Tyan Computer Tyan S1598 Network Card User Manual

Tyan Computer Tyan S1598 Network Card User Manual
Tyan S1598
Trinity ATX
Motherboard User’s Manual
Revision 1.00
Copyright © Tyan Computer Corporation, 1999. All rights reserved. No part of this
manual may be reproduced or translated without prior written consent from Tyan
Computer Corp.
All registered and unregistered trademarks and company names contained in this
manual are propery of their respective companies including, but not limited to the
following.
AwardBIOS is a trademark of Award Software Inc.
Windows is a trademark of Microsoft Corporation.
IBM, PC, AT, PS/2 are trademarks of IBM Corporation.
INTEL, Pentium, Pentium MMX are trademarks of Intel Corporation.
S1598 Trinity ATX is a trademark of TYAN Computer Corporation.
Information contained in this publication has been carefully checked for accuracy and
reliability. In no event will Tyan Computer be held liable for any direct or indirect,
incidental or consequential damage, loss of use, loss of data, or other malady resulting
from errors or inaccuracies of information contained in this manual. The information
contained in this document is subject to change without notice.
PRINTED IN USA
Table of Contents
1. Introduction.....................................................................................................4
Overview..................................................................................................... 4
Icons............................................................................................................5
Hardware Specifications/Features.......................................................... 5
Software Specifications............................................................................ 7
Technical Support......................................................................................7
Returning Merchandise for Service........................................................8
2. Board Installation.......................................................................................... 9
Unpacking...................................................................................................9
Precautions.................................................................................................9
Installation Steps.......................................................................................10
What is a Jumper?..................................................................................... 11
Map of Motherboard Jumpers.................................................................12
Picture of Motherboard Features............................................................13
Setting Jumpers..........................................................................................14
Mounting the Motherboard in the Chassis...........................................16
Installing Memory......................................................................................17
Installing CPU and Cooling Fan..............................................................20
Connecting IDE and Floppy Drives........................................................22
Connecting the Power Supply................................................................. 23
Installing Add-on Cards...........................................................................24
Connecting PS/2, USB, Serial & Parallel Devices................................. 25
Frequently Asked Questions...................................................................26
3. BIOS Configuration...................................................................................... 30
Introduction to Setup................................................................................30
Main Setup Menu......................................................................................33
Standard CMOS Setup..............................................................................35
BIOS Features Setup.................................................................................38
Chipset Features Setup.............................................................................43
Power Management Setup....................................................................... 46
PnP/PCI Setup............................................................................................51
Integrated Peripherals...............................................................................54
User Password........................................................................................... 57
Flash Writer Utility.....................................................................................57
4. System Resources......................................................................................... 60
POST Messages........................................................................................ 60
Appendix 1 - Glossary........................................................................................64
.
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Chapter 1
chapter 1
Introduction
Introduction
Overview
The S1598 Trinity ATX is a quality, high performance mainboard designed for
Socket 7 microprocessors. This mainboard utilizes the VIA MVP3 100MHz
AGPset and host bus speeds of 66MHz to 100MHz. For CPU speed support,
please refer to the CPU Compatibility Chart in Tyan’s website
(http://www.tyan.com/support/html/socket_7_compatibility.html). The Trinity
ATX also has 100MHz Front Side Bus support, which allows you to take full
advantage of 100MHz SDRAM memory modules.
The S1598 mainboard, with built-in AGP slot, provides high performance
capabilities that are ideal for a wide range of demanding applications such as
CAD, CAM, CAE, desktop publishing, 3D animation, and video production.
This system board achieves high reliability with numerous features and yet is
small enough to be supported in an ATX form factor. Some of the features
included are onboard dual channel PCI PIO, Bus Master IDE and UltraDMA/
66, onboard floppy controller, and onboard high speed I/O. Flexibility and
expandability have been designed into the Trinity ATX. With I/O and drive
controller support built onboard, the one AGP slot, five PCI and two ISA slots
(one shared, seven usable) are free for numerous add-on expansion cards.
Remember to take a look at TYAN Computer’s web site located at
http://www.tyan.com
4
Icons
In order to help you navigate this manual and set up your system, we have
added several icons to our format.
This icon alerts you to particularly important details regarding the
setup or maintenance of your system. This icon often appears next
to information that may keep you from damaging your board or
important!
system. While we will often point out the most vital paragraphs in a
chapter, you should always read every word in the text. Failing to do so can
lead to exasperation and expense.
!
Wherever possible, we have included step-by-step instructions for
setting up your system, which are indicated by this icon. However, it
procedure
is in your best interest to read an entire section (and perhaps the
entire manual) before you begin to fiddle with your motherboard.
1.
2.
3.
While we have alerted you to potential dangers in several places in
the manual with this icon, these warnings should not be regarded as
warning
the whole of your safety regimen. Never forget that computers are
electrical devices, and are capable of delivering a shock. Prevent
damage to yourself and to your board: always ensure that your system is
turned off and unplugged whenever you are working with it, and that you are
equipped with a static safety device.
Hardware Specifications/Features
Processor Information*
•Intel Pentium/Pentium MMX
•AMD /K6/K6-2/K6-3
•Cyrix/6x86MX / MII
•IDT C6/C6+
•Front Side Bus support for 66 /75 /83 /95 /100MHz
•Integrated VRM
•Supports Core Voltage settings 1.3 - 3.5V
•Supports Clock Multiplier 2.5 - 5.5
S1598 Trinity ATX
5
INTRO
http://www.tyan.com. There you can find information on all of TYAN’s
products along with FAQs, distributors list, drivers, and BIOS setting explanations.
Chapter 1
Introduction
On Board Cache
•On board Pipeline Burst SRAM 1MB
•512K or 2MB (manufacturing option)
Chipset Information
•VIA MVP3 100MHz memory & AGP
controller(VT82C598AT)
•VIA VT82C686 Super I/O controller
BIOS Information
•Award BIOS on 2MB flash RAM
•Plug and Play
•APM 1.2 / ACPI 1.0 / PC98 compliant
•IDE drive auto configure
•Soft power-down
•Multiple boot options
•DMI 2.0 compliant
•Hardware monitoring of CPU voltage, temperature,
and Fan status
System Memory
•Supports 8MB to 768MB
•Three 3.3V unbuffered 168-pin DIMM sockets.
•Maximum rated memory bus speed 100MHz
•Supports EDO, SDRAM, Parity, and ECC (ECC only
with Parity memory)
Expansion Slots
•One AGP Slot (supports 66/133MHz speeds)
•Five 32-bit PCI 2.1 Bus Master slots.
•Two 16-bit ISA slots.
•One shared, seven usable slots total.
•All slots support full length add-on cards
On Board PCI IDE
•Two 40-pin IDE connectors for up to 4 drives
•PIO Mode 3 / 4, UltraDMA33/66 supported
•ATAPI IDE CD-ROM and LS-120 supported
On Board I/O
•One Floppy port (1.44MB, 2.88MB, 3-mode)
•Two 9-pin 16550 UART Serial ports
•One 25-pin ECP / EPP Parallel port
•One Fast IR TX / RX header
•Two USB (0,1) rev 1.2 ports
•Two USB (2,3) rev 1.2 ports via cable (optional)
•PS/2 Mouse and Keyboard ports
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6
Other Features
•3-pin Wake on LAN header*
•3-pin Wake on Ring
•Two 3-pin Fan speed monitoring support
Form Factor
•ATX design (8.3” x 12.0”)
•4 Layer board
•20-pin ATX power connector
•Stacked (double row) I/O connectors
* Requires ATX 2.01 power supply
Software Specifications
OS
•Operates with Windows 95, Windows 98,
Windows NT 4.0, OS/2 v4.0, Novell Netware v5.0,
and SCO Unix v5.05
Technical Support
If a problem arises with your system, you should turn to your dealer for help
first. Your system has most likely been configured by them, and they should
have the best idea of what hardware and software your system contains.
Hence, they should be of the most assistance. Further, if you purchased your
system from a dealer near to you, you can actually bring your system in to
them to have it serviced, instead of attempting to do so yourself (which can
have expensive consequences).
S1598 Trinity ATX
7
INTRO
On Board Audio (Manufacturing Option)
•VIA VT82C686 digital link audio
•AC-97 Codec on board
•One MIDI / Game port
•Line-in MIC-in and Line-out ports
•4-pin CD-ROM audio (ATAPI) header
•4-pin Video-in (ATAPI) header
Chapter 1
Introduction
Help resources:
1. See FAQ and beep codes sections of this manual.
2. See Tyan web site for FAQ, bulletins, driver updates, etc.
http://www.tyan.com
3. Contact your dealer or distributor for help BEFORE calling Tyan.
4. Email Tyan tech support:
[email protected]
5. Call Tyan tech support:
510-440-8808
Returning Merchandise for Service
During the warranty period, contact your distributor or system vendor FIRST
for any product problems. This warranty only covers normal customer use and
does not cover damages incurred during shipping or failure due to the
alteration, misuse, abuse, or improper maintenance of products.
For Resellers Only:
A receipt or copy of your invoice marked with the date of purchase is required
before any warranty service can be rendered. You can obtain service by calling
the manufacturer for a Return Merchandise Authorization (RMA) number. The
RMA number should be prominently displayed on the outside of the shipping
carton and the package should be mailed prepaid, or hand-carried to the
manufacturer. TYAN will pay to have the board shipped back to you.
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8
chapter 2
INSTALL
Board Installation
Unpacking
The mainboard package should contain the following:
(1) S1598 mainboard
(1) 40-pin IDE and 34-pin floppy cable pack
(1) S1598 User’s Manual
(1) Driver CD
Precautions
What’s the first thing I should do?
The first thing you should do is read this user’s manual. It contains important
information which will make configuration and setup much easier.
Here are some precautions you should follow when installing your motherboard:
(1) Ground yourself properly before removing your motherboard
from the antistatic bag. Unplug the power from your computer
S1598 Trinity ATX
9
Chapter 2
Board Installation
!
important!
and then touch any metal part on the computer case. (Or wear a
grounded wrist strap.)
(2) Hold the motherboard by its edges and do not touch the bottom of
the board.
(3) Avoid touching motherboard components, IC chips, connectors,
and leads.
(4) Avoid touching pins of memory modules and chips.
(5) Place motherboard on a grounded antistatic surface or on the
antistatic bag.
Having reviewed the precautions above, the next step is to take the motherboard out of the cardboard box and static bag, hold it by its edges, and place it
on a grounded antistatic surface, component side up. Inspect the board for
damage.
warning
DO NOT APPLY POWER TO THE BOARD IF IT HAS BEEN DAMAGED!
Press down on any of the socket ICs if it appears that they are not properly
seated (the board should still be on an antistatic mat). Do not touch the
bottom of the board. Remember, don’t take any electronic device out of its
protective bag until you are ready to actually install it into the computer case.
If you do not ground yourself, you risk zapping the motherboard or adapter
card. Subsequent problems may not arise immediately because electrostatic
discharge damage, unlike physical damage, causes the device to fail over time.
*Power Supply Requirement: If you use an ATX Power Supply, it should be
2.01 compliant. Standby current must be 750mA or higher (SB5V = 0.75A)
Installation Steps
You are now ready to install your mainboard. The mounting hole pattern of the
S1598 matches the ATX system board specifications. Your chassis should
have standard ATX mainboard form factor mounting holes and an ATX power
supply.
1.
2.
3.
procedure
1. Set Jumpers
2. Mount Motherboard in Chassis
3. Install Memory
4. Install CPU & Cooling Fan
5. Connect IDE and Floppy Drives
http://www.tyan.com
10
6. Connect Power Supply
7. Install Add-on Cards
8. Connect PS/2, USB, Serial and Parallel Devices
What is a Jumper?
Jumpers and pins are connected by slipping the blue plastic jumper connector
overtop of two adjacent jumper pins (indicated by 1-2 or 2-3). The metal rod
inside the plastic shell bridges the gap between the two pins, completing the
circuit. See Figure 2-2 for more examples of pin connections.
The tables and maps on the following pages will help you set the jumpers for CPU
speed, Infrared, and external connector pin assignments, among others. The
miniature motherboard maps will help you locate the jumpers on your board. A
full-page map of the motherboard can be found on the next two pages.
3 (or more) pin jumpers
2 pin jumpers
off
1-2
on
2-3
1
2
3
Figure 2-1
open
1
2
3
Figure 2-2
S1598 Trinity ATX
11
1
2
3
INSTALL
In this manual, the terms “closed” and “on” are used when referring to jumpers
(or jumper pins) that are active; “open” and “off” are used when referring to
jumpers (or jumper pins) that are inactive. See the Figure 2-1 for examples of
“on” and “off” pins and jumpers. The square pin in the diagram is Pin 1.
Chapter 2
Board Installation
Map of Motherboard Jumpers
ATX power connector
Kbrd
Mouse
JP4
JP5
JP6
JP7
JP1
JP2
JP3
1
USB
Socket 7
DIMM bank 1
DIMM bank 2
DIMM bank 3
Com 1
Mic in
Primary IDE connector
Line in
JP8
JP9
JP10
JP11
JP12
VIA MVP3
chipset
Speaker
Joystick
(Audio optional)
Com 2
Floppy drive connector
Fan1
Secondary IDE connector
Parallel
AGP port
CD In 1 Video 1
PCI slot 1
PCI slot 2
Fan2
WOL
1
PCI slot 3
USB3
USB2
JP13
VIA MVP3
chipset
3 volt
lithium
battery
WOR
1
PCI slot 4
PCI slot 5
Award BIOS
ISA slot 1
J3
ISA slot 2
1
J4 1
J5
The tiny number “1”s next to jumpers of 3 pins or more indicate the position of
pin 1 for that jumper.
http://www.tyan.com
12
Picture of Motherboard Features
PS/2 mouse
3 DIMM slots
ATX power
connector
1MB L2
cache
CPU
temperature
sensor
ZIF Socket 7
INSTALL
PS/2
Keyboard
USB
header
VIA MVP3
AGP port
5 PCI slots
2 ISA slots
S1598 Trinity ATX
13
Award BIOS
Chapter 2
Board Installation
1. Setting Jumpers
1-A. CPU Bus Speed Settings
1-B. CPU Clock Multiplier
Bus Spe e d
JP4
JP5
JP6
M ultiplie r
JP1
JP2
JP3
60M Hz
2- 3
2- 3
2- 3
2.5x
ON
ON
O FF
66M Hz
1- 2
2- 3
2- 3
3x
O FF
ON
O FF
75M Hz
1- 2
1- 2
2- 3
3.5x
O FF
O FF
O FF
O FF
ON
83M Hz
1- 2
2- 3
1- 2
4x
ON
95M Hz
2- 3
1- 2
1- 2
4.5x
ON
ON
ON
100M Hz
1- 2
1- 2
1- 2
5x
O FF
ON
ON
5.5x
O FF
O FF
ON
1-C. CPU Core Voltage Settings
CPU Voltage
JP8
JP9
JP10
JP11
JP12
CPU Voltage
1.3V
O FF
O FF
O FF
O FF
ON
1.4V
O FF
ON
O FF
O FF
ON
1.5V
O FF
O FF
ON
O FF
1.6V
O FF
ON
ON
O FF
1.7V
O FF
O FF
O FF
1.8V
O FF
ON
1.9V
O FF
2.0V
O FF
2.1V
2.2V**
JP8
JP9
2.5V
ON
O FF
ON
O FF
O FF
2.6V
O FF
ON
ON
O FF
O FF
ON
2.7V
ON
ON
ON
O FF
O FF
ON
2.8V
O FF
O FF
O FF
ON
O FF
ON
ON
2.9V
ON
O FF
O FF
ON
O FF
O FF
ON
ON
3.0V
O FF
ON
O FF
ON
O FF
O FF
ON
ON
ON
3.1V
ON
ON
O FF
ON
O FF
ON
ON
ON
ON
3.2V
O FF
O FF
ON
ON
O FF
ON
O FF
O FF
O FF
O FF
3.3V
ON
O FF
ON
ON
O FF
O FF
ON
O FF
O FF
O FF
3.4V
O FF
ON
ON
ON
O FF
3.5V
ON
ON
ON
ON
O FF
2.3V
ON
ON
O FF
O FF
O FF
2.4V
O FF
O FF
ON
O FF
O FF
JP10
JP11
JP12
** Default Setting (2.2V)
!
The CPU speed is controlled by setting the bus speed and the multiplier with
the jumpers described above that are appropriate for your CPU and memory.
You must have a 100MHz processor AND PC/100 memory to run at a bus
speed of 100MHz. Tyan does not recommend operating CPUs, memory or PCI
bus at higher than rated speed. Tyan takes no responsibility for any problems
related to overclocking any bus or component on the system board.
important!
http://www.tyan.com
14
5
6 Power On/Off
Switch
7
8 Ground
VCC
9
10 Ground
Receive
11
12 K/B Lock
IRRX
13
14 Ground
Ground
15
16 SM I Switch
IRTX
17
18 Ground
Pwr/Slp
LEDs
Ground
Pin1
Pin2
Pin18
Power
Switch
4 Ground
Pin17
SMI
Switch
HDD
LED
2 Power LED
3
Infrared
1
LED
INSTALL
VCC
Reset
Switch
1-D. J3 External Pin Assignments
J3 Side View
1-E. FAN Pin Assignments
FAN1, FAN2
1
2
3
GND
+12V
Fan Monitor
1-F. Memory Clock
The memory clock can be set to run at the CPU
clock speed or to the AGP bus speed (normally
66MHz). The benefit of this setting is that you can
run the CPU bus at 100MHz with only 66MHz
memory by setting the memory clock jumper to
AGP.
Hardware CMOS & Password Reset
If you have been locked out of
your system because you forgot
your password or set the CMOS
incorrectly, follow the instructions below.
1. Power off the system
2. Set jumper JP13 to pins 2 and 3
3. Wait for 2 seconds, then return
jumper JP13 to pins 1 and 2.
4. Power on the system again.
By following this procedure, you
will erase your password and
reset the CMOS to the BIOS
defaults.
M e mory Clock
JP7
CPU Clock
1- 2
AGP Clock
2- 3
CM OS
JP13
D e fault
1- 2
R e s e t CM OS
2- 3
JP1 - JP7
FAN1
JP8 - JP12
FAN2,
JP13
J3, J4
S1598 Trinity ATX
15
Chapter 2
Board Installation
ACPI Bi-Color LED Connector (J5)
This connector provides a bi-color (green / yellow) LED for your computer
chassis. When the computer system is On, the Green LED will light up. If the
system is on stand-by mode, the Yellow LED will light up. Whenever there is
an incoming message, the LED will flash on and off.
Soft Power Connector
The Soft Power Connector is located on pins 6 and 8 of jumper block J3.
Pressing the Soft Power Button will turn the sytem on and off. Holding this
button for more than four seconds (when the system is on) will power down
the system. Pressing it again will reboot the system.
Speaker Connector Installation
The Trinity ATX provides a 4-pin header to connect the speaker. The speaker
is connected to jumper block J4.
CMOS RTC
The VIA MVP3 AGPset includes a Real Time Clock (RTC) circuit, which
provides the date and time for the system. If the external battery for the RTC is
low, you will lose your BIOS settings. Normally the life span of an external
battery is 2 years. If yours is running low, you will need to replace it with a new
3V lithium battery (Sony CR2032).
USB
There are two ATX Universal Serial Bus ports on the back of the board. The
board also has an additional USB header (USB2, USB3) on the edge of the
board near the third PCI slot. This header can be used to connect a USB port
on the front of the chassis.
Flash EEPROM
The Trinity ATX uses flash memory to store BIOS programs. It can be easily
updated if necessary using the flash utility (see page 57). Tyan does not
recommend flashing the BIOS unnecessarily. Check the Tyan web site for the
latest BIOS revision.
2. Mounting the Motherboard in the Chassis
Follow the instructions provided by the case manufacturer for proper installation guidelines. TYAN recommends that you use only one screw to hold down
the motherboard. The rest of the mounting holes should be used for the plastic
standoffs. If your case does not have a hole for a standoff, simply cut off the
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16
3. Installing Memory
Since TYAN boards are manufactured with performance in mind, you should
use add-in components that match. Some DIMM modules may seem to be high
quality because of name or feel but that does not guarantee real-world
usability. Some cheaper or OEM memory may have brand-name components,
but they may contain inferior or substandard parts which do not meet the
critical tolerances our products require. Because of this, your memory may not
work correctly in a TYAN board though it may work well in a competitor’s
board. This is because many of our competitors do not adhere to the strict
tolerances required for high performance. If you buy a TYAN board, you are
getting the best system available. To make installation easy and trouble free,
get high quality parts. Some brands we recommend are Corsair Microsystems,
Kingston Memory, and QesTec Incorporated. These DIMMs have proven to
be very stable on our boards and perform extremely well. For a list of recommended memory vendors, please visit Tyan’s website at www.tyan.com (go to
the Memory Support area in the Support section).
D IM M Bank
1
This table lists some
of the possible memory
configurations. Not all
possible configurations
are listed.
!
important!
Note: This board does NOT
support Registered DIMMs.
Check with your memory
dealer for more information.
D IM M Bank
2
D IM M Bank
3
8MBx1
0
0
8MB
8MBx1
8MBx1
0
16MB
Total
8MBx1
8MBx1
8MBx1
24MB
16MBx1
8MBx1
8MBx1
32MB
48MB
16MBx1
16MBx1
16MBx1
32MBx1
16MBx1
16MBx1
64MB
32MBx1
32MBx1
8MBx1
72MB
64MBx1
32MBx1
32MBx1
128MB
64MBx1
64MBx1
32MBx1
160MB
64MBx1
64MBx1
64MBx1
192MB
128MBx1
64MBx1
64MBx1
256MB
128MBx1
128MBx1
64MBx1
320MB
128MBx1
128MBx1
128MBx1
384MB
256MBx1
256MBx1
256MBx1
768MB
S1598 Trinity ATX
17
INSTALL
bottom of the plastic standoff so that the flat portion rests on the metal. The
adapter cards and the screws holding them down will keep your board flat. The
fastening screw should not short any of the traces on the motherboard. Make
certain that you do not overtighten the screw, as it will damage the motherboard and possibly break internal traces in the surrounding area. The hole you
should use is located at the top-center of the board where the adapter cards
are fastened to the case.
Chapter 2
Board Installation
Figure 2-3
*The image above is used to illustrate a concept and may not represent the actual image of
your motherboard.
To install your DIMMs, line your module up so that the pins fit into the slot.
There is only one way that your DIMM can fit properly. Make sure that the
short row of pins is lined up with the short gap in the DIMM slot. Figure 2-3
above shows how to sit the DIMM into its slot. To insert the DIMM, push
down vertically on the module with even force, as shown in the photo. Do not
shove one end in first; doing so will bend the DIMM pins.
To lock the DIMM into place, push the plastic clips on either end of the slot
onto the notches in the ends of the DIMM (see Figure 2-4 on the next page).
To remove your DIMM, simply pull the clips back, and pull up on the module.
Place the DIMMs in an anti-static bag as soon as you remove them to avoid
static damage.
The Trinity 100AT uses a 64-bit data path from memory to CPU and can
accommodate up to 384MB of SDRAM. The 168-pin DIMMs (Dual In-line
Memory Modules) must be of the 3.3V, unbuffered variety. The position of the
notch in the SDRAM key position will tell you whether or not a DIMM is
unbuffered (see Figure 2-5 below). All installed memory will be automatically
detected, so there is no need to set any jumpers.
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18
INSTALL
Figure 2-4
*The image above is used to illustrate a concept and may not represent the actual image of
your motherboard.
Some details of memory installation:
• The mainboard supports 32MB, 64MB, 128MB SDRAM modules.
• PC-100 DIMMs are required if CPU bus speed is at 100MHz
• SDRAM, Parity, and ECC (using Parity memory) memory is supported.
Unbuffered
RFU
Buffered
168-pin DIMM
Figure 2-5
Cache Memory
The Trinity ATX has 1MB (or 2MB) of onboard pipeline burst SRAM. This
SRAM cannot be upgraded.
S1598 Trinity ATX
19
Chapter 2
Board Installation
4. Installing the CPU and Cooling Fan
Socket 7 processors (see Specifications
on page 5) can be used on the Trinity
ATX. Please refer to page 14 for the correct CPU jumper settings for your CPU.
Remember:
• The CPU is a sensitive electronic
component and it can easily be
damaged by static electricity. Do
not touch the CPU pins with your
fingers.
• Before the CPU is installed, the
mainboard must be placed on a flat
surface. You should be able to insert
the CPU with minimal, but firm,
pressure. Do not press down hard on the
CPU.
!
important!
Figure 2-6
In Figure 2-6, you can see the CPU and the
ZIF socket. Notice that the arm of the ZIF
socket is up. When this arm is up, the CPU
is unlocked from the socket and allows
you to remove or install a CPU. As the ZIF
socket is keyed to the processor that you
are using, you will only be able to install
the CPU one way, thus eliminating the
Figure 2-7
chance for error. Pin 1 on the CPU is
denoted by a small dot on one of the corners and Pin 1 on the ZIF socket is
denoted by an angled corner. Never force a CPU into a socket. Forcing a CPU
to seat will bend the pins on the CPU and possibly damage the motherboard.
Check with your vendor or manufacturer for proper voltage selection.
Push down lightly on the CPU, and lower the arm on the ZIF socket to secure
the CPU. A squeaking noise is normal as the arm lowers. After the CPU is
securely seated, install the appropriate cooling device (Figure 2-7). Tyan
strongly recomends a heatsink/fan combination. Consult with your case
manufacturer for other cooling options.
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20
INSTALL
Figure 2-8
Locate the cooling fan connector (e.g. CPU Fan, Fan1) on the motherboard. Plug
the CPU’s cooling fan cable into the cooling fan connector on the board. There
will be a plastic clip assembly similar to that of the ATX power connector that will
force you to connect the fan cable correctly (see Figure 2-8 above).
Figure 2-9
S1598 Trinity ATX
21
Chapter 2
Board Installation
5. Connecting IDE and Floppy Drives
The colored stripe on a
ribbon cable should face
toward the keyboard
connector. In Figure 2-9 on
the previous page, you can
see how the IDE cables
should look when they are
connected to your hard
drive. Notice how Pin 1
(denoted by a red stripe) is
connected so that it is next
to the power connector of
the drive. The primary IDE
connector is black; the
secondary IDE connector is
white.
Pin 1
In most cases, this is the
Figure 2-10
proper way of connecting
your IDE cable to the harddrive. Figure 2-10 shows the IDE cable properly
connected to the motherboard. Contact your hard disk drive manufacturer or
documentation for more information.
ATA-66 IDE hard drives require a special IDE cable which has additional
grounding wires. The cable is sold separately, and is required when using
ATA-66 drives. This cable will also support all legacy IDE drives.
Some symptoms of incorrectly installed HDDs are:
•
Hard disk drives are not auto-detected: may be a Master / Slave problem
or a bad IDE cable. Contact your vendor.
•
Hard Disk Drive Fail message at bootup:may be a bad cable or lack of
power going to the drive.
• No video or beeps on bootup: usually means the cable is on backwards.
• Hard drive lights are constantly on: bad IDE cable or defective drives/
motherboard. Try another HDD.
• Hard drives do not power up: check power cables and cabling. May
also be caused by a bad power supply or IDE drive.
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22
Figure 2-11
INSTALL
Connecting Floppy Drives
Pin 1 on the floppy cable is usually denoted by a red or colored stripe down
one side of the cable (see Figure 2-11 on the following page). Most of the
current floppy drives on the market require that the colored stripe be positioned so that it is right next to the power connector. In most cases, there will
be a key pin on the cable which will force you to connect the cable properly.
Drive A: is usually attached to the end of the cable with the twist in it. Drive B:
is usually connected to the middle of the cable. Refer to your installation
instructions or call your dealer if you are unsure about attaching floppy drives.
Refer to Figure 2-11 for a detailed anatomy of the floppy cable. Remember, you
can only have 2 floppy drives connected at any given time.
Some symptoms of incorrectly installed floppies are:
• Floppy drives are not detected: usually caused by faulty cables,
backward cables, or a bad floppy or motherboard. Try another single
floppy drive to verify the problem or try another cable. Also, check to
see if the onboard floppy is enabled in the BIOS.
• Floppy Drive Fail message at bootup: the cable, floppy, or motherboard
may be faulty. Try another cable or floppy drive to verify.
• Light on the floppy is on constantly: a dead giveaway that the cable is on
backwards. Reverse the cable at the motherboard end and try again.
6. Connecting the Power Supply
The Trinity ATX requires an ATX power supply. The photos on the next page
show the ATX power connector before (Figure 2-12) and after (Figure 2-13) it
has been plugged in. The plastic clip on the power connector should lock over
the plastic tab on the onboard connector. You shouldn’t be able to plug the
power connector in any other way but just to be safe, make sure it looks like
S1598 Trinity ATX
23
Chapter 2
Board Installation
Figure 2-12
Figure 2-13
Figure 2-13.
Make absolutely certain that you do not miss any pins, because if you do you
will void your warranty and cause damage to yourself or your motherboard
when you turn the system on. After connecting the power, make sure the
connector is seated firmly into its socket so it will not become loose or fall off
when the computer is jostled or moved. Note: Tyan recommends using one
that conforms to industry standard revision 2.01.
7. Installing Add-on Cards
There are a few rules you need to follow when plugging in a card. In order to
assure proper operation and a quick installation, adhere to these guidelines:
!
•
important!
•
•
If you are going to install a PCI-Bus interface card on your system,
be aware that any one of the two PCI slots can support a Master
or Slave device.
NEVER force a card into a slot. If it doesn’t fit, look at the socket
on the computer to make sure there are no wires or other
obstructions to the slot.
NEVER plug an ISA card into a PCI slot or a PCI card in an ISA
slot. You will void your warranty and damage your system board if
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24
you do this.
When plugging the card in, especially when installing long cards,
try to push the entire card in at one time. Don’t force one end of
the card into the socket first and then the other. This will create a
rocking motion between the card and the slot and it will damage the
pins within the socket.
• Make sure that the cards are seated securely into the slots.
• Before turning on the system, make sure no cards are touching.
If you follow these basic guidelines, there shouldn’t be any problems with
installation. However, if you do encounter any problems, have a qualified
professional install your cards for you or contact your card manufacturer.
•
8. Connecting PS/2, USB, Serial & Parallel Devices
This board includes ports for USB, PS/2 mouse, and PS/2 keyboard devices.
Note that, for this board, the PS/2 mouse port is the upper PS/2 port, and the
PS/2 keyboard port is the lower PS/2 port.
The PS/2 connectors are probably quite familiar to you. The USB connectors,
however, may be foreign. The USB (Universal Serial Bus) is a versatile port.
This one port type can function as a serial, parallel, mouse, keyboard, or
Figure 2-14
S1598 Trinity ATX
25
INSTALL
Remember, always read the manuals and installation notes that come with the
adapter cards. They contain important information which will help you install
the components right, the first time.
Chapter 2
Board Installation
joystick port. It is fast enough to support video transfer, and is capable of
supporting up to 127 daisy-chained peripheral devices.
Connecting Com and Printer Ports
warning
Warning: When plugging in your keyboard and mouse, or when plugging
anything into a serial or Com port, make sure that the power is off. Connecting
these devices and ports while the power is on is called “hot plugging,” and
may damage your system.
Figure 2-14 on the previous page shows the ATX double row connectors on
this board. The Com and Printer ports, as well as the other ports, are labeled.
Note: Only TYAN cables will work on this motherboard. If you are using an
existing case with old cables, your system will not function properly. Use only
TYAN-approved cables.
You are done!
Other than checking the jumper settings and cable connections and putting
the case back on, you are done. Installing a new motherboard may sound
difficult, but by following these directions, you should have had a fairly
uneventful time installing our products. If you did encounter problems, your
dealer will be able to help you, or you can consult one of our many technical
support resources (see page 7).
Frequently Asked Questions
Q: My system sometimes becomes unstable. How should I check the system?
A: The first thing to do is to check and see if you have any device conflict in
address, IRQ, or DMA. If you are using Windows 95, the Device Manager
is a good place to start. Please consult your operating system manual for
details. Second of all, slowing down the memory timing in the BIOS’s
chipset setup section will help the situation, as well. Many memory
modules are not suitable for high performance systems and are probably
the main source of your problem.
Q: What is AGP?
A: AGP (Accelerated Graphics Port) is a new bus architecture for 3D graphics.
The AGP slot eliminates the PCI bandwidth bottleneck by bypassing the
PCI interface and accessing the system memory directly. Currently, the AGP
supports 1X and 2X modes, which yield bandwidths of 264MB/s (at 33MHz
bus speed) and 533MB/s (at 66MHz bus speed), respectively. Compare this
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26
with the mere 132MB/s (at 33MHz bus speed) that you get with the PCI
bus.
Q: Does my operating system support AGP?
A: Currently, only Windows 98 and Windows NT 5.0 will have built-in support
for AGP. Some AGP cards require Windows 95 OSR2.1 or a special driver
from Intel. Please check with your graphics vendor for more details.
Q: How do I identify Pin #1 of a 3-pin jumper?
A: There should be a small numeral 1 silkscreened on the board in white next
to pin 1. You can also look on the back side of the board, pin 1 is identified
with a square solder footprint.
Q: Does the motherboard support 2X AGP?
A: Yes, the S1598 supports x2 AGP.
Q: What drivers do I install from the CD-ROM provided with the S1598
motherboard?
A: Inside the CD-ROM provided with the Trinity motherboard are Win95,
Win98, and WinNT 4.0 drivers for VIA MVP3 chipset and are located in the
VIA folder.
The "agpvxd" folder will install driver support for AGP video. NOTE: this
driver is for Win95 users only, however, some Win98 users may need to
install this driver who are having conflicts in Device Manager. There are no
drivers for WinNT 4.0
The "Bmide" folder will install driver support for VIA IDE Busmaster.
NOTE: this driver is for Win95 and WinNT 4.0 users. Win98 users normally
DO NOT have to install this driver; Win98 has built in VIA IDE Bustmaster
driver when installed originally. Install only if you are having conflicts or
exclamation marks with Hard disk controllers in Device Manager
S1598 Trinity ATX
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INSTALL
Q: My AGP Video has an Intel i740 chipset and gives me problems when I plug
it onto this motherboard, why?
A: There is a known incompatibility with the Intel i740 chipset and the VIA
Apollo chipset on the motherboard. In addition, Windows NT 4.0 does not
support Intel's i740 and older chipsets. Nor does it support VIA apollo
chipset. Such a combination will definitely cause a conflict. One solution
to this problem is to install VIA´s AGP driver (AGP driver ver. 2.6 or
later). It is included on the Tyan Driver CD, or you can download it from
Via’s web site at http://www.via.com.tw/drivers/index.htm.
Chapter 2
Board Installation
The "viareg" folder is for "VIA Power Management Controller" and "VIA
PCI to USB Universal Host Controller". NOTE: this driver is for Win95
users. There are no drivers for WinNT 4.0. No need to install for Win98
users.
The "virq13 or virq11" folder will install "VIA PCI IRQ Routing Miniport
Driver". NOTE: Enable "OnChip USB" in BIOS Chipset Features setup
menu and Enable "Assign IRQ for USB" in PNP/PCP Configuration Setup
menu. NOTE II: this driver is for Win95 users only, however, some Win98
users may need to install this driver who are having conflicts in Device
Manager. There are no drivers for WinNT 4.0
Q: When Windows 95 restarts for the first time I get the following message:
"Device IOS failed to initialize. Windows Protection Error. You must reboot
your computer." How do I fix this to get into Windows 95 normally?
A: Follow the following link to download the patch file for this problem:
http://www.amd.com/products/cpg/k623d/win95_update_k6.html
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28
INSTALL
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S1598 Trinity ATX
29
Chapter 3
chapter 3
BIOS Configuration
BIOS Configuration
Introduction to Setup
This manual describes the Award EliteBIOS Setup program. The Setup
program lets you modify basic system configuration settings. The settings are
then stored in a dedicated battery-backed memory, called CMOS RAM, that
retains the information when the power is turned off.
The EliteBIOS in your computer is a customized version of an industrystandard BIOS for IBM PC AT–compatible personal computers. It supports
Intel x86 and compatible processors. The BIOS provides critical low-level
support for the system central processing, memory, and I/O subsystems.
The EliteBIOS has been customized by adding important, but nonstandard,
features such as virus and password protection, power management, and
detailed fine-tuning of the chipset controlling the system. The rest of this
manual is intended to guide you through the process of configuring your
system using Setup.
Starting Setup
The EliteBIOS is immediately activated when you first turn on the computer.
The BIOS reads system configuration information in CMOS RAM and begins
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30
the process of checking out the system and configuring it through the poweron self test (POST).
When these preliminaries are finished, the BIOS seeks an operating system on
one of the data storage devices (hard drive, floppy drive, etc.). The BIOS
launches the operating system and hands control of system operations to it.
During POST, you can start the Setup program in one of two ways:
1. By pressing <Del> immediately after switching the system on, or
2. By pressing the <Del> key or by simultaneously pressing <Ctrl>, <Alt>, and
<Esc> keys when the following message appears briefly at the bottom of the
screen during POST:
If the message disappears before you respond and you still wish to enter
Setup, restart the system to try again by turning it OFF then ON or pressing
the RESET button on the system case. You may also restart by simultaneously
pressing <Ctrl>, <Alt>, and <Delete> keys. If you do not press the keys at the
correct time and the system does not boot, an error message appears and you
are again asked to
PRESS F1 TO CONTINUE, DEL TO ENTER SETUP
Setup Keys
The table on the following page shows how to navigate in Setup using the
keyboard.
Getting Help
Press F1 to pop up a small help window that describes the appropriate keys to
use and the possible selections for the highlighted item. To exit the Help
Window press <Esc> or the F1 key again.
In Case of Problems
If, after making and saving system changes with Setup, you discover that your
computer no longer is able to boot, the EliteBIOS supports an override to the
CMOS settings that resets your system to its default configuration.
S1598 Trinity ATX
31
BIOS
TO ENTER SETUP BEFORE BOOT PRESS DEL KEY
Chapter 3
BIOS Configuration
Ke y
Up arrow
Function
Move to previous item.
Down arrow Move to next item.
Left arrow
Right arrow
Esc key
Move to iten on the left hand.
Move to item on the right hand.
Main Menu: Quit and do not save changes into
CMOS RAM. Status Page Setup Menu: Exit
current page and return to Main Menu.
PgUp key
Increase the numeric value or make changes.
PgDn key
Decrease the numeric value or make changes.
+ key
Increase the numeric value or make changes.
- key
Decrease the numeric value or make changes.
F1 key
General help, only for Status Page Setup Menu and
Option Page Setup Menu.
F2 key
Shift- F2
Change color from total 16 colors. F2 to select
color forward, Shift- F2 to select color backwards.
F3 key
Calendar, only for Status Page Setup Menu.
F4 key
Reserved.
F5 key
Restore the previous CMOS value from CMOS,
only for Option Page Setup Menu.
F6 key
Load the default CMOS RAM value from BIOS
default table, only for Option Page Setup Menu.
F7 key
Load the default.
F8 key
Reserved.
F9 key
Reserved.
F10 key
Save all the CMOS changes, only for Main Menu.
You can invoke this override by immediately pressing <Insert> when you
restart your computer. You can restart by either using the ON/OFF switch, the
RESET button or by pressing <Ctrl>, <Alt> and <Delete> at the same time.
The best advice is to alter only settings that you thoroughly understand. In
particular, do not change settings in the Chipset screen without a good reason.
The Chipset defaults have been carefully chosen by Award Software or your
system manufacturer for the best performance and reliability. Even a seemingly
small change to the Chipset setup may causing the system to become unstable.
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32
Setup Variations
Not all systems have the same Setup. While the basic look and function of the
Setup program remains the same for all systems, the appearance of your Setup
screens may differ from the screens shown here. Each system design and
chipset combination require custom configurations. In addition, the final
appearance of the Setup program depends on your system designer. Your
system designer can decide that certain items should not be available for user
configuration and remove them from the Setup program.
Main Setup Menu
A brief description of each highlighted selection appears at the bottom of the
screen. Following is a brief summary of each Setup category.
ROM PCI/ISA BIOS (2A5LET5A)
CMOS SETUP UTILITY
AWARD SOFTWARE, INC.
STANDARD CMOS SETUP
INTEGRATED PERIPHERALS
BIOS FEATURES SETUP
SUPERVISOR PASSWORD
CHIPSET FEATURES SETUP
USER PASSWORD
POWER MANAGEMENT SETUP
IDE HDD AUTO DETECTION
PNP/PCI CONFIGURATION
SAVE & EXIT SETUP
LOAD BIOS DEFAULTS
EXIT WITHOUT SAVING
LOAD SETUP DEFAULTS
↑ ↓ → ←
: Select Item
(Shift)F2 : Change Color
Esc : Quit
F10 : Save & Exit Setup
Time, Date, Hard Disk Type ...
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BIOS
When you enter the EliteBIOS CMOS Setup Utility, a Main Menu, similar to
the one shown below, appears on the screen. The Main Menu allows you to
select from several Setup functions and two exit choices. Use the arrow keys to
select among the items and press enter to accept and enter the sub-menu.
Chapter 3
BIOS Configuration
Standard CMOS Setup
Options in the original PC AT-compatible BIOS.
BIOS Features Setup
Award Software enhanced BIOS options.
Chipset Features Setup
Options specific to your system chipset.
Power Management Setup
Advanced Power Management (APM) options.
PnP/PCI Configuration
Plug and Play standard and PCI Local Bus configuration options.
Integrated Peripherals
I/O subsystems that depend on the integrated peripherals controller in your
system.
Supervisor/User Password
Change, set, or disable a password. In BIOS versions that allow separate user
and supervisor passwords, only the supervisor password permits access to
Setup. The user password generally allows only power-on access.
IDE HDD Auto Detection
Automatically detect and configure IDE hard disk parameters.
Load BIOS Defaults
BIOS defaults are factory settings for the most stable, minimal-performance
system operations.
Load Setup Defaults
Setup defaults are factory settings for optimal-performance system operations.
Save & Exit Setup
Save settings in nonvolatile CMOS RAM and exit Setup.
Exit Without Saving
Abandon all changes and exit Setup.
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34
Standard CMOS Setup
In the Standard CMOS menu you can set the system clock and calendar, record
disk drive parameters and the video subsystem type, and select the type of
errors that stop the BIOS POST.
Date
The BIOS determines the day of the week from the other date information. This
ROM PCI/ISA BIOS (2A5LET59)
STANDARD CMOS SETUP
AWARD SOFTWARE, INC.
HARD DISKS
TYPE
Primary Master :
Primary Slave
:
Secondary Master:
Secondary Slave :
Auto
Auto
Auto
Auto
SIZE
CYLS HEAD PRECOMP LANDZ SECTOR
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
Drive A : 1.44M, 3.5 in.
Drive B : None
Floppy 3 Mode Support: Disabled
Video
Halt On
ESC : Quit
F1 : Help
: EGA/VGA
: All Errors
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
MODE
AUTO
AUTO
AUTO
AUTO
Base Memory:
640K
Extended Memory:130048K
Other Memory:
384K
Total Memory:131072K
↑ ↓ → ← : Select Item
(Shift)F2 : Change Color
PU/PD/+/- : Modify
field is for information only. Press the arrow keys to move to the desired field
(date, month, year). Press the PgUp or PgDn key to increment the setting, or
type the desired value into the field.
Time
The time format is based on the 24-hour military-time clock. For example, 1 p.m.
is 13:00:00. Press the arrow keys to move to the desired field. Press the PgUp
or PgDn key to increment the setting, or type the desired value into the field.
HARD DISKS
The BIOS supports up to four IDE drives. This section does not show
information about other IDE devices, such as a CD-ROM drive, or about other
S1598 Trinity ATX
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BIOS
Date (mm:dd:yy) : Fri, Jul 10 1998
Time (hh:mm:ss) : 10 :
7 :
7
Chapter 3
BIOS Configuration
hard drive types, such as SCSI drives. Note: We recommend that you select
type auto for all drives.
The BIOS can automatically detect the specifications and optimal operating
mode of almost all IDE hard drives. When you select type auto for a hard
drive, the BIOS detects its specifications during POST, every time the system
boots. If you do not want to select drive type auto, other methods of selecting
the drive type are available:
1. Match the specifications of your installed IDE hard drive(s) with the
preprogrammed values for drive types 1 through 45.
2. Select User and enter values into each drive parameter field.
3. Use the IDE HDD Auto Dectection function in Setup.
Here is a brief explanation of drive specifications:
Type: The BIOS contains a table of pre-defined drive types. Each defined drive
type has a specified number of cylinders, number of heads, write
precompensation factor, landing zone, and number of sectors. Drives whose
specifications do not accommodate any pre-defined type are classified as type
user.
Size: Disk drive capacity (approximate). Note that this size is usually slightly
greater than the size of a formatted disk given by a disk-checking program.
Cyls: Number of cylinders
Head: Number of heads
Precomp: Write precompensation cylinder
Landz: Landing zone
Sector: Number of sectors
Mode: Auto, Normal, large, or LBA
Auto: The BIOS automatically determines the optimal mode.
Normal: Maximum number of cylinders, heads, and sectors
supported are 1024, 16, and 63.
Large: For drives that do not support LBA and have more than 1024
cylinders.
LBA (Logical Block Addressing): During drive accesses, the IDE
controller transforms the data address described by sector, head, and
cylinder number into a physical block address, significantly
improving data transfer rates. For drives with greater than 1024
cylinders.
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36
Drive A, Drive B
Select the correct specifications for the diskette drive(s) installed in the
computer.
N one
N o diskette drive installed
360K , 5.25 in
5- 1/4 inch PC- type standard drive; 360 kilobyte capacity
1.2M, 5.25 in
5- 1/4 inch AT- type high- density drive; 1.2 megabyte capacity
720K , 3.5 in
3- 1/2 inch double- sided drive; 720 kilobyte capacity
1.44M, 3.5 in
3- 1/2 inch double- sided drive; 1.44 megabyte capacity
2.88M, 3.5 in
3- 1/2 inch double- sided drive; 2.88 megabyte capacity
Video
Select the type of primary video subsystem in your computer. The BIOS
usually detects the correct video type automatically. The BIOS supports a
secondary video subsystem, but you do not select it in Setup.
EGA/VGA
Enhanced Graphics Adapter/Video Graphics Array. For EGA, VGA,
SEGA, SVGA, or PGA monitor adapters.
CGA 40
Color Graphics Adapter, power up in 40 column mode.
CGA 80
Color Graphics Adapter, power up in 80 column mode.
MONO
Monochrome adpater, includes high resolution monochrome adapters.
Halt On
During the power-on self-test (POST), the computer stops if the BIOS detects a
hardware error. You can tell the BIOS to ignore certain errors during POST and
continue the boot-up process. These are the selections:
N o errors
PO ST does not stop for any errors.
All errors
If the BIO S detects any non- fatal error, PO ST stops and prompts you to
take corrective action.
All, But K eyboard
PO ST does not stop for a keyboard error, but stops for all other errors.
All, But Diskette
PO ST does not stop for diskette drive errors, but stops for all other
errors.
All, But Disk/K ey
PO ST does not stop for a keyboard or disk error, but stops for all other
errors.
S1598 Trinity ATX
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BIOS
Floppy 3 Mode Support
When Enabled, the BIOS supports a type of 3.5-in diskette drive that can read
720-KB, 1.2-MB, and 1.44-MB diskettes.
Chapter 3
BIOS Configuration
Memory
You cannot change any values in the Memory fields; they are only for your
information. The fields show the total installed random access memory (RAM)
and amounts allocated to base memory, extended memory, and other (high)
memory. RAM is counted in kilobytes (KB: approximately one thousand bytes)
and megabytes (MB: approximately one million bytes).
RAM is the computer’s working memory, where the computer stores programs
and data currently being used, so they are accessible to the CPU. Modern
personal computers may contain up to 64 MB, 128 MB, or more.
Base Memory: Typically 640 KB. Also called conventional memory.
The DOS operating system and conventional applications use this
area.
Extended Memory: Above the 1-MB boundary. Early IBM personal
computers could not use memory above 1 MB, but current PCs and
their software can use extended memory.
Other Memory: Between 640 KB and 1 MB; often called high
memory. DOS may load terminate-and-stay-resident (TSR) programs,
such as device drivers, in this area, to free as much conventional
memory as possible for applications. Lines in your config.sys file that
start with loadhigh load programs into high memory.
BIOS Features Setup
The screen (shown on the following page) contains industry-standard options
additional to the core PC AT BIOS. This section describes all fields offered by
Award Software in this screen. The example screen below may vary from the
one in your Setup program. Your system board designer may omit or modify
some fields.
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38
ROM PCI/ISA BIOS (2A5LET59)
BIOS FEATURES SETUP
AWARD SOFTWARE, INC.
: Disabled
: Enabled
: Enabled
: Enabled
: A, C, SCSI
: Disabled
: Enabled
: On
: Normal
: Enabled
: Disabled
: 6
: 250
: Setup
: Disabled
: Non-OS2
Video BIOS Shadow : Enabled
C8000-CBFFF Shadow : Disabled
CC000-CFFFF Shadow : Disabled
D0000-D3FFF Shadow : Disabled
D4000-D7FFF Shadow : Disabled
D8000-DBFFF Shadow : Disabled
DC000-DFFFF Shadow : Disabled
Cyrix 6x86/MII CPU ID : Enabled
ESC : Quit
↑↓ →← : Select Item
F1 : Help
PU/PD/+/- : Modify
F5 : Old Values (Shift)F2 : Color
F6 : Load BIOS Defaults
F7 : Load Setup Defaults
BIOS Feature Setup - Default Settings Chart
Setting Option
BIOS Default
Se tup Default
Virus Warning
Disabled
Disabled
CPU Internal Cache
Enabled
Enabled
External Cache
Enabled
Enabled
Quick Pow er On Self Test
Disabled
Enabled
Boot Sequence
A,C, SCSI
A,C, SCSI
Sw ap Floppy Drive
Disabled
Disabled
Boot Up Floppy Seek
Enabled
Enabled
Boot Up NumLock Status
On
On
Gate A20 Option
Normal
Fast
Memory Parity / ECC Check
Enabled
Disabled
Typematic Rate Setting
Disabled
Disabled
Typematic Rate (Chars/Sec)
6
6
Typematic Delay (Msec)
250
250
Security Option
Setup
Setup
PCI / VGA Palette Snoop
Disabled
Disabled
OS Select For DRAM > 64MB
Non-OS2
Non-OS2
Video BIOS Shadow
Enabled
Enabled
C8000-CBFFF Shadow
Disabled
Disabled
CC000-CFFFF Shadow
Disabled
Disabled
D0000-D3FFF Shadow
Disabled
Disabled
S1598 Trinity ATX
39
BIOS
Virus Warning
CPU Internal Cache
External Cache
Quick Power On Self Test
Boot Sequence
Swap Floppy Drive
Boot Up Floppy Seek
Boot Up NumLock Status
Gate A20 Option
Memory Parity/ECC Check
Typematic Rate Setting
Typematic Rate (Chars/Sec)
Typematic Delay (Msec)
Security Option
PCI/VGA Palette Snoop
OS Select For DRAM > 64MB
Chapter 3
BIOS Configuration
Settings Chart (Continued)
Setting Option
BIOS Default
Setup Default
D4000-D7FFF Shadow
Disabled
Disabled
D8000-DBFFF Shadow
Disabled
Disabled
DC000-DFFFF Shadow
Disabled
Disabled
Cyrix 6x86 / MII CPU ID
Enabled
Enabled
Virus Warning
When enabled, you receive a warning message if a program (specifically, a
virus) attempts to write to the boot sector or the partition table of the hard disk
drive. You should then run an anti-virus program. Keep in mind that this
feature protects only the boot sector, not the entire hard drive. Note: Many
disk diagnostic programs that access the boot sector table can trigger the
virus warning message. If you plan to run such a program, we recommend that
you first disable the virus warning.
CPU Internal Cache/External Cache
Cache memory is additional memory that is much faster than conventional
DRAM (system memory). CPUs from 486-type on up contain internal cache
memory, and most, but not all, modern PCs have additional (external) cache
memory. When the CPU requests data, the system transfers the requested data
from the main DRAM into cache memory, for even faster access by the CPU.
The External Cache field may not appear if your system does not have external
cache memory.
Quick Power On Self Test
Select Enabled to reduce the amount of time required to run the power-on selftest (POST). A quick POST skips certain steps. We recommend that you
normally disable quick POST. Better to find a problem during POST than lose
data during your work.
Boot Sequence
The original IBM PCs loaded the operating system from drive A (floppy disk),
so IBM PC-compatible systems are designed to search for an operating system
first on drive A, and then on drive C (hard disk). However, modern computers
usually load the operating system from the hard drive, and may even load it
from a CD-ROM drive. The BIOS now offers a large number of boot devices
and boot sequence options.
Swap Floppy Drive
This field is effective only in systems with two floppy drives. Selecting
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40
Enabled assigns physical drive B to logical drive A, and physical drive A to
logical drive B.
Boot Up Floppy Seek
When Enabled, the BIOS tests (seeks) floppy drives to determine whether they
have 40 or 80 tracks. Only 360-KB floppy drives have 40 tracks; drives with 720
KB, 1.2 MB, and 1.44 MB capacity all have 80 tracks. Because very few modern
PCs have 40-track floppy drives, we recommend that you set this field to
Disabled to save time.
Gate A20 Option
Gate A20 refers to the way the system addresses memory above 1 MB (extended memory). When set to Fast, the system chipset controls Gate A20.
When set to Normal, a pin in the keyboard controller controls Gate A20.
Setting Gate A20 to Fast improves system speed, particularly with OS/2 and
Windows.
Memory Parity/ECC Check
Select Enabled or Disabled. If Enabled, allows memory checking when the
BIOS detects the presence of ECC or Parity DRAM.
Typematic Rate Setting
When Disabled, the following two items (Typematic Rate and Typematic
Delay) are irrelevant. Keystrokes repeat at a rate determined by the keyboard
controller in your system. When Enabled, you can select a typematic rate and
typematic delay.
Typematic Rate (Chars/Sec)
When the typematic rate setting is enabled, you can select a typematic rate
(the rate at which character repeats when you hold down a key) of 6, 8, 10,12,
15, 20, 24 or 30 characters per second.
Typematic Delay (Msec)
When the typematic rate setting is enabled, you can select a typematic delay
(the delay before key strokes begin to repeat) of 250, 500, 750 or 1000 milliseconds.
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BIOS
Boot Up NumLock Status
Toggle between On or Off to control the state of the NumLock key when the
system boots. When toggled On, the numeric keypad generates numbers
instead of controlling cursor operations.
Chapter 3
BIOS Configuration
Security Option
If you have set a password, select whether the password is required every time
the System boots, or only when you enter Setup.
PCI/VGA Palette Snoop
Your BIOS Setup many not contain this field. If the field is present, leave at
Disabled.
OS Select for DRAM > 64MB
Select OS2 only if you are running OS/2 operating system with greater than 64
MB of RAM on your system.
Video BIOS Shadow
Software that resides in a read-only memory (ROM) chip on a device is called
firmware. The EliteBIOS permits shadowing of firmware such as the system
BIOS, video BIOS, and similar operating instructions that come with some
expansion peripherals, such as, for example, a SCSI adaptor.
Shadowing copies firmware from ROM into system RAM, where the CPU can
read it through the 16-bit or 32-bit DRAM bus. Firmware not shadowed must
be read by the system through the 8-bit X-bus. Shadowing improves the
performance of the system BIOS and similar ROM firmware for expansion
peripherals, but it also reduces the amount of high memory (640 KB to 1 MB)
available for loading device drivers, etc.
Enable shadowing into each section of memory separately. Many system
designers hardwire shadowing of the system BIOS and eliminate a System
BIOS Shadow option.
Video BIOS shadows into memory area C0000-C7FFF. The remaining areas
shown on the BIOS Features Setup screen may be occupied by other expansion card firmware. If an expansion peripheral in your system contains ROMbased firmware, you need to know the address range the ROM occupies to
shadow it into the correct area of RAM.
Cyrix 6x86 / MII CPU ID
Select Enabled to enable the Cyrix 6x86 / MII CPU support. The settings are
Enabled or Disabled.
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42
Chipset Features Setup
This section describes features of the Intel 440EX chipset.
Advanced Options
The parameters in this screen are for system designers, service personnel, and
technically competent users only. Do not reset these values unless you
understand the consequences of your changes. Note: This chapter describes
all fields offered by Award Software in this screen. Your system board designer
may omit or modify some fields.
BIOS
ROM PCI/ISA BIOS (2A5LET59)
CHIPSET FEATURES SETUP
AWARD SOFTWARE, INC.
Bank 0/1 DRAM Timing
Bank 2/3 DRAM Timing
Bank 4/5 DRAM Timing
SDRAM Cycle Length
DRAM Read Pipeline
: SDRAM 10ns
: FP/EDO 70ns
: FP/EDO 70ns
: 2
: Disabled
Cache Rd+CPU Wt Pipeline
Cache Timing
Video BIOS Cacheable
System BIOS Cacheable
Memory Hole At 15Mb Addr
AGP Aperture Size
OnChip USB
USB Keyboard Support
: Disabled
: Fast
: Disabled
: Disabled
: Disabled
: 64M
: Enabled
: Disabled
Current CPU Temperature
Current System Temp.
Current CPUFAN Speed
Current SYSFAN Speed
Vcore : 2.40V
3.3V : 3.31V
12V : 12.12V
: 35C/95F
: 27C/80F
: 0RPM
: 0RPM
5V : 4.95V
ESC : Quit
↑↓ →← : Select Item
F1 : Help
PU/PD/+/- : Modify
F5 : Old Values (Shift)F2 : Color
F6 : Load BIOS Defaults
F7 : Load Setup Defaults
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Chapter 3
BIOS Configuration
Chipset Features Setup - Default Settings Chart
Setting Option
BIOS Default
Setup Default
Bank 0/1 DRAM Timing
SDRAM 10ns
SDRAM 10ns
Bank 2/3 DRAM Timing
FP/EDO 70ns
FP/EDO 70ns
Bank 4/5 DRAM Timing
FP/EDO 70ns
FP/EDO 70ns
SDRAM Cycle Length
3
3
DRAM Read Pipeline
Disabled
Enabled
Cache Rd+CPU Wt Pipeline
Disabled
Enabled
Cache Timing
Fast
Fast
Video BIOS Cacheable
Disabled
Enabled
System BIOS Cacheable
Disabled
Enabled
Memory Hole At 15Mb Addr
Disabled
Disabled
AGP Aperture Size
64M
64M
OnChip USB
Enabled
Enabled
USB Keyboard Support
Disabled
Disabled
Current CPU Temperature
35C / 95F
35C / 95F
Current System Temp.
27C / 80F
27C / 80F
Current CPUFAN Speed
0 RPM
0 RPM
Current SYSFAN Speed
0 RPM
0 RPM
Vcore
2.40V
2.40V
3.3V
3.31V
3.31V
5V
4.95V
4.95V
12V
12.12V
12.12V
Bank 0/1, 2/3, 4/5 DRAM Timing
The system board designer must select the proper value for these fields,
according to the specifications of the installed DRAM chips. Turbo mode
reduces CAS access time by 1 clock tick.
SDRAM Cycle Length
This field sets the CAS latency timing.
DRAM Read Pipeline
Select Enabled to pipeline reads from system memory. Pipelining improves
system performance.
Cache Rd+CPU Wt Pipeline
Select Enabled to pipeline reads from cache memory and writes from the CPU.
Pipelining improves system performance.
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Cache Timing
For a secondary cache of one bank, select Faster. For a secondary cache of
two banks, select Fastest.
Video BIOS Cacheable
Selecting Enabled allows caching of the video BIOS ROM at C0000h to
C7FFFh, resulting in better video performance. However, if any program writes
to this memory area, a memory access error may result in a system error.
System BIOS Cacheable
If Enabled, results in better system performance by permitting caching of the
system BIOS ROM at F0000h-FFFFFh. Any program which tries to write to this
memory area, however, may cause a system error.
AGP Aperture Size
Select the size of the Accelerated Graphics Port (AGP) aperture. The aperture is
a portion of the PCI memory address range dedicated for graphics memory
address space. Host cycles that hit the aperture range are forwarded to the
AGP without any translation. See www.agpforum.org for AGP information.
OnChip USB
The chipset contains an integrated USB controller. Select Enabled if you have
USB peripherals.
USB Keyboard Support
Select Enabled if your system contains a Universal Serial Bus (USB) controller
and you have a USB keyboard.
Current CPU Temp, Current System Temp, Curren CPU / SYS Fan Speed,
Vcore, 3.3V, 5V, 12V - These values are automatically detected and displayed
by the BIOS.
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BIOS
Memory Hole at 15Mb Addr.
You can reserve this area of system memory for ISA adapter ROM. When this
area is reserved, it cannot be cached. The user information of peripherals that
need to use this area of system memory usually discusses their memory
requirements.
Chapter 3
BIOS Configuration
Power Management Setup
Note: This chapter describes all fields offered by Award Software in this
screen. Your system board designer may omit or modify some fields.
ROM PCI/ISA BIOS (2A5LET5A)
POWER MANAGEMENT SETUP
AWARD SOFTWARE, INC.
ACPI Function
Power Management
PM Control by APM
Video Off Option
Video Off Method
MODEM Use IRQ
Soft-Off by PWRBTN
** PM Timers **
HDD Power Down
Doze Mode
Suspend Mode
** PM Events **
VGA
LPT & COM
HDD & FDD
PCI/master
Modem Ring Resume
RTC Alarm Resume
: Disabled
: User Define
: Yes
: Suspend->Off
: V/H SYNC+Blank
: 3
: Delay 4 sec.
: Disabled
: Disabled
: Disabled
: OFF
: LPT/COM
: ON
: OFF
: Disabled
: Disabled
Primary INTR
IRQ3(COM2)
IRQ4(COM1)
IRQ5(LPT2)
IRQ6(Floppy Disk)
IRQ7(LPT1)
IRQ8(RTC Alarm)
IRQ9(IRQ2 Redir)
IRQ10(Reserved)
IRQ11(Reserved)
IRQ12(PS/2 Mouse)
IRQ13(Coprocessor)
IRQ14(Hard Disk)
IRQ15(Reserved)
: ON
: Primary
: Primary
: Primary
: Primary
: Primary
: Disabled
: Secondary
: Secondary
: Secondary
: Primary
: Disabled
: Primary
: Disabled
ESC : Quit
↑↓ →← : Select Item
F1 : Help
PU/PD/+/- : Modify
F5 : Old Values (Shift)F2 : Color
F6 : Load BIOS Defaults
F7 : Load Setup Defaults
Power Management Setup - Default Settings Chart
Se tting Option
BIOS De fault
Se tup De fault
A CPI Function
Disabled
Disabled
Pow er Management
User Def ine
User Def ine
PM Control by A PM
Y es
Y es
V ideo Of f Option
Suspend -> Of f
Suspend -> Of f
V ideo Of f Method
V / H SY NC+Blank
V / H SY NC+Blank
MODEM Use IRQ
3
3
Sof t-Of f by PWRBTN
Delay 4 sec.
Instant Of f
HDD Pow er Dow n
Disabled
Disabled
Doze Mode
Disabled
Disabled
Suspend Mode
Disabled
Disabled
V GA
OFF
OFF
LPT & COM
LPT / COM
LPT / COM
HDD & FDD
ON
ON
PCI / master
OFF
OFF
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46
Settings Chart (Continued)
Setting Option
BIOS Default
Setup Default
Modem Ring Resume
Disabled
Disabled
RTC Alarm Resume
Disabled
Disabled
Primary INTR
ON
ON
IRQ3 (COM2)
Primary
Primary
IRQ4 (COM1)
Primary
Primary
IRQ5 (LPT2)
Primary
Primary
IRQ6 (Floppy Disk)
Primary
Primary
Primary
Primary
IRQ8 (RTC Alarm)
Disabled
Disabled
IRQ9 (IRQ2 Redir)
Secondary
Secondary
IRQ10 (Reserved)
Secondary
Secondary
IRQ11 (Reserved)
Secondary
Secondary
IRQ12 (PS/2 Mouse)
Primary
Primary
IRQ13 (Coprocessor)
Disabled
Primary
IRQ14 (Hard Disk)
Primary
Primary
IRQ15 (Reserved)
Disabled
Disabled
ACPI Function
Enable or disable Advanced Configuration Power Interface.
Power Management
This option allows you to select the type (or degree) of power saving for Doze,
Standby, and Suspend modes. See the section PM Timers for a brief description of each mode. This table describes each power management mode:
Max saving
Maximum power savings. Only available for SL CPUs.
Inactivity period is 1 minute in each mode.
User Define
Set each mode individually. Select time- out periods in the PM
Timers section, following.
Min Saving
Minimum power savings. Inactivity period is 1 hour in each
mode (except the hard drive).
PM Control by APM
If Advanced Power Management (APM) is installed on your system, selecting
Yes gives better power savings.
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BIOS
IRQ7 (LPT1)
Chapter 3
BIOS Configuration
Video Off Option
Selects the power-saving modes during which the monitor goes blank.
Always On
Monitor remains on during power- saving modes.
Suspend - - > Off
Monitor blanked when system enters Suspend mode.
All Modes- - > Off Monitor blanked when system enters any power- saving mode.
Video Off Method
Determines the manner in which the monitor is blanked. The Blank Screen
option will let the system BIOS blank the screen when disabling video. V/H
sync+Blank will allow the system BIOS to turn off the V-SYNC and H-SYNC
signals running from the VGA card to the monitor.
V/H
System turns off vertical and horizontal synchronization ports
SYNC+Blank and writes blanks to the video buffer.
DPMS
Support
Select this option if your monitor supports the Display Power
Management Signaling (DPMS) standard of the Video
Electronics Standards Association (VESA). Use the software
supplied for your video subsystem to select video power
management values.
Blank Screen
System only writes blanks to the video buffer.
MODEM Use IRQ
If Modem Ring Resume is Enabled, it is possible to wake the system by dialing
in to it. This field determines which IRQ will be monitored for the incoming call.
Soft-Off by PWRBTN
When you select Instant Off or Delay 4 Sec., turning the system off with the
on/off button places the system in a very low power usage state, either
immediately or after 4 seconds, with only enough circuitry receiving power to
detect wake-up event activity.
** PM Timers **
The following modes are Green PC power saving functions that are userconfigurable only in User Defined Power Management mode.
HDD Power Down
After the selected period of drive inactivity (1 to 15 minutes), the hard disk
drive powers down while all other devices remain active.
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48
Doze Mode
After the selected period of system inactivity (1 minute to 1 hour), the CPU
clock runs at slower speed while all other devices still operate at full speed.
Suspend Mode
After the selected period of system inactivity (1 minute to 1 hour), all devices
except the CPU shut off.
** PM Events **
A power management (PM) event awakens the system from, or resets activity
timers for, Suspend mode. You can disable monitoring of common interrupt
requests so they do not generate PM events.
LPT & COM
Select none, or one or more, ports whose activity is a PM event.
HDD & FDD
When On, any hard drive or floppy drive activity is a PM event.
DMA/master
When On, any DMA or bus master activity is a PM event.
Modem Ring Resume
When Enabled, an input signal on the serial Ring Indicator (RI) line (in other
words, an incoming call on the modem) awakens the system from Suspend
mode.
RTC Alarm Resume
When Enabled, you can set the date and time at which the RTC (real-time
clock) alarm awakens the system from Suspend mode.
Primary INTR
A system peripheral signals that it wants to gain the attention of the operating
system by sending an interrupt request. When the system is in Suspend mode,
IRQ activity can cause a Primary or Secondary wake-up. When Primary INTR is
On, the IRQs in the above fields can be configured as Primary, Secondary, or
Disabled.
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BIOS
VGA
When On, any video activity is a PM event.
Chapter 3
BIOS Configuration
Primary
Secondary
The system wakes up fully when it detects IRQ activity.
The system does not wake up, but the interrupt request is
processed. Secondary interrupts are typically
housekeeping devices needed to maintain the system while
not requiring the use of the rest of the system resources.
For example, IRQ8, the RTC Alarm, is configured as
Secondary by default. Another example might be a
network adapter continually polled by the network.
IRQn
The following is a list of IRQs (Interrupt Request Lines) assigned to common
system peripherals.
IRQ3 (COM2)
IRQ10 (Reserved)
IRQ4 (COM1)
IRQ11 (Reserved)
IRQ5 (LPT2)
IRQ12 (PS/2 Mouse)
IRQ6 (Floppy Disk)
IRQ13 (Coprocessor)
IRQ7 (LPT1)
IRQ14 (Hard Disk)
IRQ8 (RTC Alarm)
IRQ15 (Reserved)
IRQ9 (IRQ2 Redir)
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50
PnP/PCI Configuration
Note: This chapter describes all fields offered by Award Software in this
screen. Your system board designer may omit or modify some fields.
ROM PCI/ISA BIOS (2A5LET5A)
PNP/PCI CONFIGURATION
AWARD SOFTWARE, INC.
: No
: Manual
: Disabled
: Legacy ISA
: Legacy ISA
: PCI/ISA PnP
: Legacy ISA
: PCI/ISA PnP
: PCI/ISA PnP
: PCI/ISA PnP
: PCI/ISA PnP
: PCI/ISA PnP
: PCI/ISA PnP
: PCI/ISA PnP
: PCI/ISA PnP
: PCI/ISA PnP
: PCI/ISA PnP
: PCI/ISA PnP
: PCI/ISA PnP
CPU to PCI Write Buffer
PCI Dynamic Bursting
PCI Master 0 WS Write
PCI Delay Transaction
PCI#2 Access #1 Retry
AGP Master 1 WS Write
AGP Master 1 WS Read
Assign IRQ for USB
Assign IRQ for VGA
Slot 1 Use IRQ No.
Slot 2 Use IRQ No.
Slot 3 Use IRQ No.
Slot 4 Use IRQ No.
Slot 5 Use IRQ No.
ESC : Quit
↑↓ →← : Select Item
F1 : Help
PU/PD/+/- : Modify
F5 : Old Values (Shift)F2 : Color
F6 : Load BIOS Defaults
F7 : Load Setup Defaults
PnP / PCI Configuration - Default Settings Chart
Setting Option
BIOS Default
Setup Default
PnPOS Installed
No
No
Resources Controlled By
Manual
Manual
Reset Configuration Data
Disabled
Disabled
IRQ3 assigned to
Legacy ISA
Legacy ISA
IRQ4 assigned to
Legacy ISA
Legacy ISA
IRQ5 assigned to
PCI / ISA PnP
PCI / ISA PnP
IRQ7 assigned to
Legacy ISA
Legacy ISA
IRQ9 assigned to
PCI / ISA PnP
PCI / ISA PnP
IRQ10 assigned to
PCI / ISA PnP
PCI / ISA PnP
IRQ11 assigned to
PCI / ISA PnP
PCI / ISA PnP
IRQ12 assigned to
PCI / ISA PnP
PCI / ISA PnP
IRQ14 assigned to
PCI / ISA PnP
PCI / ISA PnP
IRQ15 assigned to
PCI / ISA PnP
PCI / ISA PnP
DMA-0 assigned to
PCI / ISA PnP
PCI / ISA PnP
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: Enabled
: Disabled
: Enabled
: Disabled
: Disabled
: Disabled
: Disabled
: Enabled
: Disabled
: Auto
: Auto
: Auto
: Auto
: Auto
BIOS
PNP OS Installed
Resources Controlled By
Reset Configuration Data
IRQ3 assigned to
IRQ4 assigned to
IRQ5 assigned to
IRQ7 assigned to
IRQ9 assigned to
IRQ10 assigned to
IRQ11 assigned to
IRQ12 assigned to
IRQ14 assigned to
IRQ15 assigned to
DMA-0 assigned to
DMA-1 assigned to
DMA-3 assigned to
DMA-5 assigned to
DMA-6 assigned to
DMA-7 assigned to
Chapter 3
BIOS Configuration
Settings Chart (continued)
Setting Option
BIOS Default
Setup Default
DMA-1 assigned to
PCI / ISA PnP
PCI / ISA PnP
DMA-3 assigned to
PCI / ISA PnP
PCI / ISA PnP
DMA-5 assigned to
PCI / ISA PnP
PCI / ISA PnP
DMA-6 assigned to
PCI / ISA PnP
PCI / ISA PnP
DMA-7 assigned to
PCI / ISA PnP
PCI / ISA PnP
CPU to PCI Write Buffer
Enabled
Enabled
PCI Dynamic Bursting
Disabled
Enabled
PCI Master 0 WS Write
Enabled
Enabled
PCI Delay Transaction
Disabled
Enabled
PCI #2 Access #1 Retry
Disabled
Disabled
AGP Master 1 WS Write
Disabled
Enabled
AGP Master 1 WS Read
Disabled
Disabled
Assign IRQ for USB
Enabled
Enabled
Assign IRQ for VGA
Disabled
Enabled
Slot 1 Use IRQ No.
Auto
Auto
Slot 2 Use IRQ No.
Auto
Auto
Slot 3 Use IRQ No.
Auto
Auto
Slot 4 Use IRQ No.
Auto
Auto
Slot 5 Use IRQ No.
Auto
Auto
PNP OS Installed
Select Yes if the system operating environment is Plug-and-Play aware (e.g.,
Windows 95).
Resources Controlled By
The Plug and Play EliteBIOS can automatically configure all the boot and Plug
and Play-compatible devices. If you select Auto, all the interrupt request (IRQ)
and DMA assignment fields disappear, because the BIOS automatically
assigns them.
Reset Configuration Data
Normally, you leave this field Disabled. Select Enabled to reset Extended
System Configuration Data (ESCD) when you exit Setup if you have installed a
new add-on and the system reconfiguration has caused such a serious conflict
that the operating system cannot boot.
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52
IRQ-n Assigned to
When resources are controlled manually, assign each system interrupt as one
of the following types, depending on the type of device using the interrupt:
Legacy ISA: Devices compliant with the original PC AT bus
specification, requiring a specific interrupt (such as IRQ4 for serial
port 1).
PCI/ISA PnP: Devices compliant with the Plug and Play standard,
whether designed for PCI or ISA bus architecture.
CPU to PCI Write Buffer
When this field is Enabled, writes from the CPU to the PCI bus are buffered, to
compensate for the speed differences between the CPU and the PCI bus.
When Disabled, the writes are not buffered and the CPU must wait until the
write is complete before starting another write cycle.
PCI Dynamic Bursting
When Enabled, every write transaction goes to the write buffer. Burstable
transactions then burst on the PCI bus; nonburstable transactions do not.
PCI Master 0 WS Write
When this field is Enabled, writes to the PCI bus are executed with zero wait
states.
PCI Delay Transaction
The chipset has an embedded 32-bit posted write buffer to support delay
transaction cycles. Select Enabled to support compliance with PCI specification version 2.1.
PCI#2 Access #1 Retry
Select Enabled to rotate priority of PCI masters.
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BIOS
DMA-n Assigned to
When resources are controlled manually, assign each system DMA channel as
one of the following types, depending on the type of device using the
interrupt:
Legacy ISA: Devices compliant with the original PC AT bus
specification, requiring a specific DMA channel
PCI/ISA PnP: Devices compliant with the Plug and Play standard,
whether designed for PCI or ISA bus architecture.
Chapter 3
BIOS Configuration
AGP Master 1 WS Write
Select Enabled to add one clock tick to AGP write operations.
AGP Master 1 WS Read
Select Enabled to add one clock tick to AGP read operations.
Assign IRQ for USB
Assign an IRQ number to the onboard USB port.
Assign IRQ for VGA
Assign an IRQ number to your VGA adapter.
Slot 1-5 IRQ for VGA
This option allows a user to assign specific IRQ’s to the PCI Slot.
Integrated Peripherals
Note: This chapter describes all fields offered by Award Software in this
screen. Your system board designer may omit or modify some fields.
ROM PCI/ISA BIOS (2A5LET59)
INTEGRATED PERIPHERALS
AWARD SOFTWARE, INC.
OnChip IDE First Channel
OnChip IDE Second Channel
IDE Prefetch Mode
IDE HDD Block Mode
IDE Primary Master PIO
IDE Primary Slave PIO
IDE Secondary Master PIO
IDE Secondary Slave PIO
IDE Primary Master UDMA
IDE Primary Slave UDMA
MPU-401 I/O Address
IDE Secondary Master UDMA
IDE Secondary Slave UDMA
Init Display First
: Enabled
: Enabled
: Disabled
: Disabled
: Auto
: Auto
: Auto
: Auto
: Disabled
: Disabled
: 330-333H
: Disabled
: Disabled
: PCI Slot
Onboard FDD Controller
Onboard Serial Port 1
Onboard Serial Port 2
: Enabled
: Disabled
: Disabled
Onboard Parallel Port
: 378/IRQ7
ESC : Quit
↑↓ →← : Select Item
F1 : Help
PU/PD/+/- : Modify
F5 : Old Values (Shift)F2 : Color
F6 : Load BIOS Defaults
F7 : Load Setup Defaults
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54
Integrated Peripherals - Default Settings Chart
Setting Option
BIOS Default
Setup Default
OnChip IDE First Channel
Enabled
Enabled
OnChip IDE Second Channel
Enabled
Enabled
IDE Prefetch Mode
Disabled
Enabled
IDE HDD Block Mode
Disabled
Enabled
IDE Primary Master PIO
Auto
Auto
IDE Primary Slave PIO
Auto
Auto
IDE Secondary Master PIO
Auto
Auto
IDE Secondary Slave PIO
Auto
Auto
IDE Primary Master UDMA
Disabled
Auto
Disabled
Auto
IDE Secondary Master UDMA
Disabled
Auto
IDE Secondary Slave UDMA
Disabled
Auto
Init Display First
PCI Slot
PCI Slot
Onboard FDD Controller
Enabled
Enabled
Onboard Serial Port 1
Disabled
3F8 / IRQ4
Onboard Serial Port 2
Disabled
2F8 / IRQ3
Onboard Parallel Port
378 / IRQ7
378 / IRQ7
On-Chip PCI IDE First/Second Channel
This chipset contains a PCI IDE interface with support for two IDE channels.
Select Enabled to activate the primary and/or secondary onboard IDE interface.
Select Disabled to deactivate this interface, if you install a primary and/or
secondary add-in IDE interface.
IDE Prefetch Mode
The onboard IDE drive interface supports IDE prefetching for faster drive
accesses. If you install a primary and/or secondary add-in IDE interface, set
this field to Disabled if the interface does not support prefetching.
IDE HDD Block Mode
Select Enabled only if your hard drives support block mode. Most new drives
support block mode. If Enabled, block mode yields automatic detection of the
optimal number of block read/writes per sector that the drive can support.
IDE Primary/Secondary Master/Slave PIO
The four IDE PIO (Programmed Input/Output) fields let you set a PIO mode (04) for each of up to four IDE devices that the internal PCI IDE interface
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BIOS
IDE Primary Slave UDMA
Chapter 3
BIOS Configuration
supports. Modes 0 through 4 provide successively increased performance. In
Auto mode, the system automatically determines the best mode for each
device.
IDE Primary/Secondary Master/Slave UDMA
UDMA (Ultra DMA) is a DMA data transfer protocol that utilizes ATA
commands and the ATA bus to allow DMA commands to transfer data at a
maximum burst rate of 33 MB/s. When you select Auto in the four IDE UDMA
fields (for each of up to four IDE devices that the internal PCI IDE interface
supports), the system automatically determines the optimal data transfer rate
for each IDE device.
Init Display First
Select the type of display adapter used in your system.
Onboard FDD Controller
Select Enabled if your system has a floppy disk controller (FDC) installed on
the system board and you wish to use it. If you install an add-in FDC or the
system has no floppy drive, select Disabled in this field.
Onboard Serial Port 1/ 2
Select a logical COM port address and corresponding interrupt for the first and
second serial ports. The second serial port offers infrared options in the next
field.
Onboard Parallel Port
Select a logical LPT port address and corresponding interrupt for the physical
parallel port.
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User Password
When you select this function, a message appears at the center of the screen:
ENTER PASSWORD:
Type the password, up to eight characters, and press Enter. Typing a password
clears any previously entered password from CMOS memory. Now the
message changes:
CONFIRM PASSWORD:
In the Security Option item in the BIOS Features Setup screen, select System
or Setup:
System
Enter a password each time the system boots and whenever
you enter Setup.
Setup
Enter a password whenever you enter Setup.
Note: To clear the password, simply press Enter when asked to enter a
password. Then the password function is disabled.
Flash Writer Utility
You can upgrade the BIOS on your motherboard by using the Flash Memory
Writer (FMW) utility. This utility can be downloaded from TYAN’s BBS and
from the TYAN website. The system BIOS is stored on a flash EEPROM chip
on the mainboard, which can be erased and reprogrammed by the FMW. The
following three files make up the FMW:
AWDFLASH.EXE
The Flash Memory Writer utility for Award to
Award upgrade.
README.TXT
A text file of instructions.
S71AWXX.BIN*
The new BIOS file.
(*This file name is subject to change and can have either a .bin or .rom extension.)
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BIOS
Again, type the password and press Enter. To abort the process at any time,
press Esc.
Chapter 3
BIOS Configuration
The FMW records (or programs) a new BIOS onto the flash memory chip. You
cannot upgrade an Award BIOS to an AMI BIOS or vice-versa.
Note: You should always clear your CMOS after flashing a BIOS. This will
clear out any stray settings from your old BIOS which may have been carried
over from the flashing process. Most problems encountered after flashing a
BIOS will be solved by this simple procedure (see Hardware CMOS & Password Reset, page 33).
To reprogram the system BIOS, the CPU must be running in real mode. FMW
will not run if the CPU is operating in a protected or virtual mode. This means
that you cannot run it with Windows running or with any memory manager
software. You must disable any memory manager software before you can run
FMW. The easiest way to do this is as follows:
1) Boot your system from a bootable floppy disk with no CONFIG.SYS or
AUTOEXEC.BAT files, and then run FMW from a backup copy of your
support disk. You can make your back-up floppy bootable when you format it,
and use one disk for both purposes.
2) If you are using MS-DOS 6.x, you can use the feature that allows you to
bypass the CONFIG.SYS and AUTOEXEC.BAT files. You can access this
feature by pressing <F5> while the “Starting MS-DOS...” line is on the screen
during boot-up.
If you are uncertain whether or not you have a memory manager running, try
FMW. If it works, then there is no active memory manager on your system. If
you see a warning message about the CPU mode, follow the above directions
to get around the memory manager.
Once you have your CPU in real mode, you can run FMW. You can copy the
contents of the “Flash” directory to your hard drive, or you can run the utility
from a backup of the support floppy disk. Either way, make sure that the new
BIOS file is in the same directory as the FMW utility.
To start FMW, change to the “Flash” directory if you are not already in it.
Type “awdflash” at the DOS command line and press the <Enter> key. The
FMW utility screen will appear:
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FLASH MEMORY WRITER V3.0
Copyright(C) 1993, AWARD SOFTWARE, INC.
For VX/HX-2A59CT51
Date:4/13/98
File Name to Program:
BIOS
Error Message:
Type in the whole file name, e.g. A61AW10.BIN, and confirm that you want to
program the BIOS. The utility will then “Blank,” “Erase,” and “Program” the
flash memory on the mainboard with the new BIOS file. You should choose
“Yes” to save the original system BIOS to a floppy diskette before you
program the new BIOS. This leaves you with a backup of your original BIOS in
case you need to re-install it. If you cannot successfully program the new
BIOS file for some reason, re-install your original BIOS from the backup file.
Remember, always reset the CMOS after flashing to a new BIOS (see page 33).
Warning: If you do not successfully install a complete BIOS file in the flash
memory on the mainboard, your system may not be able to boot. If this
happens, it will require service by your system vendor. Follow the instructions
in this section precisely to avoid such an inconvenience.
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Chapter 4
chapter 4
System Resources
System Resources
POST Messages
During the power-on self test (POST), the BIOS either sounds a beep code or
displays a message when it detects a correctable error. Following is a list of
POST messages for the ISA BIOS kernel. Specific chipset ports and BIOS
extensions may include additional messages. An error message may be
followed by a prompt to press F1 to continue or press DEL to enter Setup.
Beep
Currently the only beep code indicates that a video error has occurred and the
BIOS cannot initialize the video screen to display any additional information.
This beep code consists of a single long beep followed by two short beeps.
BIOS ROM checksum error - System halted
The checksum of the BIOS code in the BIOS chip is incorrect, indicating the
BIOS code may have become corrupt. Contact your system dealer to replace
the BIOS.
CMOS battery failed
CMOS battery is no longer functional. Contact your system dealer for a
replacement battery.
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CMOS checksum error - Defaults loaded
Checksum of CMOS is incorrect, so the system loads the default equipment
configuration. A checksum error may indicate that CMOS has become corrupt.
This error may have been caused by a weak battery. Check the battery and
replace if necessary.
CPU at nnnn
Displays the running speed of the CPU.
Display switch is set incorrectly.
The display switch on the motherboard can be set to either monochrome or
color. This message indicates the switch is set to a different setting than
indicated in Setup. Determine which setting is correct, and then either turn off
the system and change the jumper, or enter Setup and change the VIDEO
selection.
Press ESC to skip memory test
The user may press Esc to skip the full memory test.
HARD DISK initializing Please wait a moment...
Some hard drives require extra time to initialize.
HARD DISK INSTALL FAILURE
Cannot find or initialize the hard drive controller or the drive. Make sure the
controller is installed correctly. If no hard drives are installed, be sure the Hard
Drive selection in Setup is set to NONE.
Hard disk(s) diagnosis fail
The system may run specific disk diagnostic routines. This message appears if
one or more hard disks return an error when the diagnostics run.
Keyboard error or no keyboard present
The keyboard cannot initialize. Make sure the keyboard is attached correctly
and no keys were pressed during POST. To purposely configure the system
without a keyboard, set the error halt condition in Setup to HALT ON ALL,
BUT KEYBOARD. The BIOS then ignores the missing keyboard during POST.
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SYSTEM
Floppy disk(s) fail
Cannot find or initialize the floppy drive controller or the drive. Make sure the
controller is installed correctly. If no floppy drives are installed, be sure the
Diskette Drive selection in Setup is set to NONE or AUTO.
Chapter 4
System Resources
Keyboard is locked out - Unlock the key
This message usually indicates that one or more keys have been pressed
during the keyboard tests. Be sure no objects are resting on the keyboard.
Memory Test :
This message displays during a full memory test, counting down the memory
areas being tested.
Memory test fail
If POST detects an error during memory testing, additional information appears
giving specifics about the type and location of the memory error.
Override enabled - Defaults loaded
If the system cannot boot using the current CMOS configuration, the BIOS
can override the current configuration is a set of BIOS defaults designed for
the most stable, minimal-performance system operations.
Press TAB to show POST screen
System OEMs may replace the EliteBIOS POST display with their own proprietary display. Including this message in the OEM display permits the operator
to switch between the OEM display and the default POST display.
Primary master hard disk fail
POST detects an error in the primary master IDE hard drive.
Primary slave hard disk fail
POST detects an error in the secondary master IDE hard drive.
Resuming from disk, Press TAB to show POST screen
The BIOS offers a save-to-disk feature for notebook computers. This message
may appear when the operator re-starts the system after a save-to-disk shutdown. See the Press TAB ... message above for a description of this feature.
Secondary master hard disk fail
POST detects an error in the primary slave IDE hard drive.
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SYSTEM
This page has been intentionally left blank.
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Appendix 1
Appendix 1
Glossary
Glossary
ACPI (Advanced Configuration and Power Interface) is a power management
specification that allows the operating system to control the amount of power
distributed to the computer’s devices. Devices not in use can be turned off,
reducing unnecessary power expenditure.
AGP (Accelerated Graphics Port) is a PCI-based interface which was designed
specifically for demands of 3D graphics applications. The 32-bit AGP channel
directly links the graphics controller to the main memory. While the channel
runs at only 66MHz, it supports data transmission during both the rising and
falling ends of the clock cycle, yielding an effective speed of 133MHz.
The AT was the original form factor of IBM’s PC.
ATAPI (AT Attachment Packet Interface), also known as IDE or ATA, is a drive
implementation that includes the disk controller on the device itself. It allows
CD-ROMs and tape drives to be configured as master or slave devices, just
like hard drives.
The ATX form factor was designed to replace the AT form factor. It improves
on the AT design by rotating the board ninety degrees, so that the IDE
connectors are closer to the drive bays, and the CPU is closer to the power
supply and cooling fan. The keyboard, mouse, serial, USB, and parallel ports
are built in.
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Bandwidth refers to carrying capacity. The greater the bandwidth, the more
data the bus, phone line, or other electrical path, can carry. Greater bandwidth,
then, also results in greater speed.
A BBS (Bulletin Board System) is a computer system with a number of
modems hooked up to it which acts as a center for users to post messages and
access information.
The BIOS (Basic Input/Output System) program resides in the ROM chip, and
provides the basic instructions for controlling your computer’s hardware. Both
the operating system and application software use BIOS routines to ensure
compatibility.
A buffer is a portion of RAM which is used to temporarily store data, usually
from an application, though it is also used when printing, and in most keyboard drivers. The CPU can manipulate data in a buffer before copying it, all at
once, to a disk drive. While this improves system performance--reading to or
writing from a disk drive a single time is much faster than doing so repeatedly-there is the possibility of losing your data should the system crash. Information stored in a buffer is temporarily stored, not permanently saved.
A bus is a data pathway. The term is used especially to refer to the connection
between the processor and system memory, and between the processor and
PCI or ISA local buses.
A cache is a temporary storage area for data that will be needed often by an
application. Using a cache lowers data access times, since the needed information is stored in the SRAM instead of in the slower DRAM. Note that the
cache is also much smaller than your regular memory: a typical cache size is
512KB, while you may have as much as 1GB of regular memory.
Cache size refers to the physical size of the cache onboard. This should not
be confused with the cacheable area, which is the total amount of memory
which can be scanned by the system in search of data to put into the cache. A
typical setup would be a cache size of 512KB, and a cacheable area of 512MB.
In this case, up to 512MB of the main memory onboard is capable of being
cached. However, only 512KB of this memory will be in the cache at any given
moment. Any main memory above 512MB could never be cached.
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GLOSSARY
Bus mastering allows peripheral devices and IDEs to access the system
memory without going through the CPU (similar to DMA channels).
Appendix 1
Glossary
Closed and open jumpers Jumpers and jumper pins are active when they are
On or Closed, and inactive when they are Off or Open.
CMOS Complementary Metal-Oxide Semiconductors are chips that hold the
basic start-up information for the BIOS.
The COM port is another name for the serial port, which is so-called because it
transmits the eight bits of a byte of data along one wire, and receives data on
another single wire (that is, the data is transmitted in serial form, one bit after
another). Parallel ports transmit the bits of a byte on eight different wires at the
same time (that is, in parallel form, eight bits at the same time).
DIMM Dual In-line Memory Modules are a faster and more capacious form of
RAM than SIMMs, and do not need to be installed in pairs.
DIMM bank DIMM banks are sometimes called DIMM sockets, because the
physical slot and the logical unit are the same. That is, one DIMM module fits
into one DIMM socket, which is capable of acting as a memory bank.
DMA Direct Memory Access channels are similar to IRQs. DMA channels
allow hardware devices (like sound cards or keyboards) to access the main
memory without involving the CPU. This frees up CPU resources for other
tasks. As with IRQs, it is vital that you do not double up devices on a single
line. Plug and Play devices will take care of this for you.
In Doze mode, only the CPU’s speed is slowed.
DRAM Dynamic RAM is a widely available, very affordable form of RAM
which has the unfortunate tendency to lose data if it is not recharged regularly
(every few milliseconds). This refresh requirement makes DRAM slower three
to ten times slower than non-recharged RAM such as SRAM.
EDO RAM (Extended Data-Out RAM) speeds access to memory locations by
assuming that memory addresses are static: the next time it looks for a bit of
data, it will be at the same spot, or one nearby.
EEPROM Electrically Erasable Programmable ROM, also called Flash BIOS, is
a ROM chip which can, unlike normal ROM, be updated. This allows you to
keep up with changes in the BIOS programs without having to buy a new chip.
TYAN’s BIOS updates can be found at http://www.tyan.com/html/drivers.html
ESCD (Extended System Configuration Data) is a format for storing informahttp://www.tyan.com
66
tion about Plug and Play devices in the system BIOS. This information helps
properly configure the system each time it boots.
Firmware is low level software that controls the system hardware.
Form factor is an industry term for the size, shape, power supply type, and
external connector type of the PCB (personal computer board) or motherboard.
The standard form factors are the AT and ATX, although TYAN also makes
some Baby-AT boards.
A Global timer is an onboard hardware timer, such as the Real Time Clock.
Handshaking is a form of encryption. One system, typically the server, sends
an encryption scheme to another agent, typically a client. Thus, the client’s
data is protected during transmittal to the server.
HDD stands for Hard Disk Drive.
H-SYNC controls the horizontal properties of the monitor.
IC (Integrated Circuit) is the formal name for the computer chip.
IDE INT (IDE Interrupt) is a hardware interrupt signal that goes to the IDE.
I/O Input/Output is the connection between your computer and another piece
of hardware (mouse, keyboard, etc.).
IRQ An Interrupt Request is an electronic request that runs from a hardware
device to the CPU. The interrupt controller assigns priorities to incoming
requests and delivers them to the CPU. It is important that there is only one
device hooked up to each IRQ line; doubling up devices on IRQ lines can lock
up your system. Happily, Plug and Play operating systems take care of these
details for you.
ISA stands for Industry Standard Architecture. ISA is a slower 8- or 16-bit BUS
(data pathway).
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GLOSSARY
IDE Integrated Device (or Drive) Electronics is a simple, self-contained hard
drive interface. It can handle drives up to 8.4GB in size. Almost all IDEs sold
now are in fact Enhanced IDEs (EIDEs).
Appendix 1
Glossary
Latency is the amount of time that one part of a system spends waiting for
another part to catch up. This is most common when the system sends data
out to a peripheral device, and is waiting for the peripheral to send some data
back (peripherals tend to be slower than onboard system components).
NVRAM ROM and EEPROM are both examples of Non-Volatile RAM, memory
that holds its data without power. DRAM, in contrast, is volatile.
OEMs (Original Equipment Manufacturers) like Compaq or IBM package other
companies’ motherboards and hardware inside their case and sell them.
The parallel port transmits the bits of a byte on eight different wires at the
same time (that is, in parallel form, eight bits at the same time).
PCI stands for Peripheral Component Interconnect. PCI is a 32-bit local bus
(data pathway) which is faster than the ISA bus. Local buses are those which
operate within a single system (as opposed to a network bus, which connects
multiple systems).
The PCI PIO (PCI Programmable Input/Output) modes are the data transfer
modes used by IDE drives. These modes use the CPU for data transfer (DMA
channels do not). PCI refers to the type of bus used by these modes to
communicate with the CPU.
PCI-to-PCI bridge allows you to connect multiple PCI devices onto one PCI
slot.
Pipeline burst SRAM is a fast secondary cache. It is used as a secondary
cache because SRAM is slower than SDRAM, but usually larger. Data is
cached first to the faster primary cache, and then, when the primary cache is
full, to the slower secondary cache.
Pipelining improves system performance by allowing the CPU to begin
executing a second instruction before the first is completed. A pipeline can be
likened to an assembly line, with a given part of the pipeline repeatedly
executing a set part of an operation on a series of instructions.
PM timers (Power Management timers) are software timers that count down
the number of seconds or minutes until the system times out and enters sleep,
suspend, or doze mode.
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PnP is an acronym for Plug and Play, a design standard that has become
ascendant in the industry. Plug and Play devices require little set-up to use.
Novice end users can simply plug them into a computer that is running on a
Plug and Play-aware operating system (such as Windows 95), and go to work.
Devices and operating systems that are not Plug and Play require you to
reconfigure your system each time you add or change any part of your
hardware.
The term RAM (Random Access Memory), while technically referring to a type
of memory where any byte can be accessed without touching the adjacent
data, is often used to refer to the system’s main memory. This memory is
available to any program running on the computer.
ROM (Read-Only Memory) is a storage chip which contains the BIOS (Basic
Input/Output System), the basic instructions required to boot the computer
and start up the operating system.
SDRAM (Synchronous Dynamic RAM) is so-called because it can keep two
sets of memory addresses open simultaneously. By transferring data alternately from one set of addresses, and then the other, SDRAM cuts down on
the delays associated with non-synchronous RAM, which must close one
address bank before opening the next.
SIMM Single In-line Memory Modules are the most common form of RAM.
They must be installed in pairs, and do not have the carrying capacity or the
speed of DIMMs.
SIMM bank/socket SIMM sockets are the physical slots into which you stick
SIMM modules. A pair of SIMM sockets form a SIMM bank, and act as a unit.
If only one socket is filled, the bank will not operate.
In Sleep/Suspend mode, all devices except the CPU shut down.
SRAM Static RAM, unlike DRAM, does not need to be refreshed in order to
prevent data loss. Thus, it is faster, and more expensive.
In Standby mode, the video and fixed disk drive shut down; all other devices
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GLOSSARY
The serial port is so called because it transmits the eight bits of a byte of data
along one wire, and receives data on another single wire (that is, the data is
transmitted in serial form, one bit after another).
Appendix 1
Glossary
operate normally.
UltraDMA/33 is a fast version of the old DMA channel. UltraDMA is also
called UltraATA. Without UltraDMA your system cannot take advantage of
the higher data transmission rates of the new UltraATA hard drives.
Universal Serial Bus or USB, is a versatile port. This one port type can
function as a serial, parallel, mouse, keyboard, or joystick port. It is fast
enough to support video transfer, and is capable of supporting up to 127
daisy-chained peripheral devices.
VGA (Video Graphics Array) is the PC video display standard.
V-SYNC controls the vertical properties of the monitor.
ZIF socket Zero Insertion Force sockets make it possible to insert CPUs
without damaging the sensitive pins. The CPU is lightly placed in an open ZIF
socket, and the metal lever pulled down. This shifts the processor over and
down, guiding it into place on the board.
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Notice for the USA
Compliance Information Statement (Declaration of Conformity Procedure) DoC
FCC Part 15: This Device complies with Part 15 of the FCC Rules.
Operation is subject to the following conditions:
1) this device may not cause harmful interference, and
2) this device must accept any interference received including interference that
may cause undesired operation. If this equipment does cause harmful interference to radio or television reception, which can be determined by turning the
equipment off and on, the user is encouraged to try one or more of the
following measures:
• Reorient or relocate the receiving antenna.
• Increase the separation between the equipment and receiver.
• Plug the equipment into an outlet on a circuit different from that of
the receiver.
• Consult the dealer or an experienced radio/television technician for
help.
CAUTION: LITHIUM BATTERIES included with This PC board. Danger of
explosion if battery is incorrectly replaced. Replace ONLY with the same or
equivalent type recommended by manufacturer. Dispose of used batteries
according to manufacturer instructions.
Notice for Canada
This apparatus complies with the Class B limits for radio interference as
specified in the Canadian Department of Communications Radio Interference
Regulations.
Cet appareil est conforme aux normes de Classe B d’ interference radio tel que
spécifié par le Ministére Canadien des Communications dans les réglements
d’interférence radio.
Notice for Europe (CE Mark)
This product is in conformity with the Council Directive 89/336/EEC, 92/31/EEC
(EMC).
Document # D1353-100
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Jumper Settings Quick Reference
CPU Bus Speed Settings
CPU Clock Multiplier
Bus Spe e d
JP4
JP5
JP6
M ultiplie r
JP1
JP2
JP3
60M Hz
2- 3
2- 3
2- 3
2.5x
ON
ON
O FF
66M Hz
1- 2
2- 3
2- 3
3x
O FF
ON
O FF
75M Hz
1- 2
1- 2
2- 3
3.5x
O FF
O FF
O FF
83M Hz
1- 2
2- 3
1- 2
4x
ON
O FF
ON
95M Hz
2- 3
1- 2
1- 2
4.5x
ON
ON
ON
100M Hz
1- 2
1- 2
1- 2
5x
O FF
ON
ON
5.5x
O FF
O FF
ON
CPU Core Voltage Settings
CPU Voltage
JP8
JP9
JP10
JP11
JP12
CPU Voltage
JP8
JP9
JP10
JP11
JP12
1.3V
O FF
O FF
O FF
O FF
ON
2.5V
ON
O FF
ON
O FF
O FF
1.4V
O FF
ON
O FF
O FF
ON
2.6V
O FF
ON
ON
O FF
O FF
1.5V
O FF
O FF
ON
O FF
ON
2.7V
ON
ON
ON
O FF
O FF
1.6V
O FF
ON
ON
O FF
ON
2.8V
O FF
O FF
O FF
ON
O FF
1.7V
O FF
O FF
O FF
ON
ON
2.9V
ON
O FF
O FF
ON
O FF
3.0V
O FF
ON
O FF
ON
O FF
3.1V
ON
ON
O FF
ON
O FF
3.2V
O FF
O FF
ON
ON
O FF
O FF
3.3V
ON
O FF
ON
ON
O FF
O FF
ON
ON
ON
O FF
ON
ON
ON
ON
O FF
O FF
ON
ON
1.9V
O FF
O FF
ON
ON
ON
2.0V
O FF
ON
ON
ON
ON
2.1V
ON
O FF
O FF
O FF
O FF
2.2V**
O FF
ON
O FF
O FF
2.3V
ON
ON
O FF
O FF
O FF
3.4V
2.4V
O FF
O FF
ON
O FF
O FF
3.5V
D e fault
1- 2
CPU Clock
1- 2
R e s e t CM OS
2- 3
AGP Clock
2- 3
HDD
LED
JP7
VCC
1
2 Power LED
LED
3
4 Ground
Ground
5
6 Power On/Off
Switch
7
8 Ground
VCC
9
10 Ground
Infrared
Same as :
FAN Pin Assignments
FAN1, FAN2
J3 External Pin Assignments
Memory Clock
JP13
Reset
Switch
CMOS Reset
1
2
3
GND
+12V
Fan Monitor
Receive
11
12 K/B Lock
IRRX
13
14 Ground
Ground
15
16 SM I Switch
IRTX
17
18 Ground
See pages 14-16 for details on Jumpers.
S1590 Trinity 100AT
Pwr/Slp
LEDs
ON
Power
Switch
O FF
SMI
Switch
1.8V
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