O'DELL, POWERS,

O'DELL, POWERS,

J.

H.

ANNUAL P�ORT

OF

O'DELL,

CO��TI AGRICULTURAL AGENT

�D

H.

B.

POWERS, ASSIST1.NT

COUNTY

AGRICULTUIDL AGENT em

CHARLES

PAUL

W.

HOBART,

ASSISTJ1�T comrr AGRICULTURAL A.GENT

L1I1)

BROWN,

ASSISTJ.aNT COUNTY AGRICULTUP� AGENT

MARICOPA COUNTY

DECEMBER 1944 TO DECEMBER 1945

INDEX

III.

Summar,y of Activities and Accomplishments

•••••••••

1-2

IV.

Changes in Extension Organization

Form of

Organization

••••••••••••••••••••••••••••

General Policies

••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••

Procedure

•••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••

3

3

3 v.

Program of Work

Factors Considered and Methods Used in

Determining the Program of Work

•••••••••••••••

Project

�ctivities and Results

••••••••••••••••••

SOILS

Project #1 Alkali Rec�tion

•••••••••••••••••

Project #2

-

Fertilization Practice

•••••••••••••

Project #5 Irrigation

Practice

••••••••••••••••

CROPS

Project #6

-

Pure Seed

••••••••••••••••••••••••••

8

Project #8

-

Weed Eradication

•••••••••••••••••••

Project t�o

-

Quality Spinning and

Ginning

••••••

9

9

HORTICULTURE

Project t12 Pruning

•••••••••••••••••••••••••••

10

Project #13 Pecan Propagation

•••••••••••••••••

10

Project #l4

Date Propagation

••••••••••••••••••

10

Project #14.1

-

Citrus

Nurse�

Practice

•••••••••

11

5

6

7

4

4

MISCELLANEOUS

Project 1/15

Project 1/16

Project 1/23

Project

#26

Insect Pest Control

•••••••••••••••

P�dent Control

••••••••••••••••••••

Disease Control

Economic

(Plant)

•••••••••••

Surve,y

•••••••••••••••••••

LIVESTOCK

Project *�9

-

Feeding

Beef Cattle

•••••••••••••••

15

Project #20

-

Sheep

Production

••••••••••••••••••

15

Swine Production

••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••

17

11-14

14

14

15

DAIRY

Project #22

-

Dair,r Herd Improvement

••••••••••••

16

Project #22a

-

Dair.y

Herd

Management

••••••••••••

16

Project #23

Disease Control

(Animal)

••••••••••

17

Project #24

-

Better and Proven Sires

•••••••••••

17

POULTRY

Project #28

-

Caponizing

••••••••••••••••••••••••

19

Project #30

-

Poultry

Improvement

•••••••••••••••

IS

Project #30a

-

Poultr,y

Disease & Parasite Control

19

4-H CLUB \70RK

Project #29

-

Boys'

�d Girls' Club Work

........

19-25

ORGANIZATION

Victory

Garden

Program

••••••••••••••••••••••••••

Farm Labor

••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••

Maricopa County Farm Bureau

•••••••••••••••••••••

Soil C0nservation Service

•••••••••••••••••••••••

Fish and Wildlife Service

•••••••••••••••••••••••

Count,r U.S.D.!.

War

Board

•••••••••••••••••••••••

County Agricultural Adjustment AgenC,y

••••••••••••

War

Rationing Board

•••••••••••••••••••••••••••••

Farm Field

Days

•••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••

Service

Clubs

•••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••

Home Makers Clubs

•••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••

Arizona Rabbit Breeders Association

•••••••••••••

Pure-bred

Salt River

Dair,y

Cattle Clubs

••••••••••••••••••••

Valley

Breeders Association

••••••••••

Coun�

Agents

Conferences

•••••••••••••••••••••••

26

26

27

27

28

28

28

28

27

27

27

27

28-30

30

30

VI.

Outlook and

Recommendations, Including Suggested

Program of Work for Next Year

••••••••••••••••••••

31

SUMMARY

AND

OUTLOOK

OF

PP.DJECTS

Project

#1 Alkali Reclamation

•••••••••••••••••

Project

Project

Project

Project

#2

#5

1!6

#8

Project

1/12

Project

1/13-

Project

1/14

-

Project

Project

1/14.1

#15

Project

#16

Project #23

Fertilization Practice

•••••••••••••

Irrigation

Practice

••••••••••••••••

Pure Seed

••••••••••••••••••••••••••

Weed Eradication

•••••••••••••••••••

Pruning

•••••••••••••••••••••••••••

Pecan

Propagation

•••••••••••••••••

Date

-

Propagation

••••••••••••••••••

Citrus

Nurser.y

Practice

•••••••••

Insect Pest

Control

•••••••••••••••

Rodent Control

Disease Control

••••••••••••••••••••

•••••••••••••••••••

Project #26

Economic

Survey

•••••••••••••••••••

Dair,y

•••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••

Poultr.y

•••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••

Livestock

•••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••

Project #29

-

Boys' and Girls' Club Work

••••••••

31

31

32

32

32

32

32

32

33

33

33

33

33

33

34

34

34

III.

SUMl'lARY OF ACTIVITIES AND ACCOMPLISmmNTS

The

Agricultural Extension �ervice program in this county· has been conducted tions and by projects and in cooperation with indivieuals, organiza­ governmental agencies dealing rlth agriculture.

In spite of war­ time conditions it has been possible to maintain a full Etaff and measurable results in several fields have been accomplished.

Progress, due to the

The diligent work of Assistant

Bror.n, has been made in 4-H

Club work.

annual

4-H Fair held at Tempe sho.ed

a decided improvement in the number and

quali�

of exhibits.

More lay leaders have been brought into the program in

with1better

training for the rural youth and greater interest general in the work.

The Pure ceed program under the supervision of

Assistant Hobart has interest, in gained, through better supervision

�d grower quality of seed produced.

�eed dealers have offered to cooperate more closely in the production of registered

Eeed and this one factor alone will lead to better qualit7 seed for use in this and other states.

well

The

Smith-Doxey program conducted by

AssistUlt Bobart, also was handled and covered a

majority

of t�e growers of both long and short staple cotton.

The

Victory

Garden progr� conducted by Assist�t Po�ers in cooperation with radio station KOY at

Phoenix was executed.

Requests for information on b�en station KOY and referred to Mr.

PowerE stow problems definitely received that through ttis progr� served a make the great number of program of people greater in scope, this end well-pl�ed and other counties.

broadcasts after

Sept€�b€r

In order to dealt with problems dealing with ornaoental plants and trees and fruit trees in home pl.ant.Lngs

,

The response to this pr-ogram has been very gratifying.

Also the cooperation received by Assist&nt POfiers from the Agricultural

Chemistry staff on citrus mottle leaf and chlorosis has been quite helpful.

Acting in the

Specialist VanSant who has served as an assistent county agent while county has done excellent work in assisting the eeveral breeder as�ociations with programs which have led to products at a time when they were greatEr production of dQi� sorely needed.

His work on forming a group the of dairymen into an organization to conduct artificial inse�ination, first of its kind in the county, has been wort� of note.

The Farm

Labor more program through the efforts of Farm Labor Assistant Ttatkins led to efficient u�e of

�risoners-of-war as agricultural l�borers.

Training schools or periods for prisoners and ecucational meetings

�nth famers were

largely

responsible for the gains made.

The grasshopper contr�l progr&m conducted in all of parts of the county in co�peration with the U.

S.

Bureau

Entomolo�T and Plant Quar��tine, Gr&ss�op�er Control Divisio�, accomplished very good results after some difficulties, enco��tered in the beginning, were overco�e.

An additional appropriation from the

County

Board of

Supervisors and the financial assistance of one farmer in the

Gilbert district and of t�o of irrigation districts made possible the building three mechanical mixers for use in the program.

Control in the

Gilbert district was severe especially good due to the interest of the farmers there.

A infestation was reduced to one which Nould cause little or no damage.

The probra� in the

Buckeye district did not work out as well, although several individuals received much benefit through the use of the poison materials and one mechanical spreader loaned qy this office.

Cooperation with the Soil Conservation Service has been excellent and led

-

1

-

to the setting up of one district and the preliminu� �{ork on two more.

Monthly meetings have been conducted with the combined staff of the

County Agent and the Home Demonstration

Agent and these have led to better understanding � all members of tte st�fs of extension work being conducted in the county.

Weekly meetings with me�bers of the County Agent's staff have resulted in tion of a better weekly understanding of project work and techni�ue.

The publica­ col� in the Mesa Joarnal-Tribune on timely subjects on all ph3ses of agriculture prepared

� starr members has been the means of quickly disseminating information to rural people.

Assistance nas given to the War

Rationing Board on the certification for use of sugar to be used in control of citrus thrips and to the U.S.D.!. �ar Board through investigations and reports of agricultural activity of iniividuals for selective service.

Roney in

In conducting insect control, all projects

Matlock and �rograms in pure seed the services of work, Tate in

Speciali�ts horticultural problems, Hitch in measuring wells and furnishing data on en&ineering problems,

Baker in farm labor and econo�c surveys,

Turville in soil problems, Ballantyne on problems involving rural sociology and VanSant in poultrJ and dair,y have been exceeding17 telpful and their cooperation bigbly appreciated.

and

The clerical staff of four full-time members for five for the latter part has handled all part of the year typing, filing, record keeping, preparation of expense accounts, issuance of bulletins and circulars and distribution of grasshopper and rodent control poison.

-

2

-

IV.

CHANGES IN EXTENSION

ORGANIZATION

(1)

Form of

Organiza�!J.9!l

The annual budget for the

Agricultural

Extension Service program in this

The county may, as provided

by

law, be approved by the

Maricopa

Farm Bureau.

budget is prepared and submitted to the Farm Bureau directors for their

approval

and, this being obtained, is submitted to the

County"

Board of

Super­ visors who make appropriations covering that part of the expenditures to be paid from state and county funds.

As a matter of convenience some member at the Extension Service start attends each and acts as meeting of the Farm Bureau directors secretar,y.

No member of the staff is an officer or director ot the Farm Bureau.

The Extension Service staff consists at present of a

County Agent, three Assistant onstration

Agents, one

Home Demonstration

Agent, one

Assistant Home Dem­

Agent, one

Office

Secretar.y, four Stenographer-Clerks and one

Jan­ itor.

In addition the Extension the

Specialist in

Entomology has an office in building and is available when not engaged in other counties.

Also the

Acting Specialist in

Dairy and

Poultry bas an otfice here and is available while in the count" to perform duties usually assigned to an

Assistant

Agent.

The Farm Labor Offices located at

Phoenix, and at

1921 East

Washington street,

46

South Macdonald Street in

Mesa, are staffed by a

Farm La­ bor

Assistant, three Assistants and one

Stenographer and

� one

Stenographer­

Clerk

respectively.

Both offices are under the supervision of the

County

Ag­ ricultural

Agent.

(2)

General Policies

It bas been the facilities of both the policy of the Extension Service to otfer all the count.y

and state organization to all farm organiza­ tions, federal, state and county agencies dealing with agriculture or agri­ cultural products, to all civic organizations as well as individuals regard­ less of their aftiliations.

Projects dealing with rural people are given first consideration but much assistance is given to urban people when requested.

The

Agent has served as a and as ex-officio member of the County member of the U.S.D

.!.

Cotmty

Agricultural Adjustment

War

Board

Committee and some member of the starf has acted as directors at all secretar.y

for the County Farm Bureau regular and special meetings.

(3)

Procedure

Each year a program of work covering all phases of Extension activ­ ity is prepared separately by the

County Agent and the

Cotmty

Home

Demonstration their

Agent and submitted to the directors of the Farm Bureau for approval.

This program outlines only in a general way the proj ects which are to be carried during the year and is flexible enough to take care of emergencies as they may arise.

This program of work after approval of the

Farm Bureau directors is submitted to the Extension Director for approval and after approval a copy is filed with the

County Board of

Supervisors.

-

3

-

V.

PROGRAM OF WORK

il)

Factors Considered and Methods Used in

Determining

the

Program of Work

The Extension Service program for the year was planned to place em­ phasis on such projects as would increase production under wartime restrictions.

Due to lack of labor and transportation facilities farmers could not attend as m� meetings as in past years and for that reason fewer meetings than

formerly

were planned.

Rural peoples were to be kept informed of changing conditions through meetings, newspaper articles, personal letters, radio talks on timely subjects, telephone, circulars and bulletins and circular letters.

The educational

Agency was phase of the

Agricultural Adjustment planned to coincide with meetings held by that agency and in cooperation with the

County

Committee.

Disemination of information through commodit.y

groups was planned wherever possible.

The Farm Labor program was planned to work in close cooperation with the

War

Food

Administration,

Office of

Labor,

U.

S.

Army officials in charge of the prisoner of war program, irrigation districts and farm organizations formed to handle farm labor.

(2)

Project Activities and Results

General

Demonstration meetings of the staffs of the

County Agent and the Home

Agent were held monthly and meetings of the

County Agent's staff were held weekly in order that a thorough understanding of all phases of the work in the tion of effort and count.y

might be had by all.

Through this medium, duplica­ misunderstanding were prevented.

In several projects the work of the Home Demonstration

Agent and the

County Agent has been conducted cooperatively.

Wherever possible Specialists have been used in planning and executing projects and their services have been ver,y helpful.

The

Agent bas devoted his time during the year largely to matters involving administrative policies, farm labor problems, the grasshopper con­ trol program and in cooperation with other

P.

W.

Brown bas devoted his entire time to governmental agencies.

4-H

Club activity and

Assistant has made remarkable gains in this field.

The

4-H

Fair held at the Arizona State

Teachers

College at

Tempe under his direction was well conducted and served to promote better bas been public appreciation of this work.

Assistant Chas.

Hobart responsible for projects dealing with agronomy and irrigation.

His work on strengthening the pure seed program in cooperation with the Arizona

Crop Improvement Association was well planned and executed.

After much work in cooperation with Specialist E.

S. Turville he revised the circular "Fit­ ting Crop

Acreages to VIa ter Supply· and this in bulletin form is now in the bands of the printers.

Also his work on weed control, cotton defoliation and crop acreages has been valuable.

Assistant H.

B. Powers has conducted proj ects dealing wi th horticulture and vegetable crops.

His radio program over

Station KOY on home gardens was an outstanding success.

These weekly programs were conducted at a model garden planned � himself and were evidently listened to by home owners all over the state.

His work on citrus chlorosis and mottle leaf in cooperation with the

Department of Soil

Chemistry has shown some results which should be helpful to all citrus growers.

and

Acting Specialist

Assistant

Agent has

yanSant

serving a dual capacity of specialist developed the

Dair.y

Herd Improvement

Program

-

4

-

re�arkably during the year.

His efforts in attempting to put into effect a workable

Poultr.y Improvement Plan are beginning to show good effects.

Spe­ cialist J.

N.

Roney has been available, when not required in other counties, to help on insect and plant disease problems and this assistance has been helpful to the entire staff.

The clerical work of the office r�s been the responsibility of

Mrs.

Josephine Henness, Office

Secretar,r, assisted at the time of this re­ port by

Miss

Mary

Helen

Weickart, Mrs.

DaiS-J M.

Baxter, Mrs.

Harriet Armer and Miss Elsa

Baremore, stenographer-Clerks.

All correspondence, records, filing and expense accounts for the entire staff as well as for the

Agricultural Che�ist, �r.

George Draper, have been well done by this force.

The Farm Labor kins,

Farm Labor

Program was conducted largely by

Ur.

Clyde

Wat­

Assistant, Messrs.

Vincent

Esche and C. R.

Pendleton,

Assistants, and Mrs.

Helen

Anderson, office and by

Miss Beatrice

Jean,

Stenographer-Clerk

Stenographer-Clerk in in the the Phoenix

�esa office.

Mr.

Watkins resigned e!fective October first and was succeeded by

Mr.

Esche.

Under this staff the Farm Labor

Program has been ve� beneficial the farmers of this county.

to conducted the

The maintenance of the County

Agent's

Office building has been by

Mr.

William

Drorbaugh, Janit�r, who also served as foreman of grasshopper poison mixing plant at

Pho��ix.

SOILS

Project

#1

-

A��ali F.e�la�ation

The demonstration plot on the A. T. Jones farm west of Buckeye advanced a started step further this year but no actual work on leaching has been by the cooperator.

The twenty-acre field was levelled and bordered in the early summer.

The plot was outlined and materials, gypsu:n and sul­ fur, furnished by the

Extension Service.

Soil samples were taken and analyzed by George Draper, Agricultural Chemist, on all lands in the plot.

Unfortunately, Mr.

Jones was called to

Washington about this time regarding some litigation and remained there all s�er.

No leaching has been done to date.

A field survey by

Dr.

Fireman of the

U.

S.

Salinity Laboratory at

Riverside, California, accompanied

� Assistant Hobart and Agricultural

Chemist

Draper was made during February in the

Buckeye area.

Lands of the

Roosevelt

Irrigation

District were largely those surveyed and

Dr.

Fireman expressed the opinion that his organization might make further studies in the at district.

Samples of desert and irrigated lands were taken for analysis

Riverside.

His report on these samples showed no bigh concentration of alkali but later in the year, in

Plant

Industry found very

June,

Mr. Karl Harris of the

Bureau of positive evidence that temporary alkali was a decided factor in cotton production in that district.

-

5

-

Project

#2

-

Fertilization

Practice

Grower interest in the use of commercial fertilizers was ver,y high during the year.

This was

especially

true with regard to citrus growers who for several groves in years have had good returns from their groves and wish to top condition now.

Alfalfa growers also have shown much keep interest, probab� influenced qy fertilizer salesmen, to apply both phosphate and ni­ trogen to alfalfa

plantings.

Vegetable growers have used all types of commercials, varying with the individual crops.

Mr.

B. F.

Youngker at Buckeye applied liquid ammonia on an old stand of alfalfa in no hopes of improving production.

!

check on yields showed increase on the fertilized plot.

It has been shown at the Mesa Experimental Farm that land in al­ falfa for only two years produces better crops than that which has been in alfalfa for three years.

From this it appears that alfalfa is soil depleting after two years' growth.

To observe the effect of co�ercia1 fertilizers on fruit set and tree growth of peaches, field test plots were established qy

Assistant

Powers in cooperation with Mr.

H.

A.

Lesse] of Glendale and Mr.

F.

L.

Chap­ man of

Mesa.

On each farm three trees were given five pounds each of ammonium sulfate and three an

March.

It is application of ammonium phosphate

(16-20) in planned to carr,y this test over a three to five year period.

In in the Deer cooperation with Mr. John

Jacobs, commercial vegetable grower

Valley district, a test plot of commercial fertilizers on

Warba potatoes was conducted.

The plots checked were in the field.

Guard rows were made between each fertilized center of plot.

a

40-acre

Twelve rows, one-eighth of a mile in length, were accurately checked for yields in each plot.

Results were as follows:

Fertilizer

At

Application time of planting

450 lbs.

10-20 mix

450

10-20

As side dressing

60 days later

250 lbs.

ammonium sulfate

80

• ammonia gas

Yield, lbs.

per�

24,000

22,560

ducted

With these next year with

r�su1ts

as a guide a much larger test plot will be con­ the same grower

.......

ant in

A check on t� penetration of liquid phosphate was made br Assist­

Powers in the Walter White citrus grove near

Mesa.

Soil samples taken the grove before and after the application of the material showed no

lowering

of the pH of the soil as has been claimed b,y the representative

selling

the material.

Also contrary to his claim that the phosphate would penetrate as deep as the water, it was found that phosphate had penetrated only eight inches.

A similar check is being made on this material in a lettuce field in the

Cartwright district.

R.

M.

In December the Arizona Citrus Growers Association, through Mr.

Hess, requested that leaf samples collected qy field men of the

Asso-

-

6

-

ciation from a representative number of groves in the val1e.y

be analyzed at monthly intervals to determine the nitrogen content of the tree.

A confer­ ence was held by Dr. P.

S.

Burgess, Dr. William Jones of the U.

of A.

Experiment Station, Mr.

Hess and the

Agent to work out plans for this program.

It was agreed that samples would be taken from not over twent.y­ five groves to be selected

qy

the Association.

These samples were to be analyzed b,y

Mr.

Robert

Keswick of the U. of A. Horticultural

Department whose salar,y would be paid by the Citrus Growers Association for one week each month for the duration of the test.

to of

The cost of chemicals necessa� make proper analysis was also to be borne by the Association.

Results analyses were to be mailed to growers each month.

It is hoped to run this test for several years in order to prove that there is a direct correlation between nitrogen content of the tree and the

qualit,r

and amount of fruit produced.

During the year members of the staff gave assistance on fertili­ zer problems to growers as follows: citrus

175, deciduous fruits

29, berries

.3, pecans

4, vegetables 35, dates

.3, grain

8, alfalfa and permanent pasture one each.

Project

#5

-

Irrigation Practice

Assistant Hobart has revised the mimeograph circular

"Fitting

Crop

Acreages to Water now in the hands of the

Supplies"

for printing in bulletin form.

This is printers.

tion

At the request of representatives of the Chandler

Heights Irriga­

District,

Assistant Hobart and Specialist D. L.

Hitch measured the flow of five wells on the project.

sum

Assistant Powers outlined a result to correct a experiment on the use of gyp­

"plow soleR or uhard panin a citrus grove in order to get better near

Mesa penetration of irrigation water.

In the C.

H.

Coulson grove fifty pounds of gypsum was applied broadcast to each of two trees and disced in just prior to an irrigation.

Soil samples taken before the application and after the irrigation sho.ed

some slight improvement of the calcium-magnesium-sodium ratio but no greater penetration was obtained around the treated trees than the untreated ones.

Messrs.

In

Februar,y three representatives of the Brazilian government,

Melo, Bastos and Pinto, were shown over the irrigation projects of the county by members of the staff.

One trip was made to the Bartlett and the Horse Shoe dams in order to show these men two types of dams being used for irrigation purposes.

During the year growers as follows were given assistance ��th ir­ rigation problems: citrus 71, alfalfa

7, deciduous fruits

5, dates

6,

ornamentals 2 and cotton, grains and pecans one each.

-

7

-

CROPS

Project #6

-

Pure Seed

Although all pure seed programs, with the exception of the grain sorghums, remained more or less static during the year it is felt that considerable progress has been made.

First, Mr. M.

F.

Aepli of

Tempe was

appointed

inspector for the Arizona

Crop Improvement

Association and was available throughout the year for thresher, combine and cleaning plant in­ spections when needed.

Second, the requirement that an

-intention to plantW record be filed b.1

each sorghum grower b,y

June first kept the plantings within reason and confined them more to established growers than

formerly.

This eliminated indiscriminate plantings and had the effect of stabilizing the price to the grower.

Third, the inauguration of a double inspection of fields allowed growers to remove, if possible, hazards in time to

qua1i�

their fields for either registered or certified seed.

There has been one factor in the program which was not so favorable.

That was the lack of a guarantee to the registered grower of a sufficient price for his seed to warrant the expense of growing the same.

This has been corrected, we hope, b,y the seed dealers as an organization agreeing to finance the growing of.

registered sorghum seed for the coming year.

tion all

At the annual meeting of the Arizona

Crop Improv�ent

Associa­ held in Phoenix it was decided to increase the registration fee for crops and to use this increase in an advertising program for Arizona grown seed.

Acreages certified seed inspected and passed as qualifying for registered or during the year were as follows:

Small

Gl:ains

Calif.

Red Oats

-

314 A

Ari vat

Barley

-

134 A

Early

Baart Wheat

-

40 A

Markton Oats

-

60

A

Cotton

Calif.

Acala

San tan

-

AmSaR:

-1031 A

-

572 A

-

20

A

Grain

Hegari

Sorghums

Martin Combine

Early Hegari

D.D.

38 Milo

Plainsman

Caprock

Bonita

Sumac

1712

Midland

Imperial

Karfir

-

-

4607

A

-1067A

-

-

-

432

A

428 A

222

A

55 A

50 A

40 A

35 A

35

A

Alfalfa

Chilean -1500 A

l!!!

Punjab 20 A

Nine carloads of hegari seed were inspected and sampled b7

As­ sistant Hobart at the was to be sent to request of the War Food Administration.

This material

Algiers for food.

crease growers

The in the

Smith-Doxe,r program sign-up this year showed a decided de­ number of cotton growers, indicating that a number of smaller had turned to other crops.

A total of sixteen associations were formed, out of nineteen gins of short staple, and three gins of

long-staple

-

8

-

00

P'I

SMITH-DOXEY MEMBERSHIP

&

ACREAGE 1944 & 1945

IN MARICOPA COUNTY.

(GIN MANAGERS ATTEMPTED

100%

SIGN-UP BOTH

YEARS)

A CAL!

Nu.ber or Member.

Total

Acrea,.

Acres Per Meaber

Number or Members

Total

Acreage

Acres Per Mem.er

1944

265

42,378

160

62

4,108

66

1945

165

40,743

247

21

980

47

------

Per Cent or

1944

62

96

154

34

24

71

00

0"

I

CLASS OF SEED

Re,isterei

Total

Total

MARICOPA COUNTY PURE SEED

ACREAGES

ACCEPTED

BY

ARIZONA CROP IMPROVEMENT ASSOCIATION

FOR 1945.

ALFALFA SMALL GRAIN

AND FLAX

COTTON SORGHUM

Chilean

291 acres.

291 acres

Ari

'Ya.

t Bar

1e7

89 acres.

Markto. Oats

80 acres.

San Tan

J.ca1a

411 acres.

DD

38 Mi1·o

45 acres.

California Red Oats California Acale

Early Hecari

74 acres.

594 acres.

40 acres.

lHe,ari

91 acres.

Baart 38 Wheat

37 acres.

PunJalt

Flax

20 acrea.

�.peria1

Kalir

15 acres.

Martin

40 acres.

iPlainsun

20 acres.

300 acres

1.005

acres

251 acres

Chilean

1,204 acres.

1.2Q4

acres iri'Yat

Barle1

145 acres.

San Tan Aca1a

121 acres.

PD ,38 Mil.

428 acres.

California Red Oats California Aca1&

Ear17 Hecari

240 acres.

770 acres.

392 acres.

Hecari

4,426

acres.

Imperial Kafir

20 acres.

Martin

1,080 acres.

�lainsman

202 acres.

Bonita

385 acre_$_

_

891 acres

50 acres.

Caprock

55 acres.

Midlanci

35_ acres.

6.688

acres

were included in the program.

of Acala and

Acreage of growers in associations was

980 of SXP.

There were

21 growers of SxP and

40,763

165 growers of

Acala.

Project

#8

-

Weed

Eradication

In cooperation with

Specialist

Matlock and interested farmers,

As­ sistant

Hobart conducted a number of tests using the new

2,4-D types of weed killers on white horse nettle, bindweed and nut grass throughout the year.·

Seven chemicals were used in the first tests on horse nettle and bindweed, name1y:.Dupont

Nos.

1, 2,3 &

4, Dow,

Weedicide and Weedone.

These materials were used at a

.2%

concentration.

Definite conclusions cannot be drawn at this time but indications are that the

2,4-D materials will

(1)

Hold down horse nettle for at least one season

(2) Give best results on moist soil

(3)

Most effective when used on rapidly growing plants

(4) Kills alfalfa when plants are sprayed with the material and cotton is ver,y sensitive to the material.

Test plots on lawns using

Weedone and Sherwin-Williams Weed Killer

No.

1 were established for the control or nut grass but results cannot be determined at this time.

Twelve citrus growers, five vegetable growers and seven growers of general crops were given assistance in controlling noxious weeds.

Oil sprays have been advocated to control grass and weeds on ditch banks and fence rows.

One citrus around the grower base of trees on a is using oU to control twenty-acre grove.

weeds and grass

Project #10

-

Quality Spinning

and

Ginning

As part of the national program on food production five cotton production held in meetings

Gilbert, were

Queen held in the county in

Creek, Peoria, Buckeye

February.

and

At

Litchfield these and meetings attended by sixty cotton growers all phases of cotton growing including discussions of varieties, quality of lint, irrigation, mechanical cultivation and harvest, insect control and labor were given b.1

members of the Extension

Service,

U.S.D.!.

and Arizona

Agricultural Experiment

Station.

Gin operators and machiner,y dealers cooperated in these meetings by mailing out notices and taking part in the program respectively.

In

September a meeting was held in the County Agent's Building at which Messrs. C. A. Bennett of the U.

S.

Ginning Laborator,r at

Stoneville,

Mississippi, and

A.

M.

Pendleton, Extension Specialist in

Ginning, stressed ginning changes necessar,y if machine harvest becomes general.

A film show­ ing mechanical cultivation and harvesting machinery was shown to the thirty­ three interested growers and ginners present.

Assistant

Hobart has done considerable work on the problem of defoliating cotton with chemical.

In this matter he bas bad excellent co­ operation from Mr.

George Draper, Agricultural Chemist, and members of the

-

9

-

Agrono�

Department starr.

One test in cooperation

Arizona Fertilizers and Marsh and Franklin

Crop with the

Dusters was

Gooqyear Farms, made to deter­ mine the effect of of a field was irrigation on the effectiveness of c,yanamide.

A portion irrigated to see if the relative humidity could be raised in this manner enough to

bring

about a dew point.

Unfortunately a rain occurred just after the irrigation and no difference in humidity could be noticed.

Other materials used at the Mesa Farm were

"Ammate· and sodium nitrite.

The latter is used as a it potato vine killer and it was thought that might serve to defoliate cotton.

The ·Ammate" killed the leaves which

eventually

dropped and some green bolls were prematurely opened.

The cost of the material is too great for this

�e.

The sodium nitrite killed the leaves but green bolls th� did not fall and the lint was

badly

stained in addition to being opened prematurely.

Also another material,

"Dowicide

G", was tried late in the season.

No vapor-duster was available for applying this solution as is recommended by the manufacturer and the material was applied with a conventional type of spr�er.

No consistent results were ob­ tained and a killing frost six days after the application stopped further observation.

HORTICULTURE

Project

#12

-

Pruning ous fruit

During the year twelve method demonstrations on pruning of decidu­ trees, vines, citrus and ornamentals were held in different communities of by Assistant Powers with an attendance of 141 persons.

A total

86 fruit growers and 15 home owners were given assistance in pruning various trees and plants.

Two articles on pruning were prepared by

Assistant

Powers and published in the "Arizona Farmer".

He also pruned some of the more promising varieties of deciduous fruit trees at the Mesa

Experimental

Farm in order to have some check on the behavior of those particular varieties.

Project

#13

-

Pecan

Propagation

A series of nine budding and grafting method demonstrations were conducted by Assistant Powers with a total attendance of seventy-three.

In­ dividual help was given to 39 growers who were interested in budding or grafting seedling trees.

Since grafting of pecans requires special skill and special tools it has been fotmd that few growers will attempt to graft a tree.

Budding, however, is relatively simple, requires little special equipment and can be done by anyone.

Therefore, grafting will be dropped from the demonstrations in the future and emphasis placed on budding.

Project

#14

-

Date

Propagation

The date industry in this valley has been revived with the higher prevailing prices.

Many replacements have been made in orchards and much interest has been shown in both propagation and processing of dates.

As-

-

10

-

sistant Powers assisted Mr. Art Beck in locating sources of Deglet, Khadrawy and Halawy offshoots in the county in order to supply an order of

.3,000 off­ shoots of these varieties to growers in Indio,

California.

Seven method demonstrations on removal were held in various pollination and three on offshoot parts of the county.

The revised bulletin on dates by

Assistant Powers has been much in demand during the yeax.

families

Information on during the year.

processing dates was furnished to thirty-six farm

Project

#14.1

-_CitruS

NurserY P�actic�

General information on ten individuals who were starting citrus seed-beds

�as furnished to starting into the nursery business.

Three method demonstrations on to budding were held

� Assistant Powers,two of these being garden clubs.

It is likely that a great number of citrus trees will be budded within the next two years.

It is hoped that these new growers can be influenced to use good budwood and to produce good trees.

Project

t1s

-

Insect Pest

Control

This proj ect bas been a very trying one this yeax due to the prevalence of inj urious insects and the lack of commonly used insecticides.

With the release of DDT for general consumer use this problem was made more complex since eve�one wanted to use

DDT for the control of all pests on all plants and animals.

Insects observed in the field were grasshoppers and crickets on general crops, aphids on vegetables, melons, pecans and ornamentals, thrips on citrus, vegetables and ornamentals, false chinch bug on vegetables and ornamentals, termites in dwellings, cutworms on melons and alfalfa, grain weevils in stored grain and vegetable seed, borers in deciduous fruits and roses, peach twig borer in peaches and apricots, leaf hoppers on grapes and ornamentals, mites on tomatoes, alfalfa caterpillars on alfalfa, salt marsh caterpillar on seedling alfalfa plants, elm leaf-beetle on

Chinese elm, striped and

12-spotted cucumber beetles on melons, dried fruit beetles in figs, green June beetle on figs, dates and grapes, loopers on lettuce and cabbage and cottony cushion scale on ornanentals.

A total of 141 persons were given assistance with insect problems exclusive of those obtaining grasshopper poison.

Dair,ymen generally are following the practices recom­ mended

� Specialist Rone,y for the control of ox warble in their herds.

Cooperative method demonstrations on the control of corn-e�rworm in sweet corn conducted through the use of oU, clipping and dusting with DDT were bf Assistant Powers on the G. D. Isabell and

William

Katich ranches with Drs.

Roney and

Hoyman assisting.

The primary purpose of this demonstra­

�ion was to check the v�ue of

DDT dust in controlling the corn earworm.

Two dustings of 20 lbs. per acre of timed so as to

5%

DDT were applied b.1 plane.

These were correspond with the same stage of growth required for the first and second oil treatments.

At approximately the same time as the rest of the

-

11

-

field was Oiled, silks on two rows were clipped.

at

A check was also made on the ears oiled the farm.

This field was oiled three times at intervals.

b.1

untrained help

emplqyed approximately

rive-d�

Results:

Treatment

Check

Oiled

(hired labor)

Clipped

DDT

(dust)

Isabell-F�rtner Ranch

No.

Ears Counted

400

700

No.

Ears

Worm

Showing

Injury*

242

327

200

400

37

191

%

Wormy

60.5

46.7

18.5

47.7

*Ears showing ver,y little damage not counted unless live worm present, as oil killed some worms soon after they sta.rted

eating on corn.

Another cooperative demonstration on corn earworm control

Vias con­ ducted on the farm of Bill Katich.

Two rows

100 ft.

long were dusted with

5%

DDT at the rate of ap­ proximately 35 lbs.

per acre.

This was applied with a knapsack duster.

At the same time, two rows were oiled with the recommended p,yrethrum oil; and two rows were clipped.

Each treatment was repeated three times at five-d� intervals.

A check was also made on the corn oiled by hired help.

harvested

Counts on some of these treatments were not complete as hired help part of the co� from some of the treated rows.

Results:

Bill Katich Farm

Treatment No.

Ears Counted % Wormy

Check

Oiled

(by

H.

B.

P.)

Oiled (hired labor)

Clipped

DDT

60

89

400

136

343

No.

Ears

Worm

Showing

Injury

30

14

150

13

109

50

37.5

9.7

31.8

-12-

Yields

361

No.1

ears for 350 ft. ot row.

Row 20

(75')

No.

1

-

75

No.

2

-

14

Row 21

(75')

No.

1

-

90

No. 2

-

13

Row 5

(100')

No.

1

-

88

No. 2

-

14

Row 30

(100')

No. 1

-

108

No. 2

-

22

Conclusion:

These demonstrations indicate that from the use of DDT applied as a dust.

ver,y little benefit was derived

Clipping gave the best results of aqy method of control tried.

The success of the oiling operation depends on the ahumanft element.

This is also true of the clipping, as

29%

of the ears clipped had worms below the initial cut.

This necessitated a second and sometimes a third cut.

available.

The

Data on the mimeograph circular on the use of DDT by Specialist Roney proved timely and helpful in answering questions regarding the use of this material.

A test on fly control was started at the Balsz School b.y

Assist­ ant Powers and Specialist Roney using an

Aerosal bomb and a spray of DDT.

length of time this material will be effective is not yet

This test was made in the school cafeteria over one week-end.

The grasshopper control program in cooperation with the

Bureau of

Entomology and Plant Quarantine proved quite copa effective.

In March the Mari­

County

Board ot Supervisors made available for use of the

Count,y Agent an additional sum of five hundred dollars to build mixing machines and to defray general expenses in connection with the program.

This made a total of one thousand dollars appropriated for this purpose for the fiscal year

1944-45.

A similar sum has been made available for use during the fiscal year

1945-46.

In

April a meeting was held at Bucke,re at which

Mr.

A.

E.

Frazier of the

Grasshopper

Control Division was the principal speaker.

Grasshopper problems were discussed and plans made for a mixing station at

Buckeye.

Three mixing machines were made by the machine shop of the Good­ year

Farms and th� Roosevelt paid for partly from the above mentioned fund and partly �

Irrigation

District at

Bucke,ye and Mr.

Clyde Neely at Gilbert.

Mixing stations were established at Phoenix, Buck�e and Gilbert and were in operation until late in October.

Great interest was shown in control and much poison was used in both the Phoenix and Gilbert districts.

grasshopper damage was great in Buckeye little interest was shown

Although

� the farmers of that area.

From these three stations a total of 22,714 sacks of poison was mixed and furnished to 345 individuals.

Both sodium arsenite and sodium fluosilicate were used as the

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13

-

killing agent in the mix with equally good results after the dosage of the latter had been increased to six pounds per hundred of dr.1 Neight instead of four pounds as was used last year.

The carrier was fifty percent mi1lrun bran and fifty percent sawdust.

A number of mechanical spreaders were in use in the eastern part of the county.

Some poison mash was applied by air­ plane but this was a very small percentage of the total.

The assistance of both Mr. A.

E. Frazier and this program was very helpful.

Specialist Ron�J in

Project

#16

-

Rodent

Control

In cooperation with the U.

S. Fish and Wildlife Service and the

Maricopa County

Farm

Bureau, available to all farmers poison throughout for the gophers, year.

rabbits

Twenty-one and mice citrus has been growers, three vegetable growers and five home o�ers were given assistance in trap­ ping gophers.

Gophers were especially bad in citrus groves having permanent cover crops or high mounds of soU around the trunk.

In one twent,r-acre orchard fourteen trees were lost due to gopher injury.

Project

#23

-

Disease Control

(Plant)

More individuals call for assistance under this project than aqy other.

This is because all calls which cannot be or directly traced to insects damage from neglect or poor cultural practices are classed under dis­ eases.

growers,

The and staff rendered assistance to 253 fruit growers, 34 vegetable

95 growers of other crops or ornamentals.

Diseases observed were citrus gumosis and scaly bark, crown gall, nematodes, mottle leaf of citrus, heart rot of palms, damping off of seedling plants, blight of tomatoes, root rot of deciduous fruit trees and field crops, bacterial wilt of alfalfa, fusarium

..

-lIt on numerous plants, fruit rot of dates, an undetermined disease of ce1er,y and side rot of lettuce.

year.

Brown rot

One grower of gumosis has been troublesome in citrus groves during the twelve acres of citrus lost twent,y trees from this disease and has from one-fourth to one-third of the

Trees in this grove have a mound remaining trees infected.

of soil around the trunk reaching above the bud union.

This grower was advised two years ago to have this soil pulled away from the trees but has neglected to do so with disastrous results.

One demonstration on the treatment of trees infected with this disease was held by Assistant Powers.

The chlorotic condition of citrus known as ftiron fl1ime-induced chlorosis. has increased in severity and deficien�n or scope in many sections where valencia and navel oranges are grown.

In cooperation with

Ur. W.

T.

McGeorge of the Agricultural Chemistr.y Department, a number of control plots

Pave been established

Assistant Powers.

These tests will continue over a long period in ten different groves.

Various soil treatments and injections of chemicals are being tried.

At present the only treatment which has made any improvement in affected trees is that of a

50-50 mix of sulfur and manure

-

14-

incorporated with the soil.

This treatment is slow but does make some improve· men t in time.

It is a well-known fact that the real cause of an abnormal condition in plants may be caused by a disease organism, but in many cases other factors mB1 be the main cause of the trouble wbile the disease organism which may be found on the to plant material is secondar,y.

In such cases it is hard for �one diagnose the real cause of the trouble from plant samples submitted.

There should be some on w� in which the which the trouble occurs.

A pathologist could visit the fields or premises pathologist stationed in Phoenix would be a great help in solving these problems.

Project

#26

-

Econgmic Survey

A survey of hay sheds in the county by

Assistant Hobart and

Special­ ist Baker revealed that in December most sbeds were full of hay whereas at the same time last year most sheds were eMpty.

As&istant Hobart did some work on costs of mechanical harvesting of cotton.

Two farms at the cotton operating on this basis furnished figures which were used production meetings held in

Februa�.

work

The annual crop acreage survey was completed in

August after much by Assistant Hobart.

This survey, a copy of which is included in this report, showed alfalfa acreage cotton and small practically unchanged along with short staple grain.

Long staple cotton and grain sorghum dropped materi­ ally.

There was an increase in cs.ntaloupe

and pasture crops.

on per cotton

A survey made by

Assistant Robart and Farm Labor Assistant Watkins picking showed prisoners of war picking an average of eleven pounds hour of seed cotton as against twenty-seven pounds for civilians.

Also some data on the number of man hours required in the production of general farm crops were obtained from mill growers.

LIVESTOCK

Project #19

-

Feeding

Beef Cattle

More ve�

Feeding conditions in

Maricopa

County improved during the year.

cattle were pasture fed than were fed in previous years.

Even pen feed­ ing increased.

The Central Arizona Cattle

Feeders and the Arizona Cattle

Growers Association maintain offices in Phoenix.

These two organizations are strong and assist the cattlemen to the fullest extent.

Project

#20

-

Sheep

Production

Assistance has been given to individUal farmers in securing breeding animals to establish small farm flocks.

By request of the Wool Growers Asso­ ciation, an assistant to Dr. J.

W.

Pistor has been assigned to Maricopa County to work with the the flocks during sheepmen to correct feeding and disease problems occurring in the period that they are in the county.

-

15

-

DAIRY

Project

#22

-

DairY

Herd

Improvement

Maricopa

Vlere as

The dairy herd improvement work for the state was handled through the

County Dair,y Herd

Improvement

Association.

The officers for the year follows:

Clyde Hussey

C. L.

Phillips

-

-

President

Vice-President

George Blendinger

-

Secretary-Treasurer

A.

D.

Cheatham

-

Director

Roy

Marshall

-

Director

The field work was handled

� four testers,

R.

F.

Williams,

F.

H.

Stout,

Irvin Blume and Albert stassen.

Mr.

Stassen resigned

November

15,

1945, and was replaced b7 Delbert Hassen December

1,

1945.

Maricopa County had sixty-eight herds with

2,839 cows with complete lactation records for the year.

This is an increase of three herds and

511 cows over

1944.

Average production was

8,330 pounds of butter-fat pounds per cow.

of butter-fat

This is per cow.

an increase of of milk and 318.8

pounds

353 pounds of milk and

5.5

more

New efficient herd books will be available

D.H.I.A.

program.

by Januar,y 1,

1946,

providing a

This year has been a record year for D.H.I.A. work in the county with more herds and more cows on test than have ever been on test in the past.

January,

A new man has been hired to begin work in

Maricopa County in

1946,

making a total of five testers.

More dairymen are desiring to have their herds tested and the results of such testing are becoming more important to dairymen to enable them to operate more efficiently.

of

One of the more important programs in the

D.H.I.A.

is the reporting individual cow records to Washington to be used in proving bulls and herd analysis.

On January 1, 1945, Maricopa County had four associations with eighty-nine herds and

3,529 cows on test.

During the year

Janua�

1 to

October

1, 1945,

1,062 individual cow records were reported.

This is thirty percent of the total wr�ch is above the average for the nation.

Project

#22a

-

DairY

Herd

Mana�ement

The dai�en have been ver.y interested in feeding methods and labor requirements to obtain effieient production.

A greater men have been percentage of dair,y­ feeding grain to their cows based on production requirements.

Only two dairymen out of eighty completing

D.H.I.A. year did not feed any grain to their cows during the year.

Production records in D.H.I.A.

showed an increase of milk and fat.

-

16

-

Prices for dair,y cows have been good throughout the year, top cows being

$175.00

to

$200.00

per cow.

M� cows have been shipped out of the county and during the late summer and fall, milk production has been low and dealers have had to ration the supply.

Assistant Hobart did some work on permanent pastures during the year but the project was not stressed due to the initial cost of getting the pasture established and the high water requirement of this crop.

One dairy­ man reports ve� first short.

their year.

His good results the second year after only a fair yield the management practice included fertilization with nitrogen and feed only moderate pasturing.

This dairyman found that this planting furnishec during the early summer and early tall months when other crops were

However, other daiXJ�en in several sections of the county plowed out permanent pasture after one year or use.

Project

#23

-

Disease Control

(Animal}

Management, feeding and sanitation have been stressed to control diseases of livestock.

Dair,ymen were referred to local veterinarians when treatment was needed.

Mastitis is one of the important ailments and hard to control, requiring proper diagnosis and a definite herd management program.

Dair,ymen have been advised to use the Animal Disease

Laborato� at the

University of Arizona to determine the kind of mastitis infection and treat accordingly.

Calfhood vaccination is increasing in the control of Bang's disease.

The state and federal veterinarians have made their T.B.

checks in the to county;

Some T.B.

is being found which will require additional testing bring under' control and for the county to remain T.B.

accredited.

Project

#24

-

Better and

Proven

Sires

The proven sire program is conducted with the D.H.I.A.

qy report­ ing individual cow records to the Bureau of

Dairy Industry.

During

1944 three hundred and ninety-six records were sent in and the bulls proved as reported in the

1945 list of proven sires.

This year over one thousand records were reported in reported and the number of bulls proved for

1945 will be

1946.

Sire selection, especially pure-bred or proven sires, has been stressed.

Ten dair,ymen were directed to breeders to purchase bulls.

In­ directly many dair,rmen were assisted in securing desirable breeding animals through news letters, radio, magazine articles, personal contacts and other sources.

Swine Production were too

Swine production remained at about the same level.

Feed prices bigh for grain feeding of hogs.

All of the large producers have garbage contracts which permit them to feed hogs at a profit.

Assistance and information were given in management.

-

17

-

POULTRY

Project

#28

-

Caponizing

Ve� little interest has been shown in the production of capons ex­ cept as an individual program for given on the method of caponizing.

personal usage.

Three demonstrations were

Project

#30

-

Poultrz Improvement

Arizona

The

Maricopa County Agent's

Office is the headquarters for the

Poultr,y Improvement Association with the following officers in charge for the 1944-45 season:

Frank Picke

W.

R.

r:ells

Wal ter Cochran

S.

P.

Clark

George

G.

Hawes

O.

R. Bauer

N.

E.

Bradley

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

President

Vice-President

SecretaIjr-Treasurer

Director

Director

Poul.t.ryman

Turkey Groner in

In

Maricopa County five hatcheries signed contracts to participate the Arizona

Pou1t� Improvement Association, the official state agenc,y to administer the National Poul t.ry

testing agents were authorized state inspector for the year.

Improvement, Plan.

Ten flock selecting and by the board.

Mr.

L.

Lipp was hired as the

The annual meeting was held in the

Maricopa County Agent's Office in

September.

The program for the coming season was outlined.

More inter­ est was indicated and it is expected more hatcheries will participate in the

1945-46 season.

Interest in the

National

Turkey Improvement Plan was indicated and will have to be conducted next year.

This will mean additional supervision b,y the Extension Service in another year.

An R.O.P.

program was started at

George

G.

Hawes', Mesa, with

460 candidates in the trap-nest program.

The

Pou1t�

Improvement

Program

Extension Service because it is the is a ver.y

important phase of the only program b.Y

which aqy progress can be made to supply the farmer with a better check which is essential for a profitable poultr,r enterprise.

Summa� of the work is as follows state--composed of

Maricopa and Pima

(Maricopa

Counties):

County included in the

No.

Flocks

53

Chickens

Birds Tested

17,090

Reactors

No.

317

1.80

Turkeys

No.

Flocks

47

Birds

Tested

3,289

Reactors

-

18

-

grams, were

Individual poultr,ymen were assisted in working out breeding pro­ securing quality chicks and culling for production.

Many bulletins mailed to poultrymen upon request.

Proj ect

#30a

-

Poultry

Disease

& Pare.s1 te

Control

Calls for assistance remained about the same this year.

Disease problems in poultry is a service program on an individual basis.

Chicken­ pox, colds, blue bugs, round worms, lice, range paralysis, tumors and maqy other diseases and parasitic conditions were found among poultr,y in

Maricopa Count,y.

The problems in disease and parasite control were given individual attention and programs were outlined in meetings, news letters, news articles and bulletin distribution.

Programs for control were stressed along with treatment when needed.

4-H

CLUB WORK

Project

#29

-

Boys'

and Girls' Club Work

Organization

-

4-H Clubwork was carried on under the general supervision of Assistant

County Agent

Paul Brown, Rural boys and girls between the ages of ten and twenty-one in the several communities were organized into clubs with their own officers and own local program under the guidance of the local man or woman leader.

Each member did a piece of work under the or supervision of the

County

Extension worker that demonstrated taught the better way in agriculture or homemaking.

the

Each member work to kept a record of costs, labor and results; explained others; made an exhibit and wrote a final report.

Through the various activities involved, an effort

�as made to develop leadership, ideals, attitudes and skills which will fit boys and girls for their work of future years.

the

Program and Activities

-

The Coun� Extension worker supervised organization of 4-H Clubs and guided the formulation of tee year's program of club work.

The club program provided for the foiloring activi­ ties: and regular meetings of the 4-H

Clubs conducted by their oun officers members, the study and discussion of the best methods and management for agricultural enterprises, team demonstrations and practice in judging, project work, educational tours, contests, achievement programs, leader training, fairs and exhibits, picnics, field-day programs, c amps, social programs and war activities.

use of

The visual training of boys and girls through 4-H

Club work included the educational aids such as films, slides and pictures.

These educational devices were for the ver.r

helpful in training demonstration teams and preparation of project material for exhibition at fairs and achievement programs.

Visual aids were also used to familiarize members with market classes and ideal types.

Pictures of 4-H events such as fairs, camps and contests provided club members ,�th a better knowledge of the club program and stimulated their interest in the aims and ideals of the

-

19

-

organization.

Illustrations depicting members helped to stimulate and project' activities of maintain interest and to outstanding club raise standards of work.

in

Statistics and

Scope of Club Work

-

There were

690 youths enrolled agricultural 4-H Clubs this year.

There were

667 club members who com­ pleted all of the required work

satisfactorily.

This represented a

96.6%

completion of the work b.7

club members.

Club members cooperated with the National 7-Point 4-H

Program by expanding their projects to produce more for the war effort.

The following projects were conducted � club members this year: gardens, dair,r,

poultr,y,

swine, sheep, rabbits, handicraft, farm safety, beef, and home grounds beautification.

Members took part in scrap drives, war bond sales and they also participated in community war activities.

An outline of the various types of projects, showing enrollments and completions for each, is includ­ ed elsewhere in this report.

There were thirty achievement programs held with a total atten­ dance of

7,842

persons.

This figure included the county 4-H fair with an attendance of each week apprOximately 3,000 persons.

Club meetings were held once b.7

most 4-H

Clubs.

There were

1,082 club meetings held through­ out the county.

There were five .radf,o programs conducted by boys and girls from seven different clubs.

Eighteen tours were conducted with 419· persons in attendance.

Six picnic programs were held for club members and parents with an attendance of

416 persons.

Five field day programs were held which were attended members from qy 519 persons.

At the state 4-H

Club camp, the forty-five

Maricopa

County constituted tee largest of the various county delegations.

Two

This county had thirteen winners in the state

4-H

Club contests.

club members won in the national

4-H contests.

The state champion 4-H

Club livestock judging team was also from

Maricopa

County.

Other 4-H contests which were conducted within the local coun� and which were sponsored by organizations and business firms included victo� gardens, beef production and dair,y production.

Club work was conducted in twenty-nine communi ties throughout the county.

There were forty local club leaders who assisted with club work in the schools and communities.

An eight-member fair board

helped

plan the county

4-H fair.

The collegiate leaders'

4-H

Club of fourteen members was trained to lead

4-H

Clubs and to perform departmental duties at the county fair.

The 4-H Club program was conducted with sixty-three standard and twenty-five non-standard 4-H

Clubs participating.

A non-standard club is one having several different interests as to projects.

It is a mixed agricultural 4-H

Club.

General Activities each month

Leadership

Training

-

Leader training

meetings.

were conducted twice during the fall and winter.

Students from the Arizona State

-

�O

-

Teachers'

College at

Tempe were organized in a collegiate 4-H leaders' club of fourteen members.

They were trained to lead 4-H

Clubs and to help conduct the county

4-H fair program.

Training for other leaders was provided in special meetings called for that purpose.

A total of sixteen leader training meetings was held with an attendance of seventy-eight persons.

4-H Club Fe.irs

-

The county

4-H fair was the crowning event of the club year.

It gave provided a real opportunity for the different clubs, their members and leaders to show and compare what during the year.

It served as a means for had been accomplished qy them determining county champions and recognition to club members for work well done.

4-H

Club members had over two thousand exhibits at the fair which included omics livestock, poultry, rabbits, vegetables, handicraft and home econ­

4-H

Club work.

In addition to the exhibits there were m� contests conducted at this included the two-day fair to select county champions.

The contests judging of livestock, poultry and vegetables by exhibitors, and demonstration team contests.

There were also showmanship contests for cattle and swine exhibitors.

A victor,y parade contest was an importznt part of the program.

An auction sale of fat livestock was held at the close of the fair.

Other

4-H

Club fairs were held at the communities of Roosevelt,

Tolleson, pysart and Alhambra.

Exhibits and contests were a part of all the local fairs.

Sponsors of the local fairs �cluded men's clubs and P.T.A.

The schools cooperated and assisted with the programs.

national

4-H Contests

-

Club members who

4-H contests won thirteen state competed in the count,y, state and championship awards and one national award.

Four contestants won trips to the National

4-H

Club

Congress at

Chicago.

Contests in which

4-H

Club m�mbers participated were: demonstra­ tions in livestock production, vegetable production, handicraft, control.

Other contests were in connection with farm safety,

4-H and insect records, health

Fe champions, 4-H victory parade, gardens, meat animal production, Santa trip award, and judging of livestock, poultry and vegetables.

Maricopa County had the state champion 4-H livestock judging team.

Th� competed for this honor in a state-wide contest held during the Tucson

Livestock Show.

The state team members were

Maricopa County 4-H winners who had won the right to represent their clubs in the state event through a county-wide contest.

Two

4-H dairy club members were awarded the highest state honors

� the National Holstein-Friesian Association of America for having the best

dair,y

production achievement.

One da� club member is now competing for the national award of the Holstein-Friesian Association.

which were

Other contests within the county included two g arden club contests sponsored locally qy

Sears store and the Litchfield Kir.anis

Club.

A score card was used for steer calf was judging the winners of both these contests.

A top awarded to the

4-H member who had the best beef exhibit at the county fair.

The sponsors honored the contestants with dinner programs.

-

21

-

Field

Days

and

Tours

-

Five field day programs and eighteen educational tours were conducted with an attendance of 938 persons.

The field day programs included practice in judging livestock, poultry and

vegetables

and method demonstrations.

The crops and livestock enterprises of successful.

farmers were inspected and tours to the projects of club members were made.

Commercial nected with dairy plants and other establishments con­ agriculture were visited.

T�enty-three 4-H

Club members and leaders accompanied the county

4-H stockjudging team to the Tucson

Livestock

Show.

Achievement

Programs

-

There were thirty achievement programs held with an attendance of

7,81;2

persons.

This figure includes the county

4-H fair with an attendance of

3,000.

Most of the local 4-H achievement programs were held at or near the schools with the whole community parti­ cipating.

The awards were made at honor assemblies which were largely attended by parents, school patrons and young people.

Exhibits were on display throughout the day.

�-H

Camps leaders from this and county picnics

-

There were who forty-three club members and attended the state 4-H

Club camp.

The camp program lasted one week and provided members with much fun entertainment.

Club members who attended the camp were and a variety of selected because of their excellent clubwork.

Six picnic programs were attended programs included luncheon.

by

416

club members.

These swimming, games, motion pictures, contests and a picnic and had

140

4-H

Dairy

Projects

-

There were

144 dair.y

club members enrolled completed their work.

Of this nunber approximately twenty percent registered cattle.

Frances

Coman, a fifteen year-old girl and a member of the

Kyrene 4-H

Club with six years of 4-H

Club work won the national

4-H award and received a

$200.00 scholarship and a trip to the National

4-H

Club

Congress work with one last December.

Her records showed that she started her club registered

Holstein heifer and built up her herd to its present strength of thirteen cash prizes at state and registered count,y fairs females.

and several

She has won

$115.00

grand champion in ribbons with her exhibits.

She was awarded the

Holstein-Friesian Association for bighest state honors � the National having the best

4-H

Holstein achievement.

She is now competing for the national award of that Association.

The Scottsdale

4-H Ayrshire club won the greatest number of awards at the county fair.

Each of the members of this club has registered

Ayrshire cattle.

The club bas a total of sixteen pureblooded Ayrshires.

This club year.

produced the state

There were champion 4-H dair,y demonstration team this sevent,y-eight dairy cattle exhibited at the county 4-H fair.

and bers

217

fr-H

Garden

Projects

-

There were

222 garden club members enrolled completed.

The percent of completion was

97.7%.

Garden club mem­ planted both fall and winter gardens to produce vegetables

abundantly

for the war program.

Exhibits at the contests gave members an county fair end vegetable judging opportunity to test their judgment and become fa­ miliar with ideal were types of vegetables.

TTO garden production contests conducted which brought out the competitive spirit among club members and resulted in the production of more and better vegetables.

In the coun�­ wide contests there were five members �ho won count,y championship honors.

One of them was also a state champion.

this was

4-H

PoultrY

Projects

-

There

Tere seventy-six members enrolled in project snd seventy-one completed their work.

The percent of completion

93.4%.

The total number of fowls amounted to 3,485 which made an ap­ proximate average of forty-five fowls per member.

This proj€ct involved the grorlng of baby chicks, the management of laying flocks and broiler production.

There were three county champions in the poultry contest.

One of these was also a state winner and was

��arded a trip to the National 4-H Club

Congress.

The their county fair provided an opportunity for members to exhibit poultr.y

and compete in the poultr.y judging contests.

There were

323 who competed in these events.

4-H

HRndicraft Projects

-

There were

131 members enrolled in this project and 123 completed the work.

The handicraft exhibits at the count,y fair showed excellent workmanship and tte articles were practical.

Many of them were made

Tr�s of used materials because of the shortage of new materials.

project afforded the members the opportunity of constructing equipment for the farm and home snd to repair many articles which were not replaceable due to wartime conditions.

and

4-H S��ne Projects

-

There were fifteen enrolled in this fifteen project completed the work.

The swine projects of 4-H

Club members contributed much toward the

One member received state production of meat for the war food program.

championship honors for producing more than

$1,700.00

worth of pork as a part of his

4-H meat animal production enter­ prise.

Swine exhibits at the county fair

"ere of very high quality and type and were were in excellent condition.

Livestock conducted for swine exhibitors at the judging and a showmanship contest county fair.

A sale of fat hogs was held at the close of the fair.

4-H Beef

Projects

-

There were twenty-eight enrolled in this project and twent,y-eight completed the work.

The beef cattle exhibits at the county fair surpassed those of the previous year in condition and type.

The registered

Hereford exhibits outnumbered the steer exhibits.

One club member had the best Hereford exhibit at the Tucson Livestock Show in the

Junior

Department.

He also had the champion exhibit at the county fair and was awarded a top steer calf from the Phoenix Kiwanis Club.

It was

�resented to him during a meeting of the Kiwanis Club at which all of the bee club exhibitors were guests.

Stock judging and a showmanship contest were con­ ducted for beef club members.

A sale of fat beef cattle was held at the close of the fair.

-

�3

-

Six members were enrolled for sheep projects with

100%

completion of work.

Fort,y-five

members were enrolled for rabbit production and fort.1-four com­ pleted their work.

The

quality

of the rabbits exhibited at the county fair showed an improvement over those of the previous year.

The

Central Arizona

Rabbit

Breeders Association cooperated with the

County

Extension worker and with

Miscellaneous

4-H rabbit clubs.

Projects

-

Other

4-H

Club projects were also conducted.

They

provided a judge for the rabbit department at the fair and prizes for exhibitors.

Two Association members prepared in­ structions and information in bulletin form for the use of 4-H rabbit growers.

Fifteen were enrolled in flower and home clubs

��th a

100% completion.

One member was a grounds state beautification champion in the home

grounds

beautification contest.

All

4-H Clubs cooperated with the Farm

Safety Program

� volun­ teering to prevent fire and accident hazards from occurring on their farms.

Three members were state champions in the Farm

Safety

Contest and one of them was also a national winner.

-

24

-

4-H

CLUB WOEK

At the conclusion of achievement clubs had an enrollment of days, Maricopa County agricultural

690

4-H

Club youths with a completion of

667 or

96.6%.

The following outline is a statistical summar,y of projects, enroll­ ments, completions and exhibits.

Garden

Dairy

Poultry

Swine

Sheep

Beef

Rabbit

Flower

Handicraft

Farm

Safety

TOTALS:

Enrolled in

Projects

1944-'45

Period

144

76

15

6

28

45

15

131

8

690

Completing Projects

1944-' 45

Period

217

140

71

44

15

123

8

667

15

6

28

Exhibits

1944-'45

623

114

487

78

31

26

197

.351

164

2076

Girls Enrolled

•••••

Duplicated.

••

Actual Number......

63

4

59

Completing

•••••

63 n

4

59

Boys

Enrolled

••••••

627

11

Duplicated.

• • •

S6

Actual Number

••••••

541

11

11

11

604

86

518

Percentage completion for projects in agricultural clubs

•••••

96.6%

-

25

-

ORGANIZATION

Victory

Garden

Program til

This

Assistant

Powers conducted a weekly broadcast over

Station

KOY un­

July when the program was discontinued and resumed on

September

30.

program was broadcast from the model garden which was planted and supervised qy Assistant Powers in cooperation with the radio station.

Until

July only vegetable garden problems were program was discussed but after September a new begun to include information on the care of ornamentals, fruit and shade trees.

This program has received excellent response from home owners and rural people alike not only in this but in other counties of the state.

Questions received

Station KaY in connection with the program were answered b.Y

Assistant Powers either qy letter or on the next broadcast.

From March 1st to November 27th of this year a total of

263 requests for information was received and answered.

A few of these requests are attached to this report.

Farm Labor

The Farm

Labor program was conducted throughout the year from the two offices located in Phoenix and Mesa.

In order to take full prisoners of war who were available for advantage of agricultural work camps were in use as follows: Rittenhouse with 250 workers, Mesa

600,

Buckeye No.

1

-

750,

Buckeye

No.2

-

250 and Litchfield 460.

In addition to these numbers 150 men were

employed

out of the main camp at

Papago

Park by the

Salt

River

Val­ l� Water

Users

Association for ditch cleaning and mowing.

Although used primarily for cotton picking prisoners also did other work including hay baling, citrus and date pruning, hay hauling and stacking, weeding and thinning of vegetables, lettuce and potato harvest, citrus and date picking and general farm work such as fence building and ditch cleaning.

During

March a series of three

Litchfield at which meetings was held at

Army officials and

Bucke,re, representatives

Chandler of the and

Extension

Service explained the use of prisoners during the summer months to farmers and irrigation district officials.

In

July similar meetings were held at

Chandler and Litchfield.

A cotton picking school was held at

Uarinette in

August at which the prisoner of war program was and prisoners were instructed in the proper explained method to of cotton cotton farmers picking.

During

December a shipment of twent,y-four interstate workers was brought in for cotton picking at

Buckeye.

These workers were ver.r

unsatis­ factor,r and were returned to

Missouri in

Februar,r together with workers from other parts of the state.

One radio talk was given in

August by the

Agent over

KOY on the farm labor situation.

During Maya number of civilian agricultural workers were released temporarily to work for the

Arizona Flour

Mills and for the Capital Fuel and Feed

Com� at Phoenix loading grain for shipment.

labor number

In summarizing the farm labor program there were

1,001 placed through the two labor offices requesting orders for

3,615 men.

Of this

3,153 were placed in jobs out of

4,116

who were referred to the

-

26

-

prospective

employer.

In the prisoner of war program

346 farmers requested prisoners

totalling

6,134 and 5,691 were placed on jobs in the county.

Maricopa

County

Farm Bureau

The Extension Service furnishes an office for this organization in the

County Agent's building.

All meetings are attended by some member of the staff who acts as secretar,y.

The annual program of work is prepared qy the

Agent and submitted to the Board or Directors for approval or addi tions.

The annual submitted to the budget is also approved by this body tefore being

County Board of

Supervisors.

Soil Conservation Service sonnel in

Stafr members have cooperated with Soil Conservation Service per­ holding election meetings and in working out farm practices applicable to the several districts.

There are at present five soil conservation districts in the count.y

and one demonstration area.

In the

Queen

Creek District much work has been done on lining ditches to prevent seepage and breakage.

In the

Buckeye

District land levelling has been stressed while a soil classification is being made in the Scottsdale Indian

Bend District.

Petitions are being circulated in the area north of Bucke.ye

for the formation of a district in the area covered mainly by the

Roosevelt

Irrigation

District.

Fish and Wildlife Service pa Farm

In cooperation with the Fish and �ildlife Service and the Marico­

Bureau the

County Agent's Office has had on hand at all times supplies of poison for the control of gophers, rabbits and mice.

Also poison grain has been available at all times.

County

U.S.D.!.

War Bo�rd tended all

The

Agent has served as a member of the meetings.

During the year twent,r-six

County War Board and at­ investigations of the agricultural activities of individuals were made and reports submitted to the chairman of the board.

County

Agricultural

Adjustment

Agency

The

Agent has served as ex-officio member of the

Committee and bas attended all meetings and also the annual

County A.A.A.

meeting of

County committee men from over the state.

The

Agent has furnished technical advice on soil elected building practices as requested.

The County committee this year was as follows:

I.

E.

Moore,

Peoria, chairman, hard

Burk,

Gilbert,

vice chairman,

E.

Y.

Allgood, Scottsdale, member, and John

Beloat,

Buckeye,

alternate.

War

Rationing

Board and Mesa

The

Agent has assisted the War

Rationing

Boards at both Phoenix qy issuing certificates to bona-fide citrus growers who wished to

-

27

-

obtain sugar to be used for citrus thrips control.

A total of sixteen such certificates were issued requesting

16,220 pounds of sugar to be used on

15,;20 acres of citrus.

Rationing boards were also given assistance in mak­ ing allotments of gasoline for the transportation of farm laborers.

Farm

Field Days

The

Agent assisted members of the University of Arizona

Experiment

Station staff in

Farm on planning and conducting a field day at the Mesa Experiment general field crops in

October.

Publicity for a field day at the

Salt Fiver Citrus sistance on

Experiment

Station was gotten out

by

the

Agent but no as-

'

planning

or conducting the meeting was requested.

Service Clubs

The

Agent spoke to the Tempe

Chamber of

Commerce and the Phoenix

Junior Chamber of

Commerce on agriculture in this county.

Talks were given to the Tempe Rotar,y

Club on new trends in agriculture and on citrus to the

Phoenix Hiram Club.

at

The annual meetings of the

Arizona Milk Producers ASfociation held

Glendale and of the United Producers and

Consumers

Cooperative,the Coop­ erative Council and the Arizona Citrus GroTers Association

�ere attended

� the

Agent.

The

Agent has been appointed as advisory member of the Phoenix

Chamber of Commerce

Agricultural Committee but to date no meetings have been held.

Home Makers Clubs

Assistant Powers cooperated with Miss Grace Ryan,

Home Demonstration

Agent, in planning a program for rural home makers on home and yard beautifi­ cation.

He spoke to four groups on this subject.

Arizona Rabbit Breeders Association

Assistant Brown has attended all

Breeders Association which were held in the meetings of the Arizona Rabbit

Count,y Agent's Building.

He as­ sisted in the preparation of a circular on the care and

Tempe.

breeding of rabbits for 4-H Club members which was distributed association also offered by this association.

The special prizes for certain breeds of rabbits exhibited at the

4-H

Club Fair at

Pure-bred

Dairy

Cattle Clubs

The pure-bred dairy cattle clubs play an important part in herd improvement and in the promotion of the dairy industry.

These breeders are the prima� sources of breeding stock of all dair,r.men

and it is through their program that the Extension Service can assist in the development of better dairy animals.

-

28-

as

Arizona Holstein-Friesian As�ociation

-

Officers for the year were follows:

Warren Kurtz

-

-

President

C.

L.

Phillips

Mrs. Pearl Coman

-

-

Vice-President

Secretary

Mr. O. F.

Ostrander

-

Treasurer

Jesse Elliott

James

E.

Painter

Homrighausen

-

-

Director, 3-year term

Director, 2-year term tirector, l-year term schools in

A program was arranged including a field tour and two judging

March, assisted

by

Mr. Glen Householder, Director of Holstein­

Friesian extension program, and C. N.

herds were contacted and a

Vickers,

Western Fieldman.

program dinner was

Eighteen arranged at the Adams Hotel.

Arizona

Guernsgy

Breeders

-

Officers for the year were as follows:

W.

T.

McClelland

-

C. L.

Phillips

William J. Rasmussen

-

-

H.

Geare

-

President

Vice-President

Secretar.y-Treasurer

Director at the

A

Guernsey field day and sho� was arranged for the

Guernsey breeders

Marshall-Waldron Ranch November 8, 1945, assisted by a comnittee and

Mr.

A.

Vl.

Telfer, Western Fieldman.

Thirty-nine head were exhibited by twelve breeders.

Outstanding individuals were shown.

Arizona

Jersey

Cattle Club

-

Officers for the year were as follows:

George Blendinger

-

President

Fred Chesney

-

Vice-President

Mrs.

Clyde Hussey

Clyde Hussey

-

-

Secretar.y-Treasurer

Director

George

Peterson

-

Director

D. W.

Hulet

-

Director

A herd classification program was arranged with

Mr.

J.

W.

Ridgeway doing the classification, being sent to

Maricopa County by the American Jer­ s� Cattle Club.

three one excellent, fair.

Ninety-eight head were cl�ssified in twelve herds, with forty-six ver,y good, forty-three good-plus,five good and

Shorthorn Breeders

-

Officers for the year were as follows:

Albert Love

-

President

D. Pierce

E.

A.

Pugh

Smith

-

-

-

Vice-President

Secreta�-Treasurer

Director

R.

Scott

-

Director

Three meetings were held during the year.

-

29

-

was called

Arizona Pure-bred Breeders

Apeociation

-

An organization meeting by W.

R.

VanSant, Poultry and

Dairy Specialist,

November

15, 1945.

The purpose of this organization is to combine the efforts of all organized breed clubs for common cludes programs promoting pure-bred dairy cattle.

This in­ working with the fair commission to improve fair facilities, selecting judges, etc., also working on legislative programs and carrying out education­ al programs with

4-H

Clubs and Vocational

Agriculture.

Officers for the year were elected as follows:

C. L.

Phillips

H.

E.

Geare

Mrs.

E.

-

-

President

Vice-President

Homrighausen

-

Secretary-Treasurer

Directors

-

President and

Ayrshires

-

Johnson

-

Secretar.y

of breed clubs

Lewis

Guerns�

-

McClelland

-

P�smussen

Holstein

-

Kurtz

-

Coman

Jerse,r

-

Chesney

Shorthorn

-

Love

-

-

Russey

Pugh

Salt River

Vallgr

Breeders

Asspciation

By the efforts of a few dai�en and the Extension dair.ymen, this organization was formed to conduct an artificial breeding program for dai�­ men owning

Holstein cows.

The purpose of this organization is to develop a breeding program which will definitely improve the production of the herds by using proven bulls and purchasing yotmg bulls of superior breeding that the average dairyman could not afford to buy and at the same time control diseases associated with natural breeding.

This organization will be in­ corporated under the

Arizona corporation laws with headquarters in

Mesa.

Artificial breeding associations must be appointed and supervised br the Extension Service in order to meet the requirements outlined by the

American

Dairy

Science Association.

The officers for the year are as follows:

Clyde

Rowe

Dr. R. J.

Hight

Lynn Sharp

-

-

-

President

Vice-President

Secreta�-Treasurer

County Agents

Conferences held in

Members of the

Phoenix in

County

Agent's

staff attended a two-day conference

December, the annual conference held in Tucson in Janu­ ar,y and a a three-d� conference in

Flagstaff in September.

The

Agent attended two-day regional conference held in Phoenix in

May.

At all these conferences current problems were discussed.

-

30

-

VI.

OUTLOOK AND

NEXT YEAR

RECOlruJENDATIONS,

INCLUDING SUGGESTED PBDGRAU OF WORK FOR that the

In this county the plan of "ork will be made with the idea in mind

County Agent's Office force will be called upon to give much as­ sistance to newcomers in this area.

More demonstrations, field tours and field days at the

University of Arizona Experimental Farms should be included.

New machinery or mechanical processes should be brought to the attention of farmers implement dealers.

through demonstrations, possibly in cooperation with

The production of quality products will be stressed together with high production.

In order to know whether or not new products will do those things which are claimed by the manufacturers, the Extension

Service must conduct many field tests of such products.

This can best be done in cooperation

��th the statistics on

Experiment Station staff.

More and better production costs should be made in order to keep up with the modern trends.

An attempt will be made to obtain more information on soils and it is recommended that an assistant

The full time of an assd.st.ant, on agent be used on this problem alone.

poultry husbandry in all its phases could be utilized to good advantage.

This is because it is foreseen tr�t more people will become engaged in poultry ra.ising

as a full or part-time occupation than are engaged in any other type of farming.

It is planned to continue on a broader scale the use of newspaper publicity through weekly newspapers.

The publicity given .through

the Mesa

Journal-Tribune has shown that such articles are widely read � rural peo­ ples.

It is recognized that much competition now prevails fro� other governmental agencies dealing

��th agriculture.

If the Extension Service is to meet this competition successfully it must be prepared to give the cor­ rect answers to the farmers' problems when asked to do so.

Such a program calls for the full support of the Agricultural Experiment Station in solving these problems.

SUMMARY

AND

OUTLOOK OF PROJECTS

Project HI

-

Alkali Recla�ation

Little has been done on this project during the year due to cir­ cumstances more related in another lands not now under part of this report.

During the coming year irrigation will probably be brought into cultiva­ tion and information on soil amendments and methods of reclamation should be available.

The proposed demonstration plot on the A.

T.

Jones farm at

Buckeye will be continued in order to obtain such information.

Project

#2

-

Fertilization Practice

Emphasis during the year has been placed on the proper use of materials available for fertilizers.

With the introduction of new the establishment of products, cooperative field tests is imperative.

As many such tests will be conducted as can be successfully checked with the personnel

-

31

-

and equipment available.

The citrus leaf analysis project will be continued through the year.

Project #5

-

Irrigation Practice

This project has been stressed during the year on all crops.

Em­ phasis will be placed on the more efficient use of water.

Assistance to gro�ers will proper be given methods of on adjusting levelling and crop acreages to water

application

of water.

supply and on

Project

#6

-

Pure Seed ments made

During the past year this project has been stressed and improve­ through the cooperation of the Arizona

Crop

Improve�ent

Association and reliable seed dealers.

Ttis cooperation will continue throughout this year with the production of better quality seed as a goal.

Grower's of pure intention of seed will be encouraged to enter into the program with the raising the quality of seed produced or advised not to make application.

Project

#8

-

Wee�

Eradication

Some information on the control of noxious weeds has been ob­ tained during the year from field tests with the new

2,4-D �es of weed killers.

However, this information is not sufficient to enable the staff members to advise farmers how best to use these materials.

These tests will be continued during the coming year, probably adding new materials as they are introduced, in order to have some basic information to extend to farmers.

Project

#12

-

Pruning

Method and result demonstrations were given on all

�es of plants during the year.

These will be repeated this year, holding as many

�eetings as may be deemed necessar,r.

Project t�3

-

Pecan Propagation

Demonstrations on individuals budding and grafting have been held and macy given assistance on budding.

During the coming year the graft­ ing demonstrations will be discontinued as this practice is not a practical one for the average shade trees will unskilled individual to be advocated but commercial use.

The plantings use of pecan trees will be as discouraged.

Project ff�4

-

Date

Propagation

Interest in this project has been quite year.

and requests for information on both culture and pronounced

Pollination and offshoot removal demonstrations were well-attended processing during have the been numerous.

Demonst rations will be held this year in several count,y.

The method of deqydrating dates for home use parts of the will be advocated in

-

.32

-

preference

to the methods generally employed h1 commercial growers.

Project

#14.1

-

Citrus

Nursery

Practice

Requests for information on this year.

Assistance to individuals in subject have increased during the starting seed beds has been given but no actual be program bas been conducted.

If conditions warrant nursery tours will conducted but little interest in this subject other than qy a few indi­ viduals is anticipated.

Project

#15

-

Insect Pest Control

An

This major project has required much time of the staff members.

attempt has been made to keep the public informed on the proper use of new materials through radio programs, talks to groups and newspaper publici­ ty.

The grasshopper control program in cooperation with the Bureau of

Entomology and Plant

Quarantine was very successful especially in the Phoenix and

Gilbert areas.

All phases of this proj ect will continue durdng the year.

Project

#16

-

Rodent Control

Individuals have been assisted with rodent control problems as requested.

In

Service poisons cooperation for use in with the Farm Bureau and rodent control r�ve been the Fish available and Wildlife to all persons through the medium of the tinued

County Agent's

Office.

This project will be con­ during the year in the same manner.

Project

#23

-

Disease Control

This project has consumed a large portion of the time of several members of the staff.

Many field trips have been necessary and information on practical methods of control of m� diseases has not been available.

Dur­ ing the coming year it is hoped that several field demonstration tests may be held in order to better ac�uaint farmers with newer methods of control.

Project #26

-

Economic

Survez

Work on this project has been confined to the annual crop acreage report made in cooperation with the several irrigation districts and indi­ viduals, a hay shed survey and information on man hour requirements of certain crops.

These same surveys will be continued and further studies on production costs are recommended.

Dairy project.

Increased interest is being shown by dairymen.

Additional testing force will be required to the extent that we will need five testers in

Maricopa

County.

Official testing, herd classification and a state fair ,rill demand more

Dair,y herd improvement

��ll continue to be the most important time of the Extension Service.

The organization of the Salt P�ver

Valley

-

.33

-

Breeders Association for the artificial and breeding of dair,r cows will increase require more assistance.

Increased activity of the dairJ breed associa­ tions will require more assistance in the conducting of their programs for the improvement of dair,r cattle in

Maricopa County.

Poultry

vdth a

The Arizona

Poultr,y

Improvement greater participation for

1945-46

Association is with the taking on new life addition of R.O.P.

�ork in the county.

The addition of the National

Turkey

Plan will require more as­ sistance from the Extension Service in the county.

in

Inexperienced poultrymen will b e given all the assistance possible making a start but will be discouraged from enlarging operations too rap­ idly.

Furthermore, it is expected that a greater number of individuals will ask for assistance than in past years due to the termination of the war and the returning of servicemen.

Livestock

Increase in pen feeding and cattle feeding in general is expected during the coming year.

Swine and sheep production will remain at about the same level of production.

New farmers will be assisted in setting up their equipment needs and suggestions will be given for a sound management program.

Project #29

-

Boys'

and Girls' Club Work interested

Progress was made during the year in this project in obtaining more lay leaders, in the diversity of projects at the summer camp and in the increase in interest in the

4-H

Fair at Tempe.

During the coming year project tours, field days and achievement days will be held more often since transportation is available.

The county

4-H Fair will be held at

Ta�pe and participation in a summer camp is anticipated.

Farm Labor

This program has shown progress in so far as the prisoner-of-war phase is concerned.

Better cooperation of the individual farmer in furnishing supervision has been requested and obtained in the majority of cases.

This is due in part to the work of the Farm Labor Assistants with the commanders.

The labor offices at

Phoenix and Mesa have

J....rmy

operated branch camp all year and will continue if funds for this purpose are available.

The outlook on the farm labor situation seems fair for the coming year.

Farmers will be encour­ aged to provide situation.

At adequate housing for farm laborers as a means of

�proving present labor is available but unwilling to live in present the housing facilities.

-

34-

1/10

#11

/112

1/13

#14

1/15

#16

#17

1t18

#19

#20

#21

#22

#23

Owner

#1

1/2

#3

#4

#5

1!6

#7

1i8

#9

Total

620

640

./

./

240

./

65

./

420 v:

385

V'

620

./

10

.;

40 v:

625./

560./

115�

25

./ o t/

5v

6,290

v

.ALFALFA HAY SURVEY

-

MllUCOPA COm�'lY

TONS

12/15/4�

0"

.360./

55

./

460

t/

0.1'

110 wi"

125 wi'

450 tI'

5

./' t/

150

150

180 r/

II'

!t.Ll/44

!r.LILIi5.

O�

7 sheds,2 piles 5 sheds

."

250

55011 550

0"

40 ttl'

20 v'

35 t/

."

390

110./

105 t/' o t/

600

153

,/

./

0"/

0./

25

.,I'

12Ll2_L44

165

" o

./

5./

200'" o

./

5./

215

V

490 v

10

'"

210

"

5"'"

5t/

oV'"

50

./

0./

135./

115/

O�

25 v: o t/ o

0'"

o t/

100../

0./

5

./

30

./

0

J

0 v'

925

V

5./

10 v-

450./

500�

175 t/

40 v-

25

..,/

__)_42_v

8,163

e/

320 e/'

1,290./

600./

415./

180

./

320

./

275

./

280 t/

O�

,/

115

35./'

255v

45v

40./

70

./

5-/

0"'/

Ol/ v:

145

0./

,

100

./ o

.,/

0""

�20

V

./

1,865

CATTLE FEEDEHS:

,,1

#2-

#3

#4

#5

ALFALFA HAY SURVEY

-

TONS

MARICOPA COUNTY

(CQHT'D.)

12!15L4�

900

180

,/

65

4,000 o

,/'

,/

./

5,145 t/

4/1/44

1,500 t/

100""

0'"

1,000 o

./

2,600

12/15/44

2,300

40

./ t/

325 tI"

J

12,000

2,100 t/

.,/

16,765

4/1!AS

t/'

1,030

60./

175./

./

8,000

./

100

9,365'/

COMMERCIAL

DEALERS:

#1

#2

#3

#4

#5

Total Cattle Feeders

Total Commercial Dealers

Total Farmer

Ovmed

Total

4,000

1,500

3,000

8,500 o

,./ t/

/

tI'

17,000

0'/

50�

5�

1,400

,/

.,/

9,572

700./

250 13,000

0./

7� t/

,305

24,747

"./

**�******����*��* xxxxx�xxxxx��x�xx

5,145

,/

171000

22,145

61220

..,..

.,/

28,435 v:

2,600

,/

,202./

2!z.1 7/:t.

7

..

-.I"

2,905 41,512

./ wi"

V'

222

'"

8116.2

3,830 vi'

16,765 r/'

49,675

",

,/

600

0./

ov

r/'

5,500

10

.,/

6,110

9,365

./'

61110

15,475

.,/

./

11862./

17,340

.,/

J.

H.

SUMMARY OF ACTIVITIES

of

1945

O'DELL,

COUNTY

AGRICULTURAL AGENT

The County Agricultural Agent has been in charge of the

Agricultural Extension Service office in this county during the past year.

Because of this position he has been responsible for the planning and execution of the

Extension program in the county and also for cooperation

T.ith all other agencies dealing

��th agriculture.

As an ex-officio member of the

County Agricultural Adjustment

Committee he has been responsible for the educational phase of this program.

As a member of the U.S.D.A. War Board he has made investig�tions and reports to the chairman of agricultural activities of individuals.

The Farm Labor program has required much of the time of the

Agent in meetings with farmers as individuals and organizations, with

U.

S.

Army officers on prisoner of war labor and with other governmental agencies on general labor problems.

The Agent has prepared, with the assistance of staff members, week­ ly articles for pUblication in the

Mesa

Jo�al-Tribune and associated papers.

Talks have been given to service clubs and garden clubs on matters pertaining to agriculture.

He has assisted Soil Conservation Service personnel in formulating plans of work for soil conservation districts and made recommendations as to cultural practices applicable to this county.

Services of the

Agent and all members of the staff have been available at all times during the year to any rural resident or group of rural people in working out problems relating to agriculture.

Most of the time of the

Agent has been spent in administrative duties and in conferences with other agencies leading to better cooperation in programs and preventing duplication of effort.

H. B.

SID.mARY OF ACTIVITIES

of

1945

POWERS,

ASS"f.

COUNTY AGRICULTURAL AGENT

There is still a" tremendous turnover of citrus orchards in this county.

Considerable time has been spent with prospective purchasers, examining orchards and advising these people as to the condition of the trees, soil type, etc.

Suggestions covering all phases of orchard m�agement have been given to many of these new grove owners.

Citrus chlorosis is creating considerable anxiet] among the citrus growers.

This condition is spreading r&pidly in many of the valencia orange orchards in the valley and is rapidly beco�ng one of the most serious proble�s facing the citrus growers.

In cooperation with W.

T.

�cGeorge, head of the soils department at the University, a number of different control measures are being tried in an effort to work out a control for this chlorosis.

Since the termination of the war, the KOY victor,r garden program has been changed so as to include the planting and care of the home orchard and of ornamental trees, shrubs, and flowers.

Weekly broadcasts are made on timely and popular subjects.

Many requests are received from outlying communities for information on these subjects.

CHARLES

SUMMARY OF ACTIVITIES

of

1945

HOBART,

ASS'T.

COlJ:ITY AGRICULTURAL AGENT

Considerable work was done on revision of

"Fitting Crop Acreages to Water Supplies" for·publication as an extension circular.

Some observations of ntransient" alkali as it affects seedling plants in this area, were made.

A great deal of time was spent servicing the pure seed program.

The main accomplis�ents of the year include

(1)

Smooth functioning of the performance bond

5,1stem for cleaning-pl�t managers as officials of the

Arizona

Crop Improve�ent

Association,

(2)

Double inspection of sorghums gives us greater confidence in the product,

(3)

Seed dealers have agreed to sponsor the finanCing of growlng of k� lots registered sorghum seed, and we hope this will put this vi tal activity on a.

sounder basis.

concentrations to use for different weeds, and the best time of year to use them.

Tests of the

2-4-D weed killers were designed to find out best

In an effort to be prepared for machine harvest of cotton when equipment becomes available, work was done cooperatively and

individually

on methods of defoliation of cotton.

A cooperative attempt to test effective�ess of irrigation prior to applications of c.yanamid

was broken up by, rain.

Ammate, sodium nitrite, and Dawicide

G., three other commercial

materials,

were tried at the Mesa farm, but proved unsatisfactor,y for one reason or other.

Fact-gathering activities included the county crop report, check of

hay

sheds, and estimates of costs of machine harvest of cotton.

W.

R.

SUMMARY OF ACTIVITIES

of

1945

VANSANT,

POULTRY & DAIRY SPECIALIST

The county programs in dair,y, livestock and poult� have been conducted br the

Pou1t�

&

Dairy Specialist.

Efficienc.y

in production

��s been stressed with all farmers dealing with dairy, livestock and poultry.

Through farmer organizations, news letters, neTspapers, farm magazines, radio and individual contacts the educ�tional program dealing with pr�duction p�oblems, of which there were

��YJ has been presented to the farmers.

In fact, the entire program for the past year has been to work with faroer organizations and to supply information which would assist the dairyman, livestockman and poultr,yman to produce their products more efficiently and economically.

Greater participation occurred in all breed organizations:

Arizona

Holstein-Friesian

Association, Arizona Guernse,y

Cattle

Club, Arizona Jers�J

Cattle

Club,

Arizona Shorthorn Breeders !ssociation

and a new organization, the

Arizona Pure-bred Breeders Association.

All these organizations had headquarters in Maricopa

County and maintained close contact with the

County

Agent's Office.

The Salt River

Valley

Breeders Association was organized to conduct a cooperative artificial breeding program.

The D.H.I.A. program increased during the year.

One new tester was trained to conduct the program in the coun�.

An extensive dair.y

program was conducted in cooperation with the industr.y, based upon the National "8ft-Point

Dairy Program.

The

Pou1t�

Improvement Association required considerable time to conduct an educational program and provide information for revision of the administration of the

National

Poultr.y

Improvement Plan.

Greater participation and interest occurred during the latter part of the year.

Turkey producers and hatcheries have requested that the Arizona

Poultr,y

Improvement Association include the National Turkey Plan in their program next year.

PAUL W.

SUMN�RY OF ACTIVITIES

of

1945

BROvm, ASS'T.

COUNTY AGRICULTURAL AGENT

4-H

Club work in

Maricopa Count,r provided a varied program of projects, activities and events for the development of rural youth.

Club members cooperated fully in all local and national war programs.

Sales of war bonds by club members in the Sixth War Loan Drive amounted to

$184,000.00.

The

County

4-H Club Fair was larger this year and served to give recognition to club members for work well done.

The revival of the

4-H camp was important as a motivating force for

4-H

Club members.

There were

627 boys and

63 girls enrolled in

4-H

Clubs with a

96.6%

completion of club

�ork.

The enrollment was increased qy 5.3%.

The 4-H program was conducted in twenty-nine communities.

There were sixty-three standard and twenty-five non-standard agricultural clubs.

Forty leaders assisted with the work.

Fourteen college students were trained for

4-H

Club leadership.

A total of ten club projects were completed h1

667 members.

Thirty achievement programs, five radio programs, eighteen educational tours, six picnic programs, five field d�s, a county

4-H fair, 4-H contests, twenty-nine method demonstrations and sixteen leader-training meetings were conducted in the

4-H program.

There were thirteen winners in the state

4-H contests and two winners in the national contests.

Club work should continue to have a widespread appeal to rural boys and girls because it is based on their needs, interests and possibilities.

With the war ended, club members can properly feel that th� have a useful part in the development of the community in which they live.

Through 4-H

Club work they may become better farmers, better homemakers and better citizens and leaders in rural life •.

rx.:_�cU;_,

/kc..

1�'�1

W..eM-

�" p�c..-<..

"S.J:

I!

DON KELLER P C 0

��J

,

U"�J

�.

, '" �-

-

���-

(f��

W -

I a

�.

g�:K;r,

@�

�/!VuN,

�.�:LJ

7J?� eo.

'--rY; cvJe

/;;;

8

()

ifC?�

.:>/-��

·

(!_�a

=r:

TYPICAL PENDULOUS CROP--ONE O.r-'

MOST COMMON AILMENTS

AMONG

THE

TURKEY

S

.

OUT

ONE-FOURTH

OF THE

TURKEYS RAISED

ON THE

HOLLYWOOD FARM IN

1945 il.

E.

BR1IDL

RAISED

4,000

IN

FARM

TURKEYS

1945

4-H

WINNERS IN TP�

RECORD BOOK CONTEST

AT

COUNTY FAIR

SHOWMANSHIP CONTEST FOR

4-H MEMBERS AT COUNTY FAIR

4-H DEMONSTRATION TEAM AT COUNTY

PREPARING A

FAIR;

SUBJECT:

DAIRY HEIFER

FOR EXHIBITION

EXHIBITS AT

PffiG

PDOSEVELT

4-H

ACP�EV

4-H STOCK JUDGING PRACTICE

AT

SCOTTSDALE

PART OF THE

POULTRY AND RABBIT EXHIBITS

AT COUNTY

FAIR

JUDGING

4-H

BEEF CALVES AT

COUNTY FAIR

DEHORNING DEMONSTRATION AT SCOTTSDPLE

4-H CLUB

U;

T PRO-

W�P�COPA COUNTY WINNERS

IN H STATE

THE RADIO PROGRAM

4-H

CONTESTS DURING

REGISTERED HOLSTEIN HERD OF

NATIONAL CHAMPIONSHIP IN

FRANCES

COMAN,

WHO WON THE

4-H

DAIRY PRODUCTION

CONTEST

PART OF THE

4-H

VEGETABLE EXHIBITS

AT COUNTY FAIR

4-H

,INNERS

STATE CH.M.1PION

4-H

STuCK JUDGING TEAM

FRCli'tr MARICOPA COUNry

PRACTICE JUDGIN3 OF 3ZSF CATTLE

BY

4-H

CLUB M3':':B�F{S

VICrORY PLRADE CF

4-H

AT THE COUNTY F�IR

CLUBS

DEM(JNSTRA TINJ HOW TG eLI?

I CI..LF

FOR EXHT BI I'IuN

AT rHE scorT3Dr.-�

4-H

CLUB

4-H

GARDEN CLUB MEMBERS VISIT DE .'GNSTRATIGN GAR.DEN

IN

PHOENIX,

TO LEJ-�R

V,ETHODS

GILT

P�FRED AUSTIN FRV"

W�S

SC0TTSDP,LE

4-H STATE CHAJ:PIC;N IN POULTRY

4-H

DE�ONSTRATION J

CONTR LLH G

GRUBS ��D CATTLE

Y FAIR.

SUBJ"""'CI:

DICATING

FR .

CATTLE

JUooI.

G v lTIST

-

.-rS IN

AT

THE TUCSON IIVZSTGCK SHO�

JUDGING

SHEEP AT 4-H

FIELD DIY

PRvGRP�� AT

SCOTTSrALE

�RAND CHAMPIJ

LKING SHORTHORN AT

COUNTY 1"AI

E.

'OIBITED BY EJiliL

PUGH,

JR.

GRAND

CHAMPION

4-H JERSEY BULL AT

COUNTY FAIR-EXHIBITED

BY FRP�K NEW

GRAND CHAMPION

COUNTY

4-H AYRSH1RE ]'EMALE AT

FAIR, EXH1�iT�D BY LESTlR MATLOCK

--

-

ewGa en

ON'T be misled by those Sunday morning (9:05) garden broadcasts aired by

KOY and Ariz

F.,armer, and all the horticultural takat they can

The round up in Salt River alley.

gardeners are not deaeerating the Lord's

Day by grubbing among the furrows of the new

Demonstratial

Garden-same

Garden place, at the VaDelC

Center in Phoenix-but are merely letting their week's record speak for them.

The programs are transcribed during the week's toil at the

Garden, or in other outstanding gardens about the Valley, atld, come

Sunday, all they have to do is

..

pm the platter in KOY's control room.

of

As in the previous years, the backbone garden series will be Pat

Powers, assistant

Maricopa

County agricultural agent.

He'll be led on as usual by KOYen Jack Williams and

Extensioner Pat Powers and

4-B the

Phoenix Sears

Store.

KOYer Al Johnson

Clabbers on the Third Annual 4-B Garden helped launch Valley

cOntest,

sponsored by

Twenty-five contestants, seJected by their

AI

Johnson; and, like always, t'here'll be a lot of infol"JD&tion paased out by many a garden expert

OIl plant progress and growing prohlems

Out of the Rut leadera.

received paClkets of seed from Sears, then trooped over to the gardening advice. The

There ends any resemblance thia

){OY

rizona

Farmer Demonstration Garden for year's garden series mi t bear to resulting gardens and record books will be judged late in December, and programs of previous years.

There'll all manner of tioa with the prizes awarded.

A canning contest wiD be held in connee­ garden contest.

In the

County

Director of 4-B ork, alld contestants from Mesa, Kyrene,

Roosevelt, background:

Paul

Brown, Maricopa

Alhambra, Dysart,

Madison and

Tempe.

be a lot the Salt new

River in gardenibg under

Valley Bun!

For

Farmer example,

KOY and Arizcma plan to go a-visitml' gar­ deners all over the

Valley, luring

:======::..:....------:...._---=-.....:::..___:;;-=;;;;...._--======================� them to confide the secrets of their success with roses, radishes, and what not. Bulbs will br�oli be featured

Sunday, Oct.

21, in an interview with

Mrs.

Peter Corpstein in het' m ti­ colored about the garden, which you may.

read elsewhere in this number of

Farmer.

DDT, the new su:per-insecticide, has already been discussed in all its gar­ den phases by

Dr. J. N.

Roney,.

ex­ tension entomologist.

Anything special you'd like to hear talked about! Be long as your subject is related to gardening, ask and you

,hall reeeive.

Just send your request to the Garden

Dept.,

Arizona

Now about

Farmer, the

Phoenix.

Demonstration

Garden.

There's the regular vege­ table from plot, already lined with the

Sept.

25 planting.

For green your inspection and enlightenment, there grow rutabaga, cabbage, onions, car­ rots, head and leaf lettuce, turnips, cauliflower.

radishes, broccoli, beets, spinach and chard.

(,i�;!i:��A�meriean

Award

:-W�1IIC11

e cause an exces­ sive drop of flowers and small fruit.

For all prac­ tical the purposes blooming period and the fruit

setting period are of

PAT POWERS ance and may equal import­ be considered as one.

This :period extends

.over

several months and it is important that the trees never be allowed to become dry or to suffer for lack of moisture during this period.

Excessive blossom or fruit drop may result if the trees suffer for water any time from late

March to on the

July.

If the soil is a little dry side the roots are unable to take up sufficient water to enable the leaves to carry on their normal functions, and the leaves in tum draw moisture from the small fruit.

If very much moisture is drawn from the fruit during this setting period, the fruit will shrink, become weak­ ened, and may drop.

The best irrigation practice seems to be to give the orchard a thorough soaking during the winter months.

That is, wet the soil to a depth of six or seven feet some time in J an­ uary,

February or

March.

Then irri­ gate often moisture for enough to keep ample optimum tree growth in the soil at all times

UJ:ltil early

July.

These irrigations should be fre­ quent of rather than heavy.

irrigation will depend

Frequency mainly on soil type, the weather, and condition of the orchard.

Very light, gravelly soils may

10 to 14 require an irrigation every days, whereas heavy soils may go as much as

30 days between

I irrigations.

grown in

If cover crops are the orchard being during this per­

I iod, check your soil moisture content frequently.

Most cover crops use considerable water and will necessi­

-tate more where frequent irrigations the orchard is than clean-cultivated.

Tre

Tal

.

Arrangements have been com­ pleted by the county agricultural agent's office for the annual series of fruit tree and vine pruning dem­ onstrations, it was announced yes­ terday by

John H.

O'Dell, county agent.

The series will be given this week

In various valley, so parts that of the Salt long drives

River will not be necessary to attend demonstra­ tions conducted by H. B.

Powers, assistant county agricultural agent.

The exhibitions are open to any­ one without

Correct charge.

pruning for fruit trees will have much to do with the yields obtained,

Mr.

O'Dell pointed out.

Since such production is a direct aid to the war effort, he said the demonstrations are for the landowner primarily with only a few trees to prune.

The demonstration schedule fo� lows:

Tomorrow, 1:30 p.m.,

James

Lawrence ranch, one-quarter east of 19th avenue on mile

Glendale avenue; apricots.

Tuesday, 9:30 a.

m.,

Bartlett­

Heard

28th ranch,

Baseline road and street.

apricots and grapes;

1

229 p.

m., claude Williams

Vine street, home,

Mesa; young ap­ ricots, peaches and

Lawrence plums;

Chapman

3 p. m., ranch.

miles west of Mesa on main and two high­ way, apricots peaches.

Wednesday, 10 a.

m.,

Mrs.

W.

R.

Oliver home, 2701 East Pinchet street, peaches, plums, grapes and roses;

1:30 p.

m.,

A.

W.

AUstin ranch, one-quarter mile west of

Scottsdale on

Thomas cots, peaches and plums.

road, apri­

Thursday,

10:30 a.

m., Mrs. R. H.

Lavik home, 1185 Maple avenue,

Tempe, roses, apricots and figs;

1:30 p. m., Mrs. W. E. Wells home, first house north .of

Christy road on

Lateral

25, apricots, plums and peaches.

Farmer

.

Victory

rden

Farmer's wom.en's edi­ up at the

May & Gar­ den at

BroadC8S'll-aired e.ch

11:30 a. m.

from the

Saturday

KOY-Farmer garden at the

Valley

Garden Center

-with a garden game which sIte gave out over the mike.

By answering a questionaire (appearing in the

May

Ladies'

Home Journal) listeners could tell what kind of flowers resembled most.

they

The women's editor blushingly owned up that, according to the L. H. J.

questionaire, she must be a

Nasturtium, whereupon Assist­ ant County Agent Pat Powers cere­ moniously presented her with a lush green

To nered garlic plant.

get even, the women's ed.

cor­

Pat and made him give out in­ formation er regarding the KOY -Fann­ garden, and how it grows.

From here on it's

Pat's story.

_

Carrots, onions and garlic are the only winter veaetables left in the

,garden.

The garlic and onions are almost rots are ready for harvest.

The car­ large enough to use and by picking out the larger ones, we should have fresh carrots until the end of

June.

The summer planting con­

!lists

of three varieties of summer two squash, varieties of tomatoes, two varieties of sweet com, two varieties of soy bean s,

Hopi lima and beans, okra cucumbers.

Melons were

PAT they take up too much space.

To

POWERS date, our left out of the garden because biggest problem has been the rate ing and show

11' is up squash.

up control of the No.

1 insect enemies.

wit� on we the

Whenever theSe pests dust the nicotine.

insects.

plants

Aphids spot on our list of

They are still show­ tomatoes, cucumbers

This thoroughdusting peated at least once a the is re­ week until aphids disappear. Aphid control fairly if started before

-SO'S

\

KO

arden

(Continued

From

Page 20) corn and tomato mites on the toma­ toes:

The tomato mite is a relative­ ly new pest and causes severe dam­ age to tomato vines.

It is so small that it cannot be seen without the aid of a of microscope.

If the leaves the vine turn a yellowish-brown and dry up, there is a that the mite is

goo�

chan�e present.

This condi­ tion usually starts on the basal leav­ es the and spreads upward throughout entire plant.

It is controlled by dusting the plants with dusting sul­ phur.

Many growers containing

50% are sulphur using a dust and

50% cry­ olite.

This controls the mite as well as the worms attacking the tomatoes.

Usually two to three dustings are re­ quired during the season.

The control of the other insects mentioned sion is described in the Exten­

Service Circular

122,

"Control of

Garden Pests."

This publication con­ tains colored pests as pictures of many garden well as recommendations for their control.

It is available to you upon your ricultural request to your county agent, or the

�_I garden edi-' tor,

Arizona Farmer.

Soil

Farmer analysis of the

KOY-Arizona:

i

garden plot shows a highly alkaline condition.

The salt content of the soil is ten times that of a good garden soil.

We are overcome this

a�mpting.

to by making basins around the squash, cucumbers and tomatoes.

By root zone we flood irrigating the hope to leach most of the salt- below the roots.

The effects of alkali are xnore severe in much the summer than in

I

I' i

I!

the winter months.

Under these con­ ditions it is advisable to fore irrigate be

..

planting so as to establish a water line.

Seed should be planted just below the water line and irriga­ tions should be heavy enough to sub well beyond the seed row.

As evaporation takes cumulate place the salt will ac­ above the root zone of the plants.

It is not too late to plant the fol­

II lowing vegetables: Sweet potato slips, summer plant squash, okra, soy beans, egg-

(plants), and melons.

F.:>r information about

.

planting

II dates, and gardening sult your own

metho�s,

con­

'county agncultural agent.

Gardeners in Maricopa will find much

County helpful information in

"Suggestions to Victory

Garden

Growers able on in

Maricopa

Coun "avail­ request from Harold Powers,

Assistant tural

Maricopa County Agricul­

Agent, 1201 West Madison,

Phoenix, Arizona.

1

arm

And

me

New

(Written by the

Extension

Agricultural

Service, Phoenix)

Phone 4-2133)

Pecan

By

Troubles

H.

B.

Powers

Ass't

County Agri. Agent

During August and early Sep­ tember there is usually quite a se­ vere drop of pecans. The nuts turn black on the inside and drop off the tree.

There are several reas­ ons for this.

Certain insects such as the stink footed plant bug and the leaf­ bugs work on pecans in the same way that they do on cotton and other plants.

Before the shell hardens, they pierce the nut with their long needle-like mouth solution.

and suck out the

This sugary injury causes the meat of the nut to dry up and darken.

If done when the nut is

I

I quite Immature the entire kernel may shrivel and the nut may fall off.

It is believed that some of the dark spots on the kernels results from the by these puncturing of the nuts bugs just as the shell is hardening.

This injury comes too

Ia te to cause the entire kernel to decay and nut to drop.

The

"physiological" condition of the tree is also believed to influ­ ence the period.

drop of nuts during this

According to Dr.

A.

H.

Finch, excessive vegetative growth during the late summer and ear y fall months increases the nuts during this drop of period.

He says that pecan kernels are injured by the and high early temperatures

September, if of

August they are borne on trees that have green succulent leaves.

If the trees are not growing vegetatively and the leaves are a little on the yellow side, the tissue in the nuts be­ comes resistant to the high tem­ peratures.

It is also believed that too much shade within the trees is detri­ mental to the proper nuts.

This is filling quite of the noticeable when tall pecan trees are planted near buildings or cotton wood trees which shade them.

Pruning thin out dense trees should help.

to

Pecans grown in orchards on a commercial basis can be handled so as tion.

to obtain maximum

Individual trees produc­ planted in yards and on ditch banks make beautiful shade trees and furnish some nuts.

However, it is almost impossible to properly growth control the of these trees so as to make them produce heavily.

I

Instructions Given

On Date

H.

B.

Pollination

Powers,

Assistant

County

Agent.

Date the palms are dloecisous, 1.

e., male flowers, which produce the pollen, and the female flowers vhlch on produce the fruit are borne separate trees.

Therefore arti­ ficial pollination is necessary to insure a good and the winds set of fruit.

Bees usually do a fair job of polUnation on female palms that are within about 100 ft. of a

I male palm.

Pollination soon as should take place as possible after the sheath surrounding the female flower splits open, never delaying over

2 or

3 days.

Male collected pollen should be within a few hours after the sheath splits open.

If left on the tree several days after open­ ing, most of the pollen is lost. If he male blossoms open earlier han the female blossoms hake the male pollen out of the flower custer into a sack or box.

creen out the flower petals and he pollen may be kept for weeks in a cool dry place.

There are several methods applying the male female blossoms: pollen to of the

I

The most common method is to remove the sheath from the female flower cluster and place

3 to 5 fingers or strands of fresh male pollen of the upside down in the center female cluster.

These are held in place by tying a s rong wine around the upper end of he cluster.

This should be tied with a slip knot in such a manner that it will gradually loosen as the flower cluster expands.

Another method is to sa ura e a piece of cotton, about the size of a walnut, with previously col­ lected male pollen and to insert it in the female flower cluster in place of the male flowers at the same time

..

Some of this dried len may pol­ be dusted onto the female flower with a small hand duster.

Still could another method, which only be recommended for use on very tall trees, is to tie 1 or

2 newly opened male flower clusters in the female trees near the female flowers.

In order to insure fruit good sized give the trees plenty of water.

Try to irrigate every

2 or

3 weeks. When the fruit starts to ripen do not irrigate quite so often.

Liberal applications of barnyard manure every fall are also very beneficial.

B,.

H.

B.

POWBBS

Maricopa

Count,.

ABate Count,.

Agricultural Alent pruning diffe1'l$ with the

GRAPE and with the conditions under which vines are grown.

The most essential point to remember is that grape prun­ ing is essential­ ly a cane renew­ al system.

The fruit is borne each season on the current sea­ son'a growth,

Rroduced

from

)juds on canes which grew the year before.

i

The Malaga,

Cornichon,

Mus­ cat, Tokay, sion,

Mis­ and Black

Prince varieties

PAT POWERS are usually

"head pruned according to the system." Pruning of these varieties consists of the removal of all of last year's growth other than about 5 to 10 spurs of 2 to 4 buds each.

These spurs should be left on

3 to 5 permanent branches distribut­ ed evenly around the trunk.

The

Thompson

Seedless and

Black

Monukka

are usually pruned accord­ ing to the "Cane or

Kniffa

System." lIere apin, most of laat year'a growth is .removed.

Leave

3 to 5 of the strongest canes and cut them.

back to about

3 feet.

These will bear this coming season's crop. Also leave 4 or

6 renewal spurs of 2 buds each. Dis­ tribute them the evenly around trunk on permanent branches.

These are the renewal new canes spurs grow for fr: m which the fruiting the sec­ ond summer.

Boysenberries bear their fruit on one-year-old canes, so remove the old canes ers that bore cut off all last year.

Some grow­ the old canes immediate­ ly after the fruit is harvested.

The new canes are allowed to run on the ground until winter.

thinned out and

They are then placed on the trellis.

Other growers do the entire job in the winter.

In either case cut out the weaker canes, leaving est

"Ones.

Cut te

12 of ese the strong­ back to 6 to 8 feet and remove

Leave the weaker laterals.

fewer canes on young or weak plants.

earII OD

Kose8

Although roses are not dormant

completely

they should be pruned rather heavily during the month of

Jan­ uary in climates similar to Salt

River

Valley.

A knowledge of the fruitm and flowering habits of the various trees and shrubs will materially aid the pruner.

Most of our common fosn produce flowers on wood of the cur­ rent season's growth.

Spring and early summer flower shoots arile from buds produced last season, while the late summer and fall blooms arise from buds on the rrent season's growth.

Moderate winter reduce the number of pruning will blooms, but' will increase their size and quality.

Prun­ ing also stimulates the plant and aids in the annual renewal of fIo'W­ ering wood.

Pruning with the of roses naturally varies growth habits of the dif ferent varieties.

Most of our roses belong in the

Hybrid

Tea class.

In general, these should be pruned as follows: Remove all dead wood, weak shoots, and cross branches.

Thin the center of is too the crowded.

plant if growth

Pruning to here outside buds will tend to if spread the their growth is too plants upright.

Canes of over

2 years should be thinned heavily each year.

The plan is to gradually remove the old wood and to replace these old caoes with new growth.

The amount of wood to re­ move is a growers controvertible subject.

Most prefer a moderate pruning.

After thinning, cut back the remain­ ing branches to 7 to 12 buds. Weaker plants should bi pruned a little more severely in order to stimulate their growth.

If borers are present it advisable to remove

Would be all branches in­ fested, and to paint over all cuts larger than a lead pencil,

Pblyantha roses require very little pruning.

Thin out crowded growth and remove last season's flower stalks.

When move pruning climbing roses, re­ all dead wood and those con-­ taining borers.

Thin where crowded, especially the older grey cones.

As in the bush roses, a few of the old canes are removed each year and re­ placed with new shoots.

Small, weak cones should be removed. The laterals may back.

be thinned, the longer ones cut

hown tate

Frances Coman of

Kyrene, has made such a brilliant record in

Dairy Production.

that she won the right this year to compete for the American Holstein-Priesian

4-H

She started with one registered Holstein

Award, a

$200 scholarship to the college of her choice.

heifer, ha built up to a herd of 14 registered females valued at over

$3,000.

In her six years of Club work, he has sold over

$3,600 worth of dairy products.

THE weary editorial staff has seen beamingest smiles Arizona in many a day were those on the faces of Paul

Brown and Mrs.

Isabell Pace, directors of 4-H work in

Maricopa County, whe to they came in brag mode tly about the winnings of

Maricopa County boys and girls in the recently concluded State 4-H con­ tests

The Farmer already of O. W. Dishaw had the report acting state direc­ tor, which indicated that 13 of the 20 state awards ere handed to Mari­ copans, with Scott dale clubs

'way out in front.

The highest honor of all, though-a trip to this year's

Na­ tional Congress of cago-was j-H

Clubs in Chi­ spread around among boys and girls of Maricopa, Cochise, Yuma and Yavapai counties.

Here are the seven working and downright talented, hard­ lucky individ­ uals who are assured of that Chicago trip:

Beatrice Muretic of

Robert

Cottonwood, and

Biggs of Mesa, were adjudged

Outstanding Girl and Boy of the

State, and will take the trip as guest of the Santa Fe railroad.

Mary

Burnett of

Elfrida, had the

Be t Girl's Record.

She'll go to

Chi­ cago as and guest of compete

Montgomery

Ward there for one of the sev­ eral 200 college scholarships award­ ed by the sponsor.

In order to win over

Stokoe of stiff competition in Food Preparation, Frances

Scottsdale, answered questions that would make candidates for a master's degree turn pale.

In her five years

Club work, she has completed seven projects in baking, meal planning, canning and clothing; was outstanding 4-H bond salesman in the Fourth and Sixth War Loan won

Drives-in the latter selling $16,000 worth of bonds toward the Scotts­

Robert way up dale total of

$158,000.

Frances is working toward a career in hospital or public health dietetics.

Biggs of Mesa, worked his to become Arizona's

Out-

....,."""""---------------�l

Frances Stokoe of Scottsdale, wins standing

4-H

Boy, by seven years of enthusiastic work, including the

Food trip by virtue of superiority in

Preparation in a contest spon­ shining records in dairy, poultry, sheep and hog production.

excelled in

He also

Victory Gardening.

Has sored one by Servel, Inc. Frances may win of Servel's

$200 scholarships in national competition.

championships galore in county fairs,

4-H and is a member of the State

Champion Livestock Judging in

Dixie Lee Nuttall of

Dragoon, won

Clothing Achievement. TEat means the Spool Cotton Company will pay team.

(Please Turn to

Page 24)

Oliver Anderson of

Roosevelt record that made him the State's produced a garden and row-by-row champion 4-H

Victory

Gardener this year.

Oliver is

Award-a competing for the Sears National

Victory

Garden trip to the National Congress of 4-H Clubs at

Chicago and a

$100 Victory Bond.

4-H Contests

(Continued

From

Page 20) her expenses to Chicago and just maybe award her one of those cov­

, eted scholarships.

Rachael Frauenfelder of Somerton, was top girl in the vue, so she's

State Dress Re­

Arizona's Chicago guest of the American Viscose Corp.

In

Chicago

Rachael hopes to win a

$25 war bond and a ribbon for national superiority.

Alfred Austin of the rest in

Scottsdale, led all

Poultry

Production.

He'll represent the State in

Chicago and compete for a

200 scholarship, as guest of Swift and

Company.

There a number of others who have won

State awards in the form of

Victory Bonds, gold watches or plaques, and in addition the chance

......................---

...............

_., to compete that regionally

Chicago-bound for train.

a berth on

Malcolm Adams and

Albert

Owens of Scottsdale, if they win in the re­ gional Dairy Production Demonstra­ tion contest, will win the

Chicago trip tile and a

$200 scholarship apiece at expense of the Kraft Cheese Co.

Clare Huber of Mesa, will get to go to

E.

Chicago as the guest of

Wilson

TJlomas

Packing Co., and win a

$200 scholarship, if he wins regional­ ly in Meat

Animal Production.

Barbara Austin of

Scottsdale, top

State winner in the Farm

Safety con­ test, may win a

$200 scholarship and the eral

Chicago trip, sponsored by

Motors.

Gen­

If Oliver Anderson of repeats his state

Roosevelt, triumph in Victory

Gardening regionally, he'll go as a guest of the Sears Foundation and win a

$100 sponsor.

Victory Bond awarded by the

Wayne Ramey of Roosevelt

WOD in

Home Grounds Beautification.

If he wins in the regional contest,

Mrs.

Chas.

R.

Walgreen of stake him to that trip.

Chicago, will

Frances Coman of Kyrene, is com­ peting for the American

Holstein­

Friesian

4-H award, a

$200 scholar­ ship.

Jast_State Prizes

State prizes which are not accom­ panied by a chance to compete for regional and national honors, include the

Dairy

Foods Demonstration

COD­ test, sponsored by

�t Cheese

Ct'., and won by the Scottsdale team of

Mattie

Whinery and

Virginia

Cluff.

Mattie and

Virginia are the richer by a

$50 Victory Bond apiece.

Lester Matlock of Scottsdale, and

Frances Coman of

Kyrene,

WOD

$26

Victory Bonds, awarded by General

Motors, in the State

Farm

Safety contest.

Joseph Richey of St. Johns

WQD a

$25 bond, awarded by honors in

Ruth Ann

Sears', for state

Victory Gardening.

Spencer of Sedona and

James Dewhurst of

Yuma, won

$25 bonds from Swift and

Company for

Poultry Production.

Girls walked at the right into classes supposed to be sacred to masculinity,

Maricopa County

4-H Fair, and made the boys duck and run.

May

WestfaU and Louise Foran, Scottsdale, took first honors as demonstration team in the senior division.

They demonstrated the selec­ tion and fitting of a dairY heifer.

The slicked-and-polished heifer,

Gilfack Golden Tulio GirL belongs to Louise.

to

Outstanding records in dairy prodaction won scholarships and trips

Qlicago to attend the National 4-H Congress for the three club members above.

m.

Ore.

e a e

�ey are

(left to right) Donald Stoxen, Hampshire.

.

ura co ege s

.

and Ralph E.

Cope, Jr., Langlois.

olarships were awarded by the Kraft

Cheese

Company.

In six years of club work, Donald has raised the butterfat average of his herd to 349 pounds, with a return of $197 on fINery

$100 spent for feed.

Frances was state champion 4-H girl in

1943 in the national Holstein-Friesian Association contest, her fifth such award.

Her total certified dairy income is $2,383.19, including

$100 prize money.

Ralph is top dairyman of his county, irrespective of age.

His total dairy earnings amount to $20,187.31.

fin

Exhibits played

At

Lehi

4-H Achievement

Program

bag.

4-H Club

Lehi community held.

their an-

Dresses

(2nd year), Shiirley nual school achievement program at the

Mortensen, first; Jeanette

Hemp­

Friday, May 11, with many hill, second; and.

Bonnie Hath­ outstanding boys and!

exhibits girls of the being disfirst, for shoe cock, third.

played by members enrolled in

Dresses (3rd year), Joan handicraft and home economics projects.

edl by

The

Paul exhibits were

Brown, assistant

Franks, first; Melva

Merrill, sec­ judgond; and June

Bishop, third.

Clothing eecord books, Juanita county agent, and Mrs.

Isabell

Cain, first; Bonnie Ogle, second;

Pace, assistant home demonstraand

Bonnie' Bartram, third.

ti,?n

agent, winners, and awards

Zi�n��Ckl:;,za::hl:.con

given the

Boys

Divisio.n

Twenty-four meal jects and 26 boys icraft and three girls completed planning and clothing procompleted handcompleted live-

.

J son, esus h�s grven

Ma�lOe ez, w h

0 t

00 k f'

Irs t f book case entry, was g�and champion rac:k, fIrst; Leslie award.

or also

.

Antone Mathi­

Wester, second; stock projects.

ievement

All received!

achpins and certificates.

Russel!

Bendure and Robert Harder third.

The folLowing indicate placings and awards on exhibits:

HOlme Economics

.Table,

Billy

Clarence

Ra?ken, zales, fhird.

.

Jackson, fIrst; second: Tony Gon-

Food-for-health ond year,

B b

r,ear, �r

Jeanette ara posters

-

Sec-

Hemphill,

Chest

Frank

(large),

!Arry

Lee a1!-d

Beltram, first;

Lloyd.

Glf­ first.

Joan Franks

Bon�ie second:

' and

Hathcock,' third.

First fo:d, second; and thied.

Mike

Baisa,

Bart

:�m,

d f' t·

�\'

-

Table

(small), Sabro Sekiya, first;

Jim

Miller, second; and

Me..

4-H club and

Saturday in membera.lJl&de a fine shOwing at the Maricopa count� 4-H club fair held

Fnday

'!empe, walking away with a big shire of the J1on­ ora.

Farm produce handicraft were exhibits and displayed by 1500 members of tbe 81 4-H clubs in

Maricopa county.

Winning the largest number of awards from

Mesa was Dicky

Coutehle, giVen the health award for in boys and winning first prizes secI'etarY, dairy and handicraft record bookEr, trio of ducks, two roostel" divisions; second prizes in poulltY and handicraft record books and drake; third prize in handieraft and third and third special in

Ayrshire calf, and

Sweepstakes for judg1Dg ill an c1e­ partme�� prize for White

Rock hen, pair

� record bOok and

�d

P� ents j�

Mel

In the

JitWeepBtaltes junior dlvislon.

LeBo,.

Peel won first and second sheep, fOD thIrdaJ

Guernsey judging calf, in all junior dlvlslon.

for booIC;

Lee Huber.

book; thlrd.

for record

Lar17 Br,van, third for

New

Zealand wb1te buck; Ross Farns­ worth, second

In Barred Rock trio;

Richard Heywood.

third in demon­ stration team;

John H.

Jarvis, third in demoD8tration team; and

Sandy Fitch, sweepstakes for judg

..

tng in all departments in

�unlor diVision.

In the poulbT judging con�st

Bob Fuller won first and

Rob'rt

Biggs won second prize in the senter division, with Fuller, Biggs and

Frank New for teams.

Grant taking first prize

Harman, Larry

Brian aDd second

Dicky

Coutchie took prize for teams in the junior dlvlston.

In the sentor vegetable judging contest, dlvlslOll,

Ray

KiWs took first prize, wlth Ke1lis, Fuller and

Biggs winning first for teams.

Dicky

Coutchie

WOIl second place

In the junior divlsloD, first prize f�r teams going tb Coutche,

1\oy

Peel

Leand Kenneth Martin.

U.

R.

WOJ).

J'fee1¥ aDd Alma Huber second.

and

John H.

Jarvis and Richard H� won third pme in the demonstration team contest, jUDio,r divlsion.

BiCla&r4 Gardner

WOB firsts for lrJ.emisk Giant doe and and

$a.tlD

Doe

1�1', seconds for FlemIsh

GIaDt bU.

and for record book.

NeW won firsts for record aDd or Jersey buD, also sweepstake.

for judcing in all de­ pa.rt$en1ili In senior dlvlslcm.

Champion record book, senior division, was entered by

Robert

BIggs.

Clare Huber won first prize in the an showuianship exhibit of swine.

contest with

U. R.

eelY.

won first prize for r.eglsterecl

Holstein cow, fbr

8eqonds record book and de onstra­ tion team: Clyle Gray won first priH for

4Yrshlre gr8.de

heifer;

Talmage

Huber won first for

Holstein heifer and second f,or demonstration pwre won team; Grant first for Sho.l"thorn

.

Haly­ bull, and Bill

Berkenkamp won a first and second for New

Hampshire puUet.

1---.:;::===�======­

I

I

I

I

ll.obert

Mra.

E.

D.

Biggs,

Biggs.

street, and Clare

Mr.

and Mrs.

Lee sikle east of Mesa, outltandlng 4-H from all gue.ts

parts of of the

Ph.QAi'lht"·!f£

Commerce at a day evening.

Robert, a junior sobool, was cited as.

standing 4-B club was

Arizona's in 1945.

top

He left

0J1 gu.

_-day trip of the Santa

RObert haa been a

MM

..

4-& clUb ine�II"":' haa projeeta raising, sheep PI'4c»dl1ctioa:lJ.

dening.

Clare is a senior at and has been

In 4.-H six years.

For the

.be

has been a member champion 4-8 club lI"U��CII ing team.

This year in the state

4-H club meat

DIJ.I�"',11 production contest.

Clare 1$ active in the

Future Farm.ers

America holding the degree ot farmer in that

Organization.

Given the health award for was

Jane girls

Haymore who also won first prize for Shorthorn heifer.

Other winners, prizes won and divisions are as follows:

Russell third

Kear, first, second and prizes for Rhode Island

Red hens; Carroll

Pennington, first in ducks;

Carl

Turley, firsts in eggs and hen; Geraldine

Sabin, first for White

Leghorn hen and cham­ pion

White

Leghorn hen, and John

Hogle, seconds in turkey and rooster.

Jersey heifer,

Earl Vance, third for record

Most admired of all

Fair was this handicraft exhibits at the Maricopa loom, built and operated by fifthand

County 4-H sixth-grade boya of the their

Eighth

Street School in Tempe.

Here are some of the instructor, Virgil

Haws.

Left to right:

Paul boys

Valenzuela, and

Jimmy

Portillo,

Mike Gamboa, Freddy Gutierrez,

Mr.

Haws.

FIavio

Moraga..

",HE lice-and-warbles editor thought

...

somebody was trying to load him with to

Hassayamp' sand.

"If you want demonstrate lice and warbles con­ trol, why don't you do it that have lice and with cattle warbles on

'em 1" he snorted.

"I happen to know that those four heifers of Amos Terrell's are just off one of the finest, fanc­ iest Hereford breeding farms in Ari­ zona.

You'll find no parasites in that herd."

"You won't, are cattle."

"He's right," nodded Extension

Entomologist

J.

N.

Roney.

"Even on thousand-dollar bulla and high-record dairy cows.

The big fellows need just as much lice-and-warbles education because blame

51J1fJVl

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taauoq 'lao;)

's"d loJ no.(

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8n.lp

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.(IUO

3en

Opd3Spay

S,.I9l.10d

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., no 8,.I3l.l0d '.1(1 'l89q

9.1nl8U

tJUJ

-dl9q eq lI,no.(-o_,L pay 'J9nU

'U, flies are active from

10.

It eggs on

Feb.

10 to

April is then that the they lay their lower legs of cattle.

A little less than a larvae have moved year up later, the to the back and each one has punctured a hole for air.

Then they go back for a fraction of an inch and rest for about

37 the days before they emerge, fall to ground and pupate.

It is at this period that they can be reached with notenone or derris.

The grubs die, and every dead grub means one less fly the next season.

For this mends a altitude, Roney recom­ first treatment about Nov.

25, another 3 days later, and the third 3 days after that.

If the treat­ ment is thorough, all the lice on the animal's same bopy are destroyed at the time.

The

4-H members took keen in­ terest in the nroceedings.

Some of them are talking of forming teams to visit farms and delouse and dewarble cattle at so much a head.

They will probably find plenty of customers, especially among farmers who own just a few.

The way things are

'go­ ing now, it won't be long until all the larger operators have their own treat­ ment easy facilities.

A to shampoo outfit is make, and any can may be con­ verted into a ers of powder sprinkler.

Own­ large herds, of course, will want the dipping vats such as most of rangemen up in Apache County have already built.

op Ol tJUlqllS.Jg

311.1.

..

� .....

.-.

..

��---------------------

Best

4-8

Fair

Champion

Hereford

Breeding Heifer of the

Maricopa County 4-H Fair was this classy animal, owned and shown by

Buckeye.

She won for Price the Hereford steer

Price ilson Curd of annually given away by the Phoenix Kiwanis Club.

the a few departments and As long as we can't have our regular

Maricopa

County 4-H Fair

Arizona

State Fair, the event held ld be a fairly respectable state

Or, let's put it another way: annually by the farm boys and girls on the Arizona State

College

Campus makes a pretty good substitute.

Nothing that was on exhibition at

Tempe this year,

April have been out of place

20-21, or would outclassed in any fair competition.

This is especially true of the livestock.

There were

97 cattle entered, near­ ly all of them registered purebreds,

Here's hoping that some idea of their general excellence can be the gained from pictures to be found elsewhere in this paper.

All the breed cham­ pions are here, we believe, except

Frances Coman's Holstein heifer.

Al­ though this well-trained, brushed heifer had just combed-and­ helped

Fran-

NOT EVEN STANDING ROO

The

Old Farm Reporter's inten­ tions were good--so good, in fact, that mo t of the pictures he took for thi over story will have to be held for another issue.

You'll just have to

'scuse him, folks, but the

WPB has set our paper allotment, and that tor a gives the

Leave-out Edi­ perfect alibi.-L. A.

ces win second place in the showman­ ship contest, she managed to twist herself all out of ment shape at the mo­ the shutter clicked.

That showmanship contest definite­ ly outclassed anything ever seen in these parts.

It was good-more than good!

Yes, and the demonstrations set a new big h mark.

So did the judging contests, for that matter.

John

Chandler

Jersey breeder, was

Hulet, first in judging livestock-senior division

-with the remarkably high score of

360 out of a possible 400.

Karl

Kynast of Palo Verde was third. The winning team was made up of

Freddy Thonen,

Donald

Green and Oliver Anderson, from the Roosevelt Club.

There just isn't paper enough to

Malcolm

Adams

(left) is pronounced the best female

Fair.

Clare Huber of Mesa is here little giving

Malcolm a pigs had to shrink

Lester Matlock of at the

Scottsdale and his Grand Champion

Ayrshire cow

Maricopa County 4-H Fair.

Lester also placed first in the cattle showmanship contest.

""""m����

These four boys from the

Roosevelt School were among the winning exhibitors in the vegetable department at the Maricopa County ·4-H

Fair in Tempe.

At left is

Freddy

Thonen, vegetable judging; then

Lloyd Kosted, second high individual in

Oliver Anderson and Norbert

Bottcher.

-

-

1"'��'l;"I'�"� exkiblts at the

Maricopa super!

last year's

4-11 that

Fair in were 80

Tempe were far ahead of comparison is almost impossible.

.

The quality of the stock was

-mueh better, and this year they were fit­ ted-we11 fitted.

Besides that, there were a lot more of them.

Some club leaders and many of the spectators are predicting an even better year, assembly of dairy stock next but that is a pretty radical prediction considering this year's col­ lection.

Chances are that the 1946 goo4 though display of beef cattle will be considerably stronger.

Several club leaders are already on the lookout for good calves to be fitted ))y some of their boys-yes and girls, too.

The interest in beef cattle is beginning to snowball.

That is clearly

SDOwn in the· improvement of this ye&l"s beef exhibit over last year's.

I:n the :tirst place, there were near­ ly three times as

1JWl)" cattle en­ tered tbis year.

They were better quality and better fitted.

Buyers paid better prices for them.

Charles Mathis,

Roosevelt, won champion steer with the calf that the

Phoenix

Khvanis Club donated to Charles, the owner of the best beef cattle exhibit at the 1944 Fair.

A year old

DOW, bad ease of this steer had had a pneumonia and didn't car­ ry quite as should have.

much

Still, condition as he he was smooth enough and fat enough to go to the

Tovrea Packing Co., at the top price of

..

200 a pound.

He

'brottght

Charles

$184.80

check.

His carcass graded

"Choice." He had- stood first in the light steer class over the second place elitJ."y of Lorene Cheatha�

Laveen.

Reserve

Gene champion steer went to

Narramore,

Palo Verde, on the first class.

place winner of the heavyweight

This steer carried a little more condition than the champion, but was not as sm.ooth

and typey.

He .sold

to the

Hurley Packing pound, bringing Gene $214.00.

carcass also graded

"Choice."

There were so

Co.

for 20c a many

His heifers that they, too, had to be classes.

Betty divided into two

Westfall,

Scottsdale, won a er first entry place on her junior heif­ that went on to win Reserve.

ChaIJlpion

Washington heifer.

-

David

Rogers,

School, took second in the junior heifers.

The Champion

Herefc;>rd heifer shown

1,y

Price Curd, Buckeye.

".,,:0...

),,,;.£0

��""'__"""""''''''_'''''''''''''-_-221'''''''''''''''''''' ...

..

I

Fhoenix Kiwanis Club award­

THE purebred

Dale

Curd, Buckeye,

Hereford calf from the

Bumstead herd. This a award was made in recognition of his having h$d the best beef cattle exhibit at t'he

1945

Tempe

Maricopa County

April

13 and 14.

4-H Fair ill

The presentation was made

24 at a luncheon at the Adams

April

Hotel,

Phoenix, given ill honor of all the beef cattle exhibitors at the Fair.

Price won the award

Champion

Hereford heifer.

�th his

This is the second such award made by the Phoenix Kiwanis

Club. Charles

Mathis,

Roosevelt School, thanked the Kiwanis again for the calf they awarded him last year when he showed the best beef cattle exhibit at the 1944 Fair.

The calf won the

Champion Steer award for Charles at the

Fair this year.

er,

Paul

Brown, thanked

County

4-H

Club lead­ the membership on be­ half of all the contestants.

He point­ ed out that as a result of the annual

Kiwanis Club award, interest in beef cattle had increased

This is tremendously.

reflected, he said, in the great improvement in the exhibits this year compared to last, and the en­ thusiasm with which club leaders and boys and ed their girls projects alike have start­ for next year.

pU'B doze

'nOS

]0 siua

AII'Bap!

a.re

SluawardulJ

-qln�s aql .10] pal;)n.l�

Coyth�l �hite

the

WInDIng and

Arleigh

Rlchmond (first and second from

County for their

4-H

Fair, and helped to roll up

Roosevelt School Club. As may an left) were

del!'0nstrat.ion

team in

.th� junior division at the

Maricopa impressive total of points be deduced from their equip­ ment, they demonstrated the control of lice and warbles on cattle.

That's

Clifford

Goodwin, helping out at the halter.

Alfred

Austin of Scottsdale led all the rest in geese aDd

Poultry Production, .....

will of go to

Cbieap to compete for Batie_) honors.

These are just a few

Alfred'.

Barred

Rocks.

He also goes in for

Rhode

Island Reds, tarlreys.

Mattie

Frances

Whinery aDd

Cluff of

Scottsdale, took state h

OlrO r.

U.

Dairy

Foods Dem­ onstration.

The y presented a menu of

Brtoehy Smetana

(meat balls cooked in sour cream, to you); v e get a b

I e salad tossed in sour cream a dressing; and buttermilk fruit drink.

Malcolm Adams and

Albert Owens of

Scottsdale, ere top team in

Dairy Pro­ duction Demonstra­ tion.

They used this young of

Ayrshire cow

Albert's, in pre­ senting points to consider in the se­ lection of a animal.

dairy

Agent

4-H

Clubs

I

Editor's Note

-

The article was written following this year for the national award by

Paul W.

of the Holstein-Friesian Associa­

Brown, county agricultural agent, tion of

America.

and appeared in a recent issue of

·'Arizona Stockman."

The Scottsdale 4-H won t'1e

Ayrshire

Club greatest number of awards

In enterprises are very popular with

4-H Club proud ot their fine and dairy cattle and of their pureblooded year

Maricopa County, livestock boys and girls.

They are hogs they show the people of the

Salt River and sheep.

Once each

Valley that they can raise the finest 4-H llvestock grown anywhere.

T.hey

exhibit their livestock at the annual of the fair.

registered

Maricopa beef

Coun-

I in mg the coun�y of this club has

�attle.

the

Fair so pion 4-H

�ry ratr,

They re-openmg of the State that they can compete for state hono; s with their cattle.

c�ub produc�d dalry demonstration team which is now honors in the

Clu� department

Each?f

the competing

Hi� the members registered ar.e

s�ate county cham­ producer

Of.

4-H at the

Ayrshi�e anxiously await­

This for state contes!-­ ty

4-H Club

April.

It is said to be the largest county

4-H Club fair in the nation.

Last

April

Fair, held at Tempe in the 4-H Club boys and of fat stock was held at the close

The team eonststs ot the club s president, Malcolm Adams, and his team mate.

Albert Owens.

colm was tbe state champion

Mal-

4-H girls had more than 2,000 exhibits at the fair, which included livestock, poultry, rlabbits, vegetables, handicraft and ,home economics swine exhibitors.

An auction sale meat he was

4-H adjudged boy and received a the in 1943 and outstanding

Arizona in 1944 trtp to the National

4-H Club work.

In addition to the

4-H Club Congress as a guest of t� exhibits there were many eontests

Santa Fe Railroad.

He is complet­ conducted at this select stock, two-day fair to county champions.

tests included the poultry and vegetables by ex.hibitc!,rs and demonstration contests.

The conjudging of liveing his seventh year of 4-H Club t1am s�!ne

T,nere were also snowwork and owns a very fine

.herd.

registered Ayr­ shire herd of ten fem9.1es

and a registered Hampshire lat-est addition to enterprtses i� a flock of

Southern manship contest for cattle and ten registered sheep.

Another Scottsdale club member who has a fine livestock club rec­

OLd is Alfred Austin.

He had the

There is always keen among 4-H beef dub competitton

: c,'Uimpion Guernsey members for exhibit and re­ ceived a vards for his Hampshire the award offered annually by the hog exhibits at the 1945 county fair.

Phoenix:

Kiwans Club of a top beef

He also specializes in fine poultry steer calf to the 4-H Club boy or and is a contestant in the state girl having the best beef exhibit poultry contest.

He is begin­ at the County 4-H Club Fair.

Tlle ning his fifth year of

4-H Club winner of the calf .bas it presented work.

during a meeting of the Kiwanis

Club at which all of the 4-H beef

I

I

Mesa's 4-H Club claims the coun­ ty champion 4-H meat animal pro­ club exhibitors are guests of the

I d}1cer for this year.

He is Clare

Kiwanians.

The calf is fattened

Huber, who is a contestant for the state

4-H animal contest by the winner and e:x.bibited at the

I n�t

4-H fair.

This year's champion 4-H steer was a

Kiwanis Club

I

I

14-H

award.

meat

Clare

700.00 worth of produced over

$1,­ hogs and steers calf awarded at the to

Charles Mathis ton 4-H Club.

<Jf previous fair, the

The latest winner'

I

�his

Washing-lID ner year and bas addition.

a

He was a state win­ in the 1943 4-H fine dairy ,herd

Dairy

Produc­ or the Kiwanis calf is

Price Curd, tion contest, This is his seventh

.IT., of

Buckeye.

He had the best year of club work.

Hereford exhibit at the 1945 fair

I

_.and he also

en

TEMPE, Apr.

13-The

1)rograms of the eloslnz of the

Univermt

'annual Maricopa

B.

Gray,

County 4-H Club Fair will be held Countv will of

Arizona.

president of

Farm Bureau th,ee'':rl�:t�:��rntll the campus of the

Arizona State also

College here Saturday.

with attention the young;

The fair given to exhibits on

1.200 members.

These exhibits were judged itors could the from day parents of song club' members.

opened display early in the yesterday determine so the more that prize with visand all other ners by the ribbons and tags.

Outstanding winners in the garden and era" exhibits were

Thonen.

Lloyd

Kost.ed.

Freddy

Norbert the demonstration ant festival dress revue by the than to the girls.

health win- will be made after by hich

Paul

Maricopa County agric agent in oeriod out of the ill be nresentedl charge of boys and club work.

l-;::::=============I

Bottcher and'

Oliver And e r son, give a response.

special

With these preliminaries and

Roosevelt School. and

John Marlow

Alhl"mbra School.

Wayne Ramey and 0 r v J

11 e

Rampy.

Roosevelt

School: Jack

Worthen.

Scottsdale: Teddy Cur­ now.

Creighton:

George Meredith.

Alhambra.

and Jprry Sargent. Lenl, were winners in the rabbits divlslon.

The clothinrr pxhibit rinners op as were

Marcha McElhannon.

Arling­ ton: Shirley Chevuront.

Jo Ann

Schmuck. Merle

Hutchinson.

Bettv

4.,H C

Leader

who knows what's going

NOBODY was one bit sur­

Sharp, tin of

Virginia

Cluff and Jean Aus­ division scottsdale.

In the canning hlzh honors were wan by

Bettv Jo Tompkins.

Cartwright:

Margaret

Coman and Lail Hellman,

Tempe: Bernice Sharn and Barbara

Jean Austin. Scottsdale.

Saturday morning the demonstra­ tion teams

Yo ill conduct their con­ tests in the Training

School Audi­ torium and the

Science huildin-r.

A picnic on t1;}.e

camnus is sahed­ u1ed at noon.

with each family nro­ prised when L.

F. Joslin was selected as one leaders of 1945.

jeweled of the five outstanding club

Presentation of his leadership pin as a main event of a special program,

Nov.

16, at the Palo Verde school west of

Buckeye where he is principal and general director of 4-H activities.

vidin� its own meal for the l'CC�­ sian.

The afternoon program tarts at 1:30 o'clock.

with

R victorv na­ rade of all clubs participating in the fair.

Dr.

Grady Gammage, president cf the eolleae, will welcome the vis­ itors.

and a resoonse will be ziven by

Charles U.

Pickrell, director of the agricultural extension service

The presentation was by 0.

W.

Dishaw, acting state 4-H leader.

A number of parents were present to hear Mr.

Dishaw review the Joslin career and praise his excellent work.

County Club

Leader

Paul Brown spoke along the same line and predict­ ed that Palo Verde would make a fine showing at the county fair in Tempe next ApriL

A :few minutes had before, two teams put on excellent demonstrations.

Just a little more practice under Mr.

Joslin's supervision, said

Brown, and either team might win a ship.

Joslin club leadership began

1935 while he was an

Arizona

State

College at Tempe student.

That

� he was program director of the fair, and also assistant superin ent.

The following two years were at Buckeye, where Mr.

Joslin active club five program livestock and that in handicraft ects.

Later he carried on a proJ­ superior type of club work at the

Murphy school, and his members won sev­ eral county fair leaving

Verde.

chanlJti.ons

Since ried on at Palo

Murphy he has.

4·H Club

Members

I

Rittenhou

Is Nawa�

Members of the

Mesa Senior

4-

H club met at the home of Robert club were

<.I.-H club guests at the

Scottsdaler------�---=-��

Wednesday.

There they visited members' livestock farms

Biggs

Thursday and plans were made for the cub's activities for the coming year.

It was decided and inspected their pure blooded cattle.

The Scottsdale state cham­ to enter contestants in all the an­ pionship dairy demonstration team nual county, state and national,

4performed for the visitors.

H club contests for 1946.

4-H

A 4-H club will soon be organ ..

members wi 1 also be represented ized at the

Alma school in the county 4-H club fair and according to Mr.

Brown.

Brown and

Mrs.

at the district

4 H club competi­ tive events to be held in the near future.

The record made by the senior

Isabel

Pace, assistant home teachers at the agent, met with discussed school last week and plans for sponsoring 4-H club work at Alma

Word was received this week club in 1945 included three state championships.

Robert of Mr. and Mrs. E. D.

Biggs, son

Biggs,

Me­ sa, was selected as the state's out­ school according to Mr.

Brown.

Brown and rs.

Isabel sistant home teachers at the school

Pace, as­ agent, met with last week

Dale C.

leader, that Robert

Clare Huber were

4-H club

Riggins, local

4-H club adjudged champions in by

Biggs and

State the state­ standing 4-H club boy for 1945 and was also chosen as top livestock judge in the s.ate

contest.

Clare

Huber, state champion in 4-H club meat a production, and Bob member ot the state ship 4-H club

Iivestock

Fuller, champion­ judging team, were also pointed out f.or

high honors.

and discussed bert Gates leader.

was plans for

4-H club work at Alma.

Plans for sponsoring

Mrs Her­ appointed 4-H club getting the club underway by December

1 were made.

wide contest

Biggs

'as recently concluded.

selected as the out­ standing 4-H Club boy of Arizona for 1945.

trip to the gress a in

He will be awarded a ational 4-H Club Con­

Chicago

December guest of the Santa

Fe

2-6 as

Railroad.

He began his 4-H Club career sev­

The newest 4-H club in the Mesa district was at the organized this week

Rittenhouse school.

.Joe

Jarvis was appointed club leader

J by

PaUl agent.

Brown, assistant

Thirty-six boys and county girls f.or

club work at the

en:�{i::.

I

Members of the Mesa

Seni.or

4-�

ArIZOna.

Y oung

P eop

I e

I

Have

Splendid

Record

I

Of 4-H Ac· ements

J.

H.

O'DELL en club ed and years ago with a poultry pro­ ject which earned him a

4-H Club

Fair.

projects records show

He each year c.hamplonship prize that year at t.he

County expanded and his that he has conduct­ enterprises in dairying, swine sheep production, poultry his and gardening.

Cou'nty Agricultural Agent

A member

.of two county cham­ pionship 4-H demonstratton teams, he won the 4-H State Vict.ory

Achievement award in 1943.

He

The vember

4-H Work

3, of

Tops opening on

Saturday,

No­ nati.onal

4-H ac.hieve­ ment week will find a responsive chord in the eounttes of

Arizona.

Youngsters of this state already have stepped into the national spotltght with what is reputed to be

America's largest county

4-H club fair being held annually at

Tempe.

Maric.opa

county national winner

4-H last national 4-H test

15-year dairy clubs had a year, old Frances in the pr.oductlOn

con­

Coman.

Th� county also produced the state champion and has a beef cattle national judg.ing

.team.

champton

10 tlle

4-H victory garden contest, Freddie

The

Sc.ottsdale

community in

Maric.opa

county is outstanding

4-H

Club rated as the community of

Arizona.

L-

� was top

4-H livestock

1945 state stock judge judging in the c.onbfst

held at Tucson during show and won the Valley the stock

Natlonal

Bank award.

Latest addition to his 4-H enterprises is beef cattle.

Clare Huber won t.he. 4-H

Club

Contest in meat animal production.

His record showed that duced over

1700 worth of he pro­ hogs and steers in

1945.

He will receive the

Thos.

E.

Wilson state award of a gold watch valued at

$50.00.

In his seventh year of club work, he is now competing in the National 4-H contest for a

$200 scholarship and a a trip to Chicago.

swine project

He started with when he was ten years old and has won county champion awards

.several

wlt.h

hog exhibits.

Other

4-H Club enterprises sheep, include dairying, gardening, poultry, and beef cattle.

He was a

4-H club state champion in 1944 in the dairy production con­ test sponsored by the Kraft

Cheese

Company and recently won a award in connection with state the Fu­ ture Farmers or

America, an nization for ture in boys studying high schools.

orgi­ agricul­

I

The Chicago party, telt

Achievement contest; to right: Betty

Freddy Thonen,

Gibbens,

Ietory winner of

Garden;

Clothing

Nellie May

Hart, Santa Fe trip; Dorothy Patterson, Food Preparation; O.

Dishaw, State

Club onstration:

Ann

Leaderj Fanny Coman,

Rohrbaugh,

Girls

RecGJ1I

Dairy contest;

Production

Olive

Dem­

Rundell,

Canning; John Collins, Food for

Victory; Dorothy Adams, Dress Revue;

Malcolm

Adams,

Santa Fe trip.

WHAT

Westward of Nov.

a party it was!

Meaning ren

Austin told how she and her 4-H given at the

Hotel members had managed two highly

Ho, Phoenix, the evening

29, for the eight state 4-H successful bond and how well drives at

Scottsdale they were getting' along with the third.

champions who had won trips to the

The flustered

National Club

Congress in

Chicago.

emcee was able to that

It was likewise a dinner for the announce prizes, consisting of

Maricopa County champions of 1944

$425 worth of bonds, had been donat­ who were not also trip winners-as ed by the

Valley Bank,

Neil McGinnis four of them were.

That made about Co., Arizona Edison Co., and Southern

26 honored guests of the

Agricultural

Arizona Bank & Trust Co.

He was

Extension Service and Arizona Farmflustered because along about that er, it being a joint affair.

time he came to the ghastly reali-

On top of that, the dinner official start of the 4-H was the zation that he couldn't crowd half his bond-selling scheduled program into half an hour drive in Arizona.

So that members of air time.

That's the reason the and leaders all over the State might presentation of have faster-than-mail notification of awards by

Tom the· two

Murray

Santa occurred

Fe aft­ how the drive was to be half an hour of the conducted, er

Jack Williams had sternly discon­ program was nected the microphone.

broadcast

First, over the Arizona Network.

Anyway, the 10 champs who were

Secretary of State Dan -Garleaving for Chicago the next mornt the whole

Hart of thing when he presented

Sedona and Malcolm

Adams

.ttsdaJe.

COOPERATIVE EXTENSION v'lORK

IN

UNIVERSITY OF

ARIZONA

AGRICULTURE AND

HmiE ECONOMICS

STATE OF

ARIZONA

COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE

U.

s, Dn'A.t1T[�iENT OF AGRICULTURE

P.

o.

BOX 751

PHOENIX

AGRICUL1�RAL EXTENSION

SERVICE

HOME DF1�ONSl'RATION WORK

AND i;iAFICOPA COUNTY COOPERA'IING

COUNTY AGENT WOI�

THE YEAR

I

ROUND BULB

GARDEN

�J

Courtesy of

Mrs.

Peter Corpstein

Soil

Preparation

Most bulbs would be one prefer a rich, well-drained loam soil.

}� ideal bulb soil compo�ed of two parts loam, ont:: part zand and one part organic material such as leafmold, peatmo�s, compost or well-rottcQ manure.

Dest results are ob­ tained if the soil is prepared several weeks before planting.

If manure

1s worked into the soil, the bulb bed should be prepared siy.

to eight weeks prior to �lanting.

Bulbs should not be planted so ae to come into direct contact with manure.

If

Tna.­ nure is worked into bed just before planting, it should be put in bottom of bed and covered with three or four inche� of soil, so as to avoid injur/ t� bulbs.

The lighter soils of the valley do not re�uire £xtra sand, but the heavier soils will benefit materially from the addition of sand or so�e other material to improve drainage.

'{vorking the soil to a depth of ten to twelve inches is also bene­ fi.cial.

Planting

Bulbs do ver,y well in partial shade.

Some varieties, such as

Oxalis, re­ quire very little

S1L."l,

WhE::rE;aS others prefer an abundance of' sunshine.

Many bulbs may be be used as n foundation planting around tress and slrrubs.

Th�f do not have to segrcgatud into special bed�.

Tulips should be planted nine to twelve inches deep for best rCEults.

A well pulv0rized soil should be us�d to fill

,holes around bulbs.

Coarse, lumpy soil leaves air pockets ru1d allows bulbs to d17 out.

Practically all bulbs, irregardless of the flowering period, should be planted in t!1e

fall.

There are a.

few exceptions, such as the �1dte Spider Lily filld the

Dahlia, which may be planted in the spring.

Watering the

Avoid bulb cun use scald the bulbs.

6verwatering until growth very littlE: water.

After blooming una has started.

Until growth has started,

Overwatering,

€r;pecially in hot wea.ther, may during the resting period they do not need as much wa.ter

e.r.

during the perioJ of active growth.

other

Anemones and

Banuncul.us

are the

�oil and stored bulbs during the s�mer during the months.

resting period, only bulbs that should be removed from the

However, if it 1s desirable to remove any they should not bo dug until the leaves h&.ve

turned brown.

Fertilizing face.

The safest method of

Compost, well-rotted fertilizing is by the use of mulches on manure or similar mulches

'are the very beneficial.

SQil sur­

-2-

:2rin(" Flowering

Varieties (February, March and

April) roeus,

Anemones,

Alliums, Bulbous

Iris

Chinese

Lily,

Solel1 dlOr

(Dutch,

Spanish and

English), Cnlla.

Lilies,

(Yello�

Paper

Whites),

Daffodils, Freesias,

Gladi­

Ius, BYacinths, Grape �acinths

(Muscari),

Iy�a, Leucocor.yne,

Ornithogalum,

Rarlun­ ulus, Snowflakes, Snowdrops, Sp,s.raxis, and \7atsonic.s.

lli

Spring

(April,

Uay and

June)

Amaryllis

!'l.d M�donna

Lily.

(red),

GICLdiolus,

Hemoraeallis

(Day

'Lily),

Zcpeyrnnthis

(pink)

J��er and Fall (July to

Nove�ter)

�idcr

Amaryllis

(Belladonna),

Lycor

Ls Radiata

Lily),

Oxalis, Zep�rantr�s

(whlte

�d

(Rt:d yellow)

Spider end

Lily),

Montbrbtia.

Crinum

(White

L/6/

45

2.00�.

COOPERATIVE EX�SION WORK

IN liversity of Arizona

)11�Ce of Agriculture

.S.

ad

AGRICULTURE AND HO�m ECONOMICS

Stnte of Arizonn

Dcpar-tmen t of

Agriculture

��l2.rico'Pn.

lopero..ting

County

Ftlrm Bureau

P.O. Box 751

Phoenix

Agricultural

Extension Service lfume Demonstration Work

County Agent

Work

February

6,

1945 in

M;magers of

Maricopa

County:

t

Cotton appeared meetings

�ere not held lQ3t year, due to lack of interest.

This year earlier that th�re is more liklihood of an increase of acreage, though f

Congress acts' tofreeze allotments though cotton is not p�anted, there may be a ontinued slump.

However, we think t haf cotton nectdngs should be held in order to

001 information on machine harvest.

In

�aricopa

County

meetings will be held

February

13.

14 and 15.

Will you help us to get out crowds to these meetings by mailing penny post

:ards tQ your customers, mentioning their closest meeting and

� or two of the

,hings you think your customers will be particularly interested in, from the sub­ ects listed below?

1.

2.

Classing

work

-

R.

L. Matlock

Seed Certification

-

R.

L. �futlock

3.

Insect Control

-

J. N.

4.

Lint

Roney

Improvement

-

C. J.

Kine or

E.

H.

Pressley

5.

Irrigation

6.

M6chanization of Production

-

R.

L. Matlock or

C.

Hobart

7.

Loan,

Purch;;.se

and

Crop Insurance

-

County A.A.A.

Representative

8.

Fare L�bor

-

H.

R.

Baker or

J.

H. O'Dell

The Schedule of

Meetines

Feb.

Feb.

Feb.

13, Tuesday

10:00 A.M.

1:30 P.U.

14, Wednesday

10:00 A.M.

1:30

P .�wi.

15, Thursday

10:00 A.M.

1:30 P.M.

Gilbert

Western Gin

Rittenhouse Growers Gin

Cr�dler Farmers Mutual Gin

Bennett Brothers Gin

Buckeye

Acme Gin

Litchfield Boswell Gin

Ver.y truly yours,

...

fJ,,�

Chas. Hoba.rt

Assft.

County

Agricultural

Agent

2-5-45

30c.

COOP

Ef{hTI VE

E'(TrnSJ.OH ViOHK

IN aGRICULTURE ��D HO�£ �CONOMICS

'ni versity of Arizona

�ollege

of

Agriculture

S.

Department of

Agriculture nd

Maricopa

County

Farm Bureau

.oopera

ting

State of Arizona

P.O.

Box

Phoenix

751 Agricultural

Extension Service

Home

Demonstration Work

County �gent

Work

Phoenix,

Arizona

December

13, 1944

Ginners of'

Maricopa County:

Encl�sed

please find a copy of a leaflet entitled ttpreventing

Cotton-Press

Damage", which m�y be of some help in your oper&tions.

Very truly yours, t

Chas

,

I

:/'

I

Ott

\'

........

Hobar-t

;i

-"7 t

/1(

'I-

{1,j( j

Ass't.

County .hgricuitur&i Agent

CH:S

21 c.

COOPERATIV� EXTENSllm

V�F..K

Ilt

AGRICULTURE AND HOME ECONOMICS

University of

Arizona

Co] lege of

Agriculture

U.

S.

Department of

Agriculture

Ani

Maricopa County

Farm Bureau

Cooperating

State of A�izona

P,0

....

Box

Phoeniz

February 9,

751

1945

ESTIMATES OF COSTS OF'

MACHINE

HARVEST OF CO-TTOH.

.....

TIllE A MACHINE

FICKING

(APACI'l'Y

Acres

Bales

Agricult� EXtensio�Service

Home

Demonstratiorr?faiK

C'oun-ty- Agent

Work

TYPE B

MACHINE

:YPE c MACH-­

:mE HIGH-

PLAlNS

S

$

9.00

?

�lOpOO

LOWERW l'ER BALE

GO"

$5.00

�5r50

TOTAL COSTS (Estimated

COST OF Hk�D lLOoH

SEED

PICKING

[email protected]�2.

NET DIF"F'ERENCE 1�10.50

to \il5.0Q

�12.00

Hauling

Pickers)

LOSS IN LINT VALUE.

BX. CONTINUED

EAPOSUHE '10 '/Vai'hER MAY Bl

AS

HIGH l\S 8¢

PER POUND.

ELIMINATION

OF THIS LOSS THROUGH MECHANICAL

HARVESTING DEPENDS

\".,-r-.

__ • ..

._......

.....

....

, .....

�1"""t�,.."'"T '" f

'1T:'tl"'\T T "mTn.,.1

'1.t:'mtTl"\n("'& oes

NO� Lower

..

Grade

Compare"d:·

With

Snapping

1 gd

..

Below

Picked Cotton

.r

Maricopa County

(By

Secretaries of

Districts)

*REPORT (JF CROP

ACRELGES BY

IRRIGATltlN DISfRICTS

July

1945

IRRIGATION DISTRICT

�"d

4-t

M m

«...t

,......

Dendora

Gilu Land & Cattle

Co�peny

Gillespie Land &

Irrigation Co.

Empire Ranch

Arlington

Canal

Company

Roosevelt

Irrigation District

Buckeye Irri�ation

Company

M&ricopa Co. Mun.

District jl1

West Agua Fria Pumps

Goodyear

Farms

(Tra.inees

&

Leesesl

Marinette

-

J.

G.

Boswell Co.

Pumping plants N.

of Arizona Ct�a1 and between New and

JI.gu£ Fria Rivers

(Marinette excluded)

St.

Johns Irrigation District

Peninsula Water

Com�any

S.R.V.W.U.

Ass'n.

i.rclidia Water Co. &

Ci trus)

Broad�cres

(Fowler)

Lone Butte

(Arca.dia

Vista

Pumas near

Vies t Chandler

South

S.R.V.

Chandler

Farms(Hanna

&

WesUxrt

Indian Res.

(U.S.l.S.)

Roosevelt nater Cons.

District

Pr-Lva te

Pumps

N.

of Elect.

Dist.

Queen

Creek

Irri�.

District

Ch�ndler

Heights lrrig.

District

:rO'TAL

Jlj_

560 l�OOO

1.920

2_50

11.731.

3.489

7,37A

1,000

2.1

__

91

280

558

61�751

2�O

273

20,000

60

19200

�O

113,917

W c..,.

,.....

s:

.ri

t.d�i.U

4-t $-.

�-f l'..!)

.....

til

::s b.O

1.\S

,\} c, til

.� lAO

1.421

2...t.61O

933

7..J..2M_

_5__t_667

1_-,-750

1,500

Q) r-i

'u

Ol

100

854

350

220

5,363

2.744

930

1.100

1.695

11l

Cl) orl

� s-.

(1)

CJl

...-t'I)

+> �Ii

(1) bO

(l)

::s a:lUl

-

.....

r-f

0

CJ

CJ

0 s...

(Xl

140

33

Wl

�i1

.0

.0

..u

u

1'.'1

(1) c,

0 r-t

W

_..;) c

(.) fIl

+>

0 t d u

40 r-f

,,..1

,-t

J.,.

(l) f>!

0

::s

..-0 u til e

.-i u

E

0

U

100 l

...

07A

AOO 20

1.240

417 240

260

230 73_5350 i

500 120

I

6_a0

29-,-007

60

Itl320

32J048 77 1,848 408 521 )11219 2_213

73.0

QJ�8_3_

1_3_0

890

8

A50

950

1,070

_7_13

55,375

60

SAO

"lID

300

).125

1.800

53,616

2

79

__

1

21

.329_3

460

6

255 285

2,021

648

781

1l,470

3,2/

..

3 1,465

800

�994

284

*Sorghum crops not included eo m

.&.:J S

.&.:J .r-f

00..

0-

533

200

10

74JJ

1

C

:-op

Survey

1945

s::�

OJ..

�o

+).c

Otl)

0"'-

01 t>

� co

Q

>< cd ri

� til

.

-to i!�

�� fIl s::

Q)

'0

J.,.

.,

��o co ri t.) ez..

t) r-I

Qj

cS

4)_ ori

::Sri

+)co

+)�

Q)...-

-

I>bQ os::

::SoM

-+JJ.,.

+>0..

t>CI)

�-

(I)

+> cd

0 fIl s:l

0

OM s::

0 t>

H

.3

CIl cd fl.e

ttl

1)o"s:::

+>(1) l!

o�

0 .....

fl..-

CIl

G>-

.3t

��

OCl) fl.es:: a1

'tj

CIl

(/)

Q)

1'"""1-

..00

tL�

a>:s ba-

G)

>

't:S

� t) s::

OM

> til s::

0 r-I

Q) f

G>

+>

2.260

12.085

3.639

1.350

1.07S

3.600

10

365

16C

90

105

12C

L.335

600

1.035

LO

3.390

26

15

I

I

40

164

360

121

14C

12t:; 120

715

61

5.367

261

51.4

556 2.641

_410 280 SO

534

68

7�OOO

51.049

BC

220

[3.(26 ilL 26.550

600

660

276

206

332

173

SO

240

160

7A

119 11.448 7�O44

18

SOO

937

200

J,.�.L90

60

890

1

81

2.500

190

40

40.222

393

9/12/45

300 c.

mw

514

10

28 38

556 2.679

106

7.775

30

716

9�29 4.CJ2.7

100 50

1.507

271

60

300

960

15 150

68

109

L54

38.923

1.766

515 2.103

164

325

347 2

50

20

427

23911.626...�.

397 714

� ro t>

13�

20

128

LU

293

.

0 fIl orf

:s

(I)

P.

0

H

U

E-t

0

E-t

700

1.100

11.0S8

1.200

3.925

30.896

17.2j

04 lS.� so

4.950

'1.489

5.100

7.597

1.429

2.300

217.370

916

1.250

1.S87

1.160

6.270

3.555

29.161

580

7.390

1.060

384.427

COOPERATIVE EXTENSION WORK

IN

AGRICULTURE AND lDME ECONOMICS

State of Arizona

University of Arizona

College of

Agriculture

U.

S.

Departoent of

Agriculture and

Maricopa County Cooperating

P.

O. Box

Phoenix

751

EXHIBITS AND POSTERS

Agricultural

Extension Service

Home Demonstration Work

Coun� Agent

Work

1.

2.

3.

4.

5.

General

Instructions for Setting up Exhibits or

Making

Posters.

They should appeal to the

"general public

I

4-H

Club members.

If but wi thin the experience of

The subj ect matter should be something that is important to tell the public and of current interest.

They

�hould attract attention.

They should hold interest.

The,y should show originalit,y.

The poster.

following

suegestions may help in setting up an exlrlbit or making a

University or Arizona

College of

Agriculture

U. S.

Department or and

Maricopa

Cooperating

COOPERATIVE EXTENSION

VJORK

IN

AGRICULTURE AND HOME

ECONOMICS

State of Arizona

P.

O.

Box

Phoenix

751

Agriculture

County

Farm Bureau

Agricultural

Home

Extension

Demonstration Work

Count.y

Agent

nork

Servic�

March

20,

1945

Dear 4-H

Club Leader:

To encourage health as an impor��t factor of regular 4-H

Club work, you and are invited

�s a

4-H leader or leaders in your community, to select the girl from your school

4-H membership who best represents your group as a

boy

"heal th specimen".

As this should be a rather p�sical check-up

Contestants.

lar�e

group, we will not be able to have a

by

a physician, as w�s fo�crly done for

regular

Health Club nurse,

We suggest you solicit the assistance of your school p�siclan, school

P�sical Educati�n Department, or whatever help you can in making the selection.

The

following

points are suggested for your guidance in making the choice.

1.

2.

3.

4.

S.

Freedom from

Height.

Weight.

Posture.

ph,ysical defects including

General Heal th a.

Alertness babi ts b.

Cleanliness and c.

Food habits.

as: good grooming.

teeth.

d.

Rest and e.

Exercise.

sleep.

f.

Absence from school because of illness.

-

The delegates will be featured at tr£

Saturday afternoon program of the

County 4-H Fair, April 14, at

Tempe, and r.ill receive a ribbon in recognition of having won this distinction, and will count points for your community toward win­ ning t..�e svreepstakes cup.

Will you mail to the

Street,

not later than

April

County Office,

1201

W.

Madison

6, the names of your boy and girl selected.

For your convenience, use the space below--and retur� the entire sheet in the enclosed addressed envelope.

� � � � � -

� � � � �

-

-

� � � � � � -

4-H

Health

Representative: Height Community

Group

Paul W.

Brou�,

Assft.

Co.Agri.Agt

Club- Loader-

3-20-45

50 c.

Univ�rsity of Arizona

College of Agriculture

COOPERATIV1 EXTENSION WORK

IN

AGRICULTURE AND P.oME

ECONOMICS

State of Arizona

P.

o.

Box

Phoenix

751

U.

and

S.

Department of

Agriculture

Maricopa County

Farm Bureau

Cooper!l.ting

Agricultural

Home

Extension

Demonstration

Work

County Agent

Service

Work

Dear Club Lender: and

Before we em hogs at the 4-H

Fair,

plan for an auction sala of fat beef, sheep,

ViE MUST

�mw what and how many anfmal.a

will be offered �or sale.

Then we can contact the and we cml buyers and get nn auctioneer schedule a sale for the clos� of the Fair, which will be held at

4

P.M., April 14,

1945.

Club mc�bers allover the

COIDlt,y are asking about this sale, and

"time is of the essence." letter

HELP us by filling in the form below and sending us this by return mail, please.

Thanks in advrulce for the favor.

See you at the Fairl

PW13:S

Encl.

Yours ver,y

truly,

(j?U-{iUJ; 1iI

J1)Urn/'

P[.ul W.

Brown

Ass't.

County Agricultural Agent

Club member's name

Kind & Amonnt of Stock for S&le

Approximate

Weight

Club Leader

-__

SCORE CAPX; FOR JUDGING

DUiONSTRATION

TEAMS

Title

-------

Personal npp�arance, neat� ness, suitability of costume, cleanliness.

Presentation of subje�t mat­ tor, clear, logical, se­ quential.

�lth

Co�pletcncss

reference to the giving of all ste?s

nec­ essaIj- to clear understunding of procezs.

Deliver/: clear, disti�ct enunciation, not too fast and loud enough for

Group to hear easily.

Impor-tence of the subj ect mattor presented and relation to fundamental problems of home or f�na.

Replies to practical questions put by judges.

Cleo..nin� away r-emafns of denonDtr�tion, audience should be l�rgely un�onscious of.

it.

Perfect

Score

10

30

30

20

10

Team

Score Jud_rr�s

Remarks

Total Score 100

Judge's Si.gnature

_

3/21/45

30 c.

JUDGING

CONTEST

Clothing

Senior Team

Junior Team

High

Individual

Senior

Junior

Foods

Senior Team

Junior Team

High

Individual

Senior

�nior

WINNERS, MARICOPA COUNlY 4-H

CLUB FAIR

April 13�l4,

1945

Name

Bett,y Ruth Sumners

Hazel Zimmerman

Barbara Austin

Jean

Tryon

Margaret

Jones

Herlinda Olachea

Bett.y

Ruth Sumners

Jean Cook

Mattie

WhinerJ

Frances Stokoe

Barbara Peterson

Bessie Lou Nelson

Lois

Vay

Nancy Best

Mattie Whinery

Bessie Lou Nelson

9lB.1?

scottsdale

Rural

Scottsdale

Madison

Scottsdale

Balsz

Scottsdale

Balsz

COOPERATIVE EXTENSIOl. WORK

IN

AGRICULTURE lJW illi.ii:, ECONOMICt;

;;;TATE OF bi.IZONA

�NrVEnS.I'l·Y OF ARIZOlU

�OLLEGE OF AGF.I CULTURE

O. s.

DEP,\RT;�Et�T rc�D tlAPlCOPA

OF AClUC�TURE

COUNTY COOIJ�;ATrNG

I). O. Box

Phoenix

751

AGRICULTURAL

HOr.IE

EXTENSION SERVICE

DU10N�TRATION �;ORK

COUNTY

AGlllT ·.)OEK r�ay 9, 1945 n[,�lEDIATE ATTG1TION PLEASE

De�r 4-H Club Leader:

4-H Club gardens

\\.-111 be the judged

Sa

1.urU.sy, Uay 12th, to determine

County ninners.

Please inform the

folloVJing

members to be a t home

Saturday to ShO'11 us their

Zlo.rdens.

Record books will be requiree.

Ple�se ��vise us uJ return �ail if any changes or additions are necesoar.y.

Return tr�s whole sheet in the enclosed envelope �hich requires no postage.

Tr�s.

M

Enc

,

Paul \1. Brown

As�t.

Countj" Aericul tural

�'1gent

:lr.

Broo;m: r have checked the above nameS garden).

(please give loca.tion

or each nemarks:

5/9/45

30 c.

Phoenix,

Arizona

June 12,

1945

Dear 4-H

Club Member:

You are invited to attend a

Dinner

Party at the

Adams Hotel next in the

Tuesday, June 19th at 7:30 p.m.

Maricopa

Room.

The program will be given by rears Roebu�k &

Co.

to boys and girls in the

4-·H Victor), Garden and Canning

Club Contest which is sponsored by

Sears Roebuck & Co.

The winn�rs will be announced

during-the

progr&m and prizes will also be awarded.

You may be one of the winners and we hope you will attend.

Moving pictures and specinl

�niertainmont will be provided.

Every­ thing is free.

Please Le t us know if' you will attend.

Fill out the pp..per below mail.

Pleufe tUln in end your send it to us by return g�rden record book if you have not done so.

'Yours t.ruly,

�j...d

��·(2'/.J1iI�)U"Wr(

-.

�Mb�.

1st.bell Pace Pau L W.

Brown

?l(oJ�'rancoeur

Ass·t.

Home Ass't.

County Phx.

Group Msnagr.r

Dem.

Agent Agri.

Agent Sears Roebuck & Co.

Dear Mr.

Brown:

I will attend the 4-H Club program

June

19th:.-..

yes

My name i5:

Remarks:

_

no

_

COOPERATIVE EXTENSION WORK

IN

AGRICULTURE

AND HOME

ECONOMICS

STATE OF ARIZONA

�IVERSITY OF ARIZONA

)LLEGE OF AGRICULTURE

S

DEPARTMENT OF' AGRICULTURE

P.

o.

BOX

PHOENIX

751

In rWtICOPA COUNTY COOPERATING

AGRIC..

EXTENSION

SERV.

HOME

DEMONSTRATION

COUNTY AGENT

WORK

WORK

Dear 4-H Club Leader:

We are pleased to announce a

State 4-H

Club

Camp for boys and girls, to be held at Camp

Geronimo near

Payson for the

Your period of

J�

25 to

August 3,

1945.

4-H

Club has some outstanding members who have completed their clubwork satisfactorily and who are eligible to attend the state camp.

You are also invited and years or urged to attend.

Club members must be 12 older.

Will you please send us a list of those members having your approval to attend camp.

As soon as we receive this list we will mail each one an invitation and details concerning the camp.

An envelope is inclosed which

requires-no

postage if this sheet is returned.

Yours ver.y

�4d�P� f>ct.t!(_

ISABELL PACE

Asst.

Home Dem.

Agent trulI,

�Zt7I$�

PAUL W.

BROWN

Asst.

Co.

Agric. Agt.

ip/pwb/mhl(

Inc.

4-H

I should like to

Camp.

Yes participate as a leader at the

No

_ leader's signature

_

I suggest the following

4-H members be L�vited attend the camp.

to

6/16/45

50 cc.

COOPERATIVE EXTENSION .fORK

IN

AGRICULTURE AND HOaE ECONOMICS uruVr.RSITY OF AF.IZOUA

COLLEC·E OF AGRICULTURE u.

S.

DEPARTr.1:LNT OF AGRICULTURE

AND Ml.RICOPl� CCUNLY

COO?ERATING

STATE OF ARIZONA

P. o.

BOX

PHOElUX

751

AGRICULTURAL

EXTmJSION SERVICE

HOME Dll.10NSTRhTION

WORK

CaUl�TY AGENT WORK

MARICOPA COUNTY

A-H'

ERS TAKE

NorrICE!

t I

1.

You must have doctor's approval

sl.1.p duly slsncd

••• preferably bet�cen

July

20th and July 24th.

2.

Your mB¥ have the fa.'11i1y peysician m� m�e the health check or you such check the evening or J:uly

20th,

7:00

P.M., at

Bo":,..

Scou� n�1JuD!'te.!'s at

25

East VM Buren

I

Phoenix.

3.

Registered members will assemble at the abOVe address early Wed.l'1c;�c.i.�y norn.Ing

•••

Bu5�es leave at

6:00

A.M.

"roN'T MISS

THE BUS"

4.

Luggage must be taggod.

5.

No fireannn may go to camp,

6.

Parents are to between pick

4-H'ers up at

25

East

Van Buren

3:00 and

5:00

P .F.t.

J

August 3rd.

7.

Lddress all

1201 West

L�quiries to

Paul

Brown or

Iaabell

Pace,

Madison, Phoenix.

Phone:

4

..

2133

(fl

�.£

�--,JJ

9t:././T�.../

PLUL W.

BRmm

Asst.

County Agricultural Agent

.9.j��

ISABELL PACE

Asst.

Home Dero.

Agent

500 c.

6-22-45.

4-H SUM:lER CJ;.MP

B.y special arrangement with

Mr.

George

F.

Miller,

Scout Executive of

Roosevelt the

Council, a

4-H State Summer

C�p will be held at

Ca�p

Geronimo under the Tonto Basin Rim.

Camp

Geronimo is like a town with it� own water works, pO'Ner plant" laundry, hospital, tool shop,

�nd churches.

A large swimming pool

Le avaLl.abke for.

swimming and swimming instruction.

A nice trout stream t'Lows by t.he

camp

,

4-H

Those over

16 boys and girls under-

16 rr;.ay

obtain a pormi t to fish free.

wishing to fish must bring a fisring license.

CaclP

Geronimo pro­ vides the the good eats, the health and safety many camp firas that leave facilities,

�d the fellowship around pleasant raeaor-Lce rl.l.th each camper.

A doctor or r egi sbe red nurse is in at tendance a t till times.

h

Large Li.nrary

is aved.Labl.e

,

Hatton points will be required from each

LIo-H member at tencdng camp.

nembe r must turn in

2 blue s tamps before going to camp, al.so

t-:iO r ed s

Each tamps

,

Cb�P DhTES

-

July

25

-

August

COST OF CPJ.�P

-

$16.

�5 from Phoemx in

�luding t ranapor-ta ticn by chartered buses by

Y/ay of Globe and

Pcycon

,

All 4-H nember s arc

Insured tion bo th ways.

Buses will leave [-�cout

Heacrjuar t.er-a at

£:00

A.

during t.r-ancpor-t.a­

1:1., on

July 25.

zroup.

911.22

for t he camp period.

if transportation

Le provide':" by your-self or

No tronsportatipn is proviC:so. except fro!11 Photnix.

4-H members from other countd es must, furnish the��r

O'Nn t.rnnspor

tatd on to

Phoenix, or to the

Camp if cranspor tat.Lon from Phoenix is not deai.red

,

1116 Ge rcndmc

Camp is Locat.ed

23 lU&S east of xir tat.Lon

Payson unde r the Tonto Rir.l.

Members shcul.d

inquire at

Payson for route to furnishing

Camp.

their om trans­

C�JP ACTIVITIES:

Swi��ing, poft ball, horeeehoGs, hikes, n�turc �tudy, iandi.crar

t

, chess and checker ins t

"ot'ction,

CGJ'l) lore, tnsec t s tudy

, ind vas-Lous

0 the r ac ti vi tie s

• volley ball,

A camp s to r e will be ava i.Lr

..

bl,e where mel other i terns.

4-H ;i16!nbcrs

may purchase 4-H supplies

°lmo MF:!.

A'llTEND

rho have

4-H members 12 y eare of age and older, both toys and girl", completed their proj ect.c

for t.he yee-r-.

Summer

4-H club members may

.t.t.end

if thei r proj ec t work if.

sat.Lst'ac tory and their record books up-to-date

.t time camp cpens

,

4-H leaders are cordially invited to this camp,

The cost

'01" Leader-s will be t.he

same as for m

Leas accompan i ed

4-H member s

,

No member under 12 may attend by parent, who i::; on the camp staff.

EQUIPMENT: Keep equi.pmen

t to

50 pounds or less.

Tonto mountain nights are

.Lway

s crisp and cool.

B(.; sur-e your bedding is adequate and that you take a warm woater.

or jacket.

Clothinci:

'Ihr'ee shirts" two ped rs levis or trousers, change.

wear,

€xtr� of tmder­ socks, paj amae

, bathing suit,

Utlc:ater or heavy cvat, extra shoes

one pair must be in good condition.

Clothing

(Continued)

Girls should for bring slacks or levis.

A dress may be brought

Sunday if desired

(nothing

fancy).

All clothes should be adapted to camp life.

Bedding: Four heavy blankets or equivalent.

Sleeping bags may be

'substi tuted if desired.

Toilet Articles: Tooth brush, tooth pas� soap, two bath towels, comb, and mirror.

Tableware:

Tin, aluminum, or enamel

-.one

10 inch plate, one deep s&.u�e pan for desert,

2 cups, knife, fork, tablespoon,

2 teaspoons,

2 dish tow�ls.

Miscellaneous:

The following articles are desifable but not required:

Bible, note book and p�ncil, needle, thread, pins and buttons, extra shoe

�trings, pocket knife, canteen, flashlight, fish­ ing tackle, and short piece of rope.

Note: Each 4-H member is respon�ible for his own equipment.

Each article t��en should be mar�cd with the n�me or initial.

Make a list of all things you take to

Camp so you may check it when you leave the

Camp.

Adequate supervision of

4-H mnmbers will be given by members of the Extension t�ff and local leaders.

The rovide separ&.te

shower girls' Cbrnp will b� separate from the boys' and will

WlJ toilet f!lcilities.

Separate dining facilities will

Lso be provided.

A Camp bank viill be provi.ded

whore members may lLeave any aluaoles or money.

All members ertificate of going to

Camp must h�ve signed parents' upvroval

Uld doctor's good health.

In c?c:r· more a,tJplications fire r-ecef.ved than space rovides, members will be selected in the order in wrich their �pplic�tions are atcd, o.

w.

DISHAW

Acting state

Loader

4-H Club Vark

-;-

o

�riv�te rransport�tion

$11.25

Bus 'Iransportation

PAP�TSI APPROVAL from Phoenix

$16.25

4-H

Member

--------------------------------------------------

Ace

Address

0

This application mee t s vo;i th II\{ approval,

!'J.IlQ I understand that no re sponafbt.H

ty att�ches tn the

Crunp illanagement in the ev(�t of acciaunt or sickn�ss

.

Parcnbs

' sf.gnat

ur e

_

Date

=============================================================================='

,

$5.00

depo sd t is required with application.

No refund is granted unl.ess

notification is received of cancellation btl' July 18.

The full amount.

mcy accompany application if desired.

DEPOSIT MUST ACCOMPANY l-'b?J1rIS' AP}:Jf{OVAL

DOCTOR' S I�PROVAL MAY B1 GIVilJ AT BLGINiHNG

OF TRIP.

Sf:J'JD �A.HENTS' J...J?PROij.AI, JJI�CT TO or;

COUNTY AGENT

HOME :CEi�!ON3ThATION

J..GEN'l B1FORE JULY 7.

DOCTOR'S APflROVAL

I certify that is in good physical health, suitable for atknding the

4-H

SumT:1er

Camp at

Camp

Ge rondrao in the Tonto Bactn country

al.td.tude about 5,000 feet.

M.

D.'s

Slt,'1luture

Date

A

Lunch to be carried first balanced menu will be served day_

Fir:3t r.lecl in

Camp evening of arriv['.L

providing more than 3,000 calories a day.

6/27/45

50 c.

COOPERATIVE

EXTENSICJN \·:CJRK

IN

AGRICULTURE AND HOME ECONCJMICS

STATE OF

ARIZ0NA

P.O. BuX 751

PH0ENIX rniversity of Arizona

:ollege of

Agriculture

J.

S.

Department of

Agriculture md

Maricopa County

Farm Bureau

Coopera ting

Agricultural

Home

Extension

Service

Demonstration Work

Coun ty Jl.gen

t

Work

JULY

16,

1945.

iear 4-H Camp

Member:

WE'RE GLAD Y(JU ARE TO BE WITH US AT

CAMP.

Read again your

4-8 Summer

Camp

Letter-·Thines to look for.

� July 25 th to

Augus t 3rd inclusive.

Busses leave

6:00 o'clock A. M.

from Scout

He�dquerters, 25 East Van Buren,

Phoenix.

vhat to Bring

With You (50 lbs.

or less) All

Luggage

Prooerly Tagged

1.

Clothing: Three shirts, b!o

pairs levis or trousers, chcnge of under­ wear, extra socks, pajamas

, bathing suit, sweater or heavy coat, extra.

shoes

one or

pair

must be in good condition.

Girls should bring slacks levis.

A dress may be brought for

Sunday if desired

(nothing fancy).

All clothes should be adapted to camp life.

2.

Bedding:

Four heavy bl&nkets or equivalent or sleeping bags.

3.

Toilet Articles: Tooth comb, and mirror.

brush, tooth paste,

SO&P, two bath towe.Ls

,

4.

TablewBre:'rin, a

Iumtnum, or enamel

one

10 inch pl!\ts, one deep sauce dish for desert,

2 cups, knife, fork, teb Le spoon

,

;; teaspoons, 2 dish towe Ls

,

5.

R&tion Points:

T�o blue �d two red stamps.

6.

Mi scolloneous:

The

Bible, note book and following ar t.Lc Ie s are desi rab l,e bu t no t req_uired: pencil, needle, threed, pins and buttons, extra shoe strings, ot rope.

pocket knife, cantden, flashlight, fishing teckle, end short piece

7.

Doc tor's s.

t Scout

Approval properly signed by your family phys lc Ian or by

Doc tor

Headquarters, 25

East VD.n

Buren, the evening of

Ju.ry

20th

(only

date you may get this check-up).

No charge.

8.

The amount of money you need to you paid complete the

$16.25,

cost of c�mp.

If

$5.00

registration fee, $11.25

is the �mount.

9.

Each member is list and responsible at all times for his own equipment.

keep it.

Mark your things.

M&.ke

a

Busses will return to

Parents to pick

25 E. Van you up there

Buren, Aug.

Jrd, between

3 and 5 P.M.

�UI�

Paul

W.

Bro¥m,

Ass't,

Agent

'-IsEtbeli

Pace

,

Asst.

Home

Dem.

Agt:..

UNIVERSITY OF ARIZONA

COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE

COOPERATIVE EXTENSION WORK

IN

AGRICULTURE hND HDME ECONOMICS

U.

s.

DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE

AND t�1UCOPA COUNTY COOPERATING

STATE OF ARIZONA

P.

o.

BOX

751

PHOENIX

AGRICULTURAL EXTENSION

SERVIC

HOME DElwiONSTRATION WORK

COUNTY AGENT WORK

July 2.3, 1945

Dear

4-H

Club Member:

If you did not mail or send us the to attend the

4-H camp, then signed approval of your parents for you please see that we get it before you leave for camp.

Everyone must have their parents' approval.

I am enclosing a printed form for your parents' signature.

Please bring it with you

Wednesday morning or be sure that it reaches us before that time.

Mail to hand delivery is sometimes too slow now, so perhaps you will want it to us

Wednesday morning.

A health certificate is D�SO enclosed for your use in case you have not sent us one.

This is aloo required of all who go to camp.

We are sorr,y that the examining doctor at the Scout

Headquarters could not take care of examinations on

July

20th as we bud pl.anned,

If you cannot be examined by your family doctor, be sure to report for your examination at Scout Head­ quarters, 25 East Van Buren, Tuesday, July 24th at

1:00 P.M.

The Scout office has assured us that a doctor will be there.

Ver.r

tra� yours,

(?��

Paul V{.

Brown

Asst.

County Agricultural Agent

PWB:mhw

Encs.

7/23/45

The rabbi t

RABBIT

SEC'

RAISING

CIMPLIFIED FOR

BY ED SCHEIDLER

/{.

4-H

CLUB VIORK

I.

<0,

,

Y.,

CENTRAL AR.I

Z.

R..lj)BIT BREEDERS ASSOCIATION following instructions are compiled chiefly for boys and

C,f>/C(i,

Ji/ r,

7y

'l.1u;

4?,

'I

�(/ijo.

i(

'Il

IX

I's/�b

1C;?IC/I/ef/1;

(//.

Jj

'Y

[,r//::,/1?4/.

Sl

.,

'(S/O,'

Pf;a

S�

�4'4:

girls

in 4-H

"-1 clubs, but are pra.ctical enough for adults who are seeking a simplified j guid explaining the proper methods for beginning the raising of rabb�ts.

In addition, i tells how to carryon curf.ng

the"!

first atages following a propercbegfnnfng,

It is not intended as an

Ddvanccd guide in rabbit culture, but throughout,its purpone is to help advise the beginner.

any

�n1iln much of tho material cont�ined in the following pages is

applicable

climate, it is best suited to southam Arizona.

The hutch and nest box de­ to scrfbed here is adap ted only to the

Sal t River Valley of

Arizona.

or a similarly

\7arn1 clima te.

The methods set forth are tried and proved, and vcre g:lined during some twenty-fivE; years of br eed.lng

and marketing rabbits and rabbit pelts, and are consid­ ered simple enough to·c�rI� out.

Generally

'boys

and c:irls in 4-H club work have

II v0ry limited budget to spend on the equipment and rabbits.

Occ�sionally the first venture 1s of a temporarJ nnturej investment, therefore,

�hould be eoverncd

accordingly,

yet pr�ctical enough for expansion should the venture prove permanent.

HOW TO

BffiIN

Ber�e you build your hutches or b� your

rabbits,

visit �cveral rabbitries of successflu breeders who have been

}ood hutch8S and raising r�bbits for a considerable nwnber of years.

good rabbits arc.: each as important as tho other to insure initial success.

When good hutches are used you will save labor.

end feed costs and it will help to have more comfort and s2nitation for the rabLits.

Build hutches simple, but oui10

�hen

well, bearing in mind that well-constructed hutches have a ready resale value should you later s.bandon

your rabbit business.

The stand�rd hutch unit is about 2 ft.

rude.

It is divided in the center high,

2} ft.

from front to back and

S ft.

by u

V-type hay manger resulting in a two compart­ nent hutch of 10 sq. ft.

of floor space &ach.

The top edge of the �ater crocks and reed trough should be about

5 to

6 inches above the floor level to prevent the rab­

�its from soiling their vmt0r oo1d feed.

Tlus is � important.

Water crocks should

Je md of glazed earthen-ware with straight sides to stand firm and for

�asy cleaning, of about

2-quart capacity and about 5 inches deep.

'l'hey should 'be a tto.ched

cor­ rectly to permit outside filling and removing h�thout the necessity of opening the

1U tch door, yet not detzichab'l,e by the rabbits.

The feed trough of galvanized tin slides on the

l"x5�n

guide for outside feeding v.nd

:i,.t

also serves to catch the hay leaves that fall though the vare portion of the manger.

Note the drawing and study it carefully observing the various measurements of the trough and thE: hny manger,

�tc.

The measurem�nts of the hutch are also very important, for when you make your nutches correctly you will have less feed wasted and you can wat'Jr and feed them

Jetter.

The perfect hutch floor has not yet been found.

The h�rdware cloth floor is of

5/8"

wire mesh 30" wido and so fo..r it has been the most practical for this climate

I except in the case of stud bucks.

They often thump the floor upon disturbmces around the rabbi try and this may

CQUSO sore feet.

Therefore, to avoid tl"J.s

danger of' sore slats hocks, about

3/4 of the hutch floor in his hutch should be made of wood

(plaster laths are

suitable)

spaced a scant

3/4" apart and the other

1/4 of the floor

(that

part alone the center hay manger) should be of hardware cloth.

Use lathing smallor than

5/8" mesh.

If this cannot be obtained,

3/4"

sometimes works v'lell but this may prove somewhat too cloth is stapled to the l"x6"-8 ft.

large mesh.

To install this floor the hardware long front nnd rear boards

lying

flat on the

-

2

work bench or on these ground before nniling to the boards they are then turned up at later made have cause to be the rigid by inserting tapped into the 1"x2" place, being sta.ples holdine the

2"x2" posts.

right angles

After the wire is to the

\nre.

The floor is supports cut just a trifle c�reful not to cut then too vlire floor to pullout, but

long

just enough to so lone,�hich

stapled

that thE would draw the floor tight nnd prevent sagging.

Again study the drawing.

A r:oor suspended in this m�0r does avmy ��th the manure-collecting ledees along the sides and ccrners and the advantages are at once apparent.

As you will note, the wire floor is stt:­ pled along a line 2" from the edge of the board to permit inserting the 1"x2" sup­ ports.

'I'he wire on the inches up hay manger should be of 1" poultry netting extending about 5 the side of the manger from the bottom of the V.

The balance of the man­ ger's side to the top should be closed to prevent loss of hay leaves.

This con­ struction leaves the wire opening of the manger, well within the width of the feed trough beneath

through

designed which th� rabbits feed, to catch the leaves that fall through.

is

The left front, back, ends and top of the hutch

(�cept

the top of the manger which uncovered) is covered vii th 1" poultry netting.

All netting must be stapled to the inside of the work.

framing to prevent the rabbits from gnawing on the hutch wood­

The above roofless hutch is designed to place under a rainproof roof of about 8 ft.

in

.can

add a height �r�ch is the best arrangement.

However, �f you prefer, you roof on the above hutch and place it un�er shade trees, in which case in­ stead of covering the ceiling of the hutch rdth posts up

12" in front end

6" in back.

netting,

By placing use boards cnd extend your roof this distance above the the ceiling of the hutch you provide about 1 ft.

of insulating air space which will be advi sab'l,e even in spring and fall.

Rabbi ts can stand a great deal of cold but lit­ tIc heat.

Allow no sun to strike your hutches in warm weather, and do not construct the hutch root of any metal material, for even in our winter weather it bocomGS too warm beneath for the rabbits' comfort when your shade trees will have shed their leaves.

In winter it is well to cover the back and ends of the hutch with a vand break.

(Feed

sacks will do if

� a cked con the

outside)

SELECTING YOUa &�BIT9

If you are going to r�ise rabbits just for pleasure, get sny breed or color that suits rabbit thn.t

you.

But if profit is your main obj�ct, choose a normal furred white weighs about 10 to 12 pounds when fully grown, such as the White New

Zed.land for example.

If v�ell bred such rabbits will produce offspring that will average about four of two pounds, pounds which in at turn vveuning is the age

(8

weeks)

generally vvhlch will butcher accepted

,size the out ill excess housewife desires.

not

Health is the first be point to look for in a rabbit.

This to the beginner may readily determinable, but by observing reany rabbits, such as you will have done during your visits to rabbi tries as advised e.:.1rl:ier, you should be able to rec­ ognize a healtrrf rabbit.

First the hutches and rabbitr,y should be reasonably clean, particularly the hutch.

A healt� rabbit has clear, bright, bold, wide-awake eyes, free from watering, the latter noticeable

�.f

the fur around the eye.

If the eye is watering the fur will be wet'.

Ears should be held up and not lopped; they should free from scabs inside

••• the nose should be dry

••• no be prot-ruding teeth.

The fur, ex­ cept when

length.

moulting, should be clean, smooth, thick or dense and about one inch in

Leg bones should be straight; tail should be carried up �d not curled around sidewise or under the haunches; vent or-gana should be clean and no signs of pus discharge or scabs; it should be henlthy and dr,y.

Look under the feet for pos­ sible sores which are called sore

�ocks.

The back and hips ohould feel firm, denot­ ing healtny flesh and the abdomen or belly should not be bloated or feel puffy touched.

In senior does sec that her teats are not sore nor her udder hard and when

-

3

lumpy.

If she is nursing a little she cay have milk in her udder which

readily

distineuished from any inflamed condition.

should be from ance

The proper type of animal should be rather compact in build and when viewed top or side the rabbit should pres€nt a

nearly

rectangular or box-like appear", tapering inward but slightly toward the shoulders.

This type of rabbit indi­ cates"a thrifty meat producer.

Pedigrees and records of production are valuable it truly kept, for they are the only means or keepina prove good producers of meat and fur.

track of certain animals that

Pedigrees also serve as a bill of sale.

Now us to costs.

You should not pay cannot

�xpect to fnn�J prices but on the other hand you get good, high-producing rabbits nt scrub prices.

Good rabbits can't be erred cheap.

You should expect to pay for full-grown rabbits of the kind ref­ to, somewhere between £i vc and ten dollars each,

junior stock propor-td onabe­ ly less.

Outstanding animals, of course, are worth more but until you become expe­ rienced L� rabbit raising be satisfied with av�rage quality rabbits.

Don't make the common mistake of

buying

as rJ!D.ny

as you eon, but rE'.ther

buy as g�od as you can with the money you and have, even if it's only a pair of litter end a young buck.

juniors,

And stick to one breed only.

or a bree doe, or a doe

FEEDING

Now you have your rabbits, so what to feed is the noxt question.

Whenever pos­ sible continue at first with the same feed and feed.ing

time as the person was prac­ ticing from whom you purchased your" rabbi ts.

Make nny necessary changes

SlOVlly, taking

�s long as a week or two to change from one brand of feed to another.

Keep fresh water before all your rabbits all the time in clean crocks, emptying them in the

evening

and refilling

regardless

of the condt tion or quantity of the water in the CIY)cks.

The rest of the twenty-four hour period you need only � water as need­ ed, providing the crocks are clean.

The simplest and safest feeding practice is to keep good quality

(fine-stemmed, leafy �d pea green in

color)

alfalfa hay in the hay manger-a all the time and balance this good according to the rabbits' needs with a pellet feed available at most all feed stores.

A green pellet which contains hay, grains, salt and other concentrates is probably the best pellet to feed.

The

�mount to feed of these pell�ts to keep your stock in proper condition is not always as simple as it might at first appear.

The feeding of rabbits is one of the most important, if not the most important part of your uabbit manaeement program, and al­ so probably the most difficult to master.

For instance, some rabbits will grow fat on rations on which others grow thin.

Here again, if you purchased your stock from a reliable breeder he will be able to your tell you how he was feeding and this should be guide at first.

But you will find it necessary to use your own judgment as time

�oes on and the following is suggested to help you avoid costly mistakes.

We shall assume

In addition to you hay feed are going to keep alfalfa hay in the mangers all the time.

pellots as follows

(green

pellets,being the simplest kind to get and feed as they contain hay, a variety of grains, concentrates and

suIt,

are

recommended).

Stud bucks and growing stock under six months of age shoUld receive about 2 ounces once a day ard that in the evening and as near the same time each

Gvoning as possible.

If such stock shows signs of growing too fat or too thin reduce or increase the pellets accordingly_

But here again you may have difficulty

:mowing when a rabbit is too thin or too fat.

This too, is not ea5Y to explain, but the following should help.

The hips should be heavy and muscular, the back, from

Lhe hip to the ribs, should be solid and wide showing plenty of flesh on ei thor side

:;of' '�he back bone.

Now to check for a too fat condition.

Feel the rabbit's shoulders md if there are loose

Ghis would indicate a lumps of cord-like flesh on the upper sides of the shoulders fatty condition and pcl�ets should be cut down.

_

Nursing does with litters of eight can scarcely be fed too much and can have

-4pellets before them all the time.

Does with less than eight in the litter must vlatched, for if fed all they will eat of pellets will otten become too be fat.

Such does can be fed at

night'

only as many pellets

�'.s

they vdll clean up

by

morning.

The proper amount to feed can be readily deter�inud by noting how much you feed at night and what, if any, are left over in the trough in the morning and

reguluting

the amount given at night

accordinely.

Now green telligently feeding.

This is still a

�tter of controversey, but green feed fed is a natural and good feed for rabbits.

Fe�d it fresh, in� frGc from rain or other surface in ether water, nnd only as much as the rabbits will eat at once, or words, before it wilts.

MO:lt er�� ,�raS[Jes end crop

-planto;;

JJ.1d not wGcda are safe to feed r.!ibbits.

Watch" the droppings of your rabbitb which should, be ·firm lixe separate greens

pellets,

not stic�.

Too heavy eating of the pellet feeds, grains or can cause loose or stlcky droppines end tho caretaker should

always

be on tru lookout for such danger sf.gns

, nnd correct the cause at once.

Fryers being condi­ tioned for market should not have green fee·j

rlllring

tho final t.wo

wec�s

'bef,br-e mar­ koting-as it.lessens th� qu�ity of the clrcssed IDt:at.

BREEDnlG .

be

If you have well-bred stock of the White New Zealand variety your does should ready foC' breeding between six end seven months of age.

Your buck should be a month older before using for best results.

Take the do� to the buck's hutc� Dnd� m'H�t.iflff

should take pl.aco

at once.

In the case of nervous does it may be ndvi aahl.e

to allow as much a3 five minutes for mating to take pla.ce, tut if not do not leave her vdth the buck for noted longer periods as th� mny fight.

Successful mating will be by the buck falling off the doe sid€;\vise or backwarda at which ·time the dOG should be returned to her own rri

VEl te hutch.

One service by the buck is just as good as mere.

Make a record of this datE; on your hutch card.

Don't fail to keep your records and keep then right.

They arc

Y0ur only guide for proper future selec­ tion of

brc:�ding

stock.

They

�rc simple to keep but ver,y important.

The.1

should be attached to each hutch.

It the doc would not mate the first time tnke her back to the buck every the buck for day until she docs.

Auout a week o.fter she ma.ted take her back to testing.

If she refu�cs to acc�pt service again, and whines or whim­ pers, it woul.d

Generally indicate tho first ma.ting

»ee successful, nlthough this is not an absolute indication that she is pregnant.

Name

Sire

Date Date

Bred Bred Buck

Ear No.

Dam

Born

Date No.

No.

Wgt.

01

Kindled

Born &: Left Weaned Litter

Remarks

Sruuplo Hutch Card for

Doe

About

The doe will kindle her young about thirty-one days after a successful mnting.

foup days before she is due to kindle provide her \vi tho a nest box filled loose­ ly with clean straw, not hay or grass, and she will usually do the rest.

An open

+op apple box with the bottom reset, to prevent drafts is entirely �atisfactory in this climate.

A shallow V can be cut in one end but tho bottom of the V should be about serving for the front of the

7" above the bottom of the box to box, ke.ep

the young from

tumbling

out of the nest too soon.

If the doe has sufficient milk y-oung should sta.y

in the 'nest box until they are about three weeks old when should be old and hardy enough to begin eating the fGed that the mother doe

A.t this time clean out the nest box and supply with fresh straw.

the they is fod.

-

5

-

Don't handle the doc durine the week preceding the date she is due to kindle unless absolutely necessar,y.

In lifting rabbits never lift them by hold of the loose skin over the shoulders and vuth the other hand

0 the ears.

Take

support

0 their weieht behind the haunches just above the tail.

Arter the doe kindles her babies leave her alone for a couple of days if the nest seems to be turb0d at this

orderly.

Some does object to having their young and n�st dis­ time, so in order to be on the safe side don't let your curiosity get the better ot you.

About the third day, however, it 'lull be necessary to in­ spect the nest and litter.

Quietly

11ft out the nest box �d remove

� deud or runts.

If there are more than another doe that may have too

eight

left, either destroy them or transfer them to few, providing tho litters' aces are within three days of each other.

If the doe slwws little green feed for her will usually sien3 take of nervousness during her �tnd off the cause this and

inspection

quiet her.

a lines

When the young are born, suggested earlier on

gradually

begin to increase the doe's feed along the

feeding.

You can sto.rt her now by increasing at once to about six or eight ounces, depcnding on the size of the litter and noting her and the babies' condition.

If the nest renaina clean you can wait until the litter is three weeks old, vlhen it should be cl.canod and straw renewed therein.

Refer to section on

"Care in Hot ileath�rn.

When the

Ii tter is seven to eight weeks of ago, weigh the entire litt€r and record this wei£ht on

Y0ur hutch card.

You can now be­ gin to wean the YOlmg, at which time you c�te your doe neain, taking several days to a week to wean all the young because if all the young are weaned at once and the moti1er ie a good milker she may develop caked teats.

So d� her up gradually,as you would a good milk cow,by taking away her youne

gra�lally,

and at the s��e time reducing her pellet feed so that when the young are

�l weaned y�u will have her back on about two ounCus of pellets p0r day again.

If any young nre to be the bucks.

Several docs can kept for raising to breeding age, sepnrate the does from usually be kept,

together

until breeding age if kept in the same hutch and no oth�rs added after th0 original group were placed therein.

Bucks,

however, should be placed in individual hutches at w��ing time because with­ out previous warning th� will fight, often resulting in

Severe injur.y

to one or all.

CARE IN HOT WEATHER

Vllien you notice the rabbits breathing fast

(panting) it's time to look after their comfort.

No sun should be permitted to strike your hutches during warm weath­ er, nor the ground immediately surrounding y�ur hutches.

The tecperaturc can be lowered by

sprinkling

on the roof of the beneath the hutches.

Do not hutch or shed, and on the ground around and sprinkle on any ground near your hutches on which the sun shin�s, but only on shaded ground.

Sprinkling on ground accessible to the sun vall create a ste�-like condition which stifles the rabbits' breathing and suffo­ cntes them.

Wet burlap feed sacks hung on the hutches

�re excellent as the rabbits quickly learn to be up close to the netting over whi ch side the wet sack is hung.

They

appreciate the

life-savipg

cooled air created by the resulting evaporation.

Don't place

�et

sacks inside

�he hutch.

Also during hot wcath�r the gr�in or pellets must be for aoes with

generally

reduced except large litters and youne growing rabbits.

Careful observation during hot weather particularly

�ill pay dividends.

Green feeding is espeCially during hot weather as it is not as heating as grains and vrill assist valuable

greatly

in

keeping

your nursing does on their feed.

be

During our hot weather the neat box also needs special attention.

required nfter the litter reaches the age of throe the fur and chaff weeks, and even

No box will before this lining the nest Lox must be removed in proportion

DoS the ba.bies

-6-

�ron their own coat.

If it becomes necessa� to remove all the the box you should provide a piece of hardware cloth and cut nesting n�ntly to m�teria1 in fit the box and lay th.i.s

on the floor of the nest box to furnf.sh

n rough surface for the baby rabbits1feet to per�it standing, otherwise their legs will grow outward due to no traction on the smooth board bottom of the bare n�st box.

If allowed to develop this so-called-

spruddle-legged

condition, they

�11l have

difficulty

in eating from tho trough and vlill not raake good fryers, not to mention their

unsighUy

ntPl3arance.

8/28/45 mw

150 cc.

4-H

FLOWER RECORD

Name

---------------------

Club_

Lez

....

�8r

-------------------

-

Kind of f'Lower-s

Cost of seed or

_p_lants

Date plr..nted

Date up

Date

It

Record Started

"----

If

Finished

"----

Date of first bloom

I

Notes

,

,

I

9/15/45 mw

-

COOPERATIVE EXTENSION WORK

IN

AGRICULTURE

JJm HOME ECONOMICS

STATE OF

A.�ZONA

P.O.

BOX 751

PHOENIX

Score

Card

Utility

Q! Meat

Rabbits

I

By

Paul W. Broflfl

Perfect Score

Weight or

Size Lccording to

Age

••••••••••••••••••••••

5 points

Ful.L

deve.lopmen

t, growtli".

"

II r��eat Form

Rec tangul.ar

, broad, deeply bodied.

Back ruld loin or saddle: thick fleshed, broad.

Hindquarters: full, rounded.

thick,

�mooth and well

45

"

III

Condition or

Fatness:

Covering

•••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• deep, even covering of smooth firm flesh, especially over back, loin

20 and hindquarters.

IV

DresGing Percentage

•••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• l5

Relatively lieht in neck, head) shoulders, legs, not €xcessively paunc�; underllne straight.

V quaIl ty

•.•••••••••••.••••.......••••..•.•..••••••.•.•

15

Coat:

Bone:

E'le�:

fur fine, skin loose and light, frame compact.

pliable.

smooth, not patcQy, thick, firm.

11

"

Perfect Score

••••••••••

100 points

10/2/45

150c.

mw

10/3/45

150c.

FEATURES

0F THE NEW ZEALAND

RABBIT

BY JOHN WELLS

Fur--15 points

Color--lO points

Condition--lO points

10

.

pofn ts

�./".

.

.;�1��;'

�¥�,

/

14 paints

.....

'\

L_!!ips

Feet

6 pcin ts

l--------------Feet

6 points

NOTE:

CUT

1 PUINT Tv J\S MUCH AS HALF OF TOTAL POINT

VALUE uF EI�CH SECTION FOR POOR FEATURES.

,_----Tnil

1 point

INSTRUCTIONS FOR THE 1945 SEARS 4-H

GARDEN CONTEST

First, second and third prizes of

$7, $5, and $3; also five $1 prizes, together with premium ribbons and a free supply of

garden"

seeds and plants.

The awards will be made at a dinner program for the contest­ ants.

The above awards will also be offered to 4-H'ers who wish to enter the canning contest.

RE()DIHEAENTS:

..,_.�

-.._.--

1.

Must turn in complete and accurate records before December 12,

1945, to

County Agent's Office,

1201 West

Madison,

Phoenix.

2.

Size of the garden shall be not less than 10' x

20' or

200 square feet.

3.

Contestants are to

4.

Gardens will be plant at least

5 different vegetables.

judged on

December

14,

1945.

HOW TO BE A

WINNER:

1.

Have a garden free of weeds.

2.

Have a neat garden.

3.

Have straight rows.

4.

Have a uniform stand.

5.

Keep plants free of insects and insect injury.

6.

Have a good record book.

SCORE CARD FOR JUDGING GARDENS:

1.

Location.

• • • • • • • • • ••••

A.

Away from trees and shrubs, near good water supply.

B.

Ease of cultivation and harvest.

2.

General

Appearance

• .

.

.

·

· · · · · • · · · · .

.

A.

Soil condition, arrangement, neatness, etc.

3.

Selection of Varieties

.

.

· · · · • · · · · · ·

A.

At least five varieties adapted to Arizona conditions.

4.

Weed Control

.

• .

A" Clean seed bed.

B.

Good cultivation.

·

· ·

· ·

·

·

5�

Insect and

Disease Control

· · · · ·

· • ·

6.

A.

Spraying or dusting when necessary.

Quality of Product and Yields

· · · · ·

A.

Total amounts pro9uced and harvested.

· ·

·

·

· .

.

Points

10

15

10

20

15

.30

Mr.

Browns

I will

Sears contest and grow a victor,y garden according hope to become a winner.

to the rules of the

My school is

_

Signature of Club Member

Here are

SOc.mw

10-6-45 directions for arriving at my garden":

NINETEENTH ANNUAL

4-H

CLUB FAIR

q-H VIC TOR

R

CHI EVE m EnT

P

Hl rfl

I u m l t

S T

MARICOPA

COUNTY BOYS'

&

GIFLS'

4-H

FAIR

April 13

&

14, 1945

ARIZONA STATE TEACHERS COLLEGE CAMPUS

TElVlPE, ARIZONA

Held under the direction of the

Seryice of the University of

Agricultural

Extension

Arizona, in cooperation with the Arizona State Teachers College and the Mari­ copa

County

Farm Bureau.

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