HOBART, O'DELL, POWERS, ANI>

HOBART, O'DELL, POWERS, ANI>

ANNUAL REPORT

OF

H. B.

J.

H.

O'DELL,

COUNTY AGRICULTURAL AGENT

AND

POWERS,

ASSISTANT COUNTY AGRICULTURAL AGENT

.AND

CH!RLES

PAUL W.

HOBART,

ASSISTANT COUNTY AGRICULTURAL AGENT

ANI>

BROWN,

ASSISTANT COUNTY AGRICULTURAL AGENT

AND

W., R.

VANSANT,

ASSIST.ANT

COUNTY AGRICULTURAL AGENT

MARICOPA COUNTY

DECEMBER 1943 TO DECEMBER 1944

I N

D E X

III..

Summary of Activities and

Accomplishments

IV.

Changes in Extension

Organization

Form of

Organization

General Policies

Precednre

••

'.

!'

• ..

..

• • • • • • • • • • ..

• ..

• ..

1-.3

4

4

4

V.

Program of Work

Factors Considered and Methods Used in

Determining Program'

'of

Work

•••••••••••••••••••

6

Proj,ect Activities and Result,s

•••••••••

!t

•••••

,....

6

SOILS

Proj ect III

-

Alkali Reclamation

•••••••••••••••••.

7

Project #2

-

Fertilization Practice

•••••••••••••

8

Proj ect

#5

-

Irrigation Practic'e

••••••••••••••••

9

CllOPS

Project

#6

-

Pure Seed

••••••••••••••••••••••••••

10

Pro'!

e,et

Ii7

-

Better

Alfalfa

Hay

••••

'.

• • • • • ..

• • •

• •

11

Project

US

-

Weed

Eradication

•••••••••••••••••••

11

HORTICULTURE

Project

#l2

-

Pruning

•••••••••••••••••••••••••••

11

Proj ect

#13'

-

Pecan Propagation

N.;

••••••

•••

'�

••

12

Project #14

Dat�.

Propagation

•••••

••••••••••••

12

Proj ect

/114.1

-

Ci trtis

Nursery

Practi,ce'.........

12

DAlBY

Project

#22

-

Dairy

Herd Improvement

••••••••••••

12

Project:/l228

-

Dairy

Here; Management

••••••••••••

1.3

Proj ect

#23

Project

.:..

Disease Control

•••••••••••••

'..

• • • •

14

#24

-

Better and Proven Sires

•••••••••••

14

LIVESTOCK

Proj ect

#19

-

Feeding

Beef Cattle

....

,

••

,....

Proj ect

#20'

-

Sheep Feeding

••••••••••••••••

Swine

Production

••••••

'.

• • ..

14

15

15

POULTRY

Project #28

-

Caponizing

••••••••••••••••••••••••

Project #30

-

Poultry

Improvement

••••••

••••••••

Pro3ect #30&

-

Poultr,y

Disease

&

Parasite Control

15

15

16

MISCELLANEOUS

Project /115

Project

/116

Project 1/23

Pro

feet

1126

Insect Pest Control

••••••••••••••••

16

Rodent Control

•••••••••,............

18

Disease

Economic

Control

(Plant)

••••••••••••

,�8

Survey

•.••.•••••••••.••••.••

.,

.'

19

4-H

CLUB WORK

Project #29

...

Boys' and

Girls' Club Work .20-28

ORGANIZATION

Maricopa County Farm Bureau

••

'!

•••••••••••••••••••

29

County

Agents'

Soil

C()nference

ConserVation Servl.c·e

••••••••••••••••••••••••

29

29

War Boards

'_

.,

• • • • • • • • •

,29

State

Agricultural

Farm Labor

Advisory

Adjustment Agency Committee

•••

29

'Committee

••••••••••••••••••••

29

-

Farm Field

Day

•• ., •••••••• • • • • • • • • • • ..

30

Agrioultural,

War

Commodities,

Inc

••••••••••••••••

30

Oftice of Price Administration

:........

30 ram Labor

Fire

Program,

•••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••

,30 and Accident

Prev�ntion

Campaign

.,............

.31

Victo.ry

Gardens

••••.••

� •.••

0

• • ••

Central Arizona Rabbit Breeders' Association

•••••

..

32

33

Purebred

,Cattle'

01 ubs

.. • • • • • • • • • • • • • •

3.3

VI.

Outlook and Recommendations, In'cluding Suggested

Program of' Work for Next Year

'............

34

SUMMARY AND OUTLOOK OF PROJECTS

Project III

Alkali Reclamation

••••••••••••••••••

Project

112 Fertilization Practice

••••••••••••••

Project

115

Irrigation

Practice

•••••••••••••••••

'Proj

ect,

#6

Pure Seed

••

Proj ect lIS

Weed·

Eradication

•.•••••••••••••••••••

..

Proj e'ct

/112

Pruning;.

•••••••••••••••••••••••••••

Project

1113

-

Pecan Propagation

••••••••••••••••••

Project #14

-

Date

Project /114.1

-

�ropagation

••••••

••••••••••••

Citrus Nursery

Practice

••••••••••

Proj,ect #15

Insect Pest Control

Project #16

Rodent Control

•••••••••••••••••••••

Proj ect

#23 Disease Control

.:.,

'.

• • • • • • • .... • • • ..

• • •

Project #26

Economic

Survey

••••••••••••••••••••

.

Dairj

and Li vestoek

•••••

• • • •

• • • • • • • • • • • • • • •

Poultl1'

Proj ect

/129

-

4-H

Rural So,ciolo&V"

'Fam

Labor'

Club.s

••

• • • •

•••

••••••.•••• • •

.'.

• • • • • •

• • • • • • • •

••• •

• • • •

.

..

.

34

.35

35

3�

35

35

35

36

36

36

.36

36

36

37

.37

.37

37

37

...._-.

-...

-

In.

.

S'OIIABI OF ACTIVITIES AND

ACCOMPLISHMENTS

The

Agrieul

tura! Ixt.ension

SE1)rvioe program in

Maricopa Cotmty this year bas been conduoted in the usllal manner, following the national prograa been tor production cax-riecl with some of essential products.

Regular maj or proj ects bave cbanges to f1t present conditions of Labor-, machin­ ery and JQs:terial shortages.

Increased production in most fields bas been accomplished in spi te ot handicaps.

The

Victory

Garden program conducted by'

As,siatant

Agent

H

-.

broad.cast, from a.

model

B. Powers was well planned, using a weekly radio garden as well as talks before numerous garden clubs as a aeans ot intorming home garde�el's ot the proper care and cul­ ture ot V'egetables tor home use.

The Pure Seed program was well conduet.ed

by' As,si,stant Agent

Chas. Hobart with a great increase in the registration ot grain sorghl2lls and altalfa seed but with cotton acreage dropping to a

_1Ilian..

Und,er Assistant

Agent

Paul W

•.

Brown the

4-1

Club program has ac­ complished Iluch in spite ot lack or experienced leaders and lack of trans­ portation tor club members.

The 4-H Fair held at

Tempe was an outstanding success with an increastlt in exhibits, of high rquality.

Dair,and poultr,y pro3 eets have been handled with an increase in production in both commodi­ ties br

Acting

Specialist

W. R. VanSant who ,carried on most of the duties ot an assistant agent in addition to work of a specialist in other parts ot the state.

The Farm Labor program has required a maj or portion of the

Agent's time as, w;ell as that of Farm

Labor Assistant

,Clyde

B.

Watkins.

week11 colllJlln or timeq hints to farmers has been written for the Mesa

A

Journal

!ri'b:l$e, a weekly ne,wspaper.

Mimeograph circulars, new printed folders and circulars by personnel from both the state and county staff have aided Il8.terially

in conducting all programs.

Cooperative projects with the University ot Arizona

Experiment

Station, the U.

S.

Department of

Agriculture and other federal and state agencies have been carried on tm-oug'hout the year.

The grasshopper con­ trol program in cooperation with the Bureau of Entomology

Quarantine, Gras'shopper

Control Division, was instrumental and in crops which would have been

Plant saving many greatly reduced in value bad not poison bait been available through the

CoUnty

Agent's

Office.

Cooperation

Soil Conservation Service and the

,State·Land Commissioner with the completed the

prel1minar,y

and final work necessar,r to establish soil conservation districts or additions to the county.

Through the already established districts

County

War Board in five areas in members of the staff conducted investigations and made reports on the agricul tural activities of numerous men for Selective Service Boards in this and other states.

The distribution of rodents in poison grain and cooperation with the other materials for the control of

Fish and Wildlif,e Service has been of

Jlaterial benefit to farmers of the county.

The U.

S.

Weather

Bureau has been advised ot with farmer

Otfice ot Labor and the War furnished to farmers to cultivate otherwise organizations, would crop have conditions been the U. S.

Manpower lost.

existing from time to and

The

ArD\Y, the War relationship time.

Food

Commission resulted harvest maey acres

Administration, in labor of crops between the

Cooperation being which

Extension and exoellent

Service and all public agencies has been very satisfactory results obtained through ceopezatdon,

-

1

-

The Smith-Doxey program has been conducted as usual this year with a

complete

coverage or acreage of both long

'fbi,s progr8ll is and short-staple cotton.

seemingly accepted by most farmers in the county only because govel"llDlent loans on cotton are made only on the basis of classifi­ ca.tion

by the IOotton Classing Office.

The weak link in the program seems to be the method by" which appeals are made.

The

Agricllltural

Adjustment Agency received and filed

4,125 work sheets, and distributed

450 carloads of feed wheat.

payments to daiIj'11ten amounted to

Dai:ey ,subsidy

$769,752.00

for the period

December

1,

1943 to lovember

25, 1944.

The Agri,cul tural Chemical Laboratory, in charge of Mr.

George

Draper, Chemist, bas furnished valuable service to farmers, irrigation districts and home-owners rial consisting ot

678 or b.1 analyzing a total of 1,309 samples of mate­

water,

both domestic and irrigation, 590 ot soils,

8 ot manure, 16 of teed, 2 ot sulfur,

3 of poisons, 3 of gypsum and 9 ot miscellaneous materials.

All and a written analyses were made at no charge report furnished in each case.

This is a service much ap­ preciated by farmers and others alike.

tained at

In conducting the Farm Labor program offices have been main­

Phoenix and

Mesa.

At the

Phoenix otfice the staff consists of the Farm Labor Assistant and two men assistants who do both office and tield work and one stenographer-clerk.

The Mesa office is in charge of a stenographer-clerk.

Through these two offices a total of ot all tipes bas been furnished to farmers.

This total,

16,708 laborers consisted of

7,240 local, 2,235 imported and

7,233 prisoners of war laborers.

In ad­ dition 81 seleotive service investigations were made,

205 letters written

pertaining

to

'jobs

open, wages offered, etc., 340 long distance oalls made and labor

59 certifications for camps prisoners of war processed.

Prisoner have been established at

Mesa, :Queen Creek, Bucke.ye

and

Litchfield with an additional mobile camp west of

Buckeye.

When at full strength these camps housed approximately 3,000 men.

Through the co­ operation of the War

Food

Administration,

Office of Labor, a mobile camp tor camp

Farm migrant workers was established at

Goodyear, south of Chandler.

This bas a capac!ty

of 250 persons.

A survey made by the

Labor Office to ascertain the starf of the prevailing wage paid to hay-baler crews showed an per ton of average ot output per day.

$

.28

per ton and a prevailing rate of

$

.30,

Baler operators were notified of this find'::' ing.

.......__

.....

�......

�.

'" � total of

During the year the stafr of the County

Agent's Office made a

2,002 farm calls, received

5,186

office calls, made or received

7,730 phone calls, wrote

1,584 letters in reply to inquiries recei�ed, wrote 146 circular letters and mailed

32,603

copies of the same, made

30 radio talks on papers.

One

,various mimeograph

subjects

and prepared

66 articles for local news­ circular "On._,irrigation was prepared and d1strlb�ed, one on veg�table gardening revised and one circular on date propagation was written and is now in the process of being printed.

A total of

331 meetings with an attendance of

17,806

was attended b,y

-

2

-

members of' the staff'.

A total of 52 met,hod and resu!

t demonstrations were held with an attendance qf 1,173.

All staff members travelled a to­ tal

Q·f

38,$16

miles in conducting all phases of work.

No news letter was distributed during the year due to both labor and paper

snortage.

Month­

� meetings o!'the combined staffs of the

Home

Demonstration

Agent and

County Agent and weekly meetings of the

County Agent·' s staff were.

held throughout the year.

At these meetings all phases of the various programs were discussed in order that each member might knQw what was being done by the others.

Members of the starr attended 7 investigations.

meetings of the

County War

Bo�rd,

5 of the State War

Board, 4 of the

State

Agricultural Adjustment

Ageney, issued 14 certificates for sugar for thrips control to farmers for presentation to the local rationing board and made 164' selective service

The clerical starf of four full-time and one half-time member bas handled all typing, filing, preparation of expense accounts, answering the phone, keeping mailing list up to' date, issuing bulletins, distribution of rodent and grasshopper pod.son

and preparing reports for the entire Extension Service staff as well as for the Agricultural

Chemist and the Extension

Specialist in

Entomology.

Offices are located at

1201

West Madison Street in

Phoenix in a building specially built for the Extension Service on property leased from are

Maricopa County

Board of Supervisors.

In this building quarters furnished for the

Maricopa

County

Farm

Bureau, the Executive office of the Arizona Feed and Fertilizer Control, the

Agricultural

Chemical

Laboratory and Mr.

A. E.

Frazier of the U. S.

Plant

Bureeu

of Entomology

'Quarantine, Grasshopper

Control Division.

A meeting room and with a seating capacity of the use of the approximately

80 is maintained in, the basement for staff and all farmer organizations.

During the year

62 meetings with an attendance'of

1,224 were held in this room.

-

3

-

IV.

CRABGES II EXTENSION ORGANIZATION

(1)

Form ot

Organization prove the

State law provides that the

Maricopa County Farm Bureau may ap­ budget or annual expenditures for extension work in the

COUll­ t1-

This budget is prepared each year for approval by the Farm Bureau and then presented to the

County

Board of

Supervisors whomake available funds tor that lunds.

All part of the budget to be made up of state and

CO'UBty meetings of the Farm Bureau are attended by some member of the Ext ellS ion staff' but no member is an elected officer.

It is a matter of conveuiene,e that the starf member acts as secretary at all meetings.

At the time of this report the· Extension staff consists of a

Counv Agent, three Assistant

Agents, one

Home Demonstration

Agent, one

Assistant Home Demonstration

Agent, one

Office

Secretary, four Steno­ grapher-clerks and one

Janitor.

The Extension

Specialist in

:Entomology bas the

�,t.f'ice

in the state.

The building

Acting and is avaUable when not in other parts ot

Specialist in

Dairy and

Poultry Husbandry, former-

17

Assistant

Agent, is also in the same status· ani has submi t.ted

part of this report as

Assistant Agent.

The Farm Labor Offic'e at

Phoenix, located at 1921

E.

Washington

Street, is in charge ot a

Farm Lahor

Assistant, two ,Assistants who do both office and field wo:rk and one

stenographer-clerk.

The Mesa office, located at South McDonald

Street, is in charge of one stenographer-clerk under the supervi.sion

of the Fa.rm Labor Assistant at Phoenix.

(2)

General Policies to

As in the

past',

it bas been the policy of the Extension Service otfer all facilities of' the organization to all individuals as.

well as all agricultural and farmer organizations, federal, state and county agencies dealing with agricultural problems and to all civic organiza­ tions with proj eo.ts

pertaining to agriculture.

No distinction is made between urban and rural people

.other than that rural projects' receive first consideration ot the staff'.

The

Agent has served as a member of the

County

War Board and as ex-officio member ot the County Agricultural

Adjustment Committ,ee and some member ot the staff' has acted as secretary for the

County

Farra Bureau at all meetings.

(3)

Procedure

A program of work covering all phases of Extension work is the basis ot all activity.

This program

County

Agent and submitted to the Board

Bureau tor its

approval.

This is program prepared separately by the of Directors outlines in a of the

County

Farm general way the work to be stressed tor 8Ilergency or unforseen programs which may quite general during the year.

in order that

It must be made so as to changes may be arise.

made without provide

Projects forming are a time made new

-

4

-

proj,eet.

There is need for revision of' project headings at this time.

Some

projects

should be dropped and new ones added.

The

Program of

Work, after approval or the

Count,.

·Farm Bureau

Directors, is submitted to the

Extension Director for approval and a copy filed with the County

Board of

Supervisors.

-

5

-

v._

PBOGBAI

OF

WORK

(1)

Factors

Considered and Methods

Used in Determining the

Program.

ot Work

In planning the

Extension Program for the year, careful con­ sideration was given to those.phases

which would lead to greater produc­ tion ot essential crops through better management.

Minor projects, classed as non-essential in war times, were discontinued.

Due to lack of labor and transportation facilities for farmers, fewer meeting,s wer.e

planned.

Farmers were kept informed of changes in, or new national pro­ grams, letins through personal c;ontact, telephone,-radio, circular a,nd personal letters.

The addition of several

letters, printed

bul­ folders written 'in concise form bas been of

Freedomv great assistance in various projects.

The educational phase of the

Agricultural Adjustment

Agenc.y

program bas been carried out b.1

a series of ftFood

Fights for meetings held in all parts of the

County.

War putting over

Board activity was given major consideration but developed into nothing more than a means of classifying farm help for the guidance of Selective Service

Boards in this and other states.

Commodity groups were used in lieu of neighborhood groups for

rap'id

dissemination of information.

The Farm

Labor program was based on close cooperation with War Food

Administration,

Office of

Labor, Army officials in charge of prisoners-of-war, irrigation districts and farmer organizations set up to handle agricultural labor.

(2)

Project Activities and

Results

In order to better acquaint the staff with all phases of

.the

work being conducted, general staff meetings of both Home Demonstration

Agents and County

Agents were held on the first

Monday in each month.

Weekly meetings were held qy the

County ,Agent,

Assistant

Agents and the

Farm Labor Assistant.

This permits better understanding of all

:types of work and also duplication of effort.

Wherever

possible

Home

Demonstra­ tion and

County Agent work have been combined to carr,y out projects.

Specialists in all fields have been utilized in the planning tion of

projects.

The and execu­ help of these workers-has been ver.r

beneficial.

During the year the

Agent has devoted his time largely to ad­ ministrative duties, farm labor, and in cooperation with other agencies.

Assistant

Agent

Hobart bas been responsible for projects dealing with general field crops, such as irrigation, crops, crop ,acreage surve.ys and cotton classing, pure seed, new soil conservation districts.

In coop­ eration with Mr.

Karl

Harris,

Bureau of Plant

Industry, he prepared and published a mimeograph circular, 1tFitting Crop Acreages

This circular bas been in great demand b,y irrigation to Water districts

Supply".

using pump water ot mainly.

The Pure Seed program his time.

Assistant Agent

Powers has has been required a maj or portion assigned projects deal­ ing with horticultural and vegetable crops, landscaping disease and insect pest control, p�ing and budding and grafting such as of citrus

Victor,y gardens, commercial and vegetable deciduous trees.

culture

His work with the Victory garden program was outstanding in establishing

in dio cooperation with radio station I.C.Y.

a model taik directly from the garden.

each

Satprday

garden.

and afternoon.

making

In a ra­ this talk questions asked qy listeners during the week were answered as well as problems

arising

at the time in the garden.

This program required much

01' his time but was well received by" home gardeners in not only tbis but nearb,y counties.

His revision of the mimeograph garden circular and the circular on date culture in cooperation with

Mr.

Robert

Hilgeman,.

former­ ly with the

Department of Horticulture at the

University of

Arizona, bas been verr helpful.

This latter circular is now in the bands of the printer.

Assistant

Agent

Brown bas been responsibl·e for all

4-H

Club work and although working under' handicaps bas increased total

-membership in clubs.

The 4-H Fair held in

Tempe tmder bis supervision in coopera­ tion with the Arizona State Teachers' College was well conducted and retlect·ed his sistant tlwrougbness in the

VanSant, qualityand number of exbibi ts.

As­ although serving in a dual eapaed,ty as

Assistant

Agent and

Acting

Spe.cialist

in,

Poultry and

DailYing, bas devoted bis time largely to projects dealing with livestock and poultry.

TbrQugh his ef­ forts there has been an increase in.

the number of dairy herds put on test,.

Bis work with the several breed associations bas been veey productive with bett-er breeding ,stoc.k

being made available to individu­ als who wished to build u.p

herds.

Specialist' Roney has been available a major portion of his time to assist in all.

problems of insect and disease control.

Bis efforts have been very helpful to all the star-r.

The clerical work or the ottice has been in charge of Mrs.

Josephine Henness as

Ottice Secretar,y.

After a turn-over of help she' at the time ot this report is assisted by

Mrs.

Violet Salmon,

Miss Louise

_

Pendergast, nss

Mary

Helen Weickart and Mrs.

Daisy M.

Baxter,

Stenographer-clerks who take care of correspondence, records, filin,g and

.

expense accounts.

B.

The Farm

Labor

Watkins, Farm Labor program

Assistant, has been largely conducted by Mr.

Clyde

Messrs. Vincent

Es·che and Sam

Swift,

Assistants and Mrs.

Helen Anderson, Stenographer-clerk, in the Phoenix ottice and Mrs.

Jlary Neilson, Steno·grapher-clerk, ottice.

1Ir.

Watkins bas been very successful in of lrmf officers and those in charge of all other in charge ot the Mesa getting the.

cooperation agencies dealing with agricultural labor.

The maintenance of the building has been the responsibility of

Ir.

William of the

Drorbaugh,

Janitor, who bas also served as grasshopper foreman in charge poison mixing station operated from April through

October.

SOILS

Project

11

-

Aliali

Reclamation

One result demonstration has been planned on the land of

A. T.

Jones west ot between two

Bucke.ye.

drainage

This land canals in a comprising

160 acres is located badly waterlogged district.

Soil tests

-

7-

taken in mid-summer showed the wa.ter

table between t1 ve

.and

six feet from the surtace.

Soil samples taken ran from

16,000

to .30,000 parts per mil­ lion total salts.

it is

Brush was cl.eared from twenty acres in late summer and planned to use this plot as a demonstration.

Plots will be treated with water sulfur, gypsum, banlTard manure and bermuda sod respectively before is appli,ed.

After two acre feet have been used

.samples

0'£ soil will be taken for analysis.

Application of materials mentioned above' will be made when flood water is available

Due to lack of labor and heavy. equipment there has been little development of such lands during the y-ear.

Project

II?

-

Fertilization Practice,

Increased use, of eommerci.al

fertilizers, mainly nitrogen, on small to grains and sorghums was very pronounced this year.

This is be due to the incre�se in the thought price of grain to the grower.

A small inerease in yield only is necessar,r to offset the cost of' fertilizer.

One result demonstration on the use of alfalfa was ldd out at the Stat,e liquid phosphate on

Hospital

Farm in cooperation

.,d.th

the

Capital

Fuel

&: Feed Company of

Phoenix and

Ian .A.

Briggs of' the

Agronomy

Department or the'

University of' Arizona.

This demonstration proved of little value as the borders between fertilized failed to hold the water containing plots and check plots the fertilizer on specific lands.

However, Mr.

Fentress,

Superintendant in charge of' the farm, stated in late November that one land bad shown a noti:ceable increase in alfalfa.

Due to conditions m.entioned

above no actual test is weights were taken.

hoped to conduct this same test under proper conditions during the

It coming year.

Citrus growers fertilizer to groves have applied a tremendous amount of nitrogen

during

the fall, winter and spring months.

Because of such interest in fertilization practices a series of meetings was planned at which

Drs.

Finch, Jones, 'Bitters

Agricultural

Experiment

Station together and Streets of the Arizona with Dr.

Roney,

Extension

Specialist in Entomology, would cover disease and insect control.

These all phases of citrus fertilization, meetings were held during Januar,y in

Roosevelt, Mesa and

Madison Districts.

A later meeting in March was held in Chandler

Heights.

After each meeting groves visited the next day and conditions observed and present.

A total of

138 persons attended the in the vicinity explained to were those meetings and expressed keen interest in all subjects.

During

October several calls were received from at growers wanting to know if an that time would increase the application of fertilizer, nitrogen, size of the fruit in their groves.

This practice was oranges were results, on navel it discouraged in aqr, oranges

'question.

were or in all cases except obtained.

Growers were where lemons

�d

This will be followed to ascerta1n grapefruit for fear of dela,ying maturity

Valencia what advised not to use and nitrogen causing puffiness.

-

8

-

Later in the summer a.

offiee at which Drs. Fin,ch and meeting was held in the County Agent's

Jones explained to eighteen citrue grow,ers and packing plant

�gers the system of analyzing citrus leaves a.t in­ tervals during the year to determine whether or not fertilizer was necessary.

This meeting was called to determine if growers wished to establi,sh a laboratory for analyzing

Leaves at actual cost to growers.

It was decided not to establish such a matter had proven laboratory until r.esearch

on this conclusively that such procedure wa,s practical.

At a later date it was agreed that field men of the Arizona Citrus Growers

As­ sociation would collect leaves from a throughout the representative number of groves valley at intervals of, about one month for a twelve months period.

These samples will be analyzed by Mr.

Draper,

Agricultural

Chemist, at no oost to the growers, providing the number of groves selected is Dot in excess of this check mq twenty-five.

At the end of another season show whether or not the plan is practical.

During the year

1.34

individuals were given assistance in work­ ing out a fertilization program for the year.

Of tbis number 97 were growers ot citrus and .35

vegetable

growers

The remainders were growers of deciduous fruits, grapes, dates, pecans, berries, grain, grain sorghums, alfalfa and ornamental plants.

Project

It5

-

Irrigation

Practice

In cooperation with Mr.

E.

S.

Turvil1e, Specialist in 'Soils, plans were dram up to e·stablish a eooperative project with the Water

Users

A.ssociation

and the

Agricultural Experiment

Station on the use of pump as compared with gravity water over a long period of time.

This plan bas, however, been temporarily set aside because the land which wa.s

to have been used for the proj,ect is now

·being used as a camp for prisoners-of-war.

The.re is a possibility that even now .a

portion .of

acreage may be available to be increased at a later date.

this

In cooperation with Mr. Karl Harris ot the

Bureau of plant

Industry,

Assistant Hobart prepared and published in mimeograph form a circular

.Fitting

Crop Acreages to

Water

Supp1�.

This circular is especiall,. helpful to farmers and irrigation districts only but is also valuable to irrigation.

projects using pump water where water supply must be limited in seasonal use.

At the

Service, Mr.

D. L.

Hitch,

Specialist in Irrigation,

Hobart, measured the flow of each case a all well report owners request was will of given repre,sentatives thirteen to the eventually of the

Soil Conservation assisted by

Assistant, wells in the Queen Creek area.

owner of the well.

It is establish a permanent

In hoped that weir at these wells in order that measurements may be taken at more frequent intervals.

.

to work out a better method ot soil composed pointed of to

Specialist

Turville

Extension Service work on this has and problem.

been

One especially analysis.

A

Experiment field trip

hel�ful

spec�al was in soil

attem�ting

Station workers bas been ap­ made in cOmm1ttee this coun-cy

-

9

-

b.r

the committee to observe soil problems and attempt to arrive at the answer by using present m'ethods of soil sampling and an�lysis.

It has been clearly shown that the old method of sampldng soil by' the old method and baving an analysis made of the same is of little help in the practical solution 'of the problem.

It is thought that in sampling and analyzing soils the following should, be followed:

1.

That soil fast measure.

This samples should be taken by zones rather than by method brings to the attention of the sampler the tight imp'ervious layers of soil whioh require special treatment.

2.

That as much of the crop history of the land as it is pos­ sible to obtain should be taken and made a.

part of the study.

Cultural

meth�ds

being used by the present operator should also be considered.

on

3.

That the soil chemist cannot make practical recommendations correcting soil problems from an analysis alone.

Crop histor.y

and cuItural methods must be known and considered.

and

4.

That close the field worker is cooperation between the laboratory technician necessary for the praotical solution of soil problems.

more year.

During the year much work bas been done on this problem and much needs to be done.

This program will continue throughout the next in demand

The new by irrigation bulletin farmers and others in the by Specialist

Turville has been county.

much

During the year 39 citrus growers were given assistance in cor­ recting irrigation problems.

Twenty-two other growers of miscellaneous crops were also given assistance.

It has been observed that faulty, ir­ rigation practice is the major cause of crop failure in most tree crops.

cotton

The importance of irrigation on production meetings held in cotton was emphasized at three

Buckeye,

Peoria and Gilbert in

May.

Mr.

Karl Harris of the

Bureau of Plant valuable assistance

Industry has given throughout the year on irrigation problems.

CROPS

Project

16

-

Pure

Seed used crops to

This project under the supervision supply to growers of this of Assistant Hobart has been county an ample supply adapted to this area.

This year in cooperation of pure with the seed of

Crop

Improvement

Association a number of been grown and certified which were crops, especially grain sorghums, not recommended for have planting here but tor planting in other states.

This has greatly increased the volume ot work to be done on this project.

This acreage is shown on

Table

No.

1

I

-

10

-

f-I a

Sll

CLASS OF SEED ALFALFA

Registered

TOTAL

Certified

,--

TOTAL

I

I

I

Chilean

2321

1

I

I

I

I

I

, 232

Chilean

1869A

1869

SDLL GBAIN

COTTOI

I

I

SORGHUM

I

I

I

,

I

I

I

1

I

I

Arivat Barley

19.31

Vaughn Barley

.383A

Calif.Red Oats

73J.

,Markton

Oats lU

Baart .38

Wheat

25A

685A

Arivat

50A

Barley

Vaugbn Barley

787A

Calif. Red Oats

255A

Baart 38

Wheat lOU.

I

I

I

1193

San Tan

Acala

40U

DD

38 Milo

3SA

Hegari

76£

401

Calit.J.cala

San l242A

Tan

Acala

751.

1317

114-

DD 38 Milo

1950A

Hegari

6720A

Bonita

1651.

Early

951

Hegari

Imperial Kafir

29.

Martin Combine

1029A

Plainsman

730.6.

_1Jh_

7l_8�

___ �_

on page lOa of this report.

gram which

The Crop Improvement Association has this year developed a pro­ requires a bonded agent in each seed cleaning plant.

It is the dut,y ot this carried out.

agent to see that all regulations of the Association are

The bond is supplementary to a written agreement by the firm in handling pure seed.

At a meeting of the directors held in Phoenix

January rules and regulations were revised in order to more closely conform to those of the International Crop Improvement Association.

O.P.A.

and A.A.A.

sulted in most seed polieies in regard to alfalfa seed have re­ being recleaned before planting.

This was due to a better price being allowed the grower for recleaned seed.

ers

This year there have been several attempts by growers and alike to use the services of the Extension Service in deal­ the amount or seed to be sold as certified or sueha registered.

It policy, if approved or entered into by the

Extension

Service, would grower result in a break-down of the entire proj ect.

This is a dealer­ problem and

�he

Extension Service should not be expected to take aqy aetive part in such a program.

Project

#7

-

Better Alfalfa �y ect

Due to scarcity ot labor on farms no work was done on this proj­ during the year.

ProJ e,ct

IS

-

Weed Eradication

During the year seven eradicating noxious weeds.

individuals were

A Mack given assistance in

Anti-weed Gun bas been made available to $11 growers wisbing to use carbon bisulfide to control wild morning­ glor,r or white horse-nettle.

HORTICULTURE

Project

m'i�

Prtming

A total of eight method demonstrations on fruit and ornamental trees was tendance of 108 persons.

the home orchard was shown one individuals were given by held

Greater instructions pruning b.1

Assistant Powers interest in those attending in prunfng and than in proper of deciduous with an at­ general care prtming of trees and of past years.

Sixty­ shrubs, mostly commercial citrus groves and home orchards.

several slides to illustrate the an

Assistant Powers steps in attendance of pruning has made a different

47.

Another series of colored types points was given of trees.

One talk to the

Kyrene illustrated talk was given slides showing using

Farm Bureau on

Arbor the these with

D� to the

500 pupils of

Emerson school.

This talk was on the planting and

-

11

-

l pruning or trees and shrubs.

Project

#13

-Peean

Propagation

Interest in pecan budding was lacking this y.ear

as shown by a total of only 36 persons at.tiending

seven method demonstrations held by As­ sistant Powers.

During the year

13 individuals were given assistan·ce with

grafting

seedling pecans to standard varieties and

18 assisted with bud­ ding.

Project

1I}.4

-

Date

Propagation

This is

A keen interest bas been shown this thought to be brought about year in. date propagation.

by the scared ty" of sugar and by the high price o!

processed dates as well.

Individual home owners having one or more palms have asked assistance in proper methods ot offshoot removal, pollination and general care of palms �uring the bearing season.

Forty individuals were

Jo.

given assistance on these matters.

Extension' Circular

W-.37, -Home

Ouring of

Dates", bas been greatly in demand.

Due to increas'ed interest in date culture

EXtension

Bulletin

Ro.

149, -Date Growing � Arizona·, out of print for some time, was re­ vised by

Assistant Powers.

This circular is now in the hands of the printer and should be available for distribution at the beginning of the date season next year.

Project

/114.1

-

Citrus

Nursery

Practice

There has been an increased demand for citrus trees this year and several new plantings have been made.

No work was done on this proj­ ect since all citrus nurser,ymen now propagating trees are experienced operators and needed no help.

However, there was considerable interest in

topworking

sour orange trees, planted as ornamentals, over to standard varieties.

Six demonstrations of topworking and budding were given by As­ sistant Powers with an attendance of

199 interested persons.

DAIRI

Project

I2g

-

DairY

Herd

Improvement

the was

The dalr.r

herd

Maricopa Count,y .Dair,y improvement

Herd work for the state was handled through

Improvement

Association.

The annual meeting held Decemb�r 15, 1943.

Mr.

A.

term.

The board

D.

Cheatham was elected as a director for a five year

consists

of the following dair,ymen

-

12

-

Roy

Marshall

Clyde Hussey

Geo.

C.,

A,.

Blendinger

L.

Phillips

D.

Cheatham

President

Vice President

Sec.-Treasurer

Member

Member

T'em

Ending:

1944

1945

1947

1946

1948

Mr.

Frank Mar�in was hired as the fourth tester doing

D.H.I.A.

testing in

Maricopa,

Pinal and Pima Counties.

Pinal County was set up as a separate association.

This county had been included with

Maricopa

County association work for several years.

Mr. Martin resigned effective

October 1, 1944 and Mr.

Albert stassen was hired to take over his, terri torr be,ginning in November

1944.

with

The

Maricopa County association had

65 herds with 2,328 cows complete lactation records tor the year.

This is an increase of 5 herds and

Pinal

85 cows over the previous year or

10 herds and

249 cows when

County is included as it was last year.

Average production i,s

7,977 pounds of milk and

313.3

lbs.

of butter-fat per cow.

This is a decrease ,ot

33l'lbs.

of milk and

11.6

lbs.

of butter-fat per cow from the previous

7ear.

DairylBen experienced a most ,diffieult year f9r obtaining bigh production due to a shortag'e and bigh cost of feed at the the year and considerable difficulty in keeping and beginning securing of effici.ent

labor.

Feed conditions have improved and dairymen are in much better position for production the

'coming year than they were a year ago.

The

Shipley Trop� awarded each year to the owner of the herd in

Maricopa

County association showing the highest per cent of increase in butter-fat went to Mr. A. B.

Hellman, who,se herd of

22 grade

Hol'steins produced an average of 9,491 lbs. of milk'and 355.2

Ibs.

of butter-tat per cow for an increase of

24,.23%.

The results of the

Ton-af-Fat Club fo,r the year are as follows:

Is!.

Mission Ranch

U. S. Indian School

Total:

No.

Cows

2000 lbs.

19

0

19 fa;t

No.

Cows

�OOO

11

0

No.

lbs.

fat over

Cows

1z.000

0

1 lbs.

fa:t �

.30

1

11 1

.31

Project

#22a

-

Dairr

Herd Management labor

The dair,ymen have been ver,y interested in requirements to obtain high production labor.

A greater percentage of dair,ymen due to have been feeding bigh feeding methods and cost of feed the�r cows and use did based on ot labor.

not teed production requirements any

Only

2 dairymen of grain to their cows to the get

65 completing the

D.H.LA. year during production at a minl.DlUDl

cost the year.

ot the D.H.I.A.

showed a decrease in milk and fat.

grain.to

This decrease is

�d

Production records

-

13

-

attributed to a and the shortage and high cost of feed at the beginning of the year ditficul tyin securing and keeping e;f'ficient labor.

P.r ices for dairy cows prices ot have been some lower than good cows are still at

$175

they' were last year, howe:ver, the to

$200 per head but not much de­ mand.

Recommendations and information material have been furnished for dairy barn;s, milk houses, bull pens

, breeding shutes and other dairy equipment.

\ were cases

Irrigated permanent pastures mainly in the interest of tested out this year.,

Tours were conducted in

January and dairymen again in lay to observe progress.

In g-eneral two mistakes were made in pastures.

Not enough water was used and overgrazing was handling practiced.

A few seeured vert' good results.

Some difficulty was had in establishing

Dallis grass

� planting in October.

Last summer one grower planted

Dal­ lis in rows in and

August and at the present time the grass is well the remainder of the mixture is being seeded this fall.

developed

In September Dr. Hawkins and Mr.

Stanley were, taken to representative pastures in this

'COlmty to give them some background for their work on.

Mesa farm comparing alfalfa, small grain and sudan, and the so-called permanent pastures�

In

VanSant for

February six meetings over the county arranged by Ralph dair,ymen were participated in from the feed production angle.

Project #23

-

Disease Control tle.

One demonstration was given on

Ox Warble control in dairy cat­

Management, feeding and sanitation have been stressed to control diseases in livestock.

Where the problem of disease treatment occurred, the servioes ot a veterinarian were recommended.

Eight dairymen have been advised to use the Animal

Disease Laboratory to determine the amount and kind of Mastitis infection in their herds and treat ring accordingly.

The calfhood vaccination' started in

Januar.r, program

,is progreasdng very well.

A new program was

1944,

and should benefit all dairymen.

A proposed livestock sales law will be presented to the next Legislature.

Project

1124

-

Better and Proven

Sires

There were

5 sires in the 1944

Sire List proved in Maricopa in

1943.

Sire selection, stressed.

Ten especially pure-bred or proven sires, have been dair,ymen were directed to breeders to purchase bulls.

In­ directly

� dair,ymen were assisted in securing pure-bred bulls through news letters, personal contacts and other sources.

LIVESTOCK

Project #19

-

Feeding

Beef Cattle

The

Central Arizona

Associations maintain offices

Cattle Feeders and the Arizona

Cattle Growers in

Phoenix.

The Assistant

County Agent has

-

14

-

cooperated and wo·rked with these organizations�

Very little pen feeding was carried on during \;he 1943�44 feeding year.

However, more cattle we,re pasture fed than aqy time in histor,y.

be more cattle fed in feed lots this

There is evidence that there coming season.

will

Proj ect

#20

-

Sheen

Feeding

Assistance has been given to'individual farmers in securing breeding animals to establish and maintain small farm flocks.

Also, feed­ ing, equipment and management programs were given.

Lamb and wool prices bave averaged above normal.

Swine

Production cost

The swine population took a ot teed and

O.P.A.

ceilings ve� which made sudden decrease production due to not too high profitable.

With feed more year may see an plentiful and feed prices lower:.at

this time, the coming increase in swine population.

Assistance and information on management was given when requested.

POULTRY

Project

128

-

Caponizing

Very little interest has been shown in the production of capons except as an individual program for personal usage.

Three demonstrations were given on the method of caponizing.

Project #30

-

Poultey Improvement

Arizona

The

Maricopa County Agent's

Poultry

Improvement

Association with the charge for the 1943-44 season:

Office is the headquarters for the following officers in v. A.

I.

M.

Walter

Vogel, President

Campbell,

Vice-President

Cochran, Secretar,y-Treasurer

G.

Hawes,

Director

F.

Rieke,

Director

N.

E.

Bradley,

Director

O.

R.

Baines,

Director

Poultr,y

The specialist is the

Contact

Representative for the

Improvement

Plan sponsored by the Bureau of

Livestock

National

Industr,y,

Washington,

D.

C.

in the

'In

Maricopa County

National Plan

6 hatcheries signed contracts to participate by membership in the Arizona

Poultry

Improvement As­ sociation, the official state agenc.y.

ing agents were authorized to work for the

L.

L.

Lipp was hired as the official

Thirteen flock inspector selecting association as and test­ fieldmen.

Mr.

for the year.

-

15

-

Summary of the work is as follows cluding flocks not

accepted):

(final

tests only and in­

No

•.

Flocks

134

Handled

.4].,364

Culled

3,597

Tested

37,767

Reacted

393

%

Reactors

1.04

Retained

37,374 programs,

Indivi,dual poultrymen were assisted in working out breeding securing ;quality chicks and culling for production.

Many letins were mailed to poultr.ymen

upon request.

bul­

'Project

1l30a

�,Pou1try

Disease and Parasite Control year.

The,calls for assistapce on poultr,y disease decreased this

There was a considerable amount of chicken po� this year and some blue bugs, and

'digestive troubles due to lack of sanitation.

The problems in disease and parasite control were given individual atten­ tion and assistance through meetings, news letters, news articles, bulletin distribution.

Programs for control were stressed along and with treatment when needed.

MISCELLANEOUS

Project

#15

-

Insect Pest Contro).

Maj or inse�ct pests observed this year were grasshoppers on general crops and especiallyin alfalfa being grown for seed; cotton bugs on both long and short-staple cotton; aphids on cruciferous crops and melons late in the season; psy1lids on potatoes and tomatoes, and tomato mites on tomatoes.

for seed.

Grasshoppers were especially troublesome in alfalfa

Due to the heavy plant growth poison bait

beirlg

produced only grown partial control.

However, where growers made several applications the grasshopper populations were reduced to such numbers that no serious damage was done.

The tomato mite was found t.o be severely damaging

plantings

of tomatoes after warm weather began.

I� observed before serious damage has been done to the vines, effective control can be bad by dusting with sulfur at the rate of ,30 pounds per acre.

of mites 18 easily recognized

The presence by the appearance of the plant whereas the mites themselves are so small as to escape notice even though a good hand lens may be used.

Commercial growers will be advised to begin dusting about the time bloom begins and continue throughout the season at ten-day to two-week intervals.

Other lnsects observed in the field were apbids on citrus, alfalfa, grain, tomato, squash on citrus, onions and ornamentalfl·; scale on orn�entals; and pecans;

Putnam cutworms on scale on vegetables; thrips peaches and twelve-spotted cucumber beetle on melons; black ticks on dogs; cockroaches and termites mangelsj dtied fruit beetles in in dwellings; leaf-hoppers onions; caterpillars on, on grapes and alfalfa; loopers on lettuce and cabbage; flea-beetles on corn and maize and corn earworm

-

16

-

in corn.

The control of cotton insects was discussed at three

me'etings

held at Buckeye, Peoria and

Gilbert by

Dr. J. N.

Roney, production

Extension

Entomologist, who bas been veryhelpful on insect control problems.

This same

Count1� Ag_ent'

s

Office subject was also discussed at a meeting in the by

Dr.

Roney at which cotton varieties were dis-

I cussed by Dr.

Matlock, Extension

Agronomist,.

Cotton ginners and insecticide dealers were

prese��.

at this meeting.

This year e1 trus growers were.

much interested in the control of thrips

through

the use of a spray of tartar emetic, sugar and water.

After a conference witb local rationing board officials it was decided that sugar for this purpose would be issued only on certificate from the

Count,. Agent.

Fourteen such certificates' totalling 19,380 pounds were issued to growers and custom operators.

before

In the control of citrus thrips it was observed that blossoming was much less effective than spraying

spray

applied when about two-thirds of the blo.ssoms

bad fallen.

Assistant Agent

Powers spent, two days accompanying

Dr.

Boyce of the Riverside Citrus

Experiment.

Station and Mr.

Wog1uJD of t,he

California

Fruit Growers

Excba,nge on a field, survey of eitrus groves extending over two days.

At a later date Powers co­ operated with Dr.

Persing of the Riverside Citrus

Experiment

Station in collecting thrips from three groves in the valley to test for resistance to tartar emetic.

Final repo'rts were

100% kill in two groves and

96% in the other.

This indicates that tbrip's in this area bave not yet.

developed a resistance to the poison.

A total of

141 growers of various crops, principally commer­ cial vegetables and fruit crops, were assisted with insect control problems.

Talks were given to twelve garden clubs by' the

Agent and As­ sistants with at these special emphasis on in.sect

control.

The total attendance meet,ings was

346.

I

The new

Extension Circular No.

122,

"Control of Garden

Pests", has been<;well recej_ ved by home gardeners and fills a

/ long-felt need.

�he grasshOpper poison mixing station in operation from April through November distributed

10,.267

sacks of wet poison mash to

556 farmers for use on general crops.

The new type mixing machine developed and loaned by the Bureau of Entomology and

Plant

Quarantine, Grasshopper

Control

Division, aided materially in this program.

The formula

used

was one-third millrun bran, two-thirds sawdust with, one-half gallon liquid sodium a.rsenite

per hundred pounds of the dry mix.

Water from eight to ten gallons per one hundred pounds dr.y weight was used, depend­ ing upon the dryness or the material.

After the sodium arsenite supply was exhausted sodium fluosilicate was used as the poison.

This latter seemed to give as good results as the former and had the being much less dangerous to livestock.

advantage of

One meeting of the Grasshopper

Control Committee was held at

-

17

-

which the 'work and the agreement between the Arizona Commission of

Agricul t.ure

Bureau of Entomology was approved and signed.

Pr,oj e·ct

66

-

.

Rodent 'Oontrol

,

Poison supplied b,y the Fish and Wildlife Service bas been available to all farmers through a cooperative agreement with the

Maricopa

Farm Bureau.

Eleven individuals were given assistance in gopher control in 'citrus groves.

Pro�

ect

1/23

-

Disease Control.

(Plant)

A great deal of time has been spent by staft members in cooper­ ation with other agencf.es

on this project..

Diseases causing most damage were.

wilt on tomatoes and melons, root rot on deciduous fruit and shade trees, alfalfa and cotton, gumosis on citrus and nematodes on vegetable crops.

Other diseases observed in the field were chlorosis on decidu­ ousfruits and citrus; blight on cele:ey; sclerotinia on cauliflower, mil­ dew on alfalfa, melons, grapes and ornamentals; wind injur,y to citrus; rhizoctonia, on potato; fusarium.

wilt on potato and squash; vertieillium wilt on apricots and boysenberries; spindle tuber on potato; mosaic on pepper and squa.sh; ba'cterial rosette on peeans; brown rot on peach; a new' disease of apricots caused which certain plants in the b,y yeast cells, field turned and yellow a condition in brocolli in and made little growth.

In cooperation with R. A. Flock of the State Entomologist's Of­ fice, Assistant

Agent

Powers conducted a result demonstration on the control of' nematodes in a garden plot by the use of chloropicrin.

Due to cold weather were not as immediately after the application to the soil the results good as expected.

However, the owner reported that he had the best crop of t6matoes and squash he has bad for years.

Assistant Powers also began a result demonstration on the control ot lime-induced chlorosis on citrus at the Dean

Tbey'er grove east or

Mesa.

Plant

Following suggestions of Dr. R.

B. Streets of the Department of

Pathology at the Universit,y of Arizona trees were treated as fol­ loW's:

1.

Two trees

--

2.

Two

30

Ibs.

iron trees

-

20

11 a

.3.

One tree

-

35 lbs.

sulfur

4.

TW'o trees

-

25

" "

5.

One tree -15

11 • sulfate, 25

Ibs.

manure per tree

II

It

,

25

" "

If

,

25

'f tJ "

"

,

,

25

25

" n n u n n

11 n

The material was applied in four holes 18 inches deep equidistant around the tree.

Al though this and plot was started in

May there is no noticeable change in the trees at this time.

The mottle-leaf control plots started last year on the

August

as

-

Grunow and of the

L. T.

Rogers groves in cooperation with W. T.

McGeorge,

Head

Agricultural Chemistry

�epartment at the

University of

Arizona, have -shown little, if ant, improvement.

In cooperation with H. V.

Smith,

Agricultural

Chemist of the

University of

Ari-zona, control plots on another type of mottle-lea!

were

started on the Eva Lawrence and August Grunow groves.

This type of leaf' mottle, according to

McGeorge, is caused by an exceSs of boron in irrigation water.

A row of trees in each grove was treated with a sprq of

4 pounds of lime to 100 gallons of water.

Analysis of leaves from treated trees shows little increase in calcium content, and the condition ot the trees appears to be unchanged,

A result demonstration on the control of chlorosis on roses was started this year on the rose variet,y plot at the Mesa

Experimental

Farm.

Varying amounts of sulfur were added in hopes that tbe pH of the

-soil would be -lowered.

Soil samples taken at intervals show no lower­ ing of the pH

.

All of the

Agent

Powers.

above described plots were conducted by

Assistant

Specimens ot apricot trees and

Department of Plant boysenberr.y

plants -sent to the

Pathology

at the Uni versi ty of Arizona revealed the presence of verticillium wilt.

According to Dr. J.

G.

Brown,

Patholo­ gist, this is the first time this disease bas been reported on these orops in

Maricopa County.

This disease may be the contributing factor in the short life of most boysenberry plants in this area.

A total of 238 growers of various crops were given assistance in controlling plant disease.

Two citrus growers arching citrus trees girdled-b,y gumosis.

were assisted in in­

Project

126

-

Economic Surv§!

and

The annual crop surve.y

made available in mimeograph report form.

was compiled by

Assistant Hobart

The annual hay shed surve,r conducted b,y

Assistant Hobart and

Specialist Baker showed very little � stand in

December.

This was reported to be because O.P.A.

prices did not encourage bq.

In

April a further check showed no hay the storage of left in sheds where some was stored in December.

A general survey on the number of man and required for various crops in the eountr,y was begun, ever time was available in

Februar,y and March.

machinery and houra conducted when­

Fairly accurate cheeks on grain showed a total of 20 to 21 man hours required as against

35 to

40 man hours for alfalfa.

This survey will be continued as time is aVailable.

-

19

-

A. survey conducted by Specialist Hitch and the

Agent on t he grain sorghum situation showed an acreage of approximately 50.,00.0.

a.cres

with an average about production of one ton per acre.

o.pinions

were that

10.,00.0.

acres would be used for ensilage thus leaving fO,o.o.o.

tons of threshed grain to be disposed of by farmers.

Little if any adequate farm storage was found available and a check of commercial storage showed this to be full of barley.: Mill operators were contacted and an estimate of an annual usage of

20.,0.0.0.

tons of grain sorghum could be used it storage was available.

This left

20.,0.00.

tons to be sbipped out of the state at prevailing market prices unless stored on the farm.

An

.

article s,etting out these facts together with advice to farmers to store graIn on the farm or in empty store buildings in rural areas in order to' obtain the loan made available by Commodity

Credit

C'orporation.

The value of this survey is shown by the stabiliZation of the local price offered tained.

by dealers to that equal to the loan which might be ob­

4-H CLUB WORK

Project

1162

-

SOXe'

and Girls' Club Work

Organization

....

supervision or Assistant

4-H

Club work is carried on under the general

County Agent Paul Brown.

Rural boys and gi.rls

between the agee of 10. and 21 in the' several cOlllllmDities are organized into clubs wi t.h 'their own officers

..

and own local program under the guidance of the local man or woman leader.

Each member does a piece of work under the supe"ision of the

County Extension worker that will demonstrate or teach the bett,er way in agriculture or homemaking.

Each member keeps a record of costs, labor and results; ex� plains the wo.rk to others; makes an exhibit and writes a final report.

Through the various 4-H

Club activities involved, an effort is made to develop leadership, ideals, attitudes and skills which will fit boys and girls for their work of future years.

,

I

.

rolled in

Statistic'S and

Scope

,of

Club Work

-

There wer� 656 youths enagricultural 4-H

Clubs this year.

or this number,

548.

were boys and 10.8

were girls.

There were

523 boys and

80.

girls who completed their club work, making a total of

6,03 comple'tions for both boys and girls.

This represented a

94.3% completion of the work by club members

•.

4-H

Club members expanded their projects to bring about greater production in .connection

with the "Food

Fights for Freedom"

Program.

In keeping with their slogan to -Feed a

Fighter or

More in

1944-, club members often conducted several different.

projects.

The 4-H agricultural the 80 projects completed b,y the 523 boys amounted to

610,

and for girls, there was a total of 93 agricultural projects completed.

This makes a.

grand total of 703 by' both boys and girls

•.

agricultural projects that were completed

-

20

-

7

Point

Maricopa County 4-H Club members participated in the National

Vietol"1. Program.

All 4

....

H Clubs, cooperatied

fUlly

in conneotion with such programs as the

2.

tolloring: 1., Fire and Accident

Scrap CollectioQ., 3.

War Bond

SaleS,

4., Emergency Farm

'Prevention,

La.bor,

and

5.

'ood

Fights tor Freedom.

'Club work Was carried on in .31

schools and

29 communiti.e.s

throughout the county.

There were

40 local

4:"'H

leaders who assisted with'the work

Board helped ill the schools and communi ties.

An plan the eight-member fair

CoUnty

4-H Fair.

The

Collegiate

Leaders

4-H

Club of 19 members provided department superintendents�for .the

.Fair.

The club pro,gram was conc;iucted in 49 standard and

,86 non-standard

Clubs.

A non-standard

4-H

Club is' one having several different

4-H interests as to projects'.

It is a mixed agricultural 4-H

Club.

Program and Activiti.es

-

The

4-H

Club program ,included the following activitie's':

Regular me,etings of the

4-H

Clubs conducted by their own officers.ana.

members; the

.study

and discussion of the best methods and management for agricultural enterprises; demonstrati,ons and judging-team.

work; project work; educational tours; contests; achieve­ ment programs; leader training;: f,airs and exhibits; picnics;

f:1.e14

day programs and the 4-H

Victory

Prograa,

During the year

.38

aehi.evemenf

programs,

were held with a·,· total attendance of

10,160

persons.

This figure included the

County

4-H

Fair vdth an attendance of .3,000.' Regular club meetings held throughout the county numbered

1,079.

Special club meetings at which.

visual aids,- pic'tures and slides were used numbered .38, with a total attendance for these club meetings

·of

2,082.

There were

7 radio pro­ grams were· conducted by boys and girls from 8 different clubs.

9 tours eonduc,ted with 245 persons in attendance,

Two picnic programs' were held for club members and parents with an attendance of 115 persons.

2 field days were held, with 12 clubs at which there were

231 members in attendanc'e.

Maricopa County had

14 winners

'in the state

4-H Club

National won contests, and, four club members were awarded trips

4-H

Club to the

Congress in Chicago.

Two of the state winners also in sectional contests.

Special

4-H

Club Work

-

The training of boys and girls through

4-H

Club work included the use of visual educational aids, such as films, slides and pictures.

These educational devices were very: helpful in training demonstration teams and for the preparation of project mater�al for ,exhibition at achievement programs and fairs.

Visual aids were also used to familiarize members with market classes and ideal contests types.

Pictures of 4-H gave members a better

ev�nts

such as fairs, c amps and knowledge of the club program and stimulated their interest in the aims and ideals of the organization.

Illustrations depicting project activities of outstanding helped to stimu late and maintain interest and to raise club members, standards of work.

-

21

-

Varied lines or act1vi ty helped to pr<?mo,te the all-round

deTelopmen1;

of rural boys and girls such as health building, recreation, music

appre�iation,

tours and hikes, picnics and club festivals.

These activities moUvat,ed the club program and they were also considered as

soci,alizing

fa.ctors

iri community development.

General.

Activities

L,ead;ership

Trainins,,-

The training of leaders for·,,4-H Club work included a specia,.l progr_ iQ:r the superintendents of the va.rious, departments'"'of the County

4-H

Fair.

The many details involved in con­ nection with were th�_preparation and conduct of the two-day thorouglily worked out with the department

County

Fair

superintendents

in four dirfe,rent meetings.

'The

Collegiate

4-H Leaders

Club, consisting of:

st�dents

from the

Arizona State Teachers'

College, supplied the per.:..

sonnel for the Fair

departments..

The�e

,students gained valUB.Ible' eXperienee and training from their

Fair activities, which helped them to become better

4-H

Club leaders.'

Training.

for other leaaers was conducted in special meetings

,called for that purpose;

The leaders from two of the largest dis­ tricts,

�£

the county met with' K.

'W.

Ingwalson,

Federal Field

Agent for

4�H

Club work.

Be gave them some ,very' valuable infoI'lllation which

helped

them to become more efficient in

-'club leadership.

at the

A meeting of all the 4-H

Club leaders of the county was held

County 4-H Fair, at which time the

4-H program was discussed.

Problems arising from war conditions were analyzed and methods of proc-edure were suggested.

A schedule fo·r local

4-H

Club achievement

'programs was, worked out by the leaders before they adj ourned.

County held on the a.-II

Fair campus

,-

The

Eight�e�th

Annual of the Arizona state Teachers'

22.

A camp was maintained fo·r

4..;H

Club

Fair was

College, April 21 and

4-H exhibitors and leaders in connection with the Fair.

There were over

2,000 exhibits in the Agricultural end

Home Economics departments at the Fair.

j, great matIJ club meID:bers were

1lIl8.ble

to exhibit their p:pojects because of limitati1)ns' on

-travel and transportation due to war conditions.

There were

,3,000 persons who at� tended the 'Fair

dur�

the

2-day program.

It

The

County 4-H provided a real

Fair was the crowning event of the club year.

opportunity to the different clubs, their members and leaders, to 'show the things that bad been accomplished by them during the club year.

County

Fair exhibits and competitive contests af­ forded members With opporttm1 ties to compare their work and that ot others·, and thus learn how to skill with improve their own work from_one year

Ships to another.

It served as a means for and gave recognition determining county champion­ to club members for work well done.

Awards ot premium ribbons were made and, med.al.s were" presented to top winners in each department.

-

22

-

The

The

2-day

4-B Club Fair program included a variety of events.

schedule tor the first

;� provided ro� the judging of all exhibits and for contests of demonstration teams.

There was also a showmanship contest for halter classes.

The program.

for the second d�y provided,

,activities

and

competiti,!e

contests for both

4-H members and adults.

There were contests 1n livestock

judging,

poultcy judging, vegetable judging, home economics judging, and a dress revue

�ontest.

4-H

Clubs competed tor hon.ors

in' a

'rlcto:cy parade which was judged by' a committee selected b.r

the Farm Bureau.

The main event. 0:£ the dB.)' was enhanced a: farm'ers' and 4-H' era

"Get-together"

-pro'gram which was by a picnic at noon.

Tbi's was followed by group sin:ging and short addresses by prominent persons from the state Extension Service, the State

College and the Farm Bureau.

Awards.

were made to 4--H ,winners which inclUded many special prizes from county merchant,s and

'trQJn the

Farm.

Bureau.

The Fair ended with a

sale,

of

4-H livestock.

the

The responsibility of drawing up the plans 'and decj.ding

upon premitml list for the Fair was given to a

':County

Fair Board ot

4-H

Clu�

..

Leaders,

Farm Bureau official·s and tor the

County

Extension workers.

ludges were p�ovided by the state

Ext·ension Service.

The Collegiate

4-H

Leaders

'Club or'the

State

Teachers' College provided the superintendents different departments of' the Fair.

in this

J. detailed report.

schedule of the

Fair program is included elsewhere

Achievement grams were held for

Programs

-

Thirty-eight

4-H Achievement

Day pro­ agricultural 4-H

Clubs with a total attendance of lO,l60� This figure includes the

C'ounty

4-H

Fair with an attendance of

3,000.

Local

4-H achievement programs were usually held at or near

"the schools with the whole community participating.

The awards were made at honor assemblies which were to largely attended by parents, school patrons and young

'the people.·

]!;xhibits of club, day.

These achievement events members were on di,splay throughout provided

'a means of gi vittg recognition club members and to those who had aided the club program,

They

also informed the community of the progress made in

4-H

Club work.

members foods,

4-H

Contests

-

County and state contests in which

4-H

Club participated were:

Demonstrations in dair,y production, dairy vegetable

production

and handicraft; contests in connection with fire and accident prevention, livestock judging, poultry judging, vegetable judging,

4-H

victory parade,

4-H records, garden contests, Victory Achievement,

Meat health champion,

Animal,

Santa Fe

Award, showmanShip, fair exhibits and champion

4-H

Club.

In the

Phoenix Kiwanis

4-H

Beet

Calt

Club contest which was

Club, the champion 4-H sponsored by' the exhibitor of beef cattle at the

Count,y

4-H

Fair was awarded a steer calt in ment.

Charles Mathis won the Hereford steer recognition of his achieve­ calf and will fatten it and exhibit it at the 1945 County 4-H

Fair.

The presentation ot the calt

-

23

-

was aade during' a dinne,r program given by the Kiwanis ,Club for all

4-H

Beef' Club contestants,.

Pa.rticipation

in the state

4-H contests gave

Maricopa fourteen state winners in the following 4-B contests:

County

Victory Gardens,

&117

Production Demonstrations, for Class

A and

:8, Daiey Foods

Demonstra­ tion, 4-i

Fara

Safety,

Dress Revue olub Ilembers were awarded and the Santa Fe

Trip trips to the

National 4-H

Club

Award.

Four

Congress.

Two lIembers were sectional winners.

There were two contests conducted for

4

....

H special Victor.y

Garden garden club members.

These are explained more tullY' under the topic of

84-H VictolY

Gardens".

The, Holstein-Friesian

Association of

America named Fannie Coman champion

Holstein Calf Club member tor Arizona.

Two club leaders were state winners tor outstanding leadership.

were

Field

Days,

and Tours

...

conducted with

24 c1ubs

Two field days and 9 educational tours participating with an attendance of

476.

The programs included bles.

The crop practice in judging livestock, poultry and vegeta­ and livestock enterprises of successful farmers were inspected and tours to the projects of club members were provided.

Com­ mercial were

dai:ey

plants and other establishments connected with agriculture inspected in connection with the educational tours.

By means of tours ideas.

members were able' to observe each others work and gain helpful

They also benefited f'rom observing the practices of successful farmers.

County program and field

4-H

Club Picnics

-

The second annual 4-H Club picnic day events were held in September.

Two county-wide picnic rallies for 4-H

Club members and their parents were held to provide them with speCial entertainment and educational programs.

first one, was held at Mesa's Rendevous Park for those living on the

The east side ot the county.

The other one was held at Buckeye Park and Swimming

Pool for club membe.rs

in the western part of the count1.

These programs included county.

swimming, games, motion pictures, rol­ ler skating, demonstrations, program tor parents was contests and a conducted which picnic luncheon.

A special provided them with some good entertainment and a chance to get acquainted with their neighbors through­ out the

The state 4-H

Club Leader reviewed the state club program and explained the

4-H contests.

Short lUks were given by" county.

workers which outlined the program of

4-H

Extension participation in the war effort, particularly along lines of food production.

There were

115 persons who attended the two programs.

These events were a partial substitute for the 4-H camp and round-up, could not be held this year because which· of war conditions.

The success of these picnic rallies prompted club members ,and parents to request that tbe,r be repeated.

-

24

-

Phoenix

&-liPublicitl

-

Seven radio programs were presented from by county

4-H

Clubs.

Subj ects covered in these broadcasts in­ cluded presentation of awards,

Cpunty 4-8 Fair, Achievements, and the

4-H

W$X

Bond Drive.

The state club leader assisted at 2 of the broadcasts.

A total of

47 members from 8 different clubs took part in the radio pro­ grams.

articles ot the

Local papers and fam publications were supplied concerning 4-H

Club work throughout the year.

with

Copi-es timely of some leading articles published are included elsewhere with this report.

with

Window exhibits were displqed in local stores in connection

4-H Mobilization Week and other special events.

A

County 4-H

Fair

Book was prepared and circulated previous to the 4-H Fair.

Special editions of the and

-4-H

Booster· were prepared and distributed to members other persons interested in

Club work.

The !l4-H

Booster" �erved to acquaint members with the the are county and it also include"d lV1.th this

"activities provided report.

of the different clubs throughout information of value to members.

Copies and 1.35

#-H Dair[

Program

-

There were

141 dairy club members enrolled completed their work.

The enrollment in daiIl" club work was increased tle.

This ot by 9.2%.

Of this number, approximately

20% had registered cat­

�epresented an increase over last year, of

5%,

in the number registered animals owned by 4-H members.

The lim!

ting factors in con­ nection with the purchase of registered cat tIe were the advance in prices since the war and the emergenc.y conditions prevailing.

communi t;r

"The Scottsdale district was rated as the" of Arizona this year.

fact that each one of their 4-H outstanding 4-H

Club

This distinction was

Dair,y

Club members largely due to the had one or more registered dair" animals in addition to other fine 4-H projects.

A herd sire was purchased and the club will establish some very fine herds.

for and

The

4-H dairy cattle exhibits at the

County

4-H

Fair were of better

�uality than those of the previous year.

It was apparent that club members were ot the

Dair.y

selecting

Breed their cattle more carefully.

The cooperation

Associations helped club members receive recognition outstanding achievement.

Special awards

Fannie Coman was declared the state's were given to county champions champion 4-H

Holstein Dair,y

Club member.

4-H Victorx

Gardens

-

There were project and 203 completed.

The per cent of

2.3.3

members enrolled in this completions was

87.2%.

Larger gardens were grown

"Food by maqy of the club members in cooperation

Fights tor

Freedomprogram.

Both Fall and Winter with the gardens were popular with 4-H Garden Club members.

There were

417 vegetable exhibits at the County 4-H Fair, as

-

25

-

compared to

401 for the previous year.

A the vegetable judging contest at

County" 4-H

Fair gave members an opportunity to test their judgment and to become more familiar with ideal types of vegetables.

Two new

4-H garden contests were conducted which brought out the

eoapetd,

ti ve spirit among club members and resulted in the production ot more and better vegetables.

One

Club for all garden contest sponsored

4-H by the Litchfield Park Kiwanis garden club members residing west of the

Ag�

Fria river in the county was conducted with 69

4-H members participating.

An achievement program for the winners and contestants was sponsored by the

Kiwanis Club.

It included a dinner party with the sponsors.

This pro­ gram will be repeated for 1945.

Another

4-H garden contest was sponsored b,y the Sears

Phoenix store.

the

This contest was limited to 25 selected by different club leaders throughout the county to compete in the contest.

Seeds and plants were, provided free to the contestants by sponsor and garden club members who were special awards were made to the winners at a dinner pro­ gram given conducted by the sponsor to all contestants.

again in

1945.

This program will be

In the county-wide 4-H garden club contest there were

4 members who won county championship honors.

Two of these winners competed in the state

4-H garden contest and both contestants were declared state

4-H champions.

Fred Thonen won the sectional

4-H garden contest and received a

$100

war bond and a trip to the 4-H Congress in Chicago

4-H Poul tIT

Proj ects

-

There were

91 members enrolled in this project and 83 completed their work.

The per cent of completion was

91.2% and enrollment was increased

15.4%.

The total number of birds amounted to

3,775, which made an average of

45 birds per member.

Xbis project involved the growing of baqy chicks, the management of laying flocks and broiler production.

Profits from

4-H pou1t� projects were affected b,y the increased cost of the feed and the purchase price of

chicks;

but members generally received worth-while returns for their ef­ torts.

in the

Poultr,y exhibits at the Count,r

4-H Fair showed an improvement quality of the stock.

The pens of poultcy exhibited were of excellent quality and the condition of the birds showed that they had been well fitted for exhibition qy club members.

A poultr,y and egg judging contest was conducted and more than 300 4-H agricultural club members participated.

ect of with

27.5%.

4-H

Handicraft

-

There were

120 members enrolled in this

100% completion of the work.

This was an increase in proj­ enrollment

This project afforded members the opportunity of equipment for the farm and home and to repair ma.ey

.articles

constructing which were not replaceable because of war conditions.

Club members constructed 7.20

articles in addition to the repair work which they performed.

The handi­ craft exhibits at the Count,y 4-H

Fair showed excellent workmanship and

-

26

-

the articles were useful and practical.

and 45

4-R Swine Projects

".

55 members were enrolled in this proj ect· completed their 'work.

This was an

Lncrease in enrollment of

22.5%'�

9% of the pig club projects were registered swine and others had many produced other high quality animals in their herds.

The registered hogs b.y

club members sold ver,r readily to swine breeders and to

4-H Club members.

Swine exhibits at the

4�H Fair were of very high quality and type and were in excellent condition.

Two Scottsdale

4-H boys exhibited registered Hampshire hogs which bad been obtained from the best swine breeders' herds for foundation stock.

The swine projects of

4-H Pig

Club members contributed much toward the production of "food for freedom".

A showmanship contest was conducted for the 4-H swine exhibitors at the County 4-H Fair.

A sale of fat hogs was conducted at, the close of the Fair.

Miscellaneous

Projects

-

Other 4-H

Club projects were alsQ conducted.

There were

19 Beef Club members enrolled with 100% completions.

Last year there were only

8 club members enrolled for beet proj ects.

There were

29 beef animals produced by club members this year.

Charles Mathis had the champion registered

Hereford heifer at the

County 4-H

Fair and sold it for $250 to

Harvey

Johnson of Me,sa.

Charles was awarded a steer calf by the Phoenix Kiwanis Club in recognition of his achievement in beef club work.

Nine members were enrolled for sheep projects with

100%

completions.

Sheep production totaled 29 animals.

Forty-three members were was enrolled for rabbit projects and

41 completed their work.

There an increase in enrollment of

32% in rabbit!

club work.

Forty-eight members were enrolled in Flower and Home

Beautification

4-H Clubs, with

100% of completions.

All

4-H

Clubs cooperated in the farm safety pro­ gram b.1

volunteering to remove fire and accident hazards from their farms and homes.

A pamphlet titled

"Safety

Guide for the Farm and Home" was distributed to club members.

This pampblet was used as a guide until a more definite manual of instruction was prepared leader.

Two club members won in the state b,y the state 4-H

'Club

4-H·Safety Volunteers

Contest.

-

27

-

At the· conclusion of the Achievement

Days, Maricopa.

County

Agricultural

4-H

Clubs had an enrollment of 548 boys with a completion of

523 or

94.3%.

The following chart will show the break-down in the various types of

Proj ects, enrollments and completiQns and the number o,f exhibit,s or entries made in the'se various types of clubs at the Tempe

Fair.

At the bottom of the chart the number of project work, girls taking part in boys'

eo.pletions,

number of duplica.tes

in both boys and girls in boys club work, with the actual enrollment, is shown.

Garden

Enrolled in

1943

-

Projects

1944

Period

233

Completing Projects

1942

-

1944 Period

203

Exhibits

1943

-

1944

629

Dair,y

Poultr,y

Swine

141

91

55

135

83

91

494

82

Sheep &

Goats

Beef

9

20

45

9

19

27

17

Rabbit

Flower

43

48

120

41

48

120

209

358

162

Handicraft

Totals: 760

702

2069

1243

-

1944

Period

'Girls enrolled

121

.

ft

duplicate

1.3

Actual Number

108

Completing

93

1f

13

11 80

Ba,ys enrolled

639

• duplicate

91

Actual

Number 548 n

'"

11

610

87

52.3

Percentage

..

completion for projects in agricultural clubs

--

92.5

,,11

If for actual enrollment

--

94.3

-

28

-

TABLE NO.2

I

,

JAB.

FiB.

lIAR.

APR.

HOURS or LABOR PER

ACRE PER YEAR

* GRAIl .sORGHUMS

I

,I

1

1

!

I

I

I

I

SDDBED

PREPARATIOI

..

..

4,·

I

,I

1

CULTl:VATIOtl

'I l

BOEING

I t

IBRIGATION

I

1

HARVEST

Be HAUL

I

L

t

..

"

I

I

T

J

....

,I

I

I

J

I

I

I t

� j_

I

I

I

1

I

I

t

I

I

I i.

I

I

J

I

,

I

I

I

I

I f

I

TOTAL

I

JUII

JULy

AUG.

SEPT.

I

I

I

3.21

,

\ i

::t

I

'.,.f

i,

0.46

0.45

I

I

I

I

1.18.

2.36

I

I

I

I

I

1

I

I

1

,

I

I,

OCT.

I

I

I

I

I

I'

ROY.

...

*

DIC.

TOTAL

I

3.21

0.91

3.54

1

I

I

Based on

Only

Five Farmers Interviewed

2.00

1.,)3

2.2.3

I

I

I

I

·1

I

I

I

.,

I

5.21

i

I

I

I

I

2.9'1

5.04

2.3.3

..

7.89

2

.33

J

1

I

I

I

I

I

f

I

I

2.24

2.2.3

.'

I

t

I

I

I

I

I

I

2.24

2.23,

4.47

20.02

-

28a

-

TABLE NO. 3

HOURS' OF

LABOR

PER

ACRE PER YEAR

*!LFALFA

HAY

I

IRRIGATION

I

I

HARVEST

&

HAUL

I

i

r

I f

I

'TOTAL

I

I

JAR.

I

z.L

n'"

MAR.

APR.

OCT.

I

I

I

----�--

�1-

�1.6

al

J1JIl

04

��J

__ o.�

__

=-,

SIP.

2.0

2.0

_

0.�_j__�

__

"

I

01'

0.1

0.5

0.5

I

I

+

__

--------�--------

--=.0_

-r2•0

2.0

----�----"i

t

I

;�

__

--'-

--+-

4.3

I

I

.1

"�

I

6

.3

-�---------t----------�------

_:__-------j-------------------t----�-i_�

-,---

_

I

I

_4.:_��:_

_

_J-

I

I

6.7

----------------___J__-���

I 1_

1.0·1

I

1.5

-----------1--------1-------

I

1.0

t.

-------------��---.-__

I

I

1.5

--.....a-----

....... --.....___

"

I I

*

IOV.

DIC.

!OTAL

_

-------

--------

+_..:.3

-------------------'

_ __

_::�

---t-�::-

I

j_----------------i-------------

I

I.

24.0

I

36•6_ only five representative farmers inte�iewed.

Based on

-

28b

-

TABLE

,

NO.4

SEEDBED

PREPARATION

Be

PLAftIIG

HOURS

Of LABOR PER

ACRE PER YEAR

*COTTOH ff·hort

....

-l bale per aere)

CULTIVATION

8)E &

CHOP IRRIGATION

4PIC�IIG

'TOTAL

".

lB.

.50

5.60

-.--+---.----..........

....

---------.fo---------- �------

6.10

.---

'lB.

....

1.70

...

..

-�.

---....

---..

-----

..

--' --+--.------f------...

;---_

......

JAR.

3.00

2.50

5.50.

--

.......

-----'

---

�--

....

----

..

i_---r-·---..

...,_,------I---------

APR.

.40

.90

1.,30

......

-�

.......�---:-o--- t------------

-----

-.

..-----

......

---'

-------1----..;..----

_...._'"

.90

6.10

..i!----

.70

7.70

....

-:-

_

1.30

----t------.-----ll!--------

..

�-

5.00'

'1.30

7.·60

---------

:---------

---

JULy .50

-----I�.---�.........--

...

-----�

---,..

...-

2.70

,3.20

.. -----...

-�------

�----.--------.

-----..

...

---,----lUG.

,-4--------

---':""----------�-:'�

1.,30 1.,30

"':'"...,---------

.------.-1---------m.

---,._--....__--_ .. __------------

;------

.70

8.40

9.10

--------------------�-------ocr.

....

,--..11--------- :..-----------

-------

14.00

14.00

-----.

----

--------

------

IOV.

14.00

14.00

----t--------I---------

�-------.:..------

---------

-------

DEC.

14.00

14.00

---

�-------.-I--------

-------.

-----.:.....;.---_..:1-----------

-------

2.70

11.10

11.50

56.00

85.50

----_--------------------------------------------

*

**'

Based on

Pilla

High

Yield Club

Reoords-except picking.

Plckiag estiaated on basis ot 26.9

II seed cotton per hour.

10 records available.

-

28c

..

-

HOURS or LABOR PER ACRE PER YEAR

TABLE NO.5

*SMALL

GRAIN

I

I t

PREPARATIOI

'&:

I

PLARTI1ICl

I

�--------------1---1

FEB.

I

---i,1i----,-------4------------

-w.

I

I

I

I

I

I

t

O.�5

"

I

--

I

I-

IRRIGATION

j

I,

I

I

I

---�-r-

HARVEST

"

HAUL

-----------------J-----------------l--------------

I

I

I

1

TOTAL

-----1-------

I

'

I

0.65

-+---

lAY

-

I

.,.__-----------..

!

0.50

.----------tit

2.00

i

2.50

-----------1---------

I

1

I

AUG.

:.1

;

I

-

-I

I

-----�------t--------+--

I

t

----------__l_--------------------f----------------�----------------

SIP.

OCT.

1_.

�t---::�

------------1---------------------1---------------J------------

I· I

iLl

���--+--------.--1----------1---:::�--

--------f----------::�--�--------t_____�:::------

-----j------4.00-------I---�

----

_-

:::�-_t___:�::----------t----------:�::

_ l

__

Based on

_L_---------

.

1

u __

--farmers interviewed.

Two others only four representative hOur less following

(land

preparation

&: ir­

vegetables

'showed approximately

1 per acre

rigation)

-

28d

-

ORGANIZATION

Maricopa

County

Farm Bureau

This

organization

cooperated with the Extension Service by ap­ proving the annual budget of expenditures so far as county and state funds are concerned.

An otfice has been maintained in the Extension-

'Service the all building and all meetings ot the Board of Directors were held in assembly room.

Some member of the staff bas acted as secretary at meetings.

This organization has cooperated in making available poisons for gopher control

Wildlife Service.

b,y cooperative agreement with the Fish and

County Agents'

Conference

The annual conference of

Extension

Service workers was held in the assembly room and was attended b,y all members of the staff.

A two­ day conference of

County Agents from southern counties was attended by members of the staff in

April.

A four-day conference of

Agents from southern counties was held in Prescott in

August and attended by the

!gent

and Assistant Hobart.

Soil Conservation Service

Members of the staff assisted with elections on the

Arcadia and

Chandler

Heights addition to the :Queen Creek Soil Conservation

District, hearings on the

Chandler

Heights,

Indian

Bend, Scottsdale, New River and

Buckeye Districts, held a conference with the staff of the Soil Conserva­ tion Service on reclassification of soil types in the

Queen

Creek District and visited the �ueen

Creek

District with Mr. Dave

Hulet to observe work being done there.

War

Boards

The

Agent attended six meetings of the State War Board representing

Director Pickrell.

.Eight meetings of the County War Board were attended.

At these latter meetings selective service cases were reported on and recommendations made to local boards.

State

Agricultural Adjustment Agency

�ommittee

Four regular meetings of the state AAA Committee were attended b,y members of the staff representing

Director

Pickrell.

The

Agent tended one amount meeting of the

Fertilizer Advisor,y of fertilizer to be

Committee to determine the requested for distribution in the state.

at­

One state meeting ot

County Committ�emen was attended at which payments for soil building practices were discussed.

Farm

Labor

AdvisorY

Committee

Two meetings of this committee composed of E.

Ray Cowden,

-

29

-

chairman, 'Clyde Neely, vice-chairman, Dave

Heywood, R. M.

Hess,

H.

B.

Gray,

K. B.

McMicken,

C. L.

Phillips,

Ray

Eaton and

J.

S.

Francis were held to discuss farm labor problems and the use of prisoners of war as fam laborers.

Farm Field

PH

The

Agent assisted

Dr.

R.

S.

Hawkins, Head of the

Agr�nomy

Department and Mr.

D.

C.

Aepli, Superintendent of the Mesa Experimental

Farm in conducting an all-day tour of the fa:rm.

Work on cotton varieties, cotton insects, guar, grain sorghums, soybeans and irrigation were shown and discussed with those present.

Agricul tural War

Commodi,ties,

ID;c.

This organization of farmers was set up to handle the distribu­ tion of Mexican Nationals brought, into the state as farm laborers.

The cooperation with this organization has been excellent and most farmers seem satisfied with the servtce rendered.

The annual meeting held in

April was attended b,y' the

Agent.

Oftice of Price Administration

The

Agent has cooperated with this agency in at tempting to ad­ just prices on alfalfa seed, watermelons and grapes.

One conference was held with local representatives on the matter of issuing gasoline to farm workers.

Farm Labor

Program

This program has required much of the time of the

Agent in ad­ dition to the full time of the stafrs of the Phoenix and Mesa Farm Labor

Offices.

Numerous conferences were held with

Specia.list Baker,

Army of­ ficials in charge of the prisoner-or-war program,

Ofrice of Labor

War Food Administration, representatives, the executive secretar,y of

Agricultural

War Commodities, representatives farmers.

This year no of the several irrigation districts and interstate workers have been brought in under the government program.

laborers for various fences,

Five types

prisoner-of-war

Creek, Buckeye No.

1 and

No.2,

Litchfield of operating hay balers, harvesting camps located at and work, such as ditch cleaning

Mesa, and picking cotton, weeding vegetables, picking dates, pruning dates,

'Queen

Papago

Park have furnished mowing, bUilding vegetables and picking pecans.

Approximately three thousand prisoners are present.

The work performed by done but much slower than that these by c1 housed in these camps at the prisoners is, in most cases, well vilian workers.

Harvesting of potatoes although some potatoes were salvaged rots b,y in the Queen Creek

Germans was area by unsatisfactor.y

Italians was by this entirely unsatisfactor,y means.

Harvesting of car­ and abandoned a.fter

a trial of several

�s.

In the case

'of ditch cleaning and mowing by

Germans for the Salt

River

Water Users

Association, the efficiency was about doubled b.1

plaeing the prisoners on a piece-work instead of hourly basis.

Under

-

30

-

this a

,system prisoners are doing as much or more work than is now done in day by Yaqui

Indians usually employed on this type of work.

in

Through for cotton

Agricultural

War Commodities sao Jamaicans were brought picking within the state.

These were assigned to growers in

Maricopa,

Pima and Pinal Counties.

Through arrangement with War Food

Administration,

Office of

Labor, 1,600 comforters were obtained through the U.

S.

Army 'Quartermaster's Depot at Phoentx and 1,580 issued to growers on order from the

Agent.

These Jamaicans were entirely unsatis­ factoryand all returned to easbern states within a few days.

A later

contingent'

from Idaho proved to be fairly satisfactory workers.

Mexican

Nationals generallyhave proven satisfactory but the turn-over in these laborer,s is too great for much efficiency.

A survey of prices paid for baling hay was made in mid-sUJDmer to determine the prevailing wage in the several sections of the

COUll ty.

A summary of reports showed the prevailing wage to be each member of the crew.

Wages vary from

$

.25

in some

$.,30 per ton to sections to

$.50

per the case ton for night baling in others.

Baler operators were notified of findings of the Farm Labor Office and wages were brought up in the of the lower rates.

No wage hearings were held during the year but adjustments in certifications for the use of prisoners-of-war have been made from time to time in order that the rate specified be that prevailing for the specific type of work.

These adjustments have been made after checking records of the

Farm

Labor Offices and making field surveys.

Fire.

and Accident Preventi,on

Cam12aign

Organization

-

As a pa.rt

of the State Accident Preventi�n

Campaign, the Extension Service was asked to contact Farmers and Ranchers in the drive to aim the help people become safety minded.

The program. had for its prevention of waste of manpower and property through accidents and fires.

It contributed a definite war service.

Assistant

County Agent

Paul Brown and the Home

Demonstration

Agent conducted the program in the county.

To interest the farm people and to make the program effective, the

,as

Count.y Agent's

Office gave out such publicity

�s possible.

A circular letter purpose of the Accident Prevention was on accident prevention prepared whi,ch explained the

Campaign and copies were mailed to

Farmers and

Ranchers of the county.

Accident Hazard Check

Sheet which

Enclosed with the letter was an provided a means of checking accident hazards on the farm and for their subsequent removal.

Another enclosure remind was a green accident prevention sticker to be placed in windows to people to be careful.

The following a.

material was also made available to farm

The Farmer Shows His New people:

Help

How to

Prevent Accidents.

b.

How to

Prevent Home Accidents.

-

31

-

c.

Preventing

Accidents

With Farm

Machinery.

d.

Fires

& Accidents.

e.

sar ety on the Farm and

Home.

circular letter which was sent out six months later.

were r'eeeived

When the reports they were summarized to determine what progress had been made in

A report for each'form sent out was requested in a second preventdng accidents.

A copy of this summary· is included else­ where witb this report.

A separate report by the Home Demonstration

Agent, giving the results obtained from the Home Makers participation will be included with her annual

.

report

ViotoI'f

Gardens

This promotion of year, as last, considerable emphasis was placed on the

Victo:cy

Gardens and home orchards.

tion

In cooperation with K. o. Y.

and the Arizona

Farmer, a demonstra­

Victory

Garden was planned and planted by the

Assistant

Agent.

This garden was designed to meet the requirements of a family of five.

This garden was started in March and weekly broadcasts were made from the garden until mid-June when the broadcasts and the garden were terminated with a

Victor,y

Garden Harvest Show.

Another demonstration fall.

Broadcasts are garden was outlined and planted this beiDg made every week from the garden.

Problems confronting the gardener are discussed and 'questions that are sent in � listeners are answered.

Talks on

Victory

Gardens were given

Total attendance was

300.

to

9 different garden clubs.

Fifty-four

Victory Gardens.

people attended 2 method demonstration plantings of

With the assistance of Mr.

McKee, 39 Victory

Gardens were judged for the Sears Roebuok and Litchfield Kiwanis Club contests.

Vegeta.ble

entries were judged at the Avondale

4-H

Victory display conducted by

Paul Brown.

Garden and

Fourteen farmers were given

8 selective serVice cases were

�ssistance investigated.

with farm labor problems and

Fort,y-nine families were given processing of dates.

information on the harvesting

Forty-one families were given ing ot the home fruit orchard.

information on the· care and plant­

-

32

-

Central

kiz_ona

Rabbit

.Breeders'

Associat.1,on were

Organization

-

Growers of rabbits for meat and pelts for market

,encours.ged

to expand produetd.oa

by the

Agricultural Extension

Service, in connection with the program of

BFood

Fights for Freedom".

Assistatlt

County Agent

Paul Brown assisted the growers and met with the

Central Arizona Rabbit Breeders' Asso:ciation during each of their month­ ly meetings.

Some of the problems which were worked out with rabbit· growers included methods ot

The teed manag.ement, f'eeding, breeding practices and marketing.

supply situation came in for attention.

A s,hortage in some of the standard feeds made it necessary to work out new rations containing satisf'actort substitutes.

A plan for the purchase cooperatively of concentrates and alf"alfa by the growers was made and adopted.

Extiension was

A field day program was arranged for rabbit growers by the

SerVice, at which time a tour ot the outstanding rabbitries conducted.

The director of the Rabbit Experiment Station at Fontana,

Callf"ornia, accompanied the growers on the tour and discussed the ty"pes or equipment fo·und

'and the practices used by' the different growers.

A night meeting was held at the County Agent's

Office with the grow,ers, which gave the director and .growers

an opportunity to

.analyze

the'ir problems.

Program service was provided for the Breeders' Association and assistance was rendered in connection with t,he Annual Rabbit Show.

Copies of news articles are included with this report.

A local monthly news lett.er

was sponsored and the cooperation of the Rabbit Breeders with

4-H Rabbit Clubs was obtained.

Judges and cash prize.s

were provided for

4-H rabbit exhibitors at the

County 4-li

Fair by the

Breeders' Association.

Purebred Cattle 'Clubs

Work with these several organizations bas been conducted by

Acting Specialist

VanSant and is reported under Dairy

Herd

Impro'Vement in another part of this report.

-

33

-

VI.

OUTLOOK

A1ID

RECOMMENDATIONS,

INCLUDING SUGGESTED

PROGRAM OF WORK

FOR NEXT YEAR must be

'The Extension Service

Program for this

CO'Wlty for the next year planned in such a war as to allow for much work to be done on new or emergency proj ects as well as for the continuation of the now

existing

major projects.

Any outlook on farming ,must take into considera­ tion the farm labor situation.

With this situation as it prospect of is, with the getting worse in time" farmers will be less inclined to at­ tend

It meetings or to tr,y out aqy practice which is not definitely proven.

will be difficult to establlsh demon,stration plots because of this lack ot labor and time on the part

,of the oooperator.

Any program put into effeot must be one which will lead to

.

harvest,ed product and satisfactory returns

,greater production of the to' the tarDier.

Farmer,s should be encouraged to use every labor-saving device possible and

'to make use ot substitute materials when those which he has customari:CY used are not available.

Information on these subjects should be made available at all times.

Better cooperation between the Extension Service and the

Agricultural Experiment Station in solving current problems is sugge.stad.

A full-time Assistant

Agent to take over the poultry problems of this comty would lead to greater effici,ency in poultry produotion.

Informa­ tion on in production and returns per acre for different types of farming concise form. is badly needed.

This information should be' based on actual average net returns per acre over a comers, long period of time.

New­ especially ex-servioe men who have never farmed before but who now wish to bave a farm, will need this information in order to keep from

making

bad investments in farm land.

This is a serious problem and will call for close cooperation of the Extension Service with all agencies.

local

It is planned to use more newspaper publicity through the weelcq papers.

Experience bas shown that articles appearing in these papers are more widely read by farmers t,han those in the daily

papers.

Mailing lists will be used whenever possible as a means of get­ ting facts to the farmers.

agencies

All work will be conducted in as close dealing with agriculture as possible.

cooperation with other

SUMMARI AND OUTLOOK OF PROJECTS

Project

#1

-

Alkali Reclamation

Although ver" coming rear, it 1s little land will probably be reclaimed during planned to conduct a demonstration plot in coopera­ the tion with the

Alricultural

Chemistry leed tor more information on this

Department in the Buckeye subject will arise because district.

of new

-

34

-

op.erators taking over cheap lands and hoping to sutticient to support a

:rami�.

produce

crops from them

Project

112

-.Fertllization.Practice

With the prospective shortage of nitrogen-bearing fertiliz·ers during the coming year, emphasis will be placed on the use of animal manUl'es and green manure crops with the Arizona Citrus Growers to maintain fertility..

Association, leaf'

In samples cooperation trom carefully selected 01 trus groves will be collected at monthly intervals and analyzed for nitrogen content.

This project based on findings of the

Horticultural

Department will be continued until such time as it is definitely proven that this is a practical method of determining.

the fertilizer requirements of citrus groves.

Wherever possible resul� demonstrations will' be conducted on the use of fertilizers on all crops concerning which the fertilizatio:n requirements are not clear.

Project

It5

-

Irrigation

Practi-ce

This major pro·ject will be stressed during the year, espe·ci­ ally the use of deep moisture penetration on all crops.

Assistance will be given in land levelling and adjusting crop acreages to water supply.

The measurement of the output of irrigation wells in the Queen

Creek area will be continued.

Proj ect

#6

-

Pure Seed

·This proj ect in cooperation with the Arizona Crop Improvement

Asso'ciation will receive major consideration.

Changes in methods of

b.aD.dling

seed, leading to greater purity, vdll be advocated.

Efforts of individual growers or dealers to tie the Extension Service into marketing problems in connection with this program will be discouraged.

Coopera­ tion with the in limited

Experiment Station in supplying parent or foundation seed quantities to all �ualified growers seems desirable.

Project

#8

Weed Eradication

Until more experimental work is done on the control of noxious weeds, especiallY' white horse-nettle, bindweed and nut grass, little can be done on this·project.

Control methods now advocated are, in most eases, impractical.

Project

il2

-

Pruning orchard be

Method and result demonstrations on pruning will be continued.

both oommercial and home

Assistance to individual growers will given as requested.

Project

#13

-

Pecan Propagation

Method demonstrations of topworking seedling trees to standard

-

35

-

va.ri,eties will be

Assistance to given in

April and budding demonstrations in

August.

individuals will eontdnue as requested.

Prole,et

.1114

-

Date

Propaq.tion

to

Emphasis on proper eare of fruit from the time of picking and

pollination

processing will be the major part of this proj,ect.

Lit­ tle interest is being shown in making new plantings of dates.

However, whenever assistance is reg_uested in ofr-shoot removal and planting, it will be given.

Project

64.1

-

Citrus

Nursery

Practice

.

nursery

No work is planned under this project as regards actual pra.ctices.

Method demonstrations, on proper methods of topwork­ ing sour' orange trees into, standard varieties will be conducted, as there is great interest.

in this phase of the program.

Orcba.:rdists wishing to cbange be given grapefruit individual ,help.

over to orange's, lemons or tangerines will

Project

65

:-

Insect Pest

Control

'This maj·or proj ect will be stressed in cooperation with

Specialist tine.

The

Roney and the U. S. Bureau of

Entomology

and Plant

;�uaran­ grasshopper control program will continue using materials supplied b;y the

:Grasshopper

Control

Division of the U.S.D.A.

Field tests of control m,easureS will be conducted when practical.

Growers will be kept advised on new materials to be used and the method

Cultural methods for insect control will be emphasized of use.

due to the shortage of certain essential ingredients in commercial insecticides.

Project

(1).6

-

Rodent Control

In cooperation with the Fish and Wildlife

Service and the

Maricopa Farm

'Bureau, poisons for rodents will be made available to farmers at all times.

Individuals will be given assistance as requested.

Proj ect

1123

-

Diseas.e

Control

Field tests in cooperation with the Department of Plant

Pathology will continue.

Sanitary measures as damage to crops b.r plant diseases will be advocated

Method and result demonstrations will a means of

reduci�g

at all times.

be conducted whenever practical and individuals will be given assistance with problems as requested.

Project

#26

Economic

survey

several

The annual irrigation crop surve,y districts will conducted in cooperation with the be made and summarized in mimeograph form.

Data on labor and machinery requirements of various crops will

-

36

-

TABLE NO.6

..,.., 11· •••

.,

....

..

ACALA

Rumber or Members

Total

Acreage

Acres Per Member

1_

••

SMIm

-

DOXIl

MDlBERSHIP .. ACRliAGIC

-

].94)

It J.tt44

IB MARICOPA COURt!

1943 1944

...

...

..

508

61,946

122

265

42,378

160

..

I

\.a.)

0'

I

SIP

Humber or Members

Total

Acreage

Acres Per Member

431

30,694

71

62

4,108

66

I

PERCENT OF lC?43

S2

68

131

-.�--

14

134

93

eontinue as time is available.

Other surveys will be made as often as information is ne,ded.

�ilX

and Livestock

Projects dealing with dair.y

cattle, beef catt�e, sheep and swiDe will be continued under the direction of

The use

·of local grown feeds

Acting

Speciali.st

VanSant.

will be advo'eated as much as

posSible.

Disease control will be carried on in

cooperation

'With Dr. Pistor of the

Animal

Husbandry

Department, the Bureau of Animal

Industry and the state

Veterinarian.

Pen feeding of beef will likely increase during the year.

Daley herd te,sting will continue under the Dairy Herd Improvement plan.

Poult17

Better management of home flocks and small commercial flocks will be advocated.

The

Poultry

Improvement Plan will be conducted in cooperation with the local batcherymen who wish to comply' with the ap­ proved national plan.

Inexperienced poultrymen will be given all assis­ tanee possible in making a start but will be discouraged from enlarging operations too rapidly.

More demonstrations of culling flocks will be conducted.

Project

1129

-

4-H Clubs

This project will continue under the direction

,of

Assistant

Brown who will continue to stress the importance of food producti.on

as a part of the war effort..

Proj ect tours, achievement days and field days will be conducted as often as practical under wartime conditions.

The

4-H Fair will be held at

Tempe if at all possible.

Rural

SociologY' conduct a

In cooperation survey 'in the with Specialist Ballantyne it is planned to

Arlington

District.

By this surve,y it is felt that information may be gathered which will lead to better community ef­ fort and cooperatdon,

This area has been selected because it is isolated at one end of the valley, the farming system is the same on all farms and the people of the community have no organization for cooperative effort.

It is hoped that this survey will be so productive that others may be conducted in other areas.

Farm

Labor

The main Farm

Labor Office at

Phoenix and the branch at Mesa will continue in are

operation

throughout the year available.

Field work and cooperation with if funds for maintenance all agencies dealing with agricultural labor will continue.

Surve,ys wage rates and crop conditions will to be made as ascertain housing conditions, deemed necessar,y.

-

37

-

J.

H.

SUMMARY

OF ACTIVITIES

of

1944

O'DELL, COUNTY AGRICULTURAL AGENT

The

County Agricultural

Agent"was responsible for the proper planning and execution of the

Extension

Program in the county.

In this county his duties were largely administrative and it has been his responsibility

�.o

conduct the

educatdonal,

phases

of.

al.�

r·ederal, state and county agricultural programs.

In conducting this program c

Lose co­ operation with all agencies was essential.

During the past year a major portion of the time of the

Agent bas been devoted to conducting the Farm Labor

Program.

Numerous confarences with officials of the

A�, War Food Administration,

Office of t

Labor, the War

Manpow'er

Commission and of several irrigation districts and farmer organizations have been attended.

Reports to Selective

Service Boards in this and other states bave been made on the agricultura� activities of individuals.

Rural people have been informed of new farming methods, new crops and given timely information through personal contact, news articles in local papers, radio, circular and personal letters, demonstrations, field days, meetings, circulars and bulletins.

Mailing lists have been revised and kept up to date.

Field tests of new crops or methods have been conducted in cooperation with the several

depa�tments

of the Agricultural

Experiment Station.

Work has been done as much as possible through commodity group organiza.tions

but much personal service has been rendered.

All major projects have been carried on successfu1� throughout the year, although difficulties have been experienced.

Due to lack of transportation and labor on farms it has been difficult for farmers to at­ tend meetings.

However, attendance at field days and most demonstrations has been

ver,y.satisfactory.

SUMMARY

OF ACTIVITI.ES

of

H.

B.

POWERS,

ASST.

COUNTY

1944

AGENT

The oitrus indust:cy is enj oying a substantial boom.

Many

'or­ chards are bedng bought by newcomers to this area.

These new owners, as well as many local owners, are requesting the latest information on citrus thrips,control, fertilization and general cultural practices.

Over 5,000 acres of citrus were sprayed for the control of citrus thrips.

ConsiderL able time was spent observing the effects of the spray

treatments

in regard to the timing of the treatments.

A check with Dr.

Persing of the

Riverside Station was made on the resistance of thrips in this area to tartar emetic.

There was no evidence of any thrips resistance to this spray.

Many newcomers in the field of commercial vegetable production have dropped out of the picture.

They found that profitable marketing of

L

thin crops was a much more difficult task than the production of the crops.

The

Victory

Garden program bas been promoted wi th

consd.derabke

vigor.

In addition to talks at schools and garden clubs and articles in local newspapers, demonstration gardens were planted in cooperation with radio station

K.

o.

Y.

and the Arizona

Farmer.

A Spring and a

Fall garden were planned and outlined b.1

the Assistant

Agent.

Weekly broadcasts discussing current garden problems were made from these gardens.

Other proj ects receiving considerable attention this year were pruning and general care of ·the home orchard, citrus budding, irrigation, t.

and soU analysis.

"1

L,

/

,'"

L, lj

I

SUMMARY OF ACTIVITIES

of

CHARLES

HOBART, ASST.

1944

COUNTY AGENT

Irrigation activities included

(1)

individual service to farmers,

(2)

measuring wells in the

,Queen

Creek Soil

Conservation District in cooperation with

S.C.S.

and

Donald L.

Hitch,

(3)

survey work on problem soils in cooperation with Mr. Turville and the Soils and Irrigation departments of the Experiment Station,

(4)

preliminary work on a cooperative set-up be-

£

tween the Salt River

Valle,r

Water Users

Association,

U.S.D.A.

and University on solving problems of water penetration and value of pump water vs.

gravity water, and

(5)

a paper written in

cooperation

with Karl Harris on

"Fitting

Crop

Ac�eages

to Water Supplyn.

Pure seed activities continue to stress the aim of maintaining pure seed supplies sufficient for tpe needs or the county.

The main developments are the working out of a bonded agent system in each cleaning plant to see that the outlined program is carried out, the attempt by grow-

J ers to secure service from the Association in exercising marketing functions and continuing efforts of one grower to funotion as a plant breeder.

Man,r routine details are cared for in oonnection with pure seed in addition to giving some help in the development of the program.

��forts

to promote permanent irrigated pastures met with only

"

partial success, due in part to faulty management.

Not enough water was used and in some cases lands were overgrazed.

Economio surve,rs conducted during the year inoluded hay shed check-ups, annual crop surve,y and labor requirements per acre per year

fO;t"

alfalfa, cotton, small grain, and sorghum.

SUMMARY

OF ACTIVITIES

of

PAUL W.

BRDWN, ASST.

1944

COUNTY AGENT

War conditions had a definite effect on the

4-H

Club program again this

year.

The National 7-Point

4-H

Club

Victor,y Program was conducted to fill the demands for greater food production and participation in the war effort.

Club members grams.

cooperated fully in all local and national war pro-

The cancellation of state-wide

4-H

Club events and Fairs resulted in j a decrease in many genera!

4-H Club activities.

Count.y

4-H picnic rallies were substituted for camps and state

'RrotUld-upsll.

Th�

County 4-H

Fair took on new importance as a motivating force for

4-H

Club members.

There were

548 boys and

108 girls enrolled in 4-H

Clubs with a

94.3% completion of club work.

The enrollment was increased

� 13%.

The

There were

49 t

4-H program was conducted in 31 schools and 29 communities.

standard and

86 non-standard agricultural 4-H

Clubs.

Forty club Leader-s assisted with the work.

Nineteen college students were trained for 4-H

Club leadership.

A total of 703 club projects were completed by 656 members.

Thirty-eight achievement programs,

7 radio programs,

9 educational tours,

2 field day programs,

2 county picnic rallies, a county 4-H fair, and leader training were conducted in the 4-H

Club program.

The outlook for 4-H

Club work is good.

4-H boys and girls are doing

'a vital job for Victory and the peace to follow by learning to become better farmers, better homemakers, and better citizens and leaders in rural life through 4-H

Club work.

The National 7-Point

4-H Victory

Program is functioning satisfactorily and club members are cooperating ful� in the war effort.

County

Extension workers will continue to give the maximum amount of service to leaders and'members to enable 4-H

Clubs to acbieve their goals.

{J

SUMMARY

OF w.

R.

ACTIVITIES

of

1944

VANSANT, ASST.

COUNTY AGENT

The production

,of food and feed bas been the main objective for the year carried on with the enterprising dairyman, poultryman and livestockman.

Through farmer organizations, news letters, newspapers" farm magazines, radio and individual contacts, the educational program dealing with the production problems, of which there were many, have been presented to the farmers.

In fact, the entire program for the past year has been to supply information and give assistance to

,dairymen, poultrymen, and livestockmen', which would enable them to produce more food and feed efficiently and economically.

The D.H.I.A.

has required considerable time in assisting two

� new testers to supervise the herd work in the county, as well as the monthly publication of a

D.H.I.A.

news letter and report.

The Poult:cy Improvement

Association required considerable time to carr" on the

'educational program outlined and maintain interest in face of a reduction in participation and sale of baby chicks.

Vegetable Judging contest At The Roosevelt

4-H Club

Achieyement

Program

4-H Duiry

Club Members

Judging

Cattle At Scottsdale

Three Of Six Registered Ayrshires Belonging

To

Malcolm

Adams

Which Are Included

In

His

4-H Dairy Project.

He Won

The

Santa Fe

Trip

Award In 1944 And

The State

4-H Meat

Animal Contest In 1943

Champions

Cattle

At The County 4-H fair In

The Registered Dairy

Department

Exhibited

By

Velma

Grey,

Joe Smith

And Buddy

Cheatham

Rabbit

Judging

Contest

At The Roosevelt 4-H Club Achievement

Program

Gene Edwards, scottsdale 4-H Dairy

His

Club

Registered Ayrshires

Member, With

3 Of

The "National 7

Point 4-H

Motif Of This

Victory Program", Was The

4-H

Club In

The Victor,y parade

4-H Pig

Club Members

Judging

Swine At scottsdale

These

Department Superintendents

At The

County

4-H Fair Were

Members Of The tuted

Collegiate

4-H Leaders Club.

They

Substi­

Sa.tisfactorily

For The Boys Who Had Gone

To

War

The Showmanship

Contest For Halter Classes At

County

4-H

Fair

Champion

Registered

Fair

Jersey

Bull Exhibited At The

County

By

Joe Smith Of The Scottsdale 4-H Club

4-H

Albert

Owens, scottsdale 4-H

Dairy

Club

Member,

His

Registered Ayrshires

With

4

Of

e

Liberty 4-H

Club

Marched

Proudly

With

At The

The

Victory

Parade

County

4-H

Fair

�ambra 4-H Clubs

Marched In The

Victory Parade At The Co.

4-H

Fair With

Appropriate

Banners

The Sign Which

These

4-H'ers

Showed In The

Victory

Parade

Was

Worded;"We

Get Hitlers

Goat By �roducing

Food

For

Victory".

These

4-H

Garden Club Members

At

The Best

Arlington

Vegetables Could"Be Grown

Demonstrateq

Successfully

How

Winners At The

Washington

4-H

Club Achievement Program

Vegetable Exhibits At

The Roosevelt 4-H Club AchievemAnt

Program

Articles Exhibited By

The Union 4-H Handicraft Club At Their

Achievement Program

Each Member Of The 4-H Garden Club At

Individual Plot In The Club's

Victory

Avon�ale

Had An

Gar-den,

Which

Produced Food

For

Freedom

Tempe 4-H Garden

Club Grew

Plenty

Of Fine

Vegetables

Winners At The Roosevelt

Their Club

Won

4-H

Club Achievement

County

Honors At The

Program.

4-H

Fair

Judges

Inspecting

The

Gardens Of Gene And Elda

Their Gardens Were

Beltraminelli

Among

The �inners In

The Sears

4-H

Garden

Contest

Laveen

4-H Club And Leaders At Achievement

Day Program

Palo Verde 4-H Clubs Practiced Judging Swine

Betty

Carney

And

Billie

Hansen,

Members Uf The

Kyrene

Senior 4-H Club Were State

Champion Dairy

Production

Demons tra tors.

Each One

Had

Completed

6 Years

Of 4-H Clubwork

A

�uagon

Loaded With

Vegetables

From Union

Club Went To Market

4-H

Garden

Clare Huber

And Robert Fuller, Members

Of The Mesa Senior

4-H

Club,

Were State

Champions

In Class

A Dair.y

Production

Demonstration Each One Has Compl�ted

Five Years

Of

4-H

Clubwork

4-H

Club Members

And Leaders

Of Th� Roosevelt District

At The Left

Is

K.W.

Ingwalson,

Federal Field

Agent

For 4-H

Clubwork,

Who Conducted Leader

Training Meetings

In

Maricopa Count,y.

The

Leaders Shown Are From The

Roosevelt District

Delegates to the National 4-H Club

Congress

Four from

Maricopa County won the

Trip to

Chicago.

Maricopa County's

15

4-H

Club State

Contest

Winners Assembled for a

Radio

Program

Phoenix,

Ar-Lzona

November

15, 1944.

te Seed Growers of

Maricopa County:

This election for directors of the Arizona

Crop

Improvement Association is

�g

held at the request of Dr.

R.

L.

Matlock.

We have not had one for two years.

trghmn

grower-s are entitled to three -directors according to their participation in te past, and each sorghwn grower should vote for three..

Long Staple cotton has

!2st its director.

Kindly put checks oppo s i, te names in the sections you are lutled to vote in and mail to me at the address shown below.

Due to the lengtlv trghum list it was decided to submit to you only the names of growers that have

-

!til

in the program both the last two years.

Very yours,

'l

I...

��u has.

Ass't

Hobart,

/

.

./

;'1

//

i<2I/MP(VtII'

I

County Agricultural Agent.

�x 751,

Phoenix.

nu ARE

ELIGIBLE

TO VOTE IN SorghUtl1-Cotton-Small

Gr-adn-Al.I'a.If'a

,

(Ones

Underlined)

L S.

Abbott

SOHGHUM

(check

3

names)

B.

13.

Hawkins w.

R.

Neely

�;Jl Anderson Clarence Heberlee

,1. J. Lrnold

,D.

E.

Heywood

Hugh

Nichols

J.

Grant Peterson i. D.

Beebe

Arnold Hill Wilford

Phelps

J. M.

Quamme

�beI't

Bowen

J.

S.

Hoopes

Ear 1 G.

I rwi.n

11•

W.

Burns

I.

N.

Cooper

R.

VT

Hainey

W

.•

R.

Lacey

K.

B. MeMicken w.

Lee Rice

• jail Dana

Virgil

Shute

:arl

Ekholm

A.

P

..

Murphree

Hoss Stuart lohn H.

Evan s

Clyde Neely

B.

F.

Younker larkin Fitch l.

L.

Hadley

Otto B.

Neely s.

T.

Neely

SHORT STAPLE COTTON

(check

1 name)

B.

F.

Younker

1.

G.

Duncan

M.

F.

Patterson

�o

Ellsworth

L.

S.

Prince

Orval Knox

K.

B. iv1cIvlicken

A. Anderson

'A•

D

..

Bowers

SMALL GRAIN

(check

1

name)

Clyde Neely

J.

M.

Quamme

ALF'.ALFA

(

c he ck I

name)

w.

R.

Hegi

J'" L.

Hodges

R.

W

..

Hainey s.

Carl Miller

n/17/44

150c.

-Maricopa.

County

(By

Secretaries ,of Districts)

IRRIGATION DISTRICT

5

*Sorghum Crops Excluded cO

Ct-t rl cd

Ct-t rf

I

*REPORT OF CROP

AC��GES

BY IRRIGATION DISTRICTS

JUly

1944 co c..,..

r-I

Gj

4-f rl

-<

,::

.,-t

:n

� M

C)

Ol

m

M tv

0

..

Ol

<.:!

C1) r-I

� cd

CQ

Vl

Q)

.,-t

H

H

Q)

CQ

............

(J) H

4->�

Q)1Jl)

C1) ::;$ al(f)

'rl

..-t

0

0 o

0

M ro

(l) t..o

'0

..0

..0

liS

0

U)

(!)

(1.

::J

0

.--1 ro

-+J s:: il1

0 m

.j..)

0

H

M

.;i1

Co)

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Q)

0

.-I

4i

'.,-t

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::s ci

Co)

(J)

;j

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4->

·rl

(..)

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0 t) c..-..

o

Q'S

4->S

4-> 'r�::

OCl.4

0-"'-

-t

1

..-

S::.-+J o M

4-> 0

�..t:

OCl) u-

600

1200

3'

000

3,267

800

1

300

47

833

3 800

1,475

1

1

430

660

235

40

300

20

-4

I

986

00

55

3'l.L_

..

o

I

2 0

I

955

29

870

380

220

1 312

112

1"840

93 30 992

100

160

124

167

221

16

330 553 332 500

110

3

262

1 796

890

.__,.

:

320

750

16Q..

327

1:25

720

175

--t--Q--

!

3,,�.65

80

1

__

900

�8

55,412_

9ll_�2 ,427j_

125

250

1,787 �631

110

1,245

10

132

115

60

200

,8,375 3,3C17

10 3��

60

160

1,173

43

125

1

-,

200

_o'

19_.

470

170'

2,925

1,800

11,964

4,031

1,400

1.806

2,870

(f)

Q)

4-> as

Q

10

><

\.\l r-I t':t.,

'0

Ul

.....,

.

-riO

� til

M 'M

�:.;E til

,::

Q)

M

Q)

-o

{!)

$:

M�O d rl

.�

G>-

M

m

::s r,!)

(1)-

OM

::;$rl

...,

....,u_.

0)-

H

5

360

..-

Q)bO

() s::

::;$ .,-t

+'M

+-'p.

O)U)

..::1-

(J)

4->

� a

133

360

137

100

40

74 tn

0

"rl s:!

0

Q)

M

::1

.....,

(I)

;\) tl..t

..

20D

790

2.600

til

(1)-

O..t:

4->(f) t.U-ri

4->,...

OH

Jl.4-

100

0)

Q)� o+>

4->

Cl>

:.i) Q)

4-> �

OW

0..s::

,"

'0

::1

(f)

100 til

Q) rl-

..00

>i:)

(/j

"0

H

+-'0r4

Q):2!

Q) bDt:

11) .,-t t> :>

'"Crop Survey

1944

,

(I) s:: a ri

1>

S

H

(l)

4->

'u

$:"

....., t.ti

Q)

..c:

E::

(I)

0..

0

M

U

.

o

((J oM

:s

-

<

E-4

0

E-4

600

50

10

95

120

320

5

�OO

80

303

723

800

1,000

11,818

950

4,313

25,519

16,000

15.631

6.565

8,428

3,955

-,

820

10

80

6,934

433

850

900

4,026

300

1.U8

81

1.500

18

40,757

--t

'

4

.528

40

126

86

678

740 140

500

15

563

2�961

193

a,551-

�ilJ750

a548

915

20,613

740

53

513

600

247

165

165

20

230 120

120

40

9,659

1.382

2�JOO

617

116 tL$36 ��84

390 223.259

-

5 25

66

505 3.052

19

217 9.589

3 145 10

60

50

1,000

750

12,853 �92 1

175

1;26.516

50

30

10

114 169

15

192

85

1.000

1.,S�3 687

60

1..941

:1.072

236

2.598

250

60

110

7.':727

3 lust>

920

1.170

1.650

985

6,166

2,750

28,117

930

5.480

-

-

1,124

380_,271.

CU0PERATIVE EXTENSION WURK

IN

AGRICULTURE MW HOME ECONOMICS

Uni vers!

ty of Arizona

College

ot

Agriculture

U. S.

Department or

Agriculture and

Maricopll

Ooun ty

Farm Bureau

Coor;:r[,� ti.ng

St!..te of Arizona

P.O. Box 751

Phoenix

Agr�cultura1

Extension Service

Home Demons trs tion

Work

Coun ty Agen t V:ork

August 23,

1944

To AU Gottnn Grow'ors:

YOE in

.ltgcdn, tht s year, the Farm Labor Office of the Extension Servicf-J will assist obtaining labor to harveat your crop.

It is knoen tha t Labor will be harder to cotain for this job than La s t year and for this reason your whol.e-hear ted cooper­

Etio:1 is requested.

lit present we have four sources of labor, nameJ.y: Loca.L

labor, usua.lly

work­ ing in groups under t": l:..�b',r con tr6.C

t�'>r; prisonors of

:'nr

1i:'t

...

)

Lre e vt.ih,ble under contract, at prevailing wages, with the U.

S.

Army, the grower furnishing transport-.

atdon and picking sacks; interstate labor from the cotton growing atate s east of' here, available only when not needed in those states and under con t.rac

t with the War

Food

Administr&tion,

Office of Lsbor

, the grower

'furnishing adequate housing and wOl'k for three-fourths of the workfng da.ys

of the con t rac t period; snd Mexicon

Ratione-ls brought into this country under similar contract and condt t.Lons

,

Farm

In all ctasses except the

Labor Office at Phoenix or first, the fa.rml9r

must first sign an order with

M0SC, st�ting the number of l&borors need�d, kind the preferred, the type of work to be done

� the

'lif.;t ges to be p�

..

Ld

, requested da tel::

S possible.

and the per-Led of time needed.

This is an order, not a contract.

I'hen a ct'rtification can be made by the

County

Agent as to the need for the Lebcr-er-s

,

When, and if, the Labor' is

...

vn

Llab Le the farmer will be asked to sign a contract.

If ava fLab Le

, wcrkers will be delivered as near the

You, if you need Labor' for cot ton picking,.

are urged to place em ordezimme­ diately voU th your nearest Farm Labor Office

II

No Lsbcr-er-s can be furnished unless

TOur needs ll�re knorm

,

No interstate,. foreign or prisoner labor can be furnished ex­ cept on contract.

We arc informed that the Sta.tes of Arkt-msas, Oklahoma und Texas will allol'i no indi v idua.l

recruiting of labor in those

S ta tea.

In summarizing, the labor situation is about e s follows:

Experienced &gricultural labor is sCurccr than usual.

Four tble to some classes, locr-l, prisoners-or-war, interst�te and foreign will be aV4til­ degree.

when

The last three classes must be hired under individu�ls cove to this state at their own contract, except expense.

interstt:.te Labo'r ton

Orders must be received by the Farm Labor Office either at

1921 East

�r{Elshing­

Street, Phoenix or at 46 South Macdonald

Street, MGs�, before

� contract can be drevwn up.

Will you please Lntlcipcte your needs �nd place your order for l�borers ut un early date?

We do not promise definitely to deliver to you any Lab or

, but will in­ vcstiga.te

every plJssible source of le.b_")r in hopes

Qf filling y,",ur needs.

11e canne t

, however, do this until we know ycur needs.

Fill cut �nd return the enclosed orda� h�.nk

to the ne�re5t l&bor r.rrice

if you are interested.

:�U�,

;'2J!J�dt,

�t�

Agr1c�ltural

Agent

THE

ARIZONA GREEN CROSS

CAMPAIGN

November,

1943

-

May,

1944

Report

Ot Those

Having

Disabling

Accidents lote: A disabling accident is one which causes the loss of one day's work or more.

MARICOPA" COUNTY lAME

ADDRESS mE

OF ACCIDENT leith

Taylor·

537 'lest Palm

Lane,

·Phoenix

Auto accident troMBER

IN

NUMBER

OF

FAMILY ACCIDENTS

ADULTS

(OVER 14)

CHILD

DAYS

COST

LOST MEDICAL &

DOCTOR FEES

1

.3

.30

$

300

Cbas.

W.

Mickle

!.

&

T.

Bldg,

Phoenix

Kicked by horse

Fall trom horse

Gillespie

Land &

Gila Bend

Irrigating

Bee sting

Helping in well

Helping in cattle pen

Co.

s, L. Butler

Route

1,

Box

35,

Peoria

Sprained ankle

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

40 x

15

30

200

10 x

None x

Industrial case llorence

M.

Treat

Route 12",

Box

1010, Phoenix

Stepped into manhole

Pete

Treguhotr

Route

1,

Box 793, Glendale

Fractured neck

Lo"ren Cox

Route

2,

Box

Broken ribs

.364,

Glendale

1

1

1

1

1

1 lesley

Palmer

Route

1,

Box 70, Mesa

Sprained knee, sprained ankle

Jess

Brown,

Gilbert

Strained muscles

TOTALS

2

1

13

2

1

15

123

9 reports families reporting 1.3

accidents, involving 15 persons

15 indefinite .350

60

9

15

214

15

25

/.Q

$

940.00

COOPERArn

V l

EATEN.SION

WORK.

IN

AGRICULTURE

AND

ItOME ECONOMICS

Stnte of Arizon�

1'.0. Box

751

Phoenix l1n1versi ty of

Arizona

CollBge of

Agriculture

O. �:I.

�ne r···.pa�·i.m0nt

of

Agrieu1tur�

�Ii:-ir::..ccpa

County

Farm

Bu;-ea\(

Cocperating

Sept. 5, 1944

Agricultural Extension Service

Home Demonstration Work

County Agent

Work

IT f

S iJI.

., f,1'J.1"f-if'

...,�� d:){.�

,J'"3f\,.L:..J,

'f!iU'E

FOR

L

+

-Ii t

,ER.

S

Dee.T

4-H Club Member: make

Puck your this an event pif;nic backe t

, bring Dr.1.d

and Mother and let's long to be f{E��ENll3ERED.

Th�.re �vnl be fun for the entire family games

, sWimming, motion pfc tur-es roller-skating (at M�sa) in add.i

tiOIl to the picnic,

Everyone is UP!i t�)ti to �jwim.

liring your

$wim' suits and tove

Ls

,

A smell your charge will be made for swimming

'and

�'oller ska ting.

Tell

4-H friends abou t .i.

t t

The time and place is as follo·as:

··�::iC:1

\\,

MEE;a-l\E!t�t�EZ,VOUS

Pl:.RK

-

September

9th for all 4-H :members living eas t of

,."

Laveen.

1,·

....•

\\

,-,,\

II

BUCKEYE-BUCKEY�

SWIll1MING

POOL-

��'(/

September

16th for 4-H member-s flest of

Laveen.

4:30 f.

M.

THE j1.�

Isabell

Pace

'l'1ME

...

10:00

A., M.

to

(/)�

(i'

I)

liVing� tL��

-s

YOu::{C�.

bl�

_____

__.:_.

__

,.-

.�\�'1JI

\\\",,'\

't

t�\;;,

"1

0

��'uf��

Paul

W. Brown

�/L

c

.:::::::=:--::::

Ass't.

Home Demonst.

Asa't.

qounty

Agri. Agent

Agent

IP,PB:LP

Phoenix

MARICOPA COUNTY 4-H

VICTORY ACHIEVEMENT NUMBER

AND

CLUB nEWS

April 12,

1944

,

,�,��

LET'S ALL GO

4-H

COUNTY

FAIR

TO mlTER EXHIBITS

FROM YOUR CLUB

2 2·_

'

-------.�

.....

.::.::�

\/.

........

"<,

��JI

COOP'ERATlVE

EXTENSION WOPJ(

IN

AOnICULTURE

AND HOME

ECONOMICS

S't$.te of

Arizona

University

ot

Arizona

�ollege

of

Ag�iculture tJ.

S.

Department of

Agriculture

� MariCOpa County

Farm Bureau

Cooperating

..

P. O. Box

Phoenix

751

Agricultural

Extension Service

Home Demonstration Work

County Agent Work

*'* * * *

MA 'K E T'R E

BE'S

T BET T E R *' * * * *

...

As f�om

.the

springs forth the planting of a seed, and the cul.tdvatdon

of the ground,

plant,',

to grow and

'to' ripen, that

,we

-may

have our reward from its harvest.

So has youth reaped its benefits from an ever fertile

I

4-H:

BRIEFS OF THE 4-H FAIR

All

4-H'

Club

entcy blanks,'

should be in now-deadline is

April

17.

Loyalty to your club demands

,representation with a good exhibit.

Friday,

All exhibits are due to arrive at the

A.S.T.C.

April 21, and must be on time to be

,judged.

campus by

9:30

A.M.,

April 21

1944

CONSULT YOUR FAIR

BOOK

.

10:00

A.M.--

1:00 P.M.--

Judging ot t�e exhibits begins.

Showmanship

Contest for Halter Classes.

2:30 P.M.--

Demonstration Team Contests.

8:00

P.M:--

Camp tor

boys

and girls opens.

Leader or ps.rent chaperonage required.

Bring your bedding.

April

22

1944

(Farmers'

Day)

9:00

A.M.--

All Agricultura.l

4-H members may tests for enter the judging livestock, poultry, and, vegetables.

con­

All Home Economics contest for the

I

Club·members

project in which may en�er the tb:eyare judging enrolled-the 3 highest scores will constitute your club teem.

Show others what you can do on

Sat., April·22, at 9 A.M.

11:00 A.M.-

12 NOON

4-H

Leaders' Meeting,

Training

School Auditorium.

Picnic--

Farmers and 4-H'ers

"Get-to-gether."

1:30 P.M.- A BIG

4-H

VICTORY

.

spicuous by event its

PARA�E

absence)

(Don't

let your club

�e

con­

Make the

Parade of Clubs a real by your own original ideas, banners, flags, music, arm bands, c�ps, and 4-H colors.

3:

00 P

...

M

.-.

Dresa Revue

Contest'

3:15

P.M.Winning

�.M.-

Demonstrations.

3:50 P.M.-

AWARDS

4:00

Sale

(See

Page 4 of your Fair of

Fat 4-H

Livestock.

Book)

*****-tfo*

-2-

,win

Do you have a

DEMONSTRATION TEAM?

Remember it is a good

�y to points for your club, and you may have a winning team to compete in the sta.te,

cOi').test�

4-H

LEADERS;

please send the names of your

4-H

Demonstration

Teams.�d

the subject ot the demonstration to the County Agent's

Otfice at

1201"'

West

Madison,

Phoendx,

NOW.

*******

,�ude�s,." ,',Be

4-H

��s-- ',Remember 'the

sure yours

lippearance

is in the best formll ot your exhibits count with the

Foods

.

Let's have

;� po�t�'�

':�tid

Group.

Yours, may be

:a,,:w�ing

noii:'periSh8::t)1�

tood

'exhibit

from eveey exhibitl

,"

,*�*****

..

',

.::-

DON'T

FORGET:

.........

"

....

v

"

-

..

.:

THE

".

'..

'.

'DaESS' REVUE'

'(For

all

.�

,

,CIQtlling girls)

THE

..

;,'

;THli�

'

SHOWMANSHIP

'sWEEPSTAKEs

CONTEST ilWARD

�''':'YOllR' "SCRAP 'BodKS',,_;,,,:

'

"

YOUR

YOUR

';

','

-:

ACCIDENT

PREVENTION

HEALTff

POSTERS::

REPREsENTATIVES

..

,,"

-

'.

,.,',

", ,YOUR R&CORD

BOOKS

'Y9�R

S$CRETARY'�BOOKS',

_ ..

.',.

:""

"'

...

,

LAST request date in

BUTl:NOT

i,l!:AST��

k�hieveinent'

D�YS

��e

almost'

here.

Send your

SOON'�

':

Get your projects

co�plcted

and records in early_

.,

,�':

.�,

* * *

*

..

* *

,

Scottsdale: Malcolm Adams

Lewis ago; herd, and a purebred

Alfred Austin also purch�Sed a purebred Ayrshire calf from the famous

Ha�ps}ure

sow from the Mesa

Hampshire Farm some

� purchased a purebred

SOVI from the Mesa Farm.

Congratu­ lations for adding this fine stock to.your

club

project�.

Roosevelt had a were fine exhibited ex.'I1.ibits\ wonderful eXhibit day recently at which vegetables and lives�.

by club memb�rs.

We will see yo� at the Fair with some

,.

.

:.

,;..

:

..

,.'

.....

" of your

� ..

,

"

..

Palo Verde

has

They will be in

had'

several· -big

4:"H' parties and field days for their clubs.

:

attendance.

"at

.

" the :Fair.

...

Laveen:

Their

Space prevents

demons'tr'a

tion

•• '.

���'�i!

�'��io���4

.:;:'

">:

....

....

,bet-cire

the Washington 4-H Clubs.

additional

"nelVs" or c'i�b

��,tivi,ti��.

Watch for the next issue.

9�

��

(MrR.)

Iscbell Pete

Ass't.

Home Dem.

Agent

�/I)"�

Paul W. Brown

Ass't.

County Agri. Agent

It

I.

-r r

J"

,.

VII NO. 1

I.

NV�ICGPA

COUNTY

4-H

CLUB

N��S

F EBROARY,

1944

t r

]

ER

('

�UOTA

j

N,'

T lIE

' r

j'OUH'r:H

1",

.D

OND

rl

!/ fa VE

')

..

Tell your

What?

County

Workers

How Much?

When?

by February

16th

��_::o-l

DOn'T

FORGET

I

�\

'J[-

I

XT'S

THE

4-H

FAIR

,AT TEMPE IN APRIL.

\

--....

_----_._--if

It mL.y be b.

you want it.

bi.gger

job' in

'N<S time but

CWl be c:\..

Banner F&ir

BE

A

BOOSTER IF

YOU C11N

I r BE

A �n:NlmR.

I-Your exni.bi, ts well groomed or properly prepar-ed.

27Demonstrr.tion

TOU-fis.

3-Judging

Teams Lind Individud

,Judges

1i--A11 members of your club in "The

M.:.:.rch

of Clubs"

5-H0&1 th spec lmen o'-

6-·NeQt

Up-to-date

Boy

and Girl From Each

Recor-ds and

Secretary

Commun.i

Books ty

ILL ADD

UP

TO TELL' WHO WILL GET THE

CUJ!

FOR

1944.

YES-11LHAMBRll I-U�S IT!

DO THEY KEEP

IT

----_----

JlNOTHER

YEfl.R

?

?

?

--_._------

--

-.3-

Do and In you know wher'e'

N�tion�l

-

4-H

.•.

.•.

..

.•.

,"

..•..

'J'

Muricopu

4.

H' ers

&nked In state

Competl.

tion

Club.Contebts?

Here They hret

Dairy Foods Demonstrations B�rbara Jean Austin

Betty

Ruth

S�e�s

$50

War Bond

50

War Bond

Dress

Revue

Meat

Animal

CarolYn.Sehurter

••• j'

0' '., .......

'Malcolm Adams

Trip

To

Chicago

"$10

Vi&r

Stamp

$100

War Bond

..

Gold Watch

·Santb.:

Fe.

Trip·Awa.rd

Victory Achievement

Victory

Achievement

Victory Achievement

Victory

Gt.rden

'1

Eli G�tes

Mattie

VihinerJ

Elizabeth

Owens

Robert

Biggs,

Fred 'I'honen

01i ver

Ander con

" �

Trip

To

Chicago

,$25

�Vnr Bond

$25

War Bond

$25

War Bond

$25

War

Bond

.$25 W!lr

Bond

COUNTY �/INNERS

Food

'Prepur[�tion

Garden

Garden

.Dor6t�

Ad::..ms

Bobby Tyson

He bert Full er

Medal

Medal

Medul

"Keep Your

Head When You tUn

.And

Your

Heart'

When You

Lose."

M�E

A NOTE.

'OF THIS!

Two

Mr;.rioOpu

Coun ty

Leader-s

c.re

honored to

recei"e.

Leadership

Pins for

'outstanding servige'�-These

Pins ar-e gi yen

State

Bankers

Aaaocd.atd.on','

,.:.':':::-:.

.:

'.

;":

.'

",

mmu�ly

by the

Mr. Russell

Mrs.

Henness--Kyrene

M&r.y

Austin----ScottsdLue

-4-

NEW

CLUBS

OR OLD CLUBS

BACK

Tolle�on Home Economics

Waohington

Sunny slope

GrLndview

Mobile

MorristolJ'm

Aguila

Mes& Senior Club

Your county

Workers V'Telcome you into the

4-H

Club Ranks and wish you the

JOYS

of ccnrevenent and m�y you "M::.ke The

Best Better."

4-H

ACTIVITIES

----

WORK AND PLAY

The Senior sal.es at t.Qe

4-H Club at Scottsdti.le

has conducted the W"r stamp

Hieh

School through the year and are going .�trong in the 4th. Bond Drive.

On

Jtmuc:.ry �8th.,

Palo Verde

4

...

H girls entertained the boys, their Lecdez-s end the

County 4-H

Workers \vi th a

Truth or

Consequences

Program,

Bonfire

Party

&nd Wein�r ro�st, with all the trimmings and

�uch pie and cake--Those Palo Verde Bok6rstt

The

Boys

Will Give A Return

P�rty

Soon.

Pl.:

..

ns are ms

..

de tor a

Field

Day tor the boy

..

Judging and

Project

Visits with

&

Picnic.

to include ·Stock

"'

Alh�br�'4-H Club f1ni�hed with

��.picnic.

boyo conducted

� project tour recently and

The combined

4-fl

Club groups met In aasemhly FridLTY, Februury

4, to learn tJ.bout the

4-H

C�fety Progr(im and Plan for the Bond Drive

Campdgn--The Progrcin

\V�S highlighted by the pre�entution ,in behaLf of the NationLl

4-H Club Conunittee s.nd

the St&te

Lor.der

j of a

$100

V{t.r

Bond to

Cnrolyn Schurter, st

.....

te Winner of The Dress Rewe

Contest.

Congrutul�tions Cc:rolyn,f�nother honor added to your long list.

Who'll Be The

1944 dinn(;r?

?

?

money

The girlc ofDys�rt B&.king

with which to buy

4;.

Club sold

Christmas cards to stove to be used by the earn members at their

school--They

have Money to spend.

Will someone pl ec.se

tell them where thj;y C&l1 purchase the

�?

with

Wae.hington 4-H mqving pictures.

Clubs entcrtcined visitorf)

Funds ftf(;rC

C1.t

the rc.Lsed

for the c.lubs

School

Carnival trb!:.sury.

.,.5-

Avondt:le

4-H

Clubs put on � great displ(1.Y

of the finest vegetables from their 4-H VictorY

Gardens recently� 'Seventy-six l

..

-H Gr.rden Club member-s p[�I·ticipated in the event end mtmy fine premtum ribbon.s

wer-e

£..waro.cd to the' winning exhibitorB.

They will r.Lso exhibit

&t the County 4-H Fair in fo-pril.

Club

g�r1s

the exhibits snd the ed! tor of the Arizonu

Ft:..rmer took visited pictures of each of these groups.

'.

P-eori�� 4-H Clubs had

0.

big share in

'the success of' the

SchooJ!s

Ct..rnive.L held sometime ago

,

Thoy lu.d two booths 'and entertained the

500 Pa trons and S tud en t� with contdnuoua moving" picturf:s.

milk fund for the ccnool, ct.i'et�riu

\Vc.s

boosted considerably

The by the

4-'H Club';.; contributions from Carniv�

..

l sal.es

,

Leveen fir.r:t one

4-H Clubs m.VE: hcd two big

VlE.�i

-,�

hLyrc-...ck

purty

�d.

th

4.'.

pe.rtiet; thus f:..r.

The big

'Nemer' ros

..

st.

The second yves t: cr.mpf'Lr-e progrcm. snd gz.mes

,

�vith plenty .of' good food.

County

4-H

Worker::-3 wer-e guests £...t

L:.

'l'h�nk&g:f.

virig

Dinner progrL"..m

b.

t which

Bobby' ·Tyson· w�o presented

�;.

county

4-H Go�rden meds.L,

Union

4-H Club:; have t, fine group

Victory G""rden, which

Wt.s

gi ven

-.rI'iierecogni

tion in the Ar!.

eonz.

Furmer publ.Lce.

tion.

They will have some veri" fine exhibi tp .'...t the

County 4-H

·Fdr.

".

o

K�rene

4-H

Clubs he.vo

eno thezwhicl� is

f'i"n:6

Victocy

Gt:{rden this y€;[.�r, providing vege tc.hl.ca

;for the schoo.Ls

Cu.feteri� an� members homes

,

They c.Lao

have l;:.ctiv(;

Livecto¢k

end Home Economies

4-H Clubs.

!emPEJ

4-H Clubs:'

T\vo group

Victor.!

Gardens of the

Trdt,ling

School i:A.nd the 8th.

Street 4-H Clubs t.:.re

providing

Vegeta.bles

r.bundant.Iy

for their club members

The Grt..mmf.r Gchool' has en

�ctiv

4-1I

Livestock Club, which has been prepar-Ing diligently for the

County 4-H Fr:..ir.

I

M�s[..

4-H Club�.

s.re

�gc.in

pl.anrung

to equt.L

or surps.cs their

fo�er

fine re�ords �t the F�ir.

The

Fr�kl!n

Club

�d the Mesa

Se-r:wr

L.na

Club thE.�Y

�r(;

«re both under the cc

..

p,,-blt:

Leader-shi.p

of Mr.

D.C.

Rigg: conducting aome very fin€.:

4-H Club

Project�.

-6-

099ndler

.-8

DuilY

Club doubled its

membership

thi� ye�r.

Ic.n7

of their .embers have registered d�,iry �imcl.s, which will be exbibit�d at the

County 4-H

Fhir.

V!einel� roasb and picnic

Luncheon by

They their

�1er�

Leader treated to

,

Mr.

D.\t.

L

Hulet,

�t their

:;"�st regu1�r

meeting.

They have pl.anned

l:.

tour of

projects

md will invite pl.;.rents

and friendt.i

to come dong

(lllci see thE:ir olub projects.

'Diu y\>u re�.6

of jour �ctivitiE:s here?

If

4-H

Clab

Reporters

\1hero not, �-:hy not?

Are You?

S41FE'TY PROGIUiW

94,500 l\;-nsric';llS itiE:re KillE.d

in 194;

U.S.

Home

Accidel),ts--�Vht:.t

Are

You

4 H' er�

Get

J:..ccidcnts--3.3,oOO in

Going To [10 J'1bout

It

....

-??

Busy--Te.Ll

UD .Jht

..

t

You

Are Doing

To Prev�nt .f.ccidents.

COOPERATIVE EXTENSION

IN

�'(ORK bGRICULTUF.E f.ND HOME ECONOr,iICS

STATE OF J..RIzatlii.

-

P.o.

EOX

:PHOENIX

751

ONlVEHSITI

OF iJUZONf..

COLLEGE OF L.GRlCULTURE

U.S.

kND

DEPJ.RTMF",,'T

O�' i.GRICUL'rURE

MJsraCOp� COUNTY COOPERATING hGRICIlLTUR1;L EXTENSION SERVICE

HOME DEMONSTru�'l'ION v/ORK

COUNTY AGENT WORK

lire.)

Is�,bcl1

P�.ct::

Ass' t.

Home D&m.

il.gE)nt

rPwdW:�

Paul, �i.

Brown

.&ss't.

County Agri. l�gent

EIGHTEEN1H l�AL

4-H CLUB FhIR

PlARICOPA COUNTY

BOYS'

&

GIRLS' 4-H

FAIR

April 21 &

22,

1941.

ARIZONA STATE TEACHERS COLLEGE CAMPUS

TEMPE"

ARIZONA

Held under the directi:on of the

Agricultural

Extension

Service of the the'

University of

Jlrizonu,

A14izont.

stnte

Teachors

College in eooperation and the with

Maricopn County

Faril Bureau

..

Il'''le"!

Z

"0

N A S TAT E

TEA C HER S

TEMPE, ARIZONA

February

26,

1944

COL

LEG

E

Mr. Paul W.

Brown

Atett.

In

County Agricultural

Agent

Charge of

Boys

& Girls

4-H Club Work

Phoenix, Ari zona

'Dear Mr. Brown:;

Again we are glad to welcome the 4-H Fair to the campus of the Arizona

State Teachers

College.

The work of the 4-H

Clubs represents four of the basic factors in the lite of the nation.

ill

Cle,ar [email protected], balanced and unprejudiced thinking are al.aY8 necessary finding the best and most permanent solution to e:ny problem.

In these unusual

\be8 this is supremely important.

A philosopher once said the most valua.ble

thing in the world is "the good heart." When we think about it we probably will approve this statement.

u!he

good heart" includes our a.ttitudes, fe,elings and purposes.

We are wit­

Dessing

"hat misery and destruction can be caused by individuals who do not

�ave

"the good heart." take

This is the day of production.

We have

.seen

miracles of production place on the rarm and in the factory"

The produets of the skilled hand are to essential to survival and are being used to save civilization as well as destroY' it, acoording to the kind of

� back of their use.

The thoughts of the mind and the

·ln1te feelings of the heart require the hand to'give them def­ form, whether it be in agriculture or construction work, or art or music.

The clear, wholesome mind,

"the good heart" and the busy hand all help to one r produce good'healtn.

In turn, good health is necessary to the full use of

S abilities.

It is difficult to single out one of these factors and say it's more important than the others.

All are tied together and together they make up the tine, well-balanced and effective individual

•.

The poet and philosopher expressed the idea when he made a wish for:

"A mind unafraid to travel even though the trail be not blazed;

An understanding heart.

A sight of the eternal hills and unresting sea and of something beau tiful the hand of man has made;'

A

'sense of humor and the power

�o laugh." of a

The

4-H

Fair is the

place

we bring together and exhibit the products head, heart, hand and health.

It is serious and worthwhile business, but also very happy occasion.

Let us all join in making this

yearts

Fair a big and successful affair

JSincerelrs'

--

_,A) rad�age'l'�

President

001.8

C.

BASIS

FOR DETERMINING 4-H SWEEPSTAKES AWARD

A must be won

Trophy

Cup is given each year for Fair participation three consecutive years to be retained.

¥eual

and opportunity is given all clubs regardless of size.

All

4-H

Club leaders from a community or school should jointly fill out this report·immediat�ly after the Fair and send it to the

Madison St,

County Agent's Office, 1201 West

by

April

26th.

Report forms will be provided.

A.

ATTENDANCE A'r FAIR:

100

Full attendance fo'r each day of the Fair rates your Club points for each day.

Any percent of attendance will give your

Club that n�mber of points.

B.

EXHIBI'rS

AT THE FAIR:

1.

Exhibits made are credited on basis of relation to total enrollmel1t of club.

bers

Example:: A club of 12 mem­ displays 9 exhibits and gets 75 points.

2.

Three points are allowed for each first place ribbon

3.

Two for second place ribbon

4.

One for each third place ribbon on exhibits

I

CONTESTS ENTERED:

D.

Five points are allowed for each contest participnted in:

1.

Deaonsbrntdon Team

2

•.

Judging

3.

Showmanship

4.

Dress Rewe

5.

Health

6.

Champion

Representatives

Percentage of enrolled members in 4-H Parade uated as in

A)

(Eval­

SPECIAL

HONORS WON:

Three.points

for each first place;

2 for second;

1 for third:

Demonstration Teams

Judging Teams or

High

Indi vfdual.e

Victory Par-ade

Dress Revue

Winner

Any

Other

(describe fully)

-

1

-

4-H

SEVEN POINT VICTORY PROGRAM

1.

Help to interpret the National

Victor,y Program to the

Community.

2.

Produce and conserve abroad" needed food supplies for home and

3.

S�ve for

Victor,y.

4.

5.

Develop our heil1 th and t.hat of the coramund, ty

Acquire useful, tec,hnical and mechl�ica.l

skd.Ll,s to meet war time needs.

6.

Prcct.Lce

democratic procedures and learn to apprecf.at.e

better our democratic way of life.

7.

Organize 4-H Discussions reg&rding some of the important social end economic I'o.rces

now at work.

s

-r

;\ 1'1

D

J j\J

G G U;\

K

D vY J·r}j U i'IC L

E

Sf\ JVl

February

29

J

1944

April 7,

1944

April 15, 1944

SCHEDULE OF

EVmTS

Final {�nrollment due in

4-H office for eligibility

Each and communi� selects

��e healthiest

4-H Club boy girl and sends names to 4-H

Office,·120l

West

Madison·,

Phoenix

Record books, selected for contest, due in County

4-H

Office,

1201 West

Madi�on,

Phoenix

ENTRY

BLANKS for Fair exhibits due in Fair

O� at. Tempe on

April ?, 1944

Dc�dline for above, Monday, April 17, at 5:00 P.M.

********************

April

21!

10:00 A.M.

1:00

P.M.

2:30

P.M.

8:00

P.M.

April.

22,

1944

1944

9:00

A.M.

,

11:00

A.M.

11:00

A.M.

12:00

Noon

-----

All exhibits order to be

�st ne at A.S4T.C.

before 9:30 A.M.

in judged.

Judging of above exhibits

Sh.:>wmanship contest for halter classes

Demonstration team contests

Camp for

4-H Boys and for Girls opens at

8:00

P.M.,

Chaperonage required by leaders or parents for each group

INSTRUCTIONS TO ALL JUDGING CONTESTANTS

(Campus)

Livnstock

Judging

Contest

(All

4-H and Farmers)

1

1 ring Holstein-cattle

(written reasons)' ring Jersey cattle ring hogs

(Breeding gilts)

Poultry Judging Contest

1 pen wllite leghorns

(All

4-H members)

(written reasons)

1 pen white

1 pen reds leghorns

(Breed type)

(Production

class)

Vegetable Judging

(all 4-H)

Beets, Carrots,

Head Lettuce

Home Economics

Judging

Contest

(a)

Judging clQ�1ing-open to all clothing

(b)

Judging foods-open to all food members members

Parents visit

4-H

Le�ders

4-H exhibits

Meeting

Training

School Auditorium

Picnic

Farmers and

(Because

person of and

4-H' er-s war

"Get-togE3ther" conditions

'and food family group will rationing, provide own each

.lunch.)

-

3

-

1:30

P.M.

3:00 P.M.

3:15 P.M.

3:50 P.M.

FARMERS'

DAY PROGRAM

4-H Victory

Parade

Contest betvleen clubs, based on following points: attendance, marching, banners, original ideas

Community singing

Address of Welcome

-

Dr.

Gammage

Response in behalf of cooperating

Extension Service

Response:

Hollis

13.

County

Farm Bureau.

Gray, President,

Maricopa

Dress Rewe

Winning Demonstrations

Girls'

Highest Team.

Boys' Highest

T'eam

Awards

Health

Champions

Demonstration Teams

Judg.ing

Teams

High

Individuals

Other Medal

Winners' names read

(Medals awarded at

Achievement

Special

Awards given

Days)

MARICOPA COUNTY

4-H FAIR

COMMISSION

Mr.

Mr.

Mr.

Hollis B.

Gray

Dale

C.

Riggins

Louis F

_

.J

oslin

Mrs.

A.

W.

Austin

Mrs.

Alice

Ramsey

Miss Grace

Ryan

Mrs.

Isabell Pace

Mr.· Paul W. Brovm

Mr.

F.

E.

Ostrander

President Farm Bureau

Mesa

Palo Verde

Scottsdale

Kyrene

Home

Demonstration

Ass't. Home Dem.

Agent

Agent

Ass't.

County Agri.

Agent

A.S.T.C.

-

4

-

ELIGIBILITY date than

Only eo

4...fl

member.

in good standing whose record book is compl.ebe

to

(April 12)

and whose enrollment was in the county 4-H office not later

February

29,.1944, may compete in this fair.

G��ERAL RULES M�D REGULATIONS

-I

Competition

may exist between two members of one club or between two entries of the same member.

However, where there is no competition, judges may award one ribbon or no

ribb�n

according to merit.

First, second, and third place ribbons will be awarded according to merit.

No change in schedule will be made to accomodate members who wish to enter more than one com test.

All clipping and preparation of' exhibits for competition must be com­ plete before the exhibit is checked in at the Fair Ground.

Hand clippers.

will be permissible for last minute check-up.

wax

No leader or after the paJ·.�ent will be allowed to assist the club members in any exhibit reaches the

Fair Ground.

I

All rules not specifically stated in this prospectus will be settled by the 4-H'

Fair Commission.

This Commission meets at 5:00 P.M.

Thursday,

April 20th, Tempe.

ENTRY

R�QUIREMENTS

Fill out team contests.

entry blanks in duplicate for all exhibits and demonstration f

Entries must be furnished to fully made out on the regulation forms, lea�ers, and are due in the hands of the 4-H

Fair which will be

Superintendent at at

8:00

P.M.,

8:00

P.M.

Friday,

April 7,

1944.

Deadline on entries

---Monda.y April

17

Mail all entries for contests and e.xhibi'l:.s to the

J.-H

Fair

Superinten­ dent, a

c/o

Arizona State Teachers

College, Tempo,

Arizona.

A slip signed by member of the County

Office must be placed in the self-addressed envelope when the entr.y

blanks are mailed to the Fair

Office at Tempe.

or

Do not list on one for more than one entry blank entries for more individua�.

than one department

Do Not Make

Entry

Unless You Expect to

Exhibit

-

5

-

<

EXHIBITORS and that

Exhibi tors must see that their e,xhibi ts are tagged by the clerks they race!

ire claim checks before leaving.

In fairness to the ex­ hibitor and to the judge, all personal identification must be removed before leavin.g.

.:i at

A camp for

4-H

8:00

P.M. and close boys and girls will be open

Thursday and Frida.y nights

Saturday

A.M.

Reservation should be made a few days in advance at

Tempe

Fair

Office; memb�rs bring own cots and bedding; groups

�be

adeguately

chaperoned by leaders or parents.

EXHIBITS

Records and secretary

County 4-H

Office.

Send them books will be selected and exhibited by the directly to 1201 W.

Madison,

Phoenix.

Do not make entr,y blanks for them.

Details of arrangement for exhibits will be

Superintendents and Assistants.

handled.by

Department who

No exhibits ma.y be removed until

4:00 P.M., Saturday except for girls

participate

in Dress Revue.

In order to avoid loss, exhibitors or leaders will be expected to pick up exhibits for their club.

or's

Exhibits must be claimed by presenting stub of tag which is exhibit­ receipt.

'Fair Board not responsible for exhibits after

5:00 P.M.

S�tur­ day April 22nd.

For the Home Economics

Department, the number of lots will be limited to three in each class where the total below the county enrollment in that 'class falls enrollment for

B� standard club

(5

members) are

Club enrolled members may exhibit only in the recognized project in which they during the, current year, such as rabbit, calf, or clothing.

total

A tot.,l exhibit in any class shall consist of all the lots therein.

Total exhibit exhibits prizes will be determined mathematically.

separately.

Do not enter case or

Every effort will be made to protect and care for entri�s but in no will the Commission

,or any Fair

Official be responsible for any damage loss which may occur.

Entries are made and accepted on this condition.

-

6

-

DEMONSTRATIONS will

Friday,

beginning

at 2:30

P.M., the County Demonstr;l.tion

Contests begin and continue until the winning teams have been determined.

All club members in good standing are eligible to compete on a club demonatrub­ ion team with the following exceptions:

Members of

County Championship teams

Jll'4,st present different de'monstrations from the ones previously gi van.

Members of the State

Championship teams must present demonstration material in another division, i.e., if they are on a poultry demonstration team

.one

time, ,they 'may be on a dairy demonstration team the next time, etc.

All material used during a.

demonstration must be arranged for by the team or its leade,t.

SUbject matter used in the demonstration must pertain to the project in which the club members are enrolled.

The demonstration contest, m�y be seen by anyone, team members included.

A maximum of twenty minutes wj!ll

be allowed for each.

demonstration.

A five minute's before the limit.

warning signal

wil�

be gi ven

Each standard club or mixed

4-H club may present a demonstration.

Mixed clubs may bel's.

present no mor-e than one demonstration for each five mem­

Dairy club members may demonstrate in ei thar dairy productaon or dairy fo'ods.

Members enro

Ll.ed in Foods

Projects may enter the

D[ii�J

Foods

Demonstration.

Preliminary conte'sts may be required subject to the wishes of the

4-H

Fair Commission.

Teams must handle their equipment wi.thout

assistance from their lead­ ers from the time ary must be they enter the demonstration room.

Any assistance necess­ obtained through the chairman of the judging

,?ommittee.

DEMONSTRATION CONTESTS

The age for the Junio,r Division

(10-13)

and the Senior

Division

(14-20)

will be the age of .the contestant by, June 1st, 1944.

However, those contestants who a.re

on the border-line between the two age divisions, may compebe in that division in which they did the bulk of their work during the current year.

That is, if a contestant is in the

8th grade and becomes 14 during the last.

spring months, they may enter and compete in the Junior Division.

If a contestant is 14 near the beginning of the school year, it will be neceasary to enter in the Senior Division.

DEMONSTRATION

CLASSIfICATION

-

JUNIOR & SENIOR

Class 1

-

Class 2

-

Clothing and Home

Improvement

Baking, Canning and Food

Preparation

Class .3

-

Dairy

Food

Class

4

-

Crops

Class 5

-

Livestock

(other than

Class

6

-

Dairy Production

Class

7

-

Rural Electrification

Dairy)

Class

8

-

Miscellaneous

All demonstration team.s will give their demonstrations and be judg(;d separately, according to the following classification:

Agriculture,

Live­ stock, Foods,

(including

Baking, Canning,

Meal

Planning, Dair.y Foods,

Cloth­ ing and related

subjects.)

First, second and third place winners will be named in each division.

-

7

-

JUDGING CONTESTS

Agricultural Judging Contest, Saturday April 22, beginning at 9':00 A.M.

Home Econo:mics Jud.ging Contest,

Saturday,

April

22,

9:00 A.M.

All club members in

good

standing are eligible to judge.

GENERAL

CONTES'r RULES

1.

The judging contest is open to all boys and girls in the 4-H Clubs of

Maricopa

County.

Contestants will be grouped as follows:

First and second.

place awards will be given to highest indiv�duals in the junior and senior

.Q!Lihe

divisions in each contest.

total scorc� of their

�hree

!�1JITards will be given clubs based highest individu�ls in the contest.

2.

Any

I contestant found guilty of any unf'af.rneaa

shall be disqualified dur­ ing the contest and barred from judging.

There will be no talking during the contest.

3.

Notes may be taken while in judging the varLous classes to aid the contestants remembering their reasons for placirig.

4.

Contestants will be points.

graded as follows:

Placing"

100 points; reasons,

100

5.

Fifteen mtmrtes will be given to place each class, and write reasons.

6.

These General Rules

Judging contests.

apply to both the Agriculture and Home Economics

AGRICULTURAL JUDGING CONTEST RULES

1.

,The Senior

E-,'TOUp and Junior

group

will judge

.3

rings of ring's dairy cattle,

1 ring of hogs',

2 rings of poultry.

vegetables,

2

HOME

�CONOMICS

JUDGING CONTEST RULES

Eligibility of girls for Home Economics

Judging Contests conforms to the General Rules for rules with the

Judging contests.

The contestants shall be bound by these following additions:

1.

A girl shall enter only the judging contest in which she was enrolled for project work during the present club year.

'2.

Contestants may be asked for written or oral reasons at the pleasure of the judges.

Specific instructions to be given at time of contest.

3.

Senior and Junior'

Foods

Division contesta.nts will articles: a.

c.

Four b.

Four plates muffins plates biscuits

Four butter cakes d.

Oral and written reasons e.

Measurement of common may be required ingredients f.

Table

Setting g.

Menu

Judg:Lng judge the.

following

4.

Senior and Junior articles:

Clothing

Division Contestants will judge the following

(a)

Fringed articles;

(b)

Hemmed articles;

(c)

Dresses.

Written reasons may be required for either group.

-

8

-

SENIOR

DREss

REVUE

The time fOI" judging the individual entries in the

Senior

Dress Revue will be announced later.

Rj.bbons will not be awarded, and placings

wi'll

be subjeCt to change in order to j.nclude any summer

Dress Revue entrants.

Final

county

placings will be determined prior to

Club Week.

JUNIOR DRESS REVUE

A Junior Dress Revue will 'be held on fide member of

Friday, April

17.

Any bona first, second, third and fourth year

Clothing club who hhS made and who exhibited a dress at the 4-H Fair,will be' eligible for entry.

Leaders will send the names of those entering this event to the County

4-H

Orri,ce

by

April

21..

CLASS NO.

LOT NO.

DEPAR'l'MENT ItH. E." HOME ECONOMICS

IV

I.

II

III

FIRST YEAR CLOTHING--Juniar Division

(10

Yrs to 14

Yrs)

1.

Fringed

Article

2.

Hemmed Article

3.

Apron

4.

Cotton

Dress

SECOND

YEAR CLOTHING--Junicr Division

5.

One slip

6.

Laundry, Garment Bag

6-:a.

Shoe

Bag

7.

Cotton or

Linen School Dress--set-in sleeves

THIRD

YEAR

CLOTHING--Junior Division·

8.

Chiid's

Sun or

Play

Suit

Dress--Sport type in sil�, or cotton rayon

10.

Made over

Garment

(afternoon)

(afternoon)

FOURTH YEAR CLOTHING--Junior Division

11.

Child's outfit--one undergarment

& dress, or suit

12.

Wool or rayon dress, or skirt and blouse

13.

Made over

Garment

-

9

-

CLASS NO.

LOT NO.

DEPARTMENT "H.E."

HOME ECONOMICS

V

FIFTH YEAR CLOTHING-- Junior

Division

VI

14.

Slip

15.

Dress

16.

Made over

Garment

FIRST YEAR CLOTHING--Senior Division

(14

Yrs to 21

Yrs)

17.

Hemmed article--scar£, towel

18.

Fringed articl�

19.

..\pron

20.

Cotton dress

VII SECOND

YEAR CLOTHING--Senior Division

21.

One slip

22.

Laundry, garment Bag

22a.

Shoe

Bag

23.

Cotton or linen school dress--set-in sleeves

VIII THIRD

YEAR CLOTHING--Senior Division

24.

Childls s�n or play suit

25.

Dress--sport type in silk or rayon, or cotton afternoon

26.

Made over

Garment

IX FOURTH

Y�\R CLOTHING--S�nior Division

27.

Wool·or Rayon dress or skirt & tailored blouse

28.

Child's outfit--one

undergarment

& dress or suit

29.

Made over

Garment

X

FIFTH YEAR OLOTHING--Senior Division

30.

Dress

31.

Slip

32.

Accessories

33.

Made over

Garment

-

10

-

CLA§S

NO.

XI

_LOT

NO.

DRESS REVUE

DEFARTMENT tIH_J!4"

HOME ECONOMICS

3.4.

Senior Dress' Revue a.

may include

Wash dress or suit

(school

or

sport)

b.

c.

Wash or dress, suit or ensemble street

wear)

Best dress

Or ensemble

(school,

including dress sport, d.

Informal party dress

(floor length)

Any.

Senior or

Junior the

Dress Revue Contest.

, girl exhibiting in the Fair may participate in

XII

First Year

Canning--Junior Division

35.

Assortment

3 jars fruits

36.

Single jar fruit

37.

Assortment 3 jars tomatoes

38.

Single jar tomatoes

XIII Second year

Ca��ing--Junior Division

39.

Three jars vegeta.bles

40.

Single j ar vegetables,

(Not

tomatoes)

XIV First

Year C�nning--Senior Division

41.

Three jars frui ts-

....

assorted

42.

Single jar fruit

43.

Three

44.

jars vegetables--assorted,

Single jar vegetables other than tomatoes xv

HOME ECONOMICS 'DIVISION

-

FOODS

EXHIBITS

AND POSTERS

War conditions have greatly increased the need for foods.

To meet this increase and to give every person a fair share many foods have been rationed.

It would be unwise and even unpatriotic to waste food; hence, food clubs, meal planning and baking groups w�ll, as a group prepare and exhibit non-perishable foods only.

Raw natural models may be used.

The foods, cut outs or food following is an outlineq plan.

Full cooperation is urged"

'l'HEM� FOJ1,

EXHIBITS

-

F'OOD Ii'OR HEALTH THE 4-H WAY

Each club exhibit 'to have one poster, size

28" x

22" (others as de­

sired).

Table space will be provided approximately

30" in width for each display.

Sug£estions for

Posters:

1.

Better Health for

Victory and Peace

2.

Build

Stronger

Citizens with Healthful

3.

Eat These Foods Daily

'Foods

4.

We PlEnted Our

Way to Health, Victory

Garden

Emphasis

5.

We Include Foods from Our

Victory

Gard�ns

6.

Eating for Health

7

Meals the

4-H

8.

Others of

Way your own choice

-

11

-

Suggestions

1.

for

Displays

Groups of food needed each day, e.g., milk, vegetables, fruit, cereals, fats, eggs & meat.

2.

Amount of each needed eac� day by a

4-H girl.

1 qt.

of milk

2 servings of, green,

1 or more servings of leafy, or potatoes yellow vegetables

1 serving of citrus fruit or tomatoes

1 serving of fresh or dried fruits

1 egg

I

3 serving of meat or cheese or beans pats of butter or enriched margarine'

1 servi.ng

whole grain cereal

Bread three times a day

Total Exhibits will be judged on the following:

1.

General not

Appearance

--

Neatness, attractiveness, crowded,

general

appeal, good color effect

2,

Expresses the theme

.3.

Holds interest

�irst,

second, and third place

-

12

p

KODUC£

�CU

C

0

1'j s

E

1\

V E

HANDICRAFT DEPARTMENT

-

JUNIOR & SENIOR by

All

Handicraft exhibits must be on display Friday, April 21,

A.M.

Judging starts at

lO:OQ.A.M.,

Friday, April

21.

Classes will be made to fit entries in this division.

For example, tie racks, tables, camp stools, milk stools, book case, book ends, picture frames; tool boxes, tin ware, marble work, leather work, copper work, costume jewelry, stuffed dolls, -toys

, model aircraft, etc.

CLASS NO.

I

II

III

IV

LOT NO.

-

"

..........................

(a)

Woodcraft

(b)

Lea ther'cra,ft

DEPARTMENT

4-H

Handicraft

4-H Handicraft

(0)

Metalcraft

4-H Handicraft

(d)

Miscellaneous 4-H Handicraft

(e)

Needlecraft:

Lot 1

-

Lot

Embroidery

2.-

Knitted Articles

Lot

Lot

3

crocheted Articles

4

-

Clothing

Ensemble

Skirts with matching accessories

:::MI:::S:::C=E::LL:::;AN::'=FD=t=JS===D=EP=f=ffi=T=ME=:"N=T="P=�i'=f

===:!:(:::RE=C=.ORDS,

SECRETARY

BOOKS,

ETC.)

Please

No�!

Do not enter records or secretar,r books directly through the Fair Office.

The

County

Office will select from entries all exhibits in this

(Leaders

Department.

may'

indicate which records and secretary books they wish to enter.)

These are due in the

Club

Of'fic0, 1201 W.

Madison St, Phoenix, April 15, 1944.

4-H MEMBERS' PROJECT RECOHD

BQOKS,

AND SECRE1'AP.YS

BOOKS

1-

Dairy

2.

Beef'

J.

Swine

4.

Sheep

5.

6.

Poultry

Vegetable

Garden

7.

Flower Garden

8.

Handicraft

9.

Habbits

10.

Clothing

11.

Meal

Planning

12.

Baking

13.

Canning

14.

15.

Secretarys

Books

Project Scrap

Books

POSTERS

HOME AND FARM.

ACCIDENT PREVENTION

Open to

!ll

4-H

Club Members

Posters may te original drawings

cutouts or paintings, on cardboard size 22" x

28".

-

13

stiff

-"FOOD WILL WIN THE WAR AND

-

-

-'-.

--

WRITE

THE PEACE"

-

Claude R.

Wickard

----

DAIRY DEPARTMENT

Livestock will be received

7:00

A.M.

and

9:30 A.M.

Thursday night until 9:00

P.M.

or between

Friday.

Judging begins at 10:00 A.M.

Friday April

21.

Club members must feed, water and care for their own dairl and beef animals.

Feed for livestock must be furnished by the club member showing

Club members must show their entered in a class.

In this case, own animal� unless they have more than one they may use other club members to show ad­ ditional animals.

Animals must be shown with a halter.

All calves must have a halter 'With a rope at least five feet long.

All clipping must have been done before reaching the Show'o clippers may be used for last minute

check-up.)

(Hand

cept for

Cattle exhibits will be judged according to the breed score ca.rd

disqualifications in the case of

grades.)

(ex­

Club members must own animals shown, and all registered in the member's name, thirty days tration and transfer numbers must appear on registered stock must be

(30 days)

prior to show.

Regis­ entry blanks and all registration papers must be at hand at the time of

;judging.

Provision will be checking these papers with the

Superintendent of the Department.

made for animals

Parents and leaders will not be allowed to assist in any way with after they reach the Fair Grounds

(Your

cooperation

appreciated.)

The breed associations the various breeds of usually offer suitable prizes for winners in dair,r cattle.

between a

Tie class of grade cattle is determined by the sire.

That is, a cross

Jersey and

Guernsey would be a grade Jersey only if the sire is

Jersey.

CLASS NO.

LOT NO.

DEPAR,1MENT

liD" DAIRY

AND

BEEF CATTLE

I.

REGISTERED JERSEY

1.

2.

Registered bull born after

July 1,

1942

Cow,

.3

yrs.

and over, born before

January 1, 1941.

Cow,

2 yrs. and under) yrs, born Jan.

1, 1941 to Dec.

31,

1941-

Senior yearling heifer, born Jan.

1,

1942 to June

30,

1942.

Junior yearling heifer, born July 1, 1942 to Dec.

31, 1942.

6.

Senior heifer calf, born Jan.

1,

1943 to June 30,

1943.

7.

Jr.

heifer calf, born after July 1,

1943.

8.

Champion registered female,

(first place winners from lots 2,),

4,

5,

6 and

7.)

_

14

_

PkASS

NO..

II.

LOT NO.

GRADE JERSEY

DEPARTMENT "D"

9.

Cow,

3 yrs and over, born

befor-e

Jan.

1, 1941

10.

Cow,

2 yrs.

and under 3 yrs

.• born Jan.

1,

1941 to Dec.

31, 1941

11.

Senior yea.rling heifer, born Jan.

1, 1942 to June 30,

1942

12.

Junior yearling heifer, born

July 1,

1942 to Dec

.31.,

1942

13.

Senior heifer calf, born Jan.

1,

1943 to June 30, 1943

14.

Junior heifErcalf, born after July 1, 1943

III.

REGISTERED

HOLSTEIN

15.

Registered bull born after

July 1,

1942

16.

Cow,.3

yrs.

and over, born before Jan.

1,

1941

17.

Cow,

2 yrs and under 3 yrs, born Jan.

1, 1941 to Dec.

31" 1941

18.

Senior yearling heifer, born Jan.

1, 1942 to

June

�O;I

1942

19.

Junior yearling heifer, born

July 1,

1942 to 'Dec.

31,

1942

20.

Senior heifer calf, born Jan.

1,

1943 to

June

30,

1943

21.

Junior heifer calf, born after

July 1,

1943

22.

Champion registered fema.Le

4, 5,

6 and '7.)

,

(first place winners from Lots.

2, .3,

IV.

.GRADE

HOLSTEIN· v.

23.

Cow,

3 yrs and over, born before Jan.

1, 1941

24.

Cow,

2 yrs. and under .3

yrs.

b?rn

Jan.

1,

1941 to Dec.

31, 1941

25.

Senior yea.rling heifer, born Jan.

1, 1942 to June 30,

1942

26.

Junior yearling heifer., born July 1, 1942 to Dec.

31, 1942

27.

Senior heifer calf, born Jan.

1, 1943 to June

30,

1943

28.

Junior heifer calf, born after July 1,

1943

REGISTERED GUERNSEY

29.

30.

31.

Registered bull born after

July 1,

1942

Cow,

3 yrs.

a.nd over, born before

Jan.

1,

1941

Cow,

2 yrs. and under

.3

yrs, born

Jun.

1,

1941 to Dec.

31, 1941

32.

Senior yearling heifer, born Jan 1, 1942 to June

.30, 1942

33

•.

Junior yearling heifer, born

July 1,1942 to Dec.

-

15

-

31,1942

--

--

CLASS NO.

LOT NO.

DEPARTMENT "'D"

V.

REGISTERED,

GUERNSEY

(Continued).

VI.

34.

Senior heifer calf, born

Jan.

1,

1943 to June

30, 1943

35.

Junior heifer calf, born after

�u1y 1, 1943

36.

Champion registered female,

4,

5

,

6 and 7.)

(first

place winners from Lots

2, 3,

GRADE GUERNSEY

37.

38.

Cow,

3 yrs.

and over, born before Jan.

1,

1941

COV'l, 2 yrs.

and under 3 yrs. born Jan.

1,

1941 to

December

31, 41

39.

40.

41.

Senior yenrli.ng heifer, born Jan.

1,

1942 to June 30, 1942

Junior yearling heifer, born

July 1,

1942 to

Dec.

31,

1942

Senior helf'er calf, born Jan.

1, 1943 to June .30,

1943

42.

Junior heifer calf, born n.fter

July 1,

1943

VII.

REGISTF:RED AYRSHIRE

43.

Registered bull horn after

July 1,

1942

44.

Cow,

3 yrs.

and over, born before ,1 an.

1,

1941

45.

Cow, 2 yrs. and under .3

yrs, born Ja.n

1,

1941 to Dec.

31,

1941

46.

Senior yearling heifer, born Jan.

1, 1942 to June 30, 1942,

47.

Junior yea.rling

heifer, born

July 1,

1942 to Dec

•.

31, 1942

48.

Senior heifer calf, born Jan.

1,

1943 to June

30, 1943

49.

Junior heifer calf, born a.fter

July 1, 1943

50.

Champion registered female,

4, 5,

6 and

7.)

(first place winners from Lots 2,

3,

VIII.

GRADE }.YRSHIRE

IX.

51.

Cow,

3 yrs. ·and over, born before Jan.

1,

1941

52.

Cow,

2 yrs. and under 3 yrs.

born

Jan

1, 1941 to Dec.

31,

1941

53.

Senior

yearlfng

heifer, born Jan

1

.....

,

1942 to June

30,

1942

54.

Junior yearling heifer, born July 1,

1942 to Dec.

31,

1942

55.

SenIor heifer calf, born Jan.

1, 1943 to June 30,

1943

56.

Junior heifer calf, born after

July 1, 1943

BROWN SWISS

Class to fit entries

-

16

.-

CliM

so.

LOT NO.

r, BEEF CATTLE

BREEDS

DEPARTMENT

"D"

57.

Fat

Steer; must be fat bef'or e eligible to be sold.

Will be passed upon by

Committee.

Fat stock only sold.

,

58.

Fat Heifer

59.

Breeding heifers--Grade or

Registered--Any age.

60.

Registered Bulls

not over one year old.

papers must accompany, or

(Registration

be shown at time of

entry.)

PRODUCTION Fan VICTORY

-

FOOD IS AMMUNITION

_POULTRY

DEPARTMENT "pit

(Pigeons

and

Rabbits.)

Do not make entry unless you expect to show birds or rabbits.

and

Poultry will be received

Thursday until 9:00 P.M.

or between 7:00 A.

M.

9:30

A.M.

Friday_ Judging begins at 10:00 A.M., Friday April

21.

le

Poultry will be fed and watered by the management.

Do not feed or hand­ your own or any other birds during the Fair.

Poultry will be ju�ged for utility purposes.

Both

One egg in each,entry may be broken at the discretion external and internal charact.ers Ylill be considered in the of the judge.

ju.dging.

Specify the variety on the entry blanks.

Feed will be the rabbits.

provided for rabbits..

The management, will feed and water

All rabbits must be marked in ear with ear number.

last for the duration of the Fair if they are not tatooed.

CLASS NO.

LOT NO.

Indelible ink will

DEPARTMENT "P"

I.

II.

[email protected]

1.

Trio

2.

Cock

(2 females,

1 male--any age)

(hatched

before

July 1,

1943)

3.

Hen

(hatchod before

July 1, 1943)

4.

Cockerel

(hatched

after

July 1,

194.3)

5.

Pullet

(hatched after

July 1,

1943)

NEW

HAMPSHIRE

6.

Trio

7.

Cock

(2 females,

1 mo.le--any age)

(hatched before

July

1,

1943)

8.

Hen

(hatched before

July 1,

1943)

9.

Cockerel

(hatched after July 1,

1943)

10.

Pullet

(hatched after

July 1,

1943)

-

17

-

gLASS NQ.

LOT

NO.

DEPARTMEN·T.

"P"

III.

PLYMOUTH ROCKS

11.

Trio

12.

Cock

(2

females,

1 male--any

.age)

(hatched

before July 1,

1943)

13.

Hen

(hatched

before

July 1,

1943)

14.

Gockerel

(Hatched

-after

July 1;

1943)

15.

Pullet

(hatched

after

,July 1,

1943)

IV.

RHODE

ISLAND

REDS

16.

Trio

17.

Cock

.18.

Hen

(2 females,

1 male--any

age)

(hatched

before

July 1,

1943)

(hatched

before July

1,

19l�3)

19.

Cockerel

20.

Pullet

21.

Pen ot 5

(ha.tched

after

July 1,

1943)

(hatched

after July 1,

1943)

fryers j

10 to

14 weeks old v.

ANY OTHER STANDARD BREED pOULTRY

22.

Trio

'(2,

females, 1 male-�any

age.)

.23.

Cock

(hatched

before December 1, 1943)

24-.

2,5.

26.

Hen

(hatched before December 1, 1943)

Cockerel

Pullet

(hatched

after

December

1,

1943)

(hatched after December 1,

1943)

(Designa.te

breed)

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

�'-

-

-

--

VI.

EGGS

27.

28.

29.

30.

'White eggs,

Brown eggs,

Whi te eggs,

Brown eggs,

24-26 oz.,

1 doz.

large in carton

24-26

oz.,

1 doz.

large in carton

22-24

OZ."

1 doz.

medium in carton

22-24 oz.,

1 doz.

medium in carton

-

18

-

CLASS

NO.

LOT NO.

DEPARTMENT uP"

PIGEONS

All birds· must wear some kind of a numbered .leg

band and the band number must be properly entered on the entry blank.

General rules of the

Poultry Department will o.lso

apply to pigeons.

VII.

VIII.

HOMING PIGEONS

31.

Single male, hatched. before

January 1,

1944

32.

Single female, hatched b6fore

January

1, 1944

33.

Single male, hatched after

January

1, 1944

34.

Single female, hatched nfter

Janua�J 1, 1944

ANY OTHER PIGEONS

35.

36.

37.

38.

Single male,

Utility.

Single fe.male, Utility

Single male; Fnncy

Single female, Fancy

� � � �

J

� -

-

� -

� .� -

-

IX.

RABBITS:

Separate where classes will be made and competition exists will be between two or judged separately more individuals within the lot.

Left ear of rabbit must have id�ntification mark

RABBITS:

39.

40.

4l.

42.

43.

44.

45.

46.

47.

New Zealand

Senior

White,

-

(Pureblooded;

Buck, over

8 months papers not

required.)

Senior

Doe, over

Special Buck,

8 months

6 to

8 months

Special

Doe,

6 to

8 months

Junior

Junior

Buck, 4 to

6 months

Doe, 4 to

6 months

Baby Buck,

2 to 3 months

Baby Doe,

2 to 3 months

Doe and Litter, not less than

6 weeks of age.

-

19

-

cW,SS NQ, LOT"

NO

DEPARTMF�T "P"

I.

XI.

RABBITS: New

Zealand Red

(Pureblooded;

papers not

required.)

48.

Senior

Buck, over

8 months

49., Senior

Doe, over

8 months

,(Papers

required only for special awardv)

50.

51.

Speoial

Buck,

Speoial

6 to

8 months

Doe,

6 to

8 months

52.

Junior

Buck, 4 to

6 months

(Papers

required only for special

award.)

53.

Junior

Doe, 4 to

6 months

(Papers

required only for special

award)

54.

Baby Buck,

2 to 3 months

55.

Baby Doe,

2 to 3 months

(Papers

'required only

56.

Doe and

Litter, not less than

6 weeks of age.

for special

award)

MEAT RABBITS:

59.

Junior

Any breed or cross breed.

57.

Senior

Buck, over

8 months'

58.

Senior

Doe,

,over

8 mont.hs

Buck, 4 to

6 months

60.

Junior

61.

Meat

Doe, 4 to

6 months

Pen,

3 or more rabbits"

6 to 9 weeks

RABBITS--Grand Champ i on

,Best rabbit general in show

(Fur,

ears, bone, head, bo�y and

appearance)

will be selected by judges.

li'OOD FOR

FREEDOM

-

ALL OUT FOR VICTORY

SHEEP

A..�D SWINE DEPARTMENT "S"

Members must provide feed for sw�lne and sheep, and 'must do their own feeding and watering.

This livestock will be received

Thursday until 9:00

P.M.

or between 7:00 and 9:30

A.M.

Friday_

It must be on display by that time.

Judging will begin at 10:00

A.M., Friday, April

21.

If a gilt is to show in breeding and fat class, two entries must be made.

The pen of Fat

Hog entries may be made by a club.

A private sale of rut hogs will be held

Saturday.

CLASS

NO.

LOT NO.

I.

II.

DEPARTMENT "S"

DUROC JERSEYS

1.

Breeding

Gilts

2.

Breeding

Gilts

J.

SOW

4.

Boar

(under

4

months)

(4

months to

8

months)

EUUlPSr�RES

5.

6.

Breeding

Gilts

Br-seddng

Gilts

7.

Sow

8.

Boar

(under

4

months)

(4 months to

8

months)

III.

IV.

v.

VI.

VII.

VIII.

ANY OTH�- BP..EED

9.

10.

Breecdng

Gilts

B�e�ding

Gilts

11.

Sow

12.

Boar

(under

4

months)

(4 months to

8

months)

Pen of two fat hogs--any breed or crosses.

(necessarJ

weight

175-225 !�unds.each)

Pen of two feeder hogs--any breed or crosses.

IndividutJ.l fat hog.

weight

175-225

(Must be fat in order to be sold.

Necessary

pounds)

SHEEP

13.

Fattest lamb

(Must be r",t in order to be sold)

14.

Mature ram or ewe.

(Judged separately on own

merits)

Fat stock for sale

-

(Ex.

one

Lamb or one

pig)

(Make

entry for all fat animals to be sold)

NOTE:

Championships will be awarded if competition warrants�

-

21

-

4-H

GARDEN§,., FOft

VICTORY

VEGETABLE DEPARTMENT "V"

V,egetables will be received any time

Judging will start at 10: 00 A. M.

.Friday

morning up to

9:.30

A.M.

DEPARTMENT "V"

I.

GARDEN AND CB.CPS

1.

Six T&'ole onions

2

Six round type radish

.3.

Six long typeradish

_ ...

.,_.

4.

Six carrots

5.

Three beets

6.

Three turnips

7.

Three bunches spinach

8,

Three plants chard

9.

Three hends cabbage

10

•.

Three heads lettuce

11.

One pint pod peas

,12.

'three

rutabagas

13.

Three bunches

garlic

14.

Any other vegetable

(Classes

will be made if sufficient miscellaneous entries are made)

-

22

-

FLOWER'

DEPARTMENI

"ret

4-H

Club Contest.

Flowers will be received up to

Friday.

Judging starts at 10:00 A.M.

9:30

A.U., vases

Uniform tall metal containers

.111 be and cO.:'l'te.::ners for short ste_eel furnished.

Baskets,

'peel.1

flowers will not he turni.hed.

Must be e�l"':,�:.c�d in

Flower Club to coapete for aedals.

CLASS NO.

LOT NO

,

DEPARTMENT

"Fit

I.

FLOWERS

1.

15 sweet peas

(lavender)

2.

15 sweet peas

(pink)

3.

15 sweet peas

(

..

hi

te)

4.

Centerpiece or sweet peas and follac. includinc container

5.

8 calenclulaa

6.

16 pansi

••

7.

8 larkspurs

S.

12 petunias

9.

3 roses

NOTE: AnT variety

.r

rose represented b;y

S or .ore

entries will have a separate classification made for it.

10.

Any other flower, not less than :3 stea.

11.

Best bouquet including vase

12.

Best basket of flowers

-

2.3

-

COOPERATIVE EXTENSION WORK

IN

AGRICULTURE

AND HOME ECONOMICS

State of Arizona

P.o.

Box

Phoenix

751

UDiVtrn

ty of Arizona

College of

Agricu1 ture

U.

'8.

Department of

Agriculture

Maricopa County

Farm Bureau

Cooperating

Agricultural Extension Service

Home Demonstration Work

County Agent

Work.

Dear 4�H

Garden Club Member:

Here is some

California. through good news its local for you.

The Standard Oil

Company

-of' representatives, will give the following prizes to

4-H

Garden Club members: lrd prize" $3.75; all in War

Saving

1st prize,

Stamps.

$10.00;

Get your

2nd garden prize,

$5.00; entered and win a pr-Lze

,

Gardens will be judged about June 1st.

A copy, of the con tea t rules are enclosed.

Free copies of garden record books may be had at Standard

Stations and. dealers..

hints on

The Standard's

Victory

Garden

Guide, contains preparing and growing vegetables� Standard's Helpful Home

Preserving &

Canning

Booklet is, alsot available free.

tion may be had from your

County Agent.

Further informa-

We hope you will win a prize by growing a fine garden and thereby help to produce tood for freedom.

The Standard Oil

Company is

orre:;'!l\t:

these prizes to help you produce vegetables abundantly, and we are grateful to them for their fine coopers tion.

Let us hear from you if you need further information.

Very truly yours,

Paul

W.

Asaft.

Brovm,

County Agri. Agent.

COOPERATIVE

EX'I'EN SION lNOHK

IN

AGRICULTUR� lu�D HOME ECONOMICS

STATE of ARIZONA

UNIVERSITY

OF

AtrtZONL.

COLLEGE OF AGPICULTDIlE

U. s.

DEPARTl\�ENl' or .!l.GB!CT.1LTURT�

AND r�AIEC()Y,I:'" C;��lm',�'y COOHR�'TINC

P.

o.

Box

P 1.:0 E1H X

751

AG?tiGDI·TURAD EX�ENSION

SERVICE fDM.E

DEMON STHATION WORK

(!CUNTY

,AGENT WORK

FebruCiq

16, 1944

De&r 4-H Clu0 Leader:

If

The

4-H Boo st.er

",

Lcsue of Las t w'eek left no doubt as to whether there will be a

Tfu� D4.TE IS NOW SET FOB.

Mc:.ricopL(.

County Ij.-H.

Club Fair this year.

APRIJ;.,

21 cEld "-1944;

ARIZONA mATE

�EACHEl1S COLLEGE C�l�PUS .A1 Thl�PE.

Let'

5 make

"BOOST

THE FJ;_IRIl our slogan.

It can be the hi.gh­ light.

of the 4-H

Club Year!

vVe are counting on you!

So are your- Club Members!

as it must,

In order to get tn8 Fair it is necessary to eleet new moving members to as swiftly serve on the

Fair

Board.

Three men and two

WOllen leaders have been nominated;

You are to vote for two men and one woman

0

Space is provided

�t the end of this letter for your vote.

If you are a new leader and not acquainted with bhese people we may say past they were nominated because of their qualifications or activity with the 4-H

Fair--Their

Community is listed to also help you evaluate their ability to participate in fair planning.

The new

Fair Premium List will be out soon.

In the meantime

Please refer to last few changes are year's copy

(You should have comtemplated in t.hr

new one" one) as only a to

Pl.eaae Vote and return- your ba.Ll.ot, at eign the onf§...

You do not need ballot.

'I'ec:.r

off and return in the self addressed envelopo, which requires no postage.

I8&be11 Pace

A�srt Home Dem.

Agent h

..

ul �v.

Brown

It

County Agr. Agent

VOTE-FOR-4-H-.F'}_IR-BCJJ.l.RD-MEMBERS:

Mr.

Ds.Le C.

Riggins, MeQ£

__ -_�__ .

Mr.

Louis F.

Joslin, P�lo Verde

Mr. Joe

Acuff, Tempe

Mrs.

A.W.

Austin-Scottsd�le

Miss

M�r.y

L�ird-Roosevelt

VOTE FOR ONE

I!STRYCTI9N� EQR IRE sEW k:1l

OAP.D� goNTEST

1943

-

1944

AltAWt

'irst, second and third prizes ot

$7,

$"

and

.,;

also five

$1

prise., together nth premium ribbons and a tree supply of garden

•• eels anel plants.

the awarda will be made at a dinner program tor the contestant...

The aboye

..

warda will also be offered to

4-Rters who wish to enter the canning contest.

m:oUIIYgmlts

I

1. Must turn in

complete

and accurate recorda before lebruaty

15,

to Club Leader.

2.

S1z.

ot tho garden

.hall

b.

not lel8 than 10'120'

O�

200

.quare teet

..

3.

Contestants are to which must include plant ai least 5 different vegetable.,

3 from the tollowinC: lettuce; carrot.,

beetl'

cabbage, broccoli, apina.ch

or chard.

4.

Gardens nu be judied between

Juuar:r is and rebruaxy 1,

1944.

You.., exh1.bit.

at the

County 4-Ii

Fair in

April it you wi.h, b.r continuing with your garden after the contest.

mw

TO BE A

WIlNER!

Read the ·Sugge.tioDS

to the..

Take

70ur record

Victoxy

Gardenersand be guided. b.r

picture., or yourself in fOur garden and paste book., lrite a ahort ,tory ot your garden them in clubwork.

Ask your club leader for helpful hint" or phone

Paul Brofru,

4-2133.

Phoenix.

Stud;y the leore card.

§COM CARP

FOR

3upQINg GARDENS.

I. Location

• • • • • • • • • •

• • • • • •

• • •

Points

.10

1.

Awq from tree.

and shrubs, near good water aupply'.

B.

Ease or cultivation � harvest.

II. General

III.

Appearance

• • • •

•••••••••••••••

15

J..

Soll condition, arrangement. neatness, etc.,

Selection ot Varieties

If

••••••••••••••••

10

A. At l,east tiTe varletlee

IV. Weed Control

V.

adapted to Arbona conditione.

20

A. Clean

•• e4 bed

B. Good cultiTation

Insect and d1s8&se control

••••••••••••••••

15

VI.

A.

Spraying or dusting when neC81S&17.

Quality

ot Product and 11e�dl,'

•••••••••••••

_.30

.1.

Total amount.

produced and harvested.

University of

Arizona

College of Agricul ture

D.

S.

ADd

Mar,icopa County

Cooperating

COOl)f;.,RA'I'IVE EXTENSION hORK

IN

AGRICULTURE F�D·HOME ECONOMICS

STATE OF ARIZONA

P. O. Box

Phoenix

751

Department of Agricultllre

Farm. Bureau November

20, 1944

Agricul tural Extension': Seryice.

Home Demonstration Work

County Agent

Work

\

Dear 4-H Club

Leader:

War

Are you and your

4-H members ready to push the

Sixth

Loan

Drive?

'llhis is a

State�wide Program for the 310

4-H

Clubs in Arizona.

The

Valley

National Bank offers

$175

in

Bonds and Stamps to the

Champion 4-H

War Bond salesmen.

The greatest award is to know that we did our part to put the drive over the top.

Although your school may already be organized for the drive, your

INDIVIDUAL.

4-H

MEMBERS

�AAY

HAVE CREDIT for ali

War

Bonds or

Stamps purchased b,y their families and those sold qy them to their neighbors,

This credit extends from

November

1, 1944 to the end of the drive.

Enclosed is an outline of procedure and details of the drive.

Vie are counting on

4-H leaders and mempers to put Maricopa

Coun ty over t he top.

Your community chairman is

Neme Phone No.

Address

Please note the dates of the radio programs.

Sincerely yours,

Isabell

Pace

Ass't.

Home

Demonst.

Agent

PWB:IP:LP

Enclosure

100 c

Paul W.

Ass't.

Brown

County Agri. Agent

J'Irora

Poultry & Rabb i t ion thl1

May 1944

.The

Central

Arizona Breeders

Association,

with he&dq��rters'at Phoenix,

�rl�ona.

is backing tbe.4-H Club boya and glrls in their rabbi t nising efforts.

The rabbi.t

assooia. tion is providing cash prizes tor

4-l1·Club members at the county fair, as well a8 providing judges for the r�bblt department.

This

1s a very wor� undertaking on the part of any org�nization

6.nd

will do a members in grea t de�,l to encourage

4-8.

Club carl"1ing on.

t.heir

projects and making a success or their work.

April

1944.

Visit of Geo. s.

.

T�mpl'ton to

Phoenix.

Ariz.

By PAUL BROWN

.A.s�· t.

County

J�ent.

nlont

George

S.

Station &t

Templeton,

Db-ector 01' the U.

S.

Rf..bbit,

Expe:ri­ fontana,

Calif,

inspected loc�l rabbi\riel

Friday,

March Jrd.

and disoussed t.he

,t'ine poin ta of r� bbl t production wi tb those whQ a tte'nded

�h_'· tour.

Tbe

1--w.l

.dt�:rs proirEul

"PHi concluded with a big g$l1eru meeting at th� County

Agell ts office at whlcll.

time �:r.

Te:npleton tf'.lkad

to

't"llbbit growers on

·the anlj la.test

improved methods of mansgellloot, feeding, bl"eeding rf4bbi ts.

n. also reportltd on the pro�Iress or experimenuil work at the Fontana atation.

Here are aO:slEt of the high poin ts brough tout during tll$ ,Pl'"ogra.ml

the and

1.

The

.p-r8sent opportunity tor rabbit gTowl9ra to sell publio on th& use of rtkbbi t lIea.t

otters the indue try new

expanded

_rkets

•.

2.

Growers were the meat urged to cx�.nd

pr,oduetion

to relieve shortage

I1Dd t}l..tlJreby

contribute mue..l} to the

"Food

Fights tor hMdoll

Progrs.m.,-

3.

Profits

&re at fl.

uxiwm for 'tbe

4 lb. live rabbit industry, wi th e� bringing $l.10

dressed M\d

30; tor the pelt on the I,Terage.

'\

4.

The importance ot proper reeding was stressed �nd the

\

following rs.tion

.a8

recommended: 11.110 100 lbsJ barley

100 lbll\ soybean pelleta 100 lbs, Altalt�

(tree choioe)

JOO lbsJ

$lilt

and\

green teed.

Daily

"moun ts or teed will be mixture fJld tree choice ot altalta.

2t

oz.

or grain

Only the highest quality or teeds "Ul g1ve added profits..

,.

The tI. S.

Experimen t

S ta t10n

.a

t fontmuUIl.

b.u

8 information or value to growers in bulletin £orra" Yo me,y' wr1 ttl them tor th� �ollowina

BulleUn

NOe

[email protected] Bulletin No.2' Rabbit

Rnlsing;

31 Diseases of'

Rabhits;

Bulletin �10.

240 ?abbit

Recipes}

Bulletin

No. 202 Mf;ora.

RabbP,IJ Eull,.ttttin

No. 218

Domestio

Rabbits;

aull�Ul1

l�o.

73 Woo1.1",s.

dv�r�ity or Arizona t,) hgr of

Agricul ture and

S. Deiar tmen't of

Agr�culture

Jr.J:ie::aU ng

COOFfJtATIVE �f.TE:'lSIOH '.';ORK

IN

AGRICU.i.JTUHE ,AND hOME: ECONGEICS

St�.-te of Arizona

P. O.

Box

Phoenix

751.

July 17, 1944

Agricultural Extension

Service

Home Demonstra.tion Work

Coun ty

Agent

Viork

Dear Friend:

Remember in a the time you received the letter from us?

following st,t;,.tement

"Accidents on

Farms Cost the

People of Arizona �1.32,359"

There was a check sheet enclosed which was for the pur­ pose of helping

Yf)U to discover some of the things which might havH cauBed accidents on your farm or in your home.

If t.h� infot"''il&tl.on you r'ece i ved helped.

you to prevent accidents, then you have made a fine contribution toward winning the war

,

We would like to be able to report the progress of the campaign for preventing accidents; ask you to fill out the report thereforA we want to sheet enclosed :md return it t;) us in the enclosed envelope which reT",iref no stamp.

Your sugges t.Ions for helping to prevent acc id-rrt.s will be welcome and your hear from you coop€ration will be appreciated.

Let us by return mail.

Yours very truly,

Grace

Home

Ryan

V

Demonstra.tion

Agent

GR:PWB:LP

Enola.

Paul·W.

Ass't.

Brown

County Agri.

Agent

COOPERATIVE EXTEN SION �VORK

IN

AGRICULTURE

AND HOME

ECONO�UCS

STATE OF ARIZONA

UNIVERSITY OF ARIZONA

COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE

U,.S.

DEPARTMENT OF

AGRICULTURE

AND MARICOPA COUNTY COO¥ERATING

P.O.

BOX 7;1

PHOENIX

AGRICULTURAL

EXTENSION

SERVICE

HOME DEMONSTRATION WORK

COUNTY AGENTS ViORK

February 2.3, 1944

Dear Friend:

The late!1t

rabbits will be improved metheds of managtng

, feeding and breeding presented to all persons interested in grewing rabbits by Geo. S.

Templeton, Dire'ctor,

U.S.

Rabbit

Experiment Station,

Fontana,

California en

March 3, 1944.

You are invited to attend a.ny

or all .of

the follewing events:

1.

Visi ts to the r&,bbi tries with Mr.

Templeton discussion and demonstrations on rabbit

The itinerary is o�tlined below.

directing

production.

2.

An impertunt meeting at the County

1201 W. Madison at 7:30

Agent's

Office,

P.M.,

March .3rd., at which time

Mr.

Templeton will speak on rubbit, production experiment station resul.t.s

; problems and

This pregram offers you un opport��ity to get the latest information on rabbit production &nd the importance of this indus,try in the "FOOD FIGHTS FOR

FREEDOM,·"

program.

Pl.ease

attend and bring your

problems.

I

SCHEDULE OF EVENTS:

10 A.M.--Austin

Roberts

Rabbitry,

1607

So.

l�th.

Street

11 A.M.--O.W

•.

2

Vermillion

P.M.--Ed

Scheidler

Rabbitry, 25 E.

1st.

Rol:..d

fulbbitr,y, 38.30

N.

9th.

St.

3

P.M.--Jno.

W.

Wells

Rubbitry, N.

7th.

Ave.

and Maryland

7:30P.M.-General

Meeting,

1201 W. Madison

Yours very truly,

&CAA,J:

to: f3,.,�

Paul W.

Brown,

Assistant

County Agricultural Agent

THE'Y' were fUll while while they lasted

-

KOY-Arizona Farmer's summer gard�n broadcasts, aired each Saturday afternoon from the

Demonstration Garden out at the

Val­ ley Garden Center in Phoenix.

der the broiling sun garden

Un­ experts,

�es:pec�ia.lly

Maricopa County Assistant

IAJpi�cultul�al.

11n·tA"'U'i.t:'UT�u1

Agent Pat Powers, were by KOY

Program.

Direc-

WiHiams, KOY General

Al

J�hnson· and

Arizona

Women's

Editor

Ma!(de

lfinne�s.

ed 'for the leading boy

·cOlotesta.n\

Malcolm Adam�, and the

1''''i;Zt�Iib''I'!

and sister team in Ari­ zona.'s state

4-H hiStory· to win the award of a.

trip to Chicago.

Malcolm

Adams and

D<>rothy, both are his' sister, fe&devs in their respective projects trins to and both won

Chicagothis

'ye��

"Arizona can be boys and girls," ed

Keweth

L.

proud of these said state

McKee

,Lead­ today.

"'r.hey; represent the finest quali­ ties o� Americari youth.

I wish everyone' in the state could see the records of t:he�e boys and girls' as

'shown in the achieve­ ment books

..wihich

they prepare, and which covers the most form­ l��p�:;:,:;:;,,�=-__

.iIi'4"""�""':'"

IJlWw.w; ......

" ative periods of their lives.

"The' common books dees not

Idea of scrapat all to these' of b(J;,Wl.d

re(�l'dS' eO'velrif1f!r

-chUd�d.

written and of aII:taz:ig

( test, and: a state pretty .good' .be� for the championship, is, ,composed of,�

Barbara

June' Peterson and

F:rances'

Stokoe,

-both Scottsdale girls.

They

WO�'

at the

Tempe".f�ir, repeate4 when

Miss. Stewart and Miss

Dryden made

.

_

their rounds.

.

A

Virginia

Glti£:r

"

'of

..

S'cottsdaie

1944's cqunty winnerin" FOQd.

jS"r':__-���-'--��-'-'L':�___:-=�-,---�::",__��m_"'_"'�iIii

arati.on':'

Barbara

Austin; also-�Scottsdale, took top honors in F'OO vation.

'The Iist.

9f home:"gro

.foods

that Barbara canning and bas pres�rved, both by quiek;;.freez"ing; weuld

...

fill out the-rest of this 'column.

After m will be 1 undisturbed with his mammy at maine's until he's a big calf ready to

Tre­ and be removed to his new home.

----0'----

'1

.

Joe

Smith specializes

'in

Jerseys.

Now in his third year as

Club member, he has a herd of five purebreds.

With this bull of

Clyde

Hussey breeding, he took.

second in showmanship at the Maricopa

County 4",H.

Fair last April.

The bull, Ornx Design

.

-

Champion;

'.'

Lad, was

Grand

:

.,'

J

This

'four is

Albert

Owens' second year as a

Dairy' Calf Clabber, He owns purebred Ayrshires of'

An'gus Johnson breeding, means to have

• a, herd of 25 or

3'0 by the time he is through school.

about list of.

state

Leader Kenneth

.a

4

..

Scottsdale.

Readers of

Arizona

�om�unity!

Farmer are

bound, to have noticed the w?-y that

Scottsdale has been' surging to the front in 4-H

\news, the, last two or three years.

In announcing this year's winners,

State Club

McK;ee remarked

.

that Ayrshire' would pay big money' to have.

AI..; together there

-are

13 registered Ayrshire heifers four

Guernsey,

in'

.addition

pades

...

Barbara, Betty and

Mae t,

Westfall are each raising a registered Hereford.

The

Jerseys and one

Vomen L.

Fry:e and' LeQ to.

many fine

Hampshire

.}leaders

respectively

,

0:

Kennedy,.:' gardening.

the Junior

and!

�Miss Helen Layton is the new lead-

./ eYof the Home at the

.many

grade school and starting little

Economics

4-H groups girls on the way to cham-

(Pleas� Turn breeders anywhere

To

Page'

12)

.

I

I herds of Alfred

Austin and

Malcolm and county winners.

r

For the lase tAdanls are sources of purebred sto� -two' years ,ne lias coached tlie live-

1 if..or

a number of fhe better adult stock judging teams.

of

.the

Senior breeders all over

Salt River Valley.: Cluo, and seen them win at the ceun-

His Members Succeed ty

4-H fair.

This season his mem-

_,'

',.

For this

Iivestock

�nt�usiasm and bel'S are carrying on projects in dairy­ sayVy, a lot of credit must go to ing, beef, swine, sheep, poultry and

1 pionships.

-

/ that there was a

"landslide" of hon­ ors to Scottsdale.

There are reasons

'girls those Beottsdale

R.

.

for all this:

Leaders, the quality of the

'boys and parents ar-e raising up, and several other.

factors that fall into the

This story intangible.

must.

be mainly about

.what

the 4-H boys of

Scottsdale are' doing, since Asst.

County Agent Paul

Brownwas

'the one who led the horsenettle editor on a

Scottsdale

..J

(

,

1

At the

:high

school,

Leo Kennedy, is just .getting well started in his first year' as leader.

Mrs.

A.

and

"-CW.

Au�!!n

__

Miss

Mabelle Ollsen arel-ei(ler3 of the.

Last

Senior Home

Economics clubs.

season

Mrs.

Austin 'received the coveted state award for all-around excellence' in

Miss

4-t15!eadershfp.

Sbeand

Ollsen have turned out, county t 'winners in Dairy Foods Demonstra

...

: tion for'

194R 'and 1944.

Othe-r girls tour, If.

the touring· had been done by Asst. Home Demonstration

Agent

Isabell Pace and the women's editor, eoachew.by

them have

Preparation,

Food won; iJJ Food·

Preservation, the

Dress

'Revue, and

Farm

Safety.

-

E

..

D.

*

I

,,', this co n ....

""�.

1Ult':1:hA

,tba1�;.��jts�a�rs

..

long have is.

It

��tii'iIit'K' d,airy calf and clubs,

Senior' Scotts­

'are improving the whole district.

It's fast

[DiBCcj,ming a purebred.

because of the 'fine district, largely

Ayrshire"

Guern­ sey,

Jersey and

Hereford, blood brought in by

4-H members.

There are at least two bulls iJ?

4-H herds

..

/

Eugene three

Club

Edwards, years,in D�iry work, is the proud owner of two registered

Ayrshire heifers and a bull from the L. J. Lew­ is herd.

lJi:��hrJ)alllgl1t,,, best all-around 4-H Club girl in

4-H

Arizona, shows scrapbook to

State Club Leader Kenneth McKee.

girls and two boys all the returns are in, the trips to Chicago, where delegation may have 12 mE!mlbel� compete at the National four more state winners are

Congress, Dec. 3-6.

When peting in sectional contests

�=�=========�"-, the prizes are all-expense

Chicagoand opportunities to win ther honors there.

"King" and "Queen" of the will be Malcolm

Adams of dale,

Ann'

Rohrbaugh of Yuma..

Ann,

19 years

'old, has been' claimed the best all-around- d-H

1 in Arizona this year.

She this award in girls in 146 competition with 1,800 clubs.

\.

Malcolm, 15, has the outstanding hoy's record for 1944 and 'his

Chicago trip

-will be made at Santa Fe ex­ pense.

He competed against all boys and all girls in the 310 4'-H clubs af

Arizona.

The other certain trip winners the divisions in which they highest· slate honors:

Betty Gibbens, Cochise,'

Achievement.

Olive Ruth ning

Rundell,

Elfrida,

Contest.

Dorothy Patterson,

Elfrida,

Preparation.

Dorothy

Adams,

Scottsdale, Dress r

Revue.

.

John Collins, Marana, F"OOd. for,

.

Victory

Contest.

Nellie

May Hart,

Sedona,

S.anta Fe

Trip Contest.

And here are the state champions to still must win regionally get to

Chicago: in or-

Mattie

Whinery, Scottsdale,

Farm afety

Contest;

,

Class B

Fannie Coman, i

Dairy

Production

I

·�----'---tration; Robert Honea,

Mal'­ t

1

I

I

Meat

Animal

Contest;

Freddy

Phoenix,

Victory

Garden

Thonen of the Roosevelt in

Maricopa County is

's champion 4-H

Victory

Gardener for

10944.

and Lester Matlock of

Safety; Claire

Fuller of

Mesa, Clase A

Production

Demonstration;

Carney and Billie Hanson of

Tempe, for second

Production place.

in Class A

Dairy

Demonstration; Oliver Anderson, Phoenix, Victory Garden Con­ test}.

Jimmy Stevens, Peoria;

Ardell

Hale, Eagar;

Karl

Ronstadt, Tucson;

Jack

Stranathan, Tucson;

Alex Ro­ mero,

Ajo.

In the Food for bonds went to

Charlotte

Victory

Mary

Contest,

$25

Mc'Bride.

and

Thurston of Tucson;

Lee Nuttall, Dragoon; Bill

Spar��m.

Ajo;

Bill Nevelle and

-

Tucson.

Naurice in

Good for, the Adamses!

State Club Leader Kennetb announcing 1944 contest paid high tribute to

Scottsdale its. six, state winners.

-lie also point­ ed out that Malcolm and Dorothy

Adams are the only brother and sis­ ter in

Arizona who ever won

Chi­ ea:go trips in the same year.

Now a little more about Ann Rohr­ baugh.

The story of her nine 4-H years is told in her "54-page scrap­ book.

It describes 26 projects that

Miss Rohrbaugh has der '4-H completed un­ guidance; it also outlines th� schedule of work that she performed at home while ects.

carrying on those proj­

Methodically listed are

1,782 meals.

for a the planned, prepared and served family" of eight. She.

did much family household planning, in­ the selection of same clothing.

At time she took care of feur

ValleJ".;HtlilhrTo

Have

Picnictf

Swimming

Pool

"4-H

Clubers!

Let's start our

Club.1year

by attending tne

-:1\11-

Valley 4-H

Pfenie." This is the message sent out to the

4-H

Club members of the vailey

..

The picnic is to be held at the' Buck­ eye

16

J swimming pool between the

Saturday,

Sept.

hours of 10: 30

A. M. and 4:30 P. M.

Remember the date.

The pool ordinarily is eloaed and drained on

Saturdays, but J.

P.

VonDen­ burgh Chamber

Of pool

Oommerce chairman, has given the: Olub special permission to use' it

"that day, and it will be for

-This will be one an of' ideal thi,S big

,annual affa.ir.

the

:pl�ce

.' last op­ portunities to swim this season;

_'ce the pool

Sun

Adams, this year's outstanding amsmens is 'to build up a

Arizona

4-H boy

One of purebred Ayrshjre' h�d� He

OWl1IS three ae'gls;te1re« heifers, three heifer herd sire.

The buD, son of·

'the celebrated calves, lJre4 ·by and

L. J.

Str4th_.glass· a.

bull calf

Lewis,

Barr.

�f' destined

Phoenix,

Doughl�

•.

to is be a children, helped to milk a year, at the Arizona State Fair his

.26

cows for four months.

Hampshire .S..ows· won both :the grand and hauled wood, did' almost other chore called for championship and seiiior champion­ by

Ari� ship in the

4-H and.open

classes, farm Iife, scrapbook is prepared probably more than.

any ever in' a

,.4-H

McKee.

""It

.eontest," declares contains samples needlework; swatches of

.ma­ almost all the suits, dresses that she has cloth­ made; of letters testifying to her

50 or

60 blue and red and silver ribbons;" buttons for local fair honors; many, photo­ illustrating her

.4

..

H projects."

1J.tl�lec.lm

Adams started in club six years ago.

enough ribbons

Already he has and pri�es, forhogs and' cattle, to cover feet on many the wall of his room

• have netted.

him

$1,647.

growers

Is

'lire agreed that pr�Pably

Arizona's leadbreeder and exhibitor of

"'In his.

fourth' �-H

Grand champion Ayshire of the show, with her owner,

Velma

Gray, at the halter.

At left,

Dr.

F. E.

Ostrander, faculty sponsor for the 4-H fair, representing ..Arizona

State. Teachers ard, student

Colege,

Center, Mary superintendent of the dairy department.

How-

WHERE to begin?

That's a next­ problem when an unlfortunate scribe' sits down to write of anything so big and diverse as the

eighteenth annual Maricopa County

4-H Club zona.

Fair, on the 'grounds of Ari­

State Teachers

College at Tem­ pe,

April

21-22.

One starting point might be to re­ mark on what good farmers and home­ makers the boys and girls of this county have become.

Meaning that they're producing Food for

Victory in enormous quantities, and of aston­ ishing' quality.

Their training has really taken hold.

It's not up only that the exhibits aver­ better; there were no poor ex­ hibits.

Take the

There was not a cattle, for instance.

single animal of the scrub order.

The same was the ens

.true of hogs and the sheep and the chick­ and the rabbits.

Every entry be-

One of the best sewing exhibits was that of the Rural

Tempe, where Mrs. Frank Henness is club leader.

schoo!,

Left to south &f right:

.

Eu­ dora Griffiths, Betty May Schachner, Betty

Jean

Jones,

Lorene,

Huckabee,

�_rene �atton,

Makemson,

Shirtey

Autumn Ruth Turner.

one certain heifer that was always surrounded cowmen.

by a throng of admiring

The name on her exhibitor tag' was

Charles Mathis; of the Washington district.

She won for Charles the purebred

Hereford calf given away by the Kiwanis Club.

The calf and his new owner were at guests of honor the

Kiwanis lunch the following

Tuesday.

Over on the hog side, Alfred

Austin

-of Scottsdale won

,ing and top honors in show­ fitting.

He also had the champion

Hampshire' male.

Alfred's clubmate, Malcolm

Adams, had the best of.

Hampshire female.

Ed

Hanger

Tempe entered the.

champion

Du­ roc.

Best bird in the poultry department was a tered

N61\��e eoe el en­ by'Mar�:Coman �l

4-H a

Club.

Don'

Tate,

Scottsdale, got

'magnificent blue ribbon for bring­ ing in the best trio.

J was' not as

'1i;,;-q

champion rabbit.

partly because the cool spring than

·gardens.

But.

dt was good.

'Once more the Roosevelt

Garden back so many Club took top honors as a club, with the best all-around exhibit in that

"These youngsters h ave sure

3' department.

learned how to select and, arrange

Expert Demonstrators their exhibits," commented Harvey the garden truck.

There were four tration winning

..

demons-

Tate, who judged

��

.' ence teams, two in' domestic sci-

Superior

Showmen and two in. arts' which are sup-

They've learned to show their livestock, too.

Take Buddy

Cheatham of

Laveen.

His Holstein heifer was the best fitted bovine there.

her through her paces showmanship contest.

Buddy

put to

WIn the

<

3_ posed to be more along the masculine line.

Frances

Stokoe' and

Barbara

Peterson triumphed

OVer tion from other senior stifi opposihomemakers, with their demonStration.M.

how ergeney dairy' lunches are p,�@a:r���

Fanny

Coman of'

Kyrene, though, had the best Holstein in the show.

Melba. Wood, and"

Sarah

Velma Gray, also Kyrene, had the

New of Mesa

Palo Verde came out first the juniors, with' a charming best Ayrshire.

Frank,

(tion of "Table Manners :for a

Farm showed the best Jersey.

Among; the

Herefords there was

Home,".

Bob Fuller andClare

Huber, Mesa,

L-=--...:--------------.e!""--=-----....;......d'"""1'olIllt>rised

the other senior winning

They demonstrated and ex­ every step of the Babcock

_'''''<.nn- ..

Alton and Martha

Mc­ invaded the domain .of

mas-

""'U,lCU1�;Y

.

and captured the other junior place with their "Care and Use

Soils."

'rhe two most exciting events of the two days came right at the

Saturday afternoon.

First, the parade; second, the Dress

Of course there were more

, in the parade and, of it was the noisiest.

A whale fine were p:r:ocession, too.

All the original; some of them startling.

The judges gave the to the Scottsdale' paraders; sec­

'honors to

'Kyrene; third to AI-

One Gir her

Coman and

Grand Cham­ pion.

This cow alone has won

$78 hI p1\ize mon,ey�

Frances

Holstein

Coman's 4-H record �ith_:, question about it, she's' a real

' dairy cattle doesn't win a

_ pion here.

tional a prize this year, it's' going to, big surprise to Arizonans.;

N9 earnings of

$431.29

and a

.r,__��==��-�-_��-------,

Any -girl �Ot 16 who can show net' project in­ ventory of$1,700, aften five

,years of /

�lub work, ought to be up among the champions anywhere.

She, was' auto­ matically

<entered in a national' race, with the Holstein-Friesian

Assn.

of

America, when, the Holstein-Friesian

A.ssn.

of Arizona pronounced

'her xhe state 4-H champion, of 1943, among all boys and girls working with black-

and-white cattle.

Rabbit portunity

-cuss breeders will have an op­ to hear an expert dis­ feeding' and.

growing "prob­

Iems

Friday, during a eral

Salt River' tour of sev-

Valley rabbitries and at a

M,l in

In.&L.i

t�e

' gounts was,

Bro-wrr:--=�--""'- --:_""-

"""

',pen fo anyone interested out charge, the tour from the Austin Robert will" start rabbitry,

1F.,,07

South 12th

W.,

FiXst road.

stree,t!it

a,

W.

--:::.

19

.a.

m.

Vermillion ranch,

25

'.

With-l'l

n-l

At 2 p.

m.

the Ed Scheidler, ra�: bUry, 3830 North 'NInth stseet, will'

be,

inspected,

'Marvland avenues.

In the

"vill

'be rector U.

GS0l-$e"

.

tion, Fontana, and later the

Joe rabbitry,

S.

'T�Bbit exper

Calif.

8.eventh

charge totlr and leading the discussion

T.em�ton,

and of di­ sta-

I

',I

t

I

There's so much' to Frances' story that it's a

�ew not possible to ,give more than high-lights.

Her registered foundation cow is one

-purcnased from

Billy McNeil to' replace one given her by her grandmother, which was sold when the,J.

L� Coman herd was dis-c pers�d.

l'hat cow's, calf he came her first livestock project;

'�I fed my calf and taught it to lead and

'kept a record of

'the expense of feeding it';'

Frances writes in her club story.

"In the fall of

1940, When the' calf, was eight months old, I showed her at the State Fair.in both 4-H arid operi classes.

She won second in the open class and Grand

Champion, in the

4:"If division.

The next.

.year

I showed her, together with her younger sister, as

Produce' of, Dam and won second,

/ place

...

I also won

Grand Champion again in the 4-H division.

Both heifers first in

4-H, second and fourth in open classes.

Since we have not a-

:'

State Fair since

1941",

I have showing her, af the

Maricopa

4-H Pair and have

�Gtlai1hpjion for the lastthree

'\Won

Grand years with cow won

I began.

with as a calf.

:exactly-'-

$10Q in prize

Next to "Excellent"

IR April, Frances' mature animals

,classified by Judge Tom'

Elder.

foundation cow was classed as

'Very

Good." In fact, that was the r!:l1t1'D1"��

O'D for her nerd.

income in five years, including l'VIf1.na'T"�,nrl to.' was bills

$140 received for two

$1,843.'76.

FeeiI. costs,

.and

other, expenses

$1,406.48, leaving a net of

.28'.

Inventory value of her fiVe cows-inmilk, two yearlings, two heifer calves and two bull calves, is-eonserva, set at

$!,'700.

But Frances ha0een doing many things besides Building up a:

Very

Good, dairy herd.

She was second high individual in dairy cattle fudging at the

1944 has had

'a

Maricopa year of 4-H

.4�H Fair.

She clothing: year in a food in health club, and

'eXloer1-

II projects.

This '.�n,MJ1�O' � she completed her sophomore wear

Tempe High School and stood

}ligh in scholarship.

At the same time she has been.a

great help in relieving' the shortage on the farm of.

her

Mrs.

J.

L.

-Coman; especially milk room and -caring 'for calves;

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