Conditional Knowledge Level

Conditional Knowledge Level
Conditional Knowledge Level
All learners
TQP Instructional
Practices
Organizers
Concept Learning
Question and
Review
Grouping
Assessment
Graphic
Organizers
Examples and
Non-examples
Higher level
questions that ask
for explanations
Think-Pair-Share
Formative
Advance
Organizers
Compare and
Contrast
Games
Jigsaw
Summative
AIG
Mission
As your ship sets sail for your internship, your challenge is to create,
execute and videotape one lesson that includes two specific researchbased strategies. The first strategy will be assigned to you at random
from those that you have learned. The second strategy will be chosen
by you from a list of strategies.
Your Strategies
•
Check the list below for the island
group that has been assigned to
you. You are responsible for
selecting one of the strategies
within that island. An island group
has been randomly assigned to
each intern as part of the research
design surrounding the ISLES
work.
– List of Randomly Assigned
Strategies by First Letter
of Last Name
•
Choose an additional strategy
from a different island group.
Please note all lessons should
include some type of Assessment
strategy. The other island groups
are listed below.
– Organizers
– Concept Learning
– Question and Review
– Grouping
First Impressions
• What kind of learning environment do you want to develop in order to
establish respect and rapport, and to support students’ engagement in
learning?
• What kinds of learning tasks actively engage students in the content of
your lesson?
• How will you elicit and build on student responses in ways to develop and
deepen content understanding?
• In what ways will you connect new content to your students’ prior academic
learning and personal, cultural, or community assets during your
instruction?
• How will you use evidence from your instruction to examine and change
your teaching practices to more effectively meet a variety of student
learning needs?
Exploration: Objectives
After completing the entire Exploration section and reviewing the
accompanying documents, you should be able to:
• Plan, teach, and reflect on effective instruction integrating specified
TQP strategies appropriately within a Social Studies, Science,
English/Language Arts, or Math lesson.
• Video record your teaching, trim a segment of the video recording,
and submit it to Taskstream.
What’s This?
Context and Planning
• Based upon the strategies selected/assigned, choose an appropriate
content area and topic for your lesson. Discuss this with your instructor
and clinical teacher.
• Depending on your content, grade level and other logistics, the lesson
should be between 20 and 90 minutes.
• Research your selected content.
• Think about your learners. What needs do they have? What should you
consider when planning your lesson? How can you make the content
comprehensible to all learners? To guide your thinking, review the
Planning Considerations checklists on the HOT LINKS slide.
Context and Planning, Cont.
• Write your lesson plan using your program area’s lesson plan template.
See the HOT LINKS slide for those templates.
• Prepare materials. YOU WILL NEED TO SEND HOME ECU VIDEO
CONSENT FORMS TO ALL OF YOUR STUDENTS THAT WILL BE IN
THE VIDEO RECORDING. YOU MUST HAVE THE SIGNED
CONSENT BEFORE VIDEO RECORDING. See the HOT LINKS slide
for the consent forms.
• Share your lesson plan with your instructor and clinical teacher.
• Complete Section I of the Instruction Commentary.
Video Recording
• Prepare your video recording device. Make sure it is fully charged
and has enough memory to capture your entire lesson.
• Ask your clinical teacher or another appropriate person to video
your lesson using the camera. Consider posting a “Video In
Progress” sign on your classroom door.
Video Recording, Cont.
Helpful Hints to Share With Your Videographer:
• Make sure that your videographer captures your comments as well as your
students’ comments. You and your students should be visible in the video.
• Your videographer can also sit in a location that will be easy for him/her to
capture all of the comments that occur within the lesson. They may also have to
travel around the room in order to capture these comments.
• Make sure your ISLES strategies are visible within your lesson video.
Examples:
• If your students are completing a graphic organizer, ask your videographer to
zoom in on their work.
• If you are creating a graphic organizer on the SMART board, chart, etc. ask
your videographer to zoom in on your work.
• Make sure your assigned strategy, chosen strategy and assessment
strategy (formative or summative) are ALL visible within your final
trimmed video clip(s).
Video Recording, Cont.
• Download your full lesson video to a computer and use the editing
software to trim your video to 1-2 clips, not exceeding 10-15 minutes
total. The clip(s) should be unedited.
• For example, you could submit minutes 1-5 of your lesson on the
1st clip, then submit minutes 15-25 in the 2nd clip. This would be
a total of 15 minutes and would be continuous minutes in each
clip.
• The key is to make sure that the clip(s) you select are the best
continuous minutes of your lesson that addresses all items in the
I.S.L.E.S. #3 scoring rubric.
• Your assigned strategy, chosen strategy, and assessment
strategy should be clearly evident in your trimmed video
clip(s).
• After trimming your video, complete the remaining sections of the
Instruction Commentary.
Analysis of Teaching
• After planning, teaching, and videoing your lesson, meet with
your clinical teacher to discuss your completed work. This will
be the first time someone other than you will view the video
clip(s).
• Discuss your responses in the Instruction Commentary.
Hot Links: Resources
• I.S.L.E.S. Strategies
• Selecting Instructional Strategies Checklist
• Planning Considerations Checklists: AIG, ELL,
Instructional Technology, Universal Design of Learning,
• Video support: Preparing videos
Literacy
Flip Cameras
• Taskstream resources for ECU interns
rd
• ISLES 3 samples: Sample 1-3 ELA; Sample 2 – K - ELA
• Tech help: http://coehelp.ecu.edu
Hot Links
Required Documents
Lesson plan template by program area
ELEM:
ELEM:
MIDG:
MIDG:
SPED:
SPED:
Direct Instruction
5E
Direct Instruction
5E
GC
UDL
Video Guidelines and Consent Form
English
Spanish
Lesson Commentary Template
ISLES 3 Scoring Rubric
Take A Look
Plan lesson with selected research
based strategies, appropriate content,
and differentiated instruction.
Video record your classroom
teaching.
Analyze your teaching through
trimming your video, completing a
commentary, and conferencing.
Think About It
Work with your clinical teacher to determine your lesson topic. Consider
your students’ needs and begin planning your lesson. REMEMBER, using
researched based strategies with appropriate content should result in higher
achievement for your students.
Assessment
• You will submit your ISLES 3 Assignment to Taskstream. Select the
ISLES 3 Assignment in your program portfolio. For example, if you are an
ELEM major, then you would upload your ISLES 3 work in your ELEM
portfolio.
• Upload your files. (Your lesson plan and Instruction commentary are to be
submitted as Attachments. The trimmed video clip(s) are to be submitted
using the Video tab.)
• Your ISLES artifacts will be evaluated using the scoring rubric. This
information will be used formatively as faculty and your clinical teacher
work with you in preparation for your final Senior edTPA portfolio.
• Completion of your ISLES 3 work will be recorded in your course.
Credits
• Module Developers: D. Metcalf, A. Bullock, E. Fogarty, and K. Cuthrell
• Module Production Team: D. Kester and E. Briggs
This concludes the ISLES 3 module. Select this button to exit the file.
Print (3 pages)
ISLES 3 Rubric
Levels/Criteria
Level 1
Level 2
Level 3
Level 4
Level 5
Learning Environment
The clip(s) reveal
evidence of disrespectful
interactions between
teacher and students or
between students.
The candidate
demonstrates
respect for students.
The candidate
demonstrates rapport
with and respect for
students.
The candidate
demonstrates
rapport with and
respect for students.
The candidate
demonstrates rapport
with and respect for
students.
Candidate provides a
positive, low-risk social
environment that
reveals mutual respect
among students.
Candidate provides
a challenging
learning
environment that
promotes mutual
respect among
students.
Candidate provides a
challenging learning
environment that
provides opportunities
to express varied
perspectives and
promotes mutual
respect among
students.
In the clip(s), students
are intellectually
engaged in strategies
that develop their
understandings of
content and strategies.
In the clip(s),
students are
intellectually
engaged in
strategies that
develop their
understanding of
the content
through teacherstudent and
student-student
interaction.
In the clip(s), students
are intellectually
engaged in strategies
tailored to specific
student needs for
comprehending the
content through
teacher-student and
student-student
interactions.
How does the candidate
demonstrate a positive
learning environment that
supports students’
engagement in learning
utilizing the assigned and
chosen instructional
strategy?
Engaging Students in
Learning
How does the candidate
actively engage students in
integrating the assigned
and chosen instruction
strategy to develop content
comprehension?
OR
Candidate allows
disruptive behavior to
interfere with student
learning.
In the clip(s), students
are passive or
inattentive while
candidate directs use of
strategies.
There is little or no
evidence that the
candidate links students’
prior academic learning
or personal, cultural, or
community assets with
new learning.
The chosen and
assigned strategies don’t
match or correlate well
with the lesson. Other
strategies would have
been more effective.
OR
Candidate provides a
learning environment
that serves primarily
to control student
behavior, and
minimally supports
the use of both the
assigned and chosen
instructional
strategies.
In the clip(s), students
are participating in
strategies focusing
solely on content
without developing
understanding of the
strategies.
.
Candidate attempts to
link new content to
students’ prior learning
and experience, but
the links are
unrelated to the
content or strategies
or cause student
confusion.
The chosen and
Candidate links new
content to students’ prior
academic learning to
content and strategies.
The chosen and assigned
strategies correlate well
with the lesson objectives
and help students achieve
learning.
Candidate links both
prior academic
learning and
personal, cultural,
or community
assets to new
strategies.
The chosen and
Candidate prompts
students to make links
prior academic learning
and personal, cultural,
or community assets to
new strategies.
The chosen and
assigned strategies
correlate well with the
lesson objectives and
This rubric was adapted from the edTPA. Copyright © 2012 Board of Trustees of the Leland Stanford Junior University. All rights reserved.
Last Updated July 2014
Next page
Levels/Criteria
Level 1
Student misbehavior or
candidate’s disrespect
for one or more students
severely limits students’
engagement in learning
Deepening Student
Learning
How does the candidate
elicit student responses to
promote thinking and
develop the chosen and
selected strategies
associated with the
selected lesson content?
Candidate does most of
the talking and the
students provide few
responses.
Candidate teaches
strategies without
providing meaningful
context.
OR
Level 2
Level 3
assigned strategies
correlate well with the
lesson content and
help students achieve
learning.
Candidate primarily
asks surface-level
questions and
evaluates student
responses as correct
or incorrect.
Candidate elicits student
responses related to use
of strategies.
Candidate makes clear
connections between
strategies and content.
Level 4
Level 5
assigned strategies
correlate well with
the lesson objectives
and help students
achieve learning.
help students achieve
learning.
Candidate elicits
and builds on
students’ skills to
explicitly portray,
extend, or clarify a
strategy.
All components of Level
4 plus: Candidate
facilitates interactions
among students to
evaluate their own
abilities to apply
strategies in
meaningful content.
Candidate prompts
students to apply
strategies in
meaningful
content.
Candidate responses
include significant
strategy and content
inaccuracies that will
lead to student
misunderstandings.
This rubric was adapted from the edTPA. Copyright © 2012 Board of Trustees of the Leland Stanford Junior University. All rights reserved.
Last Updated July 2014
Next page
Levels/Criteria
Level 1
Level 2
Level 3
Level 4
Level 5
Subject-Specific
Pedagogy
Candidate does not
teach students how to
use the strategies to
support comprehension.
Candidate models the
strategies without
opportunities for
students to practice
or apply them.
Candidate models the
strategy with limited
opportunities for
practice.
Candidate explicitly
teaches students
how to apply the
strategies and
provides
opportunities for
guided practice.
Level 4 plus: Candidate
explicitly teaches
students when to apply
the strategies in
meaningful contexts.
Candidate proposes
changes that are
focused primarily on
improving directions
for learning tasks or
task/behavior
management.
Candidate proposes
changes that address
students’ collective
learning needs related
to the lesson content.
Candidate proposes
changes that
address individual
and collective
learning needs
related to the lesson
content.
Level 4 plus: Candidate
justifies changes using
principles of research
and/or theory.
How does the candidate
support students to apply
the selected and chosen
strategy in developing
content comprehension?
OR
There is a clear
mismatch between or
among strategies, skills,
and students’ readiness
to learn.
OR
Materials used in the
clip(s) include significant
content and strategy use
inaccuracies that will
lead to student
misunderstandings.
Analyzing Teaching
Effectiveness
How does the candidate
use evidence to evaluate
and change teaching
practice to meet the
students’ varied needs?
Candidate suggests
changes unrelated to
evidence of student
learning.
Candidate makes
superficial connections
to research and/or
theory.
Candidate makes
connections to
research and/or
theory.
This rubric was adapted from the edTPA. Copyright © 2012 Board of Trustees of the Leland Stanford Junior University. All rights reserved.
Last Updated July 2014
Return to lesson
ISLES 3 Randomly Assigned Strategy List
First Letter of Last Name
A
B
C
D
E
F
G
H
J
K
L
M
N
O
P
Q
R
S
T
U
V
W
X
Y
Z
Assigned Strategy Category
Question and Review
Concept Learning
Organizers
Concept Learning
Grouping
Question and Review
Question and Review
Grouping
Concept Learning
Question and Review
Organizers
Concept Learning
Grouping
Organizers
Question and Review
Grouping
Concept Learning
Organizers
Organizers
Question and Review
Organizers
Grouping
Concept Learning
Question and Review
Grouping
Return to module
August 2013
Page 1
► Student Handout:
Instructional Practices
ECU TQP Grant Project
Teacher Quality Partnership Grant (TQP)
Instructional Practices
Overview
Research has recently shown that student achievement is directly tied to teacher
effectiveness. As a result, there is now a nationwide reform movement to raise teacher
effectiveness. As part of the reform movement the Office of Innovation and
Improvement in the Department of Education awarded “Teacher Quality Partnership
Grants” to teacher education programs around the country. In the fall of 2009, the
College of Education at East Carolina University won one of the 28 Grants. With the
grant funds, ECU’s College of Education is reforming several areas of its program:
Recruitment, Curriculum, and Clinical Practice. ECU partners, Pitt County Schools and
Greene County Schools, are reforming their induction programs.
The Instructional Framework below is part of the Curriculum component of the reform.
It is designed to teach you five categories of instructional practices with two specific
strategies in each. The specific practices identified in the framework are not the only
practices that are effective or that a prospective teacher should learn to incorporate in
instruction. The ten instructional strategies discussed below constitute a starting place;
over time you are expected to learn additional effective instructional practices. You will
receive instruction on those additional practices from your professors. Also note that
instructional practices are not the only means of raising student achievement. An
effective teacher must have good classroom management, an effective curriculum, and
appropriate professional dispositions. For now, however, the curriculum reform is
focusing primarily on effective instructional practices.
TQP Instructional
Practices
Organizers
Graphic
organizers
Advance
Organizers
Concept Learning
Question and
Review
Grouping
Assessment
Examples and
Non-examples
Higher level
questions that ask
for explanations
Think-Pair-Share
Formative
Compare and
Contrast
Games
Jigsaw
Summative
Return to Hot Links page
Next page
TQP - Page 1 of 12
Updated 7/2012
ECU TQP Grant Project
► Student Handout:
Instructional Practices
ORGANIZERS
Definition:
Organizers are visual or oral representations that help students deepen their
thinking skills and improve their understanding of content.
1. Graphic Organizers
Definition:
Visual representations that help students deepen their thinking skills and
improve their understanding of subject matter across content areas. Graphic
organizers are usually a one-page form of a chart, a map, or a diagram. They
may be called graphic organizers, graphic representations, visual
representations, visual patterns, pictographs, or Thinking Maps®.
Benefits:
 Significantly improves critical thinking skills
 Increases memory of content knowledge when reading
 Well organized final products, particularly written work
 Deeper conceptual understanding
 Greater capacity to communicate abstract concepts
Examples:
 Brace chart – shows physical structures and part-whole relationships
 Bridge map – helps to transfer or form analogies and metaphors
 Bubble map/Star Diagram - describes emotional, sensory and logical
qualities
 Circles (pie chart, circle graph, cloud, start chart, Venn diagram) map –
helps define words or things in context and presents points of view
 Double bubble map – compares and contrasts qualities
 Flow chart – shows causes and effects and helps predict outcomes
 T chart – shows the relationship between main ideas and supporting
details
2. Advance Organizers
Definition:
A framework for helping students understand what they will be learning. It is
presented to students before they listen to a presentation or read textual
materials and provides a structure for the new information to be linked to
students’ prior knowledge. This information may be delivered orally, in
narrative form or as a chart. Students have an existing organization of
Next page
TQP - Page 2 of 12
Updated 7/2012
ECU TQP Grant Project
► Student Handout:
Instructional Practices
knowledge in the mind (cognitive structure) that influences their ability to
acquire new knowledge.
Benefits:
 Students who are able to connect new knowledge to, or situate new
knowledge into, their existing cognitive structures are better able to
understand and retain the new knowledge.
 Students are able to recall more information and score higher on exams.
Examples:
A history teacher is about to present information about the Vietnam War.
After reviewing yesterday’s lesson, telling the students the goals of the
lesson, and asking them to recall in their minds what they already know about
Vietnam, the teacher presents the following advance organizer:
I want to give you an idea that will help you understand why the United States
became involved in the Vietnam War. The idea is that most wars reflect
conflict between people over one of the following: ideology, territory, or
access to trade. As I describe for you the United States’ involvement in
Southeast Asia between 1945 and 1965, I want you to look for examples of
how conflict over ideology, territory, or access to trade may have influenced
later decisions to fight in Vietnam.
Next page
TQP - Page 3 of 12
Updated 7/2012
ECU TQP Grant Project
► Student Handout:
Instructional Practices
CONCEPT LEARNING
Definition:
The search for and listing of attributes that can be used to distinguish exemplars
from non-exemplars of various categories. Concepts are the mental categories
that help us classify objects, events, or ideas and each object, event, or idea has
a set of common relevant features. Thus, concept learning is a strategy which
requires a learner to compare and contrast groups or categories that contain
concept-relevant features with groups or categories that do not contain conceptrelevant features.
1. Examples and Non-Examples
Definition:
A model which consists of a definition, an expository presentation of
“matched” examples and non-examples that are arranged from easy to
difficult and are divergent, and an interrogatory practice presentation of new
encountered and randomly ordered examples and non-examples. During the
expository presentation, the teacher explains whether each instance is an
example or a non-example of the concept. During the interrogatory practice
presentation, students are asked to distinguish examples from non-examples
and explain their answers.
Benefits:
Research shows that when the model of examples and non-examples is
used, elementary students learn more and answer more test questions
correctly then when the model is not used.
Example:
Sequence
1. Write a vocabulary word (gigantic).
2. Say the word, and have students repeat it.
3. Ask what the word means and provide feedback. If students respond
correctly, say, “Yes, gigantic means huge”. If they respond incorrectly,
immediately model the correct response.
4. Discuss pictures that represent examples and non-examples of the word.
For example, point to a picture of a dinosaur and say, “The dinosaur is
gigantic.” Then point to a picture of a dog and say, “The dog is not
gigantic.”
5. Present the pictures one at a time. Have students determine if they are
examples or non-examples. For example, “The tall building is gigantic; the
toy house is not gigantic.”
Next page
TQP - Page 4 of 12
Updated 7/2012
ECU TQP Grant Project
► Student Handout:
Instructional Practices
6. Provide opportunities for students to practice discriminating whether a
picture represents an example or a non-example of a word. For example:
a. Have students sit in a circle
b. Within reach of everyone, place a stack of pictures face down in the
middle of the circle.
c. Have students take turns identifying whether the picture represents an
example or a non-example of a word.
2. Compare and Contrast
Definition:
Compare and contrast activities require students to identify important
characteristics and then use these characteristics as the basis for identifying
similarities and differences. Venn diagrams, matrices, and T-charts are all
powerful tools to help students compare.
Benefits:
Research on the use of comparing and contrasting shows that students
display an increase in student achievement. Students who spend time looking
at similarities and differences between two topics and perhaps plot these on a
graphic organizer deepen their understanding and ability to use the
knowledge
Example:
1. Hold up or display two different objects for students to focus on as they
explore the meaning of the terms compare and contrast. You might
choose two different beverage options (juice versus milk), two candy bars
(Milky Way versus Reese's Cups), or two different television programs
(SpongeBob SquarePants versus The Rugrats). Be sure to choose items
which students are familiar with so that the process of comparing the
objects will be clearer to them.
2. Make two columns on the board or chart paper and invite students to
brainstorm characteristics of first one of the objects (e.g., juice) and then
the other object (e.g., milk). Invite students to add and revise information
as they work, moving between the two columns.
3. If students need help building the lists of characteristics, ask leading
questions such as "How do you decide which beverage you want to
drink?" or "How do you decide which candy bar to buy?"
Next page
TQP - Page 5 of 12
Updated 7/2012
ECU TQP Grant Project
► Student Handout:
Instructional Practices
4. Ask students to identify characteristics that are included in both of the
columns. Either mark these similarities using a different colored pen, or
create a new chart with the column headings of "Comparison" and
"Contrast."
5. Based on the information in the lists, lead a class discussion on the
definitions of the words compare and contrast. Refer to examples on the
charts to clarify the difference between the two terms.
6. As a class, brainstorm other ways students compare and contrast in their
daily lives (sports teams, restaurants, toys, books, etc.). You can do this
by pairing students in groups or 2-4 having them compose a list as a
group and then as a coming together as a class to share ideas.
7. From there, you will brainstorm and generate a class definition of compare
and contrast making sure they understand why comparing and contrasting
is important by using examples as needed.
From http://www.readwritethink.org/classroom-resources/lessonplans/teaching-compare-contrast-essay-275.html?tab=4#tabs
Next page
TQP - Page 6 of 12
Updated 7/2012
ECU TQP Grant Project
► Student Handout:
Instructional Practices
QUESTION AND REVIEW
Definition:
Higher cognitive questions are defined as those which ask the student to
mentally manipulate bits of information previously learned to create an answer or
to support an answer with logically reasoned evidence. Educational games are
often used to help students reason and review.
1. Higher Level Questions That Ask for Explanations
Definition:
Higher level questions are usually defined as being above the memory level
of Bloom’s Taxonomy. It is more than simple recall of facts or information. It
is a function of the interaction between cognitive strategies, meta-cognition,
and nonstrategic knowledge when solving problems. They are often defined
as those which ask the student to mentally manipulate bits of information
previously learned to create an answer or to support an answer with logically
reasoned evidence. Higher cognitive questions are also called open-ended,
interpretive, evaluative, inquiry, inferential, and synthesis questions.
Benefits:
Students become better able to reflect on their learning, identify gaps in their
knowledge, understand relationships, and comprehend complex ideas. They
demonstrate better memory, problem solving, and more sophisticated
reasoning.
2. Games
Definition:
Games can be designed for review and mastery of learning of material. Students
can play academic games independently, in small group, or whole group. Games
are delivered through the use of technology, manipulatives, and orally.
Benefits:
 Motivates students to help each other master skills presented by the
teacher.
Example:
Students learn material in class; this can be taught traditionally, in small
groups, individually, using activities, etc. The next day, small groups of
students play a Smartboard review game during learning centers. In the
morning language arts block, students rotate through the game learning
center.
Next page
TQP - Page 7 of 12
Updated 7/2012
ECU TQP Grant Project
► Student Handout:
Instructional Practices
GROUPING
Definition:
Grouping is founded on cooperative learning which refers to students working
together for a common goal or purpose.
1. Think-Pair-Share
Definition:
Think-Pair-Share is a cooperative learning technique designed to give
students time to think about a given topic and share their insights with another
student. This provides students with necessary think time.
Benefits:
 Increases the length of student responses
 Increases the number of appropriate responses
 Decreases failure to respond
 Increases the number of student questions
 Improves student achievement
 Has a positive impact on teacher questioning techniques
Example:
In Think-Pair-Share, the instructor asks an open ended or thought provoking
question and asks students to think about it, giving them anywhere from 10
seconds to five minutes, depending on the nature of the question. At the end
of the thinking period, students pair up to discuss their insights. Then, the
teacher calls randomly on a few students to summarize their discussion or to
give an answer. Think-Pair-Share can be used in any curriculum area.
2. Jigsaw
Definition:
Jigsaw is a cooperative learning technique intended to reduce racial conflict,
promote academic achievement and improve student motivation. Students
learn that competitive behavior is not effective, and they learn to listen to each
other and appreciate each other as a resource for learning.
Benefits:
Jigsaw results in increased classroom participation, increases in role taking
and changes in attribution of success and failure, and has a positive effect on
liking for school.
Next page
TQP - Page 8 of 12
Updated 7/2012
ECU TQP Grant Project
► Student Handout:
Instructional Practices
Example:
Students are divided into 5-6 person heterogeneous groups. The material to
be learned is divided into 5-6 segments. Each student is assigned one
segment, and has access to his segment only. Students read over their
material to become familiar with it. Then, temporary expert groups are
formed, made up of students assigned to each segment of material; all
students assigned to segment one become part of an expert group, etc.
Students discuss the material in these expert groups and rehearse their
presentations of the material. They then return to their original groups, where
they teach their material to other students in their group. Other group
members ask questions as the materials are presented. The instructor
moves among groups to observe the process and offer any necessary
interventions.
Next page
TQP - Page 9 of 12
Updated 7/2012
ECU TQP Grant Project
► Student Handout:
Instructional Practices
ASSESSMENT
Definition:
Assessment is the process of documenting knowledge, skills, and dispositions. It
may occur during the course of instruction with feedback or at the end of the
instruction to measure against standards or benchmarks.
1. Formative Assessment
Definition:
Formative assessment is diagnostic assessment to provide feedback over the
course of instruction. It leads to instructional adjustments intended to improve
student success. Formative assessment can provide the information needed
to use as feedback to modify teaching and learning activities.
Benefits:
Research shows that students learn from formative assessment for four
primary reasons.
 The frequent, on-going nature of the feedback is provided in formative
assessment.
 The immediacy of the assessment ensures that feedback will be
meaningful.
 Specific assessment allows students to see concrete changes they
can make to improve,
 Formative assessment is consistent with constructivist learning theory.
Examples:
 Collaborating with other teachers to share information about students
 Homework, quizzes and tests
 Exit Tickets: Give students small pieces of paper and give them five
minutes at the end of the lesson to answer two questions. One should
require a factual answer related to the concepts taught in the day’s
lesson and the other should require an explanation of a concept.
Students should not sign their ticket. Collect them and analyze to
determine how many students understand the main concept presented
in the lesson and how many don’t. Adjust accordingly.
 One minute papers: Give students an open-ended question and one
minute to write a response. Examples: What was the most important
thing we discussed today? What was the most confusing thing we
discussed today? Collect the papers and use for promoting
discussion, and identifying misconceptions or confusion.
 Concept mapping
Next page
TQP - Page 10 of 12
Updated 7/2012
► Student Handout:
Instructional Practices
ECU TQP Grant Project

Survey students
2. Summative Assessment
Definition:
Summative assessments are given periodically to determine what students do
or do not know at a particular point in time.
Benefits:
For summative purposes, the information gathered must be compared to the
broad criteria that define levels or grades; common criteria are applied and
achievement is summarized in terms that have the same meaning for all
students.
Examples:
 State assessments
 District benchmark assessments
 End of unit or chapter tests
 End of term or semester exams
 Scores used for grading
RESEARCH REFERENCES
Anderson, L. W. & Krathwohl, D. R. (2001). A taxonomy for learning, teaching, and
assessing: A revision of Bloom’s Taxonomy. New York, Longman Publishing.
Aronson, E. & Bridgeman, D. (1979). Jigsaw groups and the desegregated classroom:
In pursuit of common goals. Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin. 5(4),
438-446.
Ausubel, D. P. (1963). The psychology of meaningful verbal learning. New York: Grune
& Stratton.
Ausubel, D. P. (1968). Educational psychology: A cognitive view. New York: Holt,
Rinehart & Winston.
Black, P., & Wiliam, D. (1998). Inside the black box: Raising standards through
classroom assessment. Phi Delta Kappan, 80(2), 139–148.
Bruner, J. (1960). The process of education. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press.
Next page
TQP - Page 11 of 12
Updated 7/2012
ECU TQP Grant Project
► Student Handout:
Instructional Practices
Chappus, S., & Chappuis, J. (2008). The best value in formative assessment.
Educational Leadership, 65(4), 14-19.
Daley, B. J., Shaw, C. R., Balistrieri, T., Glasenapp, K., & Piacentine, L. (1999) Concept
maps: A strategy to teach and evaluate critical thinking. Journal of Nursing
Education, 38(1), 42-47.
Education Partnerships, Inc. (2010). Research Brief: High Level Thinking and
Questioning Strategies. Retrieved from
http://www.educationpartnerships.org/Resources/ResearchBriefHighLevelThinkin
g&Questioning.pdf
Gordon, A. K. (1970). Games for growth; Educational games in the classroom. Palo
alto, CA: Science Research Associates.
Hyerle, D. (1996). Thinking maps: Seeing is understanding. Educational Leadership,
53(4), 85-89.
Johnson, D. W., & Johnson, R. T. (1999). Learning together and alone: Cooperative,
competitive, and individualistic learning. Boston: Allyn & Bacon.
Marzano, R. J., Pickering, D. J., & Pollock, J. E. (2001). Classroom instruction that
works: Research-based strategies for increasing student achievement. Alexandria,
VA: Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development.
Marzano, R. J., Pickering, D., & Pollock, J. E. (2001). Classroom instruction that works:
research-based strategies for increasing student achievement. Washington, DC:
ASCD.
Randel, J. M., Morris, B. A., Wetzel, C. D., & Whitehill, B. V. (1992). The effectiveness
of games for educational purposes: A review of recent research. Simulation &
Gaming, 23(3), 261-276.
Stiggins, R, Arter.,J., Chappuis, J., & Chappuis, S. (2004). Classroom assessment for
student learning: Doing it right--Using it well. Portland, OR: Educational Testing
Service.
Taba, H. (1971). Teaching strategies and cognitive function in elementary school
children. San Francisco: San Francisco State College.
Vogler, K. E. (2008) Asking Good Questions. Thinking Skills Now, 65. Retrieved from
http://www.ascd.org/publications/educationalleadership/summer08/vol65/num09/Asking-Good-Questions.aspx
Return to lesson
TQP - Page 12 of 12
Updated 7/2012
► Checklist: Instructional
Strategies
ECU TQP Grant Project
Selecting Instructional Strategies
Print
Instructional strategies serve clear purposes and are included in appropriate
parts of a lesson. When selecting instructional strategies for your lessons,
reflect upon the following ten considerations:
1. The strategy is appropriate for the content being taught.
2. The strategy aligns with the lesson objective.
3. The strategy is appropriate for the selected purpose, e.g., activating prior
knowledge, teaching new concepts, checking for understanding, etc.
4. The strategy will engage the students.
5. The strategy is appropriate for the intended audience and
meets the needs of the students.
6. The appropriate routines, classroom organizational practices, and
materials are in place for the use of this strategy.
7. The strategy will be used in the appropriate part of the lesson.
8. There is enough time alotted for the strategy within the lesson.
9. The benefits of this strategy can be communicated to the students.
10. A variety of instructional strategies, in addition to this one, are included
throughout the unit.
Return to Hot Links
TQP - Page 1 of 1
Last Updated on 6/14/11
► Checklist: AIG
ECU TQP Grant Project
Incorporating Academically and Intellectually Gifted (AIG)
AIG… When incorporating AIG in your unit, reflect upon the following ten
considerations:
1. Logically connect curriculum for gifted students to the overall objectives
and goals for the unit, ideally going broader and deeper than the standard
curriculum.
2. Use pre-assessment to identify which students (not just the identified AIG
students) could benefit from extensions to the standard curriculum for a
particular unit of study.
3. Use curriculum compacting, enrichment, and acceleration for advanced
learners.
4. Employ a more andragogical than pedagogical approach with gifted
learners.
5. Consider characteristics and affective needs of gifted students when
planning.
6. Provide opportunities for gifted students to learn new material in school.
7. Challenge advanced learners, instead of just giving them more of the same
work.
8. Plan lessons that allow for differentiated response.
10. Include higher order thinking skills, creativity, and use of real world
technologies in lesson plans.
Return to Hot Links page
TQP - Page 1 of 1
LJF & AL Last Updated by LJF on 6/29/11
Print
► Checklist: UDL
ECU TQP Grant Project
Print
Incorporating UDL
UDL… When incorporating UDL in your unit, reflect upon the following
ten considerations:
1. Have I considered the likely range of diversity (including
students with disabilities) in the classroom (e.g. Who are my
learners? Needs, interests, abilities, strengths…)?
2. What are my learning/unit objectives?
3. What methods will I use to teach this content?
4. What materials will I use?
5. How can/will I assess my learning objective?
6. Can my content be represented in a different way?
7. Have I included a variety of means to engage my students in
this lesson/unit?
8. Did/Can I provide a menu of expression options for
assessment – either within the lesson or across the unit?
Return to Hot Links page
TQP/UDL – King; Jones
Last Updated on 6/24/11
ECU TQP Grant Project
► Checklist: Literacy
Incorporating Literacy
Print
Literacy… When incorporating Literacy in your unit, reflect upon the
following six considerations:
1. Integrate literature (books, articles, etc.) into each lesson to build prior
knowledge (ex. booktalks) and spawn text connections (text to self, text to
text, and text to world). Literature needs to cover a variety of reading
levels (ie. beow grade level, on grade level, and above grade level texts).
2. Academic vocabulary is presented, taught, and visible within each lesson.
3. Comprehension of literature should encompass the three highest levels of
Bloom’s Revised Taxonomy (Analyzing, Evaluating, and Creating).
4. Each unit should have a reflective/responsive journal. Entries may
include graphic organizers, pictures, responses to questions or video
segments, etc.
5. 60% of all literature in the unit must be non-fiction.
6. Each lesson should offer an opportunity for students to discuss their
thoughts about their learning.
Return to Hot Links page
TQP – PMH & TMW
Last Updated on 6/28/11
ECU TQP Grant Project
► Checklist: Instructional
Technology
Incorporating Instructional Technology (IT)
Print
The use and integration of technology within your lesson planning can create
engaging and interactive learning experiences for your students. When
incorporating IT in your unit, reflect upon the following ten considerations:
1. Do you know your technology objectives (NCSCOS)? The ISTE NETs-T
or NETs-S?
2. Does the discipline objective link with the technology objective?
3. What are the barriers to the use of the selected technology?
4. Are there internal or external supports for the use of the selected
technology?
5. What is your rationale for selecting this type of technology?
6. Does the technology engage the learner?
7. How does the technology engage the learner?
8. Does this technology support diverse learners?
9. Is there a technology based assessment tool that would meet your needs?
Summative or formative?
10. Have I used the technology within the most appropriate part of the
lesson?
Return to Hot Links page
TQP - Page 1 of 1
BF Last Updated on 6/29/11
Print (2 pages)
ECU TQP Grant
Project
►ELL Checklist
Providing Comprehensible Instruction for English Language
Learners
1. Remember that ELLs can represent many different levels of English
proficiency. Consequently, when we use this term, we can be
describing students who have no English at all, as well as those who
have differing levels of fluency.
2. Since the language proficiency of ELLs represents a wide spectrum
of instructional needs, teachers need to know their students and
consistently assess both their language proficiency and content
knowledge.
3. It is common for newcomers with limited or no English proficiency to
go through a silent period in the classroom. This is normal and
should be respected.
4. Research has demonstrated that encouraging students to use their
native language as they learn English helps them in the process of
learning both content and English.
5. ELLs will often acquire social language earlier than academic
language. It is important for the teacher to distinguish between these.
6. In providing comprehensible instruction for ELLs, it is essential to
lower the “affective filter.” In essence, this means to encourage ELL
participation in a way that reduces the fear of failure or
embarrassment about making mistakes during the learning process.
For example, rather than pointing out ELL errors in grammar, restate
and model correct usage so that ELLs can hear and read correct
language examples.
7. Use visuals, manipulatives, and realia when you plan instruction for
ELLs as an accompaniment to oral and written information.
Next page
TQP - P a g e | 1
Updated July 2013
ECU TQP Grant
Project
►ELL Checklist
8. Provide ELLs with alternative ways of showing what they know, such
as through pictures rather than in spoken or written English.
9. Pairing or teaming ELLs with others who speak their first language
but have greater English proficiency can be an effective way to
support them in acquiring both English and content knowledge.
10. When planning and implementing instruction for ELLs, identify both
the content objectives and language objectives for each lesson.
Return to Hot Links page
TQP - P a g e | 2
Updated July 2013
Print - 4 pages
Import and Trim Video in Windows Live
Before editing your video, make a backup copy on your thumbdrive or other
location. Do not use it for editing unless you need to start over.
To edit videos on Windows Vista and Windows 7 computers you need to install
Windows Live Movie Maker, which is available for free from Microsoft:
http://windows.microsoft.com/en-us/windows-live/movie-maker#t1=overview
Add a Video
Get started with making a
movie and editing it by
first adding any videos
that you want to use into
Movie Maker.
On the Home tab, click
on the prompt on the
right side to browse for
your video. When you
locate it, click Open.
Or, you can drag the file
into the right side of the
Movie Maker screen.
Next page
Trim Video
To trim the beginning or end of a video clip so only the part of the video you want appears in your final
movie, click the video you want to trim, and then drag the playback indicator on the storyboard to the point
where you want the video to start or stop playing in your movie. Do one of the following:
•
To set a new start point, under Video
Tools, on the Edit tab, in the Editing
group, click Set start point.
•
To set a new end point, under Video
Tools, on the Edit tab, in the Editing
group, select Set end point.
Next page
Split a Video
To split a video into two items, click the
video, and then drag the playback indicator
to the point where you want to split the
video. Under Video Tools, on the Edit tab,
in the Editing group, click Split.
Next page
Export a Video for Taskstream
On the Home tab, in the Save movie,
Select the down arrow to display more
export settings until you see Mobile
device setting, select the Window
Phone (small).
Be sure to name each segment with a
distinct name.
The Save Movie screen will appear
and allow you to select where to
save your video, select someplace
easy to find, like your Desktop.
Press "Save"
Return to Hot Links page
NOTE TO College of Education ECU STUDENT: Please read these video guidelines
for your information. This page does not need to go home to parents/guardian.
Instead, it is for you to read in order to be informed of our video policies. Thank you
for your continued hard work!
Video Guidelines
In the new buildings and throughout campus there is a proliferation of video resources
available for instruction. The use of this equipment is very exciting, as it creates many new and
exciting opportunities. This document contains some guidelines that need to be considered when
videotaping students, guest lecturers, and others. ECU needs to be able to demonstrate that it has
permission from the students and others to tape them.
To record candidates in an ECU class lecture, you need the following:
1. A written agreement (form attached) executed by all students in the class- form must be
permanently kept for your records; or
2. Clear notice in the class syllabus that the class will be taped, those who do not wish to be
taped must notify the professor and those who do not so notify will be deemed to have given
full permission to be taped and for ECU to use their recorded image for any purpose
whatsoever. Provide this information to the class orally;
3. IF you are focusing the video on students, both 1 & 2 are required.
Sample Language for Syllabus which should be prominently displayed:
This class will be videotaped and broadcast on the internet and/or distributed on electronic
media. These video recordings may contain your image. You must notify me as soon as
possible if you DO NOT want your image contained on the video. If you do not so timely
notify me, then you understand and authorize that as part of this class we may videotape your
image and broadcast it on the internet and/or distribute it on electronic media.
To record guest lecturers or others, you need the following:
1. A written agreement executed by each individual (form attached). The form must be
permanently kept for your records.
To record PK-12 students in conjunction with an ECU project/class:
1. The ECU student should sign the consent form on page two.
2. Communication from the ECU faculty/student to the public school classroom teacher and
parents about the assignment. This can be a memo that is attached to the top of the consent
form or a separate memo included with the consent form. The memo should include what is
being videotaped, why and how it will be used (ex. placed on a secured server, for marketing
purposes, for class assignments).
3. The ECU student, with the classroom teacher, is to verify that the public school students
have the appropriate consent forms on file as per the policy of the school/school system and
the ECU consent forms.
To record patients or any act related to medical information:
1. Contact the HIPAA Compliance Officer (744.2030) PRIOR TO making any such
recordings.
Print
College of Education
East Carolina University
Speight Building • Greenville, NC 27858-4353
Video Consent and Release
In consideration of being permitted to participate in video recordings at East Carolina
University (“ECU”), I hereby grant to ECU the absolute and irrevocable right and
unrestricted permission in connection with the taping, broadcasting, and archiving in
respect of my/my child’s name, photographic portraits or pictures, likeness, or voice or any
or all of them or in which I may be included with others, to copyright the same, in ECU’s
own name or otherwise to use, re-use, publish and re-publish the same in whole or in part,
individually or in any and all media now or hereafter known, and for any educational
purpose whatsoever for illustration, promotion, art, editorial, advertising, broadcasting, or
any other purpose whatsoever without restriction as an alternation. I understand that this
content may be placed on a University owned server for educational viewing.
In consideration of being permitted to participate in video recordings, I hereby release and
discharge ECU from any and all claims and demands arising out of or in connection with
the use of my photograph, name, likeness, or voice including without limitation any and all
claims for libel, defamation, or invasion of privacy with my participation in video
recordings.
I fully understand that my participation in video recordings is completely voluntary and this
confirms that I am of full age and have the right to contract in my own name. This
acknowledges that I have read the foregoing and fully understand the contents thereof. This
release shall be binding upon me, my heirs, legal representatives, and assigns.
In witness thereof, I have caused this Consent and Release to be executed this _____ day of
_______________, 20__.
Witness:
Participant (Parent or Guardian):
_______________________________
Signature
_______________________________
Signature
Child’s name if applicable: __________________________________________________
If you have questions about this form, contact the classroom teacher.
Return to Hot Links page
Print
Facultad de Educación
East Carolina University
Speight Building • Greenville, NC 27858-4353
Formulario de Permiso para Participar en Grabaciones de Video y Descargo
Considerando el pedido de participar en grabaciones de video en la Universidad de East
Carolina (ECU), por este medio otorgo a ECU el derecho absoluto e irrevocable y el
permiso sin restrincciones de grabar, hacer público y archivar en nombre mío/de mi hijo/a,
retratos fotográficos o fotografías similares, o grabaciones de voz, de una o todas estas
mencionadas o en las que pueda estar incluído/a con otros, de tener el derecho de autor de
los mismos bajo el nombre de ECU o también para usar, reusar, publicar, republicar los
mismos en su totalidad o en parte, individualmente o en todo medio de comunicación
conocido o por ser conocido, y para cualquier propósito educativo ya sea para ilustración,
promoción, arte, editorial, propaganda, transmición televisiva, o para cualquier otro
objetivo sin restrincciones ni alteraciones. Entiendo que este consentimiento puede ser
colocado en un servidor de propiedad de la Univerisdad para ser visto con motivos
educativos.
Considerando el pedido de participar en grabaciones de video, por este medio dispenso y
libero de responsabilidad a ECU de cualquier reclamo o exigencia que surja en relación al
uso de mi fotografía, nombre, semejanza, o voz incluyendo sin límites uno y todos los
reclamos de calumnia, difamación, o invasión a la privacidad por mi participación en las
grabaciones de video.
Comprendo totalmente que mi participación en las grabaciones de video es completamente
voluntaria y esto confirma que soy mayor de edad y tengo el derecho de firmar este contrato
bajo mi nombre. Por este medio admito que he leído este documento y comprendo su
contenido en su totalidad. Este descargo es vinculante en mí, mis herederos, representantes
legales y asignados.
En virtud de lo cual, he firmado debidamente este formulario de permiso y descargo el día
………… de ……………… del año 20…………
Testigo:
Participante (Padre o Tutor Legal)
_______________________________
_______________________________
Firma
Firma
Nombre del niño/ de la niña en caso de ser pertinente:
__________________________________________________
Si tiene preguntas con respecto a este formulario,
por favor contacte al maestro / a la maestra de su hijo/a.
Return to Hot Links page
Was this manual useful for you? yes no
Thank you for your participation!

* Your assessment is very important for improving the work of artificial intelligence, which forms the content of this project

Download PDF

advertisement