1 Semiconductor Application Worldwide Dataquest

1 Semiconductor Application Worldwide Dataquest

Dataquest

Semiconductor Application

Markets Worldwide

1

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The content of this rejxjrt represents our interpretation and analysis of information generally available to the public or released by responsible individuals in the subject companies, but is not guaranteed as to accuracy or completeness. It does not contain material provided to us in confidence by our clients.

This information is not furnished in connection with a sale or offer to sell securities, or in connection with the solicitation of an offer to buy securities. This firm and its parent and/or their oiSceis, stockholders, or members of the families may, fiom time to time, have long or short position in the securities mentioned and may sell or buy such securities.

Printed in the United States of America. All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be rejModuced, stored in retrieval systems, or transmitted, in any form or by any means—^mechanical, electronic, photocopyii^, duplicating, microfilming, videotape, or otherwise—without the prior permission of the publisher.

®1991 Dataquest IrKX>rporated

Welcome to Dataquest

Semiconductor Application Markets Worldwide

You are in the

Source: Dataquest

binder

An annually updated collection of reference documents for the Semiconductor Application

Markets Worldwide service. Worldwide and North American market statistics; Company

Backgrounders; and several guides such as How to Use Dataquest, Dataquest Research

Methodology, Dataquest High-Technology GuideSegmentation and Glossary are contained in this binder.

Other Semiconductor Application Markets Worldwide service binders:

Dataquest Perspective

A series of multitopic publications that provide analysis on worldwide semiconductor application markets trends and issues and semiconductor news and views.

Semiconductor Application Markets

Worldwide

Source: Dataquest

Table of Contents

Guides

How to Use Dataquest

Dataquest Research Methodology

Dataquest High-Technology GuideSegmentation and Glossary

Market Statistics

Semiconductor Consumption and Shipment Forecast

Worldwide and North American Electronic Equipment Production Forecast

Worldwide and North American Semiconductor Consumption by Application Market Forecast

Worldwide and North American Electronic Equipment OEM Revenue by Application Market

Electronic Equipment Market Statistics

Company Bacl<grounders

Index

Company Backgrounders by Dataquest

w

Dataquest

a company of

October 14,1991

(408)437-8000 Telex 171973 Fax (408) 437-0292

Attention: Clients of Semiconductor Application Markets service

For the last two years, we at Dataquest have been in the process of changing the format in which we deliver information to our clients. The Semiconductor Application Markets service began converting to the new format in May with the consolidation of our database information into individually bound booklets, instead of loose-leaf service sections. Now we are ready to tie the new look together with new binders and a new look to our newsletters.

The New Format

Dataquest's new publication format is simple, consisting of two parts:

Dataquest Perspective — a multitopic publication containing timely

Dataquest analyses of markets, products, technologies, companies, enduser issues, and industry events. For fast retrieval of historical information, a quarterly year-to-date index will be issued at the beginning of each succeeding quarter.

Source: Dataquest — a collection of reference documents individually

boimd as booklets. These booklets include guides to Dataquest definitions and methods; market statistics, which are drawn from

Dataquest's detailed databases; and Company Backgrounders by

Dataquest, which are summaries of the companies representing the major

portion of the market.

More than Just a Name Change!

The Semiconductor Application Markets service has been renamed:

Semiconductor Application Markets Worldwide

As the new name indicates, the service has been expanded to cover worldwide as well as

North American application issues. The dynamics of specific electronic equipment markets, particularly the worldwide data processing market, are closely monitored.

The Speciflcation

Following this letter is a summary specification for the Semiconductor Application

Markets Worldwide service. If you have any questions regarding these changes, please call me at (408) 437-8624.

Sincerely,

M/^y^' MyOjt^

Alice K. Leeper

Associate Director

Marketing

Semiconductor Application Markets Worldwide

Dataquest Perspective

Dataquest's Semiconductor Application Markets Worldwide service is a comprehensive market research service providing thorough forecasts and analyses of semiconductor constmiption by end-use application markets. The service provides information on equipment manufacturers and electronic equipment markets, as well as detailed analyses of key fast-growing equipment segments.

A total of twelve (12) monthly issues will be published each year. In addition, four

special-edition issues will be published each year, covering Dataquest's worldwide

semiconductor forecast and worldwide market share analysis. The preliminary market share issue will publish January 1 each year. The final market share will publish no later than May 31 each year. The Dataquest Semiconductor Forecast issues will publish by

May 31 and October 15 each year.

Source: Dataquest

This binder contains the reference documents for the Semiconductor Application Markets

Worldwide service. These documents will be updated once or twice a year, depending on

the subject. Included in this binder are guides, Company Backgrounders by Dataquest, and the following market statistics: o Semiconductor Consumption and Shipment Forecast o Worldwide and North American Electronic Equipment Production Forecast

0 Worldwide and North American Semiconductor Consiunption by Application

Market Forecast o North American OEM Revenue by Application o Electronic Equipment Market Statistics

DataQuest

m^K i m a company of

The Dun & Bradstreet Corporation

October 14, 1991

SEMICONDUCTOR APPLICATION MARKETS

FILING INSTRUCTIONS

TITLE:

TAB:

FILING INSTRUCTIONS:

Worldwide And North American Electronic

Equipment Production Forecast

Electronic Equipment Forecast

This booklet should be placed directly behind the tab entitled "Market Statistics" in your new "Source: Dataquest binder.

TITLE:

TAB:

FILING INSTRUCTIONS!

Company Backgrounders

Company Backgrounders

Please place the company backgrounders behind the tab entitled "Company Backgrounders" in your new Source: Dataquest binder.

If you should have any questions please contact Klmberlie Southern at

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DataQuest

Semiconductor Market Definitions

Marcli 1992

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Semiconductor Market Definitions

March 1992

\

DataQuest^

Source:

Dataquest

File behind the Guides tab inside the

Source: Dataquest binder.

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Published by Dataquest Incorporated

The content of this report represents our interpretation and analysis of information generally available to the public or released by knowledgeable individuals in the subject industry, but is not guaranteed as to accuracy or completeness. It does not contain material provided to us in confidence by our clients.

Printed in the United States of America. All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced, stored in retrieval systems, or transmitted, in any form or by any means—mechanical, electronic, photocopying, duplicating, microfilming, videotape, or otherwise—without tiie prior permission of the publisher.

© 1992 Dataquest Incorporated

March 1992

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Semiconductor Market Definitions

March 1992

Table o f Contents

Market Share Survey Overview 1-1

Semiconductor Companies Surveyed Worldwide 1991 • 2-1

General Sales Definitions 3-1

Exchange Rate Definitions 4-1

Semiconductor Product Category Hierarchy 5-1

Semiconductor Product Category Definitions 6-1

Worldwide Geographic Region Definitions 7-1

Semiconductor Application Segment Definitions 8-1

Semiconductor Market Definitions

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©1992 Dataquest Incorporated March-Reproduction Prohibited

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Chapter 1

Market Share Survey Overview

Each year, Dataquest surveys semiconductor vendors in order to estimate their annual sales.

The survey covers approximately 140 semiconductor vendors worldwide (this varies according to mergers, acquisitions, liquidations, startups, and so on) by 56 individual semiconductor product categories (excluding subtotals),

6 application segments, and 5 world regions

(Europe is split into a further subregions). This exercise helps Dataquest maintain its dynamic database of semiconductor supply by company, and semiconduaor shipments by world region and product. The information gained is supplemented by, and cross-checked with,

Dataquesfs various other information sources.

The semiconductor market share survey takes place twice each year. The first survey is to prepare preliminary estimates for the calendar year. This is then followed by a second survey of the same companies diree months later in order to finalize estimates for the same calendar year. The first survey takes place during October and November. Our preliminary estimates are completed by the end of the calendar year under review, and the results are summarized in a research report (a

Dataquest Perspective document), which is released on January 1 following the end of the year. Preliminary vendor rankings are featured in a Dataquest press release shortly after this date.

The second survey takes place during March.

Our final semiconductor market share estimates are then published in greater depth in a reference report (a Source: Dataquest document) by May 31. There is usually minimal difference between preliminary and final ranking, as

Dataquest makes every effort to ensure preliminary estimates are as accurate as possible. However, there will be occasions when some company results are revised according to unexpeaed late billings or order cancellations in the final months of the calendar year being reported.

The categories for which semiconductor revenue is reported are defined comprehensively for the purpose of clarity and guidance to survey participants. These definitions may occasionally be revised, altered or expanded to reflect dianges in the industry. To support these definitions, Dataquest will issue an annual survey guide to all participants in its semiconductor market share survey program.

This document comprises the 1991 survey guide.

1-1

1-2 Semiconductor Market Defimltions Chapter 1

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©1992 Dataquest Incorporated March—Reproduction Prohibited

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Chapter 2

Semiconductor Companies Surveyed

Worldwide 1991

North American Companies

Actel

Advanced Micro Devices

Allegro Microsystems

Altera

Analog Devices

Appian Technology

Applied Micro Circuits Corporation

AT&T

Atmel

Brooktree

Burr-Brown

California Micro Devices

Catalyst

Cherry Semiconductor

Chips & Technologies

Cirrus Logic

Coralinear

Crystal

Cyipress Semiconductor

Dallas Semiconductor

Elantec

Exar

General Instrument

Gennum

Gould AMI

Harris

Hewlett-Packard

Honeywell

Hughes

IMI

Integrated Device Technology

Intel

International CMOS Technology

International Microelectronic Products

International Rectifier

nr

Kulite

Lattice

Linear Technology

LSI Logic

Maxim

Micro Linear

Micro Power Systems

Microchip Technology

Micron Technology

Microsemi

Mitel

MOSel

Motorola

National Semiconductor

NCR

Novasensor Inc.

Optek

Performance Semiconductor

Powerex

Quality Technologies

Raytheon

Rockwell

SEEQ Technology

Semtech

Sierra Semiconductor

Silicon General

Silicon Systems

Siliconix

Sipex

Solitron

Standard Microsystems

Supertex

Tektronix

Teledyne

Texas Instruments

TRW

Unitrode

Universal

Vitelic

VLSI Technology

VTC

WaferScale Integration

Weitek

Western Digital

Xicor

Xilinx

Zilog

Japanese Companies

Fuji Electric

Fujitsu

Hitachi

Matsushita

* i

z-z

Mitsubishi

NEC

New JRC

NMB Semiconductor

Oki

Ricoh

Rohm

Sanken

Sanyo

Seiko Epson

Sharp

Shindengen Electric

Sony

Toko

Toshiba

Yamaha

European Compaaies

ABB-HAFO

ABB-KYS

Austria Mikro Systeme

Ericsson

Eupec

European Silicon Structures

Eurosil

Fagor

GEC Plessey

Matra-MHS

MEDL

Mietec

Philips Semiconductors

Semikron

SGS-Thomson

Siemens

STC

TAG

Telefunken Electronic

TMS

Zetex

Semiconductor Market Definltioas

Asia/Pacific Companies

Daewoo

Goldstar

Hualon Microelectronics Corporation

Hyundai

Korean Electronic Company

MOSpec

Samsung

Silicon Integrated Systems

United Microelectronics

Winbond Electronics

Summary

83 North American Companies

20 Japanese Companies

21 European Companies

10 AsiayiPacific Companies

134 Worldwide Companies

Chapter 2

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©1992 Dataquest Incorporated March—Reproduction Prohibited

chapter 3

General Sales Definitions

1. Sales to customer. All sales are reported according to customer location, that is, the shipping destination.

2. Finished semiconductor products.

Defined as assembled and tested semiconductor products. Only count sales of fin-

ished semiconductor products to distributors

and equiprrient manufacturers. Do not include sales of finished semiconductors to other semiconductor vendors for valueadded resale. Resale revenue will be estimated separately for these companies.

3. Unfinished semiconductor products.

Defined as wafer and die foundry products.

Only count sales of unfinished semiconductor products to distributors and equipment

manufacturers. Do not include sales of unfinished semiconductors to other semiconductor vendors for resale. Resale revenue will be estimated separately for these companies.

4. Internal semiconductor sales. Defined as revenue from finished or unfinished semiconductor products from intracompany (internal or in-house) transfers to divisions and subsidiaries of your parent company that manufacture end equipment. Include

all such internal semiconductor sales at market price.

5. Hybrid products. Defined as products that comprise a number of active semiconductor die and/or passive components in a single package. Only count sales of hybrid

products that conform with definition 2 or 3.

6. Modules and board-level products.

Defined as products that comprises a number of active semiconductor and/or passive components mounted on a single printed circuit board OPCB). Only coimt sales of modules and board-level products that conform with definition 2 or 3. Only

include the market value of the active semicoyiductors in the module or boardlevel product.

System-level products. Defined as products that comprise a nxmiber of module and/or board-level products amounting to a single system or subsystem. Examples include development systems, hardware platforms, and box-level products. Iki not include any sales from

such system-level products.

NR£ charges. Defined as nonrecurring engineering charges made to customers as the result of costs incurred during the design or customizing of a semiconductor device for that customer. This occurs in the following product areas:

• Design charges for ASICs including gate arrays, ceU-based ICs, and fiall-custom

ICs.

• Mask charges that result from the customizing of a programmable array logic

(PAL), when the customer's fuse pattern is masked into it to produce a hardwired array logic (HAL).

• Mask charges that result from the customizing of ROMs.

• Mask charges that result ft^om the storage of the customer's microcode in a microcontroller.

Only count revenue from NRE charges on active semiconductor products that conform with definition 2 or 3- Include these NRE charges as part of the revenue received

from associated semiconductor product. Do not include revenue from NRE charges incurred during research, feasibility studies, or facility rental to third parties.

9.

Electronic design automation (EDA)

software. EDA software is used to automate the design of semiconductors. Dataquest includes revenue from ASIC semiconductor vendors that also sell their own

EDA software. Include any revenue derived

from EDA software in the appropriate ASIC

product category. The applicable categories are PLD, gate array, and cell-based IC.

3-1

3-2 Semiconductor Market Definitions Chapter 3

lO.IFR income. Defined as intellectual and dispute settlements. Do not include ^ property rights, income fi'om royalties, any such IPR income. licensing agreements, technology transfers,

I

©1992 Dataquest Incorporated Match—Reproduction Prohibited

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Chapter 4

Exchange Rate Definitions

When converting a company's local currency sales into U.S. dollars, or vice versa, it is important to use the 1991 exchange rates provided below. This will prevent inconsistencies in the conversion of offshore sales between each company. These are the exchange rates that will be used in the final

1991 semiconductor market share survey.

Exchange rates for historical years are available on request.

\

Average 1991 Exchange Rates against the U.S. Dollar

Country

Austria

Belgium

Denmark

Finland

France

Germany-

Ireland

Italy

Jap>an

Luxembourg

Netherlands

Norway

Portugal

South Korea

Spain

Sweden

Switzerland

Taiwan

United Kingdom

ECU

1991 Rate

11.67

34.13

6.39

4.04

5.64

1.66

0.62

1,238.93

134.68

34.13

1.87

6.49

144.02

730.90

103.81

6.04

1.43

26.50

0.57

0.81

Currency

Schillings/$

Belgian Francs/$

Danish Kroner/$

Markka/$

French Francs/$

Deutsche Marks/$

Pounds/$

Lire/$

Yen/$

Luxem. Francs/$

Gulden/$

Norwegian Kroner/$

Escudos/$

•Won/$

Pesetas/$

Swedish Kronor/$

Swiss Francs/$

NT$/$

Pounds/$

ECU/$

4-1

4-2 Semiconductor Maricet Definitions Chapter 4

©1992 Dataquest Incorporated March—Reproduction Prohibited

chapter 5

Semiconductor Product Category

Hierarchy

The following semiconductor product category hierardiy begins with total semiconductor, and indents each subcategory in the left-hand column according to its position in the hierarchy. At each level in the hierarchy, all subcategories that contribute to this level are shown as a subcategory summation in the right-hand column. Any level in the hierarchy that does not depend on any subcategories is marked as a "Data Point."

Total Semiconductor:

Total Integrated Circuit:

Bipolar Digital IC:

IC + Discrete + Optoelectronic

Digital Monolithic Bipolar IC + Digital Monolithic MOS IC + Analog/

Mixed-Signal Monolithic IC + Hybrid IC

1. Bipolar Digital TlVOther IC + Bipolar Digital ECL IC—technology

split

2. Bipolar Digital Memory IC + Bipolar Digital Microcomponent IC +

Bipolar Digital logic—Junction split

Bipolar Digital TlVOther IC:

Bipolar Digital ECL IC:

Data Point

Data Point

Bipolar Digital Memory IC:

Bipolar Digital Micro IC:

Bipolar Digital Logic IC:

Data Point

Data Point

Bipolar Digital Application-Specific IC + Bipolar Digital Standard Logic

Bipolar Digital ASIC:

Bipolar Digital GA:

Bipolar Digital PLD:

Bipolar Digital CBIC:

Bipolar Digital FQC:

Bipolar Digital Standard Logic IC:

Other Bipolar Digital Logic IC:

IC + Other Bipolar Digital Logic IC

Bipolar Digital Gate Array + Bipolar Digital Programmable Logic

Device + Bipolar Digital Cell-Based IC + Bipolar Digital Full-Custom

IC

Data Point

Data Point

Data Point

Data Point

Data Point

Data Point

MOS Digital IC:

CMOS Digital IC:

BiCMOS Digital IC:

NMOS/Other Digital IC:

1. CMOS Digital IC + BiCMOS Digital IC + NMOS/Other Digital IC—

technology split

2. MOS Memory IC + MOS Microcomponent IC + MOS Logic IC—

function split

Data Point

Data Point

Data Point

5-1

5-2

Semiconductor Market Definitions

Chapter 5

MOS Digital IVIemory IC:

DRAM:

SRAM:

EPROM:

Other NV MOS Memory IC:

Other MOS Memory IC:

MOS Digital Microcomponent IC:

MOS Digital MPU:

MOS Digital MCU:

MOS Digital MPR:

DRAM + SRAM + EPROM + Other Nonvolatile MOS Digital Memory

IC + Other MOS Digital Memory IC

Data Point

Data Point

Data Point

Data Point

Data Point

MOS Digital Microprocessor + MOS Digital Microcontroller + MOS

Digital Microperipheral

Data Point

Data Point

Data Point

MOS Digital Logic IC:

MOS Digital ASIC:

MOS Digital GA;

MOS Digital PLD:

MOS Digital CBIC:

MOS Digital FQC:

MOS Digital Standard Logic IC:

Other MOS Digital Logic IC:

MOS Digital Application-Specific IC + MOS Digital Standard Logic IC

+ Other MOS Digital Logic IC

MOS Digital Gate Array + MOS Digital Programmable Logic Device +

MOS Digital Cell-Based IC + MOS Digital Full-Custom IC

Data Point

Data Point

Data Point

Data Point

Data Point

Data Point

Analog IC:

Monolithic Analog IC + Hybrid IC

Monolithic Analog IC:

Linear IC + Mixed-Signal IC

Linear IC:

Amplifier IC:

Voltage Regulator IC:

Voltage Reference IC:

Comp>arator IC:

Special Function IC:

Special Consumer IC:

Special Automotive IC:

Linear Array ASIC:

Amplifier IC + Voltage Regulator IC + Voltage Reference IC + Comparator IC + Special Function IC + Special Consumer IC + Special

Automotive IC + Linear Array ASIC

Data Point

Data Point

Data Point

Data Point

Data Point

Data Point

Data Point

Data Point

Mixed-Signal IC:

Data Converter IC:

Telecom IC:

Data Converter IC + Telecom IC + Interface IC + Switch/Multiplexer

IC + Disk Drive IC + Mixed-Signal ASIC

Data Point

Data Point

©1992 Dataquest Incorporated March-Reproduction Prohibited

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Chapter 5

Hybrid IC:

Total Discrete:

Transistor:

Small-Signal Transistor:

Power Transistor:

Bipolar Power Transistor:

MOS Power Transistor:

Power IGBT:

Diode:

Small-Signal Diode:

Power Diode:

Thyristor:

Other Discrete:

Total Optoelectronic:

LED Lamp/Display:

Optocoupler:

CCD:

Laser Diode:

Photosensor:

Solar Cell:

Interface IC:

Switch/Multiplexer IC:

Disk Drive IC:

Mixed-Signal ASIC:

Semiconductor Product Category Hierarchy

5-3

Data Point

Data Point

Data Point

Data Point

Data Point

Transistor + Diode + Thyristor + Other Discrete

Small-Signal Transistor + Power Transistor

Data Point

Bipolar Power Transistor + MOS Power Transistor + Power Insulated

Gate Bipolar Transistor (IGBT)

Data Point

Data Point

Data Point

Small-Signal Diode + Power Diode

Data Point

Data Point

Data Point

Data Point

LED Lamp/Display + Optocoupler + CCD + Laser Diode +

Photosensor + Solar Cell

Data Point

Data Point

Data Point

Data Point

Data Point

Data Point

©1992 Dataquest Incorporated Maich-^teproduction Prohibited

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Chapter 6

SetnicondMctor Product Category

Definitions

The following semiconductor product category definitions begin with total semiconductor, and continue through each subcategory in the same order as shown in the preceding semiconductor product category hierarchy. At each

Total Semiconductor:

Total Integrated Circuit:

Bipolar Digital IC:

TTL/Other Bipolar Digital IC:

ECL IC:

Bipolar Digital Memory IC: level in the hierarchy, all subcategories that contribute to this level are shown as a subcategory summation in the right-hand colvmm. Comprehensive definitions are given at every level.

QC + Discrete + Optoelectronic.) Defined as an active semiconductor product that contains semiconducting material (such as silicon, gennanium, or gallium arsenide) and reacts dynainically to an input signal, either by modifying its shape or adding energy to it. This definition excludes standalone passive comf>Qnents, such as capacitors, resistors, induaors, oscillators, crystals, transformers, and relays.

(Digital Monolithic Bipolar IC + Digital Monolithic MOS IC + Analog

Monolithic IC + Hybrid IC.) An IC is defined as a large number of passive and/or active discrete semiconductor circuits integrated into a single package. A monolithic IC is one in which discrete circuits are integrated onto a single die, while a hybrid IC is one in which discrete circuits are integrated onto a small number of die.

1. technology ^ / » — ( m / O t h e r Bipolar IC + ECL)

2. function ^lit—(Bipolar Digital Memory IC + Bipolar Digital

Microcomponent IC + Bif)olar Digital Logic l O

A bipolar digital IC is defined as a monolithic semiconduaor product in which 100 percent of the die area performs digital functions, and concurrently, 100 percent of the die area is manufactured using bipolar semiconductor technology. A digital function is one in which data-carrying signals vary in discrete values.

Defined as a bipolar digital IC manufactured using transistortransistor logic (TTL) semiconductor technology. Other bipolar technologies include resistor-transistor logic (RTL) and diode-transistor logic (DTL).

Defined as a bipolar digital IC manufactured using emitter<oupled logic (ECL) semiconductor technology.

Defined as a bipolar digital semiconductor product in which binary data are stored and electronically retrieved. Includes ECL randomaccess memory (RAM), read-only memory (ROM), programmable

ROM (PROM), last-in/first-out (LIFO) memory, first-in/first-out (FIFO) memory.

6-1

6-2 Semiconductor Market Definitions

Chapter 6

Bipolar Digital Micro IC:

Bipolar Digital Logic IC:

Bipolar Digital ASIC:

Defined as a bipolar digital semiconductor produa that contains a data processing unit or serves as an interface to such a unit.

Includes both complex-instruction-set computing (QSC) and reduced-instruction-set computing (RISC) processor architectures.

Includes bipolar digital microprocessor (MPU), bipolar digital microcontroller (MOLO, and bipolar digital microperipheral (MPS), where applicable.

(Bipolar Digital Application-Specific IC + Bipolar Digital Standard

Logic IC + Other Bipolar Digital Logic IC.) Defined as a bipolar digital semiconduaor product in which more than 50 percent of the die area peffbrms logic functions. Excludes bipolar digital microcomponent ICs.

(Bipolar Digital Gate Array + Bipolar Digital Programmable Logic

Device + Bipolar Digital Cell-Based IC + Bipolar Digital Full-

Custom IC.) Defined as a single-user bipolar digital logic IC that is manufactured using vendor-supplied tools and/or libraries. Do not include bipolar digital ASICs incorporating microcontroller cells, as these should be reported in the bipolar digital microcontroller IC category.

Bipolar Digital GA:

Bipolar Digital PIX>:

Bipolar Digital Gate Array is defined as an ASIC device that is customized by the vendor to end-user specification using layers of interconnect. Included in this category are generic or base wafers with embedded functions, for example, SRAM, EEPROM.

Bipolar Digital Programmable Logic Device is defined as an ASIC device that is customized by the end user after assembly. Included in this category are bipolar field-programmable logic (bipolar FPL), bipolar field programmable gate array (bipolar FPGAD, bipolar programmable array logic (bipolar PAL), bipolar programmable logic array (bipolar PLA), bipolar electrically programmable logic device

(bipolar EPID), and bipolar programmable multilevel logic device

(bipolar PMD).

Bipolar Digital CBIC:

Bipolar Digital FaC:

Bipolar Digital Standard Logic IC:

Bipolar Digital Cell-Based IC is defined as an ASIC device that is produced from a library of standard circuits/cells to a single-user specification. This process involves automatic routing and placement of cells. Included in this definition is bipolar standard cell

IC. Excluded from this definition are cell-based ICs with processor cores. These should be reported under bipolar digital microcomponents.

Bipolar Digital Full-Custom IC is defined as an ASIC device that is produced for a single user using a full set of masks. This manufacturing process involves manual routing and placement of cells.

Defined as commodity bipolar family logic with less than 150 gates.

Sometimes referred to as glue logic. Examples include TTL, ECL and other family logic: TTL-compatible SSI, MSI, LSI; standard, AS,

FAST, LS, ALS lines; ECL-compatible SSI, MSI, LSI. Also RTL and

DTL.

©1992 Dataquest Incorporated March—Reproduction Prohibited

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Chapter 6

MOS Digital IC:

CMOS Digital IC:

BiCMOS Digital IC:

NMOS/Other Digital IC:

MOS Digital Memory IC:

DRAM:

SRAM:

EPROM:

Other NV MOS Memory IC:

Semiconductor Product Category Defimitions

Other Bipolar Digital Logic IC:

6-3

Defined as all other bipolar digital logic ICs not accoiinted for in the preceding categories. Includes bipolar commodity family logic with 150 or more gates, and bipolar digital general-purpose logic not belonging to any ^milies.

1. technology ^it—CCMOS + BiCMOS + NMOS/Other)

2. Junction sp/»»—CMOS Digital Memory IC + MOS Digital

Microcomponent IC + MOS Digital Logic IC)

A MOS digital IC is defined as a monolithic semiconduaor produa in which 100 percent of the die area performs digital functions, and concurrently, any portion of the die area that is manufactured using metal oxide semiconductor CMOS) technology. A digital function is one in which data-carrying signals vary in discrete values. Includes mixed technology manufacturing, such as BiMOS and BiCMOS,

•vrfiere there is some MOS technology employed.

Defined as a MOS digital IC manufactured entirely in coiiq>lementary metal oxide semiconductor CCMOS) technology.

Defined as a MOS digital IC manvifactured using bipolar and complementary metal oxide semiconduaor CCMOS) technologies.

Defined as a MOS digital IC manufactured entirely in N-channel metal oxide semiconductor CNMOS) technology. Other MOS technologies include P-channel metal oxide semiconduaor CPMOS).

CDRAM + SRAM + EPROM + Other Nonvolatile MOS Digital Memory + Other MOS Digital Memory.) Defined as a MOS digital IC in which binary data are stored and electronically retrieved.

Defined as Dynamic RAM, Multiport-DRAM CM-DRAM), and Video-

DRAM CV-DRAM). DRAMs have memory cells consisting of a single transistor, and require externally cycled memory cell refreshes on a regular basis. These are volatile memories and addressing is multiplexed.

Defined as Static RAM, Multiport-SRAM CM-SRAM), Battery Backed-

Up SRAM CBB-SRAM), and Pseudo SRAM CPSRAM). SRAMs have memory cells consisting of a minimum of four transistors, except

PSRAM, which has a memory cell consisting of a single transistor and is similar to DRAM. SRAMs do not require externally cycled memory cell refreshes. These are volatile memories and addressing is not multiplexed Cexcept in the case of PSRAM). Note that color palette DACs are included in the mixed-signal data converter category.

Defined as Erasable Programmable Read-Only Memory. Includes

Ultraviolet EPROM CUV EPROM) and One-Time Programmable Readonly Memory COTP ROM). EPROMs have memory cells consisting of a single transistor, and do not require any memory cell refreshes. These are nonvolatile memories.

Includes EEPROM, flash memory, and mask ROM. These are all nonvolatile memories.

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6-4

MOS Digital MPU:

MOS Digital MCU:

Semiconductor Market Definitlans

Other MOS Distal Memory IC:

MOS Digital Microcomponent IC:

Chapter 6

EEPROM is defined as Sectrically Erasable Programmable Read-Only

Memory. Includes Serial EEPROM (S-EEPROM), Parallel EEPROM CP-

EEPROM), and Electrically Alterable Read-Only Memory (EAROM).

EEPROMs have memory cells consisting of a minimum of two transistors, and do not require memory cell refreshes. Includes Nonvolatile RAM (NVRAM), also known as Shadow RAM. These semicond u a o r products are a combination of an SRAM and a P-EEPROM in each memory cell. TTie P-EEPROM functions as a shadow backup for the SRAM when power is lost.

Flash memory is defined as rapidly electrically erasable nonvolatile memory. Includes flash memory based on an EPROM cell structure

(that is, single transistor) and flash memory based on an EEPROM cell structure (that is, minimum of two transistors), and does not require memory cell refi-eshes. Includes flash memory based on single- or dual-voltage supply. Mask ROM is defined as Mask-

Programmable Read-Only Memory. Specifically, a form of memory that is programmed by the manufacturer to a user specification using a mask step. Mask ROM is programmed in hardware rather than software.

Defined as all other MOS digital memory not already accounted for in the preceding categories. Includes MOS digital content addressable memory (CAM), MOS digital cache-tag RAM, MOS digital first-in/ first-out memory (FIFO), MOS digital last-in/first-out (UFO) memory, ferroelectric memory.

(MOS Digital Microprocessor + MOS Digital Microcontroller + MOS

Digital Microperipheral.) Defined as a MOS digital IC that contains a data processing unit or serves as an interface to such a unit.

Includes both complex-instruction-set computing (CISC) and reduced-instruction-set computing (RISC) processor architectures.

Defined as a MOS Digital Microprocessor. A semiconductor product serving as the central processing unit (CPU) of a system. Consists of an instruction decoder, arithmetic logic unit (ALU), registers, and additional logic. An MPU performs general-purpose computing functions by executing external instructions and manipulating data held in external memory. Includes MOS digital MPUs incorporating or developed firom an ASIC design.

Defined as a MOS Digital Microcontroller. A semiconduaor product serving as a dedicated, or embedded controller in a system. Consists of an integral MPU, some nonvolatile memory containing enduser-specified instructions, and some volatile memory for temporary storage of code or data. An MCU can perform basic computing functions without support form microperipheral (MPR) products.

This category also contains members of miaocontroller product families that have had the on-chip nonvolatile memory removed and instead, access the end-user program contained in external nonvolatile memory. Includes MOS digital MCUs performing a standalone digital signal processing (DSP) function. Includes MOS digital MCUs incorporating or developed from an ASIC design.

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Chapter 6 Semiconductor Product Cat^ory Definitions 6-5

MOS Digital MPR: Defined as a MOS Digital Microperiphetal. A semiconduaor produa serving as a logical support function to an MPU or MCU in a system. An MPR provides enhancement of system p>erformance and/or interface with external systems. Includes MOS digital MPRs comprising more than one device, such as PC chip sets. Examples of a

MOS digital MPR indude: timer, interrupt control, DMA, MMU, peripheral controllers (for example, disk, graphics display, CRT, keyboard controllers), communications controllers (for example, UART), chip sets for microprocessor support, LAN coprocessors, accelerator coprocessors (for example, floating-point unit, graphics coprocessor, image processor).

MOS Digital Lpgic IC: (MOS Digital Application-Specific IC + MOS Digital Standard Logic

IC + Other MOS Digital Logic IC.) Defined as a MOS digital IC in which more than 50 percent of the die area petforms logic functions. Excludes MOS digital microcomp>onent ICs.

MOS Digital ASIC: (MOS Digital Gate Array + MOS Digital Programmable Logic

Device + MOS Digital Cell-Based IC + MOS Digital Full-Custom IC.)

Defined as a single-user logic IC that is manufactured using vendorsupplied tools and/or libraries. Do not indude ASICs incorporating microcontroller cells that should be induded in microcontroller revenue.

MOS Digital GA: MOS Digital Gate Array is defined as an ASIC device that is customized by the vendor to end-user specification using layers of intercotmea. Induded in this category are generic or base wafers with embedded functions, for example, SRAM, EEPROM.

MOS Digital PLD: MOS Digital Programmable Logic Device is defined as an ASIC device that is customized by the end user after assembly. Induded in this category are MOS field-programmable logic (MOS FPL), MOS field-programmable gate array (MOS FPGA), MOS programmable array logic (MOS PAL), MOS programmable logic array (MOS PLA),

MOS electrically programmable logic device (MOS EPLD), and MOS programmable multilevel logic device (MOS PMD).

MOS Digital CBIC: MOS Digital Cell-Based IC is defined as an ASIC device that is produced from a library of standard circuits/cells to a single-user specificatioa This process involves automatic routing and placement of cells. Induded in this definition is MOS standard cell IC.

Exduded from this definition are cell-based ICs with processor cores. These should be reported under MOS digital microcomponent.

MOS Digital FQC: MOS Digital Full-Custom IC is defined as an ASIC device that is produced for a single user using a ftill set of masks. This process involves manual routing and placement of cells.

MOS Digital Standard Logic IC: Defined as commodity MOS family logic with less than 150 gates.

Sometimes referred to as glue logic. Examples indude: HC, HCT,

AC, ACT, FACT, and 74BC BiCMOS family logic.

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6-6

Other MOS Digital Logic IC:

Analog IC:

Monolithic Analog IC:

Monolithic Linear IC:

Amplifier IC:

Voltage Regulator IC:

Voltage Reference IC:

Semiconductor Market Definltloiis

Chapter 6

Defined as all other MOS digital Ipgic ICs not accounted for in the preceding categories. Includes MOS commodity family logic with

150 or more gates, and MOS digital general-purpose logic not belonging to any families.

(Monolithic Analog IC + Hybrid IC.)

A monolithic analog IC is a semiconduaor p r o d u a that deals in the realm of electrical signal processing, power control, or electrical drive cap>ability. It is one in which some of the inputs or outputs can be defined in terms of continuously or linearly variable voltages, currents, or frequencies. Includes all monolithic analog ICs manufactured using bipolar, MOS, or BiCMOS technologies. A monolithic IC is a single die contained in a single package.

A hybrid IC is a semiconduaor p r o d u a that consists of more than one die contained in a single package. A hybrid IC may perform

100 percent linear, 100 percent digital, or mixed-signal (both linear and digital) functions. Note that hybrid digital ICs are reported in this category, and not under the earlier category of monolithic digital ICs. Includes all hybrid ICs manufactured using bipolar, MOS, or

BiCMOS technologies.

(Monolithic Linear IC + Monolithic Mixed-Signal IC.)

Monolithic linear IC is defined as an analog device that has only analog L/O, therefore its charaaeristics are inherently linear.

Monolithic mixed-signal IC is defined as an analog device that has both analog and digital I/O (see mixed-signal IC definition).

(Amplifier IC + Voltage Regulator IC + Voltage Reference IC +

Comparator IC + Special Function IC + Special Consumer IC +

Special Automotive IC + Linear Array ASIC.) Defined as an analog device that has 100 percent analog I/O.

Defined as a general-purpose linear IC that provides a voltage or current gain to an input signal. Includes operational amplifiers

(mono, dual, quad, and so on), instrumentation amplifiers, buffer amplifiers, and power amplifiers. Consumer-dedicated amplifier ICs are counted in special consumer IC. Amplifier ICs designed specifically for one customer using vendor-supplied tools and/or libraries are counted in analog/mixed-signal ASIC.

Defined as a general-purpose linear IC that outputs a variable current at a regulated DC voltage to other circuits from a variable current and voltage input. Regulator ICs are either linear regulators in which the device provides an input-to-output voltage drop, or switching regulators, in which the device provides switched quantities of power to a smoothing circuit to gain higher efficiency and reduce power dissipation.

Defined as a general-purpose linear IC that outputs a precise reference voltage to other circuits from a variable voltage input. A reference IC dififers from a regulator IC in that it is not expeaed to power other circuits. In faa, voltage regulator ICs incorporate a voltage reference circuit.

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I

t

Chapter 6

Comparator IC:

Special Function IC:

Sfjecial Consumer IC;

Special Automotive IC:

Linear Array ASIC:

Mixed-Signal I d

Semiconductor Product Category Defimltlons

6-7

Defined as a general-purpxise linear IC that compares two analog signal inputs and provides a single logic bit output. Although the output could be considered digital, these products are classed as linear ICs because they are specialty high-gain amplifiers, used in an open loop mode, and for which the output is constrained to only two states. By using a comparator, an unknown voltage can be compared with a known reference voltage.

Defined as either general-purpose linear ICs tiiat do not fit into the other categories, or market/application-specific linear ICs for which a category does not yet exist. The main products that fell into this category include timers, phase-locked loops CPLLs), voltagecontrolled oscillators (VCOs), signal/function generator ICs, and analog multipliers. Disk-drive analog ICs should be reported in their dedicated category under mixed-signal analog.

Defined as a general-purpose linear IC that is dedicated to general consumer applications, but is not application-specific. Includes analog ICs implemented in audio, video, radio, speech synthesis and recognition, electronic games, personal and home appliances, and electronic cameras. Consumer ICs designed specifically for one customer using vendor-supplied tools and/or libraries are counted in linear array ASIC or mixed-signal ASIC.

Defined as a linear IC that is used in the following applications: entertainment, engine control, safety, traction, and in-car electrical and suspension systems.

Defined as a single-user linear IC that is manufactured using vendor-supplied tools and/or libraries. Linear arrays fall into one of three types, as follows:

1. Arrays of discrete-level cells such as transistors, diodes, and transistors

2. Arrays of discrete device combinations referred to as tiles

3. Arrays of higher-level functional macro cells such as operational amplifiers, comparators, VCOs, references, and other analog functions.

These arrays are interconnected with a metal mask or by means of some user-programmable interconnect scheme. Unlike cell-based designs, they do not have a unique set of masks for all layers.

(Data Converter IC + Telecom IC + Interface IC +

Switch/Multiplexer IC + Disk Drive IC + Mixed-Signal ASIC.)

Defined as an analog IC that carries information in both digital (numeric) and signal/power forms. An IC is considered mixed-signal if it has both analog I/O and digital I/O pins. This definition is not based on the comparative size of the ICs analog and digital circuitry. It is a definition based on external pin functionality. ICs that are mainly digital but have some nominal analog housekeeping functions such as voltage monitors, power-on reset, or dock oscillators are not considered to be mixed-signal because there is no analog signal being received by or sent from the active component.

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6-8

Data Converter IC:

Telecom IC:

Interface IC:

Switch/Multiplexer IC:

Disk Drive IC:

Mixed-Signal ASIC:

Semiconductor Market Definitions

Chapter 6

Defined as a general-purpose mixed-signal IC that converts an analog signal into a digital signal, or vice versa. Includes analog-todigital converters (ADCs), digital-to-analog convertors (DACs), comparators, sample-and-hold circuits (SHCs), voltage-to-frequency circuits (VFCs), frequency-to-voltage circuits (FVCs), synchro-to-digital circuits (SDCs), and digital-to-synchro circuits (DSCs). All these are general-purpose data convertor ICs. Ako included in this category

are color-palette DACs. Consumer-dedicated data converter ICs are counted in special consumer IC. Data converter ICs designed specifically for one customer using vendor-supplied tools and/or libraries are counted in analog/mixed-signal ASIC.

Defined as a general-purpose mixed-signal IC used for voice band communication or data communication over voice band media. This category includes CODECs, combos and SLACs, SUCs, modem and fax/modem ICs, dialler and ringer ICs, repeaters, cellular communications ICs, ISDN ICs, telecom filter ICs, and other telecom-specific circuits. Telecoms ICs designed specifically for one customer using vendor-supplied tools and/or libraries are counted in linear array

ASIC or mixed-signal ASIC.

Defined as a general-purpose mixed-signal IC that serves as an interfece between a digital system and other external nonsemiconductor systems. Includes line drivers, peripherals drivers, display drivers, keyboard encoders, receivers, transmitters, and transceivers.

Consumer-dedicated interface ICs are coimted in special corasumer

ICs. Interface ICs designed specifically for one customer using vendor-supplied tools and/or libraries are counted in linear array

ASIC or mixed-signal ASIC.

Defined as a mixed-signal IC that digitally controls analog transmission gates. These products connea or disconnect the analog signal path in analog circuits. Analog switches ofjerate in a mode where each switch is operated independently by a single logic bit.

Multiplexers are multiple analog switches that are connected in a dependent manner, where only one signal path is connected through to the output depending on the state of a digital address word (greater than one bit). Thus, analog multiplexers are really addressable signal seleaor switches that select one-out-of-many signals for further analog processing. Because these addressable analog switches were the key element in time-division multiplexing, the term "multiplexer" has remained. "Hiey are an important part of the data conversion product family in that they are used to provide time-division multiplexing of signal inputs to a fast analog-to-digital converter.

Defined as a mixed-signal IC that is designed specifically for the rotating mass storage market. .^>plications include the read/'write p>ath from preamp up to the ENDEC, head positioning controller, and spindle motor control.

Defined as a mixed-signal analog IC that is manufactured for a single user, using vendor-supplied tools and/or libraries.

i

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^

I

€3iapter 6

Hybrid IC:

Total Discrete:

Transistor:

Small-Signal Transistor:

Power Transistor:

Diode:

Bipolar Power Transistor:

MOS Power Transistor:

IGBT Power Transistor:

Small-Signal Diode:

Power Diodes:

TTiyristor:

Other Discrete:

Semiconductor Product Category Definitknas 6-9

Defined as a semiconductor produa consisting of more than one die contained in a single package. May perform digital, analog, or mixed-signal functions. May be manufactured using bipolar, MOS, or

BiCMOS technology. Includes hybrid implementation of all monolithic IC fijnctions described in the preceding categories.

(Transistor + Diode + Ttyristor + Other Discrete.) A discrete semiconduaor is defined as a unit building block performing a fundamental semiconduaor function.

(Small-Signal Transistor + Power Transistor)

Defined as signal transistors, RF microwave transistors, dual transistors, MOS field-effea transistors (MOS-FETs), conductivity modulated field-effea transistors (COMFETs), insulated gate bipolar transistors

(IGBTs), and MOS-bipolar transistors (MBTs). All rated below IW power dissipation, lA current rating, or lOOV operating voltage.

(Bipolar Power Transistor + MOS Power Transistor + Power IGBT.)

All rated IW power dissipation and above, lA current rating and above, or lOOV op>erating voltage and above.

Defined as bipolar Darlington transistor, bipolar microwave transistor, bipolar radio frequency (RF) transistor.

Defined as MOS field-effea transistor (MOS-FET), MOS Darlington transistor, MOS microwave transistor, MOS radio frequency (RF) transistor.

Defined as insulated gate bipolar transistor (IGBT). Also includes conductivity modulated field-effea transistor (COMFED, MOS-bipolar transistor (MBT), and GEMFET.

(Small-Signal Diode + Power Diode)

Defined as signal diodes, Schottky diodes, zener diodes, switching diodes, voltage reference diodes, voltage regulator diodes, and rectifier diodes. All rated below 0.1 A.

Defined as zener diodes and rectifier diodes. All rated 0.1 A and above.

Defined as thyristors, silicon-controlled rectifiers (SCRs), diacs, and triacs. Also includes solid-state relays (SSRs) incorporating triacs, thyristors, resistors, and capacitors.

Defined as all other discrete semiconduaor products not accounted for in the preceding categories. Includes microwave diodes, varactors, tuning diodes, tunnel effea diodes, and selenium rectifiers.

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6-10

Total Optoelectronic:

LED Lamp/Display:

Optocoupler:

CCD:

Laser Diode:

Photosensor:

Solar Cell:

Semicoiiductor Market Definitions

Cliapter 6

(LED Lamp/Display + Optocoupler + CCD + Laser Diode +

Photosensor + Solar Cell.) Defined as a semiconduaor product in which photons induce the flow of electrons, or vice versa. Other functions may also be integrated onto the product This category does not include LCD, incandescent displays, fluorescent displays, cathode ray tubes (CRTs), or plasma displays.

LED Lamp + TFD Display.

An LED lamp is defined as a light-emitting diode: a semiconductor product consisting of a sin^e die in which photons are emitted at frequencies dependent upon the semiconduaor material employed.

An LED display is defined as an array of LEDs: a semiconduaor produa consisting of more than one die in which photons are emitted at frequencies dependent upon the semiconduaor material employed.

Defined as an optocoupler or optoisolator. A semiconduaor produa consisting of an LED separated from a photosensor by a transparent, insulating, dielectric layer. These are mounted inside an opaque package. Includes optointerrupters, in which the separation between

LED and photosensor is large enough to allow external physical systems to influence the device.

Defined as a charge-coupled device. A semiconduaor produa consisting of an array of photodiodes, an analog CCD shift register, and an output circuit. Includes linear array CCDs with serial shift registers and area array CCDs with p>arallel shift registers. Includes charge injection device (CID), chaige-coupled photodiode (CCP), charge-priming device (CPD), self-scanning photodiode (SSP).

Defined as a diode that produces coherent light. A semiconduaor produa in which the heterojunction structure stimulates light amplification by stimulated emission of radiation (laser), resulting in coherent light. Includes Fabrey-Perot laser diodes, pulsed laser diodes, and phase-shifted laser diodes.

Photodiode + Phototransistor. Defined as a diode or transistor in which photons are used to affea current flow.

Defined as photovoltaic or solar cells. A semiconduaor device in which photons are used to generate current flow.

©1992 Dataquest Incorporated March—Reproduction Prohibited

Chapter 7

^i^orldwide Geographical Region

Definitions

North America

Includes United States (50 states: Illinois,

Indiana, Michigan, Ohio, Wisconsin, Alabama,

Kentucky, Mississippi, Tennessee, Arizona,

Colorado, Idaho, Montana, Nevada, New

Mexico, Utah, Wyoming, New Jersey, New

York, Pennsylvania, Cormecticut, Maine,

Massachusetts, New Hampshire, Rhode Island,

Vermont, Alaska, California, Hawaii, Oregon,

Washington, Delaware, Florida, Georgia,

Maryland, North Carolina, South Carolina,

Virginia, West Virginia, Iowa, Kansas, Miimesota, Missouri, Nebraska, North Dakota, South

Dakota, Arkansas, Louisiana, Oklahoma, Texas),

Puerto Rico, and Canada (12 provinces: Newfoundland, Prince Edward Island, Nova Scotia,

New Brunswick, Quebec, Ontario, Manitoba,

Saskatchewan, Alberta, British Columbia,

Labrador, Northwest Territories).

Japan

Includes Hokkaido, Tohoku, Kanto, Chubu,

Kinki, Chugoku, Shihoku, and Kyushu.

Europe

Includes Benelux (Belgium, Netherlands,

Luxembourg), France, Italy, Scandinavia

(Denmark, Finland, Norway, Sweden, Iceland),

United Kingdom and Eire (England, Wales,

Scodand, Northern Ireland, Republic of Ireland), Germany (including former east Germany), and Rest of Europe (Austria, Gibraltar,

Greece, Liechtenstein, Malta, Monaco, Portugal,

San Marino, Spain, Switzerland, Turkey, Andorra, Vatican City).

Asia/Pacific

Includes East Asia (China, Hong Kong, Macau,

North and South Korea, Taiwan), South Asia

(Bangladesh, Myanmar, India, Nepal, Maldives,

Pakistan, Sri Lanka, Bhutan), Southeast Asia

(Brunei, Timor, Indonesia, Kampuchea, Laos,

Malaysia, Philippines, Singapore, Thailand,

Vietnam, Borneo, Sumatra, Sulawesi, Java).

Rest of World

Includes Mexico, Arctic, Antarctica, Greenland,

St. Pierre and Miquelon, Australia, New

Zealand (North Island, South Island, Stewart

Island), Tasmania, Christmas Island, Cocos

Islands, New Zealand, Norfolk Island, Oceania

(American Samoa, Canton and Enderbury

Islands, Fiji, French Polynesia, Guam, Johnson

Island, Kiribati, Midway Islands, Nauru, New

Caledonia, Niue, Pacific Islands, Papua New

Guinea, Pitcaim, Samoa, Solomon Islands, Toelau, Tonga, Tuvalu, Vanuatu, Wake Island, Wallis and Futuna Islands, New Britain, New Ireland, Admiralty Islands), Africa (Algeria, Libya,

Egypt, Morocco, Mauritania, Mali, Senegal,

Guinea, Sierra Leone, Liberia, Ghana, Ivory

Coast, Togo, Benin, Nigeria, Niger, Chad,

Sudan, Ethiopia, Central African Republic,

Somalia, Zimbabwe, Uganda, Gabon, Cameroon, Congo, Zaire, Tanzania, Zambia, Malawi,

Kenya, Cabinda, Namibia, Botswarxa, Mozambique, Rwanda, Biorundi, South Africa,

Swaziland, Benin, Equatorial Guinea, Burkina

Faso, Djibouti, Lesotho, Ciskei, Transkei,

Bophuthatswana, Venda), Madagascar, Mauritius,

Comores, Reunion, Central America

(Nicaragua, Panama, Guatemala, El Salvador,

Belize, Honduras, Granada, Costa Rica), South

America (Brazil, Chile, Uruguay, Paraguay,

Argentina, Colombia, Peru, BoHvia, Venezuela,

Guyana, Surinam, French Guiana, Equador,

Falkland Islands), Caribbean Islands (Cuba,

Jamaica, Haiti, Dominican Republic, Anguilla,

Montserrat, Trinidad, Tobago, Dominica,

Guadeloupe, Saint Lucia, Barbados, Martinique,

Grenadine Islands, Bermuda, Bahamas, New

Providence, Saint Vincent and The Grenadines,

Saint Croix, Antilles), Eastern Europe (Albania,

Bulgaria, Czechoslovakia, Hungary, Poland,

Yugoslavia, Romania, Estonia, Latvia, Ukraine,

7-1

7-2 Semiconductor Market Defiualtions Chapter 7

Belomssia, Lithuania, Latvia, Georgia), Com- East (Bahrain, Cypnis, Democratic Yemen,

monwealth of Independent States (formerly People's Republic of Yemen, Egypt, Gaza Strip,

USSR: Russian Federation, Moldavia, Armenia, Iran, Iraq, Israel, Jordan, Ku\s^it, Lebanon,

Azerbaijan, Kazakhstan, Uzbekistan, Tadjikistan, Oman, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, United Arab

Kirghizia, Turkmenistan), Inner Asia (Af- Emirates, Syria). ghanistan, Bhutan, Mongolia, Pakistan), Middle

©1992 Dataquest Incorporated March—Reproduction Prohibited

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Chapter 8

Semiconductor Application Segment

Definitions

Data Processing

Defined as computer systems, terminals, smart cards, data storage devices, input/output devices, and dedicated systems:

Computer systems includes supercomputers, mainframe computers, superminicomputers, minicomputers, microcomputers, workstations, personal computers.

Data storage devices includes flexible/removable disk drives, fixed/rigid disk drives, optical disk drives, tape drives (streamers).

Terminals includes alphanumeric terminals, graphics terminals, point-of-sales terminals, funds transfer terminals.

Smart cards includes credit cards or credit card-size devices with one or more

Integrated circuits such as token cards, entry key cards, bank cards, medical cards, computer peripheral cards.

Input/output devices includes dot matrix printers, thermal printers, ink jet priaters, fully formed printers, page printers, other input/output devices such as monitors, keyentry equipment, media-to-media data conversion, magnetic ink character recognition, optical scanning equipment, plotters, voice recognition/synthesizer computer equipment, mice, keyboards, digitizers.

Dedicated systems includes office equipment such as copiers, duplicators, full-color copiers, electronic calculators, dictating/transcribing equipment, electronic tj^ewriters, word processors, banking systems and cash registers, mailing/letter-handling/addressing equipment.

Conununication

Defined as premise telecom equipment, public telecom equipment, radio, and broadcast and studio:

Premise telecom equipment includes image and text communication such as facsimile, video conferencing, telex, videotex, CCTV; data communications equipment such as modems, statistical multiplexers, time-division multiplexers, local area networks (LANs), private packet data switching; PBX/key telephone systems; call processing equipment such as answering machines, attendant consoles, automatic call distributors (ACDs), voice response imits (VRUs), voice terminals, voice messaging systems, call management systems; desktop terminal equipment such as standard telephones, cordless telephones, cellular telephones, video telephones, answ^ering machines.

Public telecom equipment includes transmission equipment, central office switching, public packet switching, and mobile communication such as mobile radio base stations, pagers, base stations.

Radio includes communications equipment transmitting and receiving sound through the use of electronic waves/signals.

Broadcast and studio includes all electronic equipment used to make information public by means of radio and television.

M

8-2

Consumer Appliances

Seoiiconductor Market Definitions

Defined as audio equipment, video equipment, personal electronics, and electronic/electrical:

Audio equipment includes compact disc players, radio combinations, stereo hi-fi components: amplifiers, preamplifiers, tuners, cassette decks, graphic equalizers, turntables, speakers, and equipment used in studio, broadcast, and home environments (equipment that interprets frequencies corresponding to audible sound waves), musical instruments.

Video equipment includes video cameras, video camcorders, videocassette recorders, videotape recorders, color televisions, blackand-white televisions.

Personal electronics includes watches, docks.

Electronic/electrical appliances includes air conditioners, microwave ovens, washers and dryers, refrigerators/freezers, dishwashers, ranges, ovens.

Industrial

Defined as security/alarm management, manufacturing systems, test equipment, process control equipment, robot systems, automated material Imidling, instrumentation, medical equipment, vending machines, laser equipment, power supply, traffic control, industrial and scientific research equipment, and other industrial electronic equipment such as vending machines, laser systems, teaching machines, and aids.

Military and Civil Aerospace

Defined as military electronic equipment and

civil aerospace. This includes radar, military/ civil sonar, missile weapon, space military equipment, military/civil navigation, communication, electronic warfare, reconnaissance, aircraft systems, military computer systems, military simulation and training, miscellaneous military equipment, civilian space, dvil aircraft flight systems, and miscellaneous avionic equipment.

Transportation

Chapter 8

Defined as in-car entertainment systems, body control electronics, driver information, powertrain, and safety and convenience electronics:

In-car entertainment includes FM/AM radio, cassette, compact disc player, radio cassette combination systems, two-way radio communications systems, CB radio.

Body control electronics includes vehicle controls such as four-wheel steering control,

2"WD/4'WD control, multiplex systems such as driver's door, auto-climate control, door locks, windshield wipers, heated rear windows, memory seats, remote security systems, steering wheel, other multiplex systems; lighting controls including automatic headlight systems, timers, reminders, sequential signal controls, other lighting controls; other body electronics including aerodynamic aid control, power roof/window controls, other body electronics.

Driver information includes electronic dashboard/instrument clusters, analog or digital dusters, electronic analog/digital docks and compasses, electronic thermometers, head-up displays, navigation and location systems, signal and warning lights.

Potvertrain controls indude engine management systems, poweitrain sensors, ignition control, fuel injection systems, fuel flow, engine temperature, air temperature, coolant level, and wheel speed sensors.

Safety and convenience includes air purifier systems, airbag control systems, antilock braking systems (ABS), active suspension, collision avoidance systems, collision warning systems, cruise control, suspension control and traction control; and other safety and convenience systems.

©1992 Dataquest Incorporated March—Reproduction Prohibited

DataQuest r

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Fax: 49 6173/67901

Dataquest Hong Kong

Rm. 401, Connaught Comm. Bldg.

185 Wanchai Rd.

Wanchai, Hong Kong

Phone: (852) 8387336

Fax: (852) 5722375

Dataquest Japan Limited

Shinkawa Sanko Building

1-3-17 Shinkawa, Chuo-ku

Tokyo, 104

Japan

Phone: 81 (3) 5566-0411

Fax: 81 (3) 5566-0425

Dataquest Korea

Daeheung Bldg. 1105

648-23 Yeoksam-dong

Kangnam-gu

Seoul, Korea 135

Phone: 82 (2) 556-4166

Fax: 82 (2) 552-2661

Dataquest Singapore

4012 Ang Mo Kio Industrial Park 1

Ave. 10, #03-10 to #03-12

Singapore 2056

Phone: 65 4597181

Telex: 38257

Fax: 65 4563129

Dataquest Taiwan

Room 801/8th Floor

Ever Spring Building

147, Sec. 2, Chien Kuo N. Rd.

Taipei, Taiwan R.O.C. 104

Phone: 886 (2) 501-7960

886 (2) 501-5592

Fax: 886 (2) 505^265

0012924

DataQuest

How to Use Dataquest

How to Use Dataquest

Dataoyest

Dataquest

A worldwide network of informatlongatherlng resources

Source:

Dataquest

(

Published by Dataquest Incorporated

The content of this report represents our interpretation and analysis of information generally available to the public or released by knowledgeable individuals in the subject industry, but is not guaranteed as to accuracy or completeness. It does not contain material provided to us in confidence by our clients.

Printed in the United States of America. All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced, stored in retrieval systems, or transmitted, in any form or by any means—mechanical, electronic, photocopying, duplicating, microfilming, videotape, or otherwise—without the prior written permission of the publisher.

© 1991 Dataquest Incorporated

April 1991

i

Table of Contents

Page

1. A Guide to Help You Get the Most Out of Your Dataquest Information Resources

Introduction 1-1

2. Your Industry Service: What's in It for You?

Source: Dataquest 2-1

Guides 2-1

Market Statistics 2-1

Company Backgrounders 2-1

Dataquest Perspective 2-1

Inquiry Support 2-2

Call Your Industry Analyst 2-2

Call die Client Inquiry Center 2-2

Information Resource Center 2-4

Policies and Procedures 2-4

Non-Dataquest Consultants 2-4

3. How to Use Your Industry Service

What Written Materials Will You Receive? 3-1

Source: Dataquest 3-1

Dataquest Perspectives 3-2

How Do You File Your Written Materials? '. 3-2

How Do You Find the Written Material? 3-2

4. Customizing Your Industry Service

Custom Consulting 4-1

Multiciient Studies 4-1

Retainer Consulting 4-1

Primary Research 4-1

End-User-Based Services 4-2

Score Reports 4-2

CPE Market Dynamics 4-2

5. Whom Do You Call at Dataquest?

6. About Dataquest...

The Technology Information Division 6-1

Semiconduaor Group 6-1

Systems Group 6-2

Telecommunications Group 6-2

Peripherals Group 6-3

Ledgeway/Dataquest 6-3

The Executive and Financial Group 6-4

Other Dataquest Services 6-5

Conferences 6-5

Technology Products 6-5

2 How to Use Dataquest

7. Subscription Terms

Basic Terms of Syndicated Industry Services 7-1

Add-On Subscriptions 7-1

Payment Terms 7-1

Base Price 7-1

A Reminder .7-1

We Thank You for Choosing Dataquest as Your Marketing Research Partner 7-1

Appendix A. Dataquest Information Resource Center CD-ROMS and Computer

Databases A-1

Appendix B. Dataquest 1991 Conference Schedule B-1

Appendix C. Technology Products C-l

list of Tables

Table Page

5-1 Who to Contact at Dataquest 5-1

List of Figures

Figure Page

2-1 Client Inquiry Center Flow 2-3

2-2 Whom to Call for Your Inquiry 2-3

3-1 Contents of Your Binder 3-3

3-2 Standalone European Country Binder Contents 3-3

Chapter 1

A. Guide to Help You Get the Most Out of Your Dataquest Information

Resources

Introduction

As a Dataquest dient, we want you to obtain the greatest possible value from your subscription. This guide will acquaint you with the available information resources and will help you establish a "user strategy" that ensures that Dataquest's products and services contribute to your success.

This guide is divided into the following sections:

• Your Industry Service: What's in It for You?

• How to Use Your Industry Service

• Customizing Your Industry Service

• Whom Do You Call at Dataquest'

• About Dataquest

• Subscription Terms

• Appendixes

- Appendix A: Dataquest Information

Resource Center CD-ROMS and Computer Databases

- Appendix B: Dataquest 1991 Conference Schedule

- Appendix C: Technology Products

1-1

chapter 2

Your Industry Service: What's in It for

You?

clients can tap into Dataquest's extensive knowledge base to support their decisionmaking process in the industries and markets that we track. The information and analysis that you receive from Dataquest can help you to better:

• Evaluate markets

• Position new products

• Develop marketing strategies

• Perform competitive analysis

• Understand end-user trends

• Verify critical market assumptions

• Assess emerging technologies

• Implement and execute tactical plans

• Support your ongoing research activities

As a Dataquest client you will receive much of this information automatically through the regular publication of database documents and industry analysis. Your Industry service also provides information, available at your initiation, that is specific to your company's needs. You will receive Dataquest information through a variety of forms, including:

Source: Dataquest

• Dataquest Perspectives

• Inquiry support

- Industry Analysts

- Client Inquiry Centers

• Dataquest Information Resource Center

Source: Dataquest

The Source: Dataquest binder is an aimually updated collection of reference documents.

Tlie binder contains worldwide and regional market statistics. Company Backgrounders, and several guides.

Guides

How to Use Dataquest Describes your industry service subscription, publications, inquiry privileges, phone contacts, library use, and other services.

High-Technology GuideSegmentation and

Glossary: Lists key terms and defines the market segments, products, applications, regions, distribution charmels, and environments tracked by Dataquest.

Dataquest Research Methodology. Details the research methodology used by Dataquest to gather data and information and provides

3ie general assumptions used to generate industry forecasts,

Market Statistics

Market Statistics documents provide clients with detailed tables consisting of product shipments, average selling prices, industiy revenue, forecasts, and market share data.

Company Bacligrounders

Each service provides its clients with a set of

Company Backgrounders by Dataquest, made up of companies that represent 80 percent of the revenue of that industry. Company Back-

grounders are produced by the Strategic Company Analysis group in Research Operations.

The documents contain useful information on a company's finances, product lines, sales and manufacturing locations, and joint ventures, mergers, and acquisitions.

Dataquest Perspective

This multitopic publication, delivered on average twice a month, contains timely analysis of markets, products, technologies, companies, and industry events, and provides detailed discussions of our market projections and market share statistics. These publications are filed

2-1

2-2

chronologically, and include a quarterly index that cross-references articles by company name and major topic. They may be supplemented as needed by the timely delivery of faxes that provide information and analysis of current significant events.

Please note that all of Dataquest's written material is copyrighted and therefore may not be copied without our permission.

Inquiry Support

Inquiry—via phone, fax or letter—^is an integral part of the service Dataquest provides.

Through inquiry you can:

• Clarify or interpret information.

• Explore Dataquest information in more depth.

• Discuss the application of this information to a particular situation.

• Access information that is not available in

Dataquest publications, but is available in

Dataquest's extensive files.

Each Dataquest client has a designated binderholder. In addition to receiving all the

Dataquest published materials, the binderholder serves as the liaison between Dataquest and your company.

The binderholder has access to Dataquest's inquiry privilege and may designate up to two people to serve as alternates for inquiry privileges. Dataquest account managers need to be aware of any designated alternates.

If someone calls who is not a binderholder or alternate, Dataquest will refer that person to the account manager for your company. We have a commitment to our clients to provide them with timely, high-value information. In order to do that, services must be restricted to authorized contacts.

Call Your Industiy Analyst

How to Use Dataquest

Industry analysts have significant industry expertise. Directly or through the assistance of Client Inquiry Center (CIC) personnel, you have access to the industry analysts associated with your service. This access is on an as-required basis relative to those markets, products, and technologies within the scope of your service. Analysts may be called directly when you know exacdy what you need and who at Dataquest can provide the information.

Call t h e Client Inquiry Center

Chapter 2

Many of Dataquest's services provide a Client

Inquiry Center (Enquiry Desks for European customers). These centers are responsible solely for the quick turnaround of your factbased questions. CIC persoimel have access to industry service publications and database information, and they are trained to help you locate information within your Dataquest service. CIC personnel will also put you in touch with appropriate industry analysts when you require in-depth analysis of issues and trends, or opinion about the implications of recent industry events. The CIC may be called when you need an answer to a fact- or data-related question, when you need a backup to your regular analysts should they not be available, or when you need direction to new areas as your questions develop.

Dataquest is committed to personally handling each of your calls. Figure 2-1 illustrates how inquiries in the CIC are handled. We will ensure tliat you are put in touch with the right individual, or if you wish, you may choose to leave a voice-mail message when a particular analyst is not immediately available.

The more Dataquest knows about your inquiry, the better we will be able to help you. When you call with a question, the CIC will want to know:

• What information you already have on the subject

• What related information you are gathering

• How you plan to use the information

• What you are trying to demonstrate

It will also help us to know what stage of the market research process you are in, as well as the depth of information you require. The more we know, the better we will be able to offer additional or related information, or offer insights into different ways to approach the question. Of course, tell us only what you are comfortable with—^we don't need or want to know proprietary information. Figure 2-2 shows the mix of people available to respond to your inquiries.

©1991 Dataquest Incorporated April—Reproduction Prohibited

Chapter 2 Your Industry Service: What's in It for You?

Figure 2-1

Client Inquiry Center Flow

Inquiry Flow

CIC defines question

Analysis needed

Analyst responds to client

Information Is available or possibly available

Databases

Information Is not available

Published materials/Files

We learn your fundamental needs

Analyst's files and working documents

Source: Dataquest (April 1991)

F^;ure 2-2

Whom to Call for Your Inquiry

Whom do you call?

The Client Inquiry Center

- Dedicated specialists

- Quick response time

- Access to companywide resources

- Directs all your inquiries

Industry Analyst

- Analysis of market data

- Industry expertise

- Implications of events or trends

Source: Dataquest (April 1991)

©1991 Dataquest Incorporated April—Reproduction Prohibited

2-3

2-4

How to Use Dataquest

Information Resource Center

Dataquest's Information Resource Center (IRC) is a valuable supplement to the information delivered through your industry service. It consists of a 1,200-square-foot corporate library in

San Jose, plus two major satellite libraries located in Boston and the United Kingdom.

The IRC maintains a wide selection of industry directories, trade press periodicals, financial reports from most of the publicly held companies followed by Dataquest industry services, government reports, and CD-ROM-based and on-line information services.

The European Corporate Library maintains more than 300 tides and reference works concerning the European Community, including approximately 30 files and 100 reference works on the 1992 single European market objective.

The U.K. library collection includes basic reference works produced by Her Majesty's

Government, the Department of "Trade and

Industry, and other governmental agencies.

Special reports have also been collected from a variety of sources, including the U.K. goverrunent, trade associations, the Financial

Times, and other research organizations.

Appendix A lists the CD-ROMs and computer databases available to clients at the San Jose

IRC. The San Jose IRC is staffed by three degreed professionals (Master of Library

Science), as well as assistants who specialize in managing the corporation's secondary research resources.

Clients typically use the IRC in the following w^ays:

• To obtain financial information on the leading companies within their industry

Chapter 2

• To collect recent publications on new areas of the market

• To research a market or topic not covered by a Dataquest industry service

You are encouraged to use the IRC. If it is not convenient to visit an IRC, your Client

Inquiry Center staff can often make many of the center's resources available to you through your inquiry privilege.

Policies and Procedures

Because the IRC is a private company library, our collections are limited to the following individuals:

• All permanent Dataquest employees

• Current clients—^Binderholders and designated alternates from within the client company

• Consultants/contractors working on specific

Dataquest projects (only for duration of contract)

• Prospective clients escorted by a Dataquest salesperson

Non-Dataquest Consultants

It is Dataquest policy to deal directly with

Dataquest clients in answering their information needs. The Information Resource Center does not authorize the use of library facilities by consultants working for clients.

i i

©1991 Dataquest Incorporated April—Reproduction Prohibited

Chapter 3

How to Use Your Industry Service

Receiving value from your industry service requires knowing where to find the information you need and how to use that information. The following guidelines will help you get the most out of the many elements of your service.

What Written Materials Will You

Receive?

You will receive written material at least twice a month. Some industry services are segmented into key market areas (product or geographic) to allow you to choose the coverage that is most relevant to the markets in which you participate. You will receive written material covering both the broad-based issues of the industry as a whole, as well as the more focused issues of the particular market segment. All written material will be labeled as belonging to one of the following:

• The Source: Dataquest binder

• The Dataquest Perspective binder

• The segment binder

Source: Dataquest

Source: Dataquest is a regularly updated reference binder in which you'll find the following:

How to Use Dataquest: You are currently in this document.

Dataquest High-Technology Guide

Segmentation and Glossary: This document describes in detail the segmentation and terms used by all Dataquest services to define the markets they track. This guide should be used whenever you are looking for definitions of products, applications, regions, technologies, and environments referred to by your industry service. This document also provides you with standard definitions of research terms that appear in your industry service publications, such as retirements, average selling price, and compound annual growth rate.

Dataquest Methodology: This document will help you understand the research methodology Dataquest uses to gather information on the industries covered by our industry services. It also describes the general assumptions used to generate industry forecasts.

Market Statistics: Each Dataquest industry service provides its clients with documents that contain detailed tables consisting of history, market forecasts, and market share data. "We encourage you to use these tables as an opportunity to review your business outlook with Dataquest analysts. Updates and detailed discussions of these data are provided in the Dataquest Perspective on an ongoing basis. For segmented services, toplevel market statistics are provided in the

Source: Dataquest binder, and the more detailed statistics for each segment can be found in each segment binder.

Company Backgrounders: You will receive a set of Company Backgrounders—profiles on the top players in your industry. These documents are published annually. You should refer to them for corporate overview information, such as financial reports, product line descriptions and analysis, sales and manufacturing locations, and joint ventures, mergers, and acquisitions.

With the exception of the Company Back-

grounders, these documents will be individually bound and delivered annually or twice yearly, as required. Each Company Back-

grounder will be updated once a year and will be shipped shortly after the close of the fiscal year for that company. At the time of arrival, the earlier version of the document should be removed from the binder and archived as desired so that the most recent information will be easily accessible to you.

j*l

3-2

Dataquest Perspectives

Dataquest Perspectives are designed to deliver analysis and Dataquest's view of important issues in your industry. This is a multitopic publication delivered twice a month that contains articles under the following major topic headings:

• Market Analysis: These articles may cover either a product market, regional market, application market, or a distribution channel.

Industry service forecast updates are presented and discussed in this section of the Dataquest Perspective.

Product Analysis: These articles analyze the impact of new products on the industry.

• Company Analysis: This section highlights new activities or organizational changes within companies. The articles provide more in-depth analysis of a company's product strategy, financial performance, or marketing performance and strategy than is contained in the Company Backgrounders. Articles may also be written about companies for which there is no Company Backgrounder.

• Technology Analysis: This section analyzes the impact of key or emerging technologies on your industry. These articles are designed to assist you in strategic and competitive evaluations.

• Conferences and Exhibitions: These articles will identify important industry trends and analyze key events at the conferences and exhibitions attended by Dataquest analysts.

• News and Views: These shorter articles provide Dataquest's perspectives on major industry events.

Dataquest Perspective offers a twice-monthly opportunity to engage your industry service analysts in discussion of the issues and events contained in each publication. For this reason, we provide the name of the author of each article along with a brief synopsis. Clients are encouraged to call the appropriate analyst with questions or a request for more information.

How to Use Dataquest

Chapter 3

document that belongs in this binder will be dearly marked as such and should be filed behind the appropriate tab as indicated in the

Table of Contents. Outdated sections should be either discarded or filed separately for archival purposes.

Clients will receive at least 24 Dataquest

Perspectives each year. These should be filed in the Dataquest Perspective binder in chronological order. If you subscribe to a segmented service, at least 4 of your 24 annual

Dataquest Perspectives will focus on issues specifically related to the markets covered under that industry segment. The industrywide

Dataquest Perspectives are filed in the core

Dataquest Perspective binder, and the segmentspecific editions are filed in the segment binder.

Each Dataquest Perspective will be identified by the name of the service and the name of the segment, if appropriate. It will also have the date, volume, and number on the first page. For example, a subscriber to the

Telecommunications—^North America service may receive the following two Dataquest

Perspectives:

• Telecommunications—^North America

Vol. 1, No. 1

• Telecommunications—^North America

Image Communications

Vol. 1, No. 1

The first document would be filed in the core

Telecommunications—^North America Dataquest

Perspective binder. The second would be filed in the Image Communications segment binder.

The contents of your binders are illustrated in

Figure 3-1. Subscribers to a standalone European country segment will receive detailed market statistics for that particular country, toplevel European statistics, and the pan-European

Perspectives. The binder contents are illustrated in Figure 3-2.

How Do You File Your Written

Materials?

Your Source: Dataquest binder holds a collection of reference and statistical material. Each

How Do You Find the Written

Material?

Dataquest is committed to not only providing you with the highest quality research, but also

©1991 Dataquest Incorporated April—Reproduction Prohibited

Chapter 3

Figure 3-1

Contents of Your Binder

Source: Dataquest

How to Use Your Industry Service

Dataquest Perspective

- Guides

- Market Statistics

- Company

Backgrounders

- IVIarket Analysis

- Product Analysis

- Company Analysis

- Technology Analysis

- Conferences and

Exhibitions

- News and Views

3-3

- Guides

- Market Statistics

- Dataquest

Perspectives

Source: Dataquest (April 1991)

Figure 3-2

Standalone Etiropean Country Binder Contents

For Each Country

- Market Statistics

- Dataquest

Perspectives

Source: Dataquest (April 1991) making it easy for you to access the information. Clients are provided with the following tools:

• The spines of all binders list the types of information you will find in that binder.

• "What's in This Binder?", appearing immediately following the tide page, summarizes the documents in that binder and highlights what can be found in other binders of that service.

• A detailed Table of Contents is contained in the Source: Dataquest and segment binders.

• Each bound document in the Source:

Dataquest and segment binders has its own Table of Contents, including a list of tables where appropriate.

• To help you access the articles you need in a timely maimer, Dataquest provides you with a comprehensive index which is delivered quarterly and proAddes a year-to-date

©1991 Dataquest Incorporated April—Reproduction Prohibited

3-4 How to Use Dataquest Chapter 3

cross-reference by company name and major provides an explanation of how the index A topic. The index lists the titles of all articles can best be used, along with an example. " and of all tables and figures that appear in Segment Perspectives are indexed separately issues of the publication. Listings include the and incorporated into the year-end index title, date, and page number for each entry. provided for the entire service.

The first page of each quarterly index

i

©1991 Dataquest Incorporated April—Reproduction Prohibited

chapter 4

Customizing Your Industry Service

As a subscriber to a Dataquest syndicated market research service, clients receive significant tactical and strategic information. Dataquest also offers a variety of individualized and proprietary programs to clients to help them solve their specialized information and analysis needs. Each project is treated with the strictest confidence.

We carefully review each project with the client prior to beginning the actual research.

Dataquest's consulting staff designs a research plan that most effectively meets each client's unique requirements. This includes determining the appropriate information to be gathered, the proper sample size, appropriate collection techniques, and the best analytic methods to be used. proprietary efforts, but also through its integration of TLD information and analysis resources.

Among the elements that consulting can bring to a project are specialized platming assistance, proprietary analyses, in-person interviews, mail surveys, telephone surveys, focus groups, and custom database cuts.

Multiclient Studies

Custom Consulting engages not only in fullcustom research projects, but also in the generation of multiclient studies. These studies allow Dataquest to offer clients in-depth information on emerging and/or niche markets at an amortized cost for consulting.

Custom Consulting

Dataquest's custom consulting helps clients in any of the following ways:

• Analyzing specific markets and competitive environments

• Developing strategies for increased market penetration

• Evaluating new business, product, and distribution plans

• Verifying critical market assumptions

• Assessing the impact of emerging technologies on existing products and markets

• Assisting in developing international business strategies, including:

Identifying strategic partners, both domestic and international

Defining technology "fits"

Custom consulting is structured to provide assistance across all TID services beyond the scope of each service. In areas where new, original work is needed, consulting provides value not only through its own individualized

Retainer Consulting

Dataquest also offers its clients retainer consulting. Dataquest analysts and consultants provide consulting advice on an ongoing basis and with quick turnaround to address a variety of client management and marketing needs.

Primary Research

Dataquest's Primary Research serv^ices offer a comprehensive range of survey research capabilities that can provide vital information tailored to each client's specific needs. This is important when survey work, but not analysis, is needed. Studies of any type, size, or aspect can be performed as a supplement to existing market research efforts, when nonbiased third-party research is required, or to provide complete primary research capabilities when company resources are not available. Primary

Research assumes total responsibility for a projea at any stage, from questionnaire development through sample selection, data collection, and final tabulation. The following

4-1

4-2

How to Use Dataquest are examples of the broad range of business applications addressed by Primary Research:

• Market penetration surveys

• Customer needs and satisfaction surveys

• New product research

• Product pricing and positioning surveys

• Armual trend surveys

• Installed base surveys

• Sales trend identification

Chapter 4

with users selected randomly by vendor from a database of U.S. business establishments. No manufacturers' lists are used.

The Score Report survey meets the requirements for measuring customer satisfaction as defined by the Malcolm Baldrige National

Quality Award. The Baldrige Award is granted annually by the U.S. Department of Commerce in recognition of U.S. companies that excel in quality achievements and management.

End-User-Based Services

Score Reports

Customer satisfaction surveys track the level of satisfaction by users of PCs, copiers, electronic printers, PBXs, and public key systems. Key indicators measured include value for price, quality, commitment to customer, features, product delivery, technical documentation, and service. The Score Report is conducted four times a year so that manufacturers can monitor trends in end-user satisfaction levels over an extended period of time.

Score Reports are based on telephone interviews with an annual sample of over 5,000 respondents. A stratified sampling plan is used,

CPE Market D y n a m i c s

This end-user information service provides quarterly data on PBX, Centrex services, and key systems users' purchases by manufacturer, system model, RHC region, state, and vertical market. There are two proprietary custom options, as follows:

• Product-Presence-Hit Rate (PPH) Analysis:

Assesses a company's position in the marketplace as a function of product acceptance, distribution, or sales effectiveness.

• Win-Loss Analysis: This option takes PPH analysis one step further, delving into why systems sales are being won or lost by you and your competitors. A customized direct mail, telephone, or personal interview program is established to contact the appropriate end users.

{ i

©1991 Dataquest Incotporated April—Reproduction Prohibited

Chapter 5

fVhom Do You Call at Dataquest?

clients who have questions or need assistance in any way are encouraged to call Dataquest at their earliest convenience. Table 5-1 is an overview of who to contact at Dataquest.

Table 5-1

Who to Contact at Dataquest

Qucstton/Concem

My subscription (e.g., billing, renewal)

Subscribing to another service

Data or facts about my industry

Opinion or analysis about my industry

Other services/products offered by Dataquest

New services/products I would like Dataquest to offer or feedback on current offerings

Who to Contact

My customer service representative

My sales account manager

Qient Inquiry Center

Analyst in the service

My sales account manager

An upcoming conference

A possible proprietary consulting projea

Library visits

TTie new Dataquest format for research delivery

Reprints of selected articles

Product Marketing

Components: (408) 437-8624

Systems: (408) 437-8517

Telecommunications: (408) 437-8602

Peripherals: (408) 437-8308

Ledgeway: (617) 862-8500

Conference Department

U.S.—<408) 437-8245

Europe—(44) 895-835050

Japan/Asia—(81) 3-5566-0416

Consulting Department, sales account manager, or service analyst

Qient Inquiry Center, service analyst, or corp)orate librarian in the U.K.

(408) 437-8215, or dedicated Voice Mail Hot Line: (408) 437-7878

Sales Department—Technology

Products: (800) 624-3282

Source: Dataquest {Afnil 1991)

5-1

c h a p t e r 6

jAbout Dataquest...

Dataquest was formed in 1971 with the sole purpose of delivering timely and accurate information on critical issues in the hightechnology arena. Quoting from the Dataquest mission statement:

"Our goal is to be the acknowledged worldwide leader in market intelligence for the industries we serve by providing indispensable information and analysis to our clients."

As a member of The Dun & Bradstreet family of companies, Dataquest has access to supplemental information from Dun & Bradstreet and its subsidiaries. Together with our own primary and secondary research capabilities and analyst expertise, this relationship offers the most comprehensive information available on topics pertinent to your industry.

Dataquest comprises two basic business units. Dataquest's Technology Infonnation

Division (TED) provides data and analysis on the high-technology electronics industry, encompassing semiconductors, systems, peripherals, application markets, software, and service and support. A cross-industry financial program supported by TID analysts and assigned account managers is tailored to the needs of the financial community. The

Machinery Infonnation Division (MID) offers a full range of marketing research and consulting services for professionals in all areas of the heavy equipment and material-handling industries.

The Technology Information

Division

The information service you have purchased from Dataquest is part of our Technology

Information Division (TID) family of products.

TID provides information services that are both tactical and strategic in nature, and include syndicated industry services, custom consulting, multiclient studies, primary research, specialized information services for the financial community, product specification directories, and standalone reports on technology markets. These services are described in more detail in the following paragraphs.

Tliere are five research groups within TID.

Each provides data and analysis covering the global electronics industry from semiconductors to systems, from hardware to software, and from applications to service.

Semiconductor Group

This group covers the entire semiconductor

"food chain," including manufacturing equipment and materials, device technologies and markets, and end-use applications and procurement issues. Its information services are worldwide in scope and include targeted North

American, European, Japanese, and Asian services. The Semiconductor Group is divided into the following 9 services:

• Semiconductors—^Worldwide

Segments:

Semiconductor Memories

ASICs

Analog and Mixed Signal ICs

Microcomponents

Gallium Arsenide Semiconductors

Semiconductors—Europe

Semiconductors—Japan

Semiconductors—^Asia

Semiconductor Application Markets—

Worldwide

Semiconductor Application Markets—^Europe

Semiconductor Application Markets—^Japan

Semiconductor Procurement

Semiconductor Equipment, Manufacturing, and

Materials

6-1

6-2

Systems Group

How to Use Dataquest

This group covers business and technical computer systems and applications, both hardware and software, ranging from palmtops to PCs to supercomputers.

Chapter 6

associated hardware markets. Business Applications is divided into two services:

• Office Software

• Personal Computer Software

Computer Systems Services

The computer systems services cover the following six segments:

• Business Computers

• Servers

• Supercomputers

• Technical Computers

• Unix Systems

• Workstations

European Computer Systems

This service covers the same product areas for

14 European regions.

Technical Applications

The CAD/CAM/CAE service provides information on four key applications: Mechanical,

AEC, GIS/Mapping, and Electronic Design

Automation. Its geographic coverage extends to

North America, Europe, and Asia. The service is segmented as follows:

• Electronic Design Automation

• Mechanical Applications

• Aichitectuie, Engineering, and Construction, and Geographic Information Systems

• Personal CAD

• CAD/CAM—Europe

• CAD/CAM—Asia

In addition, CASE is covered through consulting.

Microcomputer Systems Group

This worldwide service tracks and analyzes

PCs by packaging type, microprocessor, operating system, price point, environment, and region of the world. It includes the following segments:

• Personal Computers—^North America

• Personal Computers—^Europe

• Personal Computers—Asia

• Personal Computers—^European Quarterly

Statistics

• Personal Computers—^European Price

Tracking

Business Applications

This service covers electronic equipment environments in the office that are primarily software driven and looks at the ways in which these environments drive their

Telecommunications Group

The Telecommunications Group is divided into two services, the Telecommunications North

America service and the Telecommunications

Europe service.

These worldwide services divide their coverage of the industry into five major product segments, as follows:

• Image Communications

• Networking

• Personal Communications

• Public Network Equipment and Services

• Voice Communications

Regional market options include countryspecific coverage of any of the following

European countries: France, Germany, Italy,

©1991 Dataquest Incoqx)rated April—Reproduction Prohibited

chapter 6

Netherlands, Spain, Sweden, and the United

Kingdom.

Peripherals Group

This group covers markets for devices that are typically attached to multiuser host systems or serve an output function.

Computer Storage Service

The Computer Storage service covers the following four segments:

• Rigid Disk Drives

• Tape Drives

• Optical Disk Drives

• Flexible Disk Drives

Graphics and Displays Service

The Graphics and Displays service covers the following four segments:

• Graphics Processors

• Monitors

• Display Terminals

• Network Stations

Dociunent Management Group

The Document Management group is made up of the following four services:

• Copying and Duplicating (including fax coverage)

• Electronic Printers—^North America

• Electronic Printers—^Europe

• Electronic Publishing

About Dataquest... 6-3

integration services. Ledgeway/Dataquest covers both of these market sectors.

Ledgeway/Dataquest offers 10 different subscription programs. All programs include access to Ledgeway/Dataquest analysts for inquiry support, periodic bulletins on key events in the service industry, and attendance at Ledgeway/Dataquest's aimual ServiceTrends conference.

The ServiceTrends Program

The most widely subscribed service, now in its eighth year, is Ledgeway/Dataquest's

ServiceTrends program. In addition to the cornerstone of the program, Ledgeway/Dataquest's annual two-volume Trends and Forecast report, which provides in-depth market size and forecast information and analysis of market trends, four topical reports are provided.

In 1991, these topical reports are:

Global Support Strategies

• Measuring and Managing Customer

Satisfaction

Japan and the Pacific Rim: Customers or

Competitors

Self-Service: Opportunity or Threat

The Professional ServiceTrends program features analysis of customer wants and needs for systems integration and professional services, in addition to a market trends report, which forecasts market size, growth rates, and analyzes trends. In addition, there are six profiles provided on leading participants in the industry.

Ledgeway/Dataquest

Ledgeway/Dataquest is the group that provides strategic and tactical information on the fast-growing services industry. Computer systems vendors typically obtain 25 to 30 percent of their revenue from pre- and postsale services. In addition to services provided by manufacturers, there is a very large and fastgrowing industry for professional and systems

Sector Market Programs

Sector market programs are focused on narrow segments of the service market and feature an armual market trends and forecast report, user wants and needs analysis, a pricing trends and data study (for all but the

European ServiceTrends program), and six profiles of leading service vendors in each sector.

Ledgeway/Dataquest's sector market programs are as follows:

• European ServiceTrends

• Independent/Multivendor Services

©1991 Dataquest Incorporated April—Reproduction Prohibited

6^

How to Use Dataquest

• Network/Communications Support

• Mini/Mainftame Software Support

• PC/Workstation Software Support

• Technical Workstation Service and Support

• PC/End-User Computing Services

• Charmel Support Strategies

In addition to its subscription services, Ledgeway/Dataquest has a very professional and active custom consulting group that conducts custom projects focused on the following areas:

• Customer satisfaction and service quality audits

• Key competitor analysis and positioning

• New service product market analysis and strategy formation

Subscription services and custom consulting are provided covering w^orldwide markets. clients by helping them develop financial strategies in high-technology areas, identify financial opportunities, evaluate proposed client investments and relationships, and monitor companies and markets.

Strategic Executive Service

Chapter 6

The Strategic Executive Service (SES) is a networking and technology advisory program specifically designed for CEOs or senior executives. The service is open by invitation only to the presidents of technology companies.

Dataquest senior staff from all high-technology industry service groups provide decision support to each president. SES also hosts an annual Presidents' Summit Conference, bringing together subscribers to focus on future trends in high technology products and markets. It is a highly customized service for executive decision makers.

The Executive and Financial Group

Dataquest's Executive and Financial Group

(EFG) offers a number of cross-industry services that are designed primarily for clients in the financial and executive communities. These services offer clients the following benefits:

• Access to all Dataquest research professionals

• Access to TID Dataquest Perspectives

• Access to TID conferences

• A personal account manager

EFG includes the following services, which are differentiated largely in terms of the type of clients they serve.

Equipment Leasing Service

At the core of Equipment Leasing Service

(ELS) is a portfolio of more than 300 individual future value projections for specific products from more than 45 leading computer, peripherals, and telecommunications vendors.

These projections are calculated through a proprietary model and are delivered to clients along with relevant research newsletters.

Clients also receive inquiry access to specialized leasing analysts. ELS is designed for companies that lease high-technology equipment.

The service assists clients in the areas of lease origination sales, vendor sales, equity sales, asset management and remarketing, and new business development and marketing.

Financial Services Program

The Financial Services Program (FSP) is designed to serve the needs of clients who evaluate loans and investments, monitor portfolios, identify markets and prospects, and develop strategies for penetration of new markets. FSP clients include banks, venture capital firms, CPAs, leasing companies, and development agencies. The program benefits these

Technology Investment Program

The Technology Investment Program (TIP) is designed to serve the needs of clients in the securities industry, investment banking industry, equity research markets, and institutional investment fields. The service provides clients with company evaluations, product and technology assessments, and other forms of information that help identify target companies for merger/acquisition, joint venture, initial public offerings, and equity investment.

©1991 Dataquest Incorporated April—Reproduction Prohibited

Chapter 6

Other Dataquest Services

Conferences

Technology Information Division

Conferences

Dataquest hosts a number of conferences each year to present industry forecasts and discuss critical issues and trends. Clients obtain a number of benefits from attending these conferences, including:

• Receiving Dataqueist updates on key markets

• Meeting with industry leaders and users

• Discussing market events and their significance to your organization with

Dataquest analysts

As an industry service client, you may purchase tickets to any Dataquest conference you wish to attend. Each ticket entitles you, or someone you designate, to attend one

Dataquest conference. A complete list of conferences is included in Appendix B of this documenL To purchase a conference ticket, or to obtain more information about Dataquest's conferences, contact Dataquest's conference department at any of the following locations:

• North America

(408) 437-8245

• Europe

(.44) 895-835050

• Japan/Asia

(81) 3-5566-0416

Invitational Computer Conferences

Dataquest's Invitational Computer Conferences

(ICCs) bring major computer manufacturers together with buyers in 41 regional markets

About Dataquest...

6-5

around the world. The one-day ICC format combines hands-on product displays with technology seminars designed to educate prequalified regional buyers throughout the United

States, Europe, and Asia/Pacific. Each

SalesEvent ensures a focused conference, whereby the manufacturers have a selectively targeted audience of buyers and the buyers can learn about new technology, receive a hands-on view of products and solutions, and discuss their application needs with exhibiting regional sales and technical managers. TTiree

ICC series are held as follows:

OEM Peripherals (in various U.S. and European locations), serving OEMs, systems integrators, volume end users, and government buyers/integrators who are all looking to buy computer peripherals.

Computer Connectivity (in various U.S. and European locations), serving MIS/DP managers, systems integrators, network managers, and value-added resellers/ dealers who are all looking to buy connectivity/networking solutions.

Asia Pacific (in various Asian locations), serving OEMs, systems integrators, volume end users, and government purchasers who are all looking to buy computer peripherals.

Technology Products

Dataquest also provides standalone products, including specification guides in both hard copy and electronic format (disk), reports, and monthly newsletters that are marketed and sold individually to broad customer audiences.

These products are designed to be complementary to the TID syndicated market research services and include highly tactical information on product specifications and pricing, as well as in-depth analyses of specific markets and technology trends. See

Appendix C for a current list of products.

©1991 Dataquest Incorporated April—Reproduction Prohibited

Chapter 7

Subscription Terms

Basic Terms of Syndicated

Industry Services

The service begins on the date of the first billing. At that time, the subscriber receives the Source: Dataquest binder with the current documents and a Dataquest Perspectives binder complete with documents covering the last six months. Clients also receive the current yearto-date index as well as the previous year's annual index.

Subscribers to a segment of a service receive a segment binder containing recent segmentspecific Dataquest Perspectives and the current version of the detailed, segment-specific market statistics. For the duration of the subscription, subscribers receive a copy of each Dataquest

Per^>ecHve published and any annual updates to Source: Dataquest documents as they are produced. The inquiry privilege may be used to supplement the material in the binders.

Add-On Subscriptions

Subsidiaries, divisions, regional offices, majority-owned affiliates, and parent companies of a subscribing organization within the same region are eligible for add-on subscriptions at a percentage of the base subscription price,

Add-on subscriptions include complete copies of all published material, inquiry privileges specific to the markets subscribed to, and conference attendance at discounted prices.

Regions are defined as North America, Europe, and Japan. increased costs. Subscribers will be notified in advance of any such price increase.

A Reminder

Your agreement specifies the individuals in your company who have access to Dataquest information. You will need to obtain written consent fi^om Dataquest to disclose data, analysis, and written materials to any other person or entity beyond those specified by the terms of the agreement.

Dataquest also asks that you not use any data obtained through your industry service in any legal proceedings, or as the basis for advertising copy, press releases, collateral material, or any other promotional material. For further information on the conditions pertaining to your industry service, please refer to your industry service agreement, or contact your sales representative.

Your industry service agreement provides you with a license to use your industry service for the length of time designated in the agreement. If you decide not to renew your industry service at the end of this time, it is your obligation to return these materials to your nearest local Dataquest office.

Payment Terms

Dataquest's terms, including the applicable sales or value-added tax, are net 30 days.

We Tliank You for Choosing

Dataquest as Your Marketing

Researcli Partner.

We hope this guide has helped you. Please take advantage of the services we have described. Dataquest's goal is total satisfaction.

If you have any questions or comments about this guide or the services it describes, please let us know.

Base Price

Dataquest reserves the right to change its subscription prices to reflect broadened scope or

7-1

Appendix A

Dataquest Information Resource

Center CD-ROMS and Computer

Databases

PATENTS

Micropatent

This CD-ROM is a basic search and current awareness tool for U.S. patents, containing abstracts and selected front-page information from patents published by the U.S. Patent and

Trademark Office. It covers 1975 to date, with hmited information 1969 to 1974. Patent number, inventor, title, and assignee are just a few of the ways to search this CD. It is updated monthly. Book version not available.

FINANCIAL INFORMATION

Compact d SecUSA

This CD-ROM contains financial and management information on 11,000 public companies filing with the SEC. The current and historical financial information is culled from annual reports and 10-Ks. It is updated monthly.

Book version not available; however, the library files have annual reports, lO-Ks, quarterly reports, and 10-Qs. Please check the lateral files and the listing on top of the files.

Compact d SecCanada

This CD-ROM provides financial information on

6,000 Canadian companies and is updated quarterly. Book version not available; however, the library files have annual reports. Please check the lateral files and the listing on top of the files.

Compact d SecEurope

This CD-ROM provides financial and factual information on 2,000 publicly held European companies and is updated quarterly. Book version not available; however, the library files have annual reports. Please check the lateral files and the listing on top of the files.

COMPANY DIRECTORIES

Corptech

This database contains information on developers and manufacturers of high-technology products in the United States. It is searchable by product, location, size, status, and name and is updated quarterly. Book version available.

Thomas Register

This CD-ROM provides product and direaory information for manufacturing companies in the United States and Canada. It is updated monthly. Book version available.

ARTICLE SEARCH

Computer Select (formerly Computer library)

This CD-ROM is a major upgrade to Computer

Library. In addition to the ever-growing list of periodicals included in Computer Select, the full contents of Data Sources, the most comprehensive computer industry directory available, have been added. You'll be able to retrieve specifications on over 67,000 hardware, software, and data communications products, as well as profiles of the over 1,000 companies that make them. New searching capabilities include locating articles by choosing lists of publications, article types, date ranges, topics, and other fields. It is updated monthly. Book version of Data Sources available.

A-l

A-2 How to Use Dataquest Appendix A

COMPUTER DIRECTORIES

i

ICP Software Information Database

This CD-ROM provides information on micro, mini, and mainframe software products offered by over 4,000 vendors and is updated quarterly. Book version available.

i

©1991 Dataquest Incorporated April—Reproduction Prohibited

Appendix B

Dataquest 1991 Conference Schedule

North America

Forecast '91-Technology Briefing

Ledgeway Service & Support

Semicon/West

Document Management

Personal & Wireless Communications

Portable Computing

Semiconductor

Europe

Computer Industry

Semicon/Europa '91

Semiconductor

Printer

Colour Market

Copying & Duplicating

Telecommunications

Japan and Asia

Semiconductor

Computer & Telecommunications

Strategic Industry

Peripherals

Jamaary 1991—Snli)ect to leviatom

April 22-23

June 25-26

September 24-25

October 1-3

March 5

April 8-9

May 22

June 27-28

August 12-13

September 11-12

October 14-16

February 14-15

February 19-20

February 25-26

March 6-7

March 6

May 29-31

June 11-12

June 12-13

June 13-14

November 7-8

San Jose

San Francisco

Redwood City

San Francisco

Monterey

San Jose

Monterey

London

Milano

Frankfurt

Paris

Zurich

Marbella

Amsterdam

Amsterdam

Amsterdam

London

Tokyo

Tokyo

Taipei

Tokyo

B-1

Appendix C

Technology Products

SpecCheck Guides

Copier SpecCheck-On-Disk Disk version of the

Copier SpecCheck Guide. Allows custom sorts on 500 models and 24 vendors. Six annual updates on either 3.5-inch or 5.25-inch format.

Copier SpecCheck Guide Detailed specifications and pricing information on 500 copier models.

Two full books, two updates per year.

Fax SpecCheck-On-Disk Disk version of Fax

SpecCheck Guide. Allows custom sorts on 600 models and 47 vendors. Six annual updates on either 3.5-inch or 5.25-inch format.

Fax SpecCheck Guide Detailed specifications and pricing information on 600 fax models.

Two full books, two updates per year.

PC SpecCheck-On-Disk Disk version of PC

SpecCheck Guide. Allows custom sorts on 400 models and 47 vendors. Six annual updates on either 3.5-inch or 5.25-inch format.

PC SpecCheck Guide Detailed specifications and pricing information on 400 PC models.

Four full books per year.

Personal Page Printer SpecCheck-On-EHsk Disk version of Personal Page Printer SpecCheck

Guide. Allows custom sorts on 400 models and 100 vendors. Four annual updates on either 3.5-inch or 5.25-inch format.

Personal Page and Ink Jet Printers SpecCheck

Guide Detailed specifications and pricing information on 275 personal page and ink jet printer models. Two full books per year.

Dot Matrix Printer SpecCheck Guide Detailed specifications and pricing information on 300 dot matrix printers. Two full books per year.

High-Speed Page and Line Printers SpecCheck

Guide Detailed specifications and pricing on

300 high-speed page and line printers. Two fliU books per year.

Reports

Imaging Materials Series

Series of reports on key areas of the imaging materials industry. Reports currendy available or planned are:

Toner in the VOs: The Shape of Things ft)

Come Detailed analysis of the liquid and dry toner and developer industry. The report looks at market size, structure and growth, U.S. and foreign producers, and trends in materials manufacturing and distribution. Includes directory of suppliers. Available now.

Specialty Papers and Films: New Technology,

Media, and Marixts In-depth report on the hard-copy media field for paper and film products. The report looks at imaging processes, imaging hardware, end-use applications for hard-copy output, and market size and forecast. Includes directory of suppliers. Available

June 1991.

The Photoreceptor Industry: A Marketing and

Technical Analysis Detailed analysis of photoreceptor technology and the industry. Volume

I chronicles the evolution of the industry in terms of equipment, manufacturing, and distribution, providing market size and forecasts.

Volume II is a complete reproduction of U.S. patent abstracts from 1979-1990. Includes directory of manufacturers. Available Fall 1991-

Other Reports

Fax On Demand—Marketing Tool for the '90s

A useful report to help end users evaluate and select voice/fex systems and implement fax-ondemand services for their business. Includes applications, technology, and economic considerations for fax-on-demand, as well as a directory of product vendors and service providers. Available June 1991.

Color Scanner User Survey for U.S. Publishing

Markets Extensive survey of key end-user c-i

C-2

How to Use Dataquest markets in publishing, advertising, printing services, graphic design, PostScript output services, and Fortune 1000 companies to ascertain purchase intentions and installed base of color and monochrome scanners. Available May

1991.

Semiconductor Industry Insights—from Silicon

to Systems Analysis of the global semiconductor industry containing market forecasts, key drivers, product demand, semiconductor production, equipment, and materials.

Voice Processing Opportunities in the U.S.A

Market Assessment and End-User Survey Extensive end-user survey providing networking information, applications, satisfaction level, purchase decision making, and selection criteria by key vertical markets. Also includes market shares, technology, standardization, revenue, and pricing forecasts through 1994.

High-Speed Printing Applications in Banking A vertical market study comprising two reports and videotapes/transCTipts of three focus sessions. Study focuses on hi^-speed printing applications in the banking industry and examines the applications that banks print internally and externally, as well as special printing capability needs of the banlcing industry.

Portable Computing in the 1990s Three-part series on the latest products, features, and options for transportables, laptops, notebooks, palmtops, and electronic daybooks.

PC LAN Markets in Europe 1990 Analysis of all the major PC LAN vendors in 13 European countries. Market shares, forecasts, distribution channels, and shipments segmented by enduser types.

Computer Usage in European Banks 1990 Indepth, two-volume study on the demand for hardware, applications, LANs, and operating systems in European banks, segmented by bank size. A widespread survey of banks in nine European countries was supplemented by

Appendix C

personal interviews with key decision makers at the largest banks.

Monthly Newslettefs

Copier FAXts A look at new products, distribution, organizational news, and trade show highlights for the copier and fax industries.

IC Europe All the latest local intelligence and analysis of new products, alliances, technology impacts, and forecasts for the European semiconductor industry.

European Monitor Monthly newsletter with all the latest hews on vendor, product, and distribution developments in the European personal computer market.

Price Tracking Flash Monthly newsletter on PC product announcements and changes in price, configuration, and distribution for PC products by 16 manufacturers in 14 European countries.

Other Technology Products

Company Backgrounders by Dataquest Detailed vendor profiles on almost 300 leading worldwide high-technology companies hlghli^tlng company strategic direction, business direction, detailed product line summaries, information on joint ventures, mergers and acquisitions, and licensing agreements.

DQ Monday On-Line News, analysis, and current prices for 25 leading semiconductor product groups for all the major markets: United

States, Europe, Japan, Hong Kong, Taiwan, and Korea.

DQ Test Target Package of ten 8.5 x 11-inch copier/fax test patterns: gray scale, black and white, and color.

International Test Target Package of ten standard European-size test tai^ets.

©1991 Dataquest Incorporated April—Reproduction Prohibit^

Dataquest

Dataquest Research and Sales Offices:

Dataquest Incorporated

1290 Ridder Park Drive

San Jose, California 95131-2398

Phone: (408) 437-8000

Telex: 171973

Fax: (408) 437-0292

Technology Products Group

Phone: (800) 624-3280

Dataquest Incorporated

Ledgeway/Dataquest

The Corporate Center

550 Cochituate Road

Framingham, MA 01701

Phone: (508) 370-5555

Fax: (508) 370-6262

Dataquest Incorporated

Invitational Computer Conferences Division

3151 Airway Avenue, C-2

Costa Mesa, California 92626

Phone: (714) 957-0171

Telex: 5101002189 ICCDQ

Fax: (714) 957-0903

Dataquest Australia

Suite 1, Century Plaza

80 Berry Street

North Sydno-, NSW 2060

Australia

Phone: (02) 959 4544

Telex: 25468

Fax: (02) 929 0635

Dataquest GmbH

Kronstadter Strasse 9

8000 Munich 80

West Germany

Phone; Oil 49 89 93 09 09 0

Fax: 49 89 930 3277

Dataquest Europe Limited

Roussel House, Broadwater Park

Denham, Oxbridge, Middx UB9 5HP

England

Phone: 0895-835050

Telex: 266195

Fax: 0895 835260/1/2

Dataquest Europe SA

Tour Gallieni 2

36, avenue du General-de-Gaulle

93175 Bagnolet Cedex

France

Phone: (1) 48 97 31 00

Telex: 233 263

Fax: (1) 48 97 34 00

Dataquest Hong Kong

Rm. 401, Connaught Comm. Bldg.

185 V^nchai Rd.

Wanchai, Hong Kong

Phone: 8387336

Telex: 80587

Fax: 5722375

Dataquest Israel

59 Mishmar Ha'yarden Street

Tel Aviv, Israel 69865 or

P.O. Box 18198

Tel Aviv, Israel

Phone: 52 913937

Telex: 341118

Fax: 52 32865

Dataquest Japan Limited

Shinkawa Sanko Building

1-3-17 Shinkawa, Chuo-ku

Tokyo 104 Japan

Phone: (03) 5566-0411

Fax: (03) 5566-0425

Dataquest Korea

Daeheung Bldg. 1105

648-23 Yeoksam-dong

Kangnam-gu

Seoul, Korea 135

Phone: (02) 556-4166

Fax: (02) 552-2661

Dataquest Singapore

4012 Ang Mo Kio Industrial Park 1

Ave. 10, #03-10 to /W)3-12

Singapore 2056

Phone: 4597181

Telex: 38257

Fax: 4563129

Dataquest Taiwan

Room 801/8th Floor

Ever Spring Building

147, Sect. 2, Chien Kuo N. Rd.

Taipei, Taiwan R.O.C. 104

Phone: (02) 501-7960

Telex: 27459

Fax: (02) 505-4265

Dataquest ^^^t GennaiQ'

In der Schneithohl 17

6242 Kronberg 2

West Germany

Phone: 06173/61685

Telex: 418089

Fax: 06173/67901

onmrij

i i

I

Dataquest Research Methodology

I

:

>

DataQuest

I

Dataquest Research Methodology

Source:

Dataquest

DataQuest

Published by Dataquest Iruxrpormed

The content of this report represents our interpretation and analysis of information generally available to the public or released t^ knowledgeable individuals in the subject imlustry, but is not guaranteed as to accuracy or completeness. It does not contain material provided to us in confidence by our clients.

Printed in the United States of America. All rights reserved. hJo part of this publication may be reproduced, stored in retrieval systems, or transmitted, in any form or by ar^ means—mechanical, electronic, photocopying, duplicating, microfilming, videotape, or odierwise—without the prior written permission of the publisher.

© 1991 Dataquest Incorporated

March 1991

Dataquesfs Research

PhilosophyMethodology for Vahie

From semiconductors to systems, office to factory automation, Dataquest provides quality research on more than 25 separate hightechnology industries and their markets.

Fundamental to the way Dataquest conducts its research is an underlying philosophy that says the best data and analysis come from a wellbalanced program. Sudi a program includes a balance between primary and secondary data collection techniques; between supply-side and demand-side analysis; between focused, industry-specific research and coordinated, "big picture" analysis; and between the informed, insightful perspectives of experienced industry professionals and the rigorovis, disciplined techniques of seasoned market researchers.

Ultimately, this leads to a balance between data and analysis—the combination of which provides unique insight and ultimate value to our clients.

We follow several dimensions. Sometimes there are one-to-one, or dedicated, relationships between dimensions—for example, between software products and their applications. We believe that all major high-tedmology industries mirror this scheme. Note that we do not use the term vertical markets. This term is often used to refer to either applications or environments because both terms describe the use of a product. Application describes what the product is used for, and environment describes where the product is used. The term vertical market often is used for either of these terms and thereby can cause confusion.

Figure 1

How Dataquest Tracks H i ^ Technology

Market Segmentation—Setting the Standards

The design of market segmentation and data standards is a critical issue at Dataquest. Much effort is devoted to choosing and defining the way products, industries, and markets are segmented. Dataquest's objective is to provide data and analysis along lines of segmentation that are logical, appropriate to the industry in question, and immediately useful to clients.

Over the years, Dataquest has consistently established industry-accepted standard segmentations for the way we follow products and their movement. Figure 1 reflects the way we track products. Furdier, we spend a great deal of time and effort in defining how we track these products and determining what our definitions are for the market metrics we use—^for example, shipments, installed base, retirements, factory revenue versus end-user revenue, market share, and so on.

Companies

Ship ^

'

Products

To

Various '

From f Various

Regions

Through

'

Distribution

For

'

Applications

In Specific ,

1

User Environments

Source: Dataquest (March 1991)

sion we follow:

Dataquest's Research Philosophy—Methodology for Value

We have therefore standardized on the following terminology, which distinguishes between application and environment, for each dimen-

• Major product categories:

- Materials

- Components

- Boards and subsystems

- Equipment

- Software

- Consumables

- Services

- Others

• Product—A good or service

• Product category—A group of similar products

• Region—Geographic areas of both shipments and consumption

• Distribution—^The path by which a product moves from manufacturer to ultimate user

• Application—The use to which a product is pu^ the function it performs

• Environment—^Where a product is ultimately used

The Dataquest Staff

Dataquest believes that in order for an analyst to understand and analyze an industry, the analyst must have competed in it. To that end, our staff is heavily populated with professionals who have extensive experience in the industries they analyze. These analysts have held high-level positions in engineering, marketing, product development, and other related areas.

These industry veterans are complemented by a staff of professional market researchers who understand the principles of market research and who direct Dataquest's programs in primary and secondary research, demographics, economics research, statistical analysis, forecasting, and modeling. Figure 2 illustrates our staffing philosophy. Iliis blend of ^perience and training is unique in the research industry and allows Dataquest to provide its clients with market research of unequaled value.

To develop industry analysis and data,

Dataquest collects a wide spectrum of information from a carefully selected portfolio of sources. Data are collected directly by our researchers in the United States, Europe, Japan, and Asia.

Priinaiy Research

The principal data collection methodology at

Dataquest is primary research—^firsthand data collection by Dataquest researchers. Primary research is conducted with businesses, households, government, and schools; manufacturers, suppliers, and distributors; and product end users. Dataquest's in-house Primary Research

Group Oocated in San Jose and Paris) processes more than 10,000 interviews each month, through both mail and telephone interviews, as well as using focus groups and personal interviews. Questionnaires are developed by the Primary Research Group in conjunction with Dataquest industry analysts.

All surveys have been designed and demographic samples selected to answer specific inquiries. These samples conform with

Dataquest's standard demographic profiles so that results will comply with existing data structures.

The samples are drawn from a variety of sources, frequently from the databases of our parent company, The Dun & Bradstreet Corporation, including the Dun's Market Identifier

File of 6 million U.S. businesses. We also draw samples from the databases of Computer Intelligence and Focus Research. The number of interviews conducted is usually specified to produce data with a reliability of ± 5 percent at a 95 percent confidence level.

Following questionnaire development and sample selection, each survey undergoes a rigorous pretesting to make sure the interview captures the desired information. Once adjustments have been made, the telephone surveys are conducted on-line by Dataquesfs in-house team of professional interviewers. Call monitoring allows us to provide quality control throughout the process. All data entry and tabulation are done in-house.

©1991 Dataquest Incorporated Maich—Reproduction Prohibited

Dataquest's Research Philosophy—Methodology for Value

Figure 2

Research Organization

Research Operations

Lines of Business

Source: Dataquest (March 1991)

I

I

Firsthand Observation

On a daily basis, Dataquest watches and measures high technology around the world, using yet another technique of primary research: firsthand observation. Dataquest analysts regularly visit the laboratories, R&D facilities, and manufacturing plants of the companies they follow. They view the technologies and new products; study the manufacturing yields and levels of automation; and meet the people behind the products and companies, from start-up companies to industry leaders.

Secondary Sources

Primary research is supplemented with a review of secondary-source materials.

Dataquest's Information Resource Centers throughout the world maintain an extensive collection of information including technical, trade, and general business periodicals; reports; economic data; technical papers; patents; government data; direaories; financial literature; product literature; press releases; and many on-line databases. These sources provide specific data points and qualitative input to

Dataquest analysis. They cover trends in technology, pricing, manufacturing capacity, competition, product features, demand, buyer behavior, and macroenvironmental forces such as demographics, the economy, and the regulatory arena. The following steps reflect the overall research process at Dataquest:

• Initiate and clarify research request

• Develop methodological approach

• Develop questionnaire

• Select sample

• Load questionnaire (on-line interviewing)

• Prepare estimates (if appropriate)

• Conduct interviewer briefing

• Pretest

• Interview

©1991 Dataquest Incorporated March—Reproduction Prohibited

Dataquesf s Research I>bllosopby—Methodok^y for Value

• Perform quality check and call monitoring

• Merge data

• Perform scrubbing, tabulation, and statistical analysis

• Approve data

• Report on and deliver results

• Maintain database (as required)

The following is a typical cadre of sources:

• Industry contacts

• Industry associations and user groups

• Trade shows and conferences

• Demographics

• D&B economic research

• D&B credit services

• Computer intelligence

• Document management systems

• Focus Research

• Government and regulatory agencies

• Industry and trade publications

• Public databases and libraries

• Armual reports and Forms 10-K

• Product specifications and press releases

• Patent activity

Market Siziag aad Market Share

Dataquest conducts surveys of manufacturers and distributors in their respective industries monthly, quarterly, or armually. These surveys collect information on shipment and inventory levels, pricing, and short-term market expectations. Data are checked and cross-checked across data collection points at the supplier, manufacturer, distributor, and end-user levels.

This data collection effort resides at the core of our standard syndicated industry services.

We use demand-based surveys for many of our newer products and custom consulting.

However, the balance of this discussion focuses on our standard, syndicated industry service product line.

We first develop a company universe for each industry. The sources reflected in Figure 2 are checked to make sure that we have a full census of industry participants.

Next, Dataquest analysts and researchers derive estimates for each product or product category for which we collect shipment and revenue data. The estimates are then provided to vendor representatives for correction or substantiation.

The data collected in our vendor surveys are always considered public information. TTie data are used to allow bottom-up analysis defining market revenue, market size, and market share. The names of respondents are always kept confidential, and all data are published as

Dataquest estimates. All respondents are notified of our policies when our maiket estimates are initially sent.

Following is a list of steps we go through to derive estimates and reconcile the responses for final approval and reporting:

• We establish product category or modellevel detail.

*: We establish estimates and check against the following:

- Aggregate data

- Industry forecast

- Historical performance

- Growth rate of competition

- Growth rate of related products

• We use the following sources:

- Vendor verification

- Quarterly financials

- Industry associations

- Distribution charmel data

- Manufacturing capacity

- Life-cycle analysis

- Components and peripherals purchases

- Consumables production

- Ongoing dialog with industry sources

©1991 Dataquest Incoqx>iated March—Reproduction Prohibited

Dataquest's Research PhUosopfay—Methodology for Value

- Industry analysts' qualitative insight

- Government statistics

- Other secondary sources

• We reconcile responses against Dataquest segmentation standards.

Market Forecasts

We believe that complex interrelationships among the various products, markets, and high-technology industries that we follow should be understood and accounted for in the assumptions underlying each forecast. Forecasts must reconcile the complementary nature of systems, peripherals, and components.

Our forecast methodology begins with the completion of our vendor-based data acquisition, which is used to establish market size for the given year of data collection. These data are used to measure the accuracy of our previous year's projection for the current year.

This infrastructure creates a critical foundation that is the starting point for our forecasts.

No single forecast model applies at Dataquest because of the large scope of products and industries that we follow. We have a basic forecasting framework in place that incorporates both quantitative and qualitative data to derive forecasts. Analysts take the following factors into consideration when deriving and cross-checking forecasts and their assumptions:

• Macroeconomics

• Emerging technologies

• Life-cycle analysis

• Retirements

• Environmental trends

• Demographic trends

• Product availability

• Buying intentions

• Captive production

• Historical growth

• Historical pricing

• Installed base

• Saturation

• Obsolescence

• Import and export

• Most likely constraints

• Total available market

Finally, we regularly hold research forums that provide an open exchange of opinions for our analysts.

Throughout Dataquest, each variable must be defined and measured in the same way.

Analysts may vary the relationships between variables but not the values themselves. Not all variable relationships hold true for all industries; therefore, analysts may specify which sets of variables to use. Data must be reported according to Dataquest standard segmentation, and all final data must be approved before they are reported. All preliminary data are clearly stated as such. All final data are reported as Dataquest estimates. Our information is sourced appropriately with the phrase

"Source: Dataquest," and the data are stamped with a date so that users have a dear understanding of what iteration they are using and the assumptions betund those data.

Dataquest Market Research—

What's behind the Numbers?

when Dataquest clients receive forecast data with the fainilLar line "Source: Dataquest," they receive the end result of a rigorous process of primary and secondary data collection; supply-side, demand-side, and macroenvironmental analysis; and the cross-industry perspective afforded by Dataquest's uniquely broad and in-depth worldwide coverage of high technology.

Behind the numbers is a thorough discussion, involving industry professionals and research experts, and testing of the assumptions used to develop Dataquest's forecasts. In this way, clients get more than simply a single point of data for planning and decision making. Behind the numbers is a commitment to quality—a worldwide organization of people committed to supplying the highest-quality information and analysis to Dataquest"s clients.

©1991 Dataquest Incoqxjiated Maich—Reproduction Piohibited

Dataqpest's Research Philosophy^—Methodology for Value

®1991 Dataquest Incoipoiated March—Repioductian Prohibited

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'J

DataQuest

Dataquest High-Technology Guide

Segmentation and Giossary

1991

DataQuest

Dataquest High-Technology Guide

Segmentation and Glossary

1991

Source:

Dataquest

Published by Dataquest Incorporated

The content of this report represents our Interpretation and analysis of information generally available to the public or released by responsible individuals in the subject companies, but is not guaranteed as to accuracy or completeness. It does not contain material provided to us in confidence by our clients.

Printed in the United States of America. All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced, stored in retrieval systems, or transmitted, in any form or by any means—mechanical, electronic, photocopying, duplicating, microfilming, videotape, or otherwise—without the prior written permission of the publisher.

© 1991 Dataquest Incorporated January

High-Technology Guide

The High-Technology Guide provides a reference for Dataquest research, analysis, and publications. The segments and terms found in this guide are used consistently in our research and methodology and throughout

Dataquest products.

The High-Technology Guide is divided into two parts: segmentation and glossary. The segmentation section provides a comprehensive listing of the classifications used in our research. This segmentation is broken into different dimensions including companies, products, regions, distribution, applications, and user environments. These dimensions are illustrated below (see Figure 1). The glossary is an alphabetical list defining the terms found in the segmentation section.

Figure 1

Research Dimensions

Companies ship ^

'

Products to various \ f r o m various

Regions through

'

Distribution for

Applications

In

'

User Environments

Source: Dataquest (January 1991)

© 1991 Dataquest Incorporated January—Reproduction Prohibited

Table of Contents

Page Page

Home 69

Business 69

Natural Resources and

Construction 69

Real Estate 70

Hotels and Other Lodging 70

GEOGRAPHIC REGIONS 43

Business Services 71

North America 46

Health Care 71

Europe 48

Other Services 71

Japan 50

Education 71

Government 71

Size 72

DISTRIBUTION 53

Distribution Method 55

GLOSSARY 77

APPLICATIONS 57

General Productivity 59

Organizational 61

Entertainment 66

Industry Specific 66

1991 Dataquest Incorporated January—Reproduction Prohibited

High-Technology Guide Segmentation

Segmentation

© 1991 Dataquest Incorporated January—Reproduction Prohibited

High-Technology Guide Segmentation

Companies

The companies section contains more than 3,500 companies on which

Dataquest conducts research. These companies are studied because of their concentration or emphasis in technology markets and industries.

The company segmentation shows the breadth and depth of collective coverage that Dataquest maintains. Because of the extensive nature of the company list, it is not published in this guide but can be provided upon request.

1991 Dataquest Incorporated January—Reproduction Prohibited

High-Technology Guide Segmentation

Products

The products section lists high-technology products. This section presents the segmentation of the technology as defined by Dataquest.

The major categories of products are as follows:

• Materials • Software

• Components • Consumables

• Boards and Subsystems • Services

• Equipment • Other Products

The segmentation represents Dataquest's view of the high-technology marketplace and is not intended to represent the availability of data.

1991 Dataquest Incorporated January—Reproduction Prohibited

High-Technology Guide Segmentation

Products

MATERIALS-

Wafer

Silicon Wafer

Epitaxial Wafer

Gas

Bulk Gas

Nitrogen

Oxygen

Hydrogen

Argon

Specialty Gas

Silicon Precursor

Dopant

Plasma Etchant

Reactant Gas

Atmospheric/Purge Cylinder Gas and Other

Plastics

COMPONENTS-

Semiconductor

Integrated Circuit

Bipolar Digital (by Technology)

TTL/Others

ECL

Bipolar Digital (by Function)

Bipolar Digital Memory

Bipolar RAM

Bipolar Nonvolatile Memory

Other Bipolar Memory

Bipolar Digital Microcomponents

Bipolar Digital Logic

Bipolar ASIC

Bipolar Gate Array

Bipolar PLD

Bipolar PLA

Bipolar PMD

Bipolar FPGA

The segmentation represents Dataquest's view of the high-technology marketplace and is not intended to represent the availability of data.

1991 Dataquest Incorporated January—Reproduction Prohibited

High-Technology Guide Segmentation

COMPONENTS

Bipolar ASIC (Continued)

Bipolar Cell-Based IC

Bipolar Custom IC

Bipolar Standard Logic

Other Bipolar Logic

MOS Digital (by Technology)

NMOS/PMOS

CMOS

BiCMOS

MOS Digital (by Function)

MOS Memory

DRAM

16K DRAM

32K DRAM

64K DRAM

128K DRAM

256K DRAM

1Mb DRAM

4Mb DRAM

16Mb DRAM

SRAM

Slow SRAM

IK SRAM

4K SRAM

8K SRAM

16K SRAM

64K SRAM

256K SRAM

1Mb SRAM

4Mb SRAM

Fast SRAM

IK SRAM

4K SRAM

8K SRAM

16K SRAM

64K SRAM

256K SRAM

1Mb SRAM

4Mb SRAM

The segmentation represents Dataquest's view of the high-technology marketplace and is not intended to represent the availability of data.

1991 Dataquest Incorporated January—Reproduction Prohibited

High-Technology Guide Segmentation

COMPONENTS

Nonvolatile Memory IC

ROM

4K ROM

8K ROM

16K ROM

32K ROM

64K ROM

128K ROM

256K ROM

1Mb ROM

2Mb ROM

4Mb ROM

8Mb ROM

16Mb RQM

EPROM

16K EPROM

32K EPROM

64K EPROM

128K EPROM

256K EPROM

1Mb EPROM

2Mb EPROM

4Mb EPROM

8Mb EPROM

EEPROM

IK EEPROM

2K EEPROM

4K EEPROM

8K EEPROM

16K EEPROM

32K EEPROM

64K EEPROM

128K EEPROM

25 6K EEPROM

512K EEPROM

1Mb EEPROM

Other MOS Memory

MOS Microcomponents

MOS Microprocessor (by Word Length)

8-bit MOS MPU

The segmentation represents Dataquest's view of the high-technology marketplace and is not intended to represent the availability of data.

1991 Dataquest Incorporated January—Reproduction Prohibited

1" High-Technology Guide Segmentation

COMPONENTS

MOS Microprocessor (by Word Length) (Continued)

16-bit MOS MPU

16/32-bit MOS MPU

32-bit MOS MPU

32/64-bit MOS MPU

64-bit MOS MPU

MOS Microprocessor (by Technology)

CISC MOS MPU

RISC MOS MPU

MOS Microcontroller

4-bit MOS MCU

8-bit MOS MCU

16-bit MOS MCU

32-bit MOS MCU

Digital Signal Processor

DSP Microprocessor (DSMPU)

Microprogrammable DSP (MPDSP)

Special-Function DSP (SFDSP)

MOS Microperipheral

System Support Peripheral

Traditional Peripheral

Counter/Timer

DMA

Interrupt Controller

Memory Management

Real-Time Clock

Others

General-Purpose I/O

DRAM Controller

Cache Controller

PC Logic Chip Set

Display Peripheral

Alphanumeric CRT Controller

Graphics Controller

Keyboard Controller

Printer Controller

Others

Mass Storage Peripheral

Floppy Disk Controller

Hard-Disk Controller

Optical Disk Controller

Others

The segmentation represents Dataquest's view of the high-technology marketplace and is not intended to represent the availability of data.

1991 Dataquest Incorporated January—Reproduction Proliibited

H i g h - T e c h n o l o g y G u i d e S e g m e n t a t i o n 11

COMPONENTS

Communications Peripheral

LAN

ISDN

Modem

Serial I/O

UART/USART

Others

Floating-Point Coprocessor

16-bit

32-bit

MOS Logic

MOS ASIC

MOS Gate Array

MOS PLD

MOS PLA

MOS PMD

MOS FPGA

MOS Cell-Based IC

MOS Custom IC

MOS Standard Logic

Other MOS Logic

Analog Integrated Circuit

Monolithic Analog IC

Linear IC

Amplifier IC

Voltage Regulator

Voltage Reference IC

Comparator IC

Special-Function IC

Special Consumer IC

Special Automotive IC

Linear Array/ASIC

Mixed Signal IC

Data Converter IC

Telecommunication IC

Interface IC

Switch/Multiplexer IC

Disk Drive IC

Mixed Signal ASIC

Hybrid Analog IC

The segmentation represents Dataquest's view of the high-technology marketplace and is not intended to represent the availability of data.

1991 Dataquest Incorporated January—Reproduction Prohibited

12 High-Technology Guide Segmentation

COMPONENTS

Discrete Semiconductor

Transistor

Small Signal Transistor

Power Transistor

Bipolar Power Transistor

MOS Power Transistor

Insulated Gate Bipolar Transistor

Diode

Small Signal Diode

Power Diode/Rectifier

Thyristor

Other Discrete Semiconductor

Optoelectronic Semiconductor

Light-Emitting Diode/Display

Optocoupler

CCD

Laser Diode

Photosensor

Solar Cell

III-V Semiconductor

GaAs Digital IC

GaAs Analog IC

III-V Discrete Transistor

Optoelectronic IC

Passive Component

Cable

Capacitor

Cathode Ray Tube (CRT)

Connector

Inductor

Potentiometer

Relay

Resistor

Socket

Splice (Optical)

Transducer

Liquid Crystal Display

Switch

The segmentation represents Dataquest's view of the high-technology marketplace and is not intended to represent the availability of data.

1991 Oataquest Incorporated January—Reproduction Prohibited

High-Technology Guide Segmentation 13

BOARDS AND SUBSYSTEMS

Graphic Board

Mac-Type Add-On Graphic Board

IBM-Type Add-On Graphic Board

Imaging Subsystem

Add-On Memory Board

Controller Board

Storage Controller Board

Printer Controller Board

Magnetic Recording Head

Board-Level Computer

Storage Subsystem

EQUIPMENT

Data Processing Equipment

Computer Systems by Product Segment

General-Purpose Computer System

Supercomputer

Corporate Supercomputer

Departmental Supercomputer

Research Supercomputer

Mainframe Computer

Midrange Computer

Superminicomputer

Minicomputer

Microcomputer

Workstation Computer

Graphic/Project Supercomputer

Superworkstation

Traditional Workstation

Entry-Level Workstation

Personal Computer

Desktop Personal Computer

Desk-Side Personal Computer

Transportable Personal Computer

Laptop A/C Personal Computer

Laptop D/C Personal Computer

Notebook D/C Personal Computer

Pen-Based Personal Computer

The segmentation represents Dataquest's view of the high-technology marketplace and is not intended to represent the availability of data.

1991 Dataquest Incorporated January—Reproduction Prohibited

14 High-Technology Guide Segmentation

E Q U I P M E N T -

Hand-Held Personal Computer

Special-Purpose Computer System

Data Storage Device

Flexible Disk Drive

Fixed Media

Sub-3.5-Inch Disk Drive

0 to 30MB

31 to 60MB

61 to 100MB

101 to 200MB

201 to 500MB

501+MB

3.5-Inch Disk Drive

0 to 30MB

31 to 60MB

61 to 100MB

101 to 200MB

201 to 500MB

501 to 1,000MB

1.001+MB

5.25-Inch Disk Drive

0 to 30MB

31 to 60MB

61 to 100MB

101 to 200MB

201 to 500MB

501 to 1,000MB

1,001+MB

8 to 10.5-Inch Disk Drive

0 to 30MB

31 to 60MB

61 to 100MB

101 to 200MB

201 to 500MB

501 to 1,000MB

1,001+MB

14-Inch Disk Drive

0 to 30MB

31 to 60MB

The segmentation represents Dataquest's view of the high-technology marketplace and is not intended to represent the availability of data.

1991 Dataquest Incorporated January—Reproduction Prohibited

High-Technology Guide Segmentation 15

E Q U I P M E N T -

14-Inch Disk Drive (Continued)

61 to 100MB

101 to 200MB

201 to 500MB

501 to 1,000MB

1,001+MB

Rigid Disk Drive

Fixed Media

Sub-3.5-Inch Disk Drive

0 to 30MB

31 to 60MB

61 to 100MB

101 to 200MB

201 to 500MB

501+MB

3.5-Inch Disk Drive

0 to 30MB

31 to 60MB

61 to 100MB

101 to 200MB

201 to 500MB

501 to 1,000MB

1,001+MB

5.25-Inch Disk Drive

0 to 30MB

31 to 60MB

61 to 100MB

101 to 200MB

201 to 500MB

501 to 1,000MB

1,001+MB

8 to 10.5-Inch Disk Drive

0 to 30MB

31 to 60MB

61 to 100MB

101 to 200MB

201 to 500MB

501 to 1,000MB

1.001+MB

The segmentation represents Dataquest's view of the high-technology marlcetplace and is not intended to represent the availability of data.

1991 Dataquest Incorporated January—Reproduction Prohibited

16 High-Technology Guide Segmentation

E Q U I P M E N T -

14-Inch Disk Drive

0 to 30MB

31 to 60MB

61 to 100MB

101 to 200MB

201 to 500MB

501 to 1,000MB

1,001+MB

Removable Media

Sub-3.5-Inch Disk Drive

0 to 30MB

31 to 60MB

61 to 100MB

101 to 200MB

201 to 500MB

501+MB

3.5-Inch Disk Drive

0 to 30MB

31 to 60MB

61 to 100MB

101 to 200MB

201 to 500MB

501 to 1,000MB

1,001+MB

5.25-Inch Disk Drive

0 to 30MB

31 to 60MB

61 to 100MB

101 to 200MB

201 to 500MB

501 to 1,000MB

1,001+MB

8 to 10.5-Inch Disk Drive

0 to 30MB

31 to 60MB

61 to 100MB

101 to 200MB

201 to 500MB

501 to 1,000MB

1,001+MB

The segmentation represents Dataquest's view of the high-technology marketplace and is not intended to represent the availability of data.

© 1991 Dataquest Incorporated January—Reproduction Prohibited

High-Technology Guide Segmentation 17

E Q U I P M E N T -

14-Inch Disk Drive

0 to 30MB

31 to 60MB

61 to 100MB

101 to 200MB

201 to 500MB

501 to 1,000MB

1,001+MB

Dual Media

Sub-3.5-Inch Dislc Drive

0 to 30MB

31 to 60MB

61 to 100MB

101 to 200MB

201 to 500MB

501+MB

3.5-Inch Disk Drive

0 to 30MB

31 to 60MB

61 to 100MB

101 to 200MB

201 to 500MB

501 to 1,000MB

1,001+MB

5.25-Inch Disk Drive

0 to 30MB

31 to 60MB

61 to 100MB

101 to 200MB

201 to 500MB

501 to 1,000MB

1,001+MB

8 to 10.5-Inch Disk Drive

0 to 30MB

31 to 60MB

61 to 100MB

101 to 200MB

201 to 500MB

501 to 1,000MB

1,001+MB

The segmentation represents Dataquest's view of the high-technology marketplace and is not intended to represent the availability of data.

1991 Dataquest Incorporated January—Reproduction Prohibited

18 High-Technology Guide Segmentation

E Q U I P M E N T -

14-Inch Disk Drive

0 to 30MB

31 to 60MB

61 to 100MB

101 to 200MB

201 to 500MB

501 to 1,000MB

1,001+MB

Optical Disk Drive

CD-ROM

WORM Optical Disk Drive

5.25 Inch

8 to 12 Inch

14 Inch

Rewritable Optical Disk Drive

2 to 5.25 Inch

8 to 12 Inch

Optical Jukebox

Tape Drive

1/4-Inch Tape Drive

Start-Stop

Streamer

8 Inch

5.25 Inch

3.5 Inch

1/8-Inch Tape Drive

Cassette

Cartridge

1/2-Inch Tape Drive

1/2-Inch Vacuum Column

1/2-Inch Tension Arm

1/2-Inch Streaming

1/2-Inch Cartridge

Reel-to-Reel Tape Drive Recap

Helical Scan Tape Drive

VHS

DAT

8mm

Others

Input/Output Device

Terminal

Alphanumeric (CRT) Terminal

Minicomputer-Based Terminal

The segmentation represents Dataquest's view of the high-technology marketplace and is not intended to represent the availability of data.

1991 Dataquest Incorporated January—Reproduction Prohibited

High-Technology Guide Segmentation 19

E Q U I P M E N T -

Alphanumeric (CRT) Terminal (Continued)

Non-IBM, Protocol-Specific Terminal

IBM 3270 Protocol Terminal

Host/Vendor-Independent Terminal

Processing Terminal

Graphics Terminal

Point-of-Sale Terminal

Funds Transfer Terminal (ATMs)

Smart Card

Other Specialized Terminal

Electronic Printer

Serial Printer

Serial, Impact, Dot Matrix Printer

Dot Matrix Printer by Speed

0 to 180 ops

181 to 250 cps

251 to 399 cps

400+ cps

Dot Matrix Printer by Size

Total < 9 Wire (Pin)

Total 9 Wire (Pin)

Total 18 Wire (Pin)

Total 24 Wire (Pin)

Serial, Impact, Fully Formed Printer

0 to 30 cps

31+ cps

Serial, Nonimpact, Direct Thermal Printer

Serial, Nonimpact, Thermal Transfer Printer

Wax-Based

Sublimation

Dry Silver

Serial, Nonimpact, Ink Jet Printer

Line Printer

Line, Impact, Dot Matrix Printer

0 to 450 1pm

451 to 650 1pm

651+ 1pm

Line, Impact, Fully Formed Printer

0 to 450 1pm

451 to 650 1pm

651 to 1,050 1pm

The segmentation represents Dataquest's view of the high-technology marketplace and is not intended to represent the availability of data.

1991 Dataquest Incorporated January—Reproduction Prohibited

20 H i g h - T e c h n o l o g y Guide S e g m e n t a t i o n

E Q U I P M E N T -

Line, Impact, Fully Formed Printer (Continued)

1,051 to 1,250 1pm

1,251+ 1pm

Line, Nonimpact, Direct Thermal Printer

Line, Nonimpact, Thermal Transfer Printer

Page Printer

0 to 6 ppm

7 to 10 ppm

11 to 15 ppm

16 to 20 ppm

21 to 30 ppm

31 to 50 ppm

51 to 80 ppm

81 to 150 ppm

151+ ppm

Other Input/Output Devices

Monitor

Remote Batch, Job-Entry, and Output

Key Entry Equipment

Media-to-Media Data Conversion

Magnetic Ink Character Recognition (MICR)

Optical Scanning Equipment

Computer Plotters

Small Format Pen Plotter

Large Format Pen Plotter

Small Format Electrostatic Plotter

Large Format Electrostatic Plotter

Ink. Jet Plotter

Thermal Plotter

Photosensitive Plotter

Laser Plotter

Voice Recognition Computer Device

Voice Synthesizer

Mouse

Keyboard

Digitizer

Office Equipment

Copier and Duplicator

Personal Copier (Up to 12 cpm)

Segment 1 (Up to 20 cpm)

The segmentation represents Dataquest's view of the high-technology marketplace and is not intended to represent the availability of data.

1991 Dataquest Incorporated January—Reproduction Prohibited

H i g h - T e c h n o l o g y G u i d e S e g m e n t a t i o n 21

E Q U I P M E N T -

Copier and Duplicator (Continued)

Segment 2 (21 to 30 cpm)

Segment 3 (31 to 44 cpm)

Segment 4 (45 to 69 cpm)

Segment 5 (70 to 90 cpm)

Segment 6 (91+ cpm)

Full-Color Copiers

Electronic Calculator (without Alpha Keyboard)

Dictating, Transcribing Machine

Electronic Typewriter

Word Processor

Banking System

Check-Handling System

Cash Register

Mailing, Letter-Handling, Addressing Equipment

Other Office Equipment

Communications

Telecommunicatons

Image Communications

Facsimile

Classification by Type

Standalone Systems

PC Facsimile Cards

LAN to Fax Gateways

Classification by Technology

Group I

Group II

Group III

Group III Bis

Group IV

Classification by Feature

Ultra Low End

Low End

Midrange

High End

Classification by Price

<$1,000

$1,000 to $1,499

$1,500 to $1,999

$2,000 to $2,499

$2,500 to $2,999

$3,000 or More

The segmentation represents Dataquest's view of the high-technology marketplace and is not intended to represent the availability of data.

1991 Dataquest Incorporated January—Reproduction Prohibited

22 H i g h - T e c h n o l o g y Guide S e g m e n t a t i o n

E Q U I P M E N T -

Classification by Printing Technology

Thermal

Thermal Transfer

Plain Paper (Laser, LED, etc.)

ISDN Terminals

Servers

Teleconferencing

Audio

Video

Captured Image

Near-Full Motion

Codecs

PX64

Telex

Machines

Black Boxes

Gateways

Message Switches

Videotex

Terminals

Personal Communications

Mobile Radio

Cellular Handsets

Classification by Type

Car-Mounted

Transportable

Portable

Classification by Technology

Analog

C450

NMT450

NMT900

TACS

ETACS

Radiocom 2000

AMPS

RTMS-Italy

Digital

GSM

Others

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E Q U I P M E N T -

Cordless Handsets

CTO

CTl

CT2

CT3

DECT

GSM

Base Stations

Global Positioning Systems

Mobile Infrastructure

Base Stations

Personal Communications Networks (PCN)

Mininetworks

Public Mobile Radio (PMR)

Paging Systems

Networking

Cable (Private)

Data PBX

Encryption Units

Front-End Processors

IBM and IBM-Compatible

Proprietary

ISDN

Local Area Networks (LANs)

Terminal Servers

Ethernet

Token Ring

Others

PC Network Operating Software

PC LANs

Classification by Type

IBM PC/Compatible

Apple Macintosh

Classification by Technology

802.3

802.5

Arcnet

FDDI

Others

Classification by Media

Coaxial

Unshielded Twisted Pair (UTP)

Fiber-Optic

Datagrade

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24 High-Technology Guide Segmentation

E Q U I P M E N T -

Local Operating Network Systems (LONs)

Modems

Classification by Standards

U.S. Standards

212 A

V.22 Bis

201 B/C

208 A/B

V.29

V.32

V.33

16.8 Kbps

19.2 Kbps

V.35

V.36

Proprietary Dial-Up 9.6 Kbps

European Standards

V.21/23

V.21/23 PC

V.22

V.22 PC

V.22 Bis

V.22 Bis PC

V.26

V.27

V.29 Basic

V.29 Premium

V.32

V.32 PC

Proprietary Dial-Up 9.6 Kbps

V.33

16.8 Kbps

19.2 Kbps

Proprietary Baseband

Proprietary DOVE

Multiplexers

Classification by Technology

Time Division (TDM)

Low-End Point-to-Point/Dual Trunk

Low-End Networking

Channels Banks/Primary MUX

T l / E l Point-to-Point/Dual Trunk

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High-Technology Guide Segmentation 25

EQUIPMENT-

Time Division (TDM) (Continued)

T l / E l Network Access

High-End Networking

Greater than T l / E l

Statistical Time Division (STDM)

Classification by Size

Low End (Up to 16 Channels)

Midrange (Up to 48 Channels)

High End (More than 48 Channels)

Network Management Systems

Public

Carrier

Local

Long Distance

Private

LANs

T l / E l

X.25

Modems

Voice (Call Accounting)

Switch and Patch

Matrix

Mini/Mainframe-Based

Test Equipment

Analyzers

Operator Support Systems

Network-Terminating Devices

Operator Support Systems

Other Datacom Equipment

Fiber-Optic Multiplexers

Public Data Network Systems (Equipment)

X.21 Switches

Servers

Value-Added Networks (Equipment)

X.25

Classification by Type

Packet Assemblers/Disassemblers (PADs)

Asynchronous Only

Synchronous Only

Multiprotocol

Packet Switches (Nodes)

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E Q U I P M E N T

Classification by Capacity

Low End (Up to 100 Packets per Second)

Midrange (Up to 1,000 pps)

High End (More than 1,000 pps)

Public Network Equipment

Cable

Coaxial

Fiber-Optics

Monomode

Multimode

Multlpair

Cable TV

Carrier Equipment

Central Office

Classification by Type

Local

Trunk

Gateway

Classification by Technology

Analog

Digital

ISDN

Basic Rate Interface (BRI)

Primary Rate Interface (PRI)

Others

Classification By Size

Less than 2K Lines

2K to lOK Lines

More than lOK Lines

Digital Access CrossConnect Systems (DACS)

Classification by Type

1/0 DCS

1/1 DCS

3/1 DCS

3/1/0 DCS

3/3 DCS

4/1 DCS

4/3 DCS

4/4 DCS

OCN/OCN

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E Q U I P M E N T -

Classification by Capacity

Low End

Midrange

High End

Fiber-Optic Terminal (FOTs)

Line Conditioners

Main Distribution Frame (MDF)

Connectors

Microwave

Classification by Type

Systems

Antenna

Accessories

Electronics

Classification by Usage

Short Haul

Long Haul

Classification by Technology

Analog

Digital

Multiplexers

Classification by Type

Multiplexers

Fiber-Optic Terminals

Classification by Technology

Analog

Digital

Classification by Standards

European/CEPT Standard

2 Mbps

8 Mbps

34 Mbps

140 Mbps

565 Mbps

2.4 Gbps

U.S. Standard

1.5 Mbps

6 Mbps

45 Mbps

90 Mbps

135 Mbps

1.2 Gbps

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E Q U I P M E N T -

SONET

Synchronous Digital Hierarchy (SDH)

Asynchronous Transfer Mode (ATM)

Fast Packet Switching

Frame Relay

Network Termination Units

ISDN

DSU/CSU

NTU

Operating Support Systems

Pay Phones

Public Paging Systems

Local Loop Equipment

Analog

PCM Repeaters

Digital

Twisted Pair

SLC-96 and Compatibles

Others

Fiber Optics

Universal Digital Line Carrier (UDLC)

Integrated Digital Line Carrier (IDLC)

Flexible Access System (FAS)

SONET

802.6 Metropolitan Area Network (MAN)

Others

Wireless

Basic Exchange Telephone Radio Service (BETRS)

Cordless

Satellite Communications

Space Stations

Earth Stations

VSAT

Master—Hub

Remote

Receive Only—Data Broadcast

Interactive

Direct Broadcast

Teleport

Television Receive Only

Video Distribution

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E Q U I P M E N T

Satellite Communications (Continued)

Home

Intelsat

Eutelsat

Others

Signaling

Telex

Low End (Less than 20 Ports)

Midrange(20 to 80 Ports)

High End (More than 80 Ports)

X.25

Classification by Size

Low End

Midrange

High End

Voice Communication

Answering Machines

Attendant Consoles

Automatic Call Distributors (ACDs)

Classification by Type

Standalone

Integrated

Analog

Digital

Classification by Capacity

1 to 8 Agent Positions

9 to 24 Agent Positions

25 to 48 Agent Positions

49 to 100 Agent Positions

More than 100 Agent Positions

Business Communications Systems

Classification by Type

Private Branch Exchange (PBX)

Key Telephone System (KTS)

Classification by Technology

Analog

Digital

ISDN

Terminals

ISDN

Proprietary

Servers

Network

BRI

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E Q U I P M E N T •

Network (Continued)

PRI

Proprietary

Gateways

Basic

Classification by Capacity

1 to 8 Lines

9 to 24 Lines

25 to 48 Lines

49 to 100 Lines

101 to 400 Lines

401 to 1,000 Lines

More than 1,000 Lines

Cable (Private)

Call Management Systems

Centrex

KTS

PBX

Integrated Voice/Data Workstations (IVDT)

Intercom Systems

ISDN Terminals

Voice

Data

Video

Integrated

Private Paging Systems

Trading Turrets/Dealer Boards

Voice-Messaging Systems

Classification by Capacity

1 to 4 Ports

5 to 8 Ports

9 to 16 Ports

17 to 32 Ports

33 to 64 Ports

65 to 128 Ports

More than 128 Ports

Voice Response Units (VRUs)

Classification by Capacity

1 to 4 Ports

5 to 8 Ports

9 to 16 Ports

17 to 32 Ports

33 to 64 Ports

65 to 128 Ports

More than 128 Ports

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High-Technology Guide Segmentation 31

E Q U I P M E N T -

Voice Terminals

Classification by Type

Corded

Cordless

Classification by Technology

Analog

Digital

Pulse Dial

Tone Dial (DTMF)

Industrial Electronic Equipment

Security/Energy Management

Alarm System

Intrusion Detection Alarm System

Fire Detection Alarm System

Discrete Device, Security/Energy Management

MPU Load Programmer

Computerized Energy Control System

Manufacturing System

Wafer Fabrication Equipment

Lithography Equipment

Proximity/Contact Aligners

Projection Aligner

Steppers

Direct-Write E-Beam

Maskmaking E-Beam

X Ray

Automatic Photoresist Processing Equipment

Etch-and-Clean Equipment

Wet Process

Dry Strip

Dry Etch

Ion Milling

Deposition Equipment

Chemical Vapor Deposition

Physical Vapor Deposition

Silicon Epitaxy Deposition

Metalorganic CVD Deposition

Molecular Beam Epitaxy Deposition

Diffusion

Rapid Thermal Processing

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32 High-Technology Guide Segmentation

E Q U I P M E N T -

Ion Implantation

Medium Current Ion Implantation

High-Current Ion Implantation

High-Voltage Ion Implantation

Optical CD/Wafer Inspection

Other Process Control Equipment

Factory Automation Equipment

Other Water Fabrication Equipment

Test Equipment

ATE (Automatic Test Equipment)

Discrete Component Tester

Semiconductor Tester

Interconnect/Bare PCB Tester

In-Circuit PCB Tester

Functional PCB Tester

Combined PCB Tester

Manufacturing EATE N/A

General Test Equipment

Process Control System

Process Control System, Controller

Process Control System, Recorder

Process Control System, Indicator

Process Control System, Auxiliary Station

Process Control System, Nonunified System

Process Control System, Industrial Process

Programmable Machine Tool

Boring Programmable Machine Tool

Drilling Programmable Machine Tool

Grinding Programmable Machine Tool

Horizontal Turning Programmable Machine Tool

Vertical Turning Programmable Machine Tool

Milling Programmable Machine Tool

Machining Center Programmable Machine Tool

Other Cutting Programmable Machine Tool

Punch/Shear/Bend Programmable Machine Tool

Flexible Manufacturing System Programmable Machine Tool

Mechanical Assembly Equipment

Plastic Processing Machinery

Robot System

Robotic Electronic Assembly

Robotic Nonelectronic Assembly

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E Q U I P M E N T -

Robot System (Continued)

Material-Handling/Loading Robot System

Painting Robot System

Spot-Welding Robot System

Arc-Welding Robot System

Machining Robot System

Other Robot System

Automated Material Handling

Guided Vehicle

Programmable Conveyor

Storage/Retrieval Automatic Material-Handling System

Programmable Monorail

Warehousing

Programmable Overhead Crane

Other Automated Material-Handling Equipment

Instrumentation

Integrating and Totalizing Meter for Gas

Counting Device

Digital Panel Meter

Analog Panel Meter

Panel Type Instrument

Elapsed-Time Meter

Portable Electronic Measuring Instrument

Electronic Recording Instrument

Physical Property Test, Inspection, and Measurement

Commercial Meteorological and General-Purpose Instrument

Nuclear Radiation Detection and Monitoring

Surveying and Drafting Instrument

Ultrasonic Cleaners, Drill

Meteorological Instrument

Geophysical Instrument

Analytical and Scientific Instrument

Medical Equipment

Diagnostic Medical Equipment

Automatic Blood Analyzer

CAT Scanner

Digital Radiography

Electrocardiograph

Electroencephalograph

Magnetic Resonance Imaging

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E Q U I P M E N T -

Medical Equipment (Continued)

Respiratory Analysis

Ultrasonic Scanner, Medical

X Ray, Medical

Other Diagnostic Medical Equipment

Patient-Monitoring

Prosthetic Medical Equipment

Hearing Aid

Surgical Support

Therapeutic

Defibrillator

Dialysis, Diathermy

Electrosurgical

Pacemaker

Ultrasonic Generator

Other Therapeutic Medical Equipment

Other Industrial Electronic Equipment

Vending Machine

Laser System (Excluding Communication)

Power Supply

Traffic Control

Particle Accelerator

Industrial and Scientific X Ray

Laboratory and Scientific Apparatus

Teaching Machine and Aid

Scientific Not Elsewhere Classified

Consumer Electronic Equipment

Audio Consumer

Audio Amplifier

Compact (Disc) Player, Music

Consumer Radio

Stereo (Hi-Fi) Component

Stereo Headphone

Electronic Musical Instrument

Tape Recorder, Consumer

Video, Consumer

Video Camera, Consumer

VTRs (VCRs)

Videodisc Player

The segmentation represents Dataquest* s view of the high-technology marketplace and is not intended to represent the availability of data.

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E Q U I P M E N T -

Video, Consumer (Continued)

Color Television

Black-and-White Television

HDTV

Remote Control

LCD Television

Personal Electronic

Game

Camera

Watch

Clock

Toy

Sewing Machine

Other Personal Electronic

Appliance

Air Conditioner

Microwave Oven

Washer and Dryer

Refrigerator

Dishwasher, Disposal

Range and Oven, Consumer

Rice Cookers

Fans

Heaters

Vacuum Cleaners

Food Processors

Other Consumer Appliance

Other Consumer Electronic

Automatic Garage Door Opener

Residential Smoke Alarm

Consumer Electronic Equipment Not Elsewhere Classified

Military/Aerospace Electronic Equipment

Military Electronic Equipment

Radar, Military

Sonar, Military

Missile-Weapon

Space Military Equipment

Navigation, Military

Communication, Military

Electronic Warfare

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36 High-Technology Guide Segmentation

E Q U I P M E N T -

Military Electronic Equipment (Continued)

Reconnaissance

Aircraft System

Military Computer System

Simulation and Training, Military

Miscellaneous Military Equipment

Civil Aerospace

Radar, Civilian

Civilian Space

Civil Navigation/Communication

Civil Aircraft Flight System

Civil Simulation and Training

Transportation Electronic Equipment

Entertainment, Transportation

Body Controls

Driver Information

Powertrain

Safety and Convenience

Other Electronic Equipment

SOFTWARE-

Application Software (See Applications Segmentation)

System Software

Operating System Software

Database

Document Management

Data Acquisition and Control

Storage Management

Database Administration

On-Line Transaction Processing

Development Tools

Editors

Language

Compilers

Assemblers

Translators

Data Translator

Query Languages

The segmentation represents Dataquest's view of the high-technology marketplace and is not intended to represent the availability of data.

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SOFTWARE-

Interactive Languages

Fourth-Generation Languages

Visual Programming Languages

Graphic

Communication Management

User Interface

Device Interface

Protocol

Security

Operating Environment

Operating System

Proprietary

IBM/VM/MVS

DEC VMS

Others

Open

UNIX

O S F l

Sun OS

System V/BSD

Mach

XENIX

Others

Pick

Theos

Others

Real-Time

PC

DOS

OS/2

Macintosh

Others

Operating Utilities

Peripheral I/O Management

System Subroutine Libraries

Data Center and System Management

Information Resource Management

Information Center

System Utilities

The segmentation represents Dataquest's view ol the high-technology marketplace and is not intended to represent the availability of data.

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38 H i g h - T e c h n o l o g y G u i d e S e g m e n t a t i o n

CONSUMABLES

Paper

Cut Sheet

Form

Label

Toner and Developer

Print Ribbon

Photoreceptor

Print Element

Printwheel

Golf Ball

Thimble

Computer Storage Media

Flexible Disk

Rigid Disk.

Computer Storage Tape

Optical Media

Transparency

Other Consumable

SERVICES

Telecommunications Services

Core Services

Classification by Type

Local Telephone Services

Long Distance Services

International Services

Classification by Technology

Analog

Digital

ISDN

HO

BRI

PRI

Others

Classification by Product

Toll Revenue

WATS Outgoing

WATS Incoming (800 Service)

900 Service

Switched Digital Services

Switched 56 Kbps

X.21

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SERVICES

Classification by Product (Continued)

Analog Private Lines

Conditioned

Unconditioned

Digital Private Lines

Classification by Capacity

0 to 19.2 Kbps

19.2 Kbps to 64 Kbps

64 Kbps to H l l

H U to 772 Kbps

T l

E l

8 Mbps

T3

34 Mbps

More than T3

Centrex

Classification by Type

ETN

ACD

CLASS

Routing

Billing

Network Management

Classification by Size

1 to 8 Lines

9 to 24 Lines

25 to 48 Lines

49 to 100 Lines

101 to 400 Lines

401 to 1,000 Lines

More than 1,000 Lines

B-ISDN

Operator Services

Enhanced Services

Audiotex Access Services

Voice Mail

Cable TV

Directory Inquiry

Electronic Messaging

X400

EDI

Others

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40 H i g h - T e c h n o l o g y G u i d e S e g m e n t a t i o n

SERVICES

ISDN

Public Data

Satellite

VSAT

Others

Teleconferencing

Teleport Services

Telex Services

Facsimile Services

Value-Added Networks (VANs)

Videoconferencing

Ad Hoc

Carrier Provided

Virtual Private Network Services

Videotex Access Services

X.25

Voice Messaging

Mobile Services

Cellular

Classification by Technology

Analog

C450

NMT450

NMT900

TACS

ETACS

Radiocom 2000

AMPS

RTMS-Italy

Digital

GSM

Others

Cordless

Portable

CT2

CT3

DECT

Mobile

GSM

Global-Positioning Systems

Location Identification Systems

The segmentation represents Dataquest's view ot the high-technology marketplace and is not intended to represent the availability of data.

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High-Technology Guide Segmentation 41

SERVICES

Personal Communications Networks (PCN)

SubGSM

Public Mobile Radio (PMR)

Data Services

Public Paging Systems

Messaging Services

Hardware Maintenance

Contract Maintenance

Time and Materials

Parts

Software Support

Customer Training/Education

Network Support

Professional

Systems Integration

Facilities Management

OTHER PRODUCTS

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42 H i g h - T e c h n o l o g y G u i d e S e g m e n t a t i o n

The segmentation represents Dataquest's view of the high-technology marketplace and is not intended to represent the availability of data.

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Geographic Regions

The geographic regions segmentation shows the classification scheme used by Dataquest to define the regions of the world. Dataquest classifies the world into the following regions:

• North America

• Europe

• Japan

• Rest of Asia—Rest of World

The segmentation represents Dataquest's view of the high-technology marketplace and is not intended to represent the availability of data.

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H i g h - T e c h n o l o g y G u i d e S e g m e n t a t i o n

Geographic Regions

W o r l d w i d e

4 5

North America

Europe

Japan

Rest of Asia—Rest of World

^S-"^^

w ^

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46

High-Technology Guide Segmentation

North America

^ " ^ ^ ^

North America

United States

East North Central Division

Illinois

Indiana

Michigan

Ohio

Wisconsin

East North Central Other

Mountain Division (Continued)

Montana

Nevada

New Mexico

Utah

Wyoming

Mountain Other

Middle Atlantic Division

New Jersey

New York

Pennsylvania

Middle Atlantic Other

East South Central Division

Alabama

Kentucky

Mississippi

Tennessee

East South Central Other

Mountain Division

Arizona

Colorado

Idaho

New England Division

Connecticut

Maine

Massachusetts

New Hampshire

Rhode Island

Vermont

New England Other

The segmentation represents Dataquest's view of the high-technology marketplace and is not intended to represent the availability of data.

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High-Technology Guide Segmentation

United States (Continued)

Pacific Division

Alaska

California

Hawaii

Oregon

Washington

Pacific Other

South Atlantic Division

Delaware

District of Columbia

Florida

Georgia

Maryland

North Carolina

South Carolina

Virginia

West Virginia

South Atlantic Other

West North Central Division

Iowa

Kansas

Minnesota

Missouri

Nebraska

North Dakota

South Dakota

West North Central Other

West South Central Division

Arkansas

Louisiana

Oklahoma

Texas

West South Central Other

Puerto Rico Division

Puerto Rico

United States Other

Canada

North America Other

47

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High-Technology Guide Segmentation

Europe

Western Europe

Western Europe Major

France

Germany

Italy

Netherlands

Spain

Sweden

United Kingdom

Western Europe Other

Austria

Belgium

Cyprus

Denmark

Finland

Gibraltar

Greece

Iceland

Ireland

Liechtenstein

Luxembourg

Malta

Monaco

Norway

Portugal

San Marino

Switzerland

European Community (EC)

Belgium

Denmark

France

Germany

Greece

Ireland

Italy

Luxembourg

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High-Technology Guide Segmentation

European Community (EC) (Continued)

Netherlands

Portugal

Spain

United Kingdom

European Free Trade Association (EFTA)

Austria

Finland

Iceland

Norway

Sweden

Switzerland

Eastern Europe

Albania

Bulgaria

Czechoslovakia

Hungary

Poland

Romania

Union of Soviet Socialist Republics

Yugoslavia

49

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5 0

H i g h - T e c h n o l o g y G u i d e S e g m e n t a t i o n

Japan

Japan

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High-Technology Guide Segmentation

Rest of Asia—Rest of World

51

Rest of Asia—Rest of World

Four Tigers

Hong Kong

Korea

Singapore

Taiwan

Other Asia

Bangladesh

Brunei

Burma

Cambodia

China

East Timor

India

Indonesia

Laos

Macau

Malaysia

Maldives

Nepal

Pakistan

Philippines

Sri Lanka

Thailand

Vietnam

Rest of World

Australia/New Zealand

Australia

Christmas Island

Cocos Islands

New Zealand

Norfolk Island

Oceania

American Samoa

Canton and Enderbury Islands

Cook Islands

Fiji

French Polynesia

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Oceania (Continued)

Guam

Johnson Island

Kiribati

Midway Islands

Nauru

New Caledonia

Niue

Pacific Islands

Papua New Guinea

Pitcairn

Samoa

Solomon Islands

High-Technology Guide Segmentation

Tokelau

Tonga

Tuvalu

Vanuatu

Wake Island

Wallis and Futuna Islands

Africa

Central America

Caribbean

Middle East

South America

Atlantic

Inner Asia

The segmentation represents Dataquest's view of the high-technology marketplace and is not intended to represent the availability of data.

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Distribution

The distribution segmentation outlines the path by which a product moves from the manufacturer to the ultimate end user. This segmentation is used by Dataquest to analyze markups, discounts, and buyer behavior.

Dataquest defines the major distribution classifications as follows:

• Distribution channel

• Distribution method

The segmentation represents Dataquest's view of the high-technology marl^etplace and is not intended to represent the availability of data.

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Distribution

DISTRIBUTION CHANNEL

Direct

Indirect

Value-Added Reseller/Systems Integrator

Original Equipment Manufacturer

Distributor

Regional Bell Operating Company (RBOC)

Independent Telephone Company

Telephone Interconnect Supplier

Dealer

Mass Merchandiser

Manufacturers' Representatives/Agents

DISTRIBUTION METHOD

Direct Sales Force

Telemarketing

Mail Order

Company-Owned Store

The segmentation represents Dataquest's view of the high-technology marketplace and is not intended to represent the availability of data.

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High-Technology Guide Segmentation 57

Applications

The applications segmentation describes the use to which a product is put or the function it performs. Sometimes there are one-to-one relationships between products and their applications and the actual functions that a product performs.

The major applications as defined by Dataquest are as follows:

• General productivity

• Organizational

• Entertainment

• Industry specific

The segmentation represents Dataquest's view of the high-technology marketplace and is not intended to represent the availability of data.

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Applications

GENERAL PRODUCTIVITY

Document/Media Creation and Editing

Computer-Aided Printing and Publishing

Electronic Publishing

Technical Publishing

Graphics

Chart and Map Generation

Image Generation

Graphic Design Art

Image Editing

Draw/Paint

Image Capture

Clip Art

Illustration

Presentation Graphics

Color Prepress

Input

Image Processing

Image Manipulation

Color Correction

Color Pagination

Composition and Translation

Color Separation

Page Composition and Page Makeup

Page Description

Page Imaging

Document Architecture

Desktop Publishing

Scientific Visualization/Simulation

Multimedia

Animation

Desktop

Video

Compression

Digitizer

Full-Motion

Real-Time

Videodisc

The segmentation represents Dataquest* s view of the high-technology marltetplace and is not intended to represent the availability of data.

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GENERAL PRODUCTIVITY-

Holography

Photo Realism

Information Retrieval

Forms

Publishing Utilities

Tagging

PostScript Printing

Compression/Decompression

File Translation/Data Conversion

Document Management

Author/Editor

Image Processing

Scanning

Text

Image

Word Processing

Typography

Communication

Electronic Mail

Spreadsheet/Decision Support/Executive Information Systems

Spreadsheet

General-Purpose Simulation

Modeling

Forecasting

Learning/Education/Training

Instructional

Computer Training/Assisted Instruction

Educational Simulation

Learning

Project Management

Calendaring

Scheduling

Ticketing

Library Management

Time Management

Application Utilities

Integrated Applications

Relational Database Management System

The segmentation represents Dataquest's view of the high-technology marketplace and is not intended to represent the availability of data.

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High-Technology Guide Segmentation 61

ORGANIZATIONAL -

Management and Administration

Accounting

Accounts Payable

Checkbook Management

Accounts Receivable

Billing/Invoicing

General Ledger

Payroll

Tax Accounting

Personal Finance

Capital Assets

Fixed Assets

Lease Accounting

Human Resource/Personnel Management

Benefits Administration

Employment Administration

Finance

Financial Planning

Budgeting

Cost Accounting

Investment/Portfolio Management

Cash/Money Management

Deposit/Loan Management

Treasury/Stocks/Bonds

Purchasing

Contract Administration

Vendor Management

Planning

Business Planning

Strategic Planning

Command, Control, Communications, and Intelligence

Facilities Management

Facility Planning

Facility Simulation

Equipment/Maintenance Management

Property/Real Estate Management

Facility Security Management

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ORGANIZATIONAL -

Sales and Marketing

Marketing Research

Advertising and Promotional

Public Relations

Order Entry/Processing

Customer/Prospect Management

Credit Management

Sales Support/Administration

Research, Engineering, and Development

Industrial Automation

Shop Floor Plan and Control

CAM/Automated Assembly

Manufacturing Engineering Tools

Other Planning and Control

Test and Measurement

Others

Design Automation

CAD/CAM/CAE

Modeling

Two-Dimensional

Three-Dimensional

Solid

Mechanical

Documentation/Dra fting

Detail Drafting

Document Management

Schematics

Technical Illustration

Charts

Conceptual Design

Industrial Design

Design Layout

Styling

Functional Design

Component

Assembly Verification

Linkage/Mechanism

Analysis

Fatigue

Structural

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ORGANIZATIONAL

Analysis (Continued)

Thermal

Vibrational

Magnetic

Composite

Mass Property

Manufacturing Engineering

Tool Design

Fixture Design

Part-Processing Design

Manufacturing Process Simulation

NC Part Programming

Coordinate Measuring Machines

Off-Line Robotics

QC Analysis

AEC (Architectural, Engineering, and Construction)

Architectural

Civil

Facility Design

Process Plant Design

Geographical Information Systems

GIS/Mapping

Raster-Based GIS Systems

Electronic Design Automation

Electronic Computer-Aided Engineering

Digital Design

Design Entry

Schematic Entry

Libraries

Design Verification

Simulation

Simulation Acceleration

Hardware Modeling

Static Timing Analysis

Logic Synthesis

Test Automation

Automatic Test Vector Generation

Design for Testability/Test Synthesis

Fault Simulation

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ORGANIZATIONAL

Analog Design

Design Entry

Schematic Capture

Libraries

Design Verification

Circuit Simulation

Mixed Signal Simulation

IC Layout and Verification

Editing

Layout

Verification

Module Generation

PCB Layout

Software Development

Computer-Aided Software Engineering

Artificial Intelligence

General Software Development

Earth Resources

Seismic Analysis

Geophysical Seismic Imaging

Oil Field Services

Remote Sensing

Technical Data Analysis

General Scientific

Scientific Research/Analysis

Scientific Visualization

Scientific Simulation

Chemistry

Crystallography

Modeling

Analysis

Simulation

Laboratory

Analytical Instruments

Instrument Automation

Quality Control/Assurance

Research and Laboratory Analysis

Others

The segmentation represents Dataquest's view of the high-technology marlcetplace and is not intended to represent the availability of data.

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ORGANIZATIONAL

Medical

Body Scanning

Patient Monitoring

Others

Diagnostic

Therapeutic

Manufacturing and Distribution

Distribution Planning and Control

Transportation/Fleet Management

Route Planning

Dispatching

Warehouse Management

Automated Warehousing and Materials Handling

Inventory and Distribution Management and Control

Manufacturing Planning and Control

Material/Process Requirements Planning, Production and Process Management

Shop Floor Planning and Control

CAM/Automated Assembly

Manufacturing Engineering Tools

Other Planning and Control

Simulation

Robot Programming and Simulation

Quality Assurance

Detection and Tracking

Fault Management/Adaptive

Control

Test and Measurement

Inspection

Machine Vision

Others

Real-Time Data Acquisition and Control

Simulation

C3i

Others

Building Automation

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ORGANIZATIONAL -

Others (Continued)

Traffic Control

Railroad Control

Power Grid Control

Water Quality and Sewage Control

Atmospheric Monitoring

ENTERTAINMENT-

INDUSTRY SPECIFIC

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User Environment

The user environment segmentation is based on industry classifications derived from a format that reflects the United States Department of

Commerce's Standard Industrial Classification (SIC) code scheme and the International Standard Industrial Classification of all economic activities used by the United Nations.

Environments are a description of where a product is used ultimately.

The major user environments as defined by Dataquest are as follows:

• Home

• Business

• Education

• Government

Dataquest has a classification scheme available at the two-, three-, and four-digit SIC levels, which can be provided on request.

The segmentation represents Dataquest's view of the high-technology marketplace and is not intended to represent the availability of data.

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User Environment

H O M E

BUSINESS

Natural Resources and Construction

Agricultural Production—Crops

Agricultural Production—Livestock

Agricultural Services

Forestry

Fishing, Hunting, and Trapping

Metal Mining

Coal Mining

Oil and Gas Extraction

Nonmetallic Minerals, except Fuels

General Building Contractors

Heavy Construction, except Building

Special Trade Contractors

Process Manufacturing

Food and Kindred Products

Tobacco Products

Textile Mill Products

Lumber Wood Products

Paper and Allied Products

Printing and Publishing

Chemicals Allied Products

Petroleum and Coal Products

Rubber and Miscellaneous Plastics Products

Leather and Leather Products

Stone, Clay, and Glass Products

Primary Metal Industries

Discrete Manufacturing

Apparel and Other Textile Products

Furniture and Fixtures

Fabricated Metal Products

Industrial Machinery and Equipment

Electronic and Other Electric Equipment

Instruments and Related Products

The segmentation represents Dataquest^s view of the high-technology marketplace and is not intended to represent the availability of data.

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BUSINESS

Discrete Manufacturing (Continued)

Miscellaneous Manufacturing Industries

Transportation Equipment

Transportation

Railroad Transportation

Local and Interurban Passenger Transit

Trucking and Warehousing

Water Transportation

Transportation by Air

Pipelines, except Natural Gas

Transportation Services

Communication

Communication

Utilities

Electric, Gas, and Sanitary Services

Wholesale Trade, Durable Goods

Wholesale Trade—Durable Goods

Wholesale Trade, Nondurable Goods

Wholesale Trade—Nondurable Goods

Retail Trade

Building Materials and Garden Supplies

General Merchandise Stores

Food Stores

Automotive Dealers and Service Stations

Apparel and Accessory Stores

Furniture and Home Furnishings Stores

Eating and Drinking Places

Miscellaneous Retail

Finance

Depository Institutions

Nondepository Institutions

Security and Commodity Brokers

Insurance

Insurance Carriers

Insurance Agents, Brokers, and Service

Real Estate

Real Estate

Holding and Other Investment Offices

Hotels And Other Lodging

Hotels and Other Lodging

The segmentation represents Dataquest's view of the high-technology marketplace and is not intended to represent the availability of data.

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High-Technology Guide Segmentation 71

BUSINESS

Business Services

Business Services

Legal Services

Health Care

Health Services

Other Services

Personal Services

Auto Repair, Services, and Parking

Miscellaneous Repair Services

Motion Pictures

Amusement And Recreation Services

Social Services

Museums, Botanical, Zoological Gardens

Membership Organizations

Engineering and Management Services

Services, NEC

EDUCATION-

Elementary

Secondary

Higher Education

Four-Year Institution

Tw0-Year Institution

Public

Private

GOVERNMENT

Government by Function

Executive, Legislative, and General

Justice, Public Order, and Safety

Finance, Taxation, And Monetary Policy

Administration of Human Resources

Environmental Quality and Housing

Administration of Economic Programs

National Security and International Affairs

Government

Federal

State

Local

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SIZE (BUSINESS, EDUCATION, GOVERNMENT)

Revenue (Millions of U.S. dollars)

0 to 99.9

100 to 499.9

500 to 999.9

1 to 4.9

5 to 9.9

10 to 49.9

50+

Employees

Small

0 to 9

10 to 19

20 to 49

Medium

50 to 99

100 to 249

Large

250 to 499

500 to 999

1,000+

The segmentation represents Dataquest's view of the high-technology marketplace and is not intended to represent the availability of data.

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Research Items

The research items segmentation is a listing of general terms used by

Data quest to organize, describe, and analyze data for technology markets and industries. A typical use of research items is to describe market data in terms of shipments, retirements, and installed base.

The segmentation represents Dataquest's view of the high-technology marketplace and is not intended to represent the availability of data.

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High-Technology Guide Segmentation

Research Items

Application

Assembler

Average Selling Price

Average Usage

Average Volume

Balance of Trade

Bit

Byte

Capital Spending

Captive Production

Compound Growth Rate

Consumption

Conversion Revenue

Cost

End User

End-User Average Selling Price

End-User Revenue

Environment

Export

Factory Average Selling Price

Factory Revenue

Gross Lease Additions

If-Sold Value

Import

Industry

Input/Output (I/O) Ratio

Installed Base

Internal Transfer

Inventory

Joint Venture

Lease

Lease/Rental Conversions

List Price

Manufacturer

Manufacturer's Suggested Retail Price

Market

Market Share

Markup

Merchant Production

Net Additions

New Placement Demand

Placement

Product

Product Category

Production

Replacement Demand

Research and Development

Residual Value

Retirement

Return

Revenue

Shipment

Subsidiary

Tie Ratio

Unit

Useful Life

Users per System

Year-Average Population

75

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The segmentation represents Dataquest's view ot the high-technology marketplace and is not intended to represent the availability of data.

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High-Technology Guide Glossary

Glossary

This glossary includes definitions of the major terms associated with

Dataquest's segmentation of the high-technology marketplace.

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High-Technology Guide Glossary 79

III-V discrete semiconductor. 1: A semiconductor device with low noise, low power, and high power in the range of one-half watt to one watt.

2: A device of gate structures based on D-MES-

FET and E/D MESFET devices.

add-on graphics board, Mac-type. Personal computers that were designed to run applications exclusively through a graphical user interface

(i.e., windows, menus, and icons). Mac-type systems include Apple's Macintosh series (512E,

Plus, SE, and II), Atari's ST series (524 and

1024), and Commodore's Amiga. This term also refers to peripherals intended for use in Mac-type systems.

academic support. College expenditures that include expenditures for support services that are an integral part of the institution's primary missions of instruction, research, or public service.

Includes expenditures for libraries, galleries, audio/visual services, academic computing support, auxiliary support, academic administration, personnel development, and course and curriculum development.

add-on memory board. A printed circuit board populated with memory integrated circuits (IC), usually DRAMs or SRAMs, that plugs into personal computers via connectors on the central processing unit bus. These boards are used to increase central processing unit storage capacity.

AEC. See architecture, engineering, and

construction.

accounting software. 1: A software application that supports a system of recording and summarizing business and financial transactions and analyzing, verifying, and reporting results. 2: A software application used to manage an organization's money and/or assets. This type of software includes general ledger, accounts payable/receivable, and inventory control.

aerial. See antenna.

AGVS. See automatic guided vehicle system.

AI. See artificial intelligence.

air conditioner. 1: An apparatus for controlling the temperature and humidity of air. 2: A broad field including numerous processes, among which are refrigeration, heating, ventilation and humidification, and electronic air filtering.

accounts payable (AP). An application that supports the accounts payable function, which is the amount owed by a business to its suppliers and other regular trading partners.

accounts receivable (AR). An application that supports the accounts receivable function, which is the amount owed to a business by its customers.

aircraft system (military). Electronic power devices used in airplanes to perform functions like flight control, communication and navigation, lighting computer system (including air data, mission and fire control), engine control, instrumentation, integral targeting system, associated test system, and integrated system.

ACD. See automatic call distributor.

adaptive control. 1: The property of a control system that allows it autonomously to maintain a manufacturing or process environment within predetermined control limits. 2: A device with parameters that adjust automatically to compensate for changes in the dynamics of the process to be controlled.

alarm system. A system designed to warn of an intrusion, a fire, or other undesired occurrence.

Alarm systems have three functions in common: detection, control, and annunciation signaling.

alphanumeric CRT controller. A character set of both letters and numbers that is used to control electron beams, which are used to present data in a visual form.

add-on graphics board. A graphics board that is added to a basic computer to enhance the computer's current graphic capability.

alphanumeric CRT terminal. A display terminal that provides character information to the operator.

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amateur radio. A radio used for two-way radio communications by private individuals. It is not used for enterprise activity. pass through a phone when a user is unable to pick up the telephone.

AMH. See automated materials handling.

amplifier IC. A linear IC that provides a voltage or power gain to an applied signal.

antenna. 1: A conductor or system of conductors that serves to radiate or intercept energy in the form of electromagnetic waves. 2: A device for transmitting or receiving radio waves. Also called aerial.

analog. 1: Representation of data by means of continuously variable physical quantities, such as voltage, current, or frequency. 2: A circuit or system in which the output signals bear a continuous relationship to the input signals. 3: A representation of an event in another form, e.g., the representation of voice sounds as continuously variable electrical signals.

AP. See accounts payable.

appliance. 1: An instrument or device designed for a specific household or office purpose. 2: A piece of equipment for adapting a tool or machine to a special purpose.

application. The use to which a product is put; the function it performs.

analog design verification. A software application that includes analog simulation, analog synthesis, monte carlo analysis, worst-case analysis, and parametric plotting.

application software. A software program or set of programs designed for a specific application, such as inventory control or linear programming.

analog loop. A nondigital portion of the telecommunications network.

application-specific integrated circuit (ASIC).

A single-user IC that is manufactured using vendor-supplied tools and/or libraries. (May be sold by an ASIC or standard-product group.)

analog panel meter. 1: An electrical switchboard or instrument board with continuously variable electrical signals known as analog signals. 2: A mounting plate for the controls and/or other parts of equipment, utilizing analog signals.

application utilities. A software application that enhances the operation of other standalone applications; Typically operates concurrently with these standalone applications.

analysis. Separation of a whole into its parts; proof of a mathematical proposition by assuming the result and deducing a valid statement by a series of reversible steps. Includes mass properties, kinematic and dynamic mechanism analysis, structural, thermal, composite, fluids, and vibration analysis. Finite element and finite difference are common analysis technologies used.

analytical and scientific instrument. Instruments used to measure, access, control, and monitor objects and systems.

AR. See accounts receivable.

architectural. Computer-aided tools intended for use in design and drafting of facilities' architectural aspects.

architecture, engineering, and construction

(AEC). The use of computer-aided tools by architects, contractors, plant engineers, civil engineers, and others associated with these disciplines to aid in designing and managing buildings, industrial plants, ships, and other types of nondiscrete entities.

animation. A software application to present either continuous pictures or images or to present them in rapid succession.

arc-welding robot systems. A system in which a robot carries an arc-welding torch to produce welds.

answering machine. A device, hooked to a telephone, that can record and play messages as they

argon. An inert gas extensively used in discharge tubes.

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artificial intelligence (AI). The ability of a machine to perform functions normally associated with human intelligence, such as learning, adapting, reasoning, self-correcting, and improving automatically.

ASCII. Standardized coding for alphanumeric and other standard keyboard characters.

attendant console. A specialized telephone instrument that allows fast and efficient answering and routing of telephone calls.

audio amplifier. A device that uses transistors or vacuum tubes to obtain voltage, current, or power to amplify sound.

ASIC. See application-specific integrated circuit.

audio conferencing. The ability to communicate among more than two people at one time via a speakerphone or the telephone system/network.

ASP. See average selling price.

AS/RS. See automated storage/retrieval

system.

assembler. A company that adds manufacturing value to a product.

audio equipment. Amplifiers, preamplifiers, control consoles, and other equipment used in studio, broadcast, and home environments. Equipment interprets frequencies corresponding to audible sound waves.

assembly. 1: A group of subassemblies and/or parts that, when put together, create a major subdivision of the final product. When two or more components or subassemblies are put together by the application of labor and machine hours, it is called an assembly. An assembly may be an end product or a component for a higher-level assembly. 2: The semiconductor manufacturing steps of mounting a die in a package, bonding the pads to the package leads, and sealing the package.

automated assembly system. The assembly of parts into subassemblies and/or complete assemblies using programmable equipment that may include robots. In discrete piece manufacturing, this system includes spot- and arc-welding and adhesives. In electronics, this system includes component placement and printed board component insertion. Usually, these automated assembly systems include sensors.

assembly verification. The integration of various component designs into an assembly to test size/ shape and functional characteristics.

asynchronous telecommunications software. A software application that emulates a standard computer terminal (e.g., DEC VT-100) and performs file transfer between asynchronously connected computers and/or provides remote operation of another computer.

automated guided vehicle system (AGVS). An unmanned mobile transporter under programmable control that moves materials and tooling throughout a factory and/or warehouse. Includes towing vehicles, pallet trucks, light-load transporters, unit-load transporters, and self-loading and unloading vehicles.

ATE. See automatic test equipment.

ATM. See automated teller machine.

automated materials handling (AMH). The automated handling of discrete or bulk materials in manufacturing systems. Materials handling includes the movement, storage, identification, and controlling of materials.

atmospheric monitoring. A real-time software application that monitors weather-related data from satellites and other monitoring sites around the world.

atmospheric/purge cylinder gas. A specialty gas; a cylinder gas for purging certain processing systems and equipment when manufacturers are concerned about possible back contamination of the house lines.

automated storage/retrieval system (AS/RS).

All computer hardware, software, and equipment that are used together for mechanical hoists and carriages and that interface with racks and bins for automatic storage and retrieval of unit loads, pallets, and individual parts. An AS/RS moves materials from inventory to operations and back to inventory, frequently for work-in-process inventory.

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automated teller machine (ATM). A machine used by financial institutions and designed to perform many of the banking functions performed by human tellers. (See also funds transfer

terminal.)

facility. An AWS includes a control system and associated material-handling equipment and structures, but excludes the building unless it is a structural part of the automated system. The control system includes both hardware and software.

automatic blood analyzer. Equipment used to analyze, detect, and decipher blood types and blood-related diseases.

automatic call distributor (ACD). A computerbased system located at a customer's premises that: (1) provides real-time monitoring of a telephone system's work load; (2) distributes calls to the agent who is idle longest; and (3) uses a queuing or waiting list assignment that holds the callers in queue until an agent is available, averages the random flow of traffic, and decreases peak traffic load. An ACD also contains features known as gates or agent split groups that provide functional divisions within the routing scheme and allow calls to be directed to a specific group or agent.

automation. The system or technique of the production process that minimizes human intervention. Self-controlled machines are used to accomplish human tasks or tasks not able to be accomplished by human intervention.

average selling price (ASP). The average price of a product, inclusive of any discounts. (See also

end-user ASP and factory ASP. )

average usage. The average number of units of product used per unit of time.

average volume. The average number of units of product produced per unit of time.

awarded contract. A binding agreement granted to a specific company.

automatic photoresist processing equipment

(colloquial: track). Equipment used to dispense and process photoresist material onto a wafer.

Track equipment, as this equipment is usually called, includes wafer clean/bake, wafer prime, wafer coat/bake, wafer develop/bake, and resist stabilization equipment.

automatic test equipment (ATE). Computercontrolled equipment that inspects electronic devices, both active and passive. ATE usually includes analytical and statistical data-reduction capabilities and can document test results by display, hard copy, and electronic storage. ATE can perform printed circuit board (PCB) inspection by mechanical, electrical, and visual means in an automatic, programmable mode. ATE includes both bare boards and boards that have been loaded with electronic devices. In the latter case, diagnostic capabilities are included as a part of the system definition if they are part of the equipment.

AWS. See automatic warehousing system.

B

balance of trade. 1: The difference between the value of a country's exports and imports of tangible goods over a given period, usually one year.

2: The difference between the value of a country or region's exports of tangible goods to and imports of tangible goods from a second country or region.

banking system. Systems used in the banking/ finance industries to facilitate the transmission of funds to improve efficiencies. Systems include: payroll allocation and deduction; demand deposit accounting; savings, both regular and certificates of deposit; and loan processes.

baseband modem. A type of modem that utilizes all of the available analog bandwidth on a line.

automatic warehousing system (AWS). A dedicated storage and retrieval system that is used not on the factory floor but in a warehouse that may or may not be located within a manufacturing

basic exchange telecommunications radio

system (BETRS). A radio system network that provides cost-effective basic telephone service within remote areas.

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benefits administration. A software application with the primary function of administering and aiding in managing an organization's employee benefits.

bipolar transistor. A transistor that uses positiveand negative-charge carriers. Bipolar transistors provide current gain—that is, a current input results in a larger current output.

BETRS. See basic exchange telecommunica-

tions radio system.

BiCMOS. Bipolar complementary metal oxide semiconductor. See BiMOS.

bit. Abbreviation for binary digit. A unit of information equal to one binary decision, or the designation of one of two possible and equally likely values or states of anything used to store or convey information.

BiMOS (BiCMOS). Bipolar metal oxide semiconductor (MOS). An integrated circuit (IC) manufactured with both bipolar and MOS processes that yields a component with the benefits of both technologies.

black-and-white television. Television in which the reproduced picture is displayed in shades of gray between black and white. Also known as monochrome television.

bipolar. 1: A semiconductor technology employing two junction transistors. 2: A device in which both majority and minority carriers are present. A transistor structure with electrical properties determined within the silicon material.

bipolar application-specific IC. See applica-

tion-specific integrated circuit.

board-level computer. A single, or multiple, board-level CPU that is sold individually or incorporated in systems-level products (boxes). Typically, these are products that are not considered complete packaged systems. Prices range from the low hundreds to the low thousands of dollars.

Frequently, software is bundled with the board for a specific application.

bipolar cell-based IC. See cell-based integrated

circuit. bipolar custom IC. See custom integrated circuit.

body control. Electronic equipment used to direct, manage, or guide an automobile or truck.

Examples include electronic suspension, cruise control, intermittent wipers, load-sensitive braking, antitheft devices, electronic steering, and electronic mufflers.

bipolar digital logic. See logic circuit.

book publishing software. Software with the main purpose/use of printing books or written or

microcomponent.

bipolar FPGA. See field-programmable gate

array.

boring programmable machine tool. A factory tool designed to machine internal work such as cylinders, holes, and castings.

bipolar gate array. See gate array.

bipolar memory. See memory.

bipolar nonvolatile memory. See nonvolatile

memory.

bipolar PLA. See programmable logic array.

bipolar PLD. See programmable logic device.

bipolar PMD. See programmable multilevel

logic device. bipolar standard logic. See standard logic.

broadband communications. Communications that utilize a bandwidth greater than a voice-grade circuit.

broadcast. 1: The transmission of packets on a contention bus where all data are heard by all devices on the channel and are selected by each device through address-recognition techniques.

2: To send messages or to communicate simultaneously with many or all points on a circuit.

3: The transmission of radio frequencies from a source to all devices that are capable of receiving the signal. Microwave transmission is one method of transmission. 4: Radio or television transmission intended for public reception.

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broadcast and studio equipment. Equipment used to make information public by means of radio or television.

broadcast transmitter antenna. An electronic device for generating and amplifying a radiofrequency carrier for transmission through space from an antenna.

C^I. See command, control, communications,

and intelligence.

cable. An assembly of one or more conductors within an enveloping protective sheath, constructed to permit the use of the conductors singly or in groups.

bubble memory. A storage medium that allows information to be stored on magnetically charged crystal chips. Bubble memories can hold data without electricity to sustain them; blackouts, changes in current, and static charges do not affect them. Such memories process material

75 times as fast as disk memories. However, bubble memory processors cannot handle multiprogramming, i.e., performing parallel operations with several programs.

cable television equipment. All equipment for both the head and subscriber ends of a cable television system.

cache. A fast, small memory (typically SRAM) used to enhance CPU performance, separate from main processor memory.

cache controller. A device that governs the area of a system that stores only data the system may need in the immediate future.

budgeting. An application that supports future resource planning.

building automation. A software application with the primary functions of managing the operations of a facility, including fire detection, energy management, and alarm systems. Large manufacturing plants and skyscrapers use real-time computers to control and monitor conditions. This may include fire detection and control systems; security systems; clocking, documenting, and energy management for heating, ventilation, and air conditioning.

CAD. See computer-aided design, drawing, or

drafting.

CAE. See electronic computer-aided

engineering and mechanical computer-aided

engineering.

CAGR. See compound annual growth rate.

calculator. A device capable of performing logical and arithmetical digital operations of any kind.

calendaring. 1: An application to support the scheduling of meetings and other events. It is usually a tickler file, reminding people of upcoming commitments. 2: In the papering industry, paper with a hard, smooth finish.

bulk gas. A discrete delivery of gas in a liquid state.

bundled distribution and warehouse package.

Hardware and/or software modules used for planning and control of warehouse or product distribution systems. These packages are not available separately from the total warehouse or distribution system.

business. A commercial or mercantile environment usually referred to as a vertical market. See

"User Environment" section.

call management systems. The equipment and service that records the calling activity of a centrex, PBX, or key telephone system in order to generate reports that support telephone cost allocation and other telephone management information needs.

call processing equipment. Call processing equipment provides additional functions and capabilities beyond traditional call processing.

This classification includes add-on products such as voice-messaging systems, call accounting systems, and automatic call distributors.

byte. 1: A single group of eight bits processed together. 2: The number of bits that a computer processes.

CAM. See computer-aided manufacturing.

capacitor. A commonly used component that stores electrical energy. It is sometimes referred to as a condenser.

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capital assets. An application that assists a company in managing its capital assets, which are any physical property or right that is owned and has a money value.

capital spending. The purchase of a capital asset or an asset that is needed to create a product and is acquired with the intention of keeping (rather than being resold).

CAT scanner. A computerized axial tomography—frequently shortened to CT. A reconstructive imaging technique employing an X-ray source and array of detectors rotated about the body of the patient. The host computer calculates an image based on the appearance of a thin volume in the plane of the rotation.

CBIC. See cell-based integrated circuit.

captive production. The sale of a good to a division within the manufacturing company.

CCD. See charge-coupled device.

carrier equipment. A cable-based system that provides transmission of multiple signals over a common metallic or fiber-optic cable. This segment includes subscriber carrier systems, trunk carrier systems, Basic Exchange Transmission

Radio (BETR) systems, and repeaters.

CCIT. A French acronym for the International

Telegraph and Telephone Consultative Committee, a committee of the international standards organization made up of telecommunication authorities of member countries. The committee's primary purpose is to develop and produce standards for telecommunication networks.

cartography. An application that supports map production and/or resource management. May contain a spatially indexed data structure.

CCME. See computational chemistry/molecular engineering.

CCTV. See closed circuit television.

cartridge tape drive. A tape drive that uses a special metal and plastic protective device for the tape, which can be used for 1/4-inch or 1/2-inch tape products.

CD. See critical dimension and compact disc.

CD-ROM (compact disc read-only memory).

See CD-ROM disc drive.

CASE. See

CD-ROM disc drive. All CD-ROM discs are

engineering.

4.7 inches (12cm) in diameter, have a 1.6-microinch-pitch single-spiral track, and have 2.048 data

cash register. A device that automatically regisbytes per sector. ters visibly the amount of a specific sale. Many are used to trace inventory and other product information through the sale of the product.

cell-based integrated circuit (CBIC). An ASIC device that is customized using a full set of photomasks and uses automatic placement of cells and automatic routing.

cassette tape drive. A tape drive that uses a small container of tape similar to that used for commercial audio recording purposes.

cellular handset. See cellular telephone.

cellular service. One type of mobile communications, where a low-power radio is used between limited-distance "cells."

cathode ray tube (CRT). A television-like display screen which, on receipt of information bearing electronic signals, produces a visual display of the information (text, graphics). The

CRT consists of a vacuum tube display in which a beam of electrons is projected onto a fluorescent surface of phosphors, producing a visual display.

Used in most computer display terminals. Also referred to as video display terminal/visual display tube (VDT).

cellular telephone. Mobile radio equipment associated with cellular radio services.

central office ( C O ) . l : The physical location that contains the equipment that supports the telephone network. 2: The switching equipment that connects local access lines to toll circuits.

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central office switching equipment. Equipment comprised of electronic systems that interconnect local telephone lines (loops) and connect local telephone lines to long distance trunk lines. and a receiving channel or a combined sending and receiving channel. 3: A transmission path between two or more points.

central processing unit (CPU). A microprocessor or microcontroller. Central processing unit of a computer.

centrex. An optional service that provides voice/ data switching by using the utility's central office.

CISC MPU. See complex-instruction-set com-

puting microprocessor.

citizens band: mobile and base. A frequency band allocated for private individual radio service (460 to 470 megahertz or 26.965 to

27.405 megahertz).

charge-coupled device (CCD). ICs that combine charge-coupled signal transfer with arrays of photosensors to provide image sensing. CCDs are available as linear or area arrays.

civil aerospace. Civilian travel in space.

civil aircraft flight system. Same as military aircraft, except related to civilian activity.

chart. Any table, graph, or drawing depicting a range of technical data.

civil application. A software application used for civil engineering tasks, typically for design and drafting of sites for buildings, streets, highways, bridges, dams, airports, and utilities.

chart and map generation. A graphics software application that is designed specifically for charts and predefined maps.

chemistry. 1: An application to support the science deahng with the composition structure and properties of substances and with the transformations that they undergo. 2: Chemical processes and phenomena.

civilian space. Equipment used by civilians to explore the earth's atmosphere. Includes satellites, reconnaissance equipment, and ground control equipment.

check-handling system. A system to improve the speed and accuracy of check-handling processes within the banking and finance industries.

chemical vapor deposition (CVD). A formation of a stable compound on a heated substrate by thermal reaction or decomposition of gaseous compounds. A process that chemically isolates and deposits a specific material on a wafer. CVD equipment includes atmospheric-pressure CVD

(APCVD), plasma-enhanced CVD (PECVD), and low-pressure CVD (LPCVD) techniques.

Historically, the CVD market was split into

APCVD, PECVD, and LPCVD technologies, because each had its own applications. Now, because of advanced reactors that are crossing application boundaries, it makes more sense to divide the market by film application rather than by equipment technology.

civil navigation/communication. Same as military navigation/communications, except related to civilian activity.

civil radar. Same as military radar, except related to civilian activity.

civil simulation and training. Same as military simulation and training, except related to civilian activity.

closed circuit television (CCTV). A television system where television signals are not broadcast, but are transmitted over a closed circuit and received by interconnected receivers.

CMOS. See complementary MOS.

CO. See central office.

coaxial cable. Type of transmission cable with one or more central conductors, surrounded by an insulator.

CODEC. See coder/decoder circuit.

circuit. 1: The electrical path between two or more points. 2: A means of two-way communication between two points, consisting of a sending

coder/decoder circuit. An integrated circuit that codes a voice signal into a binary waveform or decodes a binary waveform into a voice signal.

Such circuits now are used in digital communications applications.

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college. A postsecondary school that offers general or liberal arts education, usually leading to an associate, bachelor's, master's, doctor's, or first professional degree. Junior colleges and community colleges are included under this category.

communication peripheral. An interface device for machine-to-machine connections.

compact disc (CD). A disc from which data are read optically by means of a laser.

color prepress. A process that converts visual material to electronic signals.

color separation. A process of photographing objects using three filters, each corresponding in color and light transmission to one of the additive primary colors; analogous to seeing.

compact disc player. 1: A recording and playback. system used to play recorded music by means of a small plastic optical disc similar to multiplex stereo broadcast and reception. Each wall of the record groove carries a single channel of information. 2: A recording device in which the sounds are mechanically impressed onto a disc.

color television. An electronic system that transmits signals to a visual image that can be viewed in an array of colors on a screen.

comparator. A type of amplifier that produces a logic output (1 or 0) based on comparison of an input voltage with a fixed reference voltage. A widely used form of linear integrated circuit.

combined elementary and secondary school. A school that encompasses instruction at both the elementary and secondary levels. Examples of combined elementary and secondary school grade spans would be 1 through 12 or 5 through 12.

combined PCB tester. Testing equipment that combines functional and in-circuit test techniques and capabilities that result in a test strategy to suit any given board's production history and fault spectrum to achieve the highest board fault coverage at the lowest cost.

command, control, communications, and intel-

ligence (C^I). Systems used to display the ongoing status of tactical or strategic operations in dynamic scenarios for rapid decision making.

commercial antenna. See antenna.

compiler. 1: Computer routine that translates symbolic instructions to machine instructions and replaces certain items with subroutines. 2: An automatic coding system in a computer that generates and assembles a program from instructions written by a programmer. 3: A computer language system consisting of various subroutines that have been evaluated and computed into one routine handled by a computer. 4: Software used to convert application programs from computer language to machine language.

complementary MOS. A semiconductor technology that uses both P-channel and N-channel transistors on the same silicon substrate to gain the primary advantages of very low power and high noise immunity.

commercial meteorological and general-

purpose instrument. Equipment used to obtain quantitative information about the weather.

communication. 1: The transmission of information from one point or person or equipment to another. 2: The sensing of a measurement signal or phenomenon for display, recording, amplification, transmission, computing, or processing into useful information.

communication management. The organization of stations, peripherals, and devices capable of intercommunications but not necessarily on the same channel.

complex-instruction-set computing (CISC) mi-

croprocessor. The number of instructions a microprocessor runs for a specific application.

Known as a general-purpose processor.

component. An assembly, device, or piece of equipment that is part of a larger assembly or system.

component design. Design of the individual components in an assembly.

composite analysis. The analysis of composite materials (such as carbon fiber) as they change in the manufacturing process and are used in the final assembly.

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compound annual growth rate (CAGR). The average rate of growth compounded over a specified period. The formula used to calculate

CAGR is:

computer storage tape media. Long, thin, flexible tape appropriate for digital magnetic recording and storage of computer data.

/ Value in period

\ Value in period i^yo..

computer system. A combination of hardware, software, firmware, and peripheral components that has been assembled to satisfy a particular goal or set of goals.

computational chemistry/molecular engineer-

ing (CCME). The use of computers to model molecular structures, to predict physical properties of molecules, and to design new compounds for specific purposes.

computer-aided design (CAD). Systems that function as tools to expedite mechanical and electronic design. Most CAD systems consist of a graphics computer terminal linked with a computer and a software package with features that aid in design and drafting, keep track of parts, run simulations, and provide illustrated parts or circuit diagrams. Programs complete the layout, geometric transformations, projections, rotations, magnifications, and interval (cross-sectional) views of a part and its relationship with other parts.

computer systems performance segments. The following are Dataquest segments for computer systems performance: Level I—low-performance minicomputers, microcomputers, and personal computers; Level II—medium-performance minicomputers and microcomputers, very low end workstations, and high-end personal computers;

Level III—low-performance superminis, midrange workstations, and high-performance minicomputers; Level IV—midrange superminis, lowend mainframes, and high-end workstations;

Level V—high-performance superminis and midrange mainframes; Level VI—low-end supercomputers and very high performance superminis; and Level VII—supercomputers and high-end mainframes.

computer-aided manufacturing (CAM). The use of computers to program, direct, and control production equipment in the fabrication of manufactured items.

computer to PBX interface/digital multiplex

interface (CPI/DMI). Two different standards for communication between systems.

computer-aided software engineering (CASE).

A combination of artificial intelligence and structured programming techniques used to aid in the development of large software programs.

computer to plate. A process that merges type and black-and-white images and combines the functions of typesetting, camera photography, and contact platemaking.

computerized energy control system. A system with the resources for producing heat, electricity, and/or power and the capability of running on computers.

conceptual design. An application that supports styling, industrial design, and other design applications emphasizing visualization, aesthetic, and ergonomic considerations.

connector. A device used to join or fasten transistors, establishing a relationship between active and passive devices.

computer plotter. A visual display on which a dependent variable is graphed by an automatically controlled pen or pencil or other image development device/technique as a function of one or more variables. See also plotter.

consortium. An international business agreement; an association or society.

consumable. Material that is capable of being consumed.

computer storage media. The substance upon which data are stored electronically. Media may be flexible disks, rigid disks, tape, or optical disks.

consumer electronics. The application of electronics in consumer equipment.

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consumer integrated circuit (IC). An analog circuit that meets specific consumer end-market applications. These circuits are dedicated to specific applications, such as audio or radio, and would not be used for general purpose.

cordless telephony. The transmission of speech or other information via radio, enabling two persons to converse over almost any distance without a connecting cord to a base unit.

consumer N.E.C. Consumer equipment not elsewhere classified.

consumer radio. A device used by the general public for communication by electromagnetic waves transmitted through space to produce sound.

corporate publishing. Publishing that supports the main business of an organization or person; printed and published products are produced in the normal course of operations, but not as a primary source of revenue.

consumption. The markets' purchase and use of goods and services, including lease or rental.

contract administration. The management of agreements between a company and its vendors and/or customers.

corporate supercomputer. An information system priced at more than $2 million. Performance speed is more than 200 mflops; current upper limit is approximately 2 Gflops. Currently used mainly for batch applications, but the trend is toward interactive use. Optimized for very heavy, numerically intensive applications. Requires special environmental controls and cooling techniques.

cost. The expenditure necessary to produce a product.

contract maintenance service. Ongoing repair services based on agreed upon terms and conditions (such as hours of coverage and level of services) as stipulated in a written agreement between the customer and the service provider.

cost accounting. An application that supports a branch of accounting that is concerned with the collection, determination, and control of costs, particularly those costs associated with producing products or services.

controller. A device or group of devices that serve to govern, in some predetermined manner, the electric power delivered to the apparatus to which it is connected.

counter/timer circuit. A circuit that receives uniform pulses representing units to be counted and provides a voltage proportional to their frequency.

controller board. A printed circuit board that provides programmable logic that controls the sequence of operations of the functional stages of a peripheral device.

conversion revenue. The revenue generated by changing from an equipment rental contract to a purchase or lease contract.

counting device. A device register or location in computer storage for storing numbers or number representations in a manner that permits these numbers to be increased or decreased by the value of another number or to be changed or reset to zero or to an arbitrary value.

CPE. See customer premise equipment.

coordinate measuring machine. Machine used to measure the physical dimensions of a part.

CPI/DMI. See computer to PBX interface/digi-

tal multiplex interface.

CPU. See central processing unit.

copier. A reproduction device designed to produce replicas of hard-copy originals. Copiers may use either an analog or a digital scanning system.

coprocessor. A logic device that operates in association with a microprocessor to enhance system performance. Coprocessors are not capable of independent operation.

critical dimension (CD). Refers to a line, element, or feature that must be manufactured and controlled to very tight specifications.

CRT. See cathode ray tube.

CT2. See digital cordless telephone.

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custom/contract programming. Programming services that include applications development and software systems conversions. updating, and retrieving information stored as data items, commonly referred to as data files.

customer management. A software application used to maintain lists of purchasers of a company's products and services.

database publishing. A system with the main purpose/use of printing the ordered collections of data.

data capture. A process that takes possession or control of information.

customer premise equipment (CPE). Telecommunication equipment used at an end user's location, as compared with use at the local telephone utility.

data center. A program designed primarily to acquire, analyze, process, store, retrieve, and disseminate one or more types of data.

customer training/education service. Activities designed to instruct customers in the installation, usage, programming, management, and maintenance of hardware, software, and networking products.

data center construction/relocation services.

Services in which a vendor performs or manages the contracting of site management services including the design and building of a customer's data center and/or the relocation and installation of customer's equipment.

custom integrated circuit. A handcrafted, single-user integrated circuit that is customized using a full set of photomasks and requires manual placement and routing. Can be either bipolar or

MOS technology process.

datacom equipment. See data communications

equipment (DCE).

CVD. See chemical vapor deposition.

D

daisywheel. See printwheel.

DAT. See digital audiotape.

data communications equipment (DCE). Equipment used for transmitting data between points of origin and reception. It includes products such as modems, statistical multiplexers, T-1 multiplexers, front-end processors, data PBX systems, data network management systems, DSU/CSU equipment, local area networks, and private packet data switching equipment.

data acquisition and control. See real-time

data acquisition and control.

data converter. An integrated circuit that changes alternating current to direct current or direct current to alternating current.

database. The entire body of data that has to do with one or more related subjects. Typically, it consists of a collection of data files stored in a computer system.

data creation. The process of producing or originating information.

database administration. A control program function that provides access to data sets, enforcement of data storage conventions, and regulation of the use of input/output devices.

data network management system. A product or device that diagnoses, isolates, reinstates, or accumulates information for network components or provides reports and analysis of network performance.

database management system (DBMS). 1: A software application that provides storage maintenance functions for data stored in sequential, hierarchical, relational, or object format. Example of DBMS products include FOCUS (hierarchical), Ingres (relational), and GBASE (object oriented). 2: A systematic approach to storing,

data PBX system. A digital private branch exchange system that allows terminals to switch and contend for computer ports by providing

RS-232-C connections. This system does not provide voice switching. Data PBX base units and add-on channels also are included in this classification.

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data processing (DP). 1: The preparation of source media that contain data or basic elements of information and the handling of such data according to precise rules of procedures to accomplish such operations as classifying, sorting, calculating, summarizing, recording, and computing.

2: The handling of information in a sequence of reasonable operations. execution technique from scalar processors, such as mainframe computers and superminicomputers, and is typically configured as a uniprocessor rather than a parallel processor. Typical environment is a "cool room" with a raised floor and/or an ordinary office with no special environmental controls. Number of concurrent users typically ranges from 10 to 50.

data service unit (DSU) and channel service

unit (CSU). These provide an interface to digital services, such as the AT&T Dataphone Digital

Service (DDS).

deposition. The layering of various chemicals on a wafer. The introduction of dopant to wafers in high-temperature furnaces, chemical vapor deposition (CVD), sputtering, and implant.

data storage device. A product designed to hold data until needed. Storage devices are rated by technology (rigid, flexible, and optical disk drives and tape drives), physical size in inches (diameter for rigid and flexible disk drives, width for tape drives), and capacity in bytes. (See also disk

drive, tape drive.)

deposit/loan management. An application that facilitates the control and earning potential of loans and deposits.

design layout. An initial design process in which the major components and part interfaces are defined.

data translation. 1: A device that transforms computer information to data from one language to another language without affecting the meaning. 2: To change one binary word to another.

DBMS. See database management system.

desk-side personal computer. The desk-side personal computer meets all the qualifications listed for desktop personal computers but is further defined as being a personal computer that has been specifically designed to be placed next to or under the computer operating or desk surface, including foot/stand on bottom of system.

DCE. See data communications equipment.

dealer. 1: Independent businesses selling products under contract to one or more vendors. 2: A product reseller selling to end users. A dealer's primary added value is distribution; secondary added values are service, training, and support.

desktop personal computer. The desktop computer classification includes all personal computers except those products that are designed and sold as local area network servers, desk-side personal computers, and all forms of portable computers. Further, these systems are based on keyboard input devices.

defibrillator. An electronic instrument used for stopping spontaneous, local contraction of muscle fibers (fibrillation) during a heart attack by applying controlled electronic pulses to the heart muscles.

desktop publishing. 1: Generalized computing platforms used to perform electronic publishing tasks as one of many applications. 2: The formatting of text and graphics into publishing-quality printed output.

departmental supercomputer. An information system with price ranging from $100,000 to

$2 million. Performance speed ranges from 10 to

200 mflops. Acquired usually by users who need heavy number-crunching capabilities but cannot afford a full-scale supercomputer costing more than $2 million. This computer is a vector processor and thus uses a fundamentally different

desktop terminal equipment. Telecommunications equipment that is actually used on a desktop. This segment includes products such as single-line telephone equipment and integrated voice/data workstations.

desktop video. Tabletop televised images.

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detail drafting. The representation of a part in standard geometric drafting format. This representation will include all part geometry dimension and notations describing mechanical/structural, functional, and material characteristics.

digital access cross-connect system. A system that is composed of multiplex equipment that allows digital lines to be remapped electronically at a different digital level.

detection and tracking. A real-time application that detects, tracks, and controls various systems and processes. (See also data acquisition

and control.)

digital audiotape (DAT). A 4mm helical scan device (i.e., data recorded at an angle rather than parallel).

digital cordless telephone. Mobile telephone that uses digital radio transmission technology.

CT2 is a standard for these devices.

device interface. 1: An electronic device that enables one piece of gear to communicate or control another. 2: A device linking two incompatible devices. 3: A card containing circuits that allow a device to interface with other devices.

diagnostic. 1: Pertaining to the detection, discovery, and further isolation of a malfunction or mistake. 2: Medical applications that aid in diagnosing medical problems. X-rays, CAT scans, and ultrasound are examples.

digital design verification. A software application that includes logic simulation, timing analysis, hardware accelerators, hardware modelers, electrical rule checking, mixed signal simulation, transmission line simulators, and signal noise analysis.

digital panel meter. 1: An electrical switchboard or instrument board using continuously variable electrical signals known as analog signals. 2: Digital signals versus analog signals. dialysis. The separation of substances in solutions by means of their unequal diffusion through semipermeable membranes.

digital radiography. Equipment used for electronically detecting the arrival of X-ray photons transmitted through or emitted from an object on various media and converting the sensed analog signals to digital signals.

diathermy. The therapeutic use of high-frequency electric currents to produce localized heat in body tissue.

dictating/transcribing machine. A device that automatically records human speech onto a form of magnetic tape that can be played back for transcription.

digital signal processor (DSP). High-speed general-purpose arithmetic unit used for performing complex mathematical operations such as

Fourier transforms.

diffusion. 1: A process used in the production of semiconductors that introduces minute amounts of impurities into a substrate material. 2: The movement of particles away from regions of higher concentration caused by the random thermal motion of atoms and molecules to areas of lower concentration.

digitizer. A device used for the creation of digital information from alphanumeric or line artwork.

More sophisticated digitizers are able to reproduce halftone images and usually are termed scanners.

diode. 1: A semiconductor device used to permit current flow in one direction in a circuit and to inhibit current flow in the other direction.

digital. 1: Pertaining to the class of devices or circuits in which the output varies in discrete steps. 2: Circuitry in which data-carrying signals are restricted to either of two voltage levels, corresponding to logic 1 or 0.

direct channel. The sale of equipment directly to the end user by a vendor that contributes significant development or integration to the product.

Can be either sales of complete systems by turnkey vendors or sales of components of systems sold by individual suppliers.

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direct memory access (DMA). A computer feature, set up by the central processing unit (CPU), that provides for high-speed direct data transfer from a peripheral device to the computer memory or to magnetic disk or tape storage units. This feature releases CPU time to perform other procedures. Most DMA devices employ a CPU-cyclestealing approach.

direct sales force. A sales method that employs a sales force to move a product through the distribution channel by making face-to-face contact with the consumer. Also referred to as outside sales.

direct thermal printer. A printer that uses pointspecific heat and heat-sensitive substrate that change color when exposed to heat.

direct write e-beam. Equipment used in semiconductor manufacturing where electron beams are used to create heat that will expose selected areas of a wafer's surface to create a specific design. (See also lithography.)

disaster recovery and contingency planning.

The planning and implementation of data backup and recovery procedures for a customer's site, based on an analysis of the critical business functions.

discrete component testers. Equipment used to test, check, and monitor the functionality of devices that have a single functional capability per package. These devices include resistors, capacitors, diodes, transistors, and other devices not classified as integrated circuits.

discrete device, security energy management.

A circuit complete in itself used in the security and energy industries.

discrete semiconductor. An individually packaged semiconductor component complete in itself, such as a diode or transistor.

disk. 1: A high-capacity random-access storage device. Data are written onto and read from the surfaces of a stack of revolving record-like disks coated with magnetic material. May be fixed or removable. Capacity ranges from 0 to more than

1,000 pages per disk. Referred to as a rigid disk.

(See also random access.) 2: A random-access magnetic storage medium in the form of a platter or thin wafer. (See also magnetic disk.)

disk drive. The unit that controls the reading and writing of disks.

disk drive IC. An analog IC designed for the mass-storage peripheral market. These ICs include read/write amplifiers, data separators, data processors, servo controllers, and motor controllers.

diskette (floppy disk). A record-like disk of magnetically coated Mylar enclosed in a protective square envelope. Holds from 80 to 250 pages of text. Unlike cassettes or cartridges, which store text serially, diskettes are formatted in a random manner, which allows faster access.

disk, magnetic. A storage device containing information recorded on the magnetizable surface of a rotating disk; a magnetic disk storage system is an array of such devices, with associated reading and writing heads mounted on movable arms.

disk operating system (DOS). 1: A computer system based on the Intel 80XX or 80XXX architecture that use the MS/PC-DOS operating system software. 2: An operating system that uses magnetic disks as its primary on-line storage.

dispatching. A software application used to execute the route plans of multiple vehicles, taking real-world events into account.

display peripheral. A component used to address the man-to-machine interface, whereas communication peripherals are used to address the machine-to-machine interface.

distribution. 1: The act or process of distributing.

2: The path by which a product moves from the manufacturer to the ultimate end user. 3: To place or position so as to properly apportion over or throughout an area.

distribution channel. The route taken either by the title to a product or by the physical product itself as it moves from the producer to the ultimate end user. The channel for a product extends to the last consumer who buys it without requesting any significant change in its form. When form is altered and another product emerges, a new channel is started.

distribution frame. A unit for terminating telephone wiring. This unit is typically used for terminating and cross-connecting telephones to the switching system.

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distribution method. A method employed to move a product through the distribution channel.

It is separate and distinct from the channel in that many channel members may employ the same distribution method.

drive. See tape drive.

drive, disk cartridge. A disk drive using a removable one- or two-platter cartridge; may incorporate a fixed-media capability.

distributor. A wholesaler that sells to other resellers or end users. The distributor's primary function is to stock the inventory of multiple manufacturers to provide volume buying power to its end users.

DMA. See direct memory access.

drive, fixed Winchester. A disk drive that includes all fixed-media Winchester drives.

driver information. An electronic device used to assist the driver by giving visual or audio signals for direction. Examples include digital gauges, service reminders, digital clocks, trip/navigation computers, heads-up display, audio annunciator,

CRT display, miles-to-empty indicator, and shift indicator.

documentation/drafting. A software application that includes detail drafting, schematics, technical illustration, charts, specifications, bills of materials, training manuals, and other drawing- or drafting-related applications. International standards such as ISO, DIN, or ANSI can be used to define text and feature format.

dry etch. A technique in semiconductor manufacturing used to produce more uniform pattern definition on wafers without immersing the wafer in a liquid bath. Techniques include plasma etching and reactive etching through which gases and energetic ions remove unwanted chemical material from a wafer.

document management. A documentation system, generally computerized, that links and tracks all documents (drawings, procedures, specifications) related to an assembly or process.

dry silver. A photosensitive film or paper coated with silver compounds that is developed by the application of heat. Popularized by 3M.

dopant. Atoms of materials such as phosphorus, boron, or arsenic that are diffused into silicon to create resistors, diodes, and transistors.

DOS. See disk operating system.

dry strip. A process in semiconductor manufacturing for removing photoresist from the wafer after etching. Dry strip comprises barrel strippers and single-wafer strippers.

dot matrix printer. A printer that produces images through selective printing of dots chosen from a dot array matrix. Dot matrix printers are segmented by the number of wires in the printhead: 9, 18, or 24 and greater wires. Within these technology segments, additional segments are defined by speed of printing, expressed in characters per second (cps).

DSMPU. See DSP microprocessor.

DSP. See digital signal processing.

DSP microprocessor (DSMPU). A generalpurpose, programmable integrated circuit similar to a conventional microprocessor. Its distinction is characterized by the efficiency with which it implements repetitive multiplications and additions required by DSP algorithms.

DP. See data processing.

DRAM. See dynamic random-access memory.

DSU/CSU. See data service unit (DSU) and

channel service unit (CSU).

DRAM controller. A device that governs

DRAMs in some predetermined manner. Holds a process or condition at a desired level or status as determined by comparison of the actual value with the desired value.

DTMF. signaling.

See dual-tone multifrequency

dual-disk drive. A system that provides for the use of two disks at the same time.

drilling programmable machine tool. A machine tool fitted with an end-cutting tool that is rotated with sufficient power to create a hole or enlarge an existing hole in solid material.

dual-tone multifrequency signaling (DTMF). A standard signaling method for touch-tone telephones using a combination of two different tones for any button pushed.

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duplicator. 1: A small offset printing press that uses a planographic image carrier. These presses are usually capable of one or two colors and are smaller, easier to operate, but less sturdy than offset presses. 2: Machine that requires a special master to make copies but produces copies at a higher rate of speed than copying. It differs from printing in that a direct-image master is used that yields a limited number of copies. Offset, spirit, gelatin hecto, stencil, and sometimes xerography are considered duplicating processes. (See also

copier.)

EDA. See electronic design automation.

education. The process of providing schooling or training by formal instruction and supervised practice.

educational publishing. A system with the main purpose/use of printing materials used for the process of educating.

EEPROM. See electrically erasable program-

mable read-only memory.

dynaipic random-access memory (DRAM). A random-access memory device that must be electrically refreshed frequently (many times each second) to maintain information storage. DRAM densities can range from 16K, with approximately

16,000 bits, to 16Mb, with approximately 16 million bits.

elapsed time meter. An electronic measuring instrument that counts the actual time taken to observe a recurring event.

electrically erasable programmable read-only

memory (EEPROM). A nonvolatile memory device that can be erased and programmed electrically.

E

8mm tape cartridge. A class of tape drives using

8mm cartridges; used in camcorders.

electrocardiograph. An instrument used to graphically record electrical manifestations of heart activity obtained from the body's surface.

electroencephalograph. An instrument used to graphically record electrical discharges of the cerebral cortex by electrodes attached to the surface of the scalp.

E-1 multiplexer. An electronic device that consolidates or pools multiple digital streams representing voice or data signals onto a single highspeed E-1 data line. An E-1 line operates at

2.048 Mbits/second, a standard within Europe.

See T-1 multiplexer for U.S. standard.

earth resources application. Studying the earth resources by performing seismic analysis, mapping, and oil field services.

EATE (electronic automatic test equipment).

See automatic test equipment.

electronic calculator. A product with components that perform calculations and digitally display results. (See also calculator.)

electronic computer-aided engineering

(ECAE). Computer-aided tools used in the engineering or design phase of electronic products (as opposed to the physical layout phase of the product). Examples of ECAE applications are schematic capture, simulation, and test pattern creation. ECAE systems are used most often by electrical engineers.

e-beam. A sophisticated system used in semiconductor manufacturing that uses an electron beam for maskmaking or for projecting patterns onto wafers. E-beam equipment allows smaller geometries (typically less than 1 micron) than are possi-

electronic design automation (EDA). Computer-based tools that are used to automate the process of designing an electronic product, including boards, ICs, and systems. Formerly referred to as EC AD. ble under other production methods.

ECL. See emitter-coupled logic.

electronic forms generation. The process of

ECAE. See

electronic computer-aided

automatically producing documents requesting information.

engineering.

electronic game. Home electronic games that typically are attached to television receivers.

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electronic keyboard. A keyboard on which characters are generated or encoded by electronic means, usually by contact closure, as opposed to mechanical linkages. Electronic keyboards have a different feel, and some have a built-in artificial bottoming feel and/or audible click to assure the operator a key actually has been depressed.

electronic mail (e-mail). An application that supports the movement of information between users connected to a networked computer system.

electronic musical instrument. An instrument that allows the transmission of musical sound by the use of transistors.

electronic publishing. Fully integrated automation of the printing procedure.

electronic warfare (EW). Electronic operations between enemies. Includes warning receivers, jammers, assorted electronic countermeasure systems, and associated test equipment.

electrostatic plotter. A plotter using the corona from high voltages applied to needles or nibs to produce shaped electrostatic charges on paper; toner is attracted to the charged area, and heat and pressure are used to fuse the toner to the paper.

elementary/secondary school. A regular school, defined as schools that are part of state and local school systems and most nonprofit private elementary/secondary schools, both religiously affiliated and nonsectarian.

e-mail. See electronic mail.

emerging technology. A technology that is not in widespread use and that appears to have potential for widespread acceptance.

encryption unit. A device that encodes/decodes data, voice, or video transmissions for security purposes.

end user. The final purchaser of a finished product.

end-user average selling price. The average price that a user pays for a product inclusive of channel markups and discounts.

end-user revenue. End-user average selling price multiplied by shipment quantity.

enhanced service. Equipment and service charges associated with enhanced data communication networks, which may include protocol, electronic mail, or facsimile.

enrollment. In education, the total number of students registered in a given school unit at a given time, generally in the fall of a year.

entertainment system. 1: Electronic equipment used for amusement or pastime and not intended to, but may, increase productivity or skill. Examples include: radio, seek/scan, graphic equalizer, power amplifiers, noise reduction, cellular telephone, optical disk, CB radio, and digital audiotape. 2: A computer application to keep or hold the mind, something directing or engaging.

entry-level workstation. A low-cost computer workstation, priced less than $15,000. It is targeted at the end user who is sensitive to price.

This segment tends to be dominated by occasional users who are not paid for producing documents on their system. Entry-level workstations mainly run 2-dimensional graphics and have a rating of less than 12 mips and a rating of 0.5 to

1.5 mflops.

emitter-coupled logic (ECL). 1: A form of integrated circuit used to implement very high speed logic functions. 2: The emitters of the input logic transistors are coupled to the emitter of a reference transistor.

environment.

ultimately.

Where a product is used

epitaxial wafer. Single-crystal silicon grown on a crystalline silicon substrate.

EPROM. See erasable programmable read-

only memory.

employees. All civilians, who, during a reference time period, did any work for pay or profit (minimum of an hour's work) or worked 15 hours or more as unpaid workers in a family enterprise.

encryption. Process of encoding data, voice, or video transmissions for security purposes.

equipment/maintenance management. A software application that assists in the management of equipment and the respective maintenance requirements and contracts. May also calculate depreciation.

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erasable programmable read-only memory

(EPROM). A nonvolative memory device that can be erased by ultraviolet (UV) light and reprogrammed by the user.

ET. See typewriter.

facsimile (fax). 1: An electronic device that uses telephone lines to transmit documents to and receive documents from a second facsimile machine. 2: An exact copy or the process of transmitting printed matter or still pictures by a system of either telephones, telegraph, or radio for reproduction.

etch-and-clean equipment. Equipment used in semiconductor manufacturing to remove and clean material from wafers.

EW. See electronic warfare.

factory automation equipment. Equipment that includes various types of capital equipment that are automated and used throughout a manufacturing facility.

expenditure. Charges incurred, whether paid or unpaid, which are presumed to benefit the current fiscal year. These include all charges for current outlays plus capital outlays and interest.

factory average selling price.The average price per unit that is paid for a product. This figure takes into account discounts given to the distribution channel and multiple-purchase discounts.

export. The delivery of products to a foreign country for the purpose of trade or sale.

factory revenue. The amount of money received by a manufacturer for its goods.

fast packet switch. A packet-switching technique in which small packets are switched at high-speed using hardware for the transport of voice, data, and video.

fab. Abbreviation for wafer fabrication.

See fabrication.

fabrication. A manufacturing operation that makes components rather than assemblies.

fast SRAM. A static RAM device that runs at speeds less than 70 nanoseconds. (See also static

random-access memory.)

fabric ribbon. Fabric ribbons are struck repeatedly by the print mechanism until all the ink is depleted. Such ribbons are used commonly for general-purpose printing and are the most economical and durable ribbon substrate. Most fabric ribbons are made of nylon and are available in several forms, e.g., cartridge or web ribbon.

facilities design/management. A software application used to lay out, inventory, and manage assets (such as personnel, space, equipment, and utilities) within a building or geographic service area.

fatigue. In electronics, the degradation of the performance of materials, parts, or circuits with time.

fault detection, fault management, and adap-

tive control. A software application that determines if a manufacturing system or a process is functioning or performing within control limits.

Fault management and adaptive control is a control method in which control parameters are continuously and automatically adjusted in response to measured process variables to achieve near-optimum performance.

facilities management service. The responsibility of providing ongoing administration of a data processing or communications facility by a vendor.

facility planning and simulation. A facility system model is exercised and refined through a series of simulation steps until a detailed, optimum configuration is reached.

fax. See facsimile.

FDDI. See fiber distributed data interface.

federal government. A form of government in which power is distributed between a central authority and a number of constituent territorial units.

FERRAM. memory.

See ferroelectric random-access

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ferroelectric random-access memory (FER-

RAM). A nonvolatile, radiation-hard, fast read/ write memory that can store data over long periods of time without power.

fixed media rigid disk drive. A fixed media rigid disk drive has the platter enclosed in a housing that is not designed to be accessible to the user.

fiber distributed data interface (FDDI). A standard for high-speed packet switched data.

fixture design. The design of a variety of structural aids that hold the component or assembly during the manufacturing process.

fiber optic. 1: The technique of transmitting light through long, thin, flexible fibers of glass, plastic, or other transparent material. Bundles of fiber can transmit complete images. 2: A technique used in electromagnetic wave propagation in which infrared and visible light frequencies are transmitted by a light-emitting diode (LED) or a laser through a low-loss glass fiber. This method is used in very high frequency (VHP) radiation transmission.

flexible disk. See flexible disk computer stor-

age media.

flexible disk computer storage media. A flexible disk made of a 3-mil polyester substrate coated with gamma ferric iron oxide particles dispersed in an epoxy binder and encased in a vinyl jacket. These are commonly supplied in 3.5- or

5.25-inch diameters.

field-programmable gate array (FPGA). An integrated circuit incorporating an array of programmable logic elements that are not preconnected.

Interconnections between the various elements are user programmable and consist of predetermined levels of interconnect that can be connected to, or disconnected from, other interconnect lines as defined by the user. Can be of either bipolar or MOS technology.

flexible manufacturing system programmable

machine tool. A manufacturing system that typically consists of a computer-integrated group of numerical control (NC) machines or workstations linked with material transfer devices for complete automatic processing of differing product parts or the assembly of these parts into different units.

floating-point coprocessor. A separate microprocessor used in the efficient handling of floating-point operations.

field-programmable logic array (FPLA). A logic array in which programming is accomplished by blowing fuse links or shorting base-emitter junctions.

floppy (flexible) disk. A small, thin, electromagnetic media used for storing digital information.

floppy disk controller. A device controlling the storage and retrieval of data from a floppy disk.

film ribbon. See single-strike ribbon or multi-

strike ribbon.

fixed disk. A memory disk that cannot be removed from the read/write device, as opposed to a removable hard disk, diskette, or magnetic tape.

font generation. Process whereby typeface and size is selected.

finance. An application to support the management of money or other liquid resources and their respective management within an organization.

fixed asset. An application that supports the management of an organization's fixed assets, which are a capital asset that cannot be readily liquidated, such as plant, land, equipment, and long-term investments. Management of expected costs based on a specific level of production or other activity.

font management. The understanding, use, and control of fonts or typefaces that are displayed on a terminal or monitor, or printed out on a device such as a printer, plotter, or typesetter. Font management requires the understanding of the physical location of where the fonts reside—whether in diskette, hard disk, ROM, RAM, card, or cartridge. It also requires the knowledge of the type of font—whether bit map or outline, scalable or fixed point and pitch—and the applications and print system capability to address and place the fonts accurately on the screen or printing media.

forecasting. To estimate in advance or anticipate; to predict future events, trends, business conditions, etc.

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form. 1: Any material that has been printed for the primary purpose of facilitating the entry of written information by hand or machine. A form has repetitive information printed in fixed positions. Blank paper may be included, especially if it is continuous and has undergone some alteration such as punching or perforating to facilitate manual or machine entries. 2: Allows the user to graphically design a form for publication—may include data entry and database capabilities.

Provides stimulus patterns and measurement verification that the UUT actually operates correctly.

funds transfer terminal. A machine used by financial institutions and designed to perform many of the banking functions performed by human tellers. (See also automated teller machine.)

GaAs. See gallium arsenide semiconductor.

four-year institution. An institution legally authorized to offer and that does offer at least a four-year program of college-level studies wholly or principally creditable toward a baccalaureate degree.

FPGA. See field-programmable gate array.

FPLA. See field-programmable logic array.

GaAs analog IC. There are two overlapping subsets in this segment; analog products and monolithic microwave integrated circuits (MMICs).

Analog products have output that are linearly proportional to their inputs and function at a varying range of frequencies across the spectrum, depending on particular device design. MMICs operate in the microwave frequency spectrum

(above 3 GHz).

front-end processor. A computer-based product expressly designed to relieve host computers of certain communications processing tasks. Included are remote concentrators that are not attached directly to a host computer. This segment does not include general-purpose computer systems functioning as front-end processors.

gallium arsenide semiconductor (GaAs). A compound of gallium and arsenic used as a semiconductor material. GaAs devices are relatively expensive devices exhibiting very low internal noise and very high speed. game. A software application or activity engaged in for diversion or amusement.

full-color copier. A reproductive device that can recognize the full range of colors on an original and reproduce them using the three subtractive primary colors and produce a full-color copy.

gas. A consumable material used throughout the fabrication of semiconductor devices. Includes both bulk and specialty gases.

fully formed printer. A printer that prints fully formed characters by applying pressure on or to the paper and obtaining the characters from a wheel, band, type train, or drum. Such devices can be serial, fully formed printers and line, fully formed printers.

gate array. 1: An ASIC device that is customized using the final layers of interconnect. (Included in this category are generic or base wafers that include embedded functions such as static RAM.)

May be of either bipolar or MOS process technology.

functional design. An application that supports component design, assembly verification, linkage and mechanism design, and other detail or functional design activities. gateway. Equipment or conceptual point that connects two otherwise incompatible systems.

(See also protocol converter.)

functional PCB tester. An equipment tester that accesses the normal input/output interface of the unit under test (UUT). Generally, this consists of the edge-connector pins, plus any special interface that may have been provided for testing.

general analysis. A software application designed to solve various technical problems and to further research subjects. The analysis is usually mathematical in nature and performed by scientists, physicists, chemists, biologists, and engineers.

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general ledger. A software application that supports the business function of entering accounting transactions and their subsequent transferring and reporting.

Includes the executive, legislative, judicial, administrative, and regulatory functions.

graphic design art. A method of applied art used to form a visual end product that conveys information. Methods include drawing, painting, photography, printing, and bookmaking.

general operating system. An operating system with use not restricted to a particular type of computer or a specialized application.

general productivity. A software application that is used to enhance productivity within general disciplines.

general-purpose computer system. A computer system that is not configured for a specific purpose but rather for a general application. This category includes supercomputers, minisupercomputers, parallel processor computers, mainframes, workstations, and the like. graphics. Software that permits the pictorial representation of information at a screen or printer.

Early graphics packages showed bar charts or line graphs on a character-based terminal by placing characters such as + or * on grids created by repetitions of characters such as | and or _ . The term has come to apply usually to bit-mapped graphics, which are capable of processing images, freehand input, and icons on a pixel-by-pixel basis. Examples of graphics software include

MacDraw and MacPaint.

general-purpose input/output (I/O) circuit. A circuit that permits a system to communicate via a wide variety of input/output (I/O) devices with the outside world, which can include printers, modems, and monitors.

general test equipment. Test equipment not included under the definition of automatic test equipment (ATE).

geographic information system (GIS). A mapping software application that contains the functions of cartographic software and also allows data analysis through Boolean operations on multiple data layers.

graphics/animation/imaging. A software graphics application used by scientists and engineers to process and display complex technical data. It also includes applications that use computers to generate or manipulate graphics images that are the end product, i.e., cartoons.

graphics board. An add-on board connected to the bus that provides video capabilities for a personal computer.

graphics controller. A device that governs information flow used to create visual images of data.

geophysical instrument. An instrument used to observe and measure the physics of the earth and its environment.

GIS. See geographic information system. global positioning system. Equipment that calculates location based on one of several technologies such as radio or internal navigation.

golf ball. A type of print element invented by

IBM for use in the IBM Selectric typewriter. It is a round, metal element with raised characters.

graphics draw/paint. A software application that creates, retrieves, modifies, and prints graphic images.

graphics supercomputer. The performance of mips, mflops, transforms per second, and shaded polygons per second distinguishes graphics supercomputers from superworkstations. Performance ratings range from 20 to 40 mips and 16 to

40 mflops. The best distinction between graphics supercomputers and superworkstations is the graphics performance ratings, lOOK to 600K 3-D vector transforms/second and 25K to 150K

Gouraud-shaded polygons/second. The average price ranges from $75,000 to $150,000.

government. The organization, machinery, or agency through which a political unit exercises authority and performs functions and which is usually classified according to the power within it.

graphics terminal. A display terminal that provides graphical presentation of information to the operator. 1: Data conversion graphics terminals support the use of graphics to summarize or

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Otherwise relate discrete data that were not originally graphics data. 2: Concept design graphics terminals support graphics displays that help realize accurate images of ideas conceived in the human mind. 3: Imaging graphics terminals display a real image, visible or nonvisible, that was digitized to allow enhancements or data extraction.

head; manganese-zinc, landable. A type of head used in sealed fbced-media drives where heads land on the lubricated media surface and use hot-pressed manganese-zinc pole pieces.

health care. An environment or industry that includes establishments primarily engaged in providing medical, surgical, and other health services.

grinding programmable machine tool. A standalone machine with expanding use of computer numerical control (CNC) and with advance efforts to incorporate grinders into flexible, automated systems. Creep-feed is a type of grinding technology.

helical scan tape drive. A storage tape drive that records data on an angle rather than parallel.

Tape dimensions can be 4mm, 8mm, 13mm, or

19mm. Segments of this category are VHS, DAT,

8mm, and other. (See also VHS, DAT.)

gross lease additions. The total volume of new equipment leases.

high-definition television (HDTV). A television standard with high-resolution, digitized images; wide, theater-like screen; and digital stereo sound. Requires a broader video bandwidth to accommodate increased picture transmission.

H

hand-held personal computer. The hand-held personal computer is a less-than-2-pound, fully functional personal computer. To be considered a hand-held personal computer, units must operate using a fully implemented version of MS-DOS and be able to run some of the shrink-wrapped MS-

DOS-based applications. These units are expected to have a subsize keyboard and utilize nonstandard mass storage devices. The criterion for inclusion in this classification is that the device may be held in one hand using the other hand for data entry via the included keyboard. They are fully battery powered units.

higher education. Study beyond secondary school at an institution that offers programs terminating in an associate, baccalaureate, or higher degree.

high school. A secondary school offering the final years of high school work necessary for graduation, usually including grades 10, 11, and 12 or grades 9, 10, 11, and 12.

home. The usual place of residence. A homebased business is an enterprise producing goods or services that is operated in or from the home.

horizontal-turning programmable machine

tool. The tool of a machine that holds a piece along the horizontal axis for a certain function to be performed such as cutting, boring, or drilling.

hard disk. See rigid disk.

hard disk controller. A device that controls the storage and retrieval of data from a user's hard disk drive.

hardware. Electronic equipment, systems, or peripheral devices.

hardware maintenance service. Remedial repair services for equipment, systems, and peripherals.

Hardware maintenance can include on-site support, telephone/remote support, preventive maintenance, and other activities necessary to maintain hardware operation.

HDTV. See high-definition television.

host/vendor independent terminal. A hostindependent display terminal produced by an independent manufacturer. It may operate in either character or block mode. The independent manufacturer does not supply mainframes or minicomputers to which its display terminals may attach. Not included is any terminal that is from an independent manufacturer and that is protocol-specific to either a minicomputer-based or a non-IBM, protocol-specific terminal.

hotels and lodging. An environment or industry that includes commercial and noncommercial establishments engaged in furnishing lodging, or lodging and meals, and camping space and camping facilities.

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household. T h e set of persons occupying a housing unit. Thus, counts or estimates of households, householders, and occupied housing units are always defined the same.

hybrid. 1: Made up of several different components. 2: A hybrid integrated circuit is made by putting several integrated circuit die and/or passive components on a ceramic substrate with a metal pattern. 3: A substrate containing more than one component. The substrate consists of multiple ceramic layers and also can contain multiple packages. 4: A device in a speech transmission system consisting of transformers that convert a two-wire channel into a four-wire channel, thus creating a separate wire pair for each direction of transmission.

hybrid analog IC. An analog IC that combines one or more semiconductor chips with other technologies, such as chip capacitors and film resistors, on a single substrate.

if-sold revenue. The amount of money paid for products based on list price. List price does not take into account discounts or markups.

if-sold value. A measure that reflects unit shipments multiplied by list price.

IGBT. See insulated gate bipolar transistor.

illustration software. An object-oriented software program that allows the user to create original artwork consisting of lines, arcs, and other mathematically generated geometric objects.

(Line art is a term sometimes used to describe the results of illustration software.) Some illustration software can perform raster-to-vector conversion by allowing users to trace over scanned raster art.

This trace can occur on screen or on a graphics tablet. Illustration software usually offers raster-fill patterns that extend to cover an area in an illustration bounded by geometric objects. hydrogen. A chemical element used for hydrofining for sulfuration of petroleum products or to reduce metallic oxide ores.

image communication. Equipment used in a business or residence to transmit image and text.

Facsimile equipment, video teleconferencing, telex, and videotex are included in this classification.

IBM 3270 protocol terminal. A terminal that is protocol-specific to IBM's 3270 Information Display System. Included is any IBM 3270-type terminal or 3270-compatible terminal produced by another manufacturer. A terminal that can provide the appearance of a 3270 device when used with a protocol converter is not included.

image-editing software. A software program that allows a user to modify existing artwork existing in raster format. This art may have been scanned or captured as analog signal data and converted to digital data. Image-editing software can handle binary data, in which case it is called print software; or it can handle grey-scale and/or color data, in which case it is called image-retouching software.

image generation. Synonymous with image synthesis and equivalent to the historical use of graphics.

IBM/VM/MVS. An IBM standard multiuser operating system.

IC. See integrated circuit.

image management. The process of directing, controlling, or handling something that closely resembles another.

IC layout and verification. A software application tool that is used to create and validate physical implementations of an integrated circuit (IC).

IC layout tools include polygon editors for creating geometric data, symbolic editors, placement and routing (gate array, cell, and block), and

DRC/ERC verification tools.

IDVT. See integrated voice/data workstation.

image processing. A series of actions, changes, or functions that bring about a particular result for something that resembles another.

imaging. See graphics/animation/imaging.

imaging subsystem. A peripheral device that does not possess video display terminal (VDT) functionality, but acts as output devices for the display of graphics and/or image data.

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impact printer. A family of printers that use direct impression impact of a type bar, type head, or matrix pin to exert pressure against a paper ribbon and a platen to create a character.

infrared. Those radiations, such as are emitted by a hot body, with wavelengths just beyond the red end of the visible spectrum. Wavelengths longer than those of visible light and shorter than those of radio waves.

import. The supply of products from a foreign country for the purpose of trade or sale.

in-circuit PCB tester. An equipment tester that incorporates pin electronics (drivers and receivers) that verify the functionality of each part on an assembled circuit board. Verifies each component's parameter and limited functionality.

ink jet. An image-producing process currently used in electronic printers, plotters, and full-color copiers that uses piezoelectric technology to expel a very small droplet of liquid ink through nozzles onto the output paper.

indirect channel. A variety of distribution channels in which product is brought to the end user.

It includes value-added resellers (VARs) and original equipment manufacturers (OEMs).

ink jet printer. A nonimpact printing method that uses ink droplets to form a printed image.

This technology usually is classified by the nature of the drop stream; two major categories are continuous flow and drop-on-demand.

inductor. A passive component that stores energy in the form of a magnetic field (flux) around a core body.

industrial design. A process that integrates the design tools defining the style and functional aspects of the total design.

input/output (I/O) device. 1: Equipment used to communicate with a computer. 2: A general term applied to equipment used in communicating with a computer and the data involved in the computer. 3: The transmission of information from an external source to a computer or vice versa.

industrial electronic equipment. Electronic equipment used in a manufacturing environment or industry.

input/output (I/O) ratio. 1: A ratio of the value of a resource input to the value of the final product output, typically expressed as a percentage. 2:

A measure of throughput for a computer system.

industrial marking. A specified format on media that is recognized by electronic or visual means.

Examples are the printing and use of forms, bar codes, ticket printing (lottery and airline, for example), and labels.

inspection. The process of testing or measuring an object or process by remote sensing in imaging technology.

installed base. The total number of product in active, day-to-day use.

industry. A collective term for many of the productive activities of a nation or other large group.

A collective term in which a number of firms produce the same kind of commodity or service or are engaged in the same kind of operation.

INEWS. See integrated electronic warfare sys-

tem.

institutional support. In higher education, the expenditures that include day-to-day operational support for colleges, excluding expenditures for physical plant operations. Examples of institutional support include general administrative services; executive direction; planning, legal and fiscal operations; and community relations.

information center. A center designed specifically for storing, processing, and removing information for dissemination at regular intervals, on demand or selectively, according to the user's needs.

information resource management. A program that works with definitions, uses, values, and distribution of information that is processed by a user and handled by a computer system.

instruction. In higher education, expenditures of the colleges, schools, departments, and other instructional divisions of higher education institutions and expenditures for departmental research and public service that are not separately budgeted. Includes expenditures for both credit and noncredit activities. Excludes expenditures for academic administration where the primary function is administration.

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instructional. Products used to increase the understanding (either problem-solving or selfimprovement) of a specific subject matter. The primary focus of these products is the imparting of knowledge or skills to the user.

instructional staff. In education, the number of full-time equivalent positions, not the number of different individuals occupying the positions during the school year.

instrumentation. Designing, manufacturing, and using instruments for detection, observation, measurement, automatic control, automatic computation, communication, or data processing. information such as voice, data, and video over phone lines.

integrating and totalizing meter for gas and

liquid. A meter that registers consumption and positive displacement, including meters, fuel dispenser meters, and gas meters.

integrated voice/data workstation (IDVT). Terminal that possesses both telecommunications and computational capability.

integration. Integration of data types can be achieved using page composition and pagination applications.

insulated gate. A gate that is separated from other conducting surfaces through a nonconducting material.

insulated gate bipolar transistor (IGBT). A power transistor that has the insulated gate properties of a MOS transistor with the low saturation

ON voltage of a bipolar transistor.

insurance. An environment or industry that covers carriers of all types of insurance and insurance agents and brokers.

integrated application. A software application that combines several functions into one software package, which may include word processing, database management, and spreadsheet capabilities but is not exclusive to these functions. Data must be able to be shared among these functions.

intelligent terminal. An interactive terminal in which part of the processing is accomplished by a small computer or processor contained in the terminal itself. This type of terminal is sometimes referred to as a smart interactive terminal. Such a terminal has the following characteristics: (1) selfcontained storage; (2) user interaction—with the terminal or the central computer; (3) stored program; (4) part of processing accomplished in the terminal; (5) on-line via communications line with large central computer and database; (6) humanoriented input—such as keyboard and light pen; and (7) human-oriented output—such as serial printer and CRT.

interactive language. Within a system, a human user or device serviced by the computer can communicate directly with the operating program or language.

integrated circuit (IC). A combination of interconnected semiconductor elements inseparably associated on or within a continuous substrate.

Complete module of components manufactured as single, solid units made by either a film deposition or a diffusion process.

intercom systems. A system that provides internal communication, allowing calling to be confined to inside the system. In most cases, key systems provide the intercom lines that allow quick communication between stations on the key system.

integrated electronic warfare system (INEWS).

A combination of interconnected circuit elements associated on or within a continuous substrate to produce integrated systems used specifically in military operations.

interconnect and bare-board tester. Equipment designed to check, monitor, and identify printed circuit boards for electrical connectivity and detect manufacturing defects.

Integrated Services Digital Network (ISDN). A digital network having the capabilities of simultaneous signaling, switching, and transporting over a single facility. A new worldwide telephone standard that will make it easier to communicate

interface IC. An analog IC that is dedicated to interfacing digital information (in bits) with external nonsemiconductor devices such as displays, lines, solenoids, and other peripheral devices.

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105

internal transfer. The process of conveying or moving goods and services from the producer within a company.

ion milling. A technique in semiconductor manufacturing in which a beam of charged particles is used to remove material from a wafer.

international telephone service. Telecommunication services between offices or stations in different states or between mobile stations that are not in the same state or are subject to different states.

I/O ratio. See input/output ratio.

IR. See infrared.

ISDN. See Integrated Services Digital Network.

IVR. See interactive voice response system.

interrupt controller. 1: An internal controller chip that can break into the normal flow process of a routine such that the flow can be resumed from that point at a later specified time. 2: A condition or event that temporarily suspends normal processing operations. 3: A temporary disruption of the normal operation of a routine by a special signal from the computer. 4: Copying technology: A feature that allows a job to be stopped to allow another job to be run without the loss of programming for the first job.

joint venture. Two or more companies providing capital or other resources to invest or make available for investment in the ownership of a new enterprise.

intrusion-detection alarm system. A warning system used to detect when someone or something has intruded in a specified area. (See also alarm

system.)

K

keyboard. An input device that allows an operator to enter alphanumeric characters through a typewriter-style key arrangement augmented with special function keys—manual operation of keys will generate electrical signals or cause tape to be punched, or both.

inventory. Items used in the process of manufacturing a product and distributing it to the end user. Inventory can be stored at a stock point or at a work-in-process location. Inventory may consist of finished goods, parts of intermediate items, work-in-process, or raw materials.

inventory and distribution management. An application that monitors the status of materials at all levels of production, including receipts, issues, and inventory balances. It identifies both unit quantities and dollar values and provides essential input to both the general ledger for cost accounting and the production planning modules.

keyboard controller. A device that governs the functions of a keyboard transmitting a command to do something within a system.

key entry equipment. Data entry equipment such as key disk, key tape, or keypunch equipment.

key telephone system. A customer premises telephone switching system that allows telephones to interface to the public telephone central exchange or office without using an access code. This category includes the electromechanical 1A2 and electronic segments.

I/O device. See input/output device.

ion implantation. The use of an ion beam to bombard a silicon wafer, altering the concentrations of p-type and n-type material. This method of doping allows for very precise control of the device parameters. This process introduces dopant atoms into the surface of silicon wafers and accelerates them so that they bombard the wafer, causing them to penetrate the exposed portions of the wafer.

label. 1: A set of symbols used to identify or describe an item, record, message, or file. May be the same as the address in storage. 2: Matter attached to a document to identify or provide information. 3: To assign a symbol, acronym, or word as a means of identification to create a specialized record or filing handle. 4: A

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10« High-Technology Guide Glossary descriptive or identifying word or phrase. 5: To address, using self-adhesive addressing labels.

laboratory. 1: A software application that involves the use of computers inside analytical instruments and in linking these instruments together (instrumentation automation). Mass spectrometers and blood/gas analyzers are examples. 2: A place equipped for experimental study in a science or for testing and analysis.

laboratory and scientific apparatus. Any instrument, material, or equipment designed for a specific operation or particular use in the laboratory.

LAN. See local area network.

laptop D/C. The laptop D/C units are identical in style to the laptop A/C units except that they are powered by batteries and can be operated without direct connection to A/C power lines. Some of these laptop D/C units have a combination of battery- and A/C-power capability.

laptop personal computer. The laptop-case style is conducive to operation on the user's lap and is designed to be used in areas where space is restricted. This case style is referred to as the clamshell-type of system, with the display screen mounted in the top of the unit in such a way as to cover the keyboard when closed and be at the proper viewing angle in relationship to the keyboard when opened and ready for operation. This unit is completely self-contained and can be carried as a single unit that includes the keyboard, display, mass storage, and main system unit.

LAN-based e-mail. A software application that enables users of a local area network (LAN) to send and receive textual data. Some LAN-based e-mail software can send and receive computer files and graphic images.

large-format plotter. This plotter uses media engineering size C (17 x 22 inches) or larger and corresponding metric sizes. (See also plotter.)

language. In software, a set of commands that permits the programmer to perform arithmetic functions on data and/or give commands to specific hardware components of the computer system, such as the printer, terminals, disk, or memory. Statements in languages are generally required to be performed in a fixed order, although the order may be affected by loops and branches in the program and the values of parameters that control the looping and branching.

Examples of low-level languages are C and assembler; high-level, or third-generation, languages include FORTRAN, COBOL, BASIC, and P L / 1 .

language editor. A set of computer commands forming code to edit files. May involve deleting undesired information, selecting desired information, inserting invariant symbols, and applying standard processes.

laser (light amplification by stimulated emis-

sion of radiation). 1: A device that transmits an extremely narrow and coherent beam of electromagnetic energy in the visible light spectrum. 2: A laser that operates at optical frequencies. In communications, lasers may be amplitude-modulated and used to carry speech information that is received by a light beam detector.

laser diode. A laser diode is a laser that is constructed with a semiconductor material. Many

III-V semiconducting materials can be made to emit coherent light, creating a laser.

laser plotter. A device that produces an inscribed visual display of the variation of dependent variable as a function of one or more variables by the use of intense coherent beams of light.

laptop A/C. The laptop A/C units reflect the standard laptop design, i.e., clamshell-style case with the display mounted in the top portion of the shell and covering the keyboard until the unit is opened for use. These units, like transportables, are designed to be easily moved from place to place but operate only on A/C power and do not contain batteries of any kind.

laser printer. A type of nonimpact printer that combines laser beams and electrophotographic technology to form images on paper.

laser system. Any electronic device or system that is actuated by beams of coherent visible and infrared light to accomplish a task.

LCD. See liquid crystal display.

learning. An application that assists the user in learning. The subject can range from classic school subjects to games, art, and languages.

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107 lease. A contract by which one conveys equipment, facilities, or property for terms specified.

line, impact, dot matrix (LIDM). A printer that prints one line of dots at a time using an array of elements in a printhead.

lease accounting. An application that supports the management of leases.

leased circuit. A service offering that provides a customer with permanent (rather than dialed) connections to all points on the circuit for the duration of a contract.

line, impact, fully formed (LIFF). A printer that creates one line of characters at a time by placing characters—from a band, type train, or drum—on the paper by the pressure of an impact mechanism (hammer).

lease/rental conversion. The volume of contractual conversions between rental and lease options.

line, nonimpact, thermal transfer (LNTT). A printer that prints a line at a time, using an electrically heated element to produce images.

LED. See light-emitting diode.

library management. A software application that supports the administration of a library, including cataloging.

LIDM. See line, impact, dot matrix.

LIFF. See line, impact, fully formed.

light communication system. Electromagnetic radiation of a wavelength originating at one place and reproduced at a distant point.

light-emitting diode (LED). A pinhead-size device with a pn junction formed from combinations of gallium, arsenic, and phosphorus. Light emission is the result of hole-electron recombinations that take place near the junction of the p-doped and n-doped regions. As the electrons in the n region of the diode travel through the area near the junction, they recombine with a hole. As a result of this recombination between an electron and atom, light in the form of photons is produced. The wavelength of color of the light is determined by the energy level.

light-emitting display. Light-emitting diodes grouped together in a matrix of dots to form characters.

linkage mechanism. An assembly of components, with two or more movable parts usually providing some means of power, control, or fastening application.

liquid crystal display (LCD). A high-contrast, black-on-white display screen that uses closely spaced crystal segments on a square dot matrix.

The crystal segments butt together to form solid characters. A liquid crystal hermetically sealed between two glass plates.

list price. The price of a product as indicated in the seller's price book. This figure is usually quantity one and is synonymous with manufacturer's suggested retail price.

linear array/ASIC. An ASIC that is purely analog.

linear IC. An IC that is purely analog; both inputs and outputs are analog signals. Sometimes, linear and analog ICs are used interchangeably.

Dataquest uses linear as an analog-only segment of the analog market (mixed signal analog/digital is the other segment).

line printer. A printer that usually prints one line at a time at a higher speed than a character printer. Typical line printers use a drum, chain, or train of print elements and have a hammer for each print position in the line. They usually have a buffer to hold one print line. Line printers are segmented by technology (dot matrix, fully formed, thermal) and by speed, expressed in lines per minute (1pm).

lithography. 1: A printing process that prints from a planographic image on a printing plate.

Lithographic presses are configured as sheetfed and web presses, depending on the format of the paper used. 2: A technique used in semiconductor manufacturing in which a silicon wafer is coated uniformly with a radiation-sensitive film

(the resist) and an exposing source illuminates selected areas of the wafer's surface through a mask or template for a particular design.

LNTT. See line, nonimpact, thermal transfer.

line conditioner. Equipment that changes/en-

hances the transmission characteristics of a circuit.

local area network (LAN). The hardware, software, and peripherals that enable connection of a device to a cable-based network system that

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108 High-Technology Guide Glossary serves a building or a campus environment.

Excluded are connections that are point-to-point, or go through PBXs or data PBXs. Ethernet and

Token-Ring are popular LAN technologies.

local government. The political unit or organization governing counties, municipalities, townships, school districts, and numerous kinds of special districts.

local loop. The portion of the telecommunications system that connects the customer's equipment with the local telephone company's network.

magnetic. The effects of magnetism/flux on the system.

magnetic disk. 1: A random-access storage device consisting of magnetically coated disks accessible to a reading and writing arm, similar to an automatic record player. Data are stored on the surface of each disk as small, magnetized spots arranged in circular tracks around the disk.

The arm is moved mechanically to the desired disk and then to the desired track on that disk. 2:

A flat, circular plate with a magnetic surface on which data can be stored by selective magnetization of portions of the flat surface.

local telephone service. A service that includes message telecommunications services, private line services, wide-area telecommunications services

(WATS), and centrex services.

logic circuit. 1: A circuit (usually electronic) that provides an input-output relationship corresponding to a Boolean-algebra logic function. 2: An electronic device or devices used to govern a particular sequence of operations in a given system. 3: Circuits that perform basic logic decisions and/or/not, used widely for arithmetic and computing functions. Circuits can be of either bipolar or MOS technology.

magnetic ink recognition. Property of automatic devices that can detect or read ink-containing particles of magnetic substance, i.e., the ink used for printing on some bank checks for magnetic ink character recognition (MICR).

magnetic media. Any of a wide variety of belts, cards, disks, or tapes (as contrasted with paper tape) coated or impregnated with magnetic material for use with the appropriate equipment and on which dictation or keystrokes can be recorded and stored.

long distance telephone service. The revenue generated by all long distance carriers for interstate and intrastate long distance telephone services.

magnetic recording head. A magnetic head that transforms electric variations into magnetic variations for storage on a magnetic medium such as tape or disk.

M machining-center programmable machining

tool. A machine that is designed to fabricate a complete or near complete part of a single machine, with machining centers that perform a number of different operations in a single setup.

magnetic resonance imaging. Equipment used on an object placed in a spatially varying magnetic field that is subjected to pulses of radiation; the resulting nuclear magnetic resonance spectra are combined to give cross-sectional images.

magnetic tape. A serial-access magnetic storage medium. Typically, a flat ribbon of metal, plastic, or paper that is coated on one side with material that can be magnetized; information is stored on the tape by a combination of magnetized spots in certain patterns. (See also magnetic media.)

machining robot system. A robot that can pick up parts and place them in a new location. Parts are usually moved in and out of machinery or transferred from station to station.

mailing/letter-handling/addressing equipment.

Mailing systems and equipment that have been automated with components to increase capabilities and to streamline efficiencies.

mag card/mag tape. A tape or card that is coated or impregnated with magnetic material, on which information may be stored in the form of coded polarized spots.

mail order. A sales method by which a consumer may order products through a catalog.

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main distribution frame (MDF). A unit used in telephone wiring for terminating and crossconnecting telephone wiring to the telephoneswitching system. The MDF is the primary (or first) distribution point. (See also distribution

frame.)

manufacturing system. A system used to process raw material into a finished product.

mapping. Computer-aided tools that allow geographically related data to be captured, edited, analyzed, and managed. Typical users are civil and utility engineers, geophysicists, and geologists.

mainframe computer. A general-purpose information system with price range of $350,000 and up. CPU bit width ranges from 32 to 64 bits.

Physical environment can be either with or without special environmental controls and requires full-time support by professional computer systems support staff with 10 or more members.

Number of concurrent users is 250 or more.

market. The demand for a product or service.

market share. A comparison of a company's performance with the total market so that its relative position and the amount of the market it captured is derived.

maintenance management. The upkeep of property, equipment, or tooling through planning, analysis, and documentation of maintenance functions.

markup. 1: The amount added to the cost to determine the selling price for a specific product.

2: The amount added to the cost to determine the selling price for a specific product.

management. An application that supports the management of data that can be achieved using document image management software and systems.

maskmaking e-beam. Semiconductor production equipment utilizing a method that allows submicron pattern generation for producing semiconductor mask plates or maskless lithography. (See also lithography.)

manufacturer. A producer or assembler of goods.

mask ROM. A semiconductor read-only memory programmed to the customer's specified pattern during the manufacturing process. (See read-only

memory.)

manufacturer's representative/agent. An independent contractor who represents multiple manufacturers. She or he does not take title to the product.

mass merchandiser. A segment of the distribution channel with storefront locations. It differs from a dealer in that its primary business is the sale of a broad range of consumer goods.

manufacturer's suggested retail price. See list

price.

manufacturing automation. The use of a computer to aid and improve a manufacturing process.

mass property. The analysis of the physical characteristics of a part, assembly, or system. The evaluation of multiple properties—measures volume, weight, and surface area and locates center of gravity.

manufacturing EATE N.E.C. Equipment that tests electronic systems that are composed of a number of subsystems. The testing equipment must verify operability and be capable of locating a faulty subsystem or component in event of failure.

mass storage peripheral. A device that interfaces with the system or machine to external memory storage.

material. The designation of a number of basic metals, compounds, and gases to make up thermoelectric materials.

manufacturing engineering tools. The small segment of manufacturing engineering that is concerned with tool and fixture design and the development of manufacturing processes.

material-handling equipment and systems.

Equipment such as 1: Movement—Automated guided vehicle systems, conveyors, and monorails;

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2: Storage—Automated storage and retrieval systems; miniload, microload, and carousels.

3: Identification—Bar codes, radio frequency, machine vision, and other sensors used for identification are covered in Sensors in Manufacturing.

4: Controls—Computers, programmable controllers, and software used in material handling are included in Computers in Manufacturing and

Software in Manufacturing.

MBE. See molecular beam epitaxy deposition.

MCAE. See mechanical computer-aided engi-

neering.

MCU. See microcontroller.

MDF. See main distribution frame.

mechanical. Mechanical CAD/CAM is the software application of computer-aided tools to design, analyze, document, and manufacture discrete parts, components, and assemblies.

material-handling/loading robot systems.

mechanical assembly equipment. 1: Machinery

Robotics used in the loading, moving, storage, or equipment that assembles mechanical parts into subassemblies or final products. 2: Dial and unloading of materials. or rotary assembly machines; in-line transfer

material requirement planning (MRP). A planning method that uses bills of material, inventory data, and a master production schedule to calculate material requirements. This method makes machines; flexible assembly equipment (except robots).

mechanical computer-aided engineering

(MCAE). The application of CAD/CAM tools for mechanical design and analysis. MCAE applicarecommendations to restock materials inventory.

Further, because material requirements planning is time-phased, this method makes recommendations to reschedule open orders when due dates and need dates are not in phase. Originally seen only as a better way to order inventory, material requirements planning is thought of today primartions range from conceptual product design through detailed product design and analysis to supporting production design. Commonly used

MCAE products are solid modeling and finite element analysis technology. ily as a scheduling technique, i.e., a method to establish and maintain valid due dates on orders.

mechanical computer-aided manufacturing.

See mechanical.

matrix printer. An impact printer that uses wire, hammer-like bristles, or needles to create characters formed by small dots. Matrix printers produce either serial or line output. The serial printer employs a moving printhead with a matrix block

(i.e., 5 X 7 or 7 X 9) of needles. The printhead sweeps across the page to print full characters one at a time. The line printer uses a horizontal band with raised dots that moves from left to right across the paper. The individual needles strike programmed character dots to form one row of dots per sweep across the page. Successive passes of the line printer form complete characters and complete rows of textual data. High-resolution text, comparable to daisywheel output, may be produced by overlapping matrix printers that print characters via a highly concentrated matrix or successive, staggered passes of the printhead.

Fonts for matrix printers are stored in ROM or

PROM memory.

media-to-media data conversion equipment.

Computer output-to-microfilm recording units, tape print units, card-to-tape conversion units, as well as document entry devices.

medical. An environment or industry that uses computers to control and/or collect and analyze data from patients, medical equipment, and/or instruments.

memory. 1: A device into which data can be entered and stored for later retrieval. 2: An integrated current (IC) designed for the storage and retrieval of information in binary form; can be either bipolar or MOS technology and includes dynamic random-access memory (DRAM), static random-access memory (SRAM), read-only memory (ROM), programmable read-only memory (PROM), erasable programmable read-only memory (EPROM), and electrically erasable programmable read-only memory (EEPROM).

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i l l

memory management unit (MMU). 1: An integrated circuit that manages the storage and retrieval of data found by cell location or address.

2: A component (or set of components) that implements the memory management function in a processor-based system. system configuration. Normally a multiuser system used in a common work area. Usually has a merchant (nonproprietary) microprocessor.

microcontroller (MCU). An integrated circuit, containing a CPU, memory, and I/O capability, that can perform the basic functions of a computer.

merchant production. The sale of a good to a company other than the manufacturing company.

merger and acquisition. In financial terms, it means to absorb or acquire one company by another.

microperipheral (MPR). A support device or circuit for a microprocessor or microcontroller that either interfaces with external equipment or provides system support.

metalorganic CVD (MOCVD). A technique used to deposit material onto a wafer.

metal oxide silicon (MOS). 1: A circuit in which the active region is a metal oxide semiconductor sandwich. The oxide acts as the dielectric insulator between the metal and the semiconductor.

2: A process that results in a structure of metal over silicon oxide over silicon. 3: Technology that employs field effect transistors having a metal or conductive electrode that is insulated from the semiconductor material by an oxide layer of the substrate material.

microprocessor (MPU). A single-chip component, or a collection of architecturally interdependent components, functioning as the central processing unit (CPU) in a system. A microprocessor may contain some input/output circuits, but it usually does not operate in a standalone environment.

microprogrammable digital signal processor

(MPDSP). An integrated circuit that allows highperformance, modular DSP architectures to be designed using standard off-the-shelf components.

Products include bit-slice and building block components.

meteorological instrument. An instrument used to monitor and observe the weather.

metropolitan statistical area. A large population nucleus, together with adjacent communities, that has a high degree of economic and social integration with that nucleus. Each metropolitan statistical area (MSA) must include at least: (a) one city with 50,000 or more inhabitants, or (b) a census bureau-defined urbanized area of at least

50,000 inhabitants and a total MSA population of at least 100.000 (75,000 in New England).

microwave. 1: Any radio wave with a frequency higher than 890 MHz or a wavelength of between

1ml and Im. 2: A form of electromagnetic radiation that has frequencies of 1 GHz. These highfrequency bands of energy are used extensively for radar and wideband communications.

microwave antenna. A device used for receiving and transmitting microwave signal beams. (See also antenna.)

microcomponent. 1: An integrated circuit (IC) with high-speed, low-power density considered as a single part. 2: An IC that contains a processing unit or acts as an interface chip to such a device.

Types of microdevices include microprocessor

(MPU), microcontroller (MCU), microperipheral

(MPR), and digital signal processor (DSP).

microwave monolithic integrated circuit

(MMIC). An electronic circuit employing monolithic integrated circuit technology fabricated by microelectronic techniques and capable of operating at frequencies above 1 GHz.

microwave oven. An oven that uses electron waves to produce heat for faster cooking of foods.

microcomputer. An information system with price ranging up to $100,000, with the majority priced at less than $50,000. CPU bit width is normally 32 bits, but can be as low as 8 bits.

Traditionally used as a desk-side or desktop

microwave radio equipment. Equipment that includes transmitter/receiver systems, power supplies, repeaters, and other equipment used in microwave radio systems. It also includes analog and digital equipment used both in common carrier and in private industrial systems.

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midrange. The combination of microcomputer, minicomputer, and superminicomputer.

military/aerospace electronic equipment. Electronic equipment used in the military and civilian aerospace industries.

minicomputer-based terminal. A display terminal provided by a minicomputer manufacturer or a display terminal that is protocol-specific to an

IBM System/34, /36, or /38 computer. This terminal may operate in either character or block mode. Excluded from this category is any minicomputer-compatible terminal supplied by an independent manufacturer.

military communication equipment. Voice, data, and cryptographic equipment used for communication in the military.

military computer system. A computer system used for military purposes; a set of hardware components that form a system intended solely for military applications. This category includes general-purpose CPUs, storage, input/output, and terminals and includes both commercial, ruggedized, and mil'spec versions for integration into military systems and for government-sponsored programs.

military electronic equipment. Electronic equipment used exclusively by the military. Usually, this equipment must meet government specifications and regulations.

miscellaneous military equipment. Equipment that includes classified systems, test equipment

(N.E.C.), vehicle control, medical equipment, assorted development and office equipment, and research and development equipment; all used in the military.

mixed signal ASIC. An ASIC that has one analog input or output and one digital input or output.

mixed signal IC. An integrated circuit that has one analog input or output and one digital input or output.

MMIC. See microwave monolithic integrated

circuit.

military simulation and training. The performance of military maneuvers/exercises as training for real-life military situations. This category includes flight and battle simulators and equipment operation and maintenance systems.

MMU. See memory management unit.

mobile communications equipment. Equipment

(base stations, mobile units, and antenna) used primarily for portable public or private communications.

milling programmable machine tool. A machine tool for the removal of metal by feeding a workpiece through the periphery to remove the material through the motion of workpiece and cutter.

minicomputer. An information system with prices ranging from $10,000 to $300,000 but mainly falling between $25,000 and $150,000.

CPU bit width ranges from 8 to 16. Minicomputers are situated usually in a common work area and occupy more floor space than most tower configurations. Number of concurrent users ranges from 15 to 100. System usually incorporates proprietary processor, with notable exceptions, and is often packaged with third-party application software and/or peripherals and then resold into specialized applications or vertical markets. Examples of models are the HP 1000,

HP 3000/70, PDP-11/84, and IBM Series/1.

mobile infrastructure. The central base station and other central equipment that provide mobile communication services.

mobile radio base station equipment. The base/ centralized station equipment associated with cellular radio systems. This category includes both switching equipment and radio transmitter/ receiver equipment.

mobile radio service. Service or network revenue associated with cellular radio systems. (See also mobile service.)

mobile radio system equipment. Electronic equipment used in the transmission and receiving of radio signals. Equipment includes main central control, base control mobile stations, and handheld car units. Used primarily with cellular and other mobile communication technologies.

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mobile service. Radio service between a fixed location and one or more mobile radio stations, or between mobile stations.

MOS application-specific IC. See applicationspecific integrated circuit.

mobile telephone service (MTS). Radio communication between a mobile (portable) unit and the public switched network including cellular service.

MOS cell-based IC. See cell-based integrated circuit.

MOS custom IC. See custom integrated circuit.

modeling. An application that supports the representation of a process or system by using equations that simulate and represent behavior under varying conditions.

MOS digital. A semiconductor technology in which the active devices are n-channel, p-channel, or complementary MOS transistors that operate in a digital or binary mode. (See also digital.)

modem. 1: An electronic device that provides modulation and demodulation functions of transmitted data signals over telephone lines. They convert digital data signals to analog for transmission over leased lines or the analog public switched telephone network. 2: The integrated circuits used in a modem.

MOS FPGA. See field-programmable gate

array.

MOS gate array. See gate array.

MOS logic. See logic circuit.

MOS memory. See memory.

MOS microcomponent. See microcomponent.

molecular beam epitaxy deposition (MBE). A technique used in semiconductor manufacturing to deposit a single crystal layer on a substrate by use of a molecular beam.

MOS microcontroller. See microcontroller.

MOS microperipheral. See microperipheral.

MOS microprocessor. See microprocessor.

molecular engineering. See computational

chemistry/molecular engineering.

MOS nonvolatile memory. See nonvolatile

memory.

money management. An application that identifies and controls the source, flow, location, and earning potential of an organization's cash and investments.

MOS PLA. See programmable logic array.

MOS PLD. See programmable logic device.

MOS PMD. See programmable multilevel logic

device.

monitor. 1: To check the operation and performance of a system or circuit by examining parts of transmissions. 2: The physical CRT unit, associated electronics, and housing used in display systems. 3: A station or equipment arranged to supervise system operation. 4: To supervise and verify the correct operation of a system, device, or program. 5: The screen of a video display terminal. 6: An analog monitor can display an almost infinite number of colors, while a digital monitor can display a more limited range of colors.

MOS standard logic. See standard logic.

MOS transistor. A field-effect transistor

(FET) with a gate that is insulated from the semiconductor substrate by a thin layer of silicon dioxide. Being field-effect transistors, MOS-FET provide a voltage-input-to-current-output relationship called transconductance. MOS-FET are excellent switches because voltage at the gate turns the output current on or off.

monolithic analog integrated circuit. An analog

IC constructed from a single piece of material. All circuit components are manufactured in or on top of a single crystal of semiconductor material.

mouse. A hand-held device that is moved on a surface to provide coordinate input to a graphics system. It is used most often to position a pointer or cursor.

MOS. See metal oxide silicon.

MPDSP. See microprogrammable digital signal

processing.

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MPR. See microperipheral.

MPU. See microprocessor.

MPU load programmer. A device that allows engineers and IC designers to program a variety of programmable devices (ICs), thereby speeding up the design process. The device to be programmed is loaded directly on the device programmer.

MTS. See mobile telephone service.

n-channel metal oxide semiconductor (NMOS).

Pertaining to MOS devices made on p-type silicon substrates in which the active carriers are electrons that flow between n-type source and drain contacts. The opposite of PMOS. NMOS is two to three times faster than PMOS. (See also MOS.)

net additions. 1: The change in stock, such as installed base or inventory. 2: The relative increase or decrease in the total installed base of a product.

mu

iltilingual publishing. A system with the pur pose/use of printing in a variety of languages. NETVIEW. IBM network management product.

multimedia. A process that uses more than one form of communication.

multiplexer equipment. Public telecommunication equipment used to combine a number of channels for transmission over a common medium, such as satellite, microwave radio, cable carrier, or fiber-optic cable. Excluded from this are data-only customer premises multiplex equipment and multiplex equipment that is integral to carrier or microwave radio systems.

multistrike ribbon. A ribbon that advances only part of a character width; characters slightly overlay one another on the ribbon, but no character hits the exact same spot on the ribbon.

network management. A software application that controls the logical connections and information flow among computers on a network. This software may have additional functions such as performance measurement and diagnostic and accounting functions.

network support services. All services that help customers better utilize their networking facilities.

The services include site planning, installation, and ongoing on-site and remote maintenance support, as well as professional services such as network design/planning, integration, administration, and operations management.

network terminating devices. Equipment that connects a data network to the data terminal.

multiuser system. A computer system inherently designed for environments with multiple users.

new placement demand. The total end-user demand for new products (as compared with replacement products).

N

natural resources and construction. An environment or industry that includes establishments primarily engaged in agricultural production, forestry, commercial fishing, hunting and trapping, and related services; and mining or quarrying, developing mines, or exploring for nonmetallic minerals except fuel. Also, certain well and brine operations and primary preparation plants, such as those engaged in crushing, grinding, washing, or other methods of concentration.

navigation, military. A process for directing ships, aircraft, spacecraft, and other crafts to a specific destination. Equipment determines position, distance, and course of vessel or craft.

newspaper publishing. A system with the main purpose/use of printing newspapers; typically daily or weekly publication containing such elements as news, feature articles, and advertising.

nitrogen. A chemical element.

NMOS. See

n-channel metal oxide semiconductor.

non-IBM, protocol-specific terminal. A terminal that is protocol-specific to a Burroughs,

Honeywell, or Sperry mainframe computer. Included is any terminal of this type that connects to another computer by means of protocol emulation.

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nonimpact printer. A hard-copy computer output device that forms images through electrostatic or other nonimpact methods. These printers include ink jet, laser, and thermal printers. (See also ink jet printer.)

O

OCR. See optical character reader.

OEM. See original equipment manufacturer.

nonvolatile memory. An integrated circuit using two-junction transistor technology where memory retains information when the power is off. Also known as core or permanent memory. Can be either bipolar or MOS technology process.

office equipment. Equipment used in a business or office environment. Equipment may include copiers and duplicators, electronic calculators, dictating machines, electronic typewriters, word processors, banking systems, cash registers, and mail- and letter-handling equipment.

nonvolatile random-access memory (NVRAM).

A read/write semiconductor memory device that does not lose information when the power is turned off.

off-line robotics programming. A special-purpose process simulation that graphically represents the sequence of steps to program a robot for a particular operation. The resulting data can be downloaded to a robot to update its control program.

notebook personal computer. The notebook personal computer is a system that resembles a laptop personal computer in general form factor and appearance. This personal computer is smaller and lighter in weight than a laptop D/C unit. The "standard" notebook size is 8.5 inches by 11 inches by 2 inches or less, and the weight of these units is in the 5- to 7-pound range. Notebook computers also, presently, make use of industry-storage mass storage media including

3.5-inch floppy disk.

oil field services. A software application that uses small computers in the oil rigs or the wellhead areas to log and analyze data from sensors in the well.

OLTP. See on-line transaction processing.

one-time programmable read-only memory

(OTP ROM). An EPROM packaged in plastic without a quartz window for erasure. Such a device is therefore programmable only once.

nuclear radiation detection and monitoring in-

strument. An instrument used to detect, inspect, monitor, and control alpha particles (neutrons, protons, and electrons) that emanate from the atomic nucleus as a result of radioactivity and nuclear actions.

numerical control. 1: Computer instructions that automate machining and drafting tools. 2: A technique of simulating the operation of a machine tool. 3: Descriptive of systems in which digital computers are used for the control of operations, particularly of automatic machines. A technique of controlling a machine or process through the use of command instructions in coded numerical form.

on-line transaction processing (OLTP). The input, tracking, and output of a well-defined record of information, processed in real time rather than batch. Examples include ATMs and airline reservations systems. OLTP systems are usually large and complicated enough that each one is customized, so there are few generic OLTP products.

The RAMP-C and Debit-Credit benchmarks are examples of OLTP standards.

op amp. See operational amplifier.

open systems interconnection (OSI). A communication standard for network architecture that allows communication between various equipment.

numerical-control (NC) part programming.

The programming of a numerical-control machine tool or automated processing system. Graphics and language-based programming tools are available.

NVRAM. memory.

operating environment. A set of conventions for screen appearance, keyboard, mouse and screen operations, and program functions. Operating environments function within an operating system.

operating system. 1: The software program in a computer that maps logical constructs to physical

See nonvolatile random-access locations in the computer. The operating system is the program that lets a user access data by a file

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name without knowing where the file is physically located on the disk. 2: The operating system controls the computer's operations by managing disk, screen, file maintenance, and printer activity, while loading and running application programs. separated from a photo detector by a transparent, insulating, dielectric layer, all mounted in an opaque package. A current pulse in the LED causes a radiation pulse to flow across the dielectric layers to a photo detector, which produces a current pulse at the output. The input and output circuits are coupled with high-standoff voltage isolation.

operating utilities. A program or routine of general usefulness and applicable to many jobs or purposes.

operational amplifier (op amp). A type of integrated circuit (IC) that generates an amplified output that is exactly proportional to its input.

operator support system. Special equipment and/or software that facilitates the operation of a switchboard or comparable equipment.

optoelectronic (opto). A semiconductor device in which photons cause electron flow or vice versa. Optoelectronic chips contain transducers used between photonic circuit media and electronic media; they also may contain amplifiers, logic functions, and/or other photonic or electronic functions.

optical CD/wafer inspection. Critical dimension

(CD) refers to the line, element, or feature that must be manufactured and controlled to stringent specifications. Wafer inspection refers to the inspection of a patterned wafer for process defects by visual image process techniques.

order entry and sales support. An application to support the process of accepting and translating what a customer wants into terms used by the manufacturer. This can be as simple as creating shipping documents for a finished goods product line to a more complicated series of activities including engineering effort for make-to-order products. optical character reader (OCR). 1: A device or scanner that can read printed or typed characters and convert them into a digital signal for input into a data or word processor. 2: The machine identification of printed characters through the use of light-sensitive devices; computer-input-only hardware.

order entry/processing. Acceptance and translation of customer requirements into terms used by a manufacturer.

organization operation. A software application that supports the day-to-day running of an organization.

optical disk controller. A device that controls the storage and retrieval of data from a video disk that is sensed through a laser beam.

optical disk drive. A data storage device utilizing laser technology. Types include CD-ROM,

WORM, and erasable optical disk drives.

optical jukebox. A library system that holds multiple disk drives and optical disks to create a large storage environment on optical media.

optical media. The substance on which data are stored electronically and read by laser technology.

original equipment manufacturer (OEM).

1: An OEM may manufacture a product for assembly into another system or larger configuration by another manufacturer or vendor. 2: A purchaser of materials, components, or equipment to be incorporated into its product line. 3: A product reseller that integrates hardware, software, and/or services. The reseller may or may not own the hardware or software. An OEM differs from a

VAR in that it adds its own label to the product and backs up its warranties.

optical-scanning equipment. See optical char-

acter reader.

OSI. See open systems interconnection.

opto. See optoelectronic.

OS/2. Computer systems based on the Intel

80XXX architecture and using OS/2 operating system software.

optocoupler. 1: A device that transmits electrical signals, without electrical connection, between a light source and a receiver. Also called an optoisolator. 2: A device that consists of an LED

other. A subject or segment that is not distinctly defined within the Dataquest High-Technology

Segmentation scheme.

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OTP ROM. See one-time programmable read-

only memory.

painting robot system. A system consisting of a number of robots programmed to paint by carrying spray guns and applying a coating of material.

Also known as finishing robot.

PABX. See private automatic branch

PAL. See programmable array logic.

exchange.

panel-type instrument. 1: Switches, dials, and buttons that are mounted on an electronic unit

pacemaker. An electronically pulsed oscillator that controls and monitors a system. 2: Electronic implanted in the body to deliver electric pulses to instrumentation devices mounted on a panel for a the heart at a fixed rate in response to a sensor variety of equipment purposes. that detects when a person's heart rate slows.

paper. Sheets of fiber formed on a fine screen

packet assembler/disassembler (PADS). A system element that buffers data sent to and from character-mode devices and assembles and disassembles the packets needed for X.25 operation. from a water suspension. There are hundreds of different types of paper based on weight, brightness, color, opacity, and coating.

packet data switching. Data network switches that connect terminals and packet assemblers/disassemblers to a pre-edit node using a high-speed link (56,000 bps). Can be public or private.

particle accelerator. A device that accelerates electrically charged particles (protons, electrons) to high energies.

part process design. The design of the actual manufacturing process and sequence.

PADS. See packet assembler/disassembler.

parts service. Spare hardware modules or components used in the repair and/or replacement of failed hardware units.

page composition. Refers to the page composition software used to produce finished draft or camera-ready pages whereby text and graphics have been aesthetically laid out using an editable

WYSIWYG display environment.

page, nonimpact, plain paper (PNPP). A printer with the ability to buffer, in part or in whole, a page of images received from an electronic source and then to transfer these images to a receiving substrate.

passive device. 1: An inert component that may control, but does not create or amplify, energy.

2: A device that exhibits no transistance. A component that does not provide rectification, amplification, or switching but reacts to voltage and current. 3: Pertaining to a general class of device that operates as signal power alone.

patient monitoring. Equipment used to monitor, control, and record data on activity concerning or affecting a patient's health.

page printer. A printer that prints characters one at a time to full-page format. Page printers are rated by speed categories, expressed in pages per minute (ppm).

pay phones. A telephone instrument located in a public location that accepts coins for operation.

paging equipment. Communication equipment that produces an audio signal in a radio receiver carried by an individual to tell him that he is needed at the telephone. Communication system for summoning individuals or making public announcements.

paging system. The equipment necessary to selectively alert individuals by tone or voice paging, either by pocket radio receivers or speakers within a building.

payroll. A software application that supports an organization making payment to its employees for work performed.

PBX-private branch exchange. See PBX tele-

phone system.

PBX telephone system. A telephone switching system on the customer premises that, by dialing an access code, permits a telephone to interface to the public telephone central exchange or office.

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PC. See personal computer system.

PCB layout. Products that are used to create the layout of the traces and components to be placed on a printed circuit board. instructions from the CPU. 2: Information flows between the CPU and a unit of peripheral equipment.

p-channel metal oxide semiconductor (PMOS).

An MOS device made on an n-type silicon substrate in which the active carriers are holes (p) flowing between p-type source and drain controls.

personal communications network (PCN). A class of communications technology that allows communication with a mobile entity. Sample technologies include mobile radio, cellular, and paging services.

PC logic chipset. A semiconductor device (or set of devices) that integrates standard logic and controller functions onto a very large scale integration

(VLSI) chip, resulting in a reduced component count on the PC motherboard.

personal computer operating system. A personal computer operating system is a program that supervises and controls the operation of a personal computer.

PCN. See personal communications network.

pen-based personal computer. This is a new classification of portable computers for 1991. The general identifier for this class of machines is that they utilize a pen or stylus for data input and do not normally require a keyboard to operate. (Keyboard options are included in some of these models, but the system can be fully utilized without the inclusion of a keyboard.) Pen-based computers do not have to be able to run MS-DOS or applications that run under DOS. It is expected that there will be three or more operating systems utilized in this product: PenPoint by GO Corporation, Pen Windows by Microsoft, and others that have not been made public at the time of publication.

personal computer system. A personal computer intended for use on the user's desk or work surface and not designed to be readily moved from place to place. Personal computers are those systems that include, as part of the basic system, a

BIOS- or ROM-based software code that is designed to permit the use of the system with any of the existing personal computer operating systems.

personal electronics. Electronic equipment for personal use.

personal finance. A software application that records, processes, and reports on personal financial data, including personal banking, credit card management, and budgeting. These applications are suitable for small businesses as well as home use.

percent retirement. See retirement.

personnel management. A software application that supports an organization in managing its employees; may include many subapplications.

periodical publishing. A system with the main purpose/use of printing publications issued at intervals.

photoblank. A blank glass plate that is processed to become a photomask for use in semiconductor manufacturing.

peripheral device. 1: Any instrument, device, or machine that enables a computer to communicate with the outside world, or areas in the operation of the computer. 2: Equipment that is connected to a computer but is not part of the computer.

Examples include printers, terminals, and disk drives.

peripheral I/O management. 1: A program that interacts with the central processing unit (CPU) of a computer to communicate with devices beyond the CPU. The program interprets and responds to

photomask. A glass plate covered with an array of patterns, used to form circuit patterns on semiconductor wafers. Photomasks may be made of emulsion, chrome, iron oxide, silicon, or a number of other materials.

photoreceptor. The photoreceptor is the central element in an electrophotographic copier or nonimpact printer. The photoreceptor consists of two parts; a support or substrate, usually in the form of a drum or flexible belt, and a photoconductive coating consisting of one or more layers.

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photoresist. The light-sensitive film spun onto semiconductor wafers and exposed using highintensity light through a photomask.

PLC. See programmable logic controller.

PLD. See programmable logic device.

photosensitive. Capable of emitting electrons when struck by light rays.

photosensitive plotter. A plotter that uses photosensitive properties to create an image.

photosensor. An optoelectronic semiconductor that responds to radiant energy. Examples are photodiodes and phototransistors.

plotter. 1: A recorder that charts, in graph form, a dependent variable as a function of one or more variables with an automatically controlled pen or pencil. 2: Any (vector or raster) computer hardcopy devices that perform mainly graphics functions. These devices include pen plotters, electrostatic plotters, photographic and laser plotters, and ink jet plotters.

PMD. See programmable multilevel logic

device. physical property test, inspection, and meas-

urement. An instrument designed to inspect and measure physical property.

PMOS. See p-channel metal oxide semicon-

ductor.

PMR. See private mobile radio.

physical vapor deposition (PVD). A process through which specific materials are physically layered on a wafer. Includes sputtering and evaporation.

PMR. See projection microradiography.

PNPP. See page, nonimpact, plain paper.

pin diode. A diode made by diffusing the semiconductor with p-dopant from one side and ndopant from the opposite side with the process so controlled that a thin or intrinsic region separates the n and p regions. (See also power diode.)

point-of-sale terminal. A terminal device that operates as a cash register in addition to transmitting information.

polysilicon. A silicon layer grown on a wafer in a furnace.

PLA. See programmable logic array.

placement. End-user consumption of a product that is either purchased, leased, or rented.

planning. An application that facilitates the quantitative aspects of business planning, such as modeling, budgeting, analysis, and forecasting.

plasma etchant. A highly ionized gas (plasma) in the manufacture of high-density semiconductors.

population. The total of individuals occupying an area or making up a whole. A de facto population should include all persons physically present in a country (state, province, region, city, or town) or designated area at a reference date. A de jure population, by contrast, should include all usual residents of a given country or designated area, whether or not they are physically present at the reference date. By definition, therefore, a de

facto total and a de jure total are not entirely comparable.

plastic-processing machinery. Numerically controlled machinery used for injection, structural foam, extrusion, blow molding, thermoforming, and reaction injection.

portable electronic measuring instrument. An electronic measuring instrument that can be carried or transported with ease.

plastics. 1: A polymetric material of large molecular height that can be shaped by flow; usually refers to the final product. Examples include polyvinyl chloride, polyethylene, and urea formaldehyde. 2: Displaying or associated with plasticity.

portable radio receiver transmitter. A device for converting radio waves into perceptible signals.

portfolio management. A software application that allows investors to clarify, estimate, and control the sources of risk and return in their portfolio.

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postsecondary education. The provision of formal instructional programs with a curriculum designed primarily for students who have completed the requirements for a high school diploma or equivalent.

potentiometer. A device for the measurement of an electromotive force by comparison with a known potential difference. engraved; an image outlined or set forth for commercial, professional, or industrial purposes.

print element. The mechanisms used in fully formed character printers and typewriters by which marks are made on the paper. The three types of print elements are printwheels, also known as daisywheels, golf balls, and thimbles.

power diode rectifier. A diode is a two-terminal device that permits current flow in only one direction. This property is used in diodes and rectifiers to convert AC current to DC.

printer. The unit that produces copy on paper—a typewriter or a line printer. Often connected to a

CPU that transforms electronic data into hardcopy form. (See also ink jet printer and line

printer.)

power grid control. See power management.

power IC. An analog integrated circuit that can control one or more amps of current, dissipate one or more watts of power, or is capable of operating with voltages exceeding 100 volts.

power management. A real-time application that monitors and controls power generation equipment and power line grids.

power supply. 1: A unit that supplies electrical power to another unit. 2: Energy source that provides power for operating electronic apparatus.

printer controller. 1: Within a printer, the device used to regulate, accelerate, decelerate, start, stop, reverse, or protect devices connected to an electric controller. 2: A device or instrument that holds a process or cartridge at a desired level.

3: Hardware and/or software, usually either printed circuit board- or diskette-based, that takes data streams from software and converts it to printer-specific commands. The controller may reside in a CPU; may be connected to the print engine by an interface cable, a diskette or chip set in the CPU or printer; or, as in most cases, may be a physical attachment to or integrated component of the printer itself.

power train. The mechanism by which power is transmitted from the engine to other part of the vehicle that it drives. Examples include ignition, spark timing, fuel control, turbo control, emissions systems, voltage regulator, alternator, engine control, and diagnostics.

printer controller board. See printer control-

ler. (Except all devices are loaded onto a board.)

printer, impact. Family of printers that use direct impression impact of a typebar, type head, or matrix pin to exert pressure against a paper ribbon and a platen to create a character.

power transistor. 1: A transistor that dissipates power of one or more watts. 2: A transistor designed for high-current, high-voltage applications.

printer, nonimpact. A printer capable of imaging on a substrate without physically striking it; these include ink jet, laser, and thermal printers.

premises switching equipment. Voice equipment that provides switching or call-routing functions. Includes equipment such as PBX telephone system and key telephone system.

presentation graphics. 1: A software application with a principal function of formatting text or numeric data into specified formats for the presentation of ideas. This may include graphs, charts, and/or lists suitable for professional presentations. 2: An image written, printed, drawn, or

print system network. Hardware and software that is integrated to manage the information sent to one or a number of printers, usually shared by more than one user. The system may be as simple as a switch box connected to two CPUs and one printer, or as complex as a full local area network that controls print streams to many printers from multiple CPU systems and controls job-queuing management, printing error conditions, spooling, and rerouting.

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printwheel. A print element for certain character printers. The characters are engraved at the end of spokes, the entire printwheel resembling a daisy. Also known as daisywheel.

process control system, auxiliary station.

Peripheral equipment of a process control system not in direct communication with the central processing unit or system.

private automatic branch exchange (PABX).

One type of telephone switching system that is typically used in larger businesses. The PABX allows computer-like programming of incoming and outgoing calls to optimize network configurations and provide additional call management features.

process control system, controller. The controller describes that portion of a process control system that continuously measures the value of a variable quantity or condition and then automatically acts on the controlled equipment to correct any deviation from a desired present value.

private line. A telecommunications network connection for the exclusive use of one organization.

(See also leased circuit.)

process control system, indicator. A portion of the process control system that produces a diagram measuring the pressure volume changes in a running system.

private mobile radio (PMR). See cellular service.

process control system, industrial process com-

puter. A computer that monitors the manipulations and changes of numerous conditions within a process control system automatically.

private packet data switching. A private packet data network switch connects terminals and packet assemblers/disassemblers to a packet node using a high-speed link (56,000 bps). (See also

packet data switching.)

process control system, recorder. A portion of a process control system that makes a graphic or acoustic record of one or more variable quantities.

private school or institution. A school or institution that is controlled by an individual or agency other than a state, a subdivision of a state, or the federal government; usually supported primarily by funds other than public funds; and is operated by other than publicly elected or appointed officials.

process control, nonunified system. Systemtype instruments and related equipment for process control activated from standardized electrical transmission signals, in which control and signal conditioning are separated from the display and operator interface.

processing terminal. A display terminal that has local processing capability but is dependent on communication with a host, controller, or server to provide files and application programs. Such a terminal does not have a mass data storage device. process manufacturing. 1: Continuous process produces a continuous stream of products, the units of which are not differentiated from one another (i.e., gasoline). 2: Batch processing produces product by reference to a recipe (i.e., bread).

processor. A device for handling information in a sequence of reasonable operations. Any device that can perform operations on data. process control system. 1: Monitoring and maintaining the operation of plants that manufacture homogeneous materials such as oil, chemicals, and paper. Process control systems are capable of detecting errors in input variables and environment and taking corrective action. Closed-loop systems are self-correcting, and open-loop systems alert an operator. 2: A computer-based system that controls physical transformation and/or the mixing of products in a fluid state.

process planning and control. See process con-

trol system.

process simulation. The computerized simulation of the sequence and interdependencies of manufacturing processes. Also involves process modeling and includes NC part programming as a subset.

product. A good or service.

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product category. A grouping of similar products.

production. The manufacture of goods.

programmable logic controller (PLC). A device or transmission control unit in which hardwired functions have been replaced with software or microcode. A programmable controller enables a user to add, change, or tailor computer capacities to the user's needs; programmable solid-state devices that replace mechanical relays for controlling sequential operations, timing, counting, and similar simple control actions. Where the capabilities exist as a function of the PLC, this definition includes more sophisticated tasks such as mathematical computations, data acquisitions, reporting, and process equipment control.

programmable logic device (PLD). A type of application-specific integrated circuit (ASIC) that is user programmable (after assembly) rather than mask programmable. The function of a PLD is determined by blowing fuse links or programming memory devices to create the desired interconnections between the fixed logic elements on the device. Can be either a bipolar or MOS technology. (See also programmable logic array.)

production planning and control. Software used to plan for factory resources of a manufacturing company.

professional publishing. Systems dedicated exclusively to the job of publishing; typically, PCbased professional publishing systems focus on a single task or stage in the document production cycle, rather than managing the entire document production process.

professional services. A range of services including consulting on information technology, contract/custom programming, systems integration, facilities management, education, and ongoing maintenance.

programmable array logic (PAL). PAL is a trademark of Monolithic Memories, Inc. (now part of Advanced Micro Devices), referring to a family of logic devices that are customer programmable.

programmable logic array (PLA). 1: A form of programmable logic device containing a structured, partially interconnected set of gates and inverters that are fuse programmed by the user.

Can be manufactured in bipolar or MOS technology.

programmable machine tool. Numerical control

(NC), computer numerical control (CNC), direct numerical control (DNC), and flexible machining centers used for metal cutting and metal forming.

programmable multilevel logic device (PMD).

A semiconductor that can be manufactured by a bipolar or MOS technology process. The device, evolved from the basic programmable logic array

(PLA), incorporates architectures to implement complex logic functions efficiently. PMDs can implement multiple levels of logic without sacrificing input/output or I/O cells or pins.

programmable read-only memory (PROM). A nonvolatile fuse-programmable solid-state memory circuit that is programmable only once, with special equipment. It is a programmed ROM that may be programmed after manufacture by blowing fuse links or shorting base-emitter junctions.

PROMs provide high-speed access to frequently needed data and instructions. They allow a vendor company to customize a system before delivery to the user.

projection/aligner. Wafer fabrication lithography equipment that uses mirrors instead of lenses. The wafer and mask are separated by distance, not allowing the entire wafer to be exposed. This process lines up two or more layers of a wafer so that the components of one layer are compatible with the components of the other layer. (See also

lithography.)

projection microradiography (PMR). An electron beam is focused onto an extremely fine pencil, generating a point source of x-rays; enlargement is achieved by placing the sample very near this source and several centimeters from the recording material.

project management. A software application that supports the ordering of activities across time.

This application assists in planning and implementing projects by providing tools for forecasting requirements, projecting costs, and providing other charting and analysis features.

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PROM. See programmable read-only memory.

prosthetic medical equipment. Equipment used in the surgical and dental specialties concerned with the artificial replacement of missing body parts.

public switching equipment. Equipment used in public telecommunications to switch or route voice and data calls. This segment includes equipment such as digital central office switching equipment and digital access cross-connect systems.

protocol. A set of rules (not a program) for software programs to conform with in data communications. A program that reacts properly to data sent to it in a form that does not conflict with these rules and that sends data in conformance with these rules is said to support, or be in compliance with, the particular protocol. An example of a protocol is the one used by humans over twoway radio: the protocol is that one person finishes speaking by saying "over"; the other party then speaks, until finished and says "over"; the end of transmission is signalled by saying "over and out."

Examples of protocols in data communications are BSC (IBM) and T201 (Tymnet).

public telecommunications equipment. Equipment that includes public network services and equipment. It includes the various voice and data communications services provided by common carriers and the transmission and switching equipment used to implement these networks.

public telecommunications service. A service provided by public telecommunications carriers.

It includes services such as local telephone, long distance telephone, international telephone, leased circuit, public data network, enhanced network, and mobile communications.

protocol converter. Equipment that converts data from one format (protocol) to another. (See also gateway.)

proximity/contact aligner. Equipment that places a mask in direct contact with the wafer after the mask is aligned. With proximity, the mask does not come into direct contact with the wafer. (See also lithography.)

public transmission equipment. The equipment used in public telecommunications to transmit voice and data signals. It includes equipment such as multiplex equipment, carrier equipment, microwave radio equipment, and satellite earth state equipment.

publishing. 1: The business or profession of the commercial production and issuance of literature and information. 2: Computer-aided systems to automate the creation and printing of documents.

PTT. Postal, telegraph, and telephone organization. An organization that provides basic telecommunications services. For U.S., see regional bell operating companies.

public data network service. A packet-switched or circuit-switched network service available for public use. It includes the equipment and service charges associated with data communications networks that are offered to the general public.

These networks connect user terminals and computers to the network and may offer enhanced or value-added services, such as conversion of speeds, codes, protocols, electronic mail, or facsimile.

punch/shear/bend programmable machine

tool. Describes the action that occurs to a composite or material, generally metal, on a machine.

Punching literally punches a hole in the material, shearing cuts the material, and bending forms the material to a specified predetermined shape.

These three activities are performed on three separate machines.

purchasing. A software application that has computer-assisted generation or procurement documents specifying materials, quantities, and delivery times.

public packet data switching. See packet data

switching.

purchasing and vendor management. Contains statements as to the quantity, description, and price of the goods; agreed terms as to payments, discounts, date of performance, and transportation.

public school or institution. A school or institution controlled and operated by publicly elected or appointed officials and deriving its primary support from public funds.

PVD. See physical vapor deposition.

PW—private wire leased circuits. See private

line.

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Q

QC. See quality control.

QC analysis. Quality control analysis is generally performed throughout the manufacturing process, comparing the actual part shape or feature size to the design specification.

quality. The measure of how well a product or service meets customer expectations. Alternately, the ability to produce consistently a product or service within control limits or well-defined specifications.

quality assurance. The establishment and execution of procedures to measure product quality and adherence to acceptance criteria.

random-access memory (RAM). An integrated circuit permitting read-and-write access to any memory cell or address in a completely random sequence. Can be of either bipolar or MOS technology process. A memory device with the qualities of allowing arbitrary reading or writing of a desired data location. The system accesses the addressed material without reading through intervening data. Information may be retrieved more speedily from RAM than from serial media, such as tape. Also called read-and-write and scratchpad memory.

rapid thermal processing (RTP). Process that uses machines of low temperature for contact alloying and systems for the deposition of thin gate oxides. Similar to the diffusion furnace.

quality control. Process by which product is measured to ensure conformance to specification and standards.

query language. A generalized computer language that is used to interrogate a database.

R

R&D. See research and development.

radar. A radio device used to locate objects by frequency waves reflected off the object and received by the sender, allowing the sender to determine characteristics of an object. Includes airborne, shipboard, and ground search, flight control acquisition, detection, tracking, and associated test systems.

radio. 1: The use of electronic waves/signals to produce sound. 2: Home radio receivers including

AM, AM-FM, and FM radios that are classified as table models, clock models, and portable radios. This category does not include highfidelity receivers, radio-phonograph combinations, and television receivers, nor does it include automobile radios, stereos, or tape players.

railroad control. An application that monitors and controls railroad and urban rapid transit traffic.

RAM. See random-access memory.

RBOC. See regional bell operating company.

reactant gas. Molecules that act upon one another to produce a new set of molecules.

read-only memory (ROM). 1: Computer memory that can be read from but not written to.

Permanent memory on chips wherein information can be retrieved but not stored. Memory is not lost when the power to the computer system is turned off. 2: A memory device the contents of which can be read but not altered. (See also

mask ROM.)

real estate. An environment or industry that includes owners, lessors, lessees, buyers, sellers, agents, and developers of real estate.

real-time clock. A clock that indicates actual time, such as elapsed time, as opposed to a fictitious time established by a program.

real-time data acquisition and control. 1: The process by which events in the real world are translated to machine-readable signals. 2: Automated systems in which sensors of one type or another are attached to machinery. 3: Data processing is performed so that the results are available in time to influence the controlled or monitored system.

reconnaissance. Equipment used to secure data/ information about activity and resources concerning an enemy or potential enemy's territory.

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reduced-instruction-set computing micropro-

cessor (RISC MPU). The number of instructions a microprocessor runs for a specific application are reduced from a general-purpose complexinstruction-set computing (CISC) microprocessor to create a more efficient computing engine.

reel-to-reel tape drive. A tape format in which the running tape is wound onto a separate take-up reel. Also known as open reel.

regional bell operating company (RBOC).

Seven holding companies formed by the divestiture of AT&T to provide regulated and nonregulated telecommunications services in the United

States.

removable media disk drive. Removable media rigid disk drive has the platter enclosed in a housing that is designed to be user-accessible.

replacement demand. The subsequent demand by end users for new equipment.

research and development (R&D). Basic and applied research directed toward the discovery, invention, design, or development of new products and processes.

research supercomputer. An information system defined by a minimum of 32 low-performance computing nodes. Optimized to run highly parallel applications. Price ranges between $300,000 and

$2 million.

relational database management system. A software application for the storage, retrieval, update, and analysis of multiple databases. These databases are linked (related) through one or more identical fields, called keys.

residual value. The value of a product at the end of its useful life. Typically used with depreciation and leasing calculations.

resistor. A passive device that measurably opposes the passage of an electric current (e.g., doped silicon). (See also passive device.)

relay. 1: An electronic or electromechanical device for transferring a signal from one electrical circuit to another. 2: To forward a message through an intermediate station. (See also passive

device.)

remote batch. A method of entering jobs into the computer from a remote terminal.

respiratory analysis. Equipment used to examine, detect, and analyze the respiratory system.

retail trade. An environment or industry that includes establishments engaged in selling merchandise for personal or household consumption and rendering services incidental to the sale of the goods. In general, retail establishments are classified by kind of business according to the principal lines of commodities sold.

remote control. Any system of control performed from a distance. The control signal may be conveyed by intervening wires, sounds, light, or radio signals.

remote processing. A procedure in which the operating system can be used to process messages received from remote locations via telephone lines and telephone equipment. In effect, it is an extension of the data processing and programming facilities of the computer to remote locations.

remote sensing. The acquisition of information

(usually in the form of an image) about an object or area by recording electromagnetic radiation emanating from or reflected from the target. The electromagnetic energy is received and processed by a detector system that is not in physical contact with the target under study. Common platforms for detector systems are aircraft and satellites, but the definition is not restricted to these two.

retirement. The number of products that are removed from use. A product is considered retired from the installed base if it is scrapped, returned to the manufacturer, or placed in storage.

return. The number of units previously sold outright that have been returned or retired by the customer. (See also retirement.)

revenue. The amount of money that a company receives from its customers for goods and services.

rewritable optical disk drive. An optical disk drive that uses removable media that can be erased and reused many times (also called erasable optical disk drive).

ribbon. A strip of inked material or fabric, which when struck with a print element forms a character on paper. (See also single-strike ribbon, web

ribbon, film ribbon, multistrike ribbon.)

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rigid disk. media.

See rigid disk computer storage

rigid disk computer storage media. A rigid disk has a nonflexible substrate and can be made of aluminum, plastic, glass, or other rigid material. include: climate control, light reminder, keyless entry, heated windshield, sensing wipers, automatic door lock, automatic headlights, dimming, rear window defogger, antiskid braking, window control, and airbags/restraint control.

RISC MPU. See reduced-instruction-set com-

puting microprocessor.

robot. A reprogrammable multifunctional manipulator designed to move objects through variable motions for the performance of a variety of tasks. Intelligent robots commonly rely on vision systems to control their behavior through their ability to recognize objects.

robotic electronic assembly. Electronic manipulative machines that can perform functions ordinarily ascribed to humans in the assembly of material.

robotic nonelectric assembly. Same as robotic electronic assembly except that robots are mechanically maneuvered rather than through the methods and principles of electronics.

satellite. 1: A specialized radio transmitter/ receiver placed in orbit around the earth to provide transmission channels for information to be transmitted over great distances. 2: A celestial body orbiting another of larger size.

satellite communication equipment. Equipment used for communication by use of an active or passive satellite to extend the range of a radio, or other transmitter, by returning signals to earth from an orbiting satellite.

satellite earth station equipment. The total earth-based equipment used in connection with orbiting, geostationary satellites. This category includes the Very Small Aperture Terminals

(VSAT), as well as the antennae and electronic transmitting/receiving terminals.

robot programming and simulation. The use of computer-controlled manipulators or arms to automate a variety of manufacturing processes such as welding, material handling, painting, and assembly.

scanner. Input devices used for the optical sensing of images and text and/or graphics for conversion to dot patterns for incorporation into a document. This category includes both ICR and

OCR scanners with a resolution of less than

400 dpi.

robot system. Programmable manipulative machines that can perform functions ordinarily ascribed to humans. Included are robotic mechanisms, control hardware and software, and all associated peripheral equipment. These peripherals include end effectors and grippers that are used for the processing of parts, tools, and assemblies within the factory.

scheduling. An application that supports the scheduling of events.

schematic. This is a detailed diagram. In a mechanical application, schematics are used to describe hydraulic and pneumatic systems. A set of symbols are available for both applications representing standard components.

ROM. See read-only memory.

routing. An application that supports route planning. It is used to schedule the sequence of stops a transport vehicle makes.

RTF. See rapid thermal processing.

scholarships and fellowships. College expenditures applying only to money given in the form of outright grants and trainee stipends to individuals enrolled in formal coursework, either for credit or not. Aid to students in the form of tuition or fee remissions is included. College work-study funds are excluded from this category and are reported under the program in which the student is working.

safety and convenience. Equipment related to the automobile and truck industry including devices that prevent loss, hurt, or injury, or that lend ease and comfort to passengers. Examples

Schottky TTL (STTL). A form of transistor-transistor logic using Schottky diodes as transistor clamps to increase the speed of circuit operation.

A high-speed form of bipolar logic.

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scientific application. A diverse group of software applications covering varied subject matter and research on the natural sciences when these are concerned with the physical world and its

semiconductor tester. Equipment designed to test, check, and monitor the functionality of electronic circuit packages of varying complexity and functionality. phenomena. Applications are divided into two subcategories: general analysis and scientific research. General analysis is the use of computers

serial, impact, dot matrix (SIDM). A printer that creates a character image by selectively to solve various technical problems and to further placing individual dots on the substrate using research on subjects; this use is generally mathematical in nature. Scientific research applications mechanical force. are used specifically in the following fields: thermonuclear chemistry, nuclear physics, general physics, mechanical sciences, electronics engineering.

serial, impact, fully formed (SIFF). A printer that prints one character at a time using type elements to create fully formed character research, geophysics, fluid dynamics, thermodynamics, materials research, and genetic impressions.

serial input/output (SIO). 1: A device that permits data to be transmitted into and out of a

scientific research. A software application that pertains to research and development, not to applied science.

scientific visualization. An image computer is used for scientific modeling, technical data analysis, medical imaging, or similar large-volume data analysis. computer over a single conductor one bit at a time. 2: Pertaining to time sequential transmission of, storage of, or logical operations on parts of data words. 3: A technique for handling binary data words (which have more than one bit). 4: A device or technique where data are transferred to or from an I/O port in a serial or in-line manner.

serial, nonimpact, direct thermal (SNDT). A printer that creates the desired image a dot at a

security. 1: The existence and enforcement of techniques that restrict access to data and the conditions under which data can be obtained.

2: A measure taken by a command to protect a system from espionage, observation, sabotage, annoyance, or surprise. 3: Protection of a system by use of commands and codes. time using point-specific heat and a heat-sensitive substrate that changes color when exposed to heat.

serial, nonimpact, Inkjet (SNIJ). A printer that creates the desired image a character at a time by emitting ink from an array of orifices or nozzles.

security/energy management. Safety and power management within industrial equipment and manufacturing.

serial nonimpact, thermal transfer (SNTT). A printer that creates the desired image a dot at a time using point-specific heat to transfer ink from a ribbon to a receiving substrate.

seismic analysis. 1: Seismic analysis helps support exploration activities by indicating favorable conditions for finding oil or coal reservoirs.

2: Analysis relating to an earth vibration caused by earthquakes, or other natural phenomena.

semiconductor. 1: A group of materials that are electrical nonconductors in a pure state that can be altered by the selective introduction of impurities into its crystalline structure. Its resistivity can sometimes be changed by light, an electric field, or a magnetic field, 2: An electronic device made using semiconductor material.

server. A processor that provides a specific service to a network, such as connecting nodes of different networks. services. Intangible items of trade, such as education, transportation, banking, and legal and medical care.

SFDSP. See special-function DSP products.

sheet feeder. A sheet feeder is mounted on top of a printer and automatically inserts cut sheets into the printer and receives the ejected paper in a hopper. Sheet feeders may be single or dual tray

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shipment. The number of products delivered.

shop floor and cell control. A system for utilizing data from the shop floor as well as data-processing files to maintain and communicate status information on shop orders and work centers.

Provides actual output data for capacity control purposes.

single-strike ribbon. A film ribbon. Each time a character strikes the ribbon, the ribbon advances far enough so that the next character has a completely new ribbon area to strike. The ink formulation is such that the ink on the ribbon is depleted from the area where the print element strikes the ribbon. These ribbons produce the highest print quality, but ribbon life is low compared with that of fabric and multistrike ribbons.

single-user enhanced system. See workstation computer.

SIO. See serial input/output.

shop floor planning and control. See shop floor

and cell control.

SIDM. See serial, impact, dot matrix.

slow SRAM. A random-access memory (RAM) integrated circuit (IC) that runs at speeds greater than 70 nanoseconds. (See also static random-

access memory.)

SIFF. See serial, impact, fully formed.

silicon epitaxy deposition. A process through which vaporized silicon is deposited on a wafer.

(See also deposition.)

small-format pen plotter. A computer plotter that uses engineering-size A (8.5 x 11 inches) or

B (11 X 17 inches), architectural-size 1 (9 x

12 inches) or 2 (12 x 18 inches), or metric-size

A4 (21 X 29.7 centimeters) or A3 (29.7 x 42 centimeters) media. (See also plotter.)

silicon precursor gas. A specialty gas used in semiconductor manufacturing. Gases such as silane, dichlorosilane, trichlorosilane, and silicon tetrachloride are used in epitaxial and chemical vapor deposition (CVD) processes to deposit layers of silicon or silicon components onto silicon substrates.

small-signal diode. A diode with a forward current of less than 100 milliamperes (0.1 amperes).

The sides of the silicon chip are metaUized and encapsulated in a tubular glass package.

small-signal transistor. A transistor that dissipates power of less than 1 watt.

silicon wafer. A nonmetallic element that is the most widely used semiconductor material today.

Silicon is used in its crystalline form as the substrate of semiconductor devices.

smart card. A credit card or credit-card-size device that contains one or more integrated circuits.

These devices usually are carried by an individual.

Common applications include financial transactions, record keeping, and user identification.

simulation. An application or system that uses representative or artificial data to reproduce various conditions in a model that are likely to occur in the actual performance of a system. Simulation frequently is used to test the behavior of a system under different operating policies.

smart interactive terminal. See intelligent terminal.

smart power. An integrated circuit (IC) that contains both control logic circuits and power control elements.

simulation and training equipment. Equipment used to augment the acting out of real-life maneuvers/exercises as training in preparation for reallife situations. Equipment includes aircraft, flight and situation simulators, equipment operation, and maintenance systems.

smoke alarm. A detector that is activated automatically when exposed to smoke.

SNA. See system network architecture.

SNDT. See serial, nonimpact, direct thermal.

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SNIJ. See serial, nonimpact, ink jet.

SNTT. See serial, nonimpact, thermal transfer.

space military equipment. Military equipment used beyond the earth's atmosphere. Includes satellites with accompanying communication and reconnaissance equipment, various other space platforms, launch vehicles, and ground control.

socket. An opening that supports and electrically connects to vacuum tubes, bulbs, or other devices or components when they are inserted into it.

special automotive IC. An analog IC designed for a specific automotive application.

software. 1: Any set of explicit procedures constituting a computer program. 2: Programs, procedures, rules, and any associated documentation pertaining to computer operations.

special consumer IC. An analog IC designed for use solely in consumer home entertainment and appliance products.

special-function analog IC. An analog integrated

software support service. Activities that assist the end user in use and implementation of software products. Software support includes bug fixing, updates, and documentation, as well as support of ongoing operating problems includcircuit function used in specialized applications.

Examples are sensors, timers, and oscillators.

These devices differ from application-specific ing product-specific consulting, programming services, and training. functions for specific applications.

solar cell. A pn junction device that converts the radiant energy of sunlight directly and efficiently standard products (ASSPs) in being functional blocks rather than complex configurations of

special-function DSP products (SFDSP). Products built using DSP techniques and architectures but designed for specific functions. Examples ininto electrical energy. clude: modems, codecs, speech processors, digital television circuits, digital filters, and fast Fourier

solid modeling. An application that represents the external and internal part geometries, allowing the solid nature of an object to be represented in a computer. Solid models are constructed in two ways: using primitive building blocks (constructive solid geometry) and/or using boundary definitions

(boundary representation). transform (FFT) chips. Generally, these devices cannot be programmed by users to perform operations other than their defined function.

special-function IC. A linear IC that does not fall into the standard product categories. This product has a specific function such as timer, oscillator, signal generator, or sensor but is not limited to a single application or market.

solid state. Pertaining to circuits and components using semiconductors. (See also semiconductor.)

solid-state subsystem. Computer memory products that comprise a block of semiconductor memory, a controller/formatter for it, a power source or access to power, a host bus interface,

special-purpose computer system. A computer system designed for a specific purpose. For example: a banking computer system, word processor, or cash register. hardware, and software. These include modules external to the computer and kits for installation inside computers.

specialty gas. A gas used in manufacturing semiconductors that is supplied in gas cylinders rather than in bulk because smaller volumes are used.

sonar. A device used to detect submerged objects by sonar waves reflected off the object. Also can be used to measure depth or distance. Includes search, detection, tracking, guidance, navigation,

splice. A joint used to connect two lengths of conductor with good mechanical strength and good conductivity. (See also passive device.)

spot-welding robot system. A robot carries a resistance welding gun to produce welds. communication, sonabuoys, and associated test systems.

SONET. See synchronous optical network.

spreadsheet. An application with the principal function of organizing data into columns and rows to allow the user to perform numerical analysis.

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SRAM. See static random-access memory. storage temperature, storage print, and storage allocation.

standard cell. An integrated circuit designed to a customer's specifications using precharacterized cells as building blocks.

standard logic. Off-the-shelf integrated circuits belonging to "families." Bipolar digital families include AS, FAST, LS, and ALS. MOS digital families include HC, HCT, and FACT. Standard logic is available from a number of suppliers and may be used in many different applications.

Sometimes referred to as glue logic. Normally has less than 150 logic gates.

storage subsystem. Computer memory product that comprises a storage device (s), a controller/ formatter for it, a power source or access to power, a host bus interface, hardware, and software. These include modules external to the computer and kits for installation inside computers.

streamer tape drive. A tape drive that uses a continuously moving tape; one that does not start and stop on each data record.

start-stop tape drive. A tape drive that starts and stops on reading or writing a data record.

streaming tape drive. Tape drives (1/4-inch and

1/2-inch width) where the data stream over the head without stopping (continuous flow).

state government. One of the constituent units of a nation having a federal government.

structural. The dynamics of the physical system; usually refers to the static stability/integrity of a part, assembly, or system.

static random-access memory (SRAM). A

RAM that maintains memory as long as power is applied and does not require refreshing. SRAM densities can range from IK, with approximately

1,000 bits, to 4Mb, with approximately 4 million bits.

structural modeling/analysis. A software application for modeling and analysis of the integrity of a structure.

STTL. See Schottky TTL.

studio transmitter link. Equipment used to generate and amplify a radio signal.

statistical multiplexer. An electronic device that consolidates several data streams onto a single high-speed bit stream for transmission over a telephone line.

styling. A detailed design process where aesthetic considerations are foremost. Systems supporting this application have special refinements for rendering, modeling, and editing functions.

stepper. A semiconductor manufacturing device that uses a step-and-repeat process to transform the pattern image of a reticle or mask onto the surface of the semiconductor wafer.

stereo headphone. A device worn on the head that permits the transmission of sound through two earphones connected by a band.

subsidiary. A company partially or wholly owned by another company.

supercomputer. A high-performance computer designed for numerically intensive applications.

The current price ranges from approximately

$100,000 to $20 million.

stereo (hi-fi) component. Equipment that produces high-fidelity reproduction of sound.

storage controller board. 1: A board containing input data or parameters for an application of a general routine. 2: Those parts mounted on a board that carry out the instructions in proper sequence, interpret each instruction, and apply the proper signal.

storage management. Functions that manage the storage of information in which information can later be retrieved. Includes storage protection,

superminicomputer. An information system with price ranging typically from $100,000 to $1 million, with a minority below $100,000. CPU bit width ranges from 32 to 48 bits, with emphasis on

32. Environment is almost exclusively an ordinary office with no special environmental controls.

Equipment typically is supported full-time by a professional computer systems support staff of fewer than 10 members. It usually is built around proprietary processor and typically supports from

32 to 350 concurrent users. Examples of models are the HP 3000/930 and 950, DEC VAX 8700 and Micro VAX 3500, and IBM 9370.

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superworkstation. A superworkstation has higher graphics performance than a traditional workstation. It also has a higher processing performance rating to support graphic computations. The average price is $40,000 to $80,000 with performance ratings of 8 to 20 mips and 2 to 16 mflops.

systems planning and design. "Front-end" consulting services that are required to determine the nature of a customer's needs and the actions necessary to meet those requirements.

surgical support. Equipment relating to, or having connection with, surgery.

system subroutine library. An organized collection of computer programs that is maintained online with a computer system by being held on a secondary storage device and is managed by the operating system.

surveying and drafting instrument. An instrument used to detect, access, and measure radiation. The instrument is used in the drawing of objects, structures, or systems by engineers and scientists.

system support peripheral. An integrated circuit

(IC) considered a traditional peripheral, where each processor has a set of six to eight dedicated peripherals that provide rudimentary functions necessary to construct a microprocessor (MPU)based system. (See also traditional peripheral.)

switch. 1: A mechanical or electrical device that competes with or breaks the pattern of a current or sends it over a different path. 2: A device that connects, disconnects, or transfers one or more circuits and is not designated as a controller, relay, or control valve. (See also passive device.)

system utilities. Products that aid in the maintenance and/or repair of computer hardware, operating systems, or data recovery.

switch/multiplexer IC. Analog switches gate analog signals under the control of logic. Multiplexers are specialized analog switches that select only one of many inputs.

synchronous optical network (SONET). An emerging standard for optical networks.

2-D modeling. The representation of a part in two dimensions (has an x and y coordinate). This format requires three or more views (top, front, side) to depict all aspects of the part. This is the most common geometric modeling format and is used extensively with a drafting function. system management. The administration and operation of a computer system including staffing, scheduling, equipment, and service contract administration, equipment utilization practices, and time-sharing.

system network architecture (SNA). An IBM standard for data communication.

3-D modeling. The representation of a part in three dimensions, usually in a wire-frame format

(has an x, y, and z coordinate). This format is used commonly in high-level CAD systems to determine the placement and fit of components in an assembly. This format is not generally used for final drafting, although some systems have the capability to translate the 3-D image to a 2-D standard drafting format.

systems integration service. The implementation phase of tying together dissimilar devices. Services are coordinated by a single contractor who manages the procurement, installation, integration, and support of all software, hardware, and communications devices.

T-1. A high-speed, time-division, digital network link operating at 1.544 Mbps and above.

systems integrator. See value-added reseller.

T-1 multiplexer. A unit that allows multiplexing, or combining, several voice and/or data channels onto one communications link, in this case, a high-speed T-1 channel.

system software. Software that provides support structure in which applications may operate. This includes operating systems, operating environments, and utilities.

tape drive. A class of computer backup device that uses reel-to-reel, cartridge, or cassette tapes as media.

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tape recorder. A device that records and plays sound from magnetic tape.

tax accounting. An application concerned with keeping records for tax purposes, setting up accounts for paying taxes, making tax computations, and preparing tax returns.

teleconferencing. Equipment and services related to one-way and two-way video communications that use specialized video equipment and/or transmission networks. These communications enable conferencing between locations.

TDM. See time-division multiplexer.

telemarketing. A sales method that employs a sales force to move a product through the distribution channel by contacting the consumer via the telephone. Also referred to as inside sales.

teaching machine and aid. Equipment designed to assist in the training, educating, and instructing of persons to acquire knowledge or skill in a particular field(s) of interest.

technical data analysis. An application that analyzes technical or experimental data. The data may have been generated from instruments, captured from other electronic measuring devices

(such as thermocouples or strain gauges), or generated by other analysis programs.

telemetering system. See telemetry.

telemetry. Transmission of data from remote measuring instruments by electrical or, usually, radio means.

telephone. A terminal or handset used for voice and data transmission and communications. It functions as an interface between a user and a telephone switching system.

technical illustration. A drawing of a component or assembly that generally is intended for publication. This drawing will omit unnecessary dimensions and other detailed drating items and will be drawn so as to depict the part realistically.

TELeprinter Exchange (TELEX). A worldwide dial-up telegraph service enabling users to communicate directly and temporarily among themselves by means of start-stop apparatus and circuits of the public telegraph network.

technical productivity. An application that enhances the productivity of technical disciplines and is specialized for the engineering, scientific, or manufacturing fields.

teletex. An interactive communications network designed for transmission of text and graphics to televisions or other low-cost terminals.

TELEX. See TELeprinter Exchange.

technical publishing. The printing of user manuals or guides.

tension arm tape drive. A 1/2-inch reel-to-reel tape drive that uses mechanical tension arms to provide tape tension and buffing.

telecommunication integrated circuit (IC). An analog IC designed for the voice and data communication market.

telecommunications. Products and services that provide or manage the flow of information from person to person, person to machine, machine to person, or machine to machine. The telecommunications market is segmented into a combination of the premises and public telecommunications market segments.

terminal equipment. 1: A device at a node of a network through which information can be entered, extracted, or monitored. 2: Any device capable of sending and/or receiving information over a communications channel. Includes a keyboard and display that cannot stand alone because it lacks processing capability. Terminals are usually simple ASCII text-entry devices.

terms and conditions. The provisions of a contract that are stated or offered for acceptance that determine the nature and scope of the agreement.

telecom services. Includes that portion of telecommunications charges related to access and use of the public network. These charges typically are seen as a monthly usage charge for local, long distance, and private line access/utilization.

test and measurement. The process of determining the magnitude of the response of an object to a given stimulus. Also the degree to which an object may be characterized along a dimension

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(quantification of an entity). Computer-based inspection and test systems used for quality and/or process control data analysis; data may be collected by manual input or sensory devices.

test equipment. Equipment designed to test, check, monitor, and identify varying degrees of device functionality and complexity that may include quality, speed, and performance. Automated test systems and equipment such as IC testers and PC-board testers, as well as general test equipment (such as oscilloscopes, spectrum analyzers, and digital multimeters).

tie ratio. A ratio that describes the relationship between two or more product units, usually used when one product is part of or connected to another product. For example, a disk drive tie ratio to PCs of 0.8 indicates that 80 percent of the PCs contain a disk drive.

time and materials service. Remedial repair services on a per-call basis. Pricing is based on the actual length of time-to-repair, travel charges, and specific parts or materials required to complete repairs.

text capture. Process whereby words or groups of words are controlled.

therapeutic. Medical applications involved in treating specific medical conditions.

time-division multiplexer (TDM). One of several technologies used to multiplex, or combine, several voice and/or data channels onto one communications link. TDM uses "time slicing" to allocate blocks of time to each channel. See also

statistical multiplexer.

thermal. The effects of temperature on the system.

TLX. See TELeprinter EXchange.

thermal plotter. 1: A process that produces a visible image by heat-induced chemical reactions or chemically reactive media. 2: A thermally induced phase change process of a pigment-binder mixture, which is transferred from a donor sheet to the media.

thermal transfer printer. An imaging process using heated printing elements to produce prints or copies; can be either dye diffusion (coated paper) or wax based (plain paper). This process currently is used in electronic printing, facsimile machines, and full-color copiers.

thimble. A thimble-shaped print element that floats freely across the platen of a character printer, working in a similar fashion to a daisyprint element. It is shaped like a cup, with the spokes extending around the rim of the cup, with characters positioned at the end of the spokes.

thyristor. A type of diode that consists of a fourlayer slice of silicon. The device is characterized by continuous switching. Once a thyristor has been triggered into conducting current, it will continue to conduct current until the main current falls to zero.

ticketing. A software application that supports the sale and management of tickets. The application may be as simple as ticketing a single event or as complex as ticketing airline reservations.

toner. The substance used that develops a latent xerographic image from a photoreceptor onto a substrate, usually paper. Monocomponent toner contains both the imaging material and the carrier

(usually called developer) needed to transport the toner to the latent image. In dual-component toner, the imaging material and developer are held separately until they are mixed by the copier or printer itself. Liquid toner has the imaging material suspended in a solvent.

tool design. The design of custom-made tooling to facilitate an effective manufacturing process.

tools. A software program that is used by application developers or users to create applications.

Examples are spreadsheets, word processors, editors, macro languages, screen painters, and report generators. Tools are higher-level products than languages; a tool is written in a language. Unlike languages, most tools are nonprocedural, i.e., they do not require users to create code thai is sequentially executed. A good example of this is a spreadsheet, where the developer/user navigates up, down, and sideways with the arrow keys or mouse and can add or delete rows and columns at any time. Examples of tools include Lotus 1-2-3

(spreadsheet); Multimate (word processor); ED-

LIN (line editor); and Ojectworks (graphical editing and object manipulation environment).

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trading turret/dealer board. A specialized type of telephone system that allows simultaneous access to multiple telephone lines. This system is used in any business that requires frequent conversations between two or more parties (i.e., stock brokers).

traditional peripheral. An integrated circuit that has an intermediary control device, which links a peripheral unit to the control processors.

traditional workstation. A midrange workstation priced between $15,000 to $50,000. Its performance ratings are 4 to 15 mips and 0.5 to 2 mflops.

transmitter. 1: A device for transmitting a coded signal. 2: The carbon device in the telephone handset used to convert speech to electrical energy.

transparency. 1: The property of being insensitive to the meaning of a code being manipulated.

An example is a paper-tape transmitter capable of transmitting any code submitted to it. If a device interprets and reacts to coded information that it is handling, it is said to be code sensitive (not transparent). 2: Clear substrates upon which images can be written, copied, or printed for projection onto a screen by an overhead projector.

traffic control. A real-time software application, mechanism, and system used to monitor and control, exert control over, and/or enforce the movement of vehicles.

transportable personal computer. The transportable personal computer is a self-contained system that can be moved from place to place as a single unit. These systems include, in a single unit, the keyboard, display, mass storage, and main system unit. Such a personal computer operates on A/C power only (no battery power). transducer. Any device or element that converts an input signal into an output signal of a different form. (See also passive device.)

transportation. An environment or industry that includes establishments providing, to the general public or the other business enterprises, passenger and freight transportation. transistor. A transistor is as a current-amplifying device or switch, as follows: 1: Current amplifying—a small change in a small current flows between the collector and the emitter. 2: Switch—a sufficiently large voltage applied to the base causes the maximum amount of collective current to flow. It can be manufactured in bipolar or

MOS technology process. A bipolar transistor consists of a sandwich of doped silicon layers. The transistor has three electrical connections: base, emitter, and collector. Each of these areas provides access to one of the doped regions.

transportation electronic equipment. Electronic equipment used in the automotive railway and airline industry.

transportation management. The planning, analysis, and control of activities for transporting or being transported.

TTL. See transistor-transistor logic.

transistor-transistor logic (TTL). A logic circuit design with the diode inputs replaced by a multiple-emitter transistor.

two-year college. A postsecondary school that offers general or liberal arts education usually leading to an associate degree or courses that are creditable toward a baccalaureate degree.

translator. The process performed by an assembler, compiler, or other routine that accepts statements in one language and converts them to another language. 2: A device that transforms signals from one form to another form. 3: A system that has a number of inputs and outputs and is connected so that input signals representing information expressed in a certain code result in output signals that represent the input information in a different code.

two-year institution. An institution legally authorized to offer and offering at least a two-year program of college-level studies that terminates in an associate degree or is principally creditable toward a baccalaureate degree.

typewriter. A machine for writing in characters by means of a keyboard operated by striking through an inked ribbon. Usually refers to the standard office typewriter (mechanical, electrical, or electronic).

1991 Dataquest Incorporated January—Reproduction Prohibited

135

High-Technology Guide Glossary

u

UART/USART. See universal asynchronous receiver/transmitter/universal synchronous asynchronous receiver/transmitter.

utilities. An environment or industry that includes establishments providing electricity, gas, steam, water, or sanitary services to the general public or to other business enterprises.

UV EPROM. See ultraviolet electrically pro-

grammable ROM.

ultrasonic cleaners, drills. 1: An instrument used to clean debris and swarf from surfaces by immersion in a solvent in which ultrasonic vibrations are excited. 2: A drill in which ultrasonic vibrations are generated by the compression and extension of a core electrostrictive or magnetostrictive material.

vacuum column tape drive. A 1/2-inch reel-toreel tape drive with start-stop capability that uses vacuum columns to provide tape tension and buffing.

ultrasonic generator. A generator consisting of an oscillator driving an electracoustic transducer used to produce acoustic waves.

value-added network (VAN). A data communication network that provides enhanced services such as protocol conversion.

ultrasonic scanner, medical. A device that produces a picture display of ultrasonic frequency waves sent through the sample to be inspected or examined.

ultraviolet electrically programmable ROM.

An EPROM that is erasable with an ultraviolet light source.

value-added reseller (VAR) systems integrator.

A product reseller that integrates hardware, software, and/or services; it does not apply its label to the product. Systems integrators are a type of

VAR and may or may not own the hardware or software.

VAN. See value-added network.

unit. A single quantity.

universal asynchronous receiver/transmitter/ universal synchronous asynchronous receiver/

transmitter (UART/USART). An electronic circuit that converts data between the parallel format and the serial format transmitted sequentially over a communication line.

VAR. See value-added reseller systems integra-

tor.

VAX/VMS. A Digital Equipment Corporation standard multiuser operating system.

VCR. See videocassette recorder and player.

UNIX. A n operating system designed to be used with microprocessors and with the C programming language.

vertical-turning programmable machine tool.

The tool of a machine that holds a workpiece along the vertical axis for a certain function to be performed such as boring, drilling, and cutting.

useful life. The economic life of a product. Typically used to determine depreciation and leasing schedules.

vibrational. The effects of vibration and shock on the system.

user interface. 1: The point at which a user interacts with a computer. 2: An interactive computer program that sends messages to and receives instructions from a terminal user.

video. 1: Relates to the bandwidth (megahertz) and spectrum position of the signal arising from television scanning. 2: The reception or recording of electronic signals that create images on a screen or display.

users per system. The typical number of simultaneous users that a computer system will support.

video camera. A camera that records visual images and sounds on magnetic tape.

1991 Dataquest Incorporated January—Reproduction Prohibited

13fi

H i g h - T e c h n o l o g y Guide Glossary

videocassette recorder and player (VCRs or

VTRs). A complete system that has a tape format such as beta, VHS, or 8mm.

VPN. See virtual private network.

VRU. See voice response unit.

VTR. See videocassette recorder and player.

videodisc player. A complete video system that has a disc format.

video equipment. Equipment includes amplifiers, television cameras, and other equipment such as synchronization equipment, live cameras, and control consoles.

W

wafer. A thin (10 to 20 mils) disk of semiconductor material from which semiconductors are fabricated.

video home system (VHS) helical scan tape

drive. A 13mm helical scan tape drive commonly used for recording television broadcasts.

videotex. An information delivery system that uses information from a database that allows the user to interact with the service, selecting information to be displayed on the user's CRT providing financial services, electronic mail, and teleshopping.

wafer fab. The integrated circuit production process—from raw wafers through a series of diffusion, etching, photolithographic, and other steps to finished wafers.

wafer fabrication equipment. Machinery used to produce wafers in the semiconductor industry.

(See also e-beam, etch-and-clean equipment,

stepper.)

virtual private network (VPN). Similar in function to a leased circuit with the exception that the circuit is not dedicated to one customer.

VLSI. Very large scale integration.

VMS. See voice-messaging system.

wafer inspection. Inspection of patterned wafers for process defects by visual and image-processing techniques.

water quality and sewage control. A real-time software application that monitors and controls water quality and sewage.

WATS. See wide area telephone service.

voice-messaging system (VMS). A computerbased system that enables flexible, nonsimultaneous voice communications. This definition does not include personal-computer-board-level products.

web ribbon. Web or towel ribbons are wide ribbons used on line, dot matrix, and line, fully formed printers. They are as wide as the print line is long—usually approximately 15 inches.

voice-recognition computer device. The capability of a computer to recognize spoken commands.

Each user must first "train" the computer by speaking a series of words that the computer can analyze and match with stored information.

wet chemical. A chemical used in semiconductor wafer fabrication. Examples are acids and solvents.

wet etch. Immersing method for wafers in an etching solution. Chemical removal of a material by bathing the wafer in acid.

voice response unit (VRU). A computerconnected device that selectively links sentences of stored words, creating a spoken word.

voice synthesizer. A device that simulates speech by assembling a language's elements under digital control.

white-collar worker. A person working in an occupation classified by the Bureau of Labor

Statistics under the following category headings: managerial and professional specialty and technical, sales, and administrative support.

voice terminal. See telephone.

voltage regulator and reference IC. 1: A device that provides power to other circuits at a specified

DC voltage. 2: A device that provides a specified constant DC voltage to a load over a wide range of variations in input voltage and output current.

wholesale trade. An environment or industry that includes establishments or places of business primarily engaged in selling merchandise to retailers; to industrial, commercial, institutional, farm, construction contractors, or professional business users; or to other wholesalers; or acting as agents or brokers in buying merchandise for or selling merchandise to such persons or companies.

1991 Dataquesl Incorporated January—Reproduction Proliibited

High-Technology Guide Glossary 137

wide area telephone service. An enhanced telephone company service allowing reduced costs of certain telephone call arrangements. This service can be in-wats or 800-number service (calls can be placed to a location from anywhere at no cost to the calling party) or out-wats (calls can be placed out from a central location).

word processing. A software application with the principal function of editing, entering, and formatting text.

word processor (WP). A standalone word processor capable of functioning independently from a central controller or storage device, although they may communicate with each other. These products generally have removable magnetic media.

Products that have evolved from electronic typewriters generally are not included in this category. The ability to share a printer among workstations does not disqualify a product from being a standalone word processor; shared-system word processors are connected to an external file server or controller; word-processor file servers are centralized data storage devices that are accessible and dedicated to shared word processing units.

WP. See word processor.

write-once/read-many (WORM). 1: The

WORM optical disk market includes drives that can read and write data using various optical diskette media. 2: A data storage device using laser technology that uses a removable disk ranging in size from 3.5 to 14 inches.

X

X-ray (lithography). A machine that uses an X ray for generating a mask plate of direct image transfer to a semiconductor wafer.

X-ray, medical. Equipment used to detect, examine, treat, or analyze body systems through photographic X-rays.

X.25. A CCITT standard that defines the interface between a public data network and a pocketmode user device; also defines the services that these user devices can expect from the X.25 public data network. work force. All persons of either sex who furnish the supply of labor for the production of economic goods and services during a specified time period. workstation computer. A single-user computer that is distinguished from a personal computer by its features and by the user's potential migration path within the platform. A technical workstation is a system designed with integrated networking; high-performance graphics; floating point; coprocessor; and a virtual, multiuser/multitasking operating system (DOMAIN, UNIX, VMS).

WORM. See write-once/read-many. year-average population. The installed base of a product computed at the midyear between the beginning installed base and the ending installed base of the same year.

zener diode. 1: A diode that has a controlled, reverse-voltage/current relationship. 2: A twolayer device that has a sudden rise in current above a certain reverse voltage.

© 1991 Dataqucst Incorporated January—Reproduction Proliibited

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DataQuest

Semiconductor Consumption and

Sliipment Forecast

October 1991

DataQuest

Semiconductor Consumption and

Shipment Forecast

October 1991

Source:

Dataquest

Published by Dataquest Incorporated

The content of this report represents our interpretation and analysis of information generally available to the public or released by knowledgeable individuals in the subject industry, but is not guaranteed as to accuracy or completeness. It does not contain material provided to us in confidence by our clients.

Printed in the United States of America. All rights reserved. No part of diis publication may be reproduced, stored in retrieval systems, or transmitted, in any form or by any means—4nechanical, electronic, photocopying, duplicating, microfilming, videotape, or otherwise—without the prior permission of the publisher.

© 1991 Dataquest Incorporated

Oaober 1991

Table of Contents

Page 1 ^ ^

Introduction 1 Valuation of Consumption 3

Definitions and Conventions 1 Inflation 3

Data Sources 2 Exchange Rates 3

Accuracy 3 Forecast ..4

Semiconductor Consumption and

Shipment Forecast

Introduction

Semiconductor consumption and shipment data comprise a set of detailed tables that estimate the size of the semiconductor total available market (TAM) worldwide and for four major geographical regions for 1985 through 1995-

Semiconductor consumption and shipment tables contain both historical data and forecasts. Historical data begin with 1985 and end with 1990, while forecast data provide annual market size estimates for 1991 through 1995.

The following list of tables details the type of data, region, time period, and units of measure.

Each table gives estimates of semiconductor revenue or shipments listed by the major semiconductor device product categories. In these tables, semiconductor components are divided into three major produa groups: integrated circuits, discrete devices, and optoelectronic devices. These groups are divided into a number of subgroups, some of which are segmented further.

Definitions and Conventions

Dataquest uses a common maniafacmrer base for aU data tables. This base includes all suppliers to the merchant semiconductor market

It includes aggregate revenue estimates for

North American companies that manufacture devices solely for the benefit of the parent company, such as Delco, IBM, and Unisys.

Also included are companies that actively market semiconductor devices to the merchant market as well as to other divisions of their own companies. For such companies, both external and internal shipments are included.

Devices that are used internally are valued at current market prices.

Consumption—^Dataquest defines consumption as the purchase of a semiconduaor device or

List of Tables

Table

0

Beglon Covered

Japanese and Western Eurof)ean Exchange Rates la l b

Ic

Worldwide Market

Worldwide Market

Worldwide Market

2c

2d

3a

3b

3c

3d

4a

4b

4c

4d

Id

2a

2b

Worldwide Market

North American Maricet

North American Market

North American Market

North American Market

Japanese Market

Japanese Market

Japanese Market

Japanese Market

Japanese Market

Japanese Market

Japanese Market laisanese Market

Years

1970-1989

1985-1990

1985-1990

1991-1995

1991-1995

1985-1990

1985-1990

1991-1995

1991-1995

1985-1990

1985-1990

1991-1995

1991-1995

1985-1990

1985-1990

1991-1995

1991-1995

Units

Various

Dollars

Percent

Dollars

Percei«

Dollars

Percent

Dollars

Percent

Dollars

Percent

Dollars

Percent

Yen

Percent

Yen

Percent

(ContinuoO

1

'2 Semiconductor Consumption and Shipment Forecast l i s t of Tables (Continued)

Table

5a 'Westem European Market

5b Westem European Market

5c •Western European Market

5d Westem European Market

6a Asia/Pacific-ROW Market

6b Asia/Pacific-ROW Market

6c Asia/Pacific-ROW Market

6d Asia/Pacific-ROW Market

1985-1990

1985-1990

1991-1995

1991-1995

1985-1990

1985-1990

1991-1995

1991-1995

Dollars

Percent

Dollars

Percent

Dollars

Percent

Dollars

Percent devices. This definition must be differentiated from actual use of the device in a final product. A regional market size includes all devices sold to or within, or shipped to or within, that region (i.e., the TAM of that region).

Hybrids—^In earlier consumption data, hybrid devices were included as a separate segment of integrated circuits. Hybrid devices manufactured by semiconductor companies are now included in the most appropriate product segment, usually the analog segment.

The manufacturer base, product group definitions, and guidelines for including value of output that we have used in our tables may differ from those used in other studies of this type. Our base is nearly the same as that used by the World Semiconductor Trade Statistics (WSTS) program, with the following exceptions:

• Dataquest includes all of AT&T's semiconductor revenue, both merchant and captive.

• Dataquest includes—and has always included—^nonrecurring engineering (NRE) charges associated with application-specific integrated circuit (ASIC) revenue. (This applies to both the bipolar digital and MOS digital logic categories.)

• Dataquest includes the revenue generated by sales of standalone circuit design software, sold by certain U.S. manufacturers of

ASIC logic devices.

• Dataquest includes Signetics revenue with that of its parent company, Netherlandsbased N.V. Philips.

• Dataquest includes revenue for Taiwanese semiconductor manufacturers.

• Dataquest includes revenue for three Japanese companies not included by WS'K until

1990: NMB Semiconductor, Seiko-Epson, and

Yamaha.

• As noted herein, Dataquest includes hybrid revenue in the analog category.

Regions—^North America is defined as including both the United States and Canada. Latin

America, including Mexico, is considered part of the Asia/Pacific-ROW category. Asia/Pacific includes South Korea, Taiwan, Hong Kong,

Singapore, and China. Westem Europe includes

Austria, Belgium, Germany, France, Italy, Luxembourg, the Netherlands, the Scandinavian countries (Denmark, Finland, Norway,

Sweden), Spain, the United Kingdom, and the rest of Europe. Japan, the fourth region, is the only single-country region.

Data Sources

The historical information presented in the consumption and shipment data has been consolidated from a variety of sources, each of which focuses on a specific part of the market. These sources include the following:

• WSTS data and Dataquest*s estimates of regional company sales are used to determine shipments to North America.

• Japanese trade statistics compiled and published by the Ministry of Finance (MOP) and the Ministry of International Trade and

Industry (MITI), WSTS data, and Dataquest's estimates of regional company sales are used to determine shipments to Japan.

©1991 Dataquest Incotporated October—Reproduction Prohibited

Semiconductor Consumption and Shipment Forecast

• For Western European markets, marketing statistics from WSTS data and Dataquesf s estimates of regional company sales are used to determine market size.

• In Asia/Pacific-ROW, the major published sources used to estimate market size are

WSTS data and Dataquests estimates of company shipments into the region.

Dataquest believes that the estimates presented here are the most accurate and meaningful generally available today. The sources of the data and the guidelines for the forecasts presented in the tables are as follows:

• Dataquest's own forecasts of electronic equipment production and semiconductor

I/O ratios

• Unit shipments or revenue (or both) published by major industry participants, both in the United States and abroad

• Estimates presented by knowledgeable and reliable industry spokespersons

• Government data or trade association data such as those from the Electronics Industry

Association (EIA), Mm, WSTS, and the U.S.

Department of Commerce

• Published product literature and price lists

• Interviews with knowledgeable manufacturers, distributors, and users

• Relevant projected world economic data dollar (or any single currency, for that matter) as the currency b ^ i s for the tables brings with it some problems that require the readers' careful consideration in interpreting the data.

Inflation

All countries that participate significantly in international semiconductor markets suffered from an overall price inflation in the 1980s, continuing into tike 1990s. As a consequence, the dollar in a given year is not truly comparable with the dollar in any preceding year.

Consumer and wholesale price indices and

GNP deflators all measure price changes in various composite "market baskets" of goods.

However, there is no price index that measures price changes of material, equipment, and labor inputs to the semiconductor industry. Indeed, the "mix" is changing so rapidly that what is used this year was sometimes unavailable last year, at any price. Nor is there a composite price index that measures price changes in aggregate semiconductor product.

In an industry noted for its deflationary trends, this latter effect would tend to make the component purchaser's dollar worth more as time passed, in terms of purchasing ability.

We have made no adjustments in the historical data to account for these inflationary and deflationars' effects. The data are expressed in current dollars (dollars that include the inflation rate and exchange rates of the given year) for all historical data; comparisons between different years must be interpreted accordingly.

Accuracy

The tables presented here represent Dataquest estimates that we believe are reasonably accurate. Where we have no reasonable estimate, none is given. A zero in a table represents an estimate.

Valuation of Consumption

Regional market size is expressed in U.S. dollars (with the Japanese market also expressed in yen). To make the tables in this study useful in comparing different regions, it is necessary to express all values in a common currency, and we chose the U.S. dollar for convenience. However, the choice of the U.S.

Exchange Rates

Construction of the West European tables involves combining data from many countries, each of which has different and changing exchange rates. Dataquest uses Armual Foreign

Exchange Rates for each year as published by

The International Monetary Fund and The

Wall Street Journal As far as possible, we prepare our estimates in terms of local currencies before conversion to U.S. dollars.

The exchange rates for major currencies can be found in Table 0 at the end of this introduction.

©1991 Dataquest Incorporated October—Reproduction Prohibited

Semiconductor Coosumpdon and Shipment Forecast

Japanese market size is originally expressed in yen. The Japanese data published in this study are expressed in both dollars (Tables 3a, 3b,

3c, and 3d) and in yen CTables 4a, 4b, 4c, and 4d). The yen/dollar exchange rate used for each year can be found in the table below. Because of the fluctuations in the exchange rate for the yen, the dollar values given tend to distort the growth rate of the

Japanese market, but they do provide a useful basis for regional market size comparisons.

However, the data in yen give a better picture of the real growth in the Japanese market.

Forecast

As mentioned previously, historical data are expressed in current dollars or dollars that include the given year's inflation rate and exchange rates. However, the revenue forecasts use constant dollars and exchange rates, with no allowance for inflation or variations in the rates of exchange between countries. All estimates for 1991 and beyond are made as if

1991 monetaiy conditions will continue through 1995 and, therefore, show the absolute year-to-year growth during this period.

Table 0

Foreign Exchange Rates

Year

1970

1971

1972

1973

1974

1975

1976

1977

1978

Yrly/Qtrly

YR

YR

YR

YR

YR

YR

YR

YR

YR

Japan

(Yen per U.S.$)

358

343

302

269

292

297

296

269

210

France

(II.S.$ per

Franc)

0.18

0.18

0.20

0.22

0.21

0.23

0.21

0.20

0.22

1979

1980

1981

1982

1983

1984

1985

1986

1987

YR

YR

YR

YR

YR

YR

YR

YR

YR

219

227

221

248

235

237

238

167

144

0.24

0.24

0.18

0.15

0.13

0.11

0.11

0.14

0.17

1988

YR

130 0.17

1989

1990

YR

YR

138

144

0.16

0.18

Q191

QTR 134

0.19

Q291

QTR

138

0.17

Source: The International Monetary E>ataquest (October 1991)

0.39

0.35

0.34

0.46

0.56

0.57

0.53

0.62

0.65

0.58

Germany

(U.S.$ per

Deutsche Mark)

0.27

0.29

0.31

0.37

0.39

0.41

0.40

0.43

0.50

0.55

0.55

0.44

0.41

United Kingdom

CU.S.$ per

Pound Sterling)

2.38

2.44

2.50

2.44

2.33

2.22

1.82

1.75

1.92

2.13

2.33

2.04

1.75

1.52

1.79

1.50

1.79

1.91

1.70

1.33

1.30

1.47

1.64

©1991 Dataquest Incorporated October—Reproduction Prohibited

Semiconductor Coosumptlon and Sfaipment Forecast

Table l a

Worldwide Semiconductor Consumption

(Factory Revenue i n Millions of VJS. Dollars)

Company:

Product:

Region of Consunption:

Distribution Channel:

Application:

Specification:

All

Each

Worldwide

All

All

All

1985 1986 1987 1988 1989 1990

Total Including Captives 27,116 33,729

41,478 54,521 61,454 62,772

North American Captives

2,773 2,895

3,227 3,662 4,241 4,547

Total Semiconductor

Total IC

24,343

18,552

30,834

23,618

38,251

29,887

50,859

41,068

57,213

46,924

58,225

47,303

Bipolar Digital

Memory

Logic

MOS Digital

Memory

Micro

Logic

Analog

Total Discrete

Total Optoelectronic

3,684

589

3,095

4,325

606

3,719

4,760

621

4,139

5,200

689

4,511

4,510

540

3,970

4,440

459

3,981

10,103

3,817

2,745

3,541

12,815

4,511

3,489

4,815

17,473

6,056

5,108

6,309

26,988

11,692

7,144

8,152

33,024

16,361

8,202

8,461

32,292

13,091

10,068

9,133

4,765 6,478 7,654 8,880 9,390

10,571

4,578 5,730 6,655 7,612 7,662 8,235

1,213 1,486

1,709

2,179

2,627 2,687

Source Dataquest (October 1991)

©1991 Dataquest Incorporated October—Reproduction Prohibited

Semiconductor Consumption and Shipment Forecast

.'

Table lb

Worldwide Semiconductor Consumption

OPercent Chaise)

Company:

Product:

Region, of Consunption:

Distribution Channel:

Application:

SpecifLcat ion:

Total Optoelectronic

All

Each

Worldwide

All

All

All

1985 1986 1987 1988 1989 1990

CAGR

85-90

Total Including Captives

-13.4

24.4

23.0 31.4 12.7

North American Captives

10.9 4.4 11.5

13.5

15.8

Total Semiconductor -15,5

26.7 24.1

33.0

12.5

Total IC

Bipolar Digital

Memory

Logic

MOS Digital

Memory

Micro

Logic

Analog

Total Discrete

2.1

7.2

1.8

18.3

10.4

19.1

-18.0 27.3 26.5 37.4 14.3 .8

20.6

-23.0

-23.9

-22.8

17.4

2.9

20.2

10.1

2.5

11.3

9.2

11.0

9.0

-13.3

-21.6

-12.0

-1.6

-15.0

.3

3.8

-4.9

5.2

-22.0

-38.7

-15.0

1.4

26.8

18.2

27.1

36.0

36.3

34.2

46.4

31.0

54.5

93.1

39.9

29.2

22.4

39.9

14.8

3.8

-2.2

-20.0

22.8

7.9

26.2

28.0

29.7

20.9

-2.5 35.9

18.2 16.0 5.7 12.6 17.3

-8.2 25.2 16.1 14.4

.7

7.5

12.5

-.7

22.5 15.0 27.5

20.6 2.3 17.2

Souice: Dataquest <Occober 1991)

©1991 Dataquest Incorporated October—Reproduction Prohibited

Sefulooodpcwr Comsimipticta and Shl|imeat Foivcast

Table Ic

Worldwide Semiconductor Consumption

(Factory Revenue in Millions of U.S. Dollars)

Compciny:

Product:

Region of Consuinption:

Distribution Channel:

Application:

Specification:

All

Each

Worldwide

All

All

All

1991

1992

1993

1994

1995

Total Including Captives 69,232

78,767

91,055 102,193 110,352

5,584 6,556 7,518 8,407 8,691 North American Captives

Total Semiconductor

Total IC

Bipolar Digital

Memory

Logic

MOS Digital

Memory

Micro

Logic

63,648 72,211

51,863 59,672

4,095

414

3,681

35,926

13,418

12,063

10,445

3,966

407

3,559

42,496

15,958

14,494

12,044

83,537

69,840

3,843

407

3,436

50,980

19,378

17,465

14,137

93,786

79,106

3,637

378

3,259

58,661

22,583

19,982

16,096

101,661

86,141

3,390

352

3,038

64,546

24,447

22,216

17,883

11,842 13,210 15,017 16,808 18,205

Analog

Total Discrete 8,777

Total Optoelectronic 3,008

9,241

10,040

10,656

11,172

3,298 3,657 4,024 4,348

Source: Dataquest (October 1991)

©1991 Dataquest ItKorporated October—Reproduction Prohibited

Semiconductor Consumption and Shipment Forecast

Table I d

Worldwide Semiconductor Consumption

(Percent Change)

Company:

Product:

R e g i o n o f C o n s i u n p t i o n :

Distribution Channel:

Application:

Specification:

All

Each

Worldwide

All

All

All

1991 1992 1993 1994 1995

CAGR

90-95

10.3 13.8 15.6 12.2

22.8 17.4 14.7 11.8

8.0

3.4

11.9

13.8

Total Including Captives

NojTth A m e r i c a n C a p t i v e s

Total Semiconductor

Total IC

Bipolar Digital

Memory

Logic

MOS Digital

Memory

Micro

Logic

Analog

Total Discrete

Total Optoelectronic

9.3

9.6

13.5 15.7

15.1

12.3

17.0 13.3

-7.8

-9.8

-7.5

-3.2

-1.7

-3.3

-3.1

0

-3.5

-5.4

-7.1

-5.2

-6.8

-6.9

-6.8

-5.3

-5.2

-5.3

11.3

2.5

19.8

14.4

18.3

18.9

20.2

15.3

20.0

21.4

20.5

17.4

15.1

16.5

14.4

13.9

10.0

8.3

11.2

11.1

14.9

13.3

17.2

14.4

12.0

11.6

13.7

11.9

5.3 8.6 6.1 6.6

11.9 9.6 10.9 10.0

8.4 11.8

8.9

12.7

8.3 11.5

4.8

8.1

6.3

10.1

Source: Dataquest (October 1991)

©1991 Dataquest ItKoiporated October—Reproduction Prohibited

Semicondactor Consumption and Shipment Forecast

Table 2a

North American Semiconductor Consumption

(Factory Revenue in Millions of U.S. Dollars)

Company:

Product:

Region of Consumption:

Distribution Channel:

Application:

Specification:

All

Each

North America

All

All

All

1985 1986 1987 1988 1989 1990

Total Including Captives

11,663 13,171 15,454 18,789 21,348 20,844

North American Captives 2,243 2,327 2,596 2,945 3,411 3,458

9,420 10,844 12,858 15,844 17,937 17,386 Total Semiconductor

Total IC

Bipolar Digital

Memory

Logic

7,757

8,986

10,886

13,815

15,909 15,387

1,926

288

1,638

2,030

267

1,763

2,099

271

1,828

2,012

235

1,777

1,701

203

1,498

1,652

170

1,482

MOS Digital

Memory

Micro

Logic

Analog

Total Discrete

Total Optoelectronic

4,322

1,753

1,258

1,311

4,912

1,775

1,362

1,775

6,738

2,497

2,012

2,229

9,606

4,298

2,707

2,601

11,682

6,163

2,972

2,547

11,025

4,655

3,563

2,807

1,509 2,044 2,049 2,197 2,526 2,710

1,295 1,542 1,642 1,676 1,683

1,669

368 316 330 353 345 330

Source: Dataquest (October 1991)

©1991 Daaquest Incoiporated October—Reproduction Prohibited

10

Semiconductor Consumptloa and Shipment Forecast

Table 2b

North American Semiconductor Consumption

(Percent Change)

Company:

Product:

Region of Consun5)tion:

Distribution Channel:

Application:

Specification:

All

Each

North America

All

All

All

Analog

Total Discrete

Total Optoelectronic

1985 1986 1987 1988 1989 1990

CAGR

85-90

Total Including Captives -22.4 12.9 17.3 21,6 13.6 -2.4 12.3

10.7 3.7 11.6 13.4 15.8 1.4 9.0 North American Captives

Total Semiconductor

Total IC

Bipolar Digital

Memory

Logic

MOS Digital

Memory

Micro

Logic

-27.6 15.1 18.6

23.2

13.2 -3.1 13.0

-30.0 15.8 21.1

26.9

15.2 -3.3 14.7

-31.7

-34.7

-31.1

5.4

-7.3

7.6

3.4

1.5

3.7

-4.1

-13.3

-2.8

-15.5

-13.6

-15.7

-2.9

-16.3

-1.1

-3.0

-10.0

-2.0

-33.5

-48.8

-23.0

-9.1

13.7

1.3

8.3

35.4

37.2

40.7

47.7

25.6

42.6

72.1

34.5

16.7

21.6

43.4

9.8

-2.1

-5.6

-24.5

19.9

10.2

20.6

21.6

23.1

16.4

-14.6 35.5

-13.8

19.1

-11.1 -14.1

.2

6.5

4.4

7.2 15.0

2.1 .4

7.0 -2.3

7.3

-.8

12.4

5.2

-4.3 -2.2

Source: Dataquest (October 1991)

©1991 Dataquest Incorporated October—Reproduction Prohibited

Soniconductor Consumption and Shipment Forecast

Table 2c

North American Semiconductor Consunqption

(Factory Revenue in Millions of U.S. Dollars)

Company:

Product:

Region of Constunptlon:

Distribution Channel:

Application:

Specificat ion:

All

Each

North America

All

All

All

1991 1992 1993 1994 1995

Total Including Captives 22,640 25,577 29,421 32,975 35,263

North American Captives 4,157 4,849

5,533

6,217 6,447

Total Semiconductor

Total IC

18,483 20,728 23,888 26,758 28,816

16,414

18,540 21,482 24,184

26,141

Bipolar Digital

Memory

Logic

MOS Digital

Memory

Micro

Logic

1,411

149

1,262

1,305

138

1,167

1,279

134

1,145

1,194

118

1,076

1,094

104

990

12,077

4,966

4,003

3,108

13,915

5,652

4,784

3,479

16,402

6,736

5,613

4,053

18,746

7,840

6,326

4,580

20,432

8,397

6,952

5,083

Analog

Total Discrete

2,926

1,733

3,320

1,823

3,801

2,014

4,244

2,157

4,615

2,237

Total Optoelectronic

336

365

392 417 438

Source: Dataquest (October 1991)

11

©1991 Dataquest Incorporated October—Reproduction Prohibited

12

Semiconductor Consumption and Shipment Forecast

Table 2d

North American Semiconductor Consumption

(Percent C h a i s e )

Company:

Product:

Region of Consultation:

Distribution Channel:

Application:

Specification:

All

Each

North America

All

All

All

Total Including Captives

North American Captives

Total Semiconductor

Total IC

Bipolar Digital

Memory

Logic

MOS Digital

Memory

Micro

Logic

Analog

Total Discrete

Total Optoelectronic

1991 1992 1993 1994 1995

CAGR

90-95

8.6 13.0 15.0 12.1

20.2 16.6 14.1

12.4

6.3 12.1 15.2 12.0

6.9

3.7

7.7

11.1

13.3

10.6

6.7 13.0 15.9 12.6

8.0 13.5 14.5 11.7

8.1 11.2

-14.6

-12.4

-14.8

-7.5

-7.4

-7.5

-2.0

-2.9

-1.9

-6.6

-11.9

-6.0

-8.4

-11.9

-8.0

-7.9

-9.4

-7.8

9.5

6.7

12.3

10.7

15.2

13.8

19.5

11.9

17.9

19.2

17.3

16.5

14.3

16.4

12.7

13.0

9.0

7.1

9.9

11.0

13.1

12.5

14.3

12.6

8.7

11.2

3.8

1.8

5.2

10.5

8.6 7.4

7.1

6.4

3.7

5.0

6.0

5.8

Source: Dauquest (October 1991)

©1991 Daiaquest Incorporated October—*epioductioii Prohibited

Semiconductor Coiisiimi>tlon and Shipment Forecast

Table 3a

Japanese Semiconductor Consumption

(Factorjr Revenue in Millions of U.S. Dollars)

Company:

Product:

Region of Consuittption:

Distribution Channel:

Application:

Specification:

All

Each

Japan

All

All

All

Total Including Captives

North American Captives

Total Semiconductor

Total IC

Bipolar Digital

Memory

Logic

MOS Digital

Memory

Micro

Logic

Analog

Total Discrete

Total Optoelectronic

1985 1986 1987 1988 1989 1990

8,300 12,018 15,107 20,977 23,234 23,031

151 163

180 205

237

523

8,149 11,855 14,927 20,772 22,997 22,508

5,985 8,802 11,263 16,127 17,946 17,387

824

136

688

1,295

169

1,126

1,523

227

1,296

1,906

348

1,558

1,750

246

1,504

1,800

209

1,591

3,232

1,185

884

1,163

4,762

1,738

1,368

1,656

6,424

2,268

1,902

2,254

10,501

4,424

2,573

3,504

12,497

5,992

2,828

3,677

11,799

4,612

3,210

3,977

1,929 2,745 3,316 3,720 3,699 3,788

1,621 2,242 2,693 3,282 3,321

3,392

543 811

971

1,363 1,730

1,729

Source: Dataquest (October 1990

13

®1991 Dataquest Incoipoiated October—SepnxluctiQn Prohibited

14 Semiconductor Consumption and Shipment Forecast

Table 3b

Japanese Semiconductor Consumption

(Percent Change)

Company:

Product:

Region of Consumption:

Distribution Channel:

Application:

Specification:

All

Each

Japan

All

All

All

Total Including Captives

North American Captives

Total Semiconductor

Total IC

Bipolar Digital

Memory

Logic

MOS Digital

Memory

Micro

Logic

Analog

Total Discrete

Total Optoelectronic

1985 1986 1987 1988 1989 1990

CAGR

85-90

-6.8 44.8

25.7 38.9 10.8 -.9 22.6

11.9

7.9

10.4 13.9 15.6 120.7 28.2

-7.1

45.5 25.9 39.2 10.7 -2.1 22.5

-8.2 47.1 28.0 43.2 11.3 -3.1

23.8

-13.7

-16.6

-13.1

57.2

24.3

63.7

17.6

34.3

15.1

25.1

53.3

20.2

-8.2

-29.3

-3.5

2.9

-15.0

5.8

16.9

9.0

18.3

-10.7

-25.0

-9.7

9.4

47.3

46-7

54.8

42.4

34.9

30.5

39.0

36.1

63.5

95.1

35.3

55.5

19.0

35.4

9.9

4.9

-5.6

-23.0

13.5

8.2

29.6

31.2

29.4

27.9

-.6 42.3 20.8 12.2 -.6

-7.7 38.3 20.1 21.9

1.2

8.4 49.4

19.7 40.4 26.9

2.4 14.4

2.1 15.9

-.1 26.1

Source Dataquest (October 1991)

©1991 Dataquest Incorporated October-^epioduction Prohibited

Semiconductor Consumption and Shipment Forecast

Table 3c

Japanese Semiconductor Consumption

(Factory Revenue in Millions of U.S. Dollars)

Company:

Product:

Region of Consumption:

Distribution Channel:

Application:

Specification:

All

Each

Japan

All

All

All

1991 1992 1993 1994 1995

Total Including Captives 26,215

30,342 34,272 38,216 41,257

North American Captives 671 818 931 1,008

1,025

Total Semiconductor

Total IC

Bipolar Digital

Memory

Logic

MOS Digital

Memory

Micro

Logic

Analog

Total Discrete

Total Optoelectronic

25,544 29,524 33,341 37,208 40,232

19,645 23,089 26,385 29,724 32,224

1,794

204

1,590

13,391

4,581

4,008

4,802

16,260

5,731

4,855

5,674

4,460

3,849

2,050

1,865

220

1,645

4,964

4,138

2,297

1,819

225

1,594

19,131

6,884

5,725

6,522

22,090

8,112

6,561

7,417

5,435

4,420

2,536

1,757

221

1,536

5,877

4,694

2,790

1,681

217

1,464

24,347

8,695

7,391

8,261

6,196

4,964

3,044

Souice: Dataquest (October 1991)

15

®1991 Dataquest Incorpoiated October—Reproduction Prohibited

16 Semiconductor Conswnption and Shipment Forecast

Table 3d

Japanese Semiconductor Consumption

(Percent Chaise)

Company:

Product:

R e g i o n o f C o n s u l t a t i o n :

Distribution Channel:

Application:

Specification:

Total Including Captives

North American Captives

Total Semiconductor

Total IC

All

Each

Japan

All

All

All

1991 1992 1993 1994 1995

CAGR

90-95

13.8 15.7 13.0 11.5

28.3 21.9 13.8 8.3

8.0

1.7

12.4

14.4

Bipolar Digital

Memory

Logic

MOS Digital

Memory

Micro

Logic

Analog

Total Discrete

Total Optoelectronic

13.5

15.6

12.9 11.6

13.0

17.5 14.3

12.7

-.3

-2.4

-.1

4.0

7.8

3.5

-2.5

2.3

-3.1

-3.4

-1.8

-3.6

8.1

8.4

-4.3

-1.8

-4.7

12.3

13.1

-1.4

.8

-1.7

13.5

-.7

24.9

20.7

21.4

25.1

21.1

18-2

17.7

20.1

17.9

14.9

15.5

17.8

14.6

13.7

10.2

7.2

12.7

11.4

15.6

13.5

18.2

15.7

17.7

11.3 9.5

6.8

8.1

6.2

13.5 7.5

18.6 12.0 10.4 10.0

5.4

5.8

9.1

10.3

7.9

12.0

Source Dataquest (October 1991)

©1991 Dataquest Incorporated October—Reproduction Prohibited

Semlconduc^tor Consnmption and Shipment Forecast 17

Table 4a

Japanese Semiconductor Consumption

(Factory Revenue in Billions of Japanese Yen)

Conqpany: All

Product: Each

Region of Consiui^t ion: Japan

Distribution Channel: All

Application: All

Specification: All

1985 1986 1987 1988 1989 1990

Total Including Captives 1,975.3 2,006.9 2,175.4 2,727.0 3,206.3 3,316.4

North American Captives 35.9 27.2 25.9 26.7 32.7 75.3

Total Semiconductor 1,939.4 1,979.7 2,149.5 2,700.3 3,173.6 3,241.1

Total IC 1,424.4 1,469.9 1,621.9 2,096.4 2,476.6 2,503.7

Bipolar Digital 196.1 216.2 219.3 247.7 241.5 259.2

Memory 32.4 28.2 32.7 45.2 33.9 30.1

Logic 163.7 188.0 186.6 202.5 207.6 229.1

MOS Digital 769.2 795.3 925.1 1,365.1 1,724.6 1,699.0

Memory 282.0 290.2 326.6 575.1 826.9 664.1

Micro 210.4 228.5 273.9 334.5 390.3 462.2

Logic 276.8 276.6 324.6 455.5 507.4 572.7

Analog 459.1 458.4 477.5 483.6 510.5 545.5

Total Discrete 385.8 374.4 387.8 426.7 458.3 488.4

Total Optoelectronic 129.2 135.4 139.8 177.2 238.7 249.0

Exchange Rate (Yen/D.S.$) 238 167 144 130 138 144

Source: Dataquest (October 1991)

©1991 Dataquest lucoipoiaied October—Reproductian Prohfijited

18

Semiconductor Consumption and Shipment Forecast.

Table 4b

Japanese Semiconductor Consumption

(Percent Cbat^e in Yen)

Company:

Product:

Region of Consumption:

Distribution Channel:

Application:

S p e c i f i c a t i o n :

All

Each

Japan

All

All

All

Total Including Captives

North American Captives

Total Semiconductor

Total IC

Bipolar Digital

Memory-

Logic

MOS Digital

Memory

Micro

Logic

Analog

Total Discrete

Total Optoelectronic

1985 1986 1987 1988 1989 1990

CAGR

85-90

1.6 8.4 25.4 17.6 3.4 10.9

-6.4

0 0 0 0 0 0 0

-6.7 2.1

8.6 25.6

17.5 2.1

10.8

-7.8

3.2 10.3

29.3

18.1

1.1 11.9

-13.3

-16.1

-12.8

10.2

-13.0

14.8

1.4

16.0

-.7

13.0

38.2

8.5

-2.5

-25.0

2.5

7.3

-11.2

10.4

5.7

-1.5

7.0

-10.4

-24.6

-9.3

9.9

-.2

3.4

2.9

8.6

-.1

16.3

12.5

19.9

17.4

47.6

76.1

22.1

40.3

26.3

43.8

16.7

11.4

-1.5

-19.7

18.4

12.9

17.2

18.7

17.0

15.7

-.2 4.2 1.3

5.6 6.9 3.5

6.6 4.8

-7.3 -3.0

8.8

4.8

3.6

10.0 7.4

3.2 26.8 34.7 4.3 14.0

Source: Dataquest (October 1991)

©1991 Dataquest Incorporated CJctober—Reproduction Prcdiibited

Semiconductor Consuxaption and Shipment Forecast 19

Table 4c

Japanese Semiconductor Consumption

(Factory Revenue in Billions of Japanese Yen)

Company: All

Product: Each

Kegion of Consunption: Japan

Distribution Channel: All

Application: All

Specification: All

1991 1992 1993 1994 1995

Total Including Captives 3,592.8 4,187.2 4,729.8 5,273.8 5,693.3

North American Captives 92.0 112.9 128.5 139.1 141.4

Total Semiconductor 3,500.8 4,074.3 4,601.3 5,134.7 5,551.9

Total IC 2,692.3 3,186.3 3,641.3 4,101.9 4,446.8

Bipolar Digital

Memory

Logic

MOS Digital

Memory

Micro

Logic

245.9

28.0

217.9

257.4

30.4

227.0

251.1

31.1

220.0

242.5

30.5

212.0

231.9

29.9

202.0

1,835.2

627.8

549.3

658.1

2,243.9

790.9

670.0

783.0

2,640.2

950.0

790.1

900.1

3,048.4

1,119.5

905.4

1,023.5

3,359.9

1,199.9

1,020.0

1,140.0

Analog 611.2 685.0 750.0 811.0 855.0

Total Discrete 527.5 571.0 610.0 647.8 685.0

Total Optoelectronic 281.0 317.0 350.0 385.0 420.1

Exchange Rate (Yen/U.S.$) 137.0 138.0 138.0 138.0 138.0

Source: Dataquest (October 1991)

©1991 Dataquest Incorporated October—Reproduction Prohibited

20

Semiconductor Consumption and Shipment Forecast

Table 4d

Japanese Semiconductor Consumption

(Percent Change i n Yen)

Concpany:

P r o d u c t :

R e g i o n o f C o n s u n p t i o n :

D i s t r i b u t i o n C h a n n e l :

A p p l i c a t i o n :

S p e c i £ . c a t i o n :

All

Each

Japan

All

All

All

T o t a l I n c l u d i n g C a p t i v e s

N o r t h A m e r i c a n C a p t i v e s

T o t a l S e m i c o n d u c t o r

T o t a l I C

1991 1992 1993 1994 1995

CAGR

90-95

8.3

0

8.0

16.5 13.0 11.5

0 0

16.4 12.9

0

11.6

8.0

11.4

0

0

8.1

11.4

7.5 18.3 14.3 12.6 8.4 12.2

Bipolar Digital

Memory

Logic

MOS Digital

Memory

Micro

Logic

Analog

Total Discrete

Total Optoelectronic

-5.1

-7.0

-4.9

4.7

8.6

4.2

-2.4

2.3

-3.1

-3.4

-1.9

-3.6

-4.4

-2.0

-4.7

-2.2

-.1

-2.5

8.0

-5.5

18.8

14.9

22.3

26.0

22.0

19.0

17.7

20.1

17.9

15.0

15.5

17.8

14.6

13.7

10.2

7.2

12.7

11.4

14.6

12.6

17.2

14.8

12.0 12.1

8.0

8.2

9.5 8.1

6.2

6.8

12.9 12.8 10.4 10.0

5.4

5.7

9.4

7.0

9.1 11.0

Soufce: Dataquest (October 1991)

©1991 Dataquest Incorporated October—Keproduction Prcdiibited

Semiconductor Consiimption and Shipment Forecast

Table 5a

European Semiconductor Consumption

(Factory Revenue in Millions of U.S. Dollars)

Company:

Product:

Region of Consumption:

Distribution Channel:

Application:

Specification:

All

Each

Europe

All

All

All

Total Including Captives

North American Captives

Total Semiconductor

1985 1986 1987 1988 1989 1990

5,174 5,992 6,949

9,003

10,348 11,227

37 9

405 451 512 593 566

4,795 5,587

6,498 8,491 9,755 10,661

Total IC

Bipolar Digital

Memory

Logic

M O S Digital

Memory

Micro

Logic

Analog

Total Discrete

Total Optoelectronic

3,615 4,116 4,840 6,669 7,794 8,326

719

150

569

719

147

572

727

88

639

772

74

698

640

72

568

577

58

519

1,933

745 .

486

702

2,270

813

574

883

2,761

854

805

1,102

4,364

1,797

1,212

1,355

5,458

2,548

1,469

1,441

5,403

2,154

1,836

1,413

963 1,127 1,352

969 1,207 1,377

1,533

1,696 2,346

1,516

1,594 1,915

211

264

281 306

367 420

Souice Dataquest (October 1991)

21

©1991 Dataquest Incoiporated October-HEteproductioii Prohibited

22

Semiconductor Consumption and Shipment Forecast

Table 5b

European Semiconductor Consumption

(Percent Chac^)

Company:

Product:

Region of Consuirption:

Distribution Channel:

Application:

Specification:

All

Each

Europe

All

All

All

1985 1986 1987 1988 1989 1990

CAGR

85-90

Total Including Captives

North American Captives

Total Semiconductor

Total IC

Bipolar Digital

Memory

Logic

MOS Digital

Memory

Micro

Logic

-.5 15.8 16.0 29.6 14.9

12.1

6.9

11.4

13.5 15.8

8.5

-4.6

16.8

8.4

-1.4 16.5 16.3 30.7 14.9 9.3 17.3

6.8

18.2

-3.1 13.9 17.6 37.8 16.9

-3.0

4.2

-4.7

0

-2.0

.5

1.1

-40.1

11.7

6.2

-15.9

9.2

-17.1

-2.7

-18.6

-9.8

-19.4

-8.6

-4.3

-17.3

-1.8

-8.9

-24.4

3.2

5.4

17.4

9.1

18.1

25.8

21.6

5.0

40.2

24.8

58.1

110.4

50.6

23.0

25.1

41.8

21.2

6.3

-1.0

-15.5

25.0

-1.9

22.8

23.7

30.5

15.0

Analog

Total Discrete

Total Optoelectronic

11.1 17.0 20.0 13.4 10.6 38.3 19.5

2.9 24.6 14.1 10.1

10.5 25.1 6.4

5.1 20.1 14.6

8.9 19.9

14.4

14.8

Souice Dataquest (October 1991)

©1991 Dataquest IiKoipotated October—Reproduction Prohibited

Semiconductor Consnmptlon and Shipment Forecast

Table 5c

European Semiconductor Consumption

(Factory Revenue in Millions of U.S. Dollars)

Conxpany:

Product:

Region of Consumption:

Distribution Channel:

Application:

Specification:

All

Each

Europe

All

All

All

Total Including Captives 11,585 12,443 14,830 16,516 17,586

North American Captives 756 889 1,054 1,182 1,219

Total Semiconductor

1991 1992 1993 1994 1995

10,829 11,554

13,776 15,334

16,367

8,682 9,475 11,474 12,896 13,846 Total IC

Bipolar Digital

Memory-

Logic

MOS Digital

Memory

Micro

Logic

Analog

Total Discrete

Total Optoelectronic

489

49

440

5,774

2,093

2,218

1,463

2,419

1,751

396

424

40

384

6,594

2,445

2,528

1,621

2,457

1,682

397

395

40

355

8,303

3,204

3,085

2,014

2,776

1,864

438

361

32

329

317

25

292

9,454

3,604

3,532

2,318

10,262

3,832

3,885

2,545

3,081

1,954

484

3,267

2,013

508

Source: Dataquest (October 1991)

23

©1991 Dataquest Incorporated October—Bepioduction Prohibited

24

Semiconductor Consumption and Shipment Forecast

Table 5d

European Semiconductor Constunption

(Percent C h a n ^ )

Company:

P r o d u c t :

Region of Consumption:

Distribution Channel:

Application:

Specification:

All

Each

Europe

All

All

All

Tota.1 Including Captives

North American Captives

Total Semiconductor

Total IC

Bipolar Digital

Memory

Logic

MOS Digital

Memory

Micro

Logic

Analog

Total Discrete

Total Optoelectronic

1991 1992 1993 1994 1995

CAGR

90-95

3.2 7.4 19.2 11.4

6.5

9.4

33.6 17.6 18.6

12.1

3.1 16.6

1.6

4.3

6.7

9.1

19.2

21.1

11.3

12.4

6.7

7.4

9.0

10.7

-15.3

-15.5

-15.2

-13.3

-18.4

-12.7

-6.8

0

-7.6

-8.6

-20.0

-7.3

-12.2

-21.9

-11.2

-11.3

-15.5

-10.9

6.9

-2.8

20.8

3.5

14.2

16.8

14.0

10.8

25.9

31.0

22.0

24.2

13.9

12.5

14.5

15.1

8.5

6.3

10.0

9.8

13.7

12.2

16.2

12.5

3.1 1.6 13.0 11.0

-8.6

-3.9

10.8 4.8

6.0

3.0

6.8

1.0

-5.7 .3 10.3 10.5 5.0

3.9

Source: Dataquest (October 199U

©1991 Dataquest Incoiporated October—Reproduction Prohibited

Semiconductor Consumption and Shipment Forecast

Table 6a

Asia/Pacific-Rest of World Semiconductor Consumption

(Factory Revenue i n Millions of U.S. Dollars)

Contpany:

Product:

Region of Consuziption:

Distribution Channel:

Application:

Specification:

Each

All

All

All

Total Including Captives

North American Captives

Total Semiconductor

Total IC

Bipolar Digital

Memory

Logic

MOS Digital

Memory

Micro

Logic

Analog

Total Discrete

Total Optoelectronic

1985

1,979

0

1,979

1,195

215

15

200

616

134

117

365

364

693

91

1986

1987

1988 1989 1990

3,968 5,752 6,524 7,670

0 0 0 0 0

3,968

5,752

6,524 7,670

2,898 4,457 5,275 6,203

281

23

258

411

35

376

510

32

478

419

19

400

411

22

389

871

185

185

501

1,550

437

389

724

2,517

1,173

652

692

3,387

1,658

933

796

4,065

1,670

1,459

936

562 937 1,430 1,469 1,727

739

95

943 1,138

1,064 1,259

127

157

185

208

25

Source: Dataquest (October 1991>

©1991 Dataquest Incorporated October—KeproducticMi Prohibited.

26 Semiconductor Consumption and Shipment Forecast

Table 6b

Asia/Pacific-Rest of World Semiconductor Consumption

(Percent Chaise)

Company:

Product:

Region of Consiur^stion:

Distribution Channel:

Application:

Specification:

Total Including Captives

North American Captives

Total Semiconductor

Total IC

Bipolar Digital

Memory

Logic

MOS Digital

Memory

Micro

Logic

1985 1986

1987

1988 1989 1990

CAGR

85-90

-9.3

28.8 55.7

45.0

13.4 17.6 31.1

NM

NM NM

NM

NM NM

NM

-9.3

28.8 55.7 45.0 13.4 17.6

31.1

-6.7 43.4 69.1

53.8

18.4 17.6

39.0

-20.1

-42.3

-17.7

30.7

53.3

29.0

46,3

52.2

45.7

24.1

-8.6

27.1

-17.8

-40.6

-16.3

-1.9

15.8

-2.8

13.8

8.0

14.2

-12.0

-42.7

-19.3

13.7

41.4

38.1

58.1

37.3

78.0

136.2

110.3

44.5

62.4

168.4

67.6

-4.4

34.6

41.3

43.1

15.0

20.0

.7

56.4

17.6

45.8

65.6

65.6

20.7

Analog

Total Discrete

Total Optoelectronic

NM = Not meaningful

All

Each

Asia/Pacific-ROW

All

All

All

16.7

54.4 66.7 52.6

-11.7

-20.9

2.7 17.6 36.5

6.6 27.6 20.7 -6.5 18.3

12.7

4.4 33.7

23.6

17.8 12.4 18.0

Source: Dataquest (October 1991)

©1991 Dataquest Incorporated CXrtober—Reproduction Prohibited

Semiconductor Consumption and Shipment Forecast

Table 6c

Asia/Padfic-Kest of World Semiconductor Consumption

CFactory Revenue in Millions of U.S. Dollars)

Company:

Product:

Region of Consvucption:

Distribution Channel:

Application:

Spe cificat ion:

All

Each

Asia/Pacific-ROW

All

All

All

Total Including Captives

North American Captives

Total Semiconductor

Total IC

Bipolar Digital

Memory

Logic

MOS Digital

Memory

Micro

Logic

Analog

Total Discrete

Total Optoelectronic

1991

8,792 10,405 12,532 14,486 16,246

0

1992

0

1993

0

1994

0

1995

0

8,792

10,405

12,532 14,486 16,246

7,122 8,568 10,499 12,302 13,930

401

12

389

4,684

1,778

1,834

1,072

372

9

363

5,727

2,130

2,327

1,270

350

8

342

7,144

2,554

3,042

1,548

325

7

318

8,371

3,027

3,563

1,781

298

6

292

9,505

3,523

3,988

1,994

2,037

1,444

226

2,469

1,598

239

3,005

1,742

291

3,606

1,851

333

4,127

1,958

358

27

Source: Dataquest (October 1991)

©1991 Dataquest Incoipoiaied October—Reproduction Prohibited

28

Semiconductor Consumption and Shipment Forecast

Table 6d

Asia/Padfic-Sest of World Semiconductor Consumption

(Percent Change)

Contpany:

Product:

Region of Consuniption:

Distribution Chaiuiel:

Application:

Specification:

Total Including Captives

North American Captives

All

Each

Asia/Pacific-ROW

All

All

All

1991

1992 1993 1994

1995

CAGR

90-95

14.6 18.3

20.4

15.6

12.1 16.2

NM

NM

NM NM NM NM

Total Semiconductor

Total IC

Bipolar Digital

Memory

Logic

MOS Digital

Memory

Micro

Logic

Analog

Total Discrete

Total Optoelectronic

NM = Not meaningful

14.6

8.7

18.3 20.4 15.6 12.1 16.2

14.8 20.3 22.5 17.2 13.2 17.6

-2.4

-45.5

0

-7.2

-25.0

-6.7

-5.9

-11.1

-5.8

-7.1

-12.5

-7.0

-8.3

-14.3

-8.2

-6.2

-22.9

-5.6

15.2

6.5

25.7

14.5

22.3

19.8

26.9

18.5

24.7

19.9

30.7

21.9

17.2

18.5

17.1

15.1

13.5

16.4

11.9

12.0

18.5

16.1

22.3

16.3

18.0 21.2

21.7 20.0 14.4 19.0

14.7 10.7 9.0 6.3

5.8 21.8

14.4

5.8 9.2

7.5 11.5

Source: Dataquest (October 1991)

©1991 Dataquest Incorporated October—Reproduction Prohibited

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0011612

torldwide and North American Eiectronic

Equipment Production Forecast iMay 1991

I

DataQuest

Semiconductor Application il/laricets Worldwide

Worldwide and North American Electronic

Equipment Production Forecast

May 1991

Source:

Dataquest

Dataquest Semiconductor Application Markets Worldwide

i

PuMished by Dataquest Incorporated

The content of this ref>ort represents our interpretation and analysis of information generally available to the public or released by knowledgeable individuals in the subjea industry, but is not guaranteed as to accuracy or completeness. It does not contain material provided to us in confidence by our clients.

Printed in the United States of America. All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced, stored in retrieval systems, or transmitted, in any form or by any means—mechanical, electronic, photocopying, duplicating, microfilming, videotape, or otherwise—without the prior permission of the publisher.

© 1991 Dataquest Incorporated A

May 1991 i

Worldwide and North American

Electronic Equipment Production

Forecast

Introduction

Electronic equipment production is an important determinant of semiconductor market activity. This is true because semiconductor demand is derived, in part, from the underlying demand for the systems that use semiconductors. That is, the demand for semiconductors is a positive (or increasing) function of the demand for electronic systems. Therefore, the forecast of expected future electronic systems production is an essential component to assess expected future semiconductor market activity.

This booklet contains a set of detailed tables of the spring 1991 electronic equipment production forecast. Worldwide production is estimated and is segmented into four major geographic regions for the years 1988 to 1995.

Production tables contain both historical data and forecasts. Historical data begin with 1988 and end with 1990, while forecast data provide estimates for 1991 through 1995. The list of tables details the type of production data by region, application market, and unit of measure.

Definitions and Conventions

The objective of analyzing electronic systems production activity is to estimate its important implications for semiconductor consumption.

Therefore, generalized economic concepts such as production and consumption are tailored to best isolate these implications.

The value of production is estimated as factory revenue. Dataquest defines factory revenue as the exchange value of the commodity transaction between the original equipment manufacturer and the point of entry into distribution.

In the case of a direct sale that involves no distribution—as is the case with military systems—^factory revenue is equal to the finaluser cost, net of sales taxes.

The value of production estimates contained in this booklet are not directly comparable to the estimates found in the Japanese Semiconduaor

Application Market service (JSAM), or the

European Semiconductor Application Market service (ESAM). JSAM values production at faaory cost, defined as factory revenue less the quantity, gross profit mai^in plus selling, general, and adminiistrative costs. ESAM values production at final-user cost. JSAM and ESAM estimates have been converted to factory revenue to permit meaningful inter-regional production and input/output ratio comparisons and to remove changes in the value of output due to changes in distribution-channel markup that would lead to spurious changes in the input/output ratios.

Production is the value-adding process by which the factors of production Oabor and capital) and material inputs are transformed into the goods and services that are desired for consumption and investment. As such, production can span both time and geography.

For example, a North American-owned disk drive company may minimize its cost of production by manufacturing (i.e., consuming chips) its products in Singapore, for eventual sale in, for example, Europe. We would estimate this as Asia/Pacific-Rest of World (ROW) data storage/subsystems production, because we are interested in that portion of the production process that relates particularly to semiconductor consumption. Production would be valued as the exchange value of the transaction between the North American company's

Singapore operation (which is factory revenue) and the European distributor or final user.

Production is segmented into the following regions:

• North America—^This region includes the

United States and Canada. Latin America, including Mexico, is considered part of the

Asia/Pacific-ROW region.

• Europe—This region includes Austria, Belgium, France, Germany, Italy, Luxembourg,

3ie Netherlands, the Scandinavian countries

(Denmark, Finland, Norway, Sweden), Spain, the United Kingdom and Ireland, and the rest of Europe.

• Asia/Pacific-ROW—^This region includes

South Korea, Taiwan, Hong Kong,

Singapore, China, India, and the countries of Oceania.

• Japan—^The fourth region, is the only singlecountry region.

Electronic equipment is disaggregated into the following six semiconductor application markets. Worldwide production is further disaggregated into the designated systems groups.

North America production is further disaggregated into specific types of equipment systems, as shown in Tables 4a through 41.

• Data Processing

- Computers

- Data storage/subsystems

- Terminals

- Input/output

- Dedicated systems

• Communications

- Premise telecom equipment

- Public telecommunications

- Mobile communications equipment

- Broadcast and studio

- Other telecom

• Industrial

- Security/energy management

- Manufacturing systems and instrumentation

- Medical equipment

- Other industrial systems

• Consumer

- Audio

- Video

- Personal electronics

- Appliances

- Other consumer

• Military/Civilian Aerospace

• Transportation

Data Sources

Worldwide and North American Electronic Equipment Production Forecast

The historical information presented in the production data has been consolidated from a variety of sources, each of which focuses on a specific part of the market. These sources include the following:

• Dataquest's estimates of systems manufacturers' factory revenue

• U.S. Department of Commerce estimates of manufacturers' shipments

• Japanese production statistics compiled and published by the Ministry of International

Trade and Industry

• Various European and Asian nations' governmental agency statistics

• Trade association data

• Estimates presented by knowledgeable and reliable industry spokespersons

• Published product literature and prices

Dataquest believes that the estimates presented here are the most accurate and meaningful generally available today.

Valuation of Production

Regional production is expressed in U.S. dollars. To make the tables in this booklet useful in comparing different regions, it is necessary to express all values in a common currency, and we choose the U.S. dollar for convenience. However, the choice of the U.S. dollar or any other currency brings with it some problems (listed as follows) that require the readers' careful consideration in interpreting the data.

• Inflation—No adjustment has been made in the historical or forecast data to account for the effects of past inflation or expected future inflation. Production is expressed in current dollars (i.e., dollars that include the effects of inflation and changes in exchange rates).

• Exchange rates—Construction of the European tables involves combining data from many countries, each of which has a different and changing exchange rate. Dataquest uses Armual Foreign Exchange Rates for each year as published by the International

Monetary Fund. As much as possible, we prepare our estimates in terms of local currencies before conversion to U.S. dollars.

Exchange rates during the forecast period are held constant at their 1990 values.

©1991 Dataquest Incorporated May—Reproduction Prohibited

Worldwide and North American Electronic Equipment Production Forecast

List of Tables

Table Title Pi^e la Worldwide Electronic Equipment Produaion Forecast—^Factory Revenue in Millions of Dollars 5 l b Worldwide Electronic Equipment Produaion Forecast—Annual Growth in Percent 6

Ic Worldwide Electronic Equipment Production Forecast—^Percent of Total Equipment 7

Id Worldwide Electronic Equipment Produaion Forecast—^Percent of Application Market 8

2a Regional Electronic Equipment Production Forecast—Faaory Revenue in Millions of Dollars 9

2b Regional Electronic Equipment Production Forecast—Annual Growth in Percent 10

2c Regional Electrcmic Equipment Production Forecast—^Percent of Regional Total 11

2d Regional Electronic Equipment Production Forecast—^Percent of Worldwide Total 12

3a North American Electronic Equipiment Produaion Forecast—^Faaory Revenue in Millions of Dollars 13

3b _ North American Electronic Equipment Produaion Forecast—Annual Growth in Percent 14

3c North American Electronic Equipment Produaion Forecast—^Percent of Worldwide System Group 15

Total

3d North American Electronic Equipment Production Forecast—Percent of Total Equipment l6

3e North American Electronic Equipnnent Produaion Forecast—Percent of Application Market 17

4a North American Data Processing Equipment Production Forecast—^Faaory Revenue in Millions of 18

Dollars

4b North American Data Processing Equipment Production Forecast—Annual Growth in Percent 20

4c North American Communications Equipment Production Forecast—Faaory Revenue in Millions of 22

Dollars

4d North American Communications Equipment Production Forecast—Annual Growth in Percent 24

4e North American Industrial Equipment Production Forecast—Faaory Revenue in Millions of Dollars 26

4f North American Industrial Equipment Produaion Forecast—Annual Growth in Percent 27

4g North American Consumer Equipment Produaion Forecast—^Faaory Revenue in Millions of Dollars 28

4h North American Consumer Equipment Production Forecast—Annual Growth in Percent 29

4i North American Military/Aerospace Equipment Production Forecast—Faaory Revenue in Millions 30 of Dollars

4j North American Military/Aerospace Equipment Production Forecast—Annual Growth in Percent 31

4k North American Transportation Equipment Production Forecast—^Faaory Revenue in Millions of 32

Dollars

41 North American Transportation Equipment Production Forecast—Annual Growth in Percent 32

5a Regional Data Processing Equipment Produaion Forecast—Faaory Revenue in Millions of Dollars 33

5b Regional Data Processing Equipment Produaion Forecast—Annual Growth in Percent 33

5c Regional Data Processing Equipment Produaion Forecast—Percent of Worldwide Total 34

5d Regional Data Processing Equipment Produaion Forecast—^Percent of Regional Total 34

6a Regional Communications Equipment Production Forecast—Faaory Revenue in Millions of Dollars 35

6b Regional Communications Equipment Produaion Forecast—Annual Growth in Percent 35

6c Regional Communications Equipment Produaion Forecast—^Percent of Worldwide Total 36

6d Regional Communications Equipment Production Forecast—Percent of Regional Total 36

7a Regional Industrial Equipment Produaion Forecast—Faaory Revenue in Millions of Dollars 37

7b Regional Industrial Equipnnent Produaion Forecast—Aiuiual Growth in Percent 37

7c Regional Industrial Equipment Produaion Forecast—Percent of Worldwide Total 38

7d Regional Industrial Equipment Produaion Forecast—^Percent of Regional Total 38

©1991 Dataquest Incorporated May—^Reproduction Prohibited

4 Worldwide and North American Electronic Equipment Production Forecast

i

List of Tables (Continued)

Table Title Page

8a Regional Consumer Equipment Production Forecast—Factory Revenue in Millions of Dollars 39

8b Regional Consumer Equipment Production Forecast—Annual Growth in Percent 39

8c Regional Consumer Equipment Production Forecast—Percent of Worldwide Total 40

8d Regional Consumer Equipment Produaion Forecast—^Percent of Regional Total 40

9a Regional Military/Aerospace Equipanent Production Forecast—Factory Revenue in Millions of 41

Dollars

9b Regional Military/Aerospace Equijjment Production Forecast—Annual Growth in Percent 41

9c Regional Military/Aerospace Equipment Production Forecast—^Percent of Worldwide Total 42

9d Regional Military/Aerospace Equipment Production Forecast—Percent of Regional Total 42

10a Regional Transjxjrtation Equipment Production Forecast—^Factory Revenue in Millions of Dollars 43

10b Regional Transportation Equipment Production Forecast—Annual Growth in Percent 43

10c Regional Transportation Equipment Production Forecast—Percent of Worldwide Total 44 lOd Regional Transportation Equipment Production Forecast—^Percent of Regional Total 44

11 Japanese Electronic Equipment Production Forecast—^Factory Cost Revenue in Billions of Yen 45

12 Europ>ean Electronic Equipment Production Forecast—^End-User Revenue in Millions of Dollars 45

i

©1991 Dataquest Incorporated May—Reproduction Prohibited

i

Worldwide and North American Electronic Equipment Production Forecast

Table l a

Electronic Equipment Production Forecast

(Factory Revenue In Millions of Dollars)

Company:

Product:

Region of Produaion:

Distribution Channel:

Application:

Specification:

All

Each

Worldwide

Not Meaningful

All

All

1988

1989

1990 1991 1992

1993

1994

1995

Data Processing

Computers

Data Storage

Terminals

Input/Output

Dedicated Systems

Total

Communications

Premises Telecom

Public Telecom

M(^ile Communications

Broadcast & Studio

Other Communication

Total

Industrial

Security & Energy

Management

Manufacturing

Systems/Instruments

Medical Equlfmient

Other Industrial

Total

Consumer

Audio

Video

Personal Electronics

Appliances

Other Consumer

Total

Military/Aerospace

Transportation

Total Equipment

Soureci Dzuquesi (May 1991)

92,100 103,432

107,895

118.638 130,950

19,676

14,048

19,943

31,405

24,616

14,450

3,435

7,825

81,731

6,435

50,918

15,128

11,428

83,909

21,162

14,183

21,277

35,990

24,475

15,074

3,682

7,985

87,206

6,849

53,445

15,809

12,159

88,262

21,534

14,929

23,073

38,755

27,732

16,785

4,079

8,633

95,984

7,560

56,950

16,173

12,354

23.999

17,693

26.084

42,953

31,089

18,620

4,459

9,356

106,477

4.800

10.103

116,482

8,291

61,307

17,498

13,247

93,037 100,343

25,620

19,677

29,548

47,288

33.983

20.308

9.046

66,324

18.840

14.307

108.517

143,105

27,915

21,637

32,723

154.710

29,836

23,581

36,119

166,859

31.942

26,284

39.920

17,359 17,935

17.552

163,126 177,989 184,983

19,643 21.869

23,793

24,893 27.770

206,057

227.664

249,173

269.139 292,775

51,031

37,127

22,389

5,145

9,961

71,498

20,226

15,400

117,085

54,544

39,317

24.237

5,457

10,911 11,533

126,603

135.088

12.197

146,753

10,995

59.830

42.375

26,473

5,878

12,178

75,578

21,488

16,194

80,375

22,981

17,183

124,255 132,717

16,228

40,725

13,473

47,238

5,001

122,665

84,604

16,110

40,709

14,694

17,150

43,866

17.627

18,682

46,529

19,233

19.921

51.201

21.136

20,846

53,911

22,178

50,335

5,151

52,069

5,355

126,999 136,067

57.753

5,734

147,931

62.785

6,255

161,298

66,694

6,532

170,161

87,213 87.620 83,698 88,195 91,923

13,196

549,231

14,352

582,021

15,624

613,315

16,795

18,916

661,301

721,072

21,290

776,235

21.334

57.713

22.656

71.378

6.791

179,872

22.747

61.820

23,939

76,920

7,288

192,714

95,446

24,000

99,703

26,481

827,800

891,143

1990-1991

Growth

Kate (%)

10.0

11.4

18.5

13.0

11.9

11.4

10.8

12.1

10.9

9.3

8.4

10.9

9.7

8.9

6.1

9.1

10.9

7.1

8.7

-4.5

7.5

7.8

7.7

8.2

7.2

7.9

1990-1995

CAGR (%)

10.0

5.8

7.1

6.3

8.1

6.4

7.2

2.6

11,1

7.8

9.1

8.2

12.0

11.6

9.6

9.6

9.1

8.8

9.5

7.6

7.2

8.9

7.1

7.3

6.8

7.4

©1991 Dataquest Incorporated May—Reproduction Prohibited

Worldwide and North American Electronic Equipment Production Forecast

Table l b

Electronic Equipment P r o d u c t i o n Forecast

(Annual Growth i n P e r c e n t )

Company:

Product:

Region of Production:

Distribution Channel:

Application:

Specification:

Data Processing

Computers

Data Storage

Terminals

Input/Output

Dedicated Systems

Total

Communications

Premises Telecom

Public Telecom

Mobile Communications

Broadcast & Studio

Other Communication

Total

Industrial

Security & Energy

Management

Manufaauring

Systems/Instruments

Medical Equip)ment

Other Industrial

Total

Consumer

Audio

Video

Personal Electronics

Appliances

Other Consumer

Total

Mil itary/Aerospace

Transportation

Total Equipment

Source: Dataquest Qriay 199U

All

Each

Worldwide

Not Meaningful

All

All

1989

12.3

7.6

1.0

6.7

3.3

9.1

14.6

-.6

4.3

7.2

2.0

6.7

6.4

5.0

4.5

6.4

5.2

-.7

-.0

9.1

6.6

3.0

3.5

3.1

8.8

6.0

1990

10.4

6.6

2.3

1.6

5.4

7.7

133

11.4

10.8

8.1

10.1

6.5

7.8

20.0

3.4

4.0

7.1

.5

8.9

5.4

4.3

1.8

5.3

8.4

-2.1

3.9

1991

10.0

11.4

18.5

13.0

11.9

11.4

10.8

12.1

10.9

9.3

8.4

10.9

9.7

7.7

8.2

7.2

7.9

8.9

6.1

9.1

10.9

7.1

8.7

-4.5

7.5

7.8

1992

10.4

6.8

11.2

13.3

11.3

10.5

10.1

9.3

9.1

7.6

8.0

9.4

9.1

8.2

7.7

8.0

8.1

6.6

10.0

9.9

8.7

9.1

9.0

5.4

12.6

9.0

1993

9.3

9.0

10.0

10.7

8.8

9.4

7.9

9.3

10.2

7.2

8.0

8.7

10.1

7.8

7.4

7.6

7.9

4.6

5.3

4.9

6.2

4.4

5.5

4.2

12.6

7.7

1 9 9 4

6.9

5.9

8.3

6.1

5.7

6.7

5.7

3.8

12.7

6.6

2.3

7.1

2.2

7.0

4.0

8.1

6.9

9.0

10.4

4.6

8.0

10.4

5.7

6.2

5.2

6.1

1995

7.9

7.1

11.5

10.5

11.6

8.8

9.7

7.8

9.2

7.7

5.8

8.6

10.8

6.3

6.9

6.1

6.8

7.3

7.1

4.5

10.3

7.7

6.6

7.1

5.7

7.8

©1991 Dataquest Incorporated May—Reproduction Prohibited

Worldwide and North American Electronic Equipment Production Forecast

Table Ic

Electronic Equipment Production Forecast

(Percent of Total Equipment)

Company:

Product:

Region of Production:

Distribution Channel:

Application:

Specification:

Data Processing

Computers

Data Storage

Terminals

Input^Output

Dedicated Systems

Total

Communications

Premises Telecom

Public Telecom

Mobile Communications

Broadcast & Studio

Other Communication

Total

Industrial

Security & Energy

Management

Manufacturing

Systems/Instruments

Medical Equipment

Other Industrial

Total

Consumer

Audio

Video

Personal Electronics

^ p l i a n c e s

Other Consumer

Total

Military/Aerospace

Transportation

Total Equipment

Source Dataquest (May 19iH>

All

Each

Worldwide

Not Meaningful

All

All

1988

1989

16.8

3.6

2.6

3.6

3.2

29.7

5.7

4.5

2.6

.6

1.4

14.9

1.2

9.3

2.8

2.1

15.3

3.0

7.4

2.5

8.6

.9

22.3

15.4

2.4

100.0

17.8

3.6

2.4

3.7

3.1

30.6

6.2

4.2

2.6

.6

1.4

15.0

1.2

9.2

2.7

2.1

15.2

.9

21.8

15.0

2.5

100.0

2.8

7.0

2.5

8.6

1990

17.6

3.5

2.4

3.8

2.9

30.2

6.3

4.5

2.7

.7

1.4

15.7

1.2

9.3

2.6

2.0

15.2

2.8

7.2

2.9

8.5

.9

22.2

14.3

2.5

100.0

1991

17.9

3.6

2.7

3.9

3.0

31.2

6.5

4.7

2.8

.7

1.4

16.1

1.3

9.3

2.6

2.0

15.2

2.8

7.0

2.9

8.7

.9

22.4

12.7

2.5

100.0

1992

18.2

3.6

2.7

4.1

3.0

31.6

6.6

4.7

2.8

.7

1.4

16.2

1.3

9.2

2.6

2.0

15.0

2.8

7.1

2.9

8.7

.9

22.4

12.2

2.6

100.0

1 9 9 3

18.4

3.6

2.8

4.2

3.1

32.1

6.6

4.8

2.9

.7

1.4

16.3

1.3

9.2

2.6

2.0

15.1

21.9

11.8

2.7

100.0

2.7

6.9

2.9

8.6

.8

1994

2.6

7.0

2.7

8.6

.8

21.7

11.5

2.9

100.0

1.3

9.1

2.6

2.0

15.0

6.6

4.7

2.9

.7

1.4

16.3

18.7

3.6

2.8

4.4

3.0

32.5

21.6

11.2

3.0

100.0

2.6

6.9

2.7

8.6

.8

1.4

9.0

2.6

1.9

14.9

1995

18.7

3.6

2.9

4.5

3.1

32.9

6.7

4.8

3.0

.7

1.4

16.5

©1991 Dataquest Incorporated May—Reproduction Prohibited

Worldwide and North American Electronic Equipment Production Forecast

Table Id

Electronic Equipment Production Forecast

(Percent of Application Market)

Company:

Product:

Region of Production:

Distribution Channel:

Application:

Sjjecification:

All

Each

Worldwide

Not Meaningful

All

All

1988

Data Processing

Computers

Data Storage

Terminals

Input/Output

Dedicated Systems

Total

Communications

Premises Telecom

Public Telecom

Mobile Communications

Broadcast & Studio

Other Communication

Total

Industrial

Security & Energy Management

Manufacturing Systems/Instruments

Medical Equipment

Other Industrial

Total

Consumer

Audio

Video

Personal Electronics

Appliances

Other Consumer

Total

Military/Aerospace

Transportation

Source; Dataquest (May 1991)

13.2

33.2

11.0

38.5

4.1

100.0

100.0

100.0

56.5

12.1

8.6

12.2

10.6

100.0

38.4

30.1

17.7

4.2

9.6

100.0

7.7

60.7

18.0

13.6

100.0

1 9 8 9

7.8

60.6

17.9

13.8

100.0

12.7

32.1

11.6

39.6

4.1

100.0

100.0

100.0

41.3

28.1

17.3

4.2

9.2

100.0

58.1

11.9

8.0

12.0

10.1

100.0

1990

12.6

32.2

13.0

38.3

3.9

100.0

100.0

100.0

58.3

11.6

8.1

12.5

9.5

100.0

40.4

28.9

17.5

4.2

9.0

100.0

8.1

61.2

17.4

13.3

100.0

1991

8.3

61.1

17.4

13.2

100.0

12.6

31.5

13.0

39.0

3.9

100.0

100.0

100.0

40.3

29.2

17.5

4.2

8.8

100.0

57.6

11.6

8 6

12.7

9.5

100.0

1992

8.3

61.1

17.4

13.2

100.0

12.4

31.7

13.1

38.9

3.9

100.0

100.0

100.0

40.6

29.2

17.4

4.1

8.7

100.0

57.5

11.3

8.6

13.0

9.6

100.0

1 9 9 3

12.3

31.7

13.0

39.2

3.8

100.0

100.0

100.0

40.3

29.3

17.7

4.1

8.6

100.0

8.5

61.1

17.3

13.2

100.0

57.4

11.2

8.7

13.1

9.5

100.0

1994

11.9

32.1

12.6

39.7

3.8

100.0

100.0

100.0

40.4

29.1

17.9

4.0

8.5

100.0

57.5

11.1

8.8

13.4

9.2

100.0

8.8

60.8

17.3

13.0

100.0

1995

40.8

28.9

18.0

4.0

8.3

100.0

9.2

60.6

17.3

12.9

100.0

11.8

32.1

12.4

39.9

3.8

100.0

100.0

100.0

57.0

10.9

9.0

13.6

9.5

100.0

©1991 Dataquest Incorporated May—Rejjroduction Prohibited

Worldwide and North American Electronic Equipment Production Forecast

Table 2a

Electronic Equipment Production Forecast

(Factory Revenue In Millions of Dollars)

Company:

P r o d u a :

Region of Production:

Distribution Channel:

Application:

Specification;

All

Each

Each

Noi • Meaningful

All

All

1988 1989 1990

1991

1992 1993 1994

1995

North America

Data Processing

Conununications

Industrial

Consumer

Military/Aerospace

Transportation

Total

Japan

Data Processing

Communications

Industrial

Consumer

Military/Aerospace

Transportation

Total

Europe

Data Processing

Communications

Industrial

Consumer

Military/Aerospace

Transportation

73,428

25,409

30,385

15,454

58,179

4,131

206,986

45,638

20,008

19,885

54,716

1,101

4,621

145,969

78,717

28,227

32,386

17,081

59,876

4,151

220,438

47,942

19,109

22,065

51,703

1,239

5,008

147,066

21,353

28,084

31,425

30,752

22,190

3,052

136,856

26,375

30,925

31,378

34,322

22,817

3,568

Total

Asia/Padflc-ROW

Data Processing

Communications

Industrial

Consumer

Military/Aerospace

Transportation

Total

22,707

8,230

2,214

21,743

3,134

1,392

59,420

149,385

24,954

8,945

2,433

23,893

3,281

1,625

65,131

Worldwide

Data Processing

Communications

Industrial

Consumer

Military/Aerospace

Transportation

163,126

81,731

83,909

122,665

84,604

13,196

Total

Source: Dalaquest (May 1991)

549,231

177,988

87,206

88,262

126,999

87,213

14,352

582,020

82,851

30,188

33,690

17,005

60,569

4,115

228,418

46,625

20,826

22,507

54,007

1,356

5,596

150,917

28,151

34,515

33,920

37,282

22,112

4,061

160,041

27,356

10,455

2,920

27,773

3,583

1,852

73,939

86,968

32,520

35,233

17,396

56,476

4,024

232,617

54,197

24,070

25,459

60,202

1,468

5,900

171,296

32,959

38,074

36,282

40,341

21,847

4,747

174,250

31,934

11,813

3,369

29,992

3,907

2,124

83,139

93,584

35,408

37,834

18,370

59,934

4,535

249,665

59,485

25,952

27,954

63,854

1,616

6,407

185,268

38,167

41,587

38,874

43,661

22,327

5,523

190,139

36,428

13,535

3,855

35,413

4,318

2,451

96,000

184,983

95,984

93,037

136,067

87,620

15,624

613,315

206,058

106,477

227,664

116,482

100,343

147,931

83,698

16,795

661,302

108,517

161,298

88,195

18,916

721,072

100,146

37,972

40,704

19,236

62,275

4,996

265,329

64,817

27,894

30,351

64,249

1,785

6,768

195,864

43,055

45,366

41,717

47,327

22,863

6,670

206,998

41,155

15,371

4,313

39,349

5,000

2,856

108,044

106,665

40,184

43,254

20,145

64,419

5,424

280,091

68,021

29,186

32,076

64,824

1,971

7,061

203,139

48,029

48,607

44,125

51,707

23,549

8,219

224,236

46,424

17,111

4,800

43,196

5,507

3,296

120,334

113,558

42,614

46,062

20,974

67,195

5,721

296,124

72,913

31,232

34,235

66,736

2,169

7,429

214,714

54,182

53,490

47,184

57,355

24,350

9,551

246,112

52,122

19,417

5,236

47,649

5,989

3,780

134,193

249,173

126,603

117,085

170,161

91,923

21,290

776,235

269,139

135,088

124,255

179,872

95,446

24,000

827,800

292,775

146,753

132,717

192,714

99,703

26,481

891,143

1990-1991

Growth

Rate (%)

5.0

7.7

4.6

2.3

-6.8

-2.2

1.8

16.2

15.6

13.1

11.5

8.3

5.4

13.5

17.1

10.3

7.0

8.2

-1.2

16.9

8.9

16.7

13.0

15.4

8.0

9.0

14.7

12.4

11.4

10.9

7.9

8.7

-4.5

7.5

7.8

1990-1995

CAGR (%)

6.5

7.1

6.5

4.3

2.1

6.8

5.3

9.4

8.4

8.8

4.3

9.8

5.8

7.3

14.0

9.2

6.8

9.0

1.9

18.7

9.0

13.8

13.2

12.4

11.4

10.8

15.3

12.7

9.6

8.9

7.4 ,

7.2

2.6

11.1

7.8

©1991 Dalaquest Incorporated May—Reproduction Prohibited

10

Worldwide and North American Electronic Equipment Production Forecast

Table 2b

Electronic Equipment Production Forecast

(Annual Growth in Percent)

Company:

Product:

Region of Production:

Distribution Channel:

Application:

Specification:

All

Each

Each

Not Meaningful

All

All

1989

1 9 9 0

North America

Data Processing

Conomunications

Industrial

Consumer

Military/Aerospace

Transpxjftation

Japan

Total

Data Processing

Communications

Industrial

Consumer

Military/Aerospace

Transportation

Total

Europe

Data Processing

Communications

Industrial

Consumer

Military/Aerospace

Transportation

Total

Asia/Pacific-ROW

Data Processing

Communications

Industrial

Consumer

Military/Aerospace

Transportation

Total

Woridwide

Data Processing

Communications

Industrial

Consumer

Military/Aerospace

Transportation

Total

Source: Dauqiiest CM^y 1991)

7.2

11.1

6.6

10.5

2.9

.5

6.5

5.0

-4.5

11.0

-5.5

12.5

8.4

.8

23.5

10.1

-.1

11.6

2.8

16.9

9.2

9.9

8.7

9.9

9.9

4.7

16.7

9.6

9.1

6.7

5.2

3.5

3.1

8.8

6.0

-2.7

9.0

2.0

4.5

9.4

11.7

2.6

9.6

16.9

20.0

16.2

9.2

14.0

13.5

6.7

11.6

8.1

8.6

-3.1

13.8

7.1

3 9

10.1

5.4

7.1

.5

8.9

5,4

5.3

6.9

4.0

-.4

1.2

-.9

3.6

1991

5.0

7.7

4.6

2.3

-6.8

-2.2

1.8

16.2

15.6

13.1

11.5

8.3

5.4

13.5

17.1

10.3

7.0

8.2

-1.2

16.9

8.9

16.7

13.0

15.4

8.0

9.0

14.7

12.4

11.4

10.9

7.9

8.7

-4.5

7.5

7.8

1992

7.6

8.9

7.4

5.6

6.1

12.7

7.3

9.8

7.8

9.8

6.1

10.1

8.6

8.2

1 5 8

9.2

7.1

8.2

2.2

16.3

9.1

14.1

14.6

14.4

18.1

10.5

15.4

15.5

10.5

9.4

8.1

9.0

5.4

12.6

9.0

1993

7.0

7.2

7.6

4.7

3.9

10.2

6.3

9.0

7.5

8.6

.6

10.5

5.6

5.7

13.0

13.6

11.9

11.1

15.8

16.5

12.5

9.4

8.7

7.9

5.5

4.2

12.6

7.7

12.8

9.1

7.3

8.4

2.4

20.8

8.9

1994

8.0

6.7

6.1

5.7

3.8

12.7

6.6

12.8

11.3

11.3

9.8

10.1

15.4

11.4

11.6

7.1

5.8

9.3

3.0

23.2

8.3

4.9

4.6

5.7

.9

10.4

4.3

3.7

6.5

5.8

6.3

4.7

3.4

8.6

5.6

1995

7.2

7.0

6.7

2.9

10.0

5.2

5.7

6.5

6.0

6.5

4.1

4.3

5.5

5.7

8.8

8.6

6.8

7.1

4.5

10.3

7.7

12.3

13.5

9.1

10.3

8.8

14.7

11.5

12.8

10.0

6.9

10.9

3.4

16.2

9.8

©1991 Dataquest Incorporated May—^Reproduction Prohibited

Worldwide and North American Electronic Equipment Production Forecast

Table 2c

Electronic Equipment Production Forecast

(Percent of Regional Total)

Company:

Product:

Region of Production:

Distribution Channel:

Application:

Specification;

All

Each

Each

Not Meaningful

All

All

1 9 8 8

1989

North America

Data Processing

Communications

Industrial

Consumer

Military/Aerospace

Transportation

Total

Japan

Data Processing

Conununications

Industrial

Consumer

Military/Aerosp>ace

Transportation

Total

Eurof)e

Data Processing

Communications

Industrial

Consumer

Military/Aerospace

Transportation

Total

Asia/Pacific-ROW

Data Processing

Communications

Industrial

Consumer

Military/Aerospace

TransfKjrtation

T o u l

Worldwide

Data Processing

Communications

Industrial

Consumer

Military/Aerospace

Transportation

Total

Source: Dataquest (May 1991)

35.5

12.3

14.7

7.5

28.1

2.0

100.0

31.3

13.7

13.6

37.5

.8

3.2

100.0

15.6

20.5

23.0

22.5

16.2

2.2

100.0

38.2

13.9

3.7

36.6

5.3

2.3

100.0

29.7

14.9

15.3

22.3

15.4

2.4

100.0

35.7

12.8

14.7

7.7

27.2

1.9

100.0

17.7

20.7

21.0

23.0

15.3

2.4

100.0

32.6

13.0

15.0

35.2

.8

3.4

100.0

38.3

13.7

3.7

36.7

5.0

2.5

100.0

30.6

15.0

15.2

21.8

15.0

2.5

100.0

1991

37.4

14.0

15.1

7.5

24.3

1.7

100.0

31.6

14.1

14.9

35.1

.9

3.4

100.0

31.2

16.1

15.2

22.4

12.7

2.5

100.0

38.4

14.2

4.1

36.1

4.7

2.6

100.0

18.9

21.9

20.8

23-2

12.5

2.7

100.0

1 9 9 3

37.7

14.3

15.3

7.2

23.5

1.9

100.0

33.1

14.2

15.5

32.8

.9

3.5

100.0

32.1

16.3

15.1

21.9

11.8

2.7

100.0

38.1

14.2

4.0

36.4

4.6

2.6

100.0

20.8

21.9

20.2

22.9

11.0

3.2

100.0

1 9 9 2

32.1

14.0

15.1

34.5

.9

3.5

100.0

37.5

14.2

15.2

7.4

24.0

1.8

100.0

20.1

21.9

20.4

23.0

11.7

2.9

100.0

37.9

14.1

4.0

36.9

4.5

2.6

100.0

31.6

16.2

15.0

22.4

12.2

2.6

100.0

1990

30.9

13.8

14.9

35.8

.9

3.7

100.0

36.3

13.2

14.7

7.4

26.5

1.8

100.0

37.0

14.1

3.9

37.6

4.8

2.5

100.0

30.2

15.7

15.2

22.2

14.3

2.5

100.0

17.6

21.6

21.2

23.3

13.8

2.5

100.0

38.6

14.2

4.0

35.9

4.6

2.7

100.0

21.4

21.7

19.7

23.1

10.5

3.7

100.0

32.5

16.3

15.0

21.7

11.5

2.9

100.0

33.5

14.4

15.8

31.9

1.0

3.5

100.0

1994

38.1

14.3

15.4

7.2

23.0

1.9

100.0

1 9 9 5

34.0

14.5

15.9

31.1

1.0

3.5

100.0

38.3

14.4

15.6

7.1

22.7

1.9

100.0

22.0

21.7

19.2

23.3

9.9

3.9

100.0

38.8

14.5

3.9

35.5

4.5

2.8

100.0

32.9

16.5

14.9

21.6

11.2

3.0

100.0

11

©1991 Dataquest Incorporated May—Reproduction Prohibited

12

Worldwide and North American Electronic Equipment Production Forecast

Table 2d

Electronic Equipment Production Forecast

(Percent of Worldwide Total)

Company:

Product:

Region of Production:

Distribution Channel:

Application:

Sf)ecification:

All

Each

Each

Not Meaningful

All

All

1988

1989

North America

Data Processing

Communications

Industrial

Consumer

Military/Aerospace

Transportation

Total

Japan

Data Processing

Communications

Industrial

Consumer

JWilitary/Aerospace

Transportation

Total

Europe

Data Processing

Communications

Industrial

Consumer

Military/Aerospace

Transportation

Total

Asia/Pacific-ROW

Data Processing

Communications

Industrial

Consumer

Military/Aerospace

Transportation

Total

Woridwide

Data Processing

Communications

Industrial

Consumer

Military/Aerospace

Transportation

Total

Source: E>auquest (May 1991)

13.4

4.6

5.5

2.8

10.6

.8

37.7

8.3

3.6

3.6

10.0

.2

.8

26.6

3.9

5.1

5.7

5.6

4.0

.6

24.9

4.1

1.5

.4

4.0

.6

.3

10.8

29.7

14.9

15.3

22.3

15.4

2.4

100.0

8.2

3.3

3.8

8.9

.2

.9

25.3

13.5

4.8

5.6

2.9

10.3

.7

37.9

4.5

5.3

5.4

5.9

3.9

.6

25.7

4.3

1.5

.4

4.1

.6

.3

11.2

30.6

15.0

15.2

21.8

15.0

2.5

100.0

1990

13.5

4.9

5.5

2.8

9.9

.7

37.2

7.6

3.4

3.7

8.8

.2

.9

24.6

4.6

5.6

5.5

6.1

3.6

.7

26.1

4.5

1.7

.5

4.5

.6

.3

12.1

30.2

15.7

15.2

22.2

14.3

2.5

100.0

1991

13.2

4.9

5.3

2.6

8.5

.6

35.2

8.2

3.6

3.8

9.1

.2

.9

25.9

5.0

5.8

5.5

6.1

3.3

.7

26.3

4.8

1.8

.5

4.5

.6

.3

12.6

31.2

16.1

15.2

22.4

12.7

2.5

100.0

1992

13.0

4.9

5.2

2.5

8.3

.6

34.6

8.2

3.6

3.9

8.9

.2

.9

25.7

5.3

5.8

5.4

6.1

3.1

.8

26.4

5.1

1.9

.5

4.9

.6

.3

1 3 3

31.6

16.2

15.0

22.4

12.2

2.6

100.0

8.4

3.6

3.9

8.3

.2

.9

25.2

5.5

5.8

5.4

6.1

2.9

.9

26.7

5.3

2.0

.6

5.1

.6

.4

13.9

32.1

16.3

15.1

21.9

11.8

2.7

100.0

1 9 9 3

12.9

4.9

5.2

2.5

8.0

.6

34.2

1 9 9 4

8.2

3.5

3.9

7.8

.2

.9

24.5

12.9

4.9

5.2

2.4

7.8

.7

33.8

5.6

2.1

.6

5.2

.7

.4

14.5

5.8

5.9

5.3

6.2

2.8

1.0

27.1

32.5

16.3

15.0

21.7

11.5

2.9

100.0

1995

12.7

4.8

5.2

2.4

7.5

.6

33.2

8.2

3.5

3.8

7.5

.2

.8

24.1

5.8

2.2

.6

5.3

.7

.4

15.1

32.9

16.5

14.9

21.6

11.2

3.0

100.0

6.1

6.0

5.3

6.4

2.7

1.1

27.6

©1991 Dataquest Incorporated May—Reproduction Prohitrited

Worldwide and North American Electronic Equipment Production Forecast

13

Table 3a

Electronic Equipment Production Forecast

(Factory Revenue in Millions of DoUars)

Company:

Produa:

Region of Produaion:

Distribution Channel:

Application:

Specification:

All

Each

North America

Not Meaningful

Ail

All

1988 1989 1990

1991

1992

1993

1994

1995

Data Processing

Computers

Data Storage

Terminals

Input/Output

Dedicated Systems

Total

Communications

Premises Telecom

Public Telecom

Mobile Communications

Broadcast & Studio

Other Convnunication

Total

Industrial

Security & Energy

Management

Manufacturing

Systems/Instruments

Medical Equipment

Other Industrial

Total

Consumer

Audio

Video

Personal Electronics

Appliances

Other Consumer

Total

Military/Aerospace

Military

Civil Aerospace

Total

Transportation

Total Equipment

Source: Dataquest (May 1991)

49,427

6,189

2,312

10,393

5,107

73,428

10,782

6,740

2,305

1,784

3,798

25,409

3.333

17,686

5,982

3,384

30,385

703

2,865

405

10,480

1,001

15,454

52,992

6,677

2,179

11,845

5,024

78,717

12,891

7,020

2,576

1,905

3,835

28,227

3,490

18,916

6,355

3,625

32,386

697

3,407

479

11,430

1,068

17,081

55,750

7,015

2,082

13,209

4,795

82,851

14,350

7,211

2,724

1,973

3,930

30,188

3,691

19,570

6,680

3,749

33,690

707

3,375

491

11,359

1,073

17,005

57,840

7,325

2,355

14,684

4,764

86,968

15,894

7,595

2,908

2,031

4,092

32,520

3,826

20,535

7,019

3,853

35,233

722

3,451

505

11,618

1,100

17,396

61,824

7,235

2,741

16,607

5,177

93,584

17,631

8,264

3,138

2,114

4,261

35,408

3,987

22,240

7,492

4,115

37,834

736

3,627

518

12,334

1,155

18,370

65,373

7,602

3,025

18,593

5,553

100,146

18,955

8,947

3,431

2,207

4,432

37,972

4,203

24,022

8,059

4,420

40,704

750

3,774

533

12,974

1,205

19,236

69,247

8,048

3,045

20,433

5,892

106,665

19,820

9,705

3,788

2,286

4,585

40,184

4,436

25,557

8,629

4,632

43,254

764

3,907

550

13,666

1,258

20,145

72,884

8,750

3,117

22,561

6,246

113,558

20,938

10,392

4,123

2,385

4,776

42,614

4,666

27,135

9,281

4,980

46,062

778

4,030

566

14,293

1,307

20,974

51,063

7,116

58,179

4,131

206,986

51,727

8,149

59,876

4,151

220,438

51,101

9,468

60,569

4,115

228,418

45,801

10,675

56,476

4,024

232,617

47,962

11,972

59,934

4,535

249,665

48,705

13,570

62,275

4,996

265,329

49,098

15,321

64,419

5,424

280,091

49,930

17,265

67,195

5,721

296,124

1990-1991

Growth

Rate (%)

1990-1995

CAGR (%)

3.7

4.4

13.1

11.2

-.6

5.0

10.8

5.3

6.8

2.9

4.1

7.7

3.7

4.9

5.1

2.8

4.6

2.1

2.3

2.9

2.3

2.5

2.3

-10.4

12.7

-6.8

-2.2

1.8

5.5

4.5

8.4

11.3

5.4

6.5

7.8

7.6

8.6

3.9

4.0

7.1

4.8

6.8

6.8

5.8

6.5

1.9

3.6

2.9

4.7

4.0

4.3

-.5

12.8

2.1

6.8

5.3

©1991 Dataquest Incorporated May—^Reproduction Prohibited

14 Worldwide and North American Electronic Equipment Production Forecast

Table 3b

Electronic Equipment Production Forecast

(Annual Growth in Percent)

Company:

Produa:

Region of Production:

Distribution Channel:

Application:

Specification:

Data Processing

Computers

Data Storage

Terminals

Input/Output

Dedicated Systems

Total

Communications

Premises Telecom

Public Telecom

Mobile Communications

Broadcast & Studio

Other Communication

Total

Industrial

Security & Energy

Management

Manufacturing

Systems/Instruments

Medical Equipment

Other Industrial

Total

Consumer

Audio

Video

Personal Electronics

Appliances

Other Consumer

Total

Military/Aerospace

Transjjortation

Total Equipment

Source: Dataquest <Miy 1J>91)

All

Each

North America

Not Meaningful

All

All

1989

7.2

7.9

-5.8

14.0

-1.6

7.2

19.6

4.2

11.8

6.8

1.0

11.1

4.7

7.0

6.2

7.1

6.6

-.9

18.9

18.3

9.1

6.7

10.5

2.9

.5

6.5

1990

11.3

2.7

5.7

3.6

2.5

6.9

5.2

5.1

-4.5

11.5

-4.6

5.3

5.8

3.5

5.1

3.4

4.0

1.4

-.9

2.5

-.6

.5

-.4

1.2

-.9

3.6

1991

3.7

4.4

13.1

11.2

-.6

5.0

10.8

5.3

6.8

2.9

4.1

7.7

3.7

2.1

2.3

-6.8

-2.2

1.8

2.3

2.9

2.3

2.5

4.9

5.1

2.8

4.6

1992

4.2

5.6

6.1

12.7

7.3

1.9

5.1

2.6

6.2

5.0

6.9

-1.2

16.4

13.1

8.7

7.6

10.9

8.8

7.9

4.1

4.1

8.9

8.3

6.7

6.8

7.4

1993

5.4

4.3

4.7

3.9

10.2

6.3

1.9

4.1

2.9

5.2

7.5

8.3

9.3

4.4

4.0

7.2

5.7

5.1

10.4

12.0

7.3

7.0

8.0

7.6

7.4

7.6

1994

5.9

5.9

.7

9.9

6.1

6.5

4.6

8.5

10.4

3.6

3.5

5.8

1.9

3.5

3.2

5.3

4.4

4.7

3.4

8.6

5.6

5.5

6.4

7.1

4.8

6.3

1995

5.3

8.7

2.4

10.4

6.0

6.5

5.6

7.1

8.8

4.3

4.2

6.0

5.2

6.2

7.6

7.5

6.5

1.8

3.1

2.9

4.6

3.9

4.1

4.3

5.5

5.7

©1991 Dataquest Incorporated May—^Reproduction Prohibited

Woridwlde and North American Electronic Equipment Production Forecast

Table 3c

Electronic Equipment Production Forecast

(Percent of Worldwide System Group Total)

Company:

Product:

Region of Production:

Distribution Channel:

Application:

Specification:

Data Processing

Computers

Data Storage

Terminals

Input/Output

Dedicated Systems

Total

Communications

Premises Telecom

Public Telecom

Mobile Communications

Broadcast & Studio

Other Communication

Total

Industrial

Security & Energy

Management

Manufacturing

Systems/Instruments

Medical Equipment

Other Industrial

Total

Consumer

Audio

Video

Personal Electronics

Appliances

Other Consumer

Total

Military/Aerospace

Transportation

Total Equipment

Source: Dauquest (May 1991)

All

Each

North America

Not Meaningful

All

All

1988

1989

53.7

31.5

16.5

52.1

29.4

45.0

34.3

27.4

16.0

51.9

48.5

31.1

51.8

34.7

39.5

29.6

36.2

4.3

7.0

3.0

22.2

20.0

12.6

68.8

31.3

37.7

51.2

31.6

15.4

55.7

28.0

44.2

35.8

28.7

17.1

51.7

48.0

32.4

51.0

35.4

40.2

298

36.7

4.3

8.4

3 3

22.7

20.7

13.4

68.7

28.9

37.9

1990

51.7

32.6

13.9

57.2

27.3

44.8

37.0

26.0

16.2

48.4

45.5

31.5

48.8

34.4

41.3

30.3

36.2

4.1

7.7

2.8

21.8

20.0

12.5

69.1

26.3

37.2

1991

48.8

30.5

133

56.3

24.3

42.2

37.0

24.4

15.6

45.5

43.7

30.5

46.1

33.5

40.1

29.1

35.1

3.9

7.4

2.6

20.1

19.2

11.8

67.5

24.0

35.2

1992

47.2

28.2

139

56.2

23.7

41.1

37.3

24.3

15.5

44.0

42.2

30.4

44.1

33.5

39.8

28.8

34.9

3.7

7.1

2.5

196

18.5

11.4

68.0

24.0

34.6

1993

45.7

27.2

14.0

56.8

23.3

40.2

37.1

24.1

15.3

42.9

40.6

30.0

42.2

33.6

39.8

28.7

34.8

3.6

7.0

2.4

19.5

18.4

11.3

67.7

23.5

34.2

1994

3.6

6.8

2.4

19.1

18.5

11.2

67.5

22.6

33.8

44.8

27.0

12.9

56.6

23.7

39.6

36.3

24.7

15.6

41.9

39.8

29.7

40.3

33.8

40.2

28.6

34.8

38.3

33.8

40.4

29.0

34.7

3.4

6.5

2.4

18.6

17.9

10.9

67.4

21.6

33.2

1995

43.7

27.4

11.9

56.5

22.5

38.8

35.0

24.5

15.6

40.6

39.2

290

i *

©1991 Dataquest Incorporated May—^Reproduction Prohibited

16 Worldwide and Nortli American Electronic Equipment Production Forecast

Table 3d

Electronic Equipment Production Forecast

(Percent of Total Equipment)

Company;

Product:

Region of Production:

Distribution Channel:

Application:

Specification;

Data Processing

Computers

Data Storage

Terminals

Input/Output

Dedicated Systems

Total

Communications

Premises Telecom

Public Telecom

Mobile Communications

Broadcast & Studio

Other Communication

Total

Industrial

Security & Energy

Management

Manufacturing

Systems/Instruments

Medical Equipment

Other Industrial

Total

Consumer

Audio

Video

Personal Electronics

Appliances

Other Consumer

Total

Military/Aerospace

Transportation

Total Equipment

Sounrc] E>a(aqu«t <May 1 9 9 0

All

Each

North America

All

All

1988 1989

23.9

3.0

1.1

5.0

2.5

35.5

5.2

3.3

1.1

.9

1.8

12.3

1.6

8.5

2.9

2.9

14.7

.3

1.4

.2

5.1

.5

7.5

28.1

2.0

100.0

8.6

2.9

1.6

14.7

.3

1.5

.2

5.2

.5

7.7

27.2

1.9

100.0

24.0

3.0

1.0

5.4

2.3

35.7

5.8

3.2

1.2

.9

1.7

12.8

1.6

1990

24.4

3.1

.9

5.8

2.1

36.3

6.3

3.2

1.2

.9

1.7

13.2

1.6

8.6

2.9

1.6

14.7

.3

1.5

.2

5.0

.5

7.4

26.5

1.8

100.0

1991

24.9

3.1

1.0

6.3

2.0

37.4

6.8

3.3

1.3

.9

1.8

14.0

1.6

8.8

3.0

1.7

15.1

.3

1.5

.2

5.0

.5

7.5

24.3

1.7

100.0

1992

24.8

2.9

1.1

6.7

2.1

37.5

7.1

3.3

1.3

.8

1.7

14.2

1.6

8.9

3.0

1.6

15.2

.3

1.5

.2

4.9

.5

7.4

24.0

1.8

100.0

1993

24.6

2.9

1.1

7.0

2.1

37.7

7.1

3.4

1.3

.8

1.7

14.3

1.6

9.1

3.0

1.7

15.3

.3

1.4

.2

4.9

.5

7.2

23.5

1.9

100.0

1994

7.2

23.0

1.9

100.0

.3

1.4

.2

4.9

.4

7.1

3.5

1.4

.8

1.6

14.3

24.7

2.9

1.1

7.3

2.1

38.1

1.6

9.1

3.1

1.7

15.4

1.6

9.2

3.1

1.7

15.6

7.1

22.7

1.9

100.0

.3

1.4

.2

4.8

.4

1995

24.6

3.0

1.1

7.6

2.1

38.3

7.1

3.5

1.4

.8

1.6

14.4

©1991 Dataquest Incorporated May—Reproduction Prohibited

Worldwide and North American Electronic Equipment Production Forecast

Table 3e

Electronic Equipment Production Forecast

(Percent of Application Market)

Company:

Product:

Region of Production:

Distribution Channel:

Application:

Specification:

Data Processing

Computers

Data Storage

Terminals

Input/Output

Dedicated Systems

Total

Communications

Premises Telecom

Public Telecom

Mobile Communications

Broadcast & Studio

Other Communication

Total

Industrial

Security & Energy

Management

Manufacturing

Systems/Instruments

Medical Equipment

Other Industrial

Total

Consumer

Audio

Video

Personal Electronics

Appliances

Other Consumer

Total

Military/Aerospace

Transportation

Source: Dataquest (May 1991)

All

Each

North America

Not Meaningful

All

All

1988

1 9 8 9

11.0

58.2

19.7

11.1

100.0

4.5

18.5

2.6

67.8

6.5

100.0

100.0

100.0

67.3

8.4

3.1

14.2

7.0

100.0

42.4

26.5

9.1

7.0

14.9

100.0

4.1

19.9

2.8

66.9

6.3

100.0

100.0

100.0

67.3

8.5

2.8

15.0

6.4

100.0

45.7

24.9

9.1

6.7

13.6

100.0

10.8

58.4

19.6

11.2

100.0

1 9 9 0

4.2

1 9 8

2.9

66.8

6.3

100.0

100.0

100.0

11.0

58.1

19.8

11.1

100.0

47.5

23.9

9.0

6.5

13.0

100.0

67.3

8.5

2.5

15.9

5.8

100.0

1991

4.2

1 9 8

2.9

66.8

6.3

100.0

100.0

100.0

10.9

58.3

19.9

10.9

100.0

48.9

23.4

8.9

6.2

12.6

100.0

66.5

8.4

2.7

16.9

5.5

100.0

1 9 9 2

4.0

19.7

2.8

67.1

6.3

100.0

100.0

100.0

10.5

58.8

19.8

10.9

100.0

66.1

7.7

2.9

17.7

5.5

100.0

4 9 8

23.3

8.9

6.0

12.0

100.0

1993

3.9

19.6

2.8

67.4

6.3

100.0

100.0

100.0

10.3

59.0

19.8

10.9

100.0

65.3

7.6

3.0

18.6

5.5

100.0

49.9

23.6

9.0

5.8

11.7

100.0

1 9 9 4

3.8

19.4

2.7

67.8

6.2

100.0

100.0

100.0

64.9

7.5

2.9

19.2

5.5

100.0

10.3

59.1

19.9

10.7

100.0

49.3

24.2

9.4

5.7

11.4

100.0

3.7

19.2

2.7

68.1

6.2

100.0

100.0

100.0

10.1

58.9

20.1

10.8

100.0

49.1

24.4

9.7

5.6

11.2

100.0

1 9 9 5

64.2

7.7

2.7

19.9

5.5

100.0

17

©1991 Dataquest Incorporated May—Reproduction Prohibited

IS

Worldwide and North American Electronic Equipment Production Forecast

Table 4a

Electronic Equipment Production Forecast

(Factory Revenue In Millions of Dollars)

Company:

Product:

Region of Production:

Distribution Channel:

Application:

Specification:

Computers

Supercomputers

Mainframe

Midrange

Workstation

Personal Computer

Total

Rigid Disic Drives

14 inch

All

Data Processing

North America

Not Meaningful

All

All

1988

1989

1990

1991

1992

1993

1994

1995

1990-1991

Growth

Rate (o/o)

1990-1995

CAGE (%)

934

17,743

15,993

3,196

945

18,517

17,201

4,335

1,081

19,065

18,417

5,037

11,561

11,993

12,150

49,427 52,992 55,750

1,194

18,677 18,954

18,831

6,086

13,052

1,385

19,384

7,789

14,312

57,840 61,824

1,517

18,646

20,000

9,541

15,669

65,373

1,711

18,400

20,677

11,400

17,059

69,247

1,908

18,031

21,354

13,028

18,564

72,884

10.4

-2.0

2.2

20.8

7.4

3.7

12.0

-1.1

3.0

20.9

8.8

5.5

2,141

694

1,680

931

0

5,446

1,919

612

1,835

1,438

4

5,808

1,715

446

1,635

2,236

64

6,096

1,511

323

1,496

2,824

249

6,403

1,193

233

1,356

3,245

287

6,314

1,037

161

1,362

3,751

356

6,667

853

128

1,186

4,362

496

7,024

747

98

1,013

5,126

664

7,648

-11.9

-27.6

-8.5

26.3

287.7

5.0

-15.3

-26.2

-9.1

18.1

59.6

4.6

3

17

1

21

665

16

20

1

37

784

25

23

1

50

824

46

27

1

74

802

20

21

17

58

6,189

22

19

7

48

6,677

27

16

3

45

7,015

139

452

591

1,490

2,082

114

35

3

152

736

161

40

5

206

769

217

46

7

270

781

41

6

0

47

7,602

45

4

0

49

8,048

49

3

0

52

8,750

8 3 3

16.2

3 9

50.0

-2.7

26.7

-24.3

-69.7

3.4

4.4

708

300

1,008

1,732

2,741

904

277

1,181

1,844

3,025

940

194

1,134

1,911

3,045

1,034

133

1,167

1,950

3,117

196.0

-32.1

21.7

9.8

13.1

1,358

1,051

10,114

12,522

6,071

18,593

1,292

1,026

10,890

13,209

7,225

20,433

1,267

1,024

11,746

14,036

8,525

22,561

-6.2

3.4

15.4

10.6

12.5

11.2

53.7

14.9

39.8

40.3

-1.1

12.9

-28.7

-50.2

3.0

4.5

49.3

-21.7

14.6

5.5

8.4

-4.5

2.3

11.0

8.1

18.1

11.3

(Continued)

©1991 Dataquest Incorporated May—^Repnxluction Prohibited

Worldwide and North American Electronic Equipment Production Forec:ast

19

Table 4a (Continued)

Electix>nlc Equipment Production Forecast

(Factory Revenue In Millions of Dollars)

Company:

Product:

Region of Production:

Distribution Channel:

Application:

Specification:

Copiers and Duplicators

Personal Copiers

Segments 1-3

Segment 4-6

Total

Other Dedicated Systems

Dedicated Systems—Total

Data Processing—Total

Source: Dataquest (May 1991)

All

Data Processing

North America

Not Meaningful

All

All

1988

1989

1990

1991 1992 1993

1994

1995

1990-1991

Growth

Rate (%)

1990-1995

CAGR (%)

69 73 79

88 98 108 116

929

491

1,489

3,618

903

509

1,484

3.540

863

482

1,425

3,370

923 1,017

569 656

1,099

732

1,580 1,771 1,939

3,183 3,406

3,614

5,107 5,024 4,795

73,429 78,717 82,851

4,764 5,177 5,553

86,969 93,583

100,146

1,170

772

2,058

3,834

5,892

106,667

125

1,246

813

2,185

4,060

6,246

113,558

10.5

6.9

18.1

10.9

-5.6

-.7

5.0

9.6

7.6

11.0

8.9

3.8

5.4

6.5 e>1991 Dataquest Incorporated May—Reproduction Prohibited

Worldwide and North American Electronic Equipment Production Forecast

Table 4b

Electronic Equipment Production Forecast

(Annual Growth In Percent)

Company:

Produa:

Region of Production:

Distribution Channel:

Application:

Specification:

All

Data Processing

North America

Not Meaningful

All

All

1989

Computers

Supercomputers

Mainframe

Midrange

Workstation

Personal Computer

Total

Rigid Disk Drives

14 inch

8-10 inch

5.25 inch

3.5 inch

2.5 inch

Total

Optical Drives

Rewrite Optical Disk Drives

WORM Optical Drives

CD-ROM

Total

Flexible Drives

Tape Drives

3.5-inch Flexible Drives

5.25-inch Flexible Drives

8-inch Flexible Drives

Total

Data Storage/Subsystems—Total

Graphics Terminals

X-Terminals

Other Graphics Termlrjals

Total

Alphanumeric Terminals

Tenninals—Total

Printers

Serial Printers

Line Printers

Page Printers

Total

Other Input/Output

Inpu t/Output—Total

524.6

15.0

58.7

78.4

17.8

11.7

-10.5

-55.6

-16.0

7.9

-11.4

-.5

36.2

17.4

6.7

14.0

1.2

4.4

7.6

35.7

3.7

7.2

-10.4

-11.8

9.2

54.6

6.7

-18.3

-18.3

-.6

-5.8

1 9 9 0

-10.6

-27.1

-10.9

55.4

1627.3

5.0

14.4

3.0

7.1

16.2

1.3

5.2

61.3

15.2

6.4

34.5

-11.4

-7.7

26.6

14.3

5.0

11.5

5.1

20.3

-18.4

-65.3

-8.0

5.1

-18.8

6.2

•S.l

-4.5

-3.8

9.9

-30.7

-83.3

1.6

5.1

27.7

-7.7

17.2

6.4

10.4

-2.8

4.4

10.6

8.4

20.0

12,0

1 9 9 3

-13.1

-30.7

.4

15.6

24.0

5.6

9.6

-1.6

3.2

22.5

9.5

5.7

48.1

15.3

60.1

39.2

83.3

16.2

3.9

50.0

-2.7

26.7

-24.3

-69.7

3.4

4.4

196.0

-32.1

21.7

9.8

13.1

-6.2

3.4

15.4

10.6

12.5

11.2

-11.9

-27.6

-8.5

26.3

287.7

5.0

1991

10.4

-2.0

2.2

20.8

7.4

3.7

71.6

-2.3

40.1

5.9

16.4

-6.7

6.7

13.4

9.9

21.0

13.1

66.7

13.1

37.9

46.8

-4.6

10.6

-29.5

-39.4

-.5

-1.2

1992

16.0

1.5

2.9

28.0

9.7

6.9

-21.0

-27.9

-9.3

14.9

15.5

-1.4

1 9 9 4

-17.8

-20.9

- 1 3 0

16.3

39.4

5.4

12.8

-1.3

3.4

19.5

8.9

5.9

41.0

15.3

58.0

35.4

4.5

9.6

-28.4

.0

4.9

5.9

4.0

-29.9

-4.0

3.6

.7

-4.8

-2.4

7.7

5.5

19.0

9.9

1995

-12.4

-23.3

-14.5

17.5

33.8

8.9

11.5

-2.0

3.3

14.3

8.8

5.3

34.4

14.5

47.4

30.8

1.6

8.8

-30.3

-.4

5.5

8.7

10.0

-31.5

2.9

2.0

2.3

-2.0

-.2

7.9

6.3

18.0

10.4

(CciiUlnuei!)

©1991 Dataquest Incorporated May—Reprodurtion Prohibited

Worldwide and North American Electronic Equipment Production Forecast

Table 4b (Continued)

Electronic Equipment Production Forecast

(Annual Growth in Percent)

Company:

Product:

Region of Production:

Distribution Channel:

Application:

Specification:

Copiers and Duplicators

Personal Copiers

Segments 1-3

Segment 4-6

Total

Otlier Dedicated Systems

Dedicated Systems—Total

Data Processing—Total

Soutce: Dataquest (May 1991)

All

Data Processing

North America

Not Meaningful

All

All

1989

5.0

-2.9

3.6

-.3

-2.2

-1.6

7.2

1990

9.2

•4.5

-5.2

-4.0

-4.8

-4.6

5.3

1991

10.5

6.9

18.1

10.9

-5.6

-.7

5.0

1992

11.7

10.2

15.1

12.0

7.0

8.7

7.6

J993

10.2

8.0

11.6

9.5

6.1

7.3

7.0

1994

7.8

6.5

5.4

6.2

6.1

6.1

6.5

1995

7.8

6.5

5.4

6.2

5.9

6.0

6.5

21

©1991 Dataquest Incorporated May—Reproduction Proiiibited

22

Worldwide and North American Electronic Equipment Production Forecast

Table 4 c

E l e c t r o n i c E q u i p m e n t Production Forecast

(Factory R e v e n u e i n Millions o f Dollars)

Company:

Product:

Region of Production;

Distribution Channel:

Application:

Sp>ecification:

Image & Text Communication

Equipment

Facsimile

Video Teleconferencing

Total

Data Communication Equipment

Modems

Statistical Multiplexers

T-1 Multiplexers

Front-End Processors

DSU/CSU

Protocol Converters

Local Area Networks

Network Management

Packet Data Switching

Total

Premise Switching Equipment

PBX Telephone Systems

Key Telephone Systems

Total

Call Processing Equipment

Voice Messaging

Interactive Voice Response System

Call Accounting

Automatic Call Distributors

Total

Desktop Terminal Equipment

Telephone Sets/Pay Telephones

Teleprinters

Total

Premise Telecom Equipment—

Total

Transmission Equipment

Multiplex

Carrier Systems

Microwave Radio

Other (laser, infrared)

Satellite Communications Equipment

Total

All

Communications

North America

Not Meaningful

All

All

1988 1989 1990 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995

1990-1991

Growth

Rate

(%)

1990-1995

CAGR (%)

160

30

190

1,262 1,111 1,064

193

388

488

125

164

2,580 3,774

4,785 5,885 7,145

7,988 8,348 8,798

247 837 950 1,064

1,233 1,409 1,565

1,721

266

134

60

193

177

446

482

140

164

291

137

76

213

163

492

479

149

153

306

149

102

251

958

148

536

467

150

143

320

163

134

296

805

131

603

447

151

140

321

5,713

7,422 8,542 9,670 10,976 11,858 12,216 12,776

2,339

2,178 2,060 2,094 2,144

810

3,149

2,986 2,840 2,848

2,875

2,887 2,938 2,964

506

0

256

388

359

220

579

808

647

205

260

577

395

205

600

780

861

404

269

645

387

190

577

378

172

550

370

130

500

176

172

348

645

114

682

422

153

135

310

361

98

459

192

217

409

501

96

731

397

154

130

294

353

68

421

207

273

480

411

85

805

385

155

125

291

345

47

392

8.6

34.4

17.7

-10.0

-9.7

8.9

-2.5

.7

-6.5

23.0

12.0

4.6

13.2

13.0

53.5

5.9

8.1

18.2

-2.3

-9.5

-4.7

10,782 12,891 14,350 15,894 17,631 18,955 19,820 20,938 10.8

4,311 4,597 4,1

754

731

2,177

710

2,248

2,293

690

671

973

1,091

620

1,202 1,318

808

1,001 1,206

285

697

296

789

309

890

322

990

1,441

1,451

336

1,098

1,150 1,689 2,179 2,575

2,984 3,402 3,836 4,326

1,377 1,435 1,465 1,491 1,558 1,622 1,796 1,886

1,688 1,840 2,010 2,200 2,415 2,664 2,957 3,253

487 510 547 599 667 736 807 884

108 119 124 129 135 142 148 156

651 693 752 801 993 1,150 1,265 1,373

5.220 5,768 6,314 6,973 7,551

1.7

-3.3

.3

1.8

9.5

9.5

4.0

6.5

6.6

8.6

29.2

17.6

-17.3

-12.3

10.3

•4.3

.8

-4.0

13.0

12.6

-1.0

8.4

2.2

-3.0

.9

10.8

29.1

4.6

11.2

14.7

-2.3

-24.4

-7.4

7.8

5.2

10.1

10.1

4.7

12.8

9.0

(Continued)

©1991 Dataquest Incorporated May—Reproduction Prohibited

Worldwide and North American Electronic Equipment Production Forecast

23

Table 4c (Continued)

Electronic Equipment Production Forecast

(Factory Revenue In Millions of Dollars)

CompKiny:

Product:

Region of Production:

Distribution Channel:

Application:

Specification:

All

Communications

North America

Not Meaningful

All

All

Ceiuial Office Switching Equipment

Public Telecommunications—Total

Portable Radio Receiver, Transportation

Cellular Telephones

MobQe Radio Systems

Mobile Radio Base Station Equipment

Mobile Radio System Equipment

Total

Radio Checkout Equipment

Mobile Communications

Equipment—Total

Broadcast & Radio

Audio Equipment

Video Equipment

Transmitters, RF Power Amps

Studio Transmitter Links

Cable TV Equipment ccrv

Other (Studio, Theater)

Total

Other Telecom

Intercomm. Equip., Elec. Ampl.

Communications Equipment., Misc.

Total

Communications—^Total

Source: Dataquest (May 1991)

1988

2,429

6,740

1989

2,423

7,020

1990

2,313

7,211

1991

2,375

7,595

1992

2,496

8,264

1993

2,633

1994

2,732

1995

2,841

8,947 9.705 10,392

1990-1991

Growth

Rate (%)

2.7

5.3

201

714

473

1,388

603

313

2,305

314

574

125

11

420

99

241

1,784

211

800

525

1,536

725

315

2,576

335

605

125

10

450

105

275

1,905

348

629

125

10

468

107

286

1,973

236

860

542

1,638

769

318

2,724

245

925

601

1,770

816

321

2,908

362

635

125

10

489

111

299

2,031

3,138

379

665

125

10

513

109

313

2,114

313

998

635

1,946

868

325

385

1,083

711

2,179

924

328

3,431

395

699

125

10

537

114

328

2,207

499

1,165

812

2,476

981

331

3,788

410

730

125

10

560

110

341

2,286

595

1,246

902

2,743

1,046

334

4,123

429

766

125

10

587

111

357

2,385

273 275 259 275 280

284

287 293

3,525 3,560 3,670

3,798

25,409

3,835

28,226

3,930

30,188

3,817

4,092

3,981

4,261

32,519 35,409

4,149

4,432

37,972

4,298

4,585

40,184

4,483

4,776

42,614

3.8

7.5

10.9

8.1

6.2

1.0

6.7

5.9

4.0

4.1

7.7

4.2

.9

.0

.0

4.3

3.7

4.5

2.9

1990-1995

CAGR (%)

4.2

7.6

8.6

2.5

4.1

4.0

7.1

4.6

.7

4.5

3.9

4.3

4.0

.0

.0

20.3

7.7

10.7

10.9

6.4

1.0

©1991 Dataquest Incorporated May—Reproduction Prohibited

24

Worldwide and North American Electronic Equipment Production Forecast

Table 4d

Electronic Eqidpment Production Forecast

(Annual Growth In Percent)

Company:

Product:

Region of Production:

Distribution Channel:

Application:

Sf)ecification:

All

Communications

North America

Not Meaningful

All

All

1989

Image & Text Communication Equipment

Facsimile

Video Teleconferencing

Total

Data Communication Equipment

Modems

Statistical Multiplexers

T-1 Multiplexers

Front-End Processors

DSU/CSU

Protocol Converters

Local Area Networks

Network Management

Packet Data Switching

Total

Premise Switching Equipanent

PBX Telephone Systems

Key Telephone Systems

Total

Call Processing Equipment

Voice Messaging

Interactive Voice Response System

Call Accounting

Automatic Call Distributors

Total

Desktop Terminal Equipment

Telephone Sets/Pay Telephones

Teleprinters

Total

Premise Telecom Equipment—Total

-16.4

96.4

1.5

-6.9

-.2

-5.2

27.9

—•

1.6

48.7

46.9

10.0

-6.8

3.6

19.6

-12.0

-8.4

14.9

-1.1

12.0

.0

46.3

238.8

9.5

29.9

1990

2.6

27.6

10.3

-4.2

-7.6

10.3

-.8

6.4

-6.7

26.8

13.6

5.2

15.1

-5.4

-3.5

-4.9

33.1

97.1

3.5

11.6

29.0

-2.0

-7.3

-3.8

11.3

1991

8.6

34.4

17.7

-10.0

-9.7

8.9

-2.5

.7

-6.5

23.0

12.0

4.6

13.2

1.7

-3.3

.3

13.0

53.5

5.9

8.1

18.2

-2.3

-9.5

•4.7

10.8

1992

9.0

31.3

18.1

-16.0

-11.1

12,5

-4.2

.7

-2.1

21.4

15.9

.1

13.5

2.4

-3.1

.9

12.1

30.3

3.9

13.2

15.9

-2.1

-24.4

-9.1

10.9

1 9 9 3

8.3

28.6

17.5

-19.8

-13.1

13.1

-5.7

1.3

-3.6

11.8

14.3

-3.2

8.0

1.6

-2.9

.4

10.2

23.9

4.4

12.8

14.0

-2.4

-24.6

-8.2

7.5

1 9 9 4

9.3

25.8

17.5

-22.4

-15.5

7.2

-5.9

.7

-3.7

4.5

11.1

-5.3

3.0

3.2

-2.8

1.7

9.7

20.5

4.3

11.2

12.8

1995

7.6

26.0

17.3

-17.9

-11.9

10.1

-2.9

.6

-3.8

5.4

10.0

-1.1

4.6

2.0

-2.8

.9

9.3

20.3

4.3

10.9

12.8

-2.2

-30.6

-8.3

4.6

-2.3

-30.9

-6.9

5.6

(Continued)

©1991 Dataquest Incorporated May—Reproduction Prohibited

Worldwide and North American Electronic Equipment Production Forecast

Table 4d (Continued)

Electronic Equipment Production Forecast

(Annual Growth in Percent)

Company:

Produrt:

Region of Production:

Distribution Channel:

Application:

Sfjecification:

All

Communications

North America

Not Meaningful

All

All

1989

Transmission Equipment

Multiplex

Carrier Systems

Microwave Radio

Other (laser, infrared)

Satellite Communications Equipment

Total

Central Office Switching Equipment

Public Telecommunications—Total

Mobile Radio System Equipment

Cellular Telephones

Mobile Radio Systems

Mobile Radio Base Station Equipment

Total

Portable Radio Receiver, Transportation

Radio Checkout Equipment

Mobile Communications Equipment—

Total

Broadcast & Studio

Audio Equipment

Video Equipment

Transmitters, RF Power Amps

Studio Transmitter Links

Cable TV Equipment

CCTV

Other (Studio, Theater)

Total

Other Telecom

Intercotnm. Equip., Elec. Ampl.

Communications Equipment., Misc.

Total

Communications—Total

Source: DaraquESt (May 1991)

.7

1.0

1.0

11.1

4.2

9.0

4.7

10.0

6.5

6.6

-.2

4.2

6.7

5.4

,0

-9.1

7.2

5.6

14.2

6.8

5.0

12,1

11.1

10.7

20.2

.3

11.8

1990

2.1

9.2

7.3

4.4

8.5

6.6

-4.5

2.7

11,8

7.5

3.2

6.6

6.0

1.0

5.8

3.8

4.0

.0

,0

4.1

1.9

3.9

3.6

-5.7

3.1

2.5

7.0

1991

1.8

9.5

9.5

4.0

6.5

6.6

2.7

5.3

3.8

7.5

10,9

8.1

6.2

1.0

6.7

4.2

4.3

3.7

4.5

.9

,0

.0

2.9

5.9

4.0

4.1

7.7

1992

4.5

9.8

11.4

5.0

24.0

10.5

5.1

8.8

27.8

8.0

5.6

9.9

6.3

1.0

7.9

4.6

4.8

.0

.0

4.9

-1,8

4.9

4.1

1.8

4.3

4.1

8.9

1993

4.1

10.3

10.3

4.8

15.8

9.5

5.5

8.3

23.1

8.5

12.0

12.0

6.5

1.0

9 3

4.8

4.6

4.6

4.4

4.1

5.0

.0

.0

1.5

4.2

4.0

7.2

1994

10.7

11.0

9.6

4.6

10.0

10.4

3.8

8.5

295

7.5

14.3

13,6

6.2

1.0

10.4

4.3

-3.5

4.1

3.6

3.8

4.5

.0

.0

1.2

3.6

3.4

5.8

1995

5.0

10.0

9.6

4.9

8.5

8.3

4.0

7.1

192

7.0

11.0

10.8

6.6

1.0

8.8

4.8

4.9

.0

.0

4.8

.9

4.6

4.3

2.0

4.3

4.2

6.0

25

©1991 Dataquest Incorporated May—^Reproduction Prohibited

26

Worldwide and North American Electronic Equipment Production Forecast

Table 4 e

Electronic E q u i p m e n t P r o d u c t i o n Forecast

(Factory Revenue i n Millions o f Dollars)

Company:

Product:

Region of Production:

Distribution Channel:

Application:

Specification:

All

Industrial

North America

Not Meaningful

All

All

1990-1991

Growth

Rate (%) 1988

1989

1990

1991

1992

1993

1994

1995

Alarm Systems

Intrusion Detection

Fire Detection

Total

Eneigy Management Systems

Security/Energy Management—Total

Manufacturing Systems

Semiconductor Production

Controls and Actuators

Sensor Systems

Management Systems

Robotics

Total

Instni mentation

ATE-Semi

ATE-other

752 804 875 923 974 1,050 1,129 1,197

413 477 532 570 602 633 666 701

1,165 1,281 1,407 1,493 1,575 1,682 1,795 1,898

2,168 2,209 2,284 2,332 2,412 2,520 2,641 2,768

3,333 3,490 3,691 3,826 3,987 4,203 4,436 4,666

1,541 1,696 1,691 1,835 2,239 2,700 2,936 3,053

3,655 3,895 3,985 4,164 4,476 4,807 5,134 5,494

1,511 1,640 1,765 1,874 2,030 2,206 2,385 2,595

3,405 3,569 3,683 3,790 3,907 4,024 4,137 4,240

229 256 274 296 326 360 360 398

10,340 11,056 11,397 11,958 12,977 14,098 14,952 15,780

583 635 616 639 786 919 1,032 1,167

1,379 1,517 1,547 1,602 1,754 1,878 2,019 2,160

714 785 836 881 933 991 1,053 1,117

614 625 636 651 676 706 748 794

Oscilloscopes & Waveform Analyzers

Nuclear Instruments

Electrical Test Instruments

Other Test & Measurement

Total

Diagnostics

X-Ray

Ultrasonic & Scanning

Blood & Body Fluid Analyzers

Other Diagnostics

Total

Therapeutic

Patient Monitoring Equipment

980 1,003 1,029 1,060 1,093 1,131 1,173 1,214

3,075 3,295 3,509 3,744 4,021 4,299 4,578 4,903

7,346 7,860 8,173 8,577 9,263 9,924 10,604 11,355

1,658 1,725 1,756 1,784 1,818 1,862 1,901 1,939

5.5

7.2

6.1

2.1

3.6

8.5

4.5

6.2

2.9

8.0

4.9

3.8

3.5

5.4

2.4

3.0

6.7

4.9

311 320 329 339 353 370 387 407

595 605 618 633 655 681 705 732

1,048 1,160 1,278 1,411 1,589 1,808 2,049 2,340

3.1

2.4

10.4

3,611 3,810 3,981 4,167 4,416 4,721 5,042 5,417

1.6

4.7

296 305 313 321 330 338 345 353

2,075 2,240 2,386 2,531 2,746 2,999 3,242 3,511

2371 2,545 2,699 2,852 3,076 3,337 3,587 3,864

2.4

6.1

5.7

Other Therapeutic

Total

Medical Equipment—Total

Other Industrial Systems—Total

Industrial—Total

SoufH!: Diuquea (May 1991)

5,982 6,355 6,680 7,019 7,492 8,059 8,629 9,281

3,384 3,625 3,749 3,853 4,115 4,420 4,632 4,980

30,385 32,386 33,690 35,234 37,634 40,703 43.254 46,06z

5.1

2.8

4.6

1990-1995

CAGR (%)

6.5

5.7

6.2

3.9

4.8

12.5

6.6

8.0

2.9

7.8

6.7

13.6

6.9

6.0

4.6

3.4

6.9

6.8

2.0

4.3

3.4

12.9

6.4

2.4

8.0

7.4

6.8

5.8

6.5

©1991 Dataquest Incorporated May—Reproduction Prohibited

Worldwide and North American Electronic Equipment Production Forecast

Table 4f

Electronic Equipment Production Forecast

(Annual Growth In Percent)

Company:

P r o d u a :

Region of Produaion:

Distribution Channel:

Application:

Specification:

All

Industrial

North America

Not Meaningful

All

All

1989

Alarm Systems

Intrusion Detection

Fire Detection

Total

Energy Management Systems

Security/Enetgy Management—

Total

Manufacturing Systems

Semiconduaor Production

Controls and Actuators

Sensor Systems

Management Systems

Robotics

Total

Instrumentation

ATE-Semi

ATE-other

Oscilloscopes & Waveform Analyze

Nuclear Instruments

Electrical Test Instruments

Other Test & Measurement

Total

Diagnostics

X-Ray

Ultrasonic & Scanning

Blood & Body Fluid Analyzers

Other Diagnostics

Total

Therapeutic

Patient Monitoring Equipment

Other Therapeutic

Total

Medical Equipment—Total

Other Industrial Systems—Total

Industrial—Total

Source: Dataquest (May 19913

6.9

15.4

9.9

1.9

4.7

4 1

3.0

1.7

10.7

5.5

3.0

8.0

7.3

6.2

7.1

6.6

10.1

6.6

8.6

4.8

12.0

6.9

8.9

10.0

9.9

1.8

2.4

7.1

7.0

1990

8.8

11.7

9.9

3.4

5.8

1.8

2.8

2.1

10.2

4 5

2.7

6.5

6.0

5.1

3.4

4.0

-3.0

2.0

6.5

1.7

2.6

6.5

4.0

-.3

2.3

7.6

3.2

7.0

3.1

1 9 9 1

5.5

7.2

6.1

2.1

3.6

8.5

4 5

6.2

2.9

8.0

4.9

3.8

3.5

5.4

2.4

3.0

6.7

4.9

2.4

6.1

5.7

5.1

2.8

4.6

1.6

3.1

2.4

10.4

4.7

1 9 9 2

5.5

5.5

5.5

3.4

4 2

23.0

9.5

5.9

3.8

3.1

7.4

8.0

22.0

7.5

8.3

3.1

10.0

8.5

1.9

4 2

3.6

12.6

6.0

2.8

8.5

7.9

6.7

6.8

7.4

1 9 9 5

7.8

5.2

6.8

4 5

5.4

16.8

7.1

6.2

4 5

3.5

6.9

7.1

2.4

4.8

3.9

13.8

6.9

20.6

7.4

8.7

3.0

10.7

8.6

2.6

9.2

8.5

7.6

7.4

7.6

1 9 9 4

8.7

6.8

8.1

2.8

.0

6.1

2.1

8.1

7.5

7.1

4.8

6.3

12.4

7.5

6.3

5.9

3.7

6.5

6.9

2.1

4 5

3.6

13.3

6.8

7.6

5.2

6.7

4.8

5,6

13.0

7.0

6.0

6.2

3.5

7.1

7.1

2.0

5.1

3.7

14.2

7.4

4.0

7.0

8.8

2.5

10.5

5.5

2.3

8.3

7.7

7.6

7.5

6.5

1 9 9 5

6.0

5.3

5.7

4.8

5.2

27

©1991 Dataquest Incorporated May—Reproduction Prohibited

28

Worldwide and North American Electronic Equipment Production Forecast

Table 4g

Electronic Equipment Production Forecast

(Factory Revenue In Millions of Dollars)

Company:

Product:

Region of Production:

Distribution Channel:

Application:

Sfjecifi cation:

All

Consumer

North America

Not Meaningful

All

All

1988

1989 1990 1991

Audio

Compact Disc Players

Radio

Stereo (Hi-Fi)

Components

Musical Instruments

Tape Recorders

Video

Total

VTRs (VCRs)

Video Disk Players

Color Televisions

Total

Personal 0ectronics

Games

Cameras

Watches

Clocks

Total

Appliances

Air Conditioners

Microwave Ovens

Washers & Dryers

Refrigerators

Dishwashers

Ranges & Ovens

Total

Other Consumer

Automatic Garage Door

Openers

Consumer EquipmenL,

Misc.

Total

Consumer—Total

Source; DauqUEst (May 1991)

3

251

206

225

18

703

265

9

2,591

2,865

227

23

100

55

405

1,728

716

2,888

3,330

881

938

10,480

265

736

1,000

15,454

8

228

208

235

19

697

245

1

3,160

3,406

301

25

100

53

479

1.846

619

2.981

4,024

979

982

11.430

255

813

1,068

17,080

9

233

207

240

18

707

265

1

3,110

3,376

316

25

100

50

491

1,935

531

3,032

3,923

981

956

11,359

263

810

1,073

17,005

9

242

209

245

18

722

276

1

3,175

3,451

332

25

100

48

505

1,990

507

3,141

4,019

1,000

961

11,618

272

828

1,100

17,396

1992

9

246

213

250

17

736

294

1

3,332

3,628

348

23

100

46

518

2,041

580

3,329

4,267

1,049

1,067

12,334

280

875

1,155

18,369

1993

9

251

217

255

17

750

314

1

3,460

3,775

366

23

100

44

533

2,094

625

3,475

4,513

1,108

1,158

12,974

289

1994

9

256

222

260

17

764

329

1

3,577

3,907

384

23

100

42

550

2,149

644

3,629

4,821

1,171

1.252

13,666

298

1995

9

261

226

265

17

778

345

1

3,685

4,031

2.205

663

3,801

5,083

1,236

1,305

14,293

403

23

100

40

566

308

916

1,205

19,236

959

1,258

20,144

999

1,307

20,975

Rate (%)

CAGR (%)

2.4

3.5

1.0

2.1

-1.7

2.1

3.9

2.8

2.1

2.2

5.0

.0

.0

-4.0

2.8

2.8

A.6

3.6

2.4

1.9

.6

2.3

3.2

2.3

2.5

2.3

1.8

2.3

1.8

2.0

-1.4

2.0

5.4

3.0

3.5

3.6

5.0

-2.0

.0

-4.4

2.9

2.6

4.5

4.6

5.3

4.7

6.4

4.7

3.2

4.3

4.0

4.3

©1991 Dataquest Incorporated May—^Reproduction Prohibited

Worldwide and North American Electronic Equipment Production Forecast

Table 4 h

Electronic Equipment Production Forecast

(Annual Growth In Percent)

Company:

P r o d u c t

Region of Production:

Distribution Channel:

Application:

Specification;

All

Consumer

North America

Not Meaningful

All

All

1989

Audio

Compact Disc Players

Radio

Stereo (Hi-Fi) Components

Musical Instruments

Tajje Recorders

Video

Total

VTRs (VCRs)

Video Disk Players

Color Televisions

Total

Personal Electronics

G a m e s

Cameras

Watches a o c k s

Total

Appliances

Air Conditioners

Microwave Ovens

Washers & Dryers

Refrigerators

Dishwashers

Ranges & Ovens

Total

Other Consumer

Automatic Garage D o o r Openers

Consumer Equipment., Misc.

Total

Consumer—Total

Source; Dsuquesi ( M i y 1991)

148.5

-9.1

.7

4.4

3.9

-.8

-7.5

-90.2

22.0

18.9

32.7

8.7

.0

-3.6

18.3

-3.7

10.5

6.8

10.5

6.8

-13.5

3.2

20.8

11.1

4.7

9.1

1990

3.7

2.3

-.2

2.1

-3.8

1.3

8.2

11.4

-1.6

-.9

5.0

1.2

.0

-5.7

2.6

4.8

-14.2

1.7

-2.5

.3

-2.7

-.6

3.2

-.4

.4

-.4

1991

2.4

3.5

1.0

2.1

-1.7

2.1

3.9

2.8

2.1

2.2

5.0

.0

.0

-4.0

2.8

2.8

-4.6

3.6

2.4

1.9

.6

2.3

3.2

2.3

2.5

2.3

1 9 9 2

1.1

2.0

2.0

2.0

-1.1

1.9

6.8

2.7

5.0

5,1

5.0

-7.7

.0

-4.2

2.5

2.6

14.3

6.0

6.2

4.8

11.1

6.2

3.2

5.6

5.0

5.6

1 9 9 3

2.3

1.9

2.0

2.0

-1.2

1 9

6.7

4.6

3.8

4.1

5.0

.0

.0

-4.3

3.0

2.6

7.8

4.4

5.8

5.7

8.5

5.2

3.2

4.7

4.3

4.7

1994

4.7

2.6

3.4

3.5

5.0

.0

.0

-4.5

3.1

1.1

2.0

2.0

2.0

-1.8

1.9

2.6

3.1

4.4

6.8

5.7

8.2

5.3

3.2

4.7

4.4

4.7

5.0

-2.0

.0

-4.8

3.0

4.8

2.5

3.0

3.2

1995

2.2

2.0

2.0

1.9

-1.2

1.9

2.6

3.0

4.7

5.5

5.6

4.2

4.6

3.2

4.1

3.9

4.1

29

©1991 Dataquest Incorporated May—Reproduction Prohibited

30

Worldwide and North American Electronic Equipment Production Forecast

Table 41

Electronic Equipment Production Forecast

(Factory Revenue In MUUons of Dollars)

Company:

Product:

Region of Production:

Distribution Channel:

Application:

Specification:

All

Military/Aerospace

North America

Noi : Meaningful

All

All

1988 1989 1990

1991

1992

1993

1994

1995

1990-1991

Growth

Rate (%)

1990-1995

CAGR (%)

Military

Radar/Sonar

Missile-Weapon

Space

Conununicatioivl^avigation

Electionic Warfore

Aircraft Systems

Computer Systems

Simulation

Misc. Equip.

Total

Civilian

Radar

Space

Communication/Navigation

Flight Systems

Simulation

Total

Military/Aerospace—Total

Source: Oataquest (May 1991)

9,505

6,385

5,148

6,397

5,539

4,327

2,207

744

10,811

51,063

9,326

6,461

5,552

6,546

5,571

4,312

2,308

845

10,806

51,727

9,000

6,280

5,608

6,317

5,627

4,204

2,421

946

10,698

51,101

7,290

6,060

5,664

5,180

4,867

3,321

2,506

1,017

9,896

45,801

8,347

5,606

6,145

5,076

5,183

3,604

2,666

1,093

10,242

47,962

8,055

5,886,

6,667

5,025

5,360

3,568

2,840

1,164

10,140

48,705

7,773

5,945

7,001

5,051

5,508

3,532

3,010

1,240

10,038

49,098

7,773

5,767

7,351

5,152

5,729

3,709

3.190

1,321

9,938

49,930

1,825

2,470

713

1,892

216

7,116

58,179

2,080

2,818

808

2,198

245

8,149

59,876

2,288

3,114

990

2,791

285

9,468

60,569

2,517

3,347

1,168

3,308

335

10,675

56,476

2,857

3,716

1,289

3,712

398

11,972

59,934

3,214

4,403

1,412

4,071

470

13,570

62,275

3,471

5,284

1,547

4,464

555

15,321

64,419

3,679

6,340

1,694

4,896

656

17,265

67,195

-19.0

-3.5

1.0

-18.0

-13.5

-21.0

3.5

7.5

-7.5

-10.4

10.0

7.5

18.0

18.5

17.5

12.7

-6.8

-2.5

5.7

6.9

-1.5

-.5

-2.9

-1.7

5.6

-4.0

.4

10.0

15.3

11.3

11.9

18.1

12.8

2.1

©1991 Dataquest Incorporated May—^Reproduction Prohibited

Worldwide and North American Electronic Equipment Production Forecast

Table 4j

Electronic Equipment Production Forecast

(Annual Growth in Percent)

Company:

Product:

Region of Production:

Distribution Channel:

Application:

Specification:

Military

Radar/Sonar

Missile-Weapon

Space

Communication/Navigation

Electronic Warfare

Aircraft Systems

Computer Systems

Simulation

Misc. Equip.

Total

Civilian

Radar-

Space

Communication/Navigation

Fli^t Systems

Simulation

Total

Military/Aerospace

Source; Dataquest (May 1991)

All

Military/Aerospace

North America

Not Meaningful

All

All

1989

-1.9

1.2

7.8

2.3

.6

-.3

4.6

13.6

-.0

1.3

14.0

14.1

13.3

16.2

13.4

14.5

2.9

1990

10.0

10.5

22.5

27.0

16.3

16.2

1.2

-3.5

-2.8

1.0

-3.5

1.0

-2.5

4.9

12.0

-1.0

-1.2

1991

-19.0

-3.5

1.0

-18.0

-13.5

-21.0

3.5

7.5

-7.5

-10.4

10.0

7.5

18.0

18.5

17.5

12.7

-6.8

1992

14.5

-7.5

8.5

-2.0

6.5

8.5

6.4

7.5

3.5

4.7

13.5

11.0

10.4

12.2

18.8

12.1

6.1

1993

-3.5

5.0

8.5

-1.0

3.4

-1.0

6.5

6.5

-1.0

1.5

12.5

18.5

9.5

9.7

18.1

13.3

3.9

1994

8.0

20.0

9.6

9.7

18.1

12.9

3.4

-3.5

1.0

5.0

.5

2.8

-1.0

6.0

6.5

-1.0

.8

1995

.0

-3.0

5.0

2.0

4.0

5.0

6.0

6.5

-1.0

1.7

6.0

20.0

9.5

9.7

18.2

12.7

4.3

31

©1991 Dataquest Incoipoiated May—Eteproduction Prohibited

32

Worldwide and North American Electronic Equipment Production Forecast

Table 4k

Electronic Equipment Production Forecast

(Factory Revenue in Millions of Dollars)

Company:

Product

Region of Production:

Distribution Channel:

Application:

Specification:

All

Transportation

North America

Not Meaningful

All

All

Entertainment

Vehicle Controls

Body Controls

Driver Information

Powertrain

1988

510

377

42

703

2,124

1989

490

397

57

710

2,073

1990

442

463

74

705

1,875

1991

411

480

77

681

1,803

1992

453

615

91

743

1.973

1993

463

775

105

773

2,031

1994

489

932

115

818

2,135

1995

498

1,015

123

853

2,216

1990-1991

Growth

Rate (%}

-7.0

3.7

4.1

-3.4

-3.8

Safety & Convenience 376 426 556 572

659 849 935

1,016

2.9

Transportation—

Total"'" 4,132

4,153 4.115

4,024 4,534

4,996

5,424

5,721

-2.2

Valued at foctoiy revenue; previously valued at end-user cost.

'Includes only value of electronic modules, sensors, and actuators; does not indude value of nriring and other electn>mechanical parts.

Source: Dauquest (May 1991)

1990-1995

CAGR (%)

2.4

17.0

10.7

3.9

3.4

12.8

6.8

Table 41

Electronic Equipment I>ro<luction Forecast

(Annual Growth in Percent)

Company:

Product:

Region of Production:

Distribution Channel:

Application:

Specification:

All

Transportation

North America

Not Meaningful

All

All

Entertainment

Vehicle Controls

Body Controls

1989

-3.9

5.3

35.7

1990

-9.8

16.6

29.8

1991

-7.0

3.7

4.1

1992

10.2

28.1

18.2

1993

2.2

26.0

15.4

1994

5.6

20.3

9.5

Driver Information

Powertrain

Safety & Convenience

Transp)ortation—Total"

1.0

-2.4

13.3

.5

-.7

-9.6

30.5

- 9

-3.4

-3.8

2.9

-2.2

9.1

9.4

15.2

12.7

4.0

2.9

28.8

10.2

5.8

5.1

10.1

8.6

Valued at factory revenue; previously valued at end-user cost.

'includes only value of electronic modules, sensois, and actuators; does not indude value of wiring and other electromechanical parts.

Source: Dataquest (May 1991)

1995

1.8

8.9

7.0

4.3

3.8

8.7

5.5

©1991 Dataquest Incotporated May—Reproduction I>rohibited

Worldwide and North American Electronic Equipment Production Forecast

33

Table 5a

Electronic Equipment Production Forecast

(Factory Revenue in Millions of Dollars)

Company:

Product:

Region of Production:

Distribution Channel:

Application:

Specification:

All

Data Processing

Each

Not Meaningful

All

All

North America

Japan

Europe

Asia/Pacific-ROW

1988

73,428

45,638

21,353

22,707

Worldwide Total

Source: Dauquest (May 199D

163,126

1989

78,717

47,942

26,375

24,954

177,986

1990

82,851

46,625

28,151

27,356

184,983

1991

86,968

54,197

32,959

31,934

206.058

1992

93,584

59,485

38,167

36,428

227,664

1993

100,146

64,817

43,055

41,155

249,173

1994

106,665

68,021

48,029

46,424

269,139

1995

113,558

72,913

54,182

52,122

292,775

1990-1991

Growth

Rate (%)

5.0

16.2

17.1

16.7

11.4

1990-1995

CAGR (%)

6.5

9.4

14.0

13.8

9.6

Table 5b

Electronic Equipment Production Forecast

(Annual Growth in Percent)

Company:

Product:

Region of Production:

Distribution Channel:

Application:

Specification:

North America

Japan

Europe

Asia/Pacific-ROW

Worldwide Total

Source: Dataquest (May 1991)

All

Data Processing

Each

Not Meaningful

All

All

1989

7.2

5.0

23.5

9.9

9.1

1 9 9 0

5.3

-2.7

6.7

9.6

3.9

1991

5.0

16.2

17.1

16.7

11.4

1 9 9 2

7.6

9.8

15.8

14.1

10.5

1993

7.0

9.0

12.8

13.0

9.4

1 9 9 4

6.5

4.9

11.6

12.8

8.0

1995

6.5

7.2

12.8

12.3

8.8

©1991 Dataquest Incorporated May—^Reproduction Prohibited

34

Worldwide and North American Electronic Equipment Production Forecast

Table 5c

Electronic Equipment Production Forecast

(Percent of Worldwide Total)

Company:

Product;

Region of Production:

Distribution Channel:

^plication:

Specification:

North America

Japan

Eurof)e

Asia/Paciiic-ROW

Worldwide Total

Source: DaUquest (May 1991)

All

Data Processing

Each

Not Meaningful

All

All

1988

45.0

28.0

13.1

13.9

100.0

1989

44.2

. 26.9

14.8

14.0

100.0

1990

44.8

25.2

15.2

14.8

100.0

1991

42.2

26.3

16.0

15.5

100.0

1992

41.1

26.1

16.8

16.0

100.0

1993

40.2

26.0

17.3

16.5

100.0

1994

39.6

25.3

17.8

17.2

100.0

1995

38.8

24.9

18.5

17,8

100.0

Table 5d

Electronic Equipment Production Forecast

(Percent of Regional Total)

Company:

Produa:

Region of Production:

Distribution Channel:

Application:

Specification:

North America

Japan

Europe

Asia/Pacific-ROW

Woridwide Total

Source: Dataquest (May 1991)

All

Data

Each

All

All

1988

35.5

31.3

15.6

38.2

29.7

Processing

1989

35.7

32.6

17.7

38.3

30.6

1990

36.3

30.9

17.6

37.0

30.2

1991

37.4

31.6

18.9

38.4

31.2

1992

37.5

32.1

20.1

37.9

31.6

1993

37.7

33.1

20.8

38.1

32.1

1994

38.1

33.5

21.4

38.6

32.5

1995

38.3

34.0

22.0

38.8

32.9

©1991 Dataquest Incorporated May—^Reproduction Proiiiblted

{

Worldwide and North American Electronic Equipment Production Forecast 35

Table 6a

Electronic Equipment Production Forecast

(Factory Revenue In MlUions of Dollars)

Company:

Product:

Region of Production:

Distribution Channel:

Application:

Specification:

All

Communications

Each

Not Meaningful

All

All

Nortii America

Japan

Europe

1988

25,409

20,008

28,084

Asia/Paciiic-ROW 8,230

Worldwide Total

Source: Dauquest (May 1991)

81,731

1989

28,227

19,109

30,925

8,945

87,206

1990

30,188

20,826

34,515

10,455

95,984

1991

32,520

24,070

38,074

11,813

106,477

1992

35,408

25,952

41,587

13,535

116,482

1993

37,972

27,894

45,366

15,371

126,603

1994

40,184

29,186

48,607

17,111

135,088

1995

42,614

31,232

53,490

19,417

146,753

1990-1991

Growth

Rate (%)

7.7

15.6

10.3

13.0

10.9

1990-1995

CAGR (%)

7.1

8.4

9.2

13.2

8.9

Table 6b

Electronic Equipment Production Forecast

(Annual Growth in Percent)

Company:

Product:

Region of Production:

Distribution Channel:

Application:

Sfiecification:

North America

Japan

Eurof)e

Asia/Pacific-ROW

Worldwide Total

Source: Dataquest (May 1991)

All

Communications

Each

Not Meaningful

All

All

1 9 8 ?

11.1

-4.5

10.1

8.7

6.7

1990

6.9

9.0

11.6

16.9

10.1

1991

7.7

15.6

10.3

13.0

10.9

1 9 9 2

8.9

7.8

9.2

14.6

9.4

1993

7.2

7.5

9.1

13.6

8.7

1994

5.8

4.6

7.1

11.3

6.7

1995

6.0

7.0

10.0

13.5

8.6

©1991 Dataquest Incorpoiated May—Reproduction Prohibited

36 Worldwide and Nortli American Electronic Eqidpntent Production Forecast

Table 6c

Electronic Equipment Production Forecast

(Percent of Worldwide Total)

Company:

Product;

Region of Production:

Distribution Channel:

Application:

Specification:

North America

Japan

Eurofje

Asia/Pacific-ROW

Worldwide Total

Source: DaUquest (May 1991)

All

Communications

Each

Not Meaningful

All

All

1988

31.1

24.5

34.4

10.1

100.0

1989

32.4

21.9

35.5

10.3

100.0

1990

31.5

21.7

36.0

10.9

100.0

1991

30.5

22.6

35.8

11.1

100.0

1992

30.4

22.3

35.7

11.6

100.0

1993

30.0

22.0

35.8

12.1

100.0

1994

29.7

21.6

36.0

12.7

100.0

1995

29.0

21.3

36.4

13.2

100.0

Table 6d

Electronic Equipment Production Forecast

(Percent of Regional Total)

Company:

Produa:

Region of Production:

Distribution Channel:

Application:

Specification:

North America

Japan

Europe

Asia/Pacific-ROW

Worldwide Total

Source: Dztaquesi (Miy 1991}

1988

12.3

13.7

20.5

13.9

14.9

All

Communications

Each

Not Meaningful

All

All

1989

12,8

mM

20.7

13.7

15:0

1990

13.2

13.8

21.6

14.1

15.7

1991

14.0

14.1

21.9

14.2

16.1

1992

14.2

14.0

21.9

14.1

16.2

1993

14.3

14.2

21.9

14.2

16.3

1994

14.3

14.4

21.7

14.2

16.3

1995

14.4

14.5

21.7

14.5

16.5

©1991 Dataquest Incorporated May—Reproduction Prohibited

i

Worldwide and North American Electronic Equipment Production Forecast

37

Table 7a

Electronic Eqidprnent Production Forecast

(Factory Revenue In Millions of Dollars)

Company:

Product:

Region of Production:

Distribution Channel:

./^jplication:

Specification:

All

Industrial

Each

Not Meaningful

Ail

Ail

1988

Nortii America

Japan

Europe

Asia/Pacific-ROW

30,385

19,885

31,425

2,214

Worldwide Total

Source: Dataquest (May 1990

83,909

1989

32,386

22,065

31,378

2,433

88,262

1990

33,690

22,507

33,920

2,920

93,037

1991

35,233

25,459

36,282

3,369

100,343

1992

37,834

27,954

38,874

3,855

108,517

1993

40,704

30,351

41,717

4,313

117,085

1994

43,254

32,076

44,125

4,800

124,255

1995

46,062

34,235

47,184

5,236

132,717

1990-1991

Growth

Rate (%)

4.6

13.1

7.0

15.4

7.9

1990-1995

CAGR (o/o)

6.5

8.8

6.8

12.4

7.4

Table 7b

Electronic Equipment Production Forecast

(Annual Growth in Percent)

Company:

Produa:

Region of Produaion:

Distribution Channel:

Application:

Sfjecification:

North America

Japan

Europe

Asia/Pacific-ROW

Worldwide Total

Source: Dauquest (May 1991)

All

Industrial

Each

Not Meaningful

All

All

1989

6.6

11.0

-.1

9.9

5.2

1990

4.0

2.0

8.1

20.0

5.4

1991

4.6

13.1

7.0

15.4

7.9

1992

7.4

9.8

7.1

14.4

8.1

1993

7.6

8.6

7.3

11.9

7.9

1 9 9 4

6.3

5.7

5.8

11.3

6.1

1995

6.5

6.7

6.9

9.1

6.8

©1991 Dataquest Incorporated May—Reproduction Prohibited

39

Worldwide and North American Electronic Equipment Production Forecast

Table 7c

Electronic Equipment Production Forecast.

(Percent of Worldwide Total)

Company:

Product:

Region of Production:

Distribution Channel:

Application:

Sjjecification:

North America

Japan

Eurofje

Asia/Pacific-ROW

Worldwide Total

Source: Dataquest (May 1991)

All

Industrial

Each

Not Meaningful

All

All

1988

36.2

23.7

37.5

2.6

100.0

1989

36.7

25.0

35.6

2.8

100.0

1990

36.2

24.2

36.5

3.1

100.0

1991

35.1

25.4

36.2

3.4

100.0

1992

34.9

25.8

35.8

3.6

100.0

1993

34.8

25.9

35.6

3.7

100.0

1994

34.8

25.8

35.5

3.9

100.0

1995

34.7

25.8

35.6

3.9

100.0

Table 7d

Electronic Equipment Production Forecast

(Percent of Regional Total)

Company:

Product:

Region of Production:

Distribution Channel:

Application:

Specification:

North America

Japan

Europe

Asia/Pacific-ROW

Worldwide Total

Source: Dauquest (May 1991)

1988

14.7

13.6

23.0

3.7

15.3

All

Industrial

Each

Not Meaningful

All

All

1989

14.7

15.0

21.0

3.7

15.2

1990

14.7

14.9

21.2

3.9

15.2

1991

15.1

14.9

20.8

4.1

15.2

1992

15.2

15.1

20.4

4.0

15.0

1993

15.3

15.5

20.2

4.0

15.1

1994

15.4

15.8

19.7

4.0

15.0

1995

15.6

15.9

19.2

3.9

14.9

<

i

©1991 Dataquest Incorporated May—Reproduction Prohibited.

Worldwide and North American Electronic Equipment Production Forecast

39

Table 8a

Electronic Equipment Production Forecast

(Factory Revenue In Millions of Dollars)

Company:

Product:

Region of Production:

Distribution Channel:

Application:

Specification:

All

Consumer

Each

Not Meaningful

All

All

1988 1989 1990

1991

1992

North America 15,454 17,081 17,005 17,396

18,370

Japan 54,716 51,703 54,007 60,202

63,854

Europe 30,752 34,322 37,282 40,341

43,661

Asia/Pacific-ROW 21,743 23,893 27,773 29,992

35,413

61,298

Source: DaUquest (May 1991)

1993

19,236

64,249

47,327

39,349

170,161

1994

20,145

64,824

51,707

43,196

179,872

1995

20,974

66,736

57,355

47,649

192,714

1990-1991

Growth

Rale (%)

2.3

11.5

8.2

8.0

8.7

1990-1995

CAGR (%)

4.3

4.3

9.0

11.4

7.2

Table 8b

Electronic Equipment Production Forecast

(Annual Growth in Percent)

Company:

Product:

Region of Production:

Distribution Channel:

Application:

Specification:

North America

Japan

Europe

Asia/Pacific-ROW

Worldwide Total

Source: Dataquest (May 1991)

All

Consumer

Each

Not Meaningful

All

All

1 9 8 9

10.5

-5.5

11.6

9.9

3.5

1990

-.4

4.5

8.6

16.2

7.1

1991

2.3

11.5

8.2

8.0

8.7

1992

5.6

6.1

8.2

18.1

9.0

1993

4.7

.6

8 4

11.1

5.5

1 9 9 4

4.7

.9

9.3

9.8

5.7

1995

4.1

2.9

10.9

10.3

7.1

©1991 Dataquest Incorporated May—^Reproduction Prohibited

40

Worldwide and North American Electronic Equipment Production Forecast

Table 8c

Electronic Equipment Production Forecast

(Percent of Worldwide Total)

Company:

Product:

Region of Production:

Distribution Channel:

Application:

Specification:

North America

Japan

Europe

Asia/Pacific-ROW

Woridwide Total

Source: Dataquest (May 1991)

All

Consumer

Each

Not Meaningful

All

All

1 9 8 8

12.6

44.6

25.1

17.7

100.0

1989

13.4

40.7

27.0

18.8

100.0

1 9 9 0

12.5

39.7

27.4

20.4

100.0

1991

11.8

40.7

27.3

20.3

100.0

1992

11.4

39.6

27.1

22.0

100.0

1993

11.3

37.8

27.8

23.1

100.0

1 9 9 4

11.2

36.0

28.7

24.0

100.0

1995

10.9

34.6

29.8

24.7

100.0

Table 8d

Electronic Equipment Production Forecast

(Percent of Regional Total)

Company:

Product:

Region of Production:

Distribution Channel:

Application:

Specification:

North America

Japan

Europe

Asia/Pacific-ROW

Woridwide Total

Source: Oataquest (May 1991)

1988

7.5

37.5

22.5

36.6

22.3

All

Consumer

Each

Not Meaningful

All

All

1989

7.7

35.2

23.0

36.7

21.8

1990

7.4

35.8

23.3

37.6

22.2

1991

7.5

35.1

23.2

36.1

22.4

1992

7.4

34.5

23.0

36.9

22.4

1993

7.2

32.8

22.9

36.4

21.9

1994

7.2

31.9

23.1

35.9

21.7

1995

7.1

31.1

23.3

35.5

21.6

©1991 Dataquest Incorporated May—Reproduction Prohibited

(

Worldwide and Nortli American Electronic Equipment Production Forecast

41

Table 9a

Electronic Equipment Production Forecast

(Factory Revenue in Millions of Dollars)

Company:

Product:

Region of Production:

Distribution Channel:

^ p l i c a t i o n :

Sfjecification:

All

Military/Aerospace

Each

Not Meaningful

All

All

North America

Japan

1988

58,179

1,101

Europe

Asia/Pacific-ROW

Worldwide Total

Source Dauquest (M«y I99t}

22,190

3,134

84.604

1989

59,876

1,239

22,817

3,281

87,213

1990

60,569

1,356

22,112

3,583

87,620

1991

56,476

1,468

21,847

3,907

83,698

1992

59,934

1,616

22,327

4,318

88,195

1993

62,275

1,785

22,863

5,000

91,923

1994

64,419

1,971

23,549

5,507

95,446

1995

67,195

2,169

24,350

5,989

99,703

1990-1991

Growth

Rate (%)

-6.8

8.3

-1.2

9.0

-4.5

1990-1995

CAGR {%)

2.1

9.8

1.9

10.8

2.6

Table 9b

Electronic Eqtiipment Production Forecast

(Annual Growth In Percent)

Company:

Produa:

Region of Production:

Distribution Channel:

Application:

Specification:

North America

J a p a n

Europe

Asia/Pacific-ROW

Worldwide Total

Source: Dataquest (May 1990

All

Military/Aerospace

Each

Not Meaningful

All

All

1989

2.9

12.5

2.8

4.7

3.1

1 9 9 0

1.2

9.4

-3.1

9.2

.5

1991

-6.8

8.3

-1.2

9.0

-4.5

1 9 9 2

6.1

10.1

2.2

10.5

5.4

1993

3.9

10.5

2.4

15.8

4.2

1994

3.4

10.4

3.0

10.1

3.8

1995

4.3

10.0

3.4

8.8

4.5

©1991 Dataquest Incoqx>ratecl May—^Reproduction Prohibited

&

Worldwide and North American Electronic Equipment Production Forecast

Table 9c

Electronic Equipment Production Forecast

(Percent of Worldwide Total)

Company:

Product:

Region of Production:

Distribution Channel:

^plication:

Specification:

North America

Japan

Europe

Asia/Pacific-ROW

Worldwide Total

Source: Dataquest (May 1991)

All

Military/Aerospace

Each

Not Meaningful

All

All

1988

68.8

1.3

26.2

3.7

100.0

1989

68.7

1.4

26.2

3.8

100.0

1990

69.1

1.5

25.2

4.1

100.0

1991

67.5

1.8

26.1

4.7

100.0

1992

68.0

1.8

25.3

4.9

100.0

1993

67.7

1.9

24.9

5.4

100.0

1994

67.5

2.1

24.7

5.8

100.0

1995

67.4

2.2

24.4

6.0

100.0

Table 9d

Electronic Equipment Production Forecast

(Percent of Regional Total)

Company:

Product:

Region of Production:

Distribution Channel:

Application:

Specification:

North America

Japan

Europe

Asia/Pacific-ROW

Worldwide Total

Source: Dauquest (May 1991)

1 9 8 8

28.1

.8

16.2

5.3

15.4

All

Military/Aerospace

Each

Not Meaningful

All

All

1 9 8 9

27.2

.8

15.3

5.0

15.0

1990

26.5

.9

13.8

4.8

14.3

1991

24.3

.9

12.5

4.7

12.7

1 9 9 2

24.0

.9

11.7

4.5

12.2

1 9 9 3

23.5

.9

11.0

4.6

11.8

1994

23.0

1.0

10.5

4.6

11.5

1 9 9 5

22.7

1.0

9,9

4.5

11.2

©1991 Dataquest Incorporated May—Reproduction Prohibited

Worldwide and North American Electronic Equipment Production Forecast

43

Table 10a

Electronic Equipment Production Forecast

(Factory Revenue in Millions of Dollars)

Company:

P r o d u a :

Region of Production;

Distribution Channel:

Application:

Specification:

All

Transpwrtation

Each

Not Meaningful

All

All

1 9 8 8

North America

J a p a n

Europ)e

Asia/Pacific-ROW

4,131

4,621

3,052

1,392

Worldwide Total

Source: Dauquest (May 1991)

13,196

1989

4,151

5,008

3,568

1,625

14,352

1990

4,115

5,596

4,061

1,852

15,624

1991

4,024

5,900

4,747

2,124

16,795

1 9 9 2

4,535

6,407

5,523

2,451

18,916

1993

4,996

6,768

6,670

2,856

21,290

1 9 9 4

5,424

7,061

8,219

3,296

24,000

1995

5,721

7,429

9,551

3,780

26,481

1990-1991

G r o w t h

Rate (%)

-2.2

5.4

16.9

14.7

7.5

1990-1995

CAGR

C%)

6.8

5.8

18.7

15.3

11.1

Table 10b

Electronic Equipment Production Forecast

(Annual Growth in Percent)

Company:

Product:

Region of Production:

Distribution Channel:

Application:

Sp)ecification:

North America

Japan

Europe

Asia/Pacific-ROW

Worldwide

SoUfce: Dstaques* (May 1991)

All

Transportation

Each

Not Meaningful

All

All

1989

.5

8.4

16.9

16.7

8.8

1 9 9 0

-.9

11.7

13.8

14.0

8.9

1991

-2.2

5.4

16.9

14.7

7.5

1 9 9 2

12.7

8.6

16.3

15.4

12.6

1993

10.2

5.6

20.8

16.5

12.6

1994

8.6

4.3

23.2

15.4

12.7

1995

5.5

5.2

16.2

14.7

10.3

©1991 Dataquest Incorporated May—Reproduction Prohibited

44

Worldwide and North American Electronic Equipment Production Forecast

Table 10c

Electronic Equipment Production Forecast

(Percent of Worldwide Total)

Company:

Product:

Region of Production:

Distribution Channel:

Application:

Specification:

North America

Japan

Europe

Asia/Pacific-ROW

Worldwide Total

Source; Dauquest (May 1991)

All

Transportation

Each

Not Meaningful

All

All

1988

31.3

35.0

23.1

10.5

100.0

1989

28.9

34.9

24.9

11.3

100.0

1990

26.3

35.8

26.0

11.9

100.0

1991

24.0

35.1

28.3

12.6

100.0

1992

24.0

33.9

29.2

13.0

100.0

1993

23.5

31.8

31.3

13.4

100.0

1994

22.6

29.4

34.2

13.7

100.0

1995

21.6

28.1

36.1

14.3

100.0

Table lOd

Electronic Equipment Production Forecast

(Percent of Regional Total)

Company:

Product:

Region of Production:

Distribution Channel:

Application:

Specification:

North America

Japan

Europe

Asia/Pacific-ROW

Worldwide Total

Source: DataquesI (May 1991)

1988

2.0

3.2

2.2

2.3

2.4

All

Transportation

Each

Not Meaningful

All

All

1989

1.9

3.4

2.4

2.5

2.5

1990

1.8

3.7

2.5

2.5

2.5

1991

1.7

3.4

2.7

2.6

2.5

1992

1.8

3.5

2.9

2.6

2.6

1995

1.9

3.5

3.2

2.6

2.7

1994

1.9

3.5

3.7

2.7

2.9

1995

1.9

3.5

3.9

2.8

3.0

©1991 Dalaquest Incorporated May—Reproduction Prohibited

i

Worldwide and North American Electronic Equipment Production Forecast

45

Table 11

Electronic Equipment Production Forecast

(Factory Cost Revenue In Billions of Yen)

Company:

Product:

Region of Production:

Distribution Channel;

Application:

Specification:

All

Each

Japan

Not Meaningful

All

All

1988

1989

1990

1991

1992

1993

1994

1995

Data Processing 5,933 6,6l6 6,715 7,256 7,966 8,679 9,108 9,764

Communications 2,599 2,637 2,999 3,224 3,475 3,734 3,908 4,182

1990-1991

Growth

Rate (%)

8.1

7.5

5.2 Industrial 2,585 3,045 3,242 3,410 3,743 4,065 4,294 4,583

Consumer 7,113 7,135 7,777 8,062 8,549 8,603 8,679 8,935

Source: Dataquest (May 1991)

3.7

1990-1995

CAGR (%)

7.8

6.9

7.2

2.8

Table 12

Electronic Equipment Production Forecast

(End-User Revenue in Millions of Dollars)

Company:

Product:

Region of Produaion:

Distribution Channel:

Application:

Specification:

All

Each

Europe

Not Meaningful

All

All

1988

1989

1990

1991

1992

1993

1994

1995

Data Processing 40,746 49,332 52,711 61,173 70,465 78,933 87,852 98,901

1990-1991

Growth

Rate (%)

16.1

Communications 31,595 34,790 38,830 42,832 46,785 51,037 54,681 60,177

Industrial 31,426 31,378 33,920 36,282 38,874 41,717 44,126 47,184

10.3

7.0

Consumer 38,441 42,902 46,601 50,426 54,575 59,157 64,635 71,692

Source: DaUquest (May 1991)

8.2

1990-1995

CAGR (%)

13.4

9.2

6.8

9.0

©1991 Dataquest Incorporated May—Reproduction Prohibited

p

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$

Semiconductor Consumption and

' Sliipment Forecast

May 1991

DataQuest

[>ataquest

Semiconductor Consumption and

Sliipment Forecast

May 1991

Source:

Dataquest

i i

Published by Dataquest Incorporated

The content of this report represents our interpretation and analysis of information generally available to the public or released by knowledgeable individuals in the subject industry, but is not guaranteed as to accuracy or completeness. It does not contain material provided to us in confidence by our clients.

Printed in the United States of America. All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced, stored in retrieval systems, or transmitted, in any form or by any means—mechanical, electronic, photocopying, duplicating, microfilming, videotape, or otherwise—without the prior written permission of the publisher.

© 1991 Dataquest Incorporated -

May 1991 M

Table of Contents

Page

Valuation of Consumption 3

P ^ e

Semiconductor Consumption and

Shipment Forecast

Introduction

Semiconductor consumption and shipment data comprise a set of detailed tables that estimate the size of the semiconductor total available market (TAM) worldwide and for four major geographical regions for the years

1985 through 1995 and 2000. Semiconductor consumption and shipment tables contain both historical data and forecasts. Historical data begin widi 1985 and end with 1990, while forecast data provide annual market size estimates for 1991 through 1995, with additional estimates for 2000. Below is a list of tables detailing the type of data, region, time period, and units of measure.

Each table gives estimates of semiconductor revenue or shipments listed by the major semiconductor device product categories. In these tables, semiconductor components are divided into three major product groups: integrated circuits, discrete devices, and optoelectronic devices. These groups are divided into a number of subgroups, some of which are segmented further.

Definitions and Conventions

Dataquest uses a common manufacturer base for all data tables. This base includes all suppliers to the merchant semiconductor market.

It includes aggregate revenue estimates for

North American companies that manufacture devices solely for the benefit of the parent company, such as Delco, IBM, and Unisys.

Also included are companies that actively market semiconductor devices to the merchant market as well as to other divisions of their own companies. For such companies, both external and internal shipments are included.

Devices that are used internally are valued at current market prices.

List of Tables

Table

0

Region Covered

Japan and Western Europe Exciiange Rates la

lb

Worldwide Market

Worldwide Market

4b

4c

4d

2b

2c

2d

3a

3b

3c

3d

4a

Ic

Id

2a

Worldwide Market

Worldwide Market

North American Market

North American Market

North American Market

North American Market

Japanese Market

Japanese Market

Japanese Market

Japanese Market

Japanese Market

Japanese Market

Japanese Market

Tapanese Market

Years

1970-1989

1985-1990

1985-1990

1991-1995; 2000

1991-1995; 2000

1985-1990

1985-1990

1991-1995; 2000

1991-1995; 2000

1985-1990

1985-1990

1991-1995; 2000

1991-1995; 2000

1985-1990

1985-1990

1991-1995; 2000

1991-1995; 2000

Units

Various

Dollars

Percent

Dollars

Percent

Dollars

Percent

Dollars

Percent

Dollars

Percent

Dollars

Percent

Yen

Percent

Yen

Percent

(Continued)

1

^ Semiconductor Consuinptlon and Shipment Forecast

List of Tables (Continued)

5a Western Eurojjean Maricet

5b Western European Market

5c Western European Market

5d Western European Market

6a Asia/Pacific-ROW Market

6b Asia/Pacific-ROW Market

6c Asia/Pacific-ROW Market

6d Asia/Pacific-ROW Market

7a Worldwide Average Selling Prices

7b Worldwide Average Selling Prices

7c Worldwide Average Selling Prices

7d Worldwide Average Selling Prices

8a Worldwide Shipments

8b Worldwide Shipments

8c Worldwide Shipments

8d Worldwide Shipments

1985-1990

1985-1990

1991-1995;

2000

1991-1995;

2000

1985-1990

1985-1990

1991-1995;

2000

1991-1995;

2000

1985-1990

1985-1990

1991-1995;

2000

1991-1995;

2000

1985-1990

1985-1990

1991-1995;

2000

1991-1995:

2000

Consumption—Dataquest defines consumption as the purchase of a semiconductor device or devices. This definition must be differentiated from actual use of the device in a final product. A regional market size includes all devices sold to or shipped to that region, i.e., the

TAM in that region.

Hybrids—In earlier consumption data, hybrid devices were included as a separate segment of integrated circuits. Hybrid devices manufactured by semiconductor companies are now included in the most appropriate product segment, usually the analog segment.

The manufacturer base, p r o d u a group definitions, and guidelines for including value of output that w e have used in our tables may differ from those used in other studies of this type. Our base is nearly the same as that used by the World Semiconductor Trade

Statistics (WSTS) program, with the following exceptions:

• Dataquest includes all of AT&T's semiconductor revenue, both merchant and captive.

• Dataquest includes—^and has included all along—nonrecurring engineering (NRE) charges associated with application-specific integrated circuit (ASIC) revenue. (This applies to both the bipolar digital and MOS digital logic categories.)

• Dataquest includes the revenue generated by sales of standalone circuit design software, sold by certain U.S. manufacturers of

ASIC logic devices.

• Dataquest includes Signetics revenue with that of its parent company, Netherlandsbased N.V. Philips.

• Dataquest includes revenue for Taiwanese semiconductor manufacturers.

• Dataquest includes revenue for three Japanese companies not included by WSTS until

1990: NMB Semiconductor, Seiko-Epson, and

Yamaha.

• As noted herein, Dataquest includes hybrid revenue in the analog category.

Further information on the above points is available through Dataquest's Client Inquiry

Center at (408) 437-8099-

©1991 Dataquest Incorporated May—Reproduction Prohibited

Dollars

Percent

Dollars

Percent

Dollars

Percent

Dollars

Percent

Dollars

Percent

Dollars

Percent

Units

Percent

Units

Percent

Semiconductor Consumption and Shipment Forecast

Regions—^North America is defined as including both the United States and Canada. Latin

America, including Mexico, is considered part of the Asia/Pacific-ROW category. Asia/Pacific includes South Korea, Taiwan, Hong Kong,

Singapore, and China. Western Europe includes

Austria, Belgium, Germany, France, Italy, Luxembourg, the Netherlands, the Scandinavian countries (Denmark, Finland, Norway,

Sweden), Spain, the United Kingdom, and the rest of Europe. Japan, the fourth region, is the only single-country region.

• Government data or trade association data such as those from the Electronics Industry

Association (ELA), MITI, WSTS, and the U.S.

Department of Commerce

• Published product literature and price lists

• Interviews with knowledgeable manufacturers, distributors, and users

• Relevant projected world economic data

Accuracy

The tables presented here represent Dataquest estimates that we believe are reasonably accurate. Where we have no reasonable estimate, none is given. A zero in a table represents an estimate.

Data Sources

The historical information presented in the consumption and shipment data has been consolidated from a variety of sources, each of which focuses on a specific part of the market. These sources include the following:

• World Semiconductor Trade Statistics (WSTS) data, and Dataquest's estimates of regional company sales are used to determine shipments to North America.

• Japanese trade statistics compiled and published by the Ministry of Finance (MOF) and the Ministry of International Trade and

Industry ( M m ) , WSTS data, and Dataquest's estimates of regional company sales are used to determine shipments to Japan.

• For Western European markets, marketing statistics from WSTS data and Dataquest's estimates of regional company sales are used to determine market size.

• In Asia/Pacific-ROW, the major published sources used to estimate market size are

WSTS data and Dataquest's estimates of company shipments into the region.

Dataquest believes that the estimates presented here are the most accurate and meaningful generally available today. The sources of the data and the guidelines for the forecasts presented in Uie tables are as follows:

• Dataquest's own forecasts of electronic equipment production and semiconductor

I/O ratios

• Unit shipments or revenue (or both) published by major industry participants, both in the United States and abroad

• Estimates presented by knowledgeable and reliable industry spokespersons

Valuation of Consumption

Regional market size is expressed in U.S. dollars (with the Japanese market also expressed in yen). To make the tables in this study useful in comparing different regions, it is necessary to express all values in a common currency, and w e chose the U.S. dollar for convenience. However, the choice of the U.S. dollar (or any single currency, for that matter) as the currency basis for the tables brings with it some problems that require the readers' careful consideration in interpreting the data.

Inflation

All countries that participate significandy in international semiconductor markets suffered from an overall price inflation in the 1980s, continuing into the 1990s. As a consequence, the dollar in a given year is not truly comparable with the dollar in any preceding year.

Consumer and wholesale price indices and

GNP deflators all measure price changes in various composite "market baskets" of goods.

However, there is no price index that measures price changes of material, equipment, and labor inputs to the semiconductor industry.

Indeed, the "mix" is changing so rapidly that what is used this year was sometimes unavailable last year, at any price. Nor is there a composite price index that measures price changes in aggregate semiconductor product.

In an industry noted for its deflationary trends, this latter effect would tend to make the component purchaser's dollar worth more as time passed, in terms of purchasing ability.

©1991 Dataquest Incorporated May—Reproduction Prohibited

Average Selling Prices

Semiconductor Consumption and Shipment Forecast

We have made no adjustments in the historical data to account for these inflationary and deflationary effects. The data are expressed in current dollars (dollars that include the inflation rate and exchange rates of the given year) for all historical data; comparisons between different years must be interpreted accordingly. when considering the worldwide average selling prices (ASPs) for semiconductor components, one must look at the price per function of a circuit, the complexity of the circuit, and the product mix according to this increasing complexity. It is true that one characteristic of the semiconductor industry is that the price per function for integrated circuits has been dropping an average of 30 percent per year for the last 15 years. At the same time, circuits have become denser, resulting in an overall increase in the price of a device with a decreasing cost per function. Thus, Tables 7a through 7d show the worldwide ASPs increasing after many years of decreasing, due to the move toward higher-complexity devices. There are also regional differences in ASPs due to regional competition differences and the varying regional product consumption mix. The worldwide ASP is truly an aggregate measure and may differ significandy from ASPs in any specific market at any point in time.

Exchange Rates

Construction of the West European tables involves combining data from many countries, each of which has different and changing exchange rates. Dataquest uses Annual Foreign

Exchange Rates for each year as published by The International Monetary Fund and the

Wall Street Journal. As far as possible, w e prepare our estimates in terms of local currencies before conversion to U.S. dollars. The exchange rates for major currencies can be found in Table 0 at the end of this introduction.

Japanese market size is originally expressed in yen. The Japanese data published in this study are expressed in both dollars (Tables 3a, 3b,

3c, and 3d) and in yen (Tables 4a, 4b, 4c, and 4d). The yen/dollar exchange rate used for each year can be found in Table 0.

Because of the fluctuations in the exchange rate for the yen, the dollar values given tend to distort the growth rate of the Japanese market, but they do provide a useful basis for regional market size comparisons. However, the data in yen give a better picture of the real growth in the Japanese market.

Forecast

As mentioned previously, historical data are expressed in current dollars or dollars that include the given year's inflation rate and exchange rates. However, the revenue forecasts use constant dollars and exchange rates, with no allowance for inflation or variations in the rates of exchange between countries. All estimates for 1991 and beyond are made as if

1991 monetary conditions will continue through 2000 and, therefore, show the absolute year-to-year growth during this period.

©1991 Dataquest Incorporated May—Reproduction Prohibited

Scamlconductor Consumption and Shipment Forecast

Table 0

Foreign Exchange Rates

Year

1970

1971

1972

1973

1974

Yrly/Qtrly

YR

YR

YR

YR

YR

Japan

(Yen per US$)

358

343

302

269

France

(US$ per Franc)

0.18

0.18

0.20

0.22

0.21

1975

1976

1977

1978

1979

1980

YR

YR

YR

YR

YR

YR

292

297

296

269

210

219

227

0.23

0.21

0.20

0.22

0.24

0.24

1981

1982

YR 221 0.18

YR

YR

248

0.15

1983

1984 YR

235

237

238

0.13

0.11

1985

1986

YR

YR

167

0.11

0.14

1987

1988

YR

YR

144

130

0.17

0.17

1989

1990

YR

YR

138

144

0.16

0.18

Q191

QTR

134

0.19

Source: The International Monetaiy Fund Financial Times, Dataquest (May 1991)

Germany

(US$ per

Deutsche Mark)

0.27

0.55

0.55

0.44

0.41

0.39

0.35

0.34

0.46

0.56

0.57

0.53

0.62

0.65

0.29

0.31

0.37

0.39

0.41

0.40

0.43

0.50

United Kingdom

CUS$ per

Pound S t e r l l i ^

2.38

2.44

2.50

2.44

2.33

2.22

1.82

1.75

1.92

2.13

2.33

2.04

1.75

1.52

1.33

1.30

1.47

1.64

1.79

1.50

1.79

1.91

\

©1991 Dataquest Incorpoiated May—^Reproduction Prohibited

Semiconductor Consumption and Shipment Forecast

Table l a

Worldwide Semiconductor Consiunption

(Factory Revenue in Millions of U.S. Dollars)

Company: All

Product: Each

Region of Consumption: Worldwide

Distribution Channel: All

Application: All

Specification: All

1985 1986 1987 1988 1989 1990

Total Including Captives

27,116 33,729 41,478 54,521 61,454 62,772

North American Captives 2,773 2,895 3,227 3,662 4,241 4,547

24,343 30,834 38,251 50,859 57,213 58,225 Total Semiconductor

Total IC

Bipolar Digital

Memory

Logic

MOS Digital

Memory

Micro

Logic

Analog

Total Discrete

Total Optoelectronic

18,552 23,618 29,887 41,068 46,924 47,303

3,684 4 , 3 2 5 4 , 7 6 0 5 , 2 0 0 4 , 5 1 0 4,440

589 606 621 689 540 459

3 , 0 9 5 3,719 4 , 1 3 9 4 , 5 1 1 3,970 3 , 9 8 1

1 0 , 1 0 3 12,815 1 7 , 4 7 3 2 6 , 9 8 8 3 3 , 0 2 4 3 2 , 2 9 2

3,817 4 , 5 1 1 6,056 1 1 , 6 9 2 1 6 , 3 6 1 1 3 , 0 9 1

2 , 7 4 5 3,489 5 , 1 0 8 7,144 8,202 1 0 , 0 6 8

3 , 5 4 1 4 , 8 1 5 6,309 8,152 8 , 4 6 1 9 , 1 3 3

4 , 7 6 5 6,478 7,654 8 , 8 8 0 9,390 1 0 , 5 7 1

4 , 5 7 8 5,730 6 , 6 5 5 7,612 7,662 8 , 2 3 5

1,213 1,486 1,709 2 , 1 7 9 2 , 6 2 7 2 , 6 8 7

Source: Dataquest (May 1991)

©1991 Dataquest Incorporated May—^Reproduction Prohibited

Semiconductor Consumption and Shipment Forecast

Table l b

Worldwide Semiconductor Consumption

(Percent Change)

Company:

Product:

Region of Consumption:

Distribution Channel:

Application:

Specification:

All

Each

Worldwide

All

All

All

1985 1986 1987 1988 1989 1990

CAGR

85-90

Total Including Captives -13.4 24.4 23.0

31.4 12.7 2.1

18.3

North American Captives

Total Semiconductor

Total IC

Bipolar Digital

Memory

Logic

MOS Digital

Memory

Micro

Logic

Analog

Total Discrete

Total Optoelectronic

10.9

-15.5 26.7 24.1 33.0 12.5

-18.0

4.4

27.3

11.5 13.5

26.5 37.4

15.8

14.3

7.2 10.4

1.8 19.1

.8 20.6

-23.0

-23.9

-22.8

17.4

2.9

20.2

10.1

2.5

11.3

9.2

11.0

9.0

-13.3

-21.6

-12.0

-1.6

-15.0

.3

3.8

-4.9

5.2

-22.0

-38.7

-15.0

1.4

26.8

18.2

27.1

36.0

36.3

34.2

46.4

31.0

54.5

93.1

39.9

29.2

22.4

39.9

14.8

3.8

-2.2

-20.0

22.8

7.9

26.2

28.0

29.7

20.9

-2.5 35.9 18.2 16.0 5.7

12.6 17.3

-8.2 25.2

16.1

14.4 .7

-.7 22.5 15.0 27.5 20.6

7.5

2.3

12.5

17.2

Source: Dataquest (May 1990

©1991 Dataquest Incorporated May—Reproduction Prohibited

Semiconductor Consumption and Shipment Forecast

Table Ic

Worldwide Semiconductor Constunptlon

(Factory Revenue in Millions of U.S. Dollars}

Company:

Product:

Region of Consian5)tion:

Distribution Channel:

Application:

Specification:

All

Each

Worldwide

All

All

All

1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 2000

Total Including Captives

71,807 83,745 97,321 107,632 114,222

199,971

North American Captives 5,584 6,556 7,518

8,407 8,691 14,610

Total Semiconductor

Total IC

Bipolar Digital

Memory

Logic

MOS Digital

Memory

Micro

Logic

Analog

Total Discrete

Total Optoelectronic

66,223 77,189 89,803 99,225 105,531 185,361

54,103 64,232 75,522

83,934

89,840

164,196

4,624

440

4,184

4, 679

434

4,245

4,683

433

4,250

4,480

402

4,078

4,256

375

3,881

3,272

248

3,024

37,709

14,974

12,118

10,617

11,770

9,112

3,008

46,294

18,798

14,907

12,589

55,628

23,001

17,917

14,710

13,259 15,211

62,243

26,078

20,076

16,089

17,211

66,906

28,283

21,604

17,019

18,678

130,228

56,891

44,069

29,268

30,696

9,703 10,721 11,342 11,513

15,046

3,254 3,560 3,949 4,178 6,119

Source: DaUquest (May 1991)

i i i

©1991 Dataquest Incorporated May—^Reproduction Prohibited

Semiconductor Consumption and Shipment Forecast

Table Id

Worldwide Semiconductor Consumption

(Percent Change)

Company:

P r o d u c t :

R e g i o n o f C o n s u n i p t i o n :

D i s t r i b u t i o n C h a n n e l :

A p p l i c a t i o n :

S p e c i f i c a t i o n :

A l l

E a c h

W o r l d w i d e

A l l

A l l

A l l

T o t a l I n c l u d i n g C a p t i v e s

N o r t h A m e r i c a n C a p t i v e s

T o t a l S e m i c o n d u c t o r

T o t a l IC

B i p o l a r d i g i t a l

Memory

L o g i c

MOS D i g i t a l

Memory

M i c r o

L o g i c

A n a l o g

T o t a l D i s c r e t e

T o t a l O p t o e l e c t r o n i c

1 9 9 1

1 4 . 4

2 2 . 8

1 3 . 7

1 4 . 4

4 . 1

- 4 . 1

5 . 1

1 6 . 8

1 4 . 4

2 0 . 4

1 6 . 2

1 1 . 3

1 0 . 6

1 1 . 9

1 9 9 3

1 6 . 2

1 4 . 7

1 6 . 3

1 7 . 6

. 1

- . 2

. 1

2 0 . 2

2 2 . 4

2 0 . 2

1 6 . 8

1 4 . 7

1 0 . 4

9 . 4

1 9 9 2

1 6 . 6

1 7 . 4

1 6 . 6

1 8 . 7

1 . 2

- 1 . 4

1 . 5

2 2 . 8

2 5 . 5

2 3 . 0

1 8 . 6

1 2 . 7

6 . 5

8 . 2

1 9 9 4

1 0 . 6

1 1 . 8

1 0 . 5

1 1 . 1

- 4 . 3

- 7 . 2

- 4 . 0

1 1 . 9

1 3 . 4

1 2 . 1

9 . 4

1 3 . 1

5 . 8

1 0 . 9

1 9 9 5

CAGR

9 0 - 9 5

CAGR

9 5 - 0 0

1 2 . 7

6 . 1

3 . 4 1 3 . 8

1 1 . 9

1 0 . 9

6 . 4

7 . 0

- 5 . 0

- 6 . 7

- 4 . 8

7 . 5

8 . 5

7 . 6

5 . 8

1 2 . 6

1 3 . 7

- . 8

- 4 . 0

- . 5

1 5 . 7

1 6 . 7

1 6 . 5

1 3 . 3

1 2 . 1

1 1 . 9

1 2 . 8

- 5 . 1

- 7 . 9

- 4 . 9

1 4 . 2

1 5 . 0

1 5 . 3

1 1 . 5

1 0 . 4

8 . 5

1 . 5

5 . 8

6 . 9

9 . 2

5 . 5

7 . 9

Source; Dataquest (May 199^)

©1991 Dataquest Incorporated May—Reproduction Prohibited

10

Semiconductor Consumption and Shipment Forecast

Table 2a

North American Semiconductor Consumption

(Factory Revenue In Millions of U.S. Dollars)

Company:

Product:

Region of Consumption:

Distribution Channel:

Application:

S p e c i f i c a t i o n :

All

Each

North America

All

All

All

1985 1986 1987 1988 1989 1990

Total Including Captives

11,663 13,171 15,454 18,789 21,348 20,844

North American Captives 2,243 2,327 2,596 2,945 3,411 3,458

Total Semiconductor

Total IC

9,420 10,844 12,858 15,844 17,937 17,386

7,757 8,986 10,886 13,815 15,909 15,387

Bipolar Digital

Memory

Logic

MOS Digital

Memory

Micro

Logic

1,926 2,030 2,099

2,012 1,701 1,652

288 267 271 235 203 170

1,638 1,763 1,828 1,777 1,498 1,482

4,322 4,912 6,738 9,606 11,682 11,025

1,753 1,775 2,497 4,298 6,163 4,655

1,258 1,362 2,012 2,707 2,972 3,563

1,311 1,775 2,229 2,601 2,547 2,807

1,509 2,044 2,049 2,197 2,526 2,710 Analog

Total Discrete

Total Optoelectronic

1,295 1,542 1,642 1,676 1,683 1,669

368 316 330 353 345 330

Source: Dataquest (May 1991)

©1991 Dataquest Incoiporated May—Reproduction Prohibited

Semiconductor Consumption and Shipment Forecast 11

Table 2b

North American Semiconductor Consumption

(Percent Change)

Company:

Product:

Region of Consumption:

Distribution Channel:

Application:

Specification:

All

Each

North America

All

All

All

1985

1986

1987

1988 1989 1990

CAGR

85-90

Total Including Captives -22.4 12.9 17.3 21.6 13.6 -2.4 12.3

North American Captives

Total Semiconductor

Total IC

Bipolar .Digital

Memory

Logic

MOS Digital

Memory

Micro

Logic

Analog

Total Discrete

Total Optoelectronic

10.7 3.7 11.6 13.4

15.8

1.4

9.0

-27.6 15.1

18.6

23.2

13.2 -3.1 13.0

-30.0 15.8 21.1 26.9 15.2 -3.3 14.7

-31.7

-34.7

-31.1

5.4

-7.3

7.6

3.4

1.5

3.7

-4.1

-13.3

-2.8

-15.5

-13.6

-15.7

-2.9

-16.3

-1.1

-3.0

-10.0

-2.0

-33.5

-48.8

-23.0

-9.1

13.7

1.3

8.3

35.4

37.2

40.7

47.7

25.6

42.6

72.1

34.5

16.7

21.6

43.4

9.8

-2.1

-5.6

-24.5

19.9

10.2

20.6

21.6

23.1

16.4

-14.6 35.5 .2 7.2 15.0 7.3

12.4

-13.8

-11.1

19.1

-14.1

6.5

4.4

2.1 .4 -.8 5.2

7.0 -2.3

-4.3 -2.2

Source: Dauquest (May 1991)

©1991 Dataquest Incorporated May—Reproduction Prohibited

12

Semiconductor Consumption and Shipment Forecast

Table 2c

North American Semiconductor Consumption

(Factory Revenue in Millions of U.S. Dollars)

Company:

Product:

Region of Consun^ition:

Distribution Channel:

Application:

Specification:

All

Each

North America

All

All

All

Total Optoelectronic

1991

336

1992

365

1993

Total Including Captives

22,918 26,235 30,343 33,112 34,448 53,614

North American Captives 4,157 4,849 5,533

6,217 6,447 10,837

Total Semiconductor 18,761 21,386 24,810 26,895 28,001

42,777

16,692 19,198 22,404 24,394

25,557

40,005 Total IC

Bipolar Digital

Memory

Logic

MOS Digital

Memory

Micro

Logic

Analog

Total Discrete

1,621

149

1,472

2,969

1,588

138

1,450

1,649

134

1,515

1,509

118

1,391

1,381

104

1,277

987

50

937

12,102

4,989

4,003

3,110

14,242

5,808

4,784

3,650

16,899

6,963

5,613

4,323

18,580

8,106

5,960

4,514

19,495

8,681

6,254

4,560

31,615

14,827

10,026

6,762

3,368 3,856 4,305 4,681 7,403

1,733 1,823 2,014 2,089 2,039

2,307

392

1994

412

1995

405

2000

465

Source: Dataquest (May 1991)

©1991 Dataquest Incorporated May—Reproduction Prohibited

Semiconductor Consumption and Slilpment Forecast

Table 2d

Nortli American Semiconductor Consimiption

(Percent Change)

Company:

Product:

Region of Consumption:

Distribution Channel:

Application:

Specification:

Total Including Captives

North American Captives

All

Each

North America

All

All

All

1991 1992 1993 1994 1995

CAGR

90-95

CAGR

95-00

10.0 14.5

15.7 9.1

4.0 10.6 9.3

20.2 16.6

14.1 12.4 3.7

13.3 10.9

8.4

Total Semiconductor

Total IC

7.9 14.0 16.0

8.5

15.0 16.7 8.9

4.1

10.0

4.8 10.7

8.8

9.4

Bipolar.Digital

Memory

Logic

MOS Digital

Memory

Micro

Logic

Analog

Total Discrete

Total Optoelectronic

-1.9

-12.4

-.7

-2.0

-7.4

-1.5

3.8

-2.9

4.5

-8.5

-11.9

-8.2

-8.5

-11.9

-8.2

-3.5

-9.4

-2.9

-6.5

-13.6

-6.0

9.8

7.2

12.3

10.8

17.7

16.4

19.5

17.4

18.7

19.9

17.3

18.4

9.9

16.4

6.2

4.4

4.9

7.1

4.9

1.0

12.1

13.3

11.9

10.2

10.2

11.3

9.9

8.2

9.6

3.8

13.4

14.5

5.2 10.5

11.6 8.7

11.6

3.7 -2.4 4.1

1.8

8.6 7.4 5.1 -1.7 4.2

9.6

2.5

2.8

13

Source: Dataquest (Nfay 1990

©1991 Dataquest Incorporated May—Reproduction Prohibited

14 Semiconductor Consumption and Shipment Forecast

Table 3a

J a p a n e s e S e m i c o n d u c t o r C o n s u m p t i o n

(Factory R e v e n u e i n Millions o f U.S. DoUars)

Company:

Product:

Region of Consumption:

Distribution Channel:

Application:

Specification:

All

Each

Japan

All

All

All

Total Including Captives

North American Captives

Total Semiconductor

Total IC

Bipolar Digital

Memory

Logic

MOS Digital

Memory

Micro

Logic

Analog

Total Discrete

Total Optoelectronic

1985 1986

1987

1988 1989 1990

8,300 12,018

15,107 20,977 23,234 23,031

151 163 180 205 237 523

8,149 11,855 14,927 20,772 22,997 22,508

5,985 8,802 11,263 16,127 17,946 17,387

824

136

688

1,295

169

1,126

1,523

227

1,296

1,906

348

1,558

1,750

246

1,504

1,800

209

1,591

3,232

1,185

884

1,163

4,762

1,738

1,368

1,656

6,424

2,268

1,902

2,254

10,501

4,424

2,573

3,504

12,497

5,992

2,828

3,677

11,799

4,612

3,210

3,977

1,929 2,745 3,316 3,720

3,699 3,788

1,621 2,242 2,693 3,282 3,321 3,392

543 811

971

1,363

1,730 1,729

Source: Dauquest (May 1991)

©1991 Dataquest Incotporated May—^Reproduction Piohibited

Semiconductor Consumption and Shipment Forecast

Table 3b

Japanese Semiconductor Consumption

(Millions of Dollars)

Company:

Product:

Region of Consumption:

Distribution Channel:

Application:

Specification:

Total Including Captives

North American Captives

All

Each

Japan

All

All

All

1985

1986 1987 1988 1989 1990

CAGR (%)

85-90

-6.8 44.8 25.7 38.9 10.8 -.9 22.6

11.9 7.9 10.4 13.9 15.6 120.7 28.2

Total Semiconductor

Total IC

Bipolar.Digital

Memory

Logic

MOS Digital

Memory

Micro

Logic

Analog

Total Discrete

-7.1

45.5 25.9 39.2 10.7 -2.1 22.5

-8.2

47.1

28.0

43.2

11.3 -3.1 23.8

-13.7

-16.6

-13.1

57.2

24.3

63.7

17.6

34.3

15.1

25.1

53.3

20.2

-8.2

-29.3

-3.5

2.9

-15.0

5.8

16.9

9.0

18.3

-10.7

-25.0

-9.7

9.4

47.3

46.7

54.8

42.4

34.9

30.5

39.0

36.1

63.5

95.1

35.3

55.5

19.0

35.4

9.9

4.9

-5.6

-23.0

13.5

8.2

29.6

31.2

29.4

27.9

-.6 42.3 20.8 12.2 -.6

2.4

14.4

Total Optoelectronic

-7.7 38.3 20.1 21.9 1.2

8.4 49.4 19.7 40.4 26.9

2.1 15.9

-.1 26.1

15

Source: Oataquest (May 1991)

©1991 Dataquest Incorporated May—Reproduction Prohibited

16

Semiconductor Consumption and Shipment Forecast

Table 3c

Japanese Semiconductor Consumption

(Factory Revenue in Millions of U.S. Dollars)

Company:

Product:

Region of Consumption:

Distribution Channel:

Application:

Specification:

All

Each

Japan

All

All

All

1992 1993 1994 1995

Total Including Captives

27,025 31,580 35,586 39,208 41,787 72,290

North American Captives

1991

671 818 931 1,008 1,025

2000

1,723

Total Semiconductor

Total IC

Bipolar Digital

Memory

Logic

MOS Digital

Memory

Micro

Logic

Analog

Total Discrete

Total Optoelectronic

26,354 30,762 34,655 38,200 40,762 70,567

20,545 24,608

28,096 31,150 33,407 60,667

2,030

222

1,808

2,158

233

1,925

2,142

240

1,902

2,131

237

1,894

2,098

233

1,865

1,685

180

1,505

14,288

5,698

3,835

4,755

17,799

7,537

4,615

5,647

20,751

9,037

5,293

6,421

23,267

10,212

5,928

7,127

25,236

11,131

6,422

7, 683

50,100

24,719

11,780

13,601

5,752 6,073 8,882

4,227

3,827

4,651

4,017

5,203

4,242 4,467

1,982 2,137

2,317

2,583

4,601

2,754

5,816

4,084

Source: Dataquest (May 1991)

©1991 Dataquest Incorporated May—Reproduction Prohibited

Semiconductor Consumption and Shlptnent Forecast

Table 3d

Japanese Semiconductor Consumption

(Percent Change)

Company:

P r o d u c t :

R e g i o n o f C o n s u n ^ s t i o n :

D i s t r i b u t i o n C h a n n e l :

A p p l i c a t i o n :

S p e c i f i c a t i o n :

A l l

E a c h

J a p a n

A l l

A l l

A l l

T o t a l I n c l u d i n g C a p t i v e s

N o r t h A m e r i c a n C a p t i v e s

T o t a l S e m i c o n d u c t o r

T o t a l IC

B i p o l a r D i g i t a l

Memory

L o g i c

MOS D i g i t a l

Memory

M i c r o

L o g i c

A n a l o g

T o t a l D i s c r e t e

T o t a l O p t o e l e c t r o n i c

1 9 9 1

1 7 . 3

2 8 . 3

1 7 . 1

1 8 . 2

1 2 . 8

6 . 2

1 3 . 6

2 1 . 1

2 3 . 5

1 9 . 5

1 9 . 6

1 1 . 6

1 2 . 8

1 4 . 6

1 9 9 2

1 6 . 9

2 1 . 9

1 6 . 7

1 9 . 8

6 . 3

5 . 0

6 . 5

2 4 . 6

3 2 . 3

2 0 . 3

1 8 . 8

1 0 . 0

5 . 0

7 . 8

1 9 9 3

1 2 . 7

1 3 . 8

1 2 . 7

1 4 . 2

- . 7

3 . 0

- 1 . 2

1 6 . 6

1 9 . 9

1 4 . 7

1 3 . 7

1 1 . 9

5 . 6

8 . 4

1 9 9 4

1 0 . 2

8 . 3

1 0 . 2

1 0 . 9

- . 5

- 1 . 3

- . 4

1 2 . 1

1 3 . 0

1 2 . 0

1 1 . 0

1 0 . 6

5 . 3

1 1 . 5

8 . 5

9 . 0

8 . 3

7 . 8

5 . 6

3 . 0

6 . 6

1 9 9 5

CAGR

9 0 - 9 5

CAGR

9 5 - 0 0

1 2 . 7

6 . 6

1 . 7 1 4 . 4

1 1 . 6

1 0 . 9

6 . 7

7 . 2

- 1 . 5

- 1 . 7

- 1 . 5

1 2 . 6

1 4 . 0

3 . 1

2 . 2

3 . 2

1 6 . 4

1 9 . 3

1 4 . 9

1 4 . 1

9 . 9

6 . 3

9 . 8

1 1 . 6

1 2 . 7

- 4 . 3

- 5 . 0

- 4 . 2

1 4 . 7

1 7 . 3

1 2 . 9

1 2 . 1

7 . 9

4 . 8

8 . 2

17

Source: Dataquest (May 1990

©1991 Dataquest Incorporated May—^Reproduction Prohibited

18 Semiconductor Consumption and Shipment Forecast

Table 4a

Japanese Semiconductor Consumption

(Factory Revenue In Billions of Japanese Yen)

Company:

Product:

Region of Consumption:

Distribution Channel:

Application:

Specification:

All

Each

Japan

All

All

All

1985 1987

Total Including Captives 1,975.3 2,006.9 2,175.4 2 ,206.3

North American Captives 35.9

1986

27.2 25.9

1988

26.7

1989

32.7

Total Semiconductor

Total IC

Bipolar Digital

Memory

Logic

MOS Digital

Memory

Micro

Logic

Analog

1990

75.3

1,939.4 1,979.7

2,149.5 ,700.3

,173.6 ,241.1

1,424.4 1,469.9 1,621.9 ,096.4 ,476.6

,503.7

196.1

32.4

163.7

216.2

28.2

188.0

219.3

32.7

186.6

247.7

45.2

202.5

241.5

33.9

207.6

259.2

30.1

229.1

769.2

282.0

210.4

276.8

795.3

290.2

228.5

276.6

925.1

326.6

273.9

324.6

575.1

334.5

455.5

826.9

390.3

507.4

664.1

462.2

572.7

459.1 458.4 477.5 483.6 510.5 545.5

Total Discrete

Total Optoelectronic

Exchange Rate (Yen/tJS$)

385.8 374.4 387.8 426.7 458.3

488.4

129.2 135.4 139.8 177.2 238.7 249.0

238 167 144 130 138 144

Source: DaUquest (May 1991)

©1991 Dataquest Incorporated May—Reproduction Prohibited

Semiconductor Consumption and Shipment Forecast

Table 4b

Japanese Semiconductor Consumption

(Percent Change in Yen)

Company:

Product:

Region of Consumption:

Distribution Channel:

Application:

Specification:

Total Including Captives

North American Captives

Total Semiconductor

All

Each

Japan

All

All

All

1985 1986 1987 1988 1989 1990

CAGR

85-90

-6.4

1.6

3.4

10.9 8.4

25.4

17.6

.0

.0 .0 .0 .0

.0

-6.7

.0

2.1

8.6

25.6 17.5 2.1 10.8

Total IC

Bipolar.Digital

Memory-

Logic

MOS Digital

Memory

Micro

Logic

Analog

Total Discrete

Total Optoelectronic

-7.8

3.2

10.3

29.3

18.1 1.1 11.9

-13.3

-16.1

-12.8

10.2

-13.0

14.8

1.4

16.0

-.7

13.0

38.2

8.5

-2.5

-25.0

2.5

7.3

-11.2

10.4

5.7

-1.5

7.0

-10.4

-24.6

-9.3

9.9

-.2

-7.3

3.4

2.9

8.6

-.1

16.3

12.5

19.9

17.4

47.6

76.1

22.1

40.3

26.3

43.8

16.7

11.4

-1.5

-19.7

18.4

12.9

17.2

18.7

17.0

15.7

-.2 4.2 1.3 6.9

-3.0 3.6 10.0

5.6

7.4

6.6

3.5

4.8

8.8 4.8 3.2 26.8

34.7

4.3 14.0

iS

NA = Not available

Source: DaUquest (May 1991)

©1991 Dalaquest Incorporated May—^Reproduction Prohibited

20 Semiconductor Consumption and Shipment Forecast

Table 4c

Japanese Semiconductor Consumption

(Factory Revenue in Billions of Japanese Yen)

Company: All

Product: Each

Region of Consumption: Japan

Distribution Channel: All

Application: All

Specification: All

1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 2000

Total Including Captives 3,618.6 4,228.5 4,765.0 5,250.0 5,595.3 9,679.6

North American Captives 89.8 109.5 124.7 135.0 137.2 230.7

Total Semiconductor 3,528.8 4,119.0 4,640.3 5,115.0 5,458.1 9,448.9

Total IC 2,751.0 3,295.0 3,762.1 4,171.0 4,473.2 8,123.3

Bipolar Digital 271.8 289.0 286.8 285.3 280.9 225.6

Memory 29.7 31.2 32.1 31.7 31.2 24.1

Logic 242.1 257.8 254.7 253.6 249.7 201.5

MOS Digital 1,913.2 2,383.2 2,778.6 3,115.5 3,379.1 6,708.4

Memory 763.0 1,009.2 1,210.1 1,367.4 1,490.4 3,309.9

Micro

Logic

5 1 3 . 5

6 3 6 . 7

6 1 7 . 9

7 5 6 . 1

7 0 8 . 7

8 5 9 . 8

7 9 3 . 8

9 5 4 . 3

8 5 9 . 9

1 , 0 2 8 . 8

1,

, 5 7 7 . 3

1,

, 8 2 1 . 2

Analog 5 6 6 . 0 6 2 2 . 8 6 9 6 . 7

7 7 0 . 2 8 1 3 . 2

1,

, 1 8 9 . 3

Total Discrete 5 1 2 . 4

5 3 7 . 9 5 6 8 . 0 5 9 8 . 1 6 1 6 . 1 7 7 8 . 8

Total Optoelectronic 2 6 5 . 4

2 8 6 . 1

3 1 0 . 2 3 4 5 . 9 3 6 8 . 8 5 4 6 . 8

Exchange Rate (yen/US$) 1 3 3 . 9

1 3 3 . 9 1 3 3 . 9

1 3 3 . 9

1 3 3 . 9

1 3 3 . 9

Source; Dataquest (May 1991)

©1991 Dataquest Incorpoiated May—^Reproduction Prohibited

Semiconductor Consumption and Shipment Forecast

Table 4d

Japanese Semiconductor Consumption

(Percent Change In Yen)

Company:

Product:

Region of Consvunption:

Distribution Channel:

Application:

S p e c i f i c a t i o n :

Total Including Captives

North American Captives

All

Each

Japan

All

All

All

1991 1992 1993

1994 1995

CAGR

90-95

CAGR

95-00

9.1 16.9 12.7 10.2 6.6 11.0 11.6

.0 .0 .0 .0

Total Semiconductor 8.9 16.7 12.7 10.2

.0 .0 .0

6.7 11.0

11.6

Total IC

Bipolar.Digital

Memory

Logic

9.9

4.9

-1.3

5.7

19.8

6.3

5.1

6.5

14.2 10.9

-.8

2.9

-1.2

-.5

-1.2

-.4

7.2 12.3

12.7

-1.5

-1.6

-1.5

1.6

.7

1.7

-4.3

-5.0

-4.2

MOS Digital

Memory

Micro

Logic

Analog

12.6

14.9

11.1

11.2

24.6

32.3

20.3

18.8

16.6

19.9

14.7

13.7

12.1

13.0

12.0

11.0

3.8 10.0 11.9 10.5

8.5

9.0

8.3

7.8

14.7

17.5

13.2

12.4

14.7

17.3

12.9

12.1

5.6 8.3

7.9

Total Discrete

Total Optoelectronic

4.9

6.6

5.0

7.8

5.6 5.3

8.4 11.5

3.0

6.6

4.8

8.2

4.8

8.2

21

NA = Not available

Source: Dataquest (May 1991)

©1991 Dataquest Incorporated May—Reproductiot> Prohibited

22

Semiconductor Consumption and Shipment Forecast

Table 5a

European Semiconductor Consumption

(Factory Revenue In Millions of U.S. Dollars)

Company:

Product:

Region of Consumption:

Distribut ion Channel:

Application:

Specification:

All

Each

Europe

All

All

All

Total Including Captives

North American Captives

Total Semiconductor

Total IC

Bipolar Digital

Memory

Logic

MOS Digital

Memory

Micro

Logic

Analog

Total Discrete

Total Optoelectronic

1985 1986 1987 1988 1989 1990

5,174 5,992 6,949 9,003 10,348 11,227

379

405 451

512 593 566

4,795 5,587 6,498 8,491

9,755

10,661

3,615 4,116 4,840

6,669 7,794 8,326

719

150

569

719

147

572

727

88

639

772

74

698

640

72

568

577

58

519

1,933

745

486

702

2,270

813

574

883

2,761

854

805

1,102

4,364

1,797

1,212

1,355

5,458

2,548

1,469

1,441

5,403

2,154

1,836

1,413

963

1,127 1,352 1,533 1,696 2,346

969 1,207 1,377 1,516 1,594 1,915

211 264 281 306

367 420

Source; Dataquest (May 1991)

©1991 Dataquest Incorporated May—^Reproduction Prohibited

Semiconductor Consumption and Shipment Forecast

Table 5b

European Semiconductor Consumption

(Millions of Dollars)

Company:

P r o d u c t :

R e g i o n o f C o n s u m p t i o n :

D i s t r i b u t i o n C h a n n e l :

A p p l i c a t i o n :

S p e c i f i c a t i o n :

A l l

E a c h

E u r o p e

A l l

A l l

A l l

1 9 8 5

T o t a l I n c l u d i n g C a p t i v e s

N o r t h A m e r i c a n C a p t i v e s

- . 5

1 2 . 1

T o t a l S e m i c o n d u c t o r

T o t a l IC

B i p o l a r . D i g i t a l

Memory-

L o g i c

MOS D i g i t a l

Memory

M i c r o

L o g i c

A n a l o g

T o t a l D i s c r e t e

T o t a l O p t o e l e c t r o n i c

1 1 . 1

2 . 9

1 0 . 5

- 1 . 4

- 3 . 1

- 3 . 0

4 . 2

- 4 . 7

- 8 . 9

- 2 4 . 4

3 . 2

5 . 4

1 9 8 6

1 5 . 8

1 9 8 7

1 6 . 0

1 9 8 8

2 9 . 6

1 9 8 9

1 4 , 9

1990

CAGR (%)

8 5 - 9 0

8 . 5

- 4 . 6

1 6 . 8

8 . 4

6 . 9

1 6 . 5

1 1 . 4

1 6 . 3

1 3 . 5

3 0 . 7

1 5 . 8

1 4 . 9 9 . 3

6 . 8

1 7 . 3

1 8 . 2 1 3 . 9 1 7 . 6 3 7 . 8 1 6 . 9

. 0

- 2 . 0

. 5

1 . 1

- 4 0 . 1

1 1 . 7

6 . 2

- 1 5 . 9

9 . 2

- 1 7 . 1

- 2 . 7

- 1 8 . 6

- 9 . 8

- 1 9 . 4

- 8 . 6

- 4 . 3

- 1 7 . 3

- 1 . 8

1 7 . 4

9 . 1

1 8 . 1

2 5 . 8

2 1 . 6

5 . 0

4 0 . 2

2 4 . 8

5 8 . 1

1 1 0 . 4

5 0 . 6

2 3 . 0

2 5 . 1

4 1 . 8

2 1 . 2

6 . 3

- 1 . 0

- 1 5 . 5

2 5 . 0

- 1 . 9

2 2 . 8

2 3 . 7

3 0 . 5

1 5 . 0

1 7 . 0 2 0 . 0 1 3 . 4 1 0 . 6 3 8 . 3

1 9 . 5

2 4 . 6 1 4 . 1 1 0 . 1 5 . 1

1 4 . 6

2 5 . 1 6 . 4 8 . 9 1 9 . 9

2 0 . 1

1 4 . 4 1 4 . 8

23

Source: Dataquest (May 1991)

©1991 Dataquest Incorporated May—^Reproduction Prohibited

M

Semlcondnctor Consumption and Shipment Forecast

Table 5c

European Semiconductor Consumption

(Factory Revenue In Millions of U.S. Dollars)

Company:

Product:

Region of Consumption:

Distribution Channel:

Application:

Specification:

All

Each

Europe

All

All

All

Total Including Captives

13,030 15,305 18,367 20,508 21,983 41,690

North American Captives 756 889 1,054 1,182 1,219 2,050

Total Semiconductor

1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 2000

12,274

14,416 17,313

19,326 20,764 39,640

9,634 11,542 14,002 15,818 17,138 34,417

Total IC

Bipolar Digital

Memory

Logic

MOS Digital

Memory

Micro

Logic

Analog

Total Discrete

Total Optoelectronic

571

57

514

6,462

2,570

2,225

1,667

2,601

2,178

462

540

52

488

500

50

450

458

40

418

403

8,155

3,346

2,873

1,936

10,264

4,293

3,706

2,265

11,703

4,667

4,447

2,589

12,757

5,140

4,847

2,770

28,000

11,269

11,762

4,969

2,847 3,238 3,657 3,978 6,149

2,370

504

2,755

556

2,894

614

32

371

2,981

645

268

17

251

4,280

943

Source: DaUquesI (May 1991)

©1991 Dataquest Incorporated May—Reproduction Prohibited

Semiconductor Consumption and Shipment Forecast

Table 5d

European Semiconductor Consumption

(Percent Change)

Company:

Product:

Region of Consumption:

Distribution Channel:

Application:

Specificat ion:

All

Each

Europe

All

All

All

1991 1992

1993

1994 1995

CAGR

90-95

CAGR

95-00

Total Including Captives

7.2 14.4 13.7

North American Captives

16.1 17.5

20.0

11.7

33.6

17.6

18.6

12.1 3.1 16.6 11.0

Total Semiconductor

Total IC

Bipolar.Digital

Memory

Logic

15.1 17.5 20.1 11.6

15.7

19.8 21.3 13.0

7.4

8.3

14.3

15.5

13.8

15.0

-1.0

-1.7

-1.0

-5.4

-8.8

-5.1

-7.4

-3.8

-7.8

-8.4

-20.0

-7.1

-12.0

-20.0

-11.2

-6.9

-11.2

-6.5

-7.8

-11.9

-7.5

MOS Digital

Memory

Micro

Logic

Analog

Total Discrete

Total Optoelectronic

19.6

19.3

21.2

18.0

26.2

30.2

29.1

16.1

25.9

28.3

29.0

17.0

14.0

8.7

20.0

14.3

10.9

13.7

10.0

9.5 13.7 12.9

8.8 16.2 5.0

9.1 10.3

10.4

9.0

10.1

9.0

7.0

18.7

19.0

21.4

14.4

17.0

17.0

19.4

12.4

8.8

3.0

5.0

11.1

9.3

9.0

9.1

7.5

7.9

25

Source: Dataquest (May 1991)

©1991 Dataquest Incorporated May—^Reproduction Prohibited

26

Semiconductor Consumption and Shipment Forecast

Table 6a

Asla/PaclAc-Rest of World Semiconductor Consumption

(Factory Revenue In Millions of U.S. Dollars)

Company:

Product:

Region of Consumption:

Distribution Channel:

Application:

Specification:

All

Each

Asia/ROW

All

All

All

Total Including Captives

North American Captives

Total Semiconductor

Total IC

Bipolar Digital

Memory

Logic

MOS Digital

Memory

Micro

Logic

Analog

Total Discrete

Total Optoelectronic

1985 1986 1987 1988 1989 1990

1,979 2,548 3,968

5,752 6,524 7,670

0 0 0

0 0 0

1,979 2,548 3,968

5,752

6,524 7,670

1,195 1,714 2,898

4,457

5,275 6,203

215

15

200

616

134

117

365

364

281

23

258

562

411

35

376

419

19

400

411

22

389

871

185

185

501

1,550

437

389

724

2,517

1,173

652

692

3,387

1,658

933

796

4,065

1,670

1,459

936

937

510

32

478

1,430 1,469 1,727

693

91

739

95

943 1,138 1,064 1,259

127

157

185 208

Source: E>auquesc (May 1991)

©1991 Dataquest Incorporated May—Reproduction Prohibited

Semiconductor Consumption and Shipment Forecast 37

Table 6b

Asla/Paclflc-Rest of World Semiconductor Consumption

(MllUons of Dollars)

Company:

Product:

Region of Consuir^Jtion:

Distribution Channel:

Application:

Specification:

All

Each

Asia/ROW

All

All

All

Total Including Captives

North American Captives

Total Semiconductor

Total IC

Bipolar .Digital

Memory

Logic

MOS Digital

Memory

Micro

Logic

Analog

Total Discrete

Total Optoelectronic

NM = Not meaningful

1985 1986 1987 1988 1989 1990

CAGR (%)

85-90

-9.3 28.8 55.7 45.0 13.4 17.6 31.1

NM NM NM NM NM NM NM

-9.3 28.8 55.7 45.0 13.4 17.6 31.1

-6.7 43.4 69.1 53.8

18.4

17.6 39.0

-20.1

-42.3

-17.7

30.7

53.3

29.0

46.3

52.2

45.7

24.1

-8.6

27.1

-17.8

-40.6

-16.3

-1.9

15.8

-2.8

13.8

8.0

14.2

-12.0

-42.7

-19.3

13.7

41.4

38.1

58.1

37.3

78.0

136.2

110.3

44.5

62.4

168.4

67.6

-4.4

34.6

41.3

43.1

15.0

20.0

.7

56.4

17.6

45.8

65.6

65.6

20.7

16.7 54.4 66.7 52.6 2.7 17.6 36.5

-11.7

-20.9

6.6 27.6 20.7 -6.5 18.3

12.7

4.4 33.7 23.6 17.8 12.4 18.0

Source: Dauquest (M»y 1991)

©1991 Dataquest Incorporated May—Reproduction Prohibited

Semiconductor Consumption and Shipment Forecast

Table 6c

Asla/Paclfic-Rest of World Semiconductor Consumption

(Factory Revenue In Millions of U.S. Dollars)

Company:

Product:

Region of Consumption:

Distribution Channel:

Application:

Specification:

All

Each

Asia/ROW

All

All

All

Total Including Captives

North American Captives

Total Semiconductor

Total IC

Bipolar Digital

Memory-

Logic

MOS Digital

Memory

Micro

Logic

Analog

Total Discrete

Total Optoelectronic

1991 1992 1993 1994 1995

2000

8,834 10,625

13,025 14,804 16,004 32,377

0 0 0 0

0 0

8,834 10,625 13,025

14,804 16,004 32,377

7,232

402

12

390

4,857

1,717

2,055

1,085

1,973

8,884 11,020

12,572

13,738

29,107

393

11

382

6,098

2,107

2,635

1,356

2,393

392

9

383

7,714

2,708

3,305

1,701

2,914

382

7

375

8,693

3,093

3,741

1,859

3,497

374

6

368

9,418

3,331

4,081

2,006

3,946

332

1

331

20,513

6,076

10,501

3,936

8,262

1,374

228

1,493

248

1,710

295

1,892

340

1,892

374

2,643

627

Source: Dauquest CMay 1991)

©1991 Dataquest Incorporated May—Reproduction Prohibited

Semiconductor Consumption and Shipment Forecast

Table 6d

Asla/Paclflc-Rest of World Semiconductor Consumption

(Percent Change)

Company:

Product:

Region of Consuitvption:

Distribution Channel:

Application:

Specification:

Total Including Captives

North American Captives

All

Each

Asia/ROW

All

All

All

1991 1992 1993 1994 1995

CAGR

90-95

CAGR

95-00

15.2 20.3 22.6 13.7 8.1 15.8 15.1

NM NM NM NM NM NM NM

Total Semiconductor

Total IC

15.2

16.6

20.3

22.8

22.6

24.0

13.7

14.1

8.1 15.8 15.1

9.3 17.2 16.2

Bipolar Digital

Memory

Logic

MOS Digital

Memory

Micro

Logic

Analog

Total Discrete

Total Optoelectronic

NM = Not meaningful

-2.2

-45.5

.3

-2.2

-8.3

-2.1

-.3

-18.2

.3

-2.6

-22.2

-2.1

-2.1

-14.3

-1.9

-1.9

-22.9

-1.1

-2.4

-30.1

-2.1

19.5

2.8

40.8

15.9

25.6

22.7

28.2

25.0

26.5

28.5

25.4

25.4

12.7

14.2

13.2

9.3

8.3

7.7

9.1

7.9

18.3

14.8

22.8

16,5

16.8

12.8

20.8

14.4

14.2 21.3 21.8 20.0 12.8 18.0 15.9

9.1

9.6

8.7

8.8

14.5 10.6 .0 8.5 6.9

19.0 15.3 10.0 12.5 10.9

29

Source: Dataquest (May 1990

€>1991 Dacaquest Incorporated May—Reproduction Prohibited

30 Semiconductor Consumption and Shipment Forecast

Table 7a

Worldwide S e m i c o n d u c t o r A v e r s e Selling Prices

(Factory ASP In U.S. Dollars)

Company:

Product:

Region of Consumption:

Distribut ion Channel:

Application:

Specificat ion:

All

Each

Worldwide

All

All

All

1985

.30

1.05

.71

1986

.34

1.09

.71

1987

.33

1.18

.69

1988

.42

1.32

.70

1989

.42

1.45

.70

1990

.39

1.33

.68

Total Semiconductor

Total IC

Bipolar Digital

Memory

Logic

MOS Digital

Memory

Micro

Logic

Analog

Total Discrete

Total Optoelectronic

1.64

2.59

3.14

.93

.76

.08

.22

.99

.84

.09

.25

1.94

3.09

3.56

1.12

.82

.08

.28

.72

.09

.34

.70

.08

.27

2.32

4.43

4.28

1.06

.70

.08

.29

Source; Dauquest (May 1991)

©1991 Dataquest Incorporated May—Reproduction Prohibited

Semiconductor Consumption and Shipment Forecast

Table 7b

Worldwide Semiconductor Average Selling Prices

(Percent Change In Dollars)

Company:

Product:

Region of Consuniption:

Distribution Channel:

Application:

S p e c i f i c a t i o n :

Total Semiconductor

Total IC

Bipolar Digital

Memory

Logic

MOS Digital

Memory

Micro

Logic

Analog

Total Discrete

Total Optoelectronic

All

Each

Worldwide

All

All

All

CAGR

1985 1986 1987 1988 1989 1990 85-90

-15.7

-4.4

9.2

13.2 -2.7 24.8 -.3 -5.1 5.4

3.5 8.5 11.6 10.0 -8.4 4.8

.0 -2.8 1.4 .0 -2.9 -.9

-16.0

-33.6

-11.0

9.4

-.5 18.6 23.0 11.5 -12.6 7.2

-6.9 28.2 57.6 20.7 -24.7 11.3

-.3 13.7 16.6 -9.2 13.5 6.4

6.5 13.1 .9 .0 -6.2 2.7

1.3 10.5 -2.4 -12.2 -2.8 .0 -1.6

-11.1 15.0 -13.0 12.5 -11.1 .0 .0

-21.4 13.6 12.0 21.4 -20.6 7.4 5.7

Source: Dauquest (May 1991)

31

©1991 Dataquest Incorporated May—Reproduction Prohibited

32

Semiconductor Consumption and Sliipment Forecast

Table 7c

Worldwide Semiconductor Average Selling Prices

(Factory ASP In U.S. DoUars)

Company:

Product:

Region of Consumption:

Distribution Channel:

Application:

S p e c i f i c a t i o n :

All

Each

Worldwide

All

All

All

1991

.41

1.40

.70

1992

.44

1.53

.71

1993

.47

1.65

.72

1994

.48

1.62

.70

1995

.49

1.63

.69

2000

.64

2.00

.69

T o t a l Semiconductor

T o t a l IC

Bipolar Digital

Memory

Logic

MOS Digital

Memory

Micro

Logic

Analog

Total Discrete

Total Optoelectronic

2.46

4.86

4.36

1.12

.71

.08

.29

2.79

6.07

4.43

1.24

.71

.08

.29

3.17

7.34

4.49

1.41

.70

.08

.29

.68

.08

.29

3.18

9.00

4.29

1.32

.67

.08

.29

4.02

17.56

4.34

1.54

.68

.08

.29

Source: Dataquest (May 1991)

©1991 Dataquest Incorporated May—Reproduction Prohibited

Semiconductor Consumptloti and Shipment Forecast

Table 7d

Worldwide Semiconductor Average Selling Prices

(Percent Change In Dollars)

Company:

Product:

Region of Consumption:

Distribution Channel:

Application:

S p e c i f i c a t i o n :

Total Semiconductor

Total IC

Bipolar Digital

Memory

Logic

MOS Digital

Memory

Micro

Logic

All

Each

Worldwide

All

All

All

CAGR CAGR

1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 90-95 95-00

3.2 8.7 5.7 2.4 3.3 4.6 5.2

5.6 9.2

2.9 1.4

7.5 -2.0

1.4 -2.8

.8 4.1 4.1

-1.4 .3 .0

6.0

9.7

1.9

5.7

13.3

24.9

1.6

10.7

13.7

20.9

1.4

13.7

-2.8

10.4

-3.1

-7.8

3.1

11.1

-1.4

1.5

6.5

15.2

.0

4.5

4.8

14.3

.2

3.1

Analog 1.4 .0 -1.4 -2.9 -1.5 -.9 .3

Total Discrete .0 .0 .0 .0 .0 .0 .0

Total Optoelectronic .0 .0 .0 .0 .0 .0 .0

Source: Dataquest (May 1991)

33

©1991 Dataquest Incorporated May^—^Reptxxiuction Prohibited

u

Semiconductor Consumption and Shipment Forecast

Table 8a

Worldwide S e m i c o n d u c t o r U n i t S h i p m e n t s

(MlUlons o f Units)

Company: All

Product: Each

Region of Consumption: Worldwide

Distribution Channel: All

Application: All

Specification: All

1985 1986 1987 1988 1989 1990

80,380 89,881 114,551 122,085 137,808 147,757

17,607 21,654 25,260 31,098 32,303 35,553

5,172 6,092 6,899 7,429 6,443 6,529

Total Semiconductor

Total IC

Bipolar Digital

Memory

Logic

MOS Digital

Memory

Micro

Logic

Analog

Total Discrete

Total Optoelectronic

6,171 7,850 9,028 11,336 12,446 13,923

1,475 1,872 1,960 2,401 2,782 2,955

875 1,115 1,435 1,721 2,176 2,352

3,820 4,864 5,633 7,214 7,488 8,616

6,264 7,712 9,334 12,333 13,414 15,101

57,200 62,283 83,188 84,578 95,775 102,938

5 , 5 7 3 5 , 9 4 4 6 , 1 0 4 6 , 4 0 9 9 , 7 3 0 9 , 2 6 6

Source: Dataquest (May 1991)

©1991 Dataquest Incorporated Majf—Reproduction Prohibited

Semiconductor Consumption and Shipment Forecast 35

Table 8b

Worldwide Semiconductor Unit Shipments

(Percent Change)

Company: A l l

P r o d u c t : Each

R e g i o n o f C o n s u m p t i o n : W o r l d w i d e

D i s t r i b u t i o n C h a n n e l : A l l

A p p l i c a t i o n : A l l

S p e c i f i c a t i o n : A l l

CAGR

1 9 8 5 1 9 8 6 1 9 8 7 1 9 8 8 1 9 8 9 1 9 9 0 8 5 - 9 0

T o t a l S e m i c o n d u c t o r . 0 1 1 . 8 2 7 . 4 6 . 6 1 2 . 9 7 . 2 1 2 . 9

T o t a l IC - 1 4 . 4 2 3 . 0 1 6 . 7 2 3 . 1 3 . 9 1 0 . 1 1 5 . 1

Bipolar Digital -29.5 17.8 13.2 7,7 -13.3 1.3 4.8

Memory-

Logic

MOS Digital -7.1 27.2 15.0 25.6 9.8 11.9 17.7

Memory -7.6 26.9 4.7 22.5 15.9 6.2 14.9

Micro -4.5 27.4 28.7 20.0 26.4 8.1 21.9

Logic -7.4 27.3 15.8 28.1 3.8 15.1 17.7

Analog -5.0 23.1 21.0 32.1 8.8 12.6 19.2

Total Discrete 3.2 8.9 33.6 1.7 13.2 7.5 12.5

Total Optoelectronic 26.9 6.7 2.7 5.0 51.8 -4.8 10.7

Source: DaUquest (May 1991)

©1991 Dataquest Incorporated May—Reproduction Prohibited

36 Semiconductor Consumption and Shipment Forecast

Table 8 c

Worldwide S e m i c o n d u c t o r Unit S h i p m e n t s

(Millions o f Units)

Company: All

Product: Each

Region of Conauit^jtion: Worldwide

Distribution Channel: All

Application: All

Specification: All

Total Semiconductor

Total IC

Bipolar Digital

Memory

Logic

MOS Digital

Memory

Micro

Logic

Analog

Total Discrete

Total Optoelectronic

1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 2000

162,794 174,510 192,080 207,313 213,438 291,457

38,522 41,864 45,791 51,921 55,118 82,282

6,606 6,575 6,504 6,400 6,168 4,742

15,339 16,614 17,557 20,211 21,072 32,399

3,081 3,097 3,134 3,220 3,143 3,240

2,779 3,365 3,990 4,615 5,036 10,154

9,479 10,152 10,433 12,376 12,893 19,005

16,577 18,675 21,730 25,310 27,878 45,141

113,900 121,425 134,013 141,775 143,913 188,075

10,372 11,221 12,276 13,617 14,407 21,100

Source. Dataquest (May 1991)

©1991 Dataquest Incorporated May—Reproduction Prohibited

Semiconductor Consumption and Shipment Forecast

Table 8d

Worldwide Semiconductor Unit Sliipaients

(Percent Change)

Company: A l l

P r o d u c t : E a c h

R e g i o n o f C o n s u m p t i o n : W o r l d w i d e

D i s t r i b u t i o n C h a n n e l : A l l

A p p l i c a t i o n : A l l

S p e c i f i c a t i o n : A l l

Total Semiconductor

Total IC

CAGR CAGR

1 9 9 1 1 9 9 2 1 9 9 3 1 9 9 4 1 9 9 5 9 0 - 9 5 9 5 - 0 0

10.2

7 . 2 1 0 . 1 7 . 9 3 . 0 7 . 6 6 . 4

8.4

8 . 7 9 . 4 1 3 . 4 6 . 2 9 . 2 8 . 3

1.2

- . 5 - 1 . 1 - 1 . 6

- 3 . 6 - 1 . 1 - 5 . 1

Bipolar Digital

Memory-

Logic

MOS Digital

Memory

Micro

Logic

A n a l o g

T o t a l D i s c r e t e

T o t a l O p t o e l e c t r o n i c

10.2

4.3

10.0

8 . 3 5 . 7 1 5 . 1

4 . 3 8 . 6 9 . 0

. 5 1 . 2 2 . 7 - 2 . 4 1 . 2 . 6

7 . 1 2 . 8 1 8 . 6

9 . 1 1 6 . 4 1 5 . 1

4 . 2 8 . 4 8 . 1

9 . 8 1 2 . 7 1 6 . 4 1 6 . 5 1 0 . 1 1 3 . 0 1 0 . 1

1 0 . 6 6 . 6 1 0 . 4 5 . 8 1 . 5 6 . 9 5 . 5

1 1 . 9 8 . 2 9 . 4 1 0 . 9 5 . 8 9 . 2 7 . 9

Source; Dataquest (May 1991)

37

©IWl Dataquest Incorporated May—Reproduction Prohibited

DataQuest

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Phone: (408) 437-8000

Telex: 171973

Fax: (408) 437-0292

Technology Products Group

Phone: (800) 624-3280

Dataquest Incorporated

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The Corporate Center

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Phone: (508) 370-5555

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Phone: (02) 959 4544

Telex: 25468

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West Germany

Phone: Oil 49 89 93 09 09 0

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0010421

i

DataQuest lorth American OEM Revenue by Application

North American OEM Revenue by Application

Source:

Dataquest

DataQuest Semiconductor Applications Markets Worldwide

Published by Dataquest Incorporated

The content of this report represents our interpretation and analysis of information generally available to the public or released by knowledgeable individuals in the subject industry, but is not guaranteed as to accuracy or completeness. It does not contain material provided to us in confidence by our clients.

Printed in the United States of America. All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced, stored in retrieval systems, or transmitted, in any form or by any means—mechanical, electronic, photocopying, duplicating, microfilming, videotape, or otherwise—without the prior permission of the publisher.

© 1991 Dataquest Incorporated

August 1991

Electronic Equipment Company Revenue

INTRODUCTION

This section forms the Semiconductor Application Markets (SAM) service's first major database. The other databases include the electronic equipment production database, the semiconductor consumption (by application market) database, and the (semiconductor) input/(electronic equipment) output—or input/output (I/0>—ratio database. The electronic equipment revenue database has the following three purposes:

• To provide concrete historical information—

The section provides a database of the electronic equipment revenue of the 50 largest

U.S. electronics manufacturers. We estimate that these 50 companies' electronics revenue accounts for 64^ percent of the 200 largest

U.S. companies' electronics shipments in

1990 and therefore represents a good base for examining trends in the electronic equipment marketplace. This database is an efficient tool for analyzing growth by application market segment of the activities of individual companies.

• To offer a check on other summary data—

The information complements a historical view of semiconductor consumption with an equipment viewpoint rather than simply a product-shipment analysis.

• To serve as a cross-check in the development of I/O ratios—^Tracking the actual semiconductor consumption (both merchant and captive) and the actual electronic equipment revenue of given users allows an analysis of the I/O ratio, which is the relationship between semiconductor dollar value and the dollar value of the equipment in which the semiconductors are used.

In addition to electronic system semiconductor consumption analysis, Dataquest has developed and verified I/O ratios by interviewing procurement, contract, and materials managers who are experts in knowing their individual companies' merchant and captive use of semiconductors. We have interviewed more than

200 leading electronics manufacturers that have given us proprietary information on their semiconductor procurement, their captive production, and their relationships to the equipment or divisions in which the devices are used.

Dataquest has agreed to use this information only for internal purposes and report these ratios only on an aggregate basis. The I/O ratios that we develop are applied to the forecasts of electronic equipment production to estimate the associated level of semiconductor consumption. Information in those I/O ratios is available to clients that subscribe to our online services and can also be solicited from our analysts by using the inquiry privilege.

The result is a series of forecasts of semiconductor consumption by application market presented in the "Semiconductor Consumption

Analysis" section.

OVERVIEW

The information that follows is the result of a comprehensive database that tracks and analyzes the electronic equipment revenue of the

50 largest U.S. electronic equipment manufacturing companies. Major companies' revenue is listed, segmented and presented in this section in various ways. Accordingly, the data, covering an 11-year span (1979 to 1990), are presented as follows:

• Table 1—^Data Processing Equipment-Derived

Revenue by Company, 1979 to 1990

• Table 2—Communications Equipment-

Derived Revenue by Company, 1979 to

1990

• Table 3—^Industrial Equipment-Derived Revenue by Company, 1979 to 1990

• Table 4—Consumer Equipment-Derived Revenue by Company, 1979 to 1990

• Table 5—^Military/Civil Aerospace Equipment-

Derived Revenue by Company, 1979 to

1990

• Table 6—^Transportation Equipment-Derived

Revenue by Company, 1979 to 1990

• Table 7—^Total Electronic Equipment-Derived

Revenue by Company, 1979 to 1990

• Table 8—Total Equqjment Plus Semiconductor-

Derived Revenue by Company, 1979 to

1990

• Table 9—Total Revenue by Company, 1979 to 1990

METHODOLOGY

The following criterion is used to select companies for inclusion in the database: Include the 50 largest U.S. electronic systems manufacturers, based on their respective total electronic-system derived revenue for 1990.

These companies are seleaed from a much larger sample of U.S. companies, the annual

"Electronic Business 200" feature of Electronic

Business.

Company armual reports and 10-K reports provided the main source of information on equipment shipments. (I/O ratios were developed with subsequent detailed analysis.) VirtuaUy every annual report lists a company's revenue by line of business, with each line of business usually being referred to as a segment. Descriptions of each segment's revenue also are reported. Dataquest used these descriptions to determine whether or not a segment's revenue should be added to the database.

Given that the information in some annual reports is limited, Dataquest developed the following protocols to provide continuity to the database:

• The latest annual report was always used.

For example, a typical 1990 report might have historical segment data for a three- or five-year period. If only three years were reported, the 1989 report was examined for

1987 information and the data for 1989 and

1988 were simply checked against the information in the 1990 report to ensure that a company had not reclassified its reporting structure. Using the latest armual report provided continuity in the segments and their revenue. Revenue is for the company's fiscal year, not calendar year.

• The large companies' segments included nonelectronic equipment. If electronic equipment made up the majority of the segment or if there was a heavy technical influence in the description, the entire revenue was added to the database. Unless specifically

North American OEM Revenue by Application Market

detailed or additional information was obtainable, percentages were not applied to segment revenue based on the proportion or type of electronic equipment in that segment.

• Despite the name a company gave to a given segment, a description of the equipment in a segment was used to determine in which of the six Dataquest application market segments the revenue belonged.

Some of the larger companies' segments had such a varied product mix that they crossed over the Dataquest segmentation.

In such cases, the major product influence in that segment's description mandated which of our categories the revenue went into.

• In segments where there was little or no dear evidence of electronic equipment, the revenue w^as not added to the database.

Nonelectronic lines of business also were not included.

• Services, interest, supply, rentals, and other additional or product-support revenue were eliminated from the database if they were listed in the report. Most companies in the database separated such revenue.

Software revenue also was eliminated when it was broken out as a separate line item or if additional information indicated a percentage.

These gray areas appeared in only a portion of the companies in the database. Because

Dataquest dealt with them using the standards just described, we believe that this sample of companies provides a thorough and useful alternative (to more aggregate production data) snapshot of activity in the six application market segments that affect semiconductor consumption. The strength of this database lies in its power to identify and examine broad electronic system production trends with respect to specific companies. As additional years' data accumulate, we can examine the link between electronic equipment production and semiconductor consumption more closely and analyze their historical effects on each other.

©1991 Dataquest Incorporated August—Reproduction Prohibited

Electronic Equipment Company Revenue

C o m p a n y

Allied-Signal

Amdahl

Apple Computer

AT&T

Boeing

Chrysler

C o m p a q Computer

Control Data

Data General

Digital Equiptment

Emerson Electric

E-Systems

Ford Motor

General Dynamics

General Electric

General Instrument

GM H u g h e s

GTE

Harris

Hewlett-Packard

Honeywell

IBM

Intel'

ITT

Kodak

Litton Industries

Lockheed

Loral

Martin Marrietta

McDonnell Douglas

Motorola

NCR

Pitney B o w e s

Raytheon

Rockwell International

Seagate Technology

Sun Microsystems

T a n d e m Computers

Tandy

Tektronix

Texas Instruments

Table 1

D a t a P r o c e s s i n g E q u i p m e n t - D e r i v e d R e v e n u e b y C o m p a n y ,

1 9 7 9 t o 1 9 9 0

( M i l l i o n s o f D o l l a r s )

1 9 7 9

0

NA

48

0

0

0

0

1,148

439

1,382

0

0

0

0

0

NA

0

1 9 8 0

0

NA

113

0

0

0

0

1,473

549

1,779

0

0

0

0

0

NA

0

1 9 8 1

0

1 9 8 2

0

1 9 8 3

0

NA NA

325

0

533

0

0

692

873

0

0

1,660

0

0

589

2,384

0

0

0

0

1,699

617

2,794

0

0

0

0

0

111

1,916

596

2.854

0

0

0

NA

0

0

0

NA

0

0

0

0

0

0

NA

0

0

0

0

0

0

NA

0

1 9 8 4

0

1 9 8 5

0

584 550

1,301

96

0

0

1,668

592

0

0

504

329

2,128

884

3,796

2,246

912

4,266

0

0

NA

0

0

0

0

1 9 8 6

0

696

1,807

721

0

0

625

1,880

919

4,753

0

0

0

0

0

NA

0

0

0

135

0 0

0

366

0

0

NA

116

1,510

0

0

0

0

0

NA

91

240

759

0

464

0

0

NA

296

1,683

0

0

0

0

0

NA

165

326

888

0

556

0

0

NA

371

1,696

0

0

0

0

0

NA

370

391

958

622

0

0

NA

427

1,703

0

0

0

0

0

NA

550

441

1,024

0 0

656

0

0

167

463

1,710

0

0

0

0

9

400

771

455

962

0

679

0

0

162

558

1,972

0

0

0

344

39

477

864

529

963

0

394

0

0

175

598

2,158

1,386

0

0

215

115

533

802

567

862

0

319

0

0

206

496

2,410

1,506

0

0

460

200

622

953

534

789

0

179

0

0

211

427

2,983

1,726

0

0

958

457

829

1,046

501

769

1,956

1,266

1,161

851

0

139

0

167

0

758

848 1,208 1,386 1,694 1,936 2,234

2,405 2,809

748

828

895

12,050 14,124 15,808

788 778

18.850 22,164

936 1,081 940

28,341 34,690 32,954

3,199

0

4,174

0

5,223

0

5,675

0

33,909 36,239 36,369

40,258

251

0

280

0

264

0

275

0

347

0

428

0

345

0

274

0

416

0

525

0

697

0

751

0

533

652 681 767 721

857

788 932 1,048 1,181 1,260

1,242

0 0 0 0 0 0 0

0 0

0

0 0

0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

0

0

0 0

0

0

189

566

3,085

0

0

894

951

238

0

0

0

552

3,122

2,119

0

0

1,372

1,500

1,220

0

0

0

599

3,007

2,283

0

0

2,413

2,348

1,370

1,179

1,134

279

307

900

1,089

(Continued)

0

1 9 9 0

0

1,700

5,391

1,080

0

0

3,599

927

785

6,830

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

©1991 Dataquest Incorporated August—^Reproduction Prohibited

North American OEM Revenue by Application Market

Table 1 (Continued)

Data Processing Revenue by Company, 1979 to 1990

(Millions of Dollars)

Company

3M

TRW

Unisys

United Technologies

Varian Associates

Wang Laboratories

Westinghouse Electric

Xerox

Zenith Sectronics

1979 1980 1981 1982 1983 1984 1985 1986 1987 1988 1989 1990

695

0

0

0

0

188

0

772

0

0

0

0

318

0

797

0

0

0

0

501

0

808

0

0

0

0

677

0

854

0

0

0

0

898

0

946

0

0

0

0

0

906 929 918 1,130 1,186 1,245

0 0 0 0 0 0

0 1,953 3,670 3,737 3,861 3,718

0 0 0 0 0 0

0 0 0 0 0 0

0 0 0 0 0 0

2,390 3,043 3,410 3,289 3,695 4,282 4,318 4,822 5,702 6,174 6,696 7,099

38 104 120 132 172 249 352 548 1,036 1,356 0 0

Acquired by Forstmann Little & Co. in August 1990.

2

Data processing revenue restated back through 1985.

3

Data processing revenue equals net revenue (per annua] report) less total semiconductor revenue (per E^taquest market share estimates).i

4

Data processing operations discontinued in 1969.

6

Data processing revenue restated back through 1987.

Formeriy Burroughs, Sperry; merged in 1967. Revenue combined in prior years.

7

Data processing operations sold to Groupe Bull in December 1989-

NA - Not available

Source: Dauquest (August 1991)

©1991 Dalaquest Incorporated August—Reproduction Prohibited

Electronic Equipment Company Rerenue

Table 2

Communications Equipment-Derived Revenue by Company,

1979 to 1990

(MUUons of Dollars)

Company

Allied-Signal

Amdahl

Apple Computer

AT&T

Boeing

Chrysler

Compaq Computer

Control Data

Data Genoal

Digital Equipment

Emerson Electric

E-Systems

Ford Motor

General Dynamics

General Electric

General Instrument

GM Hughes

GTE

Harris

Hewlett-Packard

Honeywell

IBM

Intel

ITT

Kodak

Litton Industries

Lockheed

Loral

Martin Marrietta

McDonnell Douglas

Motorola

NCR

Pitney Bowes

Raytheon

Rockwell International

Seagate Technology

Sun Microsystems

Tandem Computers

Tandy

Tektronix

Texas Instruments

1979

0

0

0

5,954

0

0

6,467

0

0

1980

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

43

100

0

0

0

0

78

129

0

0

0

1981

0

0

0

7,306

0

0

316

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

104

NA

0

0

0

0

NA

0

1,006

985

232

0

0

0

0

0

0

160

245

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

845

0

0

0

0

1,156

0

0

1,328

0

0

0

0

0 0

342

0

0

0

164

NA

0

0

0

0

1,066

306

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

363

0

0

0

110

150

0

0

0

0

0

0

1984

0

80

0

0

0

0

0

228

NA

0

1,178

10,093

0

0

0

0

0

38

109

1,891

0

0

0

0

0

369

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

579

0

0

0

264

221

0

379

0

0

0

148

171

0

1983

0

0

220

NA

0

1,185

397

218

NA

0

1,298

0

14

0

0

0

0

65

0

8,429

0

0

0

0

1982

0

0

0

7,770

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

391

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

1.405

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

1,490

0

0

0

488

0

0

0

223

192

0

1985

0

81

0

1986

0

47

0

1987

0

70

0

10,002

0

0

0

0

0

86

0

0

0

0

0

600

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

239

NA

0

1,289

301

771

NA

0

1,212

291

0

125

2,118

0

0

0

180

2,637

0

0

0

733

0

0

0

283

236

0

8,676

0

8,875

0

0

0

0

0

177

0

0

0

0

0

900

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

761

0

0

0

352

216

0

0

0

0

0

207

0

0

0

0

828

764

0

562

243

0

0

1,100

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

81

2,981

0

0

0

860

0

0

0

401

255

0

1988

0

1989

0

1990

0

89

0

9,005

0

0

0

0

0

225

0

0

0

0

1,064

794

0

663

250

0

0

1,600

72

0

9,042

0

0

0

0

0

225

0

0

0

0

1,091

817

0

723

350

0

0

3,000

68

0

9,630

0

0

0

0

0

224

0

0

0

0

1,148

0

0

860

360

0

0

2,950

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

36

3,754

0

0

0

0

4.587

0

0

0

843

0

0

140

836

0

0

433

247

0

0

0

0

5,338

113

0

0

851

0

0

150 175

485

296

513

01

0 0

(Continued)

0

0

0

0

©1991 Daaquest Incorporated August—^Reproduction Protiibited

North American OEM Revenue by Application Market

Table 2 (Continued)

Communications Equipment-Derived Revenue by Company, 1979 to 1990

(Millions of Dollars)

3M

Company

TRW

Unisys

United Technologies

1979

0

0

0

1980

0

0

0

1981

0

0

0

Varian Associates

Wang Laboratories

Westinghouse Electric

0

0

NA

0

0

0

NA

0

Xerox

0 0

2

0

Zenith Electronics

1

Communications revenue restated back through 1985.

8

0

27

Cable products reclassified under consumer starting in 1988.

NA - Not available

Source: Dauquest (August 1991)

0

0

NA

0

1982

0

0

NA

0

0

64

0

0

0

1983

0

0

0

0

0

NA

0

0

122

1984

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

146

1985

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

53

1986

0

0

0

0

0

68

0

0

58

1987

0

0

0

0

0

1988

0

1989

0

1990

0

0

0

0

90

0

0

73

0

96

0

0

0

80

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

70

0

0

0

©1991 Dataquest Incorporated August—Reproduction Prohibited

Electronic Equipment Company Revenue

Company

Allied-Signal

Amdahl

Apple Computer

AT&T

Boeing

Chrysler

Compaq Computer

Control Data

Data General

Digital Equipment

Emerson Electric

E-Systems

Ford Motor

General Dynamics

General Electric

General Instrument

GM Hughes

GTE

Harris

Hewlett-Packard

Honeywell

IBM

Intel

ITT'

Kodak

Litton Industries

Lockheed

Loral

Martin Marrietta

McDonnell Douglas

Motorola

NCR

Pitney Bowes

Raytheon

Rockwell International

Seagate Technology

Sun Microsystems

Tandem Computers

Tandy

Tektronix

Texas Instruments

Table 3

Industrial EquipmentDerived Revenue by Company, 1979 to 1990

(MilUons of Dollars)

0

1,301

1,986

0

0

2,111

714

0

0

0

0

NA

0

0

0

1979

379

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

703

749

0

0

0

0

19

0

0

0

351

0

0

0

0

438

0

895

0

0

0

0

1,589

2,239

0

0

1,869

861

933

0

0

0

0

21

0

0

0

369

0

0

0

0

504

0

0

NA

0

0

0

0

0

0

1980

426

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

22

0

0

0

384

0

0

0

0

508

0

1981

487

0

0

0

0

1982

576

0

0

0

0

0

1,127

0

0

0

NA

0

0

0

0

1,795

2,384

0

0

0

NA

0

0

0

0

0

0

1,467

0

0

0

0

2,072

2,444

0

0

1,754

1,877

899

988

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

973

992

0

0

403

0

0

0

0

568

0

0

0

25

0

0

0

0

0

2,290

2,452

0

0

1,657

882

952

0

0

0

1,586

0

0

0

NA

0

0

0

0

0

1983

784

0

0

0

0

0

2,303

0

0

0

0

2,504

2,628

0

0

1,813

885

1,054

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

NA

0

0

0

1984

950

0

0

0

0

0

0

424

0

0

0

0

527

0

32

0

0

0

0

0

455

0

0

0

0

564

0

0

0

39

0

1985

893

0

0

0

0

1986

1,517

0

0

0

0

1987

0

0

0

0

0

0

NA

0

0

0

2,564

0

821

0

0

0

40

0

0

0

669

0

2,529

2,736

0

0

983

901

861

0

0

0

933

940

0

0

0

0

42

0

0

0

1,076

0

769

0

0

2,651

2,878

0

0

748

0

NA

0

0

0

3,356

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

615

0

0

0

0

583

0

0

1,080

0

0

0

0

618

0

0

647

0

0

0

0

0

0

2,983

3,071

0

0

741

1,048

0

0

1,410

0

0

0

3,854

997

0

0

0

0

44

0

0

0

0

0

5,303

0

0

0

0

1.249

0

0

0

0

882

0

839

1,181

1,280

0

0

0

0

42

929

0

0

3,479

3,436

0

0

1.554

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

1988

0

0

0

0

0

1989

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

1990

0

0

0

1.710

0

0

0

5,348

0

1,486

0

0

4,164

3.569

0

0

960

1.260

1,411

0

0

0

0

41

0

0

0

0

0

0

1,389

0

0

0

1,447

0

0

0

0

858

0

800

0 0

(Continued)

1,057

1,242

1,388

0

0

0

0

41

5,433

0

1,534

0

0

4,402

3,851

0

0

0

0

1,937

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

@1991 Dataquest Incorporated August—Reproduction Prohibited

North American OEM Revenue by Application Market

Table 3 (Continued)

Industrial Equipment-Derived Revenue by Company, 1979 to 1990

(Millions of Dollars)

3M

TRW

Company

Unisys

United Technologies

1979

219

0

0

0

Varian Associates

Wang Laboratories

Westinghouse Electric

268

0

0

Xerox 0

Zenith Electronics 0

1

Indtistrial revenue restated back through 1987.

2

Industrial revenue restated t»ck through 1985.

NA - Not available

Source: Dataquest (August 1991)

1980

265

0

0

0

327

0

0

0

0

1981

292

0

0

0

358

0

0

0

0

1982

300

0

0

0

369

0

0

0

0

1983

305

0

0

0

403

0

0

0

0

1984

319

0

0

0

544

0

0

0

0

1985

323

0

0

0

590

0

0

0

0

1986

353

0

0

0

472

0

0

0

0

1987

398

0

0

0

531

0

0

0

0

1988

479

0

0

0

612

0

0

0

0

1989

501

0

0

0

752

0

0

0

0

1990

548

0

0

0

787

0

0

0

0

©1991 Dataquest Incorporated August—Reproduction Prohibited

Electronic Equipment Company Revenue

Company

Allied-Signal

Amdahl

Apple Computer

AT&T

Boeing

Chrysler

Compaq Computer

Control Data

Data General

Digital Equipment

Emerson Electric

E-Systems

Ford Motor

General Dynamics

General Electric

General Instrument

GM Hughes

GTE

Harris

Hewlett-Packard

Honeywell

IBM

Intel rrr

Kodak

Litton Industries

Lockheed

Loral

Martin Marrietta

McDonnell Douglas

Motorola

NCR

Pitney Bowes

Raytheon

Rockwell International

Seagate Technology

Sun Microsystems

Tandem Computers

Tandy

Tektronix

Texas Insmj meats

Table 4

Consumer Equipment-Derived Revenue by Company, 1979 to 1990

(MilUons of Dollars)

0

4,347

0

0

4,274

0

0

0

874

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

1,069

0

0

0

0

0

0

859

0

0

97

0

0

0

0

175

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

NA

0

0

0

0

0

0

1979

0

0

0

0

0

0

NA

0

0

0

0

0

1980

0

0

0

0

0

0

129

0

0

0

0

881

0

0

173

0

0

0

0

5

0

0

0

NA

0

0

0

0

0

0

4,460

0

0

0

0

189

0

0

0

0

9

0

0

128

0

0

0

0

985

0

0

0

0

1,117

0

0

0

1981

0

0

0

0

0

0

113

0

0

0

0

896

0

0

0

NA

0

0

0

0

0

1982

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

1,180

166

0

0

0

0

11

0

0

0

3,973

0

0

0

0

4,246

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

1,042

167

0

0

0

0

13

0

0

1983

0

0

0

0

0

142

0

0

0

0

983

0

0

0

NA

0

0

0

0

0

0

1984

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

NA

0

0

0

1,023

248

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

159

0

0

0

0

1,067

0

0

4,853

0

5,549

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

16

0

0

0

NA

0

0

0

0

0

0

1985

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

1,126

240

0

0

0

0

17

0

0

157

0

0

0

0

1,186

0

0

0

18

0

0

0

0

0

175

0

0

0

0

1,363

0

0

1986

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

1,242

190

0

0

0

0

0

NA

0

0

0

7,144

0

181

0

0

0

0

1,540

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

97

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

19

0

0

1987

0

0

0

0

0

0

7,746

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

1,398

1988

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

1989

0

0

0

0

0

0

1990

100

0

0

0

0

0

0

1,696

0

0

0

0

0

0

1,575

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

18

0

0

196

0

0

0

0

97

0

5,289

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

5.620

0

0

0

0

0

1,680

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

1,656

0

18

0

0

18

0

0

214

0

0

0

0

1,865

0

0

208

0

0

0

0

2,160

0

0 0

(Continued)

0

0

0

0

0

0

5,706

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

89

0

0

0

0

0

©1991 Dataquesi Incorporated August—^Reproduction Prohibited

10 North American OEM Rerenue t>y Application Maricet

Table 4 (Continued)

Consumer Equipment-Derived Revenue by Company, 1979 to 1990

(Millions of Dollars)

3M

TRW

Unisys

Company

United Technologies

Varian Associates

Wang Laboratories

1979

0

0

0

0

0

Westinghouse Electric

Xerox 0

Zenith Electronics*

1,012

•Consumer revenue restated back through 1988.

NA - Not available

Source: E)ataquest (August 1991)

0

0 0

0

1,003

1980

0

0

0

0

0

0

1981

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

1,041

1982

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

939

1983

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

923

1984

0

0

0

0

0

1,062

0

0

0

1985

0

1986

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

1,062

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

1,154

1987

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

1,026

1988

0

0

0

0

1,186

0

0

0

0

0

0

1,321

1989

0

0

0

0

0

0

1990

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

1,229

©1991 Datatquest Incorporated August—Reproduction Prohibited

Electronic Equipment Company Revenue

11

Table 5

Mllitary/CivlI A e r o s p a c e E q u i p m e n t - D e r i v e d R e v e n u e b y C o m p a n y ,

1 9 7 9 t o 1 9 9 0

( M l U i o n s o f D o l l a r s )

C o m p a n y

Allied Signal'

Amdahl

^ p l e C o m p u t e r

AT&T'

Boeing

Chrysler

C o m p a q C o m p u t e r

Control Data

Data General

Digital Equipment

Emerson Electric

E-Systems

Ford Motor

General Dynamics

General Electric

General Instrument

GM H u g h e s '

GTE'

Harris

Hewlett-Packard

2

Honeywell

IBM'

Intel

ITT'

Kodak

Litton Industries

Lockheed

Loral

Martin Marrietta

McDonnell Douglas

Motorola

2

NCR

Pitney B o w e s

Raytheon

Rockwell International

Seagate Technology

Sun Microsystems

T a n d e m C o m p u t e r s

T a n d y

Tektronix

Texas Instruments

1 9 7 9

545

0

0

NA

0

0

0

0

0

0

NA

323

NA

NA

714

0

0

585

218

0

499

525

0

768

0

587

1,321

NA

1,049

400

176

0

0

1,500

1,112

0

0

0

0

0

545

1 9 8 0

641

0

0

0

NA

362

NA

NA

0

0

0

0

0

NA

1,549

0

0

597

263

0

598

555

0

703

0

741

1,802

NA

1,062

459

227

0

0

1,649

1.243

0

0

0

0

0

738

1 9 8 1

734

0

0

0

0

876

0

0

NA

0

0

0

0

0

0

NA

489

NA

NA

1,878

0

0

634

307

0

662

617

0

797

0

977

2,196

NA

1,474

559

236

0

0

1,946

1,267

0

1 9 8 2

745

0

0

0

0

0

707

399

0

556

245

0

0

0

0

1,059

0

NA

0

0

NA

623

NA

NA

2,079

0

0

755

737

0

992

0

996

2,673

NA

1,668

2,160

1,331

0

0

0

1 9 8 3

815

0

0

NA

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

1,204

0

0

0

NA

705

NA

NA

2,237

0

0

736

529

0

878

1,110

0

1,020

0

1,338

2,776

NA

1,775

618

369

0

0

2,614

1,458

0

1 9 8 4

850

0

0

NA

0

0

0

0

0

0

NA

733

NA

NA

2,509

0

0

719

630

0

918

1,412

0

1,213

0

1,588

3,735

NA

2,156

736

441

0

0

2,959

1,678

0

0

0

0

0

1,392

1 9 8 5

475

0

0

485

705

0

0

0

0

0

555

926

1,100

1,120

3,215

0

5,128

787

1,025

0

1,119

1,501

0

1,122

0

1,916

2,243

472

1,571

330

496

0

0

2,844

2,035

0

0

0

0

0

1,480

1 9 8 6

745

0

0

545

853

0

1,279

0

2,172

0

0

1,717

0

0

0

0

561

1,135

1,165

1,210

3,818

0

5,635

1,050

1,030

0

1,219

1,821

0

2,519

625

1,745

378

526

0

0

3,253

2,384

0

0

0

1 9 8 7

820

0

0

570

990

0

0

0

0

0

545

1,227

1,200

1,175

4,209

0

5,847

1,100

1,100

0

1,899

2,130

0

1,280

0

2,231

3,169

638

1,869

435

540

0

0

3,569

2,370

0

0

0

0

0

1,967

1 9 8 8

825

0

0

580

1,050

1,301

1,180

1,182

6,060

1,145

1,840

1,977

0

2,291

3,184

1,072

0

0

0

0

2,142

0

0

0

0

0

552

4,273

0

1,080

0

839

0

2,078

480

648

0

1 9 8 9

908

0

0

610

1,040

0

0

0

0

0

540

1,470

1,210

1,165

4,215

0

5,664

1,080

1,155

0

2,004

1,921

0

960

0

2,143

3,054

1,121

2,238

0

3,760

2,135

0

4,015

2,197

0

0

495

698

0

0

0

0

1 9 9 0

938

0

0

630

1,415

0

0

1,636

0

1,180

0

0

0

578

4,435

0

5,846

1,139

1,135

0

2,071

2,114

0

1,612

0

2,200

3,075

1,872

2,255

552

685

0

0

4,154

2,173

0

0

0

0

0 0

2,148 2,111

(Continued)

®1991 Dataquest Incorporated August—^Reproduction Prohibited

12 North American OEM Revenue by Application Market

Table 5 (Continued)

Mllitary/Civll Aerospace Equipment-Derived Revenue by Company, 1979 to 1990

(Millions of Dollars)

3M

TRw'

Unisys

Company 1979 1980 1981 1982 1983 1984 1985 1986 1987 1988 1989 1990

0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

854 1,003 1,202 1,253 1,479 1,551 2,370 2,434 2,906 2,985 2,990 3,106

United Technologies

Varian Associates

Wang Laboratories

0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2,765 2,354 2,365 2,255 2,214

NA NA NA NA NA NA NA 979 1,072 1,124 1,220 1,339

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

Westinghouse Electric

Xerox

Zenith Electronics

652

0

810

0

912 1,524 1,561 1,640 1,605 1,720 1,807 1,936 1,982 2,149

0 0 0

0 0 0 0 0

1

Restated back through 1985 per Dataquest's MUAero Service.

2

As per Dataquest's MilAero Service.

As per Dataquest's MilAero Service. Ford Aerospace sold to Loral in October 1990.

NA - Not available

Source: DaUquest (August 1991)

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

01991 Dataquest Incorporated August—Reproduction Prohibited.

Electronic Equipment Company Revenue

13

Company

Allied-Signal

Amdahl

Apple Computer

AT&T

Boeing

Chrysler

Compaq Computer

Control Data

Data General

Digital Equipment

Emerson Electric

E-Systems

Ford Motor

General Dynamics

General Electric

General Instrument

GM Hughes

GTE

Harris

Hewlett-Packard

Honeywell

IBM

Intel

ITT

Kodak

Litton Industries

Lockheed

Loral

Martin Marrietta

McDonnell Douglas

Motorola

NCR

Pitney Bowes

Raytheon

Rockwell International

Seagate Technology

Sun Microsystems

Tandem Computers

Tandy

Tektronix

Texas Instmments

Table 6

Transportation EqulpmentDerived Revenue by Company, 1979 to 1990

(Milllons of Dollars)

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

768

159

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

1979

1980 1981 1982

1983

1984

199

200 218

225

237 263

0 0

0

0 0 0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

735

0

0

0

201

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

735

0

0

0

0

0

0

203

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

730

0

0

0

0

0

0

223

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

786

0

0

0

0

0

0

250

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

294

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

923

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

3,061

0

0

0

0

1985

205

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

734

0

0

0

0

0

784

0

0

0

288

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

1,014

0

0

0

302

0

0

0

0

0

0

951

0

0

0

3,180

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

1986

287

0

0

0

0

1,200

0

0

0

3,216

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

1987

355

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

314

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

1,176

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

1,239

0

0

0

301

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

1,308

0

0

0

3,800

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

1,454

0

0

0

0

0

0

1988

410

0

0

0

0

1,255

0

0

0

0

0

0

1,382

0

0

1990

418

0

0

0

0

0

4,000

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

4,128

0

0

0

0

1,323

0

0

0

292

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

1,458

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0 0

(Continued)

0

0

0

0

0

292

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

1,360

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

1989

385

0

0

0

0

1,292

0

©1991 Dataquest Incorporated August—^Reproduction Prohibited

14 North American OEM Revenue by Application Market

Table 6 (Continued)

Transportation Equipment-Derived Revenue by Company, 1979 to 1990

(MllUons of Dollars)

3M

TRW

Unisys

Company

United Technologies

Varian Associates

Wang Laboratories

Westinghouse Electric

Xerox

1979

1980 1981 1982 1983 1984

0

0 0 0 0 0

944

0

0

0

0

0

0

Zenith Electronics

0

•ResUted back through 1988 per 1990 annual report.

Source: Dataquest (August 1991)

920

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

888

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

806

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

937

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

935

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

1985

0

977

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

1986

0

1,077

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

1987

0

1,224

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

1988

0

1,995

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

1989

0

2,233

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

1990

0

2,651

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

©1991 Daiaquest Incorporated August—Reproduction Prohibited

Electronic Equipment Company Revenue

15

Table 7

Total Electronic Equipment-Derived Revenue by Company, 1979 to 1990

CMilllons of Dollars)

Company

Allied-Signal

Amdahl

Apple Computer

AT&T

Boeing

Chrysler

Compaq Computer

Control Data

Data General

Digital Equipment

Emerson Electric

E-Systems

Ford Motor

General Dynamics

General Electric

General Instrument

GM Hughes

GTE

Harris

Hewlett-Packard

Honeywell

IBM

Intel

ITT

Kodak

Litton Industries

Lockheed

Loral

Martin Marietta

McDonnell Douglas

Motorola

NCR

Pitney Bowes

Raytheon

Rockwell International

Seagate Technology

Sun Microsystems

Tandem Computers

Tandy

Tektronix

1979

1,123

0

48

5,954

0

0

0

1,148

439

1,382

0

323

0

0

5,879

0

0

1,570

816

2,149

3,647

2,110

1,511

1,321

0

1,049

400

1,315

1,510

0

1,597

1,779

0

0

0

993

778

1980

1,267

1,124

0

113

6,467

0

0

0

1.473

549

1,779

0

362

0

0

6,878

0

0

1,603

972

2,797

3,233

12,575

251

3,665

14,679

280

3.307

2,582

1,847

1,802

0

1,062

459

1,906

1,683

0

1,778

1,954

0

0

0

959

1981

1,439

0

325

7,306

0

0

0

1,660

589

2,384

0

489

0

0

7,629

0

0

1,700

1,169

3,181

3,941

16,425

264

3,409

2.697

2,154

2,196

0

1,474

559

2,169

1,696

0

2,074

2,014

0

0

0

1,465

1,049

1982

1,546

533

7,770

0

1,699

617

2,794

0

623

0

0

7,739

0

0

1,892

1,418

3,766

3,987

19,587

275

3,476

2,920

2,154

2,673

0

1,668

556

2,336

1,703

0

2,273

2,113

0

0

0

1,594

1,180

0

0

0

1983

1,836

757

873

111

1,916

596

2,868

0

705

0

0

8,287

0

0

2,034

1,576

4,226

4,108

23,274

347

3,463

2,645

2,457

2,776

0

1,775

785

2,617

1,710

0

2,756

2,370

0

9

400

1,977

1,174

1984

2,063

630

1,301

8,429

0

10,189

0

0 0

329

2,128

884

3,834

1985

1,573

665

1,668

11,079

705

0

504

2,246

912

4,352

1986

2,549

743

1,807

9.942

853

0

625

1,880

919

4,930

1987

1,175

1,244

2,645

9,904

990

0

1,224

1.870

850

5,686

1988

1,235

1,533

3,940

10,475

1,050

1,454

2,066

1,626

914

6,494

1989

1,293

1,787

5,210

10,652

1,040

1,292

2,876

1,216

875

7.092

1990

1,356

1,768

5,391

11,340

1,415

1,255

3,599

927

785

7,054

0

733

0

0

9,893

0

0

1,897

1,678

4,738

4,482

3,949

2,765

2,890

3,735

0

2,156

1,007

3,239

1,972

0

3,118

2,712

344

39

477

2,195

1,314

555

926

1,834

1,120

11,567

0

9,010

2,076

1,720

4,934

4,936

29,753

428

36,791

345

2,889

2,815

3,017

2,243

472

1.571

630

3,557

2,158

1,386

3,001

3,437

215

115

533

2,271

1,418

561

1,135

2,116

1,210

15,089

0

9,584

2,262

1,640

5,460

829

2,987

1,374

2,604

1.636

1.382

1.180

16,722

0

11.508

1.999

2.253

10.077

5,037

35,675

274

4,970

37,139

416

5,276

39,816

5,573

41.290

5.922

45,322

525 697 751

3,041

3,107

3,302

2,519

625

1,745

764

4,021

2,410

1,506

3,428

4,221

460

200

622

2,668

1,333

2,052

1,227

2,400

1,175

16,637

899

9,710

1,662

1,522

6,182

3,197

3,494

3,228

3,169

638

1,869

727

4,325

2,983

1,726

3,750

4,310

958

457

2,206

1,301

2,488

1,182

15.929

1,015

10,789

1,808

1,469

7,653

2,917

3,937

3,571

3,184

1,072

2,078

705

5,329

3,085

1,956

3,956

4,227

1,266

894

1,091

3,290

1,367

2,347

1,470

2,570

1,165

16.274

1.135

11,150

1,803

1,672

9,387

3.243

4.200

3,554

3,054

1,121

2,238

495

6,188

3,122

2,119

4,229

4,422

1,372

1,500

1,370

3,529

4,127

4,140

3,588

3,075

1,872

2,255

552

6,973

3,120

2.283

4,362

4,471

2,413

2,348

1,545

3,807

1,433 1,408

(Continued)

©1991 Dataquest Incorporated August—Reproduction Prohibited

16 North American OEM Revenue by Application Mark^

Table 7 (Continued)

Total Electronic Equipment-Derived Revenue by Company, 1979 to 1990

(Millions of Dollars)

3M

TRW

Xerox

Company

Sun Micrcjsystems

Tandem Computers

Tandy

Tektronix

Texas Instnaments

Unisys

United Technologies

Varian Associates

Wang Laboratories

Westinghouse Electric

Zenith Electronics

1979

0

1980

0

1981

0

1982

0

1983

9

1984

39

1985

115

Source: Dauquest (August 1991)

0

993

778

1,304

914

1,798

0

0

268

188

652

2,390

1,050

0

1,124

959

1,626

1,037

1,923

0

0

327

318

810

3,043

1.115

0

1,465

1,049

1,834

1,089

2,090

0

0

358

501

912

3,410

1,188

0

1,594

1,180

2,083

1,108

2,059

0

0

369

677

1,524

3,289

1,135

400

1,977

1,174

2,166

1,159

2,416

0

0

403

898

1,561

3,695

1,217

477

2,195

1,314

2,355

1,265

2,486

0

0

544

1,271

1,640

4,282

1,457

533

2,271

1,418

2,342

1,229

3,347

0

0

590

1,363

1,605

4,318

1,467

1986

200

622

2,668

1,333

2,506

1,282

3,511

4,718

979

472

1,592

1,720

4,822

1,760

1987

457

829

2,987

1,374

2,736

1,316

4,130

6,024

1,072

531

1,683

1,807

5,702

2,135

1988

894

1,091

3.290

1.367

2,993

1,609

4,980

6,102

1,124

612

1,800

1,936

6,174

2,542

1989

1,500

1,370

3,529

1.433

3,048

1,687

5,223

6,116

1,220

752

1,758

1,982

6,696

1,321

5.759

5,932

1.339

787

1.526

2.149

7,099

1,229

1990

2.348

1.545

3.807

1.408

3.200

1.793

©1991 Dataquest Incorporated August—Reproduction Prohibited

Electronic Equipment Company Revenue

17

Table 8

Total Equipment Plus Semiconductor-Derived Revenue by Company, 1979 to 1990

(MllUons of Dollars)

Company

Allied-Signal

Amdahl

Apple Computer

AT&T

Boeing

Chrysler

Compaq Computer

Control Data

Data General

Digital Equipment

Emerson Electric

E-Systems

Ford Motor

General Dynamics

General Electric

General Instrument

GM Hughes

GTE

Harris

Hewlett-Packard

Honeywell

IBM

Intel

ITT

Kodak

Litton Industries

Lockheed

Loral

Martin Marrietta

McDonnell Douglas

Motorola

NCR

Pitney Bowes

Raytheon

Rockwell International

Seagate Technology

Sun Microsystems

Tandem Computers

Tandy

Tektronix

Texas Instruments

1979

1,123

0

48

5,954

0

0

0

1,148

439

1,382

0

323

0

1,597

1,779

0

0

0

993

778

1,304

1980

1,267

0

113

6,467

0

0

0

1,473

549

1,779

0

362

0

1,778

1,954

0

0

0

1,124

959

1,626

1981

1,439

0

325

7,306

0

0

0

1,660

589

2,384

0

489

0

2,125

2,084

0

0

0

1,465

1,049

3,129

1982

1,546

0

533

7,770

0

0

0

1,699

617

2,794

0

623

0

2,325

2,193

0

0

0

1,594

1,180

3,388

1983

1,836

757

873

8,429

0

10,189

0

0

111

1,916

596

2,868

0

705

0

2,821

2,427

0

9

400

1.977

1,174

3,804

1984

2,063

630

1,301

0

329

2,128

884

3,834

0

733

0

3,213

2,769

344

39

477

2,195

1,314

4,839

1985

1.573

665

1,668

11,079

705

0

504

2,246

912

4,352

555

926

1,834

3,080

3,481

215

115

533

2,271

1,418

4,084

1986

2,549

743

1,807

561

1,135

2,116

3,512

4,345

460

200

622

2,668

1,333

4,287

1987

1,175

1,244

2,645

10,835

10,706

853

990

0

0

625

1,880

919

4,930

1,224

1,870

850

5,686

2,052

1,227

2,400

3,839

4,482

958

457

829

2,987

1,374

4,863

1988

1,235

1,533

3.940

11,334 11,525

1,050

1,454

2,066

1,626

914

6,494

2,206

1,301

2,488

4,055

4,401

1,266

894

1,091

3,290

1,367

5,734

1989

1,293

1,787

5.210

1,040

1.292

2,876

1,216

875

7,092

2,347

1,470

2,570

4,325

4,587

1,372

1,500

1,370

3,529

1,433

1990

1.356

1.768

5.391

12,201

1,415

1,255

3,599

927

785

7,054

2,604

1,636

1,382

0

5,879

1,210 1,175

1,182

15,610 17,157

16,484

1,180

16,722

0

0

1,570

816

2,149

3,233

12,575

661

3,647

2,110

1,511

1,321

0

0

0

1,603

972

2,797

3,665

14,679

855

3,307

2,582

1,847

1,802

0

0

21

1,726

1,334

3,273

3,959

20

1,924

1,574

3,868

4,007

16,425 19,587

789 900

25

2,053

1,747

4,356

4,132

23,274

1,122

32

1,921

1,934

4,920

4,546

29,753

1,629

9,046

2,103

1,967

1,365

9,623

2,284

1,907

1,265

9,753

1,686

1,797

1,907

10,836

1,808

1,798

2,875

11,187

1,803

2,214

3,127

11,552

1.999

3.053

5,140

5.024

36,791

5,678

5,174

35,675

6,425

5,157

37,139

7,923

5.458

39,816

9,656

5,629

41,290

10,586

5.971

45,322

3.922

3,584

2,697

2,154

2,196

0

0

3,666

2,920

2,154

2,673

0

0

3,648

2,645

2,457

2,776

0

0

4,199

2,765

2,890

3,735

0

0

3,159

2,815

3,017

2,243

472

0

3,353

3,107

3,302

2,519

625

899

3,554

3,494

3,228

3,169

638

1,015

3.277

3,937

3,571

3,184

1,072

1,135

3,633

4,200

3,554

3,054

1,121

0

4,498

4,140

3,588

3.075

1,872

1,049

400

1,315

1,510

0

6,878

1,062

459

1,906

1,683

0

7,750

1,474

559

3,359

1,696

0

7,841

1,668

556

3,555

1,731

0

8,402

1,775

785

4,264

1,785

0

10,029

2,156

1,007

5,558

2,052

1,120

11,685

1,571

630

5,387

2,233

1,745

764

6,046

2,504

1,869

727

6,759

3,099

2,078

705

8,364

3,217

1,165

16,274

2,238

495

9,507

3,242

2,255

552

10,667

3,265

0 0 0 0 0 0

1,386

1,506

1,726 1,956

2,119 2,283

4,446

4,671

2,413

2,348

1,545

3,807

1,408

5.835

5,774

(Continued)

©1991 Dataquest Incoqjorated August—^Reproduction Prohibited

18 North American OEM Revenue by Application Market

Table 8 (Coiitlnued)

Total Electronic Equipment-Derived Revenue by Company, 1979 to 1990

(Millions of Dollars)

3M

TRW

Company

1979

914

1,798

Unisys

United Technologies

Varian Associates

0

0

Wang Laboratories

268

188

Westinghouse Electric

Xeroot

652

2,390

2enith Electronics

Source: Dataquest (August 1991)

1,050

1980

1,037

1,923

0

0

327

318

810

3,043

1,115

1981

1.089

2,204

0

0

358

501

971

3,410

1,188

1982

1,108

2,175

0

0

1983

1,159

2,534

0

369

677

1,577

3,289

1,135

0

403

898

1,619

3,695

1,217

1984

1.265

2,633

0

0

544

1985

1,229

3,472

0

0

590

1,271

1,692

4,282

1,457

1.363

1,657

4,318

1,467

1986

1,282

3,616

4,718

979

472

1.592

1,720

4,822

1,760

1987

1,316

4,247

6,024

1.072

531

1,683

1,807

5,702

2,135

1988

1,609

5,041

6,102

1,124

612

1,800

1,936

6,174

2,542

1989

1,687

5,250

6,116

1,220

752

1990

1.793

5,787

5.932

1.339

787

1,526

1.758

1,982

6,696

1.321

2.149

7,099

1,229

©1991 Dataquest Incorporated August—Reproduction Prohibited

Electronic Equipment Company Revenue 19

C o m p a n y

Allied-Signal

Amdahl

Apple Computer

AT&T*

Boeing

Chrysler

C o m p a q Computer

Control Data

Data General

Digital Equipment

Emerson Electric

E-Systems

Ford Motor

General Dynamics

General Electric

General Instrument

GM Hughes'*

GTE

Harris

Hewlett-Packard

H o n e y w e l l

IBM'

Intel

nr^

Kodak

Litton Industries

Lockheed

Loral

Martin Marrietta

McDonnell Douglas

Motorola

NCR

Pitney B o w e s

Raytheon

Rockwell International

Seagate Technology

Sun Microsystems

T a n d e m C o m p u t e r s

Tandy

Tektronix

Texas Instruments

Table 9

Total R e v e n u e b y C o m p a n y , 1 9 7 9 t o 1 9 9 0

( M l U i o n s o f D o l l a r s )

1 9 7 9

7,480

NA

NA

3,314

NA

4,100

NA

4,524

NA

5,937

1,505 2,159

48 117

335 583

19,208 20,861

23,567

25,064

NA

NA

0

2,249

507

1,804

NA

NA

0

2,772

654

2,368

NA

NA

0

3.120

737

3,198

NA

NA

0

3,301

806

3,881

983

27,190

33,187

34,496

34,213

NA

NA

111

3,408

829

4,272

1,516

NA

NA

329

3,693 l , l 6 l

5,584

1,918

13,745

21,256

504

3.680

1,239

6,686

1,902 2,661

33,768

4,071

35,210

5,284

5,558

16,444

15,505

22,586

26,277

16,962

35,473

20,276

27,595

34,922 30,620

625

3,347

1,268

7,590

1,224

3,367

1,274

9,389

2,066

3,628

1,365

11,475

36,112

37,285

2,876

2,935

1,314

12,742

3,599

1,691

1,216

12,943

NA

394

1 9 8 0

9,164

NA

3,410

442

1 9 8 1

10,511

NA

3,846

572

1 9 8 2

9,414

NA

3,807

754

1 9 8 3

8,159

NA

3,810

827

1 9 8 4

8,864

NA

4,587

819

NA

56,323

6,841 7,328

1 9 8 5

8,183

862

1 9 8 6

9,888

966

1 9 8 7

11,116

1 9 8 8

11,909

1,802

1 9 8 9

11,942

2,101

1 9 9 0

12,343

4,921

949

7,993

5,242

1.135

8,959

6,170

1,227

9,412

6,652

1,439

9,551

7,071

1,626

57,616

69.695 79,893

92,446 96,146

10,043

7,573

1,810

97,650

10,173

22,461

NA

24,959

NA

27,240

NA

26,500

NA

26,797

NA

27,947

NA

0

8,499

0 0 0 0

0

9,486 10,506 11,500 12,237

13,248

29,240

612

9,504

14,372

36,728 40,515

788

10,440

1,155

10,481

15,112 15,421

40,292 42,650

1,305

11,244

16,460

1,377

11,359

17,424

44,879

0

11,723

18,374

NA 976 1,121 1,301

1,467

1,671

1,967

1,907

1,797

1,798 2,214

3,053

2,361

4,270

3,099

4,870

3,528

5,261

22,863

26,213

29,070

661

855 789

4,189

4,710

6,044

6,505

7,102

8,090

9,831 11,899 13,233

5,387

4,241 3,888

4,209

34,364 40,180 45,937 50,718

4,475 5,590

52,160

55,256

5,857

59,681

6,059 6,309

62,710 69,018

900 1,122

1,629 1,365 1,265 1,907 2,875

3,127 3,922

21,996

8,028

3,066

3,532

201

23,819

9,734

3,294

4,445

238

23,197

10,337

3,978

5,176

282

21,921

20,249

10,815

10,170

19,553

13,781

10,600

10,631

4,124

3,959

6,154

4,606

7,881

4,591

5,613

310 418 502

9,223

664

16,214

18,131

11,550

13,305

4,521

9,942

676

4,420

11,078

1,136

19,306

17,304

4,864

10,433

1,187

20,005

18,398

5,023

9,891

1,274

20,604

18,908

5,156

9,958

2,127

1,908

5,332

2,700

3,003

NA

1,930

6,125

3,284

3,322

NA

2,680

7,454

3,570

3,433

NA

3,033

7,412

3,786

3,526

NA

3,228

8,424

4,328

3,731

NA

3,920

9,819

5,534

4,421

11,618

4,763

12,772

5,456 5,905

5,173

13,289

6,727

4,074

4,317

4,882 5,641

5,727

14,438

8,250

5,990

5,796 6,126

14,589 16,255

9,620

10,885

5,956

6,285

4,177

6,176

NA

0

NA

1,216

787

3,224

4,775

6,907

NA

0

NA

1,387

971

4,075

5,384

7,040

NA

0

NA

1,699

1,062

4,206

5,217

7,395

NA

0

NA

1,832

1,196

4,327

5,631

8,098

NA

9

NA

2,241

1,191

4,580

NA

1,787

5,996

6,409

9,322

11,338

344

215

39

NA

2,490

1,333

5,742

115

636

2,596

1,438

4,930

1,989

7,308

2,270

7,659

12,296

460

12,123

11,946

958

1,266

210

778

3,036

1,352

538

1,048

3,452

1,396

2,576

8,192

1,052

1,315

3,794

1,412

2,876

8,796

12,518

12,379

1,372

2,413

1,765

1,633

4,181

3,196

9,268

2,466

1,866

4,500

4,988 5,816 6,447

1.433 1,408

6,522

6,567

(Continued)

©1991 Dataquest Incorporated August—Reproduction Prohibited

20 North American OEM Revenue by Application Market

Table 9 (Continued)

Total Reveniie by Company, 1979 to 1990

(Millions of Dollars)

Company 1979 1980 1981 1982 1983 1984 1985 1986 1987 1988 1989 1990

3M*

TRW

Unisys

United Technologies

9

Varian Associates

Wang Laboratories

Westinghouse Electric

5,440

3,967

0

NA

400

321

7,443

6,080

4,336

0

NA

510

543

8,514

6,508

4,597

0

NA

598

856

9,368

6,601

4,452

0

NA

656

1,158

9,745

7,039

4,840

0

NA

691

1,535

7,947

5,369

0

NA

854

2,174

8,117 9,056 10,004 11,323 11,990 13,021

5,917 6,036 6,821 6,982 7,340 8,l69

0 7,431 9,732 9,935 10,097 10,111

NA 15,669 17,170 18,000 19.532 21,442

883 798 873 1,045 1,220 1,265

2,331 2,615 2,751 2,952 2,910 2,497

Xerox

Zenith Electronics

6,715

1,186

7,786

1,186

8,316

1,275

8,073

1,239

1

2

Total revenue restated back through 198S per 1989 annual report.

Total revenue restated back through 1987 per 1990 annual report.

Acquired by Forstmann Little & Co. in August 1990.

10,274

1,361

11,242

11,899 13,187 14,890 16,177 17,229 17.973

1,716 1,624 1,892 2,363 2,686 1,549 l,4l0

Total revenue restated back through 1987 per 1989 annual report.

Total revenue restated back throug}) 1960.

Total revenue restated back through 1964 per 1989 annual report.

8

Total revenue restated back through 1966.

9

Total revenue restated back through 1966 per 1989 annual report.

Toul revenue restated back through 1983.

10

Total revenue restated back through 196S per 1990 annual report.

NA - Not available

Source: Dataquest (August 1991)

©1991 Dataquest Incorporated August—Reproduction Prohibited

4 * ^ d

0

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5

Market Statistics:

Data Processing Equipment Worldwide

Semiconductor Application Markets Worldwide

Market Statistics:

Data Processing Equipment Worldwide

Source:

Dataquest

DataQuest Semiconductor Application Markets Worldwide

Published by Dataquest Incorporated

The content of this report represents our interpretation and analysis of information generally available to the public or released by knowledgeable individuals in the subject industry, but is not guaranteed as to accuracy or completeness. It does not contain material provided to us in confidence by our clients.

Printed in the United States of America. All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced, stored in retrieval systems, or transmitted, in any form or by any means—mechanical, electronic, photocopying, duplicating, microfilming, videotape, or otherwise—without the prior permission of the publisher.

© 1991 Dataquest Incorporated I

August 1991

Market Statistics: Data Processing

EquipmentWorldwide

Introduction

This document contains information on

Dataquest's view of selected woridwide data processing equipment markets.

The tables are organized as follows:

Table 1 Worldwide Computer Systems Forecast—Factory Revenue

Table 2 Worldwide Computer Systems Forecast—Unit Shipments

Table 3 Worldwide Computer Systems Forecast—Average Selling Price

Table 4 Worldwide PC Forecast by Bus Type—Unit Shipments

Table 5 Worldwide PC Forecast by Microprocessor Type—Unit Shipments

Table 6 Estimated PC and Woritstation DRAM Configurations—Weighted Average

Table 7 Worldwide Non-PC System Market Share—Estimated Unit Shipments

Table 8 Worldwide PC Unit Market Share—^Estimated Unit Shipments

Table 9 Worldwide Rigid Disk Drive Forecast by Width

Table 10 Worldwide Rigid Disk Drive Forecast by Capacity

Table 11 Worldwide Rigid Disk Drive Market Share—^Estimated Unit Shipments

Table 12 Worldwide Optical Disk Drive Forecast

Table 13 Woridwide Optical Disk Drive Market Share—^Estimated Unit Shipments

Table 14 Worldwide Flexible Disk Drive Forecast

Table 15 Worldwide Flexible Disk Drive Market Share—^Estimated Unit Shipments

Table l 6 Worldwide Tape Drive Forecast

Table 17 Worldwide Tape Drive Market Share—^Estimated Unit Shipments

Table 18 Worldwide Terminal and Monitor Forecast

Table 19 Worldwide Terminal and Monitor Market Share—^Estimated Unit Shipments

Table 20 Worldwide X Window Terminal Forecast

Table 21 Worldwide X Window Terminal Market Share—^Estimated Unit Shipments

Table 22 Woridwide Printer Forecast

Table 23 Woridwide Printer Market Share—Estimated Unit Shipments

Market Statistics: Data Processli^ Equipment—Worldwide

Table 1

Worldwide Computer Systems Forecast—Factory Revenue

(MiUiotis of Dollars)

Supercomputer

Mainframe

Midrange

•Workstation

PC Subtotal

Transpwnable

Laptop AC

Laptop DC

Notebook

1989

1,536.1

29,559.2

27,951.7

6,126.1

41,735.0

546.0

1,899.0

3,040.0

86.0

Pen-Based

Hand-Held

Desktop

2.0

21.0

35,528.0

Deskside 613.0

Total

106,908.1

Source: Dataquest (August l?pl)

1990

1,757.0

30,304.5

29,927.3

7,357.0

49,863.0

413.0

1,758.0

5,637.0

927.0

15.0

55.0

38,015.0

3,043.0

119,208.8

1991

1,940.0

29,350.0

30,600.0

9,200.0

54,993.0

725.0

2,084.0

6,936.0

1.373.0

183.0

226.0

37,546.0

5,920.0

126,083-0

1992

2,250.0

30,100.0

31,500.0

12,200.0

61,142.0

399.0

1,324.0

7,818.0

2,845.0

777.0

644.0

38,283.0

9,052.0

137,192.0

1993

2,465.0

29,700.0

32,500.0

15,700.0

67,175.0

224.0

553.0

8,463.0

5,306.0

3,812.0

1,226.0

36,711.0

10,880.0

147,540.0

1994

2,780.0

29,300.0

33,600.0

19,500.0

75,083.0

139.0

306.0

8,740.0

9,330.0

8,733.0

2,135.0

33,860.0

11,840.0

160,263-0

1995

3,100.0

28,700.0

34,700.0

23,200.0

83,690.0

94.0

182.0

8,872.0

13,169.0

13,131.0

3,443.0

32,610.0

12,189.0

173,390.0

CAGR (%)

1991-1995

12.4

-0.6

3.2

26.0

11.1

-40.0

-45.6

6.3

76.0

191.0

97.6

-3.5

19.8

8,3

Table 2

Worldwide Computer Systetns Forecast—Unit Shipments

Supercomputer

Mainframe

Midrange

Workstation

PC Subtotal

Transp)ortable

Laptop AC laptop DC

Notebook

Pen-Based

Hand-Held

Desktop

1989

826

14,324

905,149

292,167

21,846,000

133,000

416,000

1,883,000

32,000

1,000

82,000

19,036,000

Deskside 263,000

Total 23,058,466

Source: Dataquest (August 1991)

1990

815

15,117

1,025,235

386,157

23,994,000

101,000

349,000

2,587,000

408,000

10,000

217,000

19,735,000

587,000

25,421,324

1991

939

14,700

1,066,900

550,000

26,296,000

173,000

311,000

3,172,000

686,000

96,000

503,000

20,254,000

1,101,000

27,928,539

1992

1,113

14,700

1,112,300

836,000

29,278,000

94,000

199,000

3,592,000

1,441,000

353,000

1,559,000

20,377,000

1,663,000

31,242,113

X993

1,267

14,210

1,160,800

1,191,000

33,699,000

53,000

88.000

3,998.000

2,760.000

1,590,000

3,087,000

20,144,000

1,979,000

36.066.277

1994

1,472

14,100

1,210,400

1,647,400

39,493,000

33,000

50,000

4,370,000

4,934,000

3,498,000

5,588,000

18.824,000

2.196,000

42,366,372

1995

1,680

CAGR (0/0)

1991-1995

15.7

13,900 -1.4

1,264,000

2,200,000

46,604,000

23,000

4.3

41.4

15.4

-39.6

-42.9

10.6

33,000

4,744,000

7,180,000

5,422,000

9,365,000

17,531,000

2,306,000

50,083,580

79.9

174.1

107.7

-3.5

20.3

15.7

©1991 Dataquest Incoipoiated August—Reproduction Prohibited

Market Statistics: Data Procession Equipment—Worldwide

Table 3

Worldwide Computer Systems Forecast—Average Selling Price

(Thousands of Dollars)

Supercomputer

Mainfirame

Midrange

•Workstation

PCs

Transportable

Laptop AC

1989

1,860.0

2,064.0

31.0

21.0

4.1

4.6

1.6 laptop DC

Notebook

Pen-Based

2.7

1.5

Hand-Held

Desktop

0.3

1.9

Deskside

Source: Dataquest (August 1991)

2.3

1990

2,156.0

2,005.0

29.0

19.0

4.1

5.0

2.2

2.3

1.5

0.3

1.9

5.2

1991

2,066.0

1,997.0

29.0

17.0

4.2

6.7

2.2

2.0

1.9

0.5

1.9

5.4

1992

2,022.0

2,048.0

28.0

15.0

4.3

6.7

2.2

2.0

2.2

0.4

1.9

5.4

1993

1,946.0

2,090.0

28.0

13.0

4.2

6.3

2.1

1.9

2.4

0.4

1.8

5.5

1994

1,889.0

2,078.0

28.0

12.0

4.2

6.1

2.0

1.9

2.5

0.4

1.8

5.4

1995

1,845.0

2,065.0

28.0

11.0

CAGR C%)

1991-1995

-2.8

0.8

-1.1

-11.0

4.1

5.5

1.9

1.8

2.4

0.4

1.9

5.3

-0.3

-5.0

-3.9

-2.2

6.2

-4.8

0.1

-0.4

Table 4

Worldwide PC Forecast by Bus Type

(Thousands of Unit Shipments)

PC XT

AT

MCA (16 Bit)

MCA (32 Bit)

EISA

1989

3,638

10,570

1,221

603

4

Others

5,809

Total

21,845

Source: Dauquest (August 1991)

1990

2,549

11,332

1,450

889

272

7,511

24,005

1991

1,625

11,893

1,328

1,835

770

8,846

26,297

1992

273

12,996

1,211

2,696

1,140

10,961

29,277

1993

0

11,386

945

3,827

1.903

15,637

33,698

1994

0

8,037

760

5,033

2,741

22,924

39,495

1995

0

4,586

463

6,441

3,480

31,634

46,604

CAGR (%)

1991-1995

-100.0

-21.2

-23.2

36.9

45.8

37.5

15.4

©1991 Dataquest Incoipoiated August—Beptoduction Prohibited

MkilKt statistics: Data Processing Eqidpoteat—Worldwide

Table 5

Worldwide PC Forecast by Microprocessor Type—Unit Shipments

8088/8086

19S9

4,539

1990

3,998

80286

80386SX

80386SL

80386DX

80486SX

80486DX

80586

68XXX

7,950

1,897

0

2,551

0

5

0

2,068

7,433

4,589

0

3,552

0

328

0

2,861

Others

2,835

1,232

Total

21,845

NM - Not meiRioglijl

Source: Source: Dataquest (August 1991)

23,993

1991

3,180

5,473

6,763

463

4,890

300

922

0

3,295

1,010

26,296

1992

1,555

3,466

8,009

2,124

5,974

2,447

1,638

5

3,623

438

29,279

1993

1,266

3,051

6,666

3,856

5,009

6,372

2,856

223

4,227

174

33,700

1994

1,844

4,107

5,704

6,142

4,198

8,721

3,299

613

4,759

107

39,494

10,758

3,382

1,141

5,266

59

46,604

1995

1,967

7,093

3,721

7,605

5,612

CAGR (%)

1991-1995

-11.3

6.7

-13.9

101.3

3.5

144.7

38.4

NM

12.4

-50.8

15.4

Table 6

Estimated PC and Workstation DRAM Configurations—Weighted Average

(Megabytes p e r System)

1990

PCs

1.0

1.3

2.0

Source; Dataquest {August 1991)

80286

80386SX

80386SL

80386DX

80486SX

80486DX

80586

68XXX

Others

Workstations

2.0

4.0

1.8

0.8

12.0

1995

27.5

31.6

48.0

12.0

4.0

134.0

4.0

8.0

12.0

12.0

12.0

i

©1991 Dataquest Incorporated August—Reproduction Prohibited

MarlEct Statistics: I>ata Processing Eqnipiinent—'Wbrldiridc

Table 7

Worldwide Non-PC Computer System Market Share

Estimated Unit Shipments

Market Share (%)

1989 1990

Supercomputer Vendors

Convex Computer

AUiant Computer

Intel

AMT

Cray Research

FPS Computing

Digital Equipment

IBM

MasPar Computer

Thinking Machines

Others

Total

Mainframe Vendors

IBM

Hitachi

Fujitsu

NEC

Unisys

Siemens Nixdorf

ICL

Groupe Bull

Mitsubishi

The Ultimate Group

Others

Total

20.7

15.9

9.7

8.5

8.9

8.4

0.0

3.4

0.0

1.9

22.7

100.0

26.5

12.0

15.9

12.8

9.7

0.0

4.7

0.0

2.7

1.6

14.1

100.0

25.4

12.3

9.8

9.2

7.8

6.4

5.2

4.3

3.7

2.7

13.4

100.0

30.1

14.7

13.1

13.1

6.6

4.7

4.6

4.0

2.5

1.6

5.2

100.0

(Continued)

©1991 Dataquest Incorporated August—Kepioduction Prohibited

Market Statistics: Data Processing EquljMnent—Worldwide

Table 7 (Continued)

Worldwide Non-PC Computer System Market Share

Estimated Unit Shipments

Midrange Vendors

Unisys

IBJM

NEC

Fujitsu

AT&T

Digital Equipment

Groupe Bull

NCR

Hitachi

Siemens Nixdorf

Others

Total

Workstation Vendors

Sun Microsystems

Digital Equipment

Hewlett-Packard

Intergraph

IBM

Sony

Silicon Graphics

Xerox

NEC

Omron

Others

Total

Source: Dataquest (August 19?1)

1989

Market Share (<>/o)

1990

20.7

13.7

8.5

6.4

4.9

5.4

0.0

4.2

2.5

0

33.8

100.0

3.1

2.4

2.4

27.8

100.0

23.1

12.0

7.1

6.9

6.3

4.8

4.1

32.9

20.6

18.5

5.5

2.6

3.6

2.3

2.3

1.1

1.0

9.7

100.0

3.1

2.6

2.1

1.4

1.1

8.5

100.0

37.5

17.6

16.7

5.2

4.2

©1991 Dataquest Incorporated August—Reproduction Prohibited

Market Statistics: Data Processii^ Equipment-Worldwide

Table 8

Worldwide PC Unit Market Share

Estimated Unit Shipments

Market Share (%)

1989 1990

All PC Vendors

IBM

Apple

Commodore

NEC

Compaq

Toshiba

Atari

Tandy

Epson

Packard Bell

Olivetti

2DS-Groupe Bull

Amstrad

Hewlett-Packard

Samsung

Hyundai

Tandon

Philips

MiTAC

Acer

Others

Total

Desktop PC Vendors

IBM

Apple

Commodore

NEC

Comp>aq

Tandy

Packard Bell

Atari

Epson

Olivetti

Others

Total

11.8

7.4

7.1

5.4

3.1

2.8

4.2

2.7

2.6

2.1

2.5

NA

2.6

1.2

0.2

0.6

1.1

0.8

0.6

0.9

40.8

100.0

16.2

11.0

12.1

6.7

3.5

3.8

3.0

5.8

3.6

3.7

30.9

100.0

12.4

7.5

7.1

5.6

3.9

3.7

3.1

2.6

2.5

2.4

1.9

1.8

1.3

1.2

1.2

1.1

0.9

0.8

0.8

0.7

38.1

100.0

17.8

11.7

11.3

6.6

4.5

3.6

3.6

3.6

3.0

2.9

31.3

100.0

(Continued)

©1991 Dataquest Incoipoiated August—Seproduction Prohibited

Market Statistics: Data Processing Equipment—Woridwide

Table 8 (Coiitinued)

Worldwide PC Unit Market Share

Estimated Unit Shipments

Market Share (%)

1989 1990

Laptop DC/Pen-Based Computer Vendors

Toshiba

NEC

ZDS-Groupe Bull

Epson

Tandy

Compaq

Apple

GRID

Packard Bell

Samsung

Others

Total

Notebook/Hand-Held Computer Vendors

Atari

Compaq

Sharp

Toshiba

Epson

Texas Instruments

Samsung

CompuAdd

NEC

Mitsubishi

Others

Total

NA - Not available

Source: Dauquest (August 1991)

31.3

18.5

16.2

3.5

2.6

8.5

1.4

5.9

1.5

0

10.6

100.0

76.1

23.9

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

100.0

36.1

17.8

9.4

5.7

5.1

3.8

2.4

2.3

2.0

1.4

14.1

100.0

33.9

32.5

11.8

7.0

5.8

2.8

1.3

0.9

0.9

0.7

2.5

100.0

©1991 Dataquest Incorporated August—Reproduction Prohibited

Maricet Statistics: Data Processing Equipment—Worldwide

Table 9

Worldwide Rigid Disk Drive Forecast by Width

2.5 Inch

3.5 Inch

5.25 Inch

8-10 Inch

14 Inch

Total

Thousands of Units

CA.GR (%)

1989 1990 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1991-1995

25 714 2,888 6,192 9,960 12,968 12,836

45.2

11,267

21,742

23,727

29,262 31,516 35,304

34,955

10.2

7,768

404

263

19,727

6,877

377

237

29,947

6,750

417

167

33,948

4,684

318

134

40,591

3,734

282

95

45,587

4,384

127

44

52,828

6,396

85

33

54,305

-1.3

-32.8

-33.3

12.5

2.5 Inch

3.5 Inch

5.25 Inch

8-10 Inch

14 Inch

280

279

473

5.448

18,092

263

258

474

7,580

21,934

Average Selling Price (Dollars)

247

260

535

9,485

24,523

244

275

777

9,705

23,643

280

297

926

9,455

23,184

284

338

866

8,230

20,892

231

339

915

6,794

19,697

2.5 Inch

3.5 Inch

7

5.25 Inch

8-10 Inch

14 Inch

3,139

3,670

2,201

4,762

Total

13,779

Source: Source: Dataquest (August 1991)

187

5,612

3,262

2,855

5,207

17,123

Factory R e v e n u e (Millions of Dollars)

714

6,162

3,613

3,951

4,098

18,537

1,513

8,047

3,641

3,085

3,178

19,464

2,786

9,373

3,457

2,664

2,198

20,478

3,678

11,915

3,798

1,045

928

21,363

2,970

11,864

5.851

577

650

21,913

-1.6

6.9

14.3

-8.0

-5.3

42.8

17.8

12.8

-38.2

-36.9

4.3

©1991 Dataquest tocorporated August—Reproduction Prohibited

to

Market Statistics: Data Processing Equipment—Worldwide

Table 10

Worldwide R ^ d Disk Drive Forecast by Capacity

(Thousands of Units)

2.5 Inch

0-30MB

31-60MB

61-lOOMB

101-200MB

201-500MB

501-1,OOOMB

Total

3.5 Inch

0-30MB

31-60MB

61-lOOMB

101-200MB

201-500MB

501-1,000MB

1-2GB

2+GB

Total

5.25 Inch

0-30MB

31-60MB

61-lOOMB

101-200MB

201-500MB

501-1000MB

1-2GB

2+GB

Total

NM - Not meaningful

Source: Dataquest (August 1991)

1,250.0

2,030.0

1,122.0

820.0

955.0

636.0

64.4

0

6,877.4

4,452.0

12,850.0

1,980.0

1,758.0

702.0

0

0

0

21,742.0

1990

613.6

100.0

0

0

0

0

713.6

0

0

36.0

100.0

120.0

640.0

3,600.0

1,900.0

6,396.0

1.0

4.0

60.0

11,000.0

12,000.0

5,700.0

6,000.0

190.0

34,955.0

1995

96.0

960.0

2,800.0

2,000.0

6,500.0

480.0

12,836.0

-100.0

-100.0

-49.7

-34.3

-34.0

0.1

123.6

NM

-1.4

-81.4

-80.1

-50.3

44.3

76.4

NM

NM

NM

10.0

CAGR (%)

1990-1995

-31.0

57.2

NM

NM

NM

NM

78.2

©1991 Dataquest Incorporated August—Reproduction Proliibited

Market Statistics: Data Processing Equipment—Worldwide 11

Table 11

Worldwide Rigid Disk Drive Market Share—1990

Estimated Unit Shipments

2.5 Inch

Vendor Market Share (%)

Conner 58.9

Prairie Tek 18.0

JVC 16.8

Others 6.3

Total 100.0

3.5 Inch

Conner 20.7

Seagate 15.7

Quantum 11.5

IBM 10.9

Western Digital 10.5

NEC 8.3

Maxtor 6.2

Others l6.3

Total 100.0

5.25 Inch

Seagate 56.6

Micropolis 7.0

Maxtor 5.4

NEC 3.5

Syquest 2.5

IBM 2.5

Micxoscience 1.9

Hewlett-Packard 1.7

Others 19.0

Total 100.0

Source: I>ataquest CAugust 1991)

©1991 Dataquest Incorporated August—^Reproduction Prohibited

12 Market Statistics: Data Processing Equlpmeat—Worldwide

Table 12

Worldwide Optical Disk Drive Forecast

(Thousands of Units)

All Veisjons

Units

CD-ROM

Units

ASP C$)

Faaory Revenue ($M)

5.25-Inch WORM

Units

ASP ($)

Faaory Revenue ($M)

5.25-Inch Rewritable

Units

ASP ($)

Factory Revenue ($M)

Source: Dataquest (August 1991)

1990

359

240

207

50

31

1,200

37

77

2,000

154

1991

584

360

145

52

U

960

42

154

1,600

246

1992

980

576

102

59

62

768

48

277

1,280

355

1993

1,667

979

80

78

87

614

53

444

1,024

455

1994

2,776

1,763

68

119

122

492

60

620

819

508

1995

CAGR (%)

1991-1995

4,587

67.4

3,173

61

194

158

418

66

866

655

567

72.3

-19.5

39.0

37.7

-18.8

12.0

54.0

-20.0

23.2

©1991 Dataquest Incorporated August—Reproduction Prohibited

Market Statistics: Data Processing Equipment—'Wtorldwide

Table 13

Worldwide Optical Disk Drive Market Share

-1990

Estimated Unit Shipments

CD-ROM

Vendor

Sony

Hitachi

LMSI

Toshiba

Pioneer

NEC

Others

Total

Market Share (%)

46

18

15

9

5

4

3

100

5.25-Inch WORM

Ricoh

Panasonic

Pioneer

ISi

Others

Total

55

17

12

6

8"

100

5.25-Inch Rewritable

Sony

Ricoh

Canon

Maxoptix

Others

Total

Source: DaUquest CAugust 1991)

49

26

9

9

7

100

13

Table 14

Worldwide Fleadble Disk Drive Forecast

Units (Millions)

ASP C$)

Factory Revenue ($M)

Source: Dataquest CAugust 1991)

1989

30.2

56

1,699

1990

35.9

47

1,671

1991

39.1

46

1,791

1992

42.6

45

1,905

1993

46.1

47.3

2,177.1

1994

49.3

49.4

2,432.8

1995

52.2

48.6

2,540.3

CAGR (%)

1991-1995

7.5

1.5

9.1

©1991 Dataquest Incorporated August—Reproduction Prohibited

14

Market Statistics: Data Processii]^ Equipment—Worldwide

Table 15

Worldwide Flexible Disk Drive Market Share—1990

Estifliated Unit Shipments

Company

Teac

Chinon

Panasonic

Sony

Mitsubishi

Y-E Data

Mitsumi

Citizen

Odiers

Total

Souice: Dataquest CAugua 199i)

Market Share (%)

25.7

17.6

17.4

13.6

6.1

6.9

4.1

2.7

6.0

100.0

Table 16

Worldwide Tape Drive Forecast

Units (Thousands)

ASP ($)

Faaory Revenue ($M)

Source: Dataquest (August 1991)

1989

1,545

1,367

2,112

1990

1,611

1,236

1,991

1991

1,934

1,136

2,197

1992

2,206

1,034

2,281

1993

2,495

909.3

2,268.3

1994

2,758

803.2

2,214.8

1995

2,955

750.1

2,216.6

CAGR (%)

1991-1995

11.2

-9.9

0.2

Table 17

Worldwide Tape Drive Market Share—^1990

Estimated Unit Shipments

Company

Archive/lrwin

Wangtek

Colorado Memory

Tandberg

Mountain

Exabyte

Digital Equipment

IBM

StorageTek

Hewlett-Packard

Others

Total

Source Xkatsquest CAugust 1<)91)

Market Share (%)

30.6

15.7

13.0

8.7

6.5

6.2

3.8

1.9

1.8

1.6

10.2

100.0

©1991 Dataquest Incorporated August—Repnxluction Prohibited

Market Statistics: Data Processbig Equipment—Wbridwlde 15

Table IS

Worldwide Display Terminal and Monitor Forecast

(Thousands of Units)

CAGR (%)

1990 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1991-1995

Display Terminals 6,363 6,525 6,663 6,870 7,124 7,403 3 2

Monitors 24,764 27,423 23,544 23,626 26,186 31,l63 3-2

Source: Dataquest (August 1991)

Table 19

Worldwide Display Terminal and Monitor Market Share—^1990

Estimated Unit Shipments

Display Terminal

Company Market Share (%)

IBM 22.6

Wyse 11.3

DEC 8.0

Memorex Telex 5.3

Siemens 3-0

Others 49.8

Total 100.0

Source: Dataquest CAugua 1991)

Monitor

IBM 11.3

NEC 6.7

Commodore 5.7

Olivetti 2.9

Epson 2.6

Compaq 2,6

Amstrad 2.5

Atari 2,2

Packard Bell 2.1

Tandy 2.1

Others 59.3

Total 100.0

Table 20

Worldwide X Window Terminal Forecast

Units (Thousands)

ASP ($)

Factory Revenue ($M)

Source: Dataquest (August 1991)

1990

69

2,608

180

1991

156

2,288

356

1992

301

1,945

584

1993

506

1,653

836

1994

673

1,405

945

1995

861

1,194

1,028

CAGR (%)

1991-1995

53.4

-15.0

30.3

©1991 Dataquest Incorporated August—^Reproduction Prohibited

16 Maricet Stadsllcs: Data Procesrii^ Equlpmepf—\FtwrMwtde

Table 21

Worldwide X Window Terminal Market Share—^1990

Estimated Unit Shipments

Company Market Share (%)

NCD 33.3

DEC 16.5

HP 10.3

IBM 7.6

GraphOn 7.4

Tektronix 5.5

Visual Technology 3.6

HDS 2.6

Sun River 2.2

JCC 2.2

Others 8.8

Total 100.0

Source: Dataquest CAugusi 1990

Table 22

Worldwide Printer Forecast (Preliminary)

(Thousands of Units)

CAGR (%)

1990 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1991-19»5

All Vereions 19,395 20,911 22,041 23,086 24,212 25,271 4.8

Serial line

15,233

197

Page

Source: Dauquest (August 1991)

3,965

15,685

216

5,010

15,552

234

6,255

15,419

247

7,420

15,422

255

8,535

15,430

261

9.580

-0.4

4.8

17.6

Table 23

Worldwide Page Printer Market Share—^1990

Unit Shipments

Company Market Share j^)

Hewlett-Packard 49.9

.A^ple 7.4

IBM 7.1

Canon 5.4

Others 30.2

Total 100.0

Note: This table includes both Nonh American and European maikecs.

Source: Dataquest CAugust 1991)

©1991 Dataquest Incorporated August—Reproduction Prohibited.

Dataquest

F

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0011211

Dataquest

Worldwide and North American

Semiconductor Consumption by Application Markets

Source:

Dataquest

DataQuest Semiconductor Application Markets Worldwide

(

i

Published by Dataquest Incorporated

The content of this report represents our interpretation and analysis of information generally available to the public or released by knowledgeable individuals in the subjea industry, but is not guaranteed as to accuracy or completeness. It does not contain material provided to us in confidence by our clients.

Printed in the United States of America. All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced, stored in retrieval systems, or transmitted, in any form or by any means—mechanical, electronic, photocopying, duplicating, microfilming, videotape, or otherwise—without the prior permission of the publisher.

© 1991 Dataquest Incorporated

August 1991

i

>

( \^orldwide and North American

Semiconductor Consumption by

Application Market Forecast

Introduction and Definitions ^°^ particular semiconductor categories such as MOS Memory, what is the usage across

The tables in this booklet present data to the various equipment types? answer the following questions:

The key term that should be defined is the

• What general electronic equipment areas are input/output (I/O) ratio. In the context in driving semiconductor demand' which it is used, it describes the percentage of semiconductor content (based on value)

• What is the semiconductor value composi- per dollar of electronic equipment. tion of various categories of electronic equipment'

Worldwide and North Ameiican Semiconductor Consumption by Application Market Forecast

List o f Tables

Table

Title

Page

Table la Worldwide Semiconductor Consumption Forecast—^Factory Revenue in Millions of Dollars 5

Table l b Worldwide Semiconduaor Consumption Forecast—^Percentage of Total Equipment 6

Table Ic Worldwide Semiconduaor Consumption Forecast—^Percentage of Application Market 7

Table 2a Regional Semiconduaor Consumption Forecast—Faaory Revenue in Millions of Dollars 8

Table 2b Regional Semiconduaor Consumption Forecast—Percentage of Worldwide Total 10

Table 2c Regional Semiconduaor Consumption Forecast—^Percentage of Regional Total 12

Table 3a North American Semiconduaor Consumption Forecast—Faaory Revenue in Millions of Dollars 14

Table 3b North American Semiconduaor Consumption Forecast—^Percentage of Total Equipment 15

Table 3c North American Semiconduaor Consumption Forecast—^Percentage of Application Market l 6

Table 4a Worldwide Semiconduaor Consumption Forecast—^Data Processing 17

Table 4b Input/Output Ratios—^Data Processing 18

Table 5a Worldwide Semiconduaor Consumption Forecast—Computers 19

Table 5b Input/Output Ratios—Computers 20

Table 6a Worldwide Semiconduaor Consumption Forecast—Data Storage 21

Table 6b Input/Output Ratios—Data Storage 22

Table 7a Worldwide Semiconduaor Consumption Forecast—Terminals 23

Table 7b Input/Output Ratios—Terminals 24

Table 8a Worldwide Semiconduaor Consumption Forecast—Input/Output 25

Table 8b Input/Output Ratios—Input/Output 26

Table % Worldwide Semiconduaor Consun^tion Forecast—Dedicated Systems 27

Table 9b Input/Output Ratios—^Dedicated Systems 28

Table 10a Worldwide Semiconduaor Consumption Forecast—Communications 29

Table 10b Input/Output Ratios—Communications 30

Table 11a Worldwide Semiconduaor Consumption Forecast—Premise Telecom 31

Table l i b Input/Output Ratios—^Premise Telecom 32

Table 12a Worldwide Semiconduaor Consumption Forecast—Public Telecom 33

Table 12b Input/Output Ratios—Public Telecom 34

Table 13a Worldwide Semiconduaor Consumption Forecast—Mobile Communications 35

Table 13b Input/Output Ratios—Mobile Communications 36

Table I4a Worldwide Semiconduaor Coiisumption Forecast—^Broadcast & Studio 37

Table I4b Input/Output Ratios—^Broadcast & Studio 38

Table 15a Worldwide Semiconduaor Consumption Forecast—Other Communications 39

Table 15b Input/Output Ratios—Other Communications 40

Table l6a Worldwide Semiconduaor Consunption Forecast—^Industrial 41

Table l6b Input/Output Ratios—^Industrial 42

Table 17a Worldwide Semiconduaor Consumption Forecast—Security & Energy Management 43

Table 17b Input/Output Ratios—^Security & Energy Management 44

Table 18a Worldwide Semiconduaor Consumption Forecast—Manufacturing Systems 45

Table 18b Input/Output Ratios—Manufecturing Systems 46'

Table 19a Worldwide Semiconduaor Consumption Forecast—^Instrumentation 47

Table 19b Input/Output Ratios—^Instrumentation 48

Table 20a Worldwide Semiconduaor Consumption Forecast—Medical Equipment 49

Table 20b Input/Output Ratios—Medical Equipment 50_

©1991 Dataquest Incoiporated August—Reprcxluction Prohibited

Worldwide and North American Semiconductor Consumption by Application Market Forecast

List of Tables (Continued)

Table 21a Worldwide Semiconductor Consumption Forecast—Other Industrial

Table 21b Input/Output Ratios—Other Industrial

Table 22a Worldwide Semiconductor Consumption Forecast—Consumer

Table 22b Input/Output Ratios—Consumer

Table 23a Worldwide Semiconductor Consumption Forecast—Audio

Table 23b Input/Output Ratios—Audio

Table 24a Worldwide Semiconductor Consumption Forecast—Video

Table 24b Input/Output Ratios—Video

Table 25a Worldwide Semicondurtor Consumption Forecast—Personal Electronics

Table 25b Input/Output Ratios—Personal Electronics

Table 26a Worldwide Semiconductor Consumption Forecast—Appliances

Table 26b Input/Output Ratios—^Appliances

Table 27a Worldwide Semiconduaor Consumption Forecast—Other Consumer

Table 27b Input/Output Ratios—Other Consumer

Table 28a Worldwide Semiconduaor Consumption Forecast—Military/Aerospace

Table 28b Input/Output Ratios—Military/Aerospace

Table 29a Worldwide Semiconduaor Consumption Forecast—Transportation

Table 29b Input/Output Ratios—Transportation

Table 30a North American Semiconduaor Consumption Forecast—Data Processing

Table 30b Input/Output Ratios—^Data Processing

Table 31a North American Semiconduaor Consumption Forecast—Computers

Table 31b Input/Output Ratios—Computers

Table 32a North American Semiconduaor Consumption Forecast—Data Storage

Table 32b Input/Output Ratios—Data Storage

Table 33a North American Semiconduaor Consumption Forecast—Terminals

Table 33b Input/Output Ratios—^Terminals

Table 34a North American Semiconduaor Consumption Forecast—^Input/Output

Table 34b Input/Output Ratios—Input/Output

Table 35a North American Setniconduaor Consumption Forecast—Dedicated

Table 35b

Input/Output Ratios—^Dedicated

Table 36a

North American Semiconduaor Consumption Forecast—Communications

Table 36b

Input/Output Ratios—Communications

Table 37a

North American Semiconduaor Consumption Forecast—Premise Telecom

Table 37b Input/Output Ratios—^Premise Telecom

Table 38a North American Semiconduaor Consumption Forecast—Public Telecom

Table 38b

Input/Output Ratios—^Public Telecom

Table 39a

North American Semiconduaor Consumption Forecast—Mobile Communications

Table 39b

Input/Output Ratios—Mobile Communications

Table 40a

North American Semiconduaor Consumption Forecast—^Broadcast & Smdio

Table 40b Input/Output Ratios—^Broadcast & Studio

Table 4la North American Semiconduaor Consumption Forecast—Other Communications

Table 4lb Input/Output Ratios—Other Communications

Table 42a North American Semiconduaor Consumption Forecast—^Industrial

86

87

88

89

82

83

84

85

90

91

92

93

78

79

80

81

74

75

76

77

65

66

67

68

61

62

63

64

69

70

71

72

73

57

58

59

60

51

52

53

54

55

56

3

®1991 Dataquest Incorporated August—^Re{»txluction Prohibited

4 Worldwide and North American Semiconductor Consumption by Application Market Forecast

List of Tables (Continued)

Table 42b Input/Output Ratios—Industrial

Table 43a North American Semiconductor Consumption Forecast—Security & Energy Management

Table 43b Input/Output Ratios—Security & Energy Management

Table 44a North American Semiconduaor Consumption Forecast—Manufacturing Systems

Table 44b Input/Output Ratios—Manufacturing Systems

Table 45a North American Semiconductor Consumption Forecast—Instrumentation

Table 45b Input/Output Ratios—^Instrumentation

Table 46a North American Semiconductor Consumption Forecast—Medical Equipment

Table 46b Input/Output Ratios—Medical Equipment

Table 47a North American Semiconductor Consumption Forecast—Other Industrial

Table 47b Input/Output Ratios—Other Industrial

Table 48a North American Semiconductor Consumption Forecast—Consumer

Table 48b Input/Output Ratios—Consumer

Table 49a North American Semiconductor Consumption Forecast—Audio

Table 49b Input/Output Ratios—Audio

Table 50a North American Semiconduaor Consumption Forecast—Video

Table 50b Input/Output Ratios—Video

Table 51a North American Semiconduaor Consumption Forecast—^Personal Electronics

Table 51b Input/Output Ratios—^Personal Electronics

Table 52a North American Semiconduaor Consumption Forecast—Appliances

Table 52b Input/Output Ratios—^Appliances

Table 53a North American Semiconduaor Consumption Forecast—Other Consumer

Table 53b Input/Output Ratios—Other Consumer

Table 54a North American Semiconduaor Consumption Forecast—Military/Aerospace

Table 54b Input/Output Ratios—Military/Aerospace

Table 55a North American Semiconduaor Consumption Forecast—Transportation

Table 55b Input/Output Ratios—^Transportation

107

108

109

110

111

112

113

114

115

116

117

118

119

120

98

99

100

101

102

103

104

105

106

94

95

96

97

©1991 Dataquest Incorporated August—Reproduction Prohibited

Worldwide and North American Semiconductor Consumption by Application Market Forecast

Table l a

Semiconductor Consumption Forecast

(Factory Revenue in Millions of I>ollars)

Company:

Produa:

Region of Production:

Distribution Channel:

Application:

Specification:

All

Each

Worldwide

Not Meaningful

All

All

1988 1989

1990

1991

1992

1993

1994

Data Processing

Computers

Data Storage

Terminals

Input/Output

Dedicated

Total

Communications

Premise Telecom

Public Telecom

Mobile Communications

Broadcast & Studio

Other Communications

Total

Industrial

Security & Energy

Management

Manufacturing

13,418

3,995

2,337

2,133

1,621

23,504

3,508

1,550

1,058

188

545

6,849

251

16,323

4,229

2,506

2,687

1,772

27,517

4,028

1,702

1,116

206

587

7,638

256

16,151

4,362

2,083

2,671

1,723

26,991

4,212

1,695

1,138

203

601

7,848

272

18,037

4,820

2,410

3,302

1,986

30,555

21,064

5,080

2,814

4,105

2,335

35,397

4,967

1,977

1,330

239

701

9,213

331

6,113

2,388

1,563

285

846

408

23,525

5,494

3,197

5,099

2,712

40,027

3,010

44,126

7,595

2,949

1,921

337

1,056

11,195

13,857

517

25,328

6,040

3,547

6,201

8,554

3,230

2,167

368

1,083

15,402

571

Systems/Instruments

Medical Equipment

Other Industrial

Total

2,880

762

935

4,828

3,161

815

1,023

5,255

3,429

852

1,097

5,649

4,160

1,008

1,330

6,829

Consumer

Audio

Video

Personal Electronics

Appliances

Other Consumer

1,503

4,151

1,112

3,112

642

1,565

4,481

1,222

3,425

683

1,722

4,653

1,375

3,616

732

1,956

5,165

1,614

4,220

829

Total 10,520 11,375

12,098

13,785

Military/Aerospace

Transportation

2,769

2,389

2,859

2,570

2,846

2,794

2,863

2,979

Total Equipment

50,859 57,213 58,225 66,223

Note: Some columns do not add to touls shown because of rounding.

Source; DaUquest CAugust 1990

4,909

1,193

1,501

8,010

2,229

5,918

1,900

5,026

976

16,049

3,077

3,460

77,189

6,004

1,473

1,824

9,818

6,537

1,669

2,036

10,813

2,614

6,810

2,257

5,997

1,168

2,894

7,516

2,5l6

6,665

1,322

18,846

3,291

3,963

89,803

20,913

3,515

4,456

99,225

1995

27,088

6,470

3,763

7,137

3,187

47,645

8,928

3,320

2,235

379

1,077

15,938

597

6,587

1,736

2,100

11,020

3,087

7,914

2,743

7,164

1,438

22,344

3,768

4,817

105,531

1990-1991

Growth 1990-1995

Rate (%) CAGR (%)

11.7

10.5

15.7

23.6

15.3

13.2

17.9

16.6

16.9

17.7

16.6

17.4

21.7

21.3

18.3

21.2

20.9

13.6

11.0

17.4

16.7

13.3

13.9

0.6

6.6

13.7

10.9

8.2

12.6

21.7

13.1

12.0

16.2

14.4

14.5

13.3

12.4

15.2

17.0

13.9

15.3

13.9

14.3

12.4

11.2

14.8

14.7

14.5

13.1

5.8

11.5

12.6

©1991 Dataquest Incoqxirated August—Reproduction Prohibited

6 Worldwide and North American Semiconductor Consumption by Application Market Forecast

Table l b

Semiconductor Consumption Forecast

(Percentile of Total Equipment)

Company:

Produa:

Region of Production:

Distribution Channel:

Application:

Specification:

Data Processing

Computers

Data Storage

Terminals

Input/Output

Dedicated

Total

Communications

Premise Telecom

Public Telecom

Mobile Communications

Broadcast & Studio

Other Communications

Total

Industrial

Security & Energy

Management

Manufacturing

Systems/Instruments

Medical Equipment

Other Industrial

Total

Consumer

Audio

Video

Personal Electronics

Appliances

Other Consumer

Total

Military/Aerospace

Transportation

Total Equipment

Source: E>ataquest (August 1991)

All

Each

Woridwide

Not Meaningful

All

All

1988

1989

26.4

7.9

4.6

4.2

3.2

46.2

6.9

3.0

2.1

A

1.1

13.5

.5

5.7

1.5

1.8

9.5

3.0

8.2

2.2

6.1

1.3

20.7

5.4

4.7

100.0

19.9

5.0

4.5

100.0

2.7

7.8

2.1

6.0

1.2

7.0

3.0

2.0

.4

1.0

13.4

28.5

7.4

4.4

4.7

3.1

48.1

.4

5.5

1.4

1.8

9.2

1990

27.7

7.5

3.6

4.6

3.0

46.4

7.2

2.9

2.0

.3

1.0

13.5

.5

3.0

8.0

2.4

6.2

1.3

20.8

4.9

4.8

100.0

5.9

1.5

1.9

9.7

1991

27.2

7.3

3.6

5.0

3.0

46.1

7.5

3.0

2.0

.4

1.1

13.9

.5

6.3

1.5

2.0

10.3

3.0

7.8

2.4

6.4

1.3

20.8

4.3

4.5

100.0

1992

.5

6.4

1.5

1.9

10.4

2.9

7.7

2.5

6.5

1.3

20.8

4.0

4.5

100.0

27.3

6.6

3.6

5.3

3.0

45.9

7.9

3.1

2.0

.4

1.1

14.5

.6

6.7

1.6

2.0

10.9

2.9

7.6

2.5

6.7

1.3

21.0

3.7

4.4

100.0

1993

26.2

6.1

3.6

5.7

3.0

44.6

8.5

3.3

2.1

.4

1.2

15.4

1994

.6

6.6

1.7

2.1

10.9

2.9

7.6

2.5

6.7

1.3

21.1

3.5

4.5

100.0

8.6

3.3

2.2

.4

1.1

15.5

25.5

6.1

3.6

6.2

3.0

44.5

1995

25.7

6.1

3.6

6.8

3.0

45.1

8.5

3.1

2.1

.4

1.0

15.1

.6

6.2

1.6

2.0

10.4

2.9

7.5

2.6

6.8

1.4

21.2

3.6

4.6

100.0

©1991 Dataquest Incotporated August—Reproduction Prohibited

Worldwide and North American Semiconductor Consumption by Application Market Forecast

Table I c

Semiconductor Consumption Forecast

(Percentage of Application Market)

Company:

Produa:

Region of Production:

Distribution Channel:

Application:

Specification:

Data Processing

Computers

Data Storage

Terminals

Input/Output

Dedicated

Total

Communications

Premise Telecom

Public Telecom

Mobile Communications

Broadcast & Studio

Other Communications

Total

Industrial

Security & Energy

Management

Manufacturing

Systems/Instruments

Medical Equipment

Other Industrial

Total

Consumer

Audio

Video

Personal Electronics

Appliances

Other Consumer

Total

Military/Aerospace

Transportation

Source: Dauquest (August 1991)

All

Each

Worldwide

Not Meaningful

All

All

1988 1989

57.1

17.0

9.9

9.1

6.9

100.0

51.2

22.6

15.4

2.7

8.0

100.0

5.2

59.7

15.8

19.4

100.0

14.3

39.5

10.6

29.6

6.1

100.0

100.0

100.0

52.7

22.3

14.6

2.7

7.7

100.0

4.9

60.2

15.5

19.5

100.0

13.8

39.4

10.7

30.1

6.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

59.3

15.4

9.1

9.8

6.4

100.0

1990

60.7

15.1

19.4

100.0

14.2

38.5

11.4

29.9

6.1

100.0

100.0

100.0

53.7

21.6

14.5

2.6

7.7

100.0

59.8

16.2

7.7

9.9

6.4

100.0

4.8

1991

59.0

15.8

7.9

10.8

6.5

100.0

53.9

21.5

14.4

2.6

7.6

100.0

4.8

60.9

14.8

19.5

100.0

14.2

37.5

11.7

30.6

6.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

1992

54.6

21.3

14.0

2.5

7.6

100.0

59.5

14.4

7.9

11.6

6.6

100.0

5.1

61.3

14.9

18.7

100.0

13.9

36.9

11.8

31.3

6.1

100.0

100.0

100.0

1993

58.8

13.7

8.0

12.7

6.8

100.0

5.3

61.2

15.0

18.6

100.0

13.9

36.1

12.0

31.8

6.2

100.0

100.0

100.0

54.8

21.3

13.9

2.4

7.6

100.0

1994

55.5

21.0

14.1

2.4

7.0

100.0

13.8

35.9

12.0

31.9

6.3

100.0

100.0

100.0

5.3

60.5

15.4

18.8

100.0

57.4

13.7

8.0

14.1

6.8

100.0

1995

5.4

56.0

20.8

14.0

2.4

6.8

100.0

59.8

15.8

19.1

100.0

13.8

35.4

12.3

32.1

6.4 lOO.O

100.0

100.0

56.9

13.6

7.9

15.0

6.7

100.0

©1991 Dataquest Incorporated August—Reproduction Prohibited

8 Worldwide and North American Semiconductor Consumption by Application Maricet forecast

Table 2a

Semiconductor Consumption Forecast

(Factory Revenue in Millions of Etollars)

Company:

Produa:

Region of Production:

Distribution Channel:

Application:

Specification:

All

Each

Each

Not Meaningful

All

All

1988

1989

1990

1991

1992

1993

1994

1995

1990-1991

Growth 1990-1995

Rate (%) CAGR (%)

North America

Data Processing

Communications

Industrial

Consumer

Military/Aerospace

Transportation

Total

Japan

Data Processing

Communications

Industrial

Consumer

Milimry/Aerospace

Transportation

Total

Europe

Data Processing

Communications

Industrial

Consumer

Military/Aerospace

Transportation

Total

Asia/Pacific-ROW

Data Processing

Communications

Industrial

Consumer

Military/Aerospace

Transportation

Total

Woridwide

Data Processing

8,574

1,608

1,682

1,026

1,999

955

15,844

10,185

1,805

1,741

1,199

2,059

948

17,937

9,561

1,822

1,807

1,202

2,038

956

17,836

10,405

2.006

2,036

1,346

2,016

952

18.761

11,864

2,352

2,380

1.535

2,161

1,094

21,386

13.706

2,861

2,919

1,811

2,297

1,216

24,810

14,866

3,062

3,189

2,008

2,440

1.330

26,895

15.496

3,060

3,227

2,198

2,607

1,413

28,001

9,902

3,016

1,426

5,599

36

793

20,772

11,364

3.324

1,635

5,791

44

839

22,997

10,987

2,948

1,696

5.968

49

860

22,508

12.398

3,699

2,401

14.222

4.751

2.904

6,933

51

872

26.354

7.831

63

991

30,762

14.702

6.092

3,697

9,054

71

1.040

34.656

16.006

6,998

4.100

9,870

80

1.146

38,200

17,625

7,552

4,022

10.242

79

1,241

40.761

2,540

1,736

1,626

1,526

632

431

8,491

3,045

1,967

1,732

1,844

647

520

9,755

3,033

2,418

1,963

1,928

639

680

10.661

3,663

2,760

2,184

2,199

661

807

12.274

4,489

3,186

2,482

2,602

706

951

14.416

5.512

3.774

2,902

3,199

748

1,178

17.313

6,226

4,058

3,173

3,714

798

1,357

19,326

6,938

3.944

3,363

4,205

850

1,464

20.764

2,488

489

95

2,368

102

210

5,752

2,923

542

147

2,539

109

263

6,524

3,410

660

183

3,000

120

297

7.670

4.089

748

208

3,306

135

348

8,834

4,822

906

244

4.082

147

424

10.625

6,107

1.130

300

4.784

175

529

13,025

7,028

1,284

351

5.321

197

623

14.804

7.586

1.382

408

5,697

232

699

16,004

23,504

27,517 26.991

30,555 35.397

40,027 44,126 47,645

20.8

14.1

11.3

14.1

3.4

18.7

15.1

19.9

13.3

13.7

10.2

12.5

17.2

15.2

12.8

25.5

41.6

16.2

4.1

1.4

17.1

8.8

10.1

12.6

12.0

-1.1

-0.4

5.2

13.2

17.3

15.9

17.4

13.7

14.1

18.7

15.8

10.1

10.9

12.3

12.8

5.1

8.1

9.4

18.0

10.3

11.4

16.9

5.9

16.6

14.3

9.9

20.7

18.9

11.4

10.0

7.6

12.6

12.0

(Continued)

©1991 Dataquest Incorporated August—Reproduction Prohibited

Worldwide and North American Semiconductor Consumption by Application Market Forecast

Table 2a (Continued)

Semiconductor Consumption Forecast

(Factory Revenue in Millions of Dollars)

Company:

Produa:

Region of Production:

Distribution Channel:

Application:

Specification:

All

Each

Each

Not Meaningful

All

All

Communications

Industrial

Consumer

1988

6,849

4,828

10,520

1989

7,638

5,255

11,375

1990

7,848

5.649

12,098

1991

9,213

6,829

13,785

Military/Aerospace

Transportation

2,769

2,389

2,859

2,570

2,846

2,794

2,863

2,979

Total

50,859 57,213 58,225 66,223

Note: Some columns do not add to totals shown becauK oT lounding.

Source: Dataquest (August 1991)

1992

11,195

8,010

16,049

3,077

3,460

77,189

1993

13,857

9,818

18,846

3,291

3,963

1994

15,402

10,813

20,913

3,515

4,456

89,803

99,225

1995

15,938

1990-1991

Growth 1990-1995

Rate (%) CAGR (%)

17.4 15.2

11,020

22,344

3,768

20.9

13.9

.6

14.3

13.1

5.8

4,817

105,531

6.6

13.7

11.5

12.6

©1991 Dataquest Incorporated August—Reprcxluction Prohibited

10

Worldwide and North American Semiconductor Consumption by Application Market Forecast

Table 2b

Semiconductor Consumption Forecast

( P e r c e n t ^ e o f Worldwide Total)

Company:

Produa:

Region of Production:

Distribution Channel:

Application:

Specification:

All

Each

Each

Not Meaningful

All

All

1988

1989

North America

Data Processing

Communications

Industrial

Consumer

Military/Aerospace

Transp)ortation

Jaf>an

Total

Data Processing

Communications

Industrial

Consumer

Military/Aerospace

TransfXJrtation

Total

Europe

Data Processing

Communications

Industrial

Consumer

Military/Aerospace

Transportation

Total

Asia/Pacific-ROW

Data Processing

Communications

Industrial

Consumer

Military/Aerospace

Transportation

Total

Worldwide

Data Processing

Communications

Industrial

36.5

23.5

34.8

9.8

72.2

40.0

31.2

42.1

44.0

29.5

53.2

1.3

33.2

40.8

10.8

25.3

33.7

14.5

22.8

18.0

16.7

10.6

7.1

2.0

22.5

3.7

8.8

11.3

100.0

100.0

100.0

10.6

7.1

2.8

22.3

3.8

10.2

11.4

37.0

23.6

33.1

10.5

72.0

36.9

31.4

11.1

25.8

33.0

16.2

22.6

20.2

17.1

41.3

43.5

31.1

50.9

1.5

32.6

40.2

100.0

100.0

100.0

1990

35.4

23.2

32.0

9.9

71.6

34.2

30.6

40.7

37.6

30.0

49.3

1.7

30.8

38.7

11.2

30.8

34.7

15.9

22.5

24.3

18.3

12.6

8.4

3.2

24.8

4.2

10.6

13.2

100.0

100.0

100.0

1991

34.1

21.8

29.8

9.8

70.4

32.0

28.3

40.6

40.1

35.2

50.3

1.8

29.3

39.8

12.0

30.0

32.0

16.0

23.1

27.1

18.5

13.4

8.1

3.0

24.0

4.7

11.7

13.3

100.0

100.0

100.0

1992

33.5

21.0

29.7

9.6

70.2

31.6

27.7

40.2

42.4

36.3

48.8

2.0

28.6

39.9

12.7

28.5

31.0

16.2

22.9

27.5

18.7

13.6

8.1

3.0

25.4

4.8

12.3

13.8

100.0

100.0

100.0

1993

34.2

20.6

29.7

9.6

69.8

30.7

27.6

36.7

44.0

37.7

48.0

2.2

26.2

38.6

13.8

27.2

29.6

17.0

22.7

29.7

19.3

15.3

8.2

3.1

25.4

5.3

13.3

14.5

100.0

100.0

100.0

1994

33.7

19.9

29.5

9.6

69.4

29.9

27.1

15.9

8.3

3.2

25.4

5.6

14.0

14.9

100.0

100.0

100.0

36.3

45.4

37.9

47.2

2.3

25.7

38.5

14.1

26.3

29.3

17.8

22.7

30.5

19.5

1995

32.5

19.2

29.3

9.8

69.2

29.3

26.5

37.0

47.4

36.5

45.8

2.1

25.8

38.6

14.6

24.7

30.5

18.8

22.6

30.4

19.7

15.9

8.7

3.7

25.5

6.2

14.5

15.2

100.0

100.0

100.0

(Continued)

©1991 Dataquest Incorporated August—Reproduction Prohibited

Worldwide and North American Semiconductor Consumption by Application Market Forecast 11

Table 2b (Continued)

Semiconductor Consumption Forecast

I (Percentage of Worldwide Total)

Company: All

Product: Each

Region of Production: Each

Distribution Channel: Not Meaningful

Application: All

Specification: All

Consumer

Military/Aerospace

Transportation

Total

Source: DaUquest (August 1991!)

1988

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

1989

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

1990

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.8

1991

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

1992

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

1993

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

1994

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

1995

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

©1991 Dataquest Incorporated August—^Reproduction Prohibited

12 Worldwide and North American Semiconductor Consumption by Application Market Forecast

Table 2c

Semiconductor Consimiptlon Forecast

(Percentage of Regional Total)

Company:

Produa:

Region of Production:

Distribution Channel:

Application:

Specification:

All

Each

Each

Not Meaningful

All

All

1988

1989

North America

Data Processing

Communications

Industrial

Consumer

Military/Aerospace

Transportation

Japan

Total

Data Processing

Communications

Industrial

Consumer

Military/Aerospace

Transportation

Total

Europe

Data Processing

Communications

Industrial

Consumer

Military/Aerospace

Transp)oratation

Total

Asia/Pacific-ROW

Data Processing

Communications

Industrial

Consumer

Military/Aerospace

Transportation

Total

Worldwide

Data Processing

Communications

Industrial

54.1

10.1

10.6

6.5

12.6

6.0

100.0

47.7

14.5

6.9

27.0

.2

3.8

100.0

29.9

20.4

19.1

18.0

7.4

5.1

100.0

43.3

8.5

1.7

41.2

1.8

3.7

100.0

46.2

13.5

9.5

56.8

10.1

9.7

6.7

11.5

5.3

100.0

48.1

13.4

9.2

49.4

14.5

7.1

25.2

.2

3.6

100.0

31.2

20.2

17.8

18.9

6.6

5.3

100.0

44.8

8.3

2.3

38.9

1.7

4.0

100.0

1990

53.6

10.2

10.1

6.7

11.4

5.4

97.5

48.8

13.1

7.5

26.5

.2

3.8

100.0

28.4

22.7

18.4

18.1

6.0

6.4

100.0

44.5

8.6

2.4

39.1

1.6

3.9

100.0

46.4

13.5

9.7

*

1991

55.5

10.7

10.8

7.2

10.7

5.1

100.0

47.0

14.0

9.1

26.3

.2

3.3

100.0

29.8

22.5

17.8

17.9

5.4

6.6

100.0

46.3

8.5

2.4

37.4

1.5

3.9

100.0

46.1

13.9

10.3

1992

55.5

11.0

11.1

7.2

10.1

5.1

100.0

46.2

15.4

9.4

25.5

.2

3.2

100.0

31.1

22.1

17.2

18.0

4.9

6.6

100.0

45.4

8.5

2.3

38.4

1.4

4.0

100.0

45.9

14.5

10.4

1993

55.2

11.5

11.8

7.3

9.3

4.9

100.0

42.4

17.6

10.7

26.1

.2

3.0

100.0

31.8

21.8

16.8

18.5

4.3

6.8

100.0

46.9

8.7

2.3

36.7

1.3

4.1

100.0

44.6

15.4

10.9

1994

55.3

11.4

11.9

7.5

9.1

4.9

100.0

41.9

18.3

10.7

25.8

.2

3.0

100.0

32.2

21.0

16.4

19.2

4.1

7.0

100.0

47.5

8.7

2.4

35.9

1.3

4.2

100.0

44.5

15.5

10.9

1995

55.3

10.9

11.5

7.9

9.3

5.0

100.0

43.2

18.5

9.9

25.1

.2

3.0

100.0

33.4

19.0

16.2

20.3

4.1

7.1

100.0

47.4

8.6

2.5

35.6

1.4

4.4

100.0

45.1

15.1

10.4

(Continued)

©1991 Dataquest Incorporated August—Reproduction Prohibited

Worldwide and North American Semiconductor Consumption fay Application Market Forecast 13

Table 2c (Continued)

Semiconductor Consumption Forecast

(Percentile of Regional Total)

Company: All

Product: Each

Region of Production: Each

Distribution Channel: Not Meaningful

Application: All

Specification: All

Consumer

Military/Aerospace

Transportation

Total

Source: Dataquest CAugust 199t)

1988

20.7

5.4

4.7

100.0

1989

19.9

5.0

4.5

100.0

1990

20.8

4.9

4.8

100.0

1991

20.8

4.3

4.5

100.0

1992

20.8

4.0

4.5

100.0

1993

21.0

3.7

4.4

100.0

1994

21.1

3.5

4.5

100.0

1995

21.2

3.6

4.6

100.0

©1991 Dataquest Incorporated August—Reproduction Prohibited

14

Worldwide and North American Semiconductor Consumption by Application Market Forecast

Table 3a

Semiconductor Consumption Forecast

(Factory Revenue i n IVIiUlons o f Dollars)

Company;

Product:

Region of Production:

Distribution Channel:

Application:

Sjjecification:

All

Each

North America

Not Meaningful

All

All

1995

1990-1991

Growth 1990-1995

Rate (%) CAGR (%)

1988

1989

1990

1991

Data Processing

Computers

Data Storage

Terminals

Input/Output

Dedicated

Total

Communications

Premise Telecom

Public Telecom

Mobile Communications

Broadcast & Studio

Other Communications

Total

Industrial

Security & Energy

6,292

923

212

809

337

8,574

867

335

119

77

211

1,608

7,591

951

227

1,060

357

10,185

1,019

357

131

79

220

1,805

7,016

948

198

1,074

326

9,561

1,060

342

130

74

216

1,822

7,539

965

239

1,319

343

10,405

1,172

370

147

79

239

2,006

Management

Manufacturing Systems

Instrumentation

Medical Equipment

Other Industrial

Total

Consumer

137

664

352

280

250

1,682

137

676

372

290

267

1,741

145

690

386

299

288

1,807 l 6 l

780

433

333

329

2,036

Audio

Video

42

215

43

268

46

271

51

298

Personal Electronics

Appliances

Other Consumer

23

659

87

27

761

99

29

761

96

32

859

106

Total

Military/Aerospace

1,026

1,999

1,199

2,059

1,202

2,038

1,346

2,016

Transportation 955

948

956

952

Total Equipment

15,844

17,937

17,836

Note: Some columns do not add to totals shown because

nf rrtiinAir

•O'

18,761

Source: Dataquest CAugust 1991)

1992

8,562

910

296

1,692

406

11,864

1,383

425

174

89

281

2,352

57

331

36

988

123

1,535

2,l6l

1,094

21,386

189

916

506

384

386

2,380

1993

9,777

924

350

2,177

478

13,706

66

382

42

1,174

147

1,811

2,297

1,216

24,810

1,673

503

211

103

371

2,861

234

1,136

615

465

470

2,919

1994

10,457

906

377

2,599

527

14,866

1,830

528

232

106

366

3,062

72

415

46

1,311

165

2,008

2,440

1,330

26,895

253

1,247

672

502

515

3,189

10,631

959

391

2,962

553

15,496

257

1,264

681

504

521

3,227

1,847

512

236

100

365

3,060

78

447

50

1,443

181

2,198

2,607

1,413

28,001

7.5

1.8

20.6

22.8

5.3

8.8

10.6

8.2

12.8

5.9

10.7

10.1

11.2

13.0

12.3

11.4

14.2

12.6

11.4

9.9

11.5

12.9

11.1

12.0

-1.1

-0.4

5.2

8.7

0.2

14.6

22.5

11.1

10.1

11.8

8.4

12.6

6.2

11.1

10.9

12.2

12.9

12.1

11.0

12.6

12.3

11.3

10.6

11.6

13.7

13.6

12.8

5.1

8.1

9.4

©1991 Dataquest Incorporated August—Reproduction Prohibited

Worldwide and North American Semiconductor Consumption by Application Market Forecast

Table 3b

Semiconductor Consumption Forecast

(Percentage of Total Equipment)

Company:

Product:

Region of Production:

Distribution Channel:

Application:

Specification:

Data Processing

Computers

Data Storage

Terminals

Input/Output

Dedicated

Total

Communications

Premise Telecom

Public Telecom

Mobile Communications

Broadcast & Studio

Other Communications

Total

Industrial

Security & Energy

Management

Manufacturing

Systems/Instruments

Medical Equipment

Other Industrial

Total

Consumer

Audio

Video

Personal Electronics

Appliances

Other Consumer

Total

Military/Aerospace

Transportation

Total Equipment

Source: Dataquest (August 1991)

All

Each

North America

Not Meaningful

All

All

198S

1989

39.7

5.8

1.3

5.1

2.1

54.1

5.5

2.1

0.7

0.5

1.3

10.1

0.9

2.2

1.8

1.6

10.6

0.3

1.4

0.1

4.2

0.6

6.5

12.6

6.0

100.0

42.3

5.3

1.3

5.9

2.0

56.8

5.7

2.0

0.7

0.4

1.2

10.1

0.8

2.1

1.6

1.5

9.7

0.2

1.5

0.2

4.2

0.6

6.7

11.5

5.3

100.0

1990

39.3

5.3

1.1

6.0

1.8

53.6

5.9

1.9

0.7

0.4

1.2

10.2

0.8

2.2

1.7

1.6

10.1

0.3

1.5

0.2

4.3

0.5

6.7

11.4

5.4

97.5

1991

40.2

5.1

1.3

7.0

1.8

55.5

6.2

2.0

0.8

0.4

1.3

10.7

0.9

2.3

1.8

1.8

10.8

0.3

1.6

0.2

4.6

0.6

7.2

10.7

5.1

100.0

1992

40.0

4.3

1.4

7.9

1.9

55.5

6.5

2.0

0.8

0.4

1.3

11.0

0.9

2.4

1.8

1.8

11.1

0.3

1.5

0.2

4.6

0.6

7.2

10.1

5.1

100.0

1993

39.4

3.7

1.4

8.8

1.9

55.2

6.7

2.0

0.8

0.4

1.5

11.5

0.9

2.5

1.9

1.9

11.8

0.3

1.5

0.2

4.7

0.6

7.3

9.3

4.9

100.0

1994

38.9

3.4

1.4

9.7

2.0

55.3

6.8

2.0

0.9

0.4

1.4

11.4

0.9

2-5 .

1.9

' 1.9

11.9

0.3

1.5

0.2

4.9

0.6

7.5

9.1

4.9

100.0

1995

38.0

3.4

1.4

10.6

2.0

55.3

6.6

1.8

0.8

0.4

1.3

10.9

0.9

2.4

1.8

1.9

11.5

7.9

9.3

5.0

100.0

0.3

1.6

0.2

5.2

0.6

15

01991 Dataquest Incorporated August—Reproduction Protiibited

16

Worldwide and North American Semiconductor Consumption by Application Market Forecast

Table 3c

Semiconductor Consimiptlon Forecast

(Percentage of Application Market)

Company:

Produa:

Region of Production:

Distribution Channel:

Application:

Specification:

Data Processing

Computers

Data Storage

Terminals

Input/Output

Dedicated

Total

Communications

Premise Telecom

Public Telecom

Mobile Communications

Broadcast & Studio

Other Communications

Total

Industrial

Security & Energy

Management

Manufacturing

Systems/Instruments

Medical Equipment

Other Industrial

Total

Consumer

Audio

Video

Personal Electronics

Appliances

Other Consumer

Total

Military/Aerospace

Transp)ortation

Source: Dataquest (August 1991)

All

Each

North America

Not Meaningful

All

All

1988

1989

73.4

10.8

2.5

9.4

3.9