CIEH Model Licence Conditions and Guidance for Dog Breeding Establishments January 2014

CIEH Model Licence Conditions
and Guidance for Dog Breeding
Establishments
January 2014
The Chartered Institute of Environmental Health – January 2014
Breeding of Dogs Acts 1973 and 1991
Breeding and Sale of Dogs (Welfare) Act 1999
Model Conditions for inspection of breeding
establishments
Guidance for local authorities and their authorised
officers and veterinary inspectors
Acknowledgements
The following organisations comprise the working
party:
• A
dvisory Council on the Welfare Issues of Dog
Breeding
• British Small Animal Veterinary Association
• British Veterinary Association
• City of London Corporation
• D
epartment for Environment, Food and Rural
Affairs (Defra)
• Dogs Trust
• Epping Forest District Council
• The Kennel Club
• R
oyal Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to
Animals
as to the legal position.
Background
In 1978 the BVA published guidelines for local
authorities and their veterinary inspectors under
the Breeding of Dogs Act 1973. In 1996 a
working party comprising representatives of all
the parties involved in the inspection and licensing
of breeding establishments was set up to update
and substantially increase the guidance in light of
developments since the 1973 Act. In 1998 the BVA
published guidance based upon the 1973 and 1991
Breeding of Dogs Acts. That guide was revised to
take into account the requirements of the Breeding
and Sale of Dogs (Welfare) Act 1999 and superseded
previous BVA guidelines. In 2012 as a result of a
specific request by Defra the current working party
came together to update guidance for Inspectors
to include the provisions that must be taken into
account under the Animal Welfare Act 2006. In
addition, guidance with regards to puppy rearing,
socialisation and habituation have been produced
through the Animal Welfare Foundation / RSPCA
Puppy Contract and the Dogs Trust and Kennel Club
Puppy Plan.
Guidelines for Standard Operating Procedures (SOPs)
have been produced, all of which should help the
inspection process.
This document has been prepared in the best
interests of animal welfare and to advise those tasked This document applies to England only.
with the inspecting, advising and licensing of dog
breeding establishments. No responsibility or liability
for loss or consequential loss occasioned to any
person as a result of making use of this publication
(including the recommended best practice contained
within), is accepted by the contribution bodies, the
members of the working party or the authors of this
publication. It should also be borne in mind that laws
change and expert advice should always be sought
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Model Conditions for Inspection of Breeding Establishments
The Chartered Institute of Environmental Health – January 2014
Contents
GENERAL
OTHER RELEVANT LEGISLATION
1. Introduction................................................................................................ 4
1. Health and Safety At Work Act 1974............................................... 22
2. Health and Welfare.................................................................................. 5
2. COSHH Regulations 2002..................................................................... 22
3. Definition of a breeding establishment.......................................... 5
3. Staff............................................................................................................... 22
4. Inspection of breeding establishments.......................................... 5
4. Waste............................................................................................................. 22
5. Powers of inspection under the 1991 Act...................................... 5
5. Nuisance...................................................................................................... 23
6. Fees................................................................................................................. 6
6. Dogs (Fouling of Land) Act 1996....................................................... 23
7. Commencement and duration of the licence.............................. 6
7. Clean Neighbourhoods and Environment Act 2005................. 23
8. Offences and disqualification............................................................. 6
8. Control of Dogs Order 1992................................................................ 24
9. Requirements of the 1973 Act (as amended)............................. 7
9. Welfare of Animals (Transport) Order England 2006............... 24
10. Record keeping....................................................................................... 7
10. Dangerous Dogs Act 1991................................................................ 24
11. Sale of dogs............................................................................................. 7
11. Dangerous Dogs (Amendment) Act 1997.................................. 24
12. Transport................................................................................................... 8
12. Animal Welfare Act 2006................................................................... 24
13. Insurance.................................................................................................. 8
13. Rabies Order 1974................................................................................ 24
14. Licence display........................................................................................ 8
14. Trade in Animals and Related Products Regulations 2011.. 25
15. Domestic and non-domestic breeders.......................................... 8
15. Regulatory Reform Order (Fire Safety) 2005............................. 25
16. Further information............................................................................... 8
USEFUL CONTACTS......................................................................... 26
MODEL CONDITIONS
1. Accommodation....................................................................................... 9
2. Management............................................................................................. 14
3. Disease control, vaccination and worming.................................... 18
APPENDICES
A. Useful Information.................................................................................. 27
B. The Puppy Plan.......................................................................................... 29
4. Emergencies/Fire Prevention............................................................... 18
C. The Breeding of Dogs (Licensing Records)
Regulations 1999.......................................................................................... 30
5. Transport...................................................................................................... 18
D. Kennel Sizes................................................................................................ 33
6. Health and welfare of the breeding bitch...................................... 19
E. Standard Operating Procedure - Cleaning..................................... 34
F. Standard Operating Procedure - Socialisation.............................. 35
G. Standard Operating Procedure - Habituation.............................. 37
H. Standard Operating Procedure - Feeding...........................39
I. Health and Welfare Plan......................................................................... 40
J. Emergency Evacuation / Contingency Plan................................... 42
K. Standard Operating Procedure - Daily Routine............................ 44
L. Inspection Template................................................................................ 45
3
Model Conditions for Inspection of Breeding Establishments
The Chartered Institute of Environmental Health – January 2014
Breeding of Dogs Acts 1973, 1991 & Breeding
and Sale of Dogs (Welfare) Act 1999 & Animal
Welfare Act 2006
Guidance for local authorities and their authorised officers and veterinary inspectors
1. INTRODUCTION
The 1973 Breeding of Dogs Act (‘the 1973 Act’)
requires proprietors of breeding establishments to be
licensed (see point 3 for the definition of a breeding
establishment). Under the authority of the 1973 Act,
local authorities may issue licences to proprietors
of breeding establishments stipulating conditions
which must be complied with by the licensee. No
person is entitled to a licence if at the time he/
she is disqualified from keeping a dog breeding
establishment, pet shop or boarding kennels or if
he/she has been disqualified from keeping dogs or
other animals as a result of specified convictions for
cruelty. However, a person aggrieved by refusal of a
local authority to grant a licence or by any condition
to which the licence is subject may appeal to a
Magistrates’ Court.
The 1991 Breeding of Dogs Act (‘the 1991 Act’)
extends the powers of inspection to unlicensed
premises, excluding a private dwelling, and is
discussed further at point 5 below.
In addition, the Animal Welfare Act (2006) states
that anyone responsible for an animal should take
reasonable steps to ensure that the animal’s needs
are met.
These needs include:
• a suitable environment/place to live
• a suitable diet including fresh water
• the ability to exhibit normal behaviour
• h
oused, as appropriate, either with or apart
from other animals
• p
rotection from and treatment of pain,
suffering, injury or disease
See also the Defra Codes of Practice:
The ability of the breeder to meet the above needs
should be taken into consideration when inspecting a
breeding establishment.
It should be remembered that the aim of the
licensing system is to ensure that minimum
standards of animal health and welfare are
maintained in breeding establishments. Licence
conditions will inevitably vary; however, local
authorities should bear in mind the principal aims as
set out in Section 1(4) of the 1973 Act as well as the
Breeding and Sale of Dogs (Welfare) Act 1999 (‘the
1999 Act’) which amends and extends the existing
breeding of dogs’ legislation.
Whilst the legislation allows local authorities to
specify any conditions in the licence that they
consider necessary or expedient in a particular
case, there is no power to impose other, unrelated,
conditions in the licence. The local authority can,
though, withhold a licence on grounds other than
failing to satisfy Section 1(4). This discretion is
referred to in that section. In addition, where a
breeding establishment previously operated illegally
and where the local authority believes it is necessary,
prosecution proceedings may still be brought
notwithstanding a licence being subsequently
granted.
Throughout the text and as a licence condition, the
following applies:
• U
nless otherwise stated, these conditions shall
apply to all buildings and areas to which dogs
have access and/or used in association with the
breeding of dogs.
• U
se of the term ‘kennel’ refers to combined
sleeping and individual outdoor run areas unless
otherwise specified.
https://www.gov.uk/government/uploads/
system/uploads/attachment_data/file/69390/
pb13333-cop-dogs-091204.pdf
4
Model Conditions for Inspection of Breeding Establishments
The Chartered Institute of Environmental Health – January 2014
2. HEALTH AND WELFARE
As highlighted above, the Animal Welfare Act 2006
makes owners and keepers responsible for ensuring
that the welfare needs of their animals are met.
Anyone who is cruel to an animal, or does not
provide for its welfare needs, may be banned from
owning animals, fined up to £20,000 and/or sent to
prison for up to 6 months.
Where there is concern for the health and welfare
of the dogs, veterinary advice must be sought. For
breeding establishments licensed under the 1999
Act, there are a number of safeguards to protect the
health and welfare of the bitch. For example, the
number of litters a bitch is allowed to have in her
lifetime is restricted to six. In addition, no more than
one litter may be born in any twelve month period
and bitches may not be mated if they are under one
year old (see also Section 6 - Health and Welfare of
the Breeding Stock and Litters).
3. DEFINITION OF A BREEDING
ESTABLISHMENT
The 1999 Act amends the definition of a breeding
establishment in the 1973 Act. A breeding
establishment is defined as any premises where the
business of breeding dogs for sale is carried out.
The reference to five litters per establishment per
year within the legislation should not be considered
a minimum threshold for requiring a licence. To be
clear, an establishment breeding less than five litters
would require a licence, where the dogs are bred
for sale as a business. Defra advise that it will be a
matter for local authorities and their legal advisers to
decide whether or not a particular establishment is
required to be licensed.
In summary, a person is presumed to be carrying out
the business of breeding dogs for sale where, they
breed and sell more than two litters in a 12 month
period, or during any 12 month period, five or more
litters are born to his/her bitches which are:
(a) kept by him at any premises during any period of
12 months;
(b) kept by any relative of his at those premises;
(c) kept by him elsewhere; and
(d) kept by any person under a breeding
arrangement with him. This presumptive test will not
apply if a breeder is able to prove that none of the
5
puppies born to bitches at their premises or under
a breeding arrangement was in fact sold during the
12 month period. More detailed guidance may be
found in the relevant circulars (See Annex A – Useful
Information).
4. INSPECTION OF BREEDING
ESTABLISHMENTS
Upon application for a licence which has not
previously been granted, the premises must be
inspected by a veterinary surgeon appointed by
the local authority and a local authority officer.
For subsequent applications the local authority
has discretion as to whether the inspection is
carried out by a veterinary surgeon, or a person
with the appropriate level of competence and a
local authority officer, or both. A report, following
inspection, shall be considered by the local authority
before determining whether or not to grant a licence.
It is recommended that inspections are carried out
well before the licence date for renewal to allow for
any repairs and/or maintenance to be completed
before the licence expires (see also Section 1 Accommodation).
Once a licence has been granted, regular inspections
should be carried out during the licence period (12
months) to protect the health and welfare of the
dogs, most particularly when there is concern over a
specific breeding establishment. Routine inspections
would normally take place once or twice a year, but
inspections may also be unannounced.
5. POWERS OF INSPECTION UNDER
THE 1991 ACT
The 1991 Act empowers a Justice of the Peace
to issue a warrant to any authorised person (e.g.
local authority inspector) to enter, by reasonable
force if necessary, and inspect unlicensed premises
(excluding private dwellings) where the Magistrate
is satisfied that there are reasonable grounds for
suspecting that a dog breeding business is being
unlawfully carried out without a licence.
It should be noted that although inspection of
unlicensed private dwellings is specifically excluded
under the 1991 Act, Section 1(3) allows a warrant
to be obtained in relation to a garage, outhouse or
other structure which belongs to the premises and
therefore may be inspected under this section.
Model Conditions for Inspection of Breeding Establishments
The Chartered Institute of Environmental Health – January 2014
Inspection of domestic premises is allowed where
licensed.
6. FEES
The cost of inspecting premises shall be met by the
local authority which has the power to charge fees
in respect of applications for licences and in respect
of inspections of premises. A local authority may set
the level of fees with a view to recovering reasonable
costs and may set different fees for different
circumstances.
Persons who shall not apply for a licence
• I f they are disqualified under (a) Protection of Animals Act (1911)
(b) Breeding and Sale of Dogs Act (1973) as
amended by Breeding and Sale of Dogs (Welfare)
Act 1991 and 1999
(c) Animal Welfare Act (2006)
• I f they have been disqualified from keeping
animals under any other (a) animal welfare legislation; or
(b) dog control legislation;
7. COMMENCEMENT AND DURATION
OF THE LICENCE
• A
person under the age of 16 years of age shall
not apply for a licence (Animal Welfare Act 2006)
A local authority has three months from the
application to determine whether to grant a licence.
The duration of the licence is for one year, effective
from either the day stated in the application or the
day the licence is granted, whichever is the later.
• A
person banned under the Animal Welfare
Act (2006) may not have care and control
of any animal and this should be taken into
consideration when cohabiting with a person
applying for any licence.
With previously unlicensed breeding establishments,
there is an expectation that all appropriate
conditions will be met before a licence is granted.
However, the situation is more complicated
where an application is made for a licence where
improvements are necessary.
8. OFFENCES AND DISQUALIFICATION
Whenever improvements/repairs are required, it is
recommended that the applicant for a licence be
notified in writing of:
(i) a schedule of works (preferably agreed with the
breeding establishment);
(ii) the date by which such works must be completed;
and
(iii) the consequences of non-compliance (that is,
refusal to grant a licence).
The local authority should apply discretion when
taking enforcement measures during the period for
compliance stated in the notice.
There may be occasions where the required remedial
work is extensive. In these circumstances the local
authority should agree a schedule of works to be
completed over a reasonable period of time and
ensure that the work is being carried out as agreed in
the Schedule (see para (i) above).
6
The court has powers to order imprisonment for
a term not exceeding three months and/or a fine
not exceeding level 4 on the standard scale upon
conviction for keeping a dog breeding establishment
without a licence.
There are additional powers for the court to order
cancellation of a licence, disqualification from
keeping an establishment which is required to be
licensed and disqualification from having custody
of any dog specified. Where the offender is not the
owner, there is provision to allow the owner to make
representations.
Where a disqualification order has been made in
respect of custody of a dog, the court may also make
an order for any dog described to be delivered to a
specified person and for the offender to pay for its
care until permanent arrangements are made. Local
authorities should have contingency plans in case
dogs need to be housed. A list of welfare and breed
rescue organisations may be helpful.
Upon conviction for intentionally obstructing or
delaying any person in the exercise of their powers
of entry or inspection as provided for by the Breeding
of Dogs Act 1991, the maximum penalty is a fine not
exceeding level 4 on the standard scale.
Model Conditions for Inspection of Breeding Establishments
The Chartered Institute of Environmental Health – January 2014
9. REQUIREMENTS OF THE 1973 ACT
(as amended)
objects specified in the paragraphs (a) to (i) of this
subsection.’
Section 1(4) of the Act states:
10. RECORD-KEEPING
‘In determining whether to grant a licence for the
keeping of a breeding establishment for dogs by
any person at any premises, a local authority shall in
particular (but without prejudice to their discretion to
withhold a licence on other grounds) have regard to
the need for securing:
(a) that the dogs will at all times be kept in
accommodation suitable as respects construction,
size of quarters, numbers of occupants, exercising
facilities, temperature, lighting, ventilation and
cleanliness;
(b) that the dogs will be adequately supplied
with suitable food, drink and bedding material,
adequately exercised, and visited at suitable
intervals;
(c) that all reasonable precautions will be taken
to prevent and control the spread among dogs of
infectious or contagious diseases;
(d) that appropriate steps will be taken for the
protection of the dogs in case of fire or other
emergency;
(e) that all appropriate steps will be taken to
secure that the dogs will be provided with suitable
food, drink and bedding material and adequately
exercised when being transported to or from the
breeding establishment;
(f) that bitches are not mated if they are less than
one year old;
(g) that bitches do not give birth to more than six
litters of puppies each in their lifetime; (see also
Appendix A - Useful Information on Kennel Club
registration of litters)
(h) that bitches do not give birth to puppies before
the end of the period of twelve months beginning
with the day on which they last gave birth to
puppies; and
(i) that accurate records (in a form prescribed by
regulations) are kept at the premises and made
available for inspection there by any officer of the
local authority, or any veterinary surgeon authorised
by the local authority to inspect the premises; and
shall specify such conditions in the licence, if granted
by them, as appear to the local authority necessary
or expedient in the particular case for securing all the
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Having regard to ‘...securing all the objects specified
in section 1 (4) (a) to (i) ...’ above, it is essential
that detailed records are kept covering all aspects
concerning the health and welfare of the dogs
since this will provide the inspector with valuable
information on the adequacy of the various regimes
in place within the breeding establishment. Records
will also be helpful should problems arise and for
supplying information to purchasers – completing
puppy contract etc. Therefore completing and
maintaining accurate records is regarded as
essential.
The Breeding of Dogs (Licensing Records)
Regulations 1999 (SI 1999 No 3192) prescribe the
form of records to be kept by licensed breeding
establishments in England and Wales. These records
must be kept on the premises and made available to
local authority inspectors or any veterinary surgeon
authorised by the local authority
(see also Appendix C).
11. SALE OF DOGS
The 1999 Act establishes restrictions on the sale of
dogs born at licensed breeding establishments. The
keeper of a licensed breeding establishment has
two methods of sale. He or she may either sell a dog
direct to its final home, provided the dog is not less
than eight weeks old and the keeper does not know
or believe that the buyer intends to sell the dog on.
Alternatively, he or she is restricted to sell to licensed
third parties, namely a licensed pet shop provided
the dog is wearing a collar with an identifying
tag or badge indicating the licensed breeding
establishment at which it was born. Extreme caution
should be exercised when selling puppies to third
parties.
The Sale of Dogs (Identification Tag) Regulations
1999 (Statutory Instrument 1999 No 3191)
require additional information to be shown on the
identifying tag, namely the date of birth of the dog
and any identifying number allocated to the dog by
the licensed breeding establishment where it was
born.
It is an offence for a licensed pet shop to sell a dog
Model Conditions for Inspection of Breeding Establishments
The Chartered Institute of Environmental Health – January 2014
which, when it was supplied by the licensed breeder
was wearing a collar with identification tag but was
not wearing the tag when it was supplied to the
purchaser.
12. TRANSPORT
Section 1(4)(e) of the 1973 Act is concerned with
safeguarding the welfare of dogs ‘when being
transported to or from the breeding establishment’.
Dogs and puppies being transported under these
circumstances should be properly supervised to
ensure compliance with the obligations under the
1973 Act. (See the Welfare of Animals (Transport)
(England) Order 2006 and Council Regulation (EC)
No. 1/2005 on the protection of animals during
transport and related operations under Other
Relevant Legislation).
16. FURTHER INFORMATION
Home Office Circular Number 53/1999 provides
guidance to local authorities in England on licensing
dog breeding establishments.
A list of useful addresses and relevant pieces of
legislation is included at the back of the guide.
13. INSURANCE
Insurance should be considered when operating a
breeding establishment. There may be dogs housed
on the premises which are ‘on loan’ for which the
breeding establishment proprietor may be liable.
Veterinary fees may be insured against.
Employers Liability Insurance is mandatory for
employers under the Employers Liability (Compulsory
Insurance) Act 1969.
Certificates of Insurance must be prominently
displayed.
14. LICENCE DISPLAY
A copy of the licence and its conditions must be
suitably displayed to the public in a prominent
position in, on or about the breeding establishment.
15. BREEDERS
There are generally two ways in which dog breeding
establishments are operated. Some breeders
maintain their stock within their private dwelling
house while a number of breeders keep dogs in
outside accommodation consisting of buildings of
one sort or another, either attached or separated
from the private dwelling but in which numbers of
dogs are bred. It should be borne in mind that there
are a number of breeders who keep dogs both in
their private dwelling and in other buildings.
8
Model Conditions for Inspection of Breeding Establishments
The Chartered Institute of Environmental Health – January 2014
MODEL CONDITIONS
1. ACCOMMODATION
The following definitions are provided for the purposes of inspection:
Kennel – this is the physical structure and area that consists of an indoor sleeping area and outdoor run
Run – A run is defined as an area attached to and with direct and permanent access from a kennel
Outdoor exercise area – a separate area from the kennel itself where dogs may, for example, exercise, play,
interact with other dogs and people
Crate – a safe, secure area that a dog can go into for short periods of time. Usually consists of a wire frame
with a removable tray in the base for bedding, but can also be plastic, or fabric. Uses include security,
transportation or following veterinary advice. NB: this should only be a temporary enclosure for a dog and
only where the dog is habituated to it
General
Kennel Construction
Condition
Condition
Dogs must at all times be kept in accommodation
suitable as respects construction, size of quarters,
numbers of occupants, exercising facilities,
temperature, lighting, ventilation and cleanliness;
Breeding and Sale of Dogs Act 1973 S.1(4)(a)
Where kennels are provided, within converted
outbuildings, consideration must be given to
cleaning, wildlife access, vermin control, natural
lighting and ventilation.
Dogs kept in domestic premises must have free
access to more than one room and every dog must
be provided with continual access to a comfortable,
dry, draught-free, clean and quiet place to rest.
Guidance
Local authorities may wish to refer to Council of
Europe guidelines (see Appendix D) and the Kennel
Club Assured Breeder Scheme which provide useful
guidelines for minimum kennel sizes These sizes are
not prescriptive. The assessor’s own expertise, opinion
and common sense will be applied, and consideration
given to the daily routine in place, the breed, and
temperament and activity levels of the animals kept.
Condition
Dog crates, where used (and whilst not acceptable
as permanent housing) must be of sufficient size
to allow each dog to be able to sit and stand at full
height, step forward, turn around, stretch and lie
down in a natural position and wag its tail without
touching the sides of the crate and to lie down
without touching another individual.
Guidance
Bitches with litters should be provided with further
space.
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Guidance
In new constructions, wood should not be used on
exposed surfaces of walls, floors, partitions, door
frames or doors in the dog kennelling area.
Existing buildings may be more expensive to adapt
and less efficient to operate than new build kennels.
Proposed building works may require approval from
the building control department and/or planning
department.
Where wood has been used in an existing construction
it must be smooth and treated to render it impervious.
The purpose of avoiding wood on surface structures of
kennel interiors is because of the possibility of damage
to the material caused by scratching or chewing by
dogs. Worn and splintered material is difficult to clean,
harbours bacteria, viruses and so on, and allows the
splinters to penetrate the animal’s skin.
Condition
All internal surfaces used in the construction of walls,
floors, ceilings, partitions, doors and door frames
must be durable, smooth and impervious, easily
cleaned and disinfected. Kennels must be free from
hazards and there must be no projections or rough
edges liable to cause injury.
Sleeping areas of kennels must be insulated so as to
CIEH Model Licence Conditions and Guidance for Cat Boarding Establishments 2013
The Chartered Institute of Environmental Health – January 2014
prevent extremes of temperature.
surfaced board.
Guidance
Constructing a solid partition provides a physical
barrier to infection.
All exterior wood should be properly treated against
wood rot, e.g. tanalised. Only non-toxic products should
be used.
The interior and exterior of the buildings should be
kept in good decorative order and repair. Outer paths,
gardens, exercise areas and general surroundings
should be kept in good, clean, safe condition.
Security
Condition
The construction must be such that the security of
the dog is ensured.
Fencing material must be safe and secure.
Guidance
Where galvanised welded mesh is used for fencing
and cages or kennels, the wire diameter should not be
less than 2mm (14 standard wire gauge) excluding
any covering and the mesh size should not exceed
5cm (2in).
Walls and Partitions
Condition
Walls with which dogs may come into contact must
be of smooth impervious materials, capable of being
easily cleaned and disinfected.
Guidance
Where concrete or other building blocks or bricks are
used, they should be sealed so as to be smooth and
impervious, and resealed as necessary.
Junctions between vertical and horizontal sections
should be coved. If impractical in existing premises, all
joints should be sealed.
It is suggested that partition walls between kennels
and individual exercise areas should be of solid
construction and of sufficient height to prevent direct
nose-to-nose contact between dogs.
Partition construction may be solid from floor to
ceiling, but this should not be to the detriment
of other welfare considerations such as the dog’s
outlook, lighting, ventilation. Suitable materials for the
construction of partition walls include properly surfaced
impervious brick/block constructions, moulded plastic,
glass reinforced plastic (GRP) and pre-formed plastic
Floors
Condition
Flooring must be of a non-slip, urine-resistant
material. It must be laid in a way and at a fall that
avoids the pooling of liquids. Slatted or wire mesh
floors must not be used.
Guidance
It is recommended that new kennels should
incorporate a damp proof membrane.
All floors of kennels and individual exercise areas
should be constructed and maintained in such a
condition as to prevent pooling of liquids.
Condition
Floors of all buildings, individual exercise areas and
kennels must be of smooth, impervious materials,
capable of being easily cleaned and disinfected while
providing sufficient grip for the animal to walk or run
without sustaining injury.
Guidance
In new constructions, it is recommended that floors
should be laid to a minimum fall of 1 in 80 leading to
a shallow drainage channel or effectively covered deep
drainage channel.
Communal exercise areas should also be suitably
drained to prevent pooling of liquids.
Ceilings
Condition
Ceilings must be capable of being cleaned and
disinfected.
Doors
Condition
Kennel doors must be strong enough to resist impact
and scratching and must be capable of being
effectively secured.
Guidance
Where metal bars and frames are used, they should be
of suitable gauge with spacing adequate to prevent
dogs and puppies escaping or becoming entrapped.
10 CIEH Model Licence Conditions and Guidance for Cat Boarding Establishments 2013
The Chartered Institute of Environmental Health – January 2014
Where metal edging is used, this should not present a
risk of injury to the dog.
exercise and sleeping areas so that all parts are
clearly visible.
Door openings should be constructed such that the
passage of water/waste is not impeded, or allowed to
accumulate due to inaccessibility.
Guidance
When designing kennel doors, regard should be had
to the health and safety of the person working in the
kennel, for example, large dogs may push against the
door which may give rise to difficulties in securing
the door and even to accidents to the person on the
opposite side of the door when it opens outwards.
A door which opens inwards may also reduce the
possibility of escape. (See Health and Safety at Work
Act 1974 under Other Relevant Legislation).
Condition
Windows
Condition
Windows must not pose a security risk and must be
escape proof for the protection of the dog as well as
the public.
Guidance
When windows are so situated that they could pose
a security risk, it is recommended that welded mesh
or reinforced glass, polycarbonate or other impactresistant material is used. (See Other Relevant
Legislation concerning the Control of Dogs Order and
the Dangerous Dogs Act).
Drainage
Condition
The establishment must be connected to mains
drainage or an approved sewerage disposal system.
(See Environmental Protection under Other Relevant
Legislation)
Guidance
Drainage channels should be provided near to the
kennel edge so that urine cannot pass over walk areas
in corridors and communal access areas. A separate
drainage channel may be needed in the exercise area.
Advice concerning waste water outlets should be
sought from the Environment Agency and/or, the local
authority. (See Environmental Protection under Other
Relevant Legislation)
Lighting
Condition
During daylight hours light must be provided to
Where practicable this should be natural light.
Lighting must be of sufficient standard to enable
efficient working both during and after daylight
hours.
Supplementary lighting, adequate to allow
inspection, must be provided throughout the
establishment.
Guidance
It is recommended that breeding establishments
should have a low level night light for use after daylight
hours.
Ventilation
Condition
Ventilation must be provided to all interior areas
without the creation of excessive, localised draughts
in the sleeping area.
Guidance
A balance should be struck between providing
adequate ventilation while avoiding unnecessary loss
of heat. Checks need to be made during the day and
night to allow for temperature fluctuations. Ventilation
is important in disease control. It provides protection
against accumulation of odour and prevents excessive
humidity. High humidity increases the risk of infectious
bronchitis (‘Kennel Cough’).
Kennel Design (Size, layout and exercise
facilities)
Condition
Kennels must be divided into sleeping and activity
areas.
Kennels must be provided with an adequate size of
sleeping area, such that dogs can stand, turn around,
stretch and lie down flat in a natural position, with
sufficient space for the door to open fully.
Guidance
Special consideration should be given to whelping
bitches and bitches in season. Kennels should cater for
the maximum number of puppies having regard to the
size of the breed and litter size. (See also Appendix D)
11 CIEH Model Licence Conditions and Guidance for Cat Boarding Establishments 2013
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When constructing kennels, an appropriate design and
correct materials should be used to overcome problems
of noise emission and to ensure energy conservation.
This is in order to minimise discomfort to the dog and
risk of nuisance to persons in the vicinity of the site.
(See Nuisance under Other Relevant Legislation).
Bedding must be capable of being easily cleaned and
disinfected.
All parts of the kennel should be easily accessible to
undertake thorough cleaning by staff.
Chewing or destruction of bedding should not result in
restricted access, rather alternative materials should be
tried.
Condition
Adequate exercise areas must be provided for all
kennels. How much space will depend upon the
size of the dog as well as the circumstances of each
breeding establishment. Dogs must be able to walk,
turn around easily, wag their tails without touching
the kennel sides, and lie down without touching
another dog.
Kennels and runs must open onto secure corridors
or other secure areas so that dogs are not able to
escape from the premises.
Exercise areas must not be used as sleeping areas
Outdoor areas where animals exercise and interact
cannot have strict temperature regulation. Dogs
must not be restricted to such areas when climatic
conditions may cause them distress. They must
have constant access to fresh clean water, shade
and shelter so they can avoid rain, wind, snow, ice or
direct sunlight, etc.
In adverse weather conditions, the responsible
person must decide whether or not dogs are given
free access to their run.
The run must be at least partially roofed to provide
the dog with sufficient protection against all
weathers.
Guidance
Depending upon the breed, consideration should be
given to covering the whole of the runs.
Beds and Bedding
Condition
The bed must have clean bedding and be large
enough for each dog to lie flat on their side.
Beds must be suitable to allow dogs to be comfortable,
ie of durable construction, be sited away from and
offer protection from draughts and be of a suitable size
for the size and type of dogs kept.
Guidance
All bedding material in use should be clean, nonirritant, parasite free and dry.
Number of Dogs Permitted
Condition
The maximum number of dogs to be kept at any one
time is to be determined by the Local Authority (see
also Appendix D).
The number of dogs permitted must relate to the
number and size of the kennels or space available
and should be stipulated clearly on the front sheet
of the licence. The decision regarding the number of
dogs permitted to be kept must take into account the
maximum likely litter size as well as the effectiveness
of site management.
Guidance
This figure should include any dogs kept on the
breeders’ premises which are not being used for
breeding and must not be exceeded.
Temperature in Accommodation
Condition
Heating facilities must be available in the kennel and
used according to the requirements of the individual
dog.
Guidance
There should be some part of the sleeping area where
the dog is able to enjoy a temperature of between
10˚C -26°C. Temperature should be relevant to the
type and breed of dog. If necessary, heating and/
or automatic cooling/ventilation should be used to
achieve this.
The materials used on the kennel exterior should offer
adequate protection against temperature variations
throughout the year. The difficulty of maintaining the
ideal temperature is acknowledged; however, these are
realistic temperatures and should not be exceeded in
normal circumstances.
12 CIEH Model Licence Conditions and Guidance for Cat Boarding Establishments 2013
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Condition
from all areas used by the dogs as necessary.
Devices used for heating and cooling must be
safe and free from risk of burning or electrocution.
Manufacturer’s instructions must be followed. Open
flame appliances must not be used. (See Health
and Safety at Work Act 1974 under Other Relevant
Legislation).
All sleeping areas and bedding must be kept clean
and dry.
Guidance
Advice should be sought from the Environment Agency
or local authority concerning removal of waste such as
dog faeces, soiled material and infectious material.
There should be the ability to record temperatures
at dog level. (See also Record Keeping at Section 6 –
Health and Welfare of the Breeding Stock and Litters)..
Facilities must be provided for the proper reception,
storage and disposal of waste.
Guidance
Condition
There will be periods in the year where ambient
external temperatures will cause temperatures to
fluctuate above or below the recommended levels.
If the higher temperature level is exceeded due to
structural shortcomings rather than normal ambient
temperature, then artificial means of counteracting
this high temperature should be introduced.
Measures must be taken to minimise the risks from
rodents, insects and other pests within the breeding
establishment.
Where temperatures fall below the recommended
level, the use of individual heating lamps for dogs may
prove adequate. In some circumstances additional
background heating will also be required.
Condition
Failure to give adequate attention to construction
and insulation may cause dogs to suffer and increase
running costs. Geographical orientation will affect
temperature, e.g. north facing openings make it
difficult to maintain adequate heating levels. Correct
orientation of the kennel will allow maximum use of
natural light.
Cleanliness
(see also Appendix E -Cleaning Standard
Operating Procedure (SOP))
Guidance
Such pests should be adequately dealt with without
delay to eradicate the infestation.
Foul waste water must be disposed of by discharge
to the appropriate or an approved
drainage system. Those wishing to operate an
incinerator must seek advice from the Environment
Agency and/or the local authority. (See
Environmental Protection under Other Relevant
Legislation)
Guidance
There is a range of cleaning regimes. The regime, for
which all establishments should have an SOP, should
include:
1. Removal of solids
Condition
2. Washing
All kennels, corridors, common areas, kitchens and so
on must be kept clean and free from accumulations
of dirt and dust so that disease control is maintained.
An agreed SOP must be followed.
3. Disinfection
Each occupied kennel must be cleaned daily at a
minimum.
Guidance
Regular disinfection should be demonstrated by
keeping records of disinfecting regimes (see also SOP Appendix E).
Condition
All excreta and soiled material must be removed
4. Drying
The physical collection of faeces is usual (‘poop scoop’
or shovel and bucket). The use of detergent and water
will ‘wash down’. Pressure hoses or steam cleaning
will wash down more effectively. Bacteria, viruses,
fungi need to be controlled by the sanitising process.
Because disinfectant is washed away after a short
period of time, the long term activity of chemicals
used to control viruses, bacteria and fungi should be
considered (see also SOP – Appendix E).
Great care should be taken when using any chemicals.
Chemicals and materials should be used and
13 CIEH Model Licence Conditions and Guidance for Cat Boarding Establishments 2013
The Chartered Institute of Environmental Health – January 2014
stored correctly. (See notes on COSHH Regulations
under Other Relevant Legislation). Combinations
of bactericides, fungicides and virucides may prove
expensive to use and may not necessarily provide the
best system. Professional advice should be sought for
the most effective method.
Guidance
The following link includes DEFRA’s approved
disinfectant list for statutory use on disease control.
http://disinfectants.defra.gov.uk/Default.
aspx?Module=ApprovalsList_SI
Condition
(See column (v) – general orders)
Staff working from kennel to kennel further increase
the risk of spreading disease. Staff should be trained
in good kennel hygiene. Complete disinfection of
kennel and equipment should be carried out between
occupancies.
Where a bitch is whelped in a domestic environment
it is acceptable for a temporary disposable covering to
be used.
Varnishing wood will make it impervious.
The whelping area must be maintained at an
appropriate temperature. The bitch must be able to
move away from heat spots.
Guidance
There should be an area maintained between 26-28
degrees Celsius. This can be achieved with a local heat
source such as a heat lamp.
Whelping Facilities
Puppies under four weeks of age should be kept at a
temperature between 26°C (79°F) to 28°C (82°F) with
provision for the bitch to move to a cooler area.
Condition
Condition
There must be a separate whelping pen or room for
each whelping bitch in which to whelp. There must
be direct access to the whelping area for kennel
personnel without disturbing the general kennel
population. Once separated there must be increased
social contact with humans.
Bitches must be adequately supervised during
whelping and records kept of:
Guidance
Bitches should be moved to their whelping
accommodation 60 days after mating or sooner if
signs of imminent whelping are shown.
• time of birth of each puppy
• puppies’ sex, colour and weight
• placentae passed
• any other significant events.
Bitches must be allowed a minimum of four periods
a day for toileting and exercise away from their
puppies.
Condition
Each whelping pen must be constructed of easily
cleanable impervious materials. The area must be
cleaned regularly and a record kept of cleaning
procedures. The whelping pen must have a divider to
allow the bitch to access an area where she cannot
be reached by the puppies. There must be natural
daylight.
There must be a whelping bed raised off the floor
and with sides high enough to prevent new born
puppies from falling out. The bed must contain
sufficient bedding to ensure a soft surface for the
bitch and to enable the absorption of mess resulting
from whelping. The bed must be constructed of
easily cleanable impervious material and must be
thoroughly cleaned and disinfected between litters.
Bitches in Season
Guidance
Consideration should be given to separating bitches in
season and they should not be kept with entire male
dogs.
2. MANAGEMENT
General
Condition
Dogs must be adequately supplied with suitable
food, drink and bedding material, adequately
exercised, and visited at suitable intervals; BDA 1973
S.1(4)(b)
The 1999 Act strengthens the requirements for dogs
to be visited at suitable intervals.
14 CIEH Model Licence Conditions and Guidance for Cat Boarding Establishments 2013
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The Animal Welfare Act (2006) sets out the Duty of
Care which must be met by the person responsible
for the animals (see Animal Welfare Act under Other
Relevant Legislation)
is evidence that the standards maintained or the
condition and behaviour of the animals is being
compromised, or where an unrealistic routine is in
place.
Guidance
Condition
(See also Appendix L - Daily Routine SOP).
Sufficient adequately trained staff must be available
every day to carry out all the interactions and
procedures with dogs specified in this document.
Guidance
Supervision
Condition
A fit and proper person must always be present to
exercise supervision and deal with emergencies.
Guidance
Any person with responsibility for supervision should be
over the age of 16.
Where staff are employed, ideally a written training
policy should be provided. Training of staff, whether
permanent or temporary, should be demonstrated
(via appropriate training records) to have been carried
out on all aspects of the care of all ages of dogs
and updated regularly. Staff should be adequately
trained in the work they are expected to carry out. For
example, in handling dogs safely and in procedures to
be followed in the event of an emergency. (See Health
and Safety at Work Act 1974 under Other Relevant
Legislation).
The following are regarded as essential topics to be
covered in the training programme relating to the
care of dogs: Animal Health and Welfare; Cleanliness
and Hygiene; Feeding and Food Preparation; Disease
Prevention and Control; Recognition of Sick Animals;
Dog Handling; Health and Safety; Emergency
Procedures, Normal Whelping and Responsible
Breeding.
Condition
Establishing the number of staff required will require
an assessment of the conditions at the establishment.
As a guideline, it may be considered that a full time
attendant may care for up to 20 dogs. In domestic
environments, it is advisable for other members of the
household, or dog sitters to be provided with guidance
notes in regard to general day to day care – feeding,
grooming, cleaning, exercise and compatibility issues
– especially where several dogs, or breeds of dogs, are
involved.Guidance
Condition
Dogs must not be left alone for long periods and
must be checked at the start and end of every
working day and regularly by a member of staff at
least every four hours during the day.
Guidance
These checks should be more frequent when bitches
are imminently due to whelp, whelping and puppies
that are not yet weaned (See also Section 2 –
Management and Section 6 – Health and Welfare of
the Breeding Stock and Litters).Condition
Environmental Enrichment and Exercise
There are a variety of animal care courses available
and staff should be encouraged to attend Relevant
NVQs attained at Level 2 or the equivalent should
enable staff to gain a minimum level of competency.
Condition
Numbers of staff
Guidance
Condition
Toy and activity feeders that are changed regularly are
ideal enrichment. There should be more toys or feeders
than there are dogs in the kennel. The use of raised
beds and the ability to move out of other dogs’ sight
should be provided (see also Puppy Plan Annex B).
Numbers of staff must be appropriate for the breed/
type and number of dogs being bred. Numbers must
be sufficient to provide the level of care set out in
these model conditions.
Guidance
Staff numbers should be of concern when there
Dogs must be provided with environmental
enrichment and the ability to have some control over
their environment.Guidance
Condition
Breeding establishments are the permanent home
for some dogs and therefore provision of exercise
15 CIEH Model Licence Conditions and Guidance for Cat Boarding Establishments 2013
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facilities must be adequate for the long term. Dogs
must not be kept permanently confined.
Arrangements must be made for the dogs to be
exercised at least twice a day.
Guidance
Exercise may also be provided by walking. Where
dogs are exercised off the premises, reference should
be made to the Clean Neighbourhoods Environment
Act (2005) and the Control of Dogs Order 1992 (see
Other Relevant Legislation). The name, address and
telephone number (including the emergency number)
of the establishment’s veterinary practice should be
displayed prominently preferably by the telephone.
Handling and habituation
Condition
Breeding dogs must be handled and examined
regularly to identify changes in health, weight and
behaviour, also to ensure dogs are habituated to
handling by people. This is particularly important for
bitches, as fear of people will influence development
of puppy behaviour
Guidance
An SOP for the socialisation and habituation of
puppies from birth to the point of sale should be used
(see also Puppy Plan Annex B and Annexes F & G on
Socialisation and Habituation).
Food and Water Supplies
Condition
All dogs must be adequately supplied with suitable
food. Clean water must be available at all times
and changed at least daily. Dogs must be fed a
diet appropriate to their age, breed, activity level
and stage in the breeding cycle. Dogs must be fed
individually with separate bowls. Food must be stored
in vermin-proof containers and fresh food must be
refrigerated.
Guidance
The dog’s weight should be monitored and recorded
quarterly and diets adjusted where necessary, unless
otherwise advised by a veterinary surgeon or a
significant change in the dog’s weight/body condition
is noticed.
Condition
Eating and drinking vessels must be capable of being
easily cleansed and disinfected to prevent crosscontamination. They must be maintained in a clean
condition and cleaned and disinfected or disposed of
after each meal.
Guidance
If necessary, the veterinary surgeon should be
consulted to advise. Special dietary considerations
should be given to young and old dogs and to
whelping and nursing bitches. Nutrition is particularly
important during pregnancy and lactation and
consideration should be given to the varying nutritional
requirements of individual dogs. Body condition
score should be monitored and feeding adjusted
appropriately. (See also Annex H - SOP on feeding).
Condition
Dogs must be fed sufficiently well to maintain health.
Guidance
Inspectors should observe the general condition of the
dogs and check on the quantity of food in store and
the process of preparation.
Weaning Procedures
Condition
Puppies must start the weaning process as soon as
they are capable of ingesting food on their own. The
food offered must be appropriate for the stage of
development of the puppies.
Puppies at weaning must initially be offered food
five times a day. It must be ensured that each puppy
takes the correct share of the food offered.
Guidance
Weaning should normally commence at 3-4 weeks old.
The initial diet may be liquid progressing to solid food
over the ensuing period.
Condition
During lactation, the bitch must have sufficient
appropriate food to satisfy the demands being made
upon her.
16 CIEH Model Licence Conditions and Guidance for Cat Boarding Establishments 2013
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Guidance
First-Aid Kit for Dogs
Lactation will last until the puppies are weaned.
Condition
Consideration should also be given to how many
puppies the bitch is nursing. During lactation the bitch
should be closely monitored for signs of complications
(eg eclampsia). The feeding level required for the bitch
after weaning will depend upon her body condition.
A fully maintained first-aid kit suitable for use on
dogs and puppies must be available and accessible
on the premises.
Where a proprietary food source is used the
manufacturer’s guide should be followed. Veterinary
advice should be sought if in doubt.
Food provision can be used to enhance enrichment,
for example through the use of devices increasing
the time and effort taken to access food (e.g. puzzle
feeders, activity balls, stuffed rubber toys). Where
these are used they should be cleaned and disinfected
thoroughly between each use. Where dogs are kept in
pairs or larger groups, more devices should be available
than the number of dogs, use should be monitored
carefully to identify where aggression occurs. Dogs
which show aggression associated with feeding, or
when provided with food based enrichment, should be
separated from other dogs prior to feeding.
Guidance
A veterinary surgeon should be consulted concerning
its contents and a competent member of staff should
be in charge of its maintenance.
Isolation Facilities
Condition
Veterinary advice must be sought for any animal
with a potentially infectious disease.
Guidance
Where advised, the dog should be isolated
immediately and the procedure documented.
Condition
Kitchen Facilities
Facilities for isolation must be available when
required. Isolation facilities must be used where the
presence of infectious disease is suspected or known.
Condition
Guidance
Facilities, hygienically constructed and maintained,
must be provided for the storage and preparation of
food for the dogs.
Procedures should be in place, and understood by
all staff, to prevent the spread of infectious disease
between isolated animals and the other dogs.
Where fresh and cooked meats are stored,
refrigeration facilities must be provided. Food
contamination must be avoided.
Condition
A sink with hot and cold running water must be
available for washing kitchen utensils and eating and
drinking vessels.
Guidance
A separate hand basin with hot and cold running water
should be provided for staff.
Condition
Containers for storing foods must be provided and
must be constructed and maintained to guard
against insects and other pests.
Cross-contamination must be avoided.
Guidance
Dishes and bedding should be washed separately from
domestic items.
Isolation facilities must be in compliance with the
other licence conditions but must be physically
separate from other dogs.
Guidance
Intervening buildings and construction detail (ie
window and door positions) should be taken into
account because individual circumstances may
significantly affect the recommended distance.
For airborne diseases, ideally a distance of at least 5
m (15 ft). The requirement for 5 m distance between
isolation facilities and the other dogs is based upon
consideration of the distance that airborne infection
can carry.
Condition
Hands must be washed after leaving the isolation
facilities before handling other dogs.
Protective clothing, footwear and equipment, for use
17 CIEH Model Licence Conditions and Guidance for Cat Boarding Establishments 2013
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For the occasions where it is not possible to evacuate
only in the isolation facility, must be used to reduce
the spread of infection and must not be worn outside the dogs to alternative locations other contingency
measures should be in place, this may include long
the isolation facility.
term provision of feed/water or euthanasia (see
Guidance
Appendix K on Euthanasia).
The use of disposable clothing is recommended.
A management regime should be followed where an
isolation case is being handled. For example, isolation
cases must be cared for after all other dogs have been
attended to. Records of the isolation cases and the
management regime to be followed should be kept.
(See also Record Keeping under Section 6 – Health and
Welfare of the Breeding Stock and Litters).
Condition
Complete disinfection of the isolation facilities and
equipment must be carried out once vacated.
3. DISEASE CONTROL, VACCINATION
AND WORMING
General
Condition
All reasonable precautions must be taken to prevent
and control the spread among dogs of infectious or
contagious diseases; BDA 1973 S.1(4)(c). Licence
holders must take all reasonable steps to protect the
animal from pain, suffering, injury and disease.
All breeding establishments must be registered with
a Veterinary Practice and ensure full details are made
available to the Licensing Authority.
Guidance
Registered breeders should produce a health and
welfare plan (see Appendix I) approved by a veterinary
surgeon. This should be updated on an annual basis
and needs to take into account the health, preventive
treatment, socialisation, and welfare of the animals.
4. EMERGENCIES/FIRE PREVENTION
General
Condition
There must be Emergency Evacuation and
Contingency Plans (see Appendix J) in place which
meets approval with the local authority, and in
consultation with the local authority.
Guidance
5. TRANSPORT
Section 1(4)(e) of the 1973 Act is concerned with
safeguarding the welfare of dogs ‘when being
transported to or from the breeding establishment’.
General
Condition
Dogs and puppies being transported to and from
breeding establishments must be properly supervised
to ensure compliance with the obligations under the
1973 Act.
All appropriate steps must be taken to ensure that
the dogs will be provided with suitable food, drink
and bedding material and adequately exercised
when being transported to or from the breeding
establishment.
Bitches must not be transported in the last stages of
pregnancy, ideally not from 54 days after mating,
unless to a veterinary surgeon for treatment.
Bitches must not be transported for 48 hours after
whelping unless it is to see a veterinary surgeon for
treatment.
Guidance
It is recommended that records are kept of the
vehicles used when dogs are transported, as well as
details of journeys undertaken (see Record-keeping
section below at Section 6- Health and Welfare of
the Breeding Stock and Litters). (See also the Welfare
of Animals (Transport) (England) Order 2006 under
Other Relevant Legislation). All vehicles are considered
commercial and subject to EU Transport Regulation
1/2005.
Condition
Whenever dogs are transported they must be fit
and healthy for the intended journey. Injured and/
or diseased dogs must not be transported (except for
minor illness or injury, as determined by trained and
competent staff) unless they are being taken to a
veterinary surgery.
Contingency plans should also include consideration
for alternative housing for a large number of dogs.
18 CIEH Model Licence Conditions and Guidance for Cat Boarding Establishments 2013
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Guidance
The transporting of distressed dogs should be avoided
whenever possible.
When transporting animals, there is a general duty
of care to protect them from injury or unnecessary
suffering (see Article 4 of Welfare of Animals
[Transport] [England] Order 2006) and to also ensure
they are transported in suitable containers. If the
transportation is carried out in connection with an
‘economic activity’, as defined by the Regulations,
then there are further legal requirements to comply
with under this legislation. Furthermore, there is a
requirement under the Highway Code that animals
should be “suitably restrained” when transported (Rule
57, Highway Code). Any vehicle used for transporting
dogs should be suitable and have the correct
ventilation and temperature control so that the dog
remains comfortable during the journey, whatever
the outside temperature. Dogs should not be left
unattended in a vehicle for any length of time.
Dogs should not be fed within two hours of a journey
and should be exercised immediately before they are
loaded to give them the opportunity to go to the toilet.
During a journey dogs should be securely and
comfortably confined. If a dog is transported alone
in a container, he or she should have enough space
to stand, sit erect, lie in a natural position and turn
around normally while standing up for long journeys. If
transported with other dogs, there should be sufficient
space for all the dogs to carry out all these behaviours
without touching other dogs.
If transporting adult dogs by road, sufficient breaks
should be offered for water and the chance to go to
the toilet.
Condition
Puppies must not be transported before eight
weeks of age without their dam unless a veterinary
surgeon agrees otherwise for health and/or welfare
reasons, or in an emergency (See Welfare of
Animals (Transport) Order (England) 2006 - Council
Regulation (EC) No 1/2005).
Guidance
Where possible, puppies should be trained to stay
calmly in a crate by using reward-based training prior
to transportation.
6. HEALTH AND WELFARE OF THE
BREEDING STOCK AND LITTERS
Mating
Condition
Bitches must not be mated if they are less than one
year old.
BDA 1973 S. 1(4) (f)
Guidance
It is the responsibility of the licensee to make every
reasonable effort to ensure that both sires and bitches
are in good health prior to mating. This includes
checking for the presence of both infectious and
genetically inherited diseases which may affect the
health of either parent or resulting puppies. Where
necessary, veterinary advice should be sought.
Breeding stock should be selected on their
temperament and genetic health. Dogs that
have required surgery to rectify an exaggerated
conformation that has caused adverse welfare
(e.g. an excessively flat face or short nose or eyelid
abnormalities etc.) should not be bred from.
Dogs with exaggerated conformations that may be
associated with adverse welfare should not be bred
from.
Maximum Number of Litters
Condition
Bitches must not give birth to more than six litters of
puppies each in their lifetime.;
BDA 1973 S. 1(4) (g)
Guidance
(See also KC guidance on number of litters - Appendix
A)
Twelve Months Between Litters
Condition
Bitches must not give birth to puppies before the end
of the period of twelve months beginning with the day
on which they last gave birth to puppies; BDA 1973 S.
1(4) (h)
19 CIEH Model Licence Conditions and Guidance for Cat Boarding Establishments 2013
The Chartered Institute of Environmental Health – January 2014
Social Contact for Dogs and Socialisation of
Puppies
Adult Dogs
Condition
Social contact is very important, and all dogs used for
breeding must be kept in an environment that allows
adequate social contact with both other dogs and
people.
Guidance
Social contact with other dogs may be achieved
through pair or group housing, although the
behaviour of individuals within each group should be
monitored carefully for signs of aggression or fear. The
compatibility of the dogs may vary depending on the
stage of the breeding cycle (seasons and lactation)
and this should be monitored carefully. Dogs which
show behavioural signs of fear or anxiety associated
with contact with other dogs may be better housed
and exercised singly, as long as they are provided with
sufficient human contact. They should not be used for
breeding. A policy should be in place for monitoring
the introduction of new dogs to existing groups in
either domestic or kennel environments, to avoid stress
to either new or resident animals.
Bitches close to whelping and when lactating should
not generally be mixed with other adult dogs. On these
occasions where dogs have to be kennelled on their
own, the level of social contact with humans should be
increased to compensate.
When the social contact is provided by humans, the
contact should be for the majority of the day. When
dogs are kept in a kennel environment this should be
the working day and in a domestic environment the
normal waking hours of the household.
Puppies
See also Puppy Plan (Appendix B).
Condition
Puppies must be handled regularly from shortly after
birth for short periods (e.g. gently picking up and
examining) to habituate them to human contact
and to examine them for any sign of disease and to
ensure they are feeding properly.
Guidance
The early experience of puppies has a profound
effect on their adult behaviour, and it is important
that the facility has in place an adequate programme
to socialise puppies and prepare them for life in a
domestic environment. SOPs should be available
so that all staff know how to appropriately socialise
puppies.
Where bitches are anxious or aggressive when puppies
are approached, this process should be gradual to
acclimatise the bitch to the presence of people around
the litter.
Condition
From 3 weeks old puppies must be habituated
to events likely to be encountered in a domestic
environment.
Guidance
This should include the sights and sounds in
households, such as appliances, as well as differing
surfaces on which to walk. Introduction to novel sights
and sounds should be gradual so that puppies do not
show a fearful response such as startling or withdrawal.
Puppies should also be introduced to a variety of
people including adults of both sexes, children of
different ages, and wearing a variety of clothing styles.
Condition
To learn social skills with other dogs, puppies must be
maintained as a litter or with puppies of a similar age
and size.
Guidance
They should also ideally be introduced to nonaggressive and healthy, vaccinated adult dogs in
addition to the bitch. However, it is also important for
puppies to start to learn to be separated from others,
so should be separated from litter mates and the bitch
for short periods from the age of six weeks. During
periods of separation there should be human social
contact.
Household sounds may occur naturally in domestic
environments but could be achieved through the
playback of recordings for dogs housed in kennels.
Record Keeping
(See also Appendix C)
Condition
Accurate records in a form prescribed by regulations
as shown below must be kept at the premises and
made available for inspection there by any officer
of the local authority or any veterinary surgeon,
authorised by the local authority to inspect the
20 CIEH Model Licence Conditions and Guidance for Cat Boarding Establishments 2013
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premises; BDA 1973 S. 1(4) (i)
• accommodation temperatures;
The Breeding of Dogs (Licensing Records)
• d
etails of any isolation cases and the management
regime in place;
Regulations 1999 (SI 1999 No 3192) prescribe the
form of records to be kept by licensed breeding
establishments. These records must be accurate
and kept on the premises and made available to
local authority inspectors or any veterinary surgeon
authorised by the local authority.
A record must be kept by every licensed dog breeder
for each breeding bitch providing the name of
the bitch, date of birth, address where she is kept,
breed, description, date of mating and details of
sire. Licensed dog breeders must also keep a record
of any litters, including the sex of the puppies, date
of birth, weight, description and total number in the
litter. The record must also show the details of sale,
namely the date of sale, name and address of who
was supplied and the status of the purchaser (ie,
private owner or pet shop).
• details of vehicles used for transporting dogs, as
• w
ell as time and length of journeys taken. Records
should also show which dogs are transported and
their destination;
• date and cause of death if known;
• N
umber of dogs required to be euthanised, reason
for euthanasia, date of euthanasia and the name
of the veterinary surgeon in attendance;
• N
umber of breeding bitches retired, details of each
individual breeding bitch’s microchip (or other
permanent identification) number, outcome for the
bitch e.g. rehomed and to where
• I f dogs have come from abroad, specific additional
information should be recorded.
Guidance
• Health Plan (Annex I)
Although the sub-section does not provide any
scope for flexibility, the Home Office guidelines to
local authorities expect local authorities to take into
account any difficulties in relation to factors beyond
the breeder’s control, such as when a bitch whelps
prematurely. Accurate records showing matings and
whelpings will be essential.
• health screening test results;
Additional records will provide useful information to
the local authority inspectors should problems arise. It
is suggested that this information should include:
• T
he details and number of all dogs kept on the
premises, including movement on and off the
premises;
• puppy contract
This list is by no means exhaustive.
Documentation should also be routinely provided to
purchasers of puppies, for example as a ‘puppy pack’,
including information on the puppy’s diet, worming
history, five generation pedigree where relevant, any
parental or puppy health check results, any veterinary
treatment or ongoing medication, health insurance,
socialisation history, and advice on ongoing care.
Purchasers of puppies should also receive a puppy
contract (AWF/RSPCA), and full contact details of the
breeder. (See also Puppy Plan – Annex B).
• oestrus dates of breeding bitches;
• m
icrochip or tattoo numbers or other suitable form
of permanent identification. If the dogs are KC or
breed association registered, these numbers should
also be recorded;
• w
here dogs are under a breeding arrangement,
the details of such dogs, together with their
whereabouts;
• v accination and worming records and details of
other veterinary treatment given;
• cleaning and disinfecting regimes (see also SOP);
• feeding and exercise routines;
21 CIEH Model Licence Conditions and Guidance for Cat Boarding Establishments 2013
The Chartered Institute of Environmental Health – January 2014
Other relevant legislation
ALL LEGISLATION IS CORRECT AT DATE OF
PUBLICATION – PLEASE CHECK CURRENT STATUS
OF LEGISLATION AT TIME OF INSPECTION
• introduce and maintain control measures;
References to other relevant legislation are made
simply to alert the reader to other issues, such as
those relating to health and safety matters, as
well as environmental protection, which should
also be considered in the operation of a breeding
establishment.
• regularly review risk assessments and the
effectiveness of control measures.
References to legislation should not be taken as a
detailed explanation of the law, and this publication
may not refer to all legislation that may be relevant
depending on the circumstances.
It should be borne in mind that laws change and
expert advice should always be sought as to the
current legal position.
A list of useful addresses is included at the back of
the guide
1. Health and Safety at Work etc Act
1974
Employers must ensure the safety of their
workers, both voluntary and paid, and visitors to
the workplace. This is underpinned, inter alia, by
the Health and Safety at Work etc Act 1974 and
the Management of Health and Safety at Work
Regulations 1999. A safe system of work must be
in place and there must be adequate training and
supervision. For example, staff employed to handle
dogs must be competent and properly trained for the
work they are expected to carry out.
The Health and Safety Executive (hse.gov.uk) and/
or the local authority should be contacted for further
advice and information.
2. Control of Substances Hazardous to
Health (COSHH) Regulations 2002
These Regulations require employers to:
• assess the risks to health from work activities
which involve a hazardous substance, e.g., chemicals
or micro-organisms;
• prevent or, where this is not reasonably
practicable, adequately control exposure to the
hazardous substances;
• inform, instruct and train employees about the
risks and precautions to be taken;
These Regulations also cover zoonoses (diseases
transmitted between animals and people, such as
Salmonellosis, Toxocariasis and Toxoplasmosis)
and suitable advice on risks and precautions
should be brought to the attention of staff. Staff
should also be appropriately vaccinated. It is vital
that those working with dogs are aware of the
importance of preventing disease transference. Cross
-contamination risks are high and good hygiene is
important.
3. Staff – Workplace (Health, Safety and
Welfare) Regulations 1992, Health
and Safety (First-Aid) Regulations
1981, Personal Protective Equipment
at Work Regulations 1992
Suitable and sufficient toilet and washing facilities
must be available for staff in accordance with health
and safety requirements. There is a general duty
on employers to ensure there is adequate first aid
provision for employees. The minimum requirement
is a suitably stocked first-aid box, an appointed
person to take charge of first-aid arrangements
and information for employees about first-aid
arrangements, such as where the first-aid box is and
who the appointed first-aider is. Every employer must
ensure that suitable personal protective equipment
is provided to his employees who may be exposed to
a risk to their health or safety while at work except
where and to the extent that such risk has been
adequately controlled by other means which are
equally or more effective. Accordingly Staff may
need to be provided with items such as protective
clothing, dog catching devices and muzzles.
For guidance see HSE: www.hse.gov.uk
4. Waste – Environmental Protection Act
1990 and related legislation
Certain waste may only be passed to registered
carriers or appropriate licensed or authorised disposal
facilities. Those wishing to dispose of waste on their
22 CIEH Model Licence Conditions and Guidance for Cat Boarding Establishments 2013
The Chartered Institute of Environmental Health – January 2014
premises or operate an incinerator must seek advice
from the local authority.
The type of waste likely to be produced by breeding
establishments would include faeces, soiled material,
waste water, blood and other discharges, and tissue.
There are regulations which pertain to the collection,
carriage and disposal of such waste and place a duty
of care on those producing and handling certain
types of waste, particularly animal by-products.
Advice should be sought from the Environment
Agency Regional Office which produces information
sheets and from AHVLA or from the local authority.
5. Nuisance – Environmental Protection
Act 1990
It is important to consider the potential problem of
noise and odour nuisance. Such noise or odour that
is prejudicial to health or a nuisance may amount
to a statutory nuisance in relation to which Local
authorities may serve an abatement notice and,
if this is ignored, a summons may follow. Persons
aggrieved may also complain on notice.
Monitoring a single dog barking at close range may
produce a reading in the region of 95 dB(A). It is
important to design and site kennels to prevent any
cause for complaint from neighbours. The choice of
appropriate materials, and their correct use in design,
in terms of preventing noise (and odour) nuisance
is extremely important. It should be borne in mind
that if the nuisance is unreasonable having regard to
the area, a cause of action could still arise even if the
nuisance was already present when the complainant
moved to the area. If the nuisance amounts to a
public nuisance such “prescription”, as it is known, will
never be a defence.
Environmental Health Officers within the local
authority should be able to give further advice
and guidance on nuisance problems and related
statutory provisions. Certain types of noise, for
example, are the subject of specific statutory
controls.
6. Dogs (Fouling of Land) Act 1996
This Act empowers local authorities to designate
certain land for the purpose of making it an
offence to allow a dog to defecate on such land. If
the person in charge of a dog allows that dog to
defecate on designated land and fails to remove the
faeces forthwith, then that person will be guilty of
an offence, unless he has reasonable excuse or has
the consent of an authorised person not to remove
the faeces. It should be borne in mind that the
Act specifically states that it will not be considered
reasonable excuse if the person is without the means
to remove the faeces or is unaware that the dog has
defecated.
The Dogs (Fouling of Land) Act 1996 is only
applicable in England and Wales.
Department of the Environment Circular No.
18/1996: Dogs (Fouling of Land) Act 1996 provides
useful guidance on the Act. Where dogs are
exercised off premises, the provisions of this Act
should be borne in mind.
7. Dog Fouling – Clean Neighbourhoods
and Environment Act 2005
Part 6 of the Clean Neighbourhoods and
Environment Act 2005 relates to dogs and became
law in 2006. Under this Act local authorities and
parish councils in England and Wales have been
given the powers to introduce new Dog Control
Orders (DCOs) in respect of any land in their area to
which the public are entitled or permitted to have
access with our without payment.
This Act empowers local authorities to designate
certain land for the purpose of providing for offences
relating to the control of dogs which, inter alia, can
include offences relating to the fouling of land by
dogs and the removal of dog faeces.
The Dogs (Fouling of Land) Act 1996 is largely
repealed by this Act. Some savings were made
by Article 4 of the Clean Neighbourhoods and
Environment Act 2005 (Commencement No. 1,
Transitional and Savings Provisions) (England) Order.
The Dogs (Fouling of Land) Act 1996 empowered
local authorities to designate certain land for the
purpose of making it an offence to allow a dog to
defecate on such land without removing the faeces
forthwith and the savings provide that the Dogs
(Fouling of Land) Act 1996 shall continue to have
effect in respect of any land which is designated
land before 6 April 2006, save to the extent that a
DCO applies in respect of it, if the designation order
in question is revoked or, if the designation order in
question is amended so as to reduce the extent of
the designated land, to the extent of that reduction.
The savings also mean that various other legislative
provisions shall continue to apply in respect of the
continued effect of the 1996 Act in the form in which
they were immediately prior to the enactment of the
23 Model Conditions for Inspection of Breeding Establishments
The Chartered Institute of Environmental Health – January 2014
Clean Neighbourhoods and Environment Act 2005. 8. The Control of Dogs Order 1992
This Order replaces and extends the Control of Dogs
Order 1930 and provides that every dog, subject to
specific exceptions, while in a highway or in a place
of public resort shall wear a collar with the name and
address of the owner inscribed on the collar or on
a plate or badge attached to it. It should be noted
that it is the local authority which has the power to
enforce the Order, not the police force for any area.
9. The Welfare of Animals (Transport)
Order (England) 2006
• The transport legislation, which in England
administration and enforcement of Council
Regulation (EC) No 1/2005 on the protection and
related operations, makes it an offence to transport
any animal (not exhaustive):;
• that is unfit ;Unless there are arrangements for
its needs to be met during the journey, including
unloading at the place of destination, and for its
welfare conditions to be regularly checked and
appropriately maintained;
• using violence or any method likely to cause
unnecessary fear, injury or suffering when
handling the animals. N.B., the use of instruments
administering electric shocks is recognised, but is to
be avoided if at all possible.
There are general rules on the construction and
maintenance of vehicles. There are also speciesspecific rules. Specific requirements include
ventilation and loading equipment such as ramps.
Animals must be transported with sufficient space
to prevent suffering. There are also rules on the
segregation of non-compatible animals.
Animal Transport Certificates (ATCs) must
accompany vertebrate animals on most journeys as
part of a economic activity, although farmers are
exempted from carrying an ATC when transporting
their own animals in their own means of transport on
journeys up to 50 km from their holding, or as part of
seasonal transhumance. The information required is
set out in Article 4(1) of Council Regulation (EC) No
1/2005; there is no prescribed legal format but Defra
does provide a suggested form.
10. Dangerous Dogs Act 1991
from having in their possession or custody dogs of a
type specified in Section 1. It enables restrictions to
be imposed in relation to other types of dog which
present a serious danger to the public and makes
further provision for ensuring that dogs are kept
under proper control by their owners and those in
charge of them.
The Home Office has released several circulars on
the 1991 and 1997 Acts and these may be obtained
from the relevant Government Departments.
11. The Dangerous Dogs (Amendment)
Act 1997
The Dangerous Dogs (Amendment) Act 1997
amends the Dangerous Dogs Act 1991 and allows
the Courts limited discretion where previously a
destruction order would have been mandatory.
12. Animal Welfare Act 2006
The Animal Welfare Act 2006 makes owners and
keepers responsible for ensuring that the welfare
needs of their animals are met. These include the
need:
• for a suitable environment (place to live)
• for a suitable diet
• to exhibit normal behaviour patterns
• to be housed with, or apart from, other animals
(if applicable)
• to be protected from pain, suffering, injury, and
disease
Anyone who found guilty of an offence of causing
unnecessary suffering to an animal or failing to
provide for its welfare needs may, among other
sanctions, be banned from owning animals, fined
(in the case of causing unnecessary suffering, up to
£20,000) and/or sent to prison.
13. Rabies (Importation of Dogs, Cats
and Other Mammals) Order 1974,
Council Directive 92/65/EEC
of 13 July 1992 laying down animal health
requirements governing trade in and imports into the
Community of animals, semen, ova and embryos not
subject to animal health requirements laid down in
specific Community rules.
The Dangerous Dogs Act 1991 prohibits persons
24 CIEH Model Licence Conditions and Guidance for Cat Boarding Establishments 2013
The Chartered Institute of Environmental Health – January 2014
14. Trade in Animals and Related
Products Regulations 2011, Regulation
(EC) No 998/2003
of the European Parliament and of the Council of
26 May 2003 on the animal health requirements
applicable to the non-commercial movement of pet
animals
Dogs can be imported into Great Britain and
therefore England for trade (N.B., the exchange
of payment is not a necessary element of trade in
this context), which would include breeding, from
another EU Member State, Norway, Switzerland
or Liechtenstein without undergoing quarantine,
provided the requirements of the Trade in Animals
and Related Products Regulations 2011 and Council
Directive 92/65/EEC are met. N.B., Council Directive
92/65/EEC has been amended on several occasions
and also makes certain requirements of Regulation
(EC) No 998/2003 (of the European Parliament and
of the Council of 26 May 2003 on the animal health
requirements applicable to the non-commercial
movement of pet animals) part of the trade
requirements.
These requirements are quite complicated and
further information is available from the Animal
Health and Veterinary Laboratories Agency www.
defra.gov.uk/ahvla-en/.
15. Regulatory Reform Order (Fire
Safety) 2005
The Order imposes a number of specific duties in
relation to the fire precautions to be taken. These
include:
• suitable and sufficient assessment of the risks
• implementation of preventive and protective
measures
• e limination or reduction of risks from dangerous
substances
• p
rovide appropriate fire-fighting equipment,
including fire detectors and alarms which is easily
accessible and simple to use
appropriate procedures, including safety drills and
emergency arrangements, to be followed in the
event of serious and imminent danger to relevant
persons
• e nsure that the premises and any facilities,
equipment and devices provided are maintained
in efficient working order and in good repair
• a
ppoint one or more competent person to assist
in undertaking the preventive and protective
measures
• provide employees, and the employer of any
employees from an outside undertaking who are
working in or on the premises, with comprehensible
and relevant information on risks, preventive and
protective measures, procedures in place
• provide employees with adequate safety training
and inform them of their duties under the Order
This publication is intended to be helpful but
represents only a statement of opinion. It does
not contain legal advice or a complete statement
of the law. It should not be used as a substitute
for legal advice or as the basis for giving advice
without checking the primary sources. References
to legislation should not be taken as a detailed
explanation of the law, and this publication may
not refer to all legislation that may be relevant
depending on the circumstances. Legal advice
should always be obtained on specific facts or on
the adaptation of model conditions to specific
circumstances.
No responsibility or liability for loss or consequential
loss occasioned to any person, as a result of making
use of this publication (including the recommended good practice contained within), is accepted by the
contributing bodies, the members of the working
party or the authors of this publication. It should
also be borne in mind that laws change and expert
advice should always be sought as to the current
legal position.
• e nsure that routes to emergency exits from
premises and the exits themselves are kept clear
at all times and are adequate with regard to
use, equipment and dimensions of the premises
and the maximum number of persons who may
present there at any one time
• establish and, where necessary, give effect to
25 CIEH Model Licence Conditions and Guidance for Cat Boarding Establishments 2013
The Chartered Institute of Environmental Health – January 2014
USEFUL CONTACTS
Advisory Council on the Welfare Issues
of Dog Breeding
Website: www.dogadvisorycouncil.com
Email: heather@drydraytonestate.com
Animal Health and Veterinary
Laboratories Agency
Website: www.defra.gov.uk/ahvla-en Animal Welfare Foundation
7 Mansfield Street, London W1G 9NQ
Tel: 020 7908 6375
Email: bva-awf@bva.co.uk
British Veterinary Association
7 Mansfield Street, London W1M 0AT
Tel: 020 7636 6541
Fax: 020 7436 2970
Email: bvahq@bva.co.uk
British Small Animal Veterinary Association
Woodrow House, 1 Telford Way
Waterwells Business Park, Quedgeley,
Gloucestershire GL2 2AB
Tel: 01452 726700
Fax: 01452 726701
Website: www.bsava.com
Email administration@www.bsava.com
Chartered Institute of Environmental Health
Chadwick Court, 15 Hatfields, London SE1 8DJ
Tel: 020 7928 6006
Fax: 020 7827 5862
Local Government Association
Smith Square, London SW1P 3HZ
Tel: 020 7664 3000
Fax 020 7664 3030
Website: www.local.gov.uk
Email: info@local.gov.uk
Department for Environment,
Food and Rural Affairs
Nobel House, 17 Smith Square London SW1P 3JR
Tel: 08459 33 55 77
Website: www.defra.gov.uk
Email: defra.helpline@defra.gsi.gov.uk
Dogs Trust
17 Wakley Street, London EC1V 7RQ
Tel: 0207 837 0006
Website: www.dogstrust.org.uk
Email: info@dogstrust.org.uk
Health and Safety Executive
Website: www.hse.gov.uk
Home Office
Direct Communications Unit
2 Marsham Street, London SW1P 4DF
Tel: 020 7035 4848
Fax: 020 7035 4745
Website: www.homeoffice.gov.uk
Email: public.enquiries@homeoffice.gsi.gov.uk
International Sheep Dog Society
(Registration authority for sheep dogs)
Clifton House, 4a Goldington Road
Bedford MK40 3NF
Tel: 01234 352672
Fax: 01234 348214
Email: office@isds.org.uk
The Kennel Club
1-5 Clarges Street, Piccadilly London W1J 8AB
Tel: 0844 463 3980
www.the-kennel-club.org.uk
AWF/RSPCA Puppy Contract
www.puppycontract.org.uk
Royal College of Veterinary Surgeons
Belgravia House, 62-64 Horseferry Road
London SW1P 2AF
Tel: 020 7222 2001
Fax: 020 7222 2004
Email: info@rcvs.org.uk
Website: http://findavet.rcvs.org.uk
The Royal Society for the Prevention of Cruelty
to Animals
Wilberforce Way, Southwater
Horsham, West Sussex RH13 9RS
Website: www.rspca.org.uk
The Stationery Office
Tel: 0870 600 5522
Trading Standards
Please contact your local authority for details.
26 CIEH Model Licence Conditions and Guidance for Cat Boarding Establishments 2013
The Chartered Institute of Environmental Health – January 2014
APPENDIX A
Useful information
Kennel Club Litter Registration
The Kennel Club of the UK will not register a litter
if the bitch was under one year old at the time of
mating or if she has already whelped four litters.
Neither will it register a first litter if the bitch has
reached the age of eight years of age at the date
of whelping. Also if: the offspring are the result of
any mating between father and daughter, mother
and son or brother and sister, save in exceptional
circumstances or for scientifically proven welfare
reasons; the dam has already had two litters
delivered by caesarean section, save for scientifically
proven welfare reasons and this only normally
provided the application is made prior to the mating;
or the dam was not resident at a UK address at the
date of whelping.
There are schemes in place for screening for
hereditary conditions in dogs. The BVA, in
conjunction with the Kennel Club and the
International Sheep Dog Society, encourages
responsible breeding through its Canine Health
Schemes. Breeders may have their dogs screened for
various hereditary and breed-related conditions to
assist them to make responsible breeding decisions.
27 CIEH Model Licence Conditions and Guidance for Cat Boarding Establishments 2013
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28 Model Conditions for Inspection of Breeding Establishments
The Chartered Institute of Environmental Health – January 2014
APPENDIX B – The Puppy Plan
The latest version of the Puppy Plan, supported by
Dogs Trust and the Kennel Club, can be downloaded
here: www.thepuppyplan.com/
29 Model Conditions for Inspection of Breeding Establishments
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APPENDIX C – Record Keeping
30 CIEH Model Licence Conditions and Guidance for Cat Boarding Establishments 2013
The Chartered Institute of Environmental Health – January 2014
31 CIEH Model Licence Conditions and Guidance for Cat Boarding Establishments 2013
The Chartered Institute of Environmental Health – January 2014
32 CIEH Model Licence Conditions and Guidance for Cat Boarding Establishments 2013
The Chartered Institute of Environmental Health – January 2014
APPENDIX D – Minimum Kennel Sizes
Council of Europe guidelines: Kennel size
• T
he kennel area should be large enough to allow
separate sleeping and activity areas.
• T
he kennel must be sufficiently large to allow
each dog to be able to walk, turn around and wag
its tail without touching the sides of the kennel,
to play, to stand on its hind limbs and to lie down
without touching another individual.
• T
he minimum kennel size should be at least
4m2 for dogs under 20kg, and 8m2 for dogs
over 20kg. This should be increased in relation
to size, and number of dogs, such that both the
length and width are sufficient for all the dogs
to lie outstretched at all angles with neither
their tail nor snout touching the walls or another
individual.
• B
itches with litters should be provided with
double this space allowance.
• F or post weaned stock, the following minimum
enclosure dimensions and space allowances
should apply (taken from Council of Europe
(2006)):
Weight of dog Minimum enclosure
(kg)
size (m2)
Minimum floor area/
animal (m2)
Minimum height (m)
Up to 5
4
0.5
2
Over 5 to 10
4
1.0
2
Over 10 to 15
4
1.5
2
Over 15 to 20
4
2
2
Over 20
8
4
2
• F or dogs over 30kg these sizes should be scaled
up accordingly and should be proportionate.
33 Model Conditions for Inspection of Breeding Establishments
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APPENDIX E – Cleaning SOP
Cleaning
Bleach – Sodium Hypochlorite
In a domestic environment the hygiene measures
that are normally used in a household will also
protect the welfare and health of the dogs. Faeces
should be removed from the exercise areas on a daily
basis to reduce the likelihood of infection and to
prevent any roundworm larvae from maturing.
Bleach is commonly thought of a disinfectant and
does have some disinfectant properties. However it is
not as effective at killing bacteria, viruses and fungi
as more commonly used commercial disinfectants
and it may cause toxic effects to animals and staff
as well as degrading the structure of the building.
Bleach acts as a oxidiser and is therefore corrosive
to both materials and animals. High concentrations
can cause ulceration of the skin and mucous
membranes (inside the mouth and conjunctiva). If
mixed with some other disinfectants it can release
toxic gases that are harmful to both humans and
animals causing severe respiratory distress. Generally
bleach is not a suitable disinfectant for use in animal
premises.
When adult dogs are kennelled there is likely to
be a greater level of contamination and therefore
cleaning should be more structured.
Daily: remove all soiled material and wash
contamination away using detergent if necessary.
Dry after cleaning. Remove soiled bedding and
replace with clean. Hose down and dry exercise areas
where impervious material is used. Dispose of faeces
according to waste regulations.
Weekly: remove all furniture from kennels, hose down
using disinfectant and allow to dry before returning
furniture. Replace all bedding.
Litters of puppies require a more intensive cleaning
regime.
Daily: remove all soiled bedding as required to
ensure the area is kept clean and dry, and dispose of
appropriately. Wash soiled areas using detergent and
dry while the litter is being exercised.
Recently whelped bitches require even more work.
Daily: remove all soiled bedding as required to
ensure the area is kept clean and dry, and dispose of
appropriately. Wash soiled areas using disinfectant
twice daily and replace bedding while the bitch is
being exercised.
34 Model Conditions for Inspection of Breeding Establishments
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APPENDIX F – Socialisation SOP
Socialisation of puppies to people
Principles
Puppies need to meet a range of different people
during their ‘socialisation period’ (between about
3 and 12 weeks of age) to ensure that they accept
contact with people as a normal and positive part
of life. During this period, puppies learn what is
‘normal’ in their environment and what to expect
in different circumstances. It is therefore important
for all puppies to learn that contact with all sorts of
different people is a normal part of life. They also
need to learn about the various types of interaction
that people have with dogs. For example, they need
to accept being handled all over, picked up, their
feet being handled and cleaned, ears examined,
coat groomed, and nails cut. They also need to learn
about the various things that people do, for example,
coming in and out of the house/kennel area. They
also need to learn that sometimes people interact
and play, but at other times they may be present but
not interacting with the puppies.
The aim of a structured socialisation programme
is to give puppies the best chance of coping well
with the various types of people, circumstances in
which they appear, and ways in which they interact
with dogs, before they are homed to a domestic
environment. In order to ensure that they develop a
positive perception of people, it is important for the
introduction of new experiences to be gradual and
controlled. It is also important that puppies are not
already anxious or fearful when they interact with
people, as this will increase the risk that they will
associate contact with a negative experience.
Preparation
• P lan in advance how you will ensure that puppies
experience different types of people. All puppies
should have contact with a minimum of four
people. This should include at least one person
of each gender. It should also include at least
one person who is above retirement age. Puppies
should also experience controlled contact with
children. Ideally this should include at least one
older child (> 8 years), and also a baby or toddler.
For safety, children should only have contact with
puppies under the supervision of their parents or
responsible adult. Where access to young children
is not feasible, puppies should be exposed to the
noises of babies and young children using good
quality recordings.
• P repare in advance any items which will help
broaden puppies’ experience of people. For
example, having a brightly coloured and rustling
jacket (as worn by postmen or delivery people),
a motorcycle helmet, a cap, a back-pack, a
pushchair, a zimmer frame and an umbrella
available will mean that people engaged in
socialising the puppies can introduce puppies to
items that they will commonly see associated
with people as adults.
• E nsure that puppies are in an environment in
which they are familiar before socialisation starts
• M
ake sure that you have toys and food treats
available before starting the socialisation sessions
• S ocialisers should be familiar with behavioural
signs of anxiety in puppies to ensure appropriate
intensity of interaction for individual puppies
Socialisation to different types of people
• P uppies should be familiar and confident with
their main carer before the introduction of further
people. This person should spend time playing
and interacting with puppies until all of the
puppies in the litter approach the carer voluntarily
on entering the kennel/room. Where individual
puppies show signs of fear or anxiety, such as
cowering at the back of the pen, moving away,
trembling, or pulling back on contact, they should
be given additional attention. This should involve
the carer being quiet and calm, crouching or
sitting a short distance away from the puppy and
encouraging the puppy to approach. Approach
should be rewarded with food treats. Interaction
with nervous puppies should develop with gentle
stroking on the chest area: avoid putting the
hand directly towards the puppy’s head as this
may be perceived as threatening. With increased
confidence, the puppy can be gradually stroked
on the shoulder, back, flanks and head.
35 Model Conditions for Inspection of Breeding Establishments
The Chartered Institute of Environmental Health – January 2014
• O
nce all puppies in a litter confidently approach
and interact with their main carer, a programme
of introduction to other people can be started.
Puppies’ response to the introduction of one
other person should be evaluated first. Signs of
fear or anxiety in individual puppies should be
addressed as by the main carer. Once puppies
confidently interact with the second person,
further new people can be introduced. These
should include adults of both gender.
that periods of contact with family members
sometimes involves interaction, but sometimes
also periods when people are busy doing other
things. In addition, puppies need to accept all the
things that people regularly do with their dogs,
such as examining their ears, smoothing them
all over, reaching over them, stepping over them,
drying their feet and grooming them.
• T
o ensure that puppies accept as normal people
coming and going into a household, ensure that
• When puppies are confidently interacting with
they experience this during the socialisation
a number of adults in a familiar environment,
period. Puppies need to accept that it is
they can be introduced to people in different
normal for people to come and go out of their
circumstances. For example they should
environment, and that this is neither scary, nor
experience people coming and going through a
necessarily predictive of positive interaction. This
threshold (e.g. door in a household), and meeting
can be achieved by asking friends or neighbours
people when they are in an outside garden or run.
to come in and out of the area in which puppies
are housed. They can be asked to sometimes
• The socialisation programme can then be
ignore puppies during short visits, and sometimes
expanded to include contact with children where
interact with puppies, but only doing so once they
possible. Older children can interact with puppies,
are calm and quiet.
but should be instructed how to appropriately
handle and play with puppies before the
• To ensure that puppies have appropriate
interaction begins. Contact with children
expectations of human contact they need to
should be supervised at all times to prevent the
spend time with people when they experience
occurrence of negative experiences for either
play and interaction, but also periods where
puppies or children. Where younger children or
people are present but not interacting with
babies are introduced to puppies, they should be
puppies. This will better simulate their life with
held by their parents. Should direct contact with
people after re-homing than always expecting
children be impossible, puppies should experience
people to engage in interaction with them.
the range of noises made by babies and children
The latter expectation commonly develops
through use of a good quality sound recording
where puppies are housed away from normal
(see SOP for introducing noises to puppies).
family activity and people only go in to see the
puppies to play or interact with them. To make
• Puppies should be given additional experience
sure that puppies which are housed in kennels
about the variation in the ways people might
or quiet areas of the house develop appropriate
appear to them through the use of ‘props’. For
expectations of interaction, ensure that family
example people can interact with the puppies
members spend time with the puppies when
wearing a fluorescent jacket, motorcycle helmet
interaction does not occur, for example by sitting
or backpack. They can also walk past the puppies
quietly and reading a book or watching TV.
using a ‘zimmer frame’ or pushing a push chair
or trolley. These experiences will help puppies
• Every puppy should be handled all over by at
to learn that all these variations of how people
least four people. They should also be picked
appear are a normal part of life.
up and cuddled, have their feet and ears
examined, and be turned over. Throughout all of
Ensuring puppies are familiar with different
these interactions puppies should be observed
types of interaction
carefully for signs of fear or anxiety. Should such
behaviours occur, interactions should stop, and be
• In the domestic environment, dogs need to
subsequently re-introduced in a manner that the
accept that people come and go regularly from
puppy finds less threatening.
the house, and that this is not a cause for either
anxiety or excitement. They also need to learn
36 Model Conditions for Inspection of Breeding Establishments
The Chartered Institute of Environmental Health – January 2014
APPENDIX G – Habituation of Puppies SOP
Habituation of puppies to household
and potentially aversive noises
Principles
The aim of giving puppies experience of noises
before they are homed is to ensure that they
perceive such noises are ‘normal’ and ‘unimportant’
to protect against the development of fear responses
later in life. In order to achieve this, every puppy
needs to be exposed to noises at such a volume
that they never show signs of anxiety or fear. In this
way, sounds become a normal part of each puppy’s
experience. Before starting this program, you should
make sure that you are familiar with behavioural
signs of anxiety and fear in dogs.
It is important that puppies are not already anxious
or fearful when they first hear noises, as this will
increase the risk that they will associate the noises
with a negative experience. It is therefore important
to ensure that puppies are relaxed, or engaged in
positive behaviours such as play, before exposure
to noises. Noises need to be first presented at a
low volume to ensure that none of the puppies
show signs of anxiety. It is better to start at a very
low volume, where noises are barely audible to
the human ear, to ensure that no puppies respond
negatively. The puppies need to be observed to
ensure that no signs of anxiety or fear occur. They
should continue playing or interacting as if nothing
different has happened. Where no signs of anxiety
or fear are identified, the volume of the sound can
be slightly increased in the subsequent session.
This process is repeated, with the volume of noises
increased gradually over sessions, ensuring that the
puppies do not react in a negative manner. Should
any puppy show signs of anxiety during a session,
the sound should be stopped immediately. Once
the puppy is relaxed again, the sound should be
repeated but at a lower volume, such that the puppy
no longer reacts. Subsequent increases in volume
should be made in smaller increments.
Preparation
• P lan in advance how you will ensure that puppies
experience a range of household noises, such as
washing machines, vacuum cleaners, doorbells,
telephones, radio or TV, and food mixers. In a
domestic environment, this may be through
direct exposure as events occur in the household;
in kennels good quality recordings of these
noises may be required. These are available
commercially (e.g. ‘Sounds Sociable’ is a CD with
a range of noises for puppy habituation).
• C
onsider how you will ensure that puppies will
be exposed to sounds which do not occur in the
household, such as fireworks, gunshots, traffic
and thunder. These sounds are usually best
introduced in a controlled manner using good
quality recordings. Direct exposure of puppies to
loud noises such as fireworks risks causing a fear
response in some individuals.
• E nsure that puppies are in an environment in
which they are familiar before habituation starts
• M
ake sure that you have toys and food treats
available before starting the habituation
• E nsure familiarity with behavioural signs of
anxiety in puppies to ensure appropriate levels of
noise exposure at each stage
Habituation to household noises
• I n a domestic environment, habituation to most
household noises may occur through everyday
exposure. For this to occur, puppies need to spend
some time in areas of the house where normal
household appliances and routines occur. Where
puppies are housed in a quiet area of the house,
moving them to busy parts of the house for
periods of time is beneficial. Exposure to louder,
potentially aversive sounds, such as vacuum
cleaners should be gradual. For example, initially
a switched off vacuum cleaner can be left in an
area occupied by puppies. Subsequently, the
appliance can be moved around, whilst switched
off. The next stage may be to have the appliance
turned on but immobile and in an adjacent room,
then in the same room, and finally both turned
on and moving. During all stages of habituation,
puppies should be observed carefully for signs
of anxiety and fear. Where these occur, the
appliance should be turned off, and subsequent
sessions start again at a lower level of exposure.
37 Model Conditions for Inspection of Breeding Establishments
The Chartered Institute of Environmental Health – January 2014
• W
here puppies are housed entirely in quiet areas
of a house or in kennels, exposure to household
noises is through playing recordings of noises.
Noises should be played at times when puppies
are engaged in positive activities, such as play.
Recordings should be initially played at a low
volume, such that they are just audible to people,
and the volume increased over subsequent
sessions provided that puppies do not show
signs of fear. Recordings should include those
noises to which dogs will commonly encounter in
the domestic environment, such as telephones,
doorbells, vacuum cleaners and washing
machines.
Habituation to non-household noises
• P repare or acquire good quality recordings of
relevant noises in advance. The noises which
commonly cause fear and anxiety in dogs are:
fireworks, traffic, trains, aeroplanes, gunshots,
hot air balloons and thunder. Recordings should
enable the presentation of these sounds as
separate elements (e.g. the ‘whizz’ and ‘bang’
of fireworks presented separately as well as
together), and include the variations in types of
noise which dogs are likely to encounter later in
life (e.g. shotgun and rifle sounds).
the recording, the volume can be slightly
increased during the next session, provided
puppies do not show signs of fear or anxiety.
• T
he protocol should be repeated dependent
on the puppy’s reaction, with the volume of
recordings increased on each occasion.
Homing puppies
When puppies are homed, ensure that their new
owners are informed of the level of habituation
achieved with them. Encourage new owners to
continue with the programme of habituation once
the puppy is settled in its new home, emphasising
the importance of the programme in preventing a
serious behaviour problem in their new pet. Advise
the new owner how to continue with the programme,
emphasising the importance of gradual exposure.
• E nsure that puppies are in a familiar
environment, associated with positive
experiences (e.g. an area where the puppies are
brought out to play). Have toys ready, and ensure
there are enough people present to engage the
puppies in play.
• S et up the recording in advance, so you are sure
that it will play at a very low volume initially. Also
start by presenting the separate elements of
complex sounds if possible.
• E ngage the puppies in play before starting the
recording.
• O
bserve the puppies, and make sure none show
signs of fear or anxiety. If this occurs, then
stop the sound immediately. Continue to play
with puppies until all are relaxed and engaged
positively in play. Subsequent exposure to the
sound should be at a lower volume, such that
signs of anxiety or fear are not induced.
• Where puppies remain engaged in play during
38 Model Conditions for Inspection of Breeding Establishments
The Chartered Institute of Environmental Health – January 2014
APPENDIX H – Feeding SOP
Feeding
Adults: adult dogs (over 6-8 months old depending
on breed) should be fed twice daily to provide
environmental enrichment as well as nutrition. The
food should be appropriate for the dog’s lifestyle and
age, and consistent. Any significant changes should
be made over a period of several days. Adults should
also be given food in a variety of food toys that
are changed on a daily basis. Care should be taken
that competition for food is not going to result in
aggression between dogs.
Pregnant and lactating bitches: The nutritional
requirements for pregnant and lactating bitches
are significantly greater than for other adult dogs.
The food should be appropriately high quality and
bitches should be fed more frequently according to
the schedule below:
Pregnant 0 – 4 weeks:
xx times daily *
Pregnant 4 – 6 weeks:
xx times daily *
Pregnant > 6 weeks:
xx times daily *
After the age of four weeks puppies should be fed in
individual bowls and supervised to ensure that each
puppy eats its fair share of food. When necessary,
individual puppies may need to be removed during
feeding if they are not eating all their own food.
Hygiene: All food and water bowls should be
thoroughly washed at least once daily. Utensils used
for distributing food should be washed between
feeding sessions. All food should be kept in verminproof containers. Food should be measured to ensure
that every dog receives an appropriate amount of
food.
In a domestic environment different utensils should
be used to deal with dogs’ food and feeding utensils
should be washed separately from those used by the
people.
In a kennel environment there should be a separate
kitchen to prepare dogs’ food and this should be
cleaned with appropriate cleaning fluids after each
feeding session.
Lactating 0 – 2 weeks: xx times daily *
Lactating 2 – 4 weeks: xx times daily *
Lactating 4 – 7 weeks: xx times daily *
Puppies also require more frequent feeding with food
appropriate for growth according to the table below:
Age
Food
Frequency
3 – 4 weeks
*
* times daily
4 – 6 weeks
*
* times daily
6 – 8 weeks
*
* times daily
* Insert details as appropriate
39 Model Conditions for Inspection of Breeding Establishments
The Chartered Institute of Environmental Health – January 2014
APPENDIX I – Health & Welfare Plan
Breeding establishment veterinary
health plan
The veterinary health plan for a breeding
establishment is a statement of requirements
of routine veterinary treatment. It may not be
necessary for all breeding establishments to cover
all the issues suggested. A list of those issues that
should be included for consideration, usually in
consultation with the breeder’s veterinary surgeon, in
establishing a health plan is below:
Primary vaccination regime;
Booster vaccination regime;
External parasite treatment regime (breeding
stock and puppies);
Internal parasite treatment regime (breeding
stock and puppies);
Microchip implantation and registration regime;
Socialisation and habituation programme for
puppies
Pet insurance cover for puppies
Routine health check arrangements;
Review of cleaning regime;
Review of quarantine/isolation arrangements.
The health plan should be produced in consultation
with the establishment’s veterinary practice and
must be signed and stamped by the attending
veterinary surgeon.
Medicines
All medicines should have a current Marketing
Authorisation for sale in the UK, within its expiry
date, and used as per instruction. They should be
stored in a suitable secure cabinet. They should be
protected from light and extremes of temperature.
Prescription Only Medicine – Veterinary (POM-V)
medicines should only be used for the specific
animals to which they are prescribed. The specific
veterinary instruction should be followed.
Non Food Animal Medicine – Veterinary, Pharmacist
and Suitably Qualified Person (NFA-VPS) and
Authorised Veterinary medicine – General Sale List
(AVM-GSL) medicines should be used in accordance
with the manufacturer’s guidelines.
Contagious/infectious diseases on the premises
All dogs subject to this licence should be vaccinated
against Canine Distemper, Infectious Canine
Hepatits (Canine Adenovirus), Leptospirosis
and Canine Parvovirus unless vaccination is
contraindicated on the direction of the Veterinary
Surgeon and recorded on individual dogs’ records.
It may be necessary to vaccinate against other
diseases and veterinary advice should be sought.
Vaccination records should be kept for each
dog and be up to date according to the vaccine
manufacturer’s datasheet unless certified by the
veterinary surgeon.
Adequate precautions should be taken to prevent
and control the spread of infectious and contagious
diseases and parasites among dogs and zoonoses
among dogs and visitors. Records should be kept
of all vaccination and worming regimes (See also
Record Keeping – Section 6).
Infectious canine bronchitis (‘Kennel Cough’)
can be problematic in kennels, and staff should
be aware of the clinical signs. However, because
vaccination will depend on the local level of infection,
it is recommended that the advice of a veterinary
surgeon is sought.
Parasitic control should be in the health plan and
the log book and should also show treatments and
prevention routines for external parasites including
fleas, mites, lice and ticks. Appropriate treatment
must be carried out if they are found on any of the
dogs. When treating these infestations it is important
to take account of the life cycle of the parasite
in order to achieve maximum control or even
eradication. For instance, simply killing the adult flea
is unlikely to provide adequate control.
Several mange mites affect dogs, including Demodex folliculorum, Sarcoptes scabiei and
Cheyletiella, species, all of which attack the skin, and
Otodectes cynotis, which is most commonly seen in
the ears. Any of these infestations can cause illness in
puppies and older dogs.
40 Model Conditions for Inspection of Breeding Establishments
The Chartered Institute of Environmental Health – January 2014
Some of these parasites can cause disease in
humans. Ringworm (a fungal infection) can also be
passed to humans. Early diagnosis and thorough
treatment of both dogs and environment is essential
if the disease is to be controlled. The veterinary
surgeon should be consulted if any of these
conditions is suspected or known. Particular care is
required with pregnant bitches and suckling puppies
when using treatments for these infestations.
For the control of roundworms, pregnant and
nursing bitches should be given additional worming
treatment. Breeding bitches require particular
attention and veterinary advice should always be
sought. As a rule of thumb, it is suggested that
bitches are wormed before mating and then again
after the 41st day of pregnancy with an appropriate
anthelmintic. The bitch should be wormed at
the same time as the puppies, every two weeks
from two to twelve weeks of age. Thereafter it is
recommended that puppies should be wormed
at regular intervals, according to manufacturer’s
instructions (often monthly until 6 months of age).
From 26 weeks of age into adulthood, worming
should be carried out routinely – at least 4 times per
year
Advice concerning dogs with tapeworms should be
sought from the veterinary surgeon.
Health status of dogs
There should be a daily physical inspection of every
animal to check for any signs of illness or distress.
Advice from a Veterinary Surgeon should be sought
where a dog shows signs of disease, injury, or illness
or behavioural disorder.
If dogs are imported from abroad, appropriate
health testing should be carried out.
41 Model Conditions for Inspection of Breeding Establishments
The Chartered Institute of Environmental Health – January 2014
APPENDIX J – Emergency Evacuation/
Contingency SOP
Introduction
Fire Risk Assessment
All appropriate steps will be taken for the protection
of the dogs in case of fire or other emergency;
Breeding and Sale of Dogs Act 1973 S. 1(4)(d).
1. I dentify potential fire risk hazards in the
workplace
2. D
ecide who might be in danger (staff, Visitor,
animal) in each area
There should be an Emergency Evacuation Plan (EEP)
and fire warning procedure in place. This should be
3. Evaluate the risks arising from hazards and what
posted where staff may become familiar with it.
can be done
This procedure should include instructions dealing
4. Record your findings
where dogs are to be evacuated to and contingency
for their accommodation/care if the premises are
5. Keep assessment under review
rendered unsafe or unsuitable.
There should be adequate means of raising an
Prior to formulating an Emergency and Evacuation
alarm in the event of a fire or other emergency.
Plan carry out a Fire Risk Assessment (FRA) to
In the event of a fire breaking out within your
identify any potential fire risk hazards within your
establishment, remember that your safety and
establishment.
those of your staff is of prime importance and
no risks should be taken which may compromise
Emergency situations and the requirement to
any person’s safety. No task in tackling the fire or
evacuate from the establishment can arise from a
evacuating animals should be undertaken unless it is
number of situations like; Fire, Flooding, Damage to
safe to do so.
building, Power failure and disease.
Upon Discovery of Fire
Being prepared and planning a simple but well
• Leave fire area immediately understood procedure to be carried out in the event
of an emergency is essential to offer maximum
• Close all doors behind you
protection for you, your staff and the animals in
• Alert occupants of building by sounding alarm (if
your care. This need not be a lengthy document but
present) or yell “Fire”
should include a plan of the site giving exit points,
location of telephone, emergency equipment (fire
• Telephone Fire and Rescue Services dialling 999
extinguishers and storage of leads/baskets/cages)
from a safe location
rendezvous point and designated holding area
• Evacuate animals when it is safe to do so to the
for animals. The emergency contact details of a
designated holding area
supervisor or the proprietor and the establishments
Veterinary Surgeon should also be displayed. • Use exit to leave building
Fire fighting equipment and detectors must be
properly maintained. All electrical installations and
appliances must be maintained in a safe condition.
There should be a residual current circuit breaker
system on each kennel block /for the premises.
Heating appliances should not be sited in a location
or manner where they may present a risk of fire / risk
to dogs. Precaution should be taken to prevent any
accumulation of material which may present a risk
of fire.
Upon Hearing of a Fire Condition
• I f safe, staff can assist with evacuating animals /
occupants
• Leave building via nearest safe exist
• Close doors behind you
• Remain Calm
• Proceed to the designated RV area
42 Model Conditions for Inspection of Breeding Establishments
The Chartered Institute of Environmental Health – January 2014
Fire and Evacuation Action Plan
Planning Your
Escape
You only have a short time to get out so
prepare a plan of escape in advance rather
than waiting until there is a fire or evacuation
of the establishment.
Think of another way out in case the normal
route is blocked.
Know where door and window keys are kept.
Know where spare leads/baskets/cages are
stored.
Know where the RVP/Holding areas are.
If you discover a fire
Contacts in an
Emergency
Leave fire area immediately.
Close all doors behind you.
Sound the alarm and call 999 from any phone.
Stay calm, speak clearly and listen to the operator.
Where safe to do so, assist others to evacuate and
remove animals to the safe holding area.
If there is a fire elsewhere in the establishment, stay
where you are and await instructions or if you have to
move remember to check doors with the back of your
hand before opening.
If it feels warm, do not open it and go another way.
If there is a lot of smoke, crawl along floor where the air
will be cleaner.
If in doubt – Get out, Stay out and get the Fire & Rescue
Services Out.
(enter details here)
• Proprietors name and Telephone Number(s)
• Supervisors Name and Telephone Number(s)
• Establishments Veterinary Surgeons
Name(s) and Telephone Number(s)
(enter details here)
• Telephone at (enter location)
• Emergency equipment at (enter location)
• RVP at (enter location)
• Animal Holding area at (enter location)
• Fire Extinguishers located at (enter location)
• Keys kept at (enter location)
RVP = Rendezvous Point
The onus is upon the breeding establishment to
ensure adequate fire prevention precautions are in
place.
It is recommended that plans and deta ils for large
breeding establishments are lodged with the police
and fire authorities. Fire prevention advice may be
sought from the Fire Prevention Officer based at
your local fire station. This officer can give advice
on fire drills, fire escapes, equipment and should be
consulted when new buildings are constructed or
existing buildings modified.
Smoke detectors are recommended and you
must make sure that Fire Detection and fighting
equipment are easily accessible and regularly tested.
Exit routes should be kept clear. Staff should be
familiar with the fire evacuation procedure by use of
fire drills and how to use the fire extinguishers. The
Fire Precautions (Workplace) Regulations 1997 place
a duty on employers to carry out a risk assessment
for the premises not covered by a fire certificate.
43 Model Conditions for Inspection of Breeding Establishments
The Chartered Institute of Environmental Health – January 2014
APPENDIX K – Daily Routine SOP
Daily routine
• Grooming – (for each dog). Including daily
brushing/combing of coat, general care (teeth,
Daily routine should be set out in detail so that dogs
ear cleaning, bathing etc). Bathing or washing
can be cared for in an emergency or when owners
may be required, dependent on how dirty the
are away by a person with minimal knowledge of
dog becomes during the course of the day/night,
them. The following should be set out:
or in the event that it becomes unwell (sickness,
diarrohea etc). Unless fully qualified or approved
• Dogs’ (pet) names, ages and general
(by qualification and/ or prior agreement
character traits (likes & dislikes) – who mixes
between owner and carer), trimming of coat, or
best, exercises, plays or sleeps with whom and
nails, with either scissors or clippers will generally
general care and management of groups of dogs,
not be required. Should this be necessary, ability
where applicable.
(qualification) or willingness to carry out such
a task should be discussed prior to the owner
• General Timetable for (daily duties) waking,
leaving the premises.
feeding, cleaning, exercising, grooming and
sleeping arrangements. This may also provide
• Medication (prescriptive and/or holistic)
specific or non specific designated periods
(for each dog) – oral (by mouth), or topical
during the day when carers may leave the dogs
(applied externally), or by injection, if and when
unattended, provided the dogs are left in a
required – a time and check list (before, with
secure and safe environment (indoor/outdoor
or after mealtimes or specific time of the day)
kennel, fenced enclosure or kitchen/utility room)
for administration should also be provided. If
– a maximum of 3/4 hours per day being a
use of daily injections is required, for example
suggested time.
for diabetic dogs, special instruction should be
provided to the satisfaction of both the owner
• Feeding schedules (for each dog) containing
and carer, or arrangements made for a veterinary
explicit details as to the times, place, quantities,
visit, if preferred.
type of food required. This may be the same or
several times each day or vary according to the
• Contact information Sheet providing contact
needs of the dog(s).
details for absent owner, Veterinary Surgeon,
Dentist, Doctor, Plumber, Electrician (for
• Cleaning schedules – what is required and
household/carer requirements), etc and other
when, what cleaning materials are to be used
family or friends who might be needed to be
and means of disposal. This will include washing,
contacted for assistance in an emergency.
drying and (frequency of) replacement of
dogs’ bedding and places (dog beds, utility
• Special paperwork (example attached**) to
room/kitchen, outdoor or indoor kennel) where
be signed by both owner and carer as to both
the dog(s) rest/sleep and exercise (outdoor
daily responsibility and in the event of urgent
enclosures, exercise pens, gardens, paddocks etc).
veterinary attention, especially, if or when,
euthanasia becomes a clinical necessity. This
• Exercise/play – (for each dog), or groups of dogs
may be more applicable in the event that any, or
with explicit direction as to whether dogs are
some, of the dogs are elderly or clinically infirm
to be exercised/walked separately, or in groups
or in case of accident. The Veterinary Surgeon,
and when, where, how frequently, for what
looking after said dog(s), should be advised
length of time. Exercise may be taken in a fenced
prior to the owner’s absence, especially for long
enclosure, paddock, garden, on and off the lead
periods of time (holiday/business) that a carer is
(private/public road, parks, woodland, fields etc).
in sole charge. In any event, all effort must first
No dog(s) to be removed from the premises
be made to contact the owner prior to a decision
(other than for exercise) without (verbal/written)
by the Vet that euthanasia is the only option.
explicit permission from the owner.
44 Model Conditions for Inspection of Breeding Establishments
45 Model Conditions for Inspection of Breeding Establishments
Wooden
Semi-outdoor/
indoor
Pest Control policy/contract
Other
Litters (present)
Litters (planned)
Number of Staff
Number of dogs
Emergency
Contact
displayed
Revisit
Boarding
Number Units
Accident
Book
(H&S)
Part
Inspection
Full Inspection
Breeders Vet details displayed
Signature
Rescue
Breeding
M
F
Tick
boxes
√/x
Accomodation
Management
Vac disease Con
Emergency
Transport
Health and
Welfare of the
breeding bitch
Does not meet the minimum standard
0
1
2
3
1
2
3
4
5
6
Rating
Rating
Rating
Rating
Exceeds the standard
Meets the standard
Meets standard, but with noticeable limitations
Mating: Max no. of Litters: Puppy Plan: Record Keeping: S.O.P’s
Transportation of dogs and puppies
Monitoring: Emergency Evacuation and Contingency Plans
Health and Welfare Plan: Registered Vet
Comments
Drinking: Eating: Refrigeration: Storage of foods: Washing equipment: Supervision: E. Enrichment: Handling: Kitchen facilities: Isolation: First Aid
Section
Identification
code
Kennel Unit Design: Drainage: Exercise Area and Run: walls, floors, ceilings, doors, occupant nos., security, bedding, cleanliness. Interior Surfaces: Lighting:
Litter Trays: Roofing: Safety Corridors: Sizes: Temperature: Ventilation
Brick
Metal
Index
Domestic
Establishment
Register and
Back up
Has copy of Licence
Con & Legislation
Non Domestic
Establishment
Insurance
Licence on Display
Person seen
Address of
Establishment
Inspectors name(s)
Date of Inspection
Name
LICENCE CONDITIONS INSPECTION SHEET FOR DOG BOARDING ESTABLISHMENTS
ANNEX L – Template Inspection Proforma
46 Model Conditions for Inspection of Breeding Establishments
Identification
Code
4
6
6
6
6
6
6
6
6
6
6
6
4
6
3
6
6
6
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
Area
Records
Records
Records
Records
Records
Records
Records
Records
Records
Records
Records
Records
Records
Records
Records
Records
Records
Records
Records
Kitchen/Eating
Kitchen
Kitchen/Eating
Kitchen/Eating
Kitchen/Eating
Kitchen/Eating
Feeding regime
Storage of foods and quality kept
Washing equipment
Refrigeration
Cleanliness of Kitchen
Cleanliness/Condition of Eating and Drinking Vessels
Staff Training records
Transport (Journey times)
Retired
Puppy Contract
Health Plan
Temperature records
Fire equipment records
Veterinary details/dosplayed/health screening
Barrier nursing S.O.Ps
Whelping records
Vaccinations & Health records & Isolation Cases
S.O.Ps including Feeding and Exercise Regime
Register and Back-up
Movement of dogs
Permanent identification
Assured Breeder Scheme
Breeding Arrangements
Prescribed Forms
Written emergency plan and risk assessment
Description
√
x
ANNEX L – Template Inspection Proforma
Rating
Actions or Comments
Done
√
47 Model Conditions for Inspection of Breeding Establishments
Identification Code
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1+4
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
2
1
2
Area
Unit
Unit
Unit
Unit
Roofing
Unit/Drainage
Unit
Door and Corridor
Unit
Unit
Unit
Lighting
Ventilation
Interior
Temperature
Unit/Temperature
Unit
Unit
Unit
Bedding
Unit
Exercise Run
Exercise Run
Exercise Run
Unit
Behaviour
Hygeine
Management
First Aid Kit for dogs
Cleaning products
Toys/Environmental enrichment
Whelping facilities
Clean and secure Run
Access to Run
Exercise Run Area sizes
Windows
Bedding materials
Dog crates
Sharp edges/Other hazards
Waterproof sockets
Safe Appliances + Fire fighting equipment
Max-Min Thermometer/Temperature
Good repair, clean and sealed joints
Ventilation/Draughts
Adequate lighting
Walls & Petitions
Lighting
Flooring
Secure Corridor and width/secure doors
Escape-proof area
Drainage/Drain covers
Safe and Waterproof roofing
Secure windows, doors & fencing
Sleeping accomodation sizes
Suitable Construction Materials
Sound and safe constuction
Description
√
ANNEX L – Template Inspection Proforma
x
Rating
Actions or Comments
Done
√
48 Model Conditions for Inspection of Breeding Establishments
2
2
2
2
2
5
Isolation
Isolation
Isolation
Isolation
Isolation
Transport
ADDITIONAL NOTES
Identification
Code
Area
Use of vehicles for transportation
Size if Isolation
Cleanliness and pocedures for use
Location of isolation
Veterinary instruction
Hygeine protocols and protective garments
Description
√
x
ANNEX L – Template Inspection Proforma
Rating
Actions or Comments
Done
√
Chartered Institute of Environmental Health
Chadwick Court, 15 Hatfields, London SE1 8DJ
Telephone 020 7928 6006
Email info@cieh.org Web www.cieh.org
Registered charity no. 290350
© CIEH, 2014
POL034
ISBN: 978-1-906989-81-1
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