STli.."WAR!, DELL, McINNES, ANNUAL

STli.."WAR!, DELL, McINNES, ANNUAL

ANNUAL

REPORT

OF

HlffiRY A.

STli.."WAR!, COUNTY AGRI CULTURAL AGENT

AND

J. H. 0'

DELL, ASSISTANT COUNTY AGRICULTURAL

AGENT

AND

JOHN W.

McINNES,

ASSISl'ANT

COUNTY AGBICULTURAL AG.1NT

AND

J.

A.

CHAS.

P.

FRED

WALDRON,

ASSIsr ANT COUNTY AGRI CULTURAL AGENT

AND

THOMPOON,

AssrsrANT COUNTY AGBICULTURAL AGENT

AND

DRAPER,

ASSISl'ANT COUNTY AGRICULTURAL

AGENT

MARICOPA OOUNTY

DECm4BER 1954 to

DECEMBER 1935

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INDEX

III.

Summary of Activities and Accomplishments.

• ••

1

IV.

Changes in

County

Extension

Organization

• • ••

2

Form of

Organization

• • • • • • •

••

••••

General

Policies

• • •• •••••••••••

2

2

Pro cedure

• •• ••••••••••••••

2

V.

Program of Work

Factors Considered and Methods Used in Deter­ mining

Program of' Work

•••••••••••

S

Project

Activities and Results

••••••••

3

AGRICOLTURAL ENGINEERING

Proj ect

A-Alkali

Reclamation

• • • • • • •

••

4

Project H2-FertUization Practice

• •

• • ••

Project

4

IS-Irrigation

Practice

••••••••

4-5

Pima High

Yield Club

• • ••

•••••••••

5 crops

Project

IS-Pure

Seed

••• • • •

• •

• • ••

5-8

Project H7-Better

Alfalfa

Hay.

• • • • • •

••

Annual. Field

Crops

Dey

••••••••••••

8

8

Proj ect

I/lO-Variety

Spinning and Ginning

•••

8-9

HORrICULTURE

Proj ect

#11-C1 trus Bud Selection

•••••••

9

Project

Proj ect

#l2-Prun1ng

•••••••••••••

9

#l3-Pecan

Propagation

• • • • • •

• ••

10

Project

Proj ect

Hl4-Date

Propagation.

• • • • • • •

••

10

614.1-C1 trns

Nursery

Practice

• • ••

10

Sweet potato Hot Bed

•• • • • • • • •

• •

••

11

11

Orchard

Heating

• •

• • • • •

• • • •

• ••

Flower

Show

• • • • • • • • • • • • •

• •

••

11

DAIRY

Project

Project

Project

Proj act

Project

D22-Dairy

Herd

Improvement

•• •

• ••

#22a-Dairy

Fam Management

••

• • •

H25-Disease

Control

• • • • • •

• •

••

#24-Better

& Proven

Sires

• •

• •

••

Dl9-Feeding

Beef CatUe

• • • •

• •

••

12

1'5

IS

13

14

POULTRI

Proj.ect

Project

Oro-Poultry

Improvement

•••

#30a-Poultry

Disease Control

• •

J([ SCn:,LANIDU

S

Project IS-Weed Eradication

•••••••••

P�ject Nl5-Insect

Pest Control

•••••••

Project

12s-Disease

Control

•••••••••

Project Hl6-Rodent

Control.

• •••••••

14

14-15

15-16

16-17-18

18

19

4-H CLUB 'V'lOBK

Proj,ect

/l29-Boys!r.

& Girls' 4-H Club Work

AGRICULTURAL .Aro'UBrMENT ACT ACTIVITIES

General AAA ActiYities

• • •• •••••••

Cotton

Acreage

Reduction

••••••••••

Bankhead

• • • • • • •• ••••••••••

1nl�t

• • •

• •

• • •

• • • • • • •

• • • •

Corn-Hog

Control

Program

••••••••••

Milk License and

Agreement

••••••• ••

Citrus Fruit Prorate &: Marketing Agreement

OBGANIZATION

Maricopa County

Far.m

Bureau

• • • • • • •

• •

State Agricultural Adjustment

Act

• •

• • • •

State Farm Bureau

• • •

• • • • • • • • •

F�ers'

Union.

••••••••••••••

Rural Rehabilitation

••••••••••••

Rural Resettlement

••••• • • • •

Service Clubs

• •

• •

Maricopa County

Debt

Adjustment

• • • • •

Consum,ers'

Councu

•••••••••••••

•••••••••••••••

Bankers' Association

•••

• •

State

Fair

•••••

• • • • • •

• •

Agri cuI tural Extension

Sarvi ce

Conferences

Pure

Bred Breeders

Association

&

Club

••••

Arizona I4ilk

Arizona

Producers Association

•••••

Turkey

Growers

Association

• • • • •

OUTLOOK AND

REOOMMENDATIONS, INCLUDING

SUGGESfED PROGRAM OF OOBK FOR NEXT

YEAR

• • •

19-20

21

21

21

21

21

22

22

22-25

23

23

24

24

24

24

24

24

25

25

25

25

26

26-27

28-29

-1-

III. SUMMARY

OF

ACTIVITIES AND ACCOMPLISHMENTS

The results obtained during the year from Extension

Service activities in

Maricopa County have been much more tar­ reaching than was anticipated.

The surprising part ot the program has been that the major proj ects in the

County have been carried throughout the year with outstanding results, particularly those on

Pure Seed,

Weed

Control,

Insect Pest

Control,

4-H Club activities and the

Dairy and

Poultry projects.

Greater results have been obtained through the

Agricultural Adjustment Administration programs than was manifested last year.

Many individuals who severely criti­ cised the program at the beginning ot the year, are now not only supporting it but are actually signing adjustment contracts.

ThiS, we have found particularly true in the wheat and programs, the cotton acreage reduction program cotton having increased from 759 contracts in 1934 to 1059 contracts in 1955.

ThiS,

we believe, is due to educational meetings and personal contacts made by

£ann lea.ders

in the County who have so untiringly sup­ ported the program.

The

Phoenix MUk Market License and coming year.

Agreement has had one year's successful received from the operation and dairy producers a and very favorable distributors report that this is will continue :ror the the past

In carrying out Extension Work in the

County during

year

there were

2,123 tam visits made and a total or.

7,330 direct of'f'ice calls and an estimated 11,771 telephone call s,

Two thousand, nine hundred and eighty-nine individual letters were written with 194 circular letters prepared and

26,787 copies mailed.

Thirty radio talks were given during the year on agricultural subjects over

KTAR and through the

4-H

Club Program,

.14

talks

"ere presented.

a total

Thirty-nine

individual demonstrations were given with attendance of 1552.

There were

285 meetings held and participated in wi th an by representatives of the attendance of' 8,268 persons.

County

Agent's office, their

It is estimated that over

5,000 farmers changed practices as a result ot the

Agricultural

Extension

Program.

-2-

IV.

CHANGES I:I OOUNTY EUENSIOB

ORGANIZ!TIOI

(1) lom of

Organ' a1i�QA

'he Maricopa County Farm Bureau 1s the organization 'Which directl,.

sponsors the

Agricultural Extension

Service activities in the County.

During th·e past year, considerable activitY' has been manifested were by the

County-

Fam

Bureau

Directors.

Two new districts organized and good strong looal Farm Bureau Presidents elected.

In June of this year the

Board ot saw ot fit to raise the County Agent's budg'et from

$7550

to

$8650,

a raise

$1.080.

Six hundred dollars ot this was definitely appropriated for the carrying on ot

Directors of the Farm Bureau

4-H

Club Work in the

County.

The office force has the same number of

'Tear ago.

At this time there is the employees that it had a

County Agricultural Agent,

Home

Demonstration and one

Agent, three Assistant

County Agric:mltural Agents

Assl stant in Cot ton Adjustment, one

Office

Secretary and t1 va stenographers.

It was regrettul that we had to 10 se

Mr. J.

A.

Waldron, Assistant

Agent ha.'ldliug

Poul t17 and Dairy work in the

County and Mr. J.

W.

McInnes,

Ass't.

Agent handling 4-H Club

Work in the are

County.

They have been

V8ey replaced, however, by men mom we feel capable and should be able to hanclle the responsibUities placed upon them.

It will be the intention ot the

'with all related

Agent the coming year, to cooperate agencies and give as much time and assistance as possible to the natil' organized Divisions

SIlch as

Rural

Rehabilitation and

Rural

ResettleJllent.

Relationship with these and ot..her

agencies to date, have been most gratLfying.

The

Extension

Program ot Work will be most

Workers in the

County

I then carefully presented planned to the by the

Maricopa

County

Farm Burea.u

tor their careful consideration.

It is tor this planned

year,

that the

Program of Work will be carried out by

'each Director, to the

Farm

Bureau

Locals and thoroughlY' discussed b$£ore asking the

County

Board or Directors to maka the final approval, in this Wt:q, we teel that many new ideas tending to strengthen the

Program, can be brought about.

The

Program ot Work can than b.

presented tor the tinal approval of the Director ot

Extensicn

Service and PreSident ot the

University ot Arizona bef'ore presenting it to the

County

Board ot

Supervisors.

-3-

ProGRAM

OF WJRK

(1)

lagtgt§

ConGd�tiq

and MUhQd§ llSed in

lli\eminipg

PmgraIg _ot.. �

The

Program of Work w.Ul

necessarily be buU t around the present

Agrlcul tural

Adjustment Act.

turing the past year, we feel that the major projects in th.a

County have been continued and in most instances, much more tar-reaching results have been obtained than anticipa.ted.

This was upon prima.rily

due to the tact that concentra.ted

effort was placed them, whUe many ot the minor projects were given very little attention.

It will be our the plan the coming year, as it has been during pa.st

year, to draw on the Experiment Station and the Federal agrlcul turs!

employees located within our

State, to assist in every was as possible to keep those projects that are ot most importance, in good or better shape than they have been in the past.

U>.

Pro:Ject Ac",Vlties and RQ�t§

Each member ot the County Agent's staff' will be delegated a definite being responsibUity as has been previously practiced, the

Agent responsible tor those projects t..i1at deal with general crops,

Assistant

Poul

Agent try and

O'Dell,

Horticultural proj.ects, Assistant Thompson,

Dai17

Proj ects, Assistant

Draper,

4-H

Club

Work and the

Assistant in Cotton Adjustment responsible for the Agricultural Adjust­ ment Administration cotton program.

It is felt that nth the amount ot work that has been carried on responsibilities that have been t.."1.rough

this ottice during the past year,

J.

that the regular office staff of' Office

Secretary, BArs. Martha

Bogg

s,

Chief'

Stenographer, lira. Jean Ei var and

Stenographer-Clerks,

Iris

Dartt, done an

Gwendolyn Gurtler, Mary

Benson and O. L.

Davis, have

'exceptional piece of mrk in keeping up with the addition.a].

placed upon them.

Conferences are held weekly by rep re sentati ves of the County

Agent's ottice, at lbich time act!vi ties ot the previous week and plans tor the coming week are discussed, in this wa:y, giving each member ot the statt an what the others an opportunity to keep in close contact with doing in their respective line of the work.

During the past year, the Experiment

Station ot the

University ot Arizona has seen tit to maintain Mr.

Karl

HarriS, Irrigation

Assistant or the U. S. Bureau or

Agricultural

Engineering in the

Cottnty,

to carry on irrigation experimental work and

M. F.

Wharton,

Assistant Horticulturist ot the

University of Arizona and Mr. E.

o.

Foster,

Assistant

Agricultural

Chemist.

These men have been most helpful along with other members ot the Experiment station ot the

University ot Arizona who are called in to out our projeots.

Representatives of assist in the U.

S.

carcying

Department or Agri-

-4col tun at

Sacaton, partiCllarly

Mr.

c.

J.

King and Mr.

T.

R.

Richmond have bean most belpful and cooperative.

AGRICULTURAL ENGINEERIHl

Pmjec\

IJ.

-

.Alkali

Reclamatiop

This project has ceased to be a major project as it is only occasionally that an ind! vidual has a small spot or more located in a

40 acre field ot not over one acre in extent, that requires some method ot reclamation.

15 growers

It is lastimated that have been assisted in during the year, some taking care of these alkaline spots.

Project

12

fert�,zation Practice

A cooperative experiment on tertilization ot sweet potatoes was arranged with Mr.

C.

T.

Sharp ot Scottsdale and under the direction ot

Yr. M.

F.

Wharton,

Assistant Horticulturist of the

University ot

Arizona.

Four ditterent Commercial fertilizers were three ditterent applied to plantings ot sweet potatoes.

On the earlier plantings, practicallY'

DO difference was noted in the potatoes harvested from various plots.

A check will be made later on later plantings and it is hoped that some results which mq be beneficial.

to potato growers wUl be obtained.

Assistant

Agent

O'Dell spent considerable time during the year accompaDling Mr.

Wharton in cheoking up on tertilizer plots on various vegetables these throUghout plots, the will be made

Valley.

as the

A report crops are on reSllts obtained from harvested.

a

Assistant variety

Agent

O'Dell cooperated with Mr.

Wharton in planning planting test plot of blackberries at the

Mesa.

Farm.

Four­ teen varieti,es were planted and during the ooming year, results of yield and 1ndividual plant behavior will be checked.

at

�r1ng February,

Mr.

McGeorge spoke to 50 citrus growers the Madison School on

FertUization of 01 trus.

on

Du.ring October,

Mr. Wharton spoke to the

Japanese

Association fertUizers tor v.egatable

crops.

were

During

the 'lear, 68 growers ot va.rious crops,

�ecial11 citrus, given advice on fertUization programs tor the year.

�ro3gc\

15

-

Irrigation Practloe in

During the year, soil samples were taken whenever tor the snme, from growers ot any crop.

requests came

These wera turned over to the Chemist tor analysis and made as to the proper use ot recommendations, irrigation water.

based on this analysiS,

-5-

During the past rear, through

.E. Osborn

Foster, Assistant

Agricultural

Chemist ot the Branch

Agricu.ltural

Chemist17

Labora­ tory located in conjunction with the

County

Agent·

s office, some

S90 soU samples,

275 maDLlre and guano samples,

222 water sampl'es and 61 miscellaneous samples, as well as

15 commercial fertilizers, were

analyzed

or a total or 961 determinations.

It

1s estimated that the value ot this service, it done by a.

commercial.

laboratory, would be

approximately

$U,245.

A total ot 89 growers were given assistance in the application irrigation water, particularly with regard to obtaining batter water ot penetration.

fiJaa High Yield

Club to

This project was originally s

.et

up to have for its purpose, improve the quality and increase the quantity or Pima cotton produced in the Salt River Valley_ For the rear of 1934-55 there were

2S members that was completed their records.

At the annual meeting which held on

March

29, 1935, it was brought out that the average yield tor 1932 was

264 in pounds per acre, in 1933

ro7 pounds per acre and

19M,

578 pounds per acre, an increase of 71 pounds over

1953 and 114(l& pounds over

1952.

The gathering ot this last year's information was done primarily by H.

C.

Heard, Acting Extension Crops Specialist, assisted by the

Agent

and Dr.

George

W.

Barr,

Extansion Economist ot the

UDive�sity of Arizona.

and

Mr.

C.

J.

Dr. R. S.

King,

Superintendent ot the

Federal

Station at Sae5.ton

Hawkins, contributed materially to the annual meeting by delivering papers on methods ot production or qual!ty

cotton.

The most outstanding factor ot the reasons why these increased yl.alds

have been obtained, lies ot the

26 cooperators that primarily completed that in the tact that 22 out w:>rk, had 5 feet or more ot water penetration in the soU previous to planting their cotton.

This year, 28 .tarmers

are keeping records and through Mr.

H. C.

Heard, at that time

Acting

Extension

Crops Sp.eciali

st and

Mr.

Karl

HarriS, assisted

Irrigation

Assistant ot the U

.S.Department

ot

Agriculture, by representatives ot the

County Agent's ofrice, took levels on each ot these fields and obtained soU moisture samples trom

,each field to a the depth of five teet.

This information, when compared with yialds from.

each field this coming year, should be most interesting.

crops

Pro j

Bet

IS-pure s_

�rtirled

Sorghum

In cooperation with the Farm

Bureau-Farm

Sorghum

Seed CertU'ication Committee, the Agent assisted them,

Union because

-6or drought conditions in the Central and Middle I.estern· states, to certify to a>me

1605 acres of sorghum.

The fanners capable ot inspecting fields were taken to �"'te Untversi ty

Farm where a number of the sorghwn grains were g rowing and shown methods ot inspecting each variety.

Through

this committee, some

1,782,500

pounds of hegan, 456,500 pounds ot milo, 61,000 pounds ot

Fargo Straight

Beck and

50.000 pounds ot

Wheatland Matze were approv:ed and tagged, or a total ot

2,550,000

pounds sorghum grain.

Through this effort, the growers were able to receive cit an average ot

$1..50

instead ot the regular teed grain price ot about

$1.50

per hundred tor their seed.

Registered assisted

Sorghum Through the Arizona

Crop Improvement by

Mr. Ian

A.

Briggs, this office inspected

755

Association,

acres ot hegar!

that met the requirements ot registration and 40 acres ot,

Double Dwarf Maize which met the requirements of

registration.

VlWghn Barltl One hundred and twent1 acres ot

Vaughn Barlsy was inspected and found that it v.ould have met the requirements for registra.tion

had it not carried over

1% saute

&liar Beg\

Seed

Assistance was ren�red Mr.

HarI7

Elcock ot the

SUgar to

Manufacturing plant about one oompan1es to thousand acr�s locate of a so.tticient number ot growers sugar beet seed for· the purpose ot producing seed for the coming year.

Last year there were acres ot this seed produced in the

County, though these 12

only

acres

12 produced better than

SOOO pounds ot excellent seed per acre.

§pxb§M!

Variety

J.

tests on

G.

Boswell Cotton soybeans were carried on by cooperator'

Company and the AiroOOID1 Department of the Uni­ v.arsity

of Arizona' who we were

�e to sufficiently interest to car:ey out a much more complete and

!J.dequ.ate

test on the University Farm at Mesa.

The make seed variety test carrled on by the Bo swell

Company did not though several varieties planted by

Dr.

R. L.

l4atlock ot the University ot Arizona appear to have some real tor the production ot seed tor oU mill purposesl possibUities

AaJ,a gotton duoed in

San

Seventy acres of first generation, yellow tag seed pr.-

Joaquin

Valley, were planted by

C.

O.

Vosburgh of

Buckeye.

These 70 acres were meet this rogued and, found to be sufficiently isolated to regi strat10n requirements.

It was through the cooperation office that some five tons of this Acala seed was obtained ot through the Bakersfield

Pu.re

Seed Committee.

The

Products

County

Agent's oftice made it possible for the

Western Cotton

Company

and

County

Agent in Pinal

County to plant some roo acres of thi s seed tor seed production purpo ses, in

Pinal County" as our

Marl copa

CounV

Pure

Seed

Committee were able to furnish proper credentials which the

Bakersf'ield Seed

Organization requires before turning the seed over to outside organizations.

1

"

-1-

SxP ® saqg were

Six hundred and twent1 acres rogued which should give us approld.matelr

ot sxP &) cotton

400,000

pounds ot pure planting seed.

This last season, arrangements were made througb the

Maricopa County

Fann Bureau.

Pure Seed Committee to expand the acreag'e planted to SxPm trom about 600 acres up to 2000 acres.

This was done on the approval.

ot the U.S

•.

Department ot

,

Agricul tura,

Bureau ot Plant

Industl'1 and evert grower who

planted

the seed, signed an agreement to return all seed that met the requirements for pUN seed, to the

Maricopa

Couilt1·

Farm,

Bureau

Pure Seed

Committee and that which would not meet pure seed require­ ments, would be oU mil1·ad.

The gins also signed this agreement and are cooperating 100% in the program.

acre

Ev,e17 grower ot S:xPSl agreed to an assessment ot 50¢ per to take care of the cost ot supervision ot picking and' ginning, to se(;l that none ot this seed was misplaced.

Plans are now under

;,wa:y

')f tor further the are as expansion in acreage of this cotton in the reports from' the mUls in the East who have been usi�

SxP30 favorable as some

County,

reports which we now have, immediate steps will be taken to distribute the seed which is now in the hands ot the

Pure

Seed Committee on an equitable basis to all growers.

PiPla

Sagd

Two thousand and to rty-six acres ot Pima cotton were inspected and seed saved tor commercial purposes.

Three hundred and forty-three acres were carefully rogued for foundation purposes.

This should give us

adequate

planting seed tor 1938.

Roguing of both

SxPro and Pima was carried on by the following indidduals:

H.

C.

Heard,

Extension Specialist in

Crops, and

Irrigation ot the

Universi ty ot

Arizona;

Dr.

R. S.

Hawkins, Agronomist)

R.

L�

Matlock,

E.

H.

Pressley; A.

T.

mond;

Gordon

Bartel; E.

O.

Foster;

C.

J.

King; T.

R. Rich­

Smith;

Claude

Hope;

Harold

Fulton;

Mr.

Gordon;

'J.

H.

O'Dell;

Karl Barris and the

Ag6llt.

Ch1j.ean

the

Wilt.

Agent

On June

19 and

20, H. C.

Heard, Ian A.

Briggs and inspected the alfalfa fields that had made application to produce registered ehUeBll alfalf'a seed for the 1955 crop.

Besides th.e fields which were registered the year before, two new fields were passed, representing

520 acres, giving us a total ot

1488 aeres from which to obtain registered seed tor the

1935 crop, representing

19 growers.

The yi.eld

this year was about halt ot the average crop and it is estimated that ot seed will be only about 200,000 pounds registered.

In each case, the Directors ot the

ChUean altalta seed growers association eted as field inspectors, inspecting threshing machines and pla.cing

atter they were threshed.

Rep resentatl vee field tags on the sacks or the

County

Agent's otfice inspected the cleaners before cleaning alf'alta seed and tags and seals were

placed

on analysis by the

Agronomy the bags, if they met the requirements after

Department

ot the University ot Arizona.

association were

T'WO meetings attended by ot the ChUean Altalta Seed the

Agent

and

Ian

A.

Briggs,

Growers

Associate

-8-

Agronomist, in assisting them to

.,rk out a more adequate method of marketing their seed.

An attempt was made to obtain a higher price for regist.ered

seed over and above the Common No.

1 grade of alf'alta seed.

nax

Seed

Considerable time was spent on several occasions in company with Mr. H. C.

obtain cultural practice

Heard, in intoxmation inspecting as well as

1'1u seed fields to to determine the most were satisfactory means of harvesting.

Some 4000 acres of tlax seed planted in the

County this past fall and it was hoped that it muld be satisf'acto17 as it

'IOuld give the

CoUllty one more adaptable crop to produce.

Considerable growers as to· the publ!

ci ty was gi van previous to planting, warning dangers that t.ll.ey

would be contronted with it they planted cases, fiax in weed infested fields.

This was unheeded in several thereby greaUy reducing yields.

L'jotes were taken on the obsarvations and it is able to hoped at a later date, that Mr.

Heard will be publish his final findings on the fiu situation in the

County.

PmJ,ct 17

-

Better .1

'alta

Hg:

Assistance was rendered the

Federal

HS1

Inspection

Service by this office make a during the year as the former

Inspactor had failed to satisfactory financial statement and report to the

Hay,

Feed and soma

Seed Division in two weeks in the

Washington, D. C.

Mr. Jas. A.

Leroy spent

County in an effort to straighten out the records and

Mr.

Preston upon the recommendation ot the hey trade and this ofrice,

Brookes, very responsible and capable hq grader, was appointed to 8llcceed

Mr.

E.

H.

'PhUlips.

Since that time, vert satlsfactor.y

results have been obtained and the old indebtedness removed.

ADn"al

Field Crops

DAY

On October

22, the Annual

Crops

Field Day was held at the

Un!

versi ty Farm, at which time over

100 tarmers were in attendance.

Dr.

R.

S.

HaWkins,

R.

L.

MatJ.ock, Ian A.

Briggs and E.

H.

pressley ot the

Agricu1

University of Arizona and

Karl

HarriS, of the

U.S.Depa.rtment

or ture, explained their experimental work lhich is being carried on at the Farm.

prpj act

ilo

-

Vafiety

S,ginning and

Ginning

In that during the past

16 years, since SxP&l cotton was isolated at the

Federal agencies, as

1bperimental station at Sacaton and well as the Un!

verst ty ot that Federal

Arizona, Agronomy

Department have been car17ing on

_all variety tests and in that

SJd>&> has been earll,er in maturity and has averaged approximately

2fYI, more in yield

-9than

Pima, 1t

,was fel t by a number of Pima growers that it would be desirable to carry out a larger and more complete planting of these t'M) varieties so that the they might satisfy themselves as comparative differences in these two varieties of cotton.

to

Arrangements were made for some

26 acres of these two cottons to be planted, 13 acres of each variety,

16 rows of

SJrP30 and 16 rows of

Pima, repeated across the field until we had eight

16 row duplicates of each variety.

The £irst' picking of these plantings has been com­ pleted and results showed that the SxP&l produced 3100 pounds of lint cotton and Pima produced 2350 pounds, a difference of 1370 pounds in favor of SxP30.

Using the acre basis, SXP50 had a yield of 280 pounds ot lint while Pima only had

180 pounds per acre.

Because of this difference in it is yield and of the fact that it is earlier in maturlcy, apparent that

SxPro mey have considerable promise and to a large extent, replace Pima in the y-ears to come, in this

County.

(Hold

publicity on this untU final. results are

obtained.)

HORTICULTURE

PJl?j tet

Hll-Citrus Bud

SeJ.ection

in

During April, Assistant

Agent

O'Dell assisted Mr. D.

W.

Albert checking over the Valencia orange trees in the Omer McOullollgh grove near obtained.

been

Mesa., for trees ot good typ,e from which buds might be

This was the third check of the grove and a reoord has prepared of the condition of the fruit found on the trees during these three years and w1ll be the use ot anyone kept on rUe interested in Valencia buds.

in thi soft!

ce for

During

November, the Assistant

Bowman grove or

Navel oranges

Agent for the same checked over purpose and the J.

C.

completed a three year grove has proj eat on this grove.

A record o;f good trees in this been prepared and placed on rUe.

This proj ect was insti­ gated three years ago at the request of the Arizona Citrus

Nurserymens' Association, in an

�ttempt to provide the best budwood ob­ taina�e for the members ot the .association.

Project

Dl!-Pruning

During January, a pruning demonstration was held at the A.

G.

Bailey ramch near

Phoenix, with

Mr.

Fred

Draper,

Extension Horti­ cul turist demonstrating the proper methods of pruning older apricot trees.

Twenty-tour people were present at the demonstration.

During January,

Assistant

Agent

O'Dell spoke to members o:f the

Phoenix Garden Club on pruning ro ses and general ornamental shrubs.

Thirty

members wero present.

A similar talk

Club and to the Sierra Vista Garden Club was given to the

Peoria a.t later dates.

-10-

During January, a demonstration ot

Trees was held at the

M.

D.

Propagation of Pecan

Ewing

ranch

North of

Glendale, with

Dr. lincll giving a talk on irrigation and cultural practices mich would tend to prevent pre-harvest germination and non-filling of nuts.

IIr.

Fred

Draper gave a.

demonstration of pruning young trees.

Thirty-ii ve persons were present.

During pecans were

April, three demonstrations of grafting and budding held in the

Mesa,

Glendal,e and Madison districts respectively.

At the Mesa and Madison districts, the demonstrations were given

O'Dell.

by

Mr.

Draper

Thirty-three and persons the one were at

GlenO.al.e, by present at the

Assistant

Agent

three demonstrations.

Assistant

Agent

O'Dell, assisted qy

Mr.

Draper, demonstrated budding and grafting pecans to two classes of the Tempe

High

School.

At a later

Vthich had date, a check vdth Mr.

Draper, on the buds and grafts been put in during the demonstrations, showed that fair resul ts had been obtained from the grafts but the resul ts from budding were very unsatisfactory.

During October, the

Assistant Agent spent one day in the Yuma

District in checking over the axperimentBl.

!WOrk

which is being done in that district by Dr. Finch.

During the year, 15 growers ot pecans were given assistance in budding and gratting.

ProJlct

Il4-Date

Pmpagatiop turing 14a;v, an

Offshoot Removal and PlantiDg

Demonstration was held at the Tempe Date Farm with Mr. D.

W.

Albert and Mr.

Robert

HUgeman explaining the proper methods ot removing and planting off­ shoots and also of pollinating and processing dates.

Forty-five peepl e were present.

Eighteen g rowers of dates were assisted in dates and a great number ot the bulletin on

Home

pollinating

their

Curing ot Dates, was distributed during the year.

Pred act 114.l-Citrus

Nursery fl:8ctice

Assistant Agent O'Dall a.ttended

meetings of the Citrus Nursery­ mens' Association and acted as

Secretary at e�ch meeting.

Eight meetings were held during the year.

In February, a

Citrus

Nursery

Tour was arranged and held, during which, all nurseries of the

Association members comparisons made ot the different practices were of each visited and grower.

-11-

S!let Potato Hot

Bed an

The County

Agent's office assisted

Mr.

Ibarton in installing

'electric cable tor heating a potato seed bed at the C. T.

Sharp

ranch at Scottsdale.

Tbe bed was cable and thermostat furnished prepared by

Mr.

Sharp

and the by Mr. Wharton.

Two 60 foot cables ot 450 watt capacity, were laid in the bottom of the bed which was approximately

10 inches deep.

The cables were laid 8 inches apart and covered with 4 inches of soU, then the potatoes, at the rate of three pounds per square foot, were placed on top ot this soil and covered vd th approximately 3 inches of soU.

The entire bed was wet down at this time and covered with tar paper.

ot the bed in which the cable was installed,

Adjoining was .e

common the part manure heated bed which was used tor cable was comparison.

The installation ot the completed on

April

5 and the current immediately turned on.

At the up to end ot the third da:, the soil temperature had been bullt

8SoF.

The thermostat was then gradually turned down and all electricity was turned off at the end at the third week.

Plants were from the time of pulled trom the electrically heated bed in 50 days planting, whereas plant.

from the manure heated bed, pI anted 50 d8Js previous to this, had required 60 day s to turni sh plants.

From the 80 square feet of heated plot, 4000 plants were pulled on the first pulling and 5800 plants tViO weeks later.

So few plants were obtained trom the other end of the bed that no check was kept on the number.

The cost ot materisls for this installation was

$7.

ro for the cable, $11.00

tor the thermostat.

These materials were

.furnished

by Mr.

Wharton.

The grower estimated that the cost of electricity was approximately 15.50

for the entire three weeks.

It is planned to carry on this experiment during the next year.

Orchard

}leatiy

During Mq, a meeting was arranged at .Madison

School, at which time,

Mr.

Schoonover ot the

California Extension

Service spoke to

200 citrus growers on orchard beating and demonstrated the various types ot heaters.

Flour Sho.!

During

AprU, entries at the

Assistant

Buckeye and

Agent

O'Dell assisted in the Phoenix

Womens judging the

Club Flower Show.

-12-

DAIRY

Proj ect

#22-Dnirx

Herd

Improvement

The Circuit

Testing Division of the

Maricopa County

Herd

Improvement Association increased very two thousand and twenty-ti v.e

hundred materially cows during completing the the year, year's between records.

The

Regular Testing

Division of the

Association practically held its own.

Sixteen herds 'With 641 cows, producing an average of

8171 pounds of milk and 315."5 pounds of, butterfat, completed the year's record

July

1954 and 9

1,

1935, being about

86 pounds pounds

-of butterfat more than in 1934.

of milk less than

Feed costs averaged

71.91

cents per cow, which was than in 1954.

The average return was

49% more

$65.47

per cow over the cost of teed.

Twelve herds completing the years record, qu8litied tor Certi­ ficates of Honor oftered by ihe

National

Dai11'

Association for herds producing

300 pounds or more

of'

butterfat.

The Circuit grows in

Testing Division ot the Herd

Improvement

Association popularity because ot its' cheapness, costing· the tarmer a total of is

6¢ per cow per month

8D9, because of the £act that if care taken in weighing and sampling on the part of the owner, a very satisfactory and practical record is obtained.

No attempt is made to get teed costs unc1ar this plan, Simply a mUk and butterfat record being obtained.

There are now

1509 cows on test.

The

Board ot

Directors during the year, worked out a record card for the Circuit

Testing

Division ot the Herd

Improvement

Association,

Provision was made on these cards for age and breed­ ing records for each individual cow, as well as a six years produc­ tion record.

In this way, the owner can compare quickly, one years record with ot the the previous or any particular month with the same month preceding year.

Thi s record can accompany the cow when sold.

These are proving to be very popular with the dairymen and another practical feature ot this division of the VIOrk.

The Board ot

Directors, in cooperation with

S.

C.Minor, tester, buil t a.

trailer -which Mr.

Minor bas equipped with a complete testing outti

In t, water baths and other this wq, he is equipment used in running buttertattests.

able to run the test on the ranch ot the member of the Circuit -Testing Division and give him his record immediately.

The

Annual

School, Phoenix, picnic ot the

Association was held on

July

20 and was attended by at the U about 200

.S.Indian

members and friends.

Mr.

J

.S.llalono,

Market Milk Administrator for the Phoenix

Market and

Prof.

R.

N. Davis of the

University of Arizona, appeared on the prograui.

-15froJ sct

#22a-D!,iry

F�\1'm

Mml?gem§nt

The

County

Agent's office assisted catUe bUyers from Mexico in locating about 60 head of springer heifers and young Holstein cows.

This office from time to time has advised with daiI7JIlen regarding their individual daiey farm management problems and emphasis has been the growing ot placed upon teed neoesaa17 a to balanced f'arm support the program milking featUring herd and young cattle, without which, it is vert doubtful if 8If3 daiey .enterprise

can in succeed and it has been the rarm suggested that a cash crop be included management program, as well as incidental crops providing tamily .nstence

and for family income, such

85 cotton and poult11'.

PmJ ect 12S=Di sease

Control

(Bang

t S

DiseasR)

The

County

Agent's

Veterinarian's atfice in office has cooperated with the state promoting the Bang's disease control project being carried on under the Federal program tor the eradication ot this disease.

The.,rk of this

-educational..

otfice, ot course, is entirely

It is estimated that between 40 and SO names of' daiey­ men applying tor this mrk, have been turned in to the state Veter­ inarians office during the year.

The last showed about report from the State Veterinarians office on reactors

14% positive to the test.

This is about in line with the national.

results so far.

the

The year

County for the

Agent's office bled the herds of five dairymen during purposeof determining the extent of infection ot

Bang's disease in the under Federal herd, prelimina17 to having the herd placed supervi sion.

Proj Ict

H24.-Better

and I'roven 'Sires

Wo�

OD this project during the year has consisted mainly ot cooperation with the Bureau ot

Dairying of, the U.S.D.!.

in obtaining data on the Herd breeding histories ot herds in the County that have been in

Improvement Association for some time.

A study or the herd ot James

Painter, of'Tetnpe, has been completed.

Work is now progress on the 'Mission in

Ranch herd.

Mr.

Painter's herd has been in the Association tor ten years and the Mission Ranch herd, tor about six "ears.

Boy

Jones,

Extension

Dairyman trom the Bureau ot Dairying, spent one day in the County helping with this work.

This is

U.S.n.!.

part ot the program of the

Department ot

Agr1cul

ture to locate merl torious herd sires and other outstanding breed strains.

We hope to continue this stutV' in five or sii: herds in the County.

-14-

Proj act

1l9-FeediM

Beet

Cattl§

On

Friday, March

8, the Annual Feeder

Cattlemens'

Tour was held.

Assistance with this tour was

Extension Livestock given by

C.

U.

Pickrell,

Specialist and E. B.

Stahley,

Animal Husbandman of the as

University ot Arizona.

The University teed pens were inspected well as three other .leeder

cattJ.e

pens visited.

ot

On July 8,

Mr.

E.

B.

Stanley,

Animal Husbandman ot the

University

Arizona, assisted by the Agent, held the

Annual Feeder Cattlemens'

D81 at the University Farm.

Much interest was manifested in the demonstration as

250 inter.ested

cattlemen attended.

POULTRY

Pm3eet

150-

Poulta Ima£ovement

As noted in the 1934 Annual

Report, the Arizona

Accredited

Hatche17

Association was disbanded and the Arizona

Poultry

Improve­ ment

Association l"ormed to take its of'tice has place.

The County

Agent's

cooperated during the year with

Clyde

F.

Bow-e, Poultry

Specialist of th.e

University ot

Arizona in carI7ing forward the program outlined under th.e

auspices of this association.

This con­ sists mainly this year ot testing ot flo eks ot hatch�rymen and breeders, for pullorum disease.

This lIOrk was carried on by

Mr.

I.

E.

Cowart, in cooperation with the FERA.

IIr.

Cowart spent his entire time in

A low testing nocks in this county and in PilIla percentage of' reactors was reported, runniDg below

County.

5%,

which compares verr favorably with the record obtained men this "WOrk was started three or tour years ago when the percentage ot reactors ran around

25%.

This indicates that mere testing is carefully carried on over a period ot years, that the method is effecti

YO in tending to eliminate the di sease.

A series at nine poultry meetings was held during the last ot

Februal'1 and f'1rst ot

March, at mich, Clyde

F.

Rov."e,

Paul try Spe­ cialist discussed baby chicle management and other timely matters ot interest to paul tr.vmen

as part ot the paultey flo ck improvement proj ect.

Considerable time ot the

Agent during the year was spent in aidiDg individual poultrymen with their poultry management noblems•

Proj eet

igla-Poultrr

1>1

§§ase

CoptrpJ:

Considera.ble

time ot the

County

Agent's otfice was devoted during the year to aSSisting poultrymen nth their

poultry

disease problems.

-15-

This oftice has found the new

University of

Veterinary Department ot the

Arizona, or mich

Dr_ WUliam Pistor is head, a great help in diagnosing poultcy diseases.

When a disease 1s properly diagnosed, treatment is easUy indicated.

Dr.

Pistor also helped materially in diagnosing the trouble in disease outbreaks in several nocks of turkeys during the year.

During the month of

June, eleven meetings were held in

·d1tf·erent communi ties ot the County, at vbieb,

Dr.

William Pistor of the of the Universi ty of

Vaterinsey

Department and Clyde F.

Rowe

Arizona, discussed poultry di sease control in detaU, special emphasis being placed on infectious bronchi tis and general tarm management practices to prevont and control diseases.

These meeting s were attended by about 200 people and considerable interest was manifested.

MI SCI!LLANEDUS

Project

IS-fiNd

Eradication

For several rears, individual growers and organizations such as the

Maricopa County

Farm Bureau and Farmers' Union and this office have been requesting the Experiment Station ot the

University

of

Arizona to carry on some experimental worlt to determine the most

'economical means ot control of Wh1 te Horse N·etUe and Bindweed or

Wild

Morning Glory.

Dlring the past summer, through the cooperation of the Director of the Experiment

Station and the

Extension Director of the University ot

Arizona, a cooperative project was drawn up whereby the Plant

Pathology Department of the

University, in coopera­ tion with the and

County Agent'

8 office, demonstrational work necessary to will

C8.rI'7 out such experimental give us the required information.

Tm elI':pier1mental plots were laid out and a program arranged.

One plot, consi sting of a piece of land badly inf.ested vd th WIli te

Horse

Bettle was selected in the

Chandler District and another which was overrun with

Bindweed,

Nut Grass and Bermuda

Grass, was selected in the Cashion District.

Owners of the property in both cases have agreed that the land

1d1l be set aside for experimental purposes as long as necess8r,y_

A new sprq outfit acid, was ordered by the with a special boom for handling sulfuric

Experiment

Station and dell vered to the

County Agent's ottica in Phoenix.

This machine was set up and gotten into operation by

Dr.

Streets and Mr.

Karl Butler ot the

Department ot Plant

Pathology.

assisted by the

County Agent's of'f'1ce.

Sprqing with sulfuric acid and sodium arsenite and calcium chlorate was carried on on each kUling ot out arsenite, also plot.

In addition to thiS, individual plants through the through use the use ot a weak of Carbon the jar method ot

Bisulfide, solution was outlined

-16tor each plot.

Dllring November, a check of these plots was made and it showed that no resul.ts had been obtained on the

White

Horse

Nettle from spr81ing with straight

Sulfuric acid.

Sulfuric acid and arsenic sprey had killed the roots down to a maximum inches.

The Carbon

Bisulfide depth of 8 application was also veey effective.

Chlorates had killed the tops ot the plants but had not penetrated the roots to any great depth.

On the bindweed the roots tD a plot, the acid-arsenic sprey had penetrated depth of from one to tour inches.

The tops were completely killed.

The tops ot nut grass were killed by the spray but apparenUy the underground parts were not at.fected.

The appli­ cation of

Carbon

Bisulfide on bindweed did not give satisfactory control.

A further check ot these report made at that time.

plots will be made during the spring and a the

Arra�ements have been made to flood irrigate a small

White

Horse Nettle area at plot in

Chandler, the Salt

River Valley

Water

Users' Associa.tion

furnishing the water and the labor necessary in carr,ying out this part ot the project

1s fUrnished by the

Agent's oftice.

County

Considerable requests were received from tarmers in all sections ot the

Valley tor help in weed eradication but since no authentic intormation on control was available, no help could be g1 ven.

Pm;) Igt

A§=Insec1(

[email protected](

Con1c:m.l

Thrips Contl'21 lUring Januaey, Mr. A.

E.

McGregor of the U.

S.

Bureau ot

Entomology,

'Visited the

Valley at the request ot the

County

Agent's ofrice and outlined dusting experiments for thrips, to be carried on were during the spring months.

Two plots ot Navel oranges selected, one ot older trees at the Val Vista ranch Northeast or Mesa

The and and one ot younger trees

Phoenix.

SulfUr for this

Francisco

Sulfur experimental .,rk was donated by the San

Comp� and

5,000 pounds were applied to the tM> plots.

dusting was done all at the Col. Bumstead ranch,

West of by the grower under the direction of Mr.

McGregor checking on results obtained was done by

Mr.

McGregor

and the

Assistant

Agent

O'Dell.

The report by Mr.

McGregor during

November,

showed that very good control ot dusting was thrips had been obtained, especially men the first applied as early as

March 20.

On the Col.

atmstead ranch tinal results show that on the treated plots, an average ot

9.17% of damaged

.tru1

twas tound as against untreated plots.

At the Val

Vista

36.5% grove, a which was damaged check showed that on on the the earl,.

treated plots, only 4.11% of the troit was damaged, on the later treated trui t was plots, 18.67% and on the untreated plots,

61$ of the damaged by the insect.

Mr.

McGregor believes that the

-17first dusting in both cases was delqed a week or ten days too long.

This was unavoidable this year, since vented aqr effective dusting.

high winds at that time pre­

Grasshopoor Control

Sodium

During

May

I

150 tons of bran and &> drums ot

Arsenite were received from the Government for free distribution in the County.

The materials were stored in the warehouse ot the

Associated

DaiI7

Products

Company in Glendale and in the old

Tempe

Pumping

Plant East of

Tempe, on the Mesa highwey.

Transportation charges were paid by the Arizona Commission of Agriculture and

Horti­ culture.

Two mixing stations were first opened at the above mentioned places rut after a short time, they were both discontinued due to the fact that no requests tor poison were had.

Later, the one plant was opened at Tempe and kept open only a short time and then discontinued for several weeks and the latter part of

August,

it became n.ecessary

to open this station again and the mixing con­ tinued at that place until November 1.

lUring that time,

3,890 sacks of wet mash were distributed to growers and acres.

A man was applied to 24,026 kept at the Station at all times to Slpervise the mixing but growers were asked to furnish labor for the actual

Stencilled bags tor the mixed material were furnished by mixing.

this office.

The tormula used was

100 pounds of bran, one-halt gallon of liquid sodium arsenite and ten to twelve upon' the gallons ot water, depending dryness or the bran.

It was recommended that 20 pounds ot this wet materiql be applied per acre.

Excellent results were ob­ tained,

'8 specially where some attractant sucll as molasses, meat dried buttermilk or cottonseed meal was added to the mixture.

scraps

Sal t

'S. Clterpj

11 w:

Following the suggestion of

IIr.

Blackledge,

County

Ag.ant

in Yuma County, growers were advised to use the regular mixture and tor the control of the Salt Marsh

CaterpUlar in vegetables alfalfa.

A grower in the Gilbert District reported that the mash was ver.Y

atl'ectiv8 in

controlling

these pests.

Approximately

50 tons of the bran are still available and 'fdll be used next year in combatting an outbreak ot grasshoppers, cut1K>l'DlS or crickets.

Red

§Cale

Iuring Mq, inspectors ot the Arizona Commission ot

Agriculture and

Horticulture found quite an infestation of

Red

Scale in the

W.

L.

Smith citlUS cooperation ot

Mr.

grove

North ot PhoeniX.

Through the

Smith, the State

Entomologist's office and Depart­ ment or Vocational

Education, the

County Agent's

O.rfice

arranged a meeting to be held at the Smith grove, at which time, all interested people were shown the trees which were actually infested, and told of the danger ot this pest and what was being done to combat it.

Mr.

George, State

Entomologist, gave a talk on the Y«:>rk

Yblch 18 being done along this line to the 175 people who were present.

-18-

IDsects

OQse�aq

During the year the following pests were ob­ served on various crops and.

assistance rendered in their control:

Ground beetles on and vegetables;

SaltMarsh

Caterpillars on veg-etables alfalfa;

Crickets on vegetables; Thrips on citrus, roses, melons, cucumbers and ci true

.fro1

t;

Cutwonns on cotton and

Seed Corn ornamentals;

Maggot on cotton; Aphis on lettuce,

IriSi.'l potatoes, orna­ mental plants and cantaloupes;

Borers in citrus;

Flea beetles on grapes; Red Scale

Brown

Scale on on citrus; c1 trus;

Corn earworm on citrus and

Cockroaches in dwellings; Peach maize; twig

Soft borers in deciduous f'ruit grapes, tr.aesj

Webmrms on cotton;

Fals.e Chinch

Bugs on ornamentals, dwellings and watermelons; Termites in dwellings and lawns; Grape-leaf

Skeletonizer on grapes; Potato stalk borer in

Irish

Potatoes;

Cotton

Flea-hopper on cotton;

Flat-headed apple tree borer in deciduous fruit trees and ornamentals;

Cicadas in shade trees;

Corn stalk borer in maize;

Bostrichid in citrus and

C.C.

Scale on orna­ mental s and ct trus.

ProJegt

i25-�Iie.ase

Control

(p.lantrd

Citrus to use

Mottled Leat

In cooperation with

Mr.

Kinnison, Mr.

McGeorge,

Mr.

Albert and assisted by

Assistant

Agent

O'Dell, an experimental plot was arranged tor in the

Arcadia

District fertUizers and various chemicals in an attempt to control mottled leal of c1trtls.

The materials ware furnished by t..�e

Experiment

Station and the actual application supervised by

Mr.

H.

C.

H.eard.

A check: on this plot during

Novamber showed no out­ standing results but it is hoped to oontinue the

Experiment through two more years and at that time results should be obtained.

Tws

!!got

Rot A mmber o£ growers of ornamental plants and shade trees were advised in the use ot

Ammonium Sulfate for the control or root rot and in cases where the di sease had not gone into advanced stages, excellent results were obtained.

Chlorosis and condition of

BQsette ornamental

Very good results in correcting chlorotic plants have been obtained through the use of iron sulfate applied to the so11 and through the trunk application the same material to Eucalyptus trees.

of

Diseases

Obseagd

Eighty-tour growers were given assistance in controlling plant diseases during the year.

The following diseases wee observed:

Dry

Root Rot on citrus; MotUed leaf on citrus;

Decline on

Eucalyptu·s;

Mildew on roses, grapes and verbena;

Damping-Qf'f on can­ taloupes and cotton;

Nematodes on tan palms, figs, cantaloupes and ornamentals; Crown gallon plums, pecan and apricot;

Fusarium wilt on watermelons;

Root

Rot on

Chi:eese

Elm, umbrella and ornamental shrubs; Scaly

Bark on citrus;

Little

Leaf on plums;

Yellows on

Scab on apricots; tomatoes;

Rosette on pecans; Fire

Blight on pyracantha,

Cottony

Rot on

Watermelons; Gummosis on ci tms and apricots,

Slime nux on plum; Heart rot on ornamental palms and Side

Rot of lettuce.

-19-

,Emject #la-Rodent

Contml the

The only

V«lrk done on

Rodent control v.ork in the County year was through direct office calls and farmers given during infor­ mation as to proper use or the poison and the issuance of for the control of rodents.

Fifteen hundred and eight poison individuals were assisted in t..i-J.is

progr21.a., treating 22,620 acres with roOD pounds of poi SOn.

4-H CLUB IDRK

Proj ect

#29-Boys

smg._Girls

4.-H

..

Cll,lb Work six

Mesa

Ci"t.r:u.J!

4-H Club

F:aj:r ju(iging

In oonnection with the Mesa teams competed in the annual

Oi trus contest.

Fair,

This contest was held jointly with the

Vocational and Agricultural

Departments of the

State.

Thi s year's contest, the first annual event of this nature, seemed to be a worthwhile addition to junior agricul t1.lral events in

Maricopa County.

Mr.

Tom watson,

4-H leader at Tempe Union

High

School represented the County

Agricul turaJ.

Agent's off'ice at a meeting following the contest at which rules were set up governing the 1936 contest.

nine

Ninth_Annu�_4-H

Club

Fru Thirty seven hundred and twenty­ exhibits in agriculttlre, home economics and health were displayed in the Ninth Annual 4-H Club Fair held at the State

Teachers

College at Tempe,

Arizo:la, during AprU.

An innovation was a

4-H polo match presented as a demonstration uJ the Roosevelt

Club

Horse

Club.

This Club was organized and carried through by Mr.

T.

C.

McReynolds,

Rooseval t district rancher, assisted by

L. D.

Hamman, Laveen rancher.

Tempe service clubs presented a

Blue Ribbon

Banquet to 100 first prize winners at the Fair.

Prizes other than were ribbons furnished limited to ribbons and by the

Agricultural

Extension

Service copies of the book "Holstein-Friesian

History" presented by the

Holstein-Friesian Association ot

America,

$20.00

in prize money by the Arizona Sta.te

Holstein-Friesian

Association, ribbons and medals by the

Jersey

Cattle

Club, baseball pennants offered by the Tempe

Chamber of Commerce and miscellaneous small items.

County 4-H of some

26 business and headed

Cl�b

Committee by

Chairman

Heney

Stevans,

The County 4-H

Phoenix

Committee, consisting

proi'essional

men of the

Salt River

Valley, attorney, limited activities to an individual nature with the exception or t.entati

va plans for a

1955.

4-H Club JubUee in

September

Coopera�on ot

..

Sarvice

Clubs

4-H

Club organization

Hiram Club and the Phoenix prog rams before the Phoenix

�nd

Lions Club and Hiram

Club of Mesa, during the year.

pr.esented

Kiwanis

Club

-20-

4-H over

Six programs were presented by the

Maricopa

County

Club organiza.tion

over

KTAR.

Eight

Programs were presented

KOY by the Rohrig Leadership

Club.

Stat�

�g_Cl.ub

Week

Sevent,y-eight

club members, parents and leaders made the annual.

most part, trip to the

University

Club Week for the paying their own expenses of

$2.&l each.

L.£tadership_ Training

Three

Leadership

Clubs were organized during the year in these districts:

Tempe High,

Bohrig

and Phoenix.

The most outstanding work was done by Rohrig Leadership

Club which carried to bili completion, two projects.

This

Club assumed the responsi­ ty for getting data and preparing for the

Sears-Roebuck contest.

The report submitted in the placed Maricopa County first in Arizona and second

Western States Division ot this National contest.

The second proj ect was development of radio programs.

Eight programs were presented over

KOY and two over

KTAR by this club.

Ruth

ColI egiate

Club

During the year, through the efforts of Ema

WUdermuth and Eo bert

Birchett, both formerly

National

Club delegates, a

Collegiate Club was organized at the Arizona State

Teachers

College.

Buckeye

Junior Fair

As a contribution to rural youth, the

Extension Service office aided in the promotion of: a

Junior

Agri­

cultural Fair in

Buckeye

early in

April.

Some 400 exhibits were prepared by boys and girls of

Buckeye Valley.

Mr.

Kellogg, superin­ tendent of the Fair office that informed the due to the enthusiasm

County Agricultural

Extension promoted by this activity, a vocational agricultural class was installed at

Buckeye

High School to begin operation in

September

1955.

Bullet,.n

File

The 4.-H

Club bulletin rUes have bean revised and ref·erence manuals together, have been consisting of government bulletins, bound prepared tor reference use by the leaders.

County

4-H

25 with one

ClUb

Egg Show

The County

Egg show was held November entry.

LeRoy

Gavette won first place vdth Buff

Orping­ ton eggs.

This

-entry was forwarded to the 4-H Club

Congress in

Chicago.

National

Dairy

Show

Agent Dra.per

in taking stration team to the

The

Judging

Team

National

placed

the

October 9 to

20 was dairy judging

Dairy

11th out of 20 for all spent by

Assistant team and

Show at st.

a dairy demon­

Louis, Missouri.

breeds.

The demonstration team

placed

7 out or 11.

-2J.-

AGRICULTURAL ADJUSTMENT

ACT ACl'IVITIES

General Agricultu� Adjustm��t Act Activities

Six

Maricopa general meeting s were held over the

County as arranged by the

Cou..."'1t-J'

Farm Bureau,

Salt Riv:er

Valley water

Users'

Associa­ tion,

Arizona Milk Producers

Association, Roosevelt

Irrigation

District and

Roosevelt Water

Conservation

District, for the purpose ot educa­ ting farmers relative to the value of the Agricultural Adjustment program and its benefit to farmers.

Mo st splendid cooperation was obtained from these took a very acti v.e

meetings.

Agricultural.

leaders in the County part in presenting portions of the program and many in resolutions, wires and letters were sent to our representatives

Congress,

urging their support; or the Agricnl tural

Adjustment

Act.

CottollAg,reage Reduction

There were

759 acreage reduction contracts signed i� 1954 and

1059 signed in 1955 or an increase at 280 contracts.

These 1059 contracts represent a base acreage at 107,167 acres,

SOIDe

74 meetings were held in the County to assist in carrying out the cotton program during the year.

��a.<!

Some

1647 Bankhead applications were made in the County, 1210 or these were made by growers of short cotton and

457 were made by

Pima growers.

Wheat to a

The 1955-�5 Wheat Reduction close.

Out or the

Program is gradually being brought original

57 signers for

1955,

47

.finished

in

1954 and 42 finished in 1955.

Thirty at these 42 have cleared

Washington

and the growers have race!

ved their checks.

There are stU1

12

Contracts that will have to have soma furlher consideration.

The total base acreage in these contracts is production is

80,458 bushel s.

5,521 acres and the base

The 1936-59 program is now under way and some

42 wheat growers have signed applications.

Tabulation sheets have been forwarded to the State Board.

Corn-Hog

Qgntro1 Program

Sixty-two contracts were signed with tha.t this is not a corn a hog base or 8287.5.

In producing county, there was no corn reduction.

All corn that is

produced

here is used for insUage purposes.

-22-

Market Milk License

The

County

Agent's oftioa cooperated with the Arizona Milk

Producers

Association and the Dairy

Section ot the

Agricultural

Adju��ent

Administration in establishing a

Market

Milk License in the Phoenix market.

The operation of" the license has been' vert helpful to the producers ot this ma.rket where previously they raceived about ro% of' the consumers' dollar spent for fluid milk.

Since the establishment at the license in Nov.ember

1954, they have been racei ving from 45 to

50 cents ot the consaners!

milk dollar.

Mr.

J.

S.

Malone,

Market Administrator has administered the offioe in an impartial, erf,ective manner.

One item of interest brought out from the records of this office, is that the so-called surplus ot market milk is conSiderably lower than producers were led to believe existed and 1n fact, surplus has been steadily de­ creasing since the establishment ot the license up to

July 1.

It was

:found because of almost impossible to maintain established retail prices chiselling on the part ot practically all distributors.

This seems to have been the

·experience in practically all markets where these licenses have been in effect and is in line with amendments to the

Agricultural Adjustment

Act recently adopted by the

F.ederal

Congress.

As a whole, the market mUk license has been of great benefit to the Phoenix market and it seems safe to say that it is receiving the support or of the practically ever,y producer and a majority distributors, bringing about a situation where it is possible to get groups together around a tlble to discuss their common and reach a solution satisfactory to a majority.

This has problems really nev.ar

no been possible in the past and it the Federsl

Government serves other purpose than this, the effort and cost will be more than worthwhUe.

Ci tras

Fruit

Pror:aiLe and Marketing Agreement

Assistance has been rendered the

Market Director in the

Maricopa County otfice space in territory,

Mr. J. W.

Firth and he has been furnished conjunction with the County Agent's office.

ORGANIZATION

Maricona

C.ounW

Farm Bureau

Farm new

The

Dysart.

County

Mr.

A.

Agent

B.

acted

Bureau during the year locals werEJ assisted in as and

Ballantyne,

Secretsey of the attended some organizing,

Rural one at

28

Sociologist

Maricopa County meetings.

Avondale and one at ot the

Two

University

ot Arizona aided the Farm Bureall in organizing group discussion meetings on problems which now face American agriculture.

Some fourteen

Eaiit active Farm Bureau Locals are in the

County at the present time.

The Labor appropriate

Department ot the

Farm Bureau was re-organized and arrangements were made to

Program.

The Board ot eooperabe in the

Grasshopper

Control

Supervisors ware urged by the

Farm

Bureau to

$500.00

toward distribution of the poison bran bait.

the

The

Farm

Bureau continued to support the 4-H Club and

4-H Club Fair held at the A.S.T.C.

campus on

April sponsored

12 and 15.

Act

The

Farm Bureau also

Amendments supported the Agricultural Adjustment

100% by sending wires and letters to the Arizona delegation in

Congr.ess.

Assisted to

.:>rk out ot the problems confronting rpoper administration

Acreage

Reduction

Program and Bankhead

Act.

Two

Mr.

R. L.

special meetings ot the Farm Bureau were held at mich time

Blackbl�rnJ

President ot the California Farm

Bureau and

Director of the Amerioan Farm

Bureau was interesting talk and Mr.

Chester present and gave a very

GrB1 ot the American

Fazm

Bureau was present at a general meeting attended

� over

200 farmers, at which he ga.ve

first-hand information on the value of the American

Farm

Bureau to agriculture.

Sta\g

Agricultural

Adjustmen�

A sta.tewide

meeting was called by the

Maricopa County

Fann

Bureau,

at which time, the

County Agent obtained copies

California.

ot the

Agricultural Adjustment Act laws and presented them at this meeting.

Several other meetings were held after this general meeting, at which time,

Assistant Agent O'Dell presented the state

Agricultural Adjustment law to the Kyrene Farm Bureau.

This law was further discussed at the State Farm Bureau

19'35.

meeting held in

Janua.ry

The

State Farm Bureau drafted a law similar to that ot the

California law but it tailed to pass the state Legislature.

State Farm

Bursas

The

Agent

attended the State

Farm Bureau meetings

Phoenix on

May

30 and 31 and meetings held on

November at which time, the

Agent

assisted the

Farm Bureau in held in

15 and drafting

16, resolutions af'tecting agriculture and also in drawing up bills that were presented to the State

Legislature, namely the

Agricultu.ral

Prorate

Act,

FertUizer Bill and Dairy

BUI.

-24-

Farmers' Union

The

Agent

attended three meetings of the

Farmers'

Union during the year and discussed with ment Act and them, the

Agricaltural Adjust­ problems relating thereto.

Ru�al

Rehabilitation

The since its

Agent has acted as a member ot the

County Advisory Board inception and at each meeting, a representative of this ofrice has been in attendance to assist in approving or disapproving loans.

Assistance has cation tor loans in also been rendered individuals making appli­

Wlrking out tarm budgets.

The advisory committee has met attended usually, every

Thursdq and some

7 meeting s have been by representatives of this office, up to date.

Rural

Resettlement

Assistance was rendered the

Rural Resettlement Division in

'WOrking out tentati va farm set-ups for a general.

Carm on a

40,

60 and 80 acre basis and attended several meetings to assist those in charge at the lUOrk in the tarm units.

State,

in detennining the most economical

Maricooa.county

Debt

Ad.iustment

The

Agent

has acted as a member or the State, as well as the

County

Debt

Adjustment

Committee.

In this

County, there have been some

258 applioations made, representing a total indebtedness ot over

$1,250,000.

Up to date, the committee assisted qy a most

'efficient

SecrataIj',

Mr.

Charles Gann whom they have appointed, has closed over

200 at these cases, representing a valuation of about

$900,000

and kept these

200 farmers in their homes.

The other 58 applications are in the process of being closed.

There has been a seale down in this indebtedness ot over

$40,000.

Conrumers'

CoUDell

Some 15 meetings were attended by representatives of the

County

Agent's

ottice.

A study of retail prices was made through this organization and a much more harmonious feeling toward the producers by the Consumers'

Council was brought about because ot activities at the

Extension

Servioe in this committee.

Sem ce

Clubs

Talks were before two given by representatives

Rota.ry

Club meetings, one of the

Lions Club

Club meeting on the Agrlcul tural

Adjustment

Councy Agent's office meeting, One

Kiwanis

Act and its effect on agricul ture.

-25-

BlQkers'

Assoct�lgD

The

Agent attended the annual meeting of the

Commi ttee ot the Arizona Bankers'

Association on

Agricultural

February 18, at which time,

Mr.

Dan

Otis,

Secretary of the

Agricul

turd Committee of the National Association was present and emphasized the impor­ tance of placing a farmer on an adequate budget.

Agricultural

Ext§nsion Service

Conferences

from

Winter

Conf§fePce

The Annual Extension Conferanca was held

January

21 to

24 inclusi va at the

Universi ty ot

Arizona at

Tucson and a mo st worthwhUe program was presented.

on of

�I1\Qt Coat�tGce

The SUmmer Conference was held at prescott

July

17 and 18.

The main subject discussed was the relationship

Extension

Service to Rural RehabUi tation and Rural Resettlement.

Plans were worked out and whereby the tv«> agencies,

Rural RehabUitation

Rural

Resettlement and 'Extension

Service 1'IOuld cooperate with the

National

Program

ot

Rural

Resettlament.

Pure

Bred

BreeggrE!

A;socia;t,ion and Club

The

Cattle in the

County

Agent's

office cooperated with the Arizona J,srsey

Ciub in holding a tllO day tour or the

Jersey

cattle breeders

County, attended by breeders and at which, Mr.

Ivan

C.

Loughary,

Western was

RepresentativG of the

American

Jersey

Cattle Club present.

A vert interesting and protl table time was spent.

The ottice also assisted the Arizona Holstein Friesian breeders associa.tion to put on a sale during April.

Twenty-tour animals were

Slld, averaging about

$90.00

per head, including calves.

The sale was rather encouraging to breeders, their cattle bringing almost double that tor cattle of the same quality.

in

The

County Agent's oftice assisted the HoI stein-Friesian Club planning and conducting a tour of the

Valley, at which time, Mr.

H.

A.

Mathiesen,

Vlestem

Representative of the

Holstein-Friesian

Association was present.

§tatg

Fair breeders and other

State Fair representative livestock groups

Commission tor the purpose ot discussing with the Arizona plans tor the proposed were

The

County

Agent's office met several times with groups or new fair buildings plans, showing size, shape at prepared in the

County

Agent's the breeders and other and the State

general

agricultural

Fairgrounds.

Tentative

Lecatd.on

of t..hesa

otfice with t.�e assistance ot vroupS and buUdings submitted to the

State

Fair Commission.

-26-

Ani2.M

Milk

Producers

Association

The

County

Agent's office cooperated with the Arizona Milk

Producers Association

Association.

The during the year in the operation ot the association, as explained in previous annual reports,

1s starting on the third year ot the cooperative plan wi th the Associated DailY Products Compa.IlI1

at

Glendale.

This oooperati va arrangement has resulted in an estimated tour cent increase

Salt per

River pound butterfat tor all butterfat

Valley, regardl.ess

of produced where marketed.

The in plan the is highly satlstactoey to the dairymen and is being carried forward in a harmonious manner.

The Arizona Milk the Federal

Producers

Association has actually supported

Milk License for the Phoenix market and was instrumental in having the license :established in November 1954 and unquestionably the success ot the license has been largely due to the fact that a great number of' are dail7Dlen producing

Grade

A milk members ot the Association and to the in the Phoenix careful, market, col,1sistent manner in which these organized daieymen, through their Association, have approached the Market

MUk License and cooperation they have given the Market Admlni strator.

Arizona

Tjrke:z

Growers Association

1he

Arizona

Turkey

Growers Association was organized in the fall ot 1932 'and affiliated with: the Northwestern

Turkey Growers

Association with headquarters at

Salt Lake

City,

Utah.

It has operated very

1935.

satisfactorily in the tall ot

1934 and winter ot

The volume handled during this marketing season was slighUy less than that of 1933 and 1934.

Final reports have not been received to date because ot the fact that a considerable number ot pounds had to be held over in storage and sold during the report will probably be available about

December.

sum:mer.

Thi s was

The reason tor the lower volume handled during the past season due to the fact that there was much more demand for turkeys by buy.ers

and the prices were better than during the past t\\O or three years, however, the

Association served as an outlet tor the surplus turkeys at a ver:!

favorable price and without question, stimula.ted

competitive btzy'ing and prices paid questionable it

8ll1where near the same local locally.

price would maintained it it had not been for the local association.

It is have

The vert been

County

Agent's

ottice

cooperated

Growers in every wey

Associa.tion during the possible with the Turkey shipping season.

This ottice has

Ari zona

Turkey cooperated with Mr.

Growers

Asso ciation in

R. A.

Faul,

Manager handling the detail s or the of the

-27-

Association, throughou.t

the year.

In connection with this work, a tv«) dq Government Grading

School was held in Phoenix with Mr.

Thomas W.

Heitz,

ot

Washington,

D.C.

in attendance.

Also, a turkey kUling and dressing demonstration was held at the U.

S.

poultry

Experiment Station near ot the Northwestern

Glendale,

at which time,

Mr.

A.

Willardson

Turkey growers

Association was present.

The

Thanksgiving pool has just been closed with 500 birds being received in the for pool.

The outlook is very favorable tor good prices turkeys through the Association and we are looking forward to a largltr

Christmas pool.

-28-

VI. OurLOOK AND REOOMMENDATIONS,

INCLUDING SUGGESTED PROGRAM

OF WRK FOR NEXT lEAR

Proj-ect activities for 1956 will be carried out quite similar to those of the past year.

With the ment Administration program on wheat already

Agricr..u'tural Adjust­ out, one being pre­ pared at the present moment on corn-hogs, one on cotton which is stUl to be put in final form and one on potato

11 censing, one can realize that it is rather difficult to

Extension plan definitely, any projects on a definite or f'ixed schedul'e of time.

We realize that it is impossible, because of unforeseen happenings, for the

Agricultural Adjustment officials to have their programs completed and out in the fi,eld for tarmers to giv,e

a:1:ry

amount ot consideration if to be previous to planting time, however, this program, adequately administered and obtain the full-hearted support of farmers, it would be most advantageous that every

Adjustment Program be

prepared

and ready tor the farmers several.

weeks before planting time.

As 1 t has been during the wheat program this year, and as it occurred with the Cotton

Reduction

Program in the

Spring of

1955, application

Acreage torms and final regulations were not in the field in time for farmers to make their their crops plans and in many instances, had already planted so that it was very difficult for them to conform to any of the regulations

prescribed

in the plan.

It is planned to continue the regular

Extension

Proj acts that are ot major importance, during the coming year, such as

Irrigation Practice, Pure Seed,

Weed

Eradication,

Dairy

Farm Management, Dairy Herd Improvement, Citrus Bud Selection and Insect Pest and Disease Control.

we carried

Many of the proj ects which during the past lew years, will either be compl,etely dropped or usual only practice carried of as minor delegating proj definite ects.

We will responsibility follow to the

Assistant

Agents, in order to cover as much and as many fields ot endeavor as the possibl,e and still not lose our communities and farm identity with the farmers ot organizations and other related organi­ zations as they affect the long-time Extension policies.

It seems particularly important that very careful consideration should be cultural given to the setting up of the

Agri­

Adjustment

Administration commodity control contracts so that they will more adequately fit irrigated agriculture condi tions.

It is further recommended that the tentative

:rules, regulationsand contracts be hands so that placed in they may be taken the

Extension

Service out to the farmers for their suggestions before they are finally printed, in order that the program can be more effectively administered.

By this procedure,

-29it is believed that the .tarmers will feel that the program is part ot their responsibUity and will be much more cooperati va in assisting to carry it out.

Many more educational meetings should be held to famUlarize all farmers in the programs as well as the

County with the individual commodity general effectiveness ot the entire Act.

For this reason, plans are now under way to carry out a series of meetings in the County on the group discussion basis, under the guidance of

A.- .B.

Ballantyne,

Rural

Sociologist.

These meetings are to follow the suggested pl.an

of the Secretary of

Agricu1ture,

Henry A.

Wallace.

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