User manual | Porter-Cable 4113 Saw User Manual

Porter-Cable 4113 Saw User Manual
SUPPLEMENTARY
INSTRUCTION
MANUAL
DOVETAIL JIG
MODELS 4210 & 4212
To learn more about Porter-Cable
visit our website at:
http://www.porter-cable.com
IMPORTANT
Please make certain that the person who is
to use this equipment carefully reads and
understands these instructions before
starting operations.
The Model and Serial No. plate is located on the main
housing of the tool. Record these numbers in the
spaces below and retain for future reference.
Model No. _____________________________________
Type __________________________________________
Copyright © 2005 Porter-Cable Corporation
Serial No.______________________________________
Part No. A06477 - 02-23-05
TABLE OF CONTENTS
SAFETY GUIDELINES
3
IMPORTANT SAFETY INSTRUCTIONS
3
ADDITIONAL SPECIFIC SAFETY RULES
4
BACKGROUND INFORMATION
4
OPERATION
5
MISCELLANEOUS TECHNIQUES
5
THROUGH-DOVETAILS WITH CLAMPING BOARDS
6
THROUGH-DOVETAILS WITH UNLIMITED BOARD WIDTH
8
ALTERNATIVE METHOD - THROUGH-DOVETAILS WITH UNLIMITED BOARD WIDTH
10
HALF-BLIND DOVETAILS WITH CLAMPING BOARDS
11
USING A ROUTER TABLE
13
ALTERNATE ROUTER BITS
14
HALF-BLIND DOVETAIL TAILBOARDS THICKER THAN 7/8"
17
MITERED THROUGH-DOVETAILS
18
THROUGH-DOVETAIL, SKIPPED PIN METHOD
19
HALF-BLIND DOVETAIL, SKIPPED PIN METHOD
20
SAW KERF ALLOWANCE METHOD
22
MULTIPLE SPACER METHOD
24
END-TO-END JOINTS
24
DRAWERS WITH DOVETAIL DADOS
25
WOODEN HINGES
26
ANGLED JOINTS
29
ACUTE ANGLED JOINTS
32
SLANTED SIDE JOINTS
33
COMPOUND ANGLED JOINTS
34
INLAYED THROUGH-DOVETAILS
37
INLAYED HALF-BLIND DOVETAIL JOINTS
38
INLAYED BOX JOINTS
40
TABLES OF COMMONLY AVAILABLE ROUTER BIT SIZES
41
TROUBLESHOOTING
42
MAINTENANCE
42
SERVICE
42
ACCESSORIES
42
WARRANTY
43
Back Cover
SERVICE CENTER LOCATIONS
2
SAFETY GUIDELINES - DEFINITIONS
This manual contains information that is important for you to know and understand. This information relates to protecting YOUR SAFETY and PREVENTING EQUIPMENT PROBLEMS. To help you recognize this information, we use
the symbols to the left. Please read the manual and pay attention to these sections.
Indicates an imminently hazardous situation which, if not avoided, will result in death or serious injury.
Indicates a potentially hazardous situation which, if not avoided, could result in death or serious injury.
Indicates a potentially hazardous situation which, if not avoided, may result in minor or moderate injury.
Used without the safety alert symbol indicates potentially hazardous situation which, if not avoided, may
result in property damage.
IMPORTANT SAFETY INSTRUCTIONS
Read and understand all instructions. Failure to follow all instructions listed below, may
result in electric shock, fire and/or serious personal injury.
SAVE THESE INSTRUCTIONS.
There are certain applications for which this tool was designed. Porter-Cable strongly recommends that this
tool NOT be modified and/or used for any application other than for which it was designed. If you have any questions relative to
its application DO NOT use the tool until you have written Porter-Cable and we have advised you.
Technical Service Manager
Porter-Cable Corporation
4825 Highway 45 North
Jackson, TN 38305
1.
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15.
KEEP WORK AREA CLEAN. Cluttered areas and benches invite injuries.
AVOID DANGEROUS ENVIRONMENT. Don’t expose power tools to rain. Don’t use power tools in damp or wet
locations. Keep area well lit. Avoid chemical or corrosive environment. Do not use tool in presence of flammable
liquids or gases.
GUARD AGAINST ELECTRIC SHOCK. Prevent body contact with grounded surfaces. For example: pipes,
radiators, ranges, refrigerator enclosures.
KEEP CHILDREN AWAY. Do not let visitors contact tool or extension cord. All visitors should be kept away from
work area.
STORE IDLE TOOLS. When not in use, tools should be stored in dry, and high or locked-up place – out of reach
of children.
DON’T FORCE TOOL. It will do the job better and safer at the rate for which it was intended.
USE RIGHT TOOL. Don’t force small tool or attachment to do the job of a heavy duty tool. Don’t use tool for
purpose not intended – for example – do not use a circular saw for cutting tree limbs or logs.
DRESS PROPERLY. Do not wear loose clothing or jewelry. Loose clothing, draw strings and jewelry can be
caught in moving parts. Rubber gloves and non-skid footwear are recommended when working outdoors. Wear
protective hair covering to contain long hair.
USE ANSI Z87.1 SAFETY GLASSES. Wear safety glasses or goggles while operating power tools. Also face or
dust mask if operation creates dust. All persons in the area where power tools are being operated should also
wear safety glasses and face or dust mask.
DON’T ABUSE CORD. Never carry tool by cord or yank it to disconnect from receptacle. Keep cord from heat,
oil, and sharp edges. Have damaged or worn power cord and strain reliever replaced immediately. DO NOT
ATTEMPT TO REPAIR POWER CORD.
SECURE WORK. Use clamps or a vise to hold work. It’s safer than using your hand and it frees both hands to
operate tool.
DON’T OVERREACH. Keep proper footing and balance at all times.
MAINTAIN TOOLS WITH CARE. Keep tools sharp and clean for better and safer performance. Follow
instructions for lubricating and changing accessories. Inspect tool cords periodically and if damaged, have
repaired by authorized service facility. Inspect extension cords periodically and replace if damaged. Have all
worn, broken or lost parts replaced immediately. Keep handles dry, clean and free from oil and grease.
DISCONNECT TOOLS when not in use, before servicing, and when changing accessories such as blades, bits, cutters, etc.
REMOVE ADJUSTING KEYS AND WRENCHES. Form habit of checking to see that keys and adjusting
wrenches are removed from the tool before turning it on.
3
16. AVOID UNINTENTIONAL STARTING. Do not carry a plugged-in tool with finger on switch. Be sure switch is off
when plugging in. Keep hands, body and clothing clear of blades, bits, cutters, etc. when plugging in the tool.
17. OUTDOOR USE EXTENSION CORDS. When tool is used outdoors, use only extension cords marked “Suitable
for use with outdoor appliances – store indoors when not in use.” If an extension cord is to be used outdoors it
must be marked with the suffix W-A or w following the cord type designation.
18. STAY ALERT. Watch what you are doing. Use common sense. Do not operate tool when you are tired or while
under the influence of medication, alcohol or drugs.
19. CHECK DAMAGED PARTS. Before further use of the tool, a guard or other part that is damaged should be
carefully checked to determine that it will operate properly and perform its intended function. Check for alignment
of moving parts, binding of moving parts, breakage of parts, mounting, and any other conditions that may affect
its operation. A guard or other part that is damaged should be properly repaired or replaced by an authorized
service center unless otherwise indicated elsewhere in this instruction manual. Have defective switches replaced
by authorized service center. Do not use tool if switch does not turn it on and off.
20. WEAR ANSI S3.19 EAR PROTECTION to safeguard against possible hearing loss.
ADDITIONAL SAFETY RULES
FAILURE TO FOLLOW THESE RULES MAY RESULT IN SERIOUS PERSONAL INJURY.
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
READ AND FOLLOW ALL SAFETY INSTRUCTIONS in the instruction manual supplied with your router.
SECURE WORK. Be sure Dovetail Fixture/Jig and work is anchored securely to prevent movement.
BE SURE CORD SET IS FREE and will not hang up during routing operations.
KEEP HANDS CLEAR of cutter when motor is running to prevent personal injury.
MAINTAIN FIRM GRIP on router when starting motor to resist starting torque.
STAY ALERT and keep cutter free, clear of all foreign objects while motor is running.
BE SURE MOTOR HAS COMPLETELY STOPPED before removing router from Dovetail Fixture/Jig and setting
Dovetail Fixture/Jig down between operations.
8. NEVER REMOVE ROUTER MOTOR from router base while template guide and dovetail bit are installed. dovetail
bit may not fit through hole in template guide.
9. TIGHTEN TEMPLATE GUIDE LOCKNUT SECURELY.
10. SOME WOOD CONTAINS PRESERVATIVES WHICH CAN BE TOXIC. Take extra care to prevent inhalation and
skin contact when working with these materials. Request, and follow, any safety information available from your
material supplier.
REPLACEMENT PARTS
When servicing use only identical replacement parts.
BACKGROUND INFORMATION
The details for basic joints are found in the instruction manual for the 4212 Dovetail Jig, along with information
regarding the use of various router bits and/or templet guides, and will not be repeated in this supplemental manual.
The purpose of this document is to provide you with an advanced knowledge of the jig and to promote that
knowledge, along with your creativity, to produce beautiful woodworking projects that can stand the test of time.
4
OPERATION
MISCELLANEOUS TECHNIQUES
Using these techniques can simplify your dovetailing projects.
USE A DEAD-BLOW HAMMER
Use a plastic dead-blow hammer to join your workpieces together to help prevent the marring of wood (Fig. 1A).
CHAMFER THE TAIL EDGES
Chamfering the inner tail edges can make the joints go together easier and may prevent damage to the pins (Fig.
1B). Make the chamfers with a file or a chisel. Since the chamfers are located on the inside of the joint, they will be
invisible.
Fig. 1A
Fig. 1B
ALTERNATE THROUGH DOVETAIL AND BOX JOINT BIT DEPTH SETTING
This method of setting your router bit depth on through dovetails or box joints is very accurate for creating pins or
tails that are flush, and is especially good for inlay work. Use a board that is the same thickness as your workpiece
to be joined and draw a line.
Fig. 2B
Fig. 2A
Set the router on the template and lower the router bit until it reaches the line. Make sure that the scrap material
used in the horizontal position to support the template is at least as thick as the router bit depth-of-cut.
STOP NUT FOR BRASS ADJUSTMENT KNOB
A
If using the same setup repeatedly, you can use a 3/8"-16 nut (A)
Fig. 3A (not supplied) to keep the brass adjustment knobs from
moving.
Fig. 3A
5
TEMPLATES MOUNTED TO CLAMPING BOARDS
You can mount the jig templates to clamping boards and take the templates to the workpiece to make the joint. The
benefits of this operation are:
1. You can maneuver a mounted template onto a large workpiece easier than clamping a large workpiece to the
jig. This process allows you to join boards wider than 12" by routing a part of the joint, sliding the mounted
template just past the original cut, and routing the remainder of the joint.
Fig. 4B
Fig. 4A
Fig. 4C
2. By using the clamping boards, you can rout boards that
are too short to clamp in the jig base, allowing you to
dovetail small decorative boxes.
3. You can make half-blind joints in thicker wood than the jig can handle.
4. You can make steeply-angled joints with the clamping boards.
5. You can make joints using a router table by inverting the mounted templates.
THROUGH-DOVETAILS WITH CLAMPING BOARDS
You can use both the normal through-dovetail template (included with the 4212 Jig and the 4213 Accessory Kit),
and the miniature through-dovetail template (included with the 4215 Accessory Kit) with a clamping board.
NOTE: You can modify these clamping board methods to make box joints.
SETUP
Step 1 - Make a clamping board 2" x 3" x 19". Make sure
that all four sides are square (You may need to
glue thinner sections of wood together and
plane them to make the 2" board).
Step 2 - Drill the pilot holes for #10 screws on the face of
the board as indicated in the drawing (Fig. 6A).
Step 3 - Remove the brackets from the template (Fig.
6B).
Step 4 - Align the lines of the template with the edges of
the clamping board. You should be able to see
the pilot holes in the elongated slot of the
template Fig. 6C).
Step 5 - Drive two #10 wood screws through the
elongated slots of the template into the
clamping board (Fig. 6D).
6
Fig. 6A
DRILL PILOT HOLES
FOR #10 WOOD SCREWS
1"
13 "
3"
19 "
WOOD GRAIN
3"
2"
Fig. 6B
Fig. 6C
Fig. 6D
CUTTING THE TAILS
Step 1 - Clamp the tail board with the outside surface facing away from the clamping board (Fig. 7A). Align the tail
board, using the instructions in your basic manual in the section “OPERATION”. Look under
“POSITIONING THE WOOD”, STEP 4.
Step 2 - This step is optional. Clamp stop blocks to the clamping board for rapid setups of repeated cuts.
Step 3 - Use a small square and a pencil to draw a line along the bottom of the clamping board (Fig. 7B). Align the
line with an edge of the tail board. (This line will be used to set up the pin board).
Step 4 - Use the width of the pinboard to mark the depth of the router bit on the tailboard (Fig. 7C).
DISCONNECT THE TOOL FROM THE POWER SOURCE.
Step 5 - Set the router bit depth, using the pencil mark from STEP 4.
Step 6 - Connect your router to the power source and cut the tails (Fig. 7D).
Fig. 7A
Fig. 7B
Fig. 7C
Fig. 7D
CUTTING THE PINS
Step 1 - Clamp the pin board with the outside surface facing away from the clamping board (Fig. 8A). Align the
edge of the pin board with the line drawn in STEP 3 of “CUTTING THE TAILS”.
Step 2 - This step is optional. Clamp stop blocks to the clamping board for rapid setups of repeated cuts.
Step 3 - Use the width of the tail board to make a pencil mark on the pin board for the depth of the router bit.
DISCONNECT THE TOOL FROM THE POWER SOURCE.
Step 4 - Set the router bit depth, using the pencil mark from STEP 3.
Step 5 - Connect your router to the power source and cut the pins (Fig. 8C).
Step 6 - Remove the pin board and check the fit with the tail board (Fig. 8D).
7
Fig. 8A
Fig. 8B
Fig. 8C
Fig. 8D
FITTING THE JOINT
Step 1 - Orient the template so that the “PINS” side is
facing you (Fig. 9A).
Step 2 - Loosen the two #10 screws.
Step 3 - If the joint is too loose, move the template
toward you slightly.
Step 4 - If the joint is too tight, move the template away
from you slightly.
Step 5- Tighten the screws loosened in STEP 2.
Step 6 - Cut the pin board again and check for fit.
Fig. 9A
THROUGH-DOVETAILS WITH UNLIMITED BOARD WIDTH
You can cut dovetails in boards wider than the templates mounted on clamping boards by cutting the first part of
the joint, sliding the templet down the workpiece, and cutting the rest of the joint.
NOTE: Become familiar with the procedure for cutting through-dovetails with a template on a clamping board before
attempting working with unlimited board width.
SETUP
Remove the half-blind depth bracket. Other than that, the setup is identical to the previous setup.
8
CUTTING THE TAILS
Step 1 - Clamp the tail board with the outside surface facing away from the clamping board (Fig. 10A).
Step 2 - If the board is a width in 1" increments, (12", 13", etc.), center the edge of the board exactly between the
two fingers of the template farthest to the left (Fig. 10B).
Step 3 - If the board is not in 1" increments, take the fraction of an inch that is greater than 1" and divide it by two.
Then move the tailboard to the left of the center of the fingers by that amount (Fig. 10C). EXAMPLE: IF the
board width is 16-1/2", take the 1/2", divide it by two. You would then move the tail board to the left of the
center of the fingers by 1/4" and clamp it in place.
Step 4 - Use a piece of wood the same thickness as the pin board to mark the router bit depth.
DISCONNECT THE TOOL FROM THE POWER SOURCE.
Step 5 - Set the router bit depth, using the pencil mark from STEP 4.
Step 6 - Connect your router to the power source and cut the pins as far as the template will allow.
Fig. 10B
Fig.10A
Fig. 10C
Step 7 - Unclamp the templet, slide it down, and center the last cut
between the two straight fingers and reclamp (Fig. 10D).
Step 8 - Repeat STEPS 6 and 7 until the pins are cut across the entire
board.
CUTTING THE PINS
Fig. 10D
Step 1 - Clamp the pin board with the outside surface facing away from the clamping board.
Step 2 - If the board is a width in 1" increments, (12", 13", etc.), center the edge of the board exactly in line with the
finger of the template farthest to the left (Fig. 11A).
Step 3 - If the board is not in 1" increments, take the fraction of an inch that is greater than 1" and divide it by two.
Then move the pin board to the left of center of the fingers by that amount. EXAMPLE: IF the board width
is 16-1/2", take the 1/2", divide it by two. You would then move the tail board to the left of the leftmost
finger by 1/4" and clamp it in place (Fig. 11B).
Step 4 - Use a piece of wood the same thickness as the pin board to mark the router bit depth.
DISCONNECT THE TOOL FROM THE POWER SOURCE.
Step 5 - Set the router bit depth, using the pencil mark from STEP 4.
Step 6 - Connect your router to the power source and cut the pins as far as the template will allow.
Fig. 11A
Fig. 11B
9
Step 7 - Unclamp the templet, slide it down, and center the last cut between the two angled fingers and reclamp
(Fig. 11D).
Step 8 - Repeat STEPS 6 and 7 until the pins are cut across the entire board.
Step 9 - Remove the pin board and check the fit with the tailboard.
FITTING THE JOINT
Fitting the joint is identical to the previous section (Fig. 12A).
Fig. 11D
Fig. 12A
ALTERNATE METHOD
THROUGH-DOVETAILS WITH UNLIMITED BOARD WIDTH
This alternate method may be more accurate for correctly cutting the tail and pin boards.
Step 1 - Clamp the tail and pin boards together with a 2" wide block (Fig. 13A).
Step 2 - Use a square to align an edge of the tail and pin boards (Fig. 13B).
Step 3 - Cut the pins and the tails as far as the template will allow (Fig. 13C).
Step 4 - Slide the template, aligning the last cut in between the fingers of the template (Fig. 13D).
Step 5 - Repeat STEPS 3 and 4 until both boards are completely cut.
Fig. 13A
Fig. 13B
Fig. 13D
Fig. 13C
10
HALF-BLIND DOVETAILS WITH CLAMPING BOARDS
You can mount your half-blind template that comes with the 4210 and 4212 jigs and the 4211 accessory kit to a
board. This method, however, limits your workpiece width capacity to 8".
SETUP
Items needed to setup for the half-blind dovetails:
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
Wood to make the clamping board parts
Clamps
2" #10 wood screws (2)
1/4-20 threaded T-nut
1/4-20 x 4" bolt
1/4" washer
NOTE: These instructions can be modified for making halfblind dovetails with the through dovetail template and for
the miniature dovetail template (See the section “HALFBLIND DOVETAILS WITH TAIL BOARDS THICKER THAN
7/8").
Fig. 14A
Step 1 - Make a main clamping board 1-1/2" x 3-1/4" x 16". Square all of the sides. Make a mortise
through the board and drill pilot holes for #10 wood screws (Fig. 15A).
NOTE: Threaded inserts and #10 flathead machine screws can be used in place of the #10
wood screws.
Step 2 - Make the offset clamping block. Make a counterbore for the threaded T-nut (Fig. 15B).
NOTE: If your pin board is thinner than 3/4", modify the dimension. You may need to use extra
washers to prevent the bolt from sticking out.
Fig. 15A
Fig. 15B
1-1/2
2-1/4
"
2"
"
3/8" WIDE MORTISE GOES
THROUGH BLOCK. MORTISE
IS CENTERED ON BLOCK.
DRILL A 1/4 " HOLE
THROUGH THE BLOCK
WOOD GRAIN
1/2 "
1"
1/2 "
1-1/8
"
13-3/4
"
DRILL PILOT HOLES
FOR #10 WOOD SCREWS
3/4 "
WOOD GRAIN
16 "
3-1/4
1-1/2
"
"
MAKE THIS DIMENSION THE
THICKNESS OF THE PIN BOARD
THAT IS TO BE DOVETAILED
MAKE TWO OF THESE BLOCKS
Fig. 15C
Step 3 - Insert the threaded nut into the offset clamping
block (Fig. 15C).
11
Fig. 15D
Step 4 - Make the straight clamping block. If the
workpiece is thinner than 3/4", you will need to
modify the dimension (Fig. 15D).
Step 5 - Make two thickness blocks the same
thickness as the pin board. Drill a hole big
enough for the wood screw to go through (Fig.
15E).
Step 6 - Assemble the board-mounted half-blind
template (Fig. 15F).
NOTE: You will not need to remove the halfblind depth bracket.
Fig. 15E
1-1/2
3/4 " (IF THE PIN BOARD IS LESS THAN 3/4" THICK,
THEN REDUCE THIS DIMENSION ACCORDINGLY)
1-1/2
WOOD GRAIN
1-1/2
1-1/2
"
1-1/2
5"
Fig. 15F
"
"
"
2" LONG #10 WOOD SCREWS
"
DRILL A
1/4 " HOLE
THROUGH THE BLOCK
WOOD GRAIN
1/2 "
HALF-BLIND TEMPLATE
1"
1/4" T-NUT
THICKNESS
BLOCKS
OFFSET CLAMPING BLOCK
STRAIGHT CLAMPING BLOCK
3/4 "
MAIN CLAMPING BOARD
1/4" WASHER
MAKE THIS DIMENSION THE
THICKNESS OF THE PIN BOARD
THAT IS TO BE DOVETAILED
MAKE TWO OF THESE BLOCKS
4" LONG 1/4-20 BOLT
CUTTING THE JOINT
Step 1 - Clamp the tail board (drawer side) to the main clamping board with the outside surface facing the board
(Fig. 16A).
Step 2 - Move the offset clamping block to the right until it touches the tail board (Fig. 16B). Tighten the 1/4-20 x
4" bolt that holds the offset clamping block.
Step 3 - Insert the pin board (drawer front) flush against the tail board and the offset clamping block (Fig. 16C).
Fig. 16A
Fig. 16B
12
Fig. 16C
Step 4 - Slide the straight clamping block to the left so that it contacts the pin board (Fig. 16D). Hook the straight
clamping block over the front and back of the main clamping board.
Step 5 - Secure the pin board by clamping it between the offset and straight clamping blocks (Fig. 16E).
Step 6 - Loosen the #10 wood screws, align the template lines with the line where the pin board and tail board
meet, and retighten the #10 wood screws (Fig. 16F).
DISCONNECT THE TOOL FROM THE POWER SOURCE.
Step 7 - Set the router bit depth, using the bit depth guide.
Step 8 - Cut the joint. Fitting the joint is identical to a standard half-blind dovetail.
NOTE: You can cut the pin and tail board separately, if you prefer.
Fig. 16D
Fig. 16F
Fig. 16E
USING A ROUTER TABLE
You can use board-mounted templates with your router table. However,
the templates must be inverted. Similarly, invert all operations (setting the
router bit, etc.).
Fig. 17A
Use protective handles to keep your hands away from the router bit. Grip the handles only on the
opposite side of the workpiece.
12 "
5"
2"
1"
Make the protective handles using the dimensions in the
drawing (Fig. 17B). Round over the ends of the handles
so that they are comfortable in your hands.
RADIUS
3/4 "
1/2 "
1-1/2
2"
MAKE FROM 3/4" STOCK
"
1"
1/2 "
DRILL HOLES FOR SCREWS
ROUND OVER EDGES
Fig. 17B
13
ALTERNATE ROUTER BITS
You are not limited to using the router bits supplied with your jig. Other router bits can be used to produce a different
look or to work with thicker woods. Using alternate bits can help you produce more advanced joints (inlayed
dovetails, etc.). Since 1/2" shank bits are stronger and are much less prone to deflection than the 1/4" shank bits,
we recommend that you use the 1/2" shank bits with the 4210 and 4212 dovetail jigs, and with the 4211 and 4213
accessory kits.
THROUGH-DOVETAIL BITS
If you choose to purchase alternate through-dovetail bits, keep in mind the following:
1. The dovetail bit must have a 7° angle. This angle matches the tapered fingers used to guide the straight bit.
2. The sum of the diameters of the dovetail and straight bits must equal 15/16". For example, a 5/8" dovetail bit
must have a 5/16" straight bit - the sum of both equalling 15/16".
3. The length of the cutter determines the maximum thickness of wood that can be cut. The length of the cutter
on the dovetail bit is the maximum thickness of the pin board. The length of the cutter on the straight bit is the
maximum thickness of the tail board. If your bits have 1" cutters, you can make through-dovetails with 1" thick
boards.
4. Purchase bits that will not cut into the template guides. The template guide used with the dovetail bit has an
inside diameter of 21/32". Use bits that will fit into this dimension. Some larger bits might work, but with
minimal depth (Fig. 18A).
5. The inside diameter of the template guide used with the straight bit is 17/32". Use straight bits that are smaller
than that dimension.
DOVETAIL BIT
TEMPLET GUIDE
ROUTER SUB BASE
21/32"
DOVETAIL BIT DIAMETER
THERE IS A MINIMUM DEPTH OF CUT
WHEN THE DIAMETER OF THE ROUTER
BIT IS GREATER THAN THE INSIDE
DIAMETER OF THE TEMPLET GUIDE
Fig. 18A
THROUGH-DOVETAIL BIT COMBINATIONS (READILY AVAILABLE)
DOVETAIL BIT DIAMETER
STRAIGHT BIT DIAMETER
3/4"
5/8"
9/16"
17/32"
3/16"
5/16"
3/8"
13/32"
HALF-BLIND DOVETAIL BITS
DOVETAIL BIT
TEMPLET GUIDE
ROUTER SUB BASE
The difference in using alternate bits and standard
bits in making half-blind dovetails is in the depth-ofcut.
HALF-BLIND TEMPLET
WOOD FOR HALF-BLIND JOINT
DEPTH OF CUT FOR A HALF-BLIND JOINT
Fig. 19A
14
Some items to consider when purchasing alternate bits for half-blind dovetails are:
1.
2.
3.
A shallow angle of the bit requires a deeper cut. A steeper angle requires a shallower cut.
The diameter of the bit should be slightly greater than 1/2". The greater the diameter, the deeper the cut.
The bit should have a cutting length at least as long as the cutting depth.
NOTE: When using alternate bits, ensure that the pin board (drawer front) is thicker than the depth of cut.
NOTE: When using alternate bits, ensure that the bit will not cut into the base of the jig. For deep cuts, take out
most of the material with a straight bit, then follow up with the half-blind dovetail bit.
HALF-BLIND DOVETAIL BIT (READILY AVAILABLE)
DOVETAIL BIT
APP. DEPTH OF CUT
13/32"
3/16"
3/4"
9/16"
17/32", 7°
17/32", 14°
9/16", 7°
5/8", 14°
HALF-BLIND DOVETAIL BITS WITH THE TAILS AND PINS CUT SEPARATELY
Using two different-sized dovetail bits to make half-blind dovetails
requires separate cuts, similar to cutting the rabbeted half-blind
dovetail. This method provides a more hand-cut look and is an
important step in creating inlayed half-blind dovetails.
Fig. 20A
Some items to consider:
1.
2.
3.
The two bits must have the same angle.
A shallower angle requires a deeper cut, while a steeper angle requires a shallower cut.
When the diameters of the two bits are added together, the sum must be slightly greater than 1". The closer
the sum is to 1", the shallower the depth of cut will be. The larger the sum, the deeper the cut.
BIT COMBINATIONS FOR SEPARATE HALF-BLIND CUTS (READILY AVAILABLE)
LARGER BIT
3/4", 14°
5/8", 14°
5/8", 7°
5/8", 7°
9/16", 7°
SMALLER BIT
APPROX. DEPTH-OF-CUT
1/2" 14°
1/2" 14°
17/32",7°
9/16", 7°
17/32", 7°
9/16"
3/8"
7/8"
1"
5/8"
SETUP
The only difference between cutting this joint and cutting the
standard half-blind is the use of two router bits. If you use one
router, you will have to set the depth-of-cut for each router bit. You
can make a simple depth guide as illustrated in Fig. 21A.
If you have two routers, you will not have to go through the process
of changing the bit each time you make a different cut. This method
requires, however, two 3/4" OD template guides and two template
guide locknuts, available from Porter-Cable.
Fig. 21A
15
CUTTING THE TAILS
Cut the tail board (drawer side) similar to cutting the rabbeted half-blind dovetail, but remove the spacer and move
the left offset guide directly against the tail board.
NOTE: Support the template with a scrap workpiece thick enough to prevent the cutter from contacting the base.
CUTTING THE PINS
Cut the pin board (drawer front) similar to cutting the rabbeted half-blind dovetail. (If you use the alternate method
of aligning the pin board with secondary board. Make sure the secondary board does not have a rabbet).
NOTE: Ensure that the pin board (drawer front) is thicker than the depth of cut to prevent the cutter from contacting
the base.
FITTING THE JOINT
Fit the joint the same as you would a standard rabbeted half-blind dovetail.
NOTE: If a change in depth-of-cut is required, change it on both bits.
BOX JOINT BITS
You can make box joints with different diameter router bits for the two workpieces. The process is identical to
making standard box joints except that you will need to change the bit for the second board. Two routers will make
this job easier. However, this two-router method will require two 3/4" OD template guides and two template guide
lock nuts, available from Porter-Cable.
In selecting straight bits for these modified box joints, keep in mind the following:
1.
2,
The sum of the diameters of the two straight bits must equal 1".
The length of the bit used to cut the first board determines the maximum thickness of the second board.
(Example: if a 3/8" diameter bit used on the first board has a 1/2" long cutter, the maximum thickness of the
second board would be 1/2").
BOX JOINT BITS (READILY AVAILABLE)
LARGER STRAIGHT BIT
SMALLER STRAIGHT BIT
1/2"
9/16"
5/8"
1/2"
7/16"
3/8"
DOVETAIL DADO BITS
Any dovetail bit can be used to make dovetail dados (sliding dovetails) as long as the bit does not cut into the
template guide or the base of the jig. The process is identical to that of the standard dovetail dado. Also, you can
use template guides smaller than 3/4" OD which will have the effect of making the dado slot wider than the bit
diameter.
NOTE: Any template guide bushing surface must not extend more than 1/4" from the base.
16
DOVETAIL BIT
TEMPLET GUIDE
ROUTER SUB BASE
I.D. OF TEMPLET GUIDE
DOVETAIL BIT DIAMETER
THERE IS A MINIMUM DEPTH OF CUT
WHEN THE DIAMETER OF THE ROUTER
BIT IS GREATER THAN THE INSIDE
DIAMETER OF THE TEMPLET GUIDE
Fig. 22A
Cutting a dado with a templet guide that has an OD smaller than 3/4" requires two passes.
1. Start on the left side. Keep the router toward the back edge of the dado slot, and cut to the right until you have
completed the cut.
2. Start on the right side. Keep the router towards the front edge of the dado slot, and cut to the left until you
complete the cut.
3. Leave the router in the dado slot until the bit stops spinning.
NOTE: For deep cuts, use a straight bit first.
NOTE: Cut the tenon just as you would a standard tenon.
1/4" Maximum
Fig. 23B
Fig. 23A
HALF-BLIND DOVETAILS WITH TAIL BOARDS THICKER THAN 7/8"
For tail boards thicker than 7/8", you can use the template normally used for through dovetails (instead of that used
for half-blind dovetails) to provide deeper pins and tails (Fig. 24A).
The procedure is the same as that for a normal half-blind dovetail.
NOTE: Use the “half-blind” line for aligning the template.
Fig. 24A
Fig. 24B
With the wood clamped to the base of the jig, the maximum thickness will be 1-1/8". By using a templet mounted
to a clamping board, you can use much thicker wood, producing a strong joint.
17
MITERED THROUGH-DOVETAIL
You can make a through-dovetail with a mitered edge, creating
a molded edge that goes the whole way to the joint. This joint is
very attractive on serving trays or decorative boxes without lids.
Fig. 25A
NOTE: Depending on the depth of the molded edge, you may want to make the boards slightly wider to account for
the molded depth. If so, mount the tail board so that the mitered edge will end with the thicker half-pin. With the
offset guide set against the tail board, the pin board will automatically be cut correctly.
CUTTING THE TAILS
Cut the tails as you would a standard through-dovetail, except
do not make the tail cut on the edge from the proposed miter.
CUTTING THE PINS
Step
Step
Step
Step
1
2
3
4
-
Fig. 26A
Cut all the pins normally.
Remove the template, turn it horizontally so that the straight fingers are facing you.
Adjust the board so that the edge where the miter will be cut is to the left.
Adjust the board so that only the triangular part of the half-pin will be cut off with the router and straight
bit, leaving a squared-off pin (Figs. 27A and 27B).
Step 5 - For repeated cuts, slide the left offset guide until it touches the pin board and secure it.
Step 6 - Cut the triangular area off (Fig. 27C).
Fig. 27B
Fig. 27A
Fig. 27C
MITERING THE PINS
Step 1 - On the inside surface, use a square and pencil to draw a line from the base of the pins to the edge
where the miter will be cut (Fig. 28A).
Step 2 - Use a table saw with the miter gauge set to 45° to miter the squared-off half pin (Figs. 28B and
28C).
18
Fig. 28A
Fig. 28C
Fig. 28B
MITERING THE TAILS
Step 1 - On the inside surface, use a square and pencil to draw a line from the base of the tails to the edge where
the miter will be cut (Fig. 29A).
Step 2 - Set the table saw blade so that the height of cut of the saw blade is the same as the thickness of the
mitered half-pin.
Step 3 - Use a table saw with the miter gauge set to 45° to miter the tails. You will need to make several passes
to cut out the material (Fig. 29B).
NOTE: A dado head could be used to make this cut in one pass.
Fig. 29B
Fig. 29A
Fig. 29C
FITTING THE JOINT
You may need to trim the miter cuts by hand for a good fit. Files, chisels, shoulder planes, and rabbet planes work
well. Otherwise, adjust the tightness of the joint the same as you would for a normal through dovetail.
THROUGH-DOVETAIL, SKIPPED-PIN METHOD
This method is very similar to cutting standard through- dovetails (Fig. 30A).
CUTTING THE TAILS
Cut the tails as normal, except do not cut into the areas where you do not want a pin to appear.
Fig. 31A
Fig. 30A
19
CUTTING THE PINS
Step
Step
Step
Step
Step
Step
1
2
3
4
5
6
-
Hold the pin board against the tail board and mark the edges of the tails on the end of the pin board
(Fig. 32A).
Shade in the areas on the end of the pin board where the tails will be (Fig. 32B).
Cut all the pins (Fig. 32C).
Slide the pin board to the right 1/4" (Fig. 32D).
Cut in between the fingers of the template to cut only in the shaded area (A) Fig. 32D.
Repeat STEPS 4 and 5 until all of the material between the pins has been removed.
Fig. 32A
Fig. 32B
A
Fig. 32C
Fig. 32D
FITTING THE JOINT
Fig. 32D
Fit the joint the same as you would a standard through dovetail.
HALF-BLIND DOVETAIL, SKIPPED PIN METHOD
This method is similar to making standard half-blind dovetails,
except that the tails and pins are cut separately.
Cut the tails first. Use a scrap workpiece (thick enough to
prevent contact with the base of the jig) to support the
template.
Fig. 33A
20
Step
Step
Step
Step
Step
Step
Step
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
-
Make a climb cut from right to left.
Cut only between the fingers where you want the pins to be (Fig. 34A).
Use the router to round over the ends of the cuts (Fig. 34B).
The joint will hide any accidental excess material cut (A) Fig. 34C.
Use a pencil to mark the location of the ends of the templet fingers on the wood (Fig. 34D).
Remove the templet. Install the half-blind templet so that its straight edge is facing you.
Adjust the template back and forth to align the edge of the template with the marks on the wood(B) Fig.
34E.
Step 8 - Make a cut from left to right removing the remainder of the excess material (Fig. 34F).
A
Fig. 34B
Fig. 34A
Fig. 34C
B
Fig. 34E
Fig. 34D
Fig. 34F
CUTTING THE PINS
Step 1 - Cut the tails. Clean out all of the areas between the fingers(Fig. 35A).
Step 2 - Use a pencil to mark the location of the half-circle between the fingers of the templates (C) Fig. 35B.
Step 3 - Remove the pin board and hold it next to the tail board.
C
Fig. 35B
Fig. 35A
21
Fig. 35C
Step 4 Step 5 Step 6 Step 7 Step 8 Step 9 Step 10 -
Shade the pins that will be removed (Fig. 35C).
Place the pin board back in the jig.
Install the half-blind template so that its straight edge faces you.
Adjust the pin board so that the marks align with the straight edge of the templet (D) Fig. 35D.
Make the cuts with the router to remove the shaded pins (Fig. 35E).
Remove all excess material.
If you remove a bit more material than necessary, remember that it will be hidden in the joint (E) Fig. 35F.
E
D
Fig. 35F
Fig. 35E
Fig. 35D
FITTING THE JOINT
Fit the joint the same as you would the half-blind dovetail.
SAW KERF ALLOWANCE METHOD
An effective way to match the grain in a decorative box is to make the box from one piece of wood and then cut
the lid with a table saw. However, if the dovetails are evenly spaced, they may be unattractive because the saw kerf
removed needed material.
Fig. 37A
Fig. 37B
NOTE: For this method, you will need a spacer block equal to the thickness of the saw kerf, typically 1/8" on a
standard saw blade. Also, make the boards wider than the final size of the box by the same thickness.
NOTE: This method is very similar to making standard through-dovetails.
22
CUTTING THE TAILS
Step 1 - Center and clamp the tailboard as normal, but use the spacer on the left side of the board (A) Fig.
38A. (The spacer will cause the board to move slightly off center to the right).
Step 2 - Mark between the two fingers on the template where you want the kerf to be (B) Fig. 38B.
Step 3 - Cut the tails from the far left to the right. Stop at the mark (Fig. 38C).
Step 4 - Remove the spacer and slide the tail board to the left.
Step 5 - Cut the rest of the tails, starting with the tail that has the mark (Fig. 38D).
A
B
Fig. 38A
Fig. 38B
Fig. 38C
Fig. 38D
CUTTING THE PINS
Step 1 - Clamp the pin board with the spacer on the left (Fig. 39A).
Step 2 - Mark the pin the saw kerf will go through (Fig. 39B). (Use the tail board for comparison.)
Step 3 - Cut the tails from left to right. Stop right before the mark (Fig. 39C).
Fig. 39B
Fig. 39A
23
Fig. 39C
Step 4 - Remove the spacer and slide the pin board to the left (Fig. 39D).
Step 5 - Start with the pin to the right of the mark and cut the rest of the pins to the right (Fig. 39E).
Fig. 39D
Fig. 39E
FITTING AND CUTTING THE JOINT
Fitting the joint is the same as fitting the standard dovetail.
Once the box is glued and dried, separate the box lid and
bottom with a table saw.
Fig.40B
MULTIPLE SPACER METHOD
The saw kerf allowance method can be modified by using
multiple spacers on the same joint to create more varied
spacing of the pins and tails.
However, when removing or adding a spacer, continue cutting
the NEXT tail (instead of cutting the SAME tail as described in
“CUTTING THE TAILS” - STEP 5), and continue with the
SAME pin (instead of cutting the NEXT pin as described in
“CUTTING THE PINS” - STEP 5).
Fig. 41A
END-TO-END JOINTS
You can use the 4200 series dovetail jigs to join boards end-to-end to increase length and to make visually
interesting larger panels.
BOX END-TO-END JOINTS
End-to-end and standard box joints are the same except in the
joining of the boards. You can use any depth of cut with your
router as long as you use the same depth on both boards.
NOTE: When you set your depth-of-cut, set it so that the bit
won’t cut into the base of the jig.
Fig. 42A
24
The standard joint is shown is Fig. 42B and the end-to-end joint is shown in Fig. 42C.
Fig. 42B
Fig. 42C
DOVETAIL END-TO-END JOINTS
A dovetail end-to-end joint is a combination of a box joint and a half-blind dovetail joint. the workpieces are
mounted to the jig in the same way as for a box joint. However, the router bit and bit depth are set-up for a halfblind dovetail.
NOTE: The tightness of the joint is adjusted by the depth of the router bit.
Fig. 43A
Fig. 43B
Fig. 43C
DRAWERS WITH DOVETAIL DADOS
Drawers can be made with dovetailed dados (sliding dovetails). Lay out the parts as shown is Fig. 44A. Assembled,
the drawers will look the same as Fig. 44B
◗
◗
◗
◗
◗
◗
The drawer front will have two dados, one for each drawer side.
The drawer sides will have a tenon on the front end and a dado near the rear facing the center of the drawer.
The drawer back will have a tenon on each end.
The drawer front and sides will have a cut groove to accept the drawer bottom.
The drawer back will be cut narrower for ease of inserting the drawer bottom into the drawer.
Use brads up through the drawer back to fix the drawer bottom in place.
Fig. 44A
Fig. 44B
To hide the joint, cut the dado normally, but stop before you reach the top (Fig. 44C).
NOTE: You can clamp a stop to the template if you are making multiple cuts (Fig. 44C).
To further hide the joint, you can cut the top corner of the tenon off (Fig. 44A).
NOTE: If the sides and back are the same thickness, you can cut all of the tenons with one setup.
25
Fig. 44C
WOODEN HINGES
A wooden hinge can be used to make hinged table leafs or hinged legs for a collapsible table. The hinge pins are
normally are made of stainless steel, but you can use other materials, including wood for that purpose.
180° HINGES WITH A DRILLED HOLE
The workpiece for this simple hinge must be narrow enough to make the hole for the hinge pin with a drill bit.
This hinge has at least a range of motion of 180° (Figs. 45A and 45B).
Fig. 45A
Fig. 45B
Step 1 - Round over the ends of the two workpieces (Fig. 45C).
Step 2 - Use a drill press to drill a hole in the center of each board for the hinge pin (Fig. 45D).
Step 3 - Make an end-to-end box cut. (Make the depth-of-cut slightly deeper than the thickness of the boards
(Fig. 45E).
Step 4 - Make the length of the hinge pin narrower than the width of the boards
Step 5 - Hold the boards together, align the holes, and insert the pin (Fig. 45F).
Step 6 - Glue wooden plugs in the workpiece to hold the pins in place.(Fig. 45G).
Step 7- Cut off the protruding part of the plugs and sand (Fig. 45H).
Fig. 45C
Fig. 45D
Fig. 45E
Fig. 45F
Fig. 45G
Fig. 45H
26
270° HINGES WITH A DRILLED HOLE
Follow the previous directions for 180° Hinge and use the following photos to help you make a hinge that will have
270° or more range of motion. Cut the boards as shown in Fig. 46A.
Fig. 46A
Fig. 46B
Fig. 46C
180° HINGES WITH ROUTER-MADE GROOVES
When the width of the workpieces are too wide for a drill bit to
make the hole, use this method.Two boards compose each
hinge half. Make a half-round dado at the end of the
workpieces. When you glue the boards together, these two
dados make the hole for the hinge pin.
Fig. 47A
Step 1 - Use a router to make a half-round dado near the end of each of the four boards. Make the diameter of the
groove equal to the diameter of the hinge pin, and the depth of cut half the diameter of the hinge pin (Fig.
48A).
Step 2 - Insert the metal rod (long enough to stick out of both ends of the board) in one of the dados.
Step 3 - Glue a second workpiece to the first (Fig. 48B).
Step 4 - Repeat Steps two and three for the other half of the hinge.
Step 5 - After the glue dries, remove the metal rod.
Step 6 - Round over the ends of the glued boards.
Step 7- Make the rest of the hinge the same as you would with the 180° Hinge With a Drilled Hole.
Fig. 48A
Fig. 48B
27
270° HINGES WITH ROUTER-MADE GROOVES
This method uses two pieces of wood glued together for each
hinge-half. One of the pieces is very short.
Fig. 49A
Step 1 - Use a router to make a half-round dado near the end of a board. Make the diameter of the groove equal
to the diameter of the hinge pin, and the depth of cut half the diameter of the hinge pin(Fig. 49B).
Round over the ends of the boards (Fig. 49C).
Step 2 - Cut off the ends of the boards. The length of the cut-off should be twice the thickness of the board (Fig.
49D).
Step 3 - Repeat Step 1 for the remaining longer boards.
Step 4 - For both hinge halves, glue the short board to the long board with the metal hinge rod in the grooves and
sticking out both sides of the wood (Fig. 49E)
Step 5 - After the glue dries, remove the metal rod.
Step 6 - Make the rest of the hinge the same as you would with the 180° Hinge With a Drilled Hole.
Fig. 49B
Fig. 49C
Fig. 49D
Fig. 49E
28
ANGLED JOINTS
You can join boards at angles other than 90°. Four different methods are shown below by using the through dovetail
procedure.
OBTUSE ANGLED JOINTS
The simplest of these angled joints is the obtuse-angled
dovetail. In this joint, two boards are joined together at an
angle greater than 90°.
Joint
Angle
This joint can be made with either the template mounted to the
base of the jig or to a clamping board. If the angle is 100° or
greater, you must use the clamping board method.
Fig. 50A
SETUP WITH THE TEMPLATE MOUNTED TO THE BASE OF THE JIG
Step 1 - Make an angled insert according to one of the drawings (Figs. 51A and 51B).Match the angle of the insert
with the joint angle. If the workpiece is wider than 6" use the 12" insert.
Step 2 - Make sure that the 1/4-20 flat-head screw does not protrude (A) Fig. 51C.
Step 3 - Remove the small front knobs, the front clamping rod, and the front clamping U channel. Leave the
springs.
Step 4 - Use two 1/2" 1/4-20 flat-head screws to secure the angled insert to the front of the base of the jig, with
the thicker edge of the insert up. If you are using the 6" insert, install it in the 2 holes on the right (Fig.
51C).
Step 5 - Replace the hardware that was removed in STEP 3.
MAKE TWO COUNTERSINKS FOR
1/4-20 FLATHEAD SCREWS.
THE 1/4-20 SCREWS MUST NOT
PROTRUDE PAST THE OUTER
SURFACE OF THE INSERT.
DRILL TWO
DRILL TWO
MAKE TWO COUNTERSINKS FOR
1/4-20 FLATHEAD SCREWS.
THE 1/4-20 SCREWS MUST NOT
PROTRUDE PAST THE OUTER
SURFACE OF THE INSERT.
1/4 " HOLES
1/4 " HOLES
INSERT ANGLE
INSERT ANGLE
1-1/8
1-1/8
"
9/16 "
9/16 "
12 "
1"
4"
14 "
"
1/4 "
7"
Fig. 51A
1"
1/4 "
Fig. 51B
Fig. 51C
A
29
SETUP WITH THE TEMPLATE MOUNTED TO A CLAMPING BOARD
Step 1 - Make an angled clamping board according to the drawing (Fig. 52B). Match the angle of the
clamping board to the joint angle.
Step 2 - If necessary, create flat places on the clamping board parallel with the opposite side so that the
clamps can grab.
Step 3 - Attach the template to the clamping board with #10 wood screws. Position the angled surface on
the side of the template with the straight fingers (Fig. 52A).
Fig. 52B
Fig. 52A
DRILL PILOT HOLES
FOR #10 WOOD SCREWS
1"
13 "
3"
2"
19 "
WOOD GRAIN
ANGLE OF
BOARDS
3"
CUTTING THE TAILS
Step 1 - Cut the end of the tail board according to the instructions in the drawing (Fig. 53A). You can make these
cuts on a table saw with the blade beveled (Fig. 53B). Set the miter gauge at 90° for the first cut, then use
a tenoning jig for the second cut (Fig. 53C).
Step 2 - If you use the template mounted to the base of the jig, mount the board with the outside face toward the
base of the jig. Center the edges of the board between two fingers (Fig. 53D).
Step 3 - If you use the board-mounted template, clamp the board with the outside face toward the angled surface
of the clamping board. Center the board between two fingers.
Step 4 - Align the template using the “tails” line.
Step 5 - If the angle is steep, the “tails” line may not align with the wood. The joint will be fine if you place the straight
portion of the template fingers directly over the tail board (A) Fig. 53E. Otherwise, you may have to use an
angled clamping board.
Step 6 - Set the router bit depth where the sides of the board are at a slight angle (Fig. 53F).
Step 7- Cut the tails and remove the tail board.
THICKNESS OF PIN BOARD
FIRST CUT
90°
SECOND CUT
Fig. 53B
ANGLE BETWEEN BOARDS
OUTSIDE
SURFACE
OF BOARD
INSIDE
SURFACE
OF BOARD
Fig. 53A
Fig. 53C
30
Fig. 53D
Fig. 53E
Fig. 53F
CUTTING THE PINS
Step 1 - Cut the end of the pin board according to the drawing (54A).
Step 2 - If you use the template mounted to the base of the jig and a 12" angled insert, remove the small front
knobs, clamping rod and clamping U channel. Then remove the angled insert and reinstall the hardware.
Step 3 - Hold the boards together and mark the end of the pin board along the edges of the tails (Fig. 54B).
Step 4 - Rotate the template so that the angled fingers are facing toward you.
Step 5 - If you use the template mounted to the base of the jig, mount the pin board with the outside surface facing
away from the base of the jig. Center the marks on the end of the board between the angled fingers of
the template (Fig. 54C).
Step 6 - If you use the template mounted on a clamping board, clamp the pin board with the outside surface facing
away from the straight surface of the clamping board. Center the marks on the end of the board between
the angled fingers of the template.
Step 7- Use the "PINS” line to align the template with the edge of the pin board.
Step 8- Set the router bit depth slightly more than the thickness of the tail board. Make sure that the bit does not
contact the base of the jig.
Step 9- Cut the pins and remove the pin board.
MAKE ANGLED CUT
ANGLE BETWEEN BOARDS
INSIDE
SURFACE
OF BOARD
Fig. 54B
OUTSIDE
SURFACE
OF BOARD
Fig. 54A
Fig. 54C
FITTING THE JOINT
Fitting the joint is the same as fitting the standard dovetail. With the angled template fingers facing you, move the
template toward you for a tighter joint or away for a looser joint.
31
ACUTE ANGLED JOINTS
Fig. 55A
An acute angle joint joins two boards together at an angle less
than 90°. The acute angled joint is very similar in construction to
the the obtuse angled joint and can be used with the obtuse
angled joint to make boxes with angles other than 90°.
Joint
Angle
SETUP
Use the same setup as you would for the obtuse angled joint. Use 180° minus the joint angle for the insert angle
when you make your angled insert or your angled clamping board.
NOTE: If the acute angle and the obtuse angle add up to 180°, use the same setup for both joints.
CUTTING THE TAILS
Step 1 - Cut the end of the tail board according to the instructions on the drawing (Fig. 56A). Steep angles or thin
wood will make for a weak joint. Make this cut on a table saw with the blade beveled. Set the miter gauge
at 90° for the first cut and use a tenoning jig for the second cut (Fig. 56B).
Step 2 - Clamp the workpiece as you did for the obtuse-angled joint, except face the outside surface of the board
away from the base of the jig.
Step 3 - Step 3 is identical to Step 5 in "CUTTING THE TAILS" of the obtuse-angled section.
Step 4 - Set the router bit depth to where the step is in the tail board.
Step 5 - Cut the tails and remove the tail board.
FIRST CUT
SECOND CUT
THICKNESS OF PIN BOARD
THIRD CUT
(IF NECESSARY)
ANGLE BETWEEN BOARDS
OUTSIDE
SURFACE
OF BOARD
INSIDE
SURFACE
OF BOARD
Fig. 56B
Fig. 56A
CUTTING THE PINS
Step 1 - Cut the end of the pin board according to the instructions on the drawing (Fig. 57A). Steep angles or thin
wood will make for a weak joint. Make this cut on a table saw with the blade beveled, and with the miter
gauge set at 90°.
Step 2 - Clamp the workpiece as you did for the obtuse-angled joint.
Step 3 - Hold the boards together and mark the end of the pin board at the edges of the tails.
Step 4 - The remainder of the steps, including fitting the joint, are identical to the obtuse-angled joint section.
32
MAKE ANGLED CUT
ANGLE BETWEEN BOARDS
INSIDE
SURFACE
OF BOARD
OUTSIDE
SURFACE
OF BOARD
Fig. 57A
SLANTED-SIDE JOINTS
Two boards joined at 90°, with one board slanted to the side is known as a slanted-side joint. This method is used
to make a box with the ends at right angles to the table, but with the sides tilted outward (cradles, planters, magazine
racks).
Fig. 58A
Fig. 58B
NOTE: Usually, the tails are cut into the ends and the pins are cut into the sides.
CUTTING THE TAILS
Step 1 - Cut the ends of the tail board at the desired angle. Note that when the angle is approaching 15° that the
tails weaken (Fig. 59A).
Step 2 - Mount the board so that the outside surface faces the base of the jig and the edge is against the template
(Fig. 59B).
Step 3 - Cut the tails in the same manner as you would the standard dovetails.
Fig. 59B
Fig. 59A
33
CUTTING THE PINS
Cut the pin board according to Fig. 60A.
Hold the boards together and mark the pin board at the edges of the tails (Fig. 60B).
Rotate the template so that the tapered fingers for cutting the pins is facing you.
Mount the pin board with the outside surface facing away from the base of the jig. Center the
marks from STEP 2 between the tapered fingers (A) Fig. 60C.
Step 5 - Cut the pins in the same manner as you would with standard dovetails.
Step 1 Step 2 Step 3 Step 4 -
TAIL BOARD
EXTRA WIDTH FOR BEVEL
PIN BOARD
Fig. 60B
EDGE OF TAIL BOARD
PIN BOARD WIDTH IS EQUAL TO
EDGE OF TAIL BOARD PLUS
EXTRA WIDTH FOR BEVEL
Fig. 60A
A
FITTING THE JOINT
Fig. 60C
Fitting the joint is the same as fitting the standard
dovetail. HINT: Use pieces of scrap wood the same
thickness and species of wood to make test pin boards
until the template is adjusted for a perfect fit.
Fig. 61A
COMPOUND-ANGLE JOINTS
Two boards joined at 90°, with both boards slanted to the side is known as a compound-angle joint. This method is
used to make serving trays or planters.
Fig. 62C
Side
Angle
Fig. 62A
Fig. 62B
34
Side
Angle
NOTE: The instructions given here are for templates mounted to the base of the jig. However, this joint can also be
made with templates mounted to angled clamping boards. You must use the angled clamping board for steeper
angles.
Use the following table for setting up your table saw for these cuts:
DESIRED SIDE ANGLE
MITER gauge ANGLE
BLADE TILT ANGLE
85°
85.0°
89.6°
80°
80.1°
88.3°
75°
75.5°
86.2°
70°
71.1°
83.3°
65°
67.1°
79.7°
SETUP
Use the same setup as you would for the obtuse angled joint. Use the blade tilt angle for making the angle insert or
the angled clamping block. Bevel the edges according to the drawing (Fig. 63A).
FIRST CUT
BLADE TILT ANGLE
BEVEL THE EDGES OF THE TAIL AND PIN BOARDS
THICKNESS OF PIN BOARD
90.0°
OUTSIDE
SURFACE
OF BOARD
SECOND CUT
INSIDE
SURFACE
OF BOARD
Fig. 63A
Step 1 -
Fig. 64A
Cut the end of the tail board according to the drawing (Fig. 64A). Set the miter gauge and tilt the blade to
the values in the above table. Make the first cut with the board flat on the table surface and guide it with
the miter gauge (Fig. 64B). Make the second cut with a tenoning jig (Fig. 64C).
Fig. 64B
Fig. 64C
35
CUTTING THE TAILS
Step 2 - With the angled insert attached to the base of the jig, mount the tail board with the outside surface of the
board facing the jig and with the board centered between the fingers of the template (Fig. 64D).
Step 3 - Align the template using the “Tails” alignment line. If the angle is so steep that the “Tails” alignment line
will not work, you may have to use an angled clamping board. However, as long as the rounded part of
the fingers go past the edge of the wood, the set up will work fine as is.
Step 4 - Set the router bit depth to where the sides of the board go off at a slight angle (Fig. 64E).
Step 5 - Cut the tails and remove the tail board.
Fig. 64D
Fig. 64E
CUTTING THE PINS
Step 1 - Cut the end of the tail board according to the drawing (Fig. 65A). Set the miter gauge and tilt the blade to
the values in the previous table. Remember that the miter gauge for the tailboard must be tilted opposite
for the pin board.
Step 2 - If you are using the 12" long angled insert, remove it from the jig.
Step 3 - Hold the outside surfaces of the boards together and mark the pin board at the edges of the tail (Fig. 65B).
Step 4 - Rotate the template so that the angled fingers for cutting the pins is facing you.
Step 5 - Mount the pin board with the outside surface facing away from the base of the jig. Center the marks on
the end of the board between the angled fingers of the template (A) Fig. 65C.
Step 6 - Use the "PINS" alignment line to align the template with the edge of the pin board.
Step 7 - Set the router bit depth to slightly more than the thickness of the tail board, but prevent the bit from
contacting the base of the jig..
Step 8 - Cut the pins and remove the pin board.
BLADE TILT ANGLE
MAKE ANGLED CUT
Fig. 65B
INSIDE
SURFACE
OF BOARD
OUTSIDE
SURFACE
OF BOARD
Fig. 65A
A
Fig. 65C
36
FITTING THE JOINT
Fitting the joint is the same as fitting the standard dovetail. HINT: Use pieces of scrap wood the same thickness and
species of wood to make test pin boards until the template is adjusted for a perfect fit.
INLAYED JOINTS
The 4200 series dovetail jigs will allow you to make joints with inlays of different colored wood for a very unique look.
INLAYED THROUGH DOVETAIL
The inlayed through dovetail is produced by utilizing 2
through dovetails, one on top of the other.
SETUP
Fig. 67A
Select two sets of router bit combinations from the table for “Through Dovetail Router Bit Combinations" in the
section "TABLES OF COMMONLY AVAILABLE ROUTER BIT SIZES". Use the following table to determine the
thickness of the inlay line
Router Bit Set Combinations
Thickness of Inlay Line in
Decimal Measurements
T1 & T2
0.056
7/128
T1 & T3
0.083
11/128
T1 & T4
0.097
3/32
T2 & T3
0.028
1/32
T2 & T4
0.042
5/128
T3 & T4
0.014
1/64
Approximate Thickness
in Fractional Measurements
Use the set with the bigger dovetail bit for the first joint. Make sure that the length of the cutter on the bit is at least
the thickness of the pin board plus the thickness of the inlay line. At the same time, make sure that the length of the
cutter on the straight bit is at least the thickness of the tail board.
Use the set with the smaller dovetail bit for the second joint. Make sure that the length of the cutter is at least the
thickness of the pin board. At the same time, make sure that the length of the cutter on the straight bit is at least
the thickness of the tail board plus the thickness of the inlay line.
Plane the inlay board the same thickness as the thickness of the pin board plus the thickness of the inlay line from
the table above.
MAKE THE FIRST JOINT
Make the first joint the same way that you would make a standard through dovetail (Fig. 68A).
If the jig is set up to make through dovetails with the tails and pins slightly protruding or recessed, use the alternate
method of setting the router bit depth found in the section on “MISCELLANEOUS TECHNIQUES”.
Glue the joint together and let it dry.
37
CUT OFF THE INLAY BOARD
After the joint has dried, cut the inlay board to an amount equal to the thickness of the inlay (Fig. 68B).
Fig. 68A
Fig. 68B
If desired, you can cut off the small area shown from the remainder of the inlay wood (Fig. 68C). If left on, the
completed joint will have an extra amount of material on the inside. another alternative is to bevel this extra material
(Fig. 68D).
Fig. 68C
Fig. 68D
MAKE THE SECOND JOINT
Make the second joint the same way as you would a standard through dovetail. HINT: Do not move the offset guides
after making the first joint.
Fig. 69B
Fig. 69A
INLAYED HALF-BLIND DOVETAIL
Make this joint by producing two half-blind dovetails on
top of each other.
Fig. 70B
38
SETUP
Select one set of dovetail bits from the table for Combinations for Half-blind dovetails with the pins and the tails cut
separately in the section"TABLES OF COMMONLY AVAILABLE ROUTER BIT SIZES". Use the following table to
determine the thickness of the inlay line:
Dovetail Bit Set
Thickness of Inlay Line in
Decimal Measurements
Approximate Thickness
in Fractional Measurements
H1
0.100
13/128
H2
0.050
3/64
H3
0.042
5/128
H4
0.028
1/32
H5
0.014
1/64
NOTE: If the thickness of the inlay line is very thin, you may have difficulty cutting the inlay correctly.
MAKE THE FIRST JOINT
The first joint is identical to that described in the section on Half-Blind Dovetail Bits with the Pins and Tails Cut
Separately under the chapter “ALTERNATE ROUTER BITS”. Use the inlay material as the pin board (normally the
drawer front). For the first joint, cut the tail board with the larger dovetail bit and the pin board with the smaller
dovetail bit.
Glue the joint and let it dry.
CUT OFF THE INLAY BOARD
After the joint has dried, cut off the inlay board. Cut off the pin board flush
with the inside edge of the tail board (Fig. 71B). Then cut off the front edge of
the inlay board (Fig. 71C), making sure that the remainder of the inlay (A) Fig
71D is cut so that the thickness is equal to the thickness found in the table
on the previous page.
Fig. 71A
A
Fig. 71B
Fig. 71C
39
Fig. 71D
MAKE THE SECOND JOINT
The second joint is also identical to that described in the section on Half-Blind Dovetail Bits with the Pins and Tails
Cut Separately under the chapter “ALTERNATE ROUTER BITS”. Use the board from the previous section as the tail
board. Cut the tail board with the smaller dovetail bit and the pin board with the larger dovetail bit.
HINT: Using two routers to make these joints will make your work easier.
Fig. 72A
Fig. 72B
INLAYED BOX JOINT
This joint is made by cutting two box joints on top of each other.
SETUP
Select one set of dovetail bits from the table for “Box Joint Bit Combinations" in the section"TABLES OF
COMMONLY AVAILABLE ROUTER BIT SIZES". Use the following table to determine the thickness of the inlay line:
Straight Bit Set
Thickness of Inlay Line
B2
1/16"
B3
1/8"
NOTE: If the thickness of the inlay line is very thin, you may have difficulty in cutting the inlay correctly.
You must plane the inlay board to the thickness of the second board plus the thickness of the inlay line.
MAKE THE FIRST JOINT
The first joint is identical to a box joint with alternate router bit sizes as found in the section “ALTERNATE ROUTER
BITS”. Make a box joint with the first board and the inlay board. Use the larger straight bit with the first board and
the smaller bit with the inlay board.
If the jig is set up to make through dovetails with the tails and pins slightly protruding or recessed, use the alternate
method of setting the router bit depth found in the section on “MISCELLANEOUS TECHNIQUES”.
NOTE: For the tails and pins to be flush, be careful to make the bit depth very precise.
CUT OFF THE INLAY BOARD
After the joint has dried, cut off most of the inlay board. Leave an amount equal to the thickness of the inlay.
MAKE THE SECOND JOINT
The second joint is also identical to a box joint with alternate router bit sizes as found in the section “ALTERNATE
ROUTER BITS”. Make a box joint with the board from the previous section and the second board. Use the smaller
straight bit with the board from the previous section and the larger bit with the second board.
HINT: this section of your project (aligning the joint) is easier if you do not move the offset guides after making the
first joint.
40
TABLES OF COMMONLY AVAILABLE ROUTER BIT SIZES
THROUGH DOVETAIL ROUTER BIT COMBINATIONS
Combination Number
7° Dovetail Bit
Straight Bit
T1
T2
T3
T4
3/4"
5/8"
9/16"
17/32"
3/16"
5/16"
3/8"
13/32"
HALF-BLIND DOVETAIL BITS
Bit (Diameter and Angle)
17/32"
17/32"
9/16"
5/8"
Approximate* Depth of Cut
7°
14°
7°
14°
13/32"
3/16"
3/4"
9/16"
COMBINATIONS FOR HALF-BLIND DOVETAILS
WITH THE PINS AND THE TAILS CUT SEPARATELY.
Combination
Number
Small Dovetail Bit
(Diameter and Angle)
Large Dovetail Bit
(Diameter and Angle)
Approximate*
Depth of Cut
H1
3/4"
14°
1/2"
14°
9/16"
H2
5/8"
14°
1/2"
14°
3/8"
H3
5/8"
7°
17/32"
7°
7/8"
H4
5/8"
7°
9/16"
7°
1"
H5
9/16"
7°
17/32"
7°
5/8"
actual depth-of-cut may be a little deeper or shallower than what appears on this table. Since vendors use
different manufacturing tolerances on bit dimensions, use the manufacturer’s advertised bit dimensions only as
* The
a guide. Remember that a small amount of variation within tolerances can have a large impact on the final depthof-cut.
BOX JOINT BIT COMBINATIONS
Combination Number
Larger Straight Bit
Smaller Straight Bit
B1
B2
B3
1/2"
9/16"
5/8"
1/2"
7/16"
3/8"
41
TROUBLESHOOTING
For assistance with your tool, visit our website at www.porter-cable.com for a list of service centers or call the Porter-Cable
help line at 1-800-487-8665.
MAINTENANCE
KEEP TOOL CLEAN
Periodically blow out all air passages with dry compressed air. Clean all plastic parts with a soft damp cloth. NEVER
use solvents to clean plastic parts. They could possibly dissolve or otherwise damage the material.
WEAR ANSI Z87.1 SAFETY GLASSES WHILE USING COMPRESSED AIR.
SERVICE AND REPAIRS
All quality tools will eventually require servicing or replacement of parts due to wear from normal use. These
operations, including brush inspection and replacement, should ONLY be performed by either an AUTHORIZED
PORTER-CABLE SERVICE STATION or a PORTER-CABLE·DELTA FACTORY SERVICE CENTER. All repairs made by
these agencies are fully guaranteed against defective material and workmanship. We cannot guarantee repairs made
or attempted by anyone other than these agencies.
Should you have any questions about your tool, feel free to write us at any time. In any communications, please give
all information shown on the nameplate of your tool (model number, type, serial number, etc.).
SERVICE
REPLACEMENT PARTS
When servicing use only identical replacement parts.
SERVICE AND REPAIRS
All quality tools will eventually require servicing or replacement of parts due to wear from normal use. These
operations, including brush inspection and replacement, should ONLY be performed by either an AUTHORIZED
PORTER-CABLE SERVICE STATION or a PORTER-CABLE·DELTA FACTORY SERVICE CENTER. All repairs made by
these agencies are fully guaranteed against defective material and workmanship. We cannot guarantee repairs made
or attempted by anyone other than these agencies.
Should you have any questions about your tool, feel free to write us at any time. In any communications, please give
all information shown on the nameplate of your tool (model number, type, serial number, etc.).
ACCESSORIES
A complete line of accessories is available from your Porter-Cable·Delta Supplier, Porter-Cable·Delta Factory
Service Centers, and Porter-Cable Authorized Service Stations. Please visit our Web Site www.porter-cable.com
for a catalog or for the name of your nearest supplier.
Since accessories other than those offered by Porter-Cable·Delta have not been tested with this
product, use of such accessories could be hazardous. For safest operation, only Porter-Cable·Delta
recommended accessories should be used with this product.
42
WARRANTY
PORTER-CABLE LIMITED
ONE YEAR WARRANTY
Porter-Cable warrants its Professional Power Tools for a period of one year from the date of original purchase. We will repair or replace at our option, any part or
parts of the product and accessories covered under this warranty which, after examination, proves to be defective in workmanship or material during the warranty
period. For repair or replacement return the complete tool or accessory, transportation prepaid, to your nearest Porter-Cable Service Center or Authorized Service
Station. Proof of purchase may be required. This warranty does not apply to repair or replacement required due to misuse, abuse, normal wear and tear or repairs
attempted or made by other than our Service Centers or Authorized Service Stations.
ANY IMPLIED WARRANTY, INCLUDING THE IMPLIED WARRANTIES OF MERCHANTABILITY AND FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE, WILL LAST ONLY
FOR ONE (1) YEAR FROM THE DATE OF PURCHASE.
To obtain information on warranty performance please write to: PORTER-CABLE CORPORATION, 4825 Highway 45 North, Jackson, Tennessee 38305; Attention:
Product Service. THE FOREGOING OBLIGATION IS PORTER-CABLE’S SOLE LIABILITY UNDER THIS OR ANY IMPLIED WARRANTY AND UNDER NO
CIRCUMSTANCES SHALL PORTER-CABLE BE LIABLE FOR ANY INCIDENTAL OR CONSEQUENTIAL DAMAGES. Some states do not allow limitations on how
long an implied warranty lasts or the exclusion or limitation of incidental or consequential damages, so the above limitation or exclusion may not apply to you.
This warranty gives you specific legal rights and you may also have other legal rights which vary from state to state.
43
PORTER-CABLE • DELTA SERVICE CENTERS
(CENTROS DE SERVICIO DE PORTER-CABLE • DELTA)
Parts and Repair Service for Porter-Cable • Delta Machinery are Available at These Locations
(Obtenga Refaccion de Partes o Servicio para su Herramienta en los Siguientes Centros de Porter-Cable • Delta)
ARIZONA
Tempe 85282 (Phoenix)
2400 West Southern Avenue
Suite 105
Phone: (602) 437-1200
Fax: (602) 437-2200
CALIFORNIA
Ontario 91761 (Los Angeles)
3949A East Guasti Road
Phone: (909) 390-5555
Fax: (909) 390-5554
Tampa 33609
4538 W. Kennedy Boulevard
Phone: (813) 877-9585
Fax: (813) 289-7948
GEORGIA
Forest Park 30297 (Atlanta)
5442 Frontage Road,
Suite 112
Phone: (404) 608-0006
Fax: (404) 608-1123
San Diego 92111
7638 Clairemnot Blvd.
Phone: (858) 277-9595
Fax: (858) 277-9696
ILLINOIS
Addison 60101 (Chicago)
400 South Rohlwing Rd.
Phone: (630) 424-8805
Fax: (630) 424-8895
San Leandro 94577 (Oakland)
3039 Teagarden Street
Phone: (510) 357-9762
Fax: (510) 357-7939
Woodridge 60517 (Chicago)
2033 West 75th Street
Phone: (630) 910-9200
Fax: (630) 910-0360
COLORADO
Arvada 80003 (Denver)
8175 Sheridan Blvd., Unit S
Phone: (303) 487-1809
Fax: (303) 487-1868
MARYLAND
Elkridge 21075 (Baltimore)
7397-102 Washington Blvd.
Phone: (410) 799-9394
Fax: (410) 799-9398
FLORIDA
Davie 33314 (Miami)
4343 South State Rd. 7 (441)
Unit #107
Phone: (954) 321-6635
Fax: (954) 321-6638
MASSACHUSETTS
Franklin 02038 (Boston)
Franklin Industrial Park
101E Constitution Blvd.
Phone: (508) 520-8802
Fax: (508) 528-8089
MICHIGAN
Madison Heights 48071 (Detroit)
30475 Stephenson Highway
Phone: (248) 597-5000
Fax: (248) 597-5004
MINNESOTA
Minneapolis 55429
5522 Lakeland Avenue North
Phone: (763) 561-9080
Fax: (763) 561-0653
MISSOURI
North Kansas City 64116
1141 Swift Avenue
Phone: (816) 221-2070
Fax: (816) 221-2897
St. Louis 63119
7574 Watson Road
Phone: (314) 968-8950
Fax: (314) 968-2790
NEW YORK
Flushing 11365-1595 (N.Y.C.)
175-25 Horace Harding Expwy.
Phone: (718) 225-2040
Fax: (718) 423-9619
NORTH CAROLINA
Charlotte 28270
9129 Monroe Road, Suite 115
Phone: (704) 841-1176
Fax: (704) 708-4625
OHIO
Columbus 43214
4560 Indianola Avenue
Phone: (614) 263-0929
Fax: (614) 263-1238
Cleveland 44125
8001 Sweet Valley Drive
Unit #19
Phone: (216) 447-9030
Fax: (216) 447-3097
OREGON
Portland 97230
4916 NE 122 nd Ave.
Phone: (503) 252-0107
Fax: (503) 252-2123
PENNSYLVANIA
Willow Grove 19090
(Philadelphia)
520 North York Road
Phone: (215) 658-1430
Fax: (215) 658-1433
TEXAS
Carrollton 75006 (Dallas)
1300 Interstate 35 N, Suite 112
Phone: (972) 446-2996
Fax: (972) 446-8157
Houston 77043
4321 Sam Houston Parkway,
West
Suite 180
Phone: (713) 983-9910
Fax: (713) 983-6645
WASHINGTON
Auburn 98001(Seattle)
3320 West Valley HWY, North
Building D, Suite 111
Phone: (253) 333-8353
Fax: (253) 333-9613
Authorized Service Stations are located in many large cities. Telephone 800-438-2486 or 731-541-6042 for assistance locating one.
Parts and accessories for Porter-Cable·Delta products should be obtained by contacting any Porter-Cable·Delta Distributor, Authorized
Service Center, or Porter-Cable·Delta Factory Service Center. If you do not have access to any of these, call 800-223-7278 and you will
be directed to the nearest Porter-Cable·Delta Factory Service Center. Las Estaciones de Servicio Autorizadas están ubicadas en muchas
grandes ciudades. Llame al 800-438-2486 ó al 731-541-6042 para obtener asistencia a fin de localizar una. Las piezas y los accesorios
para los productos Porter-Cable·Delta deben obtenerse poniéndose en contacto con cualquier distribuidor Porter-Cable·Delta, Centro
de Servicio Autorizado o Centro de Servicio de Fábrica Porter-Cable·Delta. Si no tiene acceso a ninguna de estas opciones, llame al
800-223-7278 y le dirigirán al Centro de Servicio de Fábrica Porter-Cable·Delta más cercano.
CANADIAN PORTER-CABLE • DELTA SERVICE CENTERS
ALBERTA
Bay 6, 2520-23rd St. N.E.
Calgary, Alberta
T2E 8L2
Phone: (403) 735-6166
Fax: (403) 735-6144
BRITISH COLUMBIA
8520 Baxter Place
Burnaby, B.C.
V5A 4T8
Phone: (604) 420-0102
Fax: (604) 420-3522
MANITOBA
1699 Dublin Avenue
Winnipeg, Manitoba
R3H 0H2
Phone: (204) 633-9259
Fax: (204) 632-1976
ONTARIO
505 Southgate Drive
Guelph, Ontario
N1H 6M7
Phone: (519) 767-4132
Fax: (519) 767-4131
QUÉBEC
1515 ave.
St-Jean Baptiste, Suite 160
Québec, Québec
G2E 5E2
Phone: (418) 877-7112
Fax: (418) 877-7123
1447, Begin
St-Laurent, (Montréal),
Québec
H4R 1V8
Phone: (514) 336-8772
Fax: (514) 336-3505
The following are trademarks of PORTER-CABLE • DELTA (Las siguientes son marcas registradas de PORTER-CABLE • DELTA S.A.) (Les marques
suivantes sont des marques de fabriquant de la PORTER-CABLE • DELTA): Auto-Set®, BAMMER®, B.O.S.S.®, Builder’s Saw®, Contractor’s Saw®,
Contractor’s Saw II™, Delta®, DELTACRAFT®, DELTAGRAM™, Delta Series 2000™, DURATRONIC™, Emc²™, FLEX®, Flying Chips™, FRAME SAW®,
Grip Vac™, Homecraft®, INNOVATION THAT WORKS®, Jet-Lock®, JETSTREAM®, ‘kickstand®, LASERLOC®, MICRO-SET®, Micro-Set®, MIDI LATHE®,
MORTEN™, NETWORK™, OMNIJIG®, POCKET CUTTER®, PORTA-BAND®, PORTA-PLANE®, PORTER-CABLE®&(design), PORTERCABLE®PROFESSIONAL POWER TOOLS, PORTER-CABLE REDEFINING PERFORMANCE™, Posi-Matic®, Q-3®&(design), QUICKSAND®&(design),
QUICKSET™, QUICKSET II®, QUICKSET PLUS™, RIPTIDE™&(design), SAFE GUARD II®, SAFE-LOC®, Sanding Center®, SANDTRAP®&(design), SAW
BOSS®, Sawbuck™, Sidekick®, SPEED-BLOC®, SPEEDMATIC®, SPEEDTRONIC®, STAIR EASE®, The American Woodshop®&(design), The Lumber
Company®&(design), THE PROFESSIONAL EDGE®, THE PROFESSIONAL SELECT®, THIN-LINE™, TIGER®, TIGER CUB®, TIGER SAW®,
TORQBUSTER®, TORQ-BUSTER®, TRU-MATCH™, TWIN-LITE®, UNIGUARD®, Unifence®, UNIFEEDER™, Unihead®, Uniplane™, Unirip®, Unisaw®,
Univise®, Versa-Feeder®, VERSA-PLANE® , WHISPER SERIES®, WOODWORKER’S CHOICE™.
Trademarks noted with ™ and ® are registered in the United States Patent and Trademark Office and may also be registered in other countries. Las
Marcas Registradas con el signo de ™ y ® son registradas por la Oficina de Registros y Patentes de los Estados Unidos y también pueden estar
registradas en otros países.
PC7.2-0105-149
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