THE ISOLATED HUMAN BONE FROM GRASSHOPPER PUEBLO (AZ P:14:1[ASM]) by

THE ISOLATED HUMAN BONE FROM GRASSHOPPER PUEBLO (AZ P:14:1[ASM])  by
THE ISOLATED HUMAN BONE FROM
GRASSHOPPER PUEBLO (AZ P:14:1[ASM])
by
Michael Martin Margolis
A Thesis Submitted to the Faculty of the
DEPARTMENT OF ANTHROPOLOGY
In Partial Fulfillment of the Requirements
For the Degree of
MASTER OF ARTS
In the Graduate College
THE UNIVERSITY OF ARIZONA
2007
2
STATEMENT BY AUTHOR
This thesis has been submitted in partial fulfillment of
requirements for an advanced degree at The University of
Arizona and is deposited in the University Library to be
made available to borrowers under rules of the Library.
Brief quotations from this thesis are allowable without
special permission, provided that accurate acknowledgment of
source is made. Requests for permission for extended
quotation from or reproduction of this manuscript in whole
or in part may be granted by the head of the major
department or the Dean of the Graduate College when in his
or her judgment the proposed use of the material is in the
interests of scholarship. In all other instances, however,
permission must be obtained from the author.
SIGNED: _ Michael M. Margolis ______
APPROVAL BY THESIS DIRECTOR
This thesis has been approved on the date shown below:
_________________________________ ____September 27, 2007____
Barnet Pavao-Zuckerman
Date
Professor of Anthropology
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ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS
This thesis benefited from the assistance of many people, especially my
committee. Lane Beck read and reread many drafts providing direction and
improvements. J. Jefferson Reid provided insight, as well as help with the proveniences
of the assemblage. Without Barnet Pavao-Zuckerman, this thesis may have never been
finished so I am very grateful that she has aided me so kindly. She has provided essential
support, as well as providing many of the final edits. I would like to thank my entire
committee for their patience throughout my long thesis process.
Debra Martin has been teaching me about bones since I was a child and I could
not ask for a better aunt or mentor. Over the years I have learned a lot within osteology
from working with other people. They include John McClelland, Ventura Perez, Pamela
Stone, and Jennifer Hushour.
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TABLE OF CONTENTS
1.
2.
3.
4.
LIST OF FIGURES…………….……………………………………………… 6
LIST OF TABLES……………..………………………………………………. 7
ABSTRACT………………….………………………………………………... 8
CHAPTER 1: INTRODUCTION, RESEARCH OBJECTIVES, AND NAGPRA
…………………………………………………………………………….. 9
1. INTRODUCTION……………….………………………………………….. 9
1. Life Time Events…………….…………………………………………… 10
2. Burial Practices………………..………………………………………….. 10
3. Taphonomy………………….……………………………………………. 11
4. Scientific Action……………..……………………………………………. 12
5. Summary……………………..……………………………………………. 13
2. RESEARCH OBJECTIVES…………………………………………….…… 13
1. Methodology……………………………………………………..……….. 14
2. Pattern of Isolated Bone………………………………………...………… 14
3. Formation Processes………………………………………………………. 14
4. Comparison to Burial Sample…………………………………………….. 15
5. Comparison to Anomalous Assemblages………...……………………….. 16
3. NAGPRA…………………………………………………………………….. 17
5. CHAPTER 2: MATERIALS AND METHODS.………………………………. 18
1. MATERIALS………………………………………………………………… 18
2. METHODS……………………………………………………………….….. 21
1. Specimen…………………………………………….…………………….. 24
2. Side………………………………………………………………………... 25
3. Segment.……..………………………………………...………………….. 26
4. Completeness……………………………………………………...………. 26
5. Age.……………………………………………………………………….. 27
6. Age Class.…….……………………………………………...……………. 27
7. Sex………………………………………………………………………… 28
8. Observability………………………………………………………………. 28
9. Maximum Length………..…………………………………………...…… 29
10. Maximum Width………………………………………………………… 30
11. Minimum Width…………………………………………………………. 31
12. Standard Measurements………………………………………………….. 31
13. Breakage…………………………………………………………………. 31
14. Weathering……………………………………………………………….. 34
15. Burning…………………………………………………………………... 35
16. Toolmarks……………………………………………………………….. 35
6. CHAPTER 3: RESULTS……………………………………………………….. 37
7. CHAPTER 4: ANALYSIS AND DISCUSSION……………………………… 57
1. Pattern of Isolated Bone..…………………………………………………. 57
2. Comparison to Burial Sample…………………………………………….. 61
5
TABLE OF CONTENTS - Continuation
3. Formation Processes………….…………………………………………… 64
4. Comparison to Anomalous Assemblages……………………….………… 70
5. Methodology………………………………………………………………. 73
8. CHAPTER 5: CONCLUSION…………………………………………………. 77
9. APPENDIX A. DATA COLLECTION SHEET…………..…………………… 79
10. APPENDIX B. ISOLATED BONE INVENTORY (PART 1)………...…..…. 80
11. APPENDIX C. ISOLATED BONE INVENTORY (PART 2)………..….…... 143
12. APPENDIX D. REVISED DATA COLLECTION SHEET………………..… 265
13. REFERENCES CITED………………..……………………………………… 266
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LIST OF FIGURES
FIGURE 1. Measurements by Age Class…………………………………………….46
FIGURE 2. Pathologies: Types and Counts………………………………………….47
FIGURE 3. Culturally Modified Humerus…………………………………..……….54
FIGURE 4. Culturally Modified Humerus……………………………………..…….54
FIGURE 5. Refit of Culturally Modified Humerus…………………………………..55
FIGURE 6. Modified Ulna……………………………………………………...……56
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LIST OF TABLES
TABLE 1. Provenience and Percents……………………………………………… 37
TABLE 2. Body Region Distribution……………………………………………… 38
TABLE 3. Specimen Distribution by Element and Age.………………………….. 39
TABLE 4. Ranges of Observability.……………………………………………….. 40
TABLE 5. Average Observability by Element and Age Class…..………………… 42
TABLE 6. Maximum Length (mm) by Age Class and Element…..………………. 43
TABLE 7. Distribution of Ancient Max. Lengths…..……………………………... 45
TABLE 8. Avg. Max. and Min. Widths…………………………...………………. 45
TABLE 9. Associations Between Specimens……………………...………………. 47
TABLE 10. Taphonomy: Modifications Present…………………..………………. 48
TABLE 11. Specimens of Taphonomic Interest…………………………...………. 49
TABLE 12. Minimum Number of Individuals.……………………………………. 58
TABLE 13. Comparison of Isolated Bone MNI and Burial Age Data…………….. 59
TABLE 14. Summary of Maximum Lengths (mm) by Body Region ……...….. 61
TABLE 15. Burial Sample Completeness by Body Region and Element……...….. 62
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ABSTRACT
This paper presents research on isolated human remains from Grasshopper Pueblo
and analyzes the processes by which bone becomes displaced from burials. Isolated
human bone has never been systematically examined, which represents a significant gap
in the study of the prehistoric American Southwest. This research is important because it
is the first determination of the pattern of isolated bone found at an archaeological site
and the formation processes that are responsible. It is also relevant for the creation of a
standard isolated bone methodology and because it enables a better understanding of
burial assemblages and anomalous assemblages of culturally modified bone.
Subadults dominate the assemblage and larger elements are better represented
than smaller elements. Most of the modifications present are postmortem but perimortem
breakage and toolmarks are also present. This research produced a baseline of detailed
data on isolated human bone in which patterns and anomalies can be inferred; the results
suggest multiple causes of the isolation of the specimens, including prehistoric cultural
disturbance, rodent disturbance, and the process of excavation.
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CHAPTER 1: INTRODUCTION, RESEARCH OBJECTIVES, AND NAGPRA
INTRODUCTION
In the past few decades anomalous assemblages of disarticulated and culturally
modified human bone recovered from Anasazi sites have fueled debates concerning
cannibalism, witchcraft, and other activities (Billman et al. 2000; Dongoske et al. 2000).
Specific attributes of the human bone within these assemblages are used to create
arguments for the alternative explanations (Darling 1998; Bullock 1991; Turner and
Turner 2000; White 1992). The arguments are largely based on the divergence of these
assemblages from normative burial practices at these sites. One piece missing from these
debates is the general background signature of finds of isolated human bone. This study
focuses on the characterization of isolated human bone recovered from Grasshopper
Pueblo between 1963 and 1980. Patterns exhibited by the isolated human bone are
evaluated in order to assess the different processes that may have lead to the separation of
these skeletal elements from the body of the individual.
Previous to this work, isolated human bone had never been the subject of finegrained research. Many archaeologists correlate the presence of isolated bone to rodent
disturbance (Henderson 1987), without considering other causes. Physical anthroplogists
likely neglect isolated bone because burials are seen to hold much more research
potential. In past research, when isolated human bone is examined, only the most basic
attributes are recorded (Buikstra and Ubelaker 1994) and this data is rarely analyzed or
discussed. Therefore, this research represents the first attempt to determine what the
background signature of isolated human bone is at a site and how the isolated human
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bone became displaced from an individual. The continuum of burials, secondary burials,
disturbed burials, and anomalous assemblages is completed through the study of isolated
bone.
The central question addressed here concerns when and how displacement may
occur in the life history of isolated human bone. Lifetime events, burial practices,
taphonomy, and cultural disturbance are among the alternative processes that could result
in bone becoming separated from the body. This study evaluates the patterning of
isolated human bone recovered from the faunal collection at Grasshopper Pueblo and
examines how those patterns mesh with the different processes that could produce such
remains.
Lifetime Events
Human remains are subjected to the same formation processes as other artifacts
(Schiffer 1987:81). These formation processes are normally conceptualized as acting on
the body after the death of the individual, but they also act on the body during the life of
the individual. Loss of teeth and parts of fingers and toes and other parts of the body can
occur during life. Therefore, one explanation for the presence of isolated human bone in
the archaeological record involves bone loss during life.
Burial Practices
At the death of the individual physical changes to the bone halt, and taphonomy
and burial practices become the predominant factors in the life history of skeletal
remains. Based on the field records for the Grasshopper burials, the standard mortuary
practice at Grasshopper involved the digging of a pit into the ground near or in the pueblo
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(also see Whittlesey 1978). At times these pits were lined with bark, wooden planks, and
textiles. The individual was then placed into the pit in an extended position with grave
goods (e.g. bowls, projectile points, pendants). Some burials were then capped with
additional bark, planks, or rocks and subsequently covered with earth. Based on the
archaeological and osteological data, most if not all of the burials were placed in graves
as complete individuals. Therefore, it does not appear that there would have been
cultural displacement of any bone during the burial process. Additionally, the norm
appears to have been to bury individuals soon after they died, based on the level of
articulation present in most of the burials. Although secondary burial practices are not
reported as normative for this region, perimortem manipulation of remains did occur (e.g.
LeBlanc 1999:55,87-88). There is ample variation in cross-cultural examples of
treatments at death (Sprague 2005) that should not be overlooked when reconstructing the
ways in which the dead were deposited.
Taphonomy
The human body begins to decompose immediately after death. This process
lessens the strength of the forces that are necessary to displace bone. Partial
decomposition of the soft tissue may lead to multiple skeletal elements being displaced
together. After complete decomposition of soft tissue, single elements or portions of
elements could be displaced through voids in the surrounding soil. Large specimens
would necessitate large voids, and small specimens could move through relatively
smaller voids.
Wood and Johnson (1987) provide a thorough overview of the processes that
12
disturb archaeological remains. These processes include the movement of artifacts by
animals, plants, freezing and thawing, gravity, water, air, salt formation, and seismic
events (Wood and Johnson 1987:542). All of these processes may be significant to the
creation of isolated bone, but the relative importance of non-cultural processes must be
considered on a regional and site-by-site basis.
In addition to the non-cultural processes that occur in the archaeological context,
prehistoric and historic cultural behavior can displace additional bone. These cultural
formation processes can take the form of subsequent digging activities (like construction)
as well as intentional disturbances such as secondary burial practices and looting.
Waldron (1987:63) found a major cause of disturbance at a historic cemetery was graves
being “cut into by others causing damage to the pre-existing skeleton”. Whether
purposeful, or not, humans are a major factor in the disturbance of archaeological
deposits (Henderson 1987:49).
Although all human remains are subject to processes that displace and break down
the integrity of bones, smaller elements are disproportionally affected (Von Endt and
Orter 1984; Waldron 1987). In some soil types, even large bones are completely
destroyed by taphonomic processes. It is common for bones from various locations at the
same archaeological site to be exposed to different environments, causing differential
preservation (Henderson 1987). These formation processes continue to act upon the bone
until excavators recover the specimen, or until the bone completely decomposes.
Scientific Action
Excavation and curation can produce additional changes to the isolated bone,
13
particularly the fragmentation of fragile bone. Additional damage can occur during the
cleaning, storage, and improper handling of the specimens (Waldron 1987:57). Whether
a burial sample is representative is partially based on the skill of the excavators in
recognizing human bones, especially small elements (Waldron 1987:64). This results in
the possibility of human bone being collected as faunal, being collected with the wrong
individual, and not being collected. Additionally, mistakes can be made during
osteological analysis and curation that can also cause bone to become isolated. Therefore
there are numerous ways in which scientific action can cause isolated human bone.
Summary
Both cultural and non-cultural processes result in the displacement of bone from
the individual, leading to the presence of isolated bone. Various processes can displace
bone during the life of the individual, near the time of death of the individual, after the
individual was buried, during excavation of the burial, during osteological analysis, and
during curation.
RESEARCH OBJECTIVES
Although many research questions may be examined through isolated human
bone, the lack of previous research of isolated human bone makes comparisons to other
data sets problematic. Therefore, the main purpose of this research is to create a baseline
data set of isolated human bone for future comparisons. To accomplish this it is
necessary to develop and test a slate of observations specifically geared for isolated
human bone.
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Methodology
The specific slate of observations used to study isolated human bone has to be
different from the methodology used for burials because of the difference in analytic
scale. Research on burials focuses on individuals, whereas research on isolated bone is
focused on specimens. Standardized inventory data as traditionally collected for a burial
provides inadequate information for detailed analysis of isolated bone. However, such
research in human osteology can be drawn on in order to create a working methodology
for isolated bone. Additional disciplines, like zooarchaeology and paleontology, also can
be utilized to supply input for the methods. This current study tests which observations
are relevant and which need further development to obtain the data necessary for analysis
of isolated bone.
Pattern of Isolated Bone
It is important to establish the basic attributes of isolated bone found at
Grasshopper Pueblo. To this end, a wide range of data will be collected, as discussed
below in the methods section. This baseline data set can be used as a comparative data
set for future research. It is through the basic observations and subsequent analyses that
patterns and anomalies emerge in the data set. Inferences can then be made to attempt to
explain these patterns.
Formation Processes
How isolated human bone became displaced from burials is a primary research
question and can be addressed by examining the patterns and anomalies within the data
set. However, if the pattern of isolated bone suggests the remains were never part of a
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burial, there may be previously unknown burial practices that could account for these
patterns. Assessment of the proveniences, attributes of the specimens, and modifications
present on the bone surfaces can lead to inferences regarding the timing and causes for
the isolated bone to be separated and disarticulated from the majority of the individual.
Patterns may suggest the frequency of the different causal agents. Some of the potential
causes include rodent disturbance, weathering, non-cultural displacement, lack of burial,
secondary burial, purposeful cultural displacement, non-purposeful cultural displacement,
and loss of body parts during life (see Lyman 1994). However, because of equifinality, it
may not be possible to determine the taphonomic history of all of the isolated human
bone. Some formation processes may not leave traces on the bone. Multiple causes of
displacement can have the same physical signatures.
Comparison to Burial Sample
Physical anthropology and bioarchaeology are almost exclusively focused on
burials. The study of burials is centered on individuals and enables research into topics
like health, nutrition, and occupation. Burials are rarely complete, a fact that has
infrequently been taken into account by physical anthropologists. Isolated human bone
may have originated in burials and, therefore, any differential displacement results in
biases in the burial data. Thus, the study of isolated bone may lead to stronger biological
inferences based on the burial data set. This is done by examining the pattern of the
presence and absence of certain types of isolated bone in burials. This may show that
certain types of burials are differentially disturbed, making some observations in the
burial data skewed to data generated by undisturbed burials.
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An example of this may be that individuals that are not in the mainstream of the
community are placed in locations where displacement could more readily occur. This
would cause this subpopulation to have a diminished visibility in the burial assemblage.
The same could be true for individuals with specific diseases, lineages, statuses, or any
other variances from the norm. Isolated bone data may not make any difference in the
analysis of burials, but unless the isolated human bone is analyzed, inherent biases may
not be recognized.
Comparison to Anomalous Assemblages
In the American Southwest, the only bone from non-burial contexts that has been
the subject of extensive study are anomalous assemblages used as the basis for claims of
cannibalism (e.g. Turner and Turner 1999) and witch execution (Darling 1999). These
assemblages are anomalous because they consist of highly fragmented and culturally
modified human bones. The controversial debate centered on these remains is currently
at a standstill with researchers entrenched in opposing viewpoints. Research on isolated
human bone has the potential to form a consensus by creating a more thorough
understanding of all bone found at archaeological sites and through locating more cases
of anomalous human bone.
Since isolated human bone is rarely examined, it is not known how many
anomalous bones are sitting unrecognized on shelves in curation facilities. It is plausible
that the culturally modified remains central to the debate regarding cannibalism can occur
as isolated specimens as well as in clustered deposits. The existing diversity of attributes
between the currently known anomalous assemblages may be increased with anomalous
17
isolated human bone, which may help determine the cause or causes of the modified
bones.
NAGPRA
Isolated human bone has increased importance in the post-NAGPRA (Native
American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act) context of archaeology in the United
States. When excavations are conducted, there is a strong possibility of encountering
isolated human remains. Inadvertent discovery plans vary but often contain clauses in
which work is halted or stopped completely when any human bone is encountered. The
parameters of these plans often necessitate in-field determinations of the presence or
absence of human bone. It is therefore beneficial to understand the characteristics of
human bone that is commonly found outside of burial contexts so that human bone is not
disturbed and collected, if that is not the desire of the affiliated groups. Therefore, this
study of isolated human bone can suggest a minimum knowledge base necessary to
identify human bone in the field.
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CHAPTER 2: MATERIALS AND METHODS
MATERIALS
The specimens selected for use in this study were excavated from the site of
Grasshopper Pueblo (AZ P:14:1). This site is located in east-central Arizona on the
Grasshopper Plateau, bordered by the Mogollon Rim to the North, Salt River to the south,
and canyons to the east and west (Reid and Whittlesey 1997:136). During its occupation
(1275 – 1400AD), the site was the biggest community in the region and was located in
the largest expanse of agricultural land (Reid and Whittlesey 1997:152). Grasshopper
consists of a main pueblo of three roomblocks that encircle a large plaza and is
surrounded by small outlier room clusters. Grasshopper Pueblo had a total of 515 rooms
(68 second story) (Riggs 2001:14).
Raymond Thompson moved the University of Arizona’s fieldschool to
Grasshopper in 1963 and excavations continued until 1992. In the 30 years of fieldwork,
105 rooms were excavated (20% of the pueblo) (Reid and Whittlesey 1999:61).
According to Reid and Whittlesey (1999:61) human burials were only excavated up to
1979, but up to that time “every burial encountered was recorded, excavated and
preserved” (Ezzo 1991:29). Based on the field notes, a few burials that were found under
other features were only partially excavated in order to preserve the integrity of these
features. Throughout the excavations, 664 burials were excavated; these have been the
subject of “a great deal of scholarly attention” (Fulginiti 1993:17).
The number of individuals present in a burial assemblage is dependant on how an
individual is defined as well as the history of the collection. Burials are defined by in-
19
field determinations based on soil matrix, features, bone articulation, and the skill of the
excavator. The skeletal remains of individuals can be in more than one of these burial
units and more than one individual can be in the same burial. It is the job of the
osteologist to separate and combine individuals in the lab. While 664 burials were given
numbers in the field, based on the reanalysis in the laboratory, the present count of
individuals from burials is 713. Additionally, 4 cremations were found at Grasshopper,
accounting for at least 6 different individuals. In total, 719 burials and cremations were
identified.
Overall, the preservation of bone from the burials is excellent, which Hinkes
(1983:14) suggests is the result of alkaline soil. However, there are some individuals that
show weathering and are “extremely fragmentary and friable” (Fulinginiti 1993:74). The
state of the individuals corresponds to the condition of the burial. Whittlesey (1978:258)
states, “many burial numbers represent isolated fragments of human bone, others greatly
disturbed, scattered, or incomplete interments”. So although the overall preservation of
bone at the site was excellent, some burials and bones were subjected to significant
weathering and disturbances.
Hinkes (1983:15) provides the following statement on the manner in which the
burials were treated when they arrived to the laboratory: “In the lab, the bones were
washed in water, air dried, and preserved with Gelva, a polyvinyl acetate resin, to prevent
deterioration.” Before the individuals from burials were labeled and stored in boxes, the
bones were reconstructed using “Duco cement”.
It is a difficult process for anyone to differentiate human from animal bone,
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especially in the field when the bones are isolated, dirty, and possibly small and
fragmentary. As a result, isolated human bone was collected with the faunal bone that
was excavated at the site. The separation of human bone was accomplished during faunal
analysis (Olsen 1990). The isolated bones appear to have been thoroughly washed and
only a few specimens were treated with preservative. The isolated bone was then bagged
and labeled with provenience information, and placed into a cardboard box.
Olsen’s (1990) faunal research only included specimens excavated up to 1980.
Because of this, there are still isolated human bones mixed with un-analyzed faunal
remains excavated post-1980. Random checks of the bags of faunal remains excavated
after 1980 revealed human specimens. However, the scale of excavation at Grasshopper
was significantly reduced after 1980 (9 rooms were excavated post-1980; Riggs 2001).
Random spot-checking of the faunal remains excavated prior to 1980 produced no
occurrences of human remains.
As with burials, it is common to have very small specimens of bone (even bone
dust) with the larger pieces of isolated bone. Bone dust and very small specimens (less
than approximately 2 millimeters) were not included in this research. It is unlikely that
the exclusion of these specimens introduces any new bias.
Besides isolated human bone, there are commingled human bones in with burials.
This bone was not included in this study. Although the causes of commingled and
isolated bone may be linked, extra elements in a burial may reflect mixing during
laboratory processing and analysis. The sample used in this study consists of all of the
human bone excavated before 1980 that was not included with, or designated as, a burial.
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This sample consists of slightly over 1800 specimens from 7 boxes located at Arizona
State Museum on the campus of the University of Arizona in Tucson.
METHODS
As previously stated, a major focus of the current research is to define and test a
slate of observations for use in analysis of isolated human bone. The manual, Standards
for Data Collection from Human Skeletal Remains (Buikstra and Ubelaker 1994) was
created to provide a set of standard osteological observations for complete skeletons.
This manual provides an excellent starting point for research on burials, but is not
comprehensive in regard to isolated bone.
The data recommended for isolated bone, based on the procedures outlined by
Buikstra and Ubelaker (1994:9, attachment 2), are limited to basic attributes, including
the element, side, segment, completeness, minimum number of individuals, count or
weight, age, and sex. No measurements or taphonomic data are recorded. Additionally,
there is no space on the data sheet for the notation of pathology or other notes, which
could include associations of the elements to other isolated elements or burials. The scale
of this data collection method is on the element and not on the specimen. So, although
the method from this manual identifies the basic information for isolated bone, the goal is
not fine-grained analysis.
On the other hand, Tim White (1992) provides an extremely thorough data
collection method in Prehistoric Cannibalism at Mancos 5MTUMR-2346. White’s
methodology has as many as 98 observations on each specimen. The assemblage that
White researched with this methodology contained a very large amount of cultural
22
modification that is not common for most assemblages of isolated human bone. This
methodology includes a total of 19 observations on breakage, 20 observations on
toolmarks, 16 observations on animal tooth marks, and 18 observations for burning.
Additionally, measurements were taken on bone splinters. White’s methodology is
designed to record cultural modification; however, the majority of the isolated bone from
Grasshopper Pueblo does not exhibit cultural modification and thus these observations
are of limited utility. In the rare instances where cultural modification was present in the
isolated human bone from Grasshopper, White’s methods are used for comparative
purposes.
The gap between the two methodologies discussed above must be bridged to
construct one that is appropriate for the study of isolated human bone. There are various
bodies of literature that are pertinent to the construction of the methods used in human
osteology, including zooarchaeology (e.g. Lyman 1994) and the research on assemblages
of disarticulated, highly fragmented and culturally modified human bone found at
archaeological sites in the American Southwest (e.g. Martin 2001, Turner and Turner
1999, Turner 1983, White 1992). Taphonomy is the link between these bodies of
literature, both of which are pivotal in the construction of the methodology used here.
Efremov, a Russian paleontologist coined the term “taphonomy” in 1940
(Efremov 1940). Taphonomy has its roots as a subdiscipline of paleontology (Shipman
1981) but “its methods and data are often applied in archaeological contexts” (White
2000:407) as well as in bioarchaeology and forensics. While the literal meaning of
taphonomy in Latin is the laws of burial, it can be defined as the “investigation of the
23
processes that affect an organism from its death until the point at which study
commences” (Buikstra and Ubelaker 1994:95). To conduct these studies into the past it
is necessary to rely on uniformitarian assumptions that the same processes that occur in
the present have occurred throughout time and space (Gifford 1981:367).
The slate of observations necessary for this study includes the standard
observations that are collected in skeletal inventories. These illuminate the general
pattern of isolated human bone and include element, segment, side, age, sex,
completeness, and pathology. Additional data are necessary to elucidate how the isolated
human bone becomes isolated. Observations detailing weathering and breakage provide
information on the specific modifications that are present, when those modifications
occurred, and the cause of those modifications. When present, burning and toolmarks are
additional clues to identify formation processes.
Identifying the causes of the modifications is related to the uniformitarian
assumptions mentioned above, the examination of the patterns as well as the anomalies of
modifications, and lastly the skill and experience of the researcher. Skill and experience
are relevant because at times there is “difficulty to assess the different events, especially
to assess if a bone trauma is of perimortem or postmortem nature” (Quatrehomme and
Iscan 1997:155-6). The determination of when different modifications occurred is
essential in forming behavioral inferences of how and possibly why the bone was
modified.
All of the isolated human bones were previously placed in paper bags. During the
current research, each bag was numbered and initialed when it was analyzed. Each
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specimen was given a different sequential number starting at “1”. None of the bones
were damaged, destroyed, or written on during this research. The following observations
were made for each specimen (see data sheet, Appendix A).
Specimen
For this study, the term specimen refers to a single fragment of bone. When
multiple specimens from the same element were encountered, they were recorded
separately and linked to each other in the database. Additionally, fragments that
contained multiple elements (like a mandible with teeth, or a conjoined maxilla and
zygomatic) were recorded as a single specimen. This is due to the fact that formation
processes act on the specimens as conjoined specimens, and not each element separately.
The ways in which other researchers define a specimen differ from the definition
used here. White (1992:66) defines a specimen as “a singular, isolated, nonconjoined
whole or partial bone or tooth”. Similarly, Reitz and Wing (1999:10) define a specimen
as “either a complete bone, tooth, or shell or a portion thereof”. Lyman’s (1994:514)
definition of a specimen is “an archaeological/paleontological part of a skeleton that can
consist of a complete bone or fragment thereof, a complete tooth or fragment thereof, or a
bone (such as the mandible) with teeth in it”. Buikstra and Ubelaker (1994) focus on the
elements that are present and do not use the term specimen in relation to isolated bone.
The present definition is used because it reflects the way in which the bones are found in
the recovery context that allows for the possibility of answering behavioral questions. Of
course, modification that happens during the recovery and curational phases would
change the attributes and quantity of the specimens and is a source of bias in all
25
osteological studies.
The element, or elements, that constitute each specimen was recorded. For
example, a number might refer to a thoracic vertebrae, a fibula, a conjoined frontal and
parietal, or a conjoined mandible, canine, 1st permanent molar, and a 2nd permanent
molar. This observation is made to the element level of specificity when possible; but the
level of preservation can significantly hinder the accuracy of this most basic observation.
When the specific element could not be determined for a specimen, the next most
specific identification was made. For example, it is not always possible to determine
which metacarpal/metatarsal is present, in which case the specimen can be recorded as
simply metacarpal or metatarsal or may be described as metacarpal (2-4). Similarly, ribs
and vertebrae can be identified to number, or grouped by type, with possible further
differentiation by elimination (e.g. cervical vert. 3-7). Phalanges were identified as being
hand or foot, as well as proximal, intermediate, or distal.
When it was not possible to identify the long bone fragments by specific element,
they were grouped as major long bone fragments or minor long bone fragment. Cranial
specimens that were not identifiable to element were grouped by either cranial vault,
cranial base, or unidentified cranial. Other elements, such as patellas, os coxae, and
sternum were identified to the element or not at all. Specimens that could not be placed
into these categories were identified as either unidentified post-cranial fragment or
unidentified fragment.
Side
Siding of the specimens is important for many reasons, notably being the
26
calculation of the minimum number of individuals (MNI) and in the determination of the
associations between specimens. Left (L), right (R), and midline (M) were recorded
when side was known. As discussed above, at times it is not possible to determine the
element present. Therefore, in these cases it would not be possible to determine side and
the specimens were scored as indeterminate (I).
Segment
Segment refers to different portions of the element(s) represented by each
specimen. The differentiation of the various portions of the elements was modeled after
Buikstra and Ubelaker (1994:Attachment 2). This attribute refines the specimen
observation, better enabling associations between specimens, and helps to calculate the
MNI. For example, long bones were scored for the presence of the proximal end,
proximal 1/3, medial 1/3, distal 1/3, and distal end.
Completeness
The relative completeness of the specimens was recorded using the methods
proposed by Buikstra and Ubelaker (1994:7). Complete (C) refers to the presence of
greater than 75% of the element, partial (P) refers to between 25% and 75% percent of
the element being present, and fragmentary (F) refers to less than 25% of the element
being present. As the standard at the Bioarchaeology Lab at Arizona State Museum, for a
specimen to be coded as complete, it has to fit the above presence guidelines and must
have almost all of the scored observations present.
Completeness enables researchers to record the percentage of bone present for
specific specimens and also enables the patterns of preservation to be observed. There
27
may be differences in completeness between elements, groups of elements (e.g. ribs, long
bones), size of specimens, or the density of the bones (e.g. femur shaft vs. vertebral
body).
Age
The age at death of the individual from which the specimen originated was
recorded in months or years. In most cases the age determinations are based on bone
lengths, epiphysis closure, bone density, dental development, morphology, and articular
facet lipping. The rate at which teeth develop is more conservative than the other age
indicators because of differential effects of stress and nutrition so dental age estimates
were preferentially utilized whenever possible (White 2000:342).
In addition to the normal difficulties of assessing age at death (see Bass 1995:1213, White 2000:339-362), isolated bone presents additional problems. Individual
variation in size and development makes it optimal to formulate age determinations on as
many markers as possible. With isolated bone it is common to only have one, or weak,
age markers present. For this reason and the others stated above, the age determinations
made here are relatively conservative, and utilize larger rather than smaller age ranges.
Age Class
The placing of specimens in age classes is also modeled after Buikstra and
Ubelaker’s (1994:9) coding for isolated bone, but modified to fit the standards used in the
Bioarchaeology Lab of the Arizona State Museum. The following age classes were used
in this study:
Fetal (F) = before birth (0-9 lunar months)
Infant (I) = 0-2 years
28
Child (C) = 2-12 years
Subadult (SA) = 12-18 years
Young Adult (YA) = 18-25 years
Mature Adult (MA) = 25-50 years
Old Adult (OA) = 50+ years
In many cases it is not possible to determine the age at death for a specimen in only one
of the above categories. These specimens were placed in multiple age classes. An
example would be a specimen aged as 1 to 4 years of age at death, which would be
placed into the age class Infant/Child (I/C). An additional age class of adult (A) was
created to refer to individuals who are at least 18 years of age, but for which further
specificity is not possible.
Sex
When possible, sex is determined by utilizing the protocols from Standards for
Data Collection from Human Skeletal Remains (Buikstra and Ubelaker 1994:15-20). As
with age, the nature of isolated human bone limits the ability to apply these methods.
The most reliable sex markers are found on the pelvis, followed by markers on the skull
(White 2000:362,368). As these are large and relatively fragile elements, they are rarely
intact in non-burial contexts. Robusticity and size are also ways in which sex is
ascertained, but are less accurate sex markers. In the rare cases when markers are
present, it is usually necessary to score sex as probable male or probable female.
However, the vast majority of specimens in almost any study of isolated bone have no, or
highly unreliable, sex markers, and should be scored as indeterminate.
Observability
Observability is a data field created specifically for this project to supplement the
29
standard completeness field. White (1992:110,120) has a similar observation that records
the amount of intact cortex. The percent of intact cortex is taken into account by
observability, but it also factors in the presence or absence of trabecular bone. Whereas
the completeness field is scored as one of three broad ranges, observability is an
approximated percentile of the specimen that can be analyzed for the entire range of
possible osteological observations for the entire element. Obviously, this is a subjective
observation. Through informal rechecking of the data, it is believed that intraobserver
error is slight, but present. Halfway through the inventory process, I reexamined the
specimens from the first box. The intraobserver difference in observability were less than
5%, and the majority of observations were the same.
There is an enormous difference in data potential between a bone that is 100 %
and 75 % complete. For example, a specimen can be coded as “complete” (C=100-75%)
without allowing for the ability to collect any metric, non-metric, or pathology data if the
markers for those observations on bone are lost due to taphonomic processes.
Conversely, a specimen may fall into the “partial” (P=75-25%) range but enable
researchers to collect close to the entire range of possible observations. Observability
allows for precise ranking of specimens along a continuum.
Maximum Length
In standard osteological research (e.g. Buikstra and Ubelaker 1994:69-84), metric
data is collected on specimens for purposes of biological and not taphonomic research.
Population variation and comparative research are typical uses of this data. Utilizing the
standard methods, measurements are not taken on specimens when the biological
30
landmarks for the measurements are absent. For example, if the proximal end of a
humerus is not present, the length of the specimen is not recorded. This standard
methodology is insufficient for the present research and creates a situation in which
comparative data is absent.
The maximum length for every specimen in this study was measured utilizing a
sliding caliper or an osteometric board for large specimens. The sliding calipers allowed
for measurements down to the tenth of a millimeter, whereas the osteometric board is
only accurate to the millimeter. Each measurement was taken three times, averaged if
there were discrepancies, and recorded.
Maximum Width
The maximum width of the specimens was also recorded. This measurement is
more subjective than the maximum length and therefore has more inherent bias. For
most specimens, the maximum width is replicable and easily found roughly perpendicular
to the maximum length of the specimen. However, this measurement can be more
complicated for specimens that have irregular shapes (e.g. the talus, pelvis, scapula).
Theoretically, this measurement is the minimum size of an opening in the soil that
would allow for specimen to move. For example, a maximum width of 30 millimeters
would enable a specimen to move though a rodent hole that is 30 millimeters or larger.
Obviously there are other variables present (e.g. shape and the position of the specimen
relative to the opening) that influence if a specimen could move through a substrate, but
this measurement can suggest, if all of the other variables are held constant, the size of
openings in the substrate that are necessary for the bones to become displaced while they
31
are underground.
Minimum Width
The minimum width of specimens can also be subjective. Biological
measurements of width are usually taken at specific loci on bones (Buikstra and Ubelaker
1994:83). This taphonomic measurement of width however is taken at the place that is
most narrow and therefore can be anywhere on the element and not at any one locus. For
this study, the minimum width was taken roughly perpendicular to the maximum length.
Standard Measurements
Additional measurements were taken on complete bones utilizing the methods set
forth by Buikstra and Ubelaker (1994). These measurements are used to infer biological
characteristics of the individuals like stature, health and, at times, occupation (habitual
activities). These biological measurements were taken when possible.
Breakage
There is literature on the fracturing of bone in the disciplines of medicine (Cruess
1984, Hadjiargyrou et al. 2001, Malcom 1996, Micozzi 1991, Schenk 1998), biological
anthropology (Glencross and Stuart-Macadam 2001, Ortner and Putschar 1981:55-85,
White 1992; 2000), ethnoarchaeology (O’Connel and Hawkes 1988), forensic
anthropology (Dressler et al. 2000, Ohshima 2000, Ubelaker and Adams 1995),
paleontology (Noe-Nygaard 1977, Shipman 1981) and zooarchaeology (Hill 1979,
Johnson 1985, Outram 2001, Reitz and Wing 1999). Taphonomic analysis of bone
fracturing is a controversy in which the standards for determining how and when the bone
was fractured are central (Haynes 1988, Shipman and Rose 1983). The considerable
32
differences in published methodologies make simple inferences problematic and there are
ample cautionary tales that highlight the ambiguity of some of the observations (Morlan
1983, Ubelaker and Adams 1995).
Antemortem breakage refers to bones broken during the life of the individual.
There is significant information on antemortem breaks in medical literature. Such
fractures are easily differentiated from later breakage by the presence of changes to the
bone during the healing process. Perimortem breakage refers to bones being broken at or
near the time of death of the individual. Perimortem breakage shows no signs of healing
because the individual died before the bone could start to heal. From a forensic
anthropology perspective, Galloway (1999) thoroughly discusses the biomechanics of
antemortem and perimortem fractures. Breakage that occurs after the organic portions of
bone are no longer present is referred to as postmortem.
The debates concerning the timing of breakage is centered on distinguishing
perimortem from postmortem fractures (e.g. Morlan 1983:247). The rate at which bone
changes from green to dry bone varies and is controlled by the different
microenvironments in which the specimens were deposited (White 2000:409). Therefore,
perimortem breakage can actually occur during a significant time range.
Bone is broken through static or dynamic forces (Lyman 1994:316). Dynamic
forces are sudden, whereas static pressures are constant and even. Bone consists of
mainly mineral (hydroxyapatite) and organic (collagen) components (Von Endt and
Ortner 1984:248). After an organism dies, the organic component degrades and the
bones become more brittle (Lyman 1994:316). Green or fresh bone has a high moisture
33
content and intact bone marrow. These features make fresh bone elastic relative to dry or
fossilized bone (Johnson 1985:160). Variation in elasticity results in breakage with
differing morphology.
There are several observations that have been used to differentiate perimortem
from postmortem breakage (Johnson 1985:222, Morlan 1983:247). Perimortem breakage
tends to form a “smooth fracture surface” (Johnson 1985:222), rather than an irregular
break that would be more indicative of postmortem breakage. The color of the surface of
the break is considered by White (1992:133) to be “the best guide to fracture time
determination”. Perimortem breaks tend to have fracture surfaces that are the same as the
color of the adjacent cortical bone. Fracture surfaces that are lighter than adjacent bone
suggest a postmortem break. The morphology of the fracture, the angle between the
fracture and the cortical bone, the presence or absence of impact scars, and whether or
not the fracture continues into an epiphysis are other attributes that are used to
differentiate the timing of breakage (Johnson 1985:222, Morlan 1983:247). Outram
(2001, 2202) relies on the attributes of fracture angle, surface texture, and outline to
determine a fracture freshness index. Although this quantified index was not used in this
study, the attributes it is based on were heavily weighted to determine the timing of the
breakage.
However, Morlan (1983) suggests that these attributes, including coloration and
regularity of the fracture can be misleading and can create problematic inferences due to
the overlap of the characteristics between perimortem and postmortem fractures.
Although it may be difficult to determine the timing of the breakage of a specific
34
specimen, the pattern of breakage for an assemblage is less problematic.
There is minimal research on differentiating when postmortem breaks occurred
(Morlan 1983, White 1992:131-138). The coloration of the break surface relative to the
surrounding intact bone is useful but does not completely suffice to determine timing.
The time and environmental variables necessary to make the fractured surface the same
color as the surrounding bone are not presently known. It is possible to create two time
categories within postmortem: ancient and modern. Modern postmortem breaks (which
include excavation/curation breakage) differ from ancient in that the breaks are much
lighter in color relative to the surrounding bone, but both types have irregular fracture
morphologies.
Each specimen was scored for the presence and quantity of perimortem, ancient
postmortem, and modern postmortem fractures. The quantity of each of the fracture
types was recorded for every specimen. Additionally, the regularity of the fracture and
the fracture color were noted for each specimen.
Weathering
Weathering refers to the surface texture of the bone. Cortical bone can flake off
the surface of bone. Movement of water and particles around the surface of the
specimens can cause the bone to erode. Instances where it was clear bone was missing
from the specimen due to weathering, but not breakage, were recorded in a similar way to
breakage. The presence and number of locations of weathering were recorded for each
specimen.
35
Burning
Each specimen was examined for evidence of burning. There are various
modifications that can be caused by burning, including color changes, warping, cracking,
and splintering (White 1992:156-160). The number of locations on each specimen that
was burned was recorded, as well as notes that may help differentiate the timing and
intensity of the burning.
Toolmarks
There are differences in published methods for determining the presence of
toolmarks (Lyman 1987:273). Similar to breakage, it is important to be able to
differentiate if a mark is perimortem or postmortem. This differentiation can be made by
examining the morphology and color of the modification. Perimortem cutmarks are
narrow v-shaped grooves with parallel striations within the channel and have the same
coloration as the surrounding external bone (White 1992:146, Buikstra and Ubelaker
1994:98, Shipman and Rose 1983:64). In contrast, postmortem marks on bone are
usually u-shaped to v-shaped without striations within the mark and have a color or luster
that differ from the surrounding bone surface (postmortem toolmarks tend to be shiny).
Chopmarks are also v-shaped grooves but are “characterized by fragments of bone
crushed inward at the bottom of the groove” (Shipman 1981:199). The coloration and
morphology of chopmarks, like cutmarks, are used to distinguish perimortem from
postmortem marks.
Although cutmarks and chopmarks are the most common types of toolmarks,
there are additional types of modification like anvil abrasions and percussion pits. These
36
are discussed at length by White (1992) and mentioned in Turner and Turner (1999).
There is a greater degree of equifinality with these marks and less experimental research
on the reliability of their characteristics. All of the specimens used in this study were
examined for all types of toolmarks.
37
CHAPTER 3
RESULTS
In this study, 1805 specimens of isolated human bone were analyzed from
Grasshopper Pueblo. This accounted for all of the human bone that was separated from
the faunal collection excavated between 1963 and 1980. What follows is a summary of
the raw data that is presented in Appendices B and C.
Table 1, Proveniences and Percents
The proveniences from which
the specimens are found range the
entire set of archaeological contexts
that were excavated. This includes
rooms, plazas, corridors, trenches,
extramural areas, and the Great Kiva
(See Table 1). The trenches were
Provenience
Type
W/ a Burial
Corridor
Extramural
Great Kiva
Ovens
Plazas
Room
Trench
Wash
Unknown
None
Specimen Count
50
7
8
148
3
101
1215
180
15
66
12
% of
Total
2.8
0.4
0.4
8.2
0.2
5.6
67.0
10.0
0.8
3.7
0.7
excavated outside of rooms and are in the plazas and extramural areas.
The majority of the specimens of isolated human bone, as shown in Table 1, were
found in rooms. Trenches, with 10% of occurrences of isolated bone, may have an
inflated count because, unlike rooms, trenches were dug through only part of an area,
leaving adjacent areas unexcavated. The isolated bone from trenches may have been
reconnected to a burial if the rest of the individual was located. In Table 1, the unknown
row accounts for proveniences that have been coded but for which the key is currently
missing and the none row accounts for when there was no provenience information
38
In all, isolated human bone was found in 72 different rooms. Therefore, isolated
human bone was found in at least 69% of the 105 excavated rooms. This illustrates how
ubiquitous isolated human bone is at the site.
Except for 37 postcranial fragments, all of the specimens were identified to either
the cranial, dental, axial, appendicular, or extremity body region. The distribution of the
isolated bones by body region is presented in Table 2. For comparison, the percentages
of elements within each body region for an ideal adult individual are shown. The
percentages are based on 206 bones and 32 teeth in an adult skeleton. The final column
shows the difference between the percentage of the isolated specimens from each region
and the ideal distribution for an individual. Small elements like the extremities and teeth
are underrepresented, whereas, the larger specimens are over represented. However, the
large elements are less complete, which may mean that relative to the small elements,
they fragmented into more specimens.
Table 2, Body Region Distribution
Body Region
Number of
Specimens
%
Avg.
Observability
Cranial
Dentition
Axial
Appendicular
Extremities
Unidentified
380
46
570
489
283
37
21
3
32
27
16
2
23
96
42
44
84
7
Percent (%)
of Elements:
Ideal Adult
Individual
12
14
21
8
44
N/A
Difference in
Distribution:
Isolated vrs.
Ideal
+9
-11
+11
+19
-28
N/A
The distribution of specimens by element and age group is shown in Table 3.
Teeth were represented by 46 isolated specimens. An additional 48 teeth were conjoined
to a mandible or maxilla, for a total count of 94. Some elements, like phalanges and ribs,
39
were grouped, causing them to have higher relative counts than they would have
otherwise. There are fewer carpals identified in this sample than there are in one
complete individual, and only 3 specimens of patellae were recorded.
Table 3, Specimen Distribution by Element and Age
I/C
C
C/
SA
9
3
13
2
-
3
8
-
40
25
17
15
-
-
2
13
1
74
5
3
13
6
-
1
7
-
36
4
8
13
-
2
1
3
-
33
-
1
2
2
2
-
-
3
-
10
-
-
1
1
-
-
-
-
-
2
-
1
4
3
2
-
-
3
-
13
-
2
10
2
7
-
-
3
3
-
27
-
-
2
3
6
4
2
-
2
-
19
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
2
-
-
2
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
3
-
3
-
7
44
18
15
6
4
6
11
10
121
1
-
18
4
12
-
-
2
9
-
46
-
3
12
15
15
-
-
2
15
-
62
1
-
13
20
27
2
2
2
26
-
93
-
1
6
10
27
-
-
-
16
-
60
-
-
1
3
5
-
-
2
6
-
17
-
-
11
2
13
-
-
-
-
-
26
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
3
-
3
2
9
60
35
95
7
3
41
55
1
308
Element
F
F/I
Frontal
Parietal
Temporal
Occipital
Zygomatic
Nasal
Maxilla
Mandible
Sphenoid
Ethmoid
Hyoid
Cranial Frag
Teeth
Cervical Vert.
Thoracic Vert.
Lumbar Vert.
Vert.
Sacrum
Coccyx
Ribs
Sternum
Scapula
Clavicle
Humerus
Radius
Ulna
Pelvis
Femur
Tibia
Fibula
Patella
Long Bone Frag
Carpal
MC
Hand Phal.
Tarsal
MT
Foot Phal.
Postcranial Frag
Total
-
2
-
1
-
1
-
2
-
I
SA
SA/A
A
U
Total
-
-
-
1
2
-
-
-
1
-
4
-
1
3
3
8
-
1
1
3
-
20
21
-
-
6
2
7
-
-
2
4
-
2
4
10
4
13
-
-
1
27
-
61
1
2
3
1
10
-
-
1
9
-
27
1
3
11
3
11
-
-
-
6
-
35
-
3
9
8
20
2
1
-
14
-
57
3
3
30
3
31
1
1
3
7
-
82
2
4
23
3
28
1
5
-
10
-
76
2
-
8
1
15
1
3
-
11
-
41
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
1
2
-
3
-
-
5
3
18
1
12
7
16
1
63
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
1
10
-
11
1
-
6
7
7
-
-
2
30
-
53
-
1
16
2
14
-
1
-
51
-
85
-
-
1
-
5
2
-
3
21
-
32
-
6
8
9
19
2
-
-
29
-
73
-
-
1
-
6
-
-
1
21
-
29
-
1
-
-
2
-
-
5
7
22
37
16
56
366
199
497
39
37
95
465
35
1805
40
There is almost twice the number of humeri than there are either radii or ulnae.
Similarly there are twice as many specimens of femur relative to the fibulae and there are
well over double the amount of hand phalanges relative to foot phalanges. Again, it
appears large elements are better represented than small elements.
Of the 1805 specimens, 463 (26%) of the specimens were sided as left, 424 (23%)
right, and 342 (19%) as medial. 576 (32%) of the specimens could not be sided.
The last row in Table 3 shows the age categories are not equally represented. The
child age group contains the largest number of specimens followed by adults and infants.
Landmarks on the bone necessary to distinguish between the different adult age groups
(YA, MA, and OA) were not frequently present, and therefore these age classes were
grouped in this table.
There were only 16 specimens aged as fetal, with another 56 specimens in the
fetal to infant age range. This appears similar to the broad trend shown in the distribution
of specimens by body region that small elements, like fetal remains, are infrequent in the
isolated bone assemblage from Grasshopper.
Sex was much more difficult to assign. Only five specimens were not recorded as
indeterminate, with 3 probable female, 1 probable male, and 1 male.
Table 4, Ranges of Observability
Observability (%)
# of Specimens
Complete (100-75)
Partial (74-25)
Fragmentary (24-0)
584
441
780
Percent of
Specimens
32.4
24.4
43.2
The standard
observation of completeness
was recorded, as was
observability. Table 4 depicts the number and percent of specimens in each of the
41
completeness categories. Of the 1805 specimens examined in this study, 180 (10%) had
100% observability. Within the ranges in the table, 220 (12%) specimens are between
100-98% observability, 480 (27%) specimens are between 100-95% observability, and
410 (23%) of the specimens are between 5-0% observability. The overall average
observability is 46%. However, it is interesting that half of the specimens fall within 5
percent of the extremes of observability.
The dentition and extremities are the body regions with the highest observability.
In fact, both have almost double the observability of the axial and appendicular
specimens. The cranium, with thin irregular elements, has the lowest observability.
Table 5 shows the average observability of specimens by age class and element.
Specimens aged as fetal had the highest observability (88%), followed by fetal to infant
(61%). At 12%, the subadult age class has the lowest observability. The child and adult
age classes have similar average observability at 45% and 47% respectively.
Some of the elements with the highest average observability are relatively
infrequent in the Grasshopper sample. For example, the hyoid and patella are represented
by 3 specimens each, and both have observability averages over 90%. Of the elements
represented by a large number of specimens, the cervical vertebrae, ulnae, femora, and
hand phalanges have the high average observability. Specimens that were identified in
the categories cranial, vertebrae, long bone, postcranial, and unidentified fragments are
less observable than the specimens identified to element.
42
Table 5, Average Observability by Element and Age Class
Element
F
F/I
I
I/C
C
C/
SA
Frontal
Parietal
Temporal
Occipital
Zygomatic
Nasal
Maxilla
Mandible
Sphenoid
Ethmoid
Hyoid
Cranial Frag
Teeth
Cervical Vert.
Thoracic Vert.
Lumbar Vert.
Vert.
Sacrum
Coccyx
Ribs
Sternum
Scapula
Clavicle
Humerus
Radius
Ulna
Pelvis
Femur
Tibia
Fibula
Patella
Long Bone Frag
Carpal
MC
Hand Phalange
Tarsal
MT
Foot Phalange
Postcranial Frag
Total
-
30
21
17
17
10
-
4
13
-
16
-
40
14
14
11
-
-
15
13
20
14
-
30
38
52
42
17
-
65
31
-
36
-
25
35
39
59
-
8
20
10
-
40
-
-
95
-
-
-
-
-
-
81
-
-
-
100
95
-
-
-
-
98
-
45
60
37
75
-
-
-
50
-
53
-
88
45
13
36
-
-
7
43
-
39
-
-
43
18
33
16
10
-
25
-
25
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
28
-
28
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
95
-
95
-
-
8
5
5
5
-
-
6
5
8
85
-
99
100
94
-
-
100
93
-
96
82
SA
SA/A
A
U
Total
-
93
95
88
86
-
-
23
69
-
90
-
79
56
48
50
13
10
40
-
51
-
95
56
58
56
-
23
-
53
-
56
5
13
17
-
-
10
5
-
11
-
90
43
55
-
-
-
-
-
69
77
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
77
-
80
51
43
40
24
23
12
15
17
15
28
-
-
-
100
80
-
-
-
95
-
89
-
70
50
78
40
10
70
20
-
46
-
-
39
50
49
-
-
37.5
56
-
47
44
88
91
64
71
61
-
-
70
14
-
100
78
47
70
44
-
-
20
34
-
46
100
82
78
48
44
-
-
-
30
-
57
44
-
90
78
48
49
10
-
20
9
-
78
87
69
48
59
100
60
10
22
-
60
83
84
80
23
41
5
22
-
7
-
48
97.5
-
58
99
18
33
10
13
18
-
37
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
90
97
-
95
-
-
11
5
6
5
4
2
5
5
5
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
100
95
-
95
88
100
-
93
81
86
-
55
-
90
-
-
100
100
100
89
30
-
-
87
-
89
-
-
100
65
85
-
88
58
-
65
-
74
96
63
76
95
-
-
79
-
78
-
-
100
-
91
-
-
95
90
-
90
-
-
90
8
-
-
-
4
6
5
7
87
62
56
47
45
27
12
24
47
6
46
Each specimen was measured for maximum length, maximum width, and
minimum width. Table 6 shows the breakdown of average maximum lengths for each
43
Table 6, Maximum Length (mm) by Age Class and Element
Element
F
F/I
I
I/C
C
Frontal
Parietal
Temporal
Occipital
Zygomatic
Nasal
Maxilla
Mandible
Sphenoid
Ethmoid
Hyoid
Cranial
Frag
Teeth
Cervical
Vert.
Thoracic
Vert.
Lumbar
Vert.
Vert.
Sacrum
Coccyx
Ribs
Sternum
Scapula
Clavicle
Humerus
Radius
Ulna
Pelvis
Femur
Tibia
Fibula
Patella
Long Bone
Frag
Carpal
MC
Hand Phal.
Tarsal
MT
Foot Phal.
-
35.4
28.0
40.4
49.2
C/
SA
35.5
-
60.4
39.5
46.7
38.2
-
-
28.3
31.5
40.4
39.0
32.4
-
54.5
43.7
-
38.0
-
-
33.8
30.5
42.0
50.2
-
29.1
53.2
42.3
-
43.0
-
-
-
24.4
23.2
33.0
33.1
-
-
51.6
-
35.7
-
-
-
-
16.6
18.8
-
-
-
-
-
17.7
-
-
21.5
33.8
32.4
45.2
-
-
46.7
-
37.2
-
-
45.3
38.0
45.7
68.0
-
-
29.3
82.4
-
50.8
-
-
-
43.9
28.3
40.2
31.4
33.7
-
40.0
-
36.1
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
17.8
-
-
17.8
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
29.7
-
29.7
-
-
26.8
23.2
26.7
26.0
29.3
26.7
22.7
22.8
14.5
24.1
-
7.8
-
8.8
14.0
13.4
-
-
21.1
17.2
-
12.6
-
-
14.4
15.0
26.0
28.2
-
-
25.5
44.4
-
28.3
70
8.5
-
14.6
23.1
24.2
32.3
18.9
27.9
39.7
-
26.9
70
-
12.5
18.1
26.2
27.2
-
-
-
54.4
-
26.2
80
-
-
9.8
10.8
14.5
-
-
19.9
24.2
-
17.6
70
-
-
16.8
19.3
22.0
-
-
-
-
-
19.6
100
35
Post-Cranial
Frag.
SA
SA/A
A
U
Avg
Control
-
33.7
41.8
-
38.8
-
-
47.0
49.3
54.4
43.3
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
26.1
-
26.1
29.8
31.5
37.0
41.2
45.9
63.8
56.2
51.4
43.4
30.6
44.7
-
-
-
-
25.9
18.8
-
-
-
116.8
-
45.1
-
-
32.7
25.0
42.5
41.7
-
40.2
117.8
63.6
-
45.9
146
-
-
32.3
45.5
45.4
-
-
68.8
80.9
-
50.6
144
40.9
51.1
46.5
80.5
63.2
-
-
201.0
62.1
-
61.8
295
38.1
38.9
31.7
79.5
61.0
-
-
72.0
93.6
-
67.2
228
44.2
47.2
51.7
52.8
55.4
-
-
-
93.4
-
59.5
247
-
26.3
32.8
33.1
38.8
46.7
65.2
-
46.1
-
38.9
200
40.1
58.4
55.4
45.3
54.5
28.5
41.7
65.4
132.0
-
60.7
428
34.1
41.2
57.2
30.6
62.1
39.0
62.3
-
69.9
-
58.3
355
44.5
-
47.5
79.1
56.4
45.8
36.3
-
87.0
-
61.1
345
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
39.7
42.1
-
40.1
45
-
-
27.2
12.7
23.6
19.5
34.7
20.9
27.9
21.7
26.1
30
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
24.9
21.6
-
21.9
6.0
-
13.3
18.7
23.4
-
-
39.9
55.9
-
40.3
60
-
5.0
7.6
10.4
16.5
-
16.8
-
29.8
-
22.5
40
50
-
-
9.7
-
28.6
39.6
-
49.2
39.5
-
37.8
-
14.4
15.5
19.9
29.0
45.4
-
-
55.1
-
36.0
80
-
-
6.1
-
10.8
-
-
25.7
26.3
-
22.4
25
-
-
10.1
-
54.2
-
-
20.8
23.7
19.1
21.9
-
32.7
32.7
32.1
33.3
39.9
39.5
38.9
44.4
47.1
20.1
39.0
Average
Notes: U stands for unknown or indeterminate, control represents avg. lengths of whole adult
elements (taken from a sample of the Grasshopper burial population).
-
44
element and age class. Of all of the maximum lengths, 439 (24%) measurements were
more than 5 centimeters and 363 (20%) specimens had a maximum length less than 2
centimeters. The overall average maximum length is 39 millimeters. Not surprisingly
the average maximum length for adult specimens is the largest at 47.1 mm. Fetal and
infant maximum lengths are the smallest (when discarding infrequent age classes), and
there is a general progression to larger maximum lengths from infant to adult. The
unknown (U) or indeterminate specimens had the smallest average maximum lengths at
20.1 mm. The sizes of specimens are related to the ability to categorize them by element,
therefore small specimens are more likely to be classified as indeterminate. The radius
was the element that had the highest maximum length at 67.2 mm, followed by the
humerus (61.8mm) and then the femur (60.7mm). The elements with the smallest
average maximum lengths were teeth (17.8mm), carpals (21.9mm), and the phalanges
(22.5,22.4).
In regards to maximum length, 308 (17%) of the measurements were not
impacted by breakage and 78 (4%) measurements were affected by ancient and not
modern postmortem breaks. Of the adult specimens with complete maximum lengths,
only two are long bones (humerus and radius). The rest of the adult specimens are small
elements like carpals (7), hand phalanges (34), foot phalanges (11), metacarpals (18),
metatarsals (11), and teeth (4). This contrasts with the complete maximum lengths for
the child age class in which 10 specimens are major long bones. Specimens whose
maximum lengths were only affected by ancient postmortem breakage are from small and
large elements, without a discernable pattern based on size. The remaining 1419 (79%)
45
measurements of maximum lengths were taken on specimens with modern fractures that
impacted the measurements.
Table 7, Distribution of Ancient Max. Lengths
Age Class
F
F/I
I
I/C
C
C/SA
SA
SA/A
YA
A
Unknown
Number of
Specimens
1
3
11
7
27
2
1
3
2
19
2
Avg. Max.
Length (mm)
8.5
31.7
33.9
38.8
34.7
40.0
16.8
29.3
51.3
68.5
10.8
The distribution of specimens
whose maximum lengths were taken on
ancient breaks, but not impacted by
modern breaks is shown in Table 7. The
elements, including large and small,
regular and irregular, are represented with
no discernable pattern. The maximum
lengths of specimens impacted only by ancient breaks are more than 2 cm larger than the
average adult specimen, and ½ cm larger than the average infant maximum length, but ½
cm smaller than the average maximum length for the child age class.
Table 8, Avg. Max. and Min. Widths
Age Class
F
F/I
I
I/C
C
C/SA
SA
SA/YA
SA/A
YA
YA/MA
MA/OA
A
Unknown
Max. Width
(mm)
6.5
11.5
12.9
15.8
16.4
19.7
17.5
11.3
17.0
30.7
66.2
41.6
21.0
11.4
Min. Width
(mm)
2.4
2.6
3.3
3.3
5.3
6.2
5.1
5.7
5.9
10.7
13.8
16.9
7.6
2.6
The maximum and minimum
widths are shown for the age categories in
Table 8. Both measurements increase with
specimens age at death, with the exception
of age classes that account for only a few
specimens.
Figure 1 is a line graph with all
three measurements shown. It shows a
46
gradual increase of bone size with increasing age, but there is a slight dip around the
subadult (SA) and subadult/adult (SA/A) age classes. Also apparent is that fetal
maximum widths are relatively smaller in proportion to the other measurements based on
the proximity of the maximum width and minimum width lines. The overall average of
the maximum widths is 16.6 mm and the average minimum width is 5.2.
Figure 1, Measurements by Age Class
50
45
40
Measurements (mm)
35
30
Max. Length (mm)
25
Max. Width (mm)
Min. Width (mm)
20
15
10
5
0
F
F/I
I
I/C
C
C/SA
SA
SA/A
A
Unknown
Age Class
In all, 107 (6%) specimens show evidence for at least 1 pathology. The
pathologies are predominated by degenerative joint disease (37 cases) and periosteal
reactions (44). Figure 2 shows the frequencies of the various pathologies found on the
isolated human bone. None of the occurrences of pathologies are remarkable as they fit
the general pattern found in the Grasshopper Pueblo burials. The pathologies are
47
indicative of the low level of endemic illnesses among the inhabitants of the prehistoric
American Southwest.
Figure 2, Pathologies: Types and Counts
50
45
40
Number of Occurrences
35
30
25
20
15
10
5
0
Abcesses
Antemortem
Fractures
Caries
DJD
EHP
OCD
Osteoporosis
PR
PH
Pathologies
Notes: DJD = degenerative joint disease, EHP = enamel hypoplasia, OCD = osteochondritis dessicans, PR = periosteal
reaction, PH = porotic hyperostosis.
Table 9, Associations Between Specimens
Type of Association
None
Possible Same Element
Same Element
Possible Same Individual
Same individual
Sum of Same Individual
and Element
Sum of Same and Probable
Individual and Element
# of Specimens
1270
22
249
112
152
%
70.4
1.2
13.8
6.2
8.4
401
22.2
535
29.6
Some of the specimens
were possibly from the same
individual or the same element
(see Table 9). These
associations are based on
refitting and articulating of
specimens. The possible matches made between elements relate to specimens of similar
48
provenience, age, and morphology. Associations were limited in many cases to bones
bagged together; otherwise the associations would go unobserved. Close to one third of
the specimens were associated to another specimen.
The collection of taphonomic data was central to the present research. This
includes observations on breakage, weathering, burning, and toolmarks. The frequencies
of the modifications are listed in Table 10. When modifications occurred more than
once, they were grouped into the multiple category. The percent of the total number of
specimens in this study that were modified is also listed.
Table 10, Taphonomy: Modifications Present
Quantity of
Tool
Rodent
MPB APB
PB
Weathering
Burning
Modification
Marks
Gnawing
None
462
1470
1798
1395
1801
1799
1799
1
415
146
2
109
0
3
0
Multiple
928
189
5
301
4
5
6
Total #
1343
335
7
410
4
6
6
Modified
% Modified
74.4
18.6
0.4
22.7
0.2
0.3
0.3
Notes: MPB = modern postmortem breakage, APB = ancient postmortem breakage, PB =
perimortem breakage
Approximately 75% of the specimens examined in this study have at least one
modern postmortem break. Most bone that it is exposed by excavation is fragile. Even
with the most careful recovery many bones will fragment because weathering has
weakened the bone while it is in the archaeological context.
Ancient postmortem breaks occurred before the specimens were recovered.
Roughly 20 % of the specimens in this study have ancient postmortem breaks. This
suggests that a formation process affected the bone to a degree that it broke. Over half of
the specimens that have ancient postmortem breaks were broken multiple times. In the
49
case of multiple ancient breaks it is not known if the modifications occurred at the same
time.
The specimens exhibiting burning, toolmarks, and perimortem breakage are listed
in Table 11. The seven elements affected by perimortem breaks include a humerus,
maxilla/zygomatic, temporal, sphenoid, radius, and two tibia fragments. In a sample of
this size, it is reasonable that a low of a number of occurrences could be due to the
overlap of characteristics between postmortem and perimortem breaks. Inversely, some
of the specimens classified with ancient postmortem breakage may actually be
perimortem. The ulna and humerus (from the same provenience) have toolmarks in
addition to the perimortem breakage. This makes these specimens stronger cases for
perimortem cultural modification.
Table 11, Specimens Exhibiting Intentional Cultural Modification
Number
249
298
342
508
747
752
759
760
780
790
799
859
1140
1204
1433
1435
1437
1438
Specimen
Cranial Vault Frag.
Temporal
Zygomatic
Sphenoid
Radius
Ulna
Tibia
Tibia
Humerus
Pelvis
Long Bone Frag.
Humerus
Maxilla, Zygomatic
Phalange
Parietal
Parietal
Parietal
Long Bone Frag
Modification
Toolmark
Perimortem Break; Peeling
Burned; Black
Perimortem Break; Peeling
Perimortem Break?
Toolmarks
Perimortem Break
Perimortem Break
Toolmarks
Burned; Black
Burned; Calcined
Perimortem Break; Toolmarks
Perimortem Breakage
Burned; Black
Toolmarks
Toolmarks
Toolmarks
Toolmarks
Provenience
R40, SEQ, FEA. 7
CORRIDOR, L2
R27, L1
R33, PIT 3
R359, FLOOR
R231, SEQ, FLOOR
NONE
NONE
R231, SEQ, FLOOR
R27, NWQ, SFL1
R26, BURIAL FILL
R231, SEQ, FLOOR
R183, NEQ
R18
TEST TRENCH 38
TEST TRENCH 38
TEST TRENCH 38
TEST TRENCH 38
50
Although Table 10 shows only 410 specimens affected by weathering,
theoretically all bone that comes from excavations is weathered. Additionally, much
modern postmortem breakage results from the weakening of the bone due to weathering.
The categorization of weathering used here did not include this breakage and referred to
occurrences when weathering affected the overall observability of the specimen. For
example, discoloration due to weathering does not necessarily have adverse affects on
observability and therefore would not be recorded.
Only 4 (0.2%) specimens have attributes suggesting that they were burned. All 4
specimens were aged as adults and were found in rooms. At least 2 of the specimens
were found subfloor and one was in burial fill. A right zygomatic, a proximal foot
phalanx, and an acetabulum fragment were burned black. The pelvis and zygomatic
fragments were both found subfloor in room 27, although horizontal proximity within the
room is not known. All three of these specimens had ancient postmortem breaks. The
burning caused the bones to turn black, but did not cause any warping, cracking, or
shrinking. The black discoloration covered the outer cortex of the bones, as well as the
bone exposed by the breakage. Since these specimens were burned after they had already
been broken, and the breakage was postmortem, the burning occurred after a significant
amount of decomposition took place. The black coloration suggests the bones were
burned for a short duration and at a relatively low temperature.
In contrast to the charred specimens, there is a calcined long bone fragment. The
bone exhibits warping and cracking that is consistent with green bone burning and
prehistoric cremations. This bone was burned hotter, closer to the death of the individual,
51
and for a longer duration than the other specimens. Cremations were found at
Grasshopper, although they are relatively rare (n=4).
There are six (0.3%) specimens with the presence of rodent gnaw marks. All of
these marks are short, relatively narrow, parallel, and appear in clusters. The gnaw marks
on one specimen are lighter than the adjacent cortical bone, suggesting the modification
occurred relatively recently. The other five specimens have gnaw marks that appear to be
ancient. The elements affected by rodent gnawing include an ulna, a clavicle, a femur, a
radius, a rib, and a temporal. Of the specimens, five were found in rooms and one was
found in a trench. The temporal was found in roof fall, the rib was found on a floor, and
the other three specimens were found in fill.
There are eight specimens that exhibit toolmarks (see Table 11). Of these
specimens, four come from the same excavation trench, three are from room 231, and one
specimen was from room 40. The toolmarks vary in depth and patterning.
From the trench, a long bone fragment and three parietal fragments were found
with toolmarks. Although the parietals and the long bone fragment are all aged as adult,
it is not known if they are from the same individual. The long bone fragment is relatively
small (ca. 22x6mm) and has a deep toolmark located perpendicular to the maximum
length. The groove is deep (ca 1.5 mm) and is 3.6 mm long (the entire width of the
specimen at this location. This mark contains parallel striations on the walls of the vshaped groove. The coloration of the groove is the same as the rest of the specimen.
The three parietal fragments also have toolmarks, although they are different in
morphology. Refitting of the parietal fragments shows that they are from the same
52
element. The marks are fine shallow striations in four different locations. They are not
parallel or in any pattern and may be what White (1992:129,150) terms “random striae”.
Therefore, they may not be the result of purposeful cultural modification (White
1992:131). However, the fragmentary nature of the specimens does not allow for strong
support for any interpretation. Random striae, percussion striae, and even some cutmarks
can have the same morphology. The specimens have postmortem breakage that occurred
after the marks were formed based on the morphology and the locations of the marks.
The occurrence of these specimens in the same proveniences as the long bone fragment is
suggestive of some type of cultural formation process.
A cranial fragment of an infant/child, found in room fill, exhibits several
chopmarks. In all, there are six toolmarks, including one cutmark. All of the marks are
perimortem, based on coloration, luster, and morphology. This specimen was preserved
using Gelva, a preservative similar to varnish, that adhered soil into the marks and
obscures observations. The breakage of the specimen is ancient postmortem. It is
possible that the modification of this specimen, including the toolmarks, occurred during
the “gray” area of taphonomy between perimortem and postmortem.
The final three specimens exhibiting toolmarks were found on the floor of room
231. In the final phase of construction this first story room was surrounded by rooms on
all four sides. Access to the room was from above, through the floor of the second story
room. The function of room 231 was as a manufacturing location (Riggs 2001:169).
Previous to this function, it may have been used for habitation or storage, and it was used
as a midden after it was abandoned.
53
Two of the specimens are from the same adult right humerus (refit) and the third
specimen is from an adult right ulna. Based on the relative size, coloration, bone density,
cultural modifications, and proveniences of the humerus and ulna, there is a strong
probability that they are from the same individual.
With the refitting of the two humeri specimens it was possible to take the
measurement for standard maximum length (299 mm). It was also possible to measure
the vertical head diameter (41.5 mm) and the distal breadth (50.6 mm). These
measurements are within the range of female (Bass 1995:156). Additionally the humerus
is relatively small and gracile in proportion to the Grasshopper burial population. The
humeri specimens have fully fused epiphyses and no indicators of degenerative joint
disease or osteoporosis were observed. The individual was probably female and between
the ages of 18 and 40.
A striking feature of the humerus is the perimortem break down the entire length
of the shaft (Figures 3, 4, and 6). The break does not extend into the epiphyses.
Separating the two specimens is an ancient postmortem break that may have begun as a
fracture crack at the same time as the perimortem breakage. The longitudinal fracture is
perimortem based on the regularity of the fracture, the coloration, and the angulation of
the fracture relative to the long axis of the element. Additional perimortem
characteristics include an incipient fracture crack and a percussion scar.
54
Figure 3, Culturally Modified Humerus (Anterior side is up, distal end to the left; arrows show
locations of cutmarks)
Figure 4, Culturally Modified Humerus (Posterior side is up, distal end is to the left; arrows show
locations of cutmarks)
There is a concentration of cutmarks on the humerus around the distal 1/3 of the
bone. The marks in this area range from shallow to deep grooves. The deepest marks are
on high areas of the bone. The marks are parallel, v-shaped in cross-section, and
clustered. There are deep cuts on the lateral aspect of the distal 1/3, as well as the
adjacent anterior surface. There is also a cutmark on the same specimen around the
proximal 1/3 of the element. It is at the tip of the splinter caused by the large incipient
fracture crack, but also is found on the adjacent bone.
The proximal end has additional cutmarks. They are shallow and long (ca. 10
mm) v-shaped grooves. They are concentrated on the lateral aspect of the element. A
very large (10.7 x 2.9 mm) chopmark is also present in the proximal end of the humerus
that extends into the humerus head. It is deep and has inwardly crushed cortical bone
into the underlying trabecular bone. The edges of this mark have modern breakage,
55
Figure 5, Refit of Culturally Modified Humerus (posterior side is up, proximal end to the left; arrows
show the locations of cutmarks)
possibly caused by the initial cleaning of the specimen. It is not possible to securely infer
that this mark was made around the time of death because of the postmortem breakage.
If this chopmark is perimortem, the morphology and location suggest a blow from
above and behind with an implement similar to a ground stone axe. The acromion of
scapula would have been in the path of this blow. It is possible that the cutmarks on the
proximal end of this bone and the chopmark occurred as part of the dismemberment of
the arm from the torso.
The location of most of the cutmarks could be inferred to be butchering marks
because of their proximity to muscle attachments. However, some of the marks are
parallel to the long axis of the bone. These marks tend to be fine shallow striations and
may be due to defleshing.
The ulna from the same general location (see Figure 6) also has cutmarks. They
are located in four places along the anterior shaft. They are all relatively shallow vshaped grooves. There are numerous parallel marks in the locations depicted in Figure 6.
These marks may also be from defleshing. The figure also shows that the proximal and
56
distal ends of the bones are broken and the rest of the element was not recovered. The
breaks have been classified as ancient postmortem and not perimortem based on the
irregularity of the breaks.
Figure 6, Modified Ulna (Anterior side is up, distal end is to the left; arrows show the locations of
cutmarks)
As stated above, these specimens were found on the floor of Room 231. Six
additional fragments of human bone were also found on this floor. They are infant ribs
and any association with the humerus and ulna is unknown. Also found on this floor
were clusters of bowls, a ground stone axe, raw materials, a bone whistle, a scraper,
antlers, an olla, deer mandibles, and a turkey wing. The proximity and association of the
modified specimens to any of these other artifacts is not known at this time. There is a
hearth and a second earlier floor below this floor. After the room was abandoned, it was
filled with trash. There were no living surfaces above the floor with the modified human
specimens.
57
CHAPTER 4
ANALYSIS AND DISCUSSION
The following discussion is based on the research objectives stated above. The
analysis of this data set is limited by a lack of comparative research. This analysis is
therefore preliminary and meant to promote future research, peer review, and debate.
Pattern of Isolated Bone
One of the research questions centers on what the pattern of isolated human bone
is at Grasshopper Pueblo. The presence of over 1800 pieces of isolated bone represents a
significant quantity of isolated bone. If this rate of occurrence is representative of the site
as a whole, over 9000 specimens of isolated human bone are likely present at
Grasshopper Pueblo. In the 67 percent of the excavated rooms with isolated human bone,
an average of 17 specimens were found per room. The specimens were also found at all
elevations, including 103 in the first level, 61 on a floor, and 314 below a floor. Isolated
human bone is therefore ubiquitous throughout the site.
Specimens were found in all of the age classes, from fetal to old adult. To
examine demography it is necessary to determine how many individuals are represented
by the isolated human bone assemblage by calculating the minimum number of
individuals (MNI). There are multiple ways to calculate the MNI, which is defined as the
smallest number of individuals necessary to account for all of the specimens (Reitz and
Wing 1999:194-200). The method used to calculate the MNI for the isolated human bone
from Grasshopper was limited because many of the bones only had their provenience
data written on the bag in which they shared with other specimens. Placing multiple
58
specimens out of their bags from different proveniences would inevitably have caused the
loss of provenience information. Therefore, MNI was not determined by visual
inspection but based on side, observability, age, element and segment data. Table 12
shows the MNIs for the hyoid, mandible, atlas, humerus, ulna, radius, femur, tibia, and
fibula. Other elements were examined but found to be less represented in this sample.
Necessary landmark information was not recorded on the irregular bones like the carpals
and tarsals to derive an MNI but counting all of these specimens present would not
increase the MNI.
Table 12, Minimum Number of Individuals
ELEMENT
Hyoid
Mandible
Atlas
Humerus
Ulna
Radius
Femur
Tibia
Fibula
Total
Adjusted
Total
4
4
5
4
1
12
11
2
12
3
2
1
2
1
1
3
1
3
4
4
4
7
7
4
7
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
2
1
4
3
2
3
2
1
1
4
2
7
7
22
15
12
29
24
10
36
Adjusted
Total
2
6
7
14
11
9
24
20
9
27
2
12
2
7
1
1
-
4
-
32
F F/I
2
1
1
3
1
1
3
1
4
2
1
2
2
3
I
I/C C C/SA
SA
SA/A
A
Total
The total row in Table 12 shows the highest MNI determined for each age class.
The sum of these totals is 36. However, because some of the age classes overlap, there is
the possibility for redundancy. The adjusted total takes this into account by using the
same observations utilized to determine the MNI. By examining the attributes of the
specimens in the overlapping age classes, it is possible to exclude the redundancy. The
59
adjusted total results in an overall MNI of 32.
The largest MNI was represented by the left femur with 29 individuals, followed
by the tibia and humerus at 24 and 22 respectively. The MNI for infants was the greatest
at 12 (37.5%), followed by the child age group at 7 (21.9%). So although all age classes
are represented, the MNI, as well as the number of specimens, demonstrates that the
isolated human bone assemblage contains more juveniles than adults. Discussed at
length below, the proportion of juveniles to adults in the isolated bone assemblage is
skewed to juveniles relative to the burial data.
The MNI of the isolated human bone can be compared to the Grasshopper burials.
Table 13 compares the age distributions derived from the MNI and the number of isolated
human bone specimens to the age distribution of the burial population.
Table 13, Comparison of Isolated Bone MNI and Burial Age Data
ELEMENT
# of Aged Isolated
Specimens
%
Isolated MNI
%
Burial Sample
%
Difference: # of
Isolated – Burial
Difference: Isolated
MNI - Burial
SA/
A
A
Total
37
95
465
1780
2.2
1
3.1
5
0.7
2.1
1
3.1
8
1.1
5.3
0.0
9
1.3
26.1
4
12.5
233
32.7
32
713
-
5.6
1.5
1.0
4.0
-6.6
-
-0.4
2.4
2.0
-1.3
-20.2
-
F
F/I
I
I/C
C
16
56
366
199
497
39
.9
3
9.4
23
3.2
3.1
2
6.3
54
7.6
20.6 11.2 27.9
12
2
7
37.5 6.3 21.9
201 21 159
28.2 2.9 22.3
-2.3
-4.5 -7.6
8.3
6.2
-1.3
-2.0
9.3
C/SA SA
Note: The specimens categorized as unknown have been omitted from this table and calculations.
The largest discrepancy in frequency between the burial assemblage and the
isolated bone MNI is found in the adult age class. This suggests that the isolated human
bone sample is skewed toward juveniles relative to the burial assemblage. Inversely, this
60
means the burial sample may be biased towards older individuals. The root cause of this
bias may be that disturbed juvenile skeletons were not recognized as burials in the field,
causing a disproportionate number of subadult skeletons, relative to adult, to be placed in
the isolated human bone sample. Evidence for this can be found in the appendices in
which there are multiple elements from the same age range from the same provenience.
Although it is not now possible to securely combine these specimens, it is probable that
some do represent relatively complete individuals. Another explanation is that the
calculation of the adult MNI from fragmented bone is more problematic because a
fragment from a long bone shaft is not adequate to increase the MNI for an adult
specimen, but a segment of the same size from an infant could comprise an entire bone.
Thus it is likely that the MNI for adults is an underennumeration of adults relative to
juveniles. Another consideration is the precision of estimating age from isolated bone. If
the adjacent age categories in Table 14 are combined, the divergence in percentages is
not as marked. The possible bias in the burial assemblage suggests that some inferences
based on the demography of the population may be flawed.
In relation to elements present, all of the major bones of the human skeleton were
observed. The only elements not present are the small bones of the inner ear. Larger
elements of the skeleton are better represented in this sample than smaller elements. For
long bones, the elements with larger circumferences are more common than more slender
elements like radii and fibulae. Elements with thin cortical bone like the sacrum,
sternum, carpals, and tarsals are less frequent than elements with thicker cortical bone.
61
The maximum length of specimens ranged from 4 mm to 420 mm, with an
average maximum length of 39 mm. The maximum lengths of the specimens do vary by
age, starting at about 32 mm for the fetal age class and increasing to 47 mm for adults
(Table 14). The appendicular region has the largest average maximum length of 53 mm.
Larger elements break into larger specimens than do smaller elements, but the sizes that
they break into is not much larger, if any, than the average maximum lengths of complete
small elements. Additionally, large elements are more fragmented than small elements
and small elements are relatively more complete. Table 14 shows the strong trend of
maximum lengths increasing with age.
Table14, Summary of Maximum Lengths (mm) by Body Region
Body Region
J
J/A
A
U
Avg.
Cranial
35.3
31.3
42.4
20.8
35.7
Dentition
11.0
21.1
17.2
12.6
Appendicular
47.8
56.9
67.9
21.7
52.6
Axial
32.9
47.9
44.8
30.6
36.7
Extremities
18.5
39.7
39.5
31.0
Unknown
39.5
20.8
23.7
19.1
21.9
Average
36.0
43.7
47.3
20.1
39.0
Note: Juvenile (J) = Fetal to Subadult, J/A = Subadult to Adult, A = Adult, U = Unknown
Overall, the general pattern is the presence of a large amount of isolated human
bone throughout a diverse set of proveniences. The isolated bone is from the entire range
of skeletal elements and from individuals of all ages. Large, complete elements are rare
and do not fit the general pattern of isolated bone. Their presence is anomalous and
warrants future research. Additional study should examine the under representation of
small adult elements (e.g. carpals, teeth, and phalanges).
Comparison To Burial Sample
62
For contrast, a sample of burials (n=35) from Grasshopper Pueblo was compared
to the isolated bone. This included five individuals from the age classes of fetal, infant,
child, subadult, young adult, and mature adult. Unlike the isolated bone data, the burial
sample is comprised of information on the element level. The proveniences of these
individuals varied, but included rooms (25), excavation trenching (7), and the Great Kiva
(3). The burials were selected to include individuals excavated throughout the duration
of fieldwork at Grasshopper. The burial sample allows for the examination of
correlations or discrepancies in what elements are missing from the burials and what are
present in the isolated bone assemblage.
Table 15, Burial Sample Completeness by Body Region and Element
Element(s)
Cranial
Dentition
Axial
Appendicular
Extremities
Frontal
Parietals
Temporals
Occipital
Humerii (L+R)
Radii (L+R)
Ulnae (L+R)
Femurs (L+R)
Tibiae (L+R)
Fibulae (L+R)
C
15
10
12
14
7
21
26
25
21
48
40
38
48
44
21
P
16
18
18
17
15
12
6
5
12
12
18
20
11
25
26
F
3
3
3
4
12
0
0
0
0
2
4
3
0
1
5
A
1
4
2
0
1
2
3
5
2
8
8
9
11
10
18
% F or A
11
20
14
11
37
6
4
7
6
14
17
17
16
16
33
Table 15 displays
the completeness of the
body regions and major
elements of the burial
sample. Completeness
was scored utilizing the
methods stated above to
place the groups of
elements into the
categories of complete (C), partial (P), fragmentary (F), and absent (A).
Table 1 offers comparative data for Table 15. Out of the total number of isolated
human bones, 21 % are cranial, 3 % are dentition, 32 % are axial, 37 % are appendicular,
63
and 16 % are from the extremities. The relationship between the burial sample and
isolated human bone sample is that the elements most frequently missing from burials are
also missing in the isolated human bone assemblage. Teeth, extremities, and fibulae have
the lowest rates in both the burial sample and the isolated bone sample.
A similar pattern in burial data was found by Waldron (1987) in which the rates
of survival for elements are provided from the adult portion of a burial sample from a
Romano-British cemetery near London. His sample showed that the “bones which are
least represented are the phalanges of the hands and the feet, the carpals, and the coccyx”
(Waldron 1987:63).
The similarity between the skeletal elements of extremities and teeth is size.
Small elements are more likely than large elements to be affected by diagenesis and
completely disintegrating in archaeological contexts (Von Endt and Ubelaker 1984).
Their small size would also make them easier to become displaced from a burial through
non-cultural formation processes such as rodent burrowing. However, cultural
disturbance, including prehistoric digging that disturbs older burials by newer burials
would tend to displace larger elements and make small elements like those of the hands,
feet and teeth commingled remains rather than isolated. Additionally, the observability
data for the isolated bone (see Table 1) shows that when extremities or dentition are
present they are usually nearly complete specimens. This would mean that large
elements might represent more specimens of isolated human bone than small elements
because they break into more pieces.
64
Absence of teeth in the isolated bone sample has other complicating factors.
Fetuses, young infants, and individuals with congenital absences of a tooth or teeth do not
have the full set of dentition of the normal adult, and therefore they would not have as
many teeth to become potentially isolated bone. Additionally, individuals can lose their
teeth before death and it is unknown if the prehistoric discard practices would have
created isolated specimens out of these “lost” teeth. Another factor is that the
composition of teeth is different from bone and as such survives differentially in different
archaeological contexts.
Formation Processes
The causes of displacement creating isolated human bone are likely numerous and
complex. However, the data does suggest some pathways more then others.
Around 19% of the specimens have ancient postmortem breakage, meaning that
formation processes acted on some of the bones between initial interment and recovery.
The low incidence of extreme weathering, burning (4), and rodent gnawing (6) suggest
that this assemblage of isolated bone did not lie on a living surface for any extended
period of time. The majority of the burning is likely the result of non-purposeful human
behavior and if rodents came into contact with these specimens, it was while they were
underground. This hypothesis is supported by a complete lack of sun bleaching of the
isolated specimens. The frequency of rodent gnawing of the isolated bone is extremely
low (0.2%). It is not known if this is the norm for isolated bone from other sites. There
is also an absence of carnivore gnawing and tooth punctures. This suggests that if
65
displacement brought isolated specimens to the surface, this occurred after the organic
components of the bones decayed, making them unappealing to scavengers.
Most of the specimens do not show evidence for perimortem modification. The
low level of perimortem modification suggests rare cultural events rather than patterned
behavior as responsible for modification around the time of death. These anomalous
specimens will be discussed below in relation to research on cannibalism claims.
Rodent burrowing is ubiquitous at archaeological sites in the Southwest, and is
commonly blamed for disturbing burials and displacing specimens. The archaeological
field notes from excavation of the burials contain many observations of rodent
burrowing. The dimensions of the specimens and the frequency of rodent gnawing can
be evaluated to test the hypothesis that rodent burrowing is a major cause of displacement
of human remains.
The normal size of materials displaced by rodents is between 6 and 25 millimeters
and the maximum size is 50 millimeters (Bocek 1986:591). This is supported by the
average gopher burrow diameter (6 cm), which would limit the size of displaced objects.
In the isolated bone sample, 1214 (67%) specimens are greater than 25 millimeters in
maximum length, and 439 (24%) specimens are greater than 50 millimeters in maximum
length. Additionally, many of the specimens exhibit modern postmortem breakage (74%)
and therefore would have been larger before excavation. However, when maximum
width is considered, only 282 (16%) specimens are greater than 25 millimeters and 44
(2.4%) are greater than 50 millimeters. Based on the metric data the majority of isolated
66
bone in this study could have been displaced by burrowing but many specimens are larger
than the normal sizes of objects that are displaced by rodents.
Therefore, in addition to rodent burrowing other formation processes likely
played a role in displacing specimens from burials. One of these processes is the
prehistoric cultural disturbance of burials by the activities of the inhabitants of
Grasshopper Pueblo. Digging may have occurred for many reasons, but the most
prominent at Grasshopper would have been for the placement of subsequent burials and,
to a lesser degree, for features (e.g. pits, kivas). Similar to rodent gnawing, the
disturbance of burials by later burials is well documented by the excavation field notes.
The inhabitants of Grasshopper buried the dead in and closely around the
roomblocks. As the age of the pueblo increased, it is logical that subsequent burials and
construction would disturb earlier burials. Based on the excavation notes, the normal
result of this disturbance would be the placement of the more recent burial into the pit,
with the subsequent disturbed remains and possibly their grave goods placed in the fill
overlying the new burial. Frequently, excavators matched specimens from the same
individual back together based on these observations. Additional matching of specimens
from commingled individuals occurred in the lab.
The isolated human bone is the result of the inability of the excavators to find a
burial match for the displaced specimens. I attempted to match a sample of 50 isolated
human bones to burials utilizing provenience and age data. This was done by examining
the data and remains of the burials from the rooms in which the sample of isolated bone
was found. Additionally, I examined the remains from the contiguous rooms. I did not
67
examine the burial and isolated bone data for every room, but I was not successful in
making any matches in the sample I examined.
To test the hypothesis that prehistoric cultural digging was the cause of the
displacement of human bone, several lines of evidence must be evaluated. The first
relates to breakage and, more specifically, ancient postmortem breaks. These breaks,
observed in 19% of the assemblage (possibly higher in frequency but masked by modern
postmortem breaks) are possibly linked to prehistoric digging. This percentage would
seem to be consistent with prehistoric disturbance if they were treated carefully by the
diggers.
Also depending on the care taken by the prehistoric diggers, some toolmarks may
have resulted from the disturbances. However, there is no osteological evidence for
ancient postmortem toolmarks. The only toolmarks that are present (discussed in detail
below) are from sharp edged instruments. It is possible, though unlikely, that the
toolmarks left by digging have been obscured through time and not identified in the
laboratory. It is not known how the prehistoric inhabitants dug the burial pits, or what
implement, so it is possible that it was done in a way that would not modify the remains
of the original burial.
Prehistoric disturbance may be responsible for the general pattern seen in the
commingled remains and isolated human bone assemblage. The isolated assemblage is
missing small elements and these are the specimens that are commonly found as
commingled remains. This may result from the fact that these small elements may be
unnoticed by the prehistoric excavators and not be exhumed in this process. The
68
subsequent burial is then placed amongst these small elements, resulting in commingled
remains. This pattern supports the hypothesis of prehistoric cultural disturbance as a
factor in creating isolated bone, although the relative importance of this factor is not
known.
It is possible that other specimens not part of this sample could have been linked
to burials. At the minimum, this suggests that the sample of isolated human bone that I
tried to match with a burial was displaced a significant distance from its original location.
This could occur through prehistoric cultural disturbance. This is interesting because
there does not appear to have been a high degree of ritual involved in the discard of these
remains. The presence of the isolated bones in a diversity of proveniences and elevations
suggest a non-singularized process for discard. This is differentiated from the extremely
singularized mortuary practices for the complete body (see Whittlesey 1978).
This is especially interesting in light of the historic and modern beliefs of the
indigenous inhabitants of the American Southwest. It is believed by many that human
remains contain dangerous power. Many native groups believe that disturbing human
remains is taboo, and go through cleansing ceremonies if they believe they have been
near the dead. At Hopi, at least in recent times, the dead have been placed in a cemetery
away from the pueblos. At Grasshopper, however, the inhabitants were surrounded by
burials and likely encountered isolated human bone on a regular basis.
The study of isolated bone, through further osteological, archaeological, and
ethnohistorical research could trace the way in which people thought about the dead, and
how they dealt with human skeletal remains when they were disturbed in the past. The
69
presence of cemeteries outside of the Pueblo, like at Hopi, may be a cultural phenomenon
that has evolved through time. Further attempts to match isolated bone to burials and
investigate the spatial relationship of burials to places of discard of isolated human bone
would be a valuable future avenue of research.
Another hypothesis for the displacement of bone from burials relates to the
excavation of the site. Small elements are more difficult than large elements for
archaeologists with limited osteological training to be able to differentiate as human.
Additionally, to the untrained eye, subadult human remains can be mistaken for faunal
remains. This is compounded by disturbances, like bioturbation, that can disarticulate
skeletons.
The creation of isolated bone during recovery can be tested through examining the
associations noted during analysis. The 535 (30%) specimens with associations are
significant but examining the provenience and age class data in the appendices show that
there are many cases where individuals may be present but unrecognized. This presents
two problems. The first is the inability to securely state that specimens of the same age
and provenience are from the same individual. It is probable that there are individuals
but this cannot be confirmed for specific cases because the necessary information is
lacking. The second problem is how many specimens or elements from one person are
necessary to constitute another individual. The smaller the number of specimens
necessary to designate an individual would make a higher chance for redundancy in
counting individuals. Therefore, although it is apparent that during the excavation of the
70
site, individuals were designated as isolated human bone, it is not possible to know how
often this occurred and how much this biases the burial data.
Another important factor that may have created and impacted the isolated human
bone assemblage is diagenesis. Von Endt and Ortner (1984) have shown that small
elements are disproportionately affected by degradation relative to larger elements.
Along with small elements being commingled with burials, degradation is a likely cause
for the lack of small elements in the isolated assemblage. Additionally, it is plausible that
a skeleton could be degraded to a degree that only a few partial elements remain and it
would be collected as isolated bone.
Faunalturbation, diagenesis, prehistoric cultural disturbance, and excavation are
all ways in which isolated human bone was likely created at Grasshopper Pueblo. They
are all supported by the data, but the relative effects of these processes remain unknown.
However, rodent burrowing, although a factor, has been shown to be only one way that
isolated bone is created. Future research may be able to clarify the degree to which the
hypotheses are responsible for displacing human bone.
Comparison to Anomalous Assemblages
The discussion on formation processes considered the general pattern of isolated
bone found at Grasshopper Pueblo. However, during the analysis of this assemblage,
several anomalous specimens were observed. Most notable of these anomalous
specimens are those with toolmarks. However, most of the incidences of toolmarks and
perimortem breaks occurred on specimens that are fragmented to a degree that
interpretations are problematic.
71
The specimens with perimortem fractures include three cranial fragments, one
humerus fragment, one radius fragment, and two tibia fragments. These specimens may
relate to purposeful cultural modification or represent the ambiguity in the methods.
Although these specimens are interesting, the low frequency of occurrences of these
modifications limits interpretation.
Multiple specimens have evidence for cultural modification in the form of
toolmarks (see Table 12). The toolmark on the long bone fragment is extremely deep and
was probably created with a sawing action. The cause of this modification may have
been tool or jewelry manufacture. Despite having only human characteristics, the
extremely small size of this specimen means there is a chance that the specimen is faunal.
This is because the basis of this identification is based on the density and morphology of
the cortical bone and there are no landmarks or trabecular bone present.
The cause of toolmarks on the parietal fragments (see Table 11) is ambiguous.
Because the locations of the marks are random, it is possible that they were not caused by
intentional behavior. It is plausible that the parietals were modified by movement over a
hard surface (e.g. a compacted floor).
The other cranial fragment with toolmarks is small and no other specimens from
this individual were found. The preservative present on the specimen obscures the
observability of the specimen. The chopmarks, which are relatively small, do not
penetrate the inner cortex. Although the specimen is interesting, the cause of this
modification is not known. It does appear to have been made with a tool around the time
72
of death. However, the presence of preservative and the extremely fragmentary condition
limits interpretation.
On the other hand, the two humeri and ulna fragments from room 231 are more
complete and similar to the bones in the assemblages of human remains that have been
the subject of claims of cannibalism (e.g. Turner and Turner 1999). The existence of
these specimens was not previously known. There has been significant critique of the
cannibalism claims, many centered on the strength of the data. The only way that the
cannibalism debate is closed would be through finding additional anomalous remains.
These three specimens represent one such new incidence of highly modified human bone.
The locations of cutmarks on the specimens at or near sites of muscle attachment
suggest there was still flesh on the bones when the modification occurred. Additionally,
the fine shallow marks may be the result of defleshing. The breakage of the humerus
occurred after the marking by tools. The perimortem break of the humerus down the
length of the shaft is not a common way for the bone to break. It likely involved at least
one incidence of direct percussion to the shaft (supported by the percussion scar) and
possibly a twisting force to the bone to prevent the force of the break to move
perpendicular to the long axis of the bone.
This is good evidence for cultural modification including dismemberment,
defleshing, and breakage. However, the purpose of this modification is less evident.
Cannibalism, violence (intra and intercommunity), trophy taking, socially deviant
behavior, witchcraft execution, and mortuary ritual are some of the plausible scenarios
that could have resulted in the modification present.
73
As the humerus and ulna are isolated, a hypothesis that does not fit most of the
anomalous assemblages, does possibly present a reason why these specimens were
modified. Although rare, human bone was modified into tools in the prehistoric
Southwest. Hodge (1920: 70, 88, 89, and 135) describes an awl handle made from a
human coccyx and a hook made from a human ischium from Hawikuh.
There is no burning or pot-polishing which are characteristics utilized by Turner
and Turner (1999) as minimum requirements to infer cannibalism. This checklist
approach is not explicitly justified and logically does not exclude the bones from being
the result of cannibalism. The assemblages that are part of the cannibalism debate
usually include more anomalous specimens and multiple individuals. After future
examination of isolated bone from other sites, the humerus and ulna should be
reexamined in light of the presence or absence of similar specimens.
Methodology
As discussed before, the study of isolated human bone is a relatively new
phenomenon in the history of osteology in the American Southwest and unlike burials,
there have been no standardization of the methods necessary to collect the basic data.
The above results provide a baseline for future isolated human bone research, but the
methods are likely more significant because of the need to standardize the osteological
study of bone from non-burial contexts. Additional standards are warranted for the study
of isolated human bone as well as the highly modified anomalous assemblages discussed
above.
74
Many of the standard observations made for burials (Buikstra and Ubelaker 1994)
that are applicable to isolated remains have stood the test of time and peer review, and
should be retained in subsequent research for comparability to burial data, as well as
isolated bone data. These include the observations of element, side, segment, age class,
numerical age, paleopathology, and sex.
However, some of the observations not part of the standard burial osteological
methods should also be retained. Observability is a category of data that was created
specifically for this study and, despite some inherent subjectivity, it should be retained
and used for all subsequent studies on isolated bone. It is more precise than
completeness, and it enables more scrutiny of how the condition of the specimens relate
to other variables. The time it takes to make this observation is very small, making an
even stronger case for the measurement’s standardization for all studies of isolated
human bone, if not also for the osteological study of complete individuals.
The osteological standards for measurements of burials include only those with
biological and not taphonomic significance. Therefore the measurements of maximum
length, maximum width, and minimum width are not part of the standards for burials.
However, these measurements were utilized here and allowed for size to become a
variable for making inferences. The data sheet used for this study did not have a location
to systematically note when the measurements were effected by breakage or when they
were only affected by only one type of breakage. This was corrected by noting these
occurrences on the data sheet, but a standard location should be made to make this
observation more systematic.
75
The maximum length is arguably the most useful of the different measurements.
It is useful for comparing the size of the specimens to a greater degree than maximum
width. However, with future research and data comparison, maximum width may prove
to be valuable. Minimum width appears to have less utility, and is not worth the time
necessary to make this observation. This is because the location the measurement is
taken is very subjective. Maximum length and width should be made standard parts of
the methods for isolated bone research, but minimum width should be excluded. The
measurement of maximum length should also be considered for specimens from burials.
This data could prove useful and would allow comparison to isolated specimens.
Observations on breakage are integral to this type of research and can be
improved. The data sheet used here was redundant in leaving space to mark both the
presence and amount of breakage. If there is an amount, then breakage is present and the
space on the data sheet should be used for better purposes. It would be beneficial to
replace this with observations on the characteristics of the breakage. In the current study
these included the regularity of the fracture and coloration. Additional lines of evidence
were also noted. The importance of the angulation of the fracture in respect to the bone
surface suggests it should also be added to the data sheet.
This research has shown that the present level of accuracy in determining when in
the life history of a specimen a specific break occurred is not currently at a satisfactory
level. The duration and influencing variables of the discoloration of the fracture surface
and the time necessary to make it the same as that of the adjacent cortical bone is not
presently known. It is also not known how often postmortem breakage produces
76
specimens that appear to be perimortem. The duration of time that correlates to around
death for perimortem breaks is not known. This is an avenue for future research in
experimental archaeology.
Each specimen was examined for weathering, but more specificity could be
recorded with little time investment. The color and texture of the modification should be
noted for greater specificity. For example, the flaking off of the cortical bone should be
distinguished from the rounding of the specimens impacted by water. Behrensmeyer
(1978) has a standard methodology for scoring the stages of weathering. However, the
low degree of weathering present in this assemblage suggests a more precise scale would
be necessary to rank the isolated bone specimens for comparison purposes. The first
stage of weathering, which is where almost all of the specimens in this study would be
categorized, could be broken up into smaller more differentiated categories. This would
likely entail experimental archaeological projects to determine relevant subcategories of
weathering.
Overall the methods used here were a successful first attempt at conducting
research on isolated human bone. Through the application of the methods the general
pattern of isolated bone was found and presence of anomalous specimens were revealed.
Further standardization would be beneficial for future research because, like burials,
osteologists may not have unlimited access to isolated bone due to repatriation. For this
reason, a basic set of observations should be furthered by review of this study and
subsequent research. Appendix E is a revised version of the data sheet.
77
CHAPTER 5
CONCLUSION
The present research was successful in proving the utility of isolated bone even if
no strong inferences are currently possible. This is due to the lack of a comparative data
set of isolated bone. Future studies utilizing the methods suggested here will lead to
stronger data and allow for comparisons. Standardization of the methods can only occur
through the repetition of this type of research.
Data from comparative research will allow for further insight on a larger scale.
At the present time, the data and inferences of this research are restricted to Grasshopper
Pueblo. The cultural and non-cultural formation processes at other sites may or may not
be applicable to those that displaced the isolated bone at Grasshopper. Further study will
allow for inferences on a regional and possibly universal scale that would have utility in
understanding the complete array of how human bone is found at archaeological sites.
Additionally, future research can illuminate the scale of influence for specific cultural
and non-cultural formation processes.
Further research will also better define what constitutes a burial. The answer to
that question may seem simple but has multiple answers in the practice of excavation.
How complete does an individual need to be to be considered a burial? Is the answer
100, 50, 10, or 2 percent? What degree of articulation is necessary for an assemblage to
be considered a burial? By examining specimens that are not considered part of a burial,
it is possible to better define and understand what constitutes a burial.
78
Based on the results, rodent disturbance is found not to be the only cause of
isolated bone. The prehistoric inhabitants of Grasshopper Pueblo disturbed human
burials and moved some of the specimens of human bone to various places across the
site. They rarely displaced large intact elements and they did not discard the specimens
in a formal way. Burials are one of the most singularized activities of discard, whereas
the redeposition of the displaced bone appears to be done with very little ritual. The large
intact elements from this sample are anomalous and warrant further study.
This sample of isolated bone has specimens from almost all of the skeletal
elements in the human body. Additionally, all of the ages found in the burial sample
were also found in the isolated bone sample. Many archaeologists can identify relatively
complete human skeletal elements, but fragmentary (especially fetal and infant)
specimens are much more difficult to identify. This suggests that it is very important to
have an experienced osteologist in the field if legal mandates and the wishes of culturally
affiliated groups are to be respected.
This research project has created a large amount of data on a previously unstudied
artifact class. Future study, peer review, and standardization will allow for a better
understanding of not only isolated human bones, but also burials, anomalous assemblages
of highly modified specimens, and the many other ways in which bones are present in
archaeological contexts.
obervability:
Pathology:
Associations:
supple. sht.
Notes:
#
Erosion
Burning
Toolmarks
No
Mod Post Fracture
Anc Post Fracture
#:
Specimen:
BREAKAGE:
Yes
Peri. Fracture
Mod Post Fracture
Side:
Seg.:
max. length(mm):
%:
age class:
max. width(mm):
Picture:
Age:
Sex:
min. width(mm):
Notes:
Erosion
Burning
Associations:
Toolmarks
Picture:

Anc Post Fracture
Mod Post Fracture
Notes:
Erosion
Burning
Associations:
Toolmarks
Picture:

#:
Specimen:
Side:
Seg.:
%:
age class:
Age:
Sex:
BREAKAGE:
Yes No #
supple. sht. obervability:
max. length(mm):
max. width(mm):
min. width(mm):
Peri. Fracture
Pathology:
Anc Post Fracture
Mod Post Fracture
Notes:
Erosion
Burning
Associations:
Toolmarks
Picture:

#:
Specimen:
Side:
Seg.:
%:
age class:
Age:
Sex:
BREAKAGE:
Yes No #
supple. sht. obervability:
max. length(mm):
max. width(mm):
min. width(mm):
Peri. Fracture
Pathology:
Anc Post Fracture
Site Name/Number:________________________
Date:_________
Provenience/Burial #:_________________________________________________________________________________________________Page:___of ___

#:
Specimen:
Side:
Seg.:
%:
age class:
Age:
Sex:
BREAKAGE:
Yes No #
supple. sht. obervability:
max. length(mm):
max. width(mm):
min. width(mm):
Peri. Fracture
Pathology:
APPENDIX A, DATA COLLECTION SHEET
79
#
R
R
M
L
R
R
M
2 RIB
3 RIB
4 THORACIC VERT
5 HUMERUS
6 CLAVICLE
7 CLAVICLE
8 STERNUM
R
R
R
M
12 PELVIS
13 PELVIS
14 FIBULA
15 CERVICAL VERT 1ST
C
C
F
F
P
C
F
C
P
P
C
C
P
C
C
L
R
26 RIB
27 RIB
R
M
L
33 RIB
34 THORACIC VERT
35 MANDIBLE
NA
SHAFT
F
P
P
P
R
32 RIB
HEAD
F
C
31 RIB
HEAD/SHAFT
R
30 FIBULA
F
F
F
C
29 FIBULA
SHAFT
SHAFT
L
19 MAXILLA
28 RIB
C
18 MAXILLA
F
F
L
17 CRANIAL BASE FRAG
HEAD/SHAFT
NA
P1-3-D1/3
ILIUM
ILIUM
ILIUM
ILIUM
M1/3-D1/3
P1/3-M1/3
P1/3-D1/3
NA
SHAFT
SHAFT
HEAD/SHAFT
Segment
F
R
11 PELVIS
Side
16 LONG BONE FRAG
L
10 PELVIS
9 CRANIAL VAULT FRAG
L
1 RIB
Specimen
%
I/C
C
C
C
I
A
A
A
A
A
I/C
I/C
C
C
I/C
C
I/C
I/C
I/C
I/C
I/C
I/C
I
I
I
I/C
I/C
I/C
I/C
Age
Class
APPENDIX B, ISOLATED BONE INVENTORY (PART 1)
1-3
2-4
2-6
2-6
1-2
18+
18+
18+
18+
18+
1.5-2.5
1.5-2.5
3-10
3-10
1.5-3.5
2-4
1-2
1-2
1-2
1-2.5
1-5
1-5
1-2
1-2
.75-2
1-4
1-5
1-5
1-5
Age
(YRS)
15
70
50
30
100
3
5
15
20
100
5
90
5
10
90
100
2
20
45
95
15
100
45
45
90
100
30
90
95
Sex Observability # Peri
# Anc Post
# Mod Post
1
2
1
2
1
CONT
2
2
1
1
CONT
MULT
CONT
1
1
2
1
1
1
1
1
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I/R
L
L
L
L
L
L
L
L
L
L
L
L
L
L
L
L
L
L
L
L
L
L
L
L
L
S/L
80
F
F
F
F
P
L
R
L
L
R
R
L
54 CRANIAL FRAG
55 CRANIAL FRAG
56 LONG BONE FRAG
57 LONG BONE FRAG
58 RIB
59 RIB
60 RIB
61 RIB
62 RIB
63 RIB
64 RIB
SHAFT
SHAFT
65 RIB
66 RIB
SHAFT
SHAFT
SHAFT
SHAFT
HEAD/SHAFT
F
P
P
C
C
F
P
P
F
53 CRANIAL FRAG
SHAFT
F
52 CRANIAL FRAG
SHAFT
F
51 POSTCRANIAL FRAG
HEAD/SHAFT
C
R
50 RIB
P
F
P1/3-D1/3
P
F
R
47 TIBIA
P1/3-M1/3
P
P
49 CRANIAL FRAG
L
46 HUMERUS
PETROUS
P1/3
C
C
C
48 POSTCRANIAL FRAG
R
R
45 TIBIA
C
43 THORACIC VERT
44 TEMPORAL
PE-DE
M
42 PHALANGE PROX HAND
PE-DE
PHALANGE DISTAL
41 HAND
C
L
40 TARSAL, TALUS
F
F
M1/3
39 LONG BONE FRAG
38 TIBIA
F
C
CROWN/ROOT
37 TOOTH, LLM1
L
36 MANDIBLE
I/C
SA+
SA+
SA+
C
C
C
C
C
C
I/C
I/C
I
I
I
I
SA+
I/C
I
C
C
C
C
C
C
A
A
A
C
C
I/C
1-3
15+
15+
15+
2-6
2-6
2-6
2-6
2-6
2-6
1-6
1-6
0-2
0-2
0-2
0-2
15+
1.5-4
.5-2
2-12
2-6
2-10
3-9
2-4
2-6
20+
20+
18+
2-12
4-12
1-3
10
10
30
30
80
80
5
35
50
50
5
5
5
5
5
5
5
100
10
5
60
50
30
25
100
99
100
98
5
20
100
CONT
CONT
2
2
1
1
2
1
2
2
1
CONT
CONT
CONT
CONT
CONT
CONT
CONT
CONT
1
2
2
2
1
1
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
L
L
L
L
L
L
L
L
L
L
L
L
L
L
L
L
L
L
L
L
L
L
L
S
S
L
81
R
R
R
68 RIB
69 RIB
70 RIB
71 MT 5TH
M
L
74 OCCIPITAL
75 RIB
SHAFT
SHAFT
LONG BONE FRAG
78 MINOR
79 RIB
86 LUMBAR VERT
F
F
92 POSTCRANIAL FRAG
F
ILIUM
91 PELVIS
F
90 POSTCRANIAL FRAG
P1/3
F
89 TIBIA
F
PE-P1/3
C
88 TIBIA
C/NA
87 CRANIAL VAULT FRAG
L
M
85 THORACIC VERT
C
M
84 THORACIC VERT
C
F
C
M
83 CRANIAL VAULT FRAG
F
82 CRANIAL VAULT FRAG
F
F
F
F
F
P
P
C
C
C
F
F
F
C
F
F
81 CRANIAL VAULT FRAG
SHAFT
SHAFT
80 RIB
PE
LONG BONE FRAG
77 MINOR
SHAFT
76 RADIUS
L
ISCHIUM
73 PELVIS
SQUAMOUS
PE-DE
L
PHALANGE 1ST PROX
72 HAND
P1/3-D1/3
SHAFT
SHAFT
SHAFT
SHAFT
L
67 RIB
SA+
A
A
A
A
A
C-A
C
C
C
C-A
SA/A
SA/A
A
A
A
A
A
I
C
C
C
C
C
C
C
15+
18+
18+
18+
18+
25+
13+
4-12
4-10
4-10
8+
13+
13+
18+
18+
18+
18+
18+
0-1
2-8
3-8
3-8
3-8
2-6
2-6
2-6
5
5
5
5
20
5
90
100
100
5
5
5
5
10
5
5
5
70
70
95
100
100
15
15
20
10
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
2
2
1
1
1
1
1
2
1
1
1
1
2
1
1
1
1
1
1
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
L
L
S
L
L
SL
SL
SL
L
L
L
L
L
S
S
L
L
SL
L
S
L
L
82
L
L
L
96 RIB
97 RIB
98 RIB
L
L
M
M
M
M
M
L
R
L
112 PARIETAL
113 PARIETAL
114 STERNUM
115 LUMBAR VERT
116 THORACIC VERT
117 THORACIC VERT
118 CERVICAL VERT 2ND
119 TARSAL, TALUS
120 TARSAL, CALCANEUS
121 CERVICAL VERT (3-7)
NA
C/NA
C/NA
C/NA
C/NA
P1/3-D1/3
PE-DE
PE-DE
109 TEMPORAL
L
R
R
108 MT 4TH
PE-DE
111 ULNA
R
107 MC 3RD
P1/3
M1/3-D1/3
110 PHALANGE PROX FOOT
R
R
106 HUMERUS
L
104 TOOTH, LLI2
105 HUMERUS
C
C
P
C
P
C
C
C
C
F
F
C
C
P
C
C
P
P
C
F
DE
L
F
C
103 FEMUR
ILIUM
F
P
F
F
P
F
F
102 POSTCRANIAL FRAG
PE-DE
101 PELVIS
SHAFT
SHAFT
SHAFT
HEAD
100 PHALANGE PROX HAND
L
L
95 RIB
99 RIB
HEAD
94 RIB
SHAFT
ILIUM
L
93 PELVIS
18+
0-1.5
0-1.5
0-.5
18+
18+
18+
21+
0-.75
0-.75
25+
5-10
18+
18+
18+
2.8
2.8
2.8
2.8
4-12
4-12
18+
C
A
A
A
A
A
2-8
18+
18+
25+
25+
25+
MA/OA 35+
A
I
I
I
A
A
A
A
I
I
A
C
A
A
A
C
C
C
C
C
C
A
5
95
70
95
60
100
95
90
95
20
20
80
100
55
100
95
40
25
95
100
5
5
100
3
50
5
20
75
20
1
MULT
1
1
1
MULT
1
3
4
1
1
1
1
MULT
2
1
2
1
1
1
1
1
2
1
1
1
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
L
L
L
L
L
L
L
L
L
SL
SL
L
L
L
S
L
L
L
L
L
L
L
L
L
83
L
R
R
R
R
R
R
126 TARSAL, TALUS
127 PELVIS
128 PELVIS
129 MT 1ST
130 MT 5TH
131 MC 2ND
132 MT 4TH
PE-D1/3
PE-DE
PE-DE
PE-DE
ISCHIUM
ISCHIUM
PE-DE
M1/3-DE
L
R
140 TIBIA
141 TIBIA
P1/3
R
R
153 HUMERUS
154 PELVIS
PUBIS
SHAFT
PE-DE
PE-DE
152 RIB
L
149 RIB
SHAFT
R
148 RIB 2ND
PE-DE
DE
R
147 RIB
SHAFT
151 RIB
L
146 RIB
HEAD
HEAD/SHAFT
150 RIB
R
L
145 RIB
HEAD
L
143 RIB
144 RIB
SHAFT
142 RIB
P1/3-D1/3
P1/3-D1/3
P1/3
L
P1/3-D1/3
139 TIBIA
R
137 HUMERUS
P1/3-D1/3
M1/3
L
136 FEMUR
138 RADIUS
R
135 SCAPULA
P1/3-DE
R
125 CLAVICLE
134 PHALANGE PROX HAND
L
124 CLAVICLE
PE-M1/3
NA
P1/3-DE
L
123 CLAVICLE
133 PHALANGE PROX HAND
R
122 THORACIC VERT
F
P
F
F
F
C
C
C
P
P
F
F
F
P
P
P
F
C
C
C
C
C
C
C
C
C
P
P
P
C
F
P
P
C
C
A
A
I/C
I/C
I/C
I/C
I
I
A
A
I
C
C
C
A
I/C
I
I/C
C
C
C
A
A
A
C
C
C
A
A
A
C
4-10
4-10
18+
18+
1.5-5
1.5-5
1.5-5
1.5-5
0-1
0-1
25+
25+
0-1
3-6
3-6
3-6
18+
1.5-2.5
.5-1.5
1-4
4-8
4-8
4-8
18+
20+
20+
6-12
6-12
4-12
25+
25+
25+
2-8
60
10
25
5
5
15
95
95
100
70
30
15
10
10
75
50
25
20
90
100
95
90
100
100
90
75
90
45
45
30
95
25
70
1
1
2
1
1
2
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
2
2
2
1
2
1
1
2
1
2
1
1
1
1
2
1
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
L
L
S
L
SL
L
L
L
L
L
L
L
L
L
L
L
S
L
L
L
L
L
L
L
L
L
L
L
L
84
R
167 MT 3RD
P1/3
PETROUS
L
L
R
169 TIBIA
170 TEMPORAL
171 OCCIPITAL
172 RADIUS
L
L
175 PARIETAL
176 PARIETAL
F
F
F
C
177 CRANIAL VAULT FRAG
178 CRANIAL VAULT FRAG
179 CRANIAL VAULT FRAG
ZYGOMATIC/TEMPORAL
180 ARCH
L
F
F
F
F
L
174 PARIETAL
P
C
P
F
C
C
C
C
P
F
F
C
F
F
C
C
P
P
173 CRANIAL VAULT FRAG
P1/3-DE
LATERAL
ILIUM
168 PELVIS
PE-D1/3
P1/3-DE
PE
R
PE
L
L
162 FIBULA
166 MT 1ST
L
161 CARPAL, LUNATE
P1/3
165 TARSAL, CALCANEUS
L
160 FEMUR
NA
P1/3
L
159 MAXILLA
L
M
158 CERVICAL VERT 2ND
C/NA
164 TARSAL, CALCANEUS
M
157 CERVICAL VERT (3-7)
NA
C
D1/3
M
156 THORACIC VERT
163 FIBULA
M
155 THORACIC VERT
1-5
20+
1.5-4
1.5-4
A
I
I
I
I
I
I
I/C
I
I
C
C/SA
C/SA
C/SA
C/SA
C/SA
C/SA
C/SA
A
A
I
18+
0-2
0-2
0-2
0-2
0-2
0-2
1-4
.5-1.5
1-2
2-4
8-14
5-14
5-14
5-14
8-14
8-14
8-14
25+
18+
1-2
MA/OA 40+
C
A
I/C
I/C
100
2
5
5
5
5
20
10
70
95
70
5
10
95
95
100
70
10
10
100
20
10
100
95
30
30
1
1
CONT
CONT
CONT
CONT
CONT
4
3
1
2
1
1
1
2
2
1
2
1
2
1
1
2
2
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
S
L
L
L
L
L
L
L
L
L
L
L
L
L
L
L
L
L
L
SL
L
L
L
85
C
R
R
L
197 TIBIA
198 TIBIA
199 RADIUS
L
204 TIBIA
M
207 FRONTAL
R
R
R
209 TARSAL, TALUS
210 FEMUR
211 TIBIA
208 MC
R
206 MAXILLA
205 FEMUR
L
203 TEMPORAL
P1/3-D1/3
P1/3-D1/3
P1/3-DE
PE
D1/3
C
C
C
F
F
F
P
P
F
P
F
202 HUMERUS
P1/3-D1/3
R
201 LONG BONE FRAG
F
P
F
F
F
C
P
P
F
F
C
F
P
P
P
P
C
C
C
C
200 LONG BONE FRAG
M1/3-D1/3
M1/3
P1/3
P1/3
P1/3-D1/3
L
NA
R
191 SACRUM 1ST
196 TIBIA
L
190 THORACIC VERT
195 TARSAL, CALCANEUS
M
189 SCAPULA
D1/2
R
R
188 TEMPORAL
194 HUMERUS
R
187 TARSAL, CALCANEUS
P1/2
P1/3
L
186 TARSAL, CALCANEUS
P1/3-D1/3
P1/3
L
185 TIBIA
P1/3-D1/3
L
L
184 ULNA
P1/3-D1/3
193 FEMUR
R
183 HUMERUS
PE-DE
192 FEMUR
L
L
182 TARSAL, NAVICULAR
L
181 MT 3RD
C
C
A
A
C
A
C
C
A
I
C/SA
I
I
C
C
C
C
I/C
I/C
SA/A
I/C
C
C
A
A
A
I
I
I
A
A
2-6
2-6
18+
18+
2-10
18+
2-4
2-8
18+
0-.5
2-12
.5-2
.5-1.5
4-8
4-8
4-8
2-4
1.5-6
1-4
15+
1-6
2-6
2-6
18+
18+
18+
0-2
0-.5
.5-1
18+
18+
80
80
10
80
5
50
50
10
30
80
5
20
50
15
15
15
75
70
30
5
15
80
20
70
40
40
50
95
95
100
100
1
2
2
CONT
2
MULT
MULT
MULT
2
MULT
CONT
2
1
2
2
2
MULT
2
1
MULT
1
MULT
MULT
MULT
MULT
MULT
1
1
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
L
L
L
L
L
L
L
L
L
L
S
L
L
L
L
L
L
L
L
L
L
L
L
L
L
L
L
L
L
86
P1/3
M
M
M
M
R
R
R
L
L
L
221 THORACIC VERT
222 THORACIC VERT
223 THORACIC VERT
224 VERT
225 RIB
226 RIB
227 HUMERUS
228 ULNA
229 ULNA
230 ULNA
NA
R
L
L
M
L
R
232 LUMBAR VERT
233 THORACIC VERT
234 CERVICAL VERT (3-7)
235 CERVICAL VERT (3-7)
236 RIB
237 RIB
F
F
PE
PE
240 TIBIA
241 TIBIA
F
F
239 LONG BONE FRAG
F
F
C
C
C
C
P
P
P
F
P
P
P
P
F
F
P
P
P
P
F
F
F
F
P
C
238 CRANIAL VAULT FRAG
HEAD
D1/3
C
NA
NA
P1/3-D1/3
231 ULNA
M1/3-D1/3
P1/3-M1/3
P1/3
P1/3-D1/3
SHAFT
SHAFT
C
C
C
NA
NA
M
220 THORACIC VERT
P1/3
D1/3-DE
217 ULNA
M1/3-DE
216 TIBIA
C
R
R
R
215 VERT
NA
NA
219 FEMUR
M
214 VERT
218 MT (2-4)
M
M
213 CERVICAL VERT (3-7)
R
212 FIBULA
I/C
I/C
I/C
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
C
C
C
C
C
I
I
C
C
C
C
C
A
A
A
A
SA+
SA+
SA+
C
1-5
1-5
1-6
0-1
1-2
0-1
0-1
0-1
0-1
0-1
2-10
4-8
4-8
4-8
3-8
0-.5
0-.5
2-6
2-6
2-6
2-6
2-6
18+
18+
18+
18+
12+
12+
12+
2-6
5
5
5
5
10
20
100
100
100
100
30
40
30
5
70
5
70
70
20
20
50
50
25
40
10
10
10
10
40
80
1
1
CONT
CONT
1
1
2
2
2
CONT
1
2
1
1
1
1
1
2
3
1
CONT
CONT
MULT
MULT
2
2
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
L
L
L
L
L
L
L
L
L
L
L
L
L
L
L
L
L
L
L
L
L
L
L
L
L
L
87
M
L
R
M
M
243 SACRUM
244 THORACIC VERT
245 MT 2ND
246 RIB
247 SACRUM
248 SACRUM
R
R
R
R
L
L
R
L
256 THORACIC VERT
257 ULNA
258 RADIUS
259 THORACIC VERT
260 RIB
261 CERVICAL VERT 1ST
262 CERVICAL VERT 2ND
263 CLAVICLE
264 PELVIS
P1/3-M1/3
P1/3-M1/3
PE-DE
SHAFT
PE
266 MC (2-4)
267 PHALANGE PROX HAND
LONG BONE FRAG
268 MAJOR
269 TIBIA
PUBIS
M1/3-D1/3
NA
NA
HEAD/SHAFT
NA
P1/3-D1/3
P1/3-D1/3
NA
265 MC (2-3)
L
M
255 LUMBAR VERT
C
F
C
C
C
C
C
C
C
P
C
C
C
F
P
M
254 CERVICAL VERT 1ST
NA
F
P
R
253 CRANIAL VAULT FRAG
F
252 CRANIAL VAULT FRAG
NA
L
251 MT (2-4)
C
F
P
L
C
C
P
C
C
250 SPHENOID
P1/3-D1/3
C
C
249 CRANIAL VAULT FRAG
NA
C
HEAD
PE-DE
C
P1/3-D1/3
NA
L
242 PHALANGE PROX FOOT
I
SA
A
A
C
C
C
C
C
C
F
F
F
F
A
C
C
I
I
C
I/C
I/C
C
C
A
A
I/C
I
0-2
14-18
18+
18+
2-6
2-6
2-6
2-6
2-6
2-6
-.17-0
-.17-0
-.17-0
-.17-0
18+
4-8
4-8
0-2
0-2
2-6
1-5
1-8
2-6
2-6
18+
18+
1-4
0-2
100
80
10
100
80
80
80
80
95
95
70
90
100
100
10
50
50
5
5
80
30
5
80
95
50
100
100
100
1
1
MULT
CONT
2
2
2
1
1
1
1
3
1
1
CONT
CONT
2
3
CONT
2
1
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
L
L
L
L
L
L
L
L
L
S
L
L
L
L
L
L
L
SL
L
L
88
M
M
M
R
274 CERVICAL VERT 2ND
275 SACRUM
276 SACRUM
277 PELVIS
M
M
M
M
287 SPHENOID
288 OCCIPITAL
289 OCCIPITAL
290 MANDIBLE
M
M
M
M
M
L
293 PARIETAL
294 PARIETAL
295 PARIETAL
296 PARIETAL
297 PARIETAL
298 TEMPORAL
299 FIBULA
M
292 PARIETAL
291 PHALANGE PROX FOOT
M
286 SPHENOID
P1/3
P1/3-D1/3
DE
L
284 MT 1ST
285 SCAPULA
SHAFT
P1/3-D1/3
281 MT 5TH
PE
P1/3-D1/3
280 PHALANGE PROX HAND
283 FEMUR
P1/3-D1/3
279 PHALANGE PROX HAND
282 MT (2-4)
P1/3-D1/3
ISCHIUM
NA
NA
PHALANGE 1ST PROX
278 HAND
L
M1/3-D1/3
L
273 CLAVICLE
DENS
PE
272 FEMUR
PETROUS
PE
R
271 FEMUR
270 TEMPORAL
F
F
F
F
F
F
F
F
C
F
F
P
F
F
F
F
F
F
C
C
C
C
C
C
F
C
P
C
C
P
C
A
C
C
C
C
C
C
C
SA+
C
C
C
C
C
A
A
F/I
F/I
C
C
C
C
C
C
C
C
C
C
I/C
4-12
18+
4-8
4-8
4-8
4-8
4-8
4-8
2-6
12+
2-4
2-4
2-8
2-8
2-8
18+
18+
-.08-.5
-.08-.5
2-8
2-8
2-8
4-8
2-8
4-8
4-8
2-8
4-8
4-8
1-4
5
10 CONT
5
5
5
5
10
10
90
5
10
50
10
10
5
5
5
20
100
99
100
95
85
100
20
100
50
95
95
30
2
CONT
CONT
CONT
CONT
CONT
CONT
CONT
CONT
1
CONT
CONT
CONT
1
1
CONT
CONT
CONT
1
1
3
MULT
MULT
1
1
1
1
I
R
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
S
S
L
L
L
L
L
L
L
L
L
L
L
L
L
L
SL
L
L
L
L
L
L
L
L
L
89
R
M
308 FIBULA
309 CERVICAL VERT (3-7)
L
L
319 MT 1ST
320 FRONTAL
PE-M1/3
PE-DE
PE-DE
PE-DE
PE-DE
321 PHALANGE PROX FOOT
PHALANGE 1ST PROX
322 HAND
323 PHALANGE PROX HAND
324 PHALANGE PROX HAND
325 PHALANGE INT HAND
PE-DE
P1/3-D1/3
L
318 FIBULA
C
P1/3-D1/3
M
316 LUMBAR VERT
P1/3-M1/3
P1/3
NA
317 MC (2-4)
L
R
315 RADIUS
313 SACRUM
314 TIBIA
M
312 TARSAL, TALUS
PE-DE
L
L
311 MT 4TH
P1/3-D1/3
310 FIBULA
NA
PE
C
C
C
C
P
F
C
C
C
P
P
F
F
C
C
P
F
F
C
M
307 LUMBAR VERT
C/NA
F
C
306 HUMERUS
PE
R
305 CRANIAL VAULT FRAG
F
304 CRANIAL VAULT FRAG
P
P1/3-D1/3
303 FEMUR
R
F
302 PARIETAL
P
F
PE-DE
301 PARIETAL
300 PHALANGE PROX FOOT
A
A
A
A
A
C
A
I/C
C
C
C
C
C
C
A
I
SA+
A
C
C
C
C
C
C
C
A
18+
18+
18+
18+
18+
2-6
18+
1.5-2.5
4-10
5-10
5-10
2-6
2-10
4-8
18+
.5-2
12+
25+
4-10
4-12
2-8
2-8
2-6
2-10
2-10
18+
99
99
99
95
60
15
100
99
99
70
35
20
5
95
90
70
5
5
80
99
5
5
70
5
20
50
1
1
1
2
1
3
CONT
1
1
1
1
2
CONT
2
2
2
2
CONT
MULT
MULT
CONT
CONT
2
CONT
CONT
CONT
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
L
L
L
L
L
L
L
L
L
SL
L
L
L
L
L
L
L
L
L
L
L
L
L
L
L
90
L
328 MC 2ND
NA
M
R
L
R
332 CERVICAL VERT 2ND
333 CLAVICLE
334 TOOTH, LLC
335 TIBIA
M1/3-D1/3
L
M
M
337 FIBULA
338 ETHMOID
339 ETHMOID
356 LONG BONE FRAG
355 FEMUR
P1/3-M1/3
F
P
F
C
354 TIBIA
P1/3-D1/3
353 CRANIAL VAULT FRAG
R
352 THORACIC VERT
P
C
R
M
351 TIBIA
C
F
350 LONG BONE FRAG
P1/3-D1/3
F
P
C
F
C
P
P
349 PARIETAL
NA
P1/3
P1/3-D1/3
M
R
346 HUMERUS
P1/3-D1/3
348 THORACIC VERT
R
345 ULNA
WING
347 PHALANGE PROX HAND
R
R
C
R
342 ZYGOMATIC
344 SPHENOID
F
343 RADIUS
P
341 PARIETAL
F
P
P
C
C
C
C
P
C
F
P
C
C
C
340 PARIETAL
P1/3
WING
336 HYOID
P1/3-D1/3
CROWN/ROOT
PE-DE
PE-DE
NA
330 THORACIC VERT
331 MT (2-3)
M1/3-DE
329 MT (2-4)
M
PE-DE
327 MC 5TH
PE-DE
PE-DE
R
326 PHALANGE INT HAND
I
I
I
I
I/C
I
A
I
C
I/C
A
I
A
C
A
C
C
SA+
SA+
C
A
I
SA
C
C
C
A
A
A
A
A
0-2
0-2
.5-1.5
0-2
1-3
.5-1.5
18+
0-2
2-6
1-4
18+
.5-1.5
18+
4-10
18+
2-6
2-6
15+
15+
2-6
25+
.5-1.5
6-10
2-8
3-8
4-12
18+
18+
18+
18+
18+
5
50
95
5
70
98
5
5
30
100
10
90
40
30
80
5
30
5
50
70
100
75
100
99
45
95
10
40
95
99
95
2
CONT
2
MULT
CONT
1
MULT
CONT
CONT
1
CONT
2
MULT
2
1
CONT
CONT
CONT
1
2
MULT
1
3
1
2
2
2
1
MULT
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
L
L
L
L
L
L
L
L
L
L
L
L
L
L
SL
L
L
L
L
L
L
L
L
L
L
L
L
L
91
L
R
R
358 FRONTAL
359 FRONTAL
360 MANDIBLE
361 MANDIBLE
R
L
R
378 HUMERUS
379 RADIUS
380 SCAPULA
F
383 POSTCRANIAL FRAG
F
P
F
P
F
F
ILIUM
P1/3
M1/3-D1/3
PE
382 LONG BONE FRAG
381 PELVIS
L
377 RADIUS
C
L
376 RADIUS
P1/3-DE
C
PE-DE
R
375 RADIUS
C
C
C
C
C
C
P
PE-DE
C/NA
C/NA
C/NA
C/NA
C
C
374 FRONTAL
373 PHALANGE INT HAND
L
372 PATELLA
369 CERVICAL VERT (3-7)
M
M
368 CERVICAL VERT (3-7)
M
M
367 CERVICAL VERT 2ND
371 LUMBAR VERT
M
366 TARSAL, TALUS
370 CERVICAL VERT (3-7)
R
365 SCAPULA
C/NA
ACROMION
L
364 RIB
F
F
F
DE
363 CRANIAL VAULT FRAG
F
362 CRANIAL VAULT FRAG
P
P
F
F
F
L
357 LONG BONE FRAG
I
SA+
SA
A
A
SA+
SA+
A
A
A
A
A
A
A
A
A
A
A
SA+
A
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
0-2
15+
12-18
18+
18+
15+
15+
18+
18+
18+
18+
18+
18+
25+
18+
18+
18+
18+
15+
18+
0-2
0-2
0-2
0-2
0-2
0-2
0-2
F?
5
5
5
5
30
20
70
2
80
95
30
100
99
95
95
95
95
95
80
10
5
5
5
30
30
5
20
1
2
2
1
CONT
CONT
CONT
1
MULT
2
CONT
CONT
MULT
CONT
MULT
MULT
MULT
MULT
MULT
5
MULT
1
1
CONT
CONT
MULT
CONT
CONT
CONT
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
L
L
L
SL
SL
S
L
L
L
L
L
L
L
L
L
L
L
L
SL
L
L
L
L
L
L
L
92
P1/3-D1/3
M
R
R
L
M
M
389 OCCIPITAL
390 ZYGOMATIC
391 FEMUR
392 MT 5TH
393 FRONTAL
394 FRONTAL
R
L
L
L
M
M
R
R
399 RIB
400 FIBULA
401 FIBULA
402 TOOTH, LLM3
403 CERVICAL VERT (3-7)
404 LUMBAR VERT
405 TIBIA
406 TARSAL, CALCANEUS
DE
C
M
M
M
M
410 RIB
411 VERT
412 THORACIC VERT
413 THORACIC VERT
414 THORACIC VERT
C/NA
C/NA
C/NA
DE
C
C
C
F
F
F
P
409 RIB
F
P
P
C
C
C
F
F
F
F
408 THORACIC VERT
C/NA
M1/3-D1/3
C/NA
C/NA
CROWN/ROOT
D1/3
D1/3
SHAFT
407 TARSAL, CALCANEUS
M
R
398 RIB
SHAFT
R
397 RIB
F
F
P
L
396 ZYGOMATIC
F
F
C
C
F
C
C
P
395 CRANIAL VAULT FRAG
SHAFT
PE-D1/3
P1/3-D1/3
BASILAR
P1/3-D1/3
L
388 FEMUR
L
386 ZYGOMATIC
387 MC (2-5)
C
C
P
385 FEMUR
P1/3-D1/3
L
384 CARPAL, PISIFORM
A
A
A
A
A
A
A
A
A
I
A
C
A
A
A
SA+
SA+
SA+
C/SA
C/SA
C/SA
C/SA
A
I
C/SA
I/C
C
I/C
I/C
I/C
A
18+
18+
18+
18+
18+
18+
18+
18+
18+
1-2
18+
4-8
25+
18+
18+
15+
15+
15+
5-15
5-15
5-15
5-15
18+
.5-2
5-15
1-5
3-5
1-3
1-3
1-3
18+
40
80
85
5
10
10
70
10
70
50
90
90
90
5
20
5
5
10
40
5
10
10
80
80
20
99
85
70
95
80
60
1
2
1
1
1
2
2
1
MULT
1
1
1
2
1
1
MULT
MULT
CONT
2
CONT
CONT
1
MULT
CONT
CONT
CONT
2
1
2
1
1
MULT
3
2
CONT
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
L
L
L
L
L
L
L
L
L
S
L
L
S
SL
L
L
L
SL
L
L
L
L
L
SL
L
L
SL
L
L
L
L
93
M
M
M
421 LUMBAR VERT
422 THORACIC VERT
423 THORACIC VERT
M
L
M
M
430 THORACIC VERT
431 VERT
432 MC 2ND
433 COCCYX
COCCYX (3 FUSED
434 SEGMENTS)
C
C/NA
PE-DE
C
NA
NA
R
TARSAL, MEDIAL
444 CUNEIFORM
F
F
SHAFT
446 RIB 1ST
C
C
P
F
F
P
P
F
P
P
C
F
F
F
F
F
F
P
P
P
F
F
F
F
F
F
F
F
445 CRANIAL VAULT FRAG
L
M
443 LUMBAR VERT
NA
SHAFT
R
SHAFT
440 RIB
438 RIB
SHAFT
SHAFT
R
437 RIB
439 RIB
R
R
436 RIB
SHAFT
M
429 THORACIC VERT
NA
NA
SHAFT
M
428 THORACIC VERT
NA
NA
C/NA
C/NA
C
C
NA
C
C
C
C
C
435 RIB
M
M
427 THORACIC VERT
M
M
420 THORACIC VERT
426 CERVICAL VERT (3-7)
M
419 VERT
M
M
418 VERT
M
M
417 VERT
425 LUMBAR VERT
M
416 VERT
424 CERVICAL VERT 2ND
M
415 THORACIC VERT
A
I/C
A
I/C
I/C
A
A
A
A
SA+
A
A
A
A
SA+
A
A
A
A
A
A
A
A
A
SA+
A
A
A
A
A
25+
1-6
25+
1-4
1-4
18+
18+
18+
18+
15+
18+
18+
18+
18+
15+
18+
18+
18+
18+
18+
18+
18+
18+
18+
15+
18+
18+
18+
18+
18+
20
10
99
100
70
15
20
25
30
5
80
50
99
5
10
10
20
5
5
40
65
65
20
10
10
5
5
5
5
10
CONT
2
3
1
2
2
CONT
3
CONT
MULT
1
1
MULT
2
2
3
CONT
CONT
MULT
4
MULT
CONT
CONT
CONT
CONT
CONT
CONT
CONT
CONT
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
L
S
L
L
L
L
L
L
L
L
L
L
L
L
L
L
L
L
L
L
L
L
L
L
L
L
L
L
L
94
P1/3-D1/3
R
M
M
M
450 FEMUR
451 LUMBAR VERT
452 SACRUM 1ST
453 VERT
NA
M
L
R
L
475 THORACIC VERT
476 RIB
477 RIB
478 HUMERUS
P1/3-D1/3
HEAD
HEAD/NECK
NA
NA
M
M
471 THORACIC VERT
C
C/NA
474 LUMBAR VERT
M
470 THORACIC VERT
C/NA
M
469 THORACIC VERT
CROWN/ROOT
PE-DE
R
468 TOOTH, UI2
M
L
467 FRONTAL
P1/3-D1/3
P1/3-D1/3
473 LUMBAR VERT
R
466 MT 1ST
D1/3
P1/3-D1/3
SHAFT
C
NA
C
C
P1/3
472 PHALANGE PROX HAND
R
465 ULNA
M
461 THORACIC VERT
L
M
460 LUMBAR VERT
464 TIBIA
M
459 LUMBAR VERT
R
M
458 THORACIC VERT
R
R
457 TIBIA
463 TIBIA
R
456 TIBIA
462 RIB
P1/3
455 TIBIA
P1/3
SHAFT
R
LONG BONE FRAG
454 MAJOR
C
C
C
P1/3-D1/3
PE-DE
L
P1/3-D1/3
449 FEMUR
R
448 PHALANGE PROX FOOT
447 RADIUS
C
F
P
F
F
P
C
P
P
C
C
C
C
C
P
C
F
C
C
C
F
F
F
F
F
F
P
P
C
C
C
P
C
SA+
SA+
C
C
C
A
A
A
A
I/C
I
C
I
C
I
C
C
C
C
A
C
C
C
C
C
C
C
I
I
A
C
2-3
15+
15+
3-6
3-6
3-6
18+
25+
25+
25+
1.5-4
0-1.5
4-10
.5-1
4-10
.5-1.5
2-8
2-6
2-6
2-6
18+
5-10
5-10
5-10
2-12
2-8
2-6
2-6
.5-1.5
.5-1.5
18+
2-3
98
15
30
15
10
70
95
45
45
95
100
80
80
90
30
90
20
100
90
100
15
5
5
5
2
5
70
60
98
95
99
70
1
1
1
2
4
2
MULT
1
4
3
3
1
2
1
2
MULT
2
2
CONT
CONT
CONT
CONT
CONT
CONT
MULT
CONT
2
1
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
L
L
L
L
L
L
L
L
L
L
L
L
SL
L
L
L
L
L
L
L
L
L
L
L
L
L
L
L
L
95
L
L
L
L
L
L
R
493 PARIETAL
494 PARIETAL
495 PARIETAL
496 PARIETAL
497 RIB
498 SCAPULA
SHAFT
L
513 RIB
F
P
512 RIB
SHAFT
F
L
511 CRANIAL VAULT FRAG
F
P
C
F
P
P
C
C
P
P
P
P
510 CRANIAL VAULT FRAG
508 SPHENOID
CROWN/ROOT
M1/3-D1/3
HEAD/SHAFT
P
P
F
M
507 TOOTH, LRM1
P1/3-D1/3
P1/3-D1/3
P
P
C
P
F
F
C
C
C
C
C
P
509 PARIETAL
M
R
505 MANDIBLE
M
500 MANDIBLE
499 FEMUR
L
L
492 FIBULA
L
490 FEMUR
491 TIBIA
P1/3-D1/3
489 MT 1ST
P1/3-D1/3
P1/3-D1/3
L
488 PHALANGE PROX HAND
HEAD/NECK
END
L
487 RIB
DE
486 RIB
L
484 FEMUR
NA
SHAFT
M
483 LUMBAR VERT
C
C
C
NA
485 RIB
M
M
482 LUMBAR VERT
480 LUMBAR VERT
481 CERVICAL VERT (3-7)
M
M
479 SACRUM (2-4)
C
C
SA+
C+
C+
C
C
C
C
I
C
C
I/C
I/C
I/C
I/C
I
I
I
C
C
C
C
SA+
C
C
C
C
C
C
6-12
6-12
15+
8+
8+
6-12
6-10
6-10
6-10
1-2
4-8
2-6
1-4
1-4
1-4
1-4
.5-1.5
.5-1.5
.5-1.5
2-6
2-6
2-6
2-6
15+
2-6
2-6
2-6
2-6
2-6
2-6
15
65
5
5
20
50 1
100
20
45
50
80
95
5
25
25
25
70
70
70
60
90
45
20
10
90
95
100
100
95
70
CONT
CONT
1
2
2
1
2
2
CONT
MULT
3
1
2
2
2
CONT
CONT
CONT
CONT
2
2
2
CONT
1
1
1
CONT
1
2
2
2
I
I
I
I
I
IR
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
L
L
S
L
SL
SL
SL
S
L
L
L
L
L
L
L
L
L
L
L
L
SL
L
L
L
L
L
L
96
M
M
M
M
528 LUMBAR VERT
529 SACRUM (2-4)
530 SACRUM (2-4)
531 VERT
P1/3-D1/3
P1/3-D1/3
D1/3-DE
L
L
L
L
533 MT (2-5)
534 MT (2-5)
535 MT 1ST
536 MT (2-4)
537 MT (2-4)
538 MT (2-4)
M1/3
SHAFT
SHAFT
539 TIBIA
540 LONG BONE FRAG
LONG BONE FRAG
541 MAJOR
P1/3-D1/3
P1/3-D1/3
P1/3-D1/3
P1/3-D1/3
PHALANGE 1ST PROX
532 HAND
NA
C
C
F
F
F
P
P
C
F
P
P
C
F
F
F
P
P
C
F
527 LUMBAR VERT
NA
M
526 CRANIAL VAULT FRAG
F
BODY
C
F
M
P1/3-DE
F
525 SPHENOID
522 MT (2-5)
WING
P
F
P
C
F
524 CRANIAL VAULT FRAG
R
521 SPHENOID
SHAFT
HEAD
ILIUM
PE
P1/3
C
F
F
M
520 RIB 1ST
C/NA
DE
523 CRANIAL VAULT FRAG
R
R
519 RIB
R
L
516 FEMUR
518 PELVIS
R
515 TIBIA
517 FEMUR
M
L
514 CERVICAL VERT (3-7)
C
A
C
A
C
C
C
C
C
C
C
C
C
C
C
C
C/SA
C/SA
C/SA
C/SA
A
C/SA
C
A
C
C
C
A
18+
4-12
18+
4-10
4-10
4-10
4-10
4-10
4-10
4-10
4-10
4-10
4-10
4-10
4-10
6-18
6-18
6-18
6-18
18+
6-18
6-12
25+
6-12
6-12
6-12
18+
6-12
2
5
2
70
70
80
15
50
70
95
5
10
5
50
70
5
15
5
15
80
20
40
15
50
90
10
5
95
MULT
CONT
MULT
CONT
CONT
CONT
2
2
2
CONT
2
2
2
CONT
CONT
CONT
3
MULT
MULT
MULT
CONT
1
MULT
2
1
CONT
2
CONT
MULT
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
L
L
L
L
L
L
L
L
L
L
L
L
L
L
L
L
L
SL
L
L
L
L
L
L
L
L
L
L
97
F
552 POSTCRANIAL FRAG
R
L
L
564 RIB
565 RIB
L
561 TIBIA
R
R
560 TEMPORAL
563 RIB
L
559 RIB
562 MT 3RD
HEAD
558 RIB
SHAFT
HEAD
HEAD/SHAFT
PE-D1/3
M1/3-D1/3
HEAD
PUBIS/ISCHIUM
L
557 PELVIS
P1/3
556 TIBIA
NA
F
F
P
P
P
P
F
P
F
F
C
M
F
551 POSTCRANIAL FRAG
555 SACRUM
F
550 POSTCRANIAL FRAG
F
F
549 POSTCRANIAL FRAG
P
F
548 POSTCRANIAL FRAG
PE-P1/3
F
547 POSTCRANIAL FRAG
L
F
546 POSTCRANIAL FRAG
554 RADIUS
F
545 POSTCRANIAL FRAG
553 POSTCRANIAL FRAG
F
544 POSTCRANIAL FRAG
F
F
SHAFT
543 POSTCRANIAL FRAG
LONG BONE FRAG
542 MAJOR
C
C
C
A
C
C
A
A
A
A
C
A
U
U
U
U
U
U
U
U
U
U
U
C
4-8
4-8
4-10
18+
2-3
4-10
18+
18+
18+
25+
4-10
18+
U
U
U
U
U
U
U
U
U
U
U
4-12
15
15
50
60
60
65
10
30
5
5
95
35
5
5
5
5
5
5
5
5
5
5
5
5
2
1
3
2
1
CONT
2
2
CONT
CONT
2
4
CONT
CONT
CONT
CONT
CONT
CONT
CONT
CONT
CONT
CONT
CONT
CONT
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
L
L
L
L
L
L
L
L
L
L
L
L
L
L
L
L
L
L
L
L
L
L
L
L
98
L
L
L
R
R
580 FEMUR
581 TIBIA
582 ULNA
583 ULNA
584 ULNA
M
R
R
L
L
L
L
588 LUMBAR VERT
589 VERT
590 TARSAL, TALUS
591 TARSAL, CALCANEUS
592 TARSAL, TALUS
593 TARSAL, TALUS
594 TARSAL, CUBOID
595 TARSAL, CUBOID
596 LONG BONE FRAG
M
M
587 CERVICAL VERT (3-7)
L
L
579 FEMUR
M
L
578 MC 5TH
586 THORACIC VERT
L
577 MC 4TH
585 RIB
P1/3-D1/3
576 MC (2-4)
NA
NA
NA
NA
SHAFT
P1/3-D1/3
P1/3-M1/3
P1/3-D1/3
P1/3-D1/3
M1/3-D1/3
P1/3-M1/3
PE-D1/3
PE-D1/3
P1/3-DE
L
575 PHALANGE PROX FOOT
P1/3-D1/3
574 MT (2-5)
F
F
F
F
P
C
C
F
P
C
C
P
P
P
C
P
P
P
P
C
P
P
P
P
L
573 PELVIS
ISCHIUM
F
P
572 PELVIS
ILIUM
L
571 PARIETAL
P
C
F
CROWN/ROOT
C
F
570 PARIETAL
R
568 TOOTH, URI2
SHAFT
569 CRANIAL VAULT FRAG
R
567 MAXILLA
566 RIB
A
A
A
A
A
SA+
SA+
I/C
I/C
I/C
C
I
I/C
I
I
I/C
I
C
A
A
A
A
I/C
I
I
I
I
I
F
I
SA+
18+
18+
18+
25+
25+
12+
12+
1-4
1-4
1-4
2-4
0-2
1.5-2.5
.5-1.5
.5-1.5
1-4
.5-1.5
3-6
18+
18+
18+
18+
1-4
.5-2
.5-2
0-2
0-2
0-2
.25-.75
.25-.75
15+
5
20
10
10
40
95
90
5
5
99
95
40
70
50
100
60
65
65
50
75
70
70
70
40
50
5
35
5
85
85
10
CONT
CONT
CONT
CONT
CONT
MULT
MULT
1
2
1
3
2
2
2
2
1
1
CONT
3
2
1
2
1
2
CONT
CONT
CONT
1
2
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
L
L
L
L
L
L
L
L
L
L
L
L
L
L
L
L
L
L
L
L
L
L
L
L
L
L
L
L
L
99
L
603 RIB
NA
R
L
L
R
608 RIB
609 RIB
610 RIB
611 RIB
P1/3-D1/3
NA
M
M
M
M
M
M
M
M
617 PHALANGE PROX HAND
618 THORACIC VERT
619 THORACIC VERT
620 THORACIC VERT
621 THORACIC VERT
622 LUMBAR VERT
623 LUMBAR VERT
624 LUMBAR VERT
625 CERVICAL VERT (3-7)
C
NA
NA
NA
NA
NA
NA
P1/3-D1/3
616 PHALANGE INT HAND
P1/3-D1/3
614 MT (2-3)
P1/3-D1/3
SHAFT
613 RIB
615 PHALANGE PROX HAND
SHAFT
SHAFT
SHAFT
SHAFT
612 RIB
L
HEAD
R
607 RIB
SHAFT
PE
C/NA
606 FEMUR
PUBIS/ISCHIUM
605 THORACIC VERT
SHAFT
604 PELVIS
M
M
602 THORACIC VERT
C
F
F
F
F
F
F
F
C
P
P
C
F
F
F
F
P
C
F
C
C
F
F
F
P
M
601 LUMBAR VERT
NA
F
C
P1/3-D1/3
L
600 TIBIA
F
598 POSTCRANIAL FRAG
599 POSTCRANIAL FRAG
F
597 LONG BONE FRAG
C
C
C
C
C
C
C
C
C
C
C
C
I
I
I
I
I
C/SA
C/SA
C/SA
C/SA
A
A
A
A
I
U
U
A
2-6
2-6
2-6
2-6
2-6
2-6
2-6
2-6
4-12
4-12
4-12
8-12
0-2
0-2
0-2
0-2
0-2
8-18
8-18
8-14
8-14
18+
18+
18+
18+
.25-1
U
U
18+
100
5
10
15
20
15
15
15
95
70
70
99
10
5
15
15
30
95
5
100
95
5
10
5
25
95
5
5
5
1
2
3
3
3
3
3
MULT
1
1
1
2
2
2
1
2
1
1
MULT
2
2
1
2
CONT
CONT
CONT
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
L
L
L
L
L
L
L
L
L
L
L
L
L
L
SL
L
L
L
L
L
L
L
L
L
L
L
L
100
F
F
F
C
647 LONG BONE FRAG
648 CRANIAL VAULT FRAG
649 POSTCRANIAL FRAG
F
645 VERT
646 POSTCRANIAL FRAG
F
F
F
642 POSTCRANIAL FRAG
644 LONG BONE FRAG
F
641 CRANIAL VAULT FRAG
643 POSTCRANIAL FRAG
F
640 LONG BONE FRAG
NA
SHAFT
LONG BONE FRAG
639 MAJOR
M
F
F
C
M1/3
638 TIBIA
C
CRANIAL VAULT
636 OSSICLE
CRANIAL VAULT
637 OSSICLE
F
F
635 CRANIAL VAULT FRAG
ILIUM
F
C
F
L
633 PELVIS
ILIUM
C
C
C
C
P
634 PARIETAL
L
L
632 PELVIS
DE
L
630 FEMUR
631 TARSAL, CALCANEUS
PE
PE
629 FEMUR
PE
627 HUMERUS
628 FEMUR
PE
626 HUMERUS
C
I
U
C
U
C
C
U
U
C
C
C
C
SA+
SA+
C+
C
C
C
C
C
C
C
C
4-8
0-2
U
4-10
U
4-10
4-10
U
U
4-12
4-12
4-12
4-12
12+
12+
8+
4-10
2-6
2-6
6-10
4-10
4-8
4-8
4-8
60
90
5
5
2
2
5
5
5
5
5
5
5
100
100
5
15
10
10
75
95
95
100
85
CONT
CONT
CONT
CONT
CONT
1
MULT
CONT
CONT
CONT
2
CONT
CONT
CONT
CONT
CONT
CONT
CONT
1
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
L
L
L
S
L
L
S
L
L
L
S
L
L
S
S
L
L
L
L
L
S
101
M1/3
PE
M1/3
M1/3
M1/3
P1/3-D1/3
R
L
L
M
R
662 PHALANGE PROX HAND
663 PHALANGE PROX HAND
664 FEMUR
665 FEMUR
666 FEMUR
667 ULNA
668 TIBIA
669 TIBIA
670 THORACIC VERT
671 MT 1ST
L
M
M
M
673 TEMPORAL
674 OCCIPITAL
675 OCCIPITAL
676 OCCIPITAL
672 MT (2-5)
P1/3-D1/3
661 PHALANGE PROX HAND
SQUAMOUS
SQUAMOUS
SQUAMOUS
P1/3-D1/3
P1/3-D1/3
NA
P1/3
P1/3-D1/3
F
P1/3-D1/3
660 PHALANGE PROX HAND
F
F
P
C
P
P
C
F
C
C
F
F
F
F
F
F
F
P
659 POSTCRANIAL FRAG
M1/3-DE
658 PHALANGE PROX HAND
F
C
PE-DE
P1/3
R
656 MT 1ST
657 TIBIA
F
F
R
654 SCAPULA
655 CRANIAL FRAG
F
F
653 CRANIAL FRAG
F
652 VERT
NA
651 POSTCRANIAL FRAG
M
F
650 CRANIAL VAULT FRAG
I/C
I/C
I/C
I/C
I/C
I/C
I
C
C
C
A
A
A
A
A
A
A
A
A
I
A
C+
C
C+
C
U
U
1-4
1-4
1-4
1-4
1-4
1-4
0-1
2-3
2-3
2-3
18+
18+
18+
18+
18+
18+
18+
18+
18+
0-2
18+
2+
2-6
8+
2-6
U
U
15
20
30
90
50
50
90
5
75
95
5
10
5
15
10
20
20
15
30
5
95
5
10
5
5
5
15
CONT
CONT
CONT
CONT
2
CONT
CONT
CONT
CONT
CONT
1
2
CONT
CONT
2
1
1
1
CONT
CONT
CONT
CONT
2
CONT
MULT
CONT
1
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
L
L
L
L
L
L
L
L
L
L
SL
SL
S
L
L
L
L
L
L
L
L
L
S
L
L
L
S
102
LATERAL
M
L
M
M
M
M
M
693 OCCIPITAL
694 RADIUS
695 FRONTAL
696 FRONTAL
697 OCCIPITAL
698 FRONTAL
699 THORACIC VERT
L
L
R
M
L
R
R
M
701 TARSAL, CUBOID
702 MC 4TH
703 SCAPULA
704 THORACIC VERT
705 TARSAL, NAVICULAR
706 TEMPORAL
707 MANDIBLE
708 SPHENOID
700 TOOTH (PREMOLAR ?)
SHAFT
692 RIB
C/NA
ACROMION
PE-DE
ROOT
NA
PE-P1/3
SHAFT
P1/3
691 RIB
PE-DE
690 HUMERUS
R
689 PHALANGE PROX FOOT
SHAFT
688 RIB
R
SHAFT
SHAFT
686 RIB
687 RIB
SHAFT
685 RIB
L
SHAFT
SHAFT
SHAFT
682 RIB
684 RIB
SHAFT
681 RIB
683 RIB
SHAFT
680 RIB
SHAFT
HEAD
SHAFT
L
678 RIB
679 RIB
L
677 RIB
F
P
F
P
C
C
C
C
C
F
F
P
F
F
F
P
F
F
P
C
F
F
P
F
F
F
F
F
F
F
C
F
C/SA
I
C/SA
A
C
C
A
A
A
A
A
C
A
A
A
C
A
A
C
A
C
C
C
SA+
SA+
SA+
SA+
SA+
SA+
SA+
I/C
I/C
5-15
.5-2
8-15
18+
4-8
4-10
18+
18+
18+
18+
18+
2-6
18+
18+
18+
4-8
18+
18+
4-8
18+
2-4
2-8
2-4
15+
15+
15+
15+
15+
15+
15+
1-4
1-4
15
30
15
40
95
95
100
99
100
5
5
30
5
15
20
70
5
5
35
100
10
20
70
5
5
5
5
5
5
10
80
20
CONT
CONT
1
MULT
1
CONT
CONT
5
1
3
CONT
CONT
CONT
CONT
CONT
2
1
2
2
2
2
2
CONT
CONT
2
2
2
2
2
1
1
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
L
L
L
L
L
L
L
L
L
L
L
SL
L
L
S
L
SL
L
L
L
L
L
L
L
L
L
L
L
L
103
L
R
728 PELVIS
L
L
736 FIBULA
738 TEMPORAL
P1/3
735 FIBULA
737 TEMPORAL
P1/3-D1/3
M1/3
734 FIBULA
P
P
F
F
P
C
L
733 RIB 1ST
HEAD/SHAFT
F
M
732 THORACIC VERT
C
F
F
C
F
NA
SHAFT
ISCHIUM/PUBIS
F
F
731 PARIETAL
730 SCAPULA
R
R
727 CARPAL, SCAPHOID
729 RIB
M
M
726 OCCIPITAL
P
725 FRONTAL
F
NA
M
F
722 CRANIAL VAULT FRAG
724 THORACIC VERT
F
721 CRANIAL VAULT FRAG
723 CRANIAL VAULT FRAG
F
720 CRANIAL VAULT FRAG
F
F
F
SHAFT
718 RIB
719 CRANIAL VAULT FRAG
END
717 RIB
F
F
SHAFT
715 RIB
SHAFT
714 CRANIAL FRAG
716 RIB
F
F
713 LONG BONE FRAG
F
F
P1/3
712 PELVIS
711 FEMUR
F
F
M
710 CRANIAL FRAG
709 SPHENOID
C/SA
C/SA
C/SA
I
I
I
I
I/C
I/C
I
C/SA
C/SA
SA+
I
SA+
C
I/C
C
I
I/C
I/C
SA+
C
SA+
C
C
C+
A
SA+
C/SA
5-15
6-15
6-15
0-2
0-2
0-2
0-2
1-3
1-4
.5-1.5
8-15
10-14
15+
0-2
15+
2-8
1-5
4-12
.5-2
1-4
1-4
15+
2-8
15+
2-8
4-12
8+
18+
15+
5-15
20
45
10
10
30
95
15
15
90
10
10
100
5
5
25
5
5
5
5
10
10
10
5
10
5
5
5
5
5
15
1
CONT
2
CONT
MULT
CONT
1
MULT
CONT
CONT
3
1
MULT
2
CONT
CONT
CONT
4
CONT
CONT
CONT
CONT
2
1
CONT
3
CONT
CONT
1
MULT
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
L
L
SL
L
L
L
L
L
SL
L
L
SL
L
L
L
L
S
L
L
L
L
L
L
L
L
L
L
L
L
104
P1/3
F
PE-P1/3
R
772 ULNA
P
C
PE-D1/3
L
771 MT 2ND
P
P
P1/3-D1/3
F
768 ULNA
C
P
CROWN/ROOT
767 CLAVICLE
M1/3-D1/3
F
P
P
F
F
770 TOOTH, LI1
L
L
766 CLAVICLE
D1/3-DE
LATERAL
HEAD/NECK
ILIUM
M1/3
769 PARIETAL
L
L
765 TARSAL, NAVICULAR
R
L
R
762 RIB
764 FIBULA
R
761 PELVIS
763 OCCIPITAL
R
760 TIBIA
F
C
M1/3
SQUAMOUS
F
R
M1/3
F
M
R
756 FEMUR
M1/3
P
F
759 TIBIA
R
755 FEMUR
P1/3
M1/3-D1/3
758 OCCIPITAL
R
754 FEMUR
P
P
F
F
F
P
F
R
753 FEMUR
M1/3-D1/3
DE
END
SHAFT
END
M1/3
C
C
F
P
F
P
P
P
757 LONG BONE FRAG
L
R
750 RIB
L
R
749 RIB
752 ULNA
R
748 RIB
751 FEMUR
L
747 RADIUS
P1/3-D1/3
P1/3-D1/3
R
SHAFT
L
R
743 RIB
ILIUM
746 FEMUR
R
742 PELVIS
NA
745 TIBIA
M
741 LUMBAR VERT
SHAFT
L
740 TEMPORAL
744 RIB
L
739 TEMPORAL
A
A
A
A
C
C
C
A
A
I/C
A
C
A
A
C
SA+
C
C
C
C
A
C
I
I
I
A
I
I
SA+
C
C
I/C
C/SA
C/SA
25+
18+
18+
18+
2-4
4-12
4-12
18+
18+
1-4
25+
4-10
18+
18+
2-8
12+
2-4
2-4
2-4
2-4
18+
2-8
0-2
0-2
0-2
18+
0-1
.5-1.5
12+
2-8
4-8
1-3
6-15
6-15
30
90
70
20
60
15
50
95
10
50
40
5
5 CONT
10 CONT
98
5
5
5
10
45
60
40
5
15
20
30
80
95
10
30
20
50
2
2
2
1
1
1
CONT
CONT
1
2
2
CONT
1
4
2
1
1
2
1
MULT
3
CONT
CONT
CONT
2
2
CONT
2
2
2
1
2
2
MULT
MULT
CONT
CONT
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
R
R
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
SL
L
S
SL
L
L
SL
L
SL
L
L
S
S
S
S
S
L
L
L
L
SL
L
L
L
L
SL
L
L
L
S
SL
L
L
L
105
R
L
776 PARIETAL
777 TIBIA
R
R
785 HUMERUS
786 ULNA
C
M
M
792 CERVICAL VERT (3-7)
793 THORACIC VERT
F
R
R
796 TEMPORAL
797 TARSAL, NAVICULAR
798 TARSAL, NAVICULAR
P
P
F
R
795 POSTCRANIAL FRAG
F
F
P
F
C
794 PARIETAL
C
SHAFT
ACETABULUM/PUBIS F
790 PELVIS
791 FIBULA
PE-DE
789 PHALANGE INT HAND
C
PE-DE
788 PHALANGE INT HAND
C
C
C
C
C
F
F
F
P
F
C
F
C
PE-DE
P1/3-D1/3
F
F
787 PHALANGE PROX HAND
L
PE-DE
P1/3-D1/3
PE-D1/3
R
784 MC 3RD
M
782 FRONTAL
PE-P1/3
PHALANGE 1ST PROX
783 FOOT
R
M
781 FRONTAL
P1/3-M1/3
779 TIBIA
780 HUMERUS
SHAFT
L
778 FIBULA
PE
C
M
775 CERVICAL VERT (3-7)
M1/3
SHAFT
R
774 RIB
773 ULNA
A
A
A
A
SA+
C
C
C
C
A
A
A
A
F/I
F/I
A
A
SA+
SA+
A
C
C
C
SA+
I
SA+
25+
18+
18+
18+
15+
2-8
2-8
2-6
4-10
18+
18+
18+
18+
-.17-.17
-.17-.17
18+
25+
15+
15+
18+
2-6
6-12
6-12
12+
0-2
12+
15
40
50
20
5
10
10
50
20
5
100
100
95
90
90
95
80
2
5
20
60
10
95
10
100
10
2
1
CONT
1
1
CONT
1
1
1
1
CONT
CONT
MULT
2
2
2
1
1
CONT
CONT
1
1
2
CONT
MULT
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
SL
L
L
SL
L
L
L
L
L
S
L
L
L
L
L
L
SL
SL
L
L
SL
L
SL
106
L
801 MT 5TH
L
L
L
L
R
804 TEMPORAL
805 FEMUR
806 TOOTH, LLm2
807 FIBULA
808 TEMPORAL
R
R
816 MT 1ST
817 MT 5TH
P1/3-D1/3
P1/3-D1/3
HEAD/SHAFT
R
L
M
M
M
820 MT (2-4)
821 MC (2-4)
822 RIB
823 RIB
824 MANDIBLE
825 MANDIBLE
826 CRANIAL BASE FRAG
827 POSTCRANIAL FRAG
P1/3-D1/3
819 MT (2-4)
SHAFT
P1/3-D1/3
P1/3-D1/3
818 MT (2-4)
F
F
F
F
P
C
C
P
C
C
C
C
C
P1/3-D1/3
C
P1/3-D1/3
L
815 MT 1ST
C
813 FIBULA
814 TARSAL, CALCANEUS
F
812 PARIETAL
P1/3-D1/3
F
C
811 PARIETAL
PHALANGE 1ST PROX
810 FOOT
P
F
P
C
F
PE-DE
PE-P1/3
CROWN
P1/3-D1/3
P
P
C
809 CRANIAL VAULT FRAG
L
PETROUS
803 TEMPORAL
PETROUS
PE-DE
R
PHALANGE 1ST PROX
802 FOOT
C
C
PE-DE
F
800 FEMUR
P1/3-D1/3
R
799 LONG BONE FRAG
SA+
SA+
SA+
SA+
I/C
I
I/C
I/C
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I/C
I/C
A
I/C
C
A
C
I
C
C
A
A
C
A
15+
15+
15+
15+
1-3
1-2
1-4
1-4
0-2
0-2
0-2
0-2
0-2
0-2
.5-1.5
1-4
1-4
18+
1-6
2-6
18+
3-8
.5-1.5
2-8
2-8
18+
18+
2-3
18+
5
5
5
5
10
30
80
75
70
100
100
100
100
100
100
95
10
10
95
5
70
15
40
95
30
30
95
95
95
CONT
CONT
1
1
1
1
CONT
MULT
MULT
CONT
2
5
2
2
1
1
CONT
2
2
1
1
MULT
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
SL
S
L
S
SL
L
L
L
L
L
SL
SL
SL
L
L
SL
S
S
L
L
L
L
SL
107
F
F
F
F
842 CRANIAL VAULT FRAG
843 CRANIAL VAULT FRAG
844 CRANIAL VAULT FRAG
845 FEMUR
SHAFT
R
R
R
R
848 RIB 1ST
849 RIB
850 RIB
851 RIB
852 RIB
SHAFT
SHAFT
SHAFT
SHAFT
PE-DE
L
847 PHALANGE PROX FOOT
F
F
F
F
P
C
C
F
841 CRANIAL VAULT FRAG
PE-DE
F
840 CRANIAL VAULT FRAG
846 PHALANGE PROX HAND
F
839 CRANIAL VAULT FRAG
P1/3
F
838 CRANIAL VAULT FRAG
L
F
C
PHALANGE 1ST PROX
835 FOOT
837 PARIETAL
F
834 CRANIAL FRAG
P
F
833 PARIETAL
PE-DE
F
832 PARIETAL
836 PARIETAL
F
C
831 PARIETAL
C
C
F
M
829 CERVICAL VERT (3-7)
C
830 CRANIAL FRAG
M
828 SACRUM
A
A
A
A
SA+
SA+
A
A
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
A
I/C
I/C
I/C
I/C
C/SA
I/C
C
18+
18+
18+
18+
15+
15+
18+
18+
0-2
0-2
0-2
0-2
0-2
0-2
0-2
0-2
0-2
25+
1-6
1-4
1-4
1-4
4-15
1-6
2-8
2
2
2
5
30
95
90
10
2
3
5
5
10
10
15
20
30
99
5
5
5
10
5
100
95
1
CONT
1
MULT
1
CONT
1
1
CONT
CONT
CONT
2
1
1
2
1
CONT
CONT
2
CONT
MULT
CONT
2
2
1
CONT
2
CONT
CONT
2
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
L
L
L
L
SL
L
L
SL
L
L
SL
L
SL
L
L
L
S
S
L
SL
SL
SL
L
L
108
R
M
L
880 LUMBAR VERT 5TH
881 FEMUR
L
R
L
884 SCAPULA
885 RIB
886 RIB
HEAD/SHAFT
HEAD/SHAFT
C
C
P
F
P
L
883 SCAPULA
C
C
F
F
F
C
C
C
C
C
C
C
C
P
C
C
P
C
C
C
C
C
P
F
F
P
P
C
C
882 CRANIAL FRAG
P1/3-D1/3
C/NA
PE
PE
R
879 HUMERUS
NA (R1/2)
878 HUMERUS
M
875 SACRUM 2ND
C
PE
M
874 SACRUM 2ND
C
PE-DE
M
873 SACRUM 1ST
NA (R1/2)
R
M
872 SACRUM 1ST
NA (R1/2)
NA (L1/2)
877 HUMERUS
M
C
ILIUM
HEAD/SHAFT
P1/3-D1/3
SHAFT
P1/3-D1/3
ILIUM
ILIUM
P1/3-D1/3
P1/3-D1/3
P1/3-DE
PETROUS
PETROUS
PE-P1/3
PE-DE
NA
876 PHALANGE PROX HAND
M
871 SACRUM 3RD
L
864 HUMERUS
870 SACRUM 3RD
R
863 PELVIS
M
L
862 PELVIS
L
L
861 TIBIA
869 SACRUM 3RD
R
860 FIBULA
868 PELVIS
R
859 HUMERUS
L
L
858 TEMPORAL
867 RIB 2ND
R
857 TEMPORAL
L
R
856 HUMERUS
L
R
855 TEMPORAL
866 ULNA
L
854 MC 2ND
865 RIB
M
853 CERVICAL VERT 1ST
I
I
I
I
I
I
A
A
A
A
A
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
F/I
F/I
F/I
C
A
A
I
I
A
I
A
F/I
.5-2
.5-2
0-2
0-2
0-2
.5-1.5
25+
18+
18+
18+
18+
.5-2
.5-2
.5-2
.5-2
.5-2
.5-2
.5-2
.5-2
0-2
.5-1.5
0-2
-.17-.17
-.17-.17
-.17-.17
3-5
18+
18+
0-2
0-2
18+
0-.15
18+
-.17-.17
M?
90
90
30
30
20
95
90
5
5
10
99
95
100
95
95
95
95
100
70
99
99
60
95
90
90
85
80
45 CONT
5
10
30
35
95
90
CONT
MULT
1
1
1
1
1
2
CONT
CONT
1
MULT
CONT
CONT
CONT
2
1
1
1
2
1
1
1
1
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
S
L
L
L
SL
SL
SL
L
L
L
L
S
S
SL
S
S
L
S
S
SL
L
S
S
SL
L
SL
L
L
S
L
SL
L
109
L
L
L
L
L
L
L
L
L
L
L
L
L
L
R
R
R
890 HUMERUS
891 HUMERUS
892 HUMERUS
893 HUMERUS
894 HUMERUS
895 HUMERUS
896 HUMERUS
897 HUMERUS
898 HUMERUS
899 HUMERUS
900 HUMERUS
901 HUMERUS
902 HUMERUS
903 HUMERUS
904 FEMUR
905 TIBIA
906 TOOTH, LC
M
909 FEMUR
910 THORACIC VERT
L
L
913 TOOTH, ULm2
914 MC 4TH
P1/3-D1/3
916 ULNA
PE-DE
SHAFT
915 FIBULA
R
C/NA
912 LUMBAR VERT
CROWN
PE-D1/3
M
PHALANGE 1ST PROX
911 HAND
NA
PE-DE
D1/3
R
908 PHALANGE INT HAND
PE-DE
907 PHALANGE INT HAND
CROWN/ROOT
P1/3-D1/3
P1/3-D1/3
DE
DE
D1/3-DE
D1/3
D1/3
P1/3-M1/3
P1/3
P1/3
P1/3
P1/3
P1/3
P1/3
P1/3
C
F
C
C
C
P
F
C
C
C
C
C
C
F
F
F
F
F
P
F
F
F
F
F
F
F
F
F
P1/3
F
P1/3
C
L
NA/C
889 HUMERUS
M
888 POSTCRANIAL FRAG
887 CERVICAL VERT (3-7)
F/I
A
A
C
A
A
I
I
A
A
A
C
C
A
A
A
A
A
A
A
A
A
A
A
A
A
A
A
A
A
-.17-.17
18+
18+
8-12
25+
18+
0-2
.5-1.5
18+
18+
18+
2-5
2-5
18+
18+
18+
18+
18+
18+
18+
18+
18+
18+
18+
18+
18+
18+
18+
18+
18+
95
10
95
100
80
70
20
95
100
100
100
95
95
2
3
15
3
5
35
2
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
5
99
2
CONT
2
1
MULT
1
3
3
1
2
CONT
MULT
CONT
2
3
CONT
CONT
CONT
CONT
CONT
CONT
CONT
CONT
CONT
CONT
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
L
SL
L
SL
L
L
L
L
L
S
L
SL
L
SL
L
L
L
L
L
L
L
L
L
L
L
S
110
F
F
F
F
F
C
M
M
M
931 CRANIAL VAULT FRAG
932 CRANIAL VAULT FRAG
933 POSTCRANIAL FRAG
934 POSTCRANIAL FRAG
935 POSTCRANIAL FRAG
936 CERVICAL VERT (3-7)
937 CERVICAL VERT (3-7)
938 LUMBAR VERT
C
P
L
941 RIB
SHAFT
L
940 PELVIS
ILIUM
F
C
939 POSTCRANIAL FRAG
NA (L1/2)
C
F
930 CRANIAL VAULT FRAG
NA (L1/2)
F
NA (L1/2)
C
P
929 CRANIAL VAULT FRAG
927 PARIETAL
P
P
P
P
P
P
P
P
C
F
R
L
926 MANDIBLE
P1/3-D1/3
P1/3-D1/3
928 CRANIAL VAULT FRAG
L
922 FRONTAL
925 MAXILLA
R
921 OCCIPITAL
R
M
920 OCCIPITAL
R
M
919 ULNA
924 TEMPORAL
L
918 SCAPULA
923 FRONTAL
L
R
917 RADIUS
C
F/I
U
F/I
F/I
F/I
U
U
U
F/I
F/I
F/I
F/I
F/I
F/I
F/I
F/I
F/I
F/I
F/I
F/I
F/I
F/I
F/I
F/I
2-8
-.17-.17
U
-.17-.17
-.17-.17
-.17-.17
U
U
U
-.17-.17
-.17-.17
-.17-.17
-.17-.17
-.17-.17
-.17-.17
-.17-.17
-.17-.17
-.17-.17
-.17-.17
-.17-.17
-.17-.17
-.17-.17
-.17-.17
-.17-.17
-.17-.17
30
90
5
95
99
90
5
5
2
3
5
5
5
10
40
80
45
30
30
30
25
25
60
70
95
1
1
CONT
CONT
2
2
4
MULT
CONT
CONT
CONT
CONT
1
CONT
CONT
CONT
CONT
MULT
MULT
MULT
CONT
1
1
1
2
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
L
SL
L
S
S
S
L
L
L
SL
L
L
L
L
SL
L
L
SL
SL
S
SL
S
SL
L
S
111
M
L
L
L
R
R
R
R
R
R
L
M
M
M
M
R
952 THORACIC VERT
953 RADIUS
954 RIB
955 TIBIA
956 FRONTAL
957 FRONTAL
958 FRONTAL
959 FRONTAL
960 FRONTAL
961 FRONTAL
962 MT 5TH
963 LUMBAR VERT
964 LUMBAR VERT
965 LUMBAR VERT
966 THORACIC VERT
967 RIB
F
F
F
F
C
971 LONG BONE FRAG
972 LONG BONE FRAG
973 LONG BONE FRAG
974 POSTCRANIAL FRAG
975 FEMUR
PE-DE
F
970 LONG BONE FRAG
F
P
P
F
F
P
C
F
F
F
F
F
F
C
C
P
C
P
F
SHAFT
SHAFT
C
NA
NA
NA
PE-DE
P1/3-D1/3
HEAD/SHAFT
P1/3
C
NA
P
P
C
C
C
C
F
F
F
969 LONG BONE FRAG
L
M
951 LUMBAR VERT
968 RIB
M
950 THORACIC VERT
NA
CROWN
NA (R1/2)
M
949 CERVICAL VERT 1ST
P1/3-D1/3
948 TOOTH, LPM
L
947 MC 1ST
P1/3-D1/3
R
945 MC (2-4)
946 NASAL
SHAFT
944 RIB
SHAFT
SHAFT
L
943 RIB
942 RIB
A
U
SA+
SA+
SA+
SA+
SA+
A
A
A
A
A
A
A
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
C
I
I
I
I
A
I
I/C
I
C
C
C
18+
U
15+
15+
15+
15+
15+
18+
18+
18+
18+
18+
18+
18+
0-2
0-2
0-2
0-2
0-2
0-2
0-1
0-2
3-7
0-2
0-2
0-2
1-2
25+
0-2
1-5
0-2
2-8
2-8
2-8
M
95
2
2
2
2
2
2
10
30
50
5
5
30
100
10
15
15
15
15
15
95
99
30
100
40
60
85
100
100
100
95
10
5
20
CONT
1
MULT
CONT
CONT
CONT
CONT
CONT
CONT
MULT
2
2
CONT
CONT
3
CONT
CONT
CONT
CONT
CONT
CONT
2
2
1
CONT
2
2
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
SL
L
L
L
L
L
L
SL
L
SL
L
L
L
L
L
L
L
L
L
S
S
S
L
L
L
L
L
L
L
112
R
985 RADIUS
M
M
R
R
L
R
990 THORACIC VERT
991 THORACIC VERT
992 FIBULA
993 FIBULA
994 PARIETAL
995 TIBIA
NA
SHAFT
L
PE-DE
PE-DE
P1/3-D1/3
1004 PHALANGE INT HAND
R
1002 MC 5TH
PE-DE
L
1001 MC 4TH
1003 PHALANGE PROX HAND
L
1000 HUMERUS
P1/3-D1/3
L
998 ULNA
999 RIB
D1/3
L
PE-DE
P1/3-D1/3
M1/3
M1/3
997 FRONTAL
996 PHALANGE PROX HAND
PE-D1/3
989 MC 3RD
NA
P1/3-DE
R
988 PHALANGE PROX HAND
C
C
C
C
C
P
F
F
C
C
P
F
F
F
P
C
C
C
F
P
P
F
F
F
F
PE-D1/3
P
F
987 MC 5TH
D1/3
P
C
986 POSTCRANIAL FRAG
R
R
984 RADIUS
P1/3-M1/3
SHAFT
D1/3
R
983 RADIUS
SHAFT
981 RIB
LONG BONE FRAG
982 MINOR
SHAFT
C
980 RIB
978 SACRUM
NA
C
SHAFT
M
977 LUMBAR VERT
979 RIB
M
M
976 THORACIC VERT
C
A
A
A
I
C
I
C
I/C
A
I
I/C
C
C
C
C
C
C
C
SA+
C
C
C
I
C
C
C
C
C
2-6
18+
18+
18+
0-2
3-5
1-2
4-8
1-3
18+
0-1
1-4
4-8
4-8
4-8
4-8
4-8
4-8
4-8
15+
4-7
4-7
4-7
0-2
2-8
2-8
2-8
2-6
2-6
25
99
95
95
100
85
50
20
10
100
90
30
20
20
5
40
95
100
100
2
5
50
30
20
5
10
10
50
95
CONT
1
1
2
2
2
CONT
1
1
CONT
3
CONT
CONT
1
2
2
2
2
CONT
CONT
2
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
L
L
L
L
L
L
L
L
S
S
SL
SL
L
L
L
L
L
L
L
SL
L
L
L
L
L
113
D1/3-DE
R
1006 RADIUS
1007 HUMERUS
SHAFT
L
L
1030 RIB 2ND
1031 RIB
L
R
L
1034 FEMUR
1035 NASAL
1036 RIB
PE
DE
1038 FEMUR
END
1037 TIBIA
R
P1/3
L
1033 FEMUR
M1/3-D1/3
SHAFT
1032 RIB
SHAFT
P1/3-D1/3
HEAD/NECK
1029 MC 1ST
SHAFT
R
1028 RIB
CROWN/ROOT
1027 RIB
SHAFT
1024 RIB
L
SHAFT
1023 MC (2-5)
1026 TOOTH, ULI2
SHAFT
1022 RIB
1025 RIB
P1/3-D1/3
SHAFT
1021 MT (2-4)
SHAFT
1020 RIB
L
L
1019 RIB
HEAD
P1/3-D1/3
SHAFT
R
1018 RIB
END
1016 RIB
1017 MT (2-4)
SHAFT
1015 RIB
R
SHAFT
1014 RIB
SHAFT
SHAFT
R
1012 RIB 1ST
HEAD/SHAFT
1013 RIB
R
L
1011 RIB
P1/3-DE
L
1009 MT 1ST
1010 TEMPORAL
SHAFT
1008 RIB
M1/3-D1/3
PE-DE
R
PHALANGE 1ST PROX
1005 HAND
P
P
F
C
P
P
F
P
P
P
F
F
C
F
F
P
F
C
F
F
F
C
F
P
F
F
P
P
P
C
F
P
F
C
C
C
C
C
I
I
C
A
C
I/C
C
SA+
A
C
C
SA+
C
F/I
SA+
A
C
F/I
C
SA+
SA+
C
I
F/I
SA+
C
I
I
A
A
2-6
2-6
2-8
4-10
0-.5
0-.5
2-8
25+
2-8
-.17-.17
3-6
15+
25+
4-8
2-8
15+
2-6
-.17-.17
15+
18+
4-10
-.17-.17
2-8
15+
15+
2-4
0-2
-.17-.17
15+
6-10
0-2
0-1
18+
18+
40
50
15
95
60
35
5
40
25
60
20
5
95
5
10
40
5
80
5
10
20
80
15
30
5
10
35
60
65
95
5
60
20
99
2
1
2
1
2
1
2
1
1
1
1
1
1
2
1
CONT
CONT
2
2
2
1
2
2
2
2
2
2
CONT
CONT
1
CONT
2
2
2
CONT
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
SL
SL
L
L
L
L
SL
L
S
L
S
L
S
L
L
L
SL
L
L
S
L
L
S
L
L
L
L
L
SL
L
L
L
L
L
114
M
1040 LUMBAR VERT
SHAFT
P1/3-D1/3
L
L
1045 RIB
1046 FEMUR
1047 TIBIA
END
HEAD
1055 RIB
1056 RIB
C
P1/3-DE
L
L
R
R
R
L
R
1062 FEMUR
1063 PELVIS
1064 FEMUR
1065 HUMERUS
1066 RIB
1067 RIB
1068 HUMERUS
SHAFT
SHAFT
1069 RIB
1070 RIB
P1/3-D1/3
END
HEAD/END
P1/3-D1/3
P1/3-D1/3
ILIUM
P1/3-D1/3
SHAFT
R
1061 MT 1ST
F
F
C
F
C
C
C
C
P
C
F
F
SHAFT
1059 RIB
1060 RIB
F
F
F
F
C
F
F
1058 PARIETAL
SHAFT
PE-DE
1054 PHALANGE PROX FOOT
1057 RIB
SHAFT
1053 RIB
P1/3-D1/3
SHAFT
1052 RIB
R
R
1051 TIBIA
P
F
R
1050 RIB 1ST
HEAD
M
1049 OCCIPITAL
BASILAR/LATERAL
F
C
C
F
1048 CRANIAL FRAG
P1/3-D1/3
SHAFT
1044 RIB
F
P
P1/3-DE
PHALANGE 1ST PROX
1043 HAND
F
F
C
F
ISCHIUM
NA
C
1042 LONG BONE FRAG
1041 PELVIS
M
1039 LUMBAR VERT
C
SA
F/I
SA+
F/I
F/I
F/I
I
F
C
A
A
A
C+
I
C
A
A
A
I
SA+
SA/A
A
I
I
A
A
C
C
C
C
C
4-10
15+
-.17-.17
12+
-.17-.17
-.17-.17
-.17-.17
.5-1.5
-.25-0
2-6
18+
18+
18+
8+
1-2
4-8
18+
18+
18+
0-.5
15+
15-25
18+
0-.5
0-.5
18+
18+
2-8
2-12
2-6
2-6
2-6
20
5
85
10
95
95
90
90
70
95
5
5
15
15
20
5
95
2
15
90
35
20
10
95
95
10
10
50
5
10
10
85
1
1
1
CONT
1
3
1
1
1
1
2
2
1
1
3
1
CONT
1
1
2
1
CONT
MULT
2
2
MULT
MULT
MULT
1
1
1
CONT
CONT
1
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
L
SL
L
L
L
L
L
L
SL
L
L
SL
S
SL
L
L
L
L
SL
L
SL
SL
L
S
S
SL
SL
L
L
L
L
L
115
L
1075 RIB
END
L
L
R
L
L
R
L
1084 RIB
1085 RIB
1086 RIB
1087 RIB
1088 RIB
1089 RIB
1090 RIB
R
L
L
1103 RIB
1104 RIB
1105 RIB
SHAFT
HEAD/SHAFT
SHAFT
HEAD/SHAFT
R
1102 RIB
HEAD
SHAFT
1099 RIB
END
R
R
1098 RIB
SHAFT
1101 RIB
R
1097 RIB 1ST
END
HEAD/SHAFT
SHAFT
L
1096 RIB
P1/3-D1/3
WING
1100 RIB
L
L
1095 RIB
R
R
1094 HYOID
SHAFT
L
1092 RIB
1093 TIBIA
SHAFT
1091 RIB
SHAFT
HEAD
SHAFT
SHAFT
SHAFT
SHAFT
END
SHAFT
R
SHAFT
1081 RIB
1083 RIB
SHAFT
1082 RIB
SHAFT
1078 RIB
1080 RIB
SHAFT
SHAFT
1077 RIB
1079 RIB
SHAFT
SHAFT
1076 RIB
R
R
1074 RIB
SHAFT
SHAFT
L
1073 RIB
SHAFT
SHAFT
L
1072 RIB
1071 RIB
F
F
C
F
P
F
F
F
F
F
P
F
C
P
P
F
P
P
F
F
F
P
F
F
F
F
F
F
P
F
F
F
F
F
F
C/SA
F/I
F/I
C
F/I
C
C
I
C
I
C
A
A
F/I
C
A
SA+
A
C
A
C
C
C
SA+
SA+
SA+
SA+
SA+
SA+
SA+
SA
SA
C/SA
I/C
C/SA
6-15
-.17-.17
-.17-.17
2-6
-.17-.17
2-10
4-10
0-2
2-6
0-2
2-8
18+
18+
-.17-.17
4-10
18+
15+
25+
4-10
18+
6-12
6-12
6-12
15+
15+
15+
15+
15+
15+
15+
12-18
12-18
8-15
1-3
6-15
5
80
20
65
5
5
15
5
20
70
5
90
65
45
51
40
35
15
10
20
30
5
5
10
15
20
30
65
10
10
20
20
15
5
20
1
2
1
1
1
2
CONT
CONT
2
1
2
1
2
2
CONT
1
1
2
1
1
1
2
2
1
MULT
1
1
1
2
1
1
1
2
CONT
2
4
2
2
CONT
CONT
3
2
CONT
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
IR
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
L
SL
L
L
L
S
SL
SL
S
L
L
L
S
SL
SL
SL
SL
SL
SL
L
L
L
SL
S
L
L
L
L
SL
L
L
L
L
L
S
116
END
SHAFT
HEAD/SHAFT
L
L
1107 RIB
1108 RIB
1109 RIB
1110 RIB
1111 RIB
F
F
F
F
F
F
1127 CRANIAL VAULT FRAG
1128 CRANIAL VAULT FRAG
1129 CRANIAL VAULT FRAG
1130 CRANIAL VAULT FRAG
1131 CRANIAL VAULT FRAG
C
F
PE-DE
1126 CRANIAL VAULT FRAG
1124 HUMERUS
P
C
C
C
F
F
F
P
P
F
F
C
P
F
F
F
L
R
1123 PARIETAL
ILIUM
M1/3-D1/3
F
F
1125 CRANIAL VAULT FRAG
L
R
1122 HUMERUS
PE-DE
1121 PELVIS
PE-DE
C
R
M
1118 THORACIC VERT
NA
1120 MC 2ND
M
1117 THORACIC VERT
C
NA
PHALANGE 1ST PROX
1119 FOOT
M
M
P1/3-D1/3
L
1114 RADIUS
1116 LUMBAR VERT
END
1113 RIB
1115 THORACIC VERT
END
1112 RIB
HEAD/SHAFT
SHAFT
SHAFT
1106 RIB
F/I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
A
A
I/C
I/C
A
A
A
A
A
A
I/C
F/I
C
F/I
I
A
A
C/SA
-.17-.17
0-2
0-2
0-2
0-2
0-2
0-2
0-2
18+
18+
1-4
1-3
18+
18+
18+
18+
18+
18+
1-3
-.17-.17
2-6
-.17-.17
0-2
18+
18+
8-15
2
5
5
10
20
5
5
95
20
65
99
90
80
20
15
5
50
70
5
5
99
65
10
10
5
20
1
CONT
CONT
CONT
CONT
CONT
CONT
CONT
CONT
2
2
1
2
1
1
MULT
MULT
1
1
7
MULT
2
1
CONT
CONT
2
CONT
2
2
CONT
3
1
1
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
SL
SL
SL
SL
S
SL
SL
SL
L
S
SL
L
L
L
L
L
L
L
L
L
SL
SL
SL
L
L
S
117
R
R
R
R
R
R
R
L
1147 MC 3RD
1148 MC 5TH
1149 CARPAL, TRAPEZIUM
1150 CARPAL, SCAPHOID
1151 CARPAL, TRAPEZIUM
1152 CARPAL, HAMATE
PE-DE
PE-DE
PE-DE
PE-DE
1144 PHALANGE INT HAND
1146 MC 2ND
PE-DE
PHALANGE 1ST DISTAL
1143 HAND
1145 PATELLA
PE-DE
1142 PHALANGE PROX HAND
C
C
C
C
C
C
C
C
C
C
C
P
C
1141 TOOTH, RUM2
CROWN/ROOT
R
R
MAXILLA/ZYGOMATIC,
CANINE, 1ST
PREMOLAR, 1ST
1140 MOLAR
F
1137 CRANIAL VAULT FRAG
F
F
1136 CRANIAL VAULT FRAG
C
F
1135 CRANIAL VAULT FRAG
M
F
1134 CRANIAL VAULT FRAG
1139 MANDIBLE
F
1133 CRANIAL VAULT FRAG
CRANIAL VAULT
1138 OSSICLE
F
1132 CRANIAL VAULT FRAG
A
A
A
A
A
A
A
A
A
A
A
YA
YA
A
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
18+
18+
18+
18+
18+
18+
18+
18+
18+
25+
18+
18+
18+
25+
0-2
0-2
0-2
0-2
0-2
0-2
0-2
95
100
95
100
100
95
95
95
90
100
100
95
90 7
20
100
5
5
5
5
5
5
1
2
1
CONT
CONT
CONT
CONT
1
1
2
2
1
1
CONT
MULT
2
1
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
IR
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
S
L
S
L
SL
L
SL
SL
SL
SL
S
L
SL
SL
SL
118
P
C
L
M
L
R
L
R
R
L
1166 SCAPULA
1167 FRONTAL
1168 RIB
1169 RIB
1170 RIB
1171 RIB
1172 RIB
1173 RIB
HEAD
L
L
R
1176 RIB
1177 RIB
1178 TIBIA
1179 TIBIA
SHAFT
1175 RIB
P1/3
PE
END
SHAFT
1174 RIB
SHAFT
SHAFT
HEAD/SHAFT
HEAD
HEAD/SHAFT
HEAD/SHAFT
BODY
F
F
F
F
F
F
F
F
F
F
P
P
F
P
F
L
1165 RIB
C/NA
M
1164 LUMBAR VERT
HEAD
P
C
MANDIBLE, TOOTH,
1163 RLC, RLm1, RLm2, RLM1 R
CROWN
C
C
P
1160 TOOTH, RUM2
CROWN
CROWN/ROOT
MANDIBLE, TOOTH,
1162 LLI1, LLm1, LLm2, LLM2 L
L
1159 TOOTH, LLM2
C
P
L
1158 TOOTH, RLi2
CROWN/ROOT
MAXILLA, TOOTH, RUI1,
1161 RUm1, RUm2, RUM1
R
L
1157 TOOTH, RLI1
C
L
R
1156 TOOTH, LLc
CROWN/ROOT
C/NA
F
M
1154 CERVICAL VERT (3-7)
C
1155 CRANIAL FRAG
R
1153 CARPAL, HAMATE
A
A
C
C
C
C
C
C
C
C
C
C
C
C
A
A
C
C
C
C
C
C
C
C
C
A
A
18+
18+
4-8
4-8
2-10
2-10
4-8
4-8
4-8
4-8
4-8
4-8
4-8
4-8
18+
25+
4-6
4-6
4-6
4-6
4-6
4-6
4-6
4-6
4-10
25+
18+
5
5
5
5
5
5
20
20
20
15
35
45
10
65
10
95
45
40
80
100
100
100
100
100
5
70
95
CONT
CONT
1
CONT
CONT
1
1
1
1
1
CONT
1
CONT
1
1
1
1
CONT
2
1
3
2
CONT
7
2
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
SL
SL
S
L
SL
SL
SL
SL
L
L
L
SL
L
L
S
L
SL
L
SL
L
L
L
119
SHAFT
LONG BONE FRAG
1185 MAJOR
F
F
F
F
M
1199 VERT
CROWN/ROOT
R
R
1201 TOOTH, UM3
1202 TOOTH, UM2
1203 RIB
HEAD
CROWN/ROOT
PE-D1/3
R
1200 PHALANGE PROX HAND
NA
PE-DE
C
M
R
TARSAL, MEDIAL
1196 CUNEIFORM
1198 LUMBAR VERT
PE-DE
1195 MC 3RD
PHALANGE 1ST PROX
1197 FOOT
PE-DE
R
1194 PHALANGE PROX HAND
F
C
C
P
P
C
C
C
C
C
P
1193 FIBULA
P1/3-M1/3
F
1192 CRANIAL FRAG
L
R
1191 PELVIS
F
P
PUBIS
F
1190 PELVIS
ISCHIUM
R
1189 POSTCRANIAL FRAG
F
1188 POSTCRANIAL FRAG
F
SHAFT
LONG BONE FRAG
1184 MAJOR
ISCHIUM
SHAFT
LONG BONE FRAG
1183 MAJOR
F
1187 PELVIS
SHAFT
LONG BONE FRAG
1182 MAJOR
F
SHAFT
LONG BONE FRAG
1181 MAJOR
F
1186 PELVIS
SHAFT
LONG BONE FRAG
1180 MAJOR
C
SA/YA
SA/YA
A
I/C
C
A
A
A
A
A
U
A
A
A
A
A
A
A
A
A
A
A
A
2-6
17-24
17-24
18+
1-3
4-10
18+
18+
18+
18+
18+
U
18+
18+
18+
18+
18+
18+
18+
18+
18+
18+
18+
18+
5
100
100
60
30
10
80
99
95
95
35
5
5
30
5
5
5
5
5
5
5
5
5
5
3
1
CONT
CONT
CONT
CONT
1
1
1
2
2
2
1
CONT
CONT
CONT
MULT
MULT
CONT
CONT
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
L
SL
S
L
S
S
S
SL
L
SL
SL
SL
L
L
L
SL
L
SL
L
L
S
120
M
M
1220 PELVIS
1221 COCCYX
1222 THORACIC VERT
1227 RIB
SHAFT
SHAFT
HEAD
R
M
M
M
M
1229 RIB
1230 RIB
1231 RIB
1232 THORACIC VERT
1233 THORACIC VERT
1234 SPHENOID
1235 MANDIBLE
NA (L1/2)
NA (L1/2)
SHAFT
1228 RIB
F
P
P
P
F
F
F
F
P
L
1226 RIB
SHAFT
C
L
1225 CRANIAL FRAG
HEAD/SHAFT
F
F
1224 CRANIAL FRAG
F
P
C
C
P
C
P
P
P
P
P
C
P
C
F
C
P
P
P
C
1223 CRANIAL FRAG
NA (L1/2)
P1/3-D1/3
ILIUM
L
1219 MT (2-4)
P1/3-DE
NA (L1/2)
M
1218 THORACIC VERT
M1/3-D1/3
M1/3-D1/3
BODY
HEAD/SHAFT
1/2
P1/3-D1/3
ILIUM
C
C
NA (L1/2)
1217 MC (4-5)
R
L
1212 MANDIBLE
R
L
1211 TIBIA
1216 HUMERUS
R
1210 PELVIS
1215 CLAVICLE
M
1209 SACRUM
L
M
1208 CERVICAL VERT (3-7)
L
M
1207 CERVICAL VERT (3-7)
1214 SCAPULA
M
1206 THORACIC VERT
1213 RIB
NA (R1/2)
1205 THORACIC VERT
NA (L1/2)
PE-DE
M
1204 PHALANGE PROX FOOT
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I/C
I/C
U
I
A
C
I/C
I
SA+
C
SA+
SA+
I
F/I
F/I
C
C
I/C
I/C
I/C
I/C
A
.5-1
.5-1
.5-1
.5-1
.5-1
.5-1
.5-1
.5-1
.5-1
.5-1
1-4
1-4
U
0-2
18+
2-5
1-4
0-2
15+
4-8
15+
15+
0-2
-.17-.17
-.17-.17
4-10
4-10
1-3
1-3
1-3
1-3
18+
5
65
50
60
10
2
5
5
30
95
5
5
5
70
100
90
60
80
70
35
40
70
40
95
35
75
20
95
50
45
45
90
2
CONT
1
1
5
1
2
CONT
MULT
2
2
CONT
2
MULT
CONT
CONT
CONT
1
1
2
1
2
1
1
2
2
1
1
1
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
R
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
L
L
L
L
L
L
L
S
L
L
L
SL
L
S
SL
L
L
L
SL
SL
S
L
S
S
L
L
L
L
SL
SL
L
121
L
L
R
R
1244 CLAVICLE
1245 RIB
1246 SCAPULA
1247 PELVIS
ILIUM
SHAFT
PE-P1/3
CROWN
C
C
F
F
P
F
F
C
C
C
C
C
L
1253 TEMPORAL
L
1266 RIB
SHAFT
F
P
L
1265 RIB
SHAFT
F
F
SHAFT
F
P
L
R
1262 SCAPULA
M1/3-D1/3
C
C
C
C
1264 RIB
R
1261 HUMERUS
P1/3-D1/3
P1/3-D1/3
P1/3-D1/3
P1/3-D1/3
1263 CRANIAL VAULT FRAG
L
L
L
1258 TIBIA
1260 HUMERUS
L
1257 FEMUR
1259 FIBULA
R
1256 HUMERUS
C
C
1255 RIB
P1/3-D1/3
F
L
1254 CRANIAL VAULT FRAG
HEAD/SHAFT
C
1252 TOOTH, Urc
P
F
R
1251 CRANIAL FRAG
F
CROWN/ROOT
P
C
1250 PARIETAL
CROWN/ROOT
R
1243 TOOTH, CANINE
CROWN
CROWN
ILIUM
L
1242 TOOTH, CANINE
R
R
1241 TOOTH, RI1
CROWN
1249 TOOTH, URm1
L
1240 TOOTH, LLM1
CROWN
CROWN/ROOT
CROWN/ROOT
1248 PELVIS
R
L
1239 TOOTH, LLm2
1237 TOOTH, LLc
1238 TOOTH, Lli
M
L
MANDIBLE, TOOTH, L
1236 +RLm1, RLm2, RLM1
C
C
C
C
C
C
C
F
F
F
F
F
I
C
I
I
I/C
I
I/C
I/C
I/C
I/C
I/C
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
2-5
2-5
2-5
2-5
2-5
2-5
2-5
-.17--.08
-.17--.08
-.17--.08
-.17--.08
-.17--.08
0-2
2-8
.5-1.5
0-2
1-3
.5-1.5
1-4
1-4
1-3
1-4
1-4
.5-1
.5-1
.5-1
.5-1
.5-1
.5-1
.5-1
.5-1
70
5
30
10
10
15
45
80
100
95
95
95
90
10
50
100
5
20
90
10
20
60
20
10
100
100
100
100
95
100
100
1
1
1
2
1
1
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
MULT
MULT
CONT
CONT
CONT
CONT
3
2
MULT
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
SL
L
L
SL
L
SL
SL
L
L
L
L
SL
L
L
L
S
L
L
L
S
S
L
L
122
L
M
M
1272 RIB
1273 OCCIPITAL
1274 FRONTAL
WING
SQUAMOUS
SHAFT
F
F
F
F
F
M1/3-DE
R
1290 RIB
SHAFT
P1/3-M1/3
L
1294 FIBULA
SHAFT
1292 RIB
1293 RIB
SHAFT
HEAD
1291 RIB
L
R
1289 RIB
P
F
F
F
F
F
P
HEAD
F
F
1286 CRANIAL BASE FRAG
R
F
1285 CRANIAL VAULT FRAG
1288 CLAVICLE
F
1287 CRANIAL VAULT FRAG
F
1284 TEMPORAL
F
1282 FRONTAL
1283 CRANIAL BASE FRAG
F
1281 CRANIAL VAULT FRAG
M
F
F
1279 SPHENOID
1280 CRANIAL VAULT FRAG
F
1278 PARIETAL
M
F
1277 PARIETAL
F
R
1271 TEMPORAL
M
R
1270 TEMPORAL
F
P
C
1276 FRONTAL
R
1269 TEMPORAL
NA (L1/2)
F
R
1268 TEMPORAL
1275 CRANIAL VAULT FRAG
M
1267 THORACIC VERT
C
I/C
I/C
I/C
I/C
I/C
A
A
A
A
A
A
A
A
A
A
A
A
A
A
A
A
C
C
C
C
C
I
4-8
1-4
1-4
1-4
1-4
1-4
18+
18+
18+
18+
18+
18+
18+
18+
18+
18+
18+
18+
18+
18+
18+
18+
2-6
2-6
2-6
2-6
2-6
0-2
30
5
10
5
20
20
35
2
2
2
5
5
5
5
5
10
5
5
5
5
5
20
20
5
5
10
30
100
1
1
2
2
2
CONT
CONT
CONT
MULT
1
1
CONT
2
CONT
1
2
1
1
1
CONT
CONT
CONT
CONT
CONT
1
MULT
CONT
CONT
1
CONT
2
1
CONT
CONT
CONT
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
L
SL
L
SL
S
S
L
SL
L
SL
L
L
S
L
SL
SL
SL
SL
L
SL
SL
L
SL
SL
L
L
S
123
R
R
L
1311 MC 4TH
1312 MC 2ND
1313 MT 4TH
M
M
M
M
1316 CERVICAL VERT (3-7)
1317 CERVICAL VERT (3-7)
1318 CERVICAL VERT (3-7)
1319 HYOID
PHALANGE DISTAL
1320 HAND
M
1315 MANDIBLE
1314 TOOTH, MOLAR
L
1310 SCAPULA
PE-DE
WING
C
C
C
CROWN/ROOT
PE-D1/3
PE-DE
PE-DE
PE-DE
P1/3-D1/3
P1/3-M1/3
L
1307 ULNA
NA
M1/3-D1/3
1309 FIBULA
R
1306 HUMERUS
PHALANGE 1ST DISTAL
1308 HAND
M
L
1305 THORACIC VERT
L
P1/3-DE
1302 PHALANGE PROX FOOT
1304 TEMPORAL
P1/3-DE
1301 PHALANGE PROX FOOT
R
P1/3-DE
PHALANGE 1ST DISTAL
1300 FOOT
1303 ZYGOMATIC
P1/3-DE
PHALANGE 1ST PROX
1299 FOOT
P1/3-D1/3
1298 MT 1ST
C
C
C
C
C
F
C
C
C
C
F
P
C
P
P
F
C
C
C
C
C
C
P
C
R
F
F
PE-D1/3
D1/3
1297 MT (2-3)
L
LONG BONE FRAG
1296 MAJOR
1295 FIBULA
A
A
I
I
I
I
A
A
A
A
A
C
A
I/C
I/C
I/C
C
C
C
C
C
C
C
C
C
C
18+
18+
0-1
0-1
0-1
0-1
25+
18+
18+
18+
18+
4-8
18+
1-3
1-3
1-3
2-8
4-10
4-8
4-8
4-8
4-8
4-8
4-8
2-12
4-8
100
95
80
100
100
5
90
80
95
95
20
40
95
65
60
15
80
90
100
100
100
95
60
80
5
20
1
4
1
1
CONT
CONT
1
1
CONT
1
1
CONT
2
1
1
4
4
1
1
1
1
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
L
S
L
S
L
L
L
SL
SL
L
SL
L
SL
SL
S
L
L
S
S
SL
124
NA
M
R
R
R
1336 CERVICAL VERT (3-7)
1337 RIB
1338 MC 2ND
1339 MT 1ST
L
R
L
MAXILLA, TOOTH,
1345 RUm1, RUC
1346 FEMUR
1344 MC
1343 CARPAL, TRAPEZIUM
P1/3-D1/3
P1/3-DE
PE-DE
L
PHALANGE 1ST DISTAL
1341 HAND
1342 CARPAL, LUNATE
PE-DE
1340 PHALANGE INT HAND
PE-DE
PE-DE
HEAD
NA
PE-DE
ISCHIUM
PE-DE
1333 PELVIS
L
L
1332 CERVICAL VERT (3-7)
SHAFT
PE-DE
1335 MT 1ST
M
1331 CLAVICLE
1334 PHALANGE PROX HAND
L
L
1330 RIB 1ST
SHAFT
R
1329 RIB 1ST
SHAFT
SHAFT
L
1327 RIB
CROWN/ROOT
1328 RIB
L
L
1326 TOOTH, ULi1
C
P
P
C
C
C
C
C
C
P
F
C
C
F
C
C
F
P
F
F
C
F
C
1325 MAXILLA
F
L
C
1324 ZYGOMATIC
PE-DE
PHALANGE DISTAL
1322 HAND
C
1323 CRANIAL VAULT FRAG
PE-DE
PHALANGE DISTAL
1321 HAND
C
C
A
A
A
A
A
A
A
A
A
A
A
A
I/C
I/C
I/C
I/C
I/C
I/C
I/C
I/C
C
C
A
A
2-4
2-4
18+
18+
18+
18+
18+
18+
18+
18+
18+
18+
18+
18+
1-4
1-4
1-5
1-5
1-5
1-5
1-3
1-3
4-8
2-12
18+
18+
90
70
70
100
100
100
100
95
100
35
5
95
99
15
90
90
5
65
10
20
100
15
100
10
90
95
1
CONT
1
1
CONT
1
3
2
MULT
3
3
2
2
2
3
CONT
CONT
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
L
L
L
L
SL
L
SL
L
SL
L
L
L
L
L
L
L
SL
L
L
125
F
L
1359 RIB
NA (L1/2)
M
M
M
M
M
M
1361 CERVICAL VERT (3-7)
1362 CERVICAL VERT (3-7)
1363 THORACIC VERT
1364 LUMBAR VERT
1365 LUMBAR VERT
1366 LUMBAR VERT
R
L
1369 OCCIPITAL
1370 OCCIPITAL
1371 OCCIPITAL
F
F
F
F
1373 PARIETAL
1374 CRANIAL VAULT FRAG
1375 PARIETAL
P
C
P
F
F
F
P
P
P
C
C
F
F
1372 CRANIAL VAULT FRAG
LATERAL
LATERAL
SHAFT
SQUAMOUS
M
1368 LONG BONE FRAG
SHAFT
1367 RIB
NA
NA
NA (L1/2)
NA
NA (L1/2)
SHAFT
HEAD
1360 RIB
P
L
1358 RIB
SHAFT
F
P
L
SHAFT
P
C
1357 RIB
P1/3-D1/3
1355 MC (2-4)
1356 CRANIAL VAULT FRAG
M1/3-D1/3
1354 MC (2-4)
F
P1/3
D1/3
P
C
P
L
P1/3-D1/3
ILIUM
F
P
1353 CLAVICLE
L
1351 CLAVICLE
P1/3
P1/3-D1/3
1352 POSTCRANIAL FRAG
R
L
1350 PELVIS
1348 ULNA
1349 RADIUS
R
R
1347 FEMUR
C
C
C
C
C
C
C
C
C
C
C
C
C
C
C
C
C
C
C
C
C
C
C
C
C
C
C
C
C
2-4
2-4
2-4
2-4
2-4
2-4
2-4
2-4
2-4
2-4
2-4
2-4
2-4
2-4
2-4
2-4
2-4
2-4
2-4
2-4
2-4
2-4
2-4
2-4
2-4
2-4
2-4
2-4
2-4
20
20
10
15
5
30
90
65
2
5
15
40
70
70
90
90
2
10
50
60
2
80
65
30
10
20
35
85
70
CONT
1
CONT
3
1
1
1
CONT
2
1
CONT
1
CONT
CONT
CONT
2
1
CONT
CONT
1
1
2
CONT
1
1
1
CONT
2
CONT
2
2
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
SL
SL
L
SL
SL
L
L
SL
L
L
L
L
SL
L
L
L
L
SL
SL
L
L
L
L
SL
L
L
L
L
L
126
M
M
1380 FRONTAL
1381 SPHENOID
L
M
R
1399 TIBIA
1400 OCCIPITAL
1401 TOOTH, RLC
NA (R1/2)
CROWN/ROOT
BASILAR
P1/3
NA
M
M
1398 CERVICAL VERT 2ND
NA (L1/2)
1404 THORACIC VERT
M
1397 CERVICAL VERT (3-7)
PE-M1/3
P1/3-D1/3
R
1396 MT 5TH
PE-D1/3
M
MANDIBLE, TOOTH,
1395 RLPM1
M1/3-D1/3
L
L
1394 FEMUR
P1/3-M1/3
1403 MT 5TH
L
1393 FEMUR
C/NA
C/NA
C/NA
R 1/2
R 1/2
R 1/2
1402 MT (2-5)
M
M
1390 THORACIC VERT
M
M
1389 FRONTAL
1392 LUMBAR VERT
M
1388 FRONTAL
1391 CERVICAL VERT 2ND
M
1387 FRONTAL
F
C
C
C
C
F
C
P
P
P
P
P
C
P
P
F
F
P
P
M
1386 FRONTAL
L 1/2
C
R
1385 TOOTH, RUm2
CROWN/ROOT
F
F
1384 LONG BONE FRAG
F
P
F
F
1383 CRANIAL BASE FRAG
SHAFT
M
1379 FRONTAL
1382 RIB
M
1378 FRONTAL
WING (L)
F
1377 FRONTAL
P
F
M
1376 CRANIAL VAULT FRAG
I/C
F/I
F/I
I/C
C
C
I/C
I/C
A
A
I
I
A
A
A
C
C
C
C
C
C
C
C
C
C
C
C
C
C
1-4
-.17-.17
-.17-.17
1-3
2-5
2-5
1-4
1-4
18+
18+
0-.5
0-.5
25+
18+
18+
3-8
3-8
3-8
3-8
8-12
2-4
2-4
2-4
2-4
2-4
2-4
2-4
2-4
2-4
5
85
80
100
90
20
99
50
55
30
45
45
80
70
70
5
5
30
45
95
5
5
5
30
2
10
30
15
10
2
2
MULT
1
2
CONT
2
CONT
1
MULT
CONT
CONT
2
2
1
1
1
1
MULT
3
CONT
3
2
MULT
CONT
CONT
2
1
MULT
MULT
CONT
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
S
L
L
L
L
S
L
L
L
S
SL
SL
L
SL
S
S
L
SL
L
L
L
L
L
SL
S
SL
SL
L
127
P1/3-D1/3
R
R
R
L
1417 TIBIA
1418 FEMUR
1419 RIB
1420 RIB
1421 RIB
SHAFT
L
R
L
M
1429 RIB 2ND
1430 RIB
1431 RIB
1432 LUMBAR VERT
F
F
F
1434 PARIETAL
1435 PARIETAL
F
P
P
F
P
F
P
C
F
P
C
F
F
F
C
P
C
1433 PARIETAL
NA
HEAD/SHAFT
HEAD/SHAFT
SHAFT
SHAFT
NA
C/NA
R
1426 THORACIC VERT
1428 RIB
M
1425 LUMBAR VERT
LATERAL
1427 RIB
M
1424 OCCIPITAL
P1/3-D1/3
L
R
1423 FEMUR
PE-DE
1422 PHALANGE INT HAND
SHAFT
HEAD
HEAD
P1/3-D1/3
PE-DE
R
1416 PHALANGE PROX HAND
P
R
1415 RADIUS
P1/3-D1/3
C
P1/3-D1/3
L
1414 FEMUR
C
P
C
C
F
P1/3-D1/3
P
P
1413 PARIETAL
PE-M1/3
L
1412 TIBIA
PE-DE
1411 PHALANGE PROX HAND
1409 MC 2ND
SHAFT
PE-DE
R
1408 SCAPULA
PHALANGE 1ST PROX
1410 FOOT
L
R
1407 RIB
F
F
1406 FIBULA
D1/3
R
1405 PARIETAL
I/C
A
A
A
A
SA+
SA+
A
A
SA/YA
C
A
C
F
A
A
A
A
F/I
F/I
A
F/I
F/I
I
F/I
A
A
A
C
F/I
C
1-4
18+
18+
18+
18+
12+
12+
18+
18+
12-25
2-6
25+
4-8
-.25--.08
18+
18+
18+
18+
-.17-.17
-.17-.17
18+
-.17-.17
-.17-.17
0-1
-.17-.17
18+
18+
18+
2-6
-.17-.17
2-6
10
10
10
10
15
30
30
20
35
5
55
90
10
70
100
5
20
20
90
70
95
60
80
20
85
60
100
95
30
30
10
CONT
CONT
CONT
MULT
2
1
2
CONT
1
1
MULT
MULT
2
1
1
1
2
4
MULT
2
2
CONT
1
2
2
1
2
2
CONT
2
1
1
1
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
S
SL
SL
SL
L
L
SL
SL
L
L
L
L
L
L
L
L
L
L
L
L
L
L
L
L
L
L
SL
SL
SL
128
F
C
M
M
1440 CRANIAL FRAG
1441 SACRUM
1442 SACRUM
R
R
R
1464 TEMPORAL
1465 TIBIA
1466 RIB
L
1460 MT 1ST
M
R
1459 PELVIS
1463 SPHENOID
L
1458 FEMUR
L
L
1457 FEMUR
M
R
1456 FEMUR
1462 SPHENOID
M
1455 SACRUM
1461 RIB
L
M
1454 CERVICAL VERT 1ST
1452 RIB
1453 RIB
L
L
MANDIBLE, TOOTH,
1451 LLm1
R
1450 HUMERUS
SHAFT
P1/3-D1/3
PETROUS
WING
WING
SHAFT
PE-DE
ILIUM
P1/3-M1/3
P1/3-M1/3
P1/3-D1/3
NA
NA
SHAFT
HEAD/SHAFT
P1/3-D1/3
NA
M1/3
END
L
1447 CLAVICLE
CROWN
CROWN
M
L
1446 TOOTH, LLm2
1449 LUMBAR VERT
L
1445 TOOTH, LLm1
P1/3-DE
LONG BONE FRAG
1448 MAJOR
L
1444 MANDIBLE
P
C
F
F
F
P
C
C
P
P
C
P
C
P
P
F
C
F
F
P
C
C
C
C
C
F
1439 LONG BONE FRAG
NA
F
1438 LONG BONE FRAG
PHALANGE 1ST DISTAL
1443 HAND
F
1437 PARIETAL
NA
F
1436 PARIETAL
I/C
I
C/SA
I/C
I/C
I
A
C
C
C
C
I
I/C
C
C
C
I
I
C
I
I
I
I
F/I
I
I
A
A
A
A
A
.5-3
.5-2
4-16
1-3
1-3
0-2
18+
2-4
2-4
2-4
2-4
.5-2
1-3
2-6
2-6
3-6
.5-1.5
.5-2
2-6
0-2
.25-1
.25-1
.25-1
-.17-.17
0-1
0-1
18+
18+
18+
18+
18+
30
90
20
10
15
35
100
85
30
40
90
30
80
30
45
10
95
20
5
30
100
100
90
100
90
90
2
2
2
5
10
2
MULT
CONT
CONT
CONT
2
1
CONT
CONT
MULT
2
1
2
2
1
2
MULT
1
CONT
1
CONT
2
CONT
CONT
MULT
MULT
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
L
L
L
L
L
L
L
SL
L
L
L
L
SL
SL
SL
L
L
L
L
L
S
S
S
L
L
SL
SL
129
L
L
L
R
L
L
M
R
L
1473 CLAVICLE
1474 RIB
1475 RIB
1476 RIB
1477 RIB 1ST
1478 RIB 2ND
1479 LUMBAR VERT
1480 RIB
1481 RIB
M
1495 VERT
1496 MT
M
1494 THORACIC VERT
P1/3
NA
NA
NA
NA (R1/2)
P1/3-DE
M
1491 LUMBAR VERT
NA (L1/2)
ISCHIUM
M
L
1490 PELVIS
1493 THORACIC VERT
M
1489 LUMBAR VERT
HEAD/SHAFT
SHAFT
M1/3-DE
P1/3-D1/3
PETROUS
M1/3-D1/3
NA (L1/2)
SHAFT
SHAFT
NA (R1/2)
SHAFT
HEAD/SHAFT
HEAD/SHAFT
HEAD/SHAFT
SHAFT
PE-P1/3
SQUAMOUS
BASILAR
NA (L1/2)
NA (L1/2)
C
DENS
1492 PHALANGE INT HAND
R
R
1488 RIB
1486 CLAVICLE
1487 RIB
R
R
1485 ULNA
R
M
1472 OCCIPITAL
1484 TEMPORAL
M
1471 OCCIPITAL
M
M
1470 CERVICAL VERT (3-7)
L
M
1469 CERVICAL VERT (3-7)
1483 HUMERUS
M
1468 CERVICAL VERT (3-7)
1482 THORACIC VERT
M
1467 CERVICAL VERT 2ND
F
F
P
P
C
C
C
C
C
P
P
C
P
P
C
P
F
C
P
C
P
P
F
F
F
C
C
C
C
C
I/C
I/C
I/C
I/C
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I/C
I
I/C
I/C
I/C
I/C
I/C
I/C
I/C
I/C
I/C
I
I/C
C
I/C
I/C
I/C
I/C
1-3
1-3
1-3
1-3
1-2
0-2
0-1
.5-2
.5-2
.5-1.5
.5-1.5
.5-1.5
1-4
0-1
1-4
1-4
1-4
1-4
1-4
1-4
1-4
1-4
1-3
1-2
1-4
2-4
1-3
1-3
1-3
1-3
10
5
35
50
100
80
100
90
80
40
60
80
35
35
95
70
10
80
30
90
60
40
10
15
10
90
90
95
100
90
1
1
1
1
1
CONT
1
2
CONT
1
2
CONT
1
1
2
1
2
1
1
2
1
CONT
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
L
L
L
L
L
L
L
L
L
SL
L
L
L
SL
L
L
L
L
L
L
L
L
SL
L
L
L
L
130
NA
P1/3-DE
P1/3-DE
P1/3-DE
P1/3-DE
1510 PHALANGE PROX HAND
1511 PHALANGE PROX HAND
1512 PHALANGE PROX HAND
1513 PHALANGE PROX HAND
PHALANGE DISTAL
1517 HAND
P1/3-DE
P1/3-D1/3
R
P1/3-DE
1509 PHALANGE INT HAND
1516 MC 1ST
P1/3-DE
1508 PHALANGE INT HAND
P1/3-D1/3
P1/3-DE
1507 PHALANGE INT HAND
P1/3-DE
P1/3-DE
PHALANGE 1ST DISTAL
1506 HAND
R
P1/3-DE
PHALANGE 1ST DISTAL
1505 HAND
1515 MC
P1/3-DE
PHALANGE DISTAL
1504 HAND
PHALANGE 1ST PROX
1514 HAND
P1/3-DE
PHALANGE DISTAL
1503 HAND
NA
P1/3-DE
1500 VERT
PHALANGE DISTAL
1502 HAND
1499 LUMBAR VERT
HEAD/SHAFT
C
P1/3-DE
M
M
1498 THORACIC VERT
PHALANGE DISTAL
1501 HAND
L
M
1497 RIB
C
C
C
C
C
C
C
C
C
C
C
C
C
C
C
C
C
C
F
F
C
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
.5-2
.5-1.5
0-.5
0-.5
0-.5
0-.5
0-.5
0-.5
0-.5
0-.5
0-.5
0-.5
0-.5
0-.5
0-.5
0-.5
0-.5
0-.5
.5-2
.5-2
.5-2
80
100
80
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
5
10
100
1
1
1
1
I
I
I
I
L
S
SL
S
131
P1/3-D1/3
L
L
L
1539 MT 2ND
1540 TOOTH, ULm1
1541 RIB
1542 RIB
PE-DE
SHAFT
HEAD
CROWN/ROOT
PE-M1/3
PE-M1/3
NA
M
1545 LUMBAR VERT
1546 LUMBAR VERT
NA
PE-DE
M
1544 PHALANGE PROX HAND
P1/3-D1/3
R
1538 MT 2ND
1543 MC (2-5)
R
R
1537 MT 4TH
R
PE-DE
NA
M
1536 MT 5TH
P1/3-D1/3
1535 THORACIC VERT
1533 FEMUR
SHAFT
P1/3
WING
R
1532 HUMERUS
SHAFT
1534 SPHENOID
R
L
1531 RIB
R
1530 RIB
P
P
C
C
P
P
C
P
P
C
C
F
F
C
F
F
F
F
L
1529 RIB
HEAD
F
P
1528 RIB 2ND
SHAFT
L
1527 CRANIAL VAULT FRAG
F
1526 CRANIAL VAULT FRAG
C
F
1523 PHALANGE PROX HAND
C
1525 CRANIAL VAULT FRAG
P1/3-DE
1522 MC (4-5)
C
C
F
PE-D1/3
1521 MC (4-5)
C
C
1524 CRANIAL VAULT FRAG
PE-D1/3
PE-D1/3
1520 MT (2-3)
PE-D1/3
L
1519 MC (2-3)
1518 TIBIA
I/C
I/C
A
I
A
A
C
A
A
A
A
C/SA
I
I
C
C
C
I
I
I
I
I
I
I/C
I/C
I/C
I/C
I/C
I
1-4
1-4
18+
0-2
18+
18+
2-4
18+
18+
18+
18+
8-18
0-2
.25-.75
4-8
2-5
2-5
.5-2
.5-2
0-1
0-1
0-1
0-1
1-3
1-3
1-3
1-3
1-4
0-1
35
70
95
85
30
30
100
45
45
85
80
5
20
75
20
20
20
20
65
5
5
5
10
100
95
100
100
95
95
CONT
2
1
1
CONT
1
2
2
1
2
2
2
1
2
2
1
CONT
1
1
CONT
1
1
1
1
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
L
L
SL
L
L
L
L
L
L
L
L
L
SL
SL
L
L
S
L
L
L
SL
SL
L
L
L
132
NA
R
1551 MC 5TH
R
R
R
M
1554 ULNA
1555 FEMUR
1556 MANDIBLE
1557 TOOTH, RLm2
1558 FRONTAL
1576 TEMPORAL
1575 RIB
R
R
1574 ZYGOMATIC
SHAFT
NA (R1/2)
M
1573 CERVICAL VERT (3-7)
SHAFT
NA (R1/2)
L
1570 RIB
P1/3
M
L
1569 ULNA
P1/3
P1/3-D1/3
1572 THORACIC VERT
L
1568 FEMUR
P1/3-D1/3
SHAFT
SHAFT
SHAFT
P1/3-D1/3
L
1567 FEMUR
P1/3-D1/3
HEAD/SHAFT
1571 MT
R
1564 RIB
L
L
1563 RIB
1566 CLAVICLE
L
1562 RIB
1565 RIB
R
L
1561 TIBIA
C
F
C
C
C
C
F
F
F
P
P
P
P
P
C
P
F
C
R
1560 HUMERUS
F
C
C
C
C
C
C
1559 CRANIAL VAULT FRAG
P1/3-D1/3
CROWN
P1/3-D1/3
PE-DE
P1/3-D1/3
L
PHALANGE 1ST PROX
1553 FOOT
PE-D1/3
1552 PHALANGE PROX HAND
C
C
PE-DE
F
CROWN/ROOT
P
P
L
HEAD/SHAFT
1550 TOOTH, ULm2
R
1548 RIB
1549 CRANIAL VAULT FRAG
M
1547 LUMBAR VERT
I/C
C
C
I/C
I
I
I
I/C
C
C
I
I
I
I
I
I
C
F
F/I
C
I
I
I
I
A
A
A
C
F/I
I/C
1-4
2-6
2-6
1-4
0-1
0-1
0-1
1-4
2-8
3-8
0-1
0-1
0-1
0-1
0-2
0-2
2-6
-.25-0
-.17-.17
2-6
.25-.75
.25-.75
0-.5
0-.5
18+
18+
18+
3-5
-.17-.17
1-4
35
75
10
100
100
100
75
5
10
10
70
40
30
55
50
80
60
80
10
20
100
75
85
95
95
75
90
95
15
30
1
CONT
2
CONT
2
2
1
CONT
MULT
2
2
2
2
2
2
1
2
CONT
MULT
1
2
2
1
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
L
L
L
L
S
L
L
L
L
L
L
L
L
L
L
L
L
L
L
L
L
L
L
L
S
L
133
P1/3-D1/3
L
M
R
R
1587 RADIUS
1588 STERNUM
1589 TIBIA
1590 TIBIA
M1/3
R
R
R
1592 TIBIA
1593 FIBULA
1594 FIBULA
SHAFT
SHAFT
SHAFT
SHAFT
SHAFT
1603 LONG BONE FRAG
1604 LONG BONE FRAG
1605 LONG BONE FRAG
1606 LONG BONE FRAG
1607 LONG BONE FRAG
NA
SHAFT
M
1601 THORACIC VERT
C
1602 LONG BONE FRAG
L
M
1600 THORACIC VERT
L
1598 PELVIS
1599 SCAPULA
DE
1597 FEMUR
PUBIS
M1/3-DE
R
1596 PHALANGE PROX HAND
DE
1595 FIBULA
P1/3
D1/3
SHAFT
1591 TIBIA
P1/3-M1/3
PE-P1/3
F
SHAFT
1586 RIB
F
F
F
F
F
F
F
F
F
F
P
P
P
F
F
F
F
F
F
C
C
F
C
1584 TIBIA
1585 LONG BONE FRAG
F
1583 PARIETAL
P1/3-D1/3
F
F
1582 PARIETAL
F
1581 CRANIAL VAULT FRAG
F
1580 PARIETAL
L
P
F
1579 CRANIAL VAULT FRAG
P1/3-DE
SHAFT
1578 RIB
L
1577 PHALANGE PROX FOOT
C
SA
SA
SA
SA
SA
SA
SA
SA
SA
SA
SA
SA
SA
SA
SA
SA
SA
SA
SA
C
C
C
C
I
I
I
I/C
I/C
I/C
I/C
2-6
12-18
12-18
12-18
12-18
12-18
12-18
12-18
12-18
12-18
12-18
12-18
12-18
12-18
12-18
12-18
12-18
12-18
14-18
14-18
4-8
4-8
2-8
2-12
0-.5
0-.5
0-.5
1-6
1-6
1-6
1-6
5
5
5
5
5
5
5
20
10
20
60
30
30
5
5
5
5
10
10
90
85
5
5
95
5
10
5
10
5
5
60
MULT
CONT
CONT
1
MULT
CONT
1
1
1
CONT
CONT
CONT
2
CONT
CONT
MULT
1
CONT
CONT
1
1
2
CONT
2
1
CONT
CONT
CONT
CONT
1
2
CONT
1
CONT
2
1
CONT
2
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
L
SL
SL
L
L
SL
SL
SL
SL
L
L
S
L
L
SL
SL
L
L
L
L
L
SL
L
L
S
S
L
SL
SL
L
L
134
SHAFT
SHAFT
SHAFT
SHAFT
WING
M
M
1609 LONG BONE FRAG
1610 LONG BONE FRAG
1611 LONG BONE FRAG
1612 LONG BONE FRAG
1613 SPHENOID
1614 SPHENOID
1625 CLAVICLE
PE-DE
PE-DE
1632 PHALANGE PROX HAND
1633 PHALANGE PROX HAND
C
C
C
PE-DE
F
R
C
P
1631 MC 5TH
P1/3-D1/3
P
F
P
F
P
1630 PARIETAL
PE-DE
L
1629 TIBIA
SHAFT
M1/3-D1/3
C
PHALANGE 1ST PROX
1628 HAND
1627 MAXILLA, TOOTH, LUC
L
L
1624 THORACIC VERT
1626 LONG BONE FRAG
L
M
TARSAL, MEDIAL
1623 CUNEIFORM
F
R
1622 RIB
SHAFT
F
F
1621 RIB
SHAFT
L
1620 CRANIAL BASE FRAG
F
1619 CRANIAL BASE FRAG
F
M
1618 OCCIPITAL
LATERAL
F
F
1617 OCCIPITAL
BASILAR
M
1616 CRANIAL VAULT FRAG
F
F
F
F
F
F
F
F
1615 CRANIAL VAULT FRAG
WING
SHAFT
1608 LONG BONE FRAG
A
A
A
SA+
F
A
I
SA+
SA+
C
C
C
C
SA
SA
SA
SA
SA
SA
SA
SA
SA
SA
SA
SA
SA
18+
18+
18+
15+
-.33--.08
18+
.5-1.5
15+
15+
4-10
4-10
4-10
4-10
12-18
12-18
12-18
12-18
12-18
12-18
12-18
12-18
12-18
12-18
12-18
12-18
12-18
95
100
95
20
70
80
30
2
35
20
50
5
10
5
5
5
10
5
5
10
10
2
2
2
2
5
MULT
1
1
1
CONT
1
CONT
2
MULT
CONT
CONT
2
2
CONT
1
1
2
2
MULT
CONT
CONT
2
MULT
CONT
CONT
1
CONT
CONT
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
L
L
L
L
L
L
L
L
L
L
SL
SL
SL
L
L
L
L
L
L
L
L
SL
SL
L
L
135
C
F
M
M
L
R
1654 OCCIPITAL
1655 OCCIPITAL
1656 OCCIPITAL
1657 TEMPORAL
1658 TEMPORAL
P
P
F
F
F
M
1653 CRANIAL VAULT FRAG
F
F
1652 PARIETAL
F
1650 CRANIAL VAULT FRAG
1651 CRANIAL VAULT FRAG
F
C
1649 CRANIAL VAULT FRAG
NA (R1/2)
M
1648 CERVICAL VERT (3-7)
F
C
NA (R1/2)
P1/3
F
1645 HUMERUS
P
P
M
L
L
1644 PATELLA
PE-M1/3
SHAFT
1647 CERVICAL VERT 1ST
R
1643 ULNA
F
C
C
C
C
C
C
C
1646 PARIETAL
R
1642 RIB
PE-DE
L
1639 MT 1ST
SHAFT
PE-DE
PHALANGE 1ST PROX
1638 FOOT
R
PE-DE
1637 PHALANGE PROX FOOT
R
PE-DE
1636 PHALANGE PROX FOOT
1641 RIB
PE-DE
1635 PHALANGE PROX FOOT
1640 TARSAL, CALCANEUS
PE-DE
1634 PHALANGE PROX HAND
I
I
A
A
I
I/C
I/C
I/C
I/C
I/C
I
I
A
A
SA+
A
A
A
A
A
A
A
A
A
A
.5-2
.5-2
18+
18+
0-1
1-4
1-4
1-4
1-4
1-4
0-1
0-1.5
18+
18+
15+
18+
18+
18+
18+
18+
18+
18+
18+
18+
18+
70
70
5
5
10
5
5
5
5
5
100
100
10
5
90
40
30
15
90
100
100
100
100
100
95
1
CONT
CONT
CONT
CONT
1
1
1
1
CONT
CONT
CONT
CONT
CONT
1
MULT
1
CONT
MULT
CONT
2
3
MULT
MULT
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
L
L
L
L
L
SL
SL
SL
L
SL
SL
L
L
SL
SL
SL
L
L
136
L
M
R
L
R
M
1684 RIB
1685 OCCIPITAL
1686 PELVIS
1687 ULNA
1688 FEMUR
1689 THORACIC VERT
NA
DE
P1/3-D1/3
ISCHIUM
SQUAMOUS
SHAFT
M1/3-D1/3
R
P1/3-DE
1683 TIBIA
1681 MT 1ST
DE
SHAFT
M1/3-D1/3
L
1680 RIB
ILIUM
ISCHIUM
C/NA
1682 FEMUR
L
L
1679 FEMUR
L
M
1676 CERVICAL VERT (3-7)
R
M
1675 FRONTAL
1678 PELVIS
M
1674 FRONTAL
1677 PELVIS
R
1673 PELVIS
ILIUM
ILIUM
R
1672 PELVIS
M
MANDIBLE, TOOTH,
LLI2, LLC, LLPM2,
1670 LLPM1
P1/3-M1/3
P1/3-D1/3
M1/3-D1/3
L
P1/3-D1/3
CROWN
CROWN
C
1671 MT (2-3)
R
1669 TIBIA
R
1665 TOOTH, RUm1
1668 TIBIA
R
1664 MAXILLA
R
L
1663 ZYGOMATIC
R
M
1662 CERVICAL VERT (3-7)
1667 FEMUR
L
1661 RADIUS
1666 TOOTH, RUm2
P1/3-D1/3
1660 HUMERUS
P1/3
END
R
1659 LONG BONE FRAG
F
P
P
P
C
F
P
P
P
P
F
P
P
C
C
F
F
P
P
C
C
P
C
C
C
C
C
C
C
F
C
C
I/C
I/C
I
I/C
I/C
C
I
I
I/C
C
C
I
C
C
I/C
I/C
C
C
I
A
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
2-10
1-4
1-4
.5-1.5
1-4
1-4
2-8
0-.5
0-.5
1-4
4-8
4-8
.5-1.5
4-8
4-8
1-4
1-4
2-4
2-4
.5-1.5
25+
.5-1.5
.5-1.5
.5-1.5
0-1
0-1
0-1
0-2
0-1
0-.5
0-.5
5
70
35
60
95
20
40
30
30
60
10
45
70
95
100
20
20
40
40
95
80
60
95
95
100
100
75
95
99
20
90
CONT
1
MULT
CONT
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
MULT
CONT
CONT
1
2
1
1
1
CONT
1
1
2
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
L
L
L
L
S
L
L
SL
L
L
L
L
L
L
L
L
L
L
SL
L
L
L
L
L
L
L
L
L
137
1721 PELVIS
1722 FEMUR
L
L
PHALANGE 1ST PROX
1720 HAND
M1/3
ILIUM
PE-DE
PE-DE
F
P
C
C
P
L
1719 MC 1ST
M1/3-D1/3
R
1718 FEMUR
P1/3-D1/3
P
P
P
M
1714 FRONTAL
P1/3-M1/3
P
P
L
R
1713 FEMUR
LATERAL
M1/3-D1/3
1717 TIBIA
R
1712 OCCIPITAL
F
F
L
1711 ULNA
P1/3-D1/3
F
C
P
L
1710 FIBULA
P1/3
C
F
F
F
C
C
P
C
C
P
P
F
F
F
F
F
1716 PARIETAL
L
1709 FEMUR
C
F
1715 PARIETAL
R
1708 CARPAL, SCAPHOID
P1/3-DE
M1/3-D1/3
1707 MC (2-3)
1705 FIBULA
M1/3-D1/3
SHAFT
L
1704 RADIUS
C
ILIUM
HEAD/SHAFT
HEAD
SQUAMOUS
PE-DE
1706 LONG BONE FRAG
R
L
1703 ZYGOMATIC, MAXILLA
M
M
R
1700 PELVIS
1702 THORACIC VERT
L
1701 MANUBRIUM
L
1699 RIB
1695 PARIETAL
1698 RIB
L
1694 PARIETAL
L
L
1693 PARIETAL
M
L
1692 PARIETAL
1697 OCCIPITAL
L
1691 PARIETAL
1696 PARIETAL
R
L
1690 MT 1ST
A
18+
18+
18+
0-.5
1-4
1-4
1-4
2-6
0-.5
4-8
4-8
6-12
8-12
18+
18+
0-2
4-8
4-8
18+
0-.5
2-8
0-.5
0-1
0-1
0-.5
0-.5
0-.5
0-.5
0-.5
0-.5
0-.5
SA+
15+
YA/MA 25-40
A
A
I
C
I/C
I/C
C
I
C
C
C
C
A
A
I
C
C
A
I
C
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
20
30
90
95
50
70
5
30
30
45
60
30
20
20
100
80
5
20
20
90
95
70
95
95
30
30
10
10
20
10
10
10
95
1
2
1
MULT
MULT
1
2
2
1
1
CONT
CONT
1
1
2
CONT
1
2
CONT
MULT
MULT
1
2
1
2
CONT
2
MULT
2
1
1
1
1
1
2
2
1
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
L
L
L
L
L
SL
SL
SL
SL
SL
SL
L
L
S
L
L
L
L
SL
L
L
L
L
L
L
SL
SL
SL
S
SL
L
SL
138
P1/3-D1/3
M
R
L
M
L
L
1726 FRONTAL
1727 PELVIS
1728 MANDIBLE
1729 THORACIC VERT
1730 MC 4TH
1731 ULNA
P1/3-D1/3
P1/3
L
M
L
1733 FEMUR
1734 HUMERUS
1735 CERVICAL VERT (3-7)
1736 FIBULA
1740 MANDIBLE
L
L
L
1754 RIB
1755 RIB
HEAD
SHAFT
HEAD
P
P
P
P
P
1753 RIB
SHAFT
HEAD
L
P
L
P1/3
WING
1752 RIB
L
1748 SPHENOID
F
1751 RIB
R
1747 PARIETAL
F
F
R
1746 PARIETAL
F
F
R
1745 PARIETAL
F
R
R
1744 PARIETAL
P
P
F
C
P
F
1750 ULNA
R
1743 PARIETAL
SHAFT
SQUAMOUS
P
P
P
P
P
F
P
C
F
P
C
P
C
C
P
1749 PARIETAL
R
1742 PARIETAL
1741 RIB
R
1739 OCCIPITAL
D1/3
L
M
1738 ULNA
P1/3-D1/3
1737 FEMUR
M1/3
NA (R1/2)
END
1732 LONG BONE FRAG
P1/3-M1/3
PE-D1/3
NA
ILIUM
PE-DE
L
P1/3-DE
1725 FEMUR
L
1724 PHALANGE INT HAND
1723 MT 1ST
I
I
I
I
I
I/C
C
C
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I/C
I
I
C
I
I
I
C
A
A
A
I
I
A
I
A
C
0-.5
0-.5
0-.5
0-.5
0-.5
1-4
2-6
2-6
0-1
0-1
0-1
0-1
0-1
0-1
0-2
0-1
1-3
.5-1.5
0-.5
4-8
.5-1.5
0-.75
.5-2
4-10
18+
18+
18+
0-.5
0-.5
18+
0-.5
18+
4-8
40
50
40
60
30
10
10
40
5
5
10
10
25
25
5
80
70
15
70
30
70
30
60
5
25
90
5
30
95
35
90
100
70
CONT
MULT
MULT
MULT
2
1
2
2
CONT
1
1
1
2
1
1
MULT
CONT
CONT
CONT
CONT
CONT
CONT
2
MULT
2
1
2
2
1
MULT
CONT
1
1
CONT
2
1
2
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
L
L
L
L
L
L
SL
SL
L
L
L
L
L
L
L
SL
SL
L
S
L
L
SL
SL
L
SL
L
L
L
L
SL
L
L
139
1763 SPHENOID
P1/3-D1/3
BASE
P
C
P
L
R
1766 FIBULA
1767 MC 1ST
1768 PELVIS
M
M
M
R
R
R
R
R
R
L
1771 LUMBAR VERT
1772 THORACIC VERT
1773 THORACIC VERT
1774 CERVICAL VERT 1ST
1775 CERVICAL VERT (3-7)
1776 SACRUM
1777 MT 5TH
1778 RIB
1779 RIB
1780 TEMPORAL
F
P
1782 CRANIAL VAULT FRAG
1783 THORACIC VERT
P
P
F
P
P
C
C
P
P
F
NA
SHAFT
HEAD
P1/3-D1/3
NA
NA
NA
NA
NA
F
P
C
P
C
C
1781 CRANIAL VAULT FRAG
M
C
1770 LUMBAR VERT
C
P1/3-DE
M
1769 PHALANGE PROX HAND
PUBIS
P1/3-D1/3
EPIPHYSIS
P1/3-D1/3
R
1765 LONG BONE FRAG
P
L
M
1762 ULNA
NA
P
P
C
P
P
F
M
1761 LUMBAR VERT
NA
D1/3
SHAFT
SHAFT
1764 CRANIAL VAULT FRAG
R
M
L
1758 SCAPULA
1760 LUMBAR VERT
L
1757 RIB
1759 FEMUR
L
1756 RIB
I/C
A
A
A
C
I/C
C
I/C
I/C
I/C
I/C
I/C
C
C
C
C
F
F
C
C
C
C
I/C
I/C
C
I/C
I
I
1-4
18+
18+
18+
2-5
1-3
4-8
1-4
1-4
1-4
1-4
1-4
2-5
2-5
2-6
2-8
-.25-0
-.25--.08
2-6
2-6
2-6
2-3
1-5
1-5
4-8
1-3
0-.5
0-.5
70
5
5
30
60
20
70
70
95
95
30
30
10
50
90
60
100
95
30
5
60
90
45
60
35
80
70
70
1
1
2
2
1
1
CONT
CONT
MULT
1
2
1
2
2
2
2
2
CONT
2
2
CONT
1
2
CONT
1
1
1
1
2
1
1
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
L
L
L
L
L
L
SL
L
L
L
SL
L
L
L
L
L
L
L
L
SL
SL
L
S
L
SL
L
L
140
P1/3-D1/3
R
M
M
1803 HUMERUS
1804 THORACIC VERT
1805 LUMBAR VERT
C/NA
NA
D1/3-DE
PE
C
P1/3-D1/3
F
L
C
P
P
P
C
F
F
C
C
C
C
C
1810 TIBIA
PE-DE
C
C
1809 CRANIAL VAULT FRAG
PHALANGE 1ST PROX
1808 FOOT
PE-D1/3
R
1802 HUMERUS
C/NA
PE-DE
M1/3-D1/3
R
1801 MT 3RD
L
M
1800 CERVICAL VERT (3-7)
PE-DE
NA
CROWN/ROOT
1807 HUMERUS
R
1799 MC 3RD
CROWN/ROOT
CROWN/ROOT
1806 MC 3RD
R
M
1798 THORACIC VERT
1796 TOOTH, RUi2
1797 TOOTH, RUi1
R
R
1795 TOOTH, Ruc
P
C
C
CROWN
C
C
R
P1/3-D1/3
P1/3-D1/3
P
C
1794 TOOTH, RUm2
R
1792 FIBULA
M1/3-D1/3
P1/3-D1/3
C
1793 MAXILLA, TOOTH, RUm1 R
R
L
1791 FIBULA
1789 TIBIA
1790 TIBIA
L
L
1788 FEMUR
P1/3-DE
ISCHIUM
C
R
R
1787 PELVIS
P
MANDIBLE, TOOTH,
1785 RLm1, RLm2, RLC, RLI2 M
1786 MT 4TH
P
MANDIBLE, TOOTH,
1784 LLm1, LLm2, LLM1, RLI1 M
I
I/C
A
A
I/C
C
I/C
A
A
A
A
A
I/C
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
C
C
.25-.75
1-4
18+
18+
1-4
2-4
1-4
18+
18+
18+
25+
18+
1-4
.5-1.5
.5-1.5
.5-1.5
.5-1.5
.5-1.5
0-.5
0-.5
0-.5
0-.5
0-.5
0-.5
0-.5
2-4
2-4
95
5
95
35
70
65
95
10
20
90
95
95
90
100
100
100
100
50
80
100
95
95
50
95
95
40
55
MULT
2
1
MULT
2
1
2
CONT
1
1
2
2
MULT
2
1
1
1
2
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
L
SL
L
SL
L
L
L
SL
L
L
L
L
L
L
L
L
L
L
L
L
L
L
141
M
M
1813 CERVICAL VERT (3-7)
1814 THORACIC VERT
C
P
P
1818 LUMBAR VERT
C
M
1817 MT
NA (L1/2)
P
C
R
1816 PARIETAL
P1/3-D1/3
C
C/NA
C/NA
C
F
M
1812 CERVICAL VERT (3-7)
P1/3-D1/3
1815 PARIETAL
L
1811 FEMUR
I/C
I/C
A
A
I/C
A
A
I
1-4
1-4
18+
18+
1-4
25+
25+
.25-.75
98
98
35
20
95
30
60
90
2
1
CONT
CONT
2
2
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
L
L
L
L
L
L
L
L
142
12
90
14
16
9.4
13
21.8
23.8
12
15
33
11
C
43.3
10
25.9
8
34.4
27.2
7
9
25.3
6
C
65.1
16.5
4
5
32.3
3
C
64.8
2
Max
Length
68.2
C/A
1
#
C
C
C
C/A2
8.7
13.8
8.6
7.3
16.3
30.3
43.2
17
13
7.3
5.4
17.5
14.2
4
8.4
7.5
Max
Width
C
C
C
C/A3
5.9
2
4.1
0.8
4.8
4.4
3.7
3.6
3.2
3
2.9
4.5
2.3
2.8
2.8
2.7
REFIT TO 11, 12
REFIT TO 11, 13
REFIT TO 12, 13
REFIT TO 6
REFIT TO 7
Min
Associations
Width
MULT
MULT
MULT
MULT
1
1
1
# Eros # Burn # Tool Path
APPENDIX C, ISOLATED BONE INVENTORY (PART 2)
LARGER THAN 11/12
2 SEGMENTS FUSED
TOGETHER
NOTES
R47, L8, TT3N, ROOM
FILL, 7/15/71, GRADY
R47, L8, TT3N, ROOM
FILL, 7/15/71, GRADY
R47, L8, TT3N, ROOM
FILL, 7/15/71, GRADY
R47, L8, TT15, SUBLOOR,
7/29, DOYEL
R47, L8, TT15, SUBLOOR,
7/29, DOYEL
R47, L8, TT15, SUBLOOR,
7/29, DOYEL
R47, L8, TT15, SUBLOOR,
7/29, DOYEL
R47, L8, TT15, SUBLOOR,
7/29, DOYEL
R47, L8, TT15, SUBLOOR,
7/29, DOYEL
R47, L8, TT15, SUBLOOR,
7/29, DOYEL
R47, L8, TT15, SUBLOOR,
7/29, DOYEL
R47, L8, TT15, SUBLOOR,
7/29, DOYEL
R47, L8, TT15, SUBLOOR,
7/29, DOYEL
R47, L8, TT15, SUBLOOR,
7/29, DOYEL
R47, L8, TT15, SUBLOOR,
7/29, DOYEL
R47, L8, TT15, SUBLOOR,
7/29, DOYEL
PROV
143
89.5
21.3
43.5
47.9
11
83.2
28.5
53.6
33
34
35
36
37
38
39
40
59.2
31
46.5
55.3
30
32
66.8
29
C
51.7
28
52.9
26
70.1
10.3
19
27
45
18
C
16.8
17
C
C
C
40.3
9.7
13.7
9.5
10.8
23
19.2
8.6
6.1
4.5
9.1
13.5
16.5
13.2
12
9.1
38.3
8.7
C
C
C
24.9
1.9
2.9
5.3
2
6.1
2.6
3.6
4.5
1.6
4
5
4.7
5
5.7
1.2
2.3
0.4
35, 36
35, 37
36, 37
SIMILAR TO 32
SIMILAR TO 33
SIMILAR TO 29
SIMILAR TO 30
SIMILAR TO 27
SIMILAR TO 28
2
SLIGHT DJD
LIPPIING
R44, L1 (0-50CM), NWQ,
6/24/71, DOYEL
R205, L1, SEQ, CUL, 7-171, SULLIVAN
R205, L1, SEQ, CUL, 7-171, SULLIVAN
R205, L1, SEQ, CUL, 7-171, SULLIVAN
R205, L1, SEQ, CUL, 7-171, SULLIVAN
R205, L1, SEQ, CUL, 7-171, SULLIVAN
R205, L1, SEQ, CUL, 7-171, SULLIVAN
R205, L1, SEQ, CUL, 7-171, SULLIVAN
R205, L1, SEQ, CUL, 7-171, SULLIVAN
R205, L1, SEQ, CUL, 7-171, SULLIVAN
R205, L1, SEQ, CUL, 7-171, SULLIVAN
R205, L1, SEQ, CUL, 7-171, SULLIVAN
R205, L1, SEQ, CUL, 7-171, SULLIVAN
R205, L1, SEQ, CUL, 7-171, SULLIVAN
R205, L1, SEQ, CUL, 7-171, SULLIVAN
R47, L8, TT3N, ROOM
FILL, 7/15/71, GRADY
REFIT OR FIT
INTO 18-25
SLIGHT DJD
LIPPING
R47, L8, TT3N, ROOM
FILL, 7/15/71, GRADY
REFIT OR FIT
INTO 18-25
R47, L8, TT3N, ROOM
FILL, 7/15/71, GRADY
144
38.4
79.6
78.2
79.7
25.4
86
28.6
16.1
17.6
16.9
8.9
14.4
13.2
83.8
46
47
48
49
50
51
52
53
54
55
56
57
58
24
45
C
43
40.3
24.4
C
42
16.6
44
C
41
C
C
C
9.6
7.6
11
8.8
10.9
12.9
5.6
10.1
7.7
18.1
12
10.3
10.4
19.2
15.2
16.1
13.8
10.1
C
C
C
3.4
1.1
1.4
1
1.1
1.6
1.9
3.8
3.1
1.1
8.7
7.3
7.5
10.7
11
10.4
6
3.4
REFIT TO 60, 61
VERY SLIGHT
DJD LIPPING
NO FUSION TO NA
R44, L1 (0-50CM), NWQ,
6/24/71, DOYEL
R44, L1 (0-50CM), NWQ,
6/24/71, DOYEL
R44, L1 (0-50CM), NWQ,
6/24/71, DOYEL
R44, L1 (0-50CM), NWQ,
6/24/71, DOYEL
R44, L1 (0-50CM), NWQ,
6/24/71, DOYEL
R44, L1 (0-50CM), NWQ,
6/24/71, DOYEL
R44, L1 (0-50CM), NWQ,
6/24/71, DOYEL
R44, L1 (0-50CM), NWQ,
6/24/71, DOYEL
R44, L1 (0-50CM), NWQ,
6/24/71, DOYEL
R44, L1 (0-50CM), NWQ,
6/24/71, DOYEL
R44, L1 (0-50CM), NWQ,
6/24/71, DOYEL
R44, L1 (0-50CM), NWQ,
6/24/71, DOYEL
R44, L1 (0-50CM), NWQ,
6/24/71, DOYEL
R44, L1 (0-50CM), NWQ,
6/24/71, DOYEL
R44, L1 (0-50CM), NWQ,
6/24/71, DOYEL
R44, L1 (0-50CM), NWQ,
6/24/71, DOYEL
R44, L1 (0-50CM), NWQ,
6/24/71, DOYEL
R44, L1 (0-50CM), NWQ,
6/24/71, DOYEL
145
56.4
27.2
92.5
80.3
87.8
116.7
6.34
54.5
57.4
41.2
38
A
C
C
60
61
62
63
64
65
66
67
68
69
70
71
72
42.9
92.8
73
74
13.5
30.2
59
59
C
C
A
75.7
30.8
10.1
8.5
9
7.4
8.1
12.7
13.6
16.3
11.8
9.9
9.3
7.2
9.4
7.5
C
C
A
4.4
7.9
5.1
4.3
3.2
2.1
2.3
5.3
3.9
5.2
6.1
2.8
3.5
3.1
1.9
2.6
72,73
72,73
72,73
REFIT TO 58, 60
REFIT TO 58, 61
OSSIFIED
CARTILAGE
UNFUSED
UNFUSED
2ND OR 3RD RIB
R211, TT4, SUBFLOOR
L2, SEQ, CUL, 7-29-71,
DEBOWSKI
R211, TT4, SUBFLOOR
L2, SEQ, CUL, 7-29-71,
DEBOWSKI
R211, TT4, SUBFLOOR
L2, SEQ, CUL, 7-29-71,
DEBOWSKI
R211, TT4, SUBFLOOR
L2, SEQ, CUL, 7-29-71,
DEBOWSKI
R44, L1 (0-50CM), NWQ,
6/24/71, DOYEL
R44, L1 (0-50CM), NWQ,
6/24/71, DOYEL
R44, L1 (0-50CM), NWQ,
6/24/71, DOYEL
R44, L1 (0-50CM), NWQ,
6/24/71, DOYEL
R44, L1 (0-50CM), NWQ,
6/24/71, DOYEL
R44, L1 (0-50CM), NWQ,
6/24/71, DOYEL
R44, L1 (0-50CM), NWQ,
6/24/71, DOYEL
R44, L1 (0-50CM), NWQ,
6/24/71, DOYEL
R44, L1 (0-50CM), NWQ,
6/24/71, DOYEL
R44, L1 (0-50CM), NWQ,
6/24/71, DOYEL
R44, L1 (0-50CM), NWQ,
6/24/71, DOYEL
R44, L1 (0-50CM), NWQ,
6/24/71, DOYEL
146
25.5
20.2
45.3
28.5
25.4
20.4
11.5
24.4
C
C
77
78
79
80
81
82
83
84
85
86
19.9
76
46.1
18.3
46.2
75
C
C
36.3
17.9
17.9
8.2
16
18.4
7.8
10.9
5.5
10
17.9
5
C
C
14
7.9
12
1
3.6
4.3
2.2
2.6
2.9
3.2
9.7
1.4
MULT
FUSED
FUSED, NO DJD
R211, TT4, SUBFLOOR
L3, SWQ, CUL, 7-30-71,
DEBOWSKI
R211, TT4, SUBFLOOR
L3, SWQ, CUL, 7-30-71,
DEBOWSKI
R211, TT4, SUBFLOOR
L3, SWQ, CUL, 7-30-71,
DEBOWSKI
R211, TT4, SUBFLOOR
L2, SEQ, CUL, 7-29-71,
DEBOWSKI
R211, TT4, SUBFLOOR
L2, SEQ, CUL, 7-29-71,
DEBOWSKI
R211, TT4, SUBFLOOR
L2, SEQ, CUL, 7-29-71,
DEBOWSKI
R211, TT4, SUBFLOOR
L2, SEQ, CUL, 7-29-71,
DEBOWSKI
R211, TT4, SUBFLOOR
L2, SEQ, CUL, 7-29-71,
DEBOWSKI
R211, TT4, SUBFLOOR
L2, SEQ, CUL, 7-29-71,
DEBOWSKI
R211, TT4, SUBFLOOR
L2, SEQ, CUL, 7-29-71,
DEBOWSKI
R211, TT4, SUBFLOOR
L2, SEQ, CUL, 7-29-71,
DEBOWSKI
R211, TT4, SUBFLOOR
L2, SEQ, CUL, 7-29-71,
DEBOWSKI
147
22.4
108.8
42.5
19.8
33.5
25.5
17.6
56.9
108.1
38.3
27.8
76.6
87
88
89
90
91
92
93
94
95
96
97
98
10.1
9.9
6.1
8.7
10.2
12.8
14.9
22
18.7
12.9
63.8
13.6
2.1
3.4
3.8
3.4
3
11.1
3.4
5.9
14.2
11.1
26.9
2.9
94
95
88?
89?
R211, TT4, SUBFLOOR
L3, SWQ, CUL, 7-30-71,
DEBOWSKI
R211, TT4, SUBFLOOR
L3, SWQ, CUL, 7-30-71,
DEBOWSKI
R211, TT4, SUBFLOOR
L3, SWQ, CUL, 7-30-71,
DEBOWSKI
R211, TT4, SUBFLOOR
L3, SWQ, CUL, 7-30-71,
DEBOWSKI
R211, TT4, SUBFLOOR
L3, SWQ, CUL, 7-30-71,
DEBOWSKI
R211, TT4, SUBFLOOR
L3, SWQ, CUL, 7-30-71,
DEBOWSKI
R211, TT4, SUBFLOOR
L3, SWQ, CUL, 7-30-71,
DEBOWSKI
R211, TT4, SUBFLOOR
L3, SWQ, CUL, 7-30-71,
DEBOWSKI
R211, TT4, SUBFLOOR
L3, SWQ, CUL, 7-30-71,
DEBOWSKI
R211, TT4, SUBFLOOR
L3, SWQ, CUL, 7-30-71,
DEBOWSKI
R211, TT4, SUBFLOOR
L3, SWQ, CUL, 7-30-71,
DEBOWSKI
R211, TT4, SUBFLOOR
L3, SWQ, CUL, 7-30-71,
DEBOWSKI
148
27.5
C
64.3
108
110
63.5
107
55.2
38.3
106
109
24.7
105
C
18.1
40.1
103
104
34.5
102
C
56.7
101
44.6
100
C
22.7
99
C
C
C
C
13.2
39.2
16.3
13.8
12.7
10.6
5.4
20.2
10.5
25.5
14
11.1
C
C
C
C
5.8
20.1
6.2
7.7
5.7
6.7
3.7
14.5
3.6
5.8
7.2
2.5
REFIT TO 105
REFIT TO 106
1
1
VERY SMALL
MASTOID
UNFUSED
R164, UNKNOWN, WHITREID-KUI-COOLEY
R146, 20-30 CM, WEST
UNIT, SEQ, 6-25-71,
STANKOWSKI
TRASH EAST OF EAST
UNIT, "FOUND ALONG
THE WEST FACE OF THE
SALT RIVER DRAW; NO
OTHER FRAGMENTS
FOUND
R211, TT2, L6, NWQ,
CUL, 7-31-71, CURRIDEN
R206, FE6, WEST UNIT,
SEQ, CUL, 7-29-71,
POWERS
R206, FE6, WEST UNIT,
SEQ, CUL, 7-29-71,
POWERS
R205, SUBFLOOR L2,
WEST UNIT, NEQ, 7-1371, MULINSKI
R205, SUBFLOOR L2,
WEST UNIT, NEQ, 7-1371, MULINSKI
R44, TT3, SUBFLOOR,
NEQ, 6-20-71, G. RICE
R44, TT3, SUBFLOOR,
NEQ, 6-20-71, G. RICE
"Walt:we don't know
whose bod this is- Not in
R44, TT3, SUBFLOOR,
associ. W/ any of the
NEQ, 6-20-71, G. RICE
from rm 44-scattered
through trash"
R211, TT4, SUBFLOOR
L3, SWQ, CUL, 7-30-71,
DEBOWSKI
149
62.7
25.5
22.7
86.5
54.6
121
122
123
124
68.5
117
120
53.8
116
49.5
66.7
115
119
116.8
114
43.3
43.5
113
118
48.6
112
C
45.8
111
C
19.3
24
17.6
14
37.4
36
31.7
47.6
50.1
62.8
31.9
35.9
31
6.4
C
8
7.3
3.1
8.4
21.1
24.2
16.4
15.2
18.9
24.3
10.8
1.2
1.2
3.1
REFIT TO 123,
SAME INDIVIDUAL
AS 125
REFIT TO 124, 125
SAME INDIVIDUAL
REFIT TO 112
REFIT TO 113
1
DJD MEDIAL
FACET
DJD SUP FACETS
UNFUSED TO BODY
123+124=126.3MM
MAX LENGTH
123+124=126.3MM
MAX LENGTH
R211, TT4, CUL, L3, SEQ,
7-29-71, DEBOWSKI
R211, TT4, CUL, L3, SEQ,
7-29-71, DEBOWSKI
R211, TT4, CUL, L3, SEQ,
7-29-71, DEBOWSKI
R211, TT4, CUL, L3, SEQ,
7-29-71, DEBOWSKI
R211, TT4, CUL, L3, SEQ,
7-29-71, DEBOWSKI
R211, TT4, CUL, L3, SEQ,
7-29-71, DEBOWSKI
R211, TT4, CUL, L3, SEQ,
7-29-71, DEBOWSKI
R211, TT4, CUL, L3, SEQ,
7-29-71, DEBOWSKI
R211, TT4, CUL, L3, SEQ,
7-29-71, DEBOWSKI
SLIGHT
OSTEOPHYTES
DJD SUP FACETS
R211, TT4, CUL, L3, SEQ,
7-29-71, DEBOWSKI
SLIGHT
OSTEOPOROSIS;
#3
OSTEOPHYTES;
FRACTURED NA;
SIGNIFICANT
LIPPING AND
POROSITY
75-11-1070 (I-1070?)
R211, CUL, L2, SWQ, 8-171, DEBOWSKI-KEANE
R211, CUL, L2, SWQ, 8-171, DEBOWSKI-KEANE
R206, TT4, WEST UNIT,
L6, SEQ, 8-1-71,
MULINSKI
150
45
38.5
54.9
59.9
55.7
32.3
C
C
127
128
129
130
131
132
133
87.9
54.5
138
139
70.3
136
103.9
35.8
135
137
20.5
134
C
25.6
126
21.8
123.8
125
C
C
C
22.9
15.4
21.5
18.7
26.3
6.7
7.9
9.9
16.7
17.5
23.9
20.3
29.9
21.6
26.2
C
C
C
8.5
9.5
7.5
4.9
2.2
3.1
33.3
3.9
6.2
4.5
9.3
2.7
8.6
8
7.5
REFIT TO 140,
SAME INDIVIDUAL
AS 141
REFIT TO 127
REFIT TO 128
SAME INDIVIDUAL
AS 123,124
1
1
1
DJD PROX FACET
DJD PROX FACET
DJD MEDIAL
FACET
UNFUSED
PE UNFUSED
PE UNFUSED
DISTAL END UNFUSED
R211, TT4, CUL, L3, SEQ,
7-29-71, DEBOWSKI
R211, TT4, CUL, L3, SEQ,
7-29-71, DEBOWSKI
R211, TT4, CUL, L3, SEQ,
7-29-71, DEBOWSKI
R211, TT4, CUL, L3, SEQ,
7-29-71, DEBOWSKI
R211, TT4, CUL, L3, SEQ,
7-29-71, DEBOWSKI
R211, TT4, CUL, L3, SEQ,
7-29-71, DEBOWSKI
R211, TT4, CUL, L3, SEQ,
7-29-71, DEBOWSKI
R211, TT4, CUL, L3, SEQ,
7-29-71, DEBOWSKI
R211, TT4, CUL, L3, SEQ,
7-29-71, DEBOWSKI
R211, TT4, CUL, L3, SEQ,
7-29-71, DEBOWSKI
R211, TT4, CUL, L3, SEQ,
7-29-71, DEBOWSKI
R211, TT4, CUL, L3, SEQ,
7-29-71, DEBOWSKI
R211, TT4, CUL, L3, SEQ,
7-29-71, DEBOWSKI
R211, TT4, CUL, L3, SEQ,
7-29-71, DEBOWSKI
R211, TT4, CUL, L3, SEQ,
7-29-71, DEBOWSKI
151
77.1
147
7.2
40.5
146
150
25
145
92.4
47.2
144
149
39.3
143
72
24.8
142
148
90.2
141
C
85.1
140
C
10.3
7.4
9.4
7.2
5.8
9.4
15.7
17.8
3.2
20.7
10.2
C
3.1
3.2
3
1.8
2
1.8
5.1
4.9
1.8
7.8
4.5
R211, TT4, CUL, L3, SEQ,
7-29-71, DEBOUSKI
R211, TT4, CUL, L3, SEQ,
7-29-71, DEBOUSKI
R211, TT4, CUL, L3, SEQ,
7-29-71, DEBOUSKI
R211, TT4, CUL, L3, SEQ,
7-29-71, DEBOUSKI
147, 148, 149, AND
150 PROBABLY
SAME INDIVIDUAL
147, 148, 149, AND
150 PROBABLY
SAME INDIVIDUAL
147, 148, 149, AND
150 PROBABLY
SAME INDIVIDUAL
145+146=58.3MM MAX R211, TT4, CUL, L3, SEQ,
LENGTH
7-29-71, DEBOUSKI
145+146=58.3MM MAX R211, TT4, CUL, L3, SEQ,
LENGTH
7-29-71, DEBOUSKI
R211, TT4, CUL, L3, SEQ,
7-29-71, DEBOUSKI
R211, TT4, CUL, L3, SEQ,
7-29-71, DEBOUSKI
147, 148, 149, AND
150 PROBABLY
SAME INDIVIDUAL
REFITS TO 145
REFITS TO 146
DJD
DJD
R211, TT4, CUL, L3, SEQ,
7-29-71, DEBOUSKI
SAME INDIVIDUAL
AS 139,140
R211, TT4, CUL, L3, SEQ,
7-29-71, DEBOUSKI
R211, TT4, CUL, L3, SEQ,
7-29-71, DEBOUSKI
REFIT TO 139,
SAME INDIVIDUAL
AS 141
152
47.8
49.8
39
43.3
29.4
168
169
170
171
C
42.9
165
167
53.4
25.7
164
166
45.8
163
C
64.5
162
17.6
32.6
158
C
52.8
157
161
30
156
27.9
24.3
155
160
19.6
154
38
57.1
153
C
35.1
152
159
43
151
C
C
C
16.5
18.4
25.6
21.3
15.1
19.9
17.6
33.4
15.5
26
15.7
17.3
20.3
26.9
44.8
22.7
14.3
14.3
27.3
12.7
16.1
C
C
C
C
2.5
6.8
4.7
4.1
5.2
11.2
4.5
13.8
8.5
4.9
11.6
7.7
9.5
4.1
13.1
6.4
9.5
8.3
10
3.9
3.7
REFIT TO 165
REFIT TO 164
DJD
EDENTULOUS
UNFUSED
UNFUSED
UNFUSED
I-1086,R143, W1/2, STR 6,
8-8-69
I-1086,R143, W1/2, STR 6,
8-8-69
I-834, TT58
I-834, TT58
I-834, TT58
I-834, TT58
I-834, TT58
I-834, TT58
I-834, TT58
I-834, TT58
R40, SEQ, E-W TRENCH,
I-1722, 6-18-70,
TOWNSEND/ROGGE
R143, CUT 2, CUL, L2,
NEQ, T-E-E, 7-27-70,
WADEN/HORBIN
BURIAL 331, 1969, I-1748
R269, SEQ, FN 114
R211, TT2, CUL, L5,
NWQ, I-2098, 7-30-71,
CURRIDEN
NO PROVENIENCE
R269, SEQ, FN 114
R40, SEQ, FEATURE #6,
I-1738, 6-25-70,
TOWNSEND/ROGGE
R40, SEQ, FEATURE #6,
I-1738, 6-25-70,
TOWNSEND/ROGGE
R211, TT4, CUL, L3, SEQ,
7-29-71, DEBOWSKI
R211, TT4, CUL, L3, SEQ,
7-29-71, DEBOWSKI
153
23.3
42.8
29.9
20.3
23.5
17.2
12.6
60.1
C
C
C
C
173
174
175
176
177
178
179
180
181
182
183
54
28.2
57.7
48.3
184
185
186
187
63.4
35.2
69.8
39.2
172
C
C
C
C
42.1
34
11.7
8
15.6
24.6
20.7
50
7
15.7
12.1
17.1
11.6
37
21.9
8.8
C
C
C
C
C
13
7.2
5.4
2.7
5.4
14.3
6.5
3.5
0.9
1.3
1.7
1.1
1.1
1.1
2.6
3.1
REFIT TO 186
REFIT TO 187
I-1086,R143, W1/2, STR 6,
8-8-69
174, 175, 176
REFIT
SLIGHT DJD
I-1086,R143, W1/2, STR 6,
8-8-69
174, 175, 176
REFIT
I-1011, R31, L3, NEQ
I-1011, R31, L3, NEQ
I-1010, R153, NWQ, FEA3
I-1010, R153, NWQ, FEA3
R40, SEQ, L J, I-809,
TURKEY BONE AT BASE
OF ASH BAG 1, 2-15-69
R40, SEQ, L J, I-809,
TURKEY BONE AT BASE
OF ASH BAG 1, 2-15-69
R40, SEQ, L J, I-809,
TURKEY BONE AT BASE
OF ASH BAG 1, 2-15-69
R40, SEQ, L J, I-809,
TURKEY BONE AT BASE
OF ASH BAG 1, 2-15-69
I-1086,R143, W1/2, STR 6,
8-8-69
I-1086,R143, W1/2, STR 6,
8-8-69
I-1086,R143, W1/2, STR 6,
8-8-69
I-1086,R143, W1/2, STR 6,
8-8-69
I-1086,R143, W1/2, STR 6,
8-8-69
I-1086,R143, W1/2, STR 6,
8-8-69
174, 175, 176
REFIT
2
CONT
154
29.7
77.2
77.1
210
211
34
202
50.2
19.5
201
209
27.7
200
208
31
199
17.9
37.2
198
207
50.3
197
14.9
36.1
196
206
30.1
195
14.9
68
194
205
35.5
193
37.1
42.2
192
40
19.4
191
204
21
190
203
27.4
189
A
53.7
188
C
19.2
22.5
17.1
16.8
10.2
12.4
12.4
14.8
34.3
9.1
8.3
5.1
10.2
10.6
13.4
24.2
13.5
14.9
12.8
22
14.7
15.2
22
47
A
7.5
7.6
9.6
6.9
5.7
6.4
6.4
11.9
19.7
3.4
2.3
4.3
4.4
8.5
4.4
13
4.9
5.7
6.1
6.2
7.2
10.7
8
5.9
I-1064, TT92B, L1
I-1064, TT92B, L1
I-1064, TT92B, L1
I-1057, CORR DD-E, L2
PROBABLY
210,211,212 SAME
INDIVIDUAL
I-1067, R27, BACKFILL
I-1067, R27, BACKFILL
LEFT LATERAL
I-1064, TT92B, L1
SUPERIOR EYE ORBIT
4 EMPTY SOCKETS
UNFUSED
DENSE
PERPENDICULAR
I-1044, R28, L4, SWQ
I-1056, COOR BB, L2,
STTR
I-1064, TT92B, L1
I-1044, R28, L4, SWQ
I-1044, R28, L4, SWQ
I-1044, R28, L4, SWQ
I-1044, R28, L4, SWQ
I-1044, R28, L4, SWQ
I-1044, R28, L4, SWQ
I-1020, R153, L11, NWQ
I-1057, CORR DD-E, L2
1
PERPENDICULAR
I-1011, R31, L3, NEQ
I-1012, R114, L2, NWQ
PROBABLY
210,211,212 SAME
INDIVIDUAL
REFIT TO 197
REFIT TO 198
1
I-1011, R31, L3, NEQ
I-1011, R31, L3, NEQ
I-1011, R31, L3, NEQ
I-1011, R31, L3, NEQ
155
71.8
30.9
19.8
19.9
58.2
44
40.7
128.8
28.8
22.1
13.7
12.4
15.7
40.1
13.6
79.7
13.2
212
213
214
215
216
217
218
219
220
221
222
223
224
225
226
227
228
9.3
20.9
2
3.8
10.6
7.7
10
16
19.7
70.8
13.5
24.2
20.8
12
9
17.8
5.5
3.4
9.5
1.8
1.6
6.6
6.1
6.7
4.1
3.6
29
6.5
3.1
3.9
8.8
4.3
9.3
4
BAG ORIGINALLY
LABELED HUMAN
228, 229, AND 230
REFIT
R40, TRENCH AA, FEAT
4, I-1066,
TOWNSEND/ROGGE
R40, SEQ, L2, TRASH PIT
IN E/W TRENCH A, 6-1970, TOWNSEND/ROGGE
R40, SEQ, FEAT. 4, I1727, 6-25-70,
TOWNSEND/ROGGE
R40, SEQ, FEAT. 4, I1727, 6-25-70,
TOWNSEND/ROGGE
R40, SEQ, FEAT. 4, I1727, 6-25-70,
TOWNSEND/ROGGE
R40, SEQ, FEAT. 4, I1727, 6-25-70,
TOWNSEND/ROGGE
R40, SEQ, FEAT. 4, I1727, 6-25-70,
TOWNSEND/ROGGE
R40, SEQ, FEAT. 4, I1727, 6-25-70,
TOWNSEND/ROGGE
I-1670
I-960, R41, L6, SWQ, 7-3069
220 AND 221
REFIT (MAX
LENGTH 42.2)
1
I-1547, TT73, SEC F
I-1566, R27, L1, NEQ
R40, SEQ, FEAT. 4, I1727, 6-25-70,
TOWNSEND/ROGGE
OSTEOPOROSIS
SLIGHT DJD
SLIGHT DJD
I-1536, R108, SF 1 AND 2
I-1536, R108, SF 1 AND 2
I-1536, R108, SF 1 AND 2
I-1057, CORR DD-E, L2
220 AND 221
REFIT (MAX
LENGTH 42.2)
PROBABLY
210,211,212 SAME
INDIVIDUAL
156
52.1
46
14.2
C
C
C
C
230
231
232
233
234
235
13.4
10.5
15.6
14
6.1
C
C
C
C
238
239
240
241
242
243
244
245
24.1
31.8
247
248
60
64.6
22.5
246
C
12
237
9
29
236
12.2
16.4
13.2
44.7
229
C
C
C
C
C
C
C
C
C
17.7
18.9
16.1
20.6
16.7
4.7
3.5
12
11.8
8.7
5.9
6
6.7
6.7
9.3
11.7
7.6
5.6
7
16
C
C
C
C
C
C
C
C
C
10
14.6
3.1
6.7
11.2
1
1.6
4.3
4.6
4.2
0.7
2.3
2.1
9.3
1.9
1.5
1.7
5.4
5.3
5.7
R40, SEQ, TRENCH AA,
FEA 7, I-1665, 7-6-70,
TOWNSEND/ROGGE
R205, NWQ, BACKDIRT,
7-13-72
R205, NWQ, BACKDIRT,
7-13-72
R210, BACKFILL FROM
BACK DIRT OF 205, 6-1972, LINDA MAYRO
F-70-58
F-70-58
F-70-61
F-70-61
F-70-61
F-70-61
F-70-61
F-70-61
F-70-61
F-70-61
F-70-61
F-70-61
I-1089, R143, L5, NEQ, 8-7
247 + 248
PROBABLE SAME
IND. BASED ON
SIZE
RODENT GNAWING
R40, SEQ, TRENCH AA,
FEA 7, I-1665, 7-6-70,
TOWNSEND/ROGGE
CONT
R40, TRENCH AA, FEAT
4, I-1066,
TOWNSEND/ROGGE
R40, TRENCH AA, FEAT
4, I-1066,
TOWNSEND/ROGGE
247 + 248
PROBABLE SAME
IND. BASED ON
SIZE
228, 229, AND 230
REFIT
228, 229, AND 230
REFIT
157
30.5
18.8
27.2
19.5
35.7
32.3
24.9
44.2
C
C
A
250
251
252
253
254
255
256
257
258
259
18.7
28
260
261
8.5
38.1
16.4
249
A
C
C
19.2
2.5
5.3
5.4
6.6
15
19.4
19.5
17.8
16.3
6.4
21.7
5.3
A
C
C
2.7
1.1
1.1
1.9
2.1
5.8
4.8
3.6
0.8
0.8
2.7
6.4
2.3
R40, L-J, SEQ, I-941, 7-1669, BB +BV
UNFUSED
R40, SEQ, F4, TRENCH A,
I-1689, 2-16-70,
TOWNSEND/ROGGE
R40, SEQ, F4, TRENCH A,
I-1689, 2-16-70,
TOWNSEND/ROGGE
257, 258, 259, 260
LIKELY SAME
INDIVIDUAL
R40, SEQ, F4, TRENCH A,
I-1689, 2-16-70,
TOWNSEND/ROGGE
R40, SEQ, F4, TRENCH A,
I-1689, 2-16-70,
TOWNSEND/ROGGE
AGE BASED ON
LENGTH
257, 258, 259, 260
LIKELY SAME
INDIVIDUAL
R40, SEQ, F4, TRENCH A,
I-1689, 2-16-70,
TOWNSEND/ROGGE
257, 258, 259, 260
LIKELY SAME
INDIVIDUAL
AGE BASED ON
LENGTH
257, 258, 259, 260
LIKELY SAME
INDIVIDUAL
TT 70-8, I-1701, 7-1-70
CENTRUM UNFUSED, R40, L-J, SEQ, I-941, 7-16NA FUSED
69, BB +BV
UNFUSED
R45, L3, SEQ, I-889, 7-3069, K + K
R45, L3, SEQ, I-889, 7-3069, K + K
R45, L3, SEQ, I-889, 7-3069, K + K
R45, L3, SEQ, I-889, 7-3069, K + K
R40, SEQ, TRENCH AA,
FEA 7, I-1665, 7-6-70,
TOWNSEND/ROGGE
158
43.9
15.6
273
274
C
20.1
21.6
271
272
32.3
270
C
67.9
269
43.6
267
42.4
18.1
266
268
20.5
265
C
22.5
264
27.2
61.8
C
263
262
C
C
C
8.5
10.3
19.9
18.9
14.9
48.9
18.1
13.6
6.2
5.7
10.8
6.8
12.6
C
C
C
4.7
3.8
9.1
7.3
3.3
15.8
4.1
5.7
3.8
3.8
4.8
3.8
4.2
SLIGHT DJD
UNFUSED
UNFUSED
UNFUSED
UNFUSED
UNFUSED EPIPH.
UNFUSED
R40, SEQ, FEA 4,
TRENCH AA, I-1735, 6-2670, GREENE, SWAL
R40, SEQ, FEA 4,
TRENCH AA, I-1735, 6-2670, GREENE, SWAL
R40, SEQ, FEA 4,
TRENCH AA, I-1735, 6-2670, GREENE, SWAL
R40, SEQ, FEA 4,
TRENCH AA, I-1735, 6-2670, GREENE, SWAL
R40, SEQ, FEA 4,
TRENCH AA, I-1735, 6-2670, GREENE, SWAL
R50, SURFACE, 69, I-993
TT 70-9A, I-1703, 7-7-70,
ROGGE
TT 70-9A, I-1703, 7-7-70,
ROGGE
R40, SEQ, F4, TRENCH A,
I-1689, 2-16-70,
TOWNSEND/ROGGE
R40, SEQ, F4, TRENCH A,
I-1689, 2-16-70,
TOWNSEND/ROGGE
R40, SEQ, F4, TRENCH A,
I-1689, 2-16-70,
TOWNSEND/ROGGE
R40, SEQ, F4, TRENCH A,
I-1689, 2-16-70,
TOWNSEND/ROGGE
R40, SEQ, F4, TRENCH A,
I-1689, 2-16-70,
TOWNSEND/ROGGE
159
15.7
C
C
C
C
278
279
280
281
7.7
55.1
23.9
19
19
17.2
65.6
282
283
284
285
286
287
288
11.2
12.2
16.6
42.1
277
8.7
276
C
29.1
275
C
C
C
C
42.8
14.3
15.7
17.3
17.9
38.7
3.3
3.5
5.5
6.9
7.4
25.4
6
16.5
C
C
C
C
C
1.5
8.2
12.6
7.2
2.9
7.8
1.5
2
3.6
2.7
3.7
12.1
4.9
4.9
288 AND 289
PROBABLE SAME
ELEMENT
COLOR CHANGE ON
SAME BREAK
UNFUSED
UNFUSED
UNFUSED
UNFUSED
I-339, R21, SUBFLOOR,
SEQ, TRENCH ALONG S.
WALL
I-318, R21, L4,
SUBFLOOR, NE-SEQ
I-318, R21, L4,
SUBFLOOR, NE-SEQ
I-263, GREAT KIVA, SEC
7, L2, SUBFLOOR
I-201, T-33, SEC K, L1
I-122, T33, SEC C, L1
R40, SEQ, FEA 4,
TRENCH AA, I-1735, 6-2670, GREENE, SWAL
R40, SEQ, FEA 4,
TRENCH AA, I-1735, 6-2670, GREENE, SWAL
R40, SEQ, FEA 4,
TRENCH AA, I-1735, 6-2670, GREENE, SWAL
R40, SEQ, FEA 4,
TRENCH AA, I-1735, 6-2670, GREENE, SWAL
R40, SEQ, FEA 4,
TRENCH AA, I-1735, 6-2670, GREENE, SWAL
R40, SEQ, FEA 4,
TRENCH AA, I-1735, 6-2670, GREENE, SWAL
R40, SEQ, FEA 4,
TRENCH AA, I-1735, 6-2670, GREENE, SWAL
R40, SEQ, FEA 4,
TRENCH AA, I-1735, 6-2670, GREENE, SWAL
160
15.7
299
23.2
42.5
298
302
18.3
297
48.8
22.2
296
301
25.4
295
20.2
32.3
294
300
48.5
293
A
45.6
10
291
292
16.4
290
C
35.3
289
A
12.2
44.5
10.2
9
25.2
9.3
12.2
14
32.2
30.2
33.2
5.4
11.2
21.5
A
C
2.1
4.3
1.5
4.7
4.9
2
2.4
3.1
3.4
3.5
3.7
3.1
3.9
1.8
301 + 302 REFIT
301 + 302 REFIT
292-297 LIKELY
SAME ELEMENT
292-297 LIKELY
SAME ELEMENT
292-297 LIKELY
SAME ELEMENT
292-297 LIKELY
SAME ELEMENT
292-297 LIKELY
SAME ELEMENT
292-297 LIKELY
SAME ELEMENT
288 AND 289
PROBABLE SAME
ELEMENT
ENDOCRANIAL
PERIOSTEAL
REACTION
ENDOCRANIAL
PERIOSTEAL
REACTION
PERIOSTEAL
ACTIVITY INNER
VAULT
PERIOSTEAL
ACTIVITY INNER
VAULT
PERIOSTEAL
ACTIVITY INNER
VAULT
PERIOSTEAL
ACTIVITY INNER
VAULT
PERIOSTEAL
ACTIVITY INNER
VAULT
PERIOSTEAL
ACTIVITY INNER
VAULT
PERPENDICULAR
EXCELLENT
PRESERVATION,
PEELING, SEE
SUPPLEMENTAL
I-772, R195, L7, W1/2, 715-69
I-772, R195, L7, W1/2, 715-69
I-771, R39, L3B, SEQ, 710-69
R146, L3, SEQ, FILL, I1707, 6-16-70
I-1063, CORR, CC-W, L2
R195, L8, W1/3, I-808, 7-869, ST + ST
R195, L8, W1/3, I-808, 7-869, ST + ST
R195, L8, W1/3, I-808, 7-869, ST + ST
R195, L8, W1/3, I-808, 7-869, ST + ST
R195, L8, W1/3, I-808, 7-869, ST + ST
R195, L8, W1/3, I-808, 7-869, ST + ST
R195, L8, W1/3, I-808, 7-869, ST + ST
R195, L8, W1/3, I-808, 7-869, ST + ST
I-339, R21, SUBFLOOR,
SEQ, TRENCH ALONG S.
WALL
161
30.8
25.9
C
C
C
316
317
318
319
39
17.2
29.4
320
321
322
43.9
79.1
58.3
315
312
31.4
28.8
311
314
62.2
310
18.1
59.8
309
313
40.7
20
308
C
32
306
39.1
16.9
305
307
18.3
304
C
119.9
303
C
C
C
C
14.7
10.2
21.4
14.5
6.4
7.6
18.7
9.3
20.8
10.5
18.9
14
4.6
11.1
27.3
28.5
26.6
7.5
14.9
21.4
C
C
C
C
5.5
4.4
1.6
8.5
3.4
3.9
13.7
6.5
10.2
9.3
12.5
5.2
3.4
4.9
12.5
7.4
13.2
2.5
3.3
10.1
EXOSTOSES, PR
I-474, R23, L6-7, SWNWQ, BURIAL PIT 217
BREAK IS VERY
SMALL
I-521, R27, N2, SEQ
I-600, R100, FILL, L2,
NWQ
I-513, R27, FLOOR, NEQ
I-511, R27, SF2, SEQ
I-470, R23, L5, SEQ
I-467, R23, L5, NEQ
I-467, R23, L5, NEQ
I-465, R22, L6, SEQ
I-293, R22, L2, SEQ
I-293, R22, L2, SEQ
I-262C, R21, 0-100CM
I-214, GREAT KIVA, SEC
3, L2
I-20, TEST 8, L1, 0-.5M
BREAK IS VERY
SMALL
PERPENDICULAR
I-796, R33, LE-2, NEQ, 711-69
BREAKS ARE
NUMEROUS BUT
VERY SMALL; FUSED
NA + C
I-11, TT 9, O-.5M
I-1536, R108, SF 1 AND 2
BREAKS ARE
NUMEROUS BUT
VERY SMALL
I-773, R195, L5, W1/2, 1ST
10CM BELOW FLOOR, 711-69
I-773, R195, L5, W1/2, 1ST
10CM BELOW FLOOR, 711-69
I-773, R195, L5, W1/2, 1ST
10CM BELOW FLOOR, 711-69
162
C
334
62.5
25.2
10.3
43.7
27.3
41
338
339
340
341
342
29.1
336
337
60.7
335
C
65.6
C
333
15.4
33.7
332
68.2
48.4
37.3
C
328
24.5
C
327
17.1
331
C
326
28.3
330
C
325
43.1
30
C
324
31.8
329
C
323
C
C
C
C
C
C
37.1
22.6
32.8
9.9
20.3
6.9
6.8
12.3
8.3
9.1
17
10.9
21.7
12.5
16.4
12
9.3
12.8
4.1
12.8
C
C
C
C
C
C
C
4.3
1.1
1.8
1.1
4.1
3.6
1.1
4.6
6.3
2.3
6.1
4.5
7.4
6.7
7.8
5.3
3.4
4.3
5.9
4.8
338 AND 339
REFIT
CONT
1
CONT
EHP (TYPE 1)
I-1064, TT92B, L1
I-725, R40, L100-150CM,
SEQ
I-710, R23, L3, SEQ
I-675, TT42
I-675, TT42
I-657, TT38, SEC HH
I-610, R108, L2, SEQ
I-600, R100, FILL, L2,
NWQ
I-600, R100, FILL, L2,
NWQ
I-600, R100, FILL, L2,
NWQ
I-600, R100, FILL, L2,
NWQ
I-846, R41, L4, NEQ, 7-769
I-846, R41, L4, NEQ, 7-769
I-832, R41, L4B, NEQ, 716-69
I-832, R41, L4B, NEQ, 716-69
I-1586, R31, L4, B29,
UNDER POT #3, SEQ
I-1511, R153, L5, TTA,
NWQ
I-1553, R27, B298/299,
SEQ
QUITE LARGE;
BURNED; MOD FRACT
I-1524, R27, TT SF 1, FN
I/L; ANC. FRACTURE
1, L1
BLACK BUT
IRREGULAR
CORTEX ERODED
ROOT 1/2 COMPLETED I-1064, TT92B, L1
NA FUSED, C
UNFUSED
PERPENDICULAR
DE ERODED
BREAKS ARE VERY
SMALL
BREAKS ARE VERY
SMALL
163
32.7
19.1
16.9
20.9
15.1
25.7
22
19.2
356
357
358
359
360
361
362
63.5
354
355
18.4
353
C
16
69
351
352
11.1
350
C
21
347
349
66.9
8.2
346
25.1
53.7
345
348
49.4
344
C
40.5
343
C
C
11.8
14.1
8.3
9.1
14
9.6
11.4
8.7
13.5
16.3
11.4
16.2
7.8
16.4
9.2
3.8
29
7.3
29
10.3
C
C
1.2
2.4
2.6
1.8
6
2.2
3.6
5.9
5
1.7
6.7
5.3
5.1
1.5
2.7
1.8
5.1
2.6
9
6.8
I-1091, R143, L5, NWQ, 87
ENTIRE CORTEX
ERODED
I-1091, R143, L5, NWQ, 87
360 AND 361
REFIT
I-1091, R143, L5, NWQ, 87
I-1091, R143, L5, NWQ, 8-
I-1091, R143, L5, NWQ, 87
358 AND 359
REFIT
I-1091, R143, L5, NWQ, 87
I-1091, R143, L5, NWQ, 87
I-1091, R143, L5, NWQ, 87
I-310, R19, L3, NEQ, PIT
2, SUBFLOOR
I-777, R195, L6, E1/2, 715-69
I-893, R143, L2, 7-29-69
BREAKS ARE SMALL
BREAKS ARE VERY
SMALL
I-836, R33, LE-2, NWQ, 723-69
I-513, R27, FLOOR, NEQ
R195, L3B, W1/2, FLOOR,
CONTACT, I-787, 7-8-69,
STUTZ + STACY
I-1746
TT-70-90, I-1679, 7-1-70
I-569, R31, L3A, SEQ
I-1091, R143, L5, NWQ, 87
CORTEX
SLIGHTLY
ERODED
I-897, R40, SUBFLOOR,
NEQ, 8-4-69
358 AND 359
REFIT
CONT
CONT
BREAKS ARE SMALL
I-812, R40, LJ, NWQ, 7-2269
164
53.8
71.7
39.5
C
C
370
371
372
373
206
9.5
377
234
375
376
66.5
374
C
49.1
369
21.6
50.6
368
50.7
366
48.5
33.8
365
367
10.3
364
C
17
363
C
C
C
7.5
30
29.9
64
11.4
38.9
47.1
33.3
39
40.7
47
29.8
14.3
5.7
14.1
C
C
C
6.8
11.4
11.2
4.6
4.3
19.3
23.5
12.8
10.7
11.4
11.3
21.8
2.3
2.4
1.6
R31
R31
R31
R31
R31
367/368
PROBABLE
MATCH TO 375;
REFIT TO 377
GRACILE GLABELLA
AND SUPRAORBITAL
MARGIN
BREAKS ARE SMALL
R31
R31
SLIGHT DJD
SLIGHT DJD
OSTEOPHYTE
SUP "3"
R31
R31
R31
R31
367/368
PROBABLE
MATCH TO 375;
REFIT TO 377
367/368
PROBABLE
MATCH TO 375
BREAKS ARE SMALL
OSTEOPHYTE
SUP AND INF "2"
BREAKS ARE SMALL
BREAKS ARE SMALL
OSTEOPHYTE
SUP AND INF "1"
OSTEOPHYTE
BREAKS ARE SMALL
SLIGHT DJD
I-190, TRENCH 35, SEC
1/2 16(?), BURIAL 88
I-1091, R143, L5, NWQ, 87
I-1091, R143, L5, NWQ, 87
I-143, R22, SWQ
7
165
201
72
95.2
27.8
21.1
19.3
12.9
80.2
23.6
24
145.8
16.4
34.3
66.1
61
35.5
378
379
380
381
382
383
384
385
386
387
388
389
390
391
392
393
33.1
19.6
17.9
16.9
15
26.2
6.5
15.8
20
9.1
9
16.8
19.9
32
12.6
36.9
14.6
8.4
4.7
2
1.5
10.1
4
3.2
6
6.6
1.9
3.1
8
8.3
9.7
15.1
393 AND 394
REFIT;
PROBABLE SAME
IND AS 395, 396
SLIGHT DJD
BREAKS ARE SMALL
UNFUSED
RODENT GNAWING
OUTSIDE OF SE
CORNER OF R 357, RB8,
CLOSE TO SURFACE, 620-73, SHIMADA
R356, RB8, NW CORNER,
FLOOR 1, 103.63 mf, 7-2073, SHIMADA
R246, 1974
UNIT 246, FEA/BU 5
R345, RB7, SE CORNER
6-12-73, SHIMADA
R345, RB7, SE CORNER
6-12-73, SHIMADA
R145, L6g, PIT W/ B564,
NWQ, I-2781, 7-31-73,
SILVER
R145, L6g, PIT W/ B564,
NWQ, I-2781, 7-31-73,
SILVER
R145, L6g, PIT W/ B564,
NWQ, I-2781, 7-31-73,
SILVER
TT-70-9, I-1659, 7-1-70,
REID, WHALEN, ROGGE
TT-70-9, I-1659, 7-1-70,
REID, WHALEN, ROGGE
TT-70-9, I-1659, 7-1-70,
REID, WHALEN, ROGGE
TT-70-9, I-1659, 7-1-70,
REID, WHALEN, ROGGE
TT-70-9, I-1659, 7-1-70,
REID, WHALEN, ROGGE
TT-70-9, I-1659, 7-1-70,
REID, WHALEN, ROGGE
TT-70-9, I-1659, 7-1-70,
REID, WHALEN, ROGGE
166
35.5
23.8
31.9
71.5
53.9
47.7
65.6
32.4
17.9
41.9
72.3
394
395
396
397
398
399
400
401
402
403
404
54.5
26.3
10.5
13.4
23.8
16.6
16.2
14.2
27.6
21.3
20.3
27.5
5.2
4
6
12.2
1.9
2
5.2
3.8
2.3
3.8
400 AND 401
REFIT
400 AND 401
REFIT
397, 398, 399
REFIT
397, 398, 399
REFIT
MULT
OUTSIDE OF SE
CORNER OF R 357, RB8,
CLOSE TO SURFACE, 620-73, SHIMADA
393 AND 394
REFIT;
PROBABLE SAME
IND AS 395, 396
PLAZA I, PLAZA 504, A3,
G4, BULK PERSON 44,
V98.35 H2.51NW .885t, 624-75, RAUTENKRANZ
PLAZA I, PLAZA 504, A3,
G4, BULK PERSON 44,
V98.35 H2.51NW .885t, 624-75, RAUTENKRANZ
R323, RB 6, NW CORNER
(AGAINST WEST WALL),
99.41 mf, 6-21-73,
SHIMADA
R323, RB 6, NW CORNER
(AGAINST WEST WALL),
99.41 mf, 6-21-73,
SHIMADA
R323, RB 6, NW CORNER
(AGAINST WEST WALL),
99.41 mf, 6-21-73,
SHIMADA
R145, L1, SEQ, 99.27 mf,
BACKDIRT, 6-18-73,
SILVER
R145, L1, SEQ, 99.27 mf,
BACKDIRT, 6-18-73,
SILVER
R145, L1, SEQ, 99.27 mf,
BACKDIRT, 6-18-73,
SILVER
OUTSIDE OF SE
CORNER OF R 357, RB8,
CLOSE TO SURFACE, 620-73, SHIMADA
393 AND 394
REFIT;
PROBABLE SAME
IND AS 395, 396
397, 398, 399
REFIT
OUTSIDE OF SE
CORNER OF R 357, RB8,
CLOSE TO SURFACE, 620-73, SHIMADA
393 AND 394
REFIT;
PROBABLE SAME
IND AS 395, 396
167
38
68.4
40.8
46.9
51.4
36.9
23.2
51.7
42.6
43
23.8
26
33.8
23
20.2
405
406
407
408
409
410
411
412
413
414
415
416
417
418
419
C
11.4
20
31.4
19.9
19.8
20.5
28.1
39.3
11.3
16.6
16.5
36.5
31.6
41.6
9.4
6.8
10.2
6.6
3.7
8.1
17.7
18.7
24.3
4
4.2
3.3
21.9
19.3
22.6
4.9
406/407
PROBABLE SAME
ELEMENT
1
TOOL MARK IS
TROWEL
PLAZA 1, SEC 509
PLAZA 1, SEC 509
PLAZA 1, SEC 509
PLAZA 1, SEC 509
PLAZA 1, SEC 509
PLAZA 1, SEC 509
PLAZA 1, SEC 509
PLAZA 1, SEC 509
PLAZA I, PLAZA 504, A3,
G4, S TRENCH, FN 51,
BULK PERSON, V 98.38,
6-24-75, RAUTENKRANZ
PLAZA I, PLAZA 504, A3,
G4, S TRENCH, FN 51,
BULK PERSON, V 98.38,
6-24-75, RAUTENKRANZ
PLAZA I, PLAZA 504, A3,
G4, S TRENCH, FN 51,
BULK PERSON, V 98.38,
6-24-75, RAUTENKRANZ
PLAZA I, PLAZA 504, A4,
G4, V97.97 H2.38 NW, 78
SE, S-TRENCH, FN 52, 628-75, RAUTENKRANZ
PLAZA I, PLAZA 504, A4,
G4, V97.97 H2.38 NW, 78
SE, S-TRENCH, FN 52, 628-75, RAUTENKRANZ
PLAZA I, PLAZA 504, A4,
G4, V97.97 H2.38 NW, 78
SE, S-TRENCH, FN 52, 628-75, RAUTENKRANZ
R322, RB6, SW CORNER,
FLOOR 1, 126 CM SD, 625-73-SHIMADA
168
25.2
41.3
53.8
445
446
447
22.3
443
39.5
67.2
440
444
46.4
439
C
53.7
432
50.1
18.9
62.1
431
438
26
430
437
35.9
429
93.3
44.1
428
436
23
427
20
22.5
426
25.8
50.5
425
435
52
424
434
53.1
423
22.4
32
422
433
27.1
421
C
29.7
420
C
C
C
5.9
16.6
16.2
31.3
14.3
7.9
14
15.3
9.2
18.2
9.2
15.9
20.1
18.1
11.1
18.1
17
16.1
15.3
12.7
35.8
37.8
15.9
30.6
25
22.6
C
3.5
2.8
2.3
14.6
2.3
2.8
3.9
6.7
5.1
4.5
3.5
4.7
6.4
7.1
9.3
7.8
7.4
8
3.5
8.9
6.3
13.6
15.1
16.1
15.3
7.4
MULT
MULT
1
SLIGHT
OSTEOPOROSIS
POSSIBLE P.R.
PLAZA 1, SEC 509
R47, L9, TT1N, ROOM
FILL, 7-20-71, G. RINC
R47, L9, TT1N, ROOM
FILL, 7-20-71, G. RINC
R47, L9, TT1N, ROOM
FILL, 7-20-71, G. RINC
R47, L9, TT1N, ROOM
FILL, 7-20-71, G. RINC
R47, L8, TT3N, ROOM
FILL, HUMAN BONE, 719-71, GRADY
R47, L8, TT3N, ROOM
FILL, HUMAN BONE, 719-71, GRADY
PLAZA 1, SEC 509
PLAZA 1, SEC 509
PLAZA 1, SEC 509
PLAZA 1, SEC 509
PLAZA 1, SEC 509
PLAZA 1, SEC 509
CORTEX 50% ERODED PLAZA 1, SEC 509
PLAZA 1, SEC 509
PLAZA 1, SEC 509
PLAZA 1, SEC 509
PLAZA 1, SEC 509
PLAZA 1, SEC 509
PLAZA 1, SEC 509
PLAZA 1, SEC 509
PLAZA 1, SEC 509
PLAZA 1, SEC 509
PLAZA 1, SEC 509
PLAZA 1, SEC 509
PLAZA 1, SEC 509
169
25.6
459
40.1
64.8
65.8
55.3
462
463
464
465
21
27.8
458
C
22.6
457
461
30
456
38.3
37.9
455
460
27.8
454
C
20
453
33
32.6
452
C
451
75.9
C
450
24.4
75.3
C
449
448
C
C
C
C
7.8
18.3
16.1
7.7
14
23.3
17.6
21.1
20.3
19.1
24.2
8.8
14.6
16.9
14.3
20.2
19.7
11
C
C
C
C
3.4
8.1
5.5
2.3
9.1
2.7
12.3
8.9
9.5
6.6
4.1
1.8
5.9
12
10.7
5.6
5.5
5.1
NO PROVENIENCE
455, 456, 457
REFIT
R44, L1, NWQ, HUMAN
BONE, DOYEL
459, 460
ARTICULATE
R205, SEQ, W-UNIT,
MULINSKI
R44, L1, NWQ, HUMAN
BONE, DOYEL
R44, L1, NWQ, HUMAN
BONE, DOYEL
R44, L1, NWQ, HUMAN
BONE, DOYEL
R44, L1, NWQ, HUMAN
BONE, DOYEL
R44, L1, NWQ, HUMAN
BONE, DOYEL
459, 460
ARTICULATE
R205, L1, W-UNIT, OVEN
2, HUMAN BONE, 7-2-71,
MULINSKI
NO PROVENIENCE
455, 456, 457
REFIT
NO PROVENIENCE
NO PROVENIENCE
NO PROVENIENCE
NO PROVENIENCE
R205, L2, W-UNIT,
TOOL MARK IS TROWL
HUMAN BONE, OUBN3,
CHOP MARK
SULLIVAN-MULIWSKI
NO PROVENIENCE
1
R205, L2, W-UNIT,
HUMAN BONE, OUBN3,
SULLIVAN-MULIWSKI
R164, L8-2, NEQ, HUMAN
BONE, 8-2, WHIT
455, 456, 457
REFIT
449-450 ARE
MATCHES
1
170
51.3
17.8
C
C
467
468
469
30.7
54.3
49.6
30.1
19.2
470
471
472
473
474
62.8
24
466
C
12
29.1
10.4
50
25.4
57
6.4
42.6
11.1
C
4
6.1
5.1
10
17.6
15.3
1.7
6.8
7
473, 474 REFIT
473, 474 REFIT
470, 471 REFIT
470, 471 REFIT
SLIGHT DJD
DJD INF + SUP
FACETS
DJD INFERIOR
FACETS
"WALT:DON'T KNOW
R44, TT3, 0-50CM,
WHOSE BON THIS ISLSUBFLOOR, HUMAN
SCATTERED THRU
BONE, 6-21-71, G. RICE
TRASH"
"WALT:DON'T KNOW
R44, TT3, 0-50CM,
WHOSE BON THIS ISLSUBFLOOR, HUMAN
SCATTERED THRU
BONE, 6-21-71, G. RICE
TRASH"
"WALT:DON'T KNOW
R44, TT3, 0-50CM,
WHOSE BON THIS ISLSUBFLOOR, HUMAN
SCATTERED THRU
BONE, 6-21-71, G. RICE
TRASH"
"WALT:DON'T KNOW
R44, TT3, 0-50CM,
WHOSE BON THIS ISLSUBFLOOR, HUMAN
SCATTERED THRU
BONE, 6-21-71, G. RICE
TRASH"
"WALT:DON'T KNOW
R44, TT3, 0-50CM,
WHOSE BON THIS ISLSUBFLOOR, HUMAN
SCATTERED THRU
BONE, 6-21-71, G. RICE
TRASH"
"WALT:DON'T KNOW
R44, TT3, 0-50CM,
WHOSE BON THIS ISLSUBFLOOR, HUMAN
SCATTERED THRU
BONE, 6-21-71, G. RICE
TRASH"
8-9, TOOTH
R206, LSUBFLOOR, WUNIT, HUMAN BONE, 8-171, WATT
R164, L8-1, NW BALK,
HUMAN BONE, 7-28,
KUS-WHIT
171
C
C
481
482
28.2
23.2
483
484
26.1
20.1
24.8
C
480
117.8
478
17.3
41
477
479
43.3
476
C
22.3
475
C
C
12.8
18.1
16.3
11.1
16.8
11.1
25.9
15.9
10.5
18.8
C
C
C
6.6
3
11.1
7
11.8
1.3
7.1
4.6
4.7
3.4
482, 483
ARTICULATE
482, 483
ARTICULATE
NO FUSION
PARTIAL FUSION TO
NA
R44, NEQ, PIT 2,
LSUBFLOOR, 7-23-71, G.
RICE
PARTIAL FUSION TO
NA
R44, NEQ, PIT 2,
LSUBFLOOR, 7-23-71, G.
RICE
R44, NEQ, PIT 2,
LSUBFLOOR, 7-23-71, G.
RICE
R44, NEQ, PIT 2,
LSUBFLOOR, 7-23-71, G.
RICE
R44, NEQ, PIT 2,
LSUBFLOOR, 7-23-71, G.
RICE
R44, NEQ, PIT 2,
LSUBFLOOR, 7-23-71, G.
RICE
UNFUSED
R44, NEQ, PIT 2,
LSUBFLOOR, 7-23-71, G.
RICE
"WALT:DON'T KNOW
R44, TT3, 0-50CM,
WHOSE BON THIS ISLSUBFLOOR, HUMAN
SCATTERED THRU
BONE, 6-21-71, G. RICE
TRASH"
"WALT:DON'T KNOW
R44, TT3, 0-50CM,
WHOSE BON THIS ISLSUBFLOOR, HUMAN
SCATTERED THRU
BONE, 6-21-71, G. RICE
TRASH"
"WALT:DON'T KNOW
R44, TT3, 0-50CM,
WHOSE BON THIS ISLSUBFLOOR, HUMAN
SCATTERED THRU
BONE, 6-21-71, G. RICE
TRASH"
172
52.3
49.7
97.7
82.7
63.7
38.2
87.2
73.9
492
493
494
495
496
497
498
20.8
489
491
18.5
488
63.3
64.2
487
490
58.6
486
C
46
485
39.6
8.1
16.2
61.1
53
39.4
5
12.9
14.6
7.5
6.1
12
10.6
13.2
2.7
3.6
2
4
1.7
1
1.9
5.5
4.9
2.6
2.5
2.8
2.3
3.9
R44, NEQ, PIT 2,
LSUBFLOOR, 7-23-71, G.
RICE
490, 491, 492
SAME INDIVIDUAL
493-496 REFIT
493-496 REFIT
493-496 REFIT
R47, SOUTH BALK,
SUBFLOOR, 8-2, RICE
R47, SOUTH BALK,
SUBFLOOR, 8-2, RICE
R47, SOUTH BALK,
SUBFLOOR, 8-2, RICE
R47, SOUTH BALK,
SUBFLOOR, 8-2, RICE
R47, SOUTH BALK,
SUBFLOOR, 8-2, RICE
R47, SOUTH BALK,
SUBFLOOR, 8-2, RICE
R44, NEQ, PIT 2,
LSUBFLOOR, 7-23-71, G.
RICE
490, 491, 492
SAME INDIVIDUAL
493-496 REFIT
R44, NEQ, PIT 2,
LSUBFLOOR, 7-23-71, G.
RICE
490, 491, 492
SAME INDIVIDUAL
R44, NEQ, PIT 2,
LSUBFLOOR, 7-23-71, G.
RICE
R44, NEQ, PIT 2,
LSUBFLOOR, 7-23-71, G.
RICE
R44, NEQ, PIT 2,
LSUBFLOOR, 7-23-71, G.
RICE
R44, NEQ, PIT 2,
LSUBFLOOR, 7-23-71, G.
RICE
R44, NEQ, PIT 2,
LSUBFLOOR, 7-23-71, G.
RICE
173
56.9
54.5
508
509
16.7
507
C
57.1
505
92.3
500
A
48.6
499
C
A
48.4
41.7
10.1
38
32.8
16
C
A
8.4
2
7.8
5.2
11.2
4.9
500-507 SAME
INDIVIDUAL,
MANDIBLE HAS 4
TEETH IN I
R33, PIT 3, SE/SW,
SUBFLOOR, 8-5-69,
HELFGOTT, JOHNSON
R33, PIT 3, SE/SW,
SUBFLOOR, 8-5-69,
HELFGOTT, JOHNSON
NOT STILL
OCCLUDED, AGE
BASED ON ROOT
R33, PIT 3, SE/SW,
DEVELOPMENT;
SUBFLOOR, 8-5-69,
"FOUND SCATTERED
HELFGOTT, JOHNSON
IN BURIAL PIT ABOVE
344 BUT NOT PART OF
THAT BURIAL
UNFUSED TO
BASILAR,
PEELING/SMOOTH
FRACTURE
AGE BASED ON ROOT
DEVELOPMENT;
R33, PIT 3, SE/SW,
"FOUND SCATTERED
SUBFLOOR, 8-5-69,
IN BURIAL PIT ABOVE
HELFGOTT, JOHNSON
344 BUT NOT PART OF
THAT BURIAL
P.R. ACTIVE
ABCESS
AGE BASED ON ROOT
DEVELOPMENT;
R33, PIT 3, SE/SW,
"FOUND SCATTERED
SUBFLOOR, 8-5-69,
IN BURIAL PIT ABOVE
HELFGOTT, JOHNSON
344 BUT NOT PART OF
THAT BURIAL
500-507 SAME
INDIVIDUAL,
MANDIBLE HAS 4
TEETH IN I
500-507 SAME
INDIVIDUAL,
MANDIBLE HAS 4
TEETH IN I
R47, SOUTH BALK,
SUBFLOOR, 8-2, RICE
174
37.1
41.8
49
48.8
28.5
520
521
522
523
524
21.7
517
50
59.2
516
519
55.5
515
68.5
39.1
514
518
30.2
513
C
80.3
512
27.2
511
A
33
510
A
15.5
42.1
13.5
22.8
11.6
17.4
38.9
19.3
20.1
33.7
27.1
8.1
12.4
21.2
16.8
A
2
5.4
5.5
10
2
5.3
8.2
11
4.7
25.2
5.6
3.9
3.6
5.1
2.7
DJD
R211, TT4, CULL.-L, L5, 82-71, CURRIDEN
R211, TT4, CULL.-L, L5, 82-71, CURRIDEN
R211, TT4, CULL.-L, L5, 82-71, CURRIDEN
R211, TT4, CULL.-L, L5, 82-71, CURRIDEN
R211, TT4, CULL.-L, L5, 82-71, CURRIDEN
R211, TT4, CULL.-L, L5, 82-71, CURRIDEN
R211, TT4, CULL.-L, L5, 82-71, CURRIDEN
R211, TT4, CULL.-L, L5, 82-71, CURRIDEN
UNFUSED
516, 517
ARTICULATE
R211, TT4, CULL.-L, L5, 82-71, CURRIDEN
R211, TT4, CULL.-L, L5, 82-71, CURRIDEN
SLIGHT DJD
516, 517
ARTICULATE
MULT
R33, PI
T 3, SE/SW, SUBFLOOR,
8-5-69, HELFGOTT,
JOHNSON
R33, PIT 3, SE/SW,
SUBFLOOR, 8-5-69,
HELFGOTT, JOHNSON
R33, PIT 3, SE/SW,
SUBFLOOR, 8-5-69,
HELFGOTT, JOHNSON
R33, PIT 3, SE/SW,
SUBFLOOR, 8-5-69,
HELFGOTT, JOHNSON
R33, PIT 3, SE/SW,
SUBFLOOR, 8-5-69,
HELFGOTT, JOHNSON
175
29.9
25.3
24.5
22.8
14.8
20.4
15.5
14.1
25.1
25.5
21.3
32.2
30
32.1
104.6
29
25.9
36.8
525
526
527
528
529
530
531
532
533
534
535
536
537
538
539
540
541
542
8.7
3.7
10
7
7.2
8.5
8
10.7
7.2
6.3
10.6
13.2
13
12.3
16.4
17.7
21.4
18.6
3
2.8
3.9
3.2
4.5
3.7
4
5.1
4.5
3.6
5.1
3.9
5.6
3.6
7
3.9
5
13.7
CONT
CONT
2
BONE VERY FRIABLE
BONE SPLINTER
TOOL MARKS FROM
TROWEL
R211, TT4, CULL.-L, L5, 82-71, CURRIDEN
R211, TT4, CULL.-L, L5, 82-71, CURRIDEN
R211, TT4, CULL.-L, L5, 82-71, CURRIDEN
R211, TT4, CULL.-L, L5, 82-71, CURRIDEN
R211, TT4, CULL.-L, L5, 82-71, CURRIDEN
R211, TT4, CULL.-L, L5, 82-71, CURRIDEN
R211, TT4, CULL.-L, L5, 82-71, CURRIDEN
R211, TT4, CULL.-L, L5, 82-71, CURRIDEN
R211, TT4, CULL.-L, L5, 82-71, CURRIDEN
R211, TT4, CULL.-L, L5, 82-71, CURRIDEN
R211, TT4, CULL.-L, L5, 82-71, CURRIDEN
R211, TT4, CULL.-L, L5, 82-71, CURRIDEN
R211, TT4, CULL.-L, L5, 82-71, CURRIDEN
R211, TT4, CULL.-L, L5, 82-71, CURRIDEN
R211, TT4, CULL.-L, L5, 82-71, CURRIDEN
R211, TT4, CULL.-L, L5, 82-71, CURRIDEN
R211, TT4, CULL.-L, L5, 82-71, CURRIDEN
R211, TT4, CULL.-L, L5, 82-71, CURRIDEN
176
31.2
32
25.3
23.3
30.8
22.8
22.3
22.2
17.1
14.6
13.6
94.5
12.5
53.8
45.3
543
544
545
546
547
548
549
550
551
552
553
554
555
556
557
17.5
26.4
10.3
18.6
8.7
6.8
8.3
7.1
8.6
17.2
10.6
12.1
14
12.1
18.3
7
2.1
4.9
9.2
1.2
1.4
1.6
1.3
1.3
3
1.9
3.6
2.3
1.3
2.4
OSTEOPOROSIS
UNFUSED
R47, SUBFLOOR, L11,
HUMAN BONE
DISTURBED, 8-1, DOYEL
R47, SUBFLOOR, L11,
HUMAN BONE
DISTURBED, 8-1, DOYEL
R47, SUBFLOOR, L11,
HUMAN BONE
DISTURBED, 8-1, DOYEL
R47, SUBFLOOR, L11,
HUMAN BONE
DISTURBED, 8-1, DOYEL
R211, TT4, CULL.-L, L5, 82-71, CURRIDEN
R211, TT4, CULL.-L, L5, 82-71, CURRIDEN
R211, TT4, CULL.-L, L5, 82-71, CURRIDEN
R211, TT4, CULL.-L, L5, 82-71, CURRIDEN
R211, TT4, CULL.-L, L5, 82-71, CURRIDEN
R211, TT4, CULL.-L, L5, 82-71, CURRIDEN
R211, TT4, CULL.-L, L5, 82-71, CURRIDEN
R211, TT4, CULL.-L, L5, 82-71, CURRIDEN
R211, TT4, CULL.-L, L5, 82-71, CURRIDEN
R211, TT4, CULL.-L, L5, 82-71, CURRIDEN
R211, TT4, CULL.-L, L5, 82-71, CURRIDEN
177
83.5
43
69.4
30.9
47.3
56.8
33.7
7.8
561
562
563
564
565
566
567
568
17.9
44.1
560
569
34.1
559
C
54.6
558
C
16.6
6.8
33
10.4
7.2
8.1
10.4
20.3
14.5
30.6
11
10.6
C
1.9
2.4
1.9
1.7
2.8
2.8
2.5
6.7
7.5
10.1
3.5
5.2
R47, SUBFLOOR, L11,
HUMAN BONE
DISTURBED, 8-1, DOYEL
567, 568
ARTICULATE
R47, SUBFLOOR, L11,
HUMAN BONE
DISTURBED, 8-1, DOYEL
R47, SUBFLOOR, L11,
HUMAN BONE
DISTURBED, 8-1, DOYEL
567, 568
ARTICULATE
R47, SUBFLOOR, L11,
HUMAN BONE
DISTURBED, 8-1, DOYEL
R47, SUBFLOOR, L11,
HUMAN BONE
DISTURBED, 8-1, DOYEL
R47, SUBFLOOR, L11,
HUMAN BONE
DISTURBED, 8-1, DOYEL
R47, SUBFLOOR, L11,
HUMAN BONE
DISTURBED, 8-1, DOYEL
R47, SUBFLOOR, L11,
HUMAN BONE
DISTURBED, 8-1, DOYEL
R47, SUBFLOOR, L11,
HUMAN BONE
DISTURBED, 8-1, DOYEL
R47, SUBFLOOR, L11,
HUMAN BONE
DISTURBED, 8-1, DOYEL
R47, SUBFLOOR, L11,
HUMAN BONE
DISTURBED, 8-1, DOYEL
R47, SUBFLOOR, L11,
HUMAN BONE
DISTURBED, 8-1, DOYEL
178
44.7
28.5
33.5
24.3
22.5
18.9
42.9
42.7
32.8
88.9
44.2
62.2
570
571
572
573
574
575
576
577
578
579
580
581
C
12.5
15.4
27.6
10.8
10.3
10.2
7.9
6.6
16.7
19.2
12.9
32.8
6.5
4.5
7.4
4.6
5
6
3.9
4
5.5
4.5
1
1.8
570, 571 REFIT
570, 571 REFIT
R47, SUBFLOOR, L11,
HUMAN BONE
DISTURBED, 8-1, DOYEL
R47, SUBFLOOR, L11,
HUMAN BONE
DISTURBED, 8-1, DOYEL
R47, SUBFLOOR, L11,
HUMAN BONE
DISTURBED, 8-1, DOYEL
R47, SUBFLOOR, L11,
HUMAN BONE
DISTURBED, 8-1, DOYEL
R47, SUBFLOOR, L11,
HUMAN BONE
DISTURBED, 8-1, DOYEL
R47, SUBFLOOR, L11,
HUMAN BONE
DISTURBED, 8-1, DOYEL
R47, SUBFLOOR, L11,
HUMAN BONE
DISTURBED, 8-1, DOYEL
R47, SUBFLOOR, L11,
HUMAN BONE
DISTURBED, 8-1, DOYEL
R47, SUBFLOOR, L11,
HUMAN BONE
DISTURBED, 8-1, DOYEL
R47, SUBFLOOR, L11,
HUMAN BONE
DISTURBED, 8-1, DOYEL
R47, SUBFLOOR, L11,
HUMAN BONE
DISTURBED, 8-1, DOYEL
R47, SUBFLOOR, L11,
HUMAN BONE
DISTURBED, 8-1, DOYEL
179
9.2
43
53.9
589
590
591
25.8
22.3
588
593
25
587
42.1
27.9
586
592
27
585
C
77
584
69.5
44
C
583
582
C
22.3
30.2
32.1
33.4
7.3
11.1
13
20.7
5.5
12
9.9
11.1
C
7.2
10.8
23.5
21.5
3
2.4
2
2.1
1.6
4.2
4.8
3.9
R47, SUBFLOOR, L11,
HUMAN BONE
DISTURBED, 8-1, DOYEL
OSTEOPOROSIS
OSTEOPOROSIS
592, 593 SAME
ELEMENT
592, 593 SAME
ELEMENT
R47, SUBFLOOR, L11,
HUMAN BONE
DISTURBED, 8-1, DOYEL
R47, SUBFLOOR, L11,
HUMAN BONE
DISTURBED, 8-1, DOYEL
590, 591
ARTICULATE
R47, SUBFLOOR, L11,
HUMAN BONE
DISTURBED, 8-1, DOYEL
R47, SUBFLOOR, L11,
HUMAN BONE
DISTURBED, 8-1, DOYEL
R47, SUBFLOOR, L11,
HUMAN BONE
DISTURBED, 8-1, DOYEL
R47, SUBFLOOR, L11,
HUMAN BONE
DISTURBED, 8-1, DOYEL
R47, SUBFLOOR, L11,
HUMAN BONE
DISTURBED, 8-1, DOYEL
FUSED NA NOT
CENTRUM
R47, SUBFLOOR, L11,
HUMAN BONE
DISTURBED, 8-1, DOYEL
R47, SUBFLOOR, L11,
HUMAN BONE
DISTURBED, 8-1, DOYEL
R47, SUBFLOOR, L11,
HUMAN BONE
DISTURBED, 8-1, DOYEL
R47, SUBFLOOR, L11,
HUMAN BONE
DISTURBED, 8-1, DOYEL
590, 591
ARTICULATE
582, 583 MATCH
582, 583 MATCH
180
40.5
24.9
35
37.4
47.5
28.5
601
602
603
604
605
606
30.1
64.4
600
609
16.9
599
141.5
19.1
598
608
39.2
597
27.8
43.1
596
607
24.8
595
C
25.6
594
C
6.1
10.7
11.1
27.1
34.9
15.7
11.2
9.8
24.2
15.8
6.8
14.2
5.9
7.8
14.2
22.3
C
3
4.1
3.3
15.3
15.8
4.4
4.2
3.6
5.5
5.8
0.8
2.1
3
3.5
9.3
10.3
609, 610 REFIT
607, 608 REFIT
607, 608 REFIT
MULT
UNFUSED
R47, SUBFLOOR, L11,
HUMAN BONE
DISTURBED, 8-1, DOYEL
594, 595 SAME
ELEMENT
I-607, R108, FLOOR,
NWQ
I-607, R108, FLOOR,
NWQ
I-607, R108, FLOOR,
NWQ
I-607, R108, FLOOR,
NWQ
R41, BURIAL 377,
FAUNAL REMAINS, 7-1970, MCLEOD
I-190, TRENCH 35, SEC
1/2 16(?), BURIAL 88
I-190, TRENCH 35, SEC
1/2 16(?), BURIAL 88
I-190, TRENCH 35, SEC
1/2 16(?), BURIAL 88
I-190, TRENCH 35, SEC
1/2 16(?), BURIAL 88
I-2405
R47, SUBFLOOR, L11,
HUMAN BONE
DISTURBED, 8-1, DOYEL
R47, SUBFLOOR, L11,
HUMAN BONE
DISTURBED, 8-1, DOYEL
R47, SUBFLOOR, L11,
HUMAN BONE
DISTURBED, 8-1, DOYEL
R47, SUBFLOOR, L11,
HUMAN BONE
DISTURBED, 8-1, DOYEL
R47, SUBFLOOR, L11,
HUMAN BONE
DISTURBED, 8-1, DOYEL
594, 595 SAME
ELEMENT
181
22.5
22.7
618
619
13.3
617
C
11.9
30
614
616
20.5
613
17.6
22.6
612
615
31.3
611
C
20.2
610
C
19.6
18
6.1
5.6
7.2
10.2
4
6.7
5.6
6.4
4.5
3.5
2.5
2.5
3.1
3.5
1.3
2.3
1.5
2.5
609, 610 REFIT
MULT
UNFUSED
R41, BURIAL 377,
FAUNAL REMAINS, 7-1970, MCLEOD
R41, BURIAL 377,
FAUNAL REMAINS, 7-1970, MCLEOD
R41, BURIAL 377,
FAUNAL REMAINS, 7-1970, MCLEOD
R41, BURIAL 377,
FAUNAL REMAINS, 7-1970, MCLEOD
R272, SEQ, BURIAL 651,
G11C, SUBFLOOR, 8-375, O'MEARA,
POSSIBBLY PART OF BU.
640
R272, SEQ, BURIAL 651,
G11C, SUBFLOOR, 8-375, O'MEARA,
POSSIBBLY PART OF BU.
640
R272, SEQ, BURIAL 651,
G11C, SUBFLOOR, 8-375, O'MEARA,
POSSIBBLY PART OF BU.
640
R272, SEQ, BURIAL 651,
G11C, SUBFLOOR, 8-375, O'MEARA,
POSSIBBLY PART OF BU.
640
R272, SEQ, BURIAL 651,
G11C, SUBFLOOR, 8-375, O'MEARA,
POSSIBBLY PART OF BU.
640
R272, SEQ, BURIAL 651,
G11C, SUBFLOOR, 8-375, O'MEARA,
POSSIBBLY PART OF BU.
640
182
19.1
C
628
13
625
14.3
22
624
627
29.2
623
13.9
25.4
622
626
27.9
621
C
22.1
620
C
C
16
13.7
13.1
9.8
11.2
16.4
17.4
20.3
19.8
C
C
9.5
8.6
5.1
4
3.2
2.7
4.2
3.3
3.4
2
1
R272, SEQ, BURIAL 651,
G11C, SUBFLOOR, 8-375, O'MEARA,
POSSIBBLY PART OF BU.
640
R272, SEQ, BURIAL 651,
G11C, SUBFLOOR, 8-375, O'MEARA,
POSSIBBLY PART OF BU.
640
R272, SEQ, BURIAL 651,
G11C, SUBFLOOR, 8-375, O'MEARA,
POSSIBBLY PART OF BU.
640
R272, SEQ, BURIAL 651,
G11C, SUBFLOOR, 8-375, O'MEARA,
POSSIBBLY PART OF BU.
640
R272, SEQ, BURIAL 651,
G11C, SUBFLOOR, 8-375, O'MEARA,
POSSIBBLY PART OF BU.
640
R272, SEQ, BURIAL 651,
G11C, SUBFLOOR, 8-375, O'MEARA,
POSSIBBLY PART OF BU.
640
R272, SEQ, BURIAL 651,
G11C, SUBFLOOR, 8-375, O'MEARA,
POSSIBBLY PART OF BU.
640
R272, SEQ, BURIAL 651,
G11C, SUBFLOOR, 8-375, O'MEARA,
POSSIBBLY PART OF BU.
640
R272, SEQ, BURIAL 651,
G11C, SUBFLOOR, 8-375, O'MEARA,
POSSIBBLY PART OF BU.
640
183
19.3
14.3
34.3
17.7
14.1
C
C
632
633
634
635
636
637
13.4
32.4
631
32.9
630
C
18.9
629
C
C
9.7
7.7
16.5
30.8
13.1
10.6
17.4
17.9
16
C
C
3.2
5.2
2.9
3.9
6.7
5.6
11
12.3
10.2
632, 633 REFIT
632, 633 REFIT
MULT
1
R272, SEQ, BURIAL 651,
G11C, SUBFLOOR, 8-375, O'MEARA,
POSSIBBLY PART OF BU.
640
R272, SEQ, BURIAL 651,
G11C, SUBFLOOR, 8-375, O'MEARA,
POSSIBBLY PART OF BU.
640
R272, SEQ, BURIAL 651,
G11C, SUBFLOOR, 8-375, O'MEARA,
POSSIBBLY PART OF BU.
640
R272, SEQ, BURIAL 651,
G11C, SUBFLOOR, 8-375, O'MEARA,
POSSIBBLY PART OF BU.
640
R272, SEQ, BURIAL 651,
G11C, SUBFLOOR, 8-375, O'MEARA,
POSSIBBLY PART OF BU.
640
R272, SEQ, BURIAL 651,
G11C, SUBFLOOR, 8-375, O'MEARA,
POSSIBBLY PART OF BU.
640
R272, SEQ, BURIAL 651,
G11C, SUBFLOOR, 8-375, O'MEARA,
POSSIBBLY PART OF BU.
640
R272, SEQ, BURIAL 651,
G11C, SUBFLOOR, 8-375, O'MEARA,
POSSIBBLY PART OF BU.
640
R272, SEQ, BURIAL 651,
G11C, SUBFLOOR, 8-375, O'MEARA,
POSSIBBLY PART OF BU.
640
184
9.1
646
18.7
644
8.4
17.1
643
645
15.4
642
A
16
19.6
640
641
31
639
A
39.4
638
A
A
5.5
6.1
8.3
10.5
11.3
11.6
5.8
11.1
9.4
A
A
1.4
1.4
2.1
3.3
3.1
2.1
2.1
2.6
3.6
R272, SEQ, BURIAL 651,
G11C, SUBFLOOR, 8-375, O'MEARA,
POSSIBBLY PART OF BU.
640
R272, SEQ, BURIAL 651,
G11C, SUBFLOOR, 8-375, O'MEARA,
POSSIBBLY PART OF BU.
640
R272, SEQ, BURIAL 651,
G11C, SUBFLOOR, 8-375, O'MEARA,
POSSIBBLY PART OF BU.
640
R272, SEQ, BURIAL 651,
G11C, SUBFLOOR, 8-375, O'MEARA,
POSSIBBLY PART OF BU.
640
R272, SEQ, BURIAL 651,
G11C, SUBFLOOR, 8-375, O'MEARA,
POSSIBBLY PART OF BU.
640
R272, SEQ, BURIAL 651,
G11C, SUBFLOOR, 8-375, O'MEARA,
POSSIBBLY PART OF BU.
640
R272, SEQ, BURIAL 651,
G11C, SUBFLOOR, 8-375, O'MEARA,
POSSIBBLY PART OF BU.
640
R272, SEQ, BURIAL 651,
G11C, SUBFLOOR, 8-375, O'MEARA,
POSSIBBLY PART OF BU.
640
R272, SEQ, BURIAL 651,
G11C, SUBFLOOR, 8-375, O'MEARA,
POSSIBBLY PART OF BU.
640
185
13.1
12.7
21.5
A
A
652
653
654
655
11
13.4
651
10.6
650
A
10.1
649
16
11.9
A
648
647
A
A
A
A
7.7
10.4
7.5
9.2
7.2
9.2
5.1
8.8
7.6
A
A
A
A
5
4.7
5.1
6.1
1.4
2.9
4.1
1
1.8
R272, SEQ, BURIAL 651,
G11C, SUBFLOOR, 8-375, O'MEARA,
POSSIBBLY PART OF BU.
640
R272, SEQ, BURIAL 651,
G11C, SUBFLOOR, 8-375, O'MEARA,
POSSIBBLY PART OF BU.
640
R272, SEQ, BURIAL 651,
G11C, SUBFLOOR, 8-375, O'MEARA,
POSSIBBLY PART OF BU.
640
R272, SEQ, BURIAL 651,
G11C, SUBFLOOR, 8-375, O'MEARA,
POSSIBBLY PART OF BU.
640
R272, SEQ, BURIAL 651,
G11C, SUBFLOOR, 8-375, O'MEARA,
POSSIBBLY PART OF BU.
640
R272, SEQ, BURIAL 651,
G11C, SUBFLOOR, 8-375, O'MEARA,
POSSIBBLY PART OF BU.
640
R272, SEQ, BURIAL 651,
G11C, SUBFLOOR, 8-375, O'MEARA,
POSSIBBLY PART OF BU.
640
R272, SEQ, BURIAL 651,
G11C, SUBFLOOR, 8-375, O'MEARA,
POSSIBBLY PART OF BU.
640
R272, SEQ, BURIAL 651,
G11C, SUBFLOOR, 8-375, O'MEARA,
POSSIBBLY PART OF BU.
640
186
20.2
28
25.9
16.7
13.6
43.1
659
660
661
662
663
664
83.8
23.6
658
665
13.5
657
A
56
656
A
23.5
18.8
11.4
3.7
6.4
7.1
11.4
11
11.5
24.4
A
7.7
7
6
1.4
2
1.9
4.2
5.4
6.2
11.4
664-666 REFIT
664-666 REFIT
660-663 SAME
ELEMENT
660-663 SAME
ELEMENT
660-663 SAME
ELEMENT
660-663 SAME
ELEMENT
R335, NE CORNER,
BREAKAGE IS GRAY
CORNER 179, V 103.23
AREA BETWEEN POST
MF, I-2267, 6-24-72,
AND PERI
SHIMADA
R335, NE CORNER,
BREAKAGE IS GRAY
CORNER 179, V 103.23
AREA BETWEEN POST
MF, I-2267, 6-24-72,
AND PERI
SHIMADA
R392, NW CORNER,
ABOVE FLOOR,
CORNERING, I-2371, 714-72, SHIMADA
R392, NW CORNER,
ABOVE FLOOR,
CORNERING, I-2371, 714-72, SHIMADA
R392, NW CORNER,
ABOVE FLOOR,
CORNERING, I-2371, 714-72, SHIMADA
R392, NW CORNER,
ABOVE FLOOR,
CORNERING, I-2371, 714-72, SHIMADA
R392, NW CORNER,
ABOVE FLOOR,
CORNERING, I-2371, 714-72, SHIMADA
R392, NW CORNER,
ABOVE FLOOR,
CORNERING, I-2371, 714-72, SHIMADA
R392, NW CORNER,
ABOVE FLOOR,
CORNERING, I-2371, 714-72, SHIMADA
R392, NW CORNER,
ABOVE FLOOR,
CORNERING, I-2371, 714-72, SHIMADA
187
18.8
20.4
45.8
671
672
673
51.1
11.9
670
675
16.8
669
55.9
108.3
668
674
100.7
667
C
93.1
666
34.8
32.5
36.4
6.1
7.7
7
14.2
24.7
13.5
13.7
2.8
3.1
5
3.7
7.4
1.9
5.6
9.4
4.6
4.6
674-676 REFIT
674-676 REFIT
668, 669 REFIT
668, 669 REFIT
664-666 REFIT
MULT
1
MULT
UNIT 215, SEQ, FEA 8,
PIT, SUBFLOOR, A2, V
97.8MF, I-2363, 7-7-72,
NICHOLAS
UNIT 215, SEQ, FEA 8,
PIT, SUBFLOOR, A2, V
97.8MF, I-2363, 7-7-72,
NICHOLAS
UNIT 215, SEQ, FEA 8,
PIT, SUBFLOOR, A2, V
97.8MF, I-2363, 7-7-72,
NICHOLAS
UNIT 215, SEQ, FEA 8,
PIT, SUBFLOOR, A2, V
97.8MF, I-2363, 7-7-72,
NICHOLAS
UNIT 215, SEQ, FEA 8,
PIT, SUBFLOOR, A2, V
97.8MF, I-2363, 7-7-72,
NICHOLAS
R164, BURIAL 466, NEQ,
SUBFLOOR, LEV 11, LOG
COVERED BURIAL, I2221, 6-24-71,
WHITTLESEY
R164, BURIAL 466, NEQ,
SUBFLOOR, LEV 11, LOG
COVERED BURIAL, I2221, 6-24-71,
WHITTLESEY
R164, BURIAL 466, NEQ,
SUBFLOOR, LEV 11, LOG
COVERED BURIAL, I2221, 6-24-71,
WHITTLESEY
UNIT 460, G1, UNDIFF.
WEATHERED AROUND SOIL FILL, V 107.15
PROX END
2.23NE 3.72NW, 6-23-76,
P ROBERTSON
R335, NE CORNER,
BREAKAGE IS GRAY
CORNER 179, V 103.23
AREA BETWEEN POST
MF, I-2267, 6-24-72,
AND PERI
SHIMADA
188
24.1
21.5
42.4
52.9
43.6
42.3
38.5
33.8
23.5
24
74
53.8
676
677
678
679
680
681
682
683
684
685
686
687
10.4
17.8
12.6
13.4
14.6
17
17.9
16
13.7
5.7
4.1
17.8
2.8
3
1.5
2.8
4
5.8
5.8
5.4
5.8
2.1
1.4
1.7
677, 678 REFIT
677, 678 REFIT
674-676 REFIT
R44, NWQ, L1, I-1924,
DOYLE
R44, NWQ, L1, I-1924,
DOYLE
R404, SEQ, LEV 3, FILL
BELOW FLOOR, U=30 CM
BD, I-2376, 7-25-72
R404, SEQ, LEV 3, FILL
BELOW FLOOR, U=30 CM
BD, I-2376, 7-25-72
R404, SEQ, LEV 3, FILL
BELOW FLOOR, U=30 CM
BD, I-2376, 7-25-72
R404, SEQ, LEV 3, FILL
BELOW FLOOR, U=30 CM
BD, I-2376, 7-25-72
R404, SEQ, LEV 3, FILL
BELOW FLOOR, U=30 CM
BD, I-2376, 7-25-72
R404, SEQ, LEV 3, FILL
BELOW FLOOR, U=30 CM
BD, I-2376, 7-25-72
R404, SEQ, LEV 3, FILL
BELOW FLOOR, U=30 CM
BD, I-2376, 7-25-72
R164, BURIAL 466, NEQ,
SUBFLOOR, LEV 11, LOG
COVERED BURIAL, I2221, 6-24-71,
WHITTLESEY
R164, BURIAL 466, NEQ,
SUBFLOOR, LEV 11, LOG
COVERED BURIAL, I2221, 6-24-71,
WHITTLESEY
R164, BURIAL 466, NEQ,
SUBFLOOR, LEV 11, LOG
COVERED BURIAL, I2221, 6-24-71,
WHITTLESEY
189
30.8
14.4
699
700
23.6
42.1
23.4
35.8
703
704
705
706
31.9
20.1
698
51.5
64.1
697
C
26.8
696
702
42
695
701
57.7
694
C
37.9
36.6
692
693
30.5
691
A
61.5
690
18.4
689
C
26.6
688
C
C
C
A
C
33.1
19.3
39.1
14.7
12.7
23.5
7.7
12
14.9
37.9
13.1
32.9
14.3
29.7
18.8
14.8
21.1
9.1
7.6
C
C
A
C
6.2
14.3
11.4
5
5
17
3.3
7.9
4.6
3.9
1.8
7
11.3
2.4
4.4
6.2
8.4
4.1
4
695, 696 REFIT
695, 696 REFIT
MULT
LARGE CARIES
WITH PULP
EXPOSURE
SOME CRUSHING
UNFUSED
WARPING
I-30, TEST 14, L2
I-267, GREAT KIVA, SEC
7, BURIAL 140 PIT,
SUBFLOOR
I-611, R108, L3, NEQ
I-611, R108, L3, NEQ
I-611, R108, L3, NEQ
I-611, R108, L3, NEQ
I-613, R108, L3, SEQ
I-374, R24, L1, FILL, SWQ
I-374, R24, L1, FILL, SWQ
I-278, R22, SUBFLOOR,
L2, SWQ
I-352, GREAT KIVA, SEC
7, POST HOLE #3
I-352, GREAT KIVA, SEC
7, POST HOLE #3
I-400, R24, L4, TRENCH
ALONG W. WALL IN NWQ
I-291, GREAT KIVA, SEC
7, FEA 39, L2, PIT C,
BURIAL 140
I-235, PLAZA TEST 1, 050CM, SEC E, PART OF
F, CONC OF MATERIAL
AROUND ROCK PILE
I-227, TEST 33, SEC I, L1
R195, L9, PIT 1, I-851, 726-69, SHULY
FN 13, A3, TT-76-3, C 2ND
TRASH, V 101.27 MF, 415-76, MCCARTHY
R215, LEV 1, SUBFLOOR,
V 98.00 MF, I-2271, 6-2072, NICHOLAS
190
31.8
27.8
25.9
28.2
24
32.8
21.7
30.7
22.8
31.5
25
31.5
29.1
10.9
22.4
707
708
709
710
711
712
713
714
715
716
717
718
719
720
721
13.3
5.3
19.4
10.6
6.8
12.3
7.4
28.2
7
19.6
18.1
23.2
15.9
18.4
14.1
1.6
1.7
3.6
3.1
1.9
3.5
2.2
2.8
1.9
2.2
8.1
6
4
3.6
6.7
719, 720 REFIT
719, 720 REFIT
MULT
CORTEX
COMPLETELY
ERODED
I-433, GREAT KIVA, SEC
10, LARGE PIT 1, DOWN
I-433, GREAT KIVA, SEC
10, LARGE PIT 1, DOWN
80+CM
I-433, GREAT KIVA, SEC
10, LARGE PIT 1, DOWN
80+CM
I-433, GREAT KIVA, SEC
10, LARGE PIT 1, DOWN
80+CM
I-433, GREAT KIVA, SEC
10, LARGE PIT 1, DOWN
80+CM
I-433, GREAT KIVA, SEC
10, LARGE PIT 1, DOWN
80+CM
I-433, GREAT KIVA, SEC
10, LARGE PIT 1, DOWN
80+CM
I-433, GREAT KIVA, SEC
10, LARGE PIT 1, DOWN
80+CM
I-433, GREAT KIVA, SEC
UNFUSED; NO TEETH 10, LARGE PIT 1, DOWN
80+CM
I-433, GREAT KIVA, SEC
10, LARGE PIT 1, DOWN
80+CM
I-433, GREAT KIVA, SEC
10, LARGE PIT 1, DOWN
80+CM
I-433, GREAT KIVA, SEC
10, LARGE PIT 1, DOWN
80+CM
I-433, GREAT KIVA, SEC
10, LARGE PIT 1, DOWN
80+CM
I-433, GREAT KIVA, SEC
10, LARGE PIT 1, DOWN
80+CM
I-433, GREAT KIVA, SEC
10, LARGE PIT 1, DOWN
80+CM
191
30.8
37.4
14.7
23.8
47.3
28.9
13.9
730
731
732
733
734
735
736
24.9
727
49
27.6
726
729
33.1
725
43.6
41.5
724
728
18
723
C
23.4
722
C
5.2
2.7
6
10.7
10.3
19.2
21.5
10.9
16.4
15.5
23.4
24.6
30
10.2
19.2
C
2.7
1.5
0.7
2
3.9
3.2
2.9
3.5
5.6
8.3
1.8
8.5
3.2
3
4.2
734, 735, 736
REFIT
734, 735, 736
REFIT
734, 735, 736
REFIT
MULT
MULT
SEVERE
ENDOCRANIAL
ACTIVITY
SLIGHT ACTIVE
P.R.
SLIGHTLY WARPED
CORTICAL OUTER
SURFACE
COMPLETELY
ERODED
I-2351
I-2401, ROOM 231, LEVEL
A, NEQ, V3.52NW,
H4.77SW
I-2401, ROOM 231, LEVEL
A, NEQ, V3.52NW,
H4.77SW
I-2401, ROOM 231, LEVEL
A, NEQ, V3.52NW,
H4.77SW
I-2401, ROOM 231, LEVEL
A, NEQ, V3.52NW,
H4.77SW
I-276, GREAT KIVA, SEC
7, SUBFLOOR, L1
I-474, R23, SW-NWQ,
BURIAL PIT 217
I-472, R23, NEQ
I-341, GREAT KIVA, SEC
13, IN PH. #10
I-466, R23, L4, SEQ
I-339, R21, SUBFLOOR,
SEQ, TRENCH ALONG S.
WALL
I-318, R21, L4,
SUBFLOOR, NE-SEQ
I-188, PLAZA TEST 1,
SEC E, FROM SEC F, L1
I-433, GREAT KIVA, SEC
10, LARGE PIT 1, DOWN
80+CM
I-433, GREAT KIVA, SEC
10, LARGE PIT 1, DOWN
80+CM
80+CM
192
35.4
743
27.8
25.7
13.7
25.8
748
749
750
751
88.7
747
A
57.6
746
64.6
45.2
742
C
25.1
741
745
12.9
740
37.1
17
739
A
42.8
738
744
56.7
737
A
A
15.6
5.8
3.5
16.5
16.6
13.9
16.2
14.1
9.9
31.2
15.7
5.3
8.9
26.1
56
A
C
A
13.5
2.5
2.2
1.8
10.1
5.5
5.7
7.1
4
1.9
4
2.9
1.8
17.3
8.5
749, 750 REFIT
749, 750 REFIT
I-987, R33, SUBFLOOR,
SE/SWQ, PIT3
737, 738, 739, 740
REFIT
MULT
I-987, R33, SUBFLOOR,
SE/SWQ, PIT3
737, 738, 739, 740
REFIT
UNFUSED
BONE IS VERY WELL
PRESERVED, MIX OF
PERI AND POST:
GRAY AREA BUT ALL
IS LIKELY POST
I-237, PLAZA TEST 1, L1,
SEC AA
I-2340, R215, SWQ, L1,
COORD V 97.73
I-2340, R215, SWQ, L1,
COORD V 97.73
I-2340, R215, SWQ, L1,
COORD V 97.73
I-2383, R 359, L2, A,
TRASH A/FLOOR,
COORD V. 103.78
I-2394, R 359, SEQ, L2,
FLOOR, COORD V.
103.48 Mf
I-2377, SWQ. L-TT-2, A,
SUBFLOOR, COORD V.
97.95
I-386, R24, FILL, L1, NEQ
I-2415, R319, SWQ, L4,
FILL ABOVE FLOOR 2,
U=98.80
I-885, R186, FILL, SEQ
I-987, R33, SUBFLOOR,
SE/SWQ, PIT3
I-987, R33, SUBFLOOR,
SE/SWQ, PIT3
737, 738, 739, 740
REFIT
UNFUSED TO
CENTRUM
I-987, R33, SUBFLOOR,
SE/SWQ, PIT3
737, 738, 739, 740
REFIT
193
33.4
A
C
A
A
757
758
759
760
31.8
65.7
763
764
34.4
70.1
762
765
37.7
51
124.7
761
A
19.5
756
93.8
23.1
755
58
31.2
A
753
147.9
754
A
752
A
A
A
C
A
23.9
23.2
19.5
14.3
19.5
18.5
19.3
86.8
16
5.1
6.8
10.8
15.1
15
A
A
C
A
11.9
3.4
2.3
2.2
5.9
6.1
9.3
4.1
3.5
2.4
3.4
1.9
6.8
8
CONT
P.R.
SLIGHT DJD
I-860, R41, L5, SWQ
753, 754, 755, 756
REFIT
P.R. INNER AND
OUTER TABLES
I-860, R41, L5, SWQ
753, 754, 755, 756
REFIT
MULT
I-860, R41, L5, SWQ
753, 754, 755, 756
REFIT
I-1675
I-1675
DENSE, WELL
PRESERVED
DENSE, WELL
PRESERVED
I-990, R41, SEQ, FLOOR
I-502, R26, NE-NWQ,
BURIAL 225 FILL
I-605, R108, TT 75-100CM
UNFUSED; ERODED
INNER TABLE
MOD. BREAKS ARE
SMALL AND ON
ANCIENT BREAK
CRUSHING
EXCAVATIONAL
I-2329, R216, NWQ BALK,
L5, A, SUBFLOOR,
TRASH PIT, COORD V
97.71
I-30, TEST 14
I-2297, UNIT 16A,
CENTER, L12, A,
SUBFLOOR, BURIAL 477
ENDOCRANIAL
EROSION
I-2386, R359, NEQ, L2, A,
FILL ABOVE FLOOR,
COORD V 103.78
I-860, R41, L5, SWQ
753, 754, 755, 756
REFIT
WELL PRESERVED
I-2398, R231, SEQ, L4, G,
DENSE BONE, COMBO
FLOOR, COORD V 100.7,
ANCIENT/PERI=.ANCIE
4.79NW, 2.89SW
NT POST
194
94.5
96.6
49
13.6
772
773
774
775
77.6
76.1
779
780
A
42.9
778
54.5
59.4
771
C
22.6
770
777
49.3
769
43.1
50
768
776
27.9
767
C
57.4
766
C
C
46.1
22.6
11
33.6
40.5
9.1
12
16.6
39.6
21.2
17.5
31.8
11.7
13.7
11.4
C
C
4.5
7.8
7.1
15.9
4.6
6.3
2.9
3.6
10.3
7
2.2
5.8
5
6.5
4.7
772, 773 REFIT
772, 773 REFIT
1
1
MULT
MULT
MULT
SLIGHT DJD
I-543, R28, SWQ
ROBUST, REFIT ON
ANCIENT BREAK
I-263, GREAT KIVA, SECT
7, LEVEL 2, SUBFLOOR
I-580, R37, NWQ
I-580, R37, NWQ
ANCIENT SAWTOOTH,
I-2404, R231, SEQ, L5,
ROBUST/LARGE,
TRASH BELOW FLOOR,
MODERN CRUSHED
COORD V 100.3
WITH PICK?
UNFUSED
I-166, R22, NWQ, L5 (200207CM)
I-1914, R45, TT-2, L1, 0-50
CM
MODERN BREAKS ON
I-2219
ANCIENT
I-543, R28, SWQ
I-2382, R359, NWQ, L2, A,
TRASH, FLOOR, COORD
V 103.78
I-531, R28, TT, NEQ
I-531, R28, TT, NEQ
I-1969, R270, L4, NWQ
I-605, R108, TT 75-100CM
I-605, R108, TT 75-100CM
ROBUST, REFIT ON
ANCIENT BREAK
ANCIENT
PERPENDICULAR
EROSION MIX OF
SAME COLOR AND
LIGHTER
195
50.6
C
C
C
C
786
787
788
789
34.2
75.9
26.2
15.1
34.1
20
39.8
27.3
22.1
790
791
792
793
794
795
796
797
798
22.9
26.4
41.9
56.4
46
26.1
783
785
27.7
782
784
40.2
781
C
C
C
C
15.5
16.1
27.2
13.6
21.2
12.2
16
10.9
25
11.7
11.6
13.7
7
8.8
14.1
20
25.3
27.1
C
C
C
C
9.7
13.9
10.3
4
4.4
11.3
7.9
5
7.5
4.5
14.5
6.1
2.6
3.1
6
9
4.5
7.3
797, 798 REFIT
797, 798 REFIT
781, 782 REFIT
781, 782 REFIT
MULT
MULT
MULT
CONT
SIGNIFICANT
DJD/EBURNATION
EXCELLENT
PRESERVATION
BURNING AFTER
BREAKAGE
I-503, R26, NE-NWQ,
BURIAL 226 FILL
I-503, R26, NE-NWQ,
BURIAL 226 FILL
I-58, R14
I-367, GREAT KIVA, SEC
6, PH #8, PIT 19, L1
I-367, GREAT KIVA, SEC
6, PH #8, PIT 19, L1
I-367, GREAT KIVA, SEC
6, PH #8, PIT 19, L1
I-367, GREAT KIVA, SEC
6, PH #8, PIT 19, L1
I-367, GREAT KIVA, SEC
6, PH #8, PIT 19, L1
I-506, R27, SFL1, NWQ,
SC280, NC1.90, D125
I-600, R100, NWQ, FILL
I-600, R100, NWQ, FILL
I-600, R100, NWQ, FILL
I-527, R27, FLOOR, NEQ
I-527, R27, FLOOR, NEQ
I-527, R27, FLOOR, NEQ
I-1944, R205, W UNIT, L1,
NWQ, TT-B
I-548, R28, NE CORNER
OF EXCAVATION
ONLY SMALL PART OF
ANCIENT LEFT
I-548, R28, NE CORNER
BECAUSE
OF EXCAVATION
MODERN=COULD BE
PERI
196
123.3
64
C
C
800
801
802
37.7
73.5
C
A
A
804
805
806
807
61.4
10.4
37.1
803
34.5
29.8
799
A
A
C
C
30
9.7
20
16.2
18.2
19.4
20.6
29.5
12.7
A
A
C
C
6.3
5.9
5.5
10.8
10.1
8.7
7.7
10.8
5.7
MULT
1
2
MULT
CONT
RUBUST
ERUSION ON DE
EROSION ON ENDS
EROSION ON ENDS
R279, NWQ, TT10, G 12,
SUBFLOOR, FN 1131,
"MISC HUMAN BONE", 727-75, T ROBERTSON
UNIT 623, COORD V
98.98, IN SCREEN,
BRANDT
I-2460, R341, NEQ, L5, G,
TRASH, FN 45, COORD V
103.17, H NE 2.09, 2.79,
"BONE-HUMAN", 1-13-72,
SHEA
R411, NEQ, COORD V
106.94 H 523SW, 29 NE,
"HUMAN PETROUS
PORTIONS 274, 7-9-76,
BARNETTE
R411, NEQ, COORD V
106.94 H 523SW, 29 NE,
"HUMAN PETROUS
PORTIONS 274, 7-9-76,
BARNETTE
I-986, R44, NWQ, FLOOR,
"FAUNAL", 6 AUG,
MEUSEN
I-986, R44, NWQ, FLOOR,
"FAUNAL", 6 AUG,
MEUSEN
R280, NEQ, TT 2 + 3, FEA
9, FIRE PIT, COORD V 9871, "HUMAN BONE", 7-1775, SKINNER
BURNING, POSSIBLE
CALCINED BASED ON I-503, R26, NE-NWQ,
BURIAL 226 FILL
WARPING, COLOR,
AND SOUND
197
23.3
27.6
27.4
23.3
62.5
C
C
C
C
C
C
C
809
810
811
812
813
814
815
816
817
818
819
25.6
22.4
69.9
820
821
822
13.8
12.3
11.9
12.6
12.5
9.7
52
808
C
C
C
C
C
C
7.3
6.5
8
4.7
4.5
4
6.7
6.5
8.7
6.4
15.6
20.6
18.8
10.8
33.5
C
C
C
C
C
C
C
1.9
4
3.7
2.4
2.1
2.1
4
3.9
8.2
2.3
1.6
2.1
9.2
0.8
7.1
I-1938, R444, L1, NWQ, 625-71, DOYEL
I-1943, BU. 413, PIT FILL,
"ANIMAL BONE"
I-1943, BU. 413, PIT FILL,
"ANIMAL BONE"
R246, TR21, "MISC
HUMAN BONE", 1975
R246, TR21, "MISC
HUMAN BONE", 1975
R246, TR21, "MISC
HUMAN BONE", 1975
R246, TR21, "MISC
HUMAN BONE", 1975
815, 816
MATCHES
R246, TR21, "MISC
HUMAN BONE", 1975
R246, TR21, "MISC
HUMAN BONE", 1975
I-2321, R341, SEQ, L1,
TRASH, 104.10, 28-6-72,
SHELLY
I-2321, R341, SEQ, L1,
TRASH, 104.10, 28-6-72,
SHELLY
I-2319, R335, WEST
WALL, 6-29-72, SHIMADA
R246, TR21, "MISC
HUMAN BONE", 1975
1
EROSION ON ENDS
815, 816
MATCHES
811, 812 REFIT
811, 812 REFIT
MULT
I-2309, R354, COR. # 308
SW, ABOVE FLOOR,
COORD V 103.34, BONE,
I. SHIMADA
I-2309, R354, COR. # 308
SW, ABOVE FLOOR,
COORD V 103.34, BONE,
I. SHIMADA
198
33
15.5
829
832
23
828
27.1
23.3
827
831
35.9
826
21
33.9
825
830
37.7
824
C
54.6
823
C
15.8
24.8
12.2
10.6
14.8
15.4
20.6
17.2
6.5
9.8
C
2.6
2.5
2.9
4.7
11.6
3.5
3.5
3.5
2.8
2.3
MULT
I-1938, R444, L1, NWQ, 625-71, DOYEL
PROBABLE
824/825 SAME
ELEMENT: NO
REFIT
WARPAGE
UNFUSED
UNFUSED
I-2265, R 164, SWQ, L11,
SUBFLOOR, "BONE
FOUND CLOSE TO
MAXILLA" 6-27-72,
CIOLECK-TORRELLO
I-2265, R 164, SWQ, L11,
SUBFLOOR, "BONE
FOUND CLOSE TO
MAXILLA" 6-27-72,
CIOLECK-TORRELLO
I-2265, R 164, SWQ, L11,
SUBFLOOR, "BONE
FOUND CLOSE TO
MAXILLA" 6-27-72,
CIOLECK-TORRELLO
I-2265, R 164, SWQ, L11,
SUBFLOOR, "BONE
FOUND CLOSE TO
MAXILLA" 6-27-72,
CIOLECK-TORRELLO
I-2265, R 164, SWQ, L11,
SUBFLOOR, "BONE
FOUND CLOSE TO
MAXILLA" 6-27-72,
CIOLECK-TORRELLO
BREAK
I-1938, R444, L1, NWQ, 6PERPENDICULAR, NO
25-71, DOYEL
ANGLE TO BREAK
I-1938, R444, L1, NWQ, 625-71, DOYEL
I-1938, R444, L1, NWQ, 625-71, DOYEL
PROBABLE
824/825 SAME
ELEMENT: NO
REFIT
I-1938, R444, L1, NWQ, 625-71, DOYEL
199
25.1
16.8
27.2
44.1
40.1
40.7
34.5
26.9
21.7
833
834
835
836
837
838
839
840
841
7.4
20.7
16.7
17.8
32.3
26.5
20.5
12.6
15.2
1
2
1.6
1.2
2.5
1.6
7
2.6
2.7
I-2276, R164, NEQ, TT3, L
10, SUBFLOOR, 6-20-72,
GILMAN
I-2276, R164, NEQ, TT3, L
10, SUBFLOOR, 6-20-72,
GILMAN
I-2276, R164, NEQ, TT3, L
10, SUBFLOOR, 6-20-72,
GILMAN
I-2276, R164, NEQ, TT3, L
10, SUBFLOOR, 6-20-72,
GILMAN
I-2276, R164, NEQ, TT3, L
10, SUBFLOOR, 6-20-72,
GILMAN
836-844 ARE
PROBABLY SAME
INDIV. BUT NO
REFITS
836-844 ARE
PROBABLY SAME
INDIV. BUT NO
REFITS
836-844 ARE
PROBABLY SAME
INDIV. BUT NO
REFITS
836-844 ARE
PROBABLY SAME
INDIV. BUT NO
REFITS
836-844 ARE
PROBABLY SAME
INDIV. BUT NO
REFITS
I-2276, R164, NEQ, TT3, L
10, SUBFLOOR, 6-20-72,
GILMAN
I-2276, R164, NEQ, TT3, L
10, SUBFLOOR, 6-20-72,
GILMAN
DJD, PROBABLE
FRACTURE/DISLO EROSION ON PE
CATION
836-844 ARE
PROBABLY SAME
INDIV. BUT NO
REFITS
1
I-2265, R 164, SWQ, L11,
SUBFLOOR, "BONE
FOUND CLOSE TO
MAXILLA" 6-27-72,
CIOLECK-TORRELLO
I-2265, R 164, SWQ, L11,
SUBFLOOR, "BONE
FOUND CLOSE TO
MAXILLA" 6-27-72,
CIOLECK-TORRELLO
200
17
11.7
9.4
99.3
38.9
25.7
33.4
39.7
22.4
23.3
16.9
842
843
844
845
846
847
848
849
850
851
852
9.6
14
11.8
14.7
16.3
11.2
11.2
29.1
5.9
9.4
6.5
2.5
4.2
6.8
4.4
4.3
4.7
5
10.3
0.8
1.1
1
I-871, R195, L8, E1/2,
SUBFLOOR 3, 7-25-69,
STEELY
I-871, R195, L8, E1/2,
SUBFLOOR 3, 7-25-69,
STEELY
I-871, R195, L8, E1/2,
SUBFLOOR 3, 7-25-69,
STEELY
I-871, R195, L8, E1/2,
SUBFLOOR 3, 7-25-69,
STEELY
849, 850, 851, 852
REFIT
849, 850, 851, 852
REFIT
849, 850, 851, 852
REFIT
849, 850, 851, 852
REFIT
I-864, R197, L3A, 7-25-69
CRUSHING=EXCAVATI
ON DAMAGE W/
I-864, R197, L3A, 7-25-69
RADIATING
FRACTURE CRACKS
I-2295, R334, G ABOVE
FLOOR, 90-100 CM FROM
W. WALL, 70-80 SOUTH
OF N WALL, 6-29-72,
SHIMADA
I-2252, R353, COR. # 303,
FLOOR, COORD V
103.34, I SHIMADA
I-2276, R164, NEQ, TT3, L
10, SUBFLOOR, 6-20-72,
GILMAN
836-844 ARE
PROBABLY SAME
INDIV. BUT NO
REFITS
SIGNIFICANT
EROSION
I-2276, R164, NEQ, TT3, L
10, SUBFLOOR, 6-20-72,
GILMAN
836-844 ARE
PROBABLY SAME
INDIV. BUT NO
REFITS
MULT
I-2276, R164, NEQ, TT3, L
10, SUBFLOOR, 6-20-72,
GILMAN
836-844 ARE
PROBABLY SAME
INDIV. BUT NO
REFITS
201
30
11.4
23.2
16.9
269
283
134.5
855
856
857
858
859
860
861
62.4
854
C
11.7
853
C
24.9
22
51
11.2
19.9
45.2
22.9
15
7
9.2
5.4
5.5
5.2
7.2
17.3
1.6
6.3
1.7
CONT
857, 858
MATCHES
MULT
3
CONT
857, 858
MATCHES
MULT
MULT
MULT
24
I-2272, R162, L10, NEQ,
SUBFLOOR, COORD V
97.47, 6-21-72, CIOLEKTORRELLO
R395, G1, TRASH ABOVE
FLOOR, FROM FN 10,
COORD V 107.69, ISOL.
HUMAN BONE 55, 6-2576, P. ROBERTSON
TOOLMARKS
SURFACE HIGHLY
ERODED
SURFACE HIGHLY
ERODED
UNBAGGED, I-2466
UNBAGGED, "R20
ASSOC WITH BUR 116"
WRITTEN ON BONE
R411, NEQ, G4,
SUBFLOOR, V 107.16, FN
319, "HUMAN PETROUS
PORTIONS", 7-8-76,
AUBREY
R411, NEQ, G4,
SUBFLOOR, V 107.16, FN
319, "HUMAN PETROUS
PORTIONS", 7-8-76,
AUBREY
I-2485, R231, SEQ 27, L4,
FLOOR, COORD V 100.3,
H 5.82 NW, 3.85SW,
"CRIL PROV-FV", 23
JULY, STIER
39.4 MM VERT. DIA. OF
R280, W BALK, G4, WALL
HEAD=PROBABLE
FALL, FN 393, "HUMAN
MALE; ROBUST,
HUMERUS", 7-23-74,
ANCIENT=VERY
IRREGULAR/SAWTOO GERWITZ
TH
UNFUSED
R411, NEQ, G4,
SUBFLOOR, FN295,
ABOVE B 655, V 106.94,
HUMAN FETAL
VERTEBRA, 7-8-76,
AUBREY
202
23.6
48.8
60.4
63.6
C
C
863
864
865
866
867
19.4
C
C
869
870
20.8
54.5
868
41.6
24.8
862
C
C
C
C
9.3
9.7
48.9
5.2
10.3
6.5
11.3
22.4
22.5
C
C
C
1.5
9.6
5
1.8
3.1
2.3
3.4
2.8
3.8
868-875 SAME
INDIVIDUAL
868-875 SAME
INDIVIDUAL
868-875 SAME
INDIVIDUAL
2
862, 863
MATCHES
1
1
3
1
2
2
862, 863
MATCHES
R279, SWQ, TT6, G8,
FLOOR 1, FN 658,
PULLED FROM BULK
BONE FN 649, COORD V
99.17, 7-4-75
R279, SWQ, TT6, G8,
FLOOR 1, FN 658,
PULLED FROM BULK
BONE FN 649, COORD V
99.17, 7-4-75
R279, SWQ, TT6, G8,
FLOOR 1, FN 658,
PULLED FROM BULK
BONE FN 649, COORD V
99.17, 7-4-75
R279, SWQ, TT6, G8,
FLOOR 1, FN 658,
PULLED FROM BULK
BONE FN 649, COORD V
99.17, 7-4-75
R246, SWQ, TR5, A3, 8,
BELOW 1ST FLOOR,
COORD V 101.23, 7-1675, POWELL
R246, SWQ, TR5, A3, 8,
BELOW 1ST FLOOR,
COORD V 101.23, 7-1675, POWELL
R501, WEST PROFILE,
"WALT, I FOUND THIS IN
408 THIS G-HOPPER
BURIAL MATERIAL
#501?"
R501, WEST PROFILE,
"WALT, I FOUND THIS IN
408 THIS G-HOPPER
BURIAL MATERIAL
#501?"
R501, WEST PROFILE,
"WALT, I FOUND THIS IN
408 THIS G-HOPPER
BURIAL MATERIAL
#501?"
203
20.6
83.7
75.3
880
881
39.1
31
879
882
33.2
878
C
41
877
40.8
C
C
874
23.5
876
C
873
23.4
16
C
872
21.5
875
C
871
C
C
C
C
24.9
20.1
71
22.8
29.9
40.1
15.3
13.5
11.8
13.8
14
9.7
C
C
C
2.1
5.7
26.3
4.8
9.4
17.8
5.9
1.5
10.7
9.6
2.2
1.5
MULT
868-875 SAME
INDIVIDUAL
MULT
SEC 505
877, 878, 879
REFIT
DJD ON FACETS
SEC 505
877, 878, 879
REFIT
R246, SWQ, TT15, A2, 8,
7-23-75
R246, SWQ, TT15, A2, 8,
7-23-75
PLAZA 1, PLAZA S13, A4,
G2, FN 18, COORD V
98.11, SW 2.22, NE .25, 715-75, RAUTENKRANZ
SEC 505
3
R501, WEST PROFILE,
"WALT, I FOUND THIS IN
408 THIS G-HOPPER
BURIAL MATERIAL
#501?"
R501, WEST PROFILE,
"WALT, I FOUND THIS IN
408 THIS G-HOPPER
BURIAL MATERIAL
#501?"
R501, WEST PROFILE,
"WALT, I FOUND THIS IN
408 THIS G-HOPPER
BURIAL MATERIAL
#501?"
R501, WEST PROFILE,
"WALT, I FOUND THIS IN
408 THIS G-HOPPER
BURIAL MATERIAL
#501?"
R501, WEST PROFILE,
"WALT, I FOUND THIS IN
408 THIS G-HOPPER
BURIAL MATERIAL
#501?"
SEC 505
877, 878, 879
REFIT
868-875 SAME
INDIVIDUAL
2
MULT
868-875 SAME
INDIVIDUAL
868-875 SAME
INDIVIDUAL
3
868-875 SAME
INDIVIDUAL
204
22.9
21.2
61.4
64
50.4
23.1
25.7
21.2
25.6
883
884
885
886
887
888
889
890
891
11.7
7.6
9.1
16.5
40.6
6.5
5.5
18.7
16.9
4.1
2.4
3
6.5
10.9
2.8
2.5
1.2
6.1
889-903 REFIT
889-903 REFIT
889-903 REFIT
883, 884 REFIT
883, 884 REFIT
3
PLAZA 1, WEST BALK,
SEC 509, 4, SECONDARY
REFUSE, FN 46, COORD
V 98.78, 7-5-75, D.
MCLAUGHLIN
PLAZA 1, WEST BALK,
SEC 509, 4, SECONDARY
REFUSE, FN 46, COORD
V 98.78, 7-5-75, D.
MCLAUGHLIN
PLAZA 1, WEST BALK,
SEC 509, 4, SECONDARY
REFUSE, FN 46, COORD
V 98.78, 7-5-75, D.
MCLAUGHLIN
PLAZA 1, WEST BALK,
SEC 509, 4, SECONDARY
REFUSE, FN 46, COORD
V 98.78, 7-5-75, D.
MCLAUGHLIN
PLAZA 1, WEST BALK,
SEC 509, 4, SECONDARY
REFUSE, FN 46, COORD
V 98.78, 7-5-75, D.
MCLAUGHLIN
R246, SWQ, TT15, A2, 8,
7-23-75
R246, SWQ, TT15, A2, 8,
7-23-75
R246, SWQ, TT15, A2, 8,
7-23-75
R246, SWQ, TT15, A2, 8,
7-23-75
205
11.7
12.7
27
31.8
38.3
13.2
161
892
893
894
895
896
897
898
19.6
9.6
15
16.5
13.3
8.4
6.5
14.6
7.3
3.4
5.8
4.5
2.9
2.8
889-903 REFIT
889-903 REFIT
889-903 REFIT
889-903 REFIT
889-903 REFIT
889-903 REFIT
889-903 REFIT
PLAZA 1, WEST BALK,
SEC 509, 4, SECONDARY
REFUSE, FN 46, COORD
V 98.78, 7-5-75, D.
MCLAUGHLIN
PLAZA 1, WEST BALK,
SEC 509, 4, SECONDARY
REFUSE, FN 46, COORD
V 98.78, 7-5-75, D.
MCLAUGHLIN
PLAZA 1, WEST BALK,
SEC 509, 4, SECONDARY
REFUSE, FN 46, COORD
V 98.78, 7-5-75, D.
MCLAUGHLIN
PLAZA 1, WEST BALK,
SEC 509, 4, SECONDARY
REFUSE, FN 46, COORD
V 98.78, 7-5-75, D.
MCLAUGHLIN
PLAZA 1, WEST BALK,
SEC 509, 4, SECONDARY
REFUSE, FN 46, COORD
V 98.78, 7-5-75, D.
MCLAUGHLIN
PLAZA 1, WEST BALK,
SEC 509, 4, SECONDARY
REFUSE, FN 46, COORD
V 98.78, 7-5-75, D.
MCLAUGHLIN
PLAZA 1, WEST BALK,
SEC 509, 4, SECONDARY
REFUSE, FN 46, COORD
V 98.78, 7-5-75, D.
MCLAUGHLIN
206
30.5
65
29.3
24.1
153.8
129.7
25.5
C
C
900
901
902
903
904
905
906
907
27.5
42.7
899
C
C
13.4
8.6
31.1
37.1
17.1
21.8
60
16.4
20.7
C
C
5
5.4
10.2
9.9
13.9
12
15.7
9.7
16
889-903 REFIT
889-903 REFIT
889-903 REFIT
889-903 REFIT
889-903 REFIT
2
2
EHP PITS
PLAZA 513, A2, G2, FN 9,
COORD V 98.55, 1.73SW,
.75 NE, 7-8-75,
RAUTENKRANZ
R269, C-BALK, A3, G8, FN
1023, DIBLARI
R279, TT2, G8, FLOOR,
FN 1321, BU 632?,
"HUMAN BONE"
R279, TT2, G8, FLOOR,
FN 1321, BU 632?,
"HUMAN BONE"
PLAZA 1, WEST BALK,
SEC 509, 4, SECONDARY
REFUSE, FN 46, COORD
V 98.78, 7-5-75, D.
MCLAUGHLIN
PLAZA 1, WEST BALK,
SEC 509, 4, SECONDARY
REFUSE, FN 46, COORD
V 98.78, 7-5-75, D.
MCLAUGHLIN
PLAZA 1, WEST BALK,
SEC 509, 4, SECONDARY
REFUSE, FN 46, COORD
V 98.78, 7-5-75, D.
MCLAUGHLIN
PLAZA 1, WEST BALK,
SEC 509, 4, SECONDARY
REFUSE, FN 46, COORD
V 98.78, 7-5-75, D.
MCLAUGHLIN
PLAZA 1, WEST BALK,
SEC 509, 4, SECONDARY
REFUSE, FN 46, COORD
V 98.78, 7-5-75, D.
MCLAUGHLIN
207
24.1
82.3
11.1
C
C
911
912
913
914
69.8
57
915
916
54.5
12.7
910
23.5
73.5
C
909
908
C
C
C
8.2
16.9
14.8
9.6
60.6
14.8
11.3
18.2
12.7
C
C
C
3.2
8.8
6.4
5.6
26
5.8
3
6.4
4.5
916-940
PROBABLY SAME
1
INDIVIDUAL; 916,
919 MATCHES
MULT
1
2 LARGE CARIES
#2
OSTEOPHYTES
(SUP)
ROOT ERODED BY
PERMANENT
R246, SEQ, G3, ROOFDEFACTO, COORD V
102.56, 3.72SE, 3.49NE,
6-19-74, CINADR
PLAZA 1, PLAZA 513, A4,
G2, FN 17, COORD V
98.14, 1.95SW, .47NE, 715-75, RAUTENKRANZ
PLAZA 1, PLAZA 513, A4,
G2, FN 16, COORD V
98.19, SW1.93, NE .49, 715-75, RAUTENKRANZ
R246, NEQ, N-BALK, G7,
FLOOR, FEA 11A, MISC
PIT, COORD 101.47,
FROM SCREENING
PLAZA 1, PLAZA 513, A4,
G2, FN 19, COORD V
98.09, SW 1.98, NE .49,
RAUTENKRANZ
PLAZA 1, PLAZA 513, A4,
G2, FN 19, COORD V
98.09, SW 1.98, NE .49,
RAUTENKRANZ
R246, NWQ, G7, FLOOR
1, ALONG N WALL, BU
613 PIT FILL, COORD V
101.43, 7-30-75, CIOLEKTORRELLO
R246, NWQ, G7, FLOOR
1, ALONG N WALL, BU
613 PIT FILL, COORD V
101.43, 7-30-75, CIOLEKTORRELLO
PLAZA 1, PLAZA 513, A5,
G2, FN 24, COORD V
97.96, NE .41, SW 2.04, 716-75, RAUTENKRANZ
208
923
34.2
36.6
922
A
33.4
921
34.2
920
A
34
919
49.9
32.7
C
918
917
A
A
17.4
19.1
25.3
25.2
8.3
27.4
7.3
A
A
1.3
1.8
1.9
1.8
3
4.1
2.6
R246, SEQ, G3, ROOFDEFACTO, COORD V
102.56, 3.72SE, 3.49NE,
6-19-74, CINADR
R246, SEQ, G3, ROOFDEFACTO, COORD V
102.56, 3.72SE, 3.49NE,
6-19-74, CINADR
R246, SEQ, G3, ROOFDEFACTO, COORD V
102.56, 3.72SE, 3.49NE,
6-19-74, CINADR
R246, SEQ, G3, ROOFDEFACTO, COORD V
102.56, 3.72SE, 3.49NE,
6-19-74, CINADR
R246, SEQ, G3, ROOFDEFACTO, COORD V
102.56, 3.72SE, 3.49NE,
6-19-74, CINADR
UNFUSED
UNFUSED
916-940
PROBABLY SAME MULT
INDIVIDUAL
916-940
PROBABLY SAME
1
INDIVIDUAL; 916,
919 MATCHES
916-940
PROBABLY SAME
INDIVIDUAL; 920,
921 MATCHES
916-940
PROBABLY SAME
INDIVIDUAL; 920,
921 MATCHES
916-940
PROBABLY SAME
INDIVIDUAL; 920,
921 MATCHES
916-940
PROBABLY SAME
INDIVIDUAL; 920,
921 MATCHES
R246, SEQ, G3, ROOFDEFACTO, COORD V
102.56, 3.72SE, 3.49NE,
6-19-74, CINADR
R246, SEQ, G3, ROOFDEFACTO, COORD V
102.56, 3.72SE, 3.49NE,
6-19-74, CINADR
916-940
PROBABLY SAME 1
INDIVIDUAL
209
28.3
21.5
43.9
60.4
36.5
28.3
26.8
924
925
926
927
928
929
930
12.9
11.1
13.9
38.9
12.2
13.6
16.6
0.7
0.9
0.7
1.8
6.6
1.3
4.5
R246, SEQ, G3, ROOFDEFACTO, COORD V
102.56, 3.72SE, 3.49NE,
6-19-74, CINADR
R246, SEQ, G3, ROOFDEFACTO, COORD V
102.56, 3.72SE, 3.49NE,
6-19-74, CINADR
916-940
PROBABLY SAME
INDIVIDUAL; 920,
921 MATCHES
916-940
PROBABLY SAME
MULT
INDIVIDUAL; 920,
921 MATCHES
R246, SEQ, G3, ROOFDEFACTO, COORD V
102.56, 3.72SE, 3.49NE,
6-19-74, CINADR
R246, SEQ, G3, ROOFDEFACTO, COORD V
102.56, 3.72SE, 3.49NE,
6-19-74, CINADR
R246, SEQ, G3, ROOFDEFACTO, COORD V
102.56, 3.72SE, 3.49NE,
6-19-74, CINADR
R246, SEQ, G3, ROOFDEFACTO, COORD V
102.56, 3.72SE, 3.49NE,
6-19-74, CINADR
916-940
PROBABLY SAME
INDIVIDUAL; 920,
921 MATCHES
916-940
PROBABLY SAME
INDIVIDUAL; 920,
921 MATCHES
916-940
PROBABLY SAME
INDIVIDUAL; 920,
921 MATCHES
916-940
PROBABLY SAME
INDIVIDUAL; 920,
921 MATCHES
UNFUSED
R246, SEQ, G3, ROOFDEFACTO, COORD V
102.56, 3.72SE, 3.49NE,
6-19-74, CINADR
916-940
PROBABLY SAME
MULT
INDIVIDUAL; 920,
921 MATCHES
210
21.2
20.3
11.8
23
10.8
15.7
15.7
931
932
933
934
935
936
937
8.7
8.3
6.5
3.7
7.8
9.4
11.5
1.8
1.7
6.3
0.9
1
1.6
0.9
R246, SEQ, G3, ROOFDEFACTO, COORD V
102.56, 3.72SE, 3.49NE,
6-19-74, CINADR
R246, SEQ, G3, ROOFDEFACTO, COORD V
102.56, 3.72SE, 3.49NE,
6-19-74, CINADR
R246, SEQ, G3, ROOFDEFACTO, COORD V
102.56, 3.72SE, 3.49NE,
6-19-74, CINADR
R246, SEQ, G3, ROOFDEFACTO, COORD V
102.56, 3.72SE, 3.49NE,
6-19-74, CINADR
R246, SEQ, G3, ROOFDEFACTO, COORD V
102.56, 3.72SE, 3.49NE,
6-19-74, CINADR
R246, SEQ, G3, ROOFDEFACTO, COORD V
102.56, 3.72SE, 3.49NE,
6-19-74, CINADR
R246, SEQ, G3, ROOFDEFACTO, COORD V
102.56, 3.72SE, 3.49NE,
6-19-74, CINADR
916-940
PROBABLY SAME
INDIVIDUAL; 920,
921 MATCHES
916-940
PROBABLY SAME
INDIVIDUAL; 920,
921 MATCHES
916-940
PROBABLY SAME
INDIVIDUAL; 920,
921 MATCHES
916-940
PROBABLY SAME
INDIVIDUAL; 920,
921 MATCHES
916-940
PROBABLY SAME
INDIVIDUAL; 920,
921 MATCHES
916-940
PROBABLY SAME
MULT
INDIVIDUAL; 920,
921 MATCHES
916-940
PROBABLY SAME
MULT
INDIVIDUAL; 920,
921 MATCHES
211
30.5
50.9
39.9
25.7
41.4
16.9
16.6
C
C
C
940
941
942
943
944
945
946
947
948
949
11.3
939
24.2
7.9
9.7
12.5
938
C
C
C
12.3
5.8
4.7
8.3
5.6
8.6
8.9
9.9
10.8
27.9
7.2
6.8
C
C
C
4.5
1.9
3.6
1
3.2
3.4
3.9
2.7
3.5
4.8
2.6
1.3
1
LARGE CARIES
R246, SEQ, G3, ROOFDEFACTO, COORD V
102.56, 3.72SE, 3.49NE,
6-19-74, CINADR
916-940
PROBABLY SAME
1
INDIVIDUAL; 920,
921 MATCHES
MULT
R246, SEQ, G3, ROOFDEFACTO, COORD V
102.56, 3.72SE, 3.49NE,
6-19-74, CINADR
916-940
PROBABLY SAME
INDIVIDUAL; 920,
921 MATCHES
R440, SEQ, G7, SUBSOIL,
BURIAL FILL, FN 62, 7-275
R440, SEQ, G7, SUBSOIL,
BURIAL FILL, FN 62, 7-275
R440, SEQ, G7, SUBSOIL,
BURIAL FILL, FN 62, 7-275
R440, SEQ, G7, SUBSOIL,
BURIAL FILL, FN 62, 7-275
R440, SEQ, G7, SUBSOIL,
BURIAL FILL, FN 62, 7-275
R440, SEQ, G7, SUBSOIL,
BURIAL FILL, FN 62, 7-275
R440, SEQ, G7, SUBSOIL,
BURIAL FILL, FN 62, 7-275
R440, SEQ, G7, SUBSOIL,
BURIAL FILL, FN 62, 7-275
R440, SEQ, G7, SUBSOIL,
BURIAL FILL, FN 62, 7-275
R246, SEQ, G3, ROOFDEFACTO, COORD V
102.56, 3.72SE, 3.49NE,
6-19-74, CINADR
916-940
PROBABLY SAME
1
INDIVIDUAL; 920,
921 MATCHES
212
14.1
C
A
952
953
25.1
21.9
34
37
30.1
16.7
957
958
959
960
961
67
955
956
64.3
954
C
27.9
951
45.1
21.4
950
A
C
12
19.3
15.2
19.1
14.7
17.2
15.9
6.2
8.5
9.8
15.2
11.2
A
C
0.9
1.3
1.1
1.5
1.7
3.6
5.7
1.9
6
5.4
2.2
3.1
UNFUSED
UNFUSED
956, 957, 958, 959,
960, 961 REFIT
956, 957, 958, 959,
960, 961 REFIT
956, 957, 958, 959,
960, 961 REFIT
956, 957, 958, 959,
960, 961 REFIT
956, 957, 958, 959,
960, 961 REFIT
UNFUSED
956, 957, 958, 959,
960, 961 REFIT
MULT
3
MULT
R440, SEQ, G7, SUBSOIL,
BURIAL FILL, FN 62, 7-275
R440, SEQ, G7, SUBSOIL,
BURIAL FILL, FN 62, 7-275
R440, SEQ, G7, SUBSOIL,
BURIAL FILL, FN 62, 7-275
R440, SEQ, G7, SUBSOIL,
BURIAL FILL, FN 62, 7-275
R246, SWQ, T5, A1, G8,
BELOW 1ST FLOOR,
COORD V 101.43, 7-1675, POWELL
R246, SWQ, T5, A1, G8,
BELOW 1ST FLOOR,
COORD V 101.43, 7-1675, POWELL
R246, SWQ, T5, A1, G8,
BELOW 1ST FLOOR,
COORD V 101.43, 7-1675, POWELL
R246, SWQ, T5, A1, G8,
BELOW 1ST FLOOR,
COORD V 101.43, 7-1675, POWELL
R246, SWQ, T5, A1, G8,
BELOW 1ST FLOOR,
COORD V 101.43, 7-1675, POWELL
R246, SWQ, T5, A1, G8,
BELOW 1ST FLOOR,
COORD V 101.43, 7-1675, POWELL
R246, SWQ, T5, A1, G8,
BELOW 1ST FLOOR,
COORD V 101.43, 7-1675, POWELL
R246, SWQ, T5, A1, G8,
BELOW 1ST FLOOR,
COORD V 101.43, 7-1675, POWELL
213
26.8
21
46.4
123.7
42.5
21.7
17.5
964
965
966
967
968
969
970
67.7
52.9
C
963
962
C
10.5
10.1
11.7
17.5
30.3
12.3
13.6
37
18.2
C
5.3
1.5
3.4
6
23.5
4.4
5.1
8.9
8.4
PLAZA 1, PLAZA 513, A2,
G2, FN 9, ASSOCIATED
W/ B-597, 7-15-75,
RAUTENKRANZ
PLAZA 1, PLAZA 513, A2,
G2, FN 9, ASSOCIATED
W/ B-597, 7-15-75,
RAUTENKRANZ
PLAZA 1, PLAZA 513, A2,
G2, FN 9, ASSOCIATED
W/ B-597, 7-15-75,
RAUTENKRANZ
PLAZA 1, PLAZA 513, A2,
G2, FN 9, ASSOCIATED
W/ B-597, 7-15-75,
RAUTENKRANZ
PLAZA 1, PLAZA 513, A2,
G2, FN 9, ASSOCIATED
W/ B-597, 7-15-75,
RAUTENKRANZ
PLAZA 1, PLAZA 513, A2,
G2, FN 9, ASSOCIATED
W/ B-597, 7-15-75,
RAUTENKRANZ
963, 964, 965
REFIT
MULT
PLAZA 1, PLAZA 513, A2,
G2, FN 9, ASSOCIATED
W/ B-597, 7-15-75,
RAUTENKRANZ
1
PLAZA 1, PLAZA 513, A2,
G2, FN 9, ASSOCIATED
W/ B-597, 7-15-75,
RAUTENKRANZ
963, 964, 965
REFIT
963, 964, 965
REFIT
PLAZA 1, PLAZA 513, A2,
G2, FN 9, ASSOCIATED
W/ B-597, 7-15-75,
RAUTENKRANZ
214
16.5
22.8
17.3
17.6
421
24.3
26.6
24.8
39.2
40.2
971
972
973
974
975
976
977
978
979
980
10.4
10.4
17.7
21
20
69.2
5.9
8.6
12
12.2
4.3
4.1
13.3
13.2
3.4
22.3
4.3
1.9
3.9
4.1
MULT
MULT
MULT
FEMUR HEAD
DIA.=43.3 MALE
R108, SUBFLOOR, L1,
NWQ, DEPTH 120 CM, 71-68, LINSKEY
R108, SUBFLOOR, L1,
NWQ, DEPTH 120 CM, 71-68, LINSKEY
I-2521, R319, SWQ, A1,
G6, SUBFLOOR, 99.79 Mf,
6-15-73, RAHN
I-2521, R319, SWQ, A1,
G6, SUBFLOOR, 99.79 Mf,
6-15-73, RAHN
I-2521, R319, SWQ, A1,
G6, SUBFLOOR, 99.79 Mf,
6-15-73, RAHN
PLAZA 1, PLAZA 513, A2,
G2, FN 9, ASSOCIATED
W/ B-597, 7-15-75,
RAUTENKRANZ
PLAZA 1, PLAZA 513, A2,
G2, FN 9, ASSOCIATED
W/ B-597, 7-15-75,
RAUTENKRANZ
PLAZA 1, PLAZA 513, A2,
G2, FN 9, ASSOCIATED
W/ B-597, 7-15-75,
RAUTENKRANZ
PLAZA 1, PLAZA 513, A2,
G2, FN 9, ASSOCIATED
W/ B-597, 7-15-75,
RAUTENKRANZ
PLAZA 1, PLAZA 513, A2,
G2, FN 9, ASSOCIATED
W/ B-597, 7-15-75,
RAUTENKRANZ
215
33.5
41.3
96.2
18.7
12.6
29.3
C
C
C
982
983
984
985
986
987
988
989
34.9
17.1
48.3
51.3
990
991
992
993
36.8
26.2
23.2
981
C
C
10.4
10.8
11.2
33.6
10.2
9.2
8.4
9.9
12
11.7
10.7
4.3
9.2
C
C
C
7
7.6
3.2
4.6
5.7
3.8
4.9
4.6
4.5
7.3
7.1
3.9
4.8
992, 993 REFIT
992, 993 REFIT
990, 991 REFIT
990, 991 REFIT
983, 984, 985
REFIT
DE UNFUSED
MULT
PE UNFUSED
R108, L3, NW, 6-28-68,
LINSLEY
R108, L3, NW, 6-28-68,
LINSLEY
R108, SUBFLOOR, L1,
NWQ, DEPTH 120 CM, 71-68, LINSKEY
R108, SUBFLOOR, L1,
NWQ, DEPTH 120 CM, 71-68, LINSKEY
R108, SUBFLOOR, L1,
NWQ, DEPTH 120 CM, 71-68, LINSKEY
R108, SUBFLOOR, L1,
NWQ, DEPTH 120 CM, 71-68, LINSKEY
R108, SUBFLOOR, L1,
NWQ, DEPTH 120 CM, 71-68, LINSKEY
R108, SUBFLOOR, L1,
NWQ, DEPTH 120 CM, 71-68, LINSKEY
R108, SUBFLOOR, L1,
NWQ, DEPTH 120 CM, 71-68, LINSKEY
R108, SUBFLOOR, L1,
NWQ, DEPTH 120 CM, 71-68, LINSKEY
983, 984, 985
REFIT
1
R108, SUBFLOOR, L1,
NWQ, DEPTH 120 CM, 71-68, LINSKEY
R108, SUBFLOOR, L1,
NWQ, DEPTH 120 CM, 71-68, LINSKEY
983, 984, 985
REFIT
CONT
R108, SUBFLOOR, L1,
NWQ, DEPTH 120 CM, 71-68, LINSKEY
216
38.9
50.4
113.8
18.6
C
C
C
C
998
999
1000
1001
1002
1003
1004
28.1
31.7
49.7
23.3
36.6
996
997
57.9
995
C
78.2
994
C
C
C
C
12.3
12.1
11
6.1
26.6
8.2
12.4
18.3
14
11.3
55.9
C
C
C
C
4.6
4.4
4.7
3.5
9.6
1.9
6.1
5.8
4.6
4.9
4.3
2
3
MULT
MULT
2
VERY FRAGILE
I-2536, RB 13, R435, SW
CORNER, FILL BETWEEN
ROOF FALL AND FLOOR
1, COORD V 100.55 MF,
7-3-73, SHIMADA
I-2536, RB 13, R435, SW
CORNER, FILL BETWEEN
ROOF FALL AND FLOOR
1, COORD V 100.55 MF,
7-3-73, SHIMADA
I-2536, RB 13, R435, SW
CORNER, FILL BETWEEN
ROOF FALL AND FLOOR
1, COORD V 100.55 MF,
7-3-73, SHIMADA
UNIT 280, SEQ, G6, 2ND
REFUSE, FN 583, COORD
V 99.16, 1/4 SCREEN, 728-74, GIVING
UNIT 440, SE, FN 442,
COORD V. 98.06, 7-24-74,
WIZOREK
UNIT 440, SE, FN 442,
COORD V. 98.06, 7-24-74,
WIZOREK
R108, SUBFLOOR L1,
NEQ, 7-5-68, DONLON
R108, SUBFLOOR L1,
NEQ, 7-5-68, DONLON
R108, SUBFLOOR L1,
NEQ, 7-5-68, DONLON
R19, L3, NEQ, PIT 2
R22, SEQ, HEARTH #1,
L2, DICKSON
217
34.6
35.5
14.1
1020
1021
47.6
1016
1019
123.2
1015
65
29.7
1014
17
41.1
1013
1018
25.3
1012
1017
31.3
1011
A
54.5
42.3
1009
1010
20.5
1008
C
49.5
1007
30
44.4
C
1006
1005
A
C
4.2
13.5
11.4
10.7
5.8
9.9
15
17.6
9
11.2
4.2
37.1
17.9
5.8
12.8
18.6
14.2
A
2.3
12.6
5.4
4.7
2.3
3
5
4.8
1.6
1.9
1.7
13.6
9.5
2.7
4.9
4.3
5.9
MULT
MULT
CONT
1
RODENT GNAWING
I-213, BAG A123
I-190, BAG A123
I-190, BAG A123
I-125, BAG A123
I-106, BAG A123
I-96, BAG A123
I-78, R20, L3
I-909, R197, L3, TRENCH,
7-16-69
I-836, R33, LE-2, NWQ, 723-69
1-1091, R143, L5, NWQ, 87-69
I-233, PLAZA TEST 1,
SEC B, L1
I-2510, R62, NEQ, A1, G3,
ROOF FALL, 98.96 mF, 623-73, BROOK
I-2532, RB 13, R437, SE
CORNER, FLOOR 2,
100.42 Mf, 7-4-73,
SHIMADA
I-2544, R274, SWQ, 68,
99.68 Mf, 6-23-73,
ANTIEAU
I-2544, R274, SWQ, 68,
99.68 Mf, 6-23-73,
ANTIEAU
R269, SEQ, A166, BELOW
2ND STORY FLOOR TO
1ST STORY FLOORTRASH, FN 409, 100.22
mF, 7-25-74,
MGOMEZULU
I-2536, RB 13, R435, SW
CORNER, FILL BETWEEN
ROOF FALL AND FLOOR
1, COORD V 100.55 MF,
7-3-73, SHIMADA
218
77.6
31.4
22.1
38.8
18.8
33.3
1031
1032
1033
1034
1035
1036
39.5
1030
A
9.5
1029
38.2
A
13
1026
1028
31
1025
33.1
38.5
1024
1027
32.4
1023
C
27.3
1022
A
A
8
7.2
15.2
12.2
8.3
11.9
7.2
4
7.8
9.3
7.2
8.1
8.1
10.8
8
A
A
2.5
2.2
2.1
4.8
6.3
3.2
2.7
2.9
2.7
3.9
2.3
4.7
3
1.9
3.8
1
1033, 1034 REFIT 1
MULT
MULT
RODENT GNAWING
I-226, BAG A123
I-2668, R183, SEQ, L G8,
FILL OF BU 528,
SUBFLOOR, "FROM
FAUNAL", 96.54 mF,
3.16NW, 2.75SW, 6-27-73,
POLIAK
I-2668, R183, SEQ, L G8,
FILL OF BU 528,
SUBFLOOR, "FROM
FAUNAL", 96.54 mF,
3.16NW, 2.75SW, 6-27-73,
POLIAK
I-2656, R183, NEQ, G8,
TRASH PIT BELOW
FLOOR 1, 96.99 mf, BU
533, "BULK FAUNA", 7-373, POLIAK
I-2656, R183, NEQ, G8,
TRASH PIT BELOW
FLOOR 1, 96.99 mf, BU
533, "BULK FAUNA", 7-373, POLIAK
I-905, R116, WALL FALL,
L1-A, SWQ, NORTH
MEALING BIN, 8-3-69
I-1838
I-753, R195, L3B, W1/2,
FLOOR CONTACT, 7-769, STACY + STEELY
I-219, GREAT KIVA, SEC
1, L1
I-900, R40, FLOOR, SEQ,
7-30-69
I-960, R41, L6, SWQ, 7-3069
I-393, BAG A123
I-291, BAG A123
I-267, BAG A123
I-226, BAG A123
219
14.2
15
20.4
14.2
14.8
25.4
13.2
37.7
42.2
1037
1038
1039
1040
1041
1042
1043
1044
1045
13.3
12.7
4.7
10.2
12.4
8.7
11.8
10.4
9.1
5.2
4.7
0.8
1.1
8
3.2
10
5.6
6.7
1039, 1040
MATCHES
1039, 1040
MATCHES
1
1
UNFUSED
UNFUSED
I-2523, R62, SWQ, A3, G2,
WALL FALL, 99.2 MF, 620-73, NOLAN
I-2523, R62, SWQ, A3, G2,
WALL FALL, 99.2 MF, 620-73, NOLAN
I-2656, R183, NEQ, G8,
TRASH PIT BELOW
FLOOR 1, 96.99 mf, BU
533, "BULK FAUNA", 7-373, POLIAK
I-2656, R183, NEQ, G8,
TRASH PIT BELOW
FLOOR 1, 96.99 mf, BU
533, "BULK FAUNA", 7-373, POLIAK
I-2656, R183, NEQ, G8,
TRASH PIT BELOW
FLOOR 1, 96.99 mf, BU
533, "BULK FAUNA", 7-373, POLIAK
I-2656, R183, NEQ, G8,
TRASH PIT BELOW
FLOOR 1, 96.99 mf, BU
533, "BULK FAUNA", 7-373, POLIAK
I-2656, R183, NEQ, G8,
TRASH PIT BELOW
FLOOR 1, 96.99 mf, BU
533, "BULK FAUNA", 7-373, POLIAK
I-2656, R183, NEQ, G8,
TRASH PIT BELOW
FLOOR 1, 96.99 mf, BU
533, "BULK FAUNA", 7-373, POLIAK
I-2656, R183, NEQ, G8,
TRASH PIT BELOW
FLOOR 1, 96.99 mf, BU
533, "BULK FAUNA", 7-373, POLIAK
220
49.8
65.6
19.8
26.4
1051
1052
1053
1054
19.9
36.2
1050
1056
53.2
1049
21.2
29.2
1048
1055
50
1047
C
55.6
1046
6.7
11.5
12
9
15
9.8
12.9
37
27.8
10.4
14
2.2
3.2
5
1.5
4.3
4.4
4.2
12.4
11
4
4.3
1052, 1053 REFIT
1052, 1053 REFIT
MULT
2
2
I-1672, R41, NWQ,
IMMEDIATE SUBFLOOR,
6-29-70,
PIESINGER/MCLEOD
I-1667, R40, TRENCH AA,
FILL, NEQ, 7-8-70,
TOWNSEND/ROGGE
I-2594, R360, L2A, G1,
ARCHITECTUAL DEBRIS,
104.86 mf, 7-4-73,
CAMPBELL
I-2594, R360, L2A, G1,
ARCHITECTUAL DEBRIS,
104.86 mf, 7-4-73,
CAMPBELL
I-2594, R360, L2A, G1,
ARCHITECTUAL DEBRIS,
104.86 mf, 7-4-73,
CAMPBELL
I-2501, R62, SWQ, A1, G3,
ROOF FALL, 98.96 mf, 626-73, SOMERS
I-1820, R205, L3, SWQ, 720-70, SHIMADA
I-2531, R62, NEQ A3, G3,
ROOF FALL 98.58 MF, 630-73, WHITTLESEY
I-2535, R437, SE
CORNER, SECONDARY
REFUSE-FILL ABOVE
FLOOR 1, 100.77 MF, 7-473, SHIMADA
I-2523, R62, SWQ, A3, G2,
WALL FALL, 99.2 MF, 620-73, NOLAN
I-2523, R62, SWQ, A3, G2,
WALL FALL, 99.2 MF, 620-73, NOLAN
221
38.2
57.1
68.3
1069
1070
1071
49
1066
43.1
51.3
1065
58.1
55.3
1064
1068
41.5
1063
1067
34.2
24.9
1061
1062
28.9
1060
C
30.7
1059
56.1
1058
A
30.6
1057
C
C
A
8.5
7.6
12.3
13.4
11.3
3.2
12.3
14.1
38.5
8.9
12.8
11
15.6
30.2
12
A
3.7
3.2
4.3
3.7
4.7
1.3
3.6
4.1
7.1
3
6.8
3.4
3.3
7.3
3.4
MULT
1
2
1
1
I-1011, R31, L3, NEQ
I-1011, R31, L3, NEQ
I-1009, TT74, SEC B
1-1010, R153, NWQ, FEA
3
I-1011, R31, L3, NEQ
I-2660, R62, SWQ, A4, G3,
ROOF FALL, 98.38 MF, 73-73, NOLAN
I-2660, R62, SWQ, A4, G3,
ROOF FALL, 98.38 MF, 73-73, NOLAN
I-2660, R62, SWQ, A4, G3,
ROOF FALL, 98.38 MF, 73-73, NOLAN
I-2650, R62, SWQ, LG6,
TRASH BELOW FLOOR,
PLAZA, 97.78 MF,
SOMERS
I-2507, R62, NWQ, A1, G3,
ROOF FALL, 98.96 MF, 627-73, SOMERS
I-2625, R425, NWQ, L3G,
SUBFLOOR, 7-25-73,
BENSON
I-1672, R41, NWQ,
IMMEDIATE SUBFLOOR,
6-29-70,
PIESINGER/MCLEOD
I-2534, R437, OUTSIDE
SW CORNER OF RM 436,
100.14 MF, 7-4-73,
SHIMADA
I-2534, R437, OUTSIDE
SW CORNER OF RM 436,
100.14 MF, 7-4-73,
SHIMADA
I-2534, R437, OUTSIDE
SW CORNER OF RM 436,
100.14 MF, 7-4-73,
SHIMADA
222
74.6
55.8
47.4
140.7
99.5
78.5
53.1
43.3
27.3
A
A
1075
1076
1077
1078
1079
1080
1081
1082
1083
1084
66.4
54.7
44
27.9
68.4
85.2
47.9
55.8
49.4
33.9
1085
1086
1087
1088
1089
1090
1091
1092
1093
1094
22.3
79.8
1074
47.8
30.7
A
1073
1072
A
A
6.6
7.1
7.1
14.1
11.7
12.9
8.9
12.9
8.6
11
8
11.4
10.3
11.3
14.8
15
13.2
13.3
14.9
12
10.3
5
6.6
A
A
1.6
4.8
2.6
3.7
6
6
2.8
5
3.6
2.1
2.3
3.2
4.2
3
4.9
5.1
5.4
5.4
2
4.9
4
2.9
1.2
1
MULT
MULT
DJD
STRIATIONS
I-569, BAG A678, R31,
NWQ
I-569, BAG A678, R31,
NWQ
I-569, BAG A678, R31,
NWQ
I-569, BAG A678, R31,
NWQ
I-569, BAG A678, R31,
NWQ
I-569, BAG A678, R31,
NWQ
I-163, BAG A678, R18, L5,
PIT
I-470, BAG A678, R23,
SEQ
I-470, BAG A678, R23,
SEQ
I-470, BAG A678, R23,
SEQ
I-190, BAG A678, TEST
35, SEC 1/2 16 (?),
BURIAL 88
I-42, BAG A678, WALL
TRENCH OUTSIDE
ROOM 2, L2,.75-1.25M
I-1659, 11-14-74
I-1659, 11-14-74
I-1659, 11-14-74
I-1659, 11-14-74
I-1659, 11-14-74
I-1659, 11-14-74
I-1659, 11-14-74
I-1659, 11-14-74
I-1011, R31, L3, NEQ
I-1507, R42, TT, SFL1,
SEQ
I-1659, 11-14-74
223
1113
A
1112
17.8
20.2
22.4
C
1111
32.1
1107
49
26.9
1106
1110
17.3
1105
53.1
50.2
1104
1109
45.1
1103
39.2
37.8
1102
A
35
1101
1108
31
1100
30.7
1098
19.4
26.1
1097
1099
108.9
1096
A
38.8
1095
A
C
A
A
5.6
9.2
6.3
6
15.7
15.5
10.8
4
4.4
4.2
7.5
3.6
9.5
9.7
11.5
8.4
10.3
9.3
16
A
C
A
A
1.4
2.8
1.7
2.2
4.7
2.6
3.3
2
1.7
1.6
2.4
1.5
3.8
4.2
2
1.9
1.7
2.4
4.2
1104, 1105 REFIT
1
MULT
MULT
MULT
1104, 1105 REFIT MULT
MULT
3
MULT
BREAK
PERPENDICULAR
NO PROV., BAG A678
NO PROV., BAG A678
NO PROV., BAG A678
NO PROV., BAG A678
I-1748, BAG A678
I-1748, BAG A678
I-1737, BAG A678
I-1091, BAG A678, R143,
L5, NWQ, 8-7
I-1091, BAG A678, R143,
L5, NWQ, 8-7
I-1091, BAG A678, R143,
L5, NWQ, 8-7
I-1086, BAG A678, R143,
STR6, W1/2, 8-8
I-1051, BAG A678, CORR
HH, T2, L2
I-809, BAG A678, R40, LJ,
SEQ, 7-15-69
I-897, BAG A678, R40,
SUBFLOOR, NEQ, 8-4-69
I-893, BAG A678, R143,
L2, 7-29-69
I-846, BAG A678, R41, L4,
NEQ, 7-7-69
I-773, BAG A678, R195,
L5, W1/2, 1ST 10CM
BELOW FLOOR, 7-11-69
I-678, BAG A678, TT43A,
ALONG SOUTHERN
WALL OF THE ISOLATED
NORTH SECTION OF
THE EAST UNIT
I-700, BAG A678, R23,
NEQ
224
38.5
18
39
25.9
32
63.9
C
C
1115
1116
1117
1118
1119
1120
1121
49.5
79.5
1114
C
48.1
16.9
14.2
17.9
22.9
13.6
32.7
8.1
C
5.2
6.8
7.2
11.6
5.7
11.5
21.2
5.2
MULT
MULT
MULT
1
I-3044, PLAZA 1, SEC
505, G3, SECONDARY
REFUSE, 98.79 MF, FN 8,
6-13-75, D. MCLAUGHLIN
I-3046, PLAZA 1, UNIT
505, G5, SECONDARY
REFUSE, V 98.64 MF, FN
23, 6-17-75, D.
MCLAUGHLIN
I-3046, PLAZA 1, UNIT
505, G5, SECONDARY
REFUSE, V 98.64 MF, FN
23, 6-17-75, D.
MCLAUGHLIN
I-3046, PLAZA 1, UNIT
505, G5, SECONDARY
REFUSE, V 98.64 MF, FN
23, 6-17-75, D.
MCLAUGHLIN
I-3046, PLAZA 1, UNIT
505, G5, SECONDARY
REFUSE, V 98.64 MF, FN
23, 6-17-75, D.
MCLAUGHLIN
I-3223, PLAZA 1, SEC
512, A2, G3, SECOND
REFUSE, E TRENCH,
COORD V 98.33, FN 10, 79-75, D. MCLAUGHLIN
I-3223, PLAZA 1, SEC
512, A2, G3, SECOND
REFUSE, E TRENCH,
COORD V 98.33, FN 10, 79-75, D. MCLAUGHLIN
I-3223, PLAZA 1, SEC
512, A2, G3, SECOND
REFUSE, E TRENCH,
COORD V 98.33, FN 10, 79-75, D. MCLAUGHLIN
225
29.4
1128
30.2
46.5
1127
1129
19.2
1126
A
20.5
315
1124
1125
70
1123
C
80.6
1122
A
23.3
19.6
28.8
11.3
14.4
62.6
41.8
23.9
A
C
2.2
2.3
4
1.6
1.2
15
6.7
9.6
1125-1138 COULD
BE SAME INDIV.
1125-1138 COULD
BE SAME INDIV.
1125-1138 COULD
BE SAME INDIV.
1125, 1126 REFIT
1125, 1126 REFIT;
1125-1138 COULD
BE SAME INDIV.
MULT
I-277, R22, SUBFLOOR,
L2, NEQ, IN BURIAL 124
PIT
ERODING FROM WEST
BANK, NEW SALT R.
DRAW, APPROX. 1 FT
BELOW SURFACE, 100
FT SOUTH OF V. GATE,
7-68
ERODING FROM WEST
BANK, NEW SALT R.
DRAW, APPROX. 1 FT
BELOW SURFACE, 100
FT SOUTH OF V. GATE,
7-68
ERODING FROM WEST
BANK, NEW SALT R.
DRAW, APPROX. 1 FT
BELOW SURFACE, 100
FT SOUTH OF V. GATE,
7-68
ERODING FROM WEST
BANK, NEW SALT R.
DRAW, APPROX. 1 FT
BELOW SURFACE, 100
FT SOUTH OF V. GATE,
7-68
ERODING FROM WEST
BANK, NEW SALT R.
DRAW, APPROX. 1 FT
BELOW SURFACE, 100
FT SOUTH OF V. GATE,
7-68
I-317, R19, L1, E1/2,
SUBFLOOR, CONTENTS
PIT OF BURIAL 158
I-3044, PLAZA 1, SEC
505, G3, SECONDARY
REFUSE, 98.79 MF, FN 8,
6-13-75, D. MCLAUGHLIN
226
14.5
12.8
24.9
23.8
21.9
13.2
1131
1132
1133
1134
1135
1136
A
20.8
1130
A
11.5
15.9
16.8
13.8
9.3
5.7
15.3
A
2
2.1
2.3
1.4
1.7
1.2
1.7
1125-1138 COULD
BE SAME INDIV.
1125-1138 COULD
BE SAME INDIV.
1125-1138 COULD
BE SAME INDIV.
1125-1138 COULD
BE SAME INDIV.
1125-1138 COULD
BE SAME INDIV.
1125-1138 COULD
BE SAME INDIV.
1125-1138 COULD
BE SAME INDIV.
P.R.
ERODING FROM WEST
BANK, NEW SALT R.
DRAW, APPROX. 1 FT
BELOW SURFACE, 100
FT SOUTH OF V. GATE,
7-68
ERODING FROM WEST
BANK, NEW SALT R.
DRAW, APPROX. 1 FT
BELOW SURFACE, 100
FT SOUTH OF V. GATE,
7-68
ERODING FROM WEST
BANK, NEW SALT R.
DRAW, APPROX. 1 FT
BELOW SURFACE, 100
FT SOUTH OF V. GATE,
7-68
ERODING FROM WEST
BANK, NEW SALT R.
DRAW, APPROX. 1 FT
BELOW SURFACE, 100
FT SOUTH OF V. GATE,
7-68
ERODING FROM WEST
BANK, NEW SALT R.
DRAW, APPROX. 1 FT
BELOW SURFACE, 100
FT SOUTH OF V. GATE,
7-68
ERODING FROM WEST
BANK, NEW SALT R.
DRAW, APPROX. 1 FT
BELOW SURFACE, 100
FT SOUTH OF V. GATE,
7-68
ERODING FROM WEST
BANK, NEW SALT R.
DRAW, APPROX. 1 FT
BELOW SURFACE, 100
FT SOUTH OF V. GATE,
7-68
227
87.2
A
A
C
C
1140
1141
1142
1143
44.7
72.7
C
C
C
C
C
C
1145
1146
1147
1148
1149
1150
1151
20.3
28.5
25.3
56.4
68.2
18.5
1144
21.5
41
15.4
73
1139
22.1
1138
C
19.8
1137
C
C
C
C
C
C
C
14
18
17.3
14.3
18.3
18.2
42.1
10.7
13.3
14.6
7.1
54.3
36.3
21.3
14.9
C
C
C
C
C
C
C
C
9.4
10.8
7.7
6.1
6.8
7.1
12.2
4
3.5
5.4
2.5
18.9
8
2.5
1.4
MULT
1
2
1146, 1147
ARTICULATE
1146, 1147
ARTICULATE
1
COULD BE PERI?
1139, 1140, 1141
MATCHES
DJD
TEETH PERIMORTEM? I-68, ROOM 16
1139, 1140, 1141
MATCHES
R40, FEATURE 9, Q MID,
8-2-70
R40, FEATURE 9, Q MID,
8-2-70
R40, FEATURE 9, Q MID,
8-2-70
R40, FEATURE 9, Q MID,
8-2-70
R40, FEATURE 9, Q MID,
8-2-70
R40, FEATURE 9, Q MID,
8-2-70
R40, FEATURE 9, Q MID,
8-2-70
R40, FEATURE 9, Q MID,
8-2-70
R40, FEATURE 9, Q MID,
8-2-70
R40, FEATURE 9, Q MID,
8-2-70
I-68, ROOM 16
I-68, ROOM 16
1139, 1140, 1141
MATCHES
1125-1138 COULD
BE SAME INDIV.
1125-1138 COULD
BE SAME INDIV.
ERODING FROM WEST
BANK, NEW SALT R.
DRAW, APPROX. 1 FT
BELOW SURFACE, 100
FT SOUTH OF V. GATE,
7-68
ERODING FROM WEST
BANK, NEW SALT R.
DRAW, APPROX. 1 FT
BELOW SURFACE, 100
FT SOUTH OF V. GATE,
7-68
228
56
24.4
17
C
C
C
C
C
1154
1155
1156
1157
1158
1159
1160
80.6
69.3
39.8
1163
1164
1165
84
74.6
1162
1166
49.5
8.8
10.3
16.2
1161
A
25.8
1153
10.6
25.2
1152
A
C
C
C
C
58.4
17.6
67.4
28
28.5
37.6
8
9.2
5
5.7
6.6
16.9
51.8
22
17.3
A
C
C
C
C
4.5
4.4
25.8
9.9
10
15.3
2
3.8
2
2.4
3
4.4
4.4
6
6.1
I-567, R31
TEETH STILL LOCKED
IN, BREAKAGE OF
I-567, R31
MAXILLA
TEETH STILL LOCKED
IN, BREAKAGE OF
I-567, R31
MANDIBLE
1156-1163
REFIT/ASSOCIAT
ED
1156-1163
REFIT/ASSOCIAT
ED
1156-1163
REFIT/ASSOCIAT
ED
CONT
1
MULT
UNFUSED
I-567, R31
1156-1163
REFIT/ASSOCIAT
ED
R31
I-560, R31
I-569, R31
I-567, R31
I-567, R31
1156-1163
REFIT/ASSOCIAT
ED
1156-1163
REFIT/ASSOCIAT CONT
ED
I-567, R31
I-567, R31
I-567, R31
1156-1163
REFIT/ASSOCIAT
ED
OSTEOPHYTES,
DJD
OSTEOPOROSIS,
SLIGHT DJD
R40, FEATURE 9, Q MID,
8-2-70
R40, FEATURE 9, Q MID,
8-2-70
I-567, R31
2
1156-1163
REFIT/ASSOCIAT
ED
1152, 1153
MATCHES
1152, 1153
MATCHES
229
37.8
27.3
152.1
1191
1192
1193
13.7
28.3
1200
36
1199
32.5
1198
C
1197
21.7
88.2
1190
C
14.3
1189
1196
28.8
1188
62.5
36.2
1187
40.3
22.2
1186
1195
19.4
1185
1194
40.3
1184
A
34.4
27.8
1180
1183
45.8
1179
26.1
54
1178
1182
29.5
1177
25.5
26.8
1176
A
35.6
1175
1181
51.4
34
1174
55.8
1172
1173
48.8
1171
A
48.1
39.7
1170
1168
1169
45.9
62.5
1167
C
C
A
A
A
25.8
11.2
6.2
21.5
17.5
16.3
15.8
12.8
15.3
18
24.7
56.3
8.4
20.4
18.1
12.9
11.5
14.1
20.1
10.9
12.4
13.2
20.5
44.6
10.9
10.7
10.8
11
10.2
11.8
8.5
9.8
6.3
8.8
C
C
A
A
3.6
5.5
2
15.6
7.6
8.5
6.2
4.5
8
3.6
9.3
19.5
3.2
6
8.9
8
2.7
2.6
2.9
2.1
2.8
3.4
8.9
6.2
2.8
3.7
1.8
1.9
2.6
3.5
3.8
3.5
3.5
4.6
1
MULT
MULT
MULT
2
2
CONT
MULT
1
1
MULT
MULT
2
MULT
MULT
MULT
ACTIVE C.O.
UNFUSED
UNFUSED
R31
I-95, R9
I-151, R10
R31
R31
R31
R31
R31
R31
R31
R31
R31
R31
R31
R31
R31
R31
R31
R31
R31
R31
R31
R31
R31
R31
R31
R31
R31
R31
R31
R31
R31
R31
R31
230
65.6
28.4
46.6
42.1
117.8
66.9
52.1
47.3
17.6
25.2
57.5
1211
1212
1213
1214
1215
1216
1217
1218
1219
1220
15.5
1208
1210
24.8
1207
29.3
23.1
1206
1209
22.9
1205
C
26.1
25.5
22.6
1204
C
1202
19.6
1203
C
1201
C
C
C
54.6
6.3
13.8
5.9
21.7
13.2
88.8
9.1
16.9
13.5
69.9
13.9
10.6
15.1
20.3
19.4
11.6
7.6
12.2
11.1
C
C
C
10.2
4
2.5
3.9
10.4
8.2
10.4
2.6
4.3
6.7
4.5
9.3
5.8
2.8
3.4
3.5
4.8
2.9
6.8
6.7
2
1207, 1208
ARTICULATE
CONT
1
UNFUSED
RODENT GNAWING
GRAY AREA OF
BREAKAGE
IRREGULAR AND
REGULAR
UNFUSED TO RIGHT
1/2
R40, TRENCH AA, F9,
SEQ, FEATURE 9, 7-6-70
FUSED TO NA BUT
NOT TO CENTRUM
2
1207, 1208
ARTICULATE
R40, NEQ, FILL, TRENCH
AA, 7-7-70, TOWNSEND
I-33, R6
I-36, R1, L3
I-36, R1, L3
1-1, R1, LEVEL 2, NE
CORNER
1-1, R1, LEVEL 2, NE
CORNER
I-4, R7, LEVEL 1
I-29, R2, LEVEL 2
I-22, R4, SUBFLOOR
I-22, R4, SUBFLOOR
R39, SWQ, FEATURE 3,
7-7-70
R39, SWQ, FEATURE 3,
7-7-70
R40, TRENCH AA, F9,
SEQ, FEATURE 9, 7-6-70
R40, TRENCH AA, F9,
SEQ, FEATURE 9, 7-6-70
FUSED TO NA BUT
NOT TO CENTRUM
1205, 1206 REFIT 2
1205, 1206 REFIT MULT
I-127, R18
I-161, R18
I-125, R18
I-125, R18
R40, TRENCH AA, F9,
SEQ, FEATURE 9, 7-6-70
MULT CONT
ROOT NO
COMPLETELY
CLOSED
FUSED TO NA BUT
NOT TO CENTRUM
1201, 1202
ARTICULATE
1201, 1202
ARTICULATE
231
26.8
16.2
17.1
1231
1232
1233
37
1228
23.7
42.2
1227
1230
56
1226
36.4
34.8
1225
1229
42.2
1224
A
16.6
1223
30.2
15.8
C
1222
1221
A
C
14.7
11.3
12
5
6.3
9.4
9.1
7.7
6.8
20.9
20.7
14.4
12.4
A
C
8.6
2
2.3
2.5
1
3.1
3.5
3.4
2
1.5
1.8
1.1
2.6
I-135, R22, SWQ, L8
I-135, R22, SWQ, L8
I-135, R22, SWQ, L8
I-135, R22, SWQ, L8
I-135, R22, SWQ, L8
I-135, R22, SWQ, L8
I-135, R22, SWQ, L8
I-135, R22, SWQ, L8
ALL OF I-135
(1226-1243)
PROBABLE SAME
INDIV
ALL OF I-135
(1226-1243)
PROBABLE SAME
INDIV
ALL OF I-135
(1226-1243)
PROBABLE SAME
INDIV
ALL OF I-135
(1226-1243)
PROBABLE SAME
INDIV
ALL OF I-135
(1226-1243)
PROBABLE SAME
INDIV
ALL OF I-135
(1226-1243)
PROBABLE SAME
INDIV
ALL OF I-135
(1226-1243)
CONT
PROBABLE SAME
INDIV
I-126, R22, NEQ
I-126, R22, NEQ
I-121, R22, NEQ, FLOOR
I-92, R22, NEQ, L7
I-60, R5
ALL OF I-135
(1226-1243)
1
PROBABLE SAME
INDIV
MULT
232
29.9
66
9
C
C
C
C
C
C
1235
1236
1237
1238
1239
1240
1241
1242
4.3
5.1
9.9
10.7
10.7
58.9
1234
C
C
C
C
C
3.2
4.5
8.5
9
4.6
6
62.7
12.9
39.5
C
C
C
C
C
C
1.6
1.7
4.1
6.1
2.8
4.1
8.1
4.1
12
I-135, R22, SWQ, L8
ALL OF I-135
(1226-1243)
PROBABLE SAME
INDIV
I-135, R22, SWQ, L8
ALL OF I-135
(1226-1243)
MULT
PROBABLE SAME
INDIV
I-135, R22, SWQ, L8
I-135, R22, SWQ, L8
ALL OF I-135
(1226-1243)
PROBABLE SAME
INDIV
ALL OF I-135
(1226-1243)
PROBABLE SAME
INDIV
I-135, R22, SWQ, L8
ALL OF I-135
(1226-1243)
PROBABLE SAME
INDIV
CRACKING
I-135, R22, SWQ, L8
ALL OF I-135
(1226-1243)
PROBABLE SAME
INDIV
I-135, R22, SWQ, L8
TEETH STILL IN
SOCKETS
ALL OF I-135
(1226-1243)
PROBABLE SAME
INDIV
I-135, R22, SWQ, L8
I-135, R22, SWQ, L8
P.R. ACTIVE
ALL OF I-135
(1226-1243)
PROBABLE SAME
INDIV
ALL OF I-135
(1226-1243)
PROBABLE SAME
INDIV
233
44.8
C
C
C
1256
1257
1258
43.8
49.8
40.9
8.9
1252
1255
23.9
1251
32
52.8
1250
1254
9.9
1249
40.3
35.7
1248
1253
41.7
1247
C
45.1
1246
55.3
A
1245
4.3
27.5
C
1244
1243
C
C
A
C
9.7
11.8
10.2
3.2
24.9
36.9
7.4
18.7
36.7
8.7
24.2
39.2
28.7
7.3
9.7
3.2
C
C
A
C
3.8
4.5
2.9
1
2.3
18.3
4.3
1.8
2.8
4.5
1.5
3.4
3.7
3.4
3.6
1.5
TYMPANIC
DIHESCENCE
I-157, R22, SEQ, L6
AGE BASED ON LONG I-273, R22, L1, NEQ,
BONE MEASUREMENT SUBFLOOR
2
2
2
1255-1259 SAME
INDIVIDUAL
1255-1259 SAME
INDIVIDUAL
1255-1259 SAME
INDIVIDUAL
AGE BASED ON LONG I-273, R22, L1, NEQ,
BONE MEASUREMENT SUBFLOOR
AGE BASED ON LONG I-273, R22, L1, NEQ,
BONE MEASUREMENT SUBFLOOR
AGE BASED ON LONG I-273, R22, L1, NEQ,
BONE MEASUREMENT SUBFLOOR
I-166, R22, NWQ, L5
I-166, R22, NWQ, L5
I-157, R22, SEQ, L6
1255-1259 SAME
INDIVIDUAL
CONT
MULT
I-155, R22, SEQ, 2ND
FLOOR
I-151, R22, SWQ, L5
I-151, R22, SWQ, L5
1247, 1248
PROBABLE SAME
ELEMENT, NO
REFIT
I-143, R22, SWQ
I-140, R22, NWQ, 210CM,
VESSEL 3
I-140, R22, NWQ, 210CM,
VESSEL 3
I-151, R22, SWQ, L5
MULT
1
I-135, R22, SWQ, L8
1247, 1248
PROBABLE SAME
ELEMENT, NO
REFIT
ALL OF I-135
(1226-1243)
PROBABLE SAME
INDIV
234
51
52.8
25.4
14.5
1264
1265
1266
1267
36.6
39.4
1263
1268
27.4
1262
C
62.1
1261
42.6
96.5
C
1260
1259
C
C
32.3
8.6
8.9
8.8
8.5
30.4
24.5
23.5
22.5
3.6
C
C
11
1.8
3.7
3.2
3.2
2.5
5.5
9.3
8.7
1.6
AGE BASED ON LONG
I-278, R22, SUBFLOOR
BONE LENGTH
L2, NWQ
ESTIMATE
AGE BASED ON LONG
I-278, R22, SUBFLOOR
BONE LENGTH
L2, NWQ
ESTIMATE
AGE BASED ON LONG
I-278, R22, SUBFLOOR
BONE LENGTH
L2, NWQ
ESTIMATE
1260-1266 SAME
INDIVIDUAL
1260-1266 SAME
INDIVIDUAL
1260-1266 SAME
INDIVIDUAL
1268-1271 SAME
ELEMENT
I-279, R22, SUBFLOOR
L2, E1/2, IN PIT OF
BURIAL 133
I-278, R22, SUBFLOOR
L2, NWQ
AGE BASED ON LONG
I-278, R22, SUBFLOOR
BONE LENGTH
L2, NWQ
ESTIMATE
1260-1266 SAME
INDIVIDUAL
UNFUSED
AGE BASED ON LONG
I-278, R22, SUBFLOOR
BONE LENGTH
L2, NWQ
ESTIMATE
1260-1266 SAME
INDIVIDUAL
MULT
AGE BASED ON LONG
I-278, R22, SUBFLOOR
BONE LENGTH
L2, NWQ
ESTIMATE
1260-1266 SAME
INDIVIDUAL
TYMPANIC
DIHESCENCE
AGE BASED ON LONG
I-278, R22, SUBFLOOR
BONE LENGTH
L2, NWQ
ESTIMATE
1260-1266 SAME
INDIVIDUAL
1
AGE BASED ON LONG I-273, R22, L1, NEQ,
BONE MEASUREMENT SUBFLOOR
1255-1259 SAME
INDIVIDUAL
235
26.3
22.6
30.5
25.6
34.1
28.7
23.3
27
22.1
14.6
18.2
58.8
23.7
34.1
A
A
1277
1278
1279
1280
1281
1282
1283
1284
1285
1286
1287
1288
1289
1290
1291
37.5
50
32.7
25.3
A
A
1293
1294
1295
1296
1297
33.4
37.4
1292
30.3
28.1
1276
73.7
1273
23.6
51.4
1272
31.7
30.1
1271
1275
30.1
1270
1274
38.2
1269
A
A
A
A
9.6
12.1
13
5.6
7.3
10.1
8.1
5.9
6
16.4
10.5
12.2
17.7
20.5
21.5
19.6
17.2
18.9
17
15.8
20.5
16.8
19.8
19.1
43.1
10.4
15.3
24.7
28.4
A
A
A
A
3.9
2.3
5.4
4.1
3.3
3.2
2.1
3.5
1.9
7.4
4
3.5
3.9
2.5
2.8
5.7
2.8
6
5.4
3
5.1
4
4.6
7.8
7.7
2.3
1.8
2.9
5.6
1268-1271 SAME
ELEMENT
1268-1271 SAME
ELEMENT
1268-1271 SAME
ELEMENT
1
1
MULT
MULT
MULT
MULT
MULT
1
UNFUSED
I-293, R22, L2, SEQ
I-293, R22, L2, SEQ
I-293, R22, L2, SEQ
I-293, R22, L2, SEQ
I-290, R22, L2, SWQ
I-290, R22, L2, SWQ
I-290, R22, L2, SWQ
I-290, R22, L2, SWQ
I-290, R22, L2, SWQ
I-290, R22, L2, SWQ
I-290, R22, L2, SWQ
I-290, R22, L2, SWQ
I-290, R22, L2, SWQ
I-290, R22, L2, SWQ
I-290, R22, L2, SWQ
I-290, R22, L2, SWQ
I-290, R22, L2, SWQ
I-290, R22, L2, SWQ
I-290, R22, L2, SWQ
I-290, R22, L2, SWQ
I-290, R22, L2, SWQ
I-290, R22, L2, SWQ
I-290, R22, L2, SWQ
I-290, R22, L2, SWQ
I-279, R22, SUBFLOOR
L2, E1/2, IN PIT OF
BURIAL 133
I-279, R22, SUBFLOOR
L2, E1/2, IN PIT OF
BURIAL 133
I-279, R22, SUBFLOOR
L2, E1/2, IN PIT OF
BURIAL 133
I-279, R22, SUBFLOOR
L2, E1/2, IN PIT OF
BURIAL 133
I-290, R22, L2, SWQ
236
C
C
A
1300
1301
1302
1303
C
1316
1317
15.4
C
C
1320
1321
16.2
C
1326
31
1324
41.8
41.3
1323
1325
17.3
1322
C
26
1319
18
8.8
1318
7.3
11.9
11.7
C
1315
20
1314
A
60
1313
71.9
1312
C
53.9
1311
23.5
1308
61.9
59.9
1307
48.7
69.4
1306
1310
20.3
1305
1309
47.1
34.9
10.7
8.9
1304
C
C
1299
9.2
23.4
12.1
C
1298
C
C
C
C
C
C
C
A
C
A
C
C
C
12.8
6.4
12.4
29.1
26.7
9.5
9.8
7.7
6
7
2.7
8.1
8.6
8.7
18.5
19.2
12.6
54.3
7.8
14.8
11.1
18.8
14.3
29.7
30.3
5.5
4.8
7.2
8.8
C
C
C
C
C
C
C
A
C
A
C
C
C
7.8
1.9
2.4
4.1
2.8
2.7
2.6
2.5
1.7
2.8
2.6
3.9
4.1
4.9
7.8
7.1
5
8.9
3.6
5
5.4
6.8
2.3
5
6.1
3.3
2.9
2.5
4.6
1325, 1326 REFIT
1325, 1326 REFIT
1
2
MULT
1
1
MULT
1
1
1
1
LARGE CARIES
UNFUSED TO BODY
ROBUST, LARGE
I-293, R22, L2, SEQ
I-199, PLAZA TEST 3,
SEC I, 0-50 CM
I-199, PLAZA TEST 3,
SEC I, 0-50 CM
I-199, PLAZA TEST 3,
SEC I, 0-50 CM
I-199, PLAZA TEST 3,
SEC I, 0-50 CM
I-600, R100
I-600, R100
I-600, R100
I-500, WITH BURIAL 2
I-2625, WITH BURIAL 95
I-2625, WITH BURIAL 95
I-2625, WITH BURIAL 95
I-2625, WITH BURIAL 95
I-13, RUSSELS TRENC IN
ARROYO
I-30, TEST 14
I-30, TEST 14
I-30, TEST 14
I-30, TEST 14
TEST 36
I-293, R22, L2, SEQ
I-293, R22, L2, SEQ
I-293, R22, L2, SEQ
I-293, R22, L2, SEQ
I-293, R22, L2, SEQ
I-293, R22, L2, SEQ
I-293, R22, L2, SEQ
I-293, R22, L2, SEQ
I-293, R22, L2, SEQ
I-293, R22, L2, SEQ
237
C
1337
1338
27.8
C
C
C
C
1340
1341
1342
1343
44.4
40.9
105.2
40.7
1344
1345
1346
1347
16.8
17.5
20.3
63.1
1339
69.2
15
57.1
A
1336
74
44.9
1335
76.4
C
1334
63.5
1331
1333
24.5
1330
32.3
36
1329
1332
34.6
1328
C
49.9
1327
C
C
C
C
C
A
C
28.4
22.6
38
11
11.2
17
14
12.3
29.3
17.4
11.8
8.9
31.7
14.5
44.3
23.5
9.5
6.8
8.3
9.1
8.5
C
C
C
C
C
A
C
11.4
8.3
5.6
5.1
7.8
8.6
3.3
4.7
12.2
7.2
4.1
1.5
15
6
21.4
3.3
2.5
3.2
1.7
3.1
3
I-5, OVENS
I-264, WITH BURIAL 150
I-264, WITH BURIAL 150
1345-1384
PROBABLE SAME 3
INDIVIDUAL
1345-1384
PROBABLE SAME
INDIVIDUAL
I-678, TEST TRENCH 43
TEST TRENCH 42
TEST TRENCH 42
TEST TRENCH 42
TEST TRENCH 42
TEST TRENCH 42
TEST TRENCH 42
I-31, BROADSIDE/NORTH
I-196, TEST 34
ROBUST, ENORMOUS I-5, OVENS
I-5, OVENS
I-264, WITH BURIAL 150
SLIGHT DJD
1345-1384
PROBABLE SAME
INDIVIDUAL
MULT
MULT
MULT
1
MULT
I-199, PLAZA TEST 3,
SEC I, 0-50 CM
I-199, PLAZA TEST 3,
SEC I, 0-50 CM
I-199, PLAZA TEST 3,
SEC I, 0-50 CM
I-199, PLAZA TEST 3,
SEC I, 0-50 CM
I-199, PLAZA TEST 3,
SEC I, 0-50 CM
I-199, PLAZA TEST 3,
SEC I, 0-50 CM
238
79.7
77.6
46.3
32.4
28.7
28.5
15.8
17.3
16
64.4
63
26.5
1348
1349
1350
1351
1352
1353
1354
1355
1356
1357
1358
1359
7.3
9.9
10.2
7.8
6.1
6.2
10.6
11.2
12.7
45.3
12.4
9.6
3.1
3.2
2.3
1.8
3.9
4
3.3
3
4.2
2.1
5
4.7
I-264, WITH BURIAL 150
I-264, WITH BURIAL 150
I-264, WITH BURIAL 150
I-264, WITH BURIAL 150
I-264, WITH BURIAL 150
I-264, WITH BURIAL 150
I-264, WITH BURIAL 150
I-264, WITH BURIAL 150
I-264, WITH BURIAL 150
I-264, WITH BURIAL 150
I-264, WITH BURIAL 150
I-264, WITH BURIAL 150
1345-1384
PROBABLE SAME
INDIVIDUAL
1345-1384
PROBABLE SAME
INDIVIDUAL
1345-1384
PROBABLE SAME
INDIVIDUAL
1345-1384
PROBABLE SAME
INDIVIDUAL
1345-1384
PROBABLE SAME
INDIVIDUAL
1345-1384
PROBABLE SAME 2
INDIVIDUAL
1345-1384
PROBABLE SAME
INDIVIDUAL
1345-1384
PROBABLE SAME 1
INDIVIDUAL
1345-1384
PROBABLE SAME
INDIVIDUAL
1345-1384
PROBABLE SAME
INDIVIDUAL
1345-1384
PROBABLE SAME
INDIVIDUAL
1345-1384
PROBABLE SAME 1
INDIVIDUAL
239
20.7
23
22.2
24.8
20.6
21
20.4
22.5
15.3
85.7
36.2
22.9
1360
1361
1362
1363
1364
1365
1366
1367
1368
1369
1370
1371
22
30.8
65.6
4
8.3
8.7
13.5
11.5
14.8
11.5
13.2
8.8
4.7
3.1
3.7
1
1.8
1.2
3.1
2.6
2.8
2.4
2.1
1.6
I-264, WITH BURIAL 150
I-264, WITH BURIAL 150
I-264, WITH BURIAL 150
I-264, WITH BURIAL 150
I-264, WITH BURIAL 150
I-264, WITH BURIAL 150
I-264, WITH BURIAL 150
I-264, WITH BURIAL 150
I-264, WITH BURIAL 150
CRADLEBOARDED
UNFUSED
UNFUSED
1345-1384
PROBABLE SAME MULT
INDIVIDUAL
1345-1384
PROBABLE SAME MULT
INDIVIDUAL
1345-1384
PROBABLE SAME MULT
INDIVIDUAL
1345-1384
PROBABLE SAME MULT
INDIVIDUAL
1345-1384
PROBABLE SAME
INDIVIDUAL
1345-1384
PROBABLE SAME
INDIVIDUAL
1345-1384
PROBABLE SAME
INDIVIDUAL
1345-1384
PROBABLE SAME
INDIVIDUAL
1345-1384
PROBABLE SAME
INDIVIDUAL
1345-1384
PROBABLE SAME 2
INDIVIDUAL
1345-1384
PROBABLE SAME
INDIVIDUAL
I-264, WITH BURIAL 150
I-264, WITH BURIAL 150
I-264, WITH BURIAL 150
1345-1384
PROBABLE SAME
INDIVIDUAL
240
44
41.8
1382
14.5
1380
1381
49.1
1379
A
71.3
35.6
1376
1378
56.3
1375
36.3
42.4
1374
1377
53.5
1373
A
22.6
1372
A
12.5
23.3
4.7
26.8
52
28.5
22
43.2
17.2
29.6
11.5
A
2.7
7.3
1.5
2.8
4.8
2.2
2.2
2.6
1.4
3.4
1.7
I-264, WITH BURIAL 150
I-264, WITH BURIAL 150
I-264, WITH BURIAL 150
I-264, WITH BURIAL 150
I-264, WITH BURIAL 150
I-264, WITH BURIAL 150
I-264, WITH BURIAL 150
I-264, WITH BURIAL 150
I-264, WITH BURIAL 150
1345-1384
PROBABLE SAME
INDIVIDUAL
1345-1384
PROBABLE SAME MULT
INDIVIDUAL
1345-1384
PROBABLE SAME
INDIVIDUAL
1345-1384
PROBABLE SAME
INDIVIDUAL/ 13771380REFIT
1345-1384
PROBABLE SAME
INDIVIDUAL/ 13771380REFIT
1345-1384
PROBABLE SAME
INDIVIDUAL/ 13771380REFIT
1345-1384
PROBABLE SAME
INDIVIDUAL/ 13771380REFIT
1345-1384
PROBABLE SAME MULT
INDIVIDUAL
1345-1384
PROBABLE SAME
INDIVIDUAL
I-264, WITH BURIAL 150
1345-1384
PROBABLE SAME
INDIVIDUAL
SLIGHT
ENDOCRANIAL
P.R
I-264, WITH BURIAL 150
1345-1384
PROBABLE SAME
INDIVIDUAL
241
19.9
12.4
C
C
1384
1385
1386
26.9
A
A
1389
1390
18.3
18.2
18.6
1403
1404
11
1401
1402
22.8
1400
C
A
1399
40.5
95.7
C
1398
57.5
1395
24.5
32.4
1394
44.8
38.5
1393
1397
58.1
1392
1396
41.3
1391
A
30.4
1388
64
95.5
1387
96.4
12
1383
C
A
C
A
A
A
C
13.8
5.4
4.9
6.4
21.1
14.5
13.2
13.5
18
34.9
10.9
15
52
32.6
56.4
18.6
20.1
67.1
66
8.9
15.3
7.5
C
A
C
A
A
A
C
3.7
2.9
2.4
3.7
7.3
7.5
3.6
2.2
6.9
13
5.3
4.6
22.7
9.6
9.1
3.3
2.4
4.2
3.4
1.2
2.7
2.1
MULT
MULT
CONT
1393, 1394 REFIT 1
1393, 1394 REFIT MULT
1386-1389 REFIT
1386-1389 REFIT
1386-1389 REFIT
1386-1389 REFIT
ABCESS
OSTEOPOROSIS,
OSTEOPHYTES
ACTIVE EXTREME
CO, SOME VAULT
THICKENING
ACTIVE EXTREME
CO, SOME VAULT
THICKENING
ACTIVE EXTREME
CO, SOME VAULT
THICKENING
ACTIVE EXTREME
CO, SOME VAULT
THICKENING
I-188, PLAZA TEST 1
I-165, PLAZA TEST 1
I-165, PLAZA TEST 1
I-165, PLAZA TEST 1
I-165, PLAZA TEST 1
I-165, PLAZA TEST 1
I-165, PLAZA TEST 1
I-106, PLAZA TEST 1
I-20, TEST 8
I-531, R28
I-46, TEST 16
I-46, TEST 16
I-611, R108
I-609, R108
I-606, R108
R47. L8, ROOM FILL,
98.15, 7-19-71, DOYEL
R47. L8, ROOM FILL,
98.15, 7-19-71, DOYEL
R47. L8, ROOM FILL,
98.15, 7-19-71, DOYEL
R47. L8, ROOM FILL,
98.15, 7-19-71, DOYEL
R33, LE2, NE-NW, FN29,
HUMAN TOOTH FOUND
IN TRASH DEPOSIT, 716-69, HELFGOTT,
JOHNSTON
I-264, WITH BURIAL 150
1345-1384
PROBABLE SAME
INDIVIDUAL
COULD HAVE BEEN
LOST ANTEMORTEM
I-264, WITH BURIAL 150
1345-1384
PROBABLE SAME
INDIVIDUAL
242
68
C
C
1409
1410
39.5
1416
40.1
64.4
1425
1422
1424
22.4
1421
36.2
29.5
1420
1423
49.3
40.7
1419
C
27.9
1415
58.8
61.1
1414
1418
36.3
1413
42.7
44.2
1412
1417
22.7
1411
C
56.5
1408
31.6
30.9
1407
46.8
30
A
1406
1405
C
C
C
C
A
57.8
18.2
8.6
10.8
14.7
13
10.1
12.4
9.5
13.3
4.2
11.6
27.7
9.6
12.6
16.3
15
28.5
5.1
11.7
38
C
C
C
A
27
3.5
3.9
3.7
3
4.7
4.4
4.1
4
5.1
2.1
4.3
0.9
4
4.6
6.7
6.5
5.1
1.6
5.7
1.7
I-404, R24
1412, 1414, 1415,
1417, 1418
MATCHES
MULT
MULT
I-713, R23
UNFUSED TO BASILAR I-710, R23
I-422, R24
I-405, R24
I-404, R24
I-404, R24
I-404, R24
I-404, R24
MULT
I-403, R24
1
1412, 1414, 1415,
1417, 1418
1
MATCHES
I-401, R24
1412, 1414, 1415,
1417, 1418
MATCHES
I-391, R24
I-374, R24
I-400, R24
COMPRESSION
FRACTURE;
OSTEOPOROTIC
P.R.
I-67, BROADSIDE 1
I-233, PLAZA TEST 1
I-44, TEST 17, WEST
BANK OF SALT RIVER
DRAW
I-67, BROADSIDE 1
I-233, PLAZA TEST 1
I-230, PLAZA TEST 1
I-226, PLAZA TEST 1
1412, 1414, 1415,
MULT
1417, 1418
MATCHES
1412, 1414, 1415,
1417, 1418
MATCHES
MULT
CONT
1
1
243
10.7
C
C
C
1441
1442
1443
8.8
C
C
1445
1446
26.8
13.4
69.7
29.2
1448
1449
1450
1451
29.9
1447
9.5
64.5
1444
5
8.8
13.3
21.8
1438
17.9
48
1437
1440
38.2
1436
1439
42.9
32.3
1432
1435
65.5
1431
44
52.6
1430
1434
54.6
1429
57.1
60.5
1428
1433
26
1427
A
34.3
1426
C
C
C
C
C
A
18.4
17.9
7.8
13.5
5
8.3
7
24.2
3
4.3
6.2
11.5
9.2
6.1
25.9
29.3
27.9
33.2
39
27.5
10.9
11.3
11.4
11.1
10.7
17.5
C
C
C
C
C
A
9.4
7.4
2.5
2.7
3
4.7
6.3
3.8
0.7
1
0.9
3.2
3.3
2.7
6.2
6.6
6.3
6.8
6.8
7.1
6.7
5.4
5.3
3.5
3.6
4.8
2
MULT
P.R.
ACTIVE P.R.
MOLAR STILL IN
SOCKET
I-262R, R21
I-262J, R21
I-262H, R21
I-262D, R21
I-262C, R21
I-262A, R21
1444, 1445, 1446
REFIT
UNFUSED TO RT HALF I-262A, R21
I-262A, R21
MULT
R40, F1, SWQ
R40, F1, SWQ
R40, F1, SWQ
I-652, TT38, SECTION W
I-652, TT38, SECTION W
I-652, TT38, SECTION W
1444, 1445, 1446
REFIT
1444, 1445, 1446
REFIT
MULT
MULT
MULT
MULT
SCRATCHE/CUTMARK
I-652, TT38, SECTION W
S
1433-1437 SAME
INDIV
3
I-652, TT38, SECTION W
1433-1437 SAME
INDIV
MULT
I-652, TT38, SECTION W
1433-1437 SAME
INDIV
I-652, TT38, SECTION W
I-190, TEST TRENCH 35
I-190, TEST TRENCH 35
I-190, TEST TRENCH 35
I-190, TEST TRENCH 35
I-652, TT38, SECTION W
POSSIBLE
SCRATCHES?
I-190, TEST TRENCH 35
I-190, TEST TRENCH 35
1433-1437 SAME
INDIV
1433-1437 SAME
INDIV
MULT
MULT
FUSED TO NA, NOT TO
I-713, R23
CENTRUM
244
21.7
21.2
26
18.7
21.1
30
29.6
28.2
27.2
19.6
31
52.6
20.7
1471
1472
1473
1474
1475
1476
1477
1478
1479
1480
1481
1482
8.9
1468
1470
10.2
1467
22.2
34.8
1466
C
80
1465
1469
29
56.2
1460
25.6
38.7
1459
1464
59.8
1458
1463
55.7
1457
38.9
91.9
1456
28.7
11
1455
1462
19
1454
1461
47
1453
C
43.2
1452
C
C
11.7
7.9
8
8.6
16
9.5
5.1
7
5.2
6.7
13.7
19
11
10.6
8.7
6.1
6.7
19.6
13.5
14
22.4
5.6
23.9
31.1
10.6
18.2
21.5
8.7
9.3
7.6
6.4
C
C
2.2
2.6
3
2.5
1.9
2.8
3.1
2.8
2.6
3.5
1.4
7.2
1.9
2
4
4.6
3.2
7.5
10.8
5
6.4
2.4
11.3
3.8
8.1
8.8
10
1.9
2.3
2.8
2.3
MULT
1477, 1478
ARTICULATE
MULT
1
MULT
MULT
1477, 1478
ARTICULATE
1
2
1
MULT
MULT
MULT
MULT
2
1
MULT
CONT
MULT
2
1
1
EXTRA
ARTICULATION
TO 2ND RIB;
ABNORMAL
MORPHOLOGY
P.R.
OCD
REMODELED P.R.
ACTIVE P.R.
UNFUSED
UNFUSED
I-329, R21
I-329, R21
I-326, R21
I-326, R21
I-299, R21
I-299, R21
I-299, R21
I-299, R21
I-299, R21
I-299, R21
I-299, R21
I-299, R21
I-299, R21
I-299, R21
I-299, R21
I-299, R21
I-298, R21
I-298, R21
I-288, R21
I-266, R21
I-266, R21
I-262O, R21
I-262U, R21
I-262U, R21
I-262U, R21
I-262U, R21
I-262U, R21
I-262R, R21
I-262R, R21
I-262R, R21
I-262R, R21
245
8
38.6
A
C
1495
1496
1497
1498
9.8
A
C
C
C
C
1500
1501
1502
1503
1504
5.1
4.8
4.3
4.8
19.2
1499
13.3
21.2
9.4
1494
22.3
1493
10
1492
C
13.7
1491
17.3
C
1490
36.1
1487
66.1
48.9
1486
20.3
62.4
1485
1489
43
1484
1488
30.3
1483
C
C
C
C
A
C
A
C
C
2.7
2.8
2.5
2.6
9.7
4.2
9.2
10.4
4.7
7.5
8.6
17.6
5.6
7.3
11.5
8.7
7.1
7
9.4
11.1
21.9
15.5
C
C
C
C
A
C
A
C
C
0.9
0.8
0.7
0.7
6.3
1.1
7.4
2.6
2.5
5.9
3.2
2.9
2.3
2.2
4.2
2.5
2.5
2.9
2.9
4.6
7.1
5.1
1
NA FUSED, NOT TO
CENTRUM
R40, FS 64, B384-385, 731-70
R40, FS 64, B384-385, 731-70
R40, FS 64, B384-385, 731-70
R40, FS 64, B384-385, 731-70
1501-1516 SAME
INDIV
1501-1516 SAME
INDIV
1501-1516 SAME
INDIV
R40, FS 64, B384-385, 731-70
R40, FS 64, B384-385, 731-70
R40, FS 64, B384-385, 731-70
R40, FS 64, B384-385, 731-70
R205, FE 4, L3, OVEN 3
R205, FE 4, L3, OVEN 3
R205, FE 4, L3, OVEN 3
R205, FE 4, L3, OVEN 3
I-339, R21
R40, FE 9, L2, SEQ,
TRASH
R40, FE 9, L2, SEQ,
TRASH
R40, FE 9, L2, SEQ,
TRASH
I-339, R21
1501-1516 SAME
INDIV
1
MULT
MULT
MULT
MULT
I-335, R21
I-335, R21
1485-1487 SAME
INDIV
1485-1487 SAME
INDIV
I-335, R21
I-334, R21
I-329, R21
1485-1487 SAME
INDIV
1
1
246
C
C
C
1522
1523
45.7
38.6
32.2
33.4
1524
1525
1526
1527
12.5
13
15.3
22.1
22.7
78.5
C
11
1521
C
1515
6.8
1520
C
1514
11.1
C
C
1513
10.4
C
C
1512
11.3
1519
C
1511
11.4
1518
C
1510
7.3
7.8
C
1509
7.4
C
C
1508
7.4
1517
C
1507
5.6
7.7
C
1506
5.6
1516
C
1505
C
C
C
C
C
C
C
C
C
C
C
C
C
C
C
C
21.3
24.5
35
25.9
5
4.3
5.4
6.5
7.8
6.5
4.1
3.9
4.4
4
4.7
5.2
5.1
5
4.5
4.6
4.8
3.6
3.5
C
C
C
C
C
C
C
C
C
C
C
C
C
C
C
C
0.9
1.9
1
1.1
2.1
2.4
2.5
2.7
3.9
5.8
1.3
3.2
2.6
2.3
2.2
2.1
2.2
2
1.5
1.6
1.5
1.1
1
R40, FS 64, B384-385, 731-70
R40, FS 64, B384-385, 731-70
R40, FS 64, B384-385, 731-70
R40, FS 64, B384-385, 731-70
R40, FS 64, B384-385, 731-70
R40, FS 64, B384-385, 731-70
R40, FS 64, B384-385, 731-70
R40, FS 64, B384-385, 731-70
R40, FS 64, B384-385, 731-70
R40, FS 64, B384-385, 731-70
1501-1516 SAME
INDIV
1501-1516 SAME
INDIV
1501-1516 SAME
INDIV
1501-1516 SAME
INDIV
1501-1516 SAME
INDIV
1501-1516 SAME
INDIV
1501-1516 SAME
INDIV
1501-1516 SAME
INDIV
1501-1516 SAME
INDIV
1501-1516 SAME
INDIV
1
MULT
R40, FS 64, B384-385, 731-70
1501-1516 SAME
INDIV
I-201, TEST 33
I-201, TEST 33
I-201, TEST 33
I-201, TEST 33
I-201, TEST 33
I-201, TEST 33
I-201, TEST 33
I-201, TEST 33
I-129, TEST 33
I-111, TEST 33
R40, FS 64, B384-385, 731-70
R40, FS 64, B384-385, 731-70
1501-1516 SAME
INDIV
247
79
28.9
17.4
65
C
C
1533
1534
1535
1536
1537
28.5
35.5
24.2
1547
1548
1549
67.8
55.3
1554
1555
31.9
1553
C
26
1552
14.4
26.3
1546
39.5
43.8
1545
C
39.8
1544
1551
16
1543
1550
69.2
A
37.9
17.8
1540
1542
40.1
1539
1541
33
1538
C
40.7
65.2
38.8
1532
33.7
1530
1531
24.5
1529
A
47.1
1528
C
C
C
A
C
C
C
C
A
14.6
8.3
17.2
12.1
13.3
10.9
18.7
6.6
20.3
15.8
27.4
14.8
5.2
19.2
13.9
8.9
14.1
13.5
15.7
17.1
12.9
16.1
17.1
21.6
8.4
6.4
3.9
6.4
C
C
C
A
C
C
C
A
4.6
4
7.7
4
7.2
6.1
1
3.4
3.4
3.8
4.2
5.6
2.7
4.2
5.5
4.3
5.9
7
4.8
6.2
2.2
5.8
5.7
6.1
3.2
1.9
1.7
2.3
MULT
MULT
1554-1557 SAME
INDIV
1554-1557 SAME
INDIV
MULT
MULT
2
1
OCD PROX
FACET
I-53, GREAT KIVA
I-53, GREAT KIVA
I-251, TEST 33
I-241, TEST 33
I-241, TEST 33
I-236, TEST 33
I-236, TEST 33
I-236, TEST 33
I-236, TEST 33
2
I-236, TEST 33
1545, 1546, 1547
SAME INDIV
NA FUSED
I-227, TEST 33
I-227, TEST 33
I-227, TEST 33
I-227, TEST 33
I-201, TEST 33
I-201, TEST 33
I-236, TEST 33
MULT
LARGE CARIES
W/ DENTIN
EXPOSURE
I-201, TEST 33
I-201, TEST 33
I-201, TEST 33
I-201, TEST 33
I-201, TEST 33
I-201, TEST 33
I-201, TEST 33
I-201, TEST 33
I-201, TEST 33
I-201, TEST 33
I-201, TEST 33
1545, 1546, 1547
SAME INDIV
1545, 1546, 1547
SAME INDIV
1538, 1539 REFIT
1538, 1539 REFIT
MULT
MULT
2
2
MULT
MULT
1
1
248
45.5
43.5
73.1
1565
1566
1567
12.1
1572
C
20.1
1571
31.3
47.5
1564
A
62.1
1563
1570
68.2
1562
30.3
76.7
1561
30.4
37
1560
1569
30.1
1559
1568
49.3
1558
8.8
1557
C
51.6
1556
C
A
C
C
10.2
5.9
9.5
14.4
20.3
20.4
9.5
6.3
6
7.5
6.9
21.5
9.2
20.1
36.6
7.6
117.5
C
A
C
C
1.6
2.6
2.5
8.7
13.3
8.2
2.5
2.6
1.6
2.1
2.3
8.8
2.7
1.9
4.1
3.2
3.6
I-214, GREAT KIVA
I-214, GREAT KIVA
I-214, GREAT KIVA
1562-1567
PROBABLE SAME
INDIV
1562-1567
PROBABLE SAME
INDIV
1562-1567
PROBABLE SAME
INDIV
1
UNFUSED TO NA AND
I-276, GREAT KIVA
CENTRUM
I-275, GREAT KIVA
I-268, GREAT KIVA
I-267, GREAT KIVA
I-263, GREAT KIVA
I-214, GREAT KIVA
1562-1567
PROBABLE SAME
INDIV
MULT
I-214, GREAT KIVA
I-183, GREAT KIVA
I-183, GREAT KIVA
I-179, GREAT KIVA
I-82, GREAT KIVA
1562-1567
PROBABLE SAME
INDIV
HEALED CO;
ACTIVE
ENDOCRANIAL
PR
I-53, GREAT KIVA
I-53, GREAT KIVA
I-214, GREAT KIVA
1
MULT
UNFUSED
1562-1567
PROBABLE SAME MULT
INDIV
1554-1557 SAME
INDIV; 1556, 1557
REFIT
1554-1557 SAME
INDIV; 1556, 1557 MULT
REFIT
249
C
1584
88.5
42.2
56.8
1591
1592
11.4
1588
1590
112.3
1587
56
46.3
1586
1589
24.1
61.8
1585
C
A
1583
42
26.8
46.4
A
44
1580
1582
29.8
1579
1581
16.4
13.6
C
1577
1578
46.2
1576
22.7
37.3
C
1574
15.5
1575
C
1573
C
C
A
A
C
C
11.2
12.7
27.3
47.7
11.3
15.4
8.6
7.3
14.9
22.3
25.7
24.8
22.2
18.8
8.6
7.4
32.2
7.5
16.3
8.8
C
C
A
A
C
C
4.3
3.1
8.5
3
6.5
5.1
1.1
1.6
5.1
1.3
1.3
2.6
2.7
2.8
2.7
1.6
8.3
4.4
1.4
1.5
I-364, GREAT KIVA
I-364, GREAT KIVA
I-364, GREAT KIVA
1589, 1590 REFIT;
1589-1620
MULT
POSSIBLY SAME
INDIV
1589-1620
POSSIBLY SAME
INDIV
1589-1620
POSSIBLY SAME
INDIV
I-363, GREAT KIVA
I-363, GREAT KIVA
I-355, GREAT KIVA
I-355, GREAT KIVA
I-355, GREAT KIVA
I-305, GREAT KIVA
I-305, GREAT KIVA
I-364, GREAT KIVA
2
1
I-291, GREAT KIVA
3 PIECES GLUED
PR
TOGETHER; HAD TO
ENDOCRANIALLY TREAT AS 1
SPECIMEN
I-291, GREAT KIVA
I-291, GREAT KIVA
PR
ENDOCRANIALLY
I-291, GREAT KIVA
I-291, GREAT KIVA
I-291, GREAT KIVA
I-278, GREAT KIVA
1589, 1590 REFIT;
1589-1620
MULT
POSSIBLY SAME
INDIV
1582, 1583 REFIT
1582, 1583 REFIT
MULT
PR
ENDOCRANIAL
I-276, GREAT KIVA
UNFUSED TO NA AND
I-276, GREAT KIVA
CENTRUM
250
65.2
40.2
20.7
17.1
25.5
43.9
44.6
1598
1599
1600
1601
1602
1603
1604
16.8
1596
41.7
20.3
1595
1597
44.2
1594
A
44.4
1593
A
15.1
9.3
13.9
19.5
13.7
23.8
34.1
25
8
17
11.2
14.5
A
2.9
3.3
2.4
4.2
5.3
5.6
9.7
10.8
3.2
12.3
7.5
6.5
I-364, GREAT KIVA
I-364, GREAT KIVA
I-364, GREAT KIVA
I-364, GREAT KIVA
1589-1620
POSSIBLY SAME
INDIV
1589-1620
POSSIBLY SAME
INDIV
1589-1620
POSSIBLY SAME
INDIV
I-364, GREAT KIVA
1589-1620
POSSIBLY SAME MULT
INDIV
1589-1620
POSSIBLY SAME
INDIV
I-364, GREAT KIVA
1589-1620
POSSIBLY SAME MULT
INDIV
FUSED NA TO
CENTRUM, BODY
UNFUSED
I-364, GREAT KIVA
1589-1620
POSSIBLY SAME MULT
INDIV
I-364, GREAT KIVA
1589-1620
POSSIBLY SAME
INDIV
UNFUSED
I-364, GREAT KIVA
I-364, GREAT KIVA
1589-1620
POSSIBLY SAME CONT
INDIV
1589-1620
POSSIBLY SAME
INDIV
I-364, GREAT KIVA
1589-1620
POSSIBLY SAME
INDIV
UNFUSED
I-364, GREAT KIVA
1589-1620
POSSIBLY SAME
INDIV
251
40
58.4
39.7
38.6
36
27.5
26.8
14.4
28.8
38.6
36.1
21.1
1605
1606
1607
1608
1609
1610
1611
1612
1613
1614
1615
1616
13.8
21.4
22.3
19.9
5.1
6.8
9.8
9.7
10.9
12.8
13.6
14.9
4.8
4.7
6.3
5
2.1
1.4
2.2
2.6
4.1
5.4
3.8
1.4
I-364, GREAT KIVA
I-364, GREAT KIVA
I-364, GREAT KIVA
I-364, GREAT KIVA
I-364, GREAT KIVA
I-364, GREAT KIVA
I-364, GREAT KIVA
I-364, GREAT KIVA
I-364, GREAT KIVA
I-364, GREAT KIVA
I-364, GREAT KIVA
I-364, GREAT KIVA
1589-1620
POSSIBLY SAME
INDIV
1589-1620
POSSIBLY SAME
INDIV
1589-1620
POSSIBLY SAME
INDIV
1589-1620
POSSIBLY SAME
INDIV
1589-1620
POSSIBLY SAME
INDIV
1589-1620
POSSIBLY SAME
INDIV
1589-1620
POSSIBLY SAME
INDIV
1589-1620
POSSIBLY SAME
INDIV
1589-1620
POSSIBLY SAME
INDIV
1589-1620
POSSIBLY SAME
INDIV
1589-1620
POSSIBLY SAME MULT
INDIV
1589-1620
POSSIBLY SAME
INDIV
252
51.8
C
C
C
C
C
C
C
C
C
C
1631
1632
1633
1634
1635
1636
1637
1638
1639
1640
63.1
105.9
100.3
1642
1643
65.8
58.7
30.2
22.7
26.5
21.1
41.5
42.4
1641
A
50.8
1630
33.8
24.3
31.6
C
1628
1629
28.7
1627
26.2
1623
17.4
27.7
1622
1626
22.8
1621
19.4
23.1
1620
70.6
26.3
1619
1625
28.2
1618
1624
30
1617
A
C
C
C
C
C
C
C
C
C
C
31.2
21.1
18.5
29
24.8
16.6
9.3
11
9.7
16.3
13.6
13.4
10.8
41.7
4.9
13.9
14.5
10.9
15.5
12.3
21.6
10.2
8.5
16.6
15
21.5
23.5
A
C
C
C
C
C
C
C
C
C
C
C
11
3.1
3.5
21.1
10.9
7.2
4.1
4.2
3.7
5.5
4.9
4.7
4.9
4.8
2.9
5.2
7.1
5.3
6.4
9.6
4.9
2.8
4.2
2.2
3.3
8.7
9.8
MULT
3
MULT
CONT
MULT
MULT
MULT
NA FUSED
I-433, GREAT KIVA
I-433, GREAT KIVA
I-433, GREAT KIVA
I-433, GREAT KIVA
I-433, GREAT KIVA
I-433, GREAT KIVA
I-433, GREAT KIVA
I-433, GREAT KIVA
I-433, GREAT KIVA
I-433, GREAT KIVA
I-433, GREAT KIVA
I-433, GREAT KIVA
I-433, GREAT KIVA
I-425, GREAT KIVA
I-419, GREAT KIVA
I-398, GREAT KIVA
I-372, GREAT KIVA
I-369, GREAT KIVA
I-369, GREAT KIVA
I-367, GREAT KIVA
I-367, GREAT KIVA
I-367, GREAT KIVA
I-367, GREAT KIVA
I-364, GREAT KIVA
1589-1620
POSSIBLY SAME
INDIV
1
I-364, GREAT KIVA
1589-1620
POSSIBLY SAME
INDIV
I-364, GREAT KIVA
I-364, GREAT KIVA
BASILAR SUTURE
UNFUSED
1589-1620
POSSIBLY SAME
INDIV
1589-1620
POSSIBLY SAME MULT
INDIV
253
C
1648
43.6
43.7
1657
1658
8.1
C
C
C
C
1665
1666
1667
1668
1669
33.4
1664
57.9
74.7
84.6
8.7
24.4
1663
25
26.4
1656
15
29.7
1655
1662
33.8
1654
1661
27.6
1653
23.2
31.1
1652
57.3
37.1
1651
1660
25.1
1650
1659
31.2
1649
C
19.8
C
1647
17.6
40.3
1646
38.7
32
C
1645
1644
C
C
C
C
C
C
C
19.3
18.8
24
7.6
6.8
19.8
19.8
10.9
7.3
13.6
19.1
30.2
28.2
25.1
21.6
22.9
14.8
24
17.8
17.9
13.4
10.6
12.2
35.7
20.2
35
C
C
C
C
C
C
6.8
6.4
8.9
3.5
3
8.2
1.6
7.4
4.2
6.5
1.5
8.3
8
5.4
4.3
1.3
2.3
2.3
2.1
3.2
1.4
1.7
2.3
5.8
8
14.9
MULT
I-435, GREAT KIVA
MULT
MULT
MULT
1667, 1668, 1669
SAME INDIV
1667, 1668, 1669
SAME INDIV
1667, 1668, 1669
SAME INDIV
I-435, GREAT KIVA
I-435, GREAT KIVA
I-433, GREAT KIVA
1664, 1665, 1666
REFIT
I-433, GREAT KIVA
I-433, GREAT KIVA
I-433, GREAT KIVA
I-433, GREAT KIVA
I-433, GREAT KIVA
I-433, GREAT KIVA
I-433, GREAT KIVA
I-433, GREAT KIVA
I-433, GREAT KIVA
I-433, GREAT KIVA
I-433, GREAT KIVA
I-433, GREAT KIVA
I-433, GREAT KIVA
I-433, GREAT KIVA
I-433, GREAT KIVA
I-433, GREAT KIVA
I-433, GREAT KIVA
MULT
MULT
MULT
PR
ENDOCRANIALLY
PH EXPANDED W/
POROSITY
I-433, GREAT KIVA
I-433, GREAT KIVA
I-433, GREAT KIVA
I-433, GREAT KIVA
I-433, GREAT KIVA
1664, 1665, 1666
REFIT
1664, 1665, 1666
REFIT
MULT
1657, 1658
MATCHES
MULT
MULT
1657, 1658
MATCHES
MULT
MULT
MULT
MULT
MULT
254
26.7
73.2
45.4
1683
1684
1685
38.4
31.6
1682
1687
20.4
1681
28.1
37
1680
1686
25.9
1679
A
44.9
38.9
1676
1678
57.4
1675
38
40.6
1674
C
48.9
1673
1677
47.5
1672
25.6
1671
C
116.6
1670
A
C
C
13.1
17.2
41
8.5
8.8
14.9
9.2
8.8
16
36.9
27
30.7
47.9
31.4
28.6
24.3
8.4
95.2
A
C
C
5.5
5.6
2.3
2.8
5.6
6.2
4.5
1.7
4.6
9.1
5.1
6.3
3.5
4.7
6.4
6.5
3.5
11
1674, 1675 REFIT
1674, 1675 REFIT
1672, 1673 REFIT
1672, 1673 REFIT
MULT
MULT
1
1
1
MULT
ENDOCRANIAL
ACTIVITY
ENDOCRANIAL
ACTIVITY; C.O.
PERIODONTAL
DISEASE, LARGE
CARIES, ABCESS,
ANTEMORTEM
TOOTH LOSS
TEETH STILL IS
SOCKETS; 2
CARNIVORE TOOTH
PUNCTURES
R69, INFANT BONE IN
B657 PIT, ULNAR
R69, INFANT BONE IN
B657 PIT, ULNAR
R69, INFANT BONE IN
B657 PIT, ULNAR
UNIT 69, L9, SEQ, FN 340,
V97.70, 1.10SE, 4.10SW,
"HUMAN RIB", 7-28-77,
HOSLER
W/658
W/658
R69, 2ND FLOOR
R69, 2ND FLOOR
R69, 2ND FLOOR
R69, 2ND FLOOR
R69, 2ND FLOOR
UNIT 69, L9, SWQ,
V97.74, 3.93SE, 1.71SW,
7-28-77
UNIT 69, L9, SWQ,
V97.74, 3.93SE, 1.71SW,
7-28-77
R69, 2ND FLOOR
UNIT 69, A9, NE, FN 343,
"656?", V97.67 MF, 3.75
SE, 4.20SW
UNIT 69, A9, NE, FN 343,
"656?", V97.67 MF, 3.75
SE, 4.20SW
I-1865, R40, FEA 12, NEQ,
7-28-70, TOWNSEND,
ROGGE
R197, FEA 7, FILL, L4C,
QE1/2, BURIAL # NOT
ASSIGNED IN FIELD,
"HUMAN MANDIBLE", 8-669, DC, DRW
255
22.8
62.4
C
C
1698
1699
1700
1701
31.1
1697
26.1
30.3
31.7
1696
51.8
1694
39.3
42
1693
1695
48.6
1692
A
38.3
60.6
1690
1691
29.6
1689
C
20.2
1688
C
A
C
19.7
29.2
5.5
4.7
24.9
20.8
27.5
36.8
20.3
4.1
24.4
28
21.4
13.9
C
C
A
6.2
4.7
1.7
1.6
1.5
1
1.2
1.7
1.7
1.3
1.6
2.4
2.6
8.7
1691-1696 REFIT
1691-1696 REFIT
1691-1696 REFIT
1691-1696 REFIT
1691-1696 REFIT
1691-1696 REFIT
1
MULT
MULT
MULT
MULT
SEVERE DJD:
MACROPOROSIT
Y, LIPPING,
EBURNATION
I-1872, R40, FEA 9,
SUBFLOOR, 8-1-70,
TOWNSEND
I-1872, R40, FEA 9,
SUBFLOOR, 8-1-70,
TOWNSEND
I-2207, R164, L8.2, WEST
UNIT, NEQ, VAL. REID
I-2207, R164, L8.2, WEST
UNIT, NEQ, VAL. REID
I-2207, R164, L8.2, WEST
UNIT, NEQ, VAL. REID
I-2207, R164, L8.2, WEST
UNIT, NEQ, VAL. REID
I-2207, R164, L8.2, WEST
UNIT, NEQ, VAL. REID
I-2207, R164, L8.2, WEST
UNIT, NEQ, VAL. REID
I-2207, R164, L8.2, WEST
UNIT, NEQ, VAL. REID
I-2207, R164, L8.2, WEST
UNIT, NEQ, VAL. REID
I-2207, R164, L8.2, WEST
UNIT, NEQ, VAL. REID
I-2207, R164, L8.2, WEST
UNIT, NEQ, VAL. REID
UNIT 69, L9, SEQ, FN341,
V97.70, 4.00SW, 1.40SE,
"HUMAN-VERTEBRAE",
7-28-77, HOSLER
I-1661, R40, F4, SEQ,
TRENCH AA, 7-10-70,
TOWNSEND, ROGGE
256
25.6
1708
98.8
30.4
26.1
1727
1728
26.9
1724
1726
33.8
1723
67.6
130.1
1722
1725
99.3
1721
C
29.6
1720
41.8
C
1719
25.3
1716
106.7
60.9
1715
34
67.7
1714
A
35.9
1713
1718
34.6
1712
1717
59.3
1711
67.7
59.9
1707
A
39
1706
1710
67.5
1705
60.9
65.7
1704
C
53.8
1703
1709
10.1
1702
C
C
A
A
C
12.1
28.1
68.3
15.4
13.3
15.3
23.9
66.2
13.1
14.4
16.3
15.6
18
52.5
59.2
15.3
23.8
8.9
8.3
23.7
16.3
12.7
6.4
14.9
11.9
19.5
7.7
C
C
A
A
C
5.3
5.2
4.2
4.8
4.4
8.8
11.2
13.8
5.2
8.4
7.6
7.2
1.7
2.3
8.7
4.8
3.7
5.1
5.7
14.6
9.1
7.4
1.5
7.1
2.7
6.9
5.3
I-569, R31, SEQ
MULT
MULT
1
UNFUSED
I-1521, R114, B321 FILL
I-1521, R114, B321 FILL
I-1057, CORR DD-E, L2,
I-700, R23, NEQ
I-700, R23, NEQ
I-700, R23, NEQ
I-675, TT42
I-666, TT39, SEC G
I-569, R31, SEQ
1719, 1720
ARTICULATE
CONT
I-569, R31, SEQ
I-569, R31, SEQ
I-569, R31, SEQ
1719, 1720
ARTICULATE
BREAKAGE ANCIENT
BUT PERPENCIULAR
FUSED HALVES
UNFUSED
I-561, R31, NWQ
I-566, R31, SWQ, ASH
LENS
I-566, R31, SWQ, ASH
LENS
I-569, R31, SEQ
I-471, R23, SWQ
I-471, R23, SWQ
I-470, R23, SEQ
I-470, R23, SEQ
I-470, R23, SEQ
I-465, R22, SEQ
I-465, R22, SEQ
I-597, R100, FILL, NEQ
I-569, R31, SEQ
MULT
REMDELED C.O.
REMODELED P.R.
BREAK IS
PERPENDICULAR
ATTACHED
I-1872, R40, FEA 9,
SUBFLOOR, 8-1-70,
TOWNSEND
1713, 1718 REFIT MULT
1715, 1716 REFIT
1715, 1716 REFIT MULT
MULT
1713, 1718 REFIT MULT
MULT
MULT
CONT
1
257
16.3
54.6
51.5
41.1
1742
1743
1744
1737
1741
36.5
1736
50.5
90.6
1735
1740
17.7
1734
85.2
32.5
1733
1739
62.8
1732
26.5
31
1731
1738
77.1
1730
A
19.4
54
1729
A
8.9
28.6
35.9
50.6
5.1
19.7
59.5
7.2
8.2
7.7
10.9
13.2
12.9
14.2
15.4
14.2
A
4.9
2.1
3
2.8
1.6
5.4
3.5
4.5
4.8
5.4
1.5
7.3
7.8
4.3
9.9
6
UNIT 67, L9, SWQ, FN
357, V97.77, 3.80SE,
1.83SW, "HUMAN BONE",
7-28-77,
UNIT 67, L9, SWQ, FN
357, V97.77, 3.80SE,
1.83SW, "HUMAN BONE",
7-28-77,
UNIT 67, L9, SWQ, FN
357, V97.77, 3.80SE,
1.83SW, "HUMAN BONE",
7-28-77,
R69, RB1, SEQ, PIT OF
BURIAL 659, "HUMAN
BONE", 8-2-77, HRUKES
I-926, R41, L6, SEQ,
MIDDEN, 7-25-69
I-1856, R40, L2, NWQ, 727-70, ROGGE,
TOWNSEND
I-849, R35, L5, SWQ, 7-2869, THOMPSON
UNIT 67, L9, SWQ, FN
357, V97.77, 3.80SE,
1.83SW, "HUMAN BONE",
7-28-77,
UNFUSED
UNFUSED TO
LATERAL
I-1599, R114, L4, NWQ
I-2628
1740-1747
PROBABLE SAME
INDIV.; 1742-1747
REFIT
ENDOCRANIAL
ACTIVITY
ENDOCRANIAL
ACTIVITY
RODENT GNAWING
UNFUSED
I-1598, TT73, SEC E
I-1541, TT74B, B273
I-1541, TT74B, B273
UNIT 67, L9, SWQ, FN
357, V97.77, 3.80SE,
1.83SW, "HUMAN BONE",
7-28-77,
1
MULT
MULT
I-1521, R114, B321 FILL
I-1539, R27, L2 SEQ
1740-1747
PROBABLE SAME
INDIV.; 1742-1747
REFIT
1740-1747
PROBABLE SAME
INDIV.; 1742-1747
REFIT
1740-1747
PROBABLE SAME
INDIV
1740-1747
PROBABLE SAME
INDIV
1
MULT
258
39.2
34.8
25.3
53.7
59.2
21.5
29.2
40.7
23.9
26.2
1745
1746
1747
1748
1749
1750
1751
1752
1753
1754
6
5.7
6.6
5.2
14.2
36.9
32.5
15.9
15.1
22.2
2.8
1.8
2.8
1.6
9.3
3.8
11.5
1.6
1
1.1
UNIT 67, L9, SWQ, FN
357, V97.77, 3.80SE,
1.83SW, "HUMAN BONE",
7-28-77,
1740-1747
PROBABLE SAME
INDIV.; 1742-1747
REFIT
I-2493, R231, NEQ, L4G,
FLOOR, 100.35MF,
3.05NW, 4.4SW
I-2493, R231, NEQ, L4G,
FLOOR, 100.35MF,
3.05NW, 4.4SW
I-2493, R231, NEQ, L4G,
FLOOR, 100.35MF,
3.05NW, 4.4SW
I-2493, R231, NEQ, L4G,
FLOOR, 100.35MF,
3.05NW, 4.4SW
1751, 1752 REFIT;
1751-1757 SAME
INDIV.
1753, 1754 REFIT;
1751-1757 SAME MULT
INDIV.
1753, 1754 REFIT;
1751-1757 SAME MULT
INDIV.
I-926, R41, L6, SEQ,
MIDDEN, "FAUNAL", 7-2569, GRUFF
I-937, R33, SUBFLOOR,
SWQ, PIT #3-3A,
'DRAWN", 8-4-69,
HELFGOTT, JOHNSTON
1751, 1752 REFIT;
1751-1757 SAME MULT
INDIV.
1
MULT
UNIT 67, L9, SWQ, FN
357, V97.77, 3.80SE,
1.83SW, "HUMAN BONE",
7-28-77,
1740-1747
PROBABLE SAME
INDIV.; 1742-1747
REFIT
I-937, R33, SUBFLOOR,
SWQ, PIT #3-3A,
'DRAWN", 8-4-69,
HELFGOTT, JOHNSTON
UNIT 67, L9, SWQ, FN
357, V97.77, 3.80SE,
1.83SW, "HUMAN BONE",
7-28-77,
1740-1747
PROBABLE SAME
INDIV.; 1742-1747
REFIT
259
16.3
6
1767
1769
46.4
1766
24
14.6
1765
1768
34.2
1764
C
50.3
1763
28.3
1760
94.9
65.9
1759
1762
46.7
1758
24.9
55.5
1757
1761
57.8
1756
A
30.1
1755
C
A
C
5.6
11.3
3
4.1
12.5
17.7
42.4
16
14.1
15.3
36.4
36.7
5.7
6
4.8
C
A
2.6
3.6
2.2
1.4
9.2
2.6
2.1
4.9
1.6
2
9.9
4
2.2
2.4
2
1
1
1751-1757 SAME
INDIV.
1751-1757 SAME
INDIV.
NA FUSED, NOT TO
CENTRUM
1760, 1761
PROBABLE SAME
INDIV.
MULT
1
MULT
NA FUSED, NOT TO
CENTRUM
1760, 1761
PROBABLE SAME
INDIV.
1
2
1751-1757 SAME
INDIV.
I-1737, R40, FEA 4, SEQ,
6-24-70, TOWNSEND,
ROGGE
I-1737, R40, FEA 4, SEQ,
6-24-70, TOWNSEND,
ROGGE
I-1737, R40, FEA 4, SEQ,
6-24-70, TOWNSEND,
ROGGE
I-1737, R40, FEA 4, SEQ,
6-24-70, TOWNSEND,
ROGGE
I-1737, R40, FEA 4, SEQ,
6-24-70, TOWNSEND,
ROGGE
I-1737, R40, FEA 4, SEQ,
6-24-70, TOWNSEND,
ROGGE
I-1737, R40, FEA 4, SEQ,
6-24-70, TOWNSEND,
ROGGE
I-1737, R40, FEA 4, SEQ,
6-24-70, TOWNSEND,
ROGGE
R6, GEO 10, FN 385
R6, GEO 10, FN 385
R6, GEO 10, FN 385
R6, GEO 10, FN 385
I-2493, R231, NEQ, L4G,
FLOOR, 100.35MF,
3.05NW, 4.4SW
I-2493, R231, NEQ, L4G,
FLOOR, 100.35MF,
3.05NW, 4.4SW
I-2493, R231, NEQ, L4G,
FLOOR, 100.35MF,
3.05NW, 4.4SW
260
25.2
18.4
16.1
18.4
27.5
25.5
19.2
33.6
25.4
60.3
47.5
20.4
13.4
33.7
71.6
1770
1771
1772
1773
1774
1775
1776
1777
1778
1779
1780
1781
1782
1783
1784
25
18.5
11.3
19.2
30.3
7
4.6
11
10.7
16.7
18
10.4
12.5
17
17.5
4.3
3.3
7.5
4.6
12.9
2.9
1.9
5.4
2.4
2.6
2.6
3
3
5.7
14.1
1784, 1785 REFIT
1772, 1773 REFIT
MULT
CONT
CONT
CONT
CONT
MULT
MULT
MULT
1772, 1773 REFIT 1
1770, 1771 REFIT
1770, 1771 REFIT
CARIES,
ANTEMORTEM
CHIPPING
I-2174, R270, L6, SEQ, 716-71, REYNOLDS
I-2174, R270, L6, SEQ, 716-71, REYNOLDS
I-1866, R40, TT AA, W.
WALL, Q11E, 7-27-70,
ROGGE, TOWNSEND
EXTREMEL
WEATHERED
EXTREMEL
WEATHERED
NA FUSED, NOT TO
CENTRUM
UNIT 69, SEQ, FN 339,
V97.80, 4.00SW, 1.25SW,
"HUMAN MANDIBLE", 728-77, HOSLER
I-2174, R270, L6, SEQ, 716-71, REYNOLDS
FN 357
FN 357
EXTREMEL
WEATHERED
UNFUSED
UNFUSED
NA FUSED, NOT TO
CENTRUM
NA FUSED, NOT TO
CENTRUM
I-1737, R40, FEA 4, SEQ,
6-24-70, TOWNSEND,
ROGGE
I-1737, R40, FEA 4, SEQ,
6-24-70, TOWNSEND,
ROGGE
I-1737, R40, FEA 4, SEQ,
6-24-70, TOWNSEND,
ROGGE
I-1737, R40, FEA 4, SEQ,
6-24-70, TOWNSEND,
ROGGE
I-1737, R40, FEA 4, SEQ,
6-24-70, TOWNSEND,
ROGGE
I-1737, R40, FEA 4, SEQ,
6-24-70, TOWNSEND,
ROGGE
I-1737, R40, FEA 4, SEQ,
6-24-70, TOWNSEND,
ROGGE
FN 357
261
14.9
C
C
1786
1787
64.1
C
C
C
1789
1790
1791
39.3
9.6
C
C
1793
1794
1795
8.7
56.3
1792
61.8
65
43.7
1788
19
70.7
1785
C
C
C
C
C
C
C
6
8.2
22
5.6
7.4
17.4
18
22.4
12.7
4.7
24.3
C
C
C
C
C
C
3.5
6.8
5.5
2.3
2.3
6
5.9
5.4
5.7
2.2
3.7
A BURIAL?
2
2
1786-1792 SAME
INDIV.
1786-1792 SAME
INDIV.
A BURIAL?
1786-1792 SAME
INDIV.
1793-1797 REFIT
1793-1797 REFIT
1793-1797 REFIT
A BURIAL?
1786-1792 SAME
INDIV.
A BURIAL?
A BURIAL?
1786-1792 SAME
INDIV.
A BURIAL?
1786-1792 SAME
INDIV.
1
A BURIAL?
CARIES,
ANTEMORTEM
CHIPPING
1786-1792 SAME
INDIV.
1784, 1785 REFIT
UNIT 69, L9, SEQ, FN 340,
V97.80, 400SW, 1.50SE,
"HUMAN MAXILLA", 7-2877, HOSLER
UNIT 69, L9, SEQ, FN 340,
V97.80, 400SW, 1.50SE,
"HUMAN MAXILLA", 7-2877, HOSLER
UNIT 69, L9, SEQ, FN 340,
V97.80, 400SW, 1.50SE,
"HUMAN MAXILLA", 7-2877, HOSLER
I-1736, R41, TRENCH,
SUBFLOOR, NEQ, 6-2470, PIESINGER, MCLEOD
I-1736, R41, TRENCH,
SUBFLOOR, NEQ, 6-2470, PIESINGER, MCLEOD
I-1736, R41, TRENCH,
SUBFLOOR, NEQ, 6-2470, PIESINGER, MCLEOD
I-1736, R41, TRENCH,
SUBFLOOR, NEQ, 6-2470, PIESINGER, MCLEOD
I-1736, R41, TRENCH,
SUBFLOOR, NEQ, 6-2470, PIESINGER, MCLEOD
I-1736, R41, TRENCH,
SUBFLOOR, NEQ, 6-2470, PIESINGER, MCLEOD
I-1736, R41, TRENCH,
SUBFLOOR, NEQ, 6-2470, PIESINGER, MCLEOD
UNIT 69, SEQ, FN 339,
V97.80, 4.00SW, 1.25SW,
"HUMAN MANDIBLE", 728-77, HOSLER
262
23.7
140.2
30.6
1806
1807
1808
1811
74.8
64.3
34.9
1805
C
35.7
1804
1810
52
1803
28.1
50
1802
1809
62.9
1801
C
C
1800
56
57.6
C
1799
12.2
37
C
1797
11.3
1798
C
1796
C
C
C
C
17.6
15.1
27.2
17.7
39.4
8
27.2
31
34.1
15.4
18.6
45.1
14.3
24.9
5.9
4.8
C
C
C
C
5
5
3.3
7.4
13.4
4.1
14.4
3.6
4.2
4.1
6.4
11.6
6.6
3
2.8
2.6
1793-1797 REFIT
1793-1797 REFIT
2
MULT
MULT
1
MULT
3
MULT
1
MULT
MULT
MULT
MULT
ENDOCRANIAL
ACTIVITY
SMALL
OSTEOPHYTE
I-1057, R41, TEST
TRENCH, L150-200, SEQ,
6-26, GREIFF, HOUSTON
I-1057, R41, TEST
TRENCH, L150-200, SEQ,
6-26, GREIFF, HOUSTON
I-263, "CF HUMAN SKULL
FRAG IMM"
I-1729, R40, W. WALL, 714-70, COLLINS
I-1728, TT 70-1, BONE, 73-70, WATT, CATO
I-2071
I-2071
NA AND CENTRUM
FUSED TOGETHER
PRESERVATION
EXCELLENT
I-2071
I-2071
I-2071
I-2071
I-2071
I-2037
I-2037
NA FUSED, NOT TO
CENTRUM
NA FUSED, NOT TO
CENTRU;M
UNIT 69, L9, SEQ, FN 340,
V97.80, 400SW, 1.50SE,
"HUMAN MAXILLA", 7-2877, HOSLER
UNIT 69, L9, SEQ, FN 340,
V97.80, 400SW, 1.50SE,
"HUMAN MAXILLA", 7-2877, HOSLER
263
64.6
81.4
16.5
1815
1816
1817
21.2
18.6
1814
1818
32.9
1813
C
42.3
1812
14.3
5.7
50
48.6
17.3
29.5
31.5
2.6
2.7
8.3
5.5
10
4.1
10.3
MULT
1812, 1813 REFIT MULT
1812, 1813 REFIT MULT
DJD LIPPING
DJD LIPPING AND
EBURNATION
UNFUSED; ORIGINAL # R47, L8, TT3N, ROOM
442, PROBLEMS IN
FILL, HUMAN BONE, 7DATA ENTRY
19-71, GRADY
UNFUSED; ORIGINAL # R47, L8, TT3N, ROOM
441, PROBLEMS IN
FILL, HUMAN BONE, 7DATA ENTRY
19-71, GRADY
TEST TRENCH 96,
"FOUND IN BACK DIRT",
"THIS IS ALL THAT WAS
RECOVERED OF BURIAL;
THEREFORE, IT WSA
NOT ASSIGNED A
BURIAL #", 7-24-69, WAC
TEST TRENCH 96,
"FOUND IN BACK DIRT",
"THIS IS ALL THAT WAS
RECOVERED OF BURIAL;
THEREFORE, IT WSA
NOT ASSIGNED A
BURIAL #", 7-24-69, WAC
I-1690, R40, TRENCH AA,
L2, SEQ, 7-9-70,
TOWNSEND, ROGGE
I-2039, R270, L6, NEQ,
"HUMAN THORACIC
HEAVY LIPPING ON
CENTRUM FROM
FAUNAL", 7-16-71,
CLEVELAND
I-2039, R270, L6, NEQ,
"HUMAN THORACIC
HEAVY LIPPING ON
CENTRUM FROM
FAUNAL", 7-16-71,
CLEVELAND
264
Notes:
Associations:
Mod Post Fracture
Burning
Toolmarks
Weathering(1-5):
Anc Post Fracture
Mod Post Fracture
Picture:
Notes:
Burning
Toolmarks
Associations:
Weathering(1-5):
Picture:

#:
Specimen:
Side:
Seg.:
age class:
Age:
Sex:
#
BREAKAGE:
C
R/I angle %: max. length(mm):
c or a
max. width(mm):
c or a Rodent:
Carnivore:
Peri. Fracture
Pathology:
Anc Post Fracture
Mod Post Fracture
Notes:
Burning
Toolmarks
Associations:
Weathering(1-5):
Picture:

#:
Specimen:
Side:
Seg.:
age class:
Age:
Sex:
#
BREAKAGE:
C
R/I angle %: max. length(mm):
c or a
max. width(mm):
c or a Rodent:
Carnivore:
Peri. Fracture
Pathology:
Anc Post Fracture
Mod Post Fracture
Notes:
Burning
Toolmarks
Associations:
Weathering(1-5):
Picture:

#:
Specimen:
Side:
Seg.:
age class:
Age:
Sex:
#
BREAKAGE:
C
R/I angle %: max. length(mm):
c or a
max. width(mm):
c or a Rodent:
Carnivore:
Peri. Fracture
Pathology:
Anc Post Fracture
Site Name/Number:________________________
Date:_________
Provenience/Burial #:_________________________________________________________________________________________________Page:___of ___

#:
Specimen:
Side:
Seg.:
age class:
Age:
Sex:
#
BREAKAGE:
C
R/I angle %: max. length(mm):
c or a
max. width(mm):
c or a Rodent:
Carnivore:
Peri. Fracture
Pathology:
APPENDIX D, REVISED DATA SHEET
265
266
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