1, 1940 30, 1941 ANNUAL NARRATIVE

1, 1940 30, 1941 ANNUAL NARRATIVE

ANNUAL NARRATIVE

REPORT ot

MARICOPA COUNTY

December

1,

1940 to November

30, 1941

J.

H.

ANNUAL REPORT

OF

O'DELL, COUNTY

AGRICULTURAL AGENT

AND

CHARLES

FRED

HOBART,

ASSISTANT COUNTY AGRICULTURAL AGENT

AND

DRAPER,

ASSISTANT COUNTY AGRICULTURAL AGENT

AND

D. E.

CREIGHTON,

ASSISTANT COUNTY AGRICULTURAL AGENT

AND

CHARLES

M.

COCHRAN,

ASSISTANT COUNTY AGRICULTURAL AGENT

AND

E.

N.

'McGUIRE,

ASSISTANT COUNTY AGRICULTURAL AGENT

AND w. R. VAN

SAHT,

ASSISTANT COUNTY AGRICULTURAL AGENT

MARICOPA COUNTY

DECEMBER 1, 1941 to NOVEMBER 30, 1941

....

----...

_ ..

_-_-.

.....

-

INDEX

III.

Summary of Activities and

Accomplishments

•••••

IV.

Changes in

County

Extension

Organization

Form of

Organization

•••••••••••••••••••••••

General Policies

•••••••••••••••••••••••••••

Procedure

••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••

V.

Program of Work

Factors Considered and Methods used in determining

Program of Work

•••••••••••••••

Project

Activities and Results

•••••••••••••

1-2

.3

.3

3

3-4

4-5

SOILS

Project #1

-

Alkali Reclamation

••••••••••••

Project #2

-

Fertilization Practice

••••••••

Project #5

-

Irrigation Practice

•••••••••••

5

6-10

11-12

CROPS

Project

#6

-

Pure Seed

•••••••••••••••••••••

Project

#7

-

Better

Alfalfa

Hay

••••••••••••

Project #8

-

Weed Eradication

••••••••••••••

Project #1D-

Qualit,y Ginning & Spinning

•••••

12-16

16-17

17

18

HORTICULTURE

Project #12

-

Pruning

••••••••••••••••••••••

Project #13

Project #14

-

-

Pecan

Date

Propagation

Propagation

••••••••••••

•••••••••••••

Project #

14.1

-

Citrus Nursery

Practice

•••

18-19

19

19-21

21

DAIRY

Project #22

Project #24

-

-

Dairy

Herd

Improvement

•••••••

Project #22a

-

Dair,y

Farm

Management

•••••••

Project #23

-

Disease Control

••••••••••••••

Better

& Proven Sires

••••••••

21-22

22-23

23

23-24

LIVESTOCK

Project #19

Project

-

Feeding

Beef Cattle

••••••••••

#20

-

Sheep Feeding

••••••••••••••••

24

25

POULTRY

Project #30

-

Poultry Improvement

••••••••••

25

MISCELLANEOUS

Project #15

-

Insect Pest Control

•••••••••••••••

Project #23

Disease Control

(Plant)

•••••••••••

Project #26

-

Economic

Survey

•••••••••••••••••••

4-H

CLUB

WORK

Project #29

-

Boys' & Girls' Club Work

••••••••••

26-27

27-29

29-32

32-39

ORGANIZATION

Maricopa Count"

Farm Bureau

•••••••••••••••••••••

Farm

Securit,r Administration

••••••••••••••••••••

Agricultural

Conservation

Program

•••••••••••••••

County Agent's

Conference

•••••••••••••••••••••••

Homemakers' Club

••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••

Mattress

Program

••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••

Soil Conservation Service

•••••••••••••••••••••••

Land

Use

Mesa

Planning

•••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••

Relief

Societ,y

•••••••••••••••••••••••••••••

Farm

Machiner,y

Field

Day

••••••••••••••••••••••••

Pima Cotton Club

••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••

Four-State Cotton

Meeting

•••••••••••••••••••••••

National Youth Administration

•••••••••••••••••••

Smith-Doxey Organization

••••••••••••••••••••••••

National Defense

••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••

Service Clubs

•••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••

Arizona

Jersey

Cattle Club

••••••••••••••••••••••

Purebred Breeders' Association

••••••••••••••••••

Holstein-Friesian Cattle Club

•••••••••••••••••••

Guernsey

Cattle Club

••••••••••••••••••••••••••••

Miscellaneous Activities

••••••••••••••••••••••••

39-40

40

40

41

41

41

41

41

41

41-42

42-

42-

42

42-

42-43

43

43-44

44

44

45

45-47

VI.

OUTLOOK

AND RECOMMENDATIONS,

INCLUDING SUGGESTED PROGRAM

OF WOPX FOR

NEXT YEAR

••••••••••••••••••••••••••••

47-48

SUMMARY AND OUTLOOK OF PROJECTS

Project #1

Alkali Reclamation

•••••••••••••••••

Project #2

Fertilization Practice

•••••••••••••

Project #5

Irrigation

Practice

••••••••••••••••

Project #6

Pure

Seed

••••••••••••••••••••••••••

Project #8

Weed Eradication

•••••••••••••••••••

Project #12 Pruning

•••••••••••••••••••••••••••

Project #13

-

Pecan Propagation

•••••••••••••••••

Project #14

Project #14.1

-

Citrus

Nursery

Practice

•••••••••

Project

#15

Insect Pest

Control

•••••••••••••••

Project #23

-

-

Date Propagation

Disease Control

••••••••••••••••••

•••••••••••••••••••

48

49

49

49

49-50

50

50

50

50

50-51

51

Project #26

-

Economic

Survey

•••••••••••••••••

Dair,y and

Livestock

•••••••••••••••••••••••••••

Poultr.y

•••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••

Project #29

-

4-H

Club Work

•••••••••••••••••••

51

51

51

52

III.

SUMMARY OF ACTIVITIES AND ACCOMPLISHMENTS

The j�icultural

Extension Service program in

Maricopa Count,y during the year has been carried on in cooperation with numerous agencies engaged in agricultural activities.

These agencies were local farmer groups, and all count.y, state and federal agencies working on local, state or national programs.

As usual, regular projects have been carried on with seasons special emphasis on the need for such projects at the various of the year.

Miscellaneous programs have been developed as de­ manded when the been the subject was not covered by a regular project.

It has goal of the personnel to give time� service to all agricultural groups.

Special attention has been given to major projects such as

Insect

Control,

Disease

Control,

4-H

Club, Pure Seed, Dairy and

Poultry

Manage­ ment, Irrigation and Fertilization Practdces

,

Dairy

Herd

Improvement and

Economic

Surveys.

Encouraging results have been obtained in terruptions due to numerous changes in personnel.

spite of in­ of Arizona

Projects have been carried on in cooperation with the

University

Experiment

Station and the U. S.

Department of

Agriculture covering a great range of subjects.

The

Conservation

J.gent

has cooperated with the State and

County Agricultural

Committees in conducting the educational program necessary to carry on this work in the the Bureau or Plant county.

Other agencies given cooperation were

Industry, Bureau or

Entolilologyand Plant

Quarantine,

Farm

Security

Service,

Administration,

Rational Youth

Administration, Agricultural

Marketing Service, Bureau of Anima.l

Industry, Forest Service, Bureau of

Agricultural Economics,

Soil Conservation

Service,

Fish and

Wildlife and

Surplus

Marketing

Administration.

It bas been the policy of this and organization to devote considerable time to programs of all state federal agencies in order to get better coordination or effort.

been

A count,y-wide control program of grasshoppers and crickets has carried on in cooperation with the

Bureau of

Entomology and Plant

Quarantine, the County

Board of

Supervisors

One and the State Fair Commission.

mixing station was in operation from

M�

9 to

October 15.

A total of

117 tons of mixed bait was distributed to

285 growers and used on

39,400 acres of crop land.

!he

Agricultural

Conservation Association has received and filed

5762

Work Sheets and issued

1354 marketing cards for cotton and

503 for wheat.

under the

Twenty-eight

Cotton Improvement

Associations have been organized

Smith-Doxe.y

Act.

Acreages covered were

99,165 acres of Acala and 8,892 acres of

SxP or

Pima.

This is a last year, in decided acreage increase over spite of the reluctance or growers of American-Egyptian to join an association.

-1-

T.he

4-H

Club program, under the supervision of Assistant

Agent

Cochran from December

1, 1940 to

August 20, and Assistant

Agent

McGuire from

August

21 to November with a total or

30, 1941, has been very successful

686 individuals enrolled with 632 completing their projects.

This is a slightly better percentage of completion over last year.

The program has been carried on in 32 schools and in

26 communi­ ties, with the assistance of

39 voluntar.y

leaders conducting

48 stan­ dard and 71 non-standard clubs.

There were held,

; project tours, 2 special judging training trips,

3 general field days, 47 regular club meetings,

27 achievement meetings, at

17 of which, pictures and slides were shown;

6 miscellaneous meetings and

4 general fairs were held in carr,ying out the program.

total ot

In conducting all Extension Service programs in the

County, a

2716 farm calls were made,

3876 office calls and

10,722 tele­ phone calls were received by various members of the staff, 2432 letters were written in answer to tion in local papers, and individuals.

A total of inquiries,

11 articles prepared for publica­

185 circular letters were mailed to

31,046

26; meetings, with an attendance of 21,780 were attended by members of the staff.

There were

34 method and result demonstrations held and attended were traveled by

1141 persons.

A total of 40,928 miles by automobile by the starf in conducting this program.

The clerical starf of four ot the Extension Service handled all lizer Control typing, reports and and Plant correspondence

Pathology, the of the

Extension

Specialists

Agricultural Chemist, the State in Entomology

Feed and Ferti­

Orfice, and the Associate

Horticulturist in charge of research on truck crops.

The

Agricultural

Draper, has been maintained

Chemical

Laboratory, in charge of

Mr.

George during the year, analyzing 1247 samples of soil,

531 samples of water, 24 feed and 42 fertilizer samples,

90 samples of water for fluorine,

10 samples of material for poison and 56 mis­ cellaneous samples of material.

The Extension Service offices are housed in a structed for that purpose at 1201 W.

building con­

Madison Street,

Phoenix.

In addi­ tion to and all quarters for the staff, quarters are furnished the

Maricopa

County

Farm

Bureau and the

Feed and Fertilizer Control Office.

A meet­ ing room seating about

80 persons is maintained for the use of the staff agricultural organizations.

-

2

-

IV.

CHANGES III COUNTY EXTFllSION ORGANIZATION

(1) Form ot

Organi7.ation

The sponsoring organization for the Extension Service is the Maricopa County Farm

Bureau, which approves the budget of ex­ penditures and assists in working out a program of work for the year.

Some member of the Extension Service starr attends all regular and special meetings and acts as

Secretary, a.L

though not an officer ot the organization.

The staff has received much helpful advice and assistance trom the Directors of the Farm

Bureau during the year.

been made

One addition and several changes in statf personnel has during the year.

The statt at the time of this report con­ sists of the

County Agricultural Agent and three Assistant

Agents, the

Home Demonstration

Agent and one

Assistant Home Demonstration

Agent, one

Specialist in

Entomology, one

Specialist in Plant

Pathology, one

Ottice

Secretar,y, three stenographer-Clerks, and one

Janitor.

It is hoped that the vacanc,y ot Assistant

Agent in charge of horticulture will be filled at an early date.

(2)

General Policies

It 1s the policy of the Extension Service in this

County to cooperate with all farmer and federal agencies in organisations, all programs civic relating to clubs, county, agriculture.

state

Projects are made general enough to cover all conditions which may arise during the year.

Some member of the staff will continue to act as at all

County

Farm Bureau meetings and the

Agent secretary will eontinue as a member of' the Loan Committee of the

County

Farm

Security

Administra­ tion and as ex-orricio member of the County Agricultural

Conservation

Committee.

(.3) Procedure

A

Program ot Work will be prepared after advising with the

Directors ot the Farm

Bureau, outlining in a general way, the activities of the statf'.

After this program is approved by the·

Directors, it will be sent to the Extension

Director and President of the

University ot Arizona tor final approval.

This program will be made flexible enough to allow definite though emergency programs projects to be carried to conclusion even may have to be carried at the same time.

-

.3

-

V.

PROGRAM OF WORK

(1) Factors Considered and Methods Used in Determining the

Program of Work.

The

Program of Work this year will be put in tinal form after each starr member has made his own program covering the projects for which he is other responsible.

The advice of farmer organizations and cooperating agencies will be sought, in order that the program will cover all on phases ot agricultural production with special emphasis the

Rational Defense

Program.

Greater efficienc.y

in all phases will be stressed, in order that production goals may be reached without further expansion of agricultural lands.

Through revised mailing lists, farmers will be notified of all changes in the national program and given time� information on methods leading to greater efflciena,y of production.

!he

program will be planned to give each starf member a more general program, rather than a specialized one as has been the practice in past years.

This should lead to greater efficiency within the organization.

The educational phase or the

Agricultural Conserva­ tion

,Program will be continued and advice and assistance given to this and other organizations whenever requested.

(2)

Project

Activities and Results througb staff meetings held weekly, all members will be kept thorough:q conversant with all projects being conducted in the

County.

Although each member is help responsible for conducting specific pro­ jects, all members are advised of the progress being made and asked to give advice as to current problems.

Whenever available, Specialists or members of the

Experiment

Station Statt are asked to participate in these weekly meetings.

During the past year the

Agent has been responsible tor pro­ jects in phases of horticulture, pure seed, and insect pest and plant disease control, in addition to general administrative work.

Assistant

Draper has been assigned horticultural projects dealing with fertiliza­ tion, truck crops, landscaping, cost ot production, marketing, coopera­ tive tests on varieties and home gardening.

His work on cooperative tests have been the especially outstanding, as well as results obtained in

Buckeye Community

Beautification

Project.

Assistant Hobart has de­ voted his time largely to projects in general field crops, pure seed, crop surve.ys, range ot improvement, cotton irrigation water and fertilizers.

In claSSing end more efficient use advancing the cotton classing program under the

Smith-Doxey Act, he has been very successful in in­ teresting growers to take part in this project.

He has also assumed the

-4-

administrative duties of the office during the Agent's absence.

Assis­ tant Cochran has devoted his entire time to 4-H Club activit,r.

His ability to hold the interest of the members in their projects, and in conducting the annual

4-H Fair at Tempe, has especially fitted him to this work.

.After

he was called to active duty in the army on

August

Cochran's duties have been taken over by Mr.

Eugene McGuire, who, al­ though new on this work, has carried the program along suocessfully.

20,

Assistant

Creighton was responsible for all dairy, poultr,y and livestock projects until his transfer to

Navajo County as Agent, when these pro­ jects were assumed by Mr.

Ralph VanSant, who, being familiar with local conditions, is well fitted to this position.

Specialist H.

G. Johnston has been available for part time work in insect pest control in this county.

Specialist Manfred Gottlieb has been available for part time work on disease control work on all crops.

Theoda

The clerical work of the office has been the ot

Mrs.

Jean

Moore, responsibilit.f

Eivar,

Office

Secretary, with Mrs.

Josephine

Henness,

Mrs.

and Miss

Betty Dought.y, Stenographer-Clerks, assisting.

The educational program of the Agricultural Conservation

Committee has been conducted by the

Agent, while the executive work is conducted in the oftice or the County Association which is separate that of the Extension Service.

Mr.

L. B.

Smith, office manager, from main­ tains a staft ot approximately 17 assistants.

SOILS

Project Hl

-

Alkali Reclamation

Although this project is one of great importance in our irrigated area, very little interest has been shown by land owners in reclamation during the Y'ear.

Most land owners seemed to feel tha.t

the excessive rains during the winter and spring months would solve most ot their alkali problems.

This, however, was not true and it is likely that during the coming

":lear more interest will be shown in this type of work.

This will be brought about by increased prices of agricul­ tural products, with the resultant use of lands which in years past have been used as pasture or considered as waste land.

Mr.

Paul Versluis, on his ranch at Palo Verde, is success­ fullY' using Bermuda grass as a pioneer cover on alkali, as well as steep lands.

His program is to introduce Bermuda sod on alkali lands and follow by heav,y irrigations, in order to reclaim the land in time.

Mr. A. E.

Price, of

Chandler, has conducted a successful leaching program on new land, obtaining a fairly good stand of barley

-

5

-

the first year.

He hopes to have the land in condition for general cropping in from two to three years.

One project was outlined for the Negro group at

Okemah to reclaim one acre of heav,y land which had not been cropped for several years.

was not

This land was to be used as a carried community garden but the project out, due to lack of funds and interest by the group.

Through news articles and by radio, all land owners were advised to use excess or free irrigation water during the winter months to leach accumulated alkali to depths beyond the root zone of most crops.

This practice was followed by a great number, especially citrus growers.

Project

#2

-

Fertilization Practice

In carrying out this project the staff has been seriously handicapped by lack of experimental work as a basis for recommenda­ tions on field crops especially.

No recent work has been done on small grains, grain sorghums, alfalfa or cotton, whereas the fertilization needs of where vegetables and citrus crops have been worked out to the point demonstration plots can be conducted.

in

Assistant

Agent Draper has conducted a number of such plots cooperation with the land owners.

A result demonstration to show the effect of nitrate ferti­ lizers on the same yield of

Washington

Navel oranges was continued on the basis as in 1940 with Mr. C.

J.

Wood, of

Mesa, as cooperator.

Three applications of sodium nitrate or ammonium sulfate were at the rate of from

4 to 7 applied pounds per tree per season trom

January to

May.

The ot soil

Agricultural Experiment

Station is coopera ting in the making analyses prior to each application.

Harvest data tor 1940 was not completed until after the 1940 annual report was completed, and is included in this report.

(Table 1.)

The average increase in yield per tree of the fertilized trees as compared with those unfertilized, was

Tear approximately one-halt field box, which was the same as tor the previous.

It will also be noted from the 1940 data that the fruit averaged slightly larger trom the fertilized trees.

soil

The 1941 harvest data is not available at this time but the analysis data are given in Table 2.

pecan trees, a one year result demonstration with the and M. D.

In response to

Ewing, popular demand tor fertilizer trials on ot Glendale.

On each was started in cooperation

Department ot Horticulture and Mr.

I.

Phillips, or Glendale, ranch, the trees selected were

-

6-

Plot 1

Calcium Nitrate

.3

1bs.

12/26D!l_

__ r.S.B.

P04

__

N

__

Calcium Nitrate

_

2 1bs.

2i2f,j�Q

TeS.S.

P04

N l_�

...

�.......

-'

NAVEL ORANGE PLOT

C.J. Wood Ranch

1940

Calcium Nitrate

2 1bs.

3j26i1l._0

T.S.S.

P04

N T.S.S.

P04

1st ft.

2nd ft.

405

530

Jrd ft.

555

Calcium Nitrate

.3

8

4

.3.3

2

Plo_t_ _� _.-2. lb.s_e.

1st ft.

395

2nd ft.

500

Jrd ft.

600

__

12Jz6J39

6

4

3

_._.

4

4

3

_ _ _ __ _

430

5.30

620

6

.3

.3

10

7

11

Calcium Nitrate l .lb_.

460

560

5.85.

__

2/2$/4.Q

5

.3

.3

__ __

14

5

3_

..:z t

Plot.3

1st ft.

2nd ft.

.1rd

rt.

Cheek

420

530

605

6

.3

3

5

2

2

410

560

650

Check

5

.3

3

____ ._.

720

45.2

_.

__

6

525

610

4

3

Calcium Nitrate l �bs�

..

_3j_2_6JAQ

450 5

12

515 .3

7 e

S

_3

II

9.

2

1

2

Check

390

540

760

5

.3

2

Plot

4.

Ammonium

Sulfate .3

Lbs

,

3L2�_ML_

2

1

2

_

1st

2nd

3rd ft.690

ft.645

ft.7�0

5

2

3

3

1

1

Yield

1940

Block

1

n

11/27/40

2

_

4.3t

field boxes n

34 n

.3

-

28

3/4

" • n

4

-

36 ""

2.43

box per tree

1.88

1t

It n

I.

II "

1.59

2 nun

100 fr.

100 n

100"

100"

_

Check

430

495

570

4

3

.3

1

0

°

Ammonium

2

1bs.

Sulfate

4/3/40

605

685

615 weighed

57 1bs.

"

It

55t.

tf

54

"

57 n

..

_._�.

__

5

4

3

12

4

2

N T.S.S.

P04

_

Check

480

535

580

Ammonium

5

3

.3

2

-2

1

Sulfate

2

1bs.

5/15/40

580

710

710

4

4

.3

7 g

7

0)

I

Plot 1

Sodium Nitrate

3

Ibs.

lj1-$�

T.S.S.

POA

N

Soditun nitrate

2 Ibs.

_ �

3j2MJ.)_�

T.S.B.

P04

1st ft.

300

2nd ft.

445

3r�� f�_9_OO

6

.3

1

Sodium Nitrate

Plot 2

2 1bs.

1st ft.

380

2nd ft.

3rd� ft�

__

445

630

5.3

2

2

2 3

Plot .3

1st ft.

2nd ft.

.3rd

ft.

Check

36o

595

75i_

__

6

2

_2

__

3

3

2

Plot

4

3

3

4

__ � __

395

480

585

320

405

A8_0_

Cheek

315

425

615

6

4

.3

4

4

2

6

3

.3

__

TABLE

2.

NAVEL ORANGE PLOT

C.J.Wood Ranch

1941 *

N

7

15

3

5

4

J

__

Sodium nitrate

2 Ibs.

_

_4L23fAl

T.B.S.

P04

!

N

375

510

470

385

475

505

4

3

4

6

.3

9

13

9

6

12

13

10

__

T.S.S.

P04

N

3

2

2

Cheek

415 9

470

620

5

IJ.

Ammonium

Sulfate

.3

Ibs.

4123/4l

14

17

23__

_

Cheek

295

395

5

3

A_l_Q_

_

.3_

__ __

Ammonium Sulfate

.3

4

.3

2 Ibs.

5/16/41

1st ft.

480

2nd ft.

545

3rd ft.

710

7

4

.3

14

17

20

495

425

425

4

3

_3__

20

7

4

T.S.B.

Check

PO�

Ammonium

2 Ibs.

6{5!4.!

Sulfat.e

N

* Harvest data not available at this time

fertilized with tween

8 pounds of calcium nitrate per tree in

Januar,y and

8 pounds of calcium nitrate in

March.

Harvest data is given in Table .3.

It .111 be noted that there is no consistent difference in yield be­ fertilized and non-fertilized trees.

The tree color was de­ finitely darker green for the fertilized trees.

It may be that over a period of

7ears that an increase in yield could be expected.

There also appeared to be no increase in the size of the nuts.

the

The Assistant

Department or

Agent cooperated with Dr. A. E.

Griffith, of

Horticulture, in a watermelon fertilizer demonstration plot on the H.

L. Fletcher ranch.

Sinc'e the crop has not yet been harvested, a complete plan of the plot cannot be given at this time.

melon

The Assistant

Agent cooperated with Dr.

Griffiths experimental plot on the

Experimental Farm at Mesa.

in a water­ on the

A long term result demonstration on the effect of phosphate development of fruit buds on

Royal Apricot trees was started in cooperatioD with

Mr.

C.

T.

Sharp, of Scottsdale.

Six

4-yea:r old trees were selected and treated with g pounds of treble superphosphate per tree during Februar.y.

Three of these also received

4 pounds each of ammonium sulfate.

The first result should be an increase in bloom and fruit set for the was spring of 1942.

A similar started with Mr. H. A

..

Lassey, plot or Alhambra.

with treble super'alone

An unsuccessful attempt was made to secure some data from the two watermelon fertilizer plots.

Dr.

Griffiths assisted in taking some observational notes

Which indicate the value of one or more ot nitrates after the melons have set.

Better vine applications growth and better fruit set resulted when phosphates were applied early in the season.

93

During the year fertilization programs were worked out tor individuals, covering citrus, deciduous frui ts, ornamentals and vegetables.

in on

Queen

Test plots on cotton were established on the Brandon ranch

Creek, and at the Stewart Ranch near

Gilbert.

One test plot allifa, using treble superphosphate, was established at the Cleo

Wilson ranch.

The rose variety and fertilization plot at the Mesa Experi­ mental Farm was continued throughout the year and was of great interest to visi tors at the farm.

Two garden clubs,

Mesa and Garfield, were given talks on fertilizers and their use in home gardens and ornamental plantings.

-9-

Success variety

(non-fertilized)

Individual trees

Av. per tree

Success

TABLE

3.

PECAN HARVEST DATA

FOR

FERTILIZED

AND NON-FERTILIZED TREES

I.

Phillips Ranch, Glendale

48

Ibs.

"

23

15

"

11 lJr.0

31!

Ibs.

(fertilized with

16

Ibs.

in two

CaN03) applications-Januar,y and variety

March,

1940)

Tree

Av.

#10

#7

#9

#11

/I

8 per tree

56

Lbs

,

37

B

.34

" n

39

32

It

39

3/5

1bs.

Schley variety

(non-fertilized)

Individual trees

Av.

per tree

44t

lbs.

46 II

28 n

49

52

If

43

475

lbs.

Schley variety

(fertilized same as

Success)

Tree

Av.

#12

#13

#14

#15 per tree

22

26

34

37

29 lbs.

"

"

"

3/4

Lbs

,

M. D.

EWING RANCH

-

GLENDALE

CaN0.3

Success in

#5 fertilized with

SIbs.

February

1940.

CaN03 in

December and

8

1bs.

Yield

-

57

Ibs.

(14 year old tree)

2 unfertilized Success trees of same age,

Average

47 Ibs. per tree.

-JD-

Project

#5

-

Irrigation

Practice

Fitt,y-nine individual growers were given assistance in irrigation problems on crops, including citrus, cotton, alfalfa, deciduous trees, ornamentals and vegetables.

Fewer calls were received this year than last, due to the fact that adequate water has been avail­ able.

Two radio talks were local newspapers in water.

given and two articles published in regard to the proper and beneficial use of "free" was

A grain pasture irrigation test at Southwest Cotton

Comp� discontinued when it seemed evident that stands on the field to be held that dr,y in the tall would be insufficient without irrigation at time.

However, due to the wet winter, Mr.

Bartel informs us that his tests at Tucson were ruined.

The test will be continued during the next yee:r, with the differential treatment.

emphasis again on grain yields following the on short

Arizona Citrus Land staple cotton

Company inaugurated a series of tests following outlines suggested by_Karl Harris.

At the present time the test is not complete, but it appears that the plots receiving most water gave highest yields.

This is inkeeping with results previous� secured on lands of low fertility.

At the beginning of this crop year it was planned that a check-up of the practice of stubbing be nade from the s'tandpcdrrt of irrigs.tlon

used as a pra.ctice.

It was intended that the

Smith-Doxey program be basis for this check-up, dividing the season into three parts:

(1)

Early season, predominantly stub cotton

(2)

Mid-season, a mixture

(3)

Late season, predominantly planted cotton.

The division between the first two periods was determined for each gin by consulting the gin manager.

However,

Phoenix office made the difficulty in the impossible, the carrying on of this check-up.

appears from tests made by the

It

Sacaton Station that certain stub fields produce cotton of as long ste.ple

and good grade as planted.

However, adequate irrigation is more difficult with stub.

program

Mr.

The Buckeye Irrigation to solve its

Jones had in mind

District

'Seems to be legal difficulties.

During setting up a test launching a the summer months using water of different degrees of salinity for growing crops.

a program to arbitrate with

This has been side-tracked projects above them on the streams.

in

issue to

Roosevelt

Water Conservation District has voted a bond expand its pumping facilities.

'!'here is a strO!lg

movement among irrigation districts dependent on pumping to break the control of Salt River

Valley

Water

Users' Association on power coming from outside.

Demonstration plots were established on the

Arizona Citrus

Lands the

Company holding, and the Joe

Hodges ranch at

Buckeye, following recommendations of Karl

Harris, of the U.S.D.A.

Miscellaneous activities in this field were a talk to the

Tempe

Garden drainage

Club, taking part in a panel discussion at the Phoenix lens' Garden

Club, training a field foreman of one of the large vege­ table growers to

T:hunderbird use a level properly, assisting the operators of the

Airport near

Glendale in working out irrigation and problems, checking on the yields of "stub" as against planted cotton,

8�d better plant cooperating growth.

in range contouring to hold water and promote

CROPS

Project

#6

-

Pure Seed who has

This project has required much of the time of Assistant Hobart cooperated with the

Universit.y

of

Arizona Experiment Station, the

U. S.

Field Station at Sacaton and the Arizona ciation.

Dr. R. L.

Crop Improvement

Asso­

Matlock, Specialist in

Agronomy, Secretar,y of the

Association, has been helpful in conducting this program.

Meetings in have been held program throughout the year to better acquaint growers with and to arrive at

The pure seed equitable prices for various seed.

program in this county during the past year th� inaugurated better methods raised standards of pure seed production and attaining ends.

a

The meeting of the Arizona.

fine educational effort arranged by

Crop Improvement

Association was

Dr.

Matlock.

A step in the right direction is the incorporation of the Association.

This will relieve from Indi vidual resI>onsibili ty, the officers and workers of the Association.

The

Association also had a leading part in preliminar,y work leading to the passage of the state Seed

Act, which protects

Arizona from becoming a dumping ground for lots of seed prevented moving elsewhere.

from

-

12

-

A leading activit" of the Association, in which we as

Ex­ tension workers of pure ted at these participate, was the series of seeds.

It has been mentioned that

meetinl'

e setting not prices represen­ meetings and that extension workers cannot, from the nature of their work, represent consumers.

An effort is being made to work out principles of prices of seed stocks in relation to prices ot feed grains, which will make consumer attendance on price-setting meetings unnecessary unless for special reasons the producer to ask a greater premium.

needs

In Maricopa.

County

, commodity directors of the Arizona

Crop

Improvement

Association were elected by mailed ballot, at the expense of the Association.

ot a

An example of tightened requirements was the inauguration system of affidavits signed by the grower and the warehouse of amounts of thresher-run seed, which must be executed before final tags are issued.

rear.

after

Alfalfa acreage registered under the program fell this last

This was due partly to discoure.gement

with financial returns taking the trouble to register, and partly to run-out fields.

The upland cotton progra.m

in

Maricopa County was characterized by general doubt about what variety of cotton should be grown.

Variety tests were continued at the Mesa Farm and at Southwest Cotton

Company and an additional one was planted by Harr,y Stewart on

Maricopa Reservoir and Power

Company lands.

Expansion of acreage of

American-Egyptian cotton in the south­ west threw a heavy burden on the seed-producing facilities of our area.

Certification that seed sold came trom a field planted with SXP seed probably meant that the average field in New Mexico was truer to SXP type than in Arizona.

Many was all gone or of our had no reserve for growers waited until the better seed replanting.

Upland cotton was classed under the

Smith-Doxey program in

Phoenix tor the first time.

The sign-up was

100% for upland cotton this year tor the first time; following are the acreages signed up:

23

Acala'cotton improvement associations

--

5

SxP ft a ft

99,165 acres

8,892 n

Long staple growers hesitated to sign up because of the possibility that with so much stub in the Valley, these figures would be used against them in connection with the A.A.A.

regulations.

-

13

-

Cotton schools, preparatory to this sign-up, were held at Roosevelt School, Buckeye and Gilbert.

Attendance was small

�f but out of the conversation it seemed worthwhile to cneck up on uses of the

Smith-Doxey program.

This was done and a report mailed to cotton growers, excerpts of which follow:

"The of the Bureau following summary of facts collected by Mr.

Watson, of

Agricultural Economics, is for your information:

SOME ARIZONA GINNERS' COMMENTS

ON USES OF SMITH-OOXEY

SERVICE DURING

1941

In closing up the

Smith-Doxey work in March

1941, an attempt was made to collect information on uses to which the class­ ing service was pUt during the ginning and marketing season.

It was found that uses divided themselves into two classes.

Marketing was facilitated in that many single sales were completed on the basis of a sample, and the class resulting from that sample.

A tendenc.y

toward using the service to check on cultural practices and sout;�es of seed and regulation of ginning equipment began to develop.

Mesa and

Six gins in the

Peoria-Glendale,

West

Agua Fria,

Gilbert­

Buckeye districts reported that they used the service to gather cotton into even running lots on the gin yard.

Two gins in the Peoria-Glendale and West Agua

Fria gin found that its use aided in making out loan papers because it was possible to arrange in groups of same grade and sutple.

Two gins in the Gilbert-Mesa and

Coolidge districts mentioned that during the past season

Smith-Doxey cards were especially helpful in dealing with the lower grades.

districts

Three gins in the West

Agua

Fria,

Gilbert-Mesa and

Buckeye reported that their growers used the service to check on cultural practices, kind of seed, insect and weather damage.

Two gins in the West

Agua

Fria and

Buckeye districts reported they were using the service to establish a permanent on each record of cotton farm unit.

In one case it was used in checking the raising changing and/or adjusting gin opera tin and setting."

Difficulties

Phoenix office led to a arising out of classing of cotton in the meeting with Mr.

Lanham,

Mr.

Buffington,

Mr. Gohmert and Mr.

Albritton.

district.

The small grains nursery again

Vias planted in the

Buckeye done

Promotion of the by field tour, radio,

Baart,38 rust resisting wheat seed was and circular letter.

In addition, a

, 'J,I

-"'"4-

a summarizatioD of yields of

Baart

38 and ordina17 was sent to the Count,y

A.A.A. committee for of Baart possible action in requiring use

38 as a reasonable precaution in aIP.lying

for crop in­ surance.

The following excerpts from a letter to

Maricopa Count,y growers indicate the situation in our county:

"Baart

38 is regarded by Mr. A. T.

Bartel, cereals men for the U.

S.

of Baart in

Department of

Agriculture

(Tucson), as the equivalent yield in years when no rust 1s present.

at

Mr.

C. A.

Suneson,

Associate

Agronomist, USDA, stationed

Davis,

California states that for milling and baking purposes

"the

California Station and California farmers believe the similarity

(between

Baart and Baart

38) to be so close that they are not hesi­ ta ting in swinging over very rapidly to Baart

38."

Yield performance of Baart

38 as compared with ordinar,y

Baart was cheeked for the season of grew both strains.

The

1940 by reports of growers who following table gives results: cannot be

Baart

Though only one accepted as year's results from commercial plantings conclusive, the figures shown above indicate that

,38 will produce in years when rust is present to a damaging extent, at least

75% or a crop."

In the sorghum program fields used last year the method of for the first time with growing registered hegari, was extended to Double Dwarf }'alo and

Manko this year.

This means careful seed selection and observation of fields.

Hobart

This who has project has cooperated required much of the time with the of Assistant

University of Arizona Experiment

Station, the U.

S.

Field Station at Sacaton, and the Arizona Crop

-

15

-

or

The following acreages were accepted for registration certification during the year:

Small

Grams

Grain

Sorghum

Vaughn

Arivat

Baart barle.r.......

76

•••••••••••••

337

38 wheat

•••••

502

Alf'alfe.

TiS

Chilean

••••••••••••

1161

Hegari

••••••

D.D.

38

Milo.

Manko

•••••••

Cotton

3625

1199

164

4�

Acala

SxP

•••••••

•••••••••

1215

2449

36{' �

Inspections of these fields were completed by members of the staft, representatives of the U. S.

Field

Station at Sacaton and the

University of Arizona Experiment

Station, in

May for small grains, alfalfa in

June, cotton in July and sorghums in October.

Each grower was notified as to the classification of his seed and field tags were issued to cover the estimated yield.

·These field tags are removed and replaced by the regular colored tag and seal when the seed is recleaned and placed in final bags.

Meetings were held at which prices were set on

Acala cotton at $50, $55 and $60 per ton for certified, registered and foundation seed respectively, and sorghum prices at $3.75

for D.D.

Milo, $4.00

for hegar!, and $5.7; for Manko.

Barley prices were not set but made on the basis of the cost of feed grain plus

25% for certified and plus 50% for registered seed.

A meeting was held to allot foundation SxP cotton seed which was

Field Station at Sacaton.

Only one produced at the U.S.

ton of this seed was available for this

300 county and allocated as follows: C. P.

Marston, pounds; George Wortman, Phoenix,

300 pounds, and the

Scottsdale,

Southwest

Cotton

Company, at Litchfield,

1200 pounds.

The annual meeting of the Arizona Crop lature.

This was done but the bill failed

Improvement pass.

Asso­ ciation was held in

Phoenix in was made to draw up a

February at which uniform seed law to be time an attempt presented to the legis­ to

Project

#7�

Better Alfalfa

Hay

Nothing was done on excessive rains in the spring this project during the year since the caused many weeds to grow and made tile in a production of quality hay difficult.

However, groflers axe now

-

16

-

receptive mood for information on better hay, as the California market will take the good hay at better prices than paid locally. During coming year, this project will be stressed.

Project

#8

-

Weed Eradication others are with hand

Due to the shortage and high cost of labor, farmers and l1kelf to look for means of controlling weeds other than labor.

Considerable interest is being shown at this time.

With this in mind, a cooperative plot has been established at the

Charles Hood farm on the control of White

Horse Nettle.

Dr.

Charles

Davis has outlined the proj ect using smother crops of alfa.l.f'a and grain sorghums as compared with row sorghums in rows.

The crops such as cotton and grain project has been in operation only one year.

Following two years of inconsistent results on the use ot ammonium sulfate as a control for burr clover in lawns,

Assistant

Agent

Draper secured the cooperation ot Dr. Charles Davis of the

Department of

Agronomy, University ot

Arizona, and a series of field experimental plots were planned in the hopes of obtaining more accurate information.

During early February, a trial plot was started with L. C.

Smith, of Phoenix as cooperator.

The ammonium sulfate was applied dry as a dust to plants which had been sprinkled with water.

The rates ot application were

1,

2 and 3 pounds per

100 square teet of lawn area.

The plot was then kept dry tor

4 days.

The following table gives the number of plants killed in each area:,

Percentage ot burr clover

(Medicago arabica) dead

4 d�s after dustiug 8mrnopipm sulf'ate on w�t plants: not

1

7

10

12

Average

..

Jreatment

(In

R.SUmds

per 100 59. f't. of' ar-ea

J.

lb.

Pk>t.

� J.1»8.

Plgt

: o

59

2

19

2

4

S

11

38

83

17

79

54

3

6

8

9

;a lb.s.

81

100

96

92

93

• the 2 and

From this and from similar

3 pound plots in

Tucson, it appears that applications are necessar,y, that the clover should be for freshly mowed before treating, and that water should be withheld

4 days atter treatment.

The time of' day when the treatment is applied does not seem to be significant.

-

17-

Proj ect

1/10

-

Quf!11b

G�n.g

and

Spinning

This year, as in the past, very little attention has been given by the grower to his cotton after it is picked.

If the yield is satiefactor,y, most growers feel that the year has been a success.

0nl7 two gins in the entire county are equipped ,dth driers at the beginning of the much better ginning sample season.

than those not

These two so gins equipped.

are turning out a

With this in

Peoria to which a1l view, meetings were scheduled at Gilbert and ginners and growers were invited to hear about qualitr ginning, both saw and roller gins.

Messrs.

Gerdes,

Bennett and

Townsend, of the

U.S.

Department of

Agriculture, Bureau of

Plant

Industry, spoke to those present on improved methods of ginning and the resultant better grade of cotton which could be obtained.

The meetings were well attended by both ginners and growers.

HORTICULTURE

Project

#12

-

Pruning

Twelve pruning demonstrations were given for

154 people in

S communities.

scheduled

Unusually heavy rains inter!erred with further pruning demonstrations.

This work included peach, plum, apricot, grape, rose and ornamental plants, and included work done on

3 long term result demonstration plots as follows: Chandler

Farms,

13 mixed deciduous fruit

F.

L.

trees;

W.

J.

Pope,

2 apricot,

4 peach;

Chapman,

3 apricot, 2 peach.

Miscellaneous work included advice to

45 people on various pruning problems.

Two grape grafting demonstrations, a cultural program for both the young and old orchards on the Arizona State

Hospi tal

Farm, one radio program on stration on mature old olive tics on the

Mesa Farm fruit trees, pruning, one graftingnotes taken on bloom demon­ characteris­ variety_orchard, and eight new varieties of peaches and apricots budded on the Mesa Farm, were all conducted b,y

Assistant

Draper.

A thinning demonstration was started on

C. O.

Smith and

Babcock in an peaches in cooperation with Mr. Fred Chesney of Glendale, effort to increase the size of these varieties.

Several trees were heavily thinned.

No harvest data is available at this time.

lIost ot the work on this project has been handled by

Assistant

The

Draper, assisted on demonstrations by Specialist

Agent has handled most of the calls on c1true pruning

Tate.

and

lS

-

top-working, is in which there is now being worked over into oranges quite an interest.

Grapefrui of all varieties and old trees are being pruned to,promote better yields.

t

Eroject

#13

-

Pecan Propagation an

A

Dew project on pecans was started this past year in effort to obtain accurate production records on standard pecan varieties under local conditions.

It is information will hoped that this type of help to determine more accurately, the more de­ sirable commercial varieties for future plantings.

Trees were selected in was widely separated groves over the county.

Harvest data secured for the 1940 crop.

Tree numbers, varieties, location and harvest data are all listed in Table

4.

trees

Several isolated cases have been failed to reporting that pecan respond to the zinc sulfate treatment for rosette.

Several were of these trees which showed the most selected and pronounced symptoms heav.y

trunk applications made.

Two trees in the

A.

Essley orchard were treated on

March 19, and two trees in the

E.

Draper orchard were treated on

March 14.

Thus far, the response has been ver,y favorable.

Seven pecan top-working demonstrations were given during

April for 101 people.

Several visits have been made to each tree top-worked and at this time, all are in excellent condition.

Mayhan and Success varieties only, were used this year.

the

A series of 14 pictures were taken showing the progress of topworklng by budding program on the Mesa Farm pecan orchard.

ment

The Assistant

Agent has been of Horticulture in this work.

of opinion on the desirability series of pictures should be of great cooperating of this method of value in with the

Since there is a wide

Depart­ difference top-working, this showing the progress made.

problems

Fort.1-six growers during the year.

were advised regarding pecan cultural

Project

#l4

-

Date fropagation the year frui t

.,as as

The interest in date in the ripening causing much culture has not been as past.

This was proba.bly

due to fruit to ferment.

great during rains at the time

However, numerous

-

19

-

'fABLE 4.

PECAN TREE PRODUCTION RECORDS

HARVEST DATA

-

1940

II. D.

Ewing Ranch

-

Glendale

Schley 1/1

(63 Ibs

, good

(1/4 lb.

sprouts

(15

Ibs.

stick tights

Burkett #2 ( 58 Ibs.

good

(

4i_�bs.

sprouts

(

3 Ibs.

stick tights

Success

#3 (Not harvested)

Schle,- 114

(Not harvested)

Success

#5 (57 lbs.

good

7 stick tights

Western

#6 (49 lbs.

good

(4 lbs.

sprouts

(8 stick tights

F. D.

Rowell Ranch

-

Gilbert

Success

#16 (53

Ibs.

#1 nuts

(24 1bs.

#2 If

(IIi

Ibs.

stick tights

Success

#17

Delmas #18

Delmas

#19

(39

Ibs.

#1 nuts

(20!

Ibs.

#2 nuts

(12 Ibs.

stick tights

(68 Ibs

,

#1 nuts

(25

Lbs

,

#2 nuts

{14 lbs.

stick tights

(85

Ibs.

#1 nuts

(29 lbs.

#2 nuts

(13 Ibs.

stick tights

L. Redden Ranch

-

Tempe

Success

Success

#20

-

52 Ibs. nuts

#21

-

74

Ibs. nuts

I.

Phillips

Ranch

-

G.1.e.rtdale

Success

If

" n

#7

-

37 lbs.

#8

-

32

Ibs.

119

-

34 Lbs

,

#1056 Ibs.

#1139 lbs.

Schley

#12

-

22 lbs.

#13

-

26 lbs.

#14

-

34 lbs.

/I 15

-

37

Ibs.

C. B. McEwen Ranch

-

Phoenix

Burkett

Mayhan

#22

#23

J.

Birchett

�c�_-:.

Tempe stewart

#24 (41

1bs.

good

(17

Ibs.

stick tights

Success

#25 (54

Ibs.

good

(5 Ibs.

stick tights

Success

#26

Burkett

#27

(30

1bs.

good

(2t

Ibs.

stick tights

(Not harvested)

Dan Witt Ranch

-

Phoenix

Mayhan

Mayhan

Mayhan

#28

#29

#30

-

20-

calls were received for bulletins on date culture and home and eleven individuals were given assistance in processing, pollination or off­ shoot removal.

One demonstration on method of held in removing offshoots was cooperation with

Mr.

R.

H.

Hilgeman, at the

University

Date

Garden, at

Tempe.

frgdect

114.1

Citrus

NurserY

Practice there is have

!his

project has not been stressed during the year, since little demand for citrus nurser,y stock.

All nurser" operators been in the business for many years and have few problems other than those caused b.Y

disease or insects.

There has been a great deal of interest in top-working grapefruit .into

oranges, and a great deal of this work has been done by' the grower who has had no previous experi­ ence.

!he

interested

Agent and

Assistant

Draper have given assistance to all growers in pruning in preparation for budding and in the actual budding.

DAIRY

Project 622

-

DairY

Herd

Improvemen�

The

Maricopa Count,y Dair"

Herd

Improvement Association, during the year year.

1940-41, has shown increased

Four testers continue to be activity over the employed by the Association.

past

While the dair.y

cow population has slightly decreased in the

County", cow testing work has shown a small gain.

During the early part of the year, the official testing work, which had centered at the Unlversit,y of Arizona under the direction of the Dair,y Specialist_ was transferred to this carrying on official county organization.

There are seven herds testing at the present time.

The funds of this association have been merged into the account of the local organization.

Officers of the

Association continue the same as last year:

Roy

Marshall,

President

C.

L.

Phillips,

Vice-President

J.

S.

Elliott, Secretary-Treasurer

Elizabeth

Homrighausen)

Herbert Gates

) Board Members.

It 18 interesting to note that on account of the heav,y rains during the cattle were fall and winter of this year, one or two herds of carried on desert feed.

Production records indicate that this feed was very satisfactory during the two or three months time in which the.y

were thus managed.

-

21

-

The Board of Directors authorized the following needed purchase of the supplies: new financial statements for official testing, 2-year supply of herd book sheets, 500 stamped envelopes, and 500 letterheads.

The known as the

Association is sponsoring a rather exclusive club

"Ton-or-Fat" cow club to stimulate more interest in herd improvement work.

The

Plans are

Association had a display booth at the state Fair.

being made for their annual meeting, to be held in

December or

January.

Project

#22&

-

Dairy

Farm

Management

Several new methods of feeding dairy cattle have been in vogue this year on account of the extraordinary amount of pasturage and green feed which resulted from the heavy rainfall.

Electric fences were used in several ways in controlling the herds to small the strips of fresh feed, which were opened up daily by moving fencing a few rods down the borders.

Some other dair.ymen

made consdderab'Le use of soiling crops with which to feed their herd.

Owing to the more rigid enforcement of the Tucson city milk ordinance and the

City of Phoenix milk ordinance, many Grade A dair,rmen have found it necessary to make radical and rather expensive improvement in their milk barns, milk houses, feeding arrangements and disposal facilities for sewage.

Few, if any, changed classi­ fication from Grade A to Grade D on that account, however.

The use of during the permanent pastures was practically given up previous year on account of extreme water shortage.

Ver.y

few operators have taken up the idea as yet, due to the excellent growth of feed and native plants.

High prices paid for cattle have resulted in rather close culling of the herds, with the result that the gross income to the sale dair.ymen

has perhaps been higher from the or stock than for several years.

A number of dairymen have returned to the formerly sold at practice a ver,y of finishing veal calves, whereas tiley were young age for a small price.

With the increase in price of butterfat end the demand for milk as requested by our government in the dairymen are very interested in feeding

National

Defense methods to obtain

Program, higher pro­ duction.

Prices paid in October 1941 were

65¢ per pound in Grade A

-

22

-

and 49¢ per pound in manufacturing milk" while in

October 1940 the price paid was

50¢ per pound butterfat in Grade A and 3S¢ per pound butterfat in manufacturing milk.

Project

#23

-

Disease

Control

A meeting of dairymen, in cooperation with the State veterinarian and Federal

Veterinarian, was held in the

County Agent's office for the purpose of hearing about calfhood vaccination for con­ trol of

Bangs

Disease discussed by these agencies.

It was agreed by the majority present, to sponsor the program as outlined by the veterinarians, which would call tor a combination of vaccination, testing and slaughter, to control

Bangs in the dair,y herd.

in

During the winter there have been unusually heavy losses baby calves on several dair,y farms.

Several explanations have been offered, among which Dr.

Pistor pointed out that in his opinion over-feeding, poor housing and general mismanagement are no doubt the underlying causes for the high mortality.

has

A representative from one of the leading biological houses pointed out that Red Water disease in dair,y cattle is, in his opinion, quite generally spread throughout the irrigated valley and

� reach that a an acute program stage causing severe losses.

It is his opinion of vaccination against this should be stressed.

During the fall and winter months, four dairy herds were treated with a back wash for the control of Ox Warble.

Three pro­ ducts were used, allot which appear to be about equally effective.

These were products were

Derris

Root, given to most

Agicide and Borako.

Two treatments herds, although the first treatment appeared to get

90% or more of the grubs which had made openings in the hides of the cattle.

A new treatment for Screwworms called Smear

62, prepared by the Bureau of Livestock, in

Washington,

D. C.

was given to several dair,ymen and beet feeders to try out.

They report that this Smear

1s superior to any other treatment available.

62 men

Pinkeye and cattlemen in calves caused a again this year.

great deal of trouble among dairy­

Project #24

-

Better and Proven Sires dairy

Ever breeds increasing numbers of are finding buyers purebred bulls or the several among the local dairymen, due to the

-

23

-

cow testing work and to the best evidence that the study offspring of cow families, may have the which data transmitting is the ability as indicated in their he "believes it family pedigree.

One important breeder states that possible to secure as good a

Holstein bull calf for one-hundred dollars from local any herds, as it is possible to secure for price from any other herd in the nation.a

During the year, a new purebred breeder of Herefords paid eight-thousand dollars for an outstanding herd sire in one of the

Central states, which animal was shipped to this valley for use on two or three herds of registered

Hereford cattle.

This breeder has set about to build a secured some ver,y model Hereford fine specimens breeding farm and has already of cattle in various parts ot the

United States which he is raising on his local ranch.

LIVESTOCK

Project

#19

-

Feeding

Beef Cattle

During the first half of cattle have been handled in the

1941, rather large numbers of feeder county.

Maey of these herds have been placed on desert feed and have given a ver,y good

One feeder reports that the cattle running on account of themselves.

desert range made slight� higher gains than similar cattle pen fed by him.

On account of the excessive rainfall, there were weeks when the pens were

Large quite muddy and caused some foot supplies of hay have been purchased by continuing their operations on a larger troubles in the stock.

feeders who scale than anticipate formerly.

Current prices of feeds are:

Alfalfa

"

#1

••••••••••

$12 to

$14

#2

••••••••••

$10 to

$12

Hegari insilage

•••••

$ 3.50

Hegar!

and Milo

Grain $ 1.25

Barle.r

••••••••••••••

$

1.65

Cottonseed meal

•••••

$

2�40

With the high price less feeder cattle in the of feeder cattle, there are

Valley this year than last year.

about, one-third

One beef feeder states that "the feeders cannot out on the present prices buy feeder cattle and feed them of feeder cattle and the market price, be­ cause ot the narrow margin in feeding operations.n

-

24-

Project

#20

-

Sheep

Feeding

!he

sheepmen found this year to be one of the best that they have experienced in a long time.

As early as

December flocks were

15, leaving the irrigated pastures and going to the desert.

By

February 1, practically all flocks owned by non-farming operators had gone to the desert ranges and completed their process of' finishing milk lambs on desert feed.

Sheepmen are ver.y

optomistic because of the high prices paid for wool and fat lambs.

Several bands of sheep were shorn in

Paradise

Valley, north of

Phoenix, for the first time in a number ot years.

The going price for sheep feed is

2¢ per day until

January 1, then it will be

2"i¢.

This price was suggested at the annual meeting of the

County

Farm Bureau.

POULTRY

Project

#30

-

PoultrY Improvement

The hatcher,ymen have had one of the best years in several.

The Poultry Improvement Association has had a hired inspector during the season who has checked the flocks, done considerable blood test­ ing, culling and banding, and has made the rounds of several hatcheries and breeding flocks during the season.

One hatcher" was dismissed from the Association due to his failure to comply with the regulations.

According to statements made by many, there should be a light increase in flocks of poultry produced in this county during the year.

The annual poultry school was held in

September.

Clyde F.

Rowe, Extension Specialist in Poultry

&

Dairy; Harry

A.

Moore,

Poultry

Coordinator from the Bureau of Animal

Industry, and Dr. Wm. J.

Pistor, of the veterinary Department,

University of

Arizona, assisted in con­ ducting the school.

Mr.

Paul

Zumbro, of the U. S.

Department of

Agriculture, spent two days in the county and met with poultrymen to discuss the improvement of poultr,r and breeding problems.

the new egg law 1s in charge of I. E.

Cowart, and at the present time the poultr,ymen but that the law is not feel being they have a good thing in the law enforced as it should be.

This matter

1s being worked out.

-

25

-

MISCELLANEOUS

Project #li

-

Insect Pest Control members

This project has required a great amount of time of all ot the start due to the calls from individuals for assis­ tance.

Specialist

Johnston has taken the responsibility for a great number of calls whenever he is available.

were a

Meetings held or attended in relation to the project meeting held in Phoenix at which State and Federal officers discussed with some in

360 farmers present, the Pink Bollworm situation regard to growing stub cotton; the outcome of which was that no planting dates were established and stub cotton was allowed to be grown, a meeting ot alfalfa seed growers at

Arlington, at which cultural methods of insect control was discussed by Specialist

Johnston, and Messrs.

Stitt and

Russell, of the U

.S.D.A.

Bureau of

Entomology and Plant

Quarantine, meetings of the

Buckeye and

Cherr,y

Lynn

Garden Clubs at which insect control was discussed by the

Agent, a conference with state and Federal officials on the

Pink Bollworm situation, a conference in Phoenix with Federal offi­ cials on grasshopper meetings held at control, one radio talk on insect pests and

Gilbert, Buckeye and

Kyrene on the control of cotton bugs at which

U .S.D.A.

Bureau of

Specialist

Johnston and Mr.

Cassidy of the

Entomology and Plant

Quarantine explained the results of control test plots.

was

A count,r-wide control program of grasshoppers carried on in coopers.

tion with the Bureau of and

Entomology crickets and

Plant

Quarantine, the County-

Board

Fair Commission.

One mixing of

Supervisors, station was in and the state operation from

May 9 to October 15.

A total of 117 tons of mixed bait was distributed to

285 growers and used on

39,400 acres of crop land.

duled for

A peach twig borer

February in result demonstration plot was sche­ cooperation with Mr. F. C.

Chapman,

Exce"ssive rain forced a cancellation of these of

Mesa.

plans.

Twig borers continue to be a serious pest on apricot and peach, and this work should continue.

A result demonstration on the control of grubs in lawns was started in cooperation with A. G.

Clark, of lead at the rate of 1 fate at the rate of 1 of Phoenix.

Arsenate pound per 100 square feet and ammonium pound per 100 square feet lawn in has liquid sprq during

March.

appeared, and a satisfactory

To lawn appears were in the applied to making.

sul­ the date, no further grub damage

-

26-

At the request of one of our larger strawberr,y growers, a result demonstration plot on the control of red spider on straw­ berries was started in cooperation with Dr. H.

G.

Johnston,

Exten­ sion Entomologist and Mr.

H.

L.

and Rotenone dusts were

Fletcher, grower.

Sulfur, Pyraoide applied on

March 27 to

December-planted plants carrying a moderately heav.y

infestation of red spider.

Extra heav,y applications of all three dusts were applied.

A oareful check was made of each plot four days later.

No burning from the sulfur was evident on either the fruit or foliage and a nearly 100% control resulted from this treatment.

Practically no control was effected on either the pyracide or

Rotenone dusted plots.

Miscellaneous insects observed recommended for were: stink bugs and during the year and control aphis on pecans; white grubs in lawns; borers in shade trees and roses; aphis, red spider, thrips, cutworms and false chinch bugs on ornamentals; cottony cushion scale on ornamental shrubs; cypress bark beetle in

Arizona, Monterey and

Italian

Cypress; weevils in chr,ysanthemumsj flat-headed apple tree borers and twig borer in deciduous fruit trees; aphis and loopers on cabbage; mealy bugs, cutworms and army worms on cot ton i aphis and borers in pepper citrus, aphis, thrips, mites, flea-beetles, corn earworm, weevil, crickets and cutworms on miscellaneous vegetables; seed corn maggot and psyllids on

Irish potatoes, and striped cucumber beetle, darkling beetles and seed corn maggot on melons.

Specialist

Johnston spoke on at the cotton school the control of cotton insects meetings held in

Roosevelt,

Gilbert and

Buokeye districts.

Project #2J

-

Disease

Control

(Plant) as

This well as of project has taken a great

Specialist deal of the time of the staff

Gottlieb.

Mr.

Gottlieb has rendered val­ uable service in answering calls regarding disease control and in conducting demonstration tests.

Diseases observed in the field were:

Chlorosis, nematodes, root and rot, fusarium wilt, trees; brown patch in mildew and leaf lawns; spot on ornamental plants c.ypospora canker and nematodes on deciduous fruit trees; mildew on grapes; rosette on pecans; scab &�d sott rot on

Irish chlorosis on potatoes; scurf on sweet potatoes; strawberr,y; black-arm, water rot and

Alternaria and nematodes on cotton; rust on wheat eur� and barley; root rot in cotton and alfalfa; top, nematodes, damping-ofr, mosaid and blight on and mildew, vegetables and melons.

tions

A number of during the diseases year.

or conditions reached serious propor­

These were rust on grains, mildew on lettuce

-

27-

a condition of cotton as yet undetermined and a disease of canta­ loupes which has not been determined.

Test plots on the control of wheat rust were conducted on per three acre.

farms using sulfur at the rate of from 30 to

40 pounds

One and two dustings were used under the direction of

Specialist

Gottlieb without economical results.

A tour of treated plots was held before harvest to show the results obtained. Results were as follow: vi

Grower

A

B

C

No. of dustings

.3

1

2

Total Ibs. of sJllfur per acre

120

40

80

Average

Yield in sacks per acre

Dusted Undusted

8.7

8.9

6.2

7.9

6.3

8.5

6.:

7.0

Mildew on lettuce developed very rapidly due to the un­ usual rainfall during the spring months.

No satisfactory control had been worked out for this disease, but Specialist Gottlieb recom­ mended dusts cial containing copper.

Sulfur was recommended by commer­ companies but did not control the disease.

In ever,y case where copper-bearing dusts were used before the disease had made too much headway, beneficial results were obtained.

A condition on cotton in the

Peoria-Marinette section developed in

August which has as yet not been determined.

The leaves on the plants appeared as if sunburned and bolls opened pre­ maturely although there was no lack of soil moisture.

At the re­ quest ot the Agent, 1Ir.

McGeorge,

Agricultural Chemist visited the area to no taking soil and plant samples for analysis.

His findings led conclusion as to the cause of the trouble.

Drs. Barre and

Barker, of th�

U. S.

D.

Field Station at

A., together with Mr.

King of the U. S.

Sacaton, were taken into the area but were unable to ascertain the cause.

Later,

Dr.

Watleigh and Mr.

Ayres, of the

U.

S.

taking

Salinity Laboratory numerous

Boil and at

Riverside, California, plant samples for study.

visited the area

No report has been made to date on their findings.

)

During

May, a condition on cantaloupe plants developed which the older leaves died but the tips of the runners remained in

-

28

-

green.

This condition bad been examined by

Dr. J. G. Brown and pronounced bacterial wilt.

However, the symptoms shown in the field did not correspond to descriptions of bacteri�l wilt and mens were sent to the

Extension Pathologist at Washington.

His speci­ report was that no disease was present on the material.

The same material was turned over to Dr.

Doolittle for further study and he reported mosaic as causing the trouble.

At the request of the Agent to the Horticultural further

Department of the

University of Arizona for ass1stmce in this problem, Dr.

Pryor, of the U. S. D. A.

Laborator,y at La

Jolla, visited the plantings in question and could find no evidence further of bacterial wilt present.

Material was teken for study.

Later at the request of Dr.

Brown, the

Agent col­ lected several hundred adult in a further striped cucumber beetles to be study of this matter at Tucson.

used into the in

The sweet second potato seed selection year.

At the 1940 project was continued harvest, all selections made

1939 were discarded except those showing promise.

Those se­ lected were given in Table

5, with the weights and number of potatoes per grown this hill listed.

Plants from each of these hills were spring and planted on the Mesa Experimental

Farm.

Harvest will not be made until November or

December.

Harvest data tor 1940 was not available for last year's report and is included with this to be the more promising year's thus far.

data.

Hill No.

19 appears

During the year, seed trea.tment

and the use of resistant varieties to control disease has been stressed.

Baart

38 wheat showed a decided resistance to rust and in each case observed gave no better yields than the regular

Double Dwarf Milo has been

Baart.

problem this year, d.ue to the fact

Pythium wilt has been that most of the acreage of planted with Double Dwarf' Milo

38 seed.

One meeting was held at Buckeye at which Messrs.

King

Pressley of the U. S.

Field Station

Gottlieb, discussed the at

Sacaton, and

Specialist control of nematodes in cotton.

end

Specialist

Gottlieb spoke on cotton school cotton diseases at the meetings held in the

Roosevelt, Buckeye and Gilbert districts.

Project

#26

-

Economic Survey

Assistant

A survey of the alfalfa hay

Agent

Hobart in cooperation situation was made with 'Mr.

Ned by

Thompson, of

-

29

-

TABLE

5.

SWEET

POTATO HARVEST DATA

Mesa

Experimental Farm

December

-

1940 discarded

No.

From-the 1939 seleetions made in

J.

T.

Jackson's field, all were

(18 in number) at the

1940 harvest except 7 hills.

One of these,

19, appears to be promising.

The following selections were made from the

1940 harvest:

Hill No.

Lbs.

or potatoes

J39-19-1

J39-19-2

J39-19-3

J.39-19-4

J39-19-5

J39-19-6

J39-19-7

J39-19-8

J39-19-9

J'39-5-10

J39-20-11

J39-23-12

J39-17-13

J39-15-15

J.39-15-16

J39-16-17

J39-16-18

13 Ibs.

13 oz.

5 Ibs.

10 oz.

4 Ibs.

2 oz.

.2 n», 7 oz.

.3 Ibf$.

11 oz.

5

Ibs.

12 oz.

4

Ibs. 1 oz.

4

Ibs.

6 oz.

.3

Ibs.

12 oz.

8

Ibs

.3

oz.

z n».

.3

Ibs

.3

oz.

2 Ibs.

11 oz.

.3

Ibs.

2 1bs.

8 oz.

.3

Ibs

.3

oz.

4

Ibs.

10 oz.

No.

and of

Grade potato,es

4

4

5

7

4

.3

3

.3

6

4

5

4

4

4

2

.3

5

#1, 1 cull

#1, 2 #2, 2 culls

#1, 1 #2

#1, 1 #2, 3 culls

#1,

2

#2, 2 culls

#1,

1

#2

#1, .3

#2

#1,

1

#2

#1, 1 #2

1/1, .3

#2

#1, .3

culls

#1, 2 #2, 1

#1 cull

#1

#1, 2 #2, 1 cull

#1,

2

#2, 1 cull

#1,

1

#2, 1 cull

Mameyita

#1-40

#2-40

#3-40

#4-40

#5-40

116-40 lel

West

1/1-40

/12-40

#3-40

#4-40

1/..17

61bs.

.3

Ibs.

2 Ibs. 12 oz.

1 lb. 2 oz.

12 oz.

1 lb. 12 oz.

7 Ibs.

6 oz.

2 Ibs.

14 oz.

4

1bs.

14 oz.

5 1bs.

13 oz.

2

4

2

2

1

1

#1, 1

Jumbo,

2

#2

#1, .3

culls

#1, 1 cull

#1

#1

#1,

1 #2, 5 culls

5

.3

4

6

#1, 2

#2, 4

#1, .3

culls

#1, .3

#2

#1, 4

#2, 1 culls cull

-

30

-

Hill No.

Naney

Hall

/11-40

/12-40

#3-40

Key

West

111-40

#2-40

#3-40

114-40

115-40

#6-40

TABLE 5

-

Con' t.

SWEET POTATO HARVEST DATA

Lbs.

of

PO�B:.to.es.

3 1bs. 11 oz.

5

Ibs.

12 oz.

6

Ibs.

9 oz.

No.

and Grade of potatoes

5

5

8

#1

#1, 3

#2

#1

6 Ibs.

2 oz.

19

1bs.

8 potatoes

19 Ibs. 8 oz.

8 potatoes

20 Ibs. 11 oz.

11 potatoes

21 Ibs.

13 potatoes

21 Ibs.

8 oz.

9 potatoes

6

#1

-

31

-

the ona

Agricultural.

Economics

Department of the

University of Ariz­ during the spring months.

This survey showed a very definite rise in alfalra bay prices after harvest season is over.

Infor­ mation obtained from this survey was mailed to interested growers and take publisbed in local papers.

The storing of hay on the farm to advantage of this price rise is being advocated, on be

In cooperation with

Mr.

Thompson, twenty-eight growers small or medium sized farms are keeping farm records which will analyzed by Mr.

Thompson at the end of the year.

In cooperation with :Mr.

Robert

F.

Bla.ck, of the Bureau of

Agricultural ning in this state, monthly reports were sent in on labor con­ ditions in this county.

These reports are made after contacting farmers and all

Economics, with responsibilit.y

for Land Use

Plan­ agencies dealing with farm labor in the count.y.

The

Citrus Cost ot Production survey by

Assistant

Agent

Draper, in cooperation with Specialist H.

R.

Baker, has been carried on during the year.

4-H

CLUB

WORK

Project

#29

-

Boys' and Girls'

Club 'fork

Organization

-

Assistant

Agent

Cochran has been directly responsible for the

Agricultural 4-H

Club work and genera.l supervision or the

County 4-H

Club program, and all county events up to and in­ cluding

August

20.

However, most of the year's statistics and a complete report of the program, are included in this report, since the club program for the year runs on this schedule.

Home Economics

Club work has been supervised by Mrs.

Isabell

Pace

, and will be re­ ported on by her department.

§tatistics

-

This year the

4-H

Club enrollment in agricultural projects was

606 boys and

80 girls.

ot this number,

554 boys and

78 girls completed their work, making a total enrollment of

686 with 632 completing tor a percentage of

92.1%.

or this number, there were

36 duplicate enrollments with

36 duplicated completions.

Comparing this wi tb.

last or a year'

& program, there were

609 boys and 57 girls enrolled, total or

666 with

558 boys and

48 girls completing for a total of 606, or a percentage of 90.9%.

munities work was

This year the work was carried on in

32 schools and

26 com­ compared with

32 schools and 31 communities last year.

carried on with the assistance of

39 leaders

This acting as volun­ tar.J

leaders in the various schools, conducting

48 standard and 71 non-

-

32

-

standard clubs.

A non-standard club is one where there are several interests as to tural clubs.

projects, and they are organized as mixed agricul­

They do not have sufficient number of members in one project to be classified as a standard club.

sides the

Program.

and Goals

-

The program for the club yesr, be­ regular meetings, consisted of project tours, field trips, judging training, field days, inspection of commercial plants and other interesting things along agricultural lines in which the club members were interested.

Five attendance of project tours were held with a total

56.

Two special judging training trips with an atten­ dance ot

10, three general field days with an attendance of 300, 27 achievement the meetings with an attendance of regular club meetings, of which there

5480 were were

47, held, with besides

1016 in attendance.

At 17 of these meetings, with an attendance of 526, pictures and slides were shown.

Six miscellaneous meetings, with an attendance of 303, and four general fairs, pth an estimated atten­ dance ot 5825, were held.

The fairs were the

�ucke,.e

Fair, Tempe

Fair,

Glendale Fair and the Arizona state

Fair.

The miscellaneous meetings, in most cases, were with purebred breeders.

associations to acquaint them with the 4-H

Club

Program.

The reason for the ls,rge attendance at the

Achievement

Programs is that in most cases these programs an honor are held at the completion of the club year and are held at assembly in the school.

This gives 4-H

Club work a very favorable and prominent place other honors that are in the program and received in this assembly.

puts it on par with

On project tours, usual� a great deal of time the club member at his home, consulting on his is particular spent with project� and the remainder of the club members who happen to be making the tour are onlookers and participants in the educational program.

In meetings where pictures and lantern slides a.re

shown, the in livestock held slides, in most cases, are judging to prepare throughout the county.

of a nature to train the club members them for the various

Slides which explain the judging contests

4-H Program are also shown.

One partiCipation judging ot contest at the Tempe

Fair was held, with a

206, a contest at the Tucson

Round-up, with a tiCipation ot 15 trom this county, and at the various field par­ days with approximately

450 partiCipating.

the percentage this year exceeded rear will

General Goal

-

The be goal set for this by completion

2.5%.

90% because it is felt anything over tionally good, even though this year exceeded

The this was

9� goal and for next this is excep­ figure it is

-

33

-

though t that perhaps next year it will drop back to around 90%.

A goal or

5 senior demonstration teams was met, in that

3 demonstration teams and two competed at the finals in the dair,y contest, competed at the

Tempe

Fair with a general demonstration.

'!'he goal or 10 junior demonstration teams wa.s

met, in that

6 com­ peted at the

County

Fair and

4 represented the county at the Club

Round-up.

The junior and senior department will be well repre­ sented at the Club

Round-up in the demonstration contests; this county will send

4 teams in the junior and 2 in the senior depart­ ment.

fictyres end

Slides

-

Pictures and slides have been used quite extensive� in judging training and in acquainting club members wi th the progre.m.

The county has a very good library worked up and through cooperation with the State

Orfice, slides on most any sub­ ject can be shown.

has

Purebred �reeders

-

A constant and ver.y

been maintained with the various favorable contact purebred breeders in different classes or livestock.

In some cases assist 4-H Club members in the they have been called upon to purchase of calves for their projects and at most of these meetings, the Assistant

Agent has been present to keep them relative to posted on the

4-H

Club work.

latest trend and last minute information

A purchasing plan is being worked out whereb,r a definite program of calves will be made with one of the associations.

This will be in the form of a purebred pool breed whereby each, breeder will furnish one or two calves and act as sponsors of the boys who purchase these calves.

It is hoped work out ver,y favorably, that this plan will and that the interest of both the breeders and the boys will be kept up.

County

Activities the various quent notices of the 4-H

Club ties and

Publicity of

publications coming

Fair,

Very good cooperation in this

4-H publicit,y.

The bi-monthlY

4-H activities farm showing numerous pictures has been received county, in daily newspapers, regular from events have been carried.

At the time considerable space is given over to 4-H paper runs a of interest along 4-H fre­ activi­ column on

Club lines.

The two radio stations in this county cooperate by extending time to various club conducted and programs.

announcing events ot interest to

Frequently they make spot broadcasts club members.

published once a month, a

4-H

The

County office

Club News Letter which

-

34-

was sent out to various clubs.

This featured announcements and items or interest to clubs.

County 4-H

_Club Fak

-

The Fifteenth Annual

4-H

Club

Fair was held at the

Arizona state Teachers

College campus in

April, with the number of entr�es greater than at any previous fair.

There were around

2500 entries in

Agricultural and Home Economics departments.

This fair is a means by which the

4-H

Club members can ex­ hibi t proper their out the which to proj acts in competition with other club members through­ county.

It serves as a means to establish a standard by compare their projects and determine whether they are of type and meet the requirements.

In most cases the fair acts as an achievement day for the clubs, in that it gives them an opportunity to make one exhibit during the club year.

Most clubs take advantage of this by sending their projects to the fair.

Prizes offered are ribbons, and to the outstanding exhibitors, medals were given.

The local fair board, made up of

4-H

Club leaders, the

Farm Bureau

President,

Home and

Community

Chairman of the Farm

Bureau, with workers from the

County draw up plans for the fair

Orrice, and to revise the meet each year to premium list.

The

Arizona State Teachers College furnishes personnel such as superintendents and department heads and the Extension Service assists in getting the exhibits to the Fair.

The College takes charge trom there on.

the

The or better than those of in the

Dairy Department.

projects previous years with the exception of those

It is felt that the quality of the dairy slipped back somewhat this year, in that there were not so many purebred animals shown and the grade animals were inferior in qualit.y

in some cases.

It is hoped through cooperative work with the dair,y organizations, that this condition will be remedied during coming quality of exhibits in most departments was equal to year.

The

Third Annual auction sale was lambs, hogs and beef calves were sold.

held, at which time fat

Local merchants furnished special prizes which were given to demonstration club and best all teams, outstanding round club.

These poultry club, outstanding dairy prizes enoouraged club members to

-

35

-

bring their exhibits to the show.

These prizes will be offered again next year.

their

Other

Fair�

-

The

Bucke.ye

Elementary School conducted

Eighth

Annual school fa.ir, in which the Extension Service participa ted to the extent of furnishing judges and working with the Fair Board on classes and how the fair should be conducted.

State Fair

-

Sixty-one members participated in the

4-H judging contest held at the State

Fair on

November

8.

This contest is open to all

4-H

Club members in the state.

This year only one county was represented other than

Maricopa

County.

This year several

4-H members exhibited livestock at the

State Fair.

These exhibits included

Rabbits and

Dairy, Beet, Sheep, Swine,

Poultry.

Most of the 4-H members Showed in the open class and in some cases topped their respective classes.

and in

4-H Club members receive valuable fitting their animals at the fair.

training in showmanship

LeadershiR

-

The Collegiate Leadership

Club at

Tempe completed its fifth year of work with

91.3% completion.

The pur­ pose of this club is to train the college students in leadership ot

4-H

Clubs.

This works out very well with their program, in that most regular ot them are able to lead a club in school nearby schools.

there 1s always a demand for individuals who have had leadership training.

Citrus Show

-

The

Annual Citrus

Judging

Contest was held in conjunction with the Mesa

Citrus Show.

Thirty-six club members took part in the judging contest.

this

Pig Program

-

The contract year with fewer members pig program was conducted again participating than last year.

The mone,y on pigs was collected from those in the contract pig program las�ear and for the contracts not taken up again this year, the money was refunded to sponsors of the various contracts.

year, the from the quaUty

Beef

Program ability to

-

The beet program enjoyed a very increasing in number over last year b.1 sending

Annual Livestock Show at purebred and breeders

Tucson, throughout produce beet

23 calves to

These calves were the state, which

At the show these prosperous purchased insured a high calves made

-36-

WEIGH DAY

-

4-H

Member Calf

Breeder

I

June

I

July, JiUg.

Sept.

Oct. Nov. Dec.

Jan.

I

11

Bob Cooper

Bill Yeom.an

Betty

Sasser

R.

Cowa.n

220

Bright

Mixer

H.B.

Thurber

245

Baldv J.

Hunt

Dannv

Pa,t

D.Thornton

D.Jeffcott

460

245

640

710 770 845

!

215 295 385 440

195

270

355 /+00

520

450

George VanLiere

Pete Van Id ere

.J�pitor

Pedro

Big Boy

James Cartel'

Bob Kock

Jean

Percy

J&ne

Percy

Ray Percy

Dick

Neely

Bill Gates

Eli Gates

Bruce Jones

Dan

Laddie

Domino Le.ss

Bi�ly

Lucky

Chief

Bonnie

SL�rgQ_

Jinx

Cochise

Scotty

B1l11do�

Snuffy

Re9

Eo.de

Nogr",lE?s

D.Jeffcott

J. Hunt

J.

Speiden

R.COWl1n

D

.•

Thornton

J.Cart.cr

R.Cowc

..

n

C.Phillips

J.

Hunt

265

345 1(.35

520

390 490'

580 660

370

+470 i 560 655

290 i 350 U"O 520

260

320

580

7/+0

730

610

1335_

415 510 550

��

395

485

235 318

560

420

6�+i-

330 400

I

3/�5 410

(505)

570

650 j05 570

660

350 410 !�75 545

���c)')

H.B.Thurber

H.B.Thurber

200 245 310 370

315 370 450

530

C.P�OIConnor

295 369 425 495

600

550

R.

Cowden

Rain VallS¥.

.

H.B.Thurber

300 370

11-36

543

360 1<Z.89 562 673

315

I

39i

A55

L5.9_O)

604

743

6]0

J.

Hunt

445

510 555

620

650

I

C.P.O'Connor

"

" "

265

.320

A20

495

250

555

.310

390 455 550

I

-

Best gain for month

~

CALF WEIGHTS

Killing

-

-

-

.Jc1i

Jean

PerC;I

----

Jane ferov

Jr. Perc:t

tl n

Eli

Gatets_

Bill Gat s

_lli)b Coo:ger

n wame

Ye~man

~tt;:v:: n

MEiv!B

n n

"

Sassar

Tought n

ER

Bob

Butl~r

NAME

Red Neck

Big B£!

Chatn!2

§.qnn;,t

Bangles

Skett

Talle

Shine

Butch

C11Ubb:v

Oscar

i[u;gitor

Safetz

James Carte,t

Pat

11 "

Elden Thude

If n

Elma

Thud~

Pinkez

Abner

11

II

J~es

Williams

Amesjaz

Don

M

cDaniel

Balley

Rain n

Thurber

n n n

Clark

Cowan n

~§ffcgtt

"

-

· carter

Cowden

n

ThY.d!

Thude

Indian

ri

SJ2eiden

CALF

MAY

JULY

BREEDER

NO. 22-~1

1-2

Valley,

.

2

!:;.

JL!j

29

195

29

2'75

29

240

2J2

1

1

AUG

.2-6

s

2§5 335

1

5

330

405

5

320 400

AUG

,20

3'10

29

1

5

1

200 220 . 295 36o

G20slt2

G)

SEPT

2S

455

<ill)

470 535 sss

OCT

26-~

535

510

620

NOV

D;§;C

29

29

605

29

.

JAN

2-~

J

620 670

29

.3

46o

530

620 6JS

720 1 825

710 775

265

,2,20

42~ !z,7~

~,20 ~SQ

65~

600

6

.3

655

3

71S

30

3

8

weight

30

.3

I

FEB

78Q

~

775_

869-

'170

!lAIN

6o5

575

6oo

.645 i90

6 lL~

;.'12

18~

29

2Q2

.31

260

J22 jLE

202

2~~ ~!Jr.O

1

5

30

3

220

J6~

M~

. 510

5~2

65~

660

29

2

5

2J2

490

.21~

1 6

402

M,O

2/ti

620

€t

!z.'lO

~0~

6

30

4

30

4

0

800 880

0

30

4 a .

7f:JJ 800

860

!JJ,.O ~05

S20

~g~

30

30

4

.

680

292

1JO

JO

.3

:Z2~

780

30

3

280 650

30

3

30

3

622

29

3

sao

82S

682

J82

440 ~10 sa~

615 660

710

7JO

625 6'1s. '1.10

Z7

2

-· ·

sa:o

622

6~ 72~

'165

810 880

735

.635

.g25

{L90

.635

375

525

535

.530

~!2~

iOO

-'

~25

31

31

1

:200

J20

292

.30

~

27

Z22

:zso

30

4

872

280 ,225. 400

46o

520 56o 645

730 825

.31

2

4

280

~2~ ~~

31

27~

31

' 2

2

5

~20

!t22

2

5

.. J05 ~2

6

!J:22

5

tz.6o

!/.J.O

500

26o

520

622 680

30

600 620

2

30

4

610

~0

720

30

4

'115.

4

722

2~5

'JJ..O

820

845

£2.20

I

~95

~0

6oo

6J~

24

24

30

285

370 44_0 520

5.80

295

r

.

COST

COST of per

GAIN

··'

100#

AVERAGE

DAILY

GAIN

~

YIELD

GRAD_E

'

49.14

8,10

'

1.9

'j7.20 G

•.

42.14 8.54

1.8

60.40 c

,.

49.14

<

8,19 1.9

59.95 c

49.14

:z.61

2.1

~8.72

G

,~. ·'

.

73.66

14.10

1.2

61!22

., c

.

...

.

-

70.70 9.75

2.4

~;

&J.81

·.

Jl

:

'

.~

:

57.50

9~07

'

2.08 58.23 G

58.8$

<

.

.

'

.

.

6:z.~o

2s!.O

2102

7..'1.0

:;

2

1

S

."..

'

62.12

6!z.J-'l

c

53.50 8

1

37

2.08 6o.~8 c

·· ~

66,00_ l l

-

1,8

62.1;9 G

58.00

11.00

1.7

93.SO

. 17.40

84.30

·.

!.2-80

82,JO · 1~.10

81.00 16.22

1.8

.

1.8

1,8

1.6

55.~5

8,80

50.30

[email protected]

.

..

:z,20

9.29

2i06

212

2.07

59.48

.~

58 : ~80 .

!

2·21

ls2

2.26

2,06

80.16 g.90

1,8

63.Q:{.

.

.

'_, , ..

60,12

. 62.07

' •

'

62.28

G c

9

c

··

-~

61!~6

~8.2~

·

6J.7S

,

-

·

~

.

f

.

' c

' .-

64.08

.; c

!, ~ -

· ~2·20

62!12

-

.

c_

... c

G ·

35.30

12.00

1,7

' 0

Best gai~ for pe ~ od,

a ver,y creditable showing, with two killing out to grade Prime,

13

Choice and g Good.

The calves were started on feed

April 15 or the previous year and sold at auction on

Feburary

18.

The length of the feeding period was

306 days.

The average gain for these calves is around 2 pounds per day which was determined by a monthly weigh deyto determine whether or not the calves were making the required gain and to determine whether or not a change should be made in their feed ration.

There were two calves fed out and sold at the

Tempe

Fair besides those which went to

�cson.

The average amount of feed consumed per calf for the 306 days was as follows: Rolled

Barley, 962 lbs., Oats

225 Ibs.;

Beet Pulp,

375

Ibs.i

Wheat

Bran, 368 Ibs.j

Cottonseed

Meal, 202 lbs.j

Hegar!, 70

Ibs.;

Linseed meal,

36 lbs.j

Corn meal,

70 lbs.

These figures were taken from records of a

4-H

Club member who had a beef calf.

The 4-H Club members who exhibited at the Tucson Livestock

Show received very good prices tor their calves, which enabled them to make some profit.

This money was used to purchase other calves or to start a savings account.

The buyers seemed to get behind the auction sale at

Tucson, going out of their way to bid on the calves at a higher price.

These b�ers were not because of the fact that the calves were of disappointed high qualit,r.

At present there are

21 calves on feed to be shown at the Livestock Show next year.

this year.

Attached is a chart showing results of the beef program

Dairy

Projects

-

One-hundred, fifty-four enrolled, 144 completed.

Approximate�

12% of this number had registered or pure­ bred animals.

The remainder were of high grade with the exception of a tew inferior quality ca.lves.

It is the aim of this office to try and club improve the quality of dairy projects in the future.

The dairy members exhibited

85 animals at the fair this year, compared with

81 last year, however, the quality of the calves this year was not up to par.

Through the proposed cooperation of the purebred breeders, dairy" club work should be improved a great deal next year.

The popular breeds for dair,y

Ayrshires, with a few club members are

Guernseys.

Holsteins, Jerseys,

Poultry

Project�

-

One hundred and nine pleted.

One hundred and ninety-five exhibits were compared with 175 last year.

The projects in enrolled,

102 com­ made at the fair poultry club work, are

-

37

-

in most cases, small flocks of birds ranging from 25 to 75 birds.

Island

They are of the popular breeds,

White

Leghorns, Rhode

Reds,

New

Hampshire Reds, and a few fancy breeds here and there.

In some cases the club members set their own hens to raise and chicks, but in most cases they buy chicks from the hatcher,y bring them to ma turi ty.

Two poultry clubs purchased chicks and kept them in a brooder at the school until the chicks were old enough to take home.

One club had members an incubator at the bring their own eggs and put them in school, re-distributing the chicks after they had hatched.

This proved interesting and practical.

130 garden

Projects

-

One hundred and fifty-two enrolled, completed.

Three hundred and seventy-four exhibits at the fair compared with 357 last year.

Garden projects in most cases

..

are

The school projects, with the garden being on the school grounds.

work in connection with the garden is done during spare time and at regular club meeting time.

The quality of exhibits was ver.y

good and most of the

4-H

Club members in garden projects sold their excess produce for a small profit.

I

Handicraft

-

One hundred and one enrolled, same number completed, with 120 exhibits at the count,y fair.

Last year,

17 exhibits were shown.

The reason tor the increase in the handicraft project is that in most cases, a garden club of the previous year did not have sufficient amount ot water or land available, so trans­ ferred activities to handicraft work.

Miscellaneous

-

Besides these projects mentioned above, there were projects in swine, rabbit, sheep and insect clubs.

It is not felt that a detailed report should be given on these clubs, since the.y

were more or work.

The.r

less inactive as to outstanding completed their projects and came through the club year in good manner, but did nothing outstanding.

-

38

-

with the

Listed below is a previous project summar,y showing the present year, year's number and percentage completions:

Club

No. enrolled

1941 1940

No.

1941 completed

1940

Garden

Dairy

Poultry

Swine

Flower

Rabbit

Beef

Sheep

Handicraft

Crops

Insect

152

154

109

50

60

47

25

12

101

1

11

722

180

166 ll8

60

52

41

21

16

12

666

130

144

102

J..4

56

42

25

12

101

1

11

668

177

148

96

56

48

37

20

14

10

606

4-H agriculture

Round-u...Il

-

Forty-six club members in the field of represented Maricopa County at the State

4-H Round-up.

These

Six delegates represented some

21 communities in the coun4Y.

judging teams and 3 demonstration teams competed in the contests held at the delegates, tation.

Round-up.

Because of the large number of

Maricopa County two

Greyhound

Busses were chartered to provide transpor­

National Contests

-

Maricopa County 4-H

Club members com­ peted in the National

Dairy Show

Demonstration Team contest,

Santa

Fe contest,

Rural Electrification contest, and the Thomas

E.

Wilson

Meat Animal Contest.

Maricopa Counv placed state winners in the

National

Dair,y

Show demonstration

Wilson

Meat

Animal contest.

contest,

Santa Fe contest and the

ORGANIZATION

Maricopa County

Farm Bureau

Some member ot the a ttended each meeting of the

County

Extension Service starr has

Maricopa County

Farm Bureau and acted as

Secretar,y.

The annual budget of expenditures for the year prepared and pr�sented to the directors or the organization was for approval as presented and then presented to the Board of Supervisors.

Program

The Count"

Farm Bureau has to the extent of cooperated in the Mattress setting up a working fund of two-hundred

-

.39

-

dollars for this project.

The money was used to set up Mattress

Making Centers and the center to pay back into the used from tees collected.

It is fund, the amount hoped that the shrinkage in this fund will be very small.

One meeting was held with the Executive

Committee, to­ gether with the

Count.y

Agricultural Conservation Committee to dis­ cuss the Mattress

Making program.

were

Two attended meetings of the cotton division of this organization by the

Agent and also two meetings of the

Labor Com­ mittee.

annual

The statf members assisted in arranging and conducting the picnic, held in connection with the

4-H

Fair at

Tempe.

The annual and quarterly meetings of the State Farm Bureau were group attended by members of the staff who assisted in commodit.y

discussions.

Five meetings of locals were attended.

Farm Security Administration

County

The

Loan

Agent or

Assistants attended eight meetings

Committee of

'the

Farm Security of the

Administration to act in an adviSOr" capacity in considering loan applications.

The meeting room in the

Extension Service building state conferences of this organization.

has been used for

Agricultural

Conservation

Program

The

Agent, as ex-of£ioio member ot the

County Committee, has attended all such has been meetings where local committeemen have been called together to discuss a new program and assisted in every case when requested.

The election meeting in the

Peoria district was conducted by the Agent and the meeting of the County

Committee attended at which were elected,

J. M.

Cook, Chairman;

Ward

Burk,

Vice-Chairman, and

I.

E.

Moore,

Member.

Committee in ments when cotton of the

Assistant

State

Agent

Hobart assisted the members o£ the getting cotton merchants to agree to make bagging was

Committee, acting used, weight and also attended two for Director

Pickrell.

County adjust­ meetings

-

40-

County

Agent's Conference all staff

The annual conference held in members, and the

Tucson, was attended by

Agent attended four regional conferences, of which three were held in Phoenix and one in Tucson.

Home

Makers'

Club

One meeting of the

Agua

Fria Home Makers' Club was attended b,y Specialist Ballantyne, Miss Ryan, Home Demonstration

Agent, and the

Agent, to conduct games for the entertainment of the. group.

Assistant

Agent

Hobart attended one meeting of the to assist in training leaders in mattress making.

County organization

Mattress

Program

Assistant

Agent Hobart attended a meeting in Tucson to be instructed in methods to be used in mattress making in the county.

The Home Demonstration

Agent has been assisted in setting up Mattress a total of

Making

Centers throughout the

County.

During the year

892 mattresses and 325 comforters have been made at

16 centers.

been

Applications from

1025 persons for 1527 mattresses have received, reviewed and filed.

Soil Conservation Service up a one

Cooperation with this organization has consisted of setting demonstration farm in the

Queen

Creek district and reviewing a proposed outline for a demonstration in the Litchfield area to prevent flood damage.

The Agent and

Specialist Steenbergen held conference in Phoenix in regard to this proposed demonstration area.

Land Use Planning

The

Agent attended two meetings of the State

Land

Use Plan­ ning

Committee and one meeting of the executive committee of this body, held in Phoenix.

Mesa

Relief

Society the Mesa to

Ass't.

Relier assist in

Agent Draper met with the Agricultural

Committee of

Societ,y to discuss the growing of sweet potatoes and selecting a plot for growing the same.

Farm

MachinerY

Field Day

The Agent assisted Superintendent Aepli,

Experimental

Station

Farm at

Mesa, in arranging of the U.

and of A.

conducting a

-

41

-

two-day farm equipment display held at the farm.

All dealers cooperated by arranging and displaying their equipment in the space alloted.

Pima Cotton Club

Assistant contest in

Agent

Hobart has conducted the Pima

High

Yield cooperation

\,ith Mr.

Karl

Harris, of the U.

S.

Depart­ ment of Agriculture by preparing records, checking on the moisture penetration of all fields entered in the contest, and arranging the annual meeting program and dinner.

Four-state Cotton

Meeting in

!he

Agent and Assistant Hobart attended a meeting

Phoenix at which cotton growers from held

Arizona, California, New lexico and Texas formed a working organization to be known as

Four-State Cotton Committee to further the interests of cotton the growers in these states.

National

Youth Administration

Assistant

Demonstration

Agent Draper assisted members of this organization in setting up frame gardens for home vegetable production at

Tempe, using plans approved by

Miss Jean stewart,

State Leader of

Home

Agents.

Smith-Doxey

Organization

In addition to exceptional work in forming community groups for cotton classing,

Assistant

Agent

Hobart conducted a ser�es of three cotton schools at

Buekeye,

Roosevelt and

Gilbert, at which all phases of cotton culture were

Arizona and the U. S.

explained by Specialists of the

University of

Department of

Agriculture.

National Defense out the lection

Tbe stafr conducted an aluminum collection campaign through­ count" during the summer.

Schools were designated as col­ points and circular letters were mailed to farmers through­ out the county requesting that they deliver all a'lundnum to schools during a one-week period.

Only three hundred pounds of metal were collected, as the campaign was put on in rural communities after all other organizations had finished similar campaigns.

the

One meeting of the

Count"

Defense Board was attended by

Agent to make an estimate of the needs of farmers for new machiner,y

-42-

and repair parts during the coming year.

A report was prepared as requested.

Two meetings of the state

Hay and Grain Committee were attended, at which county quotas were discussed, and one meeting of the State Farm Defense members of the

Board, held in

Phoehix, was attended by staft.

A survey of junk dealers in

Maricopa County was made by.

the

Agent to obtain an estimate of the number of tons of scrap iron available.

Assistant

Agent Hobart attended one

Defense Board at the

�eeting of the State request of Director Pickrell.

Service Clubs

The staff has cooperated in every way with the various civic organizations in any program relating to agriculture.

The

Agent attended the annual

Farmers'

Day at the Phoenix Kiwanis Club, met with the Agricultural ComIni ttee of the Phoenix Cha.mber of Com­ merce to form plans for a county exhibit at the State

Fa.ir,

B..ssisted

Mr.

Walter

Strong in revising the agricultural and horticultural premium list for the same, assisted

Count,y Fair Commissioner Keith

Taylor in setting up the count,y exhibit and arranging material for judging, and collected farm products for the Chamber of Commerce exhibit during the Water Carnival.

Assistant

Agent

VanSant assisted at the State Fair with the livestock exhibits and Assistant McGuire assisted in up the

4-H

Club setting display.

Three meetings of the USDA Club were attended and at and Assistant one, the

Agent gave a talk on

"Food for Defenseft

Agent

Cochran showed colored movies and slides of

4-H

Club work in the county.

Various garden clubs were assisted in arrenging program, giving demonstrations and supplying judges for flower shows or contests.

Arizon� Jersey Cattle

Club program

The Arizona Jersey

Cattle Club has continued its general during the year.

Their annual meeting resulted in the elec­ tion of

George

Clyde Hussey, President;

Fred Chesney, Viee-President; Mrs.

Blendinger, Secretary-Treasurer.

Mrs.

Blendinger has written articles for each issue of the

Arizona

Farmer.

The Western

Field Representative for the

American

Jerse.y

Cattle during

Club, Mr.

R. T.

Warren, made a four day visit to the county, which time a tour was made of the breeders on the south side

-

4.3

-

ot the

Valley, and on the following day, a tour of the breeders on the north side was made.

It is noteworthy that several breeders have shipped in new blood lines in the form of bulls from some of the finest stock in the nation.

to

Discussion

California regarding the State Show herd which may be sent again this year, is gaining momentum.

The

Jersey

Club have and signified their interest in cooperating with the

4-H

Club

Program expect to assist in locating desirable calves for club members.

The

Jersey exhibitors had 84 head of cattle at the state

Fair, wh.ich

was the largest of the four main dairy breeds.

Purebred Breeders' Association

This association was rather ina,ctive of the year, due to the during the first half infrequent fairs and livestock shows which are held.

However, this association was re-organized by Assistant

Agent VanSant, with the help of

Mr.

C.

L.

Phillips and several other purebred breeders.

A very successful banquet and program was held on

November 12.

The next meeting will be held in

January, at which time the program of work officers held.

will be outlined for the year and the election of

Holstein-Friee:1a.n Cat.:t,le

Club

Mr.

Herbert Gates, of

Tempe, was re-elected President of this club elected for the year

1941.

Mr. W.

A.

VanSant, of Cas a

Grande, delegate to represent the Club at the National Convention was held during

June.

was the

One of the main events conducted herd classification of the by the Holstein Cattle

Club

Univer6ity of Arizona

Farm, the

Arizona state

Teachers College, a.t

Tempe, and at the Warren Kurtz farm, at Peoria.

Mr.

Nichols, steib-Friesian

Club,

Western assisted

Mr.

Joe

Representative

Knott, of for the

Pullman,

Hol­

Washington, who acted as the official connection with the scoring third annual judge.

This event was held in

Dairymens'

F'ield

Day conducted at the by

Universit,y of }�izona Farm at Tucson, about, 75 local dairymen.

A which event was barbeque luncheon was attended provided by the

University starf.

19.

The program.

The fall meeting of the Club was held at

Phoenix on

September report of the

National Convention was the main feature of the

Mr.

Ivan

Holstein-Friesi�n

Loughary, newly

Association, appointed Western

Fieldman made his first visit to the for the county during the State Fair.

-44-

/

Guernsey Cattle ClB£

This club has been qui te active this year, holding its second judging school for dairymen at the Shamrock Dair.y

at Tucson during May.

Mr.

Jack

Robinson,

Fieldman for the

Guernsey

Club was instrumental in securing .Mr.

G.

E.

Gordon, Dairy Specialist of the

University of California to act as judge.

A ver.y

interesting day was spent at the Shamrock

Dairy by some

25

Guernsey breeders from this coun ty

The elected the

Guernsey breeders met at the Kibler following officers: dairy in

July and

W.

T.

C.

L.

Bruce

McClelland,

President

Phillips,

Vice-President

Kibler, Secretary-Treasurer

S. C.

Minor

Herbert

Geare)

)

Mr.

Blackburn) Directors

Mr.

Robinson was able to during the State Fair.

spend one day with the breeders

Miscellaneous Activities

The staff has assisted numerous organizations in programs relating to agriculture and attended numerous meetings including: A talk at the Phoenix

Indie.n

School Annual Conference on

Home Gardens by

Assistant

Agent Draper and

Dr. A.

E.

tural

Griffiths, of the Horticul­

Department;

attended the Mesa Citrus

Show; the annus.l

meeting of the Arizona Citrus

Growers Association; the annual meeting of the Bank for at

Cooperatives; the meeting of the

National Reclamation Association

Phoenix; the Power and

Machinery

Section of the American

Societ,y of Agricultural Engineer's meeting held at Litchfield; the Cattle

Feeding test field day at the Mesa

Experimental Farm; the Arizona

Milk Producers' annual meeting at Glendale� the annual meeting of the

United Producers and Consumers

Cooperative; the annual fall Field

Day at the Mesa attended a

Experimental Farm on cotton, grain sorghums and soybeans; conference with Mr. L. G.

Galland, of the

Agricultural

Production Credit farm record

Association;

Miss

Ryan and

Specialist

Baker regarding keeping by members of the Association; arranged and planted a cotton va.riety

test in cooperation with Mr. H. A. stewart and the

University of Arizona

Agronomy Department; held one conference with

Directors of the St.

Johns Irrigation District in regard to flood control, and arranged a later meeting with the same board at which

Specialist Steenbergen and Mr. Warren

Turner, of the Soil Conservation

Service spoke; assisted the Mesa Chamber of Commerce in appraising land to be purchased for the use of the U. S.

Army

Air

Field near

Higley; attended a field day held by the

University of Arizona Horticultural

-

45

-

Department at the cantaloupe variety test plot at Tolleson; held one meeting of cotton growers at which the problems arising from cotton classing by the

Agricultural Marketing Service were discussed, and assisted in a survey of the State members of the Extension Service and

Hospital

Farm near

Phoenix by

Experiment

Station to outline a practical farm plan tor that farm.

in

Definite landscape assistance was given to 20 home owners

Bucke.ye

and Phoenix.

or

Seven programs were

213.

One lecture on home given to garden clubs with an attendance vegetable gardens was given to 40 people.

Sixty-one individuals have been a.dvised

on general ornamental work.

with

The Fourth Annual Buckeye Valle.y

Beautiful contest closed

60 contestants.

These entered as follows:

2 as most

19 as old unique places country homes

4 as new

22 as old

4 as new country homes cit.y

homes cit" homes

9 as community buildings

The above contestants this season: reported the following improvements

Planted

BuUt

311 roses

16 hedges

780

'shrubs

150 trees

19 vines

4 111y ponds

3 outdoor fireplaces

6 trellises and the

One day was spent in Pinal County judging a yard contest

4-H Flower Show.

was

The 4-H planned and vegetable judging contest for the

County

4-H Fair supervised by

Assistant Agent Draper.

include

The Mesa Farm rose demonstration planting was expanded to

36 varieties.

The new plantings

'Iere made in

February.

Due

-

46-

to reduced farm the budgets, no general manUre mulch was applied during spring.

Commercial fertilizer was applied in

Februacy and

May.

Ha.rvest

data was taken twice each week.

A manure mulch and ferti­ lizer summer application was made on

August

16.

At that time a ver,y light pruning was given.

We have two men who are of range revegetation in this count,y and we are actively looking for two or three more so this work can be put on a demonstrational basis.

D.

Vondracek, in Paradise doing a good

Valley job on the contoured about question

500 acres last year and is working on about

400 more this year.

Perennial plants made a good growth on stored water from last winter.

A demon­ stration ot moisture conditions above and below contour furrows was attended by a small group last spring.

J. C.

Elms, of Rt ttenhouse, has had a nursery under irri­ gation in cooperation with the Soil Conservation Service for two years.

He is assisting in securing range cooperators in his district.

In addition, attempts have been made to establish demon­ strational areas in the west end of the a county.

Roy Davis, in the

Volcenic School from domestic

District, planted grass seed which he watered supply.

However, no success has been had in getting contouring program started.

A visit was made to the farm of

G.

and

T.

Seve7 on the Gila River near

Agua Caliente, but the isolation general condition of the farm would not warrant an attempt to work in that area.

VI.

OUTLOOK AND RECOMMENDATIONS,

INCLUDING SUGGESTED

PROGRAM OF

WORK FOR NEXT YEAR be

Extension work in 'the carried on county during the coming year will by projects, as in the past, but with the entire program arranged to fit into the National Defense

Program.

It will be necessary to keep growers informed of all methods by which production can be increased without an increase in farm acreage.

A regular plan for informing producers of prices and trends will be worked out.

Mailing lists will be used this year even more than in the past and will be revised at intervals.

This plan should assist farmers in to a more obtaining top prices for commodities and also lead order� marketing program.

Qualit,y production in all lines will have to be recognbed by all producers if products from irri­ gated areas are to compete favorably areas where production costs are with those from non-irrigated less.

For this reason, quality production will be stressed in all pro3ects.

-

47-

The Agricultural Conservation

Program will require a small percentage ot the time ot the staff, although all members will be kept conversant with the program and will carr" on the educational phase of the program as necessary.

The program of the Farm

Securit.1

Administration will probab� require more time of the steff members than in the past.

This is due to the fact that the new program as outlined will be more far-reaching than that now in effect.

The National Defense

Program is at present an unknown quantity as to time which will be required.

However, it is recog­ nized as an important proj ect and as much time end effort as is re­ quired will be given by the staff.

year are

Proj ects which will be given special emphasis during the those leading to better quality and higher production in all commodities.

Pure Seed, Irrigation Practice, 4-H

Club,

Fertili­ zation

Practice,

Dairy

Feeding, Poultr,y

Management,

Economic

Survey,

Insect Pest

Control, especially on cotton and citrus, Disease Con­ trol, especially on commercial vegetables and miscellaneous crops not now being general:CYgrown in this area.

Weed eradication test plots will be continued in hopes of finding a more economical way of controlling noxious weeds than is now practical.

This will be necessar,y due to rising land values and the desire of farmers to utilize all lands under irrigation.

All work will be conducted in close cooperation with the

Farm

U. S.

Bureau,

Field the

University of Arizona

Experiment Station, the

Station, and all county, state and federal agencies and producer organizations engaged in projects relating to agriculture.

The in

Agent will devote his time largely to administrative duties and eo-ordinating the programs of the stafr with those of all agri­ cul turu agencies operating within the county.

SUMMARY AND OUTLOOK OF PROJECTS

Project

#1

-

Alkali Reclamation

Probab� more demand for assistance under this project be received this year than will last, due to a more abundant supply of water in has been all districts.

In the

Buckeye area where partial drainage completed, considerable acreage can be put in better condition through the use of tree or excess water for leaching during the winter months.

The addition of barnyard manures and cover crops to lands having a high salt content will continue to be advocated.

-48-

Project

#2

-

Fertilization

Practice with the

Fertilization test plots will be continued in cooperation

University of Arizona

Experiment Station departments, es­ pecially on cotton, alfalfa and grains, in hope that a solution of this problem may be found.

Field tours will be held covering test plots if results warrant.

!he

use of commercial fertilizers on vegetables will be advocated, tor soil as well as the use of barnyard and green manure crops building.

Due to the unavailability of some forms of com­ mercial crease fertilizers, the use of animal manures will probably in­ if prices of the material remain inkeeping with that paid for farm commodities.

Project

#5

-

Irrigation Practice

Assistance to the land owner leading to the more efficient use of water through proper levelling of land, length of irrigation

I'WlS, and time be made to of bring irrigation, about some will be research continued.

on irrigation

An effort will of alfalfa as this information is badly needed.

Demonstration plots on all crops will be established wherever practical.

Practices worked out on cotton and citrus mendations by

Mr.

Karl by the staff.

Harris, will be the basis for recom­

Project #6

-

Pure Seed

This the year in very important project will be continued throughout cooperation with the University of Arizona Experiment

Station, U.

S.

Field

Station, and Arizona

Crop Improvement

Associa­ tion.

The policy of smaller plantings of foundation stocks in the hands of reliable growers, will be continued eties or strains recommended by the

Advisor,y using only those vari­

Committee of the

Arizona

Crop Improvement

Association.

Seed dealers will be urged to keep the price of registered and certified seed down to the point where there is no incentive for

The use of pure a grower to use thresher or seed is stressed at all field days on gin run field seed.

crops.

Prgject

#8

-

Weed Eradication of the

The starf will continue to cooperate

University of Arizona

Experiment with Dr. Chas.

Davis,

Station, in maintaining noxious weed control test time in the plots.

This future than in the project will require more past.

This is due to increased land

-

49

-

values and weeds may higher prices for farm products.

Chemical control of be favored over cultural practices if labor conditions remain as at trol is present.

However, until more developed it will be the polic,r practical of this chemical department to con­ recom­ mend cultural methods or smother crops.

Project

#12

-

Pruning

Result demonstrations started last year will be continued

�uring the year.

Method demonstrations will be held at proper times in cooperation with

Specialist Tate covering all varieties of deciduous fruits, pecans, grapes, berries and ornamentals.

In con­ ducting this project considerable work will have to be carried on with individuals, as each one seems to think that his orchard or trees presents a particular problem.

Project

#13

-

Pecan

Propagation

Extension mental work projects must be closely correlated with

Experi­ being done as it affects cultural practices, yields, tilling, etc.

There 1s coming more and more interest in definite variety information for local conditions.

Marketing problems and systematic

(grading selling) should receive careful study by the Extension

Service.

It would be well to limit personal service work on budding and grafting.

Project

{IJ4.

-

Date

Propa.gation

An annual date offshoot removal demonstration should be given.

It has been found ver,y a brief discussion on other satisfactor,y to include at this phases ot date culture.

time,

Project #14.1

-

Citrus

N�serY

Practice for

There is very little interest in citrus propagation except top-working ot mature trees into varieties which fit into our present marketing picture to better advantage.

Project il5

-

Insect Pest Control

This project will be carried as in the past in cooperation with

Specialist Johnston and the U.

S.

Bureau or

Entomology and Plant

Quarantine.

Result demonstration plots on a field basis will be es­ tablished this year on done in order to bring the control or cotton insects.

This is results closer being to the grower than has been done

-

50

-

in the past.

New insecticides will be tested under field conditions in order that the most economical forms may be recommended.

Project

#23

-

Disease Control

With the cooperation of

Specialist Gottlieb, result demonstrations will be conducted as in the past method and on as many crops as may be necessary.

New control measures will be tried out and evaluated before such measures are advocated.

Special attention will be given to commercial vegetables and cotton.

Project

#26

-

E�onomic Survey

The compilation of acreage summaries of the several irriga­ tion districts will be continued this year.

In cooperation with

Specialist

Baker, the cost of production survey on citrus will be carried on.

of

It is planned to conduct more surveys on price trends major commodities and other surveys will be made as are essential in order to build up a better file of statistics for general use.

DairY and Livestock

Owing to the' very extensive army activi ty in and around

Phoenix and

Tucson, rather strong prices are being maintained for dairy and livestock products.

Several new dairymen have secured contracts to send their output to the Tucson milk the demands at Fort Huachuca and shed, owing to elsewhere.

Doubtless this trend will continue and prices may increase slightly due to this activity.

can

Sheepmen and cattlemen are finding this the best year theT remeuiber, due to higher prices and abundant feed.

This condltion is expected to be maintained throughout the year.

Swine growers are herds are in much the same being more position as other stockmen and many carefully attended to and slightly increased.

and the

Livestock men are looking forward to a very good year, government demands bring an outlook of higher prices.

Poultu

Because of rather high meat prices, poultr,rmen will probably continue to increase their activit,y here throughout year.

the

Poultr,ymen are prepared to meet the demands of increased production but at the same a time, caution is being taken to prevent serious condition that may follow.

Prices are very good and a heav,y hatch is expected.

-

51

-

Project

#29

-

4-H Club Work

During the first part of the year,

Assistant Agent

Cochran was in charge of agricultural 4-H Club work and general supervisor of the entire

4-H program in the county.

From

August

20, at which time Mr. Cochran was called to active duty,

Assistant

Agent

McGuire has been in charge of the program.

for a

There were

666 individuals enrolled with 606 completing completion of 92

.•

1%.

This number carried 722 projects in garden, dairy, poultr,y, swine, flower, rabbit, beef, sheep, handi­ craft, insects, rural electrification ahd home beautification.

This work was supervised by

39 leaders in

26 communities.

Project

Both senior and toUrs, field days and judging training were held.

junior demonstration teams were trained and repre­ sented the count,y in state competition.

The

The county fair was held for the

15th consecutive year.

Buckeye

Junior Fair was held, with exhibits made from all members in the school.

The leadership club completed its fifth year with

91.3% completion.

Twenty-three members took part in club activities, mainly semi-monthly group discussions.

The beef program enjoyed an increase to 25 members.

Twenty-three exhibits were shown at the Tucson Fair and two at the

4-H Fair at

Tempe.

manner as

For the in the coming year, work will be carried on in a similar past, stressing demonstration and judging team training, and improvement in quality of projects.

Encouragement will be given to older club members to increase the size of their projects, taking on a larger responsibilit.y

and competing in national contests.

The enrollment in this less relative peak as county has reached its more or far as number is concerned, in that any in­ crease in enrollment will not materially aid in putting the program over.

and

4-H

Club Work remains to be popular in all rural communities appeals to the youth as well as the parents.

-

52

-

SUMMARY

OF

ACTIVITIES

of

1941

J.

H.

0'

DELL, COUNTY

AGRI. AGENT

'l'he

County

Agricultural Agent is the representa.tive

of the

Agricultural

Extension Service in the county.

This service is one organized with trained workers to better rural living conditions through practical in­ struction 1n farm management, better crops and improved marketing service.

Funds for the operation of the service are supplied, after the approval of the

Count"

Farm

Bureau of a yearly program of work of extension activity, from county, state and federal funds.

It is the duty of the

County Agricultural Agent to direct the work of all county extension workers to coord�late with all other county, state and federal agency programs.

It is in this manner that a unified pro­ gram for the betterment of rural living conditions is carried on in the county.

Through the medium of field tours, method and resu! t demonstrations and meetings conducted by the Agent, producers are kept informed as to the most effective methods to use in all phases of agricultural production and marketing.

Timely information is gi.en

on various matters through radio talks, newspaper articles, circular letters and the distribution of bulletins and circulars.

Wherever possible, work is carried on through organized groups, but much individual help is given in conducting the program.

Assis­ tance and advice is always given, regardless of whether or not the individual is a member of an organization.

The service

1s one of adult education and is set up to assist all rural people without regard to size of operation, in improving rural living oonditions and making farming a more attractive and profitable occupation.

FRED

SUMMARY OF ACTIVITIES

of

DRAPER,

ASS'T. COUNTY

1941

AGRI. AGENT

The Assistant

Agent in horticultural projects has been responsible for all phases ot the work dealing with deciduous fruits, vegetables, small fruits and berries and ornamental plants, including landscaping.

In cooperation with the Horticultural

Department of the

Universit,y of

Arizona, demonstration plots have been carried on during the year in fertilization of various crops, variet,y tests, result pruning demonstrations and cost of production surveys.

Demonstrations have been held at various times in the year in cooperation with the Extension

Specialist in

Horticulture, on methods of pruning deciduous fruits, grapes, berries, ornamen tala and pecans; on graf'ting and budding of pecans, grapes, oli ves

, citrus and deciduous fruits, and on thinning of deciduous fruit for better quality production.

Individual assistance has been given in all lines to persons who have asked for the same in dealing with specific problems.

This assistance included advice on soil preparation, plant selection, cultural practices, disease and insect control, landscaping, construction of outdoor fireplaces, and pools, and fertilization.

Miscellaneous activities included assistance given in com-

��ity beautification programs, talks to garden clubs, preparation of articles tor local newspapers, radio talks and issuance of mimeographed circulars tor distribution.

SUMMARY OF ACTIVITIES

ot mGENE

McGUIRE,

1941

ASS'T. COUNTY AGENT starting on

August 13, 1941,

Assistant

Agent

McGuire took charge of the

Agricultural 4-H

Club program in

Maricopa County.

So far, his duties have included the responsibilities involved in the State 4-H Round-up at

Tucson, organization of clubs in the count.y, and an educational program for both group and individual training.

4-H

Club leaders are made acquainted with the

4-H program.

Students at the Arizona state Teachers

College at

Tempe are given rather intensive training in the procedures and problems involved in

4-H leadership.

The

Assistant

Agent assists individuals as much as possible.

Before recommending a project for a club member, his age, home conditions and type of farming in his community is seriously considered.

Group education is carried on in the form of judging tours, project tours and club meetings.

At these club meetings, feeding practices, breeds and t,ypes ot livestock and other local problems, are discussed

Besides the

.

practical application of sound agricultural practices, the Assistant Agent includes in his program, those principles that make for better citizens and citizenship.

Strict honesty in competition, obeyance of rules and regulations, willingness to cooperate with fellow club members, parliamentary procedure in club meetings and patriotism all included in the

4-H program, helps in building better citizens for the future.

SUMMARY OF

ACTIVITIES

of

D. E.

CREIGHTOll,

ASS'

T.

1941

COUNTY AGENT

During the current year, Assistant

Creighton, in charge of livestock, poultry and dairy projects, carried on the program about as usual.

The Herd Improvement Association is perhaps the one

wh�ch

receives the most attention because of the rather extensive nature of contacts which producers have to request aid with.

Problems varying from farm management, feed production, livestock management, breeding problems and selection of foundation stock, all come in for study and consideration.

A few beef cattlemen who are new in the business have been assisted in adjusting their operations in fattening cattle.

The feeding tests at the

Universit.1

of Arizona

Farm, at

Mesa, were well received by numerous beef cattle feeders who were in attendance at the Annual Field Day.

Turke,y growers have had a very good year and have found the frozen food locker plant to be of material assistance in enabling them to hold over their dressed birds and offer them to the market as needed.

w.

SUMMARY OF ACTIVITIES

or

R.

VAN

SANT,

1941

ASS'T. COUNTY AGENT

Assistant

Agent

VanSant was appointed in charge of

Dair,y,

Livestock and

Poult17 projects beginning August

1, 1941.

Since there are four distinct dair.y

breeds represented in the count" all wide� scattered, and each breed having its own cattle club organization and together make up the breeders' organization, and then another organization doing cow testing only', it is necessary to spend more time with the dairymen than any other group.

Each of these organizations have their board of directors, making six groups in all, with very little overlap in membership.

There are many demands from individuals for assistance in feeding, breeding, equipment, and general management problems.

Beet cattle and sheepmen have well functioning organizations of their own and thus make only occasional demands for individual services from this office.

Occasionally demands are made by the swine producers for assistance in their feeding and management problems.

Poultry and turkey growers, being able to enter and close out their business on short term, make a heavy load on the Extension office and account for a great many calls for individual assistance in the production ot poultry and poultry products.

There is the Poultry

Improvement

Assooia­ tion tor the hatoherymen and poultr,ymen producing hatohing eggs, and the new poultr,y producers ass�ciation which require assistance in carrying out their programs.

SUMMARY OF ACTIVITIES

of

CHARLES M.

COCHRAN,

ASS'

T.

1941

CO.

AGENT

The Assistant

County' Agent in charge of

4-H

Club work has been responsible for all boys' club activity in the

County, being assisted in general activities by the Assistant Home Demonstration

Agent.

Work in this department consisted of conducting project toun, holding field days to better acquaint club members with phases of the program, training judging teams, selecting animals for members, keeping individual records, conducting demonstrations, training leaders for project work and conducting fairs and club members to the

4-H

Roundup at Tucson.

Semi-monthly meetings were held with the

Leadership

Club at the Arizona state Teachers College, at Tempe.

Radio programs were given, articles prepared for local newspapers, and a monthly news letter published and mailed to all members.

Personal visits were made to consult with club leaders and members where necessary.

Projects have been conducted in garden, dairy, poultry, swine, flower, rabbit, sheep, handicraft, insects, rural electrification, home beautification, and beef cattle.

Results during the year have been ver,y gratifying and the work has been popular in all cummunities.

SUMMARY OF

CHARLES

HOBART,

ACTIVITIES

of

1941

ASS'

T.

COUNTY AGRI.

AGENT

Work with pure seed continues to be the most important single project worked on by

Assistant

Agent

Hobart, with responsibility for Field

Crops projects.

We have been told that our work on pure seed alone would be enough to justify our

Extension office, to say nothing of the wide variety of services rendered in addition.

The most important advances in pure seed work during the past year are:

(1)

Rapid change to disease-resistant strains of Double Dwart 38

Milo

(Pythium rot) and Baart

38

Wheat

(Rust)

(2) Extension of registration program

(more strict supervision of key fields) to other sorghums besides hegari.

(3)

Sign-up

100% of all short staple cotton under the Smith-Doxey cotton improvement work.

Long staple suffered a decrease due to fear of A.A.A.

penalties.

(4)

Some progress in our effort to secure wider use of pure seed b,y establishment of recognized limits of price based on market value of feed grain.

Work with irrigation included a study of effect based on

Water

Users' records, of use of free water on alfalfa during winter months; this seemed to affect yields through the second season after.

Irrigation methods of Karl Harris on cotton, and of A. T.

Bartell on small grain pastures were extended to growers.

Range revegetation work is being extended to other areas in

Maricopa

County, besides

Paradise

Valley, where it started.

Miscellaneous work included crop survey by irrigation districts, starting a system of record-keeping in cooperation with the Experiment

Station among operators of small to medium sized farms, hay survey, and conducting a production contest among growers of

American-Egyptian cotton.

Considerable organization work was done, particularly with the county and state Farm Bureaus and in the late months of the year with

Defense Boards.

Rose demonstration growth on plot on

Mesa Farm.

Note heavy spring

Hadley variety.

April,

1941.

Single

Hill of sweet potatoes,

Farm plot.

December, 1940.

Key West variety, from Mesa

Pecan trees

Mesa showing response to top-working by budding.

Farm, February,

1941.

Early

Newcastle apricot tree on

W.

J.

Pope place,

Phoenix.

After pruning, January,

1941.

Early

Newcastle

W.

J.

Pope apricot tree on place,

Phoenix.

Before pnming.

January, 1941.

Early Newcastle

Apricot tree on

F. C.

Chapman ranch, Mesa, after prundng

January

J

1941.

Ear� Newcastle

Apricot tree on

F. C.

Chapman ranch,

Mesa, before pruning.

January, 1941.

BEFORE

AFTER

Home of H.

M.

�Extension

Nelson, Buckeye.

Service Plans.

Landscape according to

!

BEFORE

AFTER

Smaller type of rural home.

Mrs.

Landscaping according to

Edith

Edgar,

Buckeye.

Extension Service

Plans.

Home of vice

L.

Way.

Landscaping plans.

December, 1940.

according to

Extension Ser­

Good

Beef

From

Maricopa County

BEFORE

AFTER

Home ot H. Miller, Buckeye.

Extension Service plans.

Landscape according to

Home of C.

O.

�o

Vosburgh, Buckeye.

Landscaping according

Extension Service plans.

Cultivating cotton grown in lister furrows.

Farm ot

Charles

Brandon, Rittenhouse.' Shovels ahead open up tor big wheels.

This method of culture may have a

Where alkali is a serious problem.

place

Johnson Grass in stub cotton at nearly free of it at right.

lett; planted cotton

8/21/41

Alfalfa

Will being cut at

Otto average

Neel:r's,

Gilbert.

32 or

33 inches at lower end and

6/14/41.

nearly as tall everywhere

(3 ft.

yardstick.)

Going two tons per A.

Harve

In sugar beet seed Wilson

A.

Dobson, Mesa.

background uncut beets and in far background a grain stubble fire.

Contour flooding.

Isabell-Hartner, Tolleson.

Note system of spilling water from one level to the next

(at each eno) and drop re-inforced by burlap bagging.

Threshing

Indian wheat in Paradise

Valley,

5/17/41.

(piles of bags in foreground).

Nat M.

Dysart says yields run to

1200# per A.

B. A.

Gillespie says

1000# acre yield.

Michels Grass

•.

5/6/4]..

Note sparse seed stalk growth and rosette form of plants on the ground that !ailed

to produce seed stalks.

Reclaiming

Alkali land by use of Bermuda Grass where fall is great.

Fall,

1940-Farm of Paul Versluis,

Bermuda sods heeled in lister furrows

Palo Verde.

(could not be prop­ agated from seed) and nearly covering bottom of furrow.

Fall,

1941--same location on

Paul Versluis Palo Verde farm.

Grass taller than ridges.

Roosevelt Dam wa ter

Taken spilling; north spillway carrying most of

4/19/41.

Flooded water is roads, a common sight in Salt River

Valley

When plentiful.

Chopped hay from field to feed bunk cuts the cost of fat cattle.

Finishing beef cattle is an important phase of Maricopa

County

Agriculture.

Gill

Brothers, larger cattle feeders and range men, use by-products from the cotton industr.y.

Labor saving feeding system makes for profit.

Feed processing feeds such as mill used in cattle silage, finishing.

Cheaper molasses, cottonseed hulls make for cheap gains.

Guernsey cow,

"Jessie," owned by

Marshall & Waldron doing her part in the "Food for Freedom" campaign by bearing two sets of twin heifers in just eleven months and three days.

Seth as

Rye is carrying on set up demonstrating the work of the testing agent in the work of the

Dairy

Herd

Improvement in the exhibit booth at the Arizona state

Association

Fair, 1941.

The theme of the exhibit is breeding, feeding, and culling, portrayed qy the charts in the background.

Holstein Herd Classification, Arizona State Teachers

College, Tempe.

Professor Ostrander at the chart.

A Club member and his Senior won

Ayrshire heifer that has many laurels for him in close open competition.

4-H

Club members state Fair

4.-H looking over a

Hereford heifer'at the judging contest.

4-H

Club members of learning why the judges placed a ring

Jersey cows as he did.

The

Dairy

Production Demonstration Team that repre­ sented Arizona at the National Dairy Show in Memphis.

These three fat stood one, lambs, all owned by a

4-H club member, two, three in an open class at the

State

Fair.

Buckeye

Fair

Sheep Champions

-

Ted and Don

Hazen

Buckeye

Local Fair

-

Judge from

Leadership Club

Beginning or Beef Project

-

Dick

Nee�

Finish ot Beef Project

-

Dick

Nee�

93511

-

Graded Prime

4-H

Fair

Bett,y

Sasser Placed 3rd in Beef

Project

Swine

Class

-

4-H

Fair

Swine and Auction Ring

-

4-H Fair

4-H

Entries at Tucson Show

Pou+tr,y Judging

Instruction

-

Field

D�

Swine Judging

-

Field

Day

Training

Given in

Beef'

Judging

Blue Ribbon WinnersFrom Roosevelt

A

Typical

Vegetable

Club

-

Avondale

Champion

Bird

-

4-H Fair

-

Jim

Townsend, Buckeye

Champion

Rabbit

-

4-H Fair

-

Arthur

Stallings

How to

Prepare Dairy

.Animal for Show

Ring

-

Instruction on

Field

Day

Dairy Judging

Instructions

-

Dairy

Field

Day

A

Typical 4-H Family

-

Raymond, Jr., Jane, Jean,

Mrs.

Percy

A Typical 4-H

Club

-

Mesa Franklin

Jersey Champion and Reserve

Champion

-

4-H Fair

Holsteins at

4-H

Fair

Demonstration Team

Making a

Rope

Halter

-

4-H

Fair

Demonstration Team

-

Wilbur

Bushong

4-H Fair

-

Candling

Eggs

Bob Johnson

Older

Club

Member Ed

Hauser Farms Alfalfa and

Cotton

Map Showing

Locations of 4-H

Clubs in

Maricopa Cotmty

Was this manual useful for you? yes no
Thank you for your participation!

* Your assessment is very important for improving the work of artificial intelligence, which forms the content of this project

Download PDF

advertisement