ANNUAL REPORT J. H.

ANNUAL REPORT J. H.
ANNUAL
J. H.
REPORT
o'rELL
CHARLES EOBART
PAUL Vi. BRCY.VN
w. R. V�I SAm
ANNUAL REPORT
J. H.
H. B.
OF
COUNTY AGRICULTURAL AGENT
AND
ASSISTANT COUNTY AGRICULTURAL AGENT
O'DELL,
POWERS,
AND
CHARLES
HOBART,
PAUL W.
w. R. VAN
ASSISTANT COUNTY AGRICULTURlili AGENT
AND
BROWN,
SANT,
ASSISTANT COUNTY AGRICULTURAL AGENT
AND
ASSISTANT COm�TY AGRICULTURAL AGENT
MARICOPA COUNTY
DECEMBER 1942 TO DECEMBER 1943
I N DEI
III.
Summar,y of Activities and Accomplishments
IV.
Changes in County Extension Organization
Form of Organization
.
.
•••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••
General Policies
Procedure
V.
•••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••
••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••
1-4
5
5
5
Program of Work
Factors Considered and Methods used in
determining Program of Work
Project Activities and Results
••••••••••••••••••••••
•••••••••••••••••••••
6
6-7
SOILS
Project III
Project #2
Project #5
Alkali Reclamation
••••••••••••••••••••
Fertilization Practice
Irrigation
Practice
••••••••••••••••
•••••••••••••••••••
7
7
8
CROPS
Project #6
Project 1/7
Project #'0
Pure Seed •••••••••••••••••••••••••••••
Better Alfalfa H�y ••••••••••••••••••••
11
Weed Eradication
11
••••••••••••••••••••••
9
HORTICULTURE
Project
Project
Project
Project
112
Pruning
Pecan Propagation
#13
Date Propagation
#14
#14.1-Citrus Nursery Practice
••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••
11
••••••••••••••••••••
11
-
•••••••••••••••••••••
••••••••••••••
12
12
DAIRY
Project
Project
Project
Project
#22
Dairy Herd Improvement
#22a -Dairy Herd lmnagement
Disease Control
#23
& Proven Sires
Better
#24
-
-
•••••••••••••••
••••••••••••••••
••••••••••••••••••••••
-
Swine Production
••••••••••••••••
•••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••
12
13
14
14
14
LIVESTOCK
Project #19
Project 1/20
Feeding Beef Cattle
Sheep Feeding
••••••••••••••••••
••••••••••••••••••••••••
14
14
MISCELLANEOUS
Permanent Pastures
Project
Project
Project
Project
#15
#16
#23
#26
•••••••.•••••••••••••••••••••••••
Insect Pest Control
••••••••••••••••••
Rodent Control •••••••••••••••••••••••
Disease Control (Plant) ••••••••••••••
Economic Surv�
••••••••••••••••••••••
15
16-18
18
18
19
POULTRY
Caponizing
Project #28
Project #30
Poultry Improvement
Project #30a- Poultr,y Disease Control
-
••••••••••••••••••••••
-
•••••••••••••
•••••••••
16
16
16
4-H CLUB WORK
Project #29
-
Boys
and Girls Club Work
••••••••
13-25
ORGANIZATION
Maricopa County Farm Bureau
Agricultural Conservation Program
County Agents' Conference
•••••••••••••••••••
•••••••••••••
•••••••••••••••••••••
Soil Conservation Service •••••••••••••••••••••
Farm Field Day ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••
Food
Rationing Program
••••••••••••••••••••••••
Service Clubs
Arizona Holstein-Friesian Association
Arizona Jersey Cattle Club
Arizona Guernse.y Cattle Club
Arizona Shorthorn Breeders' Association
•••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••
•••••••••
••••••••••••••••••••
••••••••••••••••••
•••••••
Pure-Bred Breeders' Association
Maricopa Poultry Producers Association
Maricopa County Rabbit Growers' Association
•••••••••••••••
••••••••
Smith-Doxey Organization
Victory Gardens
•••
••••••••••••••••••••••
•••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••
War Board
•••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••
Selective Service
Farm Labor Program
•••••••••••••••••••••••••••••
••••••••••••••••••••••••••••
25
25
25
25-26
26
26
26
26-27
27
27
28
28
28
28
28-29
29
29
29
29-31
VI. OUTLOOK AND RECOMMENDATIONS, INCLUDING SUGGESTED PROGa�
OF WORK FOR NEXT YEAR
31-32
•••••••••••••••••••••••••••
SUMMARY AND OUTLOOK OF PROJECTS
Alkali Reclamation
Project #1
Project
Project
Project
Project
Project
Project
Project
Project
Project
Project
Project
•••••••••••••••
Fertilization Practice
#2
#5
Irrigation Practice
Pure Seed
#6
Weed Eradication
#8
#12- Pruning
#13- Pecan Propagation
-
-
•••••••••••
••••••••••••••
-
••••••••••••••••••••••••
-
•••••••••••••••••
••••••••••••••••••••••••••
••••••••••••••••
#14- Date Propagation
Citrus Nursery Practice
#14.1
Insect
Pest Control
#15
Disease
Control
#23
Economic
#26
Survey
•••••••••••••••••
-
-
•••••••
•••••••••••••
-
•••••••••••••••••
-
•••••••••••••••••
32
32
32
33
33
.33
33
33
3.3
3.3-34
34
34
Dair,y & Livestock
Poultr,y
4-H Club Work
Project #29
••••••••••••••••••••••
••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••
-
••••••••••••
34
34
34
III.
SUMMP.RY OF ACTIVITIES AND ACCOMPLISHMENTS
Agricultural Extension Service program in Maricopa County
past year under numerous difficulties. The app­
roved plan of work necessarily has been changed from time to time to make
room for new projects which were deemed necessary.
As far 8.S practical
been
have
in
the regular manner
carried
to
regular projects
completion
with only minor changes being made to fit into the overall program.
To
of
farm
with
maximum
essential
the
production
products
promote
materials,
equipment and labor available has been the ultimate goal. 4-H Club work
has been carried on with as little change as any major project with in­
creased interest by individual club members; the Pure Seed program, al­
though being curtailed as regards cotton, has been increaeed to include
a number ofr'small grains and grain sorghums in order to provide an ade­
quate supply of pure seed to those areas of the country where seed is
grown with difficulty; speoial attention has been given to all pfuases of
Dairy Herd Improvement in order that greater production might be obtained
from producing herds and from herd incr�ases; Fertilization Practices'have
The
has been carried out this
'.
advoc�ted to make m.re efficient use of commercial fertilizers on
crops and th� substitution of animal manures and green manure
use
of those orops classed as less essential;
for
on Fire and Accid­
crops
ent Prevention on the farms; on better Poultry and Swine management and to
War Board Aotivities and assistance to local Selective Service Boards in
been
essential
retaining efficient farm
labor
on
farms
•
.,.
Cooperative projects with the University of Arizona Experimental
Station, the U.S. Department of Agriculture and other federal and sta'te
agencies have been eEl.rried on thr-oughcut the year. Outstanding among these
have been the educational phase of the Agricultural Adjustnent Agen� with
some member of the staff assisting the County Committee at all meetings �nd
'individuals with. problems arising from this program; cooperation with the
Soil Conservation Service in setting up soil conservation districts in three
areas; County War Board Activities in which applications for farm equipment
and dwellings were investigated and reuorted on at regul�r meetings as well
as making numerous investigations regarding requests for individuals for de­
ferment from militar,y service because of farm work; the distribution of
poison materials for both rodent and grasshopper control in cooperation with
the Fish and Wildlife Service and the U.S. Bureau of Entomology and Plant
Quarantine respectively, the U.S. Weat�er Bureau in reporting crop condit­
ions and outlook;
assistance to all farmer cooperative associations and
with
the
U.S. War Manpower CommisEion, U.S. Employment Service,
cooperation
War Food Administration, .Office of Labor and the U.S. Army in supplying labor
for the planting, cultivation and harvesting of essential crops.
The relat­
the
and
above
been
ex­
between
the
has
Extension
Service
ionship
agencies
cellent with satisfactory adjustments being made from time to time to cover
emergencies.
-1-
The SId th-Doxey program h13 s been conrtue t=d r � u sua L this past
year with a st.gn-u- of all cotton 11crPEge in thA county, but vlith much Le= s
enthusiasm for the progrflm by the individul:il farmer.
The rprllPst.E for pci�on
mash
furnished
the
from
meterials
of
BurPBu
Entomology &nd Plant
by
bran
Quarantine
the
were
grasshopper
much less this year then formerly due to the lightness of
infestation and to Ifck of ls.bor in some caSAR t.o RPply the
material.
Agricultural Conserv£tion ASfociation rpceived ��d filed a
3846 work �heets, carried insurance on 238 cotton farms �nd 29
wheat farms, received and distributed 864 tons of 20% Euner-rhosphate fert­
ilizer for use on alfalfa princip811;r Bnd distributed 201 carloads of feed
The
total of
wheat up to September 1st with each c�rload
agency also distributed subsidy payments to
report
totals is availRble.
on
The acrep.re of cotton for seed uroduction in �oo�eration with the
cut this year
but
Crop Improvement Associ�tion w�s drastically
acre�ge of vrain �nd grain sor�ru�� incrp.r-sed.
Arizona
the
This
averaging about 50 tons.
dairymen but Et this date no
Agricultural Chemical L�hor[1 tory in cr..erre of �lrr. Geor,O;p
Dr-aperprovicpd � Eervic� fnr Ell fprners renniril1C'" fnil, water or
manurp analysis,
and during the year has handled a total of 1624 Ramples
of
soil for salt contpr+, 792 water for salt, 12 noi�ons,
769
consisting
17 f'eed
13 mnnur-e and 21 miscellaneous, and in Addition to the customary
analysis for water ran 244 tests for flourine and 222 tests for nitrogen
on the 792 water samples.
Potash deteroination was JI1adp on 18 of the
soil eamples and organic nitrogen on 70 samples.
The
has
,
conducting �ll phases of tte Extension Progr�m in the County
2246 farm calls were ITlfde, 6821 office calls received, 11,140
telephone calls wade or received, 1660 letters written in res�lonse to in­
quiries, 168 circular letters written, fnd 50,585 copies mailed to individ­
uals and 67 articles prepared for publication in local rapers.
Mailing
lists have been kept up to date and contain over 3500 naMes Rnd �ddresses.
A News Letter was published during the earlier part of the year but was
discontinued due to insufficient stenographic help.
A total of 392 meet­
were
held
or
attended
of
a total attendance
members
the
�ith
staff
ings
by
In
a
of
total of
Result and method demonstrations held totaled 29 with 530 in
by automobile by staff
20,393.
A total of 34,550 miles· were traveled
attendance.
members in carrying out all programs.
the year members of the staff 'attended
of the County War Board and 6 of the State War
During
meetings
a
total of 42
Board, naking
a
total of 140
investigations on selective service, 23 for release from
army or navy to return to agricultural work and 13 for miscellaneous
farm equipment or buildings.
typing End filing of
Specialist in Entomology and
The clerical staff of four hps handled all
reports
and
for the Extension
correspondence
Chemist
for the Agricultural
ed by the staff.
in addition to all such work
-
2
-
as
has been need­
Officf's
building
which
located at 121m. Madison
are
strf'pt,
built for thp Fyt,t:>l"sion Service.
was
Phopnix in thp
In t.his
building
is housed also the �rr8.ricopa County Fern BurMl1 end the Executive Office
of t.he stat.e Feed end Fertilizer r.ontrnl.
LAtP. in the vear f,ir. A. E.
Frazif!r of the Bur-eeii of Fntomolocy FI4d Plant
Vl'3S provid.ed
Cuarnnti.rl�
with office space while at work in this county on erDsshoprer egg sur­
A meeting room which mill spet a�proximately dO IJersons is
vey work.
maintained for the
facility
ous
was
agrirultural groups for �eetinrs. This
meetings with an attendance of 1500 by va.ri­
of all
use
used for 66
far� organizations.
In tl:.king
over
the Farm Labor rrogram
-m
of'f'Lc=
r-as
estr.1blished
by branches at l.!esa and Buckeye. These offices are
staffed at Phoenix by an office rn&La�er, an assistant fnd one steno�rRrher­
clerk, and at Mesa Find. Buckeye by one stpnop'rarher-clerk e8ch. These
offices have for the 'Period June 1st t.o December 1st handled the I'-bar
at Phoenix and later
as
program
follows:
HRricopp
Orders
Cnunbr Re',ort fro.,., J'lne,
1943 t.o NovPT'1bpr, 1943 Inrlusive
1560
pIeced by farmers
Spl1�onal
�orkers needed to fill current orders
Estimate of workers available for rlpcement
Placements
yp�r-rounn
136%
'Workers ordered by farm�rs
total
846
�20
23
o
18
8152
372
314
7946
Men
�omen
youth
109
187
(under 18)
o
59
3309 Workers contacted Farm Labor nffice
seeking em�loyment
Prisoners of War
1704
bv VTF A
Interstate workers transported by VFA
1346
Foreign
workers trans"lorted
(not
housed)
Other out-of-st�te workers
�orted
or
207
trans-
692
Total out-of-state workers
2245
Approximately 365 long dist��ce calls regardL�g jobs
were
completed.
103 letters rpcoTIIDlending emergency gasoline for agricultural
workers.
102 letters
in
were
answered
giving information
on
available work
Maricopa County.
28 Cotton Growers signed contracts for 1634 interstate workers
for cotton
picking.
Of this number
the 320 cotton pickers they had
the pickers were available.
-
seven
placed
.3-
Cotton Growers h�
orders for when tn e;r
no
i ere
need for
notified
Practically
all orders for
requests for labor
have been filled
Most of t�e orners for cotton
RS of this date eycept for cotton pickers.
pickers have been filled except for out-or-way plHces, or for the Growers
with
no
housing accomnodations,
formation
Out of State pickers
on cotton picking.
or
are
for the Grower with very poor cotton.
still
reporting
to this office for in­
A good many out of statp wor�ers arp. conta�ting the Farm Labor
Office for general farm work but we rBve no r1Flr-p tn cj:)nn t,hpTTl, � IJ:lrf"P
number of these requests arp for r00rn �nn board.
It is ouite evident that trere is sufficient l�bor for
v�getable
Many workers who cane here for v�gj:)t�blp or citrus work
St�te
due to the critical housing shortege.
the
leaving
and citrus work.
are
The Mesa Farm Labor Officp has been very hplpful to the
farmers on the Southside.
We have had many favorable re:orts from
the farmers in this area.
The
Buckeye
Farm Labor Officp h�s accomnlished ve�, little.
-4-
IV.
CHbNGES IN EXTENSION ORGJ:JHZLTIUN
ill
Form of
Organization
The
lIiiaricopa County
Farm Bureau is the
or-ganf ze td on which by law
approves the program of work for each year and also the budget of expendi­
All meetings of the Board
tures of county and state funds for that work.
of Directors of the Farm Bureau &re attended by some staff member who acts
as
secretary
as
a
matter of convenience but not
as
an
elected officer.
The Extension staff at the �iting of this report consists of a
and four Assistant Agents, a. Home Demonstration I gent and one
Agent
County
Assistant Home Demonstration Agent, one Office Secret�ry, three Stenographer­
Clerks and one J��itor.
The Extension Specialist in Entomology has an office
in the building and is available at �ll timez.
..
One main Farm Labor Office is maintained in Phoenix and staffed Qy
Office Manager, one AssisULYlt Office Manager and one Stenographer-Clerk.
Branch offices at Mesa £.nd Buckeye are each in charge of one Stenographer­
an
Clerk.
(2)
General Policies
It hes been the �olicy of the Extension Service in this county to
offer the facilities of the organbation to all agricultural and farner org­
anizations, county, st�te and federal agencies and all civic organizations in
The Agent has served as a member of the
any program relating to agriculture.
County War Board and as ex-officio member of the County Agricultural Co�mittee
and a member of the staff has acted as secretary for the County Farm Bureau at
all
meetings.
(3)
Procedure
in the
Each year a program of work covering all pheses of Extension Work
drawn up by the Agent and Home Demonstration hgent and
county is
submitted to the Directors of the
County Fa.rm Bureau for suggestions or
This program outlines in a general way the ��jor and minor
to be carried on and is made flexible enough to allow for new
corrections.
projects
emergencies which may occur during the year. Project headings
general in order to cover the work without the necessity of new
Drqjects or project additions in suc� cases. The Program of �ork, after
work
are
or
made
approval by
Director for
the
County
a�provel
Farm Bureau Directors is submitted to the Extension
end
a
copy filed with the
County
Board of
Supervisors.
V.
(1)
PROGRAM OF WORK
Factors Considered B.nd Methods used in Determininp, the Program
of Work.
The Program of V[ork for the year was prepared after careful
consideration of the needs for certain phases of work.
Uajor projects
leading to greater production of essential com�odities were continued
without change and some minor projects were discontinued. Farmers have
been kept informed of changes in national programs by news letters, cir­
cular letters, circulars and bulletins, radio and news articles.
The use
of timely information in the form of printed or mimeographed leaflets has
The educational
proven quite effective in carrying out all projects.
phase of
County Agricultural Association has been centered around the
matter of the need for changes in cropping schedules and the necessity of
meeting national goals. County r.ar Bo�rd activity has been given first
consideration and will continue to be one of the major activities.
Mat­
ters to be handled through neighborhood leaders will be handled through
commodity groups and circular letters covering the program �hich needs
the
to be stressed.
(2)
Project Activities and Results.
Throughout the year staff meetings have been held as often as
General meetings with both Home Demonstration P�ents and Agri­
cultural Agents were held on the first of each �onth but conferences of
Agricultural Agents were held weekly or oftener if deemed necessa.ry.
This permits each member of the staff to be generally�iar with pro­
jects being carried by other members thereby preventing duplication of
necessary.
effort.
fberever
and execution of
pos�ible, Specialists
projects.
have been used in the
planning
During the year the �gent has devoted the major portion of
the ti�e to administrative work, T,ar Board activity and in cooperat-
ing with other &gencies. Assistant Hobart has been responsible for those
projects dealing with irrigation on field crops, pure seed, crop surveys,
better cotton gdnnfng and classing and field crops in general.
He has
been especially successful in getting established test plots on permanent
pastures with farmers in cooperation with the Soil Conservation Service.
Assistant Powers has been assigned those projects dealing with horticult­
ure, insect pest and disease control and also has devoted considerable time
to the labor program.
His work on Victory Gardens was outstanding as shown
the
remarkable
in home gardens on the farms as well as in the
increase
by
cities and towns. Assistant VanSant has been conducting those projects
dealing ��th livestock and poultry f�d has given some time to organization
of soil conservation districts. He has taken over the issuance of the
monthly report of the Cow Testing Association and at the time of this re­
port is serving as Acting Speci�list in Dairy and Poultry. Assistant
Brown has been in charge of 4-H Club work and has received excellent
cooperation· from members and leaders alike. Specialist Roney has been
available for
part time work in insect
His assistance has been very
control.
pest control
helpful.
as
�ell
as
disease
The clerical work has been ce rr-Led on by I'!irs� Jean Eivar, Office
and by Mrs. Josephine Henness who succeeded
Secretery, resigned July 1st,
her to that position, Mrs. Theoda Moore, Miss Betty Doughty, Mrs. Lorra.ine
Peterson, Miss Eileen Collins, and Mrs. Eva Williams, Stenographer-Clerks
assisting with reports, new bulletins ond mailing lists.
(Mrs. Moore,
now on lea.ve until March 1st); Miss Doughty resigned effective April 12,
1943; Miss Collins resigned effective November 6, 1943.
The Faro Labor Program has been conducted by L. B. Snith, Office
Manager,
Baxter, Assistant M��ger and Mrs. Helen �nderson, Steno­
gra�her-Clerk at the Phoenix office; Mrs. Mary Neilson in charge of the
Mesa branch and Mrs. Helen Boone at the Buckeye office.
G. M.
The office of the County Agricultural Conserve.tion Association
separate from that of the Extension Service but the educational
of
this
phase
program has been carried on at meetings, and through news
letters &nd circulars.
has been
SOILS
Project #1
Alkali Reclamation.
-
Interest in this project during the year has been slight due
to
No attempt was
shor-tage of equipment and labor for land Leachdng
alkali
districts
to
but
the
increase'in
use of sulfur
overcome
�
,
made
soil corrective has been marked. All growers are advised to make
of free water or all available �ter for leaching through heavy
irrigations during winter months.
as
a
use
Project #2
-
Fertilization Practice.
importance of
the proper use of animal manures and nit­
crops bas been stressed for all crops.
Growers have been advised to use commercial fertilizers only on crops which
are known to respond to the use of the same and to use no more than was
The
rogen-bearing
green
manure
necessary.
Citrus growers again this year have shown an increased in­
terest in grove fertilization.
This is due to the increased r�turns
per acre for fruit which will allow the grower to carryon better
Heavy nitrogen fertilization during the winter mon�s has
Assistance was given to 62 different
grove owners on their fertilization problems, recommendations being
practices.
become
an
accepted practice.
made as to the kind and amount of fertilizer to
time to apply.
-7-
use
and the proper
Arrangements were made by Assistant Powers Y'i th tvro vrowers of
an experiment on �ne control of mottlp-leaf in coorerat­
ion with the Ag-riclllturAl Chpmi�trr Dp�qrt.ment.
Mr. w. T. M"Gf"or�p will
eondnct the ey�erim€nts !lna has nut into effect two different t.reatments.
One is of the use of barnyard manure and su Lf'nr- s-nd +he o ther- wi th b�rn­
citrus to conduct
vard
manure
and sulfur with small ��ounts of mangRn�se, iron sulfate �nd
Results of these tests will be reported at a later date.
zinc sulfate.
Assistence
on
ercial
fertilization problems
These
either
given to sixteen
was
comm­
+hose
vegetable growers.
growers
grovdrig
they had not grown before. Crons involv�d were watermelons,
Numer-ous rrrowers of
potatoes, tomatoes, corn, onions end sweet po tat.oe s
small acrp8ges snd Victory ��rdeners were given Bssistancp rith their prob­
lems.
Six owners of deciduous fruit nrchprrls, two berry PTower� and numer­
ous home orcnardists were given advice on nrorer methods of fertilizRtion.
were
new
or
crops which
,
Six orchardists
ation
were assisted in tte rroppr use of cover crops.
Fertiliz­
discussed at all garden club meetings with regard to use in
Gardens.
was
Victory
The overall summary of the fertilization program seems to in­
dicate that growers of vegetable, fruit and genAral crors ""':i.th the exc�pt­
ion of cotton have endeavored to use the proper' fertilizer to produce
Alfalfa growers have used more phospl1�te �t the time of
maximum crops.
seeding
and also in renovation of old
Project #5
-
Irrig�tion
a Lf'a.Lf'a
than
was
used in
past years.
Practice
irrigation principles workpd out by Mr. Karl Harris of the
generally accepted in this county and little additional
work is being done �long this line.
This practice was stressed by Mr.
Harris at a series of cotton meetings held early in the year.
Cotton
U.S.D.!.
are
now
The barley irriga.tion plots at Southwest Cotton COIPp�ny planted
1, 1942 fhowed the value of a period of dry treatnent after plant­
ing. The fall wet plot was irrigated about a month after planting (prob­
ably a little too soon) Elld produced 2,420 pasture days of catt.le November
7 to 17.
The fall dry plot benefitted by a rain and grew rapidly by
pasturing time. November-l7 to 29 it gave 2904 pasture days of cattle.
The fall wet plots �roduced 8760 sheep d8ys of feed in l�t� Dece�ber and
the fall d� plot �s pastured about the middle of January but record
not kept.
The'fa.ll wet plot produced 1831# of threshed b�ley per &cre
and the fall dry plot 2157#.
October
Analysis
was
made in
cooperation
with Karl
Harris,
U.S.D.A. of
irrigation districts of Maricopa County on the basis of their crop
The best knowledge of water requirements of various
acreages for 1942.
the
classes of crops
be' arrived at.
was
used to
Showing
project monthly
the effect of
-
8
a
-
need
one-crop
so
that totals could
system the districts
divided into those having over 50% cotton �d tho3e having less
proportion, for sWfu�rization. Copies of the report were
to
the
sent
irrigation districts and a.t least 'two, the Roosevelt V!ater
Conservation District and Municipal i7ater District #1 are making use
of the method for their own pur�ose3 of an81ysis.
Co�plete copies of
the summaries and the individual districts are included in this report.
were
than that
Growers of citrus, vegetables, pecans, deciduous orchards,
ornamental plants, alfalfa and grains were given advice and assistance
in working out irrigation problems.
In a number of cases inefficient
use of water by inexperienced Labor-er-s was found to be the cause of ab­
normal pl.anf growth.
In all cases alfalfa and orchard growers were
advised to use at least one heavy irrigation during the winter months.
continued use of the level for prQpe� udju3tment of irrigation runs or
prior to land-levelling indicates thEt landowners have become aware of
the necessity of proper levelling as a means of higher production.
Project #6
-
Pure Seed
This year crop acreages entering the pure seed program of the
Arizona Crop Improvement Association were decidedly different from l&st
Alfalfa and sorghum acreages increased while cotton and grains
year.
decreased.
Alfalfa acreage incre�sed from 865 acres in 1942 to 1,322 acres
1943. Sorghum acrea.ge in the progran almost doubled. It came from
3,672 acres in 1942 to 6,596 acres in 1943. Increase came in hegari
acreage &nd in change of policy allowing certification of sorghums not
recommended for growing in this state, for shipment to other sections.
Under the latter classification 379 acres were grown wi� the following
varieties and acreages:
in
Bonita
Atlas Sorgo
Martin Combine �ilo
33
40
acres
306
acres
acres
Small grain dropped from 2,863 acres in 1942 to 956 in 1943.
Biggest drop was in Baart 38 wheat which was not planted to any extent
in 1943.
Arivat barley came nearest to maintaining acreage with a drop
Baart wheat dropped from 1711
from 482 acres in 1942 to 303 in 1943.
acres in 1942 to 386 acres in 1943.
All cotton in the pure seed ?rogram dropped from 7,162 acres in
to
1942
3,115 acres in 1943. Most of this was accounted for by the drop
of SxP cotton from 5,435 acres in 1942 to 1,707 acres in 1943.
prices
Table No. 1 shows acreages of accepted crops in the program Bid
charged for pure seeds the current year.
-
9-
TABLE NO. 1
-
MARICOPA COUNTY PURE SEED VARIETIES, ACREAGES ACCEPTED BY A
IMPROVEMENT ASSOCIATION IN 1943, PRICES OF CERTIFIED SEED P
-
ALFALFA
Class
of
Seed
Variety
&
Acreage
Accepted
--
-
..
-
_.-�
Price or
Cert.
Seed
for
1943
--
-
,
SMALL GRAIN
Variety
&
Acreage
Accepted
Ple.nt.
Chilean
174
acres
42¢
Registered
Price of
COTTON
Cert.
Seed
for
Variety
1943
Accepted
&
Acreage
PlRnt.
38
Baart
None
SXP
Wheat 125 A.
Avail.
776 A.
Vaughn Barley- 17 A.
38i¢
Acala
Arivat Bar-
38�¢
Coker
Wilds
40 A.
lAv-
�'l
A
Calif. Red
429 A.
Oats-5B A.
Chilean
1148 A.
40¢
Baart 38
Wheat 26lA.
Vaughn
Bar-
ley 182 A.
Arivat Bar-
Certified
ley 268 A.
Calif. Red
Oats- 10 A.
32i¢
32i¢
32i¢
40¢
SxP
931 A.
Aca.la
793 A.
Coker Wilds
82 A.
Alfalfa
handling the alfalfa program this
in alfalfa which could not
factors
year.
However,
be ignored.
was
The first
the introduction of Argentine seed which we
understood was being handled by one firm in Yaricopa County this fall.
Another was the Indian alfalfa being grown in Yuma which is more pro­
ductive but which we feel is less winter hardy and will hurt outside
business if mixed with our Chilean.
No unusual
problems
there
were
arose
in
some new
Sorghum
likely to experience some difficulty with our sorghum
a prett,y fair job in the past it appears that we are
lose out unless some"changes are made.
The labor situation was
We
seed.
are
Having
done
to
serious and we have had more trouble than usual with Johnson grass.
How­
ever there was a loosening of the rules to accept parts of fields, all
parts of which do not have sufficient isolation, which is due to give us
If the farmer owned and controlled his own combine
some bad moments.
likely
doubt that acce£ting parts of fields would work.
However, a
are
and
the owner
of
fields
harvested
custom
large proportion
by
operators
is in no position to insist that he put tags on seed from only parts of
fields.
One case that has just been checked at Blythe, California is a
clean-cut case of the combine putting tags on all the field.
The farmer
there is
in the
no
case
is
a
man
of
good character.
The car load of sorghum seed donated by growers and seedsmen was
made up early last spring for shipment to Russia.
As far as we know it arr­
ived safely, but it seems that a report should be made how the seed was used,
and what results were obtained from it.
Small Grain
Small grain seed supplies are inadequate for the needs as they have
Shift from cotton in this valley has meant considerable demand for
small grain as well as alfalfa.
Last year a drive was made to secure adequate
seed stocks of Baart 38 wheat.
It was not grown in 1943 and consequently we
arisen.
are
short of seed
this
season.
Cotton
The shift away from cotton was mainly due to the labor situation.
The course of the war has removed the need for an acreage of SXP.
Carry
over of 5xP seed from 1942 probably will provide for planting needs for 1944.
classing
Cotton acreage and number of participants in
down about 2/3 of what the,y were in 1942.
Table No. 2
new
Smith-Doxey
cotton
are
on
page 28 shows the
membership
and acreage in
1943.
Cotton meetings were held February 1-4 in the county to talk
factors in cotton production.
-
10
-
over
About 550 acres of guar were grown in Maricopa County this year
for seed (outside the Crop Improvement Association).
Most of this was
with
under
contract
General
�ills.
It was grown for its MUcilage
grown
used in paper making and is a war crop.
Whether this acreage expands
depends
on
number of factors.
a
acreage expands and the primary
feed will be a by-product.
There is 'some possibility that if the
is done locally, a high protein
milling
An important part of the pure seed program r.as the calling of
meetings of growers and dealers to set prices for pure seed. Rules eov­
erning the disposal of such seed were approved at these meetings and it
is felt that in most cases such rules he-ve benefited the general public
in that prices have been kept moderate and not allowed to go as high as
in
some
cases
Project #7
in last year.
Better Alfalfa
-
Hay
due to the ceiling price on hay
ni�ht baling impossible. With the
shortage of labor,growers were forced to bale hay at �Tti�e at which
equipment and men were available. Such practice does not lead to better
hay preparation.
This project
was
discontinued
and to the labor situation which mRde
Project #8
Weed Eradication
-
scarcity of materials and labor little was accomplished
project.
given on cultural method of control
of nut grass, Bermuda and Johnson Grass.
Many calls were received regard­
Due to the
on
this
Assistence has been
ing control or eradication of white
practices has been available.
horse nettle but
no
information
on
cul­
tural
HORTICULTURE
Pro j ect
trees
with
given
#12
-
Prlming
Seven demonstrations of proper methods of pruning deciduous fruit
conducted by Assistant Powers in various parts of the county
were
a
total attendance of 70.
and attended
by
Assistance
seven
was
One demonstration of
rose
pruning
was
also
persons.
given
to individuals
as
growers, twenty-eight deciduous fruit growers,
growers of ornamentals.
follows:
six
ber�r
eleven citrus
growers and nine
Homeowners having a few fruit trees in yards express considerable
Uost of these trees
interest in pruning and general care of these trees.
had been badly neglected in past years but with proper pruning and fert­
ilization could be brought back into
Project #13
grafting.
-
Pecan
profitable production.
J?ropa.gation
A total of 42 persons were given information
Most of these �ished to work over seedling
-11-
on
or
pecan budding and
non-profitable
varieties in
of
grafting
and
three
yard plantings. A series of seven method demonstrations
conducted by Assistant Powers during the month of April
demonstrations were attended by a total of 56 persons.
were
Interest in pecan growing has increased during the year due to
high prices of nuts and additional information on fertilization practice
is needed.
Commercial growers experience little difficulty in producing
of
good crops
nuts, but trees growing in dooryards are likely to bear only
occasionally
or
not at all.
These
are
Project #14
Date
-
being used as a combination
produce enough nuts for family use.
trees
shade and nut tree but could be made to
Propagation
Interest in date culture w�s hiRh during the yea r.
Requests for
of pollen were so great that male blooms wer� collected by Assist­
ant Powers and kept at the office to be used by owners of a small number
of palms.
Information was given on processing dates to nineteen families
and nineteen growers were assisted with problems dealing with pollination
and production.
sources
A surve.y of the date gardens Fade in August by Assistant Powers
accompanied by Ux. Roy Nixon, U.S.D.!. of Indio; California showed an
estimated loss of about 30% of the fruit due to rains in late July and early
August. This loss was keenly felt by all growers, since the demand for fruit
this year has far exceeded the supply.
Inquiries regarding home curing of
owners
were putting up dates for future use
dates indicated that more home
than in
former. years.
The need for
revised bulletin
a
on
date
growing
has been very app­
arent this year.
Project #14.1
Few trees
-
Citrus
Nursery
Practice.
The demand for citrus nursery stock during the year has been slight.
were being propagated
and these were in the hands of experienced
Therefore
nurserymen.
on this project.
no
nursery tours
or
method demonstrations
were
held
DAIRY
Project #22
-
Herd
Dairy
Improvement
herd
improvement work was handled through the Maricopa
meeting was held in the C9unty Agents office in Jan­
The
1943.
accomplishments of the past year were given by 1�. Rowe,
uary
Specialist in Poultry and Dairying.
The
D.E.I.A.
dairy
The annual
In the
cows
Maricopa County
the year.
These
completed
326.5 pounds of fat.
of milk and
sixty herds involving 2243
produced an aV5rage of 8,420 pounds
This represents an increase of 306 pounds
Association
cows
-u-
of milk and 6.2
pounds of fat
per
cow
from
previous
year.
The Shipley Trophy awarded each year to .the o��er of the herd
Maricopa County Association showing the highest percentage fat
increase goes this year to Mr. & Mrs. George Peterson, �hose herd of
fifteen registered Jerseys produced an average of 7,651 pounds of milk
and 358.5 pounds of fat each for a fat increase of 42.67 over the prev­
in the
ious year.
The results of the Ton-of-Fat Club for the year summarized
as
follows:
1-10.
cows
2000 lbs.
Name
H.
3000 Lb s
16
Phoenix U.S. Indian School
Chesney
No. Cows
Farm
8
A. VanSant
No.
,
over
Cows
4000 lbs.
7
2
1
4
0
0
Total
25
5
8
Mr. Blume
ing
ment
in October.
over
was hired as a third Field Supervisor beginning test­
All herds were put on a monthly test which is an improve­
bi-monthly testing.
The full Board of Directors and the
Herbert Gates
Roy Marshall
Clyde Hussey
c. L. Phillips
George Blendinger
Project 22a
-
DairY
Herd
length
of office is
as
follows:
President
1943
1944
1945
Director
1946
Director
1947
Secretary-Treasurer
Vice-President
Management
The dair,ymen have been very interested in feeding methods and
labor requirements to obtain high production, due to high cost of feed
and labor.
A greater percentage of dei�en have been feeding grain to
these cows based on production requirements to get high �roduction at a
use of labor.
These two factors have been stressed this
increase production over last year by
Production
records
showed
year.
months up to April at which time production began to decrease and decreased
below last years production in late summer and fall due to high cost of feed,
labor and price control on dairy products being out of balance with other
minimum cost and
This condition resulted in many herds being sold.
However, prices
were good, selling for $175 to $200 for top grade cows until
fall when the demand decreased and cows would not sell.
Recommendations and
blue prints have been furnished for dairy barns, milk houses, bull pens,
breeding chutes, and other dair.y equipment.
products.
for dairy
cows
-
13
-
Project #23
-
Disease Control
The demonstration work on Ox Warble control was continued, the
second treatment being applied on three herds cooperating in 1942-43.
No
demonstration work was planned for the fall of 1943-44.
Dr. W. T. Pistor
assisted in diagnosis work in dairy and beef cattle.
was
Management, feeding
and sanitation have been
Where
stressed to control disease in livestock.
the problem of disease treatment occurred, the services of a veterinarian
were recommended.
Swine Production
The swime population reached the maximum that could properly be
marketed in the county and many shipped to California for better prices.
At
With feed costs increasing reduction in bog numbers bas been stressed.
the present time, there is nO.demand for breeding stock and a large number
of feeder pigs are being offered for sale.
Many problems in disease and
from
ailments
resulting
improper manage�ent have occurred.
Project #24
-
Better and Proven Sires
Sire selection, especially pure-bred or proven eires, have been
stressed at dairy meetings of the breed clubs, in news letters, D.H.I.A.
Eight dairymen bought bulls based on
program and with individual dairymen.
the discussion of their pedigrees.
Indirectly many dairymen �ere assisted
in securing pure-bred bulls by being directed to the breeders having bulls
to sell.
LIVESTOCK
Project #19
-
Feeding
Beef Cattle
The Central Arizona Cattle Feeders and the Arizona Cattle Growers
The Assistant A[ent bas cooperated
Associations maintain offices in Phoenix.
and worked with these organizations whenever possible.
New feeders and cattle
the
been
their
assisted in planning
growers in
county have
equipment, layout,
rations for pen feeding and pasture practices.
Pasture sold for 12¢ to l5¢
More cattle were on pasture than any other
per day per head during the year.
Fewer cattle were pen lot fed due to market conditions controlled by
year.
the a.p.A.
During the summer, meat shortages existed, due to the closing of
a large packing plant and the reduced slaughtering of the largest packing plant.
Project #20
-
Sheep Feeding
Assistance has been given individual farmers in securing breeding
animals to establish small farm flocks, as well as equipment and feeding pro­
Pasture sold for I! to
gram information to handle these small farm flocks.
1 2/3 cents per head per day during the fall.
Lamb and wool prices were very
good, averaging above normal.
-14-
MISCELLANEOUS
Permanent irrigated pastures are being tried out in Mari­
copa County this year on the basis of recommendations of the Soil
Conservation Service trom their nurser,y work at Tucson, and the Univ­
ersity. They have jointly made recommendations of pasture mixed for
different elevations in the state and the number 1 mixture for elevat­
ions less than 2,000 feet was the basis for the trials.
We eliminated
bur clover per acre since the dair,ymen felt they already had enough
of that.. The following mixture was used as the basis of the tests:
2#
411
6#
4#
6#
2#
2#
2#
Perennial ryegrass
Meadow fescue
Orchard grass
Dallis grass
Rhodes grass
Alfalfa
Hubam clover
26#
Total
•
per
acre
Since the above mixture would cost the grower approximately
$16.00 per acre it was felt that public service agencies should bear
part of the coat of the testing. Therefore cooperative agreements
were entered into for the growers to advance $10.00 per acre for pur­
chase of 16# of the No. 1 mixture, funds to be handled by the Maricopa
County Farm Bureau. The Soil Conservation Service Nursery supplied
approximately a third of the total poundage of seed from varieties
tested by them that could ne t be purchased commercially.
Two separate
mixtures are being tested on different soil types in the county as foll­
ows:
Heavy
soil mixture
4#
4#
Harding grass
Dallia grass
Intermediate SolI Mixture
Lehmann's
1#
6#
3#
lovegrass
Prairie grass
Italian r,yegrass
This made a total poundage for the heavy soil mixture of
and for the intermediate soil mixture of 2611 per acre.
A refuhd of
$2.00
per
ture in
acre
over
made to growers.
In addition one cooperator is growing two acres of our #1 mix­
comparison to a California mixture sold commercially here.
In
using
was
24#
the
an
effort to reduce the number of
components
following:
Dallis grass
Alfalfa
Perennial ryegrass
Meadow fescue
-
15
-
one
grower is
POULTRY
Project #28
Caponizing
-
Very little interest
has been shown in the production of capons
individual program within city limits and for personal use.
Four demonstrations were given on the method of caponizing.
except
as
an
Project #30
Poultry Improvement
-
Maricopa County Agent's office is the headquarters for
Poultry Improvement Association with the following officers
The
Arizona
the
in
charge:
Vogel, President
Campbell, Vice-President
Walter Cochran, Secretary-Treasurer
G. Hawes, Director
F. Ricke, Director
N. E. Bradley, Director, Rep. Nat. Turke,y Growers
W. H. Wells, Rep. Int. Baby Chick Association
C. F. Rowe, Specialist in Poultry and Dairy, Contact Rep.
for the National Poultry Improvement Plan sponsored by
the Bureau of Livestock Industry
v. A.
I. M.
Maricopa County thirteen hatcheries signed contracts for the 19421943 program. Five hatcheries signed contracts for the 1943-1944 program. This
reduction in hatcheries is the result of increasing the requirement for parti­
cipation which included all members meeting the Pullorum Controlled classifi­
cation and membership fees based on hatching capacity.
In
Thirteen flock selecting and testing agents were authorized to work
for the Association as Fieldmen.
Mr. L. L. Lipp was hired as the official
inspector for the year.
Table No.3 summarizes the work of the
Poultry Improvement
Association.
Individual poult�en were assisted in working out breeding programs,
securing qual.tty chicks and culling poultry flocks. Many bulletins in poult­
ry production were mailed to pOUltrymen.
Project
H30A
-
Poultry
Disease Control
project required a great amount of time spent with individual
poultrymen. They were helped control and treat poultry diseasesand parasites
in their flocks.
Many new poultr,ymen came into production for eggs and meat
This
for home
use.
MISCELLANEOUS
Insect Pest Control
Project #15
-
The past year brought out a number of pests in damaging numbers which
heretofore were not of economic importance,and also some new methods of control
-
16
-
�BLE NO
•
HATCHERIES IN MARICOPA COUNTY PARTICIPATING IN THE ARIZONA PO
I��ROVEMENT ASSOCIATION
.3
Report by Hatcheries (Only
the Final Test is
Used)
Totals
-
Handled
I
Culled
I %Cul1ed
Rea
Tested
434
44
10.10
390
1
Wfi1ter Cochran Hatchery
4702
854
18.86
3S48
3
Del Rio Hatchery
4236
504
11.89
3732
1
11458
1926
16.80
9532
11
1212
61
5.03
1151
1
Glendale Hatchery
4706
481
10.22
42�5
12
Jacob's
1574
215
13.65
1359
1
Johnson's O.K. Chickeries
4877
547
11.21
4330
5
Liggett's Hatchery
9847
860
8.73
8987
14
895
67
7.84
828
3
1987
574
28.88
1413
Forrester's Hatchery
4640
472
10.17
4168
8
Sunshine Hatchery
1452
205
14.11
1247
2
Vogel Hatchery
1248
46
3.61
1202
1
Ashby Hatchery
Go1dspot Hatchery
Hensen
Mesa
HAtchery
Hatchery
Hatchery
Norton's
Hatchery
I
1
Custom Hatchery
t
3195
156
4.88
3039
9
All other Hatcheries
f
3667
186
5.07
3481
9
as
well
as new uses
for insecticides.
ologist has been especially helpful
results of control
in
Roney, Extension Entom­
makine field surveys and checking
Dr. J. N.
meaAures.
cotton bugs, causing severe
Major pests observed this year were:
and
in
all
both
short
cotton
sections; cotton 1e8.f­
damage to,
long
staple
but
found
t�e
throughout
apnearing in numbers
county
perparator generally
the
in
the
end
of
west
great enough particula�y
valley to defoliate plsnts
and cause severe loss; cutworms in �lfalfa and potatoes, but controlled read­
ily with poison bran mash; salt marsh caterpillars late in the season dam­
aging newly planted alfalfa, grain and vegetables and potato staTh borer in
Irish potatoes causing severe damage.
Other insects observed during the year were aphids on vegetables
ornamentals; cockroaches in dwellings; grasshoppers on vegetables and
general farm crops; borers in citrus, roses and deciduous fruit trees; thrips
on lettuce, onions, cabbage and ornamentals; mites on ornamentals; striped
and twelve-spotted cucumber beetles on cucumbers and melons; corn earworms
on corn; bean beetles on string beans; mealy bugs on cotton; peach twig borer
in peach and apricots; grape-leaf skeletonizer on grapes; crickets on veget­
able crops and termites in dwellings.
and
A series of four
meetings
were
held at
Buckeye, Peoria, Gilbert
and
Laveen to acquaint cotton growers witn approved methods of cotton bug con­
trol.
A color film furnished by Arizona Fertilizers Inc., ��d showing the
major
pests were shown at these meetings. At the time of the severe
potato stalk borer infestation a circular letter on the control
insect was prepared by J. N. Roney and H. B. Powers and mailed to
cotton
outbreak of
of this
all growers
A survey of the needs of citrus growers for sugar to be used
in the tartar emetic spray for the control of citrus thrips resulted in a
request being made to the OPA for five tons to be made available for this
•.
purpose.
It was found that a dust of 60% cryolite and 40% filler applied
twelve to fifteen foot band around a field at the rate of from thirty
to thirty-five pounds per acre would prevent salt marsh caterpillars from
Ln
a
entering the field
spraying
across
this dusted
area.
A test plot at the C. T. Sharp ranch at Scottsdale showed that
onions with tartar emetic did not give satisfactory control.
One meeting of the state Grasshopper Control Co�mittee was held
in Phoenix at whiCh the program for the year was discussed with Dr. Claude
Wakeland, U.S.D.A. of Denver.
Poison bran mash applied �J airplane to a potato field in Deer
Valley gave excellent control of a heavy infestation of cutworms. These
worms occurred in great numbers just prior to harvest and were damaging
ple.nts
ae
well
as
tubers.
-
17
-
The grasshopper poison m1XLn� station was in operation at Phoenix
from'May 20 to December 1, and supplied 237 growers with 18.2 tons of mixed
poison mash. Demand for material w�s light this year as compared with years
past.
Project #16
-
Rodent Control
Poison furnished by the Fish and Wilnlife Service has been av�ilable
Rabbit, gopher and rat or mice poison has
on the control of gophers and rabbits was
to all growers throughout the year.
Advice
been distributed as needed.
given to eleven individuals.
Project #23
-
This
Disease Control
project
( Plant)
has taken
a
great deal of the time of the staff
members
due to the many calls received from Victory Gardners who werp. inexperienced in
vegetable growing. Diseases most destructive to vegetable crops were wilt on
tomatoes,
peppers and melons and virus disease
on
squash.
Diseases observed in the field were: mottle-leaf on citrus; side rot
on citrus �nd deciduous fruit trees; leaf blight on carrot;
rosette on pecan; mildew on roses and pe�s; damping off on cucumbers and cotton;
nematodes on figs, tomatoes and melons; wilt on squash, melons, tomatoes and
peppers; root rot on ornamentals; rhizactonia on potatoes; virus disease on
squash; blight on tomatoes and crown gallon deciduous fruit trees.
on
lettuce; gumosis
diseases.
Twenty-four growers were given information
Psorosis, guMmosis, chlorosis and mottle
on
the control of citrus
le3f caused most of the
trouble.
There were very few cases of Brown-rot gummosis as compared to the
many cases noted last year.
Twenty-four commercial vegetable growers were
Verticillium wilt was observed for
assisted with disease control problens.
the first time
as
a
by the Assistant Agent on tomatoes. Dr. Ero� reports this
relatively scarce disease in this locality. The grower estimated a 50%
loss to this disease from his five
acres
of tomatoes.
One hundred and nineteen families
diseases
of sulfur
on
their ornamental
An
experiment
was
started
Thir�-four
on
on
were
assisted with the control of
plantings.
the control of chlorosis
the
families
rose
were
plot
on
rose
bushes
by
the
use
at the Mesa Farm.
with the control of diseases
helped
on
their deciduous fruit trees.
The loss of deciduous fruit trees
by gummosis
and other
reasons
was
much less than last year.
A number of severe cases of chlorosis were noted
in small orchards.
Dr. streets assisted in recommending corrective measures.
ChecJ-ups show that the trouble has been
carefully followed out by the grower.
when instructions
given
were
Assistant Powers wrote an article on tomato and squash diseases for
He also -assisted Dr. Hayman in setting u� his experiment
the control of side-rot on spring lettuce.
the Arizona Gazette.
on
overcome
-
18
-
Project
#26
Economic Survey
-
The annual crop survey report wns prppared by Assistant HobGrt
from acreRge reports obtainpd from each irrigation district office.
This
did
in
not
as
issued
usu�l
show
to
acreages plant�d
July
report
grain sor-
ghums.
The stored hay survey conoucted by Assistant Hobart twice durine
This si t­
t:be year showed a decrease in the amount, of hay norma Lly stored.
uation was thought to be brought about by ceiling prices which do not take
into Rccount losses which are found to occur when hay is stored.
4-H CLUB WORK
Project #29
-
�
and Girls'
Boys'
Organization
supervision of
-
Assistant
Club TIork
4-H Club work iR carried
County Agent,
and twenty-one
between the ages of ten
anized into clubs with their
Pa.ul Brovm.
on
under the
Rura.l
boys
general
girls
Bnd
in the several communities are org­
officers and o� local nrogram,·under the
woman le�der.
Each member does a piece of work
own
�lidance of the local man or
supervision of the Coun�r Extension worker that will demonstrate
or teach the better way in aericul��re Jr homemaking.
EAch member keeys a
record of costs, labor and results; explains the work to, others; m8�es an
exhibit and writes a final report.
Through the various 4-H Club activities
involved an effort is m�de to develo�
leadership, ideals, attitudes and
skills which will fit boys and girls for their work of future years.
under the
Statistics and Scope of Club T.ork
There were 577 rural youths
enrolled in agricultural 4-H Clubs this year.
Of this nunber, 459 were boys
and 118 were girls.
There were 448 boys and 114 girls who comnl.e ted their
-
work; making a total of 562 completions for both boys and girls.
represented a 97.4% completion of the work b�r club members.
club
Production
was
incre�sed in Rll
agricultural vrojects by 4-H
This
Club
members in response to the dem8nd for more food in the present emergency.
Individual agricultural enterprises of club members were enlarged and ind­
ividual members often conducted several different projects.
The 4-H agric­
to
�1
for the 118
amounted
the
448 boys
550,
projects completed by
was
a
there
tot�l
of
This made
com�leted.
174
a�icultur�l projects
girls,
a grand total of 724 agricultural projects that were completed by both boys
and girls.
ultural
Club work
was
There
carried
on
in 31 schools and 30 communities
through­
41 local 4-H leaders who assisted �ith the work
county.
in the schools and communities.
An eight member Fair Board �elped plan the
out the
were
County 4-H Fair. The College Leaders 4-H Club of 20 members, provided
partment superintendents for the Fair. The club program was conducted
de­
in
A non-standard 4-H Club is one
44 standard and 73 non-standard 4-H Clubs.
as
different
interests
to
several
having
rrojects" It is a mixen agric­
ultural 4-H Club.
-
19
-
The 4-H Club program provided for the
Program and Activities
holding of regula r meetings, the study and discussion of topics, demon­
stration and judging-team work, project work, fairs,. contests, picnics,
educational tDurs, achievement days, radio programs, leader training and
the 4-H Victory Program.
-
During the year, 36 achievement programs were held with a total
attendance of 11,220.
This figure includes the count,y 4-H Fair with an
attendance of 3000.
Regular club meetings held throughout the county
numbered 1088, special club meetings at which visual aids, pictures and
slides were used numbered 34, with a total attendance of 2490.
There
were
clubs
4 radio programs conducted with boys and girls from 9 different
participating. Seven tours were conducted with 133 members in att­
endance.
Two picnic programs were beld for club members and parents with
an attendance of 222 persons.
Seven field days were held with 11 clubs at
which there were 133 members in attendance.
Maricopa County had 10 winners
in the state 4-H Club contests, and two club members
the National 4-H Club Congress at Chicago.
were
awarded
trips
to
The training of boys and girls throueh
Special 4-H Club Work
included
the
visual
use
of
educational aids such as films,
Clubwork
4-H
slides and pictures.
These educational devices were very helpful in
-
training demonstration teams and for the prepar�tion of rroject material
for exhibition at achievement nrogr��s and fairs.
Visu�l 8ids �ere also
used to familiarize me�bers with market classes and ideal types.
Pictures
of 4-H events such as fairs, can�s �ni contests gave members a better know­
ledge of the club program and stimulated their interest in the aims and
ideals of the organization.
Illustrations depicting project activities of
outstanding
club
members, helped
to �timulate and maintain interest and to
raise standards of work.
Varied lines of
activit,y hel�ed to Dormote the all-round develop­
girls; such as health building, recreRtion, music
appreciation, tours and hikes, picnics and club festivals. These activit­
ies motivated the club program and they were also considered as socializing
factors in co�it.y development.
ment of rural
boys
and
General Activities
The training of leaders for 4-H Clubwork was
Leadership Training
conducted among college students at the Arizona State Teachers College
through the Collegiate Leadership Club. Training for other leaders was
conducted in special meetings called for that purpose.
The Leaderehip Club
-
was organized for the sole purpose of �rovidinp a nro�r8� of training that
A pro­
would prepare its members to become successful leaders of 4-H Clubs.
in
for
the
was
worked
out
with
Workers.
Extension
gram
Count�
year
cooperation
A copy of this program is included elsewhere in this
held with a total attendance of 91 perspns.
report.
Ten
meetings
were
The program was supervised by County Extension Workers and it pro­
vided practice training in leading 4-H Clubs and the opportunity to study
the 4-H Club program.
Alembers of the club assisted with the coUnty 4-H
An achievem�nt program
Fair program and gained much practical experience.
-
20-
held for the Leaders Club and certificates were presented to the
a picnic-party sponsored by County Extension Workers.
was
mem­
bers at
meeting of 4-H Club leaders was held at the county 4-H Fair, at
planned for the full participation of their clubs in
the Fair program.
They were made familiRr with the schedule of events and
with the details of the exhibits, contests and activities.
A schedule for
was
worked
out
the
leaders
before they
local 4-H Club a.chievement programs
by
adjourned.
A
which time the leaders
Countv 4-H Fair
The Spventeenth Annual 4-H Club Fair was held
A
the camDUS of the Arizona state Teachers College, AJril 16 and 17.
-
on
cRmp was maintainod for 4-H eybibit�rs �nn Ipanpr� in con�ction with the
There were ov�r 2000 exhibits in the A�ricultur�l and Home Economics
Fair.
the Fair.
A great many club members
because of limitations on tr3vel and
departments at
their projects
war
conditions.
two
day
There
were
3000 persons who
were
unable to exhibit
transportRtion due to
attended the Fair during the
program.
It
cr�flning event of the club year.
And
their
mem­
Ip.aders
provided
clubs,
bers,to show the things that had been �ccomplished by them during the club
year.
County Fair exhibits and com:,etitive contests Afforded members with
The
a
County 4-H Fair
op�ortunity
real
opportunities
was
thp
to the different
to compare their work and skill with that of o��ers tnd thus
learn how to
improve their own work from one year to anothpr. It served RS
a means for determining county chEwrionships End gave recognition to club
members for work well done.
Awprds of �remium ribbons were made and medals
were presented to top winnp.rs in each department.
The two day 4-H Club Fair ! ron-am included a v�riety of events.
The
schedule for the first day provided for the judging of all exhibits and for
contests of deMonstration teams and tpere was a showm8n�hiu contest
for
classes. The "Jrogram for the second day provided ecti vi ties and com­
petitive contests for both 4-H me�bers r�d adults. T�er� �ere contests in
livestock judging, poultry judging, veget�ble judging, ho�e pconomics judg­
ing and a dress revue contest.
hal ter
by
4-H Clt�bB competed for honor-s in a Victory rarC.ne vrhich
The Main event of the day
committ.ee of Farm Bureau meI!'bers.
a
WE: s
judged
was
a
Farm­
4-H'ers "Get-together" program which began with a picnic.at noon.
This was followed by group singing and short Bddresses b:r prominent persons
from the state Extension Service, the State College,and the Farm Bureau.
A­
ers
and
wards
were
made to 4-H winners which included many special prizes from coun�
Bureau.
The Fair ended �ith a sale of 4-H live­
merchants and from the Farm
stock.
.
The
of
plfl-ns and deciding upon the
County Fair Board of 4-H Club Lepd­
ers, Farm Bureau Officials and County Extension YTorkprs.
Judg=s were pro­
vided by the State &�tension Service.
The Collegiate 4-H le�ders Club of
the State Teachers College provided the superintendents for the different de­
A detailed schedule of the Fair program is included
partments of the Fair.
elsewhere in this report.
premium
responsibility
list for the Fair
was
drawing
given to
-
21
-
up the
a
Thirty-six 4-H Achievement Dry programs
Achievemept Prpp.rams
Clubs
with R total attend�nce of 11,220.
agricultural 4-H
the
This figure includes
County 4-H Fair with an attendance of 3000. Local
4-H achipvemp.nt programs were usually held at or near the schools with the
whole community participating.
The awards were made at honor assemblies
which were largely attended by parents, school patrons �nd young �eople.
Fxhibi ts of club nember-s werp on dis:?I�"fT t.hr-ou=boub the dav
Thesp pc­
hipv�ment evpnts �rnvided a mea�� nf giving recognition to club members
and to those whq had aided the club nroeram.
They Elso informed the com­
munity of the progref1s JTlade in 4-H clubwork.
-
held for
were
,
4-H Contpsts
-
County
contests in which 4-H club members part­
Dpiry Production, Dairy Foods and
TeaJll demonstrations in
icipated
Vegetable Production. Other contpsts included; �ivestock Judging, Poult­
ry Judging, VegetBble Judging, Victor,y Parade, 4-Records, Health ChAmp­
ion, Garden Contests, Victory Achievement, Meat Animal, SRnta Fe Award,
Showmanship, Fair Exhibits and Charn�ion 4-H Club.
were:
,state
Par-td c Lpatd.cn in the state 4-H contests gave lh�ricopa County ten
following 4-H contests: Victory hchievement, Meat
winners in the
��imal, Victory Gprdens, Dairy Foods, Demonstration, Dress Revue 8nd the
Santa Fe Trip award.
Two 4-H memoers were awarded trips to the National
Club
were two new Victory Garden contests conducted
There
4-H
Congress.
for 4-H garden club members.
These are expl�ined more fully under the
of
Gardens.n
The Holstein-Friesian Association of
"4-H Victory
topic
America named Eli Gates champion Holstein Calf Club me�ber for Arizona.
Field Days and Tours
Seven field days and educational tours were
conducted with 11 clubs pa.rticip?ting with en attende.nce of 133.
The prog­
ram included practice in judging livestock, poultry and vegetables.
The
-
crops
and livestock
inspected and
dairy
provided.
plants and other establishments connected with agriculture were inspected
in connection with the educational tours.
By means of tours, members were
e.ble to observe each ot�ers Tork and gain helpful ideas.
They also bene­
fited from observing the practices of successful farmers.
enterprises of successful farmers
tours to the projects of club members
were
were
Commercial
A new addition to the county 4-H prog­
made this year.
Two coun�-wide picnic rallies for 4-H Club
members and their parents were held to provide them with special enter­
County 4-H
Club Picnics
-
ram was
The first one was held at Litchfield
tainment and educationsl programs.
The other one was
Park for those living on the west side of the county.
held at Rendezvous Park.in Mesa for club members in the eastern part of
the
county.
The programs included swimming, garnes, motion pictures, roller
demonstra tions, contests and.a picnic luncheon.
A special prog­
for parents was directed by the Extension Specialist in Rural Sociology.
skating,
ram
an exhibit which revealed the economic importance of insects and
supplemented by a talk on "How to Control Insects, n by the Exten­
sion Entomologist.
The state 4-H Club Leader, reviewed the state club pro�·
Short talks were given by County
gram and explained the 4-H contests.
Extension Workers which outlined the program of 4-H participation in the
war effort, particularily along lines of food production.
There
this
was
was
-
22
-
222 persons who attended the two programs.
These
be held
for
could
not
substitute
the
which
4-H camp
partial
this year becau�e of ��r conditions.
The success of these picnic rallies
promoted club members and parents to request that they be repeated.
There
events
were
were
a
Four radio programs were presented at Phoenix by
Publicity
clubs.
Subjects covered in these broa.dcasts included present­
County 4-H
of
ation
awards, county 4-H Fair, AChievements, and the 4-H Mobilization
4-H
-
The state Club Leader assisted at two of the broadcasts.
A
total of 57 members from 9 different clubs took part in the radio programs.
Program.
Local paper-s and farm publications were supplied with timely art­
icles concerning 4-H club work throughout the year.
Copies of some of the
leading articles published are included elsewhere with this report.
Window exhibits
displayed
were
in local stores L� connection with
4-H Mobilization �eek and other special events. A county 4-H Fair Book was
prepared and circulated previous to the 4-H Fair. Special editions of the
"4-H Booster"
were
prepared
interested in Club Vlork.
and distributed to members and other persons
Booster", served to acquaint members
"The 4-H
with the activities of the different clubs throughout tt-e county and it also
provided information of value to members. A copy of this is included with
this report.
There were 128 dairy club members enrolled and
4-H ��� Program
123 completed their work. Of this number ap?roximately 15% had registered
-
animals.
This represented an increase over last year of 5% in the number of
registered animals owned by 4-H members. The limiting factors in connection
with the purchase of registered cattle were the advance in the prices of cat­
tle and the dairy outlook.
The 4-H dairy cattle exhibits at the county 4-H Fair surpassed in
and
The judging of the
numbers t!1.ose of the previous years Fair.
quali ty
cattle was done by W. H. Riddell, Dairy Husbandman for the University of
letter to this County Extension Worker, Mr. Riddell said:
pleasantly surprised with the quality of the dairy showings at the
recent Tempe show.
I thought the boys and girls did a somewhat better job
of fitting and showing this year then last.
There were fewer tail-enders
I believe we are getting these poor individuals weeded
in the classes.
out and I was very well satisfied with the show."
Arizona.
"I
In
a
was
of the
Dai� Breed Associations enabled many out­
recognition for their work.
Special awards were provided to county champions and a Maricopa County 4-H
Club boy was declared the state's champion 4-H Holstein Dairy Club member.
The
cooperation
standine 4-H dairy club
members to receive fine
4-H VictorY Gardens
There were 284 members enrolled in this pro­
and 277 completed.
This represents an increase in enrollment over last
This substantial in­
year of 16.4% and �� increase in completions of 74.2%.
crease in 4-H vegetable production contributed very materi9.lly to the "Feed
-
ject
a
Fighter Program" of the 4-H Clubs.
There
pared
to
380 for
were
the
401 vegetable exhibits at the county 4-H Fair
previous
A
year.
-
23
-
vegetable judging
as
com­
contest at the
opportunity to test their judgment and to
types of vegetebles. T�o new 4-H gDrden con­
tests were conducted which brought out the competitive spirit among club mem­
bers and resulted in the production of more a.nd better vegetables.
County 4-H Fair
become
more
gave members an
familiar with ideal
One
garden contest, sponsored by the Litchfield Park Ki'vanis Club for
club
members residing west of the Agua FriR river in the county, was
4-H garden
conducted with 72 4-H member-s par t.Ic lpa ting.
A summary of the results of this
contest is included elsewhere in this report.
An achievement progr�m for t�e
winners and contestants was sponsor-ed by the Ki''''�nis Club.
It included
This �rogr�m will be reperted for 1944.
ner party with the sponsors.
4-H gar-den
A
din­
tes t w-;..s sponsored by the Sears Phoenix store.
garden club me�bers who ryere selected by diff­
erent club leaders throughout the COQ�tf to comp�te in the contest.
Seeds and
pl8nts �ere provided free to the contestants by the sponsor and special awards
were made to the win!1ers at a dinner progrlihl given by the sponsor to 8.11 con­
A S1llilI!l£:.ry of this contest is included else7ihere in this report.
This
testants.
program will be conducted again in 1944.
Another
This contest
was
con
li�itp,d to 25
In the
won
county-wide 4-H garden
county ch��pionship honors. Two of
4-H garden contest &nd both contestants
club contest there
these winners
were
were
cOipeted
declared state 4-H
4 members who
in the state
champions.
There were 77 members enrolled in this project,
4-H Poultry Projects
and 76 completed t�eir work.
The total number of birds amounted to 3500, which
made an Everage of 46 birds per member.
This project involved the growing of
-
ba.by-chicks, the management of laying flocks and broiler production. Profits
from 4-H poultry projects were affected by the increased cost of the feed and
the purchase price of chicks, but members generally received worthwhile re­
tums for their efforts.
Poultry exhibits at the county 4-H Fair m�de � fine showing along
with the other exhibits.
The pens of poultry exhibited were of excellent
�nd the condition of the birds showed th�t they had been well fitted
for exhibition by club me�bers.
A poultry �nd egg judging contest was con­
ducted and more than 200 members p£.rticip�.ted.
qu�lity
4-H Ha.ndicraft
100% completion
of constructing
There were 87 members enrolled in this project with
of the work.
This project a.fforded members the opportunity
equipment for the far:n rnd home and to re?air many articles
in addition to the
repair
work which
they performed.
The handicraft exhibits at the
county 4-H
useful and
practical.
e�d the articles
monship
-
were
Fair sho�ed excellent w.ork­
4-H Swine Projects
Forty-four members were enrolled in this pro­
ject and 43 completed their work. Eight percent of the Pig Club members'
-
registered swine and o��ers had many high quality �nimals in
registered hogs produced by club members sold veri reedily and
for them was greater than the supply.
projects
herds.
demand
were
The
-24-
their
the
Swine exhibits at the 4-H Fair excelled in quality and t.ype those
A Scottsdale 4-H boy sold one of his registered Hamp­
of last years Fair.
Club members
shire sows at the 4-H Fair to a Swine Breeder for $125.00.
exhibits of swine contributed much toward the success of thp. Fair.
A show­
manship contest was conducted for tte 4-R swine �xhibitors at the Fair.
champion 4-H Pig Club member in the J.feat J...nimal contest
He produced and sold more than $500.00 worth of
boy
his
as
contribution
to
the 4-H Clubs "Feed a Fighter" program.
He plans
hogs
to expand his project.
The state
was
a
from Scottsdale.
Miscellaneous
Other 4-H Club
8 Beef Club members enrolled, with
projects were also conducted. There
were
100% completions. They produced 22
beef animals.
Ten members were enrollAd in sheep TJroject.s ,.,ith 100% corn­
p1etions. Sheep production totaled 48 animals. Twen�-nine members were
enrolled in rabbit clubs and 28 completed their work.
Seventy members wp.re
enrolled in Home Beautification Clubs with 100% completion of work.
-
ORGANIZAT,ION
Maricopa County
Farm Bureau
organization maintains F41 office in the Extension Service Euild­
meetings of the Board of Directors in the assembly room. At
each of these meetings some member of the staff acted as secretary.
The ann­
ual budget of expenditures was reviewed and B.pproved by this organization be­
fore being presented to the County Board of Supervisors.
This
ing
and holds all
Agricultural
Conserv8tion Progr��
The Agent, as ex-officio me�ber of the county co�ittee has attended
meeting of local and county cornrd tteemen when new phases f)f t.he progr-am
was discussed.
He assisted in conducting the election in the Dysart district
and also attended the annual election meeting at which I.E. Moore was elected
At' a series of
chairman; Ward Burk, vice chairman and E. G. Allgood, roemher.
four meetings held with cotton growers in the Buckeye, Peoria, Gilbert and Lav­
een areas new phases of the program were pointed out to cotton growers present.
each
County Ag�nts' Conference
The annual conference of Extension Workers was held in Phoenix and
A regional conference held in Phoenix
attended by all members of the staff.
in February at which the Farm Labor Program was discussed was attended by the
Agent and all Assistant Agents. In April another regional conference was held
in Phoenix and attended
by
the
A
Agent.
two-day
conference
plans for the Farm Labor Program and
May
with
Assistants
Hobart and Powers.
together
in
to make
was
was
held in Phoenix
�attended
by the Agent
Soil Conservation Service
Two meetings were held by the Agent and Mr. D. W. Hulet of the Soil
Conservation Service with the directors of the Queen Creek Conservation Dis-
-
25
-
trict to formulate a plan of work.
To date no actual work has been done
in the area but plans are laid for work when labor p.nd machinery are a­
vailable.
Following the heavy rains of last summer Hnd tre resultant
flooding
adjoining New River conferences wer-e held with Land­
owners in the affected area and repre�entatives of thp. Soil Conservation
Service rel8tive to th� formation of a conservation �iEtri�t coverin� the
area.
Petitions were circulated but to date have not been completpd.
of lands
Petitions
were
circulated coverinp, the
Notices of election have not been
floods
these
Arcadia District and
returned Rnd filed with the State Land CommiEsionpr Williams.
promptly
was
are
t
ub Ld shed to date.
A survev nf the area near ccottsdale known to be subject to
mAde by the Agent fUld lUr. Hulet.
Petitions vrpro issued p.nd
now
in t.he process of
beinG circulated.
levelling raf' r c tu-i l.Iy been done in the Beardsly dis­
equipment furni�hed by t�e Soil Conservation Service. This work
together with npT. checks and turn-nut in irrigation ditch�s Bre designed to
prevent excessive erosion on cultivated lands.
Some land
trict with
Farm Field
Arizona
Day
The Ag-ent assf.e t.ed Mr. Ae!lli, superintendent of the University of
EXperimental Farm at rl�esa in conducting a field rtf:'" at t.hp. farm in
cotton insect
cnntrol, flax, EU�r pnd ITAin sorghum mere
rrespnt.
expleined
Representatives of the Agro­
the
of
of
Universit.Y
nOIDf Department
�Iiznna, of the U. S. Bureau of En­
and
of
the
Gen€ral
tomology
Mills, Inc., were present to explain the VTork
conducted.
being
November.
Work
on
to the farmers
shown pnd
Food
Rationine Program
Members of the staff conducted meetings in various parts of the
to
train persons in each district to explD:.in the �rogra.m to all in­
county
tere::ted rersons in the several districts.
Leaflets and report. forms were
distributed to each leader.
Service Clubs
Cooperation with all civic organizations has bpp� stressed
Members of the staff have spoken at various Service Clubs
the year.
out the county on subjects of timely interest.
on
nurin�'
through-,
Assistant Powers was especially active in speaking to Garden Clubs
and the planting and care of ornamentals.
vegetable growing
Arizona Holstein-Friesian Association
meeting of the Arizona Holstein-Fripsian bssociation
County Agent's Office January 9, 1943. The ;rogr8m for the
The annual
was
held in the
-
26-
year
out.Ltned with emphasis on community meetings and junior member­
The following officers were elected:
was
ship.
Painter, President
Kurtz, Vice-President
y�s. Pearl Coman, Secretary
F. E. Ostrander, Tre�surer
James
Warren
�lrs.
HomrLgneusen , Director for 3
Geare, Director for 2 year
E.
H. E.
Bill
year
Director for I year
McNeil,
Mr. Ivan Loughary, Western states fieldman for the American Hol­
stein-Friesian Association resigned the early part of the year rmd Mr.
Mr. Vicker, 'fiestern States fieldm.n end rlr. House­
Vicker was appointed.
Extension Director of the �qtional Organization,were in the county
October 1st and November 30th.
A well planned tour of breeders was arranged.
C. F. Rowe, Specialist in Poult�T end Dairy,and Dr. �. H. Riddell, Dair.y Hllsb­
andman,attended all of the import��t meetines of the AssociRtion.
holder,
Arizona
Jersey
Cattle Club
The Arizona
Jersey Cattlp. Cluh held
dinner
a
meeting
in
January for
the purpose of promoting a cOmmL�it.r herd classification in the s9ring. How­
ever, with l?bor shortages and M�n� other conditions this �rogram was not
carried out.
The ��ual
ing officers
were
meeting
was
held in
July
at the Eads P�nch.
The follow­
elected:
George Peterson, President
Fred Chesnev ,
Ltt.
C.
Vice-President
New, Secreta�-Treasurer
Hussey, Director
Smith, Direc tor
Eads, Director
H. P. Shedd, Director
Mrs. Geo. 'Blendin�er,
J. Ed
S.
E.
Director
Arizona Guernsey Cattle Club
Lounsbury, M�maging Editor of the Guernsey Breeders Journal
Robinson, Southwestern states fieldman for the Guernsey Cattle
were
in the count,y for two days in July at which time the state Club
Club,
held their meeting at the home of H. E. Geare, Phoenix, as well as visit­
ing outstanding Guernsey Herds in the County. The follo�g officers were
1
Mr.
and Jack
elected for
a
term of
one
year:
T.
McClelland, President
Phillips, Vice-President
Rassmusen, Secretary-Treasurer
H. E. Geare, Director
fAr. Blackburn, Director
S. C. Minor, Director
W.,
C.
L.
w. T.
Mr.
C. F. Rowe and W. H. Riddell
-
27
-
were
present.
Arizona Shorthorn
Bre�dp,rs'
Ass0ci�tion
The annual meeting of the Arinon1i Shorthorn .6re8ders As soc Ls td.on
held November 4th in the County Pgpnt's Office.
A e:�ibition committee
W9.S appointed to arrange for a state exhibition to be hpld in t.re spring.
The followin� officers were elected:
was
Albert
Tone, President
Pip-rce, Vice-President
E. Pugh, Secret��-Tre8surcr
Mr. Wier, Direct0r
Yavapai
E. Smith, Director
�raham
W.H. Gilbert, Diroctor
Maricopa
D.
Pure-Bred Breeders'
No
AssociRtion
mpptings
Phillips, President;
retary.
were
H.
called ��i trp officArs remqin tre
and H.
Gray, Vice-President;
St.ockt.on ,
C.
SR�e.
�cting
L.
8pc­
MaricopA. Poul t�r rroducers .A ssocintion
There
�ere
meetin�s called f0r the
no
�ssoci�ti�n.
The
Poultry
Egg Co-op functiD�ing with the Unitei Producers and Consu�pr8 ceased
oner­
ations in the fall.
Maricopa County
R�bbit �rowprs'
The Rabbit Growers'
the
and
As��ci�tion
Associ�tion held
County Agent's Offi�� pxcept
talks by the members made up
the year
for the
their
summer
monthly
regular monthly meetings in
months.
S�ecial feA.tures
programs.
The officers for
were:
J.
T.
F.
I.
K.
A.
Price, President
Surface, Vice-PrAsident
Kelly, Secretary-Treasurer
Smith-Doxey Organization
Smi th-Doxey
Iitembership
and
Acreage in Mar-Lcopa County
1942-1943
porcent of 1942
1942
1943
7(32
l)0�
65
91,314
61,946
67
24-
20
AC81a Cotton
Number of Mpmbers
Acreage
Gins
SxP Cotton
617
431
69
46,712
30,694
65
13
13
Number of Members
Acreage
Gins
-
28
-
Af'!ref:Jf!P in M··ricn'IA counrv
Smi th-Doxey Member-sb i.n rnn
( con+dnu=d)
1943
1942
Coker-Wilds Cotton
4
24.3
Number of Members
Acreage
Victory G£lrdens
handled largely by Assistant Powers who has de­
In
of
his time to ·this Lmpor-t-m t dev=Lo omerrt
large portion
Mr.
Gssisted
A
with
this
Powers
individual
237
g�rden
conducting
pr0��m
This program
voted
was
a
,
organizations on veget�ble culture, gave 3 r'1dio talks on
subject, gave 3 talks on vegetablp dehydration to eqrden clubs,
assisted six scho01s with school Vict0ry pardpns, ��vp �ethod demonstr9t­
ions of pro�er methods of plenting at three schools, coniucted 3 clnsses
far the department of Vocational Agriculture on vegetable culture, judv,ed
gardens entered in Victory Garden contp�ts by 9�ars-Poebuck and the Litch­
field Kiwanis Club, prepared 4 of a series of 6 articles on ��rdpning for
the Arizona "Rermb1ic,n one article f'Jr the "ThunderlJird" on the same sub­
ject and gave assistance to ninp.ty cOM��rciHl �rowers �h0 �ere growing np�
crops for the first time.
'rhis, toC"et":.er with a survey of Vict.ory G�rnens
Central
hrizona
the
Light and Power Comp ny which srnwed that out of
by
in the count:' 50,747 vrew g�rdens during the spring
customprs
served
110,000
and summer months, indicates the effectivenprs of the nrogram.
clubs
the
civic
or
same
....
War Board
Members of the st�ff attpnr.pj
total of 42 TTl'?etin�s of the County
investieations 2S follows: selective service 140, re­
lease from Army 23, and applications for farm pnuinmpnt 13.
Mpetings were
held at least weekly for a greater �prt of the year with re�resentatives of
the Extension Service, Forest Service, Farm Security Administration, Agric­
ultural Adjustment Agenc:r taking 1Jart in all nat.t er-s br-ourht, before the
�
War Board �nd mode
board.
It is felt that
a
real service has been rendered to the farmers of
Mr. I.E. Moor�, Chairman of the
county by the actions of the boar-d
Board, has conducted the business of the board in a ve�r pffici�nt and bus­
this
,
inesslike
manner.
Selective Service
All members of the staff have
from,time to time assisted in mak­
referred to the War Board by loc�l end out-of­
state Selective Service Boards.
These cases were for defermpnt on account
of essential agricultural liorlr.
AssistAnce w�s given to individuals seek­
ing deferment for employers or relatives, and also to those seeking release
ing investigations of
cases
from the armed forces of former
ployed
in
Farm Labor
or
relatives who
were
formerly
em­
agricultural jobs.
Program
This
Agent
employees
new
activitybns required practically
since June 1st fnd considerable of the time of
-
29
-
all of the time of the
Assistcnts, Powers,
--
Conferences were first held by Extension Workers to
VanSant and Hobart.
formulate plans for the program at such time as the program was turned over
to this organization.
On June 1st the Extension Service began opera.tion through the
Phoenix office located at 1921 E. r.ashlngton Street, with personnel trans­
Mr. D. C.
ferred to this organization by the U. S. Employment Service.
Scott was placed in charge of the office with Mrs. Helen Anderson as assisFe" placements were made during the first three weeks of the month
tan t.
due to the fact that Mr. Scott showed little interest in finding pIeces on
Mr. Scott WG.S relieved of
farms for the few applicants who came to the office.
his duties on June 20th and Assistent Agents Powers and VanSe�t alternated in
taking over his duties. Mrs. Anderson was retained, on six-months leave from
the U.S.E.S. as her services were entirely satisfactory.
A circular letter
was prepared and mailed, together with a farm re­
which labor requirements r.ere to be listed, to 3500 farmers.
From
the few cards which were returned a file of farm jobs open w�s st�rted.
Farm­
ers as a whole seemed to lack confidence in this particul�r program as they
had received so little labor through L�s source in the p�st.
cord card
on
Through r�dio talks, news articles and talks to farmer groups and
service clubs an attempt was made to restore the confidence of the farmer in
the program.
The farmers have responded very well to our requests for coop­
eration.
the
time of this report it seems that farmers are now convinced
At
tha t the Extension Service is making an honest effort to sup':Jly their labor
needs although the quality of l�bor is not up to standard.
A Farm L�bor Advisory Comwittee was ap�ointed and the first meeti�g
called to elect officers and to acquaint members with the problems involved.
Officers and members of this committee were:
Chairman, E. Ray Cowden, live­
stock and general farming; Clyde Neely, Vice Chairman, general farming and
cotton; K. B. Mcl�icken, long-staple cotton and general farming; C. L. Phillips,
dairying; R. M. Hess, citrus; Ray Eaton, vegetables; Dan He�vood, general
farming; J. S. Francis, cotton and cotton ginning and Hollis B. Gray, MariThis committee met
copa Farm Bureau members, with the Agent as secretary.
again and approved the wage scale set at a meeting held early in January as
prevailing until another hearine could be called. To date no such hearing
has been held.
representative growers and officers of
Agricultural
organization of farmers formed to
Commodities,
the
for farmers throughout the state,
of
Mexican
Nationals
importation
ha�dle
of War Internment Camp at
in
of
Officers
the
Italian
Prisoner
Army
charge
Florence and representatives of the War Manpower Commission and U. S. Em­
ployment Service, on all labor problems.
Conferences
the
Taar
were
held with
en
Early in July Mr. L. B. SId th, formerly office managerCounty Agricultural Adjustment Agency, was placed in charge
of the Mari­
of the Phoenix
copa
Farm Laber Office with Mr. G. M. Baxter as Assistan t together with Mrs. And­
erson.
Office equipment was purchased to replace that loaned by the U. S.
-
30
-
(
point on, to the date of this report, the
and has been able to place all workers
successfully
operated
work
to
in
wanting
agriculture.
actually
Employment
Service.
From this
service has
who
are
were
established at Mesa
Later branch offices
of Mrs. Mary Neilson and Mrs. Helen Boone respectively.
and
Buckeye in charge
A meeting was held with representatives of all irrigation districts
within the county to make plans for the establishment of camps for housing
Col. W. H. Holden, in
Italian prisoners of war as agTicultural laborers.
the
Florence
and
C.
A. Coykendall, his assist­
of
Internment
Camp,
charge
Capt.
and
all matters dealing with
have
been
in
especially helpful
cooperative
ant,
district
the use of prisoners.
Irrigation
representatives egreed to set up
the camps as needed when prisoners were
available.
established east of Mesa, by the Salt River Valley
for
125 prisoners to be used in ditch cleaning. This
Association,
set up in an old auto camp and designed to bouse only this number of
Later another was
set up near Tolleson by the same agency to accom­
The first camp
was
Water Users
camp was
workers.
modate 4QO workers.
A third was established near Perryville by the Roosevelt
a capacity of 500 or more.
District
with
A fourth was set up near
Irrigation
Mesa by the Water Users Association to eccommodate
500 and the first camp dis­
continued with the occupants of that
into this one.
A fifth
camp being brought
established at Ttaddell by the Maricopa Reservoir and Power Company and other
large operators in the area, and designed to house 500 prisoners. At the time
of this report the Perryville camp contains 500 workers, the naddell 100, the
Tolleson 400 and the Mesa camp 400.
Camps could not be brought to full capac­
ity as prisoners were not available.
was
Prisoners have been used at prevailing wage rate in picking cotton,
cultivating vegetables, cleaning ditches and transplanting and harvesting
vegetables. The work aone by these laborers is in most cases satisfactory
although done slower than is usually expected by the farmer.
VI.
OUTLOOK P..ND RECOMMENDATIONS, INCLUZING SUGGESTED PROGRAM OF WORK
FOR NEXT YEAR
To make definite plans for an Extension Program for an entire year
in advance is difficult, under present conditions, and such plans must neces­
sarily make provisions for discontinuing certain projects and taking up new
ones or new activities at any time during the year.
However, the program
will be based on the principle of getting greater production of essential
commodities with equipment and labQr available from lands now under culti­
vation.
will be discouraged, as
Unlimited expansion of cultivated lands
such development places
a strain on the now inadequate supply of farm equip­
ment and labor.
Again this year, quality production will be stressed for all comm­
odities in order to obtain the maximum amount of fexm products from lands
being cultivated. This will be especially stressed in livestock and poultry
products. Changes must be made in the mechanics of the Pure Seed Program
in order to assure consumers in this and other sta.tes of a hith quality
product. Rules governing the acceptance of fields of pure seed must be
-31
-
enforced
Extension Workers to eliminn te the
by
bein� nlaced
on
the market
possibility
of inferior eped
by unscrUDulous growers and seedemen.
A progran includin� more fielr tests of ar�roved new nractices seems
to be needed.
These field te�ts, not too extensive but on a pra.ctical farm­
ing basis, should be conducted pnd rnrtly financed by the Extension Service.
plots Droperly placed throughout the count� �nd marked with signs
in order that the pub ld.c ml.zht, know vTat is being done, should bp Lnva Luab Le
in getting general acceptance of ne� methods or crons.
A few such
It is rlE'nned to group "'-rojects unrler new headin;:rs for �reat�r p�se
re90rtin� urO(TPss. Some new rponine-s 11'7ill be made to cover activities
heretofore reported under Organization or Miscellanpous headings.
in
Hailing
lists �ill be
kert
U""J
to date and the lIe's Bulletin ,'Till
.
be issued if stenog-ranhic help is p-vail�ble.
Circulr..r letters
subjects will be issued as needed as well as radio talks riven
All facilities of the
attention of Qll �ro�ers any np,
stations.
on
timel�T
over
.
local
�ress will be utilized to brinr to the
�r'jpct� or programs which 8re be;n� con­
ducted.
All wor-k will be carried on :'r clMp. coo_",er"'-+:icr "'i t}1 thp Farm
Burefu, University of Arizona E�'erirent Station, �ll br�e�ee of the
U.S.D.!. and all courrty , state ann f'eder-s L ElE'encieF �_nn �ivic ore�mizet­
ions Torkil1g 011 r:;rccrc.ms relatinr; to r::ricu1ture.
SUt��Jcr AND OUTLOOK OF PROJECTS
Proj�ct #1, Alkali Recl�Mation
This
of MUch
being
project
done
on
will be
of be rnyard r".d rrppn Manures e
keep alkali below the danger point.
use
Pro;ect
#2,
cctive
yert
though
such lands due to l�bor and
s
well
as
therp
is little
proepect
The
short�ge.
��chine�T
sulfur ,.-rill be advocs ted
to
Fertilizatio� Pr8ctice
Under this rroject it is ho��d that more field tests can be con­
ducted with a number of crops on which Li, ttle if any infnrmption: of 'the
value of fertilizers is ava i l.ab Le
!v�ch work needs to be done on this part­
,
icular
phase
of the
project
it is felt that most fertilizers
as
are
used at the pro"0er time or fllRce to �roduce maximum efficien�.
animal manures and green Immures will continue to be stressed.
The
not
being
use
of
Project #5, Irrigation Pra�ice
This very im�ortant project will continue to be a major one during
the year.
Assistance in land levelling or in che�ging irrifRtinn runs will
be given to all growers who are interested.
Practices based 011 '"(")rk hy v�rl
H�rriR will be r-ecommended
on
cotton sr-d citrus bv ynembers of t.he
-
32
-
staff.
Project #6
Pure Seed
-
This project will be ce.rried throughout the year even +hourh
Th8 dpmpnn for rllrp seed of
acreages of cotton ��� be at R minimum.
�nd
as
other crors Euch
plfalfa, grains
grain sorghums [hould cnuse 8n
of
trpsp
It is liyely that some
increase in lure seed acreage
crops.
included
be
in
t''-e 'rog-raT'l..
1m Lnspect.or- vri II be
vegetpble crops mav
All rneetirlF� of the Arizona
kept ava i Lab Le to cover all cror-s e s n=eded
Crop Improvement Association will be attended by st�ff members working on
The policy of holding meetings of gro�er� ��� sp�d �eRl€rs
this project.
to set prices well in �nvRIlce of
lFntin� dRtes will c0ntinu�. It is fplt
that this policy keeps rrices of np� or �carce seeds from becoMinr, excer�­
,
....
Farrser-e will be encour-aved to
i ve.
Ita
Project
or
seed for
B
11
cro os
or
until
cpp.nrer chemicRls
pre
,
developed only
mechan i.ca L methods of control will be advised.
imental work is needed
Project #12
rurp
Wped Frpdication
-
For the duration
cu I tura1
use
-
on
this
Much exper­
subject.
P�lning
Throu�h method �nd result de�onstrations cOmM�rrial Rnd home
These
orchardists will be kert advised on r.. �roved methods of pruning.
Even
demonstra tions will re held in roo-pra tion "1'ri th SpeciF: li�t rl'f1 te.
though a series of demonstrations is given
to give assistance to individual �o�prs.
Project #13
-
Pec8n
numerous
�alls will be made
Propagation
Budding and grafting demons tr-a+dons will b= heLd in April �md
help given to those v.t�o cannot attend these meetirgs. Gro�'ers
individual
will be advised to irrig�tp. Rnd fertilize groves or innivirl1Al trPAf to
Irrter-e s t in pecan r-roduc t ton will r-r-obab Iy in­
promote better rroduction.
cre�se
due to increpsed
Project #14
-
DFlt,p
prices of
nuts.
Pron�f!ation
Interest in this
demand for fresh dates.
project will probably increfEe due to increased
Assistance will be givpn to all gro=prs on rolli­
nation, thinning, harvesting and tamp nrocessing.
revise� bulletin on general care of d�tes.
Project #14.1
This
time
as
project
there is
Project #15
-
This
Roney
Citrus
-
a
Nursery
There is need for
a
Practice
will be discontinued for the nuration
demand for such
a
or
until such
program.
Insect Pest Control
project
8nd the U.
will be stressed in
S. Bureau of
tional work and field tests
on
Entomology
cooperation
�nd Plant
with
Specialist
Quarantine.
Educa­
control of cotton insects will have to be
-
33
-
conducted on a larger scale this year in order to convince growers that
The unusually poor results
cotton should be dusted to control insects.
obtained this year due to poor quality of insecticides and untimely app­
lications have created a general feeling that control measures as have
Growers will be kept advised on new
been recommended are ineffective.
The grasshopper
substitute materials to be used in insect control.
be
will
in
are
as
materials
station
as
operation
long
poison mixing
available.
or
Project #23
-
Disease Control
Field tests will be conducted in cooperation with the Depart­
ment of Plant Pathology of the Universit.1 of Arizona on diseases now
prevalent but for which no practical control measures have been dis­
Assistance will be given to all growers as requests are re­
covered.
ceived.
Project #26
-
Economic
Survey
The animal crop survey will be made and a summary made avail­
able for distribution.
The stored hay survey will be made twice during
the year in order that growers and feeders may be kept advised of supplies
and demands.
Dairy
Other
surveys.will
be made
as
deemed necessar,y.
and Livestock
Projects under this heading will be stressed in order to meet if
possible the increased demands for dairy and meat products. Cattle pen
feeding will probably be less than in the past due to uncertainty of prices
for fat cattle.
Pasturing of range cattle brought into the county will prob­
ably increase if pasture prices do not become excessive. Dairymen will be
advised· to make better use of all available protein feeds to make up for the
shortage of such feeds as are normally available.
•
Poultry
The increase of home flocks will be pushed in order to meet in­
creased demands for all poultry products.
Caution will be urged to those
wish
to
into
who
go
inexperienced producers
poultry production on a large
scale.
a
are
for
Hatcherymen
preparing
heavy demand for baby chicks and
their
are
association
through
endeavoring to supply only chicks from di­
sease free flocks.
Project #29
-
4-H Club Work
This project will be carried on as usual under the direction of
Assistant Brown who will center activit,y on some phase of training to fur­
ther the war effort.
The County Fair will be held at Tempe if conditions
do not materially change.
Project tours, achievement days and field days
will be conducted as long as transportation is available.
Projects deal­
ing with the production or preparation ·of food will be stressed. Older
club members will be encouraged ·to enlarge projects to an economical and
paying basis.
-
34-
SUMMARY OF ACTIVITIES
1943
of
J. H. O'DELL, COUNTY AGRICULTURAL AGENT
-
The
County Agricultural Agent
county is responsible for
vice in the
extension work in the
Cooperation of
county.
Farmers
of
farming
days
and
all
new
crops
representative of
and bulletins
through
sent out to
are
Work is conducted
time is
spent
tests of
in
as
in such programs is
all such programs
news
much
methods
are
departments of
and the several
mailing
as
and the U.S.D.A.
well
vitally
as
carried
the
necessar,y.
improved methods
field
articles, radio talks, meetings,
lists of
Circular
commodity
with
on
in
problems
letters,
University of
Results of these tests
are
circulars
groups.
but much
which may arise.
cooperation
in
applying
possible through organized groups
as
assisting individuals
approved
all
planning of
state and federal programs
tours and result and method demonstrations.
or
the Extension Ser­
the administration and
agencies
kept informed of
are
a
It is his duty to outline programs dealing with
county.
phases of all county,
the educational
the
as
Field
with interested growers
Arizona
Experiment Station,
publicized through
the methods
mentioned above.
The service has been set up
better rural
better
one
of adult education and
marketing
and
all the
greater returns for the work of rural families.
are
means
available to all
agricultural
mentioned above all programs
groups
are
farmer language to the level of the individual farm
type.
designed
to
living conditions through improved crops, greater production,
vices of the staff
Through
as
or
The
ser-
individuals.
handed down in
irregardless
plain
of siZe
or
SUMMARY OF ACTIVITIES
of
POWERS,
HAROLD B.
-
ASS'T. COUNTY AGRICULTURAL AGENT
The citrus growers of this county have
program of
to
lack of
equipment
holding
up this program.
thrips,
is
remove
the cover-crop
The
use
constantly increasing
are
in
vegetable crop
and
growing
new
This should
ess
gardens
vegetables
than
of their neighbors
There has been
a
most of the old
planting
their first
to the
planting of
a
orchards, especial�
picture
as
Victo� Gardners
succ-
is that everyone is
best
interest in the
care
of
to fertilization and insect control.
possible
care
trying
to increase food
of his crops and by increas-
plantings.
Since the middl� of June the Assistant
his time to
of
success
home fruit orchard.
these
the extent of his
out
gardens.
having deciduous orchards showed increased
production by taking the
t
aid in the
materially
Those
ing
branching
marked increase in the number of families want-
ing information pertaining
The over-all
are
Many others, encouraged by the
ever.
are
while others
Many people
In addition to this increase in the
Program.
commercial
with the citrus growers.
vegetable industr,y.
their first
production of
water and
two of the main factors
are
popularity
growing
the War Food Production
Few
of tartar emetic to control citrus
many newcomers in the
crops.
months.
Shortage of
cover-crop idea.
summer
are
have better
the recommended
adopted
heavy nitrate fertilization during the winter
growers have taken to the
There
1943
assisting the Emergen�
Agent
has devoted about
Farm Labor Program.
t
of
SUMMARY OF ACTIVITIES
1943
of
CHARLES HOBART, ASS'T. COUNTY AGRICULTURAL AGENT
-
A result demonstration of the benefits of
in the fallon
now
known
as
barley pasture
Goodyear
of
Analysis
water
carried
was
irrigation districts
a
of
with Karl
water to be delivered in
July.
The pure seed program in this
at
flowering
the basis of
county
this
was·carried
required
on
in
grains dropped.
Greatest lowering of
an
unsound
too much
spite of
Alfalfa and sorghum acreages in the program
while cotton and small
occurred in
on
c�nsiderable number of districts in
high acreages of cotton;
Company
Harris, U.S.D.A.)
Maricopa County
condition because of too
time difficulties.
period of dr,y treatment
at Southwest Cotton
(in cooperation
Farms.
requirements showed
on
a
war-
increased,
efficien�
sorghums due to labor difficulty of eliminating Johnson grass
time and
after,
and
accepting parts of fields
that did not
have sufficient isolation.
There
100% participation again
was
program, but acreage and" number of
in the
cotton
Smith-Doxey
participants dropped
2/3
to
classing
the
1942 sign-
up with Acala and SxP.
A start
was
made in
testing permanent pasture
mixtures
on
a
cooperative
basis with growers and Soil Conservation Service.
hay shed seasonal check-up
The usual
continued.
trict
figures of this check-up
were
made and the crop survey
used in the
irrigation
was
dis-
analysis.
Some
labor
The
was
help
was
given
responsibilit,y.
on
selective service
investigations
and the farm
SUM1� OF ACTIVITIES
of
BROWN, ASS'T.
PAUL W.
The influence of
COUNTY AGRICULTURAL AGENT
conditions
the 4-H Club program
on
The response of club members to the demand for
this year.
ion and
war
in the
participat�on
in all
cooperated fully
war
war
efforts
activities of 4-H clubs.
locally
There
were
on new
significance
as
a
and
greater food product-
of club work.
and 30 communities.
in
decreasing
The county 4-H Fair
motivating force
There
were
The 4-H program
724 club projects
were
was
carried
was
con-
fication and the 4-H Club's
were
members.
boys
probable
conditions. Greater
and
that
conducted.
Club projects
were
A total of
achievement pro-
were:
Victory
gar-
and Home Beauti-
Victory Program.
girls through 4-H training
some
lations and rural leaders has been
more
County Extension
Breed
The all-round dev-
is needed
now
more
may have to be made due to
adjustments
cooperation from
4-H agricultural clubs and
in 31 schools
Club.
Thirty-six
The outlook for the 4-H Club program is favorable.
rural
on
Twenty college students
dens, Dairy, Beef, Swine, Sheep, Poultry, Rabbits, Handicraft
war.
many
to 4-H Club members.
Collegiate 4-H Leaders
completed by 577
grams and 4 radio broadcasts
gone to
can­
44 standard and 73 non-standard agricultural
trained to lead 4-H Clubs through the
It is
The
county-wide picnic rallies
4-H clubs, and 41 leaders assisted with the work.
ever.
Club meniliers
459 boys and 118 girls enrolled in agricultural 4-H clubs with
97.4% completion
elopment of
apparent again
nationally.
fairs-resulted
New activities such as
was
satisfactory.
very
held in lieu of the state 4-H Club camp.
tinued and took
a
was
programs, both
cellation or state-wide 4-H programs and
were
1943
-
Associations,
promised.
Rural
will be used to
war
Parent Teacher Assoc-
women
replace
than
have
the
men
successfully
led
leaders who have
Workers will render the maximum amount of
leaders and members to enable the 4-H Clubs to achieve their goals.
help
to
SUMMARY OF ACTIVITIES
of
carried
stock.
on
with the
objective of
enterprises of dair,y, poultry
Through farmer organizations,
magazines, radio
AGENT
of food and feed has been the main
production
the year,
1943
SANT, ASS'T. COUNTY AGRICULTURAL
W. R. VAN
The
-
news
letters,
newspapers,
which there
sented to the farmers.
the entire program for the
rymen and
and feed
In
efficiently
great
function of the
Improvement
and
a
great
organiZation
baby
chicks the
to
past year
da�en" poult-
produce
more
food
Poultry Improvement
deal of assistance in
maintaining
in accordance with the National
proper
Poultr,y
Plan.
The D.H.I.A. for the state
wi th all
give assistance
many, has been pre-
economically.
demand for
required
and
were
which would enable them to
livestockmen,
Association
fact,
supply information
With the
farm
and individual contacts the educational �rogram deal-
ing with production problems, of
has been to
and live-
reports being
made
was
handled in the
beginning
in
February.
County Agent's office
The East
Tempe 4-H Victor,y Garden Club produced
vegetables
for
Victor,y
from
garden plot.
a
cooperative
club
Each member of the 4-H "Challengers" Garden Club
at Tempe had an individual plot in the Club's
Victor,y Garden, which produced food for freedom.
Young ladies who acted as superintendents of the
different departments at the Co. 4-H Fair.
They
were members of the College 4-H Leaders Club and
substituted satisfactorily for the boys who had
.
gone to
war.
This young lady superintendent of the Handicraft de­
partment at the Co. 4-H Fair was ver.y pleased with the
many fine exhibits.
I.
4-H Club Members and adults Judging Livestock and
Poul try together on Farmers Day at the Co. 4-H Fair.
A group of
4-H Members judging Vegetables
at the
County 4-H
Fair.
r
County Champions
at the
Four Winners at the
4-H Fair in the Jersey Ca ttle E:�1ibi ts.
County 4-H
Fair in the Holstein-Friesian Cattle Exhibits.
:f1alcolm Adams of Scottsdale, State ,inner in the 4-H :Jeat
Animal Uonteet �roduced and sold �ore than �500 Worth of
hogs.
Owens, State Winner in the Victory Achievement
Contest divided her time about equally between 4-H Agric­
She minded her baby sister too.
ultural and H.E. Projects.
Elizabeth
4-H Garden Club at _�yrene nr-oduced all the vegetables
used by their School Cafeteria and for their homes.
This
They were named County
The Roosevelt 4-H Garden Club.
of their members are
Champions at the County Fair. Two
Garden
shown holding e25 War Bonds won in the State 4-H
-Contest.
Poultr,y judging practice by the
them to compete successfully at
Seeds and
plants
for 4-H
�adison 4-H Club enabled
the County 4-H Fair.
Victor.y
Gardens
were
given
to these
Phoenix store to enable them to grow
outstanding 4-H'ers by
more vegetables for Victor,y.
a
Vegetable exhibits
County 4-H Fair filled
including the laborator,y.
at the
all available spaces
Handicraft articles made by the Union 4-H Club and
exhibited at their achievement program, and at the
County 4-H Fair.
Part of the 10 State
4-H winners fro� L!aricopa County, who
conducted the first of two radio programs telling about their
Prizes were awarded during the program.
achievements.
Presentation of 4-H State contest awards at Kyrene honor assembly
Eli Gates is receiving the Santa Fe trip award from the
program.
Elizabeth Owens is receiving the Victor.y ac­
passenger agent.
Local Leaders stand at
hievement award from State Club Leader.
the left of winners.
an award from the President of
Arizona Jersey Cattle Club for having the grand champ­
ion registered Jersey at the County 4-H Fair.
Patsy Hess, receiving
David
Rogers,
registered
Washington 4-H Club member ��th his
Hereford heifer which placed first at
the County 4-H Fair.
Victor,y Gardeners of Union 4-H Club demonstrated
conclusively that vegetables could be grown success­
fully in their community.
The
This Victor,y Garden of 3 acres enabled the Union 4-H
It was a coop­
Club to produce vegetables abundantly.
erative Club project.
Champion 4-H
the prizes
Garden Club at Roosevelt, displaying
at the County 4-H Fair.
won
Alhambra 4-H Club displaying the sweepstakes
Fair.
cup they won at the Count,r 4-H
trophy
Prize pen of R.I. Reds at the
Fair, exhibited by a Mesa 4-H
County 4-H
boy.
Randell Hulet, Chandler 4-H member exhibited
his registered Jersey cow which placed first
She was classified
at the County 4-H Fair.
as "Excellent" by the American Jersey Clubs'
fiel&�an.
Peoria
4-H Flower Club, sponsors of the flower show
at the Peoria
4-H Fair.
These winners of championship awards were honored at
4-H achievement program sponsored by the P.T.A. at
Scottsdale.
a
the Laveen
handful of tomatoes from his
won County honors.
Bobby Tyson, Jr. of
a
4-H Club displaying
Victory garden which
which
Freddy Thonen in his 4-H Victory garden
him
a
$25
War Bond and
a
won
gold medal for State and
County championship
honors.
State 4-H contest winners from Scottsdale and their leaders:
Top center: malcolm Adams, �eat Animal champion. Below,
left to right: Mattie Whinnery, victory achievement; Barbara
Austin and Betty Sumners, dai� foods demonstration; Dorothy
(County) food preparation. State Club leader made the
awards.
Whinnery, winner in the
contest, helps with the farm work and
dai eying, poultry and home economics.
ment
in
ry
has
4-H projects
Community Garden
The above garden was grown by four employees of the
Maricopa Reservoir and Power Company at Beardsley
and the Zanjero in that district.
Elmer Green and
This is typical of
T. J. Stevens are shown above.
the many gardens grown in Maricopa County this year.
SEARS PHOENIX STORE 4-H CLUB VICTORY GARDEN CONTEST FOR 1943
The
following 4-H Club members
were
selected
by their 4-H
Club Leaders to
enter this contest:
Grand Ave. 4-H Club
Dick Finch
Frank Mitchell
Mesa 4 H Club
Dysart 4-H Club
Robert Biggs
Robert Fuller
Tom Stevens
Herbert Wilson
John Garcia
...
Grant Shields
Liberty 4-H
James Short
L. W. Roberts
Beverly Wooton
Marvin Jantz
Lawrence
Laveen 4-H Club
Nadine Neal
Robert Tyson
Club
Buckeye 4-H Club
Ralph Fletcher
Henry
Alhambra 4-H Club
Roosevelt 4-H Club
Oliver Anderson
Fred Thonen
Carl Coffer
Pendergast 4-H
Henry Rojas
Jean Kunze
Jo� Kunze
Patsy Freeland
Club
Bud Thrasher
Jimmy
Horne
The gardens were judged by H. B. Powers, Co. Extension Horticulturist and the
record books were judged by Paul Brown.
Mr. J. E. Francouer, Mgr., Sears Store,
assisted with the inspection of gardens.
SUMMARY OF RESULTS:
The average size of the 4-H Vict�r.y Gardena was 400 sq. ft., which was twice
as large as the minim� requirement.
The free seeds and plants distributed to the
contestants by the Sears Phoenix Store, €n�bled club members to plant more than the
required varieties, r.hich
The
yield�
rere;
from the 4-H
tomatoep, squash, carrots,
Victory
Gardens
were
beets and chard.
approximately
Tomatoes----l000 Ibs.
Squash------l250 lbs.
Carrots-----1150 lbs.
Bects------- 900 Ibs.
Chard------- 12251bs.
Radishcs----5000 heads
Cucumbcrs-- 600 Lcs
Cabbage----- 650 Ibs.
Turnips-----1200 lbs.
Me1ons------lOOO heads
Onions------1275 heads
Lettuce----- 950 heads
Peppers-----1050 heads
Corn-------- 975 ears
Okra-------- 300 lbs.
Eggplant---- 800 lbs.
Beans------- 300 1bs.
,
AWARDS:
"Garden
1st
-
2nd
-
3rd
4th
5th
-
-
-
Development Contest."
cash and Grand Chamoion Ribbon.
no ribbon.
cash
no ribbon.
cash
Five cash merit awards of $1 each.
One red, white and blue ribbon for
$7
$5
$3
-
-
� garden project participant.
as
follows:
INSTRUCTIONS FOR
SEARS 4-H GARDEN CONTEST
�
AWARDS:
First, second and third prizes of $7, $5, and $3, free seeds valued
A banquet will be given by
to $2, plus a supply of garden plants.
the sponsor to �ll contestants.
REQUIREMENTS:
1. Must turn in complete and accurate record book before June 12,
.�, to the County 4-H Club Office, 1201 West Madison, Phoenix.
2. All contestants must grow the following vegetables:
7 tomato
plants, 10 squash, 20 feet of carrots, 20 ft. of beets, and 20
Other vegetables may be grown in addition to the
ft. of chard.
ones listed above, if desired.
3. The size of the garden shall not be � than 10' x20 I .2.r..&QQ.
square
How to Plant and
-
-
"1re'ad
by
the
them.
then
SCORE CARD
see
fQB
fi.
Grow Your Garden:
n
IISuggestions to Victory Garden Growers, and be guided
Also follow the instructions in your garden bulletin,
your 4-H Club leader.
JUDGING GARDENS:
I. Location
A. Away from trees and shrubs, near good water
B. Ease of cultivation and harvest.
••••••••••••••••••••••••
II. General Appearance.
A. Soil condition, arrangement,
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
supply
•
•
.
.
.
15
20
etc.
neatness,
III. Selection of Varieties.
A. At least five varieties adapted to Arizona condi­
tions.
IV. Weed Control
A. Clean seed bed
B. Good cultivation
•••••
.
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
••
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
•••••••
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
15
••
30
V. Insect and disease control
A.
VI.
Spraying
or
dusting
10
when necessary
of Product and Yields.
A. Total amounts produced and harvested.
Quality
Points
10
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
COOPERATIVE EXTENSION V!ORK
IN
AGRICULTURE AND HOME ECONOMICS
State of Arizona
P.O. Box 751
Arizona
of
University
Phoenix
of
Agricultural.Extension Service
Agriculture
College
of
Home Demonstration Work
S.
U.
Agriculture
Department
and
�mricopa County Cooperating
County Agent
Work
August 19, 1943
IT'S PICNIC PARTY TIME FOR 4-H'ERSl
Dear Club Member:
The big event for which you have been waiting is at hand.
Don't miss
and
and
Mother
the
a
whole
and
Dad
Pack
lunch
family.
family
up
Bring
a fine program of
a
enjoying
day
games,
swimming,
picnicking,
moving
spend
pictures, roller skating (at Mesa) and many other program features. Mother and
We have a treat for them also.
Dad will enjoy it too.
Special entertainment
wiJl be provided for Dad and Mother, in addition to that mentioned above, which
is also for them.
Everyone in the family is invited to swim. Bring along
itt
your svam suits and towels.
You cannot afford to miss this chance
give Dad and Mother ,,1. good
The time and place is as follows:
it will
outd.ng
Paul 'If. Brown
Assft. County
also.
Agri. Agent
�------------------�------------------�----------�-------�-----�--------�-�----�--�----�-
TF�R OFF
-
AND MAIL TODAY to:
There will be
County Agent, Box 751, Phoenix,
�p0rsons from
our
Arizona.
family attend the 4-H picnic
number of
program.
Your
name
Name of your club.
-,
II
-I
49
me
VI
I'J BOOS-JE J\
r
NO. I
MARICOPA COUNTY 4-H CLUB NEWS
Announcing Garden
AUGUST, 1943
Contest Winners
4-H Victory gardeners who entered the contest sponsored by Sears were
banquet recently at the Adams Hotel in Phoenix, at which time the
The highest honors went to Fred Thonen of the
winners received their anards.
In second place was Frank Mitchell from the Grand Avenue
Roosevelt 4-H Club,
Club, and Patricia Freeland of the Alhambra 4-H Club placed third.
given
a
In another 4-H Garden Contest, sponsored by the Litchfield Khranis
Club for 4-H members west of the Agua Fria River, the contestants were treated
to a dinner program at Litchfield Park, wIuch included movies of our armed
forces in action and presentation of awards.
Highest honors went to Tommy
Stevens of the D.ysart 4-H Club.
Second oold third awards went to Melza Kelly and
Jesse Pcrkino, respectively, both from the Avondale
4-H Club. The ga�dens were judg�d by Assistant
County Agent, H. B. Powers,
cst�d,
State and National 4-H
our
The following contests wore recently announced by
Sta
to 4-H leader, Mr. Kenneth lJlcKcc.
!lew
(1) 4-H Victor.y Achievements
(2) Victory Gardens
(3) Meat Animal
(4) Canning Achievement
(5) Clothing Achievement
(6) Dairy Production
(7) Food Preparation
(8) Daiey Foods
(9) 4-H L�adership
(lO)Rural Electrification
Come to the 4-H Picnic ��d hear Mr. McKee, our state 4-H Leader,
explain these contests. Maybe you can qualify and become a state wi.nner
Perhaps you might even r-oprcserrt Arizona 4-H CllJ.bs in the National 4-H Congress.
Coming
,Events Cast Their Shadows}
on August 25
Tvw 4-H Picnic Parties will be held at Li tc'hficld Park
school
opens soon
that
Remember
and at �csa on August 27
Bottcr not miss this.
for
Sec the attached letter
and few such programs
can be held then.
a.s'these
details.
Bring
your baseball
gloves along,
and your
picniC
lunch.
-2-
Your 4-·H Club Will Meet
Again Soon
brightest sides of 4-H Club work is that it enables its
each
other's company.
member-s
enjoy
Maybe you arc anxious to meet your club
and
the
club's
It is only natural that 4-H
activities.
nwmbcrs again
c'njoy
C.i.1.1.b ,):xpt:rir0nces should be dear to the heart of every 4.-H boy and girl.
Well,
i t ViO�.ll t be long now, so let's be ready for great things to come.
.beat your
mII! .L best record.
One of tho
'(,0
.
"Cozdrig toge thor is a beginning.
Keeping togJth8r is � progress.
Viorking together is a success."
Two I'11111ion Friends in 4·-H Clubs in
goal set fot" 4-H Clubs located
f;bricopa County v.1.11 do i bs shar-e
That is the
Ainedca for
19441
in every section of
in meeting this gord
Our
last enrnl.Imerrt showed an Increase and we wi.Ll, increase our 4-H membership still
1'U .... rhcr
All of you 4-H member-s are +"0 be congratulated for the fine records
Ther-e wer-e over 9CJ!, of our members rrho completed their work and
you m.ide
r.eceived pins and certificEt.cs of achievoments.
Our County 4-H Fair Vias a suc�
cess and our local achievements wer-e as good as ever, although we had to put up
rlitlJ. many lim! ta tions due to war conditions.
This proves that 4-H members do
Ll vo up to their motto:
"To make tho best better."
1944.
,
,
,
Looking
Ahead
profit too. There arc club p�rtics, pi�ics
camping trips, community and county exhibits, fo.irs, contests, trip awards
fbld days, premiums and prizes for vdnning exhibits.
The largest annual
of
Club
l;lub
Na.tional
members
is
tho
4-H
4-H
congress held at Chicago.
gc.thcring
Add 0.11 of these ad van tagcs to the fun of carrying out one of the approved
I)roj ec ts and you will see why there is- fun in 4-H and profit too. See to it
that Y'mr Club includes as many as possible "of these- in its prcgrcm,
Thore is fun in 4-H Dnd
or
,
(�
��,�
"
�\""��'"
I
�?'h\,�>���fJ\�\ !H 5
I
�J
COLLEGIATE LEADERS
CLUB
Arizona State Teachers College
Tempe,
Arizona
4-H LEADERSHIP CLUB PROGRAM
1942-1943
October 29
-
Organization
November 5
Commi ttee
November 12
Acceptance of program
Rules and Requirements
December 10
--
Meeting.
Program Planning
History and Development of 4-H Club Work
Organization and inter-relationships
January 14
Open Date
January 28
Leadership Responsibility for
Local
Meetings
Educational Values of Exhibits
February
11
February 25
--
Mr. Turville
--
Radio in Modern Youth
-
Rural Youth In
a
World at War
Programs
March 11
Demonstration Team
March 25
Organization and Plans for local and
County Achievements and contests
April 8
Open Date
April 29
Club Picnic
Training
COLLEGE CLUB MEMBERSHIP
1942-1943
Jane Allgood
Annie Marie Ballard
Martha Bishop
Ruth Crumbaker
Geraldine Dawson
Mrs. Pauline Fees
Catherine Fisher
Virginia Gleason
Frances Gray
Mary Louise Jones
Allene Neely
Marjorie Ferris
Sally Kohlberg
Irene Hanger
Olive Marie Wheeler
Claudine Layton
Lucille Byers
Malva Smith
Thelma White
Lucy Jensen
Valene Erickson
Katherine Hammon
Nathine Montgomery
Dorothy Jernigan
Martha Jane Cowles
Wilma Swan
Elsie McGovern
Keith Mortensen
Elizabeth Zoella Pratt
Katherine Nelson
OFFICERS
President
Vice President
Frances
-
Secretary Treasurer
Gray
Sally Kohlberg
-
Pauline Fees
BOYS'
AND GIRLS'
CLUB WORK
Club Emblem
The ro�-leaf clover with an "H" on each leaflet is the National Boys'
The four "H r s" stand for the equal training of the
and Girls' Club emblem.
for health.
and
and
head, heart,
hand,
Club
Pledge
member, I pledge my head to clearer thinking, my heart
hands
to larger service, and my health to better living
greater loyalty, my
for my club, my community, and my country.
As
a
true club
to
Club Motto
"Make the Best Better."
Club Creed
The Arizona Club Creed is:
I believe in Boysr and Girls' Club work
because of the opportuni t.y it gi vas me to become a useful ci.tizen.
I believe in the training of my head because of the pd\li� 1:" it will
give
to
me
think,.
to
plan,
and to
reason.
I believe in training my heart because it will
a.nd true.
help
me
to be
kind,
sympathetic,
I believe in the
and useful.
training of my ha.nds because it will
make
me
helpful,
skillful,
give
I believe in the training for health because of the strength it will
to enjoy life, to resist disease, and to become efficient.
me
I believe in the great
and achievement.
trinity of club work, the school,
I believe in my country,
their development.
in the State of
Arizona,
the
and in my
home,
responsi­
bility for
To the fulfillment of all these
things
I
am
willing
to dedicate my
service.
collegie.te 4-H Leaders Club is to give those students
sufficiently interested, real training in 4-H Club leadership. Any
Those vmo complete
individual vmo sincerely plans to finish the work may join.
the year's work receive a 4-H Leadership pin.
The purpose of the
who
are
There is
women
a
growing demand for trained 4-H Club leaders, young
men
and
who can conduct successful 4-H Clubs.
A.S. T.C.
Incidentally,
to meet thio need has organized D. leaders club on the campus.
this is the only club of its kind, and we are rather proud of it.
The 4-H
Leader-shfp
Club was organized in November , 1936, with Miss Dorothy
Mr. Forest Ostrander, of the college faculty, who is
largely responsibl� for the annual 4-H Club Fair, was fictively interested fiS
were members of the Agricultural Extension Service of the University of Arizona.
Robinson
as
sponsor.
-
3
._
SEVEN POINT 4-H VICTORY PROGRAM
1.
Help to interpret
community.
2.
Produce and
abroad.
3.
Save for
4.
Develop
5.
the National Vic tory
conserve
needed food
Program to the
supplies
for home and
Victory.
our
health and tha t of the communi ty
Acquire useful
•
technical and mechanical skills to meet
War-time needs
6.
Practice Democratic
our
7.
procedures
and learn to
appreciate better
Democratic way of life.
Organize 4-H discussions regarding
social and economic
.
sources
now
of the
some
at work
•
important
ACTIVITIES OF 4-H CLUBS
4-H Organization is an educational institution whose primary concern is
for the rural youth.
The 4-H organization, its methods and activities are bullt
around rural problems and rural ideals.
As such it is different and lacks much
of the rigidity of a city system.
4-H Leader--The foregoing comments will help to give you the proper
background for our work. The man or woman 4-H leader has splendid opportunities
for community service.
An excellent avenue of approach through the boy and girl
is opened in to the rural home and in to rural communi ty life.
The 4-H avenue
of approach is superior to any other because of the nature of the work.
4-H Club work brings permanent results nnd as such, may contribute
substantially to community improvement. The opportunity for hobby development
may be an important factor under some conditions.
4-H Club--As
a
club unit and
economic and social life of the
as
members
they
may function in both
the
community.
Each club member has a project and �he bulk of these must of necessity
projects. Each of these units is in reality a demonstration of and a
Ground for improved practices in Agriculture, Home Econorr�cs and Health.
be home
testing
boy or girl is prone to grasp new things more quickly thnn an adult
and such demonstration combines seeing a thing demonstrated, hearing it expl.afned
and the actual doing with the hands, this pr-ogram is and will con tinue to be a
powerful influence in rural communi�r life.
Since the
.
used in 4-H work , helps to popularize certain
demonstration or judging team does the same and in
Tho demonstration team
definite
practices.
Th8
addition demonstrates the
..
as
ability
and skill of the individual
Projects
are
along certain lines.
,
.
economic units and
a
source
of income to the boy
or
girl
and to the homes.
The fact that in some projects where the "income" may be in
the form of savings in time and materials, does not in any way detract from
the value of these to the home and community.
Project tours and field days are stimulative both to young and old and
should be used to an oven greater extent.
The community activities of any 4-H Club need bo limited
ability of the leader and club members.
only by
tho
time and
In this county the fellowship banquet is a step in this direction.
more of them over tIle county.
Picnics and sports have their pla.ce
and. are used to quite en extent In I+-H work.
Music should not be omitted.
Many splendid songs (ire Dvailable and will help your club maintain a place of
community leadership 2.nd influence.
We need
-5-
Personnel of 4-H Workers in Arizona
UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE
(One
of the department's major activities
conducted by the Land Grant Colleges and
Universities throughout the rural states.)
University of Arizona
College of Agriculture
P.S.
BurgrS'
Agricultural EX'
�Sidc
s�rvice
..
•
Jean M.
/'
stewart,)
)
State Agent
Emil Rovey,
State 4-H
"
Coun ty
Agen t In the Coun ty
J. H. O'Dell, Maricopa Co.
/
.
Agriculturul Extension
C U. Pickrell, Str te Direc tor
Station
Supervising adul t
dean___
work
�
/
--
)
Le"dCr)�,
Home Demons t
4-H Club Work
Pace
t.·:i;r�
.�
-,
/Gr&ce
/
/
4-H Club Work
hi.ul.
'�
�abCll
Field Workers
/
IMPORTANT
REQUIREMENTS FOR COLLEGIATE 4-H LEADERS CLUB CERTIFICATE-­
Adopted by Club in special meeting Jan. 12, 1937
*1.
Attendance at 8 of the 10 meetings.
Member dropped after three
unexcused absences.
Absences may be OK'ed by faculty sponser.
May
be reinstated upon vote of club.
Deadline for enrollment is
Docember 1.
*11
Active
participation in work
responsibility, and faithful
of
HIlI
1.
Successful
*IV
1.
Successful participation in
picnics, etc.
Successful participation in
picnics, parties, etc.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
leadership of
Collegiate
Club.
Acceptance of
service necessary.
a
4-IT Club
some
community affair--banquets,
some
club
affair--banquets
Responsibility for special programs, co��ittee work, etc,
Assisting actual clubs' as assistant leader.
a.
As in training of demonstration teams, judging teams,
exercise teams, etc.
b.
Assisting in preparation of Fair exhibits.
c.
Make or direct the making of posters, etc.
d.
Present a pep meeting to a club.
Detailed outline of actual work to be covered by
a
*V
Equivalent of 6 or 8 college units in the department in
are preparing to be a leader (waived for the duration)
*VI
Keep
*
**
-
-
club in
which you
record sheet correctly and hand in April 15 with Story of
Year's work --illustrated if possible with snapshots of major
activities.
Prize for best one.
Required
(Any
a
given comnnmity.
Successful participation in Fair and Fair organization.
Study organization method in County 4-H Club office,
1201 West Madison, Phoenix.
5 activities under IV may be substituted for
-7-
III)
4-H Activities Connected with the Fair
1.
Check indiv.idual records and stories Ln the county office.
with Mrs.' Pace or Mr. Brown.
Arrange
2.
Assist with Farm Bureau programs.
Superintendent of Fair
Superintendent
Assistant
See Mr. Brown
or
Mr. Ostrander.
of Fair
�
.
!
and .Ass'! t. Superintendents
Superintendent
in these Departments
!
j
I
Records
Grounds
!
Dair.}"
I
Rabbit
Horses
!
Sheep & Swine
I
:
Poultry
Garden Produce
Flowers
,
I
,
Garmen t Making
Bakin_g
I
I
Dress Revue
Health Posters
Agri. Demonstrations
Home Econ.
Demons.
Campin�
Boys' Gamp
Grounds Committe€
I
Information & Courtesy
L
-8-
RECORD SHEET
Keep
Project
your Record Sheet up to date
Na ture of work
Date
Time
Spent
I
I
�.
-
--I---
=1
�
�
1---
1-------
--
I----.
--
I--.
--
[
(Your standing
in the
Quality
organization is based on
quantity counts)
rather than
-9-
your record.
SAMPLE
4-H LFADERS CLUB CERTIFICATE
THIS IS TO CERTIFY that
has been a
member of the Arizona State Teachers College 4-H leaders
club during the year 1937-38, which has studied and participated
in the organization"and methods of conducting 4-H Club
work.
The holder of this certificate has also
basic
completed
the
following
courses.
Club Activities
Related Activities
Club Leader
President of Arizona State Teachers
College
Agricultural
-10-
Extension Agont
May 8, 1943
ARIZONA FARMER:_Producer
Page Three
I
•
So They Had
It"s��f�'Great 4�H
Job
T�J.s
"
4-8 Fair
a
Veteran
Le;adet:"¥s Doing
M'
ns,
lONE AUSTEN is another of
the five Arizona 4-H club lead­
who have recently been given spegood work
recognition for
they're doing, not for Just one s:ason
The Arizona
but year after year.
of the
Bankers' Assn. presented
five with leadership pins, and mother
ways they have been made
�o know
that their efforts are appreciated.
ers
I
cial
t_?e
eac�
11
of the years that have passed
when she began at the
n
Roosevelt Scl).qol,. MAt
rs.', us e has
been a 4-H leader in Maricopa county.
The only reason her career has not
been continuous is that from 1934 to
1938 she was not engaged in school
work.
For
.
"
since
1927 ,
.
_
leadership
,
When Asst. County
BrQ�n
nt Paul
delivered the
�g;.. b the Alhambra senior sweepstakes
and junior girls'
;at
a��ud and Rosalie Adams-reached
it
presu;lents-Bet�y
The
J�� � J,erry.Talbot
just
pleased but
boy� pr�sl
i; Mrs.
aged
restrain' hImself:
Spivey, Alhambra
school teacher.
Mrs.
:�g
iarold
Shumaker, former
�a
b.oy
S_PlvJey ColleO'e' the leaders credited with
st.udent
the
Phoenblx
ulmbort
the
ef;ont in spectacular fashion.
Alham
bringing
has included
Clothing, Banking and Meal Planning
Her
Hea�th,
the
Wc)D
Tempe
4·
cup
for
en
once.
Judge Clyde Rowe decided
0 th
was
,
to
At
as
h
that
this Black
\_;Australorp cock, en­
tered by Robert .Fuller of Mesa
Franklin, was the best bird in the
show. Robert was also a mem­
ber of- the champion boys' demonstration team.
at
man­
Inez
4-H
at
now ra
are
ra
c u
0
'
,
ALHAMBRA
the "best
contest, and all the 4-H clubs
,
caU:s�
clu�"
won
on
a creditable fair.
the
same
Bless
show of enthusiasm.
time Mrs. Austen has
At
seen
lacking.
Those Roosevelt 4-H
girls and boys
a lot of
work, but they have a lot
fun, thanks largely to 'their leader.
Mrs. Austen's, main
job is to manage
the school lunch at
Roosevelt, and she
makes a great success of
i�as she
do
of
everything.
not
was
nowhere
It
was
Flour Mills :gave 100
feed
was
as that
1942, but.
it below 1942
quality.,
conspicuously' ahead, in live­
stock.
So far ahead, in.
fact, that'
Dr. W. H. Riddell
of the U. of A.
_
dairy department wrote Asst.
County
Agent Paul Brown a
special letter
praising the, dairy cattle he
Judged.
Extension Livestock Specialist
Tom
Rigden was equally
'enthusiastic
about the hogs, beef
cattle and sheep
that he judged.
Extension Poultry
Speciali'st CIY,de Rowe admitted
.
-
large
as
America
�.
to
pounds
the 'best poultry
members
to it that recreation
is not
does of
"God
KOY
"
Sure they had trouble about get­
ting their exhibits transported to
just
recording made under the
trees for broadcasting that
a
anot�er
Holstem-F�Iesian
bo;V1
resp�>Ilsibility,
AI,:
sang
for
There' was many
spe�Ia I
prize. The Arizona
Assn. 'gave $2 for every registered
Holstein exhibited.s L.
Byrd ga:ve
$3 for the" grand champion Holstein,
shown by Fanny Coman 9f the Com­
mandos.
The Arizona Jersey Ca ttle
Club gave $5 for the best Jersey
shown, $3 for the blue ribbon Jersey,
The Hayden
$2 for third, place.
.n:edle,
a
th.ird
evening.
eggs
develop individual
was
ham bra
campus
.
to
whole
a
'places
They showed 'em, did those boys
and girls from the farms of Salt
River Valley and Buckeye Valley
'and points east, west, north and
sou th
They showed the world how
they're producing beef, miilk , pou Itry,
and vegetables to win the
war.,
The girls showed that they're be­
the
coming experts with the
sewing machine, the mI.xmg
So did some of
and electric range.
the boys, for that matter.
not
as
parade; because of, ma�y high
in judging, demonstration and
showmanship contests; because.
In
Maricopa County won a cont�st over
the skeptics who
doubted, If they
could put
the club
in the
poul­
club
m
of meat animals at
a�cti?n prices
well above market.
ThIS time
simply gave $15
exhibited, $5 for each
each fat sheep.
way
But the auction
Sa�e­
for each steer
fat hog, $5 for
was
no
flop,
steer, bought several hogs at good
prices. There were also some other
buyers that had slaughter qu?tas;
but the Tovrea Packing Co. bidder
was sadly missed:
As usual, the dress revue and
d�m­
onstrations
attracted
than any of the
more
numerous
attention
o.ther
the
Bu'y
Bonds-Now
that
the chickens and
rabbits were "not
bad at all."
For Clyde, that was
bUbbling over.
Trophy for
.
.
a
Busy Club
This can't be
any detailed account
of events and
prize winners; there
just isn't space. But
idea of
what went on can be
had from the
s�'l]e
"fair
"participation" contest, which
'not settled until
April 27. It
long to check over the rec­
was
took that
ords and
determine that the Alham­
had won the
handsome,
sweepstakes cup donated
the Ariby
zona
bra
club
'
Flour Mills.
Alhambra
pointS-just
two
wound
one
over
over
�p
with
Kyrene
81
and
Scottsdale, not very many
Madison, the Commandos,
Roosevelt, Mesa, and half .a dozen
other
up-and�coming clubs. Those
81
over
.Patsy Hess
best Jersey
of Madison had the
at the fair, and col­
special prize of $5 from
lected a
Clyde Hussey, president of the
ArizO,lla Jersey Cattle Club.
7
I
.points
Dress
awarded because Car­
Alhambra won the
because Alhambra had
were
olyn Schurter
Revue;
of
the greatest number
of
exhibits;
be-
Nope!
con­
This 1. becau_ the Wlnners
rnoon
,$2
Alhambra.
Slaughter restrictions cramped
Malcolm,Adams
After Judge
any more.
female in
of
�y
any means.· The Tempe Market paid
Eli Gates 16 cents a pound for a
tests.
the second
day. There were cash
prizes from the
Maricopa 'County
Farm Bureau-$5 for
Scottsdale, $3
for Madison,
for
on
'
of
livestock .sale with which hue
fai� is
always concluded. In .order to stim­
ulate
meat
production, Safeway
'Stores have been buying a nu�ber
Scottsdale doesn't
Tom Rigden had
own
this
Hampshire
sow
blue-ribboned her as the best
the swine oepartment
at the
Maricopa County 4-H Fair,
W. P. McDavid decided
that she was worth
his Sun'Valley herd.
Having more like her coming
on, Malcolm accepted
proud exhibitor was his
Another
pal, Alfred
bought for $100 from Sugar Grove Austin, Alfred's Hampshire boar,
Farm in Illinois, was.
the grand
.ehampion male, hog ,of the show.
$1251llj
.
•
•
-,
�--�----------�
ARIZONA FA
Page Sixteen
'Gardens For Lunches
School Kids Get Close to the Soil
,In Order
Nobody
hungry
goes
r
Help Feed Themselves
to'
at
The youngsters raise their
Kyrene school!
lunch
vi�mins
in'
4-H_!�dens.
own
_,.
By MAUDE LONGWELL
]
IF
stuff she needs for the
The boys take turns, in
ing it in.
l.
act i
v i tie s
of
school-lunch gar­
deners' would in­
Settmg
The influence of those 4-H gardens
Visif-tlie
lately, and
young lunch program that flourishes
at Grand Avenue school, northeast of
discovered t hat
Phoenix.
Another garden, operated
by 4-H-ers, 'Contributed minerals and
is
Rove y,
director' of
.
me
4'- H
the
project
,
s c
near
simply
was
h
a
at
o
mass
vitamins to the M�Dowell
lunch, in Pinal County.
.
of understatement.
Three' gardens, right there, on the
school grounds-a green and living
argument that when there's a will
a school lunch, there's a way.
One of the gardens is the project of
third and fourth graders; fifth and
sixth 'graders look after the second;
the 'third garden is strictly upper­
.
You know any more examples of a
school working out its lunch problem
the garden way?
Or of women,
singly or in groups, volunteering time
and energy to can, dehydrate or otherwise preserve surpluses for use In
school lunches?
Or of farmers or
dealers who contribute food to their
class.
Takes Teamwork
a
were
sod
selected in midRus-
playground.
sell Henness, the school's 4-H leader,
and C. I. Waggoner, the principal, apdistrict
plauded, advised and helped; but most (
of the work was done by, the youngsters.. Ed and Dick Hanger�bor:-;;;
rowed a team of mules and a walkin'
plow from their dad, H. C. Hanger,
and turned up the earth. J. K. Williams was prevailed. upon to lend a
disk to son Jim, who did the disking.
All hands turned to and beat out the
sod; planted a little of almost every,
thing.
Peas, turnips, carrots, onions, beets,
Swiss chard and spinach.
Leaf let­
tuce, cabbage and rutabaga.
Even)
garlic fi'nd' parsley!
They've sold enough from the 'gar­
dens to pay for the seed, in addition
to serving all the S()uP 'n' salad needs'
for 'the 150" children who eat' in the
school lunchroom.'
The gardeners" irrigate every two
weeks, but they order water' only for
every second irrigation. For the in­
between' times, they turn in waste
water from an adjoining field,
1
'. Ha\!vesting
cinch;
,
the
vegetables
is
a
Every,. school morning," :Mrs�
..
�. McOuilOug.h, the l�nchtodm ,�
school
Arizona Farmer's garden editor,
Naomi Showers, has been promising
the story and picture of the Madison
school garden, which thrives on the
site of a burned classroom building!
to have
October, from
j
�xample
01,
Tempe.
te
All three sites
an
spreading over the community. One
small girl told Mrs. Isabell Pace,
Maricopa County director of 4-H girls,
that: "1 learned about gardens from
these at school, and now we have a
garden at home that is even better
than they are!"
Kyrene isn't the only school that
has gardens, of course. Last I heard,
a garden was being planned for that
Emil
I
day's lunch.
pairs, bring­
•
spire me to 'keep
hammering away.
Emil's boasting
,
ager, tells the 4-H leader how much
didn't
already feel downright
'persevering on the subject of noon
lunches for school kids,' the 'current
I
\
feeding programs?
•
.
Eight Years in 4-H
Eli 'Gates
.
(right)
sol�his
fat pigs at auction, at the Tempe Club Fair of
1942
.
.
ARD of a Santa Fe trip to the
National Club Congress in Chi­
-cago culminates an eight-year 4-H
father's dairy,
the feed used.
Aw
for Eli Gates of
career
It
has
through
been
and Eli has figured
right
career
and raked
the 'stack.
years,
at the
up
top in many a prize list. In -the 4- H
story that he wrote himself, he re­
called his club beginnings in these
.
,
"For my second year's' -program, I
started with a new individual, a reg­
istered Holstein-Friesian heifer from
Jess Elliott. I paid $40 for the calf.
She developed well, and by fair time
she was a beautiful animal.
She
placed first in her class and also
placed as Grand Champion Female."
.
Six-Cent Pork!
Eli's third, fourth, fifth, sixth and-,
seventh years saw a steady expansion
of his projects,
In his fourth year
he bought another Holstein heifer and
a fat hog.
In his fifth year he had
the same dairy animals but fed two
The
porkers weighed 300
hogs,
pounds and sold at auction at six
cents
a
pound.
on with dairy and swine
projects through his sixth year, and
Eli kept
also fed a beef calf. At the Tucson
Livestock Show his steer did not place
His
but sold 12%' cents a pound.
Holstein hei fer was second. in her
class at the State Fair in November;
his cow and heifer both won firsts
at the club fair in Tempe.
In his seventh year, Eli concen­
"I bought my calf
trated on beef.
from Mr. Jeff Hunt of Apache, Ari­
zona," he writes. "I paid $20 for a
calf three months old. I started feedth
calf March 21, 1941.
r- ing _my
?
weighed 175 pounds. I fed �t until
It then weighed 800
Feb. 21, 1942.
.It
pounds, an average gain of two pounds
a day.
After the Tucson snow it sold
at auction for 16 cents a pound.
Accumulated Assets
"This year, 1942-43, I started my
eighth year of 4-H club work. My
projects have grown from a: dairy calf
in my first year, and gradually spread
out until I now have three registered
dairy
cows,
one
grade heifer, one
reg­
istered bull; and I sold one registered
bull two. months ago. I purchased a
war bond with the money from that
sale.
I raised a Hereford steer in
the Beef Calf Club.
I showed this
calf at the Maricopa County 4-H Club
Fair and sold him to the Tempe
Market for 16 cents a pound. For a
swine project I purchased a bred gilt
for $5.0 from Mr. C. H. Roulnac of
Tolleson. After having one litter she
died, and I have three female pigs
left.
"For my contribution toward win­
the war, I am helping on my
ning
all
work after
hay
and
helped haul
:it to
"I helped collect aluminum, iron
and rubber in .the scrap drives. I n9W
have $550 in war bonds. I won one $25
bond last year in the victory contest
of the International Harvester Co.
_
'
.
this
-
words:
"I joined a 4-H club when I was
in the fourth grade. My first year's
project was a registered Holstein
heifer. 1 fed my calf and taught it
to lead.
She placed fourth in her
class at the M-aricopa County 4-H
Fair, held at Tempe in April, 1936.
grind -and mix
school and on Saturdays. During the
summer vacation I helped with the
farm work. I d-rove a tractor, mowed
Kyrene.
notable
of those
a
everyone
I
I do
\
"This year I
was
selected
as
the
Arizona state champion Holstein calf
club boy by the
Assn. of America.
Holstein-Friesian
"I am proud to be a member of a
4-H club and I know my knowledge
gained by it will make me a better
farmer in later life."
MalcolJll. relates, "I knew that Sun
Valley 'would improve Arizona Hamp­
Shire :)log_s by having her in their
'
herd.
"Last year I kept three sows. This
tlle- largest proJect I have 1i�a.
"y """,w.o. ..•.••'�.,
to increase meat
IgS: Drq'Q,'�J
production
war.
three' sows .raised ,22 pigs from
fall litters.
THese were the,
I f�ttened out. They were all
in body, wifh good, heavy hams.
"The pens th1Lt I kept my sows and
y;oung pigs in, were all movable. That
way I shifted them to clean ground :so
thte.Y had no trouble with diseases. I
Had enough natural shade for the pens
when ft was hot. r used small feeders.
and water troughs so that I could
'Wash and clean them easily.
"When the pigs were old enough to
wean they were put in the fattening
pen. I fed skimmilk, rolled barley and
The separated milk came from
corn.
I bought the rolled
our own dairy.
barley from tlie local feed tore and
from Indians on a nearby, reserva­
The rolled barley was soaked
tion.
witli wate and mixed with -a ,Dr. Hess
The corn was
40% Hog Special.
'.
sheUed and soaked also
"They were three months old when
I sold them, and weighed about 75
pounds each. I didn't have room to
keep them longer, so' I sold them to
Sun Valley Hampshire Farms ft>r
eom
..
.
$275.
"Next year I hope to have f,ive
sows, all raising pigs and
meat for victory. Also I have added
10 Angora goats, all producing mohair
registered
for victory.
"I have bought five
am
saving for
war
bonds and
my sixth one."
KIW��IS CLUB VICTORY GARDEN 4-H CONTEST
1943
The Litchfield Kiwanis Club is offering a 4-H Garden Contest to
area west of Agua Fria River in Maricopa County.
This will
include Dysart, Litchfield, Avondale, Liberty, Palo Verde and Buckeye.
Club members in the
REQUIREMENTS
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
Must be regularly enrolled in 4-H Club end must sign enrollment sheet
for Kiwanis 4-H Garden Contest.
Must have a garden at least 20'x20', or 400 square feet.
Must have a minimum of five va.rieties of vegetables.
Turn in record books complete and accurate.
Picture of club member and garden.
Deadline
Records and stor.y must be sent to the County LIo-H Club
-
office by June 15, 1943.
SCORE CARD FOR JUDGING GARDENS
Points
I.
Location.
A.
B.
II.
III.
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
,
•
•
arrangement, neatness,
•
•
•
•
•
•
10
•
supply
15
•
etc.
20
•••••••••••
•
•
•
•
10
•
Clean seed bed
Good cultivation
Insect and disease control.
Spraying
or
dusting
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
15
when necessary
Quality of Product
A.
•
•
At least five varieties adapted to Arizona conditions
Weed Control.
A.
•
Away from trees and shrubs, near good water
Ease of cultivation and harvest.
Selection of Varieties
B.
VI.
•
••••••••
A.
v.
•
General Appearance
A.
Soil condition,
A.
IV�.
•
and Yields
Total amounts produced and harvGsted.
30
••••••
AWARDS
The gardens and records will be judged by a committee selected
County Agent. First prize will be a $25 war bond; second, $10 in
defense stamps; third, $5 in defense stamps.
by
the
Winners in this contest
Victory
are
eligible
Garden Contest for additional awards.
to
compete
in the
County 4-H
LITCHFIELD KIWANIS CLUB 4-H VICTORY GARDEN CONTEST FOR 1943
following 4-� Club members
The
Ir. Dooth
Ed Anderson
I
enrolled for this contest:
Avondale 4-H Club
Rob't. Denham
Geo. Frankl.In
Jill Goodin
"bit. Hatter
Ove Hansen
Cecil Howe
Gene Knecht
rom Ludlow
Ray Madden
Clay Po tte:r
un Burt
ionald Chap{)le
�rman Chisum
Joyd Combs
�arry Co�r
Kenneth Wood
I
were
Liberty 4-H Club
Mark
Vernon Frost
Willie Fulks
Joe Thos", Grey
Larry Hodgkins
Wm. Jarnagin
Don Jetor
Melzu Kelly
Pete Lopez
Leurs Oliver
Billy Porkins
Jesse Perkins
Jack Rahe
Fred Sullinger
John
Tyree
Buckeye 4-H Club
Bob Long
Lloyd Parker
Louis Boyer
Billy Joe Brisco
Bucey Currens
Lee Dunning
Ralph Fletcher
Don Francis
Arnold Gem try
Styles
Bill Styles
Willis Bartholomew
Lawrence Woody
MD.rvin Jantz
Roland Dean
Lawrence Henry
R2.ymond Richardson
Paul Lay
Beverly Wooton
Ray Jones
Club
Albert Cerino
John Garcia
Bobby Mathis
Bobby Padelford
Dennie Reed
Tommy Stevens
Herbert Wilson
pysart 4-H
Raymond Rhodes
L. W. Roberts
Sam Rose
Joe Rubacava
James Short
Joe
Sulzinger
Jimmie Townzen
Vcstle Ward
Verne Hi ckraan
Bill Kemp
The gardens were judged by H. B. Powers and L. D. Shumway.
Tho record books
for
The
was
Paul
Brown;
contest
all
Club
4-H
judged by
Victory gardeners west
It nas sponsored by the Litchfield Kiwanis Club to promote
of the Agua Frio. River.
more victory gardens and thus to help with productd.on on the Home Front.
sere
SUl';liJIARY OF RESULTS:
The a.verage size of the gardens exceeded the minimum requirements of 200 sq. ft.
Th� varieties of vegetables grown �lso exceeded the minimum requirements of five
varieties vihich were: tomatoes, squash, carrots, beets and chard.
The
yields
from the 4-H
Victory gardens
were
approximately
as
follows:
Tomatocs------1050 lbs.
Squash--------1275 lbs.
Carrots-Beets---Chard-----
1125 lbs.
900 lbs.
1225 lbs�
Radishcs--_---5000 heads.
Cucumbcrs
500 lbs.
-650 lbs.
Cabbage
Turnips-
-1000 Ibs.
1000 heads.
12S0 heads.
Lettuce---950 heads.
Pcppers-------1050 heads.
Corn----975 ears
Okra----_�
200 lbs.
Mclons-Onions---
Ibs.
100 lbs.
Eggplant-------300
Bcans----AWARDS:
$5
V;ar
Stamps.
First prize; $25 War Bond; second prizG; $10 War stamps; Third
priz0;
SEVENTEENTH ANNUAL 4-H CLUB FAIR
�-H veT 0 H � � CHI EVE mEn T
P I? E nll u nl LIS T
A
SEVEN POINT
VICTORY PROGRAM
MARICOPA COUNTY BOYS' & GIRLS' 4-H FAIR
April 16 & 17, 1943
ARIZONA STATE TEACHERS COLLEGE CAMPUS
TEMPE, ARIZONA
Held under the direction of the
of the Uni versi ty of Arizona, in
State Teachers College
Agricultural'Extension
Service¥
cooperation VIi th the Arizona
and the Maricopa County Farm Bureau.
ARIZONA
STATE
TEACHERS
COLLEGE
'l'�J1PE, ARIZONA
February 12, 1943
Mr. Paul W. Bronn
Ass't. County Agricultural Agent
In Charge of Boys & Girls 4-H Club Work
P.O. Box 751
Phoenix, Arizona
Dear Mr. Brown:
The Arizona State Teachers College again welcomes
all of you to its campus for the 4-H Fair.
This is one of the
annual events many of us look forNard to.
The fair has special significance for us this
country is engaged in a. desperate struggle in defense
of things we value.
Food�inathe product of isthea farm, is ofas vital
as airplanes and tanks.
4-H program
produc­
program
ti.on and education.
It is always vi tal and mor-e so net than ever.
Added interest, speed-up and maximum efficiency are the order of
the day.
year.
Our
May
demonstrating
country.
its
we
all
place
join
in
making this
in the life of
the best fair,
communities and in
our
Sin
s,
relYl;
/
I
(/
>
<-
Jj
trl.>"d{/!;;lMA.J
Grady
GG:D
,.-
9'o.mmage
President
'
our
4-H
Seven Point
1.
Help
to
interpret
Communi, ty
2.
Produce and
Victory Program
the National
Victory Program
to the
•
conserve
needed food
supplies
for home and
abroad.
3.
Save for
4.
Develop
our
5.
Acquire
useful technical a.nd mechanical skills to meet
Victory.
health and that of the community.
war
time needs.
6.
Prc.ctice democratic procedures and learn to appreciate better
our democratic way of life.
7.
Organize 4-H Discussions regarding
social and economic forces
s r ;\ 1'1 D I �I G
'IV fr}J
U 1'1 C L E
-3-
now
some
of the
at work.
important
SCHEDULE OF EVENTS
February 15, 1943
Final enrollment due in 4-H office for
April 2, 1943
Each community selects the healthiest 4-H Club
and giri.
April 2, 1943
Record
Books, if for Fair Exhibit, due
office, 1201 W. Madison, Phoenix
eligibility
in
boy
County 4-H
ENTRY BLANKS for Fair exhibits due in Fair Office at Tempe on March 27, 1942Deadline for above, Thursday, April 1, at 5:00 P.M.
* *
April 16, 1943
10:00 A.M.
* * �}.*
* -)*'
All e�hibits must be at A.S.T.C. between 8:00 A.M.
and 10:00 A.M. in order to be judged.
Judging of
above exhibits
contest for halter classes.
1:00 P.M.
Showmanship
2:00 P.M.
Demonstration team contests
8:00 P.M.
Camp
for 4--H
Boys and girls
Chaperonage required.
opens at 8:00
P.M.,
April 17, 1943
9:30 A.M.
Livestock
Judging Contest (All 4-H members
and
Farmers)
9:30 A.M.
ring Dairy Cattle (written reasons)
ring hogs (Breeding gilts)
Poultry Judging Contest (All 4-H members)
1 pen white leghorns (Breeding Cla.ss)
1 pen reds (Production class, written reasons)
9:45 A.M.
Home Economics Team
I
I
10:00 A.M.
11:00 A.M.
12:00 Noon
Judging Contest
(a) Judging clothing
(b) Judging foods
Vegetable judging
Parents visit 4-H exhibits
Picnic.
Farmers and 4-H'ers "Get-together"
(Because of war conditions and food rationing, each
person and family group will provide own Iunch ,)
-4-
1: ,0 P.M.
Farmers'Day Program
4-H Victory Parade
Contest between clubs, based
on
following points:
attendance, marching, banners, ori'ginali ty
Community singing.
Address of Welcome
Dr. Gammage
Response in behalf of cooperating Extension Service.
Response: Hollis B. Gray, President, Maricopa
County Farm Bureau.
•
.
-
3: 00 P.M.
Dress Revue
3:15 P.M.
Wiru1ing pemonstrations
Girls' High�st Team
Boys' Highest Team
3: 50 P.M.
Awards
Health Champions
Demonstration Teams
Judging Teams
High Individuals
Other Medal Winners' names road
(Medals awarded at Achievement
Special Awards given
Days)
MARICOPA COUNTY 4-H FAIR COMMISSION
President Farm Bureau
Mesa
Rural
Mr. Hollis B. Gray
Mr. Dale C. Riggins
Mrs. Mary P. Clark
Mrs. Alice
Ramsey
Kyrene
Home Demonstration Agent
Ass't. Home Dom. Agent
Miss Grace Ryan
Mrz. Isabell.Pace
Mr. Paul W. Brown
Mr. F. E. Ostrander
Ass't. County
A.S.T.C.
-5-
Agri. Agent
ELIGIBILITY
Only 4-H members in good standing
date
than
(April 2)
whose record book is complete to
in the county 4-H office not later
in this fair.
and whose enrollment
was
February 15,1943, may.compete
GENERAL RULES AND REGULATIONS
may exist between two members of one club or between two
member.
However, where there is no competition, judges
ribbon or no ribbon according to merit.
Competition
entries of the
may award
one
same
First, second,
and third
place
ribbons will be awarded
according
to
merit.
enter
No change in schedule will bo made to accomodate members who wish to
than one contest.
more
All clipping and proparation of exhibits fer competition must be com­
before the exhibit is checked in at the Fa.ir Ground.
Hand clippers
will be permissible for last minute check-up.
plete
No leader or parent will be allov.red to a.ssist the club members in any
the exhibit reaches the Fair
after
Ground.
way
All rules not specifica.lly stated in this prospectus will be settlod
Fair Comrnission.
This Commission meets at 4:30 P.M., Wednesday,
the
4-H
by
and
4:00
P.M., Thursday, April 15.
April 14,
ENTRY REQUIREMENTS
Fill out entry blanks in
duplicate for
all oxhibits and dcmons·tration
team contests.
Entries must be fully made out on the regulation forms, which will be
furnished to leader$ and are dne in the hands of the 4-H Fair Superintendent
e. t 8: 00 P.M., Saturday, March 27, 1943.
Deadline on en trie s ---Fridc.y, April
at 8:00 P.M.
Mail all entries for contests and oy.hibits to the 4-H Fair Superinten­
dent, c/o Arizona State Teachers College, Tempe, Arizona. A slip signed by
a member of the County Office must be placed in the self-addressed envelope
when the entry blanks are mailed to the Fair Office at Tempe.
or
for
Do not list on or�c en try blank
than one individual.
en trios
more
Do Not Make
Entry
Unless You
Expect
-6-
for
more
then
one
departmen t
2,
EXHIBITORS
Exhibitors must see that their exhibits are tagged by the clerks
and that they receive claim checks before leaving.
In fairness to the ex­
hibitor and to the judge,all personal identification must be removed before
leaving.
A camp for 4-H boys and girls will open Friday night at 8:00 P.M. and
mem­
close Saturday A.M.
Reservation should be made a. few days in advance;
be
bers bring own cots and bedding;
must
groups
adequately chaperoned by
leaders or parents.
EXHIBITS
Records and
County 4-H Office.
entry blanks for
secretary books will be selected and exhibited by the
Please do not send them directly· to the Fair.
Do not make
them.
Details of arrangement for exhibits will be handled by Department
Assistants.
Superintendents and
No exhibits may be removed until 4:00 P.M., Saturday except for girls
participate in Dress Revue. In order to avoid loss, exhibitors or leaders
will be expected to pick up exhibits for their club.
who
Exhibits must be claimed by
presenting
stub of
tag which
is exhibitor's
receipt.
For the Home Economics Department, the number of lots will be limited
·to three in each class where the total county enrollment in that class falls
below the enrollment for
are
a
standard club
(5 members).
Club members may exhibit only i.n the recognized project in which they
enrolled during the current year! such as rabbit, calf, or clothing.
A total exhi.bit in any class shall consist of all the lots therein.
Total exhibit prizes will be determined
total exhibits separately.
Do not enter
Every effort will be made to protect &nd care for entries but in no
will the Commission or any Fair Official be responsible for any damage
loss which may occur.
Entries are made and accepted on this condition.
case
or
mathematically.
DEMONSTRATIONS
Friday, beginning at 2:00 P.M., the County Demonstration Contests will
and
continue until the winning teams have been determined.
All club mem­
begin
bers in good standing are eligible to compete on a club demonstration team with
Members of County Championship teams must present
the following exceptions:
different demonstrations from the ones previously giveu. Members of the State
Championship teams must present demonstration material in. another divis.ion,
i.e., if they are on a poultry demonstration team one time, they may be on a
dairy demonstration team the next time, etc. All'material used during a demon­
stration must be arranged·for by the team or its leader.
Subject matter used in
the demonstration must pertain to the project in which the club members are en­
rolled. The demonstration contest ma.y be seen by anyone, team members included.
A maximum of twenty minutes will be allowed fol"' each demonstration.
A warning
signal will be given five minutes before the limit.
Each standard 4-H club is entitled to present a demonstration.
Each
Dairy Club may present a demonstration in each division, Le., one in production
and one in processing of milk.
In th� case of mixed clubs, the club may present
no more than one demonstration for each five members, or fraction in addition
thereto.
Preliminary contests
may be
required subject to the wishes of the 4-H
Fair Commission.
Teams must hend l,e their equipment without assistance from their leaders
from the time they enter the d�monstration room.
Any assistance necessary must
be obtained through the chairman of the judging committee.
pm�ONSTRATION
CONTESTS
The age for the Junior Division (10-13) nnd the Senior Division
will be the age of the contestant by June 1st, 1943.
(14-20)
those contesta.nts who are on the border-line between the two
age divisions, may compete in that division in which they did the bulk of their
work during the current year.
Th�t is, if a contestant is in the 8th grade and
becomes 15 during the last spring months, they may enter and compete in the
If a contestant is 15 near the beginning of the school year,
Junior Division.
However ,
it will be necessary to enter in the Senior Division.
County delegates to Club Weck will be the highest ranking team in each
"Class" regardless of "Division", except that 50% or more of the teams going to
COl.Ul ty winner-s of National Trip Con­
Tucson must come from the Junior Division.
tests will be named at the close of the summer 4-H season and prior to the State
Round-Up at Tucson. Nine teams only will go to Tucson and only one team in each
class, regardless of Division, will go to Tucson.
50%
will be determined
on a percentago basis.
The percentage
proportionate to tho number of competing teams.
In case the percentage quotu splits a team, tho fraction will be considered a
unit and will be given to the division having the fewest number of trip vrinning
Tho
or
more
teams in each division will be
teams.
-8-
DEMONSTRATION CLASSIFICATIONS
Junior & Senio,r Division
Class
Class
Class
Cla.ss
Class
Class
Class
Class
1
-
2
-
3
4
5
6
7
8
Clothing and Home Improvement
Bakmg Canning arid Food Prepa.ration
Dairy Food
Crops
,
-
-
-
-
Livestock
(other
than
Dairy)
Dairy Production
-
Rural Electrification
.-
Miscellaneous
All demonstration teams will give their demonstrntions and be judged
separately, according tv the following classification: Agriculture, Live­
stock, Foods, (including Baking, Canning, Meal Plarming, Dairy Foods, Garment
Making. First, second. and third place winners Viill be named in each division.
BASIS FOR POINTS IN DETEF1HNING SWEEPSTAK��S AWARDS
First
Individual e��ibits
Members of Demonstration Teams
Judging, High Individual
Health Champions
3
3
3
3
points
points
points
points
4-H HEALTH RECOGNITION
Thirq
2
points
points
2 points
2 points
2
1
1
1
1
point
point
point
point
JUDGING CONTESTS
Agricultural Judging Contest, Saturday, April 17, beginning
Home Economics
Judging Contest, Saturday, April 17, 9:45
at 9:30 A.M.
A.M.
The County
All club members in good standing are eligible to judge.
be
determined
on
will
shown
judging a.bility
by duly entered
Team, however,
to
vdll
officials
of
the
in front of the
Contestants
contest
teams.
report
Fountain.
Memorial
GENERAL CONTEST RULES
1.
Tho judging contest is open to all boys and girls in the 4-H Clubs of
Maricopa County. Contestants will be grouped liS follows: Those in gramma.r
school will be in one contest, those 'above grammar school in another.
First e�d second place awards will be given to highest individuals in the
junior and senior divisions in each contest. Awards will be given clubs
based on the total score of their three highest individuals in the contest.
2.
Any contestant found guilty of any unfairness shall be disqualified during
the contest and barred from
There will be
judging.
no
talking during the
contest.
3.
Notes may be taken while judging the various classes to aid the contestants
in
4.
remembering their
Contestnnts will be
reasons
graded
as
for
placing.
follows:
Placing, 100 points;
reasons, 100
points.
5.
Fifteen minutes will be given to
6.
These General Rules apply to both the Agriculture and Home Economics
Judeing contests.
place
each
class,
an.d v�Ti te reasons.
AGRICULTURAL JUDGING CONTEST RULES
1.
2.
The high school group and grammar school group will judge 2 rings
dairy cattle, I ring of hogs, 1 ring of poultry, t!.t the same time
t()!;�cther. Reasons wr l t ten on two clnsses to be announced G.t time
judging. This group will also judge 1 ring of beef and I ring of
of
and
of
swine.
Teams to represent the county in the state contest will be sel.ected from
both the grammar and high school judging contests.
The senior dairy
team to represent the County at the State mee t and possibly the Natbnal
Contest will be selected
during
the
-10-
summer.
HOME ECONOMICS JUDGING CONTEST RULES
Eligibility of girls for
Home Economics
the General Rules 'for Judging contests.
rules with the following additions:
Judging Contests conforms to
The contestants shall be bound by these
girl shall enter only the judging contest
pro.l act work during the present club year.
1.
A
2.
Contesta.nts may be asked for V'ITitten
or
oral
in which she
reasons
was
at the
enrolled for
pleasure of
the
judges.
3.
Delegates for the State Contest will be the Junior and the Senior team wlth
the highest numerical score in each of the Canning, Baking, and Clothing
C�ntests.
4.
Senior Division con testants will jud.ge tho following
a.
Four plates muffins
b.
Four pla.tes biscuits
Four :,utter a.:,;:�s
c.
Oral and viri tten reasons may be required.
d.
5.
Junior Division contestants will judge the following articles:
Four
Four plates biscuits
Vlri tten reasons may be
c.
..
rticl(;s:
muffins
a.
b.
plates
�
required.
SENIOR DRESS REVUE
The time for judging the individual entries in the Senior Dress Revue
will be announced later.
Ribbons will not be aWRrded, and placings will be
to
in
to include any summer Dress Revue entrants.
order
Final
change
subject
will
to
be
determined
Club
Week.
county placings
prior
JUNIOR DRESS REVUE
A' Junior Dress Revue will be held on Saturday, April 17. Any bona
fide member of first, second, third and fourth year Garment Making clubs who
has made and exhibited a dress at the 4-H Frdr will be eligible for entry.
Leaders will send tho names of those entering this event to the County 4-·H
Office by April 14.
CLASS NO.
DEPARTMENT "H.E. n HOME ECONOMICS
LOT NO.
FIRST YEAR CLOTHING--Grammar School
I
1.
Fringed Article
2.
Hemmed Article
3.
Apron
4.
Cotton Dress
SECOND YEAR CLOTIiING--Grammar School
II
CV
5.
One
6.
Laundry, Garment Bag
slip
b�.I 'v,-J�LU
6-a. Shoe Ba.g.
7.
III
Cotton
or
Linen School Dress--sot-in sleeves
THIRD YEAR CLOTHING-�Grammar School
8.
Child's Sun or Play Suit
9.
Dress--Sport tJrpe
in
silk,
or
cotton
rayon
IV
V
(afternoon)
(afternoon)
FOURTH YE&� CLOTHING--Grammar School
10.
Child's outfit--dhe undergarment & dress,
11.
Wool
or
rayon
dress,
or
FIFTH YEAR CLOTHING--Grammar School
12.
Slip
13.
Dress
R till 00 EL
ol'Y
S RV E
�12-
skirt and blouae
or
suit.
CLASS NO.
LOT NO.
DEPARTMENT "H .E."
FIRST YEAR CLOTHING--Senior Division (High
14. Hemmed articl�--scarf, towel
VI.
15.
Fringed article
16.
Apron
17.
Cotton dress
School)
SECOND YEAR CLOTHING--Senior Di vi sion
VII.
18.
One
slip
19. Laundry, garment Bag
Shoe Bag
19a.
20.
VIII.
Cotton
or
linen school dress--set-in sleeves
THIRD YEAR CLOTHING--Senior Division
21.
Child's
22.
Dross--sport type
sun
or
play
suit
in silk
or
rayon,
or
cotton
afternoon.
IX. FOURTH YEAR CLOTHING--Senior Division
23.
Wool
24.
Child's outfit--one undergarment & dress
or
Rayon dress
or
skirt & tailored blouse
or
suit
X. FIFTH YEAR CLOTHING--Senior Division
25.
Dress
26.
Slip
27.
Accessories
XI. DRESS REVUE
28.
Senior Dress Revue may include
a.
Wash dress or suit (school or sport)
b.
Wash dress, suit or £nsemble (school, sport,
or street wear)
c.
Best dress or ensemble including dress
d.
Informal party dress (floor length)
Any Junio� girl exhibiting
in the F�ir may
Revue Contest.
-13-
participate
in the Dress
CLASS NO.
XII
LOT NO.
First Year
29.
30.
31.
32.
Depa.rtment
Canning--Junior Division
Assortment 3 jars fruits
Single jar fruit
Assortment 3 jars tomatoes
Single jar tomatoes
XIII. Second year Canning--Junior Division
33� Three jars vegetables (No"t
tomatoes)
Single jar vegetables
34.
XIV
"R.E."
First Year Canning--Senior Division
35. Three jars fruits--assorted
37.
38.
Single jar fruit
Threo jars vegetables--assorted
Single jar vegetables other than
HOME
ECONo.MICS
36.
DIVISION
-
tomatoes.
FOODS EXHIBI'rS
To mo.et
War conditions ha.ve greatly increased.the need for foods.
this increase nnd to give every person a fair sh£re many foods have been
It would be unrd se and even unpatriotic to waste' food; hence,
rationed.
clubs, meal planning and baking groups will as a group prepare and
Raw natural foods, cut outs or food
exhibit non-periohable foods only.
Full cooperation
The following is an outlined plan.
models may be used.
is urged.
food
THEME FOR EXHIBITS
sired)
-
FOOD FOR HEALTH THE 4-H VIAY
Each club EJr..hibi t to have one poster, size 28" x 22" (others as de­
Table space will be provided {l.�)pr\�xi;!'k�:t.i..'l.y 30" in width for each
display_
Suggestions for Posters:
1.
Better Health for Victory and Peace
2.
Build Stronger Citizens with Hea.lthful Foods.
3. Eat These Foods Daily
4. We Planted Our Way to Health This Spring.
5. We Include Foods from Our Victory Gardens
6. Eating for Health
7. Others of your own choice.
Suggestions for Displays
1.
Groups of food
cereals, fats,
2.
needed each
day
eggs & meat.
Amount of each needed each day
1 qt. of milk
,
e.g.,
by
a
milk, vegetables, fruit,
4-H girl.
servings of green, leafy, or yellow
1 or more servings of potatoes
1 serving of citrus fruit or tomatoes
1 serving of fresh or dried fruits
1 egg
2
1
serving of moat
3 pats of butter
or
cheese
or
vegetables.
beans
enriched margrrrine
1 serving whole grain cereal.
Bread three times a day
or
-14-
Total Exhibits will be judeed
1.
on
General
not
the
follo'wing:
Appearance
Neatness, attre.ctivencss,
crowded, general appeal, good color 0ffect
--
the theme
2.
Expres�es
3.
Holds interest.
4.
Shows
originality.
First, second, and third place
awards will be made.
(��)
¥:titl
��I\\\��\
�?l8UY
LESS­
(v1Af<J fv10RE.
-15-
HAND I eRAF'T
All Handicraft
by 10:00 A.M.
CLASS NO.
I
DBP}J>1h!I�NX
exhibits must be
Judging starts
at
..
OP
1isplay.Fr�day, April
16
10:09 A.M._, Friday, �prn I?
DE:PAHTlvlFWl'
LOll' N(;.
Ha.ndicraft
to fi. t
Classes will be made
en
triea i.n t.his divIsion.
For
example,
milk stools, bock case, hook ends, pi.c ture
tie racks, tables, canp stools,
marb.Le vlork, leather 'work, copper work, coe tume
tool boxes, tin war e
f'rames
books , eny other article.
je'.'Telry, stuffGd dolls, toys scrap
,
,
,
i
I
JI
')�
\'
--<\.�
\
��,..�
'J�
-16-
MISCELLANEOUS DEPARTMENT "M"
Please Notel
(RECORDS,
SECRE'TARY BOOKS,
ETC.)
Do not enter records or secretary books directly through
the Fair Office.
The County Office will select end enter all
(Leaders
exhibits in this Department.
may indicate which re­
wish to enter.)
These are due
cords and secretary books they
in the Club Office, April 3, 1943.
4-H MEMBERS' RECORD BOOKS:
Livestock Records:
Dairy, Beef, Swine,
Poultry
and
Sheep
and Rabbits:
Chickens, Turkeys, Pigeons, Rabbits
Vogetable Garden Reoords
Flower Garden Records
Handicraft Records
Rural Electrification Records
4-H CLUB SECRETARY'S RECORD BOOK.
4-H CLUB'S SCRAP BOOK.
BAKING RECORDS
Ba.king
record book
Baking secretary
book
C.;�lNING RECORDS
Canning record book
Canning secretary book
MEAL PLANNING HECORDS
record book
Meal
Planning
Meal
planning secretary
book
ex
"lQQQ
WILL WIN THE WAR AND
� �
PEACE"
-
Claude R. vVickard
DAIRY DEP P..RTMENT
Judging
Livestock will be received between 8:00 A.M. and 10:00 A.M.,
begins at 10:00 A.M., Friday, April 16.
Club members must
water and
feed,
care
for their
orm
Friday.
dairy &nd beef
animals.
Feed for livestock must be furnished by the club member showing.
Club members must show their own animals unless they have more than one
In this case, they may use ether club members to show ad­
entered in a class.
Animals must be shown with a hal tar.
di tional animals.
All calves must have
clippers
cept
a
halter with
All livestock must have been
may be used for last minute
a
rope &.t least five feet
clipped before reaching
long.
(Hand
the Show.
check-up.)
Cattle exhibits will be judged according to the breed
for disqualifications in the case of grades .]
score
card
(ex­
Club members must own animals sho;�, and all registered stock must be
registered in the member's name thirty days (30 days) prior to show. Regis­
tration and transfer numbers must appear on entry blanks and all registration
Provision will be made for
papers must be at hand at the time of judging.
checking these papers with the Superintendent of the Department.
Parents and leaders will not be a.Ll.ovred to assist in any way with
animals after thoy reach the Fad.r Grounds (Your cooperation appreciated.)
-
The breed assoclations usually offer sui table
the various breeds of dairy CD. t bLe
pr:i.zes
for winners in
,
between
The class of
a. Jersey snd
CLASS NO.
I.
grade cattle is determinod by the sire. That is, a cross
Guernsey would be a grade Jersey only if the sire is Jersey.
DEPARTMENT ltD" DAIRY AND BEEF
LOT NO.
REGISTERED JERSEY
1.
Registered bull born after April 1, 1942.
2.
Heifer, 3
yrs.
or
over, born
before August
1, 1940.
3 •. He if'er , 2 yrs. & under J yrs. born between Aug. 1, 1940 and
Aug. 1, 1941.
4.
Senior
yearling heifer born between Aug. 1, 1941
5.
Junior
yearling
6.
Senior Heifer calf born between Aug.
7.
Cha.mpion registered female, (first place
2, 3, 4, 5, and 6.
heifer born between Feb.
(18)
1, 1942
1, 1942
& Feb.
&
& Feb.
1,1942.
Aug. 1,1942.
1, 1943.
winners from lots
cLASS NO.
II
DEPARTMENT liD"
LOT NO.
GRADE JERSEY
8.
Heifer, 3
9.
Heifer,
or
yrs.
over
born before
Aug. 1, 1940.
2 y.rs. & under 3 yrs. born between
Aug. 1, 1940 and
August 1, 1941.
III.
& Feb.
10.
Senior yea.rling heifer born between Aug.
11.
Junior yearling heifer born between Feb. 1, 1942 &
12.
Senior heifer calf born between
1, 1941
1, 1942.
Aug. 1, 1942
Aug. 1, 1942 and Feb. 1, 1943.
REGISTERED HOLSTEIN
13.
Registered bull born after April 1, 1942.
14.
Heifer, J
15.
Heifer,
yrs.
or
over
born before
Aug. 1, 1940
2 yrs. & under 3 yrs. born between
Aug. 1, 1940
Aug. 1
&
1941.
IV.
16.
Senior
yearling
heifer born between hug.
1, 1941
& Fob.
17.
Junior
yearling
heifer born between Feb.
1, 1942
&
18.
Senior heifcr calf born between
19.
Champion registered female, (first place
16, 17, 18.
Aug. 1, 1942
1, 1942.
Aug. 1, 1942.
& F�b.
1, 1943.
winner from Lot
lA, 15,
GRADE HOLSTEIN
20.
Heifer, 3
21.
Heifer,
yrs
•.
or
over
born before
Aug. J., 1940.
2 yrs. & under 3 yrs. born between
Aug. 1, 1940 & Aug. 1
1941.
V.
22.
Senior yearling heifer
23.
Junior
24.
Senior heifer calf born between
"born between
Aug. 1, 1941 & Feb, 1, 19L�2.
yearling heifer born betv:een Feb
,
1, 1942
Aug. 1, 1942
Aug. 1,1942.
and
and Feb.
1, 1943.
REGISTFllED GUERNSEY
25.
Registered bull
26.
Heifer, 3
27.
Heifer,
yrs.
born between Fob.
or
over
and Fob.
1, 1942
born before
1, 1943.
Aug. 1, 1940
2 yrs. &. under 3 yrs. born between
L.ug. 1, 1940
&
Aug. 1,
194123.
Senior
yearling heifer
born betv:een
29.
Junior
year-Ltng heifer
born-between Feb.
30.
Senior Heifer CEllf born between
31.
Champion registered female, (fir.st pl.ace winners
28, 29, 30)
·-19-
Aug. 1, 1941
1, 1941
Aug. 1, 1942
& Feb.
&
& Feb.
1, 1942.
AUG' 1, 1942.
1, 1943.
from Lots
26, 27,
CLASS NO.
VI
LOT NO.
DEPARTMENT "D"
GRADE GUERNSEY
born before
Aug. 1, 1940.
32.
Heifer, 3
33.
Heifer, 2 yrs.
Aug. 1, 1941.
34.
Senior yearling heifer born between Aug.
yrs.
or
over
& under 3 yrs. born between
Aug. 1, 1940
&
1, 1941
& Feb.
1,
1, 1942
& Aug.
1,
1942.
Junior
35.
yearling heifer
born between Feb.
1942.
36.
VII
VIII
Senior heifer calf born between Aug.
1, 1942
& Feb.
1,1943
RF�ISTERED AYRSHIRE
37.
Registered bull born between Feb. 1,1942 & Feb. 1,1943
38.
Heifer, 3
39.
Heifer 2 yrs. & under 3 born between
40.
Senior
yearling
hhifer born bet�een
41.
Junior
yearling
heifer born between Feb.
42.
Senior heifer calf born between Aug.
43.
Champion registered
40, 41, 42)
yrs.
or
over
born before
female
Aug. 1, 1940
Aug. 1,1940
&
Aug.l,1941
Aug. 1,1941 & Feb. 1,1942
1,1942
1, 1942
(first p'laco
&
Aug. 1,1942
& Feb.
1,1943.
winner of Lot
38,39,
GRADE AYRSHIRE
'
IX.
Aug. 1, 1940
Heifer, 3
45.
Heifer, 2 yrs.
Aug. 1, 1941.
46.
Senior
yearling heifer
born between
Aug. 1,1941
47.
Junior yearling heifer
born between
Feb. 1, 1942 & Aug.l,1942
48.
Senior heifer calf born between
over
or
yrs.
& under
3 yrs. born between Aug. 1, 1940 &
Aug. 1,1942
& Feb.
& Feb.
1,1942.
1,1943.
BRoTIN SWISS
(Class
X.
born before
44.
to fit
entries.)
HEREFORD
49.
Fat Steer
{must
be fat before
eligible
upon by Committee.
passed
50.
Fat Heifer
51.
Breeding heifers--Grade
52.
Registered Bulls
-
not
or
-20-
Registered--any
over
papers must accompany,
to be sold.
Fat stock
only
sold.
age.
year old. (Registration
be shown at time of entry.)
one
or
Will be
PRODUCTION FOR VICTORY
POULTRY DEPARTMENT UP"
-
FOOD IS AMMUNITION
(Pit5eons
&
Rabbits)
'Do not make entry unless you expect to show birds
Poul try will be received between 8: 00 A.M. & 10: 00
Judging begins at 10: 00 A.M , Friday, April 16.
or
rabbits.
A.M., Friday.
•.
will be fed and watered by the
any other birds during the Fair.
Poultry
your
or
own
Poultry
will be
judged for utility
management.
Do not feed
or
handle
purposes.
One egg in each entry may be broken at tho discretion of the judge.
and in ternnl characters will be considered in the judging.
external
Both
\
Specify
the
variety
Feed ��ll be
on
the
provided for
entry bl�nks.
rabbits.
The management will feed and water
the rabbits.
All rabbits must be marked in ear with ear number.
for the duration of the Fair if .they nrc not ta tooed,
CLASS NO.
I.
II
•
IV
•
v.
1
mr:'_le--any age)
Cock (hatched before December 1, 1941)
3.
4.
5.
Hon
(hatched before December 1, 1941)
(hatched after December 1, 1941)
Pullet (hatched cfter December 1, 1941)
Cockerel
NEW HANPSHIRE
10.
•
(2 females,
2.
6.
7.
8.
9.
III
DEPARTMENT "P"
LOT NO.
LEGHORNS
1.
Trio
Indelible ink will last
(2 femD.1es, 1 me.Le-i-any age)
Cock (hatched before December 1, 1941)
Hen (hatched before December 1, 1941)
Cockerel (hatched after December 1, 1941)
Pullet (hatched after December 1, 1941)
Trio
PLYMOUTH ROCKS
11.
Trio (2 females, 1 male-��ny age)
12.
Cock (hc.tched before December 1, 1941)
13. Hen (hatched before December 1, 1941)
14. Cockcr-c.L (hatched after December 1, 1941)
15. Pullet (hatched after December 1, 1941)
PJiODE ISLlJJD REDS
16. Trio (2 females, 1 male--any age)
17.
Cock (hatched before December 1, 1941)
18. Hen (hatched before December 1, 1941)
19. Cockerel (hatched after December 1, 1941)
20.
Pullet (hatched after December 1, 1941)
EGGS
21.
22.
23.
24.
Brown eggs 22-24
White eggs 22-24
Brown eggs 24-26
vnli te eggs 24-26
Each entry shall be
cluh lTlFHnhAr.
one
oz.
oz.
oz.
oz.
of the
dozen eggs and must be from the flock
-21-
PIGEONS
All birds must
wear
some
number must be properly entered
General rules of the
CLASS NO.
VI
to
pigeons.
DEPARTMENT "P"
HOMING PIGEONS
Single male, hatched before January 1, 1943.
Single female, hatched before Je.nuary 1, 1943.
Single male hatched after January 1, 1943.
Single female, hatched after January 1, 1943.
ANY OTHER PIGEONS
29.
30.
314
32.
VIII
Poultry Department vall also apply
LOT NO.
25.
26.
27.
28.
VII
kind of a numbered leg band and the band
the .entry blank.
on
Single
Single
Single
SinglG
male, Utility
female, Utility
male, Fancy
female, Fancy
ANY OTHER STM�DARD BREED POULTRY
33. Trio (2 females, 1 male--any
age.)
34.
35.
Cock (hatched before December 1, 1941)
Hert (hatched before December 1, 1941)
36.
Cockerel
37.
Pullett
NOTE:
(hatched after Deqember 1, 1941)
(hatched after December 1, 1941)
(Designate breed)
Separa te classes will be made and will be judged separately
where competition exists between two or more individuals
withi.n the lot.
IX
RABBITS--New Zealand White
38. Senior buck, 1 yr. or over.
Senior doe, 1 yr. or over.
39.
JW1ior
40.
Buck, 4 mo. to 1 yr.
Junior
41.
doe, 4 mo. to 1 yr.
42.
Doe &
litter, meat pen.
X
RABBITS--New Zealand Red.
43. Senior buck, 1 yr. or over.
44. Senior doe , 1 yr�. or over.
45. Junior buck, 4 mo. to 1 yr.
46. Junior doe, 4 mo. to 1 yr.
Doe & Litter, meat pen.
47.
XI
RABBITS--Meat Breeds
(Any
breed
or
48.
Senior buck, 1 yr.
49.
50.
51.
Senior doe, ). yr. or over.
Junior buck, 4 mo. to 1 yr.
Junior doe, 4 mo. to 1 yr.
or
RABBITS--Grand Champion
Best rabbit in show
(Fur,
general appearance) will
NOTE:
cross
ears, bone, head, body and
be selected by judges.
Fency Breeds--straight brbeds,
-22-
breed)
over.
no
crosses.
FOOD FOR FREEDOM
-
� .QY1: E.QR
VICTORY
SHEEP AND SWINE DEPARTMENT "S"
provide teed for swine and sheep,
Members must
and must do their
own
feeding and watering.
This livestock will be received between 8:00 A.M. and 10;00 A.M., Fri­
It must be on display by that time.
Judging will begin at 10:00 A.M.,
day.
Friday, April 16.
gilt is to show in breeding and fat class, two entries must be
Fat Hog entries may be made by a club.
of
The pen
If
made.
A
a
private sale of fat hogs will be held Saturday.
All fat lambs treated the seme way as fat
hogs.
DEPARTMENT "8"
CLASS NO.LOT NO.
DURoe JERSEYS
I
1.
2.
Breeding Gilts (under 4 months)
Breeding Gilts (4 months to 8 months)
3.
Sow
HAMPSHlRES
II
4.
·5.
6.
III
Breeding Gilts (Under 4 months)
Breeding Gilts (4 months to 8 mon ths)
Sow
ANY OTHER BREED
'7.
IV.
8
Breeding Gilts (under 4 months)
Breeding Gilts (4 months to'S months)
9.
Sow
Pen of two tat hogs--any breed
or crosses.
(necessary weight 175-225 poUnds each)
v
Pen ot two feeder hogs--any breed
VI
Individual rat hog •.
(Must
or
cross�s.
be tat in order to b•• old.
Necessary
weight 175-225 pounds)
VII
VIII
SHEEP
10.
11.
Fattest lamb (must be fat in order to be
Mature ram or ewe. (Judged separately on
(Ex. one lamb or one pig)
for
all
fat animals to be sold)
ontry
Fat stock for sale
(M�e
sold)
merits)
own
-
Championships
vall be awarded if
-23-
competition
warrants.
It:-H GARDENS FOR YN1'ORY
VEGETABLE DEPARTMENT "V"
will be received any time
Vegetables
Judging
CLASS NO.
I
•
Friday morning
up to 10:00 A.M.
will start at 10: 00 A.M.
DEPARTMENT "V"
LOT NO.
GARDEN AND CROPS
1.
Six table onions
2.
Six round type radish
3.
Six long type radish
4.
Six carrots
5.
Three beets
6.
Three
7.
Three bunches
s.
Three
9.
Three heads cabbage
10.
Three heads lettuce
11.
One
12.
One pint potatoes.
13.
Three bunches
14.
Any other vegetable
turnips
spinach
plants chard
pint pod peas
(Classes
entries
garlic
��ll be made if sufficient miscellaneous
arc
made)
-
..........
.....
�...
._
..
_--_
....
,
..
-'
..
-"
....
-----.
..............
........
-------........
_---_._---
FLOWER DEPARTMENT "F"
FLower-e will be received up to 10:00
starts at 10:00 A.M.
4-H Club Contest.
Judging
Friday.
A.M.,
Uniform tall metal containers will be furnished.
Baskets,
for short stemmed flowers will not be furnished.
special
vases and containers
Must be entered in Flower Club to
CLASS NO.
I
LOT NO.
DEPARTMENT "F"
Flowers
1.
15 sweet pens
(lavender)
2.
15 sweet peas
(pink)
3.
15 sweet peas
(white)
4.
Centerpiece of
5.
8 calendulas
6.
16 pansies
7.
8
8.
12
9.
3
NOTE:
compete for medals.
sweet peas and
foliage including
container
larkspurs
petunias
roses
Any varioty of rose represented by 5 or more
have' a separate classification made for it.
10.
Any
11.
Best
12.
Best basket of flowers
other
flower,
not less than 3 stems
bouquet including
vane
-25-
entries will
COOPERATIVE EXTENSION WORK
IN
AGRICULTURE AND HOME ECONOMICS
STATE OF ARIZONA
PHOENIX
ERSITY
OF ARIZONA
AGRICULTURAL EXTENSION
IGE 011' AGRICULTURE
,
DEPARTMENT
OF AGRICULTURE
COUNTY
AGENT
WORK
MARICOPA COUNTY FARM BUREAU COOPERATING
February lJ, 194.3.
HEAD
TEACHER,
PRINCIPAL OR SUPERINTENDENT:
fbe Extension �ervice h�s been k�ked to kssume tbe responsibility
tor as�istini rural schools in training an adequate number of persons to
workings of the Food Rationing Books which will be issued in
It is planned to have these trained people at the schools
future.
at the time when ration books are being issued, in order that anyone may
feel free to ask for information concerning the use of the books.
the
explain
the
near
In order to do this job, we must know from the Principal or teacher
charge where books are to be issued, the number of people you wish to
have us train for this purpose, and the number of days you wish these
people to be present at the school. It will be helpful to us if you will
in
to us, giving their names and addresses, who will be willing
in your district.
If you can suggest anyone, we would like
to know what you would like to have us do regarding the matter.
suggest people
to do thiS job
If persons are not available, they will probably have to be sent
We will be
other districts, although we consider this undesirable.
very glad to follow any suggestions you may make, because we feel that you
know the most effective workers in your district.
May we ask that upon
receipt of this letter, or as soon thereafter as possible, you call us
from
b,y phone, 4-2133 Phoenix,
regarding this matter.
In districts where
members of these
faetory
know.
at
our
we
organizations
expense,
and tell
us
have Homemakers Clubs..
to
help iq
this
what you wish to do
we
can
call upon the
matter, if this is satis­
to you.
The
Your
registration will begin Februar,y 22, as you probably already
cooperation in this matter will be greatly appreciated.
Yours very
;.;v:
J. H.
truly,
d) x!;d-/.
O'Dell,
County Agricultural Agent
JHO:EZ
SERVICE
HOME DEMONSTRATION WORK
COOPERATIVE EXTENSION WORK
IN
AGRICULTURE AND HOME ECONOMICS
State of Arizona
Phoenix
Agricultural Extension Service
University of Arizona
College of Agriculture
U. S. Department of Agriculture
and Maricopa County cooperating
Home Demonstration Work
County Agent Work
June
8, 1943 ...
Dear Sir:
The University of Arizona, Dept. of Horticulture, has developed two new
varieties of cantaloupes which should be of interest to all cantaloupe growers and
seedsmen of this county.
Dr. A. E. Griffiths, who is in charge of the
Department of Horticulture, states that the varieties
program for the
the result of a program
breeding
are
to combine the desirable characteristics of the Imperial-45 and the Super­
fecto.
These new varieties are not mildew-resistant, but have very vigorous foliage
which tends to persist for a much longer time than standard varieties, and seem well
adapted to Arizona conditions.
designed
as
Dr. Griffiths gives
follows:
a
brief
history
and
of these two varieties
description
CROSS
Imperial 45 x
GENERATION
8th from
RELEASE NUMBER
42Yl
ACCESSION NUMBER
OY2-024S1
-
-
-
-
(Superfecto
original
Imp. 45)
x
cross
Foliage Imperial 45 type, but coarser and darker. Matures slightly earlier
Imperial 45. Prolific. Fruit slightly elongate; less ribbed than Imperial 45.
In most cases netted across rib.
Flesh thick, firm, dr,y.
Smaller than Imperial 45.
Flavor
but
be
tends
to
better nnd sugar
smaller.
of
Imperial 45,
Cavity typical
Can be picked at full slip for distant shipping.
content greater than Imperial 45.
than
RELEASE NUMBER
42A
ACCESSION NUMBER.- CY3-0l5l
-
CROSS
Imperial 45 x AZ
GENERATION
7th from original
-
-
cross
Foliage very dark and vigorous. One week earlier than Imperial 45. Very
prolific. Fruit small, globular; net heavy and continuous. Little or no rib.
Flesh thick, firm and of excellent salmon color.
Cavity small. Matrix dr,y. Very
high sugar content. An excellent possibility for brushing, capping or main crop.
Can be picked at full slip for distant market shipping.
Increase plots of these new varieties are
Yuma counties this year.
In Maricopa County, plots
General
Breeding Plot
Increase Plots
-
-
University of
being grown in both Maricopa and
are
located
Arizona Date
University of
Arizona Experimental
John Jacobs Ranch in Deer Valley
M. F. Wharton Ranch, Scottsdale
as
follows:
Farm,
South of
Farm,
Tempe
Mesa
Those persons interested in seeing these varieties are invited to assemble
Date Farm, 4 miles south of Tempe, on Friday, July 2, at 1:30 P.M.
Dr. Griffiths will explain the breeding program und conduct a tour to all plots.
at the
University
ver,y
trt;l�{\
g,0ursx(nAJ.�
J. H.
O'D�,
County Agricultural Agent
COOPERATIVE EXTENSION WORK
IN
AGRICULTURE AND HOME ECONOMICS
State of Arizona
Phoenix
Extension Service
Home Demonstration Work
Agricultural
University of Arizona
College of Agriculture
U. S. Department of Agriculture
and Maricopa County cooperating
County Agent Work
June
24, 194.3.
TO ALL MARICOPA COUNTY FARM OPERATORS:
job of recruiting and placing all farm labor in the state, a function
previously performed by the U. S. Employment Service, has been assigned to the
Agricul tural Extension Service. In this county, farm labor will be handled by your
County Agent's Office through tile Farm Labor Office located at 1921 E. Washington
street, Phoenix, Phone No. 4-29.39. Branch offices will be set up at other points
throughout the county as the need requires.
The
All farmers are requested to place orders for all labor through these
offices, in order that adequate labor may be provided if it is available. All orders
should be placed as far as possible in advance of the time actually needed, in order
that your Farm Labor Office may anticipate the labor needs of the county for future
use.
Farmers contacting laborers whom they themselves are unable to employ, should
advise all such laborers to register for work with the Farm Labor Office, in order
that they may be made available to those who are short of labor.
Without the help of farmers or farmer organizations, your Farm Labor Office
do little to correct the now serious labor Shortage.
Orders must first be placed
for labor in order that we know the labor needs of the individual farmer, and of the
count,y as districts or as a whole. Laborers must register, in order that we know
where labor can be obtained.
can
It will do every­
Your Farm Labor Office is set up to serve all farmers.
of
to
but
farmers
this county, shoul�
labor
needs
the
thing possible
supply your
you,
first make known your needs through this office.
If local labor is available, it will
be supplied-- if it is not, then an attempt will be made to supply it from other
All local labor must be used before any can be supplied from other sources.
sources.
.
We are ready
This program will work if you are willing to do your part.
located
at
Farm
is
Your
Labor
Office
E.
ours.
do
1921
Washington Street, Phoenix,
tq
Fill out the enclosed form at an early date and return to the above
Phone 4-2939.
address.
Yours very
5). JI
J. H.
truly,
.
V/})Jt.
O'Dell,
County Agricultural Agent
JHO:E
Encl.
COOPERATIVE EXTENSIO� WORK
IN
AGRICULTURE AND HOME ECONOMICS
State of .Arizona.
.
Service
Home Demonstra�ion Work
Agricultural Extension
University or Arizona
College or Agriculture
U. S. Department of Agriculture and
Maricopa County Farm Bureau cooperating.
Work
County Agent
.
MARICOPA COUN'lY
1'1 E "Y.S LET r E J\
E x r E 1'1 S I 0 1'1
.
July 1942
Issued
by
the staff of the University of Arizona, Extension Service
1201 W. Madison Street, Phoenix.
Phone 4-2133
.
.
Dear Friends:
Now that most cotton is "laid by" nearly everybody will have
to
give some' thought
to other
things which JIJt!'1
have
some
bearing
soon we
.
.
.
win this war.
chance
a
how
on
The labor situation is one thing which should be given serious con­
by each farmer. The si,tu3.tion is bad i!.t present and will become
steadil1�orBe as harvest season'comes ·on if·some plan is ,no� devised to change
it,' This is a thing which cannot be handled.by the individual as has been done
in the' past, but must be worked 'out· by farmers -as an o'rganized group.
.The .Labor'
needs of ,the individual cannot be considered too seriously by those governmental
agencies wh.ich handle this problem, but the labor �equirenients or a county, state,
or region 'will be the basis upon which these agenct.ea mUst· ·work.
Hence j' it .,is ::
arid
that
farmer
labor
-he
will
need
the
time. during
each
mow
'how'
muoh'
imperative
which 'he can use it to best advantage'.I: �ese indiVidual· 'requirements! iIrllst .then
be pooled for the county or state, in order that available labor ma.y be 'used:,'
efficiently and effectively. Now is the time to get to work on this problem,
.;'
not when your crop is ready to harvest, for then it is too late.,
sideration
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You as a. farmer, can do your par't , .but: this 'part 'must be. 'as a member
of a group of farmers having- the same interests� as .you. have
Get.to work, on ....
this problem now with your neighbors" before: it ,is· too ·late.', .Hiring your neighbor's
help at a higher wage is not the smart thing to do" -nor' the: solution: ,of the:'
problem because there is not enough' labo� available for present needs.',
"
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job
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Get together on this .thing: and find ou.t .how 'much easier it, is to- dolike this when everyone does ·bis .part.
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Yours very
;
,
.
,
.
truly,
.��eillP:dJ;Jj,·:,�;
,"
County� Agri�ulturo.l,
Age}lt:::
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FALL VICTORY GARDEN
J
Now is the time to start preparations for that fall Victory Garden.
Maybe
The experience gained from
some of you were disappointed with your summer garden.,
this summer garden combined with an' early ;st�r�· i�,pr,�,p�.r�ng and planning your fall
garden should aid you considerably in making yoyr.· "ri�i:t' :gatden.a marked success.
and diseases ·to
Also, remember that there are nowhere .near 'as' many
pester
the winter months.
Y9��A�ring
�lq�<;l�",.�r:�ccts
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We
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at
one
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him and then quitting, so
If Y'1M-.' �1 put as
on
do your share and have a bf.gger and better garden this winter.
much effort into it as you did into your summer garden, it's a
much better success.
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If your fall' 'garden
start preparing and pla.nning your fall garden now.
is
in
bermuda grass , scalp off about to; .) inch layer
then dig.i� up to a depth
plot
of 8 or 10 inches. let dry for two or three weeks 'to" kill the r-omaanang grass roots.
;
'"is to! spread 8: 1ayer� .·of l>arZ:lyurd. ,manllre. 2 or :3 inches deep over
The next thing to
;:.
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and
the
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plot, dig :in�q th�
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irriga.te.· ','
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'pl,ot ·is fair4": free from grass , spread on manure, turn under
and irrigate.
If your so i.L has a.' hi�; :tUke,line. corrterrt ;lc?u maY: 'apply abou t .i.p.ound
of sulfur to each 100 square feet of garden space , mfxcd rlith·:the man.��_e before it is
About 2 irrigations will be needed to decompose the manure- sufficiently
turned under.
for p"lanting. ,Al�o,. �ny weed and grass seeds that may sprout can be chopped out
"1:£ -youx
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much
"easie� before;
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planted.
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vegetab'iBs; aw�its
A wide selection of
is
.af�r, ��.?'1r..J�r.de�
'lpl�.[.(:.:
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'for
the' fall
garden.
Lettuce, carrots, beets, turnips, radishes, endive, cabbage, cauliflower, broccol�,
chard, onions, rutaba.-ga'·s, and sp,j,nach. �ll do very well. Make your first planting'
between September l5"and
·OctoberJ,t(,;,:�d':'�otner. plartt�.g about "30 days later.
,
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If you want fall corn
L,
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-�9uc�Qers·;.' plant. them .be tween 'Ju1y 15
or
and
August
prio� ,to',}�y"' !5: if: po�.s'ibJ_'e.: :·Thc··Hopi lima bean has
been grown sl:l�c�ssfullY' and shou�d ,�arr¥t :�·<,trial.
Pole' beans ':dd ·:much 'better iIJ
the fall than in the spring. .,T}:le-; �dibl� )bybean is another 'that is well.war·th.
Beans shou'Ld
15.
be
planted
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During tJ:le summer lD0:rltt_l� m9.��- groves vdll(;req\ii);e "an: irrigat�on about
two
weeks.
Some, soils wil..l:Jl�ld: $ore'" wa tcr th�: o.tli��s· and will': th.erefore keep
every
tr8'es: :;in: good condition longer than others'.: ': Each
grove, 9WC.t. shoul.d learn' from' actual
just how long
ce-:n,
du:ring the hbtt�r lI\9iltR.s.·� but
,:��q),�r:ienc.e
his:,.:gtt>.v�.'
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CITRUS. ,IRRIGATION
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f'or' -theae who do not have' thl.s
.knorlle�gG'f the ·two-week mtervnl is safe. It should
be kept' in mind that grapefruit:.tre�s
.and that
..
wi th cover crops
cul�ivated
Us'e
ones.
your grove' to
determi��)ust
IRRIGATIOf1
when
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G;r
shovel:·or.;
a·
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SXP COTTON
:vii,ll .u'�e";more w��e�:"_than.· oro.nge·
0+ 'weeds, gr-ass
probe.', �ci:'nlso
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grower
sho�ld
hit
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on
irrigati6l'l':1.s:'ne,ces:��rY,.�-:-J��.�b.
an
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groves
vni ter than':elean
note,. ,th�I c.ondi tiori of the tree�
us.e ·-more
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month" that' Sx:?,: 9ptton should
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��t �b� ':�de'r': �vdter
;
stress.' The
striqe of ��ter,��plication at ten day or two week intervals
through th�� .month,., "YP.. to., thi.� inon�' un interval of from three to four
weeks should
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have been observed between tile first and second irrigations, since the plants have
been small and therefore have not pumped very much water into the atmosphere.
problem of trained irrigll tors is very real wi th many farmers,
if one good irrigator is availai:Jle, that he be used in a
that
it has been suggested
�pervisory capacity and be on duty more or less the mlole twent,y-four hours, checking
on operations every three or four hours and at least brice or three times every night.
The owner cannot run water every night and do en adequate job of supervising opera­
tions. Some plan must 'be devised to see that regular irrigation is practiced if a
Since the
good yield and staple is
to be
grown.--C.H.
QUALITY EGGS
If they are to retain·
Most eggs are of good quality when first laid.
initial
and
the
this
reach
market in good condition they must be properly
quality
handled and cared for by the producers end all other persons taking part in the
marketing of the eggs. No marketing process ccn improve an egg of poor quality.
Ail tha.t can be done ls- to preserve as ,nearly as possible, the original quality.
a prerequisite to the ma.rketing of good eggs.
Good care on the farm is'
.
,
First of
all, bood poultr,y
stock bred to
great
as
a
degree of uniformit,y
possible, is necessOIjr in order to produce eggs of uniform size and color. The
flocks must be well fed and cared for in order to increaso p�oductivit,y.�s soon as
as
the hatching season is over nll male birds should ··e disposed of or separated from
the hens so that only infertile eggs of superior "keeping qual! ty will be produced,
Nests, clean and sufficient in number, must be prov ided in order 'to obtain the
largest percentage of clean eggs. Dirt,r eggs should never be washed unless intended
for immedbte consumption.
Washing reduces the keeping quality and results in greater
if
the
Icss, especlally
oggs.cr-e placed in cold storage
,
,
Eggs should be gathered frequently, t'.t l�ist once a day. During hot
gather them two or three times l'� dt..Y' to prevent them from
heated.
should
be
beini�
kept in· a cool, zodern te'ly moist p'Laco to maintain
';l'hey
their quality and prevent'evaporation.
All ver,y small, very large, checked, cra cked
or dirty eggs should' be used at home.
weather it is desirable to
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The ''tarine'r can �crea.se: }'lis income, �rom the' 'paul try flock by' making a
candle, and candlfng 'the eggs and keeping, the lower qUllli"-ty eggs,-�at home and market
only the high quality eggs vdlich bring. a hl.ghe�r price. Candling ·t:otlsists of holding
the egg before a streng light in such a' way' that the rays of the light· penetrate the
egg to a considerable extent, thus mnking it �ssible to observe the condition and
behavior of the contents.
Homemade egg candles may be easily &nd cheaply constructed from a tin
of sufficient size to hold one 100 watt incondescent lamp.
The lamp cord should
run through a hole in the removable top of the can, and a round hole
inch
in
diameter should be cut in the side of the can opposite the light filament.
can
1:
.
In learning to candle eggs, the beginner must trnin his eye to look for
air
Large
sacks, blood spots, defined yolks, watery whites, germ spot development,
stucked yolks, moldy eggs, rots, blind checks and cracks, as all this points to
low quality eggs and should be used at home.
Frequent checking of the candler's
out
those
about which there is doubt, will
'eggs, particularly
judgement by breaking
and
will
be
instructive
of
assistance
to the beginner in acquiring'
prove very
great
confidence and skill.-- W.R.V.
(2)
NEW BULLETIN ON POULTRY
Clyde Rowe, Extension Specialist in Poultry and Dairying, has recently
published
short, concise and understandable bulletin on the care of poultry, vmich
should be of interest to all beeinners or small flock owners.
With this bulletin
on hand many perplexing problems can be solved and difficult situations avoided.
If you haven't a cop.y, write or phone the County Agent's Office, and a copy' will be
mailed to you promptly.--J.H.O.
a
PURE tONG-STAPLE COTTON SEED
Representatives of the Extension Service and Experiment Station of the
University qf Ari�ona, together with those of the U. S. Field Station at Sacatpn, have
j�st completed the first inspection of SXP cotton seed fields in Maricopa County.
Over 7(''(_·O acres having isolatlon 'of one-half mile or' over from any other variety of
cotton were examined.
This program is being. conducted in cooperation with the
Arizona Crop Improvement Association, a statewide organization of pure seed gro"ers
.
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fields'w�:re f'ourid. to'
satisfactory at this :time1 '.
indicating that. �� .grower s of these fields 'had carefully rogued the� pr-evi.ous to':;:'�
Lnspectdon
othe�: :t.ielqs 'were either. too. yo:ung or had not been rogued by the oWner;
and will:·be given .ano ther- and -final inspection <;luring the latter part of ·this month.
.
nUmber
A
of' the',
,:',
be
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farmers
!this acreage
for 'certification; Maricopa'
assured of an adequate: supply� Qf .nd.gh-grade 'seed for planting in 1943. ,A list
of 'those- grcwer-s .whe qualify"'on' final--inspectiotl'wil1 be available.8:t a later·d.ate�
and those farm�rs·,.ylho want. to- grow SxP in 1943' shoul.d 'arrange' as soon thereafter'
for their seed···supply.· It is::likely, tha�'_:the ,�tit-o�-state demand 'for ,certi£ie� seed
will be great this next year .-- J.H .0'...
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Co�ty"
eligible
are
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SMITH�DOxri 'ORGANIZATION'}' '.!'
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s�mplifica.tion ·of· procedure in setting up· Snii th-Doxey "ork fqr 1942 has:
been suggested' and Will 'be' followed in Maricopa County this yea.r Ii. By this method'"
a county-wide organization for each va:dety' is se't up with·· only, one: set of spor,isoring
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Gin: manager-a
.�al�able·, �s'sistan'ce
may .render
by giving .'ii,s·ts "o'f .pabrons with .acreages 'grown' 'in 1942,
in 1941, .or .produetdon iri that year.
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in ,the
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but need nO,t list acreages
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It is expected that mor-e
organi.zat�ons will be set 'up
If the grower: takes advantage of·
in view of ,the. price floor under this cornmodi ty.
this floor', � the cotton' wi1� .have to. be: .6014 on. government grade.
Thus'� "the� Smith­
Doxey member: �i.ll have -identical �.��vfc�� w,i,thou:t·· cost, ·with th� non-member , who must
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Ma.�y:,gins .have not 'had pure se'ed:·l:>ro·gr8.JJl&--=l tied in'\1�th their giri:'op'era­
tiqnE�. '.\ ';rhus in t1rne·' 'of' �seed:.'sharta:ge poor .seed is apt to be planted. Since 'Smith­
DoxeyLs a. .cot ton ;mprcivement:pro��in.··we have been assured that we can make a start
.
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:a·:r?-.ther··ui1.�atisractory';·pure··:se�,� s�t�up" if there is assurance' that thie viill
imp;r9Vcd J.�. ·the f'uture', 'Ther�ror�., w� :��:��e a.ll the', gins of ·Maricopa CoUrity'·:
that� they, can :participate ·In: Smith�Dox�y: oti;�ization work .if ,they toke st.epa to'··
'.'
provide sources' of improved seed-Ln .,���. fut-q,re �-C.H.
with
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HINTS FOR HOMEMAKERS
From time to time we receive news "hriefs" rela.tive to thE. effect which
the defense program has on homemaking o.ctiviticc.
Ue take the liberty of passing
a few on to Arizona's farm homemakers:
If you ho.ve supplies of spices on hand, guard them well!
What's on your Spice Shelf?
The TIar Production Board has put a ban on eight spices which we uso commvnly for
household purposes.
These are black end white p�pper, allspice, cinnamon, c�0ves,
ginger, nutmeg, and mace. You'll be wondcrin� ,[hat is left in the spice list. Not
many, but perhaps VIC will adjust oui-ae lves by learning to use many of the herbs
which European cooks h�vo used tor generations, end which have made them famous as
chefs.
Use Fruit Juices in
urged to use riper,
Canning. Rat.her than mal:ing "wnter packs" of fruit, we are
juicier fruits to provfde juic�s \7hich Vie may substitute for
wuter in conning.
Often this riper fruit is not desirable to put into the cans, as
fruit, but will be conserved if crushed, heatci in water, and the resulting juice
used for liquids in canning.
in Cannine: Eouipment� Home canners who are feorful about the supplies
of caps for canning, will be interested to kr ow that two types of experiments are
under way.
In one case, expr-riments are going forword to use a silver lining for
These
are said to be only 0. little :nore expensive than tin tops.
jar tops.
Dt')Vclopments
..
One glass company is busy devising a "slip-under" cap which makes it
possible to reseal gl.ass jars of non-standard type. By that we mean mayonnaise
jars, pickle jars, peanut-butter jars, etc. �ich hav� frequently given us trouble
when we ,tried to use them in place of s tandard jars.
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Storrige for Clothing. One w�r slogan is "make your clothes last through the
It
If we are to do thiS, ca.reful storage is necessary.
We have. a few
emergency.
copies of a leaflet which stresses better pr�ctices in stor�ge of clothing. You
Better
may secure
one
by calling
the office of the Home
Demonstration"Agent, 4-2l33.�-
G.R.
4-H CLUB NEVIS
Summer activities of 4-H Club member-a haeabeen advanced in all of its
The 4-H Club Victory program has stimulated summer
Club Work immensely, and club members are fully aware that we must defend ourselves;
our way of life-- our ideals.
We must do it with food, clothing, guns, ammunition,
phases in Maricopa County,
ships-- Club members are going "all out" for gardening, cannin�, food preparation,
poultry, dairy, pig, clothing �d other first-lind p�ojects.
It has t��en a rubber shortage ��d the threat of what th�t shortage
to
our
fighting forces to mQke us put forth our best effort3 in s�lvuging
may
rubber and other waste materials.
The 4-H Club Victory progrQm includes participa­
tion in the scrap iron and rubber salvage collection campaign, and the whole-heQrted
mean
The removal of fire hazards to
response of club members has been very satisfactory.
farm
and
is
nnother
of
the
4-H Victor,y Program which
protect
buildings
crops
phase
club members are tackling �i�� vim and vigor.
in
these programs entitles
Activity
members to wear a 4-H Victory Pin and 4-H'ers are proudly displaying their pins.--P.B.
(4)
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U. S. DEPAHTMENT OF AGRICULTURE
Extension Service
Washington,
D.C.
OFFICIAL BUSINESS
PENALTY· FOR PRIVATE USE TO
AVOID' PAn�ENT OF
.
POSTAGE
$300
COOPERATIVE EXTENSION WORK
IN
AGRICULTURE AND HOME ECONOMICS
State of Arizona
Phoenix
University of Arizona
College of Agriculture
u. S. Department of Agriculture
and Maricopa County Cooperating
Extension Service
Home Demonstration Work
Agricultural
County Agent Work
April 21, 1942
GINNERS OF MARICOPA COUNTY:
advised that Smith-Doxey cotton improve­
organization must be complete in Arizona by August 15.
Since ginning may begin shortly after August 1, we must
aim at a date considerab� earlier to compensate for war­
We are suggesting
time delays in getting supplies back.
1.
July
We
are
ment
get the official forms we rill supply
you and hope that you will cooperate with us as in former
years in making this sign-up.
As
soon
as
we
In the case of Acala organizations we would like to
have you list acreages of other upland varieties such as
Coker-Wilds, New Mexico 15-17, etc.
It appears that the Phoenix classing office will
be open throughout the year and that if you or your farmers
have problems they can be taken up with Mr. Crittendon at
time.
any
Yours very
-",
truly,
,J
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Charles Hobart,
Ass't. County Agri. Agent
CH:E
'COOPERATIVE EXTENSION WORK
IN
AGRICULTURE AND HOME ECONOMICS
State of Arizona
'
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•
Universi ty of Arizona
College of Agriculture
U. S. Department of Agriculture and
Maricopa County Farm Bureau cooperating
Extension Service
Home Demonstration'Work
Agricultural
County Agent
MARICOPA COUNTY
Work
.
January 15, 1943·
the University of Arizona, Extension Service
.:,
Issued
the starf of
by
.
1201 W. Madison Street, Phoenfx,
'Phone 4-2133
Dear Friends:
here
Well,
we
are
beginning
.
another year
ins��ountable.
vie,�oint, face obstacles which seom
we started other years under similar handicaps1
'.
'and,
But,
from the f&rmerl s
after all, haven't
,
.
:
You
rimember' the time you' got stuck 'in the' mud or sand. You'
worked until you were worn'out, you; cussed the car for not having enough power
:to get out:ot that holo'and yourself for not ha.ving B.·shovel, the country· in
gen'erai- for having such things in the road, and yet you were still stuck.
Then 'along came· a car �th four or five fellows in it.
They had a shovel
"'; "end after
little digging:nnd
push 'by everybody; the old car got out of
Working··together you'
got the job,done in a few minutes with
11 ttle effort,' whereas, you alone had worked all morning, were worn but, dd s-:
and still stuck.
gusted with everything
a.
a
all
the hole.,
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� As·
you drove on down 'the road, things', looked a lot different;·
so· bad after· all; maybe the old car 'wasn't a wreck;·you
wasn't
the:coUhtry
felt better and'those' fellows Who gave you the push:were certainly fine people
They"felt, sort of, puffed up toobeceuse they had' given a, hand to a fellow in
.
.
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need.·
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.
these obstacles if',we all work together, but
to' 'pull· out �lone., Wars are' not Ylon by indivi­
duals but by7 armies made' up �f iI'ldivi.dua.Le
fig� ting 'for the same cauae s
�1e' can"
"
get
we'll all be -stuck if':
.
,
as
c:Let'
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over',
wo
try·
get together end get this job, over with in+,eel better rrhen itt � over �
s
Yours very
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short a·"time
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possible and
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H. O'Dell
"'Count.Y·Agricultural Agent
•
CARE OF THE HOME ORCHARD
�iany homes, whetb.ef· {h -the city
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;
best
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high price and scarcity of fresh
the
.or.i an
The·present
important:: thn.h
deciduous fruit trees in,the yard.
frui ts and vegetables make's' it' mo're'
be given the
best possible care�":'
that these fruit trees
'ever
.
'..
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c.tl'uit· trees should
be
pruned yearly Yfh���· dormant, •... ��e
_
tho month of
January�'!J)�;'Y�1:Ul�or: trees, .,
may still be possible to.. help. shape �}fl�;. tree. ·.OnlY'
four or five main branches should be left on bach: tree
It .mor-e o,�cur,·:·cut then
off as close to the trun.k as possible in order to open up the center'of'thft: tree.
If necessary, take out part of the central branches this year and finish the job
next year.
As th,(;' rerp�·",c.�.·of·:too :�IlanJ: branches a t j one �im.e �ll.y open the tree
up so much that the -remain1ng branches may. "be bad:ty sunburned
Young trees in a
Valley is
tdme In. th?S�l��·.�lver
three to five"years ola; it
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condition
severely. The
is thinned and about 2/3 of the growth on the' .romafnfng branches is
Cut to cutsdde la t.er8:1s when posetb.Le .in ··order· 'to spread the tree.
vigorous growing
�sually pruned
are
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tre·es,.�
rather
4:',
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�J.���_��d
all:.:d:ead .and .:MAl-y .'
On old·'
New growth should be thinned and cut back about half
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wood
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growth
nower
removed.
.
.·sh6uld 'be' r-emoved,
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be giv0n at several point� �n t�e
of
Watch
for
these
notices
county., tl:lis
meetings and attend one or ail
)....
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....,
how
iii
see
'fs
> prun
g
·actually·.,done •... : .: ;".
�f.�theIll ':m� order.... �o�
Pruning demonstrations will
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and r�'" c�l­
ll.tti�·: f�r'tiii
badlY'� negl.ected �
such
,A.:
t�vaJi0n !lr�,�h.� �.e���;.
cO�Tlercial fertilizer,
quick�y. ava�lable
to Eo
should:
If the trees
..
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le·ss',. },he 'amount, dependin�("Ori
as sodium
good start
tr:�\$j·orf
tive pounds and smaller. ones
the 'SiZf)' arid'. condition of. t;.rGOs,.·
When 'usfug'lthis
n.�trat�, �pp'l+.�¢t 1n:."early February
help·
thi� 'spr� ng.;·:.·.La·rgc" ·tra·as! shoul.d be�'·.giv:en :fo\1r.
.
aer
a:
arc'
the:
OF.'
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type 'pt �er'tllh;er·, beisurc ·jlrid· give the '.trees a .heavy �r�iga,t�on' i�ledi.Eit��y
after":tho .app�ica:ti6n •. :Ei tnel":�chicken" oj;j. barn yard manure, is yery' good ,' but
is not "avaf.LahLe to the ·tre"�·:as. 'soon .as c-oromercir.tl,ni, �r,atc •. t·�· .Ls bes,t tQ·' apply
these .ferti,lize�s· 'in' the ··fhll -so tnat 'they will have- ;ti.Ino t� .dccompoae "a.nc(.b.e'.
come available 'to' the"t.ree':bi·'the·_:time growth starts i�._the .spr-i.ng :
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.I� the ground Ls woody, hard D.�d does not"take \'rate; '��li; ':ci:"culti­
vation' �o ��.d�pt�·'·otjfive or 'sax inches:;.j�n r'ecommendedv- �, good t.Lme to do this
The": trees should"rcc.e�v� ;'�<��a�: i;rri.gat�on
: ��. q-fter '. a11p�r�t;l�·· �he �.�rtilizor·�
duri�g January pr ea'r11 F?bruary� This" irri5c:ltlon� sh-�ulq,.:vv:et',,;the.� soiJ.. to a.
depth' of' five' biV1··�ti·.' f'6·C'.t/ tind \·iill help to;;18flch 'cut: ;iQj),., s�J ts and. soak, up .the
sub-soil.
During tht;} fruit setting period do not let the trees' become-' tq:o'.·ary
or $uffer from the lack. of' water, as an excessive drop of fruit may occur'�'
During. 'this' ·pe:H.c'cflt 'i1g�:'b(3tter to; h.rlgate:fairlY·J)ften and lightly, rather
than \0 appiy. �(jaVy,�lr��'g[�ticn:s':a-t less frequent: int_e;r'v:�:is.�:::;. Af��r the fruit is
harve'sted,' do' not "fater' tti6i bfteh" ljust>cmmgh; wa�ter :t9; kS3�P the. tre'e li'o�J;thy is
sufficient •. roo. m'llch water in late summer t..nd fall s�ems to cause 'r: sourlng of
the roots and" may: r'eSUl't. '-in 'th:e ·.tlea·�.Q! G.! some' ·:of ·t4e tro�e�.... '.' H. B P
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VICTORY
•
G�l1iS.,,����:.��-: �B>��S�.� i:::'i::;:>'
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"", Eve,f-Y f;arIJl should have a vegetable garden this year. Now is the
time to.g�t .th�t p19t' :i1�ady for spring planting if it hasn't already been pre­
pared. A nuinbet- or vege·tablBs can be planted now but the regular summer vari­
Get a planting.outline
eties will be ple.nted'after danger of froHt is over.
J.H.O.
from·the"C<nintY·Ag�ht"·s<'·off·ice and got to work on this job.
..
-1-
ALFALFA IRHIGATION
In these days when Labor is an increasingly tough problem many:
farmers
givin'g thought to alfalfa as a way out if the labor situation
r.e�ches an acute'�tD.ge.·· One.of the ways thnt labor requirementG can be distri­
..
buted lIl:�e evenly, is to £ollovi';the practice of heavy winter or early spring'
irrig& tio� of' cltclfn. Many of you r-emeaber the summer of 1941 and the diff
c��y ot: �dryiJ?.g, up.,.a1t�fa ;fields due to large amounts !of f'ree wa tor used' dur­
lng, the win,�o�", Tho' .v�ter. llpplied �e.ny months before 'went right on producing
alfn,li'n. during -.tA� summer
Though there ara. nany winter time chores to be done
and the cold'nif;��'s "are disagreeaple, irrigation in winter months' or early
C .H
spring will l1Gh ten' the summer Load
are
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BARLEY FOR SPRING PLANTING.
Though Jcnu�ry probably is the limit for planting thG standard
V�ughn ��d Arivat burley, Mariout barley can be pltnted somewhat
l�ter with satisfactory results. It should be romcmbe�cd that regardless of
planting da.te nll grains mn ture tit o.pproxi:natel:(.the same time, rnd irrigr..tions
shoUld be ap�l�ed �rtencr �o thet required growth can,be.mnde.
C.H.
varieties of
CC �i.1T6N 'PLANTING PLANS
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Cotton farrners"rire�strtiggl1nl' still with th.; problem of getting
cotton picked out but it is nut too soon to make pluns:'for. next season
Cott'Jn stalks should be br-oken D,S seen as possible�t1ndJ,tha.luild -plv";.·cd.
On the
heavi er lands irrigation shoul.d be run Rt Les.s t two orllthree lieeks ahead (If
pl.antdng time and seed beds prepared, �t i;lr..nting time ;$")Ile'devico should be
.
used t9 shove aside
It now-appears that
the dry top soil
and
hcavier sof Le
seed in acd l, of pr-oper- moisture.
the
I.lut
·fc:ct.)r .im ·d�pres.sing c.rt ton
either
"is'
so'll'
caused
yields
.l.y nc._lting; a seed t>�d- .too soon after- irtipuddl.Ing ,
the
C H�.·
soil
whim
is· too wet�
gatdoncr by cultivating'
on
ser tous
a
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POULTRY
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The demand fer
to such
extent thut
Loca.L demand ,
en
creased
•
•
••
m�at and eggs is increasing every day and
exists nod will become more ecute, -due to in­
poultry
shortnge
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transporta:tion
radIi tics, nod demands
e Lsewhere
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It is the duty of everyonevt.o produce.ito rthe
fullest" extent IJ£ their t..bili tie Th<f demand ·ro'!' .baby chicks
is an indication tho. t everyone is: aw�r� 'of the .needed i)Mduction.
Many people are raising paul try who have not been doing so in the' past. This has' incr-easE:a the- need for: brooder
:.equipmen t' and 'b: shor tcge existA,. cspecinlly of' the, ·larger:-There. probably. is c. ,large number. of, brooders ·that.·
brooders.
'.
are not
be used by r-ccondf tioning.
be�g
These brooders should gGt uitb t11e·::M.nds of some! poul.t.ryman ;
hatcheryman or dealer so that, others may usc them. So, if you
have ��, brooder .that's not workmg , let somebody have it who
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Every: 'i>Oliltrimrin
::)lace
at
��h� ·t:h:d 'he ?;an�ts them
'shou Ld
Insure
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DAIRY BULLS
Any dairyman anticipating 'the need ':of a 'bull wi thin' the. next year
would find it very profitable ·to purchase' a pure-bred calf· at, the present time.
The breeders have the ma-jority of their 'cows freshening in the fall, which gives
the buyer a Lar-ger selection at the present :time and' the. cost is much less
than the purchase of a bull ready for service'.
If the dairjmrn puts off buying
until he has a need for a bull, he often finds it difficult to purchase a bull
of breeding age and also few from which to· select. Make arrangements to get
Vv.R.V.
your bull and raise him for the time that you-need him.
FEEDING DAIRY COWS
Wi th' the scarei ty and hi.gh ,pricE: '�f alfalfa hay many de Lrymen can'
well afford to inc�ease grain feeding to offset some' of tho' pay 8.z:ld pasture
�
requiremen bs , .The folloWing. grain rq. tlon rpd wi th 'limi ted amoun t of' hay a�«(
pasture \"Till give good results if fed cit the rate of one pound of': grain 'for:'
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to eight pounds of milk
condi tion and r-oughage available:
each,four
produced, depending
"
or. rolled or grOt}!ld,
Lbs
200 Lbs, bran
75 Lbs cct.tonseed mea'l,
7 Lbs
salt.�
400�
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th�.breedJ fles�e�i�ff
J.'.-:: .. �'�';-":' :.:�
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Many.cia'irYnien have b�'�ri"·.carigh:t 'shor-t
.
iuralfa hay and stiffi:'"
cient pasture at the present time,.
Every .daf.rymen shoul.d be making p'Ians t6:
:
provide sUfficient amount of fe.eel 'Vlell in advance of' his needs. In case' of
purchases, this should be made !it the tiine' 'of harvesting.'· 'wher'a: 'additional
of.
.
;
finance is needed it would be wise to make arr�geillents in adv��ce for credit�
W.R.V.
HOME BUTCHERING
A great deal' or" c'oriftis;io� '�xists in =the' minds of most rural people
regarding OPA regul.ataons govorn.lng the slau:gh.ter,ing .of animals on the farm.
A recent news releas,?:. py. the EXtension. Servfce in: Washington .has cLeared up
this mat.ter and here are the .f'ae.ts' as .s ta'ted 'in 'that 'release.
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All farmer-s .are
thei� meat needs on the'. -'.
.tor 1,.
basis of two and ('me-ha1t:':rpoun.d.s of mea t ·per. 'I)Cr'sori per' 'week,
'This includes
ali meat whether bought on home-dr-essed. ?lith·. tho exception .of poultry, fiSh;;:":
'Ihidget
asked
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or
game.
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.homo-dr-eascd meat. thi�(ytia�" than the:t sold in , : :.'
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farme/�h� ;·in··.' the" 'first' 'rii!�e '·mon·th� \Sf i942 handied less 'tharl' one
'2. •.• Sell
the ye9.r
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pounds of mentis classed as c. "non-quota" slaughteret!�'
"n(;m�gu.otan .'slaughte�e� may. :not· slaughter. oyer lQQ i>er cent of the amount of
and one-half million
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year 1941' end 'ofter this: meaf roio' sale. He must shon
records to prove that he did" siaughter the same' 'am�unt' of"the' same kind'ot'-meat
in each quarter of 1941.
There is no re�triction on the amount of meat a
farmer can slaughter £nd store for the'use of his OTIn. family.
If further de­
ta.ils are desired, call tho State O.P.A. office in Phoenix.
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mea t
he handled in the
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FARM SIG:�-UP
Within the next few weeks all farmers will be asked to fill out
work
sheet �d a farm plan work sheet at the request of the AAA and
regular
War Boards.
This is part or the "Farm Mobilization" program and should be done
promptly. This farm plan will show just whn.t crops and acrecges each farmer
From teese p'lans it will be escer'tatned if
Intends to grow during the year.
this county is to reach the goals ns set for the various crops by the Secretary
of Agriculture. We. tch for the do. te IlI1d plr..cc fat" t.hE.: sign-up and get: this done
at an early date.
It is imporUnt.
J .H.O.
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FIRE PREVENTION
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In the rush of business, don't forget �bout fire prevention.
Several dJ.sasterous fires occurred in rural areas during the past year which
�ght havo b3en preventen if proper precaution had b�en taken beforehand. Re­
move those hazards now.
Look over' that check list 'lhich was sent, to you some
time ago and do those things which you neglected to do at that time.
Lot.s of
J .H.O.
stuff which will burn canno t be repla.ced un til aft.er t.he wc.r.
BUY
BONDS
AND
STAMPS!
THAT VICTORY TAX
�
Farmers ere not required ·to hold out 5% of the wages of farn
laborers for tne neT. Victo� Tex.
However, evcryune making as much as $624
(J. return for that year.
will
be
file
to
This return w�l.�:
1943
during
required
be made .by the individual f'arm Is borer ru thor then by. the emp'Lcyer
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RABBITS TROUBLESOME
Due to the extreme
desert
areas
dryness
6f the
,
-movfng into cul.t.Ivated
in grent numbers and damagdng r.lfalfa and.
.areas
r&bbits
are
other crops.
Now is the ti:ne to poison these
wait until your- cotton or vegetable
Don't
pests.
are
planted tc begin pcisoning operations.
crops
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SELECTIVE SERVICE
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Poison is" available at the County Agent's Office
or
ass�strulce·. 1..'1. ac tue.L puisoning may be had
the Fish and V;ildlife· Service in the Post aTfice
at:
Building'.
C�ll
PhoGn�x.
need asst stance
th th�s
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F�rmers �ho
to draft should file
are
of
draft
age
or
who'have
employees
who
ere·subject
request for deferment. f9r themselves or t..�eir employees
as soon as possdhLe with their LocaL Selocti ve Service' Board'.
This request
should be accompcnt.ed by � full s tt:. temen t of the f'armdng operation of the farmer
or the work performed by his emp'Loyce
Such a statement \'lill.servt';:· tC{'guide
the member-s of the board in grant.Lng def'ermerrt
Put in the request �s. soon
as notice of classification is received r&ther than wait lintil the man is called
for physical exa.mina.ti,Qn!. .Such delay causes confusion snd will cause the loss
to agriculture of essential �orkers.
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A farmer or agricultural laborer should feel 110 hesitancy in asking
A man who works long hours
for deferment since farming is an essenticl L�dustry.
on the farm producing food and fiber cro?s for cur armed forces and those of our
allies is just as important to the war effort as the
J.R.O.
We've got to have both to win the ��r.
(4)
man
in the fron t line.
4-H CLUB,ACTIVITY
The,
,
at the'
Attra,cti��ncss Bulletins have 'bee�':rec·ef.ved··
j:
being, relayed' to local, ,gr�,ip$ .' I�!.�V:G!" .bef'ore
Health and
new
County Office
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and
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has the Health "H" ,of, the 4 H Club Pr-ogram been so vi tal' 'as', now in our: 'Ii All"
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A dishrict honor
come to two fine
Gir�s' {..-H
Club Work and to Maricopa County as' woll. whon Mr. Emil t1'. Rbvoy� State Leader'
of 4-II Club Work, announced Mrs. Lone Austin of the Roosevelt 4-.H .P��P1.�.
leader for eleven years, and Mrs. Alice Ramsey of the Kyrene Distri-c·tJ··.wri>"".�·,L:
loaders. pi"
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has served, as Leader; '�o:r: .seven.
Er.ch
y��!S., had
of these VIOr.1Cn .has .beon cut.atandi.ng :lS a Youth Leader' and ,Will r ece tve from
'OJ
the. St&te Banker-s' ·Association a jewel�d: /l�·.l ".' OUP congrrrtu'La t Lons go to these'"
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fine Leader-e and. our thanks to .tho Banker-s A's.socib.t·iori.·
f.p.: -:
?e�n,. aw�rd.ed le:fu?r.spi.p. p�ns.
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If you ·,vish
Films.
LP.
4-H workers.
,pr��i��ge, .plce.s6 phof.ie or ....m;i_�r. yourJ�otmty
�".�:;,-,�'1"'). (,,��; b
,..,.---;r�;' <� _' y'--'}. (;/6i� p,
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AND
BONDS
S T /";n, �p'-:'S'�:::��>f�''f :/-'('��i'!"';-"\..
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4-H MOBILIZA'I'IOr-T'· WEEK:
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"Nati.onal 4�H Mo1::iliza'tion :W�ek will
Februar,y· e---14; 1943�
�f this' observance Ls to' reach Lar-ge riu:mbersL"of' rtH�l: 'young' people
The
to do their utmost through 4-H activities to help win the War .•
Enjiccor dance
wi th the National pr-ogram, VIC will ho Ld enro.Lunent.s of 4-H Club- 'eiembeF,s�.open. ..
urrtd l after 'this 4-Il Mooilizc.tiol1 Week. )loYf? .and etrls \'r�sh�ng tc enroll in
4-H Clubs sh�()'4;:I.��:ite 'or phone. the County',',tgent" s Ofric�J, 1201' 'W. Mad Lson ,
or see t.he i.r
': ":'���b Leader sv .. -.
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presen ted. to
Mo.!i.c'opi G0uil ty 4-H. Cl-ub,' member-s for
work
outstanding club
,r:li Ga.tes'or,Ky�ene, L.�:.��rerice.McDo'!!e�l·or mesa, Ruth'
Crumbaken of I'empe and 'i,lary L.o�se.'·,j ones' �)r,� ';(f;inpe each 'r'e¢bi:v!ed, a $25 bond for
War .bonds
were
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Vict'orY:Acp.:leVe{n8nt ·Contest·. Robert :RQS3 of Avondale
.:
of fi ire state winners wl::o" tec.Bi.ve�.: '$25 bonds in the' �tate' 4:"'H_ 'Club"
Victory Garden Contest. Jean Percy �la.'s·'presented with a gold meditlfoit' the
Arizona Farmer's Junf.cr Livestock Producers AnnuaL Banquet.
J.c�n .:won th� County
:'.'":,::: � '-.':'�' I,,
Meat Animal Contest.
P.W.B.
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winning the State' 4-·H Club
was
one
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THIS PUBLICATIOJJ 'c�i� '(iNLY BE'SEr:T :l'l;;'�(t�'\?::'S VJHO REQUEST 'IT' •. <IF· YOu. PISH:::TO RECEIVE
FUtTJR;8: IS�mE�j. ANP' hiv�;:�(Ji: ·A�IlEll.Dt'·IN·bICAT'ED 'SO .'ott THE FARiA :BELOVT-; PLEASE .FILL IT
IN ;,'AND .,RETURI� .�T"'TO .TH;rS .OFfICE' Ir;li�EPI�TEi.Y,-· 'B'ox ·751.�! Phoenix; Lrizoha:·
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DRIED FRUITS AND VEGETABIIES
More dried fruits and vegetables will be used this year than
before. Such products will, if properly prepared and storod, keep in­
definitely and t;"'.ke up little storage space. They are palatable and nutrd tdoua
A number of vegetables are now available and should
and can be prepared llt home.
be put up either dried or canned for future use.
Anyone interested in canning
or drying fruits or vegetables for home use should ca.ll Miss Ryan, Home Demon­
stration Agent, who has this information ree� for distribution.
J.H.O.
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CITRUS FERTILIZATION
Citrus growers who have not already done so may yet want to
fertilize their groves with commercial fertilizer this year.
If available,
either sodium nitrate or ammonium sulfate applied now and folloued by a good
irrigetion should help keep groves in good condition� Tho amount applied per
tree will vary with the tree size and condition.
Amounts greater than one
ni
that
of
�onium
of
is
sulfata qr- 9ix pounds'.of
trogen,
pound
riv� pounds
sodium nitrat.e per tree should not be applied. Greater amount.s nay resU:lt in
injury to the trees or to waste of materials. For further inro�.tion on
this matter, ca.ll the county Agent' s Offic�.
J .R.O.
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PRUN� SHADE TREES AND ORN1J,tENTALS
This month is tho best time to prune sh�de trees &nd most orna­
mentals. Most shade trees can be kept in be t ter shape ,lith some pruning at
Elms and euca'lyptus tend to grow too tall 1ihich resul ts
least every other year.
in large limbs breaking during sucmer r�in and r.ind storms.
Such trees are
dangerous if close to a dwelling or other tuildings and the long limbs should
be shortened to give the tree better sh�pe �d strength.
All dead br�ches should
be removed also.
Shrubs should bl)
plan t.
protect
be
pruned
pruned
after
flowering
if
n
with
painted
point.
at that
remove
dead
growth and
to
shape
the
maximum of bloom is desired.
On both shade trees and
be
to
Pruning at this tine will perni t the plant to �)U t out new growth to
the elder wood by the time hot weather begins.
Flowering s��bs should
some
��terproof co�ting
to
all
Lar-ge cuts or wounds should
prevent decay or disease from entering
shrubs,
PENALTY -FOR PRIVATE· USE TO' AVOID
u s. DEP l\.RTMENT OF' AGRI CULTURE
EXTENSION SERVICE
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PAYMENT. OF .POSTAGE
Washington, D..C'.
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$300.
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