PhD in Rehabilitation Counseling and Administration Concentration in Rehabilitation and Clinical Counseling

PhD in Rehabilitation Counseling and Administration Concentration in Rehabilitation and Clinical Counseling
EAST CAROLINA UNIVERSITY
PhD in Rehabilitation
Counseling and Administration
Concentration in Rehabilitation and Clinical Counseling
Course Syllabi
CACREP Document
2/3/2016
1
TABLE OF CONTENTS
I.
ADRE 7340: Advanced Clinical Counseling Theories and Techniques ................................................2
II.
ADRE 7601: Rehabilitation Administration and Leadership ...............................................................14
III. ADRE 8050: Ethical and Legal Issues in Counselor Education and Supervision ..............................22
IV.
ADRE 8210: Advanced Pedagogy in Rehabilitation Counseling .........................................................28
V.
ADRE 8360: Advanced Practicum .........................................................................................................45
VI.
ADRE 8380: Rehabilitation Counseling Supervision ...........................................................................55
VII. ADRE 8420: Advanced Assessment and Evaluation .............................................................................64
VIII. ADRE 8550: Advanced Research in Rehabilitation ..............................................................................69
IX.
ADRE 8810: Doctoral Seminar in Rehabilitation .................................................................................75
X.
ADRE 8891-8994: Advanced Internship ...............................................................................................80
XI.
*BIOS 7021: Biostatistics for Health Professionals I ...........................................................................93
XII. *BIOS 7022: Biostatistics for Health Professionals II ..........................................................................96
XIII. *BIOS 7550: Applied Multivariate Analysis ..........................................................................................98
*Courses denoted with an asterisk are offered through the Department of Biostatistics located within the
College of Allied Health Sciences.
PhD in Rehabilitation Counseling and Administration
2
East Carolina University
College of Allied Health Sciences
Department of Addictions and Rehabilitation Studies
Ph.D. in Rehabilitation Counseling and Administration Program
ADRE 7340 Advanced Clinical Counseling Theories and Techniques – 3 hrs
Spring
Instructor:
Phone Number:
E-mail Address:
Office Location:
Office Hours:
Class Day & Hours:
Class Location:
Lloyd Goodwin, Jr., Ph.D., LPCS, LCAS, CRC-CS, MAC, CCS, ACS
252-744-6292
[email protected]
Health Sciences Building, Room 4425B
By Appointment
Wednesday 9-12 am
Health Sciences Building, Room 4355
Reasonable Accommodations:
East Carolina University seeks to comply fully with the Americans with Disabilities Act
(ADA). Students requesting accommodations based on a disability must be registered
with the Department for Disability Support Services located in Slay 138 (252) 737-1016
(Voice/TTY).
ECU emergency weather information:
Severe weather: http://www.ecu.edu/alert/
Emergency information hotline: 252-328-0062
Continuity of Instruction:
In the event that face-to-face classes are suspended due to a pandemic or other
catastrophe I will strive to continue instruction to those that are able to participate. If and
when face-to-face classes are suspended, you will receive an email from me and a
Blackboard Announcement that detail how we will communicate, where you can locate
course information and what you can expect during this time period. I realize that some
of you may be affected by the event and not able to participate, however I will continue
to provide instruction to those that are able to continue.
Required Textbook/Readings/Handouts
 Readings & handouts will be assigned throughout the semester.
Catalog Course Description
7340. Advanced Clinical Counseling Theories and Techniques (3)
P: ADRE 6300, 6310 or equivalent; or consent of instructor. Counseling theories utilized
with people with disabilities, such as cognitive behavioral counseling, transactional
analysis, and gestalt therapy. Counseling techniques and strategies such as stress
management skill training, anger management, self-esteem building, conflict
management, dream work, and alternative and complementary therapies.
PhD in Rehabilitation Counseling and Administration
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Purpose of the Course:
The purpose of this course is for students to gain advanced knowledge and skills in
counseling theories and techniques, including evidence-based counseling practices. This
course will focus on the integration of counseling theories and the conceptualization of
clients from multiple theoretical perspectives. Methods for evaluating counseling
effectiveness along with ethical and culturally relevant counseling in multiple settings
will be explored. Counseling areas and issues such as the principles and practice of
counseling, career development, group work, systems, consultation, crises, disasters, and
other trauma causing events will be explored through multiple theoretical counseling
viewpoints.
Professionalism, Student Conduct and Academic Integrity:
Students enrolled in the Substance Abuse and Clinical Counseling program at East Carolina
University must abide by of the American Counseling Association (ACA) Code of Ethics
http://www.counseling.org.
Students who would like to report any behavioral concerns within their campus
environment are welcome to make a report through the ECU Cares webpage
www.ecu.edu/cs-studentlife/dos/onlinereporting.cfm or
may call 252-737-5555.
Additionally, academic integrity is expected of every East Carolina University Student.
Academic honor is the responsibility of the students and faculty of East Carolina
University. Academic Integrity Violations include: (a) Cheating – Unauthorized aid or
assistance or giving or receiving of unfair advantage on any form of academic work;
(b) Plagiarism - Copying the language, structure, ideas, and/or thoughts of another and
adopting same as one’s own original work; (c) Falsification - Statement of any untruth,
either spoken or written, regarding any circumstances relative to academic work; and (d)
Attempts - Attempting any act that if completed would constitute an academic integrity
violation. For more information concerning academic integrity please see the ECU
Graduate Student Manual http://www.ecu.edu/cs-acad/acadprograms/catalogs.cfm
Course Plan/Structure:
This course will be taught through presentations, discussions, experiential activities,
videos, and assigned readings in a seminar format.
Course Objectives: (CACREP [2016] Standards: Section 6: Doctoral Standards: B. Doctoral Professional
Identity; 1. Counseling; 4. Research and Scholarship; A. Doctoral Learning Environment noted)
As a result of this course, students will know/understand/apply:
Doctoral Level Standards
6.B.1.a Scholarly examination of theories
relevant to counseling
6.B.1.b Integration of theories relevant to
counseling
6.B.1.c Conceptualization of clients from
PhD in Rehabilitation Counseling and Administration
Means of Assessment
Journal Manuscript Preparation
Presentation to faculty
Journal Manuscript Preparation
Presentation to faculty
Seminar Discussion and Presentation of
4
multiple theoretical perspectives
6.B.1.d Evidence-based counseling practices
6.B.1.f Ethical and culturally relevant
counseling in multiple settings
6.B.4.h Professional writing for journal and
newsletter publication
6.A.2.c Support faculty and students in
publishing and/or presenting the results of
scholarly inquiry.
Readings
Journal Manuscript Preparation
Presentation to faculty
Seminar Discussion and Presentation of
Readings
Journal Manuscript Preparation
Journal Manuscript Preparation
Presentation to faculty
Course Requirements
1. Attendance: Class meeting attendance is mandatory. Students who miss 3 or more meetings will receive
an “F” for the course, regardless of the reasons for missing.
2. Manuscript: Students are expected to develop, during the semester, and submit, by the end of the
semester, a manuscript for publication in a peer-reviewed, counseling-related journal. Manuscripts will
be based on a counseling-related conceptual model or theory of interest to the student. Manuscript
development will be completed in phases, with each phase including a peer- and instructor-feedback
component. Manuscript phases include:
a. Phase I: An abstract of the manuscript and a reference list of at least 30 references in APA
format.
b. Phase II: An introduction section (4-5 pages) plus an additional 20 references and revision to
previous phases.
c. Phase III: A main body section (7-8) pages plus revision to previous phases.
d. Phase IV: A conclusion/implications section (4-5 pages) plus revision to previous phases.
e. Phase V: End of semester draft. This includes a draft the student intends to submit for
publication. A cover letter to the journal for submission should accompany the draft.
 Electronic copies of all phases must be emailed to all course members by the due date (see
course calendar). Late submissions will not be accepted.
 Students may want to ask another student or faculty member to co-author the student’s final draft
for publication submission.
3. Seminar Discussion Participation: Each student will be assigned specific readings to be responsible for
presenting for discussion in seminar. All students are expected to read all of the assigned readings. Students are
expected to participate in all course and class activities. Class meetings will be very dynamic, involving
discussion and activities based on assigned readings. Therefore, intelligent participation is greatly dependent upon
an environment conducive to learning and free from distractions.
4. Presentation. Students will conduct a 30-minutes presentation on their manuscript at the end of the semester.
Presentations will be open to the department.
Grading
Grading Policy: at the conclusion of the semester, all points are totaled and graded as follows:
Earned points
90-100 points
80- 89 points
Grade assignment
A
B
PhD in Rehabilitation Counseling and Administration
5
70-79 points
Below 70 points
C
F
Assignments
Class Presentation of Readings
Manuscript for Journal
 APA style = 10
 Intro & Review of Literature = 10
 New material = 10
 Summary = 5
Presentation to DARS Faculty
 Organization = 7
 Visual aids (e.g. Pp, handouts) = 6
Completion of DARS Evaluation
Total
Points
50
35
13
2
100
Readings
CBT
1. Barbee, P.W. (2009). Rational emotive behavior therapy and groups. In American Counseling
Association, The ACA encyclopedia of counseling (pp. 443-444). Alexandria, VA: Author.
2. Cavallaro, M.L (2009). Cognitive behavior modification, Donald Meichenbaum’s theory of. In
American Counseling Association, The ACA encyclopedia of counseling (pp. 103-104). Alexandria, VA:
Author.
3. Conte, C. (2009). Cognitive therapies. In C. Conte, Advanced techniques for counseling and
psychotherapy (pp. 191-199). NY: Springer.
4. Readings from Goodwin, L.R., Jr. (2002). The button therapy book: How to work on your buttons and the
button-pushers in your life. BC, Canada: Trafford Publishing.
a. Handout of Pp Presentation of Button Therapy
b. Six –Step Button Therapy Model
c. Button-Removal Techniques (Cognitive Interventions)
d. 30 Seeds for Your Mind’s Garden
5. Goodwin, L.R., Jr. (2002). The six-step button therapy method. BC, Canada: Trafford Publishing.
6. Petry, N.M (2012). Background of behavioral therapies and the evolution of contingency management.
In N.M. Petry, Contingency management for substance abuse treatment: A guide to implementing this
evidence-based practice. (pp. 9-16). NY: Routledge.
7. Wehrman, J.D. (2009). Behavioral counseling. In American Counseling Association, The ACA
encyclopedia of counseling (pp. 57-58). Alexandria, VA: Author.
8. Choate, L.H. (2012). Counseling adolescents who engage in nonsuicidal self-injury: A dialectical
behavior therapy approach. Journal of Mental Health Counseling, 34(1), 56-70.
9. Springer, J.M. (2012). Acceptance and commitment therapy: Part of the “third wave” in the behavioral
tradition. Journal of Mental Health Counseling, 34(3), 205-212.
Counseling (C)
1. Centore, A. (2013, January). Nine reasons counseling practices lose their best clinicians. Counseling
Today, 26-27.
2. Hodges, S. (2012, December). The continuing evolution of ‘great’ counseling. Counseling Today, 14-16.
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3. Shallcross, L. (2012, December). The recipe for truly great counseling. Counseling Today, 26-33.
Crisis Intervention (CI)
1. American Counseling Association (2011, October). 1:1 Crisis counseling. Fact Sheet #10, American
Counseling Association’s Traumatology Interest Network. www.counseling.org.
2. France, K. (2013). Intervening with clients in crisis. In G.P. Koocher, J.C. Norcross, & B.A. Greene
(Eds.). Psychologists’ desk reference (3rd ed.). NY: Oxford University Press.
3. McAdams, C.R., III, & Keener, H.J. (2008). Preparation, action, recovery: A conceptual framework for
counselor preparation and response in client crises. Journal of Counseling and Development, 86, 388398.
4. Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (2009). Practice guidelines: Core elements
for responding to mental health crises. HHS Pub. No. SMA-09-4427. Rockville, MD: Center for Mental
Health Services, SAMHSA, 1-20.
5. Wachter, C.A. (2009). Crisis intervention. In American Counseling Association, The ACA encyclopedia
of counseling (pp. 131-132). Alexandria, VA: Author.
Evidence-Based Practices (EBPs)
 Chambless, D.L. & Klonsky, E.D. (2013). Compendium of empirically supported treatments. In G.P.
Koocher, J.C. Norcross, & B.A. Greene (Eds.). Psychologists’ desk reference (3rd ed.). NY: Oxford
University Press.
 SAMHSA website for EBPs (http://www.nrepp.samhsa.gov/
 North Carolina‘s website for EBP information (www.ncpic.net)
Existential-Humanistic Counseling (EC)
1. Eliason, G.T., & Samide, J.L. (2009). Existential counseling. In American Counseling Association, The
ACA encyclopedia of counseling (pp. 183-185). Alexandria, VA: Author.
2. Schneider, K.J. (2016). Existential-humanistic psychotherapy. In I. Marini & M.A. Stebnicki (Eds.). The
professional counselor’s desk reference (2nd ed.). NY: Springer.
Gestalt Therapy (GT)
1. Brownell, P. (2016). Gestalt therapy. In I. Marini & M.A. Stebnicki (Eds.). The professional counselor’s
desk reference (2nd ed.). NY: Springer.
2. Mistler, B.J. (2009). Gestalt therapy. In American Counseling Association, The ACA encyclopedia of
counseling (pp. 211-212). Alexandria, VA: Author.
Grief Counseling (GC)
1. Alexander, E. (2012, November 26/December 3). The science of heaven, Newsweek, 24-26.
2. American Counseling Association. (2011). Grief reactions over the life span. Fact Sheet #12, American
Counseling Association’s Traumatology Interest Network. www.counseling.org, 2 pp.
3. Arkowitz, H., & Lilienfeld, S.O. (2011, November/December). Grief without tears. Scientific American
Mind, 68-69.
4. Jones, D. (2012, May). Grief revisited. Counseling Today, 24. (DSM-V)
3. Kevorkian, K.A. (2016). Counseling the terminally ill and their families. In I. Marini & M.A. Stebnicki
(Eds.). The professional counselor’s desk reference (2nd ed.). NY: Springer.
5. Konigsberg, R.D. (2011, January 24). Good news about grief. Time, 42-46.
PhD in Rehabilitation Counseling and Administration
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6. Muselman, D.M., & Wiggins, M.I. (2012). Spirituality and loss: Approaches for counseling grieving
adolescents. Counseling and Values, 57, 229-240.
7. Salisbury, C.Z.A. (2009). Grief. In American Counseling Association, The ACA encyclopedia of
counseling (pp. 215-216). Alexandria, VA: Author.
8. Shallcross, L. (2012, June). A loss like no other. Counseling Today, 26-31.
Group Work (GW)
1. Azima, F.J.C. (1993). Group psychotherapy with personality disorders. In H.I. Kaplan, & B.J. Sadock
(Eds.). Comprehensive group psychotherapy (3rd ed., pp. 393-406). Baltimore, MD: Williams &
Wilkins.
2. Bishop, M., & Harley, D.A. (2006). Groups in rehabilitation settings. In D. Capuzzi, D.R. Gross, &
M.D. Stauffer. Introduction to group work (4th ed.), 385-413. Denver, CO: Love Publishing Co.
3. Brook, D.W. (1993). Group psychotherapy with anxiety and mood disorders. In H.I. Kaplan, & B.J.
Sadock (Eds.). Comprehensive group psychotherapy (3rd ed., pp. 374-393). Baltimore, MD: Williams &
Wilkins.
4. Brooks, F., & McHenry, B. (2009). Group counseling and addiction. In F. Brooks & B. McHenry, A
contemporary approach to substance abuse and addiction counseling. Alexandria, VA: Author.
5. Corey, G. (2008). Comparisons, contrasts, and integration. In G. Corey, Theory and practice of group
counseling (7th ed., pp. 447-468). Belmont, CA: Thomson, Brooks-Cole.
6. Corey, G. (2008). The evolution of a group: An integrative perspective in G. Corey, Theory and practice of
group counseling. (7th ed., pp. 469-494). Belmont, CA: Thomson, Brooks-Cole.
7. Fernando, D.M., & Herlihy, B.R. (2010). Supervision of group work: Infusing the spirit of social justice.
The Journal for Specialists in Group Work, 35(3), 281-289.
8. Schimmel, C.J, Jacobs, E., & Adams, J.R. (2016). Involuntary in a group. In I. Marini & M.A. Stebnicki
(Eds.). The professional counselor’s desk reference (2nd ed.). NY: Springer.
9. Stone, W.N. (2009). Group psychotherapy with the chronically mentally ill. In H.I. Kaplan, & B.J. Sadock
(Eds.). Comprehensive group psychotherapy (3rd ed., pp. 418-429). Baltimore, MD: Williams &
Wilkins.
Holistic Counseling and Rehabilitation (HCR)
1. Campbell, J.C., & Christopher, J.C. (2012). Teaching mindfulness to create effective counselors.
Journal of Mental Health Counseling, 34(3), 213-226.
2. Dowdle, H. (2009, August). Feel your best! The 17 most trusted names in integrative health give their
top advice for preventing illness, revving up energy, easing stress-and more. Body + Soul, 74-80.
3. Goodwin, L.R., Jr. (1980). A humanistic psychology course and individualized personal growth
program. The Humanist Educator, 18(4), 197-198.
4. Goodwin, L.R., Jr. (1986). A holistic perspective for the provision of rehabilitation counseling services.
Journal of Applied Rehabilitation Counseling, 17(2), 29-36.
5. Myers, J.E., & Sweeney, T.J. (2008). Wellness counseling: The evidence base for practice. Journal of
Counseling and Development, 86, 482-493.
6. Myers, J.E., & Sweeney, T.J., & Witmer, J.M. (2000). The Wheel of Wellness counseling for wellness:
A holistic model for treatment planning. Journal of Counseling and Development, 78, 251-266.
7. Olpin, M., & Hesson, M. (2010). Complementary and alternative health. In M. Olpin & M. Hesson,
Stress management for life: A research-based, experiential approach. Belmont, (pp. 341-356) CA:
Wadsworth/ Cengage Learning.
PhD in Rehabilitation Counseling and Administration
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8. Reese, R.F., & Myers, J.E. (2012). EcoWellness: The missing factor in holistic wellness models.
Journal of Counseling & Development, 90, 400-406.
Person-Centered Counseling (PCC)
1. Neukrug, E. (2009). Client-centered counseling. In American Counseling Association, The ACA
encyclopedia of counseling (pp. 100-121). Alexandria, VA: Author.
Reality Therapy (RT)
1. Alston, P.P. (2016). Reality therapy. In I. Marini & M.A. Stebnicki (Eds.). The professional counselor’s
desk reference (2nd ed.). NY: Springer.
2. Urofsky, R.I. (2009). Reality therapy. In American Counseling Association, The ACA encyclopedia of
counseling (pp. 444-445). Alexandria, VA: Author.
3. Wubbolding, R.E. (2009). Reality therapy: Underlying principles and the WDEP system. In American
Counseling Association, The ACA encyclopedia of counseling (pp. 445-446). Alexandria, VA: Author.
Spirituality (S)
1. Adams, J.R. (2012). Spiritual issues in counseling: What do students perceive they are being taught?
Counseling and Values, 57, 66-80.
2. Cashwell, C.S., & Young, S. (2011). Common spiritual themes. In C.S. Cashwell & S. Young (Eds.),
Integrating spirituality and religion into counseling: A guide to competent practice. Alexandria, VA:
American Counseling Association.
3. Dobmeier, R.A., & Reiner, S.M. (2012). Spirituality in the counselor education curriculum: A national
survey of student perceptions. Counseling and Values, 57, 47-66.
4. Diallo, A. (2013). Clients’ willingness to incorporate religion or spirituality in counseling: A brief
report. Rehabilitation Counseling Bulletin, 56(2), 120-122.
5. Francis, P.C. (2016). Religion and spirituality in counseling. In I. Marini & M.A. Stebnicki (Eds.). The
professional counselor’s desk reference (2nd ed.). NY: Springer.
6. McWilliams, S.A. (2010). Inherent self, invented self, empty self: Constructivism, Buddhism, and
psychotherapy. Counseling and Values, 55, 79-100.
7. Menahem, S. (2010, September/October). The psychology of prayer. Unity Magazine, 26-31.
8. Sherman, J. (2009). Spirituality in counseling. In American Counseling Association, The ACA
encyclopedia of counseling (pp. 519-521). Alexandria, VA: Author.
9. Upson, S. (2012, May/June) Healthy skepticism. Scientific American Mind, 59-63.
10. Wallis, C. (1996, June 24). Faith & healing. Time, 1-6.
http://www.time.com/time/subscriber/article/0,33009,984737,00.html
Systems (Sys)
1. Hackney, H.L., & Cormier, S. (2013). Systemic interventions. In H.L. Hackney & S. Cormier. The
professional counselor: A process guide to helping (7 th ed.). Boston, MA: Pearson.
Transactional Analysis (TA)
1. Young, M.E. (2009). Transactional analysis. In American Counseling Association, The ACA encyclopedia
of counseling (pp. 104-105). Alexandria, VA: Author.
Trauma Counseling (TC)
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1. American Counseling Association website: www.counseling.org >Resources >Trauma & Disaster>
DMH Resources > Fact Sheets 1-15.
1. Bicknell-Hentges, L., & Lynch, J.J. (n.d.) Everything counselors and supervisors need to know about
treating trauma. Presentation at the 2009 American Counseling Association Annual Conference and
Exposition, March 19-23, Charlotte, NC. www.counseling.org.
2. Brown, L.S. (2013). Treating the effects of psychological trauma. In G.P. Koocher, J.C. Norcross, &
B.A. Greene (Eds.). Psychologists’ desk reference (3rd ed.). NY: Oxford University Press.
3. Flagstaff Child and Family Counseling Center (n.d.) Common responses to traumatic events. Prepared
by the Flagstaff Child and Family Counseling Center, Flagstaff Arizona and the ACA.
www.counseling.org/tragedy/responses.html.
4. Goodwin, L.R., Jr., & Holmes, G.E. (1988). Counseling the crime victim. Journal of Applied
Rehabilitation Counseling, 19(2), 42-47.
5. Herbert, W. (2012, November/December). Embattled childhood: The real trauma in PTSD. Scientific
American Mind, 74-75.
6. Janson, G.R. (2009). Trauma counseling. ACA encyclopedia of counseling. Alexandria, VA: ACA, 551553.
7. Lilienfeld, S.O., & Arkowitz, H. (2012, May-June). When coping fails: Revisiting the role of trauma in
post-traumatic stress disorder. Scientific American Mind, 64-65.
8. North Carolina Practice Improvement Collaborative, Evidence-Based Practice Series, Mental Health
Bulletin #1 (n.d.) Trauma-Focused Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (TF-CBT).
9. Stebnicki, M.A. (2009). Disaster mental health response and stress debriefing. In I. Marini & M.A.
Stebnicki (pp. 675-690), The professional counselor’s desk reference. NY: Springer Publishing Co.
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Course Calendar
**** Schedule is tentative and is subject to change.
Date
1/13
Topic
Review of Course Syllabus & Calendar Outline
1/20
HOLISTIC COUNSELING & REHABILITATION
(CACREP-2016): Section 6. DOCTORAL
STANDARDS; B. DOCTORAL PROFESSIONAL
IDENTITY; 1. COUNSELING; a scholarly
examination of theories relevant to counseling.
1/27
HCR 1-8
HCR 1-8
HOLISTIC COUNSELING (continued)/
SPIRITUALITY / EXISTENTIAL COUNSELING / CBT
(CACREP-2016): Section 6. DOCTORAL
STANDARDS; B. DOCTORAL PROFESSIONAL
IDENTITY; 1. COUNSELING; a scholarly
examination of theories relevant to counseling; b.
integration of theories relevant to counseling; c.
conceptualization of clients from multiple theoretical
perspectives.
2/10
Assignments Due
HOLISTIC COUNSELING & REHABILITATION
(continued):
(CACREP-2016): Section 6. DOCTORAL
STANDARDS; B. DOCTORAL PROFESSIONAL
IDENTITY; 1. COUNSELING; a scholarly
examination of theories relevant to counseling.
2/3
Readings
HCR 1,6
S 1-9
EC 1
CBT 4-5
SPIRITUALITY (continued)/ PERSON-CENTERED
COUNSELING
(CACREP-2016): Section 6. DOCTORAL
STANDARDS; B. DOCTORAL PROFESSIONAL
IDENTITY; 1. COUNSELING; a scholarly
examination of theories relevant to counseling; b.
integration of theories relevant to counseling; c.
conceptualization of clients from multiple theoretical
perspectives.
PhD in Rehabilitation Counseling and Administration
S 1-9
PCC 1
Phase I (Manuscript)
11
2/17
CBT/ HOLISTIC COUNSELING
(CACREP-2016): Section 6. DOCTORAL
STANDARDS; B. DOCTORAL PROFESSIONAL
IDENTITY; 1. COUNSELING; a scholarly
examination of theories relevant to counseling; b.
integration of theories relevant to counseling; c.
conceptualization of clients from multiple theoretical
perspectives.
2/24
CBT/ EXISTENTIAL COUNSELING/ GESTALT
THERAPY / PERSON-CENTERED COUNSELING/
REALTY THERAPY/ TA
(CACREP-2016): Section 6. DOCTORAL
STANDARDS; B. DOCTORAL PROFESSIONAL
IDENTITY; 1. COUNSELING; a scholarly
examination of theories relevant to counseling; b.
integration of theories relevant to counseling; c.
conceptualization of clients from multiple theoretical
perspectives.
3/3
CBT 1-9
H1
CBT 1-9
EC 1
GT 1
PCC 1
RT 1-2
TA 1
CBT (continued)
(CACREP-2016): Section 6. DOCTORAL
STANDARDS; B. DOCTORAL PROFESSIONAL
IDENTITY; 1. COUNSELING; a scholarly
examination of theories relevant to counseling; b.
integration of theories relevant to counseling; c.
conceptualization of clients from multiple theoretical
perspectives; d. evidence-based counseling practices
3/10
No Class Spring Break
3/17
TRAUMA/ CRISIS COUNSELING/ DISASTER/ CRIME
VICTIM
(CACREP-2016): Section 6. DOCTORAL
STANDARDS; B. DOCTORAL PROFESSIONAL
IDENTITY; 1. COUNSELING; a scholarly
examination of theories relevant to counseling; b.
integration of theories relevant to counseling; c.
conceptualization of clients from multiple theoretical
perspectives.
PhD in Rehabilitation Counseling and Administration
CBT 1-9
TC 1-7
C 1-3
CBT 4-5
EC 1
Phase II (Manuscript)
12
3/24
TRAUMA (continued)
(CACREP-2016): Section 6. DOCTORAL
STANDARDS; B. DOCTORAL PROFESSIONAL
IDENTITY; 1. COUNSELING; a scholarly
examination of theories relevant to counseling; b.
integration of theories relevant to counseling; c.
conceptualization of clients from multiple theoretical
perspectives; d. evidence-based counseling practices
3/31
TRAUMA (continued)
(CACREP-2016): Section 6. DOCTORAL
STANDARDS; B. DOCTORAL PROFESSIONAL
IDENTITY; 1. COUNSELING; a scholarly
examination of theories relevant to counseling; b.
integration of theories relevant to counseling; c.
conceptualization of clients from multiple theoretical
perspectives; d. evidence-based counseling practices
4/7
TC 1-7
C 1-4
CBT 4-5
EC 1
COUNSELING ISSUES & FUTURE/ EBPs/ GROUP
WORK/ SYSTEMS/ SELF-ESTEEM
(CACREP-2016): Section 6. DOCTORAL
STANDARDS; B. DOCTORAL PROFESSIONAL
IDENTITY; 1. COUNSELING; a scholarly
examination of theories relevant to counseling; b.
integration of theories relevant to counseling; c.
conceptualization of clients from multiple theoretical
perspectives; d. evidence-based counseling practices
4/14
TC 1-7
C 1-4
CBT 4-5
EC 1
C 1-3
EBPs
GW 1-7
SYS 1
SE 1-2
GRIEF COUNSELING/ CBT/ EXISTENTIAL
COUNSELING/ GESTALT COUNSELING / PERSONCENTERED COUNSELING/ SPIRITUAL
(CACREP-2016): Section 6. DOCTORAL
STANDARDS; B. DOCTORAL PROFESSIONAL
IDENTITY; 1. COUNSELING; a scholarly
examination of theories relevant to counseling; b.
integration of theories relevant to counseling; c.
conceptualization of clients from multiple theoretical
perspectives; d. evidence-based counseling practices
PhD in Rehabilitation Counseling and Administration
GC 1-8
EC 1
GT 1
PCC 1
S 2,5
Phase III (Manuscript)
13
4/21
GRIEF COUNSELING (continued)
(CACREP-2016): Section 6. DOCTORAL
STANDARDS; B. DOCTORAL PROFESSIONAL
IDENTITY; 1. COUNSELING; a scholarly
examination of theories relevant to counseling; b.
integration of theories relevant to counseling; c.
conceptualization of clients from multiple theoretical
perspectives; d. evidence-based counseling practices
4/28
Phase IV (Manuscript)
STUDENT PRESENTATION of MANUSCRIPT
(CACREP-2016): Section 6. DOCTORAL
STANDARDS. A. THE DOCTORAL LEARNING
ENVIRONMENT. 2. (c) support faculty and students
in publishing and/or presenting the results of
scholarly inquiry.
5/5
GC 1-8
EC 1
GT 1
PCC 1
S 2,5
PROCESSING OF PRESENTATIONS AND
MANUSCRIPTS
(CACREP-2016): Section 6. DOCTORAL
STANDARDS. A. THE DOCTORAL LEARNING
ENVIRONMENT. 2. (c) support faculty and students
in publishing and/or presenting the results of
scholarly inquiry.
PhD in Rehabilitation Counseling and Administration
Phase V
(Manuscript/Presentation)
14
East Carolina University
College of Allied Health Sciences
Department of Addictions and Rehabilitation Studies
Substance Abuse and Clinical Counseling Program
Rehabilitation and Career Counseling Program
ADRE 7601 – Rehabilitation Administration and Leadership – 3 hrs.
Spring Semester 2015
Instructor:
Phone Number:
E-mail Address:
Office Location:
Office Hours:
Steven R. Sligar, EdD., CVE, PVE
252-744-6293
[email protected]
Health Sciences Building, Room 4425 G
Monday 2:00-5:00 PM
Tuesday 2:00-5:00 PM (Class 6-9)
Wednesday (Class 2-5)
Thursday Research Day
Friday by appointment
Class Day & Hours: Wednesday 2:00 – 5:00 PM
Class Location:
Health Sciences Building, Room 4345
Reasonable Accommodations
East Carolina University seeks to comply fully with the Americans with
Disabilities Act (ADA). Students who request accommodations based on a
disability must be registered with the Department for Disability Support Services
located in Slay 138 (252) 737-1016 (Voice/TTY). I am willing to meet with you
to discuss any accommodations that will facilitate your learning.
Severe Weather and University Emergency Notices (including Closings)
http://www.ecu.edu/alert/
Emergency information hotline: 252-328-0062
Continuity of Instruction
In the event that face-to-face classes are suspended due to a pandemic or other
catastrophe I will strive to continue instruction to those that are able to
participate. If and when face-to-face classes are suspended, you will receive an
email from me and a Blackboard Announcement that detail how we will
communicate, where you can locate course information, and what you can expect
during this time period. I realize that some of you may be affected by the event
and not able to participate, however I will continue to provide instruction to those
that are able to continue.
Cell phone
The usage disrupts the learning environment and concentration of the user and
other students. Therefore, all cell phones are to be either off or on silent
notification mode.
PhD in Rehabilitation Counseling and Administration
15
Course Materials
There are three required textbooks and resource materials are available through
the ECU Bookstore. Additional readings are listed on the schedule or assigned in
class.
Required Texts
Lewis, J.A., Packard, T., & Lewis, M.D. (2011). Management of human service
programs (5th ed). Belmont, CA: Thomson Brooks/Cole Learning (ISBN-10:
084003427X)
Northhouse, P. G. (2013). Leadership: Theory and practice (6th ed.). Thousand Oaks,
CA: Sage Publications (ISBN-9781452203409)
Resource Materials
American Psychological Association (2001). Publication manual of the American
Psychological Association (6th ed.). Washington, DC: Author. ISBN-13: 9781433805615
Brewerton, P. & Millward, L. (2006). Organizational research methods. Thousand Oaks,
CA: Sage Publications (ISBN-0761971017)
Strunk Jr., W. & White, E.B. (2000). The elements of style (4th ed.). Needham Heights,
MA: Allyn & Bacon. ISBN-13: 978-0205313426
Catalog Course Description/Prerequisites
Prerequisite: None. 7601. Rehabilitation Evaluation (3)
Provides overview of management and supervisory theory for rehabilitation
service delivery organizations.
Professionalism, Student Conduct and Academic Integrity:
Students enrolled in the Rehabilitation Counseling & Administration program at
East Carolina University must abide by of the American Counseling Association
(ACA) Code of Ethics (http://www.counseling.org/), the American Mental Health
Counselors Association (AMHCA) Code of Ethics
(https://www.amhca.org/assets/news/AMHCA_Code_of_Ethics_2010_w_paginat
ion_cxd_51110.pdf), and the Commission on Rehabilitation Counselor
Certification (CRCC) Code of Ethics
(http://www.crccertification.com/pages/crc_ccrc_code_of_ethics/10.php)
respectively.
Additionally, students who would like to report any behavioral concerns within
their campus environment are welcome to make a report through the ECU Cares
webpage www.ecu.edu/cs-studentlife/dos/onlinereporting.cfm or may call 252737-5555.
PhD in Rehabilitation Counseling and Administration
16
Furthermore, academic integrity is expected of every East Carolina University
Student. Academic honor is the responsibility of the students and faculty of East
Carolina University. Academic Integrity Violations include:
(a) Cheating – Unauthorized aid or assistance or giving or receiving of unfair
advantage on any form of academic work;
(b) Plagiarism - Copying the language, structure, ideas, and/or thoughts of
another and adopting same as one’s own original work;
(c) Falsification - Statement of any untruth, either spoken or written, regarding
any circumstances relative to academic work; and
(d) Attempts - Attempting any act that if completed would constitute an academic
integrity violation. For more information concerning academic integrity please see
the ECU Graduate Student Manual http://www.ecu.edu/csacad/acadprograms/catalogs.cfm
Course Plan/Structure:
This course will be taught through lectures (face to face and online), discussions,
and small and large group activities.
Objectives
For each student to (CACREP 2016 standards):
Doctoral Professional Identity Standards
(Section 6: CACREP 2016)
4.f. Compare models and methods of program
evaluation
4.h. Compose professional writing for journal and
newsletter publication
5.a. Analyze theories and skills of leadership
Means of Assessment
Final exam
Research project
Interview
5.b. Differentiate leadership and leadership
development in professional organizations
Interview
5.c. Analyze leadership in counselor education
programs
Class discussion
5.d. Examine knowledge of accreditation standards
and processes
Class discussion
5.e. Compare leadership, management, and
administration in counseling organizations and other
institutions
Research project
5.f. Plan for different leadership roles and strategies
for responding to crises and disasters
Research project
5.g. Differentiate strategies of leadership in
consultation
Interview
PhD in Rehabilitation Counseling and Administration
17
5.h. Debate current topical and political issues in
Oral presentation
counseling and how those issues affect the daily work
of counselors and the counseling profession
5.i. Manage the role of counselors and counselor
Personal statement
educators advocating on behalf of the profession and
professional identity
5.j. Interpret models and competencies for advocating Class discussion
for clients at the individual, system, and policy levels
5.k. Propose strategies of leadership in relation to
current multicultural and social justice issues
Research project
5.l. Support ethical and culturally relevant leadership
and advocacy practices
Class discussion
Class Schedule
Readings and assignments will be made during the class throughout the semester.
The schedule is subject to change and any changes will be discussed in class.
Black Board
Course materials and notes are posted in Blackboard. You may access Blackboard
through the ECU web page. Click on the Bb icon. Use the same user name and
pass phrase to log in to Blackboard that you use to check your email. I will send
email notifications of postings and other class information to your ECU email
account.
Requirements:
Grade is based on quality of your interview, research project and presentation,
critiques, personal statement, and class participation.
Attendance & Discussion
Class attendance and discussion are considered a part of the grading system.
During the semester, you will be asked to bring references (e.g., article from the
Wall Street Journal, Harvard Business Review, the Daily Reflector, a book
chapter, refereed journal article, or other relevant source) to class that relates to
leadership, advocacy, and administration of a counseling program. In 3-5 minutes
you will provide a concise oral summary of the reference and link it to the text or
theory presented in class. You are encouraged to use references that you review
for your research paper.
Papers/Oral Presentation/Critique
Three papers are required, an Interview Report, a Research Paper and a
Personal Statement. All papers are to be word-processed, double spaced, with 12
point font and follow APA format and style. Grammar and/or formatting errors
result in loss of <15 points or a letter grade. You will submit your paper via
SafeAssign, which is plagiarism detection software imbedded in Blackboard that
PhD in Rehabilitation Counseling and Administration
18
gives feedback on referencing. I recommend that you use the Draft feature of
SafeAssign several days before the due date to obtain feedback on your
referencing. This will allow you time to make any needed corrections before you
submit the final version of the paper. I do not view or grade the draft. Late
assignments will be accepted ONLY with prior approval and a penalty or letter
grade will be assessed (see rubric). Content information for the three papers and
oral presentation is attached and due dates are on the schedule.
Final Exam
In order to help you prepare for comprehensive exams there will be one
comprehensive essay exam at the end of the semester. This exam will cover all of
the objectives of this course. We will meet in the VE Lab and you will be
expected to either word process or handwrite your answer.
DARS Student Survey of Instruction
Complete the DARS Student Survey of Instruction. Completion of the survey will
count as 2% of your final grade. One week prior to reading day, you will receive
an email from ECU’s Qualtrics system containing a link to complete the survey
for this course. Please note that you will receive a separate email from Qualtrics
for each course you are taking in DARS. You will then have until 12 PM EST on
reading day to complete the survey. Also note that the DARS Student Survey of
Instruction is different from ECU’s “Student Perception of Teaching Survey
(SPOTS).” Finally, please note that your responses on the survey are confidential;
I will only be informed of which students did not complete the assignment and
will only be privy to the survey results after grades have been submitted usually
the following semester.
PhD in Rehabilitation Counseling and Administration
19
Grading
Task
Class discussion
Interview
Research Project Peer Critique
Research Project
Oral Presentation
Personal statement
Final Exam
Complete DARS Course Evaluation
Per Cent
Total
Final grades are: A (100-90); B (89-80); C (79-70); F (<69).
PhD in Rehabilitation Counseling and Administration
15
15
5
35
8
10
10
2
100
20
ADRE 7601: Rehabilitation Administration and Leadership
Interview Report
Research Paper
Oral Presentation
Personal Statement
The purpose of the Interview and Research Paper is for you to demonstrate your ability to
link theory from text, readings, discussions, and lectures to the practice of leadership,
advocacy, and administration of a counseling program. The purpose of the Oral
Presentation is to develop your ability to present research in understandable, meaningful,
and interesting ways, and to demonstrate your knowledge in a particular area. The
Personal Statement represents your current evolution as an administrator and leader. The
Peer Review process is utilized within the profession to insure integrity, lessen bias, and
improve the robustness of the research.
For the Interview Report, you need to select an administrator of a program. This person
may be a chief executive officer or, for larger organizations, an upper level executive
who manages at least a million dollar budget and 50 employees. You need to develop the
interview protocol and submit it along with a prospective subject for approval. After the
interview, submit a summary report with clear links to rehabilitation and leadership
including the texts and references that demonstrate relatedness to the topic.
For the Research Paper, you need to select a topic that clearly relates to leadership,
advocacy, and administration (hopefully one that also relates to your research agenda or
dissertation) and a method of research. You may conduct a literature review, metaanalysis, action research project, case study, pilot study, survey or other scholarly activity
(e.g., position or concept paper). Your topic and method need approval before the
conduct of the research. Upon approval, you need to select a potential journal for
publication and prepare your manuscript per the journal’s guidelines. Length is usually
determined by the journal but a good rule of thumb is no longer than 10-15 pages doublespaced, excluding references, tables, or figures. Submit the journal requirements along
with the Research Paper because these requirements will be used as part of the scoring
rubric.
The Personal Statement is a one-page comprehensive summary of your personal
philosophy of three areas: administration, management, and leadership of a counseling
program.
PhD in Rehabilitation Counseling and Administration
21
Note schedule is subject to change and announcements will be made in class.
Wk.
Date
Lewis (L), or Northouse (N) Chapter (C) and
Topics/Readings (CACREP, 2016)
Introduction
L C 1 Facing the Challenges of Management
L C 2 Knowing the Environment (5.j)
Tischler, L. (July 2005). Join the circus. Fast Company.
How does this article about Cirque du Soleil apply to
HSOs? (link posted in Blackboard)
N C 1-8 Leadership Theories (5.a, 5.b,
1
01/14
2
01/21
3
01/28
4
02/04
N C 9-16 Leadership Theories
Pat Frede, Director of Development, College of Allied
Health Sciences and Military Programs, ECU
Quartermaster Senior Chief (SW/EXW), USNR
L C 3 Planning & Program Design (5.d, 5.f)
5
02/11
L C 7 Building Supervisory Relationships (5.i)
6
02/18
L C 4 Applying Organizational Theories
7
02/25
L C 5 Creating Organizational Designs (5.c)
8
03/04
9
10
03/11
03/18
11
03/25
L C 6 Developing and Managing Human Resources (5.g,
5.k)
Spring Break
Robert Campbell, Associate Professor, HSIM
L C 11 Leading & Changing Human Service Organizations
(5.h)
Xiaoming Zeng, Chair HSIM
L C 9 Designing and Using Information Systems
12
04/01
13
14
04/08
04/15
15
04/22
Brewerton C 8 Assessing Performance in Organizations
(4.f)
L C 8 Managing Finances to Meet Program Goals
C 10 Evaluating Human Services Programs (4.f)
3:30-5:00 Todd Hickey, Senior Vice President at Vidant
Medical Center
LC 12 Achieving and Maintaining Organizational
Excellence (5.l, 5.e)
Research Presentation
16
17
04/29
05/06
Reading Day
Final Exam
PhD in Rehabilitation Counseling and Administration
Due
Assigned theory
presentation
Assigned theory
presentation
Assigned
Mission statement
Motivation theory
presentation
Theory
presentation
Design
presentation
Interview Report
No Class
Peer critiques
Research Paper
Personal
Statement
No Class
2:00-4:30 PM
22
East Carolina University
College of Allied Health Sciences
Department of Addictions and Rehabilitation Studies
ADRE 8050: Ethical and Legal Issues in Counselor Education and Supervision – 3 hrs
Summer 2015
Instructor:
Phone Number:
E-mail Address:
Office Location:
Office Hours:
Class Day & Hours:
Class Location:
Steven R. Sligar, EdD, CVE, PVE
(252) 744-6293
[email protected]
Health Sciences Building, Room 4425-G
Tuesday 10:00 am -12:00 PM and Thursday 1:00-5:00 PM
Tuesday 1:00 to 5:00 PM & online (see schedule)
Health Sciences Building, Room 1305
Reasonable Accommodations
East Carolina University seeks to comply fully with the Americans with
Disabilities Act (ADA). Students requesting accommodations based on a disability
must be registered with the Department for Disability Support Services located in
Slay 138 (252) 737-1016 (Voice/TTY).
ECU emergency weather information
Severe weather:
http://www.ecu.edu/alert/
Emergency information hotline: 252-328-0062
Continuity of Instruction
In the event that face-to-face classes are suspended due to a pandemic or other
catastrophe I will strive to continue instruction to those that are able to
participate. If and when face-to-face classes are suspended, you will receive an
email from me and a Blackboard Announcement that detail how we will
communicate, where you can locate course information and what you can expect
during this time period. I realize that some of you may be affected by the event and
not able to participate, however I will continue to provide instruction to those that
are able to continue.
Texts and Readings
Corey, G., Corey, M. S., &. Callanan, P. (2011). Issues and ethics in the
helping professions. Belmont, CA: Cengage Learning, Inc. ISBN-13:
978-0495812418 REQUIRED for all majors
Geppert, C., & Roberts, L. W. (Eds.). (2008). The book of ethics: Expert guidance
for professionals who treat addiction. Center City, MN: Hazelden. ISBN:
978-1-59285-292-9 REQUIRED for SACC Majors
Neulicht, A. T., McQuade, L. J., & Chapman, C. A. (Eds.). (2010). The CRCC
desk reference on professional ethics: A guide for rehabilitation counselors.
Athens, GA: Elliot & Fitzpatrick, Inc. ISBN-13: 978-0979878695
REQUIRED for RC Majors
PhD in Rehabilitation Counseling and Administration
23
Catalog Description/Prerequisites
P: ADRE 6050 or consent of instructor. Issues of professionalism and ethical
practice related to counselor education, supervision, administration, consultation,
and practice.
Purpose of the Course
This course is designed specifically for doctorial level students and includes
professional and ethical issues in counseling education and supervision.
Professionalism, Student Conduct and Academic Integrity
In this course, you are entering an experience that involves discussions, roleplaying, and sharing of ethical practices. Student colleagues may share something
personally important and confidential. You are to maintain confidentiality.
Students who would like to report any behavioral concerns within their campus
environment are welcome to make a report through the ECU Cares webpage
www.ecu.edu/cs-studentlife/dos/onlinereporting.cfm may call 252-737-5555.
Students enrolled in the Substance Abuse & Clinical Counseling and Rehabilitation
Counseling programs at East Carolina University must abide by of the American
Counseling Association (ACA) Code of Ethics http://www.counseling.org/ and the
Commission on Rehabilitation Counselor Certification (CRCC) Code of Ethics
http://www.crccertification.com/pages/crc_ccrc_code_of_ethics/10.php
respectively.
Additionally, academic integrity is expected of every East Carolina University
student. Academic honor is the responsibility of the students and faculty of East
Carolina University. Academic Integrity Violations include: (a) Cheating –
Unauthorized aid or assistance or giving or receiving of unfair advantage on any
form of academic work; (b)Plagiarism - Copying the language, structure, ideas,
and/or thoughts of another and adopting same as one’s own original work; (c)
Falsification - Statement of any untruth, either spoken or written, regarding any
circumstances relative to academic work; and (d) Attempts - Attempting any act
that if completed would constitute an academic integrity violation. For more
information concerning academic integrity please see the ECU Graduate Student
Manual http://www.ecu.edu/cs-acad/acadprograms/catalogs.cfm.
Course Plan/Structure
This course will be taught through lectures (face to face and online), discussions,
small-group activities, videos, guest presenters, and assigned readings.
PhD in Rehabilitation Counseling and Administration
24
Course Objectives: (CACREP [2016] Standards noted)
For each student to know/understand/apply/demonstrate/promote:
Section 2: Professional Counseling Identity
F. 1. i. Ethical standards of professional counseling
organizations and credentialing
Means of Assessment
Presentation and
group facilitation
Section 6: Doctoral Standards (CACREP 2016)
B. 1. f. ethical and culturally relevant counseling in
multiple settings
B. 2. j. legal and ethical issues and responsibilities in
clinical supervision
B. 3. h. ethical and culturally relevant strategies used in
counselor preparation
B. 4. l. ethical and culturally relevant strategies for
conducting research
B. 5. l ethical and culturally relevant leadership and
advocacy practices
Means of Assessment
Presentation and
group facilitation
Presentation and
group facilitation
Presentation and
group facilitation
Presentation and
group facilitation
Presentation and
group facilitation
Course objectives beyond CACREP (2016) standards:






Assess awareness of ethical issues in their personal and professional lives.
Describe different ethical issues, and utilize and defend their chosen model of ethical
decision making.
Explain the relationship between professional counseling ethics and the law.
Develop greater moral responsibility and the character strength to take action.
Point out and tolerate ambiguity in the ethical decision making process.
Choose an ethical decision making model considering the client’s disability, substance
use, and/or clinical mental health needs.
Course Requirements
1. Group facilitation and class leadership: You will facilitate class or small group
activities for the MS students each week as assigned. At the conclusion of the small
group facilitation you will submit a participation grade for each MS student in your
group. You will be expected to have a thorough knowledge of the subject to be able to
lead effectively the group discussions on each topic.
2. Online lectures: You will develop and post at least two online lectures using lecture
capture software. The topics will be assigned at the beginning of the semester and due
dates are posted in the schedule. Each lecture will be approximately 60 minutes
divided into 4-6 segments. Each lecture will be named according to the assigned
chapter as follows:
C01 Introduction part 1
C01 Introduction part 2
and so on. The lecture will include information from the assigned chapter,
supplemental resources (e.g., other texts, journal articles, program policies, court &
administrative rulings, popular literature or movies), and personal experiences or
anecdotes. Each lecture will also incorporate Universal Design for Learning
Guidelines: see
http://www.udlcenter.org/aboutudl/udlguidelines
PhD in Rehabilitation Counseling and Administration
25
3. Quizzes: You will develop and post at least two online quizzes (you may use the test
bank) that correspond to your assigned lecture.
Grading Policy/Scale
Task
Facilitations (6 @ 50 points each)
Online lectures (2 @ 200 points each)
Quizzes (2 @ 42 points each)
DARS Faculty Evaluation
Total
Grade
Points
A
720-800
B
640-719
C
560-639
F
<559
Points
300
400
84
16
800
Course Connection to Program Portfolio
Possible portfolio artifacts from this course include: Online Lectures
Assignment Rubric and Areas to Assess
8050 Lecture Rubric
Online Lecture covers
DNMEx*
MEx
EXEx
Possible
Assigned topic
150
Code of Ethics (ACA, CRC)
50
Cultural and setting relevance
Points
Total
for
Supervision
Counselor education
related
Conduct of research
topics
Leadership and advocacy
Total
200
* Legend: Does Not Meet Expectations: Unprepared, lecture is choppy and straight from the text.
Meets Expectations: Prepared, includes one to two outside sources or anecdotes and demonstrates
knowledge, and interest.
PhD in Rehabilitation Counseling and Administration
26
Exceeds Expectations: Prepared, includes current topics and interesting/unique stories.
Demonstrates deep understanding of the topic.
8050 Facilitation Rubric
Facilitation related to
DNMEx*
MEx
EXEx
Possible
Assigned topic
40
Code of Ethics (ACA, CRC)
10
Cultural and setting relevance
points
Total
for
Supervision
Counselor education
related
Conduct of research
topics
Leadership and advocacy
Total
50
* Legend: Does Not Meet Expectations: Unprepared, group is not challenged or off topic.
Meets Expectations: Prepared, group is engaged and on topic.
Exceeds Expectations: Prepared, interesting/unique questions, group comments positively about
the experience.
PhD in Rehabilitation Counseling and Administration
27
Course Schedule and Outline Summer 1, 2013*
Week
1
Date
05/14
2
05/21
3
05/28
4
06/04
5
06/11
06/13
6
06/18
06/19
Assignment
Notes
Lecture & discussion
Online lectures posted no later than 5/16 2:00 PM:
Introduction & review of syllabus
Ch 2 The Counselor as a Person and as a Professional
Ch 1 Introduction to Professional
Ch 3 Values and the Helping Relationship
Ethics
Quizzes open 05/16 2:00 PM close 05/21 2:00 PM
MS student participation grades due
One page My Code of Ethics #1 paper due. SafeAssign opens 05/14 at 5:00 PM and closes
05/16/2013 at 5:00 PM.
Lecture & discussion
Online lectures posted no later than 5/23 2:00 PM:
Chapters 2 & 3
Ch 4 Multicultural Perspectives and Diversity Issues
Ch 5 Client Rights and Counselor Responsibilities
MS student participation grades due
Quizzes open 05/23 2:00 PM close 05/28 2:00 PM
Lecture & discussion
Online lectures posted no later than 5/30 2:00 PM:
Chapters 4 & 5
Ch 7 Managing Boundaries and Multiple Relationships
Ch 10 Issues in Theory and Practice
MS student participation grades due
Quizzes open 05/30 2:00 PM close 06/04 2:00 PM
Lecture & discussion
Online lectures posted no later than 6/6 2:00 PM
Chapters 7 & 10
Ch 6 Confidentiality: Ethical and Legal Issues
Ch 8 Professional Competence and Training
Ch 12 Ethical Issues in Group Work
MS student participation grades due
Quizzes open 06/06 2:00 PM close 06/11 2:00 PM
Lecture & discussion
Online lectures posted no later than 6/13 2:00 PM:
Chapters 6, 8, &12
Ch 9 Issues in Supervision and Consultation
Ch 11 Ethical Issues in Couples and Family
Ch 13 Ethical Issues in Community Work
MS student participation grades due
Quizzes open 06/13 2:00 PM close 06/18 2:00 PM
One page My Code of Ethics #2 paper due. SafeAssign opens 06/11 at 5:00 PM and closes
06/13/2013 at 5:00 PM.
My 3 Minute Video on Ethics is due in Blackboard by 5:00 PM.
Lecture & discussion
Chapters 9, 11, & 13
MS student participation grades due
Final Exam opens 9:00 AM and closes on 06/20 at 7:00 PM
* Class schedule may change and additional web sites/readings may be added. Any changes will
be discussed in class or posted in Blackboard.
PhD in Rehabilitation Counseling and Administration
28
ADRE 8210: Advanced Pedagogy in Rehabilitation Counseling
Wednesday 2:00 – 5:00 PM, Room 4355 Health Sciences Building
Department of Addictions and Rehabilitation Studies
College of Allied Health Sciences
East Carolina University
Fall 2015
Instructor
Martha H. Chapin, Ph.D., LPC, CRC, NCC, CDMS
4425L Health Sciences Building
Office phone: (252) 744-6291
Fax number: (252) 744-6302
[email protected]
Office Hours: Tuesday 10:30 - 11:30 AM and 1:15 – 3:30 PM; Wednesday 9:30 – 10:30 AM and 1:00 –
1:45 PM; other hours by appointment.
Severe weather and university emergency notices (includes closings): http://www.ecu.edu/alert/
Emergency information hotline: 252-328-0062
Reasonable Accommodations
East Carolina University seeks to comply fully with the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA). Students
requesting accommodations based on a disability must be registered with the Department for Disability
Support Services located in Slay 138 (252) 737-1016 (Voice/TTY).
Academic Integrity, Respectful Behavior, and Student Code of Conduct
Academic integrity and being respectful of others are expected standards of all students. Academic
integrity includes no cheating, plagiarism, falsification of your work, or attempting to be dishonest. The
Student Handbook (http://issuu.com/ecustudentaffairs/docs/at_the_helm) and the ECU Student Code of
Conduct (http://www.ecu.edu/PRR/11/30/01) address expected student behavior at ECU and outline the
academic integrity policies and procedures. If a violation occurs, at minimum, the student will receive a
zero on the assignment in question and can fail the course as a consequence of their action(s). The case
may also be referred to the Office of Student Rights and Responsibilities for an Academic Integrity Board
hearing.
All participants share a responsibility in creating a civil and non-disruptive classroom environment.
Students are expected to conduct themselves at all times in the classroom in a manner that does not
disrupt teaching and learning. Using cell phones, checking social media sites or emails during class, and
arriving late to class are examples of disruptive behavior. Behavior which disrupts the learning process
may lead to disciplinary action and/or removal from class.
Students who would like to report any behavioral concerns within their campus environment are welcome
to make a report through the Dean of Students webpage at http://www.ecu.edu/csstudentaffairs/dos/person_of_concern-report_a_person.cfm or may call the ECU CARES phone line at
252-737-5555.
ECU Continuity of Instruction
In the event that face-to-face classes are suspended due to a pandemic or other catastrophe, I will strive to
continue instruction to those that are able to participate. If and when face-to-face classes are suspended,
you will receive an email from me and a Blackboard Announcement that detail how we will communicate,
where you can locate course information and what you can expect during this time period. I realize that
some of you may be affected by the event and not able to participate; however I will continue to provide
instruction to those that are able to continue.
Purpose of the course
The purpose of this course is to support participants in becoming a more reflective and effective
rehabilitation, substance abuse, clinical, and mental health counselor educators. We will address this goal
by exploring the following themes: 1) conceptions of teaching; 2) key factors that relate to teaching,
including the characteristics of learners in postsecondary educational settings, the learning process, and
PhD in Rehabilitation Counseling and Administration
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learning environments; 3) instructional design and planning; 4) strategies to encourage active, involved
learning, including strategies involving lecturing, small groups, discussion, experiential learning, and
educational technologies; 5) approaches to assessing learning; and 6) approaches to improving teaching
through assessment and faculty learning and development; and 7) enhanced knowledge of the counseling
profession in the role of an educator. Additionally, we will discuss obtaining employment as a rehabilitation,
substance abuse, clinical, and mental health counselor educator and job requirements after obtaining
employment.
An underlying assumption that will be explored throughout the course is that the identity, beliefs, and
values of the teacher are deeply connected with the process of teaching and therefore with the process
and outcomes of students’ learning. For purposes of this course, we will consider adults to include both
traditional-age undergraduate college students as well as adults over twenty-two years of age engaged in
other forms of postsecondary education. We also will begin with the view that effective teaching must be
considered in terms of specific students, contexts, areas of study, and purposes. That is, we are not
seeking to define or advocate a particular way of teaching but rather to explore the assumptions, choices,
theories, and beliefs that should be considered as a teacher makes choices in particular contexts.
The course should be useful to those involved in or interested in teaching in a variety of postsecondary
contexts, including, for example, college and university classrooms, workshops, and professional or
corporate education settings. Those preparing for administrative roles in postsecondary settings also
should benefit from the exploration of the theories that inform teaching, the strategies available, and the
factors that may guide choices in particular settings.
CACREP Standard
3. a. roles and responsibilities related
to educating counselors
3. b. pedagogy and teaching methods
relevant to counselor education
3. c. models of adult development
and learning
3. d. instructional and curriculum
design, delivery, and evaluation
methods relevant to counselor
education
3. e. effective approaches for online
instruction
3. f. screening, remediation, and
gatekeeping functions relevant to
teaching
3. g. assessment of learning
3. h. ethical and culturally relevant
strategies used in counselor
preparation
3. i. the role of mentoring in counselor
education
Measure(s) of Assessment
Assignments: Discussion of assigned readings: CACREP/CORE
standards, Conceptions and Challenges of Teaching
Philosophical/Theoretical Approach to Teaching Paper
Assignments: Classroom teaching experience and presentation
Participation, presentation, & paper on teaching mentor
experience.
Assignments: Discussion of assigned readings: Students as
Learners including models of adult development and learning
preferences.
In-class teaching experience
Classroom teaching experience and presentation.
Assignments: Evaluation of syllabi
Syllabus project and presentation
In-class teaching experience
Assignment: Discussion of assigned readings and course content
related to online instruction
Discussion of assigned readings on Assessment and Evaluation
techniques including screening, remediation, and gatekeeping
functions relevant to teaching.
Assignment: Discussion of assigned readings on Assessment
and Evaluation techniques and on Students as Learners.
Assignment: Discussion of assigned readings on Students and
Teachers as Learners.
Assignments: Participation, Presentation, & Paper on Teaching
Mentor Experience and Discussion on Teaching in the Academy
Text
Required:
th
Svinicki, M., & McKeachie, W. (2014). McKeachie’s teaching tips. (14 ed.). Belmont, CA: Wadsworth
Cengage Learning. ISBN-13: 9781133936794.
PhD in Rehabilitation Counseling and Administration
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Useful Resources:
Buller, J. (2010). The essential college professor: A practical guide to an academic career. San Francisco:
Jossey-Bass.
Davis, B. (2009). Tools for teaching. San Francisco: Jossey-Bass.
Lucas, C. J., & Murry, J. W., Jr. (2007). New faculty: A practical guide for academic beginners. New York:
Palgrave MacMillan.
Palmer, P. J. (2007). The courage to teach: Exploring the inner landscape of a teacher’s life. San
Francisco: Jossey-Bass.
Important







Arrive on time, if not early, for class as class starts promptly at 2:00 PM and ends at 5:00 PM.
Attendance at all class sessions is expected. If an unavoidable absence is necessary, please make
prior arrangements with the instructor.
All cell phones, pagers, and other related electronic devices must be turned off during our class and
the class in which you are mentoring. Computers, iPads, and other electronic devices can only be
used for taking notes for ADRE 8210 or for the class in which you are mentoring. Using these devices
for purposes not related to ADRE 8210 is considered disruptive behavior. The student will be asked to
leave class and this behavior may result in disciplinary action and/or permanent removal from class.
Students learn by experience both in the classroom and in the field. Class attendance, reading course
material, and participation in all class exercises/activities are expected, as well as attendance and
participation in the course where you will be completing your teaching mentor experience.
Students should read textbooks, online materials, and other assignments prior to each class period as
the readings provide essential information that supplements classroom discussion. Students are
expected to actively participate in all classroom discussions. The quality of our course depends on
each person’s commitment to preparing for and engaging in class sessions. Each week we will
assume that everyone has carefully read the assigned materials and will be prepared to discuss the
readings when called on by the instructor. The readings will be the basis for assignments and inperson discussions; however, while the readings will guide our discussions and work, we will not
always specifically review, summarize, or discuss each reading in class. Students are expected to
have homework assignments completed on time and be prepared to discuss these assignments in
class.
Timeliness counts! All assignments are due at 2:00 PM instructor’s watch on the assigned due date.
Once the door to the classroom is closed your assignment is late. Uploading to SafeAssign does not
mean the assignment has been submitted. Fifteen points will be deducted from any assignment that is
turned in after the classroom door has closed and will continue to be deducted 15 points for each 24
hour period the assignment is late. After an assignment is 48 hours late it will not be accepted unless
the instructor has agreed to other arrangements in advance or a documented emergency arises. This
means you should not wait until the last minute to complete or print your assignment as printer, flash
drive, or other computer problems are not a valid excuse for the submission of a late assignment to
class or to SafeAssign. Ten points will be deducted if required assignments are not uploaded to
SafeAssign before the beginning of class.
All submissions should be written in the style outlined in the Publication Manual of the American
th
Psychological Association (APA), 6 edition and sources should be cited.
Students are encouraged to use the University Writing Center, which offers both online and face-toface tutoring (http://www.ecu.edu/writing/writingcenter) with offices located throughout the university.
The University Writing Center will generally not review your paper on the due date since writing is
considered a process and their purpose is to help you improve your writing skills rather than edit your
papers. Papers must reflect the quality of a counseling educator. Grading will be based on
thoroughness, accuracy, relatedness, logic, and the degree to which points made are supported
effectively. Papers receiving an “A” will be outstanding in each area.
SafeAssign Directions
You will be submitting some of your papers through SafeAssign which is part of Blackboard. SafeAssign is
designed to aid in educating students about plagiarism and the importance of proper attribution of any
borrowed content. SafeAssign is a plagiarism prevention service which helps educators detect unoriginal
content in student papers. Additional information can be found at
PhD in Rehabilitation Counseling and Administration
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http://wiki.safeassign.com/display/SAFE/Student+FAQs. Use Google Chrome or Firefox to enter
Blackboard and upload to SafeAssign. You may also want to complete a System Compatibility Check with
Blackboard.
Students are given the opportunity to check a draft copy of their work prior to submitting the final paper by
clicking on the >> View/Complete link >> under the appropriate Draft submission link, fill in the information,
upload your file, and click submit. The draft will not be reviewed or graded by the instructor. After
submitting a draft paper, you will receive a SafeAssign report within a few hours or longer, which will be
accessible via Blackboard in the appropriate papers Draft section. You may want to submit a draft report
to determine if you will experience any problems using SafeAssign prior to submitting your final draft.
Once your paper is in its final form click on the appropriate Final submission >> View/Complete link >>
and submit your final version. On this screen you have the option to submit your paper to the Global
Reference Database - check or leave blank. Do not wait until the last minute to upload your paper to
SafeAssign in case you encounter difficulties with the upload.
Course Requirements
1.
Classroom participation and discussion (5%)
During each class meeting, students will have the opportunity to earn 10 points for class participation.
Class
meetings are very dynamic, involving discussion and group activities based on assigned readings.
Therefore, active
participation is greatly dependent upon an environment conducive to learning and free
from distractions. Thus, points will be lost for talking when others are speaking, not listening, leaving class during
non-break times, the use
of electronic equipment not required for class, being disruptive during class, and
other inattentive behaviors.
Students who are disruptive during a class will be asked to leave. All cell phones
and pagers must be turned off
and put away during class.
2.
Evaluation of syllabi (3%)
Due: September 9,
2015
Visit the American Counseling Association (ACA)-Association for Counselor Education and Supervision
(ACES) website to access syllabi: http://www.counseling.org/knowledge-center/clearinghouses/syllabusclearinghouse.
There is also a syllabus available at the National Clearinghouse of Rehabilitation Training Materials
(NCRTM) https://ncrtm.ed.gov/SearchResults.aspx?st=syllabus. This presentation and paper will be
graded using the attached rubric.
3.
2015
In-class Teaching Experience (15%)
Due: September 23,
On the first day of class, students will select one of the teaching strategies (e.g., active learning, problem
based learning, large classes, experiential approaches, and writing to enhance learning) for encouraging
effective learning and will present this chapter on this day. Each student will determine how to facilitate and
guide the class’s consideration of the teaching topic. The approach you choose to teach about your topic
should incorporate some of the strategies or ideas we have considered in the course. This presentation
and paper will be graded using the attached rubric.
Classroom Teaching Experience and Presentation (20%)
Due: November 11,
2015
Each student will record a one hour or longer class presentation in the class where you are completing
your teaching experience. Scheduling of the recording should be done one month in advance, if possible.
To schedule the recording, complete a Mediasite Recording Form located on Blackboard. If you do not
receive confirmation of your scheduled recording, please contact Jean Merenda, Educational
Technologists, to confirm your scheduled date and time. Portable equipment can be used to record during
the day. If recording will be done at night confirm that your class is in a recording capable room. If not,
PhD in Rehabilitation Counseling and Administration
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contact the instructor or the Educational Technologist to arrange for your class to be moved on the night of
your recording as portable equipment cannot be used in the evenings.
The students attending your class session on the day of the recording must fill out a permission to be
videotaped form which is located on Blackboard and then given to Dr. Chapin on the day of your
presentation. Additionally, you will develop a critique form to be completed by the students and faculty
member at the conclusion of the teaching experience. The recording will be reviewed and critiqued in this
class. This presentation and paper will be graded using the attached rubric.
4.
Syllabus Project and Presentation (15%)
Due: October 21, 2015
Each student will develop a course syllabus for a course they would like to teach and will present the
syllabus to the class for critique and feedback. This syllabus, presentation, and paper will be graded using
the attached rubric.
5.
2015
Paper on Your Philosophical/Theoretical Approach to Teaching (10%) Due: November 18,
Write a paper in which you present the philosophical/theoretical ideas that shape your teaching. This paper
will be graded using the attached rubric.
6.
Participation, Presentation & Paper on Teaching Mentor Experience (30%) Due: December
14, 2015
The Advanced Pedagogy in Rehabilitation Counseling class requires working with a faculty member as a
teaching assistant throughout the semester. This experience will be graded using the attached rubric.
7.
DARS Evaluation of Teaching Survey (2%)
Students will complete the DARS Student Survey of Instruction. One week prior to Reading Day, students
will receive an email from ECU’s Qualtric system containing a link to complete the survey for this course.
Please note that you will receive a separate email from Qualtric for each course you are taking in DARS.
You will then have until 12 pm EST on Reading Day to complete the survey. Also note that the DARS
Student Survey of Instruction is different from ECU’s “Student Perception of Teaching Survey (SPOTS).”
Finally, please note your responses on the survey are confidential; I will only be informed of which students
did not complete the assignment by the due date and will only be privy to the survey results after grades
have been submitted usually the following semester.
Grading Scale:
90% - 100% = A
80% - 89% = B
70% - 79% = C
69% and below = F
Course Session Plan
8/26
Introduction, Course Outline, CORE and CACREP standards.
CACREP Standards 3.a.; 3. d.
Assignment: Positive Introduction Due - Compose a one-half to one page Positive Introduction
of you at your very best. It should tell a concrete story about a moment in time that shows you at
your best and illustrates your highest strengths. The story should have a beginning, middle, and
end with a bang, not a whimper. We will read the Positive Introductions in class.
Readings:
Visit the CORE website at http://www.core-rehab.org/ and read the CORE Standards for graduate
and undergraduate rehabilitation programs.
Read the CACREP guidelines for master’s level counseling programs under Resources at
http://www.cacrep.org/wp-content/uploads/2013/12/2009-Standards.pdf
 Special Issue on CORE Standards for the master’s degree curriculum in rehabilitation
counseling. (2008). Rehabilitation Education, 22(3 & 4).
PhD in Rehabilitation Counseling and Administration
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
Special issue: CACREP: 30 years of quality assurance in counselor education. (2013). Journal
of Counseling & Development, 91(1).
9/2
CORE and CACREP Standards (cont.), Conceptions and Challenges of Teaching
CACREP Standards 3.a.; 3. d.
Readings: Svinicki & McKeachie – Chapter 1
 Koch, L. (2004). The student-teacher working alliance in rehabilitation counselor education.
Rehabilitation Education, 18, 4, 235-242.
 Sorcinelli, M. D. (2003-2004). “Encouraging Civil Behavior in Large Classes.” (University of
Massachusetts, Amherst). Essays on Teaching Excellence, 15(8).
Practical strategies for encouraging a constructive classroom climate.
http://legacy.kctcs.edu/prodev/network/Encouraging%20Civil%20Behavior%20in%20Large%2
0Classes.htm
 Meyers, S. A. (2003). Strategies to prevent and reduce conflict in college classrooms.
College Teaching, 51(3), 94-98. Permanent link:
http://jproxy.lib.ecu.edu/login?url=http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=ehh
&AN=11254889&site=ehost-live
 University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Center for Faculty Excellence. This website
offers a library of resources on teaching, research, and academic leadership.
http://cfe.unc.edu/index.html
9/9
Course Design and Syllabus Development
CACREP Standard 3.d.
Assignment: Evaluation of syllabi
Readings: Svinicki & McKeachie – Chapter 2 & 3
 Designing and Teaching a Courses in Speaking of Teaching, Stanford University Newsletter
on Teaching: http://www.stanford.edu/dept/CTL/cgibin/docs/newsletter/designing_and_teaching.pdf. Lots of additional teaching resources can be
found at http://www.stanford.edu/dept/CTL/cgi-bin/docs/newsletter/index.html
 Syllabus Guidelines and Information http://www.ecu.edu/csacad/facultyorientation/syllabus.cfm (see The Course Syllabus a Guide to Student Success for
ECU guidelines
 New Faculty Orientation: ECU - Syllabus Guidelines and Information http://www.ecu.edu/csacad/facultyorientation/syllabus.cfm
 Center for Teaching & Learning, University of Washington, Teaching Resources.
http://www.washington.edu/teaching/teaching-resources/
 Huitt W., "Bloom et al.'s Taxonomy of the Cognitive Domain," Educational Psychology
Interactive (Valdosta State University). An overview of Bloom's Taxonomy of learning
behaviors. http://www.edpsycinteractive.org/topics/cognition/bloom.html, University of Victoria
Counseling Center http://www.coun.uvic.ca/learning/exams/blooms-taxonomy.html, Bloom’s
Taxonomy Emerging Perspectives on Learning and Teaching includes a discussion of the
revised Bloom’s Taxonomy
http://projects.coe.uga.edu/epltt/index.php?title=Bloom%27s_Taxonomy
 Bloom's Taxonomy, Vanderbilt University. http://cft.vanderbilt.edu/guides-sub-pages/bloomstaxonomy/
9/16
Distance Learning – Jean Merenda, CAHS Educational Technologist
CACREP Standard 3.e.
Readings: Svinicki & McKeachie – Chapter 17
 Crozier, M., Chapin, M., Thomas, J., & Bell, A. (2013). Training Doctoral Students to Teach
Online. Ideas and research you can use: VISTAS 2013. Article 78. Retrieved from
http://www.counseling.org/Resources/. See Blackboard for link.
 Harley, D. A., Jolivette, K., & McNall, R. (2004). Speeding up learning: Accelerated distance
learning in rehabilitation education. Assistive Technology, 16(2), 124-134. doi:
10.1080/10400435.2004.10132081
PhD in Rehabilitation Counseling and Administration
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

Faculty Focus: Online course design: 13 strategies for teaching in a web-based distance
learning environment. http://www.facultyfocus.com/ (An account will need to be created which
will result in emails on all areas of interest that you indicate.)
Faculty Focus: Synchronous and asynchronous learning tools: 15 strategies for engaging
online students using real-time chat, threaded discussions and blogs.
http://www.facultyfocus.com/
9/23
Teaching Strategies
CACREP Standard 3.d.
Assignment: In-class Teaching Experience
Readings: Svinicki & McKeachie – Chapter 4 - 6
9/30
Teaching Strategies (cont.)
CACREP Standard 3.d.
Readings: Svinicki & McKeachie 14 – 16, 18 – 19
10/7
Students as Learners
CACREP Standard 3.c.
Readings: Svinicki & McKeachie – Chapter 12 – 13, 20
 Oblinger, D. G. & Oblinger, J. L. "Educating the Net Generation," (EDUCAUSE).
Links to this ebook. http://www.educause.edu/educatingthenetgen or
http://net.educause.edu/ir/library/pdf/pub7101.pdf
 Roberts, G. R. Technology and Learning Expectations of the Net Generation (EDUCAUSE).
http://www.educause.edu/research-and-publications/books/educating-netgeneration/technology-and-learning-expectations-net-generation
 Oblinger, D. “Is It Age or IT: First Steps toward Understanding the Net Generation,”
(EDUCAUSE) and James Oblinger (North Carolina State University). Characteristics of the
Net Generation and implications for higher education institutions.
http://www.educause.edu/research-and-publications/books/educating-net-generation/it-ageor-it-first-steps-toward-understanding-net-generation
Andragogy
 Chan, S. (2010). Applications of andragogy in multi-disciplined teaching and learning. Journal
of Adult Education, 39(2), 25-35. http://eric.ed.gov/?id=EJ930244
 Knowles, M. (1977). Adult Learning Processes: Pedagogy and Andragogy. Religious
Education, 72(2), 202-211.
http://jproxy.lib.ecu.edu/login?url=http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=reh
&AN=ATLA0000765764&site=ehost-live
 Malcolm Knowles http://chadswebworld.com/knowles/malcolm_knowles.html
 Smith, M. K. (2002). Malcolm Knowles, informal adult education, self-direction and andragogy,
The Encyclopedia of Informal Education. http://infed.org/mobi/malcolm-knowles-informal-adulteducation-self-direction-and-andragogy/.
Transformative Learning
 Grabove, V. (1997). The many facets of transformative learning theory and practice. New
Directions for Adult & Continuing Education, 97(74), 89-96.
http://jproxy.lib.ecu.edu/login?url=http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=a9h
&AN=9712154877&site=ehost-live
 Meziroz, J. (1997). Transformative Learning: Theory to Practice. New Directions for Adult &
Continuing Education, 74, 5-12.
http://jproxy.lib.ecu.edu/login?url=http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=a9h
&AN=9712154860&site=ehost-live
10/14
Students as Learners (cont.)
CACREP Standard 3.c.
Readings: Svinicki & McKeachie – Chapter 11, 21
PhD in Rehabilitation Counseling and Administration
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Section IV, C. 2
 Beloit College Mindset List. Lists of characteristics and the mindset of entering freshmen
since 2002. Read the 2017 list. http://www.beloit.edu/mindset/2018/
 Learning Styles. Overview of instruments for determining a student's learning style. Read
about visual, auditory, and kinesthetic learning styles and David Kolb’s Experiential Learning.
http://nwlink.com/~donclark/hrd/styles.html
 Take this questionnaire to explore your learning preferences:
o Index of Learning Styles Questionnaire, Barbara A. Solomon and Richard M. Felder
(North Carolina State University). A learning styles online questionnaire.
http://www.engr.ncsu.edu/learningstyles/ilsweb.html
 VARK: A Guide to Learning: http://vark-learn.com/home/
 Take the VARK questionnaire: http://vark-learn.com/the-vark-questionnaire/
 Davis, B. D. "Motivating Students," (University of California, Berkeley). From Tools for
Teaching, Jossey-Bass, 1993.
http://orgs.bloomu.edu/tale/documents/Davis_Motivating_Students.pdf
 Callahan, M. How do I motivate my students?
https://www.azwestern.edu/learning_services/instruction/center_teaching_effect/resources/do
wnloads/How%20do%20I%20Motivate%20My%20Students.pdf
 May want to review Bloom’s Taxonomy from Course Design and Syllabus Development
lecture
 Universal design:
o What is universal design:
http://www.universaldesign.com/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=327:wha
t-is-universal-design&catid=2196:universal-design&Itemid=113
o The seven principles of universal design:
http://www.universaldesign.com/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=1761:th
e-seven-principles-of-universal-design&catid=2196:universal-design&Itemid=2931
o National Center on Universal Design for Learning: http://www.udlcenter.org/ (What is UDL
[Universal Design for Learning]? And Universal Design Guidelines
http://www.udlcenter.org/aboutudl/udlguidelines)
10/21
Syllabus Presentation and Assessment and Evaluation Techniques
CACREP Standards 3.d., 3.f,. & 3.g.
Assignment: Syllabus Presentation
Readings: Svinicki & McKeachie – Chapter 7 – 10
10/28
Assessment and Evaluation Techniques (cont.)
CACREP Standards 3.f. & 3.g.
 “Classroom Assessment Techniques," from Angelo, T. A., & Cross, K. P. (1993).
Classroom assessment techniques, A handbook for college teachers, (2nd ed.). San
Francisco: Jossey-Bass.
 “Classroom Assessment Techniques”, from Angelo, T. A., & Cross, K. P. (1993) book
created by S. Gaulden: http://www.celt.iastate.edu/teaching-resources/classroompractice/teaching-techniques-strategies/check-student-learning/ and
http://sloat.essex.edu/sloat/delete/contentforthewebsite/classroom_assessment_techniques.p
df
 Mueller, J. Authentic Assessment Toolbox:
http://jonathan.mueller.faculty.noctrl.edu/toolbox/index.htm
 Teaching Goals Inventory On-line: http://fm.iowa.uiowa.edu/fmi/xsl/tgi/data_entry.xsl?db=tgi_data&-lay=Layout01&-view
 Student Expectations Seen as Causing Grade Disputes:
http://www.nytimes.com/2009/02/18/education/18college.html?_r=1&em
11/4
Teachers as Learners
CACREP Standard 3.h.
Readings: Svinicki & McKeachie 22 - 23
PhD in Rehabilitation Counseling and Administration
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






Teaching Perspectives Inventory: http://www.teachingperspectives.com/tpi/
o Review the Five Teaching Perspectives
Pratt, D. D., Collins, J. B., Selinger, S. J. Development and Use of the Teaching Perspective
Inventory: https://facultycommons.macewan.ca/wp-content/uploads/TPI-online-resource.pdf
Pratt, Daniel D. (2002). Good Teaching: One Size Fits All? New Directions for Adult &
Continuing Education, (93), 5-15. http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/ace.45/pdf
Boston University Center for Excellence and Innovation in Teaching:
Documenting Your Teaching (Teaching Portfolio): http://www.bu.edu/ceit/facultydevelopment/documenting-your-teaching/
Teaching Philosophy - http://www.bu.edu/ceit/faculty-development/documenting-yourteaching/teaching-philosophy/
Center for Teaching & Learning, University of Washington, Develop a Teaching Portfolio
Resources: http://www.washington.edu/teaching/teaching-resources/self-reflection-onteaching/
Writing a Philosophy of Teaching Statement (Ohio State University). Examples and
suggestions for writing philosophy statements: http://ucat.osu.edu/read/teachingportfolio/philosophy
Faculty Focus Special Report – Philosophy of teaching statements: Examples and tips
on how to write a teaching philosophy statement (2009): http://www.facultyfocus.com/
11/11
Teaching Presentation
CACREP Standard 3.b. & 3.d.
Assignment: Teaching Presentation
11/18
Searching for Employment
Assignment: Philosophical Approach to Teaching Paper
 The Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching. Classification Descriptions.
http://classifications.carnegiefoundation.org/descriptions/basic.php Further information can be
found at: http://classifications.carnegiefoundation.org/resources/faqs.php
 McCormick, A. C., & Zhao, C. M. (2005). Rethinking and reframing the Carnegie classification.
Change, Sept/Oct 2005, 51-57.
 Agre, P. (2002). Networking and the network: A guide to professional skills for PhD students.
1-94. (Excellent resource guide): http://vlsicad.ucsd.edu/Research/Advice/network.html
 Degeneffe, C., & Bishop, M. (2004). Navigating the process of seeking and attaining a first
position in rehabilitation counseling academia: Strategies for success. Rehabilitation
Education, 18, 1, 33-37.
 Degeneffe, C. E., Boland, E. A., Bishop, M. (2009). Searching for the first faculty position in
rehabilitation counselor education: Results of a national survey. Rehabilitation Education, 23
(1), 43-52.
 Goodwin, L. R. (1988). The rehabilitation counselor education job search: A practical guide for
the applicant. Journal of Applied Rehabilitation Counseling, 19, 1, 37-42.
11/25
Thanksgiving Break
12/2
Teaching in the Academy
CACREP Standard 3.i.
Readings – Teaching in the Academy
 Ziker, J. (2013). The long, lonely job of homo academicus. The Blue Review. Boise State
University. https://thebluereview.org/faculty-time-allocation/
Tenure and Promotion
 Chapin, M. H. (2006). The pursuit of tenure and promotion. Rehabilitation Education, 20(1),
21-30.
 Dunn, P., Millard, R., Satcher, J., & Cain, H. (2003). Academic tenure in higher education: A
guide for rehabilitation counselor educators. Rehabilitation Education, 17, 2, 111-116.
 Flowers, C., & Crimando, W. (2004). Perceived academic preparation stressors and coping
strategies among rehabilitation educators. Rehabilitation Education, 18, 4, 223-233.
PhD in Rehabilitation Counseling and Administration
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Research
 Chapin, M. H. (2012/2013). Challenges in program evaluation preparation and survey
implementation. Vocational Evaluation and Career Assessment Professionals Journal, 8(2)
and 9(1), 30–42.
 Crimando, W., & Riggar, T. F., & Flowers, C. R., & Bernard, T. (2003). NCRE faculty and
grants: Experience and beliefs. Rehabilitation Education, 17, 1, 33-43.
 Koch, L. C., Niesz, T., & McCarthy, H. (2014). Understanding and reporting qualitative
research: An analytical review and recommendations for submitting authors. Rehabilitation
Counseling Bulletin, 57(3), 131-141.
 Lambie, G. W., Sias, S. M., Davis, K. M., Lawson, G., & Akos, P. (2008). A scholarly writing
resource for counselor educators and their students. Journal of Counseling and Development,
86, 18-25. (The article provides some good information, but the APA guidelines discussed in
th
th
this article are based on the 5 not the 6 edition of APA.)
 Special section: Counseling research and publishing in JCD. (2011). Journal of Counseling
and Development, 89(3), 259-317.
 Special Issue: Evidence based practice and knowledge translation in rehabilitation counseling.
(2010). Rehabilitation Education, 24(4), 173-248.
Final class meeting – 2:00 – 4:30
CACREP Standard 3.b. & 3.i.
Assignment: Presentation on semester long teaching experience
The instructor reserves the right to change any or all parts of this syllabus at any time during the semester.
If major changes are required, students will be notified in writing of the change.
12/14
PhD in Rehabilitation Counseling and Administration
38
Rubrics
Classroom Discussion
Areas to Address
Develop and demonstrate critical reading and listening strategies and
actively participate in discussions of what was read and discussed
during all classes, particularly contribute to discussions of:
 roles and responsibilities related to educating counselors (3. a.) CORE/CACREP standards, Conceptions and Challenges of
Teaching;
 models of adult development and learning (3. c.) - Students as
Learners;
 instructional and curriculum design, delivery, and evaluation methods
relevant to counselor education (3. d.) - Teaching Strategies
 effective approaches for online instruction (3. e.) - Distance Learning,
 screening, remediation, and gatekeeping functions relevant to
teaching (3. f.) and assessment of learning (3. g.) - Assessment and
Evaluation;
 ethical and culturally relevant strategies used in counselor
preparation (3. h.) - Teachers as Learners; &
 the role of mentoring in counselor education (3. i.) - Teaching in the
Academy.
Subtotal:
Possible Points
100
Points deducted:
- 5/day if late to class, late returning from break, or for disruptive behavior
Total:
Evaluation of Syllabi
Areas to Address
Possible Points
Evaluation of Syllabi - complete and submitted on time
100
Presentation:
Bring in two syllabi that are in an area related to a Counselor Education
course that you would like to teach.
Show and discuss the syllabi chosen to the class.
Critique the syllabi based on instructional and curriculum design, delivery, and
evaluation methods relevant to counselor education, your readings, and class
discussions (3.d.).
Paper:
Critique the syllabi based on instructional and curriculum design, delivery, and
evaluation methods relevant to counselor education, your readings, and class
discussions (3.d.).
25
Format:
APA
Submission:
Upload to SafeAssign and give to the instructor.
Subtotal:
PhD in Rehabilitation Counseling and Administration
75
39
Points deducted:
- 15/day if assignment is submitted late – assignment not accepted after 48
hours.
- 10 if not uploaded to SafeAssign.
Total:
/100
In-class Teaching Experience
Areas to Address
Possible Points
In-class Teaching Experience - complete and submitted on time
100
Presentation:
Teach one of the teaching strategies (e.g., active learning, problem based
learning, large classes, experiential approaches, and writing to enhance
learning) while considering instructional and curriculum design, delivery, and
evaluation methods relevant to counselor education (3.d.) your readings, and
class discussions (3.d.).
Discuss the strengths and weaknesses of this teaching strategy.
Determine how to facilitate and guide the class’s consideration of the teaching
topic to encourage effective adult development and learning (3.c.).
The class may be taught in-person, online, or using a hybrid learning
experience. The approach you choose to teach about your topic should
incorporate some of the strategies or ideas we have considered in the course.
Prepare a resource list relevant to your topic (this might include websites,
articles, or books) to give to the class.
Paper:
By Monday at 10:00 AM after the seminar submit a 3 - 4 page paper
describing your goals for the session, the rationale for using the particular
teaching approaches chosen, your critique of the strengths and areas for
improvement in your class presentation, and insights gained from planning
and presenting the seminar.
Include a copy of your PowerPoint slides for review by the instructor.
95
5
Format:
APA
Submission:
Give to the instructor.
Subtotal:
Points deducted:
- 15/day if assignment is submitted late – assignment not accepted after 48
hours.
Total:
/100
Classroom Teaching Experience and Presentation
Areas to Address
Classroom Teaching Experience and Presentation - complete and submitted
on time
Classroom Teaching Experience:
Record a one hour or longer class presentation in the class where you are
completing your teaching experience considering models of adult
development and learning (3. c.) and using pedagogy and teaching methods
PhD in Rehabilitation Counseling and Administration
Possible Points
100
90
40
relevant to counselor education (3. b.).
Have students attending your class session on the day of the recording fill out
a permission to be videotaped form that is then given to the ADRE 8210
instructor.
Develop a critique form to be completed by the students and faculty member
at the conclusion of your teaching experience.
Presentation to ADRE 8210:
Select a section of this recording to be viewed and critiqued in ADRE 8201.
The instructor will indicate the length of your lecture that can be viewed during
the ADRE 8210 class session.
Paper:
Describe your reason for selecting this class and lecture topic, the models of
adult development and learning considered(3. c.), the rationale for using the
particular teaching approaches chosen in counselor education (3. b.), your
critique of your strengths and areas for improvement in the class presentation,
and insights gained from planning and presenting to the class.
Attach to your paper, the original critique forms completed by the students
and faculty member in the class taught, plus a summary of the results.
10
Format:
APA
Submission:
Give to the instructor.
Subtotal:
Points deducted:
- 15/day if assignment is submitted late – assignment not accepted after 48
hours
Total:
/100
Syllabus Project and Presentation
Areas to Address
Possible Points
Syllabus Project and Presentation - complete and submitted on time
100
Syllabus:
Develop a course syllabus for a course you would like to teach that considers
instructional and curriculum design, delivery, and evaluation methods relevant
to counselor education (3. d.).
The syllabus should be your own ideas and not just a modification of an
existing syllabus.
Locate an appropriate textbook and indicate how the textbook readings would
be incorporated into the syllabus.
Address CACREP/CORE standards in the syllabus.
80
Presentation
Present the syllabus to the class for critique and feedback.
Paper:
Write a paper analyzing the rationale for your decisions on the content of the
syllabus including instructional and curriculum design, delivery, and
evaluation methods relevant to counselor education (3. d.).
Discuss the theories, principles, or ideas from the readings and course
discussions that have influenced your plan or been incorporated into the
5
PhD in Rehabilitation Counseling and Administration
15
41
syllabus as well as how you will teach the course.
Format:
APA
Submission:
Give to the instructor.
Subtotal:
Points deducted:
- 100 if an existing syllabus was just modified.
- 15/day if assignment is submitted late – assignment not accepted after 48
hours.
- 10 if not uploaded to SafeAssign.
Total:
/100
Philosophical Approach to Teaching Paper
Areas to Address
Possible Points
Philosophical Approach to Teaching Paper - complete and submitted on time
100
State the philosophical/theoretical ideas that shape your teaching including
your roles and responsibilities related to educating counselors (3.a.).
Reflect on the reading, dialogue, and deep thinking in which you will be
engaged as you participate in this course.
Write so this can be included in a Teaching Portfolio: illuminate who you are
as a teacher, and why and how your identity, philosophies, theoretical
perspectives, beliefs, and values contribute to who you are as a teacher and
how you enact (or will enact) your teaching role.
Format:
2-4 pages
APA
Submission:
Uploaded to SafeAssign and give to the instructor.
Subtotal:
Points deducted:
- 15/day if assignment is submitted late – assignment not accepted after 48
hours
- 10 if not uploaded to SafeAssign
Total:
/100
Participation, Presentation, & Paper on Teaching Mentor Experience
Areas to Address
Participation, Presentation, & Paper on Teaching Mentor Experience
- complete and submitted on time
Participation as a teaching assistant:
Work with a faculty member as a teaching assistant throughout the semester
to understand the role of mentoring in counselor education (3. i.).
PhD in Rehabilitation Counseling and Administration
Possible Points
100
70
42
Assist with class presentations, grading, and other activities to gain a full
understanding of the teaching process.
Complete student evaluation form on Blackboard.
Have faculty member complete faculty evaluation on Blackboard and provide
a grade for your participation this semester.
Presentation
During the final class meeting, give a formal 15 – 20 minute presentation on
your teaching experience and discuss how your experience relates to the
knowledge learned in ADRE 8210.
Explore the pedagogy and teaching methods relevant to counselor education,
the theories that inform teaching, the strategies available, and the factors that
may guide choices in particular settings may be areas to address as well as
knowledge of techniques for helping students develop into competent
rehabilitation professionals and counselors (3. b. ).
Paper:
Document your teaching experience, describe the activities performed
throughout the semester, indicate what was learned, your strengths, areas for
improvement, and documentation of days missed.
20
10
Format:
APA
Submission:
Give to the instructor.
Subtotal:
Points deducted:
- 15/day if assignment is submitted late – assignment not accepted after 48
hours
Total:
PhD in Rehabilitation Counseling and Administration
/100
43
Additional Resources
Teaching Resources
 ECU Office of Faculty Excellence: http://www.ecu.edu/ofe/
 The Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching: http://www.carnegiefoundation.org/
Employment Resources
 American Counseling Association: http://www.counseling.org/careers/job-listings
 American Mental Health Counselors Association: http://careers.amhca.org/
 Chronicle of Higher Education: http://chronicle.com/section/jobs/61
 NCRE Job Board: http://www.ncre.org/jobboard.html
Salary Information
 Losing focus: The annual report on the economic status of the profession, 2013-14:
http://www.aaup.org/file/zreport.pdf
 Chronicle of Higher Education Interactive Faculty Salary calculator: http://chronicle.com/article/2011Salary-Explorer/126972/?sid=wb&utm_source=wb&utm_medium=en
Faculty Focus Special Reports http://www.facultyfocus.com/:
 Course design and development ideas that work. (2010).
 Effective strategies for improving college teaching and learning.
 10 effective classroom management techniques every faculty member should know.
 12 tips for improving your faculty development plan.
 Online course design: 13 strategies for teaching in a web-based distance learning environment.
 Synchronous and asynchronous learning tools: 15 strategies for engaging online students using realtime chat, threaded discussions and blogs.
 Teaching mistakes from the college classroom. (2010).
Articles
 Chapin, M. H. (2004). Employment follow-up of undergraduate rehabilitation majors. College Student
Journal, 38(2), 273-279.
 Chapin, M. H. (2004). Employers’ preferences for bachelors’ and masters’ level rehabilitation
graduates. College Student Journal, 38(3), 362-369.
 Chapin, M. H., & Goodwin, L. R. (2006). Rehabilitation counselor education students’ career goals: A
partial replication study. College Student Journal, 40(4), 832-845.
 Dynarski, M, & Kisker, Ellen. (2014). Going public: Writing about research in everyday language (REL
2014–051). Washington, DC: U.S. Department of Education, Institute of Education Sciences, National
Center for Education Evaluation and Regional Assistance, Analytic Technical Assistance and
Development. Retrieved from http://ies.ed.gov/ncee/edlabs.
 Falco, L. D., & McCarthy, C. J. (2013). Writing for publication: A guide for counseling practice articles.
Journal of Counseling & Development, 91, 343-348.
 Goodwin, L. R. Jr. (2006). Rehabilitation counselor specialty areas offered by rehabilitation counselor
education programs. Rehabilitation Education, 20(2), 133-143.
 Knowles, M. S. (1974). Human Resources Development in OD. Public Administration Review, (34)2,
115-123.
 Knowles, M. (May 1980). Malcolm Knowles on ...Training & Development Journal, (34)5, 96-99.
 Percy, R. (2005). The contribution of transformative learning theory to the practice of participatory
research and extension: Theoretical reflections. Agriculture & Human Values, 22(2), 127-136.
http://jproxy.lib.ecu.edu/login?url=http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=eih&AN=17
551063&site=ehost-live
Globalization in Adult Learning articles
 Akdere, M., Russ-Eft, D., & Eft, N. (2006). The Islamic worldview of adult learning in the workplace:
Surrendering to God. Advances in Developing Human Resources, 8(3), 355-363.
PhD in Rehabilitation Counseling and Administration
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
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


Ardichvili, A. (2006). Russian Orthodoxy worldview and adult learning in the workplace. Advances in
Developing Human Resources, 8(3), 373-381.
Beck, J. K. (2006). Jewish adult learning and the workplace. Advances in Developing Human
Resources, 8(3), 364-372.
Grover, l. L., & Keenan, K. M. (2006). An Ojibwe American Indian view of adult learning in the
workplace. Advances in Developing Human Resources, 8(3), 391-399.
Johansen, B-C. P., & Gopalakrishna, D. (2006). A Buddhist view of adult learning in the workplace.
Advances in Developing Human Resources, 8(3), 337-345.
Johansen, B.-C. P., & McLean, G. N. (2006). Worldview of adult learning in the workplace: A core
concept in human resource development. Advances in Developing Human Resources, 8(3), 321-328.
McLean, G. N. (2006). Rethinking adult learning in the workplace. Advances in Developing Human
Resources, 8(3), 416-423.
Nafukho, F. M. (2006). Ubuntu worldview: A traditional African view of adult learning in the workplace.
Advances in Developing Human Resources, 8(3), 408-415.
Nielson, T. R., Madsen, S. R., & Hammond, S. C. (2006). Worldview of adult learning in the workplace
through a Mormonism lens. Advances in Developing Human Resources, 8(3), 382-390.
Papuni, H. T., & Bartlett, K. R. (2006). Maori and Pakeha perspectives of adult learning in
Aotearoa/New Zealand workplaces. Advances in Developing Human Resources, 8(3), 400-407.
Yang, B., Zheng, W., & Li, M. (2006). Confucian view of learning and implications for developing
human resources. Advances in Developing Human Resources, 8(3), 346-354.
PhD in Rehabilitation Counseling and Administration
45
East Carolina University
College of Allied Health Sciences
Department of Addictions and Rehabilitation Studies
ADRE 8360 (3 hrs)
Advanced Practicum
Fall 2015
Instructor:
Phone Number:
E-mail Address:
Office Location:
Office Hours:
Class Day & Hours:
Class Location:
Lloyd Goodwin, Ph.D., LPCS, LCAS, CCS, CRC-CS, MAC, ACS
252-744-6202
[email protected]
Health Sciences Building, Room 4440
By appointment
6-9 pm Tuesday
Health Sciences Building, Room 4410 E
Reasonable Accommodations:
East Carolina University seeks to comply fully with the Americans with
Disabilities Act (ADA). Students requesting accommodations based on a
disability must be registered with the Department for Disability Support
Services located in Slay 138 (252) 737-1016 (Voice/TTY).
ECU emergency weather information:
Severe weather:
http://www.ecu.edu/alert/
Emergency information hotline: 252-328-0062
Continuity of Instruction:
In the event that face-to-face classes are suspended due to a pandemic or
other catastrophe I will strive to continue instruction to those that are able
to participate. If and when face-to-face classes are suspended, you will
receive an email from me and a Blackboard Announcement that detail
how we will communicate, where you can locate course information and
what you can expect during this time period. I realize that some of you
may be affected by the event and not able to participate, however I will
continue to provide instruction to those that are able to continue.
Required Texts:
Hackney, H. & Cormier, L. S. (2013). The professional counselor: A
process guide to helping. (7th ed.). Boston: Pearson.
Ivey, A. E., Ivey, M. B., & Zalaquette (2014). Intentional Interviewing
and Counseling: Facilitating Client Development in a Multicultural
Society. (8th ed.). Pacific Grove, CA: Brooks/Cole.
Readings and videos on Blackboard (Bb) / American Counseling
Association Membership
PhD in Rehabilitation Counseling and Administration
46
Catalog Description/Prerequisites:
Prerequisite: Enrollment in the Professional Counselor Preparation
concentration of the PhD in Professional Counselor Preparation and
Leadership program. Minimum of 8 hours per week in applied setting.
Counseling of clients with problems of personal/social adjustment,
substance abuse, adjustment to disability, educational and/or career
planning in an applied setting.
Purpose of the Course:
Students enrolled in the Professional Counselor Preparation concentration
of the PhD in Professional Counselor Preparation and Leadership program
are required to participate in a supervised doctoral-level practicum of a
minimum of 100 hours in counseling, of which 40 hours must be in direct
service with clients. The nature of the practicum experience is to be
determined in consultation with program faculty and/or a doctoral
committee. During the student’s practicum, supervision will occur as
outlined in CACREP entry-level standards III.A and III.C–E. Please note
that the use of student supervisors is not allowed in this course.
The purpose of this course is to gain counseling knowledge and skills
through supervised practice. This is a continuation of the counseling skills
and theories learned in the Addictions, Clinical, Rehabilitation, and Career
Counseling Theories courses, as well as the Advanced Clinical Counseling
Theories and Techniques course. In addition, this course will allow
students to explore issues and topics currently important in substance
abuse and clinical counseling, and rehabilitation and career counseling.
Professionalism, Student Conduct and Academic Integrity:
Students enrolled in the Professional Counselor Preparation concentration
of the PhD in Professional Counselor Preparation and Leadership program
at East Carolina University must abide by of the American Counseling
Association (ACA) Code of Ethics http://www.counseling.org/ and the
Commission on Rehabilitation Counselor Certification (CRCC) Code of
Ethics
http://www.crccertification.com/pages/crc_ccrc_code_of_ethics/10.php
respectively.
Additionally, academic integrity is expected of every East Carolina
University Student. Academic honor is the responsibility of the students
and faculty of East Carolina University. Academic Integrity Violations
include: (a) Cheating – Unauthorized aid or assistance or giving or
receiving of unfair advantage on any form of academic work;
(b) Plagiarism - Copying the language, structure, ideas, and/or thoughts
of another and adopting same as one’s own original work; (c) Falsification
- Statement of any untruth, either spoken or written, regarding any
circumstances relative to academic work; and (d) Attempts - Attempting
PhD in Rehabilitation Counseling and Administration
47
any act that if completed would constitute an academic integrity violation.
For more information concerning academic integrity please see the ECU
Graduate Student Manual http://www.ecu.edu/csacad/acadprograms/catalogs.cfm.
Course Plan/Structure:
Student demonstrations, discussion, taped counseling sessions, and
feedback from instructor, field-site supervisors, and other students. Three
hours of weekly seminar plus 8 hours of supervised counseling and other
counseling services in the field per week that total a minimum of 100
clock hours are required. The practicum provides for the development of
advanced counseling knowledge and skills under supervision.
The Student’s Practicum Includes:
1. forty hours of direct service (average of 3 hours/week for 15
weeks) with clients, including experience in individual and
group counseling;
2. weekly supervision with an average of one hour per week of
individual and/or triadic supervision with a faculty member or a
doctoral student supervisor working under the supervision of a
faculty member;
3. three hours per week of group supervision provided by a faculty
member and
4. an evaluation of the student’s performance throughout the
practicum including a formal evaluation after the student
completes the practicum.
Field-Site Supervisor Qualifications
1. Field-site supervisors should hold a graduate degree in a mental health
discipline (e.g. counseling, psychology, social work);
2. have a minimum of 2 years of relevant clinical counseling experience;
3. hold a license (e.g. LPC, LCAS) or certification (e.g. CSAC, CRC) in
their professional discipline;
4. have knowledge of the SACC/RC programs’ expectations,
requirements, and evaluation procedures for students; and
5. have relevant training in counseling supervision.
PhD in Rehabilitation Counseling and Administration
48
Faculty Qualifications:
1. Faculty teaching the practicum course should hold a doctoral
degree and/or appropriate clinical experience and preparation;
2. have relevant professional experience and demonstrated
competence in counseling; and
3. have relevant training and supervision experience.
The Clinical Instruction Environment:
The clinical instruction environment is conducive to modeling,
demonstration, and training and is available and used by the students in
the program. Administrative control of the clinical instruction
environment ensures adequate and appropriate access by the faculty and
students. The clinical instruction environment includes:
1. a setting for individual and group counseling with assured privacy and
sufficient space for appropriate equipment;
2. necessary and appropriate technologies that assist learning (audio,
video, and telecommunications equipment);
3. a settings with observational and interactive supervision capabilities;
and
4. procedures that ensure that the client’s confidentiality and legal rights
are protected.
Orientation of Field Site Supervisors:
The expectations and requirements of the practicum course are provided
primarily by the Practicum Manuals developed by the directors of the
Substance Abuse and Clinical Counseling program and the Rehabilitation
and Career Counseling Program. Assistance, consultation, and
professional development opportunities are provided by faculty to field
site supervisors.
Student Responsibilities:
1. Students are responsible for setting up field placements in consultation
with their faculty advisor and practicum instructor, securing clients, and
scheduling counseling session appointments.
2. Students are responsible for keeping confidential information and case
files on clients. Students are to use client initials or a coding system for the
client name and remove any identifying information such as name, family
member names, address, phone, and social security number.
PhD in Rehabilitation Counseling and Administration
49
3. Students must attend the weekly class meetings for counseling skill
training, practice sessions, and to learn from the critiqued tapes.
Course Objectives: (CACREP [2016] Standards noted)
The primary objectives of this course are for students to
know/understand/apply:
Doctoral Level Practicum Standards (2016)
6.C.1. Doctoral students participate in a
supervised doctoral-level counseling practicum
of a minimum of 100 hours, of 40 hours must
be providing direct counseling services. The
nature of doctoral-level practicum experience
is to be determined in consultation with
counselor education program faculty and/or a
doctoral committee.
6.C.2. During the doctoral student’s practicum,
supervision is provided by a counselor
education program faculty member or an
individual with a graduate degree (preferably
doctoral) in counseling or a related mental
health profession with specialized expertise to
advance the student’s knowledge and skills.

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
6.C.3. Individuals serving as practicum
supervisors have (1) relevant certifications
and/or licenses, (2) knowledge of the
program’s expectations, requirements, and
evaluation procedures for students, and (3)
relevant training in counseling supervision.


6.C.4. Doctoral students participate in an
average of one hour per week of individual
and/or triadic supervision throughout the
practicum. When individual/triadic supervision
is provided by the counselor education
program faculty, practicum courses should not
exceed a 1:6 faculty:student ratio.
6.C.5. Group supervision is provided on a
regular schedule with other students
throughout the practicum and must be


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PhD in Rehabilitation Counseling and Administration
Means of Assessment
Master Practicum Hours Summary
Sheet
Mid-term and final evaluation forms
completed by faculty and field-site
supervisors
Ongoing supervision by field-site and
faculty supervisors
Field sites are approved by faculty
instructor, faculty advisor and student.
Supervisors’ resumes
Mid-term and final evaluation forms
completed by faculty and field-site
supervisors
Students meet 1 hour weekly
individually or triadically with faculty
supervisor
Students meet 2 hours and 40 minutes
each week in group supervision and
seminar
Supervisors’ resumes
Signature page of practicum manual
signed by student, field-site supervisor
and faculty supervisor
Supervisors’ resumes and attendance at
DARS department sponsored clinical
supervision trainings
Master Practicum Hours Summary
Sheet initialed by supervisors
Practicum Supervision Log signed by
supervisor
Master Practicum Hours Summary
Sheet initialed by faculty supervisor
50
performed by a counselor education program
faculty member. Group supervision of
practicum students should not exceed a 1:12
faculty:student ratio.
6.C.6. Doctoral students are covered by
individual professional counseling liability
insurance policies while enrolled in practicum.

Department secretary verifies that each
doctoral student is covered by liability
insurance
Course Requirements:
1. Attendance is required:
Students must attend seminar to give feedback to peers and benefit from
discussions.
 One absence = no penalty in grade
 Two absences = three journal article abstracts required
 Three absences = F or need to come back when the student can
complete the course
2. Client Presentations - You are expected to do at least one client
presentation during class. This should include a segment of a taped
counseling session and background information (assessment summary,
multi-model, case/progress note) on client.
3. Summary Evaluation of Practicum Experience:
Complete a summary report (2-3 pages) of the practicum experience
including a reflection of: a) the seminar/group supervision, b) field-site
experience and supervision, c) supervision from the doctoral student and
d) general comments. Please place the name of the field-site and address at
the top of the first page. These will be saved in our department directory
of field sited for Practicum and Internships for future student to review
when selecting a field site. To be turned in during the final class period.
4. Professional Organization: Students will research the American
Counseling Association (ACA) (history, mission, goals, divisions, and
benefits of membership) and select one division they would like to join.
Students will write a one page summary about ACA and why they want to
join that given division. Students must join ACA (joining a Division is
optional) and show proof of membership to the instructor by 10-08-14.
Practicum Requirements:
1. Practicum Hours - Minimum of eight (8) hours per week at the
Practicum site, including 40 hours of direct service to clients. Efforts
should be made to maintain a counseling relationship with at least two or
three clients over a number of sessions. Counseling sessions will be
approximately 30-50 minutes in length. Individual weekly
supervision/consultation will be available from faculty and site supervisor.
PhD in Rehabilitation Counseling and Administration
51
Site supervisors will complete a mid-semester and final semester
evaluation form highlighting the student’s performance.
2. Reports - The following records are to be completed and turned in
with each taped session.

Case/progress notes and client records will be made for each
client you work with. This will be done consistent with guidelines of
the agency or center in which you are working. These will be left
with the on-site supervisor during the semester and turned in (with
proper blocking out of identifying information) with each taped
session.

Complete Client File Records for Class
You will turn in no less than 4 and not more than 6 complete
client records to demonstrate a working knowledge of appropriate
client record keeping. Complete client folders will contain:
 Assessment Summary – on each client
 Treatment/Rehabilitation Plan – on each client
 Case/Progress Notes – on each client - for each counseling
session and all client contacts
 Discharge Summary/Termination
 Cognitive Self-Assessment Inventory (optional)
 Multimodal Life History Questionnaire – (optional)
 Client-Feedback and Self-Review forms for each taped
counseling session
 Consent for Taping Release Form (to be filed in the client’s
agency chart)
 Signed Consent for Release of Information forms
*The above information must be completed by you not
another counselor.
 Psychological and/or Medical Evaluations (if available)
 Psychological tests/inventories (if used)
 Copies of handouts for bibliotherapy (if used)
3. Video/Audio tapes – Video/Audio tapes will be made of counseling
sessions for review before the class, instructor and individual supervisor.
If audio tapes are made and can’t be heard well, written transcripts of
the sessions must be completed. Four (4) tapes must be turned in during
the semester. The tapes and performance of “in class” exercises will be the
predominate basis for your grade. Schedule for tapes to be turned in are as
follows:
First tape:
Class #7
Second tape:
Class #10
Third tape:
Class #12
Fourth tape:
Class #14
PhD in Rehabilitation Counseling and Administration
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**When you turn in your tape, you must turn in the accompanying
file folder.
Grading Policy:
Grades will be determined based on the completion of the following:
1. In-class practice and demonstration sessions of counseling
skill/intervention.
2. Tapes of counseling sessions played in class
.
3. Four taped counseling sessions.
4. Case recording (e.g. assessment summaries, treatment. plans,
and termination reports).
5. Demonstrating the ability to establish a working relationship with
clients.
6. Demonstrating the ability to choose appropriate technique, materials,
and instruments.
7. Demonstrating the ability to work in harmony with the field and
faculty supervisors and fellow students.
8. Demonstrating the ability to accept and act on constructive criticism.
9. Demonstrating the ability to evaluate his or her effectiveness.
***There are no incompletes given for this course unless under
unusually dire straits. The majority of the grade is based on
counselor skill level and development.
* Advanced Practicum Course Outline
(CACREP [2016] STANDARDS noted)
Substance Abuse and Clinical Counseling (SACC)
Rehabilitation and Career Counseling (RCC)
DATE
8-25-15
TOPIC
- Introduction to the course
ASSIGNMENTS/
READINGS
See Handouts posted on Bb and
DARS website > Supervision Forms
- Review of syllabus
- Discussion of Practicum sites & guidelines
- Review of information packet
(self-care, ethical/legal issues, crisis/risk management) (CACREP-2016),
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

Section 2: PROFESSIONAL COUNSELING IDENTITY. COUNSELING
CURRICULUM. F.1. PROFESSIONAL ORIENTATION AND
ETHICAL PRACTICE. c. d. j.; F.5. COUNSELING AND HELPING
RELATIONSHIPS. g. m. n.; F.2. SOCIAL AND CULTURAL DIVERSITY. f. h;
Section 5: C. CLINICAL MENTAL HEALTH COUNSELING (CMHC). 1.
FOUNDATIONS. c.; 2. CONTEXTUAL DIMENSIONS. a. f. l. 3. PRACTICE. e.
9-1-15 - Continue with review of the information packet
- Review of intentional interviewing &
counseling skills
- Practice of interviewing/counseling skills

9-8-15

Hackney & Cormier
Chapters 5 & 6
Section 2: PROFESSIONAL COUNSELING IDENTITY. COUNSELING
CURRICULUM. F. 7. ASSESSMENT AND TESTING. e. i. j. k. l. m..
Section 5: C. CMHC. 3. PRACTICE. a.
- Cont. with assessment & goals
Hackney & Cormier Chapter 7
- Counseling strategies & interventions
- Case presentation review

10-6-15
Section 5: C. CMHC. 3. PRACTICE. b.
- Practicum site discussion
- Assessing client problems &
developing goals

9-29-15
Section 5: C. CMHC. 3. PRACTICE. c. d.
- Rapport & relationship building
Hackney & Cormier
- Review of intentional interviewing &
Chapters 3 & 4
counseling skills
- Practice of interviewing/counseling skills
Ivey Chapters 1-7

9-22-15
Section 5: C. CMHC. 2. CONTEXTUAL DIMENSIONS. c. k. m.
- Practicum site discussion
Hackney & Cormier
- Characteristics of effective helpers,
Chapters 1 & 2
professional roles & functions
- Stages & skills of counseling (structuring a counseling session)

9-15-15
Ivey & Ivey
Chapters 1-7
Section 5: C. CMHC. 2. CONTEXTUAL DIMENSIONS. b. d.
- Practicum site discussion
- Focusing a session/Confrontation
- Affective Interventions

Section 5: C. CMHC. 3. PRACTICE. b.
10-13-15
No Class (fall break)
10-20-15
- Practicum site discussion
- Student Tape Presentation # 1 & 2

Ivey & Ivey Chapters 9 & 10
Hackney & Cormier Chapter 8
Joining ACA Due
Tape 1 is due
Section 5: C. CMHC. 2. CONTEXTUAL DIMENSIONS. b. d. 3. PRACTICE. b.
PhD in Rehabilitation Counseling and Administration
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10-27-15
- Brief site discussion
- Student Tape Presentation # 3
- Cognitive Interventions

11-03-15
11-10-15
Tape 3 is due
Section 5: C. CMHC. 2. CONTEXTUAL DIMENSIONS. b. d. 3. PRACTICE. b.
Hackney & Cormier Chapter 12
Section 5: C. CMHC. 3. PRACTICE. b.
- Practicum site discussion
Tape 4 Summary
evaluation is due
- Counselor Supervision, Consultation, Advocacy,
Credentialing, Managed Care, and Professional Organizations

12-8-15
Section 5: C. CMHC. 2. CONTEXTUAL DIMENSIONS. b. d. 3. PRACTICE. b.
- Practicum site discussion
- Termination & Follow-up

12-01-15
Section 5: C. CMHC. 2. CONTEXTUAL DIMENSIONS. b. d. 3. PRACTICE. b.
- Practicum site discussion
- Student Presentation # 7 & 8

11-24-15
Tape 2 is due
Hackney & Cormier
Chapters 10 & 11
- Practicum site discussion
- Student Presentation # 5 & 6

11-17-15
Section 5: C. CMHC. 2. CONTEXTUAL DIMENSIONS. b. d. 3. PRACTICE. b.
- Brief site discussion
- Student Presentation # 4
- Behavioral/Systemic Interventions

Hackney & Cormier Chapter 9
Section 5: C. CMHC. 2. CONTEXTUAL DIMENSIONS. c. k. 3. PRACTICE. e.
- Practicum site discussion
- Counselor Supervision, Consultation, Advocacy,
Credentialing, Managed Care, and Professional Organizations
Course Wrap-up, Student Presentation (as needed)

Section 5: C. CMHC. 2. CONTEXTUAL DIMENSIONS. b. c. d. k. 3.
PRACTICE. b.
* Schedule is tentative and is subject to change. Additional readings such as journal articles
or handouts may be added throughout the semester
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East Carolina University
College of Allied Health Sciences
Department of Addictions and Rehabilitation Studies
ADRE 8380 – Rehabilitation Counseling Supervision
Fall 2015
Instructor:
Phone Number:
E-mail Address:
Office:
Office Hours:
Class Day & Hours:
Class Location:
Shari Sias, Ph.D., LPC
252-744-6304
[email protected]
Health Sciences Building, Room 4425M
Tuesday 9 – 11 am and 1 – 5 pm
Monday 2 – 5 pm
Room 4355
Reasonable Accommodations:
East Carolina University seeks to comply fully with the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA).
Students requesting accommodations based on a disability must be registered with the
Department for Disability Support Services located in Slay 138, phone number (252) 737-1016
(Voice/TTY).
ECU Emergency Weather Information:
Severe weather alert: http://www.ecu.edu/alert
Emergency information hotline: 252-328-0062
Continuity of Instruction:
In the event that face-to-face classes are suspended due to a pandemic or other catastrophe I will
strive to continue instruction to those that are able to participate. If and when face-to-face classes
are suspended, you will receive an email from me and a Blackboard Announcement that detail
how we will communicate, where you can locate course information and what you can expect
during this time period. I realize that some of you may be affected by the event and not able to
participate, however I will continue to provide instruction to those that are able to continue.
Required Texts:
Bernard, J. M. & Goodyear, R. K. (2014). Fundamentals of Clinical Supervision, 5th ed. Upper
Saddle River, NL, Pearson Publishing.
Border, L. D. & Brown, L. L. (2005). The new handbook of counseling supervision. Mahwah, NJ,
Lawrence Erlbaum Associates.
Course Description:
ADRE 8380 - Rehabilitation Counseling Supervision
Current knowledge in theoretical foundations and applied models of counselor clinical
supervision. Simulated counselor supervision experiences and engagement in experiential training
by supervising master’s-level practicum supervisees.
P. Consent of instructor.
Purpose of the Course:
This course examines the dynamics, rationale, and theory of clinical supervision. Students will be
introduced to a variety of supervision theories and intervention strategies. The emphasis is on
analysis of taped supervision sessions.
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Professionalism, Student Conduct and Academic Integrity:
In this course, you are entering an experience that involves role-playing and practicing of family
counseling skills. Student colleagues may share something personally important and confidential.
It is your duty to maintain confidentiality.
Students enrolled in the Substance Abuse & Clinical Counseling program at East Carolina University
must abide by of the American Counseling Association (ACA) Code of Ethics
(http://www.counseling.org/) and the American Mental Health Counselors Association (AMHCA)
Code of Ethics
(https://www.amhca.org/assets/news/AMHCA_Code_of_Ethics_2010_w_pagination_cxd_51110.
pdf).
Students who would like to report any behavioral concerns within their campus environment are
welcome to make a report through the ECU Cares webpage www.ecu.edu/csstudentlife/dos/onlinereporting.cfm or may call 252-737-5555.
Additionally, academic integrity is expected of every East Carolina University student. Academic
honor is the responsibility of the students and faculty of East Carolina University. Academic
Integrity Violations include: (a) Cheating – Unauthorized aid or assistance or giving or receiving
of unfair advantage on any form of academic work; (b)Plagiarism - Copying the language,
structure, ideas, and/or thoughts of another and adopting same as one’s own original work; (c)
Falsification - Statement of any untruth, either spoken or written, regarding any circumstances
relative to academic work; and (d) Attempts - Attempting any act that if completed would
constitute an academic integrity violation. For more information concerning academic integrity
please see the ECU Graduate Student Manual http://www.ecu.edu/csacad/acadprograms/catalogs.cfm.
Course Plan:
This course will be taught through assigned readings, lectures, discussions, student
demonstrations, taped supervision sessions, and feedback from instructor and students
Course Objectives: (CACREP [2016] Standards noted)
As a result of this course, students will be able to understand/explain/apply:
Doctoral Professional Identity – Supervision (CACREP 2016)
B.2.a. purposes of clinical supervision
B.2.b. theoretical frameworks and models of clinical supervision
B.2.c. roles and relationships related to clinical supervision
B.2.d. skills of clinical supervision
B.2.e. opportunities for developing a personal style of clinical
supervision
B.2.f. assessment of supervisees’ developmental level and other
relevant characteristics
PhD in Rehabilitation Counseling and Administration
Means of Assessment
Supervision Model Paper
Supervision Model Paper
Supervision Model Paper &
Supervision of Practicum
Students and Session
Presentations
Supervision of Practicum
Students and Session
Presentations
Supervision of Practicum
Students and Session
Presentations
Supervision Model Paper &
Supervision of Practicum
Students and Session
57
B.2.g. modalities of clinical supervision and the use of technology
B.2.h. administrative procedures and responsibilities related to clinical
supervision
B.2.i. evaluation, remediation, and gatekeeping in clinical supervision
B.2.j. legal and ethical issues and responsibilities in clinical supervision
B.2.k. culturally relevant strategies for conducting clinical supervision
B.4.h. professional writing for journal and newsletter publication
Presentations
Supervision Model Paper
Supervision Model Paper
Supervision Model Paper &
Supervision of Practicum
Students and Session
Presentations
Supervision Model Paper &
Supervision of Practicum
Students and Session
Presentations
Supervision Model Paper &
Supervision of Practicum
Students and Session
Presentations
Supervision Article
Critiques & Supervision
Manuscript
Course Requirements:
1. Regular Attendance and Active Participation in Class Activities:
Because of the experiential nature of this course, class attendance is essential. Students
are expected to alert the instructor in advance, either by e-mail, phone, or in person if
they cannot participate in any course activity.
2. Supervision of Practicum Students and Supervision Session Presentation(s):
(100 pts)
Students will be assigned 3 to 5 master’s-level practicum students and be asked to provide weekly
individual or triadic supervision for their supervisees. Students are to maintain progress notes on
each meeting, with focus on (a) the supervisees’ concerns/questions, (b) the supervisor
recommendations/plan, (c) the supervisees/supervisor goals and progress and (d) evaluation of
supervisee (case staffing, case recording, live supervision, role-playing/modeling of clinical
skills).
Videotapes – Videotapes of supervision sessions will be made for review before the class and
instructor.
First tape 10-5-15
Second tape - 10-26-15
Third tape - 11-09-15
Students will be required to present taped supervision session during class. The presentation
should include a segment of the taped supervision session and background information
concerning the supervisor and supervisee goals. Students are to have reviewed the tape prior
to the class presentation and have questions or areas for instructor and peer feedback ready in
advance.
PhD in Rehabilitation Counseling and Administration
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Supervision Session Tape Review Rubric
Supervision
Tasks/Interventions
Number of
Times Used
Not Observed
INITIAL
SUPERVISORY
SESSION
Discussion of structure
and *nature of
supervision sessions
(Inform supervisee of
your training
requirements [i.e.,
taping of supervision
sessions] meet one
hour weekly, face-toface, confidentiality,
how to contact you
between sessions, etc.)
Development of
supervisor/supervisee
relationship (introduce
self, discuss past
counseling/supervisory
experience, theory of
choice, etc.)
Discussion of case and
tape reviews
Review Midterm/Final Evaluation
Form
Mutual goal setting
Discuss supervisee
learning style
ONGOING
SUPERVISION
SESSIONS
*Monitoring client
welfare
*Encouraging
compliance with legal,
ethical, & professional
standards
*Teaching therapeutic
skills and building the
supervision/supervisee
relationship
*Providing regular
feedback
PhD in Rehabilitation Counseling and Administration
Possible Points
6
7
5
5
5
5
4
4
4
3
Points
Earned
59
*Providing regular
evaluation
*Providing
professional
experiences &
opportunities
*Weekly review of
case notes
*Review of counseling
sessions
Use of supervision
skills/interventions
(open-ended questions,
closed-end questions,
reflection of
content/feeling, role
play, IPR)
Progress notes and
Supervision Plan
3
2
4
4
2
4
3. Personal Counseling Supervision Model Paper: (50 pts)
Each student will develop a scholarly paper that introduces his or her primary counseling
supervision model. More specifically, the paper should clearly present your personal model of
clinical supervision. The paper should also discuss other issues relating to your supervision
model, such as addressing transference, counter-transference, the parallel process, legal and
ethical matters, and dual relationships. Further, your paper should review potential strengths and
limitations of your counseling supervision model and implications for counselor educators and
supervisors.
This assignment is a scholarly work; therefore, you will be expected to apply APA style
guidelines and to cite relevant research and existing supervision models to support your
statements. The paper (in manuscript format) should be 6 -10 pages, not counting the title page.
Keep the paper’s title and headings within the paper as short as possible. Double-space all
material, including references and quotations (1 inch margins, 12-pt typeface, Times New Roman
font). Place the paper's title on a separate page and include the author’s name, contact
information, course number and title, course instructor, semester, and running head. An
electronic copy of the paper is due in the SafeAssign section of Blackboard by 11-2-15 and a
hard copy is due at the same time. SafeAssign is plagiarism detection software imbedded in
Blackboard that the Department of Addictions and Rehabilitation Studies is using.
Supervision Model Paper Rubric and
Areas Address
Title page
Introduction to supervision and supervision
model
Relevance/appropriateness of supervision
model (rationale)
Review of theoretical foundation and
central tenets of supervision model
Research supporting the validity and
Possible Points
2
5
5
10
PhD in Rehabilitation Counseling and Administration
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Points Earned
60
effectiveness of your supervision model
Clear description of the application and
evaluation of your supervision model
Review of practical challenges relating to
your supervision model (i.e., transference,
counter-transference, the parallel process,
legal and ethical matters, and dual
relationships)
Discussion of potential limitations and
strengths of your supervision model
Brief conclusion
References
5
5
7
2
2
4. Supervision Article Critiques: (25 pts each)
Each student will critique two (2) refereed research journal articles related to specific issues in counselor
supervision (e.g., diversity in the supervision process; supervision in mental health, substance abuse, or
rehabilitation; effective qualities of counseling supervisors). Place the citation of the article according to
APA Publication Manual guidelines at the top of the paper, followed by the three page critique of each
reviewed article (double-spaced, Times New Roman font, 12-pt., 1-inch margins on all sides). Be prepared
to facilitate a discussion about the content of the each article. Please provide copies of your article critiques
for each class member.
Supervision Article Critique #1
Evaluative Criteria
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
4
5
6
7
Satisfactory
6
6
6
4
4
4
Poor /
Limited
2
2
2
6
6
4
4
2
2
6
4
2
6
8
4
6
2
4
Strong
Satisfactory
6
6
6
4
4
4
Poor /
Limited
2
2
2
6
6
4
4
2
2
6
4
2
6
4
2
Appropriate APA (2001) Reference
Rationale for Selecting Article
Description & Critique of Research
Methodology
Description of Research Findings
Informed Review of Articles Strengths &
Limitations
Logical Implications for Counselor Education &
Supervision
Adherence to Publication Manual (APA, 2001)
Overall Clarity & Readability
Supervision Article Critique #2
Evaluative Criteria
1
2
3
Strong
Appropriate APA (2001) Reference
Rationale for Selecting Article
Description & Critique of Research
Methodology
Description of Research Findings
Informed Review of Articles Strengths &
Limitations
Logical Implications for Counselor Education &
Supervision
Adherence to Publication Manual (APA, 2001)
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8
Overall Clarity & Readability
8
6
4
5. Supervision Manuscript: (100 pts)
Students will develop a manuscript that synthesizes, not simply summarizes, a supervision topic.
The manuscript should be between 15 - 20 pages in length and be appropriate for publication in a
peer reviewed journal. The manuscript should be written following the most current APA style.
Prior to final submission, students must have a peer in the course review their manuscript and
provide feedback. An alternative to having a peer edit the manuscript is to have the manuscript
edited by the ECU writing center. For the final as assignment, in addition to the manuscript and
proof of editing, students will submit all items necessary (e.g., letter to the editor) for submission
at chosen submission location. Students may submit his/her manuscript for publication in a
refereed scholarly journal. An electronic copy of the paper is due in the SafeAssign section of
Blackboard by 12-14-15 and a hard copy is due at the same time.
6. DARS Student Survey of Instruction: (2% of the student’s final grade)
Students will complete the DARS Student Survey of Instruction. Completion of the survey will
count as 2% of the student’s final grade. One week prior to reading day, students will receive an
email from ECU’s Qualtrix system containing a link to complete the survey for this course.
Please note that you will receive a separate email from Qualtrix for each course you are taking in
DARS. You will then have until 12pm EST on reading day to complete the survey. Also note that
the DARS Student Survey of Instruction is different from ECU’s “Student Perception of
Teaching Survey (SPOTS).” Finally, please note your responses on the survey are confidential; I
will only be informed of which students did not complete the assignment.
*The grade on assignments turned in late will be reduced by one letter grade
for EACH DAY the assignment is late. After four (4) days late, assignments will not be
accepted.
**Extra credit projects WILL NOT be offered for this course.
Grading Policy:
At the conclusion of the semester, all points are totaled and a percentage score is calculated. The
grade ranges for percentage scores are as follows:
Percent of total points
90 – 100%
80 – 89%
70 – 79%
Below 70 %
Assignments
Supervision Progress Notes &
Session Presentation(s)
Article Critiques
Supervision Model Paper
Supervision Manuscript
DARS Student Survey
Total Points Available
Grade assignment
A
B
C
F
Points
100
100
50
100
2% of final grade
350 (plus 2% if DARS Student Survey is completed)
PhD in Rehabilitation Counseling and Administration
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*ADRE 8380 - Rehabilitation Counseling Supervision
Course Outline
WEEK
8-24-15
TOPIC(S)
Introduction to the Course
- Review of Syllabus
- Overview of Supervision
8-31-15
TOPIC(S)
Introduction to Clinical Supervision
ASSIGNMENT(S)/READINGS
- Bernard & Goodyear – Chapter 1
- Borders & Brown Chapter 1, pages 1- 6
- Complete Self-Assessment Resume & Self-Assessments
of Knowledge, Skills & Abilities (Table 1.1, 1.2 & 1.3)
9-7-15
Labor Day – No class
9-14-15
TOPIC(S)
Supervision Models
ASSIGNMENT(S)/READINGS
- Bernard & Goodyear – Chapter 2
- Borders & Brown – Chapter 1, pages 7-17
- Development of Supervision Disclosure Statement for Practicum
and Licensure Supervision
- Begin scheduling supervision appointments with Practicum
Students
9-21-15
TOPIC(S)
Processes and Issues of the Supervisory Triad and Dyad
ASSIGNMENT(S)/READINGS
- Bernard & Goodyear – Chapter 3
- Borders & Brown – Chapter 2
9-28-15
TOPIC(S)
Supervisee and Supervisor Factors Affecting the Relationship
ASSIGNMENT(S)/READINGS
- Bernard & Goodyear – Chapter 4
- Borders & Brown – Chapter 5
10-5-15
TOPIC(S)
Multicultural Supervision
ASSIGNMENT(S)/READINGS
- Bernard & Goodyear – Chapter 5
- Supervision Tape 1 is due
10-12-15
Fall Break – No Class
10-19-15
TOPIC(S)
Writing of Personal Model Papers
PhD in Rehabilitation Counseling and Administration
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10-26-15
TOPIC(S)
Organizing the Supervision Experience
Videotape Presentation # 1: _______________________
ASSIGNMENT(S)/READINGS
- Bernard & Goodyear – Chapter 6
- Supervision Tape 2 is due
11-2-15
TOPIC(S)
Supervision Interventions
Videotape Presentation # 2: _______________________
ASSIGNMENT(S)/READINGS
- Borders & Brown – Chapter 3
- Personal Counseling Supervision Model paper is due
11-9-15
TOPIC(S)
Individual, Group, and Live Supervision
Videotape Presentation # 3: _______________________
ASSIGNMENT(S)/READINGS
- Bernard & Goodyear – Chapters 7, 8, 9
- Borders & Brown – Chapter 4
- Supervision Tape 3 is due
11-16-15
TOPIC(S)
Evaluation
Videotape Presentation # 4: _______________________
ASSIGNMENT(S)/READINGS
- Bernard & Goodyear – Chapter 10
- Borders & Brown – Chapter 7
11-23-15
In class review/discussion of supervision manuscripts
11-30-15
TOPIC(S)
Ethical and Legal Foundations for Supervision
ASSIGNMENT(S) / READINGS
- Bernard & Goodyear – Chapter 10
- Borders & Brown – Chapter 6
12-7-15
TOPIC(S)
Teaching and Researching in Supervision
ASSIGNMENT(S)/READINGS
- Bernard & Goodyear – Chapter 12
12-14-15
Course Wrap-up
Supervision Manuscript is due
* Schedule is tentative and subject to change. Additional readings such as journal articles and/or
handouts may be added throughout the semester.
PhD in Rehabilitation Counseling and Administration
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East Carolina University
College of Allied Health Sciences
Department of Addictions and Rehabilitation Studies
ADRE 8420 Advanced Assessment and Evaluation—3 hours
Spring 2016
Instructor:
Phone Number:
E-mail Address:
Office Location:
Office Hours:
Class Day & Hours:
Class Location:
Stephen J. Leierer, Ph.D.
Associate Professor, Department of Addictions and Rehabilitation
252-744-6298
[email protected]
Health Sciences Building, Room 4425C
By appointment.
Tuesday 3:00 pm – 6:00 pm
Health Sciences Building, Room 2350
Reasonable Accommodations:
East Carolina University seeks to comply fully with the Americans with Disabilities Act
(ADA). Students requesting accommodations based on a disability must be registered with
the Department for Disability Support Services located in Slay 138, (252) 737-1016
(Voice/TTY).
ECU emergency weather information:
Severe weather:
http://www.ecu.edu/alert/
Emergency information hotline: 252-328-0062
Continuity of Instruction:
In the event that face-to-face classes are suspended because of pandemic or other
catastrophe I will strive to continue instruction If and when face-to-face classes are
suspended, you will receive an email from me and a Blackboard Announcement that detail
how we will communicate, where you can locate course information and what you can
expect during this time period ECU offers a SAFE RIDE transportation to students taking
night classes. Call 328-7433 for a ride.
Required Texts
Heppner, P. P., Wampold, B., & Kivlighan, D. M, (2008). Research design in counseling (3rd Ed.).
Belmont, CA: Thomson Brooks/Cole.
Lyman, H. B. (2009). Test scores and what they mean, (6th edition). Boston: Allyn & Hall.
Internet Links to online research methods knowledge base:
1.
http://www.socialresearchmethods.net/kb/
2.
http://www.socialresearchmethods.net/kb/contents.php
Recommended
American Psychological Association. (2009). Publication Manual of the American Psychological
Association, (6th Edition.). Washington, DC: Author.
Strunk,W. Jr. & White, E. B. (1999). Elements of style (4th Edition.). New York: Longman.
PhD in Rehabilitation Counseling and Administration
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Course Description and Broad Objectives
The purpose of this course is to provide a practical overview of psychometric theory and methods; test
construction and the psychometric evaluation of tests; and an examination of the historical, legal, ethical,
and cultural diversity issues surrounding the assessment process. The development, selection, use, and
interpretation of tests with healthy populations will be addressed. More specifically, the primary learning
objectives includes, but is not limited to the following:
Section 6: Doctoral Standards (CACREP 2016)
B. 4. a. Develop research designs appropriate to quantitative
and qualitative research questions
B. 4. b. Evaluate univariate and multivariate research designs
and data analysis methods
B. 4. g. Formulate research questions appropriate for
professional research and publication
B. 4. j. Develop the design and evaluation of research proposal
for a human subjects/institutional review board review
B. 4. k. Develop search and writing skills related to grant
proposals and other sources of funding
Means of Assessment
Methods Section
Write-up
Methods Section
Write-up
Presentation
Methods Section
Write-up
Methods Section
Write-up
At the completion of this course, students are also expected to:
(a) apply a hypothesis-building approach to assessment with specific knowledge of various tests
currently used in counseling healthy populations;
(b) use that knowledge in the appropriate evaluation, selection, administration and interpretation of
assessment/appraisal information in counseling;
(c) discriminate sound assessment procedures from weak ones;
(d) integrate information gained from assessment in a clear and concise testing report;
(e) understand the ethical issues and controversies related to test use, especially with regard to
different genders and racial/ethnic groups;
(f) have the skills required to develop tests for use in research or application; and
(g) complete two drafts of Methods chapter 3 simulation.
A.
B.
ASSIGNMENTS
Class Comps Preparation (18 points)- Application of material covered in the readings to specifics to
the comprehensive examinations.
Presentation (See pg. 44 of the Ph.D. Handbook): This assignment requires a 60 minute presentation
of the primary instrument(s) that you will be using to collect your data for your dissertation (15
points).
1. In first 15 minutes, you should address the following topics:
i. Theoretical and clinical background for the study,
ii. Problem statement/Study justification,
iii. Research questions/Hypotheses.
PhD in Rehabilitation Counseling and Administration
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2. During the second 10 minutes, you should make a powerful and logical argument explaining why
the inventory or test that you have selected is the best way to collect and analyze the data to answer
your research questions.
3. During the final 35 minutes of the presentation, you should describe your methods for collecting
and analyzing your data:
4. After the presentation, you will be asked to address the limitations of your study by Dr. Leierer and
the other students in the class. Both the presenter and students asking the questions will be
evaluated during this part of the presentation.
i. Population
ii. Sampling
iii. Instrumentation (most important section)
iv. Statistical Analysis and Consultation with Dr. Leierer about the design and statistics that
might be most appropriate for answering your research questions.
C. Method section write-up (50 Points): You should complete the equivalent of the Methods sections of
your dissertation included:
1. Clinical and theoretical of the study
2. Statement of the problem and rationale for the study
3. Research questions/Hypotheses
4. Research design
5. Sample and sampling
6. Instrumentation (most important section related to REHB 8240)
7. Procedures
8. Statistical analysis
9. Limitations and ethical considerations.
10. Check points for the third chapter
a. First draft (student critique) of your paper is due on March 22, 2016.
b. Critique of first draft (Dr. Leierer’s critique) of your paper will be due on April 1??
c. Second critique will be due on April 12??
11. Method section write-up (50 points)
a. Draft 1 ----15 points
b. Critique --10 points
c. Draft 2----25 points
D. Mid-Term Examination-This examine will focus on concepts relates to (1) reliability, (2) internal
validity, (3) external validity, and (4) limitations of the study.
E. Final Examination-Comprehensive Examination Simulation (10 points)
F. DARS Evaluation of Teaching Survey Completion of the DARS Evaluation of Teaching Survey is
required to get a grade in this course. Students who do not complete the survey will receive an incomplete
until the survey is completed. Survey opens 10 days before ECU Reading Day. Survey closes on Reading
Day (2 points).
PhD in Rehabilitation Counseling and Administration
67
GRADING SCALE
Class Comps Preparation
18 points
Method Presentation
Mid-term (Comps Simulation I)
Method section write-up:
DARS Teaching Survey Evaluation
15 points
05 points
50 points
02 points
Final Examination (Comps Simulation II)
Total Points
10 points
100 points
90-100
80-89
70-79
60-69
60<
PhD in Rehabilitation Counseling and Administration
A
B
C
D
F
68
WEEK
Week 1-Jan 12
Week 2-Jan 19
COURSE SCHEDULE
TOPIC
Introduction
Cleaning the Data
Descriptive Statistics
Test Scores And What They Mean
Basic Concepts Of Psychological Assessment
ACTIVITY
Cleaning Data
Week 3 Jan 26
HWK 3 Identifying & Operationalizing Research Topics
HWK 4 Choosing Research Design
HWK-3 & 4
Week 4-Feb 2
HWK-5 & 6
Week 5- Feb 9
HWK 5 Validity Issues in Research Design
HWK 6 Ethical Issues in Counseling Research
HWK 19 Design Issues Related to Counseling Process
Research
HWK 20 Scale Construction.
Week 6-Feb 16
Career And Life Planning Assessment
Strong Interest Inventory
Writing Club
Week 7-Feb 23
MMPI, Projective Tests
Writing Club
Week 9-Mar 08
Week 10-Mar 15
Personality Assessment

Objective Assessment

Subjective Assessment
GAIN SS
Theoretical Foundation

Treatment Application

Psychometric Considerations
SPRING BREAK
Student Presentations-I
Week 8- Mar 22
Student Presentations-II
Draft 1—Due
Week 11 March
29
Week 12-April 05
In-class critique
Peer Critique
Reviewed in Class
Week 13-April 12
Individual Meeting Specifics Issues
Draft 2-Due
Week 14 April 19
Week 15 April 26
Week 15-May 3
Review For The Final Examination
TBA
Final Exam
Final Exam
Week 8-Mar 01
HWK-19 & 20
Mid_term
GAIN_SS
Writing Club
HWK 15 Conceptual & Methodological Issues Related to
Multicultural Research
PhD in Rehabilitation Counseling and Administration
69
East Carolina University
College of Allied Health Sciences
Department of Addictions and Rehabilitation Studies
Substance Abuse and Clinical Counseling Program
Rehabilitation and Career Counseling Program
ADRE 8550 --Advanced Research in Rehabilitation– 3 hrs
Spring Semester
Instructor:
Phone Number:
E-mail Address:
Office Location:
Office Hours:
Class Day & Hours:
Class Location:
Stephen J. Leierer
252-744-6298
[email protected]
Health Sciences Building, Room 4425-C
By appointment
Thursday 9 – 12 pm
Health Sciences Building, Room 4425-Q
Reasonable Accommodations:
East Carolina University seeks to comply fully with the Americans with
Disabilities Act (ADA). Students requesting accommodations based on a
disability must be registered with the Department for Disability Support
Services located in Slay 138 (252) 737-1016 (Voice/TTY).
ECU emergency weather information:
Severe weather: http://www.ecu.edu/alert/
Emergency information hotline: 252-328-0062
Continuity of Instruction:
In the event that face-to-face classes are suspended due to a pandemic or
other catastrophe I will strive to continue instruction to those that are able to
participate. If and when face-to-face classes are suspended, you will receive
an email from me and a Blackboard Announcement that detail how we will
communicate, where you can locate course information and what you can
expect during this time period. I realize that some of you may be affected by
the event and not able to participate, however I will continue to provide
instruction to those that are able to continue.
Required Texts and Materials:
American Psychological Association. (2010). Publication manual of the
American Psychological Association (6th ed.), Washington, DC: Author
Galvan, J. L. (2009). Writing literature reviews: A guide for students of the
behavioral sciences (4th Ed.). Glendale, CA: Pyrczak Publishing.
Granello, D. H. (2001). Promoting cognitive complexity in graduate written
work: Using Bloom’s taxonomy as a pedagogical tool to improve literature
reviews. Counselor Education and Supervision, 40, 292-307.
PhD in Rehabilitation Counseling and Administration
70
Heppner, P. P., Wampold, B., & Kivlighan, D. M, (2008). Research design
in counseling (3rd Ed.). Belmont, CA: Thomson Brooks/Cole.
Catalog Description/Prerequisites:
ADRE 8550 - Advanced Research in Rehabilitation; 3 Semester Hours
Prepares advanced doctoral students to construct the dissertation proposal
prospectus.
Pre-requisite : ADRE 6401, 6550; BIOS 7021, 7022 or second statistics
course. Consent of instructor.
Course Description:
This course is a doctoral level research seminar for rehabilitation counseling
and rehabilitation administration students. It is intended to promote
development of skills in critiquing, summarizing and designing research.
Emphasis is placed on developing conceptual understanding of major
quantitative and qualitative methods in order to critique and design research.
Students will build a foundation of knowledge in one of several core areas
of rehabilitation studies by immersing themselves in a selected body of
literature and developing a summary of the state of that literature. Students
will use their understanding of this literature to develop a specific research
question and design a study to address their question.
Professionalism, Student Conduct and Academic Integrity:
Students enrolled in the Substance Abuse & Clinical Counseling and
Rehabilitation &Career Counseling programs at East Carolina University
must abide by of the American Counseling Association (ACA) Code of Ethics
(http://www.counseling.org/), the American Mental Health Counselors
Association (AMHCA) Code of Ethics
(https://www.amhca.org/assets/news/AMHCA_Code_of_Ethics_2010_w_p
agination_cxd_51110.pdf), and the Commission on Rehabilitation Counselor
Certification (CRCC) Code of Ethics
(http://www.crccertification.com/pages/crc_ccrc_code_of_ethics/10.php)
respectively.
Additionally, students who would like to report any behavioral concerns
within their campus environment are welcome to make a report through the
ECU Cares webpage www.ecu.edu/cs-studentlife/dos/onlinereporting.cfm or
may call 252-737-5555.
Furthermore, academic integrity is expected of every East Carolina
University Student. Academic honor is the responsibility of the students and
faculty of East Carolina University. Academic Integrity Violations include:
PhD in Rehabilitation Counseling and Administration
71
(a) Cheating – Unauthorized aid or assistance or giving or receiving of
unfair advantage on any form of academic work; (b) Plagiarism - Copying
the language, structure, ideas, and/or thoughts of another and adopting same
as one’s own original work; (c) Falsification - Statement of any untruth,
either spoken or written, regarding any circumstances relative to academic
work; and (d) Attempts - Attempting any act that if completed would
constitute an academic integrity violation. For more information concerning
academic integrity please see the ECU Graduate Student Manual
http://www.ecu.edu/cs-acad/acadprograms/catalogs.cfm.
Course Plan/Structure:
This course will be taught through lectures, discussions, small group
activities, videos, and assigned readings.
Course Objectives:
This course uses a career development approach as it relates to the content areas in
the CACREP and CORE accreditation standards. Pre-professionals will be offered
the knowledge and skills to work with clients in a person-centered, realistic, and
practical manner. The intention is to assist clients in preparing for, obtaining, and
maintaining employment, as well as dealing with concerns in transitional
employment. More specifically, the primary learning objectives includes, but is not
limited to the following:
Section 6: Doctoral Standards (CACREP 2016)
B. 4. c. Compare qualitative designs and approaches to
B. 4. g. Formulate research questions appropriate for
Means of Assessment
Review of Literature
Assignment
Review of Literature
Assignment
Review of Literature
Assignment
Research Presentation
professional research and publication
B. 4. l. Know and apply ethical and culturally relevant
strategies for conducting research
Review of Literature
Assignment
qualitative data analysis
B. 4. d. Assess emergent research practices and processes
B. 4. e. Analyze models and methods of instrument design
Course Requirements
1 Active Class Participation (15% Of Course Grade).
a. Students are expected to complete reading assignments prior to class, attend each
class session, and participate fully in class activities.
b. Class discussion will focus on clarifying and extending understanding of concepts
from assigned readings.
c. Students are expected to interact actively with the other class members as they
discuss the readings from Heppner and his colleagues. Students will also participate
in small group discussions of research articles and research designs. Students
should strive to demonstrate a balance of verbal input and involved listening during
group discussions. Students will be assigned credit or no credit for participation at
PhD in Rehabilitation Counseling and Administration
72
the end of each class period. Credit will be awarded for making a substantive
contribution to class discussions.
d.
DARS Evaluation of Teaching Survey Completion of the DARS Evaluation of Teaching
Survey is required to get a grade in this course. Students who do not complete the survey
will receive an incomplete until the survey is completed. Survey opens 10 days before ECU
Reading Day. Survey closes on Reading Day.
2) Research Presentation (20% of course grade ). The focus of the research presentation is
on developing skills in communication your knowledge about your dissertation project.
The initial version of the research proposal will be presented during class order to facilitate
discussion and feedback concerning the research topic. Written feedback on the draft
proposal will be provided by the instructor and one student colleague.
a. The major components of the presentation are the rationale for the proposed
research questions based on a review of literature pertinent to your topic.
b. Present a brief introduction to the proposed study.
c. Cover the points outlined in the Dissertation Power Point Outline.
d. Discussion of anticipated results should include anticipated implications for
counseling practice, teaching and/or research as applicable, as well as limitations.
3) Review Of Literature Assignment (45%) Of Course Grade;).
a. First Draft Of Chapters 1-2 (10% Each Of Course Grade; First Draft Due Ch. 2
3/24/16; First Draft Due Ch. 1 4/7/16).
i. The purpose of this assignment is to provide students with additional
practice in applying course concepts to the development of dissertation.
Consult Heppner et al. (2008), Chapter 22 for content recommendations;
follow APA writing style.
ii. Students should write the Chapter 2 of the dissertation:
b. Final Draft of Dissertation Proposal (25% of course grade 04/21/16).
i. Students should write the first two chapters of the dissertation:
1.
Chapter 1-Introduction to the proposed study.
2.
Chapter 2-Review of Literature.
ii. Provide comment to indicate that each editorial comment has been
addressed. The track changes are numbered, make a note to indicate that
each suggested change has been addressed. This revised version of the
proposal should also incorporate previous feedback.
4) Peer Critique of First Draft (8% of course grade).
a. The purpose of this assignment is to provide students with additional practice in
applying course concepts to the development of dissertation
b. Students will use recent reviewer guidelines for the Galvan (2009) to provide
constructive written feedback concerning the strengths and weaknesses of the draft
PhD in Rehabilitation Counseling and Administration
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for another student-colleague.
c. Students will develop research critiques of the other student dissertation drafts using
track changes.
d. Comments should be made using the track changes feature of Word.
5) Final Examination (10% of the final grade)
a. Comprehensive Examination Simulation
b. Preparation for the Comps type question.
6) DARS Evaluation of Teaching Survey (2% of course grade). Completion of the DARS
Evaluation of Teaching Survey is required to get a grade in this course. Students who do
not complete the survey will receive an incomplete until the survey is completed. Survey
opens 10 days before ECU Reading Day. Survey closes on Reading Day.
Grading Scale
Assignments
Points
Participation/Discussion Questions/Course Evaluation
15
Class Presentation
20
Dissertation Chapters 1 & 2
45
Peer Review/Critique
8
Final Exam
10
DARS Student Survey
2
Total
100
Earned points
90-100 points
80- 89 points
70-79 points
Below 70 points
PhD in Rehabilitation Counseling and Administration
Grade assignment
A
B
C
F
74
Schedule of Classes
Week
Topic
Assignment
WEEK 1-JAN 14
Introduction to ADRE 8550
Overview Materials
 Dissertation Outline
 PowerPoint Techniques
 Bem, 1995; Granello, 2001
WEEK 2- JAN 21
HWK 1 Science and Counseling
HWK 2 Research Training
Research Survey
HWK 1 & 2
WEEK 3- JAN 28
Writing Literature Reviews
WEEK 4-FEB 04
Writing Literature Reviews
WEEK 5-FEB 11
HWK 7 Between-Groups and Within-Subjects Designs
Presentations
Galvan- 1-63
Presentations
Galvan- pp 64-116
HWK 7
WEEK 6-FEB 18
HWK 8 Quasi-experimental, Time Series
HWK 9 Single Subject Designs
HWK 8 & 9
WEEK 7-FEB 25
HWK10 Quantitative Descriptive Designs
HWK 10
WEEK 8-MAR 03
HWK11 Qualitative Research
HWK 11
WEEK 9-MAR 10
SPRING BREAK
WEEK 10-MAR17
HWK12 Designing & Evaluating the IV
HWK13 Designing or Choosing the DV
HWK 12 & 13
WEEK 11-MAR 24
HWK14 Population Issues
HWK 16 Investigator, Experimenter, Participant Bias
WEEK 12-MAR 31
HWK 17 Analogue Research
HWK 18 Outcome Research: Strategies &
Methodological Issues
HWK 14 & 16
First Draft
Dissertation Proposal (Chapter 2)
HWK 17 & 18
WEEK 13-APR 7
Comps Test Prep-1
WEEK 14 APR 14
Comps Test Prep-2
WEEK 15-APR 21
HWK 21 Program Evaluation
HWK 22 Professional Writing
WEEK 16- APR 28
Process & Outcome Research/Review
WEEK 17-MAY 5
FINAL EXAM
PhD in Rehabilitation Counseling and Administration
First Draft
Dissertation Proposal (Chapter 1)
Dissertation Proposal (Chaps 1-2)
FINAL EXAM
75
East Carolina University
College of Allied Health Sciences
Department of Addictions and Rehabilitation Studies
ADRE 8810 Doctoral Seminar in Rehabilitation
Semester:
Meeting Times:
Meeting Place:
Instructor:
SPRING 2016
Monday 1:30-2:30 PM
CAHS 4355
Stephen J. Leierer, PhD, Associate Professor
Phone: 252-744-6298
Fax: 252-744-6302
Office: CAHS 4425C
Email: [email protected]
Office Hours: By appointment.
Reasonable Accommodations:
East Carolina University seeks to comply fully with the Americans with
Disabilities Act (ADA). Students requesting accommodations based on a
disability must be registered with the Department for Disability Support Services
located in Slay 138 (252) 737-1016 (Voice/TTY).
ECU emergency weather information:
Severe weather:
http://www.ecu.edu/alert/
Emergency information hotline: 252-328-0062
Continuity of Instruction:
In the event that face-to-face classes are suspended due to a pandemic or other
catastrophe I will strive to continue instruction to those that are able to
participate. If and when face-to-face classes are suspended, you will receive an
email from me and a Blackboard Announcement that detail how we will
communicate, where you can locate course information and what you can expect
during this time period. I realize that some of you may be affected by the event
and not able to participate, however I will continue to provide instruction to those
that are able to continue.
Required Text:
Cone, J. D. & Foster, S. L. (2006). Dissertations and theses from start to finish (2 ed). Washington, DC:
American Psychological Association.
Simon, M. K. & Goes, J. (2013). Dissertation and Scholarly Research: Recipes for Success, 2013
Edition. Seattle, WA. Dissertation Success, LLC.
 http://www.dissertationrecipes.com/
Optional Text:
American Psychological Association. (2010). Publication manual of the American
Psychological Association (6th ed.). Washington, DC: Author.
PhD in Rehabilitation Counseling and Administration
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Key Web Pages
http://www.socialresearchmethods.net/kb/contents.php
http://www.ats.ucla.edu/stat/sas/whatstat/
Course Description and Broad Objectives
This course seeks to increase student’s awareness the research literature and SPSS syntax specific to
his/her dissertation topic. In addition, each student will be given tasks to develop job search skills related
to developing a letter of application and a curriculum vitae. The CV assignment helps the student
understand the relationship between one’s research and clinical endeavors and professional
development.
More specifically, the primary learning objectives includes, but is not limited to the following:
Section 6: Doctoral Standards (CACREP 2016)
Means of Assessment
B. 4. i. Initiate activities related to professional conference Literature Review and
proposal preparation
Presentation
At the completion of this course, students are also expected to:
(a) To increase student’s awareness the research literature and SPSS syntax specific to his/her
dissertation topic.
(b) To develop job search skills related to developing a letter of application and a curriculum vitae.
Course Requirements
1. Literature Review Presentation–(18 points, 18% of final grade). Each student must complete a
Reference List with at least 50 citations appropriate to your dissertation. Each reference is 0.36 points
A. Each person will select a research question to investigate.
B. Find a meta-analysis or comprehensive list of references about the research topic.
C. The reference presentation should take 18 to 22 minutes. The presentations will begin on March
14, 2016.
D. Be prepared to explain the techniques that you used to develop your reference list.
2. SPSS/Results Presentation–(15 points, 25% of final grade).
A. Each student must complete a variable coding list for the dissertation study variables.
B. Each student must complete SPSS SYNTAX required to analyze the variables used to answer
his/her dissertation study research question topic.
C. The first presentations will begin on March 28, 2016.
D. Be prepared explain how the SPSS SYNTAX commands were selected.
3. Application Letter and Vitae –(20 points, 20% of final grade)
a. Each student must complete an application for actual job opening. The job must be listed in the
Spring of 2016, and have a start date no later the January of 2017.
b. Each student must develop a curriculum vitae to accompany the letter of application.
c. Application Presentations will begin on April 4,2016
4. Attendance Module: (45 points, 45% of the final grade), Each student will be required to attend and
participate in class. Each day of attendance is worth 3 points.
PhD in Rehabilitation Counseling and Administration
77
5. DARS Evaluation of Teaching Survey –(2 points, 2% of final grade) Completion of the DARS
Evaluation of Teaching Survey is required to get a grade in this course. Students who do not complete
the survey will receive an incomplete until the survey is completed. Survey opens on 4/17/16, 10 days
before ECU Reading Day. Survey closes on Reading Day 4/27/16.
Literature Review Presentation
18 points
SPSS/Results Presentation
15 points
Application Letter and Vitae
20 points
Attendance Module
45 points
DARS Evaluation of Teaching Survey
2 points
Total
100 points
Grade Assignment
Earned points
90-100 points
80- 89 points
70-79 points
Below 70 points
PhD in Rehabilitation Counseling and Administration
A
B
C
F
78
Calendar
WEEK
WEEK 1January 11, 2016
ASSISGNMENT
Introduction to 8810- Doctoral Hacks
Hack = Slang to cope with something successfully.
http://www.thefreedictionary.com/hack
WEEK 2January 18, 2016
WEEK 3
January25, 2016
WEEK 4
February 1, 2016
WEEK 5
February 8, 2016
WEEK 6
February 15, 2016
WEEK 7
February 22, 2016
WEEK 8
February 29, 2016
WEEK 9
March 7, 2016
WEEK 10-
1. Literature Review Hacks
2. Your SPSS/Results Section Hacks
3. Job Application Hacks
4. Funding Hacks
Martin Luther King Holiday
Literature Review Hacks
1. Know Yourself
2. Understand the Goal/Environment
3. Integration Self and Goal
4. Some of my Hacks
SPSS/Results Section Hacks
1. NEVER DO THIS, but if you did?
2. What is your research question?
3. Morphing for the research question to the statistical procedure.
Job/Career Hacks
1. Consider the Your Direction/Your Ideal Job ---Use your Strong Results
2. Consider what Job Environments
3. Rating the Match4. Building the Vitae Part 1
Literature Review Hacks
1. Parallel Literature Pathways
2. Merging Literatures
3. Merging Methods/Results
SPSS/Results Section Hacks
1. Putting SPSS Output into other software formats
a. Email
b. Excel
c. Word
2. APA Style and Software availability
3. Do’s and Don’t
Job/Career Hacks
1. Building the Vitae Part 2
2. Building the Cover Letter Part 1
SPRING BREAK
Literature Review Hacks
PhD in Rehabilitation Counseling and Administration
79
March 14, 2016
WEEK 11
March 21, 2016
WEEK 12
March 28, 2016
1. Presentation of Dissertation References
2. Review of Literature Review techniques
Literature Review Hacks
1. Presentation of Dissertation References
2. Review of Literature Review techniques
SPSS/Results Section Hacks
1. Present your projected data file
2. Examine possible coding issues
3. Present Syntax for Dissertation Study
WEEK 13April 4, 2016
SPSS/Results Section Hacks
1. Present your projected data file
2. Present possible coding issues
3. Present Syntax for Dissertation Study
WEEK 14
April 4, 2016
Job/Career Hacks
1. Presentation of Vitae
2. Presentation of Application Letter
WEEK 15
April 11, 2016
Job/Career Hacks
1. Presentation of Vitae
2. Presentation of Application Letter
WEEK 16April 18, 2016
Course Review and Evaluation
PhD in Rehabilitation Counseling and Administration
80
East Carolina University
College of Allied Health Sciences, Dept of Addictions & Rehabilitation Studies
ADRE 8991-8994 (3-12 hrs): Advanced Internship
Semester:
Meeting Times:
Meeting Place:
Instructors:
Fall 2015
Thursday, 2-3pm (Group Supervision)
HS 4355
Paul J. Toriello, RhD, CRC, CCS, LCAS, Associate Professor
Phone: 252-744-6297 Fax: 252-744-6297
Email: [email protected]
Office: HS 4425K
Office Hours: By appointment.
Declarations
This syllabus is subject to amendment over the course of the term. Any changes that are necessitated will be
carefully considered and announced in advance.
Course Description
Doctoral students are required to complete internships that total a minimum of 600 clock hours. The 600 hours
must include supervised experiences in at least three of the five doctoral core areas (counseling, teaching,
supervision, research and scholarship, leadership and advocacy). Advanced internship is designed so students
have the flexibility to craft their professional identity/expertise via individualized combinations of advanced
internship experiences. Combinations should reflect students’ chosen cognate area. For example, a student
could structure an internship focused on 6 sh hours of teaching, 3 sh of clinical practice, and 3 sh of supervision.
Course Objectives (CACREP [2016] Standards Addressed)
Doctoral Level Internship Standards
6.C.7 Doctoral students are required to complete
internships that total a minimum of 600 clock hours.
The 600 hours must include supervised experiences in
at least three of the five doctoral core areas
(counseling, teaching, supervision, research and
scholarship, leadership and advocacy).
6.C.8 During internships, the student receives an
average of one hour per week of individual and/or
triadic supervision, performed by a supervisor with a
doctorate in counselor education or an individual with
a graduate degree and specialized expertise to advance
the student’s knowledge and skills.
6.C.9 Group supervision is provided on a regular
schedule with other students throughout the internship
and must be performed by a counselor education
program faculty member.
PhD in Rehabilitation Counseling and Administration









Means of Assessment
Advanced internship planning form.
Advanced internship log.
Mid-term and final evaluation forms completed
by faculty and field-site supervisors.
Advanced internship site/field supervisor
information form.
Supervisors’ resumes
Advanced internship log.
Mid-term and final evaluation forms completed
by faculty and field-site supervisors
Advanced internship log.
Group supervision attendance sheet.
81
Textbook/Readings/Handouts

Readings & handouts will be assigned throughout the semester.
Course Policies




Attendance: Attendance in this course is critical and mandatory: there are no excused absences. Students
are responsible for class material missed, regardless of reasons for missing class.
Class Participation: Class meetings will be very dynamic, involving discussion and group activities
based on assignments.
Reasonable Accommodations: East Carolina University seeks to fully comply with the Americans with
Disabilities Act. Students requesting accommodations based on a disability must be registered with the
Department for Disability Support Services located in Brewster A-117, voice- 252-328-6799, TTY- 252328-0899.
ECU Weather & Emergency
o Severe Weather- http://www/ecu/edu/alert
o Emergency Information Hotline- 252-328-0062
Course Requirements
1. Prior to the beginning of advanced internships, students must complete and have the instructor approved
an Advanced Internship Planning form.
2. Doctoral students completing a counseling or supervision internship, are required to be covered by
individual professional counseling liability insurance policies. Students must provide documentation of
insurance at the beginning of the semester.
3. Each section for which a student is enrolled requires 150 clock hours of supervised advanced internship
experiences (e.g., counseling, teaching, supervision, research and scholarship, leadership and advocacy).
4. During internships, the student must receive weekly individual and/or triadic supervision, with a Field
Site Supervisor or a Faculty Mentor.
5. Group supervision will be facilitated by Dr. Toriello on a weekly basis.
6. Required documentation:
a. Advanced Internship Planning form
i. Due prior to the beginning of the semester
b. Advanced Internship Site & Mentor/Field Site Supervisor Information form
i. Due at the beginning of the semester
c. Evaluation of Advanced Internship Student Evaluation form
i. Completed and turned in at the mid-point and the end of the semester
d. Advanced Internship Log
i. Completed throughout the semester and turned in at the end of the semester.
7. All completed required documentation must be turned in to Dr. Toriello by the end of the semester or
the student will receive an incomplete.
PhD in Rehabilitation Counseling and Administration
82
Grading Policy:
Grades will be determined based on the completion of the following:
1. Evaluated demonstration of CACREP Doctoral Professional Identity Standards (Section B.1-5) as
identified on Advanced Internship Planning forms (see below).
2. Completion of all required paperwork.
3. Attendance and participation.
Course Calendar
Group supervision meetings will be held on the following dates during the Fall 2015 semester:
8/27
9/03, 9/10, 9/17, 9/24
10/1, 10/15, 10/22, 10/29
11/5, 11/12, 11/19, 11/26
12/3, 12/10
PhD in Rehabilitation Counseling and Administration
83
Advanced Internship Planning Form
Student Name: ___________________________________
Semester/Year: ___________________________________
# Semester Hours enrolled: _______
# of Clock Hours required: ______
Document below how many clock hours of each advanced internship activity you plan to complete during the
semester. For each activity that you plan to complete hours, list the CACREP Doctoral Professional Identity
standards that you will demonstrate.
Counseling: _____ clock hours
Standards to be demonstrated: 1. _________________________________________________________
2. _________________________________________________________
3. _________________________________________________________
4. _________________________________________________________
5. _________________________________________________________
Teaching: _____ clock hours
Standards to be demonstrated: 1. _________________________________________________________
2. _________________________________________________________
3. _________________________________________________________
4. _________________________________________________________
5. _________________________________________________________
Research/Scholarship: _____ clock hours
Standards to be demonstrated: 1. _________________________________________________________
2. _________________________________________________________
3. _________________________________________________________
4. _________________________________________________________
5. _________________________________________________________
Supervision: _____ clock hours
Standards to be demonstrated: 1. _________________________________________________________
2. _________________________________________________________
3. _________________________________________________________
4. _________________________________________________________
5. _________________________________________________________
Leadership/Advocacy: _____ clock hours
Standards to be demonstrated: 1. _________________________________________________________
2. _________________________________________________________
3. _________________________________________________________
4. _________________________________________________________
5. _________________________________________________________
Student Signature/Date: ________________________________________
Instructor Signature/Date: ______________________________________
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Advanced Internship Site and Mentor/Field Supervisor Information
Student Name: ________________________________
Your cell phone number: __________________
Semester/Year: ________________
Your home phone number: ______________________
ECU email ____________________________
Advanced Internship Students
As soon as you secure your Advanced Internship site complete the following information on this form. Complete on computer by
putting cursor toward the beginning of the line and hit “insert”.
For Advanced Internships within the ECU Department of Addictions & Rehabilitation Studies:

Complete all that apply:
o Faculty Mentor for Clinical Practice: ____________________________
o Faculty Mentor for Teaching: ____________________________
o Faculty Mentor for Research: ____________________________
o Faculty Mentor for Clinical Supervision: ____________________________
o Faculty Mentor for Leadership/Advocacy: ____________________________
For Advanced Internships outside the ECU Department of Addictions & Rehabilitation Studies:










Name of field site program/agency: _____________________________________________________
Address (include zip): _______________________________________________________________
Phone number of field site: ________________ Website address: ____________________________
Highlight type of program: Outpatient / Inpatient / Residential / Methadone/ Other ______________
Highlight primary type of disorders served: SA / MH / Physical Disabilities / Other _____________
Does program specialize in certain types of treatment (e.g. DUI) or counseling interventions (e.g. CBT)? If yes describe:
_______________________________________________________________
Check with your practicum/internship site to see if you need any of the following trainings prior to starting your field
experience. If yes, what are they: ________________________________________
o Highlight those trainings/ items you have completed: HIPPA / CPR / Drug Screening / Blood Bourne Pathogens /
Paid Malpractice Insurance / Other (describe) _____________________
Highlight the Code of Ethics you have reviewed: LPC (see www.counseling.org) / LCAS (see www.ncsappb.org) / CRC
(see www.crccertification.com) / VE (see director of VE program)
Site driving directions: _______________________________________________________________
__________________________________________________________________________________
Field Site Supervisor Information
o
Name of field supervisor(s) (Include full name, credentials (i.e. degree, licensure, certifications):
_________________________________________________________________________________
o
Field site supervisor’s phone number: _________________________________________________
o
Field site supervisor’s email address: __________________________________________________
o
List any training the supervisor has received in clinical supervision: _________________________
o
Highlight whether or not your field site supervisor(s) have emailed his or her resume to you?

yes / no
For external Advanced Internships, email a copy of your Field Site Supervisor’s resume as well.
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Evaluation of Advanced Internship Student Performance
Evaluation of Student Performance by Faculty Mentor or Field Site Supervisor
Doctoral Student Name: ___________________
Name of Field Site (if applicable) ________________________________
Name of Field Site Supervisor (if applicable) ____________________________
Name(s) of Faculty Mentor(s) (if applicable) ______________________________
Advanced Internship Instructor _________________________________
Note to Field Site Supervisor: Please complete the following evaluation for the above named
student’s performance at the MIDWAY POINT and again upon COMPLETION of his/her
placement with your organization, and return it to the Advanced Internship Instructor either
through the student (please return in a sealed envelope with your signature on the back) or by
mail (East Carolina University – CAHS, Dept. of Addictions & Rehabilitation Studies, Health
Sciences Building, Greenville, NC 27858). Please feel free to contact the faculty instructor
(Paul Toriello at 252-744-6297 or [email protected]) with questions or problems regarding this
task. Thank you for your assistance.
Also note that students will populate performance categories with CACREP Doctoral
Professional Identity Standards that they planned on demonstrating during the
internship.
Performance Category
Evaluation (Circle One)
1. Standard: ___________________________________________________________
Poor Satisfactory Excellent
Comments:
1
2
3
2. Standard: ___________________________________________________________
Poor Satisfactory Excellent
Comments:
1
2
3
3. Standard: ___________________________________________________________
Poor Satisfactory Excellent
Comments:
1
2
3
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4. Standard: ___________________________________________________________
Poor Satisfactory Excellent
Comments:
1
2
3
5. Standard: ___________________________________________________________
Poor Satisfactory Excellent
Comments:
1
2
3
6. Standard: ___________________________________________________________
Poor Satisfactory Excellent
Comments:
1
2
3
7. Standard: ___________________________________________________________
Poor Satisfactory Excellent
Comments:
1
2
3
8. Standard: ___________________________________________________________
Poor Satisfactory Excellent
Comments:
1
2
3
9. Standard: ___________________________________________________________
Poor Satisfactory Excellent
Comments:
1
2
3
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10. Standard: ___________________________________________________________
Poor Satisfactory Excellent
Comments:
1
2
3
11. Responsiveness to Supervision/Mentorship
Poor Satisfactory Excellent NA
Comments:
1
2
3
4
12. Working Relationship with
Organizational Staff:
Comments:
Poor Satisfactory Excellent NA
1
2
3
4
13. Attendance/Punctuality
Comments:
Poor Satisfactory Excellent NA
1
2
3
4
14. Professionalism
(i.e., dress, attitude, interactions
with public)
Comments:
Poor Satisfactory Excellent NA
1
2
3
4
15. Enthusiasm/Creativity
Comments:
Poor Satisfactory Excellent NA
1
2
3
4
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11. Notable Strengths Observed in Student’s Performance:
12. Notable Areas for Improvement in Student’s Performance:
13. Has the student satisfactorily fulfilled your expectations in his/her assigned role in your
organization? Explain.
14. May this evaluation be shared with the named student? (Please Circle)
Yes No
Additional Comments:
15. Have you reviewed this evaluation with the student? Yes ___ No ___
Completed by: ____________________________ Date: _______________
Signature/credentials- Mentor/Supervisor
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Advanced Internship Log (page 1)
Student Name: ________________________________
Semester: ________________
For each section of Advanced Internship you are taking, you need to complete 150 clock hours of activities. Use the following
codes to designate the specific activity.
C- Counseling, T- Teaching, RS- Research/Scholarship, CS- Clinical Supervision (provided), LA- Leadership/Advocacy
GS- Group Supervision (received) IS- Individual Supervision (received)
Date
Amount of
Time (in hours)
Activity (only 1 per row)
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Notes
Mentor Signature
(When Applicable)
90
Advanced Internship Log (page 2)
Date
Amount of
Time (in hours)
Activity (only 1 per row)
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Notes
Mentor Signature
(When Applicable)
91
Advanced Internship Log (page 3)
Date
Amount of
Time (in
hours)
Activity (only 1 per row)
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Notes
Mentor Signature
(When Applicable)
92
Advanced Internship Log (page 4)
Date
Amount of
Time (in
hours)
Activity (only 1 per row)
Complete after experience ends:
Total # of Hours by activity:
Notes
_____ Counseling
_____ Teaching
_____ Supervision
_____ Research/Scholarship
_____ Leadership/Advocacy
_____ Grand total
Student Signature/Date: _______________________________________
Instructor Signature/Date: _____________________________________
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Mentor Signature
(When Applicable)
93
Biostatistics 7021 Syllabus for Fall 2015
(sections: 001 and 601/602/603)
7 Aug 2015
This class will be recorded and broadcast on the internet and/or distributed on electronic
media. These video recordings may contain your image. You must notify me as soon as possible if
you DO NOT want your image contained on the video. If you do not so timely notify me, then you
understand and authorize that as part of this class we may videotape your image and broadcast it
on the internet and/or distribute it on electronic media.
Tue, Thu:
Aug 25, 27
Sep 1, 3
Sep xx, 10
Sep 15, 17
Sep 22, 24
Sep 29, Oct
1
Oct 6,
xx,8 15
Oct 20, 22
Oct 27, 29
Nov 3, 5
Nov 10, 12
Nov 17, 19
Nov 24, xx
Dec 1, 3
Dec 10
Topic
Intro
& Describing
Data
Describing Data:
one
variable Describing Data:
2+
variables
Producing
Data Describing
Data: 2+and
variables
Samples
Experiments; (SPSS)
Sampling Distribution, Test 1
(15%)to Inference
Intro
Intro to Inference, Hypothesis
Testing
Hypothesis
Testing
Confidence
Intervals
Confidence
Two
Populations, Review
Intervals
Test 2Exam:
(20%);Thu
Two11:00
populations
Final
– 1:30
Two populations
PhD in Rehabilitation Counseling and Administration
Text
Ch 1
Ch 1
Ch 2
Ch 2
Ch 3
Chs 3, 5
Ch 5
Chs
Chs
Chs
Chs
Chs
Chs
6, 7
6, 7, and 8
6, 7, and 8
6, 7, and 8
7 and 8
7 and 8
cumulative
94
Text:
Introduction to the Practice of Statistics,
6th ed, Moore, DS, McCabe, GP, and Craig, BA 2009, Freeman.
Instructor:
Paul Vos, Ph.D.
2435C Health Sciences Building (HSB)
tel. 252.744.6040; fax. 252.744.6044
[email protected]
http://tinyurl.com/BIOS7021
Time/Location:
10:45 - 12:00 Tu, Th (section 001)
Office Hours:
10 - 11:50 Mon, 2:00 - 3:20 Tu, Th, or by appt.
Grading
As indicated above, there will be two tests worth 15% and 20%. The second test will focus on the
material covered since the previous test but a portion will review earlier material. The final exam
(35%) is cumulative but will have increased emphasis on material covered after the second test.
Homework will be assigned from the text and time will be set aside each week to discuss the
homework. The final and tests will contain problems similar to those assigned for homework. The
final and tests will also contain multiple choice questions; these will be similar to those found in the
online quizzes on the text’s website (http://bcs.whfreeman.com/ips6e). During most weeks
there will be a work sheet where you will be allowed to work in small groups (no more than three
in a group). Work sheets together with graded homework will be worth 30% of your course grade.
Work sheets are handed in during class, other work will be turned in using BlackBoard
https://blackboard.ecu.edu/ so you will likely want to have access to a scanner.
Distance Education (DE) Students: For both tests and the final you will need to use a
proctor from the UNC proctoring service. In many cases I can also serve as your proctor.
On-line Materials
Most materials appear on my web page http://tinyurl.com/BIOS7021. The lecture will be
on mediasite and there will be a link on my web page.
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Outlines of Class Notes: All students must print these from the web page.
HW from Text: All students must check the web page regularly. HW will be updated weekly.
All students will use WebAssign.
Worksheets: DE students must print these from the blackboard; see Worksheet folder in
Assignment section. DE students will turn these in using blackboard. I’ll provide hardcopy for
f2f students, for an excused absence you may follow the instructions (and due date) for DE
students. The lowest worksheet score will be dropped.
Other Hand-in HW: All students must print these from the web page.
Statistical Software: I’ll be using SPSS. ECU has a site license for this statistical package that
is available in most computer labs.
The virtual computing lab is another option
http://vcl.ecu.edu/
Other Material: There is a review of chapters 1 and 2 on the web page.
This is a pdf file but behaves like a power point presentation. You don’t need to look at it now
but it might be useful for review. The textbook’s website (http://bcs.whfreeman.com/ips6e)
has some useful statistical applets and quizzes. A portion of each test will consist of multiple
choice questions obtained from the test bank provided to instructors. The quizzes will give you an
idea of what these questions will be like.
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BIOSTATISTICS 7022 – Spring 2016
BIOSTATISTICS FOR HEALTH PROFESSIONALS II
Lecture: Tues. and Thurs. 1:15 – 2:30 pm
2425 & 1307 Health Sciences Building
Office Hours: By appointment & Mon. 12:30-2:00
Tues. 2:30-3:30
Thurs. 2:30-3:30
Instructor: Suzanne Hudson, Ph.D.
Office: 2435B Health Sciences Bldg.
Phone: 744-6043
email: [email protected]
Virtual Office Hours: Sun. 7:30-9:00 pm
COURSE CONTENT. Introduction to the application of statistics to the health field. Topics include
chi-square tests for two-way tables, simple linear regression, multiple regression, one-way analysis of
variance, two-way analysis of variance, randomized complete block design, repeated-measures design and
logistic regression. The last topic is covered in Chapter 14 of the text which is available on the Web site
for the text, http://bcs.whfreeman.com/ips8e/.
EXAMS.
Midterm Exams: Tentative dates: Thurs. Feb. 18 and Thurs. March 31
Final Exam: Thurs. April 28, 11:00-1:30
GRADING. Tentative grade %s: SPSS homework 10%, written homework 10%, midterm exams 20%
each, final exam: take-home part 15%, in-class part 25%.
[90 %, 100 %] = A, [80 %, 90%) = B, [65 %,80 %) = C, [50 %,65 %) = D, [0 % ,50 %) = F.
Sometimes I adjust these ranges downwards a few percentage points but I will not adjust them upwards.
BLACKBOARD SITE. The course syllabus, homework assignments, announcements, guided notes for
each chapter and other handouts will be posted on the course Blackboard site. Please check for new
announcements and print out new guided notes and handouts the day before each class. To reach this site,
first go to ECU’s homepage http://www.ecu.edu and click on the Blackboard icon (Bb) near the top right side
of the page (or go directly to https://blackboard.ecu.edu/ ). Login with your ECU email username and
password. Click on the BIOS 7022 site.
MEDIASITE. The class will be recorded. You can watch or re-watch a class on Mediasite. These video
recordings may contain your image and voice. You must notify me as soon as possible if you DO NOT
want your image or voice contained on the video. If you do not so timely notify me, then it is assumed
that you understand and authorize that as part of this course we may videotape your image and voice and
broadcast it on Mediasite. Apart from the students in the Spring 2015 BIOS 7022 sections, very few other
people will have access to these Mediasite recordings (primarily Instructional Technology staff). Please
note that the recording begins shortly before the class starts, and at that time the ceiling microphones are
activated and will record conversations between students. Mediasite recordings are embedded into the
Blackboard site for this course. Click on the Mediasite content item in the list at the top left of the
Blackboard site. Then click on the link which looks this :
.
CALCULATOR. For exams you may not use graphing calculators (such as the TI-83) and other
calculators that have the capability to store notes. For exams I suggest using the Texas Instruments TI30XIIS which costs about $15.00. You can borrow one from me on exam days.
TEXT. Introduction to the Practice of Biostatistics, 6th Ed. by Moore, McCabe, and Craig, Freeman,
2009.
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HOMEWORK. There will be two types of homework: SPSS homework and written homework. I will
accept homework for credit up to 5 days (not class periods) late. There will be a late penalty which
increases with the number of days an assignment is late. If you turn in homework assignments later than
that, you may not get homework points, but if the assignment is done reasonably well, it will count
towards receiving a passing grade in the class. Collaboration on the homework should be very limited.
Of course, you may not copy someone else’s homework or have someone else do it for you. In particular,
SPSS homework should not be done collaboratively. You may get a little help getting started from
another student. You may also get help from me. If you are not able to turn your homework in during
class, you may put it in the box on my office door or in the Department of Biostatistics drop-box outside
our office suite (after hours only), or occasionally you may email it to me. If you email it, the assignment
should be in a single Word document.
SPSS. SPSS is available in some of the computer labs around campus including the computer lab in
Laupus library. You may also use these on the Virtual Computer Lab (VCL). A tutorial on using VCL
(prepared by Dr. Andrada Ivanescu) is posted on Blackboard in the Course Info folder.
NOTES ON HOMEWORK ASSIGNMENTS
1. Please use 8.511” paper. Put only one problem per row. Turn in the problems in the order assigned
(rather than in numerical order).
2. Write neatly. Show your work correctly and clearly. For numerical answers either put a box around
the answer or highlight it.
3. Keep at least 3 significant figures in the answers to the exercises. To avoid round-off error, keep at
least 4 significant figures in the numbers to be used in a calculation. Note 54.127 has 5 sig. fig.s , 2.70
has 3 sig. fig.s, 0.01384 has 4 sig. fig.s. Use the following rule for rounding numbers.
If the digit following the round-off point is 0 to 4, don’t change the last digit you keep. If the digit
following the round-off point is 5 to 9, add 1 to the last digit you keep. So 54.123  54.1,
27.2893  27.3, 1.596  1.60, 27.849  27.8.
ECU HOT LINE: 328-0062. Call for class delays and cancellations due to adverse weather conditions
or other emergencies.
If you have a disability that needs to be accommodated in some way, please discuss this
with me.
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BIOS 7550 Applied Multivariate Analysis
Lecture time: Tuesday & Thursday 9:30AM – 10:45AM
Classroom: 2425 Allied Health Sciences Building
Instructor: Kevin F. O’Brien
Email: [email protected]
Office: 2435A Allied Health Sciences Building
Office hours: Mon: 9:30AM-10:30AM, Tues after class, Wed 2:30PM – 4:00PM, Thur after class and Fri: 9:30AM10:30AM
Phone: (252)744-6048-- you are welcome to call anytime or come by for that matter, just check to see if I am in
before making a long trip.
Web: blackboard.ecu.edu
Course: this is an introductory course in applied multivariate statistical analysis. The focus is on concepts
understanding, implementation using data and output interpretation. We will discuss some mathematical
fundamentals of the methods as they relate to our understanding of the methods and appropriate use.
Textbook: Multivariate Statistical Methods: a primer 3rd Edition, 2004. Author: Brian F. J. Manly. Publisher: Chapman
& Hall/CRC, Boca Raton, FL 33431.
Computer and software: you are strongly recommended to bring your laptops to the lectures to facilitate your
learning. Throughout the semester, we will use the statistical software package: (SPSS Version 22 or higher. You
should be able to obtain the software through the Helpdesk: http://www.ecu.edu/cs-itcs/help.cfm and OneStop
making a software request.
Lectures: we will follow the order of chapters (somewhat) in the text over the course of the lectures. SPSS will be
used to illustrate the various methods and you will be expected to use SPSS for the assignments. However, I am not
‘wed’ to the use of SPSS. If you can produce the necessary output with other software (R, SAS, or JMP) then that
would be fine with me.
A tentative Outline for Lectures
Week
Topic
Week 1
Course Business
Week 1
Chapter 1 introducing the topics and Matrix Algebra and other Math background
Week 2
Chapter 2: Matrix Algebra , Multivariate Normal Distribution
Week 2
Chapter 3: Displaying Multivariate Data
Week 3
Chapter 6: Principal Components Analysis (also read pp177-181 of Chapter 12: Ordination)
Week 4
Chapter 5: Measuring and Testing Multivariate Distance
Week 5
Chapter 4: Tests of Significance and Multivariate ANOVA
Week 6
Chapter 4 material continued
Week 7
Chapter 8: Discriminant Function Analysis and Logistic Regression
Week 8
Chapter 10: Canonical Correlation Analysis
Week 9
Chapter 7: Factor Analysis
Week 10
Chapter 9: Cluster Analysis
Week 11
Chapter 12: Correspondence Analysis
Week 12:
Chapter 11: Multidimensional Scaling, read pages 189-190 of Chapter 12
Weeks>12
Catch up and Missing Data
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Note: October 10-13 is Fall Break and we will not have class on Tuesday October 13.
Message on videotaping: this class will be videotaped and broadcast on the internet and/or distributed on
electronic media. These video recordings may contain your image. There will be a form to fill out in regard to this
aspect. If you do not want your image or voice on this recording please notify me immediately.
Homework: there will be homework for almost every chapter. The main part of the homework will be to (re)produce
analysis for given data sets using SPSS. We thank previous classes, the members of which meticulously entered the
data for all the examples in the text. Check the accuracy regarding entry of the values and naming of variables.
Assignments, solutions and grades will be posted in Blackboard.
A table of data tables in the text
Data Table
Table 1.1: Female Sparrows
Table 1.2: Egyptian Male Skulls
Table 1.3: Environmental Variables
Table 1.4: Mean Mandible Measurements for Seven Canine Groups
Table 1.5: Workforce Data for Nine Industries
Table 4.5: Mandible Measurements for Dogs
Table 6.6: Prehistoric Goblet Measurements
Table 6.7: Protein Consumption in Europe
Table 9.7: Plant Abundance Measurements
Table 9.8: Grave Goods in Burial Sites
Table 10.2: Soil and Vegetarian Variables
Table 10.4: More on Sources of Protein in Europe
Pages
2-3
4-5
7
9
10-11
55-57
87
89
138
139-140
152-156
page 160
Grading: grading is on a 10 point scale: 0-100. There is no curving or other adjustments. The grade will come from
the homework assignments. The homework assignments are the core of the course, and will result in a ‘portfolio’ of
worked examples that you can reference. I will also work the assignments and provide you with my take on the
analysis. The assignments will all be applications of the methods to data files that are either in the text or from past
consulting projects.
Project: there could be a project for this class, and we will discuss it. The Projects in the past were to find journal
articles, in your field of study, that use multivariate methods. Students found articles in their field that use:
Multivariate ANOVA, Principal Components Analysis, Factor Analysis, Discriminant Function Analysis, logistic
Regression, Cluster Analysis, Canonical Correlation Analysis, Multidimensional Analysis, or Correspondence Analysis.
It may be possible to work in small groups.
Attendance/Class Participation: attendance is not mandatory, although strongly encouraged as the material tends
to be difficult to learn on your own. Class participation is not mandatory, but if you have a question or comment it is
always welcome and encouraged. Note that all lectures are recorded and can be watched either live or at any time
you choose.
ECU hot line: 328-0062: call for class delays and cancellations due to adverse weather conditions or other
emergencies.
Disability and Access: if you have a disability that needs to be accommodated in some way, please discuss this with
me. Also you may want to contact the office of disability services: http://www.ecu.edu/accessibility/
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Academic Integrity Statement: academic integrity is a fundamental value of higher education and East Carolina
University; therefore, acts of cheating, plagiarism, falsification or attempts to cheat, plagiarize or falsify will not be
tolerated. Should it be determined that an academic integrity violation has taken place, the instructor may assign a
grade sanction or to refer the case to the Office of Student Conflict Resolution for a hearing.
References on Multivariate Methods and Data Analysis
1. Richard A. J. and Dean W. W. Applied Multivariate Statistical Analysis 6th edition, Prentice Hall, Upper Saddle
River, New Jersey 07458
2. Jacoby W. G. (1998). Statistical Graphics for Visualizing Multivariate Data, Sage Publications (OASS Series number
120), Thousand Oaks, CA 91320
3. Clausen, Sten-Erik (1988).Applied Correspondence Analysis: an introduction. Sage Publications (OASS Series
number 121), Thousand Oaks, CA 91320
4. Kim, Jae-On and Mueller, C. W. (1978). Introduction to Factor Analysis. Sage Publications (OASS Series number
13), Thousand Oaks, CA 91320
5. Aldenderfer, M. S. and Blashfield, R. K. (1984). Cluster Analysis. Sage Publications (OASS Series number 44),
Thousand Oaks, CA 91320
6. Thompson, B. (1984). Canonical Correlation Analysis. Sage Publications (OASS Series number 47), Thousand
Oaks, CA 91320
7. Dunteman, G. H. (1989). Principal Components Analysis. Sage Publications (OASS Series number 69), Thousand
Oaks, CA 91320
8. Bartholomew, D. J., Steele, F., Moustaki, I. and Galbraith, J. I. (2002). The Analysis and Interpretation of
Multivariate Data for Social Scientists. Chapman & Hall/CRC, Boca Raton, FL 33431
9. Morrison, D. F. (1976). Multivariate Statistical Methods. McGraw-Hill Inc., New York, NY
10. Seber. G. A. F. (1984). Multivariate Observations. John Wiley and Sons Inc., New York, NY.
11. Hair, J.F. Jr., Black, W.C., Babin, B.J., Anderson, R.A. and Tatham, R.L. (2006). Multivariate Data Analysis, Sixth
Edition. Pearson Prentice Hall, Upper Saddle River, New Jersey 07458.
12. Everitt, Brian S. and Dunn, Graham (2001). Applied Multivariate Analysis, Second Edition. Arnold Publishing, 338
Easton Road, London.
13. Everitt, Brian S. (2004). An R and S-Plus Companion for Multivariate Analysis.
14. Johnson, Richard A. and Wichern, Dean (2007). Applied Multivariate Statistical Analysis, 6th Edition.
15. James, Gareth, Witten, Daniela, Hastie, Trevor and Tibshirani, Robert (2013). An Introduction to Statistical
Learning: with Applications in R. Springer Texts in Statistics
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