School of Social Work Annual Safety Report October 2015 BOSTON UNIVERSITY POLICE

School of Social Work Annual Safety Report October 2015 BOSTON UNIVERSITY POLICE
BOSTON UNIVERSITY POLICE
SAFETY ON CAMPUS
Annual Safety Report
October 2015
School of Social Work
REPORTING EMERGENCIES
Boston University needs you to report all criminal incidents, suspicious circumstances, and safety-related emergencies
promptly and accurately.
FOR ALL EMERGENCIES
POLICE • MEDICAL
At Cape Cod Community College in West Barnstable:
Call 911
At Middlesex Community College in Bedford:
Call 911
At UMass Dartmouth in Fall River:
Call 911
Boston University Police Department:
617-353-2121
FIRE
If the emergency involves a fire, call 911.
AVAILABILITY OF ANNUAL SECURITY REPORT
Copies of this report are available by calling the Office of the Chief of Police at 617-353-5362. Copies of the report are
also available at the Boston University Safety website at http://www.bu.edu/safety/ In addition, you may wish to review a copy of the Annual Security Report for the college or university campus at which
your Social Work classes are offered.
Cape Cod Community College’s Annual Security Report is available on the Cape Cod Community College Office of Public
Safety website at www.capecod.edu/web/public-safety
Middlesex Community College’s Annual Security Report is available on the Middlesex Community College’s website at
https://www.middlesex.mass.edu/disclosurestatements/campsecrpt.aspx
UMass Dartmouth’s Annual Security Report is available on the UMass Dartmouth Department of Public Safety’s website
at http://www.umassd.edu/publicsafety/
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TABLE OF CONTENTS
3
Message from the Chief of Police and Executive Director of Public Safety
4
The Boston University Police Department
6
Other Campuses Police Departments
9
University Safety and Support Network
10
Health and Well-Being
12
Other Resources
13
Reporting Crimes or Other Emergencies
14
Safety-Related Awareness Programs and Other Services
16
Crime Prevention and Safety Advice
16
Timely Warnings, Emergency Notification, and Emergency Preparedness
26
Dissemination of Information Concerning Crimes and Safety
30
Access to Facilities
32
Alcohol and Drug Policies and Disclosures
33
BU Statement on Drug- and Alcohol-Related Medical -Emergencies and Judicial Sanctions
33
State and Federal Laws and Sanctions Concerning Drugs and Alcohol
36
Firearms and Other Weapons
37
Sexual Misconduct/ Title IX Policy
53
Student Sexual Misconduct Procedures
63
Faculty/ Staff Sexual Misconduct Procedures
69
Hazing
70
Campus Crime Statistics
71
Important Contact Information
73
Appendix A -- Education and Prevention Programming
81
Appendix B -- State Law Definitions
2
MESSAGE FROM THE CHIEF OF POLICE AND EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR OF PUBLIC SAFETY WELCOME TO BOSTON UNIVERSITY
Boston University is committed to ensuring the safety of students, faculty, staff, and guests to enhance their experience
within our community. This commitment to safety extends beyond the borders of our main campus in Boston,
Massachusetts. More than ever, Boston University students are engaged in academic pursuits around the country and
around the world. It is with our more distant community members in mind, that this report is compiled to address issues of
crime prevention and personal safety.
The federal Jeanne Clery Disclosure of Campus Security Policy and Campus Crime Statistics Act (the “Clery Act”)
requires that colleges and universities publish annually a report to address campus safety-related policies and procedures
as well as campus crime and, when there is on-campus student residences, fire safety and fire statistics. This annual
security report focuses on the policies, procedures and statistics applicable to the School of Social Work Satellite
Campuses in Bedford, Cape Cod and Fall River.
I urge you to read the information presented in this report and to take a moment to think about your personal safety.
• Know how to contact the local police at your BU site and store that information in your mobile phone;
•
Sign up for and pay attention to the emergency alert service offered at your BU site;
•
Report any crime or safety concerns you may have to local police and administrators at your site;
•
Finally, look out for your fellow students’ welfare and remember that we all share a responsibility for creating and
maintaining a safe and secure environment for every member of our community.
Chief Thomas G. Robbins
Boston University Police Department
[email protected]
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THE BOSTON UNIVERSITY POLICE DEPARTMENT
The Boston University Police Department’s mission is to assure the safety and security of all persons and property on the
Boston University campuses.
The Boston University Police Department (BUPD) responds to and investigates crimes, maintains order and safety, and
enforces Massachusetts laws and University regulations in and around the Boston University Charles River and Medical
Campuses. The department is committed to community-based policing. The BUPD is a full-time, professional law
enforcement agency that also provides a wide variety of public services—including emergency medical assistance—to the
Boston University community. Patrols are conducted throughout the campus area 24 hours a day.
Boston University employs more than 50 state-certified police officers. All new officers complete the same five-month
police academy training required of municipal officers in the Commonwealth of Massachusetts. Each officer must also
complete at least 40 hours of additional classroom training a year, and must demonstrate safety and proficiency with
issued equipment, such as firearms, twice each year. Additionally, all officers receive tactical training in the event they
must respond to a potentially violent individual or situation. Officers also take specialized training courses offered by the
International Association of Chiefs of Police and other professional organizations.
All Boston University police officers are empowered by the Commonwealth of Massachusetts to enforce criminal laws and
to make arrests, not only on the campus grounds but also in the areas surrounding the University. They also hold
appointments as Deputy Sheriffs of Suffolk County, Middlesex County, and Norfolk County. The prosecution of all criminal
offenses is conducted by the prosecuting attorneys of the relevant jurisdiction and typically are addressed in Brookline
District Court, Boston Municipal Court, or Suffolk Superior Court.
The Boston University Police Department has an excellent record for the arrest and prosecution of criminal offenders.
Our work has received formal recognition from the Boston Police Commissioner and from the Suffolk County District
Attorney’s office. The department is widely recognized as one of the best-trained and most professional law
enforcement agencies in Massachusetts. Members of the BUPD attend community meetings of the many residence
associations to provide residents with up-to-date crime prevention information and to hear their concerns about crime
and safety issues. The Boston University Police Department is among the few university police departments certified by
the Massachusetts Police Accreditation Commission and the Commission on Accreditation for Law Enforcement
Agencies.
Boston University’s Charles River Campus is located at the intersection of three cities (Boston, Brookline, and Cambridge)
within three different counties (Suffolk, Norfolk, and Middlesex). The Boston University Police Department works closely
with other local law enforcement agencies, including the Boston Police Department, Brookline Police Department,
Cambridge Police Department, MBTA Transit Police Department, county sheriffs, the Massachusetts State Police, and
security departments of other area universities, as appropriate. The department has radio communications interoperability
through the Boston Area Police Emergency Radio Network (BAPERN) and has access to law enforcement databases as
a member agency of the Massachusetts Department of Criminal Justice Information Services. The Boston University
Police Department also works with local law enforcement authorities at its Study Abroad locations, satellite campuses and
other locations outside of Boston as appropriate. The University does not have written agreements with those various law
enforcement agencies.
Through coordination with local law enforcement agencies, any reported criminal activity engaged in by students at offcampus locations, including noncampus locations of student organizations officially recognized by the University, including
those with noncampus housing facilities, is monitored and recorded. This information is provided to the Dean of Students
for possible disciplinary action.
The Chief of Police and Executive Director of Public Safety for Boston University reports directly to the Vice President for
Administrative Services (617-353-6500).
Follow BUPD on Twitter—@BUPolice
Follow BUPD on Facebook—www.facebook.com/BostonUPolice
Follow BUPD on Instagram—@BUPOLICE
If you have a complaint about our police service, we wish to address and resolve it quickly and fairly. Please contact the
Patrol Supervisor on duty at 617-353-2110 or contact the Chief of Police and Executive Director of Public Safety (32 Harry
Agganis Way, Boston, MA 02215) at 617-353-2127.
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Although the Boston University Police Department is located on the University’s Boston campuses, the Department also
assists students, faculty and staff who study and work at the University’s satellite campuses in matters concerning safety,
law enforcement and crime reporting. BUPD encourages individuals participating in the School of Social Work’s satellite
campuses to call the local police department, by dialing 9-1-1, to report a crime, BUPD welcomes any member of the
University community to contact the Department for any reason, regardless of the location where the individual is studying
or working.
BUPD serves as a public safety resource for you. However, it is important for you to familiarize yourself with the public
safety resources that are local to the location where you are taking classes. Each of the locations has different safety
resources and procedures.
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WEST BARNSTABLE / CAPE COD COMMUNITY COLLEGE CAMPUS LAW ENFORCEMENT
Cape Cod Community College’s Department of Public Safety is located on the bottom floor of the Administration Building.
All members of the College community are required to report all criminal actions to the Department of Public Safety
immediately.
The Department of Public Safety has a good working relationship with the Massachusetts State Police and Barnstable
Police Department and relies on them for the investigation of alleged criminal offenses occurring on College property. The
College encourages accurate and prompt reporting of all crimes to the Department of Public Safety at 508-362-2131 Ext.
3333.
Personal Safety Escorts
The CCCC Department of Public Safety provides safety escorts for students and employees upon request 24 hours per
day, 7 days a week on the Main Campus. The CCCC Department of Public Safety encourages the use of the “buddy
system” for personal safety on and off campus.
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BEDFORD / MIDDLESEX COMMUNITY COLLEGE CAMPUS LAW ENFORCEMENT
The Middlesex Community College Public Safety officers enhance the safety and security of the MCC campus, its
community members, visitors and guests. Campus Public Safety officers are authorized to enforce the rules and
regulations of Middlesex Community College in the following ways:
•
•
•
•
Dispersing activities not permitted under campus guidelines, i.e., improper use of facilities, harassment, and
trespass.
Issuance of parking tickets.
Verbal warnings to cease unauthorized activity.
Escorting violators from the campus facilities.
Public Safety officers do not operate with police powers and do not carry weapons.
Relationship with State and Local Police
Because MCC is a state-owned property, enforcement authority rests with the state police. MCC campus security officers
routinely work with state police and/or local police in investigation of criminal activity occurring on the campus property.
The state or local police are called in by campus Public Safety officers in cases of criminal activity such as assault,
automobile accidents, theft, violation of restraining orders, etc.
MCC partners with the Bedford Police Department to ensure safety on our campuses. In order to provide easier access to
police and for timely responses to incidents, MCC has established a position on each campus for a Campus Safety
Officer. These officers are Bedford and Lowell Police officers and have full authority on the MCC campuses. On their
respective campuses, these officers patrol the campus, assist with criminal and emergency incidents, establish
relationships with students, faculty and staff, and assist with creation and maintenance of preventative safety and security
protocols, conduct trainings for the campus community and act as a liaison to the police department.
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FALL RIVER / UMASS DARTMOUTH CAMPUS LAW ENFORCEMENT
The Boston University School of Social Work program in Fall River is held at a location away from UMass Dartmouth’s
main campus. As a result, UMass Dartmouth’s Department of Public Safety does not routinely patrol the building or the
immediately adjacent area. As a result, students and employees are encouraged to first report any emergency situations,
including criminal incidents, to the local Fall River police.
UMass Dartmouth maintains a police department within its Department of Public Safety (DPS). The DPS operates 24
hours per day, seven days a week, providing all patrol, investigation, specialized, and emergency response, as well as
crime prevention and educational services at the University of Massachusetts Dartmouth campus.
DPS works in collaboration with other state and federal level law enforcement agencies. Meetings are held between the
leaders of these agencies on both a formal and an informal basis. DPS also works in collaboration with local law
enforcement. The DPS and the Dartmouth Police Department (DPD) communicate regularly on the scene of incidents that
occur in and around the campus area. The DPS detectives work closely with the detectives from DPD when incidents
arise that require joint investigative efforts, resources, crime related reports and exchanges of information.
DPS can be reached at (508) 999-8107, at headquarters located at 285 Old Westport Road, North Dartmouth, MA, or via
e-mail at [email protected] 8
BOSTON UNIVERSITY SAFETY AND SUPPORT NETWORK
In addition to its Police Department and Medical Campus Public Safety Department, Boston University has
established a comprehensive safety and security program with the following components:
University Websites
For information about campus safety, including an online version of this report, as well as important information about
sexual misconduct, alcohol, drugs and hazing, consult the University’s safety website at www.bu.edu/safety.
University Security Council
The administrators of the University Security Council and senior members of the BUPD meet weekly during the academic
year and regularly during the summer to coordinate the many -security programs operating at Boston University. Information on current incidents is reviewed and recommendations for security improvements are discussed-.
Crisis Management Team
When any emergency, tragedy, or other unusual event occurs that will affect the campus community, this group meets as
necessary to make assessments and respond to the community’s needs. Crisis Management Team representatives may
vary depending on the situation and come from all areas of the University’s administration.
Safety & Security
Boston University Police Department
32 Harry Agganis Way
617-353-2110; [email protected]
617-353-2121 (emergencies only)
617-353-6516 (anonymous tip line)
617-353-5387 (TTY)
www.bu.edu/police
Anonymous tips may be texted to 847411. Type BU <space> and then the message. Standard text messaging rates
apply. The message is anonymous and the sender may opt out at any time by texting “stop” to 847411.
The Boston University Police Department is a full-time, professional law enforcement agency that also provides a wide
variety of public services, including alarms, emergency medical assistance, investigating suspicious circumstances, and
responding to and investigating criminal matters. Patrols are conducted throughout the Boston University area 24 hours a
day and span an area that includes over 132 acres of University-owned property and surrounding streets. Emergency
response time is generally under three minutes to any location on campus.
Campus Security Authorities
The University has designated certain administrators as campus security authorities (CSAs), who are individuals who
have significant responsibility for student and campus activities, including, but not limited to, student housing, student
discipline and campus judicial proceedings. CSAs are mandated to report crimes to BUPD. The University regularly
identifies those individuals who fit the definition of CSA and provides training to assist them in fulfilling this important role.
Please visit our CSA webpage at www.bu.edu/safety/security to access the CSA training -presentation. BUPD officers
are also available to present the training to groups.
If you have any questions about CSA training, please contact the Boston University Police at 617-353-5362 or
[email protected] CSA reporting forms are available at www.bu.edu/safety/security. Confidential reporting forms for
counselors and clergy are available at www.bu.edu/safety/assault.
The CSAs for the Cape Cod site are:
Deb Berglin, Coordinator of Cape Cod Program
[email protected]
Telephone: 617-353-3766
Mena daSilva-Clark, Assistant Dean
[email protected]
Work: 617-353-3766
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The CSAs for the Bedford site are:
Terese Romano, Director of BU-North Program
[email protected]
Work: 617-353-3766
Mena daSilva-Clark, Assistant Dean
[email protected]
Work: 617-353-3766
The CSAs for the Fall River site are:
Sonia Mee, Director of Fall River Program
[email protected]
Work: 617-353-3766
Mena daSilva-Clark, Assistant Dean
[email protected]
Work: 617-353-3766
Environmental Health & Safety
704 Commonwealth Avenue
617-353-4094; [email protected]
617-353-7233 (emergency line)
www.bu.edu/ehs
Environmental Health & Safety oversees the following health and safety programs: fire safety, laboratory safety,
hazardous material management, and compliance with environmental rules and regulations. Information concerning the
University’s Fire Safety Program is available at www.bu.edu/firesafety.
BOSTON UNIVERSITY HEALTH AND WELL-BEING RESOURCES
Student Health Services
881 Commonwealth Avenue, First Floor
617-353-3575
617-353-3569 (urgent mental health-related needs)
www.bu.edu/shs
Student Health Services is designed to help meet BU students’ health care needs while at -Boston University. SHS
provides primary care, sports medicine, and counseling services by appointment and on an emergency basis. SHS also
provides wellness and prevention services that address alcohol, drugs, sexual health, and healthy relationships. SHS
provides resources
for faculty, staff, and students to help students who may be in distress at www.bu.edu/shs/
behavioral/helpinfo.
Sexual Assault Response & Prevention Center
930 Commonwealth Avenue
617-353-7277; [email protected]
www.bu.edu/sarp
The Sexual Assault Response & Prevention Center provides rapid, confidential, compassionate, supportive, and free-ofcharge advocacy and assistance to BU students who have experienced a traumatic incident, including but not limited to
sexual assault, physical assault, interpersonal violence, and other crimes.
Chaplains
Marsh Chapel—735 Commonwealth Avenue
617-353-3560
www.bu.edu/chapel
University chaplains from a variety of religious traditions are available to all students, regardless of religious affiliation.
Appointments can be scheduled, or students can visit the chapel office on weekdays between 9 a.m. and 10 p.m.
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University chaplains provide confidential assistance to BU students.
The Albert & Jessie Danielsen Institute
185 Bay State Road
617-353-3047
www.bu.edu/danielsen
The mission of the Danielsen Institute is to alleviate suffering and to promote healing, growth, and change in the persons,
communities, and institutions that we serve. The institute seeks to accomplish this mission through service, training,
teaching, and research which emphasizes depth psychotherapy and is informed by spiritual, religious, and existential
perspectives.
The Center for Anxiety & Related Disorders
648 Beacon Street, Sixth Floor
617-353-9610
www.bu.edu/card
The Center for Anxiety & Related Disorders (CARD) is an internationally known clinical and research center dedicated to
advancing knowledge and providing care for anxiety, mood,
eating, sleep, and related disorders.
Psychological Services Center at Boston University
648 Beacon Street, Fifth Floor
617-358-4290
www.bu.edu/psc
The Psychological Services Center is a mental health center with a dual mission of providing a wide range of
psychological services to students, faculty, and staff of Boston University and training opportunities to the students of
Boston University’s clinical psychology program.
University Service Center
881 Commonwealth Avenue, Lower Level
617-358-1818; [email protected]
www.bu.edu/usc
The University Service Center is charged with the resolution of problems that are complex, highly sensitive, or that cross
administrative and academic lines—including matters of safety and security. Staff members have broad discretion in
identifying issues and resolving problems for students, families, and employees.
Counseling for Medical Students
Behavioral medicine services for students are available on the medical campus. The clinic is located in the Solomon
Carter Fuller Mental Health Building, 85 E. Newton St., Suite 816. It is staffed Mondays from 9 a.m.-6 p.m. and
Wednesdays 9 a.m.-5 p.m., by clinicians not affiliated with the Medical Campus. In addition, the facilities on the Charles
River Campus, including Student Health Services, the Center for Anxiety & Related Disorders, the Danielsen Institute, and
the Psychological Services Center are available to medical students. Alternatively, individuals within the Student Affairs
office may provide confidential referrals.
Faculty & Staff Assistance Office
BU Faculty & Staff Assistance Office has two locations:
Charles River Campus
270 Bay State Road, B-30
617-353-5381
Medical Campus
Dr. S. C. Fuller Mental Health Center
85 E. Newton Street, 10th Floor, M-1007
617-638-5381
The BU Faculty & Staff Assistance Office offers free, confidential consultation and counseling to Boston University
employees who may be experiencing difficulties that affect their personal lives or work. We can help BU faculty and staff and
their families on both the Charles River Campus and the Medical Campus with a range of issues, including stress,
depression, relationship and family concerns, sexual misconduct, harassment, interpersonal violence, and abuse.
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OTHER BOSTON UNIVERSITY RESOURCES
Dean of Students
George Sherman Union
775 Commonwealth Avenue, Third Floor
617-353-4126; [email protected]
www.bu.edu/dos
The Dean of Students office is a service-oriented department operating on behalf of students. If you are a student and have
any concern that you think should be addressed, contact this office. The Dean of Students is vested with principal
responsibility for implementing and administering the Code of Student Responsibilities (www.bu.edu/dos/policies/studentresponsibilities)
and for overseeing student judicial proceedings. The Dean of Students also sponsors a safety program, “Be Safe @ BU.”
For additional information, including valuable safety tips, visit the -website at www.bu.edu/dos/resources/be-safe.
Disability Services
19 Deerfield Street
617-353-3658; [email protected]
617-353-7790 (TTY/V)
www.bu.edu/disability
Students with disabilities who live on campus may contact Disability Services for assistance in arranging for special fire
alarm annunciators, door buzzers, evacuation plans, and TTY services. University “blue-light” emergency call boxes
are accessible to persons in wheelchairs.
Equal Opportunity
25 Buick Street, Second Floor
617-353-9286; [email protected]
www.bu.edu/eoo
The Equal Opportunity Office is designated to receive and investigate complaints of sexual harassment and other types of
discrimination. Kim Randall, the University’s Title IX Coordinator, is Executive Director of the Equal Opportunity Office.
Every school and college and many administrative offices have designated Deputy Title IX coordinators. Contact
information is available at www.bu.edu/eoo/title-ix-2.
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REPORTING CRIMES OR OTHER EMERGENCIES
Boston University students, staff, and faculty are urged to report all crimes and emergency situations as promptly as
possible, whether they occur on or off campus. Prompt reporting will help address emergency situations and provide
appropriate notice to the University community, where appropriate. Telephone stickers with the emergency number are
distributed to residences and to faculty and staff offices. This information is also printed on the back of all Terrier ID cards.
The Boston University Police Department responds to all emergencies on campus, including reports of crime, medical
emergencies, suspicious activities, fires, or other hazards. If you believe an emergency situation exists, call the Boston
University Police emergency number: 617-353-2121. If the emergency involves a fire, call 911 first and then the BUPD
number above.
In addition, students may seek assistance from the Dean of Students office ([email protected]; 617-353-4126), or the
University Service Center ([email protected]; 617-358-1818).
The BUPD depends on members of the community to report suspicious behavior and emergencies. Please report any
suspicious activity so that BUPD officers may investigate. -Additional information about reporting suspicious activities is
available at www.bu.edu/police/crime.
Boston University encourages all members of the community to report all crimes, including when the victim of the crime
elects not to report or is unable to report the crime directly.
Members of the Boston University community and the public at large may provide anonymous tips to the Boston
University Police. Anonymous tips may be sent by text to 847411. Type BU <space> and then the message. Standard
text messaging rates apply. The message is anonymous and the sender may opt out at any time by texting “stop” to
847411. In addition, anonymous tips may be submitted by calling 617-353-6516 or filling out an online form at
www.citizenobserver.com/cov6/app/webTip-Form.html?id=3762.
Boston University’s mobile application “BU Mobile” (available for download from iTunes)
contains an “Emergency” section that permits you to call BUPD, Student Health Services, the Sexual Assault Response &
Prevention Center, or the Escort Security Service with one touch.
Boston University Police Department provides information to the MyPD app (available for download from iTunes and
Google play). Users may submit tips to BUPD or find other BUPD-related information from the MyPD app.
Reporting Crimes of Other Emergencies to Local Law Enforcement, Campus Police or Safety
Because the School of Social Work programs occur at satellite locations, away from Boston University's main campus, the
University has provided below information regarding how Cape Cod Community College, Middlesex Community College
and UMass Dartmouth encourage members of their communities to report crimes and other emergencies because, in
certain circumstances, it is more practicable to report in accordance with those local procedures.
West Barnstable/ Cape Cod Community College
Cape Cod Community College’s Department of Public Safety encourages accurate and prompt reporting of crimes and
incidents. Call 508-362-2131 Ext. 3333 from any outside phone or Ext. 3333 from a campus phone. An officer will
respond immediately to your call, take a report and, if necessary, notify an outside police agency for further investigation
assistance.
When reporting an emergency, please be prepared to:
• Identify yourself;
• Give the location that you are calling from;
• State the nature of the incident / emergency of your call.
Depending on the call, police personnel may ask you to stay on the line. To report a crime that occurs at an off-campus
location, please contact the appropriate police department or other emergency departments.
College Telephone Numbers
MAIN CAMPUS EMERGENCY 911
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NON-EMERGENCY LINE 508-362-2131 Ext. 3333
Cape Cod Hospital 508-771-1800
Bedford / Middlesex Community College
Middlesex Community College students, faculty, staff, guests and visitors are encouraged to report all crimes and public
safety related incidents to the MCC Public Safety or Campus Safety Officer in a timely manner. Public Safety and the
Campus Security Officer, based on their role, are mandated to report crimes and emergency incidents. Both the Lowell
and Bedford campus maintain 24 hour coverage and are continually patrolled. Public Safety officers can be approached at
any time.
Campus, Medical or Campus Safety Emergency
Dial 911 immediately
When calling for an emergency or non-emergency incident, be prepared to:
Clearly identify yourself State where you are calling from
State briefly the nature of your call
Non-Emergency Incidents
For Non-life threatening emergencies,
Dial Ext. 6224 from on-campus phones or
Public Safety, Bedford: 781-589-0234
Fall River / UMass Dartmouth
To report a crime from the building located at 139 S. Main Street, Fall River, call 911, which will connect you to local law
enforcement. Although this building is leased from UMass Dartmouth, the telephones in this building are not directly
connected to the campus system.
You may also contact UMass Dartmouth’s Department of Public Safety, at (508) 999-9191. Dispatchers are available 24
hours a day, 7 days a week to answer your call.
BOSTON UNIVERSITY SAFETY-RELATED AWARENESS PROGRAMS
AND -OTHER SERVICES
Please also refer to Appendix A which contains information about Boston University programming and initiatives intended
to increase the University community's knowledge and to prevent violence and promote safety, including bystander
intervention awareness and other prevention programs intended to prevent dating violence, domestic violence, sexual
assault and stalking.
University Orientation
During the summer and fall, members of the Police Department and the Dean of Students office (Judicial Affairs) deliver
safety and security presentations to parents and incoming undergraduate students. These sessions provide information
on crime prevention, our various security programs, and what resources are available to all members of the University
community. Expectations for student behavior under the Code of Student Responsibilities are clearly defined, with
examples provided.
New Employee Orientation
The Boston University Police Department and Human Resources provide crime prevention and safety materials to new
employees at the University’s orientation program. In addition, a member of BUPD attends new employee orientation and
educates new employees on crime prevention, the various security programs and the resources available to all members
of the University community, as well as the University's obligations under the Clery Act.
Town Hall Meetings
Held throughout the academic year, town hall meetings give students an opportunity to meet with the Chief of Police &
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Executive Director of Public Safety and the Dean of Students to discuss safety and security on campus. Town hall
meetings are announced on the Police Department website at www.bu.edu/police.
Safety Week
BUPD sponsors Safety Week each fall semester. Held at the George Sherman Union, Safety Week includes RAD
demonstrations, computer and bicycle registration, and provides information and resources about a number of other safety
issues, including alcohol.
Awareness Programs and Classes
The Boston University Police Department offers the Rape Aggression Defense (RAD) program specifically for women who
wish to physically protect themselves against rape and other forms of violence. The 16-hour or the 20-hour course is
taught by certified BUPD RAD instructors. The goal of the BUPD RAD program is to provide an easily accessible program
of education and awareness for the women of Boston University. The program trains women in basic self-defense and
offers them viable options when confronted with various threats of violence. Information about this program is available at
www.bu.edu/police/services/RAD.
Members of the Boston University community can schedule a ride along with a Boston University Police Officer. For
more information, contact Captain -Robert Molloy via email at [email protected]
The Public Safety Department on the Medical Campus provides classes titled “Street Survival—Personal Safety
Awareness and Response” and de-escalation techniques for front-line staff. Information about those programs is available
at www.bumc.bu.edu/publicsafety/crimepreventionandeducation/awarenesspro and classes are open to all
members of the BU community.
Group Meetings
Members of the Boston University Police Department meet regularly with student groups, including fraternities and
sororities, to discuss safety issues. Contact BUPD at 617-353-2110 to ask a member of BUPD to attend one of your group
meetings.
Informational and Educational Materials
The Boston University Police Department provides helpful tips about safety and crime prevention, including tips for safety
in the dorms and suggestions for steps to take if you are the victim of a crime. That information is available online at
www.bu.edu/police/crime. The Boston University Police Department also issues Safety Bulletins, available at
www.bu.edu/police/advisories (RSS newsfeed available).
Office Watch Program
www.bu.edu/police/services/watch
Office Watch is a crime prevention program similar in philosophy to that of a neighborhood watch program. The goal of
Office Watch is to reduce the opportunities to commit crime by enlisting a cooperative effort between the Boston
University community and the Boston University Police Department. This mission will be accomplished by establishing a
formal network of communication between University departments, their personnel, and the University Police. For more
information on the Office Watch program or about becoming a part of the Office Watch program, contact Sergeant Jeff
Burke at 617-353-2110 or [email protected] between 4 p.m. and
11 p.m. or Detective John J. Ryan, Monday–Friday at 617-353-3436 or [email protected] between
8 a.m. and 4 p.m.
Emergency “Blue-Light” Telephones
Charles River Campus:
www.bu.edu/police/contacting/blue-light
Medical Campus:
www.bumc.bu.edu/publicsafety/services/emergencycallboxes/
Emergency telephones have been installed in many Charles River and Medical Campus areas. In the event of an
emergency, simply press the red button to connect directly to the Boston University Police dispatcher. For a map of
available “blue-light” telephones on the Charles River Campus and the Medical Campus, visit www.bu.edu/maps and
click “Emergency Call Boxes.”
Escort Security Service
Charles River Campus: 617-353-4877
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The Escort Security Service provides walking escorts to students and employees seven nights a week, from 8 p.m. to 2
a.m. (3 a.m. on weekends). Security escorts are equipped with radios and can communicate directly with BUPD officers.
Service is extended during study periods and final examinations.
Medical Campus: 617-414-4444
The Public Safety Department will provide vehicular or pedestrian escorts to the garages, lots, and surrounding Medical
Campus buildings during night and weekend hours upon request. Escorts are subject to availability by calling the
Command and Control Center at 617-414-4444.
Domestic and Dating Violence and Stalking Prevention
The Boston University Police Department provides a full range of services addressing domestic and dating violence and
stalking issues, including obtaining restraining orders, safety planning, and criminal prosecution.
Please also refer to Appendix A which contains information about University programming and initiatives intended to
increase the University community's knowledge and to prevent violence and promote safety, including bystander
intervention awareness and other prevention programs intended to prevent dating violence, domestic violence, sexual
assault and stalking.
The University complies with applicable law in recognizing lawfully-issued restraining orders, including orders for
protection, no-contact orders or other similar lawful orders.
Massachusetts law provides for Abuse Prevention Orders (Massachusetts General Law chapter 209A) and Harassment
Prevention Orders (Massachusetts General Law chapter 258E).
Bicycle and Pedestrian Safety
The University maintains a dedicated website addressing bike safety on campus and outlining laws and regulations for
bikers, drivers, and pedestrians on campus and in the city. Parking & Transportation Services, Sustainability, and the
BUPD work together to run campus events promoting bike safety throughout the year. Bike Safety also administers an
online bicycle registration program to support, promote, and increase awareness about this important transportation
option. Registration is open to all members of the Boston University community. We also strongly suggest you secure
your bicycle with the best lock you can afford.
Laptop Registration Program
Offered by the BUPD through STOP (Security Tracking of Office Property), this program enters laptops in a national
database and tags computers with an aluminum plate that aids not only in deterring theft but in the return of recovered
property. An indelible tattoo is also etched into the cover of the laptop that remains even if the plate is removed. Lifetime
registration costs $10 per computer. Details are available at the Boston University Police Department at 32 Harry Agganis
Way or at www.bu.edu/police/services/laptop.
BOSTON UNIVERSITY CRIME PREVENTION AND SAFETY ADVICE
The Five Most Important Things You Can Do to Avoid Being a Victim of a Crime Are:
1. Lock your room door when you are asleep or out of the room, even for a few minutes.
2. Do not leave personal property unattended anywhere.
3. Always be aware of your surroundings, whether on or off campus.
4. Report suspicious persons to the campus or local police department. Do not assume they are okay; trust your
instinct.
5. Be clearheaded—no drugs, no alcohol.
Safety on the Street
• Always be alert to your surroundings.
• At night, walk in well-lit, heavily traveled areas.
• Use the Escort Security Service or walk with a friend.
• Always avoid alleyways and deserted parking lots.
• Never expose cash or expensive items.
• Hold pocketbooks and purses under your arm.
• Be cautious of strangers who approach you and ask for the time or for directions.
• Do not stop if a car pulls up beside you. Get away from the car.
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• Use common sense; don’t jaywalk.
• Use pedestrian walk lights and crosswalks.
• Never hitchhike.
• Be careful of scam artists. Never accept cash or checks from, or provide check cashing services to, anybody
you don’t know.
Safety on Public Transportation
• When possible, travel with a companion.
• If you’re the only passenger in a subway car or bus, sit as close to the operator as possible.
• In a deserted subway station, stand near the attendant’s booth.
• At night, be particularly careful of oncoming traffic while getting off a bus or trolley.
Theft Prevention
Be particularly careful of your personal property when in public places such as dining rooms or libraries.
• Never leave your laptop, pocketbook, or backpack unattended, even for a minute.
• If you must leave your property behind, ask a trusted friend to watch it.
• Never allow yourself to be lured away from your property by a stranger.
Preparing the Annual Disclosure of Crime Statistics
BUPD in conjunction with Judicial Affairs, local law enforcement agencies and other campuses’ public safety departments,
prepares this report to comply fully with the Jeanne Clery Disclosure of Campus Security Policy and Crime Statistics Act.
Statistics are compiled in accordance with the Uniform Crime Reporting System of the Department of Justice and the
Federal Bureau of Investigation.
Campus crime, arrest and referral statistics include those reported to BUPD, designated campus officials, local law
enforcement agencies and other campuses’ public safety departments.
The University encourages every member of the community to report a crime promptly to BUPD, local law enforcement or
campus security authorities.
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TIMELY WARNINGS, EMERGENCY NOTIFICATION,
AND EMERGENCY PREPAREDNESS
Emergency Notification
Boston University has established a notification system (BU Alert) for the purpose of communicating with the campus
community upon the confirmation of a significant emergency or dangerous situation involving an immediate threat to the
health or safety of students or employees occurring on the campus.
BUPD supervisory personnel, in consultation with University administrators, as appropriate, determine whether there is a
significant emergency that requires notification through the BU Alert system.
The Vice President for Administrative Services is the Incident Commander for all confirmed -emergency situations and will
determine the content of the message and identify the segment(s) of the community to be notified. If the situation warrants
immediate action and the Vice President for Administrative Services is not available, the Chief of the Boston University
Police or his designee will assume this role. In all cases, Boston University Police Operations is responsible for initiating the
BU Alert system and sending the message. As appropriate, emergency notifications may be targeted at only a segment
or segments of the campus community that is at risk.
In the interest of safety for the members of our community, the University will initiate the BU Alert system without delay
unless the notification will, in the professional judgment of responsible authorities, compromise efforts to assist victims or
to contain, respond to, or otherwise mitigate the emergency.
The Public Relations office shall be responsible for dissemination of information to the larger community, including via the
University’s website (www.bu.edu) and BU Today (www.bu.edu/today).
For more information about BU Alert, visit www.bu.edu/ehs/faqs/bu-alert.
Students may add or update their BU Alert contact information by visiting the Student Link (www.bu.edu/studentlink)
and clicking the “Personal” tab to update “Address and Phone.” Questions concerning enrollment in the BU Alert program
may be addressed to the Admissions Office (617-353-2300).
Staff may add or update their BU Alert contact information by visiting the BUworks Central Portal
(www.bu.edu/buworkscentral) and clicking on the “Employee Self-Service” tab, and then selecting “Personal
Information” to update “BU Alert Information.”
Timely Warning
A timely warning will be issued when a Clery crime that has occurred within the University's Clery geography is reported to
BUPD and is considered to represent— in the judgment of the Chief of Police and Executive Director of Public Safety or
his designee -- an ongoing or continuing threat to the campus community. The warning will be issued through the BU Alert
system. Notice may be sent via text message, voice mail, or email. Notice may also be posted on the BU home page, BU
web pages, and scrolled on the University’s cable television system.
Emergency notifications and timely warnings will withhold as confidential the names and other identifying information of
victims.
Emergency Response and Evacuation Procedures
Boston University has established emergency response and evacuation procedures to ensure that it is prepared for
emergency situations. For more information, visit Emergency Response Planning at www.bu.edu/ehs/comm. That
website provides the detailed emergency response plans for a number of emergencies, including severe weather,
emergency closings, and instructions for evacuations and sheltering in place. It also outlines the responsibilities of the
Emergency Response Team in the event of an emergency. Boston University has been designated as a Storm Ready
Community from the National Weather Service (www.stormready.noaa.gov).
Boston University participates in tabletop and other training drills annually, including drills to respond to active shooter
situations. Additional information about how to respond in an active shooter situation is available at
www.bu.edu/police/safety/shooter/index.shtml.
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The Boston University Police Department and Boston University Medical Campus Public Safety Department are the first
responders for all emergencies, including police, and medical emergencies. In the event of a fire, call 911 first, and then
call BUPD or the BUMC Public Safety Department. BUPD responds to all calls for service and addresses any hazardous
situation it encounters during patrol operations or that is reported.
The Emergency Response Planning Division (ERPD) is responsible for the maintenance, review, and revision of the
University’s emergency response and evacuation plans and coordinates regular tests of the emergency response and
evacuation procedures on at least an annual basis. These tests may be announced or unannounced, and each will be
documented with a description of the exercise, the date, time, and whether the test was announced or unannounced.
ERPD publicizes the University’s emergency response and evacuation procedures in conjunction with at least one test per
calendar year. Following every declared emergency or following a campuswide drill, the Director of ERPD evaluates the
drill as a means of assessing and evaluating emergency plans and capabilities.
The ERPD evacuation plans for the Charles River and Medical Campuses are available at
www.bu.edu/ehs/management-plans/emergency/emergency-response-plan.
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TIMELY WARNING, EMERGENCY NOTIFICATION AND EMERGENCY PREPAREDNESS
PROTOCOLS AT THE SATELLITE CAMPUS LOCATIONS
Boston University recognizes that in certain occasions, the campus on which you are taking your Boston University
courses may be in a better position to alert members of that community, including you, about emergency situations
occurring in that area. As a result, Boston University has included below information regarding the practices at Cape Cod
Community College, Middlesex Community College and UMass Dartmouth with respect to issuing timely warnings,
emergency notifications and other emergency preparedness protocols.
West Barnstable/ Cape Cod Community College
Please note that Boston University students, faculty and staff have the ability to receive notifications from Cape
Cod Community College through its RAVE system. If for any reason you do not believe that you are currently
registered to receive RAVE notifications, please contact Coordinator Deb Berglin.
In addition to the University's procedures, Cape Cod Community College has developed emergency response and
evacuation procedures for its campus. Members of the CCCC community should notify the Department of Public Safety
of any situation or incident on campus that involves a significant emergency or dangerous situation which may involve an
immediate or on-going threat to the health and safety of students and / or employees on campus.
Emergency preparedness is a team effort led by the Chief of Public Safety. Emergency Preparedness Teams consist of
the College Emergency Response Team. Campus police and College administrators are responsible for developing
emergency response plans and policy for implementation. The College Emergency Response Team is responsible for
reviewing the plans and policies, and for decision making / assistance during an emergency event relative to managing
the emergency event and business continuity. The College Emergency Response Team consists of building coordinators
who are responsible for assisting in the development and execution of building emergency plans that conform to all
hazard situations that would include evacuation, relocation, and lockdown / shelter-in-place. The building coordinators
assign building staff as floor and area coordinators who will assist in execution of the plan. All of these individuals work
together to ensure the building plan is appropriately coordinated and can be immediately activated should the need arise.
Testing of emergency and notification equipment occurs several times a year, in addition to fire alarm testing which is
conducted throughout the calendar year. Tabletop and full evacuation drills are conducting during the academic calendar.
The testing of equipment and procedures is necessary to provide proper planning in preparation for man-made and
natural disasters. Procedures are formally reviewed annually and updated at any time as necessary.
Emergency incident confirmation policy
Main Campus
The Department of Public Safety will expeditiously respond to emergencies, gather all available information and conduct
necessary investigations in order to determine appropriate response and resources, who is affected, and who needs to be
notified. Emergency situations may range from medical emergencies, crimes in progress, fire emergencies, hazardous
materials emergencies, weather emergencies, etc. If sufficient information is not provided to make a clear determination of
the circumstances and required response, the DPS will respond, within their capabilities and training, to the location of the
emergency to further assess appropriate response.
The DPS staff will utilize the assistance of other departments as necessary in responding and assessing the situation,
including but not limited to CCCC facilities, maintenance and other staff members. DPS staff will collaborate and
coordinate responses with local and state emergency response agencies when applicable.
Alarms and notification systems
CCCC has implemented a multi-layered communication system to expedite communication during an emergency. Upon
confirmation of a significant emergency or dangerous situation involving an immediate threat to the health or safety of
students or employees occurring on campus, CCCC will initiate appropriate communication system(s) to alert the
appropriate segment or segments of the campus community. As such, CCCC will without delay, and taking into account
the safety of the community, determine the content of the notification and initiate the appropriate notification system(s)
unless the notification will, in the professional judgment of the responsible authorities, compromise the efforts to assist
victims or to contain, respond to, or otherwise mitigate the emergency.
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An order to evacuate and/or other emergency notification(s) may be received via one or more of the following: an audible
alarm signal, Mass Notification System (RAVE), campus email, phone call back (reverse audix), or at the direction of
CCCC staff.
In the event of an evacuation or other emergency notification, all faculty, students, and staff, and the public must
immediately follow the instructions of emergency personnel and Emergency Response (evacuation) Team members by
exiting the building or area and responding to the emergency as instructed.
Audible and Visual Alarms
All campuses maintain an audible fire alarm system. The alarm signal is a unique emission from the horns placed
throughout the College and flashes a red emergency light. Fire alarm pull boxes are located in the halls throughout each
building. Each space in the College contains a sign labeled “FIRE EXIT” which identifies primary and secondary routes.
The primary exit should be used where feasible. The secondary exit should be used when the primary exit is obstructed or
otherwise unavailable or unsafe to use.
Any recognized problems with the system are addressed expeditiously in coordination with the CCCC facilities
department. Alarm systems at the Hyannis Center are monitored by the landlord overseeing the property and by College
personnel during evacuation drills/exercises and problems are reported immediately to the building owner. The College
coordinates testing and evacuation drills of the emergency systems with the property owners, as necessary.
Protocol for response to campus crime or emergencies
Under the Clery Act the College is required to immediately notify the campus community upon “confirmation of a
significant emergency or dangerous situation involving an immediate threat to the health or safety of students or
employees occurring on campus.”
In the event of a campus disaster, responses will be in accordance with a protocol outlined in the Cape Cod Community
College Emergency Operations Plan. Campus Police and Public Safety officers will coordinate with local and/or state
emergency responders, as necessary and appropriate, to the situation and location of the incident.
Emergency response and evacuation procedures
The following evacuation procedures are in place for Cape Cod Community College buildings. These procedures are to
be followed when a fire alarm sounds. All occupants must exit the building when a fire alarm sounds, regardless of
whether it is a fire drill, false activation, or actual fire. Any persons physically unable to exit the building should
immediately contact the Cape Cod Community College Department of Public Safety by dialing extension 3333 from any
campus phone or by cell phone at 508-367-9879. All questions pertaining to evacuation procedures should be directed to
the Department of Public Safety at extension 3333.
Please use the emergency exits available in your building. DO NOT USE ELEVATORS. It is very important to be aware of
ALL possible exit locations in the building you are occupying in the event that one or more of the fire exits are unsafe.
If you are or become aware of someone that is unable to travel down a stairwell, please immediately contact the
Department of Public Safety. Once notified, Public Safety will dispatch personnel equipped with an EVAC Chair.
Immediate emergency response and evacuation procedures
In the event of an incident which poses an immediate threat to members of the CCCC community, the College has
systems in place to communicate information quickly to everyone concerned. The College can use network emails,
emergency text messages sent to a cell phone or PDA (sign up at https://www.getrave.com/login/capecod), and
emergency broadcast messages on phones in classrooms and conference rooms. The College will post updates during a
critical incident on the College’s website. Members of the larger community interested in receiving information about
emergencies on campus should sign up for the emergency text message system and visit the College website for
updates.
The College publicizes emergency response and evacuation procedures on an annual basis in a manner designed to
reach students and staff through the College catalog, public safety website and the CCCC website.
The College tests its emergency response and evacuation procedures on an annual basis. The emergency notification
system is tested at the beginning of the fall, spring and summer terms.
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Immediate notification
All members of CCCC are notified on an annual basis that they are required to notify the CCCC Department of Public
Safety of any situation or incident on campus that involves a significant emergency or dangerous situation that may
involve an immediate or ongoing threat to the health and safety of students and / or employees on campus. Public Safety
has the responsibility of responding – and summoning the necessary resources – to mitigate, investigate and document
any situation that may cause a significant emergency or dangerous situation. In addition, the DPS has a responsibility to
respond to such incidents to determine if the situation does pose a threat to the community. In case of a threat, federal
law requires that the institution immediately notify the campus community or appropriate segments of the community that
may be affected by the situation.
DPS will inform the College, or appropriate portion of the community, if the problem is limited to a particular building or
segment of the population, of any threat. The department will, without delay and taking into account the safety of the
community, determine the content of the notice and initiate the notification system, unless issuing a notification will, in the
professional judgment of the first responders (including, but not limited to: CCCC Department of Public Safety, the
Massachusetts State Police, the Barnstable Police Department, and the West Barnstable Fire & Rescue Department),
compromise efforts to assist a victim or to contain, respond to or otherwise mitigate the emergency.
Statement of policy addressing timely warnings
The Cape Cod Community College Department of Public Safety is responsible for issuing timely warnings - Campus
Safety Alerts - which is in compliance with the Clery Act. In the event that a critical incident either on or nearby the
campus occurs, these alerts are issued to keep the campus community informed about the involved safety matters. The
decision to issue a Safety Alert is decided on an incident by incident basis with an emphasis on the facts surrounding the
incident, continuing threat to the campus community, and the possible risk of compromising law enforcement efforts.
Safety Alerts are issued for specific crime classifications, such as, but not limited to, Aggravated Assault and Sex
Offenses. The identity of the victim of such a crime will not be disseminated in a safety alert message. Safety Alerts may
also be issued as deemed necessary to maintain safety on the College campus. The Safety Alerts are distributed to our
College community via College email and Emergency SMS Text Messages.
Cape Cod Community College is mindful of the importance of timely and effective communications to students, faculty
and staff during a time of crisis. The Cape Cod September 2014 Annual Security Report 19
Community College emergency notification network is a comprehensive communications solution that allows the College
to quickly disseminate urgent messages through multiple communication mediums including, but not limited to, voice
messages to cell phones, text messages to cell phones, home phone, email messages and emergency phones in
classrooms.
Members of the Public Safety Department will work directly with the College Director of Communications to determine
what information will be issued. Timely warnings will provide information about the nature of the incident, suggested
precautions people should take, and if additional information will be forthcoming when available. Occasionally, Timely
Warnings will ask members of the community for their help in gathering information about an incident or identifying those
responsible. You can contact the Public Safety Department by dialing 3333 from any College phone.
In the event the College Director of Communications is unavailable, the following members of the College’s Critical
Incident Team and Public Safety have been trained and are responsible for sending Timely Notifications: Vice President
for Administration & Finance, Vice President for Student and Academic Affairs, Assistant Vice President of Information
Technology.
In order to disseminate emergency information to the larger community, the College Director of Communications will post
information to the College’s social media platforms, on the Cape Cod Community College website, and will send
information via email.
The Department of Public Safety has a good working relationship with the Massachusetts State Police and Barnstable
Police Department and relies on them for the investigation of alleged criminal offenses occurring on College property. The
College encourages accurate and prompt reporting of all crimes to the Department of Public Safety at 508-362-2131 Ext.
3333.
Public Safety Officers patrol the campus 24 hours a day. The office is open from 7:00 a.m. – 11:00 p.m. seven days a
week. Members of the College community requesting assistance in an emergency should call 911. Non-emergencies can
be directed to 508-362-2131 Ext. 3333.
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Bedford / Middlesex Community College
Please note that Boston University students, faculty and staff have the ability to receive notifications from
Middlesex Community College through the MCC Emergency Alert System. If for any reason you do not believe
that you are currently registered to receive these notifications, please contact Coordinator Terese Romano.
What is an Emergency?
An emergency is an unforeseen event or condition requiring prompt action. Emergencies at Middlesex Community
College can be generally classified as medical emergencies, fire/fire alarm emergencies, and public safety emergencies &
environmental emergencies. Emergency conditions either affect an individual, a small group or the entire college. In the
case they affect the entire College they typically involve the evacuation of the campuses.
Campus Evacuation
There are many reasons a campus may have to be evacuated. The most common reason for evacuation is due to fire
alarm activation. Other reasons for evacuating a campus include, but are not limited to a bomb threat, environmental
condition or a physical threat. When you are asked to evacuate the facility by Public Safety personnel, law enforcement or
the fire alarm sounds:
1. Collect all personal belongings including book bags, jackets, brief cases, etc. Why? Because you can't count on
returning to the building and in the case of a bomb threat such items would be considered suspicious and handled as a
possible "device".
2. Immediately leave the building following any verbal instructions and follow the evacuation route posted adjacent to the
primary classroom exit door.
3. Faculty should assign someone to provide assistance in assuring students with disabilities are directed to the
evacuation point.
4. Faculty should turn off all gas and electrical appliances. The lights should be left on, the corridor door closed and left
unlocked.
5. Upon exiting the building move well away from the building. This will prevent a "log jam" of people at the entranceway
and allow the fire department swift access.
6. Re-entry: The College public safety personnel shall notify you when it is safe to return to the building.
We recommend that faculty review the evacuation procedure with their class at the beginning of each semester. Students
should also take time to review the evacuation route posted next to the primary classroom exit door.
We recommend that students with disabilities identify themselves to a faculty member if they feel they may require
assistance during an evacuation. Together they can formulate an evacuation plan. Under no circumstances are the
elevators to be used when a fire alarm is sounding.
Emergency Drills, Testing and Evacuation Procedures
The purpose of evacuation drills is to prepare building occupants for an organized evacuation in case of an emergency. At
Middlesex Community College, evacuation drills are used as a way to educate and train students, faculty and staff. During
the drill, students, faculty and staff ‘practice’ drill procedures and familiarize themselves with the location of exits and the
sound of the fire alarm. In addition to education, the process also provides MCC with the opportunity to test the operation
of fire alarm system components.
Evacuation drills are coordinated by the Department of Public Safety & the Environmental Health & Safety Officer. In all
buildings, emergency exits signs are provided to give guidance on the direction people should travel when exiting each
building for a short-term building evacuation. In academic buildings, evacuation maps are posted on the wall next to the
classroom doors and in administrative buildings the evacuation maps are located along the corridors. MCC does not tell
individuals in advance about the designated locations for long-term evacuations because those decisions are affected by
time of day, location of the building being evacuated, the availability of the various designated emergency gathering
locations on campus, and other factors such as the location and nature of the threat. Staff on the scene will communicate
information to individuals regarding the developing situation or any evacuation status changes. Fire drills are typically
scheduled during the early start of the fall & spring semesters.
MCC conducts announced and unannounced drills and exercises each year and conducts follow-through activities
designed for assessment and evaluation of emergency plans and capabilities.
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Timely Warnings
The Middlesex Community College Emergency Alert system is intended to give students, faculty and staff timely
notifications of incidents that may present an immediate threat to the campus community and to heighten safety
awareness. The alerts can also be used to assist law enforcement agencies with widespread communications to our
campus community with valuable and timely information to assist them with the management of an operation.
The safety of our students, staff and faculty is paramount to Middlesex Community College. The college has created a
three-tier, Emergency Management Team consisting of more than 100 administrators to oversee all operations on
campus, both during a crisis as well as in the planning and preparedness stages.
The Emergency Management Team shall be responsible for the activation of a Middlesex Community College Emergency
Alert when an incident is reported to the team and rises to the level of a required widespread communication. The
Emergency Management Team shall determine if there is a significant emergency or dangerous situation, determine the
appropriate community members that should receive the notification, determine the content of the notification and initiate
the notification system.
Every effort will be made to distribute the alert in a timely manner; however each release is subject to the availability of
accurate information concerning the incident and if releasing information will compromise efforts to assist a victim or to
contain, respond to or otherwise mitigate the emergency. Alerts are distributed to faculty, students and staff through a
variety of sources, including text messaging, phone calls, social media, or email.
Participation in the Emergency Alert system, however, is voluntary on behalf of the individuals, who are provided with
constant opportunities to opt into the information system. If the individual, however, elects not to share his/her cell phone
information through the system, that individual will not receive electronic communications that are distributed through the
automated Emergency Alert system. Other manners of communication, such as oral communications from security and
Emergency Management Team personnel and audible instructions on the intercom system will also be used when
necessary.
Middlesex Community College tests the Emergency Alert System annually, which may be announced or unannounced
and may be limited to a small portion of the staff. Community members are encouraged to read these procedures in
advance so they are prepared.
For questions related to emergency responses, evacuation procedures and timely warnings, please contact the Director of
Public Safety, Daniel Martin at [email protected], 781-280-3751, or Cataldo Building, room 211.
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Fall River / UMass Dartmouth
Please note that Boston University has worked with UMass Dartmouth regarding BU students, faculty and staff
receiving notifications from UMass Dartmouth. Currently, Coordinator Sonia Mee and Assistant Dean Mena
daSilva-Clark can receiving emergency notifications directly from UMass Dartmouth and she or they will, as
appropriate, forward the content of such message to individuals associated with the Social Work program in Fall
River, via email and/or text message.
It is the policy of the DPS to fully comply with the provisions and intent of the “Clery Act,” in regards to the timely
notification of our campus community, of any continuing threats to their safety, in order to aid in the prevention of similar
occurrences.
The DPS is responsible for issuing Crime Alerts in compliance with the Clery Act. In an effort to provide timely notice to
the UMass Dartmouth community, and in the event of a serious incident which may pose an on-going threat to members
of the UMass Dartmouth community, a Crime Alert is sent by blast email or text message to all students and employees
on campus. The alerts are generally written and distributed to the University community by the Chief of Police or a
designee and they are approved and distributed to the community by the University Relations Office.
This e-mail or text message indicates that a Crime Alert has been issued and may provide a link to the DPS Crime Alert
web page at http://www.umassd.edu/publicsafety/jeanneclerydisclosureact/campuscrimealerts/
In addition to these Crime Alerts, UMass Dartmouth has been able to issue campus-wide alerts via text- messaging, email, cell phones, home and office telephones and face-to-face communication to the campus community in the event of
an imminent or ongoing threat to the community. UMass campus-wide alerts are disseminated with the goal of notifying as
many people as possible, as rapidly as possible (i.e., active threats, bomb threats, or a dangerous chemical spill, etc.)
These alerts are sent to individuals who subscribe to UMass campus-wide alerts.
All members of the University community are notified on an annual basis that they are required to notify DPS of any
situation or incident on campus that involves a significant emergency or dangerous situation that may involve an
immediate or ongoing threat to the health and safety of students and/or employees on campus. DPS has the responsibility
of responding to, and summoning the necessary resources to mitigate, investigate, and document any situation that may
cause a significant emergency or dangerous situation. In addition, DPS has the responsibility to respond to such incidents
to determine if the situation does in fact, pose a threat to the community. If that is the case, Federal Law requires that the
institution immediately notify the campus community or the appropriate segments of the community that may be affected
by the situation.
The decision to issue an alert shall be decided on a case by case basis in light of all the facts surrounding an incident or
crime, including factors such as the nature of the incident/crime, the continuing threat to the campus community, and the
possible risk of compromising law enforcement efforts.
The DPS and University Relations receive information from various offices/departments on campus. If DPS and or
University Relations confirms that there is an emergency or dangerous situation that poses an immediate threat to the
health or safety of some or all members of the University community, they will collaborate to determine the content of the
message and will use some or all of the systems described below to communicate the threat to the University Community
or to the appropriate segment of the community, if the threat is limited to a particular building or segment of the
population. The DPS in conjunction with University Relations will, without delay and taking into account the safety of the
community, determine the content of the notification and initiate the notification system, unless issuing a notification will, in
the judgment of the first responders, compromise the efforts to assist a victim or to contain, respond to, or otherwise
mitigate the emergency. The entire campus community will be notified when there is at least the potential that a very large
segment of the community will be affected by a situation or when a situation threatens the operation of the campus as a
whole. There will be a continuing assessment of the situation and additional segments of the campus community may be
notified if a situation warrants such action. The DPS will determine how much information is appropriate to disseminate at
different points in time. Depending on what segments of the community the notification targets, the content may differ.
In the event of a serious incident that poses an immediate threat to the health and safety of the University community, the
University has various systems in place for communicating information quickly. Some or all of these methods of
communication may be activated in the event of an immediate threat to the University campus community. These
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methods of communication include MyAlert, a system that provides emergency communications and other important
information via text message, cellular phone and email. Students, faculty and staff can register for this service at
http://www.umassd.edu/publicsafety/myalert/ to login, enter your full UMass Dartmouth email address and password.
MyAlert does not charge subscribers to send or receive SMS messages. Standard or other messaging charges apply
depending upon your wireless carrier plan and subscription details. Once registered, you can opt out of SMS messages at
any time by texting STOP to 67283 or 226787. Other forms of communication include network emails, phone trees, faceto-face communications, bulletins posted on building entrances and exits, the fire alarm system, and outdoor sirens and
PA system. In the event a situation requires the activation of the University’s emergency notification system, updates are
available on the UMass Dartmouth web site www.umassd.edu.
Students should take responsibility for regularly checking their e-mail. In order to receive campus-wide-e- mail
announcements, students must have a University e-mail account, which may be obtained from the Office of Informational
Technology located in the Claire T. Carney Library. Instructions for automatic forwarding of e-mail messages from a
University account to another account are available from Informational Technology. Individuals with disabilities are
encouraged to contact either the Center for Access and Success at 508.999.8711 or the Help Desk at 508.999.8884 for
assistance in subscribing to Campus Alerts.
University Departments are responsible for developing contingency plans and continuity of operation plans for their own
staff and areas of responsibility. The University conducts numerous announced or unannounced emergency response
exercises each year, such as table top exercises, field exercises, and tests of the emergency notification systems on
campus. These tests are designed to assess and evaluate the emergency plans and capabilities of the institution.
The DPS officers and supervisors have received training in Incident Command and Responding to Critical Incidents on
Campus. The Incident Command System (ICS) is utilized when responding to critical incidents. When a serious incident
occurs that causes an immediate threat to campus, the first responders to the scene are usually the DPS, Environmental
Health and Safety (EH&S) and DFD (Dartmouth Fire Department) who typically respond and work together to manage,
mitigate, and recover from incidents.
Depending on the nature of the incident, other UMass departments and other local or federal agencies could also be
involved in responding to the incident.
General information about the emergency response and evacuation procedures for UMass Dartmouth is publicized each
year as part of the institution’s Clery Act compliance effort and that information is available on the University of
Massachusetts Dartmouth website at: www.umassd.edu/publicsafety.
The University annually reviews the emergency response and evacuation procedures as to provide updates and ensure
that the University continues to move forward and strengthen emergency response programs, policies and procedures.
Emergency Response and Evacuation
The purpose of evacuation drills is to prepare building occupants for an organized evacuation in case of an emergency. At
UMass Dartmouth, evacuation drills are used as a way to educate and train occupants on issues specific to their building.
During the drill, occupants ‘practice’ drill procedures and familiarize themselves with the location of exits and the sound of
the fire alarm. In addition to educating the occupants of each building about the evacuation procedures during the drills,
the process also provides the University the opportunity to test the operation of fire alarm system components.
Evacuation drills are coordinated by Environmental Health and Safety (EH&S) each semester for all residence halls,
academic, research and business buildings (all buildings) on campus. Thus, the emergency response and evacuation
procedures are tested at least twice each year. Students, faculty and staff learn the locations of the emergency exits in the
buildings and are provided guidance about the direction they should travel when exiting each building for a short-term
building evacuation. EH&S does not tell individuals in advance about the designated locations for long-term evacuations
because those decisions are affected by time of day, location of the building being evacuated, the availability of the
various designated emergency gathering locations on campus, and other factors such as the location and nature of the
threat. EH&S and staff on the scene will communicate information to individuals regarding the developing situation or any
evacuation status changes.
Students receive information about evacuation and shelter-in-place procedures during their first floor meetings and during
other educational sessions that they can participate in throughout the year. The Residence Life Staff members are trained
in these procedures as well and act as an on-going resource for the students living in residential facilities.
DPS conducts announced and unannounced drills and exercises each year and conducts follow-through activities
designed for assessment and evaluation of emergency plans and capabilities. DPS coordinates announced and
unannounced evacuation drills each semester, as described above, to test the emergency response and evacuation
procedures, and to assess and evaluate the emergency evacuation plans and capabilities. UMass Dartmouth will publish
a summary of its emergency response and evacuation procedures in conjunction with at least one drill or exercise each
calendar year.
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DPS performs Active Threat Drills. An active threat refers to any incident which creates an immediate threat or presents
an imminent danger to the campus community such as a shooter or hostage situation. Although encountering an active
threat on campus remains remote, we encourage members of the campus community to review the guidelines in the
event of an emergency.
The University conducts table top and real time exercises as to test emergency preparedness, Business Continuity and
Disaster Recovery Plans. The Town of Dartmouth and other UMass campuses are encouraged to participate and/or
observe during these exercises.
What it means to “Shelter-in-Place”:
If an incident occurs and the buildings or areas around you become unstable, or if the air outdoors becomes dangerous
due to toxic or irritating substances, it is usually safer to stay indoors, because leaving the area may expose you to that
danger. Thus, to “shelter-in-place” means to make a shelter of the building that you are in, and with a few adjustments this
location can be made even safer and more comfortable until it is safe to go outside.
Basic “Shelter-in-Place” Guidance:
If an incident occurs and the building you are in is not damaged, stay inside in an interior room until you are told it is safe
to come out. If your building is damaged, take your personal belongings (purse, wallet, student ID card, etc.) and follow
the evacuation procedures for your building (close your door, proceed to the nearest exit, and use the stairs instead of the
elevators). Once you have evacuated, seek shelter at the nearest University building quickly. If police or fire department
personnel are on the scene, follow their directions.
How You Will Know to “Shelter-in-Place”:
A shelter-in-place notification may come from several sources, including DPS, EH&S, Residential Life Staff members,
other University employees, the federal or local government, LPD, or other authorities utilizing the University’s emergency
communications tools.
How to “Shelter–in-Place”:
No matter where you are, the basic steps of shelter-in-place will generally remain the same. Should the need ever arise;
follow these steps, unless instructed otherwise by local emergency personnel:
1. If you are inside, stay where you are. Collect any emergency shelter-in-place supplies and a telephone to be used in
case of emergency. If you are outdoors, proceed into the closest building quickly or follow instructions from emergency
personnel on the scene.
2. Locate a room to shelter inside. It should be:
-An interior room;
-Above ground level; and
-Without windows or with the least number of windows. If there is a large group of people inside a particular building,
several rooms maybe necessary.
3. Shut and lock all windows (tighter seal) and close exterior doors.
4. Turn off air conditioners, heaters, and fans.
5. Close vents to ventilation systems as you are able. (University staff will turn off the ventilation as quickly as possible.)
6. Make a list of the people with you and ask someone (Residential Life Staff, faculty, or other staff) to call the list in to
DPS so they know where you are sheltering. If only students are present, one of the students should call in the list.
7. Turn on a radio or TV and listen for further instructions.
8. Make yourself comfortable.
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DISSEMINATION OF INFORMATION CONCERNING CRIMES AND
SAFETY
Boston University Websites
Boston University’s safety website is available at www.bu.edu/safety. In addition, the Dean of -Students maintains the
[email protected] website at www.bu.edu/dos/resources/be-safe.
Open Police and Fire Log Laws
Massachusetts law requires all police agencies in the state to maintain open police logs, and federal law requires open
logs be maintained by colleges and universities. The public has a right of access to summary information regarding
reported incidents. The identification of victims of sexual assault, or attempted sexual assault, is prohibited by law.
The Boston University police and fire logs are available at the police station at 32 Harry Agganis Way.
The Medical Campus Public Safety police and fire logs are available at 710 Albany Street.
We recognize that you may be interested in the crime logs for the site where you take School of Social Work classes. As
a result, we have provided the locations of the crime logs at those sites.
West Barnstable / Cape Cod Community College
Cape Cod Community College maintains a crime log at the CCCC Public Safety Office of the Administration Building at
the Office for the VP of Finance and Administration.
Bedford / Middlesex Community College
The Middlesex Community College Public Safety Office maintains a crime log. It is available for viewing during regular
College office hours.
Fall River / UMass Dartmouth
UMass Dartmouth's Department of Public Safety maintains a crime log. It is available for review at the DPS located at
285 Old Westport Road, North Dartmouth, MA from 9 a.m.–3 p.m. Monday through Friday, excluding holidays.
Campus News Services
The Boston University Police Department regularly provides up-to-date crime incident information to all University news
services, including BU Today (www.bu.edu/today).
Boston University Police Website
www.bu.edu/police
The department’s website provides current campus crime statistics, crime information bulletins, and information about the
University’s police services. In addition, the department sends email announcements to the University community
concerning emergencies and reports of criminal activity that may be of interest to the community. Members of the
University -community and their families are encouraged to follow the department on Twitter and Facebook for updates.
www.facebook.com/BostonUPolice
@BUPolice
@BUPOLICE
Campus Sex Offender Reporting
www.bu.edu/police/sensitive/sex-offender
Federal law requires states to ask every sex offender registered under “Megan’s Law” if they are or will be enrolled at or
employed by a college or university. State governments will then provide that information to the school’s police
department or a local police department with jurisdiction for the campus.
Students and employees may obtain any information provided by any state under this law at the Boston University Police
Department, 32 Harry Agganis Way, during business hours, or at www.bu.edu/police.
In addition, the Campus Sex Crimes Prevention Act of 2000 requires institutions of higher education to issue a statement
advising the campus community where law enforcement information provided by a state may be obtained.
The Executive Office of Public Safety for the Commonwealth of Massachusetts provides a searchable database of
Massachusetts-area level-3 sex offenders, available at www.mass.gov/eopss/agencies/sorb/
Boston University Emergency Management Website
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www.bu.edu/ehs/management-plans/emergency
Boston University provides information about existing emergencies on its Emergency -Management website.
Environmental Health & Safety
www.bu.edu/ehs
Environmental Health & Safety’s (EHS) mission is to provide a safe environment for students, faculty, staff, and others
visiting our facilities. EHS maintains the University’s Fire Log, which is available for inspection at 704 Commonwealth
Avenue, Second Floor, and also compiles the annual Fire Safety Report.
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ACCESS TO FACILITIES/ SECURITY AND MAINTENANCE
West Barnstable/ Cape Cod
During business hours, Cape Cod Community College will be open to students, parents, employees, contractors, guests,
and invitees. During non-business hours, access to all College facilities is by key, if issued, by admittance via the Campus
Police and Department of Public Safety, or by the landlord in the case of satellite campuses. In the case of periods of
closing, the College will admit only those with prior permission. Emergencies may necessitate changes or alterations to
any posted schedules.
Campus Police and Public Safety Officers provide regular patrols and are available for safety escorts upon request. The
buildings and rooms are locked and unlocked according to a published schedule for Cape Cod Community College.
Outdoor lighting is left on in the parking lots and walkways at night, whenever activities are scheduled on campus.
DPS works closely with College facilities staff to identify and correct any landscaping and maintenance problems that
could affect CCCC security and safety. If you see a possible hazard, such as an area needing better lighting, please alert
the DPS office.
After-hours Access
Cape Cod Community College is committed to the safety and security of all faculty, staff, students, and visitors who work,
study, and utilize our College. The practice of the College is to lock building access for all doors, both internal and
external, at night and when the College is closed. Having Public Safety provide access for a faculty or staff member when
the building is otherwise closed ensures awareness of the individual’s presence by our Department of Public Safety.
Security and Maintenance Measures
CCCC will periodically examine grounds keeping practices from a security perspective and will assess pathways and plant
growth and debris that may materially detract from security. Indoor and outdoor lighting will be monitored and defective or
burned-out lights will be replaced as soon as possible after being reported. Lost or found keys and keycards should be
reported to DPS as soon as possible by calling (508) 362-2131 Ext. 3333.
Bedford/ Middlesex Community College
Security of and Access to Campus Facilities
Campus grounds are open to the public for non-organized activities, including but not limited to, walking, bicycling, etc.
Visitors are expected to use facilities safely and properly. Those found violating normal safety practices or acting
discourteously will be asked to leave. Organized uses include but are not limited to; community events are scheduled
through the Campus Manager on either campus. Campus Public Safety officers are provided with a schedule of organized
events and will investigate unscheduled activity taking place.
Access to Buildings during Off-hours
No unauthorized persons are allowed into campus buildings off-hours without prior permission or unless accompanied by
an authorized person. College staff or students needing access to buildings during off-hours are required to make
arrangements with the appropriate Campus Manager's office. The Campus Manager will provide security with an
authorized Access List.
Campus buildings are open Monday-Thursday, 7am - 10pm, Friday, 7am - 5pm, and Saturday 8am - 1pm when classes
are in session. Buildings remain secured on holidays, Sundays, and during nonscheduled class periods unless special
arrangements are made to the contrary by contacting the Campus Manager.
Maintenance
Middlesex Community College employees provide for janitorial services. The supervisor of the janitorial crew has keys to
campus buildings in order to provide access for employees during their work shift, 10pm - 7am. During this time period,
other employees or students are generally not on campus. Mechanical contractors and mechanical trade’s workers are
accompanied by a college employee when it is necessary for them to be on campus during other than normal working
hours.
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Fall River/ UMass Dartmouth
The Facilities Department maintains all the University building grounds with a special concern for safety and security.
Personnel conduct inspections to identify lighting deficiencies and make recommendations for repairs to security/safety
equipment such as broken locks, windows and fire safety equipment.
Most campus buildings and facilities are accessible to members of the campus community, guests, and visitors during
normal hours of business, Monday through Friday, and for limited designated hours on
Saturday, Sunday, and holidays. Facilities are maintained, and their security monitored, in the interest of students, staff,
and faculty. Many cultural and athletic events are held in University facilities. Other facilities such as the bookstore,
libraries, and cafeterias are also open to the public.
Access to academic and administrative facilities on campus is generally limited to students, employees, and visitors for
the purpose of study, work, teaching, and to conduct other University business. Each academic building has established
its hours based on the needs of specific academic departments and the hours may vary at different times of the year.
Access to some of these buildings is also controlled by card access after normal business hours, and all of these buildings
have varied levels of access. Most academic and administrative buildings do not have a DPS officer assigned to them.
However, University Police provide random patrols of all facilities 24 hours a day.
Maintenance of Campus Facilities
Facilities and landscaping are maintained in a manner that minimizes hazardous conditions and endeavors to provide
necessary levels of safety to the campus. University police and security officers patrol the campus and report all
functioning lights, roadway depressions and other unsafe physical conditions to Facilities Management for correction
through use of a computerized work order system. DPS encourages members of the University community to report
safety and equipment problems to Facilities / safety issues to EH&S (Environmental Health and Safety).
Emergencies may necessitate changes or alterations to any posted schedules. Areas which appear to be problematic
have security surveys conducted by DPS.
FIRE SAFETY – BOSTON UNIVERSITY
If you see smoke or fire, immediately activate the nearest fire alarm system. Call 911 once you have safely evacuated, and
then call BUPD at 617-353-2121 or Medical Campus Public Safety at 617-638-4444.
Fire safety is the responsibility of all those within the Boston University community. Environmental Health & Safety
develops fire safety programs and works closely with Residence Life to train Resident Assistants and students about fire
safety. Boston University is required to annually disclose statistical data on all fires that occur in on-campus student
housing facilities.
A fire log is maintained at the Boston University Police Department that includes the nature, date, time, and general
location of each fire.
Even in the event that a fire appears to be extinguished, please call 911 first and then notify -Boston University Police at
617-353-2110 and Environmental Health & Safety at 617-353-4094.
When calling, please provide as much information as possible about the location, date, time, and cause of the fire.
Additional information on fires and fire safety programs is available www.bu.edu/ehs/faqs/fire-safety.
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BOSTON UNIVERSITY'S ALCOHOL AND DRUG POLICIES AND
DISCLOSURES
Policy on Illegal Drugs and Alcohol
Boston University’s campuses and activities are not sanctuaries from federal, state, and local laws. Boston University
prohibits the unlawful use, possession, sale, distribution, or manufacture of controlled substances or alcohol on University
property or as part of University activities. Boston University’s alcoholic beverage policy is consistent with the laws of the
Commonwealth of Massachusetts.
However, the University’s standards of personal conduct substantially exceed the minimum expectations of civil law and
custom. Students found in violation of the University alcohol policy or engaging in misconduct related to the abuse of
alcohol, whether on or off campus, will be subject to disciplinary action under the Code of Student Responsibilities and
may also be subject to prosecution. Boston University enforces the state alcohol laws. The legal drinking age in
Massachusetts is twenty-one.
Boston University neither permits nor condones the possession, use, or sale of illegal drugs and narcotics. Violators are
subject to University disciplinary procedures, as well as to criminal prosecution under state and federal laws. Dealing in
narcotics or illegal drugs anywhere on campus will result in expulsion from the residence system and further disciplinary
action by the University. Conviction for drug-related offenses in any jurisdiction may affect a student’s eligibility for federal,
state, or University financial aid.
The University falls within federal and state Drug-Free School Zone laws.
Violations of drug and liquor laws are reported under the federal Jeanne Clery Disclosure of Campus Security Policy and
Campus Crime Statistics Act, and under Massachusetts law.
Standards of Conduct
The unlawful possession, use, or distribution of illegal drugs or alcohol by any student or employee on University property
or in conjunction with any University activity is prohibited.
Disciplinary Sanctions
The University will impose disciplinary sanctions on students and employees who violate University standards of conduct. In
addition, students or employees who violate public law are subject to criminal prosecution. Conviction may result in fines,
imprisonment, and revocation or loss of eligibility to receive federal funding (such as grants and financial assistance) and
other privileges.
University-imposed discipline may include sanctions up to and including expulsion of a student or termination of
employment, in addition to referral for criminal prosecution. Disciplinary sanctions may include required participation in a
treatment, counseling, or other approved rehabilitation program.
BOSTON UNIVERSITY SANCTIONS
As further clarification of our approach to dealing with illegal use or possession of alcohol, it is useful to understand the
typical sanctions in cases where students do not seek medical assistance. The disciplinary sanctions typically imposed for
underage alcohol possession and use violations, together with the education and counseling programs that are usually
required,
are as follows:
Violations Not in University Residence Halls
Following are the sanctions and education and counseling programs typically imposed for underage alcohol possession
and use violations that do not take place in University residence halls. If other unacceptable behavior—such as fighting,
sexual assault, or property damage—occurs in conjunction with the alcohol violation, additional sanctions may be
imposed for that behavior. Second violations are uncommon and third violations are rare. Sanctions for a third violation
will include, among other things, suspension from the University.
First Incident:
• Disciplinary Sanction: Probation and $100 fine
• Education/Counseling: an online self-assessment and education on alcohol use
Second Incident:
• Disciplinary Sanction: Deferred suspension
• Education/Counseling: Alcohol education class
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Financial Assistance
By federal law, students convicted of drug offenses committed while receiving Title IV federal financial aid may be ineligible
for federal financial aid for one or more years from the
date of conviction. For additional information, visit the Financial Assistance website at
www.bu.edu/finaid/eligibility/convictions.
Resources
Boston University requires every incoming first-year student to take AlcoholEdu for College, an online, non-judgmental,
evidence-based alcohol abuse prevention course.
The following resources are available at Boston University to address alcohol- and drug-related issues: Wellness &
Prevention Services (a department of Student Health Services) offers drug and alcohol groups and interactive education
classes; substance abuse assessments, including BASICS (Brief Alcohol Screening and Intervention for College Students);
consultation services; and online intervention programs, including ‘AlcoholEdu for College’ and ‘e-Checkup to Go’ for both
alcohol and marijuana. For more information about these programs, visit the SHS website
(www.bu.edu/shs/wellness/aod), call 617-353-4085, or stop by 930 Commonwealth Avenue. The SHS website also
provides information about additional resources at www.bu.edu/shs/wellness/aod/alcohol.
Faculty and staff may contact the Faculty & Staff Assistance office (www.bu.edu/fsao;
617-353-5381) for referrals.
BU STATEMENT ON DRUG- AND ALCOHOL-RELATED MEDICAL
EMERGENCIES AND JUDICIAL SANCTIONS
The illegal use or abuse of alcohol or drugs can be hazardous to students’ health and safety as well as an impediment to
academic and personal success. The University is, above all else, concerned for the safety and well-being of all members
of our community; therefore, the University addresses all reported violations of the University’s alcohol and drug policies,
including notifying the parents of undergraduate students of alcohol- and drug-related incidents, if necessary.
At Boston University, student health and safety are paramount. The University recognizes that alcohol or drug
consumption may create medical or safety emergencies in which the potential for University disciplinary action may deter
students from seeking assistance for themselves or others. In these situations, we strongly encourage students to act with
their own and others’ health and safety as the primary concern.
When the University learns of a student’s illegal possession or use of alcohol or drugs as a result of that student’s seeking
medical assistance for him or herself, or another person, that student ordinarily will not be subject to University disciplinary
sanctions for possession or use of that substance so long as the student completes all education and counseling
programs recommended by the University. We are committed to the use of education and treatment approaches because,
in our experience, education and/or treatment for individuals who receive emergency medical attention may reduce the
likelihood of future occurrences.
When there is a question of sexual abuse or assault in a situation involving alcohol or drugs, the student who was sexually
abused or assaulted is not subject to discipline under the University’s alcohol and drug policies.
STATE AND FEDERAL LAWS AND SANCTIONS -CONCERNING DRUGS
AND ALCOHOL
In addition to disciplinary sanctions imposed by the University, all students, faculty, and staff should be aware that federal,
state, and some local laws treat illegal use, possession, sale, distribution, or manufacture of drugs or alcohol as serious
crimes. Conviction can lead to imprisonment, fines, and assigned community service. Courts do not lift prison sentences
in order to allow convicted persons to attend college or continue their jobs. Felony and certain other convictions can
prevent you from entering many fields of employment or professions and may have to be listed on applications for
employment or admission to graduate or professional schools.
Many cities and towns in Massachusetts, including Boston, have local ordinances and regulations which prohibit public
consumption of alcoholic beverages or consumption of alcoholic beverages on private property without the owner’s
consent. The Department of Conservation and Recreation also prohibits public consumption of alcohol in its parks. Similar
laws and
regulations apply in most other states and in many localities.
Massachusetts laws punish sale or delivery of alcoholic beverages to persons under 21 with a fine of up to $2,000 and six
months imprisonment, or both. Misrepresenting one’s age or falsifying an identification to obtain alcoholic beverages is
33
punishable by a fine of $300. First conviction of driving under the influence of alcohol has a penalty of a $500–$5,000 fine,
one-year revocation of driver’s license, up to two-and-a-half years in prison, and mandatory alcohol rehabilitation.
Massachusetts has criminal penalties for use of controlled substances, or drugs, with penalties varying with the type of
drug. In general, use of narcotic and addictive drugs, and drugs with high potential for abuse, have heavier penalties.
Possession of drugs is illegal without valid authorization. While penalties for possession are generally not as great as for
manufacture and distribution of drugs, possession of a relatively large quantity may be considered distribution. Under both
state and federal laws, penalties for possession, manufacture, and distribution are much greater for second and
subsequent convictions. Many laws dictate mandatory prison terms and the full minimum term must be served.
Massachusetts makes it illegal to be in a place where heroin is kept and to be “in the company” of a person known to
possess heroin. Anyone in the presence of heroin at a private party or in a dormitory suite risks a serious drug conviction.
Sale and possession of “drug paraphernalia” is illegal in Massachusetts. Under federal laws and some state laws,
participation in drug-related criminal activity can result in seizure or forfeiture of personal property and other assets utilized in
conjunction with or stemming from the proceeds of the illegal activity. In addition, conviction of a drug-related offense may
entail civil fines and denial or revocation of certain licenses and benefits.
Persons convicted of drug possession under state or federal law are ineligible for federal student grants and loans or for
participation in federally sponsored research grants or contracts for up to one year after the first conviction, and up to five
years after the second; the penalty for distributing drugs is loss of benefits for five years after the first conviction, 10 years
1
after the second, and permanently after the third.
Under federal law, distribution of drugs to a person under age 21 is punishable by twice the normal penalty, i.e., a
mandatory one-year prison term; a third conviction is punishable by mandatory life imprisonment. These penalties apply to
distribution of drugs in or within 1,000 feet of a college or school. Federal law sets greatly heightened prison sentences for
manufacture and distribution of drugs if death or serious injury results from use of the substance.
Federal Drug Laws
The possession, use, or distribution of illegal drugs is prohibited by federal law. There are
strict penalties for drug convictions, including mandatory prison terms for many offenses.
The following information, although not complete, is an overview of federal penalties for first convictions. All penalties are
doubled for any subsequent drug conviction.
A. Denial of Federal Benefits
21 U.S.C. 862
A federal drug conviction may result in the loss of federal benefits, including school loans, grants, scholarships, contracts,
and licenses. Federal drug trafficking convictions may result in denial of federal benefits for up to five years for a first
conviction. Federal drug convictions for possession may result in denial of federal benefits for up to one year for a first
conviction and up to five years for subsequent convictions.
Federal Drug Possession Penalties
B. Forfeiture of Personal Property and Real Estate
21 U.S.C. 853
Any person convicted of a federal drug offense punishable by more than one year in prison shall forfeit to the United
States any personal or real property related to the violation, including houses, cars, and other personal belongings. A
warrant of seizure is issued and property is seized at the time an individual is arrested on charges that may result in
forfeiture.
C. Federal Drug Trafficking Penalties
21 U.S.C. 841
Penalties for federal drug trafficking convictions vary according to the quantity of the controlled substance involved in the
transaction. The list below is a sample of the range and severity of federal penalties imposed for first convictions. Penalties for
subsequent convictions are twice as severe.
If death or serious bodily injury results from the use of a controlled substance which has been illegally distributed, the
person convicted on federal charges of distributing the substance faces a mandatory life sentence and fines ranging up to
$8 million.
Persons convicted on federal charges of drug trafficking within 1,000 feet of a university (21 U.S.C. 845a) face penalties
of prison terms and fines which are twice as high as the regular penalties for the offense, with a mandatory prison
sentence of at least one year.
1
In accordance with the requirements of the Drug-Free Workplace Act of 1988, as a condition of employment, any employee who is engaged in the performance of
work under a federal grant or contract must notify the University if he or she is convicted of violating any criminal drug statute for activities done in the workplace
not later than 10 days after conviction; students who receive Pell and certain other federal grants are subject to similar conditions and must report any conviction of
a drug-related offense to the U.S. Department of Education within 10 days of the conviction if the offense occurred during the period covered by the grant.
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D. Federal Drug Possession Penalties
Persons convicted on federal charges of possessing any controlled substance face penalties of up to one year in prison
and a mandatory fine of no less than $1,000 up to a maximum of $100,000. Second convictions are punishable by not
less than 15 days but not more than two years in prison and a minimum fine of $2,500. Subsequent convictions are
punishable by not less than 90 days but not more than three years in prison and a minimum fine of $5,000.
Illegal Drugs and Alcohol
Massachusetts Marijuana Law
On January 2, 2009, the Commonwealth of Massachusetts enacted a change in the law regarding the possession of
marijuana. The new law amends the possession of one (1) ounce or less of marijuana or THC from a criminal offense to a
civil infraction, punishable by a $100 civil penalty and forfeiture of the contraband. The law does not change the criminal
status for those offenders who are in possession of marijuana or THC that exceeds one (1) ounce.
Offenders who are found to be in possession of one ounce or less of marijuana or THC will receive a civil citation to
appear in court. The marijuana or THC will also be seized. Offenders do not have to appear in court if they choose to pay
the fine before their assigned court date.
If the offender is under the age of 18, parents or legal guardians will be notified, and he or she will also be required to
complete a drug awareness program within one year of the offense, with enhanced penalties for failure to comply.
It is very important to understand that possession of one ounce or less of marijuana or THC is still illegal in Massachusetts
and is a violation of the Boston University Code of Student Responsibilities. Consequently, offenders remain subject to
sanctions from the University along with the civil penalties prescribed by the Commonwealth of Massachusetts.
For more detailed information regarding the law, visit the Massachusetts Official Website of the Executive Office of Public
Safety and Security at www.mass.gov.
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Federal Trafficking Penalties for Schedules I, II, III, IV, and V (except Marijuana) Schedule Substance/Quantity II Cocaine 500-­‐4999 grams mixture II Cocaine Base 28-­‐279 grams mixture Fentanyl 40-­‐399 grams mixture Fentanyl Analogue 10-­‐99 grams mixture Heroin 100-­‐999 grams mixture LSD 1-­‐9 grams mixture Methamphetamine 5-­‐49 grams pure or 50-­‐499 grams mixture IV I I I II II Penalty First Offense: Not less than 5 yrs. and not more than 40 yrs. If death or serious bodily injury, not less than 20 yrs. or more than life. Fine of not more than $5 million if an individual, $25 million if not an individual. Substance/Quantity Cocaine 5 kilograms or more mixture Cocaine Base 280 grams or more mixture Fentanyl 400 grams or more mixture Fentanyl Analogue 100 grams or more mixture Heroin 1 kilogram or more mixture LSD 10 grams or more mixture Methamphetamine 50 grams or more pure or 500 grams or more mixture PCP 100 grams or more pure or 1 kilogram or more mixture Second Offense: Not less than 10 yrs. and not more than life. If death or serious bodily injury, life imprisonment. Fine of not more than $8 million if an individual, $50 million if not an individual. PCP 10-­‐99 grams pure or 100-­‐999 grams mixture Substance/Quantity Any Amount Of Other Schedule I & II Substances Any Drug Product Containing Gamma Hydroxybutyric Acid Flunitrazepam (Schedule IV) 1 Gram Any Amount Of Other Schedule III Drugs Any Amount Of All Other Schedule IV Drugs (other than one gram or more of Flunitrazepam) Any Amount Of All Schedule V Drugs Penalty First Offense: Not less than 10 yrs. and not more than life. If death or serious bodily injury, not less than 20 yrs. or more than life. Fine of not more than $10 million if an individual, $50 million if not an individual. Second Offense: Not less than 20 yrs, and not more than life. If death or serious bodily injury, life imprisonment. Fine of not more than $20 million if an individual, $75 million if not an individual. 2 or More Prior Offenses: Life imprisonment. Fine of not more than $20 million if an individual, $75 million if not an individual. Penalty First Offense: Not more that 20 yrs. If death or serious bodily injury, not less than 20 yrs. or more than Life. Fine $1 million if an individual, $5 million if not an individual. Second Offense: Not more than 30 yrs. If death or serious bodily injury, life imprisonment. Fine $2 million if an individual, $10 million if not an individual. First Offense: Not more than 10 yrs. If death or serious bodily injury, not more that 15 yrs. Fine not more than $500,000 if an individual, $2.5 million if not an individual. Second Offense: Not more than 20 yrs. If death or serious injury, not more than 30 yrs. Fine not more than $1 million if an individual, $5 million if not an individual. First Offense: Not more than 5 yrs. Fine not more than $250,000 if an individual, $1 million if not an individual. Second Offense: Not more than 10 yrs. Fine not more than $500,000 if an individual, $2 million if other than an individual. First Offense: Not more than 1 yr. Fine not more than $100,000 if an individual, $250,000 if not an individual. Second Offense: Not more than 4 yrs. Fine not more than $200,000 if an individual, $500,000 if not an individual. 36
Federal Trafficking Penalties for Marijuana, Hashish and Hashish Oil, Schedule I Substances Marijuana 1,000 kilograms or more marijuana mixture or 1,000 or more marijuana plants Second Offense: Not less than 20 yrs. or more than life. If death or serious bodily injury, life imprisonment. Fine not more than $20 million if an individual, $75 million if other than an individual. First Offense: Not less than 5 yrs. or more than 40 yrs. If death or serious bodily injury, not less than 20 yrs. or more than life. Fine not more than $5 million if an individual, $25 million if other than an individual. Marijuana 100 to 999 kilograms marijuana mixture or 100 to 999 marijuana plants Marijuana 50 to 99 kilograms marijuana mixture, 50 to 99 marijuana plants Hashish More than 10 kilograms Hashish Oil More than 1 kilogram Marijuana less than 50 kilograms marijuana (but does not include 50 or more marijuana plants regardless of weight) 1 to 49 marijuana plants Hashish 10 kilograms or less Hashish Oil 1 kilogram or less First Offense: Not less than 10 yrs. or more than life. If death or serious bodily injury, not less than 20 yrs., or more than life. Fine not more than $10 million if an individual, $50 million if other than an individual. Second Offense: Not less than 10 yrs. or more than life. If death or serious bodily injury, life imprisonment. Fine not more than $8 million if an individual, $50million if other than an individual. First Offense: Not more than 20 yrs. If death or serious bodily injury, not less than 20 yrs. or more than life. Fine $1 million if an individual, $5 million if other than an individual. Second Offense: Not more than 30 yrs. If death or serious bodily injury, life imprisonment. Fine $2 million if an individual, $10 million if other than an individual. First Offense: Not more than 5 yrs. Fine not more than $250,000, $1 million if other than an individual. Second Offense: Not more than 10 yrs. Fine $500,000 if an individual, $2 million if other than individual. 37
Description of Health Risks
Serious health and personal risks are associated with the use of illegal drugs and abuse of alcohol. They may include
temporary or permanent physical or mental impairment, injury, or death. Use and abuse of such substances may also give
rise to conduct which causes injury, death, or damage to the user/abuser or to the person or property of others, resulting
in criminal or civil prosecution and liability. Use and abuse of such substances may also lead to unsafe and/or
nonconsensual sex, unwanted pregnancy, and may cause defects, injury, or death in unborn children. Consequences also
include temporary or permanent loss of educational or employment opportunities.
Drugs and the Body
Narcotics (Heroin):
• Initial euphoria followed by drowsiness and nausea
• Constricted pupils, watery eyes, dazed look
• Overdose may produce slow, shallow breathing, clammy skin, loss of appetite and weight, and possible death
Depressants (Barbiturates, Tranquilizers):
• Relaxed muscles, calmness, drowsiness
• Confusion, disorientation, slurred speech
• Overdose may produce shallow breathing, clammy skin, weak and rapid pulse, coma, and possible death
Stimulants (Cocaine, Methamphetamine):
• Increased heart and respiratory rate, elevated blood pressure, decreased appetite
• Blurred vision, dizziness, insomnia, anxiety
• High doses can cause physical collapse, irregular heartbeat, stroke, and possible death
Hallucinogens (LSD, PCP, Mushrooms):
• Illusions and hallucinations
• Confusion, panic, anxiety, depression, and poor perception of time and distance
• Respiratory failure, death due to careless behavior
Cannabis (Marijuana, Hashish):
• Increased heart rate, bloodshot eyes, dry mouth and throat, and increased appetite
• Interferes with memory, speech, coordination, and perception of time
• Increases risk of lung cancer, weakened immune system, and affects reproductive system
Alcohol and the Body
• Impairment of brain function, judgment, alertness, coordination, and reflexes
• Attitude and/or behavioral changes, such as uncharacteristic hostility, or increased risk taking, such as driving
recklessly
• Alcohol taken with other drugs can intensify the effects of the drug, alter the desired effect of the drug, cause
nausea, sweating, severe headaches, and convulsions
• Addiction or chemical dependency
• Memory blackouts
• Uncharacteristic family, school, work, or legal problems
• Health problems such as cirrhosis of the liver
• If used during pregnancy, birth defects and mental retardation in users’ unborn
children may occur
FIREARMS AND OTHER WEAPONS
The possession of weapons of any kind, including replicas, is strictly prohibited on campus. This includes, but is not
limited to: firearms, all chemical sprays, knives, and martial arts weapons (for example, nunchaku). The University will
impose disciplinary sanctions on students and employees who violate University regulations and standards of conduct
regarding weapons. Violations of weapons laws are reported under federal and state law.
Carrying an illegal weapon is a felony punishable by up to five years in state prison. Students or employees who violate
public law are subject to criminal prosecution and University sanctions. A conviction for unlawfully carrying a firearm
without a license in Massachusetts mandates a one-year jail sentence.
Even if one has a valid firearm license, carrying a firearm on a college or university campus in Massachusetts is a crime
(with the exception of full-time police officers).
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Sexual Misconduct/Title IX Policy
Boston University is committed to fostering an environment that is free from all forms of sexual misconduct, including
sexual assault and sexual harassment. In support of that commitment, BU takes steps to increase awareness of such
misconduct, eliminate its occurrence on campus, provide support for survivors, diligently investigate all reports of sexual
misconduct, and deal fairly and firmly with offenders. Creating a safe campus environment and a culture of respect is the
shared responsibility of all members of the BU community, individually and collectively.
The University complies with all state and federal discrimination laws, including Title IX of the Higher Education
Amendments of 1972, the federal law that prohibits discrimination on the basis of sex in education programs and
activities. The Boston University Sexual Misconduct/Title IX Policy (“Policy”) is intended to ensure a safe and nondiscriminatory educational and work environment.
Attached at Appendix B is information regarding the definitions of, as applicable, domestic violence, dating violence,
stalking, sexual assault and consent
Effective January 1, 2015 Table of Contents I. Introduction II. Prohibited Conduct: Definitions and Examples III. Other Important Concepts and Definitions IV. Campus and Community Resources V. Reporting Sexual Misconduct VI. Other Information Related to Reporting Sexual Misconduct VII. Title IX Review VIII. Prevention and Education IX. Training X. Resources and Support XI. Confidentiality Protections and Reporting Obligations I. INTRODUCTION. A. Statement of University Values. Boston University is committed to fostering an environment that is free from all forms of sexual misconduct, including
sexual assault and sexual harassment. In support of that commitment, BU takes steps to increase awareness of such
misconduct, eliminate its occurrence on campus, provide support for survivors, diligently investigate all reports of sexual
misconduct, and deal fairly and firmly with offenders. Creating a safe campus environment and a culture of respect is the
shared responsibility of all members of the BU community, individually and collectively.
The University complies with all state and federal discrimination laws, including Title IX of the Higher Education
Amendments of 1972, the federal law that prohibits discrimination on the basis of sex in education programs and
activities. The Boston University Sexual Misconduct/Title IX Policy (“Policy”) is intended to ensure a safe and nondiscriminatory educational and work environment.
As described in more detail below, in this Policy “sexual misconduct” is intended to refer to a broad range of conduct
focused on sex and/or gender that may or may not be sexual in nature. Sexual harassment, sexual assault, sexual
exploitation, stalking, and relationship violence are all forms of sexual misconduct prohibited by law and this Policy.
This Policy sets forth the University’s definition of and approach to addressing sexual misconduct. Section II defines
prohibited conduct and includes scenarios illustrating sexual misconduct. Section III provides additional definitions of
important concepts such as consent, incapacitation, and force. Section IV identifies on and off-campus resources for all
members of the BU community, including information about where to access resources in a confidential manner, Sections
V and VI describe how a member of the University community can report sexual misconduct and describes available
interim measures. Section VII explains the role of the Title IX Coordinator and Deputy Title IX Coordinators. Sections VIII
and IX outline the University’s prevention, education, and training efforts. Finally, Section X provides the contact
information for campus and community resources and Section XI describes the reporting obligations of various University
offices.
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B. Scope of the Policy and Procedures.
This Policy is intended to provide the Boston University community with a clearly articulated set of behavioral standards,
and definitions of prohibited conduct and key concepts. The Policy applies to all community members, including students,
faculty, staff, affiliates, visitors, applicants for admission or employment, and independent contractors. Vendors and others
who conduct business with the University or on BU property are also expected to comply with this Policy. The Policy
applies regardless of a person’s gender, gender identity, gender expression, sexual orientation, age, race, nationality,
class status, religion, or other protected status.
This Policy applies both to on-campus and off-campus conduct if (i) the conduct was in connection with a University or
University-recognized program or activity, or (ii) the conduct may have the effect of creating a hostile environment for a
member of the BU community. Section XI includes a list of on-campus resources available to those affected by sexual
misconduct and the extent to which such resources have reporting obligations or may maintain the confidentiality of a
report of sexual misconduct. The accompanying Procedures for the Resolution of Sexual Misconduct Complaints against
Students (“Student Procedures”), describe the investigation and disciplinary process that applies when a current
undergraduate, graduate, or professional student at Boston University (including a student on leave) is accused of sexual
misconduct. If a Boston University faculty or staff member, or other person doing business with BU is accused of sexual
misconduct, the investigation and disciplinary processes described in Boston University’s Procedures for the Resolution of
Sexual Misconduct Complaints against Faculty, Staff, Affiliates, and Non-Affiliates (“Faculty and Staff Procedures”) apply.
Boston University recognizes that sexual assault, harassment, discrimination and other forms of sexual misconduct can
have a profound impact on a person’s personal, academic, and work life. The University encourages anyone coping with
such a situation to seek help and support. Students who are uncertain of their options or simply need help should call the
Sexual Assault Response & Prevention Center (“SARP”) at (617) 353-7277. Faculty and staff may contact the
Faculty & Staff Assistance Office (“FSAO”) at (617) 353-5381 for assistance.
Nothing in this Policy or any of the University’s procedures for the resolution of sexual misconduct complaints
shall be construed to abridge academic freedom, principles of free speech, or Boston University’s educational
mission.
C. Notice of Non-Discrimination.
Boston University is committed to establishing and maintaining an environment free of all forms of discrimination and
harassment for all members of the University community. The University prohibits discrimination against any person on
the basis of race, color, religion, sex, age, national origin, physical or mental disability, sexual orientation, gender identity
or expression, genetic information, military service, or because of marital, parental, veteran status, or any other protected
class.
The University does not discriminate on the basis of sex in its educational, extracurricular, athletic, or other programs, or
in the context of employment. Sexual misconduct, including sexual harassment as defined in this Policy, is a form of sex
discrimination prohibited by Title IX of the Education Amendments of 1972, a federal law that provides that:
No person in the United States shall, on the basis of sex, be excluded from participation in, be denied the benefits of, or
be subjected to discrimination under any education program or activity receiving Federal financial assistance.
Sex discrimination is also prohibited under Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, Massachusetts General Laws Chapter
151B, and other applicable statutes.
D. Coordination with Boston University’s Non-Discrimination Policy.
Boston University recognizes that discrimination and harassment related to a person’s sex can occur in connection with
misconduct related to a person’s sexual orientation, gender identity, or gender expression, race, color, ethnicity, national
origin, religion, age, disability, or other protected class. Targeting a person on the basis of these characteristics is also a
violation of state and federal law and University policy. Under these circumstances, the University will endeavor to
coordinate the investigation and resolution efforts of sexual misconduct complaints with the investigation and resolution of
complaints of discrimination or harassment
II. PROHIBITED CONDUCT: DEFINITIONS & EXAMPLES.
“Sexual misconduct” is a broad, non-legal term that encompasses a wide range of behaviors, including but not limited to,
sexual harassment, sex/gender discrimination, sexual assault, rape, acquaintance rape, stalking, and relationship
violence (including dating and domestic violence). It is a violation of University policy as well as applicable law to commit
or to attempt to commit these acts.
Sexual misconduct can occur between strangers or acquaintances, or people who know each other well, including
between people who are or have been involved in an intimate or sexual relationship. It can be committed by anyone,
regardless of gender or gender identity, and can occur between people of the same or different sex or gender. This Policy
prohibits all forms of sexual misconduct.
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A. Sexual Assault (including Rape).
Sexual assault is actual or attempted sexual contact with another person without that person’s consent. Sexual assault
includes, but is not limited to:
• Intentional touching of another person’s intimate parts without that person’s consent; or
• Other intentional sexual contact with another person without that person’s consent; or
• Coercing, forcing, or attempting to coerce or force a person to touch another person’s intimate parts without that
person’s consent; or
• Rape, which is penetration, no matter how slight, of (1) the vagina or anus of a person by any body part of
another person or by an object, or (2) the mouth of a person by a sex organ of another person, without that
person’s consent.
See Section III for the definitions of consent, incapacitation, and force.
B. Sexual Harassment.
1. Definition of Sexual Harassment
Sexual Harassment is unwelcome conduct of a sexual nature that has the effect of creating a hostile or stressful living,
learning, or working environment, or whenever toleration of such conduct or rejection of it is the basis for an academic or
employment decision affecting an individual. Conduct is considered “unwelcome” if the person did not request or invite it
and considered the conduct to be undesirable or offensive.
Sexual harassment includes any conduct or incident that is sufficiently serious that it is likely to limit or deny a student’s
ability to participate in or benefit from the University’s educational programs or a faculty or staff member’s ability to work,
which may include a single incident of sexual assault or other serious sexual misconduct.
2. Forms of Prohibited Sexual Harassment.
Sexual harassment can take many forms, and can:
• Occur between equals, such as student to student, faculty member to faculty member, staff to staff, or
visitor/contracted employee to staff.
• Occur between persons of unequal power status, such as supervisor to subordinate, faculty member to student,
coach to student-athlete, student leader to first-year student. Although sexual harassment often occurs in the
context of an exploitation of power by the person with the greater power, a person who appears to have less
power in a relationship can also commit sexual harassment (such as a student harassing a faculty member).
• Be committed by an acquaintance, a stranger, or someone with whom the complainant has or had a personal,
intimate, or sexual relationship.
• Occur by or against a person of any sex, gender identity or expression, or sexual orientation.
The following non-exhaustive list includes examples of behavior that could be considered sexual harassment:
• Unwelcome sexual innuendo, propositions, sexual attention, or suggestive comments and gestures.
• Unwelcome physical contact of a sexual nature, such as touching, hugging, kissing, patting, or pinching, that is
uninvited and unwanted or unwelcome by the other person.
• Humor and jokes about sex or gender-specific traits; sexual slurs or derogatory language directed at another
person’s sexuality or gender.
• Insults and threats based on sex or gender; and other oral, written, or electronic communications of a sexual
nature that a person communicates and that are unwelcome.
• Written graffiti or the display or distribution of sexually explicit drawings, pictures, or written materials; sexually
charged name-calling; sexual rumors or ratings of sexual activity/performance; the circulation, display, or creation
of e-mails or Web sites of a sexual nature. (For more information on misconduct using the University’s computing
facilities, please see the Conditions of Use and Policy on Computing Ethics.)
• Non-academic display or circulation of written materials or pictures degrading to a person(s) or gender group.
• Unwelcome attention, such as repeated inappropriate flirting, inappropriate or repetitive compliments about
clothing or physical attributes, staring, or making sexually oriented gestures.
• Change of academic or employment responsibilities (increase in difficulty or decrease of responsibility) based on
sex, gender identity or expression, or sexual orientation.
• Use of a position of power or authority to: (i) threaten or punish, either directly or by implication, for refusing to
tolerate harassment, for refusing to submit to sexual activity, or for reporting harassment; or (ii) promise rewards
in return for sexual favors.
• Acts of verbal, nonverbal, or physical aggression, intimidation, or hostility based on sex or sex-stereotyping.
C. Sexual Exploitation.
Sexual exploitation occurs when a person takes sexual advantage of another person for the benefit of anyone other than
that person without that person’s consent.
Examples of behavior that could rise to the level of sexual exploitation include:
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•
•
•
•
Prostituting another person;
Recording images (e.g., video, photograph) or audio of another person’s sexual activity, intimate body parts, or
nakedness without that person’s consent;
Distributing images (e.g., video, photograph) or audio of another person’s sexual activity, intimate body parts, or
nakedness, if the individual distributing the images or audio knows or should have known that the person depicted
in the images or audio did not consent to such disclosure and objects to such disclosure; and,
Viewing another person’s sexual activity, intimate body parts, or nakedness in a place where that person would
have a reasonable expectation of privacy, without that person’s consent, and for the purpose of arousing or
gratifying sexual desire.
D. Stalking.
1. Definition of Stalking.
Stalking is a course of conduct involving more than one instance of inappropriate and unwanted attention, harassment,
threatening or intimidating physical or verbal contact, or any other course of conduct directed at a person that could be
reasonably regarded as likely to alarm or place that person in fear of harm or injury, including physical, emotional, or
psychological harm. This includes the use of technology to pursue, harass, threaten, intimidate, or otherwise make
unwelcome contact with another person. Stalking may involve people who are known to one another or have an intimate
or sexual relationship, or may involve people not known to one another.
Stalking is prohibited by Massachusetts law. Stalking can also constitute a violation of this Policy when the conduct
involves a Boston University student or employee and is gender-based.
2. Examples of Stalking.
The following persistent, unwanted, and repeated harassing conduct may constitute stalking:
• Every time Natalie went to class, Ben, another student, would sit next to her. Ben kept trying to talk to Natalie
even though she told him she was not interested in him. Ben then started showing up everywhere that Natalie
went — in the lobby of her residence hall, in the George Sherman Union, and at her work-study job. Ben was
persistent and threatened to “make” Natalie go out with him. If Ben continues to pursue this conduct, his action
may constitute stalking in violation of this Policy.
• David dated Ellen, a graduate student, a couple of times but eventually stopped seeing her. Then Ellen began
sending David several e-mails a day, messaging him on Instagram, and sending text messages to his cell phone.
David changed his e-mail address and cell phone number, but somehow Ellen discovered his new address and
cell phone number and began sending even more e-mails and texts. David really wants Ellen to stop contacting
him, but he is not sure what to do. Ellen’s conduct toward David may constitute stalking in violation of this Policy.
E. Relationship (Dating and Domestic) Violence.
1. Definition of Relationship Violence.
Relationship violence is abuse, violence, or intentionally controlling behavior between partners or former partners
involving one or more of the following elements: (i) battering that causes bodily injury; (ii) purposely or knowingly causing
reasonable apprehension of bodily injury; (iii) emotional abuse creating apprehension of bodily injury or property damage;
(iv) repeated telephonic, electronic, or other forms of communication — anonymously or directly — made with the intent to
intimidate, terrify, harass, or threaten. Relationship violence can occur in all type of relationships (e.g., heterosexual, same
sex, or any other type of relationship). Relationship violence may constitute a violation of this Policy when it involves a
Boston University student, faculty or staff member, and the conduct is gender-based.
2. Examples of Relationship Violence.
Examples of relationship violence include the following:
• Tracey’s boyfriend Mark yelled at her today because she was late meeting him for lunch. Mark grabbed Tracey’s
arm and pulled her out of the dining hall. Tracey was embarrassed. Later Mark said he was so sorry for
humiliating her. Tracey says things are okay now, but she wonders when it will happen again.
• Zach and James have been dating for a month. Zach, a student, has always been jealous, but now he becomes
angry when he does not know where James is. He tells James that he will kill him if he ever cheats on him. Zach
also told James that he would kill himself if James ever left him. The other day, Zach slapped James when he
was mad at him. James is becoming more and more afraid of Zach, but he feels trapped and does not know what
to do.
F. Retaliation.
1. Definition of Retaliation.
Retaliation is an adverse action or attempt to seek retribution against the complainant, or any person or group of persons
involved in the investigation and/or resolution of a sexual misconduct complaint. Retaliation can be committed by any
person or group of persons, not just a respondent. Retaliation may include continued abuse or violence, other forms of
harassment, and slander and libel.
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It is a violation of Massachusetts and federal law and a violation of this Policy to retaliate against a person for filing a
complaint of sexual misconduct or for cooperating in a sexual misconduct investigation. Any person who retaliates against
a person who has reported sexual misconduct, filed a sexual misconduct complaint, or participated in a sexual misconduct
investigation is subject to disciplinary action up to and including expulsion or termination by the University.
2. Examples of Retaliation.
• Katie reported to the Dean of Students that she felt her ex-boyfriend, Nate, was harassing her on the basis of her
sex. The Office of Judicial Affairs (OJA) conducted an investigation and held Nate responsible for the behavior
reported. Nate was suspended for one semester. A week after the disciplinary decision was issued, Nate’s friends
excluded Katie from the invitation list of a unique educational conference because she had “ratted out” Nate to the
Dean.
• Rachel accused Danielle of stalking. Rachel told Judicial Affairs that she had four witnesses, including Katrina
who was Danielle’s roommate. Danielle found out that Katrina was a witness in the investigation and had provided
information supportive of Rachel. Danielle confronted Katrina in the GSU and told her that because Katrina didn’t
support Danielle during the investigation, they were no longer friends and Danielle would no longer lend Katrina
her car.
III. OTHER IMPORTANT CONCEPTS AND DEFINITIONS.
A. Consent.
Consent must be informed and voluntary, and can be withdrawn at any time. Consent can be given by words or actions as
long as those words or actions create mutually understandable permission regarding the scope of sexual activity. There is
no consent when there is force, expressed or implied, or when coercion, intimidation, threats, or duress is used. Whether
a person has taken advantage of a position of influence over another person may be a factor in determining consent.
Silence or absence of resistance does not imply consent. Past consent to sexual activity with another person does not
imply ongoing future consent with that person or consent to that same sexual activity with another person.
If a person is mentally or physically incapacitated or impaired so that he or she cannot understand the fact, nature, or
extent of the sexual situation, there is no consent; this includes impairment or incapacitation due to alcohol or drug
consumption that meets this standard, or being asleep or unconscious.
Effect of drugs and alcohol on consent:
Individuals should be aware of, and carefully consider, the potential consequences of the use of alcohol or drugs. Alcohol
and other drugs can lower inhibitions and create an atmosphere of confusion over whether consent is freely and
affirmatively given. If there is a question about whether someone consented to sexual activity after consuming drugs or
alcohol, the University will examine the issue from the perspective of a reasonable person. Specifically, the University will
consider whether the respondent reasonably should have known about the impact of alcohol and other drugs on the
complainant’s ability to give consent.
B. Incapacitation.
Incapacitation is the inability, temporarily or permanently, to give consent, because the person is mentally and/or
physically helpless due to drug or alcohol consumption, either voluntarily or involuntarily, or the person is unconscious,
asleep, or otherwise unaware that the sexual activity is occurring. Some signs of incapacitation may include, but are not
limited to, lack of control over physical movements (e.g., stumbling, falling down), lack of awareness of circumstances or
surroundings, the inability to speak or communicate orally, or the inability to communicate for any reason.
It is a violation of this Policy and Massachusetts law to engage in sexual activity with a person who is incapacitated,
regardless of whether the person appeared to be a willing participant. It is especially important, therefore, that anyone
engaging in sexual activity be aware of the other person’s level of intoxication.
C. Force.
The use of force to cause someone to engage in sexual activity is, by definition, non-consensual contact, and is
prohibited. Force may include words, conduct, or appearance. Force includes causing another’s intoxication or impairment
through the use of drugs or alcohol. Under this Policy, force includes the use of any of the following:
1. Physical Force, Violence, or a Weapon.
Example: Steve and Melissa return to his room after a party. They consensually begin kissing and touching each other.
Steve wants to have sex, but Melissa tells him that she does not want to go that far. When Melissa tries to get off the bed
and leave the room, Steve holds her down and they have sex. Steve’s use of force renders the sexual intercourse nonconsensual and violates this Policy.
2. Threats.
Example: Josh and Lucas meet at a party. Josh confides in Lucas that he has recently “come out” to a few close friends,
but most people do not know he is gay. Josh worries how people will react if they knew. As the evening progresses, Lucas
and Josh start kissing. Lucas wants to have sex, but Josh tells him he is not ready for that. Lucas threatens to “out” Josh
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on Instagram and Twitter if he does not have sex with him. Out of fear for his reputation, Josh submits to Lucas even
though he really does not want to. Any sexual activity that then occurs is forced sexual contact and violates this Policy.
3. Intimidation and Implied Threats.
Example: Dylan is a popular senior and the captain of a sports team on campus. He has brought Grace, who is a first year
female athlete at school, to a fraternity party. Grace would not have been able to get into the party if it was not for Dylan’s
influence. Later in the evening, Grace wants to leave, but Dylan blocks her way with his body. He is significantly bigger
than she is and she cannot get around him. Dylan starts to kiss and touch Grace, but she tells him to stop. Dylan tells
Grace he can make sure she gets into all the big parties on campus this year which would help her relationship with her
new teammates (implying he could turn the team against her). Grace does not want to be with Dylan, but she is worried
about the impact he could have on her social and athletic life if she refuses. If Grace submits to Dylan out of his implied
threats and abuse of his status, it may constitute forced sexual contact in violation of this Policy.
4. Coercion.
Coercion is to force one to act based on fear of harm to self or others. Means of coercion may include, but are not limited
to, pressure, threats, or emotional intimidation.
Example: Hannah’s parents both died recently and she has been having a hard time focusing this semester. Owen, a
friend of Hannah’s, comes to her room to watch a movie with her. When Hannah starts crying and becomes upset, Owen
hugs and comforts her. Eventually Hannah and Owen start kissing and touching one another. Hannah wants to stop, but
Owen tells her “you’ve made me so hot, how can you stop now?” When Hannah tells Owen she wants to be alone, Owen
tells Hannah that it isn’t cool to leave him like this, especially when he came over to help her. Hannah is confused and
emotionally vulnerable. Owen implies that Hannah “owes him sex” after all he has done to support her. Owen continues to
pressure Hannah until she eventually submits to his advances. Owen’s conduct constitutes coercion in that he pressured
Hannah into additional sexual contact that was not freely chosen, in violation of this Policy.
D. Hostile Environment.
A hostile environment exists when sexual or sex-based harassment is sufficiently serious to deny or limit a student’s
ability to participate in or benefit from the University’s programs or activities or has the effect of unreasonably interfering
with an employee’s work performance or altering the terms and conditions of the employee’s employment. A hostile
environment can be created by anyone involved in a University program or activity (e.g., administrators, faculty members,
students, and campus visitors).
In determining whether sex-based harassment has created a hostile environment, the University considers the conduct in
question from both a subjective and objective perspective. It will be necessary, but not enough, that the conduct was
unwelcome to the student who was harassed. But the University will also need to find that a reasonable person in the
student’s position would have perceived the conduct as undesirable or offensive in order for that conduct to create or
contribute to a hostile environment.
To determine whether a hostile environment exists for a student or employee, the University will consider a variety of
factors related to the severity, persistence, or pervasiveness of the sex-based harassment, including: (1) the type,
frequency, and duration of the conduct; (2) the identity and relationships of persons involved; (3) the number of individuals
involved; (4) the location of the conduct and the context in which it occurred; and, (5) the degree to which the conduct
affected the student’s education or the employee’s employment.
The more severe the sex-based harassment, the less need there is to show a repetitive series of incidents to find a hostile
environment. Indeed, a single instance of sexual assault may be sufficient to create a hostile environment. Likewise, a
series of incidents may be sufficient even if the sex-based harassment is not particularly severe.
E. Miscellaneous Definitions.
• Complainant: The person making the allegations of sexual misconduct.
• Respondent: The person against whom a complaint of sexual misconduct has been made.
• Reporter: A person who has information that sexual misconduct may have been committed by a University
student or a participant in a University Program and who initiates a complaint.
IV. CAMPUS AND COMMUNITY RESOURCES.
As outlined here and in the “Resources and Support” section at the end of this Policy, a variety of support and counseling
resources are available to members of the Boston University community affected by sexual misconduct. Contact
information for the resources described here is available in Section X.
A. Emergency / Immediate Assistance.
The University encourages all community members affected by sexual misconduct to seek immediate assistance. Doing
so promptly may be important to ensure the person’s physical safety or to obtain medical care or other support. It may be
helpful to preserve evidence, which can assist the University and/or law enforcement in proving that the alleged criminal
offense occurred or may be helpful in obtaining a protective order. Assistance for students is available 24 hours a day, 7
days a week (by phone at (617) 353-SARP or email at [email protected]).
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B. Privacy & Confidentiality.
Boston University values the privacy of its students, faculty, staff, and other community members. BU wants all community
members to seek the assistance they need without fear that the information they provide will be shared more broadly than
they would like. Federal and state laws, however, impose reporting obligations on certain University employees that
require them to disclose information from a report of sexual misconduct with those University employees responsible for
responding to such a report. However, there are individuals at Boston University who are not subject to these reporting
requirements, with whom students, faculty, and staff can speak in complete confidence. The table in Section XI
summarizes the confidentiality protections and reporting obligations of various BU employees and offices.
Even when University employees have an obligation to report to others, which means their office is described as
“non-confidential” under this Policy, they will protect and respect an individual’s privacy to the greatest extent
possible and share information only on a need-to-know basis. Any of the staff listed as Resources will be able to
explain their respective reporting obligations in more detail.
C. Confidential Campus Resources and Support.
The University encourages all members of the BU community to report any incident of sexual misconduct. The University
recognizes, however, that not every person will choose to make a formal report with the University or with local law
enforcement. For those who are not prepared to make a report or pursue a complaint, the University provides confidential
advocacy, crisis and pastoral counseling, and medical services on campus. Conversations with these individuals are
confidential (except as described in Section XI). They can explain options for obtaining additional support from the
University and off-campus resources. They can also arrange for medical care and accompany complainants, or arrange
for someone to accompany complainants, to seek such care. Complainants may use these resources to talk to someone
about an incident of sexual misconduct in a confidential manner whether or not they decide to make an official report or to
participate in the University complaint resolution process or the criminal justice system. Conferring with these resources
will not trigger an investigation by the University or law enforcement. However, these offices are familiar with the
University’s complaint resolution processes, can explain what to expect, and can provide support while University or
criminal processes are pending.
D. Non-Confidential Campus Resources.
In addition to the confidential resources discussed above, all members or the BU community have access to a variety of
individuals who are trained to support those affected by sexual misconduct and to coordinate with the Title IX Coordinator
consistent with the University’s commitment to a safe and healthy campus environment. While not bound by
confidentiality, these resources will nevertheless maintain the privacy of a person’s information within the limited circle of
those involved in the Title IX investigation and resolution process.
1. Title IX Coordinators.
The Title IX Coordinator is responsible for overseeing the University’s response to Title IX reports and complaints, and
identifying and addressing any patterns or systemic problems revealed by such reports and complaints. The Title IX
Coordinator’s contact information is in Section X.
The Deputy Title IX Coordinators are individuals located in academic departments, and some administrative departments,
who are trained to assist students and employees in their departments with complaints or concerns about sexual
misconduct, and direct them to the resources they need. They report all complaints and concerns to the Title IX
Coordinator, and work closely with the Title IX Coordinator in promptly responding to a person’s concerns. The Deputy
Coordinators can help with interim measures that a complainant may need during the investigation of a complaint. Contact
information for the Deputy Title IX Coordinators is in Section X.
2. Boston University Police Department.
Complainants may report sexual misconduct to the Boston University Police Department (“BUPD”), the Boston Police
Department, the Brookline Police Department, and/or the local law enforcement agency or District Attorney’s office where
the misconduct occurred. The University complaint resolution procedures and the criminal justice system work
independently from one another and law enforcement officials do not determine whether a violation of this Policy has
occurred. BUPD personnel and the other resources listed in Section X are familiar with state and local law enforcement
processes and can explain what happens when sexual misconduct is reported to law enforcement. Confidential
resources, the Dean of Students Office, the Office of Judicial Affairs, and BUPD can explain how to report sexual assault
and other forms of sexual misconduct to law enforcement. Although confidential resources or BUPD personnel will
accompany any student requesting support to the appropriate Police Department or District Attorney’s Office, they are not
able to provide legal advice on these matters.
E. Off-Campus Resources.
Students, faculty, and staff may also access resources located in the local community. The organizations and agencies
listed in Section X can provide crisis intervention services, counseling, medical attention, and legal assistance. All
members of the BU community are encouraged to utilize the resources that are the best suited to their needs, whether on
45
or off campus. In general, off-campus resources can provide assistance to those who wish to make a report to the
University, but will not notify the University without the consent of the complainant.
V. REPORTING SEXUAL MISCONDUCT.
Boston University encourages all survivors to report incidents of sexual misconduct as promptly as possible so that the
University can respond effectively. Students may report sexual misconduct to the Dean of Students, the Office of Judicial
Affairs (“OJA”), the Title IX Coordinator, or a Deputy Title IX Coordinator. Faculty and staff may report incidents to the Title
IX Coordinator, a Deputy Title IX Coordinator, a supervisor, a Dean, or a department head. In general, when one of these
offices receives a report, the University must commence an investigation. All reports of such incidents will be disclosed to
the Title IX Coordinator.
The University recognizes that student complainants may be most comfortable disclosing sexual misconduct to a
University employee they know well, such as a faculty member, coach, or resident adviser (“RA”). Students are welcome
to speak with them, but should understand that these individuals are considered “responsible employees” of the University
(other than the confidential resources identified in the Section X), and if they receive a report of sexual misconduct are
required to inform the Title IX Coordinator about the incident. The University defines a “responsible employee” to include
supervisors and officials with significant responsibility for student and campus activities including, but not limited to,
academics, student residences, athletics, discipline, and campus safety. Employees whose positions legally require
confidentiality (e.g., counseling staff and clergy) are not “responsible employees.”
Before a student discloses an incident of sexual misconduct, University faculty and staff will try to ensure that the student
understands the employee’s reporting obligations — and, if the student wishes to maintain confidentiality, direct the
student to confidential resources. Similarly, before a faculty or staff member discloses an incident of sexual misconduct,
the person to whom the disclosure is to be made will endeavor to ensure that the faculty or staff member understands his
or her reporting obligations. Section X identifies the confidential resources available to students, faculty, and staff who do
not wish to file a complaint or trigger an investigation, or who would like to better understand their options.
A. Reports to a Non-Confidential Resource: Requests for Confidentiality.
The University has designated the Title IX Coordinator and a small number of other University administrators to evaluate
requests for confidentiality and oversee the University’s response to reports of sexual misconduct where the complainant
has disclosed an incident of sexual misconduct to a “responsible employee” (who must report the incident) and also
requested that his or her identity not be disclosed or that no action be taken.
In such cases, the Title IX Coordinator, in consultation with a small number of key University administrators, which may
include SARP, representatives of the Dean of Students Office, the Boston University Police Department, and the Office of
the General Counsel, will weigh the request against the University’s obligation to provide a safe, non-discriminatory
environment for all students, including the complainant. When weighing a request that no investigation be pursued or the
complainant’s identity not be disclosed, the Title IX Coordinator and the appropriate University administrators will consider
a range of factors, including whether:
• The respondent is likely to commit additional acts of sexual or other violence, such as:
• There have been other sexual misconduct complaints about the same respondent;
• The respondent has a history of arrests or records from a prior school indicating a history of violence;
• The respondent threatened further sexual misconduct or other violence against the complainant or others;
• The sexual misconduct was committed by multiple respondents.
• The sexual misconduct was perpetrated with a weapon;
• The complainant is a minor;
• The respondent is a Boston University employee;
• The University possesses other means to investigate the sexual misconduct (e.g., security cameras or personnel,
physical evidence);
• The complainant’s report reveals a pattern of perpetration (e.g., via illicit use of drugs or alcohol) at a given
location or by a particular person or group.
The presence of one or more of these factors could lead the University to investigate and, if appropriate, pursue conduct
action against the respondent. If none of these factors are present, the University will likely respect the complainant’s
request.
If the University honors a request for confidentiality or decision not to participate in an investigation, the University’s ability
to meaningfully investigate the incident or pursue conduct action against the respondent(s) may be limited.
In some cases the University may not be able to honor a confidentiality request in order to adhere to its obligation to
provide a safe, non-discriminatory environment for the BU community. If the Title IX Coordinator determines that the
University cannot maintain a complainant’s confidentiality, the Title IX Coordinator will inform the complainant prior to
starting an investigation and will only share information with those University officials responsible for handling the
University’s response.
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B. Interim Measures and Support.
Boston University provides a range of support services for survivors of sexual misconduct, including interim measures.
Interim measures are available to provide for the safety of the complainant and the campus community while the
University is investigating an allegation of sexual misconduct. Requests for interim measures can be made by or on behalf
of the complainant to the University Title IX Coordinator or a Deputy Title IX Coordinators. Students may also seek
assistance from the Dean of Students Office. The Title IX Coordinator will work with the appropriate office(s) to ensure
that any necessary interim measures are promptly provided. For more information about interim measures and support,
see Student Procedures, Section VII, and Faculty and Staff Procedures, Section V.
Upon the receipt of a report of sexual misconduct, and until any investigation into the report has been completed, the
University will provide reasonable protective measures and interim support to provide a safe educational and work
environment and to prevent additional acts of sexual misconduct, even when there is no specific request for protective
action.
The University may impose any measure that can be tailored to the parties involved to achieve the goals of this Policy. In
addition, the University will maintain as confidential any accommodations or protective measures provided to the
complainant to the extent that maintaining such confidentiality would not impair the ability of the University to provide the
accommodations or protective measures.
An individual’s failure to comply with restrictions imposed by interim measures is a violation of this Policy and a basis for
disciplinary action.
Outside the University, a complainant may also be entitled to obtain remedies under applicable law, such as a judicial
restraining order. The University can assist in contacting law enforcement or legal service organizations to learn about
these remedies.
C. Amnesty for Students Who Report Sexual Misconduct.
Boston University encourages the reporting of all concerns regarding sexual misconduct. In some instances, students
may be hesitant to report sexual misconduct because they fear they may be charged with other policy violations, such as
underage alcohol consumption or violation of the University’s drug policy. Because BU’s primary interest is in protecting
the well-being of its community and remedying sexual misconduct, a person who reports sexual misconduct, either as a
complainant or a third party witness, will not be subject to disciplinary action by the University for his/her own personal
consumption of alcohol or drugs at or near the time of the incident, provided that any such violations did not and do not
place the health or safety of any other person at risk. However, the use of alcohol or drugs does not excuse sexual
misconduct and a person who has been incapacitated through the use of alcohol and drugs (or by any other means)
cannot give effective consent to sexual activity. The University may initiate an educational discussion or pursue other
educational remedies regarding alcohol or other drugs.
VI. OTHER INFORMATION RELATED TO REPORTING SEXUAL MISCONDUCT
A. Time for Reporting.
Although all members of the Boston University community are encouraged to report sexual misconduct immediately in
order to maximize the University’s ability to respond promptly and equitably, the University does not limit the time frame
for reporting. However, the University’s ability to investigate and respond effectively may be reduced with the passage of
time.
B. Anonymous Reports and Reports from Third Parties.
Any person may make an anonymous report concerning an act of sexual misconduct. A person may report the incident
without disclosing his/her/their name, identifying the respondent, or requesting any action. Depending on the level of
information available about the incident and the people involved, however, the University’s ability to respond to an
anonymous report may be limited. Anonymous reports may be made by submitting the Sexual Misconduct Report Form to
the University Title IX Coordinator or one of the Deputy Title IX Coordinators.
In cases in which the report was made anonymously or by a third party (such as a friend, roommate, adviser, or faculty
member), this Policy will apply in the same manner as if the complainant had made the initial report. A Title IX Coordinator
or member of the OJA staff will make every effort to meet with the complainant to discuss available options and oncampus and off-campus resources.
C. Reporting of Crime and Disciplinary Statistics.
The Jeanne Clery Disclosure of Campus Security Policy and Campus Crime Statistics Act (“Clery Act”) is a federal law
that requires the University to record and report certain information about campus safety, including the number of
incidents of certain crimes on or near campus, some of which constitute sexual misconduct under this Policy. As
described in the chart in Section XI, many BU employees who receive reports of sexual misconduct are required by the
Clery Act to notify BUPD about such incidents for statistical reporting purposes, without the inclusion of personally
47
identifiable information, as defined by VAWA. These notifications may include the classification and location of the
reported crimes, but, in the case of employees with “confidential” status, do not identify the parties involved.
The Clery Act also requires the University to issue a “timely warning” when it receives a report of certain crimes that pose
a serious or continuing threat to the University community. This warning will not contain any biographical or other
identifying information regarding the victim of the crime. Immediately threatening circumstances include, but are not
limited to, recently reported incidents of sexual misconduct that include the use of force, a weapon, or other
circumstances that represent a serious and ongoing threat to BU students, faculty, administrators, staff, or visitors.
D. Public Awareness Events.
The University supports public awareness events that further campus-wide education and prevention efforts. A survivor’s
public disclosure of incidents of sexual misconduct at these events will not be considered a report to the University for the
purpose of triggering an investigation of a particular incident.
In addition, the University may, from time-to-time, conduct climate surveys to gauge the BU communities’ attitudes about
sexual misconduct and awareness of campus resources. These voluntary surveys will contribute to the University’s
understanding of the campus climate and student safety at BU. The disclosure of incidents of sexual misconduct in
responses to survey questions will not be considered a report to the University for the purpose of triggering an
investigation of a particular incident.
E. Prohibition Against Retaliation.
The University and Title IX strictly prohibit retaliation against and intimidation of any person because he or she reported of
an incident of sexual misconduct or is involved in the University’s response. BU will take strong disciplinary action in
response to any retaliation or intimidation, and will pursue such discipline through the applicable student conduct policy or
other disciplinary process and follow the applicable time frames within such policies or processes.
F. Filing a Criminal Complaint and Coordination with Law Enforcement.
Boston University encourages complainants to pursue criminal action for incidents of sexual misconduct that may also be
crimes under Massachusetts law. In general, the University, through the Chief of the BUPD, will notify the Boston or
Brookline Police Department of allegations of sexual violence. The University will also assist a complainant in making a
criminal report and will cooperate with law enforcement agencies if a complainant decides to pursue the criminal process
to the extent permitted by law. However, a complainant may also choose not to pursue criminal action, and under most
circumstances, the Boston or Brookline Police Department will not force a complainant to pursue criminal charges if he or
she is not willing to do so.
VII. TITLE IX REVIEW.
A. Role of the Title IX Coordinator.
The Title IX Coordinator oversees the University’s centralized review, investigation, and resolution procedures for reports
of sexual misconduct and coordinates the University’s compliance with Title IX. The Title IX Coordinator is supported by a
team of University administrators who serve as Deputy Title IX Coordinators. Each Deputy Title IX Coordinator is
knowledgeable and trained in state and federal laws that apply to matters of sexual misconduct, as well as this Policy and
the complaint resolution procedures.
A complete list of the Deputy Title IX Coordinators is available here.
The Title IX and/or Deputy Title IX Coordinators can be contacted by telephone, e-mail, or in person during regular office
hours. They can provide information related to campus and community resources and describe the options available to
address concerns related to sexual misconduct.
The duties and responsibilities of the Title IX and Deputy Title IX Coordinators also include training, education, climate
assessments, and the oversight of procedures that are designed to promptly and equitably end sexual misconduct,
prevent its recurrence, and address its effect on persons and the University community as a whole. The Title IX
Coordinator, with the assistance of Deputy Title IX Coordinators as appropriate, will:
• Oversee the investigation and resolution of all reports of sexual misconduct;
• Ensure prompt and equitable resolutions that comply with all requirements and timeframes specified in the
University’s complaint procedures;
• Conduct climate checks to track and monitor sexual misconduct allegations on campus; and,
• Coordinate all training, education, and prevention efforts.
The Title IX Coordinator and a Deputy Title IX Coordinator will meet with any person, including a complainant,
respondent, or third party, to discuss interim measures, resources, and procedural options for on-campus and off-campus
reporting. Any student, faculty, or staff member who has concerns about sexual misconduct, including sexual assault,
discrimination, or harassment, is encouraged to seek the assistance of the University’s Title IX Coordinator or any of the
Deputy Title IX Coordinators.
48
B. Procedures for Responding to Sexual Misconduct.
The Title IX Coordinator oversees the initial response and assessment of reports of sexual misconduct through the
University’s sexual misconduct resolution procedures. The procedure used will be determined by the status of the
respondent:
• Complaints against student respondents will be resolved by the Procedures for the Resolution of Sexual
Misconduct Complaints against Students.
• Complaints against faculty and staff respondents, as well as non-affiliates, will be resolved by the Procedures for
the Resolution of Sexual Misconduct Complaints against Faculty, Staff, Affiliates, and Non-Affiliates.
Each process is guided by the same principles of fairness and respect for all parties. Resources are available for both
students and employees, whether as complainants or respondents, to provide guidance throughout the investigation and
resolution of a sexual misconduct complaint.
VIII. PREVENTION AND EDUCATION
Boston University expects all community members to take reasonable and prudent actions to prevent or stop an act of
sexual misconduct. Taking action may include direct intervention, calling law enforcement, or seeking assistance from a
person in authority. Members of the BU community who intervene to prevent or stop sexual misconduct will be supported
by the University and protected from retaliation. Read more about SARP’s education, awareness, and training program.
IX. TRAINING
In connection with its obligations under Title IX, Boston University is committed to ensuring appropriate training for its Title
IX Coordinator, Deputy Title IX Coordinators, law enforcement personnel, “responsible employees,” victim advocates, and
others involved in responding to, investigating, or adjudicating sexual misconduct. In addition, the University has
developed an on-line training program for faculty, staff, and students to assist them in recognizing sexual misconduct,
teach them how to respond to reports of sexual misconduct, and ensure that they are aware of available on and off
campus resources.
X. RESOURCES AND SUPPORT.
The contact information for the resources listed here was confirmed at the time of the Policy’s initial publication in January
2015. Up-to-date contact information can always be found on the University’s website at www.bu.edu/safety.
CONFIDENTIAL ON-CAMPUS CRISIS INTERVENTION, SUPPORT, ADVOCACY AND HEALTH RESOURCES
Sexual Assault Response & Prevention Center (“SARP”) (for students)
www.bu.edu/sarp
930 Commonwealth Ave.
24-hour hotline: 617-353-SARP (7277)
By email: [email protected]
Student Health Services/Behavioral Medicine
www.bu.edu/shs
881W Commonwealth Ave., 1st Floor
Medical Department
617-353-3575
Behavioral Medicine
24-hour hotline: 617-353-3569
Faculty & Staff Assistance Office (for employees)
www.bu.edu/fsao
Charles River Campus
270 Bay State Road, B-30
617-353-5381
Medical Campus
Dr. Solomon Carter Fuller Mental Health Ctr.
85 East Newton St., 10th Floor, M-1007
617-638-5381
By email: [email protected]
Office of the Ombuds
www.bu.edu/ombuds/
Charles River Campus
49
19 Deerfield Street, Suite 203
617-358-5960
Medical Campus
Dr. Solomon Carter Fuller Mental Health Ctr.
85 East Newton St., Suite 957E
617-638-7645
University Chaplains
www.bu.edu/chapel/staff/chaplains/
Charles River Campus
735 Commonwealth Ave.
617-353-3560
By email: [email protected]
NON-CONFIDENTIAL CAMPUS RESOURCES
University Title IX Coordinator
19 Deerfield Street, 2nd Floor
617-353-9286
By email: [email protected]
Deputy Title IX Coordinators and their contact information
Boston University Police Department
32 Harry Agganis Way
In an emergency: 617-353-2121
Detective Unit: 617-353-3436
www.bu.edu/police/
Dean of Students Office (Students)
George Sherman Union, 3d Floor
775 Commonwealth Ave.
www.bu.edu/dos/about-us/contact-us/
617-353-4126
Office of Judicial Affairs (Students)
19 Deerfield Street, 3rd Floor
617-358-0700
Equal Opportunity Office (Faculty & Staff)
www.bu.edu/eoo
19 Deerfield Street, 2nd Floor
617-353-9286
By email: [email protected]
Human Resources (Faculty & Staff)
Charles River Campus
25 Buick Street, 2nd Floor
617-353-2380
Medical Campus
801 Massachusetts Avenue
Crosstown Center Building, Suite 400
617-638-4610
University Service Center
881 Commonwealth Avenue
617-358-1818
By email: [email protected]
Student Financial Assistance
881 Commonwealth Avenue
50
617-353-2965
By email: [email protected]
Website: http://www.bu.edu/finaid/contact-us/
OFF-CAMPUS COUNSELING, ADVOCACY, AND LEGAL RESOURCES, including assistance with or referrals for visa
and immigration matters
Boston Area Rape Crisis Center (“BARCC”)
www.barcc.org
617-492-RAPE (7273)
800-841-8371
GLBTQ Domestic Violence Project
www.glbtqdvp.org
800-832-1901
Victim Rights Law Center (“VRLC”)
www.victimrights.org/
115 Broad Street, 3rd Floor
Boston, MA 02110 617-399-6720, x19
Fenway Health Violence Recovery Program
www.fenwayhealth.org/
Ansin Building
1340 Boylston Street
Boston, MA 02215
617-927-6250 800-834-3242
After 5:00 pm or on the weekends, call 877-785-2020
OFF-CAMPUS LAW ENFORCEMENT RESOURCES
Boston Police Department Sexual Assault Unit
www.cityofboston.gov/police/divisions/sau_home.asp
Boston Police Department – 911
617-343-4400
Boston Police Sexual Assault Unit
617-343-4400
Brookline Police Department – 911
Brookline Police Detective Bureau
617-730-2244
OFF-CAMPUS MEDICAL / HEALTH CARE RESOURCES
A medical provider can provide emergency and/or follow-up medical services as appropriate, and a person can discuss
any related health care concerns in a confidential medical setting. The medical examination has two primary goals: (i) to
diagnose and treat the full extent of any injury or physical effect (sexually transmitted infection or pregnancy) and (ii) to
properly collect and preserve evidence. There is a limited window of time within which to preserve physical and other
forms of evidence (usually within 96 hours of the sexual assault). Taking the step to gather evidence immediately does not
commit a person to any course of action.
Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center Emergency Department
330 Brookline Ave., Boston, MA
617-754-2323
Note: Beth Israel Deaconess, along with Boston Medical Center and Brigham & Women’s Hospital are SANE designated
hospitals that have specially trained Sexual Assault Nurse Examiners (“SANE”) on call. SARP can help students arrange
a SANE examination.
GOVERNMENT RESOURCES
The resources listed here may provide additional assistance for those who would like to file an external complaint of
sexual misconduct or students with inquiries regarding the application of Title IX and its implementing regulations.
White House Task Force
http://www.notalone.gov
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U.S. Department of Education, Office for Civil Rights
http://www.ed.gov/ocr
U.S. Department of Education
Office for Civil Rights
Region I – Boston Office
5 Post Office Square, 8th Floor
Boston, MA 02109-3921
617-289-0111
[email protected]
U.S. Department of Justice, Office on Violence Against Women
www.ovw.usdoj.gov
U.S. Department of Justice
Office on Violence Against Women
145 N Street, NE, Suite 10W.121
Washington, DC 20530
202-307-6026
U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services
www.uscis.gov/about-us/find-uscis-office/field-offices/massachusetts-boston-field-office
Boston Field Office
John F. Kennedy Federal Bldg.
15 New Sudbury St.
Room E-160
Boston, MA 02203
800-375-5283
Massachusetts Commission Against Discrimination (“MCAD”)
1 Ashburton Place, Sixth Floor
Boston, MA 02108
617-994-6000
XI. CONFIDENTIALITY PROTECTIONS & REPORTING OBLIGATIONS.
As a reminder, confidential resources will not share information with anyone. Non-confidential resources are also required
to respect a complainant’s privacy to the greatest extent possible. They will disclose identifying information to others only
on a need-to-know basis.
Office/Personnel
Status
Reporting Obligation
University Chaplains
(Clergy)
Confidential None, unless acting in a role described below.
Behavioral Medicine will report incidents without any identifying information to
the Title IX Coordinator to help the University understand the existence and
extent of the problem (Title IX).
Behavioral Medicine
Confidential
If the incident is a crime on or near campus, Behavioral Medicine will report it
without any identifying information to BUPD for inclusion in the annual
security report and for issuance of any required timely warning (Clery Act).
SARP will report incidents without any identifying information to the Title IX
Coordinator to help the University understand the existence and extent of the
problem (Title IX).
Sexual Assault Response
and Prevention Center
(“SARP”)
Confidential
Student Health Services
(“SHS”)
SHS will report incidents without any identifying information to the Title IX
Confidential Coordinator to help the University understand the existence and extent of the
problem (Title IX).
If the incident is a crime on or near campus, SARP may report it without any
identifying information to BUPD for inclusion in the annual security report and
for issuance of any required timely warning (Clery Act) if the complainant
consents to the report.
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If the incident is a crime on or near campus, SHS will report it without any
identifying information to BUPD for inclusion in the annual security report and
for issuance of any required timely warning (Clery Act).
If there is reasonable cause to suspect that a minor has been sexually
assaulted, SHS will notify law enforcement (Massachusetts Law).
FSAO will report incidents without any identifying information to the Title IX
Coordinator to help the University understand the existence and extent of the
problem (Title IX).
Faculty & Staff Assistance
Office (“FSAO”)
Confidential
University Ombuds
The Ombuds may provide anonymous (de-identified) information to the Title
IX Coordinator in an effort to address emerging problems or to prevent
Confidential
recurrence, including information on general trends or patterns of concern
(Title IX).
If the incident is a crime on or near campus, FSAO will report it without any
identifying information to BUPD for inclusion in the annual security report and
for issuance of any required timely warning (Clery Act).
Unless a complainant requests otherwise and the request is granted, the Title
IX Coordinator will supervise the investigation and response to reported
incidents of sexual misconduct (Title IX).
Title IX Coordinator
Not
If the incident is a crime on or near campus, the Title IX Coordinator will report
Confidential it without any identifying information to BUPD for inclusion in the annual
security report and for issuance of any required timely warning (Clery Act).
The Title IX Coordinator will share information with University Personnel who
need to know it in order to carry out University policies and procedures.
Unless a complainant requests otherwise and the request is granted, the
Not
Deputy Title IX Coordinators will assist the Title IX Coordinator in the
Deputy Title IX Coordinators
Confidential investigation and response to reported incidents of sexual misconduct, as
appropriate (Title IX).
Unless a complainant requests otherwise and the request is granted, the
Dean’s designee (the Office of Judicial Affairs) will investigate and respond to
reported incidents of sexual misconduct (Title IX).
Dean of Students Office
(“Dean”)
Not
If the incident is a crime on or near campus, the Dean will report it without any
Confidential identifying information to BUPD for inclusion in the annual security report and
for issuance of any required timely warning (Clery Act).
The Dean will share information with University Personnel who need to know
it in order to carry out University policies and procedures.
Unless a complainant requests otherwise and the request is granted, OJA will
investigate and respond to reported incidents of sexual misconduct (Title IX).
Office of Judicial Affairs
(“OJA”)
If the incident is a crime on or near campus, OJA will report it without any
Not
identifying information to BUPD for inclusion in the annual security report and
Confidential
for issuance of any required timely warning (Clery Act).
OJA will share information with University Personnel who need to know it in
order to carry out University policies and procedures.
Equal Opportunity Office
(“EOO”)
Not
Confidential
Unless a complainant requests otherwise and the request is granted, EOO
will investigate and respond to reported incidents of sexual misconduct (Title
IX).
If the incident is a crime on or near campus, EOO will report it without any
identifying information to BUPD for inclusion in the annual security report and
53
for issuance of any required timely warning (Clery Act).
EOO will share information with University Personnel who need to know it in
order to carry out University policies and procedures.
BUPD will report to the Title IX Coordinator all information received about
sexual misconduct incidents so the University can investigate and respond
(Title IX.)
If the incident is a crime, BUPD will include it in a crime log and the annual
security report without identifying the victim (Clery Act).
Boston University Police
Department (“BUPD”)
Not
If the incident is a crime and poses a serious or continuing threat, BUPD will
Confidential issue a timely warning or emergency notification (Clery Act).
If there is reasonable cause to suspect that a minor has been sexually
abused, BUPD will notify University leadership (MA Law on Protection of
Minors).
BUPD will share information with University personnel who need to know it in
order to carry out University policies and procedures.
Will report to the Title IX Coordinator all information received about sexual
misconduct incidents so the University can investigate and respond (Title IX.)
Other University Personnel
Not
Confidential
If the incident is a crime, a “campus security authority” will report it without
any identifying information to BUPD for inclusion in the annual security report
and for issuance of any required timely warning (Clery Act).
If there is reasonable cause to suspect that a minor has been sexually
abused, other University personnel will notify University leadership (MA Law
on Protection of Minors).
Other University personnel will share information with University personnel
who need to know it in order to carry out University policies and procedures.
Please refer to Appendix A which contains information about University programming and initiatives intended to increase
the University community's knowledge and to prevent violence and promote safety, including bystander intervention
awareness and other prevention programs intended to prevent dating violence, domestic violence, sexual assault and
stalking.
Student Sexual Misconduct Procedures
Procedures for the Resolution of Sexual Misconduct Complaints Against Students
Effective January 1, 2015
Table of Contents
I. Applicability
II. Rights of the Complainant and Respondent
III. Preliminary Matters
IV. Initiating a Complaint
V. How to file a Complaint
VI. Information for Complaints
VII. Interim Measures
VIII. Withdrawal of a Complaint
IX. Complainant Requests for Confidentiality
X. Responding to a Complaint
XI. Investigation of a Complaint
XII. Resolution of a Complaint
XIII. Appeal to the University Board on Student Conduct
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XIV. Appeals to the University Provost
XV. Disciplinary Records, Withdrawal and Readmission
I. APPLICABILITY
These Procedures will be used to investigate and resolve all complaints of sexual misconduct against Boston University
students (undergraduate, graduate, full-time, and part-time). Complaints of sexual misconduct against Boston University
faculty, staff, affiliates, and non-affiliates will be investigated and resolved using the Procedures for the Resolution of
Sexual Misconduct Complaints against Faculty, Staff, Affiliates, and Non-Affiliates.
II. RIGHTS OF THE COMPLAINANT AND RESPONDENT
Boston University’s Procedures for the investigation, adjudication, and resolution of sexual misconduct complaints brought
against students are designed to be accessible, prompt, equitable, and impartial. Throughout this process, both the
complainant and respondent have the following rights:
• To be treated with respect, dignity, and sensitivity.
• To receive appropriate support from the University.
• Privacy to the extent possible, consistent with applicable law and University policy.
• Information about the University’s Sexual Misconduct/Title IX Policy.
• The presence of an Adviser throughout the process.
• To participate or to decline to participate in the investigation or complaint resolution process. However, a decision
not to participate in the process either in whole or in part will not prevent the University from proceeding with the
information available.
• A prompt and thorough investigation of the allegations.
• Adequate time to review documents in the Office of Judicial Affairs following the investigation.
• To appeal the decision made or any sanctions imposed by the Dean of Students to a Hearing Panel of the
University Board on Student Conduct.
• To challenge a Hearing Panel member(s) for a possible conflict of interest.
• To refrain from making self-incriminating statements.
• To appeal the decision by made the Hearing Panel of the University Board on Student Conduct to the University
Provost.
• Notification, in writing, of the case resolution, including the outcome of any appeals, and the final determination.
• For the complainant, to report the incident to law enforcement (including the Boston University Police or with the
police department in the jurisdiction in which the sexual misconduct occurred) at any time.
Boston University will disclose information about its investigation and resolution of sexual misconduct complaints only to
those who need to know the information in order to carry out their duties and responsibilities. It will inform all University
personnel participating in an investigation, proceeding, or hearing that they are expected to maintain the privacy of the
process. This does not prohibit either a complainant or respondent from obtaining the assistance of family members,
counselors, therapists, clergy, doctors, attorneys, or other resources.
III. PRELIMINARY MATTERS
A. Timing of Complaints.
If the respondent is a current Boston University student (undergraduate or graduate, full-time or part-time), there is no
time limit for filing a complaint to initiate these Procedures. However, students are strongly encouraged to report sexual
misconduct in a timely manner to maximize the University’s ability to gather evidence, and conduct a thorough, impartial,
and reliable investigation. If the respondent is a second semester senior (or in the final semester of a graduate program),
the University may withhold that student’s Boston University degree pending conclusion of the complaint resolution
procedures.
B. Effect of Criminal Proceedings.
The filing and processing of a complaint of sexual misconduct is separate from and independent of any criminal
investigation or proceeding. Boston University will not wait for the conclusion of any criminal investigation or proceedings
to begin its own investigation although the University may delay temporarily the fact-finding component of the investigation
while the police are gathering evidence. Neither law enforcement’s determination as to whether or not to prosecute a
respondent nor the outcome of any criminal prosecution is determinative of whether sexual misconduct occurred under
the University’s Sexual Misconduct/Title IX Policy.
C. Effect of a Pending Complaint on the Respondent.
If the respondent is a current BU student, no notation will be placed on the respondent’s transcript of a complaint or
pending disciplinary action prior to the conclusion of the complaint resolution process. If the respondent withdraws from
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Boston University while a sexual misconduct complaint is pending, the respondent’s transcript will reflect a withdrawal and
a notation of pending disciplinary action subject to modification to reflect the outcome of the disciplinary action.
D. Amnesty.
A student who files a sexual misconduct complaint, or who serves as a third party witness during the complaint resolution
process, will not be subject to disciplinary action by the University for his or her own personal consumption of alcohol or
other drugs at or near the time of the alleged sexual misconduct, provided that such violations did not and do not place
the health or safety of any other person at risk. However, the use of alcohol or drugs does not excuse sexual misconduct
and a person who has been incapacitated through the use of alcohol and drugs (or by any other means) cannot give
effective consent to sexual activity. The University may initiate an educational discussion or pursue other educational
remedies regarding alcohol or other drugs.
E. Adviser.
The complainant and respondent may each choose and be accompanied to any meeting or hearing related to these
Procedures by an Adviser, who may provide support during such meeting or hearing. During meetings and interviews, the
Adviser may quietly confer or pass notes with the party in a non-disruptive manner. The Adviser may not intervene in a
meeting or interview, or address the Investigator. Consistent with the University’s obligation to promptly resolve sexual
misconduct complaints, the University reserves the right to proceed with any meeting or interview, regardless of the
availability of the party’s selected Adviser.
F. Declining to Participate.
A complainant and/or respondent may decline to participate in the investigative or complaint resolution process. The
University may continue the process without the complainant’s and/or respondent’s participation. In most cases, a refusal
to participate in the investigative process will preclude a complainant or respondent from appealing any determination.
The Dean of Students will make this determination.
G. Time Frame for Complaint Resolution.
The University will seek to resolve every report of sexual misconduct within sixty (60) calendar days of the start of an
investigation, not counting any appeals. Time frames may vary depending on the complexity of a case, the availability of
witnesses, and at certain times of the academic year (for example, during breaks, study periods or final exams). The
University may extend any time frame for good cause, with a written explanation to the complainant and respondent.
H. Prohibition on Retaliation.
It is illegal and a violation of the University’s Sexual Misconduct/Title IX Policy to retaliate against a person for filing a
complaint of sexual misconduct or for cooperating in a sexual misconduct investigation. Any person who retaliates against
a person for reporting sexual misconduct, filing a sexual misconduct complaint, or participating in a sexual misconduct
investigation is subject to disciplinary action up to and including expulsion from the University.
I. Notice.
The Office of Judicial Affairs (“OJA”) will give the complainant and respondent, respectively, a written explanation of their
rights and options, and any available accommodations, as soon as possible after a complaint is reported. OJA and the
Dean of Students Office will also ensure that both the complainant and respondent are updated throughout the
investigative process, including with timely notice of meetings where either the complainant’s or the respondent’s
presence may be required.
IV. INITIATING A COMPLAINT.
A. Individual.
Any person who believes he or she has experienced sexual misconduct as defined in the University’s Sexual
Misconduct/Title IX Policy, may file a complaint against the Boston University student responsible for that conduct (the
person filing a complaint is referred to as a “complainant”). A person who has information that sexual misconduct may
have been committed by a University student or a participant in a University Program may also file a complaint (the
person with such information is referred to as a “reporter”). A complainant or reporter may include any member of the
Boston University community, including students, faculty, administrators, and staff members, visitors, applicants for
employment or admission, participants in a BU program or activity, or a non-affiliate with knowledge of an incident of
sexual misconduct.
B. Administrative.
In extraordinary cases, such as situations that threaten the safety of members of the BU community, the University may
56
initiate a complaint through the Dean of Students Office against a Boston University student. As set forth in the Sexual
Misconduct/Title IX Policy, reports of sexual misconduct undergo a Title IX Review to determine the appropriate response.
V. HOW TO FILE A COMPLAINT.
A complainant or reporter may submit a Sexual Misconduct Report Form (paper or electronic format) to the Dean of
Students Office, the Office of Judicial Affairs (“OJA”), or one of the University’s Title IX Coordinators. Although the Report
Form should contain sufficient information to permit the respondent to understand and respond adequately to the charges
being brought, it may not reflect every detail related to the allegations in the complaint, as additional information may be
discovered during the investigation.
A complainant may also call or meet with the Dean of Students Office, OJA, or a Title IX Coordinator to initiate a
complaint.
University Title IX Coordinator
19 Deerfield Street, Fl. 2, Boston, MA 02115
(617) 353-9286
[email protected]
Deputy Title IX Coordinators
Contact information available here.
Dean of Students Office
George Sherman Union, Fl. 3
775 Commonwealth Avenue, Boston, MA 02115
(617) 353-4126
[email protected]
Office of Judicial Affairs
19 Deerfield Street, Fl. 3, Boston, MA 02115
(617) 358-0700
VI. INFORMATION FOR COMPLAINANTS.
After receiving a report of sexual misconduct, OJA will notify the complainant of the option to have an Adviser accompany
him or her to any meeting or interview related to the complaint resolution process. OJA will also:
• Provide the complainant with information regarding the Rights of the Complainant and Respondent.
• Explain the prohibition against retaliation.
• Explain the process for investigating and resolving a sexual misconduct complaint (including the available appeal
procedures).
• Instruct the complainant not to destroy any potentially relevant documentation in any format.
• Give the complainant a copy of the relevant policies.
• Explain the availability of interim measures.
• Provide the complainant with a list of on-campus and off-campus support resources.
VII. INTERIM MEASURES.
Upon the filing of a sexual misconduct complaint, the Dean of Students, OJA, or a Title IX Coordinator will review the
allegations and determine the necessity and scope of any interim measures to prevent further acts of harassment,
misconduct, or retaliation and to provide a safe educational and work environment. The range of interim measures may
include, but not be limited to:
• Moving the complainant’s or respondent’s residence.
• Adjusting the complainant’s or respondent’s work schedule, assignment, or location for University employment.
Changing the complainant’s academic schedule, allowing the complainant to take an incomplete in one or more
courses, allowing the complainant to drop (or retake) a course without penalty, or attend class via web
conference.
• Changing the complainant’s transportation arrangements or providing an escort to ensure safe movement
between classes and other activities.
• Allowing the complainant to withdraw from or retake a class without penalty, or extending deadlines for
examinations or other assignments.
• Reassigning the respondent to another section, if the complainant and respondent are enrolled in the same
lecture, discussion class, academic team, or project group.
• Providing access to tutoring or other academic support.
• Issuing an administrative “stay-away” (no contact) order.
• Interim suspension of the respondent.
57
The University will maintain as confidential any accommodations or protective measures provided to the complainant to
the extent that maintaining such confidentiality would not impair the ability of the University to provide the
accommodations or protective measures.
An individual’s failure to comply with restrictions imposed by interim measures is a violation of University Policy and a
basis for disciplinary action, up to and including expulsion from the University.
VIII. WITHDRAWAL OF A COMPLAINT.
Prior to the conclusion of a sexual misconduct investigation, the complainant may withdraw his or her complaint.
Withdrawal of the complaint will ordinarily end the complaint investigation and resolution process. However, the University
reserves the right to proceed with the complaint, even after the complainant withdraws it, in order to protect the interests
and safety of the BU community.
IX. COMPLAINANT REQUESTS FOR CONFIDENTIALITY.
If the complainant is willing to participate in the review and investigation process, OJA will proceed as described in the
Investigation section below.
If the complainant requests confidentiality or asks that the report of sexual misconduct not be pursued, the University will,
generally before taking any further investigative steps, evaluate the complainant’s request in the manner set forth in
Section V.A of the Sexual Misconduct/Title IX Policy. The evaluation will be conducted by the Title IX Coordinator in
consultation with a small number of University administrators as deemed necessary and appropriate under the
circumstances.
Even absent a request for confidentiality, every reasonable effort will be made to protect the privacy of all parties during
the investigation. Boston University will disclose information about its investigation and resolution of sexual misconduct
complaints only to those who need to know the information in order to carry out their duties and responsibilities. It will
inform all University personnel participating in an investigation, proceeding, or hearing that they are expected to maintain
the privacy of the process. This does not prohibit either a complainant or respondent from obtaining the assistance of
family members, counselors, therapists, clergy, doctors, attorneys, or other resources.
X. RESPONDING TO A COMPLAINT.
A. Notification of Respondent.
The person alleged to have committed sexual misconduct is called the respondent. Unless the complainant requests and
is granted confidentiality, the respondent will be notified in writing that a complaint alleging sexual misconduct has been
filed against him or her. The respondent will be advised that he or she may have an Adviser accompany him or her to any
meeting or interview related to the investigation and complaint resolution process.
B. Information for Respondent.
Within seven (7) calendar days of receiving notice of the complaint, the respondent must arrange to meet with OJA. At
that meeting, OJA will:
• Provide the respondent with information regarding the Rights of the Complainant and Respondent.
• Provide the respondent with a copy of the complaint.
• Explain the prohibition against retaliation.
• Discuss the nature of the complaint.
• Explain the rights and responsibilities of the complainant and respondent. Explain the process for investigating
and resolving the complaint (including the available appeal procedures).
• Instruct the respondent not to destroy any potentially relevant documentation in any format.
• Give the respondent a copy of the relevant policies.
• Provide the respondent with a list of on-campus and off-campus support resources.
If the respondent fails to meet or cooperate with the OJA Investigator, the investigation and resolution of the complaint will
proceed without input from the respondent. If interim measures have been imposed, OJA will explain the scope of those
measures and the respondent’s duty to comply with the interim measures.
C. Acceptance of Responsibility.
After reviewing the complaint and meeting with OJA and the Dean of Students, the respondent may choose to end the
complaint resolution process by accepting responsibility for the conduct alleged in the complaint. If the respondent
accepts responsibility for the conduct alleged in the complaint, the Dean of Students will determine an appropriate
sanction for the respondent. If the respondent disputes the allegations of the complaint, the matter will proceed to an
investigation.
At any point in the process, the respondent may accept responsibility for the conduct alleged in the complaint. In such
cases, the Dean of Students may impose sanctions for violations of the Sexual Misconduct/Title IX Policy.
58
XI. INVESTIGATION OF A COMPLAINT.
A. Investigators.
The Office of Judicial Affairs will designate two Investigators specifically trained in sexual misconduct investigations to
conduct a prompt, thorough, and fair investigation.
B. Investigation Process.
The investigation will include one or more interviews with the complainant, the respondent, and any witnesses. The
investigation will include the gathering of physical, documentary, or other relevant and available evidence, including law
enforcement reports. As part of the investigation, the University will provide an opportunity for all parties to present written
statements, identify witnesses, and submit other evidence. The Dean of Students Office may require student-witnesses to
cooperate with the investigation regardless of the parties’ selection of witnesses.
C. Standard of Proof.
In resolving complaints pursuant to the Sexual Misconduct/Title IX Policy, the University will use a “preponderance of the
evidence,” standard, which is whether the evidence gathered and information provided during the investigation supports a
finding that it is more likely than not that the respondent violated the Sexual Misconduct/Title IX Policy.
D. Investigation Finding.
At the conclusion of the investigation, the Investigators will prepare a report (the “Investigative Report”) summarizing and
analyzing the relevant facts determined through the investigation, with reference to any supporting documentation or
statements. Before the Investigative Report is finalized, the complainant and respondent will be given the opportunity to
review their own statements and, may also be provided with a written summary of other information collected during the
investigation.
A complainant or respondent must submit any comments about their own statement, or on any investigation summary that
might be provided, to the Investigators within five (5) calendar days after the statement or summary was provided.
Following the receipt of any comments submitted, or after the 5-day comment period has lapsed without comment, the
Investigators will address any identified factual inaccuracies or misunderstandings, as appropriate. The final Investigative
Report will provide a summary of the Investigators’ impressions, including context for the evidence and a
recommendation, but will not make a final determination as to whether a violation of the Sexual Misconduct/Title IX Policy
occurred, reserving that decision (and any sanctions) for the Dean of Students. The parties will be provided with a copy of
the final Investigative Report simultaneously.
XII. RESOLUTION OF A COMPLAINT.
A. Voluntary Resolution.
A complainant and a respondent may choose to resolve a complaint through voluntary resolution. Voluntary resolution
may include conflict mediation or a restorative conference with a University community member. However, voluntary
resolution may only be used:
1. Prior to a decision by Dean of Students being issued;
2. When the Dean of Students determines this is a suitable option for resolving the complaint, and both the complainant
and respondent agree to use the process;
3. When the complaint does not involve sexual assault, as defined in Section II.A of the Sexual Misconduct/Title IX Policy.
Either the complainant or respondent may choose to end the voluntary resolution process at any time and commence or
resume the formal complaint resolution process.
Because the outcome of voluntary resolution process is mutually developed and agreed upon by the parties, an appeal of
the process and its result is not permitted. If the parties are unable to agree on a voluntary resolution, the matter will be
referred by the Dean of Students for investigation by the Office of Judicial Affairs.
B. Dean of Students Determination of Responsibility under the University’s Sexual Misconduct/Title IX Policy.
On behalf of the University, the Dean of Students shall have jurisdiction in cases of alleged misconduct by Boston
University students and shall determine if a student has violated the Sexual Misconduct/ Title IX Policy. The Office of
Judicial Affairs will provide the Dean of Students with a copy of the Investigative Report within seven (7) calendar days of
its completion. Within fourteen (14) calendar days after receiving the Investigative Report, the Dean of Students will make
a determination as to whether the respondent(s) violated the Sexual Misconduct/Title IX Policy, and impose a sanction if a
violation has been found.
1. Determination & Notice of the Outcome.
59
The Dean of Students may, in his or her discretion, provide the complainant and the respondent with an opportunity to
meet, accompanied by the party’s Adviser. If the Dean of Students meets with one party, he or she will offer the other
party the chance to meet.
The Dean of Students will provide the complainant and respondent with simultaneous, written notice of the outcome of the
University’s resolution of the sexual misconduct complaint (the “Letter of Determination”), the sanction, if any, that has
been imposed on the respondent, and any additional steps that the University has taken to eliminate the hostile
environment (if the Dean found one exists) and prevent any recurrence of any sexual misconduct. The Letter of
Determination will include a description of the right to appeal for both the complainant and the respondent.
2. Sanctions for Violations of the Sexual Misconduct/Title IX Policy.
If the respondent is found responsible for violating the Sexual Misconduct/Title IX Policy, the Dean of Students will impose
a sanction designed to eliminate the misconduct, prevent its recurrence, and remedy its effects, while supporting the
University’s educational mission and Title IX obligations. Sanctions may also serve to promote safety or deter students
from similar future behavior.
The following, individually or in combination, are potential sanctions for violations of the University’s Sexual
Misconduct/Title IX Policy. Where appropriate, the statement of the sanction includes the duration, any conditions to be
observed during that period, and the conditions for termination of the sanction.
Major Sanctions.
• Expulsion from the University or a program of the University.
• Suspension from the University or a program of the University for a specific period of time.
• Deferred suspension from the University or a program of the University.
• Denial of graduation, diploma, or degree.
• Deferral of graduation, diploma, or degree for a specific period of time.
• Revocation or withdrawal of diploma or degree previously credited, awarded, or conferred.
Other Available Sanctions.
• Expulsion from a University residence.
• Suspension from a University residence for a specific period of time.
• Deferred residence expulsion (with or without relocation to a different residence location).
• Disciplinary probation. Disciplinary probation may involve counseling with faculty or administrative staff; restriction
of student privileges; prohibitions against participation in University activities or events, including athletic or nonathletic activities; and prohibitions against holding office or participating in student organizations or residence,
school, or college organizations or activities.
• Residence probation. Residence probation may involve periodic meetings with a member of the residence staff
and/or restriction of specific residence privileges.
• Disciplinary reprimand or warning.
• Restitution. The student will reimburse the University and/or other appropriate party for damage to or loss of
property or for costs or expenses incurred by the University or other party. Restitution will be made at full cost of
replacement or repair, and other expenses.
Note: If the respondent is a graduate student who also serves as a teaching assistant, sanctioning decisions related to the
respondent’s teaching responsibilities will be made by the appropriate academic Dean.
3. Remedies for Complainants.
As part of the sanctioning process, the Dean of Students, or designee, may require that existing interim remedies stay in
place for a prescribed period of time. In consultations with the Title IX Coordinator and the Director of SARP, the Dean of
Students may also impose new remedies or administrative actions such as stay-away orders, housing placement, or
academic accommodations based upon the investigation and resolution of the case.
XIII. APPEAL TO THE UNIVERSITY BOARD ON STUDENT CONDUCT.
A. Grounds for Appeal.
The complainant and respondent each have the right to appeal the Dean of Students’ determination to the University
Board on Student Conduct (“UBSC”). The complainant and respondent will be notified of this right and the procedures for
appeal in writing. The Dean’s determination will be presumed to have been reached reasonably and appropriately, by a
preponderance of the evidence. Therefore, a party may appeal the Dean’s determination only on the following grounds:
1. Insufficient evidence to support OJA’s findings.
2. The sanction imposed is disproportionate to the violation of the Sexual Misconduct/Title IX Policy.
3. The discovery of new, relevant evidence, that was unavailable to the appealing party during the investigation that could
reasonably affect the outcome of the case.
4. Prejudicial bias on the part of an OJA Investigator.
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To appeal to a Hearing Panel of the UBSC, the appealing party must submit a written appeal petition to the Dean of
Students within ten (10) calendar days of the date of receipt of the Letter of Determination. The Dean of Students may
accept a late submission under extenuating circumstances.
The Dean of Students will provide the non-appealing party with a copy of the appeal petition. The non-appealing party will
have ten (10) days from receipt of the appeal petition to file a response to the appeal petition. The response must be in
writing and submitted to the Dean of Students. The Dean of Students will forward the response to the petition to the
appealing party upon receipt.
B. Content of Appeal Petition and Response.
The appeal petition must specify the grounds for the appeal, along with the supporting rationale, including a response to
the Investigative Report, if any. The appeal may also include, or make reference to, other relevant information such as the
identity of new witnesses who were not reasonably discoverable during the investigation or other evidence that was not
considered during OJA’s investigation. Any response to the appeal petition must address the issue raised in the appeal.
Each party will have the opportunity to review any written submissions of the other party prior to the Hearing.
C. University Board on Student Conduct.
The membership of the UBSC will be as follows: one-third of the members will be members of the faculty appointed by the
Provost. The Provost will make his or her designation from a list of 15 nominations made by the Faculty Council. One-third
of the members will be students (undergraduate and graduate) selected by the Dean of Students. One-third of the
members will be appointed by the Vice President for Enrollment & Student Affairs and may include students, faculty, or
members of the administrative staff of the University. Temporary imbalances in the composition of the Board caused by
the absence or withdrawal from the UBSC of any member(s) will not affect the validity of actions taken by a Hearing Panel
of the UBSC.
Membership on the UBSC shall be for a term of two years except that the term for student members shall be one year.
Members appointed to fill a vacancy on the Board shall serve for the duration of the term.
If, during the summer or during any other period, sufficient members of the UBSC are not available to create a Hearing
Panel, the Office of the Provost, at the request of the Dean of Students, may designate individuals to serve as interim
members of the UBSC for the purpose of serving on a Hearing Panel.
A member of the Dean of Students’ staff will sit in ex officio, and will be responsible for the administrative functions of the
UBSC, but will not participate in any Hearing. Each Hearing Panel will consist of three or five members of the UBSC. At
least one member of each Hearing Panel will be a student and at least one member will be a member of the faculty.
1. Training.
All UBSC members must participate in training. In addition, each year, returning UBSC members must receive refresher
training. In addition to training on how the adjudicatory process works, the training will include specific instruction about
how to approach students about sensitive issues that may arise in the context of sexual misconduct.
2. Hearing Panel Selection / Conflict Checking.
The Dean of Students will appoint a Hearing Panel of three or five members and will appoint one of these members as the
Panel Chair. The Hearing Panel will not include any person who has participated in any effort to resolve the same
complaint. The Hearing Panel members will receive the names of the complainant, the respondent, and all witnesses, and
must withdraw from the proceedings if their relationship to a party or witness, or other circumstances leads them to
believe that they cannot judge the matter fairly.
The Dean of Students will send a notice to the complainant and respondent, providing the names of the Hearing Panel
members and informing them of their right to object to the participation of a Hearing Panel member. The objection must be
in writing to the Dean of Students and received within two (2) calendar days of the date of the notice, and must state the
party’s reasons for believing the Hearing Panel member is incapable of fairly judging the matter.
The Dean of Students will decide whether an objection is justified, and that decision is final. When necessary, the Dean of
Students will select a replacement Hearing Panel member. Parties will have an opportunity to object to any Panel member
selected as a replacement.
D. Hearing Procedures.
1. Timing and Notice.
The Dean of Students will notify the complainant and the respondent of the time and location of the Hearing and will
endeavor to convene a Hearing Panel within fourteen calendar (14) days of the written appeal petition. The parties are
expected to cooperate in the scheduling of the Hearing.
2. Pre-Hearing Procedures.
a. Pre-Hearing Review.
Prior to the Hearing, the Hearing Panel members will review all the written materials provided to them by the Dean of
Students, including OJA’s Investigative Report, the Dean of Students’ Letter of Determination, the appeal petition and
61
response (if any), and any other documents or evidence submitted by the parties. Based on the appeal petition and
response, the Hearing Panel, in its sole discretion, will determine whether third party witnesses will be called at the
Hearing and will provide the names of those witnesses to the Dean of Students, who will arrange for those witnesses to
appear. The Hearing Panel may also ask to see underlying materials that were relied upon by OJA in its Investigative
Report. In the absence of good cause as determined by the Chair in his or her sole discretion, parties may not introduce
witnesses, documents, or other evidence at the Hearing that were not included in or referred to by the appeal petition or
any response.
b. Pre-Hearing Meeting.
Prior to the Hearing date, the Dean of Students will schedule individual meetings with the complainant and the respondent
and their respective Advisers. At the meeting, the Dean of Students will review the Hearing Panel procedures. In addition,
the Dean of Students will provide the complainant and the respondent with a copy of the list of witnesses, and copies of
documents or other evidence that the Hearing Panel may consider at the Hearing. The University reserves the right,
through the Chair, to add witnesses to the witness lists with reasonable notice prior to the Hearing.
c. Attendance at Hearing.
If the complainant or the respondent fails to appear at the scheduled Hearing, the Chair may postpone the proceedings or
direct that the Hearing proceed and determine the appeal on the basis of the available information, provided the absent
party was duly notified of the scheduled Hearing date, as outlined above.
3. Conduct of Hearing.
The Chair will preside at the Hearing and may make such rulings as he or she deems necessary for the orderly conduct of
the Hearing. No one other than the Hearing Panel members, the complainant and respondent, their respective Advisers,
witnesses (when called), and necessary University personnel may be present in the Hearing room or rooms during the
proceeding. The Dean of Students Office will work with other University personnel so that any student whose presence is
required may participate in the Hearing.
In general, Hearings will proceed as follows:
• Complainant opening statement;
• Respondent opening statement;
• Questions to the complainant by the Hearing Panel;
• Questions to the respondent by the Hearing Panel;
• Witness testimony (if any) and questioning by the Hearing Panel;
• Questions to the Investigators by the Hearing Panel (if any);
• Closing statement by complainant; and
• Closing statement by respondent.
The Hearing Panel will not consider the romantic or sexual history of either the complainant or respondent, except for
testimony offered by one or the other about the complainant’s and respondent’s shared sexual history that the Hearing
Panel deems relevant. If such information is offered by the complainant or respondent, the other has the right to respond.
The existence of a prior consensual dating or sexual relationship between the complainant and respondent by itself does
not support an inference of consent to sexual contact.
The Hearing Panel may set reasonable time limits for any part of the Hearing. In cases where either the complainant or
respondent opts not to participate in the Hearing, the Hearing Panel may still hear from the other.
The Hearing will not follow a courtroom model, and the rules of evidence and civil or criminal procedure do not apply. The
Chair has the sole discretion to commence, recess, and reconvene the Hearing, and may suspend the Hearing at any
time. The Chair will make any procedural decisions during the Hearing that he or she deems necessary to safeguard the
integrity and fairness of the Hearing and to avoid undue delay. The Chair will determine the admissibility, relevance, and
materiality of the testimony and information offered and may exclude any testimony or evidence that he or she determines
to be cumulative or irrelevant. The Hearing Panel may take notice of facts or information within the knowledge of the
University community or based on University records.
Upon timely request by the complainant or respondent, the Chair may accommodate concerns for the personal safety,
well-being, and/or fears of confrontation of the complainant or respondent during the Hearing by providing separate
facilities, by using a visual screen, and/or by permitting participation by telephone, videophone, closed circuit television,
video conferencing, videotape, audiotape, written statement or other means, where and as determined in the sole
discretion of the Chair to be appropriate.
a. Audio Recording.
The Dean of Students will arrange for the hearing to be audio recorded, and may arrange for the preparation of any
transcript of the recording that he or she deems appropriate. The complainant and respondent will have the right to
62
access a copy of the recording without cost, or to obtain a copy of the recording at his or her expense. The Hearing
Panel’s post-Hearing deliberations will not be recorded.
Personal cell phones and recording devices may not be used in the Hearing room(s) to record the Hearing unless
approved by the Chair in advance.
b. Preponderance of the Evidence Standard of Review.
All decisions by the Hearing Panel will be made by majority vote and must be supported by a preponderance of evidence.
c. Opening Statements and Questioning by the Parties.
The complainant and respondent will each have the opportunity to present an opening statement. Only the Chair and the
Hearing Panel members are permitted question the individual parties and witnesses (if any). However, the complainant
and the respondent may ask the Chair to pose additional questions or inquire further into specific matters by submitting
these requests to the Chair in writing or orally, at the discretion of the Chair. The Chair may disallow or reframe any
questions that are redundant, irrelevant, or disruptive. If, prior to the conclusion of the Hearing, the Hearing Panel
determines that unresolved issues exist that would be clarified by the presentation of additional evidence, the Chair may
suspend the Hearing and reconvene it in a timely manner to receive such additional information. A suspension of the
Hearing may not be based on the proposed introduction of documents or other evidence that could have been presented
prior to the Hearing.
d. Respondent Testimony.
The respondent shall have the right not to answer questions during the Hearing; however, the exercise of that right shall
not preclude the Hearing Panel from proceeding and evaluating the appeal on the basis of the Investigative Report, Letter
of Determination, and other available information.
e. Privacy of the Hearing.
To comply with Title IX and FERPA, and to provide an orderly process for the presentation and consideration of relevant
information without undue intimidation or pressure, the Hearing is not open to the public. Accordingly, documents
prepared in anticipation of the Hearing (including the Investigative Report, the Letter of Determination, the appeal petition
and response, documents, testimony, or other information introduced at the Hearing, and any recording or transcripts of
the Hearing) may not be disclosed outside of the Hearing procedures, except as may be required or authorized by law.
4. Hearing Panel Decision.
After completion of the Hearing, all persons other than the members of the Hearing Panel will be asked to leave the
Hearing room. The Hearing Panel will then deliberate privately. The members of the Hearing Panel are the sole arbiters of
the weight of the evidence and the credibility of the witnesses. The specification or description of a violation of the Sexual
Misconduct/Title IX Policy or the sanction imposed may be modified by the Hearing Panel to conform to the evidence,
provided that the modification does not deprive the respondent of his or her right to respond to particular charges.
The Hearing Panel shall consider the merits of an appeal petition only on the basis of the four grounds for appeal set forth
in Section XIII.A and supporting information provided in the written appeal petition, any response to the appeal petition,
the record of the original decision, and any testimony elicited at the Hearing. Any decision of the Hearing Panel shall be
made by majority vote. The vote itself will not be communicated to the parties.
The Hearing Panel may:
1. Affirm, modify, or reverse the Dean of Students’ determination.
2. Affirm or modify (either to increase or decrease) the sanctions imposed.
3. Remand the matter to OJA for further investigation. This shall ordinarily be done in the case of new and relevant
information, for an assessment of the weight and effect of the new information and a determination after consideration the
new facts.
5. Communication of the Hearing Panel’s Decision.
Within seven (7) calendar days from the conclusion of the Hearing Panel’s deliberations (or such longer time as the Chair
may for good cause determine), the Chair will simultaneously communicate the Hearing Panel’s decision on the appeal
petition to the complainant, the respondent, and the Dean of Students, and will do so in writing.
6. Maintenance of Records.
The Hearing audio recording, together with the documents, information and other evidence presented at the Hearing, will
serve as the record of the hearing proceedings and will be maintained by the Dean of Students as part of the respondent’s
disciplinary record.
The disciplinary files of students who have been suspended or expelled from the University are maintained in the Dean of
Students Office for at least seven (7) years after the students’ departure from the University.
63
XIV. APPEALS TO THE UNIVERSITY PROVOST.
A. Procedure for Appeal.
The complainant and the respondent each have the right to appeal the Hearing Panel’s decision to the University Provost.
An appeal to the University Provost must be in writing and received by the Provost within ten (10) calendar days of receipt
of the Hearing Panel’s decision. The only grounds for appeal to the Provost are:
1. Procedural irregularity that affected the outcome of the Hearing.
2. The sanction is disproportionate to the violation of the Sexual Misconduct/Title IX Policy.
3. The discovery of new, relevant evidence that was unavailable to the appealing party prior to the Hearing Panel that
could reasonably affect the outcome of the case.
4. Prejudicial bias on the part of the Hearing Panel.
The Provost will provide a copy of the appeal petition to the other party. If the non-appealing party chooses to respond to
the appeal, he or she must do so in writing to the Provost within ten (10) calendar days after receiving the appeal petition.
Upon receipt of a timely appeal petition, the Dean of Students will forward to the Provost the relevant record of the matter.
The University Provost will limit his or her review of Hearing Panel decisions to a review of the record of the original
Hearing (including the audio recording), supporting documents, and statements made by one or both parties in the appeal
petition.
The Provost will review the record and the statements submitted. The decision of the Provost will be in writing, with copies
provided to the complainant, respondent, and the Dean of Students, and will be communicated within fourteen (14)
calendar days after receiving the appeal petition or any response.
B. Impact of an Appeal Petition on Imposed Sanctions
The filing of an appeal petition will not operate to stay the effect of sanctions imposed. However, the appeal petition may
seek a stay or modification of the sanctions pending the Provost’s decision on the appeal. The Dean of Students or the
University Provost, in his or her discretion, may suspend, stay, or modify sanctions imposed, subject to such conditions as
either may deem appropriate.
C. Provost’s Decision on Appeal.
The University Provost may:
1. Affirm, modify, or reverse the Hearing Panel’s decision.
2. Affirm or modify (either to increase or decrease) the sanctions imposed.
3. Remand the matter to the UBSC for a new Hearing. This shall normally be done when there is a procedural irregularity
that could be corrected in a rehearing.
If the Provost remands the matter, he or she will specify whether the sanctions are to be maintained, modified,
suspended, or reversed pending completion of the matter on remand.
Any act authorized by this procedure to be performed by the Provost may also be done by an authorized designee of the
Provost.
The decision of the Provost will be final.
XV. DISCIPLINARY RECORDS, WITHDRAWAL, AND READMISSION.
A. Disciplinary Records.
A sanction of expulsion or suspension from the University or a program of the University will be entered on the student’s
permanent record unless this provision is waived by the Dean of Students and the Provost concurs.
The University Registrar will be informed of all sanctions involving suspension or expulsion from the University or from a
program of the University, and no student will be permitted to re-enroll in the University following such sanction unless he
or she presents evidence to the Registrar of satisfaction of the sanction and of appropriate permission for re-enrollment.
B. Withdrawal and Readmission.
If a student voluntarily withdraws from the University or a program of the University while charges against him or her are
pending, or as part of a negotiated settlement of such charges, this fact will be communicated to the University Registrar
and the student will not be permitted to re-enroll unless he or she presents evidence that appropriate permission for reenrollment has been obtained. Such permission shall be granted solely at the discretion of the Dean of Students or the
Provost. If the student withdrew while charges against him or her were pending, permission for readmission will be
granted only after the charges have been resolved.
If permission to re-enroll is not granted, the student may petition the Provost for permission, setting forth in his or her
petition the relevant facts and the basis upon which the petition is made. The decision of the Provost will be final.
Failure of a student to comply with a sanction or condition imposed or to obtain permission for re-enrollment in
accordance with the above requirements may be a basis for denial of re-enrollment.
64
Faculty/Staff Sexual Misconduct Procedures
Procedures for the Resolution of Sexual Misconduct Complaints Against Faculty, Staff, Affiliates and NonAffiliates
Effective January 1, 2015
Table of Contents
I. Applicability
II. Rights of the Complainant and Respondent
III. Preliminary Matters
IV. Initiating a Complaint
V. Interim Measures
VI. How to File a Complaint
VII. Investigation of a Complaint
VIII. Requests for Confidentiality and Privacy
IX. Appeal
X. Imposition of Sanctions
I. APPLICABILITY.
These Procedures will be used to investigate and resolve all complaints of sexual misconduct against Boston University
faculty and staff members, affiliates, and non-affiliates, as appropriate. For purposes of the University’s Sexual
Misconduct/Title IX Policy and these Procedures, an “affiliate” includes, but is not limited to, visiting scholars and postdoctoral fellows who are not otherwise classified as Boston University faculty, staff, or students. Complaints of sexual
misconduct against Boston University students will be investigated and resolved using the Procedures for the Resolution
of Sexual Misconduct Complaints against Students.
All other complaints of discrimination or harassment against faculty and staff members, including but not limited to those
based on race, color, creed, religion, ethnic origin, age, sex, disability, and sexual orientation, will be resolved using the
University’s Complaint Procedures in Cases of Alleged Unlawful Discrimination and Harassment.
II. RIGHTS OF THE COMPLAINANT AND RESPONDENT.
These Procedures for the investigation, adjudication, and resolution of sexual misconduct (including sexual harassment)
complaints brought against faculty, staff, affiliates and non-affiliates are designed to be accessible, prompt, fair, and
impartial. Throughout this process, both the complainant and respondent have the following rights:
• To be treated with respect, dignity, and sensitivity.
• To receive appropriate support from the University.
• Privacy to the extent possible, consistent with applicable law and University policy.
• Information about the University’s Sexual Misconduct/Title IX Policy.
• A prompt and thorough investigation of the allegations.
• Notification, in writing, of the case resolution, including the outcome of any appeals.
To report the incident to law enforcement (including the Boston University Police or the police department in the
jurisdiction in which the sexual misconduct occurred) at any time.
III. PRELIMINARY MATTERS.
A. Effect of Criminal Proceedings.
The filing and processing of a complaint of sexual misconduct is separate from and independent of any criminal
investigation or proceeding. Boston University will not wait for the conclusion of any criminal investigation or proceedings
to begin its own investigation, although the University may delay temporarily the fact-finding component of the
investigation while the police are gathering evidence. Neither law enforcement’s decision whether to prosecute a
respondent nor the outcome of a criminal prosecution is determinative of whether sexual misconduct occurred under the
University’s Sexual Misconduct/Title IX Policy.
B. Adviser.
The complainant and respondent may each choose and be accompanied to any meeting or hearing related to these
Procedures by an Adviser, who may provide support during such meeting or hearing. During meetings and interviews, the
Adviser may quietly confer or pass notes with the party in a non-disruptive manner. The Adviser may not intervene in a
meeting or interview, or address the Investigator. Consistent with the University’s obligation to promptly resolve sexual
misconduct complaints, the University reserves the right to proceed with any meeting or interview, regardless of the
availability of the party’s selected Adviser.
65
C. Declining to Participate.
A complainant may decline to participate in the investigative or complaint resolution process. The University may continue
the process without the complainant’s participation.
D. Time Frame for Complaint Resolution.
The University will seek to resolve every report of sexual misconduct within sixty (60) calendar days of the start of an
investigation, not counting any appeals. Time frames may vary depending on the complexity of a case and the availability
of witnesses, and at certain times of the academic year (for example, during breaks, study periods or final exams). The
University may extend any time frame for good cause, with a written explanation to the complainant and respondent.
E. Prohibition on Retaliation.
It is illegal and a violation of the University’s Sexual Misconduct/Title IX Policy to retaliate against a person for filing a
complaint of sexual misconduct or for cooperating in a sexual misconduct investigation. Any person who retaliates against
a person for reporting sexual misconduct, filing a sexual misconduct complaint, or participating in a sexual misconduct
investigation is subject to disciplinary action up to and including termination by the University.
F. Notice.
The Title IX Coordinator, or designee, will give the complainant and respondent, respectively, an explanation of their rights
and options, and as appropriate, any available accommodations, as soon as possible after a complaint is reported. The
Equal Opportunity Office will also ensure that both the complainant and respondent are updated throughout the
investigative process, including with timely notice of meetings where either the complainant’s or the respondent’s
presence may be required. The complainant and respondent will be simultaneously provided with written notice of the
results of any investigation including whether there has been a violation of the University’s Sexual Misconduct/Title IX
Policy. The Title IX Coordinator or designee will also inform the complainant of any sanctions imposed on the respondent
that directly relate to the complainant, and any other steps the University has taken to prevent recurrence of the
misconduct.
IV. INITIATING A COMPLAINT.
Any person who believes he or she has experienced sexual misconduct, as defined in the University’s Sexual
Misconduct/Title IX Policy, may file a complaint against the Boston University faculty or staff member, affiliate, or nonaffiliate responsible for that conduct (the person filing a complaint is referred to as a “complainant”). A person who has
information that a University faculty or staff member, affiliate, or non-affiliate may have committed sexual misconduct may
also file a complaint (the person filing the complaint is referred to as a “reporter”). A complainant or reporter may include
any member of the Boston University community, including students, faculty, administrators, staff members, visitors,
applicants for employment or admission, participants in a BU program or activity, or a non-affiliate with knowledge of an
incident of sexual misconduct.
V. INTERIM MEASURES.
Upon the filing of a sexual misconduct complaint, the Title IX Coordinator will review the allegations and determine the
necessity and scope of any interim measures to prevent further acts of harassment, misconduct, or retaliation and to
provide a safe educational and work environment. The range of interim measures may include, but not be limited to:
• Adjusting the complainant’s or respondent’s work schedule, assignment, or location for University employment.
• Changing the complainant’s academic schedule, allowing the complainant to take an incomplete in one or more
courses, allowing the complainant to drop (or retake) a course without penalty, or attend class via web
conference.
• Providing an escort to ensure safe movement between classes, work sites, and other activities.
• Allowing the complainant to withdraw from or retake a class without penalty, or extending deadlines for
examinations or other assignments.
• Providing access to tutoring or other academic support.
• Putting the respondent on paid administrative leave until the conclusion of the investigation.
• Issuing an administrative “stay-away” (no contact) order.
The University will maintain as confidential any accommodations or protective measures provided to the complainant to
the extent that maintaining such confidentiality would not impair the ability of the University to provide the
accommodations or protective measures.
An individual’s failure to comply with restrictions imposed by interim measures is a violation of University Policy and a
basis for disciplinary action, up to and including termination of employment.
VI. HOW TO FILE A COMPLAINT.
66
A complainant or reporter may submit a Sexual Misconduct Report Form (paper or electronic format), to the Title IX
Coordinator, one of the Deputy Title IX Coordinators, Human Resources, or the Equal Opportunity Office. Although the
Report Form should be as specific as possible regarding the conduct that precipitated the complaint, it need not reflect
every detail related to the allegations in the complaint, as additional information may be discovered during the
investigation.
A complainant may also call or meet with the Title IX Coordinator, a Deputy Title IX Coordinator, Human Resources, or
the Equal Opportunity Office to initiate a complaint.
University Title IX Coordinator
19 Deerfield Street, Fl. 2, Boston, MA 02115
(617) 353-9286
[email protected]
Deputy Title IX Coordinators
Contact information available here.
Human Resources
Charles River Campus
25 Buick Street, Boston, MA 02115
(617) 353-4044
Medical Campus
801 Massachusetts Avenue, Suite 400, Boston, MA 02118
(617) 638-4610
Equal Opportunity Office
19 Deerfield Street, Fl. 2, Boston, MA 02115
(617) 353-9286
[email protected]
VII. INVESTIGATION OF A COMPLAINT.
A. Investigator.
The Title IX Coordinator will designate an Investigator (ordinarily a member of the University’s Equal Opportunity Office)
specifically trained in sexual misconduct investigations to conduct a prompt, thorough, and fair investigation of any sexual
misconduct complaint against a University faculty or staff member, affiliate, or a non-affiliate.
B. Investigation Process.
The investigation may involve one or more meetings with the complainant and respondent, interviewing witnesses,
reviewing other relevant evidence, requesting written statements from the parties, informing the respondent of the
allegations and/or providing to that person a copy of the complainant’s statement. Before any adverse determination is
made, the respondent will be informed as to the nature of the complaint, and will have the opportunity to respond. The
respondent will also be advised of the University’s strict prohibition against retaliation.
C. Standard of Proof.
In resolving complaints pursuant to the Sexual Misconduct/Title IX Policy, the University will use a “preponderance of the
evidence” standard, which is whether the evidence gathered and information provided during the investigation supports a
finding that it is more likely than not that the respondent violated the Sexual Misconduct/Title IX Policy.
D. Investigation Finding.
At the conclusion of the investigation, the Investigator will prepare a report (the “Investigative Report”) summarizing and
analyzing the relevant facts determined through the investigation, with reference to any supporting documentation or
statements.
The final Investigative Report will provide a summary of the Investigator’s impressions, including context for the evidence,
and will make a determination as to whether the respondent’s conduct violated the Sexual Misconduct/Title IX Policy. The
Investigative Report will then be provided to the Dean of the respondent’s School or College (if a faculty member), the
Provost (if the complaint contains allegations against a Dean), or relevant Vice President or Dean (if a staff member).
After review of the Investigative Report, the Dean (with the approval of the Provost), Provost, or relevant Vice President
will, if a violation of the Sexual Misconduct/Title IX Policy has been found, make a final determination as to the appropriate
disciplinary sanction for the respondent’s violation of the Sexual Misconduct/Title IX Policy. Prior to any disciplinary action,
the respondent shall be afforded an appeal, as described in Section VIII, below.
E. Preservation of Records.
A confidential record of all complaints, including their disposition, will be maintained by the Title IX Coordinator and the
Equal Opportunity Office.
67
VIII. REQUESTS FOR CONFIDENTIALITY AND PRIVACY.
Every reasonable effort will be made to protect the privacy of all parties during the investigation, consistent with and
subject to the University’s obligation to investigate and resolve the complaint. Complainants who prefer to discuss an
incident of sexual misconduct confidentially such that an investigation will not be initiated should contact one of the
confidential resources listed in Section X of the Sexual Misconduct/Title IX Policy.
If the complainant reports an incident of sexual misconduct to any other campus resource and requests confidentiality or
asks that the report of sexual misconduct not be pursued, the University will, generally before taking any further
investigative steps, evaluate the complainant’s request in the manner set forth in Section V.A of the Sexual
Misconduct/Title IX Policy. The evaluation will be conducted by the Title IX Coordinator in consultation with a small
number of University administrators as deemed necessary and appropriate under the circumstances.
Even absent a request for confidentiality, every reasonable effort will be made to protect the privacy of all parties during
the investigation. Boston University will disclose information about its investigation and resolution of sexual misconduct
complaints only to those who need to know the information in order to carry out their duties and responsibilities. It will
inform all University personnel participating in an investigation, proceeding, or hearing that they are expected to maintain
the privacy of the process. This does not prohibit either a complainant or respondent from obtaining the assistance of
family members, counselors, therapists, clergy, doctors, attorneys, or other resources.
IX. APPEAL.
The respondent has the right to appeal the investigative determination and the sanction imposed by the respondent’s
Dean, Provost, or relevant Vice President.
The University’s determination as to whether the respondent’s conduct violated the Sexual Misconduct/Title IX Policy will
be presumed to have been reached reasonably and appropriately, by a preponderance of the evidence. Therefore, an
appeal is available only on the following grounds:
1. Insufficient evidence to support the Investigator’s findings.
2. The disciplinary sanction imposed is disproportionate to the violation of the Sexual Misconduct/Title IX Policy.
3. The discovery of new, relevant evidence, that was unavailable to the appealing party during the investigation that could
reasonably affect the outcome of the case.
4. Prejudicial bias on the part of the Investigator.
Any appeal must be in writing and should be filed with the Title IX Coordinator within ten (10) calendar days of the date of
receipt of the Dean, Provost, or relevant Vice President’s final decision. The Title IX Coordinator may accept a late
submission under extenuating circumstances.
In the case of complaints against staff members and non-affiliates, the Title IX Coordinator will direct the appeal to the
appropriate officer of the University for review and disposition. In the case of complaints against faculty, the Title IX
Coordinator will consult with the University Provost to determine the appropriate officer of the University to whom the
appeal should be directed.
The decision of the University officer charged with hearing the appeal will be final, subject to Section X, below.
X. IMPOSITION OF SANCTIONS.
A. Suspension or Termination of Faculty.
Any disciplinary sanction that involves the suspension or termination of a faculty member will be conducted pursuant to
the procedures outlined in the Faculty Handbook.
B. Disciplinary Actions against Staff.
Disciplinary sanctions involving staff will be consistent with any applicable collective bargaining agreement and University
policies.
68
HAZING
Boston University expressly prohibits any form of hazing. Hazing is against the law, incorporates other serious crimes,
and violates University policy. Reports of hazing will be investigated immediately by the Boston University Police
Department, other University administrative offices, outside law enforcement agencies, or any combination of the three. In
addition to criminal penalties under Massachusetts law, students or employees are subject to University disciplinary action
for organizing or participating in hazing or failing to report persons in danger in conjunction with hazing. Additional
information about hazing is available at the University’s safety website (www.bu.edu/safety/hazing).
Anyone can report a hazing incident anonymously at www.bu.edu/dos/policies/lifebook/hazing-preventionreporting/report-hazing.
General Laws of Massachusetts
Chapter 269: Section 17.
Hazing; organizing or participating; hazing defined
Section 17. Whoever is a principal organizer or participant in the crime of hazing, as defined herein, shall be punished by
a fine of not more than three thousand dollars or by imprisonment in a house of correction for not more than one year, or
both such fine and imprisonment.
The term “hazing” as used in this section and in sections eighteen and nineteen, shall mean any conduct or method of
initiation into any student organization, whether on public or private property, which willfully or recklessly endangers the
physical or mental health of any student or other person. Such conduct shall include whipping, beating, branding, forced
calisthenics, exposure to the weather, forced consumption of any food, liquor, beverage, drug, or other substance, or any
other brutal treatment or forced physical activity which is likely to adversely affect the physical health or safety of any such
student or other person, or which subjects such student or other person to extreme mental stress, including extended
deprivation of sleep or rest or extended isolation.
Notwithstanding any other provisions of this section to the contrary, consent shall not be available as a defense to any
prosecution under this action. (Amended by 1987, 665.)
Chapter 269: Section 18.
Failure to report hazing
Section 18. Whoever knows that another person is the victim of hazing as defined in section seventeen and is at the
scene of such crime shall, to the extent that such person can do so without danger or peril to himself or others, report
such crime to an appropriate law enforcement official as soon as reasonably practicable. Whoever fails to report such
crime shall be punished by a fine of not more than one thousand dollars. (Amended by 1987, 665.)
Chapter 269: Section 19. Copy of secs. 17–19; issuance to students and student groups, teams, and organizations; report
Section 19. Each institution of secondary education and each public and private institution of postsecondary education
shall issue to every student group, student team, or student organization which is part of such institution or is recognized
by the institution or permitted by the institution to use its name or facilities or is known by the institution to exist as an
unaffiliated student group, student team, or student organization, a copy of this section and sections seventeen and
eighteen; provided, however, that an institution’s compliance with this section’s requirements that an institution issue
copies of this section and sections seventeen and eighteen to unaffiliated student groups, teams, or organizations shall
not constitute evidence of the institution’s recognition or endorsement of said unaffiliated student groups, teams, or
organizations.
Each such group, team, or organization shall distribute a copy of this section and sections seventeen and eighteen to
each of its members, plebes, pledges, or applicants for membership. It shall be the duty of each such group, team, or
organization, acting through its designated officer, to deliver annually to the institution, an attested acknowledgement
stating that such group, team, or organization has received a copy of this section and said sections seventeen and
eighteen, that each of its members, plebes, pledges, or applicants has received a copy of sections seventeen and
eighteen, and that such group, team, or organization understands and agrees to comply with the provisions of this section
and sections seventeen and eighteen.
Each institution of secondary education and each public or private institution of postsecondary education shall, at least
annually, before or at the start of enrollment, deliver to each person who enrolls as a full-time student in such institution a
copy of this section and sections seventeen and eighteen.
Each institution of secondary education and each public or private institution of postsecondary education shall file, at least
annually, a report with the regents of higher education and in the case of secondary institutions, the board of education,
certifying that such institution has complied with its responsibility to inform student groups, teams, or organizations and to
notify each full-time student enrolled by it of the provisions of this section and sections seventeen and eighteen and also
certifying that said institution has adopted a disciplinary policy with regard to the organizers and participants of hazing,
and that such policy has been set forth with appropriate emphasis in the student handbook or similar means of
69
communicating the institution’s policies to its students. The board of regents and, in the case of secondary institutions, the
board of education, shall promulgate regulations governing the content and frequency of such reports, and shall forthwith
report to the attorney general any such institution which fails to make such report. (Amended by 1987, 665.)
BOSTON UNIVERSITY CAMPUS CRIME STATISTICS
Statistics are accurate as of the date of publication.
The Annual Security Reports for Boston University’s other campuses can be located at the University’s Safety website
http://www.bu.edu/safety.
School of Social Work, Cape Cod
Murder & Non-­‐negligent Manslaughter
Manslaughter
Forcible Sex Offenses
Non-­‐forcible Sex Offenses
Robbery
Aggravated Assault
Burglary
Motor V ehicle Theft
Arson
Stalking
Domestic V iolence
Dating V iolence
Liquor Law V iolations
Arrest
Referred
Drug Law V iolations
Arrest
Referred
Weapons Law V iolations Arrest
Referred
On Campus
2012
2013
n/a
n/a
n/a
n/a
n/a
n/a
n/a
n/a
n/a
n/a
n/a
n/a
n/a
n/a
n/a
n/a
n/a
n/a
n/a
n/a
n/a
n/a
n/a
n/a
n/a
n/a
n/a
n/a
n/a
n/a
n/a
n/a
n/a
n/a
n/a
n/a
Statistics were not collected for previous years
No crimes were unfounded i n 2014
No hate crimes were reported i n 2014
70
2014
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
Public Property
2012
2013
2014
n/a
n/a
0
n/a
n/a
0
n/a
n/a
0
n/a
n/a
0
n/a
n/a
0
n/a
n/a
0
n/a
n/a
0
n/a
n/a
0
n/a
n/a
0
n/a
n/a
0
n/a
n/a
0
n/a
n/a
0
n/a
n/a
0
n/a
n/a
0
n/a
n/a
0
n/a
n/a
0
n/a
n/a
0
n/a
n/a
0
School of Social Work, Chelmsford
Murder & Non-­‐negligent Manslaughter
Manslaughter
Forcible Sex Offenses
Non-­‐forcible Sex Offenses
Robbery
Aggravated Assault
Burglary
Motor V ehicle Theft
Arson
Stalking
Domestic V iolence
Dating V iolence
Liquor Law V iolations
Arrest
Referred
Drug Law V iolations
Arrest
Referred
Weapons Law V iolations Arrest
Referred
On Campus
2012
2013
n/a
n/a
n/a
n/a
n/a
n/a
n/a
n/a
n/a
n/a
n/a
n/a
n/a
n/a
n/a
n/a
n/a
n/a
n/a
n/a
n/a
n/a
n/a
n/a
n/a
n/a
n/a
n/a
n/a
n/a
n/a
n/a
n/a
n/a
n/a
n/a
2014
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
Public Property
2012
2013
2014
n/a
n/a
0
n/a
n/a
0
n/a
n/a
0
n/a
n/a
0
n/a
n/a
0
n/a
n/a
0
n/a
n/a
0
n/a
n/a
0
n/a
n/a
0
n/a
n/a
0
n/a
n/a
0
n/a
n/a
0
n/a
n/a
0
n/a
n/a
0
n/a
n/a
0
n/a
n/a
0
n/a
n/a
0
n/a
n/a
0
Statistics were not collected for previous years
No crimes were unfounded i n 2014
No hate crimes were reported i n 2014
This c hart s hows the c rime s tatistics for 100 Apollo Drive, Chelmsford, where the School of Social W ork program was held through March 2015, before i t moved to i n Bedford.
71
School of Social Work, Fall River
Murder & Non-­‐negligent Manslaughter
Manslaughter
Forcible Sex Offenses
Non-­‐forcible Sex Offenses
Robbery
Aggravated Assault
Burglary
Motor V ehicle Theft
Arson
Stalking
Domestic V iolence
Dating V iolence
Liquor Law V iolations
Arrest
Referred
Drug Law V iolations
Arrest
Referred
Weapons Law V iolations Arrest
Referred
On Campus
2012
2013
n/a
n/a
n/a
n/a
n/a
n/a
n/a
n/a
n/a
n/a
n/a
n/a
n/a
n/a
n/a
n/a
n/a
n/a
n/a
n/a
n/a
n/a
n/a
n/a
n/a
n/a
n/a
n/a
n/a
n/a
n/a
n/a
n/a
n/a
n/a
n/a
Statistics were not collected for previous years
No crimes were unfounded i n 2014
No hate crimes were reported i n 2014
72
2014
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
Public Property
2012
2013
2014
n/a
n/a
0
n/a
n/a
0
n/a
n/a
0
n/a
n/a
0
n/a
n/a
1
n/a
n/a
0
n/a
n/a
0
n/a
n/a
0
n/a
n/a
0
n/a
n/a
0
n/a
n/a
0
n/a
n/a
0
n/a
n/a
0
n/a
n/a
0
n/a
n/a
0
n/a
n/a
0
n/a
n/a
0
n/a
n/a
0
IMPORTANT CONTACT INFORMATION
Police Departments
Boston University Police Department
Emergencies only: 617-353-2121
www.bu.edu/police
(TTY: 617-353-5387)
Non-emergency: 617-353-2110
Ambulance and Fire
Boston University
617-353-2121
Boston, Brookline, Cambridge
911
Medical
Boston University Student Health Services
617-353-3575
www.bu.edu/shs
Boston University Behavioral Medicine Clinic
617-353-3569
www.bu.edu/shs/behavioral
Boston Medical Center
617-638-8000
www.bmc.org
Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center
617-667-7000
www.bidmc.org
Brigham and Women’s Hospital
617-732-5500
www.brighamandwomens.org
Crisis Intervention and Counseling
Boston University Crisis Counselor
Days 617-353-3569
Nights and weekends 617-353-2121
Boston University Sexual Assault Response & Prevention Center
617-353-7277
www.bu.edu/sarp
Boston Area Rape Crisis Hotline
(24 hours) 617-492-7273
www.barcc.org
Women’s Health Group, Boston Medical Center
617-638-7428
www.bmc.org/womenshealth.html
The Family Justice Center of Boston
617-779-2100
http://www.bphc.org/whatwedo/violence-prevention/Family-Justice-Center/Pages/Family-Justice-Center.aspx
Other University Resources
Dean of Students
617-353-4126
www.bu.edu/dos
University Service Center
617-358-1818
www.bu.edu/usc
Residence Life
73
617-353-4380
www.bu.edu/reslife
Human Resources
www.bu.edu/hr
Charles River Campus: 617-353-2380
Medical Campus: 617-638-4610
Equal Opportunity Office/Title IX Coordinator
617-353-9286
www.bu.edu/eoo
Dean of Marsh Chapel
617-353-3560
www.bu.edu/chapel
Danielsen Institute (pastoral counseling)
617-353-3047
www.bu.edu/danielsen
Escort Security Service
617-353-4877
www.bu.edu/escort
Faculty & Staff Assistance
617-353-5381
www.bu.edu/fsao
Health & Wellness Educator
617-358-5362
www.bu.edu/shs/wellness
Environmental Health & Safety
617-353-4094
www.bu.edu/ehs
74
Appendix A
Included below is information about University programming and initiatives intended to increase the University
community's knowledge and to prevent violence and promote safety, including bystander intervention awareness and
other prevention programs intended to prevent dating violence, domestic violence, sexual assault and stalking.
Program Name / Description
Type
Undergraduate Student Orientation
The University's summer and winter
orientation programs for approximately 4,600
incoming undergraduate students emphasize
crime prevention, personal responsibility, and
bystander education. Representatives from
Student Health Services, the Sexual Assault
Response & Prevention Center, Judicial
Affairs, and the Boston University Police
discuss strategies for keeping the newest
members of the BU community healthy and
safe. This panel presentation includes the
following:
Orientation/Skits - Sexual Assault
Response & Prevention Center
(SARP)
Three skits written and performed by SARP
student ambassadors depict situations new
students might encounter. The "party scene"
illustrates the role pro-social bystanders can
play in preventing sexual misconduct. In the
"catcalling scene," students are encouraged to
come forward and report sexual harassment.
The third skit depicts students' response to an
escalating argument between dating partners
and incorporates an interactive polling system
to encourage positive intervention.
Students
Annually to new
students
Students
Annually to new
students
Students
Annually to new
students
Students
Primary rape,
acquaintance rape,
domestic violence,
dating violence,
sexual assault, and
stalking prevention
and awareness /
Crime Prevention /
Drug and alcohol
abuse education
Orientation/Boston University Police
(BUPD) - Crime Prevention Tips
75
Annually to new
students
Primary rape,
acquaintance rape,
domestic violence,
dating violence,
sexual assault, and
stalking prevention
and awareness /
Prosocial Bystander
•
•
Target
Orientation covers a
wide array of topics
summarized below.
•
Orientation/Overview of Policies &
Title IX - Judicial Affairs
The Judicial Affairs' presentation outlines
expectations for behavior, consequences for
misconduct, and key University policies (e.g.,
alcohol, drugs, threats, physical and
interpersonal violence, hazing, prohibition
against weapons). The presentation, along
with an accompanying video, also promotes
fire, pedestrian, and bike safety. In a separate
follow-up presentation, Judicial Affairs
provides a brief review of sexual harassment
and sexual misconduct support services and
reporting options, both on and off campus.
Frequency
This presentation by the Deputy Chief
provides an overview of various programs,
services, and reporting options offered by
BUPD, including the Rape Aggression
Defense program, blue light phones, the
University's emergency notification system,
Instagram, Twitter, and Text-a-Tip.
Campus security
procedures and
practices / looking out
for one another
Graduate Student Orientations
Annually
Students
Annually
Students
Annually
Students
Annually
First year
Students
Ongoing / Upon
Request
Students
Graduate and professional school orientations
are held each year. These sessions provide
information on crime prevention, drug and
alcohol abuse, looking out for their fellow
students and sexual assault prevention. Some
of the programs are described below:
•
Graduate Orientations - Sexual
Misconduct Information Sessions
At each of the graduate and professional
school orientations, the University’s Title IX
Coordinator or designee discusses Title IX,
sexual misconduct, and the University’s
policies and resources.
Graduate Orientation - Crime
Prevention Tips
BUPD or Public Safety personnel presents
personal crime prevention strategies to
students both on and off campus. Students
are encouraged to "see something, say
something", to look out for their fellow
students, and to pay close attention to BU
Alert messages sent to notify them about
crime and emergency situations.
Alcohol EDU
Sexual misconduct /
campus security
procedures and
practices
•
This evidence-based course is designed to
educate students about risky drinking and its
effects. AlcoholEdu for College® is
confidential and non-judgmental and is a key
part of Boston University’s comprehensive
alcohol prevention program.
Campus security
procedures and
practices / crime
prevention
Alcohol abuse
prevention /
encourage students
to look out for one
another
FY (First Year)101
76
FY101 is a unique, seminar-style course that
provides the opportunity to explore issues
relevant to new undergraduate students at
Boston University. Students learn to explore
and practice strategies involving a wide range
of relevant issues to foster campus
involvement and personal well-being including
alcohol abuse education modules.
Drug or alcohol abuse
education
BASICS
BASICS is a brief clinical intervention for
substance abuse available to all BU Students.
Students
Annually
Students
(RAs)
Ongoing
Students
Upon hire
Faculty &
Staff
Alcohol, students in
distress, sexual
violence prevention
CHOICES Education Classes
The CHOICES® Alcohol Education class
teaches students practical strategies for
drinking in a less risky way. Students discuss
their own expectations about alcohol and
identify behaviors that can promote or prevent
dangerous drinking. Students who have been
adjudicated for violating the BU's drug and
alcohol policies are mandated to participate.
The CHOICES classes cover both alcohol and
marijuana.
Ongoing
Drug or alcohol abuse
education
Resident Assistant Training
Residence Assistants learn how to effectively
respond to situations they may encounter in
their duties including how to recognize and
prevent sexual violence.
Students
Drug or alcohol abuse
education
e-Checkup to Go
A personalized, web-based feedback tool for
alcohol and marijuana.
Ongoing
Drug or alcohol abuse
education
Sexual Misconduct Awareness Brochure
The University widely distributes an
informational brochure entitled “Have You
Experienced Sexual Assault, Sexual
Harassment, Stalking, or Domestic or Dating
Violence?” to students and employees
throughout campus. It provides awareness of
these issues and helpful resources to contact
if needed. The brochure is also available
online at
www.bu.edu/safety/files/2013/10/DOS-SexualMisconduct-Brochure_Final.pdf
Ongoing rape,
acquaintance rape,
domestic violence,
dating violence,
sexual assault, and
stalking prevention
and awareness
New Employee Orientation
77
All new Boston University employees are
required to attend an orientation training from
Human Resources that includes an awareness
level training in sexual misconduct reporting
as well as an introduction to campus
resources available for drug and alcohol
dependency issues. There is also a
presentation from the BU Police on campus
safety and Clery Act.
Primary rape,
acquaintance rape,
domestic violence,
dating violence,
sexual assault, and
stalking prevention
and awareness /
Crime Prevention /
Drug and alcohol
abuse education
Faculty & Staff Assistance Office Programs
The BU Faculty & Staff Assistance Office
offers free, confidential consultation and
counseling to Boston University employees
who may be experiencing difficulties that affect
their personal lives or work. This office helps
BU faculty and staff and their families with a
range of issues, including alcohol and drug
abuse, stress, depression, relationship and
family concerns, sexual misconduct,
harassment, interpersonal violence, and
abuse.
Students,
Faculty &
Staff
Annually
Students,
Faculty &
Staff
Multiple events
each semester/
online
Students
Ongoing rape,
acquaintance rape,
domestic violence,
dating violence,
sexual assault, and
stalking prevention
and awareness
Educational programming concerning
sexual health
78
Annually
Ongoing rape,
acquaintance rape,
domestic violence,
dating violence,
sexual assault, and
stalking prevention
and awareness
Sexual Assault Awareness Week
The BU community observes Sexual Assault
Awareness Week, an annual nationwide
campaign that highlights the importance of
public awareness of sexual assault and
prevention. Campus events have included
discussions, performances, and a screening of
Hunting Ground, a powerful documentary
about sexual assault on college campuses.
The weeklong observance concludes with the
Take Back the Night Rally.
Faculty &
Staff
Drug or alcohol abuse
/ domestic violence /
stress and depression
Healthy Relationships Workshop
SARP hosts a Domestic Violence Awareness
workshop about healthy relationships.
Participants learn what constitutes a healthy
relationship and how to recognize trouble
signs of domestic violence. Crisis Intervention
Counselors at SARP navigate these issues
and discuss way to get help for oneself or
others.
Ongoing
A number of educational workshops and
programs that are ongoing throughout the year
focus on promoting healthy sexual
relationships, understanding consent in a
sexual context, interpersonal violence and
sexual health.
Ongoing rape,
acquaintance rape,
domestic violence,
dating violence,
sexual assault, and
stalking prevention
and awareness
Step Up Step In BU Bystander Training
Step Up Step In BU (SUSIBU) is an interactive
bystander training session to raise awareness
about sexual assault and what we as
members of the BU community can do to help
prevent it. SUSIBU bystander training is a
requirement by Student Activities Office for
recognized student organizations accepting
funding from the Allocations Board. Each
organization must send at least one person
with allocation responsibilities to a training
session.
Female
students,
faculty & staff
Ongoing / Upon
Request
Students,
Faculty &
Staff
Biannually
Faculty &
Staff
Ongoing rape,
acquaintance rape,
domestic violence,
dating violence,
sexual assault, and
stalking prevention
and awareness
Sexual Misconduct: The Role of Faculty
and Staff in Preventing, Identifying and
Reporting
79
Multiple classes
each semester
Ongoing rape,
acquaintance rape,
domestic violence,
dating violence,
sexual assault, and
stalking prevention
and awareness
Domestic and Dating Violence Prevention
The Boston University Police Department
provides a full range of services addressing
domestic and dating violence issues, including
obtaining restraining orders, safety planning,
and criminal prosecution.
Students
Ongoing rape,
acquaintance rape,
domestic violence,
dating violence,
sexual assault, and
stalking prevention
and awareness / look
out for one another
Rape Aggression Defense (R.A.D.)
Specifically for women who wish to physically
protect themselves against rape and other
forms of violence. The 16-hour or the 20-hour
course is taught by certified BUPD RAD
instructors. The program trains women in
basic self-defense and offers them viable
options when confronted with various threats
of violence.
Multiple events
each semester
Faculty and staff learn how to recognize
sexual misconduct, have an appropriate
conversation with anyone who reports sexual
misconduct, help by directing the survivor to
University or off-campus resources, and report
the incident to proper authorities.
Sexual Misconduct Training in the
Workplace
In addition to the bi-annual online training, the
University’s Title IX Coordinator and Director
of the University’s Equal Opportunity Office
provides a variety of training and educational
programming concerning sexual misconduct
upon request. Participants learn to recognize
sexual misconduct in the workplace and how
to appropriately report and manage
complaints.
Prevention of Sexual Assault and
Harassment (DOD)
At the beginning of each academic year, each
ROTC class conducts a session on the
prevention of sexual assault and harassment
using programming provided by the
Department of Defense. In addition, the Army
ROTC program requires freshmen cadets to
review a two-hour video training session on
the prevention of sexual assault and
harassment at the beginning of each
academic year.
Ongoing rape,
acquaintance rape,
domestic violence,
dating violence,
sexual assault, and
stalking prevention
and awareness /
campus security
procedures and
practices
Annually
Students
(ROTC)
Ongoing / online
Students,
Faculty &
Staff
Ongoing / online
Students,
Faculty &
Staff
Ongoing rape,
acquaintance rape,
domestic violence,
dating violence,
sexual assault, and
stalking prevention
and awareness
Ongoing rape,
acquaintance rape,
domestic violence,
dating violence,
sexual assault, and
stalking prevention
and awareness
Courageous Conversations
80
Faculty &
Staff
Sexual Misconduct
Training
The Common Thread Podcast
The Thurman Center, a division of the Dean of
Students Office, is committed to preserving
the legacy of Dr. Howard Thurman by
breaking barriers of divisiveness and building
community. The Common Thread podcast
explores a variety of issues, including
sexuality, sexual health, and University
resources concerning sexual misconduct.
Ongoing / Upon
Request
Courageous Dialogues is a Thurman Center
program focused on small group discussions
to build meaningful relationships among
participants. The program focuses on issues
of race, class, gender, and sexuality, and are
designed to equip individuals with skills
necessary to engage in sensitive dialogue
around these topics.
Tolerance and
community building
Town Hall Meetings
Held throughout the academic year, town hall
meetings give students an opportunity to meet
with the Chief of Police & Executive Director of
Public Safety and the Dean of Students to
discuss safety and security on campus. Town
hall meetings are announced on the Police
Department website.
Ongoing
Students
Ongoing
Students,
Faculty &
Staff
Ongoing / Upon
Request
Faculty &
Staff
Crime Prevention
Programs
81
Students,
Faculty &
Staff
Crime Prevention
Programs
Informational and Educational Materials
The Boston University Police Department
prepares and disseminates information about
safety and crime prevention, including tips for
safety in the dorms and suggestions for steps
to take if you are the victim of a crime. The
Medical Campus Public Safety Department
prepares and disseminates a variety of
informational brochures providing general
guidance for safety and crime prevention,
including bicycle theft, “street sense,” and
identity theft.
Office Watch Program
Annually (Fall)
Crime Prevention
Programs
Group Meetings
Members of the Boston University Police
Department meet regularly with student
groups, including fraternities and sororities, to
foster good relations and to discuss safety
issues or any topics that may come up.
Students,
Faculty &
Staff
Crime Prevention
Programs
Safety Week
BUPD sponsors Safety Week each fall
semester. Held at the George Sherman Union,
Safety Week includes RAD demonstrations,
computer and bicycle registration, and
provides information and resources about a
number of other safety issues, including
alcohol.
Quarterly
Office Watch is a crime prevention program
similar in philosophy to that of a neighborhood
watch program. The goal of Office Watch is to
reduce the opportunities to commit crime by
enlisting a cooperative effort between the
Boston University community and the Boston
University Police Department. This mission is
accomplished by establishing a formal network
of communication between University
departments, their personnel, and the
University Police.
Crime Prevention
Programs
Public Safety Meet & Greet: Medical
Student Residence
An evening of pizza and public safety
presentations welcoming new and returning
medical students to the Medical Student
Residence facility. The Department of Public
Safety, Boston University Police, Boston
Police, and Transit Police are all represented
and engage students in conversation about
personal safety, campus security procedures,
reporting crimes and the importance of looking
out for one another in the busy urban
environment of the Medical Campus.
Annually
Campus security
procedures and
practices
82
Students
(MED)
Appendix B – Selected Massachusetts State Definitions
In accordance with the Violence Against Women Reauthorization Act of 2013, the University has provided below the
definitions under Massachusetts law of sexual assault, domestic violence, dating violence, stalking and consent.
Please note that the state law definitions may differ from the definitions in the University’s Sexual Misconduct Policy,
which applies to the University’s internal processing of complaints.
Domestic Violence / Dating Violence
Massachusetts does not have one state definition of domestic or dating violence. Under Massachusetts law, a person
suffering abuse from a family or household member may seek a restraining order. Abuse includes: attempting to cause or
causing physical harm; placing another in fear of imminent serious physical harm; or causing another to engage
involuntarily in sexual relations by force, threat, or duress. Mass. G. L. ch. 209A.
The term “family or household members” includes persons who: (a) are or were married to one another; (b) are or were
residing together in the same household; (c) are or were related by blood or marriage; (d) having a child in common
regardless of whether they have ever married or lived together; or (e) are or have been in a substantive dating or
engagement relationship, which shall be adjudged by district, probate or Boston municipal courts in consideration of the
following factors: (1) the length of time of the relationship; (2) the type of relationship; (3) the frequency of interaction
between the parties; and (4) if the relationship has been terminated by either person, the length of time elapsed since the
termination of the relationship. Mass. G. L. ch. 209A.
Stalking
Under Massachusetts law, a person who (1) willfully and maliciously engages in a knowing pattern of conduct or series of
acts over a period of time directed at a specific person which seriously alarms or annoys that person and would cause a
reasonable person to suffer substantial emotional distress, and (2) makes a threat with the intent to place the person in
imminent fear of death or bodily injury, shall be guilty of the crime of stalking. Mass. G. L. ch. 265, Section 43. The
conduct may include threats made by electronic communications such as email, text messages, Instant message and the
like. Stalking may be punished by up to five years in state prison.
Massachusetts also prohibits criminal harassment. Under Massachusetts law, a person who willfully and maliciously
engages in a knowing pattern of conduct or series of acts over a period of time directed at a specific person, which
seriously alarms that person and would cause a reasonable person to suffer substantial emotional distress, shall be guilty
of the crime of criminal harassment. Mass. G. L. ch. 265, Section 43A. The conduct may include communications by
electronic means, including email, text messages, instant messages and the like.
Sexual Assault Massachusetts does not specifically define sexual assault, but rather uses the terms rape and indecent
assault and battery.
Rape is defined as having sexual intercourse or unnatural sexual intercourse with a person and compelling such person to
submit by force and against his or her will or compelling such person to submit by threat of bodily injury. Mass. G. L. ch.
265, Section 22.
Massachusetts law also prohibits indecent assault and battery, which includes the intentionally having physical contact of
a sexual nature with another person, such as the indecent touching of another person’s private parts. Mass. G. L. ch.
Section 13H.
Consent
The term consent is not specifically defined by Massachusetts law. However, Massachusetts law provides that children
under 16, persons that are incapacitated or intoxicated, asleep or mentally impaired can never give consent.
83
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