used in some familiar
media forms (e.g., specific pictures and colours are used in traffic signs to make messages
immediately recognizable to drivers and pedestrians; icons are used on computer screens
instead of words to help users locate computer functions; jingles and slogans are used in
television advertisements to make the messages memorable; background music may be used in
a movie to communicate a mood such as suspense or happiness)
Teacher prompts: “How do colour and size help you notice a sign?” “What happens to the music when
the villain appears? What does that tell you? How does it affect you?”
3. Creating Media Texts
1e85
Purpose and Audience
3.1 identify the topic, purpose, and audience for media texts they plan to create (e.g., a media text to
explain the importance of hand-washing to a Kindergarten class, or to tell the story of a class
trip to parents or visitors)
Teacher prompt: “How can we use photographs to tell the story of our trip? What could we use in
addition to the photographs to help visitors understand what we did on our trip?”
1e86
Form
3.2 identify an appropriate form to suit the purpose and audience for a media text they plan to create
Teacher prompt: “Which would be a better way to tell the school about an upcoming book sale – a
poster or a P.A. announcement by a student? Why?”
1e87
Conventions and Techniques
3.3 identify conventions and techniques appropriate to the form chosen for a media text they plan to
create (e.g., tape-recorded music to reflect the changing scenes or moods in a picture book)
Teacher prompt: “How will the music help people understand the book?”
1e88
Producing Media Texts
3.4 produce some short media texts for specific purposes and audiences, using a few simple media
forms and appropriate conventions and techniques(e.g.,
• a tape-recorded soundtrack for a story
• a sequence of pictures and/or photographs that tells a story
• a sign or poster for their classroom or the school
• a selection of images downloaded from the Internet to accompany a science project
• a collage of items a story character might enjoy or own
• an enactment of a scene about a character from a favourite movie)
Ministry of Education 2006
English Language Expectations
Pg. 11
4. Reflecting on Media Literacy Skills and Strategies
1e89
Metacognition
4.1 identify, initially with support and direction, what strategies they found most helpful in making
sense of and creating media texts
Teacher prompts: “How did thinking about your audience help you create your poster?” “How did
looking at other posters help you come up with ideas for this poster?”
1e90
Interconnected Skills
4.2 begin to explain, initially with support and direction, how their skills in listening, speaking,
reading, and writing help them to make sense of and produce media texts
Teacher prompts: “How did talking about the project with other students help you create a better
poster?” “What language skills did you use in creating this media text?”
Ministry of Education 2006
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