MegaRAID SAS Software USER’S GUIDE
USER’S
GUIDE
MegaRAID SAS Software
June 2007
Version 2.0
®
80-00156-01, Rev. B
This document contains proprietary information of LSI Corporation. The information contained herein is not to be used by or disclosed to third parties without the
express written permission of an officer of LSI Corporation.
Document 80-00156-01, Rev. B, Version 2.0 (June 2007)
This document describes the LSI Corporation’s MegaRAID Storage Manager
software. This document will remain the official reference source for all
revisions/releases of this product until rescinded by an update.
LSI Corporation reserves the right to make changes to any products herein at
any time without notice. LSI does not assume any responsibility or liability arising
out of the application or use of any product described herein, except as expressly
agreed to in writing by LSI; nor does the purchase or use of a product from LSI
convey a license under any patent rights, copyrights, trademark rights, or any
other of the intellectual property rights of LSI or third parties.
Copyright © 2005-2007 by LSI Corporation. All rights reserved.
TRADEMARK ACKNOWLEDGMENT
LSI, the LSI logo design, iBBU, MegaRAID, and MegaRAID Storage Manager are
trademarks or registered trademarks of LSI Corporation. Microsoft and Windows
are trademarks or registered trademarks of Microsoft Corporation. Linux is a
registered trademark of Linus Torvalds. Intel and Pentium are registered
trademarks of Intel Corporation. All other brand and product names may be
trademarks of their respective companies.
KL/CD
To receive product literature, visit us at http://www.lsi.com.
For a current list of our distributors, sales offices, and design resource
centers, view our web page located at
http://www.lsi.com/cm/ContactSearch.do?locale=EN
ii
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Copyright © 2005-2007 by LSI Corporation. All rights reserved.
Preface
This document explains how to use the MegaRAID Storage Manager™
software, WebBIOS, and Command Line Interface (CLI) utilities to
configure, monitor, and maintain MegaRAID® SAS RAID controllers and
the storage-related devices connected to them.
Audience
This document assumes that you are familiar with SAS controllers and
configuration utilities. The people who benefit from this book are network
administrators who need to create storage configurations on LSI SAS
controllers.
Organization
This document has the following chapters and appendixes:
•
Chapter 1, “Introduction to RAID,” describes RAID (Redundant Array
of Independent Disks), RAID functions and benefits, RAID
components, RAID levels, and configuration strategies. In addition, it
defines the RAID availability concept, and offers tips for configuration
planning.
•
Chapter 2, “WebBIOS Configuration Utility,” explains how to use the
pre-boot WebBIOS Configuration Utility to create and manage
storage configurations.
•
Chapter 3, “MegaRAID Command Tool,” explains how to use the
MegaRAID Command Tool to create and manage storage
configurations. The MegaRAID Command Tool is a CLI application
for SAS.
MegaRAID SAS Software User’s Guide
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Copyright © 2005-2007 by LSI Corporation. All rights reserved.
iii
•
Chapter 4, “MegaRAID Storage Manager Overview and Installation,”
introduces the main features of MegaRAID Storage Manager
software and explains how to install it.
•
Chapter 5, “MegaRAID Storage Manager Window and Menus,”
describes the layout of the MegaRAID Storage Manager window and
lists the available menu options.
•
Chapter 6, “Configuration,” describes how to use the MegaRAID
Storage Manager software to configure or reconfigure storage
devices, how to save configurations, and how to apply saved
configurations to a controller.
•
Chapter 7, “Monitoring System Events and Storage Devices,”
explains how the MegaRAID Storage Manager software monitors the
status of storage configurations and devices and displays information
about them.
•
Chapter 8, “Maintaining and Managing Storage Configurations,”
describes the MegaRAID Storage Manager maintenance functions
for virtual disks and other storage devices.
•
Appendix A, “Events and Messages,” provides descriptions of the
MegaRAID Storage Manager events.
•
Appendix B, “Glossary,” contains definitions of storage-related terms.
Conventions
iv
Note:
Notes contain supplementary information that can have an
effect on system performance.
Caution:
Cautions are notifications that an action has the potential to
adversely affect equipment operation, system performance,
or data integrity.
Preface
Version 2.0
Copyright © 2005-2007 by LSI Corporation. All rights reserved.
Revision History
Document
Number
Date
Revision
Remarks
80-00156-01 Rev. B June 2007
Version 2.0
Updated the WebBIOS Configuration Utility and the MegaRAID Storage Manager. Updated the MegaCLI commands.
Added the RAID introduction chapter.
80-00156-01 Rev. A August 2006
Version 1.1
Corrected the procedure for creating RAID 10 and RAID 50
arrays in the WebBIOS Configuration Utility.
DB15-000339-00
Initial release of this document.
December 2005
Version 1.0
Preface
Version 2.0
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Preface
Version 2.0
Copyright © 2005-2007 by LSI Corporation. All rights reserved.
Contents
Chapter 1
Introduction to RAID
1.1
RAID Description
1.2
RAID Benefits
1.3
RAID Functions
1.4
Components and Features
1.4.1
Physical Array
1.4.2
Virtual Disk
1.4.3
RAID Array
1.4.4
Fault Tolerance
1.4.5
Consistency Check
1.4.6
Background Initialization
1.4.7
Patrol Read
1.4.8
Disk Striping
1.4.9
Disk Mirroring
1.4.10 Parity
1.4.11 Disk Spanning
1.4.12 Hot Spares
1.4.13 Disk Rebuilds
1.4.14 Rebuild Rate
1.4.15 Hot Swap
1.4.16 Physical Drive States
1.4.17 Virtual Disk States
1.4.18 Enclosure Management
1.5
RAID Levels
1.5.1
Summary of RAID Levels
1.5.2
Selecting a RAID Level
1.5.3
RAID 0
1.5.4
RAID 1
1.5.5
RAID 5
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1.7
1.8
Chapter 2
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1.5.6
RAID 6
1.5.7
RAID 10
1.5.8
RAID 50
1.5.9
RAID 60
RAID Configuration Strategies
1.6.1
Maximizing Fault Tolerance
1.6.2
Maximizing Performance
1.6.3
Maximizing Storage Capacity
RAID Availability
1.7.1
RAID Availability Concept
Configuration Planning
1.8.1
Number of Physical Disks
1.8.2
Array Purpose
WebBIOS Configuration Utility
2.1
Overview
2.2
Starting the WebBIOS CU
2.3
WebBIOS CU Main Screen Options
2.4
Creating a Storage Configuration
2.4.1
Selecting the Configuration with the
Configuration Wizard
2.4.2
Using Auto Configuration
2.4.3
Using Custom Configuration
2.5
Viewing and Changing Device Properties
2.5.1
Viewing and Changing Adapter Properties
2.5.2
Viewing and Changing Virtual Disk Properties
2.5.3
Viewing Physical Drive Properties
2.5.4
Viewing Battery Backup Unit Information
2.6
Viewing System Event Information
2.7
Managing Configurations
2.7.1
Running a Consistency Check
2.7.2
Deleting a Virtual Disk
2.7.3
Importing or Clearing a Foreign Configuration
2.7.4
Migrating the RAID Level of a Virtual Disk
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Chapter 3
MegaRAID Command Tool
3.1
Product Overview
3.2
MegaCLI Version 1.00.22 Upgrade for Linux
3.3
Command Line Abbreviations and Conventions
3.3.1
Abbreviations Used in the Command Line
3.3.2
Conventions
3.4
Adapter Property-Related Options
3.4.1
Display Adapter Properties
3.4.2
Display Number of Controllers Supported
3.4.3
Enable or Disable Automatic Rebuild
3.4.4
Flush Adapter Cache
3.4.5
Set Adapter Properties
3.4.6
Display Specified Adapter Properties
3.4.7
Set Factory Defaults
3.4.8
Set SAS Address
3.4.9
Set Time and Date on Adapter
3.4.10 Display Time and Date on Adapter
3.5
Patrol Read-Related Adapter Properties
3.5.1
Set Patrol Read Options
3.5.2
Set Patrol Read Delay Interval
3.6
BIOS-Related Properties
3.6.1
Set or Display Bootable Virtual Disk ID
3.6.2
Select BIOS Status Options
3.7
Battery Backup Unit-Related Properties
3.7.1
Display BBU Information
3.7.2
Display BBU Status Information
3.7.3
Display BBU Capacity
3.7.4
Display BBU Design Parameters
3.7.5
Display Current BBU Properties
3.7.6
Start BBU Learning Cycle
3.7.7
Place Battery in Low-Power Storage Mode
3.7.8
Set BBU Properties
3.8
Options for Displaying Logs Kept at Firmware Level
3.8.1
Event Log Management
3.8.2
Set BBU Terminal Logging
3.9
Configuration-Related Options
3.9.1
Add RAID 0, 1, 5, or 6 Configuration
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3.9.2
Add RAID 10, 50, or 60 Configuration
3.9.3
Clear the Existing Configuration
3.9.4
Save the Configuration on the Adapter
3.9.5
Restore the Configuration Data from File
3.9.6
Manage Foreign Configuration Information
3.9.7
Delete Specified Virtual Disk(s)
3.9.8
Display the Free Space
Virtual Disk-Related Options
3.10.1 Display Virtual Disk Information
3.10.2 Change the Virtual Disk Cache and
Access Parameters
3.10.3 Display the Virtual Disk Cache and
Access Parameters
3.10.4 Manage Virtual Disk Initialization
3.10.5 Manage a Consistency Check
3.10.6 Manage a Background Initialization
3.10.7 Perform a Virtual Disk Reconstruction
3.10.8 Display Information about Virtual Disks
and Physical Disk Drives
3.10.9 Display the Number of Virtual Disks
Physical Drive-Related Options
3.11.1 Display Physical Disk Drive Information
3.11.2 Set the Physical Disk Drive State to Online
3.11.3 Set the Physical Disk Drive State to Offline
3.11.4 Change the Physical Disk Drive State to
Unconfigured Good
3.11.5 Change Physical Disk Drive State
3.11.6 Manage a Physical Disk Drive Initialization
3.11.7 Rebuild a Physical Disk Drive
3.11.8 Locate the Physical Disk Drive(s) and
Activate LED
3.11.9 Mark the Configured Physical Disk Drive
as Missing
3.11.10 Display the Physical Drives in Missing Status
3.11.11 Replace the Configured Physical Disk Drives
and Start an Automatic Rebuild
3.11.12 Prepare the Unconfigured Physical Disk
Drive for Removal
Contents
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Chapter 4
Chapter 5
3.11.13 Display Total Number of Physical Disk Drives
3.11.14 Display List of Physical Devices
Enclosure-Related Options
Flashing the Firmware
3.13.1 Flash the Firmware with the ROM File
3.13.2 Flash the Firmware in Mode 0 with the ROM File
SAS Topology
Diagnostic-Related Options
3.15.1 Start Adapter Diagnostics
3.15.2 Start Battery Test
3.15.3 Start NVRAM Diagnostic
3.15.4 Set Mode for the Adapter Connector
3.15.5 Get Multiplexer Mode
Miscellaneous Options
3.16.1 Display the MegaCLI Version
3.16.2 Display Help for MegaCLI
MegaRAID Storage Manager Overview and Installation
4.1
Overview
4.1.1
Creating Storage Configurations
4.1.2
Monitoring Storage Devices
4.1.3
Maintaining Storage Configurations
4.2
Hardware and Software Requirements
4.3
Installation
4.3.1
Installing MegaRAID Storage Manager
Software on Microsoft Windows
4.3.2
Installing MegaRAID Storage Manager
Software for Linux
4.3.3
Linux Error Messages
MegaRAID Storage Manager Window and Menus
5.1
Starting MegaRAID Storage Manager Software
5.2
MegaRAID Storage Manager Window
5.2.1
Physical/Logical View Panel
5.2.2
Properties/Operations/Graphical View Panel
5.2.3
Event Log Panel
5.2.4
Menu Bar
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Chapter 6
Chapter 7
xii
Configuration
6.1
Creating a New Storage Configuration
6.1.1
Understanding Virtual Disk Parameters
6.1.2
Using Auto Configuration
6.1.3
Using Guided Configuration
6.1.4
Using Manual Configuration: RAID 0
6.1.5
Using Manual Configuration: RAID 1
6.1.6
Using Manual Configuration: RAID 5
6.1.7
Using Manual Configuration: RAID 6
6.1.8
Using Manual Configuration: RAID 10
6.1.9
Using Manual Configuration: RAID 50
6.1.10 Using Manual Configuration: RAID 60
6.2
Adding Hot Spare Disks
6.3
Changing Adjustable Task Rates
6.4
Changing Virtual Disk Properties
6.5
Changing a Virtual Disk Configuration
6.5.1
Adding a Disk Drive to a Configuration
6.5.2
Removing a Physical Drive from a Configuration
6.5.3
Changing the RAID Level of a Configuration
6.6
Deleting a Virtual Disk
6.7
Saving a Storage Configuration to Disk
6.8
Clearing a Storage Configuration from a Controller
6.9
Adding a Saved Storage Configuration
6-1
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Monitoring System Events and Storage Devices
7.1
Monitoring System Events
7.2
Configuring Event Notifications
7.2.1
Setting Alert Delivery Rules
7.2.2
Changing the Event Severity
7.2.3
Defining Exceptions
7.2.4
Selecting Email Settings
7.3
Monitoring Controllers
7.4
Monitoring Disk Drives
7.5
Running a Patrol Read
7.6
Monitoring Virtual Disks
7.7
Monitoring Enclosures
7-1
7-3
7-4
7-5
7-6
7-8
7-10
7-12
7-14
7-16
7-18
Contents
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7.8
7.9
Chapter 8
Monitoring Battery Backup Units
Monitoring Rebuilds and Other Processes
7-19
7-20
Maintaining and Managing Storage Configurations
8.1
Initializing a Virtual Disk
8.2
Running a Consistency Check
8.3
Scanning for New Drives
8.4
Rebuilding a Drive
8.5
Making a Drive Offline or Missing
8.6
Upgrading the Firmware
8-1
8-2
8-3
8-3
8-4
8-5
Appendix A
Events and Messages
Appendix B
Glossary
Customer Feedback
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Contents
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Figures
1.1
1.2
1.3
1.4
1.5
1.6
1.7
1.8
1.9
1.10
1.11
2.1
2.2
2.3
2.4
2.5
2.6
2.7
2.8
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2.10
2.11
2.12
2.13
2.14
2.15
2.16
2.17
2.18
2.19
2.20
2.21
2.22
2.23
2.24
Example of Disk Striping (RAID 0)
Example of Disk Mirroring (RAID 1)
Example of Distributed Parity (RAID 5)
Example of Disk Spanning
RAID 0 Array Example with Two Disk Drives
RAID 1 Array
RAID 5 Array with Six Disk Drives
Example of Distributed Parity across Two Blocks
in a Stripe (RAID 6)
RAID 10 Level Virtual Disk
RAID 50 Level Virtual Disk
RAID 60 Level Logical Drive
WebBIOS CU Main Screen
WebBIOS Configuration Wizard Screen
WebBIOS Disk Group Definition Screen
WebBIOS Virtual Disk Definition Screen
RAID 0 Configuration Preview
WebBIOS Disk Group Definition Screen
WebBIOS Virtual Disk Definition Screen
RAID 1 Configuration Preview
WebBIOS Disk Group Definition Screen
WebBIOS Virtual Disk Definition Screen
RAID 5 Configuration Preview
WebBIOS Disk Group Definition Screen
WebBIOS Virtual Disk Definition Screen
RAID 6 Configuration Preview
WebBIOS Disk Group Definition Screen
WebBIOS Virtual Disk Definition Screen
RAID 10 Configuration Preview
WebBIOS Disk Group Definition Screen
WebBIOS Virtual Disk Definition Screen
RAID 50 Configuration Preview
WebBIOS Disk Group Definition Screen
WebBIOS Virtual Disk Definition Screen
RAID 60 Configuration Preview
First Adapter Properties Screen
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4.3
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7.2
7.3
7.4
7.5
7.6
7.7
7.8
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Second Adapter Properties Screen
Virtual Disk Screen
Physical Drive Screen
Battery Module Screen
Event Information Screen
Foreign Configuration Screen
Foreign Configuration Preview Screen
Customer Information Screen
Setup Type Screen
Setup Type Screen
Custom Setup Screen
Server Screen
Select Server Window
Server Login Window
Main MegaRAID Storage Manager Window
Operations Tab
Graphical View Tab
First Configuration Wizard Screen
Auto Configuration Screen
First Guided Configuration Screen
Second Guided Configuration Screen
First Manual Configuration Screen
Manual Configuration – Defining a Virtual Disk
Creating a Global Hot Spare
Set Adjustable Task Rates
Set Virtual Disk Properties
Reconstruction Wizard
Event Information Window
Event Notification Configuration Screen
Change Events Severity
Add an Event to the Exceptions List
Edit Delivery Methods for Exception Events
Email Settings
Add Email Address Dialog Box
Controller Information
Physical Drive Information
Patrol Read Configuration
Virtual Disk Properties
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7.13
7.14
Enclosure Information – Graphical View
Battery Backup Unit Information
Group Show Progress Window
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Tables
1.1
1.2
1.3
1.4
1.5
1.6
1.7
1.8
1.9
1.10
1.11
1.12
1.13
1.14
1.15
2.1
2.2
2.3
3.1
3.2
3.3
3.4
3.5
3.6
3.7
3.8
3.9
3.10
3.11
3.12
3.13
3.14
3.15
3.16
3.17
Types of Parity
Spanning for RAID 10, RAID 50, and RAID 60
Physical Drive States
Virtual Disk States
RAID 0 Overview
RAID 1 Overview
RAID 5 Overview
RAID 6 Overview
RAID 10 Overview
RAID 50 Overview
RAID 60 Overview
RAID Levels and Fault Tolerance
RAID Levels and Performance
RAID Levels and Capacity
Factors to Consider for Array Configuration
WebBIOS CU Toolbar Icons
Adapter Properties Menu Options
Additional Disk Drives Required for RAID-Level
Migration
Command Line Abbreviations
Conventions
Adapter Parameters
Number of Controllers Supported
Enable or Disable Automatic Rebuild
Cache Flush on Selected Adapter
Set Adapter Properties
Display Specified Adapter Properties
Set Factory Defaults
Set SAS Address on Adapter
Set Time and Date on Adapter
Display Time and Date on Adapter
Set Patrol Read Options
Set Patrol Read Delay Interval
Bootable Virtual Disk ID
Options for BIOS Status
Display BBU Information
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Display BBU Status Information
Display BBU Capacity Information
Display BBU Design Parameters
Display Current BBU Properties
Start BBU Learning Cycle
Place Battery in Low-Power Storage Mode
Set BBU Properties
Event Log Management
Set BBU Terminal Logging
Add RAID 0, 1, 5, or 6 Configuration
Add RAID 10, 50, or 60 Configuration
Clear Existing Configuration
Save Configuration on the Adapter
Restore Configuration Data from File
Manage Foreign Configuration Information
Delete Specified Virtual Disks
Display Free Space
Display Virtual Disk Information
Change Virtual Disk Cache and Access Parameters
Display Virtual Disk Cache and Access Parameters
Manage Virtual Disk Initialization
Manage Consistency Check
Manage Background Initialization
Virtual Disk Reconstruction
Display Virtual Disk and Physical Disk Drive Information
Display Number of Virtual Disks
Display Physical Disk Drive Information
Set Physical Disk Drive State to Online
Set Physical Disk Drive State to Offline
Change Physical Disk Drive State to Unconfigured Good
Change Physical Disk Drive State
Physical Disk Drive Initialization
Rebuild a Physical Disk Drive
Locate Physical Disk Drive and Activate LED
Mark Configured Physical Disk Drive as Missing
Display Physical Disk Drives in Missing Status
Replace Configured Physical Disk Drive(s) and
Start Automatic Rebuild
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3.65
3.66
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3.68
7.1
A.1
A.2
Prepare Unconfigured Physical Disk Drive(s) for
Removal
Display Number of Physical Disk Drives Attached
to an Adapter
Display List of Physical Devices Attached to Adapter(s)
Display Enclosure Information
Flash Firmware with ROM File
Flash Firmware in Mode 0 with ROM File
Display PHY Connection Information
Start Diagnostics Setting
Start Battery Test
Start NVRAM Diagnostic
Set Mode for the Adapter Connector
Get Multiplexer Mode for the Adapter Connector
Display MegaCLI Version
Display Help for MegaCLI
Event Severity Levels
Event Error Levels
Event Messages
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Contents
Version 2.0
Copyright © 2005-2007 by LSI Corporation. All rights reserved.
Chapter 1
Introduction to RAID
This chapter describes RAID (Redundant Array of Independent Disks),
RAID functions and benefits, RAID components, RAID levels, and
configuration strategies. In addition, it defines the RAID availability
concept, and offers tips for configuration planning.
1.1
RAID Description
RAID is an array, or group, of multiple independent physical disks that
provide high performance and fault tolerance. A RAID array improves I/O
(input/output) performance and reliability. The RAID array appears to the
host computer as a single storage unit or as multiple logical units. I/O is
expedited because several disks can be accessed simultaneously.
1.2
RAID Benefits
RAID arrays improve data storage reliability and fault tolerance compared
to single-drive storage systems. Data loss resulting from a physical disk
failure can be prevented by reconstructing missing data from the
remaining physical disks. RAID has gained popularity because it
improves I/O performance and increases storage subsystem reliability.
1.3
RAID Functions
Virtual disks, also known as logical drives, are arrays or spanned arrays
that are available to the operating system. The storage space in a virtual
disk is spread across all the physical drives in the array.
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1-1
Your physical drives must be organized into virtual disks in an array and
must be able to support the RAID level that you select. Below are some
common RAID functions:
1.4
•
Creating hot spare drives
•
Configuring physical arrays and virtual disks
•
Initializing one or more virtual disks
•
Accessing controllers, virtual disks, and physical drives individually
•
Rebuilding failed physical disks
•
Verifying that the redundancy data in virtual disks using RAID level
1, 5, 6, 10, 50, or 60 is correct
•
Reconstructing virtual disks after changing RAID levels or adding a
physical disk to an array
•
Selecting a host controller to work on
Components and Features
RAID levels describe a system for ensuring the availability and
redundancy of data stored on large disk subsystems. See Section 1.5,
“RAID Levels,” for detailed information about RAID levels.
1.4.1
Physical Array
A physical array is a group of physical disk drives. The physical disk
drives are managed in partitions known as virtual disks.
1.4.2
Virtual Disk
A virtual disk is a partition in a physical array of disks that is made up of
contiguous data segments on the physical disks. A virtual disk can
consist of an entire physical array, more than one entire physical array, a
part of an array, parts of more than one array, or a combination of any
two of these conditions.
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1.4.3
RAID Array
A RAID array is one or more virtual disks controlled by the RAID
controller.
1.4.4
Fault Tolerance
Fault tolerance is the capability of the subsystem to undergo a single
failure without compromising data integrity, and processing capability.
The RAID controller provides this support through redundant arrays in
RAID levels 1, 5, 10, 50, and 60. The system can still work properly even
with a single disk failure in an array, though performance can be
degraded to some extent.
Note:
RAID level 0 is not fault tolerant. If a drive in a RAID 0 array
fails, the whole virtual disk (all physical drives associated
with the virtual disk) will fail.
Fault tolerance is often associated with system availability because it
allows the system to be available during the failures. However, this
means that it is also important for the system to be available during the
repair of the problem.
A hot spare is an unused physical disk that, in case of a disk failure in a
redundant RAID array, can be used to rebuild the data and re-establish
redundancy. After the hot spare is automatically moved into the RAID
array, the data is automatically rebuilt on the hot spare drive. The RAID
array continues to handle requests while the rebuild occurs.
Auto-rebuild allows a failed drive to be replaced and the data
automatically rebuilt by “hot-swapping” the drive in the same drive bay.
The RAID array continues to handle requests while the rebuild occurs.
1.4.5
Consistency Check
The Consistency Check operation verifies correctness of the data in
virtual disks that use RAID levels 1, 5, 10, 50, and 60. (RAID 0 does not
provide data redundancy). For example, in a system with parity, checking
consistency means computing the data on one drive and comparing the
results to the contents of the parity drive.
Note:
It is recommended that you perform a consistency check at
least once a month.
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1-3
1.4.6
Background Initialization
Background initialization is a consistency check that is forced when you
create a virtual disk. The difference between a background initialization
and a consistency check is that a background initialization is forced on
new virtual disks. This is an automatic operation that starts 5 minutes
after you create the virtual disk.
Background initialization is a check for media errors on physical drives.
It ensures that striped data segments are the same on all physical drives
in an array. The default and recommended background initialization rate
is 30 percent. Before you change the rebuild rate, you must stop the
background initialization or the rate change will not affect the background
initialization rate. After you stop background initialization and change the
rebuild rate, the rate change takes effect when you restart background
initialization.
1.4.7
Patrol Read
Patrol read involves the review of your system for possible physical disk
errors that could lead to drive failure and then action to correct errors.
The goal is to protect data integrity by detecting physical drive failure
before the failure can damage data. The corrective actions depend on
the array configuration and the type of errors.
Patrol read starts only when the controller is idle for a defined period of
time and no other background tasks are active, though it can continue to
run during heavy I/O processes.
You can use the MegaRAID Command Tool or the MegaRAID Storage
Manager to select the patrol read options, which you can use to set
automatic or manual operation, or disable patrol read. See Section 3.5,
“Patrol Read-Related Adapter Properties,” or Section 7.5, “Running a
Patrol Read”.
1.4.8
Disk Striping
Disk striping allows you to write data across multiple physical disks
instead of just one physical disk. Disk striping involves partitioning each
drive storage space into stripes that can vary in size from 8 KB to 128
KB. These stripes are interleaved in a repeated sequential manner. The
1-4
Introduction to RAID
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combined storage space is composed of stripes from each drive. It is
recommended that you keep stripe sizes the same across RAID arrays.
For example, in a four-disk system using only disk striping (used in RAID
level 0), segment 1 is written to disk 1, segment 2 is written to disk 2,
and so on. Disk striping enhances performance because multiple drives
are accessed simultaneously, but disk striping does not provide data
redundancy.
Figure 1.1
Segment 1
Segment 5
Segment 9
1.4.8.1
Example of Disk Striping (RAID 0)
Segment 2
Segment 6
Segment 10
Segment 3
Segment 7
Segment 11
Segment 4
Segment 8
Segment 12
Stripe Width
Stripe width is the number of disks involved in an array where striping is
implemented. For example, a four-disk array with disk striping has a
stripe width of four.
1.4.8.2
Stripe Size
The stripe size is the length of the interleaved data segments that the
RAID controller writes across multiple drives, not including parity disks.
For example, consider a stripe that contains 64 KB of disk space and has
16 KB of data residing on each disk in the stripe. In this case, the stripe
size is 64 KB and the strip size is 16 KB.
1.4.8.3
Strip Size
The strip size is the portion of a stripe that resides on a single physical
disk.
1.4.9
Disk Mirroring
With mirroring (used in RAID 1), data written to one physical disk is
simultaneously written to another physical disk. If one disk fails, the
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1-5
contents of the other disk can be used to run the system and reconstruct
the failed disk. The primary advantage of disk mirroring is that it provides
100 percent data redundancy. Because the contents of the disk are
completely written to a second disk, it does not matter if one of the disks
fails. Both disks contain the same data at all times. Either disk can act
as the operational disk.
Disk mirroring provides 100 percent redundancy, but is expensive
because each drive in the system must be duplicated. Figure 1.2 shows
an example of disk mirroring.
Figure 1.2
Example of Disk Mirroring (RAID 1)
Segment 1
Segment 2
Segment 3
Segment 4
Segment 1 Duplicated
Segment 2 Duplicated
Segment 3 Duplicated
Segment 4 Duplicated
1.4.10 Parity
Parity generates a set of redundancy data from two or more parent data
sets. The redundancy data can be used to reconstruct one of the parent
data sets. Parity data does not fully duplicate the parent data sets. In
RAID, this method is applied to entire drives or stripes across all disk
drives in an array. The types of parity are described in Table 1.1.
Table 1.1
Types of Parity
Parity Type
Description
Dedicated
The parity of the data on two or more disk drives is stored
on an additional disk.
Distributed
The parity data is distributed across more than one drive in
the system.
If a single disk drive fails, it can be rebuilt from the parity and the data
on the remaining drives. RAID level 5 combines distributed parity with
disk striping, as shown in Figure 1.3. Parity provides redundancy for one
1-6
Introduction to RAID
Version 2.0
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drive failure without duplicating the contents of entire disk drives, but
parity generation can slow the write process.
Figure 1.3
Example of Distributed Parity (RAID 5)
Segment 1
Segment 7
Segment 2
Segment 8
Segment 3
Segment 9
Segment 4
Segment 10
Segment 13
Segment 19
Segment 25
Parity (26–30)
Segment 14
Segment 20
Parity (21-25)
Segment 26
Segment 15
Parity (16-20)
Segment 21
Segment 27
Parity (11–15)
Segment 16
Segment 22
Segment 28
Segment 5
Parity (6-10)
Segment 11
Segment 17
Segment 23
Segment 29
Parity (1-5)
Segment 6
Segment 12
Segment 18
Segment 24
Segment 30
Note: Parity is distributed across all drives in the array.
1.4.11 Disk Spanning
Disk spanning allows multiple physical drives to function like one big
drive. Spanning overcomes lack of disk space and simplifies storage
management by combining existing resources or adding relatively
inexpensive resources. For example, four 20 GB drives can be combined
to appear to the operating system as a single 80 GB drive.
Spanning alone does not provide reliability or performance
enhancements. Spanned virtual disks must have the same stripe size
and must be contiguous. In Figure 1.4, RAID 1 arrays are turned into a
RAID 10 array.
Note:
Figure 1.4
60 GB/s
Make sure that the spans are in different backplanes, so
that if one span fails, you do not lose the whole array.
Example of Disk Spanning
60 GB/s
Can Be Accessed as
One 120 GB/s Drive
60 GB/s
Can Be Accessed as
One 120 GB/s Drive
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60 GB/s
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1-7
Note:
1.4.11.1
Spanning two contiguous RAID 0 virtual disks does not
produce a new RAID level or add fault tolerance. It does
increase the size of the logical volume and improves
performance by doubling the number of spindles.
Spanning for RAID 10, RAID 50, and RAID 60
Table 1.2 describes how to configure RAID 10, RAID 50, and RAID 60
by spanning. The virtual disks must have the same stripe size and the
maximum number of spans is eight. The full drive size is used when you
span virtual disks; you cannot specify a smaller drive size.
See Section Chapter 6, “Configuration” for detailed procedures for
configuring arrays and virtual disks, and spanning the drives.
Table 1.2
Spanning for RAID 10, RAID 50, and RAID 60
Level
Description
10
Configure RAID 10 by spanning two contiguous RAID 1 virtual
disks. The RAID 1 virtual disks must have the same stripe size.
50
Configure RAID 50 by spanning two contiguous RAID 5 virtual
disks. The RAID 5 virtual disks must have the same stripe size.
60
Configure RAID 60 by spanning two contiguous RAID 6 virtual
disks. The RAID 6 virtual disks must have the same stripe size.
1.4.12 Hot Spares
A hot spare is an extra, unused disk drive that is part of the disk
subsystem. It is usually in standby mode, ready for service if a drive fails.
Hot spares permit you to replace failed drives without system shutdown
or user intervention. MegaRAID SAS RAID controllers can implement
automatic and transparent rebuilds of failed drives using hot spare drives,
providing a high degree of fault tolerance and zero downtime.
Note:
When running RAID 0 and RAID 5 virtual disks on the
same set of physical drives (a sliced configuration), a
rebuild to a hot spare will not occur after a drive failure until
the RAID 0 virtual disk is deleted.
The RAID management software allows you to specify physical drives as
hot spares. When a hot spare is needed, the RAID controller assigns the
hot spare that has a capacity closest to and at least as great as that of
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the failed drive to take the place of the failed drive. The failed drive is
removed from the virtual disk and marked ready awaiting removal once
the rebuild to a hot spare begins. You can make hot spares of the
physical drives that are not in a RAID virtual disk.
Note:
If a rebuild to a hot spare fails for any reason, the hot spare
drive will be marked as "failed". If the source drive fails,
both the source drive and the hot spare drive will be
marked as "failed".
There are two types of hot spares:
1.4.12.1
•
Global hot spare
•
Dedicated hot spare
Global Hot Spare
A global hot spare drive can be used to replace any failed drive in a
redundant array as long as its capacity is equal to or larger than the
coerced capacity of the failed drive. A global hot spare defined on any
channel should be available to replace a failed drive on both channels.
1.4.12.2
Dedicated Hot Spare
A dedicated hot spare can be used to replace a failed drive only in a
selected array. One or more drives can be designated as a member of a
spare drive pool. The most suitable drive from the pool is selected for fail
over. A dedicated hot spare is used before one from the global hot spare
pool.
Hot spare drives can be located on any RAID channel. Standby hot
spares (not being used in RAID array) are polled every 60 seconds at a
minimum, and their status made available in the array management
software. RAID controllers offer the ability to rebuild with a disk that is in
a system, but not initially set to be a hot spare.
Observe the following parameters when using hot spares:
•
Hot spares are used only in arrays with redundancy: RAID levels 1,
5, 6, 10, 50, and 60.
•
A hot spare connected to a specific RAID controller can be used to
rebuild a drive that is connected to the same controller only.
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1-9
•
You must assign the hot spare to one or more drives through the
controller BIOS or use array management software to place it in the
hot spare pool.
•
A hot spare must have free space equal to or greater than the drive
it would replace. For example, to replace an 18 GB drive, the hot
spare must be 18 GB or larger.
1.4.13 Disk Rebuilds
When a physical drive in a RAID array fails, you can rebuild the drive by
recreating the data that was stored on the drive before it failed. The RAID
controller uses hot spares to rebuild failed drives automatically and
transparently, at user-defined rebuild rates. If a hot spare is available, the
rebuild can start automatically when a drive fails. If a hot spare is not
available, the failed drive must be replaced with a new drive so that the
data on the failed drive can be rebuilt. Rebuilding can be done only in
arrays with data redundancy, which includes RAID 1, 5, 6, 10, 50, and
60.
The failed physical drive is removed from the virtual disk and marked
ready awaiting removal when the rebuild to a hot spare begins. If the
system goes down during a rebuild, the RAID controller automatically
restarts the rebuild after the system reboots.
Note:
When the rebuild to a hot spare begins, the failed drive is
often removed from the virtual disk before management
applications detect the failed drive. When this occurs, the
events logs show the drive rebuilding to the hot spare
without showing the failed drive. The formerly failed drive
will be marked as "ready" after a rebuild begins to a hot
spare.
Note:
If a rebuild to a hot spare fails for any reason, the hot spare
drive will be marked as "failed". If the source drive fails,
both the source drive and the hot spare drive will be
marked as "failed".
An automatic drive rebuild will not start if you replace a drive during a
RAID-level migration. The rebuild must be started manually after the
expansion or migration procedure is complete.
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1.4.14 Rebuild Rate
The rebuild rate is the percentage of the compute cycles dedicated to
rebuilding failed drives. A rebuild rate of 100 percent means that the
system gives priority to rebuilding the failed drives.
The rebuild rate can be configured between 0 percent and 100 percent.
At 0 percent, the rebuild is done only if the system is not doing anything
else. At 100 percent, the rebuild has a higher priority than any other
system activity. Using 0 or 100 percent is not recommended. The default
rebuild rate is 30 percent.
1.4.15 Hot Swap
A hot swap is the manual replacement of a defective physical disk unit
while the computer is still running. When a new drive has been installed,
a rebuild will occur automatically if:
•
The newly inserted drive is the same size as or larger than the failed
drive
•
It is placed in the same drive bay as the failed drive it is replacing
The RAID controller can be configured to detect the new disks and
rebuild the contents of the disk drive automatically.
1.4.16 Physical Drive States
A physical drive state is a property indicating the status of the drive. The
physical drive states are described in Table 1.3.
Table 1.3
Physical Drive States
State
Description
Online
A physical disk that can be accessed by the RAID
controller and is part of the virtual disk.
Unconfigured
Good
A physical drive that is functioning normally but is not
configured as a part of a virtual disk or as a hot spare.
Hot Spare
A physical drive that is powered up and ready for use as
a spare in case an online drive fails.
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1-11
Table 1.3
Physical Drive States (Cont.)
State
Description
Failed
A physical disk that was originally configured as Online or
Hot Spare, but on which the firmware detects an
unrecoverable error.
Rebuild
A physical disk to which data is being written to restore
full redundancy for a virtual disk.
Unconfigured
Bad
A physical disk on which the firmware detects an
unrecoverable error; the physical disk was Unconfigured
Good or the physical disk could not be initialized.
Missing
A physical disk that was Online but which has been
removed from its location.
Offline
A physical disk that is part of a virtual disk but which has
invalid data as far as the RAID configuration is concerned.
1.4.17 Virtual Disk States
The virtual disk states are described in Table 1.4.
Table 1.4
Virtual Disk States
State
Description
Optimal
The virtual disk operating condition is good. All configured
physical drives are online.
Degraded
The virtual disk operating condition is not optimal. One of the
configured physical drives has failed or is offline.
Failed
The virtual disk has failed.
Offline
The virtual disk is not available to the RAID controller.
1.4.18 Enclosure Management
Enclosure management is the intelligent monitoring of the disk
subsystem by software and/or hardware. The disk subsystem can be part
of the host computer or can reside in an external disk enclosure.
Enclosure management helps you stay informed of events in the disk
subsystem, such as a drive or power supply failure. Enclosure
management increases the fault tolerance of the disk subsystem.
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1.5
RAID Levels
The RAID controller supports RAID levels 0, 1, 5, 6, 10, 50, and 60. The
supported RAID levels are summarized in the following section. In
addition, it supports independent drives (configured as RAID 0.) The
following sections describe the RAID levels in detail.
1.5.1
Summary of RAID Levels
RAID 0 uses striping to provide high data throughput, especially for large
files in an environment that does not require fault tolerance.
RAID 1 uses mirroring so that data written to one disk drive is
simultaneously written to another disk drive. This is good for small
databases or other applications that require small capacity but complete
data redundancy.
RAID 5 uses disk striping and parity data across all drives (distributed
parity) to provide high data throughput, especially for small random
access.
RAID 6 uses distributed parity, with two independent parity blocks per
stripe, and disk striping. A RAID 6 virtual disk can survive the loss of two
disks without losing data.
RAID 10, a combination of RAID 0 and RAID 1, consists of striped data
across mirrored spans. It provides high data throughput and complete
data redundancy but uses a larger number of spans.
RAID 50, a combination of RAID 0 and RAID 5, uses distributed parity
and disk striping and works best with data that requires high reliability,
high request rates, high data transfers, and medium-to-large capacity.
Note:
Having RAID 0 and RAID 5 virtual disks in the same
physical array is not recommended. If a drive in the physical
array has to be rebuilt, the RAID 0 virtual disk will cause a
failure during the rebuild.
RAID 60, a combination of RAID 0 and RAID 6, uses distributed parity,
with two independent parity blocks per stripe in each RAID set, and disk
striping. A RAID 60 virtual disk can survive the loss of two disks in each
of the RAID 6 sets without losing data. It works best with data that
RAID Levels
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Copyright © 2006-2007 by LSI Corporation. All rights reserved.
requires high reliability, high request rates, high data transfers, and
medium-to-large capacity.
1.5.2
Selecting a RAID Level
To ensure the best performance, you should select the optimal RAID
level when you create a system drive. The optimal RAID level for your
disk array depends on a number of factors:
1.5.3
•
The number of physical drives in the disk array
•
The capacity of the physical drives in the array
•
The need for data redundancy
•
The disk performance requirements
RAID 0
RAID 0 provides disk striping across all drives in the RAID array. RAID
0 does not provide any data redundancy, but does offer the best
performance of any RAID level. RAID 0 breaks up data into smaller
segments, and then stripes the data segments across each drive in the
array. The size of each data segment is determined by the stripe size.
RAID 0 offers high bandwidth.
Note:
RAID level 0 is not fault tolerant. If a drive in a RAID 0 array
fails, the whole virtual disk (all physical drives associated
with the virtual disk) will fail.
By breaking up a large file into smaller segments, the RAID controller
can use both SAS drive and SATA drives to read or write the file faster.
RAID 0 involves no parity calculations to complicate the write operation.
This makes RAID 0 ideal for applications that require high bandwidth but
do not require fault tolerance.
Table 1.5
1-14
RAID 0 Overview
Uses
Provides high data throughput, especially for large files.
Any environment that does not require fault tolerance.
Strong Points
Provides increased data throughput for large files. No
capacity loss penalty for parity.
Weak Points
Does not provide fault tolerance or high bandwidth. All
data lost if any drive fails.
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Table 1.5
RAID 0 Overview
1 to 32
Drives
Figure 1.5
RAID 0 Array Example with Two Disk Drives
Segment 1
Segment 3
Segment 5
Segment 7
1.5.4
Segment 2
Segment 4
Segment 6
Segment 8
RAID 1
In RAID 1, the RAID controller duplicates all data from one drive to a
second drive. RAID 1 provides complete data redundancy, but at the cost
of doubling the required data storage capacity. Table 1.6 provides an
overview of RAID 1.
Table 1.6
RAID 1 Overview
Uses
Use RAID 1 for small databases or any other
environment that requires fault tolerance but small
capacity.
Strong Points
Provides complete data redundancy. RAID 1 is ideal for
any application that requires fault tolerance and minimal
capacity.
Weak Points
Requires twice as many disk drives. Performance is
impaired during drive rebuilds.
Drives
2
RAID Levels
Version 2.0
1-15
Copyright © 2006-2007 by LSI Corporation. All rights reserved.
Figure 1.6
RAID 1 Array
Segment 1 Duplicated
Segment 2 Duplicated
Segment 3 Duplicated
Segment 4 Duplicated
Segment 1
Segment 2
Segment 3
Segment 4
1.5.5
RAID 5
RAID 5 includes disk striping at the block level and parity. Parity is the
data’s property of being odd or even, and parity checking is used to
detect errors in the data. In RAID 5, the parity information is written to
all drives. RAID 5 is best suited for networks that perform a lot of small
input/output (I/O) transactions simultaneously.
RAID 5 addresses the bottleneck issue for random I/O operations.
Because each drive contains both data and parity, numerous writes can
take place concurrently.
Table 1.7 provides an overview of RAID 5.
Table 1.7
1-16
RAID 5 Overview
Uses
Provides high data throughput, especially for large files.
Use RAID 5 for transaction processing applications
because each drive can read and write independently.
If a drive fails, the RAID controller uses the parity drive
to recreate all missing information. Use also for office
automation and online customer service that requires
fault tolerance. Use for any application that has high
read request rates but low write request rates.
Strong Points
Provides data redundancy, high read rates, and good
performance in most environments. Provides
redundancy with lowest loss of capacity.
Weak Points
Not well suited to tasks requiring lot of writes. Suffers
more impact if no cache is used (clustering). Disk drive
performance will be reduced if a drive is being rebuilt.
Environments with few processes do not perform as
well because the RAID overhead is not offset by the
performance gains in handling simultaneous processes.
Drives
3 to 32
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Figure 1.7
RAID 5 Array with Six Disk Drives
Segment 1
Segment 7
Segment 2
Segment 8
Segment 3
Segment 9
Segment 4
Segment 10
Segment 13
Segment 19
Segment 25
Parity (26–30)
Segment 14
Segment 20
Parity (21-25)
Segment 26
Segment 15
Parity (16-20)
Segment 21
Segment 27
Parity (11–15)
Segment 16
Segment 22
Segment 28
Segment 5
Parity (6-10)
Segment 11
Segment 17
Segment 23
Segment 29
Parity (1-5)
Segment 6
Segment 12
Segment 18
Segment 24
Segment 30
Note: Parity is distributed across all drives in the array.
1.5.6
RAID 6
RAID 6 is similar to RAID 5 (disk striping and parity), except that instead
of one parity block per stripe, there are two. With two independent parity
blocks, RAID 6 can survive the loss of two disks in a virtual disk without
losing data.
Table 1.8
RAID 6 Overview
Uses
Provides a high level of data protection through the use
of a second parity block in each stripe. Use RAID 6 for
data that requires a very high level of protection from
loss.
In the case of a failure of one drive or two drives in a
virtual disk, the RAID controller uses the parity blocks
to recreate all the missing information. If two drives in a
RAID 6 virtual disk fail, two drive rebuilds are required,
one for each drive. These rebuilds do not occur at the
same time. The controller rebuilds one failed drive, and
then the other failed drive.
Use for office automation and online customer service
that requires fault tolerance. Use for any application that
has high read request rates but low write request rates.
Strong Points
Provides data redundancy, high read rates, and good
performance in most environments. Can survive the
loss of two drives or the loss of a drive while another
drive is being rebuilt. Provides the highest level of
protection against drive failures of all of the RAID levels.
Read performance is similar to that of RAID 5.
RAID Levels
Version 2.0
1-17
Copyright © 2006-2007 by LSI Corporation. All rights reserved.
Table 1.8
RAID 6 Overview
Weak Points
Not well suited to tasks requiring a lot of writes. A RAID
6 virtual disk has to generate two sets of parity data for
each write operation, which results in a significant
decrease in performance during writes. Disk drive
performance is reduced during a drive rebuild.
Environments with few processes do not perform as
well because the RAID overhead is not offset by the
performance gains in handling simultaneous processes.
RAID 6 costs more because of the extra capacity
required by using two parity blocks per stripe.
Drives
3 to 32
Figure 1.8 shows a RAID 6 data layout. The second set of parity drives
are denoted by Q. The P drives follow the RAID 5 parity scheme.
Figure 1.8
Segment 1
Segment 6
Segment 2
Segment 7
Segment 11
Segment 16
Parity (P17-P20)
Segment 12
Parity (P13-P16)
Parity (Q17-Q20)
Example of Distributed Parity across Two Blocks in a
Stripe (RAID 6)
Segment 3
Segment 8
Segment 4
Parity (P5-P8)
Parity (P9-P12) Parity (Q9–Q12)
Segment 13
Parity (Q13-Q16)
Segment 17
Segment 18
Parity (P1-P4)
Parity (Q5-Q8)
Segment 9
Segment 14
Segment 19
Parity (Q1-Q4)
Segment 5
Segment 10
Segment 15
Segment 20
Note: Parity is distributed across all drives in the array.
1.5.7
RAID 10
RAID 10 is a combination of RAID 0 and RAID 1. RAID 10 consists of
stripes across mirrored drives. RAID 10 breaks up data into smaller
blocks and then mirrors the blocks of data to each RAID 1 RAID set.
Each RAID 1 RAID set then duplicates its data to its other drive. The size
of each block is determined by the stripe size parameter, which is set
during the creation of the RAID set. Up to eight spans can be supported
by RAID 10.
1-18
Introduction to RAID
Version 2.0
Copyright © 2006-2007 by LSI Corporation. All rights reserved.
Table 1.9 provides an overview of RAID 10.
Table 1.9
RAID 10 Overview
Uses
Appropriate when used with data storage that needs
100 percent redundancy of mirrored arrays and that also
needs the enhanced I/O performance of RAID 0 (striped
arrays.) RAID 10 works well for medium-sized
databases or any environment that requires a higher
degree of fault tolerance and moderate to medium
capacity.
Strong Points
Provides both high data transfer rates and complete
data redundancy.
Weak Points
Requires twice as many drives as all other RAID levels
except RAID 1.
Drives
4 - 32
In Figure 1.9, virtual disk 0 is created by distributing data across four
arrays (arrays 0 through 3). Spanning is used because one virtual disk
is defined across more than one array. Virtual drives defined across
multiple RAID 1 level arrays are referred to as RAID level 10, (1+0). To
increase performance, by enabling access to multiple arrays
simultaneously, data is striped across arrays.
Using RAID level 10, rather than a simple RAID set, up to eight spans
can be supported, and up to eight drive failures can be tolerated, though
less than total disk drive capacity is available. Though multiple drive
failures can be tolerated, only one drive failure can be tolerated in each
RAID 1 level array.
Figure 1.9
RAID 10
RAID 10 Level Virtual Disk
Segment 1
Segment 1
Duplicate
2
Segment 2 Segment
Duplicate
Segment 3 Segment 3
Duplicate
Segment 4
Segment 5
Segment 5
Duplicate
Segment 6 Segment 6
Duplicate
...
7
Segment 7 Segment
Duplicate
...
8
Segment 8 Segment
Duplicate
...
...
RAID1
RAID1
RAID1
Segment 4
Duplicate
RAID1
RAID 0
RAID Levels
Version 2.0
1-19
Copyright © 2006-2007 by LSI Corporation. All rights reserved.
1.5.8
RAID 50
RAID 50 provides the features of both RAID 0 and RAID 5. RAID 50
includes both parity and disk striping across multiple arrays. RAID 50 is
best implemented on two RAID 5 disk arrays with data striped across
both disk arrays.
RAID 50 breaks up data into smaller blocks and then stripes the blocks
of data to each RAID 5 disk set. RAID 5 breaks up data into smaller
blocks, calculates parity by performing an exclusive-or on the blocks and
then writes the blocks of data and parity to each drive in the array. The
size of each block is determined by the stripe size parameter, which is
set during the creation of the RAID set.
RAID level 50 can support up to eight spans and tolerate up to eight
drive failures, though less than total disk drive capacity is available.
Though multiple drive failures can be tolerated, only one drive failure can
be tolerated in each RAID 1 level array.
Table 1.10 provides an overview of RAID 50.
Table 1.10
1-20
RAID 50 Overview
Uses
Appropriate when used with data that requires high
reliability, high request rates, high data transfer, and
medium to large capacity.
Strong Points
Provides high data throughput, data redundancy, and
very good performance.
Weak Points
Requires 2 to 8 times as many parity drives as RAID 5.
Drives
6 to 32
Introduction to RAID
Version 2.0
Copyright © 2006-2007 by LSI Corporation. All rights reserved.
Figure 1.10 RAID 50 Level Virtual Disk
RAID 50
Segment 1
Segment 6
Segment 2
(Segment 1,2)
(Segment 5,6) Segment 5
(Segment 9,10) Segment 9
Segment 3
Segment 8
Segment 10
Segment 4 (Segment 3,4)
(Segment 7,8) Segment 7
(Segment 11,12) Segment 11 Segment 12
RAID 5
RAID 5
RAID 0
1.5.9
RAID 60
RAID 60 provides the features of both RAID 0 and RAID 6, and includes
both parity and disk striping across multiple arrays. RAID 6 supports two
independent parity blocks per stripe. A RAID 60 virtual disk can survive
the loss of two disks in each of the RAID 6 sets without losing data. RAID
60 is best implemented on two RAID 6 disk arrays with data striped
across both disk arrays.
RAID 60 breaks up data into smaller blocks, and then stripes the blocks
of data to each RAID 6 disk set. RAID 6 breaks up data into smaller
blocks, calculates parity by performing an exclusive-or on the blocks and
then writes the blocks of data and parity to each drive in the array. The
size of each block is determined by the stripe size parameter, which is
set during the creation of the RAID set.
RAID 60 can support up to 8 spans and tolerate up to 16 drive failures,
though less than total disk drive capacity is available. Two drive failures
can be tolerated in each RAID 6 level array.
RAID Levels
Version 2.0
1-21
Copyright © 2006-2007 by LSI Corporation. All rights reserved.
Table 1.11
RAID 60 Overview
Uses
Provides a high level of data protection through the use
of a second parity block in each stripe. Use RAID 60 for
data that requires a very high level of protection from
loss.
In the case of a failure of one drive or two drives in a
RAID set in a virtual disk, the RAID controller uses the
parity blocks to recreate all the missing information. If
two drives in a RAID 6 set in a RAID 60 virtual disk fail,
two drive rebuilds are required, one for each drive.
These rebuilds do not occur at the same time. The
controller rebuilds one failed drive, and then the other
failed drive.
Use for office automation and online customer service
that requires fault tolerance. Use for any application that
has high read request rates but low write request rates.
Strong Points
Provides data redundancy, high read rates, and good
performance in most environments. Each RAID 6 set
can survive the loss of two drives or the loss of a drive
while another drive is being rebuilt. Provides the highest
level of protection against drive failures of all of the
RAID levels. Read performance is similar to that of
RAID 50, though random reads in RAID 60 might be
slightly faster because data is spread across at least
one more disk in each RAID 6 set.
Weak Points
Not well suited to tasks requiring lot of writes. A RAID
60 virtual disk has to generate two sets of parity data
for each write operation, which results in a significant
decrease in performance during writes. Disk drive
performance is reduced during a drive rebuild.
Environments with few processes do not perform as
well because the RAID overhead is not offset by the
performance gains in handling simultaneous processes.
RAID 6 costs more because of the extra capacity
required by using two parity blocks per stripe.
Drives
A minimum of 8
Figure 1.11 shows a RAID 6 data layout. The second set of parity drives
are denoted by Q. The P drives follow the RAID 5 parity scheme.
1-22
Introduction to RAID
Version 2.0
Copyright © 2006-2007 by LSI Corporation. All rights reserved.
Figure 1.11 RAID 60 Level Logical Drive
RAID
60
Segment 1
Segment 2
Parity (Q3-Q4)
Parity (Q1-Q2)
Segment 3
Segment 4
Parity (Q3-Q4)
Parity (P3-P4)
Segment 8
Parity (P3-P4)
Segment 7
Segment 6
Parity (Q5-Q6)
Parity (P5-P6)
Parity (Q11–Q12)
Parity (P11-P12)
Segment 11
Segment 12
Parity (Q9–Q10)
Segment 5
Segment 10
Parity (P15-P16)
Segment 15
Segment 16
Parity (Q15-Q16)
Parity (P13-P14)
Parity (P9-P10)
Segment 13
Segment 9
Parity (P1-P2)
Segment 14
Parity (Q13-Q14)
RAID 6
RAID 6
RAID 0
Note: Parity is distributed across all drives in the array.
1.6
RAID Configuration Strategies
The most important factors in RAID array configuration are:
•
Virtual disk availability (fault tolerance)
•
Virtual disk performance
•
Virtual disk capacity
You cannot configure a virtual disk that optimizes all three factors, but it
is easy to choose a virtual disk configuration that maximizes one factor
at the expense of another factor. For example, RAID 1 (mirroring)
provides excellent fault tolerance, but requires a redundant drive. The
following subsections describe how to use the RAID levels to maximize
virtual disk availability (fault tolerance), virtual disk performance, and
virtual disk capacity.
1.6.1
Maximizing Fault Tolerance
Fault tolerance is achieved through the ability to perform automatic and
transparent rebuilds using hot spare drives and hot swaps. A hot spare
drive is an unused online available drive that the RAID controller instantly
plugs into the system when an active drive fails. After the hot spare is
automatically moved into the RAID array, the failed drive is automatically
rebuilt on the spare drive. The RAID array continues to handle requests
while the rebuild occurs.
A hot swap is the manual substitution of a replacement unit in a disk
subsystem for a defective one, where the substitution can be performed
while the subsystem is runninghot swap drives. Auto-Rebuild in the
RAID Configuration Strategies
Version 2.0
Copyright © 2006-2007 by LSI Corporation. All rights reserved.
1-23
WebBIOS Configuration Utility allows a failed drive to be replaced and
automatically rebuilt by “hot-swapping” the drive in the same drive bay.
The RAID array continues to handle requests while the rebuild occurs,
providing a high degree of fault tolerance and zero downtime.
Table 1.12
RAID
Level
RAID Levels and Fault Tolerance
Fault Tolerance
0
Does not provide fault tolerance. All data lost if any drive fails. Disk striping writes data
across multiple disk drives instead of just one disk drive. It involves partitioning each
drive storage space into stripes that can vary in size. RAID 0 is ideal for applications
that require high bandwidth but do not require fault tolerance.
1
Provides complete data redundancy. If one disk drive fails, the contents of the other
disk drive can be used to run the system and reconstruct the failed drive. The primary
advantage of disk mirroring is that it provides 100 percent data redundancy. Since the
contents of the disk drive are completely written to a second drive, no data is lost if one
of the drives fails. Both drives contain the same data at all times. RAID 1 is ideal for
any application that requires fault tolerance and minimal capacity.
5
Combines distributed parity with disk striping. Parity provides redundancy for one drive
failure without duplicating the contents of entire disk drives. If a drive fails, the RAID
controller uses the parity data to reconstruct all missing information. In RAID 5, this
method is applied to entire drives or stripes across all disk drives in an array. Using
distributed partiy, RAID 5 offers fault tolerance with limited overhead.
6
Combines distributed parity with disk striping. RAID 6 can sustain two drive failures and
still maintain data integrity. Parity provides redundancy for two drive failures without
duplicating the contents of entire disk drives. If a drive fails, the RAID controller uses
the parity data to reconstruct all missing information. In RAID 6, this method is applied
to entire drives or stripes across all disk drives in an array. Using distributed partiy,
RAID 6 offers fault tolerance with limited overhead.
10
Provides complete data redundancy using striping across spanned RAID 1 arrays.
RAID 10 works well for any environment that requires the 100 percent redundancy
offered by mirrored arrays. RAID 10 can sustain a drive failure in each mirrored array
and maintain drive integrity.
50
Provides data redundancy using distributed parity across spanned RAID 5 arrays. RAID
50 includes both parity and disk striping across multiple drives. If a drive fails, the RAID
controller uses the parity data to recreate all missing information. RAID 50 can sustain
one drive failure per RAID 5 array and still maintain data integrity.
60
Provides data redundancy using distributed parity across spanned RAID 6 arrays. RAID
60 can sustain two drive failures per RAID 6 array and still maintain data integrity. It
provides the highest level of protection against drive failures of all of the RAID levels.
RAID 60 includes both parity and disk striping across multiple drives. If a drive fails, the
RAID controller uses the parity data to recreate all missing information.
1-24
Introduction to RAID
Version 2.0
Copyright © 2006-2007 by LSI Corporation. All rights reserved.
1.6.2
Maximizing Performance
A RAID disk subsystem improves I/O performance. The RAID array
appears to the host computer as a single storage unit or as multiple
logical units. I/O is faster because drives can be accessed
simultaneously. Table 1.13 describes the performance for each RAID
level.
Table 1.13
RAID
Level
RAID Levels and Performance
Performance
0
RAID 0 (striping) offers the best performance of any RAID level. RAID 0 breaks up data
into smaller blocks, then writes a block to each drive in the array. Disk striping writes
data across multiple disk drives instead of just one disk drive. It involves partitioning
each drive storage space into stripes that can vary in size from 8 KB to 128 KB. These
stripes are interleaved in a repeated sequential manner. Disk striping enhances
performance because multiple drives are accessed simultaneously.
1
With RAID 1 (mirroring), each drive in the system must be duplicated, which requires
more time and resources than striping. Performance is impaired during drive rebuilds.
5
RAID 5 provides high data throughput, especially for large files. Use this RAID level for
any application that requires high read request rates, but low write request rates, such
as transaction processing applications, because each drive can read and write
independently. Since each drive contains both data and parity, numerous writes can
take place concurrently. In addition, robust caching algorithms and hardware based
exclusive-or assist make RAID 5 performance exceptional in many different
environments.
Parity generation can slow the write process, making write performance significantly
lower for RAID 5 than for RAID 0 or RAID 1. Disk drive performance is reduced when
a drive is being rebuilt. Clustering can also reduce drive performance. Environments
with few processes do not perform as well because the RAID overhead is not offset by
the performance gains in handling simultaneous processes.
6
RAID 6 works best when used with data that requires high reliability, high request rates,
and high data transfer. It provides high data throughput, data redundancy, and very
good performance. However, RAID 6 is not well suited to tasks requiring a lot of writes.
A RAID 6 virtual disk has to generate two sets of parity data for each write operation,
which results in a significant decrease in performance during writes. Disk drive
performance is reduced during a drive rebuild. Environments with few processes do not
perform as well because the RAID overhead is not offset by the performance gains in
handling simultaneous processes.
RAID Configuration Strategies
Version 2.0
Copyright © 2006-2007 by LSI Corporation. All rights reserved.
1-25
RAID
Level
Performance
10
RAID 10 works best for data storage that need the enhanced I/O performance of RAID
0 (striped arrays), which provides high data transfer rates. Spanning increases the size
of the logical volume and improves performance by doubling the number of spindles.
The system performance improves as the number of spans increases. (The maximum
number of spans is eight.) As the storage space in the spans is filled, the system stripes
data over fewer and fewer spans and RAID performance degrades to that of a RAID 1
or RAID 5 array.
50
RAID 50 works best when used with data that requires high reliability, high request
rates, and high data transfer. It provides high data throughput, data redundancy, and
very good performance. Spanning increases the size of the logical volume and
improves performance by doubling the number of spindles. The system performance
improves as the number of spans increases. (The maximum number of spans is eight.)
As the storage space in the spans is filled, the system stripes data over fewer and fewer
spans and RAID performance degrades to that of a RAID 1 or RAID 5 array.
60
RAID 60 works best when used with data that requires high reliability, high request
rates, and high data transfer. It provides high data throughput, data redundancy, and
very good performance. Spanning increases the size of the logical volume and
improves performance by doubling the number of spindles. The system performance
improves as the number of spans increases. (The maximum number of spans is eight.)
As the storage space in the spans is filled, the system stripes data over fewer and fewer
spans and RAID performance degrades to that of a RAID 1 or RAID 6 array.
RAID 60 is not well suited to tasks requiring a lot of writes. A RAID 60 virtual disk has
to generate two sets of parity data for each write operation, which results in a significant
decrease in performance during writes. Disk drive performance is reduced during a
drive rebuild. Environments with few processes do not perform as well because the
RAID overhead is not offset by the performance gains in handling simultaneous
processes.
1.6.3
Maximizing Storage Capacity
Storage capacity is an important factor when selecting a RAID level.
There are several variables to consider. Striping alone (RAID 0) requires
less storage space than mirrored data (RAID 1) or distributed parity
(RAID 5 or RAID 6). RAID 5, which provides redundancy for one drive
failure without duplicating the contents of entire disk drives, requires less
space then RAID 1. Table 1.14 explains the effects of the RAID levels on
storage capacity.
1-26
Introduction to RAID
Version 2.0
Copyright © 2006-2007 by LSI Corporation. All rights reserved.
Table 1.14
RAID
Level
RAID Levels and Capacity
Capacity
0
RAID 0 (disk striping) involves partitioning each drive storage space into stripes that
can vary in size. The combined storage space is composed of stripes from each drive.
RAID 0 provides maximum storage capacity for a given set of physical disks.
1
With RAID 1 (mirroring), data written to one disk drive is simultaneously written to
another disk drive, which doubles the required data storage capacity. This is expensive
because each drive in the system must be duplicated.
5
RAID 5 provides redundancy for one drive failure without duplicating the contents of
entire disk drives. RAID 5 breaks up data into smaller blocks, calculates parity by
performing an exclusive-or on the blocks, then writes the blocks of data and parity to
each drive in the array. The size of each block is determined by the stripe size
parameter, which is set during the creation of the RAID set.
6
RAID 6 provides redundancy for two drive failures without duplicating the contents of
entire disk drives. However, it requires extra capacity because it uses two parity blocks
per stripe. This makes RAID 60 more expensive to implement.
10
RAID 10 requires twice as many drives as all other RAID levels except RAID 1. RAID
10 works well for medium-sized databases or any environment that requires a higher
degree of fault tolerance and moderate to medium capacity. Disk spanning allows
multiple disk drives to function like one big drive. Spanning overcomes lack of disk
space and simplifies storage management by combining existing resources or adding
relatively inexpensive resources.
50
RAID 50 requires two to four times as many parity drives as RAID 5. This RAID level
works best when used with data that requires medium to large capacity.
60
RAID 60 provides redundancy for two drive failures in each RAID set without duplicating
the contents of entire disk drives. However, it requires extra capacity because a RAID
60 virtual disk has to generate two sets of parity data for each write operation. This
makes RAID 60 more expensive to implement.
1.7
1.7.1
RAID Availability
RAID Availability Concept
Data availability without downtime is essential for many types of data
processing and storage systems. Businesses want to avoid the financial
costs and customer frustration associated with failed servers. RAID helps
you maintain data availability and avoid downtime for the servers that
provide that data. RAID offers several features, such as spare drives and
rebuilds, that you can use to fix any physical disk problems, while
RAID Availability
Version 2.0
1-27
Copyright © 2006-2007 by LSI Corporation. All rights reserved.
keeping the servers running and data available. The following
subsections describe these features.
1.7.1.1
Spare Drives
You can use spare drives to replace failed or defective drives in an array.
A replacement drive must be at least as large as the drive it replaces.
Spare drives include hot swaps, hot spares, and cold swaps.
A hot swap is the manual substitution of a replacement unit in a disk
subsystem for a defective one, where the substitution can be performed
while the subsystem is running (performing its normal functions). The
backplane and enclosure must support hot swap in order for the
functionality to work.
Hot spare drives are physical drives that power up along with the RAID
drives and operate in a standby state. If a physical disk used in a RAID
virtual disk fails, a hot spare automatically takes its place and the data
on the failed drive is rebuilt on the hot spare. Hot spares can be used for
RAID levels 1, 5, 10, and 50.
Note:
If a rebuild to a hot spare fails for any reason, the hot spare
drive will be marked as "failed." If the source drive fails,
both the source drive and the hot spare drive will be
marked as "failed."
A cold swap requires that you power down the system before replacing
a defective physical disk in a disk subsystem.
1.7.1.2
Rebuilding
If a physical disk fails in an array that is configured as a RAID 1, 5, 10,
50, or 60 virtual disk, you can recover the lost data by rebuilding the
drive. If you have configured hot spares, the RAID controller
automatically tries to use them to rebuild failed disks. Manual rebuild is
necessary if no hot spares with enough capacity to rebuild the failed
drives are available.You must insert a drive with enough storage into the
subsystem before rebuilding the failed drive.
1-28
Introduction to RAID
Version 2.0
Copyright © 2006-2007 by LSI Corporation. All rights reserved.
1.8
Configuration Planning
Factors to consider when planning a configuration are the number of
physical disks the RAID controller can support, the purpose of the array,
and the availability of spare drives.
Each type of data stored in the disk subsystem has a different frequency
of read and write activity. If you know the data access requirements, you
can more successfully determine a strategy for optimizing the disk
subsystem capacity, availability, and performance.
Servers that support video on demand typically read the data often, but
write data infrequently. Both the read and write operations tend to be
long. Data stored on a general-purpose file server involves relatively
short read and write operations with relatively small files.
1.8.1
Number of Physical Disks
Your configuration planning for the SAS RAID controller depends in part
on the number of physical disks that you want to use in a RAID array.
The number of drives in an array determines the RAID levels that can be
supported. Only one RAID level can be assigned to each virtual disk.
1.8.2
Array Purpose
Important factors to consider when creating RAID arrays include
availability, performance, and capacity. Define the major purpose of the
disk array by answering questions related to these factors, such as the
following, which are followed by suggested RAID levels for each situation:
•
Will this disk array increase the system storage capacity for generalpurpose file and print servers? Use RAID 5, 6, 10, 50, or 60.
•
Does this disk array support any software system that must be
available 24 hours per day? Use RAID 1, 5, 6, 10, 50, or 60.
•
Will the information stored in this disk array contain large audio or
video files that must be available on demand? Use RAID 0.
•
Will this disk array contain data from an imaging system? Use RAID
0 or 10.
Configuration Planning
Version 2.0
Copyright © 2006-2007 by LSI Corporation. All rights reserved.
1-29
Fill out Table 1.15 to help you plan the array configuration. Rank the
requirements for your array, such as storage space and data redundancy,
in order of importance, and then review the suggested RAID levels.
Table 1.15
Factors to Consider for Array Configuration
Requirement
Rank
Suggested RAID Level(s)
Storage space
RAID 0, RAID 5
Data redundancy
RAID 5, RAID 6, RAID 10, RAID 50,
RAID 60
Physical disk performance and throughput
RAID 0, RAID 10
Hot spares (extra physical disks required)
RAID 1, RAID 5, RAID 6, RAID 10,
RAID 50, RAID 60
1-30
Introduction to RAID
Version 2.0
Copyright © 2006-2007 by LSI Corporation. All rights reserved.
Chapter 2
WebBIOS Configuration Utility
This chapter describes the WebBIOS Configuration Utility (CU) and
consists of the following sections:
2.1
•
Section 2.1, “Overview”
•
Section 2.2, “Starting the WebBIOS CU”
•
Section 2.3, “WebBIOS CU Main Screen Options”
•
Section 2.4, “Creating a Storage Configuration”
•
Section 2.5, “Viewing and Changing Device Properties”
•
Section 2.6, “Viewing System Event Information”
•
Section 2.7, “Managing Configurations”
Overview
The WebBIOS CU enables you to create and manage RAID
configurations on LSI SAS controllers. Unlike the MegaRAID Storage
Manager™ software, the WebBIOS CU resides in the SAS controller
BIOS and operates independently of the operating system.
You can use the WebBIOS CU to do the following tasks:
•
Create physical arrays and virtual disks for storage configurations
•
Delete virtual disks
•
Migrate a storage configuration to a different RAID level
•
Detect configuration mismatches
•
Import a foreign configuration (see Section 2.7.3, “Importing or
Clearing a Foreign Configuration”)
MegaRAID SAS Software User’s Guide
Version 2.0
Copyright © 2005-2007 by LSI Corporation. All rights reserved.
2-1
•
Display adapter, virtual disk, physical drive, and battery backup unit
(BBU) properties
•
Scan devices connected to the controller
•
Initialize virtual disks
•
Check configurations for data consistency
The WebBIOS CU provides a configuration wizard to guide you through
the configuration of virtual disks and physical arrays.
2.2
Starting the WebBIOS CU
Follow these steps to start the WebBIOS CU and access the main
screen.
1. When the host computer is booting, hold down the <Ctrl> key and
press the <H> key when the following text appears on the screen:
Copyright© LSI Logic Corporation
Press <Ctrl><H> for WebBIOS
The Adapter Selection screen appears.
2. If the system has multiple SAS adapters, select an adapter.
3. Click Start to continue.
The main WebBIOS CU screen appears.
2-2
WebBIOS Configuration Utility
Version 2.0
Copyright © 2005-2007 by LSI Corporation. All rights reserved.
2.3
WebBIOS CU Main Screen Options
Figure 2.1 shows the screen that appears when you start the WebBIOS
CU and select an adapter.
Figure 2.1
WebBIOS CU Main Screen
This is the Logical View screen, which displays in the lower right panel
all virtual disks (virtual drives) that are configured on this controller. It
also shows in the upper right panel the physical drives that are
connected to the controller. To toggle between the physical view and
logical view of the storage devices connected to the controller, click
Physical View or Logical View in the menu on the left. When the
Physical View screen is displayed, the lower right panel displays the
arrays that are configured on this controller.
WebBIOS CU Main Screen Options
Version 2.0
Copyright © 2005-2007 by LSI Corporation. All rights reserved.
2-3
The toolbar at the top of the WebBIOS CU has the following buttons, as
listed in Table 2.1.
Table 2.1
Icon
WebBIOS CU Toolbar Icons
Description
Click this icon to return to the main screen from any other WebBIOS CU screen.
Click this icon to return to the previous screen that you were viewing.
Click this icon to exit the WebBIOS CU program.
Click this icon to display the Adapter Selection screen. If the computer system has
multiple adapters, you use this screen to view the devices connected to a different
controller.
Click this icon to turn off the sound on the onboard controller alarm.
Click this icon to display information about the WebBIOS CU version, browser
version, and HTML interface engine.
Here is a description of the options listed on the left of the main
WebBIOS CU screen:
2-4
•
Adapter Properties: Select this to view the properties of the
currently selected SAS adapter. For more information, see Section
2.5.1, “Viewing and Changing Adapter Properties.”
•
Scan Devices: Select this to have the WebBIOS CU re-scan the
physical and virtual disks for any changes in the drive status or the
physical configuration. The WebBIOS CU displays the results of the
scan in the physical and virtual disk descriptions.
•
Virtual Disks: Select this to view the Virtual Disks screen, where
you can change and view virtual disk properties, delete virtual disks,
initialize disks, and perform other tasks. For more information, see
Section 2.5.2, “Viewing and Changing Virtual Disk Properties.”
WebBIOS Configuration Utility
Version 2.0
Copyright © 2005-2007 by LSI Corporation. All rights reserved.
2.4
•
Physical Drives: Select this to view the Physical Drives screen,
where you can view physical drive properties, create hot spares, and
perform other tasks. For more information, see Section 2.5.3,
“Viewing Physical Drive Properties.”
•
Configuration Wizard: Select this to start the Configuration Wizard
and create a new storage configuration, clear a configuration, or add
a configuration. For more information, see Section 2.4, “Creating a
Storage Configuration.”
•
Adapter Selection: Select this to view the Adapter Selection screen,
where you can select a different SAS adapter. You can then view
information about the adapter and the devices connected to it, or
create a new configuration on the adapter.
•
Physical View/Logical View: Select this to toggle between the
Physical View and Logical View screens.
•
Events: Select this to view system events in the Event Information
screen. For more information, see Section 2.6, “Viewing System
Event Information.”
•
Exit: Select this to exit the WebBIOS CU and continue with system
boot.
Creating a Storage Configuration
This section explains how to use the WebBIOS CU Configuration Wizard
to configure RAID arrays and virtual disks. The following subsections
explain how to use the Configuration Wizard to create storage
configurations:
•
Section 2.4.1, “Selecting the Configuration with the Configuration
Wizard”
•
Section 2.4.2, “Using Auto Configuration”
•
Section 2.4.3, “Using Custom Configuration”
Creating a Storage Configuration
Version 2.0
Copyright © 2005-2007 by LSI Corporation. All rights reserved.
2-5
2.4.1
Selecting the Configuration with the Configuration Wizard
Follow these steps to start the Configuration Wizard, and select a
configuration option and mode:
1. Click Configuration Wizard on the WebBIOS main screen.
The first Configuration Wizard screen appears, as shown in
Figure 2.2.
Figure 2.2
WebBIOS Configuration Wizard Screen
2. Select a configuration option.
Caution:
If you choose the first or second option, all existing data in
the configuration will be deleted. Make a backup of any
data that you want to keep before choosing these options.
–
Clear Configuration: Clears the existing configuration.
–
New Configuration: Clears the existing configuration and lets
you create a new configuration.
–
Add Configuration: Retains the existing storage configuration
and adds new drives to it (this does not cause any data loss).
3. Click Next.
2-6
WebBIOS Configuration Utility
Version 2.0
Copyright © 2005-2007 by LSI Corporation. All rights reserved.
A dialog box warns that you will lose data if you select Clear
Configuration or New Configuration.
4. On the next screen, select a configuration mode:
–
Custom Configuration: Allows you to control all attributes of the
new storage configuration.
–
Auto Configuration with Redundancy: Automatically creates
an optimal RAID 1 or RAID 5 configuration, providing data
redundancy. LSI recommends that you select this option.
–
Auto Configuration without Redundancy: Automatically
creates a non-redundant RAID 0 configuration.
5. Click Next to continue.
If you select one of the Auto Configuration options, continue with Section
2.4.2, “Using Auto Configuration.” If you select Custom Configuration,
continue with Section 2.4.3, “Using Custom Configuration.”
2.4.2
Using Auto Configuration
Follow these instructions to create a configuration with auto
configuration, either with or without redundancy:
1. When WebBIOS displays the proposed new configuration, review the
information on the screen, and click Accept to accept it. (Or click
Back to go back and change the configuration.)
–
RAID 0: If you selected Auto Configuration without
Redundancy, WebBIOS creates a RAID 0 configuration.
–
RAID 1: If you selected Auto Configuration with Redundancy,
WebBIOS creates a RAID 1 configuration if only two disk drives
are available.
–
RAID 5: If you selected Auto Configuration with Redundancy,
WebBIOS creates a RAID 5 configuration if three or more disk
drives are available.
2. Click Yes when you are prompted to save the configuration.
3. Click Yes when you are prompted to initialize the new virtual disk(s).
WebBIOS CU begins a background initialization of the virtual disks.
Creating a Storage Configuration
Version 2.0
Copyright © 2005-2007 by LSI Corporation. All rights reserved.
2-7
2.4.3
Using Custom Configuration
The following subsections describe the procedures for creating RAID disk
groups for RAID levels 0, 1, 5, 6, 10, 50, and 60:
2.4.3.1
•
Section 2.4.3.1, “Using Custom Configuration: RAID 0”
•
Section 2.4.3.2, “Using Custom Configuration: RAID 1”
•
Section 2.4.3.3, “Using Custom Configuration: RAID 5”
•
Section 2.4.3.4, “Using Custom Configuration: RAID 6”
•
Section 2.4.3.5, “Using Custom Configuration: RAID 10”
•
Section 2.4.3.6, “Using Custom Configuration: RAID 50”
•
Section 2.4.3.7, “Using Custom Configuration: RAID 60”
Using Custom Configuration: RAID 0
RAID 0 provides disk striping across all drives in the RAID array. RAID
0 does not provide any data redundancy but does offer the best
performance of any RAID level. RAID 0 is ideal for applications that
require high bandwidth but do not require fault tolerance. RAID 0 also
denotes an independent or single drive.
Note:
RAID level 0 is not fault-tolerant. If a drive in a RAID 0 array
fails, the whole virtual disk (all physical drives associated
with the virtual disk) fails.
When you select Custom Configuration and click Next, the Disk Group
Definition screen appears. You use this screen to select physical drives
to create disk groups (arrays).
1. Hold <Ctrl> while selecting two or more ready drives in the Physical
Drives window on the left until you have selected all desired physical
drives for the disk group.
2. Click Accept DG to move the drives to a proposed disk group
configuration in the Disk Groups window on the right, as shown in
Figure 2.3.
If you need to undo the changes, click the Reclaim button.
2-8
WebBIOS Configuration Utility
Version 2.0
Copyright © 2005-2007 by LSI Corporation. All rights reserved.
Figure 2.3
WebBIOS Disk Group Definition Screen
3. When you have finished selecting physical disks for the disk groups,
click Next.
The Virtual Disk Definition screen appears, as shown in Figure 2.4.
You use this screen to select the RAID level, strip size, read policy,
and other attributes for the new virtual disks.
Creating a Storage Configuration
Version 2.0
Copyright © 2005-2007 by LSI Corporation. All rights reserved.
2-9
Figure 2.4
WebBIOS Virtual Disk Definition Screen
4. Change the virtual disk options from the defaults listed on the screen
as needed.
Here are brief explanations of the virtual disk options:
2-10
•
RAID Level: The drop-down menu lists the possible RAID levels for
the virtual disk. Select RAID 0.
•
Strip Size: The strip size specifies the size of the segment written
to each disk in a RAID configuration. You can set the strip size to 8,
16, 32, 64, or 128 Kbytes. A larger strip size produces higher read
performance. If your computer regularly performs random read
requests, choose a smaller strip size. The default is 8 Kbytes.
•
Access Policy: Select the type of data access that is allowed for this
virtual disk:
◊
RW: Allow read/write access. This is the default.
◊
Read Only: Allow read-only access.
◊
Blocked: Do not allow access.
WebBIOS Configuration Utility
Version 2.0
Copyright © 2005-2007 by LSI Corporation. All rights reserved.
•
•
•
Read Policy: Specify the read policy for this virtual drive:
◊
Normal: This disables the read ahead capability. This is the
default.
◊
Ahead: This enables read ahead capability, which allows the
controller to read sequentially ahead of requested data and
to store the additional data in cache memory, anticipating
that the data will be needed soon. This speeds up reads for
sequential data, but there is little improvement when
accessing random data.
◊
Adaptive: When Adaptive read ahead is selected, the
controller begins using read ahead if the two most recent
disk accesses occurred in sequential sectors. If the read
requests are random, the controller reverts to Normal (no
read ahead).
Write Policy: Specify the write policy for this virtual drive:
◊
WBack: In Writeback mode the controller sends a data
transfer completion signal to the host when the controller
cache has received all the data in a transaction. This setting
is recommended in Standard mode.
◊
WThru: In Writethrough mode the controller sends a data
transfer completion signal to the host when the disk
subsystem has received all the data in a transaction. This is
the default.
◊
Bad BBU: Select this mode if you want the controller to use
Writeback mode but the controller has no BBU or the BBU
is bad. If you do not choose this option, the controller
firmware automatically switches to Writethrough mode if it
detects a bad or missing BBU.
IO Policy: The IO Policy applies to reads on a specific virtual disk.
It does not affect the read ahead cache.
◊
Direct: In direct I/O mode, reads are not buffered in cache
memory. Data is transferred to the cache and the host
concurrently. If the same data block is read again, it comes
from cache memory. This is the default.
◊
Cached: In cached I/O mode, all reads are buffered in cache
memory.
Creating a Storage Configuration
Version 2.0
Copyright © 2005-2007 by LSI Corporation. All rights reserved.
2-11
•
•
•
Disk Cache Policy: Specify the disk cache policy:
◊
Enable: Enable the disk cache.
◊
Disable: Disable the disk cache. This is the default.
◊
Unchanged: Leave the current disk cache policy unchanged.
Disable BGI: Specify the background initialization status:
◊
No: Leave background initialization enabled. This means that
a new configuration can be initialized in the background
while you use WebBIOS to do other configuration tasks. This
is the default.
◊
Yes: Select Yes if you do not want to allow background
initializations for configurations on this controller.
Select Size: Specify the size of the virtual disk in megabytes.
Normally, this would be the full size for RAID 0 shown in the
Configuration Panel on the right. You may specify a smaller size if
you want to create other virtual disks on the same disk group.
5. Click Accept to accept the changes to the virtual disk definition, or
click Reclaim to return to the previous settings.
6. Click Next when you are finished defining virtual disks.
The configuration preview screen appears, as shown in Figure 2.5.
2-12
WebBIOS Configuration Utility
Version 2.0
Copyright © 2005-2007 by LSI Corporation. All rights reserved.
Figure 2.5
RAID 0 Configuration Preview
7. Check the information in the configuration preview.
8. If the virtual disk configuration is acceptable, click Accept to save the
configuration. Otherwise, click Cancel to end the operation and
return to the WebBIOS main menu, or click Back to return to the
previous screens and change the configuration.
9. If you accept the configuration, click Yes at the prompt to save the
configuration.
The WebBIOS main menu appears.
2.4.3.2
Using Custom Configuration: RAID 1
In RAID 1, the RAID controller duplicates all data from one drive to a
second drive. RAID 1 provides complete data redundancy, but at the cost
of doubling the required data storage capacity. It is appropriate for small
databases or any other environment that requires fault tolerance but
small capacity.
Creating a Storage Configuration
Version 2.0
Copyright © 2005-2007 by LSI Corporation. All rights reserved.
2-13
When you select Custom Configuration and click Next, the Disk Group
Definition screen appears. You use this screen to select physical drives
to create disk groups (arrays).
1. Hold <Ctrl> while you select two ready physical drives in the Physical
Drives window on the left.
2. Click Accept DG to move the drives to a proposed disk group
configuration in the Disk Groups window on the right, as shown in
Figure 2.6.
If you need to undo the changes, click the Reclaim button.
Figure 2.6
WebBIOS Disk Group Definition Screen
3. When you have finished selecting physical disks for the disk groups,
click Next.
The Virtual Disk Definition screen appears, as shown in Figure 2.7.
You use this screen to select the RAID level, strip size, read policy,
and other attributes for the new virtual disks.
2-14
WebBIOS Configuration Utility
Version 2.0
Copyright © 2005-2007 by LSI Corporation. All rights reserved.
Figure 2.7
WebBIOS Virtual Disk Definition Screen
4. Change the virtual disk options from the defaults listed on the screen
as needed.
Here are brief explanations of the virtual disk options:
•
RAID Level: The drop-down menu lists the possible RAID levels for
the virtual disk. Select RAID 1.
•
Strip Size: The strip size specifies the size of the segment written
to each disk in a RAID configuration. You can set the strip size to 8,
16, 32, 64, or 128 Kbytes. A larger strip size produces higher read
performance. If your computer regularly performs random read
requests, choose a smaller strip size. The default is 8 Kbytes.
•
Access Policy: Select the type of data access that is allowed for this
virtual disk:
◊
RW: Allow read/write access. This is the default.
◊
Read Only: Allow read-only access.
◊
Blocked: Do not allow access.
Creating a Storage Configuration
Version 2.0
Copyright © 2005-2007 by LSI Corporation. All rights reserved.
2-15
•
•
•
2-16
Read Policy: Specify the read policy for this virtual drive:
◊
Normal: This disables the read ahead capability. This is the
default.
◊
Ahead: This enables read ahead capability, which allows the
controller to read sequentially ahead of requested data and
to store the additional data in cache memory, anticipating
that the data will be needed soon. This speeds up reads for
sequential data, but there is little improvement when
accessing random data.
◊
Adaptive: When Adaptive read ahead is selected, the
controller begins using read ahead if the two most recent
disk accesses occurred in sequential sectors. If the read
requests are random, the controller reverts to Normal (no
read ahead).
Write Policy: Specify the write policy for this virtual drive:
◊
WBack: In Writeback mode the controller sends a data
transfer completion signal to the host when the controller
cache has received all the data in a transaction. This setting
is recommended in Standard mode.
◊
WThru: In Writethrough mode the controller sends a data
transfer completion signal to the host when the disk
subsystem has received all the data in a transaction. This is
the default.
◊
Bad BBU: Select this mode if you want the controller to use
Writeback mode but the controller has no BBU or the BBU
is bad. If you do not choose this option, the controller
firmware automatically switches to Writethrough mode if it
detects a bad or missing BBU.
IO Policy: The IO Policy applies to reads on a specific virtual disk.
It does not affect the read ahead cache.
◊
Direct: In Direct I/O mode, reads are not buffered in cache
memory. Data is transferred to the cache and the host
concurrently. If the same data block is read again, it comes
from cache memory. This is the default.
◊
Cached: In Cached I/O mode, all reads are buffered in cache
memory.
WebBIOS Configuration Utility
Version 2.0
Copyright © 2005-2007 by LSI Corporation. All rights reserved.
–
•
•
Disk Cache Policy: Specify the disk cache policy:
◊
Enable: Enable the disk cache.
◊
Disable: Disable the disk cache. This is the default.
◊
Unchanged: Leave the current disk cache policy unchanged.
Disable BGI: Specify the background initialization status:
◊
No: Leave background initialization enabled. This means that
a new configuration can be initialized in the background
while you use WebBIOS to do other configuration tasks. This
is the default.
◊
Yes: Select Yes if you do not want to allow background
initializations for configurations on this controller.
Select Size: Specify the size of the virtual disk in megabytes.
Normally, this would be the full size for RAID 1 shown in the
Configuration Panel on the right. You may specify a smaller size if
you want to create other virtual disks on the same disk group.
5. Click Accept to accept the changes to the virtual disk definition, or
click Reclaim to return to the previous settings.
6. Click Next when you are finished defining virtual disks.
The configuration preview screen appears, as shown in Figure 2.8.
Creating a Storage Configuration
Version 2.0
Copyright © 2005-2007 by LSI Corporation. All rights reserved.
2-17
Figure 2.8
RAID 1 Configuration Preview
7. Check the information in the configuration preview.
8. If the virtual disk configuration is acceptable, click Accept to save the
configuration. Otherwise, click Cancel to end the operation and
return to the WebBIOS main menu, or click Back to return to the
previous screens and change the configuration.
9. If you accept the configuration, click Yes at the prompt to save the
configuration.
The WebBIOS main menu appears.
2.4.3.3
Using Custom Configuration: RAID 5
RAID 5 uses disk striping at the block level and parity. In RAID 5, the
parity information is written to all drives. It is best suited for networks that
perform a lot of small input/output (I/O) transactions simultaneously.
RAID 5 provides data redundancy, high read rates, and good
performance in most environments. It also provides redundancy with
lowest loss of capacity.
RAID 5 provides high data throughput. RAID 5 is useful for transaction
processing applications because each drive can read and write
2-18
WebBIOS Configuration Utility
Version 2.0
Copyright © 2005-2007 by LSI Corporation. All rights reserved.
independently. If a drive fails, the RAID controller uses the parity drive to
recreate all missing information. You can use RAID 5 for office
automation and online customer service that require fault tolerance. In
addition, RAID 5 is good for any application that has high read request
rates but low write request rates.
When you select Custom Configuration and click Next, the Disk Group
Definition screen appears. You use this screen to select physical drives
to create disk groups (arrays).
1. Hold <Ctrl> while you select at least three ready physical drives in
the Physical Drives window on the left.
2. Click Accept DG to move the drives to a proposed disk group
configuration in the Disk Groups window on the right, as shown in
Figure 2.9.
If you need to undo the changes, click the Reclaim button.
Figure 2.9
WebBIOS Disk Group Definition Screen
Creating a Storage Configuration
Version 2.0
Copyright © 2005-2007 by LSI Corporation. All rights reserved.
2-19
3. When you have finished selecting physical disks for disk groups, click
Next.
The Virtual Disk Definition screen appears, as shown in Figure 2.10.
You use this screen to select the RAID level, strip size, read policy,
and other attributes for the new virtual disks.
Figure 2.10 WebBIOS Virtual Disk Definition Screen
4. Change the virtual disk options from the defaults listed on the screen
as needed.
Here are brief explanations of the virtual disk options:
2-20
•
RAID Level: The drop-down menu lists the possible RAID levels for
the virtual disk. Select RAID 5.
•
Strip Size: The strip size specifies the size of the segment written
to each disk in a RAID configuration. You can set the strip size to 8,
16, 32, 64, or 128 Kbytes. A larger strip size produces higher read
performance. If your computer regularly performs random read
requests, choose a smaller strip size. The default is 8 Kbytes.
•
Access Policy: Select the type of data access that is allowed for this
virtual disk:
WebBIOS Configuration Utility
Version 2.0
Copyright © 2005-2007 by LSI Corporation. All rights reserved.
•
•
•
◊
RW: Allow read/write access. This is the default.
◊
Read Only: Allow read-only access.
◊
Blocked: Do not allow access.
Read Policy: Specify the read policy for this virtual drive:
◊
Normal: This disables the read ahead capability. This is the
default.
◊
Ahead: This enables read ahead capability, which allows the
controller to read sequentially ahead of requested data and
to store the additional data in cache memory, anticipating
that the data will be needed soon. This speeds up reads for
sequential data, but there is little improvement when
accessing random data.
◊
Adaptive: When Adaptive read ahead is selected, the
controller begins using read ahead if the two most recent
disk accesses occurred in sequential sectors. If the read
requests are random, the controller reverts to Normal (no
read ahead).
Write Policy: Specify the write policy for this virtual drive:
◊
WBack: In Writeback mode the controller sends a data
transfer completion signal to the host when the controller
cache has received all the data in a transaction. This setting
is recommended in Standard mode.
◊
WThru: In Writethrough mode the controller sends a data
transfer completion signal to the host when the disk
subsystem has received all the data in a transaction. This is
the default.
◊
Bad BBU: Select this mode if you want the controller to use
Writeback mode but the controller has no BBU or the BBU
is bad. If you do not choose this option, the controller
firmware automatically switches to Writethrough mode if it
detects a bad or missing BBU.
IO Policy: The IO Policy applies to reads on a specific virtual disk.
It does not affect the read ahead cache.
◊
Direct: In Direct I/O mode, reads are not buffered in cache
memory. Data is transferred to the cache and the host
Creating a Storage Configuration
Version 2.0
Copyright © 2005-2007 by LSI Corporation. All rights reserved.
2-21
concurrently. If the same data block is read again, it comes
from cache memory. This is the default.
◊
•
•
•
Cached: In Cached I/O mode, all reads are buffered in cache
memory.
Disk Cache Policy: Specify the disk cache policy:
◊
Enable: Enable the disk cache.
◊
Disable: Disable the disk cache. This is the default.
◊
Unchanged: Leave the current disk cache policy unchanged.
Disable BGI: Specify the background initialization status:
◊
No: Leave background initialization enabled. This means that
a new configuration can be initialized in the background
while you use WebBIOS to do other configuration tasks. This
is the default.
◊
Yes: Select Yes if you do not want to allow background
initializations for configurations on this controller.
Select Size: Specify the size of the virtual disk in megabytes.
Normally, this would be the full size for RAID 5 shown in the
Configuration Panel on the right. You may specify a smaller size if
you want to create other virtual disks on the same disk group.
5. Click Accept to accept the changes to the virtual disk definition, or
click Reclaim to return to the previous settings.
6. Click Next when you are finished defining virtual disks.
The configuration preview screen appears, as shown in Figure 2.11.
2-22
WebBIOS Configuration Utility
Version 2.0
Copyright © 2005-2007 by LSI Corporation. All rights reserved.
Figure 2.11 RAID 5 Configuration Preview
7. Check the information in the configuration preview.
8. If the virtual disk configuration is acceptable, click Accept to save the
configuration. Otherwise, click Cancel to end the operation and
return to the WebBIOS main menu, or click Back to return to the
previous screens and change the configuration.
9. If you accept the configuration, click Yes at the prompt to save the
configuration.
The WebBIOS main menu appears.
2.4.3.4
Using Custom Configuration: RAID 6
RAID 6 is similar to RAID 5 (disk striping and distributed parity), except
that instead of one parity block per stripe, there are two. With two
independent parity blocks, RAID 6 can survive the loss of two disks in a
virtual disk without losing data. Use RAID 6 for data that requires a very
high level of protection from loss.
RAID 6 is best suited for networks that perform a lot of small input/output
(I/O) transactions simultaneously. It provides data redundancy, high read
rates, and good performance in most environments.
Creating a Storage Configuration
Version 2.0
Copyright © 2005-2007 by LSI Corporation. All rights reserved.
2-23
In the case of a failure of one drive or two drives in a virtual disk, the
RAID controller uses the parity blocks to recreate all the missing
information. If two drives in a RAID 6 virtual disk fail, two drive rebuilds
are required, one for each drive. These rebuilds do not occur at the same
time. The controller rebuilds one failed drive, and then the other failed
drive.
When you select Custom Configuration and click Next, the Disk Group
Definition screen appears. You use this screen to select physical drives
to create disk groups (arrays).
1. Hold <Ctrl> while selecting at least three ready physical drives in the
Physical Drives window on the left.
2. Click Accept DG to move the drives to a proposed disk group
configuration in the Disk Groups window on the right, as shown in
Figure 2.9.
If you need to undo the changes, click the Reclaim button.
Figure 2.12 WebBIOS Disk Group Definition Screen
2-24
WebBIOS Configuration Utility
Version 2.0
Copyright © 2005-2007 by LSI Corporation. All rights reserved.
3. When you have finished selecting physical disks for disk groups, click
Next.
The Virtual Disk Definition screen appears, as shown in Figure 2.10.
Use this screen to select the RAID level, strip size, read policy, and
other attributes for the new virtual disks.
Figure 2.13 WebBIOS Virtual Disk Definition Screen
4. Change the virtual disk options from the defaults listed on the screen
as needed.
Here are brief explanations of the virtual disk options:
•
RAID Level: The drop-down menu lists the possible RAID levels for
the virtual disk. Select RAID 6.
•
Strip Size: The strip size specifies the size of the segment written
to each disk in a RAID configuration. You can set the strip size to 8,
16, 32, 64, or 128 Kbytes. A larger strip size produces higher read
performance. If your computer regularly performs random read
requests, choose a smaller strip size. The default is 8 Kbytes.
•
Access Policy: Select the type of data access that is allowed for this
virtual disk:
Creating a Storage Configuration
Version 2.0
Copyright © 2005-2007 by LSI Corporation. All rights reserved.
2-25
•
•
•
◊
RW: Allow read/write access. This is the default.
◊
Read Only: Allow read-only access.
◊
Blocked: Do not allow access.
Read Policy: Specify the read policy for this virtual drive:
◊
Normal: This disables the read ahead capability. This is the
default.
◊
Ahead: This enables read ahead capability, which allows the
controller to read sequentially ahead of requested data and
to store the additional data in cache memory, anticipating
that the data will be needed soon. This speeds up reads for
sequential data, but there is little improvement when
accessing random data.
◊
Adaptive: When Adaptive read ahead is selected, the
controller begins using read ahead if the two most recent
disk accesses occurred in sequential sectors. If the read
requests are random, the controller reverts to Normal (no
read ahead).
Write Policy: Specify the write policy for this virtual drive:
◊
WBack: In Writeback mode the controller sends a data
transfer completion signal to the host when the controller
cache has received all the data in a transaction. This setting
is recommended in Standard mode.
◊
WThru: In Writethrough mode the controller sends a data
transfer completion signal to the host when the disk
subsystem has received all the data in a transaction. This is
the default.
◊
Bad BBU: Select this mode if you want the controller to use
Writeback mode but the controller has no BBU or the BBU
is bad. If you do not choose this option, the controller
firmware automatically switches to Writethrough mode if it
detects a bad or missing BBU.
IO Policy: The IO Policy applies to reads on a specific virtual disk.
It does not affect the read ahead cache.
◊
2-26
Direct: In Direct I/O mode, reads are not buffered in cache
memory. Data is transferred to the cache and the host
WebBIOS Configuration Utility
Version 2.0
Copyright © 2005-2007 by LSI Corporation. All rights reserved.
concurrently. If the same data block is read again, it comes
from cache memory. This is the default.
◊
•
•
•
Cached: In Cached I/O mode, all reads are buffered in cache
memory.
Disk Cache Policy: Specify the disk cache policy:
◊
Enable: Enable the disk cache.
◊
Disable: Disable the disk cache. This is the default.
◊
Unchanged: Leave the current disk cache policy unchanged.
Disable BGI: Specify the background initialization status:
◊
No: Leave background initialization enabled. This means that
a new configuration can be initialized in the background
while you use WebBIOS to do other configuration tasks. This
is the default.
◊
Yes: Select Yes if you do not want to allow background
initializations for configurations on this controller.
Select Size: Specify the size of the virtual disk in megabytes.
Normally, this would be the full size for RAID 6 shown in the
Configuration Panel on the right. You may specify a smaller size if
you want to create other virtual disks on the same disk group.
5. Click Accept to accept the changes to the virtual disk definition, or
click Reclaim to return to the previous settings.
6. Click Next when you are finished defining virtual disks.
The configuration preview screen appears, as shown in Figure 2.11.
Creating a Storage Configuration
Version 2.0
Copyright © 2005-2007 by LSI Corporation. All rights reserved.
2-27
Figure 2.14 RAID 6 Configuration Preview
7. Check the information in the configuration preview.
8. If the virtual disk configuration is acceptable, click Accept to save the
configuration. Otherwise, click Cancel to end the operation and
return to the WebBIOS main menu, or click Back to return to the
previous screens and change the configuration.
9. If you accept the configuration, click Yes at the prompt to save the
configuration.
The WebBIOS main menu appears.
2.4.3.5
Using Custom Configuration: RAID 10
RAID 10, a combination of RAID 1 and RAID 0, has mirrored drives. It
breaks up data into smaller blocks, then stripes the blocks of data to
each RAID 1 disk group. Each RAID 1 disk group then duplicates its data
to its other drive. The size of each block is determined by the strip size
parameter, which is 64 Kbytes. RAID 10 can sustain one drive failure in
each array while maintaining data integrity.
RAID 10 provides both high data transfer rates and complete data
redundancy. It works best for data storage that must have 100 percent
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WebBIOS Configuration Utility
Version 2.0
Copyright © 2005-2007 by LSI Corporation. All rights reserved.
redundancy of RAID 1 (mirrored arrays) and that also needs the
enhanced I/O performance of RAID 0 (striped arrays); it works well for
medium-sized databases or any environment that requires a higher
degree of fault tolerance and moderate to medium capacity.
When you select Custom Configuration and click Next, the Disk Group
Definition screen appears.
You use the Disk Group Definition screen to select physical drives to
create disk groups (arrays).
1. Hold <Ctrl> while selecting two ready physical drives in the Physical
Drives window on the left.
2. Click Accept DG to move the drives to a proposed two-drive disk
group configuration in the Disk Groups window on the right.
If you need to undo the changes, click the Reclaim button.
3. Hold <Ctrl> while selecting two more ready physical drives in the
Physical Drives window to create a second two-drive disk group.
4. Click Accept DG to move the drives to a second two-drive disk group
configuration in the Disk Groups window, as shown in Figure 2.15.
If you need to undo the changes, click the Reclaim button.
Creating a Storage Configuration
Version 2.0
Copyright © 2005-2007 by LSI Corporation. All rights reserved.
2-29
Figure 2.15 WebBIOS Disk Group Definition Screen
5. When you have finished selecting physical disks for the disk groups,
click Next.
The Virtual Disk Definition screen appears, as shown in Figure 2.16.
You use this screen to select the RAID level, strip size, read policy,
and other attributes for the new virtual disks.
6. Hold <Ctrl> while selecting 2 two-drive disk groups in the
Configuration window on the right.
2-30
WebBIOS Configuration Utility
Version 2.0
Copyright © 2005-2007 by LSI Corporation. All rights reserved.
Figure 2.16 WebBIOS Virtual Disk Definition Screen
Note:
The WebBIOS Configuration Utility displays the maximum
available capacity while creating the RAID 10 disk group. In
version 1.03 of the utility, the maximum size of the RAID 10
disk group is the sum total of the two RAID 1 disk groups.
In version 1.1, the maximum size is the size of the smaller
disk group multiplied by two.
7. Change the virtual disk options from the defaults listed on the screen
as needed.
Here are brief explanations of the virtual disk options:
•
RAID Level: The drop-down menu lists the possible RAID levels for
the virtual disk. Select RAID 1.
•
Strip Size: The strip size specifies the size of the segment written
to each disk in a RAID configuration. You can set the strip size to 8,
16, 32, 64, or 128 Kbytes. A larger strip size produces higher read
performance. If your computer regularly performs random read
requests, choose a smaller strip size. The default is 8 Kbytes.
Creating a Storage Configuration
Version 2.0
Copyright © 2005-2007 by LSI Corporation. All rights reserved.
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•
•
•
2-32
Access Policy: Select the type of data access that is allowed for this
virtual disk:
◊
RW: Allow read/write access.
◊
Read Only: Allow read-only access. This is the default.
◊
Blocked: Do not allow access.
Read Policy: Specify the read policy for this virtual drive:
◊
Normal: This disables the read ahead capability. This is the
default.
◊
Ahead: This enables read ahead capability, which allows the
controller to read sequentially ahead of requested data and
to store the additional data in cache memory, anticipating
that the data will be needed soon. This speeds up reads for
sequential data, but there is little improvement when
accessing random data.
◊
Adaptive: When Adaptive read ahead is selected, the
controller begins using read ahead if the two most recent
disk accesses occurred in sequential sectors. If the read
requests are random, the controller reverts to Normal (no
read ahead).
Write Policy: Specify the write policy for this virtual drive:
◊
WBack: In Writeback mode the controller sends a data
transfer completion signal to the host when the controller
cache has received all the data in a transaction. This setting
is recommended in Standard mode.
◊
WThru: In Writethrough mode the controller sends a data
transfer completion signal to the host when the disk
subsystem has received all the data in a transaction. This is
the default.
◊
Bad BBU: Select this mode if you want the controller to use
Writeback mode but the controller has no BBU or the BBU
is bad. If you do not choose this option, the controller
firmware automatically switches to Writethrough mode if it
detects a bad or missing BBU.
WebBIOS Configuration Utility
Version 2.0
Copyright © 2005-2007 by LSI Corporation. All rights reserved.
•
•
•
•
IO Policy: The IO Policy applies to reads on a specific virtual disk.
It does not affect the read ahead cache.
◊
Direct: In Direct I/O mode, reads are not buffered in cache
memory. Data is transferred to the cache and the host
concurrently. If the same data block is read again, it comes
from cache memory. This is the default.
◊
Cached: In Cached I/O mode, all reads are buffered in cache
memory.
Disk Cache Policy: Specify the disk cache policy:
◊
Enable: Enable the disk cache.
◊
Disable: Disable the disk cache. This is the default.
◊
Unchanged: Leave the current disk cache policy unchanged.
Disable BGI: Specify the background initialization status:
◊
No: Leave background initialization enabled. This means that
a new configuration can be initialized in the background
while you use WebBIOS to do other configuration tasks. This
is the default.
◊
Yes: Select Yes if you do not want to allow background
initializations for configurations on this controller.
Select Size: Specify the size of the virtual disk in megabytes.
Normally, this would be the full size for RAID 10 shown in the
Configuration Panel on the right. You may specify a smaller size if
you want to create other virtual disks on the same disk group.
8. Click Accept to accept the changes to the virtual disk definition, or
click Reclaim to return to the previous settings.
9. When you are finished defining virtual disks, click Next .
The configuration preview screen appears, as shown in Figure 2.17.
Creating a Storage Configuration
Version 2.0
Copyright © 2005-2007 by LSI Corporation. All rights reserved.
2-33
Figure 2.17 RAID 10 Configuration Preview
10. Check the information in the configuration preview.
11. If the virtual disk configuration is acceptable, click Accept to save the
configuration. Otherwise, click Cancel to end the operation and
return to the WebBIOS main menu, or click Back to return to the
previous screens and change the configuration.
12. If you accept the configuration, click Yes at the prompt to save the
configuration.
The WebBIOS main menu appears.
2.4.3.6
Using Custom Configuration: RAID 50
RAID 50 provides the features of both RAID 0 and RAID 5. RAID 50 uses
both distributed parity and disk striping across multiple arrays. It provides
high data throughput, data redundancy, and very good performance. It is
best implemented on two RAID 5 disk arrays with data striped across
both disk arrays. Though multiple drive failures can be tolerated, only one
drive failure can be tolerated in each RAID 5 level array.
RAID 50 is appropriate when used with data that requires high reliability,
high request rates, high data transfer, and medium to large capacity.
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WebBIOS Configuration Utility
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Copyright © 2005-2007 by LSI Corporation. All rights reserved.
When you select Custom Configuration and click Next, the Disk Group
Definition screen appears. You use this screen to select physical drives
to create disk groups (arrays).
1. Hold <Ctrl> while selecting at least three ready physical drives in the
Physical Drives window on the left.
2. Click Accept DG to move the drives to a proposed disk group
configuration in the Disk Groups window on the right.
If you need to undo the changes, click the Reclaim button.
3. Hold <Ctrl> while selecting at least three more ready physical drives
in the Physical Drives window to create a second disk group.
4. Click Accept DG to move the drives to a proposed disk group
configuration in the Disk Groups window on the right, as shown in
Figure 2.18.
If you need to undo the changes, click the Reclaim button.
Figure 2.18 WebBIOS Disk Group Definition Screen
Creating a Storage Configuration
Version 2.0
Copyright © 2005-2007 by LSI Corporation. All rights reserved.
2-35
5. When you have finished selecting physical disks for the disk groups,
click Next.
The Virtual Disk Definition screen appears, as shown in Figure 2.19.
You use this screen to select the RAID level, strip size, read policy,
and other attributes for the new virtual disk(s).
6. Hold <Ctrl> while selecting 2 three-drive disk groups in the
Configuration window on the right.
Figure 2.19 WebBIOS Virtual Disk Definition Screen
7. Change the virtual disk options from the defaults listed on the screen
as needed.
Here are brief explanations of the virtual disk options:
2-36
•
RAID Level: The drop-down menu lists the possible RAID levels for
the virtual disk. Select RAID 5.
•
Strip Size: The strip size specifies the size of the segment written
to each disk in a RAID configuration. You can set the strip size to 8,
16, 32, 64, or 128 Kbytes. A larger strip size produces higher read
performance. If your computer regularly performs random read
requests, choose a smaller strip size. The default is 8 Kbytes.
WebBIOS Configuration Utility
Version 2.0
Copyright © 2005-2007 by LSI Corporation. All rights reserved.
•
•
•
Access Policy: Select the type of data access that is allowed for this
virtual disk:
◊
RW: Allow read/write access.
◊
Read Only: Allow read-only access. This is the default.
◊
Blocked: Do not allow access.
Read Policy: Specify the read policy for this virtual drive:
◊
Normal: This disables the read ahead capability. This is the
default.
◊
Ahead: This enables read ahead capability, which allows the
controller to read sequentially ahead of requested data and
to store the additional data in cache memory, anticipating
that the data will be needed soon. This speeds up reads for
sequential data, but there is little improvement when
accessing random data.
◊
Adaptive: When Adaptive read ahead is selected, the
controller begins using read ahead if the two most recent
disk accesses occurred in sequential sectors. If the read
requests are random, the controller reverts to Normal (no
read ahead).
Write Policy: Specify the write policy for this virtual drive:
◊
WBack: In Writeback mode the controller sends a data
transfer completion signal to the host when the controller
cache has received all the data in a transaction. This setting
is recommended in Standard mode.
◊
WThru: In Writethrough mode the controller sends a data
transfer completion signal to the host when the disk
subsystem has received all the data in a transaction. This is
the default.
◊
Bad BBU: Select this mode if you want the controller to use
Writeback mode but the controller has no BBU or the BBU
is bad. If you do not choose this option, the controller
firmware automatically switches to Writethrough mode if it
detects a bad or missing BBU.
Creating a Storage Configuration
Version 2.0
Copyright © 2005-2007 by LSI Corporation. All rights reserved.
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•
•
•
•
IO Policy: The IO Policy applies to reads on a specific virtual disk.
It does not affect the read ahead cache.
◊
Direct: In Direct I/O mode, reads are not buffered in cache
memory. Data is transferred to the cache and the host
concurrently. If the same data block is read again, it comes
from cache memory. This is the default.
◊
Cached: In Cached I/O mode, all reads are buffered in cache
memory.
Disk Cache Policy: Specify the disk cache policy:
◊
Enable: Enable the disk cache.
◊
Disable: Disable the disk cache. This is the default.
◊
Unchanged: Leave the current disk cache policy unchanged.
Disable BGI: Specify the background initialization status:
◊
No: Leave background initialization enabled. This means that
a new configuration can be initialized in the background
while you use WebBIOS to do other configuration tasks. This
is the default.
◊
Yes: Select Yes if you do not want to allow background
initializations for configurations on this controller.
Select Size: Specify the size of the virtual disk in megabytes.
Normally, this would be the full size for RAID 50 shown in the
Configuration Panel on the right. You may specify a smaller size if
you want to create other virtual disks on the same disk group.
8. Click Accept to accept the changes to the virtual disk definition, or
click Reclaim to return to the previous settings.
9. Click Next when you are finished defining virtual disks.
The configuration preview screen appears, as shown in Figure 2.20.
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WebBIOS Configuration Utility
Version 2.0
Copyright © 2005-2007 by LSI Corporation. All rights reserved.
Figure 2.20 RAID 50 Configuration Preview
10. Check the information in the configuration preview.
11. If the virtual disk configuration is acceptable, click Accept to save the
configuration. Otherwise, click Cancel to end the operation and
return to the WebBIOS main menu, or click Back to return to the
previous screens and change the configuration.
12. If you accept the configuration, click Yes at the prompt to save the
configuration.
The WebBIOS main menu appears.
2.4.3.7
Using Custom Configuration: RAID 60
RAID 60 provides the features of both RAID 0 and RAID 6, and includes
both parity and disk striping across multiple arrays. RAID 6 supports two
independent parity blocks per stripe. A RAID 60 virtual disk can survive
the loss of two disks in each of the RAID 6 sets without losing data. RAID
60 is best implemented on two RAID 6 disk arrays with data striped
across both disk arrays. Use RAID 60 for data that requires a very high
level of protection from loss.
Creating a Storage Configuration
Version 2.0
Copyright © 2005-2007 by LSI Corporation. All rights reserved.
2-39
RAID 60 can support up to eight spans and tolerate up to 16 drive
failures, though less than total disk drive capacity is available. Two drive
failures can be tolerated in each RAID 6 level array.
RAID 60 is appropriate when used with data that requires high reliability,
high request rates, high data transfer, and medium to large capacity.
When you select Custom Configuration and click Next, the Disk Group
Definition screen appears. You use this screen to select physical drives
to create disk groups (arrays).
1. Hold <Ctrl> while selecting at least three ready physical drives in the
Physical Drives window on the left.
2. Click Accept DG to move the drives to a proposed disk group
configuration in the Disk Groups window on the right.
If you need to undo the changes, click the Reclaim button.
3. Hold <Ctrl> while selecting at least three more ready physical drives
in the Physical Drives window to create a second disk group.
4. Click Accept DG to move the drives to a proposed disk group
configuration in the Disk Groups window on the right, as shown in
Figure 2.18.
If you need to undo the changes, click the Reclaim button.
2-40
WebBIOS Configuration Utility
Version 2.0
Copyright © 2005-2007 by LSI Corporation. All rights reserved.
Figure 2.21 WebBIOS Disk Group Definition Screen
5. When you have finished selecting physical disks for the disk groups,
click Next.
The Virtual Disk Definition screen appears, as shown in Figure 2.19.
You use this screen to select the RAID level, strip size, read policy,
and other attributes for the new virtual disk(s).
6. Hold <Ctrl> while selecting 2 three-drive disk groups in the
Configuration window on the right.
Creating a Storage Configuration
Version 2.0
Copyright © 2005-2007 by LSI Corporation. All rights reserved.
2-41
Figure 2.22 WebBIOS Virtual Disk Definition Screen
7. Change the virtual disk options from the defaults listed on the screen
as needed.
Here are brief explanations of the virtual disk options:
•
RAID Level: The drop-down menu lists the possible RAID levels for
the virtual disk. Select RAID 6.
•
Strip Size: The strip size specifies the size of the segment written
to each disk in a RAID configuration. You can set the strip size to 8,
16, 32, 64, or 128 Kbytes. A larger strip size produces higher read
performance. If your computer regularly performs random read
requests, choose a smaller strip size. The default is 8 Kbytes.
•
Access Policy: Select the type of data access that is allowed for this
virtual disk:
•
2-42
◊
RW: Allow read/write access.
◊
Read Only: Allow read-only access. This is the default.
◊
Blocked: Do not allow access.
Read Policy: Specify the read policy for this virtual drive:
WebBIOS Configuration Utility
Version 2.0
Copyright © 2005-2007 by LSI Corporation. All rights reserved.
•
•
◊
Normal: This disables the read ahead capability. This is the
default.
◊
Ahead: This enables read ahead capability, which allows the
controller to read sequentially ahead of requested data and
to store the additional data in cache memory, anticipating
that the data will be needed soon. This speeds up reads for
sequential data, but there is little improvement when
accessing random data.
◊
Adaptive: When Adaptive read ahead is selected, the
controller begins using read ahead if the two most recent
disk accesses occurred in sequential sectors. If the read
requests are random, the controller reverts to Normal (no
read ahead).
Write Policy: Specify the write policy for this virtual drive:
◊
WBack: In Writeback mode the controller sends a data
transfer completion signal to the host when the controller
cache has received all the data in a transaction. This setting
is recommended in Standard mode.
◊
WThru: In Writethrough mode the controller sends a data
transfer completion signal to the host when the disk
subsystem has received all the data in a transaction. This is
the default.
◊
Bad BBU: Select this mode if you want the controller to use
Writeback mode but the controller has no BBU or the BBU
is bad. If you do not choose this option, the controller
firmware automatically switches to Writethrough mode if it
detects a bad or missing BBU.
IO Policy: The IO Policy applies to reads on a specific virtual disk.
It does not affect the read ahead cache.
◊
Direct: In Direct I/O mode, reads are not buffered in cache
memory. Data is transferred to the cache and the host
concurrently. If the same data block is read again, it comes
from cache memory. This is the default.
◊
Cached: In Cached I/O mode, all reads are buffered in cache
memory.
Creating a Storage Configuration
Version 2.0
Copyright © 2005-2007 by LSI Corporation. All rights reserved.
2-43
•
•
•
Disk Cache Policy: Specify the disk cache policy:
◊
Enable: Enable the disk cache.
◊
Disable: Disable the disk cache. This is the default.
◊
Unchanged: Leave the current disk cache policy unchanged.
Disable BGI: Specify the background initialization status:
◊
No: Leave background initialization enabled. This means that
a new configuration can be initialized in the background
while you use WebBIOS to do other configuration tasks. This
is the default.
◊
Yes: Select Yes if you do not want to allow background
initializations for configurations on this controller.
Select Size: Specify the size of the virtual disk in megabytes.
Normally, this would be the full size for RAID 60 shown in the
Configuration Panel on the right. You may specify a smaller size if
you want to create other virtual disks on the same disk group.
8. Click Accept to accept the changes to the virtual disk definition, or
click Reclaim to return to the previous settings.
9. Click Next when you are finished defining virtual disks.
The configuration preview screen appears, as shown in Figure 2.20.
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WebBIOS Configuration Utility
Version 2.0
Copyright © 2005-2007 by LSI Corporation. All rights reserved.
Figure 2.23 RAID 60 Configuration Preview
10. Check the information in the configuration preview.
11. If the virtual disk configuration is acceptable, click Accept to save the
configuration. Otherwise, click Cancel to end the operation and
return to the WebBIOS main menu, or click Back to return to the
previous screens and change the configuration.
12. If you accept the configuration, click Yes at the prompt to save the
configuration.
The WebBIOS main menu appears.
2.5
Viewing and Changing Device Properties
This section explains how you can use the WebBIOS CU to view and
change the properties for adapters, virtual disks, physical drives, and
BBUs.
Viewing and Changing Device Properties
Version 2.0
Copyright © 2005-2007 by LSI Corporation. All rights reserved.
2-45
2.5.1
Viewing and Changing Adapter Properties
WebBIOS allows you to view information for one LSI SAS adapter at a
time. If your computer system has multiple LSI SAS adapters, you can
view information for a different adapter by clicking Adapter Selection on
the main screen. When the Adapter Selection screen appears, select the
adapter you want from the list.
To view the properties for the currently selected adapter, click Adapter
Properties on the main WebBIOS screen. There are two Adapter
Properties screens. Figure 2.24 shows the first screen.
Figure 2.24 First Adapter Properties Screen
The information on this screen is read-only and cannot be modified
directly. Most of this information is self-explanatory. The screen lists the
number of virtual disks that are already defined on this adapter, plus the
number of physical disks connected to the adapter.
If a background initialization is in progress, you can click Background
Init Progress to determine its state of completion. Click Next to view the
second Adapter Properties screen, as shown in Figure 2.25.
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WebBIOS Configuration Utility
Version 2.0
Copyright © 2005-2007 by LSI Corporation. All rights reserved.
Figure 2.25 Second Adapter Properties Screen
Table 2.2 describes the entries/options listed on the second Adapter
Properties screen. LSI recommends that you leave these options at their
default settings to achieve the best performance, unless you have a
specific reason for changing them.
Table 2.2
Adapter Properties Menu Options
Option
Description
Battery Backup
This entry indicates whether the selected controller has a BBU. If present,
you can click Present to view information about the BBU. For more
information, see Section 2.5.4, “Viewing Battery Backup Unit Information.”
Set Factory Defaults
Use this option to load the default MegaRAID® WebBIOS CU settings. The
default is No.
Cluster Mode
Use this option to enable or disable Cluster mode. The default is Disabled.
A cluster is a grouping of independent servers that can access the same
data storage and provide services to a common set of clients. When Cluster
mode is disabled, the system operates in Standard mode.
Rebuild Rate
Use this option to select the rebuild rate for physical drives connected to the
selected adapter. The default is 30 percent. The rebuild rate is the
percentage of system resources dedicated to rebuilding a failed drive. The
higher the number, the more system resources devoted to a rebuild.
BGI Rate
Use this option to select the amount of system resources dedicated to
background initialization of virtual disks connected to the selected adapter.
The default is 30 percent.
CC Rate
Use this option to select the amount of system resources dedicated to
consistency checks of virtual disks connected to the selected adapter. The
default is 30 percent.
Viewing and Changing Device Properties
Version 2.0
Copyright © 2005-2007 by LSI Corporation. All rights reserved.
2-47
Table 2.2
Adapter Properties Menu Options (Cont.)
Option
Description
Reconstruction Rate
Use this option to select the amount of system resources dedicated to
reconstruction of physical disks connected to the selected adapter. The
default is 30 percent.
Adapter BIOS
Use this option to enable or disable the BIOS for the selected adapter. The
default is Enabled. If the boot device is on the selected controller, the BIOS
must be enabled; otherwise, the BIOS should be disabled or it might not be
possible to use a boot device elsewhere.
Coercion Mode
Disk coercion is a tool for forcing physical disks of varying capacities to the
same size so they can be used in an array. The coercion mode options are
None, 128MB-way, and 1GB-way. The default is None.
Note: The number you choose depends on how much the drives from various vendors vary in their actual size. LSI recommends that you use
the 1GB coercion mode option.
PDF Interval
This option determines how frequently the controller polls for physical drives
reporting a Predictive Drive Failure (S.M.A.R.T. error). The default is 300
seconds (5 minutes).
Alarm Control
Select this option to enable, disable, or silence the onboard alarm tone
generator on the controller. The default is Disabled.
Patrol Read Rate
Use this option to select the rate for patrol reads for physical drives
connected to the selected adapter. The default is 30 percent. The patrol
read rate is the percentage of system resources dedicated to running a
patrol read. See Section 3.5, “Patrol Read-Related Adapter Properties” for
additional information about patrol read.
Cache Flush Interval
Use this option to control the interval (in seconds) at which the contents of
the onboard data cache are flushed. The default is 4 seconds.
Spinup Drive Count
Use this option to control the number of drives that spin up simultaneously.
The default is 2 drives.
Spinup Delay
Use this option to control the interval (in seconds) between spinup of
physical disks connected to this controller. The delay prevents a drain on
the system’s power supply that would occur if all disks spun up at the same
time. The default is 12 seconds.
StopOnError
Enable this option if you want the boot process to stop when the controller
BIOS encounters an error during boot-up. The default is Disabled.
If you make changes to the options on this screen, click Submit to
register them. If you change your mind, click Reset to return the options
to their default values.
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WebBIOS Configuration Utility
Version 2.0
Copyright © 2005-2007 by LSI Corporation. All rights reserved.
2.5.2
Viewing and Changing Virtual Disk Properties
Access the Virtual Disk screen by selecting a virtual disk (virtual disk)
from the virtual disk list on the WebBIOS CU main screen and clicking
Virtual Disk. Figure 2.26 shows the Virtual Disk screen.
Figure 2.26 Virtual Disk Screen
The Properties panel of this screen displays the virtual disk’s RAID level,
state, size, and strip size.
The Policies panel lists the virtual disk policies that were defined when
the storage configuration was created. For information about these
policies, see Section 2.4.3, “Using Custom Configuration.” To change any
of these policies, make a selection from the drop-down menu and click
Change.
The Operations panel lists operations that can be performed on the
virtual disk. To perform an operation, select it and click Go. Then choose
from the following options:
•
Select Del to delete this virtual disk. For more information, see
Section 2.7.2, “Deleting a Virtual Disk.”
Viewing and Changing Device Properties
Version 2.0
Copyright © 2005-2007 by LSI Corporation. All rights reserved.
2-49
•
Select Locate to make the LEDs flash on the physical drives used
by this virtual disk. This works only if the drives are installed in a disk
enclosure that supports SAFTE.
•
Select Fast or Slow to initialize this virtual disk. A fast initialization
quickly writes zeroes to the first and last 10 Mbyte regions of the new
virtual disk and then completes the initialization in the background.
A slow initialization is not complete until the entire virtual disk has
been initialized with zeroes. It is seldom necessary to use this option,
because the virtual disk was already initialized when you created it.
Caution:
•
Before you run an initialization, back up any data on the
virtual disk that you want to save. All data on the virtual disk
is lost when you initialize it.
Select CC to run a consistency check on this virtual disk. For more
information, see Section 2.7.1, “Running a Consistency Check.” (This
option is not available for RAID 0 virtual disks.)
In the right panel of the Virtual Disk screen you can change the virtual
disk configuration by adding or removing a physical drive or by changing
the RAID level.
Caution:
Before you change a virtual disk configuration, back up any
data on the virtual disk that you want to save.
To remove a physical drive from a virtual disk, select the drive in the
small panel beneath the Remove physical drive option. Then select
Remove physical drive and click Go at the bottom of the panel.
See Section 2.7.4, “Migrating the RAID Level of a Virtual Disk” for
information about adding a physical drive to a virtual disk or migrating its
RAID level.
2.5.3
Viewing Physical Drive Properties
The Physical Drive screen displays the properties of a selected physical
drive and also enables you to perform operations on the physical drive.
Figure 2.27 shows the Physical Drive window.
2-50
WebBIOS Configuration Utility
Version 2.0
Copyright © 2005-2007 by LSI Corporation. All rights reserved.
Figure 2.27 Physical Drive Screen
The physical drive properties are view-only and are self-explanatory.
Note that the properties include the state of the disk’s physical drive. The
operations listed at the bottom of the screen vary depending on the state
of the drive. After you select an operation, click Go to start the operation.
•
Select MakeDriveOffline if you want to force the physical drive
offline.
Note:
If you force offline a good physical drive that is part of a
redundant array with a hot spare, the drive will rebuild to
the hot spare drive. The drive you forced offline will go into
the Unconfigured and Bad state. Access the BIOS utility to
set the drive to the Unconfigured and Good state.
•
Select Locate to make the LED flash on the physical drive. This
works only if the drive is installed in a disk enclosure.
•
If the selected physical drive is not already part of a disk group, you
have the option of making it a Global hot spare or a Dedicated hot
spare.
WebBIOS displays the global hot spare as Global and the dedicated
hot spare as Ded.
•
A Prepare for removal option may also appear.
Viewing and Changing Device Properties
Version 2.0
Copyright © 2005-2007 by LSI Corporation. All rights reserved.
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2.5.4
Viewing Battery Backup Unit Information
If your SAS controller has a battery backup unit (BBU), you can view
information about it. To do this, follow these steps:
1. Click Adapter Properties on the main WebBIOS CU screen.
2. Click Next to view the second Adapter Properties screen.
3. Click the word Present in the Battery Backup field at the top left of
the screen.
The Battery Module screen appears, as shown in Figure 2.28.
Figure 2.28 Battery Module Screen
Most of the Battery Module properties are view-only and are selfexplanatory. In the lower right panel, there are two properties that can be
changed. (LSI recommends that you leave these properties at their
default settings.)
A learning cycle is a battery calibration operation performed by the
controller periodically to determine the condition of the battery. To
change the length of the interval between learning cycles, enter a
different number of hours for Learn Delay Interval and click Go.
Note:
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LSI recommends 30 days for the interval between cycles.
WebBIOS Configuration Utility
Version 2.0
Copyright © 2005-2007 by LSI Corporation. All rights reserved.
2.6
Viewing System Event Information
The SAS controller firmware monitors the activity and performance of all
storage configurations and devices in the system. When an event occurs
(such as the creation of a new virtual disk or the removal of a physical
drive) an event message is generated and is stored in the controller
NVRAM. You can use the WebBIOS CU to view these event messages.
To do this, click Events on the main WebBIOS CU screen. The Event
Information screen appears, as shown in Figure 2.29.
Figure 2.29 Event Information Screen
The right side of the screen is blank until you select an event to view.
The First Sequence and Last Sequence fields in the upper left of the
screen show you how many event entries are currently stored.
To view event information, follow these steps:
1. Select an Event Locale from the menu. For example, select
Enclosure to view events relating to the disk enclosure.
2. Select an Event Class: Information, Warning, Critical, Fatal, or Dead.
3. Enter a Start Sequence number, between the First Sequence and
Last Sequence numbers. The higher the number, the more recent
the event.
Viewing System Event Information
Version 2.0
Copyright © 2005-2007 by LSI Corporation. All rights reserved.
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4. Enter the Number of events of this type that you want to view, and
click Go.
The first event in the sequence appears in the right panel.
5. Click Next or Prev to page forward or backward through the
sequence of events.
6. If you want, select different event criteria in the left panel, and click
Go again to view a different sequence of events.
Each event entry includes a timestamp and a description to help you
determine when the event occurred and what it was.
2.7
Managing Configurations
This section includes information about maintaining and managing
storage configurations.
2.7.1
Running a Consistency Check
You should periodically run a consistency check on fault-tolerant virtual
disks. A consistency check verifies that the redundancy data is correct
and available for RAID 1, RAID 5, RAID 6, RAID 10, RAID 50, and
RAID 60 arrays. To do this, follow these steps:
1. On the main WebBIOS CU screen, select a virtual disk.
2. Click Virtual Disks.
3. When the Virtual Disk screen appears, select CC in the lower left
panel, and click Go.
The consistency check begins.
If the WebBIOS CU finds a difference between the data and the parity
value on the redundant array, it assumes that the data is accurate and
automatically corrects the parity value. Be sure to back up the data
before running a consistency check if you think the consistency data may
be corrupted.
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WebBIOS Configuration Utility
Version 2.0
Copyright © 2005-2007 by LSI Corporation. All rights reserved.
2.7.2
Deleting a Virtual Disk
You can delete any virtual disk on the controller if you want to reuse that
space for a new virtual disk. The WebBIOS CU provides a list of
configurable arrays where there is a space to configure. If multiple virtual
disks are defined on a single array, you can delete a virtual disk without
deleting the whole array.
To delete a virtual disk, follow these steps:
Caution:
Back up any data that you want to keep before you delete
the virtual disk.
1. On the main WebBIOS CU screen, select a virtual disk.
2. Click Virtual Disks.
3. When the Virtual Disk screen appears, select Del in the lower left
panel, and click Go.
4. When the message appears, confirm that you want to delete the
virtual disk.
2.7.3
Importing or Clearing a Foreign Configuration
A foreign configuration is a storage configuration that already exists on a
replacement set of physical disks that you install in a computer system.
In addition, if one or more physical disks are removed from a
configuration, by a cable pull or physical disk removal, for example, the
configuration on those disks is considered a foreign configuration by the
RAID controller.
The WebBIOS CU allows you to import the foreign configuration to the
RAID controller, or to clear the configuration so you can create a new
configuration using these physical disks.
If WebBIOS CU detects a foreign configuration, the screen appears, as
shown in Figure 2.30.
Managing Configurations
Version 2.0
Copyright © 2005-2007 by LSI Corporation. All rights reserved.
2-55
Figure 2.30 Foreign Configuration Screen
The GUID (Global Unique Identifier) entries on the drop-down list are
OEM names and will vary from one installation to another.
Click ClearForeignCfg if you want to clear the configuration and reuse
the physical disks.
Click GUIDPreview if you want to preview the foreign configuration. The
screen, as shown in Figure 2.31, appears.
Figure 2.31 Foreign Configuration Preview Screen
The right panel shows the virtual disk properties of the foreign
configuration. In this example, there is a RAID 1 virtual disk with
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WebBIOS Configuration Utility
Version 2.0
Copyright © 2005-2007 by LSI Corporation. All rights reserved.
1,000 Mbytes. The left panel shows the physical disks that comprise the
foreign configuration.
Click Import to import this foreign configuration and use it on this
controller.
Click Cancel to clear the configuration and reuse the physical disks for
another virtual disk.
2.7.3.1
Foreign Configurations in Cable Pull and Disk Removal Scenarios
If one or more physical disks are removed from a configuration, by a
cable pull or physical disk removal, for example, the configuration on
those disks is considered a foreign configuration by the RAID controller.
Use the Foreign Configuration Preview screen to import or clear the
foreign configuration in each case. The import procedure and clear
procedure are described in Section 2.7.3, “Importing or Clearing a
Foreign Configuration.”
The following scenarios can occur with cable pulls or physical disk
removals.
Note:
If you want to import the foreign configuration in any of the
following scenarios, you should have all the drives in the
enclosure before you perform the import operation.
1. Scenario #1: If all of the physical disks in a configuration are
removed and re-inserted, the controller considers the drives to have
foreign configurations.
Import or clear the foreign configuration. If you select Import,
automatic rebuilds will occur in redundant virtual disks.
Note:
Start a consistency check immediately after the rebuild is
complete to ensure data integrity for the virtual disks. See
Section 2.7.1, “Running a Consistency Check,” for more
information about checking data consistency.
2. Scenario #2: If some of the physical disks in a configuration are
removed and re-inserted, the controller considers the drives to have
foreign configurations.
Import or clear the foreign configuration. If you select Import,
automatic rebuilds will occur in redundant virtual disks.
Managing Configurations
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Note:
Start a consistency check immediately after the rebuild is
complete to ensure data integrity for the virtual disks. See
Section 2.7.1, “Running a Consistency Check,” for more
information about checking data consistency.
3. Scenario #3: If all the physical disks in a virtual disk are removed,
but at different times, and re-inserted, the controller considers the
drives to have foreign configurations.
Import or clear the foreign configuration. If you select Import, all
drives that were pulled before the virtual disk became offline will be
imported and then automatically rebuilt. Automatic rebuilds will occur
in redundant virtual disks.
4. If the physical disks in a non-redundant virtual disk are removed, the
controller considers the drives to have foreign configurations.
Import or clear the foreign configuration. No rebuilds will occur after
the import operation because there is no redundant data to rebuild
the drives with.
2.7.4
Migrating the RAID Level of a Virtual Disk
As the amount of data and the number of disk drives in your system
increase, you can use RAID-level migration to change a virtual disk from
one RAID level to another. You do not have to power down or reboot the
system. When you migrate a virtual disk, you can keep the same number
of drives, or you can add drives. You can use the WebBIOS CU to
migrate the RAID level of an existing virtual disk.
Note:
While you can apply RAID-level migration at any time, LSI
that recommends you do so when there are no reboots.
Many operating systems issues I/O operations serially (one
at a time) during boot. With a RAID-level migration running,
a boot can often take more than 15 minutes.
Migrations are allowed for the following RAID levels:
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•
RAID 0 to RAID 1
•
RAID 0 to RAID 5
•
RAID 1 to RAID 5
•
RAID 1 to RAID 6
WebBIOS Configuration Utility
Version 2.0
Copyright © 2005-2007 by LSI Corporation. All rights reserved.
Table 2.3 lists the number of additional disk drives required when you
change the RAID level of a virtual disk.
Table 2.3
Additional Disk Drives Required for RAID-Level Migration
From RAID Level to RAID
Level
Original Number of Disk
Drives in Array
Additional Disk Drives
Required
RAID 0 to RAID 1
RAID 0: 1 drive
1
RAID 0 to RAID 5
RAID 0: 1 drive
2
RAID 1 to RAID 5
RAID 1: 2 drives
1
RAID 1 to RAID 6
RAID 1: 2 drives
1
Follow these steps to migrate the RAID level:
Caution:
Back up any data that you want to keep before you change
the RAID level of the virtual disk.
1. On the main WebBIOS CU screen, select a virtual disk.
2. Click Virtual Disks.
3. When the Virtual Disk screen appears, select Migration only (and
skip to step 6) or Migration with addition in the right panel.
4. If you selected Migration with addition, select one or more physical
disks from the small window in the lower right of the screen.
5. Select a new RAID level from the drop-down menu on the right. The
available RAID levels are limited, based on the current RAID level of
the virtual disk plus the number of physical disks available.
6. When you have made your selections, click Go at the bottom of the
right panel.
7. When the message appears, confirm that you want to migrate the
RAID level of the virtual disk.
A reconstruction operation begins on the virtual disk. You must wait until
the reconstruction is completed before performing any other tasks in the
WebBIOS CU.
Managing Configurations
Version 2.0
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WebBIOS Configuration Utility
Version 2.0
Copyright © 2005-2007 by LSI Corporation. All rights reserved.
Chapter 3
MegaRAID Command
Tool
The MegaRAID Command Tool (CT) is a CLI application for SAS. You
can use this utility to configure, monitor, and maintain MegaRAID SAS
RAID storage adapters and the devices connected to them.
Note:
The CT supports only the MegaRAID controller. It supports
SAS and SATA II but does not support other types of
MegaRAID controllers, such as U320, SATA I, or IDE.
This chapter has the following sections:
•
Section 3.2, “MegaCLI Version 1.00.22 Upgrade for Linux.”
•
Section 3.1, “Product Overview”
•
Section 3.3, “Command Line Abbreviations and Conventions”
•
Section 3.4, “Adapter Property-Related Options”
•
Section 3.5, “Patrol Read-Related Adapter Properties”
•
Section 3.6, “BIOS-Related Properties”
•
Section 3.7, “Battery Backup Unit-Related Properties”
•
Section 3.8, “Options for Displaying Logs Kept at Firmware Level”
•
Section 3.9, “Configuration-Related Options”
•
Section 3.10, “Virtual Disk-Related Options”
•
Section 3.11, “Physical Drive-Related Options”
•
Section 3.12, “Enclosure-Related Options”
•
Section 3.13, “Flashing the Firmware”
•
Section 3.14, “SAS Topology”
•
Section 3.15, “Diagnostic-Related Options”
•
Section 3.16, “Miscellaneous Options”
MegaRAID SAS Software User’s Guide
Version 2.0
Copyright © 2005-2007 by LSI Corporation. All rights reserved.
3-1
3.1
Product Overview
The MegaCLI Configuration Utility is a command line interface
application you can use to manage MegaRAID SAS RAID controllers.
You can use MegaCLI Configuration Utility to perform the following tasks:
3-2
•
Configure MegaRAID SAS RAID controllers and attached devices
•
Display information about virtual disks and physical drives for the
adapter and other storage components
•
Display ongoing progress for operations on physical drives and
virtual disks
•
Change properties for the virtual disks and physical drives for the
adapter and other storage components
•
Set, retrieve, and verify adapter default settings
•
Change the firmware on the adapters
•
Monitor the RAID storage systems
•
Support RAID levels 0, 1, 5, 6, 10, 50, and 60 (depending on the
RAID controller)
•
Create and use scripts with the scriptable CLI tool
•
Configure physical disk drives into groups and virtual disks on the
controller
•
Display configuration information for the controller, physical disk
drives, and virtual disks
•
Change virtual disk properties on the controller
•
Change physical disk drive properties on the controller
•
Display controller properties
•
Load configuration to the controller from a file
•
Save the controller configuration to a file
•
Start or stop a rebuild, consistency check (CC), or initialization
operation
•
Enable or disable a background initialization (BGI)
•
Stop or display an ongoing background initialization
•
Start or display a reconstruction
MegaRAID Command Tool
Version 2.0
Copyright © 2005-2007 by LSI Corporation. All rights reserved.
•
Start or stop patrol read
•
Set and retrieve patol read related settings
•
Flash new firmware on the SAS RAID controller
•
Read and program NVRAM and flash memory directly into DOS
•
Display relevant messages on the console and/or in the log file
•
Display controller data using one command
•
Exit with predefined success or failure exit codes
•
Scan, preview, and import foreign configurations
•
Set predefined environment variables, such as the number of
controllers and virtual disks
•
Display firmware event logs
•
Display help for how to use the command line options:
•
Display battery unit properties
•
Display enclosure properties
•
Display and set connector mode on supported controllers
The following sections describe the command line options in the
MegaCLI Configuration Utility you can use to perform these functions.
3.2
MegaCLI Version 1.00.22 Upgrade for Linux
Note:
This section is for the Linux operating system only. You can
upgrade the MegaCLI version in other operating systems,
but only Linux requires this procedure.
If you want to upgrade from MegaCLI version 1.00.09 to MegaCLI
version 1.00.22, you need to remove version 1.00.09 first. Version
1.00.22 can not uninstall the older version. This is because of the way
that the RPM Package Manager installs MegaCLI and the location in
which the older versions were installed. MegaCLI version 1.00.09 was
installed to /usr/sbin, and MegaCLI version 1.00.22 is installed to
/opt/megaraid.
To remove version 1.00.09, perform the following steps:
1. Go to the location of the MegaCLI and type rpm –q.
MegaCLI Version 1.00.22 Upgrade for Linux
Version 2.0
Copyright © 2005-2007 by LSI Corporation. All rights reserved.
3-3
The package name displays.
2. Use the rpm -e command to remove the older version and then
install the new version.
For example, for version MegaCLI-1.01.26-0, type rpm –e
MegaCli-1.01.26-0 to remove the package.
3.3
Command Line Abbreviations and Conventions
This section explains the abbreviations and conventions used with
MegaCLI Configuration Utility commands.
3.3.1
Abbreviations Used in the Command Line
Table 3.1 lists the abbreviations for the virtual disk parameters used in
the following sections.
Table 3.1
3.3.2
Command Line Abbreviations
Abbreviation
Description
WB
WriteBack write policy
WT
WriteThrough write policy
ADRA
Adaptive Read Ahead read policy
RA
Read Ahead read policy
NORA
Normal Read policy (No read ahead)
DIO
Direct I/O cache policy
CIO
Cached I/O cache policy
Conventions
There are some options for which you can specify multiple values. You
can enter commands for a single adapter (–aN), multiple adapters
(-a0,1,2) or work on all present adapters (-aALL). This is denoted as –
aN|-a0,1,2|-aALL in this document and specifies that you can enter
commands for one adapter, multiple adapters, or all adapters.
Note :
3-4
All options in the MegaRAID Command Tool are positiondependent, unless otherwise specified.
MegaRAID Command Tool
Version 2.0
Copyright © 2005-2007 by LSI Corporation. All rights reserved.
Table 3.2 describes the conventions used in the options.
Table 3.2
Conventions
Convention
Description
|
Specifies “or,” meaning you can choose between options.
-aN
N specifies the adapter number for the command.
-a0,1,2
Specifies the command is for adapters 0, 1, and 2. You can
select two or more adapters in this manner.
-aALL
Specifies the command is for all adapters.
-Lx
x specifies the virtual disk number for the command.
-L0,1,2
Specifies the command is for virtual disks 0, 1, and 2. You can
select two or more virtual disks in this manner.
-Lall
Specifies the command is for all virtual disks.
[E0:S0,E1,S1,…] Specifies when one or more physical devices need(s) to be
specified in the command line. Each [E:S] pair specifies one
physical device where E means device ID of the enclosure in
which a PD resides, and S means the slot number of the
enclosure.
In the case of a physical device directly connected to the SAS
port on the controller, with no enclosure involved, the format of
[:S] can be used where S means the port number on the
controller. For devices attached through the backplane, the
firmware provides an enclosure device ID and MegaCLI expects
the user input in the format of [E:S]. In the following sections,
only the format, [E:S], is used in the command descriptions,
although both formats are valid.
[ ]
Indicates that the parameter is optional except when it is used
to specify physical devices. For example, [WT] means the write
policy (WriteThrough) is optional.
If you enter WT at the command line, the application will use
WriteThrough write policy for the virtual disk. Otherwise, it uses
the default value for the parameter.
{ }
Indicates that the parameters are grouped and that they must be
given at the same time.
You can specify the -Silent command line option for all possible
functions of the MegaCLI Configuration Utility. If you enter this option at
the command line, no message displays on the screen.
Command Line Abbreviations and Conventions
Version 2.0
Copyright © 2005-2007 by LSI Corporation. All rights reserved.
3-5
3.4
Adapter Property-Related Options
You can use the commands in this section to set or display properties
related to the adapter(s), such as the virtual disk parameters and factory
defaults.
3.4.1
Display Adapter Properties
Use the command in Table 3.3 to display parameters for the selected
adapter(s).
Table 3.3
Adapter Parameters
Convention
CmdTool -AdpAllinfo -aN|-a0,1,2|-aALL
Description
Displays information about the adapter, including cluster state, BIOS, alarm, firmware
version, BIOS version, battery charge counter value, rebuild rate, bus number/device
number, present RAM, serial number of the board, and SAS address.
3.4.2
Display Number of Controllers Supported
Use the command in Table 3.3 to display the number of controllers
supported on the system.
Table 3.4
Number of Controllers Supported
Convention
CmdTool -AdpCount
Description
Displays the number of controllers supported on the system and returns the number
to the operating system.
3.4.3
Enable or Disable Automatic Rebuild
Use the command in Table 3.5 to turn automatic rebuild on or off for the
selected adapter(s). If you have configured hot spares and enabled
automatic rebuild, the RAID adapter automatically tries to use them to
rebuild failed disks. Automatic rebuild also controls whether a rebuild will
start when a drive that was part of the array is reinserted.
Table 3.5
Enable or Disable Automatic Rebuild
Convention
CmdTool –AdpAutoRbld -Enbl|-Dsbl|-Dsply -aN|-a0,1,2|-aALL
Description
Enables or disables automatic rebuild on the selected adapter(s).
The -Dsply option shows the status of the automatic rebuild state.
3-6
MegaRAID Command Tool
Version 2.0
Copyright © 2005-2007 by LSI Corporation. All rights reserved.
3.4.4
Flush Adapter Cache
Use the command in Table 3.6 to flush the adapter cache on the selected
adapter(s). This option sends the contents of cache memory to the
virtual disk(s). If the MegaRAID system must be powered down rapidly,
you must flush the contents of the cache memory to preserve data
integrity.
Table 3.6
Cache Flush on Selected Adapter
Convention
CmdTool –AdpCacheFlush -aN|-a0,1,2|-aALL
Description
Flushes the adapter cache on the selected adapter(s).
3.4.5
Set Adapter Properties
This command sets the properties on the selected adapter(s). For
example, for {RebuildRate -val}, you can enter a percentage between
0 percent and 100 percent as the value for the rebuild rate. (The rebuild
rate is the percentage of the compute cycles dedicated to rebuilding
failed drives.) At 0 percent, the rebuild is done only if the system is not
doing anything else. At 100 percent, the rebuild has a higher priority than
any other system activity.
Note:
LSI recommends the default rebuild rate of 30 percent, and
the default patrol read rate of 30 percent.
Use the command in Table 3.7 to display the list of properties you can
set for the adapter(s).
Table 3.7
Convention
Set Adapter Properties
CmdTool –AdpSetProp {CacheFlushInterval –val}|{RebuildRate -val}|
{PatrolReadRate –val}|{BgiRate –val}|{CCRate –val}| {ReconRate –val}|
{SpinupDriveCount –val}|{SpinupDelay –val}|{CoercionMode –val} |
{PredFailPollInterval –val}|{ClusterEnable –val}| {BatWarnDsbl –val}|
{EccBucketSize –val}|{EccBucketLeakRate –val}|AlarmEnbl | AlarmDsbl |
AlarmSilence -aN|-a0,1,2|-aALL
Adapter Property-Related Options
Version 2.0
Copyright © 2005-2007 by LSI Corporation. All rights reserved.
3-7
Table 3.7
Set Adapter Properties (Cont.)
Description
3.4.6
Sets the properties on the selected adapter(s). The possible settings are:
CacheFlushInterval: Cache flush interval in seconds. Values: 0 to 255.
RebuildRate: Rebuild rate. Values: 0 to 100.
PatrolReadRate: Patrol read rate. Values: 0 to 100.
BgiRate: Background initilization rate. Values: 0 to 100.
CCRate: Consistency check rate. Values: 0 to 100.
ReconRate: Reconstruction rate. Values: 0 to 100.
SpinupDriveCount: Max number of drives to spin up at one time. Values: 0 to 255.
SpinupDelay: Number of seconds to delay among spinup groups. Values: 0 to 255.
CoercionMode: Drive capacity Coercion mode. Values: 0 - None, 1 - 128 Mbytes,
2 - 1 Gbyte.
PredFailPollInterval: Number of seconds between predicted fail polls. Values: 0
to 65535.
ClusterEnable: Cluster is enabled or disabled. Values: 0 - Disabled, 1 - Enabled.
BatWarnDsbl: Disable warnings for missing battery or missing hardware.
Values: 0 - Enabled, 1 - Disabled.
EccBucketSize: Size of ECC single-bit-error bucket. Values: 0 to 255.
EccBucketLeakRate: Leak rate (in minutes) of ECC single-bit-error bucket.
Values: 0 to 65535.
AlarmEnbl: Set alarm to Enabled.
AlarmDsbl: Set alarm to Disabled.
AlarmSilence: Silence an active alarm.
Display Specified Adapter Properties
Use the command in Table 3.8 to display specified properties on the
selected adapter(s).
Table 3.8
Display Specified Adapter Properties
Convention
CmdTool –AdpGetProp CacheFlushInterval | RebuildRate | PatrolReadRate|
BgiRate | CCRate | ReconRate | SpinupDriveCount | SpinupDelay |
CoercionMode | PredFailPollInterval | ClusterEnable | BatWarnDsbl |
EccBucketSize | EccBucketLeakRate | EccBucketCount | AlarmDsply -aN|a0,1,2|-aALL
Description
Displays the properties on the selected adapter(s). See Table 3.7 for explanations of
the options.
3.4.7
Set Factory Defaults
Use the command in Table 3.9 to set the factory defaults on the selected
adapter(s).
3-8
MegaRAID Command Tool
Version 2.0
Copyright © 2005-2007 by LSI Corporation. All rights reserved.
Table 3.9
Set Factory Defaults
Convention
CmdTool -AdpFacDefSet -aN|-a0,1,2|-aALL
Description
Sets the factory defaults on the selected adapter(s).
3.4.8
Set SAS Address
Use the command in Table 3.10 to set the SAS address on the selected
adapter(s).
Table 3.10
Set SAS Address on Adapter
Convention
CmdTool –AdpSetSASA str[0-64] -aN
Description
Sets the adapters SAS address. This string must be a 64-digit hexadecimal number.
3.4.9
Set Time and Date on Adapter
Use the command in Table 3.11 to set the time and date on the selected
adapter(s).
Table 3.11
Set Time and Date on Adapter
Convention
CmdTool –AdpSetTime yyyymmdd HH:mm:ss -aN|-a0,1,2|-aALL
Description
Sets the time and date on the adapter. This command uses a 24-hour format. For
example, 7 p.m. displays as 19:00:00. The order of date and time is reversible.
3.4.10
Display Time and Date on Adapter
Use the command in Table 3.12 to display the time and date on the
selected adapter(s).
Table 3.12
Display Time and Date on Adapter
Convention
CmdTool –AdpGetTime -aN
Description
Displays the time and date on the adapter. This command uses a 24-hour format.
For example, 7 p.m. would display as 19:00:00.
3.5
Patrol Read-Related Adapter Properties
You can use the commands in this section to select the settings for Patrol
Read. A Patrol Read scans the system for possible physical disk drive
Patrol Read-Related Adapter Properties
Version 2.0
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3-9
errors that could lead to drive failure, then takes action to correct the
errors. The goal is to protect data integrity by detecting physical drive
failure before the failure can damage data. The corrective actions depend
on the virtual disk configuration and the type of errors. Patrol Read
affects performance; the more iterations there are, the greater the
impact.
3.5.1
Set Patrol Read Options
Use the command in Table 3.13 on the selected adapter(s) to set the
Patrol Read options.
Table 3.13
Set Patrol Read Options
Convention
CmdTool –AdpPR –Dsbl|EnblAuto|EnblMan|Start|Stop|Info -aN|
-a0,1,2|-aALL
Description
Sets Patrol Read options on a single adapter, multiple adapters, or all adapters:
-Dsbl: Disables Patrol Read for the selected adapter(s).
-EnblAuto: Enables Patrol Read automatically for the selected adapter(s). This
means Patrol Read will start automatically after the adapter initialization is complete.
-EnblMan: Enables Patrol Read manually for the selected adapter(s). This means
that Patrol Read does not start automatically; it has to be started manually by
selecting the Start command.
-Start: Starts Patrol Read for the selected adapter(s).
-Stop: Stops Patrol Read for the selected adapter(s).
-Info: Displays the following Patrol Read information for the selected adapter(s):
• Patrol Read operation mode
• Patrol Read execution delay value
• Patrol Read status
3.5.2
Set Patrol Read Delay Interval
Use the command in Table 3.14 on the selected adapter(s) to set the
time between Patrol Read iterations.
Table 3.14
Set Patrol Read Delay Interval
Convention
CmdTool –AdpPRSetDelay –Val -aN|-a0,1,2|-aALL
Description
Sets the time between Patrol Read iterations on a single adapter, multiple adapters,
or all adapters:
-Val: Sets delay time between Patrol Read iterations. The value is time of delay in
hours. A value of zero means no delay and an immediate restart.
3-10
MegaRAID Command Tool
Version 2.0
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3.6
BIOS-Related Properties
You can use the commands in this section to select the settings for
BIOS-related options.
3.6.1
Set or Display Bootable Virtual Disk ID
Use the command in Table 3.15 to set or display the ID of the bootable
virtual disk.
Note:
Table 3.15
This option does not write a boot sector to the virtual disk.
The operating system will not load if the boot sector is
incorrect.
Bootable Virtual Disk ID
Convention
CmdTool –AdpBootDrive {-Set –Lx} | -Get -aN|-a0,1,2|-aALL
Description
Sets or displays the bootable virtual disk ID:
-Set: Sets the virtual disk as bootable so that during the next reboot, the BIOS will
look for a boot sector in the specified virtual disk.
-Get: Displays the bootable virtual disk ID.
3.6.2
Select BIOS Status Options
Use the command in Table 3.16 to set the options for the BIOS status.
Table 3.16
Options for BIOS Status
Convention
CmdTool –AdpBIOS -Enbl|-Dsbl|-Dsply| SOE | BE
Description
Sets BIOS options. The following are the settings you can select on a single adapter,
multiple adapters, or all adapters:
-Enbl, -Dsbl, -Dsply: Enables, disables or displays the BIOS status on selected
adapter(s).
-SOE: Stops on BIOS errors during POST for selected adapter(s). When set to -SOE,
the BIOS stops in case of a problem with the configuration. This gives you the option
to enter the configuration utility to resolve the problem. This is available only when
you enable the BIOS status.
-BE: Bypasses BIOS errors during POST. This is available only when you enable the
BIOS status.
-aN|-a0,1,2|-aALL
BIOS-Related Properties
Version 2.0
Copyright © 2005-2007 by LSI Corporation. All rights reserved.
3-11
3.7
Battery Backup Unit-Related Properties
You can use the commands in this section to select the settings for
BBU-related options.
3.7.1
Display BBU Information
Use the command in Table 3.17 to display complete information about
the BBU for the selected adapter(s).
Table 3.17
Display BBU Information
Convention
CmdTool -AdpBbuCmd -aN|-a0,1,2|-aALL
Description
Displays complete information about the BBU, such as status, capacity information,
design information, and properties.
3.7.2
Display BBU Status Information
Use the command in Table 3.18 to display complete information about
the status of the BBU, such as temperature and voltage, for the selected
adapter(s).
3-12
MegaRAID Command Tool
Version 2.0
Copyright © 2005-2007 by LSI Corporation. All rights reserved.
Table 3.18
Display BBU Status Information
Convention
CmdTool -AdpBbuCmd -GetBbuStatus –aN|-a0,1,2|-aALL
Description
Displays complete information about the BBU status, such as the temperature and
voltage. The information displays in the following formats:
BBU Status for Adapter: xx
Battery Type: XXXXXX(string)
Voltage: xx mV
Current: xx mA
Temperature: xx C°
Firmware Status: xx
Battery state: xx
Gas Gauge Status:
Fully Discharged: Yes/No
Fully Charged: Yes/No
Discharging: Yes/No
Initialized: Yes/No
Remaining Time Alarm: Yes/No
Remaining Capacity Alarm: Yes/No
Discharge Terminated: Yes/No
Over Temperature: Yes/No
Charging Terminated: Yes/No
Over Charged: Yes/No
Additional status information displays differently for iBBU™ and BBU.
For iBBU:
Relative State of Charge: xx
Charger System State: xx
Charger System Ctrl: xx
Charging Current: xx mA
Absolute State of Charge: xx%
Max Error: xx%
For BBU:
Relative State of Charge: xx
Charger Status: xx
Remaining Capacity: xx mAh
Full Charge Capacity: mAh
isSOHGood: Yes/No
3.7.3
Display BBU Capacity
Use the command in Table 3.19 to display the BBU capacity for the
selected adapter(s).
Battery Backup Unit-Related Properties
Version 2.0
Copyright © 2005-2007 by LSI Corporation. All rights reserved.
3-13
Table 3.19
Display BBU Capacity Information
Convention
CmdTool -AdpBbuCmd -GetBbuCapacityInfo –aN|-a0,1,2|-aALL
Description
Displays BBU capacity information. The information displays in the following format:
BBU Capacity Info for Adapter: x
Relative State of Charge: xx%
Absolute State of Charge: xx%
Remaining Capacity: xx mAh
Full Charge Capacity: xx mAh
Run Time to Empty: xxx Min
Average Time to Empty: xxx Min
Average Time to Full: xxx Min
Cycle Count: xx
Max Error: xx%
3.7.4
Display BBU Design Parameters
Use the command in Table 3.20 to display BBU design parameters for
the selected adapter(s).
Table 3.20
Display BBU Design Parameters
Convention
CmdTool -AdpBbuCmd -GetBbuDesignInfo –aN|-a0,1,2|-aALL
Description
Displays information about the BBU design parameters. The information displays in
the following formats:
BBU Design Info for Adapter: x
Date of Manufacture: mm/dd, yyyy
Design Capacity: xxx mAh
Design Voltage: mV
Serial Number: 0xhhhh
Pack Stat Configuration: 0xhhhh
Manufacture Name: XXXXXX(String)
Device Name: XXXXXX(String)
Device Chemistry: XXXXXX(String)
3.7.5
Display Current BBU Properties
Use the command in Table 3.21 to display the current BBU properties for
the selected adapter(s).
3-14
MegaRAID Command Tool
Version 2.0
Copyright © 2005-2007 by LSI Corporation. All rights reserved.
Table 3.21
Display Current BBU Properties
Convention
CmdTool -AdpBbuCmd -GetBbuProperties –aN|-a0,1,2|-aALL
Description
Displays current properties of the BBU. The information displays in the following
formats:
BBU Properties for Adapter: x
Auto Learn Period: xxx Sec
Next Learn Time: xxxx Sec
Learn Delay Interval: xx Hours
Auto-Learn Mode: Warn via Event/Disabled/Enabled
3.7.6
Start BBU Learning Cycle
Use the command in Table 3.22 to start the BBU learning cycle on the
selected adapter(s). A learning cycle is a battery calibration operation
performed by the adapter periodically (approximately every three
months) to determine the condition of the battery.
Table 3.22
Start BBU Learning Cycle
Convention
CmdTool -AdpBbuCmd -BbuLearn -aN|-a0,1,2|-aALL
Description
Starts the learning cycle on the BBU. No parameter is needed for this option.
3.7.7
Place Battery in Low-Power Storage Mode
Use the command in Table 3.23 to place the battery into Low-Power
Storage mode on the selected adapter(s). This saves battery power
consumption.
Table 3.23
Place Battery in Low-Power Storage Mode
Convention
CmdTool -AdpBbuCmd -BbuMfgSleep -aN|-a0,1,2|-aALL
Description
Places the battery in Low-Power Storage mode. The battery automatically exits this
state after 5 seconds.
3.7.8
Set BBU Properties
Use the command in Table 3.24 to set the BBU properties on the
selected adapter(s) after reading from the file.
Battery Backup Unit-Related Properties
Version 2.0
Copyright © 2005-2007 by LSI Corporation. All rights reserved.
3-15
Table 3.24
Set BBU Properties
Convention
CmdTool -AdpBbuCmd -SetBbuProperties -f<fileName> -aN|-a0,1,2|-aALL
Description
Sets the BBU properties on the selected adapter(s) after reading from the file. The
information displays in the following formats:
autoLearnPeriod = 1800Sec
nextLearnTime = 12345678Sec Seconds past 1/1/2000
learnDelayInterval = 24hours Not greater than 7 days
autoLearnMode = 0 0 – Enabled, 1 - Disabled, 2 – WarnViaEvent.
3.8
Options for Displaying Logs Kept at Firmware Level
Use the commands in this section to select the display settings for the
event log and BBU terminal log, which are kept at the firmware level.
3.8.1
Event Log Management
Use the command in Table 3.25 to manage the event entries in the event
log for the selected adapter(s).
Table 3.25
Event Log Management
Convention
CmdTool –AdpEventLog –GetEventlogInfo | –GetEvents | GetSinceShutdown|
GetSinceReboot | IncludeDeleted | {GetLatest <number>} -f <filename>
| Clear -aN|-a0,1,2|-aALL
Description
Manages event log entries. The following are the settings you can select on a single
adapter, multiple adapters, or all adapters:
-GetEventlogInfo: Displays overall event information such as total number of
events, newest sequence number, oldest sequence number, shutdown sequence
number, reboot sequence number, and clear sequence number.
-GetEvents: Gets event log entry details. The information shown consists of total
number of entries available at firmware side since the last clear and details of each
entries of the error log. Start_entry specifies the initial event log entry when
displaying the log.
-GetSinceShutdown: Displays all the events since last controller shutdown.
-GetSinceReboot: Displays all the events since last adapter reboot.
-IncludeDeleted: Displays all events, including deleted events.
-GetLatest: Displays the latest number of events, if any exist. The event data will
be writtent to the file in reverse order.
-Clear: Clears the event log for the selected adapter(s).
3-16
MegaRAID Command Tool
Version 2.0
Copyright © 2005-2007 by LSI Corporation. All rights reserved.
3.8.2
Set BBU Terminal Logging
Use the command in Table 3.26 to set the BBU terminal logging for the
selected adapter(s).
Table 3.26
Set BBU Terminal Logging
Convention
CmdTool –FwTermLog -Bbuoff |–BbuoffTemp|-Bbuon|-BbuGet|-Dsply | -Clear
-aN| -a0,1,2|-aALL
Description
Sets BBU terminal logging options. The following are the settings you can select on
a single adapter, multiple adapters, or all adapters:
-Bbuoff: Turns off the BBU for firmware terminal logging. To turn off the BBU for
logging, you have to shut down your system or turn off the power to the system after
you run the command.
–BbuoffTemp: Temporarily turns off the BBU for TTY (firmware terminal) logging.
The battery will be turned on at the next reboot.
-Bbuon: Turns on the BBU for TTY (firmware terminal) logging.
-BbuGet: Displays the current BBU settings for TTY logging.
-Dsply: Displays the TTY log (firmware terminal log) entries with details on the
given adapters. The information shown consists of the total number of entries
available at a firmware side.
-Clear: Clears the TTY log.
3.9
Configuration-Related Options
You can specify the physical disk drives by using the Enclosure ID:Slot
ID for SAS adapters. This assumes that all physical drives are connected
to the adapter through an enclosure. If the drives are not connected to
an enclosure, it is assumed that they are connected to Enclosure 0. In
this case there is no slot, so you can use the pdlist command to get the
slot equivalent number. (This applies to all commands that use the
Enclosure ID:Slot ID format.) MegaCLI expects the input in [:S] format for
directly attached devices.
In the following options, [E0:S0, E1:S1] specifies the enclosure ID and
slot ID for the physical drive.
3.9.1
Add RAID 0, 1, 5, or 6 Configuration
Use the command in Table 3.27 to add a RAID level 0, 1, 5, or 6
configuration to the existing configuration on the selected adapter. For
Configuration-Related Options
Version 2.0
Copyright © 2005-2007 by LSI Corporation. All rights reserved.
3-17
RAID levels 10, 50, or 60, see Section 3.9.2, “Add RAID 10, 50, or 60
Configuration.”
Table 3.27
Add RAID 0, 1, 5, or 6 Configuration
Convention
CmdTool –CfgLDAdd -R0|-R1|-R5|-R6[E0:S0,E1:S1,...] [WT | WB] [NORA |
RA | ADRA] [Direct | Cached] [CachedBadBBU|NoCachedBadBBU] [szXXXXXXXX [-szYYYYYYYY [... ]]] [-strpszM] [–Hsp[E5:S5,...]] [–
afterLdX] -aN
Description
Adds a RAID level 0, 1, 5, or 6 configuration to a specified adapter. Even if no
configuration is present, you have the option to write the configuration to the adapter.
-Rx[E0:S0,...]: Specifies the RAID level and the physical drive enclosure/slot
numbers to construct a disk array.
-WT (Write through), WB (Write back): Selects write policy.
-NORA (No read ahead), RA (Read ahead), ADRA (Adaptive read ahead): Selects read
policy.
-Cached, -Direct: Selects cache policy.
[{CachedBadBBU|NoCachedBadBBU }]: Specifies whether to use write cache when
the BBU is bad.
-szXXXXXXXX: Specifies the size for the virtual disk, where XXXX is a decimal
number of Mbytes. However, the actual size of the virtual disk may be smaller,
because the driver requires the number of blocks from the physical drives in each
virtual disk to be aligned to the stripe size. If multiple size options are specified, CT
will configure the virtual disks in the order of the options entered in the command
line. The configuration of a particular virtual disk will fail if the remaining size of the
array is too small to configure the virtual disk with the specified size. This option can
also be used to create a configuration on the free space available in the array.
-strpszM: Specifies the stripe size, where the stripe size values are 8, 16, 32, 64,
128, 256, 512, or 1024 MBytes.
Hsp[E5:S5,...]: Creates hot spares when you create the configuration. The new
hot spares will be dedicated to the virtual disk used in creating the configuration. This
option does not allow you to create global hot spares. To create global hot spares,
you must use the -PdHsp command with proper subcommands.
You can also use this option to create a configuration on the free space available in
the virtual disk. You can specify which free slot should be used by specifying the
-AfterLdX: This command is optional. By default, the application uses the first free
slot available in the virtual disk. This option is valid only if the virtual disk is already
used for configuration.
3-18
MegaRAID Command Tool
Version 2.0
Copyright © 2005-2007 by LSI Corporation. All rights reserved.
3.9.2
Add RAID 10, 50, or 60 Configuration
Use the command in Table 3.28 to add a RAID 10, RAID 50, or RAID 60
configuration to the existing configuration on the selected adapter. For
RAID levels 0, 1, 5, or 6, see Section 3.9.1, “Add RAID 0, 1, 5, or 6
Configuration.”
Table 3.28
Add RAID 10, 50, or 60 Configuration
Convention
CmdTool –CfgSpanAdd -aN|-a0,1,2|-aALL -R10|-R50|R60 –
Array0[E0:S0,E1:S1,...] –Array1[E0:S0,E1:S1,...] [...]
[WT | WB]
[NORA | RA | ADRA] [Direct | Cached] [CachedBadBBU|NoCachedBadBBU] [szXXXXXXXX [-szYYYYYYYY [... ]]] [-strpszM] [–afterLdX] -aN
Description
Creates a RAID level 10, 50, or 60 (spanned) configuration from the specified arrays.
Even if no configuration is present, you must use this option to write the configuration
to the adapter.
Multiple arrays are specified using the –ArrayX[E0:S0,...] option. (Note that X
starts from 0, not 1.) All of the arrays must have the same number of physical drives.
At least two arrays must be provided. The order of options {WT |WB} {NORA | RA
| ADRA} {Direct | Cached} is flexible.
The size option, -szXXXXXXXX, may be accepted to allow slicing in the spanned
arrays if the controller supports this feature. The [–afterLdX] option is accepted if
the size option is accepted. CT exits and does not create a configuration if the size
or the afterLd option is specified but the controller does not support slicing in the
spanned arrays.
3.9.3
Clear the Existing Configuration
Use the command in Table 3.29 to clear the existing configuration on the
selected adapter(s).
Table 3.29
Clear Existing Configuration
Convention
CmdTool –CfgClr -aN|-a0,1,2|-aALL
Description
Clears the existing configuration.
3.9.4
Save the Configuration on the Adapter
Use the command in Table 3.30 to save the configuration for the selected
adapter(s) to the given filename.
Configuration-Related Options
Version 2.0
Copyright © 2005-2007 by LSI Corporation. All rights reserved.
3-19
Table 3.30
Save Configuration on the Adapter
Convention
CmdTool –CfgSave
Description
Saves the configuration for the selected adapter(s) to the given filename.
3.9.5
–f FileName
-aN
Restore the Configuration Data from File
Use the command in Table 3.31 to read the configuration from the file
and load it on the selected adapter(s). You can restore the read/write
properties and RAID configuration using hot spares.
Table 3.31
Restore Configuration Data from File
Convention
CmdTool –CfgRestore
Description
Reads the configuration from the file and loads it on the adapter. MegaCLI can store
or restore all read and write adapter properties, all read and write properties for
virtual disks, and the RAID configuration including hot spares. Note the following:
• MegaCLI does not validate the setup when restoring the RAID configuration.
• The -CfgSave option stores the configuration data and adapter properties in the
file. Configuration data has only the device ID and sequence number information
of the physical drives used in the configuration. The CfgRestore option will fail if
the same device IDs of the physical drives are not present.
3.9.6
–f FileName
-aN
Manage Foreign Configuration Information
Use the command in Table 3.32 to manage configurations from other
adapters, called foreign configurations, for the selected adapter(s). You
can scan, preview, import, and clear foreign configurations.
Note:
Table 3.32
The actual status of virtual disks and physical disks may
differ from the information displayed in the –Scan option.
LSI suggests that you run –Preview before you import a
foreign configuration.
Manage Foreign Configuration Information
Convention
CmdTool –CfgForeign –Scan | {-Preview | –Dsply| -Import | -Clear
[FID]} -aN|-a0,1,2|-aALL
Description
Manages foreign configurations. The options for this command are:
-Scan: Scans and displays available foreign configurations.
-Preview: Provides a preview of the imported foreign configuration. The foreign
configuration ID (FID) is optional.
-Dsply: Displays the foreign configuration.
-Import: Imports the foreign configuration. The FID is optional.
-Clear [FID]: Clears the foreign configuration. The FID is optional.
3-20
MegaRAID Command Tool
Version 2.0
Copyright © 2005-2007 by LSI Corporation. All rights reserved.
3.9.7
Delete Specified Virtual Disk(s)
Use the command in Table 3.33 to delete one, multiple, or all virtual disks
on the selected adapter(s).
Table 3.33
Delete Specified Virtual Disks
Convention
CmdTool –CfgLDDel –Lx|-L0,1,2|-Lall -aN|-a0,1,2|-aALL
Description
Deletes the specified virtual disk(s) on the selected adapter(s). You can delete one
virtual disk, multiple virtual disks, or all the selected virtual disks on selected
adapter(s).
3.9.8
Display the Free Space
Use the command in Table 3.34 to display the free space that is available
to use for configuration on the selected adapter(s).
Table 3.34
Display Free Space
Convention
CmdTool –CfgFreeSpaceInfo -aN|-a0,1,2|-aALL
Description
Displays all the free space available for configuration on the selected adapter(s). The
information displayed includes the number of disk groups, the number of spans in
each disk group, the number of free space slots in each disk group, the start block,
and the size (in both blocks and megabytes) of each free space slot.
3.10 Virtual Disk-Related Options
You can use the commands in this section to select settings for the virtual
disks and perform actions on them.
3.10.1
Display Virtual Disk Information
Use the command in Table 3.35 to display virtual disk information for the
selected adapter(s).
Virtual Disk-Related Options
Version 2.0
Copyright © 2005-2007 by LSI Corporation. All rights reserved.
3-21
Table 3.35
Display Virtual Disk Information
Convention
CmdTool –LDInfo –Lx|-L0,1,2|-Lall -aN|-a0,1,2|-aALL
Description
Displays information about the virtual disk(s) on the selected adapter(s). This
information includes the name, RAID level, RAID level qualifier, size in megabytes,
state, stripe size, number of drives, span depth, cache policy, access policy, and
ongoing activity progress, if any, including initialization, background initialization,
consistency check, and reconstruction.
3.10.2
Change the Virtual Disk Cache and Access Parameters
Use the command in Table 3.36 to change the cache policy and access
policy for the virtual disk(s) on the selected adapter(s).
Table 3.36
Change Virtual Disk Cache and Access Parameters
Convention
CmdTool –LDSetProp WT | WB|NORA |RA | ADRA|-Cached|Direct|
CachedBadBBU|NoCachedBadBBU} | -RW|RO|Blocked | {-Name nameString} |
-EnDskCache|DisDskCache –Lx| -L0,1,2|-Lall -aN|-a0,1,2|-aALL
Description
Allows you to change the following virtual disk parameters:
-WT (Write through), WB (Write back): Selects write policy.
-NORA (No read ahead), RA (Read ahead), ADRA (Adaptive read ahead): Selects read
policy.
-Cached, -Direct: Selects cache policy.
-CachedBadBBU|NoCachedBadBBU : Specifies whether to use write cache when the
BBU is bad.
-RW, -RO, Blocked: Selects access policy.
-EnDskCache: Enables disk cache.
-DisDskCache: Disables disk cache.
3.10.3
Display the Virtual Disk Cache and Access Parameters
Use the command in Table 3.37 to display cache and access parameters
for the virtual disk(s) on the selected adapter(s).
Table 3.37
Display Virtual Disk Cache and Access Parameters
Convention
CmdTool –LDGetProp -Cache | -Access | -Name | -DskCache -Lx|-L0,1,2|
-Lall -aN|-a0,1,2|-aALL
Description
Displays the cache and access policies of the virtual disk(s):
-Cache: -Cached, Direct: Displays cache policy.
-WT (Write through), WB (Write back): Selects write policy.
-NORA (No read ahead), RA (Read ahead), ADRA (Adaptive read ahead): Selects read
policy.
-Access: -RW, -RO, Blocked: Displays access policy.
-DskCache: Displays physical disk cache policy.
3-22
MegaRAID Command Tool
Version 2.0
Copyright © 2005-2007 by LSI Corporation. All rights reserved.
3.10.4
Manage Virtual Disk Initialization
Use the command in Table 3.38 to manage initialization of the virtual
disk(s) on the selected adapter(s).
Table 3.38
Manage Virtual Disk Initialization
Convention
CmdTool –LDInit {–Start [Fast | Full]} |-Abort|–ShowProg|-ProgDsply
-Lx|-L0,1,2|-Lall -aN|-a0,1,2|-aALL
Description
Allows you to select the following actions for virtual disk initialization:
-Start: Starts the initialization (writing 0s) on the virtual disk(s) and displays the
progress (this is optional). The fast initialization option initializes the first and last
8 Mbyte areas on the virtual disk. The full option allows you to initialize the entire
virtual disk.
-Abort: Aborts the ongoing initialization on the LD(s).
-ShowProg: Displays the snapshot of the ongoing initialization, if any.
-ProgDsply: Displays the progress of the ongoing initialization. The routine
continues to display the progress until at least one initialization is completed or a key
is pressed.
3.10.5
Manage a Consistency Check
Use the command in Table 3.39 to manage a data consistency check
(CC) on the virtual disks for the selected adapter(s).
Table 3.39
Manage Consistency Check
Convention
CmdTool –LDCC –Start|-Abort|–ShowProg|-ProgDsply –Lx|-L0,1,2|-Lall
-aN|-a0,1,2|-aALL
Description
Allows you to select the following actions for a data CC:
-Start: Starts a CC on the virtual disk(s), then displays the progress (optional) and
time remaining.
-Abort: Aborts an ongoing CC on the virtual disk(s).
-ShowProg: Displays a snapshot of an ongoing CC.
-ProgDsply: Displays ongoing CC progress. The progress displays until at least
one CC is completed or a key is pressed.
3.10.6
Manage a Background Initialization
Use the command in Table 3.40 to enable, disable, or suspend
background initialization (BGI), as well as display initialization progress
on the selected adapter(s).
Virtual Disk-Related Options
Version 2.0
Copyright © 2005-2007 by LSI Corporation. All rights reserved.
3-23
Table 3.40
Manage Background Initialization
Convention
CmdTool –LDBI -Enbl|-Dsbl|GetSetting|-ShowProg|-ProgDsply –Lx|L0,1,2|-Lall -aN|-a0,1,2|-aALL
Description
Manages background initialization options. The following are the background
initialization settings you can select on a single adapter, multiple adapters, or all
adapters:
-Enbl, -Dsbl: Enables or disables the background initialization on the selected
adapter(s).
-ProgDsply: Displays an ongoing background initialization in a loop. This function
completes only when all background initialization processes complete or you press a
key to exit.
-ShowProg: Displays the current progress value.
- GetSetting: Displays current background initialization setting (Enabled or
Disabled).
3.10.7
Perform a Virtual Disk Reconstruction
Use the command in Table 3.41 to perform a reconstruction of the virtual
disk(s) on the selected adapter(s).
Table 3.41
Virtual Disk Reconstruction
Convention
CmdTool –LDRecon {–Start –Rx [Add | Rmv PhysDrv[E0:S0,E1:S1,...] ] }
|–ShowProg|-ProgDsply –Lx –aN
Description
Controls and manages virtual disk reconstruction. The following are the virtual disk
reconstruction settings you can select on a single adapter:
-Start: Starts a reconstruction of the selected virtual disk to a new RAID level.
-Start –Add PhysDrv[E0:S0,E1:S1....]: Adds listed physical disks to the
virtual disk and starts reconstruction on the selected virtual disk.
-Start –Rmv PhysDrv[E0:S0,E1:S1....]: Removes one physical disk from
the existing virtual disks and starts a reconstruction.
-ShowProg: Displays a snapshot of the ongoing reconstruction process.
-R0|-R1|-R5: Changes the RAID level of the virtual disk when you start
reconstruction. You may need to add or remove a physical drive to make this
possible.
-ProgDsply: Allows you to view the ongoing reconstruction. The routine continues
to display progress until at least one reconstruction is completed or a key is pressed.
3.10.8
Display Information about Virtual Disks and Physical Disk
Drives
Use the command in Table 3.42 to display information about the virtual
disks and physical disk drives for the selected adapter(s), such as the
number of virtual disks, RAID level, and physical disk drive size.
3-24
MegaRAID Command Tool
Version 2.0
Copyright © 2005-2007 by LSI Corporation. All rights reserved.
Table 3.42
Display Virtual Disk and Physical Disk Drive Information
Convention
CmdTool –LDPDInfo -aN|-a0,1,2|-aALL
Description
Displays information about the present virtual disk(s) and physical disk drive(s) on
the selected adapter(s). Displays information including the number of virtual disks,
the RAID level of the virtual disks, and physical drive size information, which includes
raw size, coerced size, uncoerced size, and the SAS address.
3.10.9
Display the Number of Virtual Disks
Use the command in Table 3.43 to display the number of virtual disks
attached to the adapter.
Table 3.43
Display Number of Virtual Disks
Convention
CmdTool –LDGetNum –aN|-a0,1,2|-aALL
Description
Displays the number of virtual disks attached to the adapter. The return value is the
number of virtual disks.
3.11 Physical Drive-Related Options
You can use the commands in this section to select settings for the
physical disk drives and perform actions on them.
3.11.1
Display Physical Disk Drive Information
Use the command in Table 3.44 to display information about the physical
disk drives on the selected adapter(s).
Table 3.44
Display Physical Disk Drive Information
Convention
CmdTool –PDInfo -PhysDrv[E0:S0,E1:S1....] -aN|-a0,1,2|-aALL
Description
Provides information about the physical disk drives connected to the enclosure and
adapter slot. This includes information such as the enclosure number, slot number,
device ID, sequence number, drive type, size (if a physical drive), foreign state,
firmware state, and inquiry data.
For SAS devices, this includes additional information such as the SAS address of the
drive. For SAS expanders, this includes additional information such as the number of
devices connected to the expander.
Physical Drive-Related Options
Version 2.0
Copyright © 2005-2007 by LSI Corporation. All rights reserved.
3-25
3.11.2
Set the Physical Disk Drive State to Online
Use the command in Table 3.45 to set the state of a physical disk drive
to Online. In an online state, the physical drive is working normally and
is a part of a configured virtual disk.
Table 3.45
Set Physical Disk Drive State to Online
Convention
CmdTool –PDOnline -PhysDrv[E0:S0,E1:S1....] -aN|-a0,1,2|-aALL
Description
Changes the physical disk drive state to Online.
3.11.3
Set the Physical Disk Drive State to Offline
Use the command in Table 3.46 to set the state of a physical disk drive
to Offline. In the offline state, the virtual disk is not available to the RAID
adapter.
Table 3.46
Set Physical Disk Drive State to Offline
Convention
CmdTool –PDOffline -PhysDrv[E0:S0,E1:S1....] -aN|-a0,1,2|-aALL
Description
Changes the physical disk drive state to Offline.
3.11.4
Change the Physical Disk Drive State to Unconfigured Good
Use the command in Table 3.47 to change the state of a physical disk
drive from Unconfigured-Bad to Unconfigured-Good.
Table 3.47
Change Physical Disk Drive State to Unconfigured Good
Convention
CmdTool –PDMakeGood -PhysDrv[E0:S0,E1:S1....] -aN|-a0,1,2|-aALL
Description
Changes the physical disk drive state to Offline.
3.11.5
Change Physical Disk Drive State
Use the command in Table 3.48 to change the physical disk drive state,
as it relates to hot spares, and to associate the drive to an enclosure and
virtual disk for the selected adapter(s).
3-26
MegaRAID Command Tool
Version 2.0
Copyright © 2005-2007 by LSI Corporation. All rights reserved.
Table 3.48
Change Physical Disk Drive State
Convention
CmdTool –PDHSP {–Set [{-Dedicated -ArrayN |-Array0,1...}] [EnclAffinity] [-nonRevertible] } | -Rmv -PhysDrv[E0:S0,E1:S1,...] aN|-a0,1,2|-aALL
Description
Changes the physical disk drive state (as it relates to hot spares) and associates the
drive to an enclosure and virtual disk on a single adapter, multiple adapters, or all
adapters:
-Set: Changes the physical disk drive state to dedicated hot spare for the enclosure.
-Rmv: Changes the physical drive state to ready (removes the hot spare).
-EnclAffinity: Associates the hot spare to a selected enclosure.
-Array0: Dedicates the hot spare to a specific virtual disk.
3.11.6
Manage a Physical Disk Drive Initialization
Use the command in Table 3.49 to manage a physical disk drive
initialization on the selected adapter(s).
Table 3.49
Physical Disk Drive Initialization
Convention
CmdTool –PDClear -Start |-Stop|-ShowProg |-ProgDsply PhysDrv[E0:S0,E1:S1....] -aN|-a0,1,2|-aALL
Description
Manages physical disk initialization or displays initialization progress on a single
adapter, multiple adapters, or all adapters:
-Start: Starts initialization on the selected physical disk drive(s).
-Stop: Stops an ongoing initialization on the selected physical disk drive(s).
-ShowProg: Displays the current progress percentage and time remaining for the
initialization. This option is useful for running the application through scripts.
-ProgDsply: Displays the ongoing clear progress. The routine continues to display
the initialization progress until at least one initialization is completed or a key is
pressed.
3.11.7
Rebuild a Physical Disk Drive
Use the command in Table 3.50 to start or stop a rebuild on a physical
disk drive and display the rebuild progress. When a physical disk in a
RAID array fails, you can rebuild the physical disk by recreating the data
that was stored on the physical disk before it failed.
Physical Drive-Related Options
Version 2.0
Copyright © 2005-2007 by LSI Corporation. All rights reserved.
3-27
Table 3.50
Rebuild a Physical Disk Drive
Convention
CmdTool –PDRbld –Start |-Stop|-ShowProg |-ProgDsply –PhysDrv
[E0:S0,E1:S1....] -aN|-a0,1,2|-aALL
Description
Manages a physical disk rebuild or displays the rebuild progress on a single adapter,
multiple adapters, or all adapters. Note that the physical disk must meet the size
requirements before it can be rebuilt, and it must be part of an array:
-Start: Starts a rebuild on the selected physical drive(s) and displays the rebuild
progress (optional).
-Stop: Stops an ongoing rebuild on the selected physical drive(s).
-ShowProg: Displays the current progress percentage and time remaining for the
rebuild. This option is useful for running the application through scripts.
-ProgDsply: Displays the ongoing rebuild progress. This routine displays the
rebuild progress until at least one initialization is completed or a key is pressed.
3.11.8
Locate the Physical Disk Drive(s) and Activate LED
Use the command in Table 3.51 to locate the physical disk drive(s) for
the selected adapter(s) and activate the physical disk activity LED.
Table 3.51
Locate Physical Disk Drive and Activate LED
Convention
CmdTool –PDLocate –PhysDrv[E0:S0,E1:S1....] -aN|-a0,1,2|-aALL
Description
Locates the physical disk drive(s) for the selected adapter(s) and activates the
physical disk activity LED.
3.11.9
Mark the Configured Physical Disk Drive as Missing
Use the command in Table 3.52 to mark the configured physical disk
drive as missing for the selected adapter(s).
Table 3.52
Mark Configured Physical Disk Drive as Missing
Convention
CmdTool –PDMarkMissing –PhysDrv[E0:S0,E1:S1....] -aN|-a0,1,2|-aALL
Description
Marks the configured physical disk drive as missing for the selected adapter(s).
3.11.10 Display the Physical Drives in Missing Status
Use the command in Table 3.52 to mark the configured physical disk
drive as missing for the selected adapter(s)
3-28
MegaRAID Command Tool
Version 2.0
Copyright © 2005-2007 by LSI Corporation. All rights reserved.
.
Table 3.53
Display Physical Disk Drives in Missing Status
Convention
CmdTool –PDGetMissing -aN|-a0,1,2|-aALL
Description
Displays the physical disk drive(s) in missing status. The format is:
No
Row
Column SizeExpected(MB)
0
x
y
zzzzzzzzz
…
Where x is the index to the arrays, y is the index to the drive in that array, and zzzzzz
is the minimum size of the disk that can be used as a replacement.
3.11.11 Replace the Configured Physical Disk Drives and Start an
Automatic Rebuild
Use the command in Table 3.54 to replace configured physical disk
drive(s) and start an automatic rebuild of the drive for the selected
adapter(s).
Table 3.54
Replace Configured Physical Disk Drive(s) and Start Automatic Rebuild
Convention
CmdTool –PDReplaceMissing –PhysDrv[E0:S0,E1:S1....] -ArrayX -RowY -aN
Description
Replaces the configured physical disk drives that are identified as missing and then
starts an automatic rebuild.
3.11.12 Prepare the Unconfigured Physical Disk Drive for Removal
Use the command in Table 3.55 to prepare the unconfigured physical
disk drive(s) for removal from the selected adapter(s).
Table 3.55
Prepare Unconfigured Physical Disk Drive(s) for Removal
Convention
CmdTool –PDPrpRmv [-Undo] – PhysDrv[E0:S0,E1:S1....] -aN|-a0,1,2|-aALL
Description
Prepares unconfigured physical drive(s) for removal. The firmware will spin down this
drive. The drive state is set to unaffiliated, which marks it as offline even though it is
not a part of configuration.
The -Undo option undoes this operation. If you select undo, the firmware marks this
physical disk as unconfigured good.
Physical Drive-Related Options
Version 2.0
Copyright © 2005-2007 by LSI Corporation. All rights reserved.
3-29
3.11.13 Display Total Number of Physical Disk Drives
Use the command in Table 3.56 to display the total number of physical
disk drives attached to an adapter. Drives can be attached directly or
through enclosures.
Table 3.56
Display Number of Physical Disk Drives Attached to an Adapter
Convention
CmdTool –PDGetNum –aN|-a0,1,2|-aALL
Description
Displays the total number of physical disk drives attached to an adapter. Drives can
be attached directly or through enclosures. The return value is the number of
physical disk drives.
3.11.14 Display List of Physical Devices
Use the command in Table 3.57 to display a list of the physical devices
connected to the selected adapter(s).
Table 3.57
Display List of Physical Devices Attached to Adapter(s)
Convention
CmdTool –PDList –aN|-a0,1..|-aAll
Description
Displays information about all physical disk drives and other devices connected to
the selected adapter(s). This includes information such as the drive type, size (if a
physical disk drive), serial number, and firmware version of the device. For SAS
devices, this includes additional information such as the SAS address of the device.
For SAS expanders, this includes additional information such as the number of drives
connected to the expander.
3.12 Enclosure-Related Options
The commands in this section are used for enclosures.
Use the command in Table 3.58 to display enclosure information for
selected adapter(s).
Table 3.58
Display Enclosure Information
Convention
CmdTool –EncInfo -aN|-a0,1,2|-aALL
Description
Displays information about the enclosure for the selected adapter(s).
3-30
MegaRAID Command Tool
Version 2.0
Copyright © 2005-2007 by LSI Corporation. All rights reserved.
3.13 Flashing the Firmware
The options in this section describe the functionality of the existing flash
application. The firmware flash options do not require input from the user.
3.13.1
Flash the Firmware with the ROM File
Use the command in Table 3.59 to flash the firmware with the ROM file
specified at the command line for the selected adapter(s).
Table 3.59
Flash Firmware with ROM File
Convention
Description
3.13.2
CmdTool –AdpFwFlash –f filename [-NoSigChk] [-NoVerChk]-aN|a0,1,2|-aALL
Flashes the firmware with the ROM file specified at the command line.
The –NoSigChk option forces the application to flash the firmware even if the check
word on the file does not match the required check word for the adapter. This option
flashes the firmware only if the existing firmware version on the adapter is lower than
the version on the ROM image.
If you specify –NoVerChk, also, the application flashes the adapter firmware without
checking the version of the firmware image. The version check applies only to the
firmware (APP.ROM) version.
This command also supports the “Mode 0” flash functionality. For Mode 0 flash, the
adapter number is not valid. There are two possible methods:
• Select which adapter to flash after the adapters are detected.
• Flash the firmware on all present adapters.
XML output data is generated by this option.
Flash the Firmware in Mode 0 with the ROM File
Use the command in Table 3.60 to flash the firmware in Mode 0 with the
ROM file specified at the command line for the selected adapter(s). This
option is for DOS only.
Table 3.60
Convention
Description
Flash Firmware in Mode 0 with ROM File
CmdTool –AdpM0Flash –f filename
Flashes the firmware in Mode 0 with the ROM file listed on the command line. This
option supports the Mode 0 flash functionality. For Mode 0 flash, the adapter number
is not valid. The method to handle this is to flash the firmware on all present adapters
which are compatible with the image.
Flashing the Firmware
Version 2.0
Copyright © 2005-2007 by LSI Corporation. All rights reserved.
3-31
3.14 SAS Topology
The commands in this section are used to display SAS topology.
Use the command in Table 3.61 to display the PHY connection
information for physical PHY M on the selected adapter(s). Each PHY
can form one side of the physical link in a connection with a PHY on a
different device. The physical link contains four wires that form two
differential signal pairs. One differential pair transmits signals, and the
other differential pair receives signals. Both differential pairs operate
simultaneously and allow concurrent data transmission in both the
receive and the transmit directions. PHYs are contained within ports.
A port can contain a single PHY or can contain multiple PHYs. A narrow
port contains a single PHY, and a wide port contains multiple PHYs.
Table 3.61
Display PHY Connection Information
Convention
CmdTool –PHYInfo -phyM –aN|-a0,1,2|-aALL
Description
Displays PHY connection information for physical PHY M on the adapter(s).
3.15 Diagnostic-Related Options
The commands in this section are used to run diagnostic tests.
3.15.1
Start Adapter Diagnostics
Use the command in Table 3.62 to start the adapter diagnostic for a set
amount of time.
Table 3.62
Start Diagnostics Setting
Convention
CmdTool –AdpDiag [val] –aN|-a0,1,2|-aALL
Description
Sets the amount of time for the adapter diagnostic to run.
3-32
MegaRAID Command Tool
Version 2.0
Copyright © 2005-2007 by LSI Corporation. All rights reserved.
3.15.2
Start Battery Test
Use the command in Table 3.63 to start the battery test. This command
requires a system reboot.
Table 3.63
Start Battery Test
Convention
CmdTool –AdpBatTest –aN|-a0,1,2|-aALL
Description
Starts the battery test. This command requires that you turn off the power to the
system, and then turn on the power and reboot the system.
3.15.3
Start NVRAM Diagnostic
Use the command in Table 3.64 to start the adapter NVRAM diagnostic
for a set amount of time. This option is for DOS only.
Table 3.64
Start NVRAM Diagnostic
Convention
CmdTool –AdpNVRAM {-Read|-Write -ffilename}|–Clear
[-StartOffset 0xXXXX] [-EndOffset 0xXXXX] aN
Description
Starts the NVRAM diagnostic.
-Read: Reads the content in NVRAM and writes the data to file filename.
-Write: Reads data from file filename and writes to NVRAM.
-Clear: Writes 0 to NVRAM at the specified range from start offset to end offset.
-StartOffset/-EndOffset: Specifies the start offset and/or end offset in NVRAM.
If you do not use the -StartOffset and -EndOffset options, the default
StartOffset is 0 and the default EndOffset is the end of actual NVRAM size.
3.15.4
Set Mode for the Adapter Connector
Use the command in Table 3.65 to get and set the mode for the adapter
connector.
Table 3.65
Set Mode for the Adapter Connector
Convention
MegaSCU –AdpConnectorSetMode -External |–Internal –ConnectorN|Connector0,1..|-ConnectorAll –aN|-a0,1..|-aAll
Description
-External: Set the Multiplexer to select an external port, such as scanning the
external bus.
-Internal: Set the Multiplexer to select an internal port, such as scanning the SAS
bus for connected devices.
Diagnostic-Related Options
Version 2.0
Copyright © 2005-2007 by LSI Corporation. All rights reserved.
3-33
3.15.5
Get Multiplexer Mode
Use the command in Table 3.66 to get the Multiplexer mode for the
adapter connector.
Table 3.66
Get Multiplexer Mode for the Adapter Connector
Convention
MegaSCU –AdpConnectorGetMode –ConnectorN|-Connector0,1..|-ConnectorAll
–aN|-a0,1..|-aAll
Description
Gets the Multiplexer mode whether it is external or internal.
3.16 Miscellaneous Options
The commands in this section are used to display various information.
3.16.1
Display the MegaCLI Version
Use the command in Table 3.67 to display the version number of the
MegaCLI utility.
Table 3.67
Display MegaCLI Version
Convention
CmdTool –v
Description
Displays the version number of the MegaCLI utility.
3.16.2
Display Help for MegaCLI
Use the command in Table 3.68 to display help information for the
MegaCLI utility.
Table 3.68
Display Help for MegaCLI
Convention
CmdTool –h|–Help|?
Description
Displays help for the MegaCLI utility.
3-34
MegaRAID Command Tool
Version 2.0
Copyright © 2005-2007 by LSI Corporation. All rights reserved.
Chapter 4
MegaRAID Storage Manager
Overview and Installation
This chapter provides a brief overview of the MegaRAID Storage
Manager software and explains how to install it on the supported
operating systems. This chapter has the following sections:
4.1
•
Section 4.1, “Overview”
•
Section 4.2, “Hardware and Software Requirements”
•
Section 4.3, “Installation”
Overview
MegaRAID Storage Manager software enables you to configure, monitor,
and maintain storage configurations on LSI SAS controllers. The
MegaRAID Storage Manager graphical user interface (GUI) makes it
easy for you to create and manage storage configurations.
4.1.1
Creating Storage Configurations
MegaRAID Storage Manager software enables you to easily configure
the controllers, disk drives, and virtual disks on your workstation or
server. The Configuration Wizard greatly simplifies the process of
creating arrays and virtual disks.
You can use the Configuration Wizard Auto Configuration mode to
automatically create the best possible configuration with the available
hardware. You can use the Guided Configuration mode, which asks you
a few brief questions about the configuration, and then creates it for you.
Or you can use the Manual Configuration mode, which gives you
complete control over all aspects of the storage configuration.
The Reconstruction Wizard enables you to increase or reduce the size
of a virtual disk and to change the RAID level of an array.
MegaRAID SAS Software User’s Guide
Version 2.0
Copyright © 2005-2007 by LSI Corporation. All rights reserved.
4-1
4.1.2
Monitoring Storage Devices
MegaRAID Storage Manager software displays the status of controllers,
virtual disks, and physical disks on the workstation or server that you are
monitoring. System errors and events are recorded in an event log file
and are displayed on the screen. Special device icons appear on the
screen to notify you of disk failures and other events that require
immediate attention.
4.1.3
Maintaining Storage Configurations
You can use MegaRAID Storage Manager software to perform system
maintenance tasks such as running patrol read operations, updating
firmware, and running consistency checks on arrays that support
redundancy.
4.2
Hardware and Software Requirements
The hardware requirements for MegaRAID Storage Manager software
are as follows:
•
PC-compatible computer with an IA-32 (32-bit) Intel Architecture
processor or an EM64T (64-bit) processor and at least 128 Mbytes
of system memory (256 Mbytes recommended)
•
Disk drive with at least 50 Mbytes available free space
The supported operating systems for the MegaRAID Storage Manager
software are as follows:
•
Microsoft Windows 2000, Microsoft Windows Server 2003, Microsoft
Windows XP, and Microsoft Windows Vista
•
Red Hat Linux 3.0, 4.0, or 5.0
•
SUSE SLES 9 and 10, with latest updates and service packs
Refer to your server documentation and to the operating system
documentation for more information on hardware and operating system
requirements.
4-2
MegaRAID Storage Manager Overview and Installation
Version 2.0
Copyright © 2005-2007 by LSI Corporation. All rights reserved.
4.3
Installation
This section explains how to install (or reinstall) MegaRAID Storage
Manager software on your workstation or server for the supported
operating systems: Microsoft Windows, Red Hat Linux, and SUSE Linux.
4.3.1
Installing MegaRAID Storage Manager Software on Microsoft
Windows
Follow these steps if you need to install MegaRAID Storage Manager
software on a system running Microsoft Windows 2000, Microsoft
Windows Server 2003, Microsoft Windows XP, or Microsoft Windows
Vista:
1. Insert the MegaRAID Storage Manager software installation CD in
the CD-ROM drive.
If necessary, find and double-click the setup.exe file to start the
installation program.
2. When the Welcome screen appears, click Next.
If MegaRAID Storage Manager software is already installed on this
system, the Program Maintenance screen appears. Read the screen
text and select Modify, Repair, or Remove.
3. When the next screen appears, read and accept the user license,
and click Next.
The Customer Information screen appears, as shown in Figure 4.1.
Installation
Version 2.0
4-3
Copyright © 2005-2007 by LSI Corporation. All rights reserved.
Figure 4.1
Customer Information Screen
4. Enter your user name and organization name. In the bottom part of
the screen, select an installation option:
–
If you select All users, any user with administrative privileges
can use this version of MegaRAID Storage Manager software to
view or change storage configurations.
–
If you select Only for current user, the MegaRAID Storage
Manager shortcuts and associated icons will be available only to
the user with this user name.
5. Click Next to continue.
6. On the next screen, accept the default Destination Folder, or click
Change to select a different destination folder. Click Next to
continue.
The Setup Type screen appears, as shown in Figure 4.2.
4-4
MegaRAID Storage Manager Overview and Installation
Version 2.0
Copyright © 2005-2007 by LSI Corporation. All rights reserved.
Figure 4.2
Setup Type Screen
7. Select one of the Setup options. The options are fully explained in
the screen text.
–
Normally, you would select Complete if you are installing
MegaRAID Storage Manager software on a server.
–
Select Custom Installation if you want to select individual
program components.
8. Click Next to continue.
If you selected Custom Installation as your setup option, the
second Setup Type screen appears, as shown in Figure 4.3.
If you select Complete as your setup option, the Installation Wizard
is ready to install MSM. To begin installation, click on Install on the
next screen that appears.
Installation
Version 2.0
4-5
Copyright © 2005-2007 by LSI Corporation. All rights reserved.
Figure 4.3
Setup Type Screen
9. Select one of the custom setup options. The options are fully
explained in the screen text.
–
Select Client if you are installing MegaRAID Storage Manager
software on a PC that will be used to view and configure servers
over a network. To begin installation, click on Install on the next
screen that appears.
–
Select Server to install only those components required for
remote server management. To begin installation, click on Install
on the next screen that appears.
–
Select StandAlone if you will use MegaRAID Storage Manager
software to create and manage storage configurations on a
standalone workstation. To begin installation, click on Install on
the next screen that appears.
–
Select Custom if you want to specify individual program features
to install.
If you select Custom, a window listing the installation features
appears, as shown in Figure 4.4. Select the features you want on
this screen.
4-6
MegaRAID Storage Manager Overview and Installation
Version 2.0
Copyright © 2005-2007 by LSI Corporation. All rights reserved.
Figure 4.4
Custom Setup Screen
10. Click Next to proceed.
11. Click Install to install the program.
12. When the final Configuration Wizard screen appears, click Finish.
If you select Client installation for a PC used to monitor servers, and if
there are no available servers with a registered framework on the local
subnet (that is, servers with a complete installation of MegaRAID Storage
Manager software), the server screen will appear, as shown in
Figure 4.5. The server screen will not list any servers. You can use this
screen to manage systems remotely.
Installation
Version 2.0
4-7
Copyright © 2005-2007 by LSI Corporation. All rights reserved.
Figure 4.5
4.3.2
Server Screen
Installing MegaRAID Storage Manager Software for Linux
Follow these steps if you need to install MegaRAID Storage Manager
software on a system running Red Hat Linux or SUSE Linux:
1. Copy the SSM_linux_installer...tar.gz file to a temporary
folder.
2. Untar the SSM_linux_installer...tar.gz file using the
following command:
tar -zxvf SSM_linux_installer...tar.gz
A new disk directory is created.
3. Go to the new disk directory.
4. In the disk directory, find and read the readme.txt file.
5. To start the installation, enter the following command:
csh install.sh -a
If you select Client installation for a PC used to monitor servers, and if
there are no available servers with a registered framework on the local
4-8
MegaRAID Storage Manager Overview and Installation
Version 2.0
Copyright © 2005-2007 by LSI Corporation. All rights reserved.
subnet (that is, servers with a complete installation of MegaRAID Storage
Manager software), the server screen appears. The server screen does
not list any servers. You can use this screen to manage systems
remotely.
4.3.3
Linux Error Messages
The following messages may appear while you are installing MegaRAID
Storage Manager software on a Linux system:
•
More than one copy of MegaRAID Storage Manager software has
been installed.
This message indicates that the user has installed more than one
copy of MegaRAID Storage Manager software. (This can be done by
using the rpm-force command to install the rpm file directly, which
is not recommended, instead of using the install.sh file.) In such
cases, the user must uninstall all the rpm files manually before
installing MegaRAID Storage Manager software with the procedure
listed previously.
•
The version is already installed.
This message indicates that the version of MegaRAID Storage
Manager software you are trying to install is already installed on the
system.
•
The installed version is newer.
This message indicates that a version of MegaRAID Storage
Manager software is already installed on the system, and it is a
newer version than the version you are trying to install.
•
Exiting installation.
This is the message that appears when the installation is complete.
•
RPM installation failed.
This message indicates that the installation failed for some reason.
Additional message text explains the cause of the failure.
Installation
Version 2.0
4-9
Copyright © 2005-2007 by LSI Corporation. All rights reserved.
4-10
MegaRAID Storage Manager Overview and Installation
Version 2.0
Copyright © 2005-2007 by LSI Corporation. All rights reserved.
Chapter 5
MegaRAID Storage Manager
Window and Menus
This chapter explains how to start MegaRAID Storage Manager software
and describes the MegaRAID Storage Manager window and menus. This
chapter has the following sections:
5.1
•
Section 5.1, “Starting MegaRAID Storage Manager Software”
•
Section 5.2, “MegaRAID Storage Manager Window”
Starting MegaRAID Storage Manager Software
Follow these steps to start MegaRAID Storage Manager software and
view the main window:
1. Start the program using the method required for your operating
system environment:
–
To start MegaRAID Storage Manager software on a Microsoft
Windows system, select Start->Programs->MegaRAID Storage
Manager->StartupUI, or double-click the MegaRAID Storage
Manager shortcut on the desktop.
Note:
If a warning appears stating that Windows Firewall has
blocked some features of the program, click Unblock to
allow MegaRAID Storage Manager software to start. (The
Windows Firewall sometimes blocks the operation of
programs that use Java.)
–
To start MegaRAID Storage Manager software on a Red Hat
Linux system, select Applications->System Tools->MegaRAID
Storage Manager StartupUI.
–
To start MegaRAID Storage Manager software on a SUSE
SLES 9 system, select Start->System->More Programs
->MegaRAID Storage Manager.
MegaRAID SAS Software User’s Guide
Version 2.0
Copyright © 2005-2007 by LSI Corporation. All rights reserved.
5-1
2. When the program starts, the Select Server window appears, as
shown in Figure 5.1.
Figure 5.1
Select Server Window
If the circle in the server icon is yellow instead of green, it means
that the server is running in a degraded state—for example, because
a disk drive used in a virtual disk has failed. If the circle is red, the
storage configuration in the server has failed.
Note:
To access servers on a different subnet, type in the box at
the bottom of the screen the IP address of a server in the
desired subnet where the MegaRAID Storage Manager
software is running, and click Update. If you check the
Connect to remote server at: IP address box, you can
also access a standalone (remote) installation of
MegaRAID Storage Manager software, if it has a network
connection.
3. Double-click the icon of the server that you want to access. The
Server Login window appears, as shown in Figure 5.2.
5-2
MegaRAID Storage Manager Window and Menus
Version 2.0
Copyright © 2005-2007 by LSI Corporation. All rights reserved.
Figure 5.2
Server Login Window
4. Select an access mode from the drop-down menu.
–
Select Full Access if you need to both view the current
configuration and change the configuration.
–
Select View Only if you need to only view and monitor the
configuration.
5. Enter your user name and password, and click Login.
Note:
If the computer is networked, this is the login to the
computer itself, not the network login.
You must enter the root/administrator user name and password to
use Full Access mode. If your user name and password are correct
for the Login mode you have chosen, the main MegaRAID Storage
Manager window appears.
Starting MegaRAID Storage Manager Software
Version 2.0
Copyright © 2005-2007 by LSI Corporation. All rights reserved.
5-3
5.2
MegaRAID Storage Manager Window
This section describes the MegaRAID Storage Manager window, which
is shown in Figure 5.3.
Figure 5.3
Main MegaRAID Storage Manager Window
The following topics describe the panels and menu options that appear
in this window.
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MegaRAID Storage Manager Window and Menus
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Copyright © 2005-2007 by LSI Corporation. All rights reserved.
5.2.1
Physical/Logical View Panel
The left panel of the MegaRAID Storage Manager window displays either
the Physical view or the Logical view of the system and the devices in it,
depending on which tab is selected.
•
The Physical view shows the hierarchy of physical devices in the
system. At the top of the hierarchy is the system itself. One or more
controllers are installed in the system. The controller label identifies
the MegaRAID controller, such as the MegaRAID 8708ELP
controller, so that you can easily differentiate between multiple
controllers. Each controller has one or more ports. Disk drives and
other devices are attached to the ports.
•
The Logical view shows the hierarchy of controllers, virtual disks, and
disk groups that are defined on the system. (Physical drives also
appear in the Logical view, so you can see which physical drives are
used by each virtual disk.)
The following icons in the left panel represent the controllers, disk drives,
and other devices:
•
System
•
Controller
•
Port
•
Array
•
Virtual disk
•
Physical drive
•
Enclosure
•
Battery backup unit (BBU)
A red circle to the right of an icon indicates that the device has failed.
For example, this icon indicates that a physical drive has failed:
MegaRAID Storage Manager Window
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.
5-5
A yellow circle to the right of an icon indicates that a device is running
in a degraded state. For example, this icon indicates that a virtual disk is
running in a degraded state because a disk drive has failed:
5.2.2
.
Properties/Operations/Graphical View Panel
The right panel of the MegaRAID Storage Manager window has either
two or three tabs, depending on what kind of device is selected in the
left panel.
5-6
•
The Properties tab displays information about the selected device.
For example, if a controller icon is selected in the left panel, the
Properties tab lists information such as the controller name, NVRAM
size, and device port count. For more information, see Section 7.3,
“Monitoring Controllers,” Section 7.4, “Monitoring Disk Drives,” and
Section 7.6, “Monitoring Virtual Disks.”
•
The Operations tab lists the operations that can be performed on the
device that is selected in the left panel. For example, Figure 5.4
shows the options that are available when a controller is selected.
These include enabling or silencing the alarm and running a Patrol
Read. Some types of devices, such as arrays and ports, do not have
operations associated with them. For more information, see
Chapter 8, “Maintaining and Managing Storage Configurations.”
MegaRAID Storage Manager Window and Menus
Version 2.0
Copyright © 2005-2007 by LSI Corporation. All rights reserved.
Figure 5.4
Operations Tab
•
The Graphical View tab can be selected in the right panel if a
physical drive, virtual disk, or disk enclosure is selected in the left
panel. In graphical view, the device’s storage capacity is color coded
according to the legend shown on the screen. For example, on a
physical drive configured space is blue, available space is white, and
reserved space is red, as shown in Figure 5.5. For more information,
see Section 7.4, “Monitoring Disk Drives,” and Section 7.6,
“Monitoring Virtual Disks.”
MegaRAID Storage Manager Window
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5-7
Figure 5.5
5.2.3
Graphical View Tab
Event Log Panel
The lower part of the MegaRAID Storage Manager window displays the
system event log entries, as shown in Figure 5.3. New event log entries
appear during the session. Each entry has an ID, a timestamp and date,
an error level indicating the severity of the event, and a brief description
of the event.
For more information about the event log, see Section 7.1, “Monitoring
System Events.” For more information about the event log entries, see
Appendix A, “Events and Messages.”
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MegaRAID Storage Manager Window and Menus
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5.2.4
Menu Bar
Here are brief descriptions of the main selections on the MegaRAID
Storage Manager menu bar. Specific menu options are described in
more detail in Chapters 6, 7, and 8 of this manual.
5.2.4.1
File Menu
The File menu has an Exit option for exiting from the MegaRAID Storage
Manager software. It also has a Rescan option for updating the display
in the MegaRAID Storage Manager window. (Rescan is seldom required;
the display normally updates automatically.)
5.2.4.2
Operations Menu
The Operations menu is available when a controller, physical drive, or
virtual disk is selected in the MegaRAID Storage Manager window. The
Operations menu options vary depending on what type of device is
selected in the left panel of the MegaRAID Storage Manager window. For
example, the Scan for Foreign Config option is available only when a
controller is selected. The options also vary depending on the current
state of the selected device. For example, if you select an offline physical
drive, the Make Drive Online option appears in the Operations menu.
You can also view the Operations selections on the main window on the
Operations tab in the right panel. If an operation requires user inputs
before it can be executed, it appears in the Operations tab but not in the
Operations menu. A device-specific Operations menu pops up if you
right-click a device icon in the left panel.
Configuration options are also available. This is where you access the
Configuration Wizard and other configuration-related commands. To
access the other configuration commands, select Operations->
Configuration.
5.2.4.3
Group Operations Menu
The Group Operations menu options include Check Consistency,
Initialize, and Show Progress.
MegaRAID Storage Manager Window
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5.2.4.4
Tools Menu
On the Tools menu you can select Configure->Monitor Configurator to
access the Event Configuration Notification screen, which you can use
to set the alert delivery rules, event severity levels, exceptions, and email
settings. For more information, see Section 7.2, “Configuring Event
Notifications.”
5.2.4.5
Log Menu
The Log menu includes options for saving and clearing the message log.
For more information, see Appendix A, “Events and Messages.”
5.2.4.6
Help Menu
On the Help menu you can select Help->Help to view the MegaRAID
Storage Manager online help file. You can select Help->About to view
version information for the MegaRAID Storage Manager software.
5-10
Note:
When you use the MegaRAID Storage Manager online
help, you may see a warning message that Internet
Explorer has restricted the file from showing active content.
If this warning appears, click on the active content warning
bar and enable the active content.
Note:
If you are using the Linux operating system, you must
install Firefox® or Mozilla® for the MegaRAID Storage
Manager online help to display.
MegaRAID Storage Manager Window and Menus
Version 2.0
Copyright © 2005-2007 by LSI Corporation. All rights reserved.
Chapter 6
Configuration
You use MegaRAID Storage Manager software to create and modify
storage configurations on LSI SAS controllers. These controllers support
RAID 0, RAID 1, RAID 5, RAID 6, RAID 10, RAID 50, and RAID 60
storage configurations. To learn more about RAID and RAID levels, see
Chapter 1, “Introduction to RAID.”
The Reconstruction Wizard allows you to easily change RAID levels or
to expand or reduce the capacity of existing virtual disks.
Note:
You cannot create or modify a storage configuration unless
you are logged on to a server with administrator privileges.
This chapter explains how to use MegaRAID Storage Manager software
to perform the following configuration tasks:
6.1
•
Section 6.1, “Creating a New Storage Configuration”
•
Section 6.2, “Adding Hot Spare Disks”
•
Section 6.3, “Changing Adjustable Task Rates”
•
Section 6.4, “Changing Virtual Disk Properties”
•
Section 6.5, “Changing a Virtual Disk Configuration”
•
Section 6.6, “Deleting a Virtual Disk”
•
Section 6.7, “Saving a Storage Configuration to Disk”
•
Section 6.8, “Clearing a Storage Configuration from a Controller”
•
Section 6.9, “Adding a Saved Storage Configuration”
Creating a New Storage Configuration
You can use the MegaRAID Storage Manager Configuration Wizard to
create new storage configurations on systems with LSI SAS controllers.
MegaRAID SAS Software User’s Guide
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Copyright © 2005-2007 by LSI Corporation. All rights reserved.
6-1
To open the MegaRAID Storage Manager Configuration Wizard, select a
controller in the left panel of the MegaRAID Storage Manager window
and then select Operations->Configuration->Configuration Wizard.
Figure 6.1 shows the first Configuration Wizard screen.
Figure 6.1
First Configuration Wizard Screen
The menu lists three configuration modes:
•
Auto Configuration automatically creates an optimal configuration
from the available disk drives.
•
Manual Configuration gives you the greatest level of control in
creating a new virtual disk.
•
Guided Configuration asks you a few simple questions about what
kind of configuration you want and then automatically creates it from
the available disk drives.
Note:
6-2
You can use Auto, Guided, or Manual mode to create a
RAID 0, RAID 1, RAID 5, or RAID 6 configuration. To create
a RAID 10, RAID 50, or RAID 60 configuration, you must
use the Manual Configuration mode.
Configuration
Version 2.0
Copyright © 2005-2007 by LSI Corporation. All rights reserved.
The following subsections explain how to use the Configuration Wizard
to create storage configurations:
6.1.1
•
Section 6.1.1, “Understanding Virtual Disk Parameters”
•
Section 6.1.2, “Using Auto Configuration”
•
Section 6.1.3, “Using Guided Configuration”
•
Section 6.1.4, “Using Manual Configuration: RAID 0”
•
Section 6.1.5, “Using Manual Configuration: RAID 1”
•
Section 6.1.6, “Using Manual Configuration: RAID 5”
•
Section 6.1.7, “Using Manual Configuration: RAID 6”
•
Section 6.1.8, “Using Manual Configuration: RAID 10”
•
Section 6.1.9, “Using Manual Configuration: RAID 50”
•
Section 6.1.10, “Using Manual Configuration: RAID 60”
Understanding Virtual Disk Parameters
This section describes the Virtual Disk Parameters that you can set when
you use the Guided Configuration or Manual Configuration modes of the
Configuration Wizard. You should change these parameters only if you
have a specific reason for doing so. It is usually best to leave them at
their default settings.
•
Stripe Size: Stripe sizes of 8, 16, 32, 64, and 128 Kbytes are
supported. For more information, see the striping Glossary entry. The
default is 64 Kbytes.
•
Read Policy: Specify the read policy for this virtual drive:
◊
Always read ahead: Read ahead capability allows the
controller to read sequentially ahead of requested data and
to store the additional data in cache memory, anticipating
that the data will be needed soon. This speeds up reads for
sequential data, but there is little improvement when
accessing random data.
◊
No read ahead: Disables the read ahead capability. This is
the default.
◊
Adaptive read ahead: When selected, the controller begins
using read ahead if the two most recent disk accesses
Creating a New Storage Configuration
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Copyright © 2005-2007 by LSI Corporation. All rights reserved.
6-3
occurred in sequential sectors. If the read requests are
random, the controller reverts to No read ahead.
•
Write Policy: Specify the write policy for this virtual drive:
◊
Write back: In this mode the controller sends a data transfer
completion signal to the host when the controller cache has
received all of the data in a transaction. This is the default.
◊
Write through: In this mode the controller sends a data
transfer completion signal to the host when the disk
subsystem has received all of the data in a transaction.
Note:
•
The Write Policy depends on the status of the battery
backup unit (BBU). If the BBU is not present or is bad, then
the Write Policy will be Write through.
IO Policy: The IO policy applies to reads on a specific virtual disk.
It does not affect the read ahead cache.
◊
Cached IO: In this mode, all reads are buffered in cache
memory. This is the default.
◊
Direct IO: In this mode, reads are not buffered in cache
memory. Data is transferred to the cache and the host
concurrently. If the same data block is read again, it comes
from cache memory.
Cached IO provides faster processing, and Direct IO ensures
that the cache and the host contain the same data.
•
•
6-4
Access Policy: Select the type of data access that is allowed for this
virtual disk.
◊
Read/Write: Allow read/write access. This is the default.
◊
Read Only: Allow read-only access.
◊
Blocked: Do not allow access.
Disk Cache Policy: Select a cache setting for this disk:
◊
Enable: Enable the disk cache. This is the default.
◊
Disable: Disable the disk cache.
◊
Unchanged: Leave the current disk cache policy unchanged.
Configuration
Version 2.0
Copyright © 2005-2007 by LSI Corporation. All rights reserved.
•
6.1.2
Init State: Specify the background initialization status:
◊
No Initialization: The new configuration is not initialized and
the existing data on the disks is not overwritten. This is the
default.
◊
Fast Initialization: MegaRAID Storage Manager software
quickly writes zeroes to the first and last 10-Mbyte regions of
the new virtual disk and then completes the initialization in
the background. This allows you to start writing data to the
virtual disk immediately.
◊
Full Initialization: A complete initialization is done on the new
configuration. You cannot write data to the new virtual disk
until the initialization is complete. This may take a long time
if the disks are large.
Using Auto Configuration
Auto Configuration is the quickest and simplest way to create a new
storage configuration. When you select Auto Configuration mode on the
first Configuration Wizard screen, the Configuration Wizard creates the
best configuration possible using the available physical disks.
Figure 6.2 shows the Auto Configuration screen.
Creating a New Storage Configuration
Version 2.0
Copyright © 2005-2007 by LSI Corporation. All rights reserved.
6-5
Figure 6.2
Auto Configuration Screen
Follow these steps to create a new storage configuration in Auto
Configuration mode:
1. Select a redundancy option from the drop-down menu at the bottom
of the Auto Configuration window:
–
No Redundancy: The new configuration will have no data
redundancy (RAID 0). If a physical disk in the configuration fails,
all data will be lost.
–
With Redundancy: The new configuration will have data
redundancy, either via parity data (RAID 5 and RAID 6) or
mirrored data (RAID 1). If a physical disk fails, data is still
protected.
2. Select an initialization option from the drop-down menu at the bottom
of the window:
6-6
–
No Initialization: The new configuration is not initialized, and the
existing data on the disks is not overwritten.
–
Fast Initialization: MegaRAID Storage Manager software
quickly writes zeroes to the first and last 10 Mbyte regions of the
Configuration
Version 2.0
Copyright © 2005-2007 by LSI Corporation. All rights reserved.
new virtual disk and then completes the initialization in the
background. This allows you to start writing data to the virtual
disk immediately.
–
Full Initialization: A complete initialization is done on the new
configuration. You cannot write data to the new virtual disk until
the initialization is complete. This may take a long time if the
disks are large.
3. (Optional) Click Modify if you want to to Manual Configuration
mode so you can modify the suggested Auto Configuration.
When you click Modify, the Virtual Disk Creation screen appears.
Select the new virtual disk, and click Reclaim. Then select the new
array from the Arrays with Free Space list, and change the virtual
disk parameters as needed.
4. Click Finish. The new storage configuration will be created and
initialized (unless you selected No Initialization).
6.1.3
Using Guided Configuration
Guided Configuration provides an easy way to create a new storage
configuration. Based on the information that is provided, the
Configuration Wizard uses the available disk drives to create an optimal
storage configuration.
Figure 6.3 shows the first screen that appears when you select Guided
Configuration.
Creating a New Storage Configuration
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Copyright © 2005-2007 by LSI Corporation. All rights reserved.
6-7
Figure 6.3
First Guided Configuration Screen
Follow these steps to create a new storage configuration in Guided
Configuration mode:
1. Select a redundancy option at the top of the Guided Configuration
window:
–
Redundancy Only: Create a configuration only if redundancy
(RAID 1, RAID 5, or RAID 6) is possible.
–
Redundancy when possible: Create a redundant configuration
if possible. Otherwise, create a non-redundant configuration.
–
No Redundancy: Create a non-redundant configuration.
2. Choose whether you want to use existing arrays in the new virtual
disk. The options are:
–
Use Existing Arrays Only
–
Do not Use Existing Arrays
–
Use Existing and New Arrays
The first and third options are disabled if there are no available
existing arrays.
6-8
Configuration
Version 2.0
Copyright © 2005-2007 by LSI Corporation. All rights reserved.
3. Select a maximum number of virtual disks to be created. The
Configuration Wizard may not be able to create as many virtual disks
as you want, depending on the current configuration and the number
of virtual disks that have already been created.
4. Click Next to continue to the next window, as shown in Figure 6.4.
Figure 6.4
Second Guided Configuration Screen
5. Change the default volume parameters in this window, if needed.
In the top section of the window you can specify the number of virtual
disks to create. You can also choose to use less than the full capacity
of this array for the virtual disk(s). (You could do this to leave capacity
available for other virtual disks that you create later.) To learn about
the Stripe Size and other virtual disk parameters, see Section 6.1.1,
“Understanding Virtual Disk Parameters,” page 6-3.
6. Click Next to continue to the next window.
The VD Summary screen appears.
7. Check the configuration that you have just defined. If it is acceptable,
click Finish. If you want to change something, click Back to return
to the previous windows.
Creating a New Storage Configuration
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Copyright © 2005-2007 by LSI Corporation. All rights reserved.
6-9
6.1.4
Using Manual Configuration: RAID 0
Follow these steps to create a RAID 0 storage configuration using the
Manual Configuration mode of the Configuration Wizard.
Figure 6.5 shows the first screen that appears when you select Manual
Configuration.
Figure 6.5
First Manual Configuration Screen
1. In the first Manual Configuration window, select two or more available
drives in the left panel. Click the Right Arrow button to move the
selected drives to the right panel.
Note:
MegaRAID Storage Manager software will not allow you to
select the disk drive on which the operating system is
installed or any other drives that are already part of a
configuration.
2. Click Accept to accept these drives for the new RAID 0 array.
6-10
Configuration
Version 2.0
Copyright © 2005-2007 by LSI Corporation. All rights reserved.
Note:
To remove a single drive from a proposed new array, select
the drive icon in the right panel and click the Left Arrow
button.
3. Click Next.
The next Configuration Wizard window appears, as shown in
Figure 6.6.
Figure 6.6
Manual Configuration – Defining a Virtual Disk
The Arrays with Free Space menu lists the new array that you just
defined, plus any existing arrays with holes (free space) that could
be used for a new configuration.
4. From the Arrays with Free Space menu, select the array to use for
the new virtual disk.
5. In the right panel, select RAID 0 as the RAID level.
6. (Optional) Set Size (in MB) to a lower number if you do not want to
use the entire available capacity for the new virtual disk.
Creating a New Storage Configuration
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Copyright © 2005-2007 by LSI Corporation. All rights reserved.
6-11
7. (Optional) Change the other Virtual Disk Properties, if necessary. For
more information, see Section 6.1.1, “Understanding Virtual Disk
Parameters.”
8. Click Accept to accept the configuration of the new virtual disk.
Note:
Click the Reclaim button if you want to undo a virtual disk
that you just defined. (For more information, see the reclaim
virtual disk Glossary entry.)
9. Click Next to continue with the next configuration step.
The Virtual Disk Summary window appears.
10. Review the configuration shown in the Virtual Disk Summary window.
If you want to change something, click Back and change the
configuration parameters.
11. Click Finish to accept the configuration and start the initialization
process (unless you selected No Initialization earlier).
6.1.5
Using Manual Configuration: RAID 1
Follow these steps to create a RAID 1 storage configuration using the
Manual Configuration mode of the Configuration Wizard:
1. In the first Manual Configuration window, shown in Figure 6.5, select
two available drives in the left panel. Click the Right Arrow button to
move the selected drives to the right panel.
Note:
MegaRAID Storage Manager software will not allow you to
select the disk drive on which the operating system is
installed or any other drives that are already part of a
configuration.
2. Click Accept to accept these drives for the new RAID 1 array.
3. Click Next.
The next Configuration Wizard window appears, as shown in
Figure 6.6.
The Arrays with Free Space menu lists the new array(s) that you just
defined, plus any existing arrays with holes (free space) that could
be used for a new configuration.
4. Select the array to use for the new virtual disk.
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Configuration
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Copyright © 2005-2007 by LSI Corporation. All rights reserved.
5. In the right panel, select RAID 1 as the RAID level.
6. (Optional) Set Size (in MB) to a lower number if you do not want to
use the entire available capacity for the new virtual disk.
7. (Optional) Change the other Virtual Disk Properties, if necessary. For
more information, see Section 6.1.1, “Understanding Virtual Disk
Parameters.”
8. Click Accept to accept the configuration of the new virtual disk.
Note:
Click the Reclaim button if you want to undo a virtual disk
that you just defined. (For more information, see the reclaim
virtual disk Glossary entry.)
9. Click Next to continue with the next configuration step.
The Virtual Disk Summary window appears.
10. Review the configuration shown in the window. If you want to change
something, click Back and change the configuration parameters.
11. Click Finish to accept the configuration and start the initialization
process (unless you selected No Initialization earlier).
6.1.6
Using Manual Configuration: RAID 5
Follow these steps to create a RAID 5 configuration using the Manual
Configuration mode of the Configuration Wizard:
1. In the first Manual Configuration window, shown in Figure 6.5, select
three or more available drives in the left panel. Click the Right Arrow
button to move the selected drives to the right panel.
Note:
MegaRAID Storage Manager software will not allow you to
select the disk drive on which the operating system is
installed or any other drives that are already part of a
configuration.
2. Click Accept to accept these drives for the new RAID 5 array.
3. Click Next.
The next Configuration Wizard window appears, as shown in
Figure 6.6.
Creating a New Storage Configuration
Version 2.0
Copyright © 2005-2007 by LSI Corporation. All rights reserved.
6-13
The Arrays with Free Space menu lists the new array(s) that you just
defined, plus any existing arrays with holes (free space) that could
be used for a new configuration.
4. Select the array to use for the new virtual disk.
5. In the right panel, select RAID 5 as the RAID level.
6. (Optional) Set Size (in MB) to a lower number if you do not want to
use the entire available capacity for the new virtual disk.
7. (Optional) Change the other Virtual Disk Properties, if necessary. For
more information, see Section 6.1.1, “Understanding Virtual Disk
Parameters.”
8. Click Accept to accept the configuration of the new virtual disk.
Note:
Click the Reclaim button if you want to undo a virtual disk
that you just defined. (For more information, see the reclaim
virtual disk Glossary entry.)
9. Click Next to continue with the next configuration step.
The Virtual Disk Summary window appears.
10. Review the configuration shown in the window. If you want to change
something, click Back and change the configuration parameters.
11. Click Finish to accept the configuration and start the initialization
process (unless you selected No Initialization earlier).
6.1.7
Using Manual Configuration: RAID 6
Follow these steps to create a RAID 6 configuration using the Manual
Configuration mode of the Configuration Wizard:
1. In the first Manual Configuration window, shown in Figure 6.5, select
three or more available drives in the left panel. Click the Right Arrow
button to move the selected drives to the right panel.
Note:
MegaRAID Storage Manager software will not allow you to
select the disk drive on which the operating system is
installed or any other drives that are already part of a
configuration.
2. Click Accept to accept these drives for the new RAID 6 array.
3. Click Next.
6-14
Configuration
Version 2.0
Copyright © 2005-2007 by LSI Corporation. All rights reserved.
The next Configuration Wizard window appears, as shown in
Figure 6.6.
The Arrays with Free Space menu lists the new array(s) that you just
defined, plus any existing arrays with holes (free space) that could
be used for a new configuration.
4. Select the array to use for the new virtual disk.
5. In the right panel, select RAID 6 as the RAID level.
6. (Optional) Set Size (in MB) to a lower number if you do not want to
use the entire available capacity for the new virtual disk.
7. (Optional) Change the other Virtual Disk Properties, if necessary. For
more information, see Section 6.1.1, “Understanding Virtual Disk
Parameters.”
8. Click Accept to accept the configuration of the new virtual disk.
Note:
Click the Reclaim button if you want to undo a virtual disk
that you just defined. (For more information, see the reclaim
virtual disk Glossary entry.)
9. Click Next to continue with the next configuration step.
The Virtual Disk Summary window appears.
10. Review the configuration shown in the window. If you want to change
something, click Back and change the configuration parameters.
11. Click Finish to accept the configuration and start the initialization
process (unless you selected No Initialization earlier).
6.1.8
Using Manual Configuration: RAID 10
Follow these steps to create a RAID 10 storage configuration using the
Manual Configuration mode of the Configuration Wizard:
1. In the first Manual Configuration window, shown in Figure 6.5, select
two available drives in the left panel. Click the Right Arrow button to
move the selected drives to the right panel.
2. Click Accept to accept these drives for a new RAID 1 array.
3. Select two more drives for a second RAID 1 array, and click Accept.
4. Click Next.
Creating a New Storage Configuration
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Copyright © 2005-2007 by LSI Corporation. All rights reserved.
6-15
The next Configuration Wizard window appears, as shown in
Figure 6.6.
The Arrays with Free Space menu lists the new arrays that you just
defined, plus any existing arrays with holes (free space) that could
be used for a new configuration.
5. In the left panel, select the two RAID 1 arrays from the menu.
6. In the right panel, select RAID 10 as the RAID level.
7. (Optional) Set Size (in MB) to a lower number if you do not want to
use the entire available capacity for the new virtual disk.
8. (Optional) Change the other Virtual Disk Properties, if necessary. For
more information, see Section 6.1.1, “Understanding Virtual Disk
Parameters.”
9. Click Accept to accept the configuration of the new virtual disk.
Note:
Click the Reclaim button if you want to undo a virtual disk
that you just defined. (For more information, see the reclaim
virtual disk Glossary entry.)
10. Click Next to continue with the next configuration step.
The Virtual Disk Summary window appears.
11. Review the configuration shown in the window. If you want to change
something, click Back and change the configuration parameters.
12. Click Finish to accept the configuration and start the initialization
process (unless you selected No Initialization earlier).
6.1.9
Using Manual Configuration: RAID 50
Follow these steps to create a RAID 50 storage configuration using the
Manual Configuration mode of the Configuration Wizard:
1. In the first Manual Configuration window, shown in Figure 6.5, select
three or more available drives in the left panel. Click the Right Arrow
button to move the selected drives to the right panel.
2. Click Accept to accept these drives for a new RAID 5 array.
3. Select more drives for a second RAID 5 array, and click Accept.
4. Click Next.
6-16
Configuration
Version 2.0
Copyright © 2005-2007 by LSI Corporation. All rights reserved.
The next Configuration Wizard window appears, as shown in
Figure 6.6.
The Arrays with Free Space menu lists the new arrays that you just
defined, plus any existing arrays with holes (free space) that could
be used for a new configuration.
5. In the left panel, select the two RAID 5 arrays from the menu.
6. In the right panel, select RAID 50 as the RAID level.
7. (Optional) Set Size (in MB) to a lower number if you do not want to
use the entire available capacity for the new virtual disk.
8. (Optional) Change the other Virtual Disk Properties, if necessary. For
more information, see Section 6.1.1, “Understanding Virtual Disk
Parameters.”
9. Click Accept to accept the configuration of the new virtual disk.
Note:
Click the Reclaim button if you want to undo a virtual disk
that you just defined. (For more information, see the reclaim
virtual disk Glossary entry.)
10. Click Next to continue with the next configuration step.
The Virtual Disk Summary window appears.
11. Review the configuration shown in the window. If you want to change
something, click Back and change the configuration parameters.
12. Click Finish to accept the configuration and start the initialization
process (unless you selected No Initialization earlier).
6.1.10 Using Manual Configuration: RAID 60
Follow these steps to create a RAID 60 storage configuration using the
Manual Configuration mode of the Configuration Wizard:
1. In the first Manual Configuration window, shown in Figure 6.5, select
three or more available drives in the left panel. Click the Right Arrow
button to move the selected drives to the right panel.
2. Click Accept to accept these drives for a new RAID 6 array.
3. Select more drives for a second RAID 6 array, and click Accept.
4. Click Next.
Creating a New Storage Configuration
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Copyright © 2005-2007 by LSI Corporation. All rights reserved.
6-17
The next Configuration Wizard window appears, as shown in
Figure 6.6.
The Arrays with Free Space menu lists the new arrays that you just
defined, plus any existing arrays with holes (free space) that could
be used for a new configuration.
5. In the left panel, select the two RAID 6 arrays from the menu.
6. In the right panel, select RAID 60 as the RAID level.
7. (Optional) Set Size (in MB) to a lower number if you do not want to
use the entire available capacity for the new virtual disk.
8. (Optional) Change the other Virtual Disk Properties, if necessary. For
more information, see Section 6.1.1, “Understanding Virtual Disk
Parameters.”
9. Click Accept to accept the configuration of the new virtual disk.
Note:
Click the Reclaim button if you want to undo a virtual disk
that you just defined. (For more information, see the reclaim
virtual disk Glossary entry.)
10. Click Next to continue with the next configuration step.
The Virtual Disk Summary window appears.
11. Review the configuration shown in the window. If you want to change
something, click Back and change the configuration parameters.
12. Click Finish to accept the configuration and start the initialization
process (unless you selected No Initialization earlier).
6.2
Adding Hot Spare Disks
Hot spares are disk drives that are available to automatically replace
failed drives in a RAID 1, RAID 5, RAID 6, RAID 10, RAID 50, or RAID 60
virtual disk. Global hot spares are available to any virtual disk on a
specific controller.
To add a global hot spare disk, follow these steps:
1. Select the Physical View tab in the left panel of the MegaRAID
Storage Manager window, and select the icon of an unused disk
drive.
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2. In the right panel of the MegaRAID Storage Manager window, select
the Operations tab, and select Make Global Hotspare, as shown in
Figure 6.7.
Figure 6.7
Creating a Global Hot Spare
3. Use the affinity options in the right frame to choose whether to
associate the hot spare to a selected enclosure.
If you select With Affinity, the hot spare may be used only for virtual
disks that are on disks in the same enclosure as the hot spare. If you
select No Affinity, the hot spare is not restricted to those virtual
disks.
4. Click on Go to create the global hot spare.
Adding Hot Spare Disks
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6-19
6.3
Changing Adjustable Task Rates
Follow these steps if you need to change the adjustable rates for
rebuilds, and other system tasks that run in the background:
Note:
LSI recommends that you leave the adjustable task rates at
their default settings to achieve the best system
performance. If you raise the task rates above the defaults,
foreground tasks will run more slowly and it may seem that
the system is not responding. If you lower the task rates
below the defaults, rebuilds and other background tasks
may run very slowly and may not complete within a
reasonable time. If you decide to change the values, record
the original default value here so you can restore them
later, if necessary:
Rebuild Rate: ____________
Background Initialization (BGI) Rate: ____________
Check Consistency Rate: ____________
1. Select the Physical View tab in the left panel of the MegaRAID
Storage Manager window, and select a controller icon.
2. In the right panel of the MegaRAID Storage Manager window, select
the Operations tab, and select Set Adjustable Task Rates.
The default task rates appear in the right panel, as shown in
Figure 6.8.
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Copyright © 2005-2007 by LSI Corporation. All rights reserved.
Figure 6.8
Set Adjustable Task Rates
3. Enter changes, as needed, to the task rates for Rebuild Rate,
Background Initialization (BGI) Rate (for fast initialization), and Check
Consistency Rate (for consistency checks). Each task rate can be
set from 0 to 100. The higher the number, the faster the activity will
run in the background, possibly impacting other system tasks.
4. Click Go to accept the new task rates.
5. When the warning message appears, click OK to confirm that you
want to change the task rates.
Changing Adjustable Task Rates
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6-21
6.4
Changing Virtual Disk Properties
You can change a virtual disk’s Read Policy, Write Policy, and other
properties at any time after the virtual disk is created. To do this, follow
these steps:
1. Click Logical view tab in the left panel of the MegaRAID Storage
Manager window.
2. Select a virtual disk icon in the left panel of the MegaRAID Storage
Manager window.
3. In the right panel, select the Operations tab, and then select Set
Virtual Disk Properties.
A list of Virtual Disk Properties appears in the right panel, as shown
in Figure 6.9.
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Figure 6.9
Set Virtual Disk Properties
4. Change the virtual disk properties as needed in the right panel. For
information on these properties, see Section 6.1.1, “Understanding
Virtual Disk Parameters,” page 6-3.
5. Click Go to accept the changes.
6.5
Changing a Virtual Disk Configuration
You can use the MegaRAID Storage Manager Reconstruction Wizard to
change the configuration of a virtual disk.
Caution:
Be sure to back up the data on the virtual disk before you
change its configuration.
Changing a Virtual Disk Configuration
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6-23
The Reconstruction Wizard allows you to change a virtual disk
configuration by adding disk drives to the virtual disk, removing disk
drives from it, or changing its RAID level.
Note:
You cannot change the configuration of a RAID 10, or
RAID 50, or RAID 60 virtual disk. You cannot change a
RAID 0, RAID 1, RAID 5, or RAID 6 configuration if two or
more virtual disks are defined on a single array. (The
Logical View tab shows which arrays and disk drives are
used by each virtual disk.)
To start the Reconstruction Wizard, select a virtual disk icon in the left
panel of the MegaRAID Storage Manager window, and then select
Operations->Advanced Operations->Reconstruction Wizard from the
menu. You can also right-click on the virtual disk icon to access the
Reconstruction Wizard.
A warning to back up your data appears. Select Confirm and click on
Yes.
The Reconstruction Wizard menu appears, as shown in Figure 6.10
Figure 6.10 Reconstruction Wizard
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Copyright © 2005-2007 by LSI Corporation. All rights reserved.
This section has the following subsections explaining the Reconstruction
Wizard options:
6.5.1
•
Section 6.5.1, “Adding a Disk Drive to a Configuration”
•
Section 6.5.2, “Removing a Physical Drive from a Configuration”
•
Section 6.5.3, “Changing the RAID Level of a Configuration.”
Adding a Disk Drive to a Configuration
Caution:
Be sure to back up the data on the virtual disk before you
add a drive to it.
Follow these steps to add a disk drive to a configuration with the
Reconstruction Wizard:
1. Click Add Drive on the Reconstruction Wizard screen.
2. When the next screen appears, select an available disk drive in the
top panel, and click the Down Arrow button to move it to the
Selected Drive list.
3. Click Next to continue.
The next screen appears.
4. (Optional) Select a different RAID level for the configuration from the
drop-down menu in the lower right of the window.
5. Review the information in the window. If everything is acceptable,
click Finish.
A warning states that this operation cannot be aborted and asks
whether you want to continue.
Note:
If you add a disk drive to a RAID 1 configuration, the RAID
level automatically changes to RAID 5.
A reconstruction operation begins on the virtual disk. You can monitor the
progress of the reconstruction in the Group Show Progress window. To
do this, select Group Operations->Show Progress.
Changing a Virtual Disk Configuration
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6.5.2
Removing a Physical Drive from a Configuration
Caution:
Be sure to back up the data on the virtual disk before you
remove a drive from it.
Follow these steps to remove a disk drive from a RAID 1, RAID 5, or
RAID 6 configuration with the Reconstruction Wizard:
1. Click Remove Drive on the Configuration Wizard screen.
This option is not available for RAID 0 configurations.
2. When the next screen appears, select a disk drive in the top panel,
and click the Down Arrow button to remove it from the configuration.
3. Click Next to continue.
The next screen appears.
4. (Optional) Select a different RAID level from the drop-down menu in
the lower right of the window.
5. Review the information in the window. If everything is acceptable,
click Finish.
A warning states that this operation cannot be aborted and asks
whether you want to continue.
Note:
If you remove a disk drive from a RAID 5 configuration, the
RAID level automatically changes to RAID 0.
A reconstruction operation begins on the virtual disk. You can monitor the
progress of the reconstruction in the Group Show Progress window. To
do this, select Group Operations->Show Progress.
6.5.3
Changing the RAID Level of a Configuration
Caution:
Be sure to back up the data on the virtual disk before you
change its RAID level.
Follow these steps to change the RAID level of a RAID 1 or RAID 5
configuration with the Configuration Wizard:
1. Click Change RAID Level on the Configuration Wizard screen.
This option is not available for RAID 0 configurations.
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2. When the next screen appears, select a RAID level from the dropdown menu in the lower right corner.
3. Review the information in the window. If everything is acceptable,
click Finish.
A warning states that this operation cannot be aborted and asks
whether you want to continue.
A reconstruction operation begins on the virtual disk. You can
monitor the progress of the reconstruction in the Group Show
Progress window. To do this, select Group Operations->Show
Progress.
6.6
Deleting a Virtual Disk
Caution:
Be sure to back up the data on the virtual disk before you
delete it. Be sure that the operating system is not installed
on this virtual disk.
You can delete virtual disks to rearrange the storage space. To delete a
virtual disk, follow these steps:
1. Back up all user data on the virtual disk you intend to delete.
2. In the left panel of the MegaRAID Storage Manager window, select
the Logical tab, and click the icon of the virtual disk you want to
delete.
3. In the right panel, select the Operations tab, and select Delete
Virtual Disk.
4. Click Go.
5. When the warning message appears, click Yes to confirm that you
want to delete the virtual disk.
Deleting a Virtual Disk
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6-27
6.7
Saving a Storage Configuration to Disk
You can save an existing controller configuration to a file so you can
apply it to another controller. To save a configuration file, follow these
steps:
1. Select a controller icon in the left panel of the MegaRAID Storage
Manager window.
2. On the menu bar, select Operations-> Configuration->Save
Configuration.
The Save dialog box appears.
3. In the Save dialog box, type a name for the configuration file, or
accept the default name (hostname.cfg).
4. Click Save to save the configuration file.
6.8
Clearing a Storage Configuration from a Controller
You must clear a storage configuration from a controller before you can
create a new configuration on the controller or load a previously saved
configuration file.
Caution:
Before you clear a configuration, be sure to save any data
that you want to keep. Clearing a configuration deletes all
data from the disks of the existing configuration. Be sure
that the operating system is not installed on this
configuration.
To clear a configuration from a controller, follow these steps:
1. Select a controller icon in the left panel of the MegaRAID Storage
Manager window.
2. On the menu bar, select Operations->Configuration->Clear
Configuration.
A warning message appears that states that clearing the
configuration will destroy the virtual disks and result in data loss on
the selected controller.
3. Click Yes to clear the configuration or No to cancel the operation.
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6.9
Adding a Saved Storage Configuration
When you replace a controller, or when you want to duplicate an existing
storage configuration on a new controller, you can add a saved
configuration to the controller.
Caution:
When you add a saved configuration to a replacement
controller, be sure that the number and size of the physical
disks connected to the controller are exactly the same as
when the configuration was saved.
To add a saved configuration, follow these steps:
1. Select a controller icon in the left panel of the MegaRAID Storage
Manager window.
2. On the menu bar, select Operations->Configuration->Add
Configuration.
A warning message appears that states that this operation may
cause an unstable condition because of differences in the two
configurations.
3. Click Yes.
4. When the Open dialog box appears, select the configuration file, and
click Open.
5. View the configuration detail, then select Apply.
6. Confirm the new configuration when prompted.
Adding a Saved Storage Configuration
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Configuration
Version 2.0
Copyright © 2005-2007 by LSI Corporation. All rights reserved.
Chapter 7
Monitoring System Events and
Storage Devices
The MegaRAID Storage Manager software enables you to monitor the
status of disk drives, virtual disks, and other storage devices. This
chapter explains how to use MegaRAID Storage Manager software to
perform the following monitoring tasks:
7.1
•
Section 7.1, “Monitoring System Events”
•
Section 7.3, “Monitoring Controllers”
•
Section 7.4, “Monitoring Disk Drives”
•
Section 7.5, “Running a Patrol Read”
•
Section 7.6, “Monitoring Virtual Disks”
•
Section 7.7, “Monitoring Enclosures”
•
Section 7.8, “Monitoring Battery Backup Units”
•
Section 7.9, “Monitoring Rebuilds and Other Processes”
Monitoring System Events
MegaRAID Storage Manager software monitors the activity and
performance of all controllers in the system and the storage devices
connected to them. When an event occurs (such as the creation of a new
virtual disk or the removal of a physical drive) an event message appears
in the log displayed at the bottom of the MegaRAID Storage Manager
window, as shown in Figure 7.1.
You can use MegaRAID Storage Manager to alert you about events.
There are settings are for the delivery of alerts, the severity level of
events, exceptions, and email settings.
MegaRAID SAS Software User’s Guide
Version 2.0
Copyright © 2005-2007 by LSI Corporation. All rights reserved.
7-1
Figure 7.1
Event Information Window
Each message that appears in the event log has an severity level that
indicates the importance of the event, as shown in Table 7.1, a date and
timestamp, and a brief description. You can click on an event to display
the same information in a window. (For a list of all events, see
Section Appendix A, “Events and Messages.”)
Table 7.1
Event Severity Levels
Severity Level Meaning
7-2
Information
Informational message. No user action is necessary.
Warning
Some component may be close to a failure point.
Critical
A component has failed, but the system has not lost data.
Fatal
A component has failed, and data loss has occurred or will
occur.
Monitoring System Events and Storage Devices
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Copyright © 2005-2007 by LSI Corporation. All rights reserved.
The Log menu has four options:
7.2
•
Save Log: Saves the current log to a file.
•
Save Log Text: Saves the text of the current log to a file.
•
View Saved Log: Displays the contents of a saved log.
•
Clear Log: Clears the current log information.
Configuring Event Notifications
You can use the Event Notification Configuration screen to perform the
following functions:
•
Set rules for the delivery of alerts
•
Change the severity level of events
•
Define selected events as exceptions
•
Select the settings for the email addresses that are recipients of alert
notifications
To access this screen, select Tools->Configure->Monitor Configurator.
The Event Notification Configuration screen appears, as shown in
Figure 7.2.
Configuring Event Notifications
Version 2.0
Copyright © 2005-2007 by LSI Corporation. All rights reserved.
7-3
Figure 7.2
7.2.1
Event Notification Configuration Screen
Setting Alert Delivery Rules
Alert delivery rules determine the methods used to send alert deliveries,
such as by popup, email, system log, or MSM log. Perform the following
steps to set the rules:
1. On the Alert Delivery Rules screen, click on one of the severity
levels, such as Fatal or Critical.
2. Click on Edit.
3. In the dialog box, select or deselect the desired alert delivery
methods for the severity level.
4. Click on OK.
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Monitoring System Events and Storage Devices
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Copyright © 2005-2007 by LSI Corporation. All rights reserved.
The delivery methods display under the heading Deliver Alerts by.
7.2.2
Changing the Event Severity
To change the severity level for a specific event, perform the following
steps (see Table 7.1 for details about the severity levels):
1. On the Alert Delivery Rules screen, click on Change Events
Severity.
The Change Events Severity dialog box appears, as shown in
Figure 7.3. The dialog box displays the events by their ID number,
description, and severity level.
Figure 7.3
Change Events Severity
2. Click on an event in the list to select it.
Configuring Event Notifications
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7-5
To select multiple events at one time, hold the <Shift> key while you
click on two events. Those two events and any events in-between are
selected.
To select multiple events one at a time, hold the <Ctrl> key while you
click on separate events.
3. Click the box under the Severity heading to display the list of severity
levels.
4. Select a different severity level for the event from the list.
5. Click Apply.
The severity level for the event changes in the dialog box.
6. Click OK.
The severity level for the event changes and the dialog box closes.
7.2.3
Defining Exceptions
You can select events to make as exceptions to the alert delivery rules,
and then edit or remove these exceptions. A reason for making
exceptions is to change the alert delivery options for the event without
changing the severity level. To add, edit, or remove exceptions, perform
the following steps:
1. Click on the Alert Delivery Rules tab.
2. Click on the Add button in the Define exceptions section of the
screen.
The dialog box used to add events to the exceptions list appears, as
shown in Figure 7.4.
7-6
Monitoring System Events and Storage Devices
Version 2.0
Copyright © 2005-2007 by LSI Corporation. All rights reserved.
Figure 7.4
Add an Event to the Exceptions List
3. Click on an event to select it and click OK.
The event displays in the Define exceptions section of the Event
Notification Configuration screen.
4. To edit the exception event, click on the event, and click on Edit.
A dialog box appears, as shown in Figure 7.5.
Configuring Event Notifications
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Copyright © 2005-2007 by LSI Corporation. All rights reserved.
7-7
Figure 7.5
Edit Delivery Methods for Exception Events
5. Select the desired alert delivery methods and click on OK.
The alert delivery methods for the exception event are changed.
6. To remove the event as an exception, click on the exception event in
the Event Notification Configuration screen, and then click Remove.
The event is no longer in the list of exceptions.
7.2.4
Selecting Email Settings
You can use the Event Notification Configuration screen to enter email
addresses of recipients of the alert notifications. MegaRAID Storage
Manager sends alert notifications to the email addresses listed in the
Recipients section of this screen. This screen displays the sender
address, the SMTP server number, and the email addresses for alert
notification recipients.
You can add, edit, or remove email addresses, and perform a test to
make sure the recipient receives a alert notification. To select email
settings, perform the following steps:
1. Click on the E-mail Settings tab on the Event Notification
Configuration screen.
The E-mail Settings screen appears, as shown in Figure 7.6.
7-8
Monitoring System Events and Storage Devices
Version 2.0
Copyright © 2005-2007 by LSI Corporation. All rights reserved.
Figure 7.6
Email Settings
2. Click on the Add button to add an email address.
The following dialog box appears, as shown in Figure 7.7.
Figure 7.7
Add Email Address Dialog Box
3. Enter the email address you want to add and click on OK.
The added email address appears in the Recipients section of the
E-mail Settings screen.
4. Click on File and select Save As to save the email address.
Configuring Event Notifications
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7-9
5. To edit an email address, click on the email address in the
Recipients section of the screen, click on Edit, and then change the
email address.
6. To remove an email address, click on the email address in the
Recipients section of the screen, and then click on Remove.
7. To send a test message to an alert recipient, click on an email
address in the Recipients section of the screen, and then click Test.
If MegaRAID Storage Manager cannot send an email message to the
email address, an error message appears.
7.3
Monitoring Controllers
When MegaRAID Storage Manager software is running, you can see the
status of all controllers in the left panel of the MegaRAID Storage
Manager window. If the controller is operating normally, the controller
icon looks like this:
. If the controller has failed, a small red circle
appears to the right of the icon. (See Section 5.2.1, “Physical/Logical
View Panel” for a complete list of device icons.)
To display complete controller information, click a controller icon in the
left panel of the MegaRAID Storage Manager window, and click the
Properties tab in the right panel.
Figure 7.8 shows the Controller Information window.
7-10
Monitoring System Events and Storage Devices
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Copyright © 2005-2007 by LSI Corporation. All rights reserved.
Figure 7.8
Controller Information
Most of the information on this screen is self-explanatory. Note the
following:
•
The Rebuild Rate, Patrol Read Rate, Reconstruction Rate,
Consistency Check Rate, and BGI Rate (background initialization)
are all user selectable. For more information, see Section 6.3,
“Changing Adjustable Task Rates,” page 6-20.
•
The BBU Present field indicates whether a battery backup unit is
installed.
The Alarm Present and Alarm Enabled fields indicate whether the
controller has an alarm to alert the user with an audible tone when there
is an error or problem on the controller. There are options on the
Monitoring Controllers
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Copyright © 2005-2007 by LSI Corporation. All rights reserved.
7-11
controller Properties tab for silencing or disabling the alarm. All controller
properties are defined in the Section Appendix B, “Glossary.”
7.4
Monitoring Disk Drives
When MegaRAID Storage Manager software is running, you can see the
status of all physical disk drives in the left panel of the MegaRAID
Storage Manager window. If the disk drive is operating normally, its icon
looks like this:
. If the disk drive has failed, a small red circle appears
to the right of the icon, like this:
. (See Section 5.2.1,
“Physical/Logical View Panel” for a complete list of device icons.)
To display complete disk drive information, click a disk drive icon in the
left panel of the MegaRAID Storage Manager window, and click the
Properties tab in the right panel.
Figure 7.9 shows the Properties panel for a physical drive.
7-12
Monitoring System Events and Storage Devices
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Copyright © 2005-2007 by LSI Corporation. All rights reserved.
Figure 7.9
Physical Drive Information
The information on this panel is self-explanatory. There are no userselectable properties for physical devices. Icons for other storage devices
such as CD-ROM drives and DAT drives may also appear in the left
panel.
If the physical drives are in a disk enclosure, you can identify which
physical drive is represented by a disk icon on the left. To do this, follow
these steps:
1. Click the physical disk icon in the left panel.
2. Click the Operations tab in the right panel.
3. Select Locate Physical Drive, and click Go.
The LED on the physical disk drive in the enclosure starts blinking
to show its location.
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4. To stop the disk drive light from blinking, select Stop Locating
Physical Drive, and click Go.
All disk drive properties are defined in the Glossary.
To display a graphical view of a disk drive, click on a drive icon in the left
panel of the MegaRAID Storage Manager window, and click the
Graphical View tab. In Graphical View, the drive’s storage capacity is
color coded according to the legend shown on the screen: configured
space is blue, available space is white, and reserved space is red. When
you select a virtual disk from the drop-down menu, the disk space used
by that virtual disk is displayed in green.
7.5
Running a Patrol Read
A patrol read periodically verifies all sectors of physical disks connected
to a controller, including the system reserved area in the RAID configured
drives. A patrol read can be used for all RAID levels and for all hot spare
drives. A patrol read is initiated only when the controller is idle for a
defined time period and has no other background activities. To start a
patrol read, follow these steps:
1. Click a controller icon in the left panel of the MegaRAID Storage
Manager window.
2. Select Operations->Start Patrol Read.
To change the patrol read settings, follow these steps:
1. Click a controller icon in the left panel of the MegaRAID Storage
Manager window.
2. Select the Operations tab in the right panel, and select Set Patrol
Read Properties, as shown in Figure 7.10.
7-14
Monitoring System Events and Storage Devices
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Copyright © 2005-2007 by LSI Corporation. All rights reserved.
Figure 7.10 Patrol Read Configuration
3. Select an Operation Mode for a patrol read. The options are:
–
Auto: Patrol read runs automatically at the time interval you
specify on this screen.
–
Manual: Patrol read runs only when you manually start it by
selecting Start Patrol Read from the controller Options panel.
–
Disabled: Patrol read does not run.
4. (Optional) Specify a maximum count of physical drives to include in
the patrol read. The count must be between 0 and 255.
5. (Optional) Select virtual disks on this controller to exclude from the
patrol read. The existing virtual disks are listed in the gray box. To
exclude a virtual disk, check the box next to it.
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7-15
6. (Optional) Change the frequency at which the patrol read will run.
The default frequency is 7 days (168 hours), which is suitable for
most configurations. (You can select second, minute, or hour as the
unit of measurement.)
Note:
LSI recommends that you leave the patrol read frequency
and other patrol read settings at the default values to
achieve the best system performance. If you decide to
change the values, record the original default value here so
you can restore them later, if necessary:
Patrol Read Frequency: ___________________
Continuous Patrolling: Enabled/Disabled
Patrol Read Task Rate: ___________________
7. (Optional) Select Continuous Patrolling if you want patrol read to
run continuously in the background instead of running at periodic
intervals. If you select Continuous Patrolling, the time interval field is
grayed out.
8. Click Go to enable these patrol read options.
Note:
Patrol read does not report on its progress while it is
running. The patrol read status is reported in the event log
only.
You can also (optionally) change the patrol read task rate. The task rate
determines the amount of system resources that are dedicated to a
patrol read when it is running. LSI recommends, however, that you leave
the patrol read task rate at its default setting. If you raise the task rate
above the default, foreground tasks will run more slowly and it may seem
that the system is not responding. If you lower the task rate below the
default, rebuilds and other background tasks may run very slowly and
may not complete within a reasonable time. For more information, about
the patrol read task rate, see Section 6.3, “Changing Adjustable Task
Rates.”
7.6
Monitoring Virtual Disks
When MegaRAID Storage Manager software is running, you can see the
status of all virtual disks. If a virtual disk is operating normally, the icon
looks like this:
7-16
. If the virtual disk is running in Degraded mode (for
Monitoring System Events and Storage Devices
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Copyright © 2005-2007 by LSI Corporation. All rights reserved.
example, if a physical disk has failed) a small yellow circle appears to the
right of the icon:
.
When the Logical tab is selected, the left panel of the MegaRAID Storage
Manager window shows which physical disks are used by each virtual
disk. The same physical disk can be used by multiple virtual disks.
To display complete virtual disk information, click the Logical tab in the
left panel, click on a virtual disk icon in the left panel, and click the
Properties tab in the right panel. All virtual disk properties are defined
in the Glossary. Figure 7.11 shows the Properties panel for a virtual disk.
Figure 7.11 Virtual Disk Properties
The RAID level, stripe size, and access policy of the virtual disk are set
when it is configured.
Monitoring Virtual Disks
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Copyright © 2005-2007 by LSI Corporation. All rights reserved.
7-17
Note:
You can change the read policy, write policy, and other
virtual disk properties by selecting Operations->Set
Virtual Disk Properties.
If the physical drives in the virtual disk are in a disk enclosure, you can
identify them by making their LEDs blink. To do this, follow these steps:
1. Click the virtual disk icon in the left panel.
2. Click the Operations tab in the right panel.
3. Select Locate Virtual Disk, and click Go.
The LEDs on the physical disk drives in the virtual disk start blinking
(except for hot spare drives).
4. To stop the LEDs from blinking, select Stop Locating Virtual Disk,
and click Go.
To display a graphical view of a virtual disk, click on a virtual disk icon in
the left panel of the MegaRAID Storage Manager window, and click the
Graphical View tab. In Graphical View, the disk group (array) used for
this virtual disk is shaded blue to show how much of the disk group
capacity is used by this virtual disk. If part of the disk group is shaded
white, this indicates that some of the capacity is used by another virtual
disk. In a RAID 10, RAID 50, or RAID 60 configuration, two disk groups
are used by one virtual disk.
7.7
Monitoring Enclosures
When MegaRAID Storage Manager software is running, you can see the
status of all enclosures connected to the server by selecting the
Physical tab in the left panel. If an enclosure is operating normally, the
icon looks like this:
. If the enclosure is not functioning normally—for
example, if a fan has failed—a small yellow or red circle appears to the
right of the icon.
Information about the enclosure appears in the right panel when you
select the Properties tab. Figure 7.12 shows the more complete
enclosure information that is displayed when you select the Graphical
View tab.
7-18
Monitoring System Events and Storage Devices
Version 2.0
Copyright © 2005-2007 by LSI Corporation. All rights reserved.
Figure 7.12 Enclosure Information – Graphical View
The display in the center of the screen shows how many slots of the
enclosure are actually populated by disk drives, and the lights on the disk
drives show the drive status. The information on the right shows you the
status of the temperature sensors, fans, and power supplies in the
enclosure.
7.8
Monitoring Battery Backup Units
When MegaRAID Storage Manager software is running, you can see the
status of all BBUs connected to controllers in the server by selecting the
Physical tab in the left panel. If a BBU is operating normally, the icon
looks like this:
. If it has failed, a red dot appears next to the icon.
Monitoring Battery Backup Units
Version 2.0
Copyright © 2005-2007 by LSI Corporation. All rights reserved.
7-19
Figure 7.13 shows the BBU information that appears in the right panel
when you select the Properties tab.
Figure 7.13 Battery Backup Unit Information
The BBU properties include the following:
7.9
•
The number of times the BBU has been recharged (Cycle Count)
•
The full capacity of the BBU, plus the percentage of its current state
of charge, and the estimated time until it will be depleted
•
The current BBU temperature, voltage, current, and remaining
capacity
•
If the battery is charging, the estimated time until it is fully charged
Monitoring Rebuilds and Other Processes
MegaRAID Storage Manager software allows you to monitor the progress
of rebuilds and other lengthy processes in the Group Show Progress
window. Open this window, shown in Figure 7.14 by selecting Group
Operations->Show Progress on the menu bar.
7-20
Monitoring System Events and Storage Devices
Version 2.0
Copyright © 2005-2007 by LSI Corporation. All rights reserved.
Figure 7.14 Group Show Progress Window
Operations on virtual disks appear in the left panel of the Group Show
Progress window, and operations on physical drives appear in the right
panel. The following operations appear in this window:
•
Background or foreground initialization of a virtual disk
•
Rebuild (see Section 8.4, “Rebuilding a Drive”)
•
Reconstruction (see Section 6.5.1, “Adding a Disk Drive to a
Configuration”)
•
Consistency check (see Section 8.2, “Running a Consistency
Check”)
A reconstruction process cannot be aborted. To abort any other ongoing
process, click the Abort button next to the status indicator. Click Abort
All to abort all ongoing processes. Click Close to close the window.
Monitoring Rebuilds and Other Processes
Version 2.0
Copyright © 2005-2007 by LSI Corporation. All rights reserved.
7-21
7-22
Monitoring System Events and Storage Devices
Version 2.0
Copyright © 2005-2007 by LSI Corporation. All rights reserved.
Chapter 8
Maintaining and Managing
Storage Configurations
This section explains how to use MegaRAID Storage Manager software
to maintain and manage storage configurations. This chapter explains
how to perform the following tasks:
8.1
•
Section 8.1, “Initializing a Virtual Disk”
•
Section 8.2, “Running a Consistency Check”
•
Section 8.3, “Scanning for New Drives”
•
Section 8.4, “Rebuilding a Drive”
•
Section 8.5, “Making a Drive Offline or Missing”
•
Section 8.6, “Upgrading the Firmware”
Initializing a Virtual Disk
To initialize a virtual disk after completing the configuration process,
follow these steps:
1. Select the Logical tab in the left panel of the MegaRAID Storage
Manager window, and click the icon of the virtual disk that you want
to initialize.
2. Select Group Operations->Initialize.
The Group Initialize dialog box appears.
3. Select the virtual disk(s) to initialize.
Caution:
Initialization erases all data on the virtual disk. Be sure to
back up any data you want to keep before you initialize. Be
sure the operating system is not installed on the virtual disk
you are initializing.
MegaRAID SAS Software User’s Guide
Version 2.0
Copyright © 2005-2007 by LSI Corporation. All rights reserved.
8-1
4. Select the Fast Initialization check box if you want to use this
option. If you leave the box unchecked, MegaRAID Storage Manager
software will run a Full Initialization on the virtual disk. (For more
information, see Section 6.1.1, “Understanding Virtual Disk
Parameters.”)
5. Click Start to begin the initialization.
You can monitor the progress of the initialization. See Section 7.9,
“Monitoring Rebuilds and Other Processes” for more information.
8.2
Running a Consistency Check
You should periodically run a consistency check on fault-tolerant virtual
disks. It is especially important to do this if you suspect that the virtual
disk consistency data may be corrupted. Be sure to back up the data
before running a consistency check if you think the consistency data may
be corrupted.
To run a consistency check, follow these steps:
1. Select Group Operations->Check Consistency.
The Group Consistency Check window appears.
2. Select the virtual disks that you want to check, or click Select All to
select all virtual disks.
3. Click Start to begin.
You can monitor the progress of the consistency check. See
Section 7.9, “Monitoring Rebuilds and Other Processes” for more
information.
Note:
8-2
You can also run a consistency check by selecting the
virtual disk icon in the left panel of the MegaRAID Storage
Manager window and selecting the option on the Operation
tab in the right panel.
Maintaining and Managing Storage Configurations
Version 2.0
Copyright © 2005-2007 by LSI Corporation. All rights reserved.
8.3
Scanning for New Drives
MegaRAID Storage Manager software normally detects newly installed
disk drives and displays icons for them in the MegaRAID Storage
Manager window. If for some reason MegaRAID Storage Manager
software does not detect a new drive (or drives), you can use the Scan
for Foreign Config command to find it. To do this, follow these steps:
1. Select a controller icon in the left panel of the MegaRAID Storage
Manager window.
2. Select Operations->Scan for Foreign Config.
If MegaRAID Storage Manager software detects any new disk drives,
it displays a list of them on the screen.
3. Follow the instructions on the screen to complete the disk detection.
8.4
Rebuilding a Drive
If a single drive in a RAID 1, RAID 5, RAID 10, or RAID 50 virtual disk
fails, the system is protected from data loss. A RAID 6 virtual disk can
survive two failed drives. A failed drive must be replaced, and the data
on the drive must be rebuilt on a new drive to restore the system to fault
tolerance. (You can choose to rebuild the data on the failed drive if the
drive is still operational.) If hot spare disks are available, the failed drive
is rebuilt automatically without any user intervention.
If a drive has failed, a red circle appears to the right of the disk drive
icon:
. A small yellow circle appears to the right of the icon of the
virtual disk that uses this physical disk:
. This indicates that the
virtual disk is in a degraded state; the data is still safe, but data could be
lost if another drive fails.
Follow these steps if you need to rebuild a physical drive:
1. Right-click the icon of the failed drive, and select Rebuild.
2. Click Yes when the warning message appears. If the drive is still
good, a rebuild will start.
Scanning for New Drives
Version 2.0
Copyright © 2005-2007 by LSI Corporation. All rights reserved.
8-3
You can monitor the progress of the rebuild in the Group Show
Progress window by selecting Group Operations->Show Progress.
If the drive cannot be rebuilt, an error message appears. Continue
with the next step.
3. Shut down the system, disconnect the power cord, and open the
computer case.
4. Replace the failed disk drive with a new drive of equal capacity.
5. Close the computer case, reconnect the power cord, and restart the
computer.
6. Restart the MegaRAID Storage Manager software.
When the new drive spins up, the drive icon changes back to normal
status, and the rebuild process begins automatically. You can monitor
the progress of the rebuild in the Group Show Progress window by
selecting Group Operations->Show Progress.
8.5
Making a Drive Offline or Missing
If a disk drive is currently part of a redundant configuration and you want
to use it in another configuration, you can use MegaRAID Storage
Manager commands to remove the disk drive from the first configuration.
When you do this, all data on that drive is lost.
To remove the disk drive from the configuration without harming the data
on the virtual disk, follow these steps:
1. In the left panel of the MegaRAID Storage Manager window, rightclick the icon of a disk drive in a redundant virtual disk.
2. Select Make drive offline from the pop-up menu. The disk drive
status changes to Offline.
3. Right-click the disk drive icon again, and select Mark physical disk
as missing.
4. Select File->Rescan. The disk drive status changes to Unconfigured
Good. At this point, the data on this disk drive is no longer valid.
5. If necessary, create a hot spare disk for the virtual disk from which
you have removed the disk drive. (See Section 6.2, “Adding Hot
Spare Disks.”)
8-4
Maintaining and Managing Storage Configurations
Version 2.0
Copyright © 2005-2007 by LSI Corporation. All rights reserved.
When a hot spare is available, the data on the virtual disk will be
rebuilt. You can now use the removed disk for another configuration.
Caution:
8.6
If MegaRAID Storage Manager software detects that a disk
drive in a virtual disk has failed, it makes the drive offline.
If this happens, you must remove the disk drive and replace
it. You cannot make the drive usable for another
configuration by using the Mark physical disk as missing
and Rescan commands.
Upgrading the Firmware
MegaRAID Storage Manager software enables you to easily upgrade the
controller firmware. To do this, follow these steps:
1. In the left panel of the MegaRAID Storage Manager window, click the
icon of the controller you need to upgrade.
2. In the right panel, click the Operations tab, and select Flash
Firmware.
3. Click Go.
4. Browse for the .rom update file, and click OK.
MegaRAID Storage Manager software displays the version of the
existing firmware and the version of the new firmware file.
5. When you are prompted to indicate if you want to upgrade the
firmware, click Yes.
The controller is updated with the new firmware code contained in
the .rom file.
Upgrading the Firmware
Version 2.0
Copyright © 2005-2007 by LSI Corporation. All rights reserved.
8-5
8-6
Maintaining and Managing Storage Configurations
Version 2.0
Copyright © 2005-2007 by LSI Corporation. All rights reserved.
Appendix A
Events and Messages
This appendix lists the MegaRAID Storage Manager events that may
appear in the event log.
MegaRAID Storage Manager software monitors the activity and
performance of all controllers in the workstation and the devices attached
to them. When an event occurs, such as the start of an initialization, an
event message appears in the log at the bottom of the MegaRAID
Storage Manager window.
Each message that appears in the event log has an error level that
indicates the severity of the event, as shown in Table A.1.
Table A.1
Event Error Levels
Error Level
Meaning
Information
Informational message. No user action is necessary.
Warning
Some component may be close to a failure point.
Critical
A component has failed, but the system has not lost data.
Fatal
A component has failed, and data loss has occurred or will
occur.
Table A.2 lists all of the MegaRAID Storage Manager event messages.
The event message descriptions include placeholders for specific values
that are determined when the event is generated. For example, in
message No. 1 in the Event Messages table, “%s” is replaced by the
firmware version, which is read from the firmware when the event is
generated.
MegaRAID SAS Software User’s Guide
Version 2.0
Copyright © 2005-2007 by LSI Corporation. All rights reserved.
A-1
Table A.2
Event Messages
Number Type
Event Text
0x0000
MegaRAID firmware initialization started (PCI ID
%04x/%04x/%04x/%04x)
Information
0x0001
Information
MegaRAID firmware version %s
0x0002
Fatal
Unable to recover cache data from TBBU
0x0003
Information
Cache data recovered from TBBU successfully
0x0004
Information
Configuration cleared
0x0005
Warning
Cluster down; communication with peer lost
0x0006
Information
Virtual disk %s ownership changed from %02x to %02x
0x0007
Information
Alarm disabled by user
0x0008
Information
Alarm enabled by user
0x0009
Information
Background initialization rate changed to %d%%
0x000a
Fatal
Controller cache discarded due to memory/battery
problems
0x000b
Fatal
Unable to recover cache data due to configuration
mismatch
0x000c
Information
Cache data recovered successfully
0x000d
Fatal
Controller cache discarded due to firmware version
incompatibility
0x000e
Information
Consistency Check rate changed to %d%%
0x000f
Dead
Fatal firmware error: %s
0x0010
Information
Factory defaults restored
0x0011
Information
Flash downloaded image corrupt
0x0012
Caution
Flash erase error
0x0013
Caution
Flash timeout during erase
0x0014
Caution
Flash error
0x0015
Information
Flashing image: %s
0x0016
Information
Flash of new firmware image(s) complete
0x0017
Caution
Flash programming error
0x0018
Caution
Flash timeout during programming
0x0019
Caution
Flash chip type unknown
0x001a
Caution
Flash command set unknown
0x001b
Caution
Flash verify failure
(Sheet 1 of 9)
A-2
Events and Messages
Version 2.0
Copyright © 2005-2007 by LSI Corporation. All rights reserved.
Table A.2
Event Messages (Cont.)
Number Type
Event Text
0x001c
Information
Flush rate changed to %d seconds
0x001d
Information
Hibernate command received from host
0x001e
Information
Event log cleared
0x001f
Information
Event log wrapped
0x0020
Dead
Multi-bit ECC error: ECAR=%x, ELOG=%x, (%s)
0x0021
Warning
Single-bit ECC error: ECAR=%x, ELOG=%x, (%s)
0x0022
Dead
Not enough controller memory
0x0023
Information
Patrol Read complete
0x0024
Information
Patrol Read paused
0x0025
Information
Patrol Read Rate changed to %d%%
0x0026
Information
Patrol Read resumed
0x0027
Information
Patrol Read started
0x0028
Information
Rebuild rate changed to %d%%
0x0029
Information
Reconstruction rate changed to %d%%
0x002a
Information
Shutdown command received from host
0x002b
Information
Test event: %s
0x002c
Information
Time established as %s; (%d seconds since power on)
0x002d
Information
User entered firmware debugger
0x002e
Warning
Background Initialization aborted on %s
0x002f
Warning
Background Initialization corrected medium error (%s at
%lx
0x0030
Information
Background Initialization completed on %s
0x0031
Fatal
Background Initialization completed with uncorrectable
errors on %s
0x0032
Fatal
Background Initialization detected uncorrectable double
medium errors (%s at %lx on %s)
0x0033
Caution
Background Initialization failed on %s
0x0034
Progress
Background Initialization progress on %s is %s
0x0035
Information
Background Initialization started on %s
0x0036
Information
Policy change on %s from %s to %s
0x0038
Warning
Consistency Check aborted on %s
0x0039
Warning
Consistency Check corrected medium error (%s at %lx
(Sheet 2 of 9)
A-3
Version 2.0
Copyright © 2005-2007 by LSI Corporation. All rights reserved.
Table A.2
Event Messages (Cont.)
Number Type
Event Text
0x003a
Information
Consistency Check done on %s
0x003b
Information
Consistency Check done with corrections on %s
0x003c
Fatal
Consistency Check detected uncorrectable double
medium errors (%s at %lx on %s)
0x003d
Caution
Consistency Check failed on %s
0x003e
Fatal
Consistency Check failed with uncorrectable data
on %s
0x003f
Warning
Consistency Check found inconsistent parity on %s at
strip %lx
0x0040
Warning
Consistency Check inconsistency logging disabled on
%s (too many inconsistencies)
0x0041
Progress
Consistency Check progress on %s is %s
0x0042
Information
Consistency Check started on %s
0x0043
Warning
Initialization aborted on %s
0x0044
Caution
Initialization failed on %s
0x0045
Progress
Initialization progress on %s is %s
0x0046
Information
Fast initialization started on %s
0x0047
Information
Full initialization started on %s
0x0048
Information
Initialization complete on %s
0x0049
Information
LD Properties updated to %s (from %s)
0x004a
Information
Reconstruction complete on %s
0x004b
Fatal
Reconstruction of %s stopped due to unrecoverable
errors
0x004c
Fatal
Reconstruct detected uncorrectable double medium
errors (%s at %lx on %s at %lx)
0x004d
Progress
Reconstruction progress on %s is %s
0x004e
Information
Reconstruction resumed on %s
0x004f
Fatal
Reconstruction resume of %s failed due to
configuration mismatch
0x0050
Information
Reconstructing started on %s
0x0051
Information
State change on %s from %s to %s
0x0052
Information
PD Clear aborted on %s
0x0053
Caution
PD Clear failed on %s (Error %02x)
(Sheet 3 of 9)
A-4
Events and Messages
Version 2.0
Copyright © 2005-2007 by LSI Corporation. All rights reserved.
Table A.2
Event Messages (Cont.)
Number Type
Event Text
0x0054
Progress
PD Clear progress on %s is %s
0x0055
Information
PD Clear started on %s
0x0056
Information
PD Clear completed on %s
0x0057
Warning
Error on %s (Error %02x)
0x0058
Information
Format complete on %s
0x0059
Information
Format started on %s
0x005a
Caution
Hot Spare SMART polling failed on %s (Error %02x)
0x005b
Information
PD inserted: %s
0x005c
Warning
PD %s is not supported
0x005d
Warning
Patrol Read corrected medium error on %s at %lx
0x005e
Progress
Patrol Read progress on %s is %s
0x005f
Fatal
Patrol Read found an uncorrectable medium error on
%s at %lx
0x0060
Caution
Predictive failure: CDB: %s
0x0061
Fatal
Patrol Read puncturing bad block on %s at %lx
0x0062
Information
Rebuild aborted by user on %s
0x0063
Information
Rebuild complete on %s
0x0064
Information
Rebuild complete on %s
0x0065
Caution
Rebuild failed on %s due to source drive error
0x0066
Caution
Rebuild failed on %s due to target drive error
0x0067
Progress
Rebuild progress on %s is %s
0x0068
Information
Rebuild resumed on %s
0x0069
Information
Rebuild started on %s
0x006a
Information
Rebuild automatically started on %s
0x006b
Caution
Rebuild stopped on %s due to loss of cluster ownership
0x006c
Fatal
Reassign write operation failed on %s at %lx
0x006d
Fatal
Unrecoverable medium error during rebuild on %s
at %lx
0x006e
Information
Corrected medium error during recovery on %s at %lx
0x006f
Fatal
Unrecoverable medium error during recovery on %s
at %lx
0x0070
Information
PD removed: %s
(Sheet 4 of 9)
A-5
Version 2.0
Copyright © 2005-2007 by LSI Corporation. All rights reserved.
Table A.2
Event Messages (Cont.)
Number Type
Event Text
0x0071
Warning
Unexpected sense: %s, CDB%s, Sense: %s
0x0072
Information
State change on %s from %s to %s
0x0073
Information
State change by user on %s from %s to %s
0x0074
Warning
Redundant path to %s broken
0x0075
Information
Redundant path to %s restored
0x0076
Information
Dedicated Hot Spare PD %s no longer useful due to
deleted array
0x0077
Caution
SAS topology error: Loop detected
0x0078
Caution
SAS topology error: Unaddressable device
0x0079
Caution
SAS topology error: Multiple ports to the same SAS
address
0x007a
Caution
SAS topology error: Expander error
0x007b
Caution
SAS topology error: SMP timeout
0x007c
Caution
SAS topology error: Out of route entries
0x007d
Caution
SAS topology error: Index not found
0x007e
Caution
SAS topology error: SMP function failed
0x007f
Caution
SAS topology error: SMP CRC error
0x0080
Caution
SAS topology error: Multiple subtractive
0x0081
Caution
SAS topology error: Table to table
0x0082
Caution
SAS topology error: Multiple paths
0x0083
Fatal
Unable to access device %s
0x0084
Information
Dedicated Hot Spare created on %s (%s)
0x0085
Information
Dedicated Hot Spare %s disabled
0x0086
Caution
Dedicated Hot Spare %s no longer useful for all arrays
0x0087
Information
Global Hot Spare created on %s (%s)
0x0088
Information
Global Hot Spare %s disabled
0x0089
Caution
Global Hot Spare does not cover all arrays
0x008a
Information
Created %s}
0x008b
Information
Deleted %s}
0x008c
Information
Marking LD %s inconsistent due to active writes at
shutdown
0x008d
Information
Battery Present
(Sheet 5 of 9)
A-6
Events and Messages
Version 2.0
Copyright © 2005-2007 by LSI Corporation. All rights reserved.
Table A.2
Event Messages (Cont.)
Number Type
Event Text
0x008e
Warning
Battery Not Present
0x008f
Information
New Battery Detected
0x0090
Information
Battery has been replaced
0x0091
Caution
Battery temperature is high
0x0092
Warning
Battery voltage low
0x0093
Information
Battery started charging
0x0094
Information
Battery is discharging
0x0095
Information
Battery temperature is normal
0x0096
Fatal
Battery needs to be replacement, SOH Bad
0x0097
Information
Battery relearn started
0x0098
Information
Battery relearn in progress
0x0099
Information
Battery relearn completed
0x009a
Caution
Battery relearn timed out
0x009b
Information
Battery relearn pending: Battery is under charge
0x009c
Information
Battery relearn postponed
0x009d
Information
Battery relearn will start in 4 days
0x009e
Information
Battery relearn will start in 2 day
0x009f
Information
Battery relearn will start in 1 day
0x00a0
Information
Battery relearn will start in 5 hours
0x00a1
Information
Battery removed
0x00a2
Information
Current capacity of the battery is below threshold
0x00a3
Information
Current capacity of the battery is above threshold
0x00a4
Information
Enclosure (SES) discovered on %s
0x00a5
Information
Enclosure (SAFTE) discovered on %s
0x00a6
Caution
Enclosure %s communication lost
0x00a7
Information
Enclosure %s communication restored
0x00a8
Caution
Enclosure %s fan %d failed
0x00a9
Information
Enclosure %s fan %d inserted
0x00aa
Caution
Enclosure %s fan %d removed
0x00ab
Caution
Enclosure %s power supply %d failed
0x00ac
Information
Enclosure %s power supply %d inserted
(Sheet 6 of 9)
A-7
Version 2.0
Copyright © 2005-2007 by LSI Corporation. All rights reserved.
Table A.2
Event Messages (Cont.)
Number Type
Event Text
0x00ad
Caution
Enclosure %s power supply %d removed
0x00ae
Caution
Enclosure %s SIM %d failed
0x00af
Information
Enclosure %s SIM %d inserted
0x00b0
Caution
Enclosure %s SIM %d removed
0x00b1
Warning
Enclosure %s temperature sensor %d below warning
threshold
0x00b2
Caution
Enclosure %s temperature sensor %d below error
threshold
0x00b3
Warning
Enclosure %s temperature sensor %d above warning
threshold
0x00b4
Caution
Enclosure %s temperature sensor %d above error
threshold
0x00b5
Caution
Enclosure %s shutdown
0x00b6
Warning
Enclosure %s not supported; too many enclosures
connected to port
0x00b7
Caution
Enclosure %s firmware mismatch
0x00b8
Warning
Enclosure %s sensor %d bad
0x00b9
Caution
Enclosure %s phy %d bad
0x00ba
Caution
Enclosure %s is unstable
0x00bb
Caution
Enclosure %s hardware error
0x00bc
Caution
Enclosure %s not responding
0x00bd
Information
SAS/SATA mixing not supported in enclosure; PD %s
disabled
0x00be
Information
Enclosure (SES) hotplug on %s was detected, but is
not supported
0x00bf
Information
Clustering enabled
0x00c0
Information
Clustering disabled
0x00c1
Information
PD too small to be used for auto-rebuild on %s
0x00c2
Information
BBU enabled; changing WT virtual disks to WB
0x00c3
Warning
BBU disabled; changing WB virtual disks to WT
0x00c4
Warning
Bad block table on PD %s is 80% full
0x00c5
Fatal
Bad block table on PD %s is full; unable to log
block %lx
(Sheet 7 of 9)
A-8
Events and Messages
Version 2.0
Copyright © 2005-2007 by LSI Corporation. All rights reserved.
Table A.2
Event Messages (Cont.)
Number Type
Event Text
0x00c6
Information
Consistency Check Aborted due to ownership loss
on %s
0x00c7
Information
Background Initialization (BGI) Aborted Due to
Ownership Loss on %s
0x00c8
Caution
Battery/charger problems detected; SOH Bad
0x00c9
Warning
Single-bit ECC error: ECAR=%x, ELOG=%x, (%s);
warning threshold exceeded
0x00ca
Caution
Single-bit ECC error: ECAR=%x, ELOG=%x, (%s);
critical threshold exceeded
0x00cb
Caution
Single-bit ECC error: ECAR=%x, ELOG=%x, (%s);
further reporting disabled
0x00cc
Caution
Enclosure %s Power supply %d switched off
0x00cd
Information
Enclosure %s Power supply %d switched on
0x00ce
Caution
Enclosure %s Power supply %d cable removed
0x00cf
Information
Enclosure %s Power supply %d cable inserted
0x00d0
Information
Enclosure %s Fan %d returned to normal
Information
BBU Retention test was initiated on previous boot
0x00d2
Information
BBU Retention test passed
0x00d3
Caution
BBU Retention test failed!
0x00d4
Information
NVRAM Retention test was initiated on previous boot
0x00d5
Information
NVRAM Retention test passed
0x00d6
Caution
NVRAM Retention test failed!
0x00d1
0x00d7
Information
%s test completed %d passes successfully
0x00d8
Caution
%s test FAILED on %d pass. Fail data: errorOffset=%x
goodData=%x badData=%x
0x00d9
Information
Self check diagnostics completed
0x00da
Information
Foreign Configuration Detected
0x00db
Information
Foreign Configuration Imported
0x00dc
Information
Foreign Configuration Cleared
0x00dd
Warning
NVRAM is corrupt; reinitializing
0x00de
Warning
NVRAM mismatch occurred
0x00df
Warning
SAS wide port %d lost link on PHY %d
0x00e0
Information
SAS wide port %d restored link on PHY %d
(Sheet 8 of 9)
A-9
Version 2.0
Copyright © 2005-2007 by LSI Corporation. All rights reserved.
Table A.2
Event Messages (Cont.)
Number Type
Event Text
0x00e1
Warning
SAS port %d, PHY %d has exceeded the allowed error
rate
0x00e2
Warning
Bad block reassigned on %s at %lx to %lx
0x00e3
Information
Controller Hot Plug detected
0x00e4
Warning
Enclosure %s temperature sensor %d differential
detected
0x00e5
Information
Disk test cannot start. No qualifying disks found
0x00e6
Information
Time duration provided by host is not sufficient for self
check
0x00e7
Information
Marked Missing for %s on array %d row %d
0x00e8
Information
Replaced Missing as %s on array %d row %d
0x00e9
Information
Enclosure %s Temperature %d returned to normal
0x00ea
Information
Enclosure %s Firmware download in progress
0x00eb
Warning
Enclosure %s Firmware download failed
0x00ec
Warning
%s is not a certified drive
0x00ed
Information
Dirty cache data discarded by user
0x00ee
Information
PDs missing from configuration at boot
0x00ef
Information
VDs missing drives and will go offline at boot: %s
0x00f0
Information
VDs missing at boot: %s
0x00f1
Information
Previous configuration completely missing at boot
0x00f2
Information
Battery charge complete
0x00f3
Information
Enclosure %s fan %d speed changed
(Sheet 9 of 9)
A-10
Events and Messages
Version 2.0
Copyright © 2005-2007 by LSI Corporation. All rights reserved.
Appendix B
Glossary
access policy
A virtual disk property indicating what kind of access is allowed for a
particular virtual disk. The possible values are Read/Write, Read Only, or
Blocked.
adapter
A device that enables a computer system to access peripheral devices
by converting the protocol of one bus or interface to another. An adapter
may also provide specialized function. For example, a RAID controller is
a type of adapter that provides RAID functions. Adapters may reside on
the system board or be an add-in card. Other examples of adapters
include network and SCSI adapters.
alarm enabled
A controller property that indicates whether the controller’s onboard
alarm is enabled.
alarm present
A controller property that indicates whether the controller has an onboard
alarm. If present and enabled, the alarm is sounded for certain error
conditions.
array
See disk group.
BBU present
A controller property that indicates whether the controller has an onboard
battery backup unit to provide power in case of a power failure.
BGI rate
A controller property indicating the rate at which the background
initialization of virtual disks will be carried out.
BIOS
Basic Input/Output System. The computer BIOS is stored on a flash
memory chip. The BIOS controls communications between the
microprocessor and peripheral devices, such as the keyboard and the
video adapter, and miscellaneous functions, such as system messages.
cache
Fast memory that holds recently accessed data. Use of cache memory
speeds subsequent access to the same data. When data is read from or
written to main memory, a copy is also saved in cache memory with the
MegaRAID SAS Software User’s Guide
Version 2.0
Copyright © 2005-2007 by LSI Corporation. All rights reserved.
B-1
associated main memory address. The cache memory software monitors
the addresses of subsequent reads to see if the required data is already
stored in cache memory. If it is already in cache memory (a cache hit),
it is read from cache memory immediately and the main memory read is
aborted (or not started). If the data is not cached (a cache miss), it is
fetched from main memory and saved in cache memory.
cache flush
interval
A controller property that indicates how often the data cache is flushed.
caching
The process of using a high speed memory buffer to speed up a
computer system’s overall read/write performance. The cache can be
accessed at a higher speed than a disk subsystem. To improve read
performance, the cache usually contains the most recently accessed
data, as well as data from adjacent disk sectors. To improve write
performance, the cache may temporarily store data in accordance with
its write back policies.
coerced size
A physical drive property indicating the size to which a disk drive has
been coerced (forced) to make it compatible with other disk drives that
are nominally the same size. For example, a 4 Gbyte drive from one
manufacturer may be 4,196 Mbytes, and a 4 Gbyte from another
manufacturer may be 4,128 Mbytes. These drives could be coerced to a
usable size of 4,088 Mbytes each for use in a disk group in a storage
configuration.
coercion mode
A controller property indicating the size to which disk drives of nominally
identical capacity are coerced (forced) to make them usable in a storage
configuration.
consistency
check
An operation that verifies that all stripes in a virtual disk with a redundant
RAID level are consistent and that automatically fixes any errors. For
RAID 1 disk groups, this operation verifies correct mirrored data for each
stripe.
consistency
check rate
The rate at which consistency check operations are run on a computer
system.
controller
A chip that controls the transfer of data between the microprocessor and
memory or between the microprocessor and a peripheral device such as
a physical disk. RAID controllers perform RAID functions such as striping
and mirroring to provide data protection. MegaRAID Storage Manager
software runs on LSI SAS controllers.
B-2
Glossary
Version 2.0
Copyright © 2005-2007 by LSI Corporation. All rights reserved.
current write
policy
A virtual disk property that indicates whether the virtual disk currently
supports Write Back mode or Write Through mode.
•
In Write Back mode the controller sends a data transfer completion
signal to the host when the controller cache has received all the data
in a transaction.
•
In Write Through mode the controller sends a data transfer
completion signal to the host when the disk subsystem has received
all the data in a transaction.
default write
policy
A virtual disk property indicating whether the default write policy is Write
Through or Write Back. In Write Back mode the controller sends a data
transfer completion signal to the host when the controller cache has
received all the data in a transaction. In Write Through mode the
controller sends a data transfer completion signal to the host when the
disk subsystem has received all the data in a transaction.
device ID
A controller or physical disk property indicating the manufacturerassigned device ID.
device port
count
A controller property indicating the number of ports on the controller.
disk cache
policy
A virtual disk property indicating whether the virtual disk cache is
enabled, disabled, or unchanged from its previous setting.
disk group
A logical grouping of disks attached to a RAID controller on which one
or more virtual disks can be created. All virtual disks in the disk group
use all of the physical disks in the disk group.
disk subsystem
A collection of disks and the hardware that controls them and connects
them to one or more controllers. The hardware can include an intelligent
controller, or the disks can attach directly to a system I/O bus controller.
fast
initialization
A mode of initialization that quickly writes zeroes to the first and last
sectors of the virtual disk. This allows you to immediately start writing
data to the virtual disk while the initialization is running in the
background.
fault tolerance
The capability of the disk subsystem to undergo a single drive failure per
disk group without compromising data integrity and processing capability.
LSI SAS RAID controllers provides fault tolerance through redundant disk
B-3
Version 2.0
Copyright © 2005-2007 by LSI Corporation. All rights reserved.
groups in RAID levels 1, 5, 6, 10, 50, and 60. They also support hot
spare disks and the auto-rebuild feature.
firmware
Software stored in read-only memory (ROM) or programmable ROM
(PROM). Firmware is often responsible for the behavior of a system
when it is first turned on. A typical example would be a monitor program
in a system that loads the full operating system from disk or from a
network and then passes control to the operating system.
foreign
configuration
A RAID configuration that already exists on a replacement set of physical
disks that you install in a computer system. MegaRAID Storage Manager
software allows you to import the existing configuration to the RAID
controller, or you can clear the configuration so you can create a
new one.
formatting
The process of writing a specific value to all data fields on a physical
disk, to map out unreadable or bad sectors. Because most physical disks
are formatted when manufactured, formatting is usually done only if a
physical disk generates many media errors.
hole
In MegaRAID Storage Manager, a hole is a block of empty space in a
disk group that can be used to define a virtual disk.
host interface
A controller property indicating the type of interface used by the
computer host system: for example, PCIX.
host port count
A controller property indicating the number of host data ports currently
in use.
host system
Any computer system on which the controller is installed. Mainframes,
workstations, and standalone desktop systems can all be considered
host systems.
hot spare
A standby physical disk that can automatically replace a failed physical
disk in a virtual disk and prevent data from being lost. A hot spare can
be dedicated to a single redundant disk group or it can be part of the
global hot spare pool for all disk groups controlled by the controller.
When a physical disk fails, MegaRAID Storage Manager software
automatically uses a hot spare to replace it and then rebuilds the data
from the failed physical disk to the hot spare. Hot spares can be used in
RAID 1, 5, 6, 10, 50, and 60 storage configurations.
B-4
Glossary
Version 2.0
Copyright © 2005-2007 by LSI Corporation. All rights reserved.
initialization
The process of writing zeros to the data fields of a virtual disk and, in
fault-tolerant RAID levels, generating the corresponding parity to put the
virtual disk in a Ready state. Initialization erases all previous data on the
physical disks. Disk groups will work without initializing, but they can fail
a consistency check because the parity fields have not been generated.
IO policy
A virtual disk property indicating whether Cached I/O or Direct I/O is
being used. In Cached I/O mode, all reads are buffered in cache
memory. In Direct I/O mode, reads are not buffered in cache memory.
Data is transferred to cache and the host concurrently. If the same data
block is read again, it comes from cache memory. (The IO Policy applies
to reads on a specific virtual disk. It does not affect the read ahead
cache.)
media error
count
A physical drive property indicating the number of errors that have been
detected on the disk media.
migration
The process of moving virtual disks and hot spare disks from one
controller to another by disconnecting the physical disks from one
controller and attaching them to another one. The firmware on the new
controller will detect and retain the virtual disk information on the physical
disks.
mirroring
The process of providing complete data redundancy with two physical
disks by maintaining an exact copy of one disk’s data on the second
physical disk. If one physical disk fails, the contents of the other physical
disk can be used to maintain the integrity of the system and to rebuild
the failed physical disk.
name
A virtual disk property indicating the user-assigned name of the virtual
disk.
non-redundant
configuration
A RAID 0 virtual disk with data striped across two or more physical disks
but without disk mirroring or parity. This provides for high data throughput
but offers no protection in case of a physical disk failure.
NVRAM
Acronym for non-volatile random access memory. A storage system that
does not lose the data stored on it when power is removed. NVRAM is
used to store firmware and configuration data on the RAID controller.
NVRAM present
A controller property indicating whether an NVRAM is present on the
controller.
B-5
Version 2.0
Copyright © 2005-2007 by LSI Corporation. All rights reserved.
NVRAM Size
A controller property indicating the size of the controller’s NVRAM.
offline
A physical disk is offline when it is part of a virtual disk but its data is not
accessible to the virtual disk.
patrol read
A process that checks the physical disks in a storage configuration for
physical disk errors that could lead to drive failure and lost data. The
patrol read operation can find and sometimes fix any potential problem
with physical disks prior to host access. This enhances overall system
performance because error recovery during a normal I/O operation may
not be necessary.
patrol read rate
The user-defined rate at which patrol read operations are run on a
computer system.
physical disk
A non-volatile, randomly addressable device for storing data. Physical
disks are rewritable and commonly referred to as disk drives.
physical drive
state
A physical drive property indicating the status of the drive. A physical disk
can be in one of the following states:
B-6
•
Unconfigured Good: A disk accessible to the RAID controller but not
configured as a part of a virtual disk or as a hot spare.
•
Hot Spare: A physical disk that is configured as a hot spare.
•
Online: A physical disk can be accessed by the RAID controller and
will be part of the virtual disk.
•
Rebuild: A physical disk to which data is being written to restore full
redundancy for a virtual disk.
•
Failed: A physical disk that was originally configured as Online or Hot
Spare, but on which the firmware detects an unrecoverable error.
•
Unconfigured Bad: A physical disk on which the firmware detects an
unrecoverable error; the physical disk was Unconfigured Good or the
physical disk could not be initialized.
•
Missing: A physical disk that was Online, but which has been
removed from its location.
•
Offline: A physical disk that is part of a virtual disk but which has
invalid data as far as the RAID configuration is concerned.
Glossary
Version 2.0
Copyright © 2005-2007 by LSI Corporation. All rights reserved.
•
None: A physical disk with an unsupported flag set. An Unconfigured
Good or Offline physical disk that has completed the prepare for
removal operation.
physical drive
type
A physical drive property indicating the characteristics of the drive.
product info
A physical disk property indicating the vendor-assigned model number of
the drive.
product name
A controller property indicating the manufacturing name of the controller.
RAID
A group of multiple, independent disk drives that provide high
performance by increasing the number of disks used for saving and
accessing data. A RAID disk group improves input/output (I/O)
performance and data availability. The group of disk drives appears to the
host system as a single storage unit or as multiple virtual disks. Data
throughput improves because several physical disks can be accessed
simultaneously. RAID configurations also improve data storage
availability and fault tolerance. Redundant RAID levels (RAID levels 1, 5,
6, 10, 50, and 60) provide data protection.
RAID 0
Uses data striping on two or more disk drives to provide high data
throughput, especially for large files in an environment that requires no
data redundancy.
RAID 1
Uses data mirroring on a pair of disk drives so that data written to one
physical disk is simultaneously written to the other physical disk. RAID 1
works well for small databases or other small applications that require
complete data redundancy.
RAID 5
Uses data striping and parity data across three or more disk drives
(distributed parity) to provide high data throughput and data redundancy,
especially for applications that require random access.
RAID 6
Uses data striping and parity data across three or more disk drives
(distributed parity) to provide high data throughput and data redundancy,
especially for applications that require random access. RAID 6 can
survive the failure of two disk drives.
RAID 10
A combination of RAID 0 and RAID 1 that uses data striping across two
mirrored disk groups. It provides high data throughput and complete data
redundancy.
B-7
Version 2.0
Copyright © 2005-2007 by LSI Corporation. All rights reserved.
RAID 50
A combination of RAID 0 and RAID 5 that uses data striping across two
disk groups with parity data. It provides high data throughput and
complete data redundancy.
RAID 60
A combination of RAID 0 and RAID 6 that uses data striping across two
disk groups with parity data. It provides high data throughput and
complete data redundancy. RAID 60 can survive the failure of two disk
drives in each RAID set in the spanned array.
RAID level
A virtual disk property indicating the RAID level of the virtual disk. LSI
SAS controllers support RAID levels 0, 1, 5, 6, 10, 50, and 60.
raw size
A physical drive property indicating the actual full size of the drive before
any coercion mode is applied to reduce the size.
read policy
A controller attribute indicating the current Read Policy mode. In Always
Read Ahead mode, the controller reads sequentially ahead of requested
data and stores the additional data in cache memory, anticipating that the
data will be needed soon. This speeds up reads for sequential data, but
there is little improvement when accessing random data. In No Read
Ahead mode, read ahead capability is disabled. In Adaptive Read Ahead
mode, the controller begins using read ahead if the two most recent disk
accesses occurred in sequential sectors. If the read requests are
random, the controller reverts to No Read Ahead mode.
rebuild
The regeneration of all data to a replacement disk in a redundant virtual
disk after a physical disk failure. A disk rebuild normally occurs without
interrupting normal operations on the affected virtual disk, though some
degradation of performance of the disk subsystem can occur.
rebuild rate
The percentage of central processing unit (CPU) resources devoted to
rebuilding data onto a new physical disk after a disk in a storage
configuration has failed.
reclaim virtual
disk
A method of undoing the configuration of a new virtual disk. If you
highlight the virtual disk in the Configuration Wizard and click the
Reclaim button, the individual disk drives are removed from the virtual
disk configuration.
reconstruction
rate
The user-defined rate at which a reconstruction operation is carried out.
B-8
Glossary
Version 2.0
Copyright © 2005-2007 by LSI Corporation. All rights reserved.
redundancy
A property of a storage configuration that prevents data from being lost
when one physical disk fails in the configuration.
redundant
configuration
A virtual disk that has redundant data on physical disks in the disk group
that can be used to rebuild a failed physical disk. The redundant data
can be parity data striped across multiple physical disks in a disk group,
or it can be a complete mirrored copy of the data stored on a second
physical disk. A redundant configuration protects the data in case a
physical disk fails in the configuration.
revision level
A physical disk property that indicates the revision level of the disk’s
firmware.
SAS
Acronym for Serial Attached SCSI. SAS is a serial, point-to-point,
enterprise-level device interface that leverages the Small Computer
System Interface (SCSI) protocol set. The SAS interface provides
improved performance, simplified cabling, smaller connectors, lower pin
count, and lower power requirements when compared to parallel SCSI.
SATA
Acronym for Serial Advanced Technology Attachment. A physical storage
interface standard. SATA is a serial link that provides point-to-point
connections between devices. The thinner serial cables allow for better
airflow within the system and permit smaller chassis designs.
SCSI device
type
A physical drive property indicating the type of the device, such as disk
drive.
serial no.
A controller property indicating the manufacturer-assigned serial number.
size
A virtual disk property indicating the amount of storage space on the
virtual disk.
strip size
The portion of a stripe that resides on a single physical disk in the disk
group.
stripe size
A virtual disk property indicating the length of the interleaved data
segments that the RAID controller writes across multiple drives, not
including parity disks. For example, consider a stripe that contains 64 KB
of disk space and has 16 KB of data residing on each disk in the stripe.
In this case, the stripe size is 64 KB and the strip size is 16 KB. The user
can select the stripe size.
striping
A technique used to write data across all physical disks in a virtual disk.
Each stripe consists of consecutive virtual disk data addresses that are
B-9
Version 2.0
Copyright © 2005-2007 by LSI Corporation. All rights reserved.
mapped in fixed-size units to each physical disk in the virtual disk using
a sequential pattern. For example, if the virtual disk includes five physical
disks, the stripe writes data to physical disks one through five without
repeating any of the physical disks. The amount of space consumed by
a stripe is the same on each physical disk. Striping by itself does not
provide data redundancy. Striping in combination with parity does provide
data redundancy.
subvendor ID
A controller property that lists additional vendor ID information about the
controller.
uncorrectable
error count
A controller property that lists the number of uncorrectable errors
detected on physical disks connected to the controller. If the error count
reaches a certain level, a physical disk will be marked as failed.
vendor ID
A controller property indicating the vendor-assigned ID number of the
controller.
vendor info
A physical drive property listing the name of the vendor of the drive.
virtual disk
A storage unit created by a RAID controller from one or more physical
disks. Although a virtual disk may be created from several physical disks,
it is seen by the operating system as a single disk. Depending on the
RAID level used, the virtual disk may retain redundant data in case of a
disk failure.
virtual disk
state
A virtual disk property indicating the condition of the virtual disk.
Examples include Optimal and Degraded.
write-back
In Write-Back Caching mode, the controller sends a data transfer
completion signal to the host when the controller cache has received all
the data in a disk write transaction. Data is written to the disk subsystem
in accordance with policies set up by the controller. These policies
include the amount of dirty/clean cache lines, the number of cache lines
available, and elapsed time from the last cache flush.
write policy
See Default Write Policy.
write-through
In Write-Through Caching mode, the controller sends a data transfer
completion signal to the host when the disk subsystem has received all
the data and has completed the write transaction to the disk.
B-10
Glossary
Version 2.0
Copyright © 2005-2007 by LSI Corporation. All rights reserved.
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