Elementary Literacy Assessment Handbook September 2013

Elementary Literacy Assessment Handbook September 2013
Elementary Literacy
Assessment Handbook
September 2013
edTPA_ElemLit_02
edTPA stems from a twenty-five-year history of developing performance-based assessments of
teaching quality and effectiveness. The Teacher Performance Assessment Consortium (Stanford
and AACTE) acknowledges the National Board for Professional Teaching Standards, the
Interstate Teacher Assessment and Support Consortium, and the Performance Assessment for
California Teachers for their pioneering work using discipline-specific portfolio assessments to
evaluate teaching quality. This version of the handbook has been developed with thoughtful input
from over six hundred teachers and teacher educators representing various national design
teams, national subject matter organizations (AAHPERD, ACEI, ACTFL, AMLE, CEC, IRA,
NAEYC, NAGC, NCSS, NCTE, NCTM, NSTA), and content validation reviewers. All contributions
are recognized and appreciated.
This document was authored by the Stanford Center for Assessment, Learning and Equity (SCALE)
with editorial and design assistance from Evaluation Systems.
Copyright © 2013 Board of Trustees of the Leland Stanford Junior University. All rights reserved.
edTPA is a trademark of Stanford or its affiliates. Use, reproduction, copying or redistribution of trademarks,
without the written permission of Stanford or its affiliates is prohibited.
edTPA Elementary Literacy Assessment Handbook
Contents
Introduction to the edTPA Elementary Literacy....................................................................... 1 Purpose ..................................................................................................................................................................1 Overview of the Assessment...................................................................................................................................1 Structure of the Handbook ......................................................................................................................................3 edTPA Elementary Literacy Tasks Overview ..........................................................................................................5 Task 1: Planning for Instruction and Assessment .................................................................. 8 What Do I Need to Think About? ............................................................................................................................8 What Do I Need to Do?...........................................................................................................................................8 What Do I Need to Write? .....................................................................................................................................10 How Will the Evidence of My Teaching Practice Be Assessed? ...........................................................................12 Planning Rubrics...................................................................................................................................................13 Task 2: Instructing and Engaging Students in Learning....................................................... 18 What Do I Need to Think About? ..........................................................................................................................18 What Do I Need to Do?.........................................................................................................................................18 What Do I Need to Write? .....................................................................................................................................19 How Will the Evidence of My Teaching Practice Be Assessed? ...........................................................................20 Instruction Rubrics ................................................................................................................................................21 Task 3: Assessing Student Learning ...................................................................................... 26 What Do I Need to Think About? ..........................................................................................................................26 What Do I Need to Do?.........................................................................................................................................26 What Do I Need to Write? .....................................................................................................................................27 How Will the Evidence of My Teaching Practice Be Assessed? ...........................................................................29 Instruction Rubrics ................................................................................................................................................30 Professional Responsibilities.................................................................................................. 35 Elementary Literacy Context for Learning Information......................................................... 36 Elementary Literacy Evidence Chart....................................................................................... 38 Task 1: Artifacts and Commentary Specifications.................................................................................................38 Task 2: Artifacts and Commentary Specifications.................................................................................................39 Task 3: Artifacts and Commentary Specifications.................................................................................................40 Elementary Literacy Glossary ................................................................................................. 42 Copyright © 2013 Board of Trustees of the Leland Stanford Junior University.
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i
edTPA Elementary Literacy Assessment Handbook
Introduction to the edTPA Elementary
Literacy
Purpose
The purpose of edTPA Elementary Literacy, a nationally available performance-based
assessment, is to measure novice teachers’ readiness to teach elementary literacy. The
assessment is designed with a focus on student learning and principles from research and
theory. It is based on findings that successful teachers
 develop knowledge of subject matter, content standards, and subject-specific
pedagogy
 develop and apply knowledge of varied students’ needs
 consider research and theory about how students learn
 reflect on and analyze evidence of the effects of instruction on student learning
As a performance-based assessment, edTPA is designed to engage candidates in
demonstrating their understanding of teaching and student learning in authentic ways.
Overview of the Assessment
The edTPA Elementary Literacy assessment is composed of three tasks:
1. Planning for Instruction and Assessment
2. Instructing and Engaging Students in Learning
3. Assessing Student Learning
For this assessment, you will first plan 3–5 consecutive literacy lessons (or, if teaching
within a large time block, 3–5 hours of connected instruction) referred to as a learning
segment. Consistent with the Common Core State Standards for English-Language Arts and
Literacy 1 and recommendations provided by the International Reading Association 2 (2010)
for literacy professionals, a learning segment prepared for this assessment should reflect a
balanced literacy curriculum. This means your learning segment should include learning
tasks in which students have opportunities to develop a key literacy strategy and related
literacy skills to comprehend OR compose text.
You will then teach the lessons, making a videorecording of your interactions with students
during instruction. You will also assess, informally and formally, students’ learning
throughout the learning segment. Upon completion of the three tasks, you will submit
1
The Common Core State Standards for English-Language Arts (June 2010) can be found at
http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy . Note that Minnesota and Virginia have not adopted the Common Core State
Standards.
2
The Standards for Reading Professionals can be found at
http://www.reading.org/General/CurrentResearch/Standards/ProfessionalStandards2010.aspx
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edTPA Elementary Literacy Assessment Handbook
artifacts from the tasks (e.g., lesson plans, clips from your videorecording, assessment
materials, instructional materials, student work samples), as well as commentaries that you
have written to explain/reflect on the planning, instruction, and assessment components of
the task. The artifacts and commentaries for each task will then be evaluated using rubrics
especially developed for each task.
The edTPA Tasks and the Cycle of Effective Teaching
The three edTPA tasks represent a cycle of effective teaching (i.e., teaching that is focused
on student learning). The planning task documents your intended teaching, the instruction
task documents your enacted teaching, and the assessment task documents the impact of
your teaching on student learning.
The three tasks and the evidence you provide for each are framed by your understandings
of your students and their learning. As you develop, document, and teach your lessons, you
will reflect upon the cyclical relationship among planning, instruction, and assessment, with
a focus on your students’ learning needs.
Evidence of Teaching Practice: Artifacts and Commentaries
An essential part of the assessment is the evidence you will submit of how you planned,
taught, and assessed your lessons to deepen student learning in literacy. This evidence
includes both artifacts and commentaries:
 Artifacts represent authentic work completed by you and your students. These
include lesson plans, copies of instructional and assessment materials, video clips of
your teaching, and student work samples.
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edTPA Elementary Literacy Assessment Handbook
 Commentaries are your opportunity to describe your artifacts, explain the rationale
behind their choice, and analyze what you have learned about your teaching practice
and your students’ learning. Note that although your writing ability will not be scored
directly, commentaries must be clearly written and well focused.
When preparing your artifacts and commentaries, refer to the rubrics frequently to guide
your thinking, planning, and writing. Refer to the Elementary Literacy Evidence Chart for
information about how your evidence should be formatted for electronic submission.
Evaluation Criteria
The evidence (i.e., artifacts and commentaries) you submit will be judged on five
components of teaching practice:
1. Planning
2. Instruction
3. Assessment
4. Analyzing Teaching
5. Academic Language
You will provide evidence for the planning, instruction, and assessment components within
the corresponding tasks. You will provide evidence for the analyzing teaching component
across all three tasks. You will provide evidence for the academic language component in
the planning task, as well as in the instruction AND/OR assessment task.
The rubrics used to score your performance are included in this handbook and follow the
sections describing the directions for each task. The descriptors in the five-level rubrics
address a wide range of performance, beginning with the knowledge and skills of a novice
not ready to teach (Level 1) and extending to the advanced practices of a highly
accomplished beginner (Level 5).
Structure of the Handbook
The following pages provide specific instructions on how to complete each of the three tasks
of the edTPA Elementary Literacy assessment. After an overview of the tasks, the handbook
provides instructions for each task organized into four sections:
1. What Do I Need to Think About?
This section provides focus questions for you to think about when completing the
task.
2. What Do I Need to Do?
This section provides specific, detailed directions for completing the task.
3. What Do I Need to Write?
This section tells you what you need to write and also provides specific and detailed
directions for writing the commentary for the task.
4. How Will the Evidence of My Teaching Practice Be Assessed?
This section includes the rubrics that will be used to assess the evidence you provide
for the task.
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edTPA Elementary Literacy Assessment Handbook
Additional requirements and resources are available to you in this handbook: 3
 Professional Responsibilities: guidelines for the development of your evidence
 Elementary Literacy Context for Learning Information: prompts used to collect
information about your school/classroom context
 Elementary Literacy Evidence Chart: specifications for electronic submission of
evidence (artifacts and commentaries), including templates, supported file types,
number of files, response length, and other important evidence specifications
 Glossary: definitions of key terms can be accessed by rolling your cursor over each
glossary term marked with a dotted underline throughout the handbook or by
referring to the Elementary Literacy Glossary.
Review all instructions carefully before beginning to teach the learning segment to
ensure that you are well prepared for all tasks. Refer to the Making Good Choices
document to help you prepare for all tasks. Refer to the Professional
Responsibilities section of this handbook for important information about
permissions, confidentiality, and other requirements.
If your program requires you to submit artifacts and commentaries for official
scoring, refer to www.edTPA.com for complete and current information before
beginning your work and to download templates for submitting materials. The
website contains information about the registration process, submission deadlines,
submission requirements, withdrawal/refund policies, and score reporting. It also
provides contact information should you have questions about your registration and
participation in edTPA.
Whether submitting directly to www.edTPA.com or via your program’s electronic
portfolio management system, follow the submission guidelines as documented in
the Evidence Chart and review edTPA Submission Requirements to ensure that
your materials conform to the required evidence specifications and requirements for
scoring.
3
Your preparation program will have additional resources, including the Making Good Choices document, that provide
guidance as you develop your evidence.
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edTPA Elementary Literacy Assessment Handbook
edTPA Elementary Literacy Tasks Overview
What to Do
What to Submit
Evaluation Rubrics
Task 1: Planning for Instruction and Assessment
► Select one class as a focus for this
assessment.
Provide
relevant context information.
►
► Identify a learning segment to plan, teach,
and analyze student learning. Select a
learning segment of 3–5 consecutive
lessons (or, if teaching literacy within a
large time block, about 3–5 hours of
connected instruction).
► Identify a central focus. The central focus
should support students to develop an
essential strategy for comprehending or
composing text and requisite skills that
directly support that strategy.
► Write and submit a lesson plan for each
lesson in the learning segment.
► Select and submit key instructional
materials needed to understand what you
and the students will be doing.
► Respond to commentary prompts prior to
teaching the learning segment.
► As part of the commentary, choose one
language function to analyze elementary
literacy language demands and identify a
learning task where students use that
language function. Identify both the
language that students will be expected to
use to engage in the learning task and
your instructional supports.
► Submit copies or directions for all planned
assessments from the learning segment.
 Part A: Context for Learning
Information
 Part B: Lesson Plans for
Learning Segment
 Part C: Instructional Materials
 Part D: Assessments
 Part E: Planning Commentary
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Planning Rubrics
Rubric 1: Planning for Literacy
Learning
Rubric 2: Planning to Support
Varied Student Learning Needs
Rubric 3: Using Knowledge of
Students to Inform Teaching
and Learning
Rubric 4: Identifying and
Supporting Language Demands
Rubric 5: Planning Assessments
to Monitor and Support Student
Learning
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edTPA Elementary Literacy Assessment Handbook
What to Do
What to Submit
Evaluation Rubrics
Task 2: Instructing and Engaging Students in Learning
► Obtain required permissions for
 Part A: Video Clips
videorecording from parents/guardians of
your students and other adults appearing  Part B: Instruction
Commentary
in the video.
Identify
lessons
from
the
learning
segment
►
you planned in Task 1 to videorecord. You
should choose lessons that show you
interacting with students to support them
to independently apply the literacy
strategy and requisite skills to
comprehend or compose text in
meaningful contexts.
► Videorecord your teaching and select 1 or
2 video clips (no more than 15 minutes
total).
► Analyze your teaching and your students’
learning in the video clips by responding to
commentary prompts.
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Instruction Rubrics
Rubric 6: Learning Environment
Rubric 7: Engaging Students in
Learning
Rubric 8: Deepening Student
Learning
Rubric 9: Subject-Specific
Pedagogy
Rubric 10: Analyzing Teaching
Effectiveness
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edTPA Elementary Literacy Assessment Handbook
What to Do
What to Submit
Evaluation Rubrics
Task 3: Assessing Student Learning
► Select one assessment from the learning
segment that you will use to evaluate your
students’ developing knowledge and skills.
Submit the assessment used to evaluate
student performance.
► Define and submit the evaluation criteria
you will use to analyze student learning.
► Collect and analyze student work from the
selected assessment to identify
quantitative and qualitative patterns of
learning within, and across learners in, the
class.
► Select 3 student work samples to
illustrate your analysis of patterns of
learning within, and across learners, in the
class. At least 1 of the samples must be
from a student with specific learning
needs. These 3 students will be your
focus students.
► Summarize the learning of the whole
class, and refer to work samples from the
three focus students to illustrate patterns
in student understanding across the class.
► Submit feedback on the assessment for
the three focus students in written, audio,
or video form.
► Analyze evidence of students’ language
use from (1) the video clips from the
instruction task, (2) an additional video clip
of one or more students using language
within the learning segment, AND/OR the
student work samples from the
assessment task.
► Analyze your assessment of student
learning and plan for next steps by
responding to commentary prompts.
 Part A: Student Work
Samples
 Part B: Evidence of Feedback
 Part C: Assessment
Commentary
 Part D: Evaluation Criteria
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Assessment Rubrics
Rubric 11: Analysis of Student
Learning
Rubric 12: Providing Feedback
to Guide Further Learning
Rubric 13: Student Use of
Feedback
Rubric 14: Analyzing Students’
Language Use and Literacy
Learning
Rubric 15: Using Assessment
to Inform Instruction
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edTPA Elementary Literacy Assessment Handbook
Task 1: Planning for Instruction and
Assessment
What Do I Need to Think About?
In Task 1: Planning for Instruction and Assessment, you will describe your plans for the
learning segment and explain how your instruction is appropriate for the students and the
content you are teaching. As you develop your plans, you need to think about the following:
 What do your students know, what can they do, and what are they learning to do?
 What do you want your students to learn? What are the important understandings
and core concepts you want students to develop within the learning segment?
 What instructional strategies, learning tasks, and assessments will you design to
support student learning and language use?
 How is the teaching you propose supported by research and theory about how
students learn?
 How is the teaching you propose informed by your knowledge of students?
Task 1 prepares you to demonstrate and analyze the effectiveness of your teaching of the
planned learning segment.
What Do I Need to Do?
 Select a class. If you teach more than one class, select one focus class for this
assessment.
 Provide context information. The Elementary Literacy Context for Learning
Information form is provided later in this handbook and must be submitted in a template.
This form provides essential information about your students and your school/classroom.
The context information you submit should be no more than 3 pages, including the
prompts.
 Identify a learning segment to plan, teach, and analyze. Review the curriculum with
your cooperating teacher and select a learning segment of 3–5 consecutive lessons. (If
teaching literacy within a large time block, select a learning segment of about 3–5 hours
of connected instruction.) Identify a central focus. Identify the central focus along
with the content standards and objectives you will address in the learning segment. The
central focus should support students to develop an essential literacy strategy and the
requisite skills for comprehending or composing text in meaningful contexts.
 Analyze language demands. Select a language function, a key learning task, and
additional language demands required by the task.
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edTPA Elementary Literacy Assessment Handbook
 Write a lesson plan for each lesson in the learning segment. If you are planning for a
group rather than the full class, your plans should describe instruction for that group 4 .
Your lesson plans should be detailed enough that a substitute or other teacher could
understand them well enough to use them. If your teacher preparation program requires
you to use a specific lesson plan format for this assessment, you must include the
information described below.
 Lesson plans should include the following information:
 State-adopted student academic content standards and/or Common Core State
Standards that are the target of student learning. (Note: Please list the number and
text of each standard that is being addressed. If only a portion of a standard is being
addressed, then only list the part or parts that are relevant.)
 Learning objectives associated with the content standards
 Informal and formal assessments used to monitor student learning, including type(s)
of assessment and what is being assessed
 Instructional strategies and learning tasks (including what you and the students will
be doing) that support diverse student needs
 Instructional resources and materials used to engage students in learning
 Lesson plans should be no more than 4 pages in length. You will need to condense or
excerpt lesson plans longer than 4 pages. Any rationale for decisions or explanations
should be included in your Planning Commentary and deleted from your plans.
 Respond to the commentary prompts listed in the Planning Commentary section prior
to teaching the learning segment.
 Submit your original lesson plans. If you make changes while teaching the learning
segment, you may offer reflection on those changes in the Instruction and Assessment
Commentaries that are part of Tasks 2 and 3.
 Select and submit key instructional materials needed to understand what you and
the students will be doing (no more than 5 pages per lesson plan). The instructional
materials might include such items as class handouts, assignments, slides, and
interactive whiteboard images.
 Submit copies of all written assessments. (Submit only the blank assessments given
to students; do not submit student work samples.)
See the Task 1: Artifacts and Commentary Specifications in the Elementary Literacy
Evidence Chart for instructions on electronic submission of evidence. This evidence
chart identifies templates, supported file types, number of files, response length, and
other important evidence specifications.
4
A group is a subset of the whole class and must include at least four students.
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edTPA Elementary Literacy Assessment Handbook
What Do I Need to Write?
In Task 1: Planning for Instruction and Assessment, you will write
 a description of your context for learning (see “What Do I Need to Do?” above for
directions)
 lesson plans (see “What Do I Need to Do?” above for directions)
 a commentary explaining your plans (see “Planning Commentary” below for
directions)
Planning Commentary
In Task 1: Planning for Instruction and Assessment, you will write a commentary, responding
to the prompts below. Your commentary should be no more than 9 single-spaced pages,
including the prompts.
1. Central Focus
a. Describe the central focus and purpose for the content you will teach in the
learning segment.
b. Given the central focus, describe how the standards and learning objectives
within your learning segment address
 an essential literacy strategy
 requisite skills
 reading/writing connections
c. Explain how your plans build on each other to help students make connections
between skills and the essential strategy to comprehend OR compose text in
meaningful contexts.
2. Knowledge of Students to Inform Teaching
For each of the prompts below (2a–b), describe what you know about your students
with respect to the central focus of the learning segment.
Consider the variety of learners in your class who may require different
strategies/support (e.g., students with IEPs, English language learners, struggling
readers, underperforming students or those with gaps in academic knowledge,
and/or gifted students).
a. Prior academic learning and prerequisite skills related to the central focus—What
do students know, what can they do, and what are they learning to do?
b. Personal/cultural/community assets related to the central focus—What do you
know about your students’ everyday experiences, cultural backgrounds
and practices, and interests?
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edTPA Elementary Literacy Assessment Handbook
3. Supporting Students’ Literacy Learning
Respond to prompts 3a–c below. To support your explanations, refer to the
instructional materials and lesson plans you have included as part of Task 1. In
addition, use principles from research and/or theory to support your
explanations.
a. Explain how your understanding of your students’ prior academic learning and
personal/cultural/community assets (from prompts 2a–b above) guided your
choice or adaptation of learning tasks and materials.
b. Describe and justify why your instructional strategies and planned supports are
appropriate for the whole class, individuals, and/or groups of students with
specific learning needs.
Consider students with IEPs, English language learners, struggling readers,
underperforming students or those with gaps in academic knowledge, and/or
gifted students.
c. Describe common developmental approximations or common misconceptions
within your literacy central focus and how you will address them.
4. Supporting Literacy Development Through Language
a. Language Function. Identify one language function essential for students to
learn the literacy strategy within your central focus. Listed below are some
sample language functions. You may choose one of these or another more
appropriate for your learning segment.
Analyze
Argue
Interpret
Predict
Categorize Compare/contrast
Question
Retell
Describe
Explain
Summarize
b. Identify a key learning task from your plans that provides students with
opportunities to practice using the language function. Identify the lesson in which
the learning task occurs. (Give lesson day/number.)
c. Additional Language Demands. Given the language function and learning task
identified above, describe the following associated language demands (written or
oral) students need to understand and/or use:
 Vocabulary or key phrases
 Plus at least one of the following:
 Syntax
 Discourse
Consider the range of students’ understandings of the language function and
other language demands—what do students already know, what are they
struggling with, and/or what is new to them?
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edTPA Elementary Literacy Assessment Handbook
d. Language Supports. Refer to your lesson plans and instructional materials as
needed in your response to the prompt.
 Describe the instructional supports (during and/or prior to the learning task)
that help students understand and successfully use the language function
and additional language demands identified in prompts 4a–c.
5. Monitoring Student Learning
In response to the prompts below, refer to the assessments you will submit as part of
the materials for Task 1.
a. Describe how your planned formal and informal assessments will provide direct
evidence that students can use the literacy strategy and requisite skills to
comprehend or compose text throughout the learning segment.
b. Explain how the design or adaptation of your planned assessments allows
students with specific needs to demonstrate their learning.
Consider all students, including students with IEPs, English language learners,
struggling readers, underperforming students or those with gaps in academic
knowledge, and/or gifted students.
How Will the Evidence of My Teaching Practice Be
Assessed?
For Task 1: Planning for Instruction and Assessment, your evidence will be assessed with
rubrics 1–5, which appear in the following pages. When preparing your artifacts and
commentaries, refer to the rubrics frequently to guide your thinking, planning, and writing.
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edTPA Elementary Literacy Assessment Handbook
Planning Rubrics
Rubric 1: Planning for Literacy Learning
How do the candidate’s plans build students’ literacy skills and an essential strategy for comprehending or
composing text?
Level 1 5
Level 2
Level 3
Level 4
Level 5
Candidate’s plans focus
solely on literacy skills
without connections to any
strategy for comprehending
or composing text.
Plans for instruction support
student learning of skills
with vague connections to
strategies for
comprehending or
composing text.
Plans for instruction build on
each other to support learning
of skills with clear
connections to the essential
literacy strategy for
comprehending or
composing text.
Plans for instruction build on
each other to create a
meaningful context that
supports learning of skills with
clear and consistent
connections to the essential
literacy strategy for
comprehending or
composing text.
Level 4 plus:
Plans build an authentic
connection between reading
and writing. Candidate
explains how s/he will use
learning tasks and materials
to lead students to
independently apply the
essential strategy and
identified skills.
There are significant content
inaccuracies that will lead to
student misunderstandings.
OR
Standards, objectives, and
learning tasks and materials
are not aligned with each
other.
5
Text representing key differences between adjacent score levels is shown in bold. Evidence that does not meet Level 1 criteria is scored at Level 1.
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edTPA Elementary Literacy Assessment Handbook
Planning Rubrics continued
Rubric 2: Planning to Support Varied Student Learning Needs
How does the candidate use knowledge of his/her students to target support for students’ literacy learning?
Level 1
There is little or no evidence
of planned supports.
OR
Candidate does not attend to
requirements in IEPs and
504 plans.
Level 2
Planned supports are loosely
tied to learning objectives or
the central focus of the
learning segment.
AND
Candidate attends to
requirements in IEPs and
504 plans.
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Level 3
Planned supports are tied to
learning objectives and the
central focus with attention to
the characteristics of the
class as a whole.
AND
Candidate attends to
requirements in IEPs and
504 plans.
Level 4
Planned supports are tied to
learning objectives and the
central focus. Supports
address the needs of
specific individuals or
groups with similar needs.
AND
Level 5
Level 4 plus:
Supports include specific
strategies to identify and
respond to common
developmental
approximations or
misconceptions.
Candidate attends to
requirements in IEPs and
504 plans.
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Planning Rubrics continued
Rubric 3: Using Knowledge of Students to Inform Teaching and Learning
How does the candidate use knowledge of his/her students to justify instructional plans?
Level 1
Candidate’s justification of
learning tasks is either missing
OR represents a deficit view
of students and their
backgrounds.
Level 2
Candidate justifies learning
tasks with limited attention to
students’ prior academic
learning OR
personal/cultural/community
assets.
Level 3
Candidate justifies why
learning tasks (or their
adaptations) are
appropriate using
 examples of
students’ prior
academic learning
OR
 examples of
personal/cultural/
community assets
Level 4
Candidate justifies why learning
tasks (or their adaptations) are
appropriate using
 examples of students’ prior
academic learning
 examples of
personal/cultural/community
assets
Level 5
Level 4 plus:
Candidate’s justification is
supported by principles from
research and/or theory.
Candidate makes connections
to research and/or theory.
Candidate makes
superficial connections
to research and/or
theory.
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edTPA Elementary Literacy Assessment Handbook
Planning Rubrics continued
Rubric 4: Identifying and Supporting Language Demands
How does the candidate identify and support language demands associated with a key literacy learning task?
Level 1
Level 2
Level 3
Level 4
Level 5
Language demands 6 identified
by the candidate are not
consistent with the selected
language function 7 OR task.
Candidate identifies
vocabulary as the major
language demand associated
with the language function.
Attention to additional
demands is superficial.
Candidate identifies vocabulary
and additional language
demand(s) associated with the
language function.
Candidate identifies vocabulary
and additional language
demand(s) associated with the
language function.
Level 4 plus:
Instructional supports are
designed to meet the needs
of students with different
levels of language learning.
Plans include general
support for use of
vocabulary as well as
additional language
demand(s).
Plans include targeted
support for use of vocabulary
as well as additional language
demand(s).
OR
Language supports are
missing or are not aligned with
the language demand(s) for
the learning task.
Language supports primarily
address definitions of
vocabulary.
6
Language demands include: language function, vocabulary, syntax and grammar, and discourse (organizational structures, text structure, etc.).
7
Language function refers to the learning outcome (verb) selected in prompt 4a (e.g., analyze, interpret…).
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edTPA Elementary Literacy Assessment Handbook
Planning Rubrics continued
Rubric 5: Planning Assessments to Monitor and Support Student Learning
How are the informal and formal assessments selected or designed to monitor students’ use of the essential
strategy and requisite skills to comprehend or compose text?
Level 1
Level 2
Level 3
Level 4
Level 5
The assessments only provide
evidence of students' use of
skills.
The assessments provide
limited evidence to monitor
students’ use of the essential
strategy OR skills during the
learning segment.
The assessments provide
evidence to monitor students’
use of the essential strategy
and skills during the learning
segment.
The assessments provide
multiple forms of evidence to
monitor students’ use of the
essential strategy and skills
throughout the learning
segment.
Level 4 plus:
The assessments are
strategically designed to allow
individuals or groups with
specific needs to demonstrate
their learning.
Assessment adaptations
required by IEP or 504 plans
are made.
Assessment adaptations
required by IEP or 504 plans
are made.
Assessment adaptations
required by IEP or 504 plans
are not made.
Assessment adaptations
required by IEP or 504 plans
are made.
Assessments are not aligned
with the central focus and
standards/objectives for the
learning segment.
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Task 2: Instructing and Engaging Students
in Learning
What Do I Need to Think About?
In Task 2: Instructing and Engaging Students in Learning, you will demonstrate how you
support and engage students in literacy learning. Before you begin your instruction, you
need to think about the following:
 What kind of learning environment do you want to develop in order to establish
respect and rapport, and to support students’ engagement in learning?
 What kinds of learning tasks actively engage students in the central focus of the
learning segment?
 How will you elicit and build on student responses in ways to develop and deepen
content understanding?
 In what ways will you connect new content to your students’ prior academic learning
and personal, cultural, or community assets during your instruction?
 How will you use evidence from your instruction to examine and change your
teaching practices to more effectively meet a variety of student learning needs?
What Do I Need to Do?
 Obtain required permission for videorecording. Before you record your video, ensure
that you have the appropriate permission from the parents/guardians of your students
and from adults who appear in the video. Adjust the camera angle to exclude individuals
for whom you do not have permission to film.
 Examine your plans for the learning segment and identify challenging learning tasks
in which you and students are actively engaged. The video clips you select for
submission should provide a sample of how you interact with students to develop their
literacy strategy and skills.
 Identify lessons to videorecord.
 Provide 1–2 clips (together totaling no more than 15 minutes) that demonstrate
how you interact with students in a positive literacy environment to develop an
essential literacy strategy and requisite skills. Your clips should show how you
model the strategy and support students to practice and independently apply
the essential literacy strategy to comprehend or compose text in meaningful
contexts.
 Determine whether you will feature the whole class or a targeted group of students
within the class.
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 (Optional) Provide evidence of students’ language use. You may provide
evidence of language use with your video clips from Task 2, an additional video clip
of one or more students using language within the learning segment (no more than
5 minutes in length), AND/OR through the student work samples analyzed in
Task 3.
 Video record your classroom teaching. Tips for videorecording your class are
available from your teacher preparation program.
 Select 1–2 video clips to submit and verify that the clips meet the following
requirements:
 A video clip must be continuous and unedited, with no interruption in the events.
 Check the video and sound quality to ensure that you and your students can be seen
and heard on the video clips you submit.
 Do not include the name of the state, school, or district in your video. Use first names
only for all individuals appearing in the video.
 Respond to the prompts listed in the Instruction Commentary section below after
viewing the video clips.
 Determine if additional information is needed to understand what you and the
students are doing in the video clips. For example, if there are graphics, texts, or
images that are not clearly visible in the video, or comments that are not clearly heard,
insert digital copies or transcriptions at the end of the Instruction Commentary (no more
than 2 pages).
See the Task 2: Artifacts and Commentary Specifications in the Elementary Literacy
Evidence Chart for instructions on electronic submission of evidence. This evidence
chart identifies templates, supported file types, number of files, response length, and
other important evidence specifications.
What Do I Need to Write?
Instruction Commentary
In Task 2: Instructing and Engaging Students in Learning, you will write a commentary,
responding to the prompts below. Your commentary should be no more than 6 singlespaced pages, including the prompts.
1. Which lesson or lessons are shown in the video clips? Identify the lesson(s) by
lesson plan number.
2. Promoting a Positive Learning Environment
In response to the prompt, refer to scenes in the video clips where you provided a
positive learning environment.
 How did you demonstrate mutual respect for, rapport with, and responsiveness to
students with varied needs and backgrounds, and challenge students to engage
in learning?
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3. Engaging Students in Learning
Refer to examples from the video clips in your responses to the prompts.
a. Explain how your instruction engaged students in developing an essential literacy
strategy and requisite skills.
b. Describe how your instruction linked students’ prior academic learning and
personal, cultural, and community assets with new learning.
4. Deepening Student Learning during Instruction
Refer to examples from the video clips in your explanations.
a. Explain how you elicited and built on student responses to promote thinking and
apply the literacy strategy using requisite skills to comprehend or compose text.
b. Explain how you modeled the literacy strategy and supported students as they
practiced and applied the literacy strategy in a meaning-based context.
5. Analyzing Teaching
Refer to examples from the video clips in your responses to the prompts.
a. What changes would you make to your instruction—for the whole class and/or for
students who need greater support or challenge—to better support student
learning of the central focus (e.g., missed opportunities)?
Consider the variety of learners in your class who may require different
strategies/support (e.g., students with IEPs, English language learners,
struggling readers, underperforming students or those with gaps in academic
knowledge, and/or gifted students).
b. Why do you think these changes would improve student learning? Support your
explanation with evidence of student learning and principles from theory and/or
research.
How Will the Evidence of My Teaching Practice Be
Assessed?
For Task 2: Instructing and Engaging Students in Learning, your evidence will be assessed
using rubrics 6–10, which appear in the following pages. When preparing your artifacts and
commentaries, refer to the rubrics frequently to guide your thinking, instruction, and writing.
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Instruction Rubrics
Rubric 6: Learning Environment
How does the candidate demonstrate a positive literacy learning environment that supports students’
engagement in learning?
Level 1
Level 2
Level 3
Level 4
Level 5
The clips reveal evidence of
disrespectful interactions
between teacher and students
or between students.
The candidate demonstrates
respect for students.
The candidate demonstrates
rapport with and respect for
students.
The candidate demonstrates
rapport with and respect
for students.
The candidate demonstrates
rapport with and respect for
students.
Candidate provides a positive,
low-risk social environment
that reveals mutual respect
among students.
Candidate provides a
challenging learning
environment that promotes
mutual respect among
students.
Candidate provides a
challenging learning
environment that provides
opportunities to express
varied perspectives and
promotes mutual respect
among students.
OR
Candidate allows disruptive
behavior to interfere with
student learning.
Candidate provides a
learning environment that
serves primarily to control
student behavior, and
minimally supports the
learning goals.
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Instruction Rubrics continued
Rubric 7: Engaging Students in Learning
How does the candidate actively engage students in integrating strategies and skills to comprehend or
compose text?
Level 1
Level 2
Level 3
Level 4
Level 5
In the clips, students are
participating in tasks that
are vaguely or superficially
related to the central focus.
In the clips, students are
participating in learning tasks
focusing primarily on skills
with little attention to the
essential strategy for
comprehending or composing
text.
In the clips, students are
engaged in learning tasks that
address their
understandings of requisite
skills and the essential
literacy strategy for
comprehending or composing
text.
In the clips, students are
engaged in learning tasks that
integrate their understandings
of requisite skills and the
essential literacy strategy for
comprehending or composing
text.
In the clips, students are
engaged in learning tasks that
deepen and extend their
understandings of requisite
skills and the essential literacy
strategy for comprehending or
composing text.
There is little or no evidence
that the candidate links
students’ prior academic
learning or personal, cultural,
or community assets with new
learning.
Candidate makes vague or
superficial links between
prior academic learning and
new literacy learning.
Candidate links prior
academic learning to new
learning.
Candidate links both prior
academic learning and
personal, cultural, or
community assets to new
learning.
Candidate prompts students
to link prior academic learning
and personal, cultural, or
community assets to new
learning.
OR
Links cause student
confusion.
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Instruction Rubrics continued
Rubric 8: Deepening Student Learning How does the candidate elicit student responses to promote thinking and develop literacy skills and the essential
strategy to comprehend and/or compose text?
Level 1
Level 2
Level 3
Level 4
Level 5
Candidate does most of the
talking and the students
provide few responses.
Candidate primarily asks
surface-level questions and
evaluates student responses
as correct or incorrect.
Candidate elicits student
responses to support use of
literacy skills or the
essential strategy.
Candidate elicits and builds
on students’ responses to
explicitly portray, extend, or
clarify the literacy strategy.
Candidate facilitates
interactions among students
so they can evaluate their
own abilities to apply the
essential strategy in
meaningful reading or
writing contexts.
OR
Candidate responses include
significant content
inaccuracies that will lead to
student misunderstandings.
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edTPA Elementary Literacy Assessment Handbook
Instruction Rubrics continued
Rubric 9: Subject-Specific Pedagogy How does the candidate support students to apply the essential literacy strategy?
Level 1
Level 2
Level 3
Level 4
Level 5
Candidate does not teach
students how to use the key
strategy to support
comprehension or composition.
Candidate models the key
strategy or skills without
opportunities for students to
practice or apply them.
Candidate models the key
strategy with limited
opportunities for practice.
Candidate explicitly teaches
students how to apply the
strategy and provides
opportunities for guided
practice.
Level 4 plus:
Candidate explicitly teaches
students when to apply the
strategy in meaningful
contexts.
OR
There is a clear mismatch
between or among strategies,
skills, and students’ readiness
to learn.
OR
Materials used in the clips
include significant content
inaccuracies that will lead to
student misunderstandings.
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Instruction Rubrics continued
Rubric 10: Analyzing Teaching Effectiveness
How does the candidate use evidence to evaluate and change teaching practice to meet students’ varied
learning needs?
Level 1
Level 2
Level 3
Candidate suggests changes
unrelated to evidence of
student learning.
Candidate proposes changes
that are focused primarily on
improving directions for
learning tasks or
task/behavior management.
Candidate proposes changes
that address students’
collective learning needs
related to the central focus.
Candidate makes superficial
connections to research
and/or theory.
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Level 4
Candidate proposes changes
that address individual and
collective learning needs
related to the central focus.
Level 5
Level 4 plus:
Candidate justifies changes
using principles of research
and/or theory.
Candidate makes
connections to research
and/or theory.
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Task 3: Assessing Student Learning
What Do I Need to Think About?
In Task 3: Assessing Student Learning, you will analyze both student learning and student
use of language. Before you begin the analysis, you need to think about the following:
 How will you gather evidence and make sense of what students have learned?
 How will you provide meaningful feedback to your students?
 How will you use evidence of what students know and are able to do to plan next
steps in instruction?
 How will you identify evidence and explain students’ use of language that
demonstrates the development of content understanding?
What Do I Need to Do?
 Determine which assessment from your learning segment you will use to evaluate
your students’ developing knowledge and skills. It should be an assessment that is
completed by the entire class featured in the learning segment. The assessment should
reflect the work of individuals, not groups, but may be individual work from a group task.
The assessment should provide opportunities for students to demonstrate
 the essential literacy strategy
 requisite skills
 Define and submit the evaluation criteria you will use to analyze student learning
related to the literacy understandings described above.
 Collect and analyze student work from the selected assessment to identify
quantitative and qualitative patterns of learning within, and across learners in, the class.
 Select 3 student work samples that represent the patterns of learning (i.e., what
individuals or groups generally understood and what a number of students were still
struggling to understand) you identified in your assessment analysis. These students will
be your focus students for this task. At least one of the students must have specific
learning needs, for example, a student with an IEP (Individualized Education Program),
an English language learner, a struggling reader or writer, an underperforming student or
a student with gaps in academic knowledge, and/or a gifted student needing greater
support or challenge.
 Document the feedback you gave to each of the 3 focus students either on the work
sample itself, as an audio clip, or as a video clip.
 If you submit feedback as a video or audio clip and your comments to focus
students cannot be clearly heard, attach transcriptions of your comments (no more
than 2 pages) to the end of the Assessment Commentary.
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 If you submit feedback to focus students as a video or audio clip and additional
students are present, clearly identify which students are your focus students at
the end of the Assessment Commentary (in no more than two sentences).
 Respond to the prompts listed in the Assessment Commentary section below after
analyzing student work from the selected assessment.
 Include and submit the chosen assessment, including the directions/prompts
provided to students. Attach the assessment (no more than 5 pages) to the end of
the Assessment Commentary.
 Provide evidence of students’ understanding and use of the targeted academic
language function. You may choose evidence from the video clips submitted in Task 2,
an additional video clip of one or more students using language within the learning
segment (no more than 5 minutes in length), AND/OR student work samples
submitted in Task 3.
See the Task 3: Artifacts and Commentary Specifications in the Elementary Literacy
Evidence Chart for instructions on electronic submission of evidence. This evidence
chart identifies templates, supported file types, number of files, response length, and
other important evidence specifications.
What Do I Need to Write?
Assessment Commentary
In Task 3: Assessing Student Learning, you will write a commentary, responding to the
prompts below. Your commentary should be no more than 10 single-spaced pages,
including the prompts.
1. Analyzing Student Learning
a. Identify the specific standards/objectives measured by the assessment you
chose for analysis.
b. Provide the evaluation criteria you used to analyze student learning.
c. Provide a graphic (table or chart) or narrative that summarizes student learning
for your whole class. Be sure to summarize student learning for all evaluation
criteria described above.
d. Use evidence found in the 3 student work samples and the whole class
summary to analyze the patterns of learning for the whole class and differences
for groups or individual learners relative to
 the essential literacy strategy
 requisite skills
Consider what students understand and do well, and where they continue to
struggle (e.g., common errors, confusions, need for greater challenge).
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2. Feedback to Guide Further Learning
Refer to specific evidence of submitted feedback to support your explanations.
a. In what form did you submit your evidence of feedback for the 3 focus students?
 Written directly on work samples or in a separate document;
 In audio files; or
 In video clips from the instruction task (provide a time-stamp reference) or in
a separate video clip
b. Explain how feedback provided to the 3 focus students addresses their individual
strengths and needs relative to the standards/objectives measured.
c. Describe how you will support students to apply feedback to guide improvement,
either within the learning segment or at a later time.
3. Evidence of Language Understanding and Use
You may provide evidence of students’ language use from ONE, TWO OR
ALL THREE of the following sources:
1. Use video clips from Task 2 and provide time-stamp references for language
use.
2. Submit an additional video file named “Language Use” of no more than 5
minutes in length and provide time-stamp references for student language use
(this can be footage of one or more students’ language use). Submit the clip in
Task 3 Part B.
3. Use the student work samples analyzed in Task 3 and cite language use.
When responding to the prompt below, use concrete examples from the video clips
(using time-stamp references) and/or student work samples as evidence. Evidence
from the clips may focus on one or more students.
 Explain the extent to which your students were able to use or struggled to use
language (selected function, vocabulary, and additional identified language
demands from Task 1) to develop content understandings.
4. Using Assessment to Inform Instruction
a. Based on your analysis of student learning presented in prompts 1c–d, describe
next steps for instruction
 for the whole class
 for the 3 focus students and other individuals/groups with specific needs
Consider the variety of learners in your class who may require different
strategies/support (e.g., students with IEPs, English language learners,
struggling readers, underperforming students or those with gaps in academic
knowledge, and/or gifted students needing greater support or challenge).
b. Explain how these next steps follow from your analysis of student learning.
Support your explanation with principles from research and/or theory.
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How Will the Evidence of My Teaching Practice Be
Assessed?
For Task 3: Assessing Student Learning, your evidence will be assessed using rubrics 11–
15, which appear in the following pages. When preparing your artifacts and commentaries,
refer to the rubrics frequently to guide your thinking, planning, instruction, assessment, and
writing.
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edTPA Elementary Literacy Assessment Handbook
Assessment Rubrics
Rubric 11: Analysis of Student Learning
How does the candidate analyze evidence of student learning?
Level 1
Level 2
Level 3
Level 4
Level 5
The analysis is superficial or
not supported by either
student work samples or the
summary of student
learning.
The analysis focuses on what
students did right OR wrong
using evidence from the
summary or work samples.
The analysis focuses on what
students did right AND wrong
and is supported with
evidence from the summary
and work samples.
Analysis uses specific
examples from work
samples to demonstrate
patterns of student learning
consistent with the
summary.
Analysis uses specific
evidence from work samples to
demonstrate the
connections between
quantitative and qualitative
patterns of student learning
for individuals or groups.
Analysis includes some
differences in whole class
learning.
Patterns are described for
whole class.
The evaluation criteria are not
aligned with the learning
objectives and/or analysis.
OR
The analysis is not aligned with
the learning objectives.
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edTPA Elementary Literacy Assessment Handbook
Assessment Rubrics continued
Rubric 12: Providing Feedback to Guide Further Learning
What type of feedback does the candidate provide to focus students?
Level 1
Level 2
Level 3
Level 4
Level 5
Feedback is unrelated to the
learning objectives OR is
inconsistent with the
analysis of the student’s
learning.
Feedback addresses only
errors OR strengths
generally related to the
learning objectives.
Feedback is accurate and
primarily focuses on either
errors OR strengths related to
specific learning objectives,
with some attention to the
other.
Feedback is accurate and
addresses both strengths
and needs related to specific
learning objectives.
Level 4 plus:
Candidate describes how s/he
will guide focus students to
use feedback to evaluate
their own strengths and
needs.
OR
Feedback contains
significant content
inaccuracies.
OR
Feedback is inconsistently
provided to focus students.
Feedback is provided
consistently for the focus
students.
Feedback is provided
consistently for the focus
students.
OR
Feedback is expressed in a
way that is disrespectful to
students or is developmentally
inappropriate.
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edTPA Elementary Literacy Assessment Handbook
Assessment Rubrics continued
Rubric 13: Student Use of Feedback
How does the candidate provide opportunities for focus students to use the feedback to guide their further
learning?
Level 1
Level 2
Level 3
Level 4
Level 5
Opportunities for applying
feedback are not described.
Candidate provides vague
explanation for how focus
students will use feedback
to complete current or future
assignments.
Candidate describes how
focus students will use
feedback on their strengths
and weaknesses to revise
their current work, as
needed.
Candidate describes how s/he
will support focus students to
use feedback on their
strengths and weaknesses to
deepen understandings and
skills related to their current
work.
Level 4 plus:
Candidate guides focus
students to generalize
feedback beyond the current
work sample.
OR
Candidate provides limited
or no feedback to inform
student learning.
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Assessment Rubrics continued
Rubric 14: Analyzing Students’ Language Use and Literacy Learning
How does the candidate analyze students' use of language to develop content understanding?
Level 1
Level 2
Level 3
Level 4
Level 5
Candidate identifies
language use that is
superficially related or
unrelated to the language
demands (function, 8
vocabulary and additional
demands).
Candidate provides
evidence that students use
vocabulary associated with
the language function.
Candidate explains and
provides evidence of students’
use of the language function
as well as vocabulary OR
additional language
demand(s). 9
Candidate explains and
provides evidence of students’
use of the language function,
vocabulary, and additional
language demand(s) in ways
that develop content
understandings.
Level 4 plus:
Candidate explains and
provides evidence of
language use and content
learning for students with
varied needs.
OR
Candidate does not address
students’ repeated misuse
of vocabulary.
8
The selected language function is the verb identified in the Planning Commentary Prompt 4a (analyze, explain, interpret, etc.).
9
These are the additional language demands identified in the Planning Commentary Prompt 4c (vocabulary and/or symbols, plus either syntax or discourse).
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edTPA Elementary Literacy Assessment Handbook
Assessment Rubrics continued
Rubric 15: Using Assessment to Inform Instruction
How does the candidate use the analysis of what students know and are able to do to plan next steps in
instruction?
Level 1
Level 2
Level 3
Level 4
Level 5
Next steps do not follow from
the analysis.
Next steps focus on
repeating instruction,
pacing, or classroom
management issues.
Next steps propose general
support that improves
student learning related to
 the essential literacy
strategy
Next steps provide targeted
support to individuals or
groups to improve their
learning relative to:
 the essential literacy
strategy
 requisite skills
Next steps provide targeted
support to individuals and
groups to improve their
learning relative to:
 the essential literacy
strategy
 requisite skills
Next steps are loosely
connected with research
and/or theory.
Next steps are justified with
principles from research and/or
theory.
OR
Next steps are not relevant to
the standards and learning
objectives assessed.
OR
Next steps are not described
in sufficient detail to
understand them.
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OR
 requisite skills
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Professional Responsibilities
Refer to the following table for an overview of your professional responsibilities in
developing evidence for edTPA. If you are submitting artifacts and commentaries for official
scoring, refer to www.edTPA.com, for complete and current information before beginning
your work. Included here is important information and policies such as submission
requirements and deadlines, registration agreements, attestations, permissions, and
confidentiality. Whether or not you are submitting for official scoring, you should fulfill the
professional responsibilities described below.
Responsibility
Description
Protect
confidentiality
To protect confidentiality, please remove your name and use pseudonyms or general
references (e.g., “the district”) for your state, school, district, and cooperating teacher. Mask
or remove all names on any typed or written material (e.g., commentaries, lesson plans,
student work samples) that could identify individuals or institutions. During video recording,
use students’ first names only.
To ensure confidentiality of your students and yourself, do not share your video on any
publicly accessible platforms or websites (YouTube, Facebook, etc.).
Before you record your classroom instruction, ensure that you have the appropriate
permission from the parents/guardians of your students and from adults who appear in the
video recording.
Your program will provide you with procedures and necessary forms to obtain these
permissions, according to agreements with the school or district in which you are student
teaching or completing your internship.
If your program does not provide the necessary forms, you may refer to the sample forms
found on www.edTPA.com.
The release forms are not to be submitted with your materials, but you should follow your
campus policy for retaining them.
Acquire
permissions
Cite sources
Provide citations for the source of all materials that you did not create (e.g., published texts,
websites, and material from other educators). List all citations by lesson number at the end
of the Planning Commentary.
Align instruction
with state standards
As part of the assessment, you will document the alignment of your lesson plans with stateadopted academic content standards or Common Core State Standards that are the target
of student learning. Refer to the education agency website for your state to obtain copies of
relevant standards for this assessment.
Follow the
guidelines for
candidate support
at www.edtpa.com
Follow the guidelines for candidate support found at www.edTPA.com as you develop your
evidence for edTPA. Although you may seek and receive appropriate support from your
university supervisors, cooperating/master teachers, university instructors, or peers during
this process, the ultimate responsibility for completing this assessment lies with you.
Therefore, when you submit your completed work, you must be able to confirm your
adherence with certain statements, such as the following:
 I have primary responsibility for teaching the students/class during the learning segment
profiled in this assessment.
 I have not previously taught this learning segment to the student/class.
 The video clips submitted show me teaching the students/class profiled in the evidence
submitted.
 The student work included in the documentation is that of my students, completed
during the learning segment documented in this assessment.
 I am sole author of the commentaries and other written responses to prompts and other
requests for information in this assessment.
 Appropriate citations have been made for all materials in the assessment whose
sources are from published text, the Internet, or other educators.
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Elementary Literacy Context for Learning
Information
Use the Context for Learning Information to supply information about your school/classroom
context.
About the School Where You Are Teaching
1. In what type of school do you teach?
Elementary school:
Middle school:
Other (please describe):
Urban:
Suburban:
Rural:
2. List any special features of your school or classroom setting (e.g., charter, coteaching, themed magnet, classroom aide, bilingual, team taught with a special
education teacher) that will affect your teaching in this learning segment.
3. Describe any district, school, or cooperating teacher requirements or expectations
that might affect your planning or delivery of instruction, such as required curricula,
pacing plan, use of specific instructional strategies, or standardized tests.
About the Class Featured in This Assessment
1. How much time is devoted each day to literacy instruction in your classroom?
2. Is there any ability grouping or tracking in literacy? If so, please describe how it
affects your class.
3. Identify any textbook or instructional program you primarily use for literacy
instruction. If a textbook, please provide the title, publisher, and date of publication.
4. List other resources (e.g., electronic whiteboard, classroom library or other text sets,
on-line professional resources) you use for literacy instruction in this class.
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edTPA Elementary Literacy Assessment Handbook
About the Students in the Class Featured in This Assessment
1. Grade level(s): _______________________________
2. Number of
 students in the class _____
 males _____ females _____
3. Complete the chart below to summarize required or needed supports,
accommodations or modifications for your students that will affect your instruction in
this learning segment. As needed, consult with your cooperating teacher to complete
the chart. Some rows have been completed in italics as examples. Use as many
rows as you need.
Consider the variety of learners in your class who may require different
strategies/supports or accommodations/modifications to instruction or
assessment.
 English language learners
 Gifted students needing greater support or challenge
 Students with Individualized Education Programs (IEPs) or 504 plans
 Struggling readers
 Underperforming students or those with gaps in academic knowledge
Students with Specific Learning Needs
IEP/504 Plans:
Classifications/Needs
Example: Visual processing
Number of
Students
2
Supports, Accommodations,
Modifications, Pertinent IEP Goals
Close monitoring, large print text,
window card to isolate text
Other Learning Needs
Number of
Students
5
Supports, Accommodations,
Modifications
Leveled text, targeted guided reading,
ongoing reading assessment (e.g.,
running records, miscue, conferencing)
Example: Struggling readers
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edTPA Elementary Literacy Assessment Handbook
Elementary Literacy Evidence Chart
Your evidence must be submitted to the electronic portfolio management system used by your teacher preparation program. Your
submission must conform to the artifact and commentary specifications for each task. This section provides instructions for all
evidence types as well as a description of supported file types for evidence submission, number of files, response lengths, and
other information regarding format specifications.
Task 1: Artifacts and Commentary Specifications
What to
Submit
Supported File
Types
Part A: Context for
Learning
Information
(template provided)
Number of Files
Response
Length
Additional Information
Min
Max
.doc; .docx; .odt; .pdf
1
1
No more than 3
pages, including
prompts
 Use Arial 11-point type.
 Single space with 1" margins on all sides.
Part B: Lesson
Plans for Learning
Segment
.doc; .docx; .odt; .pdf
1
1
No more than 4
pages per lesson
 Submit 3–5 lesson plans in 1 file.
 Within the file, label each lesson plan (Lesson 1, Lesson 2, etc.).
 All rationale or explanation for plans should be written in the
Planning Commentary and removed from lesson plans.
Part C:
Instructional
Materials
.doc; .docx; .odt; .pdf
1
1
No more than 5
pages of KEY
instructional materials
per lesson plan
 Submit materials in 1 file.
 Within the file, label materials by corresponding lesson (Lesson 1
Instructional Materials, Lesson 2 Instructional Materials, etc.).
 Order materials as they are used in the learning segment.
Part D:
Assessments
.doc; .docx; .odt; .pdf
1
1
N/A
 Submit assessments in 1 file.
 Within the file, label assessments by corresponding lesson
(Lesson 1 Assessments, Lesson 2 Assessments, etc.).
 Order assessments as they are used in the learning segment.
Part E: Planning
Commentary
(template provided)
.doc; .docx; .odt; .pdf
1
1
No more than 9
pages, including
prompts
 Use Arial 11-point type.
 Single space with 1" margins on all sides.
 Respond to prompts before teaching the learning segment.
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edTPA Elementary Literacy Assessment Handbook
Task 2: Artifacts and Commentary Specifications
What to
Submit
Supported File
Types
Number of Files
Response
Length
Additional Information
Part A: Video Clips
flv, asf, qt, mov, mpg,
mpeg, avi, wmv, mp4,
m4v
1
2
No more than
15 minutes total
running time
 Before you record your video, obtain permission from the
parents/guardians of your students and from adults who appear on
the video.
 Refer to Task 2, What Do I Need to Do? for video clip content and
requirements.
 When naming each clip file, include the number of the lesson
shown in the video clip.
Part B: Instruction
Commentary
(template
provided)
.doc; .docx; .odt; .pdf
1
1
No more than 6
pages of
commentary,
including prompts
 Use Arial 11-point type.
 Single space with 1" margins on all sides.
Min
Max
If needed, no more
than 2 pages of
supporting
documentation
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IMPORTANT:
 Insert documentation at the end of the commentary file if
 graphics, texts, or images that you or the students are using are
not clearly visible in the video
 portions of the video are inaudible
 If submitting documentation, include the video clip number, lesson
number, and explanatory text (e.g., “Clip 1, lesson 2, text from a
whiteboard that is not visible in the video,” “Clip 2, lesson 4,
transcription of a student response that is inaudible”).
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edTPA Elementary Literacy Assessment Handbook
Task 3: Artifacts and Commentary Specifications
What to
Submit
Supported File
Types
Number of Files
Part A: Student
Work Samples
.doc; .docx; .odt; .pdf
3
Part B: Evidence
of Feedback
For written feedback
not written on the
work samples: .doc;
.docx; .odt; .pdf
0
And, if included,
video evidence of
academic
language use
Response
Length
Additional Information
3
N/A
 Use correction fluid, tape, or a felt-tip marker to mask or remove
students’ names, your name, and the name of the school
before copying/scanning any work samples.
 On each work sample, indicate the student number (Student 1 Work
Sample, Student 2 Work Sample, or Student 3 Work Sample)
and refer to them accordingly in the Assessment Commentary.
 When naming each work sample file, include the student number.
 If your students’ writing is illegible, write a transcription directly on
the work sample.
4
N/A
 Document the location of your evidence of feedback in the
Assessment Commentary.
 If feedback is not written on the student work samples or recorded
on the video clips, submit only 1 file for each student—a document,
video file, OR audio file—and indicate the student number (Student
1 Feedback, Student 2 Feedback, or Student 3 Feedback) in the
corresponding feedback.
 When naming each feedback file, include the student number.
 If you submit feedback as a video or audio clip and your comments
cannot be clearly heard, attach transcriptions of your comments
(no more than 2 pages) to the end of the Assessment
Commentary.
 For Academic Language – If you choose to submit a video clip of
student language use, it should be no more than 5 minutes, with a
time-stamp reference for the evidence of language use described
in the Assessment Commentary.
Min
Max
For audio feedback:
flv, asf, wmv, qt, mov,
mpg, avi, mp3, wav,
mp4, wma
For video clips
(feedback and/or
language use): flv,
asf, qt, mov, mpg,
mpeg, avi, wmv, mp4,
m4v
(Continued on next page)
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edTPA Elementary Literacy Assessment Handbook
Task 3: Artifacts and Commentary Specifications (continued)
What to
Submit
Supported File
Types
Number of Files
Part C:
Assessment
Commentary
(template
provided)
.doc; .docx; .odt; .pdf
1
1
 Use Arial 11-point type.
No more than 10
pages of commentary,  Single space with 1" margins on all sides.
including prompts
IMPORTANT: Insert a copy of the chosen assessment, including
directions/prompts provided to students.
Plus
 no more than 5
pages for the
chosen
assessment,
 if necessary, no
more than 2
pages of feedback
transcriptions
Part D: Evaluation
Criteria
.doc; .docx; .odt; .pdf
1
1
N/A
Min
Max
Copyright © 2013 Board of Trustees of the Leland Stanford Junior University.
All rights reserved.
Response
Length
Additional Information
 Indicate the lesson number on the corresponding evaluation criteria
(Lesson 1 Evaluation Criteria, Lesson 2 Evaluation Criteria, etc.).
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edTPA Elementary Literacy Assessment Handbook
Elementary Literacy Glossary
Source citations for glossary entries are provided as footnotes in this section.
academic language: Oral and written language used for academic purposes. Academic
language is the means by which students develop and express content understandings.
Academic language represents the language of the discipline that students need to learn
and use to participate and engage in meaningful ways in the content area. There are
language demands that teachers need to consider as they plan to support student learning
of content. These language demands include vocabulary, language functions, syntax,
and discourse.
 discourse: Discourse includes the structures of written and oral language, as well as
how members of the discipline talk, write, and participate in knowledge construction.
Discipline-specific discourse has distinctive features or ways of structuring oral or
written language (text structures) that provide useful ways for the content to be
communicated. 10 In the language arts and literacy, there are structures for
composing, interpreting, and comprehending expository, narrative, poetic,
journalistic, and graphic print materials as well as video and live presentations. If the
language function is to interpret character development, then appropriate language
forms could include written essays (with particular ways of citing textual evidence) or
pattern sentences like “The author used (action, dialogue, and/or description) to
introduce (main character). One example of (action, dialogue, and/or description)
was ____________, which suggested that the character was _______________.”
 language demands: 11 Specific ways that academic language (vocabulary,
functions, discourse, syntax) is used by students to participate in learning tasks
through reading, writing, listening, and/or speaking to demonstrate their disciplinary
understanding.
 language functions: The content and language focus of the learning task
represented by the active verbs within the learning outcomes. Common language
functions in the language arts include identifying main ideas and details; analyzing
and interpreting characters and plots; arguing a position or point of view;
predicting; evaluating or interpreting an author’s purpose, message, and use of
setting, mood, or tone; comparing ideas within and between texts; and so on.
 syntax: The set of conventions for organizing symbols, words, and phrases together
into structures (e.g., sentences, graphs, tables). 12
 vocabulary: Includes words and phrases that are used within disciplines including:
(1) words and phrases with subject-specific meanings that differ from meanings used
in everyday life (e.g., table); (2) general academic vocabulary used across disciplines
10
Quinn, H., Lee, O., & Valdés, G. (2012). Language demands and opportunities in relation to next generation science
standards for ELLs. Retrieved from http://ell.stanford.edu/sites/default/files/pdf/academic-papers/03Quinn%20Lee%20Valdes%20Language%20and%20Opportunities%20in%20Science%20FINAL.pdf
11
O'Hara, S., Pritchard, R., & Zwiers, J. (2012). Identifying academic language demands in support of the common core
standards. ASCD Express, 7(17). Retrieved from http://www.ascd.org/ascd-express/vol7/717-ohara.aspx
12
Zwiers, J. (2008). Building academic language: Essential practices for content classrooms. San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass.
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edTPA Elementary Literacy Assessment Handbook
(e.g., compare, analyze, evaluate); and (3) subject-specific words defined for use in
the discipline. 13
aligned: Consistently addressing the same/similar learning outcomes for students.
artifacts: Authentic work completed by you and your students, including lesson plans,
copies of instructional and assessment materials, video clips of your teaching, and student
work samples. Artifacts are submitted as part of your evidence.
assessment (formal and informal): “[R]efer[s] to all those activities undertaken by
teachers and by their students . . . that provide information to be used as feedback to modify
the teaching and learning activities.” 14 Assessments provide evidence of students’ prior
knowledge, thinking, or learning in order to evaluate what students understand and how they
are thinking. Informal assessments may include, for example, student questions and
responses during instruction and teacher observations of students as they work. Formal
assessments may include, for example, quizzes, homework assignments, journals, and
projects.
assets (knowledge of students):
 personal: Refers to specific background information that students bring to the
learning environment. Students may bring interests, knowledge, everyday
experiences, and family backgrounds, and so on, that a teacher can draw upon to
support learning.
 cultural: Refers to the cultural backgrounds and practices that students bring to the
learning environment, such as traditions, languages, world views, literature, art, and
so on, that a teacher can draw upon to support learning.
 community: Refers to common backgrounds and experiences that students bring
from the community where they live, such as resources, local landmarks, community
events and practices, and so on, that a teacher can draw upon to support learning.
central focus: A description of the important understandings and core concepts that you
want students to develop within the learning segment. The central focus should go beyond a
list of facts and skills, align with content standards and learning objectives, and address the
subject-specific components in the learning segment. The subject-specific components for
elementary literacy include an essential literacy strategy and the associated requisite skills
for comprehending or composing text. For example, the central focus for a primary grade
learning segment might be summarizing narratives. The learning segment would focus on
the essential literacy strategy (summarizing) and requisite skills (e.g., decoding, recalling,
sequencing). The central focus for an upper elementary learning segment might be
persuasive writing. The learning segment would focus on the essential literacy strategy
(using evidence to support an argument) and requisite skills (e.g., writing paragraphs, using
correct verb tense, or other conventions). See the Making Good Choices resource for
suggestions on selecting your central focus.
13
Quinn, H., Lee, O., & Valdés, G. (2012). Language demands and opportunities in relation to next generation science
standards for ELLs. Retrieved from http://ell.stanford.edu/sites/default/files/pdf/academic-papers/03Quinn%20Lee%20Valdes%20Language%20and%20Opportunities%20in%20Science%20FINAL.pdf
14
Black, P., & Wiliam, D. (1998). Inside the black box: Raising standards through classroom assessment. Phi Delta Kappan.
Retrieved from https://www.measuredprogress.org/documents/10157/15653/InsideBlackBox.pdf
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edTPA Elementary Literacy Assessment Handbook
commentary: Submitted as part of each task and, along with artifacts, make up your
evidence. The commentaries should be written to explain the rationale behind your teaching
decisions and to analyze and reflect on what you have learned about your teaching practice
and your students’ learning.
developmental approximations: Include transitional spelling or other attempts to use skills
or strategies just beyond a student’s current level/capability.
engaging students in learning: Using instructional and motivational strategies that
promote students’ active involvement in learning tasks that increase their knowledge, skills,
and abilities related to specific learning objectives. Engagement in learning contrasts with
student participation in learning tasks that are not well designed and/or implemented and do
not increase student learning.
evaluation criteria: Performance indicators or dimensions that are used to assess evidence
of student learning. They indicate the qualities by which levels of performance can be
differentiated and that anchor judgments about the learner’s degree of success on an
assessment. Evaluation criteria can be represented in various ways, such as a rubric, a
point system for different levels of performance, or rules for awarding full versus partial
credit. Evaluation criteria may examine correctness/accuracy, cognitive complexity,
sophistication or elaboration of responses, or quality of explanations.
evidence: Consists of artifacts that document how you planned and implemented
instruction AND commentaries that explain your plans and what is seen in the video
recording(s) or examine what you learned about your teaching practice and your students’
learning. Evidence should demonstrate your ability to design lesson plans with instructional
supports that deepen student learning, use knowledge of your students to inform instruction,
foster a positive learning environment that promotes student learning, monitor and assess
student progress toward learning objectives, and analyze your teaching effectiveness. Your
evidence must be submitted electronically using the electronic portfolio management system
used by your teacher preparation program.
learning environment: The designed physical and emotional context, established and
maintained throughout the learning segment to support a positive and productive learning
experience for students.
learning objectives: Student learning outcomes to be achieved by the end of the lesson or
learning segment.
learning segment: A set of 3–5 lessons that build one upon another toward a central focus,
with a clearly defined beginning and end.
learning task: Includes activities, discussions, or other modes of participation that engage
students to develop, practice, and apply skills and knowledge related to a specific learning
goal. Learning tasks may be scaffolded to connect prior knowledge to new knowledge and
often include formative assessment. A sample literacy learning task for fifth grade focused
on writing an essay with an argument structure could be a discussion about a topic for which
students have strong opinions (e.g., school uniforms) and draw from their everyday
experiences constructing arguments to introduce the features of the genre. Over a unit of
instruction, the teacher models the various features, students read and analyze argument
text on a variety of topics, and develop their own argument essay.
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edTPA Elementary Literacy Assessment Handbook
literacy skills: Specific knowledge needed for reading and writing including
phonemic/phonological awareness; print concepts; decoding; word analysis; sight-word
recognition; and spelling, punctuation, or other language conventions.
literacy strategy: An approach selected deliberately by a reader or writer to comprehend or
compose text. When students are able to select and use strategies automatically, they have
achieved independence in using the strategy to accomplish reading and writing goals.
Example strategies for reading include summarizing or retelling, comparing and contrasting
firsthand and secondhand accounts of the same event, using evidence to predict,
interpreting character’s feelings, or drawing conclusions from informational text. Example
strategies for writing include organizing ideas before writing, note taking from informational
text to support drafting a topic, using graphic organizers to organize writing, using a rubric to
revise a draft, or using quotes as evidence to support an argument.
misconceptions: Include confusions about a strategy or skill (e.g., misunderstandings
about text purpose and structure, application of a skill, multiple meaning words).
patterns of learning: Includes both quantitative and qualitative consistencies for different
groups of students and individuals across the whole class. Quantitative patterns indicate the
number of similar correct responses or errors across or within student assessments.
Qualitative patterns include descriptions of understandings and/or misunderstandings,
partial understandings, and/or attempts at applying a strategy that underlies the quantitative
patterns.
planned supports: Instructional strategies, learning tasks and materials, and other
resources deliberately designed to facilitate student learning of the central focus.
prior academic learning and prerequisite skills: Includes students’ content knowledge
and skills as well as academic experiences developed prior to the learning segment.
rapport: A close and harmonious relationship in which the people or groups understand
each other’s feelings or ideas and communicate well with each other.
reading/writing connections: Support students’ literacy development through an explicit
understanding that many of the skills that are taught in reading instruction are also beneficial
to young writers. Students gain insight on how the processes of reading and writing are
interdependent, thereby reinforcing their understanding of the varied purposes of texts, how
texts are organized, how to make meaning from text, and how writers develop their craft.
Examples of learning tasks that support reading/writing connections include reading or
researching informational text to inform an essay; journal writing to make predictions;
making personal or text-to-text connections; writing book reviews or alternative endings to
stories; or writing in a style that emulates a model.
requisite skills: Literacy skills students will develop and practice while learning a literacy
strategy in the learning segment. Not to be confused with prerequisite skills, which are
developed before the learning segment begins.
respect: A positive feeling of esteem or deference for a person and specific actions and
conduct representative of that esteem. Respect can be a specific feeling of regard for the
actual qualities of the one respected. It can also be conduct in accord with a specific ethic of
respect. Rude conduct is usually considered to indicate a lack of respect, disrespect,
whereas actions that honor somebody or something indicate respect. Note that respectful
actions and conduct are culturally defined and may be context dependent.
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edTPA Elementary Literacy Assessment Handbook
rubrics: Subject-specific evaluation criteria used to score your performance on edTPA.
These rubrics are included in the handbook following the directions for each task. The
descriptors in the five-level rubrics address a wide range of performance, beginning with the
knowledge and skills of a novice not ready to teach (Level 1) and extending to the advanced
practices of a highly accomplished beginner (Level 5).
variety of learners: Students in your class who may require different strategies or support.
These students include, but are not limited to, students with IEPs, English language
learners, struggling readers, underperforming students or those with gaps in academic
knowledge, and/or gifted students.
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