ARIZONA. 30,

ARIZONA. 30,

COUNTY AGENT SUPERVISION

ARIZONA.

AGRICUnr URAL EXTENSION SERVICE

Howard R.

Baker

As sistant Director

Deoember

1,

1946 to

November 30,

1947

TABLE OF CONTENTS

I.

THE SITUATION

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II.

RESPONSIBILITIES

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III.

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OBJ1IJTIVES, :MErHODS, AND RESULTS

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IV.

EVALUATION OF ACCOMPLISHMENTS

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5 v.

ACCOMPLISHMENTS WITHIN THE COUNTIES

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VI.

CHANGES IN PERSONNEL

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VII.

COOPERATION.

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VIII.

OUTIDOK

AND RlOOOMMENDATI mrs

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35

ANNUAL REPORT

COUBTY AGENT

SUPERVISION

ARIZONA AGRICULTURAL mENSION SERVICE

December 1, 1946 to Nevember

30,

1947

I.

THE SITUATION

Adminiatrati va

responsibility

for the operation of the

Agricultural

ExteDliG:u Serviee of the of Extension.

University ef Arizona is vested in the Director

Certain administrative and supervisory responsibilities pertaiming to county agricultural agents' and specialists' programs of work bave been assigned to the Assistant

Director of Extension.

Stat.

specialists

assist the county agricultural agents and the home demonstra­ tion agent

8 in planning their program within the county and in carrying out the planned program.

There are teurteen cOUIlties in the state, twelve of which carry a program of extensiGJl work.

The other two eounties are without agents.

One ot these oOUllties,

:Mobave, bas never had an agent;.

However, assistanoe is gi

Ten to farmers and ranehers in these two lmorganized counties it and when special requests are

_de.

Generally this assistance comes from a

D8arby county.

However" under certain conditions the assista.nce will come from the state effiee.

CountZ

Apaeh.

Cochis.

Coconino

Gila

Graham

Greenlee

)(aricopa.

lavajo

Pima

Piml

Yavapai

Yuma

The program. of the

Agricultural

Extensien Service oontinues to expand.

D\lriDg the war period a great deal of service was state, and eounty programs.

given

to special federal,

At the close of the war, many of these pro­ grams were return te a disoontinued and it was regular and organiz necessary ad extension for the Extension Service to program.

This change-over is practically completed.

In the meantime, many farmers mt ve become aecua­ tomed t.

individ.ual

service and this, together with an enlarged prGgram,

_.

laid a heavy burden en the county agent's office.

There are yet

'9aca.ncies, both in the specialist staff and in one or two counties.

County personnel in 1941 included the following oounty workers:

Assistant Asst. Home

A�rie. A�.nt.

A§rio.

A,ents

Home Dam.

A,ents

Dem.

Agts.

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

I

1

I

I

1

0

0

0

0

0

0

4

0

1

1

0

1

Part-Time

*

I

Part-Time

**

Part-Time **

Part-Time ***

Part-Time

***

1

Part-Time •

1

I

Part-Time **

I

0

0

0

0

0

0

I

0

0

0

0

0

••

•••

One

One

OBe agent serves both

Apache and

Navajo Counties

• agent serves

Coconino, Gi Ia

, and Ya va pal

C ounti es.

agent serves

Graham and Greenlee Counties.

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State spt.i.list persoImel in 1941 was as tellows:

Specialist

in

AgrCDnomy

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Norris W. Gilbert

Specialist

in Animal Husbandry

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Walter

D.

Armer

Specialist

in

Entomology

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J. H.

Rone,.

Extensien Horticulturist

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Extension.

Information

Harvey

F. Tat.

Specialist

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Joe

McClelland

Specialistin

Irri�tion

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Donald L. Hitch

Specialist

in

Poultry

&

Dairying

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W. R. Van Sant

Specialist

Sta;te in Rural

Socialegy

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A. B.

Ballantyne

Leader, 4-11.

Club Work

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Kenneth L.

:McKee

Unfilled positions in 1947 included a specialist in_ agricultural engineer­ ing and an assistant .xtension economist.

II.

REPOlISIBI LITIES

Certain administrative responsibilities have been assigned to the Assistant

Directer.

He has the responsibility of preparing the county budgets and presenting them. to the

COlimty supervisors.

He has the responsibility ot

.eeuri:ng county persozmel, subject tG) the final

approval

ot the Director of Extension •. The order th&t responsibility of maDAgemeD.t

of the county offices in they meet state requirements has been assign.ed

to the Assistant

Direotor.

This

responsibility

refers primarily to the purchase and illVen­ tory of and th e

equipment

in the county offiees, office location and arrangement, relationship of' the

COUD.ty

office to the state office.

The.retirement program for,extensien personnel,

...eident insurance programs for extension of the Assistaat Director.

and personnel the are life, health, the and responsibility

Assigned supervisQry responsibili tie. include the

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rangem.em

of programs tor ance county agent meetings, with county both district and the annual extension programs.

and the conference.

'coordination of assist­ specialists' programs with county programs, and the over-al1 responsibility

4-H club program in the state.

There are other miscellaneous for the responsibili­ ties, including co.peration

with federal agencies

J and with state and oounty organizations.

Considerable cooperation has been given to the agrioultural eeenomies program in the absence of an extension economist.

Ill.

OBJECTIVES

J

METHODS

J

AND RESUnr

S

A.

Personnel Problema

1., Selection and employment of oounty and state personnel

It was extremely difficult to obtain qualified personnel during the year 1941.

The dEmand.

was great throughout the country and the supply inadequate.

Fortunately there were few resignations in county and

.tate

personnel duriDg the year.

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Changes

were mad.e in three counties in 1941.

In Cochise

County, the county agricultural agent resigned in. midsummer and was replaced in

Sept-.ber

of 1947 with another county agent who had been in charge of the Farm. Laber oultural

Program.

In Marioopa Cou:r.rl;y, an assistant county agri­ agent 1n>charge of 4-H dub work was named as of

January

1.

1941.

The an previous assistant agent had resigned in

September.

Also.

assistant agent in charge

Qf agronomy was appoint ed in

February.

1941.

This post had likewise becOJIle

..

cant during the latter plrt of

1946.

The county agricultural agent in

Na'ftjo

County, who had resigned in the la.te fall of

1946, was replaoed on

Mareh 16, 1947 with another tr�sferee from the Farm Labor

Program.

These changes constituted the changes within the county extension offices during

1947.

In the state year.

The office, two position specialist appointments were of extension agronomist, made during the which bad been vacan:\; for apprOximately a year, was filled with the appointment of Norris W.

Gilbert on

Septanber

1.

1941.

The position ot information specialist was tilled.

.en

Ootober

It

1947.

These bave been the changes in the

Agricultural

Extension

Servioe.

during

1947.

It is hoped that additional employees

C8Jl.

be obtained during

1948.

With th e.

progress of time" more tra.ined individua,ls should be avail­ able.

QualiTica.tions

tor most of these posi tiona include a degree trom.a

recognized agricultural college and some experience, if at all possible.

Also' desired is actual farm.

training as a youth.

2.

In-service training

Because of the great need for personnel and the almost entire lack of

supply

of trained individuals, it has been almost impossible to carry on a training program. for new personnel.

It is desirable for inex­ perienced pers.nnel

to serve a period of apprenticeship in the oounty and state offioes prior to being assigned to a detini te county posi­ tion.

Generally, the individual is given

approximately

one month's training in the state office, where he becomes familia.r with state ottice routine.

While at the sta.te

office, he is in constant contact wi th the various specialists and is learning methods and subjeot mat­ ter from.

them." Atter

8.

brief period in the state oftice, he is assigned to a

(unmty' in order the.

t he may learn extension methods trom the he may be county agricultural agent.

Depending upon oireumstan.ces, assigned to several counties over a period of several months, in order that he may beoome acquainted 'With the different methods aap10yed by difterent agents and also in order that he may learn the agric'l11ture of the state more fully.

Atter apprenticeship in the state office and in one or more oounties, i� is otten desirable to assign e.

special problem tor his studiY' and analysis.

This gives the at the method of attack on the more involved to the individual individual some knowledge problems in the oounties.

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3.

Professional improvem.ent

Protessional improvement is an essential in any progressive organiza­ tion.

This

protesslonal improvement

may be obtained in several wa.ys.

Reading

current literature in his own tield is a tirst essentia.l.

Encouragement

is alse given to all extension personnel to obtain some organized cour se work.

This may be summer school, a semester.

or an entire year.

Every efron is being

:made to encourage personnel to attend sUID'IlSr s,chool.

and to those who have been employed tor a longer

period.

ot time' sabbatio leave is available.

B.

.Assistanoe to

Agents in the

Development ef the Extension Program.

A requi sit8 to

.etting

up an adequate extension program in the county is

8,.

knowledge

of the

a.gricultural

resources of that county.

County sUrveys ot agricultural resources are being made for eaoh county in the state..

This inf ormation will then be used as a basis for deter­ mining the major problelUs in the

eo1llIb1.

With a knowledge or the agricultura.l

resources in. the county and the various problems deter­ mined.

the srtensi on program for the county may be set up.

To be most etfecti ve, the a.

plan set up for rural people should include thinking of the individual. tor wham.

the planning is done.

The organization of the rural people to assist in this planning is essen­ tial.

Some additional work needs to be cione on the organization of rural people.

In 4-H club work.

a

4-H club county counoil is being established in several sf the CO'tUlti es in an effort to better plan and conduot the 4-H club program.

Certain phases of the county extension program otten receive valuable assistance from farmer is

8specially commodity organisations.

The commodity' group illt erested in its

Q'Wn welfare and is constantly seeking asaistan.ce from the county agent.

Many times the county agricultural agent calls in the

specialiSt

and all three s it down to work out the prGblem.�

A porti&n of the ceunty extension program. is thus built in this way.

This prooedure has been customary through the years.

other important problems in the county must of necessity be stressed by the county agent.

Assisted by the extensien specialist, he calls in a small group of farmers to diseuss the problem and its solution.

This meeting gaaerally results in definite action being taken.

It i8 ultimately p�ed that the county extension plan of work

De a unified program tor farmers and the farm home.

It will shall probably take some time to reaoh this goal.

but it is a definite goal in the txtensiOQ program.

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c.

Assistance to

Agents

in

Carrying

Ou.t the Extension

Program

'r'he eO\1D.ty agent has the established pr ogram.

respoIl.si'bi.li

From his own ty for the execution of the experi cmce he

.us

t determine the besil m.ethcd

of

procedure.

In making this final deci sian, suggestions are obtained from the speoialists.

The responsibility tor obtaining local leaders is of cour se his.

Knowing their interests and influenoe with ether tarmers in the community, he can select his leaders more wisely.

The extension year program in the county is observed and ekecked. f'rQDl time to time to note both and the suceesa

closely

changes during the in the program being achieved.

Ordinarily the agent needs the sug­ gestions ot the

specialists

determine the best and the procedures.

supervisors in order to better

IV.

IVA.LlIA.TION

OF ACCOMPLISHMENTS

1.

Extension Conferenees

The extGSion conference is an excellent method of encouraging better

'Working

relationships.

I:m.

addition, it ofters an opportunity to pre­ sent both subject matter and extension methods to personnel.

It also after.

an' excellent

opportunity

to discuss the over-all extension pro­ g�.as it affects the farmer state-wide.

Three extension coni' erences were held during the year 1947.

The annual extension conterenee was held the week of

December

15 on the campus of the

University of Arizona at Tucson.

This cont erenoe stressed both

,uDjectmatter and extension methods.

Two out-of-state speakers were present to ofter inspirational talks to personnel in attendance at the conference.

Two regional conferences were set up during the month of

May..

The high altitude county agricultural agents met on

May

15 to discuss their programs and problems.

The groups af

14 and agent.

from.

the lower altitude counties met on tion to extension

Yay

21-23 in conference.

In addi­ methods, these.

district conferenoes stressed subjeot

_tter.

The program was built around soils, insectioides, fertilizers, aDd 4-H club work.

AgronOmic problems also received same consideration.

B.

4-H Club Work

One of the most

Olllb progr8.Dl.

important phases of the extension progra:m. is the 4-H

There are over

3,000 boys and girls enrolled in 4-H olub work in

Arizona, of which apprOximately two-thirds are girls.

The num­ ber of club members in the state must be increased and the program for these olUb m�ber8 must be greatly improved.

Every assistance is being gi

Ten to the atate 4-H club leader and to the various oounties in the stat. in building

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better

4-H club program.

Each county is enoouraged to have at least one county event in which all

4-H club members in the county

'My participate.

Greater stress is event.

BUch as

4-H club fair

•.

pic�o,

oamp, state trip.

being plaoed on the oounty eto

•• than on the out-of'­

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Several stat

....

ide events were helt tor 4-H club members in 1947.

The 4-Ii Olub

RGlUldup

had its usual

well-planned

program the first week in June.

To this

Roundup

came representatives from. each coUIIt;y in the state.

Demonstration teams,

judging

teams

..

shoWlll8!l.ship

teams.

and all phases of 4-H fairs were held during club work were the year and.

represented.

were attended

Fi by v.

the

4

..

H club supervisor.

·These 4-H olub fairs are probably the best attended events held in the eowatie8 and the plan is to encourage all counties to hold 4-II clUB fairs.

T'R

4-H club c8.1D.ps

were held during the year,

80 located that most of the oounties could participate.

One camp was held at

Payson tor one week, and the other one near

Presoott.

The state staft assisted in conduoting these two oaaps.

The supervisor of cOUllty agricultural agents acted as a member of the committee which

judged

the exhibits 0t those olub members competing for' Natienal 4-H Club

Cougress and National 4-H Club

Camp trips.

There are several

:aeed is maj or needs in.

4-H club work in Arizona.

The first

probably

a mere complete and better adapted program.

Work i.

being dom with this in mind.

A seoond important need i8 4-H club leadership.

Every effort is being made to improve this leadership through more assistanoe.

Tentative plans are

Ullder way for a

4-H leaders camp for

Arizona club leaders.

made to make 4-H club work mG>re

Every

effort is also being widely known.

amongst rural and towns­ people.

In at least one

CQunty,

.4-H dUD work is receiving county­ wide

.support

from all groups.

It is hoped to make this universal throughout the state.

c�

Comty

Oftice

Arra�gement

and

Equipment

An

efficiently

organized county otfice is essential to the success or the in county extension program.

Assista.nce

is being given agents organizing their offices, arranging their equipment, securing new equipaent, and in fi li:n.g systems.

Ini tia.l

steps in this pr ogram were taken in 1947.

Ywua

County

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Initial steps were taken in 1947 to improve the Yuma

CoUDty extension offiee.

Plans were made to partition the present large rc)(.

into fow private offices tor the two agents and the home c1anonstration agent.

A fourth oftiee will be set up in anticipation ot tutwe needs.

The sms.ll

amount of equipment was purchased and will be greatly added to in 1948.

Javajo

CoUltby

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Initial steps have been made to rearrange the

Navajo

County agent' s office.

Needed equipment is being purcha sed, and the oftice entirely rearranged in order to best utilize the spaoe therein.

Initial step.

were taken in several of the other counties looking toward the impr

.• v�umt of the county otfices during

1948.

One of the tirst counti es to b.

rearranged in 1948 will be the Cochise

County oltice.

Initial steps were ta.ken

in this regard late in 1947.

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D.

Program PlaDning

!ke

COQJlty mension program should be planned

largely

by the rural peopl..

The

program

itself will have several phases.

It is almost

impoasible

to omit the servioe pbase of extension work.

However, each agent will 'be encouraged to to include certain

analyze

his program

caretully

and phases of service in a project of county-wide scepe.

By

clevel"ping certa.in

:major problems into extension projects

..

a much greater number of rural people can be served with much less effort.

There should be both long-term and short-term.

projects.

The short-tar..

a short projects are those whieh ean be solved rather easily within period of tim..

The lODger term problems will require much more effort and tim..

Answers to these long-time problems can

only

be secured through long-time projects.

Assistance was gi van to county agricultural agents during

1947 ill

plal:m.ing

their eounty programs.

The plan ot operation of the last few years has net been greatly changed to date.

It is anticipated

..

however, that there will be some change in the system of county

pl.a.nning.

This change will involve two major pointsl

More assistance will

\>e given county agricultural agents programs

..

in the preparation of their and an effort will be made to obtain a better representation ot rural people in the ceunty planning work.

It may b. necessary to vary the the late months of plan of operation in the county.

In

1947, scme definite county planning work was carried on in Graham

County.

The specialists and the state supervisor met with the county agent to discuss the agriculture in the county.

After a brier discussion of the agriculture ot the couaty, at which time agricultural resources in the county were presented to the entire group by the extension economist, the agent and the various special­ ists made a trip over the county to see at first-hand the situation.

A stop was made in each community in the county and the major problems ot that community discussed.

At the conclusion at the trip, a detailed discussion was had of the eral definite major prcblems throughout the county.

Sev­ steps were outlined in an ettort to establish certain projects for the county.

For example, one community was rather care­ fully analyzed by the entire group.

It was then decided to make a survey in the eamnuni ty to determine wha. t the agricultural resources or that one community might be.

After the resources were determined, a meeting would be planned and the entire situation discussed with the people in the community.

Plans have been made to follow that procedure

This

It plan,will be checked carefully for its suocesses and failures.

successful, it will likely be adopted in other counties.

Only the ini t1al steps have been taken in program planning Ln

Ari zona..

Muoh planning needs to be done, and it will be necessary to determine the best method of county planning tor the state.

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I.

Miscellaneous

Supervisory

Responsibilities

and

Accomplishments

1.

County

fairs

County

fairs were held in five oounti

8S in the state in 1947.

In an eftort to assist their oounty agricultural agents in better planning fairs, a fair committee was established at the state otfiee.

tor

This fair committee assisted them censiderable assistance in fair eommittee agents in setting their dates and gave also assisted in setting up the tair catalog.

This seleoting judges for these various county fairs·a:nd in

eeordiD8.ting

the ·eonclusiGn ot the the entire county fair progre.m..

At fairs, it was decided that more assistance must' be given to county agents in their fair programs.

With this' in

:mind, it was decided to prepare a bulletin on county fair techniques.

This

1JI11letill would discuss the mechanioal organization ot the tair# the records necessary to

properly

conduct a fair

..

and would give a list of suggested exhibits tor the tair.

This publication will be pre­

:plred in. the early spring of 1948 in order to be �tilized fully at

1948 county fairs.

2.

Farm La.bor

Program

Consid.rable assistance was given in 1947 to the state supervisor ot the Farm Labor

I&bor

Progre.m

in the planning and carrying out of the Farm

Program.

1941 was the· last fUll year of the extension-operated

Farm

Labor

'be obtain.

Program.

Farm labor became

All ot the prisoners more plentiful and much easier of war had been removed from the state

..

and many of them returned to their homes in grem became 0118 of

Europe.

The Pro­ directing migrant labor to the areas ef need

..

and thilwas done var" effectively of Farm. Labor offices at the and port efficiently through of entry the into the state operation and stop­ over camps at· the same

100a1;ion.

It was at the suggestion of the county agent 8uperviaer that an overnight camp was established at each port of enbry in order to better contaot migrant labor com.i� into the state.

With his assistanoe, the entire program of migrant camps tor those tm.teriDg

the state was prepared.

I.

Soils school

One of the greatest needs of intormatien on county agricultural agents is up-to-date subject matter.

With this in mind, the county agent aupervisor suggested at·the

May district extension conferences that a

80il. sehool or soils conference might be valuable to oounty agents.

The

8uggestiQn was agreed with by the agents present, and the super­ vilor took it upon himself to plan such a meeting..

there being no

8011a specialist on the state staft.

After obtaining suggestions trGB iDterested personnel

..

a program was planned ference.

It was held for the soils oon­

September

3, 4, and 5 on the campus of the

University

of Arizona, with all county agents and assistant agents present.

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The

_tire out with the outliaed soils department.

The talks to be presented were fully by th.e

supervisor and the soils department

personnel

ahead of time.

program tor this soila

DEmonstrations were school had

previously

'been worked planned and set up in order to be in readineas ter the school.

The supervisor then took the various talks aDd made.

a brief out line or them.

Each set dow.n

on, notebook paper and space major point of the talk was lett between each major statement in order that the

In this way, the agent might make Ji1.otes

as the talk wa.s

being gi veD.

agent be.d

a

complete

outline ot the talk, and at the same time could. make notes of his own as the talk was given.

This pr0ved very etfective in gettillg across ter presented.

to the

At the same time it oftered an agent the subject mat­ opportunity for him tG take hom.e with him the notes which he had made and the notes of the outlined speech.

The sohoolwas Tery effective along several lines.

In the first place, it gave the new agents a:nd the older agents up-to-date infor­ mation on soils.

At the same time, it brought a oloser tie between the soils tollowed department and the Extension Service.

This school will b.

by a similar school each year.

Probably in 1948 a fertilizer schoel will be held.

4.

The retirement program

CQnsiderable time during the year was spent on the retiranent program of .the lJ

•.

S. Civil. Service Commission.

Early in the year the informa­ tion·beoame available that extension personnel were eligible for these benefits.

With this in mind, information on the retirems.t program wa� assembled and after being ca.refully a.nalyzed by the supervisor, was sent to all extension each.

individual in the personnel.

Mandatory

and optional payment

Extension Service were determined as of s tor

July 1,

1947.

This ini'ormation

1I&.S

sent to each individual on the staft

Accom.panyilllg

this stat_ant was a brief summary of the program.

As a result of the work done on the retirement prog� in

Arizona, welv. members of the state and cOUllty stafts made application for the

Civil Service retirement program.

A their checks would be mailed in plan was set up whereby regularly by the state supervisor.

6.__

Subject matter information for county agricultural agents

County agents were kept informed as to the latest bulletins which might pertldn to.

agriculture in their county.

In general, the spec­ ialilts in the various fields sent out bulletins in their field8.

Research bulletins on specific subject matter in fields not covered by specialist.

were sent out by the state supervisQr.

In order that county agents might have complete inf'ormation on ourrent activities or the

Commodity

Credit

Corporation and the U.

S.

Department oulture and its tarm program, inf'ornation was sent out of

Agri­ regularly to agents on each new development in the program.

This information pertained primarily to price supports, the loan program, etc.

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I.

)(iseellaneQus

A rather complete survey of irrigated lands in Cochise in 1947.

fhe primary purpose of this Sl1M"ey was to

County

determine was the made amount of'

agricultural

land in the ceunty and its locatiorl..

This in­ formation 'Will be used as basic ini'ormation in the

planning

of the

Cochise

Gaunt,.

extension program.

Considerable assistance was grUls of the given during the year to the radio pro­ agricultural college of the

University

0f Arizona.

As a lIlember Ci)f' the state agricultural college radie program committee, the supervisor assisted in planning the progr�s tor the year.

'fbi. committee met tour times during the y_r to prepare these pro­ grams.,

The Assistant �reetor a180 served as a member of the Uni­ versit,.

()f Arizona

Forum. radio cGmmitte..

This committee outlined the once programs eaoh tor the week

University througheut of Arizona

Forum, a program presented the sohool year.

This committee met four times during the year to prepare the program of subjects and personnel tor this presentation.

Several out-at-state

Brtensiol1 meetings were attended duriDg the year.

The

Workshop at Pullman, Washington, lIarch

10-22, 1941, was attended by the supervisor.

This was an excellent workshop of state supervisors meetillg to discuss their problems.

The Western Farm

Economics meeting

·at

Logan,

Utah, was attended in June.

This was a meeting of agricultural economists of the' western states.

The Western

States Extension Conterence at

Corvallis, Oregon, August 4-7, was attendedtion, by the Assistant Director.

This program stressed administra­

"'agronomy,

and soil conservation.

Many

m.eetings

were attended during the year within the state.

Among th.ese

were several of' the monthly meetings of the

State Farm.

Bureau.

These meetiDg8 were held in Phoenix and centered around the Farm. Bureau program.

The annual meeting of the United Producers and Consumers Co­ operative, Arizona's largest cooperative, was attended at the request or the officials ot the group.

The annual vation meeting of the Soil Oonser­

Serviee was attended and a short talk given.

Several county farm. bureau meetings were attended during the year in the various counties in the state.

The Assistant Director acted as discussion leader of a tour set up by the Douglas

Chamber of Commerce.

Thi.

tour was set up in an effort to bring the rural people and the tewnspeople closer together.

The tour was made of farms in the Douglas area.

The annual and meeti� or the Bureau of Reolamation,

Experiment Station,

Extensi0n

Service, held in Yuma., Arizona, early in

July of each year, was at this attended.

Of meeting was the primary importance to the Extension Service disoussion of subject matter to be made avail­ able tor the prospective veteran farmers on the m.esa

farm lands.

-

11

v.

I1!ENSIOl{ ACTIVITIES AND ACCOMPLISHMENTS

WITHIN THE COUNTIES

The

rellning

is a brief

S'D1JD&ry by oounties of the extension program

aco.,li_ants

tor th.e

year

1941:

.lpaeae

County

There are

only approximately

8.000

aeree ef irrigated land in

Apaohe

County.

the reainder of the area being utilized by the range livestook

iiLdl1stry.

ApprexiDltely

15,000 head .t

ca.ttle

were dipped or sprayed in

194'1 in the exte:nsion livestock program.

Fifteen meetings were held, with.

a total attendance of· 162, on the oontrol ot lie. in cattle.

Fif'ty­ four titterent individuals attended

Several eight meetings thousand head of cattle were treated tor held on gru'D grubs during control.

the year.

D_QILstrations showed both the use of ci_t and the

spraying

.ethod in grub contrel.

The extension program also included the oontrol of deer tlies and horn flies.

In an effort to centrol horn

.flies,

a n_

fly

spray was tried out; duriug tae year trollei threllga with considerable suecess.

Ear ticks on cattle were con­ the u.s e.

of a mixture of two parts pine tar to one part cottonseed oil.

Three ciEmoBstrations were given during the year to eighteen ranohers on tile centrol ot lumpy jaw.

During the winter and early spring a nutri­ tie_l diaease made its appearanoe.

The trouble was diagn.osed

as a lack of paosphorus and proteiD..

Alfalfa hay was ted om e a week in order to r_edy the situation.

In order te better good stock, a aequaint ranchers with good stock and the sources of pure-bred breeders field day was held in the early tall.

Ie

011 pasteurized milk is produced in the oounty and there are very tew ee_erei

..

l dairies.

The extension.

teuriza.tien of m.ilk for local program

_phasiz es the need ot pas­ consumption.

One dEmonstration was held the selection of dairy calves, using the new technique developed by the U. S.

Department

of Agriculture.

Soil tests were

_cie throughout the county in an effort to better deter­

Jline the needs for adeq\Bte production.

The analyses were depended upon

�.

show the tertilizer needs for each fa.rm.

Nine meetings with a tcptal atteDdanee ot 185 were held to discuss soil

1011 problems.

In addition to proDl.a, cnlltural practices, the use of the Lister drill in plant­ ag small grains, and other related matters were discussed.

The Lister drill wa8 widely recOJDJaended il!l.

an effort to meet th e drought oonditiona.

In oooperation wi t1l the

Eagar Irrilation Company

I three test areas were aet 1Ip along the irription ditches.

These areas were oiled in order to eheekwater loss.s.

Irrigation practice during the year a180 incluQ8d demonstratioBs on the use of' the farm level.

-

12

line

•••

tings

w,ere h.eld

during the y_r en orchard

JD8l'Jagan.ent,

66 individ­

.11

being

present.

Discussed at these meetings were the pr<Dper pruning et frut

1;rees, fertilization and oar., and at harvest time the selection of

apple.

tor fair .%Aibita.

Disease control Was also demonstrated.

ho

.eetillgs

with 68 iIldi viduals in att.ndanoe

were held on weed

_rk: will be eradica­ tion.

Som.e

At the testing has been done to determine the best weedicidel to use.

present time sodiwa chloride is rather

_:,widely

usei.

Further test neoessary in order te determine the best methods ot weed control.

Two '_onstrations

Oll

-la present.

The grasshopper control were held, with fifteen inti'Vid­ grasshopper.

eentrol nrk carried'in previou.s

years has

UDdwbbedly-

reduoed.

grasshopper populations.

in 1947.

A

80ciol.gical

survey was made in the

Alpine

community of this survey was

1;;0 determine the resources in that in 1947.

!he purpose community and to make the necessary reeemme:adatio1'l.s

concerning agricultural produotion.

Soil samples were taken and.

analyzed at the

8ssary

80il recommendati

0118

University

in ord.er to make the nec-

Forty hdividuals out of 62 enrolled. in 4-H club work completed their work during the year.

Four eomm.umties

were served with this program.

The major probl_ in �H club work is proper leadership.

A delegation of club members attended. the Annual 4-H Club

Roundup at Tucson.

A

..

eekly col\1J1lD.,

"Farm.

sad Garden Notes, tt has been carried in the looal

Poper, in the also together with various other neVIs

_rticles.

Assistance was given planning and operatioD.

of the Apache Co�y Fair.

Cooperation was given to the Soil Conservation Service and tG the

Agricultural

Con­ a.nation

in t,he TB

ProgrlJll..

program

Assistance i:n the was oeunty.

also giTen to th.e State

Sanitary

Beard

Cochise

CoUBtl the Cochise

County agrioultural agent cooperated eight y-ears.

closely

with the business and ta.rm

organiza.tions

in the county.

Assistance was given to the

County

Fair Commission in

re-esta.blishing

the county fair.

This annual fair had not been held for

Coohise

County is primarilya livestook

COtmty, there being only approxi­

ately

22.000

aore.

of irrigated land in the county.

The beet cattle procram is most important.

The spraying program for the coIItrol ot lice, warbles, and flies is fairly well established.

One demonstration on insect coutro1 was t.at 'Work with the given to 21 ranchers, 508 cattle

'being sprayed.

Some spraying program.

was carried

OB, using benzene hexa­

.hloride in the sprayin an effort to reduce the number of treatments needei.

-

13

-

.bo�h.r

the

project

which bas been carried on for the last year or two is

irrigation

of Dative pastures.

This l8.lld is fairly level

..

and there­ fore little leveliag is needed in order to rough irrigate certain areas.

This· areas

practice

has increased materially of farm.

land.

the carrying oapacity ot certain

Considerable assistance was given to a number of small dairymen iB the ocnmty in their _iry management problao.s.

Steps were taken to form.

a

Dairy

Herd

Improvemel11t

Assode.

aheep raisers during the year.

ticn.

Some assistance was given to three

Soil poor

Soil

.problema

are rather serious in Cochise

County.

A heavy soil with dre.inage

has been the cause of certain serious production samples have been rather widely taken in an eftor"b

problems.

:to

determine the needs tor crop production.

Probably the most important problem is water

penetration.

In an ettort to improve water

penetration,

gypS\l1Il is being recomaended in certain cases.

The use of SGil demonstrated and fumigants tor sterilizing soil in chili hot becis was discussed with 24 farmers in a

:meeting at

Elfrida.

At a county

£a� bureau meeting with 33 farmers present, proper fertilizers tor enili erops were discussed.

Added infor.mation is needed on the proper fertilization

Gf cotton.

A fertilizer lished to determine the time and experiment is being estab­ placement; of fertilizer for cotton.

lany soil management problEIIIL.

have been discussed with individual farmers.

A great ieal of .individual service was given farmers on.

their field erep probl_s.

Field tests were carried in an effort to determine the best varieties of small grains and corn.

To date, field tests have shown that

Funks No.7-II surpasses other varieties for grain

yield,

and Pioneer 300 is the best silage cern.

Twenty-five farmers were given information re­ garding adapted small grain varieties.

The field of cotton grown in.

1946 resulted in several farmers growing cotton in 1947.

The introduotion of cotten growing has brought additional requests for assistanoe to the

OOlmty agent.

Allor the faraers producing the

2,000 acres of cotton in

1947 were tion growing this crop tor the first time.

resulted in spotty

Insufficient stands.

Wilt is serious in Cochise pre-irriga­

County, and

I

...

lIlexico. 1611 wilt resistant cotton will be grown in 1948.

Three meet­ iI.gs

were set up, with an avera.ge

of 25 fa.rmers

present at each meeting

..

to discuss cotton diseases, cotton seed certification program, and cul­ tural practices.

Coohise

County produoes a considerable acreage of pinto beans, and an ertort was made

Permanent during the year to obtain a better pasture has been rather widely advocated variety during ot the pinto past beans.

years, but it is tel

..

that this type of pasture is not well adapted to the small tarmer.

An effort is being made to better serve the farmer in this situa­ tion.

Chili produetion i8 a most important crop in the county.

The exten­ lion program made definite recamnendations rertllizat1en, and larTesting treatment and hoii bed methods.

fumigation.

One regarding

80il sterilization, demonstrati on was held on seed

-

14-

·Se1'8ral

plantiltgs

of lettuoe were made in the county, and assistance was

giyen

t.

these tamera in the seleotion of the proper variety

.l. aoa. 'b·ea.tttif'ication program is being sucoessfully carried on within the

Goat,..

Six

landsoaping

demonstrations were held in oonjunotion with orebaita.

pruning demonstrations, with 209 individuals present.

Adapted varietie8� eultural practioes, and pruning m.ethods

were disoussed.

The

Douglas

Claaaber of COJIIDlerce assisted in

clev.loping

a.

tree plant; ing program tor the

oity",

Weed control is an importan:b other counties.

TAis

problem.

program is in Coohise

CoUllty, as well as in.

being established, based on general in­ t.rmatiGD aDd local field tests.

IDSeot contrel is an the extension program.

Assistance was important phase of given to farmers throughout the

cou:o:by

in the centrol .f insects on alfalta� cotton. orehards.

a.nd.

orna­ m.elltal

plant;

...

Two boYI 4-H clubs were oarried during

1947.

Club meetings were held and stTeral club members attended the 4-H Club Roundup at the University of

Arizona.

lIiseellueous aetivities earried during the year included assistaAce in the tarm.

labor

One probl_s related to cu�tton pioking and ohili harvesting.

ianonetra tion on

poul�ry

o1111i;1g and one on

poultry

aanacem.ent

were given du.ring

the year, 27 individ.uals

being present at these two demon-

8trati8:13.s.

AD agrieultural survey ot irrigated land in the county gave rather detiDite information regarding the land under irrigation in the county during the y_r.

CooGDiao Cow:dil

Coool1ino

C01iaty.

i8

primarily

a livestook: county with a small acreage of

dey

tara laDd.

1941 was an exeepliionally dry year, whioh resulted in a

greatly

deoreased procmetion of crops and livestock.

Many additional probl_s"

••re brought to the county agent's office as a result of the

drought.

AlsiRanoe to dairy farmers included problems in the feeding of dairy cattle, disea.se

control.

_rket outlook illformatlon, end general dairy

__ ,ament problems.

A circular letter on the feeding of dairy cows was prepared and sent

Gut.

Another circular letter pertained to general

da117

__ cement problems.

Assistanoe was given in the seleotion and puroha.a.

of pure-bred dairy animals.

The 'fB and

Bangs control program

.ere

strongly supported and assisted during the year.

Poultry.

productiE>n has Dot been important in Coconino

County in reoent

,ears.

Poultrymen

..

ere advised regarding souroes of disease free baby ehioks.

Thil was followed by a.ssistanoe in the feeding and oare of these chi.k. aDd -their later selection as laying pullets.

Assistance was also giTeD in the oare and houaiDg of laying hen

••

-

15

-

'fhe chief

•.

rops grown

.l

ii'eli tes"planting ill Coconino or four

County pinto are pinto beans and small grains beaD. varieties carried in 1946 shoured

• two time

high-yielding

strains.

These two st�ins yere a.gain

grown in 1941, both of th_

producing

m.ore

beans than the local

'98.riety.

Fifty

pounds of pintl 'e88.l!l.S

gr01l'Il in

Nebraska were included in the 1947 test.

At harvest

_rketiDg

information was made available to bean grQWers.

Potato a.creage

pretit of

pinto

ill 1941 was the smallest in 28

'bean.

pro_etion.

Immediately

years, prior due to the to

planting

greater time, a

...

ting of pGtato growers _s held, at which time seed treatment, adapted variet.lea, and other problems were disous sed in detail.

Twei> circular letters yere

The

•• letters prepa.red

aDd. sent to the fifty potato grOfiers in the county.

.tressed

good seed, seed treatment, and the neoessary spray­ i� program.

At spraying time a third circular letter cave detailed in­ tor_tieD.

e.

spraying potatoes.

The d.rought

eliminated a potato variety teat

plot.

Oats aDd wMat

!wo

produotion are

important

in a small way in Coconino

County.

meetings ot grain tanners

..ere

held early in the year to discuss seed leleotien aDd treatment and cultural practices.

Over a period ef years the

Ixtensio:n Servia e has been several

...

11

largely

responsible tor the introduction 01'

grain

varieties now in use.

Han.nchen

barley was introduoed.

'17 the Extensien Service aDd is the best yielding barley adapted to C

000nino,

County.

:Marldion and ldamine _ts and Reliance wheat, all of which were inbrocmoed by the Extensiol1

Service, are the hig.est

yielders

in their respective

1'ield.s.

These varieties are being ohecked with older varieties and new iJJ:tiroductiona in an effort to determine the varieties best aaapted t.

Ceeenao

County conditions.

Canadian field pea.s drilled in oats bas been recommended as a lay erop tor the county.

Three farmers were assisted in.

planting a grass mixture for permanent pasture.

The Oak Oreek area i8 noted primarily for apple and peach production.

Many pro.lem.

OOClD" ill orchard work.

Late frost, codling Dloth, thrips, red spider, root rot and powdery mildew are tae principal problem,s in the

apple

grcnr1UC areas.

These diseases all receive tne attention of the Extension

Senioa.

In the

.praying

seaSOD a dEmonstration was h.eld with thirteen

...

hard.istlS

spray8 present.

There is widespread belief that the use of DDT in.

baa killed the parasitic insects of red

spider.

This will result ill sCIIle

.bange

in spraying reco1&endations.

Soil fertility maintenance is important in th ese orchards.

Soil

:management is important because of the type of soil and the inadequate raiDfall., The.

terracing iee several years ago aDd of farm. lands was initiated i8 today one of the most by the important

Extension

Serv­ soil lIltlnage­

..

1;

·practice.

oontour in the county.

Strip cropping is widely advocated.

as is taming.

There has been some subsoiling, with fall subsoiling betag preferable to suD.oiling

in the spring.

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16

-

Weed eontrol is a.ll

importa.J:m phase of th. extension program.

replaced

the .sodimn

ohloride recommended in previous years.

being

._,.

to det.mine

the moat effective

,sprays.

2,4-D has

Tests are

One .4-11 ebb was

14 of the 23 been done in erganized, with a total en.rollJaent

of 14

girls

and 9 boysJ completed the

project.

Preliminary

organizational

work las

Done,

Park in the organiza.tion

of a

4-H club

.Assistanoe

was given

130 laberers were to farmers in th.eir farm labor placed with 41 dift.rent tarmers.

prQ'Olem.s.

There was

In 1941, considerabl.

interest in construotion in 194'1.

Eleven requests were reoeived for eon­

.tr�tion plans for homes, poultry housing, and home freezers.

Gila

County

Gila

CollBty i.

a livestock producing oounty, with probably 3,000 acres of irrigated land. in the county.

The extension program is based

primarily

upon the· .eeda of tAa ranchers.

In order to assist ranchers in

selling

their livestock.

a cattle listing service has been maintained by the oOlUlty agent's ottie..

Th.e

eOlilllty agent oooperates

closely

with the Gila.

County

Ca.ttle

Growers

Cattle

Association,. assisting th_ in the planning of tAeir procram.

apraying d_onstrations were held at eight ranches in

Gila

Count7 during tae year.

These d_ens't;ratiol'll showed ranchers the proper m.ethod

of oontrol Of ener_l parasites on.oatt1e.

DEIIloutrations on the spraying or.

cattle rer grub a.nd lice control were also presented during the year.

fwo d_oastrationa

GIl the control of ieclid.

inj,eted in the lumpy jaw through the use ot soditDl

jugular

Tein were held during the year.

Fluid milk tor cOXJS\IDlptien in the Globe-Miami.

district is produoed by tive oOllDlercial dairies in the county.

Assistance was given these dairymen in

'Various manag._t

problems. including feeding and disease control.

An outireak of distemper early in

194'1 required assistance from the ceunty agent'a office.

Oontrol m.ethods

recommended included the use or 8ulfa,

penicillia,

and distamper

�ociDes.

The shortage ot

home-pro4ueed

teeda bas prevented the development of any appreciable number ot caanercia1 poultry produoera.

Assistance in feeding aM

The housing was gi

Ten poor to the SlQ.8.11

number of poultry producers in the count,..

quality' ot teed has been a problem during

1947.

One caponizing cl8lllonatra;bion

_s gi

TeD.

t.

an individual.

producer who planned to supply a

.pe81al

-rat.

A joint

Soil Conser'V8.-tion Service

-

Agricultural Extension Service project

-.

oom.pl'ted on one ranch during the year.

The land was leveled, the irri�t1on ditehes were established, and a

900-gallon well was drilled t.

IUppll water for this land.

The tarm plAns

'Were prepared by the county agrio.l

tval agent.

Assistance was given to one other tarmer in the ter­ racing aad leveling of his land.

Same releveling work was carried on in the e ount,.

during the year.

-

11

-

A tiel« test

69'2

p.lot

tor

hYBrid

corn brought out the tact that

Wisconsin No.

o_,.:lelcled

the

locally

grovm.

seed.

by

20 per cent.

Further tests are

peing

earned on with this w.riety.

A wheat test plot produced a hard red winter wheat

ftriety

_ioh

considerably oubyie1ded

the variety

locally

gtChlD..

to

Field. test ct.tel"lline

plots

aclapted on grain 80rghllDls

'Varieties.

were carried. out in

Drought prevented any an effort definite -results.

There are a

:m.um.ber

or small h_e orchards in the eoun:ty.

and eGuideraDle a.sai.tan

•• was giTa te these operators during the year.

They

were given a aprayiag pro,ram tor the control of m1aeellaaeoua insects.

Two truit tree

codling

moth, thrips.

and other

gratting

demonstrations were given aDd pnmiD.g

dem.eBstra:bions were held in each of the fruit growing areas.

S,.veral

new or chards were plant ed and pruned under the direction of the county agent.

Some

'Work was done in home beautifioation and in hom.e

proclucti en.

garden

Two 4-R clubs were

A organized during the year with eommunit1 1'air

"W1LS held at

Young,

with

only

average judges supplied by the success.

Agricul­ tural Extension Service.

Gra.ham C oUlLty

The Graham

County agrieultural agent coopers.ted

elosely

with several fa.ra

and busiDBSS

Gra._

crgan1zaticns in the

CO\U1ty in

194'1.

These included the

County'

ram.

Bureau.

the

Gra.ham

County

Chamber 01'

Commerce" the

Valley

National

Bank, am several of the rural churches of the Latter Day

Saints.

The

Valley

National Bank coopera.ted

in the

4-H club program by

financing

65 per cent Qf the cost of 4-H club calves purchased by

4-H club members.

There are approximately 34.000

acres of irr�ated land in Graham

County, and tarmers in these irrigated areas require oonsiderable assistance from the cOlUlty agent.

The remainder of the

CC1.mty

is given ever to the live­ atocktinterests.

A.

livestock feeders day was held and visits were made to three oattle

UaiTeraity feeciing pens.

Experimental data on cattle feeding by the of Arizona was discussed in full at the various feeding pens.

The Graham

County feeders were also asked to discuss their ra.tions and their per head gains.

Four d.emonstrations

were given

Ci)n the spraying of oattle for lie. and g1"UDS.

B.u.n. hexachlorid.e

was used in the spray_

A junior fair fer Future Farmers of America and

4-H club Dlembers was

deYeloped

into.,a county fair for both adults and juniors.

The junior fair had been carried on for several years.

Six dairies in

Graham Ceunty were given assistance in dairy management probl_s.

The majority of the farmers in the county have only a small number of

0_8.

These six dairies have herds in .ilk.

Daieymen.

in the county

Tlere assisted varying from 15 to

100 cowa in or!;anil iag a

Dairy

Herd

-

18

-

laproT_eDt

Associa.tion.

Tne

primary

purpose of this

Dairy

Herd

Improve.

meat

Association is to increase the

production

per aniJaal ud ta increase the tarmer' a

:net inoom.e.

The county agent has worked

olosely

with daieymen

atartlq

out in the dairy buiness,.

Assistance was also given to the TB

testiDg

program and the

Bangs control program.

'fwo d_oastrations on the use of power eqqipaent in

spra.ying

for grub ccmtrol in dairy cattle, and.

five d.em.Outra.ti8D.s enr

Several milk tever and the .hand method of rGtenone and

_atitis cases· in sulphur were given.

dairy cattle were handled by the eomty ageat.

Other dairy mamt,em.ez

dairy cattle and the

culling

of dairy

pro'blems

heifers.

included

Dairy

the barn feeding

plans

and or safety

'bull pen

plans

were gi

Ten te six farmers.

C_ereial poultry production is of minor importance in Graham

County.

)(any ot the farms have small farm flocks.

Feed costs are high.

which makes proper feeding. culling.

and housing very important in the ceun.ty.

The poultry program bas been carried en.

primarily threugh farm 'Visl ta.

office calls.

circular letters.

and the press.

Until very recent years.

water supplies tor the irrigated land have come chiefly trom. the

Gila River.

With the building of the

Cooldge

Dea.

Graham

County farmers reeeive an alle_ent, based on the supply in the reservoir.

This allotment was inauttieiellt and wells were drilled in order to auppl.­

_at the river salt

_ter.

Pump water coutent.

whicA in turn has in Graham.

developed a

County serious

normally

soil has probl8Dl a high in tae eounty.

'rhe extensien program ill irrigation and.

soils bas taken this fact iato consideration.

Field tests with gypsum in the irrigation

41.,tribubed on the land have been _de.

Results are

110t water and complete to date.

Another phase of the soils program.

is the releveling of' land.

Assistance was gi

Tell to ten farmers in the releveling of their land and in ebanc;i� the direction or the lrrigatiGn run.

A large

:mrm.ber

or soil samples have been taken

OD.

many tarms in the valley in an effort to determine the needs ot 'those 80ils.

'Where 80il struoture is a problem.

gypSlDll has often been recommended.

The

.,st of ·the important orep in Graham

County is ootton.

ApprOximately half irrigated aoreage

.is in cotton each year.

An effort was macia in

1941 to

develop

and maintain pure seed supplies of Acala and Santan cotton.

This work was ca.rried

en under the

AdlollA supervision and regulations of the

Crop ImprGvanent Assooiation.

This pure seed will be used for planting purposes in 1948.

Another phase ot the cotton program in Graham.

County is insect control.

S

•• epa were mad.e

regularly at specific cotton fields throughout the county in order to determine the insect count and the proper time to start dust­

iDg.

N_apaper artieles and radio broadcasts were also prepared on this problem of cotton inseot control.

Aphid eontrol was also necessary and a.rrang.eDts

were

_de

'b

•• tle

•• by the county agent for the importation of

Ladybird

-

.L�

-

In all effort t

•• elect suitable eorn

'Y8.rietiea.

CQrn variety test. have ie

..

carried en for three years.

Funks &-711 is be�ng grown rather

widely

asa reault of these field tests.

.1Iarkton oa.ts

continue.

to be the best pl.,stur.

crop available.

Forty acres of in order tG produce a seed

supply.

Ari vat

However,

'barleY'

this crop were was sown in 1941 destroyed.

Taere are to

"JJmll

approximately

200 acres of pecans in Graham

Count,..

in addition ad!

'Vidual trees found a.

t various hemes.

Assistance was given to peoan growers

through

eleven demonstrations given during dtJD.o:D.strations gave information en the preper methods tor the year.

These buddin, pecans, peoan culture, disease ana the uae of zinc eODtirol, and.

harvesting.

Pecan r0sette is

prevalent, sulphate

in small circular trenches at the base of the trees aad program.

irrigated in in the early spring was advocated by the extension

Aphifl eantral is generally necessary with pecans.

In order to determine the

,feasibility

ot oontrol by

airplane

dusting, two pecan groves

..ere

dusted ia this

1D.8mler

in 1947.

Thre.

ct_onstratiou were

Through the importation of given on the pruning of deciduous fruit trees.

parasites from

WaShington state, wooly aphis was oontrelled in Grchards.

This practice will be continued as necessary.

There are a extensiolL large number of home gardens in the county and the extension

"geat has given a great deal of assistance in the development of these gardens.·

A.

mimeographed vegetable planning outline was prepared and. dil­ tribated throughout the eOUlty.

Assistance

1I8.S

also given in insect and disease control.Home beautifieation. is another important 'phase of the pregram in horticulture.

Informs.tion

on the care and culture or oruae:nt&.l

plants

"8 prepared graphe' circular.

and presented in the .form

of a mimeo­

Efforts lave been directed during the last two or three years to establishment of a weed control program for the county.

Johnson the grass is prebe.bl,.

the m.ost

serieus weed, and tests on the value of burning, pl

....

il1g, clean eultivation, and.

spraying bave be811 carried out.

Some of these method.

are costly, and an effort is being made to determine the most eeoaomical form of control.

A demonstration was set up on the highway where passing farmers micht s •• the results.

Three types ot sprays were used in this test.

All three of the sprays killed the Johnson grass within three or tour loon recovered.

days time.

However, in most oases the Johnson grass

Eight ciemonatraticms were given.

on the control ot bind-

•• edwith Sinox general

.pray.

Six demonstrations were establiShed show­ ing the ettects of ette.tiT

•.

with only

2.4-D application.

two or three

It is believed that sprayings.

2.4-D

Additional work is may be being done on this test.

,A field test project on the control of weeds in alfalfa was oarried on.

tield, in the

Clipping weeds early in the year was tested on several alfalfa.

county.

The m.ost

serious difficulty with this procedure was the delaying ot the first cutting ot alfalfa by two or three weeks.

Four d-.onstrationa

were given in the control of pepper grass and tansy mustard h alfalta

'but

�.re

through the use of Sinox general spray.

The weeds were killed was some delay in the maturity ot the sucoeeding alt'alf'a hay crop.

-

20

-

$0.. as.i,tano.

was giTen in the far.. labor

problems

of cotton growers iD. tae in the

coa:tr..

The ames and addresses of eotton piokers who had worked

cellllty

in.

1946 were sent to the tarmers.

They were th.en.

urged to write letters to these

people

oonoerning

1941 cotton picking in the oounty.

FUt7-one Na'V8.jo

Indiana

'Were brought into. the county in an etfort to inorease labor

supplies.

Assistanoe was also given in the

importation

of

-.Xi-oan .atio_ls

tor 'this purpose.

Better labor housing was stressed by the county agent

1 s ottic

••

The 4-11 club program il!l.' Graham

County

_s always been an iaportant phase of .the.

extension pregram..

A ter 4-H junior liTestook show ofters an club aElillbers to exhibit their projects.

Judging opportunity

contests are

•• tablish.d. ill ord.er

te assist them in club m.ebers

are, brought learning livestock judging.

4-H in to the Annual 4-H Club

Rotmdup at the Univer­ sit)' o£ Ariscma in June.

Six cGmDllmities carried boys'

.4-H club

'Work in

1941.

-with livestock clubs beiDg the mest suocesstul.

ID an effen to assist

·'turkey grovrers in the markrnDg et their birds.

grners were supplied with a

·list et wholesale westen aDd middle-western states.

The same houses in several of' the procedure was tollowed in the

aark.tiDg

of' pecans.

Several wao1esa.le hQuses were contacted, result­ ing in the sale .r

a goodly portion of the 1941 pecan crop.

liaoeJ.l&neeu8 actirlties of the Ext

•• siGn Service in the county included the eontrol of gophers and rabbits in the county.

Gopher damage is found both on ditoh banks and in alfalfa tie14s.

A rural seciGlogy program.

was established ia one aDd a short amall community with rather good results'.

PQQr soil supply

.f

irritation water have been serious

..

preblems in this particulAr oOJDlll1Dity.

A program.

was developed Whereby the standard o£

Ihing

in thia oeDDD.1Ulity' might be raised.

Greenle.

County

Greenlee

Tbis

Ccnmty has suttered frem.

a shortage of rainfall tor several years.

shor�age has affeeted beth erop produetion and livestock production iB 1941.

It

.... s necessary to reduce livestock numbers on the range in

1946 and again in 1941.

Suppl_ental feeding was necessary in many areas.

A spra1ing pro&ram tor the control of liee, grubs, and flies is bei:og e.tablished

in the county.

An effort was made to erganize a

Dairy

Herd lILprev

__ t Asaociation ia the eounty, but the dairymen preferred to join with.

GraMm

County in their Association.

The number of dairy herds in.

the oOlUlt'1 i8 Tery small.

Dairy management tis.le oontrol.

problems

included feeding and

There are tflfl poultry producers in the county.

There are many small farm floek

•• aad considerable assistance is given to these producers throughout the year.

.phaeized

in the extension program is proper feeding, culling, and dieeaa. oontrol.

There is some turkey produotion in the county.

and aa.iataD.ce

was gL

Ten to them.

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21

-

The soils

8truct�re,

Program

in the county is built around the problems of poor soil

low.fertility, improper

land leveling, and insufficient irriga­ tion _tar.

In an effort to inorease ferlility, green manure crops, the

plowing

under ot crop residues, and the use of commercial fertilizers in

.ertain

eases are recemmended.

The use of gypsum as a soil amendment is reeommen.ded UDder certain conditions.

The winter irrigation of land in order to build up storage supplies or water is also a recommended.

practice.

ApproxiJra tely

900 acres or irrigated land receiTed winter irrigation sup­

p1ie.

in 1941.

This is double the acreage which was wiater irrigated in

1946.

The chief crep grown in the stresse4 aad resulted in the county is cotton.

\

The extension program bas development or a one variety cotton district.

lew lIcioo 1517 wilt resistant cotton is planted and oertii'ied seed pro­ duced under the

regulations

of the Arizona

Crop Improvement

Assooiation.

The �can am. bas

Valley

Pure Seed Aasociation has been active tor several years always reeei ved th e support or the Extension Service.

This

Gl"ganilatlon owns its nn cotton gin and its own seed.

warehouse.

Alfalfa aoreage declined during the year, primarily due to the shortage of irrigation

Water.

The alfalfa program. includes primarily alfalfa ma.na.ge­

Bent; prct'blem.s.

A variety rie14 test compared

India and African alfalfa with

lo�ally

grown varieties.

Field tes�a ef corn.

indicated that Funks G-7l1 beat, adapted to conditions in Greenlee

County.

variety of hybrid corn was

Permall8nt pasture acreage in the county continues to decline.

mainly ie,auae of short water supplies.

Sweet Sudan grass is replacing eammon

Sudan as "a.

temporary

8tmmler

-pasture.

An important; phase of the extension program is the home beautirioation project.

One schoolhouse was landscaped during the year and a

Bermuda gra.ss lawn established on the grounds.

The county agent attended one garden club meeting

..

di scassing

,the use or ornamental plants and the con­ trol ot iaseets and diseases affecting these ornamental plants.

There is a small but prominent acreage of vegetable crops in the county each year.

In order to aid these moall truck growers, a test

1I'&S carried aut with six varieties of potato variety potatoes being planted.

This tield. test Teritied the fa.ct that White Rose potatoes were probably best ad.a.pted

to Greenlee

County oonditions.

Assistance was given to the

Duncan

Vall�

CaDtaloupe Growers

Assooiation in the selection of proper varieties to grn, cultural praetiees" and inseot control methods.

The farmers in this area

..

operated

_in the purohase of the seed used in. the cantaloupe

product!o!{.

Production was almost

triple

that at 1946.

Oro_rd

;management has been reoei ving some attention from the extension acent.

Pruning

demonstrations were established in several orchards.

So

..

work "Ai done with pecan trees and the zinc sulphate treatment advo­ oated tor the control of pecan rosette.

-

22

-

Irri,gation problems

are

important

in the county.

.Proper

irrigation s'brue'bllre. for th.e efficient

'Use of water were recommended

Two demonstrations were duriDg

1941.

given d.uring

the previous year on the oontrol of

aquatic

weeds in irrigation

08.138.18.

As a result Qt these dem.(!)nstra.tions

the previous year� one irrigation district purchased equipment ter the application of ehanicals in aquatic weed control.

A

....

ed cOD.trol dEmonstration

,was carried en on the ditch banks in the count,.

with very satisfactory results.

Five tarms carried test the oontrol of bindweed through the use of

2,4-D.

Tests with

plots

2.4-D on tor

Russian lmapweed did not prove ettective.

Results indicate that spray

applications

shou14 be made early in the life of the planUlwhile they are

1et growing vigorously.

The eountyagellb werked olosely with the farmers in their tam labor pro'b-

1....

Farm.

lAbor needs are high. only during the cotton season and the truck: harvest season.

With an inoreased cotton acreage in 1947.

labor needs were increased labor proportionately.

lDi'or.mation

on labor

supplies

and hOll.in, was distributed to tarmers immediately prior to the cotton picking season.

·An exhibit on farm labor housing was on

Greenlee C

Gun:ty

Fa.ir.

display

at the

Two 4-H dubs in the Dunoan community had a total m.embership

of 53 individ­

..

la.

Fifteen llElllbers meetings were held by these clubs during the year.

Club participated in the Greenlee

County

Fair with project exhibits.

JatiGnal 4-H Club Week was observed with e.

program at the Dlilnoan grad..

Ichool ance.

early

The in

Mareh,

at which entire program was meeting

270 boys and girls were in attend­ presemed by club members, including two

'ri.a1ting ,olub

mEmbers fraa Graham

County

who had made out-at-state trips

duriDg

the year.

One 1eaderB training meeting was held in the county agent's office at the begiIUling of the olub year.

Iar1copa COuatl

'lier.

are

The approximately principal crops

400,000 grown are acres cotton, of irrigated land in

Maricopa County.

alfalfa, barley, grain sorghums, aDd wheat.

fhe most iaport8:Qt phase of the livestock industry is the ratten­ ing or

'beet oat·He.

Dairying, poultry production, and the winter pasturing

.t

llwep are also important.

There are several farmer commodity groups in

Maricopa. County, and the

OOWlty' agricultural agents work closely with these groups.

The results of the experimental work on the tw0

University experimental farms in

Maricopa

Count,.

are given to the .fa.rmers

in the oounty through field days, the radio, aDd th. 100a1 press.

Fhe

Dairy

Herel tal direotion

Improvement

Associations

.t.the

ExtensioD in

Service, are the county, organized

indirectly

8upervi

•• d under by the asaiatarrt; agent in charge of poultry and dairy work.

The training of _ilk

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23

testerl tor these associations las been an eouid.rable assistance has been important pbase of' this program.

gi

Ten to the Grade

A. milk producers in

laricopa

COlUlty' in the produotion of' Grade A milk.

Many

haTe ohanged over ir.

the preduction of Grade D milk to Grade A milk and have needed aasist­

&.DCa

eases in the development of their milk processing facilities.

In several

they

haTe had to remodel their entire

dairy

tarm.

layout.

Much assistanoe was also given to dairymen:, in their feeding problems.

With f'.ed

priees

high" there has been a tendency tor milk producers to prepare their

'OWB mixed' teeds from feeds grewn en tae farm.

Assistance was also gi'9'en t.

dairymen in the e

GWlty in their breeding and di sease

,COD rol proilems.

The agent has worked closely with the several breed assoeiatiens in the county.,

Coasidaraob assistance was

Their caiet given to poultry producers in the county.

problams were housing, feeding" and sanitation and disease control.

The

Board in agent worked closely with the Arizona

Poultry

Imprev_ent

publieiziDi the importance ot flock selection and pullorum t8st-c iug_

,Twelve tiem.oll8tratioD,a in poultry culling were given during the year.

On.oapoDidng

·d_enstration was presented.

292 requests tor assistance

011

poultry

diseases were received' during the year.

The lack of sanitary facilities'i8 one of the chief' causes et poultry diseases in the county.

'lith

400,000 acres of irrigated land in the county"

80il problems are paramount.

,Fertilization practice is one of' the most important prebleDS.

Fertilisation "b'rals were carried in 1947 with alfalfa" grain'sorghllllls,

_d

&rl.,..

The testing was done both as to proper depth ot application or tertilizer, the spacing and plaCEment of' fertilizer, and the quantity azul type.

Fertiliza.tion trials with alf'alfa indicated that plaoing the phosphate on the surface ot the ground is fully as satisfactory as deep plAo_eat;.

On medium and lighter soils" phosphate can be placed at or

.ear

the sartaee.

Water penetration is another serious problem in Mari­ cope.

Count,..

C_paction of the soil by heavy equipment dam loil structure.

Tests to date indicate that

definitely

plowing under breaks barnyard

..

nure, water e8pecially in the medium. and heaVY' soils" may increase the rate of penetration.

It lett on.

the surtace, little effeet was noted.

Trials to date intic.te that gypsum. used without little Beneficial .ttect

on water penetration if organic applied matter IDAy have in the small aaolU1ta- often. recGmIDlended.

a.n4 eYP8l1. with.

Apparently header applications of gypsum, bal'1l1&rd manure" improved wa.ter

penetration.

hr

•• eed proCraa.

production is an important phase ot the

Maricopa County extension

Five meetings of the

Maricopa

Caunty Crop

Improvement

Association

..er.

the att8D.ded

during the year.

Seed certifioation during the year included tollewing aecQRplisbaenta: 156 different growers made application for

22,656 acre.

ot grain sGrghums, consisting ot thirteen difterent varieties;

11 growers made

UDder the a.ppl1cation

regulations of the for 2,785 acres of small

Crop Improvement grains

Association) to be

2100 prGduced acres of

Chilean and African. alfalfa were grown under the pure seed program;

358

&ore, ot SaDtan

Acala ootton, of which 70 acres were foundation seed;

36 acre, ot

Panjab flaxJ and 35 acres of Mexican June corn were also accepted

-

24

in the pure seed progrem.

This pure seed program required innumerable field inspectiens at various -times during the growing period.

It also

required

the inspeetien of cotton gins, combines, and threshers in order t. ma.intain

purity

of seed.

rhe Extension Service worked

closely

with the seed dealers in this program.

Several dem.onstratienB

were carried on durillg the year in the control ef weeds.

Results to date indicate that Johnson rather grass can now be oontrolled easily.

HoweTer, additienal testing will be necessary before the e.plete

program on weed control has been developed.

A great deal of assistance was procrams.

given to farmers during the year in their crop production

Planting

procedures, time of irrigation, fertilization, and other basic pr0blems were handled through individual contacts with farmers.

Citrus production in Maricopa. Ceunty is again coming to the front as a

problem

"area.

Th.e low prices for grapefruit have revived interest in the extension project of top-werking grapefruit trees to oranges, lemons, and tangerines.

A circular en top-working bas been prepared and distributed.

Assistance has also been in cit.rus grG>ves is given in fertilization problems.

Weed control being handled thro\1gh the use.

of oil sprays.

This is relatively new but is being rather highly recommended by the county agri­ cultural agent.

In the meantime, several groves are being watched

closely

tor

.ore

._.tillite. results on oil spraying.

A study of root stocks en citrus is being made in an effort to contrGl the quick decline which has been

8G serieus in California.

Many fit the citrus trees in

Arizo1l8. have been budded on root stocks susceptible to quick decline.

Rough l

..on

and other root stocks are being tried out in an attempt to meet this situation.

·

The Extension Servioe cooperated with the Federated Women's Garden Club in obtaiDing an

American Rose

SGciety trial garden for tne Phoenix area.

Thia rose garden tests out the various new varieties and old 'V8.rieties 0t rous.

The assistant agent was appointed secretary of this club.

In co­ op.ration

with Batio Station KOY and th. Ariaona Farmer.

a demonstration garien program

118.8' carried out fGr the fourth consecuti va year.

This program. is UDder the direction of the assistant county agent in charge of horticu 1tur e.

The the

Karie.,. County

4-H club program is the largest

4-H club program in state, with some

1500 club _.bers enrolled.

The all1'lual 4-H club fair, held en the campus of the Arizona State

College at

Tempe.

oldest fairs in -the state.

Club members from all over the is one of the county exhibit their projects a.nd

compete with each other on demonstration teams, judging teems.

and.

various other contests.

The winners at the county

4-H club tair _ka the trip to the Annual 4-H Olub Roundup at the

University, where they oompete with club members from all over the state.

Thirty-one

4-H club mmbera attended the state 4-H e

Iub camp at

Payson in

July.

Two

Jlarieopa

County club members _de the trip to the National Club Congrese in Dec_ber.

The 4-H club program in

Maricopa County is a well-planned procr...

including a wide choice of projeots for both boys and girls, and

}articipation in state-wide and natifimal events, as well as local and

-

25

oounty events.

Older club members and junior club leaders are in charge ct the aDual 4-H club fair ill.

Maricopa County.

A oowrliy

4-H club lead­ ers eouncil has been of great assistance in planning the 4-H club program.

!u

••

UIlty tam bureau Me abQ cooperated in the 4-H club program.

ia'V8.je

C

Gunty

.l

large

part or

Navajo County is taken up with the

Navajo

Indian Reser'V8.­ tioD..

I[uoh of the remaining area is ra.nge

area, with

Qnly

approximately

1,000 aeres under

irrigation.

There is some dry farming area in the eounty, totaling'probably

8,000 aeres.

1941 was again a dry year, result­ ing in reduced water cattle and

\ cirought.

supplies for the irrigated areas and reduced teed tor sheep.

Cattle numbers cont; in1!led to be reduced, due to the

!he most active tarmers' irllODa Cattlemen's

-f)rganisat�en in

Navajo County is the Northern

Association.

This Cattlemen's Association sponsQred the livestook show and the rodeo which was held in conjunction with the oouuty fair.

The county agricultural agent worked closely with,the oounty tair commission in planning and conducting the fair.

lluch of the time of the the raage the selecthn of range.

and eattle range county agricultural agent is spent in assisting industry in.

the county.

Assistance was given in 1947 pure-bred bulls and in the general improvement ot the in cattle.

Thirty-seven tanks were built

.en

the ranges during the year.

This managEment practice is oa.rried

Ol!l.

by ranehers 4urillg the year.

probably

one of the best

An external insect control pre­ gram. has beau initiated in the county and will probably become cOlmty-wide in 1948.

Several demonstrations on spraying cattle fer lice and grubs

Jaave bean given in the ceu.ty.

Dairf produetion in. the county is only sufficient to supply loeal demands.

Assistance to dairymen has been p-imarily· in

dairy

management, including teeding and disease control.

O:ne of the greatest needs is modern equip­

_nt, and eV$ry effort is being made to improve and modernize the dairy equipment in the dairy plants in the county.

The fly and lice control program.

is a180 included in the pre>gram for dairya_.

Tllere are one f_ eOllUllercial oooperative poultry producers poultrymen's orgaIdzation in in

Navajo County.

There is

Joseph City, and the extension program, gives th_ every eneouragement.

Individual poultrymen have been a.ali.ted

in their poultry feeding programs and in their poultry disease proilems.

Assistance has alse been given in the marketing ot their eggs aDd

tryers.

Although feed costs have been high, incame has been very

,aU.tactory.

!he loi1. and irription pr()�ram in the county stresses primari ly water

l.ppl1el,

water utilization, and soil analysis.

Water supplies generally are

inadequate

and. every effort is being made to increase them.

Assi Rance

"II.a

giTeJ'1 to farmers in

OXle area in planning and building a

desiltinglasin

-

26

-

along, th�

Little Celorado River.

Water from. the river is run into the

deailting

"basin wAara the silt settles to the bettom and the clear water i8 r.oved

from the ether, end of the basin.

In an effort to secure Illore

complete

information on soil types and needs" soil t eating has been rather

widely

adopted.

The m.ost

important tield crops in Navajo alfalfa.

These crops are grown on

'both

County

are corn, wheat, and

irrigated

and dry farms.

The extension in some few cases been program.

has pit strongly reoommended the use ot trench silos, and sil08 have been abandoned and trench silos have dug.

Wheat grown in

Navajo

County is planted in the fall, used for sprillC.pa.sture, in on selecting in the county and thEm. cut tor best adapted gra.in.

varieties, tor several years in.

In order to assist wheat farmers wheat test both the plots have been carried irrigated and dry land

farming

area s

1lfalf'a produotion is an important phase of the extension program" and will receive even greater"attentiE>n in 1948.

Alfalfa wilt is rather com­ l10n and takes a heavy toll of the a!falt'a ,crop.

Misoellaneous assistance was given to tarmers in their hal iB.sisted

on greater' oare permanent pasture being given to program.

The

00unty agent permanent; pastures in order to secure the greatest returns.

There are several 8mall orchards in ticliltural program includes eare and liavaj

0

County management and the extensien hor­ ef these orchard..

The oontrol of insects is important and has reoeived considera.ble attentien.

Tae Extension Sern.e.

has developed a spraying program for codling moth and various oth.er insects.

common to the orchards of that area.

J.

..

l1.acreage

of truok crops is grown in the county, and this requires oODsiciera'bl. assi stance from. the are probably m.ost

oounty agent.

Inseot oontrol prG)blems important in the productien of these truck crops.

Im­ proved cultural pra.ctices

a.nd

the use of modern insecticides is an impor­ tant pha.e

Gf the mensiQD. program in both hame gardens and vegetable produetion.

Thre. 4-H clubs were

Two ot these elubs organized in boys work. in

Navajo County in 1947.

completed their work and were represented at the

Annual 4-H Club

Roundup.

One or the greatest problems in 4-H club work is leadership.

Pima

Ceuntl

There are appro:xim.ately

26,000 acres of land under irrigation in Pima

County.

Of this aoreage, approximately one-half is in ootton, the most iaportaxIt, crop in the county.

The remainder of the area is given over to the range 11Testock industry.

In grain lorghuas, barley, and a addition to c,otton

..

the chief orops are small acreage of alfalfa.

The county agri­ o.ltural

agents oooperat.

closely with the various agricultural groups in

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21

the county and a180 the two or three principal 'business or�nilations

.A

great

4_1 of work is being den.

with cotton.,tertilisation and varietal

testiDg

through field tests.

One cotton fertilization projeot initiated ill 1946 was

e_plated

in 1941.

Another fertilization test was started in

194'1..

The fi eld test on fertiliza.tion showed increa.ses in cotton tion from Di tregen fertilisation.

220 pounds of ammonium.

produo­

suphate

resulted in q inorease of 463 p0unds nitrate also gave a

250 pound of seed cotton.

The application af Chilean.

in.crease

in seed cotton.

Th.e pure seed procr� or the

Crop

Improvanent

Associatien was also given attent1en.

Four a.atings

were held during th.e yea.r

Oll insect control, and insect oolmts were made

reg\\larly

during the season, the results ot these counts being proper

pub1ioised

tully in ord.er to assist the farmers in determining the time to Gat eetton.

Two cotton detoliation dElllonstrations

... ere given in an effort to find.

a successful defoliant.

Practically all far.aers in the county are msabers of the

Smith-Doxey classing organization.

In an effort to determine th e best adapted varieties of altalta., two variety tests were made during the year.

India,

African, and

Hairy

Peru­ vian alfalfa were and the canpared with each other.

Results were not definite project will be continued in 1948.

A field test on alfalfa fer­ tilization carried far the past three years was completed.

This test proved rather conclusively that 80 to 100 pounds of P-205 would give yield inoreases.

Liquid phosphate proved most effective of the phosphate terti lis ers.

Th. acreage of snall were grains in the county is very limited.

Markton oats produced by one farm.er under the regulations of th e

ArizClma

Crop

IDlprovament

Assoeia:t;ion.

Markton oats are prexluced for pasture purposes

primarily-

A iield demonstration was also carried on on small grain fer­ tilization.

Nitrogen fertilizer applied during the cold weather gave definite increases in 'both plsturage and grain yields.

This pra.ctioe

is being adopt ad by fanaers.

Three 80il amendment demonstrations were completed during the year.

Three other 80il amendment demonstrations bave been established.

Recommenda­ tiens on the

US8 of sulphur and gypsum.

are awaiting more definite results.

The extension agent is recommendillg deep tillage and oertain other soil management practioes which will give greater water penetration and result in 'better soil struoture.

Some work is being done with the beef cattle interests in the oounty.

One d_onstration was held on the control of gruDs and lice in cattle, a high pr.ssure spray rig being used in this demonstration.

The Pima

County

Dairy Herd Improv8ID.EIl.t

Assooiation combined with the Pinal

County Dairy

Herd

Garry

I.provact

Assooiation during the year in order to more

OD.

the progra:m..

effectively

Gras8hopper

control work required

30 tons of poisoned bait on approxi­

_tel, 5,000 aores be very

IUcca.stul.

Qt orop land.

Clllordane was also used and proved to

-

28

..

There

.ere

aixteen

agricliltural

4-H elllbs in

PiJu.

CQ\Ulty in

1941, with.

an enrollaent .t

184 cluD members a.nd.

eom.pletions

of 134 indirlduals.

Of this a_ger,

159 club mem.'Ders were

...

ere held boY's and 26 were

girls.

Speoia1

county events

cluing

tk.

year fer these 4-R cluB m.ambers.

They participated

in the Tucson Li vestook:

Sh_, the county

4-H clllo fair and auction day, and the &J!lnua.l

ill

Pima

County

Fair.

Pima

County club :members also participated the,

Stat.

4-R Club Roundup, a state 4-H club ca.mp-� and exhibited at the

Stat,. Fair.

event.

-WiDner, of,the eountY' demonstration team. and judging team plrtieipated in the annual 4-H club fair and at the 4-H Club

Round.up.

Tne alent in charge of 4-H olub werk--appeared in 25 broa.dcasts

over the

100al radiG atatien and

199 ram prepared

50 arti�les for the press duriDg the y.ar.

visits were m.ade-iD the interests et the 4-H club program.

Thirty

'tourl

..

ere

_de

duri:ag

.the

y.r

to gi v.

eluo members instructions in judging, and also in order to visit 4-H club projects.

Twenty-four individuals par­ ticipated in aamonstration teams and sixty individuals participated in. the various judging contests.

Pinal County

With som.e

200.000

acres under irrigation,

Pi-l

County

is the seoond largeat irrigated agricultural CQunty in tb. estate.

Approximately

one-teurth the water supply tor this irrigated area comes fran the San Carlos Reservoir.

The other tbree-tourth,& ot the water supply is pumped water.

There has

'been a steady expansion of irrigated land in the oounty during the past ten years.

The e(\)\Ult7 agricultural agent cooperates closely with the Pinal

County

Re­ jeareb. Oemmitte. in its study of _ter supplies and.

needs.

He also works

elosely

with the Pi_I

County

Fann Bureau and the various local farm. bureaus.

nee.llaneous

assi stance was the

or'ganizati�n

of a given in a ceUDtiy road marking program� and in rura.l tire distri.ct.

Fitteen commUDities in Pinal

County were given assistance by the oounty agent; in their pro'Olem.s pertaiDing to livestock.

Fourteen cattle feeders

....re

furnished nth im'ormation on feeding cattle.

Sixteen were given in­ torution en the control of external pe.rasites� and three were given intCl)r­

_tioD.

on the eollbral flit internal parasites.

A large number of cattle were imported from sou"bhern states in 1947.

and the rather l0ng and hard rail trip r.su1ted. in

..

ny ease$, of shipping fever.

The extension considerable aS8istanoe in the treatment of these oattle.

agent gaTe the dairy extenaion progra. gave assistance in dairy management problems, and 1;0 the

Dairy

Herd

ImprovElllent

Associa tioD.

This a.ssociation is com­ po.ed

ot

21 herd. of dairy

0011'8.

with a total of 1,�53 eows on test.

The

Dairy

Herd ImproTElD.ent

Aaseciation is oombined with the Pima

Count;y

Dairy

Herd

Improvement

Association.

The oounty agricultural agent bas stressed proper te.d1JJg

ot dairy oattle and has set up dairy rations and pasture

Iyst

..

tf)r the the crowing da.irymeD.�'.

.... son rather

He has taan encouraged during the the winter purchase season of when hay during high prices pre'Vail tor hay.

Assistance was also given in the

Bangs and

TB eradication proCraa oarried

Oil in the county.

-

29

-

See auhtanc.

was

given

to poultrymen in sixteen eOlD:mtmities im. the

'OO'W:tt1.

This work included the feeding, care, and housing of poultry.

Feurt·een

poultrymen

were assisted wi.

t11 information regarding disease-free ba.'by' ehicks.

Twen.ty

received assistanoe in the feeding of poultry, and tifteen in disease and parasite control.

Sei1 and analysis, land leveling, effioient use of water, alkali reclamation were the chief' phases fertilization tests, of the extension program stressed by the county agent.

Farty-s even farmers us ed the extenaion-

OWD..ed farm level in leveling their land.

Total land leveled with the diso farm level was approximately 2,500 acres.

Through soil analyses a fertili­ zation program.

was established and advocated to farmers.

During the year fourteen. farms were e overed in the soil analysi s program, and 40 wat er analyse.

were made.

A deep plow whieh plows to a depth ot

24" was purchased by one of the tarmers.

240 aeres have been deep-plowed in order to mix the sandy subsoil with the heavier clay top soil.

Two and one-halt miles of irrigaUon

4i toh were lined in 1947.

Every effort is being made to tully utilize the water supply.

The county agent eoopera.ted closely with the Arizona

Crop Improvement;

Associati&n.

4000 aores of grain sorghums.

270 aeres of certified

Vaughn

barley;

and a few acres of Calif'ornia red oats and Punjab flax were grown

UDder the

•• rtithation regulations ot the

Crop Improvement

Association during the

.year.

Considerable assistance was given to flax growers during

1947.

This assistance ineluded intonna.tion

on cultural practices.

narket­ ing

..

and the owlook for flax.

FertilizatiQn of barley was stressed in the

1'a11 of' 1947.

Assistane e with the alfalf'a orop

'Was given in sixteen oom­ munities.

TwentY'-nine offioe calls and twelve :farm visits.

were made rela­ tive to alfalfa production.

Ai'rican and India. alfalfa seed were seoured tor five alfali'a growers.

Five farmers were given information regarding pemanent l*stures aDd were assisted in establishing these pastures.

Cotton i.

an survey important orop in Pinal County.

Forty-four

days of the a.gent's time were spent in cotton work in thirteen communi ties, with twelve local leaders assisting.

The ootton progra.m. includes a weekly inaect report which wa.s

sent; to all cotton farmers and otherwi se publicised threughout the oounty.

Cotton acreage in 1947 was fifty per cent greater than in

1946.

Six cotton defoliation demonstrations were gben lB. 1947.

Three new cotton varieties developed by the

Plant

Breeding

Department of the

University of

Arizona were tested in a field test.

RecomDumded by the county agent tor cotton production are the important factors of proper soil preparation. heavy pre-irrigation, early planting,

8D4 oareful cultivation and weed Gontrol.

The

OawBty agent eontinued to carry a home

�rden projeot during the year.

Publicity

through news releases.

radio, and meetings, stressed the need of hClDe gardens and furnished information on proper prooedures.

Home beauti­ fioation i. also an important phase of the extension program.

lAndscape plalDling ter the hoae was discussed at several women's club meetings" and d_oDstra:ti ons ...er.

presented on the pruning of ornamental plant

8.

As aist­ an .......

also given in the control of insect.

and diseases on ornamental

plant

••

-

30

-

Seven _Y8

.'ere spent in assisting the vegetable prGducers in Pillal

COtmty

pharis

.... s placed on the use ot ring rot free potate seed and. the cutting or

potato

seed with a.

sterilized knife.

Forty-one vegetable growers were assi.ted

in the control ot inoluded the

plant

diseases and insects.

Grasshopper

control baitimg of grasshoppers on

3600 acres ot irrigated land.·

Sixteen in the a taa days were spent on tarm management practiees in eighteen conmunities county.

Eight

fa.rmers

were given assistance in the developm..e:at of plan.

Sixteon farmers were given assistance in their leasing con­ tracts with landlords.

in

Seven individuals were assisted in getting started farming and seven others in securing credit for their operations.

Fif­ teen days time

_s dev0ted to marketing problems in fourteen communities.

Assistance was lI18tOOdl.

given to sixteen ginners in the county in proper ginning

Throughout the regular cotton harvest season, regular

weekly

reports on the cotton ginned in the county cized.

This assisted in the farm labor were progra.m..

secured and

widely

publi­

Seventy-five farmers were given marketing ini'orDltion on hay, grain.

live­ stock,

poultry.

and eggs.

COllsicl.er,a'b1e assistance was given to fa.rmers in the seouring of cotton pieters.

Cetton pickers were placed with 315 farmers, anq total labor placements for the year were

1,976.

I:aformation was

,given to farmers on tarm, labor housing.

Assistance was given to the county fam bureau in planning a reeruitiag end transporting program from other areas.

A in weekly oolqm in the pLper entitled

,all tour plpers in the county.

"Along

the Farm

This collllm carried

Front" timely was carried infor_tieD coneern.ing important problems in the county.

357 4-H club members were enrolled in Pinal

County.

a

300%

increase over the previous year.

226 individuals completed

230 projects.

These club

..

bet.

were em-called in six communities thr'mghout the count,..

186 farm.

and horae 'Visit.

were made to

137 dif'f'erent farms and homes in the 4-H club prC>Cre.m.

599 office oalls were rece! ved by the work.

The annual 4-R club fair was held in Pinal agent regarding

County

4-H clu.b

with 230 exhibitors trOll the variou. oommunities.

Fifteen demonstration and judging teams com­ peted in the contests.

Approximately

1600 peeple visited the annual 4-H dub fair.

Seventeen 4-R ClllO members and three leaders atteIlded the State

4-H Club

Roundup the 4-H club and camp.

oompeted sendiDg in the cEmtest

28 young people s and there.

Pinal two leaders

County to the a.ttended

camp.

A total of 80 presa articles were prepared tor the papers in the county, and at tile time of the 4-H olub fair an entire page in each newspaper was devoted to 4-H club work.

.

-

31

-

Ya1l;pai

County

There are

only

a f_ thousand aores of irrigated farm.

land in

Yavapai

CI_Y,

the remainder of the area being given over to range livestock.

The extension pregrem is based ers in the cemtty and the primarily upon the

proal_a

or the ranch­ needs of the many small farmers in the irrilated

-11818.

During

1947 the county agent worked closely with the

Yavapai

Co\D3.'ty

Cattb· Growers' Association.

Listings or calves for 8&.le

by ranch­ ers in the

CQUl'1ty were made available to

prospective

buyers fran within and without the state.

Assistance was also given the Assooiation in the planning of taeir amlual calf sale.

A.

supplementary

feeding program was offered,to ance ranchers,

•.

A liee and twenty-six operators taking grub control program was advantage continued in the ot this assist­ county, with aeven eperator s being given assi stance.

Four operators were assisted in building dippiug Tats, and two were assisted in securing spray equipm.ent.

JUDipers are and with

rapidly

taking this in mil'1d the over the range in certain areas in the county, county agenb is preparing a program. for their eradication.

,This preject will be in eooperationwith the Forest Service and will be on

Forest

Service land.

It will be primarily

experimental

in

_ture.

The year.

Arizona

Mohair Growers Association

..

organized in.

previeua by the

Agricultural Extension Service.

was given assistance in their reorganization..

Many of the goat raisers have changed to cattle produo­ tioD. in order to better utilize the range.

In this way, the organization has dwindled trem 40 members im. 1943 "be tion will oontinue to function, with only.

six in 1947.

The organiza­ meetings ene e or twice a year, but will carry no active oarried on with tae publicity program.

A goat range study projeet,

Association, will continue to check goat range plots to determine grazing etfecta.

!her.

are given

..

them.

only a few commercial primari ly in dairymen in the county.

dairy management problems.

Three

Assistance dairymen was were assisted in establishing pasteUrization plants.

Four were assisted in purchasing feed supplies cooperatively and in securing financing for this project.

A survey was made to determine the need tor a

Dairy

Herd

Improve­ ment .188001at1$n, but dairy cow numbers were too small to justify suoh an association.

A permanent pasture program originally advocated b.Y

the ooUDty agent's office is pr�ducing desired results with five commeroial dairies.

Water requirEment ter p ennanent pasture is rather heavy, but a trem.eadous

amount of teed is being produoed.

Assistanoe was given one dairymNl in.

building a modern dairy barn

..An eftert was made to place eggs in cold storage in the surplus spring peri.'.

Because of inadequate supplies of fresh eggs.

this attempt tailed.

Feeds were ratlaer short.

This high-priced during the year required assistance from the and protein agent's supplies offie. in the way of preparing rations to meet these problems.

Eight n ...

commeroial poultry operators were given assiatance.

-

32

-

The

project

of ditch lining in the Chino

Valley Irrigation

District was eOJltiaued ill. 1941.

A

.eetion of the dit.h

originally

oiled in 1946 was re-oile' in 1941.

Results indicate that this oiling process is eonomiea.l, prevel1t.

excessive weed growth, and does save water losses.

The _rk

poimtl

to the tact that the ditohes should. be wet at the time of the

application

in order to give proper penetration.

Oiling should

probably

i. dODe tor two successive years.

Twenty-five

conerete drops were in­

.talled in d.itches with steep grades and forty concrete turnout boxes

.ere

in built Gel put in place.

Assistanoe was giTen to twelve operators plaDDing irrigation ditch lines.

The exteuion pro&ram on soi 18 is making a test of three different means of lAse inereasiDg water penetration.

of gypsum. the use of organic

Comparison

matter, and is being made mechanical between the means of improv­ ing structure.

Results will not be mown tor some time.

Because ot the water shortage during the year, crop production in the county was greatly reduced in 1941.

Assistance was given farmers in setting up a plan for the efficient use of the water available.

Assistanee in working out crop

rotatio�

program.

was given to six operators.

Five operators were assisted in land leveling.

'fen operators received 'information regarding pumping

plant

installations and. di"tch lining for the distribution of irrigation water.

An'mpertant

phe.se

of' the extension program in field crops is the securinc of pure

.e�d tor small grain plantings.

Assistance was given to tarmers iD Soil COILSenation Districts in working out crop rotation program

••

Orehardiats in the county were gi veIl assistance in cultural practices and insect and disease oontrol.

Codling moth oontrol and thrip control spray procrams have been orohard pruning in force and are program was giving established satisfactory primarily for control.

The new operators who had net had previous experience.

The small acreage of grapes is receiving considerable attention.

A field test tor th e coRtrol of western yellows on six varieties of' tomatoes gave inconclusive results.

Pearson and Mar­ globe varieties apparently were the most resistant to western yellows.

The production ot truck orop. bas been greatly reduced as compared with

1946.

Three 4-H club.

were organized in 1947, with 38 boys enrolled.

Only

18

'boy. completed their work.

JA)cal l_dership again was the most serious preblem..

Considerable assistance was given by the

OCi)unty agent in the planning ot the annual county fair.

Assistance was given in the prepar

..

tion of the premium.

book and in the operation of the fair itself.

1\18.

Counbl

There are approximately 80,000 acres

With rainfall in the county of irrigated approximating only

�d in

Yuma three or four

County, inohes annually, there is little livestock produotion on the range.

Principal trope grown in the valley land.

are flax, alf'a1f'a, and truok crops.

.ect and di

••a •• problems are ot major importance in the county.

The

In­

-

33

..

d.TeloPJent

of the Wellton-Mohawk Division of the Gila

Project will prob­

,ably

do.pl.

the irrigated acreage in the county.

The

COUJiLty agent

I s office has worked closely with beef cattle feeders

througheut

the county in an attempt to determine the cause ot the loss ot

It.lr·s on teed.

Assistance bas been given in the

Ba:cgs

and TB testing program

'Which was initia.ted in 1947.

III 1946 a titch were limng project was initiated in which tifty teet of ditch lined with. bitumuls at a eost of 70 cents per linear toot.

This

liniDg

is prniDg very satisfactory and economical.

It is thought that lame problems may arise when Colorado River water is used in the Roll-

Wellton area for irrigation purposes.

'With that in mind.

soil from that area was placed in tanks in an eftort to determine water penetration under .tbree different on thr types ot soil amendments.

This testing was carried oughout the year.

Flax bu eale developed into a most important crop in Yuma

County.

Pasmo dis­ and fusarium wilt have necessitated test prQjects for the oontrol ot these diseases.

Field test work has been carried on in the proper ter­ tilisa.tion

of flax.

It was determined that the use ot ca.lcium.

cyanamid to rot gra.in sorghum stalks prior to planting flax was an exoellent prac­ tice.

Inf'ormation eene ernin.g

disease control.

ferti lization.

and planting dates of flax bas been talks, meetings, widely circulated among the farmers through radio and newspaper articles.

Assistance was given to India and African alfalfa seed growers in an advertising and marketing program fer their seed.

An alfali'a variety test of three varieties, including

Afr�ean end India,

1II8.s

started in northern Yuma

County.

This field test projeot will.

serve the Parker area.

The tion pure, seed program, carried under the

Arizena

Crop Improvem.ent

Associa­

rules"

i8 obtaining definite results fer Yuma

County.

There were

4,250 acres

�f certified a"11'a seed alfalfa prodllced in the eoun-Gy in 1947.

Two dehydrating plants were encouraged to move into the county in 1947.

A eotton variety field test was established in Parker to determine adapted varieties.

Results indicated that Paula cotton was best adapted to the

Parker area.

Field tests with sugar beets are being made in order to check yield a.nd sugar content in anticipation of developing a new source of in­ come tor Yuma

County.

The Yuma

County agent assisted farmers in that area in growing

700 acres of guar for the General Mills

Company.

Two varieties of oats were increased under the regulations of the ciation tor a seed company in Minnesota

Crop Improvement

Asso­

.An insect and disease oontrol program for the county has become fairly well estaDlished.

The use ot DDT aDd other new inseoticides bas been an effeo-

1;in means ot ta.1.8

chinch oontrolling lygus on alfalfa.

The beet army worm and the bug en tlax bav. been the cause of

�age in flax and a oon­ tro1 program has been worked out for these insects.

A red program in alfalfa fields has 'been developed.

A spider control grasshopper control pro­ gram tor 1:h. Wellton-Mohawk area.

and for the south Gila

•• tablished and carried out with very

Valley area was satisfactory results.

-

34

-

Field testing has 'been done in an effort to seoure a wilt resistant water­

_lon.

T'en varieties were planted in this field test.

The Blue Ri 'bboD.

variety was

tiDAlly

seleoted as the most promising.

A.

large

seale a'itrus fertilizer £i.ld test was carried during the year.

The

primary

purpose of this test was to determine

..

:nether phosphate or potash has any eftect on eitrus quality and yield.

This test was set up in ten-acre blocks aDd will continue for several years.

Assiatanee was given to farmers in their farm labor problems in the

early

part of' the' year.

Requests from veteran.s tor intarmation on reolamation projects were received by the agent; and eaeh Qf these veterans given

.

assistance.

In order to better serve the farmers of Yuma

County,

three mimeographed pamphlets were prepared on ornamental plants adapted to Yuma

County.

!1te 4-H elub program in Yuma County is serving the young people very sat­

isfactorily.

The townsp •• ple and business people are enthusiastic in th.'ir support of this program.

250 individuals were enrolled in 4-H clulD

....

rk,

...

i th a high percentage ot completions.

The annual 4-H e lub fair oarried exhibits from every

A county

�H clu.b

community and counoil advises with the from.

almost every club member.

agent regarding 4-H club work.

The eouncil served as an

4-H dub events.

ad"risGry committee for the junior fair and other

Twenty-five

club members attended the Annual 4-H Club

Rounclup at the annual 4-H club

University camp.

of Arizona, and sixty club members attended the

Fourteen new leaders have been secured for a.gricul­ tural clubs fer the 1941 lar intervals in order to program.

C'lub leaders meetings are held at regu­ plan and carry out the 4-H club program.

At the coapletion of the year's work, a reoognition banquet was held for all club members and club leaders.

Seven Yuma

County delegates were chosen to attend. the National Club

Congress, and their names made known at this recognition banquet.

VI.

CHANGES IN PERSONNEL

There were f.w

Changes in

personnel

during the year 1947.

In Cochise

County,

Paul

Brown, county agricultural agent, resigned in June, and

Roy

!oUDg, fennerly in the Fann Labor

Program, was appointed county agricul­ tural agent tor the county on

September

1,

194'7.

Two appointments.were

made in

Maricopa. Count;y during the year.

On

Januaey

1,

1947, LeRoy

Gavette was appointed assistant county agricultural agent and given the responsibility of the 4-H club program.

On

February 1,

1947, Robert Pinnow was appointed assistant oounty agricultural agent in oharge of the agronomy field of work.

The county agent in

Navajo County resigned in November of 1946, and Jame.

Araer,

a tenner

_ployee in the Farm. Labor Program, was appOinted county agricultural agent

Maroh

16,

1947.

-

35

-

These cOllStituted the changes in the counties during

1947.

In the state office the vacant for some as e�ension position of extension agronomist.

which had been time� was filled agronomist em.

by the appointment of

September

1,

1947.

Norris W.

Gilbert

The the position ot information specialist was tilled on

Ootober l� 1941� �th appointment of Joe MeClelland.

VII.

COOPERATION

Close

These cooperation was had with federal agencies during the year

1941.

agencies included the Soil Conservation Serviee� the Production and

Marketing

Administration, the Bureau of

Plant

Industry

� and the Bureau of

Reclama.tion.

The Extension Service is

cooperatizlg

with the Bureau of

Reo�tion in the planning for assistanoe to veterans on the mesa.

Plans were made during lat. 1947 to assist the Food Conservation in ita program for the conservation of food and feed.

A meeting

Prog� was had with·the leader of that project,

Mr. Halbert W.

Miller, to plan the pro­ gram.

The first which time

-each meeting was held in the

Capitol Building at

Phoenix, at group present indicated the type of assistanee which they might be able to gi va.

Immediately after this meeting, a brief meeting with Mr. Miller a.nd

his assistants was held to discuss further plans.

Mr.

Miller then made a trip to the University to discuss with a group in the

ExtenaiGri

Service and

Experiment

Station the over-all pragram.

In per-

80nal the meeting with Mr.

Miller.

the work was outlined in such a way that

Extension Service would carry the program in seven counties� and

Mr.

Miller's organizatiGn in the other seven.

The Extension Service cooperated closely with the state and oounty farm burealll 'and the various eommodi ty organizations of farmers.

In some few oases, extension personnel has acted as secretary fGr the organization.

Ranver, this is not customary.

Assistance is given these organizations in planning their pr'ograms.

�II.

OtlTLOO�

AND RmOMMENDATIONS aequest.

for assistance during the year 1947 were many more than in the pre-war year..

oome.

The

This will primary reason undoubtedly tor the be greater characteristic of' the years to nwnber ot demands upon the

GOunt" agent's office is the large amount of individual assistanee given to farmers during the war period..

There is only one logical method of handling the increased vo1um.

in the county agent's office in the years to o.e.

That is through the inclusion ot the more important demands into a projeot or

projects

which will obtain the same or greater results through .erving

a larger number ot individuals.

The hiring of additional perloDel is probably essential, but efficiency demands that the above prooedure be tollowed.

-

36

-

The needs ot reters to agriculture should be

analyzed

from two angles.

The first the.

needs within the

Agrioultural

Extension Service.

The other refers to the needs of agriculture within the state.

Several recommendati

Gn.

can be made

Added regarding the Extension Serne

••

personnel,

both in the counties and to a certain extent in the state offioe, is essem;1al to the eftieiell.t and the Service.

The meth0d of' complete operation

0t planning the county extension programs shou14 De with this materially improved within the next few years.

In conjunction improved planning, the system of county extension reports should b. streamlined with a uniform system.in

use throughout the state.

Finally,

some improvement should be made in the organization and equip­ ping of county extension offices.

There are several the important needs within agriculture itself'.

Probably

greatest-

need within the state is the need for an improved organiza­ tion of' famers to assist in program.

planning itself.

The 4-H club pro­ gram is a mGst important phase of the extension program.

There is a need

.for

greater emphasis en strictly agricultural projects.

With the in­ ereaied staff and program of the last few years, there is a need for

reaching

a larger number of

yeung

people.

It would appear logical that a greater number of club work.

The need county events would

�stim.ulate greater interest in 4-H

�or

trained leadership is likewise an important need.

The marketing of farm.

products should reoei va greater attention from the

Exten8ion Service in 1948.

With

surpluses

increasing, a definite progr8JD.

of assistance in this field shou.ld

be of developed.

Weed control is a phase

agr10uiture

that needs

greater

clarification within the state, followed by definite aS8i8�e.

to farmers.

It will be necessary for the

Extension

Serviee to prepare additional subjeot matter bulletins in order to fully lerT.

this need.

The influx of veterans into demands upon the farming will inoreas. the

county

agent for assistance in planning far.m

programs.

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