Mercedes-Benz 2003 C-Class Wagon Automobile User Manual

Mercedes-Benz 2003 C-Class Wagon Automobile User Manual

Maintenance Manual

Extensa

TM

660 Series

Notebook Computers

9813214-0001, Rev. A

February 1997

Copyright © 1996, 1997 Texas Instruments

All Rights Reserved

Extensa

TM

660 Series Notebook Computers

Maintenance Manual

TI Part No. 9813214-0001, Rev. A

Original Issue: December 1996

Revision A: February 1997

Changes may be made periodically to the information in this publication. Such changes will be incorporated in new editions of this manual.

No part of this publication may be reproduced, stored in a retrieval system, or transmitted, in any form or by any means, electronic, mechanical, photocopy, recording, or otherwise, without the prior written permission of Texas

Instruments.

The equipment, as well as the programs that TI has created to use with them, are tools that can help people better manage the information used in their business; but tools — including TI products — cannot replace sound judgement nor make the manager's business decisions.

Consequently, TI cannot warrant that its products are suitable for any specific customer application. The manager must rely on judgement of what is best for his or her business.

Address all correspondence regarding orders to:

Texas Instruments

P.O. Box 6102, M/S 3255

Temple, Texas 76503

Extensa and

live

gear are trademarks of Texas Instruments. The icons in the Windows

Notebook and Startup groups are copyrighted by Texas Instruments.

Kensington is a registered trademark of Kensington Microware Ltd.

PS/2 is a registered trademark of International Business Machines Corporation.

Microsoft, Windows and MS-DOS are registered trademarks of Microsoft Corporation.

Intel and Pentium are registered trademarks of Intel Corporation.

Ethernet is a registered trademark of Xerox Corporation.

IRDA is a trademark of Infra Red Data Association.

Sound Blaster is a trademark of Creative Technology, Ltd.

SimulSCAN is a trademark of Cirrus Logic, Inc.

Audio Rack is a trademark of ESS Technology, Inc.

Phillips is a registered trademark of Phillips Screw Company.

IBM is a registered trademark of International Business Machines Corporation.

SCSI is a registered trademark of Security Control Systems, Inc.

Synaptics is a registered trademark of Synaptics, Inc.

Preface

Introduction

This manual provides installation, operation and servicing data for the Extensa

TM

660

Series Notebook Computers.

Intended Audience

This manual is primarily intended for use by qualified service technicians but contains information useful to non-technical users.

Contents

This manual contains six sections and one appendix that are common to all Extensa

660 Series Notebook Computers (differences described as they are covered):

Section 1: General Description - Introduces the main features of the Extensa

660 Series Notebook Computers; identifies all options, provides physical and electrical specifications.

Section 2: Installation - Describes how to unpack, install options and begin using the notebook.

Section 3: Operating Instructions - Describes the notebook computer operating controls and indicators and basic operating procedures required to support maintenance operations.

Section 4: Theory of Operation - Provides a block diagram level theory of operation for the Extensa Series Notebooks.

Section 5: Troubleshooting Procedures - Provides troubleshooting procedures for the notebook computer series.

Section 6: Field Service - Provides preventive and corrective maintenance procedures for the notebook computer series including FRU removal/ replacement procedures.

Appendix A: Schematic Diagrams - Provides schematic diagrams for the

Extensa 660 Series Notebook Computer.

Preface vii

Other Manuals About the System

The following documents provide additional information related to the Extensa

Notebook Computer Series:

Extensa Series Notebook Computers Users Guide - Contains user reference information for the Extensa 660 Series Notebook Computers.

PC-Doctor Help and Technical Reference (online)

Ordering Parts and Supplies

To order a copy of any TI publication or to order option kits, spare parts or supplies for your system, contact your TI reseller:

Telephone Toll-free: 1-800-TI TEXAS.

viii Preface

Contents

Paragraph Page

Preface

Introduction - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - vii

Intended Audience - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - vii

Contents- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - vii

Other Manuals About the System - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -viii

Ordering Parts and Supplies - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -viii

Section 1 General Description

Introduction - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - 1-1

Product Overview - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - 1-2

Extensa 660 Series Notebook Features - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - 1-2

Video Display Features - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - 1-5

Internal LCD - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - 1-6

External CRTs - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - 1-6

Display Hot Key Sequences - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - 1-6

Keyboard Features - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - 1-7

Software Features - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - 1-8

Standard Peripheral Devices - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - 1-9

660 Series Connectivity Features - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - 1-9

Expansion Capabilities - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - 1-10

Advanced PCI Card Options - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - 1-11

PCMCIA Card Options - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - 1-11

Notebook Batteries - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - 1-12

Determining Battery Charge Level - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - 1-12

External Battery Charger Option - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - 1-13

Standard Test Features - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - 1-13

Power On Self Test - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - 1-13

PC-Doctor Diagnostics Program - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - 1-13

Extensa 660 Series Specifications - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - 1-15

Regulatory Agency Approvals - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - 1-18

Section 2 Installation

Introduction - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - 2-1

Unpacking Instructions- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - 2-1

Installing Internal Notebook Options - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - 2-2

Installing Main Memory Expansion (Optional) - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - 2-2

Setting Up the Software - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - 2-3

Installing Advanced PCI Option Card - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - 2-4

Installing PCMCIA Options - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - 2-5

Contents iii

Contents

(continued)

Paragraph Page

Section 2 Installation (continued)

Installing External Notebook Options - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - 2-7

Installing Ext. Keyboard/Mouse/Numeric Keypad - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - 2-7

Installing an External Parallel Printer - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - 2-8

Installing an External Serial Port Device - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - 2-9

Installing an External VGA Monitor - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - 2-10

Battery Pack Installation - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - 2-11

Installing the AC Power Adapter - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - 2-12

Initial Software Load - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - 2-12

Backing Up System Files - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - 2-14

Demo Program - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - 2-14

Stopping the Demo Program - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - 2-14

Running the Demo Again - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - 2-14

Deleting the Demo Program - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - 2-14

Initial System Checkout - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - 2-15

Section 3 Operating Instructions

Introduction - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - 3-1

Controls/Indicators- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - 3-1

Power On/Off Switch - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - 3-2

Notebook LEDs - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - 3-2

LED Icons - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - 3-2

Keyboard Hot Key Sequences- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - 3-3

Windows 95 Special Keys- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - 3-4

DOS Special Keys - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - 3-5

Configuring the Glidepad - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - 3-5

Using a CD-ROM Drive - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - 3-6

Auto Speed/Max Speed Settings- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - 3-6

Inserting a CD into the Drive - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - 3-6

Handling CDs - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - 3-6

Built-in Sound System - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - 3-6

Adjusting the Volume - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - 3-7

Sound Software - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - 3-7

External Sound Equipment - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - 3-7

Using Remote Connections - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - 3-7

Using the Fast Infrared (FIR) Port - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - 3-8

Using Zoomed Video Features - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - 3-8

MPEG PC Card - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - 3-8

Battery Saving Tips - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - 3-8

Lowering Inactivity Timeouts - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - 3-9

Suspending Operation While Idle - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - 3-9

Responding to a Low Battery Condition - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - 3-9

Replacing the Battery - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - 3-10

Saving to Disk- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - 3-10

iv Contents

Contents

(continued)

Paragraph Page

Section 4 Theory of Operation

Introduction - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - 4-1

Notebook Functional Overview - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - 4-1

System Processor - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - 4-3

Memory Subsystem - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - 4-3

Main Memoy- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - 4-3

Flash ROM - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - 4-3

System Controller Function- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - 4-3

Video Subsystem - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - 4-5

Sound Subsystem- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - 4-5

Keyboard Subsystem- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - 4-6

Hard Disk Drive Subsystem - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - 4-6

Hard Disk Drive Power Management- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - 4-6

Floppy Disk Drive Subsystem - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - 4-6

Power Subsystem - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - 4-7

AC Power Adapter - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - 4-7

Section 5 Troubleshooting Procedures

Introduction - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - 5-1

Overview of Fault Isolation Process - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - 5-1

Troubleshooting Procedures - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - 5-3

Troubleshooting a Power Supply Problem - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - 5-3

Troubleshooting a Display Problem - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - 5-3

Fault Isolation Using Power On Self Test - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - 5-5

POST Error Messages- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - 5-5

POST Beep Error Messages - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - 5-8

Run Time Error Messages - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -5-11

PCMCIA Modem Problem - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -5-12

General Fault Isolation Procedures - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -5-12

Fault Isolation Using Diagnostics - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -5-15

PC-Doctor (In DOS Mode or DOS Windows)- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -5-15

Supporting Online Documentation - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -5-16

User Interface to PC-Doctor - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -5-16

Quitting PC-Doctor - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -5-17

Board Level Troubleshooting Procedures - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -5-17

Section 6 Field Service

Introduction - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - 6-1

Preventive Maintenance - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - 6-1

Cleaning the Computer - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - 6-1

Handling the Computer - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - 6-1

Handling the Computer Battery Pack - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - 6-2

Password Caution- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - 6-2

Contents v

Contents

(continued)

Paragraph Page

Section 6 Field Service (continued)

Required Tools and Equipment - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - 6-3

Notebook FRUs - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - 6-3

Cover-Display Assembly - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - 6-4

System Base Assembly - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - 6-5

FRU Removal/Replacement Procedures - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - 6-9

Removing/Replacing the Primary Battery Pack - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - 6-10

Removing/Replacing a Media Bay Device - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - 6-11

Removing/Replacing PCMCIA Options- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - 6-13

Removing/Replacing the APCI Card Option - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - 6-13

Removing/Replacing the Hard Disk Drive Assembly - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - 6-15

Removing/Replacing the Keyboard Assembly - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - 6-16

Removing/Replacing the Heat Sink Assembly - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - 6-17

Removing/Replacing the CPU PWB Assembly - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - 6-18

Removing/Replacing the Display Assembly - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - 6-19

Removing/Replacing the Top Cover Assembly- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - 6-20

Removing/Replacing the LED PWB Assembly - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - 6-21

Removing/Replacing the Glidepad Assembly - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - 6-22

Removing/Replacing the Power Supply PWB Assembly - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - 6-23

Removing/Replacing the Audio PWB Assembly - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - 6-24

Removing/Replacing the Main PWB Assembly - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - 6-25

Removing/Replacing the Battery/HDD Transfer PWB Assembly - - - - - - - - - - - - 6-26

Removing/Replacing the Display FRUs - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - 6-27

Appendix A Schematic Diagrams

Introduction - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - A-1

vi Contents

1

General Description

1.1 Introduction

This manual contains field and factory level servicing information for the Extensa

TM

660

Series Notebook Computers (Figure 1-1) marketed by Texas Instruments. The first six sections contain information common to all members of the Extensa 660 Family of

Notebook Computers.

This section provides a general overview of the Extensa 660 Series, describes the standard and optional features, and identifies the major assemblies and subassemblies.

This section also contains detailed functional and environmental specifications for the

Extensa 660 Series Notebook Computers.

Figure 1-1 Extensa 660 Series Notebook Computers

General Description

1-1

1.2 Product Overview

The Extensa 660 Series contains two major product lines including:

660 CD Series

660 CDT Series

Both notebook series are similar in construction and appearance, have similar operating controls and indicators and use the same software. Both notebook series use a similar startup self test program and diagnostics program (described in detail in Section 5 of this manual). The two models differ in Hard Drive capacity and LCD screen size as listed in Table 1-1 below.

CPU

Table 1-1 Extensa 660 Series Notebook Characteristics

Feature

Standard Onboard Memory

Maximum Expandable Memory

HDD

LCD Display Type

Video Memory

SVGA

32-Bit CardBus Ready PC Slots

Advanced PCI Slot

Battery Pack (Primary)

Battery Pack (Primary) Option

Battery Pack (Secondary) Option

Infrared Port

Power System

660CD Series

166 MHz Pentium with MMX

Technology

16 MB

80 MB

1.4 GB

12.1-inch DSTN

1.0 MB

Supports up to 1024 x 768 by

256 color external monitors

2

1

NiMH (3500mA)

Li-Ion

Li-Ion

FIR (4 Mb/s)

Auto-switching AC adapter

660CDT Series

166 MHz Pentium with MMX

Technology

16 MB

80 MB

2.1 GB

11.3-inch TFT

1.0 MB

Supports up to 1024 x 768 by

256 color external monitors

2

1

NiMH (3500mA)

Li-Ion

Li-Ion

FIR (4 Mb/s)

Auto-switching AC adapter

1-2 General Description

1.3 Extensa 660 Series Notebook Features

The Extensa 660 Series Notebook Computers are large screen, high-performance, multimedia notebooks powered by the Intel

®

P54CSLM Pentium

®

Processor Chip

(133-MHz). Other major features of the 660 Series include:

166 MHz Pentium processor with MMX technology to support advanced video applications

Powerful PCI Bus architecture

16 MB main memory (expandable to 80 MB using 16 MB, 32 MB or 64 MB

EDO 64-bit type small outline dual inline memory module (soDIMM) upgrades)

Built-in 2.5-inch IDE high capacity (1.4 GB or greater) Hard Disk Drive

Media Bay that accepts any one of the following user-removable devices:

- 3.5-inch, 1.44 MB Floppy Disk Drive

- CD-ROM Drive

- Second Rechargeable Battery Pack option

Advanced video features

- DSTN or TFT internal color display

- Simultaneous display with external CRT

- 1.0 MB video memory

- Fast video graphics accelerator

-Full motion video up to 30-frames per second using the Optional MPEG2

PC Card

Built-In 86/87-key keyboard

Internal glidepad pointing device with two Select buttons

Built-in audio features

- 16-bit stereo audio, Line In, Line Out and Microphone In stereo jacks

- ESS 1878 Sound Device Drivers

Small, lightweight AC adapter, auto-switching (90 VAC to 264 VAC, 50-60 Hz)

Portable power system with advanced power savings features for extra long battery life

- Zero-Volt Suspend, 5-Volt Suspend and Standby power saving modes

- Rechargeable NiMH (Nickel-Metal-Hydride) primary battery pack

General Description

1-3

- Provisions for installation of second rechargeable battery pack in the

Media Bay for extended portable operation.

- Li-Ion primary battery option

Powerful expansion capabilities including:

- Advanced PCI Card slot (accessible from door at base of notebook),

120-pin port (PCI Bus plus sidebands).

- Two PCMCIA card slots that support two Type I or Type II PC cards at the same time or one Type III PC Card option

Flexible set of external ports for desktop operation

- Fast infrared communication (4 Mb/s)

- PS/2

® port for connecting an external keyboard, numeric keypad, or mouse

- 9-pin serial port for connecting external devices such as a modem or mouse

- Parallel port with EPP and ECP for connecting to a printer

- External VGA Port for attaching an external high resolution CRT display

- 120-pin Expansion Bus for attaching an optional Port Replicator

Figure 1-2 identifies the major external notebook features.

1-4 General Description

Internal

Microphone

Notebook

Release latch

Built-in

Keyboard

Left

Speaker

LCD

Select

Buttons

Right

Speaker

Glidepad

(mouse)

Primary NiMH

Battery Pack

Media Bay

Device (CD-ROM,

FDD or second Battery)

(Release Latch Underneath)

Left Side of Notebook

Media Bay

Release Latch

APCI Compartment

Expansion Memory

Compartment

AC Adapter

Connector

Power

Button

APCI Access

Cover

PCMCIA Card

Slots

Kensington Lock

Slot

Hard Disk

Drive

Bottom of Notebook

Battery Release

Latch (Primary

Battery)

HDD

Module

Figure 1-2 660 Series Notebook External Features

1.3.1 Video Display Features

The Extensa 660 Series Notebooks contain large screen internal LCD displays and can simultaneously drive the internal LCD and an external CRT (SimulSCAN

TM

mode). On all Extensa models, the LCD screen brightness, contrast, video mode of operation, etc. are adjustable from the keyboard as described in Section 3.

General Description

1-5

1.3.1.1 Internal LCD

The Extensa 660 Series Notebooks contain one of the following LCDs (model dependent):

12.1-inch DSTN display (660CD Only)

11.3-inch TFT

1.3.1.2 External CRTs

The Extensa 660 Series Notebooks are equipped with a 15-pin SVGA connector that can drive an external CRT (either alone or simultaneously with the internal LCD).

When the notebook is set to the SimulSCAN mode, a minimum resolution of 800 x 600 x 256 colors is supported. When operating in the External CRT Mode, resolutions up to 1024 x 768 x 256 colors are supported.

1.3.1.3 Display Hot Key Sequences

The display mode of operation (LCD only, Simultaneous LCD and external CRT and external CRT only modes) is keyboard-selectable using the following hot key sequences.

Fn-Up Arrow and Fn-Down Arrow - control LCD screen brightness (higher brightness setting uses more battery energy)

Fn-Right Arrow - lightens the LCD screen contrast

Fn-Left Arrow - darkens the LCD screen contrast

Fn-F12 - alternates between display modes (LCD, External CRT or both)

Fn-F11 - turns off the LCD backlight; pressing any key turns the LCD backlight on.

Note: In addition to the hot keys that control the notebook display functions, there are several other hot key functions that control other notebook functions such as turning the Glidepad on/off, etc. For these sequences, refer to

Section 3.

1-6 General Description

1.3.2 Keyboard Features

The Extensa 660 Series Notebooks contain a built-in 86/87-key keyboard (Figure 1-3) compatible with the IBM

®

enhanced 101/102-key keyboard. The keyboard contains 12 programmable function keys, an embedded numeric keypad (Figure 1-4) and dedicated control keys (hot keys).

Figure 1-3 Extensa 660 Series Keyboard Layout

Figure 1-4 Embedded Numeric Keypad

General Description

1-7

1.3.3 Software Features

As a standard feature, the Extensa 660 notebooks are factory loaded with dual load

(Windows

®

95 or Windows for Workgroups) software to allow the user to configure the notebook’s operating system environment as summarized in Table 1-2.

Table 1-2 User-Selectable Operating System Environments

Operating System

Windows 95

Windows/DOS 6.22

Description

Supports both desktop and mobile operation with Plug N Play capabilities and Advanced Power

Management; customized to include TI startup screen, CSL Support information, Internet browser, multimedia options, and choice of wallpaper to customize different computer resources,

TI utilities such as wBattery, wSetpower, TISetup, variety of device drivers including NeoMagic

2093, ESS 1878 Sound Device Drivers, WinModem Device Drivers, PC-Card Bus Socket

Services and Card Services Device Drivers, and Windows 95 MPEG-1 Software Audio/Video

Compression Device Drivers.

This environment has some limitations in the Plug N Play area; includes TI utilities and various device drivers including NeoMagic 2093, ESS 1878 Sound Device Drivers, WinModem Device

Drivers, PC-Card Bus Socket Services and Card Services Device Drivers, etc.

1-8 General Description

1.3.4 Standard Peripheral Devices

As standard features, the Extensa notebooks include an internal IDE hard drive, a

3.5-inch floppy disk drive, a CD-ROM drive and built-in glidepad (mouse device).

1.3.5 660 Series Connectivity Features

As standard features, the Extensa 660 Series notebooks includes most standard desktop ports including a serial port, parallel port, PS/2 port, and external VGA port.

The 660 Series also includes an expansion bus port for connection to an external Port

Replicator and a fast infrared (FIR) Port. The external ports for the 660 Series are shown in Figure 1-5 and described in Table 1-3.

Line

Out

Line

In

Mic

Input

FIR

Port

VGA Port

Parallel

Port

Expansion

Bus

Serial

Port

PS/2 Port

Figure 1-5 660 Series External Ports

General Description

1-9

Port Assignment

External VGA Port

Serial Port

Parallel Port

PS/2 Port

DC-IN Connector

Fast Infrared Port

Audio In/Out, Mic In Jacks

Expansion Bus

Table 1-3 660 Series External Ports

Description

15-pin Female connector used to attach an external SVGA monitor to the notebook.

9-pin Male connector used to attach an RS-232 serial device to the notebook.

25-pin Female connector used to attach a bidirectional printer or an external floppy disk drive (requires special cable for use with floppy disk drive).

6-pin Circular connectors used to attach external keyboard/mouse devices to the notebook.

Power in connector used to attach the output of the AC adapter to the notebook.

Fast Infrared Port (4 M/b) used for wireless communications between the notebook and an FIR-equipped device such as keyboard, another notebook, printer, etc.

Stereo audio line inputs, stereo line outputs and external microphone input

120-pin PCI Bus that supports an external Port Replicator

1.3.6 Expansion Capabilities

In addition to the external ports, the Extensa 660 Series Notebooks are designed with a variety of expansion features that permit substantial functionality and performance upgrades over the life of the product. The expansion capabilities built into the notebook are summarized in Table 1-4 and described in greater detail in the following paragraphs.

Table 1-4 Extensa 660 Expansion Features Summary

Expansion Feature

Media Bay CD-ROM Drive

Description

Reads from Audio CD, Photo CD or CD ROM

Media Bay 3.5-inch Diskette Drive Module Provides convenient storage on a removable disk format

Memory Expansion Features Main memory can be expanded from 16 MB to a maximum of 80 MB using one soDIMM module (16 MB, 32 MB, or 64 MB configurations).

Flash ROM (hardware feature)

PCMCIA Slots

Permits new versions of BIOS to be downloaded into Flash ROM without physically having to replace the ROMs

Allows installation of any optional PCMCIA device such as speakerphone modems, Ethernet

®

cards, and full motion video cards.

Advanced PCI Slot

Port Replicator

Provisions for installing one Advanced PCI Card (accessible through a compartment door on the bottom of the unit).

Device that attaches to the Expansion Bus on the 660 Series Notebook and provides the connectivity with quick removal/installation feature required for combination desktop and portable environments.

These expansion features are described in greater detail in the following paragraphs.

1-10 General Description

1.3.7 Advanced PCI Card Options

The Extensa 660 Series Notebooks contain provisions for an advanced PCI Card (installs from the bottom of the notebook by removing the APCI Cover as shown in Figure 1-6).

Advanced PCI Compartment

Advanced PCI Connector

Compartment with cover removed

Bottom of Notebook

Figure 1-6 Installing Advanced PCI Card

1.3.8 PCMCIA Card Options

The Notebook contains an onboard PCMCIA Controller and two 64-pin sockets that can accept up to two credit-card size (14.5 mm) Type I or Type II PCMCIA option cards or one Type III card. The PCMCIA Card options install on the left side of the notebook

(Figure 1-7) and are removed using the PC Card Release levers.

PC Card

Release

Levers

Figure 1-7 Installing PCMCIA Card Options

General Description

1-11

1.4 Notebook Batteries

The notebook computer can use one of three types of batteries:

Primary Battery - Nickel-Metal-Hydride type

Primary Battery - Lithium-Ion type (option)

Secondary Battery - Lithium-Ion type (option)

The primary battery is housed in the battery compartment and the Secondary battery fits in the Media Bay compartment. The characteristics of the available batteries are listed in Table 1-5.

Type

Maximum charge current

Average charge time

Table 1-5 Battery Specifications

Primary

Ni-MH

1.3A

3 hours

Primary

Li-Ion

CC/1.3A,

CV/12.3V

4 hours

Li-Ion

Secondary

CC/1.3A,

CV/12.3V

4 hours

1.4.1 Determining Battery Charge Level

As shown in Figure 1-8, the batteries used in the Extensa 660 have a series of lighted indicators that show the amount of charge remaining in the battery (visible when the

Charge Display button is pressed).

1-12 General Description

Charge

Display

Button

Charge Indicators

Figure 8 Battery Charge Indicators

Table 1-6 shows how to interpret the battery indicators.

Table 1-6 Interpreting the Battery Charge Indicators

3

4

1

2

No. of Indicators On

None

Charge in Battery

Less then 20% (ORG)

20% to 40% (GRN)

40% to 60% (GRN)

60% to 80% (GRN)

80% to 100% (GRN)

1.4.2 External Battery Charger Option

An optional external battery charger is available that charges a battery outside of the computer (all three types of batteries used by the Extensa 660 Series). To order an optional battery charger (or any of the Extensa options), contact your computer dealer or call Texas Instruments at

1-800-TI-TEXAS

.

1.5 Standard Test Features

The Extensa 660 Series Notebook Computers use modular design and built-in test features to reduce the mean time to repair. A power on self test program automatically verifies the operational state of the primary circuits and a powerful suite of diagnostic tests (known as PC-Doctor) are available to further test selected parts of the system.

1.5.1 Power On Self Test

The Extensa line of notebook computers contain a BIOS-resident, Power On Self Test

(POST) that automatically performs a test of memory and all major circuits each time the computer is powered up. In the event of a failure, the computer displays a descriptive error message and issues a series of coded beeps (in case the display subsystem is not functioning). If self test completes normally, the computer displays the amount of memory tested, loads the Operating System and Windows environment.

1.5.2 PC-Doctor Diagnostics Program

The Extensa 660 Series Notebooks are shipped with PC-Doctor for Windows, a powerful diagnostics tool that can help you scan a system for viruses, determine the hardware configuration of a local or remote system, benchmark its performance, analyze the performance of all subsystems, and perform a suite of interactive and non-interactive tests on attached devices (such as printers, VGA monitors, SCSI

®

devices, CD-ROM drives). The test results are stored in a log which can be printed out (by pressing F2) or saved in a disk file (by pressing

F3

).

Features of the diagnostic program are accessed through a series of pull-down menus and basic keyboard keys (cursor keys to move highlighted pointer,

Enter

key to select a highlighted feature,

Esc

key to cancel a function and move back one level.

General Description

1-13

PC-Doctor is typically user-friendly but if you don't understand a feature, contextsensitive help information is available at any time by pressing the

F1

function key; pressing the

F1

function key twice accesses the online Technical Reference Manual for

PC-Doctor.

A powerful set of utilities within PC-Doctor (that can be run locally or remotely) simplify the task of determining system configuration data, allocating and using system memory,

IRQ and DMA use, what device drivers are installed, what COM and LPT ports are assigned and what ports are available, identifying partitioning data for fixed disk drive(s), determining the VGA setup information, reading the software interrupts/ interrupt vectors, etc.

Note: Refer to Troubleshooting Procedures (Section 5) for additional information regarding the Diagnostics Program.

1-14 General Description

1.6 Extensa 660 Series Specifications

General specifications for the Extensa 660 Series Notebooks are provided in Table 1-6.

Table 1-6 Extensa 660 Specifications

Characteristic

CPU

Internal Hard Disk Drive

Model 660CD

Pentium P55CLM, 166 MHz; 3.1

Volt

Standard Module

Model 660CDT

Pentium P55CLM, 166 MHz; 3.1

Volt

Standard Module

Disk Storage Capacity:

Average access time:

Throughput

1.4 GB

12 ms or less

11+ Million I/O's per second

2.1 GB

12 ms or less

11+ Million I/O's per second

DRAM Memory

Size

Maximum Expansion Size

Flash ROM:

16 MB DRAM, 60-ns, pageinterleaved

80 MB

256 KB

16 MB DRAM, 60-ns, pageinterleaved

80 MB

256 KB

FDD

Disk Storage Capacity:

Disk Size

Drive Height

Mode

CD-ROM Drive

LCD Display

Software

Internal Keyboard

Key Travel

Standard Module Standard Module

1.44 MB 1.44 MB

3.5-inch disk

12.5 mm

Choice of 720 KB/1.2 MB or

1.44 MB

3.5-inch disk

12.5 mm

Choice of 720 KB/1.2 MB or

1.44 MB

Standard Module

12.1-inch DSTN, SVGA

Standard Module

11.3-inch TFT, SVGA

Dual Load Dual Load

86/87-key, PS/2 and AT-compatible 86/87-key, PS/2 and AT-compatible

Embedded Numeric Keypad

3 mm

Embedded Numeric Keypad

3 mm

General Description

1-15

Table 1-6 Extensa 660 Specifications

Characteristic

Built-in Mouse Device

Model 660CD

Glidepad built-in to the base of the keyboard (select buttons just below

Glidepad)

Model 660CDT

Glidepad built-in to the base of the keyboard (select buttons just below

Glidepadpad)

Video Subsystem

LCD Aspect Ratio

1-1 1-1

Emulations:

Video Memory Size

SVGA

1.5 MB

SVGA

1.5 MB

Video Bus:

LCD Resolution:

32-bits

640 x 480 pixels bit-mapped at

64K colors

LCD Characters/Line

LCD Lines/Screen:

LCD Brightness Control:

80

25

Function hot key brightness and contrast control and SimulSCAN control

External CRT Monitor

Interface

Connector Type:

15-Pin, female, D-type connector

32-bits

640 x 480 pixels bit-mapped at

64K colors; 600 x 800 at 64K colors.

80

25

Function hot key brightness and contrast control and SimulSCAN control

15-Pin, female, D-type connector

Monitors Supported:

640 x 480 with 16.7 million colors on CRT

800 x 600 with 65K colors on CRT

1024 x 768 with up to 256 colors on CRT

640 x 480 with 16.7 million colors on CRT

800 x 600 with 65K colors on CRT

1024 x 768 with up to 256 colors on CRT

1-16 General Description

Table 1-6 Extensa 660 Specifications

Characteristic

RS-232-D Serial Port:

Model 660CD

9-Pin, male, sub-D-type connector

Model 660CDT

9-Pin, male, sub-D-type connector

Method:

EIA RS-232-D

EIA RS-232-D

Type:

Bits per second:

Parity: Transmit:

Receive:

Line control:

Data word:

16550 UART Support

Asynchronous transmission

110, 200, 300, 600, 1200, 2400,

4800, 9600, 19200

Odd, even, mark, space

Data check: odd, even

READY/BUSY, DC1/DC3

7- or 8-bit

Yes

Asynchronous transmission

110, 200, 300, 600, 1200, 2400,

4800, 9600, 19200

Odd, even, mark, space

Data check: odd, even

READY/BUSY, DC1/DC3

7- or 8-bit

Yes

Selectable Serial Port

(BIOS Setup)

COM1 (IRQ4, 3F8h)

COM2 (IRQ3, 2F8h)

COM3 (IRQ4, 3E8h)

COM4 (IRQ4, 2E8h)

Disable

EPP/ECP Bidirectional

COM1 (IRQ4, 3F8h)

COM2 (IRQ3, 2F8h)

COM3 (IRQ4, 3E8h)

COM4 (IRQ4, 2E8h)

Disable

EPP/ECP Bidirectional

Parallel Port

Connector Type

Fast I/R Port

Transfer Data Rate

Expansion Bus Port

25-Pin, DB-25 Connector

Yes

4 Mb/s

Yes

25-Pin, DB-25 Connector

Yes

4 Mb/s

Yes

General Description

1-17

1.7 Regulatory Agency Approvals

All Extensa 660 Series products meet the following regulatory agency standards:

Underwriter’s Lab (UL) Standard 1950 (safety)

Canadian Standards Association (CSA) Standard 950 or CUL (safety)

FCC CFR 47, Part 15, Subpart B, FCC Level B (Emissions)

Canadian Department of Communications (DOC) ICES, Class B (Emissions)

VDE- EN60950 (Safety)

EN 50082-1 (Immunity: ESD, RFI, EFT, and Surge)

EN 50081-1 (Emissions: RFI, EMI, Harmonics, and Flicker)

Approval Marks: UL, CUL, VDE, FCC, and CE

1-18 General Description

2

Installation

2.1 Introduction

This section contains unpacking and preparation for use instructions for the Extensa

660 Series Notebook Computers. This includes:

Removing the computer and all manuals, options and accessories from the shipping container(s)

Installing Internal Notebook Options

Installing External Notebook Options

Installing Battery Packs

Installing Desktop Devices

Installing the AC Adapter

Checking Out the System

Installing the System Software

Making Backups of System Software

Loading Application Software

2.2 Unpacking Instructions

Unpack the computer using the following instructions:

1.

2.

3.

4.

Carefully cut the tape that seals the top flap of the shipping carton.

Remove the computer and the accessories carton from the main shipping carton.

Remove all protective coverings from the computer.

Open the accessory box; remove the contents.

Note: Save the two shipping containers and packaging for later reuse.

Installation

2-1

2.3 Installing Internal Notebook Options

If you have no internal options to install at this time, skip to Paragraph 2.4. Otherwise, continue with Paragraph 2.3.1.

2.3.1 Installing Main Memory Expansion (Optional)

Main memory on the 660 Series Notebooks can be expanded using an EDO Small

Outline Dual Inline Memory Module (EDO soDIMM). These modules are available in

16 MB, 32 MB, and 64 MB sizes and install in the expansion memory slot on the System

Board accessed through the Memory Expansion Door on the bottom of the notebook.

The installation process consists of the following steps:

7.

8.

9.

3.

4.

1.

2.

5.

6.

Caution: The EDO soDIMM module option contains components that are sensitive to static electricity. When handling the module and the internal parts of the computer, protect against static electricity by using wrist or ankle grounding straps and grounded working mats. When moving or storing items, use the anti-static bags supplied with the items.

Ensure that the notebook is powered off and the AC adapter disconnected from the AC outlet. Also, ensure that all batteries are out of the unit.

Disconnect any peripheral device interface cables from the external interface connectors and remove any installed PCMCIA options.

Turn the notebook over and locate the Expansion Memory Access Cover on the bottom of the notebook.

Remove the screw holding the Expansion Memory Access Cover and remove the cover.

Remove the EDO soDIMM module from its shipping container.

Refer to Figure 2-1. To install an soDIMM module, first align the connector edge of the memory module with the key in the connector. Insert the edge of the memory module board into the connector using a rocking motion to fully insert the module. Push downward on each side of the memory module until it snaps in place.

Reinstall the Expansion Memory Access Cover using the screw removed in

Step 4.

Replace the batteries and AC adapter.

Power up the notebook. If all of the installed memory is not recognized, try reseating the soDIMM module and rebooting.

2-2 Installation

Memory Expansion

Compartment With

Cover Removed soDIMM

Socket

Installing soDIMM in Socket

Figure 2-1 Memory Expansion Removal/Replacement

Note: After installing expansion memory in your notebook, you must run the

PHDISK utility in order for the Save-To-Disk or 0V Suspend functions to operate correctly.

2.3.2 Setting up the Software

Note: If you are using an operating system other than Windows 95, Windows for

Workgroups, or DOS, you may need to re-partition your hard disk drive to allow for the additional memory. Check with your system administrator.

Installation

2-3

In Windows 95

Follow these steps if your computer is running Windows 95.

1.

2.

3.

4.

5.

From the Taskbar, select Start then Shut Down.

Select the Restart the Computer in MS-DOS mode.

Click on Yes.

Type PHDISK /C /F at the DOS prompt and press Enter.

The DOS screen appears and shows the save file name and size. Press any key to reset the system. The computer will reboot.

In Windows for Workgroups

Follow these steps if your computer is running MS-DOS and Windows for Workgroups.

1.

2.

Close all applications and exit Windows for Workgroups to MS-DOS.

At the command prompt (typically C:\) type PHDISK /C /F and press Enter.

This will create a file which can be used to save the contents of your memory system when you perform a 0V Suspend operation.

2.3.3 Installing Advanced PCI Option Card

To install an Advanced PCI Card option, use the following procedure:

Caution: The Advanced PCI card option contains components that are sensitive to static electricity. When handling the card and the internal parts of the computer, protect against static electricity by using wrist or ankle grounding straps and grounded working mats. When moving or storing items, use the anti-static bags supplied with the items.

3.

4.

1.

2.

5.

6.

Ensure that the notebook is powered off and the AC adapter disconnected from the AC outlet. Also, ensure that the battery is out of the unit.

Disconnect any peripheral device interface cables from the external interface connectors and remove any installed PCMCIA options.

Turn the notebook over and locate the Advanced PCI Access Cover on the bottom of the notebook (refer to Figure 2-2).

Remove the screw holding the Advanced PCI Access Cover and remove the cover.

Review the installation instructions supplied with the Advanced PCI option card.

Hold the card at the end opposite the connector pins with the label side up.

Insert the card firmly into the Advanced PCI connector on the Main Board.

2-4 Installation

7.

Replace the Advanced PCI Access Cover and all components removed in Steps

1 and 2 above. Refer to the User Documentation for the Advanced PCI option for further instructions.

Advanced PCI Compartment

Advanced PCI Connector

Compartment with cover removed

Bottom of Notebook

Figure 2-2 Installing an Advanced PCI Card Option

2.3.4 Installing PCMCIA Options

The Notebook has two connector slots for PCMCIA option cards. These two slots can be used to install one Type III or two Type I/II credit card size PCMCIA option cards. You can install a PCMCIA (PC card) without turning the computer off.

Use the following procedure to install a PCMCIA option:

1.

2.

3.

Review the installation instructions supplied with the PCMCIA option card(s).

Hold the card at the end opposite the connector pins with the label side up.

Insert the card into an unused slot on the left side of the Notebook.

If the option requires external cabling (e.g., modem option), connect external cabling at this time.

Note: After installation of a PCMCIA option card, Windows 95 displays the New

Hardware Found dialog box to help you configure the new device. To remove a card, click on the PCMCIA icon; then, press the appropriate PC Card Release lever (or press both levers for a Type III device) and remove the option.

Installation

2-5

PC Card

Release

Levers

Figure 2-3 Installing PCMCIA Option Cards

Note: When installing a Zoomed Video option card, the card must be installed in the upper card slot (slot 0 or A). Other option cards can be installed in either card slot.

2-6 Installation

2.4 Installing External Notebook Options

2.4.1 Installing Ext. Keyboard/Mouse/Numeric Keypad

A PS/2 compatible Keyboard, mouse or an optional PS/2-compatible numeric keypad may be installed on the notebook via the mouse connector on the left rear port as shown in Figure 2-4.

4

2

6 5

1

3

1

2

3

4

5

6

Mouse/Keyboard Connector

Pin No.

Signal Name

MDATA/KDATA

MSGND

MSVcc

MCLK/KCLK

Figure 2-4 PS/2 Port Pinouts

Installation

2-7

2.4.2 Installing an External Parallel Printer

The Notebook is equipped with an external, bidirectional, ECC/EPP compatible, 25-pin parallel printer port. The connector pinouts and connector location are shown in

Figure 2-5.

PIN

11

12

13

14

15

16

17

8

9

6

7

10

3

4

1

2

5

18

19

20

21

22

23

24

25

PARALLEL PORT PINOUTS

SIGNAL

Strobe*

Data Bit 0

Data Bit 1

Data Bit 2

Data Bit 3

Data Bit 4

Data Bit 5

Data Bit 6

Data Bit 7

Acknowledge*

Busy

Paper Out

Select

Auto Line Feed*

Error*

Initialize Printer*

Select In*

LPT 18

VCC

PLP120

PLP121

PLP122

FDD 5V

LP125

Ground

SPP MODE

BUSY

PE

SLCT

AFD*

ERR*

INIT*

SLIN*

LPT18

VCC

PLP120

PLP121

PLP122

FDD 5V

LP125

Ground

STB*

PD0

PD1

PD2

PD3

PD4

PD5

PD6

PD7

ACK*

Note:

* Denotes

Active Low

13

25

12

24

11

10

23 22

9

21

8

20

7

19

6

18

5

17

4

16

3

15

2

14

1

Figure 2-5 Parallel Port Pinouts

2-8 Installation

2.4.3 Installing an External Serial Port Device

The notebook contains an external RS-232 serial port with a 9-pin, male DB-9 connector as shown in Figure 2-6 (25-pin cables require the use of an adapter for use with the

9-pin port). The serial ports are used to interconnect such devices as:

External Modem

Serial Mouse

Serial Printer

Any device that uses an RS-232 interface

Caution: Never connect a parallel device to a serial port or a serial device to a parallel port or video port; this may cause damage to the notebook and/or external device. If you are uncertain of what type connector the external device has, refer to the technical manual for the external device.

Figure 2-6 Serial Port Pinouts

Installation

2-9

2.4.4 Installing an External VGA Monitor

The notebook contains an external CRT port that can drive one of a variety of monitor resolutions and colors as summarized in Table 1-9. The associated connector location and pinouts are shown in Figure 2-7.

5 4 3 2 1

1 5

1 0

1 4

9

1 3

8

1 2

7

1 1

6

EXTERNAL VGA CONNECTOR PINOUTS

PIN SIGNAL NAME DIRECTION

8

9

6

7

1 0

3

4

1

2

5

11, 12

1 3

1 4

1 5

RED VIDEO

GREEN VIDEO

BLUE VIDEO

NOT USED

GROUND

RED RETURN

GREEN RETURN

BLUE RETURN

NOT USED

GROUND

NOT USED

HORIZONTAL SYNC

VERTICAL SYNC

NOT USED

OUTPUT

OUTPUT

OUTPUT

INPUT

INPUT

INPUT

OUTPUT

OUTPUT

Figure 2-7 External VGA Pinouts

Use the following procedure to install an external monitor:

1.

2.

3.

4.

5.

Turn off power to both the notebook and monitor.

Connect the 15-pin external VGA cable from the monitor to the VGA connector on the notebook computer (refer to Figure 2-7).

Power up the notebook computer first; then, turn on power to the monitor.

Setup the notebook display mode for LCD only, simultaneous LCD and CRT or CRT only (under Windows 95, select the Change Display Utility; under

Windows for Workgroups, use the WinMode Utility).

Install the correct driver, if required (refer to the Monitor Installation

Instructions supplied by the CRT vendor).

2-10 Installation

2.5 Battery Pack Installation

1.

Turn off the computer and disconnect the AC adapter if attached to the computer.

2.

NOTE: If removing an existing battery, press the battery release latch located underneath the notebook as shown in Figure 2-8 and remove the battery.

Look for the hand hold and insert the battery with hand hold down until battery pack snaps in place.

Optional Media

Bay Secondary

Battery Pack

(Li-Ion)

Secondary

Battery Release

Latch

NiMH or Li-Ion

Primary Battery

Primary Battery Release

Latch

Figure 2-8 Battery Pack Removal/Installation Installation

Installation

2-11

2.6 Installing the AC Power Adapter

Use the following procedures to connect the AC adapter to the system:

Caution: Use only the AC adapter supplied with the computer; other adapters can damage the unit.

1. Remove the AC adapter from the packaging. Connect the round coaxial connector supplied with the notebook to the DC IN power receptacle on the left rear of the notebook as shown in Figure 2-9.

2.

Connect the female side of the AC power cord to the AC adapter and connect the male end to a grounded AC outlet.

Figure 2-9 Installing the AC Adapter

2.7 Initial Software Load

After unpacking and setting up the notebook for the first time, you must perform an initial software load that takes approximately 30 minutes.

Because of the way Windows 95 structures its files, stopping in the middle of the setup

2-12 Installation

process can cause irreversible file damage. Before starting the initial software load process, ensure that you have the following:

Extensa 660 User’s Guide - Contains latest software installation instructions.

AC Adapter/Access to AC power - Although the battery pack may have some charge, it may be insufficient for the entire set up. Loss of power during setup can cause irreversible file damage.

Certificate of Authenticity - You will need to enter the number from your

Windows 95 Certificate of Authenticity during Windows 95 Setup. This certificate is part of the Windows 95 documentation kit. You need this number even if you are installing Windows for Workgroups.

Language - During initial setup you choose the following:

- Language for Windows displays

- Language for keyboard installed

Printer type - As part of the Windows setup, you are prompted to choose a printer. Microsoft

®

includes the files for many different printers. If you cannot find your printer in the list, you will need the floppy disk with the printer driver provided by the printer manufacturer. If you do not want to install a printer at this time, you can skip this part of the setup.

Operating System Type- During initial setup you must choose which, operating system to load, either Windows 95 or MS-DOS

®

and Windows for

Workgroups (DOS+WFW). This choice is final. You will not be able to change the

operating system after installation is complete. For most users, Windows 95 is the better choice. You might want to load DOS+WFW under the following circumstances.

- Your corporation or workgroup may have guidelines that require use of

DOS+WFW. Check with your manager to determine the policy at your company.

- The software that controls your local area network may not be compatible with Windows 95. Check with your network administrator to determine whether Windows 95 is compatible.

- Although most software that is compatible with DOS+WFW is also compatible with Windows 95, it is possible that the existing software you are using will not run in Windows 95. If you have a critical software application that you intend to copy to your new computer, check with the manufacturer of the software to determine whether your application is compatible with Windows 95.

Installation

2-13

2.8 Backing Up System Files

After setting up the operating system, the computer gives you the opportunity to back up the operating system on floppy disks. You can make your backups immediately following setup or later. When you choose to back up your operating system on floppy disks, you will need approximately 40 floppy disks for Windows 95 or 20 floppy disks for DOS+WFW.

2.9 Demo Program

After completing setup, you can run a multimedia demo program. This program is entertaining and informative and includes the following information.

The features of your computer and how to use them

The

live

gear™ accessories available for your computer

The software loaded on your computer

How to get service and technical support

More about Texas Instruments

2.9.1 Stopping the Demo Program

To stop the demo, press the left mouse button or double-tap the Glidepad.

2.9.2 Running the Demo Again

To run the demo program, do one of the following.

In Windows 95

1.

2.

Double-click on the About Your Extensa icon on the desktop.

Follow the directions to use the program.

In Windows for Workgroups

1.

2.

3.

From the Program Manager, double-click on the Texas Instruments

Multimedia group.

Double-click on the About Your Extensa icon.

Follow the directions to use the program.

2.9.3 Deleting the Demo Program

An uninstall program helps you delete all or part of the demo program to free up space on your hard disk drive. The way you get to the program to remove the demo program depends on your operating system.

2-14 Installation

Windows 95

1.

2.

Double-click on the Uninstall Demo icon on the desktop.

When the Uninstall window appears, you can choose a complete or partial uninstall. If you want to keep some parts of the demo, you can deselect those parts, then click on OK.

Windows for Workgroups

1.

2.

3.

In the Program Manager double-click on the Texas Instruments Multimedia

group.

Double-click on the Uninstall Demo icon.

When the Uninstall window appears, you can choose a complete or partial uninstall. If you want to keep some parts of the demo, you can deselect those parts, then click on OK.

2.10 Initial System Checkout

After you've installed all internal options, external devices, and loaded the software system, you're ready for system checkout and software configuration.

To check out the system, press the power button on the left side of the notebook which initiates self test. During self test execution, the computer checks the operation of all key hardware including memory and CPU (and displays copyright and version number data during test execution).

Upon successful conclusion of self test, the computer automatically loads its operating system and windows environment. If self test fails to complete and an error message is displayed, try powering down the computer for a couple of minutes and turning power back on to repeat self test. If the error message persists, refer to Section 5 for troubleshooting information.

Note: Refer to the Extensa 660 Series Notebook Computer User’s Guide for additional information.

Installation

2-15

3

Operating Instructions

3.1 Introduction

This section contains a summary of notebook operating procedures useful for maintenance operations. For additional detail, refer to the Extensa Series Notebook

Computer User’s Guide supplied with the notebook.

3.2 Controls/Indicators

The operating controls and indicators for the 660 Series Notebooks are shown in Figure

3-1 and briefly described in the following paragraphs.

Cover Release

Button

Keyboard

Status

Indicators

Power

Indicator

Power ON/OFF

Button

PC Card

Release

Levers

Glidepad

(mouse device)

Glidepad Select

Buttons

Figure 3-1 Operating Controls and Indicators

Operating Instructions 3-1

3.2.1 Power On/Off Switch

The notebook contains an alternate action power switch located on the left side of the notebook as shown in Figure 3-1. The first time you press the power switch, power is turned on to the notebook. The next time you press the power switch, power is turned off.

3.2.2 Notebook LEDs

The notebook contains the following LED Indicators:

Power On/Battery Charge and Battery Low (Blinking) Indicator

HDD Indicator

Battery/ Battery Low Indicator (flashing)

Caps Lock Indicator

Num Lock Indicator

Suspend Mode Indicator

Standby Mode Indicator

3.2.3 LED Icons

Table 3-1 contains a listing and description of Extensa LED Icons:

Table 3-1 LED Icon Descriptions

Icon Description

Disk Media Indicator

Lights when the computer writes to or reads from the floppy disk drive, or reads from the CD-ROM drive.

HDD Indicator

Lights when the computer writes to or reads from the hard disk drive.

Power/Battery-low Indicator

Lights when the computer is on and there is power to the computer.

Flashes when the battery power is low. Connect a powered AC adapter to the computer as soon as possible.

Caps Lock Indicator

Lights when the caps lock function is toggled ON using the Caps Lock

Key.

3-2 Operating Instructions

Icon

Table 3-1 LED Icon Descriptions

Description

Num Lock Indicator

Lights when the embedded numeric keypad is toggled ON using the

Num Lock hot key (Fn+F7). Refer to

Using the Internal Numeric

Keypad section for further details.

A

Suspend Mode Indicator

Lights when the computer is in Suspend mode. Flashes when the computer is in the 5V Suspend mode.

The computer enters the 5V Suspend mode when you press the 5V

Suspend hot key (Fn+F3), the 5 Volt Suspend Timeout parameter in

Setup is enabled and expires, or the display is closed.

Standby Mode Indicator

Lights when the computer is in the Standby mode.

The computer enters the Standby mode if the Standby hot key

(Fn+F3) is pressed or the Standby Timeout parameter in Setup is enabled and expires.

3.2.4 Keyboard Hot Key Sequences

Table 3-2 contains a summary of keyboard hot key sequences useful when performing maintenance operations.

Table 3-2 Summary of Notebook Hot Key Sequences

Function

CMOS Setup

Enter 0V Suspend Mode

5 Volt Suspend

Enter Standby Mode

Resume from Standby Mode

Scroll Lock

Numeric Lock

Turn off the LCD backlight

Turn on the LCD backlight

Alternate between display modes (LCD, Ext.l CRT or both)

Decrease LCD screen brightness

Increase LCD screen brightness

Lighten LCD screen contrast

Darken the LCD screen contrast

Exit 0V Suspend Mode

Key Sequence

Fn+F1

Fn+F2

Fn+F3

Fn+F4

Press any key

Fn+F6

Fn+F7

Fn+F11

Press any key

Fn+F12

Fn+Down Arrow

Fn+Up Arrow

Fn+Right Arrow

Fn+Left Arrow

Press Power switch

Operating Instructions 3-3

Table 3-2 Summary of Notebook Hot Key Sequences

Function

Toggle speaker output on/off

Stop a command or application

Resume a command or application

Send the contents of the screen to the printer

Sets the notebook to echo keystrokes to the printer; prints a line when you press Enter; continues until you press Ctrl+P

Enable/disable the internal keypad

Warm boot

Start

Display the application’s context menu

Key Sequence

Fn+End

Ctrl+Pause

Press any key

Shift+PrtSc

Ctrl+P

Fn+T

Ctrl+Alt+Del

Windows logo key

Application key

Table 3-3 Hot Keys Available on Attached External keyboard

Function

System Setup

0V Suspend

5V Suspend

LCD/CRT Toggle

Speaker Toggle

Key Sequence

Ctrl+Alt+F1

Ctrl+Alt+F2

Ctrl+Alt+F3

Ctrl+Alt+F12

Ctrl+Alt+S

3.2.4.1

Windows 95 Special Keys

Pressing the Windows Logo Key acts as the Start button. Pressing this key in combination with other keys performs special functions. Table 3-4 contains several examples of using the Windows 95 special keys.

Table 3-4 Windows 95 Special Keys

Hot Key

Windows Logo Key+Tab

Windows Logo Key+E

Windows Logo Key+F

Windows Logo Key+M

Windows Logo Key+R

Function

Activates next Taskbar button

Explore my Computer

Find Document

Minimize All

Display Run dialog box

Pressing the Application Key displays the context menu for an application. This is the same as clicking the secondary (right) mouse button.

3-4 Operating Instructions

Refer to your Windows 95 manual for more information on these Windows 95-specific keys and their functions.

3.2.4.2

DOS Special Keys

Table 3-5 contains a list of the DOS special keys.

Table 3-5 DOS Special Keys

Hot Key

Ctrl+Pause

Shift+Prt Sc

Ctrl+Break

Ctrl+P

Ctrl+Alt+Del

Function

Stops a command or application; primarily used to stop the screen from scrolling; pressing any other key resumes the execution of the command or application.

Sends the contents of the screen to the printer port; prints only text characters unless you have run the Graphics.com utility to enable printing graphics.

Terminates the current command or application.

Sets the computer to echo keystrokes to the printer; prints a line when you press Enter; continues until you press Ctrl-P again.

Terminates all programs, reloads

MS-DOS

and executes the Autoexec file; also called the “warm start” or “warm boot”.

3.3 Configuring the Glidepad

You can personalize the control of the glidepad by configuring various settings using the Synaptics

®

Glidepad utility. Configure the glidepad using the Mouse utility located in the Control Panel Window. Follow these steps to configure the Glidepad:

In Windows 95

1.

2.

3.

4.

5.

Select the Start button, then select Settings.

Select Control Panel to display the Control Panel window.

Double-click on the Synaptics Glidepad icon.

Select the glidepad tab to customize the glidepad to your preference.

Click on Enhancements to bring up additional features and to get to the online help for the Synaptics Glidepad drivers.

In Windows for Workgroups

1.

2.

3.

From the Program Manager double-click on the Main program group.

Double-click on the Control Panel icon.

Double-click on the Synaptics Glidepad icon.

Operating Instructions 3-5

4.

5.

Select the glidepad tab to customize the glidepad to your preference.

Click on Help for the Synaptics Glidepad drivers online documentation.

3.4 Using a CD-ROM Drive

An optional CD-ROM drive installed in the modular bay of the computer provides fast access to text, programs, graphics, sound, animation and video on a standard CD. (With an optional MPEG PC Card installed, you can play back approximately 75 minutes of

MPEG1-compressed, full-motion video from a CD.)

3.4.1 Auto Speed/Max Speed Settings

The CD-ROM drive has a switch that selects either Auto-Speed or Max-Speed operation.

At Max Speed setting, some CDs vibrate and cause errors. In the Auto-Speed setting, the drive can adjust the speed of the CD-ROM for optimum reading. The switch is accessible when the CD-ROM disc tray is extended.

3.4.2 Inserting a CD into the Drive

1.

2.

3.

4.

Press the eject button on the front of the CD-ROM drive to eject the disc tray.

Slide out the disc tray.

Place the CD, label side up, in the depression on the disc tray.

Slide the disc tray into the drive.

3.4.3

Handling CDs

Follow these guidelines to avoid damaging your CDs:

When removing a CD from its protective case or loading a CD into a drive, hold the CD by its central hole and outer edge. Never touch the data surface (nonlabel side).

To protect the CD against scratches and dirt when not in use, keep the CD in its protective case.

Clean a CD with a clean, dry, lint-free cloth. Always wipe from the center to the edge. Don’t wipe the CD in a clockwise or counterclockwise direction.

Keep CDs away from high temperatures and direct sunlight.

3.5 Built-in Sound System

The Extensa 660 Series Notebook comes with an internal microphone and stereo speakers. These features give direct sound generation and recording capability in the system.

3-6 Operating Instructions

3.5.1 Adjusting the Volume

To adjust volume on your computer, press the following keys:

Fn+PgUp:

Fn+PgDn:

Fn+End:

Increases speaker volume

Decreases speaker volume

Turns mute On/Off

3.5.2 Sound Software

The computer has pre-installed sound support utilities in the AudioRack32 group.

These include:

AudioRack™32

Audio Recorder

3.5.3 External Sound Equipment

You can improve the quality of sound production and increase convenience by connecting external sound equipment.

The computer has the following jacks for connecting to external sound equipment:

Microphone Input

Stereo Headphone/Speaker Line Output

Stereo Line Input

3.6 Using Remote Connections

The computer can send and receive e-mail, surf the Internet, connect to one of the online services or share files with other office employees.

The Extensa communicates with the outside world in one of the following ways:

Over a telephone line using a PC Card modem installed in the computer

Over a network using a network adapter

Note: You can purchase compatible modems and network adapters from your dealer or directly from Texas Instruments.

Operating Instructions 3-7

3.6.1 Using the Fast Infrared (FIR) Port

The FIR port, located on the rear of the computer, offers wireless communication with other Texas Instruments notebook computers or a variety of IRDA-compliant devices.

Without a physical connection, you can print remotely, transfer files between computers, use a remote mouse during a presentation or receive information from a

PDA or pocket organizer. To transfer a file follow these steps:

Align the FIR ports of the two devices making sure that the distance separating them is between six inches and three feet (one meter).

3.6.2 Using Zoomed Video Features

Your computer supports Zoomed Video (ZV) PC Cards through the PC Card slots. ZV

PC Cards connect to the internal ZV port, allowing advanced multimedia capabilities such as video conferencing and on-screen television at full, smooth motion. The Zoomed

Video port adds a dedicated video bus that provides a direct link between a PC Card and the VGA accelerator or audio DAC. This “detour” lets video and audio data bypass the PCI bus, reducing bandwidth impositions and improving system performance for more fluid audio and video.

3.6.3 MPEG PC Card

The optional MPEG PC Card uses the Zoomed Video port built into the computer to display MPEG video and audio on the computer. The MPEG card features MPEG-1 video playback with 16.7 million colors, MPEG-1 audio layers I and II, is MPC3 compliant and Windows 95 Plug and Play. With this option you can run full-motion video, combined with digital audio, graphics, text and data, enabling you to create far more effective presentations or play the most advanced video games.

3.7 Battery Saving Tips

There are a number of actions you can take to reduce the rate at which your computer depletes the battery. By taking some or all of these actions, you can substantially increase the time you can operate on battery power before recharging the battery:

Reducing screen brightness — Although the screen controller uses new technology to increase brightness without increasing energy consumption, the screen is still the largest single consumer of the battery charge. Reducing the brightness to the lowest acceptable level increases battery life. To reduce the brightness, press Fn+

.

Caching the hard disk — By caching the hard disk, you can reduce the length of time the hard disk is rotating and using energy. Both Windows 95 and

Windows for Workgroups use a disk-caching program by default. As long as you have not disabled these programs, you can take advantage of the battery savings.

3-8 Operating Instructions

3.7.1 Lowering Inactivity Timeouts

Inactivity timeouts turn off devices in the computer when you are not using them.

Lowering the inactivity timeouts shortens the period of time the computer waits before turning off the device.

3.7.2 Suspending Operation While Idle

Although the computer goes into Suspend mode automatically after a defined period of inactivity, you can reduce energy consumption even further by pressing either Fn+F3

(Suspend) or Fn+F4 (Standby) as soon as you no longer need the computer to be active.

Pressing Fn+F4 (Standby) turns off the screen.

Pressing Fn+F3 (Suspend) turns off the screen, stops the hard disk, and reduces energy usage to the lowest level possible without turning off the computer.

Pressing the Shift key resumes activity after the notebook has been in either the Suspend or Standby modes.

3.7.3 Responding to a Low Battery Condition

When you are operating the computer on battery power and the charge remaining is down to between 10% and 20%, the battery-low indicator blinks and an audible alarm sounds. When this happens you should take the following actions to conserve battery power and reduce the possibility of data loss.

Saving files — Save all open files frequently while the computer is in a lowbattery condition.

Turning off the alarm — Turn off the audible alarm by pressing Fn+End (Mute).

Reducing screen brightness — Reduce screen brightness by pressing Fn+

.

Connecting the AC adapter — If you have access to AC power, connect the computer to the AC adapter. You can do this without turning off the computer.

Suspending operations — Press Fn+F3 or Fn+F4 to put the computer into

Suspend or Standby mode whenever you are not actively using the computer.

Press the Shift key to bring the computer out of Suspend or Standby mode.

Operating Instructions 3-9

3.7.4 Replacing the battery

If you have a spare, charged battery, you can do one of the following.

Insert a secondary battery into the modular bay.

If you already have a battery in the modular bay, you can replace the primary battery without turning off the computer.

If you cannot insert the spare battery into the modular bay, suspend operations to disk by pressing Fn+F2 and replace the battery. When you turn on the computer, the computer returns to the saved state.

3.7.5 Saving to Disk

When the battery power becomes critically low (less than 5% charge remaining), the computer saves the current state of the computer to disk and turns off. When you turn the computer on again, the computer restores the state that was saved to disk.

3-10 Operating Instructions

4

Theory of Operation

4.1 Introduction

This section contains a general block diagram theory of operation description of the

Extensa 660 Series Notebook Computers.

Note: Various internal components may change on future models and busses/bus speeds are subject to change.

4.2 Notebook Functional Overview

The Extensa 660 Series Notebooks consist of eight major functions or sections including:

System Processor — implemented on the System Board Assembly

Memory Subsystem — implemented on the System Board Assembly

I/O Subsystem — implemented on the I/O Board

Keyboard Subsystem — implemented on the System Board Assembly and the

Keyboard Assemblies

Video Subsystem — implemented on the I/O Board, LED Board, and LCD

Display Panel

Sound Subsystem — implemented on the System Board Assembly.

Glidepad Mouse Subsystem — implemented on the Glidepad assembly and on the System Board Assembly

Hard Disk Drive Subsystem — implemented on the System Board Assembly and the Hard Disk Drive Assembly

Floppy Disk Drive Subsystem — implemented on the System Board and Floppy

Disk Drive Assembly

PCMCIA Controller and Sockets — implemented on the System Board

CD-ROM Subsystem — implemented on the System Board and the CD-ROM

Power Subsystem — implemented on the Power Supply Board, Inverter Board, battery packs, and AC adapter

Theory of Operation

4-1

FLASH BIOS

256KB

PCMCIA

OMEGA

82C094

CARD 0

CARD 1

Bank 1

8, 16MB

(DIMM)

Pentium

P55CLM-

166MHz

CORE CHIP

UMC

UM8891BF-N,

UM8892BF-N,

UM8886BF-N

KB

CONTROLLER

MITSUBISHI

M38813M4

GLIDE PAD

EXT. KB/MOUSE

INTERNAL KB

COM1

PRINTER

VGA CHIP

C&T 65548

VIDEO RAM

1MB

CD-ROM

(8X, 10X)

LCM

INVERTER

14.318MHz X'TAL

CLOCK GEN

ICS

AV9154-43

CRT ON

AC Input

66MHz

24MHz

14.318MHz

AC

ADAPTER

BATTERY IN

SUPER I/O

NS PC87336VLJ

DC/DC

CONVERTER

+3.45V

+5V

+12V

DC-IN

HDD

FDD

Figure 4-1 Extensa Functional Block Diagram

4-2 Theory of Operation

4.2.1 System Processor

The System Processor function for the notebook is implemented on the System Board in the form of an Intel Pentium P55CLM 166 MHz Super scalar 586 Processor Chip.

The processor operates in conjunction with RAM and ROM Memory and other control logic to process software instructions (BIOS, DOS, Windows, and applications). The processor communicates with the hard disk drive and the memory components using high speed busses.

The Processor also interacts with other hardware logic to provide the power savings features for the notebook. These features include controlling CPU clock speeds, reducing clock speeds whenever possible, e.g., when performing floppy disk drive accesses, powering down unused devices, etc.

4.2.2

Memory Subsystem

The memory subsystem comprises the following components:

Main memory

L2 Secondary Memory (cache)

Flash ROM

The Extensa Series uses fast Extended Data Out (EDO) DRAM for main and video memory and high-speed synchronous, pipelined burst SRAM for L2 cache memory.

Main BIOS and Video BIOS are stored in Flash ROM.

4.2.2.1 Main Memory

The standard 660 Series notebook comes with 16 MB of Main memory installed on the

System Board. Memory expansion accommodations are provided via a standard soDIMM connector on the bottom of the System Board Assembly. By installing a

64 MB soDIMM module, the basic memory size can be expanded to a maximum of

80 MB.

4.2.2.2 Flash ROM

All versions of the Extensa notebook family use a "Flash" ROM that contains both the main system BIOS and the VGA BIOS. The Flash ROM contains "Boot Block" logic that allows downloading new versions of BIOS without destroying the Boot Load area.

The Flash ROM execution RAM is 8 bits wide. However, better performance is attained by enabling the Shadow. With this feature enabled, BIOS is copied into a 32-bit, highspeed system.

4.2.3 System Controller Function

The system controller function is implemented on the System Board via a UMC 8890

Series Notebook Chipset. The UM8890 is an advanced 586 compatible single chip that integrates such functions as the PMU, System Controller, RTC and Peripheral

Theory of Operation

4-3

Controller (206) into a single 208 QFP package.

Major features of the System Logic Controller include:

System:

— Fully compatible with IBM PC/AT

— Supports PCI Bus-Master mode

— System Operation Voltage from 3V to 5.5V

— Three programmable non cacheable regions

— Flash ROM Boot block erase protection

— Supports general purpose I/O

— Hybrid Voltage

Integration:

— Built-in 206

— Built-in 146818A

— Built-in Memory Controller

Memory Controller:

— Supports ROM DOS up to 64 MB by XIP, 16 MB by EMS

— Supports Shadow RAM from C0000-FFFFF

— Supports SLOW and SELF Refresh DRAM

— Supports Stagger Refresh

— On-board memory up to 48 MB

— Supports Three Memory Banks

— Supports Page Mode/Burst mode operation

— Supports 512 KB x 8, 1M x 4, 1M x 16, 2M x 8 and 4M x 4 type DRAM

— Supports 8- or 16-bit ROM configuration

— Programmable DRAM timing for each bank

Power Management:

— Supports up to Ten Programmable PMC Outputs

— Supports Multiple Power Saving Mode

— Full On Mode

4-4 Theory of Operation

— On Mode

— Doze Mode

— Sleep Mode

— Suspend Mode

— Auto Power Reduction Mode (APR)

— Word Processing Mode (WP)

— All Register Read/Writeable for 0V Suspend

— Microsoft APM Compatible

— Supports 0V Suspend

— Demand Driven Clock Control

— Supports Resume/Suspend Key

— Auto Wake-Up Function

— Three Low Battery Monitor Input

— System Operating Voltage from 3V to 5.5V

— Low Power Consumption (at 3.3V)

— 50mA at Full On Mode

— 25mA at Doze Mode

— 100

µ

A at SUSPEND Mode

— 15

µ

A at POWER-OFF Mode with RTC active

4.2.4 Video Subsystem

The video subsystem is implemented on the VGA Video Board and on the System

Board Assemblies.

The notebook contains a built-in 10.4-inch (or larger) LCD and features simultaneous

LCD and external VGA display.

The video subsystem includes a 1.5 MB DRAM memory, 32-bit DRAM bus, and separate display and memory clocks. An additional frame buffer/accelerator DRAM increases the available memory band width for CPU accesses. The video section also uses additional levels of write FIFOs, a read cache, page mode DRAM.

4.2.5 Sound Subsystem

The Extensa Series Notebook is equipped with a sound chip set that is Sound

Blaster

TM and Sound Blaster Pro compatible. Internal stereo speakers provide the

Notebook with sound generation capabilities. A set of 3.5 mm connectors allow for

Theory of Operation

4-5

external microphone and line inputs and headphone/speaker outputs.

The sound subsystem also includes a variety of sound utilities that combine to provide additional multi-media functions:

4.2.6 Keyboard Subsystem

The keyboard subsystem, implemented on the Keyboard Assembly and the System

Board Assemblies Board, consists of the following major sections:

Keyboard Assembly

Keyboard Scanner

Status LED Interface

4.2.7 Hard Disk Drive Subsystem

The Hard Disk Drive Subsystem, implemented on the System Board and on the associated hard disk drive module(s), provides disk storage for all system software and user files.

The notebook is equipped with a high-capacity hard disk drive. The hard disk drive also features built-in power conservation features configured from the standard CMOS

Setup Routine. An Automatic Power Down mode can be selected which powers down the drive motor during periods of inactivity. An additional level of power conservation may also be selected which powers down the motor plus all control circuits.

The hard disk drives are factory formatted as a single drive (Drive C:) and are preloaded with installation versions of Windows 95 or Windows for Workgroups (in dual load versions, the user selects the operating system during software installation).

4.2.7.1 Hard Disk Drive Power Management

Both the internal hard disk drive and the hard disk drive installed in the media bay implement power savings features. From the CMOS setup routine, an automatic power down mode can be selected which enables the drive to turn off its motor after a specified period of inactivity. Additional Sleep modes can direct additional power savings during inactive periods by powering down the control circuitry.

4.2.8 Floppy Disk Drive Subsystem

The Extensa 660 is equipped with a 3.5-inch floppy disk drive in the media bay that can read/write standard 3.5-inch disks (either1.44 MB or 2 MB capacity). The drive can also read a 720 KB disk (for interchange of data with other computers).

The data transfer rate for the floppy disk drive is 500 Kbits per second for highdensity disks and 250 Kbits per second for double-density disks.

4-6 Theory of Operation

4.2.9 Power Subsystem

The notebook is equipped with a software/hardware monitored/controlled Power

Subsystem that minimizes battery usage for prolonged battery operation and automatically recharges the batteries when the notebook is used with an AC adapter.

4.2.9.1 AC Power Adapter

The computer is equipped with a universal AC power adapter that converts AC voltage into DC voltage (approx. 46 Watts of power) used to operate the notebook and charge the batteries. The specifications for the AC adapter include:

Input Voltage:

Input Current:

Input Frequency:

100 to 250 VAC

Approximately 1.5 Amps

50 to 60 Hz

Theory of Operation

4-7

5

Troubleshooting Procedures

5.1 Introduction

This section provides an overview of the fault isolation process, provides guidelines for isolating 660 Series computer malfunctions to replaceable subassemblies and provides instructions for executing diagnostics and interpreting error messages.

5.2 Overview of Fault Isolation Process

The fault isolation process (summarized in Figure 5-1) consists of the following steps:

Checking the Notebook power system (including battery packs and AC adapter connections) - refer to Paragraph 5.4.

Checking Switch settings (ensuring Power is On)

Pressing the Shift key to ensure that Notebook is not in Suspend mode

Verifying if computer is configured to boot from the A: Drive or C: Drive.

Checking LCD brightness adjustment (press Fn-Up Arrow keys to increase brightness)

Ensuring that computer is not set for external monitor (press Fn-F12 to select internal screen)

Recording and attempting to resolve any displayed error messages or error beeps (refer to Paragraph 5.3.3.1 and Tables 5-1 and 5-2)

Rebooting the system (Ctrl-Alt-Del)

If the computer is capable of running the Setup program; checking the serial and parallel port configurations, Sound System enable/disable, and other features that may affect system operation.

Running PC-Doctor Diagnostics to further isolate problem area (refer to

Paragraph 5.5). For indicated hardware failures, cycling power and repeating self test to verify that a hard failure has occurred.

Removing and replacing suspect hardware (as described in Section 6 of this manual) and retest the system using the diagnostic tests as described in

Paragraph 5.5.

Troubleshooting Procedures 5-1

When Power button is pressed, no indication of power is present (dark

LCD, no Status icons lit, no disk drive activity, etc.)

Press Power button;

Selftest automatically runs when power turned on.

START

COMPUTER

TROUBLE

INDICATION

?

YES

NO

YES

See Paragraphs

5.3.1 & 5.3.2

PORT REPLICATOR

PROBLEMS?

NO

Yes

ATTACH DESKTOP

DEVICES DIRECTLY

TO NOTEBOOK TO

ISOLATE PORT

REPLICATOR PROBLEMS

DEAD

COMPUTER

SYMPTOMS

?

NO

RUN

SELF TEST

SEE PARAGRAPH

5.4

ERROR

MESSAGE

?

NO

YES

SEE PARAGRAPHS

5.3.3.1 and 5.3.3.2

MODEM

PROBLEM

?

NO

YES

SEE PARAGRAPH

5.3.5

RUN

DIAGNOSTICS

DIAGNOSTICS

ERROR MSG

?

NO

YES

SEE PARAGRAPH

5.5

Figure 5-1 Notebook Computer Troubleshooting Flow Chart

5-2 Troubleshooting Procedures

5.3 Troubleshooting Procedures

The built-in self test program and the disk resident diagnostics program (PC-Doctor) are useful tools in computer troubleshooting. However, if the computer has a power, keyboard or display problem, you must first solve this problem before running diagnostics. If the computer powers up and displays messages on the LCD or emits a series of beeps, skip to Paragraph 5.3.3 for further instructions.

5.3.1 Troubleshooting a Power Supply Problem

If the computer does not power up when the Power Switch is set to the ON position, you most likely have a malfunction in the power subsystem (loss of power at the AC outlet, faulty AC adapter, discharged Battery Packs, or faulty Power Supply on the

Main Board). With a power problem, all LEDs are extinguished, the LCD screen is blank, the system does not respond when the suspend switch is pressed several times consecutively and no drive activity can be heard. The computer is unable to load software and displays no visible signs of activity. To fault isolate a power problem, check the following:

AC adapter and Battery - Plug in the AC adapter and double-check all connections on the adapter and computer. Ensure that the Notebook Power switch is set to the On position and that the system is not in Suspend or Sleep mode.

Measure the voltage at the AC outlet or plug in a known good appliance (e.g., a lamp) to verify that voltage is present. If the voltage is ok, try replacing the

AC adapter.

Check to see that the battery packs are installed correctly and that the battery charge indicators on the front of the battery packs indicate the batteries are charged (try using a new battery pack if batteries are discharged).

If the AC outlet voltage, AC adapter, and battery packs test normal but the computer will not power up, try disconnecting the display cable from the base

(refer to Section 6 for disassembly instructions) to see if a short in the display assembly has occurred.

If the display assembly appears to be normal, replace the Bottom Board as described in Section 6 and retest system.

5.3.2 Troubleshooting a Display Problem

If the LCD remains blank when you turn on the computer, and the status indicators light, check the following controls on the display:

LCD suspend mode - Press Shift to terminate Suspend mode.

Brightness set too low - Press Fn-Up Arrow keys to increase screen brightness

Notebook Set for External Monitor - Press Fn-F12 to switch to the internal screen.

Troubleshooting Procedures

5-3

Faulty LCD - Replace the cover-display assembly as described in Section 6 of this manual.

Low battery - Use a fully charged battery and/or plug in the AC adapter.

Table 5-1 contains fault isolation information for Display Problems on the notebook.

Symptoms are listed along the left side of the chart and the various Display FRUs are listed along the top of the chart. Within the body of the table are the probabilities of each of the FRUs causing that particular problem. For example, a single display line on the screen is most likely caused by the LCD Panel or Display Cable; other components have a low probability of causing the problem.

Table 5-1 Display Troubleshooting Guide

Display

Cable

Medium

Mother

Board

Low

BIOS

Low

Problem Description Inverter

Board

Low Single line on LCD display (horizontal or vertical)

Multiple lines on display (horizontal or vertical)

Sections of the display are missing characters

Scrambled Display

Low

Low

Intermittent characters on display

Bright display, no visible characters

Brightness level fluctuating or display blinking on/off

Low

Low

Low

High

Display goes dim over time

Dim display but characters very visible

Very dark display and characters are slightly visible when a light is directed at surface of the display

Very dark display and no characters are visible

High

Medium

High

Low

LCD

Panel

High

Medium

Medium

Medium

Medium

Medium

Low

Medium

Medium

Low

High

Medium

Medium

Low

Medium

Medium

Medium

Low

Low

Low

High

Low

Low

Medium

Medium

Medium

Low

Low

Low

Low

Medium

Low

Low

Medium

Low

Low

Low

Low

Low

Low

Low

5-4 Troubleshooting Procedures

5.3.3 Fault Isolation Using Power On Self Test

When the computer is first powered up, it automatically performs a Power On Self

Test (POST) that checks the notebook’s central hardware and memory functions.

During POST (which lasts for a few seconds), the display shows copyright and version number information.

Note: Some procedures in this paragraph require you to use keystroke sequences, such as Ctrl-Alt-Del. To execute a keystroke sequence such as this, you must press all three keys simultaneously.

5.3.3.1 POST Error Messages

Upon successful completion of Power On Self Test, the computer automatically loads its operating system and other built-in utilities. If POST fails to complete successfully, the display shows one of the error messages described in Table 5-2.

Note: In the event of a hardware problem that affects the display, the Notebook also communicates errors via a series of beeps. The interpretation of the beep codes is provided in Table 5-3.

Troubleshooting Procedures

5-5

Table 5-2 Power On Self Test Error Messages

Message

Diskette drive A failure

Possible Cause Action

The drive failed or is missing.

Check the drive to determine the problem.

The disk is either not formatted or is defective.

Replace the disk with a bootable disk and retry.

Diskette read failure press F1 to retry boot, F2 for SETUP utility

Display adapter failed, using alternate

Gate A20 failure

Fixed disk configuration error

Fixed disk controller failure

Fixed disk read failure press F1 to retry boot, F2 for SETUP utility

Pointer device failure

The primary video adapter failed.

The keyboard controller is not accepting command, specifically, the enable and disable A20 command.

Check the primary video adapter.

Check the keyboard controller and system board. Turn the power off, then back on again. If the problem persists contact qualified service personnel.

Correct the fixed disk configuration.

The specified configuration is not supported or doesn't match the actual hardware installed.

The fixed disk may be defective.

The fixed disk may be configured incorrectly or is defective.

Try rebooting. If that doesn't work, replace the fixed disk.

Check the drive type selected in

SETUP. Try rebooting. If that does not work, replace the fixed disk.

The PS/2-style mouse failed.

Try rebooting. If problem persists, check the mouse, cable and connector.

5-6 Troubleshooting Procedures

Message

Table 5-2 POST Error Messages (continued)

Possible Cause Action

No boot device available press F1 to retry boot, F2 for SETUP utility

No boot sector on fixed disk - press F1 to retry boot, F2 for SETUP utility

Not a boot diskette - press

F1 to retry boot, F2 for

SETUP utility

No timer tick interrupt

Either disk drive A:, the fixed disk, or both the disk and fixed disk are defective.

The C: drive is not formatted or is not bootable.

The disk in drive A: is not formatted as a bootable disk.

The timer chip has failed.

Try rebooting. If problem persists, replace the disk or the fixed disk.

Format the C: drive and make it bootable.

Replace the disk with a bootable disk and try rebooting.

Shutdown failure

Time of day not set - run

SETUP program

Timer 2 failure

Either the keyboard controller is not accepting the reset command or the associated reset logic has failed.

Real time clock not set.

The timer chip has failed.

Check the system board. Turn the power off, then back on again. If the problem persists, contact qualified service personnel.

Check the keyboard controller and system board. Turn the power off, then back on again.

If the problem persists, contact qualified service personnel.

Run the SETUP utility.

F2 to enter ROM-based

SETUP

Check the system board. Turn the power off, then back on again. If the problem persists, contact qualified service personnel.

You must run SETUP utility and correct configuration information.

Invalid configuration information - please run

SETUP

Invalid configuration information must be changed.

Display adapter is configured incorrectly.

Memory size is incorrect.

Wrong number of disk drives.

Other configuration errors.

Run the SETUP utility.

Troubleshooting Procedures

5-7

Message

Table 5-2 POST Error Messages (continued)

Possible Cause Action

Keyboard clock line failure

The keyboard, the keyboard cable connection, or the keyboard controller is defective.

Keyboard data line failure

The keyboard controller firmware has failed.

Keyboard stuck key failure

A key is jammed.

Memory failure at hexvalue, read hex-value, expecting hex-value

Unexpected interrupt in protected mode

Real time clock failure

Circuitry associated with the memory chips has failed.

Hardware interrupt or NMI occurred while in protected mode.

The RTC or battery failed.

Make sure the keyboard cable and keyboard are connected properly. Check the keyboard controller and the system board.

Turn the power off, then back on again. If the problem persists, contact qualified service personnel.

Check the keyboard controller and system board. Turn the power off, then back on again. If the problem persists, contact qualified service personnel.

Locate the jammed key and fix it. Make sure the keyboard cable and keyboard are connected properly. Turn the power off, then back on again. If the problem persists, contact qualified service personnel.

Turn the power off, then back on again. If the problem persists, contact qualified service personnel.

Check the timer chip or the interrupt controller on the system board.

Run SETUP and turn the power off and on. If the problem persists, replace the RTC battery. If the problem remains, contact qualified service personnel.

5.3.3.2 POST Beep Error Messages

In the event of a hardware problem that affects the display, the Notebook also communicates errors via a series of beeps. These codes may be heard over the system's speaker as three bursts of beeps. The interpretation of the beep codes is provided in Table 5-3.

To recover from a self test error, try cycling power to the computer. Also, press

Ctrl-Alt-Esc to ensure that the Setup configuration is correct. In general, most of the failures are associated with the Upper and Lower Electronics Boards and may require board removal/replacement.

5-8 Troubleshooting Procedures

Try running PC-Doctor (Paragraph 5.5) if possible to verify the source of problem.

Table 5-3 Self Test Beep Messages

Beep Code Port 80h

None 01h

1-1-3 02h

2-2-3

2-2-4

2-3-1

2-3-2

2-3-3

2-3-4

2-4-1

2-4-2

2-4-3

2-4-4

3-1-1

1-4-1

1-4-2

2-1-1

2-1-2

2-1-3

2-1-4

2-2-1

2-2-2

1-1-4

1-2-1

1-2-2

1-2-3

1-3-1

None

1-3-3

1-3-4

16h

17h

18h

19h

1Ah

1Bh

1Ch

1Dh

1Eh

1Fh

20h

12h

13h

14h

15h

0Ch

0Dh

10h

11h

08h

09h

0Ah

0Bh

03h

04h

05h

06h

Description

CPU Register Test in Progress

CMOS Failure

ROM BIOS Checksum Failure

Programmable Interval Timer Failure

DMA Initialization Failure

DMA Page Register Write/Read Failure

DRAM Refresh Verification Failure

1ST 64K RAM Test in Progress

1ST 64K RAM Chip or Data line Failure

1ST 64K RAM Odd/Even Logic Failure

Address Line Failure, 1ST 64K RAM

Parity Failure, 1ST 64K RAM

Bit 0, 1ST 64K RAM Failure

Bit 1, 1ST 64K RAM Failure

Bit 2, 1ST 64K RAM Failure

Bit 3, 1ST 64K RAM Failure

Bit 4, 1ST 64K RAM Failure

Bit 5, 1ST 64K RAM Failure

Bit 6, 1ST 64K RAM Failure

Bit 7, 1ST 64K RAM Failure

Bit 8, 1ST 64K RAM Failure

Bit 9, 1ST 64K RAM Failure

Bit A, 1ST 64K RAM Failure

Bit B, 1ST 64K RAM Failure

Bit C, 1ST 64K RAM Failure

Bit D, 1ST 64K RAM Failure

Bit E, 1ST 64K RAM Failure

Bit F, 1ST 64K RAM Failure

Slave DMA Register Failure

Troubleshooting Procedures

5-9

Beep Code

3-1-2

3-1-3

None

1-2

1-3

None

None

None

None

4-2-1

3-1-4

None

3-2-4

None

None

3-3-4

3-4-1

3-4-2

4-2-2

4-2-3

4-2-4

4-3-1

4-3-3

4-3-4

4-4-1

4-4-2

4-4-3

Table 5-3 Self Test Beep Messages

Port 80h

21h

22h

31h

32h

33h

34h

2Eh

2Eh

2Eh

30h

29h

2Bh

2Ch

2Dh

23h

25h

27h

28h

35h

36h

37h

38h

3Ah

3Bh

3Ch

3Dh

3Eh

Description

Master DMA Register Failure

Master Interrupt Mask Register Failure

Slave Interrupt Mask Register Failure

Interrupt Vector Loading In Progress

Keyboard Controller Test Failure

CMOS Power Failure and Checksum in Progress

CMOS Configuration Validation in Progress

Screen Memory Test Failure

Screen Initialization Failure

Screen Retrace Test Failure

Search for Video ROM in progress

Cirrus Video Chip Failure

Cirrus RAM DAC or Video RAM Failure

Screen Believed Operable; running with Video ROM

Monochrome Monitor Believed Operable

Color Monitor (40 Column) Believed Operable

Color Monitor (80 Column) Believed Operable

No Time Tick

Shutdown Failure

Gate A20 Failure

Unexpected Interrupt in Protected Mode

Memory High Address Line Failure at 010000h-0A0000h

Timer Chip Counter 2 Failed

Time of Day Clock Stopped

Serial Port Failure

Parallel Port Failure

Math Coprocessor Failure

5-10 Troubleshooting Procedures

5.3.4 Run Time Error Messages

In the event of a hardware/software error that occurs after completion of POST, the error messages listed and described in Table 5-4 may occur.

Table 5-4 Run Time Error Message Troubleshooting

Message

I/O card parity interrupt at address. Type (S)hut off

NMI, (R)eboot, other keys to continue

Memory parity interrupt at address. Type (S)hut off

NMI, (R)eboot, other keys to continue

Unexpected HW interrupt, interrupt at address. Type

(R)eboot, other keys to continue

Unexpected SW interrupt, interrupt at address. Type

(R)eboot, other keys to continue

Unexpected type 02 interrupt at xxxxh. Type (S)hut off

NMI, (R)eboot, other keys to continue

Cause

Memory on a peripheral card has failed.

A memory chip(s) has failed.

Hardware problem. Not displayed if the expected interrupt handler is not enabled.

Error(s) in the software program. Not displayed if the extended interrupt handler is not enabled.

A parity error occurred, but the source can not be determine.

Action

Check the memory cards installed in the system.

Check the memory on the system board.

Check all hardware in the system.

Turn the machine off and then on again. If doesn’t work, check the program.

Turn the power off and then on again.

5.3.5 PCMCIA Modem Problems

If an optional PCMCIA modem does not work properly, check the following items:

Dialing problem or wrong number - Try dialing a number that you have previously dialed successfully.

Faulty phone line - Connect a telephone to the line and listen for a dial tone.

Software program - Check to ensure that you have installed the software correctly.

Troubleshooting Procedures

5-11

5.4 General Fault Isolation Procedures

Table 5-5 contains a summary of general problems that may occur during operation of the notebook and the appropriate corrective actions that should be taken for each. For other symptoms, go on to Paragraph 5.5 and troubleshoot the notebook using

PC-Doctor Diagnostics. In the event of problems using a Port Replicator, try attaching all desktop devices to the notebook to isolate the problem to either the notebook or the port replicator. If available, substitute a known good Port Replicator to assist in troubleshooting.

Table 5-5 General Troubleshooting Procedures

No power

Problem

Data on the LCD is unreadable

Corrective Actions

1. Check that the AC adapter is plugged into the power connector of the system. Also, check that the AC adapter is plugged into a properly grounded AC power outlet.

2. If using the battery as main power source, check if the battery pack is of the right type, charged, and is inserted correctly.

3. Check the powerboard of the system. Is it inserted into the motherboard connector properly.

Otherwise, replace the powerboard.

1. Adjust the brightness and contrast display controls.

2. Check if the LCD cables are inserted properly.

Check also connections inside the LCD panel.

3. Check if installed VGA driver is correct.

4. Check VGA controller chip on the motherboard to see if there is any cold or loose soldering.

5. Replace the motherboard.

5-12 Troubleshooting Procedures

Table 5-5 General Troubleshooting Procedures

(continued)

LCD screen does not show data

Battery Power does not last

System halts during boot sequence

I/O processing malfunctions

Diskette drive does not work

Hard disk drive malfunction

1. Check the LCD Status Bar if Suspend mode is activated. Press any key or press the power button to resume operation and display.

2. Check if LCD cables are disconnected or loose.

3. Check if the display output is switched to the external monitor.

4. Check if the Contrast level is set to minimum.

5. Check if there is power.

6. Replace the LCD Inverter board found inside the

LCD Panel.

1. Make sure that the power management features are enabled.

2. Recharge the battery pack for 1.5 hours before using again.

3. Replace the battery pack.

1. Check condition of selected bootload device (disk or hard disk) for bad boot track or incorrect OS files.

2. Try booting from a new bootable disk and recopy or repartition hard disk.

3. Check for any BIOS error messages on the display screen.

4. Replace motherboard.

1. Check the connections of all internal devices.

2. Replace motherboard.

1. Check if floppy disk drive cable is connected properly.

2. Check disk type if correct and not faulty.

3. Replace disk drive.

4. Replace motherboard.

1. Check if hard disk drive is set properly on CMOS

SETUP.

2. Check disk drive cables and connections.

3. Check if disk drive is good.

Troubleshooting Procedures

5-13

Table 5-5 General Troubleshooting Procedures

(continued

)

M em o ry m a lfu n ctio n 1 . C h e ck if th e m em o ry m o d u le is in s erted p ro p erly .

2 . R ep la ce th e m e m o ry m o d u le .

E x te rn a l k ey b o a rd o r P S / 2 m o u s e d o e s n ’t w o rk

P C M C IA ca rd d o e s n o t w o rk

M o u s e d o e s n ’t w o rk

S e ria l d ev ice d o es n o t w o rk

P a ra lle l d ev ice d o es n o t w o rk

1 . C h e ck if th e k ey b o a rd o r th e m o u s e a re co n n ecte d p ro p e rly . C h e ck if th e Y -ca b le is b ein g u s e d . P o w er o ff s y s tem firs t b efo re p lu g g in g in th e d ev ice.

2 . R ep la ce th e k e y b o a rd o r m o u s e.

1 . C h e ck th e P C M C IA d riv e r in s ta lla tio n fo r a n y IR Q o r IO a d d res s co n flicts .

2 . C h e ck if th e P C M C IA ca rd is in s erted p ro p erly a n d a ll co n n ectio n s a re s et.

3 . R ep la ce th e P C M C IA ca rd .

1 . C h e ck if P S / 2 m o u s e d riv e r is p ro p e rly in s ta lle d .

2 . C h e ck th e k ey b o a rd co n tro lle r ch ip fo r a n y co ld o r lo o s ed s o ld e rin g .

1 . If u s in g s eria l m o u s e, ch eck if tra ck b a ll o p tio n is d is a b led u n d er C M O S S etu p .

2 . C h e ck if m o u s e d riv er is in s ta lled p ro p erly .

3 . C h e ck if s eria l d ev ice is co n n e cted p ro p erly .

4 . R ep la ce s eria l d e v ice .

5 . C h e ck th e I/ O co n tro ller ch ip o n th e m o th erb o a rd fo r a n y co ld o r lo o s e s o ld e rin g .

1 . C h e ck if a ll co n n ectio n s a re p ro p erly s et.

2 . C h e ck if ex te rn a l d e v ice is tu rn ed o n .

3 . C h e ck I/ O co n tro lle r ch ip o n th e m o th erb o a rd fo r a n y co ld o r lo o s e s o ld e rin g .

5-14 Troubleshooting Procedures

5.5 Fault Isolation Using Diagnostics

PC-Doctor, supplied with the Extensa Series Notebooks, is a powerful diagnostics tool that can help you determine the hardware configuration of a local or remote system, benchmark its performance, analyze the performance of all subsystems, and perform a suite of interactive and non-interactive tests on attached devices (such as printers, joystick devices, VGA monitors, SCSI devices, CD-ROM drives). The test results are stored in a log which can be printed out or saved in a disk file.

5.5.1 PC-Doctor (In DOS Mode or DOS Windows)

Features of the diagnostic program are accessed through a series of pull-down menus and basic keyboard keys (cursor keys to move highlighted pointer, Enter key to select a highlighted feature, Esc key to cancel a function and move back one level.

PC-Doctor is typically user-friendly but if you don't understand a feature, contextsensitive "help" information is available at any time by pressing the F1 function key; pressing the F1 function key twice accesses the online Technical Reference Manual for PC-Doctor.

A powerful set of utilities within PC-Doctor (that can be run locally or remotely) simplify the task of determining system configuration data, allocating and using system memory, IRQ and DMA use, what device drivers are installed, what COM and

LPT ports are assigned and what ports are available, identifying partitioning data for fixed disk drive(s), determining the VGA setup information, reading the software interrupts/interrupt vectors, etc.

Functionally, PC-Doctor includes the following:

Group of non-Interactive diagnostic tests that perform a non-destructive test of the major hardware functions in the notebook (Processor, Memory, System board, video section, serial and parallel ports (when loopback adapters are installed), hard disk drive and floppy disk drive).

Group of Interactive tests (require operator input) for testing the keyboard, video sections, sound subsystem, mouse, joystick, disk drive, printer subsystem and the SCSI/CD-ROM Drive subsystems supported by the docking station options.

Utility that provides detailed system information such as configuration data, allocation and use of system memory, IRQ and DMA use, what device drivers are installed, what COM and LPT ports are assigned and what ports are available, partitioning data for fixed disk drive(s), VGA setup information, software interrupts and interrupt vectors, and installed SCSI options.

Troubleshooting Procedures

5-15

Group of special purpose utilities to run other tests from PC-Doctor, perform a virus scan of the system, edit configuration files, surface scan hard drives, measure system performance, open a DOS prompt, provides terminal access to devices connected to serial ports, supports memory debug operations, enables remote operations, permits deep discharge of notebook batteries and provides an extensive test reporting function.

5.5.2 Supporting Online Documentation

The PC-Doctor Diagnostic contains the following online information sources:

Online Technical Manual - selected at any time by pressing F1 key twice or by clicking on the Question Mark in the upper left hand corner of any

PC-Doctor Menu

Online Help system - provides context sensitive information from every

PC-Doctor screen - accessed by pressing F1 key once (pressing F1 twice gets you into the online manual).

5.5.3 User Interface to PC-Doctor

PC-Doctor is structured as a text-mode, windowed user interface with pull-down menus. Program operation requires the use of the following keys:

Cursor Keys - Moves the highlighted pointer

Enter Key - Selects the highlighted option

Esc Key - Cancels current function and goes back one step

F1 Key - Activates the context-sensitive help feature (pressing F1 twice in a row calls up the online Technical Reference Manual for PC-Doctor)

Scrolling windows, which show the results of various operations, use the following keys:

Page Up/Page Down - Moves the screen one page at a time

F2 - Prints the log to PRN

F3 - Saves the log to a file

You can also use the mouse or Point to interact with PC-Doctor. The leftmost Select key is used to choose objects (menu entries and action codes typically enclosed in brackets). The rightmost Select key is equivalent to the Esc key which takes you back to your previous step.

5-16 Troubleshooting Procedures

5.5.4 Quitting PC-Doctor

To exit PC-Doctor, select the Quit pull down menu and then select the Quit option.

Note: For additional information, access the Online Reference Manual for

PC-Doctor.

5.6 Board Level Troubleshooting Procedures

Figures 5-2 through 5-19 contain board-level troubleshooting procedures for the

Extensa 660 Notebook. Table 5-6 contains a diagram index to the troubleshooting procedures:

Table 5-6 Troubleshooting Flowchart Index

5-2

5-3

Figure

No.

5-12

5-13

5-14

5-15

5-16

5-17

5-18

5-19

5-8

5-9

5-10

5-11

5-4

5-5

5-6

5-7

Description

System Fails to Boot, Initial Checks

Memory Interface Troubleshooting Diagram

CRT Interface Troubleshooting Diagram

FDD Interface Troubleshooting Diagram

HDD Interface Troubleshooting Diagram

Keyboard Interface Troubleshooting Diagram

CD-ROM Interface Troubleshooting Diagram

Glidepad Interface Troubleshooting Diagram

DC/DC Converter Interface Troubleshooting Diagram

Battery Charger Interface Troubleshooting Diagram

LED Indicator Function Troubleshooting Diagram

Serial Port Function Troubleshooting Diagram

Suspend Function Troubleshooting Diagram

Cover Switch Function Troubleshooting Diagram

Cover Close Function Troubleshooting Diagram

External Keyboard Function Troubleshooting Diagram

PS/2 External Mouse Function Troubleshooting Diagram

Printer Port Interface Troubleshooting Diagram

Troubleshooting Procedures

5-17

1

System Fails to Boot:

Initial Tests

Vcc5=5V

Vcc3=3.3V

No

Check CON10 Pin13

PWRON=5V

Yes

Check PWRGOOD

Check DC-DC

Converter

No

Check U7 P1C16C62

Pin23 PWRGOOD

Yes

Check CPUCLK=66MHz

No

Check U39 74CT2524

Pin2

Yes

Check PCICLK=33MHz

No

Check U40 74CT2524

Pin6

Yes

END

Figure 5-2 System Fails to Boot, Initial Checks

5-18 Troubleshooting Procedures

2

System Fails to Boot:

Memory Interface Tests

Check MEMVCC=3.3V

Yes

No

Check CN10 Pin 10

Check RAS0, CAS(0~7)

Signals

Yes

No

Check RP45, RP86,

RP87

Check MAC(0~11) No

Check RP39, RP47,

RP51

Yes

Check MD(0~63)

No

Check U12, U15, U22,

U27, U28, U31, U32, &

U33 Pin 2, 3, 4, 5, 7, 8,

9, 10, 41, 42, 43, 44, 46,

47, 48, & 49

Yes

END

Figure 5-3 Memory Interface Troubleshooting Diagram

Troubleshooting Procedures

5-19

3

Check CN4 and CRT

Cable

Yes

Check VGA Clock,

14,318MHz and

32,768KHz

Yes

END

System Fails to Boot:

CRT Interface Checks

No

Check L15, L21, L22,

L23, L24 (Red, Green,

Blue, Hsync, Vsync)

No

Check U20 (2093)

Pin 71=33MHz,

Pin 93=14,318MHz,

Pin 82=32,768KHz

Figure 5-4 CRT Interface Troubleshooting Diagram

5-20 Troubleshooting Procedures

4

BIOS Menu

Setup

O.K.?

Yes

Floppy Diskette properly formatted?

Yes

System Fails to Boot:

FDD Interface Check

No

No

Enter Correct FDD type

Format Diskette or

Change Diskette

FDD Power Checked?

No

Check U605 (9956)

Pin1=5V, CN29 Pin53

(motor-ON0#)=5V

Yes

FDD Motor Checked?

No

Check CN17 Pin51

(Motor-0N04) signal

Yes

Seek Operation Checked?

No

Check CN17 Pin44

(TRK0), Pin50 (step #),

PIN 60 (Index#) Signals

Yes

Check Read or Write

Operation

Yes

No

Check CN17

PIN48(Write-Data#),

PIN46(Write-Gate#),

PIN40(F-Read-Data#)

END

Figure 5-5 FDD Interface Troubleshooting Diagram

Troubleshooting Procedures

5-21

5

BIOS Setup O.K.?

Yes

Hard Disk properly formatted?

Yes

Check HDD Power

Yes

System Fails to Boot:

HDD Interface Checks

No

Enter Correct HDD type or Auto to Setup Item

No

Use DOS FDISK program and Format

Hard Disk

No

Check U605 (9956)

Pin3=5V

No

Check U13

PIN 36, 37, 38, 39, 50,

51, 52, 53, 62, 63, 64,

65, 71, 72, 73, & 74

Check HDD Data Bus

Yes

Check HDD Address

Bus

Yes

END

No

Check U13

Pin688, Pin69, Pin70,

HSA0, HSA1,HSA2

Figure 5-6 HDD Interface Troubleshooting Diagram

5-22 Troubleshooting Procedures

6

Keyboard FPC Cable

O.K.?

Yes

Checked Keyboard

Interrupt?

System fils to boot:

Keyboard Interface Checks

No

Check FPC Cable:

Broken or not

No

Check U8(M38813)

Pin15, IRQ1

Yes

Checked Keyboard

Scanning Signals?

Yes

No

Check CN18

PIN 1 ~ PIN 15 (X1~15)

Check CN16

PIN 1 ~ PIN 8 (Y0~7)

Check U8 Entire Circuit

END

Figure 5-7 Keyboard Interface Troubleshooting Diagram

Troubleshooting Procedures

5-23

7

System Fails to Boot:

CD-ROM Interface Checks

Checked CD-ROM Power?

No

Check U605(9956) Pin1

VCC-CDROM=5V

Yes

Checked CD-ROM Data

Bus?

No

Check U13

PIN 36, 37, 38, 39, 50,

51, 52, 53, 62, 63, 64,

65, 71, 72, 73, & 74

Yes

Checked CD-ROM

Address Bus?

Yes

Checked IRQ Signal?

No

Check U13

PIN68, PIN69, PIN70,

HSA0, HSA1, HSA2

No

Check U13 Pin86,

DIRQ15

Yes

END

Figure 5-8 CD-ROM Interface Troubleshooting Diagram

5-24 Troubleshooting Procedures

8

System Fails to Boot:

Glide Pad Interface Checks

Check GLide Pad Data

Signal

No

Check CN21 Pin2

GLPDATA Signal

Yes

Check Glide Pad Power

No

Check CN21 Pin3

GLPCLK Signal

Yes

Check Glide Pad Power

Yes

Check Glide Pad IRQ

Yes

END

No

Check CN21 Pin1=5V

No

Check U8(38813)

Pin14 IRQ12

Figure 5-9 Glidepad Interface Troubleshooting Diagram

Troubleshooting Procedures

5-25

5V

0V

5V

0V

9

System Fails to Boot:

DC/DC Converter Interface Checks

PRESS POWER

SWITCH

DC-IN = 20V

BAT = 12V

YES

SW2 = 5V

YES

NO

NO

Check T3, F1, D12,

D11, F2, Q5, D14

Check M/B Check SW1

Check CN33 PIN4

for low pulse

YES

NO

Check SW2

NO Check D29, D2, D3, U2,

Q1, Q2, Q3, Q4, C14, R13,

R14, D4, D5, R8, R9, R10,

R11, R1

U1, PIN 7

YES

END

Figure 5-10 DC/DC Converter Interface Troubleshooting Diagram

5-26 Troubleshooting Procedures

10

Plug-In AC Adapter

System Fails to Boot:

Battery Charger Interface Checks

No

Check F1, T3

DC_IN=19V

Yes

U4=5V

Yes

Charge Battery 1 or

Charge Battery 2

No

Check D18

No

Check Charger Control

Board (RBC3) U1, D8,

D7

Check Battery Pack

Voltage & Temp

Yes

END

Figure 5-11 Battery Charger Interface Troubleshooting Diagram

Troubleshooting Procedures

5-27

11

Check Caps Lock LED

Yes

Check NUM Lock LED

Yes

HDD Read/Write LED

LED Indicator Function

Troubleshooting

No

Check CN11 Pin4 CAP#=0V

No

No

Check CN11 Pin7 NUM#=0V

Check CN7 Pin 3

Yes

Check CD-ROM, FDD, & LED

No

Check CN11 Pin2 CD/FDD/HDD-

LED#=OV, while any device access

Yes

Check Power Management LED

No

Check Con11 Pin5 PMUEN#=0V, while power management (BIOS) enable

Yes

Clock Suspend LED Blanking

No

Check CN11 Pin6

SUS-LED#=5V~0V, 0V~5V

Yes

Check Charge LED

Check CN11 Pin8 CHarge=5V, while battery is charging

Yes

END

Figure 5-12 LED Indicator Function Troubleshooting Diagram

5-28 Troubleshooting Procedures

12

System Boots:

Serial Port Checks

Check BIOS Setup

No

Enter Correct type for

COM1

Yes

Check Transmitting

Signal

Yes

No

Check U1(MAX213)

SOUT1

Check Receiving Signal

No

Check U1(MAX213)

SIN1

Yes

Check MD(0~63)

Yes

No

Check U21(87338) Pin1,

Pin100, IRQ3,IRQ4

END

Figure 5-13 Serial Port Function Troubleshooting Diagram

Troubleshooting Procedures

5-29

13

Suspend Function Troubleshooting

Check BIOS Power

Management Setup

No

Enter Correct type

Yes

Suspend to RAM

Yes

Check Suspend Signal

No

Check U9 Pin 3

(SUSPEND#=0V)

Suspend to Disk

Check Suspend Signal

No

Check U9 Pin 3

Susepend

Yes

Check Resume

Operation

No

Check U9 Pin 3

Suspend#= 5V

Yes Yes

Yes

Check Resume

Operation

No

Check U9 Pin 3

Suspend#=5V

END

Figure 5-14 Suspend Function Troubleshooting Diagram

5-30 Troubleshooting Procedures

14

Check BIOS Setup

Yes

Check Switch

Yes

END

System Boots:

Cover Switch Function Checks

No

Enter Correct Value

No

Press Cover Switch

Check COVSW#=0V

Figure 5-15 Cover Switch Function Troubleshooting Diagram

15

System Boots:

Cover Close Function Checks

Cover Close Check

YES

Check COVSW#:

Low when cover closed

High when cover open

YES

Check COVSW#:

Normally High

Low pulse when Cover

Closes

YES

NO

NO

Check D18, R112,

C58

Check D18, R112,

C58

END

Figure 5-16 Cover Close Function Troubleshooting Diagram

Troubleshooting Procedures

5-31

16

System Boots:

External Keyboard Checks

Check Keyboard Data

No

Check U8(38813)

Pin17 EXT1DATA

Signal

Yes

Check Keyboard Clock

Yes

Check IRQ Signal

No

Check U8(38813)

Pin16 EXT1CLK

Check U8(38813)

PIN15 IRQ1

Yes

END

Figure 5-17 External Keyboard Function Troubleshooting Diagram

17

System Boots:

PS/2 External Mouse Interface Check

Check Mouse Data

No

Check U8(38813)

Pin12 EXT2DATA

Yes

Check Mouse Clock

Yes

No

Check U8(38813)

Pin13 EXT2CLK

No

Check U8(38813)

PIN14 IRQ12

Check IRQ Signal

Yes

END

Figure 5-18 PS/2 External Mouse Function Troubleshooting Diagram

5-32 Troubleshooting Procedures

1 8

System Boots:

Printer Port Interface Checks

Check BIOS Setup

No

Enter Correct Type of

Printer

Yes

Check the Data Bus

No

Check RP5, RP7

Yes

Check Busy Signal

No

Check RP2 Pin6(BUSY)

Yes

Check U21(87338)

Entire Circuit

END

Figure 5-19 Printer Port Interface Troubleshooting Diagram

Troubleshooting Procedures

5-33

6

Field Service

6.1 Introduction

This section contains general preventive and corrective maintenance procedures that apply to all members of the Extensa 660 Notebook family. The first part of the section describes the computer cleaning procedures and preferred handling procedures for sensitive components (e.g., disk drives, batteries).

The second part of the section identifies all field-replaceable parts; the remainder of the section contains removal and replacement procedures for the field-replaceable parts.

6.2 Preventive Maintenance

Preventive maintenance is limited to cleaning the plastic case, keyboard and the display screen.

6.2.1 Cleaning the Computer

When it is necessary to clean the plastic case and keyboard use a soft, lint-free cloth, slightly dampened with a mild detergent solution or use the contents of any commercially available computer cleaning kit.

Caution: Never spray any liquids directly on the computer case, keyboard, or screen. If the liquid-crystal display (LCD) screen has become smeared or dusty, clean the screen first with a soft, clean, lint-free cloth and gently wipe the glass. If the glass is still smeared, use distilled water or a 25% solution of alcohol and distilled water.

Caution: Do not use paper towels to clean the display screen. Paper can scratch the display screen matte.

6.2.2 Handling the Computer

The notebook computer requires reasonable care and handling for extended life. Some of the precautions to follow to protect your computer against accidental damage include:

Never pick up or carry the unit by the cover.

Do not force the cover beyond its fully opened position (about 180 degrees).

Never subject the computer to harsh environments (dusty areas or areas of rapidly changing temperatures).

Field Service

6-1

Never place anything on top of the computer, particularly when it is operating or charging (could result in overheating and damage to the computer).

Never move the computer while the hard drive is rotating (press the

Suspend button to put the computer in a Sleep mode before closing cover).

Never expose the computer hard disk drive(s) or disks to strong magnetic fields such as those generated by transformers, speakers, or telephone handsets.

6.2.3 Handling the Computer Battery Pack

The battery pack furnished with the computer requires reasonable care and handling to ensure efficient operation and maximum life. Periodically inspect the battery terminals and the batteries for evidence of corrosion and oxide build-up; clean if necessary.

To ensure that the battery packs endure normal life cycle, always observe the following precautions when handling the battery packs:

Do not drop the battery pack or subject it to excessive shock and vibration.

Do not expose the battery pack to direct sunlight, moisture, or chemical compounds.

Do not disassemble the battery pack.

Do not use the battery pack to power other devices.

Do not short the battery leads or connect the battery with reversed polarity.

Never attempt to charge the battery pack in any way other than as described in this manual.

Always charge the battery pack as soon as possible after a low battery indication.

6.2.4 Password Caution

The notebook computer can be password protected to prevent unauthorized use.

However, if the password is lost, the notebook must be returned to the Texas

Instruments manufacturing facility in Temple, Texas U.S.A. to restore access. This service is not covered by warranty.

6-2 Field Service

6.3 Required Tools and Equipment

All Extensa Notebook corrective maintenance procedures can be performed using the following tools:

Tweezers

Plastic Stick

Small flat-blade screwdriver

Small Phillips

®

screwdriver

5 mm Nut Driver

Caution: All boards, options and peripherals contain components that are sensitive to static electricity. When handling any of these items, protect against static electricity by using wrist grounding straps and grounded working mats. When moving or storing items, use the anti-static bags supplied with the items.

6.4 Notebook FRUs

Table 6-1 lists and describes the various FRUs for the Extensa 660 Series. As shown in Figure 6-1, all members of the Extensa 660 Series Notebook Computers contain two major assemblies including the System Base Assembly and the Cover Display Assembly.

Display

Assembly

Base

Assembly

Figure 6-1 Extensa 660 Series Assemblies

Field Service 6-3

6.4.1 Cover-Display Assembly

The Cover-Display Assembly shown in Figure 6-2, contains the LCD screen, DC-AC

Inverter Board, DC-DC Inverter Board, bezel LCD cover and various other components as listed in Table 6-1.

LCD Flex

Cable

LCD

Panel

Display

Cover

Display

Bezel

Inverter

PWB

Flex Cable,

Transfer to

Inverter

Transfer

PWB Assembly

Flex Cable,

Main to

Transfer

Figure 6-2 Cover Display Assembly FRUs

6-4 Field Service

Table 6-1 Cover Display Assembly FRU Listing

FRU Description

LCD Panel, 11.3", TFT (HO)

LCD Panel, 11.3", TFT (LG)

LCD Panel, 12.1", DSTN (SANYO)

Display Back Cover, 11.3" (HO)

Display Back Cover, 11.3" (LG)

Display Back Cover, 12.1" (SANYO)

11.3" Display Bezel

12.1" Display Bezel

11.3" LCD Flex Cable (HO)

11.3" LCD Flex Cable, TFT (LG)

12.1" LCD Flex Cable, DSSTN (SANYO)

Inverter PWB Assembly (DELTA)

Transfer-Inverter Flex Cable Assembly

Transfer-Main Board Flex Cable

Transfer PWB, Main Board to LCD (SANYO)

Transfer PWB, Main Board to LED (HO, LG)

Assembly/

Disassembly

Paragraph

6.5.17

6.5.17

6.5.17

6.5.17

6.5.17

6.5.17

6.5.17

6.5.17

6.5.17

6.5.17

6.5.17

6.5.17

6.5.17

6.5.17

6.5.17

6.5.17

TI Part No.

9813168-0001

9813169-0001

9813170-0001

9813165-0001

9813207-0001

9813167-0001

9813164-0001

9813166-0001

9813150-0001

9813199-0001

9813149-0001

9813162-0001

9813153-0001

9813154-0001

9813191-0001

9813190-0001

6.4.2 System Base Assembly

As shown in Figure 6-3, the System Base Assembly houses a variety of field-replaceable subassemblies and components. The various assemblies and reference paragraph numbers containing removal/replacement procedures are listed in Table 6-2. Table

6-3 contains a listing of Customer-Replaceable Units (CRUs).

Field Service 6-5

CPU PWB

Power

Supply

PWB

Glidepad

Battery/HDD

Transfer PWB

Button

PWB

PCMCIA

Door

Keyboard

Assembly

Heat Sink

Assembly

Top Cover

Assembly

CMOS Battery

Audio PWB

Bottom

Case

Assembly

Main PWB

Figure 6-3 System Base Assembly FRUs

6-6 Field Service

Table 6-2 System Base Assembly FRU Listing

Base Assembly FRU Description Assembly/

Disassembly

Paragraph

PWB Assemblies

Mainboard PWB Assembly, Extensa 66x

CPU PWB Assembly

Power Supply PWB Assembly

HDD/Battery Transfer Board PWB Assembly

Audio Board PWB Assembly

LED Board PWB Assembly

Glidepad Assembly w/Plastic

Button Board PWB Assembly

Keyboard Assembly (U.S.)

PCMCIA Connector Kit

6.5.6

Ref

FDD Module, 1.44 MB, w/Housing

Peripherals/Sound Accessories/Misc

6.5.2

HDD Module w/Housing, 1.4 GB (IBM)

HDD Module w/Housing, 2.1 GB (IBM)

HDD Module w/Housing, 1.35 GB (Seagate)

10X CD-ROM Module w/Housing (Sanyo)

6.5.5

6.5.5

6.5.5

6.5.2

6.5.15

6.5.8

6.5.13

6.5.16

6.5.14

6.5.11

6.5.12

6.5.12

Microphone Assembly w/Cable

Speaker Kit, Left

Speaker Kit, Right

Battery, CMOS w/Cover

Heat Sink

Top Case

Bottom Case (Not for Sale Domestically)

Latch Kit (Battery)

Latch Kit (Media Bay)

Lens, FIR

Power Button

Cover Suspend Switch

Ref

Ref

Ref

Ref

Ref

Ref

6.5.10

6.5.10

Ref

6.5.7

6.5.10

Ref

TI Part No.

9813135-0001

9813136-0001

9813138-0001

9813143-0001

9813140-0001

9813142-0001

9813157-0001

9813139-0001

9805758-0001

9813176-0001

9813200-0001

9813201-0001

9813204-0001

9813211-0001

9813133-0001

9813174-0001

9813180-0001

9813181-0001

9813146-0001

9813160-0001

9813183-0001

9813144-0001

9813215-0001

9813216-0001

9813217-0001

9813177-0001

9813182-0001

Field Service 6-7

Table 6-2 System Base Assembly FRU Listing

Base Assembly FRU Description

Nameplate, Logo

Nameplate, Model 660CD

Nameplate, Model 660CDT

PCMCIA Doors (w/Spring)

Assembly/

Disassembly

Paragraph

Ref

Ref

Ref

Ref

Covers, Doors, Buttons

Cover Assembly, Advanced PCI Board

Cover, Memory Expansion

Right and Left Hinge Covers

HDD Cover Door

Rubber Foot

6.5.4

Section 2

Ref

6.5.5

Ref

TI Part No.

9813173-0001

9813173-0002

9813173-0003

9813175-0001

9813156-0001

9813178-0001

9813161-0001

9813158-0001

9813179-0001

Table 6-3 Customer-Replaceable Units (CRUs)

Base Assembly FRU Description Assembly/

Disassembly

Paragraph

AC Adapter Kit ADP-45CBF (U.S. Power Cord)

AC Adapter Kit ADP-45CBF (WW Power Cord)

PWB Assemblies

Battery, Primary, Ni-MH

FDD Module, External w/Housing

HDD Module, 1.35 GB, Seagate w/Housing

HDD Module, 1.4 GB, IBM w/Housing

HDD Module, 2.1 GB, IBM w/Housing

CD-ROM Module, 10X, SANYO

Doors and Covers

Cover Assembly, Advanced PC

Cover, Memory

HDD Door Cover

Hinge Cover, Right and Left

Section 2

Section 2

6.5.1

6.5.2

6.5.2

6.5.2

6.5.2

6.5.2

6.5.4

2.3.1

6.5.5

Ref

TI Part No.

9813497-0003

9813562-0002

9813147-0001

9813200-0001

9813211-0001

9813201-0001

9813204-0001

9813133-0001

9813156-0001

9813178-0001

9813158-0001

9813161-0001

6-8 Field Service

Table 6-3 Customer-Replaceable Units (CRUs)

Base Assembly FRU Description Assembly/

Disassembly

Paragraph

Options

Battery, Primary, Li-Ion

Battery, Secondary, Li-Ion

External Battery Charger, U.S.

External Battery Charger, WW

Auto Adapter

Port Replicator, Extensa 65X/66X

FDD w/Cable, (External)

HDD Kit, 2.1 GB

RAM Module, 16 MB

RAM Module, 32 MB

6.5.1

6.5.2

Ref

Ref

Ref

Ref

6.5.2

6.5.5

Section 2

Section 2

TI Part No.

9813130-0001

9813131-0001

9813134-0001

9813134-0004

9813126-0001

9813564-0001

9813561-0001

9813125-0001

9811344-0002

9811344-0003

6.5 FRU Removal/Replacement Procedures

The following paragraphs contain field service-level removal/replacement procedures for the 660 Series Notebook Computers.

Most FRU removal/replacement procedures involve connecting and disconnecting cable connectors. The Extensa series uses two types of connectors including:

Locking-type connectors - use a plastic stick to unlock and lock these type of connectors as shown in Figure 6-4.

Non-locking connectors

Field Service 6-9

Unplugging the

Cable

Connecting the

Cable

Figure 6-4 Removing/Installing Cables with ZIF Connectors

6.5.1 Removing/Replacing the Primary Battery Pack

Before performing any of the assembly/disassembly procedures, always disconnect the

AC adapter from the notebook and remove all battery packs. The procedure for removing and replacing the primary battery pack is as follows:

1.

2.

3.

4.

Turn off the computer and disconnect the AC adapter from the computer.

Press the battery release latch outwards (underneath the notebook) as shown in Figure 6-5.

While holding the battery release latch outward, slide the battery outward as shown in Figure 6-5.

Insert the replacement battery (with label side facing upward) until it snaps in place.

6-10 Field Service

Optional Media

Bay Secondary

Battery Pack

(Li-Ion)

Secondary

Battery Release

Latch

NiMH or Li-Ion

Primary Battery

Primary Battery Release

Latch

Figure 6-5 Battery Removal/Replacement

6.5.2 Removing/Replacing a Media Bay Device

The computer has a latch-controlled locking mechanism that prevents accidental removal of devices from the modular bay.

Follow these steps to change modules.

1.

2.

3.

Turn off the computer.

Press the release latch on the bottom of the computer as shown in Figure 6-6.

Pull out the accessory currently in the modular bay.

Field Service 6-11

Module Lock

Grip Area

Figure 6-6 Removing/Replacing a Media Bay Device

4.

5.

6.

7.

Unpack the new accessory.

Slide the new accessory into the modular bay and push the accessory until it latches into place.

Place the original accessory in a safe place.

Turn on the computer.

6-12 Field Service

6.5.3 Removing/Replacing PCMCIA Options

The procedure for removing and replacing the PCMCIA options is as follows:

1.

2.

3.

Stop operation according to operating system (Windows 95 or Windows for

Workgroups) instructions.

Press the upper card eject button to eject the upper card, lower button controls the lower card and use both buttons for Type III devices (refer to

Figure 6-7).

To replace the PCMCIA device, remove any filler cards present and insert the device. Reinstall any external cabling required for the device.

PC Card

Release

Levers

Figure 6-7 Installing/Removing PCMCIA Options

6.5.4 Removing/Replacing the APCI Card Option

The procedure for removing and replacing the Hard Disk Drive assembly is as follows:

1.

2.

Power down the notebook, disconnect the AC adapter, if installed, and remove all battery packs.

Disconnect any peripheral device interface cables from the external interface

Field Service 6-13

3.

connectors and remove any installed PCMCIA options.

Turn the computer over and locate the APCI Access Cover as shown in

Figure 6-8.

Advanced PCI Compartment

Advanced PCI Connector

Bottom of Notebook

Compartment with cover removed

Figure 6-8 Removing/Replacing the APCI Option

6-14 Field Service

6.5.5 Removing/Replacing the Hard Disk Drive Assembly

The procedure for removing and replacing the Hard Disk Drive assembly is as follows:

1.

2.

3.

4.

Power down the notebook, disconnect the AC adapter, if installed, and remove any installed battery packs as described in Paragraphs 6.5.1 and 6.5.2.

Disconnect any peripheral device interface cables from the external interface connectors.

Turn the computer over and remove the hard disk drive bay cover (refer to

Figure 6-9).

Slide the two release tabs inward (Figure 6-9), slide the drive out of the notebook.

1

2

3

4

Figure 6-9 Removing/Replacing the Hard Disk Drive Module

5.

6.

Caution: Exercise care to only handle the drive by its sides to prevent damage to the drive.

Store the HDD in an antistatic bag.

Replacement is the reverse of Steps 1 through 5.

Field Service 6-15

6.5.6 Removing/Replacing the Keyboard Assembly

The procedure for removing and replacing the keyboard assembly is as follows:

1.

2.

3.

4.

5.

6.

7.

Turn off the computer; disconnect the AC power adapter (if attached), and remove the battery packs as described in Paragraphs 6.5.1 and 6.5.2.

Press the Cover Release Latch and open the notebook to a full 180 degree position.

Locate the keyboard tabs along the top edge of the notebook. Using a small plastic stick, press down and toward the front of the unit on the leftmost tab.

Repeat for remaining two tabs to free the keyboard.

Lift the keyboard up and out of the notebook and rest the keyboard, face down, on the palm rest area.

Disconnect two ZIF-type keyboard cable connectors CN16 and CN18 from the main board.

Remove Keyboard Assembly from the base assembly.

Replacement is the reverse of steps 1 through 6. To secure the keyboard in place, carefully press on the keyboard in the area of the three tabs until the keyboard snaps in place.

1

Release Keyboard by pressing three tabs along top edge of Keyboard

2

Disconnect CN16 and CN18

(ZIF Connectors)

Keyboard

Release

Tabs

Figure 6-10 Removing/Replacing the Keyboard Assembly

6-16 Field Service

6.5.7 Removing/Replacing the Heat Sink Assembly

The procedure for removing and replacing the Heat Sink Assembly is as follows:

1.

2.

3.

4.

5.

Turn off the computer; disconnect the AC power adapter (if attached), and remove the battery packs as described in Paragraphs 6.5.1 and 6.5.2.

Press the Cover Release Latch and open the notebook to a full 180 degree position.

Remove the Keyboard Assembly as described in Paragraph 6.5.6.

Remove the four screws securing the Heat Sink Assembly to the Main Board and carefully lift the Heat Sink Assembly from the base assembly.

Replacement is the reverse of Steps 1 through 4.

Heat Sink

Assembly

Keyboard Assembly

Figure 6-11 Removing/Replacing the Heat Sink Assembly

Field Service 6-17

6.5.8 Removing/Replacing the CPU PWB Assembly

The procedure for removing and replacing the CPU PWB Assembly is as follows:

1.

2.

3.

4.

Turn off the computer; disconnect the AC power adapter (if attached), and remove the battery packs as described in Paragraphs 6.5.1 and 6.5.2.

Press the Cover Release Latch and open the notebook to a full 180 degree position.

Remove the Keyboard Assembly as described in Paragraph 6.5.6.

Remove the Heat Sink Assembly as described in Paragraph 6.5.7.

5.

6.

Caution: Avoid touching the CPU as the CPU pins bend easily.

Carefully remove the CPU PWB exercising caution not to damage the CPU pins.

Replace using the reverse of Steps 1 through 5. (Note: When installing a replacement CPU PWB assembly, add thermal grease to the bottom of the

Heat Sink Assembly where it comes in contact with the CPU).

Keyboard

Assembly

Heat Sink

Assembly

CPU PWB

Assembly

Main PWB

Assembly

Figure 6-12 Removing/Replacing the CPU PWB Assembly

6-18 Field Service

6.5.9 Removing/Replacing the Display Assembly

The procedure for removing and replacing the Display Assembly is as follows:

1.

2.

3.

4.

5.

6.

Turn off the computer; disconnect the AC power adapter (if attached), and remove the battery packs as described in Paragraphs 6.5.1 and 6.5.2.

Press the Cover Release Latch and open the notebook to a full 180 degree position.

Remove four screws from the face of the LCD cover and pull the covers apart starting at the top of the Display (refer to Figure 6-13).

Remove the single screw holding the FPC Cable and gently remove the cable connector (CN1) from the LCD Transfer Board.

Remove five screws (3 on left hinge and 2 on the right hinge) and remove the

Cover-Display Assembly from the Base Assembly.

Replacement is the reverse of Steps 1 through 5.

Figure 6-13 Removing/Replacing the Display Assembly

Field Service 6-19

6.5.10 Removing/Replacing the Top Cover Assembly

The procedure for removing and replacing the Top Cover Assembly is as follows:

1.

2.

3.

4.

5.

6.

7.

8.

9.

Turn off the computer; disconnect the AC power adapter (if attached), and remove the battery packs as described in Paragraphs 6.5.1 and 6.5.2.

Press the Cover Release Latch and open the notebook to a full 180 degree position.

Remove the Keyboard Assembly as described in Paragraph 6.5.6.

Remove the Heat Sink Assembly as described in Paragraph 6.5.7.

Remove the Cover-Display Assembly as described in Paragraph 6.5.9.

Turn the unit over and remove five recessed screws from the bottom of the base assembly. Also remove two screws from the primary battery compartment and two screws from the Hard Disk Drive compartment.

Turn the assembly to normal position and unsnap the base cover from the top cover by pulling gently up along both sides and along the front until the top cover unsnaps from the base cover assembly.

Unplug the cable connectors from the top cover PWB assemblies (LED Board,

Glidepad, and speakers) and remove the top cover assembly.

Reassembly is the reverse of Steps 1 through 8. Note: Ensure that the Close

Cover Switch cap is installed before reassembling the Top Cover Assembly.

Keyboard

Assembly

Heat Sink

Assembly

Top Cover

Assembly

Bottom

Case

Assembly

Figure 6-14 Removing/Replacing the Top Cover Assembly

6-20 Field Service

6.5.11 Removing/Replacing the LED PWB Assembly

The procedure for removing and replacing the LED PWB Assembly is as follows:

1.

2.

6.

7.

8.

3.

4.

5.

Turn off the computer; disconnect the AC power adapter (if attached), and remove the battery packs as described in Paragraphs 6.5.1 and 6.5.2.

Press the Cover Release Latch and open the notebook to a full 180 degree position.

Remove the Keyboard Assembly as described in Paragraph 6.5.6.

Remove the Heat Sink Assembly as described in Paragraph 6.5.7.

Remove the Cover-Display Assembly as described in Paragraph 6.5.9.

Remove the Top Cover Assembly as described in Paragraph 6.5.10.

Remove two screws and remove the LED PWB from the Top Cover Assembly.

Reassembly is the reverse of Steps 1 through 7.

LED Board

Assembly

Top Cover

Assembly

Figure 6-15 Removing/Replacing the LED PWB Assembly

Field Service 6-21

6.5.12 Removing/Replacing the Glidepad Assembly

The procedure for removing and replacing the Glidepad Assembly is as follows:

1.

2.

3.

4.

5.

6.

7.

8.

9.

Turn off the computer; disconnect the AC power adapter (if attached), and remove the battery packs as described in Paragraphs 6.5.1 and 6.5.2.

Press the Cover Release Latch and open the notebook to a full 180 degree position.

Remove the Keyboard Assembly as described in Paragraph 6.5.6.

Remove the Heat Sink Assembly as described in Paragraph 6.5.7.

Remove the Cover-Display Assembly as described in Paragraph 6.5.9.

Remove the Top Cover Assembly as described in Paragraph 6.5.10.

Turn the top cover over and locate the Glidepad PWB; disconnect cable connectors CN21 and CN22 from the Main PWB assembly.

Remove the six screws securing the Glidepad module and PWB to the cover and remove these assemblies.

Reassembly is the reverse of Steps 1 through 8.

Figure 6-16 Removing/Replacing the Glidepad Assembly

6-22 Field Service

6.5.13 Removing/Replacing the Power Supply PWB Assembly

The procedure for removing and replacing the Power Supply PWB Assembly is as follows:

1.

2.

3.

4.

5.

6.

7.

8.

Turn off the computer; disconnect the AC power adapter (if attached), and remove the battery packs as described in Paragraphs 6.5.1 and 6.5.2.

Press the Cover Release Latch and open the notebook to a full 180 degree position.

Remove the Keyboard Assembly as described in Paragraph 6.5.6.

Remove the Heat Sink Assembly as described in Paragraph 6.5.7.

Remove the Cover-Display Assembly as described in Paragraph 6.5.9.

Remove the Top Cover Assembly as described in Paragraph 6.5.10.

Remove the screw securing the power Supply PWB to the Main PWB and remove the Power Supply PWB.

Reassembly is the reverse of Steps 1 through 7.

CN28

CN4

CN6

Figure 6-17 Removing/Replacing the Power Supply PWB Assembly

Field Service 6-23

6.5.14 Removing/Replacing the Audio PWB Assembly

The procedure for removing and replacing the Power Supply PWB Assembly is as follows:

1.

2.

3.

4.

5.

6.

7.

8.

Turn off the computer; disconnect the AC power adapter (if attached), and remove the battery packs as described in Paragraphs 6.5.1 and 6.5.2.

Press the Cover Release Latch and open the notebook to a full 180 degree position.

Remove the Keyboard Assembly as described in Paragraph 6.5.6.

Remove the Heat Sink Assembly as described in Paragraph 6.5.7.

Remove the Cover-Display Assembly as described in Paragraph 6.5.9.

Remove the Top Cover Assembly as described in Paragraph 6.5.10.

Remove two screws securing the Audio PWB to the Main PWB and disconnect three connectors (CN15, CN27 and CN28). Remove the PWB from the unit.

Reassembly is the reverse of Steps 1 through 7.

Figure 6-18 Removing/Replacing the Audio PWB Assembly

6-24 Field Service

6.5.15 Removing/Replacing the Main PWB Assembly

The procedure for removing and replacing the Power Supply PWB Assembly is as follows:

1.

2.

3.

4.

5.

6.

7.

8.

9.

10.

Turn off the computer; disconnect the AC power adapter (if attached), and remove the battery packs as described in Paragraphs 6.5.1 and 6.5.2.

Press the Cover Release Latch and open the notebook to a full 180 degree position.

Remove the Keyboard Assembly as described in Paragraph 6.5.6.

Remove the Heat Sink Assembly as described in Paragraph 6.5.7.

Remove the Cover-Display Assembly as described in Paragraph 6.5.9.

Remove the Top Cover Assembly as described in Paragraph 6.5.10.

Remove all PWB assemblies from the Main PWB Assembly and install on the replacement Main PWB Assembly.

Remove the three large posts (one visible, one under the Power Supply PWB and one under the Battery and HDD Transfer PWB). Note and record the location and size of hex screws (posts) for use during reassembly.

Remove the four screws and carefully remove the Main PWB Assembly.

Reassembly is the reverse of Steps 1 through 9.

Main PWB

Assembly

Bottom

Case

Assembly

Figure 6-19 Removing/Replacing the Main PWB Assembly

Field Service 6-25

6.5.16 Removing/Replacing the Battery/HDD Transfer PWB

Assembly

The procedure for removing and replacing the Battery/HDD Transfer PWB Assembly is as follows:

1.

2.

3.

4.

5.

6.

7.

8.

Turn off the computer; disconnect the AC power adapter (if attached), and remove the battery packs as described in Paragraphs 6.5.1 and 6.5.2.

Press the Cover Release Latch and open the notebook to a full 180 degree position.

Remove the Keyboard Assembly as described in Paragraph 6.5.6.

Remove the Heat Sink Assembly as described in Paragraph 6.5.7.

Remove the Cover-Display Assembly as described in Paragraph 6.5.9.

Remove the Top Cover Assembly as described in Paragraph 6.5.10.

Remove the three holding screws and remove the Battery/HDD Transfer PWB

Assembly.

Replacement is the reverse of Steps 1 through 7.

Battery/HDD

Board

Figure 6-20 Removing/Replacing the Battery/HDD Transfer PWB Assembly

6-26 Field Service

6.5.17 Removing/Replacing the Display FRUs

The procedure for removing and replacing the Display FRUs is as follows:

1.

2.

3.

4.

5.

Turn off the computer; disconnect the AC power adapter (if attached), and remove the battery packs as described in Paragraphs 6.5.1 and 6.5.2.

Press the Cover Release Latch and open the notebook to a full 180 degree position.

Remove the Cover-Display Assembly as described in Paragraph 6.5.9.

Refer to Figure 6-21 and remove the desired display FRU.

Replacement is the reverse of Steps 1 through 4.

LCD

Panel

Display

Cover

LCD Flex

Cable

Display

Bezel

Transfer

PWB Assembly

Inverter

PWB

Flex Cable,

Transfer to

Inverter

Flex Cable,

Main to

Transfer

Figure 6-21 Removing/Replacing Internal Display FRUs

Field Service 6-27

A

Schematic Diagrams

A.1 Introduction

This section contains schematic diagrams for the Extensa 660 Notebook Computer.

Schematic Diagrams A-1

Figure A-1 Motherboard PWB Logic Diagrams (Sheet 1 of 23)

A-2 Schematic Diagrams

Figure A-2 Motherboard PWB Logic Diagrams (Sheet 2 of 23)

Schematic Diagrams A-3

Figure A-1 Motherboard PWB Logic Diagrams (Sheet 3 of 23)

A-4 Schematic Diagrams

Figure A-1 Motherboard PWB Logic Diagrams (Sheet 4 of 23)

Schematic Diagrams A-5

Figure A-1 Motherboard PWB Logic Diagrams (Sheet 5 of 23)

A-6 Schematic Diagrams

Figure A-1 Motherboard PWB Logic Diagrams (Sheet 6 of 23)

Schematic Diagrams A-7

Figure A-1 Motherboard PWB Logic Diagrams (Sheet 7 of 23)

A-8 Schematic Diagrams

Figure A-1 Motherboard PWB Logic Diagrams (Sheet 8 of 23)

Schematic Diagrams A-9

Figure A-1 Motherboard PWB Logic Diagrams (Sheet 9 of 23)

A-10 Schematic Diagrams

Figure A-1 Motherboard PWB Logic Diagrams (Sheet 10 of 23)

Schematic Diagrams A-11

Figure A-1 Motherboard PWB Logic Diagrams (Sheet 11 of 23)

A-12 Schematic Diagrams

Figure A-1 Motherboard PWB Logic Diagrams (Sheet 12 of 23)

Schematic Diagrams A-13

Figure A-1 Motherboard PWB Logic Diagrams (Sheet 13 of 23)

A-14 Schematic Diagrams

Figure A-1 Motherboard PWB Logic Diagrams (Sheet 14 of 23)

Schematic Diagrams A-15

Figure A-1 Motherboard PWB Logic Diagrams (Sheet 15 of 23)

A-16 Schematic Diagrams

Figure A-1 Motherboard PWB Logic Diagrams (Sheet 16 of 23)

Schematic Diagrams A-17

Figure A-1 Motherboard PWB Logic Diagrams (Sheet 17 of 23)

A-18 Schematic Diagrams

Figure A-1 Motherboard PWB Logic Diagrams (Sheet 18 of 23)

Schematic Diagrams A-19

Figure A-1 Motherboard PWB Logic Diagrams (Sheet 19 of 23)

A-20 Schematic Diagrams

Figure A-1 Motherboard PWB Logic Diagrams (Sheet 20 of 23)

Schematic Diagrams A-21

Figure A-1 Motherboard PWB Logic Diagrams (Sheet 21 of 23)

A-22 Schematic Diagrams

Figure A-1 Motherboard PWB Logic Diagrams (Sheet 22 of 23)

Schematic Diagrams A-23

Figure A-1 Motherboard PWB Logic Diagrams (Sheet 23 of 23)

A-24 Schematic Diagrams

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