English Language Expectations 2006 Oral Communication Overall Expectations

English Language Expectations   2006 Oral Communication Overall Expectations
English Language Expectations 2006
Pg. 1 Grade 3
Oral Communication
Overall Expectations
3e1
1. listen in order to understand and respond appropriately in a variety of situations for a variety of
purposes;
3e2
2. use speaking skills and strategies appropriately to communicate with different audiences for a
variety of purposes;
3e3
3. reflect on and identify their strengths as listeners and speakers, areas for improvement, and the
strategies they found most helpful in oral communication situations.
1. Listening to Understand
3e4
Purpose
1.1 identify purposes for listening in a variety of situations, formal and informal, and set personal goals
related to listening tasks (e.g., to explore ideas in a book club discussion; to understand and
empathize with a favourite character in a play; to express an opinion or offer advice to a
partner during a peer conference)
3e5
Active Listening Strategies
1.2 demonstrate an understanding of appropriate listening behaviour by using active listening
strategies in order to contribute meaningfully and work constructively in groups (e.g., demonstrate
an understanding of when to speak, when to listen, and how much to say; make connections
between personal experiences and the contributions of other group members; ask relevant
questions to clarify information and ideas)
3e6
Comprehension Strategies
1.3 identify a variety of listening comprehension strategies and use them appropriately before, during,
and after listening in order to understand and clarify the meaning of oral texts (e.g., list the
important ideas in a poem or story read in class; ask questions to monitor understanding of an
oral text; visualize and ketch to clarify understanding of an oral text)
3e7
Demonstrating Understanding
1.4 demonstrate an understanding of the information and ideas in a variety of oral texts by identifying
important information or ideas and some supporting details (e.g., paraphrase a partner’s
reflections after a think-pair-share activity; paraphrase the important ideas in a play; engage
in relevant dialogue after an oral presentation; create a poster/art work representing the
important ideas in a poem or song)
3e8
Making Inferences/Interpreting Texts
1.5 distinguish between stated and implied ideas in oral texts (e.g., distinguish between the actual
words and the emphasis placed on them by the speaker)
Teacher prompts: “How does the emphasis that the speaker places on specific words or phrases help
you understand what is being said?” “Why do you think the speaker spoke those words so loudly?”
“How does the way the speaker chooses to say words change the meaning of what he or she says?”
3e9
Extending Understanding
1.6 extend understanding of oral texts by connecting the ideas in them to their own knowledge and
experience; to other familiar texts, including print and visual texts; and to the world around them
(e.g., brainstorm to connect a topic to their background knowledge of the topic; compare oral
texts with similarthemes from different cultures; connect messages in oral texts to social issues
of relevance to the class)
Ministry of Education 2006
English Language Expectations
Pg. 2
3e10
Analysing Texts
1.7 identify and explain the importance of significant ideas and information in oral texts (e.g., rank
information in order of importance; compare key aspects of two oral texts using a Venn
diagram; represent the main elements of an oral text on a web organizer or story map)
3e11
Point of View
1.8 identify the point of view in different types of oral texts and cite words, phrases, ideas, and
information from the texts that confirm their identification (e.g., the use of first- or third-person
personal pronouns in a narrative; the selective use of facts on a given topic; the use of words
and phrases that indicate generalizations: all, every, always, never, every single time)
Teacher prompts: “What helped you determine the point of view in this text?” “What evidence do you
have that this is the speaker’s point of view?” ”Has the speaker used language that includes
everyone?” “Is this point of view a common one in our world today?”
3e12
Presentation Strategies
1.9 identify some of the presentation strategies used in oral texts and explain how they influence the
audience (e.g., intonation, eye contact)
Teacher prompts: “Do you think the speaker used intonation and eye contact in an appropriate and
effective way? How did they influence your response?” “What other strategies might be effective in
engaging or influencing the audience?”
2. Speaking to Communicate
3e13
Purpose
2.1 identify a variety of purposes for speaking (e.g., to entertain an audience; to establish positive
personal and learning relationships with peers; to ask questions or explore solutions to
problems in smallgroup and paired activities; to explain to a small group how to play a new
game; to present to the class an item or event of personal interest; to share ideas or
information in order to contribute to understanding in large or small groups)
3e14
Interactive Strategies
2.2 demonstrate an understanding of appropriate speaking behaviour in a variety of situations,
including smalland large-group discussions (e.g., paraphrase or restate other group members’
contributions; acknowledge another person’s point of view; link their responses to the topic of
conversation and/or what was said by the previous speaker)
3e15
Clarity and Coherence
2.3 communicate orally in a clear, coherent manner, presenting ideas, opinions, and information in a
logical sequence (e.g., use an organizational pattern such as comparison or chronological
order in presenting a short oral report)
3e16
Appropriate Language
2.4 choose a variety of appropriate words and phrases, including descriptive words and some technical
vocabulary, and a few elements of style, to communicate their meaning accurately and engage the
interest of their audience (e.g., use alliteration for emphasis; use comparatives such as like, instead
of, however, the same as, compared to, unlike to clarify similarities and differences; use
appropriate technical terms when explaining a scientific investigation)
3e17
Vocal Skills and Strategies
2.5 identify some vocal effects, including tone, pace, pitch, and volume, and use them appropriately,
and with sensitivity towards cultural differences, to help communicate their meaning (e.g., pause
in appropriate places long enough to allow others to respond during dialogue with peers or in
small groups)
3e18
Non-Verbal Cues
2.6 identify some non-verbal cues, including facial expression, gestures, and eye contact, and use them
in oral communications, appropriately and with sensitivity towards cultural differences, to help
convey their meaning
Ministry of Education 2006
English Language Expectations
3e19
Pg. 3
Visual Aids
2.7 use a variety of appropriate visual aids (e.g., overheads, diagrams, graphic organizers, charts,
artefacts) to support or enhance oral presentations (e.g., use a large-size labelled diagram to
illustrate an explanation of how soil erodes)
3. Reflecting on Oral Communication Skills and Strategies
3e20
3.1 identify, in conversation with the teacher and peers, what strategies they found most helpful before,
during, and after listening and speaking
Teacher prompts: “What questions do you ask yourself after listening to check that you have
understood?” “How do you check to be sure that the audience understands what you are saying?”
3e21
Interconnected Skills
3.2 identify, in conversation with the teacher and peers, how their skills as viewers, representers,
readers, and writers help them improve their oral communication skills
Teacher prompts: “How does speaking make you a better listener?” “How does seeing a television
program on a topic help you when you are discussing that topic in class?” “Does learning new words
from your reading help you when you are listening to oral texts?”
Reading
Overall Expectations
3e22
1. read and demonstrate an understanding of a variety of literary, graphic, and informational texts,
using a range of strategies to construct meaning;
3e23
2. recognize a variety of text forms, text features, and stylistic elements and demonstrate understanding
of how they help communicate meaning;
3e24
3. use knowledge of words and cueing systems to read fluently;
3e25
4. reflect on and identify their strengths as readers, areas for improvement, and the strategies they
found most helpful before, during, and after reading.
1. Reading for Meaning
3e26
Variety of Texts
1.1 read a variety of literary texts (e.g., fables, traditional Aboriginal stories, poetry, chapter
books, adventure stories, letters, diaries), graphic texts (e.g., comic books, posters, charts,
tables, maps, graphs), and informational texts (e.g.,“How to” books, print and electronic
reference sources, magazine articles)
3e27
Purpose
1.2 identify a variety of purposes for reading and choose reading materials appropriate for those
purposes (e.g., comic books and adventure stories for entertainment and interest, trade books to
find information and answer questions, dictionaries to find word meanings and pronunciation,
atlases for specific information about the world, newspapers for information on current events)
3e28
Comprehension Strategies
1.3 identify a variety of reading comprehension strategies and use them appropriately before, during,
and after reading to understand texts (e.g., activate prior knowledge through brainstorming
and/or developing mind maps; ask questions to focus reading and clarify understanding; use
visualization to clarify details about such things as homes and clothing of early settlers; use
pictures to confirm understanding of printed text)
Ministry of Education 2006
English Language Expectations
Pg. 4 Grade 3
3e29
Demonstrating Understanding
1.4 demonstrate understanding of a variety of texts by identifying important ideas and some supporting
details (e.g., restate important ideas and some related details from an informational text about
early settlers; retell a story giving details about specific elements of the text such as setting,
characters, and theme)
3e30
Making Inferences/Interpreting Texts
1.5 make inferences about texts using stated and implied ideas from the texts as evidence
Teacher prompts: “Using information from the story opening, what can you infer about the outcome
of the game?” “How do you think the other characters will react to the actions of the main
character?” “Why do you think early settlers chose wood to build their homes? Is there any evidence
in the text to explain this?”
3e31
Extending Understanding
1.6 extend understanding of texts by connecting the ideas in them to their own knowledge and
experience, to other familiar texts, and to the world around them
Teacher prompts: “How are homes in this book the same as or different from homes today?” “Do you
know of other reasons why trees are important besides the reasons mentioned in the book?”
3e32
Analysing Texts
1.7 identify specific elements of texts and explain how they contribute to the meaning of the texts
(e.g., narrative: setting, characters, plot, theme; explanation of a procedure: procedure to be
explained, sequence of steps)
Teacher prompts: “In what way does knowing more about the characters help you to understand the
text?” “How does identifying the setting in the text help you as a reader?” “Why is it important to
have the steps in a specific sequence?”
3e33
Responding to and Evaluating Texts
1.8 express personal opinions about ideas presented in texts (e.g., identify traits they admire in the
characters; comment on actions taken by characters) Teacher prompts: “Do any of the characters
in this story remind you of someone you know?” “What do you think about the way this story ends?”
3e34
Point of View
1.9 identify the point of view presented in a text and suggest some possible alternative perspectives
(e.g., retell the story from the point of view of someone other than the author)
Teacher prompts: “How does the author show his/her point of view on this poster?” “How might the
story have been different if the main character had been a girl instead of a boy or a senior instead of
a child?”
2. Understanding Form and Style
3e35
Text Forms
2.1 identify and describe the characteristics of a variety of text forms, with a focus on literary texts
such as a fable or adventure story (e.g., plot development, characters, setting), graphic texts such
as a comic book (e.g., speech bubbles, illustrations, captions), and informational texts such as a
nature magazine (e.g., table of contents, diagrams, photographs, labels, captions)
3e36
Text Patterns
2.2 recognize a few organizational patterns in texts of different types, and explain how the patterns
help readers understand the texts (e.g., classification/grouping of ideas in a report or a factual
recount) Teacher prompt: “How does this pattern help you understand the text?”
Ministry of Education 2006
English Language Expectations
Pg. 5
3e37
Text Features
2.3 identify a variety of text features and explain how they help readers understand texts (e.g., table
of contents, charts and chart titles, headings, an index, a glossary, graphs, illustrations,
pictures, diagrams, hyperlinks, a menu)
Teacher prompt: “What is the purpose of a glossary in a non-fiction text? How could you use it to
help you understand the text?”
3e38
Elements of Style
2.4 identify some elements of style, including voice, word choice, and different types of sentences, and
explain how they help readers understand texts (e.g., different sentence types make the text more
interesting for the reader and help the author express different kinds of ideas – questions
express or stimulate curiosity; exclamations convey emotions such as surprise or excitement)
3. Reading With Fluency
3e39
Reading Familiar Words
3.1 automatically read and understand most high-frequency words, many regularly used words, and
words of personal interest or significance, in a variety of reading contexts e.g., words from
gradelevel texts; terminology used regularly in discussions and posted on anchor charts; words
from shared-, guided-, and independent-reading texts, and some regularly used resource
materials in the curriculum subject areas)
3e40
Reading Unfamiliar Words
3.2 predict the meaning of and rapidly solve unfamiliar words using different types of cues, including:
• semantic (meaning) cues (e.g., prefixes, suffixes, base words, phrases, sentences, and visuals that
activate existing knowledge of oral and written language) ;
• syntactic (language structure) cues(e.g., word order, language patterns, punctuation) ;
• graphophonic (phonological and graphic) cues (e.g., onset and rime; syllables; similarities
between words with common spelling patterns and unknown words; words within words)
Teacher prompt (for cross-checking of cues): “Does the word sound right and make sense given your
understanding of the text?”
3e41
Reading Fluently
3.3 read appropriate texts at a sufficient rate and with sufficient expression to convey the sense of the
text readily to the reader and an audience (e.g., read a poem for two voices with a partner, using
appropriate phrasing and expression)
4. Reflecting on Reading Skills and Strategies
3e42
Metacognition
4.1 identify, initially with some support and direction, what strategies they found most helpful before,
during, and after reading and how they can use these and other strategies to improve as readers
Teacher prompts: “What questions do you ask yourself to make sure you are understanding what you
are reading?” “How do you know if you are on the right track?” “When you come to a word or
phrase you don’t understand, how do you solve it?” “How do you figure out what information is
important to remember?” “What do you do when you get confused during reading?”
3e43
Interconnected Skills
4.2 explain, initially with some support and direction, how their skills in listening, speaking, writing,
viewing, and representing help them make sense of what they read
Teacher prompts: “How does hearing a similar text read aloud help you when you read a new text
independently?” ”How does knowing specific words or phrases from speaking or listening help you
as a reader?” “How does dialogue with the teacher or peers in conferences help you as a reader?”
“What do you know about writing that helps you as a reader?”
Ministry of Education 2006
English Language Expectations
Pg. 6 Grade 3
Writing
Overall Expectations
3e44
1. generate, gather, and organize ideas and information to write for an intended purpose and audience;
3e45
2. draft and revise their writing, using a variety of informational, literary, and graphic forms and
stylistic elements appropriate for the purpose and audience;
3e46
3. use editing, proofreading, and publishing skills and strategies, and knowledge of language
conventions, to correct errors, refine expression, and present their work effectively;
3e47
4. reflect on and identify their strengths as writers, areas for improvement, and the strategies they
found most helpful at different stages in the writing process.
1. Developing and Organizing Content
3e48
Purpose and Audience
1.1 identify the topic, purpose, audience, and form for writing (e.g., an original fable, modelled on
the structures and conventions of fables read, to entertain the class; a scientific explanation
demonstrating how some common levers make work easier, for a peer group; a labelled map
with a legend identifying the key components of an early settlement in Upper Canada, to
accompany a small-group project)
Teacher prompts: “What is your writing about?” “Why are you writing?” “Whom are you writing
for?”
3e49
Developing Ideas
1.2 generate ideas about a potential topic, using a variety of strategies and resources (e.g., formulate
and ask questions to identify personal experiences, prior knowledge, and information needs
and to guide searches for information; brainstorm and record ideas on the topic)
3e50
Research
1.3 gather information to support ideas for writing in a variety of ways and/or from a variety of sources
(e.g., from discussions with family and friends; from teacher read-alouds, mentor texts, shared-,
guided-, and independent-reading texts, and media texts)
3e51
Classifying Ideas
1.4 sort ideas and information for their writing in a variety of ways (e.g., by using graphs, charts,
webs, outlines, or lists)
3e52
Organizing Ideas
1.5 identify and order main ideas and supporting details into units that could be used to develop a
short, simple paragraph, using graphic organizers (e.g., a story grammar, a T-chart, a paragraph
frame) and organizational patterns (e.g., comparison, chronological order)
3e53
Review
1.6 determine whether the ideas and information they have gathered are relevant and adequate for the
purpose, and gather new material if necessary (e.g., discuss the content with a peer or reading
buddy; review material using a story map or web)
Ministry of Education 2006
English Language Expectations
Pg. 7 Grade 3
2. Using Knowledge of Form and Style in Writing
3e54
Form
2.1 write short texts using a variety of forms (e.g., a personal or factual recount of events or
experiences that includes photographs or drawings and captions; a report comparing
transportation in urban and rural communities; a paragraph explaining how physical
geography and natural resources affected the development of early settler communities; a letter
from the point of view of a settler, describing how First Nations people have taught the settlers
to adapt to their new environment; a familiar story told from a new perspective; a patterned
poem using rhyme or repetition)
3e55
Voice
2.2 establish a personal voice in their writing, with a focus on using concrete words and images to
convey their attitude or feeling towards the subject or audience (e.g., words used literally or
figuratively to communicate intensity of feeling: a shiver of excitement; hot anger)
3e56
Word Choice
2.3 use words and phrases that will help convey their meaning as specifically as possible (e.g.,
comparative adjectives such as smaller, smallest; adverbs)
3e57
Sentence Fluency
2.4 vary sentence structures and maintain continuity by using joining words (e.g., and, or) to combine
simple sentences and using words that indicate time and sequence to link sentences (e.g., first,
then, next, before, finally, later)
3e58
Point of View
2.5 identify their point of view and other possible points of view on the topic, and determine if their
information supports their own view
Teacher prompt: “What supporting details have you included for your point of view? Would this point
of view be accepted by others? Why, or why not?”
3e59
Preparing for Revision
2.6 identify elements of their writing that need improvement, using feedback from the teacher and
peers, with a focus on specific features (e.g., a strong opening or “lead”; the clarity of the main
idea)
Teacher prompts: “Can you think of another way you might get the attention of your audience at the
beginning?” “Have you provided enough detail to support your main idea?”
3e60
Revision
2.7 make revisions to improve the content, clarity, and interest of their written work, using several
types of strategies (e.g., reordering sentences, removing repetition or unnecessary information,
adding material needed to clarify meaning, adding or substituting words to increase interest,
adding linking words or phrases to highlight connections between ideas, using gender-neutral
language as appropriate)
Teacher prompts: “What similar words or phrases could you use instead of…?” “What time order
words might help clarify the sequence of events in your story?”
3e61
Producing Drafts
2.8 produce revised, draft pieces of writing to meet identified criteria based on the expectations related
to content, organization, style, and use of conventions
3. Applying Knowledge of Language Conventions and Presenting Written Work
Effectively
3e62
Spelling Familiar Words
3.1 spell familiar words correctly (e.g., words from their oral vocabulary, anchor charts, the class
word wall, and shared-, guided-, and independent-reading texts)
Ministry of Education 2006
English Language Expectations
Pg. 8
3e63
Spelling Unfamiliar Words
3.2 spell unfamiliar words using a variety of strategies that involve understanding sound-symbol
relationships, word structures, word meanings, and generalizations about spelling(e.g., pronounce
a word as it is spelled: Wed-nes-day; make analogies to rhyming words; apply knowledge of
short-vowel and long-vowel patterns; cluster words by visual similarities; follow rules for
changing base words when adding common endings: hope/hoping, slam/slammed; use memory
aids such as visualization)
3e64
Vocabulary
3.3 confirm spellings and word meanings or word choice using several different types of resources
(e.g., locate words in an alphabetized personal word book or dictionary using first, second,
third, and fourth letters, entry words, or pronunciation; use a variety of dictionaries, such as a
rhyming dictionary or a dictionary of synonyms and antonyms; use a thesaurus to find
alternative words)
3e65
Punctuation
3.4 use punctuation to help communicate their intended meaning, with a focus on the use of: quotation
marks to indicate direct speech; commas to mark grammatical boundaries within sentences; capital
letters and final punctuation to mark the beginning and end of sentences
3e66
Grammar
3.5 use parts of speech appropriately to communicate their meaning clearly, with a focus on the use of:
proper nouns for titles (e.g., of businesses, teams); the possessive pronouns my, mine, your,
yours, his, her, hers, its; action verbs in the present and simple past tenses; adjectives and adverbs;
question words (e.g., when, where, why, how)
3e67
Proofreading
3.6 proofread and correct their writing using guidelines developed with peers and the teacher (e.g., a
checklist modified in a teacher-student conference to support individual writing strengths and
indicate next steps; a posted class writing guideline)
3e68
Publishing
3.7 use some appropriate elements of effective presentation in the finished product, including print,
script, different fonts, graphics, and layout (e.g., use legible printing and some cursive writing;
use different font sizes and colours on a poster to attract attention; use proper paragraph form
including spacing and margins; supply captions for photographs)
3e69
Producing Finished Works
3.8 produce pieces of published work to meet identified criteria based on the expectations related to
content, organization, style, use of conventions, and use of presentation strategies
4. Reflecting on Writing Skills and Strategies
3e70
Metacognition
4.1 identify what strategies they found most helpful before, during, and after writing and what steps
they can take to improve as writers (e.g., use a writer’s notebook to record ideas, sources for
future reference, and useful types of organizers for sorting information)
Teacher prompts: “How does your writer’s notebook help you generate ideas for writing?” “How did
you choose the resources you used? How were they helpful?” “What strategy did you use to organize
your information before you began writing?”
3e71
Interconnected Skills
4.2 describe, with prompting by the teacher, how some of their skills in listening, speaking, reading,
viewing, and representing help in their development as writers
Teacher prompts: “How does what you know about reading help you when you are writing?” “How
does listening to or viewing different kinds of texts help you generate ideas for writing?”
Ministry of Education 2006
English Language Expectations
3e72
Pg. 9 Grade 3
Portfolio
4.3 select pieces of writing that they think show their best work and explain the reasons for their
selection
Media Literacy
Overall Expectations
3e73
1. demonstrate an understanding of a variety of media texts;
3e74
2. identify some media forms and explain how the conventions and techniques associated with them are
used to create meaning;
3e75
3. create a variety of media texts for different purposes and audiences, using appropriate forms,
conventions, and techniques;
3e76
4. reflect on and identify their strengths as media interpreters and creators, areas for improvement, and
the strategies they found most helpful in understanding and creating media texts.
1. Understanding Media Texts
3e77
Purpose and Audience
1.1 identify the purpose and intended audience of some media texts (e.g., this magazine is aimed at
children/teens/adults; these boxes for DVDs/videos are aimed at the parents of very young
children)
Teacher prompt: “Who is this intended for? Who else would like it? Who would not like it? Why, or
why not?”
3e78
Making Inferences/Interpreting Messages
1.2 use overt and implied messages to draw inferences and make meaning in simple media texts
(e.g., overt message of toys, clothing, or games associated with movies, television shows, or
books: This product is closely connected to the characters you admire in your favourite book;
implied message: If you own this product, you will be more closely connected to your favourite book
and more like the characters you admire)
Teacher prompts: “What things do you have that are related to a TV show, a movie, or a book? What
do they mean to you?” “Are the roles of girls and boys similar or different in the television shows
that you watch?”
3e79
Responding to and Evaluating Texts
1.3 express personal opinions about ideas presented in media texts (e.g., respond to the messages in
a public service announcement about recycling; explain why the Internet safety rules outlined
in a school pamphlet are important)
Teacher prompt: “Do you agree or disagree with the message that we all have a responsibility to
reduce, reuse, and recycle? Why?” “Why do parents worry about Internet safety? What online rules
should you know?”
3e80
Audience Responses
1.4 describe how different audiences might respond to specific media texts (e.g., select a magazine
that appeals to them, predict the responses of different age groups or of children from different
countries to the magazine, and explain the reasons for their predictions)
Teacher prompt: “Why do you like the magazine? Who else would like it? Why? Who would not like
it? Why not?”
Ministry of Education 2006
English Language Expectations
Pg. 10
3e81
Point of View
1.5 identify whose point of view is presented or reflected in a media text and suggest how the text
might change if a different point of view were used (e.g., a poster advertising the zoo aimed at
younger children might emphasize baby animals, whereas one aimed at adults or older children
might emphasize unusual or dangerous animals)
Teacher prompt: “Who is the intended audience for this poster? How do you know? Whose
perspective is reflected? Whose perspective is not reflected?”
3e82
Production Perspectives
1.6 identify who produces selected media texts and why those texts are produced (e.g., companies
design eye-catching logos so their products will be immediately recognizable to people;
designers produce clothes as fashion statements and to make money)
Teacher prompt: “Where do we often find logos?”
2. Understanding Media Forms, Conventions, and Techniques
3e83
Form
2.1 identify elements and characteristics of some media forms (e.g., newspapers use print and
mostly black-and-white photographs; television news coverage has colour, sound, and “live”
action reporting; cartoons use animated drawings of characters, while movies and plays use
live actors)
Teacher prompt: “What would you look for in a television news show that you wouldn’t find in a
newspaper? And vice versa?”
3e84
Conventions and Techniques
2.2 identify the conventions and techniques used in some familiar media forms and explain how they
help convey meaning (e.g., DVDs/videos use dialogue, music, and sound effects to help explain
the visual images; picture books use illustrations, layout, and different kinds of print to help
explain and dramatize the printed words) Teacher prompt: “Watch a section of this DVD without
the sound. Watch again with sound. How does the soundtrack help convey the message?”
3. Creating Media Texts
3e85
Purpose and Audience
3.1 identify the topic, purpose, and audience for media texts they plan to create (e.g., a collage of
images conveying the mood of a poem to help classmates understand the poem)
Teacher prompts: “How will understanding the mood help us understand the poem’s meaning?”
“Which of the images in the collage help us understand the poem better?”
3e86
Form
3.2 identify an appropriate form to suit the specific purpose and audience for a media text they plan to
create (e.g., a tape-recorded interview to present a classmate’s opinion about a favourite show,
toy, or game)
Teacher prompt: “Why would a taperecording be better than a written record of the interview?”
3e87
Conventions and Techniques
3.3 identify conventions and techniques appropriate to the form chosen for a media text they plan to
create (e.g., a pamphlet about a unit of study could require titles, headings, subheadings,
captions, different font sizes, colour, and illustrations)
Teacher prompt: “How can you use these features to help you communicate your ideas effectively?”
Ministry of Education 2006
English Language Expectations
3e88
Pg. 11
Producing Media Texts
3.4 produce media texts for specific purposes and audiences, using a few simple media forms and
appropriate conventions and techniques (e.g.,
• a series of video stills or photographs about a topic of their choice to display to the class
• a simple slide show for a multimedia presentation to a younger class
• a tape-recorded interview with a classmate about a favourite show, toy, or game
• a comic strip for publication in a class newsletter
• a skit, including sound effects, based on a photograph
• a compilation of images from magazines, newspapers, or the Internet that convey the mood of a
poem or song
• an illustrated pamphlet about a unit of study
• a storyboard for the climactic scene in a short story
• a scrapbook of images from newspapers,
magazines, posters, the Internet, and so on, illustrating camera shots from different angles and
distances)
4. Reflecting on Media Literacy Skills and Strategies
3e89
Metacognition
4.1 identify, initially with support and direction, what strategies they found most helpful in making
sense of and creating media texts
Teacher prompt: “What skills did you use to understand this book/video/ Internet site? Would you use
your skills differently or the same way the next time you view a similar work?”
3e90
Interconnected Skills
4.2 explain, initially with support and direction, how their skills in listening, speaking, reading, and
writing help them to make sense of and produce media texts
Teacher prompt: “What language skills did you need to use to make sense of the video? How does
your knowledge of fiction and non-fiction help you understand videos/movies/DVDs?”
Ministry of Education 2006
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