Agent 1, 1950 1, COlL."'lty

Agent 1, 1950 1, COlL."'lty

YUMA COUNTY ANNUAL NARRATIVE REPORT

Dece�ber

1, 1950 to

December

1,

1951

Albert

R.

Face

-

COlL."'lty Agricultural Agent

Frank Pritchard

-

A.ssistant

County

Agent

Lonnie

McGrew

-

Assistant

County Agent

Winston leSueur

-

Itin.

Assistant

County

Agent

TABIE OF CONTENTS

County Agricultural Agent

-

Albert R. Face

Assistant Count" Agricultural Agent

-

Frank

Pritchard

Sunnnaey

• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •

• • • • • •

1-2

Sumnar.y

of Demonstrations

• • • •

• •

• • •

• • • • •

Situation

• • • • •

• • •

• • • • •

• • • • • • • • •

Organization.

• • • •

• • •

• • • • • • • • • • • •

1.

Agricultural.

• • • • • • • • •

• • • • • • • •

2.

Extension..

• • • • • • • • • •

• • • • • • • •

3-4

5-13

14-15

14-15

15

AGRONOMY

Alfalfa.

• • •• • • • •

1.

Prices..

• • •

16-21

16

2.

Diseases..

• • • • • • • • •

• • •

••

• •

16-11

3.

Insect

Control.

• • •

11-18

4.

Insect Control Bulletin.

• • • • •

• • • • •

• •

18

5.

Varieties..

• • •

• •

• • • •

••••••

6.

One

Variety Community

••••••••••••••

18-19

1.

Weed Control

• •

• • • •••••••••••••

19

8.

Fertilizer

Test

-

Yuma

Mesa.

• • • • •

• • • •

19-20

9.

Fertilizer

Test

-

South

Gila

Valley

•••••••

21

10.

Preharvest spr� test.

• • • • •

• • • • •

• • •

18

21-23

11.

Fertilizer and

Irrigation

Test

Yuna

Mesa

•••

24

12.

Pollination

•••• •

••••••••••••••

25

13.

Aphid

Control Test

• • • • • • • •

• • • •

Ih.

Mite Control Tests

• • • • • • •

• • • •

25-26

26-21

BARLEY.

••• • • • • • • • • •

• • • • • • •

• • •

28-32

1.

Fertilizer Test.

• • • • • •

• • • • • • •

• •

28-29

2.

Fertilizer

Test Following Sorghum.

• •

• • •

• •

29-32

3.

Weed Control

• • • •

• • • • • • • •

• • •

• • •

32

BERMUDA

1.

Acreage.

• •

• • • • • • • • • •

• •

• •

••••

••••••••••••

33

2.

Fertilization.

• • •

• • •

• •

33

3.

Insect Control

• •

• • • • • • • • • •

• • •

• • • • • • •

• •

33

4.

Price and Yield.

• •

• •

33

5.

Supp�.

• •

• • •

• • • • • •

• • • •

BEANS.

• • •• •

33

CASTOR

••••••••••••••••

• • • • • • • • •

• • • ••••

34-40

1.

Insect Problems.

35

2.

Harvesting..

• • • • • •

• • • • •

• • • •

Survey

•••••••••••••••

35-36

3.

Mite Control

• • • • • • • • •

• • • • • •

36-37

4.

Fertilizer Tests

5.

Fumigation

Test

6.

PreHarvest

7.

Field

•••••••••••••••••

Spray

• • • • • • • • •

• • • • • •

39

D�s

•••••••••••••••••••

39-40

8.

Outlook For

Yuma

County.

• • • • •

• • • ••••

37-38

39

40

CORN

••

• •

1.

Varieties

• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •••••

�41

•••••••••••••••••••

T ABIE OF CONTENTS

(con' t )

County Agricultural Agent

-

Albert R. Face

Assistant

County Agricultural Agent

Frank Pritchard

Agronomy

COTTON

1.

(con' t )

• •

• • •

• •

• • • • • •

• • • •

• • • •

• •

4252

Variety Selection.

• •

• • • • • • •

• • •

42

2.

Pre

Planting

Information and

Meetings

• • • •

3.

Fertilizer Recommendations

• •

• • • • • • •

42-43

43

4.

Insect Control Recommendations

• • • • • • • • •

43-44

5.

First Bale Contest

• • • • • • • • • • • • • • •

44

6.

Fertilizer Tests

•••••••••••••••••

45-46

7.

8.

Variety

Tests

••••••••••••••••••

46-48

Spacing

Tests.

• • •

• •

• • •

•••••

48

9.

Mite Control Test.

• • • • • ••••••••••

48-49

10.

Defoliation Test

• • • • •

• • •

• • •

11.

Disease

•••••••••••

FLAX"

• • • • • • • •

•••••••••••••••••••••••••

50-51

52

52-55

1.

Disease

••••••••••••••••••••

2.

Fertilizer Tests

• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •

SOIDHUM.

• •

• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •

52-53

53-55

56-57

1.

S WAR

Variety Date of Planting

Test.

• • • • • • • • •

B.EETS.

• • • • •

• • •

• •

• • • • • • • •

•••••••••••••••••••••••••

56-51

58

58

1.

Fertilizer Test

•••••••••••••••••

58-59 crop

1.

Improvement

• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •

60-63

Seed

Increase.

• • • •

• •

• • •

• • • • • • •

62-63

Economics

••••••••••••••••••••••••

64

Engineering.

• • • •

• •

• • • •

• • • • •

• • •

Entomology

• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •

• •

• • •

Horticulture

• • • • • • • •

• •

• • •

• • • • •

64

65-61

68-83

Vegetable Gardening.

• • • • • •

• • • • • • • • • •

68-82

Commercial

• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •

68 lettuce.

• • • • • • •

• • •

• • • • •

• • • • •

Fertilizer Test

-

Fertilizer

Test

-

68

"

1950-1951

•••••••••••

69A,B,C,D,E

1951-1952

•••••••••••

70

Disease Test

• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •

Cantaloupes.

• • • • • • • • • • • • • • •

••

Fertilizer Test

•••••••••••••••••

70-72

73-78

Insect

Control

• •

Disease.

• • • • •

Varieties.

• • • • • • • • • • •

• • ••

Carrots

••••••••••••••••••••••

Disease

•••••••••••••••••••••

Water.melons.

• • • • • •

• • • • • •

• •••••

Variety

Test

• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •

Tomatoes

• • • • • • • • • • •

• •

• • •

• • • • •

13-77

78

78

78

78-79

78-79

79-81

79-81

81-82

Disease

•••••••••••••••••••••

81-82

82

Orchard Management

• • • • • • • • • • • • •

• • • • •

Citrus

Survey.

• • • •

• • • •••

Home Beautification.

• • • •

• •

• •

• • • • •

82

82-83

82

Grapes

• • • • • • • •

• • • • • • • • • • • • •

Garden Club

Meetings

• • • • • • • • • •

• • • • •

Pecan

Insect Control

• • • • • • • • • • • •

• • •

83

83

TABLE OF CONTBNTS

(con It)

County

Agricultural Agent

-

Albert �

Face

Assistant Count,r Agricultural Agent

-

Frank

Pritchard'

Livestock

••••••••••••• _

•••••••••••

84-99

Yuma Livestock Association

Beef

• • • •

• • • • • • • •

Organized.

• • •

• • • • •

• • • • • • • • • •

• • • • •

84-85

Swine Field

D�

• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •

85

Livestock Association

Meeting

• • • • • • • • • • __

••

86

87-89

Hemoglobinurea.

• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •

,External Parasites

••••••••••••••••••••

87-89

89

Feed

Supply and Costs

• • • • • • • • • • • • • •

• • • •

89

Swine.

• • • • • • • _ • • • • • • • • •

• •

• • • • • • •

89-97

Swine

Feeding

Tests

• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •

90-97

Sheep_

• •

• • •

• •

• • • • • • • • • • • • • •

97-98

Dairy-.

• • • • • • • • • • • •

• • • •

• • • • •

• •

Dair,y

Herd

Improvement.

• • _ •

• • • • • • •

_

• •

98-99

98-99

Plant

Pathology

• • • • • • • • • • • _ • • • • • • • • • •

100

Poultr,r

• • • • • • • • • • • _ • • • • • • _ • • • • • •

101

Soils

• •

• • • • • •

• • • • • • • • • • •• • •••

101

Weed'Control

••••••••••••••••••••••••

101-102

Field

Days.

• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •

_

• _ •

••

102

Irrigation.

• • • • • • • • • • _ • • • • • • • • • • • • •

103

Information

Radio

Program

• • _ • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •

Stations.

• •

• • •

• •

• • • • • • •

• • ••

10�1ll

104

Wee� Newspapers

••••••••••.••••••••••

104-106

Daily Newspapers

•••••••••••••••••••••

107-110

Magazines

• •

• • • • • • • • • • • • • • •

.,

• • • • •

111

Visual Aids

• • • • • • • _ • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •

111

Cooperation

With Other

Agencies

• • • • •

• • • •

112-113

4-H

Club Work

• • • • • • •

• •

• • • • • • • • • • • • •

113-115

Club

Camp

• •

• •

• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •

113

Assistance to new

Agent

• • • • •

• •

• • • •

• •

114

Recognition Banquet

• • • • • • • • • • • •••••••• state Winners

• • • • • • • • • • • • •

• •

• •

• •

114

114

Completions

• • •

• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •

Summary-

• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •

114-115

115

TABLE OF CONTENTS

Assistant

County Agent,

Lonnie

McGrew

Summa:ry of

4-H

Activities and

Accomplishments

Highlights

• • • • • • •

• •

116

4-H organization

• • ••

•••••••••••••••••

111

4-H

Meetings

••••••••••••••••••••••••

117

Project

Visits

• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • ••

111 state Fair

• • • v.

• •

• • • • •

• • • •

• • • • • ••

117-118

Project Requirements for

Yuma

County

4-H Club Work

••

118

4-H

Demonstrations

• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •

••

118

Newspaper Publicity.

• • • • • • • • • • • • •

• • • •

118-120

Radio

Publicity.

• • • •

• • • • • • • • •

• • • • • ••

120

4-H

CoveredWWagon.

• • • • • •

• • • • • • • • • • • ••

12�121

4-H

Sponsors

• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •

� .121

4-H Recognition

Banquet.

• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • ••

121-123

4-H

Lead�rs and Council

Members.

• •

• • • • • • • • • ••

123-124

4-H

Awards

• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •.

• • •

• • ••

124

4-H

Tours.

• •

• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •

124

National

4-H

Congress.

• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • ••

125

Health.

• • • •

Farm

• • • • • • • • • • •

• •

• • • • ••

125

Safety.

• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • ••

125

Projects for the Coming Year

• • • • • • • • • • • •

Beef'

• •

•.

• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • ••

125-126

125

Lamb

• • • • •

S,\"iin.e

• • • • •

••

••

125

126

Poultry.

• • •

• • • • • • • e • •

• • • • •

••

126

Recreation

••• e ••••••••••••••••••••

126·

Itinerant Assistant County Agricultural Agent Winston J. LeSueur

Summary

• • • • • • • • • •

• •

• •

• e.

• • •

'. 127-128

Albert R.

Face

-

Frank

Pritchard

-

Cdlmlfiy Ag.

Ass't

Co.

Yuma County,

Arizona

1951

Agent

Agent

SUMMARY

The Yuma an

C01.mty

adult extensive one the agricultural extension program has been past year.

Field demonstrations were continued to two in lvith a change over to twelve cotton tests compared

1950.

Seven castor bean tests were likewise added.

Last year year only one vegetable test was conducted and the four were conducted.

These tests were given past basis for a more extensive and accurate information program in

1952.

Forty-four field tests were either started, completed, or both started and completed by the Yuma

County Extension Service during the year.

The work

County Agent.

and the Assistant closely wi.th the Bureau of

County

Plant

A�ent

Industry continued to on the Yuma

Mesa and the Uni varsity Experimental Farms.

Exr:e rimental progress and Field and results werepublicized through newspaper, radio,

Days.

Five

Field

Days were conducted during the

• year.

The local Extension staff conducts week� radio programs

'over two radio stations and writes news articles for a wee� and a daizy newspaper.

Progr ans frequently arranged for or presented by the

County Agent and

/ or the Assistant

County

Agent to Farm Bureau locals, the Yuma

CO'W1ty Pure Seed Associa­ tion, the Yuma Livestock

Association, the Yuma

County Agri­ cultural Seminar

Group, and the Yuma

County Agricultural

Research Council.

Considerab� more emphasis has been given to cotton, castor beans and livestock the past year.

Insect problems, though alw�s great, were even greater this past year with spider mites, aphids, and woo� worms as leading problems.

In Februar.y, the EXtension

Entomologist and local

Extension

Agents met with

Imperial and RiverSide

County Entomologists and

Entomologists of the

University in reviewing the probable year1s insect control recommendations for cotton and alfalfa.

The Extension an

Entomologist and local Extension Agents prepared alfalfa seed insect control bulletin for Yuma Coonty following this meeting.

The

County Agent assisted in organizing the Yuma

LivestoCk

Association and the Assistant

County Agent got a

Yuma area

Dair,y

Herd

Improvement

Association with assistance from the

,Extension underway

Dair.y

this past

Specialist.

year

The

County Agent's

Office kept Crop Improvement records and asked inquiries of growers.

-1-

Albert

R. Face

-

Cotmty Ag.

Agent

Frank.'Pritchard

',-

!sslt Co.

Agent

Yuma

County,

Arizona

1951

SUMMARY

(cont't )

The most inquiries for information came on cotton, castor beans and alfalfa this past year.

This is included under insect problems in these crops.

Numerous people from

California, Texa�, New MexiCO,

Salt

River

Valley and other areas have contacted the

County Agent and the Assistant

County Agent to learn about

Yuma agriculture and possibilities of buy-ing or renting farm land.

This is very time consuming and often at times when other work is pressing.

The following pages will enlarge on the above items and cover ma� items not mentioned above that are important to Yuma

County's

Extension progran.

-2-

Albert

R. Face

-

County

Frank Pritchard

-

Ass't

Yuma County,

Arizona

1951

Ag.

Agent

County Agent

S��ARY OF DEMONSTRATIONS

The demonstrations conducted in Yuma

County by the

Agricultural

Extension Service are listed below.

These demonstrations were either started or finished or both during the annual report year.

Demonstrations

When

Started

When

COIDEleted

ALFALFA

Fertilizer

Fertilizer

P.reharvest

Spray

Fertilization and

Irrigation

Bee Pollination

Mar.

26

Sept.19,1950

Aug.16

July

6

July

20 d

Jan. 12

May

16

Insects

Aphid control test

April

2

Mite

Control test June 9

V�te control test June 21

July 5

Aug.

19/

Aug.

1

May

10

July 15

July

20

Vfhen to be

Completed

Page

19-20

21

21-23

24

25

25-26

26-21

21

BARLEY

Fertilizer

Fertilizer following sorghum

Weed control

Weed control

Jan.

5

Jan.6

Feb.1S

Feb.16

June

6

J

Ailay 21

June 6

)

I

:May

21

J

'28-29

29-32

32

32

CANT.ALOUPE

Ob'ertilizer

Feb.15

June 20 13-71

CASTOR BEAN

Fertilizer(Carstens)A)r.

Fertilizer

1,1951 Nov.

2,

22

(Franklin)

May 24

Defoliation(Carstens)Oct.

15

Nov. 2

Fumigation(Livingston)Mar.

27

Mite

Control(Barclay)Aug.

10

Mite

Control(Bann)

July 20

Sept. 15

Aug.

30

/

/

'"

)

Dec.

Dec.

1951

1951

Dec.

1951

CORN ./

-variety

(Barkley) Aug.

5, 1950 Dec.

16, 1950

37-38

37-38

37-38

39

39

36-31

36-31

40-41

-3-

Albert R.

Face

-

Frank

County Ag. Agent

Pritchard

-

Ass'tCo.

Agent

Yuma

County,

Arizona

1951

SUM:.:.ARY OF DEMONSTRATIONS

(con't)

DEMONSTRATION

WHEN

STARTED

WHEN

COMPLETED*

WHEN TO BE

COMPLETED

CarTON

Ferti1izer(BarkJay)

Apr.

1

Ferti1izer(Karumann)

May

24

·Ferlilizer(Bruce)

Mey-

25

Ferti1izer(Gardner)

May

22

Ferti1!zer(iright)

Mczy-

5

Fertilize r

(Franklin)

June

19

Variety(S ugden)

Apr.

18

Variet.1(Francis)

Apr.

11

Variety

(McVey)

Spacing(Barkley)

Apr.

June

25

27

Spacing(Bar kley

)

June 27

Insect

Control(Kryger)July

3

Defoliation(Si1va) oct. 16

Def'oliation(McElhaney)Oct.

25

FLAX

-rertilizer(Frauen-

Nov.

3, felder)

Fertilizer(Osborne)

Nov.

14

Fertilizer(Thacker)

Nov.

15

1950

SORGHUM

Variety(Barkley)

It

Variety.

" Variety

Rate of

Planting

(Barkley)

WHEAT

Fertilizer

(Emrick)

June

July

July

July

20, 1950

14, 1950

29, 1950

29, 1950

Dec.

5, 1950

LETrUCE

D�sease(McDaniel)

Fertilizer (Silva)

Fertilizer(Ma1one)

Nov.

oct.

Nov.

20

13

23, 1950

WATERMEIDN

Variety(Wat son

)

Jan.

1951

SlfINE

Feea":i.ng

Test

(Gardner)

Yuma

Hog Feeding

Test

Dec.

,...

Aug.

Oct.

27

Nov.

10

�'"

/'

July

13

./

Dec.

Dec.

Dec.

Dec.

May 27

15,'50f

12,

1950/

13, 1950

/

14,

1950

14,

1950

Feb.

23

June

1951

/

Mar.

7 July

12

Sept.

14,

1950

Jan.

12, 1951

Dec.

Dec.

Dec.

Dec.

Dec.

Dec.

Dec.

Dec.

1951

1951

1951

1951

1951

1951

1951

1951

Dec.

Dec.

1951

1951

May,

May,

1952

1952

Mar.

Mar.

1952

1952

PAGE

-

45-46

45-46

45-46

45-46

45

46

47

47

4�47

48

48

48-h9

50

50-51

53-55

55

55

56-57.

56-57

56-57

57

58-59

70-72

72

69, a, b, c, d, e,70

79-81

90-91

92-97 l1EED CONTROL

DitCh Bank

Oct.

20, 1950

1952

101-103

-4-

Albert H.

Face

-

County Ag. Agent

Frank pritchard

-

Ass't Co.

Agent,

Yuma Co unty, Arizona

1951

THE SITUATION

Yuma the

County is in the southwest corner of

Arizona bordering

Colorado

River with Cali! ornia on the west and

Mexico on the south.

Yuma

County is referred to as one of the lower elevation counties in Arizona and has an irrigated agriculture entirely except for. desert range lands.

Yuma County being in the Arid southwest has an annual rainfall of

360 of sunshine

J!

inches and annua'LIy

,

1949 was a high rainfall year with da:rs

32 inches falling in

January.

Yuma County Agriculture presents m� Extension to its wide range in types of agricultural problems production; due variation in agricultural areas, distance between purchase because of agricultural conditions in Yuma

County.

agricultural areas, farmers insect control demands, through homesteading newly and new developed land, home owners new through opportunities and climatic

Yuma

County presents all of the problems of many mid-western counties in its small grain, livestock, alfalfa, pastures, weed and insect control.

To t::ese farm

County adds grass enterprizes

Yuma seed, citrus, dates, grapes, lettuce, car­ rots, cantaloupes, watermelons, pecans, castor beans, cotton, sugar beets, peanuts, in fact new crops are continually being raised whenever the price outlook becomes favorable.

Yuma

County's 12 month grolnng season, plentiful supply of Colorado

River water and any crop.

versatile

Some trees farming permits the growing of most

(fruit and others) requiring winter dormancy and cooler summers don't do too well in Yuma

County.

Yuma

County has made winter seed increases for no rthe'm states from east to west.

Seed increases have included corn, peas, wheat, flax, oats, barley and alfalfa on farm scale.

Cotton and castor beans the past unquestionab� year than aQY other crops.

presented

Cotton was more problems important be­ caus e of the tremendous expanse in acreage from approximately

700 to of from the

24,665 acres in southern Yuma

County and em increase l,�\7P acres to

9,350 in northern Ymna

County.

17ith indication that cotton will be a good price again next year, it appears this acreage will continue aDther year.

Castor beans came

Growers up as possibly a promising crop last year.

signed contracts to grow over

2,000 acres.

It being a new crop, considerable time was spent assisting growers.

Insect of any problems were defined the most difficult and time phase of the Extension program

...

, consuming

-5-

Albert R.

Face

-

County Ag. Agent

Frank

Pritchard

-

Ass't

Co.

Agent

Yuma

County,

.P..rizona

1951

THE SITUATION

(con It)

From the acreage standpoint of irrigated projects, Yuma County breaks down as follows:

I s

Yuma

Project

Yuma

Valley

Yuma-Mesa (unit B)

48,688

., 2,150

Gila

Project

Wellton-Mohawk

North Gila

South Gila

Yuma Mesa

8,375

5,800

9,695

8,500

32,,370

2,150

Bouse-Hope

Parker

Yuma

County

Total A.

-

30,000 n5,358

Yuma County is divided into six agricultural areas from the standpoint yuma of the County Agent's Office.

They are known as:

Valley, Yuma Mesa,

North

Gila,

South

Gila,

Wellton

-

Mohawk, and Parker

Valley.

All of these areas are iITigated, however, the

South

Gila and the

Wellton-Mohawk area are the only areas irrigated by pump water.

The South Gila Valley has a good and plentiful supp� of water being sometimes slightly limited in electric power for area has grown pumping.

The Wellton-Mohawk smaller and smaller each year in c ultivated acreage because.

the salty pump water has gotten the land so salty that only the most salt tolerant crops can grow.

The Yuma all

North Gila, Yuma Mesa and Parker

Valley are

Colorado

River water.

The soils in all areas being sandy aren't except the Yuma-Mesa are

ValJe y soils and for the most part are sandy loam soils heavily' silted.

The Yuma Mesa soils classify as sand.

The

Yuma Mesa soils profitable adapted to maQY crops grown on

Valley soils.

Alfalfa does with somewhat more water and wonderfully

-well on the Yuma-Mesa phosphate than required on

Vall¢.1

soils.

Legumes seem to do besb on the Yuma Mesa.

Citrus, dates, onions and tomatoes are other crops most adaptable.

With alfalfa as pasture and for hay, livestock are becoming more and more drew abundant on the Yuma Mesa.

farm units

Fifty four homesteaders ranging from

40 to

160 acres on the Yuma Mesa in June of

1948.

This involves over

5,000 acres.

These new farmers from the far corners of the for

County on a soil designed special crops brings many new problems and projects to the County Agent who has done his utmost to assist these veteran homesteaders.

Thera are

16 homesteaders in the Yuma Valley who drew their fanns in March of

1948.

-6-

Albert R. Face

-

County Ag. Agent

Frank Pritchard

-

Ass1t Co.

Agent

Yuma County,

Arizona

1951

THE S rrUATION

(con 't )

During the past year

19 of the Yuma Mesa homesteaders with small units were awarded additional acreages of raw land

(generally 80 acre blocks).

Most of these homesteaders planted ranger alfalfa this fall or plan to next fall.

One group of

13 homesteaders in approximatelY a

1,000 acre block were organized into a ranger alfalfa area by the

Extension service.

B.p.r.

experimental plots indicated at :e ast lito 2 bales of cotton can be grown on the Yuma Mesa with good culture and management.·

With a weed problem in old alfalfa

(sand burs), there may be growers who will plent some cotton next year.

One grower grew 10 acres of castor beans the past year that look promising.

Harvesting in December will indicate their worth.

The Wellton-Mohawk area is about to present the Extension

Service with one of its only has biggest jobs.

At present the area

8,375 acres in crop but b,rthe'end of

1952 it is probable that this area will be doubled.

This past year the crops' grown were cotton, alfalf�ber.muda

and barley.

Wit.h Colorado River water, farmers will soon be diversifying as much as other areas in Yuma fanners in· that area

County.

When this will want to get detailed happens,' information on the that crops grown in other areas of the

County.

It is expected in two years time over half of the farmers in the area will be will be areas entirely new to Ytmla

County.

Privately owned land developed as water deliveries are made to the various and farms will be sold to veterans on a homestead type of drawing as per the following schedule

(1)

August of 1952, nine farms

Mohawk Unit No.1.

comprising 1,300 acres in

(2) October of 1953,

16 farms (2,400,acres) in Mohawk Unit

NO.2,

18 far.ms

(2,600 acres) in

Wellton Unit

No.1, and

18 fams (2,700 acres) in Mohawk Unit No.3.

(3)

October of

1954,

13 fams

(2,OCDacres) in

Mohawk Unit

No.4, and 10 farms (1,500 acres) in Wellton Unit No.2.

(4) october of

1955, 17 farms (5,100 acres) in Dome Unit

No.1, and 10 farms (1,300 acres) in Dome

Unit No.2.

(5)

December of

1956, five farms

(700 acres) in Ralph's

Unit, and farm

(150 acres) in

Texas Hill Unit.

Mill

-7-

Albert R.

Face

-

County Ag. Agent

Frank Pritchard

-

Ass't Co.

Agent

Yuma

County,

Arizona

1951

THE SITUP..TION

(con' t)

Two demonstration farms are to be set up by the

Reclamation cooperation with the Bureau of

Flant Industry and the in

University of Arizona.

One of these farms is to be a livestock and alfalfa hay and seed farm on

Mesa soil and the other in the

Valley to develope information on methods of reclaiming alkiline soils.

Yuma Valley has the greatest diversification of all Yuma areas.

Field crops include: alfalfa, barley,

County bermuda grass, cotton, flax, gnar, hemp, oats, safflower, sorghum, sugar beets, and wheat.

Vegetable crops include: lettuce, carrots, cantaloupes and water.me10ns.

other vegetables frequent� grown commercially are'cucumbers, cabbage, onions and potatoes

Dates, pecans, and citrus are also grown in the valley.

Cattle and sheep are fed in Yuma

Valley and several farmers raise hogs.

It is estimated that 25,000 c�ttle;

35,000 sheep; and

7,000 hogs went to the west coast markets from the

Yuma area in

1951 and that there were on feed December

1, cattle; 30,000 sheep and

10,000 hogs.

1951, 45,000

The Gila but

Valleys can produce all crops grown in the Yuma

Valley thus far are a little less diversified.

On the average these soils are perhaps the most productive in Yuma County.

The Parker

Valley, which is an

Indian

Reservation, now has

30,000 acres under cultivation.

5,000 of this acreage was developed this past year.

8,000 acres of this land is under lease to white farmers.

There was of

7,200 acres of cotton and

15,000 acres of alfalfa this past year.

3,000 additional acres will be planted to alfalfa soon.

The remaining acres grew in bennuda pasture, sudan, wheat, barley, and carrbal.oupea,

There were was fanned

360 acres of cantaloupes.

4,000 acres of the cotton by white farmers.

This Fall, 27,000 head 0.£ sheep went on alfalfa pasture at Parker.

There are about 2,000 head

Indian cattle and about

1,000 head of other cattle in the

Valley.

There is an area south of Bouse

(Bouse is about 30 miles south of Parker) where

2,1,0 acres

Pa

-, t of this land is on the of cotton was grown the past highway between Quartzsite and year.

Salome.

There are a few hundred acres of irrigated land near

Dateland.

Distances between

Valley agricultural areas in Yuma

County are quite great.

Parker

Valley is

(furthest

140 miles north,

Wellton-Mohawk point)

70 miles east,

Yuma Mesa

(furthest point)

15 miles southwest,

North Gila northwast,

South Gila

(furthest

(furthest point) 20 miles point) 13 miles east, and Yuma

(furthest point)

30 miles southwest.

-8-

Albert R. Face

-

Frank

County se-

Pritchard

-

Asslt Co·.

Yuma County,

Ariz ona

195'1

Agent

Agent

THE

SITUATION (con It)

Desert including

Yuma

Range with probab� carries

500 to 1,000 cows annuallY

�ll areas in the County.

Most areas are north of

�ienden and Parker areas having largest numbers.

Dry years.are

might tough on these cattle.

-9-

��rrTY�� __ -rrTiI,,-rrrTT;-� __

��=-�����������������,5rlio

Ii

.Costlt

Dome

YUMA

COUNTY,

ARIZONA

SCALE IN MILES

-10..

'UMA

-

4t'J

/;r/ tfc.I(NI

,v,(.I) iLL/fa ted.

Ne.JR_

ft!

I

._.

l

As

Assembled

Spring 1951

Annual Crop Acreage by the Bureau of

Rec12mation

Report

-

Yuma Area

!I

(Lower

Colorado Hi ver

District)

:

TOTArB

YUL:A PROJECT :

Yuma:

:

North

G!LA PRO JECT

:

Soutli

Gila

:

Gila

CROP

:

Valley

:

Reservation

:

Division

:

Division

:

Auxiliary:

Yuma

Division

:

Mesa

:

:

Valley

:

Valley

:

:

'([ellton-

:

Yuma

Mohawk

:

Area

Alfalfa

Cotton

Bermuda

2/

Alfalfa-Bermuda

ax

B

3/

,-!'h

'.JUea

t

Oats

Sugar

Beets cant-aloupes

T!aterme1ons

Grapefruit

Oranges

Lemons

Pecans

Grapes

Dates

Miscellaneous

Fallow

4/

Crops

:

:

:

:

: n

:

:

:

·

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

8,530:

19,000:

100:

-

-

2,

740:

2-470·

1

170:

:

11,910:

1,020:

30

20:

-

400:

:

30:

530:

2,670:

:

-

-

-

-

-

1,550

4,300

-

10:

100:

1,390:

80

:

:

:

:

:

:

-

660:

690

:

630·

-

-

:

-

-

-

25o

2�

15

5/: 6,570

:

2,585

:

4;640

:

:

25:

1)430

:

970

:

25)095

1,785

:

2,400

:

21r;�

:

:

-

-

:

:

-

-

:

:

-

770

=

: g,335

1.-;610

:

:

3,205

7--

1j010

:

985

-

:

8$: 500

:

-

:

3:,

:

:

-

235:

:

-

2S-S:

:

1,050

:

1,110

:

5,535

240

-:

195 t

2

,1

05

:

-

:

-

:

-

-

:

-

-

:

.'

170

100

:

530:

-

10:

6o:

-

30:

:

:

1,020:

4.>8:

210:

-

-

-

:

:

:

-

20:

-

10:

-

:

-

595:

:

:

:

:

-

:

-

: :

70:

2:

240:

-

35:

-

:

:

30:

40:

-_.

205: 160

:

:.690

:

-

-

_

'_

-

-

170

:

:

:

:

:

-

-

-

-

-

-

:

15:

_

:

420

:

-

95

!

-_

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

13:,205

1,030

1,160

51�

210

410.

325

-167

2,735

3,575

TOTAL ACREAGE

:

47,370: 9,850

:

2,150

:

7,340

:

5,800

:

9,695

:

8,375

-

1/

Includes only crops growing in late

J�pril

early l'Jay,

1951; figures represent net irrigable canals,

3/

Does not include mixed alfalfa-barley stands for pasture.

1;./

Fallow as of about

!tray

1; mainly disked lettuce and carrot a, acreages, drains, road rights-of-w�, and farmsteads deducted.

2/

Includes mixed alfalfa-barley stands and alfalf� for pasture, but not mixed alfalfa-bermuda stands.

:

90,580 with

'1;/

Represents

'alfalfa r;rovm alone; an additional

330 acres of alfalfa was

Lettuce

(19,O�1951 season) 17�613

Yuma area

Carrots (19,0-1951 season)

2',5)6

Yuma area grown interplanted with citrus.

YUM;!. COUNTY PLANTING AND HARVESTING DATES

The foUclling has been prepared in order that those unfamiliar with Yuma

County

�griculture might better understand its 12 month growing season.

PL:�NI'ING rL'�VEST ING

January Barley

Cantaloupes

Pecans

Watermelons

Carrots

Citrus

Lettuce

February

Barley

Cantaloupes

Citrus

Pecans

Watermelons

Carrots

Citrus

Lettuce

1iarch

Cantaloupes

Castor beans

Alfalfa

Carrots

Hay

Citrus Citrus

Cotton Lettuce

----------------------------------�

-----------------

!.pril

Castor beans Alfalfa

Citrus

Cotton

Dates

Barley

Carrots

Citrus

Lettuce

-------------------------------------

H�

Castor Beans

Cotton

Dates

.A.lfalfa

Hay

Barley

Cant aloupes

Carrots

Citrus

Sugar

Beets rIJ.1eat

June Grain

Gunr

Sorghum

Sesbania

July l

...

ugust

Carrots

Grain

Sorghum

Carrots

Grain

Sorghum

Alfalfa Seed and

Hay

Cantaloupes

Citrus

Flax

Sugar

Beets rTatennelons

Alfalfa Seed and

Bermuda Seed

Cant alo upe s

Flax

Sugar

Beets

Watennelons

Hay

Alfalfa Seed and

Bermuda

Seed

Cotton

Hay

September Alfalfa

Lettuce

Sugar

Beets

:_lfalf a

Seed and

Bermuda Seed

Cotton

Det.es

Hay

YU1'I1'� C OUNTY

PU�lT ING l�ND ILUNEST ING DATES (con' t)

PL1.NTING

HARVESTING october

Alfalfa

Barley

Sugar

Beets

.l�lfalfa Seed and

Bermuda

Seed

Citrus

Cotton

Dates

Grain'

Pecans

Sorghum

Castor Beans

-------------------------------------,

November Alfalfa

Barley

Flax r:.'he at

Hay l.lfalf

a

Seed and

Bermuda Seed

Carr-cbs

Castor Be ans

Cotton

Dates

Grain Sorghum

Lettuce

Pecans

Hay

December

Barley

Cantaloupes

Flax

'7atermelons

1riTheat

Alfalfa

Carrots

Hay

Castor Beans

Citrus

Cotton

Lettuce

Pecans

Yuma County

Co��ty tgent's Office

December

1, 1951

-13-

Albert R.

Face

-

C 01.mty

Ag.

Agent

Frank Pritchard

-

Ass It Co.

Agent

Yuma

County, Arizona

19.51

OIDANIZATION

There are four Farm Bureau locals in Yuma county with approxi­ mate� 400 members.

These locals go under the names of Gadsden,

Crane, Yuma

Mesa, and Wellton Mohawk.

Each of these locals hold mon� meetings on the first full week of every month.

The meetings are held consecutively in order to give the

Extension Service a better opportunity to present programs requiring out of town speakers and scheduled films.

AI tho, the

County Agent doesn't alwqys furnish programs for the local

Farm

Bureaus, he is alw�s requested to furnish material that he might have available and his at any of these meetings.

The privilege

Comty to make announcements

Agent finds these Fann

Bureau meetings very valuable in putting across an

Extension program.

Another far,mer organization through which the

County Agent works and cooperates is the Yuma County Pure Seed Association.

The organization meets on call of the local President and usual� meets four or five times a year.

The

County Agent usually meets with the Executive Committee of this organization and assists in planning meetings and publicizing the same.

The Yuma Livestock Association was

The

County organized the past year.

Agent assisted in forming the organization's con­ stitution and acted as chairman of its organization meeting.

The Extension Service is asked to set in on in an executive meetings advisory capacity.

This organization was organized to promote the livestock industry in

Yuma

County.

The

County Agent keeps close working relationships with the office of the local Production

Marketing Adminstration.

The

County Agent ver,y frequent� publicizes new programs and changes of programs for the secretary of the Production

Marketing

Adminst­ ration, both through newspaper, radio and farmer meetings.

The Yuma-Mesa Citrus Growers Association and the

Yuma Producers

Cooperative Association are two farmer organizations in Yuma

County through Which tEe County Agent's

Office can work on problans pretaining to these organizations.

The

Yuma Producers

Cooperative Association is an organization of.

the growers vegetable of the Yuma area.

Altho the Extension Service hasn't worked with these groups welcomed to do so at a� particularly in the past, we are time.

The

Extension Service in Yuma County finds the organization known as the

Agricultural

Seminar

Group of Yuma County very adventageous in keeping up with

AgricUltural problems of the area and workers.

groups exchanging ideas with other Agricultural Governmental

Agricultural workers of the follovdng

Governmental are members of this organization: Bureau of

Plant Industry,

-14-

Albert R.

Face

-

C

Frank Pritchard

ounty Ag.

Agent

Ass't

Co. Agent

Yuma

County,

1951

Arizona

OR GANIZATION

Bureau of

Vocational

Reclamation,

Bureau of

Entomology and Plant Quarantine,

Agriculture, University Experimental staff, and

Agricultural Extension Service of the Yuma area.

This organization has o� held one meeting in the last year but the.

Extension Seryice plans to encourage 2 or

3 meetings for the coming year.

The

Extension Service works and cooperates with ��e Yuma County

Agricultur al Resea.rch

Council which is an organization of far.mers who meet to consider

Agricultural

Research and test plot needs for the

County.

Sub-committees of this organization function on alfalfa, field crops

(less alfalfa), livestock, vegetables and citrus.

The

County Agent and his assistant meet with this group in an of the group to advisory formulate this capacity and take suggestions plan of work.

The most recent efforts of this organization has been the development offlnancia1 support of the University of Arizona

Entomology

Department to do research work in Yuma

County on mites.

The Yuma this

Area Dair,y

Herd

ImproVement Association was organized past year by the

Extension

Service.

Its activities have been guided by the Assistant

County Agent and the Extension

Dairy Specialist.

Extension

There have been several staff changes on the Yuma

County

Extension during the past year.

These who have served all of the past

12 months are

Home Demonstration

AgEn

Assistant County

Agent,

Frank

Pritchard; t, and

Mariel

County

Hopldns;

Agent,

Albert R.

Face.

Assistant served as

County Agent,Robert I.

McCreight

4-H

Agent from December

1,

1950, to

July, 1951.

Itinerant Assistant Home Demonstration

Agent, Mar.y

Gail

Bonsall, to in

July, 1951.

Lonnie

McGrew served as

Assistant

County Agent charge of

4-H

Club work from

September

6,

1951 to

December

1, 1951.

Winston LeSueur came to Yuma

County as an

Itinera.'1t

Assistant County Agent

October

3,

1951, and remainded to

December,

1951.

The secretarial staff has been Miss

Eileen Ellis and Miss

Winnie Guinn for the past

12 months.

Miss Ellis is filling the position of secreta� but hasn't as yet received her ap­ pointment.

Upon completion of her shorthand early in

1952, she will be recommended for the appointment.

Miss Guinn is serving as temporar,r stenographer but it is hoped a per.manent

position will be she can be established for the next fiscal appointed.

year to which

-15-

Albert R.

Face

-

Frank

County Ag.

Agent

I

Pritchard

-

Ass t

Co.

Agent

Yl.mla

County,

Arizona

1951

AGRONOMY

Alfalfa

Alfalfa as a did in crop didn't get as much extension time as it

1950.

This was partzybecause cotton demanded so much time and partly because a much smaller acreage of southern varieties were turned to seed.

There was less alfalfa turned to seed because of higher hay prices than the previous year.

In addition, part of the

Valley alfalfa acreage was plowed up for cotton.

Alfalfa Prices

Last December

(1950)

No.

1 alfalfa hay was selling on the roadside for and

$18 a ton.

B.1

Februar,y

1 it had gone up to by the end of

February

$38.

March 31st saw it at

$35

$34 a ton.

The low price for the.

sumner' was

$26 in J� and by

September prices some had sold for

.were·

$40

$32 per ton.

By the end of November per ton.

Alfa1£a seed prices were stronger than last year.

Support prices were:

Southern: Uncertified 21¢ and Certified

25¢;

Northern:

(Buffalo

&

Ranger) 43¢.

Buffalo sold from

55¢ to

65¢ this summer.

Ranger went from

51¢ to

60¢.

Southern seed sold from

25¢ to 21¢.

Alfalfa Diseases

The principal disease problems in Yuma

County on alfalfa were

Texas Root

Rot, Bhizoctonia, Rust,

Fusarium Crom Rot and

Nematodes.

Texas Root Rot,

Rhizoctonia, and Fusarium CrOlm

Rot were no more severe this past year than in previous years.

Rust and nematode activity were, however, more severe than usual.

A field of

Ranger alfalfa in the Roll area was observed that had a severe rust and in problem.

This summer was unusual:CYhumid this field the alfalfa very rank.

The grower was advised not to irrigate so often to hold down the re1ati ve hl.DD.idity

and to cut the hay if the rust condition became more severe.

A serious condition was observed in alfalfa fields on the

Yuma

Mesa by the County Agent and the Assistant

County Agent.

This condition was one of Chlorotic plants appearing in large numbers genera� over near� all of the acreage on the Yuma Mesa.

Plants were dug in mahy fielc1s that had a

Chlorotic appearance.

-16-

Albert R. Face

-

Frank

Cou.nty

seAgent

Pritchard

-

Ass t t Co.

Agent

Yuma

County,

Arizona

1951

AGRONOMY

(centt )

.Alfalfa

(cont't )

Alfalfa Diseases (con't)

These plants general� had no outward appearance of disease such as

Crown Rot or

Rhizoctonia lesions but did have nematode galls on the roots.

Samples were sent to the Plant Pathology

Department_at the

University for a

1aborator,r an�sis as to the primary casual agent.

The analysis report showed this primary agent to be the Root Knot nematode,

Heteradera Marioni.

This nematode has been for several years causing considerable loss to

Yuma

Me sa hay growers but this summer is more serious than ever before.

No control at present is available to these alf alf a growers.

Alfalfa Insect Control

The past year young alfalfa escaped the worm problem, that is, the cut

WOIm and the beet army worm which are often a serious problem.

The first real problem was aphid control on hay in March and

April.

This was hancfia:1 by am ving ct recommendations through a field test to be described later in this report.

The mites followed the aphids and although they were in alfalfa fields used for hay, they didn't have time to do sufficient damage to warrant at-tempts to control them.

They were a serious problem.

in alf alra seed and cause reduced yields and increased control costs.

No adequate method of control was developed.

Tests that were conducted to find control measures are des­ cribed later in this report.

Iqgus and stink bugs were routine problems for which the extension service recommended control measures.

Leafroller damage was scattered and not quite as serious as a year earlier.

The alfalfa caterpillar appeared to be becoming serious in

August when late

August rains came.

Following these rains the alfalfa caterpillar seem to disappear.

The wooly worm, however, did do serious october.

It wasn't until these worms damage in

September and began disappearing natural� that the alfalf'a began to grow.

-17-

Albert R. Face

-

County Ag.

Fr ank Pritchard

-

Ass' t Co.

Yuma) County,

Arizona

1951

Agent

Agent

AGRONOMY (conlt)

Alfalfa (conrb )

Alfalfa Insect Control (conrt)

Yuma Mesa alfalfa growers harvested month of October because of the very wooly little wonn hay problem.

during

Some the growers escaped with only little damage while others were un­ able to make any hay cuttings.

It was impossible to control the wooly worms in that they fields.

It seems that fields continuall3' migrated into the along side of large stacks of hay were worst.

eggs on the

Apparent� stacks as the wooly worm moths laid their they were flying across country and the hatch of worms migrated back into the fields.

Alfalfa Insect Control Bulletin

Ytmla County's

A1!aila

Seed Insect Control bulletin was again revised following a meeting in

February of Dr.

Larry

Carruth,

Dr.

George Butler,

Ed

Swift,

Hal

Reynolds,

Mr.

Dixon,

Dr.

J.

N.

Roney,

Frank

Todd, Mr.

MacGregger, the Assistant

County Agent, and

1¥le Courrliy Agent.

This bulletin received general distribution.'

Alfa1fa Varieties

The extension servi ce has been recommending

Chile an

21-5 and

African and southern varieties.

For the Yuma Mesa African is to be preferred.

In case of the northern varieties, Ranger and Buffalo have been recommended.

Consideration is given communities and the variety they alreaq, have because of isolation problems.

A One Variety Connnunity

In

August the extension service organized a one variety northern alfalfa seed producing community on the Yuma

Mesa with

13 Yuma

Mesa homesteaders who had been given additional allotments of

80 acres of land to supplement their small acreage of 40 to

60 acres.

the

A few of the homesteaders in this group indicated to

County Agent that they were interested' in growing northern alfalfa seed but with the problem of isolation, it was almost impossible to do so unless their neighbors cooperated.

Recognizing this in problem, the

Comty Agent called together all of the farmers this community which involved more than

1,000 acres.

As a result of a and research meeting at which old time alfalfa seed people presented facts concerning the producers production of alfalfa seed, homesteaders in this community agreed unamiously to make a

Ranger alfalfa seed producing community.

The County

-18-

Albert R.

Face

-

County Ag. Agent

Frank Pritchard

-

Ass't Co.

Agent

Yuma County",

Arizona

1951

AGRONOMY

(con

It)

Alfalfa

(conlt)

A One

Variety Community

(con't)

Agent outlined to this group the requirements in certified alfalfa seed, also, the results producing ot research work with regard to innoculation, fertilization, planting rate, spacing, and insect control for seed production.

At the last of two meetings held on this group sub.ject,

Yuma Mesa homesteaders in this signed an agreement to the affect that they would plant

Ranger alfalfa seed in a cooperative venture to form a one variety alfalfa seed producing area,

This agreement was filed in the

County Agent's

Office.

Alfalfa Weed Control

An

80 acre second year Buffalo al.f."alf a field was observed by the

County Agent and the Assistant closely

County Agent that was sprayed with Dow general weed killer during February.

Weeds present were

Lambs

Quarters,

Mustard, and Red Weed.

This strong weed killer was used because the alfalfa is in a dormant stage during the winter months.

Very poor weed control was realized from this application.

The grass burr problem in alfalfa fields on the Yuma Mesa is a growing and serious told the

County Agent problem.

and the

Many Yuma

Assistant

Mesa farmers

County Agent have that grass burrs are to becoming very serious in their fields and are wanting know hoW' they might go about controll:ing them.

Of course, growers who worked start have constantly on grass burr control from the kept them down but where hand work was neglected early, fields are seriously infected.

This matter was drawn to the attention of extension agronomist,

Charlie

Ellwood,

The

County Agent discussed this matter with Assistant

Coun�J

Agent,

Asslt

Supt.

of the

Yuma

Experimental Farms, and·Assft

Agronomist

-

HCJ'lard P. Cords.

Mr.

Cords was agreeable to discuss the matter with on

Fred Arle and make grass burr control in plans for experimental work alfalfa on the Yuma Mesa for the coming year

•.

Alfalfa Fertilizer Test on the Yuma Mesa

The

County Agent and the

Assistant County Agent lizer to an established stand of alfalla on the applied ferti­

Hugh Johnston fam on the Yuma

Mesa.

This alfalfa field had not been ferti­ lized with on]3 phosphate during the previous

12 month period and had

100 pounds P205 applied during the previous 24 month period.

It was expected that on this sandy land a great response would be received from an application-of P20'.

-19-

Albert R.

Face

-

Frank

County Ag.

Agent

Pritchard

-

Ass't Co.

Agent

YlDlla County, Arizona

1951

CUTTmG

AGRONOMY

(con It)

Alf alfa

(con

It)

·Alfalfa Fertilizer

Test on the Yuma Mesa (con't)

Fertilizer was

Two applied on

March

26th.

forms of fertilizer were used:

1.

2.

Dey single super

Liquid phosphate renovated in to

4 inch depth.

P205 applied in irrigation water.

The fertilizer treatments were as follows:

Treatment

Treatment

Treatment

Treatment

#1.

Dry single super phosphate 37 lbs.

P205

#2. Liquid P20.5

-

36

1bs.

P205 per acre.

63.

Liquid

P20.5

-

64

1bs.

P205

114.

Check plot

-

No fertilizer.

per acre.

per acre.

The made following

April yield data

Wq_S obtained from three different cuttings

24,

May

24, and

July

.5.

REPLICATE

NO.

NO. 1

TREATMENT

NO. 2

TREltTMENT

NO.

3

TREATMENr

NO.

4

TREATMENT

2nd hay cutting

April

24, 1951

Average Ibs.

1

2

3

4

�eld

Ear acre

3rd

May hay cutt1pg

24, 1951

Average lbs.

1

2

3

4

�eld per acre

4th hay cutting

July

5, 1951

Average

Ibs.

1

2

:3

4 lield

�er acre

Pounds yield per acre average for

3 cuttings

2038

1922

2240

2132

200J

3088

2873

3062

2916

2559

2024

2255

2512

2468

2168

1922

2752

2086

3076

3171

3076

2964

2432

2216

2539

2604.

2589

1786

1728

2650

2546 mro

2728

3145

3278

3232

3'09'0

2413

2243

2539

��,

2578

,.'

�.�

..

: No'.

si griif'ic ant; difference was obtained due to fertilization on this test.

The results oi this test were mimeographed and distributed to

Yuma Mesa farmers for their information.

2010

1994

2600

2107 nm:

3026

2977

2708

28.56

2"S9I

2245

2093

2327

§�t!

2440

-20-

Albert R.

Face

-

County Ag.

Agent

Frank Pritchard

-

Asslt Co.

Agent

Yuma County,

Arizona

19,1

AGRONOMY (conlt)

AU air a

(con' t

)

Alfalfa Fertilizer Test in the South Gila

ValJey

The

Cotmty Agent and the Assistant·

County Agent applied phos­ phate fertilizer test

4 different rat�s replicated 4 times on

20 acres of

Most alfalfa new� planted alfalfa field in South Gila

Valley.

growers in that area haven't received response to phosphate fertilization in the past but decreasing hay yields make them wonder if they need it.

Hay yields were taken on three euttings of hay, one in

April, one in

May and one in

June.

The entire test area consists of 20 acres.

Treatment No.1

-

Single super phosphate

27 pounds actual

P205 per acre.

Treatment No. 2

-

Treatment No.

Treatment No.

Single super phosphate 75 lbs.

actual

3

-

Single super

4

-

Check plot

no fertilizer.

P20, per

A.

phosphate 150 lbs. actual

P205 per A.

Treatment No

.5

-

Single super phosphate 343 lbs. actual

P20, per

A.

The follow.i.ng

yields per acre were obtained.

Three cuttings of hay were aver aged for this data.

TREATMENT YIELD IN POUNDS PER ACRE

1

2

3

4 s

2464

2474

2634

2284

2358

Alfalfa Preharvest

Spra;r

Test

Preharvest seed spraying of alfalfa for direct field combining for production has been practiced by some growers in the Yuma area for the past few years.

Some of these growers reported good results with some materials while others failed using the same materials and rates.

The

County Agent planned and

County Agent and the Assistant applied five different spray materials to was

30 ft.

in strips

1200 ft.

long and replicated twice.

This test cooperation with G.

M.

Sugden.

All of the materials listed below were with a bean applied at the rate of

80 gallons per acre ground spr�er with

8003

T Jet Nozzles.

-21-

Albert R.

Face

-

Frank Pritchard

-

County

Ag.

Agent

Ass' t Co.

Agent

Yuma

County,

Arizona

1951

AGRONOMY (con't)

Alfalfa

(con

It)

Alfalfa Preharvesb

Spray

Test

(con't)

1.

Shell

35

Mixture

(Shell 20 with 5%

13 gallons

Shell

35 pentach1oraphyno1) applied Jucy- 14.

J

87 gallons water

-

,

100

Shell

35 cost:

35¢ a gallon over

200 gallon lots

40¢ a gallon under 200 gallon lots

80 gallons of material per acre cost

$3.64

for material.

This material was was followed applied on a day with' high temperatures but by c10udly humid poor drying weather.

The alfalfa was dense.

The kill wasn't sufficient for harvesting.

2.

Sinox General Weed Killer

applied

July

25th.

3 quart to

25 gallons of diesel oil plus 175 gallons of water.

This mixture was of applied at

80 gallons per acre at a cost

$u.28

per acre.

3.

California

Sprq

Chemical

applied July

25.

Pentox 2 (Aeromatie Oil)

7 gallons plus 73 gallons of water.

This material was applied at a cost of $3.00

per acre.

4.

California

Spray

Chemical

-

Applied July

25 pentox

2 (7 gallons) plus

Contu 1 quart

plus 13 gallons water per aere

,

Contax

Pent ox

2

This material was

$12 pe r gallOn

18¢ Under 200 gallons

17¢ over

200 gallons applied at· a cost of 4.19

cents per acre.

5.

Dow General

Weed

Killer

-

Applied July

26

3 quarts of

Dow

25 gallons

Diesel plus 175 gallons water

General

-

$12 per gallon

Diesel

-

--

This material was

12.8¢ per gallon applied at a cost of 4.19

cents per acre.

-22-

Albert R.

Face

-

County Ag.

Agent

Frank Pritchard

-

Ass It Co.

Agent

Yuma

County,

Arizona

1951

AGRONOMY

(conrb)

Alfa1:ta (cOn't)

Alfalfa Preharvest

Spray

Test

(contb }:

The Sugden alla1:ta seed field was very rank and dense.

Weather wasn't at all ideal from the stand point of temperatures and humidity.

At any rate not a s:ingle material in the rates ap­ plied did a sufficient job of top killing to permit harvesting.

The seed was final:CYrolled except in sandy-spobs in the field.

There appeared to be slight variations in the effectiveness of materials but since none gave adequate top ld.l1ing

to permit harvesting, no attempt rill be made to report this except that treatments 2 and 4 appeared to be near:cyeffective enough to harvest.

Treatments 3 and

5 were obviously inadequate.

Treat­ ment 1 looked as' good as treatments 2 and

4, however, it was applied

10 days earlier and could hardly be compared.

Tempera­ tures and humidities are listed below as a matter of record.

Temperatures and humidities are:

JUU'

14

15

16

17

18

19

20

21

22

23

24

25

26

27

28

29

30

31

Date

WEATHER REPORr

Between

12,:20 and 12:30

Temperature

Degrees

102

107

101

102

100

103

102

96

98

99

104

109

101

101

102

102

105

110

Each compaI\V furnished their own materials for the test.

35

35

29

32

25

27

37

42

32

26

34

34

29

31

28

21

16

22

-23-

Albert R. Face

-

Frank

County Ag.

Pritchard

-

Ass

Agent

It

Co.

Agent

Yuma

County, lrizona

1951

AGRONOMY

(can't)

Alfalfa (eon't)

Fertilizer and

Irrigation

Test on the Yuma Mesa

The County Agent and the Assistant

County Agent cooperated with the Bureau of plant rndustry

,

University of Arizona

� eri­ mental Station and the Bure au.

of Bec1anation in conducting a test to determine the effect of soil moisture and phosphate fertilization on the

Mesa.

The Extension production of alfalfa seed on the

Yuma

SerVice 'assuaed the responsibility of insect control recommendations and pollination recommendations using honey bees.

Two levels of

P205 were used in the test and four different irrigation schedules.

The

P205 levels were

100 pounds of

P205 applied at planting time

(October 1950) and the other 100 poUnds P205 applied at planting time and 200 pounds P205 applied in the spring.

The four different irrigations were the so called standard treatment used farmers, an extra a wet treatment.

by the majority of Yuma Mesa dry treatment, a hay schedule treatment and

The irrigation treatments and dates of irrigation are as follows:

TREATMENr DATES

OF mJl.IGATION

III standard Treatment

#2

Extra

Dry

Treatment

#3

Ha.v

Treatment

#4

Wet Treatment

April

June

26,

May 11,

May

24,

June

5,

11, June

28,

July

11, July

24

April

26,

May 11,

June

5,

June

19,

July 7

,

July

24

April

June

26,

May 11,

19, July 2,

May

July

24,

June

5,

11, July 29

'April

26,

May 11, May

24,

May 31,

June

8,

June

19,

June

July' 11, July

17, July

26,

J�

2,

26

The irrigation treatments and were as follows: yields

IRRIGATION TREATMENT

Standai'd

Extra

Dry

Hay

Schedule

Wet per acre from the

YIEID LBS. CLEAN SEED

239

140

139

133 plots

/

A.

A heavy rain in

The low total early yields

August per acre caused a severe loss in this is attributed to this rain test.

stor.m

and lack of gration from adequate insect control because or continual mi­ adjoining fields being cut for h� but allow borders to go to seed.

The year under a similar test will be continued

:irrigation program.

again this coming

-24-

Albert R.

Face

-

Frank Pritchard

-

County Ag. Agent

ABSft

Co.

Agent

Yuma

County,

Arizona

1951

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

AGRONOMY

(con It)

Alfalfa (cent b)

Alfal1'a�Polllnation

Pollination of alfalfa factor in seed by honey bees is still an uncertain production on most Yuma area farms.

Two tests have been conducted by the

Agricultural Extension Service on the use of honey bees.

In

1950, two cages were set up, one l'li th a hive and the other without, and open field plots were marked off at various distances from apiary's.

This year cages were set up in a

Buffalo field in the Yuma

Valley.

Spider mites spoiled this test.

To date, very little conclusive evidence is available under local conditions to substantiate the work with honey bees that has been so successf.ul in seed production in other areas.

The County Agent and the Assistant.

C

Olmty

Agent observed all fields close� Where honey bees were used and feel that they are of value.

This fact needs to be demonst­ rated to local seed producers and will be attempted again in

1952.

Aphid

Control Test

During

March and

April each year, insect on alfalfa in this aphids locality.

Most are the most alfalfa hay destructive growers had used no

.control

measures extensive� until this year.

Insec­ ticide salesmen were spray at a cost of selling them a combination of

TEP.P��

$4.60

per acre.

This material should not be applied to hay being sold for dai� feed.

The

County Agent and the Assistant

COlmty Agent ticides on the

C.

V.

Spencer farm on applied insec­ the Yuma Mesa for the control of this serious pest.

Application of insecticides were made on

April 2nd.

Dust applications were made with a

Hardie Ground Duster.

Spray applications were made by airplane.

INSECTICnE

L% nDr +

8� sulfur

BHe ""

5Qt sulphur

1� pints TEFP t

2 pints 25%

DDT

2% Parathion -45o,t sulphur

1 pint TEl'f-

.J.. 2 qts.

2% Parathion-+

25%

DDT

50% sulphur

Check plot

FORM INSECTICIDE

LBS

..:LJAL./

A.

Dust

Dust

Spra;y

Dust

3511 per acre

18.# per acre

8 gal.

per acre lh# per acre

Spray

Dust

No

10 gal.

per acre

24.# per acre

Insecticide

HAY

-

YIELD

LBS.

I

A.

2234

2235

1806

2541

2000

2390

1106

The h� yield on this replicated test was control received since all used as a basis for plots had a uniform� severe infestation at the the start of the test.

The applications of

2% Parathion gave best control and were recommended since

Parathion has little

-25-

Albert R..

Face

-

County

Ag�

Frank

Pritchard

-

Ass't Co.

Agent

Agent

Yuma County

J

Arizona

19,1

AGRONOMY

(con It)

Alfalfa (conrt )

Aphid Control Test

(con't) to no residual of qualities.

By applying

10 to

1, pounds per acre

2%

Par a:lihion 30 days in advance of cutting, growers were more certain of not having residual insecticide on the

This will be the recommendation for this coming spring.

h�.

Mimeo­ graphed sheets mowing these results have been mailed to growers.

Alfalfa Mite Control Test

Spider mites in Yuma this past season were the limiting of taetor production of several crops including alfalfa seed.

Several alfalfa seed fields were almost a total loss due to the severity of damage from years was spider mites.

Control recommendations in past

2, to 30 pounds per acre of

325 mesh dusting sulphur.

Several fanners this year made with no control.

Mite three

40 pound per acre applications samples

Viere taken and sent to Dr.

Earl

Pritchard at the

University of

California, Berkeley, for identi­ fication.

His identification stated it was bimaculatis green form which is a probably

Tetranchus sulphur resistant mite.

Since sulphur was no longer effective in control and many new miticides were being tried with little success by growers, the

County Agent and the Assistant County- Agent felt it necessaey to put all available miticide"s into a controlled test to help detennine their value.

Dr.

Larry

Carruth and Dr.

Geo. Butler from the

University of Arizona

-

Department of Entomology co­ operated in the test.

Fifteen different insecticides were used with ten of them at two different rates of ferent treatments.

application making a total of

24 dif­

Application was made the nights of June

9 and 10 with a

Hardie Ground Duster mounted on a

John Deere tractor furnished b.y

the far.mer

cooperator.

Each plot was

30 ft. wide and l200 ft.

long.

A second of application was made to some of the plots at the end

5 days.

These plots were checked for two weeks daily by

Dr. Geo.

Butler and Dr.

L.

Carruth along with the Extension

Staff.

Of these materials none gave adequate control at any rate of application used.

At the end of two weeks, mite counts were higher than before application of the insecticides on all plots.

Sulphur gave as good control as

� but was ver,r inadequate.

-26-

Albert R. Face

-

Frank

County

Ag.

Agent

Pritchard

-

Ass f t COe Agent

Y1Dlla County,

Ariz ana

1951

AGRONOMY

(con t t)

Alfalfa

(cont b )

Alfalfa Mite Control Test

(con1t)

Insecticides and rates per acre applied

R.�E

was as follows:

POUNDS

PER ACRE

INSECTICIDE

1st application

2nd g2plicatiol

3

4

1

2

1 para-5DDT-50

2% Parathion

2

Para

-

50

10

R242,

2

Para

-

30

Check

5

1 Para

-

Check

5D11.r

-

50

9

10

11

12

20

Tox.

-

10

45

2

Para

-

2 Para

-

�o

0

R2L2,

2

Para

-

30

10

R2Ii2 30

J

2 Para

-

MR-30

23.8

26.4

26.4

22.6

50.0

12.5

12.5

21.4

14 Dust�ng sUll'ur

15

Dus ting sulfur i6

Soil sulfur

17

Soil sulfur

18

10 Tox

-

70

Check

19

20

21

22

4 nDr

-

80

BaR

1

Para

-

1 Para

-

5 nIYr

-

50

5

DDT

-

50

23 EPN

24 4049

CheCk

300

25.6

25.6

20.2

22.6

19.0

20.2

lli.3

21.6

12.3

A second mite control test was applied qy the

Agricultural Extension

Service on

June

21 in and farmer Joe cooperation with Dr.

Carruth,

Dr.

Butler

Morrell.

This test was similar to the one on the

Sugden farm except that spray applications of maIzy' of these same materials were made.

Again, no adequate control was fran any of the insecticides used in either dust or received spray form.

It is felt that same basic researCh needs to be conducted in

Yuma and

County on our insect problems b.r

competent research men steps are now being taken by Yuma area farmers to bring this about.

-27-

Albert R. Face

-

COl.Ulty

Ag. Agent

Frank Pritchard

-

A5sft

Co.

Agent

Yuma

County,

1951

Arizona

AGRONOMY

(ccnrb )

Barley

Barley is w.i.thout doubt the most popular small grain an ong farmers in Ymn,a ber for

County.

They begin planting it in late septem­ pasture and finish planting it for grain production around the first of March.

Most barley grain growers consider a planting date of December 1 to

December 10 as the ideal planting date.

Last year the

UniverSity

EJq:erimental Farm compared planting dates from November

16 through March 14 with the varieties

-

Mariout and Arivat barley.

On four planting dates,

Mariout barley out yielded Ari vat.

The highest yield of Max-iout barley came from the

December

1st planting, however, it

16 was on�

2 bushels per acre higher than the

November planting.

The Extension Serv.ice in

Yuma

County considers

Mariout barle,y a higher yielder than Arivat on all planting dates, however,

Arivat barley when planted on

December 1st to lOth will do almost as is a better weed good as

Mariout barley and grows taller and competitor.

Mariout barley is criticized for lodging.

The Extension Service in Yuna

County considers three main points in the program on barley.

They are: barley barley varieties, fertilizers, and weed control.

Considerable publicity is given these topics over the radio" and in the neaspaper-,

To help demonstrate to growers the importance of fertilization and weed control, the extension service conducted two fertilizer tests and in each of these tests, weed control demonstrations were conducted.

Barley

Fertilizer Test

The

County

Agent and the Assistant County Agent conducted a bar1e,r fertilizer test on the Yuma Mesa for the purpose of demonstrating to those growers that barley can successfuJ.4r

be used in a rotation program and what fertilizer program would be the most economical to use.

The equipment used in harvesting was furnished by the

University of Arizona Valley

Experimental

Farm.

The fertilizer was:

January applied in four applications starting

5 and ending April

12.

The first application was made using dry fertilizer in the form of ammonium nitrate just before planting.

The fertilizer was applied with an

"Eezy" flow spreader and disked in before planting.

It was

Januar.r

8 following alfalfa.

The second application planted was dry anunonium inches nitrate spread on the surface

When the barley was four high.

The third and fourth applications were shell gas applied in the irrigation water all plo-m receiving the same rate.

All plots raceived a pre-planting application of

75 pounds

0:£ actual

P205 per acre.

Dry fertilizers for this test were furnished by the Yuma

County

Farmers' Marketing

Association and the Shell gas by Jacoby and Son in Somerton.

-28-

Albert R.

Face

-

Frank Pritchard

-

County Ag.

Ass't Co.

Yuma County,

Arizona

1951

Agent

Agent

AGRONOMY (contb)

Barley

(conrb )

Barley Fertilizer Test

(con' t)

The rates of times of application in pounds of actual nitrogen per acre, application and yield in bushels per acre are as

£01lows:

Total rate of plication of

N apper acre.

1.

2.

60lbs.

78.5

lbs.

3.

85.6

lbs.

4.

97.0

1bs.

5. 104.1

1bs.

6.

]22.0 lbs.

7.

8.

129.8

1bs.

148.3

Ibs.

20

20

45.6

20

4.5.6

45.6

71.3

71.3

Time per

Jan.

of application and application.

5

Feb�

28

Mar.

30 nitrogen

AEr.

12

0

18.5

0

37

18.5

37

18.5

37

20

20

20

20

20

20

20

20

20

20

20

20

20

20

20

20

Yield Bu.

per Acre

59.2

62.4

61.1

76.1

67.3

.;

70.1

65.6

68.8

No additional response was received from over

97 pounds of nitrogen per acre.

Up to higher.

The rate of

97, however, application apps the ars yield was progressive:cy­ to have not been as important as time of application.

The

No.2

application appears to have been the critical one.

The 37 pound applications at that time gave the

There was no highest yields regardless unfertilized check in this test of total nitrogen.

because of

3rd and 4th applications being applied as liquids.

The test was was not irrigated every 12 days.

It is felt that this frequent enough for maximum production.

Ten days between irrigations with most of the fertilizer earlier would very likely give better results.

application

This test was conducted in by the

Agricultural

Extension Service cooperation with grower C.

V.

Spencer and the

University of

Arizona Valley

Experimental

Farm mo furnished the combine for harvesting.

The barley was harvested June

6th.

Barley Fertilizer

Test

Following Sorghum

A barley fertilizer test following sorghum was again conducted by the

Agricultural

Extension Service this year.

The test the previous year gave excellent results and it wa� felt by the

County Agent and the Assistant

County Agent that two years work would give adequate information for fertilizer recommendations following sorghum with small grains.

-29-

Albert R.

Face

-

County

Ag.

Agent

Frank Pritchard

-

Assft Co.

Agent

Yuma County,

Arizona

1951

AGRONOMY

(con't)

Barley

(conrt )

Barley Fertilizer

Te-st Following Sorghum (contb)

The plot l�out and yields are as follows.

Applied januar,y 5, 1951

-

-

Harvested

Mqy 30, 1951

P205 applied

\,ll

.,,_

�-....",

I l20'

r

i, i

2 3

S

:

No

P205

I

� i

X

6

7

8

9

P20, applied

/.

.--.f,;r.-........" fr'

No P205

A.:

""::,""

9

8 7 6

140'

4

3

.5

2

1 9

8

7

6 6

7

8

9

I

140'

.�

.5

1

3

4

,!

\ i t; 1

\ � i i

I

I i

14

Ii i

.5

r

2'

"\

8 6

9 7 i7,91618!

7

916

8

)

8 6

19

,7

.5

4

3 2 1

1

2 .5

3

J

...

4

3 1 .5

2

--

2 i

I

.5

4

1

3

Harvest data was taken from a long on

Reps strip

.5

ft. wide and

140

1, 2,

& 3 and

.5

ft. wide and 120 ft.

long ft.

on

Rep. 4.

(

X indicates no harvest data taken.)

-3D-

Albert

R. Face

-

Frank

County Ag.

Pritchard

-

Ass't

Co.

Agent

Agent

Yuma County,

Arizona

1951

AGRONOMY (cenrt )

Barley

(con

't )

BarleY'

Fertilizer Test

Following Sorghum

(con't)

� phosphate plots

TEST NO.

FERrILIZER N t acre

P205 / acre

7

8

9

3

4

.5

6

1

2

Ammoriium. nitrate

Ammonium nitrate

Ammoni um.

ni trat e

Ammonium nitrate

Almnonium sulfate

AImnonium sulfate

3

4

5

6

7

8

Ammonium sulfate

Ammonium sul.fate

9

Check plot

Phosphated plots

1

Ammonium �trate

2

Ammonium nitrate

Ammoni um nitrate

Annnonium nitrate

Ammonium sulfate

Ammonium Sulrate

Ammonium sulfate

Alnmonium sulfate

Phosphate only

110

33

86

120

25

55,

80

173

25

55

80

110

33

86

120

173

0

38.7

38.7

38.7

38.7

38.7

38.7

38.7

38.7

38.7

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

7.37

11.50

15.07

19.27

8.82

16.77

21.87

29.82

3.87

ferti.

cost

Eer acre

3.50

7.70

1l.20

15.40.

4.95·

12.90

18.00

25.95

yield

Ear ac

29.�

40.�

,55.(

74.f

34.(

63.(

8l.C

93.�

21.€

27.6

44.c

50.S

68.6

42.;

60.1

68.6

77.5

19.€

-31-

Albert R

•.

Face

-

Frank Pritchard

-

County Ag. ,Agent

Asstt Co.

Agent

Yuma

County,

Arizona

1951 from th'e

COUNTY'

AGENT'S G.FFICE

MARKET

RE/PQRT in

Th,e, lows: small

Angeles gr" ain for

.rnarket

the 'week ing

November 1,

1951 was as

"'I fol-· tended.

.Betty

charge of was B�ckers recreation.

th"

�,"

Meet

Representatives.

of

'y u m a

County's "home maker clubs met to

No.2 soft white hite 'wheat were

$4.22

per 100 and pounds

No, quoted bulk

2,hard at the 13PW clubhouse

Tuesday to

'at

$4.20

participate ill' basis.

"Food when a program entitled

Entertaining."

Mrs.

I

J t per oats.

bushel was cwt.,

No.

,1 flax; seed was

$4.00

per bushel.

have proven best all-around

Yuma area.

and because it is a variety, consequently a' poor yield other varieties in

No.

pounds

$4.02

Experimental

�t during the been

Its serious competitor.

spite

Bill to

No.2

2 ha�, pCI' white

$4.05

yellow

$3.27

to

$3.28

; basis.

results

California

• testing) 38 quoted at

Marioutvbarley lodgmg

It of its p milo was er

100 quoted pounds at' bulk

.'

Martout Best cri.tJcized

quoted work and pa�t conclusively t short-growing does, however, lodging.

few outconsistently

I

",

Elsie

Th�,pro�ram

ration of a buffet cereals er; na weed

Mrs.

Mcrr'is, extension s-ervice nutritionist, was in charge,

Mrs.

Holl

.included

discussion of present day and luncheon. Use of liberal amounts of dried milk.

veg-

�t etables and fruits and whole .grain

grower years hat ts ct h e variety for the b5caus�.

<;>f

,hensl\.re

nut�ibon knowledge, was

Attending

Gertrude ing, of special interest.

were-

Mrs.

Amelia J

0hannsen,

Mrs.

Henry

Frauenfeld­

Lenon,

Mrs.

J.

C.

Mrs.

Lillie Smith,Mrs.'

Kigbee,'

Ann

.Mrs,

Mrs.

Adele

Bates,

.Hugh.

Mrs.

R.

C.

Johnston, a compre-.

the.

prepa-

Mrs.

An­

Fleming,

Home'r

Wright, Mrs.

:M:rs.

Walker,

E_.

T.

characteristic

Crismon,

Mrs.

Pauline Land, Mrs.]

Wes'\'Lang,

', Mrs,

Bertha

Smith,'

Clyde,

Gaines,

Mrs.

Beryl

Cravens, Mrs.'

Marguerite

Evans' and

Ml:p::iel

Hopkins, home demonstratton agent.

Wootton," assistant superr, ��'�""__"'�����---,-"--���� intendant

'Of, the valley tal farm, last year' experimen-] conducted a r variety date of planting

I' test to com, pare

Here are

California Martout

�,nd,

Y,�eld

Variety

("

-Nov,"

M

16,

• 4o' arlO,!'"

,---....

,"

,,'"

-.-

... ---.-

...

....

,

' ..•.

'''!.lS

","

7

'I

I

I l

Arivat

,.......................................

83.9

-�i:t�

--��:��-:---:------�--�:--:-�::

::

�!;��

14

..

.:

..

··:

..

,66.3

�..................

67.S_

Mariout

...:

��I��tr;;i�

..

..

·ii��i·��t

6��··b;

'"

March

;���t-II ed up to the middle of and] still produce a seems to fair yield:

'l'here be little benefit from

J planting of earlier than the middle

December except where pasture,

" might be needed..

Dates' Changed,

Due to the' tact that

Apri11L

: comes on

Good

Friclay, this year

�rid the following Sundaysis

Eas­ tel', the

ITunior changed dates of the'

Agricultural.

from

Yuma ,Count�

Fair have been

April

.11-12 to April

18�19.

Calves

Distribute Calves bought recently in s

Yava­ pai

County tor- 'distribution .t'O, [email protected]?l

4-H'ers will arrtva atthe BIll

Wl!lt.

man ranch in the South

[ey today.

the top ed to

Individual

30

'Or

35 head begin drawings are at 1 :30 p.m

Gila

..

',,val­ on sched�l"

Sund'ay,

�;ov.

11.' All

4-H members, with

��posits up for calves'

S�b';lld br prompt in reporting for' .their

111-, mals.·

The 4-H 'officer

,'.

a, training, meeting scheduled for.

Nov.

19 has postponed indefinitely.

ing er was

T�e called off when state

Kenneth

McKee' and' b.e

en meetlea?-

E�l.en

Kightlinger, er, assistant state announced.

they

.lea?:-

'WOUld be unable to attend on that date.

",I

1

Recognize ,Mem�ets

Crane

4-H clubs held their,

'OWl).

recognition party

Tue:;;day.' night.

Members 'Of the ture, Jolly

Crane

Agricul.

Commuters arid, t11 e

Crane Home

Econom�cs

Clubs re-: ceived certi-ficates

.of

achievement, and -recognition pins.

Approxil11ately"

,90 p�:rsons at-

Albert R.

Face

-

County Ag. Agent

Frank Pritchard

-

Ass't Co.

Agent

Yuma

County,

Ariz ona

1951

AG:a.ONOMY

(con

It)

Barley

(conrt )

Barle.r

Fertilizer Test

Following Sorghum

(con't)

Soil ana:CY-sis showed on an average of l2

PPM nitrogen.

at planting time and

8

PPM

P205.

The sorghum was disked up two weeks previous to planting.

This test was conducted by the

Agricultural Extension Service and the

University of Arizona

Valley Experimental Farm in co­ operation with

Les and Jim

Barkley.

Weed Control

Two barley fertilizer tests were conducted in Yuma

County and both had a weed problem.

The

Spencer test on the Yuma

Mesa had a thick stand of volunteer alfalfa and the

Barkley test had were

Red Wood and Lambs sprayed with

Quarters.

Both, of these test plots

It pounds of the acid equivalent of

2,,4-D for broad leafed weedscontrol.

At the end of the growing season no broad leafed weeds were in the

Barkley test plot and only a few alfalfa plants in the

Spencer test.

Both growers were impressed with the control received and made plans to use

2,4-D' in this weed control programs in the future.

-32-

Albert R.

Face

-

Frank Pritchard

-

Yuma

County Ag.

Agent

!ss'tCo.

Agent

County,

Arizona

1951

AGRONOMY (conrb )

Bermuda

Berm uda Acr eage

The

This bermuda grass acreage drop in acreage to dropped by

!

during the

1951 year.

3205 acres occurred most� in the

Wellton-Mohawk area.

There were two main reasons for this large drop in acreage, the possibility of Colorado River water reaching these farmers in the spring of in cotton production.

1952 and the interest

Bermuda Fertilization

The

County Agent and the Assistant

County Agent spent very little time with bermuda grass seed production problems.

Publicity was given on bermuda grass fertilization.

The fertilizer test conducted in the spring of 1950 was reviewed and fertilizer recommendations made to several growers.

Bermuda Insect Control

The

Insect problem in bermuda grass seed serious as in other years but growers production have become was as acquainted with the inse cte and control the major insect methods necesaary,

Thrips was problem which was readily controlled with 20 pounds per acre of 2% Parathion dust.

Spider mites did not infest bermuda grass pest was a major fields during the year to aqy degree.

This problem the previous year.

Bermuda Price and Yields

The bermuda seed price was better this year than in the two previous years.

Seed and 30 cents per pound produced during to growers.

1951

Yields brought were up between to

25 nozmal, production on the spring seed crop but low on the summer crop.

Yields in the spring crop were around

1,000 pounds )er acre and the summer crop below

500 pounds per acre.

Bermuda

Supply

Carry over of seed during the year

1948 and

1949 was the main contributing factor to' low prices received �J gro\rers for their

1949 and

1950 crops but this carry over was very small from

1950 to

1951 which brought the increase in price to growers.

The reduced acreage this year possib� will bring the demand up to the supply during

1952.

-33-

Albert

R.

Face

-

Comty

Ag.

Agent

Frank Pritchard

-

Ass't Co.

Agent

Yuma

County,

Arizona'

1951

AG RONOMY

(con' t

)

Castor Beans

The Froduction

Marketing Adminstration informed the

County

Agent that the government was interested in getting an increase in the production of castor beans in that castor oil was much in need for jet airplanes, armor piercing bullets and sub­ marines not to mention a long list of other manufactured items.

Farmers heard about this duction program being supported by the Pro­

Marketing

Adminstration and asked,' the

Connty Agent

1 s

Office for details.

Local Extension selves with acreages that were

Agents acquainted them­ grown in the

Imperial

Valley in 1950.

In so doing they visited the

Brawley U.

S. Field

Station, fanners mo had grown castor beans and

Baker Castor

Oil

Camp� field representatives who had followed the

'Production of the crop.

In

Februar.y, representatives from the Southwest

Flaxseed

Association and the Bake r

Castor

Oil Company-' .sd.gned

contracts for was

2,500 acres with Yuma area growers.

At that time the price

$268 a ton with a support price of $200 per ton.

These representatives estimated yields of from 1,400 to

4,000 pounds of castor beans per acre.

The

CO'lnlty Agent arranged for linperial

County castor bean authorIties to conduct a

Gadsden in program on castor bean production at

February and in Yuma in March.

Both meetings had a large attendance and growers showed considerable interest.

These castor bean bred representatives said that the beans had been for resistance to shattering and that mechanical harvesters had answered all actual harvesting problems.

They recommended

50 pounds of nitrogen and about the same of

P205 although principal response had been to

Nitrogen.

After the castor bean

Agent

1 s planting season got

Office had numerous inquiries on underway, general the County culture, insect control, fertilization, and preharvest spraying.

The

County Agent and the Assistcnt

County

Agent learned consider­ able about proper culture of castor of growers was beans.

A begun in

November and will be complete surve,y completed later.

It has been learned from observation, however, that castor beans should be back planted on level land, be spout irrigated, be subbed

4 or

5 days after the first subbing, be thinned within ten days to two weeks after the.y

get the the second subbing, be

-3hr-

Albert R. Face

-

County ss-

Agent

Frank

Pritchard

-

Ass It Co.

Agent

Yuma,County,.

Arizona

1951

AGRONOMY

(con't)

Castor Beans (conlt) given good cultivation and necessar,r hand weeding; 90 to 100 actual pounds of nitrogen on average land; frequent light ir­ rigations in the summer; adequate insect control on mites, a� worms, boll a worms

, and wooly worms; and that they with heayier frost than cotton and needed a preharvest stand spraying it as they were to be harvested

50%.·

-.

by

December 1.

Like"'ivise,' they observed that the most serious and shattering

Which reduced problem was that of dehiscence yields, it

�s estimated, as,much

:.

-

Insect Problems

Insect problans became evident early when beet army worms and cut worms were worms quite a problem.

Some growers had to control twice.

The

Extension Service recommended 1 pound

'of teChnical

DDT per acre.

Some growers had a good number of cotton boll worms which required

2 teclmical pounds of

DDT.

Mites we.re

an extremely serious problem in many fields and greatly reduced yields.

In order to assist in combating these mites the

County Agent and the Assistant

County Agent put out miticide tests that

'Will be described later in this report.

/'�

Wooly worms became serious in

September.

The regular recomi' mendation of

30 pounds

5%

DDl'

-

15%

Tox and

40% sulfur didn't l give control in a few instances where it was tried.

This is believed to be due to the slick leaf surfaces.

Extension

Agents tried

3 quarts of

6cJI,

Tox and

2 quarts of

25%

DDl' and got excellent control at the rate of

8 gallons per acre

� air

.

..._

Harvesting

On

August

24th, representatives of the Bake r

Castor Oil

Conq>any and the to Yuma engineer for

Massey

Harris

Castor Bean Harvester came

County to assist in the first harvesting of castor beans on the John

Peach ranch by

Kannnann and Franklin.

Mr.

Smith made many suggestions for field changes and conversions in order that the castor bean thresher be made ready for the major portion of the

Agent observed this coming castor bean operation.

Local harvest.

thresher

The

County operators have had considerable difficulties with threshers.

Numerous changes and adjustments were necessary.

The machine seemed to be built to light and continually requiring repair.

Early estimates were that the machines would thresh 10 to

The machines have had

15 acres per day.

difficulty in threshing more than

6 to

8 acres per and three d� under hullers are this in year's operation conditions.

in the Yuma

Five threshers area.

-35-

Albert

Frank

R. Face

-

County Ag. Agent,

Pritchard

-

Ass't

Co.

agent

Yuma County,

1951

Arizona

J

Report

On ean

Fertilizatio

of

Reports last spring that low rates nitrogen and no phosphate were the fertilizer requirements for castor beans have been proven to be only partially correct, so says

Frank

Pritchard, assistant county agent.

.L

1:===:::::::::::::::i:�=�=:::;�::;;;:;;=::;;....J

He said the bean fertilizer test at the Pete below

Carstens, Jr., ranch

Somerton,

-harvested last week, showed very good response to nitrate fertilization.

Six treat­ ments of varying amounts of nitrogen and one treatment of nitrogen and phosphates were applied by side seven dressing early in

May and received a blanket applica­ tion of 24 pounds of nitrogen in the I of Shell gas on

July 15.

Five

form,

were made after the field was subbed up.

I

The plot yields were consistent in the replicates and are highly sig­ nificant when analyzed statistical­ ly, Prttchard: said.

rrhe i.iertiliz& applications and yields in pounds per acre were:

I

'Nitrogen

24

�tiosphate

--._._................

0

...

__ ..

54

__

.,

__

.:

..

..

__

0

__ ..

.

__ .____

..

Yield

2089

2433

84

..

__ .__

0

'.

...

2572

114,

_.

..•

...

0

__

.....

__ ..

__

2512

144

174

114

__ .

__ ...

..

..

..

__

:____

._

..

..

0

0

100

..

__ ....

..

__

..

__

2548

2581

2440

Pritchard said there apparently is little benefit for the application of, more than 84 pounds of actual nitrogen on this particular land.

No response was received from the addition of

114 phosphate when the poynd nitrogen and the 114 pound nitrogen plus 100 pounds of phosphate tests are compared.

If anything, he said, thre is a slight reduction in yield from the ad­ dition of phosphate.

Last fall, an application o!

80 pounds of phos­ phate was made which seems to have been more than sufficient for the castor bean crop.

Two more bean fertilizer tests will be tension harvested shortly by the exservice and the results will be made available as soon as possible.

j

I

Early

B'e·ans.Yi'eld

1,000 t,o

1,500 6"�\:�

P,ounds Per Acre

Early-harvested castor beans in the

Yuma area have yielded be­ tween 1,000 and

1,500

,pounds per acre.

.i-/

Many those fields are expected figures considerably.

to top

Thresh­ er operators have been busy in these ments early fields necessary making adjust­ with new equipment.

Several growers have applied pre-harvest defoliation sprays. The established pre-harvest spray at this point is 12 gallons with one quart of diesel oil of Dinitro per acre.

It is possible that as temper­ atures drop, this rate -may have to be increased.

Pre-harvest spray­ ing, of course, will with the coming be eliminated of frost.

This process has' perm itt e d growers to thresh without danger of shattering

However, early-matured beans.

where an excess of green be beans blown

�ver exists in the field, many of them will not fill and will when hulled.

-

35A-

Albert R. Face

-

Frank

County Ag. Agent

Pritchard

-

Ass t t

Co.

Agent

Yuma

County,

1951

Arizona

AGRONOMY

(conI t)

Castor Beans

(con't)

Harvesting

(con

1 t)

In September the Assistant

County Agent observed a castor bean harvesting and harvester was hulling operation in the Yuma

Valley.

The doing a good job of picking up all beans and threshing them but the huller was skinning and cracking

20% of the beans.

The farmer,

Walt Kammann, and the Assistant.

County Agent took the huller apart to try to locate the trouble.

The a hulling operation consists of a stationar,r rotating rubber disk spaced rubber disk and

3/8 inches apart.

It was found that both the stationary and rotating disk

�re of hard rubber.

The was stationsr,r disk should have been soft rubber.

observed that the casting holding the rubber on

Also, the it rotating di�k was warped.

New parts fulfilling these requirements were inserted and the clearance and trouble consequent� .eliminated.

Proper disk t.ypes

of rubber were recommended by the Baker

Castor Oil representati vas in EI Centro.

Mite Control

Survey

Three castor bean the spider mite control tests were conducted

County

Agent and the

Assistant

County Agent.

The recom­ mended use of sulfur for control of fective in their spider mites was not ef­ control, therefore, new materials were applied.

Test No.

I consisted of dust applications using a

Hardie Ground

Duster to used in strips

30 ft.

wide and

600 ft.

long.

The materials this test were

2% Parathion mixed with

.5%

Aramite ap­ plied at

2.5 pounds fer acre,

2%

Parathion a10ne at

25 pounds per acre,

10% Sulphenone at

2.5

pounds per acre,

.5%

Aramite applied at

25 pounds per acre and dusting sulfur applied at

40 pounds per acre.

None of these materials were effective.

Test No. 2 consisted of both sprqy and dust applications b.1

airplane.

Strips

120 ft.

wide and

600 ft.

10ng were the p10t sizes and each replicated twice.

'Materials used were sulfur dust applied at

40 pounds per acre,

It pints Aramex in

8 gallons water per acre, per acre.

and lqg dust sulphenone applied at

30 pounds

The aramex spray application gave

9� control at the end of two weeks.

This recommendation gave intermi..tt ant control in field scale applications.

Test No.

3 consisted of three materials applied on strips

60 ft.

wide and materials were

2 acre, quarts sulphenone in

8 gallons of water per li pints of aramex in

8 gallons of water, li pints of aramex plus one quart of TEFP in

8 gallons of water per acre, and one

600 ft.

long by quart of

TEPP in

8 airplane spray and dust both.

These gallons water per acre.

-36..

Albert R.

Face

-

Frank

Pritchard

-

Comty Ag.

Ass' t

Co.

Ytuna

County,

1951

Arizona

Agent

Agent

AGRONOMY (cont t )

Castor Beans (con.t)

Mite Control

Survey

(conrt.)

At the end of two 'Weeks the plots having

Aramex gave

70% mite control.

The TEPP was not effective.

The gave sulphenone spray by far the best mite control which was

9(J/, at the end of

7 days and 87% at the end of 2 weeks.

castor Bean Fertilizer

Tests

Three castor bean fertiliZ er tests were cultural extension in Ymna put out by the agri­

County during the month of

Mey.

One test was on the other two tests were in the Yuma

Austin and

Yuma-Mesa on the

Curly Livingston farm and the

Valley on

Pete Carstens and­

George

Franklin ranches.

On the

Cur:J_y

Livingston ranch, the treatments were as follows:

1.

100

2.

100 pounds of

N pounds of

P205

3.

100 pounds of K2 0

4.

100 pounds of N

100 pounds of

P205

100 pounds of K20

5.

100 pounds of

N

100 pounds of

P205

6.

No fertilizer apnlie d

Mr.

Livingston applied his regular fertilizer treatment to this entire test.

This is only to determine whether or not his fertilizer treatments are limited in any way.

In the

��­ case of the Pete Carstens and of these tests received any

George

Franklin tests, neither li;' additional fertilization.

On the

1/

Pete

Carsten ranch, six treatments plus a check were applied.

Rates of nitrogen ranged in rates divisable by 30, from 30

"11}/

J

_

1!�

J(

...

10rp"

III f pounds per acre of N to 150 pounds per acre of N.

The

90 pound rate of N was applied alone and also with 100 pounds of

P205.

The George and Austin

Franklin castor bean ferti­ lizer test was for "the

30 identical to that of the Pete Carstens except pound rate of nitrogen which was not applied in this test.

Fertilizer for the test was furnished by the

Livingston castor bean fertilizer

Benedict

FertiJ izer

Company and the fertilizer for the Pete Carstens and

George and Austin Franklin test was furnished by the farmers themselves.

The fertilizer was applied with side dreasdng equipment in cooperation with

Logan

Brimhall of the

UniverSity of Arizona Soils

Chemistry

Department.

OnlY one of these tests has been harvested at the time of this report.

The results of the

Pete

Carstens test are in this report.

-37-

Albert R. Face

-

County Ag.

Frank Pritchard

-

Assft Co.

Yuma

County,

Ariz ona

1951

Agent

Agent

AGRONOMY (conrb

)

Castor Beans

(cont t )

Castor Bean

Fertilizer Test

-

Carstens

The Castor Bean fertilizer test conducted and the

Assistant by the

County

Agent

County Agent on the Pete

Carstens,

Jr.

Fam.

in lower Yuma

Valley was harvested November 2 with definite response to nitrate fertilization.

formation on the-land and yields,

The following is the in­

Previous

Cropping

-

Flax

Planting Date

-

April 3

Fertilization and Date

-

1948-1949, lettuce

1950-51 spring

Dry fertilizers in the test were applied May

23 by side dressing.

An application of

24 pounds of

ActUal

Nitrate

Vias applied on

July 5

Qy the farmer to the entire test.

Plot

Layout

each treatment consisted of two

38 inch rows

285 ft.

long and replicated 4 times.

Harvesting

-

Plots were harvested with a regular castor bean as harvester by sacking the beans in the bull they came out of the harvester.

The sacks were-marked and then weighed before'hulling and as they came out of the huller, sacked and l{eighed again.

The treatments, pounds yield per acre of unhulled beans, pounds per acre yield hulled beans, and hulling percentage, are listed as follows:

3

4

5

6

Treatment

Ferti. lbs.

N

/

A.

P205

1

2

7

Lbs.

yield

/

A.

unhulled beans

Lbs.

yield

/

A.

Percentage hulled beans turnout

30

60

90

120

150

0

0

0

0

0

3918

4167

4044

4153

4183

2434

2572

2.512

2548

2581

62%

62%

90

0

100

0

3928

3364

2440

2089

There was no apparent difference between treatments :1S to the percentage turnout of the different tTeatments.

This indicates in this one particular test that the high percentage of light immature beans present in the field was not dte., to fertilization but to other factors.

61%

61%

61%

63%

62%

-38-

AGRONOMY

(conrb

)

Castor Beans (con't)

Castor Bean

Planting

Albert R. Face

-

County

Ag. Agent

Frank Pritchard

-

Assft Co.

Agent

Yuma

County,

1951

Arizona

.

j:!.� i�;·f�+�f�f;��

:-��

Local made the Yuma planter that area, o-wned planted and made all of castor by

Walt Kamrnann.

beans in

-38A-

Albert R. Face

-

CountyAg. Agent

Frank Pritchard

-

Asstt Co.

Agent

Yuma

County,

Arizona

1951

AGRONOMY (con' t)

Castor Beans (con.t)

Castor Bean

Fumigation Test

Since castor beans are susceptab1e to nematode injury and nematodes were known to be present on the Yuma Mesa, the County

Agent and the Assistant to four

County Agent decided to applY a nematacide strips through a

10 acre castor bean field on the Yuma

Mesa.

In this test,

6 gallons

];e r acre of Dow Fume

85 was applied to four strips each 12 ft.

wide and

600 ft.

long.

This test had not been harvested for this report.

The field was yield data at the time of writing preharvest sprayed on

November 22 and harvesting was planned for December 10.

Field observations during the growing season failed to show any damage from nematode activity to the tre ated or tmtreated of the field.

Yield data will be taken, however.

parts

Castor Bean

Preharvest

Spray

The desire of castor bean growers to get their beans off their fields it early so that double cropping could be necessar,r for the

County Agent and the practiced,

ASSistant made

County to apply materials in a controlled test to determine the best and most economical treatment for growers to use.

Three materials were used in a test on the

Pete

Farm in the lower Yuma

Carstens, Jr.

Valley.

The application of the sprays was made by airplane each to a plot

600 ft.

long and

60 ft.

wide.

The treatments were

Stauffer

Chemical

Company defoliant

10 Lbs

, in 10 gallOns water per acre, and 1 quart

Di Nitro in

12 gallons diesel oil per acre.

or these materials in this test

I o� the combination of Di

Nitro and diesel oil was effective.

It was observed that where foliage was with this extreme:cy- heavy, gallonage but in full coverage light foliage was not possibly obtained more was applied than· ne cessary

It was recommended to growers that one quart of Di Nitro in between 10 and

15 gallons of diesel be applied per acre depending upon. the amount' of foliage.

Castor Bean Field

Dgrs

Farmers attended a cotton and castor bean field day at the Yuma

Valley University of Arizona Experimental

Farm in November.

This field day was arrcnged

Service.

Farmers were and extreme]¥ publicized interested by the in the

Extension four dates of

VS planting, variety test, spacing test, and double bed single bed (38n) comparisons.

These result s will all

(76") be available for next season.

Some farmers felt spacing of plants to 12 to

16 inches was unnecessar,r.

About,OO acres of the

-39-

Albert R.

Face

-

County Ag. Agent

Frank

Pritchard

-

Ass't Co.

Agent

Yuma

County,

1951

Arizona

AGRONOMY

(con't)

Castor Beans

(con.t)

Castor Bean Field

Days (con't)

Y1lllla acreages was acres on plant ed on double beds and the remaining single beds.

A second field to see day on the Yuma Mesa gave farmers an opporttmity

Livingston's castor beans and the Extension Service tests.

Likevlise, they saw

Bureau of Plant Industry and the

University

Gila

Project Far.m

tests.

The B.P.I.

had fertilizer and date of planting tests while the

University had moisture levels.

The results of these tests are not yet avai].;;b'_e-.

Castor Bean

Outlook for Yuma

County

It is believed that full season care of crops, that is, those planted in

April, should yield

2,500 to

3,000 pounds per acre provided shattering wasn't a factor.

Breeding work will probabzytake this and make 2 ton yields possible as time goes on.

However, at present, a full season crop o� be depended upon.

Cotton being an

2,500 older and more pounds can't dependable crop is a tough competitor with cotton at present prices.

Late cotton, that is" June and early July plantings, considerably higher net returns than castor beans are planted giving on corresponding dates.

Late plantings of cotton are making over a bale of cotton while late castor beans aren't making a

1,000 pounds.

The

County Agent and the

Assistant

County Agent feel that the support price needed to

'be

15 to 20 cents per pound instead" of 10 cents for

1952 if farmers are going to be expected to grow castor beans.

Corn

Although long time experience in yuma County has found corn unsatisf actory, many people would like to grow corn if new improved hybrid varieties might increase yields.

The insect problem, of course, is one that can only be handled with added insecticide costs.

To tr.y

to learn more about corn for

Yuma

County a variety test was planted on

August

5, 1950, in cooperation with L. P.

and Jim Barkley.

This corn variety demonstration was harvested in

December,

1950, by the

County Agent and the Assistant

County Agent.

The test consisted of inch rows planting

10 varieties on

August

600 ft. in length.

Each plot consisted of

5 in 32

4 rows and each was replicated 4 times.

-40-

A.LOerti .it.

lrace

liOUIl-VY ag

.agerru

Frank Pritchard

-

Ass

It

Co.

Agent

Yuma County,

1951

Arizona

AGRONOMY

(can't)

Com

(can't)

Corn varieties

(can't)

V.ARTErY

Pioneer

352

Pioneer 300

M.F.

Cargill

115

M.F.

Cargill 110

M.F.

Cargill

108

M.F.

Cargill

95

Yield

Eer pounds acre

3158

2750

1420

1105

1105

1500

Yield bushels shelled com per acre

43.7

38.2

19.7

15.3

15.3

20.8

stank st per acn

Mexican June

King Cross K3

King Cross

K4

Desert Seed

No.

-

24

3000 "-

2040

41.6

28.3

21.8

1579

3450

"

47.9

The bushels per acre was corn to

60 pounds figured shelled corn.

on the basis of 72 pounds ear

An exceptional� ear� frost hit this killing the corn stalks.

This fact field coupled on

November with a

9 severe

corn ear warm infestation and a very poor stand over the field as a whole accounted for the low yield.

The poor stand was

�ttributed mainly to too rapid drying of the soil after plant­ ing.

Future plantings made in extremeJ.y

hot weather will be irrigated up.

Future to a plantings will be made from two weeks month earlier to insure the corn of sufficient time to make before frost.

17740 l2l05

9945

7052

9473

13584

11735

13352

11894

13263

The severe of infestation of co� ear worm in the early stage plant growth was attributed main]J" to the fact the 14 acre corn on field was the entirely surrounded by maize.

The worms worked inside of the corn stalk and thus ware difficult to kill.

The field was dusted three duster using

20 times, twice with ground pounds per acre

10%

DDT and once by plane using

35 pounds per acre

10%

DDl'.

Very little control was realized from any of these applications.

The silks were dusted twice with

10%

DI1l' using puff dusters.

Corn isnlt an acre or recommended for Yuma two in a

County and nothing more than patch is grown.

-41-

Albert R.

Face

-

County Ag.

Frank Pritchard

-

Ass

It Co.

Yuma County,

1951

Arizona

Agent

Agent

AGRONaJY

(con't)

Cotton

With

Yuma in

1950 to

CountY's cotton acreqge increasing from

33,000 acres in

1951, the

2,512 acres

Extension Service in Yuma

County found itself faced �th numerous new problems and projects on cotton.

There were

8,000 acres in northern Yuma

County and

25,000 acres in southern Yuma County.

The

County Agent and the Assistant

County

Agent conducted a total of 13 cotton field tests with fanners six fertilizer tests,

2 variety durtlng the year: tests,

2 spacing tests,

1 spider mite test, and two cotton defoliation tests.

Variety

Selection

The first project on the

1951 cotton crop was to get groweza to select one conducted variety which they did at a meeting called and by the

County Agent in November of

1950.

The variety selected was

Acala

44.

There were a few n die-hards" that planted

California Acala.

4-42, however, this involved less than

5% of the acreage.

Since

4-U2 is an excellent qu2lity cotton, it is felt that the community suffers no loss but that individual growers will get somewhat less in

Growers seemed to be very yield than those pleased with

Acala

44 in gro'Wing spite

A-44.

of its lodging more seriously than other varieties.

At a meeting of farmers in

November of

1951, conducted

� the

County Agent, growers again selected Acala

Their reasons for

44 as their variety for

1952.

selecting

Acala

44 were: earlier by

2 to 3 weeks on the first picking than

Acala

28, adequate amounts 0:£ planting seed are available, and it sells on a comparable basis to California Acala

4-42.

Prof. E. H.

Pressley, University of Arizona Cotton

Wilbur

Breeder;

Extension Agronomist, Charlie

Ellwood;

T/uertz, Executive Secretary of the

Arizona Cotton Planting

Seed the

Distributers;

Bill wootton,

Assistant

Superintendent of

Yuma

Valley University of

Arizona Experiment Farm] and the

Assistant value

County Agent of a one spoke on variety variety community.

test results and the

Cotton

Preplanting

Information and Meetings

Growers started planting cotton in early

March and as a resulll many growers had to plant over because the soil didn1t warm up sufficiently until about March

26th.

Growers were advised against this early' planting.

Those who planted early cor.rplained

about the germination of the seed.

The

County Agent checked thoroughly into this and found all seed had a high germination.

-42-

Albert R. Face

-

Frank Pritchard

-

County Ag.

Ass'tCo.

Agent

Agent

Yuma

County,

1951

Arizona

AGRONOMY

(con't) cotton (cont b )

Prep1anting Information and

Meetings

(con't)

The

County Agent's

Office put out infonnation on planting methods, dates of planting, temperatures, and seed in the newspaper and over the radio.

Three meetings wpre held on cotton planting and general cotton culture.

The first of these was held in Parker March 1st.

This meeting was con­ ducted

A by the

County Agent and the

Assistant

County Agent.

panel discussion type of meeting was held at the

Wellton­

Mohawk Farm

Bureau for the

Wellton-Mohawk March

7th.

The

Count.y Agent led the were the Assistant panel discussion and those on the panel

County Agent,

Weyne

Wright, Clyde

Gaines and

Mr. Frank McElhaney.

On

March

8th a meeting on cotton culture was held at the Crane School under the sponsorship of the Crane Farm Bureau.

County Agent, K.

K.

Henness of

Pinal

County was the principal.speaker.

Cotton

Fertilizer

Recommendations

On the basis of tests in Yuma

Count,y and other lower elevation countys in

Arizona, proximately

100 the pounds

Extension of Actual N

Service and recommended

0 to

40 pounds ap­ of

Actual

Phosphate depending on previous crop and fertilizer history

•.

This slowed up some phosphate fertilizer sales and provoked fertilizer dealers.

Future information on fertilizers will be available next season based on current fertilizer tests.

A meeting of County Agents in February,

1951, under the to chairmanship of the Extension

Agronomist was very helpful local Extension·. Agem,s.

At this meeting fertilizer test results from over the state were reviewed.

rnsect Control Recommendations

Cut worms, fields in darkling beetles, and thrips were problems in marw

April and

May.

The two-spotted mite began to show up in several fields in

Parker area in

May.

The

County Agent visited the

May

"mere they were having difficulty identifying their cut of wonn, darkling beetle and thrip problem.

10 pounds

S�

DDr per acre was used for thrips, 20 to

25 pounds of

10%

DDr was used for of darkling beetles and cutworms, and 25 pounds

99% dusting suJ..fur

was used for mites.

In late

May, a few growers had began dusting for lygus with

1.5 pounds of 1�

DIYr.

-43-

Albert

R. Face

-

Frank

County Ag.

Agent

Pritchard

-

Ass1t Co.

Agent

Yuma

County,Arizona

1951

AGRONOMY (con' t )

Cotton (con' t)

Insect Control Recommendations

(con't)

In

June, bollworm control began.

Most farmers used extension reconnnendations of 20 pounds of 10%

Dill with sulfur.

All growers were advised to use dusts that included sulfur as anti-mite measure.

By the end of

June, many growers were using

20 to 25 pounds of

2%

BHC,

5%

DDT and 40% sulfur to control had been lygus, stink bugs, and boll worms.

Spider mi tea very serious in maey fields in Jpne.

Some insecticide dealers were recommending

Parathion.

�ere this was used, preditors were apparently killed and mites would build up again a few days after the material was applied.

This is discussed further under mite control test.

In in

July and August

August problans continued much the same, however, wooly worm control became necessary in many fields.

5%

DDT

-

15%

Tox and

40%

Sulfur at 30 pounds per acre was recom­ mended but didn't seem to control as

3 quarts of give quite as consistant and complete

60%

Toxaphene and 2 quarts of 25%

DDT in

8 gallons of water.

Some insecticide dealers were recommending 3 to

4 quarts of water.

Fields observed

60%

Toxaphene in 7 or

8 gallons of by the

County Agent and the ASsist81 t

County Agent didn It seem to have adequate control.

Many growers worms f�led to see the importance of controlling wooly and suffered considerable yield loss.

The Extension

Farm Bureau

Entomologist,

Dr.

J.

N

Roney, spoke at several meetings and

Field

Day meetings in communities throughout the County during the cotton season.

A bulletin on tlCotton Insect Control" written damage.

tT.f

the Extension Entomologist was distributed to every cotton farmer in the

Extension Entomologist was of great assistance

County.

The to the

Count�:r-

Agent and the Assistant County Agent in teaching them how to identify all of the insect Likewise, farmers were shown. how to find their problems.

first Bale Contest

The first bale of cotton W4S picked in Yuma County on

J�

25 by

Seba

Musgrove in the lower Yuma Valley

southwest of

Gadsden.

The

Count,y Agent served on the First Bale

Contest committee.

This contest was sponsored by the First National

Bank.

-44-

Albert R.

Face

-

Frank Pritchard

-

County

Ag. Agent

Ass't

Co.

Agent

Yuma County,

Arizona

1951

AGRONOMY

(con' t )

Cotton (con't)

Cotton

Fertilizer

Tests

The

Cotm.ty Agent and.

the A.ssistant

CO'lmty Agent cooperated

I' ith

Logan

Brimhall of the

University of Arizona Soils

Chemistcy

Dep artment and six

Yuma

County fanners in conducting six different cotton fertilizer tests.

Equipment for applicativD was furnished by

Logan

Brimhall and the lertilizers by those listed below.

The cotton fertilizer tests were applied in

May in the

Mesa on the

Les and Jim

Mohawk are a on the Wayne

Wright ranch; on the

Yuma

John

Gardner ranch; in the Yuma Valley on the

Bafkley ranch, the

George and Austin

It-'ranklin ranch, and the Walt Kammann ranch; and in the Parker area on the

Ronald

Bruce ranch.

'Mohawk Cotton Fertilizer Test

The

Wayne �ight cotton fertili�er test was of interest to Mr.

Brimhall as he wanted to make a principal phosphate st� on that particular land where we had made a previous fertilizer test.

The fertilizer test as is in an applied this year adjoining border to where the fertilizer test was conducted on the

1Vayne Wright ranch last year.

The entire test received an per acre application of 100 pounds of actual nitrogen in the form of

Ammo�um

Nitrate, while each of the five tests had var.ying

levels of phosphate from 0 to 100 actual pounds in the form of treble super phosphate.

In one instance,

200 pounds of Ammonium N�trate was applied without phosphate to detennine what results we would get from that high level.

of nitrogen.

the rest

Altho, of.the

this rate is tests, the applied replicates are to as much area unrandonized.

as

Yuma

Valley

-

Parker Cotton Fertilizer

Tests

Fertilizer treatments on

2 Yuma and the one at

Valley cotton fertilizer teot�

Parker were all the same.

Rates of nitrogen varied from

So actual pounds to

200 actual pounds per acre.

These rates of of nitrogen were applied alone and with combinations phosphate from

So to 100 actual pounds.

Nitrogen was also combined with of

50 actual pounds of K20, both with

50 pounds

P205 and without.

The fertilizer for the Las and J:iJn

Barkley fertilizer test was furnished by the farmers themselves.

Fertilizer for the

Walt Kammann fertilizer test was fUl"nished by the Yuma

County Farmer1s Marketing

Association and the fertiliz:3r for the Ronald.

Bruce fertilizer test at Parker was furnished by the

University of Arizona Soils Chemistcy Depar1Allent.

-45-

Albert R. Face

-

Frank Pritchard

-

County Ag.

Agent

Ass't

Co.

Agent

Yuma

County,

1951

Arizona

AGRONOMY (con't)

Cotton (con't)

Yuma

Valley

-

Parker

Cotton

Fertilizer Tests

(con.t)

Fertilizer for all of the above cotton fertilizer tests was assembled at a central location qy the

Assistant Count,y Agent and the

County Agent and fertilizers were mixed in a small cement mixer and sacked in small amounts to be paper sacks according to applied to the various plots.

Mixing was done ahead of time in large sacks and just the day before the fertilizer tests were put out, the' fertilizer was lTaighed in small paper sacks to make accurate applications of ferti­ lizer.

Yuma

Valley

Cotton Phosphate Test

(cont c

)

A phosphate fertilizer test was

George applied on the Austin and

Franklin ranch in the

Yuma

Valley June

18th.

Two rates of phosphate were applied.

70.8

and

105.3

actual pounds of

P205 per acre.

Each treatment was applied to two rows

1227 feet long and were each ments were replicated four times.

These treat­ replic ated with the check rows which were unfertilized.

This field showed an availcble average of

16.9 parts per million of

P205 per acre when soil ana�sis was taken in March.

The Extension

Service recommended that this field not be fertilized with determine phosphate •.

This test is being applied to whether or pot the recommendation was satisfactor,y.

All of these test of plots were picked at least once and moot them twice.

Since none of the plots have been completed, no attempt will be made to report or summarize the data obtained to date.

The spider mite and salt marsh caterpillar problem in Yuma

County this past cotton growing season affected the test plots to some degree.

treatment was

Attempts were made to determine if anyone aff�cted more b.1

mites than aqy other.

No difference in damage could be determined.

The data from all of these fertilizer tests will be in the

1952 annual report.

reported

Cotton

Variety

Test

The

County Agent and the Assistant County Agent conducted one cotton variety test during the

1950 season.

This test was conducted in

Six cooperation with

M.

C.

McVey in Parker Valley.

varieties of cotton were used in the test.

These were

Acala 28, Acnla 33,

AcnIa 44, California

4-42,

Pl8 and

Paula.

-46-

Albert

R. Face

-

Frank Pritchard

-

County

Ag.

Agent

Ass'teo.

Agent

Yuma County,

Ariz ona

1951

AGRONOMY (con' t )

Cotton (con't)

Cotton

Variety

Test (con't)

The varieties in seedwas this test were planted on

April

25, 1950.

planted in a mulch and a poor stand resulted.

Some

The plants came up after irrigation but the test plot still had a uniformly poor stand.

The area harvested in each variety and replicated four times was two rows

38n apart and 235 feet long.

The an soil anal;rsis before planting and fertiliZation showed average of

32 actual pounds of available P205 per acre and an average of

38 actual

The entire test was side pounds of available nitrogen per acre.

dressed with 200 pounds of

16-20-0 at thinning time.

No additional fertilizer was applied.

The varieties and yields per acre are listed below:

Variety

Aca1a

28

Aca1a 33

Aca1a

44

Calif.

4-42

Pl8

Paula

1st

Seed Cotton 1bs.

yield

�r acre

Eicldng

2nd

Eicking total

1117 1402 2519

1308

1331

1213

666

1147

1151

926

485

980

485

2465

2257

1698

1646

1632

Two cotton variety tests were conducted by the

County Agent and the Assistant County Agent during the

1951 season.

One of these tests was

Bob in Yuma.

Valley in cooperation

'With fanner

Sugden and the other in Parker Valley in cooperation with farmer,

O. B.

Francis.

The Bob Sugden test was planted April

18 and consisted of four varieties all

Acala 28, Acala

44,

Acala 33, and California 4-42, planted in plots

4 rOYlS wide and 1200 ft.

long and each replicated 4 times.

Only one picking was writing this report.

made at the time of

The O. B. Francis test in Parker Valley was planted April

12 using the varieties Aca1a

),_1"

Witn

28,

Acala

44, Aca1a 33,

California and PJ

8e The

�lrep�c�tes

_plots were of-each.

8 rows

·wide and 1200 ft.

Only one picking long has been made to date.

-47-

AGroNOMY (ccni t

)

Cotton

(con' t

)

Cotton Varieties

Albert

R.

Face

-

Frank Pritchard

county Ag.

Asslt

Co.

Yuma

County,

1951

Arizona

Agent

Agent

Picture taken at cotton variet,y test conducted by

Agricultural Extension Service near

Somerton during

Field

D� program.

-47A-

Albert

R. Face

-

County Ag.

Frank Pritfhard

-

Ass

I t

Co.

Yuma

County,

1951

Arizona

Agent

Agent

AGRONOMY

(can't)

Cotton (con 't) cotton

Variety

Tests (con't)

The final data from these tests is not and will be complete on these tests reported in the

19,2 repo rt.

Cotton

Spacing in

Rows

The

County

Agent and the Assistant

Comty Agent conducted two cotton spacing tests in Yuma

Valley during the 1951 seasona

These tests were conducted on two fields of farmer Les P.

Bar-kley in lower Yuma

Valley.

The thinning was done June 27, a little later than desirable.

Seven spacings were used in both tests.

These were unthinned

2.4

inChes between plants, thinned to

, inches between plants, thinned to 9 inChes between plants, thinned to

12 inches between plants, thinned to

16 inches between plants, thinned to 20 inches between plants and blocked to an average qf

, inches between plants.

Each plot was two rows wide but lengths of plots varied from

100 to

150 ft.

in length.

Each was replicated 4 titties.

Boll counts made during the season at interV,als indicated more bolls per foot of row on the unthinned plots.

Only one picking been made on each of these two tests.

One test is on has quite heavy land and the other on quite be reported in the 1952 report.

sandy land.

Final data will

Cotton Mite Control Test

A serious

June spider mite problem in cotton starting ear4" in prompted the County

Agent and the

Assistant

County Agent to' conduct a mite control test in the Yuma mite control had been obtained in

Valley.

Good spider previous years from the ap­ plication of dusting sulfur but starting in J\Ule high rates and repeated applications of dusting sulfur often failed to even slow down the increase in populations in maey

Yuma Valley cotton fields.

Where sulfur was applied to cotton in

May other insecticides were.used

results were before r good and no additional material had to be

Field most applied for mites throughout the season.

seriously effected were those that had been treated

2 or

3 times with Parathion upon the recommendation of insecticide dealers.

-48-

Albert R.

Face

-

Cotmty" Ag. Agent

Frank Pritchard

-

Ass'tCo.

Agent

Yuma County

-

Arizona

1951

AGRONOMY

(cont t )

Cotton

(con't)

Cotton Mite Control Test

(con't)

Eleven different insecticide treatments were acre field of cotton belonging to Homer applied on a

10

Kr,yger'in the

Yuma

Valley.

Each plot was

300 ft.

long and

30 ft. wide with

4 replications of each.

Application of the insecticides was made with a

Hardie Ground Duster mounted on a high John

Deere

Tractor.

The insecticides and pounds per acre are listed as follows:

TREP_TM�::NT

INSECTICIDE

LBS.

/

A. APPLIED

1

Check plot

2 45

.5

6

3

4

7

8

9

Dusting sulfur

Dusting sulfur

2%

Parathion,

5%

DDT and

5� sulfur

2%

Parathion and

5� sulfur

2%

Benzene

Hexachloride, 5% DDT and

.5� slD:-fur

3% 88R

(Aramite)

7.5%

Ovatran

45

26

27

31

48

45

"'

20

10 la,t sulphenone lqt sulphenone, 2% Parathion, �d

30% sulfur

32

11 .5% 4049

32

A second application of insecticides was planned at the end of

5 days on one dusting sulfur plot, both Parathion plots and the

88R plot but a misunderstanding on the irrigation schedule caused the second application to be lost due to the

:impossibility of app�ng the insecticide on a wet field.

None of the commerciallY available. insecticides applied in this

�estgaveadequa.te

mite control.

One significant thing was that-no'"'mater:tu" available at that time gave any better control than sulfur which gave

50% control.

The best material "OVatran"­ did, however, give good spider mite control.

This material was not available commercia� but is expected to be available this coming season.

-49-

Albert

R.

Face

-

County Ag. Agent

I

Fr ank

Pritchard

-

Ass t Co.

Agent

Yuma County,

Arizona

1951

AGRONOMY (ccnrb)

Cotton (con It)

Cotton Defoliation Test

Several growers become interested in cotton the month of October.

'defoliation during

They were interested in using mechanical pickers and wondered how well the defoliants would work

�nd what defoliants to use.

In view of

Office worked this, the

County Agent's cooperatively with Bill Silvia of the

Garin

Produce

CompatV in putting out a cotton defoliation test using four different materials.

Materials used wer-e:

CY.namid

x5,

Shell Cotton

Defoliant,

California

Sp:ay

Chemical Cotton

De­ foliant, and a

Stauffer

Experimental

Defoliant.

The

Cynamid:. x5 appeared to do the best job and the Shell Cotton

Defoliant likewise was were satisfactory.

The' other two materials unsatisfactory.

The x5 was applied at the rate of 18 pounds in

15

&allons of

Water per acre.

The Shell Cotton De­ foliant was applied at the rate of

10 gallons of water per acre.

In harvesting these two treatments with mechanical pounds of lint was picker,

666 picked out of 20 rows where

Shell defoliant was used and

633 pounds of lint was picked out of 20 rows where

Cynamid· x5' was' used.

The machine also picked undefoliated cotton and cotton out was picked from 20 rows with hand pickers.

They picked

663 pounds of lint cotton.

All of the cotton grade� middling

1

1/16 inch except the machine undefoliated cotton which graded low picked out

617 pounds of lint ca�ton.

Undefoliated middling 1

1/32.

The machine picked undefoliated cotton was erroneous� girUled in a different gin from the other cotton, there­ fore, information is not as satisfactory as it should be.

Mr.

Silvia had Mexican labor pick up the cotton that the machine picker dropped on

20 rows and he got

610 pounds of seed cotton at a cost of

$62.

It is believed that the rows that were picked by the machine must have been slightly better in that the hand pickers did an excellent and clean job of picking 26 rows, and yet the machine picked rows yielded a little more cotton than did the hand picked ro�, when it is considered there was some lint left on the ground.

-50..

Alberti R. Face

-

Frank

Pritchard

-

County Ag. Agent

Ass't Co.

Agent

Yuma

County, Arizona

1951

AGRONOMY

(contt)

Cotton (c onr'b )

Cotton

Defoliation

Test

(conft)

Ive i'eking esu

and

t on

Comparing

Defoliatinft

.c..fi

,S'-''',

v ,'I

I

A ng mechanical cot ton picker] test fields are being defoliated on atherecl efoliated nearly as much lint from plots as hand pickers

I and id from undefoliated the

McElhaney ranch the in

Henry Davis and

Wellton

Barkley plots in pickranches in the Yuma Valley.

Re­ comparison and defoliation sults should be available n ext ests recently.

I

I week.

The county agent's office, which conducted the test in agencies, said that less lint was saved on the undefoliated

Less and Jim one

Barkley now are defoliated·

60-a c r e with farmers and defoliant sales

I field with two mechanical pickers.

I' and Shell Cotton Detouant.

Other

_------�-----------------' picked plots with the mechanical harvester.

The extension service men also reported were that damaged many green and dropped bolls to the ground.

.

.

.

They, explained that mechanical picking should be very satisfactory cotton has pecially in fields where the completely opened, es­ if some of the first bottom crop already has been cotton on the Garin picked.

The ranch where the test was conducted had not

I been picked at all.

The combined mechanical and han d pic kin g

I

I gathered an average yield of one and a half bales per acre.

The cot-

I

I

I ton was not rank.

Defoliants showing the best re­ sults in the test were

Cynamid X-!5

A second cotton defoliation test was applied on the

Frank

McElhaney ranch in the Wellton area.

This cotton was some what greener and ranker than was the cotton on the Garin ranch.

The

Garin ranch cotton was quite short and had been damaged somewhat with wooly worms.

The

McElhaney test in­ cluded C�d xs,

Cynamid

XIO, and Shell Cotton defoliant.

The

Cynamid

1:5 was applied at a rate of

18 pounds in

15 gal­ lons per acre while the XlO was applied at the rate of

25 pounds per acre� This material was.

applied the last week in october.

It was observed that the Shell Cotton defoliant did a little bit the best it was not too job in this particular satisfactor.y.

No test, however, yield data was taken in this particular instance.

The McElhaney's sold their cotton picker.

It appears that very few growers in the

Yuma are a will use pickers due to the availability of hand pickers and to the losses through mechanical mechanical picker has picking.

picked for

To date, no commercial less than the cost of hand picking.

Most growers with mechanical pickers have sold their machine and they have been moved to other communities.

It is believed that only

5 mechanical pickers remained in

Yuma County.

-51-

Albert R. Face

-

Frank Pritchard

-

County Ag. Agent

Ass't Co.

Agent

Yuma County,

Ariz ana

1951

AGRONOMY (con , t )

Cotton (con' t)

Cotton Disease

Only two diseases of cotton were of major concern in Yuma

County this past cotton growing season.

These were

Texas

Root Rot and Alternaria Leaf and Boll spot

Neither of these were epiphytotic in proportion.

Yuma ared.

reasons.

ed to i'anners quit growing ciltton in 1937 for mainly two lnsects and Texas Root

Rot.

MaQy fields were plant­ co�ton in

1951 that had 100% Root 'Rot infection in 1937.

The

County Agent and the Assistant

County Agent observed these fields close� for incidence and proportion of this serious

Root disease.

No serious Texas lioot situation was observed in the Yuma

Area.

The in

Alternaria Leaf and Boll spot disease was very serious the Wellton-Mohawk area on a small acreage in

1950 but was of no serious in an:y of

'consequence during the 1951 cotton season the areas in Yuma

County.

Flax

The flax acreage

�cres to the in

1950 cotton to for southern Yuma

5,175 in

1951.

County

This acreage increase and low was dropped from probab� due

8,498 largely support price of

$2.85

on no flax.

longer

Further, a few more growers realized that they could plant flax and escape serious.

fusarium wilt.

The past year was a relativelY good year for flax.

Insect were at a pare minimum.

as was frost damage.

Although problems there was some growers tJ"ost damage it didn't prove to

.be

to se.rious.

Many held their flax until fall and sold for $4.50

to

$5.00

per bushel.

Flax Disease

The two of very major" disease problems little consequence in flax in the Yuma during the

1950-51 area were flax season,

During the

1949-50 season the two flax diseases "Fusarium

Wilt" and

'tDamping Off" were very serious in near� all flax fields in ehe Yuma area.

This past season neither presented any problem.

rhe

County Agent and the Assistant Count.y Agent publicized b.1

ever.y

possible means the necessity of not planting flax where Fusarium Wilt was knoym to be present in the land.

Fieli checks were made in Flax fields where growers thought they might have a wilt problEm.

Plant samples were sent to the

-52-

Albert R. Face

-

Frank

County Ag. Agent

Pritchard

-

Ass't Co.

Agent

Yuma County,

Arizona

1951

AGRONOMY (con It)

Flax

(cont t

)

Flax

Disease{Con1t)

University of Arizona Plant Pathology Department for disease an�sis.

l?here

wilt was found to be present, growers were advised to follow a grown every third to crop rotation fourth year.

program with flax being

This on program was very successful in that only

2 fields were planted to flax in the

1950-51 season that were known to have wilt present.

In the

1951-52 season no plantings were made wilt land.

No the

Damping Off of any serious proportion was observed in either plantings made in the fall of

1950 or the fall of

1951.

Both years the climate and tempe�ature were unfavorable for this disease.

In the fall of

1949, this disease reached epiphy>totic proportions.

Flax Fertilizer

Test

The flax

County Agent and the

Assistant

County Agent conducted a fertilizer test on the

HenlY Frauenfelder farm near

Gadsden in cooperation with the University of

Arizona Valley

Experimental Farm.

This test consisted of applying

14 different rates and combina­ tions of

280 ft.

nitrogen and

P205 to the long and

10 ft.

wide with test

4 area.

Each replications plot was of each treat­ ment.

A

5 ft.

strip was harvested from the center of each plot for yield data using the

University of Arizona

Valley

Experimental

Farms

5 ft A. C.

Combine.

The land was fertilized

October on

21, the flax planting on

November

10, and harvested

July

11.

Single fertilizers mre and Treble

Super applied

Phosphate.

in the form of

Mixed fertilizers

Ammonium Nitrate were

10-20-0 and 10-10-0.

The treatments, fertilizer rates per acre and yields in bushels per acre are listed as follows:

-53-

Albert R. Face

-

County Ag.

Agent

Frank Pritchard

-

Ass It

Co.

Agent

Yuma County,

Arizona

19,1

TREATMENT

AGRONOMY (con 1 t )

,

Flax

(con 't

)

Flax

Fertilizer

Test (cont t )

ACTUAL POUNDS PER ACRE

N

P205

1

2

44

65

III 3

4

5

6

44

65

III

III

·lll

III

9

10

11

12

13

14

1,

7

8 o o

44

6,

11l

44

32

,4

Check Plot

111 o

40

18

18

18

64

,4

YIELD BU.

PER ACRE

44.0/'

\.'�"

41.7

38.9

42.6

/' t'�

/r\

42.8

46.2'/

r\:\

40.7

41.6

42.4

"

-,

/\.

37.4

A statistical analysis was made of this test by the Extension

Agronomist.

The least significant difference at

,% was

4., bushels per acre and at 1% 8., bushels per acre.

Treatments number in

2, 3,

4, " 6,

9,

10, and

14 were significant� higher yield and tre atment number n· was higher significant in comparison to the check plot.

The soil available analysis made previous to fertilization showed

6 ppm

P205 and

1, ppm available nitrogen.

On the basis of this .so'i1 test, it was expected that very little response would be received from nitrate application but good response from P205 application.

As it turned out, the reverse was true.

-54-

Albert

R. Face

-

Frank

County Ag.

Pritchard

-

Ass't Co.

Yuma County,

1951

Ariz ona

Agent

Abent

NO CHANCES-No chances are taken on the applications off balance in applying

[ertlllzer in the current flax tests.

This shot n the Thacker ranch shows Frank

(left), assistant county agent, and

Winston La.Sueur, itinerant assistant

�.

I�

II oJ) county agent, checking the output of the fertilizer spreader.

The tractor drtver is Rufus of the U of

A experimental farm.

Kennedy

(Sun Staff

Photo).

rest Flax Fertilization

The extension service is out a­ gain this year, the fourth in a row, to try to get all the answers for

Yuma growers on flax fertili­ zation.

Two tests are being made this year in cooperation with Truman

Osborne and

Hubert and Bill

Thacker.

Osborne's

Avenue B at placa is on

91h street. The Thack­ er test is located north of the

1st street extension west of Ave­ nue

C.

Tests in past years havs not been too consistent

80 there still are some answers to be had in

Again

fertilizer recommendations.

Most growers have used fairly hi g h amounts of high flax nitrogen yields and in producing some ha ve applied also 40 to 60 actual pounds of phosphate.

Until further infor­ mation can be gathered, the recommendation consists of about

50 pounds of phosphate land has made terrific history.

Flax probably from 70 to 100 actual unless the phosphate will benefit pounds of nitrogen in two or three doses.

Enough nitrogen to give the plants a good plied at start should be planting ap­ tim e and addi­ tional in applications may

February and again in be made the early blooming stage.

Fertilizer for this year's tests, which include the application of varying amounts of nitrogen and phosphate singly and in com­ bination' was provided by S a

Dick and the Yuma County F mers

Marketing

Association.

Most growers are perial Punjab planting

Im­ flax this year in view of the results of last was year's variety tests at the University's valley experimental farm. In every date of planting, Imperial

Punjab the high yielder.

-54A.-

Albert R.

Face

-

Frank Pritchard

-

County Ag.

Agent

Ass't Co.

Agent

Yuma County,

Ariz ona

1951

AGRONOlfi

(con' t

)

Flax (con It)

Flax Fertilizer

Tests

(con't)

Inconsistant results from three flax fertilizer tests in

Yuma

County by the Experimental Farm and

Extension Service in the years

1949 and

1950 and

1951 made it imperatiye that more tests be conducted to best determine the flax fertilization needs for Yuma area far.mers.

The

County Agent and t,he Assistant

County Agents fertilizers to two different test applied plots with two farmer cooperators in Yuma

Valley.

Both tests consisted of app�g seven different rates and combinations of nitrogen and

P205.

These rates and combinations per acre were:

No.

1

check plot;

No.2

-

31.4

N; No.3

-

31.4

N plus 55.3

P205;

No.

4-

31.4

N plus

110.6

55.3

P205;

No.5

-

92.4

N;'No.

6

-

92.4

N plus

P205;

No.7

-

92.4

N plus

110.6

P205;

No.

8

-

123.8

N.

Each of these treatments were applied to a plot

230 ft.

long and 10 ft.

wide with four replicates.

Each of these test p10ts will get a late spring application of about 30 pounds of actual nitrogen.

-55-

Albert

R. Face

-

Frank

County

Ag. Agent

Pritchard

-

Ass't Co.

Agent

Yuma

County, Ariz ona

1951

AGRONOMY

(con't)

Sorghum

The this sorghum acreage was on� about past year

1500 acres from

Yuma

County compared to

1950

When there was

7,000 acres.

Since considerable work was done on demonstrations in 1950, the Extension Service confined their efforts to advising growers on varieties, rates of planting, dates of planting and fertilizer

..

programs in

1951.

This informat,ion was discussed individually with m� growers and was carried in news stories.

Sorghum. Variety and Date of

Planting

Tests

The

County Agent and the Assistant

County Agent conducted a sorghum variety date of during the summer of planting

1950.

The test in lower plots were

Yuma harvested

Valley in

December, 1950.

The yield data and plot information is on the enclosed sheet.

Soil anazy-sis made before fertilization of these plots showed an average of 12 ppm

P205 and

8 parts per million with 300

Nitrogen.

The entire test pounds per acre plot area of Ammonium Nitrate.

was fertilized

-56-

SORGHUM V:.RIETY DATE OF PLANTING

DEMONSTRATIONS

Conducted -by the ;Iogricultural Extension Service in cooperation vTith Les and Jim

Barkley in the lower Yuma Valley.

Juna 20

Plantind

V:..RIETY

YIELD POUNDS PER ACRE

Double

Dwarf

Caprock

Hegari

Martins

38

Combine

2167

2147

2092

1818

.. very poor stand was obtained on all plots in the June 20 planting.

This was due

,mainly to an adcbe clay soil whi.ch dried out too fast for good germination and also to crickets in the field when the seedlings emerged.

July

14

Planting

Double Dwarf

Plainsman

38

Caprock

Hegari

Martins Combine

4274

3954

3709

3370

3046

July

29

Planting

Double Dwarf

Plainsman

38

Caprock

Hegari

Martins Combine

2943

2848

2368

2592

2224

!!uly

29 Rate of Planting Test

Variety

Double Dwarf

Hegari

38

Yield pounds per acre in

4 lb.

p8r acre seeding rate

2943

2592

Yield in pounds per acre

8 lb.

per acre seed­ ing rate

3201

2641

Each test consisted of six 21 inch rows

600 feet long and replicated four times.

These plots were harvested vd. th a

12 foot for each replicate and pusher test.

These sacks were combine wi. th sacks being tagged

Yleighed individually in the fi.elcl

vdth cotton scales.

County l�gent' s

Office

December, 1950

-57-

Albert R. Face

-

County ss-

Agent

Frank Pritchard

-

Ass'tCo.

Agent

Yuma County,

Arizona

1951

AGRONOMY (con' t

)

Sugar

Beets

The 100 acres of sugar beets in three different fields grown by two different growers were harvested in

May.

It is the un­ official

Understanding of the Extension Office that these fields of yielded from 19 to 23 tons per acre with a sugar content

18 to 19 per cent.

The beet

Holly Sugar Company is very interested in having a sugar acreage in Yuma

County this year.

They have contacted several growers,.

be three growers however, it.

is believe that there will only growing sugar beets this year and that the total acreage will be somewhere in the neighborhood of 100 acres.

Wheat

Wheat Fertilizer Test

The

County Agent and the Assistant

County Agent conducted a wheat fertilizer test on the Elmer Emrick ranch in lower Yuma

Valley.

This test was conducted to bring up to date the ferti­ lizer needs for small grain production in Yuma ValJe y.

This field was each planted to Awned

Onas wheat on

December

5 with a good stand resulting.

On

Janua:ry

5th, the fertilizer was applied to one border with

6 different fertilizer treatments replicated 4 times.

Plots were

260 ft.

long and 10 ft.

wide.

The test was harvested with the

University of Arizona

Valley Experimental

Farms

5 ft.

A.

C.

Combine.

A

5 ft.

swath was taken from the center of each plot for yield data.

Two forms of fertilizer were used in the test.

These were

Ammonium Phosphate

(16-20-0) and Annnonium Nitrate (33-0-0).

The treatment number, fertilizer, rate in pounds per acre of fertilizer, and yield in bushels per acre are listedaas follows:

TREATMENT

FERrILIZER

Actual

#

/

A.

!L_

P205

Yield in bu.

1

2

3

4

5

6

16-20-0

Ammonium nitrate

Ammonium nitrate

Ammonium nitrate

16-20-0

& Ammonium

Nitrate

Check

Plot

32

33

58

92

90

40

0

0 a

40

60.4

69.4

67.0

67.3

60.0

61.0

/A.

-58-

Albert R. Face

-

County

Ag.

Agent

Frank Pritchard

-

Assft

Co.

Agent

Yuma County,

Arizona

1951

AGRONOMY (con' t )

Vmeat

(cont t

)

�eat Fertilizer Test (con't)

The results of this test were least statisticalzyanalyized.

The significant difference at

5% was

8.1

bushels per acre and at 1% variance it was

11.2 bushels per acre.

Only one

.treatment

was significantzy- higher than the check

This was treatment No. 2 which was a

33 plot pound nitrogen yield.

ap­ plication.

There was no significant difference between � of the fertilizer treatments.

The soil an ana�sis made before fertilizer application showed average of

18 parts per million available

P205 and 11 parts per million available nitrogen.

From this soil analysis, little if any, response to either nitrate or phosphate were expected.

One important fact noted in these results is that when phosphate was added, the yield dropped but was significant only between treatments

No.1

and 2.

-59-

Albert R.

Face

-

County Ag. Agent

Frank

Pritchard

-

Ass't Co.

Agent

Yuma County,

Arizona

1951

CROP IMPROVEMENT

The

County Agent's

Office handle all applications for inspection of certified crops.

Those interested in growing certification call for advise.

Information a crop applicable under to

Crop

Improvement work is supplied to growers through letters, news­ paper and radio.

Preplanting inspections are taken care of in routine

County extension trips by the

County Agent and the Assistant

Agent.

The

County Agent accepts all applications for foundation seed which is obtained by growers through the

Arizona

Crop

Improvement Association.

In December and January, the County Agent's Office received applications for

Registered

Acala

44 cottonseed.

The

County Agent assisted in organizing a

County Pure Seed

Association meeting on January

15th.

The Extension Office provided in at this publicity planning this for this agenda.

meeting

Election and of assisted officers the was chairman conducted meeting.

The new� elected officers were:

President­

Ernest Johannsen, Vice Presiient

-

Everett

Gatlin, Secretar,y

-

Treasure

-

Bill

Wootton, Directors

-

Ralph

McGill and Earl

Stark.

Elected as a two ment year

Association was

Ernest director to the State

Johannsen.

Bob

Crop

Improve­

Moody was the carr.y­ over director for Yuma

County and has one year.

Yuma County's

Pure Seed for

Association supported

Bob

Moody for their candidate"

State

President for the Arizona

Crop

Improvement

Association to which he was elected in

Februar.y.

The

County Agent attended the Arizona

Crop meeting in

Phoenix

-

Improvement Association

February 21st with Yuma

County directors.

The a

County Agent's

Office assisted in arranging for and

County Pure

Seed Association meeting held

Februar,r publicizing

23rd.

The principle purpose of this meeting was to give

Yuma

County Pure

Seed growers an opportunity to hear Keller

Beason,

Indiana's

Extension grown alf

Agronomist, speak on the relative position of Arizona alfa seed in Indiana.

It was further arranged by the

County Agent's

Office to have

Bill

Wootton years alfalfa speak on last experimental work conducted at the

Yuma ValJe y

Experimental

Farm and Frank

Pritchard,

Assistant County Agent, speak on a cooperative pollination test conducted in Yuma Count.y

in

1950.

Mr.

Beason spoke at the State

Meeting and was invited to stay over and visit Yuma by

Yuma

County

Directors.

-60-

Albert

R.

Face

-

Frank Pritchard

-

County Ag.

Ass't Co.

Yuma County,

Arizona

1951

Agent

Agent

CROP IMPROVEMENT

(con't)

11

Gleanings from the

County

.

Agenrs

OfficeJi1:,

7

I

I

\

\

'The

Yuma county

Association ing gin id

January e, gram

S'" k

Th

Cided

23 e the

In

1951'

Johannsen,

Everett

'Wootton, and to

Ralpli pure immediately

C helq, its

15, at following growers county's

VIce

Gatlin, and hold a w p pureseed r

S��'h i�o�O be held in

Pure sid e n seed

���u��:ee:�

�c wet e e elec t d to secretarY-E Irl direc�ors

MCGIll.

, seed

ASSOcia meeting

Improvement

t'

Ion pro­ president-Ernest t

-

Bill de

-

�ebru�� followmg meetmg

Phoenix ex­

:e�ruary

21.

Keller

Beeson"

JJ' tension who

February

The

23, executive

, the is v'ersity the" expected planning lSram

C agronomis located at is to be state

,meeting, to oun ty pureseed an,

ASsoCIatIOn interes ti mg profor wI'11 be of

IndIana, purdue

23

Uniguest speakeT

Mr.

Beeson visit the

Yuma the February e�, announced

�t

IS area of meet­ early ing w hi h

Fe'PrUary, in

\

Yuma that

County presented a resolution at the State Convention required nurse crops for alfalfa to be planted with certified seed.

The of principle project in Extension Service during the month

August was that of organizing a one variety connnunity on the Yuma Mesa.

In addition to the 13 growers in this one variety community,

� or.

7 other farmers in that area plan to plant registered

Banger alfalfa seed for certified seed production.

Inquiries came to the

County Agent

I s

Office con­ cerning the changes made in alfalfa seed isolation, for southern varieties.

This information was publicized on the radio and in the newspaper in those isolation order to requirements.

better acquaint the f armers with

-61-

Albert R.

Face

-

Frank Pritchard

-

County Ag.

Agent

Asslt

Co.

Agent

Yuma Comty, Arizona

1951

CROP IMPROVEMENT

(conrb)

Additional field tags were made for several farmers during the months of

JU:CYand

August.

A few prep1anting field inspection requests were received.

International crop Dnprovement re­ gUlations were so revised in

1950 that Arizona had to require

165 ft. isolation between southern varieties grown under certification which had previousl¥ only had roadwcus· and ditches as isolation.

Seed Increases

Yuma

County has had a flax seed increases reputation for making small grain and for mid-western and northern states over the past few years.

There were.a

few seed increases, again, last year.

Growers were

Ernest

Frank

Johannsen,

Truman

Osborne,

Johnson,

Bill

Johnson, and Fred Watkins.

Dunn Nugget wheat was increased for the

Imperial Seed Camp� of Clear

Lake, Iowa, by all of the above named

_ growers except

Truman

Osborne who increased

80 acres of

James Hul1ess Oats for Sam

Bober of

Newell,

S. D.

Ernest Johannsen grew a small acreage

(Approximately

3 acres in all) of a fell different oats varieties for Dr.

Murphy of Iowa State

College.

This was the most suc­ cessful on the

1950 seed increased in that they were harvested

May

8 and

9 and yields were very good.

These increases were grown for a flat fee of

$175 per acre and Iowa State

College paid for the threshing.

The following indicates yields and number of fold increase from seed planted:

Index

No.

or

Variety

421

Pounds Planted

4.75

Yield per acre

Number of fold increase

60.6

167

411

401

305

174

Cherokee

#5444

4.75

4.75

4.75

4.75

24.00

67.8

75.1

86.4

81.0

89.2

79.8

165

213

210

191 l4l

16,

Dr.

Murphy said they could only expect a

20 to

50 fold increase in Iowa.

-62-

Albert R. Face

-

County

Ag.

Frank

Pritchard

-

Ass' t Co.

Yuma

County,

Arizona

1951

�enli

Agent

.

CROP IMPROVEMENT

(con't)

Seed

Increases

The wheat increases were not entire� satisfactor,r in that the wheat matured later than for the desirable to the company, except fields of E.

Johannsen and Bill Johnson which were harvested the first week in

Mey-.

Further, the company was slow in pqying off.

In the case of the oats for South parties.

Dakota, they were fertilized and irrigated to late in the season and didn't mature up for harvest until early June.

They then underwent a heavy wind and shattering was terrific.

This crop was unprofit�le to both

In the oats

Fall of

1951,

E.

Johannsen made small plantings of for three different parties.

One is for

OIDormell Seed

Company also of Iowa and another for Purdue

University.

He is growing about 10 acres of flax for North

Dakota and

Truman

Osborne is growing

15 acres for the same concern.

-63-

Albert R.

Face

-

Comty Ag. Agent

Frank Pritchard

-

Ass't

Co.

Agent

Yuma

County,

Arizona

1951

ECONOMICS

The

County Agent and the Assistant inquiries from farmers on market

County outlook,

Agent prices have and frequent government support.prices.

The County Agent's Office received week� commodity market reports for the Production Marketing Adminstration.

From these reports, a market report is published each week in the County

Agent's

Column.

The local

P.Y.A.

office notifies the

County

Agent's office when new support prices are announed and these are publicized over the ram

0 and in the newsp aper.

The various support prices have been reported under the various commodities in this report.

Lacal Extension cost

Agent$ are often asked to give production break downs to people new to the area on various crops.

This has been especial�'true this past year on cotton and castor beans.

The

County Agents continua� urge small grain growers to store their grain and market at a later date since.

prices are always at their low point at harvest time.

Likewise, feeders are urged to bey their feed grain at harvest time from those who are foolish enough to sell at that time.

Ma� farmers have begun to build grain storage in the past two years.

The Extension Office has given considerable publicity to this during that time.

ENGINEERING

Extension

Agricultural Engineer,

Blaine

Madden, visited Yuma

County to assist with the meChanical picking of cotton defoliation tests.

There was a problem involving the loss of green.

bolls in the particular field where defoliants had been

The machine was picking out about applied.

lt bales of cotton per acre and there were about a

!

bale of green bolls on the plants.

The acre picker was knocking off about

$30 worth of green bolls per according to a survey taken by extension agents.

I�r. Madden looked over the adjustments on the mechanical picker qnd agreed that in that type of cotton it rroul.d

probably be impossible avoid those losses.

Mr.

Madden looked over castor bean to threshing and hulling operations with the

County Agent and discussed their operation with operatores.

The

County Agent has asked the Extension

Engineer to try to find, or help develope, spray equipment that might be

-efficiently used for the mite spr�ng of field crops, control.

This equipment to be particularly cotton, needed to provide for better coverage of plants to control the

"hard-to

--ldll" two spotted mite.

-64-

Albert

R.

Face

-

County

Ag.

Agent

Frank Pritchard

-

Ass' t Co.

Agent

Yuma

County,

Arizona

1951

ENTOMOLOGY

Approximately

20% of the County Agent's and the

Assistant

County Agent's time is spent on insect control prob.Leas

, not to mention the number of d�s spent by the Extension Entomolo­ gist, in Yuma

County.

Problems seem to be almost continual.

The maQY problems have been reviewed under the various crops in Which they are a and castor problem.

Alfalfa, beans lead the list this cotton, cantaloupes, past year which the two­ spotted mite continuing his existence

February through ember in sept­ cantaloupe, alfalf'a, cotton and castor beans in that order.

Alfalfa leads off with aphids in March and ends up with are wooly worms in the Fall.

Control measures on most insects fairly satisfactor.v.

Those for which we have no satisfactor,y control measures are chalid flies, leaf rollers, and the two spotted mite.

With the assistance of the Extension

Entomologist, the

County

Agent and the Assistant

County Agent try to keep aware of all current insect mendations at problems and make appropriate warnings and recom­ meetings, in newspapers, through radio and cir­ cular letters.

An attempt is made to teach as ma� farmers as possible how to recognize hannful insects, when to control them and how they can be controlled.

Yuma the

County farmers have been quite alarmed the past year over inability to control the two spotted spider mite, especially in cotton but likewise in beans.

Tfle cantaloupes,

Research Council held alfalfa, and castor meetings to which the

County

Agent was.

invited to discuss the promotion of an extended research program in Yuma

County on mite control.

They asked

Dr.

Lar.r,r

Carruth, head of the University of

Arizona

Entomology

Department and Dean Phil S.

Eckert, dean of

Agriculture at the

University of

Arizona, what could be done by the

Entomology"

Department's experimental branch.

Dr.

Carruth, explained it was a matter of insufficient funds that'prevented more work in Yuma

County.

A Research has

Connn{ttee appointed by the Yuma County Fann Bureau planned a program to raise funds which are to be placed in a

"Yuma

County

Pest

Control" trust fund from which funds are to be turned over to the

University:i)r research on spider mite control in Yuma

County.

Dr. Richard of Arizona President and Chas.

U.

Harvill,

Pickrell,

University

Director of the

Extension

Service, attended a joint meeting of the Yuma County

Farm Bureau and

Agricultural

Research Council when this matter was discussed.

Since experimental evidence hasn't given the Extension Service adequate control measures to recommend, it is hoped that this program developes successfull;r which it is like:cyto do under

Dr.

Carruth's direction.

-65-

Albert R.

Face

-

Frcnk

County Ag.

Pritchard

-

Ass't Co.

Y-mna County,

1951

Arizona

Agent

Agent

ENTOMOLOGY

(con' t )

In order that 1951 alfalfa seed insect control recommendations be assembled, the

County Agent arranged to have Dr.

Roney,

Extension

Entomologist,

Dr.

Carruth, head qf the Entomology

Department at the

University of

Arizona, and Ed

Swift, Imperial

Valley

Farm

Advisor, attend a meet ing February

26th.

It re­ sulted that

Mr. Swift was able to bring with him two Riverside

Experimental workers, Mr. Dixon and Mr.

Reynolds.

Dr. Carruth brought with him his assistcn t, Dr.

Butler.

The meeting proved to be a ver,y profitable one on alfalfa seed insect control.

Part of the meeting was devoted to a discussion of

1951 cotton insect control measures.

On

February 27th, Dr.

Roney, Dr.

Carruth, and Mr.

Todd discussed

'With the for Mr.

County Agent and the Assistant

County Agent

Todd IS pollination exper:im.ental

work in

1951.

plans

Dr.

J.

N.

Roney, Extension

Entomologist, spent four days in Yuma

County during the month of and

M�, visiting cotton, castor bean, alfalfa fields with extension agents and advising them with regard to recommended control methods of thrips, mites, cutwonns, and darkling beetles.

Dr. Carruth

'and

Dr.

Butler of the

Experiment

Station of the

Entomology Department at the

Uni versi ty of Arizona were also in Yuma

County during the month of

'May making plans for summer experimental work.

The

Extension'

Service 'strongly advised Dr.

Carruth to spend the majority of his time on mite research in

Yuma

County this summer with ad­ ditional work on cicada and chalcis time flY and other insects if provided.

Mr.

Frank Todd of the

Bureau of Plant

Industry

Bee Cultural

Laboratory spent time with local extension agents in planning

Todd in Yuma pollination research studies to be made by Mr.

County on northern alfalfa seed yields during the doming months.

Dr.

J.

N.

Roney, Extension Entomologist, spent four days in Yuma

County during the month of June.

One trip was made to Parker during this time and another to.

the Roll-Wellton area.

Cotton meetings were held in all areas including the Gila Valley and the Yuma

Valley.

Information was furnished in cotton insect control.

Dr.

Butler and Dr.

Carruth came to

Yuma to start their summer

County early in June experimental work.

The Assistant

County

Agent and the

County Agent mental work.

The Assistant discussed with them

County Agent and the needed the experi­

County agent aleo assisted them in making plans and arrangements for their work.

Ed

Swift,

Farm Advisor from Imperial Valley and

Dr.

Reynolds, experimental worker in the field of Entomology from

Riverside, visited Yuma County to look over mite problems in late June.

-66-

Albert

Frank it. �ace

-

County

Ag.

Agent

Pritchard

-

Ass It Co.

Agent

Yuma

County,

Arizona

1951

ENTOMOLOGY

(con't)

Wooq

Wonn

Control

Albert R.

Face

-

County Ag.

Agent

Frank Prit chard

-

Ass' t Co.

Agent

Yuma

County,

1951

Arizona

One method used by lettuce growers in

Yuma

Valley to control apart migrating wooly worms.

Two paper barriers and :Cwo steep bank eli tches 4 ft.

apart

4 ft.

in front of each area were used in addition to three ft.

deep round holes being placed in the bottom of the ditches.

-66A-

Albert R. Face

-

County Ag.

Agent

Frank Pritchard

-

A8s1t

Co.

Agent

Yuma

County,ft...rizona

1951

ENTOMOLOGY

(con

't

)

Mite control tests and mite control work were the principal problems during the month of

July.

For details on the mite control test conducted on the Homer �ger ranch in cotton can be seen under the heading "Cotton".

Bill

Kauffman of the

Bureau of Plant

Industry

-

Division of

Cotton Insect

Investigations, visited Yuma

County early in

July and observed mite problems which he has worked on at

S afford.

He aclmowledged that our serious he had seen.

Dr.

probleni was one of the most

Carruth and Dr.

Butler also spent considerable time in Yuma

County during the month of

July doing reseqrch work

principally on mites.

The.y

completed work on the Yuma Mesa alfalfa moisture trials and on the Joe

Morrell alfalfa mite control test they put out in June.

Dr.

J. N.

Roney, Extensi on

Entomologist, sp ent four days in

Yuma was

County during the month of

Ju�.

'One day,

J� 3rd spent in checking the mite control test on the Homer

�ger one ranch; also, week later.

Dr.

he aSSisted in

Roney and the checking

Assistant on

J�

10th,

County Agent visited Parker in that area.

July 10th at which time they surveyed the fields

On July 11th, the

County Agent and

Dr.

Roney visited the Wellton-Mohawk area and went over field problems in that area.

-67-

Albert R.

Frank

Face

-

County Ag. Agent

Pritchard

-

Asslt

Co.:

Agent

Yuma

County,

Arizona

1951

Ulna

Growers

Fighting

Worst

ooly

Worm

War

Since

'30's

I,�'I ettuce Crops iped

Out vernight

Yuma area valiant but e worst growers are uphill wooly battle worm fighting against infestation this area since the mid '30' s.

Thousands upon thousands of dol­ rs are.

being funneled into every onceivable kind of control meas­ re by vegetable men whom the ooly hordes threaten to eat out of usiness.

The crawling creatures with the nending appetites begin their life f devastation in castor bean and otton fields but leave these for e more succulent fields of young egetables.

Another reason the y eave the host plants, growers are irmly convinced, is that most cat­ on and castor beans are past tage where the worms can the create!

I'

� i erious

The damage.

finger of accusation seems o be pointing at old man cotton.

ot having grown castor beans be­ ore, growers can't ust how tell for sure much that crop is con­ ributing nsects.

to the

They propagation do of the know, however, hat the woolies were very much resent when cotton was reat grown in quantities in years past and early disappeared during the perod that saw cotton acreage drop

I

I

WORM

BARRIER-Yuma growers are trying everything con­ ceivable to stop the wooly worm onslaught.

This is one of the ingenious devices to come out of the battle. It is an electric fence set up strong enough about by

Elmon to kill the woo lies but does continuing

Sapp in the lower the climb over valley.

the fence.

The change

(Sun electricity

Staff isn't their minds

Photo).

plant.

This same t,-:cower explained that his crews standing guard would kill the worms as they began to eat.

That accounted for ff to practically nothing.

FAVOR LETTUuE one .lettuce

plant per mediately, worm.

Imanother worm would be

Th h� e few orms oung

1.

e bl ac prmtable k d names favor.

.

one 0 fl given the by growers cantaloup lettuce.

plants which have

I killed in the next plant and so on down the line until the worms were all killed and the entire crop e at en sprouted voluntarily in many car-

I

I up

.

One company that planned to rot fields, and carrots follow in the worms' order of preferred eating.

They are gluttons from the word go in that one they will field into another migrate growing from the same crop in the belief that the

I

�arvest m out about 216 acres of lettuce

December had 80 of them

,wiped completely

....

overmght.

Devising new means the worms is becoming of an killing obses­ other offers better say they eating.

Growers meet each other in exchanging feeding

The only sure grounds.

way to get rid sion with growers.

ning to stay awake

They so begin­ up ways to

Some meet the vegetable onslaught.

fields have been barricaded as to resemble the of the little devils is to stomp them to death or smash the m battlefields of a first-class shooting with a club. The cost of a crew of men

011 keeping guard with war

...

except for the barbed wire.

One field even has a barrier simi­ clubs obviously would be next to lar to that item.

prohibitive

"The but that h88 been done.

very thing

One

BARRICADE FIELDS system being used quite a maddening part of it is," bit is the surrounding of the fields one g�ower said, "that they eat to be protected with a barrier of you rIght out of business while oil paper bread wrappers.

The you're f cis, killing they

'em".

In let t u c e worms have trouble don't skip a single hold on the getting a slick surface and foot­ are slowed c-own or can leaves long enough some­ times for the clubbers to

However, nature is worms and provides counter-weapon favoring the them with a in the form of dew that either causes the paper to sag enough for the pests to crawl over that have gathered during the night.

Aluminum foil is successfully being used in Phoenix as barr;

_ get them.

droplets that the worms get traction on.

Consequently, growers send men out each morning to straighten up the barricades and club the worms cades but local growers are una' to buy this material. Some grr have built double waxed barriers with poison the two.

with soil

They augers sht in also haw worms down and burn them with r

Elmon ley

Sapp has corr ingenious r up cour

Ie an e-

61f>..-

Albert

R.

Face

-

County Ag.

Agent

Frank Pritchard

-

Ass't Co.

Agent

Yuma County, Arizona

1951

HORTICULTURE

Vegetable

Gardening

Connnercial

The principal vegetable crops in Yuma

County are lettuce, cantaloupes, watermelons, acreage of and carrots,

31,029 acres in

1949-50 and which made up

34,404 in a total

1950-51.

The

1950-51 acreage broke down as follows: lettuce cantaloupe

17,613;

13,205; watermelons

1,030; carrots

2,556.

It is felt that this important industr,y demanded more attention to its problems.

In citrus there are oranges and

1,160 acres of grapefruit, 518 acres of

210 of lemons making a total of

1,888 acres.

Lettuce

The

1950-51 crop was not a profitable one because of the extremely warm early fall and winter weather that caused bolting.

The

Great

Lakes variety was about the onlY one that didn't bolt to as seriouslY for growers and it isn't considered desirable a variety from the stand point of quality as far shippers are concer.ned.

Dr.

Bob

Foster, university Vegetable

Breeder, had extensive work on lettuce varieties at the Yuma

Valley E� erimental Farm.

The Extension Service gave to these publicity variety tests and invited grower-s to visit them.

At a meeting of vegetable growers called by the

County Agent's

Office in

September,

Dr. Foster reported on his ]e ttuce variety work.

He stated that the lettuce variety test at

Yuma this year consisted of

16 varieties planted at various dates throughout the year.

It was interesting but the results showed nothing new.

The early lettuce bolted.

The

Great

Lakes of course was least infested.

Arizona

44 was planted and seme bolting was about date

15% on the

Imperial 44 planted on the bolting was about 20%.

Dr.

Foster pointed out to the grcwer� that he was tr,ying to obtain higher yield, greater

UU2.iOlmit,y, irnpr:Jved shape of head, tizhter heads, with im­ proved ta.::;to and texture.

At this seme

11e(:,rt:b�

Dr. I·.

Pew, Superincendent of -"ne

Vegetable Farm

J.

...

Tempe eported on the results of the lettuce fertilizer test which was conduct ed on the L.

T. 11alone ranch in the lower

Yuma

Vallc'!y.

llc s�::.t�crl 'Lhat the soil analysis showed that there were

4 parts

�,er nrl.lli'Jn of

P205 and

23 parts per million of on nitrogen.

These samples were taken at several locations the plot and to a

12 inch depth.

There were

9 samples in all.

There were

20 treatments in this fertilizer test and the,y were replicated

6 times.

Response to nitrogen indicated that where 0 nitrogen was applied" there were

:Ie ss than 100 crates per acre.

and resulted in

90 units of nitrogen was the highest rate

278 crates per acre.

These yields were based

-68-

Albert

R.

Face

-

County se-

Agent

Frank Pritchard

-

ASSf�

Co.

Agent

Yuma County,

Arizona

1951

HaRTICULrURE (con't)

Lettuce (con't) on

4 and 5 dozen sizes.

In the case of

P205 in combination with while nitrogen,

0 rate of

30 units of

P205'yielded

P205 yielded

197 and

200 crates per hundred

90 units per acre yielded 192.

Dr. Pew brought out that frequently is added for the purpose of improving the quality.

phosphate

In this particular on test, it could not be determined since it is how hard or soft the head is, texture and color, based and whether or not it will break dovm in shipping.

Growers were given an of treatments at a opportunity to see the var,ying effects field visit in Januar,y at which.time Harvey

Tate,

Extension

Horticulturist, and

Dr. Pew were on hand to make explanations to growers.

Those present were verv

;�nterested.

Lettuce Fertilizer Test

-

1950-51

The

County Agent and the

Assistant

County Agent with Dr. D. Pew of the

University of Arizona cooperated

Tempe Vegetable

Farm in conducting a lettuce fertilizer test in Yuma

Valley.

This test was conducted in cooperation with E. E. Evans of the Malone

Produce Co.

There were three main objectives in conducting this test.

These were to determine the most ef­ ficient and economical ratio between to detennine the nitrogen and phosphorus importance of split applications of certain fertilizer'mixes and and subsequent side dressings with nitrogen, efficien� of single fertilizers as compared to certain commercial mixes.

The field was planted October 27, 1950.

The fertilizers on page

A.

The plot layout follows on page

B.

A nitrogen stuqy graph follows on page

C, a nitrogen and

P205 study graph follows on page

D, and the summary showing yield crates per acre follows on used, rates per acre, and date of application page E.

This test was harvested in late in total yield was observed

January, due to

1951, and some loss a.disease

in the plots.

This disease was

"lettuce Drop" caused by the Organism

Sclerotinia sclerotiorum.

No differences in infection was observed between fertilizer treatments.

The most a important single factor derived from this test was decrease in total yield from the application of

P205.

This is contra� to current grower practice.

-69-

LETTUCE FERTILIZER

Malone Produce

Ranch

-

TEST

Somerton,

Arizona

:nrst

AppiTcation

--Second

Nov.

24

Dec.

___

..AlA-.w.ct.u.al_

..

N

P205

K20

N

ApplTcatlon-'--TO'fAL-----.

30

_Act1!S!-L

._

.•...

P205

K20

__ .

._

..

_ ..

A_g1_ual:

N

P205

_.

K20

_

Fertilizer mmoni.um

JIlIIl�':�um!�:rate---�-�

unmom.um

'reble

'rebl,e

Nitrate

N�trate

Super Phos.

Super

Phos.

j

!

��-!

90

---

I

__ j------

-�-

120

,

I

--

+==t.

--

'I

---

I

-t-+J--_'

_L�

I'

I

--"I

+T---

I

I

--tR�---'

1

I i 90

0

0

-

-

�.

0

�--··-I·I

_0

I

0

60-

0

120

---

�=

�---

-

---

_

��i!�u�!�!���

;��

�o�i� Nitrate

?rebfe

Super-

I

-Phos:----l--lI20T--·---

�mo--:�·Nitrat;---·--t.�60-t·-·---l-·--

�r�b���er-

-._-.-.

---

PhOS-:----·j-

lmlnqniurn

Nitrate

�reb1e

Super

Phos.

'mmorrium

Nitrate

'rebl�S�

PhE'?.!_

�'"!l0nium

Nitrate

._

-----

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Agent'

5

Office lry,

1951

Page A.

PLOT

LAYOUT

-

HAlm-TE

LETTUCE

FEmILIZER TE3T

l

CI lJj

North

-

--_.-

---------

94 e

7

88

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.18-.application

Nov.

County

Agents

24

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Cooperati ve

Test -.}i.

th

L.

T.

Malone Produce

Company, Yuma,

Arizona

LETTUCE

Yields of Graded Sizes from

VarJing Rates of

Nitrogen

300

O(i

Cl

..

�o

I

(J)

H o

<l1

H

<l>

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100

50

0

/

Cooperative

Test '1ith

L.

T.

Malone

Produce

Compaey, Yuma,

Arizona

LETTUCE

Yields of Total Marketable Heads

(Crates

Per

Acre) v

/-

IV.

�--

....

-

-

-

-

/

�/

-.-

-

-

-

-

��

----/_-

.-

P20S.

I i

I

I

I

0

0

Pounds of Actual N or to

,

SO

P205

1�0

SlWAllY

OF ",'INTER 1EI'TUCE TEST

FROM COOPER.\.TlVE TEST

-.-rITH THE L. T. MALONE PRODUCE CO.,

THE UNIVEffilTY EXPERTI:IENT

ST

..

lTION £.ND

EXTENSION SERVICE

1950

-

1951

Yuma,

Arizona

Effects of varying amounts of nitrogen:

(All yield data are expressed in crates per acre.)

I

R��TE

6

30

60

90

.5 DOZ.

31

117

121

123

4

DOZ

51

53

123

155

Tar,,�L YIELD

82.

-

170

244

278

***************************************

Effects of

(r

...

11 yield

Va�Jing'amounts of phosphorous: data are expressed in crates per acr'e

,

)

5

DOZ.

4

DOZ.

0

126 102

60

98

120

93

99

99

TOT,,".1

YIELD

228

197,

192

County J�ent's Office

October

31,

1951

Page

E

Albert R.

Face

-

Frank

County

Ag.

Pritchard

-

Ass't Co.

Yuma county,Arizona

1951

Agent

Agent

HOiTICULTURE (con't)

Lettuce (con't)

Lettuce Fertilizer Test

-

1951-52

As a result of the whiCh showed not

1950-51 lettuce fertilizer test results onlY a lack of response to

P205 but a decrease in yield where P20S was applied, the

COl:lIlty Agent and the

Assistant of the

County Agent are again cooperating with Dr.

D.

Pew

Tempe

Vegetable

Farm and a local produce Company in conducting a

1951-52 lettuce fertilizer test.

The objectives in mind in again conducting a cooperative

�ttuce fertilizer test are to determine the most economical ratio between nitrogen and phosphorus to determine the import­ ance of split applications of certain fertilizers, determine efficiency of single fertilizer as compared to certain com­ mercial mixes, and determine if loss of test was due to yield in the previous

P205 application or was peculiar to that season and particular soil.

In the previous years test, no

P205 was applied to the soil.

before planting.

1ll contrar,y to grower

P205 was side dressed in later which is practice.

P20S was applied on

October

13,

1951, to four strips

10 ft. wide and

600 ft.

long in the test plot area so that both ear� and late applications of P205 could be ed compared to no

P205 applied.' The ]a ttuce was plant­

November

1.5

and a very good stand resulted.

The first side dressing of fertilizer will be made around December

20.

Rates of nitrate will acre alone and vary from 0 to 120 in combination with all actual pounds per

P205 and K20 applications.

P205 applications wUl vary from 0 to

100 actual pounds of

P205 per acre both alone and in combination with all nitrogen and

K20 rates.

in

K20 will be combination with all applied from 0 to 100 nitrogen and pounds per acre

P205 rates and combinations.

LettUce Disease Test

The

County Agent and the Assistant

County Agent observed a lettuce disease in lower Yuma worse from year to year.

Valley progressively getting

This disease is "Lettuce Drop" caused by the organism Sclerotinia sclerotiorum.

A.

large acreage this could not be planted to spring lettuce because of disease.

Lettuce growers desired information on methods of control and had tried some recommended control measures with little success.

-70-

Albert R. Face

-

County Ag. Agent

Frank

Pritchard

-

Ass

I t Co.

Agent

Yuma

County,

Arizona

1951

HORl.'ICULTURE

(con' t)

Lettuce

(con't).

Lettuce Disease

Test

-

McDaniel & Sons BanCh

-

Nov.,

1951

PROJECT: Control of "Lettuce solerotio rum.

Drop" organism

Sc1erotnia

PERSONNEL

&.

COOPERATERS: Yuma

County

Agricultural

Extension Service in coopera tion with McDaniel & Sons Produce

Company of Somerton, otto A.

Sonntag of the American

Cynamide

Corp., and L.· E.

Gould of the Shell Chemical

Corporation am pre Paul D.

Keener of the

University of Arizona Plant

Pathology

Department.

T.

LOCATION AND ACREAGE: SW lOs, R.

24w.

Located

1/8

SVT

1/4 sw

1/4,

Sec.

7,

11 miles south of

16th street on

Avenue

I on the east side of the road.

4 acres in the entire test area.

OBJECT.lVES: Determine the control recei vea from an ap­ plication of fumigants to the soil for the control of "Lett uce

Drop" a disease caused qy the organism

Sclerotinia sclerotiorum and the rates per acre of fumigants for best and no sb economical control of this disease.

PROCEEDURE AND MATERIALS:

Aero Cynamide

(granular) was applied in three different, rates per acre and replicated twice with an

Eezy

Flow fertilizer spreader.

Then flood in�igated and left until the gas content of the soil was low enough for planting, this planting date to be determined by

Chemical soil testing.

The first application of shell was applied

October 10 and was inch applied with a hand injection gun on a l2 by 14 inCh grid pattern at a

33.8

gallon per acre rate.

The second application on

October

15

Was applied with a fumi­ gation machine shanks

14 inches apart at a

15 gallon per acre rate.

The shell treated area was inches and disked plowed to a depth of 10

5 days aftl3r the first application and 3 hours before the second.

Plot

No.

1

2

3

4

5

Materia:L

Cyanamide

Cyanamide.

Cyanamide

Check

.

Shell

Rates per acre

629 pounds

889 pounds

1485 pounds

X

33.8 gallons per acre first application

(October loth)

15 gallons per acre second application

(October 15th) x SA Check

Ends of the field and 20 fot. spaces between an plots all recei red application of

889 pounds per acre of

Aero Cyanamide.

-11-

Albert R.

Face

-

County Ag.

Agent

Frank Pritchard

-

Ass' t

Co.

Agent

Yuma

Comty,

1951

Arizona i t:

PLOT LAYOUT

-

Applied

October 9, 1951

LETTUCE DISEASE TEST

-

McDANIEL & SONS

BANCH

60 ft.

NO TEST

C

?O

i'+.

l\.Tn

'l'R�'l'

?O

1'+.

Nn

'T'F.�'1'

20 ft.

NO TEST

?O

-ri-.

N(,)

TFST

:

5

3

4

1

2

3

4

1

2

5A

T

1

2801

i

1

2801

1

280-

T i

1

2801

1 lOot

32 .ft.

NO

TRc)rp

-72-

"-

.1"

701

� t i

Albert R.

Face

-

C ounty

Frank Pritchard

-

Ag. Agent

Ass't

Co.

Agent

Yuma

County,

Arizona

1951

HORrICUI:rURE

(conrt )

Cantaloupe

(con't) cant aloupe

Fertilizer

Test

Equipment used in applying by the

Agricultural fertilizer in the

Extension cantaloupe

Service fertilizer test on the

McLaren ranch in lower Yuma

Valley.

-72A-

Albert R� Face

-

County Ag,.,

Frank Pritchard'

-

Ass

I t Co.

Yuma County, Arizona

1951

Agent

Agent

,HORrICULTURE (con It)

Cantaloupe

The cantaloupe crop is really an important one in Yuma

County and the past year was the most profitable of all vegetable crops.

The Extension

Service has recognized fertilizers, spider mites, bacterial blight, and varieties as subject on which the,r might be of assistance to growers.

Since it had been some years since a cantaloupe fertilizer test has been conducted in cooperation with a grower in Yuma

County it was decided to work with Dr.

D.

Pew of the

University

Tempe Vegetable Farm and conduct an extensive fertilizer test.

The

County Agent arranged for McLaren Produce

Company as co­ operators.

The cantaloupes wer e subbed February

20, were side

dressed with fertilizer the first time

April

6 and the second application was sidedressed on

5 treatments

April

30.

Treatments in the test were as follows:

TREATMENT

NUMBERS

Treatments in

LBS. NITROGEN actuai pounds of

N., P., & K

LBS.

PHOO PHOROUS LBS.

POTASSIUM

7.

8.

9.

10.

ll.

12.

13.

14.

15.

16.

17.

18.

19.

20.

1.

2.

3.

4.

5.

6.

0

0

0

0

0

0

90-30

*

90-30

90-30

90-30

90-30

90-30

60-30

60-30

60-30

30-30

30-30

30-30

Commercial 10-20

16-20

��O. Phose

0

60

120

0

60

120

0

60

120

0

60

120

0

60

120

0

60

120

0 a

0

120

0

120

0

120

0

120

0

120

0

120

0

0

0

0

0

0

0 a

*

The first figure in the nitrogen column is the amount of actual nitrogen

The second applied in the special mix at time of thinning.

figure is the amount of actual nitrogen applied as a subsequent side-dressing.

All figures represent actual amounts of the element involveu;

-73-

Albert R. Face

-

County Ag.

Agent

Frank Pritchard

-

Ass't Co.

Agent

Yuma County ,Arizona

1951

Ho...-rn' IC ULT TIRE (con f t

) cantaloupe

(con't)

Dr.

Pew in reported to Yuma growers on this test at a meeting

I

September.

He said the yield of 27

IS,

36' s, and

45

S from o rate of of nitrogen was

182 crates per acre while

90 units nitrogen yielded 119 crates per acre.

The 120 pound ap­ plication yielded only 202 crat-es per acre showing that the

90 units of nitrogen on this particular test was the ideal rate.

In the case of

P205, the 0 rate of

P205 yielded 207 crates

200 while

60 pounds yielded

200 and 120 units yielded indicating that there was no response from

P205.

Dr.

Pew said that he could see no imp;rovement in quality through the use of the

P205.

The

June cantaloupe fertilizer test plots were harvested between

16 and June 30.

Mr. lfallace of the Vegetable Inspection and Standardization Service, graded all the cantaloupes.

Cooperative1¥, C.

W.

Van

Horn,

Assistant

County Agent, and

Dr.

D. Pew harvested the plots with some assistance from the

County Agent.

-74-

From

Summary of Cantaloupe Data

Cooperative

Test with Mclaren Produce Co.

Yuma" Arizona u-ying amounts of

Nitrogen:

(All yield data are expressed in crates per A.)

�51 s

47

361s

-

92

27's

43

45

-

36

139

45

-

36

-

27

182

57

59

61

110

121

102

47

39

39

167

180

163

214

219

202

Total Yields

191

229

229

219

************************************* rar,ring amounts of phosphorous:

(All yield data are expressed in crates per

A.)

�5'S 36's

110

27's

43

45

-

164

36 45

-

36

-

27

207

54

54

103

43 157

200

58

103

39

161

200

Total

Yields

220

210

211

**********************************�**

'�ing amounts of Potash:

�51S

55

(All yield dat a are expressed in crates per

A.)

361 s

-

271s

45

-

36 45

-

36

-

27

102

37

157

194

Total Yields

202

54

98 46 152 198

208

************-************************

-75-

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Albert R. Face

-

CCl1.mty

Ag.

Agent

1

Frank Pritchard

-

Ass t CQ.

Agent

Yuma County,

Arizona

'1951

HORTICULTURE

(con

't)

Cantaloupe

(con't)

Cantaloupe Spider

Mites

Two-spotted this past spider year.

mites were

Parathion was a serious used problem extensively in but cantaloupes never completely stopped the mites, it on� reduced the population temporari�.

New miticides either weren't adequate or they weren't available in commercial and quantities.

Ovatran, aramite sulfanone are materials that viill be tried next season.

If mites could be stopped in cantaloupes it is possible there might be considerable less of a problem in cotton.

Cantaloupe

Bacterial

Blight

Many cantaloupe fields were observed by the Assistant

County

Agent and the

County Agent to quit producing long before they should have because the vines die back.

This condition is caused one by bacterial blight.

The 'Assistant

Comty Agent had grower treat a field with a commercial bordeaux spr� which held the vines for near� 3 weeks additional harvest.

It is planned that more extensive testing of such materials will be made next season.

If this bacterial blight could be controlled it would mean considerable to growers.

Cantaloupe

Varieties

The

County Agent and the Assistant County

Agent continue follow

Dr. Fosters cantaloupe breeding work which hasn't developed a variety to replace the present variety

"4.5".

to yet

Carrots

Carrot Disease

During the area carrot past three carrot growing seasons, several Yuma growers have applied soil fumigants for control of nematodes in large acreages.

In these fields, no evidence of nematodes was apparent either before or after fumigation.

Two been fields were checked by the Assistant

County Agent that had fumigated with Ethlene Di Bromide with check areas left unfumigated.

At harvest time yield data was taken with no significant difference in yield between the plots.

-78-

Albert R. Face

-

Fraruc Pritchard

-

Yuma

County

Ag.

Agent

Ass'tCo.

A�ent

County, Arizona

19,1

HORT IC ULTUB.E

(con' t

)

Carrots

(con rt

)

Carrot Disease (con.t)

Two fumigation tests were planned but did not get applied this year.

The so called forking problem in carrots that has long been attributed entirely to nematodes needs much further investigation.

Other factors are involved in this particular area at least.

Forking in a field this year cost the grower

SO% of his total potential crop but no evidence of nematodes could be found.

Watermelons

The Extension

Service serioUs recognizes the two-spotted mite as a problem in watermelons as in cantaloupes.

This matter was discussed under cantaloupes.

Watermelon Varieties

The Assistant on

County Agent planted a watermelon variety test

T. B.

Watson Truck Garden in

January.

The test was harvested in June

The by the Assistant

Comty Agent and the

County

Agent.

variety tests were harvested in two pickings.

The first picking all varieties picked were placed on the ranch market.

fruit stand and were sold to consumers.

Consumers were res-olYed

/ that many of the watermelons were picked too green.

Mr.

Watson's regular picker was acquainted with picking but it was found that it was hard to determine the

Klondikes ripeness of so many earliest diffe,rent varieties.

The one variety that was the maturing of all varieties was the Missouri Queen.

Mr.

Watson being a truck gardener and grocer was interested in the

Missouri Queen melon.

It was the nicest appearing melon and had a fair flavor but was not sweet enough to suit most people.

On the second assisted in picking., Dr.

Foster,

Dr.

Lundeen, and Mr.

Whi"f,e grading the melons and their findings are attached to this

,report.

All of these melons were given to the Extension

Service for distribution to people who would report on the qualities of the melons.

This survey resulted in

Blacklee and

1V290, Hawksbury, w407 as being chosen by the consumer.

You will note that the attaChed chart also includes Klondikes and

Peacocks, howe ver, were and as these being

Chosen two melons were not in our variety test, but sampled by a conmdttee at the time other melons were sampled graded along

'With them.

Of the four varieties mentioned by consumers,

W407 was perhaps

�he leading choice.

-79-

Albert R.

Face

-

Frank Pritchard

-

County ssAgent

Ass't Co.

Agent

Yuma

County,

Arizona

1951

(

HORTICULTURE (lc'cin� t)

Waterme10ns (con't)

Variety

T.

W.

Watson

-

Watermelon

Variety

Test

-

Color of Texture

External Indent.

Flesh of Flesh

1951

Rind

Flavor Thickness

Blue ribbon

Long melon striped stringy

3

9/16

Missouri Round

Queen striped 3 stringy

2t

1" to l�

1r290 Long Striped

3 stringy

3

3/4" to 1"

Color

Seeds

Tan-brown mottled

Yellow

Brawn-blade mottled

R7 Long green

:x

W407

Long dark green faint strip

:x

Klondike

Long dark green

X peacock

DENT.

aue Ribbon

Long dark green

UNIFORMITY

4

3

Hawksbur,y Long light green

3

Blacklee

Congo

Long green

Long dark green striped-orange red

3�

Stringy stringy stringy

Stringy

Stringy stringy

3

� to

3/4"

2*

-r' to

3/4"

3

3.,

3/,

2t �, to

3/4"

4

Stringy

GENERAL DEFECTS

White streaks in flesh

3.',

3/4"

�n to

3/4"

,

�to

1"

Small black

Large black

Large black

Large

Tan

Large

Black seed

Small black

�n to 1"

Small black

RIND DEMARKATON

4 lssouri

Queen

2

Thick rind at stem end

2 tough rind

W290

3 Hollow heart

,7

Hollow heart

Hawksbu.zy

Blacklee ongo x

W407

Klondike

Peacock

4

4

3!

4

4

4

None

3 tough rind

4 bough rind

Slight breakdown around seeds

Thin blossom end

3t

3

,Thick on sbem end and thin on blossom end

Thin blossom

4 end, white streak in flesh

4

-8Q..

Albert R.'Face

-

Frank Pritchard

-

Yuma

County,

County Ag.

Agent

Assit

Co.

Agent

Arizona

1951

HORTICULTURE (con't) watermelon (conlt)

...

W.

Watson

-

Watermelon Variety Test

-

1951

(cont t )

The score of

X denotes

5 is the ultimate grade, that is, 4 is superior to 3.

melons consumers liked best.

XX denotes melons consumers liked and which were more frequent� good than the others.

Tomatoes

Tomato'�.

Disease

Yuma area farmers are t�ing each year to find a successful method of producing winter tomatoes on the Yuma-Mesa.

Each attempt to date has failed due to one or more factors.

Most failures have been due to disease.

and

Nematodes, Cur� Top Virus,

Damping-Of!

have been the principal disease problems.

,

The Assistant field that was

County Agent observed a

10 acre winter tomato severely infested with Root Knot' Nematode.

This field was transplanted st and resulted that

September grew resulted.

The field was

1st and subbed.

vigorously until nematode very sandy

An excellent injury soil on the Yuma Mesa and was taken out of alfalfa for the tomatoes.

The alfalfa was plowed under in J� and the field fallowed until

September 1st.

Four tomato beds were fumigated with Dow Fume

85 for nematode control.

Neither the the fallowing or fumigant or both controlled spread of the nematodes.

By

Januar,y

1st, the nematodes had sapped the strength from the plants to the point where they were non-productive.

The grower did not realize enough from the crop to pay the expenses.

It is believed lations of nematodes in the field winter that the warm fall

,infestation.

coupled with the high popu­ brought about this severe

Attempts will be made next year to control this serious pest.

A

10 acre field of the

Assistant

Jan� planted tomatoes was observed

County Agent that was

8� infested with by

Curly

Top

Virus.

This field was

January.

The first seeded in the field and subbed in symptoms of

Curly Top

Virsus disease be­ came evident in gener ally over the entire 10 acres by mid

March.

No other crops are close since this field is bordered on three sides by desert and the other by bell peppers.

Insect sweeps were desert made on the field and land for evidence of the beet leaf also a neighboring hopper.

None were found.

It was believed that an ear� migration occUXl�ed and infected the plants at that time.

-81-

Albert R. Face

-

County Ag. Agent

Frank Pritchard

-

Ass't

Co.

Agent

Yuma

County,

1951

Arizona

HORrleurI'TIRE

(contb )

Tomato (conrb)

Tomato Disease (con.t)

Plant samples were taken and sent to Dr. Keener of the

Plant

Pathology Department at the

University to see if the disease could be transmitted from the infected plants to healt� plants by sterile leaf hoppers.

The results of this test showed the disease to be

Curly Top

Virus.

The field of tomatoes had to be abandoned as a result of the Virus disease.

Orchard

Management

Citrus

The local Extension Agents with the Extension Horticulturist and C.

W.

Van

Horn, SuperL"1.tendent

of the Uni'tTersity's

Yuma

Experimental

Farms began conducting a citrus survey of all

Yuma as citrus to all groves in cultural

February.

This survey is very detailed practices, varieties, root stock, age of groves and yields.

Every grower or manager was contacted for information.

The survey was begun personally in February when about 9o;b of the groves were surveyed..

The remaining groves were surve,yed in October.

At this time, dlllston

LeSueur,

�ssistant County Agent, assisted the Extension

Horticulturist.

This a information will be report compiled in early

1952 after which will be made to growers and the information will be used to guide future Extension programs and experilnental ram studies.

Home Beautification

The

County

Agent's

Office has numerous calls from owners of city homes as well as

County homes regarding problems with, and questions on, home plantings.

Some of these questions are answered in the office, others by home visits and some only want copies of special home beautification bulletins that have been written in years past for

Yuma

County.

Wool;r worms caused the most calls this past, year with spider mites next in line.

Grapes

At the request of several home owners in

County Agent arranged to have grape

Yuma, plantings the Assistant on their property budded.

These stock plantings were the nematode resistant root

16-13 and were budded either to cardinal or thompson seedless.

_82-

Albert R. Face

-

County Ag.

Agent

Frank

Pritchard

-

ABslt Co.

Agent

Yuma

County,

Arizona

1951

HORTICULTURE (con't)

Home

Beautification

(con't)

Garden Club

Meetings

Extension

Horticulturist, Harvey

Tate, attended the Pecan Grove

Garden

Club with the

County Agent on

February

6th and presented an interesting program on

Home Beautification.

The Extension

Horticulturist assisted the

County Agent further and made sug­ gestions to tbe committee chairman of a landscaping project for Yumat s entrance from California.

The Extensi on

Horticulturist assisted with other while he was in Yuma problems in connection �th home plantings

County.

The

Assistant in

September on fertilizers and soil preparation.

They were particularly interested in composts.

They ask maqy questions and were very

County Agent spoke at the Yuma-Mesa Garden Club appreciative.

Aphids in I"ecans

On the outskirts." of in front and in

Yuma, several home owners have pecan trees back of their homes.

Each year the honeydew aphid infests the trees and sheds honeydew over clothes lines and automobiles.

Several people made inquir.y

at the

Extension

Office with regard to a practical method of control.

An effort to answer these questions, the material BHC was used upon the recommendation of Dr.

J.

N.

Roney.

AS a test, four pounds of

12% material was used in 10 gal10ns of water and applied with a conventional beam sprayer.

It was found that old type beam spr�ers didn't the larger trees have

•.

adequate pressure to efficient� cover

This is a method of control that can be used.

and the material was found to be satisfactory.

Lindane was also used and was more found to be expensive.

It is satisfactory, however, it is much found that it took from

15 to

2.5

gallons of material to adequate� cover the trees.

Further work might determine that less material could be used.

-83-

Albert R.

Face

-

County Ag.

Agent

Frank Pritchard

-

Ass

It Co.

Agm t

Yuma County, Arizona

1951

LIVESTOCK

All in types of livestock have increased considerab� in numbers

Yuma

County during the past year.

In

1950, it was estimated that there were between

25,000 and

30,000 head of cattle-on feed

December

1st and

10,000 head of sheep on pasture.

Hog numbers were estimated at about 5,000.

On

December

1st,

1951, it is estimated that there are between

35,000 and 40,000 head of cattle on pasture and in numbers are estimated at feed lots in

Yuma

County.

Sheep

35,000 in southern Yuma County and

10,000 in the Parker area.

It is estimated that there are

10,000 head of hogs on farms on

December 1.

Yuma

Livestock Association

O�ganized one of· the most pertinent activities in the livestock field was the organization of the

Yuma the month of

June.

Several

Livestock

Association during cattleman had asked the

Extension

Service about the

Bank of

Arizona in possibilities of organizing a local organization.

In response to thiS, the

County Agent in cooperation with

Roy

Young, 11vestock Loan Representative for the first National

Yuma, made arrangements to hold a meeting on

June 12th.

As a result of this elected an meeting, the group present organization committee which met on

June

14th.

The

County Agent met with this group and assisted them in drawing up a tentative for the constitution in which objectives were outlined organization.

On June

26th an additional meeting was the held for· all livestock growers in

Yuma

County, in -which, organization's committee recommended that all livestock including of the beef, sheep, Swine, and dairy be included as members organization.

Officers were elected at the June

26th meeting and a tentative constitution was read, amended and approved.

Officers elected for the organization were:

L. P.

Barkley, President; Har:ry Knight,

Vice-President; Secretary

-

Treasurer,

Art

Converse; and

Directors, Earl

Miller and Frank

Ferguson.

The following are objectives of the organization as listed in their constitution.

No.1

to promote the livestock industey in Yuma County and the Bard area.

No.

2

to deal with the mutual problems of stockman, this to include beef, dairy, sheep and swine.

No.

3

to disseminate information of value and interest to local stockman.

No.

4

to educate the consuming public.

No.

and meat

5

to assist or cooperate with allied livestock organizations.

No.6

to promote livestock among yough organizations.

No.

7

to promote research on livestock problems.

-84-

Albert R.

Face

-

Frank

Pritchard

-

County Ag.

Agent

Asaft

Co.

Agent

Yuma County,

Arizom

1951

LIVESTOCK (cont t )

Yuma L.vestock Association

1.

Organized

...

(conlt)

New� elected officers and guest speakers at the

Organization meeting of the

Yuma

Livestock Association standing: left to right

-

Walter

Converse,

Armer, Dr. N.

Ittner, Dr.

Wm• Pistor,

Art

Unknown,

Frank

Ferguson.

Seated left to right

-

Dr.

Stanley,

Les Barkley

-

President, Harry Knight

-

Vice

President, and

Floyd

Newcomer

-

Secretar,y-Treasurer.

-84A-

Albert R. Face

-

Rrank Pritchard

-

County Ag. Agent

AS8tt Co.

Agent

Yuma

County

I

Arizona

1951

LI'V]STOCK

(con't)

Yuma

Livestock Association Organized (con't)

The membership voted to issue Junior memberships to

4-H and

FFA members.

To provide for this, the following

'Was written in Section

4 of Article

6 in the constitutiona All local

4-H and are

FFA members in to good standing and car.r.ying

livestock be issued Junior membership cards.

projects

Vocational Instructors and Extension Agents charged with supervision of respective youth programs are to certif,r as to the memberships to be issued.

Howard

Baker,

Assistant Extension

Director;

Charlie

Ellwood,

Extension

Agronomist; the

County Agent and ASSistant

County

Agents attended the Meloland in

�vestock and Pasture Field Day

Imperial Valley April 24th

•.

The entire day proved to be very interesting.

Speakers on permanent pasturing advocated the use of Alta

Fescue either with or

'Without alfalfa.

They granted, however, that it was hard to beat straight alfalfa with fall seeding of grain.

They stressed the importance of the month of

October, both in planting, fertilizing and generally getting such pastures under way.

The Extension Service received some valuable infonnation at this

Field

Day and will continue to follow the results of the expe rdment.al, work being conducted at this station.

As a result of this

Agent field day., the

Cotmty publicized the value of planting and fertilizing livestock pastures in October.

Swine Field

Day

For the first time the Extension Service conducted a

Swine

Field Day in Yuma County.

The purpose of this Swine Field

Day was to give the results on a swine feeding test that had been started

September

14th,

1950.

This Field

D� was held on

January 19th; there were approximately 50 people in at­ tendance at the Field

Walt

Armer, spoke on

Day.

The

Extension

L.

vestock the value of function

Specialist,

5f

Anti-biotics.

The Livestock

Specialist had the feeding test statistical� analyized by the Animal

Husbandry Department at the University of

Arizona and he stated that altho differences between the various lots were not differences were statistically Significant, dollar value great.

A copy of this test is included in this report, and will show the results.

Bob

McCreight,

Assis­ tant the

County

Agent, who was in charge of the test explained how cooperati va test had been conducted.

The

County Agent made an on explanation of daily gains with cost and comparisons based data taken from Smith's test,

Pork Production.

-85-

Elbert

R.

Face

Frank

-

Pritchard

-

County Ag.

Agent

Ass't

Co.

Agent

Yuma

County,

Arizona

1951

LIVESTOCK

(con1t)

Swine

Feeding

Test Field

Dev

Growers and swine feeders who attended this Swine

Test Field

Feeding

Day held at the

George

Ludiker £ar.m

where the test was conducted.

-85A-

Albert

R. Face

-

Frank

County Ag.

Agent

Pritchard

-

Ass' t Co.

Agent

�uma

County, Arizona

1951

LIVESTOCK (con't)

Yuma Livestock Association

Meeting

-

October

17th

The

Yuma

Livestock Association held a dinner meeting at

Clymer's

October

17th.

The program and in so

County Agent arranged for an educational doing, had

Dr.

William Pistor,

Animal Pathologist;

Prof. E. B.

and

\Valter

Stanley, head of the

Animal Husbandry

Department;

Armer, Extension Livestock Specialist of the University of

Arizona; and Nick

Ittner, Superintendent of the

Meloland

Experimental

Station in the

Imperial Valley as speakers at the meeting.

Les

Barkley,

President of the Yuma acted as chairman of the

Livestock

Association meeting.

The

County Agent provided for extensi ve publicity on this meeting and an attendance of 70 was very gratifying.

Livestock men were very pleased with the program presented of the by the Universi�y of Jrizona personnel and

Mr.

Ittner

Meloland Station.

During the day of October

17th prior to the dinner meeting,

University of Arizona personnel and Mr.

Ittner visited

Yuma

County feed lots and livestock feeding operations.

They were especially interested in the swine feeding operation of

Harry and

Bob

Knight in the

North Gila ValJey.

This operation in­ volved

1,700 head of hogs on

October 17th.

The

County Agent feels that this annual event of having

Universi ty personnel visit livestock operations in

Yuma County should be continued in that it

Yuma

County gives the

County livestock

Agent problems an with opportunity

University to discuss personnel and acquaint these people with local conditions.as

they exist.

l

I

St,ockm,en's

Group

M,eet

W'ednesday r2 e4

./�

/ '�"'I

The first fall meeting of the

Yuma Livestock Association is scheduled for

17 at

Les

Clymers.

Barkley,

Wednesday, association ent, said the dinner

October presid­ meeting will begin at 7 :30 p.m.

The program will cover a wide range of livestock subjects.

Walt

Armer, extension service livestock specialist, will tell of pertinent

J research being carried on at stat-

I ions throughout fessor E.

B.

the

Stanley, country.

Pro­ head of the animal husbandry the U of A., will department at report on the results of the ental dry past year's experim­ lot and pasture feeding.

pasture disease

N.

R.

Ittner of

, animal

Dr.

William Pis tor ologist at the U of A., will talk on problems.

path-I the

Meloland ex­

I perimental ley ing station in will tell of of crossbreeds

IMperial experimental shorthorns and herefords.

Val­ feedcompared to t

Association business will be be­ fore the program.

Officers invite interested in livestock to anyone attend.

Reservaions can be made by phoning association secretary

Art

Converse at 3-4431 or the coun­ ty agent's office.

Albert R.

Face

-

County Ag. Agent

Frank Pritchard

-

!sSlt Co.

Agent

Yuma County,

Arizona

1951

LIVESTOCK (conrt )

Beef'

By

December led to

1st,

Yuma Cattle Feeders had their feed lots fil­ capacity.

Cattle feeders went slow on contracting in

August for the fall and winter feeding season due to the in­ stability of feeder prices and the tendenc.y

for feed to be high.

At that time, it was questionable, however, whether the feed prices would continue to go higher or whether there would be a decline.

MOst cattle going into feed lots were

"Oaki.e" type cattle being purchased from

30¢ to 34¢ per pound.

A few at high quality cattle were purchased and put in feed lots prices of 38¢ to

40¢ per pound.

Most all cattle being fed in this area are calves.

Hemoglobinuria

In late December, the

County Agent was notified by

Jans

Investment

Company, who was feeding near�

2,000 head of cattle in the Yuma

Valley, that they were loosing cattle from an un­ known disease to the

County while pasturing on alfalfa and barley.

It appeared

Agent that it was a disease that had previously occur�ed on the Les and Jim

Barkley ranch a few years ago.

Atter examining the contacted Dr.

William of

Fistor,

Animal

Pathologist at the

Arizona, who came to Yuma

Universit,y

County to advise on the handling of the cattle, it was quite obvious.

The

County Agent disease.

The

Count,y Agent sent specimens from posted animals to the Animal

Pathologist prior to his coming to Yuma

County.

Jans Investment

Company was advised to move all of their cattle from green pasture to a dey feed lot.

By the end of

December, they had lost 20 head out of approximate� 350 that were on this occurred.

By particular alfaU'a the last d� of pasture

December, on which deaths had the deaths subsided.

It was plarmed that cattle should be left on dry feed for a week or ten days and then returned to green feed at which time they should be supplemental feed with dry feed.

JaIlS

Investment

CompaQ1 reported loosing a few more calves in

Januar,y after feeding fresh carrots f'ron the field.

After they discontinued feeding carrots and starte.d

feeding dr,y feed, these losses stopped.

Several and cattle feeders in the Yuma became

Valley heard of these losses quite excited over just what the mysterious disease might be.

In order to oomteract a this, the

County Agent letter and mailed it to all cattle feeders in Yuma prepared

County on

January

17th.

The letter was entitled,

Losses you should know about is

"A Cause of

Hemoglobinuria".

Cattle

The letter read as follows:

-87-

Albert R.

Face

-

Frank Pritchard

-

County Ag. Agent

A55ft Co.

Agent

Yuma

County,

1951

Arizona

LIVESTOCK

(con' t )

Hemoglobinuria (con't)

"There has recentlY been another occurrence of a cattle disease which is often spoken of as

"red water" among local cattlemen but is identified for of the study by Dr.

lfm.

Pistor, Animal Pathologist

University of

Arizona, as

"Idiopathic

Hemoglobinuria".

Dr. 1m.

pistor and

Dr. B.

P. Cardon of the

University of

Arizona came to Yuma

County the las� vleek in December to make a study of the disease.

There was only one outbreak in this area and incidently the disease has never been proven contagious ac­ cording to

Dr.

Pistor.

Dr.

Pistor and Dr.

Cardon have tried to transmit the disease to healthy animals in vain.

If they could transmit the causes would be disease, efforts to detennine specific much easier.

The

University Specialists took material fram the effected animals for laboratory study.

Results of these studies have not yet been completed.

Sick animals occurred on an case in irrigated pasture as has been the other instances where similar s.ymptoms

have occurred in New

Mexico,

West

Texas, California, and

Arizona.

In the recent local case, the pasture was barley and alfalfa.

In most cases where the

Dr.

histor,y of the disease has been traced,

Fistor states that losses have occurred after cattle have been on a particular irrigated pasture for 12 to

25 days.

Death in the cattle results from the breaking down of red corpules which are liberated in the urine, causing it to be red in color.

Red urine and shallow rapid breathing are most obvious symptoms.

Also quite obvious is the yellowing of visible membranes.

Recent local death losses moved to corrals and were green feed with dry stopped 4 days after cattle had been put on dry feed.

When put back on supplement, a few losses recurred in 10 days.

As a warning to those taken.

Feed some animals have it or fast and avoid dry pasturing cattle, this caution might be feed each day that is accessible to all in your pasture.

At the first sign of "Hemoglobinuria", positivelY identified.

Don't move effedted cattle far handling.

Running effected cattle through a squeeze shute might cause losses that could otherwise be avoided.

-88-

Albert R.

Face

-

Frank

Pritchard

-

County Ag. Agent

Ass't Co. Agent

Yuma County,

1951

Arizona

LIVESTOCK

(eonr t

)

Hemoglobinuria

(con't)

It must be understood that much more is to be known about

"Hemoglobinuria" but at are present the precautions mentioned the best that can be afforded.

Research workers wish to follow every outbreak that occurs for the benefit of the cattle industey.

Cattleman having suppected cases should report them in order that work can be continued.

It is everyone's wish that more can be found out about this disease at the earliest possible date."

External Parasites

The Extension Service in Yuma the

Control of

County handled information on lice, grubs, and ear ticks through newspaper articles and radio programs.

III addition, the new4r published bulletin entitled man at the Yuma

"Livestock

Pests" was distributed to cattle­

Livestock

Association meeting in October.

Other calls have been made for this bulletin.

Feed

Most cattle in Yuma County are fed alfalfa straw and alfalfa heyor one or the other as roughage and the concentrate is made up was of bar ley and sorghum.

The used is cotton seed moving for protein supplement most eonnnoacy­ meal.

On

December

1st, most alfalfa hay

38 to

10 dollars per ton.

Maize was costing

$70 and barley

$80 per ton.

Those harvesting sorghum in November were getting

$68 per ton.

Altho most cattle feeders had their feed on hand before are still prices reached their peak, some cattle feeders buying a certain amount of feed.

A local feed re­ presentati ve told the of in the history

County of Yuma

Agent

County that the most maize he has been s hipped in from knows

Texas tMs�ll.

Swine

Swine producers in Yuma

County calIon the Extension Service for various information throughout the year.

Common requests are for mtions and recommendations for the control of external parasites.

Calls are also received on

Enteritis on worming with sodium chl.ordde

, problems and

It was growers reported in the'

1950

Annual

Report for Yuma

County that urged the

County Agent's

Office to get information on the very much few publicized animal protein experiments throughout the factor.

country,

Since there the

County were

Agent's office cooperative� assisted in conducting a swine feeding test

Albert

R. Face

-

County Ag.

Agent

Frank Pritchard

-

Ass

1 t Co.

Agent

Yuma

County

1951

-

Arizona

LIVESTOCK

(con' t)

Swine (con't) using

30 head of hogs.

These hogs were divided in five pens with six tember hogs to the pen.

The test was actually begun on

Sep-

14th, 1950, and completed on

January 19, 1951.

As re­ ported earlier, a swine field day was held on

January

19th at which time results of this test were discussed with swine feed­ ers.

Swine feeders have been very interested in these results and the test has given the Extension office an opportunity to discuss were problems with all swine feeders.

Since rations used mixed from basic feeds, it gives the Extension Service a basis on which to make a comparison to commercial mixed feeds.

The results of this test are included in this report.

This re­ port shows the rations fed, the average dai� gain of each individual hog, and the net cash gain per hog.

Swine

Feeding

Test

-

Gardner

"

Maurice Langley of the Bureau of Reclamation contacted the

County Agent in able to

February conducting and asked if another swine our feeding office would be agree­ test on the

Yuma-Mesa on alfalfa pasture if he were to furnish the hogs.

He suggested

John

Gardner as a cooperator.

Upon contacting

John

Gardner, the

County Agent found he was interested in fencing off five pastures and conducting the test.

Therefore, tentative arrange­ ments were made in Februar,y to start a swine feeding test on pasture.

The test actually began

March 7th.

The

Extension

Livestock

Specialist assisted the County Agent and his assistants in randomizing the hogs in the various pens on

March 7th.

The rations were all mixed under the supervision of the Co unty

Agent's office.

Rations were given corresPonding numbers to the pen numbers, that is,

Pen No.1

was fed Ration No.1.

Each pen or group of hogs had approximate� a one-half acre pasture.

Separate sheets showing the rations and rates of gains are included in this report.

There were a few instances when hogs got mixed between pastures following the

April 5th weighing, therefore, the total feed consumed and the cost of gain wasn't calculated.

It was regretable that this happened, however, this information is still of value since hogs been pastured on the Yuma Mesa previouslY under the had never observation of

2 the

County Agent's

Office.

All

25 hogs gained an average of pounds per day from

March 7th through April

18th.

It is as­ sumed that the·weighing period between

April 5th and

April

18th is too short a period to gi ve significant information.

Since the alfalfa pasture is on a very sandy soil on the Yuma

Mesa, hogs never had to be taken off the pasture when it was irrigated.

As a result of m�ne these feeding tests, feeders saw the value in more than half of Yuma using mixed feeds and

County purchased feed mixers.

This has been a them an very good thing in that it gives opport\uU ty to thoroughly mix niacin into their ration

-90-

J

GARDNER HOG FEEDING TEST

Yuma Mesa

Conducted on alfalfa

Started March pasture

7,

1951

COST OF

RATIONS

-----

91.5 # Barley

7.5 # Tankage

.5 # Bonemeal

.5 # Sc.ilt

100.0

ff

50%

Q

@

@

@

$).05/100# or

$.O)O'/lb.

$,.)5/100# or

�.05)5/1b.

$5.25/1001/= or

$ .O'2'/1b.

$1.55/100# or

� .0155/lb'.

=

=

=

=

$2.790

$ .401

$ '.026

$ .008

$)

.225-tota1

No.

2

89.5 If

9.,

Barley

#

Cottonseed meal

.5 4 Bonemeal

.5 # Salt

.5 #

A.

P.

F.

100.0

#

4)%

(Aurofac)

:_L:

@

@

@

@ fr) .05/100# or

$.0)05/lb.

-=

$2,7)0

-:;4.00/100# or

$

.0400/1b

:

$

.l20

$,.25/100# or

$.052'/lb�

:

$ .026

�1.'5/l00# or

�.0155/1b.

=

$ ,008

!ti>45.

/lOOlji or

$.4500/1b

=

� .225

$j.J09-total

No., .3

89.5

# Barley

9.5 #

Cottonseed meal

.5 # Boneme a1

.5 #

Salt

100.0

#

No.4

98.5 #

,

Barley

.5 #

Bonemeal

.5 #

Salt

.5 #

A.

P.

F.

roo.o

#

(Aurofae)

No.5

89.5

#

9.

Barley

#

Cottonseed meal

.5 # Bonemeal

.5 #

Salt

'1..5

#

A.

P.

1".

(Aurofae) lz' t.spoonsful

Niacin foo.o

#

@

@

@

@

$).05/100# or

$.0)05/1b.

=

$2.730

t>4.00/l00i¥ or

$.0400/1b.

=

$ .380

$5.2,/100# or

$.0525/1b.,

$1.55/100# or

$.0155/1b.

=

=

$ .026

$ .008

$).144-total

@

@

@

@

$') .05/100# or

$.0305/1b.

$5.25/100# or

�.0525/1b.

=

=

$) .004

$ .026

$1.55/100# or

$.0155/1b.

: $ .008

$45.

11001/ or

$.4500/lb.

=

$ .225

$) .263-total

@

@

@

@

@

@

$3.05/100# or

$.0305/1b.

= $2.7)0

$>4.00/100# or

$.0400/lb.

�7.50/500 gram jar

=

=

.320

�5.25/l00# or

$.0525/lb.

= $ .026

�1.55/100# or

$.0155/1b.

:

$

.008

$45� /100# or

$.4500/lb.

$'.225

$

.107

$3 �416-total

5 hogs in each of

5 pens.

Hogs are furnished by

1�urice

Langley.

County

Agent's Office

March, 1951

-91-

Pen.

No.1

l.vc.

'!,'iTt.

;l.ve.

Daily

Gain

Pen Noo

2 t.se;

:l.ve.

wt.

Daily

Gain

Pen

Noo 3

.

Ave.

,rft

• ta«,

Daily

Gain

Pen

No�

4

153

149

110

147

171

146

YUMA

HOG FEEDING

---

TEST

-

Conducted by Yuma

Swine Producers in

Cooperation with the :

..

griculture.l

Extension Service

Test

Began September

Completed ;�pril

14,

1950

18, 1951

March 7

Starting 'f,feight

Ind. wt.

Lpri1

5

----

142

151

1.33

133

159

143

200

226

197

200

232

.3/5

211

170

133

131

157

142

146

247

192

194

233

212

3,,$

215

3/5

132

154 l1.a

136

168

147

194

231

201

206

245

2/5

215

2/5

237

228

174

212

226

215

2/5

Ave.

Mar.

29

Daily

Gain

7 to ,L·

..

pr-,

5 day

Period

2.00

2.58

2.20

2.31

2.51

2.32

2.65

2.03

2.17

2.62

2_41

2.37

2.14

2e65

1.86

2.41

2.65

3/5

2.34

1/5

2.89

2.72

'2.20

2.23

1.89

Weight

April

18

13 day period

L.Eril

5 to

18

229

240

218

219

248

230

4/5

266

209

212

241

231

231

4/5

212

261

229

234

271

241

2/5

252

238

186

228

234

227

3/5

Ave.

Daily

Gain

2.23

1.09

1.61

1.46

1.23

1.52

2/5

1.46

1.30

1.31

.6

1.46

1,22

3/5-

1.31

2.30

2.15

2.15

2.76

2.13

2/5

,/

1.15

.77

.92

1.23

.6

Lve. Wt.

Lve;

Daily

Gatn

Pen

No.

5

Ave. ',':Jt.

Ave.

Daily

Gain

140

172

135

125

127

139

213

253

180

199

198

4/5 208 3/5

2.38

3/5

2.51

2.77

1.55

2.58

2.44

2.37

234

270

194

217

216

226 1/5

.93

2/5

1.61

1.30

1.09

1.31

1.31

1.32

2/5

County Lgcnt's Office

Ilopril, 1951

-92-

YUMA HOO FE;EDING TEST

Conducted by

Yuma Swine

Cooperation w i.t.h the

Producers in

Agricultural

Extension

Service

Test

Began September

14, 1950

COST Oli' RATIONS

No.1

80# Barley

9# Gr.

AIr.

10#

Tankage

�5#Bonemeal

.5#Salt

:66ff

@ $55.

T or

Hay ®

17.

T or

@ 110. T or

@

@

108.

T or

34.

T or

.C275/lb.

.Oo8S/lb.

:

.055/lb.

:

.054/1b.

=

.017/1b.

=

Sept.

14-Nov

.13 �:-N�v

.1L�-Dec .14

{tDec

.15-

2.20

.0165

.55

.027

,,(JoBS

2.8620

83#

2.2825

85# 2.3375

9# .0765

9# .0765

7#

.)85

.5#

.027

5# .275

.5#

.027

.5# .0085

100#

.5# .0085

2.77� roor 2.7245

*

Ration

No.

1 had

December

Tankage reduced Nov.

14 to

7# and Barley increased to

15, the Tankage was reducedto

5# and Barley increased to

85#.

83#.

On

No.2

80# Barley

@ �55.

T or

9#

Gr. Alf.

Hay

@

17.

T or

9.5#

Cottonseed Meal

@

80.

T or

.5#

Bonemeal

.5#

Salt

5#

A.P.F.

100r

@

@

@

108.

T or

34�

900.

T or

T or

.0275/lb.

:

.0085/lb.

:

.04/1b.

.054/lb.

.017/1b.

.45/1b

-

-

-

2.20

.0765

.38

.027

.0085

.225

2.9170

80# Barley·,

@

$55.

T or

9#

Gr. A1f.

Hay @ 17.

T or

10#

Cottonseed

Meal

@

.5#Bonemeal

5#Salt

100#

@

@

80.

T or

108.

T or

34.

T or

.0275/1b.

:

.0085/lb.

=

.04/1b.

-

-

.054/1b.

=

.017/1b

=

2.20

.0765

.38

.027

.0085

2.6920

No.4

80#

Barley

@

$55.

T or

18;5#Gr.

Alf.

[email protected] 17.

T or

.5#Bonemeal

@ 108.

T or

.5#Salt

@

34.

T or

.5#A.P.F.

100#

@ 900.

T or

.0275/lb.

=

.008S/lb.

=

-

.054/lb.

.017/1b.

:

.45/1b.

=

2.20

.1572

.027

.0085

.225'

2.6177

No. 5

�arley

9# Gr.

Alf.

@ $55.

T or

Hay

@

17.

T or

9.5#Cottonseed

Meal

.0275/1b.

:

.0085/lb.

=

2.20

.0765

.5#Bonemeal

.5#Salt

@

@

@

80.

T or

108.

T or

34.

T or

.04/lb.

_

-

.054/lb.

.017/1b.

=

.5#A.P.F.

@ 900.

T or

.45/1b.

=

It t.spoonsful

Niacin

@

7.50/500 gram jar:

100#

County

Agent's

Office

-

.38

.027

.0085

.225

.1071

3.0241

January, 1951

Gr. Alf.

Hay is

Ground Alfalfa

Hay

-93-

YUMA HOG FEEDING TEST

-

_-

Conducted by

Ywna

Swine Producers in

Cooperation with the Agricultural

Extension Service

Test began

September 14,

1950

#

1

301

'F

302

A

303

L

Six pigs per pen

Individua'l pig

I

S

304

S

305

S

306

L

_

Pen

-

Five average pens daily e,;aill and individual weights on

'�ieight days

14:

Oct, 12

� i

Nov. 13

-

59--

;-.

..s;6

_

148.

'daVs

_;_.15.B..._

-.'

...

-

.-

--t-

;

_ _

....

__ __

� -_.

Sept.

.

.•.•......

_-_._.

".,.

;

29-days i on feed

_

----.

--

-

I

;

32

..

days:

I on feed

.

!-_.

-

-

._.

L

__ .

""-'-"r"'-'-

-_

Dec.

11 'Jan.

12

28-days:

JZ days on

--.feed' on feed

_

_-.

Jan

7 y

..

On. f��d

..

.

.

_f

._.

I

:

.1ieight.

--'.-

30-

:

39-

..

,Av�rag�

.

.��.��:l:'y

...

y�.!!!-,l

..

__ .

__ .

...

--L--

�}±.._

__ .

_�

!

_

___!.�3_.

__

I

:1:.!.3?

....

_ ....

J.!93

_ ..

i

..

}�.!

4

.3

.....

-

--"

:A�����t

:�.o

10

i

_41_

,.Daily

.a��Il.� i

.

�§

_._

t

L

_!.?G

_.

._�.

-!_41

__ ..

+.

_&�

._

....

i..

__ ..

8G__.

.ac2U_

.....

•.

91

-

-.

_J:!f2

..

-'

..

--.

i

'Weight

76 84

Average: i'

��aily_._G:�ill!

...

__ .... _,.

__

.�_ ..,!g§.

:

!

112

;' -; l

155

._.J!.�

__

.�_!21-l.

'.

209

I

:

221 b

..

&2__�J.a1l_----,

!

Weight

:

43

I'"

'ag tDaITY

..

8aiu-i--

..

_+

t

••

...

61

_�_9f

..

....

..:.

..

;

99

-.1_..J..9.-

..

-

.J

149

J.

....

79

...

;

;

..

y�e�g�t i

40

_..:

.49.

Average

:

: f

I.

lJJaily

..

Gaill!

_

--

..

---.---i�_·_.-A3l_

.... �.

-�-

--

�1

.3a..i j

-·1_·

..

04

�a.k

�5

__ .

__

:

: Weight

'Average

_.;

! l!�.gLQaini_

_

!!v�

..

��

I

Average.

11.DaiU_

G_a.inl

-t:

53

4.f·2/3

_.

I

55

,

_.�_!

!.?�_._

..

__

'1' f"

97

--

I

1

_.5�

2/3..

__ f

;._.

lUJ

;

__

�p.22

..

102

-�

;

197

� l.2.9

..

_.

104

65!

87

--j"

I

L.---

�3!.

__

4-_._

•.

7J

.�.

__

.S�_

J_18

__

..

21.

.-.�

..

2.9

__

..

_ ....

-

II!

..

_12q.

_J

..

.k_].:L_

_.

I

:

72

�j6!

105.

;

.!.

__

!642

..

..142

l/6

..

15012

� ..

L�.l.

..

!.�

�.J_.!..16_2jJ_:l_

1�.19.

_

�_

..

_._.

i

-94-

313

F,

314

A

315 s

316 s

317

L

318

L

-----�--

PEN

-

.

#

F

A

5

L

L

S

....

----:.--

_

319

320

321

322

J23

324

4

Pen

.....

4

1

---.--.-�-

:

,

:

....

-....

We.!_gh� iAverage

;��:h��in_1

2j'

;Averaget

.-

;?��t�hi��nh;2---f-��;

'Average

-

1-

.

..

"

..

..

-.

:��;:ht�

_.

1

-...

--:

I:

..

�-���t i

� 39_.

_

'_

40

_

:;

'.

--

-

i:�-�?--=L

:

;"

.

:��

--

-

I�verage

:D���!..

���.� ti

Iii

.�

7

_

I!ff�gh�

+

�_O.

:�verage

1

.1

:

,._67

I.

I

T"

.\

..

-��-���tt·

__

�6

:��

.

.44

8)

..

+-

-'�1'

-_

I'

..

._

-

_

-·f

11..

!

1'_

I

1

,-

-

_

_�t�;�1.

I

106.

l._��

.

��3'

·�r--.�f��t�··h�i·

--

1.00

115

-

..

_.!

I t

!

'1'

+_l.�;

1-

l.�QQ_

...

.

3fnJ;;Lfn_���

....

I

_1·6Q.

f

_

-

..161..

-1·��;·--1--1���.

1.20

-

.L

; l

r-

l

..

_

1��

-.��.

2

-�:.

...

1.51

T

J

166

178

_

_

....

..

I

�Daily

Gain

-:----

Wel.ght

_.-._

..

j f'

....

...

.... ·· .....

._._

;,-�'''� � �

..

........

�---.,

.....

_._

....

---"-�-

---· ··_·· ..

.....

---�

......

-----..

-·i··

_·_··1

!Sept.

14

Oct.

12

:

Nov

•.

13 !

Dec.

11

: Jan

..1..2 !Jan.

� i

-_._

----·-1-·

43

I

..

.24

r

.50

-.

5.3

·----t·-·-'-

I.

--_._

75

1.14

I

1.59

-._--

.....

---.-----t-.-.

9)

._1

122

..

131_

...

1.71

-.----------.-

._

!

I

i;�;�;��l��",. =i

..

��

.�, c,-c�2�

=>: , c' "

.•

��.".

J

.

AL-=

.cc

!�2i.

'":':-=.�

Average Wt.

I.l.·

....

!

53.8.3

;AVerage _'!

IDaily Gain

I

.32

'J�

1/6

-.

10� i

'.

143

.70

_ l

1

15�2

..

1'-

1_-,�9�_"

1

�_?_LW

.1.2£.._,

..

__

..

9-;

-.

_ ......

_ _ � __ .

__ .

_

_._

...

_

..

�_.

"_40' ...

_.

PEN

.-

_.

# 5

-;;5--"'-

L

326

A

327

L

328

S

329

F

330 s

;

!

..

,

!

!

: i i

:

L

..

-

�.

i

I

Daily

Gain:

_..

.,-

1 ..

:

,I

:

'Sept.

14:

Oct.

12

:

Nov.

13 ,Dec. 11 'Jan.

12..

!Jan.

19

:

:

29-days' on feed!

32-days; on feed

I

28-days' on feed

12

� days: feed

7

,lon

fd�Sa

.--.-----

.···..

..

-.

...

-·t .

_ --._.

-.----

_.---�-----t�--··

.f"

_"

56

62

.21

._:

95

_!

�24._,

101....

!

1.03

1.,04

18

..

_ _, ...

: r-

i

197..

_

2.29

• __ ..

_.

-

........

20

27

46

72 i

Weight

!--Average t

:

Daily

Gain;

_.

-,'

..

[.��;g��'

Average

Weight

Average

Daily

_.

.._

..

Gain;

,Weight

-

,··Average-·

.....

Daily Gain:

I

;

;

'-

_.

...

79.

42

-.

:

1-i

'��Jeight I

34

"Aver age"

"'j

.�

,

.

,,, ..

.24

9�.

.41

_

1

__ ....

60....

�.

-

\-

.62

48

-

J

!

j.

1-

-

..

59

130

1.22

105'

1.41

89

"-1

--

__

I

!

: t.

1

17�.

..

.93

__

50

144

1.39

13�.5

.

..

...

1.22

..

_._

2

III

231.

_.

Q 3.

_.

192

1.50

-180

_

I i l

I i

, ...

124

;

1.86

_

..

..

_.

_

-1-..

:

.,256

.-

....

--

I

i

�.�

_7 �

._

203

,

1.57

iae

......

Daily Gain

"

_ ..

__ ..

_ t

._

_

__ .

.48

65

�.,.

1.28

..

_�.

1.6)

..

}.�4�_!

.����

..

_ ..

_ ..

:-A�:{!�!

��.��-�

'

..

_�7..

l

���!!l.-

.... ..

I

I

.

._ ..

·�.

..

.112

...

:

I

L

__

��47_.

I-

1�7 i

2.�3

_l.�_

..

_�.��

•.

1:'-"

��.Q6.._

..

!

250

12.43

.....

,.

q

P e�_

:

..

A!:;::�e

D"1 G

�J._�_.

!11

a�_n.L

46

__

1/� 58.83

J

43

;

.•.

96

1/6:

135.6_: g19

.!

203

..

I

1.17

1.41

1 I' j

..

_ ..

_ ..

_L

__

__

_l

.s

QL

!_�

.<:?_:

.

Letters indicate the hog for the test.

A cooperator furnishing the

� ANDERSON

D

-

DICK

F

-

FACE'

L

-

S

-

LUDlKER

SIBLBY particular

The hogs in this t�st wer� fed by

George Ludiker.

-95A-

YUMA HOG FEEDING

TEST

Conducted by

Yuma Swine Froducers in

Cooperation with the

Agricultural Extension

Service

Test

Began September

14,

1950

COST OF RATIONS

September

14, 1950, to

January

12,

1951,

--

120 days

Pen

No.

Ave. Gain per hog

Ave.

Lbs

, consumed hog feed per

Ave.

cost of feed per hog

1

2

3

4

98#

114#

114#

98#

530.5

515.16

538

486.5

$14.77

�15.04

$14.48

$12.75

Per of

21¢ hog val ue

Net cash gain

@ gain per hog for feed_L

$20.58

$ 5.81

$23.94

$ 8.90

$23.94

$ 9046

$20.58

$ 7.83

5 143#

608

$18039 $30.03

��11.64

The to swine following chart isn't part of the above test but should be of interest producers.

DAILY G1-�INS WITH COST COHPARISONS as

The chart below effected by the age gives estimated rate and cost of gains, and feed comsumption" of the pig.

Price of.

various weights is estimated.

The first three columns are taken from Table XI of "'!nrilliam '7. Smith's

The last two columns were text, "Pork

Production".

prepared locally.

Prices are estimated r.O.B,

Yuma,

Janua�

12, 1951.

'�leight of

Average

Daily pig gain

Birth to

50#

50

-

100#

100

-

150#

150

-

200#

200

-

250#

250

-

300#

300

-

350#

350

-

400#

400

-

450#

Concentrates to produce

1 cwt gain

Dry

Lot

Cost per 1 cwt of gain with feed @ �3 cwt t lb.

1 lb.

Ii lb.

I!

lb.

1-2/3 lb.

1-2/3 lb.

l� lb.

1� lb.

1 lb.

300

375

400

435

475

535

$

9.00

$11.25

$12.00

$13.05

$14.25

$16.05

60�

675

775

$18C/00

$20.25

$23.25

County Agent's

Office

-

Janua�,

1951

Estimated value per hundred of

Jan

•.

12,

1951 hogs

$27.00

$25.00

$23.00

$21.00

$21.00

�20�00

$18.00

$18.00

$18.00

-96-

Albert R. Face

-

Frank Pritchard

-

Yuma

County Ag.

Agent

Ass't

Co.

Agent

County, Arizona

1951

LIVESTOCK (con't)

Swine

(con't)

Swine Feeding

Test

-

Gardner (conrt-) for small pigs.

Likewise, it gives them an opporttmity to use the animal protein factor when the,r desire to.

Further, it gives them a very convenient method of mixing their sodium flouride into the feed when it is to be used for has worming.

One feeder designed a feed mixer that he mounts on the back of a ford tractor.

After to his self mixing feeders.

the feed, he delivers it in the mixer

The majority of Yuma their

County's hog feeders bring economw into feeding by using cull carrots that they g ather into the fields during the carrot harvesting season, and during the cantaloupe season they get cantaloupe culls from the packing sheds.

Most swine growers no additional feed get ver,y good gains with l�ttle to during the time when these cull products are plentiful.

Since s'wine growers in Yuma County have been using niacin and the animal protein factor on their small very

Ii ttle enteritis has occurred.

Several boys in the pigs,

FFA on the

Vocational Farm had hogs affected with enteritis this fall.

Apparent:cy-, they were not conscious of the very important need of

USing niacin in their ration.

The called to look at the hogs and pointed

County

Agent was out to them the impor­ tance of doing this and the fact that farmers in the and a half to two years have past year used this in their ration and have cut down their previous high losses from this disea�e.

Sheep

Altho there are

35,

000 head of sheep in southern

Yuma County, most of these are handled by about

5 or

6 operators.

J.

good number' of the

Yuma.

Most of lambs cost around the

30¢ a hundred laid down in operations are lamb pasturing operations.

However, there is one operation in the lower Yuma Valley that includes ewes and lambs.

The ewes have been climbing for the past two months.

These ewes and lambs are not on pasture but are being fed green chapped.

alfalfa h�.

Losses have been at a minimum and the lambs and ewes both seem to be doing very well.

sturges has

8pproximate� 10,000 lambs in the North Gila

Valley.

Recently this foreman called the

County Agent to look at some lambs that he was having difficulty with.

In an effort to determine what was wrong with the lambs, the

County Agent called the

The

Animal

Pathologist at the university of Arizona in Tucson.

County Agent described the disease to the PatholOgist and he said he thought that the lambs were affected With Entro­ toxemia.

He reconnnended that the lambs be left on quite short pasture and that dzy feed be put out on the borders.

He

-97-

Albert R. Face

-

Frank

County Ag.

Agent

Pritchard

-

Ass It Co.

Agent

Yuma

County,

1951

Arizona

LIVESTOCK

(con't)

Sheep

(con It) recommended that they obtain Entro-toxemis serum and vacinate all of the lambs.

The on

November

County Agent investigated this problem.

26th and on

December

1st, no word had been heard from the

Sturges

I foreman.

Dairy

Dair,y Herd

Improvement

Several

Dairy herd owners in the Yuma area indicated interest in forming a area.

these

Dair,y Herd

Improvement

Association in the Yuma

The

County Agent and the

Assistant County Agent advised herd owners as to the functions of such a group and how it could be

,organized.

Ralph

Van

Sant,

'Extension

Dairy Specia­ list, came to

Yuma

County in March and helped ,form the organi­ zation.

It was formed under the name of Yuma Area

Daicy

Herd

Improvement

Association with four'dair,y herd owners joining at the of the start.

Other herd owners were present at the founding organization but did not feel ready to join at that time.

Officers were elected and money advanced from herd owners to purchase testing equipment.

George Bradley was elected President;

Lewis Trussell

-

Vice President; and

Bob Fram

-

Secretar,y

-

Treasurer.

Ennis Rice is the fourth member.

Testing equipment arrived in

May and was set up on the

George

Ludiker farm.

for testing.

George

Ludiker was the first tester for the new

Association.

The first test was made on

June

9

'With

Ralph

Van Sant and the Assistant

County

Agent assisting the new tester.

At the total present time there are tr.ree

herds under test of 109 cows.

Several herds in this with a locality are not now under test.

Those herds not under test consist of

305 cows.

The

County Agent's

Office has arranged for two Yuma owners to

Dairy

Herd purchase registered bull calves from the

University dairy herd.

These herd owners were

Bob Fram and George

Bradley.

Bob Fram received a bull calf in service for 12 months.

He is now

August,

1949,' and receiving had him in excellent large calves from that bull.

He obtained a second bull calf in

September,

1950, which is now in limited service.

His older bull has been sold to the Cypert dairy in Y1.UIla

Valley.

Mr.

Fram

He recently obtained his third bull from the University herd.

is very pleased with the quality of these calves.

....

-98-

I

Albert

R.

Face

-

County Ag.

Agent

Frank Pritchard

-

Ass't

Co. Agent

Yuma County,

Ariz ona

1951

LIVESTOCK

(con.t)

Daizy

(con' t)

DailY

Herd

Improvement

(con' t

)

George in

Bradley obtained a bull calf from the

University herd

July,

195'1.

This calf is from an excellent cow family and sire.

He plans to obtain if possible one new bull each year from the

University herd.

Yuma Are a much more

Dairy Herd Improvement Association members are now conscious of the value of testing than before testing was started.

They realize now the value of the individual cow record.

These herd owners are carefully watching the progress of their cows throughout their complete lactation period.

All of them now realize for the first time that they are going to have to be advised mercinary in their culling program but have been to finish a complete lactation period before aQ1 severe culling is practiced.

Yuma Area Dairy

Herd owners became dissatisfied with prices being paid them by two local creameries.

In order to bring pressure to bear on the creamer" owners, these herd owners affiliated with the is an

Dairy League in

Phoenix.

The

Dairy League organization of Class A dair,ymen organized for the better­ ment of the

Dairy business.

The

League worked with local dairy­ men in stabilizing prices in consumer price paid by pointing out that any increase for milk would be passed on to the producer.

There was a in

2¢ per quart raise to consumers early

1951 that was not passed on to the producer.

�he

Dair,r

League was successful in owners and pointing this out to local creamery consequently the herd owners receive more for their milk.

The first

6 months of testing presented the

Assistant

County

Agent in supervising the newly organized Association ma� pro91ems but the biggest problem was keeping a tester on the job.

George

Ludiker who started as tester had to quit for health reasons.

C.

M. HOWell only worked a short time and became dissatisfied with the income.

The current tester is

Charles

Ko10sky.

He seems very interested in the work and is planning to learn more about dairy business while on the job.

He is emplo.yed

full time as a

Civil

Engineer with the State

Highway Department.

-99-

Albert

R.

Face

-

Frank Pritchard

-

County Ag.

Agent

Ass'tCo.

Agent

Yuma County,

Arizona

1951

PLANT PATHOLOGY

The

County Agent and the

Assistant

Cotmty

Agent continued an educational program in on all crops in

Yuma plant

County.

disease identification

]"articular emphasis and was control placed on soil borne diseases that are difficult and often impossible to eradicate.

High prices of certain crops has caused farmers to plant the same crop on land year after year at the expense of the land.

�educed yields have resulted and the disease problem has become progressive� worse.

Particular emphasis was placed on

Fusarium Wilt of flax,

T·exas

Root Rot in cotton and alfalfa, nematodes in many crops"

Sclerotinia Selerotio rum

(Drop) particularly in lettuce and df.seasea

of the new crop to Yuma

County castor beans.

Details of these diseases will be discussed under the crop affected.

The following is the diseases encountered by the

County Agent and The Assistant

County Agent during the year.

Root

Alfalfa:

Texas

Root

Rot,

Fusarium

Crown Rot,

Rhizoctonia

Lesion, Nematodes, and Red Rust were the diseases observed.

.

'Barley:

Some stripe was

Marioutfi but

WqS not serious.

observed in the variety uCalifornia

Castor Beans:

One ver.y

significant this year was tnat castor beans gro'wing observation made on land known to have Texas Root Rot present did not show a� sign disease.

No root rot was observed in any of the castor bean field.

were

Cotton:

Only two cotton diseases were observed.

These

Texas Root Rot and Alternaria

Leaf and Boll spot.

were

Flax: Small infections of

�problem in flax.

Damping

Off and Fusarium Wilt

Carrots:

Nematodes and

'some

Sclerotial

Rot was observed.

was

Lettuce: Lettuce the lettuce disease drop caused by Sclerotinia Sclerotiorum.

problem.

Some Botr,ytus rot was observed but it was secondar,y.

Cantaloupes:

Bacterial Blight was a very serious problem.

l'fatermelons: Bacterial ver,y serious but were in

Blight and Fusarium Wilt were spotted locations.

Tomatoes: Nematodes and damage to several fields.

Curly Top virus caused very serious

-100-

I

Albert

Frank

R. Face

-

County

Ag.

Agent

Pritchard

-

Ass't Co.

Agent

Yuma

County,

1951

Arizona

POULTRY

The Extension on

Service in

Yuma

County has no planned program.

poultr.y.

Extension work is limited to assistance to several individual small flock and is in the form of family flock owners.

This assistance answering requests for information.

These questions are assorted but are death.

losses.

Mailings principal� of literature are concerned with mailed frequent� to those who show an interest in particular phases of poultry production.

There are reallY only

2 or

3 small flocks interested in connnercial egg production and about the same number in meat production.

Yuma

County doesn't nearly meet its own demand for poultry and eggs.

This industry could be developed if proper facilities were provided and people who had the capital and understood the business were to want to establish in

Yuma

County.

SOlIS

-

The Extension Service in Yuma

County has worked mostly with soils fertility and in this line it has done considerable work.

The work that has been done is discussed in this report under the various crops on which fertilizer tests or recom­ mendations were made.

Yuma

County soils are from very sandy to extremely heavy.

Some soils are quite alkaline, especiall1 certain pieces of

�d in the Wellton-Mohawk.

These soils will present many and varied reclamation be done on this problems.

Considerable more work will in the future.

The

Wellton-�Mohawk

Extension problems have been discussed jointly

Irrigation qy the

Specialist, the

Extension

Soils

Specialist, and the County Agent.

A summary of this discussion is reported under "Irrigationu•

WEED CONTROL

The weed

County Agent and the Assistant

County Agent conducted three control tests during the year.

In addition to conducting these tests, publicity was given to all weed control information available on all crops grown in

Yuma

County.

The three tests conducted were two broad leafed weed control tests in

Barley and a

Johnson Grass on ditch bank control test.

Information was and and publicized on the use of oil sprays for carrots onions,

2,4-D for broad leafed weed control in small grains flax, T.e.A.

for Johnson

Grass control, and

I.P.C.

for grasses in several crops.

-101-

I

Albert

Yuma

R.

Face

-

Frank Pritchard

County,

1951

-

County Ag. Agent

Asslt Co.

Arizona

Agent

This Is

·Wee.d

nme for

Conscious�,� I

r

Grain.

Flax

M,.{.'

By

FRANK PRITCHARD

Assistant

County Agent

This is the time' of year when acid same equivalent is sufficient at the gallonage and pressure.

Use Caution small grain should be and thinking trol.

flax growers of weed con-

Flax growers should in the use of

2,4-D for use caution weed, con­ trol in their flax fields.

Research

Where weeds are present, thick conducted at the

University of Ari­ enough in the field to reduce

.the

zona farm last valley experiment crop yield and where

-growers do

Bill Wootton of the univer­ year by not want any weeds to go to seed,

U.S.D.A.

sity farm, and Fred Arle, it may be necessary to control weed control as sprays are applied+such tions of

2,4-D for broad leafed weed specialist from Phoe­ weeds by chemic.al sprays.

Where chemical nix, indicates that heavy

2,4-D in both the

apPlica-�l

form and Ester form reduced the control, the plied and when growing the equipment can get on lering but before booting.

trolled in small be ap-

Broad leafed weeds can be conflax following an irrigation.

These facof the tors are very weed control with grain weeds important spray�d are fast as soon for

2,4-D.

The good sm�ll not thick yield crease their considerably over un-I spr.ayed plots.

One pound of acid the yields.

In such case, grains with

2,4-D where red weed is if the weeds are right should be time.

d present,

I'the acid spray should young as the field after sprayed at the tII-.

t�e

Where red weed

IS one and a half equivalent pounds.

of of the ammo

I enough materially depresent, ,three­ lent of the Amino form of the eequivalent of 2,4-D reduced yield by 16 per cent in one plots.

It is recommended that growers spray their

2,4-D unless weed fourths pound to of flax fields with populations are the should be used.

This will not kill acid equiva­

2,'l-D application' all of the red weed

I

It form of 2,4-D

"ter should be should be in 30 applied applied gallons per at acre.

40 of to wa-

'This

60 but will stunt it severely, Where

Lambs Quarter and Mustard

�re present and no red weed, one-half, pressure.

'Where no red pound of the equivalent 'of

'pounds

present, one pound of the

L.;...---------------;I

I the Amino be used.

aCid.

of

2,4-D should

In all cases on flax,

30 gallons of water per acre at.

to 40 pounds pressure should.

35 be, applied.

Wild oats and annual grasses in flax can be controlled with I.P.C.

I spray.

The I.P.C.

should be ap-.

plied when the flax is in the four to five true leaf stage and will' hurt flax if it is, eight inches to

10 inches tall.

The wild oats and annual grasses should be sprayed before they tiller.

The younger the better.

I.P.C.

is unlike 2,4-D in that it works directly on the roots of the plants down to the roots tion water.

and is carried by the

Irrlga-.

The field should be irrigated soon after

I.P.C. should be spraying.

applied at

The five to six in

50

50 pounds of 50 per cent gallons of

?later

per pounds pressure.

material!

acre

,atl

Growers who use

2,4-D are cau­ tioned to use the Amino form.

If by mistake the Ester form is serious damage to other used, crops growing sure near by might of the form of occur.

your

Be

2,4·D before you use it.

-10lA-

Albert R. Face

-

Frank Pritchard

-

County Ag.

Agent

Ass't Co.

Agent

Yuma

County,

1951

Arizona

WEED CONTROL (conrt )

With the increase in cotton acreage this year and the ability of cotton to damage by

2,4-D, the

County Agent suscept­ gave a great deal of publicity to the value of caution on the use of 2,4-D in or around cotton fields.

One field was observed with 2,4-D damage where the

2,,4-D had been applied

6 months before planting cotton to kill out alfalfa.

MEETn�GS ATTENDED

Field

Days

The

Comty Agent's

Office conducted six field days in YUma

County during the year.

Arrangements were made and publicity given for each by circular letter, radio and newspape r.

These six field d�s were as follows:

(1)

Januar,y

19,

1951, mvine feeding field d�

discussion ,of two swine feeding

(2)

Februar,y demonstrations,

6, 1951, lettuce fertilization Field

Day

held on grower field at site of a lettuce fertilizer test,

(3)

April

18, 1951, Yuma

Valley Exr.erimental

Farm Field

Day,

(4)

April

25, 1951,

Yuma Mesa

Field

Day

-

University of Ariz ona

Gila

Project Farm,

Bureau of Plant Industry

Farm, and Extension

Service demonstration plots,

(5)

November 5, 1951, Yuma

Valley

Experimental Farm and Extension Service Cotton and

Castor Bean plots,

(6)

November

13,

1951,

Yuma

Mesa

Field

Day

-

University of Arizona Gila

Project

Farm, Bureau 'of

Plant Industr,r and

Extension Service cotton-and castor bean plots.

In addition to these six schedu+ed field d�s, the County

Agent and the

Assistant

County Agent with the assistance of

Dr.

J. N.

several

Roney, Extension Service

Entomologist, conducted field demonstrations on insect identification, damage, and control measures

:L."1.

were very responsive all partsof Yuma County.

Farmers to these type of meetings and were helped great� in their insect control program by these meetings.

-102-

Albert R. Face

-

Frank

County Ag.

Agent

I

Pritchard

-

Ass t

Co.

Agent

Yuma

County,

Ariz ona

1951'

I

Set Yuma

Mesa

Field

��'Ot

,ti' pay Tuesday

Experimental efforts with crops and cultural practices to deter­ ine an economical plan for iYuma mesa farmers will good look Tuesday at be given the Yuma esa field day.

Growers are invited to view he experimental work being arried on by

!Arizona's

Gila the Uiversity project farm of and he Bureau of Plant ield experimental

Industry's farms and in­ ividual growers.

ew

In

Experimental work in the past years has made bringing closer great the strides answers ought by mesa growers.

Tues­

(lay, they will see some experi ents with emphasis on

..

castor beans and cotton.

An irrigation test will be viewed at the Uni­ ersity farm and cotton variety, ate of planting, fertilization and ed versus flat planting tests will e seen along wtth sprinkler ation tests at the

BPI irri­ plots.

ertilizer and date of planting ests on castor beans also are vailable.

-TeSt

Yen-nuts

Flat and furrow plantings of peanuts are different soil being compared using working techniques.

Also, four noculum are strains of peanut in­ being compared with striking results.

Fertilization test I results will be reported, too.

ffesults d this year's sweet potato crop, harvested in

August, again will be of interest to grow­ ers as will the root stock compar­ ison of grapes.

Onions, raised both experiment­ ally and on field scale the 'past few years, will be

Viewed.

Var­ ieties, ferttlization, spacing and, dates of test planting 'Rre the main reports that will be made.

Ranger alfalfa seed production tests also will he observed.

Of, most interest in this test Will be the moisture level and flat and

I

� hill row spacing experiments.

Growers also will look over a good commercial field of castor

Itheans on the

Curley

Livingston

�anch.

�ation

Tests on nematode fumi­ and bean fertilizer tests carried on cooperatively on the'

Livingston ranch with the ext en­

�ion servtcs will be seen

Those interested in there.

going over hese tests are invited to meet at

� :30 p.m.

at the University's Gila

Project farm. This farm is locat­ ed about a quarter mile west of he 4th avenue extension on

15th street.

----�

.-

._

-1021-

Albert R. Face

-

County Ag. Agent

Frank Pritchard

-

Assft Co.

Agent

Yuma

County,

Ariz ona

1951

IRRIGATION

The of

Extension

Agents in

Yuma irrigation to top crop

County recognize production.

the importance

Where recommendations can safely be made on irrigation, they are made, however, with extreme soil types certain crops such as cotton co d alfalfa seed are difficult to make s pacific recommendations on.

In spite of what some experimental people say local

Extension various

Agents feel more information is needed on the crops for top production in Yuma County.

Although the Extension Service is not conducting any irrigation tests the need for is irrigation experimental work on various crops recognized as being important.

This matter has been discussed with the Extension Irrigation Specialist.

It is believed that cooperators can not be obtained to conduct the Extension field demonstrations to the necessary degree of accuracy.

This matter has been discussed with the

Superintendent of the Yuma Valley

Experimental

Farm and they are interested in this program.

It is hoped that the experimental people can be interested in do­ ing more experimental work on irrigation.

Pat

Middleton,

Irrieation Specialist, spent

October

4 and

5 in Yuma

County along with extension

Soils

Specialist, Howard

Ray.

The principle purpose of these two specialists visiting

Yuma County at that time was to look over the Wellton-Mohawk project with their soils and irrigation problems in mind.

Frank

Pritcharcl,

Assistant

County Agent, accompanied those specialists along with the Itinerant Assistant

County Agent,

Winston LeSueur.

On October

Reclamation

5, the specialists discussed the Wellton-Mohawk problems with the

County Agent.

They went over the notes from the Well ton-Mohawk of

Arizona in meeting held at the

University

Tucson, September 19th, which was attended by experiment station personnel from the Soils Department and the

Agronomy

Department as well as

Agricultural

Engineering.

This meeting was under the chairmanship of Pat Middleton.

The

County Agent was left a copy of the notes taken at this meeting after they had been discussed in detail.

The notes set forth several alternative soils.

The proceedures for leaching

·Wellton-Mohawk

County Agent felt that the notes were quite com­ prehensive and gave quite a full approach to the problem.

It was the opinion of the

County Agent and

Specialists in question that the Extension putting out field

Service best approach these problems in demonstrations with farmers the time Colorado

River water is available.

It is perform.

possible that further work might be conducted on demonstration farms, however, those present were too vague on just what demonstration farms will be able to

-103-

Albert R.

Face

-

Frank

County se- Agent

Pritchard

-

Ass't

Co.

Agent

Yuma

County,

1951

Arizona

INFOID.rIAT

ION

PROGRAM

The objective of the

County information program has been to reach the farm people of this

County with time� and authentic agricultural information that vdll help to develop and extend the

Agricultural Extension program of

Yuma

County.

Major project work and latest information on insect control, weed

,control, fertilizers, varieties, and livestock feeding is stressed.

4-H

Club publicity is timely with constant emphasis on activities and project work.

Radio Stations

A regular weekly,

1.5

minute

Agricultural Extension program, is presented over

KYUM at

6:45 a.m.

every

Wednesday morning by members of the Extension staff.

The program is alternated among members of the Extension

Staff.

The past year a new station KYMA came to Yuma.

This station transcribes a radio program be in the

County Agent's re-broadcasted at

Office

7 a.m.

eaCh each

Saturday morning

Monday morning.

These to stations also gives spot announcements of meetings and other information the

Extension

Service wishes to put across to farmers.

Weekly Newspapers

The Somerton star is a carries

Agricultural weekly newspaper in Yuma

County that stories furnished by the

Agricultural

Extension Service.

The news items must be furnished for this newspaper

Friday.

for the by

Wednesday and reaches the hands of farmers on

The past year this newspaper has done the best job

Extension Service of any year in the past six to the present

Extension Agent's knowledge.

-104-

Albert

R.

Face

-

Frank Pritchard

-

County Ag. Agent

Ass' t

Co. Agent

Yuma County,

1951

Arizona

INFOBMATlOO mOGRAM (con' t

) lreek� Newspapers (con't)

Farm and Home

by the

County Aoen,I's

Office

MARKET

REPORT

The small

Los grain market report in

Angeles for the week end­ ing

Oct. 11 was as follows:

No.2 soft white and No.2 hard white wheat were quoted at $3.95

to $4.00

per

100 pounds bulk basis.

No.

2 western barley testing 46 pounds per bushel was quoted at

$3.48

to $3

.

.52 per

100 pounds bulk basis.

No.

2 white oats testing 38 pounds per bushel was quoted at

$3.70

to $3.77

per

100 pounds bulk basis.

No.

2 yellow milo was quoted at

$3.11

to $3.13

per

100 pounds bulk basis.

No.

1 flaxseed was

$4.00

per bushel.

quoted at

4-H COUNCIL

The 4-H Council members held a at meeting last

Saturday;

Oct.

13,

10 a.m.

Fourteen- members were present.

Final plans were made for the

Recognition Banquet and also officers were elected for t.,he coming year.

President, Steve

Duke; vice-president, Jerry Pow­ er; secretary, treasurer,

Dixie

T'ommy Crowe;

Anderson; and re­ porter, Corinne Moore.

The 4-H leaders meeting was at

1 'p.m.

on leaders the same present.

day

They with 16 discussed the

Calendar of Events.

Since the unior come 'on

Agricultural Fair Dates the week-end of Good Fri­ day and

Easter, they decided to ry and have the Junior Fair post­ oned until one week later.

The ssistant en county agent has writ­

Mr.

Kenneth

McKee, State 4-H lub leader, concerning this mater.

RECOGNITION

BANQUET

The Sixth Annual

Recognition anquet is to be this

Saturday ight, Oct.

20, at 7 :'30 p.m.

in the rane school auditorium.

The new

-H

Council and 4-H Leader of­ icers will be installed at the ban':' uet.

uest

Jerry

Canno will be the speaker.

plots were put out on

Tuesday,

Oct.

16 and should be ready for the machine to move into the field

Monday or

Tuesday of next week which is the 22nd or

23rd of Oc­ tober.

Announcement will be made over both radio stations and in the Saturday farm page of the

Yuma

Daily

Sun if these fields will be ready on those days and what day they will be ready so that as many

Yuma county farmers as possible can' get down to see this picker operate in the field and also compare the defoliant themselves as they were put on side by side in the field.

Castor beans cab.

be easily defo­ liated with several of the defoli­ ants now availabl� for' cotton de­ foliation.

This, however, does not give the desired results necessary for the harvesting of castor beans before frost'.

-It -is necessary to dry up and defoliate castor bean plants of all leaves because the harvester will take the leaves in and will separate the leaves from the beans.

The big factor of de­ foliating castor beans for harvest is to dry up the green beans from the top of the plant.

It is necessary for to dry these beans up mainly two reasons: (1) to get them through the harvester and into the castor bean hopper and also to will dry them up so that they mature, even though they do mature a little small.

To try to get more information on castor bean delofliation, the c 0 u n t y agent's office put out a castor bean defoliation test on the' Pete

Carsten farm in the Lower Yuma

Valley.

Three materials were used in this test, one of them a

Stauf­ fer defoliant which.is the same de­ foliant used on cotton.

The' other two' materials are weed killers that we commnly use for killing weeds on ditch banks and in fields.'

One of them a di-nitro compound mixed with 10 gallons of 'diesel oil has shown at the end of three days to give very good leaf kill­ ing and quite a bit of bean -drying already.

The other was

Sinox W mixed with nine at the rate of five gallons of' water quarts of Sinox

W per water.

acre and .nine

gallons of

This material at the' end of three days gave very poor de­ foliation or drying up of the beans.

4-H LAMB PROJECTS

Lambs will be in some time next eek for the 4-H members .that

re planning' on carrying on lamb rojects.

The exact date of de­ ivery has not been determined as et.

CASTOR

The two are crops,

BEANS cotton and castor

The Stauffer Chemical

Company defoliant at the end of three days partially defoliated the plants and dried up all the leaves but did not eans, very similar in many seem

To to dry up any of the beans.

date, the di-nitro mixed with spects but erent require entirely diferent act methods of harvesting.

This makes it necessary to use difmaterials for defoliation

10 gallons of diesel oil at the rate of one quart of di-nitro-benezene or early harvesting of either crop.

yearly harvesting it is .meant

efore frost.

with 10 gallons of diesel oil looks by far the best on castor bean defoliation work.,

�y,

For cof�n hanical nly hemical, rop sta, with the leaves with to it is desirable cause revent trashy cotton, ined ng to of off the ow on harvesting pickers, dry but grade.

up plant.

,cotton

them

This a to should consequentlowerchemicals cotton m;-� -.

not are deto see

17th Street

..

more t?

-castor-Jjeangrowers.

like field can look at them at the Pete

Carstens t,hese days,.

castor like to ga�d, farm, on the west end of information on bean

materIa,

contact

At the gro.wers

wllo these defoliants

In the

.end

of

.would

a

�ll few of

Is should be available who would dry up their plants so that oliation, or this some of them purpose, being good they and some of them frost.

can be harvested ahead of

For more

.

...

information

In this re­ n y the ore past and in aving shown up too well.

To get information for Yuma counfarmers on this other areas not office, the' county agent's subject of co't:.-:i-------E::::lii=-=---::�---

...

.

n defoliation, the county agent's ffice has put out a cotton defoilaion test in the

Yuma

Valley.

The est was put out at 11 :00 a.m

..

on uesday, Oct.

16.

Four chemials were ct used in the test, a prod­ by the California

Spray Chem­ cal

Corporation; a defoliant put ut by the American

Cyanamid

Corporation; a shell chemical de­ oliant, and a

Stauffer chemical efoliant.

These defoliants were ut out on a seven acre he Lower Yuma plot on

Valley belonging o

Bill Silva.

We would like to express

Bill our

Silva.

thanks at this time to for leaving this seven acre our plot for test purposes.

Also; thanks to Bob Wilbur of the alley Dusters for applying these aterials for us.

It i$ planned that in the cotton defoliation test, the four defoliants ill be compared in the field side by side for the amount of defoli­ ation, speed of defoliation and thoroughness.

In addition to get­ ting this valuable' information on defoliants, we will compare the mechanical picker versus hand picking in the same field.

The me­ chanical picker, belonging to Orner

Casey, will pick one of the defo­ iated lot next to this

:will be aken plots and a hand picked picked with the weights from both defoliated plots and a plot grade received on the cotton from each of the plots.

In addition to get­ ting the defoliant information, cotton picker information versus and picking information, we plan o have a machine efoliant pick another plot and compare that to a plot not defoliated.

Also, on this, we will get yield data and grade data from the gin.

These

Albert

11. Face

Frank

...

County

Ag.

Agent'

Pritchar'd

-

Asstt

Co.

Agent

Yuma

County,

Arizona

1951

:rnFORMATION

PROGRAM

(con

1 t)

Weekly

Newspapers

(con't)

Farm

and

-

Home'-

by the.

Couoty

.Agen��f�'��_1

WOO;L Y WORM CONTROL i

During the past, three weeks, the ilWooly ery worm situation has become serious, not only in farmers'

,

: cotton and castor bean fields, but

On

.flowers

and

�roper.

garden plots in

Y,!-!-

Many townspeople, have on control f this pest.

The recommended, dust for con­ trol is dietns 5

Wooly

Worm Dust-ingre­ per cent

DDT, lp per cent toxaphene, 40' per cent sulfur,

This dust mixture has given by far the best control of this worm, which il:!

ery difficult to kill.

Application

....

The

ROLL'4·H CLUBS

)

.:: r

Busy

Bees, 4·H Club of Roll he,ld p.m.

their fall organizational meet­ ing, Thursday" Sept.

21 at 2:30

Twenty-four.

members were present.

Officers elected for the coming year were:

President,

Carolyn

Kumley; vice-president,

G era

I d

Langford; ty ny

Sue secretary-treasurer,

Langfordsj reporter,

Bet­

John­

Luellenf; council members,

Sharon Rider and Nancy

DOf!kery.j

The high scKbol age group of"

4-H'ers in Roll also held their or­ ganizational meeting Friday, Sept.' l should be made with a small hand duster getting complete coverage of all the plants on and' around the plants when the worm' eggs hatched.

Migrating worms, may ake several applications neces­

Sary, to keep them from destroying small plants and ruining' the ap­ pearance of many others.

be ty

Small packages of this dust can purchased at the Yuma Coun­

Farmers the

Marketing .A.sociation, corner of Fourth avenue and

21.

with

The meeting was at 8:30 p.m., eight members present.

The club voted to change their name from Wellton,;.,Mohawk to

Antelope

Club�

Officers elected were:

President, Sandra Gaines; vice-president, 'Joyce Moore;· sec-I retary-treasurerl

Mary Jo Gra-' ham; council member, Steve

Duke;

1, alternate, Charles Kumley, Jr.; re­

I porter,

Ann Crismon; recreational leader,

Kenneth

M,oore."

'I

'on

,Eighth street.

JOLL Y COMMUTERS

4;.H

COUNCIL LUN'CHOON

The annual 2l�H Club Leaders and

4:.H

Club

...

Council members',

'I

The rianne donna

Jolly, Commuters 4:-H

Club of Grane held, their organizational eeting Tuesday, Sept.

18, at

Crarie school.

The icers were elected: following of-

President;

Ma-

Euhus; vice-president, La-

Euhus; secretary-treasurer, ing council member

,', luncheon at

-:

.i�ems meeting were was.

held today.

Rec: ognition banquet, Future

Leader and

12:00 noon at

All 4-H

Leaders and 4-H Coun-] cil members met to

Council discussed: 4-H

"meetings, the dates for the 4-H Calendar of Events for

1951-1952� In

Clymer's.

plan addition the follow­

Club

Or­ ganization,

Last

Year's, Comple­

I

;

CRA�E

4-H CLUBS

The Crane tions,

-.

Officer Training Schools, and Leader Training

Schools.

Agriculture

4-H Club

I

I held their annual

'meeting Sept.

17 with 34 members present.",

The elected: erty; reporter, council t following

President,

[erty, treasurer; organizational officers

EUgene were

LeRoy

Hightower'; vice-president,

Milton Eu,..

hus; secretary,

Sharleen Dough-

Dough-

Lelcoy Brumley;

YUMA.M,ESA JACKRABBITS

Bob

Coutchie,

4-H leader, reports that the Yuma-Mesa'

Jackrabbits held meeti�g

-rollowing

President, taty,

Jeanne tl1eir

Se.pt. 19, officeit's:

Favil, ident;: Patsy Jo Thompson;

Pryor, organizational,

�nd

."

West, elected member, Leroy Hightower.

ridean West.

council member,

�he,

_', viee-pres-] secre-I treasurer, ,Ma-I

GADSEN 4-H CLUB ren

Ka-"1

The Gadsden 'Go-Getters

4-H'

West, recreation leader,

Bar-

I sa b I

; re

'"

....

� rt er,

J

.

C

.

Walk

-

'-

-I

Cluib held their organizational' er.

:00 meeting Friday, Sept.

21 at 1 p.m.

in the Gadsden school.

WELLTON 4-H CLUBS

.

Also

Wellton on

Friday, Sept. 21, the

Agriculture

4-H

Club held their p.m, organizational 'meeting at 3 in the Wellton school.

Albert R.

Face

-

Fr ark

County Ag. Agent

Pritchard

-

Ass

It Co.

Agent

Yuma

County,

Arizo na

1951

INFORMATION PHOGRAM

(con't)

Daily Newspapers

The news

Agricultural Extension Service in Yuma stones to the farm page of the

Yuma

County furnishes

Daily sun each

Saturday.

The ram page carries the

County Agent'

5 column entitled ttGleamings from the Comty Agent

I s

Office".

Articles are written for this page in addition to the column.

Members of the �ension Staff are to contribute articles to this column or page the week where weekly.

Irrequently stories rill be run during inrarmation must be gotten to farmers before

Saturday.

GLEANINGS from the,

CJU,.Ie9//I:r1

COUNTY AGENT'S OFFICE

,

I

I in

The small

Los grain ing Oct.

4 follows:

No.2

soft white white to

$3.9lJ

basis.

were per

100

No.2 western pounds

$3.�8 baSIS.

w�eat

No.

2 pounds

$3.�,5 to to a,nd

Market Report per

'White oats per and quoted pounds bulk barley bushel was

$3.50

per

100 bushel was

$3.75

per .100

I market report

Angeles for the week end-

No.2

at testing quoted

'One-thir,d.

hard

$3.88

I'

46 quoted at pounds bulk testing 381' pounds bUlk fields,

I'

, be filed with the grower's planting inspection card.

This nurse preregulation on crop certifying planting seed.

was passed of at the last annual the

Arizona meeting

Crop

Improve­ ment

Association.

The

4-H

6th

Saturday,

Oct.

,the

,Crane

Jerry ceremomes begin, recognition

Cannon a,t

4-H

Banquet annual

20, at 7 :30 p.m. in sc�ool' will and banquet is set for

Harold Giss will be

Yuma be

State county aUditorIum.'

'master of

.Senator

guest speaker.

baSIS.

Crane

NO.2

basis.

yellow milo was

$3.50

to

$3.35

per 100 quoted at I

The pounds bulk

� met last

I members

Crane

No.

1 flaxseed

$4 per bushel.

was

Meeting agricultural club

Monday night with

22 quoted at

Power in attendanos.

Wilbur) discussed with club

'bers how to start a beef mem-:

I calf

'On

Cast'Or,

Y�ma area beans cotton are currently feed.

quoted

'Or at

12.06

cents ton,

L.A.

per pound

$241.20

per

Worms

Trouble market.'

Drv

J.

arrangements

,N.

R'Oney,' extension were made for a' beef entom'Ol'Ogist, in looking

'Over

A movie was

'c'Ounty shown

Sunday

'On agent

'sWine by the and af'ter'noon, production' assistant project tour

The tour will

;

'infested

WIth wooly worms this week, said that if a field has remained,

2:30 p.m.

SUC-jI---'

==== culent

.has ,b'Olls grown, to one-half do a lot of eat the worms could damage.

The worms the bracks

'Off the bolls

'The open cansing them to prematurely.' wooly worm is the larvae stage and of the salt marsh caterpillar

.usually

feeds about during the summer.

The'

39: days worms

Crane school at

__,._�...__

+ now until feeding will soon seek spring.'

Then c'Over they' will pupate and emerge as adult moths to lay.

eggs.

Winter cleanup

'Of fence may rows, roadways and' ditches help red1:lC� next.

year's populatton

.of

F'Or control pounds wooly worms;

,cast'Or

'Of the pests in cotton

'Or ndation is

15

Per cent toxa­ phene', .5 per cent DDT and 40 per cent

SUlphur beans, the recomapplied at the rate of

30 per acre

'Or three quarts 'Of

60 and

DlDT two make an per cent

Barriers, clubs, and must be quarts

'Of 25 mixed wi th enough water t'O eight gatlon appltcation.

teamed for toxaphene.

per cent insecticides control in lettuce fields.

1

_

Test

Notes

The Yuma experimental farms are increasing a new selecti'On

'Of

IAfrican alfalfa in a planting t'O produce foundation seed in

1952.

rI'his is zona a selection

'Of

Bryan, pr'Ofess'Or

.E:

University

'Of

Ari­ plant breeder.

Rates Tested

'At a recent field day at the

Mesa experimental farm, it was rep'Orted that in rates

'Of wheat, crease' in

(l)ver of

50

100 pounds.

testing planting to 140 pounds per acre barley and

'Oats, n'O in­ yield was found.

M'Ore lodging was observed in the rates

�'Or

!

New PlantIng's

Growers planting nurse certified alfalfa

.

crops fields are emmded that small

't grain used

�or this, and a purpose must be certified tag fr'Om planting seed must

Albert

R. Face

-

Frank Prii;chard

-

Yuma

County

Ag. Agent

Ass't

Co

.Agent

County, Arizona

1951

.----------------------..J,ll

I

Daily Newspapers (can't)

T

ALFALFA SPACING

Six inch row the spacings yielded highest in the first year that alfalfa seed yields were taken from the tests at the Yuma mesa

'e»peTimental farm, according to

Bill dent.

Wootton, assistant superinten­

However, the 24 inch row r

I

� put yielded the six inch spacing in the second year's test.

No wider row spacing was tested.

-

!

'i t

GI•

I

COTTON VARIETIES

As the cotton season has progressed, there has been considerable discussion among growers refrom the ounty

.,'

I

Agent's

Off lee

t,Jt,

.It

, I

,

..

"

.

MARKET REPORT

The small grain market report in Los

Angeles for the week ending

October 18th was as follows:

I

I gar ding the relative ious varieties.

merits of var-

More than 90 per cent of Yuma cotton is Acala 44.

I:

It is apparent to everyone this that variety lodges very badly but most with

It is hard to make a of how varieties react under various people are quite the yield results.

conditions when satisfied comparison they are planted in different fields under different cultural and fertility con­ ditions.

Growers who are thorough-

No.

2 soft white and No. 2 hard interested in varieties should be white wheat were quoted at $4.05

.ly

sure to visit the tests af the valley to $4.12

per 100 pounds bulk basis.

No.

2 western pounds per barley testing bushel was

$3.55

to $3.65

per 100 quoted at

461 pounds bulk ba3�.

No.

2 white oats experimental farm where all of the A cal a varieties are being rrrown

4-42.

including

California Acala

Also, these varieties are being testing 38,

I'

grown in a large scale test on the pounds per bushel was

$3.90

to

$3.95

per 100 quoted at U.

M.

pounds bulk and Bob

Sugden ranch in

I the Yuma Valley. Signs are posted basis.

I on

Somerton A venue and 16th

No. 2 basis.

yellow milo was quoted at

$3.20

to

$3.22

per

100 pounds bulk

I

Street test showing the location of the plots.

Rows are labeled so that growers can distinguish them,

No.

1 flax seed was

$4.00

per bushel.'

INCREASE

The.

Yuma station will

Valley grow a quoted at

PEAS

I

None of these varieties picked yet have been but will be some time next week.

Each variety will be experimental!

ginned separately seed increase

I ual so that individ­ grades may be determined.

on

Papago crop green

Peas this winter.

This) makes an excellent winter

I

I manure crop for

Arizona, to precede spring melons, cas beans and cotton.

At tor the

Mesa experimental farm last year,

14 tons of green weight or one and

Growers who variety for try next to year decide on a without go­ ing to the trouble of 'visiting these

I test plots are overlooking the best variety comparison available.

ELECT 4-II'ERSt

Yvonne Shown was elected presthree-quarters of dry weight were ident of the Rood 4-H Club at' produced from

Papago peas tween December

15 and bethat group's organization meeting

1

February

.October· 23.

Other officers a I' e l

�8

..

This is an excellent way of Judy

Breech, vice-president; Lar­ corporating organic

in-I

ry

Nunnaley, the winter for summer-

Linda soil during

Shown, secretary-treasurer: reporter; Reba Briscouncil member.

growing crops.

SELECT coe,

RESISTORS The group will decide on an of-

Professor three wiltfrom the

Bryan has selected ficial name at resistant flax strains I the next set for November 13.

Barkley wilt nursery in'

CALVES BOUGHT meeting the

Yuma on the

Valley valley to be increased The

Junior Fair livestock proexperimental farm curement committee has paid $2,­ this coming season.

available

This will make 000 to bind a contract on

100 to 110 planting seed on all these head of Will

Young (Yavapai strains at the end of another year County) hereford feeder calves to should wilt-resistant flax ed.

be deslrbe delivered November 10.

For

I this reason no more calf deposits can be returned unless someone

I is waiting to pay a deposit. Also, deposits have been made on all these calves so no more can be

I accepted unless someone wit h­ draws his deposit.

,

-108-

Albert R. Face

-

County Ag. Agent

Frank Pritchard

-

Asslt Co.

Agent

Yuma, County,

1951

Arizona

Castor

Beans

Topic

Of

Monday

Meet

By

Al Face

County Agricultural

�1

.:l7,

/,�-I

Ag""!::tr-

Many farmers and others in the Yuma area have read and heard from various sources that castor beans are

1m perial Valley.

In order that everyone as a might get a true picture of crop for the Yuma area, an doing wonders in the castor beans educational meeting ranged for 8 p.m.

ary 29 in the superior of the court house.

Considerable made has been

Monday, effort ar-

Janucourt room has been price advanced $23 per ton.

Castor beans throu�rh appear into a crop rotation

Yield A Ton to plan, fit well having a planting date of early March

June from f5.

Harvesting dates by research workers to castor beans a practical range per acre.

August through No­ make farmers to produce.

vember, crop for

Castor beans have problem at presented a

Callahan Brothers in planting time because flax and harvested hOO

Imperial

Valley planted July 20 following pounds conventional planters crushed the seed.

This has been overcome through the manufacture of a specially-designed planter.

Harvesting has been a hand job until recently.

A combine was designed this past year to do the work.

From interviews with growers, experimen tal station personnel and with Baker Castor Oil repre­ sentatives, it appears castor beans should average a ton per acre in yield.

It is reported that castor

Develop

Dwarf

Earlier attempts to grow castor beans were made with the giant tree-like castor bean plant but breeders have developed a.

dwarf plant for commercial use.

Only the dwarf type can be mechanic­ ally harvested.

The original ing work in the breed­ development of desirable varieties was carried on by L.

G.

charge mental

Goar while of the Melolandl

Farm in the he was in

Experi­

Imperial beans follow small grains in rota­ tion very well.

The present prlee is $226 per tOlTI,.

Cost of growing the to harvestis estimated at crop

$60 an acre.

Planting seed for ap­ proximately

1,000 acres can be made available to

Yuma.

area growers and contracts can be secured, assuring growers of a price relative to the price of castor oil at the time of harvest.

a be

At the meeting MOnday night,

55-minute colored shown, picture will much of which is de­ voted to castor beans. The entire

Valley.

The many uses.

of castor, of which the bean is 50 per oil, cent, are amazing.

The principal uses affecting an a{ld a increased demand rising price are in armor­ piercing bullets, jet planes and submarines.

has

The government asked that all available seed be increased.

SilTIce the

, film is concerned

Everett with

Nice, Baker agriculture.

Cistor

Oil

Company plant breeder, who worked four years on the dwarftype castor beans in the

Imperial

Valley will narrate the film and speak on in the the castor bean future

Southwest.

Korean war began, prices have advanced materially.

From Dec­ ember 13 to January 20, the

Plants of commercial varieties will be on display at the meeting.

1 i

I

-109-

Albert

R.

Face

-

County Ag. Agent hank Pritchard

-

Ass

I t Co.

Agent

Yuma,

County,

1951

Ariz ona

ocial

Security

Comes To

Yuma

Farm

Worker This

Year

Social security is comin� to Yuma area farm workers.

Regular farm workers, perhaps as many as q,OOO in this area, came

:::SSh

-

/�

/!7

/ under the Federal social eeurity law beginning January 1, according to J.

Leland

Embrey, field representative of the EI Centro octal security office which now serves

Yuma.

County.

.'

He explaining spoke the this week.

at the regular monthly meetings of workings of the program to local farm employers.

the Gadsden and Mesa 'Farm

Bureaus,

'He empha��d fu� tt � fuel regular farm worker who is paid cash wages who will come under

�_�-----------�-�-----�-�--� the law-not the itinerant, sea­ sonal or part-time worker.

'A new

1 e a fie t,

"Notice to

Farmers w i't h Regular

Hired

Help," explains operator can tell how the farm whether any of his employees are covered by

'the law.

Issued by the Bureau of

Internal

Revenue, the leaflet fis available from the collector of lnternal revenue, room

...

108,

Post

O{fice cial building, Yuma; the so­ security admtnlstratlon, 146

ISO;

5th ,street,

EI Oentro; or

'from offices of county

,PrQdtiction Marketing

.tratlon

offices.

agents or

Adminis­

In addition to explaining just, what farm workers are covered, the leaflet contains a tear-off slip,

F()rm SS�4a, which the farm' op­

�rator should complete and mail if,.

.he+has employees who will be covered by the law.

Further in-

,�o�m�ation_

�rl>, tax r.eportjng

about making the quart­ reports and copies of the

.blanks

will be sent to tatIi1�rs who mail this form to

,�� eollector of

.internal

revenue.

'...........

Not New

Although the new law brings

�a�m workers under the social culllty system for the first· time, the�, system

U.iQusands

will rrot be of farm 'workers.

new

se-]

Many

6f them made a substantial start toward .old-age and survivors in­ f$urapce payments by working in

Commercial or industrial jobs at some time since 1936.

Some of them,' worked in war plants and others are veterans of World War

J!,'jVho' eredits will receive social security for: their military service

.

J

:Regularly e m p loy e d farm workers who do not have it so­

"cial security account number

!

_-llar�l should secure one within the 'next few weeks. The account

'�ti m ber is necessary in order to b�ure, proper social s_ecurity cred,t for, the worker's wages.

Applications for the nuni�r card are in account ever-§" post

9fff�e.

T,lie,card is issued at

"��.,�cos�, to the

,worker.

:"�ot: alljarm workers are cov­ eredby the, new law,"

Embrey

�nipJ:uisizM.

The farm operator i01.self

'does not receive the pro t�C�iOI;l,: of" old-age and survivor

·risura1)c'e,.

nor do farm worker w.:�o or

'�ork,

,:on·e less than five month employer

.

.

����!.dr�,hecan be covered by th

'w,' a:' farm worker must wor

'qr' an employer during a quali

'iiig��perlo<;r of 'one' full calendar u,arte'r.

This may be the las alendar

.quarter

of 1950-0ctober

'o.v.emher and'

December.

r�;Af,ter

"he, has served the quali

�t.hg

,',p'eriod, the employee wil

Urt.).sp9ial

security credit for eac

!tccee�ling" calendar' quarter

0 r.#l.

:: p:l�yme,nt ag'IQng

-as he contmues to wor

'e least ',60

,by the

.same operato days on a full-tim

'fl�ii;

In- each calendar quarter an

':�tlis fLt'_�east $50 in each quarter.

j,I:I,e;;also

.will, be covered for the ir;�t:�, quarter in which he works e��:,l)li:t:p

':

60

'days if he earns cash

;�g���,

9f> at least

$50.

In this

�.�

.n,f,I

P1t2a}.1y

,.pe, fote.

he can be covered future quarter, l*;t,l�'

.iqh:;tbe second.

he must

���,Il{se,:r;ve a qualifying: period.

\�mpreY'wi1l be in' Yuma regu­ and fourth

,,: .��.Ud;ys_cofeach month and can

_';'>:'.'�.Qhtacted': through the U.

S.

mployinent office or the county

'gent's office.

,-110-

Albert

R.

Face

-

County

Ag. Agent

Frank Pritchard

-

Ass't Co.

Agent

Yuma

County,

Arizona

1951

INFOBMAT ION PROGRAM (con' t)

Magazines

The

County Agent and his Assistant will fr�quent:cy send stories to the

Arizona Farmer or furnish reporters of Arizona Farmer with information for stories.

Frequent� reporters

Arizona

Farmer are directed to the stories in the of the

County.

Often these stories have connection with demonstration plots of

Agricultural Extension Service.

It is intended that at least one or two stories be furnished Arizona stockman and Arizona

Cattle10g each year.

Visual Aids

Visual aids

such as kodachrome posters, slides, motion pictures, exhibits, illustrated circulars, circular letters, photographers, and field demonstrations are used to a£fective� supp:cy" information on maj or work to be brought before farm people of the County.

-111-

Albert.

R. Face

-

Frank

Pritchard

-

County Ag. Agent

Ass't

Co.

Agent

Yuma

County,

Ariz ona

1951

COOPERATION WITH OTHER

AGENCIES

Much of the success of Yuma

County's

Extension

Program has been dependent upon cooperation with other agencies.

Those wi th which the

Extension Service has worked during the past year are:

Bureau of Plant

Industry,

Production and

Marketing

Adminstration,

Bureau of

Reclamation,

Vocational

Agriculture,

Social

Security Adminstration, and the Far.m

Home Adminstration.

The Bureau of Plant under the

Industry has a small director of

Dr.

o.

Stanberry on experimental the Yuma force

Mesa.

The

B.P.I.

gives the Extension Service reports on their work and the Extension Service conducts field can see their work

•.

days so that farmers

The

B.P.I. furnishes the material and the

Extension

Service to farmers.

These mimeographs field d� programs to distribute programs carry important resu! ts and pro gress reports.

The Extension Service insect control advise on their gives the B.P

.1.

cultural and experimental plots.

The Bureau of

Reclamation is interested in land settlement problems and it is principally

'With this branch that the Extension

Service cooperates.

The Reclamation makes acreage and crop surveys which they make available to the

Extension Service.

They frequently calIon the

C01Ulty Agent or the Assistant in ma�ng these surveys.

Local Extension Agents are frequent� asking questions regarding crop recommendations which they use in setting up plans for the allotment of land.

The Bureau has asked the

County Agent to set in on ration farms for the Wellton-Mohawk planning

Project meetings which for is to be demonst­ a joint project between the

University of

Industr.y

and Bureau of

Reclamation.

Arizona, Bureau of Plant

The local

Production and

Marketing Adminstration executive secretary has been very cooperative in notifying the County

Agent's

Office of support loans and conservation price payments.

announcements,

In turn, the grain storage

Extension

Service has given radio and newspaper publicity to the local programs.

The

Extension

Service has cooperated with the

Vocational

Agricultural Department on a swine feeding test, securing project beef animals and in the Jr.

Agricultural Fair.

The extent of the

Vocational cooperation on the swine feeding test was loaning of their feed grinder.

The

Junior Fair Livestock

Improvement Committee which is made up of business men, ranchers, 4-H

Leaders, vocationa+ instructor and Extension

Agents, procurred 114 beef calves which were divided almost equally between the two organizations.

Extension Agents as­ sumed most of the responsibility in the mechanics of the dis­ tribution, however,

Vocational Agents cooperated.

The

Extension

Service assumes the and leadership on the Junior Agricultural

Fair provides judges for Vocational exhibits.

There is a distinct lack of cooperation on the part of Vocational Agriculture instructors, in that, they tell our fourth and fifth year club members that if can't carry they want to be in

Vocational

Agriculture

4-H

Club work.

This has been very distasteful they

-112-

Albert R.

Face

-

COml1iY Ag

• agen'c

Frank Pritchard

-

Ass

It

Co.

Agent

Yuma County,

1951

Arizona

COOPERATION VtTTH amER AGEHCIES

(con

It) to maqy

Agents.

4-H members, parents and

4-H Leaders as well as

Extension

The Far.m Home as

Adminstration didn't have an office in Yuma during the past year.

Their headquarters for this area was in Florence.

As a one result, they were permitted to meet their clients about day a month in the

County Agent

I s

Office.

The Extension

Service included announcements of when they would be in Ymna in the County Agent's Column.

Those interested in seeing

F.H.A.

representatives frequent� inquired at the Extension Office to when these representatives might be in Yuma.

During the past year,

Social Security was enacted for those employed in

Agriculture.

The

County Agent cooperated with the

Social

Security representative for this area b.r making it possible for him to speak to several farmer groups and explain the program.

Extension news stories and radio programs publicized the meetings and the program.

4-H

CLUB 1llORK

The

County Agent and the

Assistant

County Agent, Frank

Pritchard, spent 43 days on

4-H

Club work during the past year.

This number of days is perhaps more than might have been necessar,r had it not been for the

I.

fact that Assistant

County

Agent,

Robert

McCreight, was called back into the U.

S.

Army in June. This left when

4-H responsibilities to

J..gricultural Agents uhtil

September

Assistant County Agent, :ronnie

].lcGrew, came to Yuma

County.

4-H

Camp

Assistant County Agent,

Frank

Pritchard, took

24

Yuma

County

4-H

Club members to 4-H Club

Camp with the Home Demonstration

Agent.

in

August.

The

Camp was held at the

Sky-Y Camp at

Prescott, Arizona, making a

237 mile trip from Yuma.

The group wa-a taken to camp in a

Cra.Tle

School bus and

4-H Leader,

Pete

Gonzales, drove the bus.

He returned to Yuma by

Greyhound after taking the campers to

Prescott and then returned to by

Prescott

Greyhound the last day of

Camp to drive the group back to

Yuma.

This year's

Camp group was smaller than it should have been partly due to the lack of a

4-H

Agent on the job and partly because of the increased cost of

4-H

Club camp over previous years.

-113-

/

Albert R. Face

-

County Ag.

Frank pritchard

-

Ass't Co.

YYuma

County,

Arizona

1951

Agent

Agent

4-H

CLUB WORK (conrb )

Assistance to New

4-H

Agent

The and in

County Agent has spent considerable time during the summer fallon

4-H

Club work.

The majority of this time was spent acquainting

Assistant

County Agent,

Lonnie

McGrew, with the

4-H

Club program in Ytmla

County.

As a result, local

4-H meetings,

4-H

Council meetings and

4-H

Leader meetings were attended by the C oUIlty Agent.

Further assistance was given the

Assistant County Agent on the distribution of beef calves.

The

County Agent attended all

Junior

Fair

Livestock

Improvement meetings and help guide the group in its decisions.

Recognition Banquet

The

County Agent, Assistant, Comty the Home

Demonstration

Agent,

Agent worked with

Lonnie McGrew, and

4-H members in planning and organizing the

6th

Annual

4-H

Recognition Banquet which was pronounced the most successful to date by many people.

state Winners

The

County Agent selected and submitted the records on

Yuma

Countyts 4-H agricultural entries in the State

4-H contests.

Those

4-H members whose records were submitted in the State

4-H contest were:

Carter

'Wilsey,

Santa

Fe;

Steve

Duke, Cudahy

Meat Animal; Hannes Johannsen,

Field

Crops;

Frank

Quintero,

Tractor

Maintenance; Clyde CUlliing, Cudahy

Meat

'Animal; Corrine

Moore', Poultry} Jerry

Powers,

Garden.

Completions

The

County Agent had the job of reporting final agricultural completions.

This was quite a job with Assistant

County Agent

McCreight in the Service.

than previous years in

Completions projects such as were somewhat lower camping, tractor mainte­ nance, preditor,y animal handicraft.

Project control, completions home beautification, in livestock and and poultry projects vere very good.

Yuma County member economics were: completions in both agriculture and home

Enrolled

488

Completed 310

Completions

63%

-1lJ.r.

Albert R.

Face

-

Frank Pritchard

-

County Ag.

Agent;

Ass't Co.

Agent

Yuma County,

Arizona

1951

4-H

CLUB WORK (cont b )

Completions

(con't)

Project were: completions in both agriculture and home economics

Enrolled

1158

Completed

617

Completions 53%

Sunnnary

There were

490 members who enrolled in

4-H

Club work in Yuma

County the

28 4-H past

Clubs.

year.

These boys and girls were enrolled in

The Yuma comm1.mity

COlUlty

4-H program continued to gain support among people.

Actually, if

4-H Club work can continue to enjoy the support it has enjoyed the past six years, it can continue to flurish and improve.

4-H local leadership has gradua� improved the past few years.

Today, ma.rzy-

4-H

Leaders know vb at to do and when to do it' where six

Leader in the years ago there

County.

was hardly an experienced

There are new leaders is starting the

1951-52

Club year and there still need for a new

Leader or two.

Enrollments in October and November for the coming year are good and most projects to be as sucdessful as are the underway.

past year.

The coming year promises

-u.5-

Lonnie McGrew

Assistant

Yuma

COUll

County

Agent ty,

Ariz ona

1951

SUMMARY OF

4-H

ACTIVITIES

AND ACCOMPLISHMENTS

highlights

The

Assistant

September

County

Agent,

Lonnie

McGrew, arrived in Yuma

6, to take charge of the

4-H program in Yuma

County.

So far, he has not had any time to devote to anything except 4-H club work.

During home

September boys and economics and girls

October were proj3 cts

, enrolJ.ed

4-H clubs were organized and in boys and agricultural and girls were enrolled in agricultural

II' ojects.

During

October and

November, the Assistant distributed beef calves and lambs for

4-H

County Agent projects.

Also in October, the

Sixth Annua.L

h-H

Recognition Banquet was held with approximately 285 people attending

The Assistant COtUl as ty

.Agent

attended as many

4-:H meetings possible and before and after each meeting, he visited

4-H projects.

He visited as ma�

4-H projects that time permitted.

-116-

Lonnie McGrew

Assistant County Agent

Yuma County,

Arizona

1951

4-H Organization

In September, the

Assistant

County

Agent contacted 4-H

Leaders and made plans for the new year's

4-H activities.

He worked on completions and arranged for a tour to the

Yavapai Calf Sale.

The

Assistant

County Agent made plans with

4-H

Leaders to call their clubs started this organizational meetings

Fall.

He discussed to plans get for the coming 4-H Recognition Banquet

•.

In

October, he met with practically all the agricultural clubs and helped them organize and get their project plans started

October.

He visited leaders and discussed during plans for a

Leaders' Training

Meeting in

October.

During November, he continued to organize

4-H club work by enrolling new members and by discussing program planning with

4-H Leaders.

He als

0 conducted a

4-H Leader Training

Meeting.

4-H

Meetings

The

Assistant

County

Agent attended

13 4-H club meetings in September at which he asked for completion of last year's work and told 4-H'ers plans for the coming year.

He attended twenty-one

4-H meetings during

October.

At these officers were meetings, elected, clubs organized, project plans made and tion requirements discussed.

Plans were made for the

Banquet on

October 20.

Recogni­

In Nov:ember, he attended fourteen 4-H meetings including three

At the recognition events and one leader training meeting.

4-H meetings, projects were discussed and project reports given.

Project

Visits

In September, the

Assistant

County Agent visited several

4-H'ers and discussed project plans

"With them for the coming year.

He offered to help them secure animals for their projects.

He visited several projects during

October and also of spent considerable time supervising sheep and beef caLves to 4-H'ers.

the distribution

During November, the

Assistant

County Agent visited as maqy projects as possible.

He visited some

4-H1ers vilo had sick lambs and calves and recommended shots of penecillium.

State

Fair

The Assistant

County Agent arranged for several exhibits to be shown at the

State j;t'air in November.

Since the judgi� contest has been discontinued, nothing was done in this connection.

.117

-

Lonnie McGrew

Assistant

County Agent

Yuma

County,

Arizona

1951

4-H

Projects and Completions

A total of

288 girls and 200 boys were enrolled in

US8 projects last jlear.

183 girls and 127 boys projects.

63% of the members completed

53% completed 617 of

�e projects.

The Assistant of the

County

Agent believes that perhaps because some leaders had members enrolled in projects that were never started, is one reason that the percentage of projects completed decreased this year.

This fact has been pointed out to the leaders on numerous occasions ana.

shouJ.d not occur

-again.

Project Requirements for Yuma County

U.-H Club Work

Project requirement bulletins were passed out to all eligible persons interested in joining a

4-H club by the

Assistant

County Jgent this fall.

Plans for t.his year are that all and fat lambs must receive a beef calves, fat barrows,

Red, Blue or

Purple ribbon at the Junior

Fair in order to qualify to be sold at the Junior

Fair Livestock Auction Sale.

It is even possible that Red ribbon animals vviLl not be sold indi viduaJ.ly

but vdJ..L be sold in Lo ts similar to the manner in which

White ribbon animals were sold' in the on the basis of the total

1951 Show.

This will be determined number of

Blue ribbon anima�s that are offered for sale.

Defini te policy on t his will be established by

4-H Leaders and the Yuma County

Livestock

Improvement

Association prior to the

Junior Fair.

4-H

Demonstrations

At all

4-H members to meetings, the

Assistant

County prepare and present more

Agent urged demonstrations cJ.ub

at club meetings this year.

During November, the

Assistant

County Agent arranged ior demonstrations at three 4-H meetings to a total of fifty­ two club members.

The C1emonstration was entitled "How to

Make a

Feed

Scoop".

Newspaper

Publicity

The

AsSistant

County Agent wrote thirteen articles on follOWing topics in September: 4-H

Leaders'

Meeting, the

4-H Organizational Meetings, Requirements for

4-H

Membership,

4-H ment

.Program

Planning

Committee

11eeting, Junior Fair

Livestock

Improve­

1�eting,

4-H Leaders and

Council

Luncheon,

Yavapai

Calf Sale Tour.

The

Assistant for use in the organizational

County

Agent wrote twenty articles in October local papers on the meetings, Yavapai following subjects:

4-H

Calf Sale,

4-H

Leaders' ket.�g, 4-H Counc� llembers Meeting,

4-H

Leader

Training

• f

-.

_.

-.Ll8-

Newspap!r Publicity

(eon· t)

Lonnie l4cGrew

Assistant County

Agent

Yuma

County,

1951

Arizona

-.119-

Newsp!per

PUblicity

(con't) meeting, 4-H

Lamb tion

Banquet,

Projects,

State

Awards,

4-H

Calf

County

Projects,

Awards, and

4-H Recogni­

Record Books.

In

November, the following eleven articles by the Assistant

County

Agent were published in local papers:

Junior

Planting, 4-H Chicago Trip

Fair,

Officer

Beef

Training

Meeting,

Crane

Recognition

Event, 4-H calves, w�ellton Reocgnition Banquet,

4-H Garden

Winners, Leader

Training.

The

Yuma have

Dally

Sun and the Somerton given excellent

Star, both local papers, publicity to

Yuma

County 4-H

Club Work.

Since the present

Assistant

County Agent reported for duty in

September, f orty-f our news items written by him have been published.

In addition to newspapers, concerning the

4-H news stories published in the two local

Assistant

County

4-H

Activities in

Yuma

Agent wrote

County that one was article published in the

Arizona Cattlelog.

Radio

Publicity

The

Assistant programs

County

Agent participated in four radio during the month of September and discussed the aims and purposes of can

4-H Clubs and how interested people give 4-H a boost.

He had charge of one radio program in October and he had

Dr.

J.

N.

Roney assist him in the broadcast.

They talked about

Insect Control and

4-H

Activities.

The

Assistant

County

Agent assisted Al

Face,

County Agricultural Agent, in three radio broadcasts.

He talked on lamb, beef, swine and poultry projects.

During November, he had charge of one radio.

program.

The program was bullt around Yuma

County 4-H

Activities.

He.

also assisted in three additional programs and talked on poultry and swine projects and on

Grub Control.

4-H Covered �Wagon

Every club member looks forward to receiving the

Newsletter

"4-H

Covered

County.4-H

Wagon", which is edited by the

.t2.ssistant

County

Agent

•.

It is usually published every month.

The

Home

Demonstration Agent usually contributes to its contents.

This newsletter is mimeographed in the County

Two editions have been

Agent's Office.

published since the

Assistant

County

Agent reported for duty in

September.

This newsletter serves to projects as well as give explain

4-H activities, events, and publicity to various boys and girls and leaders throughout the year.

-120-

Lonnie McGrew

Assistant

Yuma

County Agent

County,

Arizona

1951

Lonnie Mc Grew

Assistant

County Agent

Yuma

County,

Ariz ona

1951

4-H

Covered

Wagon

(con't)

The regular

September edition of the

4-H Covered

.'{agon was published containing project requirements for

Beef,

Swine, Sheep and also news concerning people interested in attending the Yavapai County

Calf Sale.

The

Assistant

County Agent and Home

Demonstration

Agent prepared an

October issue of the

Covered

·Wagon in which they discussed 4-H projects,

4-H club doings,

State and

National awards and

Coming

Events.

4-H Sponsors

In

October, the Yuma

County

Farm Bureau presented the

4-H

Council with a

$100 check to be used to purchase material for additional panels for the

1952 Junior Fair.

The Kiwanis Club

Council Members and Leaders

Association on

September

22 at

Clymers at which tine they set up the

Calendar of Events for sponsored a luncheon meeting for the

4-H

1951-52 and discussed the

�-H County Program.

4-H Recognition Banquet

The

Sixth Annual Recognition Banquet was held at

Crane

School on

October attended.

the

20,

1951.

Approximately 285 people

Recognition

Event including fifty-three guests.

Jerry

Cannon was

Master of

Ceremonies and

State

Senator Harold Giss was

Guest

Speaker.

Dinner-time entertainment was

Palo provided by Mar.r

Joslin of

Verde, and by a trio composed of Marianne Euhus

,

Rowena Slocum and

Corinne Moore.

Certificates of

AI

Leadership were awarded by

County Agent,

Face.

Louis

Joslin of Palo

Verde spoke on

"Inspirations to

4-H Leaders

II

Mariel

Hopkins,

Home Demonstration .Agent

and Lonnie McGrew, Assistant County Agent announced the

County vi inners

New

4-H

Council

Officers for 1951-52 are:

President

-

Steve Duke

Vice President

-

Jerr,y Power

Secretary

-

Tommy Crowe

Treasurer

-

Dixie Anderson

Reporter

-

Corinne Moore

Advisors:

Pete

Gonzales and

Mrs.

Harry

Ellis

Yuma

County

4-H Leader Association

Officers for

19.51-52 are:

President

-

IvAlS..

..

Heward Salyer

Vice President

-

Mrs.

Secretary

-

Mrs.

Clyde

Gaines

Dan "vlilliams

Reporter

l¢s. Lois Pappin

-121-

Lonnie McGrew

Assistant

Yuma

County Agent

County,

Arizona

1951

4-H

Recognition Banquet

(con It)

State winners were announced

State

4-H club leader.

by

Ellen

Kightlinger,

Assistant

Yuma

County 4-H boys and girls won eight trips to

Chicago out of a total of

14 for the entire state.

This yearts representatives from Yuma County will be:

Steve Duke

-

:Meat Animal

Jill Cannon

-

Girl's Record

Hannes Johannsen

-

Field

Carter

WOillis

Crops

�ilsey

-

Santa Fe trip

Ann

3mi th

-

He alth

Nedra

Tudor

-

Dress Revue

Eugene

Ochoa

-

Santa Fe

Sandra Gaines

-

Room trip

Improvement

Other State

Winners were:

In addition to the Chicago trip winners, there were three girls who won

State Contests and were awarded

Gold watches.

Dixie Anderson

-

Barbara

Dairy

Foods Demonstration Team

Smith Clark

Betty

Bickers

-

Dair.y

Foods

Demonstration

IndividuaL

Last but not

Recreation.

least, Myrna

..EJ.J.is

was

State winner in

The following clubs also held local during

November which the

Assistant

Crane Clubs, Somerton Clubs and

Well

Recognition

Events

County Agent attended: ton

Clubs.

The leaders of each cLub presented recognition pins and certificates of achievement.

4-H Leaders and Council

Members

The

Yuma

County 4-H

Council and 4-H

Leaders held a meeting

September

22 at which time they set up the

Calendar of

Events for

1951-52 and discussed the

County 4-H Program.

This year plans were made to hOld leader training meetings on subject matter on

November

November

19, and judging

3; schools officer in training

December and on

March.

'rhe 4-H

Recognition Banquet date was set for October 20.

The Yuma

County

Junior

Agricultural

Fair dates were temporarily set for April 11

-

12, 1952.

These two groups held meetings

October 13 to elect new officers and make finai plans for the

Sixth Annual Yuma County

4-H

Recogni tion Banquet.

The new officers were installed at the

Banquet and are listed under that headin5.

At the leaders' meeting, plans were on made to hold the Leader

Training

Meeting

November

J.

At the Council members' meeting, plans were

-l2}-

Lonnie

McGrew

Assistant County

Agent

Yuma

County,

Arizona

1951

4-H Leaders and Council

Members

(con't) made to hold the Officers

Training

Meeting on

November

19.

Also at che

Council Members' decided to award the new

Meeting, it was unanimously

Harry English series

E

Savings

Bond to the boy and girl with the best record book.

The

Assistant County Agent, with the help of

Al

Face,

County

Agent, held a

Leader Training Meeting on subject matter on

November

3.

Four leaders attended.

AWARDS

BarEY

English

In the past, a

Harr.y

English award has been given to the

4-H sweepstakes winner in the form of a prize.

Upon the death of Harry English, the National

Bank of Decatur,

Decatur,

Illinois, announced that prior to Mr.

English's death, he set up a trust fund to annually award a

Series

E United

States Savings Bond to one

4-H boy and one

4-H girl competing f or this award.

At the 4-H Council Members unanamously the most agreed upon that the

4-H boy and 4-H girl with outstanding record book at the end of each year, will receive the awards.

Meeting on

October

Record books will be

13, it was judged on cOmpleteness, accuracy and neatness.

This award is to be presented each year at the

Annual 4-H

Recognition Banquet beginning in October, 1952.

4-H

Tours

The Assistant

County

Agent arranged to take a group of

36

4-H'ers from Yuma County to attend the

Yavapai

Calf Sale

September 29,

1951.

wbile there, each

4-H'er was given a card on which he scored each calf in the sale as

Medium, or

Common.

Prizes of

Fanc.y, Choice, Good,

$10; $7.50; $5.00

and

$2 .50

were paid to the four members placing highest respectively.

Winners of the contest were:

Ladonna

First

-

Jerry Cannon,

Second

-

Euhus,

Third

-

Milton Euhus

,

Fourth

-

Jens Johannsen.

The Assistant

County

Agent· felt that this was a very educational tour.

During October, the

Assistant

County Agent helped arrange for the C�ane Agriculture

Club to hold a project tour in which fourteen club members visited eleven beef and lamb projects.

In

November, he helped the Rood

4-H

Club plan a similar event to be held

December 1.

The Assistant

County Agent feels that these tours are very beneficial to the c.Lub

members.

-124-

Lonnie

McGrew

Assistant

County Agent

Yuma

County,

Arizona

1951

National 4-H

Congress

Eight Yuma County

4-H'ers won trips to Chicago this year.

They were:

Steve Duke of

Roll

-

Meat

Animal,

Jill

Cannon of Yuma

-

Girl's

Crops,

Carter

Record,

Hannes Johannsen of Yuma

-

Field

Wilsey of Yuma

-

Santa Fe

Trip,

Willis

Ann

Smith of

Somerton

-

Health,

Nedra Tudor of Yuma

-

Dress

Revue, Eugene

Ochoa of Yuma

Gaines of Roll

-

Room

-

Santa Fe

Improvement.

Trip

These and

Sandra

4-Hters left

Yuma November

2), 9:05 a an

, for Chicago and.

returned

December 2.

We are very proud of these boys and girls.

They did a fine job and really deserve this trip.

Health

The Assistant at

County Agent distributed health bulletins

4-H Meetings and encouraged better health practices.

Farm

Safety

In

September, the

Assistant

County Agent showed a safety film entitled

"Safety on the Farm" to the

Jolly

Commuters

4-H Club and the Crane AgriculturaL Club.

Approximately forty-five members saw the movie. He showed a safety film entitled

"My

Model Farm" to the Somerton

Junior and Homemakers and the Somerton Boy

Scouts at a

Farmers combined meeting movie.

in October

•.

Approximately forty members saw the

Projects for the COming Year

Beef

The Assistant

County Agent was able to secure twelve calves locally before the

Yavapai

Calf

Sale.

On

Friday before the

Calf

Sale, ten calves were obtained from ranchers in

Peeples

Valley, and sixteen ca..Lves

were obtained from the Yavapai

Ca.Lf Sa..Le

the next day by the Junior

Fair

Livestock

Improve­ ment Committee.

These calves were ear-tagged and distributed immedia te..Ly

after the call sate

,

In October the

Assistant twelve beef calves

County Agent weighed and ear-tagged that were secured by the members.

In

November, he weighed and ear-tagged forty-six head of beef calves contracted from the Will Young

Ranch near

Prescott.

Twenty-six of these calves were for individual proje cts and twenty head went to Charles

Kumley of Roll for a pen feeding project.

In the southern part of the individual calf

County, seventy-seven projects have been started, and in the northern part, fifteen have been started.

Lambs

The

Assistant lambs to by

4-H members for

Sa.mmyDick.

County Agent assisted in distributing twe..Lve

projects.

These lambs were furnished

-125-

Lonnie

McGrew

Assistant County Agent

Yuma County,

.Ariz

ona

1951

Projects for the Coming

Year

(con't)

Swine

Forty-six club members are enrolled in swine projects.

At aLl meetings during

November, the

Assistant County Agent encouraged club members to secure pigs for fat barrow projects that were farrowed between

October 1 and October

31, so they would be more nearly the correct weight at

Fair time in April.

Poultry

The

Assistant County Agent continuously encouraged more poultr,y projects with beginners starting with at least one hundred

November baby chicks hatched between September 15 and

15 or with at least a laying flock of 25 and then increasing the number of birds each year.

Recreation

Plans are being made to try to improve the County 4-H

Recreation a program.

llore stress will be put on, inc.luding

well-planned recreation program at every 4-H meeting.

-126-

Winston J.

LeSueur

Itin.

Ass

I t County Agricul tura1 Agent

Yuma

County,

Arizona

1951

SUMMARY

The

Itinerant

Assistant

County

Agricultural

Agent arrived in

Yuma

County on the

3rd of October,

County Agent for duty assignment.

1951, reporting to the

The first week was spent in the company of the County Agent and

Assistant in the Yuma

County Agent, visiting several farms and ranches

Valley and viellton-Mohawk areas becoming acquainted with numerous farmers and ranchers, becoming familiar with their problems.

Time was devoted to office procedures as well as field procedures.

Valuable knowledge and experience was gained by observing and assisting the County Agent and the

Assistant

County Agent ��th experimental plot layouts, consisting of cotton fertilizer, variety, spacing, and defoliation test plots.

Assistance and emphasis was placed on

Flax fertilizer,

Lettuce areas.

disease,

Castor beans, and Citrus experimental

Studies were made as to soil classification and test taking of soil samples from experimental test analysis.

plots for chemical

The Itinerant the

Assistant

County

Agricultural

Agent assisted

County .Agent

and

Assistant County Agent on the harvesting and compiling of statistical data on the fertilizer experimental tests: following

Cotton

(1)

Tm Jim and Les Barkley home and lower ranches located near

Gadsden.

(2)

The

George and

Austin

Fr�klin Ranch near

Somerton.

(3)

The

John

Gardner Farm in the

South

Gila

Valley.

(4)

The Ronald

Druce

Ranch located near

Parker.

(5) The �alt

Kammann

Ranch near

Somerton.

Assistance was also given with the harvesting of two spacing test located on the Les and Jim Barkley ranch.

A statistical cotton variety report

«as compiled after the harvesting of a test located on the

Robert Sugden

Ranch near

Somerton.

Also statistical data was obtained and recorded following a

Cotton defoliation test

Ranch with the cooperation of Mr.

plot

Bill harvest

Silva.

on the

Garin

The Itinerant Assistant County

Agricultural agent assisted the

County Agent and

Assistant

County agent with the plot layout and fertilization of two

Flax fertilizer tests, located on the

Osborne and

Thacker farms.

Time

Nas devoted to the layout and fertilization of a lettuce

-121-

Winston J. LeSueur

Itin.

Ass't

Yuma County,

1951

County Agricultural Agent

Arizona test soil plot on the

Bill Silva Ranch and with the layout fumigation of a lettuce disease plot located on and the

Ted

N�Daniel Ranch near

Somerton.

A

Citrus

Survey was made with the assistance of

Mr.

Harvey

Tate,

Extension

Horticulturist.

The purpose of the survey was to obtain data on

Citrus crops comprising grapefruit, oranges, lemons, tangerines and limes.

Summary will be made following completion of the survey.

Two

Castor Bean fertilizer test plots were harvested ana statistical data on the Pete recorded.

One of the test plots was located

Carstens' farm and the other located on the

Austin

Franklin

Ranch, both test areas being located near

Somerton.

Soil

Samples were taken to determine the amounts of the available plant nutrients on the

Flax fertilizer test plots.

Soil test

Samples were also taken on the

Lettuce Soil fumigation plot areas to determine the amount of toxicity prior to planting.

lne Itinerant Assistant

County

Agricultural

Agent assisted the

Assistant

County

Agent,

Lonnie

McGrew, with the ear-�agging, drawing and distribution of

4-H calves.

Assistance was given to the distribution of

4-H sheep to 4-H club members.

For additional information on the Experimental test plots as to actual the layouts and harvest figures, reference is made to

County Agent's and

Assistant

County Agent's report.

-l28-

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