1 J i Manufacturing, and Materials

1 J i Manufacturing, and Materials
i Semiconductor Equipment,
Manufacturing, and Materials
DataQuest
1
J
Welcome to Dataquest
Semiconductor Eauipment^ Manufacturings
ana Materials
You are in the
Source: Dataquest
binder
An annually updated collection of reference documents for the Semiconductor Equipment,
Manufacturing, and Materials service. Worldwide and regional market statistics;
Company Backgrounders; and several guides such as How to Use Dataquest,
Dataquest Research Methodology, Dataquest High-Technology Guide—Segmentation
and Glossary are contained in this binder.
Other Semiconductor Equipment, Manufacturing, and Materials
service binders:
Dataquest
Perspective
A series of multitopic publications that provide analysis on worldwide semiconductor equipment,
manufacturing, and materials issues and semiconductor news and views.
Semiconductor Equipment^ Manufacturings
and Materials
Source: Dataquest
Table of Contents
Guides
How to Use Dataquest
Dataquest Research Methodology
Dataquest High-Technology Guide—Segmentation and Glossary
i«4l
Market Statistics
Semiconductor Consumption and Shipment Forecast
Semiconductor Equipment, Manufacturing, and Materials Forecast
Silicon Wafer Market Statistics
Wafer Fab Equipment Market Share Estimates
Asia/Pacific and Rest of World Fab Database
European Fab Database
Japanese Fab Database
North American Fab Database
Company Backgrounders
List of Companies
Company Backgrounder Order Form
Company Backgrounders by Dataquest
01/11/93
SEMICONDUCTOR EQUIPMENT, MANUFACTURING, AND MATERIALS
SOURCE: DATAQUEST
Binder Checklist
%
SECTION TITLE
COPYRIGHT
Title Page
Disclaimer
1991
Welcome To Dataquest...
Guides (Tab)
How To Use Dataquest
Dataquest Research Methodology
Dataquest High Technology Guide
04/91
03/91
01/91
Market Statistics (Tab)
North American Fab Database
Asia/Pacific & Rest Of World Fab Database
European Fab Database
Silicon Wafer Market Share
Wafer Fab Equipment Market Share Estimates 1991
Japanese Fab Database
10/27/92
10/26/92
10/19/92
05/25/92
04/27/92
10/91
Market Trends:
SEMM-SVC-MT-9202 (Semi. Equipment Manufacturing ,
and Materials Forecast)
SEMM-SVC-MT-9201 (Semi. Equipment Manufacturing ,
and Materials Forecast)
Vendor Profiles:
SEMM-SVC-VP-9202 (Texas Instruments)
SEMM-SVC-VP-9201 (Silicon Valley Group Inc.)
m
12/28/92
08/17/92
12/21/92
09/28/92
MISSING
Dataquest Incorporated
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The content of this report represents our interpretation and analysis of information generally available to the public or released by responsible
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confidence by our clients.
This information is not furnished in connection with a sale or offer to sell securities, or in connection with the solicitation of an offer to buy
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in the securities mentioned and may sell or buy such securities.
Printed in the United States of America. AU rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced, stored in retrieval systems, or
transmitted, in any form or by any means—^mechanical, electronic, photocopying, duplicating, microiUming, videotape, or otherwise—without the
prior permission of the publisher.
©1991 Dataquest Incorporated
Dataqyest
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Dataoyest
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How to Use Dataquest
Dataquest
A worldwide
network of
Informationgathering
resources
Source:
Dataquest
Dataoyest
Published by Dataquest Incorporated
The content of this report represents our interpretation and analysis of information generally available to the public or
released by knowledgeable individuals in the subject industry, but is not guaranteed as to accuracy or completeness. It does
not contain material provided to us in confidence by our clients.
Printed in the United States of America. Ail rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced, stored in
retrieval systems, or transmitted, in any form or by any means—mechanical, electronic, photocopying, duplicating, microfilming, videotape, or otherwise—without the prior written permission of the publisher.
© 1991 Dataquest Incorporated
April 1991
Table of Contents
Page
1.
2.
3.
A Guide to Help You Get the Most Out of Your Dataquest Information Resources
Introduction
1-1
Your Industry Service: What's in It for You?
Source: Dataquest
Guides
Market Statistics
Company Backgrounders
Dataquest Perspective
Inquiry Support
Call Your Industry Analyst
Call the Client Inquiry Center
Information Resource Center
Policies and Procedures
Non-Dataquest Consultants
2-1
2-1
2-1
2-1
2-1
2-2
2-2
2-2
2-4
2-4
2-4
How to Use Your Industry Service
What Written Materials Will You Receive?
Source: Dataquest
Dataquest Perspectives
How Do You File Your Written Materials?
How Do You Find the Written Material'
3-1
3-1
3-2
3-2
3-2
;
4. Customizing Your Industry Service
Custom Consulting
Multiclient Studies
Retainer Consulting
Primary Research
End-User-Based Services
Score Reports
CPE Market Dynamics
5.
Whom Do You Call at Dataquest?
6.
About Dataquest...
The Technology Information Division
Semiconductor Group
Systems Group
Telecommunications Group
Peripherals Group
Ledgew^ay/Dataquest
The Executive and Financial Group
Other Dataquest Services
Conferences
Technology Products
4-1
4-1
4-1
4-1
4-2
4-2
4-2
6-1
6-1
6-2
6-2
6-3
6-3
6-4
6-5
6-5
6-5
2
7.
How to Use Dataquest
Subscription Terms
Basic Terms of Syndicated Industry Services
Add-On Subscriptions
Payment Terms
Base Price
A Reminder
We Thank You for Choosing Dataquest as Your Marketing Reseai'ch Partner
Appendix A.
Dataquest Information Resource Center CD-ROMS and Computer
Databases
7-1
7-1
7-1
7-1
7-1
7-1
A-1
Appendix B. Dataquest 1991 Conference Schedule
B-1
Appendix C.
C-l
Technology Products
List of Tables
Table
5-1 Who to Contact at Dataquest
Page
5-1
List of Figures
Figure
2-1
2-2
3-1
3-2
CUent Inquiry Center Flow
Whom to Call for Your Inquiry
Contents of Your Binder
Standalone European Country Binder Contents
Page
2-3
2-3
3-3
3-3
chapter 1
A Guide to Help You Get the Most
of Your Dataquest
Information
Resources
Introduction
As a Dataquest client, we want you to obtain
the greatest possible value from your subscription. This guide will acquaint you w^ith the
available information resources and will help
you establish a "user strategy" that ensures
that Dataquest's products and services contribute to your success.
This guide is divided into the following
sections:
• Your Industry Service: What's in It for You?
• How^ to Use Your Industry Service
Out
• Customizing Your Industry Service
• Whom Do You Call at Dataquest?
• About Dataquest
• Subscription Terms
• Appendixes
-
Appendix A: Dataquest Information
Resource Center CD-ROMS and Computer Databases
-
Appendix B: Dataquest 1991 Conference Schedule
-
Appendix C: Technology Products
1-1
Chapter 2
Your Industry
You?
Service: What's in It for
Clients can tap into Dataquest's extensive
knowledge base to support their decisionmaking process in the industries and markets
that we track. The information and analysis
that you receive from Dataquest can help
you to better:
Guides
• Evaluate markets
• High-Technology Guide—Segmentation and
Glossary: Lists key terms and defines the
market segments, products, applications,
regions, distribution charmels, and environments tracked by Dataquest.
• Position new products
• Develop marketing strategies
• Perform competitive analysis
• Understand end-user trends
• Verify critical market assumptions
• Assess emerging technologies
• How to Use Dataquest: Describes your
industry service subscription, publications,
inquiry privileges, phone contacts, library
use, and other services.
• Dataquest Research Methodology. Details the
research methodology used by Dataquest to
gather data and information and provides
the general assumptions used to generate
industry forecasts.
• Implement and execute tactical plans
• Support your ongoing research activities
Market Statistics
As a Dataquest client you will receive much
of this information automatically through the
regular publication of database documents and
industry analysis. Your industry service also
provides information, available at your initiation, that is specific to your company's
needs. You will receive Dataquest information
through a variety of forms, including:
Market Statistics documents provide clients with
detailed tables consisting of product shipments,
average seUing prices, industry revenue, forecasts, and market share data.
• Source: Dataquest
• Dataquest Perspectives
• Inquiry support
-
Industry Analysts
-
Client Inquiry Centers
Company Backgrounders
Each service provides its clients with a set of
Company Bacl^rounders by Dataquest, made
up of companies that represent 80 percent of
the revenue of that industry. Company Backgrounders are produced by the Strategic Company Analysis group in Research Operations.
The documents contain useful information on
a company's finances, product lines, sales and
manufacturing locations, and joint ventures,
mergers, and acquisitions.
• Dataquest Information Resource Center
Dataquest Perspective
Source: Dataquest
The Source: Dataquest binder is an annually
updated collection of reference documents.
liie binder contains worldwide and regional
market statistics. Company Backgrounders, and
several guides.
This multitopic publication, delivered on average twice a month, contains timely analysis of
markets, products, technologies, companies,
and industry events, and provides detailed discussions of our market projections and market
share statistics. These publications are filed
2-1
2-2
How to Use Dataquest
chronologically, and include a quarterly index
that cross-references articles by company name
and major topic. They may be supplemented
as needed by the timely delivery of faxes that
provide information and analysis of current
significant events.
Please note that all of Dataquest's written
material is copyrighted and therefore may not
be copied without our permission.
Inquiry Support
Inquiry—^via phone, fax or letter—is an
integral part of the service Dataquest provides.
Through inquiry you can:
• Clarify or interpret information.
• Explore Dataquest information in more
depth.
• Discuss the application of this information
to a particular situation.
• Access information that is not available in
Dataquest publications, but is available in
Dataquest's extensive files.
Each Dataquest client has a designated binderholder. In addition to receiving all the
Dataquest published materials, the binderholder
serves as the liaison between Dataquest and
your company.
The binderholder has access to Dataquesfs
inquiry privilege and may designate up to
two people to serve as alternates for inquiry
privileges. Dataquest account managers need
to be aware of any designated alternates.
If someone calls who is not a binderholder or
alternate, Dataquest will refer that person to
the account manager for your company. We
have a commitment to our clients to provide
them with timely, high-value information. In
order to do that, services must be restricted to
authorized contacts.
Call Your Industry Analyst
Industry analysts have significant industry
expertise. Directly or through the assistance
of Client Inquiry Center (CIC) personnel, you
have access to the industry analysts associated
with your service. This access is on an
Chapter 2
as-required basis relative to those markets,
products, and technologies within the scope of
your service. Analysts may be called directly
when you know exactly what you need and
who at Dataquest can provide the information.
Call the Client Inquiry Center
iVIany of Dataquest's services provide a Client
Inquiry Center (Enquiry Desks for European
customers). These centers are responsible
solely for the quick turnaround of your factbased questions. CIC personnel have access to
industry service publications and database
information, and they are trained to help you
locate information within your Dataquest service. CIC persormel will also put you in touch
with appropriate industry analysts when you
require in-depth analysis of issues and trends,
or opinion about the implications of recent
industry events. The CIC may be called when
you need an answer to a fact- or data-related
question, when you need a backup to your
regular analysts should they not be available,
or when you need direction to new areas as
your questions develop.
Dataquest is committed to personally handling
each of your calls. Figure 2-1 illustrates how
inquiries in the CIC are handled. We will
ensure tliat you are put in touch w^ith the
right individual, or if you wish, you may
choose to leave a voice-mail message when a
particular analyst is not immediately available.
The more Dataquest knows about your
inquiry, the better we will be able to help
you. When you call with a question, the CIC
will want to know:
• What information you already have on the
subject
• What related information you are gathering
• How you plan to use the information
• What you are trying to demonstrate
It will also help us to know what stage of the
market research process you are in, as well as
the depth of information you require. The
more we know, the better we will be able to
offer additional or related information, or offer
insights into different ways to approach the
question. Of course, tell us only what you are
comfortable with—^we don't need or want to
know proprietary information. Figure 2-2
shows the mix of people available to respond
to your inquiries.
©1991 Dataquest Incorporated April—Reproduction Prohibited
Chapter 2
Your Industry Service: 'What's in It for You?
F^;ure 2-1
Client Inquiry Center Flow
Inquiry Flow
CIC
defines question
Analysis
needed
Information Is
not available
Analyst
responds to
client
We learn your
(Lindamental
needs
Information Is
available or possibly
Databases
available
Published materials/Files
Analyst's files and
working documents
Source: Dataquest (April 1991)
Figure 2-2
Whom to Call for Your Inquiry
Whom do you call?
The Client Inquiry Center
- Dedicated specialists
- Quick response time
- Access to companywide resources
- Directs all your inquiries
Industry Analyst
- Analysis of market data
- Industry expertise
- Implications of events or trends
Source: Dataquest (April 1991)
©1991 Dataquest Incorporated April—Reproduction Prohibited
2-3
2-4
How to Use Dataquest
Chapter 2
Information Resource Center
• To collect recent publications on new areas
of the market
Dataquest's Information Resource Center (IRC)
is a valuable supplement to the information
delivered through your industry service. It consists of a 1,200-square-foot corporate library in
San Jose, plus two major satellite libraries
located in Boston and the United Kingdom.
The IRC maintains a wide selection of industry
directories, trade press periodicals, financial
rejxjrts from most of the publicly held companies followed by Dataquest industry services,
government reports, and CD-ROM-based and
on-line information services.
• To research a market or topic not covered
by a Dataquest industry service
The European Corporate Library maintains
more than 300 titles and reference works concerning the European Community, including
approximately 30 files and 100 reference works
on the 1992 single European market objective.
The U.K. library collection includes basic reference works produced by Her Majesty's
Government, the Department of Trade and
Industry, and other governmental agencies.
Special reports have also been collected from
a variety of sources, including the U.K.
government, trade associations, the Financial
Times, and other research organizations.
Appendix A lists the CD-ROMs and computer
databases available to clients at the San Jose
IRC. The San Jose IRC is staffed by three
degreed professionals (Master of Library
Science), as well as assistants who specialize
in managing the corporation's secondary
research resources.
You are encouraged to use the IRC. If it is
not convenient to visit an IRC, your Client
Inquiry Center staff can often make many of
the center's resources available to you through
your inquiry privilege.
Policies and Procedures
Because the IRC is a private company library,
our collections are limited to the following
individuals:
• All permanent Dataquest employees
• Current clients—Binderholders and designated alternates from within the client
company
• Consultants/contractors working on specific
Dataquest projects (only for duration of
contract)
• Prospective clients escorted by a Dataquest
salesperson
Non-Dataquest Consultants
It is Dataquest policy to deal direcdy with
Dataquest clients in answering their information needs. The Information Resource Center
does not authorize the use of library facilities
by consultants working for clients.
Clients typically use the IRC in the following
ways:
• To obtain financial information on the leading companies wthin their industry
©1991 Dataquest Incoqxjrated April—Reproduction Prohibited
chapter 3
How
to Use Your Industry
Receiving value from your industry service
requires knowing where to find the information you need and how to use that information. The following guidelines will help you
get the most out of the many elements of
your service.
What Written Materials Will You
Receive?
You will receive written material at least
twice a month. Some industry services are
segmented into key market areas (product or
geographic) to allow you to choose the coverage that is most relevant to the markets in
which you participate. You will receive written
material covering both the broad-based issues
of the industry as a whole, as well as the
more focused issues of the particular market
segment. All written material will be labeled
as belonging to one of the following:
• The Source: Dataquest binder
• The Dataquest Perspective binder
• The segment binder
Source:
Dataquest
Source: Dataquest is a regularly updated reference binder in which you'll find the follow^ing:
• How to Use Dataquest: You are currently in
this document.
• Dataquest High-Technology Guide—
Segmentation and Glossary: This document
describes in detail the segmentation and
terms used by all Dataquest services to
define the markets they track. This guide
should be used whenever you are looking
for definitions of products, apphcations,
regions, technologies, and environments
referred to by your industry service. This
document also provides you with standard
Service
definitions of research terms that appear in
your industry service publications, such as
retirements, average selling price, and compound annual growth rate.
• Dataquest Methodology: This document will
help you understand the research methodology Dataquest uses to gather information
on the industries covered by our industry
services. It also describes the general
assumptions used to generate industry
forecasts.
• Market Statistics: Each Dataquest industry
service provides its clients with documents
that contain detailed tables consisting of history, market forecasts, and market share
data. We encourage you to use these tables
as an opportunity to review your business
outlook with Dataquest analysts. Updates
and detailed discussions of these data are
provided in the Dataquest Perspective on an
ongoing basis. For segmented services, toplevel market statistics are provided in the
Source: Dataquest binder, and the more
detailed statistics for each segment can be
found in each segment binder.
• Company Backgrounders: You will receive
a set of Company Backgrounders—profiles
on the top players in your industry. These
documents are published aimually. You
should refer to them for corporate overview
information, such as financial reports, product line descriptions and analysis, sales and
manufacturing locations, and joint ventures,
mergers, and acquisitions.
With the exception of the Company Backgrounders, these documents will be individually bound and delivered aimually or twice
yearly, as required. Each Company Backgrounder will be updated once a year and
will be shipped shortly after the dose of the
fiscal year for that company. At the time of
arrival, the earlier version of the document
should be removed from the binder and
archived as desired so that the most recent
information will be easily accessible to you.
**^
3-2
How to Use Dataquest
Dataquest Perspectives
Dataquest Perspectives are designed to deliver
analysis and Dataquest's view of important
issues in your industry. This is a multitopic
publication delivered twice a month that
contains articles under the following major
topic headings:
• Market Analysis: These articles may cover
either a product market, regional market,
application market, or a distribution channel.
Industry service forecast updates are
presented and discussed in this section of
the Dataquest Perspective.
• Product Analysis: These articles analyze the
impact of new products on the industry.
• Company Analysis: This section highlights
new activities or organizational changes
within companies. The articles provide more
in-depth ar^ysis of a company's product
strategy, financial performance, or marketing
performance and strategy than is contained
in the Company Backgrounders. Articles
may also be written about companies for
which there is no Company Backgrounder.
• Technology Analysis: This section analyzes
the impact of key or emerging technologies on your industry. These articles are
designed to assist you in strategic and
competitive evaluations.
• Conferences and Exhibitions: These articles
will identify important industry trends and
analyze key events at the conferences and
exhibitions attended by Dataquest analysts.
• News and Views: These shorter articles
provide Dataquest's perspectives on major
industry events.
Chapter 3
document that belongs in this binder will be
dearly marked as such and should be filed
behind the appropriate tab as indicated in the
Table of Contents. Outdated sections should
be either discarded or filed separately for
archival purposes.
Clients will receive at least 24 Dataquest
Perspectives each year. These should be
filed in the Dataquest Perspective binder in
chronological order. If you subscribe to a segmented service, at least 4 of your 24 annual
Dataquest Perspectives will focus on issues
specifically related to the markets covered
under that industry segment. The industrywide
Dataquest Perspectives are filed in the core
Dataquest Perspective binder, and the segmentspecific editions are filed in the segment
binder.
Each Dataquest Perspective will be identified
by the name of the service and the name of
the segment, if appropriate. It will also have
the date, volume, and number on the first
page. For example, a subscriber to the
Telecommunications—^North America service
may receive the following two Dataquest
Perspectives:
• Telecommunications—^North America
Vol. 1, No. 1
• Telecommunications—^North America
Image Communications
Vol. 1, No. 1
The first document would be filed in the core
Telecommunications—^North America Dataquest
Perspective binder. The second would be filed
in the Image Communications segment binder.
Dataquest Perspective offers a twice-monthly
opportunity to engage your industry service
analysts in discussion of the issues and events
contained in each publication. For this reason,
we provide the name of the author of each
article along with a brief synopsis. Clients are
encouraged to call the appropriate analyst with
questions or a request for more information.
The contents of your binders are illustrated in
Figure 3-1. Subscribers to a standalone European country segment will receive detailed
market statistics for that particular country, toplevel European statistics, and the pan-European
Perspectives. The binder contents are illustrated
in Figure 3-2.
How Do You File Your Written
Materials?
How Do You Find the Written
Material?
Your Source: Dataquest binder holds a collection of reference and statistical material. Each
Dataquest is committed to not only providing
you with the highest quality research, but also
©1991 Dataquest Incorporated April—Reproduction Prohibited
Haw to Use Your Industry Service
Chapter 3
3-3
Figure 3-1
Contents of Your Binder
Source: Dataquest
- Guides
- Market Statistics
- Company
Backgrounders
Dataquest Perspective
-
Market Analysis
Product Analysis
Company Analysis
Technology Analysis
Conferences and
Exhibitions
- News and Views
Source: Dataquest (April 1991)
Figure 3-2
Standalone European Country Binder Contents
For Each Country
making it easy for you to access the information. Clients are provided with the following
tools:
• The spines of all binders list the types of
information you will find in that binder.
• "What's in This Binder?", appearing immediately following the title page, summarizes
the documents in that binder and highlights
what can be found in other binders of that
service.
- Market Statistics
- Dataquest
Perspectives
• A detailed Table of Contents is contained in
the Source: Dataquest and segment binders.
• Each bound document in the Source:
Dataquest and segment binders has its
own Table of Contents, including a list
of tables where appropriate.
Source: Dataquest (April 1991)
• To help you access the articles you need in
a timely manner, Dataquest provides you
with a comprehensive index which is delivered quarterly and provides a year-to-date
©1991 Dataquest Incorporated April—Reproduction Prohibited
3-4
How to Use Dataquest
cross-reference by company name and major
topic. The index lists the titles of all articles
and of all tables and figures that appear in
issues of the publication. Listings include the
title, date, and page number for each entry.
The first page of each quarterly index
Chapter 3
provides an explanation of how the index
can best be used, along with an example.
Segment Perspectives are indexed separately
and incorporated into the year-end index
provided for the entire service.
©1991 Dataquest Incorporated April—Reproduction Prohibited
Chapter 4
Customizing
Your Industry
As a subscriber to a Dataquest syndicated market research service, clients receive significant
tactical and strategic information. Dataquest
also offers a variety of individualized and proprietary programs to clients to help them solve
their specialized information and analysis
needs. Each project is treated with the strictest
confidence.
We carefully review each project with the client prior to beginning the actual research.
Dataquest's consulting staff designs a research
plan that most effectively meets each client's
unique requirements. This includes determining
the appropriate information to be gathered, the
proper sample size, appropriate collection techniques, and the best analytic methods to be
used.
Service
proprietary efforts, but also through its integration of TID information and analysis resources.
Among the elements that consulting can bring
to a project are specialized plarming assistance,
proprietary analyses, in-person interviews, mail
surveys, telephone surveys, focus groups, and
custom database cuts.
Multiclient Studies
Custom Consulting engages not only in fullcustom research projects, but also in the
generation of multiclient studies. These studies
allow Dataquest to offer clients in-depth information on emerging and/or niche markets at
an amortized cost for consulting.
Custom Consulting
Dataquest's custom coiisulting helps clients in
any of the following ways:
• Analyzing specific markets and competitive
environments
• Developing strategies for increased market
penetration
Retainer Consulting
Dataquest also offers its clients retainer consulting. Dataquest analysts and consultants
provide consulting advice on an ongoing basis
and with quick turnaround to address a variety of client management and marketing
needs.
• Evaluating new business, product, and distribution plans
• Verifying critical market assumptions
Primary Research
• Assessing the impact of emerging technologies on existing products and markets
Dataquest's Primary Research services offer
a comprehensive range of survey research
capabilities that can provide vital information
tailored to each client's specific needs. This is
important when survey work, but not analysis,
is needed. Studies of any type, size, or aspect
can be performed as a supplement to existing
market research efforts, when nonbiased
third-party research is required, or to provide
complete primary research capabilities when
company resources are not available. Primary
Research assumes total responsibility for a
project at any stage, from questiormaire
development through sample selection, data
collection, and final tabulation. The following
4-1
• Assisting in developing international business
strategies, including:
Identifying strategic partners, both
domestic and international
Defining technology "fits"
Custom consulting is structured to provide
assistance across all TTD services beyond the
scope of each service. In areas where new,
original work is needed, consulting provides
value not only through its own individualized
How to Use Dataquest
4-2
are examples of the broad range of business
applications addressed by Primary Research:
Chapter 4
with users selected randomly by vendor from
a database of U.S. business establishments. No
manufacturers' lists are used.
• Market penetration surveys
• Customer needs and satisfaction surveys
• New product research
• Product pricing and positioning surveys
• Aimual trend surveys
• Installed base surveys
• Sales trend identification
End-User-Based Services
Score Reports
Customer satisfaction surveys track the level of
satisfaction by users of PCs, copiers, electronic
printers, PBXs, and public key systems. Key
indicators measured include value for price,
quality, commitment to customer, features,
product delivery, technical documentation, and
service. The Score Report is conducted four
times a year so that manufacturers can monitor
trends in end-user satisfaction levels over an
extended period of time.
Score Reports are based on telephone interviews with an annual sample of over 5,000
respondents. A stratified sampling plan is used,
The Score Report survey meets the requirements for measuring customer satisfaction as
defined by the Malcolm Baldrige National
Quality Award. The Baldrige Award is granted
annually by the U.S. Department of Commerce
in recognition of U.S. companies that excel in
quality achievements and management.
CPE Market Dynamics
This end-user information service provides
quarterly data on PBX, Centrex services, and
key systems users' purchases by manufacturer,
system model, RHC region, state, and vertical
market. There are two proprietary custom
options, as follows:
• Product-Presence-Hit Rate (PPH) Analysis:
Assesses a company's position in the
marketplace as a function of product acceptance, distribution, or sales effectiveness.
• Win-Loss Analysis: This option takes PPH
analysis one step further, delving into why
systems sales are being won or lost by you
and your competitors. A customized direct
mail, telephone, or personal interview program is established to contact the appropriate end users.
©1991 Dataquest Incotporated April—Reproduction Ptohibited
Chapter 5
Vyhotn Do You Call at
clients who have questions or need assistance
in any way are encouraged to call Dataquest
Dataquest?
at their earliest convenience. Table 5-1 is an
overview of who to contact at Dataquest.
Table 5-1
Who to Contact at Dataquest
QuestJon/Concefn
Who to Contact
My subscription (e.g., billing, renewal)
My customer service representative
Subscribing to another service
My sales account manager
Data or facts about my industry
Client Inquiry Center
Opinion or analysis about my industry
Analyst in the service
Other services/products offered by Dataquest
My sales account manager
New services/products I would like Dataquest
to offer or feedback on current offerings
Product Marketing
Con^wnents: (408) 437-8624
Systems: (408) 437-8517
Telecommunications: (408) 437-8602
Peripherals: (408) 437-8308
Ledgeway: (617) 862-8500
An upcoming conference
Conference Department
U.S.—(408) 437-8245
Europe—(44) 895-835050
A possible proprietary consulting projea
Library visits
"Hie new Dataquest format for research
delivery
Reprints of selected articles
Japan/Asia—(81) 3-5566-0416
Consulting Department, sales account manager, or service analyst
Qient Inquiry Center, service analyst, or corporate librarian in
the U.K.
(408) 437-8215, or dedicated Voice MaU Hot Line: (408) 437-7878
Sales Department—Technology
Products: (800) 624-3282
Source: DaUquest (ApiU 1991)
5-1
chapter 6
About
Dataquest...
Dataquest was formed in 1971 with the sole
purpose of delivering timely and accurate
information on critical issues in the hightechnology arena. Quoting from the Dataquest
mission statement:
specialized information services for the financial community, product specification directories, and standsdone reports on technology
markets. These services are described in more
detail in the following paragraphs.
"Our goal is to be the
acknowledged worldwide leader
in market intelligence for the
industries we serve by providing indispensable information
and analysis to our clients."
There are five research groups within TID.
Each provides data and analysis covering the
global electronics industry from semiconductors
to systems, from hardware to software, and
from applications to service.
Semiconductor Group
As a member of The Dun & Bradstreet family
of companies, Dataquest has access to supplemental information from Dun & Bradstreet
and its subsidiaries. Together with our own
primary and secondary research capabilities
and analyst expertise, this relationship offers
the most comprehensive information available
on topics pertinent to your industry.
Dataquest comprises two basic business
units. Dataquest's Technology Information
Division (TlD) provides data and analysis
on the high-technology electronics industry,
encompassing semiconductors, systems,
peripherals, application markets, software,
and service and support. A cross-industry
financial program supported by TID analysts
and assigned account managers is tailored to
the needs of the financial community. The
Machinery Information Division (MID) offers
a full range of marketing research and consulting services for professionals in all areas of
the heavy equipment and material-handling
industries.
This group covers the entire semiconductor
"food chain," including manufacturing equipment and materials, device technologies and
markets, and end-use applications and procurement issues. Its information services are worldwide in scope and include targeted North
American, European, Japanese, and Asian
services. The Semiconductor Group is divided
into the following 9 services:
• Semiconductors—Worldwide
Segments:
Semiconductor Memories
ASICs
Analog and Mixed Signal ICs
Microcomponents
Gallium Arsenide Semiconductors
Semiconductors—^Europe
Semiconductors—Japan
The Technology Informatioii
Division
The information service you have purchased
from Dataquest is part of our Technology
Information Division (TID) family of products.
TID provides information services that are
both tactical and strategic in nature, and
include syndicated industry services, custom
consulting, multidient studies, primary research,
Semiconductors—^Asia
Semiconductor Application Markets—
Worldwide
Semiconductor Application Markets—^Europe
Semiconductor Application Markets—^Japan
Semiconductor Procurement
Semiconductor Equipment, Manufacturing, and
Materials
6-1
6-2
How to Use Dataquest
Chapter 6
Systems Group
associated hardware markets. Business Applications is divided into two services:
This group covers business and technical computer systems and applications, both hardware
and software, ranging from palmtops to PCs to
supercomputers.
• Office Software
• Personal Computer Software
Computer Systems Services
Teclinical Applications
The computer systems services cover the following six segments:
The CAD/CAM/CAE service provides information on four key applications: Mechanical,
AEC, GIS/Mapping, and Electronic Design
Automation. Its geographic coverage extends to
North America, Europe, and Asia. The service
is segmented as follows:
• Business Computers
• Servers
• Supercomputers
• Electronic Design Automation
• Technical Computers
• Mechanical Applications
• Unix Systems
• Architecture, Engineering, and Construction,
and Geographic Information Systems
• Workstations
• Personal CAD
European Computer Systems
• CAD/CAM—Europe
This service covers the same product areas for
14 European regions.
• CAD/CAM—Asia
Microcomputer Systems Group
This worldwide service tracks and analyzes
PCs by packaging type, microprocessor, operating system, price point, environment, and
region of the world. It includes the following
segments:
• Personal Computers—^North America
In addition, CASE is covered through
consulting.
Teleconununlcations Group
The Telecommunications Group is divided into
two services, the Telecommunications North
America service and the Telecommunications
Europe service.
• Personal Computers—Asia
These worldwide services divide their coverage
of the industry into five major product segments, as follows:
• Personal Computers—^European Quarterly
Statistics
• Image Communications
• Personal Computers—^Europe
• Personal Computers—^European Price
Tracking
• Networking
• Personal Communications
• I>ublic Network Equipment and Services
Business Applications
• Voice Communications
This service covers electronic equipment
environments in the office that are primarily
software driven and looks at the ways in
Vhich these environments drive their
Regional market options include countryspecific coverage of any of the following
European countries: France, Germany, Italy,
©1991 Dataquest Incorporated April—Reproduction Prohibited
Chapter 6
About Dataquest...
€.i
Netherlands, Spain, Sweden, and the United
Kingdom.
integration services. Ledgeway/Dataquest covers
both of these market sectors.
Peripherals Group
Ledgeway/Dataquest offers 10 different subscription programs. AH programs include
access to Ledgeway/Dataquest analysts for
inquiry support, periodic bulletins on key
events in the service industry, and attendance
at Ledgeway/Dataquest's annual ServiceTrends
conference.
This group covers markets for devices that are
typically attached to multiuser host systems or
serve an output function.
Computer Storage Service
The Computer Storage service covers the follow^ing four segments:
• Rigid Disk Drives
• Tape Drives
• Optical Disk Drives
• Flexible Disk Drives
Graphics and Displays Service
The Graphics and Displays service covers the
following four segments:
• Graphics Processors
The ServiceTrends Program
The most widely subscribed service, now
in its eighth year, is Ledgeway/Dataquest's
ServiceTrends program. In addition to the cornerstone of the program, Ledgeway/Dataquest's
annual two-volume Trends and Forecast
report, which provides in-depth market size
and forecast iriformation and analysis of market trends, four topical reports are provided.
In 1991, these topical reports are:
• Globed Support Strategies
• Measuring and Managing Customer
Satisfaction
• Japan and the Pacific Rim: Customers or
Competitors
• Monitors
• Display Terminals
• Self-service: Opportunity or Threat
• Network Stations
Document Management Group
The Document Management group is made up
of the following four services:
• Copying and EHjplicating (including fax
coverage)
The Professional ServiceTrends program features analysis of customer wants and needs for
systems integration and professional services,
in addition to a market trends report, which
forecasts market size, growth rates, and analyzes trends. In addition, there are six profiles
provided on leading participants in the
industry.
• Electronic Printers—^North America
• Electronic Printers—^Europe
• Electronic Publishing
Ledgeway/Dataquest
Ledgeway/Dataquest is the group that
provides strategic and tactical information on
the fast-growing services industry. Computer
systems vendors typically obtain 25 to 30 percent of their revenue from pre- and postsale
services. In addition to services provided by
manufacturers, there is a very large and fastgrowing industry for professional and systems
Sector Market Programs
Sector market programs are focused on
narrow segments of the service market and
feature an atmual market trends and forecast
report, user wants and needs analysis, a
pricing trends and data study (for all but the
European ServiceTrends program), and six profiles of leading service vendors in each sector.
Ledgeway/Dataquest's sector market programs
are as follow^s:
• European ServiceTrends
• Independent/Multivendor Services
©1991 Dataquest Incorporated April—Reproduction Prohibited
6-4
How to Use Dataquest
• Network/Communications Support
• Mini/Mainfirame Software Support
• PC/Workstation Software Support
• Technical Workstation Service and Support
Chapter 6
clients by helping them develop financial
strategies in high-technology areas, identify
financial opportunities, evaluate proposed client
investments and relationships, and monitor
companies and markets.
• PC/End-User Computing Services
• Channel Support Strategies
In addition to its subscription services, Ledgeway/Dataquest has a very professional and
active custom consulting group that conducts
custom projects focused on the following
areas:
• Customer satisfaction and service quality
audits
• Key competitor analysis and positioning
• New service product market analysis and
strategy formation
Subscription services and custom consulting are
provided covering worldwide markets.
The Executive and Financial Group
Dataquest's Executive and Financial Group
(EFG) offers a number of cross-industry services that are designed primarily for clients in
the financial and executive communities. These
services offer clients the following benefits:
• Access to all Dataquest research
professionals
• Access to TID Dataquest Perspectives
• Access to TID conferences
• A personal account manager
EFG includes the follow^ing services, which are
differentiated largely in terms of the type of
clients they serve.
Financial Services Program
The Financial Services Program (FSP) is
designed to serve the needs of clients who
evaluate loans and investments, monitor portfolios, identify markets and prospects, and
develop strategies for penetration of new markets. FSP clients include banks, venture capital
firms, CPAs, leasing companies, and development agencies. The program benefits these
Strategic Executive Service
The Strategic Executive Service (SES) is a
networking and technology advisory program
specifically designed for CEOs or senior executives. The service is open by invitation only
to the presidents of technology companies.
Dataquest senior staff from all high-technology
industry service groups provide decision suf)port to each president. SES also hosts an
annual Presidents' Summit Conference, bringing
together subscribers to focus on future trends
in high technology products and markets. It is
a highly customized service for executive decision makers.
Equipment Leasing Service
At the core of Equipment Leasing Service
(ELS) is a portfolio of more than 300
individual ftiture value projections for specific
products from more than 45 leading computer,
peripherals, and telecommunications vendors.
These projections are calculated through a proprietary model and are delivered to clients
along with relevant research newsletters.
Clients also receive inquiry access to specialized leasing analysts. ELS is designed for companies that lease high-technology equipment.
The service assists clients in the areas of lease
origination sales, vendor sales, equity sales,
asset management and remarketing, and new
business development and marketing.
Technology Investment Program
The Technology Investment Program (TIP) is
designed to serve the needs of clients in the
securities industry, investment banking industry,
equity research markets, and institutional
investment fields. The service provides clients
with company evaluations, product and technology assessments, and other forms of information that help identify target companies for
merger/acquisition, joint venture, initial public
offerings, and equity investment.
©1991 Dataquest Incorporated April—Reproduction Prohibited
Chapter 6
About Dataquest...
Other Dataquest Services
Conferences
Technology Information Division
Conferences
Dataquest hosts a number of conferences each
year to present industry forecasts and discuss
critical issues and trends. Clients obtain a
number of benefits from attending these conferences, including:
• Receiving Dataqueist updates on key markets
• Meeting with industry leaders and users
• Discussing market events and their significance to your organization with
Dataquest analysts
As an industry service client, you may purchase tickets to any Dataquest conference you
wish to attend. Each ticket entities you, or
someone you designate, to attend one
Dataquest conference. A complete list of conferences is included in Appendix B of this
document. To purchase a conference ticket, or
to obtain more information about Dataquest's
conferences, contact Dataquest's conference
department at any of the following locations:
6-5
around the world. The one-day ICC format
combines hands-on product displays with technology seminars designed to educate prequalified regional buyers throughout the United
States, Europe, and Asia/Pacific. Each
SalesEvent ensures a focused conference,
whereby the manufacturers have a selectively
targeted audience of buyers and the buyers
can learn about new technology, receive a
hands-on view of products and solutions, and
discuss their application needs with exhibiting
regional sales and technical managers. Three
ICC series are held as follows:
• OEM Peripherals (in various U.S. and European locations), serving OEMs, systems
integrators, volume end users, and government buyers/integrators who are all looking
to buy computer peripherals.
• Computer Connectivity (in various U.S.
and European locations), serving MIS/DP
managers, systems integrators, network
managers, and value-added resellers/
dealers who are all looking to buy
connectivity/networking solutions.
• Asia Pacific (in various Asian locations),
serving OEMs, systems integrators, volume
end users, and government purchasers who
are all looking to buy computer peripherals.
Technology Products
• North America
(408) 437-8245
• Europe
(44) 895-835050
• Japan/Asia
(81) 3-5566-0416
Invitational Computer Conferences
Dataquest's Invitational Computer Conferences
(ICCs) bring major computer manufacturers
together with buyers in 41 regional markets
Dataquest also provides standalone products,
including specification guides in both hard
copy and electronic format (disk), reports, and
monthly newsletters that are marketed and
sold individually to broad customer audiences.
These products are designed to be complementary to the TID syndicated market
research services and include highly tactical
information on product specifications and
pricing, as well as in-depth analyses of
specific markets and technology trends. See
Appendix C for a current list of products.
©1991 Dataquest Incorporated April—Reproduction Prohibited
Chapter 7
Subscription
Terms
Basic Terms of Syndicated
Industry Services
The service begins on the date of the first
billing. At that time, the subscriber receives
the Source: Dataquest binder with the current
documents and a Dataquest Perspectives binder
complete with documents covering the last six
months. Clients also receive the current yearto-date index as well as the previous year's
annual index.
Subscribers to a segment of a service receive
a segment binder containing recent segmentspecific Dataquest Perspectives and the current
version of the detailed, segment-specific market
statistics. For the duration of the subscription,
subscribers receive a copy of each Dataquest
Perspective published and any annual updates
to Source: Dataquest documents as they are
produced. The inquiry privilege may be used
to supplement the material in the binders.
Add-On Subscriptions
Subsidiaries, divisions, regional offices,
majority-owned affiliates, and parent companies
of a subscribing organization within the same
region are eligible for add-on subscriptions at
a percentage of the base subscription price.
Add-on subscriptions include complete copies
of all published material, inquiry privileges
specific to the markets subscribed to, and conference attendance at discounted prices.
Regions are defined as North America, Europe,
and Japan.
Payment Terms
Dataquest's terms, including the applicable
sales or value-added tax, are net 30 days.
Base Price
increased costs. Subscribers will be notified in
advance of any such price increase.
A Reminder
Your agreement specifies the individuals in
your company who have access to Dataquest
information. You will need to obtain written
consent from Dataquest to disclose data, analysis, and written materials to any other person
or entity beyond those specified by the terms
of the agreement.
Dataquest also asks that you not use any data
obtained through your industry service in any
legal proceedings, or as the basis for advertising copy, press releases, collateral material, or
any other promotional material. For further
information on the conditions pertaining to
your industry service, please refer to your
industry service agreement, or contact your
sales representative.
Your industry service agreement provides you
with a license to use your industry service for
the length of time designated in the agreement. If you decide not to renew your industry service at the end of this time, it is your
obligation to return these materials to your
nearest local Dataquest office.
We Thank You for Choosing
Dataquest as Your Marketing
Research Partner.
We hope this guide has helped you. Please
take advantage of the services we have
described. Dataquest's goal is total satisfaction.
If you have any questions or comments about
this guide or the services it describes, please
let us know.
Dataquest reserves the right to change its subscription prices to reflect broadened scope or
7-1
Appendix A
Dataquest
Information
Resource
Center CD-ROMS and Computer
Databases
PATENTS
version not available; however, the library
files have annual reports. Please check the
lateral files and the listing on top of the files.
Micropatent
This CD-ROM is a basic search and current
awareness tool for U.S. patents, containing
abstracts and selected fi:ont-page information
from patents published by die U.S. Patent and
Trademark Office. It covers 1975 to date, with
limited information 1969 to 1974. Patent number, inventor, tide, and assignee are just a few
of the ways to search this CD. It is updated
monthly. Book version not available.
FINANCIAL INFORMATION
Compact d Sec—USA
This CD-ROM contains financial and management information on 11,000 public companies
filing with the SEC. The current and historical
financial information is culled from annual
reports and 10-Ks. It is updated monthly.
Book version not available; however, the
library files have annual reports, 10-Ks, quarterly reports, and 10-Qs. Please check the
lateral files and the listing on top of the files.
Compact d Sec—Canada
This CD-ROM provides financial information on
6,000 Canadian companies and is updated
quarterly. Book version not available; however,
the library files have annual reports. Please
check the lateral files and the listing on top of
the files.
Compact d Sec—Europe
This CD-ROM provides financial and factual
information on 2,000 publicly held European
companies and is updated quarterly. Book
COMPANY DIRECTORIES
Corptech
This database contains information on developers and manufacturers of high-technology
products in the United States. It is searchable
by product, location, size, status, and name
and is updated quarterly. Book version
available.
Thomas Register
This CD-ROM provides product and directory
information for manufacturing companies in
the United States and Canada. It is updated
monthly. Book version available.
ARTICLE SEARCH
Computer Select (formerly Computer
Library)
This CD-ROM is a major upgrade to Computer
Library. In addition to the ever-growing list of
periodicals included in Computer Select, the
full contents of Data Sources, the most comprehensive computer industry directory available, have been added. You'll be able to
retrieve specifications on over 67,000 hardware, software, and data communications
products, as well as profiles of the over 1,000
companies that make them. New searching
capabilities include locating articles by choosing lists of publications, article types, date
ranges, topics, and other fields. It is updated
monthly. Book version of Data Sources
available.
A-l
A.-Jt
How to Use Dataquest
COMPUTER DIRECTORIES
ICP Software Information Database
This CD-ROM provides information on micro,
mini, and mainframe software products offered
by over 4,000 vendors and is updated quarterly. Book version available.
©1991 Dataquest Incorporated April—Reproduction Prohibited
Appendix A
Appendix B
Dataquest
1991 Conference
Schedule
North America
Forecast '91-Technology Briefing
Ledgeway Service & Support
Semicon/West
Document Management
Personal & Wireless Communications
Portable Computing
Semiconductor
March 5
April 8-9
May 22
June 27-28
August 12-13
September 11-12
October 14-16
San Jose
San Francisco
Redwood City
San Francisco
Monterey
San Jose
Monterey
February 14-15
February 19-20
February 25-26
March 6-7
March 6
May 29-31
June 11-12
June 12-13
June 13-14
November 7-8
London
MUano
Frankfurt
Paris
Zurich
Marbella
Amsterdam
Amsterdam
Amsterdam
London
April 22-23
June 25-26
September 24-25
October 1-3
Tokyo
Tokyo
Taipei
Tokyo
Europe
Computer Industry
Semicon/Europa '91
Semiconductor
Printer
Colour Market
Copying & Duplicating
Telecommunications
Japan and Asia
Semiconductor
Computer & Telecommunications
Strategic Industry
Peripherals
For rcserrattoiu or ftudier
Jwnmy 1991—Subject to Rviilon
U.K. 8»5^J050 Sm JoK iiSfSi 437-S243 Tokyo }-53664»«ll
B-1
Appendix C
Technology
Products
SpecCheck Guides
Reports
Copier SpecCheck-On-Disk Disk version of the
Copier SpecCheck Guide. Allows custom sorts
on 500 models and 24 vendors. Six annual
updates on either 3.5-inch or 5.25-inch format.
Ims^ing Materials Series
Copier SpecCheck Guide Detailed specifications
and pricing information on 500 copier models.
Two full books, two updates per year.
Fax SpecCheck-On-Disk Disk version of Fax
SpecCheck Guide. Allows custom sorts on 600
models and 47 vendors. Six atmual updates on
either 3.5-inch or 5.25-inch format.
Fax SpecCheck Guide Detailed specifications
and pricing information on 600 fax models.
Two full books, two updates per year.
PC SpecCheck-On-Disk Disk version of PC
SpecCheck Guide. Allows custom sorts on 400
models and 47 vendors. Six annual updates on
either 3.5-inch or 5.25-inch format.
PC SpecCheck Guide Detailed specifications
and pricing information on 400 PC models.
Four full books per year.
Personal Page Printer SpecCheck-On-Disk Disk
version of Personal Page Printer SpecCheck
Guide. Allows custom sorts on 400 models
and 100 vendors. Four annual updates on
either 3.5-inch or 5.25-inch format.
Personal Page and Ink Jet Printers SpecCheck
Guide Detailed specifications and pricing information on 275 personal page and ink jet
printer models. Two full books per year.
Dot Matrix Printer SpecCheck Guide Detailed
specifications and pricing information on 300
dot matrix printers. Two full books per year.
High-Speed Page and Line Printers SpecCheck
Guide Detailed specifications and pricing on
300 high-speed page and line printers. Two
full books per year.
Series of reports on key areas of the imaging
materials industry. Reports currendy available
or planned are:
Toner in the '90s: The Shape of Things to
Come Detailed analysis of the liquid and dry
toner and developer industry. The report looks
at market size, structure and growth, U,S. and
foreign producers, and trends in materials
manufacturing and distribution. Includes directory of suppliers. Available now.
Specialty Papers and Films.- New Technology,
Media, and Markets In-depth report on the
hard-copy media field for paper and film
products. The repon looks at Imaging processes, imaging hardware, end-use applications for
hard-copy output, and market size and forecast. Includes directory of suppliers. Available
June 1991.
The Photoreceptor Industry: A Marketing and
Technical Analysis Detailed analysis of photoreceptor technology and the industry. Volume
I chronicles the evolution of the industry in
terms of equipment, manufacturing, and distribution, providing market size and forecasts.
Volume n is a complete reproduction of U.S.
patent abstracts from 1979-1990. Includes directory of manufacturers. Available Fall 1991.
Other Reports
Fax On Demand—Marketing Tool for the '90s
A usefiil report to help end users evaluate and
select voice/fax systems and implement fax-ondemand services for their business. Includes
applications, technology, and economic considerations for fax-on-demand, as well as a
directory of product vendors and service
providers. Available Jvine 1991Color Scanner User Survey for U.S. Publishing
Markets Extensive survey of key end-user
c-i
C-2
How to Use Dataquest
markets in publishing, advertising, printing
services, graphic design, PostScript output services, and Fortune 1000 companies to ascertain
purchase intentions and installed base of color
and monochrome scanners. Available May
1991.
Semiconductor Industry Insights—from Silicon
to Systems Analysis of the global semiconductor industry containing market forecasts, key
drivers, product demand, semiconductor
production, equipment, and materials.
Appendix C
personal interviews with key decision makers
at the largest banks.
Monthly Newsletters
Copier FAXts A look at new products, distribution, organizational news, and trade show
highlights for the copier and fax industries.
IC Europe All the latest local intelligence and
analysis of new products, alliances, technology
impacts, and forecasts for the European semiconductor industry.
Voice Processing Opportunities in the U.S.—A
Market Assessment and End-User Survey Extensive end-user survey providing networking
information, applications, satisfaction level, purchase decision making, and selection criteria
by key vertical markets. Also includes market
shares, technology, standardization, revenue,
and pricing forecasts through 1994.
European Monitor Monthly newsletter with all
the latest hews on vendor, product, and distribution developments in the European personal
computer market.
High-Speed Printing Applications in Banking A
vertical market study comprising two reports
and videotapes/transcripts of three focus sessions. Study focuses on high-speed printing
applications in the banking industry and examines the applications that banks print internally
and externally, as well as special printing
capability needs of the banking industry.
Other Technology Products
Price Tracking Flash Monthly newsletter on PC
product announcements and changes in price,
configuration, and distribution for PC products
by 16 manufacturers in 14 European countries.
Portable Computing in the 1990s Three-part
series on the latest products, features, and
options for transportables, laptops, notebooks,
palmtops, and electronic daybooks.
Company Backgrounders by Dataquest Detailed
vendor profiles on almost 300 leading worldwide high-technology companies highlighting
company strategic direction, business direction,
detailed product line summaries, information
on joint ventures, mergers and acquisitions,
and licensing agreements.
PC LAN Markets in Europe 1990 Analysis of
all the major PC LAN vendors in 13 European
countries. Market shares, forecasts, distribution
channels, and shipments segmented by enduser types.
DQ Monday On-Line News, analysis, and current prices for 25 leading semiconductor product groups for all the major markets: United
States, Europe, Japan, Hong Kong, Taiwan,
and Korea.
Computer Usage in European Banks 1990 Indepth, two-volume study on the demand for
hardware, applications, LANs, and operating
systems in European banks, segmented by
bank size. A widespread survey of banks in
nine European countries was supplemented by
DQ Test Target Package of ten 8.5 x 11-inch
copier/fax test patterns: gray scale, black and
white, and color.
International Test Target Package of ten standard European-size test taigets.
©1991 Datacpiest Incorporated April—Reproduction Prohibit^
Dataquest
Dataquest Research and Sales Offices:
Dataquest Incorporated
1290 Ridder Park Drive
San Jose, California 95131-2398
Phone: (408) 437-8000
Telex: 171973
Fax: (408) 437-0292
Technology Products Group
Phone: (800) 624-3280
Dataquest Incorporated
Ledgeway/Dataquest
The Corporate Center
550 Cochituate Road
Framingham, MA 01701
Phone: (508) 370-5555
Fax: (508) 370-6262
Dataquest Incorporated
Invitational Computer Conferences Division
3151 Airway Avenue, C-2
Costa Mesa, California 92626
Phone: (714) 957-0171
Telex: 5101002189 ICCDQ
Fax: (714) 957-0903
Dataquest Australia
Suite 1, Century Plaza
80 Berry Street
North Sydn^-, NSW 2060
Australia
Phone: (02) 959 4544
Telex: 25468
Fax: (02) 929 0635
Dataquest GmbH
Kronstadter Strasse 9
8000 Munich 80
West Germany
Phone: Oil 49 89 93 09 09 0
Fax: 49 89 930 3277
Dataquest Europe Limited
Roussel House, Broadwater Park
Denham, Uxbridge, Middx UB9 5HP
England
Phone: 0895-835050
Telex: 266195
Fax: 0895 835260/1/2
Dataquest Europe SA
Tour Gallieni 2
36, avenue du General-de-Gaulle
93175 Bagnolet Cedex
France
Phone: (1) 48 97 31 00
Telex: 233 263
Fax: (1) 48 97 34 00
Dataquest Hong Kong
Rm. 401, Connaught Comm. Bldg.
185 V^nchai Rd.
Wanchai, Hong Kong
Phone: 8387336
Telex: 80587
Fax: 5722375
Dataquest Israel
59 Mishmar Ha'yarden Street
Tel Aviv, Israel 69865
or
P.O. Box 18198
Tel Aviv, Israel
Phone: 52 913937
Telex: 341118
Fax: 52 32865
Dataquest Japan Limited
Shinkawa Sanko Building
1-3-17 Shinkawa, Chuo-ku
Tokyo 104 Japan
Phone: (03) 5566-0411
Fax: (03) 5566-0425
Dataquest Korea
Daeheung Bldg. 1105
648-23 Ifeoksam-dong
Kangnam-gu
Seoul, Korea 135
Phone: (02) 556-4166
Fax: (02) 552-2661
Dataquest Singapore
4012 Ang Mo Kio Industrial Park 1
Ave, 10, #03-10 to #03-12
Singapore 2056
Phone: 4597181
Telex: 38257
Fax: 4563129
Dataquest Taiwan
Room 801/8th Floor
Ever Spring Building
147, Sect. 2, Chien Kuo N. Rd,
Taipei, Taiwan R.O.C. 104
Phone: (02) 501-7960
Telex: 27459
Fax: (02) 505-4265
Dataquest \ \ ^ t Germany
In der Schneithohl 17
6242 Kronbeig 2
West Germany
Phone: 06173/61685
Telex: 418089
Fax: 06173/67901
fxiwras
Dataquest Research Methodology
DataQuest
Dataquest Research Methodology
Source:
Dataquest
Dataoyest
Published by Dataquest Incorporated
The content of this report represents our interpretation and analysis of information generally available to the public or released
by knowledgeable individuals in the subject industry, but is not guaranteed as to accuracy or completeness. It does not contain
material provided to us in confidence by our clients.
Printed in the United States of America. All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced, stored in
retrieval systems, or transmitted, in any form or by any means—mechanical, electronic, photocopying, duplicating, microfilming, videotape, or otherwise—without the prior written permission of the publisher.
© 1991 Dataquest Incorporated
March 1991
Dataquesfs
Research
Philosophy—Methodology
From semiconductors to systems, office to factory automation, Dataquest provides quality
research on more than 25 separate hightechnology industries and their markets.
Fundamental to the way Dataquest conducts its
research is an underlying philosophy that says
the best data and analysis come from a wellbalanced program. Such a program includes a
balance between primary and secondary data
collection techniques; between supply-side and
demand-side analysis; between focused,
industry-specific research and coordinated, "big
picture" analysis; and between the informed,
insightful perspectives of experienced industry
professionals and the rigorous, disciplined
techniques of seasoned market researchers.
Ultimately, this leads to a balance between
data and analysis—the combination of which
provides unique insight and ultimate value to
our clients.
Market Segmentation—Setting
the Standards
The design of market segmentation and data
standards is a critical issue at Dataquest. Much
effort is devoted to choosing and defining the
way products, industries, and markets are segmented. Dataquest's objective is to provide
data and analysis along lines of segmentation
that are logical, appropriate to the industry in
question, and immediately useful to clients.
Over the years, Dataquest has consistentiy
established industry-accepted standard segmentations for the way we follow products and
their movement. Figure 1 reflects the way we
track products. Further, we spend a great deal
of time and effort in defining how we track
these products and determining what our definitions are for the market metrics we use—for
example, shipments, installed base, retirements,
factory revenue versus end-user revenue, market share, and so on.
for
Value
We follow several dimensions. Sometimes there
are one-to-one, or dedicated, relationships
between dimensions—^for example, between
software products and their applications. We
believe that all major high-technology industries mirror this scheme. Note that we do not
use the term vertical markets. This term is
often used to refer to either applications or
environments because both terms describe the
use of a product. Application describes what
the product is used for, and envirormient
describes where the product is used. The term
vertical market often is used for either of
these terms and thereby can cause confusion.
Figure 1
How Dataquest Tracks High Technology
Companies
Ship
'
Products
To
Various
ir
From
Various
Regions
Through
'
Distribution
For
Use In
\'
Applications
In Specific ^
'
User Environnnents
Source: Dataquest (March 1991)
Dataquest's Research Philosophy—Methodology for Value
We have therefore standardized on the following terminology, which distinguishes between
application and environment, for each dimension we follow:
• Major product categories:
-
Materials
-
Components
-
Boards and subsystems
-
Equipment
-
Software
-
Consumables
-
Services
Others
• Product—^A good or service
• Product category—^A group of similar
products
• Region—Geographic areas of both shipments
and consumption
• Distribution—^The path by which a product
moves from manufacturer to ultimate user
• Application—^The use to which a product is
put; the function it performs
• Environment—^Where a product is ultimately
used
The Dataquest Staif
Dataquest believes that in order for an analyst
to understand and analyze an industry, the
analyst must have competed in it. To that end,
our staff is heavily populated with professionals who have extensive experience in the
industries they analyze. These analysts have
held high-level positions in engineering, marketing, product development, and other related
areas.
These industry veterans are complemented by
a staff of professional market researchers who
understand the principles of market research
and who direct Dataquest's programs in primary and secondary research, demographics,
economics research, statistical analysis, forecasting, and modeling. Figure 2 illustrates our
staffing philosophy. This blend of experience
and training is unique in the research industry
and allows Dataquest to provide its clients
with market research of unequaled value.
To develop industry analysis and data,
Dataquest collects a w^ide spectrum of information from a carefully selected portfolio of
sources. Data are collected direcdy by our
researchers in the United States, Europe, Japan,
and Asia.
Primary Research
The principal data collection methodology at
Dataquest is primary research—^firsthand data
collection by Dataquest researchers. Primary
research is conducted with businesses, households, government, and schools; manufacturers,
suppliers, and distributors; and product end
users. Dataquest's in-house Primary Research
Group (located in San Jose and Paris)
processes more than 10,000 interviews each
month, through both mail and telephone interviews, as well as using focus groups and personal interviews. Questionnaires are developed
by the Primary Research Group in conjunction
with Dataquest industry analysts.
All surveys have been designed and demographic samples selected to answ^er specific
inquiries. These samples conform with
Dataquest's standard demographic profiles so
that results will comply with existing data
structures.
The samples are drawn from a variety of
sources, frequendy from the databases of our
parent company, The Dun & Bradstreet Corporation, including the Dun's Market Identifier
File of 6 million U.S. businesses. We also draw
samples from the databases of Computer Intelligence and Focus Research. The number of
interviews conducted is usually specified to
produce data with a reliability of ± 5 percent
at a 95 percent confidence level.
Following questionnaire development and
sample selection, each survey undergoes a rigorous pretesting to make sure the interview
captures the desired information. Once adjustments have been made, the telephone surveys
are conducted on-line by Dataquest's in-house
team of professional interviewers. Call monitoring allows us to provide quality control
throughout the process. All data entry and
tabulation are done in-house.
©1991 Dataquest Incorporated March—Reproduction Prohibited
Dataquest's Research Philosophy—Methodology for Value
Figure 2
Research Organization
Research Operations
Lines of Business
Source: Dataquest (March 1991)
Firsthand Observation
On a daily basis, Dataquest watches and measures high technology around the world, using
yet another technique of primary research:
firsthand observation. Dataquest analysts regularly visit the laboratories, R&D facilities, and
manufacturing plants of the companies they
follow. They view the technologies and new^
products; study the manufacturing yields and
levels of automation; and meet the people
behind the products and companies, from
start-up companies to industry leaders.
government data; directories; financial literature;
product literature; press releases; and many
on-line databases. These sources provide
specific data points and qualitative input to
Dataquest analysis. They cover trends in technology, pricing, manufacturing capacity, competition, product features, demand, buyer
behavior, and macroenvironmental forces such
as demographics, the economy, and the
regulatory arena. The following steps reflect
the overall research process at Dataquest:
• Initiate and clarify research request
• Develop methodological approach
• Develop questionnaire
Secondary Sources
Primary research is supplemented with a
review of secondary-source materials.
Dataquest's Information Resource Centers
throughout the w^orld maintain an extensive
collection of information including technical,
trade, and general business periodicals; reports;
economic data; technical papers; patents;
• Select sample
• Load questionnaire (on-line interviewing)
• Prepare estimates (if appropriate)
• Conduct interviewrer briefing
• Pretest
• Interview
©1991 Dataquest Incorporated March—Reproduction Prohibited
Dataquest's Research Philosophy—Methodology for Value
• Perform quality check and call monitoring
• Merge data
• Perform scrubbing, tabulation, and statistical
analysis
• Approve data
• Report on and deliver results
• Maintain database (as required)
The following is a typical cadre of sources:
Industry contacts
Industry associations and user groups
Trade shows and conferences
Demographics
D&B economic research
D&B credit services
Computer intelligence
Document management systems
Focus Research
Government and regulatory agencies
Industry and trade publications
Public databases and libraries
Annual reports and Forms 10-K
We first develop a company universe for each
industry. The sources reflected in Figure 2 are
checked to make sure that we have a full
census of industry participants.
Next, Dataquest analysts and researchers derive
estimates for each product or product category
for which we collect shipment and revenue
data. The estimates are then provided to
vendor representatives for correction or
substantiation.
The data collected in our vendor surveys are
always considered public information. The data
are used to allow bottom-up analysis defining
market revenue, market size, and market
share. The names of respondents are always
kept confidential, and all data are published as
Dataquest estimates. All respondents are notified of our policies when our market estimates
are initially sent.
Following is a list of steps we go through to
derive estimates and reconcile the responses
for final approval and reporting:
• We establish product category or modellevel detail.
• We establish estimates and check against the
follo"wing:
Product specifications and press releases
-
Aggregate data
Patent activity
-
Industry forecast
-
Historical performance
-
Growth rate of competition
-
Growth rate of related products
Market Sizing and Market Share
Dataquest conducts surveys of manufacturers
and distributors in their respective industries
monthly, quarterly, or annually. These surveys
collect information oh shipment and inventory
levels, pricing, and short-term market expectations. Data are checked and cross-checked
across data collection points at the supplier,
manufacturer, distributor, and end-user levels.
This data collection effort resides at the core
of our standard syndicated industry services.
We use demand-based surveys for many of
our newer products and custom consulting.
However, the balance of this discussion
focuses on our standard, syndicated industry
service product line.
• We use the following sources:
-
Vendor verification
-
Quarterly financials
-
Industry associations
-
Distribution channel data
-
Manufacturing capacity
-
Life-cycle analysis
-
Components and peripherals purchases
-
Consumables production
-
Ongoing dialog with industry sources
©1991 Dataquest Incorporated March—Reproduction Prohibited
Dataquest's Research Phllosopfay—Methodology for Value
-
Industry analysts' qualitative insight
• Installed base
-
Government statistics
• Saturation
-
Other secondary sources
• Obsolescence
• We reconcile responses against Dataquest
segmentation standards.
• Import and export
• Most likely constraints
• Total available market
Market Forecasts
We believe that complex interrelationships
among the various products, markets, and
high-technology industries that we follow
should be understood and accounted for
in the assumptions underlying each forecast. Forecasts must reconcile the complementary nature of systems, peripherals, and
components.
Our forecast methodology begins with the
completion of our vendor-based data acquisition, which is used to establish market size for
the given year of data collection. These data
are used to measure the accuracy of our
previous year's projection for the current year.
This infrastructure creates a critical foundation
that is the starting point for our forecasts.
No single forecast model applies at Dataquest
because of the large scope of products and
industries that we follow. We have a basic
forecasting framework in place that incorporates both quantitative and qualitative data
to derive forecasts. Analysts take the following
factors into consideration when deriving and
cross-checking forecasts and their assumptions:
• Macroeconomics
• Emerging technologies
• Life-cycle analysis
• Retirements
• Environmental trends
• Demographic trends
• Product availability
• Buying intentions
• Captive production
• Historical growth
• Historical pricing
Finally, we regularly hold research forums that
provide an open exchange of opinions for our
analysts.
Throughout Dataquest, each variable must be
defined and measured in the same way.
Analysts may vary the relationships between
variables but not the values themselves. Not
all variable relationships hold true for all
industries; therefore, analysts may specify
which sets of variables to use. Data must be
reported according to Dataquest standard segmentation, and all final data must be approved
before they are reported. All preliminary data
are clearly stated as such. All final data are
reported as Dataquest estimates. Our information is sourced appropriately with the phrase
"Source: Dataquest," and the data are stamped
with a date so that users have a dear understanding of what iteration they are using and
the assumptions behind those data.
Dataquest Market Research—
What's behind the Numbers?
when Dataquest clients receive forecast data
with the familiar line "Source: Dataquest,"
they receive the end result of a rigorous process of primary and secondary data collection;
supply-side, demand-side, and macroenvironmental analysis; and the cross-industry perspective afforded by Dataquest's uniquely broad
and in-depth worldwide coverage of high
technology.
Behind the numbers is a thorough discussion,
involving industry professionals and research
experts, and testing of the assumptions used
to develop Dataquest's forecasts. In this way,
clients get more than simply a single point of
data for planning and decision making. Behind
the numbers is a commitment to quality—a
worldwide organization of people committed
to supplying the highest-quality information
and analysis to Dataquest's clients.
©1991 Dataquest Incorporated March—Reproduction Prohibited
DataQuest
Dataquest Research and Saks Offices:
Dataquest Incorporated
1290 Ridder Parle Drive
San Jose, California 95131-2398
Phone: (408) 437-8000
Telex: 171973
Fax: (408) 437-0292
Technology Products Group
Phone: (800) 624-3280
Dataquest Incorporated
Ledgeway/Dataquest
The Corporate Center
550 Cochituate Road
Framingham, MA 01701
Phone: (508) 370-5555
Fax: (508) 370-6262
^ ^ ^ K
^^^^B
^^^^^F
^^^^•^
Dataquest Incorporated
Invitational Computer Conferences Division
3151 Airway Avenue, C-2
Costa Mesa, California 92626
Phone: (714) 957-0171
Telex: 5101002189 ICCDQ
Fax: (714) 957-0903
Dataquest Australia
Suite 1, Century Plaza
80 Berry Street
North Sydney, NSW 2060
Australia
Phone: (02) 959 4544
Telex: 25468
Fax: (02) 929 0635
Dataquest GmbH
Kronstadter Strasse 9
8000 Munich 80
West Germany
Phone; Oil 49 89 93 09 09 0
Fax: 49 89 930 3277
Dataquest Europe Limited
Roussel House, Broadwater Park
Denham, Uxbridge, Middx UB9 5HP
England
Phone: 0895-835050
Telex: 266195
Fax: 0895 835260/1/2
Dataquest Europe SA
Tour Gallieni 2
36, avenue du General-de-Gaulle
93175 Bagnolet Cedex
France
Phone; (1) 48 97 31 00
Telex: 233 263
Fax: (1) 48 97 34 00
_
Dataquest Hong Kong
Rm. 401, Connaught Comm. Bldg.
185 Wanchai Rd.
Wanchai, Hong Kong
Phone: 8387336
Telex: 80587
Fax: 5722375
Dataquest Israel
59 Mishmar Ha'yarden Street
Tel Aviv, Israel 69865
or
P.O. Box 18198
Tel Aviv, Israel
Phone: 52 913937
Telex: 341118
Fax: 52 32865
Dataquest Japan Limited
Shinkawa Sanko Building
1-3-17 Shinkawa, Chuo-ku
Tokyo 104 Japan
Phone: (03) 5566-0411
Fax: (03) 5566-0425
fl
-=f
-J
^
fl
J
Dataquest Korea
Daeheung Bldg. 1105
648-23 Yeoksam-dong
Kangnam-gu
Seoul, Korea 135
Phone: (02) 556-4166
Fax: (02) 552-2661
Dataquest Singapore
4012 Ang Mo Kio Industrial Park 1
Ave. 10, #03-10 to #03-12
Singapore 2056
Phone: 4597181
Telex: 38257
Fax: 4563129
Dataquest Taiwan
Room 801/8th Floor
Ever Spring Building
147, Sect. 2, Chien Kuo N. Rd.
Taipei, Taiwan R.O.C. 104
Phone: (02) 501-7960
Telex: 27459
Fax: (02) 505-4265
Dataquest West Germany
In der Schneithohl 17
6242 Kronberg 2
West Germany
Phone: 06173/61685
Telex: 418089
Fax: 06173/67901
0009692
>•
Q
§
5
Q
0 c
LUJ
iL8
DataQuest
Dataquest High-Technology Guide
Segmentation and Glossary
1991
Dataquest High-Technology Guide
Segmentation and Glossary
1991
>
Source:
Dataquest
Dataqyest
Published by Dataquest Incorporated
The content of this report represents our interpretation and analysis of information generally available to the public or
released by responsible individuals in the subject companies, but is not guaranteed as to accuracy or completeness. It
does not contain material provided to us in confidence by our clients.
Printed in the United States of America. All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced, stored in
retrieval systems, or transmitted, in any form or by any means—mechanical, electronic, photocopying, duplicating,
microfilming, videotape, or otherwise—without the prior written permission of the publisher.
© 1991 Dataquest Incorporated January
i
^
High-Technology Guide
The High-Technology Guide provides a reference for Dataquest research,
analysis, and publications. The segments and terms found in this guide
are used consistently in our research and methodology and throughout
Dataquest products.
The High-Technology Guide is divided into two parts: segmentation and
glossary. The segmentation section provides a comprehensive listing of the
classifications used in our research. This segmentation is broken into
different dimensions including companies, products, regions, distribution,
applications, and user environments. These dimensions are illustrated
below (see Figure 1). The glossary is an alphabetical list defining the
terms found in the segmentation section.
Figure 1
Research Dimensions
\
Companies
ship
1
'
Products
to
various
from
various
Regions
througii
'
Distribution
for
use In
'
Applications
In
specific
1'
User Environments
Source: Dataquest (January 1991)
1991 Dataquest Incorporated January—Reproduction Prohibited
Table of Contents
Page
SEGMENTATION
1
COMPANIES
3
PRODUCTS
Materials
Components
Boards and Subsystems
Equipment
Software
Consumables
Services
Other Products
5
7
7
13
13
36
38
38
41
GEOGRAPHIC REGIONS
North America
Europe
Japan
Rest of Asia—Rest of World
43
46
48
50
51
DISTRIBUTION
Distribution Channel
Distribution Method .
53
55
55
APPLICATIONS
General Productivity
Organizational
Entertainment
Industry Specific
57
59
61
66
66
Page
USER ENVIRONMENT
Home
Business
Natural Resources and
Construction
Process Manufacturing
Discrete Manufacturing
Transportation
Communication
Utilities
Wholesale Trade
Retail Trade
Finance
Insurance
Real Estate
Hotels and Other Lodging
Business Services
Health Care
Other Services
Education
Government
Size
67
69
69
RESEARCH ITEMS
73
GLOSSARY
1991 Dataquest Incorporated January—Reproduction Prohibited
69
69
69
70
70
70
70
70
70
70
70
70
71
71
71
71
71
72
77
High-Technology Guide Segmentation
I
Segmentation
^
1991 Dataquest Incorporated January—Reproduction Prohibited
High-Technology Guide Segmentation
>
Companies
The companies section contains more than 3,500 companies on which
Dataquest conducts research. These companies are studied because of
their concentration or emphasis in technology markets and industries.
The company segmentation shows the breadth and depth of collective
coverage that Dataquest maintains. Because of the extensive nature of the
company list, it is not published in this guide but can be provided upon
request.
i
)
1991 Dataquest Incorporated January—Reproduction Proliibited
High-Technology Guide Segmentation
Products
The products section lists high-technology products. This section
presents the segmentation of the technology as defined by Dataquest.
The major categories of products are as follows:
•
Materials
•
Software
•
Components
•
Consumables
•
Boards and Subsystems
•
Services
•
Equipment
•
Other Products
The segmentation represents Dataquest's view of the high-technology marketplace and is not intended to represent
the availability of data.
1991 Dataquest Incorporated January—Reproduction Prohibited
High-Technology Guide Segmentation
Products
MATERIALSWafer
Silicon Wafer
Epitaxial Wafer
Gas
Bulk Gas
Nitrogen
Oxygen
Hydrogen
Argon
Specialty Gas
Silicon Precursor
Dopant
Plasma Etchant
Reactant Gas
Atmospheric/Purge Cylinder Gas and Other
Plastics
)
COMPONENTSSemiconductor
Integrated Circuit
Bipolar Digital (by Technology)
TTL/Others
ECL
Bipolar Digital (by Function)
Bipolar Digital Memory
Bipolar RAM
Bipolar Nonvolatile Memory
Other Bipolar Memory
Bipolar Digital Microcomponents
Bipolar Digital Logic
Bipolar ASIC
Bipolar Gate Array
Bipolar PLD
Bipolar PLA
Bipolar PMD
Bipolar FPGA
The segmentation represents Dataquest's view of the high-technology marketplace and is not intended to represent the
availability of data.
1991 Dataquest Incorporated January—Reproduction Prohibited
High-Technology Guide Segmentation
i
COMPONENTS
Bipolar ASIC (Continued)
Bipolar Cell-Based IC
Bipolar Custom IC
Bipolar Standard Logic
Other Bipolar Logic
MOS Digital (by Technology)
NMOS/PMOS
CMOS
BiCMOS
MOS Digital (by Function)
MOS Memory
DRAM
16K DRAM
32K DRAM
64K DRAM
128K DRAM
256K DRAM
1Mb DRAM
4Mb DRAM
16Mb DRAM
SRAM
Slow SRAM
IK SRAM
4K SRAM
8K SRAM
16K SRAM
64K SRAM
256K SRAM
1Mb SRAM
4Mb SRAM
i
Fast SRAM
IK SRAM
4K SRAM
8K SRAM
16K SRAM
64K SRAM
256K SRAM
1Mb SRAM
4Mb SRAM
The segmentation represents Dataquest's view of the high-technology marketplace and is not intended to represent the
availability of data.
1991 Dataquest Incorporated January—Reproduction Proliibited
i
High-Technology Guide Segmentation
COMPONENTS
Nonvolatile Memory IC
ROM
4K ROM
8K ROM
16K ROM
32K ROM
64K ROM
128K ROM
256K ROM
1Mb ROM
2Mb ROM
4Mb ROM
8Mb ROM
16Mb ROM
EPROM
16K EPROM
32K EPROM
64K EPROM
128K EPROM
256K EPROM
1Mb EPROM
2Mb EPROM
4Mb EPROM
8Mb EPROM
EEPROM
IK EEPROM
2K EEPROM
4K EEPROM
8K EEPROM
16K EEPROM
32K EEPROM
64K EEPROM
128K EEPROM
256K EEPROM
512K EEPROM
1Mb EEPROM
Other MOS Memory
MOS Microcomponents
MOS Microprocessor (by Word Length)
8-bit MOS MPU
The segmentation represents Dataquest's view ol the high-technology marketplace and is not intended to represent the
availability of data.
1991 Dataquest Incorporated January—Reproduction Prohibited
10
High-Technology Guide Segmentation
COMPONENTS
MOS Microprocessor (by Word Length) (Continued)
16-bit MOS MPU
16/32-bit MOS MPU
32-bit MOS MPU
32/64-bit MOS MPU
64-bit MOS MPU
MOS Microprocessor (by Technology)
CISC MOS MPU
RISC MOS MPU
MOS Microcontroller
4-bit MOS MCU
8-bit MOS MCU
16-bit MOS MCU
32-bit MOS MCU
Digital Signal Processor
DSP Microprocessor (DSMPU)
Microprogrammable DSP (MPDSP)
Special-Function DSP (SFDSP)
MOS Microperipheral
System Support Peripheral
Traditional Peripheral
Counter/Timer
DMA
Interrupt Controller
Memory Management
Real-Time Clock
Others
m
General-Purpose I/O
DRAM Controller
Cache Controller
PC Logic Chip Set
Display Peripheral
Alphanumeric CRT Controller
Graphics Controller
Keyboard Controller
Printer Controller
Others
Mass Storage Peripheral
Floppy Disk Controller
Hard-Disk Controller
Optical Disk Controller
Others
The segmentation represents Dataquest's view of the high-technology marketplace and is not intended to represent the
availability of data.
1991 Dataquest Incorporated January—Reproduction Prohibited
i
High-Technology Guide Segmentation
COMPONENTS
Communications Peripheral
LAN
ISDN
Modem
Serial I/O
UART/USART
Others
Floating-Point Coprocessor
16-bit
32-bit
MOS Logic
MOS ASIC
MOS Gate Array
MOS PLD
MOS PLA
MOS PMD
MOS FPGA
MOS Cell-Based IC
MOS Custom IC
MOS Standard Logic
Other MOS Logic
>
Analog Integrated Circuit
Monolithic Analog IC
Linear IC
Amplifier IC
Voltage Regulator
Voltage Reference IC
Comparator IC
Special-Function IC
Special Consumer IC
Special Automotive IC
Linear Array/ASIC
Mixed Signal IC
Data Converter IC
Telecommunication IC
Interface IC
Switch/Multiplexer IC
Disk Drive IC
Mixed Signal ASIC
Hybrid Analog IC
)
The segmentation represents Dataquest's view o( the high-technology marketplace and is not intended to represent the
availability of data.
1991 Dataquest Incorporated January—Reproduction Prohibited
11
12
High-Technology Guide Segmentation
i
COMPONENTS
Discrete Semiconductor
Transistor
Small Signal Transistor
Power Transistor
Bipolar Power Transistor
MOS Power Transistor
Insulated Gate Bipolar Transistor
Diode
Small Signal Diode
Power Diode/Rectifier
Thyristor
Other Discrete Semiconductor
Optoelectronic Semiconductor
Light-Emitting Diode/Display
Optocoupler
CCD
Laser Diode
Photosensor
Solar Cell
III-V Semiconductor
GaAs Digital IC
GaAs Analog IC
III-V Discrete Transistor
Optoelectronic IC
Passive Component
Cable
Capacitor
Cathode Ray Tube (CRT)
Connector
Inductor
Potentiometer
Relay
Resistor
Socket
Splice (Optical)
Transducer
Liquid Crystal Display
Switch
The segmentation represents Dataquest's view of the high-technology marketplace and is not intended to represent the
availability of data.
1991 Dataquest Incorporated January—Reproduction Proliibited
i
High-Technology Guide Segmentation
BOARDS AND SUBSYSTEMS
Graphic Board
Mac-Type Add-On Graphic Board
IBM-Type Add-On Graphic Board
Imaging Subsystem
Add-On Memory Board
Controller Board
Storage Controller Board
Printer Controller Board
Magnetic Recording Head
Board-Level Computer
Storage Subsystem
EQUIPMENTData Processing Equipment
Computer Systems by Product Segment
General-Purpose Computer System
Supercomputer
Corporate Supercomputer
Departmental Supercomputer
Research Supercomputer
Mainframe Computer
Midrange Computer
Superminicomputer
Minicomputer
Microcomputer
Workstation Computer
Graphic/Project Supercomputer
Superworkstation
Traditional Workstation
Entry-Level Workstation
Personal Computer
Desktop Personal Computer
Desk-Side Personal Computer
Transportable Personal Computer
Laptop A/C Personal Computer
Laptop D/C Personal Computer
Notebook D/C Personal Computer
Pen-Based Personal Computer
The segmentation represents Dataquest's view of the high-technology marketplace and is not intended to represent the
availability of data.
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High-Technology Guide S e g m e n t a t i o n
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EQUIPMENTHand-Held Personal Computer
Special-Purpose Computer System
Data Storage Device
Flexible Disk Drive
Fixed Media
Sub-3.5-Inch Disk Drive
0 to 30MB
31 to 60MB
61 to 100MB
101 to 200MB
201 to 500MB
501+MB
3.5-Inch Disk Drive
0 to 30MB
31 to 60MB
61 to 100MB
101 to 200MB
201 to 500MB
501 to 1,000MB
1,001+MB
5.25-Inch Disk Drive
0 to 30MB
31 to 60MB
61 to 100MB
101 to 200MB
201 to 500MB
501 to 1,000MB
1,001+MB
i
8 to 10.5-Inch Disk Drive
0 to 30MB
31 to 60MB
61 to 100MB
101 to 200MB
201 to 500MB
501 to 1,000MB
1,001+MB
14-Inch Disk Drive
0 to 30MB
31 to 60MB
The segmentation represents Dataquest's view of the high-technology marketplace and is not intended to represent the
availability of data.
1991 Dataquest Incorporated January—Reproduction Prohibited
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High-Technology Guide Segmentation
•
EQUIPMENT14-Inch Disk Drive (Continued)
61 to 100MB
101 to 200MB
201 to 500MB
501 to 1.000MB
1,001+MB
Rigid Disk Drive
Fixed Media
Sub-3.5-Inch Disk Drive
0 to 30MB
31 to 60MB
61 to 100MB
101 to 200MB
201 to 500MB
501+MB
I
3.5-Inch Disk Drive
0 to 30MB
31 to 60MB
61 to 100MB
101 to 200MB
201 to 500MB
501 to 1,000MB
1,001+MB
5.25-Inch Disk Drive
0 to 30MB
31 to 60MB
61 to 100MB
101 to 200MB
201 to 500MB
501 to 1,000MB
1,001+MB
8 to 10.5-Inch Disk Drive
0 to 30MB
31 to 60MB
61 to 100MB
101 to 200MB
201 to 500MB
501 to 1,000MB
1,001+MB
The segmentation represents Dataquest's view of the high-technology marketplace and is not intended to represent the
availability of data.
^
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High-Technology Guide Segmentation
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EQUIPMENT14-Inch Disk Drive
0 to 30MB
31 to 60MB
61 to 100MB
101 to 200MB
201 to 500MB
501 to 1,000MB
1,001+MB
Removable Media
Sub-3.5-Inch Disk Drive
0 to 30MB
31 to 60MB
61 to 100MB
101 to 200MB
201 to 500MB
501+MB
3.5-Inch Disk Drive
0 to 30MB
31 to 60MB
61 to 100MB
101 to 200MB
201 to 500MB
501 to 1,000MB
1,001+MB
5.25-Inch Disk Drive
0 to 30MB
31 to 60MB
61 to 100MB
101 to 200MB
201 to 500MB
501 to 1,000MB
1,001+MB
8 to 10.5-Inch Disk Drive
0 to 30MB
31 to 60MB
61 to 100MB
101 to 200MB
201 to 500MB
501 to 1,000MB
1,001+MB
The segmentation represents Dataquest's view of the high-technology marketplace and is not intended to represent the
availability of data.
1991 Dataquest Incorporated January—Reproduction Prohibited
High-Technology Guide Segmentation
EQUIPMENT14-Inch Disk Drive
0 to 30MB
31 to 60MB
61 to 100MB
101 to 200MB
201 to 500MB
501 to 1,000MB
1,001+MB
Dual Media
Sub-3.5-Inch Disk Drive
0 to 30MB
31 to 60MB
61 to 100MB
101 to 200MB
201 to 500MB
501+MB
3.5-Inch Disk Drive
0 to 30MB
31 to 60MB
61 to 100MB
101 to 200MB
201 to 500MB
501 to 1,000MB
1.001+MB
5.25-Inch Disk Drive
0 to 30MB
31 to 60MB
61 to 100MB
101 to 200MB
201 to 500MB
501 to 1,000MB
1,001+MB
8 to 10.5-Inch Disk Drive
0 to 30MB
31 to 60MB
61 to 100MB
101 to 200MB
201 to 500MB
501 to 1,000MB
1,001+MB
The segmentation represents Dataquest's view of the high-technology marketplace and is not intended to represent the
availability of data.
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High-Technology Guide Segmentation
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EQUIPMENT
14-Inch Disk Drive
0 to 30MB
31 to 60MB
61 to 100MB
101 to 200MB
201 to 500MB
501 to 1,000MB
1,001+MB
Optical Disk Drive
CD-ROM
WORM Optical Disk Drive
5.25 Inch
8 to 12 Inch
14 Inch
Rewritable Optical Disk Drive
2 to 5.25 Inch
8 to 12 Inch
Optical Jukebox
Tape Drive
1/4-Inch Tape Drive
Start-Stop
Streamer
8 Inch
5.25 Inch
3.5 Inch
1/8-Inch Tape Drive
Cassette
Cartridge
1/2-Inch Tape Drive
1/2-Inch Vacuum Column
1/2-Inch Tension Arm
1/2-Inch Streaming
1/2-Inch Cartridge
Reel-to-Reel Tape Drive Recap
Helical Scan Tape Drive
VHS
DAT
8 mm
Others
i
Input/Output Device
Terminal
Alphanumeric (CRT) Terminal
Minicomputer-Based Terminal
The segmentation represents Dataquest's view o( the high-technology marketplace and is not intended to represent the
availability of data.
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High-Technology Guide Segmentation
EQUIPMENTAlphanumeric (CRT) Terminal (Continued)
Non-IBM, Protocol-Specific Terminal
IBM 3270 Protocol Terminal
Host/Vendor-Independent Terminal
Processing Terminal
Graphics Terminal
Point-of-Sale Terminal
Funds Transfer Terminal (ATMs)
Smart Card
Other Specialized Terminal
Electronic Printer
Serial Printer
Serial, Impact, Dot Matrix Printer
Dot Matrix Printer by Speed
0 to 180 cps
181 to 250 cps
251 to 399 cps
400+ cps
Dot Matrix Printer by Size
Total < 9 Wire (Pin)
Total 9 Wire (Pin)
Total 18 Wire (Pin)
Total 24 Wire (Pin)
Serial, Impact, Fully Formed Printer
0 to 30 cps
31+ cps
Serial, Nonimpact, Direct Thermal Printer
Serial, Nonimpact, Thermal Transfer Printer
Wax-Based
Sublimation
Dry Silver
Serial, Nonimpact, Ink Jet Printer
Line Printer
Line, Impact, Dot Matrix Printer
0 to 450 1pm
451 to 650 1pm
651+ 1pm
Line, Impact, Fully Formed Printer
0 to 450 1pm
451 to 650 1pm
651 to 1,050 1pm
The segmentation represents Dataquest's view of the high-technology marketplace and is not intended to represent the
availability of data.
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High-Technology Guide Segmentation
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EQUIPMENTLine, Impact, Fully Formed Printer (Continued)
1,051 to 1,250 1pm
1,251+ 1pm
Line, Nonimpact, Direct Thermal Printer
Line, Nonimpact, Thermal Transfer Printer
Page Printer
0 to 6 ppm
7 to 10 ppm
11 to 15 ppm
16 to 20 ppm
21 to 30 ppm
31 to 50 ppm
51 to 80 ppm
81 to 150 ppm
151+ ppm
Other Input/Output Devices
Monitor
Remote Batch, Job-Entry, and Output
Key Entry Equipment
Media-to-Media Data Conversion
Magnetic Ink Character Recognition (MICR)
Optical Scanning Equipment
Computer Plotters
Small Format Pen Plotter
Large Format Pen Plotter
Small Format Electrostatic Plotter
Large Format Electrostatic Plotter
Ink Jet Plotter
Thermal Plotter
Photosensitive Plotter
Laser Plotter
Voice Recognition Computer Device
Voice Synthesizer
Mouse
Keyboard
Digitizer
^
^
Office Equipment
Copier and Duplicator
Personal Copier (Up to 12 cpm)
Segment 1 (Up to 20 cpm)
The segmentation represents Dataquest's view of the high-technology marketplace and is not intended to represent the
availability of data.
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High-Technology Guide Segmentation
EQUIPMENT
Copier and
Segment
Segment
Segment
Segment
Segment
Duplicator (Continued)
2 (21 to 30 cpm)
3 (31 to 44 cpm)
4 (45 to 69 cpm)
5 (70 to 90 cpm)
6 (91+ cpm)
Full-Color Copiers
Electronic Calculator (without Alpha Keyboard)
Dictating, Transcribing Machine
Electronic Typewriter
Word Processor
Banking System
Check-Handling System
Cash Register
Mailing, Letter-Handling, Addressing Equipment
Other Office Equipment
\
Communications
Telecommunicatons
Image Communications
Facsimile
Classification by Type
Standalone Systems
PC Facsimile Cards
LAN to Fax Gateways
Classification by Technology
Group I
Group II
Group III
Group III Bis
Group IV
Classification by Feature
Ultra Low End
Low End
Midrange
High End
Classification by Price
<$1,000
$1,000 to $1,499
$1,500 to $1,999
$2,000 to $2,499
$2,500 to $2,999
$3,000 or More
The segmentation represents Dataquest's view of the high-technology marketplace and is not intended to represent the
availability of data.
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High-Technology Guide S e g m e n t a t i o n
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EQUIPMENTClassification by Printing Technology
Thermal
Thermal Transfer
Plain Paper (Laser, LED, etc.)
ISDN Terminals
Servers
Teleconferencing
Audio
Video
Captured Image
Near-Full Motion
Codecs
PX64
Telex
Machines
Black Boxes
Gateways
Message Switches
Videotex
Terminals
Personal Communications
Mobile Radio
Cellular Handsets
Classification by Type
Car-Mounted
Transportable
Portable
Classification by Technology
Analog
C450
NMT450
NMT900
TACS
ETACS
Radiocom 2000
AMPS
RTMS-Italy
Digital
GSM
Others
The segmentation represents Dataquest's view of the high-technology marketplace and is not intended to represent the
availability of data.
1991 Dataquest Incorporated January—Reproduction Prohibited
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H i g h - T e c h n o l o g y Guide S e g m e n t a t i o n
EQUIPMENTCordless Handsets
CTO
CTl
CT2
CT3
DECT
GSM
Base Stations
Global Positioning Systems
Mobile Infrastructure
Base Stations
Personal Communications Networks (PCN)
Mininetworks
Public Mobile Radio (PMR)
Paging Systems
Networking
Cable (Private)
Data PBX
Encryption Units
Front-End Processors
IBM and IBM-Compatible
Proprietary
ISDN
Local Area Networks (LANs)
Terminal Servers
Ethernet
Token Ring
Others
PC Network Operating Software
PC LANs
Classification by Type
IBM PC/Compatible
Apple Macintosh
Classification by Technology
802.3
802.5
Arcnet
FDDI
Others
Classification by Media
Coaxial
Unshielded Twisted Pair (UTP)
Fiber-Optic
Datagrade
The segmentation represents Dataquest's view of the high-technology marketplace and is not intended to represent the
availability of data.
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High-Technology Guide Segmentation
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EQUIPMENTLocal Operating Network Systems (LONs)
Modems
Classification by Standards
U.S. Standards
212 A
V.22 Bis
201 B/C
208 A/B
V.29
V.32
V.33
16.8 Kbps
19.2 Kbps
V.35
V.36
Proprietary Dial-Up 9.6 Kbps
European Standards
V.21/23
V.21/23 PC
V.22
V.22 PC
V.22 Bis
V.22 Bis PC
V.26
V.27
V.29 Basic
V.29 Premium
V.32
V.32 PC
Proprietary Dial-Up 9.6 Kbps
V.33
16.8 Kbps
19.2 Kbps
Proprietary Baseband
Proprietary DOVE
Multiplexers
Classification by Technology
Time Division (TDM)
Low-End Point-to-Point/Dual Trunk
Low-End Networking
Channels Banks/Primary MUX
T l / E l Point-to-Point/Dual Trunk
The segmentation represents Dataquest's view of the high-technology marlcetplace and is not intended to represent the
availability of data.
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H i g h - T e c h n o l o g y Guide S e g m e n t a t i o n
\
EQUIPMElSfT
>
>
Time Division (TDM) (Continued)
T l / E l Network Access
High-End Networking
Greater than T l / E l
Statistical Time Division (STDM)
Classification by Size
Low End (Up to 16 Channels)
Midrange (Up to 48 Channels)
High End (More than 48 Channels)
Network Management Systems
Public
Carrier
Local
Long Distance
Private
LANs
Tl/El
X.25
Modems
Voice (Call Accounting)
Switch and Patch
Matrix
Mini/Mainframe-Based
Test Equipment
Analyzers
Operator Support Systems
Network-Terminating Devices
Operator Support Systems
Other Datacom Equipment
Fiber-Optic Multiplexers
Public Data Network Systems (Equipment)
X.21 Switches
Servers
Value-Added Networks (Equipment)
X.25
Classification by Type
Packet Assemblers/Disassemblers (PADs)
Asynchronous Only
Synchronous Only
Multiprotocol
Packet Switches (Nodes)
The segmentation represents Dataquest's view of the high-technology marketplace and is not intended to represent the
availability of data.
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High-Technology Guide Segmentation
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EQUIPMENT
Classification
Low End
Midrange
High End
by Capacity
(Up to 100 Packets per Second)
(Up to 1,000 pps)
(More than 1,000 pps)
Public Network Equipment
Cable
Coaxial
Fiber-Optics
Monomode
Multimode
Multipair
Cable TV
Carrier Equipment
Central Office
Classification by Type
Local
Trunk
Gateway
Classification by Technology
Analog
Digital
ISDN
Basic Rate Interface (BRI)
Primary Rate Interface (PRI)
Others
Classification By Size
Less than 2K Lines
2K to lOK Lines
More than lOK Lines
Digital Access CrossConnect Systems (DACS)
Classification by Type
1/0 DCS
1/1 DCS
3/1 DCS
3/1/0 DCS
3/3 DCS
4/1 DCS
4/3 DCS
4/4 DCS
OCN/OCN
The segmentation represents Dataquest's view of the high-technology marketplace and is not intended to represent the
availability of data.
1991 Dataquest Incorporated January—Reproduction Prohibited
High-Technology Guide S e g m e n t a t i o n
EQUIPMENT
Classification by Capacity
Low End
Midrange
High End
Fiber-Optic Terminal (FOTs)
Line Conditioners
Main Distribution Frame (MDF)
Connectors
Microwave
Classification by Type
Systems
Antenna
Accessories
Electronics
Classification by Usage
Short Haul
Long Haul
Classification by Technology
Analog
Digital
Multiplexers
Classification by Type
Multiplexers
Fiber-Optic Terminals
Classification by Technology
Analog
Digital
Classification by Standards
European/CEPT Standard
2 Mbps
8 Mbps
34 Mbps
140 Mbps
565 Mbps
2.4 Gbps
U.S. Standard
1.5 Mbps
6 Mbps
45 Mbps
90 Mbps
135 Mbps
1.2 Gbps
The segmentation represents Dataquest's view of the high-technology marketplace and is not intended to represent the
availability of data.
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High-Technology Guide Segmentation
I
EQUIPMENTSONET
Synchronous Digital Hierarchy (SDH)
Asynchronous Transfer Mode (ATM)
Fast Packet Switching
Frame Relay
Network Termination Units
ISDN
DSU/CSU
NTU
Operating Support Systems
Pay Phones
Public Paging Systems
Local Loop Equipment
Analog
PCM Repeaters
Digital
Twisted Pair
SLC-96 and Compatibles
Others
Fiber Optics
Universal Digital Line Carrier (UDLC)
Integrated Digital Line Carrier (IDLC)
Flexible Access System (FAS)
SONET
802.6 Metropolitan Area Network (MAN)
Others
Wireless
Basic Exchange Telephone Radio Service (BETRS)
Cordless
Satellite Communications
Space Stations
Earth Stations
VSAT
Master—Hub
Remote
Receive Only—Data Broadcast
Interactive
Direct Broadcast
Teleport
Television Receive Only
Video Distribution
The segmentation represents Dataquest's view of the high-technology marketplace and is not intended to represent the
availability of data.
1991 Dataquest Incorporated January—Reproduction Prohibited
High-Technology Guide Segmentation
>
EQUIPMENTSatellite Communications (Continued)
Home
Intelsat
Eutelsat
Others
Signaling
Telex
Low End (Less than 20 Ports)
Midrange(20 to 80 Ports)
High End (More than 80 Ports)
X.25
Classification by Size
Low End
Midrange
High End
^
Voice Communication
Answering Machines
Attendant Consoles
Automatic Call Distributors (ACDs)
Classification by Type
Standalone
Integrated
Analog
Digital
Classification by Capacity
1 to 8 Agent Positions
9 to 24 Agent Positions
25 to 48 Agent Positions
49 to 100 Agent Positions
More than 100 Agent Positions
Business Communications Systems
Classification by Type
Private Branch Exchange (PBX)
Key Telephone System (KTS)
Classification by Technology
Analog
Digital
ISDN
Terminals
ISDN
Proprietary
Servers
Network
BRI
>
The segmentation represents Dataquest's view of the high-technology marlcetplace and is not intended to represent the
availability of data.
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High-Technology Guide S e g m e n t a t i o n
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EQUIPMENTNetwork (Continued)
PRI
Proprietary
Gateways
Basic
Classification by Capacity
1 to 8 Lines
9 to 24 Lines
25 to 48 Lines
49 to 100 Lines
101 to 400 Lines
401 to 1.000 Lines
More than 1,000 Lines
Cable (Private)
Call Management Systems
Centrex
KTS
PBX
Integrated Voice/Data Workstations (IVDT)
Intercom Systems
ISDN Terminals
Voice
Data
Video
Integrated
Private Paging Systems
Trading Turrets/Dealer Boards
Voice-Messaging Systems
Classification by Capacity
1 to 4 Ports
5 to 8 Ports
9 to 16 Ports
17 to 32 Ports
33 to 64 Ports
65 to 128 Ports
More than 128 Ports
Voice Response Units (VRUs)
Classification by Capacity
1 to 4 Ports
5 to 8 Ports
9 to 16 Ports
17 to 32 Ports
33 to 64 Ports
65 to 128 Ports
More than 128 Ports
The segmentation represents Dataquest's view o( the high-technology marketplace and is not intended to represent the
availability of data.
1991 Dataquest Incorporated January—Reproduction Prohibited
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High-Technology Guide Segmentation
I
EQUIPMENT
Voice Terminals
Classification by Type
Corded
Cordless
Classification by Technology
Analog
Digital
Pulse Dial
Tone Dial (DTMF)
Industrial Electronic Equipment
Security/Energy Management
Alarm System
Intrusion Detection Alarm System
Fire Detection Alarm System
Discrete Device, Security/Energy Management
MPU Load Programmer
Computerized Energy Control System
^
Manufacturing System
Wafer Fabrication Equipment
Lithography Equipment
Proximity/Contact Aligners
Projection Aligner
Steppers
Direct-Write E-Beam
Maskmaking E-Beam
X Ray
Automatic Photoresist Processing Equipment
Etch-and-Clean Equipment
Wet Process
Dry Strip
Dry Etch
Ion Milling
Deposition Equipment
Chemical Vapor Deposition
Physical Vapor Deposition
Silicon Epitaxy Deposition
Metalorganic CVD Deposition
Molecular Beam Epitaxy Deposition
Diffusion
Rapid Thermal Processing
^
The segmentation represents Dataquest's view of the high-technology marlcetplace and is not intended to represent the
availability of data.
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High-Technology Guide Segmentation
EQUIPMENTIon Implantation
Medium Current Ion Implantation
High-Current Ion Implantation
High-Voltage Ion Implantation
Optical CD/Wafer Inspection
Other Process Control Equipment
Factory Automation Equipment
Other Water Fabrication Equipment
Test Equipment
ATE (Automatic Test Equipment)
Discrete Component Tester
Semiconductor Tester
Interconnect/Bare PCB Tester
In-Circuit PCB Tester
Functional PCB Tester
Combined PCB Tester
Manufacturing EATE N/A
General Test Equipment
Process Control System
Process Control System,
Process Control System,
Process Control System,
Process Control System,
Process Control System,
Process Control System,
Controller
Recorder
Indicator
Auxiliary Station
Nonunified System
Industrial Process
Programmable Machine Tool
Boring Programmable Machine Tool
Drilling Programmable Machine Tool
Grinding Programmable Machine Tool
Horizontal Turning Programmable Machine Tool
Vertical Turning Programmable Machine Tool
Milling Programmable Machine Tool
Machining Center Programmable Machine Tool
Other Cutting Programmable Machine Tool
Punch/Shear/Bend Programmable Machine Tool
Flexible Manufacturing System Programmable Machine Tool
Mechanical Assembly Equipment
Plastic Processing Machinery
Robot System
Robotic Electronic Assembly
Robotic Nonelectronic Assembly
The segmentation represents Dataquest's view of the high-technology marketplace and is not intended to represent the
availability of data.
1991 Dataquest Incorporated January—Reproduction Prohibited
H i g h - T e c h n o l o g y Guide S e g m e n t a t i o n
EQUIPMENTRobot System (Continued)
Material-Handling/Loading Robot System
Painting Robot System
Spot-Welding Robot System
Arc-Welding Robot System
Machining Robot System
Other Robot System
Automated Material Handling
Guided Vehicle
Programmable Conveyor
Storage/Retrieval Automatic Material-Handling System
Programmable Monorail
Warehousing
Programmable Overhead Crane
Other Automated Material-Handling Equipment
Instrumentation
Integrating and Totalizing Meter for Gas
Counting Device
Digital Panel Meter
Analog Panel Meter
Panel Type Instrument
Elapsed-Time Meter
Portable Electronic Measuring Instrument
Electronic Recording Instrument
Physical Property Test, Inspection, and Measurement
Commercial Meteorological and General-Purpose Instrument
Nuclear Radiation Detection and Monitoring
Surveying and Drafting Instrument
Ultrasonic Cleaners, Drill
Meteorological Instrument
Geophysical Instrument
Analytical and Scientific Instrument
Medical Equipment
Diagnostic Medical Equipment
Automatic Blood Analyzer
CAT Scanner
Digital Radiography
Electrocardiograph
Electroencephalograph
Magnetic Resonance Imaging
The segmentation represents Dataquest's view of the high-technology marlcetplace and is not intended to represent the
availability of data.
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High-Technology Guide S e g m e n t a t i o n
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EQUIPMENTMedical Equipment (Continued)
Respiratory Analysis
Ultrasonic Scanner, Medical
X Ray, Medical
Other Diagnostic Medical Equipment
Patient-Monitoring
Prosthetic Medical Equipment
Hearing Aid
Surgical Support
Therapeutic
Defibrillator
Dialysis, Diathermy
Electrosurgical
Pacemaker
Ultrasonic Generator
Other Therapeutic Medical Equipment
Other Industrial Electronic Equipment
Vending Machine
Laser System (Excluding Communication)
Power Supply
Traffic Control
Particle Accelerator
Industrial and Scientific X Ray
Laboratory and Scientific Apparatus
Teaching Machine and Aid
Scientific Not Elsewhere Classified
Consumer Electronic Equipment
Audio Consumer
Audio Amplifier
Compact (Disc) Player, Music
Consumer Radio
Stereo (Hi-Fi) Component
Stereo Headphone
Electronic Musical Instrument
Tape Recorder, Consumer
Video, Consumer
Video Camera, Consumer
VTRs (VCRs)
Videodisc Player
The segmentation represents Dataquest's view of the high-technology marltetplace and is not intended to represent the
availability of data.
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High-Technology Guide S e g m e n t a t i o n
EQUIPMENTVideo, Consumer (Continued)
Color Television
Black-and-White Television
HDTV
Remote Control
LCD Television
Personal Electronic
Game
Camera
Watch
Clock.
Toy
Sewing Machine
Other Personal Electronic
^
Appliance
Air Conditioner
Microwave Oven
Washer and Dryer
Refrigerator
Dishwasher, Disposal
Range and Oven, Consumer
Rice Cookers
Fans
Heaters
Vacuum Cleaners
Food Processors
Other Consumer Appliance
Other Consumer Electronic
Automatic Garage Door Opener
Residential Smoke Alarm
Consumer Electronic Equipment Not Elsewhere Classified
Military/Aerospace Electronic Equipment
Military Electronic Equipment
Radar, Military
Sonar, Military
Missile-Weapon
Space Military Equipment
Navigation, Military
Communication, Military
Electronic Warfare
The segmentation represents Dataquest's view of the high-technology marketplace and is not intended to represent the
avaitabilily of data.
>
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3S
High-Technology Guide Segmentation
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EQUIPMENTMilitary Electronic Equipment (Continued)
Reconnaissance
Aircraft System
Military Computer System
Simulation and Training, Military
Miscellaneous Military Equipment
Civil Aerospace
Radar, Civilian
Civilian Space
Civil Navigation/Communication
Civil Aircraft Flight System
Civil Simulation and Training
Transportation Electronic Equipment
Entertainment, Transportation
Body Controls
Driver Information
Powertrain
Safety and Convenience
Other Electronic Equipment
i
SOFTWAREApplication Software (See Applications Segmentation)
System Software
Operating System Software
Database
Document Management
Data Acquisition and Control
Storage Management
Database Administration
On-Line Transaction Processing
Development Tools
Editors
Language
Compilers
Assemblers
Translators
Data Translator
Query Languages
The segmentation represents Dataquest's view of the high-technology marketplace and is not intended to represent the
availability of data.
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High-Technology Guide Segmentation
SOFTWAREInteractive Languages
Fourth-Generation Languages
Visual Programming Languages
Graphic
Communication Management
User Interface
Device Interface
Protocol
Security
Operating Environment
Operating System
Proprietary
IBM/VM/MVS
DEC VMS
Others
>
Open
UNIX
OSFl
Sun OS
System V/BSD
Mach
XENIX
Others
Pick
Theos
Others
Real-Time
PC
DOS
OS/2
Macintosh
Others
Operating Utilities
Peripheral I/O Management
System Subroutine Libraries
Data Center and System Management
Information Resource Management
Information Center
System Utilities
>
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availability of data.
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High-Technology Guide S e g m e n t a t i o n
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CONSUMABLESPaper
Cut Sheet
Form
Label
Toner and Developer
Print Ribbon
Photoreceptor
Print Element
Printwheel
Golf Ball
Thimble
Computer Storage Media
Flexible Disk
Rigid Disk
Computer Storage Tape
Optical Media
Transparency
Other Consumable
SERVICES
Telecommunications Services
Core Services
Classification by Type
Local Telephone Services
Long Distance Services
International Services
Classification by Technology
Analog
Digital
ISDN
HO
BRI
PRI
Others
Classification by Product
Toll Revenue
WATS Outgoing
WATS Incoming (800 Service)
900 Service
Switched Digital Services
Switched 56 Kbps
X.21
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availability of data.
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H i g h - T e c h n o l o g y Guide S e g m e n t a t i o n
>
SERVICES
^
Classification by Product (Continued)
Analog Private Lines
Conditioned
Unconditioned
Digital Private Lines
Classification by Capacity
0 to 19.2 Kbps
19.2 Kbps to 64 Kbps
64 Kbps to H U
H l l to 772 Kbps
Tl
El
8 Mbps
T3
34 Mbps
More than T3
Centrex
Classification by Type
ETN
ACD
CLASS
Routing
Billing
Network Management
Classification by Size
1 to 8 Lines
9 to 24 Lines
25 to 48 Lines
49 to 100 Lines
101 to 400 Lines
401 to 1,000 Lines
More than 1,000 Lines
B-ISDN
Operator Services
Enhanced Services
Audiotex Access Services
Voice Mail
Cable TV
Directory Inquiry
Electronic Messaging
X400
EDI
Others
I
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High-Technology Guide Segmentation
i
SERVICES
ISDN
Public Data
Satellite
VSAT
Others
Teleconferencing
Teleport Services
Telex Services
Facsimile Services
Value-Added Networks (VANs)
Videoconferencing
Ad Hoc
Carrier Provided
Virtual Private Network Services
Videotex Access Services
X.25
Voice Messaging
Mobile Services
Cellular
Classification by Technology
Analog
C450
NMT450
NMT900
TACS
ETACS
Radiocom 2000
AMPS
RTMS-Italy
Digital
GSM
Others
Cordless
Portable
CT2
CT3
DECT
Mobile
GSM
Global-Positioning Systems
Location Identification Systems
The segmentation represents Dataquest's view of the high-technology marlcetplace and is not intended to represent the
availability of data.
© 1991 Dataquest Incorporated January—Reproduction Prohibited
High-Technology Guide Segmentation
SERVICES
Personal Communications Networks (PCN)
SubGSM
Public Mobile Radio (PMR)
Data Services
Public Paging Systems
Messaging Services
Hardware Maintenance
Contract Maintenance
Time and Materials
Parts
Software Support
Customer Training/Education
Network Support
Professional
Systems Integration
Facilities Management
OTHER PRODUCTS
The segmentation represents Dataquest's view of the high-technology marketplace and is not intended to represent the
availability of data.
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High-Technology Guide
Segmentation
i
The segmentation represents Dataquest* s view of the high-technology marketplace and is not intended to represent the
availability of data.
1991 Dataquest Incorporated January—Reproduction Prohibited
High-Technology Guide Segmentation
Geographic Regions
The geographic regions segmentation shows the classification scheme used
by Dataquest to define the regions of the world. Dataquest classifies the
world into the following regions:
•
North America
•
Europe
•
Japan
•
Rest of Asia—Rest of World
The segmentation represents Dataquest's view of the high-technology marketplace and is not intended to represent
the availability of data.
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High-Technology Guide Segmentation
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Geographic Regions
Worldwide
^
"
"
^
North America
Europe
Japan
Rest of Asia—Rest of World
The segmentation represents Dataquest's view of the high-technology marketplace and is not intended to represent the
availability of data.
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High-Technology Guide Segmentation
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North America
^ ^ • = 3 ^
North America
United States
East North Central Division
Illinois
Indiana
Michigan
Ohio
Wisconsin
East North Central Other
East South Central Division
Alabama
Kentucky
Mississippi
Tennessee
East South Central Other
Mountain Division
Arizona
Colorado
Idaho
Mountain Division (Continued)
Montana
Nevada
New Mexico
Utah
Wyoming
Mountain Other
i
Middle Atlantic Division
New Jersey
New York
Pennsylvania
Middle Atlantic Other
New England Division
Connecticut
Maine
Massachusetts
New Hampshire
Rhode Island
Vermont
New England Other
The segmentation represents Dataquest's view of the high-technology marketplace and is not intended to represent the
availability of data.
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High-Technology Guide Segmentation
United States (Continued)
Pacific Division
Alaska
California
Hawaii
Oregon
Washington
Pacific Other
South Atlantic Division
Delaware
District of Columbia
Florida
Georgia
Maryland
North Carolina
South Carolina
Virginia
West Virginia
South Atlantic Other
West North Central Division
Iowa
Kansas
Minnesota
Missouri
Nebraska
North Dakota
South Dakota
West North Central Other
West South Central Division
Arkansas
Louisiana
Oklahoma
Texas
West South Central Other
Puerto Rico Division
Puerto Rico
United States Other
Canada
North America Other
The segmentation represents Dataquest's view of the high-technology marketplace and is not intended to represent the
availability of data.
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High-Technology Guide Segmentation
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Europe
i
Western Europe
Western Europe Major
France
Germany
Italy
Netherlands
Spain
Sweden
United Kingdom
Western Europe Other
Austria
Belgium
Cyprus
Denmark
Finland
Gibraltar
Greece
Iceland
Ireland
Liechtenstein
Luxembourg
Malta
Monaco
Norway
Portugal
San Marino
Switzerland
European Community (EC)
Belgium
Denmark
France
Germany
Greece
Ireland
Italy
Luxembourg
The segmentation represents Dataquest's view of the high-technology marketplace and is not intended to represent the
availability of data.
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High-Technology Guide Segmentation.
European Community (EC) (Continued)
Netherlands
Portugal
Spain
United Kingdom
European Free Trade Association (EFTA)
Austria
Finland
Iceland
Norway
Sweden
Switzerland
Eastern Europe
Albania
Bulgaria
Czechoslovakia
Hungary
Poland
Romania
Union of Soviet Socialist Republics
Yugoslavia
The segmentation represents Dataquest's view of the high-technology marketplace and is not intended to represent the
availability of data.
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High-Technology Guide Segmentation
Japan
"^tsi^'o;
^-CT^^ 7
i
"^
I
Japan
The segmentation represents Dataquest's view of the high-technology marketplace and is not intended to represent the
availability of data.
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High-Technology Guide Segmentation
Rest of Asia—Rest of World
Rest of Asia—Rest of World
Four Tigers
Hong Kong
Korea
Singapore
Taiwan
Other Asia
Bangladesh
Brunei
Burma
Cambodia
China
East Timor
India
Indonesia
Laos
Macau
Malaysia
Maldives
Nepal
Pakistan
Philippines
Sri Lanka
Thailand
Vietnam
Rest of World
Australia/New Zealand
Australia
Christmas Island
Cocos Islands
New Zealand
Norfolk Island
Oceania
American Samoa
Canton and Enderbury Islands
Cook Islands
Fiji
French Polynesia
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availability of data.
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High-Technology Guide Segmentation
Oceania (Continued)
Guam
Johnson Island
Kiribati
Midway Islands
Nauru
New Caledonia
Niue
Pacific Islands
Papua New Guinea
Pitcairn
Samoa
Solomon Islands
Tokelau
Tonga
Tuvalu
Vanuatu
Wake Island
Wallis and Futuna Islands
Africa
Central America
Caribbean
Middle East
South America
Atlantic
Inner Asia
The segmentation represents Dataquest's view o[ the high-technology marketplace and is not intended to represent the
availability of data.
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High-Technology Guide Segmentation
Distribution
>
The distribution segmentation outlines the path by which a product moves
from the manufacturer to the ultimate end user. This segmentation is
used by Dataquest to analyze markups, discounts, and buyer behavior.
Dataquest defines the major distribution classifications as follows:
•
Distribution channel
•
Distribution method
^
^
The segmentation represents Dataquest's view of the high-technology marlietplace and is not intended to represent
the availability ot data.
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H i g h - T e c h n o l o g y Guide S e g m e n t a t i o n
Distribution
DISTRIBUTION CHANNEL
Direct
Indirect
Value-Added Reseller/Systems Integrator
Original Equipment Manufacturer
Distributor
Regional Bell Operating Company (RBOC)
Independent Telephone Company
Telephone Interconnect Supplier
Dealer
Mass Merchandiser
Manufacturers' Representatives/Agents
DISTRIBUTION METHOD
Direct Sales Force
Telemarketing
Mail Order
Company-Owned Store
The segmentation represents Dataquest's view of the high-technology marketplace and is not intended to represent the
availability of data.
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High-Technology Guide Segmentation
Applications
The applications segmentation describes the use to which a product is put
or the function it performs. Sometimes there are one-to-one relationships
between products and their applications and the actual functions that a
product performs.
The major applications as defined by Dataquest are as follows:
•
General productivity
•
Organizational
•
Entertainment
•
Industry specific
The segmentation represents Dataquest* s view of the high-technology marketplace and is not intended to represent
the availability of data.
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High-Technology Guide S e g m e n t a t i o n
^
Applications
GENERAL PRODUCTIVITY
Document/Media Creation and Editing
Computer-Aided Printing and Publishing
Electronic Publishing
Technical Publishing
Graphics
Chart and Map Generation
Image Generation
Graphic Design Art
Image Editing
Draw/Paint
Image Capture
Clip Art
Illustration
Presentation Graphics
I
Color Prepress
Input
Image Processing
Image Manipulation
Color Correction
Color Pagination
Composition and Translation
Color Separation
Page Composition and Page Makeup
Page Description
Page Imaging
Document Architecture
Desktop Publishing
Scientific Visualization/Simulation
Multimedia
Animation
Desktop
Video
Compression
Digitizer
Full-Motion
Real-Time
Videodisc
I
The segmentation represents Dataquest's view ol the high-technology marketplace and is not intended to represent the
availability of data.
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High-Technology Guide Segmentation
GENERAL PRODUCTIVITY
Holography
Photo Realism
Information Retrieval
Forms
Publishing Utilities
Tagging
PostScript Printing
Compression/Decompression
File Translation/Data Conversion
Document Management
Author/Editor
Image Processing
Scanning
Text
Image
Word Processing
Typography
Communication
Electronic Mail
Spreadsheet/Decision Support/Executive Information Systems
Spreadsheet
General-Purpose Simulation
Modeling
Forecasting
Learning/Education/Training
Instructional
Computer Training/Assisted Instruction
Educational Simulation
Learning
Project Management
Calendaring
Scheduling
Ticketing
Library Management
Time Management
Application Utilities
Integrated Applications
Relational Database Management System
The segmentation represents Dataquest's view of the high-technology marketplace and is not intended to represent the
availability of data.
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High-Technology Guide Segmentation
ORGANIZATIONAL
Management and Administration
Accounting
Accounts Payable
Checkbook Management
Accounts Receivable
Billing/Invoicing
General Ledger
Payroll
Tax Accounting
Personal Finance
Capital Assets
Fixed Assets
Lease Accounting
Human Resource/Personnel Management
Benefits Administration
Employment Administration
Finance
Financial Planning
Budgeting
Cost Accounting
Investment/Portfolio Management
Cash/Money Management
Deposit/Loan Management
Treasury/Stocks/Bonds
Purchasing
Contract Administration
Vendor Management
Planning
Business Planning
Strategic Planning
Command, Control, Communications, and Intelligence
Facilities Management
Facility Planning
Facility Simulation
Equipment/Maintenance Management
Property/Real Estate Management
Facility Security Management
The segmentation represents Dataquest's view of the high-technology marketplace and is not intended to represent the
availability of data.
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High-Technology Guide S e g m e n t a t i o n
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ORGANIZATIONALSales and Marketing
Marketing Research
Advertising and Promotional
Public Relations
Order Entry/Processing
Customer/Prospect Management
Credit Management
Sales Support/Administration
Research, Engineering, and Development
Industrial Automation
Shop Floor Plan and Control
CAM/Automated Assembly
Manufacturing Engineering Tools
Other Planning and Control
Test and Measurement
Others
Design Automation
CAD/CAM/CAE
Modeling
Two-Dimensional
Three-Dimensional
Solid
Mechanical
Documentation/Drafting
Detail Drafting
Document Management
Schematics
Technical Illustration
Charts
Conceptual Design
Industrial Design
Design Layout
Styling
Functional Design
Component
Assembly Verification
Linkage/Mechanism
Analysis
Fatigue
Structural
The segmentation represents Dataquest's view of the high-technology marketplace and is not intended to represent the
availability of data.
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High-Technology Guide S e g m e n t a t i o n
\
ORGANIZATIONAL Analysis (Continued)
Thermal
Vibrational
Magnetic
Composite
Mass Property
Manufacturing Engineering
Tool Design
Fixture Design
Part-Processing Design
Manufacturing Process Simulation
NC Part Programming
Coordinate Measuring Machines
Off-Line Robotics
QC Analysis
AEC (Architectural, Engineering, and Construction)
Architectural
Civil
Facility Design
Process Plant Design
^
Geographical Information Systems
GIS/Mapping
Raster-Based GIS Systems
Electronic Design Automation
Electronic Computer-Aided Engineering
Digital Design
Design Entry
Schematic Entry
Libraries
Design Verification
Simulation
Simulation Acceleration
Hardware Modeling
Static Timing Analysis
Logic Synthesis
Test Automation
Automatic Test Vector Generation
Design for Testability/Test Synthesis
Fault Simulation
I
The segmentation represents Dataquest's view of the high-technology marketplace and is not intended to represent the
availability o( data.
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High-Technology Guide S e g m e n t a t i o n
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ORGANIZATIONAL Analog Design
Design Entry
Schematic Capture
Libraries
Design Verification
Circuit Simulation
Mixed Signal Simulation
IC Layout and Verification
Editing
Layout
Verification
Module Generation
PCB Layout
Software Development
Computer-Aided Software Engineering
Artificial Intelligence
General Software Development
Earth Resources
Seismic Analysis
Geophysical Seismic Imaging
Oil Field Services
Remote Sensing
Technical Data Analysis
General Scientific
Scientific Research/Analysis
Scientific Visualization
Scientific Simulation
Chemistry
Crystallography
Modeling
Analysis
Simulation
Laboratory
Analytical Instruments
Instrument Automation
Quality Control/Assurance
Research and Laboratory Analysis
Others
The segmentation represents Dataque$t*s view of the high-technology marketplace and is not intended to represent the
availability of data.
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H i g h - T e c h n o l o g y Guide S e g m e n t a t i o n
ORGANIZATIONAL Medical
Body Scanning
Patient Monitoring
Others
Diagnostic
Therapeutic
Manufacturing and Distribution
Distribution Planning and Control
Transportation/Fleet Management
Route Planning
Dispatching
Warehouse Management
Automated Warehousing and Materials Handling
Inventory and Distribution Management and Control
Manufacturing Planning and Control
Material/Process Requirements Planning, Production
and Process Management
Shop Floor Planning and Control
CAM/Automated Assembly
Manufacturing Engineering Tools
Other Planning and Control
Simulation
Robot Programming and Simulation
Quality Assurance
Detection and Tracking
Fault Management/Adaptive
Control
Test and Measurement
Inspection
Machine Vision
Others
Real-Time Data Acquisition and Control
Simulation
C3i
Others
Building Automation
The segmentation represents Dataquest's view of the high-technology marketplace and is not intended to represent the
availability of data.
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High-Technology Guide S e g m e n t a t i o n
ORGANIZATIONAL Others (Continued)
Traffic Control
Railroad Control
Power Grid Control
Water Quality and Sewage Control
Atmospheric Monitoring
ENTERTAINMENT-
INDUSTRY SPECIFIC
The segmentation represents Dataquest's view of the high-technology marketplace and is not intended to represent the
availability of data.
1991 Dataquesl Incorporated January—Reproduction Prohibited
High-Technology Guide Segmentation
User Environment
The user environment segmentation is based on industry classifications
derived from a format that reflects the United States Department of
Commerce's Standard Industrial Classification (SIC) code scheme and
the International Standard Industrial Classification of all economic
activities used by the United Nations.
Environments are a description of where a product is used ultimately.
The major user environments as defined by Dataquest are as follows:
•
Home
•
Business
•
Education
•
Government
Dataquest has a classification scheme available at the two-, three-, and
four-digit SIC levels, which can be provided on request.
The segmentation represents Dataquesfs view ot the high-technology marketplace and is not intended to represent
the availability of data.
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High-Technology Guide S e g m e n t a t i o n
•
User Environment
HOME
BUSINESS
Natural Resources and Construction
Agricultural Production—Crops
Agricultural Production—Livestock
Agricultural Services
Forestry
Fishing, Hunting, and Trapping
Metal Mining
Coal Mining
Oil and Gas Extraction
Nonmetallic Minerals, except Fuels
General Building Contractors
Heavy Construction, except Building
Special Trade Contractors
i
Process
Manufacturing
Food and Kindred Products
Tobacco Products
Textile Mill Products
Lumber Wood Products
Paper and Allied Products
Printing and Publishing
Chemicals Allied Products
Petroleum and Coal Products
Rubber and Miscellaneous Plastics Products
Leather and Leather Products
Stone, Clay, and Glass Products
Primary Metal Industries
Discrete
Manufacturing
Apparel and Other Textile Products
Furniture and Fixtures
Fabricated Metal Products
Industrial Machinery and Equipment
Electronic and Other Electric Equipment
Instruments and Related Products
I
The segmentation represents Dataquest's view of the high-technology marlcetplace and is not intended to represent the
availability of data.
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High-Technology Guide S e g m e n t a t i o n
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BUSINESS
Discrete Manufacturing
(Continued)
Miscellaneous Manufacturing Industries
Transportation Equipment
Transportation
Railroad Transportation
Local and Interurban Passenger Transit
Trucking and Warehousing
Water Transportation
Transportation by Air
Pipelines, except Natural Gas
Transportation Services
Communication
Communication
Utilities
Electric, Gas, and Sanitary Services
Wholesale Trade, Durable Goods
Wholesale Trade—Durable Goods
Wholesale Trade, Nondurable Goods
Wholesale Trade—Nondurable Goods
Retail Trade
Building Materials and Garden Supplies
General Merchandise Stores
Food Stores
Automotive Dealers and Service Stations
Apparel and Accessory Stores
Furniture and Home Furnishings Stores
Eating and Drinking Places
Miscellaneous Retail
Finance
Depository Institutions
Nondepository Institutions
Security and Commodity Brokers
Insurance
Insurance Carriers
Insurance Agents, Brokers, and Service
Real
Estate
Real Estate
Holding and Other Investment Offices
Hotels And Other Lodging
Hotels and Other Lodging
The segmentation represents Dataquest's view of the high-technology marketplace and is not intended to represent the
availability of data.
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High-Technology Guide Segmentation
I
BUSINESS
Business Services
Business Services
Legal Services
Health Care
Health Services
Other Services
Personal Services
Auto Repair, Services, and Parking
Miscellaneous Repair Services
Motion Pictures
Amusement And Recreation Services
Social Services
Museums, Botanical, Zoological Gardens
Membership Organizations
Engineering and Management Services
Services, NEC
EDUCATIONElementary
Secondary
Higher Education
Four-Year Institution
Two-Year Institution
Public
Private
GOVERNMENT
Government by Function
Executive, Legislative, and General
Justice, Public Order, and Safety
Finance, Taxation, And Monetary Policy
Administration of Human Resources
Environmental Quality and Housing
Administration of Economic Programs
National Security and International Affairs
Government
Federal
State
Local
The segmentation represents Dataquest's view of the high-technology marketplace and is not intended to represent the
availability of data.
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High-Technology Guide Segmentation
SIZE (BUSINESS, EDUCATION, GOVERNMENT)
Revenue (Millions of U.S. dollars)
0 to 99.9
100 to 499.9
500 to 999.9
1 to 4.9
5 to 9.9
10 to 49.9
50+
Employees
Small
0 to 9
10 to 19
20 to 49
Medium
50 to 99
100 to 249
Large
250 to 499
500 to 999
1,000+
The segmentation represents Dataquest's view of the high-technology marketplace and is not intended to represent the
availability of data.
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High-Technology Guide Segmentation
\
Research Items
The research items segmentation is a listing of general terms used by
Dataquest to organize, describe, and analyze data for technology
markets and industries. A typical use of research items is to describe
market data in terms of shipments, retirements, and installed base.
I
I
The segmentation represents Dataquest's view of the high-technology marketplace and is not intended to represent
the availability of data.
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High-Technology Guide Segmentation
Research Items
Application
Assembler
Average Selling Price
Average Usage
Average Volume
Balance of Trade
Bit
Byte
Capital Spending
Captive Production
Compound Growth Rate
Consumption
Conversion Revenue
Cost
End User
End-User Average Selling Price
End-User Revenue
Environment
Export
Factory Average Selling Price
Factory Revenue
Gross Lease Additions
If-Sold Value
Import
Industry
Input/Output (I/O) Ratio
Installed Base
Internal Transfer
Inventory
Joint Venture
Lease
Lease/Rental Conversions
List Price
Manufacturer
Manufacturer's Suggested Retail Price
Market
Market Share
Markup
Merchant Production
Net Additions
New Placement Demand
Placement
Product
Product Category
Production
Replacement Demand
Research and Development
Residual Value
Retirement
Return
Revenue
Shipment
Subsidiary
Tie Ratio
Unit
Useful Life
Users per System
Year-Average Population
The segmentation represents Dataquest's view of the high-technology marketplace and is not intended to represent the
availability of data.
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High-Technology Guide Segmentation
i
The segmentation represents Dataquest's view of the high-technology marketplace and is not intended to represent the
availability of data.
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High-Technology Guide Glossary
I
Glossary
This glossary includes definitions of the major terms associated with
Dataquest's segmentation of the high-technology marketplace.
>
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High-Technology Guide Glossary
79
III-V discrete semiconductor. 1: A semiconductor device with low noise, low power, and high
power in the range of one-half watt to one watt.
2: A device of gate structures based on D-MESFET and E/D MESFET devices.
add-on graphics board, Mac-type. Personal
computers that were designed to run applications
exclusively through a graphical user interface
(i.e., windows, menus, and icons). Mac-type
systems include Apple's Macintosh series (512E,
Plus, SE, and II), Atari's ST series (524 and
1024), and Commodore's Amiga. This term also
refers to peripherals intended for use in Mac-type
systems.
academic support. College expenditures that include expenditures for support services that are
an integral part of the institution's primary missions of instruction, research, or public service.
Includes expenditures for libraries, galleries,
audio/visual services, academic computing support, auxiliary support, academic administration,
personnel development, and course and curriculum development.
add-on memory board. A printed circuit board
populated with memory integrated circuits (IC),
usually DRAMs or SRAMs, that plugs into personal computers via connectors on the central
processing unit bus. These boards are used to
increase central processing unit storage capacity.
accounting software. 1: A software application
that supports a system of recording and summarizing business and financial transactions and analyzing, verifying, and reporting results. 2: A software
application used to manage an organization's
money and/or assets. This type of software includes general ledger, accounts payable/receivable, and inventory control.
accounts payable (AP). An application that supports the accounts payable function, which is the
amount owed by a business to its suppliers and
other regular trading partners.
accounts receivable (AR). An application that
supports the accounts receivable function, which
is the amount owed to a business by its customers.
ACD. See automatic call distributor.
adaptive control. 1: The property of a control
system that allows it autonomously to maintain a
manufacturing or process environment within predetermined control limits. 2: A device with parameters that adjust automatically to compensate
for changes in the dynamics of the process to be
controlled.
add-on graphics board. A graphics board that is
added to a basic computer to enhance the computer's current graphic capability.
AEC. See architecture, engineering, and
construction.
aerial. See antenna.
AGVS. See automatic guided vehicle system.
AI. See artificial intelligence.
air conditioner. 1: An apparatus for controlling
the temperature and humidity of air. 2: A broad
field including numerous processes, among which
are refrigeration, heating, ventilation and humidification, and electronic air filtering.
aircraft system (military). Electronic power
devices used in airplanes to perform functions like
flight control, communication and navigation,
lighting computer system (including air data, mission and fire control), engine control, instrumentation, integral targeting system, associated test
system, and integrated system.
alarm system. A system designed to warn of an
intrusion, a fire, or other undesired occurrence.
Alarm systems have three functions in common:
detection, control, and annunciation signaling.
alphanumeric CRT controller. A character set
of both letters and numbers that is used to control
electron beams, which are used to present data in
a visual form.
alphanumeric CRT terminal. A display terminal that provides character information to the
operator.
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High-Technology Guide Glossary
amateur radio. A radio used for two-way radio
communications by private individuals. It is not
used for enterprise activity.
AMH. See automated materials handling.
amplifier IC. A linear IC that provides a voltage
or power gain to an applied signal.
analog. 1: Representation of data by means of
continuously variable physical quantities, such as
voltage, current, or frequency. 2: A circuit or
system in which the output signals bear a continuous relationship to the input signals. 3: A representation of an event in another form, e.g., the
representation of voice sounds as continuously
variable electrical signals.
pass through a phone when a user is unable to
pick up the telephone.
antenna. 1: A conductor or system of conductors
that serves to radiate or intercept energy in the
form of electromagnetic waves. 2: A device for
transmitting or receiving radio waves. Also called
aerial.
AP. See accounts payable.
appliance. 1: An instrument or device designed
for a specific household or office purpose. 2: A
piece of equipment for adapting a tool or machine
to a special purpose.
application. The use to which a product is put;
the function it performs.
analog design verification. A software application that includes analog simulation, analog synthesis, monte carlo analysis, worst-case analysis,
and parametric plotting.
application software. A software program or set
of programs designed for a specific application,
such as inventory control or linear programming.
analog loop. A nondigital portion of the telecommunications network.
application-specific integrated circuit (ASIC).
A single-user IC that is manufactured using vendor-supplied tools and/or libraries. (May be sold
by an ASIC or standard-product group.)
analog panel meter. 1: An electrical switchboard
or instrument board with continuously variable
electrical signals known as analog signals. 2: A
mounting plate for the controls and/or other parts
of equipment, utilizing analog signals.
application utilities. A software application that
enhances the operation of other standalone applications; Typically operates concurrently with
these standalone applications.
analysis. Separation of a whole into its parts;
proof of a mathematical proposition by assuming
the result and deducing a valid statement by a
series of reversible steps. Includes mass properties, kinematic and dynamic mechanism analysis,
structural, thermal, composite, fluids, and vibration analysis. Finite element and finite difference
are common analysis technologies used.
AR. See accounts receivable.
architectural. Computer-aided tools intended for
use in design and drafting of facilities' architectural aspects.
analytical and scientific instrument. Instruments used to measure, access, control, and monitor objects and systems.
architecture, engineering, and construction
(AEC). The use of computer-aided tools by architects, contractors, plant engineers, civil engineers,
and others associated with these disciplines to aid
in designing and managing buildings, industrial
plants, ships, and other types of nondiscrete
entities.
animation. A software application to present
either continuous pictures or images or to present
them in rapid succession.
arc-welding robot systems. A system in which a
robot carries an arc-welding torch to produce
welds.
answering machine. A device, hooked to a telephone, that can record and play messages as they
argon. An inert gas extensively used in discharge
tubes.
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artificial intelligence (AI). The ability of a machine to perform functions normally associated
with human intelligence, such as learning, adapting, reasoning, self-correcting, and improving
automatically.
ASCII. Standardized coding for alphanumeric
and other standard keyboard characters.
ASIC. See application-specific integrated
circuit.
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attendant console. A specialized telephone instrument that allows fast and efficient answering
and routing of telephone calls.
audio amplifier. A device that uses transistors or
vacuum tubes to obtain voltage, current, or power
to amplify sound.
audio conferencing. The ability to communicate
among more than two people at one time via a
speakerphone or the telephone system/network.
ASP. See average selling price.
AS/RS. See automated storage/retrieval
system.
assembler. A company that adds manufacturing
value to a product.
audio equipment. Amplifiers, preamplifiers, control consoles, and other equipment used in studio,
broadcast, and home environments. Equipment
interprets frequencies corresponding to audible
sound waves.
assembly. 1: A group of subassemblies and/or
parts that, when put together, create a major subdivision of the final product. When two or more
components or subassemblies are put together by
the application of labor and machine hours, it is
called an assembly. An assembly may be an end
product or a component for a higher-level assembly. 2: The semiconductor manufacturing steps of
mounting a die in a package, bonding the pads to
the package leads, and sealing the package.
automated assembly system. The assembly of
parts into subassemblies and/or complete assemblies using programmable equipment that may include robots. In discrete piece manufacturing, this
system includes spot- and arc-welding and adhesives. In electronics, this system includes component placement and printed board component
insertion. Usually, these automated assembly
systems include sensors.
assembly verification. The integration of various
component designs into an assembly to test size/
shape and functional characteristics.
automated guided vehicle system (AGVS). An
unmanned mobile transporter under programmable control that moves materials and tooling
throughout a factory and/or warehouse. Includes towing vehicles, pallet trucks, light-load
transporters, unit-load transporters, and self-loading and unloading vehicles.
asynchronous telecommunications software. A
software application that emulates a standard
computer terminal (e.g., DEC VT-100) and performs file transfer between asynchronously connected computers and/or provides remote operation of another computer.
ATE. See automatic test equipment.
ATM. See automated teller machine.
atmospheric monitoring. A real-time software
application that monitors weather-related data
from satellites and other monitoring sites around
the world.
atmospheric/purge cylinder gas. A specialty gas;
a cylinder gas for purging certain processing systems and equipment when manufacturers are concerned about possible back contamination of the
house lines.
automated materials handling (AMH). The
automated handling of discrete or bulk materials
in manufacturing systems. Materials handling includes the movement, storage, identification, and
controlling of materials.
automated storage/retrieval system (AS/RS).
All computer hardware, software, and equipment
that are used together for mechanical hoists and
carriages and that interface with racks and bins
for automatic storage and retrieval of unit loads,
pallets, and individual parts. An AS/RS moves
materials from inventory to operations and
back to inventory, frequently for work-in-process
inventory.
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automated teller machine (ATM). A machine
used by financial institutions and designed to perform many of the banking functions performed
by human tellers. (See also funds transfer
terminal.)
facility. An AWS includes a control system and
associated material-handling equipment and structures, but excludes the building unless it is a structural part of the automated system. The control
system includes both hardware and software.
automatic blood analyzer. Equipment used to
analyze, detect, and decipher blood types and
blood-related diseases.
automation. The system or technique of the
production process that minimizes human intervention. Self-controlled machines are used to accomplish human tasks or tasks not able to be
accomplished by human intervention.
automatic call distributor (ACD). A computerbased system located at a customer's premises
that: (1) provides real-time monitoring of a telephone system's work load; (2) distributes calls to
the agent who is idle longest; and (3) uses a
queuing or waiting list assignment that holds the
callers in queue until an agent is available, averages the random flow of traffic, and decreases
peak traffic load. An ACD also contains features
known as gates or agent split groups that provide
functional divisions within the routing scheme and
allow calls to be directed to a specific group or
agent.
automatic photoresist processing equipment
(colloquial: track). Equipment used to dispense
and process photoresist material onto a wafer.
Track equipment, as this equipment is usually
called, includes wafer clean/bake, wafer prime,
wafer coat/bake, wafer develop/bake, and resist
stabilization equipment.
automatic test equipment (ATE). Computercontrolled equipment that inspects electronic
devices, both active and passive. ATE usually
includes analytical and statistical data-reduction
capabilities and can document test results by
display, hard copy, and electronic storage. ATE
can perform printed circuit board (PCB) inspection by mechanical, electrical, and visual means in
an automatic, programmable mode. ATE includes
both bare boards and boards that have been
loaded with electronic devices. In the latter case,
diagnostic capabilities are included as a part
of the system definition if they are part of the
equipment.
automatic warehousing system (AWS). A dedicated storage and retrieval system that is used not
on the factory floor but in a warehouse that may
or may not be located within a manufacturing
average selling price (ASP). The average price
of a product, inclusive of any discounts. (See also
end-user ASP and factory ASP. )
average usage. The average number of units of
product used per unit of time.
average volume. The average number of units of
product produced per unit of time.
awarded contract. A binding agreement granted
to a specific company.
AWS. See automatic warehousing system.
B
balance of trade. 1: The difference between the
value of a country's exports and imports of tangible goods over a given period, usually one year.
2: The difference between the value of a country
or region's exports of tangible goods to and imports of tangible goods from a second country or
region.
banking system. Systems used in the banking/
finance industries to facilitate the transmission of
funds to improve efficiencies. Systems include:
payroll allocation and deduction; demand deposit
accounting; savings, both regular and certificates
of deposit; and loan processes.
baseband modem. A type of modem that utilizes
all of the available analog bandwidth on a line.
basic exchange telecommunications radio
system (BETRS). A radio system network that
provides cost-effective basic telephone service
within remote areas.
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83
benefits administration. A software application
with the primary function of administering and
aiding in managing an organization's employee
benefits.
bipolar transistor. A transistor that uses positiveand negative-charge carriers. Bipolar transistors
provide current gain—that is, a current input
results in a larger current output.
BETRS. See basic exchange telecommunications radio system.
bit. Abbreviation for binary digit. A unit of information equal to one binary decision, or the designation of one of two possible and equally likely
values or states of anything used to store or
convey information.
BiCMOS. Bipolar complementary metal oxide
semiconductor. See BiMOS.
BiMOS (BiCMOS). Bipolar metal oxide semiconductor (MOS). An integrated circuit (IC)
manufactured with both bipolar and MOS
processes that yields a component with the
benefits of both technologies.
bipolar. 1: A semiconductor technology employing two junction transistors. 2: A device in which
both majority and minority carriers are present. A
transistor structure with electrical properties
determined within the silicon material.
bipolar application-specific IC. See application-specific integrated circuit.
bipolar cell-based IC. See cell-based integrated
circuit.
bipolar custom
circuit.
IC. See custom
integrated
bipolar digital logic. See logic circuit.
bipolar
digital
microcomponent.
microcomponent.
See
bipolar FPGA. See field-programmable gate
array.
bipolar gate array. See gate array.
bipolar memory. See memory.
bipolar nonvolatile memory. See nonvolatile
memory.
bipolar PLA. See programmable logic array.
bipolar PLD. See programmable logic device.
bipolar PMD. See programmable multilevel
logic device.
bipolar standard logic. See standard logic.
black-and-white television. Television in which
the reproduced picture is displayed in shades of
gray between black and white. Also known as
monochrome television.
board-level computer. A single, or multiple,
board-level CPU that is sold individually or incorporated in systems-level products (boxes). Typically, these are products that are not considered
complete packaged systems. Prices range from the
low hundreds to the low thousands of dollars.
Frequently, software is bundled with the board for
a specific application.
body control. Electronic equipment used to
direct, manage, or guide an automobile or truck.
Examples include electronic suspension, cruise
control, intermittent wipers, load-sensitive braking, antitheft devices, electronic steering, and
electronic mufflers.
book publishing software. Software with the
main purpose/use of printing books or written or
printed literary works.
boring programmable machine tool. A factory
tool designed to machine internal work such as
cylinders, holes, and castings.
broadband communications. Communications
that utilize a bandwidth greater than a voice-grade
circuit.
broadcast. 1: The transmission of packets on a
contention bus where all data are heard by all
devices on the channel and are selected by each
device through address-recognition techniques.
2: To send messages or to communicate simultaneously with many or all points on a circuit.
3: The transmission of radio frequencies from a
source to all devices that are capable of receiving
the signal. Microwave transmission is one method
of transmission. 4: Radio or television transmission intended for public reception.
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broadcast and studio equipment. Equipment
used to make information public by means of
radio or television.
broadcast transmitter antenna. An electronic
device for generating and amplifying a radiofrequency carrier for transmission through space
from an antenna.
bubble memory. A storage medium that allows
information to be stored on magnetically charged
crystal chips. Bubble memories can hold data
without electricity to sustain them; blackouts,
changes in current, and static charges do not affect them. Such memories process material
75 times as fast as disk memories. However,
bubble memory processors cannot handle multiprogramming, i.e., performing parallel operations
with several programs.
budgeting. An application that supports future
resource planning.
building automation. A software application with
the primary functions of managing the operations
of a facility, including fire detection, energy management, and alarm systems. Large manufacturing
plants and skyscrapers use real-time computers
to control and monitor conditions. This may include fire detection and control systems; security
systems; clocking, documenting, and energy
management for heating, ventilation, and air
conditioning.
bulk gas. A discrete delivery of gas in a liquid
state.
bundled distribution and warehouse package.
Hardware and/or software modules used for planning and control of warehouse or product distribution systems. These packages are not available
separately from the total warehouse or distribution
system.
business. A commercial or mercantile environment usually referred to as a vertical market. See
"User Environment" section.
byte. 1: A single group of eight bits processed
together. 2: The number of bits that a computer
processes.
C-^I. See command, control, communications,
and intelligence.
cable. An assembly of one or more conductors
within an enveloping protective sheath, constructed to permit the use of the conductors singly
or in groups.
cable television equipment. All equipment for
both the head and subscriber ends of a cable
television system.
cache. A fast, small memory (typically SRAM)
used to enhance CPU performance, separate from
main processor memory.
cache controller. A device that governs the area
of a system that stores only data the system may
need in the immediate future.
CAD. See computer-aided design, drawing, or
drafting.
CAE.
See
electronic
engineering and mechanical
engineering.
computer-aided
computer-aided
CAGR. See compound annual growth rate.
calculator. A device capable of performing logical and arithmetical digital operations of any kind.
calendaring. 1: An application to support the
scheduling of meetings and other events. It is
usually a tickler file, reminding people of upcoming commitments. 2: In the papering industry,
paper with a hard, smooth finish.
call management systems. The equipment and
service that records the calling activity of a
centrex, PBX, or key telephone system in order
to generate reports that support telephone cost
allocation and other telephone management information needs.
call processing equipment. Call processing
equipment provides additional functions and
capabilities beyond traditional call processing.
This classification includes add-on products such
as voice-messaging systems, call accounting systems, and automatic call distributors.
CAM. See computer-aided manufacturing.
capacitor. A commonly used component that
stores electrical energy. It is sometimes referred to
as a condenser.
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capital assets. An application that assists a company in managing its capital assets, which are any
physical property or right that is owned and has a
money value.
capital spending. The purchase of a capital asset
or an asset that is needed to create a product and
is acquired with the intention of keeping (rather
than being resold).
captive production. The sale of a good to a division within the manufacturing company.
carrier equipment. A cable-based system that
provides transmission of multiple signals over a
common metallic or fiber-optic cable. This segment includes subscriber carrier systems, trunk
carrier systems, Basic Exchange Transmission
Radio (BETR) systems, and repeaters.
cartography. An application that supports map
production and/or resource management. May
contain a spatially indexed data structure.
cartridge tape drive. A tape drive that uses a
special metal and plastic protective device for the
tape, which can be used for 1/4-inch or 1/2-inch
tape products.
CASE.
See
engineering.
computer-aided
software
cash register. A device that automatically registers visibly the amount of a specific sale. Many
are used to trace inventory and other product
information through the sale of the product.
cassette tape drive. A tape drive that uses a
small container of tape similar to that used for
commercial audio recording purposes.
cathode ray tube (CRT). A television-like
display screen which, on receipt of information
bearing electronic signals, produces a visual
display of the information (text, graphics). The
CRT consists of a vacuum tube display in which a
beam of electrons is projected onto a fluorescent
surface of phosphors, producing a visual display.
Used in most computer display terminals. Also
referred to as video display terminal/visual display
tube (VDT).
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CAT scanner. A computerized axial tomography—frequently shortened to CT. A reconstructive imaging technique employing an X-ray source
and array of detectors rotated about the body of
the patient. The host computer calculates an
image based on the appearance of a thin volume
in the plane of the rotation.
CBIC. See cell-based integrated circuit.
CCD. See charge-coupled device.
CCIT. A French acronym for the International
Telegraph and Telephone Consultative Committee, a committee of the international standards
organization made up of telecommunication
authorities of member countries. The committee's
primary purpose is to develop and produce standards for telecommunication networks.
CCME. See computational chemistry/molecular engineering.
CCTV. See closed circuit television.
CD. See critical dimension and compact disc.
CD-ROM (compact disc read-only memory).
See CD-ROM disc drive.
CD-ROM disc drive. All CD-ROM discs are
4.7 inches (12cm) in diameter, have a 1.6-microinch-pitch single-spiral track, and have 2.048 data
bytes per sector.
cell-based integrated circuit (CBIC). An ASIC
device that is customized using a full set of
photomasks and uses automatic placement of cells
and automatic routing.
cellular handset. See cellular telephone.
cellular service. One type of mobile communications, where a low-power radio is used between
limited-distance "cells."
cellular telephone. Mobile radio equipment associated with cellular radio services.
central office ( C O ) . l : The physical location that
contains the equipment that supports the telephone network. 2: The switching equipment that
connects local access lines to toll circuits.
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central office switching equipment. Equipment
comprised of electronic systems that interconnect
local telephone lines (loops) and connect local
telephone lines to long distance trunk lines.
central processing unit (CPU). A microprocessor or microcontroller. Central processing unit of
a computer.
centrex. An optional service that provides voice/
data switching by using the utility's central office.
charge-coupled device (CCD). ICs that combine
charge-coupled signal transfer with arrays of
photosensors to provide image sensing. CCDs are
available as linear or area arrays.
chart. Any table, graph, or drawing depicting a
range of technical data.
chart and map generation. A graphics software
application that is designed specifically for charts
and predefined maps.
check-handling system. A system to improve the
speed and accuracy of check-handling processes
within the banking and finance industries.
chemical vapor deposition (CVD). A formation
of a stable compound on a heated substrate by
thermal reaction or decomposition of gaseous
compounds. A process that chemically isolates
and deposits a specific material on a wafer. CVD
equipment includes atmospheric-pressure CVD
(APCVD), plasma-enhanced CVD (PECVD),
and low-pressure CVD (LPCVD) techniques.
Historically, the CVD market was split into
APCVD, PECVD, and LPCVD technologies.
because each had its own applications. Now,
because of advanced reactors that are crossing
application boundaries, it makes more sense to
divide the market by film application rather than
by equipment technology.
chemistry. 1: An application to support the science dealing with the composition structure and
properties of substances and with the transformations that they undergo. 2: Chemical processes
and phenomena.
circuit. 1: The electrical path between two or
more points. 2: A means of two-way communication between two points, consisting of a sending
and a receiving channel or a combined sending
and receiving channel. 3: A transmission path
between two or more points.
CISC MPU. See complex-instruction-set computing microprocessor.
citizens band: mobile and base. A frequency
band allocated for private individual radio
service (460 to 470 megahertz or 26.965 to
27.405 megahertz).
civil aerospace. Civilian travel in space.
civil aircraft flight system. Same as military
aircraft, except related to civilian activity.
civil application. A software application used for
civil engineering tasks, typically for design and
drafting of sites for buildings, streets, highways,
bridges, dams, airports, and utilities.
civilian space. Equipment used by civilians to
explore the earth's atmosphere. Includes satellites, reconnaissance equipment, and ground control equipment.
civil navigation/communication. Same as military navigation/communications, except related to
civilian activity.
civil radar. Same as military radar, except related to civilian activity.
civil simulation and training. Same as military
simulation and training, except related to civilian
activity.
closed circuit television (CCTV). A television
system where television signals are not broadcast,
but are transmitted over a closed circuit and
received by interconnected receivers.
CMOS. See complementary MOS.
CO. See central office.
coaxial cable. Type of transmission cable with
one or more central conductors, surrounded by
an insulator.
CODEC. See coder/decoder circuit.
coder/decoder circuit. An integrated circuit that
codes a voice signal into a binary waveform or
decodes a binary waveform into a voice signal.
Such circuits now are used in digital communications applications.
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college. A postsecondary school that offers general or liberal arts education, usually leading to an
associate, bachelor's, master's, doctor's, or first
professional degree. Junior colleges and community colleges are included under this category.
color prepress. A process that converts visual
material to electronic signals.
color separation. A process of photographing
objects using three filters, each corresponding in
color and light transmission to one of the additive
primary colors; analogous to seeing.
color television. An electronic system that transmits signals to a visual image that can be viewed in
an array of colors on a screen.
combined elementary and secondary school. A
school that encompasses instruction at both the
elementary and secondary levels. Examples of
combined elementary and secondary school grade
spans would be 1 through 12 or 5 through 12.
combined PCB tester. Testing equipment that
combines functional and in-circuit test techniques
and capabilities that result in a test strategy to suit
any given board's production history and fault
spectrum to achieve the highest board fault coverage at the lowest cost.
command, control, communications, and intelligence (C^I). Systems used to display the ongoing status of tactical or strategic operations in
dynamic scenarios for rapid decision making.
commercial antenna. See antenna.
commercial
meteorological
and
generalpurpose instrument. Equipment used to obtain
quantitative information about the weather.
87
communication peripheral. An interface device
for machine-to-machine connections.
compact disc (CD). A disc from which data are
read optically by means of a laser.
compact disc player. 1: A recording and playback system used to play recorded music by
means of a small plastic optical disc similar to
multiplex stereo broadcast and reception. Each
wall of the record groove carries a single channel
of information. 2: A recording device in which
the sounds are mechanically impressed onto a
disc.
comparator. A type of amplifier that produces a
logic output (1 or 0) based on comparison of an
input voltage with a fixed reference voltage. A
widely used form of linear integrated circuit.
compiler. 1: Computer routine that translates
symbolic instructions to machine instructions and
replaces certain items with subroutines. 2: An
automatic coding system in a computer that generates and assembles a program from instructions
written by a programmer. 3: A computer language
system consisting of various subroutines that have
been evaluated and computed into one routine
handled by a computer. 4: Software used to convert application programs from computer language
to machine language.
complementary MOS. A semiconductor technology that uses both P-channel and N-channel transistors on the same silicon substrate to gain the
primary advantages of very low power and high
noise immunity.
complex-instruction-set computing (CISC) microprocessor. The number of instructions a microprocessor runs for a specific application.
Known as a general-purpose processor.
communication. 1: The transmission of information from one point or person or equipment to
another. 2: The sensing of a measurement signal
or phenomenon for display, recording, amplification, transmission, computing, or processing into
useful information.
component design. Design of the individual components in an assembly.
communication management. The organization
of stations, peripherals, and devices capable of
intercommunications but not necessarily on the
same channel.
composite analysis. The analysis of composite
materials (such as carbon fiber) as they change in
the manufacturing process and are used in the
final assembly.
component. An assembly, device, or piece of
equipment that is part of a larger assembly or
system.
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Htgh-Technotogy Guide Glossary
compound annual growth rate (CAGR). The
average rate of growth compounded over a
specified period. The formula used to calculate
CAGR is:
(
Value in period l + n \ ( - )
Value in period 1 /
_.
computational chemistry/molecular engineering (CCME). The use of computers to model
molecular structures, to predict physical properties of molecules, and to design new compounds
for specific purposes.
computer-aided design (CAD). Systems that
function as tools to expedite mechanical and electronic design. Most CAD systems consist of a
graphics computer terminal linked with a computer and a software package with features that aid in
design and drafting, keep track of parts, run simulations, and provide illustrated parts or circuit
diagrams. Programs complete the layout, geometric transformations, projections, rotations, magnifications, and interval (cross-sectional) views of a
part and its relationship with other parts.
computer-aided manufacturing (CAM). The
use of computers to program, direct, and control
production equipment in the fabrication of manufactured items.
computer-aided software engineering (CASE).
A combination of artificial intelligence and structured programming techniques used to aid in the
development of large software programs.
computerized energy control system. A system
with the resources for producing heat, electricity,
and/or power and the capability of running on
computers.
computer plotter. A visual display on which a
dependent variable is graphed by an automatically
controlled pen or pencil or other image development device/technique as a function of one or
more variables. See also plotter.
computer storage media. The substance upon
which data are stored electronically. Media may
be flexible disks, rigid disks, tape, or optical
disks.
computer storage tape media. Long, thin, flexible tape appropriate for digital magnetic recording and storage of computer data.
computer system. A combination of hardware,
software, firmware, and peripheral components
that has been assembled to satisfy a particular goal
or set of goals.
computer systems performance segments. The
following are Dataquest segments for computer
systems performance: Level I—low-performance
minicomputers, microcomputers, and personal
computers; Level II—medium-performance minicomputers and microcomputers, very low end
workstations, and high-end personal computers;
Level III—low-performance superminis, midrange
workstations, and high-performance minicomputers; Level IV—midrange superminis, lowend mainframes, and high-end workstations;
Level V—high-performance superminis and midrange mainframes; Level VI—low-end supercomputers and very high performance superminis;
and Level VII—supercomputers and high-end
mainframes.
computer to PBX interface/digital multiplex
interface (CPI/DMI). Two different standards
for communication between systems.
computer to plate. A process that merges type
and black-and-white images and combines the
functions of typesetting, camera photography, and
contact platemaking.
conceptual design. An application that supports
styling, industrial design, and other design apphcations emphasizing visualization, aesthetic, and
ergonomic considerations.
connector. A device used to join or fasten transistors, establishing a relationship between active
and passive devices.
consortium. An international business agreement; an association or society.
consumable. Material that is capable of being
consumed.
consumer electronics. The application of electronics in consumer equipment.
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consumer integrated circuit (IC). An analog circuit that meets specific consumer end-market applications. These circuits are dedicated to specific
applications, such as audio or radio, and would
not be used for general purpose.
consumer N.E.C. Consumer equipment not elsewhere classified.
consumer radio. A device used by the general
public for communication by electromagnetic
waves transmitted through space to produce
sound.
consumption. The markets' purchase and use of
goods and services, including lease or rental.
contract administration. The management of
agreements between a company and its vendors
and/or customers.
contract maintenance service. Ongoing repair
services based on agreed upon terms and conditions (such as hours of coverage and level of
services) as stipulated in a written agreement between the customer and the service provider.
controller. A device or group of devices that
serve to govern, in some predetermined manner,
the electric power delivered to the apparatus to
which it is connected.
controller board. A printed circuit board that
provides programmable logic that controls the sequence of operations of the functional stages of a
peripheral device.
conversion revenue. The revenue generated by
changing from an equipment rental contract to a
purchase or lease contract.
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cordless telephony. The transmission of speech
or other information via radio, enabling two persons to converse over almost any distance without
a connecting cord to a base unit.
corporate publishing. Publishing that supports
the main business of an organization or person;
printed and published products are produced in
the normal course of operations, but not as a
primary source of revenue.
corporate supercomputer. An information system priced at more than $2 million. Performance
speed is more than 200 mflops; current upper
limit is approximately 2 Gflops. Currently used
mainly for batch applications, but the trend is
toward interactive use. Optimized for very
heavy, numerically intensive applications. Requires special environmental controls and cooling
techniques.
cost. The expenditure necessary to produce a
product.
cost accounting. An application that supports a
branch of accounting that is concerned with the
collection, determination, and control of costs,
particularly those costs associated with producing
products or services.
counter/timer circuit. A circuit that receives uniform pulses representing units to be counted and
provides a voltage proportional to their frequency.
counting device. A device register or location in
computer storage for storing numbers or number
representations in a manner that permits these
numbers to be increased or decreased by the
value of another number or to be changed or
reset to zero or to an arbitrary value.
CPE. See customer premise equipment.
coordinate measuring machine. Machine used
to measure the physical dimensions of a part.
CPI/DMI. See computer to PBX interface/digital multiplex interface.
copier. A reproduction device designed to produce replicas of hard-copy originals. Copiers may
use either an analog or a digital scanning system.
CPU. See central processing unit.
coprocessor. A logic device that operates in association with a microprocessor to enhance system
performance. Coprocessors are not capable of independent operation.
critical dimension (CD). Refers to a line, element, or feature that must be manufactured and
controlled to very tight specifications.
CRT. See cathode ray tube.
CT2. See digital cordless telephone.
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High-Technology Guide Glossary
custom/contract programming. Programming
services that include applications development
and software systems conversions.
customer management. A software application
used to maintain lists of purchasers of a company's products and services.
customer premise equipment (CPE). Telecommunication equipment used at an end user's location, as compared with use at the local telephone
utility.
customer training/education service. Activities
designed to instruct customers in the installation,
usage, programming, management, and maintenance of hardware, software, and networking
products.
custom integrated circuit. A handcrafted, single-user integrated circuit that is customized using
a full set of photomasks and requires manual
placement and routing. Can be either bipolar or
MOS technology process.
CVD. See chemical vapor deposition.
D
daisywheel. See printwheel.
DAT. See digital audiotape.
updating, and retrieving information stored as
data items, commonly referred to as data files.
database publishing. A system with the main
purpose/use of printing the ordered collections of
data.
data capture. A process that takes possession or
control of information.
data center. A program designed primarily to
acquire, analyze, process, store, retrieve, and disseminate one or more types of data.
data center construction/relocation services.
Services in which a vendor performs or manages
the contracting of site management services including the design and building of a customer's
data center and/or the relocation and installation
of customer's equipment.
datacom equipment. See data communications
equipment (DCE).
data communications equipment (DCE). Equipment used for transmitting data between points of
origin and reception. It includes products such as
modems, statistical multiplexers, T-1 multiplexers,
front-end processors, data PBX systems, data network management systems, DSU/CSU equipment,
local area networks, and private packet data
switching equipment.
data acquisition and control. See real-time
data acquisition and control.
data converter. An integrated circuit that
changes alternating current to direct current or
direct current to alternating current.
database. The entire body of data that has to do
with one or more related subjects. Typically, it
consists of a collection of data files stored in a
computer system.
data creation. The process of producing or originating information.
database administration. A control program
function that provides access to data sets, enforcement of data storage conventions, and regulation of the use of input/output devices.
data network management system. A product
or device that diagnoses, isolates, reinstates, or
accumulates information for network components
or provides reports and analysis of network
performance.
database management system (DBMS). 1: A
software application that provides storage maintenance functions for data stored in sequential, hierarchical, relational, or object format. Example
of DBMS products include FOCUS (hierarchical), Ingres (relational), and GBASE (object
oriented). 2: A systematic approach to storing,
data PBX system. A digital private branch exchange system that allows terminals to switch and
contend for computer ports by providing
RS-232-C connections. This system does not provide voice switching. Data PBX base units and
add-on channels also are included in this
classification.
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91
data processing (DP). 1: The preparation of
source media that contain data or basic elements
of information and the handling of such data according to precise rules of procedures to accomplish such operations as classifying, sorting, calculating, summarizing, recording, and computing.
2: The handling of information in a sequence of
reasonable operations.
execution technique from scalar processors,
such as mainframe computers and superminicomputers, and is typically configured as a uniprocessor rather than a parallel processor. Typical
environment is a "cool room" with a raised floor
and/or an ordinary office with no special environmental controls. Number of concurrent users
typically ranges from 10 to 50.
data service unit (DSU) and channel service
unit (CSU). These provide an interface to digital
services, such as the AT&T Dataphone Digital
Service (DDS).
deposition. The layering of various chemicals on
a wafer. The introduction of dopant to wafers in
high-temperature furnaces, chemical vapor deposition (CVD), sputtering, and implant.
data storage device. A product designed to hold
data until needed. Storage devices are rated by
technology (rigid, flexible, and optical disk drives
and tape drives), physical size in inches (diameter
for rigid and flexible disk drives, width for tape
drives), and capacity in bytes. (See also disk
drive, tape drive.)
deposit/loan management. An application that
facilitates the control and earning potential of
loans and deposits.
data translation. 1: A device that transforms
computer information to data from one language
to another language without affecting the meaning. 2: To change one binary word to another.
DBMS. See database management system.
design layout. An initial design process in which
the major components and part interfaces are
defined.
desk-side personal computer. The desk-side
personal computer meets all the qualifications
listed for desktop personal computers but is further defined as being a personal computer that
has been specifically designed to be placed next to
or under the computer operating or desk surface,
including foot/stand on bottom of system.
DCE. See data communications equipment.
dealer. 1: Independent businesses selling products under contract to one or more vendors. 2: A
product reseller selling to end users. A dealer's
primary added value is distribution; secondary
added values are service, training, and support.
defibrillator. An electronic instrument used for
stopping spontaneous, local contraction of muscle
fibers (fibrillation) during a heart attack by applying controlled electronic pulses to the heart
muscles.
departmental supercomputer. An information
system with price ranging from $100,000 to
$2 million. Performance speed ranges from 10 to
200 mflops. Acquired usually by users who need
heavy number-crunching capabilities but cannot
afford a full-scale supercomputer costing more
than $2 million. This computer is a vector
processor and thus uses a fundamentally different
desktop personal computer. The desktop computer classification includes all personal computers except those products that are designed and
sold as local area network servers, desk-side personal computers, and all forms of portable
computers. Further, these systems are based on
keyboard input devices.
desktop publishing. 1: Generalized computing
platforms used to perform electronic publishing
tasks as one of many applications. 2: The formatting of text and graphics into publishing-quality
printed output.
desktop terminal equipment. Telecommunications equipment that is actually used on a desktop. This segment includes products such as single-line telephone equipment and integrated
voice/data workstations.
desktop video. Tabletop televised images.
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High-Technology Guide Glossary
detail drafting. The representation of a part in
standard geometric drafting format. This representation will include all part geometry dimension
and notations describing mechanical/structural,
functional, and material characteristics.
detection and tracking. A real-time application
that detects, tracks, and controls various systems and processes. (See also data acquisition
and control.)
device interface. 1: An electronic device that
enables one piece of gear to communicate or control another. 2: A device linking two incompatible
devices. 3: A card containing circuits that allow a
device to interface with other devices.
diagnostic. 1: Pertaining to the detection,
discovery, and further isolation of a malfunction
or mistake. 2: Medical applications that aid in
diagnosing medical problems. X-rays, CAT scans,
and ultrasound are examples.
dialysis. The separation of substances in solutions
by means of their unequal diffusion through semipermeable membranes.
diathermy. The therapeutic use of high-frequency electric currents to produce localized heat
in body tissue.
dictating/transcribing machine. A device that
automatically records human speech onto a form
of magnetic tape that can be played back for
transcription.
diffusion. 1: A process used in the production of
semiconductors that introduces minute amounts
of impurities into a substrate material. 2: The
movement of particles away from regions of
higher concentration caused by the random thermal motion of atoms and molecules to areas of
lower concentration.
digital. 1: Pertaining to the class of devices or
circuits in which the output varies in discrete
steps. 2: Circuitry in which data-carrying signals
are restricted to either of two voltage levels, corresponding to logic 1 or 0.
digital access cross-connect system. A system
that is composed of multiplex equipment that
allows digital lines to be remapped electronically
at a different digital level.
digital audiotape (DAT). A 4mm helical scan
device (i.e., data recorded at an angle rather than
parallel).
digital cordless telephone. Mobile telephone
that uses digital radio transmission technology.
CT2 is a standard for these devices.
digital design verification. A software application that includes logic simulation, timing analysis,
hardware accelerators, hardware modelers, electrical rule checking, mixed signal simulation,
transmission line simulators, and signal noise
analysis.
digital panel meter. 1: An electrical switchboard
or instrument board using continuously variable
electrical signals known as analog signals. 2: Digital signals versus analog signals.
digital radiography. Equipment used for electronically detecting the arrival of X-ray photons
transmitted through or emitted from an object on
various media and converting the sensed analog
signals to digital signals.
digital signal processor (DSP). High-speed
general-purpose arithmetic unit used for performing complex mathematical operations such as
Fourier transforms.
digitizer. A device used for the creation of digital
information from alphanumeric or line artwork.
More sophisticated digitizers are able to reproduce halftone images and usually are termed
scanners.
diode. 1: A semiconductor device used to permit
current flow in one direction in a circuit and to
inhibit current flow in the other direction.
direct channel. The sale of equipment directly to
the end user by a vendor that contributes significant development or integration to the product.
Can be either sales of complete systems by turnkey vendors or sales of components of systems
sold by individual suppliers.
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direct memory access (DMA). A computer feature, set up by the central processing unit (CPU),
that provides for high-speed direct data transfer
from a peripheral device to the computer memory
or to magnetic disk or tape storage units. This
feature releases CPU time to perform other procedures. Most DMA devices employ a CPU-cyclestealing approach.
direct sales force. A sales method that employs a
sales force to move a product through the distribution channel by making face-to-face contact
with the consumer. Also referred to as outside
sales.
direct thermal printer. A printer that uses pointspecific heat and heat-sensitive substrate that
change color when exposed to heat.
direct write e-beam. Equipment used in semiconductor manufacturing where electron beams
are used to create heat that will expose selected
areas of a wafer's surface to create a specific
design. (See also lithography.)
disaster recovery and contingency planning.
The planning and implementation of data backup
and recovery procedures for a customer's site,
based on an analysis of the critical business
functions.
discrete component testers. Equipment used to
test, check, and monitor the functionality of
devices that have a single functional capability per
package. These devices include resistors, capacitors, diodes, transistors, and other devices not
classified as integrated circuits.
discrete device, security energy management.
A circuit complete in itself used in the security
and energy industries.
discrete semiconductor. An individually packaged semiconductor component complete in itself,
such as a diode or transistor.
disk. 1: A high-capacity random-access storage
device. Data are written onto and read from the
surfaces of a stack of revolving record-like disks
coated with magnetic material. May be fixed or
removable. Capacity ranges from 0 to more than
1,000 pages per disk. Referred to as a rigid disk.
(See also random access.) 2: A random-access
magnetic storage medium in the form of a platter
or thin wafer. (See also magnetic disk.)
93
disk drive. The unit that controls the reading and
writing of disks.
disk drive IC. An analog IC designed for the
mass-storage peripheral market. These ICs include read/write amplifiers, data separators, data
processors,
servo
controllers,
and
motor
controllers.
diskette (floppy disk). A record-like disk of
magnetically coated Mylar enclosed in a protective square envelope. Holds from 80 to 250 pages
of text. Unlike cassettes or cartridges, which store
text serially, diskettes are formatted in a random
manner, which allows faster access.
disk, magnetic. A storage device containing information recorded on the magnetizable surface
of a rotating disk; a magnetic disk storage system
is an array of such devices, with associated reading and writing heads mounted on movable arms.
disk operating system (DOS). 1: A computer
system based on the Intel 80XX or 80XXX architecture that use the MS/PC-DOS operating system
software. 2: An operating system that uses magnetic disks as its primary on-line storage.
dispatching. A software application used to execute the route plans of multiple vehicles, taking
real-world events into account.
display peripheral. A component used to address the man-to-machine interface, whereas
communication peripherals are used to address
the machine-to-machine interface.
distribution. 1: The act or process of distributing.
2: The path by which a product moves from the
manufacturer to the ultimate end user. 3: To
place or position so as to properly apportion over
or throughout an area.
distribution channel. The route taken either by
the title to a product or by the physical product
itself as it moves from the producer to the ultimate end user. The channel for a product extends
to the last consumer who buys it without requesting any significant change in its form. When form
is altered and another product emerges, a new
channel is started.
distribution frame. A unit for terminating telephone wiring. This unit is typically used for terminating and cross-connecting telephones to the
switching system.
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High-Technology Guide Glossary
distribution method. A method employed to
move a product through the distribution channel.
It is separate and distinct from the channel in that
many channel members may employ the same
distribution method.
distributor. A wholesaler that sells to other resellers or end users. The distributor's primary
function is to stock the inventory of multiple
manufacturers to provide volume buying power to
its end users.
DMA. See direct memory access.
documentation/drafting. A software application
that includes detail drafting, schematics, technical
illustration, charts, specifications, bills of materials, training manuals, and other drawing- or drafting-related applications. International standards
such as ISO, DIN, or ANSI can be used to define
text and feature format.
document management. A documentation system, generally computerized, that links and tracks
all documents (drawings, procedures, specifications) related to an assembly or process.
dopant. Atoms of materials such as phosphorus,
boron, or arsenic that are diffused into silicon to
create resistors, diodes, and transistors.
DOS. See disk operating system.
dot matrix printer. A printer that produces images through selective printing of dots chosen
from a dot array matrix. Dot matrix printers are
segmented by the number of wires in the printhead: 9, 18, or 24 and greater wires. Within these
technology segments, additional segments are defined by speed of printing, expressed in characters
per second (cps).
DP. See data processing.
DRAM. See dynamic random-access memory.
DRAM controller. A device that governs
DRAMs in some predetermined manner. Holds a
process or condition at a desired level or status as
determined by comparison of the actual value
with the desired value.
drilling programmable machine tool. A machine tool fitted with an end-cutting tool that is
rotated with sufficient power to create a hole or
enlarge an existing hole in solid material.
drive. See tape drive.
drive, disk cartridge. A disk drive using a removable one- or two-platter cartridge; may incorporate a fixed-media capability.
drive, fixed Winchester. A disk drive that includes all fixed-media Winchester drives.
driver information. An electronic device used to
assist the driver by giving visual or audio signals
for direction. Examples include digital gauges,
service reminders, digital clocks, trip/navigation
computers, heads-up display, audio annunciator,
CRT display, miles-to-empty indicator, and shift
indicator.
dry etch. A technique in semiconductor manufacturing used to produce more uniform pattern
definition on wafers without immersing the wafer
in a liquid bath. Techniques include plasma etching and reactive etching through which gases and
energetic ions remove unwanted chemical material from a wafer.
dry silver. A photosensitive film or paper coated
with silver compounds that is developed by the
application of heat. Popularized by 3M.
dry strip. A process in semiconductor manufacturing for removing photoresist from the wafer
after etching. Dry strip comprises barrel strippers
and single-wafer strippers.
DSMPU. See DSP microprocessor.
DSP. See digital signal processing.
DSP microprocessor (DSMPU). A generalpurpose, programmable integrated circuit similar
to a conventional microprocessor. Its distinction is
characterized by the efficiency with which it implements repetitive multiplications and additions
required by DSP algorithms.
DSU/CSU. See data service unit (DSU) and
channel service unit (CSU).
DTMF.
signaling.
See
dual-tone
multifrequency
dual-disk drive. A system that provides for the
use of two disks at the same time.
dual-tone multifrequency signaling (DTMF). A
standard signaling method for touch-tone telephones using a combination of two different tones
for any button pushed.
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High-Technology Guide Glossary
duplicator. 1: A small offset printing press that
uses a planographic image carrier. These presses
are usually capable of one or two colors and are
smaller, easier to operate, but less sturdy than
offset presses. 2: Machine that requires a special
master to make copies but produces copies at a
higher rate of speed than copying. It differs from
printing in that a direct-image master is used that
yields a limited number of copies. Offset, spirit,
gelatin hecto, stencil, and sometimes xerography
are considered duplicating processes. (See also
copier.)
dynamic random-access memory (DRAM). A
random-access memory device that must be electrically refreshed frequently (many times each
second) to maintain information storage. DRAM
densities can range from 16K, with approximately
16,000 bits, to 16Mb, with approximately 16 million bits.
EDA. See electronic design automation.
education. The process of providing schooling or
training by formal instruction and supervised
practice.
educational publishing. A system with the main
purpose/use of printing materials used for the
process of educating.
EEPROM. See electrically erasable programmable read-only memory.
elapsed time meter. An electronic measuring instrument that counts the actual time taken to observe a recurring event.
electrically erasable programmable read-only
memory (EEPROM). A nonvolatile memory device that can be erased and programmed electrically.
electrocardiograph. An instrument used to
graphically record electrical manifestations of
heart activity obtained from the body's surface.
E
8mm tape cartridge. A class of tape drives using
8mm cartridges; used in camcorders.
E-1 multiplexer. An electronic device that consolidates or pools multiple digital streams representing voice or data signals onto a single highspeed E-1 data line. An E-1 line operates at
2.048 Mbits/second, a standard within Europe.
See T-1 multiplexer for U.S. standard.
earth resources application. Studying the earth
resources by performing seismic analysis, mapping, and oil field services.
EATE (electronic automatic test equipment).
See automatic test equipment.
e-beam. A sophisticated system used in semiconductor manufacturing that uses an electron beam
for maskmaking or for projecting patterns onto
wafers. E-beam equipment allows smaller geometries (typically less than 1 micron) than are possible under other production methods.
ECAE.
See
engineering.
95
electronic
computer-aided
ECL. See emitter-coupled logic.
electroencephalograph. An instrument used to
graphically record electrical discharges of the
cerebral cortex by electrodes attached to the surface of the scalp.
electronic calculator. A product with components that perform calculations and digitally display results. (See also calculator.)
electronic
computer-aided
engineering
(ECAE). Computer-aided tools used in the engineering or design phase of electronic products (as
opposed to the physical layout phase of the
product). Examples of ECAE applications are
schematic capture, simulation, and test pattern
creation. ECAE systems are used most often by
electrical engineers.
electronic design automation (EDA). Computer-based tools that are used to automate the
process of designing an electronic product, including boards, ICs, and systems. Formerly referred
to as ECAD.
electronic forms generation. The process of
automatically producing documents requesting
information.
electronic game. Home electronic games that
typically are attached to television receivers.
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High-Technology Guide Glossary
electronic keyboard. A keyboard on which characters are generated or encoded by electronic
means, usually by contact closure, as opposed to
mechanical linkages. Electronic keyboards have a
different feel, and some have a built-in artificial
bottoming feel and/or audible click to assure the
operator a key actually has been depressed.
electronic mail (e-mail). An application that
supports the movement of information between
users connected to a networked computer system.
electronic musical instrument. An instrument
that allows the transmission of musical sound by
the use of transistors.
electronic publishing. Fully integrated automation of the printing procedure.
electronic warfare (EW). Electronic operations
between enemies. Includes warning receivers,
jammers, assorted electronic countermeasure systems, and associated test equipment.
electrostatic plotter. A plotter using the corona
from high voltages applied to needles or nibs to
produce shaped electrostatic charges on paper;
toner is attracted to the charged area, and heat
and pressure are used to fuse the toner to the
paper.
elementary/secondary school. A regular school,
defined as schools that are part of state and local
school systems and most nonprofit private elementary/secondary schools, both religiously affiliated and nonsectarian.
e-mail. See electronic mail.
emerging technology. A technology that is not in
widespread use and that appears to have potential
for widespread acceptance.
emitter-coupled logic (ECL). 1: A form of integrated circuit used to implement very high speed
logic functions. 2: The emitters of the input logic
transistors are coupled to the emitter of a reference transistor.
employees. All civilians, who, during a reference
time period, did any work for pay or profit (minimum of an hour's work) or worked 15 hours or
more as unpaid workers in a family enterprise.
encryption. Process of encoding data, voice, or
video transmissions for security purposes.
encryption unit. A device that encodes/decodes
data, voice, or video transmissions for security
purposes.
end user. The final purchaser of a finished
product.
end-user average selling price. The average
price that a user pays for a product inclusive of
channel markups and discounts.
end-user revenue. End-user average selling price
multiplied by shipment quantity.
enhanced service. Equipment and service
charges associated with enhanced data communication networks, which may include protocol,
electronic mail, or facsimile.
enrollment. In education, the total number of
students registered in a given school unit at a
given time, generally in the fall of a year.
entertainment system. 1: Electronic equipment
used for amusement or pastime and not intended
to, but may, increase productivity or skill. Examples include: radio, seek/scan, graphic equalizer,
power amplifiers, noise reduction, cellular telephone, optical disk, CB radio, and digital
audiotape. 2: A computer application to keep or
hold the mind, something directing or engaging.
entry-level workstation. A low-cost computer
workstation, priced less than $15,000. It is targeted at the end user who is sensitive to price.
This segment tends to be dominated by occasional
users who are not paid for producing documents
on their system. Entry-level workstations mainly
run 2-dimensional graphics and have a rating of
less than 12 mips and a rating of 0.5 to
1.5 mflops.
environment.
ultimately.
Where
a
product
is
used
epitaxial wafer. Single-crystal silicon grown on a
crystalline silicon substrate.
EPROM. See erasable programmable readonly memory.
equipment/maintenance management. A software application that assists in the management of
equipment and the respective maintenance
requirements and contracts. May also calculate
depreciation.
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erasable programmable read-only memory
(EPROM). A nonvolative memory device that
can be erased by ultraviolet (UV) light and
reprogrammed by the user.
ET. See typewriter.
etch-and-clean equipment. Equipment used in
semiconductor manufacturing to remove and
clean material from wafers.
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facsimile (fax). 1: An electronic device that uses
telephone lines to transmit documents to and
receive documents from a second facsimile
machine. 2: An exact copy or the process of
transmitting printed matter or still pictures by a
system of either telephones, telegraph, or radio
for reproduction.
EW. See electronic warfare.
factory automation equipment. Equipment that
includes various types of capital equipment that
are automated and used throughout a manufacturing facility.
expenditure. Charges incurred, whether paid or
unpaid, which are presumed to benefit the current
fiscal year. These include all charges for current
outlays plus capital outlays and interest.
factory average selling price.The average price
per unit that is paid for a product. This figure
takes into account discounts given to the distribution channel and multiple-purchase discounts.
export. The delivery of products to a foreign
country for the purpose of trade or sale.
factory revenue. The amount of money received
by a manufacturer for its goods.
F
fast packet switch. A packet-switching technique
in which small packets are switched at high-speed
using hardware for the transport of voice, data,
and video.
fab. Abbreviation
fabrication.
for wafer
fabrication. See
fabrication. A manufacturing operation
makes components rather than assemblies.
that
fabric ribbon. Fabric ribbons are struck repeatedly by the print mechanism until all the ink is
depleted. Such ribbons are used commonly for
general-purpose printing and are the most economical and durable ribbon substrate. Most fabric
ribbons are made of nylon and are available in
several forms, e.g., cartridge or web ribbon.
facilities design/management. A software application used to lay out, inventory, and manage
assets (such as personnel, space, equipment, and
utilities) within a building or geographic service
area.
facilities management service. The responsibility of providing ongoing administration of a data
processing or communications facility by a
vendor.
facility planning and simulation. A facility system model is exercised and refined through a
series of simulation steps until a detailed,
optimum configuration is reached.
fast SRAM. A static RAM device that runs at
speeds less than 70 nanoseconds. (See also static
random-access memory.)
fatigue. In electronics, the degradation of the
performance of materials, parts, or circuits with
time.
fault detection, fault management, and adaptive control. A software application that determines if a manufacturing system or a process is
functioning or performing within control limits.
Fault management and adaptive control is a control method in which control parameters are
continuously and automatically adjusted in response to measured process variables to achieve
near-optimum performance.
fax. See facsimile.
FDDI. See fiber distributed data interface.
federal government. A form of government in
which power is distributed between a central
authority and a number of constituent territorial
units.
FERRAM.
memory.
See
ferroelectric
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High-Technology Guide Glossary
ferroelectric random-access memory (FERRAM). A nonvolatile, radiation-hard, fast read/
write memory that can store data over long
periods of time without power.
fiber distributed data interface (FDDI). A
standard for high-speed packet switched data.
fiber optic. 1: The technique of transmitting light
through long, thin, flexible fibers of glass, plastic,
or other transparent material. Bundles of fiber
can transmit complete images. 2: A technique
used in electromagnetic wave propagation in
which infrared and visible light frequencies are
transmitted by a light-emitting diode (LED) or a
laser through a low-loss glass fiber. This method is
used in very high frequency (VHF) radiation
transmission.
field-programmable gate array (FPGA). An integrated circuit incorporating an array of programmable logic elements that are not preconnected.
Interconnections between the various elements
are user programmable and consist of predetermined levels of interconnect that can be connected to, or disconnected from, other interconnect lines as defined by the user. Can be of either
bipolar or MOS technology.
field-programmable logic array (FPLA). A
logic array in which programming is accomplished
by blowing fuse links or shorting base-emitter
junctions.
fixed media rigid disk drive. A fixed media rigid
disk drive has the platter enclosed in a housing
that is not designed to be accessible to the user.
fixture design. The design of a variety of structural aids that hold the component or assembly
during the manufacturing process.
flexible disk. See flexible disk computer storage media.
flexible disk computer storage media. A flexible disk made of a 3-mil polyester substrate
coated with gamma ferric iron oxide particles dispersed in an epoxy binder and encased in a vinyl
jacket. These are commonly supplied in 3.5- or
5.25-inch diameters.
flexible manufacturing system programmable
machine tool. A manufacturing system that typically consists of a computer-integrated group of
numerical control (NC) machines or workstations
linked with material transfer devices for complete
automatic processing of differing product parts or
the assembly of these parts into different units.
floating-point coprocessor. A separate microprocessor used in the efficient handling of floating-point operations.
floppy (flexible) disk. A small, thin, electromagnetic media used for storing digital information.
floppy disk controller. A device controlling the
storage and retrieval of data from a floppy disk.
film ribbon. See single-strike ribbon or multistrike ribbon.
font generation. Process whereby typeface and
size is selected.
finance. An application to support the management of money or other liquid resources
and their respective management
within an
organization.
fixed asset. An application that supports the
management of an organization's fixed assets,
which are a capital asset that cannot be readily
liquidated, such as plant, land, equipment, and
long-term investments. Management of expected
costs based on a specific level of production or
other activity.
font management. The understanding, use, and
control of fonts or typefaces that are displayed on
a terminal or monitor, or printed out on a device
such as a printer, plotter, or typesetter. Font management requires the understanding of the physical location of where the fonts reside—whether in
diskette, hard disk, ROM, RAM, card, or cartridge. It also requires the knowledge of the type
of font—whether bit map or outline, scalable or
fixed point and pitch—and the applications and
print system capability to address and place the
fonts accurately on the screen or printing media.
fixed disk. A memory disk that cannot be removed from the read/write device, as opposed to
a removable hard disk, diskette, or magnetic tape.
forecasting. To estimate in advance or anticipate;
to predict future events, trends, business conditions, etc.
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form. 1: Any material that has been printed for
the primary purpose of facilitating the entry of
written information by hand or machine. A form
has repetitive information printed in fixed
positions. Blank paper may be included, especially if it is continuous and has undergone some
alteration such as punching or perforating to
facilitate manual or machine entries. 2: Allows
the user to graphically design a form for publication—may include data entry and database
capabilities.
four-year institution. An institution legally
authorized to offer and that does offer at least a
four-year program of college-level studies wholly
or principally creditable toward a baccalaureate
degree.
FPGA. See field-programmable gate array.
FPLA. See field-programmable logic array.
front-end processor. A computer-based product
expressly designed to relieve host computers of
certain communications processing tasks. Included are remote concentrators that are not attached directly to a host computer. This segment
does not include general-purpose computer systems functioning as front-end processors.
full-color copier. A reproductive device that can
recognize the full range of colors on an original
and reproduce them using the three subtractive
primary colors and produce a full-color copy.
fully formed printer. A printer that prints fully
formed characters by applying pressure on or to
the paper and obtaining the characters from a
wheel, band, type train, or drum. Such devices
can be serial, fully formed printers and line, fully
formed printers.
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Provides stimulus patterns and measurement verification that the UUT actually operates correctly.
funds transfer terminal. A machine used by financial institutions and designed to perform many
of the banking functions performed by human
tellers. (See also automated teller machine.)
G
GaAs. See gallium arsenide semiconductor.
GaAs analog IC. There are two overlapping subsets in this segment; analog products and monolithic microwave integrated circuits (MMICs).
Analog products have output that are Unearly proportional to their inputs and function at a varying
range of frequencies across the spectrum, depending on particular device design. MMICs operate in the microwave frequency spectrum
(above 3 GHz).
gallium arsenide semiconductor (GaAs). A
compound of gallium and arsenic used as a semiconductor material. GaAs devices are relatively
expensive devices exhibiting very low internal
noise and very high speed.
game. A software application or activity engaged
in for diversion or amusement.
gas. A consumable material used throughout the
fabrication of semiconductor devices. Includes
both bulk and specialty gases.
gate array. 1: An ASIC device that is customized
using the final layers of interconnect. (Included in
this category are generic or base wafers that include embedded functions such as static RAM.)
May be of either bipolar or MOS process
technology.
functional design. An application that supports
component design, assembly verification, linkage
and mechanism design, and other detail or functional design activities.
gateway. Equipment or conceptual point that
connects two otherwise incompatible systems.
(See also protocol converter.)
functional PCB tester. An equipment tester that
accesses the normal input/output interface of the
unit under test (UUT). Generally, this consists of
the edge-connector pins, plus any special interface that may have been provided for testing.
general analysis. A software application designed
to solve various technical problems and to further
research subjects. The analysis is usually mathematical in nature and performed by scientists,
physicists, chemists, biologists, and engineers.
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High-Technology Guide Glossary
general ledger. A software application that supports the business function of entering accounting
transactions and their subsequent transferring and
reporting.
general operating system. An operating system
with use not restricted to a particular type of computer or a specialized application.
general productivity. A software application that
is used to enhance productivity within general
disciplines.
general-purpose computer system. A computer
system that is not configured for a specific purpose but rather for a general application. This
category includes supercomputers, minisupercomputers, parallel processor computers, mainframes,
workstations, and the like.
general-purpose input/output (I/O) circuit. A
circuit that permits a system to communicate via a
wide variety of input/output (I/O) devices with the
outside world, which can include printers, modems, and monitors.
general test equipment. Test equipment not included under the definition of automatic test
equipment (ATE).
geographic information system (GIS). A mapping software application that contains the functions of cartographic software and also allows data
analysis through Boolean operations on multiple
data layers.
geophysical instrument. An instrument used to
observe and measure the physics of the earth and
its environment.
Includes the executive, legislative, judicial, administrative, and regulatory functions.
graphic design art. A method of applied art used
to form a visual end product that conveys information. Methods include drawing, painting, photography, printing, and bookmaking.
graphics. Software that permits the pictorial representation of information at a screen or printer.
Early graphics packages showed bar charts or line
graphs on a character-based terminal by placing
characters such as + or * on grids created by
repetitions of characters such as | and or _ . The
term has come to apply usually to bit-mapped
graphics, which are capable of processing images,
freehand input, and icons on a pixel-by-pixel basis. Examples of graphics software include
MacDraw and MacPaint.
graphics/animation/imaging. A software graphics application used by scientists and engineers to
process and display complex technical data. It
also includes applications that use computers to
generate or manipulate graphics images that are
the end product, i.e., cartoons.
graphics board. An add-on board connected to
the bus that provides video capabilities for a personal computer.
graphics controller. A device that governs information flow used to create visual images of data.
graphics draw/paint. A software application that
creates, retrieves, modifies, and prints graphic
images.
golf ball. A type of print element invented by
IBM for use in the IBM Selectric typewriter. It is
a round, metal element with raised characters.
graphics supercomputer. The performance of
mips, mflops, transforms per second, and shaded
polygons per second distinguishes graphics supercomputers from superworkstations. Performance
ratings range from 20 to 40 mips and 16 to
40 mflops. The best distinction between graphics
supercomputers and superworkstations is the
graphics performance ratings, lOOK to 600K 3-D
vector transforms/second and 25K to 150K
Gouraud-shaded polygons/second. The average
price ranges from $75,000 to $150,000.
government. The organization, machinery, or
agency through which a political unit exercises
authority and performs functions and which is
usually classified according to the power within it.
graphics terminal. A display
vides graphical presentation of
operator. 1: Data conversion
support the use of graphics
GIS. See geographic information system.
global positioning system. Equipment that calculates location based on one of several technologies
such as radio or internal navigation.
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terminal that proinformation to the
graphics terminals
to summarize or
High-Technology Guide Glossary
otherwise relate discrete data that were not originally graphics data. 2: Concept design graphics
terminals support graphics displays that help realize accurate images of ideas conceived in the human mind. 3: Imaging graphics terminals display a
real image, visible or nonvisible, that was digitized
to allow enhancements or data extraction.
grinding programmable machine tool. A standalone machine with expanding use of computer
numerical control (CNC) and with advance efforts to incorporate grinders into flexible, automated systems. Creep-feed is a type of grinding
technology.
gross lease additions. The total volume of new
equipment leases.
H
hand-held personal computer. The hand-held
personal computer is a less-than-2-pound, fully
functional personal computer. To be considered a
hand-held personal computer, units must operate
using a fully implemented version of MS-DOS and
be able to run some of the shrink-wrapped MSDOS-based applications. These units are expected
to have a subsize keyboard and utihze nonstandard mass storage devices. The criterion for inclusion in this classification is that the device may be
held in one hand using the other hand for data
entry via the included keyboard. They are fully
battery powered units.
hard disk. See rigid disk.
hard disk controller. A device that controls the
storage and retrieval of data from a user's hard
disk drive.
h a r d w a r e . Electronic equipment, systems, or peripheral devices.
hardware maintenance service. Remedial repair
services for equipment, systems, and peripherals.
Hardware maintenance can include on-site
support, telephone/remote support, preventive
maintenance, and other activities necessary to
maintain hardware operation.
HDTV. See high-definition television.
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head; manganese-zinc, landable. A type of
head used in sealed fixed-media drives where
heads land on the lubricated media surface and
use hot-pressed manganese-zinc pole pieces.
health care. An environment or industry that
includes establishments primarily engaged in
providing medical, surgical, and other health
services.
helical scan tape drive. A storage tape drive that
records data on an angle rather than parallel.
Tape dimensions can be 4mm, 8mm, 13mm, or
19mm. Segments of this category are VHS, DAT,
8mm, and other. (See also VHS, DAT.)
high-definition television (HDTV). A television
standard with high-resolution, digitized images;
wide, theater-like screen; and digital stereo
sound. Requires a broader video bandwidth to
accommodate increased picture transmission.
higher education. Study beyond secondary
school at an institution that offers programs terminating in an associate, baccalaureate, or higher
degree.
high school. A secondary school offering the final
years of high school work necessary for graduation, usually including grades 10, 11, and 12 or
grades 9, 10, 11, and 12.
home. The usual place of residence. A homebased business is an enterprise producing goods or
services that is operated in or from the home.
horizontal-turning
programmable
machine
tool. The tool of a machine that holds a piece
along the horizontal axis for a certain function to
be performed such as cutting, boring, or drilling.
host/vendor independent terminal. A hostindependent display terminal produced by an
independent manufacturer. It may operate in
either character or block mode. The independent
manufacturer does not supply mainframes or
minicomputers to which its display terminals may
attach. Not included is any terminal that is from
an independent manufacturer and that is protocol-specific to either a minicomputer-based or a
non-IBM, protocol-specific terminal.
hotels and lodging. An environment or industry
that includes commercial and noncommercial
establishments engaged in furnishing lodging, or
lodging and meals, and camping space and camping facilities.
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102
household. The set of persons occupying a housing unit. Thus, counts or estimates of households,
householders, and occupied housing units are
always defined the same.
hybrid. 1: Made up of several different components. 2: A hybrid integrated circuit is made by
putting several integrated circuit die and/or
passive components on a ceramic substrate with a
metal pattern. 3: A substrate containing more
than one component. The substrate consists of
multiple ceramic layers and also can contain
multiple packages. 4: A device in a speech transmission system consisting of transformers that
convert a two-wire channel into a four-wire channel, thus creating a separate wire pair for each
direction of transmission.
hybrid analog IC. An analog IC that combines
one or more semiconductor chips with other
technologies, such as chip capacitors and film resistors, on a single substrate.
hydrogen. A chemical element used for hydrofining for sulfuration of petroleum products or to
reduce metallic oxide ores.
IBM 3270 protocol terminal. A terminal that is
protocol-specific to IBM's 3270 Information Display System. Included is any IBM 3270-type terminal or 3270-compatible terminal produced by
another manufacturer. A terminal that can
provide the appearance of a 3270 device when
used with a protocol converter is not included.
IBM/VM/MVS. An IBM standard multiuser operating system.
IC. See integrated circuit.
IC layout and verification. A software application tool that is used to create and validate physical implementations of an integrated circuit (IC).
IC layout tools include polygon editors for creating geometric data, symbolic editors, placement
and routing (gate array, cell, and block), and
DRC/ERC verification tools.
IDVT. See integrated voice/data workstation.
if-sold revenue. The amount of money paid for
products based on list price. List price does not
take into account discounts or markups.
if-sold value. A measure that reflects unit shipments multiplied by list price.
IGBT. See insulated gate bipolar transistor.
illustration software. An object-oriented software program that allows the user to create original artwork consisting of lines, arcs, and other
mathematically generated geometric objects.
(Line art is a term sometimes used to describe the
results of illustration software.) Some illustration
software can perform raster-to-vector conversion
by allowing users to trace over scanned raster art.
This trace can occur on screen or on a graphics
tablet. Illustration software usually offers raster-fill
patterns that extend to cover an area in an illustration bounded by geometric objects.
image communication. Equipment used in a
business or residence to transmit image and text.
Facsimile equipment, video teleconferencing,
telex, and videotex are included in this classification.
image-editing software. A software program that
allows a user to modify existing artwork existing in
raster format. This art may have been scanned or
captured as analog signal data and converted to
digital data. Image-editing software can handle
binary data, in which case it is called print software; or it can handle grey-scale and/or color
data, in which case it is called image-retouching
software.
image generation. Synonymous with image synthesis and equivalent to the historical use of
graphics.
image management. The process of directing,
controlling, or handling something that closely
resembles another.
image processing. A series of actions, changes,
or functions that bring about a particular result for
something that resembles another.
imaging. See graphics/animation/imaging.
imaging subsystem. A peripheral device that
does not possess video display terminal (VDT)
functionality, but acts as output devices for the
display of graphics and/or image data.
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impact printer. A family of printers that use
direct impression impact of a type bar, type head,
or matrix pin to exert pressure against a paper
ribbon and a platen to create a character.
import. The supply of products from a foreign
coimtry for the purpose of trade or sale.
in-circuit PCB tester. An equipment tester that
incorporates pin electronics (drivers and receivers) that verify the functionality of each part on
an assembled circuit board. Verifies each component's parameter and limited functionality.
indirect channel. A variety of distribution channels in which product is brought to the end user.
It includes value-added resellers (VARs) and
original equipment manufacturers (OEMs).
inductor. A passive component that stores energy
in the form of a magnetic field (flux) around a
core body.
industrial design. A process that integrates the
design tools defining the style and functional aspects of the total design.
i03
infrared. Those radiations, such as are emitted
by a hot body, with wavelengths just beyond the
red end of the visible spectrum. Wavelengths
longer than those of visible light and shorter than
those of radio waves.
ink jet. An image-producing process currently
used in electronic printers, plotters, and full-color
copiers that uses piezoelectric technology to expel
a very small droplet of liquid ink through nozzles
onto the output paper.
ink jet printer. A nonimpact printing method
that uses ink droplets to form a printed image.
This technology usually is classified by the nature
of the drop stream; two major categories are continuous flow and drop-on-demand.
input/output (I/O) device. 1: Equipment used to
communicate with a computer. 2: A general term
applied to equipment used in communicating with
a computer and the data involved in the computer. 3: The transmission of information from an
external source to a computer or vice versa.
industrial electronic equipment. Electronic
equipment used in a manufacturing environment
or industry.
input/output (I/O) ratio. 1: A ratio of the value
of a resource input to the value of the final product output, typically expressed as a percentage. 2:
A measure of throughput for a computer system.
industrial marking. A specified format on media
that is recognized by electronic or visual means.
Examples are the printing and use of forms, bar
codes, ticket printing (lottery and airline, for example), and labels.
inspection. The process of testing or measuring
an object or process by remote sensing in imaging
technology.
industry. A collective term for many of the productive activities of a nation or other large group.
A collective term in which a number of firms
produce the same kind of commodity or service
or are engaged in the same kind of operation.
INEWS. See integrated electronic warfare systern.
information center. A center designed specifically for storing, processing, and removing information for dissemination at regular intervals, on
demand or selectively, according to the user's
needs.
information resource management. A program
that works with definitions, uses, values, and distribution of information that is processed by a
user and handled by a computer system.
installed base. The total number of product in
active, day-to-day use.
institutional support. In higher education, the
expenditures that include day-to-day operational
support for colleges, excluding expenditures for
physical plant operations. Examples of institutional support include general administrative
services; executive direction; planning, legal and
fiscal operations; and community relations.
instruction. In higher education, expenditures of
the colleges, schools, departments, and other instructional divisions of higher education institutions and expenditures for departmental research
and public service that are not separately
budgeted. Includes expenditures for both credit
and noncredit activities. Excludes expenditures
for academic administration where the primary
function is administration.
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instructional. Products used to increase the
understanding (either problem-solving or selfimprovement) of a specific subject matter. The
primary focus of these products is the imparting of
knowledge or skills to the user.
instructional staff. In education, the number of
full-time equivalent positions, not the number of
different individuals occupying the positions during the school year.
instrumentation. Designing, manufacturing, and
using instruments for detection, observation,
measurement, automatic control, automatic computation, communication, or data processing.
insulated gate. A gate that is separated from
other conducting surfaces through a nonconducting material.
insulated gate
power transistor
erties of a MOS
ON voltage of a
bipolar transistor (IGBT). A
that has the insulated gate proptransistor with the low saturation
bipolar transistor.
insurance. An environment or industry that covers carriers of all types of insurance and insurance
agents and brokers.
integrated application. A software application
that combines several functions into one software
package, which may include word processing,
database management, and spreadsheet capabilities but is not exclusive to these functions. Data
must be able to be shared among these functions.
integrated circuit (IC). A combination of interconnected semiconductor elements inseparably
associated on or within a continuous substrate.
Complete module of components manufactured
as single, solid units made by either a film deposition or a diffusion process.
integrated electronic warfare system (INEWS).
A combination of interconnected circuit elements
associated on or within a continuous substrate to
produce integrated systems used specifically in
military operations.
Integrated Services Digital Network (ISDN). A
digital network having the capabilities of simultaneous signaling, switching, and transporting over a
single facility. A new worldwide telephone standard that will make it easier to communicate
information such as voice, data, and video over
phone lines.
integrating and totalizing meter for gas and
liquid. A meter that registers consumption and
positive displacement, including meters, fuel dispenser meters, and gas meters.
integrated voice/data workstation (IDVT). Terminal that possesses both telecommunications and
computational capability.
integration. Integration of data types can be
achieved using page composition and pagination
applications.
intelligent terminal. An interactive terminal in
which part of the processing is accomplished by a
small computer or processor contained in the terminal itself. This type of terminal is sometimes
referred to as a smart interactive terminal. Such a
terminal has the following characteristics: (1) selfcontained storage; (2) user interaction—with the
terminal or the central computer; (3) stored program; (4) part of processing accomplished in the
terminal; (5) on-line via communications line with
large central computer and database; (6) humanoriented input—such as keyboard and light pen;
and (7) human-oriented output—such as serial
printer and CRT.
interactive language. Within a system, a human
user or device serviced by the computer can communicate directly with the operating program or
language.
intercom systems. A system that provides internal communication, allowing calling to be confined to inside the system. In most cases, key
systems provide the intercom lines that allow
quick communication between stations on the key
system.
interconnect and bare-board tester. Equipment
designed to check, monitor, and identify printed
circuit boards for electrical connectivity and detect manufacturing defects.
interface IC. An analog IC that is dedicated to
interfacing digital information (in bits) with external nonsemiconductor devices such as displays,
lines, solenoids, and other peripheral devices.
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internal transfer. The process of conveying or
moving goods and services from the producer
within a company.
international telephone service. Telecommunication services between offices or stations in
different states or between mobile stations that are
not in the same state or are subject to different
states.
interrupt controller. 1: An internal controller
chip that can break into the normal flow process
of a routine such that the flow can be resumed
from that point at a later specified time. 2: A
condition or event that temporarily suspends normal processing operations. 3: A temporary disruption of the normal operation of a routine by a
special signal from the computer. 4: Copying technology: A feature that allows a job to be stopped
to allow another job to be run without the loss of
programming for the first job.
intrusion-detection alarm system. A warning
system used to detect when someone or something
has intruded in a specified area. (See also alarm
system.)
inventory. Items used in the process of manufacturing a product and distributing it to the end
user. Inventory can be stored at a stock point or
at a work-in-process location. Inventory may consist of finished goods, parts of intermediate items,
work-in-process, or raw materials.
inventory and distribution management. An
application that monitors the status of materials at
all levels of production, including receipts, issues,
and inventory balances. It identifies both unit
quantities and dollar values and provides essential
input to both the general ledger for cost accounting and the production planning modules.
105
ion milling. A technique in semiconductor manufacturing in which a beam of charged particles is
used to remove material from a wafer.
I/O ratio. See input/output ratio.
IR. See infrared.
ISDN. See Integrated Services Digital Network.
IVR. See interactive voice response system.
joint venture. Two or more companies providing
capital or other resources to invest or make available for investment in the ownership of a new
enterprise.
K
keyboard. An input device that allows an operator to enter alphanumeric characters through a
typewriter-style key arrangement augmented with
special function keys—manual operation of keys
will generate electrical signals or cause tape to be
punched, or both.
keyboard controller. A device that governs the
functions of a keyboard transmitting a command
to do something within a system.
key entry equipment. Data entry equipment such
as key disk, key tape, or keypunch equipment.
key telephone system. A customer premises telephone switching system that allows telephones to
interface to the public telephone central exchange
or office without using an access code. This category includes the electromechanical 1A2 and
electronic segments.
I/O device. See input/output device.
ion implantation. The use of an ion beam to
bombard a silicon wafer, altering the concentrations of p-type and n-type material. This method
of doping allows for very precise control of the
device parameters. This process introduces
dopant atoms into the surface of silicon wafers
and accelerates them so that they bombard the
wafer, causing them to penetrate the exposed portions of the wafer.
label. 1: A set of symbols used to identify or
describe an item, record, message, or file. May be
the same as the address in storage. 2: Matter
attached to a document to identify or provide
information. 3: To assign a symbol, acronym, or
word as a means of identification to create a
specialized record or filing handle. 4: A
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High-Technology Guide Glossary
descriptive or identifying word or phrase. 5: To
address, using self-adhesive addressing labels.
laboratory. 1: A software application that
involves the use of computers inside analytical
instruments and in linking these instruments
together (instrumentation automation). Mass
spectrometers and blood/gas analyzers are examples. 2: A place equipped for experimental study
in a science or for testing and analysis.
laboratory and scientific apparatus. Any instrument, material, or equipment designed for a specific operation or particular use in the laboratory.
LAN. See local area network.
LAN-based e-mail. A software application that
enables users of a local area network (LAN) to
send and receive textual data. Some LAN-based
e-mail software can send and receive computer
files and graphic images.
language. In software, a set of commands that
permits the programmer to perform arithmetic
functions on data and/or give commands to
specific hardware components of the computer
system, such as the printer, terminals, disk, or
memory. Statements in languages are generally
required to be performed in a fixed order, although the order may be affected by loops and
branches in the program and the values of parameters that control the looping and branching.
Examples of low-level languages are C and assembler; high-level, or third-generation, languages include FORTRAN, COBOL, BASIC, and PL/1.
language editor. A set of computer commands
forming code to edit files. May involve deleting
undesired information, selecting desired information, inserting invariant symbols, and applying
standard processes.
laptop A/C. The laptop A/C units reflect the
standard laptop design, i.e., clamshell-style case
with the display mounted in the top portion of the
shell and covering the keyboard until the unit is
opened for use. These units, like transportables,
are designed to be easily moved from place to
place but operate only on A/C power and do not
contain batteries of any kind.
laptop D/C. The laptop D/C units are identical in
style to the laptop A/C units except that they are
powered by batteries and can be operated without
direct connection to A/C power lines. Some of
these laptop D/C units have a combination of
battery- and A/C-power capability.
laptop personal computer. The laptop-case style
is conducive to operation on the user's lap and is
designed to be used in areas where space is
restricted. This case style is referred to as the
clamshell-type of system, with the display screen
mounted in the top of the unit in such a way as to
cover the keyboard when closed and be at the
proper viewing angle in relationship to the keyboard when opened and ready for operation. This
unit is completely self-contained and can be carried as a single unit that includes the keyboard,
display, mass storage, and main system unit.
large-format plotter. This plotter uses media engineering size C (17 X 22 inches) or larger and
corresponding metric sizes. (See also plotter.)
laser (light amplification by stimulated emission of radiation). 1: A device that transmits an
extremely narrow and coherent beam of electromagnetic energy in the visible light spectrum. 2: A
laser that operates at optical frequencies. In communications, lasers may be amplitude-modulated
and used to carry speech information that is
received by a light beam detector.
laser diode. A laser diode is a laser that is constructed with a semiconductor material. Many
III-V semiconducting materials can be made to
emit coherent light, creating a laser.
laser plotter. A device that produces an inscribed
visual display of the variation of dependent variable as a function of one or more variables by the
use of intense coherent beams of light.
laser printer. A type of nonimpact printer that
combines laser beams and electrophotographic
technology to form images on paper.
laser system. Any electronic device or system
that is actuated by beams of coherent visible and
infrared light to accomplish a task.
LCD. See liquid crystal display.
learning. An application that assists the user in
learning. The subject can range from classic
school subjects to games, art, and languages.
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lease. A contract by which one conveys equipment, facilities, or property for terms specified.
lease accounting. An application that supports
the management of leases.
leased circuit. A service offering that provides a
customer with permanent (rather than dialed)
connections to all points on the circuit for the
duration of a contract.
lease/rental conversion. The volume of contractual conversions between rental and lease options.
LED. See light-emitting diode.
library management. A software application that
supports the administration of a library, including
cataloging.
LIDM. See line, impact, dot matrix.
LIFF. See line, impact, fully formed.
light communication system. Electromagnetic
radiation of a wavelength originating at one place
and reproduced at a distant point.
light-emitting diode (LED). A pinhead-size
device with a pn junction formed from combinations of gallium, arsenic, and phosphorus. Light
emission is the result of hole-electron recombinations that take place near the junction of the
p-doped and n-doped regions. As the electrons in
the n region of the diode travel through the area
near the junction, they recombine with a hole. As
a result of this recombination between an electron
and atom, light in the form of photons is
produced. The wavelength of color of the light is
determined by the energy level.
light-emitting display. Light-emitting diodes
grouped together in a matrix of dots to form
characters.
linear array/ASIC. An ASIC that is purely
analog.
linear IC. An IC that is purely analog; both
inputs and outputs are analog signals. Sometimes,
linear and analog ICs are used interchangeably.
Dataquest uses linear as an analog-only segment
of the analog market (mixed signal analog/digital
is the other segment).
line conditioner. Equipment that changes/enhances the transmission characteristics of a
circuit.
107
line, impact, dot matrix (LIDM). A printer that
prints one line of dots at a time using an array of
elements in a printhead.
line, impact, fully formed (LIFF). A printer
that creates one line of characters at a time by
placing characters—from a band, type train, or
drum—on the paper by the pressure of an impact
mechanism (hammer).
line, nonimpact, thermal transfer (LNTT). A
printer that prints a line at a time, using an electrically heated element to produce images.
line printer. A printer that usually prints one line
at a time at a higher speed than a character
printer. Typical line printers use a drum, chain, or
train of print elements and have a hammer for
each print position in the line. They usually have
a buffer to hold one print line. Line printers are
segmented by technology (dot matrix, fully
formed, thermal) and by speed, expressed in lines
per minute (1pm).
linkage mechanism. An assembly of components, with two or more movable parts usually
providing some means of power, control, or
fastening application.
liquid crystal display (LCD). A high-contrast,
black-on-white display screen that uses closely
spaced crystal segments on a square dot matrix.
The crystal segments butt together to form solid
characters. A liquid crystal hermetically sealed
between two glass plates.
list price. The price of a product as indicated
in the seller's price book. This figure is usually
quantity one and is synonymous with manufacturer's suggested retail price.
lithography. 1: A printing process that prints
from a planographic image on a printing plate.
Lithographic presses are configured as sheetfed
and web presses, depending on the format of the
paper used. 2: A technique used in semiconductor manufacturing in which a silicon wafer is
coated uniformly with a radiation-sensitive film
(the resist) and an exposing source illuminates
selected areas of the wafer's surface through a
mask or template for a particular design.
LNTT. See line, nonimpact, thermal transfer.
local area network (LAN). The hardware, software, and peripherals that enable connection of a
device to a cable-based network system that
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serves a building or a campus environment.
Excluded are connections that are point-to-point,
or go through PBXs or data PBXs. Ethernet and
Token-Ring are popular LAN technologies.
local government. The political unit or organization governing counties, municipalities, townships,
school districts, and numerous kinds of special
districts.
local loop. The portion of the telecommunications system that connects the customer's
equipment with the local telephone company's
network.
local telephone service. A service that includes
message telecommunications services, private line
services, wide-area telecommunications services
(WATS), and centrex services.
logic circuit. 1: A circuit (usually electronic) that
provides an input-output relationship corresponding to a Boolean-algebra logic function. 2: An
electronic device or devices used to govern a
particular sequence of operations in a given
system. 3: Circuits that perform basic logic decisions and/or/not, used widely for arithmetic and
computing functions. Circuits can be of either
bipolar or MOS technology.
long distance telephone service. The revenue
generated by all long distance carriers for interstate and intrastate long distance telephone
services.
M
machining-center programmable machining
tool. A machine that is designed to fabricate a
complete or near complete part of a single
machine, with machining centers that perform a
number of different operations in a single setup.
machining robot system. A robot that can pick
up parts and place them in a new location. Parts
are usually moved in and out of machinery or
transferred from station to station.
mag card/mag tape. A tape or card that is
coated or impregnated with magnetic material, on
which information may be stored in the form of
coded polarized spots.
magnetic. The effects of magnetism/flux on the
system.
magnetic disk. 1: A random-access storage
device consisting of magnetically coated disks
accessible to a reading and writing arm, similar to
an automatic record player. Data are stored on
the surface of each disk as small, magnetized
spots arranged in circular tracks around the disk.
The arm is moved mechanically to the desired
disk and then to the desired track on that disk. 2:
A flat, circular plate with a magnetic surface on
which data can be stored by selective magnetization of portions of the flat surface.
magnetic ink recognition. Property of automatic
devices that can detect or read ink-containing
particles of magnetic substance, i.e., the ink used
for printing on some bank checks for magnetic
ink character recognition (MICR).
magnetic media. Any of a wide variety of belts,
cards, disks, or tapes (as contrasted with paper
tape) coated or impregnated with magnetic material for use with the appropriate equipment and
on which dictation or keystrokes can be recorded
and stored.
magnetic recording head. A magnetic head that
transforms electric variations into magnetic variations for storage on a magnetic medium such as
tape or disk.
magnetic resonance imaging. Equipment used
on an object placed in a spatially varying magnetic
field that is subjected to pulses of radiation; the
resulting nuclear magnetic resonance spectra are
combined to give cross-sectional images.
magnetic tape. A serial-access magnetic storage
medium. Typically, a flat ribbon of metal, plastic,
or paper that is coated on one side with material
that can be magnetized; information is stored on
the tape by a combination of magnetized spots in
certain patterns. (See also magnetic media.)
mailing/letter-handling/addressing equipment.
Mailing systems and equipment that have been
automated with components to increase capabilities and to streamline efficiencies.
mail order. A sales method by which a consumer
may order products through a catalog.
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main distribution frame (MDF). A unit used in
telephone wiring for terminating and crossconnecting telephone wiring to the telephoneswitching system. The MDF is the primary (or
first) distribution point. (See also distribution
frame.)
mainframe computer. A general-purpose information system with price range of $350,000 and
up. CPU bit width ranges from 32 to 64 bits.
Physical environment can be either with or without special environmental controls and requires
full-time support by professional computer systems support staff with 10 or more members.
Number of concurrent users is 250 or more.
maintenance management. The upkeep of property, equipment, or tooling through planning,
analysis, and documentation of maintenance
functions.
management. An application that supports the
management of data that can be achieved using
document image management software and
systems.
manufacturer.
goods.
A producer
or
assembler
of
manufacturer's representative/agent. An independent contractor who represents multiple
manufacturers. She or he does not take title to
the product.
manufacturer's suggested retail price. See list
price.
manufacturing automation. The use of a
computer to aid and improve a manufacturing
process.
manufacturing EATE N.E.C. Equipment that
tests electronic systems that are composed of a
number of subsystems. The testing equipment
must verify operability and be capable of locating
a faulty subsystem or component in event of
failure.
manufacturing engineering tools. The small
segment of manufacturing engineering that is concerned with tool and fixture design and the development of manufacturing processes.
109
manufacturing system. A system used to process
raw material into a finished product.
mapping. Computer-aided tools that allow geographically related data to be captured, edited,
analyzed, and managed. Typical users are civil
and utility engineers, geophysicists, and geologists.
market. The demand for a product or service.
market share. A comparison of a company's performance with the total market so that its relative
position and the amount of the market it captured
is derived.
markup. 1: The amount added to the cost to
determine the selling price for a specific product.
2: The amount added to the cost to determine the
selling price for a specific product.
maskmaking e-beam. Semiconductor production
equipment utilizing a method that allows submicron pattern generation for producing semiconductor mask plates or maskless lithography. (See
also lithography.)
mask ROM. A semiconductor read-only memory
programmed to the customer's specified pattern
during the manufacturing process. (See read-only
memory.)
mass merchandiser. A segment of the distribution channel with storefront locations. It differs
from a dealer in that its primary business is the
sale of a broad range of consumer goods.
mass property. The analysis of the physical characteristics of a part, assembly, or system. The
evaluation of multiple
properties—measures
volume, weight, and surface area and locates center of gravity.
mass storage peripheral. A device that interfaces with the system or machine to external
memory storage.
material. The designation of a number of basic
metals, compounds, and gases to make up thermoelectric materials.
material-handling equipment and systems.
Equipment such as 1: Movement—Automated
guided vehicle systems, conveyors, and monorails;
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cranes and lift trucks are included only when
they are computer-controlled; material-handling
robots are included in Robotics in Manufacturing.
2: Storage—Automated storage and retrieval
systems; miniload, microload, and carousels.
3: Identification—Bar codes, radio frequency,
machine vision, and other sensors used for identification are covered in Sensors in Manufacturing.
4: Controls—Computers, programmable controllers, and software used in material handling are
included in Computers in Manufacturing and
Software in Manufacturing.
material-handling/loading
robot
systems.
Robotics used in the loading, moving, storage,
and unloading of materials.
material requirement planning (MRP). A planning method that uses bills of material, inventory
data, and a master production schedule to calculate material requirements. This method makes
recommendations to restock materials inventory.
Further, because material requirements planning
is time-phased, this method makes recommendations to reschedule open orders when due dates
and need dates are not in phase. Originally seen
only as a better way to order inventory, material
requirements planning is thought of today primarily as a scheduling technique, i.e., a method to
establish and maintain valid due dates on orders.
matrix printer. An impact printer that uses wire,
hammer-like bristles, or needles to create characters formed by small dots. Matrix printers produce either serial or line output. The serial printer
employs a moving printhead with a matrix block
(i.e., 5 X 7 or 7 X 9) of needles. The printhead
sweeps across the page to print full characters one
at a time. The line printer uses a horizontal band
with raised dots that moves from left to right
across the paper. The individual needles strike
programmed character dots to form one row of
dots per sweep across the page. Successive passes
of the line printer form complete characters and
complete rows of textual data. High-resolution
text, comparable to daisywheel output, may be
produced by overlapping matrix printers that print
characters via a highly concentrated matrix or
successive, staggered passes of the printhead.
Fonts for matrix printers are stored in ROM or
PROM memory.
MBE. See molecular beam epitaxy deposition.
MCAE. See mechanical computer-aided engineering.
MCU. See microcontroller.
MDF. See main distribution frame.
mechanical. Mechanical CAD/CAM is the software application of computer-aided tools to design, analyze, document, and manufacture discrete parts, components, and assemblies.
mechanical assembly equipment. 1: Machinery
or equipment that assembles mechanical parts
into subassemblies or final products. 2: Dial
or rotary assembly machines; in-line transfer
machines; flexible assembly equipment (except
robots).
mechanical
computer-aided
engineering
(MCAE). The application of CAD/CAM tools for
mechanical design and analysis. MCAE applications range from conceptual product design
through detailed product design and analysis to
supporting production design. Commonly used
MCAE products are solid modeling and finite
element analysis technology.
mechanical computer-aided
See mechanical.
manufacturing.
media-to-media data conversion equipment.
Computer output-to-microfilm recording units,
tape print units, card-to-tape conversion units, as
well as document entry devices.
medical. An environment or industry that uses
computers to control and/or collect and analyze
data from patients, medical equipment, and/or
instruments.
memory. 1: A device into which data can be
entered and stored for later retrieval. 2: An integrated current (IC) designed for the storage and
retrieval of information in binary form; can be
either bipolar or MOS technology and includes
dynamic random-access memory (DRAM), static
random-access memory (SRAM), read-only
memory (ROM), programmable read-only memory (PROM), erasable programmable read-only
memory (EPROM), and electrically erasable
programmable read-only memory (EEPROM).
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memory management unit (MMU). 1: An integrated circuit that manages the storage and retrieval of data found by cell location or address.
2: A component (or set of components) that implements the memory management function in a
processor-based system.
merchant production. The sale of a good to a
company other than the manufacturing company.
merger and acquisition. In financial terms, it
means to absorb or acquire one company by
another.
metalorganic CVD (MOCVD). A technique
used to deposit material onto a wafer.
metal oxide silicon (MOS). 1: A circuit in which
the active region is a metal oxide semiconductor
sandwich. The oxide acts as the dielectric insulator between the metal and the semiconductor.
2: A process that results in a structure of metal
over silicon oxide over silicon. 3: Technology that
employs field effect transistors having a metal or
conductive electrode that is insulated from the
semiconductor material by an oxide layer of the
substrate material.
meteorological instrument. An instrument used
to monitor and observe the weather.
metropolitan statistical area. A large population
nucleus, together with adjacent communities, that
has a high degree of economic and social integration with that nucleus. Each metropolitan statistical area (MSA) must include at least: (a) one city
with 50,000 or more inhabitants, or (b) a
census bureau-defined urbanized area of at least
50,000 inhabitants and a total MSA population of
at least 100,000 (75,000 in New England).
microcomponent. 1: An integrated circuit (IC)
with high-speed, low-power density considered as
a single part. 2: An IC that contains a processing
unit or acts as an interface chip to such a device.
Types of microdevices include microprocessor
(MPU), microcontroller (MCU), microperipheral
(MPR), and digital signal processor (DSP).
microcomputer. An information system with
price ranging up to $100,000, with the majority
priced at less than $50,000. CPU bit width is
normally 32 bits, but can be as low as 8 bits.
Traditionally used as a desk-side or desktop
Ml
system configuration. Normally a multiuser system
used in a common work area. Usually has a merchant (nonproprietary) microprocessor.
microcontroller (MCU). An integrated circuit,
containing a CPU, memory, and I/O capability,
that can perform the basic functions of a
computer.
microperipheral (MPR). A support device or
circuit for a microprocessor or microcontroller
that either interfaces with external equipment or
provides system support.
microprocessor (MPU). A single-chip component, or a collection of architecturally interdependent components, functioning as the central
processing unit (CPU) in a system. A microprocessor may contain some input/output circuits, but
it usually does not operate in a standalone
environment.
microprogrammable digital signal processor
(MPDSP). An integrated circuit that allows highperformance, modular DSP architectures to be
designed using standard off-the-shelf components.
Products include bit-slice and building block
components.
microwave. 1: Any radio wave with a frequency
higher than 890 MHz or a wavelength of between
1ml and Im. 2: A form of electromagnetic radiation that has frequencies of 1 GHz. These highfrequency bands of energy are used extensively
for radar and wideband communications.
microwave antenna. A device used for receiving
and transmitting microwave signal beams. (See
also antenna.)
microwave
monolithic
integrated
circuit
(MMIC). An electronic circuit employing monolithic integrated circuit technology fabricated by
microelectronic techniques and capable of operating at frequencies above 1 GHz.
microwave oven. An oven that uses electron
waves to produce heat for faster cooking of foods.
microwave radio equipment. Equipment that
includes transmitter/receiver systems, power
supplies, repeaters, and other equipment used in
microwave radio systems. It also includes analog
and digital equipment used both in common carrier and in private industrial systems.
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midrange. The combination of microcomputer,
minicomputer, and superminicomputer.
military/aerospace electronic equipment. Electronic equipment used in the military and civilian
aerospace industries.
military communication equipment. Voice,
data, and cryptographic equipment used for communication in the military.
military computer system. A computer system
used for military purposes; a set of hardware components that form a system intended solely for
military applications. This category includes
general-purpose CPUs, storage, input/output, and
terminals and includes both commercial, ruggedized, and mil'spec versions for integration into
military systems and for government-sponsored
programs.
military electronic equipment. Electronic equipment used exclusively by the military. Usually,
this equipment must meet government specifications and regulations.
military simulation and training. The performance of military maneuvers/exercises as training
for real-life military situations. This category includes flight and battle simulators and equipment
operation and maintenance systems.
milling programmable machine tool. A machine tool for the removal of metal by feeding a
workpiece through the periphery to remove the
material through the motion of workpiece and
cutter.
minicomputer. An information system with
prices ranging from $10,000 to $300,000 but
mainly falling between $25,000 and $150,000.
CPU bit width ranges from 8 to 16. Minicomputers are situated usually in a common work area
and occupy more floor space than most tower
configurations. Number of concurrent users
ranges from 15 to 100. System usually incorporates proprietary processor,
with
notable
exceptions, and is often packaged with third-party
application software and/or peripherals and then
resold into specialized applications or vertical
markets. Examples of models are the HP 1000,
HP 3000/70, PDP-11/84, and IBM Series/1.
minicomputer-based terminal. A display terminal provided by a minicomputer manufacturer or
a display terminal that is protocol-specific to an
IBM System/34, /36, or /38 computer. This
terminal may operate in either character or block
mode. Excluded from this category is any minicomputer-compatible terminal supplied by an independent manufacturer.
miscellaneous military equipment. Equipment
that includes classified systems, test equipment
(N.E.C.), vehicle control, medical equipment, assorted development and office equipment, and
research and development equipment; all used in
the military.
mixed signal ASIC. An ASIC that has one analog input or output and one digital input or
output.
mixed signal IC. An integrated circuit that has
one analog input or output and one digital input
or output.
MMIC. See microwave monolithic integrated
circuit.
MMU. See memory management unit.
mobile communications equipment. Equipment
(base stations, mobile units, and antenna)
used primarily for portable public or private
communications.
mobile infrastructure. The central base station
and other central equipment that provide mobile
communication services.
mobile radio base station equipment. The base/
centralized station equipment associated with
cellular radio systems. This category includes
both switching equipment and radio transmitter/
receiver equipment.
mobile radio service. Service or network revenue associated with cellular radio systems. (See
also mobile service.)
mobile radio system equipment. Electronic
equipment used in the transmission and receiving
of radio signals. Equipment includes main central
control, base control mobile stations, and handheld car units. Used primarily with cellular and
other mobile communication technologies.
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mobile service. Radio service between a fixed
location and one or more mobile radio stations, or
between mobile stations.
mobile telephone service (MTS). Radio communication between a mobile (portable) unit and the
public switched network including cellular service.
modeling. An application that supports the representation of a process or system by using equations that simulate and represent behavior under
varying conditions.
modem. 1: An electronic device that provides
modulation and demodulation functions of transmitted data signals over telephone lines. They
convert digital data signals to analog for transmission over leased lines or the analog public
switched telephone network. 2: The integrated
circuits used in a modem.
113
MOS application-specific IC. See applicationspecific integrated circuit.
MOS cell-based IC. See cell-based integrated
circuit.
MOS custom IC. See custom integrated circuit.
MOS digital. A semiconductor technology in
which the active devices are n-channel, p-channel, or complementary MOS transistors that operate in a digital or binary mode. (See also digital.)
MOS FPGA.
array.
See
field-programmable
gate
MOS gate array. See gate array.
MOS logic. See logic circuit.
MOS memory. See memory.
MOS microcomponent. See microcomponent.
molecular beam epitaxy deposition (MBE). A
technique used in semiconductor manufacturing
to deposit a single crystal layer on a substrate by
use of a molecular beam.
MOS microcontroller. See microcontroller.
MOS microperipheral. See microperipheral.
MOS microprocessor. See microprocessor.
molecular engineering. See computational
chemistry/molecular engineering.
money management. An application that identifies and controls the source, flow, location, and
earning potential of an organization's cash and
investments.
monitor. 1: To check the operation and performance of a system or circuit by examining parts of
transmissions. 2: The physical CRT unit, associated electronics, and housing used in display systems. 3: A station or equipment arranged to
supervise system operation. 4: To supervise and
verify the correct operation of a system, device,
or program. 5: The screen of a video display
terminal. 6: An analog monitor can display an
almost infinite number of colors, while a digital
monitor can display a more limited range of
colors.
monolithic analog integrated circuit. An analog
IC constructed from a single piece of material. All
circuit components are manufactured in or on top
of a single crystal of semiconductor material.
MOS. See metal oxide silicon.
MOS nonvolatile
memory.
memory.
See
nonvolatile
MOS PLA. See programmable logic array.
MOS PLD. See programmable logic device.
MOS PMD. See programmable multilevel logic
device.
MOS standard logic. See standard logic.
MOS
transistor. A field-effect
transistor
(FET) with a gate that is insulated from the
semiconductor substrate by a thin layer of silicon
dioxide. Being field-effect transistors, MOS-FET
provide a voltage-input-to-current-output
relationship called transconductance. MOS-FET are
excellent switches because voltage at the gate
turns the output current on or off.
mouse. A hand-held device that is moved on a
surface to provide coordinate input to a graphics
system. It is used most often to position a pointer
or cursor.
MPDSP. See microprogrammable digital signal
processing.
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114
MPR. See microperipheral.
MPU. See microprocessor.
MPU load programmer. A device that allows
engineers and IC designers to program a variety of
programmable devices (ICs), thereby speeding up
the design process. The device to be programmed
is loaded directly on the device programmer.
MTS. See mobile telephone service.
multilingual publishing. A system with the purpose/use of printing in a variety of languages.
multimedia. A process that uses more than one
form of communication.
multiplexer equipment. Public telecommunication equipment used to combine a number of
channels for transmission over a common
medium, such as satellite, microwave radio, cable
carrier, or fiber-optic cable. Excluded from this
are data-only customer premises multiplex equipment and multiplex equipment that is integral to
carrier or microwave radio systems,
multistrike ribbon. A ribbon that advances only
part of a character width; characters slightly overlay one another on the ribbon, but no character
hits the exact same spot on the ribbon,
multiuser system. A computer system inherently
designed for environments with multiple users,
N
natural resources and construction. An environment or industry that includes establishments
primarily engaged in agricultural production, forestry, commercial fishing, hunting and trapping,
and related services; and mining or quarrying,
developing mines, or exploring for nonmetallic
minerals except fuel. Also, certain well and brine
operations and primary preparation plants, such
as those engaged in crushing, grinding, washing,
or other methods of concentration.
navigation, military. A process for directing
ships, aircraft, spacecraft, and other crafts to a
specific destination. Equipment determines position, distance, and course of vessel or craft.
n-channel metal oxide semiconductor (NMOS).
Pertaining to MOS devices made on p-type silicon
substrates in which the active carriers are electrons that flow between n-type source and drain
contacts. The opposite of PMOS. NMOS is two to
three times faster than PMOS. (See also MOS.)
net additions. 1: The change in stock, such as
installed base or inventory. 2: The relative increase or decrease in the total installed base of a
product.
NETVIEW. IBM network management product.
network management. A software application
that controls the logical connections and information flow among computers on a network. This
software may have additional functions such as
performance measurement and diagnostic and
accounting functions.
network support services. All services that help
customers better utilize their networking facilities.
The services include site planning, installation,
and ongoing on-site and remote maintenance support, as well as professional services such as
network design/planning, integration, administration, and operations management,
network terminating devices. Equipment that
connects a data network to the data terminal.
new placement demand. The total end-user demand for new products (as compared with
replacement products).
newspaper publishing. A system with the main
purpose/use of printing newspapers; typically daily
or weekly publication containing such elements as
news, feature articles, and advertising.
nitrogen. A chemical element.
NMOS.
See
semiconductor.
n-channel
metal
oxide
non-IBM, protocol-specific terminal. A terminal that is protocol-specific to a Burroughs,
Honeywell, or Sperry mainframe computer. Included is any terminal of this type that connects
to another computer by means of protocol
emulation.
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115
nonimpact printer. A hard-copy computer output device that forms images through electrostatic
or other nonimpact methods. These printers include ink jet, laser, and thermal printers. (See
also ink jet printer.)
OCR. See optical character reader.
nonvolatile memory. An integrated circuit using
two-junction transistor technology where memory
retains information when the power is off. Also
known as core or permanent memory. Can be
either bipolar or MOS technology process.
office equipment. Equipment used in a business
or office environment. Equipment may include
copiers and duplicators, electronic calculators,
dictating machines, electronic typewriters, word
processors, banking systems, cash registers, and
mail- and letter-handling equipment.
nonvolatile random-access memory (NVRAM).
A read/write semiconductor memory device that
does not lose information when the power is
turned off.
notebook personal computer. The notebook
personal computer is a system that resembles a
laptop personal computer in general form factor
and appearance. This personal computer is
smaller and lighter in weight than a laptop D/C
unit. The "standard" notebook size is 8.5 inches
by 11 inches by 2 inches or less, and the weight of
these units is in the 5- to 7-pound range. Notebook computers also, presently, make use of industry-storage mass storage media including
3.5-inch floppy disk.
nuclear radiation detection and monitoring instrument. An instrument used to detect, inspect,
monitor, and control alpha particles (neutrons,
protons, and electrons) that emanate from the
atomic nucleus as a result of radioactivity and
nuclear actions.
numerical control. 1: Computer instructions that
automate machining and drafting tools. 2: A technique of simulating the operation of a machine
tool. 3: Descriptive of systems in which digital
computers are used for the control of operations,
particularly of automatic machines. A technique
of controlling a machine or process through the
use of command instructions in coded numerical
form.
numerical-control (NC) part programming.
The programming of a numerical-control machine
tool or automated processing system. Graphics
and language-based programming tools are
available.
NVRAM.
memory.
See
nonvolatile
random-access
o
OEM. See original equipment manufacturer.
off-line robotics programming. A special-purpose process simulation that graphically represents
the sequence of steps to program a robot for a
particular operation. The resulting data can be
downloaded to a robot to update its control
program.
oil field services. A software application that uses
small computers in the oil rigs or the wellhead
areas to log and analyze data from sensors in the
well.
OLTP. See on-line transaction processing.
one-time programmable read-only memory
(OTP ROM). An EPROM packaged in plastic
without a quartz window for erasure. Such a
device is therefore programmable only once.
on-line transaction processing (OLTP). The input, tracking, and output of a well-defined record
of information, processed in real time rather than
batch. Examples include ATMs and airline reservations systems. OLTP systems are usually large
and complicated enough that each one is customized, so there are few generic OLTP products.
The RAMP-C and Debit-Credit benchmarks are
examples of OLTP standards.
op amp. See operational amplifier.
open systems interconnection (OSI). A communication standard for network architecture that allows communication between various equipment.
operating environment. A set of conventions for
screen appearance, keyboard, mouse and screen
operations, and program functions. Operating environments function within an operating system.
operating system. 1: The software program in a
computer that maps logical constructs to physical
locations in the computer. The operating system is
the program that lets a user access data by a file
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name without knowing where the file is physically
located on the disk. 2: The operating system controls the computer's operations by managing disk,
screen, file maintenance, and printer activity,
while loading and running application programs.
operating utilities. A program Or routine of general usefulness and applicable to many jobs or
purposes.
operational amplifier (op amp). A type of integrated circuit (IC) that generates an amplified
output that is exactly proportional to its input.
operator support system. Special equipment
and/or software that facilitates the operation of a
switchboard or comparable equipment.
optical CD/wafer inspection. Critical dimension
(CD) refers to the line, element, or feature that
must be manufactured and controlled to stringent
specifications. Wafer inspection refers to the inspection of a patterned wafer for process defects
by visual image process techniques.
optical character reader (OCR). 1: A device or
scanner that can read printed or typed characters
and convert them into a digital signal for input
into a data or word processor. 2: The machine
identification of printed characters through the
use of light-sensitive devices; computer-input-only
hardware.
optical disk controller. A device that controls
the storage and retrieval of data from a video disk
that is sensed through a laser beam.
optical disk drive. A data storage device utilizing
laser technology. Types include CD-ROM,
WORM, and erasable optical disk drives.
optical jukebox. A library system that holds multiple disk drives and optical disks to create a large
storage environment on optical media.
optical media. The substance on which data are
stored electronically and read by laser technology.
optical-scanning equipment. See optical character reader.
opto. See optoelectronic.
optocoupler. 1: A device that transmits electrical
signals, without electrical connection, between a
light source and a receiver. Also called an optoisolator. 2: A device that consists of an LED
separated from a photo detector by a transparent,
insulating, dielectric layer, all mounted in an
opaque package. A current pulse in the LED
causes a radiation pulse to flow across the dielectric layers to a photo detector, which produces a
current pulse at the output. The input and output
circuits are coupled with high-standoff voltage
isolation.
optoelectronic (opto). A semiconductor device
in which photons cause electron flow or vice
versa. Optoelectronic chips contain transducers
used between photonic circuit media and electronic media; they also may contain amplifiers,
logic functions, and/or other photonic or electronic functions.
order entry and sales support. An application to
support the process of accepting and translating
what a customer wants into terms used by the
manufacturer. This can be as simple as creating
shipping documents for a finished goods product
line to a more complicated series of activities including engineering effort for make-to-order
products.
order entry/processing. Acceptance and translation of customer requirements into terms used by
a manufacturer.
organization operation. A software application
that supports the day-to-day running of an
organization.
original equipment manufacturer (OEM).
1: An OEM may manufacture a product for assembly into another system or larger configuration
by another manufacturer or vendor. 2: A purchaser of materials, components, or equipment to
be incorporated into its product line. 3: A product
reseller that integrates hardware, software, and/or
services. The reseller may or may not own the
hardware or software. An OEM differs from a
VAR in that it adds its own label to the product
and backs up its warranties.
OSI. See open systems interconnection.
OS/2. Computer systems based on the Intel
80XXX architecture and using OS/2 operating
system software.
other. A subject or segment that is not distinctly
defined within the Dataquest High-Technology
Segmentation scheme.
1991 Dataquest Incorporated January—Reproduction Prohibited
High-Technology Guide Glossary
OTP ROM. See one-time programmable readonly memory.
PABX.
See
exchange.
private
automatic
branch
pacemaker. An electronically pulsed oscillator
implanted in the body to deliver electric pulses to
the heart at a fixed rate in response to a sensor
that detects when a person's heart rate slows.
packet assembler/disassembler (PADS). A system element that buffers data sent to and from
character-mode devices and assembles and disassembles the packets needed for X.25 operation.
packet data switching. Data network switches
that connect terminals and packet assemblers/disassemblers to a pre-edit node using a high-speed
link (56,000 bps). Can be public or private.
PADS. See packet assembler/disassembler.
page composition. Refers to the page composition software used to produce finished draft or
camera-ready pages whereby text and graphics
have been aesthetically laid out using an editable
WYSIWYG display environment.
page, nonimpact, plain paper (PNPP). A printer with the ability to buffer, in part or in whole, a
page of images received from an electronic source
and then to transfer these images to a receiving
substrate.
page printer. A printer that prints characters one
at a time to full-page format. Page printers are
rated by speed categories, expressed in pages per
minute (ppm).
paging equipment. Communication equipment
that produces an audio signal in a radio receiver
carried by an individual to tell him that he is
needed at the telephone. Communication system
for summoning individuals or making public
announcements.
paging system. The equipment necessary to selectively alert individuals by tone or voice paging,
either by pocket radio receivers or speakers within
a building.
117
painting robot system. A system consisting of a
number of robots programmed to paint by carrying spray guns and applying a coating of material.
Also known as finishing robot.
PAL. See programmable array logic.
panel-type instrument. 1: Switches, dials, and
buttons that are mounted on an electronic unit
that controls and monitors a system. 2: Electronic
instrumentation devices mounted on a panel for a
variety of equipment purposes.
paper. Sheets of fiber formed on a fine screen
from a water suspension. There are hundreds of
different types of paper based on weight, brightness, color, opacity, and coating.
particle accelerator. A device that accelerates
electrically charged particles (protons, electrons)
to high energies.
part process design. The design of the actual
manufacturing process and sequence.
parts service. Spare hardware modules or components used in the repair and/or replacement of
failed hardware units.
passive device. 1: An inert component that may
control, but does not create or amplify, energy.
2: A device that exhibits no transistance. A component that does not provide rectification, amplification, or switching but reacts to voltage and
current. 3: Pertaining to a general class of device
that operates as signal power alone.
patient monitoring. Equipment used to monitor,
control, and record data on activity concerning or
affecting a patient's health.
pay phones. A telephone instrument located in a
public location that accepts coins for operation.
payroll. A software application that supports an
organization making payment to its employees for
work performed.
PBX-private branch exchange. See PBX telephone system.
PBX telephone system. A telephone switching
system on the customer premises that, by dialing
an access code, permits a telephone to interface
to the public telephone central exchange or
office.
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High-Technology Guide Glossary
PC. See personal computer system.
PCB layout. Products that are used to create the
layout of the traces and components to be placed
on a printed circuit board.
p-channel metal oxide semiconductor (PMOS).
An MOS device made on an n-type silicon substrate in which the active carriers are holes (p)
flowing between p-type source and drain controls.
PC logic chipset. A semiconductor device (or set
of devices) that integrates standard logic and controller functions onto a very large scale integration
(VLSI) chip, resulting in a reduced component
count on the PC motherboard.
PCN. See personal communications network.
pen-based personal computer. This is a new
classification of portable computers for 1991. The
general identifier for this class of machines is that
they utilize a pen or stylus for data input and do
not normally require a keyboard to operate. (Keyboard options are included in some of these models, but the system can be fully utilized without the
inclusion of a keyboard.) Pen-based computers
do not have to be able to run MS-DOS or applications that run under DOS. It is expected that
there will be three or more operating systems utilized in this product: PenPoint by GO Corporation, Pen Windows by Microsoft, and others that
have not been made public at the time of
publication.
instructions from the CPU. 2: Information
flows between the CPU and a unit of peripheral
equipment.
personal communications network (PCN). A
class of communications technology that allows
communication with a mobile entity. Sample technologies include mobile radio, cellular, and paging
services.
personal computer operating system. A personal computer operating system is a program that
supervises and controls the operation of a personal computer.
personal computer system. A personal computer
intended for use on the user's desk or work surface and not designed to be readily moved from
place to place. Personal computers are those systems that include, as part of the basic system, a
BIOS- or ROM-based software code that is designed to permit the use of the system with any of
the existing personal computer operating systems.
personal electronics. Electronic equipment for
personal use.
personal finance. A software application that
records, processes, and reports on personal financial data, including personal banking, credit card
management, and budgeting. These applications
are suitable for small businesses as well as home
use.
percent retirement. See retirement.
personnel management. A software application
that supports an organization in managing its employees; may include many subapplications.
periodical publishing. A system with the main
purpose/use of printing publications issued at
intervals.
photoblank. A blank glass plate that is processed
to become a photomask for use in semiconductor
manufacturing.
peripheral device. 1: Any instrument, device, or
machine that enables a computer to communicate
with the outside world, or areas in the operation
of the computer. 2: Equipment that is connected
to a computer but is not part of the computer.
Examples include printers, terminals, and disk
drives.
photomask. A glass plate covered with an array
of patterns, used to form circuit patterns on semiconductor wafers. Photomasks may be made of
emulsion, chrome, iron oxide, silicon, or a number of other materials.
peripheral I/O management. 1: A program that
interacts with the central processing unit (CPU) of
a computer to communicate with devices beyond
the CPU. The program interprets and responds to
photoreceptor. The photoreceptor is the central
element in an electrophotographic copier or nonimpact printer. The photoreceptor consists of two
parts; a support or substrate, usually in the form
of a drum or flexible belt, and a photoconductive
coating consisting of one or more layers.
1991 Dataquest Incorporated January—Reproduction Prohibited
High-Technology Guide Glossary
photoresist. The light-sensitive film spun onto
semiconductor wafers and exposed using highintensity light through a photomask.
photosensitive. Capable of emitting electrons
when struck by light rays.
photosensitive plotter. A plotter that uses photosensitive properties to create an image.
photosensor. An optoelectronic semiconductor
that responds to radiant energy. Examples are
photodiodes and phototransistors.
physical property test, inspection, and measurement. An instrument designed to inspect and
measure physical property.
physical vapor deposition (PVD). A process
through which specific materials are physically
layered on a wafer. Includes sputtering and
evaporation.
pin diode. A diode made by diffusing the semiconductor with p-dopant from one side and ndopant from the opposite side with the process so
controlled that a thin or intrinsic region separates
the n and p regions. (See also power diode.)
PLA. See programmable logic array.
placement. End-user consumption of a product
that is either purchased, leased, or rented.
planning. An application that facilitates the
quantitative aspects of business planning, such as
modeling, budgeting, analysis, and forecasting.
plasma etchant. A highly ionized gas (plasma) in
the manufacture of high-density semiconductors.
plastic-processing machinery. Numerically controlled machinery used for injection, structural
foam, extrusion, blow molding, thermoforming,
and reaction injection.
plastics. 1: A polymetric material of large
molecular height that can be shaped by flow;
usually refers to the final product. Examples include polyvinyl chloride, polyethylene, and urea
formaldehyde. 2: Displaying or associated with
plasticity.
119
PLC. See programmable logic controller.
PLD. See programmable logic device.
plotter. 1: A recorder that charts, in graph form,
a dependent variable as a function of one or more
variables with an automatically controlled pen or
pencil. 2: Any (vector or raster) computer hardcopy devices that perform mainly graphics functions. These devices include pen plotters, electrostatic plotters, photographic and laser plotters,
and ink jet plotters.
PMD. See
device.
programmable
multilevel
logic
PMOS. See p-channel metal oxide semiconductor.
PMR. See private mobile radio.
PMR. See projection microradiography.
PNPP. See page, nonimpact, plain paper.
point-of-sale terminal. A terminal device that
operates as a cash register in addition to transmitting information.
polysilicon. A silicon layer grown on a wafer in a
furnace.
population. The total of individuals occupying an
area or making up a whole. A de facto population
should include all persons physically present in a
country (state, province, region, city, or town) or
designated area at a reference date. A de jure
population, by contrast, should include all usual
residents of a given country or designated area,
whether or not they are physically present at the
reference date. By definition, therefore, a de
facto total and a de jure total are not entirely
comparable.
portable electronic measuring instrument. An
electronic measuring instrument that can be carried or transported with ease.
portable radio receiver transmitter. A device
for converting radio waves into perceptible
signals.
portfolio management. A software application
that allows investors to clarify, estimate, and
control the sources of risk and return in their
portfolio.
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120
High-Technology Guide Glossary
postsecondary education. The provision of formal instructional programs with a curriculum
designed primarily for students who have completed the requirements for a high school diploma
or equivalent.
potentiometer. A device for the measurement of
an electromotive force by comparison with a
known potential difference.
power diode rectifier. A diode is a two-terminal
device that permits current flow in only one direction. This property is used in diodes and rectifiers
to convert AC current to DC.
power grid control. See power management.
power IC. An analog integrated circuit that can
control one or more amps of current, dissipate
one or more watts of power, or is capable of
operating with voltages exceeding 100 volts.
power management. A real-time application that
monitors and controls power generation equipment and power line grids.
power supply. 1: A unit that supplies electrical
power to another unit. 2: Energy source that provides power for operating electronic apparatus.
power train. The mechanism by which power is
transmitted from the engine to other part of the
vehicle that it drives. Examples include ignition,
spark timing, fuel control, turbo control, emissions systems, voltage regulator, alternator, engine
control, and diagnostics.
power transistor. 1: A transistor that dissipates
power of one or more watts. 2: A transistor designed for high-current, high-voltage applications.
premises switching equipment. Voice equipment that provides switching or call-routing functions. Includes equipment such as PBX telephone
system and key telephone system.
presentation graphics. 1: A software application
with a principal function of formatting text or
numeric data into specified formats for the
presentation of ideas. This may include graphs,
charts, and/or lists suitable for professional presentations. 2: An image written, printed, drawn, or
engraved; an image outlined or set forth for commercial, professional, or industrial purposes.
print element. The mechanisms used in fully
formed character printers and typewriters by
which marks are made on the paper. The three
types of print elements are printwheels, also
known as daisywheels, golf balls, and thimbles.
printer. The unit that produces copy on paper—a
typewriter or a line printer. Often connected to a
CPU that transforms electronic data into hardcopy form. (See also ink jet printer and line
printer.)
printer controller. 1: Within a printer, the device
used to regulate, accelerate, decelerate, start,
stop, reverse, or protect devices connected to an
electric controller. 2: A device or instrument that
holds a process or cartridge at a desired level.
3: Hardware and/or software, usually either
printed circuit board- or diskette-based, that takes
data streams from software and converts it to
printer-specific commands. The controller may
reside in a CPU; may be connected to the print
engine by an interface cable, a diskette or chip set
in the CPU or printer; or, as in most cases, may
be a physical attachment to or integrated component of the printer itself.
printer controller board. See printer controller. (Except all devices are loaded onto a board.)
printer, impact. Family of printers that use direct
impression impact of a typebar, type head, or
matrix pin to exert pressure against a paper
ribbon and a platen to create a character.
printer, nonimpact. A printer capable of imaging
on a substrate without physically striking it; these
include ink jet, laser, and thermal printers.
print system network. Hardware and software
that is integrated to manage the information sent
to one or a number of printers, usually shared by
more than one user. The system may be as simple
as a switch box connected to two CPUs and one
printer, or as complex as a full local area network
that controls print streams to many printers from
multiple CPU systems and controls job-queuing
management, printing error conditions, spooling,
and rerouting.
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printwheel. A print element for certain character
printers. The characters are engraved at the end
of spokes, the entire printwheel resembling a
daisy. Also known as daisy wheel.
private automatic branch exchange (PABX).
One type of telephone switching system that is
typically used in larger businesses. The PABX
allows computer-Uke programming of incoming
and outgoing calls to optimize network configurations and provide additional call management
features.
private line. A telecommunications network connection for the exclusive use of one organization.
(See also leased circuit.)
private mobile
service.
radio
(PMR).
See
cellular
private packet data switching. A private packet
data network switch connects terminals and packet assemblers/disassemblers to a packet node
using a high-speed link (56,000 bps). (See also
packet data switching.)
private school or institution. A school or institution that is controlled by an individual or agency
other than a state, a subdivision of a state, or the
federal government; usually supported primarily
by funds other than public funds; and is operated
by other than publicly elected or appointed
officials.
process control, nonunified system. Systemtype instruments and related equipment for process control activated from standardized electrical
transmission signals, in which control and signal
conditioning are separated from the display and
operator interface.
process control system. 1: Monitoring and maintaining the operation of plants that manufacture
homogeneous materials such as oil, chemicals,
and paper. Process control systems are capable of
detecting errors in input variables and environment and taking corrective action. Closed-loop
systems are self-correcting, and open-loop systems
alert an operator. 2: A computer-based system
that controls physical transformation and/or the
mixing of products in a fluid state.
121
process control system, auxiliary station.
Peripheral equipment of a process control system
not in direct communication with the central
processing unit or system.
process control system, controller. The controller describes that portion of a process control
system that continuously measures the value of a
variable quantity or condition and then automatically acts on the controlled equipment to correct
any deviation from a desired present value.
process control system, indicator. A portion of
the process control system that produces a diagram measuring the pressure volume changes in a
running system.
process control system, industrial process computer. A computer that monitors the manipulations and changes of numerous conditions within
a process control system automatically.
process control system, recorder. A portion of a
process control system that makes a graphic
or acoustic record of one or more variable
quantities.
processing terminal. A display terminal that has
local processing capability but is dependent on
communication with a host, controller, or server
to provide files and application programs. Such
a terminal does not have a mass data storage
device.
process manufacturing. 1: Continuous process
produces a continuous stream of products, the
units of which are not differentiated from one
another (i.e., gasoline). 2: Batch processing
produces product by reference to a recipe (i.e.,
bread).
processor. A device for handling information in a
sequence of reasonable operations. Any device
that can perform operations on data.
process planning and control. See process control system.
process simulation. The computerized simulation
of the sequence and interdependencies of manufacturing processes. Also involves process
modeling and includes NC part programming as a
subset.
product. A good or service.
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122
product category.
products.
High-Technology Guide Glossary
A
grouping
of
similar
production. The manufacture of goods.
production planning and control. Software used
to plan for factory resources of a manufacturing
company.
professional publishing. Systems dedicated
exclusively to the job of publishing; typically, PCbased professional publishing systems focus on a
single task or stage in the document production
cycle, rather than managing the entire document
production process.
professional services. A range of services including consulting on information
technology,
contract/custom programming, systems integration, facilities management, education, and
ongoing maintenance.
programmable array logic (PAL). PAL is a
trademark of Monolithic Memories, Inc. (now
part of Advanced Micro Devices), referring to
a family of logic devices that are customer
programmable.
programmable logic array (PLA). 1: A form of
programmable logic device containing a structured, partially interconnected set of gates and
inverters that are fuse programmed by the user.
Can be manufactured in bipolar or MOS
technology.
programmable logic controller (PLC). A device
or transmission control unit in which hardwired
functions have been replaced with software or
microcode. A programmable controller enables a
user to add, change, or tailor computer capacities
to the user's needs; programmable solid-state
devices that replace mechanical relays for controlling sequential operations, timing, counting, and
similar simple control actions. Where the capabilities exist as a function of the PLC, this definition
includes more sophisticated tasks such as
mathematical computations, data acquisitions,
reporting, and process equipment control.
programmable logic device (PLD). A type of
application-specific integrated circuit (ASIC) that
is user programmable (after assembly) rather than
mask programmable. The function of a PLD is
determined by blowing fuse links or programming
memory devices to create the desired interconnections between the fixed logic elements on the
device. Can be either a bipolar or MOS technology. (See also programmable logic array.)
programmable machine tool. Numerical control
(NC), computer numerical control (CNC), direct
numerical control (DNC), and flexible machining
centers used for metal cutting and metal forming.
programmable multilevel logic device (PMD).
A semiconductor that can be manufactured by a
bipolar or MOS technology process. The device,
evolved from the basic programmable logic array
(PLA), incorporates architectures to implement
complex logic functions efficiently. PMDs can implement multiple levels of logic without sacrificing
input/output or I/O cells or pins.
programmable read-only memory (PROM). A
nonvolatile fuse-programmable solid-state memory circuit that is programmable only once, with
special equipment. It is a programmed ROM that
may be programmed after manufacture by blowing fuse links or shorting base-emitter junctions.
PROMs provide high-speed access to frequently
needed data and instructions. They allow a
vendor company to customize a system before
delivery to the user.
projection/aligner. Wafer fabrication lithography
equipment that uses mirrors instead of lenses. The
wafer and mask are separated by distance, not
allowing the entire wafer to be exposed. This
process lines up two or more layers of a wafer so
that the components of one layer are compatible
with the components of the other layer. (See also
lithography.)
projection microradiography (PMR). An electron beam is focused onto an extremely fine pencil, generating a point source of x-rays; enlargement is achieved by placing the sample very near
this source and several centimeters from the
recording material.
project management. A software application that
supports the ordering of activities across time.
This application assists in planning and implementing projects by providing tools for forecasting
requirements, projecting costs, and providing
other charting and analysis features.
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High-Technology Guide Glossary
PROM. See programmable read-only memory.
prosthetic medical equipment. Equipment used
in the surgical and dental specialties concerned
with the artificial replacement of missing body
parts.
protocol. A set of rules (not a program) for software programs to conform with in data communications. A program that reacts properly to data
sent to it in a form that does not conflict with
these rules and that sends data in conformance
with these rules is said to support, or be in compliance with, the particular protocol. An example of
a protocol is the one used by humans over twoway radio: the protocol is that one person finishes
speaking by saying "over"; the other party then
speaks, until finished and says "over"; the end of
transmission is signalled by saying "over and out."
Examples of protocols in data communications
are BSC (IBM) and T201 (Tymnet).
protocol converter. Equipment that converts
data from one format (protocol) to another. (See
also gateway.)
proximity/contact aligner. Equipment that
places a mask in direct contact with the wafer
after the mask is aligned. With proximity, the
mask does not come into direct contact with the
wafer. (See also lithography.)
PTT. Postal, telegraph, and telephone organization. An organization that provides basic telecommunications services. For U.S., see regional bell
operating companies.
public data network service. A packet-switched
or circuit-switched network service available for
public use. It includes the equipment and service
charges associated with data communications
networks that are offered to the general public.
These networks connect user terminals and computers to the network and may offer enhanced
or value-added services, such as conversion of
speeds, codes, protocols, electronic mail, or
facsimile.
public packet data switching. See packet data
switching.
public school or institution. A school or institution controlled and operated by publicly elected
or appointed officials and deriving its primary
support from public funds.
123
public switching equipment. Equipment used in
public telecommunications to switch or route
voice and data calls. This segment includes equipment such as digital central office switching equipment and digital access cross-connect systems.
public telecommunications equipment. Equipment that includes public network services and
equipment. It includes the various voice and data
communications services provided by common
carriers and the transmission and switching equipment used to implement these networks.
public telecommunications service. A service
provided by public telecommunications carriers.
It includes services such as local telephone,
long distance telephone, international telephone,
leased circuit, public data network, enhanced network, and mobile communications.
public transmission equipment. The equipment
used in public telecommunications to transmit
voice and data signals. It includes equipment such
as multiplex equipment, carrier equipment, microwave radio equipment, and satellite earth state
equipment.
publishing. 1: The business or profession of the
commercial production and issuance of literature
and information. 2: Computer-aided systems to
automate the creation and printing of documents.
punch/shear/bend
programmable
machine
tool. Describes the action that occurs to a composite or material, generally metal, on a machine.
Punching literally punches a hole in the material,
shearing cuts the material, and bending forms
the material to a specified predetermined shape.
These three activities are performed on three
separate machines.
purchasing. A software application that has computer-assisted generation or procurement documents specifying materials, quantities, and delivery times.
purchasing and vendor management. Contains
statements as to the quantity, description, and
price of the goods; agreed terms as to payments, discounts, date of performance, and
transportation.
PVD. See physical vapor deposition.
PW—private wire leased circuits. See private
line.
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High-Technology Guide Glossary
QC. See quality control.
QC analysis. Quality control analysis is generally
performed throughout the manufacturing process,
comparing the actual part shape or feature size to
the design specification.
quality. The measure of how well a product or
service meets customer expectations. Alternately,
the ability to produce consistently a product
or service within control limits or well-defined
specifications.
quality assurance. The establishment and execution of procedures to measure product quality and
adherence to acceptance criteria.
quality control. Process by which product is
measured to ensure conformance to specification
and standards.
query language. A generalized computer language that is used to interrogate a database.
R
R&D. See research and development.
radar. A radio device used to locate objects by
frequency waves reflected off the object and
received by the sender, allowing the sender to
determine characteristics of an object. Includes
airborne, shipboard, and ground search, flight
control acquisition, detection, tracking, and
associated test systems.
radio. 1: The use of electronic waves/signals to
produce sound. 2: Home radio receivers including
AM, AM-FM, and FM radios that are classified
as table models, clock models, and portable
radios. This category does not include highfidelity receivers, radio-phonograph combinations, and television receivers, nor does it include
automobile radios, stereos, or tape players.
railroad control. An application that monitors
and controls railroad and urban rapid transit
traffic.
RAM. See random-access memory.
random-access memory (RAM). An integrated
circuit permitting read-and-write access to any
memory cell or address in a completely random
sequence. Can be of either bipolar or MOS technology process. A memory device with the qualities of allowing arbitrary reading or writing of a
desired data location. The system accesses the
addressed material without reading through intervening data. Information may be retrieved more
speedily from RAM than from serial media, such
as tape. Also called read-and-write and scratchpad memory.
rapid thermal processing (RTF). Process that
uses machines of low temperature for contact alloying and systems for the deposition of thin gate
oxides. Similar to the diffusion furnace.
RBOC. See regional bell operating company.
reactant gas. Molecules that act upon one another to produce a new set of molecules.
read-only memory (ROM). 1: Computer memory that can be read from but not written to.
Permanent memory on chips wherein information
can be retrieved but not stored. Memory is not
lost when the power to the computer system is
turned off. 2: A memory device the contents of
which can be read but not altered. (See also
mask ROM.)
real estate. An environment or industry that includes owners, lessors, lessees, buyers, sellers,
agents, and developers of real estate.
real-time clock. A clock that indicates actual
time, such as elapsed time, as opposed to a
fictitious time established by a program. ,
real-time data acquisition and control. 1: The
process by which events in the real world are
translated to machine-readable signals. 2: Automated systems in which sensors of one type or
another are attached to machinery. 3: Data processing is performed so that the results are
available in time to influence the controlled or
monitored system.
reconnaissance. Equipment used to secure data/
information about activity and resources concerning an enemy or potential enemy's territory.
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High-Technology Guide Glossary
reduced-instruction-set computing microprocessor (RISC MPU). The number of instructions
a microprocessor runs for a specific application
are reduced from a general-purpose complexinstruction-set computing (CISC) microprocessor
to create a more efficient computing engine.
reel-to-reel tape drive. A tape format in which
the running tape is wound onto a separate take-up
reel. Also known as open reel.
regional bell operating company (RBOC).
Seven holding companies formed by the divestiture of AT&T to provide regulated and nonregulated telecommunications services in the United
States.
relational database management system. A
software application for the storage, retrieval, update, and analysis of multiple databases. These
databases are linked (related) through one or
more identical fields, called keys.
relay. 1: An electronic or electromechanical device for transferring a signal from one electrical
circuit to another. 2: To forward a message
through an intermediate station. (See also passive
device.)
remote batch. A method.of entering jobs into the
computer from a remote terminal.
remote control. Any system of control performed
from a distance. The control signal may be conveyed by intervening wires, sounds, light, or radio
signals.
remote processing. A procedure in which the
operating system can be used to process messages
received from remote locations via telephone lines
and telephone equipment. In effect, it is an extension of the data processing and programming
facilities of the computer to remote locations.
remote sensing. The acquisition of information
(usually in the form of an image) about an object
or area by recording electromagnetic radiation
emanating from or reflected from the target. The
electromagnetic energy is received and processed
by a detector system that is not in physical contact
with the target under study. Common platforms
for detector systems are aircraft and satellites, but
the definition is not restricted to these two.
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removable media disk drive. Removable media
rigid disk drive has the platter enclosed in a housing that is designed to be user-accessible.
replacement demand. The subsequent demand
by end users for new equipment.
research and development (R&D). Basic and
applied research directed toward the discovery,
invention, design, or development of new products and processes.
research supercomputer. An information system
defined by a minimum of 32 low-performance
computing nodes. Optimized to run highly parallel
applications. Price ranges between $300,000 and
$2 million.
residual value. The value of a product at the end
of its useful life. Typically used with depreciation
and leasing calculations.
resistor. A passive device that measurably
opposes the passage of an electric current (e.g.,
doped silicon). (See also passive device.)
respiratory analysis. Equipment used to examine, detect, and analyze the respiratory system.
retail trade. An environment or industry that
includes establishments engaged in selling merchandise for personal or household consumption
and rendering services incidental to the sale of the
goods. In general, retail establishments are classified by kind of business according to the principal
lines of commodities sold.
retirement. The number of products that are removed from use. A product is considered retired
from the installed base if it is scrapped, returned
to the manufacturer, or placed in storage.
return. The number of units previously sold outright that have been returned or retired by the
customer. (See also retirement.)
revenue. The amount of money that a company
receives from its customers for goods and
services.
rewritable optical disk drive. An optical disk
drive that uses removable media that can be
erased and reused many times (also called erasable optical disk drive).
ribbon. A strip of inked material or fabric, which
when struck with a print element forms a character on paper. (See also single-strike ribbon, web
ribbon, film ribbon, multistrike ribbon.)
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rigid disk. See rigid disk computer storage
media.
rigid disk computer storage media. A rigid disk
has a nonflexible substrate and can be made of
aluminum, plastic, glass, or other rigid material.
RISC MPU. See reduced-instruction-set computing microprocessor.
robot. A reprogrammable multifunctional manipulator designed to move objects through variable motions for the performance of a variety of
tasks. Intelligent robots commonly rely on vision
systems to control their behavior through their
ability to recognize objects.
robotic electronic assembly. Electronic manipulative machines that can perform functions
ordinarily ascribed to humans in the assembly of
material.
robotic nonelectric assembly. Same as robotic
electronic assembly except that robots are mechanically maneuvered rather than through the
methods and principles of electronics.
robot programming and simulation. The use of
computer-controlled manipulators or arms to
automate a variety of manufacturing processes
such as welding, material handling, painting, and
assembly.
robot system. Programmable manipulative machines that can perform functions ordinarily ascribed to humans. Included are robotic mechanisms, control hardware and software, and all
associated peripheral equipment. These peripherals include end effectors and grippers that are
used for the processing of parts, tools, and assemblies within the factory.
ROM. See read-only memory.
routing. An application that supports route planning. It is used to schedule the sequence of stops
a transport vehicle makes.
RTF. See rapid thermal processing.
safety and convenience. Equipment related to
the automobile and truck industry including devices that prevent loss, hurt, or injury, or that
lend ease and comfort to passengers. Examples
include: climate control, light reminder, keyless
entry, heated windshield, sensing wipers, automatic door lock, automatic headlights, dimming,
rear window defogger, antiskid braking, window
control, and airbags/restraint control.
satellite. 1: A specialized radio transmitter/
receiver placed in orbit around the earth to provide transmission channels for information to be
transmitted over great distances. 2: A celestial
body orbiting another of larger size.
satellite communication equipment. Equipment
used for communication by use of an active or
passive satellite to extend the range of a radio, or
other transmitter, by returning signals to earth
from an orbiting satellite.
satellite earth station equipment. The total
earth-based equipment used in connection with
orbiting, geostationary satellites. This category includes the Very Small Aperture Terminals
(VSAT), as well as the antennae and electronic
transmitting/receiving terminals.
scanner. Input devices used for the optical
sensing of images and text and/or graphics for
conversion to dot patterns for incorporation into a
document. This category includes both ICR and
OCR scanners with a resolution of less than
400 dpi.
scheduling. An application that supports the
scheduling of events.
schematic. This is a detailed diagram. In a mechanical application, schematics are used to describe hydraulic and pneumatic systems. A set of
symbols are available for both appUcations representing standard components.
scholarships and fellowships. College expenditures applying only to money given in the form of
outright grants and trainee stipends to individuals
enrolled in formal coursework, either for credit or
not. Aid to students in the form of tuition or fee
remissions is included. College work-study funds
are excluded from this category and are reported under the program in which the student is
working.
Schottky TTL (STTL). A form of transistor-transistor logic using Schottky diodes as transistor
clamps to increase the speed of circuit operation.
A high-speed form of bipolar logic.
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scientific application. A diverse group of software applications covering varied subject matter
and research on the natural sciences when these
are concerned with the physical world and its
phenomena. Applications are divided into two
subcategories: general analysis and scientific
research. General analysis is the use of computers
to solve various technical problems and to further
research on subjects; this use is generally mathematical in nature. Scientific research applications
are used specifically in the following fields:
thermonuclear chemistry, nuclear physics, general physics, mechanical sciences, electronics
research, geophysics, fluid dynamics, thermodynamics,
materials
research,
and
genetic
engineering.
scientific research. A software application that
pertains to research and development, not to
applied science.
scientific visualization. An image computer is
used for scientific modeling, technical data analysis, medical imaging, or similar large-volume data
analysis.
security. 1: The existence and enforcement of
techniques that restrict access to data and the
conditions under which data can be obtained.
2: A measure taken by a command to protect a
system from espionage, observation, sabotage, annoyance, or surprise. 3: Protection of a system by
use of commands and codes.
security/energy management. Safety and power
management within industrial equipment and
manufacturing.
seismic analysis. 1: Seismic analysis helps support exploration activities by indicating favorable
conditions for finding oil or coal reservoirs.
2: Analysis relating to an earth vibration caused
by earthquakes, or other natural phenomena.
semiconductor. 1: A group of materials that are
electrical nonconductors in a pure state that can
be altered by the selective introduction of impurities into its crystalline structure. Its resistivity can
sometimes be changed by light, an electric field,
or a magnetic field, 2: An electronic device made
using semiconductor material.
127
semiconductor tester. Equipment designed to
test, check, and monitor the functionality of electronic circuit packages of varying complexity and
functionality.
serial, impact, dot matrix (SIDM). A printer
that creates a character image by selectively
placing individual dots on the substrate using
mechanical force.
serial, impact, fully formed (SIFF). A printer
that prints one character at a time using
type elements to create fully formed character
impressions.
serial input/output (SIO). 1: A device that permits data to be transmitted into and out of a
computer over a single conductor one bit at a
time. 2: Pertaining to time sequential transmission
of, storage of, or logical operations on parts of
data words. 3: A technique for handling binary
data words (which have more than one bit). 4: A
device or technique where data are transferred to
or from an I/O port in a serial or in-line manner.
serial, nonimpact, direct thermal (SNDT). A
printer that creates the desired image a dot at a
time using point-specific heat and a heat-sensitive
substrate that changes color when exposed to
heat.
serial, nonimpact, ink jet (SNIJ). A printer that
creates the desired image a character at a time by
emitting ink from an array of orifices or nozzles.
serial nonimpact, thermal transfer (SNTT). A
printer that creates the desired image a dot at a
time using point-specific heat to transfer ink from
a ribbon to a receiving substrate.
server. A processor that provides a specific
service to a network, such as connecting nodes of
different networks.
services. Intangible items of trade, such as education, transportation, banking, and legal and medical care.
SFDSP. See special-function DSP products.
sheet feeder. A sheet feeder is mounted on top
of a printer and automatically inserts cut sheets
into the printer and receives the ejected paper in
a hopper. Sheet feeders may be single or dual tray
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for the feeding of letterhead and second sheets,
or they may incorporate an envelope-feed
tray for the printing of letters and envelopes
simultaneously.
shipment. The number of products delivered.
shop floor and cell control. A system for utilizing data from the shop floor as well as data-processing files to maintain and communicate status
information on shop orders and work centers.
Provides actual output data for capacity control
purposes.
shop floor planning and control. See shop floor
and cell control.
SIDM. See serial, impact, dot matrix.
SIFF. See serial, impact, fully formed.
silicon epitaxy deposition. A process through
which vaporized silicon is deposited on a wafer.
(See also deposition.)
silicon precursor gas. A specialty gas used in
semiconductor manufacturing. Gases such as
silane, dichlorosilane, trichlorosilane, and silicon
tetrachloride are used in epitaxial and chemical
vapor deposition (CVD) processes to deposit
layers of silicon or silicon components onto silicon
substrates.
silicon wafer. A nonmetallic element that is the
most widely used semiconductor material today.
Silicon is used in its crystalline form as the
substrate of semiconductor devices.
simulation. An application or system that uses
representative or artificial data to reproduce various conditions in a model that are likely to occur
in the actual performance of a system. Simulation
frequently is used to test the behavior of a system
under different operating policies.
simulation and training equipment. Equipment
used to augment the acting out of real-life maneuvers/exercises as training in preparation for reallife situations. Equipment includes aircraft, flight
and situation simulators, equipment operation,
and maintenance systems.
single-strike ribbon. A film ribbon. Each time a
character strikes the ribbon, the ribbon advances
far enough so that the next character has a completely new ribbon area to strike. The ink formulation is such that the ink on the ribbon is
depleted from the area where the print element
strikes the ribbon. These ribbons produce the
highest print quality, but ribbon life is low compared with that of fabric and multistrike ribbons.
single-user enhanced system. See workstation
computer.
SIO. See serial input/output.
slow SRAM. A random-access memory (RAM)
integrated circuit (IC) that runs at speeds greater
than 70 nanoseconds. (See also static randomaccess memory.)
small-format pen plotter. A computer plotter
that uses engineering-size A (8.5 x 11 inches) or
B (11 X 17 inches), architectural-size 1 (9 x
12 inches) or 2 (12 x 18 inches), or metric-size
A4 (21 X 29.7 centimeters) or A3 (29.7 x 42 centimeters) media. (See also plotter.)
small-signal diode. A diode with a forward current of less than 100 milliamperes (0.1 amperes).
The sides of the silicon chip are metallized and
encapsulated in a tubular glass package.
small-signal transistor. A transistor that dissipates power of less than 1 watt.
smart card. A credit card or credit-card-size device that contains one or more integrated circuits.
These devices usually are carried by an individual.
Common applications include financial transactions, record keeping, and user identification.
smart interactive
terminal.
terminal.
See
intelligent
smart power. An integrated circuit (IC) that contains both control logic circuits and power control
elements.
smoke alarm. A detector that is activated automatically when exposed to smoke.
SNA. See system network architecture.
SNDT. See serial, nonimpact, direct thermal.
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SNIJ. See serial, nonimpact, ink jet.
SNTT. See serial, nonimpact, thermal transfer.
socket. An opening that supports and electrically
connects to vacuum tubes, bulbs, or other devices
or components when they are inserted into it.
software. 1: Any set of explicit procedures constituting a computer program. 2: Programs, procedures, rules, and any associated documentation
pertaining to computer operations.
software support service. Activities that assist
the end user in use and implementation of software products. Software support includes bug
fixing, updates, and documentation, as well as
support of ongoing operating problems including product-specific
consulting,
programming
services, and training.
solar cell. A pn junction device that converts the
radiant energy of sunlight directly and efficiently
into electrical energy.
solid modeling. An application that represents
the external and internal part geometries, allowing
the solid nature of an object to be represented in
a computer. Solid models are constructed in two
ways: using primitive building blocks (constructive
solid geometry) and/or using boundary definitions
(boundary representation).
solid state. Pertaining to circuits and components
using semiconductors. (See also semiconductor.)
solid-state subsystem. Computer memory products that comprise a block of semiconductor
memory, a controller/formatter for it, a power
source or access to power, a host bus interface,
hardware, and software. These include modules
external to the computer and kits for installation
inside computers.
sonar. A device used to detect submerged objects
by sonar waves reflected off the object. Also can
be used to measure depth or distance. Includes
search, detection, tracking, guidance, navigation,
communication, sonabuoys, and associated test
systems.
SONET. See synchronous optical network.
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space military equipment. Military equipment
used beyond the earth's atmosphere. Includes
satellites with accompanying communication and
reconnaissance equipment, various other space
platforms, launch vehicles, and ground control.
special automotive IC. An analog IC designed
for a specific automotive application.
special consumer IC. An analog IC designed for
use solely in consumer home entertainment and
appliance products.
special-function analog IC. An analog integrated
circuit function used in specialized applications.
Examples are sensors, timers, and oscillators.
These devices differ from application-specific
standard products (ASSPs) in being functional
blocks rather than complex configurations of
functions for specific applications.
special-function DSP products (SFDSP). Products built using DSP techniques and architectures
but designed for specific functions. Examples include: modems, codecs, speech processors, digital
television circuits, digital filters, and fast Fourier
transform (FFT) chips. Generally, these devices
cannot be programmed by users to perform
operations other than their defined function.
special-function IC. A linear IC that does not
fall into the standard product categories. This
product has a specific function such as timer,
oscillator, signal generator, or sensor but is not
limited to a single application or market.
special-purpose computer system. A computer
system designed for a specific purpose. For example: a banking computer system, word processor,
or cash register.
specialty gas. A gas used in manufacturing semiconductors that is supplied in gas cylinders rather
than in bulk because smaller volumes are used.
splice. A joint used to connect two lengths of
conductor with good mechanical strength and
good conductivity. (See also passive device.)
spot-welding robot system. A robot carries a
resistance welding gun to produce welds.
spreadsheet. An application with the principal
function of organizing data into columns and rows
to allow the user to perform numerical analysis.
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SRAM. See static random-access memory.
standard cell. An integrated circuit designed to a
customer's specifications using precharacterized
cells as building blocks.
standard logic. Off-the-shelf integrated circuits
belonging to "families." Bipolar digital families
include AS, FAST, LS, and ALS. MOS digital
families include HC, HCT, and FACT. Standard
logic is available from a number of suppliers and
may be used in many different applications.
Sometimes referred to as glue logic. Normally has
less than 150 logic gates.
start-stop tape drive. A tape drive that starts and
stops on reading or writing a data record.
state government. One of the constituent units of
a nation having a federal government.
static random-access memory (SRAM). A
RAM that maintains memory as long as power is
applied and does not require refreshing. SRAM
densities can range from IK, with approximately
1,000 bits, to 4Mb, with approximately 4 million
bits.
statistical multiplexer. An electronic device that
consolidates several data streams onto a single
high-speed bit stream for transmission over a telephone line.
stepper. A semiconductor manufacturing device
that uses a step-and-repeat process to transform
the pattern image of a reticle or mask onto the
surface of the semiconductor wafer.
stereo headphone. A device worn on the head
that permits the transmission of sound through
two earphones connected by a band.
stereo (hi-fi) component. Equipment that produces high-fidelity reproduction of sound.
storage controller board. 1: A board containing
input data or parameters for an application of a
general routine. 2: Those parts mounted on a
board that carry out the instructions in proper
sequence, interpret each instruction, and apply
the proper signal.
storage management. Functions that manage the
storage of information in which information can
later be retrieved. Includes storage protection,
storage temperature, storage print, and storage
allocation.
storage subsystem. Computer memory product
that comprises a storage device (s), a controller/
formatter for it, a power source or access to
power, a host bus interface, hardware, and software. These include modules external to the computer and kits for installation inside computers.
streamer tape drive. A tape drive that uses a
continuously moving tape; one that does not start
and stop on each data record.
streaming tape drive. Tape drives (1/4-inch and
1/2-inch width) where the data stream over the
head without stopping (continuous flow).
structural. The dynamics of the physical system;
usually refers to the static stability/integrity of a
part, assembly, or system.
structural modeling/analysis. A software application for modeling and analysis of the integrity of
a structure.
STTL. See Schottky TTL.
studio transmitter link. Equipment used to generate and amplify a radio signal.
styling. A detailed design process where aesthetic
considerations are foremost. Systems supporting
this application have special refinements for rendering, modeling, and editing functions.
subsidiary. A company partially or wholly owned
by another company.
supercomputer. A high-performance computer
designed for numerically intensive applications.
The current price ranges from approximately
$100,000 to $20 million.
superminicomputer. An information system with
price ranging typically from $100,000 to $1 million, with a minority below $100,000. CPU bit
width ranges from 32 to 48 bits, with emphasis on
32. Environment is almost exclusively an ordinary
office with no special environmental controls.
Equipment typically is supported full-time by a
professional computer systems support staff of
fewer than 10 members. It usually is built around
proprietary processor and typically supports from
32 to 350 concurrent users. Examples of models
are the HP 3000/930 and 950, DEC VAX 8700
and Micro VAX 3500, and IBM 9370.
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superworkstation. A superworkstation has higher
graphics performance than a traditional workstation. It also has a higher processing performance
rating to support graphic computations. The average price is $40,000 to $80,000 witJi performance
ratings of 8 to 20 mips and 2 to 16 mflops.
surgical support. Equipment relating to, or
having connection with, surgery.
surveying and drafting instrument. An instrument used to detect, access, and measure radiation. The instrument is used in the drawing of
objects, structures, or systems by engineers and
scientists.
switch. 1: A mechanical or electrical device that
competes with or breaks the pattern of a current
or sends it over a different path. 2: A device that
connects, disconnects, or transfers one or more
circuits and is not designated as a controller, relay, or control valve. (See also passive device.)
switch/multiplexer IC. Analog switches gate analog signals under the control of logic. Multiplexers
are specialized analog switches that select only
one of many inputs.
synchronous optical network (SONET).
emerging standard for optical networks,
An
system management. The administration and operation of a computer system including staffing,
scheduling, equipment, and service contract administration, equipment utilization practices, and
time-sharing.
system network architecture (SNA). An IBM
standard for data communication.
systems integration service. The implementation
phase of tying together dissimilar devices. Services
are coordinated by a single contractor who manages the procurement, installation, integration,
and support of all software, hardware, and communications devices.
systems integrator. See value-added reseller.
system software. Software that provides support
structure in which applications may operate. This
includes operating systems, operating environments, and utilities.
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systems planning.and design. "Front-end" consulting services that are required to determine the
nature of a customer's needs and the actions
necessary to meet those requirements.
system subroutine library. An organized collection of computer programs that is maintained online with a computer system by being held on a
secondary storage device and is managed by the
operating system.
system support peripheral. An integrated circuit
(IC) considered a traditional peripheral, where
each processor has a set of six to eight dedicated
peripherals that provide rudimentary functions
necessary to construct a microprocessor (MPU)based system. (See also traditional peripheral.)
system utilities. Products that aid in the maintenance and/or repair of computer hardware, operating systems, or data recovery.
2-D modeling. The representation of a part in
two dimensions (has an x and y coordinate). This
format requires three or more views (top, front,
side) to depict all aspects of the part. This is the
most common geometric modeling format and is
used extensively with a drafting function.
3-D modeling. The representation of a part in
three dimensions, usually in a wire-frame format
(has an x, y, and z coordinate). This format is
used commonly in high-level CAD systems to determine the placement and fit of components in
an assembly. This format is not generally used for
final drafting, although some systems have the
capability to translate the 3-D image to a 2-D
standard drafting format.
T-1. A high-speed, time-division, digital network
link operating at 1.544 Mbps and above.
T-1 multiplexer. A unit that allows multiplexing,
or combining, several voice and/or data channels
onto one communications link, in this case, a
high-speed T-1 channel.
tape drive. A class of computer backup device
that uses reel-to-reel, cartridge, or cassette tapes
as media.
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tape recorder. A device that records and plays
sound from magnetic tape.
tax accounting. An application concerned with
keeping records for tax purposes, setting up accounts for paying taxes, making tax computations,
and preparing tax returns.
TDM. See time-division multiplexer.
teaching machine and aid. Equipment designed
to assist in the training, educating, and instructing
of persons to acquire knowledge or skill in a particular field(s) of interest.
technical data analysis. An application that analyzes technical or experimental data. The data
may have been generated from instruments, captured from other electronic measuring devices
(such as thermocouples or strain gauges), or
generated by other analysis programs.
technical illustration. A drawing of a component
or assembly that generally is intended for publication. This drawing will omit unnecessary dimensions and other detailed drating items and will be
drawn so as to depict the part realistically.
technical productivity. An application that enhances the productivity of technical disciplines
and is specialized for the engineering, scientific,
or manufacturing fields.
technical publishing. The printing of user manuals or guides.
telecommunication integrated circuit (IC). An
analog IC designed for the voice and data communication market.
telecommunications. Products and services that
provide or manage the flow of information from
person to person, person to machine, machine to
person, or machine to machine. The telecommunications market is segmented into a combination of the premises and public telecommunications market segments.
telecom services. Includes that portion of telecommunications charges related to access and use
of the public network. These charges typically are
seen as a monthly usage charge for local, long
distance, and private line access/utilization.
teleconferencing. Equipment and services related
to one-way and two-way video communications
that use specialized video equipment and/or transmission networks. These communications enable
conferencing between locations.
telemarketing. A sales method that employs a
sales force to move a product through the distribution channel by contacting the consumer via
the telephone. Also referred to as inside sales.
telemetering system. See telemetry.
telemetry. Transmission of data from remote
measuring instruments by electrical or, usually,
radio means.
telephone. A terminal or handset used for voice
and data transmission and communications. It
functions as an interface between a user and a
telephone switching system.
TELeprinter EXchange (TELEX). A worldwide
dial-up telegraph service enabling users to communicate directly and temporarily among themselves by means of start-stop apparatus and circuits of the public telegraph network.
teletex. An interactive communications network
designed for transmission of text and graphics to
televisions or other low-cost terminals.
TELEX. See TELeprinter EXchange.
tension arm tape drive. A 1/2-inch reel-to-reel
tape drive that uses mechanical tension arms to
provide tape tension and buffing.
terminal equipment. 1: A device at a node of a
network through which information can be entered, extracted, or monitored. 2: Any device
capable of sending and/or receiving information
over a communications channel. Includes a keyboard and display that cannot stand alone because it lacks processing capability. Terminals are
usually simple ASCII text-entry devices.
terms and conditions. The provisions of a contract that are stated or offered for acceptance that
determine the nature and scope of the agreement.
test and measurement. The process of determining the magnitude of the response of an object to
a given stimulus. Also the degree to which an
object may be characterized along a dimension
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(quantification of an entity). Computer-based inspection and test systems used for quality and/or
process control data analysis; data may be collected by manual input or sensory devices.
test equipment. Equipment designed to test,
check, monitor, and identify varying degrees of
device functionality and complexity that may
include quality, speed, and performance. Automated test systems and equipment such as IC
testers and PC-board testers, as well as general
test equipment (such as oscilloscopes, spectrum
analyzers, and digital multimeters).
text capture. Process whereby words or groups of
words are controlled.
therapeutic. Medical applications involved in
treating specific medical conditions.
thermal. The effects
system.
133
tie ratio. A ratio that describes the relationship
between two or more product units, usually used
when one product is part of or connected to another product. For example, a disk drive tie ratio
to PCs of 0.8 indicates that 80 percent of the PCs
contain a disk drive.
time and materials service. Remedial repair
services on a per-call basis. Pricing is based on the
actual length of time-to-repair, travel charges, and
specific parts or materials required to complete
repairs.
time-division multiplexer (TDM). One of
several technologies used to multiplex, or combine, several voice and/or data channels onto one
communications link. TDM uses "time slicing" to
allocate blocks of time to each channel. See also
statistical multiplexer.
of temperature on the
TLX. See TELeprinter Exchange.
thermal plotter. 1: A process that produces a
visible image by heat-induced chemical reactions
or chemically reactive media. 2: A thermally induced phase change process of a pigment-binder
mixture, which is transferred from a donor sheet
to the media.
thermal transfer printer. An imaging process
using heated printing elements to produce prints
or copies; can be either dye diffusion (coated
paper) or wax based (plain paper). This process
currently is used in electronic printing, facsimile
machines, and full-color copiers.
thimble. A thimble-shaped print element that
floats freely across the platen of a character
printer, working in a similar fashion to a daisyprint element. It is shaped like a cup, with the
spokes extending around the rim of the cup, with
characters positioned at the end of the spokes.
thyristor. A type of diode that consists of a fourlayer slice of silicon. The device is characterized
by continuous switching. Once a thyristor has
been triggered into conducting current, it will continue to conduct current until the main current
falls to zero.
ticketing. A software application that supports
the sale and management of tickets. The application may be as simple as ticketing a single event or
as complex as ticketing airline reservations.
toner. The substance used that develops a latent
xerographic image from a photoreceptor onto a
substrate, usually paper. Monocomponent toner
contains both the imaging material and the carrier
(usually called developer) needed to transport the
toner to the latent image. In dual-component
toner, the imaging material and developer are
held separately until they are mixed by the copier
or printer itself. Liquid toner has the imaging
material suspended in a solvent.
tool design. The design of custom-made tooling
to facilitate an effective manufacturing process.
tools. A software program that is used by application developers or users to create applications.
Examples are spreadsheets, word processors, editors, macro languages, screen painters, and report
generators. Tools are higher-level products than
languages; a tool is written in a language. Unlike
languages, most tools are nonprocedural, i.e.,
they do not require users to create code that is
sequentially executed. A good example of this is a
spreadsheet, where the developer/user navigates
up, down, and sideways with the arrow keys or
mouse and can add or delete rows and columns at
any time. Examples of tools include Lotus 1-2-3
(spreadsheet); Multimate (word processor); EDLIN (hne editor); and Ojectworks (graphical editing and object manipulation environment).
1991 Dataquest Incorporated January—Reproduction Prohibited
134
High-Technology Guide Glossary
trading turret/dealer board. A specialized type
of telephone system that allows simultaneous access to multiple telephone lines. This system is
used in any business that requires frequent conversations between two or more parties (i.e.,
stock brokers).
traditional peripheral. An integrated circuit that
has an intermediary control device, which links a
peripheral unit to the control processors.
traditional workstation. A midrange workstation
priced between $15,000 to $50,000. Its performance ratings are 4 to 15 mips and 0.5 to 2 mflops.
traffic control. A real-time software application,
mechanism, and system used to monitor and control, exert control over, and/or enforce the movement of vehicles.
transducer. Any device or element that converts
an input signal into an output signal of a different
form. (See also passive device.)
transistor. A transistor is as a current-amplifying
device or switch, as follows: 1: Current amplifying—a small change in a small current flows between the collector and the emitter. 2: Switch—a
sufficiently large voltage applied to the base
causes the maximum amount of collective current
to flow. It can be manufactured in bipolar or
MOS technology process. A bipolar transistor
consists of a sandwich of doped silicon layers. The
transistor has three electrical connections: base,
emitter, and collector. Each of these areas provides access to one of the doped regions.
transistor-transistor logic (TTL). A logic circuit
design with the diode inputs replaced by a multiple-emitter transistor.
translator. The process performed by an assembler, compiler, or other routine that accepts statements in one language and converts them to
another language. 2: A device that transforms
signals from one form to another form. 3: A
system that has a number of inputs and outputs
and is connected so that input signals representing
information expressed in a certain code result in
output signals that represent the input information
in a different code.
transmitter. 1: A device for transmitting a coded
signal. 2: The carbon device in the telephone
handset used to convert speech to electrical
energy.
transparency. 1: The property of being insensitive to the meaning of a code being manipulated.
An example is a paper-tape transmitter capable of
transmitting any code submitted to it. If a device
interprets and reacts to coded information that it
is handling, it is said to be code sensitive (not
transparent). 2: Clear substrates upon which images can be written, copied, or printed for projection onto a screen by an overhead projector.
transportable personal computer. The transportable personal computer is a self-contained
system that can be moved from place to place as a
single unit. These systems include, in a single unit,
the keyboard, display, mass storage, and main
system unit. Such a personal computer operates
on A/C power only (no battery power).
transportation. An environment or industry that
includes establishments providing, to the general
public or the other business enterprises, passenger
and freight transportation.
transportation electronic equipment. Electronic
equipment used in the automotive railway and
airline industry.
transportation management. The planning,
analysis, and control of activities for transporting
or being transported.
TTL. See transistor-transistor logic.
two-year college. A postsecondary school that
offers general or liberal arts education usually
leading to an associate degree or courses that are
creditable toward a baccalaureate degree.
two-year institution. An institution legally
authorized to offer and offering at least a two-year
program of college-level studies that terminates in
an associate degree or is principally creditable
toward a baccalaureate degree.
typewriter. A machine for writing in characters
by means of a keyboard operated by striking
through an inked ribbon. Usually refers to the
standard office typewriter (mechanical, electrical,
or electronic).
1991 Dataquest Incorporated January—Reproduction Prohibited
High-Technology Guide Glossary
u
UART/USART. See universal asynchronous receiver/transmitter/universal synchronous asynchronous receiver/transmitter.
ultrasonic cleaners, drills. 1: An instrument
used to clean debris and swarf from surfaces by
immersion in a solvent in which ultrasonic vibrations are excited. 2: A drill in which ultrasonic
vibrations are generated by the compression and
extension of a core electrostrictive or magnetostrictive material.
ultrasonic generator. A generator consisting of
an oscillator driving an electracoustic transducer
used to produce acoustic waves.
ultrasonic scanner, medical. A device that produces a picture display of ultrasonic frequency
waves sent through the sample to be inspected or
examined.
ultraviolet electrically programmable ROM.
An EPROM that is erasable with an ultraviolet
light source.
135
utilities. An environment or industry that includes establishments providing electricity, gas,
steam, water, or sanitary services to the general
public or to other business enterprises.
UV EPROM. See ultraviolet electrically programmable ROM.
vacuum column tape drive. A 1/2-inch reel-toreel tape drive with start-stop capability that uses
vacuum columns to provide tape tension and
buffing.
value-added network (VAN). A data communication network that provides enhanced services
such as protocol conversion.
value-added reseller (VAR) systems integrator.
A product reseller that integrates hardware, software, and/or services; it does not apply its label to
the product. Systems integrators are a type of
VAR and may or may not own the hardware or
software.
VAN. See value-added network.
unit. A single quantity.
universal asynchronous receiver/transmitter/
universal synchronous asynchronous receiver/
transmitter (UART/USART). An electronic circuit that converts data between the parallel format
and the serial format transmitted sequentially over
a communication line.
VAR. See value-added reseller systems integrator.
VAX/VMS. A Digital Equipment Corporation
standard multiuser operating system.
VCR. See videocassette recorder and player.
UNIX. An operating system designed to be used
with microprocessors and with the C programming
language.
vertical-turning programmable machine tool.
The tool of a machine that holds a workpiece
along the vertical axis for a certain function to be
performed such as boring, drilling, and cutting.
useful life. The economic life of a product. Typically used to determine depreciation and leasing
schedules.
vibrational. The effects of vibration and shock
on the system.
user interface. 1: The point at which a user interacts with a computer. 2: An interactive computer
program that sends messages to and receives instructions from a terminal user.
video. 1: Relates to the bandwidth (megahertz)
and spectrum position of the signal arising from
television scanning. 2: The reception or recording
of electronic signals that create images on a
screen or display.
users per system. The typical number of simultaneous users that a computer system will support.
video camera. A camera that records visual images and sounds on magnetic tape.
© 1991 Dataquest Incorporated January—Reproduction Prohibited
136
High-Technology Guide Glossary
videocassette recorder and player (VCRs or
VTRs). A complete system that has a tape format
such as beta, VHS, or 8mm.
videodisc player. A complete video system that
has a disc format.
video equipment. Equipment includes amplifiers,
television cameras, and other equipment such as
synchronization equipment, live cameras, and
control consoles.
video home system (VHS) helical scan tape
drive. A 13mm helical scan tape drive commonly
used for recording television broadcasts.
videotex. An information delivery system that
uses information from a database that allows the
user to interact with the service, selecting information to be displayed on the user's CRT providing financial services, electronic mail, and
teleshopping.
virtual private network (VPN). Similar in function to a leased circuit with the exception that the
circuit is not dedicated to one customer.
VPN. See virtual private network.
VRU. See voice response unit.
VTR. See videocassette recorder and player.
W
wafer. A thin (10 to 20 mils) disk of semiconductor material from which semiconductors are
fabricated.
wafer fab. The integrated circuit production
process—from raw wafers through a series of diffusion, etching, photolithographic, and other steps
to finished wafers.
wafer fabrication equipment. Machinery used
to produce wafers in the semiconductor industry.
(See also e-beam, etch-and-clean equipment,
stepper.)
wafer inspection. Inspection of patterned wafers
for process defects by visual and image-processing
techniques.
VLSI. Very large scale integration.
water quality and sewage control. A real-time
software application that monitors and controls
water quality and sewage.
VMS. See voice-messaging system.
WATS. See wide area telephone service.
voice-messaging system (VMS). A computerbased system that enables flexible, nonsimultaneous voice communications. This definition
does not include personal-computer-board-level
products.
web ribbon. Web or towel ribbons are wide ribbons used on line, dot matrix, and line, fully
formed printers. They are as wide as the print line
is long—usually approximately 15 inches.
voice-recognition computer device. The capability of a computer to recognize spoken commands.
Each user must first "train" the computer by
speaking a series of words that the computer can
analyze and match with stored information.
voice response unit (VRU). A computerconnected device that selectively links sentences
of stored words, creating a spoken word.
voice synthesizer. A device that simulates speech
by assembling a language's elements under digital
control.
voice terminal. See telephone.
voltage regulator and reference IC. 1: A device
that provides power to other circuits at a specified
DC voltage. 2: A device that provides a specified
constant DC voltage to a load over a wide range of
variations in input voltage and output current.
wet chemical. A chemical used in semiconductor
wafer fabrication. Examples are acids and
solvents.
wet etch. Immersing method for wafers in an
etching solution. Chemical removal of a material
by bathing the wafer in acid.
white-collar worker. A person working in an
occupation classified by the Bureau of Labor
Statistics under the following category headings:
managerial and professional specialty and technical, sales, and administrative support.
wholesale trade. An environment or industry
that includes establishments or places of business
primarily engaged in selling merchandise to retailers; to industrial, commercial, institutional, farm,
construction contractors, or professional business
users; or to other wholesalers; or acting as agents
or brokers in buying merchandise for or selling
merchandise to such persons or companies.
1991 Dataquest Incorporated January—Reproduction Prohibited
High-Technology Guide Glossary
wide area telephone service. An enhanced telephone company service allowing reduced costs of
certain telephone call arrangements. This service
can be in-wats or 800-number service (calls can
be placed to a location from anywhere at no cost
to the calling party) or out-wats (calls can be
placed out from a central location).
word processing. A software application with the
principal function of editing, entering, and formatting text.
word processor (WP). A standalone word processor capable of functioning independently from a
central controller or storage device, although they
may communicate with each other. These products generally have removable magnetic media.
Products that have evolved from electronic typewriters generally are not included in this category. The ability to share a printer among workstations does not disqualify a product from being a
standalone word processor; shared-system word
processors are connected to an external file server
or controller; word-processor file servers are centralized data storage devices that are accessible
and dedicated to shared word processing units.
work force. All persons of either sex who furnish
the supply of labor for the production of economic goods and services during a specified time
period.
workstation computer. A single-user computer
that is distinguished from a personal computer by
its features and by the user's potential migration
path within the platform. A technical workstation
is a system designed with integrated networking;
high-performance graphics; floating point; coprocessor; and a virtual, multiuser/multitasking operating system (DOMAIN, UNIX, VMS).
WORM. See write-once/read-many.
137
WP. See word processor.
write-once/read-many
(WORM).
1:
The
WORM optical disk market includes drives that
can read and write data using various optical diskette media. 2: A data storage device using laser
technology that uses a removable disk ranging in
size from 3.5 to 14 inches.
X
X-ray (lithography). A machine that uses an X
ray for generating a mask plate of direct image
transfer to a semiconductor wafer.
X-ray, medical. Equipment used to detect, examine, treat, or analyze body systems through
photographic X-rays.
X.25. A CCITT standard that defines the interface between a public data network and a pocketmode user device; also defines the services that
these user devices can expect from the X.25 public data network.
year-average population. The installed base of a
product computed at the midyear between the
beginning installed base and the ending installed
base of the same year.
zener diode. 1: A diode that has a controlled,
reverse-voltage/current relationship. 2: A twolayer device that has a sudden rise in current
above a certain reverse voltage.
1991 Dataquest Incorporated January—Reproduction Prohibited
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DataQuest
Wafer Fab Equipment
IVIarlcet Share Estimates 1991
April 27, 1992
>
0)
D.
0J
OirO
iL8
Market Statistics
DataQuest
Semiconductor Equipment, IVIanufacturing,
and li/lateriais
SEMM-SVC-MS-9201
I
Wafer Fab Equipment
IVIarlcet Share
April 27, 1992
Source:
Dataquest
Market Statistics
^
Dataqyest'
File behind the Market Statistics tab inside the
binder labeled Semiconductor Equipment,
Manufacturing, and Materials
€
Published by Dataquest Incorporated
The content of this report represents our interpretation and analysis of information generally available to the public or released
by knowledgeable individuals in the subject industry, but is not guaranteed as to accuracy or completeness. It does not contain
material provided to us in confidence by our clients.
Printed in the United States of America. All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced, stored in retrieval
systems, or transmitted, in any form or by any means—mechanical, electronic, photocopying, duplicating, microfilming, videotape, or otherwise—without die prior permission of the publisher.
© 1992 Dataquest Incorporated
April 1992
Wafer Fab Equipment Market Share
Table of Contents
Chapter 1: Introduction to the Wafer Fab Equipment Database
Introduction
1-1
1-1
Market
1-1
Conventions
1-2
Exchange Rates
1-2
Equipment Companies
1-2
Notes on Market Share
1-3
Chapter 2: Wafer Fab Equipment—Summary Data by Category
2-1
Chapter 3: Wafer Fab Equipment—^Import/Export Data
3-1
Chapter 4: Wafer Fab Equipment—Company Shares by Category
4-1
Chapter 5: Wafer Fab Equipment—Company Ranking
5-1
Table
Page
Table 1.1
Wafer Fab Equipment Categories.
1_1
Table 1.2
Wafer Fab Equipment Companies
j_4
Table 1.3
Summary of Mergers and Acquisitions Incorporated in the Wafer Fab
Equipment Database
Revenue from Shipments of Wafer Fab Equipment into Each Region
(End User Revenue in Millions of U.S. Dollars)
Each Regional Company Base's Revenue from Shipments of Wafer Fab
Equipment to the World (End User Revenue in Millions of U.S. Dollars)
Each Regional Company Base's Revenue from Shipments of Wafer Fab
Equipment to Each Region of the World (End User Revenue in Millions of
U.S. DoUare)
Each Regional Company Base's Revenue from Shipments of Wafer Fab
Equipment into Each Region of the World (End User Revenue in Millions of
U.S. Dollars)
Each Company's Revenue from Shipments of Lithography Equipment to
the World By Equipment Category (End User Revenue in Millions of
U.S. Dollars)
Each Company's Revenue from Shipments of Contact/Proximity Equipment
to Each Region (End User Revenue in Millions of U.S. Dollars)
Each Company's Revenue from Shipments of Projection Aligner Equipment
to Each Region (End User Revenue in Millions of U.S. Dollars)
Each Company's Revenue from Shipments of Stepper Equipment to Each
Region (End User Revenue in Millions of U.S. Dollars)
Each Company's Unit Shipments of Stepper Equipment to Each
Region (Units)
Table 2.1
Table 2.2
Table 3.1
Table 3.2
Table 4.1
Table 4.2
Table 4.3
Table 4.4
Table 4.5
Note: All tables show estimated data.
1-6
2-2
2-8
3-2
3-4
4-2
4-4
4-5
4-6
4-8
Table (Continued)
Table 4.6
Each Company's Revenue from Shipments of Direct-Write Lithography
Equipment Each Region (End User Revenue in Millions of U.S. Dollars)
Table 4.7
Each Company's Revenue from Shipments of Maskmaking Lithography
Equipment to Each Region (End User Revenue in Millions of U.S. Dollars)
Table 4.8
Each Company's Revenue from Shipments of Direct-Write and Maskmaking
Lithography Equipment to Each Region (End User Revenue in Millions of
U.S. Dollars)
Table 4.9
Each Company's Revenue from Shipments of X-Ray Aligner Equipment to
Each Region (End User Revenue in Millions of U.S. Dollars)
Table 4.10
Each Company's Revenue from Shipments of Automatic Photoresist
Processing Equipment (Track) to Each Region (End User Revenue in
Millions of U.S. Dollars)
Table 4.11
Each Company's Revenue from Shipments of Wet Process Equipment to
North America (End User Revenue in Millions of U.S. Dollars)
Table 4.12
Each Company's Revenue from Shipments of Wet Process Equipment to
Japan (End User Revenue in Millions of U.S. Dollars)
Table 4.13
Each Company's Revenue from Shipments of Wet Process Equipment to
Europe (End User Revenue in Millions of U.S. Dollars)
Table 4.14
Each Company's Revenue from Shipments of Wet Process Equipment to
Asia/Pacific-ROW (End User Revenue in Millions of U.S. Dollars)
Table 4.15
Each Company's Revenue from Shipments of Wet Process Equipment to the
World (End User Revenue in Millions of U.S. Dollars)
Table 4.16
Each Company's Revenue from Shipments of Dry Strip Market Equipment to
North America (End User Revenue in Millions of U.S. Dollars)
Table 4.17
Each Company's Revenue from Shipments of Dry Strip Equipment to Japan
(End User Revenue in Millions of U.S. Dollars)
Table 4.18
Each Company's Revenue from Shipments of Dry Strip Equipment to Europe
(End User Revenue in Millions of U.S. Dollars)
Table 4.19
Each Company's Revenue from Shipments of Dry Strip Equipment to
Asia/Pacific-ROW (End User Revenue in Millions of U.S. Dollars)
Table 4.20
Each Company's Revenue from Shipments of Dry Strip Equipment to the
World (End User Revenue in Millions of U.S. Dollars)
Table 4.21
Each Company's Revenue from Shipments of Dry Etch Equipment to North
America (End User Revenue in Millions of U.S. Dollars)
Table 4.22
Each Company's Revenue from Shipments of Dry Etch Equipment to Japan
(End User Revenue in Millions of U.S. Dollars)
Table 4.23
Each Company's Revenue from Shipments of Dry Etch Equipment to Europe
(End User Revenue in Millions of U.S. Dollars)
Table 4.24
Each Company's Revenue from Shipments of Dry Etch Equipment to
Asia/Pacific-ROW (End User Revenue in Millions of U.S. Dollars)
Table 4.25
Each Company's Revenue from Shipments of Dry Etch Equipment to the
World (End User Revenue in Millions of U.S. Dollars)
Table 4.26
Each Company's Revenue from Shipments of Chemical Vapor
Deposition Equipment to North America (End User Revenue in
Millions of U.S. Dollars)
Table 4.27
Each Company's Revenue from Shipments of Chemical Vapor Deposition
Equipment to Japan (End User Revenue in Millions of U.S. Dollars)
Note: All tables show estimated data.
©1992 Dataquest Incorporated April—Reproduction Prohibited
Page
4-10
4-12
4-14
4-l6
4-17
4-20
4-23
4-26
4-29
4-32
4-35
4-36
4-37
4-38
4-39
4-40
4-41
4-42
4-43
4-44
4-45
4-48
Table (Continued)
Table 4.28
Each Company's Revenue from Shipments of Chemical Vapor Deposition
Equipment to Europe (End User Revenue in Millions of U.S. Dollars)
Table 4.29
Each Cqmpany's Revenue from Shipments of Chemical Vapor Deposition
Equipment to Asia/Pacific-ROW (End User Revenue in Millions of
U.S. Dollars)
,
Table 4.30
Each Company's Revenue from Shipments of Chemical Vapor
Deposition Equipment to the World (End User Revenue in Millions of
U.S. Dollare)
Table 4.31
Each Company's Revenue from Shipments of Physical Vapor Deposition
Equipment to North America (End User Revenue in Millions of
U.S. DoUars)
Table 4.32
Each Company's Revenue from Shipments of Physical Vapor Deposition
Equipment to Japan (End User Revenue in Millions of U.S. Dollars)
Table 4.33
Each Company's Revenue from Shipments of Physical Vapor Deposition
Equipment to Europe (End User Revenue in Millions of U.S. Dollars)
Table 4.34
Each Company's Revenue from Shipments of Physical Vapor Deposition
Equipment to Asia/Pacific-ROW (End User Revenue in Millions of
U.S. DoUars)
Table 4.35
Each Company's Revenue from Shipments of Physical Vapor Deposition
Equipment to the World (End User Revenue in Millions of U.S. Dollars)
Table 4.36
Each Company's Revenue from Shipments of Silicon Epitaxy Equipment to
Each Region (End User Revenue in Millions of U.S. Dollars)
Table 4.37
Each Company's Revenue from Shipments of Metalorganic CVD Equipment
to North America (End User Revenue in Millions of U.S. Dollars)
Table 4.38
Each Company's Revenue from Shipments of Metalorganic CVD Equipment
to Japan (End User Revenue in Millions of U.S. Dollars)
Table 4.39
Each Company's Revenue from Shipments of Metalorganic CVD Equipment
to Europe (End User Revenue in Millions of U.S. Dollars)
Table 4.40
Each Company's Revenue from Shipments of Metalorganic CVD Equipment
to Asia/Pacific-ROW (End User Revenue in Millions of U.S. Dollars)
Table 4.41
Each Company's Revenue from Shipments of Metalorganic CVD Equipment
to the World (End User Revenue in Millions of U.S. Dollars)
Table 4.42
Each Company's Revenue from Shipments of Molecular Beam Epitaxy
Equipment to the World (End User Revenue in Millions of U.S. Dollars)
Table 4.43
Each Company's Revenue from Shipments of Diffusion Furnace Equipment
to North America (End User Revenue in Millions of U.S. Dollars)
Table 4.44
Each Company's Revenue from Shipments of Diffusion Furnace Equipment
to Japan (End User Revenue in Millions of U.S. Dollars)
Table 4.45
Each Company's Revenue from Shipments of Diffusion Furnace Equipment
to Europe (End User Revenue in Millions of U.S. Dollars)
Table 4.46
Each Company's Revenue from Shipments of Diffusion Furnace Equipment
to Asia/Pacific-ROW (End User Revenue in Millions of U.S. DoUars)
Table 4.47
Each Company's Revenue from Shipments of Diffusion Furnace Equipment
to the World (End User Revenue in MUUons of U.S. Dollars)
Page
4-51
4-54
4-57
4-60
4-62
4-64
4-66
4-68
4-70
4-72
4-73
4-74
4-75
4-76
4-77
4-80
4-82
4-84
4-86
4-88
Note: All tables show estimated data.
©1992 Dataquest Incoqx)rated April—Reproduction Prohibited
m
Table (Continued)
Table 4.48
Each Company's Revenue from Shipments of Rapid Thermal Processing
Equipment to Each Region (End User Revenue in Millions of U.S. Dollars)
Table 4.49
Each Company's Revenue from Shipments of Ion Implantation Equipment
to North America (End User Revenue in Millions of U.S. Dollars)
Table 4.50
Each Company's Revenue from Shipments of Ion Implantation Equipment
to Japan (End User Revenue in Millions of U.S. Dollars)
Table 4.51
Each Company's Revenue from Shipments of Ion Implantation Equipment
to Europe (End User Revenue in Millions of U.S. Dollars)
Table 4.52
Each Company's Revenue from Shipments of Ion Implantation Equipment
to Asia/Pacifiic-ROW (End User Revenue in Millions of U.S. Dollars)
Table 4.53
Each Company's Revenue from Shipments of Ion Implantation Equipment to
the World (End User Revenue in Millions of U.S. Dollars)
Table 4.54
Each Company's Revenue from Shipments of Optical CD & CD SEM
Equipment to North America (End User Revenue in Millions of
U.S. Dollars)
Table 4.55
Each Company's Revenue from Shipments of Optical CD & CD SEM
Equipment to Japan (End User Revenue in Millions of U.S. Dollars)
Table 4.56
Each Company's Revenue from Shipments of Optical CD & CD SEM
Equipment to Europe (End User Revenue in Millions of U.S. Dollars)
Table 4.57
Each Company's Revenue from Shipments of Optical CD & CD SEM
Equipment to Asia/Pacific-ROW (End User Revenue in Millions of
U.S. Dollars)
Table 4.58
Worldwide Optical CD & CD SEM By Equipment Category
(End User Revenue in Millions of U.S. Dollars)
Table 4.59
Each Company's Revenue from Shipments of Wafer Inspection Equipment
to North America (End User Revenue in Millions of U.S. Dollars)
Table 4.60
Each Company's Revenue from Shipments of Wafer Inspection Equipment
to Japan (End User Revenue in Millions of U.S. Dollars)
Table 4.61
Each Company's Revenue from Shipments of Wafer Inspection Equipment
to Europe (End User Revenue in Millions of U.S. Dollars)
Table 4.62
Each Company's Revenue from Shipments for Wafer Inspection Equipment
to Asia/Pacific-ROW (End User Revenue in Millions of U.S. Dollars)
Table 4.63
Each Company's Revenue from Shipments of Wafer Inspection Equipment
to the World (End User Revenue in Millions of U.S. Dollars)
Table 5.1
Each Company's Revenue from Shipments of Semiconductor Wafer Fab
Equipment to the World (End User Revenue in Millions of U.S. Dollars)
Note: All tables show estimated data.
©1992 Dataquest Incorporated April—Reproduction Prohibited
Page
4-90
4-93
4-94
4-95
4-96
4-97
4-98
4-100
4-102
4-104
4-106
4-108
4-109
4-110
4-111
4-112
5-2
Chapter
1
Introduction
Equipment
to the Wafer Fab
Database
Introduction
This document contains detailed information
on Dataquest's view of the semiconductor
wafer fabrication equipment market for the
years 1987 through 1991. This database is the
result of an extensive research projea conducted by SEMMS whereby we contact the
world's wafer fab equipment manufacturers to
obtain detailed regional and company market
share data.
Table 1.1
Wafer Fab Equipment Categories
1. Lithography
Contact/Proximity
Projection Aligners
Steppers
Direa-Write Lithography
Maskmaking Lithography
X-Ray
Market
Dataquest has organized the wafer fab equipment market into 10 major categories of frontend processing equipment. These categories,
along with key subcategories, are shown in
Table 1.1.
2. Automatic Photoresist Processing
Equipment
3. Etch and Qean
Wet Process
Dry Strip
Dry Etch
Ion Milling
4. DefKDsition
This equipment is used to perform five key
tasks in the semiconductor device fabrication
process, as follows:
• Patterning of a thin film Oithography and
automatic photoresist processing equipment)
• Etching and cleaning of thin films and/or
substrate surfaces (wet process, dry strip,
dry etch equipment)
• Depositing a thin film (chemical vapor
deposition, physical vapor deposition, silicon
epitaxy, metalorganic CVD and molecular
beam epitaxy equipment)
• Modify the properties of a thin film or substrate (diffusion and ion implantation)
• And finally, verify that all previous steps in
the fabrication process have been perfromed
correctly (process control equipment including optical critical dimension (CD) measurement, CD scanning electron microscopy
(SEM), and wafer inspection)
Chemical Vapor Deposition
Physical Vapor Deposition
Silicon Epitaxy
Metaloiganic CVD
Molecular Beam Epitaxy
5. Diffusion
6. Rapid Thermal Processing
7. Ion Implantation
Medium Current
High Current
High Voltage
8. Process Control
Optical CD
CD SEM
Wafer Inspection
Other Process Control
9. Faaory Automation
10. Other Equipment
Source: Dataquest (April 1992)
1-1
1-2
Semiconductor Equipment, Manufacturing, and Materials
Capital spending by the world's merchant and
captive semiconductor manufacturers consists
of three components: spending for front-end,
or wafer fab equipment; spending for backend, or assembly and test equipment; and
spending for property and plant. The total
world market for the 10 categories of wafer
fab equipment as defined in this database is
equal to the total capital spending for frontend equipment by the world's semiconductor
manufacturers.
Most of the equipment categories are selfexplanatory; however, a few categories require further definition. The Other Process
Control category represents a broad market
that includes mask inspection and repair
equipment, process monitoring equipment,
surface analysis equipment, and analytical
instrumentation. This is a highly fragmented
market with dozens of companies selling into
a multitude of noncompetitive market niches.
Factory Automation includes CIM software for
shop floor control, factory host computer systems, cell controllers and interface hardware,
and wafer transport systems including automatic guided vehicles, robotics, and rail transport systems.
Other Equipment is a general, catchall category
that includes the other capital equipment used
throughout the fab but not classified with the
other nine major types of wafer processing
equipment. Included in this segment are
decontamination systems, wafer markers, gas
analyzers, storage stations, and other types of
equipment.
Conventions
The data in the tables represent end-user
revenue for calendar year shipments, organized by company or by region. For companies
with a different fiscal year, calendar year
shipments have been estimated. Shipments
do not include spare parts or service but do
include retrofits and upgrades. In addition, our
market estimates reflect only equipment used
in the front-end wafer fabrication process. We
do not include equipment used in other market applications such as flat panel display
manufacturing, thin film head manufacturing,
or multichip modules. Finally, as part of our
convention to report end-user revenue, the
revenue associated with equipment kits sent
from one company to be fabricated and
assembled by another company is valued
at the full system shipment price to the semiconductor manufacturer, rather than at the
value of the kit. Thus, for public companies,
the sales reported here may be different from
the sales reported in the annual reports. The
compound annual growth rate (CAGR) is calculated over the years 1987 to 1991 for each
major line item.
Exchange Rates
Worldwide market share estimates combine
data from many countries, each of which
has different and fluctuating exchange rates.
Estimates of non-U.S. market consumption or
revenue are based upon the average exchange
rate for the given year. As a rule, our estimates are calculated in local currencies, and
then converted to U.S. dollars.
For example, Japanese-manufactured equipment
sold in Japan is valued in dollars in the database tables at the average exchange rate for
each year, as shown in the following:
Yen/Dollar Exchange Rate
1987
144
1988
130
1989
139
1990
144
1991
135
Equipment Companies
Table 1.2 presents a list of the equipment
companies found in the database tables by
region of company ownership. (Please note
that Table 1.2 includes companies that are
currently active in the wafer fab equipment
industry in addition to those companies that,
for whatever reason, are no longer participants.) The database comprises a total of
96 U.S. equipment companies, 58 Japanese
companies, 38 European companies, and
8 joint venture companies. These 200 companies account for virtually all of the world's
wafer processing equipment for lithography,
automatic photoresist processing, etch and
dean, deposition, diffusion, rapid thermal
processing, ion implantation, and optical
CD/wafer inspection.
©1992 Dataquest Incorporated April—Reproduction Prohibited
Wafer Fab Equipment Market Share
Table 1.3 presents a summary of recent
mergers and acquisitions in the wafer fab
equipment industry. Meiger and acquisition
activity is often accompanied by a change
in company name. These changes have
been incorporated in our market share
tables. For example, Vickers Instruments
was acquired by Biorad in early 1989. Thus,
Vickers' sales of optical CD and CD SEM
equipment in 1989 is found under the company's new name, Nanoquest; subsequently,
estimates under the Vickers category drop
to 0.
Notes o n Market Share
In the process of conducting data collection
and evaluating market statistics, Dataquest
will sometimes consolidate or revise previously
published market estimates. We revise one
year of history only in those situations when
an individual company's market position or the
1-3
size of a given regional market for a segment
of wafer fab equipment would be altered
significantiy.
Dataquest believes that the estimates presented
within this document are the most accurate
and meaningful statistics available.
Despite the care taken in gathering, analyzing,
and catergorizing the data in a meaningful
way, careful attention must be paid to the
definitions and assumptions used herein when
interpreting the estimates presented in this
document. Variuos companies, government
agencies, and trade associations may use
slightly different definitions of product catergories and regional groupings, or they may
include different companies in their summaries.
These differences should be kept in mind
when making comparisions between data and
numbers provided by Dataquest and those
provided by other suppliers.
©1992 Dataquest Incorporated April—Reproduction Prohibited
Semiconductor Equipment, Manufacturing, and Materials
1-4
Table 1.2
Wafer Fab Eqiilpment C o m p a n i e s
North American Companies
Advantage Production Technology
AG Associates
Alameda Instruments
American Semiconductor Equip. Tech.
Amray
Angstrom Measurements
Anicon
Applied Materials
Ateq
Athens
Biorad
Bjome Enterprises
Branson/IPC
BTU International
CFM Technology
CHA Industries
CPA
Crystal Specialties
CVC Products
CVD Equipment
Denton Vacuum
Dexon
Drytek
Eaton
Emcore
Epitaxy Inc.
Estek
Etec
Focus Semiconductor
FSI International
Fusion Semiconductor Systems
Gasonics
GCA
Gemini
General Signal Thinfilm Company
Genus
Hampshire Instruments
High Temperature Engineering
Innotec
Insystems
Integrated Air Systems
Ion Tech
IPEC
IVS Inc.
KLA Instruments
Kurt J. Lesker
Lam Research
LFE
Machine Technology Inc.
Materials Research Corp.
Matrix
Mattson Technologies
Metrologix
Micronix
Moore
MR Semicon
MRL Industries
Nanometrics
Nanoquest
Nanosil
National Electrostatics
Novellus Systems Inc.
Optical Specialties Inc.
Peak Systems
Perkin-Elmer
Plasma-Therm
Poly-Flow Engineering
Process Products
Process Technology Ltd.
Pure Aire Corporation
Rapro
Reichert-McBain
S&K Products International
Santa Clara Plastics
SCI Manufacturing
Semiconductor Systems Inc.
Semifab
Semitherm
Semitool
Silicon Valley G r o u p
SiScan Systems
Solitec
Spectrum CVD
Spire
Sputtered Films
SubMicron Systems Inc.
Tegal
Tempress
Thermco
Tylan
Ultratech
Universal Plastics
Varian
Veeco
Verteq
Watkins-Johnson
CContinued)
©1992 Dataquest Incorporated April—Reproduction Prohibited
Wafer Fab Equipment Market Share
1-5
Table 1.2 (Continued)
Wafer Fab Equipment Companies
Japanese Companies
ABT Corporation
Advanced FUm Technology Inc.
Amaya
Anelva
Canon
Chemitronics
Chlorine Engineering
Dainippon Screen
Daiwa Semiconductor
Dan Science Co. Ltd.
Denko
Disco
Eiko
Elionix
Enya
Ergo Plasma Systems
ETE Company Ltd.
Fuji Electric
Hitachi
Holon
Japan Production Engineering
JEOL
Kaijo Denki
Kokusai Electric
Koyo Lindberg
Kuwano Electric
Kyoritsu
Maruwa
MRC (Sony)
Musashi
Nidek
Nikon
Nippon EMC
Nippon Sanso
Nissin Electric
Plasma Systems
Ramco
Ryokosha
Samco
Sankyo Engineering
Seiden Sha
Seiko
Shibaura
Shimada
Shinko Electric
Sugai
Sumitomo Metals
Tazmo
Tohokasei
Tokuda
Tokyo Electron Ltd.
Tokyo Ohka Kogyo
Topcon
Toshiba
Toyoko Chemical
Ulvac
Ushio
Yuasa
European Companies
AET
Addax Technologies
Aixtron
ASM International
ASM Lithography
Balzers
BCT Spectrum
Cambridge Instruments
Centrotherm
Convac
CVT
E.T. Electrotech
EEV
Heidelbei;g Instruments
Helmut Seier
ISA Riber
Jipelec
Karl Suss
Leica
Leica Lasertechnik
Leybold-Heraeus
LPE
Micro-Controle
Nano-Master
Plasma Technology
Pokomy
Sapi Equipments
Semco Engineering
Sitesa
Technics
Temescal
Thomas Schwonn
VG Instruments
Vickers Instruments
"Wellman Furnaces
Wild Leit2
Wild Leitz Instruments
Zeiss
Joint Venture Companies
Alcan Technology
BTUAJlvac
Sumitomo/Eaton Nova
[>auquest CAptil 1992)
TEIAAM
TEI/Varian
m'FSI
Ulvac/BTU
VarianA^
®1992 Dataquest Incorporated ^ril—Reproduction -Prohibited
1-6
Semiconductor Equipment, Manufacturing, and Materials
Table 1.3
Summary of Mergers and Acquisitions Incorporated in the Wafer Fab Equipment Database
Company
Action
Company
First Year
Change Noted
Now Identified As In Database
Angstrom Measurement
acquired by
TVS, Inc.
IVS, Inc.
1992
BCT Spectrum
acquired by
MRC Sony
MRC Sony
1992
Ateq Coqx)ration
merged with
Etec Systems
Corporation
Etec Systems, Inc.
1992
Tokuda
acquired by
Shibaura
Shibaura
1991
Shinko Electric
Denko Systems
name change to
Shinko Electric
Sitesa S.A.
acquired by
Addax Technologies
1991
Addax Technologies 1991
ABT Corporation
acquired by
Toshiba
Topcon
1991
BTUAJlvac
acquired by
Ulvac
Ulvac
1991
Ulvac/BTU
acquired by
Ulvac
Ulvac
1991
Micro-Controle
name change to
Nano-Master
Nano-Master
1991
Spectrum CVD
acquired by
Balzers AG
BCT Spectrum
1991
Semiconduaor Systems
Inc.
management buyout from General Signal
Semiconduaor
Systems Inc.
1991
Branson/lPC
merged with
Gasonics
1991
1990
ASM Lithography (e-beam acquired by
lithography group)
Gasonics
Cambridge Instruments Leica
Circuits Processing
Apparatus (GSTC)
management buyout from General Signal "ITiinfilm CPA
Materials Research Corp.
acquired by
Sony
Materials Research
Corp.
1990
Nanoquest
name change to
-
Biorad Micromeasurements
1990
Perkin-Elmer (e-beam
lithography group)
acquired by
industry consortium
Etec Systems, Inc.
1990
Perkin-Elmer (optical
lithography group)
acquired by
Silicon Valley Group
SVG Lithography
1990
Wild Leitz
merged with
Cambridge Instruments Leica
Wild Leitz Instruments
name change to
-
Leica Lasertechnik
1990
ASM Lithography
(50% of joint venture)
acquired by
Philips
ASM Lithography
1989
Cambridge Instruments
(MOCVD group)
acquired by
MR Semicon
MR Semicon
1989
Estek (wet processing
equipment group)
acquired by
Verteq
Verteq
1989
OCA Corporation
acquired by
General Signal
GCA Corporation
1989
acquired by
Wild Leitz
Wild Leitz
Instruments
1989
Heidelberg Instruments
€
1990
1990
(Continued)
«
©1992 Dataquest Incorporated April—Reproduction Prohibited
Wafer Fab Equipment Market Share
1-7
Table 1.3 (Continued)
Siunmary of Mergers and Acquisitions Incorporated In the Wafer Fab Equipment Database
Company
Action
Company
First Year
Change Noted
Now Identlfiied As In Database
TEL/Thennco
acquired by
Tokyo Electron Ltd.
Tokyo Electron Ltd. 1989
Thermco
acquired by
Silicon Valley Group
Silicon Valley Group 1989
Tylan (diffusion and CVD
group)
management buyout from Tylan
Tystar
1989
Vickers Instruments
acquired by
Biorad
Nanoquest
General lonex
acquired by
Genus
Genus
1989
1988
TEL/Lam
acquired by
Tokyo Electron Ltd.
Tokyo Electron Ltd. 1988
Tempress
merged with
Circuits Processing
Apparatus
General Signal
Thinfilm
1988
1987
AET Addax (RTP group)
Anicon
acquired by
Sitesa
Sitesa Addax
acquired by
Silicon Valley Group
Silicon Valley Group 1987
Gemini
acquired by
Lam Research
Lam Research
Source: Dataquest (April 1992)
©1992 Dataquest Incorporated April—Reproduction Prohibited
1987
Chapter
2
Wafer Fab
Equipment—Summary
Data by Category
This section of the equipment database consists of two summary tables for the worldwide
fab equipment market. Both tables present
sales by equipment category for the years
1987 to 1991. In Table 2.1, the annual sales
for each equipment category are organized
by region of equipment sales; in Table 2.2,
aimual sales for each equipment category are
organized by equipment vendor nationality
(United States, Japan, and Europe). Joint
venture equipment companies have their own
listing.
For example, the total worldwide sales for
contact/proximity aligners of $24.6 million in
1987 is the same in both Table 2.1 and
Table 2.2; however, whereas Table 2.1 breaks
the sales down by region. Table 2.2 breaks
the sales down by nationality of the companies supplying the aligners.
In Table 2.2, the subtotal fab equipment line
item designates that portion of the total worldwide fab equipment market for which detailed
company data are available. For some of the
categories in Table 2.2 (Ion Milling, Other
Process Control, Factory Automation, and
Other Equipment), detailed company data are
not complete. For these categories, top-down
estimates have been made and included in
Tables 2.1 and 2.2 so that world fab equipment sales are consistent across all tables.
Detailed company data are available for
approximately 86 percent of the total worldwide wafer fab equipment market for 1991.
2>1
2-2
Semiconductor Equipment, Manufacturing, and Materials
Table 2.1
Revenue from Shipments of Wafer Fab Equipment into Each Region
(End User Revenue In Millions of U.S. Dollars)
Company:
Produa:
Region Of Consumption:
All
Each
Each
'
1987
1988
1989
1990
1991
CAGR (%)
1987-1991
10.0
7.3
6.2
2.6
(28.6)
5.7
8.6
5.3
7.9
7.0
11.0
6.0
Lithography
Contact/Proximity
North American Market
Japanese Market
5.2
8.9
4.0
Eurofjean Market
5.0
5.4
4.4
8.8
4.0
3.6
24.6
22.3
22.6
3.9
24.0
3.3
20.8
(6.9)
(4.1)
North American Market
66.4
60.7
22.4
24.8
14.8
Japanese Market
36.7
63.3
36.9
30.7
(31.3)
(.4.4)
European Market
17.3
8.2
16.3
7.4
43.9
13.0
7.6
(18.6)
15.0
15.1
16.6
147.7
94.3
93.4
15.3
68.4
16.9
(14.6)
277.5
502.1
23.9
Asia/Pacific-ROW Market
Total Contact/Prox.
Projection Aligners
Asia/Pacific-ROW Market
Total Projection
128.6
Total Steppers
North American Market
184.0
280.0
336.4
289.0
Japanese Market
212.8
436.6
532.4
535.5
10.8
European Market
58.5
90.0
110.6
131.8
94.1
12.6
Asia/Pacific-ROW Market
47.8
114.4
201.3
155.4
503.1
921.0
1,180.7
95.9
1,052.2
1,029.1
34.3
19.6
Total Projection
Direct-Write Lithography
North American Market
17.2
13.6
10.0
15.9
Japanese Market
32.7
27.1
7.3
35.6
(19.3)
2.1
European Market
34.5
20.4
24.1
7.3
(16.8)
5.1
26.4
55.3
(4.7)
15.2
35.9
17.2
Asia/Pacific-ROW Market
2.0
2.0
5.2
Total Direa-Write
67.1
68.7
70.1
9.1
76.2
Maskmaking Lithography
North American Market
13.6
16.0
15.4
14.7
9.5
(8.6)
Japanese Market
38.0
27.5
40.1
22.9
29.8
(5.9)
European Market
7.6
8.2
(30.7)
11.0
67.6
62.1
47.1
3.5
45.8
3.9
Total Maskmaking
5.5
69.2
3.5
6.0
3.0
Asia/Pacific-ROW Market
13.0
3.0
(9.3)
.0
3.4
2.0
.0
2.4
NM
1.8
NM
X-Ray
North American Market
Japanese Market
.0
1.6
.0
.0
European Market
.0
1.4
2.8
1.6
.0
NM
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
NM
.0
6.4
4.8
1.6
4.2
Asia/Pacific-ROW Market
Total X-Ray
NM
(Continued)
©1992 Dataquest Incorporated April—Reproduction Prohibited
Wafer Fab Equipment Market Share
2-3
Table 2.1 (Continued)
Revenue from Shipments of Wafer Fab Eqtilpment into Each Region
(End User Revenue in Millions of U.S. Dollars)
Company:
Product:
Region Of Consumption:
All
Each
Each
,
1987
1988
North American Market
291.2
382.6
Japanese Market
325.4
568.9
European Market
109.0
137.9
138.8
CAGR (%)
1987-1991
1989
1990
1991
393.5
656.6
350.6
314.1
1.9
631.0
161.0
181.4
607.9
119.0
16.9
2.2
230.6
131.5
182.6
29.3
11.5
Total Lithography
Asia/Pacific-ROW Market
65.4
Total Lithography
791.0
Automatic Photoresist Processing
Equipment
North American Market
1,228.2
1,441.7
1,294.5
1,223.6
78.0
91.1
156.2
90.7
110.4
16.0
171.4
179.3
28.7
<t
Japanese Market
60.9
65.4
113.6
European Market
28.5
36.5
38.6
Asia/Pacific-ROW Market
12.9
25.3
253.4
47.7
35.5
28.4
34.5
44.4
4.9
36.2
333.6
326.0
368.6
21.8
87.8
74.9
245.8
105.6
12.6
204.8
31.2
44.0
34.7
11.9
59.9
405.0
55.3
24.8
Total Track
167.7
Etch and Qean
North American Market
65.6
Japanese Market
69.2
83.3
138.8
European Market
22.1
29.2
10.3
167.2
25.6
276.9
376.8
35.3
400.0
North American Market
16.7
23.0
27.0
25.1
32.2
17.8
JajDanese Market
33.7
64.2
75.9
75.5
62.1
16.5
9.2
Asia/Pacific-ROW Market
Total Wet Process
201.7
43.3
44.0
Dry Strip
6.9
11.4
9.3
7.8
15.6
33.5
35.7
57.9
7.3
100.4
121.2
117.7
119.1
19.8
North American Market
118.1
171.1
186.1
184.5
10.0
Japanese Market
113.0
240.1
329.9
European Market
58.3
18.0
72.9
74.5
365.9
95.6
173.1
356.6
79.0
44.4
97.2
7.5
52.4
307.4
49.1
533.2
669.5
690.4
704.7
23.0
Eurojsean Market
Asia/Pacific-ROW Market
Total Dry Strip
2.9
4.6
5.9
Dry Etch
Asia/Pacific-ROW Market
Total Dry Etch
77.8
33.3
Ion Milling
North American Market
3.7
4.0
3.0
3.0
3.8
.7
Japanese Market
1.5
2.0
5.0
5.0
7.0
47.0
European Market
1.6
2.0
3.0
3.0
2.1
7.0
Asia/Pacific-ROW Market
1.0
1.5
1.5
2.0
3.8
39.6
Total Ion Milling
7.8
9.5
12.5
13.0
16.7
21.0
(Continued)
©1992 Dataquest Incorporated April—Reproduction Prohibited
24
Semiconductor Equipment, Manufacturing, and Materials
Table 2.1 (Continued)
Revenue from Shipments of Wafer Fab Equipment into Each Region
(End User Revenue in Millions of U.S. Dollars)
Company:
Produa:
Region Of Consumption:
All
Each
Each
1987
1988
CAGR (%)
1987-1991
1989
1990
1991
314.7
11.4
630.5
30.5
Total Etch and Clean
North American Market
204.1
281.4
303.9
Japanese Market
217.4
612.5
287.5
692.2
European Market
84.9
445.1
110.0
127.7
151.9
123.8
9.9
Asia/Pacific-ROW Market
33.9
83.5
540.3
920.0
89.5
1,221.1
176.5
Total Etch and Qean
135.9
1.180.0
1,245.5
51.1
23.2
North American Market
92.7
188.6
19.4
93.0
193.3
262.4
224.4
Japanese Market
152.3
190.2
343.7
58.0
73.2
92.9
369.7
76.4
41.2
European Market
61.9
30.2
DepKJSition
CVD
7.1
16.4
74.7
49.2
112.7
466.4
82.3
611.2
55.5
260.1
716.5
747.4
North American Market
93.8
105.1
111.8
132.2
133.0
9.1
Japanese Market
99.8
138.1
175.0
197.6
232.4
23.5
European Market
40.7
36.0
45.0
50.7
43.3
1.6
Asia/Pacific-ROW Market
16.6
22.8
28.0
302.0
65.3
474.0
40.8
250.9
36.6
368.4
North American Market
13.4
43.0
31.7
24.8
16.6
Japanese Market
13.0
46.1
37.2
6.4
23.5
13.4
20.7
European Market
Asia/Padiic-ROW Market
2.7
5.6
6.1
35.5
85.5
Asia/Pacific-ROW Market
Total CVD
PVD
Total PVD
408.5
17.2
Silicon Epitaxy
Total Silicon Epitaxy
35.7
18.2
11.9
2.4
11.0
14.5
6.7
25.5
75.0
68.2
88.6
25.7
16.5
Metaloiganic CVD
North American Market
11.0
13.8
14.9
12.2
13.9
6.0
Japanese Market
14.1
16.6
16.2
9.2
9.6
.7
13.5
2.4
22.9
9.4
12.9
European Market
16.9
10.6
Asia/Pacific-ROW Market
Total MOCVD
5.2
.5
104.0
44.3
51.4
10.4
20.8
9.3
36.3
19.0
23.7
25.1
12.2
10.5
29.8
(14.6)
22.3
10.6
(2.4)
4.0
4.3
7.2
11.4
8.0
18.9
68.0
80.9
74.0
58.0
58.9
(3.5)
(Continued)
.3
34.6
42.0
3.5
44.6
21.3
Molecular Beam Epitaxy
North American Market
19.7
Japanese Market
32.6
European Market
11.7
Asia/Pacific-ROW Market
Total MBE
©1992 Dataquest Incorporated April—Reproduction Prohibited
(2.2)
Wafer Fab Equipment Market Share
2-5
Table 2.1 (Continued)
Revenue from Shipments of Wafer Fab Equipment into Each Region
(End User Revenue in Millions of U.S. Dollars)
Company:
Produa:
Region Of Consumption:
All
Each
Each
1987
1988
1989
1990
1991
CAGR (%)
1987-1991
North American Market
230.6
370.8
12.6
252.5
372.5
497.0
413.8
Japanese Market
335.5
405.0
600.8
700.9
European Market
126.0
153.7
168.0
181.2
150.7
29.1
4.6
Total Deposition
Asia/Pacific-ROW Market
40.0
82.6
135.7
99.7
197.9
649.1
976.8
1,173.2
1.295.5
1,420.3
North American Market
37.1
85.2
87.8
77.1
Japanese Market
105.4
128.2
172.8
European Market
59.1
39.2
79.9
154.1
41.1
Asia/Pacific-ROW Market
10.0
46.9
58.0
46.2
68.4
33.0
36.3
64.8
145.4
295.5
330.6
324.0
335.1
59.5
23.2
10.1
11.7
10.4
14.6
18.4
16.2
4.5
2.7
6.2
7.0
9.2
14.4
3.2
4.1
6.9
2.1
33.7
26.4
Total Deposition
Diffusion
Total Diffusion
49.1
21.6
21.1
27.1
(1.9)
Rapid Thermal Processing
North American Market
Japanese Market
European Market
Asia/Pacific-ROW Market
Total RTP
.9
18.2
1.2
3.6
3.1
2.8
22.3
25.1
29.7
41.8
23.1
16.3
59.6
13.3
23.6
Ion Implantation
Medium Current
North American Market
9.9
17.4
23.5
17.2
Japanese Market
29.6
64.1
76.8
69.7
Europ>ean Market
15.1
6.4
17.9
8.7
13.7
18.5
22.3
7.9
18.7
61.0
117.9
131.3
113.5
107.5
27.6
59.3
58.4
38.6
8.7
Asia/Pacific-ROW Market
Total Medium Current
17.9
19.1
(2.4)
29.3
15.2
High Current
North American Market
Japanese Market
46.3
44.5
139.4
European Market
21.5
32.6
164.7
136.1
129.7
29.4
27.1
26.5
5.4
27.9
23.3
218.1
19.5
Asia/Pacific-ROW Market
11.5
24.6
26.3
50.4
Total High Current
106.9
241.1
300.7
249.5
North American Market
8.1
6.2
7.4
2.6
Japanese Market
5.9
4.0
8.1
4.1
15.5
.0
.0
.0
18.0
18.4
19.3
High Voltage
European Market
Asia/Padfic-ROW Market
Total High Voltage
(22.6)
4.2
2.9
11.4
.0
3.3
(4.7)
1.7
.0
.0
NM
24.6
6.8
17.6
(.6)
(Conllnucd)
01992 Dataquest Incorporated April—Reproduction Prohibited
17.9
Semiconductor Equipment, Manufacturing, and Materials
2-6
Table 2.1 (Continued)
Revenue from Shipments of Wafer Fab Equipment into Each Region
(End User Revenue in Millions of U.S. Dollars)
Company:
Produa:
Region Of Consumption:
All
Each
Each
CAGR (%)
1987-1991
1987
1988
1989
1990
1991
45.6
68.1
90.2
78.2
57.8
6.1
Total Implantation
North American Market
Japanese Market
81.8
211.6
257.0
210.0
200.7
25.2
European Market
40.6
54.6
35.0
35.0
23.2
1.7
43.1
377.4
74.4
46.6
43.5
41.2
456.6
369.8
343.2
16.6
33.4
25.4
22.9
19.8
5.6
Japanese Market
15.9
15.0
27.6
20.5
15.3
European Market
8.0
12.8
16.5
4.2
19.3
13.2
7.0
13.3
19.8
Asia/Pacific-ROW Market
17.9
Total Implantation
Optical CD
185.9
North American Market
6.5
Asia/Pacific-ROW Market
3.4
5.6
12.9
10.8
Total Optical CD
42.3
79.4
69.6
58.9
59.3
8.8
North American Market
19.0
26.5
26.2
23.2
17.9
Japanese Market
22.7
37.7
41.4
59.0
European Market
3.4
5.5
9.5
54.5
6.8
(1.5)
27.0
5.4
12.3
1.3
46.4
1.9
71.6
3.5
80.6
3.1
87.6
12.0
94.3
74.3
19.4
North American Market
23.2
35.7
40.1
27.7
26.4
Japanese Market
21.8
39.3
40.2
41.1
European Market
8.5
4.2
12.9
42.9
23.4
3.3
17.2
18.3
15.6
16.4
CD SEM
Asia/Pacific-ROW Market
Total CD SEM
Wafer Insp>ection
12.6
10.8
4.6
6.6
12.0
57.7
100.5
117.2
90.8
89.7
11.7
North American Market
104.4
129.6
120.0
121.0
3.8
Japanese Market
112.3
41.1
116.5
153.4
176.8
171.0
181.0
12.7
48.2
48.8
45.0
42.0
.5
37.3
49.2
32.0
54.0
17.9
368.0
398.0
8.6
3.3
15.0
Asia/Pacific-ROW Market
Total Wafer Inspection
Other Process Control
European Market
Asia/Pacific-ROW Market
27.9
Total Other Process Control
285.7
355.4
404.4
Total Process Control
North American Market
162.5
212.1
221.3
193.8
Japanese Market
171.8
258.0
281.6
281.0
185.1
300.4
European Market
61.0
79.4
94.6
86.6
76.2
5.7
Asia/Pacific-ROW Maricet
36.8
57.4
74.3
43.9
79.6
Total Process Control
432.1
606.9
671.8
605.3
641.3
21.3
10.4
CContinued)
©1992 Dataquest Incorporated April—Reproduction Prohibited
Wafer Fab Equipment Market Share
2-7
Table 2.1 (Continued)
Revenue from Shipments of Wafer Fab Equipment into Each Region
(End User Revenue in Millions of U.S. Dollars)
Company:
Produa:
Region Of Consumption:
All
Each
Each
1990
1991
CAGR (%)
1987-1991
1987
1988
1989
24.0
26.0
37.0
40.0
36.0
10.7
132.0
25.0
Faaory Automation
North American Market
Japanese Market
54.0
76.0
112.0
121.0
European Market
17.0
17.0
25.0
27.0
23.0
7.8
73.2
23.1
Asia/Pacific-ROW Market
4.0
11.0
21.0
28.0
36.0
Total Automation
99.0
130.0
195.0
216.0
227.0
39.7
55.1
58.2
50.8
49.1
5.5
97.1
96.5
20.6
24.8
16.7
20.3
27.2
35.8
189.4
193.1
14.6
1.597.1
1,536.3
3,016.7
634.2
24.0
Other Equipment
North American Market
Japanese Market
45.6
80.5
Europ>ean Market
18.6
Asia/Pacific-ROW Market
Total Other Equipment
8.0
23.5
18.2
111.9
177.3
1,105.8
1,535.7
97.9
25.2
28.5
209.8
2.2
Total Wafer Fab Equipment
North American Market
Japanese Market
1,277.5
Europ>ean Market
Asia/Pacific-ROW Market
527.5
229.8
Total Fab Equipment
3,140.6
2,270.3
662.7
519.1
4,987.8
1,665.9
2,806.0
8.6
725.4
2,986.5
767.6
820.1
520.1
852.3
38.8
6,017.4
5,871.3
6,039.5
17.8
NM - Not Meaningful
The category of Optical CD includes dedicated overlay toob, In addition to joint linewidth/oveilay measurement systems.
Ref: SUMMREG
Source: Dataquest (April 1992)
©1992 Dataquest Incorporated April—Reproduction Proliibited
4.7
Semiconductor Equipment, Manufacturing, and Materials
2-8
Table 2.2
Each Regional Company Base's Revenue from Shipments of Wafer Fab Equipment to the World
(End User Revenue In Millions of U.S. Dollars)
Company:
Produa:
Region Of Consumption:
Each Regional Company Base
Each
The World
World Fab Equipment Market
1987
1988
3.140.6
4,987.8
1989
6,017.4
5,871.3
6,039.5
CAGR (%)
1987-1991
17.8
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
NM
11.0
8.6
6.3
10.5
7.9
(7.9)
13.5
(1.3)
NM
1990
1991
Lithography
Contact/Proximity
North American Companies
Japanese Companies
13.6
137
.0
.0
16.3
.0
.0
12.9
.0
24.6
22.3
22.6
24.0
20.8
(4.1)
North American Companies
88.0
78.6
37.0
21.2
Japanese Companies
40.6
44.9
49.4
56.4
47.2
.0
.0
.0
(29.9)
3.8
NM
European Companies
Joint Venture Companies
Total Contact/Proximity
Projection Aligners
European Companies
.0
69.1
.0
Joint Venture Companies
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
NM
128.6
147.7
94.3
93.4
68.4
(14.6)
124.5
198.0
664.4
145.4
912.1
136.8
824.4
113.2
844.6
(2.4)
25.4
58.6
123.2
91.0
.0
.0
71.3
.0
18.1
.0
921.0
1,180.7
1,052.2
1,029.1
19.6
9.9
41.0
10.5
.0
(100.0)
44.6
19.2
54.9
10.8
3.1
(12.2)
.0
76.2
Total Projection
Stepjjers
North American Companies
Japanese Companies
European Companies
Joint Venture Companies
Total Steppers
341.9
36.7
.0
503.1
NM
Direct-Write Lithography
North American Companies
Japanese Companies
European Companies
9.6
12.8
39.5
18.0
40.7
15.2
.0
.0
67.1
68.7
.0
70.1
North American Companies
28.6
38.2
34.7
28.0
Japanese Companies
35.0
29.6
European Companies
4.0
16.5
7.4
.0
.0
4.9
.0
Joint Venture Companies
Total Direct-Write
10.7
.0
NM
55.3
(4.7)
(2.8)
16.6
25.5
17.8
(15.6)
2.5
2.5
NM
.0
.0
NM
NM
Maskmaking Lithography
Joint Venture Companies
67.6
62.1
69.2
47.1
45.8
North American Companies
.0
1.8
2.0
.0
2.4
NM
Japanese Companies
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
NM
2.8
1.6
1.8
NM
.0
4.2
NM
ERR
Total Maskmaking
X-Ray
European Companies
.0"
Joint Venture Companies
.0
Total X-Ray
.0
4.6
.0
.0
.0
6.4
4.8
1.6
©1992 Dataquest Incorporated ^ril—Reproduction Prohibited
2-9
Wafer Fab Equipment Market Sliare
Table 2.2 (Continued)
Each Regional Company Base's Revenue jErom Shipments of Wafer Fab Equipment to the World
(End User Revenue i n Millions of U.S. DoUars)
Company:
Produa:
Region Of Consumption:
Each Regional Company Base
Each
The World
CAGR (o/o)
1987-1991
1987
1988
1989
1990
1991
North American Companies
250.7
329.4
Japanese Companies
799.3
236.9
1,038.4
212.3
468.0
962.8
162.3
962.1
European Companies
99.5
.0
166.4
119.4
99.2
Joint Venture Companies
72.3
.0
.0
.0
.0
(10.3)
19.7
8.2
NM
Total Lithography
791.0
1,228.2
1,441.7
1,294.5
1,223.6
11.5
Total Lithography
Automatic Photoresist Processing
Equipment
North American Companies
80.2
93.4
106.8
98.5
103.5
6.6
Japanese Companies
76.6
146.2
195.2
229.1
31.5
Europ>ean Companies
10.9
.0
13.8
12.2
198.3
15.4
14.8
.0
19.4
13.8
18.9
17.1
21.8
Joint Venture Companies
NM
167.7
253.4
333.6
326.0
368.6
North American Companies
95.2
122.7
6.5
67.7
114.5
248.6
96.2
Japanese Companies
106.5
165.7
291.6
271.0
41.4
European Companies
4.3
.0
4.7
12.2
.0
11.3
.0
27.3
.0
13.7
.0
167.2
276.9
376.8
400.0
405.0
24.8
North American Companies
25.4
38.6
39.8
37.8
38.8
11.2
Japanese Companies
27.5
.0
51.6
68.3
.0
68.2
59.4
21.2
.0
.0
NM
Total Track
Wet Process
Joint Venture Companies
Total Wet Process
NM
Dry Strip
European Companies
Joint Venture Companies
Total Dry Strip
5.0
.0
10.2
11.7
20.9
57.9
100.4
13.1
121.2
43.0
117.7
119.1
19.8
210.3
364.0
388.0
358.7
356.2
14.1
313.7
44.2
15.7
258.3
17.0
294.6
23.0
18.3
26.3
14.1
16.5
(1.3)
Dry Etch
North American Companies
Japanese Companies
European Companies
Joint Venture Companies
Total Dry Etch
72.5
7.2.
153.5
17.4
.0
6.2
307.4
533.2
669.5
690.4
704.7
23.0
138.0
258.2
416.4
104.6
418.5
195.4
32.0
35.3
78.0
372.3
143.6
91.3
4.0
611.2
101.9
27.6
Deposition
CVD
North American Coo^anies
Japanese Companies
European Companies
Joint Venture Companies
Total CVD
8.8
260.1
100.1
3.5
466.4
170.6
716.5
©1992 Dataquest Incorporated April—Reproduction Prohibited
97.1
36.4
747.4
53.4
5.6
42.6
30.2
(Continued)
2-10
Semiconductor Equipment, Manufacturing, and Materials
Table 2.2 (Continued)
Each Regional Company Base's Revenue from Shipments of Wafer Fab Equipment to the World
(End User Revenue in Millions of U.S. Dollars)
Company:
Product:
Region Of Consumption:
Each Regional Company Base
Each
The World
1987
1988
1989
1990
1991
CAGR (%)
1987-1991
North American Companies
102.0
132.4
157.7
123.0
173.5
14.2
Japanese Companies
102.7
46.2
129.7
161.1
236.1
49.6
49.4
271.3
29.2
27.5
(10.8)
.0
39.9
.0
.0
.0
.0
NM
250.9
302.0
368.4
408.5
474.0
17.2
33.4
67.2
46.9
12.2
36.8
6.7
35.3
18.4
72.0
24.7
.0
34.9
.0
NM
PVD
European Companies
Joint Venture Companies
Total PVD
Silicon Epitaxy
North American Companies
1.4
Japanese Companies
2.1
6.2
European Companies
.0
12.1
Joint Venture Companies
.0
.0
15.9
.0
35.5
85.5
75.0
68.2
88.6
25.7
North American Companies
10.2
17.0
18.5
16.0
10.5
11.0
13.1
13.7
15.7
Japanese Companies
14.5
14.4
11.2
12.6
16.1
16.9
16.0
.0
.0
.0
NM
42.0
44.6
44.3
51.4
10.4
20.3
21.6
17.2
4.7
5.2
15.5
15.6
24.7
(25.7)
10.4
Total Silicon Epitaxy
NM
Metalorganic CVD
European Companies
Joint Venture Companies
Total MOCVD
2.9
34.6
13.5
1.7
9.8
Molecular Beam Epitaxy
North American Companies
17.1
Japanese Companies
16.6
European Companies
34.3
.0
39.0
41.3
.0
37.7
.0
29.0
.0
.0
(4.1)
NM
68.0
80.9
74.0
58.0
58.9
(3.5)
597.9
440.2
651.0
21.3
33.2
Joint Venture Companies
Total MBE
Total Deposition
North American Companies
300.7
491.2
609.8
Japanese Con^anies
167.2
275.8
346.9
European Companies
169.5
204.6
229.8
11.7
5.2
212.5
4.0
526.7
206.2
27.6
36.4
32.8
649.1
976.8
1,173.2
1,295.5
1,420.3
21.6
North American Companies
65.3
117.2
100.3
88.6
7.9
Japanese Companies
33.3
115.9
141.2
159.5
203.8
European Companies
21.5
26.9
11.5
35.3
18.6
167.9
33.0
57.3
7.7
(14.1)
295.5
330.6
Joint Venture Companies
Total Deposition
5.0
Diffusion
Joint Venture Companies
Total Diffusion
25.3
145.4
22.8
28.9
13.8
324.0
335.1
23.2
(Continued)
©1992 Dataquest Incorporated April—Reproduction Prohibited
Wafer Fab Equipment Market Share
2-11
Table 2.2 (Continued)
Each Regional Company Base's Revenue from Shipments of Wafer Fab Eqiilpment to the World
(End User Revenue in Millions of U.S. Dollars)
Company:
Product:
Region Of Consumption:
Each Regional Company Base
Each
The World
CAGR (%)
1987-1991
1987
1988
1989
1990
1991
16.3
1.2
19.3
1.8
21.2
25.0
35.6
21.6
Japanese Companies
2.4
3.0
2.9
24.7
Eurojjean Companies
.7
1.2
.0
.0
3.3
.0
47.4
.0
1.5
.0
1.7
Joint Venture Companies
18.2
22.3
25.1
29.7
41.8
23.1
107.0
197.6
223.7
199.7
191.6
15.7
53.3
4.2
82.9
1.6
64.8
63.5
.0
24.1
148.4
88.1
15.6
16.6
Rapid Thermal Processing
North American Companies
Total RTP
NM
Ion Implantation
North American Companies
Japanese Companies
26.8
European Companies
2.8
.0
NM
Joint Venture Companies
49.3
Total Ion Impantation
Optical CD
185.9
122.3
377.4
456.6
105.3
369.8
343.2
North American Companies
10.4
28.7
37.6
34.4
38.5
38.7
Japanese Companies
15.1
16.8
27.7
19.1
11.8
12.5
23.0
12.7
.0
.0
12.9
.0
.0
8.3
.0
(4.6)
(16.2)
42.3
79.4
69.6
58.9
59.3
8.8
European Companies
Joint Venture Companies
Total Optical CD
NM
CD SEM
North American Companies
Japanese Comp>anies
European Companies
Joint Venture Companies
Total CD SEM
3.9
6.4
16.0
32.9
9.6
53.2
64.6
11.5
76.1
12.9
81.4
34.9
25.4
12.0
.0
.0
.0
NM
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
NM
46.4
71.6
80.6
87.6
94.3
19.4
35.4
62.1
74.6
55.2
40.6
3.5
15.5
6.8
26.1
28.8
22.3
13.8
.0
12.3
.0
.0
13.3
.0
37.3
11.8
24.6
.0
NM
57.7
100.5
117.2
90.8
89.7
11.7
1,200.8
1,853.1
1,895.4
1,986.1
2,513.0
1,827.5
2,601.6
1,842.3
2,763.4
11.3
28.8
486.9
460.5
406.2
108.7
417.9
149.2
209.7
195.3
192.8
5.9
15.4
2,636.2
4,315.6
5,195.7
5,084.9
5,204.7
Wafer Inspection
North American Companies
Japanese Companies
European Companies
Joint Venture Companies
Total Wafer Insp.
14.8
Subtotal Fab Equipment*
North American Companies
Japanese Comp>anies
European Companies
Joint Venture Companies
Subtotal Fab Equipment
1,004.3
322.4
18.5
(Continued)
01992 Dataquest Incorporated April—Reproduction Prohibited
Semiconductor Equipment, Manufacturing, and Materials
2-12
Table 2.2 (Continued)
Each Regional Company Base's Revenue from Shipments of Wafer Fab Equipment to the World
(End User Revenue in Millions of U.S. Dollars)
Company:
Product:
Region Of Consumption:
Each Regional Company Base
Each
The World
1987
1988
1989
1990
1991
CAGR (%)
1987-1991
7.8
9.5
12.5
13.0
l6.7
21.0
285.7
355.4
404.4
368.0
398.0
8.6
99.0
130.0
195.0
216.0
227.0
23.1
111.9
177.3
209.8
189.4
193.1
14.6
3,140.6
4,987.8
6,017.4
5,871.3
6,039.5
17.8
Ion Milling
All Companies
Other Process Control
All Companies
Faaory Automation
All Companies
Other Equipment
All Companies
Total Fab Equip.
•Subtotal Fab Equipment does not include Ion Milling, Other Process Control, Factory Automation, and Other Equipmeiu categories as detailed
company data Is not complete for these categories. Aggregate data for these categories are added to provide a consistent total for the worldwide
wafer fiab equipment maiket
The category of Optical CD includes dedicated overlay tools, in addition to joint linewidth/overlay measurement systems.
NM - Not Meaningful
Ref; SUMMSHR
Source: Dataquest (April 1992)
«
©1992 Dataquest Incorporated April—Reproduction Protiibited
Chapter
Wafer
Data
3
Fab
Equipment—Import/Export
This section of the equipment database consists of two summary tables that provide information on the import/expon markets for the
worldwide wafer fab equipment market. In
both Table 3.1 and Table 3.2, the worldwide
fab equipment market total in millions of U.S.
dollars is listed at the begiiming of the table
and followed by the subtotal for fab equipment. The subtotal fab equipment line item
includes all of the front-end equipment
categories for which detailed company analysis
has been made and accounts for 86 percent
of all front-end equipment for 1991. For some
equipment categories (Ion Milling, Other
Process Control, Factory Automation, and
Other Equipment), detailed company analysis
is not yet complete. For these categories,
which account for the remaining 14 percent
of wafer fab equipment, a top-down estimate
has been made and included in Tables 3-1
and 3.2 so that worldwide fab equipment
sales are consistent across all tables.
The subtotal fab equipment market includes
all of the major wafer fab equipment categories and accounts for the majority of all
import/export activity in the worldwide fab
equipment market. Relatively little import/
export activity exists for the remaining 14 percent of wafer fab equipment for which
detailed company data are not yet complete.
These equipment markets are largely supplied
by domestic suppliers. Significant import/export
analysis of the fab equipment market can be
done, however, with the aid of the data in
Tables 3.1 and 3.2.
3-1
Semiconductor Equipment, Manufacturing, and Materials
3-2
Table 3.1
Each Regional Company Base's Revenue from Shipments of Wafer Fab Equipment to Each Region of
the World (End User Revenue In Millions of U.S. Dollars)
Company:
Produa:
Region Of Consumption:
Each Regional Company Base
All
Each
1987
1988
1991
3,140.6
4,987.8
1989
6,017.4
CAGR (%)
1987-1991
5,871.3
6,039.5
17.8
Subtotal Fab Equip.'
2,636.2
4,315.6
5.195.7
5,084.9
5.204.7
18.5
Subtotal Percent (%)
83.9
86.5
86.3
86.6
86.2
World Fab Equipment Market
1990
Subtotal Fab Equipment
North America
N. American Co. Sales
697.6
1,000.2
1,001.7
954.7
854.2
5.2
Japanese Co. Sales
1237
177.1
230.1
261.6
301.0
24.9
European Co. Sales
112.7
156.8
137.7
.0
180.9
25.4
149.7
.0
17.3
5.1
NM
934.0
1.334.1
1,438.1
1,383.3
33.5
1.326.4
Joint Venture Co. Sales
Subtotal N. America Market
9.2
Japan
N. American Co. Sales
149.7
322.0
355.1
381.7
455.3
32.1
Japanese Co. Sales
767.9
37.8
1,443.9
1.838.0
1.950.7
26.2
64.7
14.4
4.5
25.0
44.9
108.7
1,064.1
44.3
148.2
1,984.9
70.6
176.3
155.2
1,958.4
2,414.3
2,592.4
129.5
2,600.2
N. American Co. Sales
241.9
304.1
314.5
288.6
265.8
2.4
Japanese Co. Sales
54.5
152.8
82.4
122.7
184.5
99.9
201.0
166.8
189.6
132.8
22.5
-3.4
.0
1.0
8.0
22.8
25.5
NM
449.2
572.0
623.4
667.8
546.8
5.0
111.6
226.8
314.8
202.5
267.0
24.4
389.0
60.8
71.0
European Co. Sales
Joint Venture Co. Sales
Subtotal Japan Market
Europe
European Co. Sales
Joint Venture Co. Sales
Subtotal Europe Market
Asia/Pacific-ROW
N. American Co. Sales
Japanese Co. Sales
58.2
192.0
345.0
European Co. Sales
19.1
.0
32.3
.0
60.1
188.3
50.6
.0
.0
4.3
38.9
NM
188.9
451.1
719.9
441.4
731.3
40.3
N. American Co. Sales
1,200.8
1,986.1
1,827.5
1,842.3
11.3
Japanese Co. Sales
1,004.3
1.853.1
1.895.4
2,513.0
2,601.6
2,763.4
28.8
406.2
5.9
15.4
Joint Venture Co. Sales
Subtotal Asia/Pacific-ROW Market
Worldwide
European Co. Sales
322.4
Joint Venture Co. Sales
108.7
Subtotal Fab Equip.
2,636.2
417.9
149.2
486.9
460.5
209.7
195.3
192.8
4,315.6
5.195.7
5.084.9
5,204.7
©1992 Dataquest Incorporated April—Reproduction Prohibited
18.5
(Continued)
Wafer Fab Equipment Marlcet Sliare
3-3
Table 3.1 (Continued)
Each Regional Company Base's Revenue from Shipments of Wafer Fab Equipment to Each Region of the
World (End User Revenue In Millions of U.S. Dollars)
Company:
Produa:
Region Of Consumption:
Ion Milling
All Companies
Other Process Control
All Companies
Faaory Automation
All Companies
Other Equipment
All Companies
Total Fab Equipment
Each Regional Company Base
All
Each
1987
1988
1989
1990
1991
CAGR (%)
1987-1991
7.8
9-5
12.5
13.0
l6.7
21.0
285.7
355.4
404.4
368.0
398.0
8.6
99.0
130.0
195.0
216.0
227.0
23.1
111.9
3,140.6
177.3
4,987.8
209.8
6,017.4
189.4
5,871.3
193.1
6,039.5
14.6
17.8
'Subtotal Fab Equipment does not include Ion Milling, Other Process Contn>l, Factory Automation, and Other Equipment categories, as detailed
company dau are not complete for these categories. Aggregate data for these categories are added to provide a consistent total for the worldwide wafer fab equipment maricet.
NM - Not Meaningful
Ref: IMEXSHR
Source: Dataquest (April 1992}
©1992 Dataquest Incorpoiaied April-Reproduction Prohibited
3-4
Semiconductor Equipment, Manufacturing, and Materials
Table 3.2
Each Regional Company Base's Revenue from Shipments of Wafer Fab Equipment Into Each Region of
the World
(End User Revenue in Millions of U.S. Dollars)
Company:
Product:
Region Of Consumption:
All
All
All
CAGR (%)
1987-1991
1987
1988
1989
1990
1991
3140.6
2636.2
4987.8
4315.6
6017.4
86.5
86.3
6039.5
5204.7
86.2
18.5
83.9
5871.3
5084.9
86.6
Sales in North America
697.6
1000.2
1001.7
954.7
854.2
5.2
Sales in Japan
149.7
322.0
355.1
381.7
226.8
314.5
314.8
455.3
265.8
32.1
288.6
202.5
267.0
24.4
1200.8
1853.1
1986.1
1827.5
1842.3
11.3
Sales in North America
123.7
177.1
230.1
261.6
301.0
Sales in Japan
767.9
1443.9
82.4
1838.0
1984.9
166.8
1950.7
24.9
26.2
World Fab Equipment Market
Subtotal Fab Equipment*
Subtotal Percent (%)
5195.7
17.8
Subtotal Fab Equipment
N. American Equipment Companies
Sales in Europe
241.9
111.6
Sales in Asia/Pacific-ROW
Total N. American Companies
304.1
•
2.4
Japanese Equipment Companies
Sales in Eurojje
192.0
99.9
345.0
389.0
1004.3
1895.4
2513.0
188.3
2601.6
22.5
60.8
2763.4
28.8
112.7
156.8
180.9
149.7
137.7
37.8
44.3
44.9
70.6
64.7
5.1
14.4
132.8
-3.4
54.5
58.2
Sales in Asia/Pacific-ROW
Total Japanese Companies
122.7
European Equipment Companies
Sales in North America
Sales in Japan
Sales in Europe
Sales in Asia/Pacific-ROW
Total European Companies
152.8
184.5
201.0
189.6
19.1
32.3
60.1
50.6
71.0
38.9
5.9
322.4
417.9
486.9
460.5
406.2
.0
.0
25.4
33.5
NM
108.7
148.2
176.3
17.3
155.2
129.5
.0
1.0
8.0
22.8
25.5
4.5
NM
.0
.0
.0
.0
108.7
149.2
209.7
195.3
4.3
192.8
15.4
4315.6
5195.7
5084.9
5204.7
18.5
Joint Venture Equipment Companies
Sales in North America
Sales in Japan
Sales in Europe
Sales in Asia/Pacific-ROW
Total JV Companies
Subtotal Fab Equip.
2636.2
©1992 Dataquest Incorporated April—Reproduction Prohibited
NM
Wafer Fab Equlpmeat Market Share
^'^
Table 3.2 (Continued)
Each Regional Company Base's Revenue from Shipments of Wafer Fab Equipment Into Each Region of
the World
(End User Revenue In Millions of U.S. Dollars)
Company:
Produa:
Region Of Consumption:
Ion Milling
All Companies
Other Process Control
All Companies
Factory Automation
All Companies
Other Equipment
All Companies
Total Fab Equipment
All
All
All
1987
1988
1989
1990
1991
CAGR (%)
1987-1991
7.8
9.5
12.5
13.0
l6.7
21.0
285.7
355.4
404.4
368.0
398.0
8.6
99.0
130.0
195.0
216.0
227.0
23.1
111.9
3140.6
177.3
4987.8
209.8
6017.4
189.4
5871.3
193.1
6039-5
14.6
17.8
'Subtotal Fab Equipment does not include Ion Milling, Other Process Control, Factory Automation, and Other Equipment categories as detailed
company dau is not complete for these categories. Aggregate data for these categories are added to provide a consistent total for the worldwide
wafer fab equipment market.
Ref: IMEXSHR
Source: Dataquest CApiil 1992)
®1992 Dataquest Incorporated April—Reprcxluction Prohibited
Chapter
4
Wafer Fab
Equipment—Company
Shares by Category
This section of the equipment database contains detailed company market share data by
region for the major front-end equipment
categories as shown in Tables 4.1 through
4.63. All of the companies that participate in
an equipment segment are listed for each
region, regardless of whether or not they have
sales in a particular region. Although this
approach results in a large number of zeros in
the tables, it also indicates that Dataquest has
not recorded any sales for the company in
that region. We believe that this format gives
more positive information than eliminating a
company with no sales in a given region.
At the beginning of each table, the total world
market for a particular equipment category
is presented. This total is the same for each
category as the total listed in Tables 2.1
and 2.2 in Chapter 2 entitled "Wafer Fab
Equipment—Summary Data by Category." Thus,
all tables are completely consistent as one proceeds from the summary tables to the detaUed
tables presented here in this section.
4-1
4-2
Semiconductor Equipment, Manufacturing, and Materials
Table 4.1
Each Company's Revenue from Shipments of Lithography Equipment to the World By Equipment
Category (End User Revenue In Millions of U.S. Dollars)
Comfjany:
Product:
Region Of Consumption:
World Lithography Market
Each
Lithography
Worldwide
1987
1988
1989
1990
791.0
1,228.2
1,4417
1,294.5
1991
1,223.6
11.0
8.6
6.3
10.5
7.9
13.5
CAGR (%)
1987-1991
11.5
Contact/Proximity
Canon
Karl Suss
13.6
13.7
24.6
22.3
16.3
22.6
24.0
12.9
20.8
Canon
40.6
69.1
49.4
56.4
47.2
Perkin-Elmer
88.0
78.6
.0
.0
44.9
.0
.0
.0
37.0
21.2
128.6
147.7
94.3
93.4
68.4
Total Cont./Prox.
-4.1
Projection Aligners
SVG Lithography
Total Projection
Steppers
ASET
11.3
16.0
4.0
.0
.0
ASM Lithography
36.7
58.6
123.2
91.0
71.3
Canon
89.8
125.0
182.9
202.2
219.7
GCA
47.4
104.0
68.9
78.2
46.8
33.3
218.8
49.2
75.5
103.8
86.7
490.2
653.7
518.4
538.2
25.2
5.0
10.2
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
30.6
30.4
40.6
73.0
62.3
28.0
36.0
503.1
921.0
1,180.7
1,052.2
1,029.1
8.0
7.2
7.2
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
10.0
8.0
12.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
10.5
.0
Hitachi
Nikon
Perkin-Elmer
SVG Lithography
Ultratech
Total Steppers
-14.6
19.6
Direct-Write Lithography
ASM Lithography
Ateq
Cambridge
Etec
Hitachi
JEOL
Leica
Perkin-Elmer
Total Direct-Write
8.7
9.6
9.4
19.5
17.8
30.8
31.6
35.4
26.8
.0
10.8
10.7
9.9
70.1
.0
.0
76.2
55.3
.0
31.1
.0
9.6
12.8
67.1
68.7
©1992 Dataquest Incorporated April—Reproduction Prohibited
-4.7
(Continued)
4-3
Wafer Fab Equipment Market Share
Table 4.1 (Continued)
Each Company's Revenue £rom Shipments of Lithography Equipment to the World By Equipment
Category (End User Revenue In Millions of U.S. Dollars)
Company:
Produa:
Region Of Consumption:
Each
Lithography
Worldwide
1987
1988
1989
1990
1991
ASM Lithography
4.0
2.4
2.4
.0
.0
Ateq
1.6
11.2
13.7
14.0
15.0
.0
.0
CAGR (%)
1987-1991
Maskmaking Lithography
Cambridge
.0
5.0
Etec
.0
.0
2.5
.0
14.0
10.5
6.2
6.7
Hitachi
13.4
3.8
6.6
JEOL
18.1
5.0
15.8
10.4
11.1
.0
.0
.0
Perkin-Elmer
27.0
27.0
21.0
2.5
.0
2.5
.0
Toshiba
3.5
67.6
7.7
62.1
7.2
.0
.0
69.2
47.1
45.8
.0
1.8
.0
.0
2.4
2.0
.0
.0
Leica
Total Maskmaking
-9.3
X-Ray
Hampshire Instruments
Perkin-Elmer
.0
.0
Karl Suss
.0
4.6
2.8
1.6
1.8
.0
6A
4.8
1.6
4.2
NM
791.0
1,228.2
1,441.7
1,294.5
1,223.6
11.5
Total X-Ray
Total Lithography
Ref: LTTHSHR
NM - Not Meaningful
Source: Dataquest (April 1992)
©1992 Dataquest Incorporated April-^leproduction Prohibited
4-4
Semiconductor Equipment, Manufacturing, and Materials
Table 4.2
Each Company's Revenue from Shipments of Contact/Proximity Equipment to Each Region
(End User Revenue in Millions of U.S. Dollars)
Company:
Product:
Region Of Consumption:
World Cont./Prox. Market
Each
Contact/Proximity
Each
1987
1988
1989
1990
1991
CAGR (%)
1987-1991
24.6
22.3
22.6
24.0
20.8
-4.1
4.5
3.0
1.4
1.1
North America
Canon
Karl Suss
Total North America
5.5
5.9
5.9
5.1
.5
2.1
10.0
8.9
7.3
6.2
2.6
3.6
2.7
2.7
6.2
6.2
1.6
1.3
4.0
3.0
2.4
1.7
5.2
5.7
8.6
7.9
1.5
1.5
.8
1.1
.5
6.5
-28.6
Japan
Canon
Karl Suss
Total Japan
11.0
Europe
Canon
Karl Suss
5.2
5.0
3.9
5.4
4.2
6.0
5.3
7.0
Canon
1.4
1.4
1.4
2.1
.7
Karl Suss
3.0
2.6
2.2
1.8
2.6
4.4
4.0
3.6
3.9
3.3
Canon
11.0
8.6
6.3
10.5
7.9
Karl Suss
13.6
13.7
22.3
16.3
22.6
13.5
24.0
12.9
24.6
Total Europe
3.5
8.8
Asia-Padfic/ROW
Total A/P-ROW
-6.9
Worldwide
Total Worldwide
Ref: CONTSHR
Source: Dauquest (April 1992)
©1992 Dataquest Incorporated April—Reproduction Protiibited
20.8
-4.1
Wafer Fab Equipment Market Share
4-5
Table 4.3
Each Company's Revenue from Shipments of Projection Aligner Equipment to Each Region
(End User Revenue In Millions of U.S. Dollars)
Company:
Product:
Region Of Consumption:
World Projection Market
Each
Projection Aligner
Each
1987
1988
1989
1990
1991
128.6
147.7
94.3
93.4
68.4
8.4
12.0
8.4
14.6
6.2
.0
CAGR (%)
1987-1991
-14.6
North America
Canon
Perkin-Elmer
58.0
48.7
14.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
10.2
8.6
66.4
60.7
22.4
24.8
14.8
Canon
21.7
36.0
27.7
25.2
Perkin-Elmer
15.0
52.3
11.0
.0
.0
7.9
.0
.0
.0
9.2
5.5
367
63.3
43.9
36.9
30.7
6.3
11.0
3.2
2.5
2.1
13.1
.0
10.5
.0
4.9
.0
10.2
17.3
16.3
13.0
15.1
5.5
7.6
Canon
4.2
1.6
2.5
9.2
Perkin-Elmer
4.0
5.8
.0
.0
.0
12.5
.0
13.7
.0
7.4
1.6
8.2
7.4
15.0
16.6
15.3
40.6
69.1
49.4
56.4
47.2
44.9
.0
.0
.0
37.0
21.2
94.3
93.4
68.4
SVG Lithography
Total North America
-31.3
Japan
SVG Lithography
Total Japjan
-4A
Eurofje
Canon
Perkin-Elmer
SVG Lithography
Total Europe
.0
.0
-18.6
Asia-Pacific/ROW
SVG Lithography
Total A/P-ROW
16.9
Worldwide
Canon
Perkin-Elmer
SVG Lithography
Total Worldwide
88.0
78.6
.0
.0
128.6
147.7
Ref: PROJSHR
Source: Dalaquest (April 1992)
©1992 Dataquest Incorporated April—Reproduction Prohibited
-14.6
4-6
Semiconductor Equipment, Manufacturing, and Materials
Table 4.4
Each Company's Revenue from Shipments of Stepper Equipment to Each Region
(End User Revenue in Millions of U.S. Dollars)
Company:
Product:
Region Of Consumption:
World Stepper Market
Each
Steppers
Each
1987
1988
1989
503.1
921.0
1,180.7
1990
1,052.2
10.4
14.0
4.0
.0
.0
1991
1,029.1
CAGR (%)
1987-1991
19.6
North America
ASET
ASM Lithography
19.6
39.0
82.6
49.7
40.7
Canon
25.2
25.0
31.2
41.7
47.7
GCA
36.7
80.6
53.0
68.2
38.2
.0
.0
.0
6.2
.0
Nikon
44.0
71.5
112.0
75.6
117.8
Perkin-Elmer
18.0
5.0
10.2
.0
.0
Hitachi
SVG Lithography
Ultratech
Total North America
.0
.0
.0
30.6
15.0
30.1
43.4
17.0
18.1
184.0
44.9
280.0
336.4
289.0
277.5
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
24.1
.0
.0
.0
.0
45.0
64.7
92.4
99.5
.0
.0
1.7
10.8
Japan
ASET
ASM Lithography
Canon
GCA
4.4
Hitachi
33.3
3.9
49.2
Nikon
151.0
336.2
Perkin-Elmer
.0
SVG Lithography
.0
.0
Ultratech
Total Japan
75.5
96.4
50.7
344.2
.0
390.5
.0
.0
334.9
.0
.0
.0
.0
7.8
2.3
436.6
1.7
2.5
212.8
532.4
535.5
7.5
502.1
.9
.0
.0
.0
.0
23.2
27.1
9.0
23.9
Europe
ASET
ASM Lithography
17.1
16.9
Canon
18.0
20.0
37.5
41.7
29.0
18.2
5.2
.0
15.9
.0
4.5
Hitachi
6.3
.0
.0
.0
Nikon
6.2
22.0
25.2
54.0
Perkin-Elmer
2.7
.0
.0
.0
39.1
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
7.6
7.3
12.9
90.0
8.8
110.6
4.5
131.8
94.1
GCA
SVG Lithography
Ultratech
Total Europe
58.5
4.2
12.6
(Continued)
©1992 Dataquest Incorporated April—Reproduction Prohibited
4-7
Wafer Fab Equipment Market Share
Table 4.4 (Continued)
Each Company's Revenue from Shipments of Stepper Equipment to Each Region
(End User Revenue in Millions of U.S. Dollars)
Company:
Produa:
Region Of Consumption:
Each
Steppers
Each
1987
1988
1989
1990
1991
CAGR (%)
1987-1991
Asia/Pacific-ROW
ASET
.0
2.0
.0
.0
.0
ASM Lithography
.0
2.7
17.4
14.2
21.6
22.5
35.0
49.5
.0
26.4
43.5
.0
1.7
Canon
GCA
.0
1.3
.0
.0
5.5
1.2
17.6
60.5
126.0
44.6
36.0
46.4
4.5
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
3.2
12.9
114.4
8.4
4.0
6.2
47.8
201.3
95.9
155.4
ASET
11.3
16.0
4.0
.0
.0
ASM Lithography
Hitachi
Nikon
Perkin-Elmer
SVG Lithography
Ultratech
Total A/P-ROW
34.3
Worldwide
36.7
58.6
123.2
91.0
71.3
Canon
89.8
125.0
182.9
202.2
219.7
GCA
47.4
104.0
68.9
78.2
46.8
Hitachi
33.3
49.2
75.5
103.8
86.7
Nikon
218.8
490.2
653.7
518.4
538.2
25.2
5.0
10.2
.0
.0
Perkin-Elmer
SVG Lithography
Ultratech
Total Worldwide
.0
.0
.0
30.6
30.4
40.6
73.0
62.3
28.0
36.0
503.1
921.0
1,180.7
1,052.2
1,029.1
Ref: STEPSHR
Source: E>ataquest (April 1992)
®1992 Dataquest Incorporated April—Reproduction I>rohibited
19.6
4-8
Semiconductor Equipment, Manufacturing, and Materials
Table 4.5
Each Company's Unit Shipments of Stepper Equipment to Each Region
(Units)
Company:
Produa:
Region Of Consumption:
World Stepper Market
<
Each
Steppers
Each
1987
1988
520
833
11
14
1989
1990
1991
CAGR (%)
1987-1991
954
771
679
6.9
4
0
0
North America
ASET
ASM Lithography
16
30
57
33
Canon
28
30
23
30
GCA
25
40
44
26
5
56
0
80
0
0
41
25
62
Hitachi
0
0
0
Nikon
50
65
80
Perkin-Elmer
20
SVG Lithography
Ultratech
0
5
0
3
0
37
41
203
242
45
254
197
19
182
ASET
0
0
0
0
0
ASM Lithography
0
0
0
0
0
20
45
60
70
4
0
0
65
1
Total North America
9
20
4
-2.7
Japan
Canon
GCA
Hitachi
30
3
40
Nikon
148
310
Perkin-Elmer
0
SVG Lithography
0
0
70
78
38
0
325
0
255
0
215
0
0
0
0
2
3
401
2
202
457
3
406
330
1
0
0
0
0
ASM Lithography
14
15
20
13
20
16
Canon
30
30
5
20
GCA
7
14
12
4
Hitachi
0
0
0
0
3
0
Nikon
7
20
18
40
25
Perkin-Elmer
3
0
0
0
0
SVG Lithography
0
0
0
0
2
9
61
14
10
6
81
86
95
5
60
Ultratech
Total Japan
9
13.1
Europe
ASET
Ultratech
Total Europe
-.4
(Continued)
«
©1992 Dataquest Incorpwrated April—Reproduction Prohibited
Wafer Fab Equipment Market Share
4-9
Table 4.5 (Continued)
Each Company's Unit Shipments of Stepper Equipment to Each Region
CUnlts)
Company:
Produa:
Region Of Consumption:
Each
Steppers
Each
1990
1987
1988
ASET
0
2
0
0
0
ASM Lithography
0
2
12
10
12
25
45
0
20
30
4
1
1989
1991
CAGR (%)
1987-1991
Asia/Pacific-ROW
Canon
GCA
0
35
1
Hitachi
0
0
0
1
27
Nikon
20
• 55
0
90
30
0
33
0
0
Perkin-Eimer
5
0
SVG Lithography
0
0
0
0
Ultratech
4
14
10
5
7
54
109
157
73
107
ASET
12
16
4
0
0
ASM Lithography
30
45
85
160
58
40
150
145
52
52
31
65
Total Asia/Pacific-ROW
18.6
"Worldwide
Canon
GCA
93
52
125
80
Hitachi
30
40
70
84
Nikon
225
450
513
384
350
28
5
0
3
0
0
0
8
40
679
Perkin-Elmer
SVG Dthography
Ultratech
Total Worldwide
0
50
72
67
9
34
520
833
954
771
Ref: STEPUNTT
Source: DaUquest (April 1992)
©1992 Dataquest Incoiporated April—Reproduction Prohibited
6.9
4-10
Semiconductor Equipment, Manufacturing, and Materials
Table 4.6
Each Company's Revenue from Shipments of Direct-Write Lithography Equipment Each Region
(End User Revenue in Millions of U.S. Dollars)
Company:
Produa:
Region Of Consumption:
World Direct-Write Market
«
Each
Direa-Write Lithography
Each
1987
1988
67.1
1990
76.2
1991
68.7
1989
70.1
4.0
2.4
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
4.0
2.0
4.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
5.6
.0
8.3
2.0
3.0
55.3
CAGR (%)
1987-1991
-4.7
North America
ASM Lithography
Ateq
Cambridge Instruments
Etec
Hitachi
.0
.0
.0
.0
JEOL
6.0
6.0
6.0
Leica
.0
.0
.0
Perkin-Elmer
Total North America
3.2
3.2
.0
.0
4.3
.0
17.2
13.6
10.0
15.9
7.3
-19.3
Japan
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
Ateq
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
Cambridge Instruments
Etec
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
ASM Lithography
Hitachi
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
8.7
9.6
9.4
17.8
17.8
Leica
.0
.0
.0
8.3
.0
JEOL
20.8
21.6
18.8
3.2
23.1
3.2
3.5
.0
.0
32.7
35.9
34.5
27.1
35.6
4.0
4.8
7.2
.0
.0
Perkin-Elmer
Total Japan
.0
2.1
Europe
ASM Lithography
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
4.0
4.0
6.0
.0
.0
Etec
.0
.0
.0
7.0
.0
Hitachi
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
JEOL
4.0
2.0
4.0
Leica
.0
.0
.0
8.3
8.8
Ateq
Cambridge Instruments
Perkin-Elmer
Total Europe
3.0
3.2
6.4
3.2
.0
4.3
.0
15.2
17.2
20.4
24.1
7.3
©1992 Dataquest Incorporated ^ril—Reproduction Prohibited
-16.8
CCondnued)
4-11
Wafer Fab Equipment Market Share
Table 4.6 (Continued)
Each Company's Revenue Crom Shipments of Direct-Wrlte Lithography Equipment Each Region
(End User Revenue in Millions of U.S. Dollars)
Company:
Produa:
Region Of Consumption:
Each
Direa-Write Lithography
Each
1987
1988
1989
1990
1991
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
CAGR (%)
1987-1991
Asia/Pacific-ROW
ASM Lithography
Ateq
Cambridge Instruments
.0
2.0
.
.0
.0
.0
.0
2.0
2.0
.0
.0
3.5
5.6
.0
Etec
.0
.0
.0
Hitachi
.0
.0
.0
.0
JEOL
.0
.0
.0
.0
3.0
Leica
.0
.0
.0
.0
2.1
Perkin-Elmer
Total Asia/Pacific-ROW
Worldwide
ASM Lithography
Ateq
Cambridge Instruments
.0
.0
3.2
.0
.0
2.0
2.0
5.2
9.1
5.1
8.0
7.2
7.2
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
10.0
8.0
12.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
10.5
.0
8.7
9.6
9.4
17.8
JEOL
30.8
31.6
Leica
.0
31.1
.0
19.5
35.4
.0
10.8
10.7
9.6
12.8
.0
.0
67.1
68.7
9.9
70.1
76.2
55.3
Etec
Hitachi
Perkin-Elmer
Total Worldwide
Ref: D^tTTHSHR
Source: Dataquest CAptil 1992)
©1992 Dataquest Incorporated April—Reproduction Prohibited
26.4
26.8
-4.7
Semiconductor Equipment, Manufacturing, and Materials
4-12
i
Table 4.7
Each Company's Revenue from Shipments of Maskmaldng Lithography Equipment to Each Region
(End User Revenue In Millions of U.S. Dollars)
Company:
Product:
Region Of Consumption:
World Maskmaking Market
Each
Maskmaking Lithography
Each
1987
1988
1990
1991
67.6
62.1
1989
69.2
CAGR (%)
1987-1991
47.1
45.8
-9.3
.0
2.4
2.4
.0
.0
1.6
1.6
4.0
11.2
6.0
.0
.0
North America
ASM Lithography
Ateq
Cambridge Instruments
.0
.0
.0
Etec Systems
.0
.0
.0
3.5
.0
3.5
.0
Hitachi
.0
.0
.0
JEOL
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
Leica
Perkin-Elmer
Toshiba
Total North America
.0
.0
.0
.0
12.0
12.0
9.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
13.6
16.0
15.4
14.7
9.5
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
7.5
.0
2.8
6.0
.0
.0
-8.6
Japan
ASM Lithography
Ateq
.0
8.0
Cambridge Instruments
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
10.4
3.8
e.(i
3.5
6.2
3.5
Hitachi
JEOL
18.1
5.0
15.8
10.4
11.1
Leica
.0
.0
.0
.0
2.5
6.0
3.0
3.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
29.8
Etec Systems
Perkin-Elmer
Toshiba
Total Japan
i
6.7
3.5
38.0
7.7
7.2
27.5
40.1
22.9
4.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
3.0
-5.9
Europe
ASM Lithography
Ateq
.0
1.6
2.2
Cambridge Instruments
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
Etec Systems
.0
.0
.0
.0
3.0
.0
.0
3.5
.0
JEOL
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
Leica
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
Hitachi
Perkin-Elmer
Toshiba
Total Europe
.0
6.0
6.0
6.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
3.5
3.0
13.0
7.6
8.2
-30.7
(Continued)
i
©1992 Dataquest Incorp>oiated April—Reproduction Prohibited
4-13
Wafer Fab Equipment Marlcet Share
Table 4.7 (Continued)
Each Company's Revenue from Shipments of Maskmaking Lithography Equipment to Each Region
(End User Revenue in Millions of U.S. Dollars)
Company:
Product:
Region Of Consumption:
Each
Maskmaking Lithography
Each
1987
1988
1989
1990
1991
ASM Lithography
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
Ateq
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
Cambridge Instruments
.0
5.0
.0
.0
Etec Systems
.0
.0
2.5
.0
3.5
3.5
Hitachi
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
CAGR (%)
1987-1991
Asia/Pacific-ROW
JEOL
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
Leica
.0
.0
.0
2.5
.0
3.0
6.0
3.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
3.0
11.0
5.5
6.0
3.5
Perkin-Elmer
Toshiba
Total Asia/Pacific-ROW
3.9
Worldwide
ASM Lithography
4.0
2.4
2.4
.0
.0
Ateq
1.6
11.2
13.7
14.0
15.0
Cambridge Instruments
.0
5.0
.0
.0
Etec Systems
.0
.0
2.5
.0
14.0
10.5
Hitachi
13.4
3.8
(>£
6.2
6.7
JEOL
18.1
5.0
15.8
10.4
11.1
2.5
.0
2.5
.0
.0
.0
.0
Perkin-Elmer
27.0
27.0
21.0
Toshiba
3.5
67.6
7.7
7.2
.0
.0
62.1
69.2
47.1
45.8
Leica
Total Woridwide
Ref: MMUTHSHR
Source: Dataquest CApril 1992)
©1992 Dataquest Incorporated April—Reproduction Prohibited
•
-9.3
Semiconductor Equipment, Manufacturing, and Materials
4-14
i
Table 4.8
Each Company's Revenue from Shipments of Dlrect-Write and Maskmaklng Lithography Equipment to
Each Region
(End User Revenue in Millions of U.S. Dollars)
Company:
Product:
Region Of Consumption:
Each
Direct-Write and Maskmaking Lithography
Each
1987
1988
1989
1990
1991
CAGR (%)
1987-1991
134.7
130.8
139.3
123.3
101.1
-6.9
ASM Lithography
Ateq
4.0
48
2.4
.0
.0
1.6
1.6
4.0
11.2
6.0
Cambridge Instruments
Etec
4.0
2.0
4.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
6.0
3.5
5.6
3.5
.0
6.0
3.0
World Direct-Write and Maskmaking
Lithography Market
North America
Hitachi
JEOL
Leica
Perkin-Elmer
6.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
8.3
2.0
15.2
15.2
9.0
.0
4.3
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
30.8
29.6
25.4
30.6
16.8
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
Ateq
.0
8.0
7.5
2.8
6.0
Cambridge Instruments
Etec
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
Toshiba
Total North America
-14.1
Japan
ASM Lithography
.0
.0
.0
3.5
3.5
Hitachi
19.1
13.4
16.0
24.5
JEOL
38.9
.0
28.1
37.4
14.5
29.2
.0
.0
.0
9.2
6.2
.0
3.5
7.7
6.5
7.2
2.5
.0
.0
.0
70.7
63.4
74.6
50.0
65.4
8.0
4.8
7.2
.0
.0
.0
3.0
Leica
Perkin-Elmer
Toshiba
Total Japan
28.9
-1.9
Europe
ASM Lithography
.0
1.6
2.2
4.0
4.0
6.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
Hitachi
3.0
.0
.0
10.5
.0
JEOL
4.0
2.0
4.0
.0
.0
.0
8.3
8.8
3.0
Leica
9.2
12.4
9.2
.0
4.3
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
28.2
24.8
28.6
27.6
10.3
Ateq
Cambridge Instruments
Etec
Perkin-Elmer
Toshiba
Total Europe
.0
-22.3
(Continued)
01992 Dataquest Incorporated April—Reproduction Prohibited
Wafer Fab Equipment Market Share
4-15
Table 4.8 (Continued)
Each Company's Revenue from Shipments of Dlrect-Write and Maskmaking Lithography Equipment to
Each Region
(End User Revenue In Millions o f U.S. Dollars)
Company:
Product:
Region Of Consumption:
Each
Direa-Write and Maskmaking Lithography
Each
1987
1988
1989
1990
1991
ASM Lithography
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
Aieq
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
7.0
3.5
CAGR (%)
1987-1991
Asia/Pacific-ROW
Cambridge Instruments
2.0
7.0
Etec
.0
.0
4.5
.0
Hitachi
.0
.0
.0
5.6
.0
JEOL
.0
.0
.0
.0
3.0
Leica
.0
.0
.0
2.1
3.0
6.0
6.2
2.5
.0
.0
8.6
Perkin-Elmer
Toshiba
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
5.0
13.0
10.7
15.1
ASM Lithography
Ateq
12.0
9.6
9.6
.0
.0
1.6
11.2
13.7
14.0
15.0
Cambridge Instruments
10.0
13.0
.0
.0
Total Asia/Pacific-ROW
14.5
Worldwide
.0
.0
14.5
.0
24.5
10.5
Hitachi
22.1
13.4
16.0
25.7
24.5
JEOL
36.1
47.4
45.8
Leica
48.9
.0
.0
.0
37.9
13.2
Perkin-Elmer
36.6
39.8
3.5
7.7
30.9
7.2
13.3
.0
Etec
Toshiba
Total Woridwide
134.7
130.8
139.3
Ref: DWMMSHR
Source: Dataquest (April 1992)
©1992 Dataquest Incorporated April—Reproduction Prohibited
.0
.0
.0
123.3
101.1
-6.9
Semiconductor Equipment, Manufacturing, and Materials
4-16
i
Table 4.9
Each Company's Revenue from Shipments of X-Ray Aligner Equipment to Each Region
(End User Revenue in Millions of U.S. Dollars)
Company:
Product:
Region Of Consumption:
Each
X-Ray Aligner
Each
1989
4.8
1990
1.6
1991
4.2
1.8
.0
.0
2.4
.0
2.0
.0
.0
1.6
.0
.0
.0
.0
3.4
2.0
.0
2.4
Hampshire Instruments
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
Perkin-Elmer
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
1.8
1987
1988
.0
6.4
Hampshire Instruments
.0
Perkin-Elmer
.0
Karl Suss
.0
World X-Ray Market
CAGR (%)
1987-1991
NM
North America
Total North America
NM
Japan
Karl Suss
Total Japan
.0
1.6
.0
.0
.0
1.6
.0
.0
1.8
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
NM
Europe
Hampshire Instruments
Perkin-Elmer
.0
.0
.0
.0
Kark Suss
.0
1.4
2.8
1.6
.0
.0
1.4
2.8
1.6
.0
Hampshire Instruments
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
Perkin-Elmer
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
Hampshire Instruments
.0
1.8
.0
.0
2.4
Perkin-Elmer
.0
.0
2.0
.0
.0
Karl Suss
.0
4.6
2.8
1.6
1.8
1.6
4.2
Total Europe
NM
Asia/Pacific-ROW
Karl Suss
Total Asia/Pacific-ROW
NM
Worldwide
Total Worldwide
.0
6.4
4.8
NM
Kef: XRAYSHR
NM - Not Meaningful
Source: Dataquest CApiil 1992)
i
©1992 Dataquest Incorporated April—Reproduction Prohibited
Wafer Fab Equipment Market Share
4-17
Table 4.10
Each Company's Revenue from Shipments of Automatic Photoresist Processli^ Equipment (Track)
to Each Region
(End User Revenue in Millions of U.S. Dollars)
Company:
Produa:
Region Of Consumption:
World Track Market
Each
Track
Each
1987
1988
1989
1990
167.7
253.4
333.6
326.0
1991
368.6
.0
.0
.0
1.1
.0
4.0
5.9
6.4
.5
3.1
1.1
5.7
7.1
6.2
8.3
11,1
.0
.0
1.5
.0
4.8
CAGR (%)
1987-1991
21.8
North America
Canon
Convac
Dainippon Screen
Eaton
FSI International
GCA
Machine Technology
Semiconduaor Systems
Silicon Valley Group
Solitec
Tazmo
Tokyo Electron Ltd
Varian/TEL
Yuasa
Total North America
3.7
.0
1.0
1.4
2.8
2.2
.0
.0
.0
10.1
10.0
9.6
7.9
19.8
18.7
17.5
20.0
18.5
14.0
20.8
25.4
27.0
23.7
37.0
5.3
2.0
2.1
5.6
7.0
5.0
3.0
2.0
5.0
1.7
.0
1.7
.0
1.5
.0
.0
.0
13.6
9.3
.0
.0
.0
6.9
.0
60.9
78.0
91.1
90.7
.7
3.8
10.1
6.2
1.5
110.4
16.0
Japan
Canon
Convac
Dainippon Screen
.0
.0
.0
.0
27.8
31.7
51.8
48.1
12.3
.0
Eaton
.0
.0
.0
.0
51.3
.0
FSI International
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
GCA
.3
.2
.0
.0
.0
Machine Technology
.3
.5
.5
.0
1.6
Semiconductor Systems
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
Silicon Valley Group
.0
.0
.5
.5
.0
Solitec
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
Tazmo
Tokyo Electron Ltd.
Varian/TEL
Yuasa
Total Japan
2.1
2.9
6.8
15.3
11.9
30.6
68.5
77.7
95.5
.0
97.8
5.8
4.4
171.4
179.3
.0
.0
3.6
6.0
.0
8.8
65.4
113.6
156.2
.0
28.7
(ContinuecO
®1992 Dataquest Incorporated April—Reproduction Prohibited
Semiconductor Equipment, Manufacturing, and Materials
4-18
t
Table 4.10 (Continued)
Each Company's Revenue from Shipments of Automatic Photoresist Processing Equipment (Track)
to Each Region
(End User Revenue in Millions of U.S. Dollars)
Company:
Product:
Region Of Consumption:
Each
Track
Each
1989
1990
1991
.0
.0
.0
.0
6.9
7.9
5.8
7.7
1.9
5.2
2.7
5.1
8.3
2.1
6.6
1.0
.9
1987
1988
Canon
.3
Convac
Dainippon Screen
CAGR (%)
1987-1991
Europe
Eaton
4.8
.0
.0
6.3
.0
.0
.0
GCA
3.2
2.5
.0
.0
.0
Madiine Technology
1.0
Semiconductor Systems
1.2
1.3
2.2
Silicon Valley Group
6.9
.1
.3
FSI Internationa]
Solitec
Tazmo
Tokyo Electron Ltd.
1.5
.0
.6
3.5
6.5
3.0
.0
6A
3.3
10.8
8.8
5.3
A
.5
.4
1.5
.3
6.2
.4
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
5.8
6.9
7.8
.0
.0
.0
1.5
.0
28.5
36.5
38.6
35.5
34.5
C^on
.0
.0
.0
1.1
.0
Convac
.0
.0
.0
.0
2.9
1.0
2.7
5.1
2.8
1.6
3.3
.0
.6
.3
3.2
2.2
2.3
2.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.2
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
Varian/TEL
Yuasa
Total Europe
4.9
Asia/Pacific-ROW
Dainippon Screen
Eaton
FSI International
GCA
Machine Technology
-
.0
.7
Semiconductor Systems
1.3
.0
Silicon Valley Group
5.3
5.6
15.7
11.0
6.6
Solitec
.8
1.5
.2
.5
.4
.5
.4
Tazmo
1.5
.4
1.8
Tokyo Electron Ltd.
Varian/TEL
Yuasa
Total Asia/Pacific-ROW
2.0
10.8
21.6
10.4
28.4
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
44.4
.0
.0
.0
.0
12.9
25.3
47.7
28.4
36.2
(Continued)
«
©1992 Daiaquest Incorporated ^ril—Reproduction Prohibited
Wafer Fab Equipment Market Share
4-19
Table 4.10 (Continued)
Each Company's Revenue £rom Shipments of Automatic Photoresist Processli^ Equipment (Track)
to Each Region
(End User Revenue In Millions of U.S. Dollars)
Company:
Product:
Region Of Consumption:
Each
Track
Each
1987
1988
1989
1990
1991
CAGE (%)
1987-1991
Worldwide
Canon
Convac
Dainippon Screen
Eaton
FSI International
GCA
1.0
3.8
10.1
8.4
12.3
10.9
31.2
13.8
12.2
15.4
18.9
40.2
67.7
59.2
69.5
10.5
.0
11.0
10.5
4.7
4.3
.0
.0
.0
4.8
7.0
.0
.0
.0
Machine Technology
12.7
5.5
10.0
26.6
10.8
22.0
11.3
22.0
21.0
Semiconduaor Systems
23.0
14.0
Silicon Valley Group
33.0
37.4
54.0
44.0
48.9
6.2
7.5
9.0
5.8
4.9
15.2
Solitec
Tazmo
Tokyo Electron Ltd.
VariaivTEL
Yuasa
Total Worldwide
4.6
5.7
9.3
17.5
36.2
99.3
19.4
105.9
13.8
126.2
.0
90.5
.0
3.6
6.0
8.8
167.7
253.4
333.6
7.3
326.0
5.9
368.6
Kef: TRACKSHR
Source: Dataquest CApril 1992)
©1992 Dataquest Incorporated .^ril-4leptoductlon Prohibited
17.1
22.3
4-20
Semiconductor Equipment, Manufacturing, and Materials
Table 4.11
Each Company's Revenue £rom Shipments of Wet Process Equipment to North America
(End User Revenue in Millions of U.S. Etollars)
Company:
Product:
Region Of Consumption:
World Wet Process Market
Each
Wet Process
North America
1987
1988
1989
1990
1991
CAGR (%)
1987-1991
167.2
276.9
376.8
400.0
405.0
24.8
.3
2.1
2.9
4.3
.0
.0
.0
4.5
.0
.0
4.1
.0
.0
.0
.5
.0
.0
.0
1.4
.0
.0
Integrated Wet Systems
CFM Technology
.0
1.0
DainipfKjn Screen
.0
2.2
Dalton Corporation
.0
.0
Dan Science Co., Ltd.
.0
.0
Dexon
.7
ETE Company, Ltd.
.0
3.1
.0
Enya
.0
.0
Fuji Electric
Integrated Air Systems
Kaijo Denki
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
2.3
.6
1.8
.0
.0
.0
3.1
3.0
.0
6.7
2.1
2.0
.0
Kuwano Electric
.0
Maruwa
.0
.9
.0
.0
.0
.0
Musashi
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
Pokomy
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
Poly-Flow Engineering
.1
.0
.0
.0
.0
1.0
1.1
.0
.0
Pure-Aire
1.5
1.7
Sankyo Engineering
1.2
.0
2.5
.0
Santa Qara Plastics
6.0
6.0
7.2
5.8
15.0
Sapi Equipements
.0
.0
2.5
3.0
2.0
S a Manufocturing
2.8
1.0
1.1
.4
4.8
Semifab
2.6
5.0
6.2
3.5
3.0
Shimada
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
Submicion Systems, Inc.
.0
.0
2.0
10.0
12.0
Sugai
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
1.5
.0
2.0
4.2
1.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
S&K Products International
Tohokasei
Toyoko Chemical
.0
.0
.0
Tokyo Electron
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
1.6
5.5
4.5
1.1
5.5
.0
.0
36.3
59.2
Universal Plastics
Verteq
.8
3.1
1.8
Other Companies
.0
.0
.9
.0
21.7
32.7
45.9
Total Integr. Systems
1.7
28.5
(Continued)
«
©1992 Dataquest Incorporated April—Reproduction Prohibited
4-21
Wafer Fab Equipment Market Share
Table 4.11 (Continued)
Each Company's Revenue from Shipments of Wet Process Equipment to North America
(End User Revenue in Millions of U.S. Dollars)
Company:
Product:
Region Of Consumption:
Each
Wet Process
North America
1987
1988
1989
1990
1991
.0
.4
.5
.0
.0
.0
CAGR (%)
1987-1991
Manual Wet Benches
Dainippon Screen
.0
.0
.0
.0
2.1
2.3
1.6
.5
.0
Dalton Corp)oration
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
Enya
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
ETE Company, Ltd.
.0
.0
.0
Dan Science Co., Ltd.
Dexon
.0
.0
Integrated Air Systems
.7
.2
.0
.0
.0
Kaijo Denki
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
Kyoritsu
.0
.0
.0
.0
Maruwa
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.1
Musashi
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
Pokomy
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
Pure-Aire
.6
.1
.1
.0
.5
.0
.2
Sankyo Engineering
.0
.0
Santa Qara Plastics
3.0
1.8
.7
1.2
.6
.5
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
SQ Manufacturing
1.7
.0
.0
4.3
.0
.9
1.2
1.3
Semifab
2.0
.0
2.4
.0
.9
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
Sapi Equipements
Shimada
Sugai
.0
Tohokasei
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
Toyoko Chemical
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
Universal Plastics
1.9
.0
4.6
3.0
3.0
3.6
.4
.0
.0
.0
Verteq
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
14.3
12.3
9.4
6.2
6.7
Dainippon Screen
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
Dan Science Co., Ltd.
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
Enya
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
Estek
.8
.8
.0
.0
.0
1.3
.1
Kuwano
.0
.3
.2
.7
.2
1.4
Kaijo Denki
.7
.0
1.1
.0
.0
.0
Poly-How Engineering
.2
.1
.2
.0
.2
Sankyo Engineering
.0
.2
.1
.0
.0
Other Companies
Total Man. Benches
-17.3
RinsersAJryers
FSI International
.0
CCominued)
©1992 Dataquest Incorporated April—Reproduction Prohibited
4-22
Semiconductor Equipment, Manufacturing, and Materials
i
Table 4.11 (Continued)
Each Company's Revenue from Shipments of Wet Process Equipment to North America
(End User Revenue in Millions of U.S. Dollars)
Company:
Produa:
Region Of Consumption:
Each
Wet Process
North America
1987
1988
10.9
.0
9.7
1989
4.6
1990
5.8
1991
6.1
.0
.0
.0
.0
S&K Products International
.6
.9
2.2
4.0
6.0
Sugai
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
Tohokasei
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
2.7
4.0
4.1
3.9
4.2
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
15.9
17.3
12.1
15.1
17.9
.0
.0
.0
.0
2.6
.0
.0
.0
1.2
.8
1.0
4.0
2.0
2.4
1.2
.0
.0
.6
.9
7.5
8.8
.9
10.7
7.4
6.9
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.1
.0
.0
.1
.0
1.5
Semitool
Shimada
Verteq
Other Companies
Total Rinser/Dryers
CAGR (%)
1987-1991
3.0
Acid Processors
Advantage Production 'Technology
Alameda Instruments
Athens
Dainippon Screen
FSI International
Musashi
Poly-Flow Engineering
Semitool
Total Acid Process.
2.2
2.9
1.3
1.6
10.8
15.7
14.9
13.3
13.9
.9
.0
6.5
Megasonic Cleaners
Dainippon Screen
.0
.8
.7
.0
Enya
.0
.0
.0
.0
1.2
Kaijo Denki
1.3
.0
.9
.0
.5
.0
.8
.0
S&K Products
.0
.0
.0
.0
1.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
1.7
3.2
5.3
3.5
4.0
5.2
2.9
65.6
3.9
5.5
83.3
87.8
74.9
FSI International
Shimada
Verteq
Total Megasonics
Total N.A. "Wet Process
-
Ref: 'VTETSHR
Source: Dauquest (April 1992)
©1992 Dataquest Incorporated April—Reproduction Prohibited
.0
7.9
105.6
28.5
12.6
4-23
Wafer Fab Equipment Market Share
Table 4.12
Each Company's Revenue from Shipments of Wet Process Equipment to Japan
(End User Revenue In Millions of U.S. Dollars)
Company:
Produa:
Region Of Consumption:
World Wet Process Market
Each
Wet Process
Japan
1987
1988
1989
1990
1991
CAGR (%)
1987-1991
167.2
276.9
376.8
400.0
405.0
24.8
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
28.9
41.3
Integrated Wet Systems
CFM Technology
Dainipjxjn Screen
18.7
25.7
Dalton Corporation
.0
.0
1.7
1.7
19.3
1.2
Dan Science Co., Ltd.
Dexon
.0
.9
.0
5.1
.0
4.2
5.8
.0
.0
ETE Company, Ltd.
.0
1.5
5.4
2.9
7.6
10.4
6.5
2.4
5.6
10.7
2.6
2.0
1.6
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
Kaijo Denki
6.2
7.7
19.4
13.5
Kuwano Electric
5.6
Enya
Fuji Electric
Integrated Air Systems
.0
4.9
.0
4.0
Maruwa
.0
8.5
1.8
27.3
5.6
4.0
5.9
5.9
Musashi
.0
.0
1.2
Pokomy
.0
.0
.0
3.9
.0
3.1
.0
Poly-Flow Engineering
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
Pure-Aire
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
3.1
.0
5.3
.0
25.1
.0
25.0
23.8
.0
.0
Sapi Equip)ements
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
S a Manufacturing
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
Sankyo Engineering
Santa Clara Plastics
7.1
Semifab
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
Shimada
3.4
8.6
13.4
.0
13.9
.0
24.4
28.0
23.4
.0
4.9
.0
Sugai
2.8
15.0
S&K Products International
2.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
1.8
2.0
3.4
5.2
.9
5.6
Submicron Systems, Inc.
Tohokasei
.0
Toyoko Chemical
.0
1.2
1.7
3.8
Tokyo Electron
.0
.0
.0
.0
Universal Plastics
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
Verteq
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
4.2
6.2
8.2
.0
.0
88.5
146.1
179.2
150.9
Other Companies
Total Integr, Systems
50.9
31.2
CCondnued)
©1992 Dataquest Incorporated April—Reproduction Prohibited
Semiconductor Equipment, Manufacturing, and Materials
4-24
i
Table 4.12 (Continued)
Each Company's Revenue from Shipments of Wet Process Equipment to Japan
(End User Revenue in Millions of U.S. Dollars)
Company:
Product:
Region Of Consumption:
Each
Wet Process
Japan
1987
1988
1989
1990
1991
1.8
2.7
1.1
.0
.0
Dan Science Co., Ltd.
.0
1.5
2.2
3.6
3.3
Dexon
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
Dalton Corporation
.0
.0
.9
.8
1.3
4.0
.9
2.6
.7
Enya
ETE Company, Ltd.
.0
1.1
2.1
Integrated Air Systems
.0
.5
.0
.9
.5
.0
.0
.0
Kaijo Denki
.8
1.9
1.1
1.6
.0
Kyoritsu
.0
2.7
.0
1.8
3.1
6.4
.0
Maruwa
2.5
1.4
Musashi
.0
.5
.7
Pokomy
.0
.0
.0
.9
.0
.0
.0
CAGR (%)
1987-1991
Manual Wet Benches
Dainippon Screen
5.6
.7
Pure-Aire
.0
.0
.0
.0
Sankyo Engineering
1.9
.0
2.3
.0
3.4
2.6
Santa Qara Plastics
.9
.0
.0
.0
Sapi Equipements
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
s a Manufacturing
.0
.0
.0
Semifab
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
Shimada
.3
.3
.4
.9
.0
.0
.0
1.1
1.4
1.2
Tohokasei
.0
1.1
1.1
1.4
1.2
Toyoko Chemical
.0
1.2
1.1
.0
Universal Plastics
.0
.0
.0
1.3
.0
Verteq
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
Sugai
Other Companies
Total Man. Benches
.0
2.4
3.7
4.5
.0
.0
7.3
22.1
25.1
28.7
16.7
1.2
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.5
.9
.5
.2
.3
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.9
.9
23.0
Rinsers/Dryers
Dainippon Screen
Dan Science Co., Ltd.
.5
.0
Enya
Estek
FSI International
.0
.0
.0
Kaijo Denki
.6
1.3
1.4
1.7
2.4
Kuwano
.7
.8
.0
.0
.0
Poly-Flow Engineering
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.6
1.2
1.8
1.7
2.3
Sankyo Engineering
(Continued)
•
©1992 Dataquest Incoiporated April—Reproduction Prohibited
Wafer Fab Equipment Market Share
4-25
Table 4.12 (Continued)
Each Company's Revenue from Shipments of Wet Process Equipment to Japan
(End User Revenue in Millions of U.S. DoUars)
Company:
Produa:
Region Of Consumption:
Each
Wet Process
Japan
1987
1988
Semitool
.0
.4
1989
.4
1990
.4
1991
.6
Shimada
.2
.2
.0
.0
.0
S&K Products International
3.8
4.5
1.2
.0
.0
Sugai
1.4
1.9
.0
.0
.0
Tohokasei
.0
.4
.4
.5
.7
Verteq
.1
.4
1.6
.3
9.4
.5
1.9
.0
.5
.0
13.0
.5
7.8
8.8
6.2
Advantage Production Technology
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
Alameda Instruments
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
Athens
.0
.0
.0
1.2
.0
Dainippon Screen
.0
.0
5.4
10.8
10.0
Other Companies
Total Rinser/Dryers
CAGR (%)
1987-1991
-9.9
Add Processors
1.2
1.3
1.1
.5
2.4
Musashi
.0
.0
.0
.0
.7
Poly-How Engineering
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
Semitool
.0
.3
1.6
.4
.2
6.9
12.7
.3
13.4
14.4
8.4
1.1
.0
FSI International
Total Acid Process.
1.2
82.8
Megasonic Qeaners
Dainippon Screen
.0
Enya
.0
13.1
.0
10.3
.0
FSI International
.2
.1
.1
.0
.0
Kaijo Denki
.1
.1
.1
2.1
1.9
.0
5.2
S&K Products
.0
.0
.0
.0
Shimada
.0
.0
.0
5.8
Verteq
.1
.3
13.6
.1
.1
.2
.4
15.8
16.4
17.6
157.6
69.2
138.8
201.7
245.8
204.8
31.2
Total Megasonics
Total Japan Wet Process
Ref: WEISHR
Source: Dataquest CApiil 1992)
©1992 Dataquest Incorporated April—Reproduction Prohibited
4-26
Semiconductor Equipment, Manufacturing, and Materials
Table 4.13
Each Company's Revenue from Shipments of Wet Process Equipment to Europe
CEnd User Revenue in Millions of U.S. Dollars)
Company:
Produa:
Region Of Consumption:
Each
Wet Process
Europe
1987
1988
1989
1990
1991
CAGR (%)
1987-1991
167.2
276.9
376.8
400.0
405.0
24.8
CFM Technology
.0
.0
.0
.0
2.4
Dainippon Screen
.0
.0
.0
.7
4.5
Dalton Corporation
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
Dan Science Co., Ltd.
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
Dexon
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
ETE Company, Ltd.
.0
.0
.0
World Wet Process Market
Integrated Wet Systems
.0
.0
Enya
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
Fuji Electric
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
Integrated Air Systems
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
1.8
.0
.0
3.6
.0
Kuwano Electric
.0
.0
.0
.0
2.3
.0
1.0
Maruwa
.0
.0
.0
Kaijo Denki
Musashi
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
Pokomy
2.3
.0
2.5
.0
4.7
6.2
6.6
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
Sankyo Engineering
1.2
4.2
6.9
1.4
2.4
3.0
3.1
3.0
2.2
Santa Qara Plastics
Poly-Flow Engineering
Pure-Aire
2.0
Sapi Equipements
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
S a Manufacturing
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
Semifab
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
Shimada
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
Submioon Systems, Inc.
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
Sugai
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
S&K Products International
.0
1.5
3.5
2.0
.0
Tohokasei
.0
.0
.0
4.6
.0
Toyoko Chemical
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
Tokyo Electron
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
Universal Plastics
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.6
.0
Verteq
.0
.0
Other Companies
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
12.4
15.6
26.0
17.9
Total Integr. Systems
8.3
21.2
(Continued)
«
©1992 Dataquest Incorporated April—Reproduction Prohibited
Wafer Fab Equipment Market Share
4-27
Table 4.13 (Continued)
Each Company's Revenue from Shipments of Wet Process Equipment to Europe
(End User Revenue in Millions of U.S. Dollars)
Company:
Produa:
Region Of Consumption:
Each
Wet Process
Europ)e
1987
1988
1989
1990
1991
Dainippon Screen
.0
.4
.0
.0
Dan Science Co., Ltd.
.0
.0
.5
.0
.0
.0
.3
.0
.1
.4
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
Enya
.0
.0
.0
2.1
.0
ETE Company, Ltd.
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
Integrated Air Systems
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
Kaijo Denki
CAGR (%)
1987-1991
Manual Wet Benches
Dexon
Daiton Corporation
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
Kyoritsu
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
Maruwa
.0
.0
.0
.0
.8
Musashi
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
Pokomy
2.0
2.2
1.2
.0
.0
3.5
.0
1.2
Pure-Aire
.0
.0
Sankyo Engineering
.0
3.2
.0
.0
.0
Santa Clara Plastics
1.0
.8
.6
.1
.1
Sapi Equipements
.0
.0
3.0
1.8
1.5
SO Manufiacturing
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
Semifab
.1
.0
.0
.0
.0
Shimada
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
Sugai
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
Tohokasei
.0
.0
.0
1.0
.0
Toyoko Chemical
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
Universal Plastics
.1
.0
.0
.0
.0
Verteq
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
Other Companies
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
3.5
6.7
8.0
6.2
3.6
Dainip>p>on Screen
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
Dan Science Co., Ltd.
.0
.0
.0
.0
.2
Enya
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
Estek
.4
.0
.0
.2
.3
.4
.0
FSI International
Kaijo Denki
.0
.2
.0
.9
.0
1.2
Kuwano
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
Total Man. Benches
Rinsers/Dryers
.2
.0
Poly-Flow Engineering
.0
.0
.1
.2
.0
Sankyo Engineering
.0
.2
.2
.2
.3
(Continued)
©1992 Dataquest Incorporated April—Reproduction Proliibited
4-28
Semiconductor Equipment, Manufacturing, and Materials
i
Table 4.13 (Continued)
Each Company's Revenue from Shipments of Wet Process Equipment to Europe
(End User Revenue in Millions of U.S. Dollars)
Company:
Produa:
Region Of Consumption:
Each
Wet Process
Europe
1987
1988
1989
1990
1991
Semitool
2.1
1.6
2.5
2.1
Shimada
.0
.0
.0
.0
2.3
.0
S&K Products International
.6
.5
.0
.5
1.2
Sugai
.0
.5
.0
.0
.0
Tohokasei
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
Verteq
.3
.0
.5
.0
.6
.0
.9
.0
.9
.0
3.6
3.7
4.1
4.8
6.1
Advantage Production Technology
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
Alameda Instruments
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
Athens
Dainippon Screen
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.4
.6
3.3
.0
3.5
.0
Other Companies
Total Rinser/Dryers
CAGR (%)
1987-1991
14.1
Acid Processors
FSI International
Musashi
Poly-How Engineering
.0
.0
5.1
.0
4.2
.9
7.4
.0
.0
.0
.1
4.1
.2
.0
.7
.8
.4
1.5
1.1
5.9
4.7
13.9
5.0
4.8
Dainippon Screen
.0
.8
.7
1.4
Enya
.0
.0
.0
.0
.9
.0
FSI International
.4
.2
.2
.4
Kaijo Denki
.5
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
S&K Products
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
Shimada
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.5
.8
.4
1.0
1.7
1.7
2.0
2.3
30.2
43.3
44.0
34.7
11.9
Semitool
Total Acid Process.
-5.0
Megasonic Qeaners
Verteq
Total Megasonics
Total Europe "Wet Process
.3
.8
22.1
29.2
Refi WETSHR
Source: Dauquest CApril 1992)
i
©1992 Dataquest Incorporated April—Reproduction Prohibited
4-29
Wafer Fab Equipment Market Share
Table 4.14
Each Company's Revenue from Shipments of Wet Process Equipment to Asia/Padfic-ROW
(End User Revenue in Millions of U.S. Dollars)
Company:
Produa:
Region Of Consumption:
World Wet Process Market
Each
Wet Process
Asia/Pacific-ROW
1990
1991
405.0
1987
167.2
1988
276.9
1989
376.8
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
12.6
400.0
CAGR (%)
1987-1991
24.8
Integrated Wet Systems
CFM Technology
Dainippon Screen
.0
2.2
8.6
1.4
Dalton Corporation
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
Dan Science Co., Ltd.
Dexon
.0
.0
4.9
.0
.0
8.5
.0
9.1
.0
ETE Company, Ltd.
.0
.0
.3
.0
.0
.0
Enya
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
Fuji Electric
.0
.0
.0
.0
8.3
.0
.0
Integrated Air Systems
.0
.5
.0
Kaijo Denki
.0
.0
.0
.0
9.7
Kuwano Electric
.0
.9
2.0
.0
.0
2.2
1.0
.0
Maniwa
.0
.0
2.3
.0
Musashi
.0
.0
.0
Pokomy
.0
.0
.0
1.9
.0
Poly-Flow Engineering
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.2
.2
.1
.1
.1
Sankyo Engineering
1.1
1.8
2.4
1.2
Santa Qara Plastics
1.7
2.0
Pure-Aire
.0
2.5
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
2.4
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
2.0
2.0
Sapi Equipements
.0
.0
2.9
.0
S a Manufacturing
.0
.0
Semifab
.1
.0
Shimada
.0
Submicron Systems, Inc.
.0
Sugai
.0
.0
6.3
.0
8.0
.0
2.9
.0
5.4
S&K Products International
Tohokasei
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
Toyoko Chemical
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
Tokyo Electron
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
Universal Plastics
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
Verteq
.0
.2
.2
.0
.0
Other Companies
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
3.4
10.2
35.4
26.3
46.9
Total Integr. Systems
.0
92.7
(Continued)
©1992 Dataquest Incorporated April—Reproduction Prohibited.
4-30
Semiconductor Equipment, Manufacturing, and Materials
Table 4.14 (Continued)
Each Company's Revenue from Shipments of Wet Process Equipment to Asla/Padfic-ROW
(End User Revenue In Millions of U.S. Dollars)
Company:
Produa:
Region Of Consumption:
Each
Wet Process
Asia/Pacific-ROW
1990
1987
1988
Dainippon Screen
.0
.4
.2
.0
.0
Dan Science Co., Ltd.
.0
.0
.0
1.6
1.1
Dexon
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
Dalton Corporation
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
1989
1991
CAGR (%)
1987-1991
Manual Wet Benches
Enya
.0
.0
.0
.0
ETE Company, Ltd.
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
Integrated Air Systems
.0
.0
.0
.0
Kaijo Denki
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
Kyoritsu
.0
.0
.0
Maruwa
.0
.0
.0
.0
.4
.0
.0
Musashi
.0
.0
.0
Pokomy
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.1
.1
Pure-Aire
.1
.4
.2
Sankyo Engineering
.0
.0
.0
.0
1.0
6.5
1.0
.5
.2
.1
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
Santa Gara Plastics
Sapi Equipements
S a Manufacturing
.0
.0
.0
Seroifab
.6
.8
.5
1.0
1.1
.0
.0
Shimada
.0
.0
.0
Sugai
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
Tohokasei
.0
.0
.0
Toyoko Chemical
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.5
.0
Universal Plastics
.1
.8
.9
Veneq
.2
.1
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
2.0
10.0
2.3
3.4
2.8
Dainippon Screen
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
Dan Science Co., Ltd.
.0
.0
.0
.1
.0
Enya
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
Estek
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.3
.4
.2
.0
.0
.0
.0
Other Companies
Total Man. Benches
8.8
Rinsers/Dryefs
FSI International
Kaijo Denki
.3
.0
.3
.0
Kuwano
.0
.0
.0
.0
Poly-Flow Engineering
.1
.0
.0
.0
.0
.3
.2
.1
Sankyo Engineering
.0
.4
(Continued)
©1992 Dataquest Incorporated April—Reproduction Prohibited
Wafer Fab Equipment Market Share
4-31
Table 4.14 (Continued)
Each Company's Revenue from Shipments of Wet Process Equipment to Asia/Pacific-ROW
(End User Revenue in Millions of U.S. Dollars)
Company:
Produa:
Region Of Consumption:
Each
Wet Process
Asia/Pacific-ROW
1990
1987
1988
Semitool
2.5
.1
1989
.2
Shimada
.0
.0
.0
.3
.0
S&K Products International
.0
.0
.0
.5
.0
1991
.4
.0
Sugai
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
Tohokasei
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
Verteq
.2
.4
.0
.0
.3
.0
.3
.0
.4
Other Companies
3.1
1.2
1.1
1.8
1.1
Advantage Production Technology
.0
.0
.0
.0
.8
Alameda Instruments
Athens
.0
.0
.0
.0
.8
.0
.0
.0
.6
.0
Dainippon Screen
.0
.0
.7
.0
.0 -^
1.2
3.3
.0
1.5
.0
Total Rinser/Dryers
CAGR (%)
1987-1991
.0
-22.8
Acid Processors
FSI International
4.0
Musashi
.0
2.9
.0
Poly-Flow Engineering
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
Semitool
.3
.0
.0
.0
.2
1.5
2.9
4.0
2.1
5.8
Total Acid Process.
.0
40.2
Megasonic Qeaners
Dainippon Screen
.0
.8
.7
.7
2.0
Enya
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
FSI International
.2
.5
.3
.2
.1 .
Kaijo Denki
.0
.0
.0
.0
.4
S&K Products
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
Shimada
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
Verteq
.1
.0
.2
.8
.8
1.3
25.6
1.2
1.7
3.3
82.1
44.0
35.3
59.9
55.3
Total Megasonics
Total A/P-ROW Wet Process
.3
10.3
Ref: WETSHR
Source: Dataquest C^HJl 1992)
©1992 Dataquest Incorporated .^lil—Reproduction Prohibited
Semiconductor Equipment, Manufacturing, and Materials
4-32
Table 4.15
Each Company's Revenue from Shipments of Wet Process Equipment to the World
(End User Revenue i n Millions of U.S. Dollars)
Company:
Produa:
Region Of Consumption:
World Wet Process Market
Each
Wet Process
World
1987
1988
1989
1990
167.2
276.9
376.8
400.0
.0
1.0
5.3
30.1
.3
41.8
2.1
18.7
43.4
40.9
1.2
1991
405.0
CAGR (%)
1987-1991
24.8
Integrated Wet Systems
CFM Technology
Dainippon Screen
Dalton Corporation
.0
.0
1.7
1.7
Dan Science Co., Ltd.
.0
.9
10.0
12.7
Dexon
.7
3.1
4.4
ETE Company, Ltd.
.0
1.5
2.9
.5
7.6
4.9
.0
5.4
6.5
7.0
10.7
2.6
10.7
2.0
2.1
2.3
8.6
1.8
.0
.0
.0
Kaijo Denki
10.8
22.4
29.9
Kuwano Electric
30.9
9.6
8.1
6.6
Enya
Fuji Electric
Integrated Air Systems
5.6
12.6
9.4
Maruwa
.0
1.8
4.0
Musashi
.0
.0
1.2
5.9
5.8
2.3
.1
2.5
4.7
6.2
Pokomy
Poly-Flow Engineering
14.9
.0
10.4
7.1
4.1
.0
.0
.0
.0
1.1
1.2
6.6
1.9
10.2
2.6
29.7
33.6
27.4
Pure-Aire
1.7
Sankyo Engineering
11.0
11.0
14.3
9.2
Sapi Equipements
.0
.0
2.5
3.0
19.5
2.0
S O Manufacturing
2.8
1.0
1.1
.4
4.8
Semifab
2.7
5.0
6.2
3.5
3.0
Shimada
3.4
4.9
.0
8.6
2.0
16.3
10.0
13.4
.0
Sugai
2.8
17.9
29.8
34.3
31.4
S&K Products International
3.5
.0
3.5
7.7
3.0
.0
1.8
2.0
8.0
5.2
Toyoko Chemical
.0
1.2
1.7
3.8
.9
Tokyo Electron
.0
.0
.0
.0
5.6
.8
3.1
2.0
5.5
1.1
4.5
4.2
6.2
8.2
1.7
.0
5.5
1.7
84.3
143.8
243.0
267.8
Santa Clara Plastics
Submicron Systems, Inc.
Tohokasei
Universal Plastics
Verteq
Other Companies
Total Integr. Systems
1.6
12.0
.0
274.9
34.4
(Continued)
«
©1992 Dataquest Incorporated April—Reproduction Prohibited
4-33
Wafer Fab Equipment Market Share
Table 4.15 (Continued)
Each Company's Revenue from Shipments of Wet Process Equipment to the World
(End User Revenue in Millions of U.S. Dollars)
Company:
Produa:
Region Of Consumption:
Each
Wet Process
World
1987
1988
1989
1990
1991
1.8
3.9
2.3
.0
.0
.0
1.5
2.2
5.2
4.4
2.4
2.4
2.0
.5
.0
Dalton Corporation
.0
.0
.9
.9
.7
Enya
.8
4.0
47
.9
ETE Company, Ltd.
.0
1.1
2.1
.5
Integrated Air Systems
.7
1.3
.5
.2
.0
.0
.0
Kaijo Denki
.8
1.9
1.1
1.6
.0
Kyoritsu
.0
2.7
2.5
3.1
.0
Maruwa
.0
1.8
1.4
6.4
6.9
Musashi
.0
.5
.7
.9
.7
Pokomy
2.0
2.2
3.5
1.2
1.2
.4
.2
.2
3.0
3.4
2.6
CAGR (%)
1987-1991
Manual Wet Benches
Dainippon Screen
Dan Science Co., Ltd.
Dexon
Pure-Aire
.7
Sankyo Engineering
.9
.9
11.6
Santa Clara Plastics
5.0
3.6
2.3
.9
.7
.0
.0
3.0
1.8
1.5
.9
1.3
.0
.0
3.0
Sapi Equipements
S a Manufacturing
1.7
Semifab
5.0
Shimada
.3
2.0
.4
1.4
.0
.0
Sugai
.3
.9
1.1
1.4
3.5
.0
1.2
Tohokasei
.0
1.1
1.1
2.4
1.2
Toyoko Chemical
.0
1.2
1.1
1.3
.0
Universal Plastics
2.1
5.4
3.9
3.5
3.6
.2
.5
.0
.0
.0
2.4
3.7
4.5
.0
.0
27.1
51.1
44.8
44.5
29.8
1.2
.0
.0
.0
.0
Dan Science Co., Ltd.
.0
.5
.5
Enya
.5
.3
.0
.0
Estek
1.2
.9
1.1
.0
.0
.0
.0
Verteq
Other Companies
Total Man. Benches
2.4
Rinsers/Dryers
Dainippon Screen
.5
1.2
1.8
1.2
4.3
3.7
Kaijo Denki
.6
1.8
1.6
2.5
.9
Kuwano
.7
1.0
.0
.0
.0
Poly-Flow Engineering
.3
.6
.1
.3
2.4
.2
.2
2.1
2.7
FSI International
Sankyo Engineering
2.0
(Continued)
6)1992 Dataquest Incorporated April—Reproduction Prohibited
Semiconductor Equipment, Manufacturing, and Materials
4-34
i
Table 4.15 (Continued)
Each Company's Revenue from Shipments of Wet Process Equipment to the World
(End User Revenue In Millions of U.S. Dollars)
Company:
Product:
Region Of Consumption:
Each
Wet Process
World
Semitool
1987
1988
1989
1990
15.5
.2
11.8
7.7
8.6
1991
9.4
.2
.0
.0
.0
S&K Products International
5.0
5.9
5.0
7.2
Sugai
1.4
.0
.0
.0
1.9
.4
3.9
.0
.4
.5
.7
3.3
5.3
(>£
7.0
6.0
.0
Shimada
Tohokasei
Verteq
Other Companies
Total Rinser/Dryers
.3
32.0
.5
35.2
.5
.0
25.1
30.5
31.3
.0
.0
.0
.0
3.4
CAGR (%)
1987-1991
-.6
Acid Processors
Advantage Production Technology
Alameda Instruments
Athens
Dainipfxjn Screen
FSI International
.0
.0
.0
1.2
1.6
1.0
4.0
2.0
4.2
1.2
11.5
16.8
.0
.0
7.9
11.8
15.0
17.2
12.7
.0
.7
.3
.0
Musashi
.0
.0
22.5
.0
Poly-Flow Engineering
.1
.1
4.1
3.3
19.4
3.6
3.2
2.9
2.7
24.9
39.7
33.1
37.9
15.5
.0
16.5
1.1
10.5
.0
14.1
1.5
1.3
.1
.9
2.1
.0
.0
Semitool
Total Add Process.
18.2
Megasonic Cleaners
Dainippon Screen
Enya
FSI International
.0
.0
2.1
Kaijo Denki
.1
2.3
.1
S&K Products
.0
.0
Shimada
Verteq
Total Megasonics
Total W.W. Wet Process
.0
2.3
1.0
.0
.0
.0
5.8
5.2
2.2
4.0
4.8
7.2
4.4
21.9
5.0
24.2
24.1
31.1
276.9
376.8
400.0
405.0
167.2
•!
63.1
24.8
Ref: WETSHR
Source: DaUquest (April 1992)
i
©1992 Dataquest Incorporated April—Reproduction Prohibited
Wafer Fab Equipment Market Share
4-35
Table 4.16
Each Company's Revenue from Shipments of Dry Strip Market Equipment to North America
(End User Revenue In Millions of U.S. Dollars)
Company:
Product:
Region Of Consumption:
Each
Dry Strip
North America
World Dry Strip Market
1987
1988
57.9
100.4
1989
121.2
1990
1991
CAGR (%)
1987-1991
117.7
119.1
19.8
North America
Alcan Tech
.0
.0
.0
.0
4.0
Branson/IPC
3.8
8.0
6.4
6.0
.0
Chemitronics
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
Chlorine Engineers
Drytek
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.8
.8
1.0
.0
.0
.5
1.6
1.0
1.5
1.5
.8
2.1
6.8
14.9
.0
.0
Fusion Semiconduaor Systems
Gasonics
Hitachi
LFE
Lam Research
m.FSI
.0
.0
5.3
.0
1.0
.8
1.2
1.0
1.1
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
Machine Technology
2.0
3.0
1.0
.0
Matrix
4.5
.0
4.7
6.0
4.1
.0
5.5
.0
.0
Plasma Systems
.0
.0
.0
1.1
1.5
1.2
Plasma-Therm
.0
.0
1.0
.0
.0
Mattson Technologies
Ramco
.0
.0
.0
.0
2.1
Samco
.0
.1
.1
.1
.2
Shinko Seiki
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
Sumitomo Metals
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
2.5
.0
2.5
.0
2.0
2.0
1.6
2.0
.6
.7
.0
.0
25.1
32.2
Tegal
Tokyo Ohka Kogyo
Ulvac
Total North America
.0
.0
.0
16.7
23.0
27.0
Source: £)ataquest CApril 1992)
®1992 Dataquest Incorporated ^lil—Reproduction Prohibited
17.8
4-36
Semiconductor Equipment, Manufacturing, and Materials
i
Table 4.17
Each Company's Revenue from Shipments of Dry Strip Equipment to Japan
(End User Revenue In Millions of U.S. Dollars)
Company:
Product:
Region Of Consumption:
Each
Dry Strip
Japan
1987
1988
1990
1991
57.9
100.4
1989
121.2
CAGR (%)
1987-1991
117.7
119.1
19.8
Alcan Tech
5.0
9.2
11.6
9.7
12.7
Branson/IPC
1.4
1.0
1.5
1.0
.0
Chemitronics
.0
1.4
.0
.0
.0
Chlorine Engineers
Drytek
.6
.0
2.8
2.7
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
Fusion Setniconduaor Systems
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
World Dry Strip Market
Japan
Gasonics
.0
.0
.1
1.0
1.0
Hitachi
.0
4.6
5.0
2.7
LFE
.0
.0
.0
.0
4.5
.0
Lam Research
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
m.FSI
.0
.0
.0
.0
1.7
Machine Technology
.7
1.5
.0
.0
.0
Matrix
.2
.0
.5
.0
1.0
Mattson Technologies
.5
.0
.0
.3
.0
15.0
21.0
16.7
.0
.0
4.3
.0
10.4
Plasma-Therm
Plasma Systems
.0
.0 '
Ramco
8.7
9.6
11.0
16.0
5.6
Samco
.0
.7
.8
Shinko Seiki
.0
.0
.9
.0
.0
.9
1.1
Sumitomo Metals
.0
.0
.0
.0
2.1
.5
.5
.0
.0
.7
Tokyo Ohka Kogyo
8.7
19.9
22.0
17.3
12.5
Ulvac
3.6
4.9
64.2
5.5
2.3
75.9
75.5
2.3
62.1
Tegal
Total Japan
33.7
-
16.5
Source Dauquest CApril 1992)
i
©1992 Dataquest Incorporated April—Reproduction Prohibited
4-37
Wafer Fab Equipment Market Share
Table 4.18
Each Company's Revenue from Shipments of Dry Strip Equipment to Europe
(End User Revenue In Millions of U.S. Dollars)
Company:
Produa:
Region Of Consumption:
Each
Dry Strip
Europe
1991
1987
1988
57.9
100.4
1989
121.2
1990
117.7
.0
1.0
1.5
2.0
.9
Branson/IPC
1.4
2.0
3.2
4.5
.0
Chemitronics
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
World Dry Strip Market
119.1
CAGR (%)
1987-1991
19.8
Europe
Alcan Tech
Chlorine Engineers
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
Drytek
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
Fusion Semiconductor Systems
.0
.0
.0
.0
Gasonics
.4
.6
.1
.4
.5
2.0
Hitachi
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
LFE
.0
.1
.0
.0
Lam Research
.0
.5
.0
.0
.0
.0
m.FSI
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
Machine Technology
Matrix
.0
.0
.0
.2
.0
.1
.6
.0
.0
1.5
.0
2.4
Mattson Technologies
.5
.0
Plasma Systems
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
Plasma-Therm
.0
.0
.0
.0
Ramco
.0
.0
.0
.0
1.6
.0
Samco
.0
.0
.0
.0
Shinko Seiki
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
Sumitomo Metals
Tegal
.0
.0
.0
.0
1.0
1.2
.5
.5
.8
1.0
Tokyo Ohka Kogyo
.0
.0
1.0
.2
Ulvac
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
6.9
9.3
9.2
Total Europe
2.9
5.9
Source: Dataquest (April 1992)
01992 Dataquest Incorporated April—Reproduction Prohibited
33.5
4-3fi
Semiconductor Equipment, Manufacturing, and Materials
i
Table 4.19
Each Company's Revenue from Shipments of Dry Strip Equipment to Asia/Pacific-ROW
(End User Revenue in Millions of U.S. Dollars)
Company:
Product:
Region Of Consumption:
Each
Dry Strip
Asia/Pacific-ROW
1990
1991
CAGR (%)
1987-1991
117.7
119.1
19.8
1987
1988
57.9
100.4
1989
121.2
Alcan Tecli
.0
.0
.0
.0
1.6
Branson/IPC
1.2
4.0
4.9
3.0
.0
Chemitronics
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
Chlorine Engineers
Drytek
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.2
.4
.4
.0
.0
Fusion Semiconductor Systems
.0
.0
.0
.0
.6
Gasonics
.0
.0
5.0
Hitachi
.0
.3
.0
.7
.0
.0
1.1
.0
.2
.4
.4
.4
World Dry Strip Market
Asia/Pacific-ROW
LFE
Lam Research
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
m.FSI
.0
,0
.0
.0
.0
Machine Technology
.0
.0
.5
.0
.0
Matrix
.4
1.4
.5
.0
.7
.0
.0
.5
.0
1.1
.0
2.0
2.8
Plasma-Therm
.0
.0
.0
.0
3.3
.0
Ramco
.0
.0
.0
.0
1.0
Samco
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
Shinko Seiki
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
Sumitomo Metals
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
1.2
1.0
1.0
.4
.5
.0
.0
1.0
.5
.6
.0
.0
.0
1.5
.0
4.6
7.3
11.4
7.8
15.6
Mattson Technologies
Plasma Systems
Tegal
Tokyo Ohka Kogyo
Ulvac
Total A/P-ROW
•
.0
35.7
Source: Dataquest (April 1992)
i
©1992 Dataquest Incorporated April—Reproduction Prohibited
Wafer Fab Equipment Market Share
4-39
Table 4.20
Each Company's Revenue from Shipments of Dry Strip Equipment to the World
(End User Revenue in Millions of U.S. Dollars)
ODmpany:
Produa:
Region Of Consumption:
Each
Dry Strip
World
1987
1988
1989
1990
1991
CAGR (%)
1987-1991
57.9
100.4
121.2
117.7
119.1
19.8
Alcan Tech
5.0
10.2
13.1
11.7
19.2
Branson/IPC
7.8
15.0
16.0
14.5
.0
.0
.0
World Dry Strip Market
Worldwide
Chemitronics
.0
1.4
.0
Chlorine Engineers
Drytek
.6
.0
2.8
2.7
.0
.0
1.9
Fusion Semiconductor Systems
Gasonics
1.0
1.2
1.4
.0
.5
2.0
1.0
3.0
1.5
6.2
1.5
8.2
.0
4.6
5.0
1.0
22.9
5.6
1.7
Lam Research
.0
1.5
.0
2.7
1.4
.0
.0
m.FSI
.0
.0
.0
.0
Machine Technology
Matrix
2.7
5.2
4.5
7.2
1.5
7.0
.2
1.7
.0
9.0
7.5
Mattson Technologies
.0
.0
.0
.0
5.4
10.4
17.0
.0
.0
1.0
24.9
.0
1.5
21.2
8.7
.0
9.6
11.0
16.0
.8
1.0
Shinko Seiki
.0
.0
.0
.9
.0
Sumitomo Metals
.0
.0
.0
.0
3.0
3.5
Hitachi
LFE
Plasma Systems
Plasma-Therm
Ramco
Samco
1.5
.0
.0
10.3
1.1
1.1
2.1
Tegal
5.2
5.2
Tokyo Ohka Kogyo
9.2
19.9
3.5
26.0
18.7
15.7
3.6
4.9
100.4
5.5
121.2
2.3
117.7
119.1
Ulvac
Total Woridwide
57.9
Source: Dataquest (April 1992)
G1992 Dataquest Incorporated April—Reproduction Prohibited
2.3
19.8
Semiconductor Equipment, Manufacturing, and Materials
^40
i
Table 4.21
Each Company's Revenue from Shipments of Dry Etch Equipment to North America
(End User Revenue In Millions of U.S. Dollars)
Company:
Product:
Region Of Consumption:
World Dry Etch Market
Each
Dry Etch
North America
1987
1988
1989
1990
1991
307.4
533.2
669.5
690.4
704.7
CAGR (%)
1987-1991
23.0
North America
Alcan Technology
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
Anelva
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
48.1
72.9
.0
77.0
78.0
60.0
.0
1.2
2.0
.0
11.0
23.0
18.0
13.0
15.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
1.0
4.2
4.0
4.0
4.8
3.0
4.0
.0
.0
.0
Gasonics
.0
.0
.0
.0
3.5
Hitachi
.0
.0
.0
7.0
Kokusai
.0
.0
.0
.0
3.3
.0
20.0
29.0
44.0
48.0
63.0
2.5
.0
6.0
4.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
2.1
MRC (Sony)
.0
.0
.0
.8
2.6
Plasma Systems
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
Applied Materials
Branson/IPC
Drytek
Elionix
E.T. Electrotech
GCA
Lam Research
Materials Research
Matrix
Plasma Technology
Plasma-Therm
Samco
.0
.8
1.0
10.2
12.0
2.5
10.0
2.7
11.4
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.7
Shibaura
.0
.0
Sumitomo Metals
.0
.0
.0
.7
.0
20.0
21.0
18.0
13.0
11.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
1.1
.0
.7
.5
.0
Tokyo Ohka
.0
.0
.0
.0
TEL/LAM
.0
.0
.0
.3
.0
Ulvac
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
Varian/TEL
.0 .
.0
6.2
4.7
4.4
171.1
186.1
184.5
173.1
Tegal
Tokyo Electron
Tokuda
Total North America
118.1
.0
10.0
DETCHSHR
Source: DaUquest (Apiil 1992)
«
01992 Dataquest Incorporated April—Reproduction Prohibited
4-41
Wafer Fab Equipment Market Share
Table 4.22
Each Company's Revenue from Shipments of Dry Etch Equipment to Japan
(End User Revenue In Millions of U.S. Dollars)
Company:
Product:
Region Of Consumption:
Each
Dry Etch
Japan
1987
1988
1989
1990
1991
CAGR (%)
1987-1991
307.4
533.2
669.5
690.4
704.7
23.0
.0
.0
.0
2.5
5.6
22.3
24.8
41.6
76.1
39.1
79.0
27.3
52.0
20.3
47.0
.6
.0
.7
.0
.0
.0
.0
5.0
3.0
3.0
.3
1.2
.7
E.T. Electrotech
.3
.0
.3
.0
1.5
.0
2.5
.0
.0
GCA
1.5
.0
Gasonics
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
Hitachi
18.8
34.6
47.6
Kokusai
1.4
1.5
1.0
79.5
1.1
95.1
.0
.0
.0
2.2
24.2
21.1
.0
World Dry Etch Market
Japan
Alcan Technology
Anelva
Applied Materials
Branson/IPC
Drytek
Elionix
Lam Research
Materials Research
Matrix
.0
1.0
5.0
2.2
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
3.9
1.7
5.2
.0
.0
.0
3.2
Plasma Technology
1.9
.0
.0
3.3
.0
.0
1.5
.0
Plasma-Therm
1.2
1.2
1.6
5.0
11.0
Samco
.0
.0
2.2
2.8
3.4
Shibaura
.0
.0
.0
.0
14.1
5.6
6.2
12.0
15.0
15.4
.0
3.0
3.0
5.0
7.0
86.0
MRC (Sony)
Plasma Systems
Sumitomo Metals
Tegal
Tokyo Electron
Tokuda
Tokyo Ohka
TEIAAM
Ulvac
Varian/TEL
Total Japan
.0
44.6
70.5
96.8
5.0
3.2
28.3
22.3
.0
14.0
7.1
10.0
21.7
13.5
17.4
.0
.0
.0
.0
5.6
8.1
8.7
(>.(>
6.2
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
113.0
240.1
329.9
365.9
356.6
DETCHSHR
Source: Dataquest CApril 1992)
C>1992 Dataquest tocoiporated April—Reproduction Prohibited.
33.3
Semiconductor Equipment, Manufacturing, and Materials
4-42
Table 4.23
Each Company's Revenue from Shipments of Dry Etch Equipment to Etu-ope
(End User Revenue In Millions of U.S. Dollars)
Company:
Produa:
Region Of Consumption:
World Dry Etch Market
Each
Dry Etch
Europe
1987
1988
1989
1990
1991
CAGR (%)
1987-1991
307.4
533.2
669.5
690.4
704.7
23.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
Europe
Alcan Technology
Anelva
Applied Materials
Branson/IPC
Drytek
Elionix
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
22.0
31.0
35.0
28.0
.0
28.3
.0
.8
1.0
.0
2.0
.0
3.0
4.0
5.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
E.T. Electrotech
6.2
7.7
8.0
10.0
4.8
GCA
1.0
1.0
.0
.0
.0
Gasonics
Hitachi
.0
.0
.0
.0
1.5
.0
.0
.0
5.0
Kokusai
.0
.0
.0
.0
4.5
.0
7.0
13.0
11.0
17.0
12.0
1.5
.0
1.2
.0
.0
Matrix
.9
.0
.0
.0
.0
MRC (Sony)
.0
.0
.0
.0
1.8
Plasma Systems
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
Plasma Technology
.0
1.0
3.0
3.6
Plasma-Therm
.8
.8
1.2
1.2
2.0
2.1
Samco
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
Shibaura
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
Sumitomo Metals
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
15.6
19.4
16.0
11.0
8.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
2.8
.0
.7
.0
Tokyo Ohka
.0
.0
.0
TEL/LAM
.0
•0
.0
1.3
.0
.0
.0
.0
Ulvac
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
Varian/TEL
.0
.0
.0
6.9
6.5
58.3
72.9
74.5
95.6
77.8
Lam Research
Materials Research
Tegal
Tokyo Electron
Tokuda
Total Europe
7.5
DETCHSHR
Source: Dataquest CApril 1992)
«
©1992 Dataquest Incorporated April—Reproduction Prohibited
4-43
Wafer Fab Equipment Market Share
Table 4.24
Each Company's Revenue fi^m Shipments of Dry Etch Equipment to Asia/Padfic-ROW
(End User Revenue in Millions of U.S. Dollars)
Company:
Product:
Region Of Consumption:
World Dry Etch Market
Each
Dry Etch
Asia/Pacific-ROW
1991
CAGR (%)
1987-1991
704.7
23.0
1987
1988
1989
307.4
533.2
669.5
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
2.0
1990
690.4
Asia/Pacific-ROW
Alcan Technology
.0
.0
9.4
2.1
Applied Materials
7.1
19.4
21.0
10.0
19.0
Branson/IPC
Drytek
1.0
.0
.5
.0
4.0
2.0
.5
4.0
2.0
2.0
Elionix
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
E.T. Electrotech
.0
.7
1.0
2.4
GCA
.0
.0
1.5
.0
.0
.0
Gasonics
Hitachi
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
Kokusai
.0
.0
.0
.0
12.3
.0
5.0
23.0
26.0
20.0
31.0
Materials Research
.0
.0
.0
.0
Matrix
.0
.5
.0
.0
.0
.2
MRC (Sony)
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
Anelva
Lam Research
Plasma Systems
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
Plasma Technology
.0
.0
.0
.0
Plasma-Therm
.3
.0
1.0
.0
Samco
.3
.0
.0
.4
.0
.0
.0
Shibaura
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
Sumitomo Metals
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
Tegal
.0
3.0
4.0
2.0
3.0
Tokyo Electron
.0
.0
10.1
2.4
24.0
Tokuda
.5
.0
2.1
.6
.0
Tokyo Ohka
.0
.0
.0
2.8
TEL/LAM
.0
.0
.0
.0
1.3
.0
Ulvac
.1
.2
.0
.0
.0
Varian/TEL
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
79.0
44.4
97.2
Total A/P-ROW
18.0
49.1
DETCHSHR
Source: DaUquest CApril 1992)
©1992 Dataquest Incorporated April—Reproduction Prohibited
52.4
4-44
Semiconductor Equipment, Manufacturing, and Materials
Table 4.25
Each Company's Revenue from Shipments of Dry Etch Equipment to the World
(End User Revenue In Millions of U.S. Dollars)
Company:
Produa:
Region Of Consumption:
World Dry Etch Market
Each
Dry Etch
World
1987
1988
1989
1990
1991
CAGR (%)
1987-1991
307.4
533.2
669.5
690.4
704.7
23.0
.0
.0
.0
5.6
22.3
102.0
41.6
48.5
2.5
29.4
1967
208.0
175.0
Worldwide
Alcan Technology
Anelva
Applied Materials
22.3
154.0
1.6
.0
3.2
3.5
.0
17.0
25.0
30.0
22.0
25.0
.3
7.2
.3
14.1
.3
1.2
.7
E.T. Electrotech
15.0
17.5
12.0
GCA
4.0
5.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
5.0
Hitachi
18.8
34.6
47.6
1.4
1.5
1.0
91.5
1.1
115.2
Kokusai
32.0
65.0
83.2
109.2
127.1
4.4
13.0
7.4
.0
.0
Matrix
.0
.0
.0
.0
MRC (Sony)
.0
.0
.0
4.7
2.3
9.6
1.9
.0
3.2
1.7
1.5
1.6
3.3
2.0
13.7
12.9
15.2
5.5
18.0
6.3
13.8
Samco
.0
.0
2.2
2.8
3.4
Shibaura
.0
.0
.0
.0
14.1
Branson/IPC
Drytek
Elionix
Gasonics
Lam Research
Materials Research
Plasma Systems
Plasma Technology
Plasma-Therm
Sumitomo Metals
Tegal
Tokyo Electron
Tokuda
Tokyo Ohka
TEL/LAM
Ulvac
Varian/TEL
Total Worldwide
\
.0
5.6
6.2
12.0
15.7
15.4
35.6
46.4
41.0
31.0
29.0
.0
44.6
80.6
99.2
110.0
9.4
3.2
32.4
24.1
.0
15.3
.0
7.1
10.0
21.7
16.6
17.4
.0
.0
.0
5.7
8.3
8.7
(,£
6.2
.0
.0
6.2
11.6
10.9
307.4
533.2
669.5
690.4
7047
23.0
DETCHSHR
Source: Oauquest CApril 1992)
i
01992 Dataquest Incorporated April—Reproduction Prohibited
Wafer Fab Equipment Market Share
4-45
Table 4.26
Each Company's Revenue from Shipments of Chemical Vapor Deposition Equipment to North America
(End User Revenue in Millions of U.S. Dollars)
Company:
Product:
Region Of Consumption:
Each
Chemical Vapor Deposition
North America
World CVD Market
Tube CVD
Horizontal Tube LPCVD
ASM International
BTU International
Centrotherm
Enya
General Signal Thinfilm
Kokusai Electric
Koyo Lindberg
Process Technology
Silicon Valley Group
Solitec
TEI/Thermco
Thermco
Tokyo Electron Ltd.
Tylan
Tystar
Ulvac
Ulvac/BTU
VarianAEL
Wellman
Total Horizontal LPCVD
Vertical Tube LPCVD
ASM International
BTU International
Denko
Disco
General Signal Hiinfilm
Helmut Seier
Koyo Lindbeig
Kokusai Electric
Semitherm
Shinko Electric
Silicon Valley Group
Toyoko Chemical
Tokyo Electron Ltd.
Ulvac
VariaivTEL
Total Vertical LPCVD
1987
1988
260.1
466A
1989
611.2
1.7
3.4
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
3.8
.0
2.0
.0
3.0
.0
1.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
2.6
7.4
2.0
9.0
.0
.0
3.0
.8
.0
4.0
.0
48
.0
2.5
.0
3.0
.0
.0
2.2
7.0
4.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.6
.0
.0
.0
.0
14.9
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
1.6
.0
.0
.0
.0
1.6
3.5
.0
1.5
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
27.6
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
2.5
.5
.0
1.6
.0
.0
.0
.0
4.6
30.3
1990
716.5
2.5
4.0
2.8
.0
2.0
.0
.0
2.5
6.0
4.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.2
.0
.0
.0
.0
24.0
.0
8.8
2.5
1.6
.0
.0
.0
.0
1.2
4.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
11.3
3.5
.0
.0
3.0
.0
.0
2.5
5.5
1.5
.0
8.0
.0
.0
.0
2.0
21.2
1.5
.0
12.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
2.0
.0
.0
2.2
CAGR (%)
1987-1991
30.2
2.0
1.2
2.0
.0
.0
4.0
.0
.0
.6
.0
1.0
.0
3.0
.0
.0
.0
1991
747.4
-6.7
2.0
5.3
32.8
112.8
(Continued)
®1992 Dataquest Incorporated April—Reproduction Prohibited
Semiconductor Equipment, Manufacturing, and Materials
4-46
i
Table 4.26 (Continued)
Each Company's Revenue from Shipments of Chemical Vapor Deposition Equipment to North America
(End User Revenue in Millions of U.S. Dollars)
Company:
Produa:
Region Of Consumption:
Each
Chemical Vap)or Deposition
North America
CAGR (%)
1987-1991
1987
1988
1989
1990
1991
23.1
20.6
16.0
16.0
10.0
3.7
2.7
1.8
1.5
1.0
26.8
23.3
17.8
17.5
62.7
11.0
-20.0
55.1
6.2
Horizontal Tube PECVD
ASM International
Pacific •Western
Total Horizontal Tube PECVD
Total N.A. Tube CVD
43.3
55.5
56.9
Alcan (Canon)
.0
.0
.0
.0
2.7
Amaya
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
3.0
3.0
2.0
.0
.0
.0
.5
.0
.5
.0
.5
.0
Non-Tube CVD Reaaors
APCVD Reaaors
Applied Materials
General Signal "Hiinfilm
Hitachi
.0
.5
.0
Kokusai Electric
Koyo Lindberg
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
Pacific Western
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
Tempress
.0
.0
.5
.0
.5
.0
.0
Toshiba Machine
.5
.0
10.0
13.2
Watkins-Johnson
Total APCVD Reaaors
i
.0
7.3
10.5
10.0
10.3
14.5
13.0
11.0
16.4
1.4
.6
.6
.0
.0
.0
.0
12.3
LPCVD Reaaors
Anicon
Anelva
.0
1.5
.0
^ p l i e d Materials
BCT Spectrum
.0
.0
.0
12.0
12.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
2.0
BTUAJlvac
.0
.0
.0
1.6
.0
Enya
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
Focus Semiconduaor
Genus
Kokusai Qectric
LAM Research
1.0
1.6
.0
.0
.0
7.1
.0
11.7
.0
22.0
14.0
12.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
1.3
1.0
.0
.0
1.4
Novellus
Silicon Valley Group
Spectrum CVD
2.3
.0
Tokyo Electron, Ltd.
.0
.0
1.5
1.1
.6
3.0
.6
5.7
.0
2.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.6
Ulvac
.0
.0
.0
.0
Varian
2.5
2.0
.7
.0
.0
33.1
32.3
Total LPCVD Reaaors
157
19.4
26.9
®1992 Dataquest Incorporated April—Reproduction Prohibited
19.8
4^7
Wafer Fab Equipment Market Share
Table 4.26 (Continued)
Each Company's Revenue from Shipments of Chemical Vapor Deposition Equipment to North America
(End User Revenue in Millions of U.S. Dollars)
Company:
Product:
Region Of Consumption:
Each
Chemical Vapor Deposition
North America
PECVD Reaaors
Anelva
Applied Materials
Enya
E.T. Electrotech
Japan Produaion
LAM Research
Novellus
Plasma-Therm
Samco
Total PECVD Reaaors
ECR CVD
Anelva
Fuji Electric
Plasma Technology
Sumitomo Metals
Total ECR CVD Reactors
Total N.A. Non-Tube CVD
Total N.A. CVD
1991
1987
1988
1989
1990
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
54.0
15.5
.0
37.0
56.0
67.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
1.0
4.2
.0
.0
2.5
.0
3.5
.0
3.4
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
3.1
3.8
16.9
4.0
35.0
42.0
23.0
2.0
2.0
1.2
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
23.4
62.1
95.5
114.5
81.6
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.8
.0
1.0
.0
.6
.0
2.5
.5
2.7
.0
.0
.8
1.0
3.1
3.2
49.4
96.8
136.4
161.7
133.5
92.7
152.3
193.3
224.4
188.6
Ref: CVDSHR
Source: Oataquest CApril 1992)
©1992 Dataquest Incorporated April—Reproduction Prohibited
CAGR (%)
1987-1991
36.7
28.2
19.4
4-4S
Semiconductor Equipment, Manufacturing, and Materials
Table 4.27
Each Company's Revenue from Shipments of Chemical Vapor Deposition Equipment to Japan
(End User Revenue In Millions of U.S. Dollars)
Company:
Produa:
Region Of Consumption:
Each
Chemical Vapor Deposition
Japan
World CVD Market
Tube CVD
Horizontal Tube LPCVD
ASM International
BTU International
Centrotherm
Enya
General Signal Thinfilm
Kokusai Electric
Koyo Lindberg
Process Technology
Silicon Valley Group
Solitec
TEI/Thermco
Thennco
Tokyo Electron Ltd.
Tylan
Tystar
Ulvac
Ulvac/BTU
Varian/TEL
Wellman
Total Horizontal LPCVD
Vertical Tube LPCVD
ASM International
BTU International
Denko
Disco
General Signal Thinfilm
Helmut Seier
Koyo Lindberg
Kokusai Electric
Semitherm
Shinko Electric
Silicon Valley Group
Toyoko Chemical
Tokyo Electron Ltd.
Ulvac
Varian/TEL
Total Vertical LPCVD
1987
1988
260.1
466.4
2.0
.0
.0
.6
.0
7.6
1.0
.0
.0
.0
3.9
.0
.0
1.8
.0
6.4
1.8
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
8.5
.0
.0
.0
3.5
.0
.0
8.3
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.5
.0
.0
20.0
.0
.0
2.1
.0
.0
.3
1.0
2.8
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
6.2
1989
611.2
2.0
.0
.0
1.7
.0
2.2
25.9
3.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
8.7
.0
.0
.0
4.0
.0
.0
21.6
.0
.0
.6
.0
2.3
.0
.0
3.5
.0
.0
.0
1.1
23.6
.0
.0
.0
5.8
.3
2.7
12.3
.0
.0
.8
.0
3.8
.0
.0
22.2
15.9
.0
.0
50.5
1990
716.5
1.5
.0
.0
.0
.0
2.5
1.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
3.6
.0
.0
.0
6.2
.0
.0
14.8
13.9
.0
3.8
.0
.0
.0
2.1
39.2
.0
.0
.0
5.2
34.0
.0
.0
98.2
1991
747.4
CAGR (%)
1987-1991
30.2
.9
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
7.1
.0
.0
5.3
.0
.0
.0
13.3
-9.7
14.1
.0
.0
2.7
.0
.0
1.9
32.3
.0
4.0
.0
5.0
45.0
5.0
.0
110.0
105.2
(CoDtinued^
©1992 Dataquest Incorporated April—Reproduction Prohibited
i
Wafer Fab Equipment Market Share
4-49
Table 4.27 (Continued)
Each Company's Revenue from Shipments of Chemical Vapor Deposition Equipment to Japan
(End User Revenue In Millions of U.S. Dollars)
Company:
Produa:
Region Of Consumption:
Each
Chemical Vap)or Deposition
Japan
1987
1988
9.8
2.8
12.6
38.8
15.5
2.1
17.6
65.7
1989
1990
1991
17.0
.0
17.0
23.6
.0
23.6
136.6
19.0
.0
19.0
142.3
.0
19.0
4.0
.0
1.1
.0
.6
.0
.0
4.2
20.0
48.9
15.0
21.4
15.3
3.0
.0
.0
.0
.8
.0
.0
3.2
20.0
12.3
.0
.0
.0
.0
.6
.0
.0
3.2
15.4
57.3
52.9
.7
1.1
.0
.0
.0
1.7
.0
23.0
.0
.0
.0
.7
.6
.0
4.2
.0
1.4
8.0
.0
.0
3.5
.0
19.0
.0
2.8
17.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
CAGR (%)
1987-1991
Horizontal Tube PECVD
ASM International
Pacific Western
Total Horizontal Tube PECVD
Total Japan Tube CVD
Non-Tube CVD Reaaors
APCVD Reactors
Alcan (Canon)
Amaya
Applied Materials
General Signal Thinfilm
Hitachi
Kokusai Electric
Koyo Lindberg
Pacific Western
Tempress
Toshiba Machine
Watkins-Johnson
Total APCVD Reaaors
LPCVD Reactors
Anicon
Anelva
Applied Materials
BCT Spectrum
BTUAJlvac
Enya
Focus Semiconduaor
Genus
Kokusai Electric
LAM Research
Novellus
Silicon Valley Group
Spectrum CVD
Tokyo Electron, Ltd.
Ulvac
Varian
Total LPCVD Reactors
.0
.0
5.5
8.5
.0
.0
.0
.2
.2
.0
5.0
2.0
21.4
17.5
8.7
.5
.5
.7
1.3
.0
.5
6.0
15.0
50.7
.8
.7
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
1.5
2.3
.0
.0
.0
1.8
3.3
.0
.0
.0
.8
.0
.0
1.4
2.4
9.4
.9
12.7
.0
.0
.0
1.5
.3
.0
3.8
2.3
27.1
89.1
4.3
36.3
3.1
1.4
.0
.0
.6
4.9
4.5
.0
46.4
12.3
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
2.7
7.4
.0
42.2
10.8
38.4
25.4
45.6
(Contintied)
®1992 Dataquest Incorporated April—Reproduction Prohibited
Semiconductor Equipment, Manufacturing, and Materials
4-50
i
Table 4.27 (Continued)
Each Company's Revenue from Shipments of Chemical Vapor Deposition Equipment to Japan
(End User Revenue in Millions of U.S. Dollars)
Company:
Produa:
Region Of Consumption:
Each
Chemical Vapor Deposition
Japan
1987
1988
1989
1990
1991
.0
1.4
.4
.0
.0
10.0
25.0
59.0
70.0
85.4
1.6
CAGR (%)
1987-1991
PECVD Reaaors
Anelva
Applied Materials
Enya
1.9
4.2
3.5
3.8
E.T. Electrotech
5.2
4.9
4.0
4.5
7.6
Japan Produaion
4.5
.0
6.5
.0
7.0
8.0
5.6
.0
.0
.0
Novellus
.5
3.4
5.6
11.0
26.0
Plasma-Therm
.3
.0
.5
.0
.6
.5
.0
1.0
22.4
45.9
81.1
2.3
100.1
129.2
1.0
.8
1.0
.4
2.2
Fuji Electric
.0
.0
.0
.0
Plasma Technology
.0
.0
.0
.0
.9
.0
Sumitomo Metals
.0
.0
6.0
2.9
.0
1.0
.8
7.0
3.3
Total Japan Non-Tube CVD
54.2
93.0
173.3
262.4
207.1
Total Japan CVD
124.5
190.2
3.1
227.4
343.7
369.7
LAM Research
Samco
Total PECVD Reactors
3.0
55.0
ECR CVD
Anelva
Total ECR CVD Reactors
"
i
43.1
41.2
Ref: CVDSHR
Source: ITataquest (AptU 1992)
i
©1992 Dataquest Incorporated April—Reproduction Prohibited
4-51
Wafer Fab Equipment Market Share
Table 4.28
Each Company's Revenue from Shipments of Chemical Vapor Deposition Equipment to Europe
(End User Revenue in Millions of U.S. Dollars)
Company:
Produa:
Region Of Consumption:
Each
Chemical Vapor Deposition
Europe
1990
466.4
1989
611.2
716.5
1991
747.4
16.2
16.7
10.0
5.0
3.5
3.0
3.5
.0
3.5
2.0
1.5
.0
2.0
2.0
Enya
.0
.0
.0
.0
1.5
.0
General Signal Thinfilm
.0
.8
1.0
1.0
.0
Kokusai Electric
.0
.0
.0
2.0
.0
Koyo Lindberg
.0
.0
.0
.0
Process Technology
.5
.0
.0
.0
.3
1.0
.5
2.0
.0
.2
1.8
.3
.0
.6
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
2.2
1.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
1987
1988
260.1
ASM International
BTU International
World CVD Market
CAGR (%)
1987-1991
30.2
Tube CVD
Horizontal Tube LPCVD
Centrotherm
Silicon Valley Group
Solitec
TEI/Thermco
Thermco
Tokyo Electron Ltd.
Tylan
2.0
2.3
.0
.0
.0
.0
Tystar
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
Ulvac
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
Ulvac/BTU
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
Varian/TEL
.0
.0
.0
2.1
1.9
Wellman
.0
.3
.0
.0
24.2
.5
25.4
18.1
16.6
10.4
ASM International
.0
.0
1.2
1.8
3.5
BTU International
.0
.0
.0
1.5
1.0
Denko
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
Total Horizontal LPCVD
-19.0
Vertical Tube LPCVD
Disco
.0
.0
.0
General Signal Thinfilm
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
Helmut Seier
.0
.0
.0
.0
Koyo Lindberg
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
Kokusai Electric
.0
.0
.0
Semitherm
.0
.0
.3
.0
2.2
.0
.0
Shinko Electric
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
Silicon Valley Group
.0
.8
.5
1.6
1.5
(Continued)
©1992 Dataquest Incorporated April—Reproduction Prohibited
4-52
Semiconductor Equipment, Manufacturing, and Materials
i
Table 4.28 (Continued)
Each Company's Revenue from Shipments of Chemical Vapor Deposition Equipment to Europe
(End User Revenue in Millions of U.S. Dollars)
Company:
Product:
Region Of Consumption:
Each
Chemical Vapor Deposition
Europ>e
1990
.0
1989
.0
.7
1991
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.7
2.4
.0
.8
2.0
6.3
10.6
ASM International
5.8
10.3
9.0
5.0
4.0
Pacific Western
1.4
.9
1.0
1.0
.0
1987
1988
Toyoko Chemical
.0
Tokyo Electron Ltd.
.0
Ulvac
Varian/TEL
Total Vertical LPCVD
CAGR (%)
1987-1991
• ERR
Horizontal Tube PECVD
Total Horizontal Tube PECVD
Total Europe Tube CVD
7.2
11.2
10.0
6.0
4.0
-13.7
31.4
37.4
30.1
28.9
25.0
-5.5
Non-Tube CVD Reaaors
APCVD Reactors
Alcan (Canon)
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
Amaya
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
Applied Materials
3.0
3.0
1.0
1.0
.0
General Signal Thinfilm
.0
.0
.3
.0
.3
.0
.0
Hitachi
.3
.0
.0
.0
Kokusai Electric
.0
.0
.0
.0
Koyo Lindberg
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
Pacific Western
.0
.0
.0
.0
Tempress
.0
.3
.3
.3
Toshiba Machine
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
Watkins-Johnson
6.7
6.0
5.0
8.0
4.9
9.7
9.6
6.6
9.6
4.9
Anicon
1.1
.7
.0
.0
.5
.0
.7
Anelva
.0
.0
.0
Applied Materials
.0
.0
.0
5.0
2.0
BCr Spectrum
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
Total APCVD Reaaors
i
-15.7
LPCVD Reartors
BTUAJlvac
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
Enya
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
Focus Semiconduaor
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
3.7
.0
7.0
7.0
.0
.0
4.5
.0
Genus
Kokusai Electric
1.7
.0
(Continued)
i
©1992 Dataquest Incorporated April—Reproduction Prohibited
4-53
Wafer Fab Equipment Market Share
Table 4.28 (Continued)
Each Company's Revenue from Shipments of Chemical Vapor Deposition Equipment to Europe
(End User Revenue In Millions of U.S. Dollars)
Company:
Produa:
Region Of Consumption:
Each
Chemical Vapwr Deposition
Europe
LAM Research
Novellus
Silicon Valley Group
Spectrum CVD
Tokyo Electron, Ltd.
Ulvac
Varian
Total LPCVD Reaaors
PECVD Reaaors
Anelva
Applied Materials
Enya
E.T. Electrotech
Japan Produaion
LAM Research
Novellus
Plasma-Therm
Samco
Total PECVD Reactors
ECR CVD
Anelva
Fuji Electric
Plasma Technology
Sumitomo Metals
Total ECR CVD Reaaors
Total Europe Non-Tube CVD
Total Europe CVD
1987
1988
1989
1990
1991
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
1.1
.5
.7
.7
.0
.0
.0
.0
.6
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
1.5
5.4
1.4
.0
.0
.0
6.1
8.4
14.0
6.5
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
16.0
24.0
22.0
3.9
.0
8.9
.0
.0
.0
.0
8.0
.0
7.1
9.8
7.0
8.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
1.1
6.0
9.0
.5
.0
1.0
3.7
.4
.0
.0
.0
.5
.0
11.5
20.8
27.1
38.5
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.8
1.0
.0
.0
1.9
.0
1.0
.0
.0
.8
1.0
26.6
37.3
43.1
73.2
1.9
64.0
1.0
51.4
92.9
76.4
58.0
74.7
Source: E>aUquest CApril 1992)
©1992 Dataquest Incorporated April-Reproduction Prohibited
4.7
.0
39.0
Ref: CVDSHR
CAGR (%)
1987-1991
35.7
.0
17.9
7.1
Semiconductor Equipment, Manufacturing, and Materials
4-54
Table 4.29
Each Company's Revenue from Shipments of Chemical Vapor I>eposltion Equipment to Asla/Padfic-ROW
(End User Revenue i n Millions of U.S. Dollars)
Company:
Produrt:
Region Of Consumption:
i
Each
Chemical Vapor Deposition
Asia/Pacific-ROW
466.4
716.5
1991
747.4
.0
2.6
1.0
1.0
1.5
1.5
3.6
5.0
1.2
2.0
.0
.0
1988
260.1
ASM International
BTU International
World CVD Market
1990
1989
611.2
1987
CAGR (%)
1987-1991
30.2
Tube CVD
Horizontal Tube LPCVD
Centrotherm
.0
.0
.0
Enya
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
General Signal Thinfilm
.0
.0
.0
Kokusai Electric
.0
2.0
.0
.0
1.6
.0
Koyo Lindberg
.0
.0
.0
.0
Process Technology
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
2.0
2.0
3.5
1.3
.6
1.0
1.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
1.8
2.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
3.8
6.0
.0
.0
3.3
.0
.0
1.0
.2
.3
Silicon Valley Group
Solitec
TEI/Thermco
Thermco
Tokyo Electron Ltd.
Tylan
.0
Tystar
.0
.0
.2
Ulvac
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
Ulvac/BTU
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
Varian/TEL
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
Wellman
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
5.6
14.6
15.2
8.7
8.9
ASM International
.0
.0
.6
.6
3.0
BTU International
.0
.0
.0
1.5
.0
Denko
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
Total Horizontal LPCVD
12.3
Vertical Tube LPCVD
Disco
.0
.0
.0
General Signal Thinfilm
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
Helmut Seier
.0
.0
.0
Koyo Lindberg
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
22.0
Kokusai Electric
.0
6.8
18.8
13.4
Semitherm
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
Shinko Electric
.0
.0
.0
2.2
.0
(Continued)
€
©1992 Dataquest Incorporated April—Reproduction Prohibited
4-55
Wafer Fab Equipment Market Share
Table 4.29 (Continued)
Each Company's Revenue from Shipments of Chemical Vapor Deposition Eqtilpment to Asia/Padfic-ROW
(End User Revenue in Millions of U.S. Dollars)
Company:
Produa:
Region Of Consumption:
Each
Chemical Vapor Deposition
Asia/Pacific-ROW
1987
1988
1989
1990
1991
Silicon Valley Group
.0
.4
.5
1.6
3.0
Toyoko Chemical
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
Tokyo Electron Ltd.
.0
.0
.0
.0
8.0
Ulvac
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
Varian/TEL
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
7.2
19.9
17.1
38.2
5.8
5.2
9.0
5.0
7.0
Total Vertical LPCVD
CAGR (%)
1987-1991
N/M
Horizontal Tube PECVD
ASM International
.0
.5
.0
.0
.0
5.8
5.7
9.0
5.0
7.0
4.8
11.4
27.5
44.1
30.8
54.1
47.6
Alcan (Canon)
.0
.0
.0
.0
2.7
Pacific Western
Total Horizontal Tube PECVD
Total A/P-ROW Tube CVD
Non-Tube CVD Reaaors
APCVD Reaaors
Amaya
.0
.0
.0
.0
1.0
2.0
.7
1.0
.0
Applied Materials
.0
General Signal Thinfilm
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
Hitachi
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
Kokusai Electric
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
Koyo Lindberg
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
Pacific Western
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
Tempress
.0
.0
.5
.0
.5
.0
.0
Toshiba Machine
.5
.0
Watkins-Johnson
.0
4.5
6.0
7.0
3.0
15.0
9.5
5.2
17.7
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
Total APCVD Reactors
.0
.0
LPCVD Reaaors
.4
Anelva
.0
.5
.0
^ p l i e d Materials
.0
.0
.0
1.0
1.0
.0
.0
Anicon
BCT Spectrum
.0
.0
.0
BTUAJlvac
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
Enya
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
Focus Semiconduaor
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
4.0
6.0
Genus
1.1
5.3
10.0
®1992 Dataquest Incorporated April—Reproduction Prohibited
ERR
Semiconductor Equipment, Manufacturing, and Materials
4-56
Table 4.29 (Continued)
Each Company's Revenue from Shipments of Chemical Vapor Deposition Equipment to Asla/Padfic-ROW
(End User Revenue in Millions of U.S. Dollars)
Company:
Produa:
Region Of Consumption:
Each
Chemical Vap)or Deposition
Asia/Pacific-ROW
1987
1988
Kokusai Electric
.0
.0
1989
.0
LAM Research
.0
.0
.0
1990
.0
1991
.0
.0
1.9
Novellus
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
Silicon Valley Group
A
.5
.0
.0
.0
Spectrum CVD
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
Tokyo Electron, Ltd.
Ulvac
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
1.5
.7
.0
.0
.0
3.4
7.0
10.0
5.0
8.9
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
9.0
25.0
.0
Varian
Total LPCVD Reaaors
CAGR (%)
1987-1991
27.2
PECVD Reaaors
Anelva
Applied Materials
Enya
.0
4.5
.0
12.0
.0
.0
E.T. Electrotech
.0
1.4
2.0
1.5
1.0
Japan Production
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
LAM Research
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
1.6
Novellus
.0
2.3
4.7
4.0
6.0
Plasma-Therm
.0
.5
.0
.0
.0
Samco
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
1.6
8.7
18.7
14.5
32.0
Anelva
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
Fuji Electric^
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
Plasma Technology
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
Sumitomo Metals
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
Total PECVD Reaaors
111.5
ECR CVD
Total ECR CVD Reaaors
Total A/P-ROW Non-Tube CVD
Total A/P-ROW CVD
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
5.0
21.7
38.2
24.7
58.6
85.0
16.4
49.2
82.3
55.5
112.7
61.9
Ref: CVDSHR
Source: Dataquest CApiil 1992)
i
©1992 Dataquest Incorporated April—Reproduction Prohibited
4-57
Wafer Fab Equipment Market Share
Table 4.30
Each Company's Revenue from Shipments of Chemical Vapor Deposition Equipment to the World
(End User Revenue i n Millions of U.S. Dollars)
Company:
Produrt:
Region Of Consumption:
Each
Chemical Vapor Deposition
World
1987
1988
260.1
19.9
1990
466.4
1989
611.2
716.5
1991
747.4
25.8
15.0
10.0,
7.9
7.9
.0
14.5
17.5
7.2
6.0
.0
.6
1.8
4.5
1.7
4.8
Enya
3.1
.0
General Signal Tliinfilm
.0
3.8
4.0
3.0
.0
4.5
1.0
1.6
3.0
1.4
World CVD Market
CAGR (%)
1987-1991
30.2
Tube CVD
Horizontal Tube LPCVD
ASM International
BTU International
Centrotherm
.0
Kokusai Electric
7.6
9.2
2.2
Koyo Lindberg
1.0
1.8
3.0
Silicon Valley Group
4.3
.0
4.0
.0
2.5
10.0
10.0
Solitec
3.6
6.0
5.0
5.0
9.3
.0
TEI/rhermco
8.3
7.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
Process Technology
Thermco
.0
.0
.0
.0
6.9
.0
7.1
1.5
14.7
.0
.0
.0
.8
.4
.3
.0
.0
.0
.0
.5
3.5
4.0
6.2
5.3
.0
Varian/TEL
.0
.0
.0
2.1
Wellman
.0
.5
.0
1.9
.0
64.7
93.5
.3
85.2
64.1
43.9
.0
6.5
14.6
4.0
Tystar
Ulvac
Ulvac/BTU
Tokyo Electron Ltd.
Tylan
Total Horizontal LPCVD
.0
-9.2
Vertical Tube LPCVD
ASM International
.0
.0
3.0
17.5
22.6
BTU International
.0
.0
.0
5.0
4.5
Denko
2.1
3.5
.0
.0
.0
2.3
.0
3.8
Disco
.0
2.7
General Signal Thinfiim
.0
.0
2.0
4.0
3.0
.3
.0
.0
.0
Koyo Lindberg
.3
1.0
2.7
1.1
2.1
Kokusai Electric
2.8
21.6
55.1
1.9
62.0
Semitherm
.0
Shinko Electric
.0
.5
.0
44.9
1.0
1.5
.0
1.5
6.2
Helmut Seier
.0
(Continued)
©1992 Dataquest Incorporated April—Reproduction Prohibited
4-58
Semiconductor Equipment, Manufacturing, and Materials
i
Table 4.30 (Continued)
Each Company's Revenue from Shipments of Chemical Vapor Deposition Equipment to the World
(End User Revenue In Millions of U.S. Dollars)
Company:
Product:
Region Of Consumption:
Each
Chemical Vapor Deposition
World
1987
1988
1989
1990
1991
1.6
3.6
4.0
11.2
16.5
Toyoko Chemical
.0
.0
5.8
5.9
5.0
Tokyo Electron Ltd.
.0
3.8
34.0
53.0
.0
5.0
Silicon Valley Group
Ulvac
.0
.0
15.9
.0
Varian/TEL
.0
.0
.0
2.7
7.7
7.8
34.8
81.2
142.8
191.6
ASM International
44.5
51.6
51.0
49.6
40.0
Pacific Western
7.9
52.4
6.2
2.8
1.0
57.8
53.8
2.5
52.1
41.0
124.9
186.1
220.2
259.0
276.5
Total Vertical LPCVD
CAGR (%)
1987-1991
122.6
Horizontal Tube PECVD
Total Horizontal Tube PECVD
Total Worldwide Tube CVD
-5.9
22.0
Non-Tube CVD Reaaors
APCVD Reaaors
Alcan (Canon)
Amaya
^ p l i e d Materials
.0
.0
.0
15.0
26.8
5.5
17.5
19.0
16.0
14.5
12.3
.0
15.7
9.0
5.0
General Signal Thinfilm
.0
1.3
.8
.8
Hitachi
.0
.5
1.1
.0
.5
.0
Kokusai Electric
.0
.7
.0
.0
.0
Koyo Lindbeig
.2
.8
.6
.2
1.3
.0
.6
Pacific Western
.0
.0
.0
.0
1.8
5.0
6.0
1.3
4.2
1.3
3.2
3.2
Tempress
Toshiba Machine
.0
16.0
36.0
42.0
41.0
48.5
41.4
80.8
78.0
83.1
91.9
Anicon
3.7
4.0
2.0
.0
Anelva
.7
1.1
1.3
1.4
2.8
.0
26.0
32.0
.0
.0
2.0
.0
1.6
.0
Watkins-Johnson
Total APCVD Reaaors
22.1
LPCVD Reaaors
Applied Materials
.0
2.3
.0
BCT Spectrum
.0
.0
BTUAJlvac
.0
.0
(Continued)
«
©1992 Dataquest Incorporated April—Reproduction Prohibited
Wafer Fab Equipment Market Sliare
4-59
Table 4.30 (Continued)
Each Company's Revenue £tx>m Shipments of Chemical Vapor Deposition Equipment to the World
(End User Revenue in Millions of U.S. Dollars)
Con^any:
Produa:
Region Of Consumption:
Each
Chemical Vapor Deposition
World
Enya
Focus Semiconduaor
1987
1988
1989
1990
1991
.0
1.8
1.7
.0
1.0
2.5
.0
3.5
.0
44.0
34.8
.0
.0
13.2
33.4
62.0
Kokusai Electric
.0
.0
.0
3.1
LAM Research
.0
.0
.0
2.7
1.9
Novellus
.0
.0
.0
1.0
5.7
Silicon Valley Group
3.7
4.0
2.0
Spectrum CVD
1.4
3.6
1.3
3.2
.0
Tokyo Electron, Ltd.
2.3
.0
.0
.0
4.9
2.7
Ulvac
1.4
3.8
4.2
8.0
Genus
Varian
Total LPCVD Reaaors
CAGR (%)
1987-1991
.0
7.9
6.4
5.0
4.5
.0
33.9
59.6
81.6
98.5
89.9
.0
1.4
.4
.0
.0
31.0
75.4
143.0
170.0
186.4
1.9
4.2
3.5
3.8
1.6
13.3
20.3
6.5
15.5
7.0
17.5
8.0
20.0
4.5
.0
27.6
PECVD Reaaors
Anelva
Applied Materials
Enya
E.T. Electrotech
Japan Production
5.6
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
Novellus
3.6
23.7
49.0
63.0
64.0
Plasma-Therm
4.6
6.0
3.0
3.0
1.2
.0
.0
1.0
3.0
58.9
137.5
222.4
2.3
267.6
281.8
LAM Research
Samco
Total PECVD Reaaors
47.9
ECR CVD
1.0
.8
1.0
.4
2.2
Fuji Electric
.0
.0
.0
.0
.9
Plasma Technology
.0
1.6
2.0
Sumitomo Metals
.0
.0
6.0
2.5
5.4
2.7
1.0
2.4
9.0
8.3
7.3
280.3
466.4
391.0
457.5
611.2
716.5
470.9
747.4
Anelva
Total ECR CVD Reaaors
Total Worldwide Non-Tube CVD
135.2
Total Worldwide CVD
260.1
Ref: CVDSHR
Source: DaUquest (April 1992)
®1992 Dataquest Incorporated April—Reproduction Prohibited
1.5
36.6
30.2
Semiconductor Equipment, Manufacturing, and Materials
4-60
Table 4.31
Each Company's Revenue £rom Shipments of Physical Vapor Deposition Eqtjlpment to North America
(End User Revenue in Millions of U.S. Dollars)
Company:
Produa:
Region Of Consumption:
World PVD Market
Each
Physical Vapor Deposition
North America
1987
1988
1989
1990
1991
CAGR (%)
1987-1991
250.9
302.0
368.4
408.5
474.0
17.2
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
10.0
10.0
10.8
17.8
20.8
.0
.0
.0
20.0
5.0
5.0
4.0
6.5
2.0
.4
Sputtering
Advanced Film Tech.
Anelva
Applied Materials
Balzers
CHA Industries
Circuit Processing
.0
.3
.7
.1
.4
2.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
1.0
2.0
6.8
9.0
5.0
6.0
1.4
7.5
1.8
3.0
3.0
3.0
.0
2.6
2.0
.0
.0
2.4
4.2
.7
Kurt J. Lesker
.8
.5
.8
.3
.1
.2
Ion Tech
.5
.1
.8
1.0
.2
3.0
3.0
2.0
2.0
1.0
13.0
15.0
24.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
25.0
30.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
1.8
2.1
1.0
.0
.0
CPA
CVC Products
E.T. Electrotech
GSTC
Innotec
Leybold-Heraeus
Materials Research
MRC Sony
Novellus
Perkin-Elmer
.2
Shlbaura
.0
.9
.0
.0
.0
.0
Shinko Seiki
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
1.0
.6
1.2
1.0
1.5
Temescal
.0
.0
.1
.1
.0
Tokuda
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
6.2
12.6
4.5
Sputtered Films
Ulvac
6.3
6.4
Varian
21.3
24.6
28.0
36.0
25.5
Others
3.1
79.2
5.1
1.9
1.3
1.4
88.7
94.7
115.1
118.5
Total Sputtering
10.6
(Continued)
i
©1992 Dataquest Incorporated April—Reproduction Prohibited
4-61
Wafer Fab Equipment Market Share
Table 4.31 (Continued)
Each Company's Revenue from Shipments of Physical Vapor Deposition Equipment to North America
(End User Revenue In Millions of U.S. Dollars)
Company:
Product:
Region Of Consumption:
Each
Physical Vap)or Deposition
North America
1987
1988
1989
1990
1991
CAGR (%)
1987-1991
Evaporation
Anelva
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
Balzers
1.1
1.1
1.5
2.0
.0
CHA Industries
6.0
2.8
3.0
.0
6.3
1.0
5.6
CVC Products
1.0
1.5
2.7
Innotec
.0
1.0
.0
.0
.0
Kurt J. Lesker
.3
.3
.4
.6
.2
Leybold-Heraeus
.5
.5
.8
.0
.0
4.5
5.0
6.0
5.1
1.5
.2
1.6
1.5
2.7
.7
2.8
14.5
133.0
Temescal
Ulvac
5.1
1.4
Others
.2
1.2
Total Evaporation
14.6
16.4
17.1
17.1
Total North America
93.8
105.1
111.8
132.2
Ref: PVDSHR
Source: DaUquest (April 1992)
©1992 Dataquest Incorporated April—Reproduction Prohibited
-.2
9.1
4-62
Semiconductor Equipment, Manufacturing, and Materials
i
Table 4.32
Each Company's Revenue from Shipments of Physical Vapor Deposition Equipment to Japan
(End User Revenue In Millions of U.S. I>olIars)
Company:
Produa:
Region Of Consumption:
World PVD Market
Sputtering
Advanced Film Tech.
Anelva
Applied Materials
Balzers
CHA Industries
Circuit Processing
CPA
CVC Products
E.T. Electrotech
Each
Physical Vajxjr DefHDsition
Japan
1987
250.9
1988
302.0
1989
368.4
1990
408.5
1991
474.0
.0
.0
.0
.7
.8
34.7
43.8
65.0
64.5
80.0
.0
.0
.0
6.5
21.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
1.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.6
.3
.6
.0
1.6
1.0
.5
.0
GSTC
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
Innotec
Ion Tech
Kurt J. Lesker
Leybold-Heraeus
Materials Research
MRC Sony
Novellas
Perkin-Elmer
Shibaufa
Shinko Seiki
Sputtered Films
Temescal
Tokuda
Ulvac
Varian
Others
Total Sputtering
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
1.9
.0
7.5
13.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
27.0
34.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
4.0
.4
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
11.1
7.0
5.6
5.8
.0
50.0
24.7
40.1
43.6
46.0
12.6
18.7
24.0
26.0
28.2
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
86.6
118.0
152.8
177.5
218.9
CAGR (%)
1987-1991
17.2
26.1
(Continued)
i
©1992 Dataquest Incorporated .^jril—Reproduction Prohibited
Wafer Fab Equipment Market Share
4-63
Table 4.32 (Continued)
Each Company's Revenue from Shipments of Physical Vapor Deposition Equipment to Japan
(End User Revenue in Millions of U.S. Dollars)
Company:
Produa:
Region Of Consumption:
Each
Physical Vapor Dep)Osition
Japan
1987
1988
1989
1990
1991
4.9
.0
6.2
4.3
1.4
4.1
4.1
.0
2.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
CAGR (%)
1987-1991
Evaporation
Anelva
Balzers
CHA Industries
CVC Products
.0
.0
.0
.0
Innotec
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
Kurt J. Lesker
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
Leybold-Heraeus
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
3.5
13.0
2.0
1.6
12.0
7.8
Temescal
2.4
2.4
Ulvac
5.9
.0
11.5
.0
.0
.0
.0
Total Evaporation
13.2
20.1
22.2
20.1
Total Japan
99.8
138.1
175.0
197.6
13.5
232.4
Others
Ref: PVDSHR
Source: Dataquest (April 1992)
01992 Dataquest Incorf>orated April—Reproduction Prohibited
.6
23.5
Semiconductor Equipment, Manufacturing, and Materials
4-64
Table 4.33
Each Company's Revenue £rom Shipments of Physical Vapor Deposition Equipment to Europe
(End User Revenue In Millions of U.S. Dollars)
Company:
Produa:
Region Of Consumption:
Each
Physical Vapor Depjosition
Europe
302.0
1989
368.4
408.5
1991
474.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
1.5
5.0
3.7
2.0
1987
1988
250.9
Advanced Film Tech.
Anelva
World PVD Market
1990
CAGR (%)
1987-1991
17.2
Sputtering
.0
.0
.0
2.0
8.9
.0
6.0
4.2
5.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
Circuit Processing
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
CPA
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
2.9
4.0
3.5
6.0
2.0
.0
8.0
1.5
8.0
8.0
GSTC
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
innotec
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
Ion Tech
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
Applied Materials
Balzers
CHA Industries
CVC Products
E.T. Electrotech
.0
.0
.0
.0
.8
Leybold-Heraeus
7.0
4.8
6.0
5.0
2.6
Materials Research
4.0
4.0
5.0
.0
.0
7.0
Kurt J. Lesker
MRC Sony
.0
.0
.0
Novellus
.0
.0
.0
.0
8.5
.0
Perkin-Elmer
.3
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
Shinko Seiki
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
Sputtered Films
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
Shibaura
Temescal
.0
.0
.0
.0
Tokuda
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
Ulvac
2.0
1.2
Varian
6.3
6.0
5.9
7.0
10.0
12.7
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
35.4
31.5
39.6
43.5
38.3
Others
Total Sputtering
2.0
(Continued)
t
©1992 Dataquest Incorporated April—Reproduction Prohibited
4-65
Wafer Fab Equipment Market Share
Table 4.33 (Continued)
Each Company's Revenue from Shipments of Physical Vapor Deposition Equipment to Europe
(End User Revenue in Millions of U.S. Dollars)
Company:
Product:
Region Of Consumption:
Each
Physical Vapor Deposition
Europe
1989
1990
1991
.0
.0
.0
.0
1.8
1.5
2.0
.0
.0
.0
1987
1988
Anelva
.0
Balzers
1.8
CAGR (%)
1987-1991
Evaporation
CHA Industries
.0
.0
.0
CVC Products
.0
.6
.6
.8
.0
.4
Innotec
.0
.0
.2
Kurt J. Lesker
.0
.0
.0
.0
.5
.6
Leybold-Heraeus
1.0
.0
1.0
1.0
1.4
Temescal
2.4
1.8
2.1
3.0
.3
.0
.0
.0
2.5
.0
.0
.0
.0
4.5
5.4
7.2
5.0
36.0
45.0
50.7
43.3
Ulvac
.1
Others
.0
Total Evaporation
Total Europe
5.3
40.7
Kef: PVDSHR
Source: Dataquest (April 1992)
©1992 Dataquest Incorporated April—Reproduction Prohibited
4.4
1.6
Semiconductor Equipment, Manufacturing, and Materials
4-66
Table 4.34
Each Company's Revenue from Shipments of Physical Vapor Deposition Equipment to Asia/Padfic-ROW
(End User Revenue In Millions of U.S. Dollars)
Company:
Product:
Region Of Consumption:
Each
Physical Vapor Deposition
Asia/Pacific-ROW
302.0
408.5
1991
474.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
3.6
3.5
10.0
12.0
1988
250.9
Advanced Film Tech.
Anelva
World PVD Market
1990
1989
368.4
1987
CAGR (%)
1987-1991
17.2
Sputtering
Applied Materials
.0
.0
.0
.0
Balzers
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
CHA Industries
.0
.0
.0
.0
Circuit Processing
.0
.0
.0
.0
.3
.0
CPA
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
CVC Products
.0
1.0
1.0
1.0
1.5
.0
1.5
.5
1.0
.0
.0
E.T. Electrotech
.0
.6
GSTC
.0
.0
Innotec
.0
.0
.0
.5
Ion Tech
.0
.0
.0
.0
.5
.0
Kurt J. Lesker
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
Leybold-Heraeus
2.0
.0
.8
.8
.8
Materials Research
4.2
.0
.0
.0
7.5
.0
12.0
MRC Sony
.0
3.6
12.0
Novellus
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
Perkin-Elmer
.7
.0
.0
.0
.0
Shibaura
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
Shinko Seiki
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
Sputtered Films
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
Temescal
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
Tokuda
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
Ulvac
1.0
1.0
.0
.0
Varian
8.1
12.0
14.0
12.0
24.5
.4
62.0
Others
Total Sputtering
.0
.0
.0
.2
16.0
22.1
32.9
23.1
40.3
(Continued)
®1992 Dataquest Incorporated April—Reproduction Prohibited
Wafer Fab Equipment Market Sliare
4-67
Table 4.54 (Continued)
Each Company's Revenue from Shipments of Physical Vapor Deposition Equipment to Asia/Padfic-ROW
(End User Revenue in Millions of U.S. Dollars)
Company:
Produa:
Region Of Consumption:
Each
Physical Vapor Deposition
Asia/Pacific-ROW
1989
1990
1991
1987
1988
Anelva
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
Balzers
.0
.0
1.0
.5
1.2
.0
.7
.4
.0
CAGR (%)
1987-1991
Evaporation
CHA Industries
.0
.0
CVC Products
.0
.0
1.5
.4
Innotec
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
Kurt J. Lesker
.0
.0
.2
.0
.0
Leybold-Heraeus
Temescal
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.6
.5
2.0
1.6
Ulvac
.6
.7
.0
.0
.0
Others
.0
.0
.0
.3
.4
4.9
28.0
65.3
Total Evaporation
Total A/P-ROW
.6
.7
3.7
16.6
22.8
36.6
Ref: PVDSHR
Source: Dataquest (^ril 1992)
•
©1992 Dataquest Incorporated April—Reproduction Prohibited
.6
3.3
53.1
40.8
SemJconductor Equipment, Manufacturing, and Materials
4-68
Table 4.35
Each Company's Revenue £ix)m Shipments of Physical Vapor Deposition Equipment to the World
(End User Revenue in Millions of U.S. Dollars)
Company:
Product:
Region Of Consumption:
World PVD Market
Each
Physical Vapor Deposition
World
1987
1988
250.9
302.0
1989
368.4
1990
1991
408.5
474.0
CAGR (%)
1987-1991
17.2
Sputtering
Advanced Film Tech.
Anelva
Applied Materials
Balzers
CHA Industries
Circuit Processing
CPA
CVC Products
E.T. Electrotech
GSTC
Innotec
Ion Tech
.0
.0
.0
.7
.8
44.7
53.8
80.9
90.8
114.5
.0
.0
.0
15.0
55.0
13.9
11.0
8.2
7.0
.0
.3
3.0
.7
.1
.4
.7
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
1.0
2.0
9.7
6.0
12.3
9.0
12.0
7.5
7.0
14.1
2.6
2.0
13.5
.0
12.0
.0
2.4
4.2
.5
.1
.8
.7
.1
.2
.7
.5
.0
.8
.8
.8
1.0
1.0
Leybold-Heraeus
12.0
7.8
8.8
7.8
4.4
Materials Research
23.1
.0
34.0
54.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
62.6
84.5
.0
.0
.0
.0
1.8
.9
.0
1.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
4.0
.4
Kurt J. Lesker
MRC Sony
Novellus
Perkin-Elmer
Shibaura
3.1
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
1.0
.6
1.2
1.0
1.5
.0
.0
.1
.1
.0
Tokuda
11.1
7.0
5.6
5.8
.0
Ulvac
34.0
48.7
55.7
58.6
54.5
84.0
1.5
359.2
90.9
1.8
Shinko Seiki
Sputtered Films
Temescal
Varian
48.3
61.3
73.0
Others
3.1
217.2
5.1
1.9
320.0
Total Sputtering
260.3
437.7
19.1
CContinued)
«
©1992 Dataquest Incorporated April—Reproduction Prohibited
Wafer Fab Equipment Market Share
4-69
Table 4.35 (Continued)
Each Company's Revenue from Shipments of Physical Vapor Deposition Equipment to the World
(End User Revenue in Millions of U.S. Dollars)
Company:
Produa:
Region Of Consumption:
Each
Physical Vap)or Deposition
World
1987
1988
1989
1990
1991
4.9
6.2
4.3
4.1
4.1
CAGR (%)
1987-1991
Evaporation
Anelva
.0
Balzers
2.9
2.9
5.4
CHA Industries
6.0
6.3
7.1
6.5
4.0
3.7
CVC Products
.0
1.6
2.0
2.7
2.7
Innotec
.0
1.0
.2
.4
.5
.8
Kurt J. Lesker
.3
.3
.6
.6
Leybold-Heraeus
1.5
.5
1.8
Temescal
9.9
8.0
8.7
11.2
1.5
13.0
10.8
14.0
14.6
8.5
3.2
36.3
474.0
Ulvac
.2
.2
1.2
13.5
3.0
Total Evaporation
33.7
41.7
48.4
49.3
Total Woridwide
250.9
302.0
368.4
408.5
Others
Ref: PVDSHR
Source: Dataquest (^ril 1992)
©1992 Dataquest Incorporated April—Reproduction Prohibited
2.0
1.9
17.2
4-70
Semiconductor Equipment, Manufacturing, and Materials
Table 4.36
Each Company's Revenue from Shipments of Silicon Epitaxy Equipment to Each Region
(End User Revenue in Millions of U.S. DoUars)
Company:
Product:
Region Of Consumption:
Each
Silicon Epitaxy
Each
1987
1988
1989
1990
35.5
85.5
75.0
68.2
6.4
25.5
13.0
ASM Epitaxy
.0
1.5
3.8
12.5
12.6
15.0
Kokusai Electric
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
Total Epitaxy Market
1991
88.6
CAGR (%)
1987-1991
25.7
North America
Applied Materials
Lam Research
7.0
7.0
15.0
12.8
LPE
.0
.0
.0
7.9
.0
Moore
.0
1.0
1.2
1.8
2.8
Rapro
.0
.0
.9
.0
Sitesa
.0
.0
.9
.0
.0
.0
Toshiba Machine
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
13.4
43.0
31.7
35.7
24.8
8.0
5.4
.0
8.5
3.0
20.0
.0
16.5
.8
Kokusai Electric
1.5
4.2
5.7
2.2
Lam Research
2.9
.0
.0
.0
.0
3.1
.0
5.9
.0
.0
.0
Moore
.0
.0
.0
.0
Rapro
.0
.0
.0
.0
.5
.0
Sitesa
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
Toshiba Machine
.6
2.0
6.5
13.0
23.5
20.7
4.5
18.2
12.5
46.1
Total North America
.0
16.6
Japan
Applied Materials
ASM Epitaxy
LPE
Total Japan
7.2
37.2
Europe
3.6
4.4
3.0
3.1
3.0
ASM Epitaxy
.0
.8
2.4
3.6
5.5
Kokusai Electric
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
2.8
1.0
2.8
.0
.0
.0
2.7
3.0
4.0
1.2
2.5
.0
Applied Materials
Lam Research
LPE
Moore
.0
.0
.4
Rapro
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
Sitesa
.0
4.5
.0
.0
Toshiba Machine
.0
.0
4.9
.0
Total Europe
6.4
13.4
16.5
.0
.0
11.9
11.0
14.5
(Continued)
©1992 Dataquest Incorporated April—Reproduction Prohibited
4r-n
Wafer Fab Equipment Market Share
Table 4.36 (Continued)
Each Company's Revenue from Shipments of Silicon Epitaxy Equipment to Each Region
(End User Revenue in Millions of U.S. Dollars)
Company:
Produa:
Region Of Consumption:
Each
Silicon Epitaxy
Each
1989
1990
1991
.8
.8
.9
2.0
.0
.0
.0
2.2
1987
1988
Applied Materials
.6
ASM Epitaxy
.0
CAGR (%)
1987-1991
Asia/Pacific-ROW
Kokusai Electric
Lam Research
LPE
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
2.1
3.0
.0
.0
2.5
.0
.0
1.8
3.5
1.8
Moore
.0
.0
.0
1.5
.0
Rapro
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
Sitesa
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
•
.0
.0
.0
.0
2.7
5.6
6.1
.0
2.4
6.7
Applied Materials
ASM Epitaxy
18.6
47.2
22.2
25.0
32.0
.0
19.2
29.9
1.5
14.8
3.1
4.2
6.2
Kokusai Electric
5.7
22.2
2.2
5.9
.0
Toshiba Machine
Total A/P-ROW
Worldwide
Lam Research
LPE
.0
Moore
Rapro
19.0
7.9
5.0
4.8
.0
4.5
1.0
.0
.0
.9
Sitesa
.0
4.9
Toshiba Machine
.6
4.5
2.0
.9
.0
6.5
4.5
12.5
35.5
85.5
75.0
68.2
88.6
Total Woridwide
1.6
5.5
3.0
Ref: EPISHR
Source: Dataquest CApiil 1992)
©1992 Dataquest Incorporated April—Reproduction Prohibited
25.5
3.3
.0
.0
25.7
4-72
Semiconductor Equipment, Manufacturing, and Materials
i
Table 4.37
Each Company's Revenue £rom Shipments of Metalorganic CVD Equipment to North America
(End User Revenue in Millions of U.S. Dollars)
Company:
Produa:
Region Of Consumption:
Each
Metalorganic CVD
North America
1987
1988
1989
1990
1991
34.6
42.0
44.6
44.3
51.4
.0
.8
3.5
4.4
6.0
1.5
1.3
.0
.0
.0
Crystal Specialties
1.7
2.3
.0
.0
.0
CVD Equipment
CVT
1.2
1.0
1.0
.7
.7
.0
.0
.0
.0
1.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
4.0
"World MOCVD Market
CAGR (%)
1987-1991
10.4
North America
Aixtron
Cambridge Instruments
Daiwa Semiconduaor
EEV
MR Semicon
5.1
.0
6.5
.0
7.5
1.2
5.4
.0
1.2
Nippon EMC
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
Emcore
Nipp>on Sanso
.2
.0
.0
.0
.0
Nissin Electric
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
Samco
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
Seiden
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
Semco Engineering
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
1.3
.0
1.5
.0
1.7
.0
1.7
1.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
Thomas Schwonn
.0
.4
.0
.0
.0
Toyoko Chemical
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
Shimada Rika
Spire
TEL
TEX/Ihermco
Ulvac
.0
.0
.0
Yamoto
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
14.9
12.2
13.9
Total North America
11.0
13.8
i
6.0
Ref: MOCVDSHR
Source: DaUquest (AptH 1992)
i
©1992 Dataquest Incorporated April—Reproduction Prohibited
Wafer Fab Equipment Market Share
4-73
Table 4.38
Each Company's Revenue from Shipments of Metalorganlc CVD Equipment to Japan
(End User Revenue in Millions of U.S. Dollars)
Company:
Produa:
Region Of Consumption:
Each
Metalorganlc CVD
Japan
1987
1988
1989
1990
34.6
42.0
44.6
44.3
1991
51.4
Aixtron
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
Cambridge Instruments
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
Crystal Specialties
.9
.0
.4
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
"World MOCVD Market
CAGR (%)
1987-1991
10.4
Japan
CVD Equipment
CVT
Daiwa Semiconductor
.4
EEV
.0
Emcore
.5
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
6.0
MR Semicon
.0
.0
.5
.0
2.5
.0
5.0
.0
.0
Nippon EMC
1.4
1.9
2.2
2.2
Nipjxjn Sanso
4.7
5.7
Nissin Electric
.0
6.3
.0
1.7
5.6
.0
.0
Samco
.6
1.0
.6
.8
Seiden
.6
.6
.0
.0
6.9
1.1
.9
.0
Semco Engineering
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
Shimada Rika
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
Spire
.0
.6
.7
.0
.0
TEL
.0
.0
.0
1.7
.0
.0
Thomas Schwonn
2.9
.0
2.9
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
Toyoko Chemical
.7
1.2
.0
.0
.0
1.9
.0
2.2
2.0
.0
.0
3.1
.0
4.3
16.6
16.2
22.9
TEI/Thermco
Ulvac
Yamoto
Total Japan
14.1
16.9
Ref: MOCVDSHS
Source: Dauquest CApril 1992)
©1992 Dataquest Incorporated April—Reproduction Prohibited
1.5
12.9
4-74
Semiconductor Equipment, Manufacturing, and Materials
Table 4.39
Each Company's Revenue from Shipments of Metalorganlc CVD Equipment to Europe
(End User Revenue in Millions of U.S. Dollars)
Company:
Produa:
Region Of Consumption:
Each
Metalorganlc CVD
Europe
1987
1988
1989
1990
1991
CAGR (%)
1987-1991
34.6
42.0
44.6
44.3
51.4
10.4
Aixtron
4.9
6.7
6.7
8.6
6.0
Cambridge Instniments
1.5
1.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
World MOCVD Market
Eurof)e
Crystal Specialties
CVD Equipment
CVT
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
1.1
1.6
1.1
2.2
.0
Daiwa Semiconduaor
EEV
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.7
.0
.0
.0
.0
Emcore
.0
.0
1.2
.0
.0
.0
.8
1.2
MR Semicon
1.5
2.2
Nippon EMC
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
Nippon Sanso
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
Nissin Electric
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
Samco
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
Seiden
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
1.0
.0
.0
Shimada Rika
.3
.0
.9
.0
.0
• .0
.0
Spire
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
TEL
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
TEL/Thermco
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
Semco Engineering
Thomas Schwonn
.7
.4
.0
.0
.0
Toyoko Chemical
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
Ulvac
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
Yamoto
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
9.2
10.6
9.6
13.5
9.4
Total Europe
Refi MOCVDSHR
Source Dauquest (April 1992)
©1992 Dataquest Incorporated April—Reproduction Prohibited
.5
4-75
Wafer Fab Equipment Market Sliare
Table 4.40
Each Company's Revenue from Shipments of Metalorganlc CVD Equipment to Asia/Pacific-ROW
(End User Revenue in Millions of U.S. Dollars)
Company:
Produa:
Region Of Consumption:
Each
Metalorganlc CVD
Asia/Pacific-ROW
1987
1988
1989
1990
1991
CAGR (%)
1987-1991
34.6
42.0
44.6
44.3
51.4
10.4
Aixtron
.0
.0
1.2
Cambridge Instruments
.3
.0
.4
.0
.9
.0
3.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.3
.0
.0
World MOCVD Market
Asia/Pacific-ROW
Crystal Specialties
CVD Equipment
CVT
.0
.0
.3
.0
.0
.0
.0
.9
.0
.0
Daiwa Semiconduaor
.0
.0
EEV
.0
.0
.0
Emcore
.0
.0
.0
•0
.0
1.0
MR Semicon
.0
.0
.0
Nippon EMC
.0
.0
.0
.0
1.5
.0
1.2
.0
Nippon Sanso
.0
.0
1.1
.0
.0
Nissin Electric
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
Samco
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
Seiden
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
Semco Engineering
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
Shimada Rika
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
•
Spire
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
TEL
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
TEL/Thermco
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
Thomas Schwonn
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
Toyoko Chemical
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
Ulvac
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
Yamoto
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
3.5
2.4
5.2
Total A/P-ROW
.3
.7
Refi MOCVDSHR
Source: Dataquest CApril 1992)
®1992 Dataquest Incorporated April—Reproduction Prohibited
104.0
Semiconductor Equipment, Manufacturing, and Materials
4-76
Table 4.4l
Each Company's Revenue £rom Shipments of Metalorganlc CVD Equipment to the World
(End User Revenue in Millions of U.S. Dollars)
Company:
Product:
Region Of Consumption:
Each
Metalorganic CVD
World
1987
1988
1989
1990
34.6
42.0
44.6
44.3
Aixtron
4.9
7.5
11.4
15.0
Cambridge Instruments
3.3
2.6
2.7
.0
13.9
.0
2.7
.0
.0
.0
1.2
1.3
2.0
.7
.7
2.2
1.0
World MOCVD Market
1991
51.4
CAGR (%)
1987-1991
10.4
Worldwide
Crystal Sp>ecialties
CVD Equipment
CVT
.0
1.1
1.3
1.6
Daiwa Semiconduaor
.4
.5
.0
.0
.0
EEV
.7
.0
.0
.0
.0
Emcore
MR Semicon
5.1
.0
7.0
10.0
11.6
12.2
.0
2.0
3.0
4.6
Nippon EMC
1.4
1.9
2.2
1.7
2.2
6.8
5.6
6.9
.0
.0
1.1
NipfKjn Sanso
Nissin Electric
4.9
.0
6.3
.0
Samco
.6
1.0
.6
.8
Seiden
.6
.6
.0
.0
.9
.0
Semco Engineering
.3
.0
.9
.0
1.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
Shimada Rika
2.1
2.4
1.7
TEL
1.3
.0
1.0
.0
.0
.0
TEL/Ihermco
2.9
1.7
2.9
.0
.0
.0
.7
.8
.0
.0
.0
Spire
Thomas Schwonn
Toyoko Chemical
Ulvac
Yamoto
Total Worldwide
.7
1.2
.0
.0
.0
1.9
.0
2.2
2.0
4.3
.0
.0
3.1
.0
34.6
42.0
44.6
44.3
1.5
51.4
10.4
Hef: MOCVDSHR
Source: DaUquest (April 1992)
«
©1992 Dataquest Incorporated ^rll—Reproduction Prohibited
4-77
Wafer Fab Equipment Market Share
Table 4.42
Each Company's Revenue from Shipments of Molecular Beam Epitaxy Equipment to the World
(End User Revenue in Millions of U.S. Dollars)
Conpany:
Product:
Region Of Consumption:
World MBE Market
Each
Molecular Beam Epitaxy
Each
1990
58.0
1991
CAGR (%)
1987-1991
80.9
1989
74.0
58.9
-3.5
1987
1988
68.0
North America
Anelva
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
Daido Sanso
Hike
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
Emcore
.0
.0
.0
1.0
.0
2.5
4.0
Intevac
ISA Riber
.0
.0
.0
.0
7.0
8.0
3.6
.0
.0
6.5
.0
.0
.0
5.0
2.8
.0
.0
.0
Seiko
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
Ulvac
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
Varian
5.2
5.4
7.8
2.1
.0
VG Instruments
2.5
.0
5.1
.0
6.5
.0
2.6
4.0
.0
.0
19.7
21.3
20.8
9.3
10.5
9.7
6.8
6.2
8.7
.0
11.5
.0
.0
.0
1.8
1.4
1.2
2.6
2.2
Nissin Electric
Perkin-Elmer
Yamato Semico
Total North America
-14.6
Japan
Anelva
Daido Sanso
Eiko
Emcore
.0
.0
2.9
.0
.0
.0
Intevac
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
6.0
3.9
1.4
2.7
.8
Nissin Electric
.0
.0
.0
.0
.6
Perkin-Elmer
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
4.9
ISA Riber
Seiko
1.2
1.4
.0
Ulvac
4.3
4.0
Varian
1.9
8.1
7.5
5.2
.5
.7
5.9
.0
5.6
4.9
6.1
4.3
1.9
25.1
5.5
29.8
VG Instmments
Yamoto Semico
Total Jafjan
.0
.0
1.8
32.6
36.3
22.3
-2.2
CConiinuect)
©1992 Dauquest Incorporated April—Reproduction Prohibited
4-78
Semiconductor Equipment, Manufacturing, and Materials
Table 4.42 (Continued)
Each Company's Revenue £rom Shipments of Molecular Beam Epitaxy Equipment to the World
(End User Revenue in Millions of U.S. Dollars)
Company:
Produa:
Region Of Consumption:
Each
Molecular Beam Epitaxy
Each
1987
1988
1989
1990
1991
Anelva
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
Daido Sanso
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
Eiko
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
Emcore
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
Intevac
.0
.0
.0
.0
4.9
.0
6.9
.0
8.0
9.6
2.7
3.4
.0
.0
.0
Perkin-Elmer
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
Seiko
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
8.9
6.8
.0
.0
2.6
CAGR (%)
1987-1991
Europe
ISA Riber
Nissin Electric
Ulvac
.0
Varian
4.4
VG Instruments
2.4
6.3
5.8
Yamoto Semico
.0
.0
.0
.0
4.5
.0
11.7
19.0
23.7
12.2
10.6
Anelva
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
Daido Sanso
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
Eiko
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
Emcore
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
Total Europe
-2.4
Asia/Pacific-ROW
Intevac
ISA Riber
Nissin Electric
.0
.0
.0
.0
1.4
3.7
6.4
4.4
5.8
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
Perkin-Elmer
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
Seiko
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
Ulvac
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
Varian
.6
.6
.0
.0
VG Instruments
2.0
.0
.8
.9
6.1
2.2
Yamoto Semico
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
4.0
4.3
7.2
11.4
8.0
Total Asia/Pacific-ROW
©1992 Dataquest Incoiporated April—Reproduction Prohibited
18.9
(Continued)
Wafer Fab Equipment Market Share
4-79
Table 4.42 (Continued)
Each Company's Revenue from Shipments of Molecular Beam Epitaxy Equipment to the World
(End User Revenue in Millions of U.S. Dollars)
Company:
Produa:
Region Of Consumption:
Each
Molecular Beam Epitaxy
Each
1987
1988
1989
1990
1991
9.7
11.5
6.8
6.2
8.7
.0
.0
.0
.0
1.8
CAGR (%)
1987-1991
Worldwide
Anelva
Daido Sanso
1.4
1.2
2.9
2.6
2.2
Emcore
.0
.0
.0
1.0
.0
Intevac
.0
.0
.0
.0
5.2
Hike
ISA Riber
19.3
.0
22.5
.0
22.3
.0
20.3
.0
14.0
5.0
1.2
2.8
1.4
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
7.5
4.0
Varian
4.3
12.1
17.5
17.2
4.9
3.7
5.9
.0
VG Instalments
15.0
19.0
17.4
15.0
.0
16.5
.0
1.8
68.0
80.9
74.0
1.9
58.0
58.9
Nissin Electric
Perkin-Elmer
Seiko
Ulvac
Yamoto Semico
Total Worldwide
Ref: MBESHR
Source: Dauquest (Apiil 1992)
01992 Dataquest Incorporated April—Reproduction Prohibited
.6
5.5
-3.5
Semiconductor Equipment, Manufacturing, and Materials
4-80
Table 4.43
Each Company's Revenue from Shipments of Diffusion Furnace Equipment to North America
(End User Revenue in Millions of U.S. Dollars)
Company:
Product:
Region:
World Diffusion Market
Each
Diffusion Furnaces
North America
1987
1988
1989
145.4
295.5
330.6
2.3
3.4
2.5
3.5
2.5
17.3
.0
18.0
10.0
6.0
.0
.0
.0
9.0
8.0
6.0
7.5
3.0
4.0
3.0
1.0
.0
.0
1990
324.0
1991
335.1
CAGR (%)
1987-1991
23.2
Horizontal Tube
ASM International
BTU International
Denko
Gasonics
GSTC
8.3
.0
7.5
.0
Kokusai Electric
.0
1.2
.0
Koyo Lindberg
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.6
.4
Pacific Western
.0
.6
.6
Process Technology
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
15.0
Silicon Valley Group
.0
.0
34.0
24.0
Solitec
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.5
15.7
.0
.0
.0
.0
42.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
Tylan
2.0
.0
.0
.0
Tystar
.0
2.5
.0
.6
Ulvac
.0
.0
.0
.3
.0
.5
.0
Ulvac/BTU
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
3.0
TEL/Thermco
Tempress
Thermco
Tokyo Electron Ltd.
Varian/TEL
.0
.0
.0
.0
Others
.0
.0
1.9
1.2
36.3
79.0
1.3
69.0
49.3
37.1
Total N.A. Horizontal
.5
(Continued)
©1992 Dataquest Incorporated ^ril—Reproduction Prohibited
4-81
Wafer Fab Equipment Market Share
Table 4.43 (Continued)
Each Company's Revenue from Shipments of Diffusion Furnace Equipment to North America
(End User Revenue in Millions of U.S. Dollars)
Company:
Produa:
Region:
Each
Diffusion Furnaces
North America
1987
1988
1989
1990
1991
ASM Intertutional
.0
.0
1.0
2.0
4.0
BTU International
.0
1.0
.0
3.0
5.0
Denko
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
Disco
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
5.0
2.0
CAGR (%)
1987-1991
Vertical Tube
GSTC
.0
.0
3.0
Helmut Seier
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
Koyo Lindberg
.0
.0
.0
Kokusai Electric
.0
27
4.2
17
7.0
4.0
3.0
Semitherm
.0
.5
2.0
Shinko Electric
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
17.0
Silicon Valley Group
.8
2.0
3.0
10.0
TEI/Thermco
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
Tokyo Electron Ltd.
.0
.0
.0
Ulvac
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
Ulvac/BTU
.0
.0
.0
Varian/TEL
.0
.0
5.6
2.1
4.8
.8
6.2
18.8
27.8
42.8
37.1
85.2
87.8
77.1
79.9
Total North America Vertical
Total North America
Ref: DDT
Source: Dataquest (April 1992)
(01992 Dataquest Incorporated April—Reproduction Prohibited
170.5
21.1
Semiconductor Equipment, Manufacturing, and Materials
4-83
Table 4.44
Each Company's Revenue from Shipments of Diffusion Furnace Equipment to Japan
(End User Revenue in Millions of U.S. Dollars)
Company:
Produa:
Region:
World Diffusion Market
Each
Diffusion Furnaces
Japan
1987
1988
1989
1990
1991
CAGR (%)
1987-1991
145.4
295.5
330.6
324.0
335.1
23.2
.0
.0
2.0
2.6
2.2
.0
.0
Horizontal Tube
ASM International
BTU International
.0
.0
.0
Denko
.8
.9
.0
.0
.0
1.0
.0
.0
.0
Gasonics
.0
.0
.0
GSTC
.0
.0
Kokusai Electric
16.7
.5
13.4
10.8
4.8
5.6
Koyo Lindberg
2.6
3.3
5.0
4.5
Pacific Western
.0
.0
.0
.0
5.9
.0
Process Technology
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
Silicon Valley Group
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
Solitec
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
22.9
.0
.0
.0
.0
Tempress
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
Thermco
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
Tokyo Electron Ltd.
.0
44.6
52.0
38.0
Tyian
.0
.0
.0
.0
22.3
.0
Tystar
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
TEL/Thermco
.0
.0
.0
.0
10.4
Ulvac/BTU
1.7
9.2
10.0
13.2
.0
Varian/TEL
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
Others
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
44.7
71.9
79.8
64.1
46.4
Ulvac
Total Japan Horizontal
.9
(Continued)
©1992 Dataquest Itjcorpoiated April—Reproduction Prohibited
Wafer Fab Equipment Market Share
4-83
Table 4.44 (Continued)
Each Company's Revenue from Shipments of Diffusion Furnace Equipment to Japan
(End User Revenue In Millions of U.S. Dollars)
Company:
Produa:
Region:
Each
Diffusion Furnaces
Japan
1987
1988
1989
1990
1991
.0
.0
2.0
2.8
1.0
CAGR (%)
1987-1991
Vertical Tube
ASM International
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
Denko
1.2
1.8
4.0
.0
3.6
6.9
5.8
10.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
BTU International
Disco
1.5
GSTC
.0
2.9
.0
Helmut Seier
.5
.7
Koyo Lindberg
3.1
3.5
3.1
7.6
6.7
Kokusai Electric
7.3
.0
13.5
34.3
.0
31.7
.0
16.5
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
7.4
Semitherm
Shinko Electric
.0
Silicon Valley Group
.0
.8
.0
.0
.0
TEI/Thermco
.7
.0
.0
.0
.0
Tokyo Electron Ltd.
.1
8.0
48.3
.0
.0
16.9
.0
48.0
Ulvac
.0
2.6
Ulvac/BTU
.0
2.3
2.3
.0
.0
.0
3.3
.0
.0
Varian/TEL
Total Japan Vertical
14.4
108.7
107.7
65.4
59.1
33.5
105.4
48.4
Total Japan
128.2
172.8
154.1
27.1
Ref: DIFF
Source: dauquest (April 1992)
®1992 Dataquest Incorporated April—Reproduction Prohibited
.0
Semiconductor Equipment, Manufacturing, and Materials
4-84
€
Table 4.45
Each Company's Revenue from Shipments of Diffusion Furnace Eqiilpment to Europe
(End User Revenue in Millions of U.S. Dollars)
Company:
Produtt:
Region:
Each
Diffusion Furnaces
Europe
World Diffusion Market
1990
1991
CAGR (%)
1987-1991
335.1
23.2
1987
1988
1989
145.4
295.5
330.6
324.0
16.2
16.0
8.0
5.0
7.3
19.3
8.2
9.0
5.0
3.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
Horizontal Tube
ASM International
BTU International
Denko
Gasonics
.0
.0
.0
GSTC
.0
.8
1.0
1.0
.0
.0
.0
Kokusai Electric
.0
.0
.0
Koyo Lindberg
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
Pacific Western
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
Process Technology
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
Silicon Valley Group
.0
.0
12.0
10.0
7.0
Solitec
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
TEI/rhermco
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
Tempress
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
Thermco
13.2
12.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
Tokyo Electron Ltd.
.0
Tylan
.0
2.3
.0
.0
.0
.0
Tystar
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
Ulvac
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
Ulvac/BTU
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
Varian/TEL
.0
.0
.7
4.2
2.7
3.5
42.2
5.2
4.5
22.2
Others
Total Europe Horizontal
2.5
39.2
3.5
46.1
33-4
-13.3
(Continued)
i
©1992 Dataquest Incorporated April—Reproduction Prohibited
4-85
Wafer Fab Equipment Marlcet Share
Table 4.45 (Continued)
Each Company's Revenue from Shipments of Diffusion Furnace Equipment to Europe
(End User Revenue i n Millions of U.S. Dollars)
Company:
Product:
Region:
Each
Diffusion Furnaces
Europe
1987
1988
1989
1990
1991
ASM International
.0
.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
BTU International
.0
.0
.0
1.5
1.0
CAGR (%)
1987-1991
Vertical Tube
Denko
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
Disco
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
GSTC
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
Helmut Seier
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
Koyo lindberg
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
Kokusai Electric
.0
.0
.0
.0
3.8
Semitherm
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
Shinko Electric
Silicon Valley Group
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.8
1.0
3.2
3.0
TEI/Thermco
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
Tokyo Electron Ltd.
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
Ulvac
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
Ulvac/BTU
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
Varian/TEL
.0
.0
.0
.0
3.3
.0
.8
4.0
7.7
14.1
NM
46.9
46.2
41.1
36.3
-1.9
Total Europe Vertical
Total Europe
39.2
NM - Not meaningful
Ref: DIFF
Source: Dalaquest (April 1992)
©1992 Dataquest Incorporated April—Reproduction Prohibited
Semiconductor Equipment, Manufacturing, and Materials
4-86
Table 4.46
Each Company's Revenue from Shipments of Diffusion Furnace Equipment to Asla/Pacific-ROW
(End User Revenue In Millions of U.S. Dollars)
Comfsany:
Produa:
Region:
Each
Diffusion Furnaces
Asia/Pacific-ROW
World Diffusion Market
1987
1988
145.4
295.5
1989
330.6
.0
.0
1.5
1990
1991
324.0
335.1
4.0
CAGR (%)
1987-1991
23.2
Horizontal Tube
ASM International
BTU International
Denko
2.0
3.7
8.5
14.0
1.5
3.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
Gasonics
.0
.0
.0
1.0
1.2
GSTC
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
Kokusai Electric
.0
4.6
.0
.0
.0
Koyo Lindbei;g
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
Pacific Western
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
Process Technology
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
Silicon Valley Group
.0
.0
6.0
4.0
6.0
Solitec
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
TEI/Thermco
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
Tempress
Thermco
.0
.0
.0
6.0
6.0
.0
.0
.0
14.7
Tokyo Electron Ltd.
.0
27.7
21.0
6.2
Tylan
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
Tystar
.0
.0
.0
.2
Ulvac
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
Ulvac/BTU
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
Varian/TEL
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
9.7
46.8
1.5
44.0
1.5
17.4
1.5
29.4
Others
Total A/P-ROW Horizontal
31.9
(CondnuecQ
«
©1992 Dataquest Incorporated April—Reproduction Proiiibited
4-87
Wafer Fab Equipment Market Share
Table 4.46 (Continued)
Each Company's Revenue from Shipments of Diffusion Furnace Equipment to Asia/Padfic-ROW
(End User Revenue in Millions of U.S. Dollars)
Conqjany:
Produa:
Region:
Each
Diffusion Furnaces
Asia/Pacific-ROW
1987
1988
1989
1990
1991
.0
.0
1.0
1.0
2.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
1.5
.0
Disco
.0
.0
• .0
.0
.0
GSTC
Helmut Seier
Koyo Lindberg
Kokusai Electric
Semitherm
Shinko Electric
Silicon Valley Group
TEL/Thermco
Tokyo Electron Ltd.
Ulvac
Ulvac/BTU
Varian/TEL
Total A/P-ROW Vertical
Total A/P-ROW
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
10.8
22.4
10.1
20.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.3
.0
.4
1.0
3.0
6.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
7.4
.0
Vertical Tube
ASM International
BTU International
Denko
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.3
10.0
11.2
24.4
15.6
35.4
58.0
68.4
33.0
64.8
Ref: DIFF
SOURS: Dauquest (April 1992)
©1992 Dataquest Incorporated April—Reproduction Prohibited
CAGR (%)
1987-1991
229.6
59.5
4-88
Semiconductor Equipment, Manufacturing, and Materials
i
Table 4.47
Each Company's Revenue £rom Shipments of Diffusion Furnace Equipment to the World
(End User Revenue in Millions of U.S. Dollars)
Company:
Product:
Region:
Each
Diffusion Furnaces
World
1990
324.0
1991
295.5
1989
330.6
CAGR (%)
1987-1991
335.1
23.2
18.5
22.7
22.0
15.6
11.7
19.3
.8
34.0
41.0
18.0
13.0
.9
9.0
.0
.0
.0
8.0
8.0
8.7
5.0
4.0
1.0
10.8
4.8
5.6
1987
145.4
ASM International
BTU International
World Diffusion Market
1988
Horizontal Tube
Denko
Gasonics
GSTC
Kokusai Electric
7.5
.0
16.7
4.3
19.2
Koyo Lindberg
2.6
.0
3.3
.6
5.0
Pacific Western
.6
4.5
.6
5.9
.4
Process Technology
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
Silicon Valley Group
.0
.0
52.0
38.0
28.0
.0
Solitec
TEI/rhermco
.0
.0
.0
.0
22.9
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
Tempress
.5
.0
.0
Tliermco
34.9
.0
60.0
.0
.0
.0
74.6
73.0
44.2
37.0
2.0
2.5
.0
.0
.0
Tystar
.0
.0
.6
Ulvac
.0
.0
.0
.5
.0
.5
10.4
9.2
10.0
13.2
.0
Varian/TEL
1.7
.0
.0
.7
4.2
5.7
Others
2.5
3.5
243.8
6.3
235.0
8.6
7.2
164.2
135.1
Tokyo Electron Ltd.
Tylan
Ulvac/BTU
Total W.W. Horizontal
129.9
1.0
i
©1992 Dataquest Incorporated April-Reproduction Prohibited
Wafer Fab Equipment Market Share
4-89
Table 4.47 (Continued)
Each Company's Revenue from Shipments of Diffusion Furnace Equipment to the World
(End User Revenue in Millions of U.S. Dollars)
Company:
Produrt:
Region:
Each
Diffusion Furnaces
Worid
1987
1988
1989
1990
1991
ASM International
.0
.0
7.0
8.8
10.0
BTU International
.0
1.0
.0
6.0
6.0
Denko
1.2
1.8
4.0
.0
Disco
1.5
3.6
10.0
GSTC
.0
2.9
.0
6.9
5.8
3.0
5.0
2.0
Helmut Seier
.5
7
.0
.0
.0
Koyo Lindberg
3.1
Kokusai Electric
7.3
.0
3.5
27.0
CAGR (%)
1987-1991
Vertical Tube
Semitherm
Shinko Electric
Silicon Valley Group
.0
.5
.0
3.1
7.6
6.7
43.1
2.0
46.1
62.5
4.0
3.0
.0
.0
7.4
1.1
4.0
5.0
16.2
26.0
TEL/Thermco
.7
.0
.0
.0
.0
Tokyo Electron Ltd.
.1
8.0
55.7
.0
.0
16.9
.0
48.0
Ulvac
.0
2.6
Ulvac/BTU
.0
.0
2.3
5.6
3.3
2.1
.0
Varian/TEL
2.3
.0
8.1
15.5
145.4
51.7
95.6
159.8
200.0
295.5
330.6
324.0
335.1
Total Worldwide Vertical
TotalWorldwide
Ref: DDT
Source: Dauquest CApiil 1992)
©1992 Dataquest Incoiporated April—Reproduction Prohibited
89.5
23.2
Semiconductor Equipment, Mannfactiuing, and Materials
4-90
i
Table 4.48
Each Company's Revenue from Shipments of Rapid Thermal Processing Equipment to Each Region
(End User Revenue in Millions of U.S. Dollars)
Company:
Produa:
Region Of Consumption:
"World RTP Market
Each
Rapid Thermal 1Processing
Each
1987
1988
1989
1990
1991
CAGR (%)
1987-1991
18.2
22.3
25.1
29.7
41.8
23.1
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
5.9
.0
6.0
6.0
9.2
.0
.0
.0
11.9
.0
North America
Addax Technologies
AG Associates
Dainipp)on Screen
.2
.2
.0
,0
.0
High Temperature Eng.
.0
.0
.0
.5
Jipelec
.0
.0
.0
.3
.7
1.0
.0
.0
Eaton
Kokusai
.0
.0
.0
Koyo Lindberg
.0
.0
.0
.0
.4
2.7
.3
4.2
.0
.4
3.0
3.3
.3
4.0
Process Products
.6
.8
1.0
.7
.7
Sitesa Addax
.2
.0
.0
.0
.0
.2
.2
.0
.0
.0
10.1
11.7
10.4
14.6
18.4
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
9.3
2.0
Nanosil
Peak Systems
Varian
Total North America
.3
16.2
Japan
Addax Technologies
1.9
1.0
2.0
2.0
4.0
1.2
1.8
Eaton
.0
.2
.0
2.3
.0
High Temperature Eng.
.0
.0
.0
.0
.2
Jip)elec
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
Kokusai
.0
.0
.0
.0
.6
Koyo Lindberg
.2
.6
.6
.7
.3
Nanosil
.0
.0
.0
.1
.0
Peak Systems
.7
2.0
2.5
2.1
2.0
Process Products
.0
.0
.1
.0
.0
Sitesa Addax
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.7
.2
.0
.0
.0
4.5
6.2
7.0
9.2
14.4
AG Associates
Dainippon Screen
Varian
Total Japan
.0
33.7
«
6)1992 Dataquest Incorporated April—Reproduction Prohibited
Wafer Fab Equipment Market Share
4-91
Table 4.48 (Continued)
Each Company's Revenue from Shipments of Rapid Thermal Processing Equipment to Each Region
(End User Revenue in Millions of VS. Dollars)
Company:
Produa:
Region Of Consumption:
Each
Rapid Thennal ;Processing
Each
1987
1988
1989
1990
1991
CAGR (%)
1987-1991
Europe
Addax Technologies
AG Associates
.0
.0
.0
.0
2.1
1.6
.8
2.3
3.2
Dainipp)on Screen
.0
.0
1.5
.0
.0
.0
Eaton
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
High Temperature Eng.
Jipelec
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
Kokusai
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
Koyo Lindberg
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.2
.0
.0
.0
1.0
1.0
.4
.0
Nanosil
.0
Peak Systems
.0
Process Products
Sitesa Addax
.1
.2
.1
.9
.4
.5
1.2
1.5
1.0
Varian
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
2.7
3.2
4.1
3.1
6.9
Addax Technologies
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
AG Associates
.9
1.0
1.5
.6
.0
Dainippon Screen
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
Total Europe
26.4
Asia/Pacific-ROW
Eaton
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
High Temperature Eng.
.0
.0
.0
.0
.1
Jipelec
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
Koyo Lindberg
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
Nanosil
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
Peak Systems
.0
.2
2.0
2.1
1.6
Process Products
.0
.0
.1
.1
.4
.0
Sitesa Addax
.0
.0
.0
.0
Varian
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
1.2
3.6
2.8
2.1
Total Asia/Pacific-ROW
.9
23.6
(Continued)
®1992 Dataquest Incorporated April—Reproduction Prohibited
Semiconductor Equipment, Manufacturing, and Materials
4-92
i
Table 4.48 (Continued)
Each Company's Revenue £rom Shipments of Rapid Thermal Processing Equipment to Each Region
(End User Revenue In Millions of U.S. Dollars)
Company:
Produa:
Region Of Consumption:
Each
Sapid Thermal Processing
Each
1987
1988
1989
1990
1991
.0
.0
.0
.0
10.8
10.6
11.0
14.6
2.3
24.4
1.0
1.2
1.8
2.0
.2
A
.0
2.3
.0
.0
.0
.0
.3
.8
.0
.0
.0
.7
1.0
.0
.6
CAGR (%)
1987-1991
Worldwide
Addax Technologies
AG Associates
Dainippon Screen
Eaton
High Temperature Eng.
Jipelec
.0
Kokusai
.0
.0
.0
Koyo Lindberg
.2
.6
.6
.7
.3
.3
3.4
.3
6.6
.4
8.5
.5
8.4
.3
8.6
Process Products
.7
1.0
1.3
1.2
Sitesa Addax
.7
1.2
1.5
1.0
1.5
.0
.9
18.2
.4
.0
.0
.0
22.3
25.1
29.7
41.8
Nanosil
Peak Systems
Varian
Total Worldwide
Ref: KTPSHR
Source: Oauquest (April 1992)
©1992 Dataquest Incorporated April-Reproduction Prohibited
23.1
Wafer Fab Equipment Market Share
4-93
Table 4.49
Each Company's Revenue from Shipments of Ion Implantation Equipment to North America
(End User Revenue In Millions of U.S. EtoUars)
Company:
Produa:
Region Of Consumption:
•World Implanter Market
Each
Ion Implantation
North America
1987
1988
185.9
377.4
1989
456.6
1990
369.8
1991
343.2
CAGR (%)
1987-1991
16.6
Medium Current
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
Eaton
4.0
10.0
9.0
5.7
4.4
Balzers
Nissin
.0
1.2
.0
.0
1.3
.0
1.9
.0
2.8
Sumitomo/Eaton Nova
TEI/Varian
Ulvac
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
Varian
Total Medium Current
High Current
Applied Materials
Eaton
.0
5.9
6.2
13.2
9.6
9.1
9.9
17.4
23.5
17.2
16.3
4.0
18.4
24.2
12.0
17.0
9.1
27.0
19.0
19.5
18.5
Hitachi
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
Nissin
.0
.0
2.1
1.7
.0
Sumitomo/Eaton Nova
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
TEiyVarian
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
Ulvac
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
Varian
Total High Current
6.6
8.4
19.8
27.6
44.5
59.3
13.0
58.4
38.6
4.5
.0
.0
.0
.0
13.3
'8.1
8.7
High Voltage
Eaton
Genus
.0
3.2
3.4
2.6
1.8
1.2
4.0
.0
2.9
.0
Nissin
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
Sumitomo Eaton Nova
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
1.8
1.8
.0
.0
.0
2.9
57.8
National Electrostatics
Varian
Total High Voltage
Total North America
8.1
6.2
7.4
2.6
45.6
68.1
90.2
78.2
Ref: IMPLSHR
Source: Dataquest (Apiil 1992)
©1992 Dataquest Incorporated ^ril—Reproduction Prohibited
-22.6
6.1
4-94
Semiconductor Equipment, Manufacturing, and Materials
i
Table 4.50
Each Company's Revenue £tY>m Shipments of Ion Implantation Equipment to Japan
(End User Revenue in Millions of U.S. Dollars)
Company:
Product:
Region Of Consumption:
World Implanter Market
Each
Ion Implantation
Japan
1987
1988
1989
1990
1991
CAGR (%)
1987-1991
185.9
377.4
456.6
369.8
343.2
16.6
Medium Current
Balzers
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
Eaton
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
Nissin
11.1
26.2
34.1
30.4
18.4
.9
.0
.0
28.0
20.4
11.7
13.8
(>B
12.0
11.1
18.4
Sumitomo/Eaton Nova
2.6
TEiyVarian
8.4
Ulvac
5.2
Varian
2.3
29.6
64.1
76.8
69.7
59.6
2.0
8.6
12.1
12.7
.0
.0
16.5
.0
.0
.0
11.2
10.2
7.5
51.6
11.2
Total Medium Current
High Current
Applied Materials
Eaton
2.9
24.1
7.5
3.4
.0
Hitachi
3.8
9.6
14.4
Nissin
1.8
4.1
14.3
Sumitomo/Eaton Nova
18.4
42.8
TEiyVarian
16.8
47.5
72.0
45.7
30.7
Ulvac
2.1
52.5
3.8
.0
33.3
.0
Varian
1.4
18.0
.0
20.4
19.2
46.3
139.4
164.7
136.1
129.7
Total High Current
19.1
.0
29.4
High Voltage
Eaton
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
Genus
.0
8.1
12.6
4.2
8.4
.0
.0
.0
3.0
.0
.0
Nissin
2.8
.0
Sumitomo Eaton Nova
3.1
.0
.0
2.9
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
8.1
15.5
257.0
4.2
11.4
210.0
200.7
National Electrostatics
Varian
Total High Voltage
Total Japan
5.9
81.8
211.6
Kef: IMPLSHR
Source Dauquest (April 1992)
©1992 Dataquest Incorporated April—Reproduction Prohibited
17.9
25,2
Wafer Fab Equipment Market Share
4-95
Table 4.51
Each Company's Revenue from Shipments of Ion Implantation Equipment to Europe
(End User Revenue in Millions of U.S. Dollars)
Company:
Produa.Region Of Consumption:
Each
Ion Implantation
Eurofje
1991
CAGR (%)
1987-1991
16.6
1987
1988
185.9
377.4
1989
456.6
1990
369.8
343.2
Balzers
1.4
2.1
.8
.0
.0
Eaton
7.0
11.0
3.5
2.6
3.7
Nissin
.0
.0
4.1
1.8
Sumitomo/Eaton Nova
TEL/Varian
.0
.9
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
Ulvac
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
Varian
6.7
3.9
4.4
1.2
8.2
15.1
17.9
8.7
7.9
13.7
World Implanter Market
Medium Current
Total Medium Current
-2.4
High Current
Applied Materials
Eaton
9.7
9.2
10.5
.0
11.9
.0
.0
.0
.0
4.0
7.2
12.0
23.0
14.5
8.2
Hitachi
.0
.0
Nissin
.0
.0
.0
Sumitomo/Eaton Nova
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
TEiyVarian
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
Ulvac
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
5.5
2.4
3.6
5.5
6.8
21.5
32.6
26.3
27.1
26.5
2.2
2.5
.0
.0
.0
3.3
.0
Varian
Total High Current
5.4
High Voltage
Eaton
Genus
.0
1.6
.0
National Electrostatics
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
Nissin
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
1.8
.0
.0
.0
.0
Sumitomo Eaton Nova
Varian
Total High Voltage
Total Europe
4.0
4.1
.0
.0
3.3
•4.7
40.6
54.6
35.0
35.0
43.5
1.7
Ref: IMPLSHR
Source: DaUquest (April 1992)
01992 Dataquest Incorp>oiated April—Reproduction Prohibited
Semiconductor Equipment, Manufacturing, and Materials
4-96
i
Table 4.52
Each Company's Revenue from Shipments of Ion Implantation Equipment to Asla/Padfic-ROW
(End User Revenue In Millions of U.S. Dollars)
Company:
Produa:
Region Of Consumption:
Each
Ion Implantation
Asia/Pacific-ROW
1991
1987
1988
1989
185.9
377.4
456.6
1990
369.8
343.2
Balzers
1.4
2.1
.8
.0
.0
World Implanter Market
CAGR (%)
1987-1991
16.6
Medium Current
Eaton
2.0
7.0
10.5
9.2
4.5
Nissin
.0
.0
.0
1.1
5.0
Sumitomo/Eaton Nova
TEiyVarian
.0
' .0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
Ulvac
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
Varian
3.0
9.4
11.0
8.4
8.4
6.4
18.5
22.3
18.7
17.9
.0
Total Medium Current
29.3
High Current
Applied Materials
Eaton
Hitachi
.0
.0
.0
.0
6.0
9.0
28.8
18.7
11.6
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
Nissin
.0
.0
.0
.0
Sumitomo/Eaton Nova
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
TEiyVarian
.0
.0
.0
.0
Ulvac
.0
.0
.0
.0
5.5
15.6
21.6
9.2
11.7
11.5
24.6
50.4
27.9
23.3
Eaton
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
Genus
.0
1.7
.0
.0
.0
National Electrostatics
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
Nissin
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
Sumitomo Eaton Nova
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
Varian
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
1.7
74.4
.0
.0
NM
46.6
41.2
23.2
Varian
Total High Current
19.3
High Voltage
Total High Voltage
Total A/P-ROW
17.9
43.1
MM - Not meaningful
Ref: IMPLSHR
Source: DaUquest (Apiil 1992)
i
©1992 Dataquest Incorporated April—Reproduction Prohibited
4-97
Wafer Fab Equipment Market Share
Table 4.53
Each Company's Revenue from Shipments of Ion Implantation Equipment to the World
(End User Revenue i n Millions of U.S. Dollars)
Company:
Produa:
Region Of Consumption:
Each
Ion Implantation
Worldwide
1987
1988
185.9
377.4
1989
456.6
1990
369.8
1991
343.2
2.8
4.2
1.6
.0
.0
Eaton
13.0
28.0
23.0
17.5
12.6
Nissin
11.1
28.3
35.4
37.5
28.0
Sumitomo/Eaton Nova
2.6
.0
8.4
.9
28.0
.0
TEiyVarian
2.9
24.1
20.4
11.7
Ulvac
5.2
7.5
13.8
22.9
28.6
6.9
31.2
44.1
117.9
131.3
113.5
107.5
49.4
46.0
33.9
56.0
50.1
40.6
14.4
11.2
10.2
World Implanter Market
CAGR (%)
1987-1991
16.6
Medium Current
Balzers
Varian
Total Medium Current
17.9
61.0
11.1
15.2
High Current
Applied Materials
Eaton
10.0
35.0
24.9
59.0
Hitachi
3.8
9.6
Nissin
1.8
18.4
4.1
16.4
9.2
11.2
Sumitomo/Eaton Nova
42.8
51.6
45.7
TEI/Varian
16.8
47.5
72.0
33.3
.0
30.7
Ulvac
Varian
Total High Current
2.1
52.5
3.8
.0
.0
44.4
241.1
45.0
48.1
45.8
106.9
300.7
249.5
218.1
6.7
2.5
.0
.0
3.3
19.0
19.5
High Voltage
Eaton
Genus
17.7
National Electrostatics
1.8
12.9
1.2
6.8
4.0
.0
11.3
.0
Nissin
2.8
.0
2.9
.0
3.0
Sumitomo Eaton Nova
3.1
3.6
.0
.0
.0
.0
1.8
.0
.0
.0
18.0
18.4
24.6
6.8
17.6
-.6
185.9
377.4
456.6
369.8
343.2
16.6
Varian
Total High Voltage
Total Woridwide
.0
Kef: IMPISHR
Source: Dauquest CApril 1992)
©1992 Dataquest Incorporated April—Jteproduction Prohibited
Semiconductor Equipment, Manufacturing, and Materials
4-98
i
Table 4.54
Each Company's Revenue from Shipments of Optical CD & CD SEM Equipment to North America
(End User Revenue i n Millions of U.S. Dollars)
Company:
Product:
Region:
Each
Optical CD & CD SEM
North America
1987
1988
1989
1990
1991
CAGR (%)
1987-1991
88.7
151.0
150.2
146.5
153.6
14.7
Biorad
.0
.0
.0
6.5
Heidelberg Instmments
.7
1.7
.0
.0
5.9
.0
Hitachi
.0
.0
.3
.0
1.4
6.4
.3
5.2
6.0
4.8
2.8
World Optical CD & CD SEM Market
Optical Critical Dimension
IVS, Inc.
KLA Instruments
.0
2.8
3.8
3.4
Leica
.0
.0
.0
1.5
.6
Leica Lasertechnik
.0
.0
.0
.0
Micro-Controle
.0
.0
.0
.3
.0
.0
Nano-Master
.0
.0
.0
.0
.8
Nanometrics
1.1
1.4
.5
1.4
Nanoquest
.0
.0
5.8
.0
.9
.0
Nidek
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
Nikon
.3
1.1
.5
1.0
.0
.0
.0
1.8
1.0
.0
2.3
.0
1.4
.3
.0
.0
.0
.0
Optical Specialties
Perkin-Elmer
Reichert-McBain
Ryokosha
.3
.0
.3
.0
.0
1.9
.0
2.0
.0
2.2
4.9
4.9
7.0
.0
.0
2.3
.0
3.3
.0
1.9
1.4
.0
.0
.0
.0
1.5
1.8
1.4
1.2
.8
15.9
33.4
25.4
22.9
19.8
SiScan Systems
2.3
Vickers Instruments
Wild Leitz
Wild Leitz Instruments
Other CD Companies
Total Optical CD
.0
5.6
(Continued)
i
©1992 Daiaquest Incorporated April—Beproduction Prohibited
4-99
Wafer Fab Equipment Market Share
Table 4.54 (Continued)
Each Company's Revenue from Shipments of Optical CD & CD SEM Equipment to North America
(End User Revenue in Millions of U.S. Dollars)
Company:
Produa:
Region:
Each
Optical CD & CD SEM
North America
1987
1988
1989
1990
1991
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
1.4
2.6
1.3
1.1
2.8
.0
.0
.3
.0
.0
2.2
6.9
13.9
.0
4.9
8.0
CAGR (%)
1987-1991
CD SEM
ABT Corporation
Amray
Angstrom Measurements
Biorad
.0
.0
Hitachi
7.0
10.8
Holon
.0
.0
15.1
.0
JEOL
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
1.7
.0
1.6
.5
.0
.0
.0
.8
.0
Metrologix
Nanometrics
2.1
Nanoquest
.0
Opal
.0
Topcon
.0
Vickers
Total CD SEM
Total North America CD & CD SEM
1.3
.0
6.5
1.4
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
17.9
37.7
8.5
10.1
.0
19.0
26.5
26.2
23.2
34.9
59.9
51.6
46.1
The category of Optical CD Includes dedicated oveilay tools, in addition to joint linewidth/oveilay measurement systems.
Hef: CDSHR
Source: Dataquest CApril 1992)
©1992 Dataquest Incorporated April-Reproduction Prohibited
-1.5
1.9
Semiconductor Equipment, Manufacturing, and Materials
4-100
i
Table 4.55
Each Company's Revenue from Shipments of Optical CD & CD SEM Equipment to Japan
(End User Revenue In Millions of U.S. Dollars)
Company:
Product:
Region:
Each
Optical (::D & CD SEM
Japan
World Optical CD & CD SEM Market
1990
1991
CAGR (%)
1987-1991
153.6
14.7
1987
1988
88.7
151.0
1989
150.2
146.5
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
Optical Critical Dimension
Biorad
Heidelberg Instruments
Hitachi
.0
.4
.0
.0
.0
6.0
7.1
5.1
3.6
.0
6.3
.0
.0
.0
3.4
TVS, Inc.
.0
KLA Instruments
.0
Leica
.0
1.5
.0
1.1
.0
3.3
.0
Leica Lasertechnik
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
Micro-Controle
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
Nano-Master
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
Nanometrics
.1
.4
.0
.0
.5
.0
.0
Nanoquest
.0
.0
.0
.0
Nidek
.0
.5
.0
.0
Nikon
4.5
.0
12.9
.3
7.0
3.8
5.9
.7
.6
Perkin-Elmer
.0
.2
.0
.9
.0
3.9
.0
Reichert-McBain
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
Optical Specialties
1.4
1.7
1.4
1.0
.7
SiScan Systems
.2
.0
2.2
.0
.0
Vickers Instruments
.8
.0
.0
.0
.0
Wild Leitz
.5
.2
.0
.0
.0
Wild Leitz Instruments
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
1.5
15.0
2.0
1.6
1.2
1.3
27.6
20.5
15.3
19.3
Ryokosha
Other CD Companies
Total Optical CD
«
6.5
(Continued)
€
©1992 Dataquest Incorporated Aptii—Reproduction Prohibited
4-101
Wafer Fab Equipment Market Share
Table 4.55 (Continued)
Each Company's Revenue from Shipments of Optical CD & CD SEM Equipment to Japan
(End User Revenue in Millions of U.S. Dollars)
Company:
Product:
Region:
Each
Optical CD & CD SEM
Japan
1987
1988
1989
1990
1991
1.2
2.4
1.5
5.2
.0
Amray
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
Angstrom Measurements
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
Biorad
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
26.9
4.8
33.5
6.1
38.8
45.6
8.9
.0
8.0
.0
CAGR (%)
1987-1991
CD SEM
ABT Corporation
Hitachi
18.6
Holon
.8
JEOL
2.1
1.7
Metrologix
.0
2.9
.0
.0
.0
.0
Nanometrics
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
Nanoquest
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.3
.0
.0
Opal
1.6
1.6
Topcon
.0
.0
.0
.0
2.1
.0
59.0
27.0
78.3
20.0
Vickers
Total CD SEM
Total Japan CD & CD SEM
.0
.7
.0
.0
22.7
37.7
41.4
37.7
65.3
61.9
54.5
69.8
I h e category of Optical CD includes dedicated overiay tools, in addition to joint linewidlh/ovetlay measurement systems.
Ref: CDSHR
Source: Dataquest CApijl 1 9 9 9
©1992 Dataquest Incorporated April-Reproduction Prohibited
Semiconductor Equipment, Manufacturing, and Materials
4-102
i
Table 4.56
Each Company's Revenue fix>m Shipments of Optical CD & CD SEM Equipment to Europe
(End User Revenue In Millions of U.S. Dollars)
Company:
Product:
Region:
Each
Optical CD & CD SEM
Europe
1990
151.0
1989
150.2
146.5
1991
153.6
.0
.0
.0
3.6
3.1
Heidelberg Instruments
.9
1.4
.0
.0
.0
Hitachi
.0
.0
.0
.0
.6
.0
.8
1.6
.0
.8
1.2
.0
5.0
.5
World Optical CD & CD SEM Market
1987
1988
88.7
CAGR (%)
1987-1991
14.7
Optical Critical Dimension
Biorad
rVS, Inc.
.1
.0
KLA Instruments
.0
Leica
.0
1.9
.0
Leica lasertechnik
.0
.0
.0
.7
.0
4.4
.0
Micro-Controle
.0
.0
2.2
Nano-Master
.0
.0
.0
.0
5.2
.4
.1
Nanoquest
.3
.0
.2
.0
3.2
.0
.5
.0
Njdek
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
Nikon
.2
.5
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
Nanometrics
Optical Specialties
.1
.3
.2
Perkin-Elmer
.0
.2
.3
.0
Reichert-McBain
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
Ryokosha
.0
.0
.0
.0
.5
.3
.0
.7
.0
.0
Vickers Instruments
2.6
2.0
.0
.0
.0
Wild Leitz
2.8
5.7
4.4
.0
.0
Wild Leitz Instruments
.0
.0
.6
.0
.0
Other CD Companies
.5
8.0
.7
.8
.8
12.8
12.9
16.5
.5
13.2
SiScan Systems
Total Optical CD
13.3
(Continued)
€
©1992 Dataquest Incorporated April-Reproduction Prohibited
4-103
Wafer Fab Equipment Marlcet Share
Table 4.56 (Continued)
Each Company's Revenue from Shipments of Optical CD & CD SEM Equipment to Eiu-ope
(End User Revenue in Millions of U.S. Dollars)
Company:
Produa:
Region:
Each
Optical CD & CD SEM
Europe
CAGR (%)
1991 1987-1991
1987
1988
1989
1990
ABT Corporation
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
Amray
.0
.0
.8
.6
.6
Angstrom Measurements
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
Biorad
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
5.6
6.2
4.0
.0
.0
.0
CD SEM
Hitachi
2.3
.0
4.3
.0
JEOL
.0
.0
.0
.0
.o'
Metrologix
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
Holon
Nanometrics
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
Nanoquest
Opal
.0
.0
1.7
.0
.0
.0
.0
1.4
.0
.8
Topcon
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
Vickers
Total CD SEM
Total Europe CD & CD SEM
1.1
1.2
.0
.0
.0
3.4
5.5
9.5
6.8
5.4
11.4
18.3
22.4
23.3
18.6
The category of Optical CD includes dedicated overlay tools, in addition to foint linewidth/overlay measurement systems.
Ref: COStK
Source: Dauqvwst (April 1992)
®1992 Dataquest Incorporated April—Reproduction Prohibited
12.3
13.0
4-104
Semiconductor Equipment, Manufacturing, and Materials
Table 4.57
Each Company's Revenue from Shipments of Optical CD & CD SEM Equipment to Asia/Padfic-ROW
(End User Revenue In Millions of U.S. Dollars)
Company:
Product:
Region;
i
Each
Optical CD & CD SEM
Asia/Pacific-RCW
1987
1988
88.7
Biorad
.0
Heidelberg Instruments
.0
Hitachi
.0
World Optical CD & CD SEM Market
1990
1991
153.6
151.0
1989
150.2
146.5
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.9
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
CAGR (%)
1987-1991
14.7
Optical Critical Dimension
TVS, Inc.
.0
.0
2.0
1.2
1.2
KLA Instruments
.0
.0
1.6
1.1
1.9
Leica
.0
.0
.0
.0
.7
.0
.0
.0
Leica Lasertechnik
.0
.0
Micro-Controle
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
Nano-Master
.0
.0
Nanometrics
.2
.4
.2
.0
.5
.0
.0
Nanoquest
.0
.0
.0
Nidek
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
Nikon
.2
.6
.0
.1
.4
.5
2.0
.0
Optical Sp>ecialties
.7
.8
Perkin-Elmer
.0
.2
.0
.0
.0
Reichert-McBain
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
Ryokosha
.0
.2
.0
.0
.0
SiScan Systems
.0
.0
.2
.0
.0
Vlckers Instruments
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
Wild Leitz
.8
.6
1.6
.0
.0
Wild Leitz Instruments
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
Other CD Companies
2.1
3.2
2.7
1.2
1.0
3.4
5.6
10.8
4.2
7.0
Total Optical CD
19.8
(Continued)
i
©1992 Dataquest Incorporated April—Reproduction Prohibited
Wafer Fab Equipment Market Share
4-105
Table 4.57 (Continued)
Each Company's Revenue from Shipments of Optical CD & CD SEM Equipment to Asia/Padflc-ROW
(End User Revenue in Millions of U.S. Dollars)
Con^any:
Produa:
Region:
Each
Optical CD & CD SEM
Asia/Pacific-ROW
CD SEM
ABT Corporation
Amray
Angstrom Measurements
Biorad
Hitachi
Holon
JEOL
Metrologix
Nanometrics
Nanoquest
Opal
Top)con
Vickers
Total CD SEM
Total Asia/Pacific-ROW CD & CD SEM
1987
1988
1989
1990
1991
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.9
.0
1.1
2.8
.0
3.1
.0
12.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
A
.8
.0
.0
.7
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
3.5
3.1
12.0
14.3
7.3
19.0
1.3
4.7
1.9
7.5
The category of Optical CD includes dedicated overlay tools, in addition to )oint linewidth/overlay measurement systems.
Ref: CDSHR
Source: Dauquest (April 1992)
©1992 Dataquest Incorporated April—Reproduction Prohibited
CAGR (%)
1987-1991
.0
74.3
41.8
Semiconductor Equipment, Manufacturing, and Materials
4-106
Table 4.58
Worldwide Optical CD & CD SEM
By Equipment Category
(End User Revenue in Millions of U.S. Dollars)
Company:
Produa:
Region:
«
All
Optical CD & CD SEM
Worldwide
"World Optical CD & CD SEM Market
1990
1987
1988
88.7
151.0
1989
150.2
146.5
.0
.0
.0
10.1
1991
153.6
CAGR (%)
1987-1991
14.7
Optical Critical Dimension
Heidelberg Instruments
1.6
3.5
.0
,0
9.9
.0
Hitachi
6.0
6.6
5.4
4.2
TVS, Inc.
1.5
.0
7.1
6.4
7.2
8.0
7.6
6.2
6.5
.0
8.6
9.3
1.8
Biorad
KLA Instruments
Leica
.0
.0
Leica Lasertechnik
.0
.0
6.5
1.0
4.4
.0
Micro-Controle
.0
.0
.0
2.2
Nano-Master
.0
.0
.0
.0
6.0
Nanometrics
1.7
2.3
.0
.9
1.8
2.4
9.0
.0
.0
.3
8.0
.0
.0
3.8
5.9
4.7
1.4
1.9
.0
5.7
.0
.0
.0
.0
2.5
1.4
1.0
.7
Nanoquest
.0
Nidek
.0
.5
Nikon
5.2
14.3
Optical Specialties
1.3
.0
2.3
Perkin-Elmer
Reichert-McBain
2.9
.0
.0
Ryokosha
.3
1.4
SiScan Systems
3.0
4.9
5.0
2.0
2.2
8.3
6.4
9.0
.0
.0
.0
9.8
.0
.0
.0
7.9
2.0
.0
Wild Leitz Instruments
.0
.0
Other CD Companies
5.6
7.7
6.5
4.4
3.6
42.3
79.4
69.6
58.9
59.3
Vickers Instruments
Wild Leitz
Total Optical CD
8.8
(ContinuecD
i
©1992 Dataquest Incorporated April—Reproduction Prohibited
Wafer Fab Equipment Market Share
4-107
Table 4.58 (Continued)
Worldwide Optical CD & CD SEM
By Eqtilpment Category
(End User Revenue i n Millions of U.S. Dollars)
Company:
Product
Region;
All
Optical CD & CD SEM
Worldwide
1989
1990
2.4
1.5
5.2
.0
2.6
2.1
1.7
3.4
.0
.3
.0
.0
2.2
1987
1988
ABT Corporation
1.2
Amray
1.4
.0
1991
CAGR (%)
1987-1991
CD SEM
Angstrom Measurements
Biorad
Hitachi
.0
.0
6.9
4.9
28.8
43.1
4.8
57.0
62.0
69.6
6.1
8.9
.0
8.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
2.3
.0
8.5
2.8
.5
.0
2.4
2.4
.0
.0
2.1
Holon
.8
JEOL
2.1
Metrologix
Nanometrics
Nanoquest
Opal
.0
2.9
.0
2.5
.0
2.5
.0
.0
1.7
.0
Topcon
.0
1.3
.0
Vickers
9.6
12.0
.0
.0
.0
46.4
71.6
80.6
87.6
88.7
151.0
150.2
146.5
94.3
153.6
Total CD SEM
Total "Woridwide CD & CD SEM
l l i e category of Optical CD indudes dedicated overlay tools, in addition to joint linewidth/overlay measurement systems.
Ref: CDSHR
Source: Dataquest CApril 1993
©1992 Dataquest Incotporated ^jiil—Reproduction Prohibited
19.4
14.7
Semiconductor Equipment, Manufacturing, and Materials
4-108
i
Table 4.59
Each Company's Revenue from Shipments of Wafer Inspection Equipment to North America
(End User Revenue in Millions of U.S. Dollars)
Company
Product:
Region:
Each
Wafer Insp)ection
North America
1990
1991
CAGR (%)
1987-1991
100.5
1989
117.2
90.8
89.7
11.7
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.1
.2
.0
.0
.0
1987
1988
57.7
Canon
Estek
World Wafer Inspection, Market
Wafer Insjjection
Hitachi
.0
.0
.0
.0
.9
1.1
6.4
7.1
7.4
11.6
16.8
23.4
14.9
6.5
11.0
Leica
.0
.0
.0
.8
1.4
Micro-Controle
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.8
1.7
Insystems
KLA Instruments
Nidek
.0
.0
.2
Nikon
3.4
4.4
2.1
Optical Specialties
2.9
3.6
3.3
.1
Wild Leitz
2.2
5.0
1.3
1.8
.1
.0
.0
Carl Zeiss
.6
.9
1.2
.9
1.0
.7
.7
.9
27.7
26.4
Other Companies
1.1
Total N.A Wafer Inspeaion
23.2
1.8
35.7
40.1
.8
3.3
Ref: INSPSHR
Source: Oauquest CApril 1992)
«
©1992 Dataquest Incorporated April—Reproduction Prohibited
Wafer Fab Equipment Market Share
4-109
Table 4.60
Each Company's Revenue from Shipments of Wafer Inspection Equipment to Japan
(End User Revenue in Millions of U.S. Dollars)
Company:
Product:
Region:
Each
Wafer Inspection
Japan
1987
1988
1989
1990
1991
CAGR (%)
1987-1991
57.7
100.5
117.2
90.8
89.7
11.7
Canon
2.0
3.0
3.5
3.8
4.0
Estek
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
World Wafer Inspection Market
Wafer Inspection
Hitachi
Insystems
KLA Instruments
Leica
.0
.0
.0
.0
9.8
1.1
3.4
4.2
7.0
3.9
11.5
.0
18.4
20.0
16.1
.0
.0
.0
9.9
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
2.3
4.4
5.0
5.7
5.2
8.8
4.5
10.0
7.1
7.4
Optical Specialties
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
Wild Leitz
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
Carl Zeiss
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.5
21.8
.7
.7
39.3
42.9
.5
40.2
41.1
Micro-Controle
Nidek
Nikon
Other Companies
Total Japan Wafer Insfjection
Ref: INSPSHR
Source: Dataquest (April 1992)
©1992 Dataquest Incorporated April—Reproduction Prohibited
.9
17.2
Semiconductor Equipment, Manufacturing, and Materials
4-110
€
Table 4.61
Each Company's Revenue from Shipments of Wafer Inspection Equipment to Europe
(End User Revenue In Millions of U.S. Dollars)
Company:
Produa:
Region:
Each
Wafer Inspeaion
Europe
World Wafer Inspection Market
1987
1988
100.5
1989
117.2
1990
90.8
1991
57.7
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
89.7
CAGR (%)
1987-1991
11.7
Wafer Inspection
Canon
Estek
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
Hitachi
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
Insystems
KLA Instruments
Leica
.0
.0
3.0
1.2
2.6
3.6
4.8
7.0
4.7
3.3
.0
.0
.0
5.2
2.5
.0
3.1
5.0
5.4
.3
.2
.2
2.5
.0
1.2
.8
.0
.0
.0
Micro-Controle
.0
Nidek
.0
.4
1.1
2.0
.2
.2
Nikon
Optical Specialties
w a d Leitz
2.1
4.5
6.5
.0
Carl Zeiss
1.2
.9
.1
.7
.7
.3
.9
.1
.1
.1
8.5
12.9
23.4
18.3
15.6
Other Companies
Total Europe Wafer Inspection
Kef: INSPSHR
Source: Dataquest (April 1992)
©1992 Dataquest Incorporated April—Reproduction Prohibited
16.4
4-111
Wafer Fab Equipment Market Share
Table 4.62
Each Company's Revenue from Shipments for Wafer Inspection Equipment to Asla/Padfic-ROW
(End User Revenue In Millions of U.S. Dollars)
Company:
Produa:
Region:
Each
Wafer Inspection
Asia/Pacific-ROW
CAGR (%)
1991 1987-1991
1987
1988
100.5
1989
117.2
1990
57.7
90.8
89.7
Canon
.0
.0
.0
.4
.4
Estek
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
Hitachi
.0
.0
.0
.0
World Wafer Inspection Market
11.7
Wafer Inspection
.0
.0
.0
1.2
.9
.0
.9
8.0
6.7
1.3
2.2
Leica
.0
.0
.0
.8
1.0
Micro-Controle
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.3
.2
1.6
Insystems
KIA Instruments
,
Nidek
.8
.8
Nikon
1.1
1.6
.3
2.2
.0
Optical Sp>ecialties
.2
.5
.7
Wild Leitz
A
.0
.0
.5
.0
.0
Carl Zeiss
.9
.0
.0
.0
Other Companies
.8
.8
.4
.4
4.2
12.6
10.8
4.6
.5
6.6
Total A/P-ROW Wafer Inspection
Ref: INSPSHR
Source: Dataquest CAptU 1992)
©1992 Dataquest Incorporated April—Reproduction Prohibited
12.0
Semiconductor Equipment, Manufacturing, and Materials
4-112
i
Table 4.63
Each Company's Revenue from Shipments of Wafer Inspection Equipment to the World
(End User Revenue in Millions of U.S. Dollars)
Company:
Product:
Region:
Each
Wafer Inspection
World
1989
117.2
1990
90.8
1991
CAGR (%)
1987-1991
89.7
11.7
4.2
4.4
.0
.0
.0
11.6
1987
1988
57.7
100.5
Canon
2.0
3.0
Estek
.1
.2
3.5
.0
Hitachi
.0
.0
.0
World Wafer Inspection Market
Wafer Inspection
2.2
9.8
14.3
16.8
13.0
27.6
48.0
37.0
26.4
Leica
.0
.0
57.1
.0
6.8
Micro-Controle
.0
.0
3.1
5.0
4.9
5.4
Insystems
KLA Instruments
3.1
6.2
5.3
6.7
7.1
19.1
2.0
10.7
Optical Specialties
9.5
4.0
15.8
13.1
.1
Wild Leitz
4.7
Carl Zeiss
1.8
117.2
Nidek
Nikon
Other Companies
Total W.W. Wafer Inspection
8.8
.3
.0
1.8
1.8
1.4
1.4
2.7
2.8
2.2
57.7
100.5
1.9
90.8
2.3
89.7
2.5
10.4
.0
11.7
Ref: INSPSHR
Source: OaUquest (April 1992)
i
©1992 Dataquest Incorporated April—Reproduction Prohibited
Chapter
5
Wafer Fab
Rankings
Equipment—Company
This section of the wafer fab equipment
database presents the ranking of wafer fab
equipment manufacturers by 1991 revenue, as
shown in Table 5.1. Line 1 in the table shows
the total worldwide wafer fab equipment market. Individual company data shown in the
table represent 86 percent of the 1991 total
wafer fab equipment market of approximately
$6,039 million. The companies listed here
represent virtually all worldwide industry sales
in the key front-end equipment categories of
lithography, automatic photoresist processing,
etch and clean, deposition, diffusion, ion
implantation, and CD/wafer inspection. The
remaining 14 percent of the total worldwide
wafer fab equipment includes other process
control, factory automation, and other frontend equipment. Company sales for these
categories are not included in the table.
Table 5.1 includes only company sales of
front-end equipment; it does not include company sales of assembly and test equipment.
For instance, back-end equipment sales by
General Signal or ASM International are not
included. Likewise, KLA's CD/wafer inspection
equipment sales only are included; KLA's sales
of mask inspection equipment (part of the
Other Process Control Equipment category)
are not.
The revenue reported in Table 5 1 is for
the calendar year and includes system sales,
upgrades, and retrofits, but it does not indude
service and spare parts. Thus, the revenue
reported here will differ from each company's
sales as reported in its financial statements.
Some companies, such as Silicon Valley Group,
have experienced significant growth as a result
of mergers and acquisitions. Please refer to
Table 1.3 in Chapter 1 for a summary of
merger and acquisition activities in the wafer
fab equipment industry.
Several companies are denoted as being
involved in wafer fab equipment joint venture
activities. The entries for these companies do
not include the revenue of the joint ventures.
Instead, the reader should refer to the individual entry for the joint venture equipment company. For example, the estimated revenue of
the TEiyVarian or Varian/TEL joint ventures is
listed separately from Tokyo Electron Ltd. and
Varian Associates.
5-1
Semiconductor Equipment, Manufacturing, and Materials
5-2
I
Table 5-1
Each Company's Revenue frota Shipments of Semiconductor Wafer Fab Equipment to the World
(End User Revenue i n Millions of U.S. Dollars)
Company:
Product:
Region Of Consumption:
World Fab Equipment Market
Each
Each
World
1987
3,140.6
1988
1989
1990
1991
4,987.8
6,017.4
5,871.3
6,039.5
538.2
1991 Rank
X
Nikon
Steppers
Critical Dimension
218.8
490.2
653.7
518.4
5.2
14.3
8.0
3.8
5.9
10.7
9.5
15.8
233.5
520.3
19.1
680.8
532.9
13.1
557.2
102.0
196.7
208.0
175.0
154.0
14.5
.0
15.7
9.0
5.0
.0
LPCVD
.0
.0
26.0
32.0
PECVD
31.0
75.4
143.0
170.0
186.4
.0
.0
.0
15.0
55.0
Silicon Epitaxy
18.6
47.2
22.2
25.0
32.0
Ion Implantation
10.0
24.9
49.4
46.0
33.9
176.1
359.9
431.6
462.0
493.3
36.2
99.3
80.6
105.9
99.2
126.2
Wafer Inspjection
Total
Applied Materials
Dry Etch
APCVD
Sputtering
Total
Tokyo Electron Ltd.'
Resist Processing Equip.
Dry Etch
.0
90.5
44.6
Wet Process
.0
.0
.0
.0
5.6
LPCVD
.0
18.4
30.6
45.8
62.8
MOCVD
.0
.0
2.9
.0
.0
Diffusion
.1
82.6
89.9
92.2
92.7
Total
36.3
236.1
303.3
343.1
397.3
8.7
13.4
9.6
9.4
17.8
3.8
6.6
19.5
6.2
49.2
75.5
103.8
86.7
Dry Strip
33.3
.0
4.6
5.0
2.7
5.6
Dry Etch
2.1
2.3
2.3
4.5
1.5
ECR Etch
16.7
32.3
113.7
.5
45.3
1.1
87.0
.0
110.0
Hitachi
Direct Write
Maskmaking
Steppers
APCVD
6.7
.0
.0
Ion Implantation
3.8
9.6
14.4
11.2
10.2
Wafer Inspection
.0
.0
.0
.0
11.6
Critical Dimension
Total
34.8
50.2
63.6
67.4
73.8
112.8
162.1
223.2
302.3
327.6
(Continued)
©1992 Dataquest Incorporated April—Reproduction Prohibited
Wafer Fab Equipment Market Share
5-3
Table 5.1 (Continued)
Each Company's Revenue from Shipments of Semiconductor Wafer Fab Equipment to the World
(End User Revenue in Millions of U.S. Dollars)
Company:
Produa:
Region Of Consumption:
Each
Each
World
1987
1988
1989
1990
1991
Canon'
5
Contaa Proximity
11.0
8.6
Projection Aligners
40.6
Steppers
Resist Processing Equip.
89.8
1.0
69.1
125.0
3.8
2.0
3.0
144.4
Wafer Inspection
Total
Varian Associates'
LPCVD
Sputtering
Molecular Beam Epitaxy
Rapid Thermal Processing
Ion Implantation
Total
Silicon Valley Group
6.3
49.4
10.5
56.4
7.9
47.2
182.9
10.1
202.2
8.4
219.7
12.3
4.4
209.5
3.5
252.2
4.2
281.7
291.5
7.9
6.4
5.0
.0
.0
48.3
12.1
61.3
73.0
17.2
84.0
90.9
.0
4
.9
40.5
109.7
17.5
.4
69.1
154.7
Projection Aligners
.0
.0
.0
.0
37.4
33.0
5.3
1.1
Total
Anelva
39.4
Dry Etch
ECR Etch
18.1
4.2
ECR CVD
1.0
89.9
180.8
37.0
21.2
30.6
44.0
30.4
.0
.0
57.0
127.0
188,3
180.3
38.5
45.6
23.8
3.1
.8
2.9
1.0
5.6
16.3
6.0
.4
2.2
1.1
1.4
2.8
.4
.0
90.8
22.5
54.2
48.9
25.8
54.0
&
.0
2.3
1.4
44.7
53.8
4.9
9.7
6.2
Total
Kokusai Electric
79.3
167.0
.0
4.0
49.0
.7
Molecular Beam Epitaxy
73.6
168.8
7.6
PECVD
Evaporation
3.7
.0
54.0
16.0
LPCVD
Spunering
.0
7
Steppers
Resist Processing Equip.
LPCVD
Diffusion
83.3
11.5
117.6
80.9
4.3
6.8
143.0
4.1
6.2
.0
114.5
4.1
132.3
8.7
154.6
Si
LPCVD
10.4
30.8
47.1
62.7
63.6
Diffusion
24.0
46.2
Dry Etch
Silicon Epitaxy
Rapid Thermal Processing
1.5
.0
1.5
4.2
50.9
1.1
68.1
1.4
53.9
1.0
5.7
.0
2.2
5.9
.0
.6
.0
.0
.0
107.7
116.9
138.2
APCVD
Total
1991 Rank
.0
J7.3
.0
.7
83.4
.0
CContinu«d)
©1992 Dataquest Incorporated April—Reproduction Prohibited
Semiconductor Equipment, Manufacturing, and Materials
5-4
i
Table 5.1 (Continued)
Each Company's Revenue from Shipments of Semiconductor Wafer Fab Equipment to the World
(End User Revenue In Millions of U.S. Dollars)
Company:
Produa:
Region Of Consumption:
Each
Each
World
1987
1988
1989
1990
1991
Dainippon Screen
IQ
Resist Processing Equip.
31.2
Wet Process
21.7
Rapid Thermal Processing
Total
1.0
53.9
40.2
67.7
59.2
69.5
49.5
1.2
68.5
1.8
65.7
66.5
90.9
138.0
2.3
127.2
138.0
2.0
11
LAM Research
Dry Etch
LPCVD
Silicon Epitaxy
Total
1991 R a n k
32.0
65.0
83.2
109.2
127.1
.0
.0
.0
2.7
14.8
19.0
22.2
46.8
84.0
105.4
7.9
119.8
1.9
.0
129.0
12
Ulvac*
Dry Strip
3.6
Dry Etch
3.6
ECR Etch
2.1
LPCVD
Diffusion
Sputtering
4.9
6.0
8.7
2.3
(y£
2.3
6.2
5.5
.0
.0
.0
1.4
2.3
3.8
4.2
4.5
.0
.0
.0
.0
18.3
13.0
34.0
48.7
55.7
58.6
54.5
Evaporation
8.0
14.0
14.6
13.5
8.5
Molecular Beam Epitaxy
4.3
7.5
2.2
4.0
4.9
5.9
2.0
3.1
11.3
13.8
100.7
108.5
6.9
100.4
4.3
11.1
124.1
21.7
MOCVD
Ion Implantation
Total
1.9
7.3
66.2
13
ASM International
Diffusion
18.5
22.7
29.0
24.4
PEGVD
44.5
51.6
51.0
49.6
40.0
19.9
.0
25.8
18.0
30.5
3.1
103.2
6.2
27.5
19.2
104.2
120.7
LPCVD
Silicon Epitaxy
Total
82.9
29.9
122.1
14
General Signal Companies
Ultratech
Steppers
36.0
40.6
73.0
62.3
28.0
1.0
1.2
1.4
.0
.0
Drytek
Dry Strip
Dry Etch
Total
17.0
25.0
30.0
22.0
25.0
18.0
26.2
31.4
22.0
25.0
(Continued)
i
©1992 Dataquest Incorporated April—Reproduction Prohibited
Wafer Fab Equipment Market Share
5-5
Table 5.1 (Continued)
Each Company's Revenue from Shipments of Semiconductor Wafer Fab Equipment to the World
(End User Revenue In Millions of U.S. Dollars)
Company:
Produa:
Region Of Consumption:
Each
Each
World
1987
19S8
1989
1990
1991
10.8
22.0
22.0
23.0
.0
.0
.0
4.3
3.8
9.0
7.0
3.0
3.0
.0
.0
.0
1.3
2.6
12.0
8.0
6.0
.8
2.0
16.8
.8
.0
16.8
.5
.0
6.5
3.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.5
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
72.4
.0
133.2
68.9
201.4
78.2
168.0
46.8
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
4.7
62.6
1991 Rank
Semiconduaor Systems, Inc.
Resist Processing Equip.
General Signal Thinfilm
Diffusion
LPCVD
APCVD
Sputtering
Total
Circuits Proc. Apparatus
Sputtering
Tempress
Diffusion
GCA
Steppers
Total General Signal Companies
Materials Research Corp. (Sony)
Dry Etch
Sputtering
Total
Novellus Systems, Inc.
PECVD
Spunering
LPCVD
Total
ASM Lithography
Steppers
Direa \{«te
Maskmaking
Total
Eaton'
Ion Implantation
Resist Processing Equip.
Rapid Thermal Processing
Total
Alcan Technology
Dry Strip
Dry Etch
APCVD
Total
114.3
15
67.3
9.6
84.5
94.1
16
3.6
23.7
49.0
63.0
.0
1.0
64.0
1.8
5.7
3.6
23.7
49.0
64.0
71.5
36.7
8.0
4.0
58.6
7.2
123.2
7.2
91.0
.0
2.4
68.2
2.4
132.8
.0
91.0
71.3
.0
.0
17
48.7
71.3
18
54.7
10.5
.2
65.4
89.5
11.0
.4
79.0
10.5
.0
67.6
4.7
.0
100.9
89.5
72.3
56.5
4.3
.0
60.8
19
5.0
.0
.0
10.2
.0
.0
13.1
.0
.0
11.7
19.2
2.5
15.0
5.6
26.8
5.0
10.2
13.1
29.2
51.6
(Continued)
©1992 Dataquest Incorporated April—Reproduction Prohibited
5-6
Semiconductor Equipment, Manufacturing, and Materials
I
Table 5.1 (Continued)
Each C o m p a n y ' s Revenue f r o m S h i p m e n t s of Semdconductor Wafer Fab E q u i p m e n t to the World
(End User Revenue in Millions of U.S. Dollars)
Company:
Product:
Region Of Consumption:
Each
Each
World
1987
1988
1989
1990
1991
Resist Processing Equip.
.0
.0
19.4
13.8
17.1
Dry Etch
.0
.0
6.2
11.6
LPCVD
.0
.0
.0
4.8
10.9
9.6
Diffusion
.0
.0
6.3
6.3
13.8
51.4
20
Varian/TEL
Total
.0
.0
31.9
36.5
36.0
42.0
41.0
Watkins-Johnson
APCVD
21
16.0
48.5
22
Genus
LPCVD
Ion Implantation
Total
13.2
33.4
62.0
44.0
34.8
.0
12.9
17.7
6.8
13.2
46.3
79.7
50.8
11.3
46.1
Sumitomo/Eaton Nova
Ion Implantation
23
24.1
45.7
48.4
51.6
45.7
24
E.T. Electrotech
PECVD
Dry Etch
Sputtering
Total
13.3
7.2
20.3
14.1
15.5
15.0
17.5
20.0
17.5
12.0
6.0
9.0
14.1
13.5
12.0
26.5
43.4
44.6
48.5
44.0
15.7
32.4
54.7
46.7
42.2
Nissin Electric
Ion Implantation
25
Molecular Beam Epitaxy
.0
.0
.0
.0
.6
MOCVD
.0
.0
.0
.0
1.1
Total
15.7
32.4
54.7
46.7
43.9
26
TEI/Varian
Ion Implantation
1991 Rank
25.2
76.6
100.0
53.7
42.4
27
JEOL
Direa Write
Maskmaking
30.8
18.1
31.1
5.0
31.6
35.4
26.8
15.8
10.4
11.1
2.9
39.0
.0
.0
1.7
51.0
47.4
45.8
39.6
Dry Etch
.0
.0
.0
.0
5.0
Dry Strip
2.0
3.0
6.2
8.2
22.9
8.7
36.6
Critical Dimension
Total
2.1
28
Gasonics
Diffusion
7.5
9.0
8.0
8.0
Total
9.5
12.0
14.2
16.2
(Continued)
©1992 Dataquest Incorporated April—Reproduction Prohibited
Wafer Fab Equipment Market Share
5-7
Table 5-1 (Continued)
Each Company's Revenue from Shipments of Semiconductor Wafer Fab Equipment to the World
(End User Revenue In Millions of U.S. Dollars)
Company:
Produa:
Region Of Consumption:
Each
Each
World
1987
1988
1989
1990
1991
.0
6.2
6.5
8.6
9.3
27.6
48.0
57.1
37.0
26.4
27.6
54.2
63.6
45.6
35.7
10.1
14.6
25.2
37.1
33.1
8.1
23.8
39.1
32.7
30.9
35.7
32.6
3.5
29.0
KIA Instruments
Critical Dimension
Wafer Inspection
Total
29
Kaijo Denki
Wet Process
30
Sanyko Engineering
Wet Process
1991 Rank
31
35.1
Sugai
32
Wet Process
4.5
20.7
Dry Strip
5.2
Dry Etch
35.6
5.2
46.4
3.5
41.0
3.0
31.0
40.8
51.6
44.5
34.0
32.5
9.2
26.0
18.7
15.7
7.1
19.9
10.0
21.7
16.6
15.3
16.3
29.9
47.7
35.3
31.0
7.9
17.5
41.0
12.2
19.3
27.2
14.5
35.0
49.5
58.5
24.0
36.2
10.5
19.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
18.3
21.3
25.2
17.9
21.8
18.3
21.3
25.2
17.9
26.6
12.7
10.0
11.3
21.0
26.6
Dry Strip
2.7
4.5
1.5
.2
.0
Sputtering
3.0
5.0
1.0
.0
.0
18.4
19.5
13.8
21.2
26.6
Tegal
33
Total
34
Tokyo Ohka Kogyo
Dry Strip
Dry Etch
Total
BTU International*
LPCVD
Diffusion
Total
35
29.5
FSI International'
Resist Processing Equip.
Wet Process
Total
36
4.8
Machine Technology, Inc.
Resist Processing Equip.
Total
37
AG Associates
Rapid Tliermal Processing
38
10.8
10.6
11.0
14.6
24.4
39
Plasma Systems
Dry Strip
Dry Etch
Total
5.4
10.4
17.0
24.9
21.2
1.9
3.2
3.3
1.7
1.5
7.3
13.6
20.3
26.6
22.7
(Continued)
©1992 Dataquest Incorporated April-^Reproduction Prohibited
5-8
Semiconductor Equlpmetit, Manu&cturlng, and Materials
Table 5-1 (Continued)
Each Company's Revenue from Shipments of Semiconductor Wafer Fab Equipment to the World
(End User Revenue in Millions of U.S. Dollars)
Company:
Produa:
Region Of Consumption:
H
Each
Each
World
1987
1988
1989
1990
1991
16.0
14.6
16.6
10.1
20.2
Dry Strip
.0
.0
.0
.0
2.1
ECR Etch
5.6
6.2
12.0
15.7
15.4
2.7
20.2
1991 Rank
40
Santa Clara Plastics
Wet Process
41
Sumitomo Metals
ECR CVD
Total
.0
.0
6.0
5.4
5.6
6.2
18.0
21.1
42
Leica and Leica Lasertechnik
10.8
10.7
.0
2.5
.0
2.5
1.8
.0
7.5
6.8
4.9
.0
27.6
19.9
Direct Write
.0
.0
.0
Maskmaking
.0
.0
Critical Dimension
.0
.0
Wafer Inspection
.0
.0
.0
.0
Total
43
Dan Science Co., Ltd.
Wet Process
.0
2.9
12.7
18.2
19.8
44
Convac
Resist Processing Equip.
10.9
13.8
12.2
15.4
18.9
22.1
18.6
45
Shimada
3.9
5.5
8.6
MOCVD
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
Silicon Epitaxy
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
3.9
5.5
8.6
22.1
18.6
Wet Process
Total
46
Sbibaura Engineering Works (Formerly Tokuda)
Dry Etch
Sputtering
Total
9.4
3.2
32.4
24.1
14.1
4.0
18.1
11.1
7.0
5.6
5.8
20.5
10.2
38
29.9
47
Semitool and Semithenn
18.8
15.4
10.9
11.5
12.1
Diflfusion
.0
.5
2.0
4.0
3.0
LPCVD
.0
.5
16.4
1.0
1.5
17.0
1.5
16.6
Wet Process
Total
18.8
13.9
48
Toshiba
Maskmaking
APCVD
Silicon Epitaxy
Total
.
3.5
5.0
7.7
7.2
.0
.0
6.0
4.2
3.2
3.2
.6
2.0
6.5
4.5
12.5
9.1
15.7
17.9
7.7
15.7
©1992 Dataquest Incorporated April—Reproduction Prohibited
ff^r\a^ti n 11 Ar1'^
Wafer Fab Equipment Market Share
5-9
Table 5-1 (Continued)
Each Company's Revenue from Shipments of Semiconductor Wafer Fab Equipment to the World
(End User Revenue in Millions of U.S. Dollars)
Company:
Produa:
Region Of Consumption:
Each •
Each
World
1987
1988
1989
1990
1991
.8
.6
4.1
Koyo Lindbeig
1991 Rank
49
APCVD
.2
1.3
.6
LPCVD
2.0
4.5
6.8
8.1
3.1
12.1
1.9
12.6
Diffusion
5.7
Rapid Thermal Processing
Total
.2
.6
.6
.7
8.1
13.2
13.4
16.7
.3
15.4
17.5
15.2
Tazmo
50
Resist Processing Equip.
4.6
5.7
9.3
Axitron
51
MOCVD
4.9
7.5
11.4
13.9
15.0
Ateq
52
Direa Write
.0
.0
.0
1.6
.0
11.2
.0
Maskmaking
13.7
14.0
15.0
Total
1.6
11.2
13.7
14.0
15.0
Maruwa
53
Wet Process
3.6
5.4
12.3
15.0
Plasma-Therm
54
Dry Etch
12.9
6.0
15.2
18.0
13.8
4.6
3.0
3.0
1.2
18.3
18.9
18.2
21.0
15.0
13.7
PECVD
Total
VG Instruments
55
Molecular Beam Epitaxy
15.0
16.5
19.0
17.4
15.0
Verteq
56
Wet Process
6.5
11.8
12.7
13.5
14.9
Kail Suss
57
Contaa Proximity
X-Ray Aligners
Total
13.6
13.7
.0
4.6
16.3
2.8
13.5
1.6
12.9
1.8
13.6
18.3
19.1
15.1
14.7
58
Biorad
Critical Dimension
17.0
.0
14.8
59
ISA Riber
Molecular Beam Epitaxy
19.3
22.5
22.3
20.3
14.0
60
Semiconductor Systems, Inc.
.0
Resist Processing Equip.
.0
14.0
61
Shinko Electric (Formerly Denko)
LPCVD
2.1
2.3
3.5
3.8
6.2
Diffusion
2.0
2.7
4.0
6.9
7.4
Total
4.1
5.0
7.5
10.7
13.6
(Continued)
©1992 Dataquest Incorporated .^ril—Reproduction Prohibited
5-10
Semiconductor Equipment, Manufacturing, and Materials
Table 5.1 (Continued)
Each Company's Revenue £rom Shipments of Semiconductor Wafer Fab Equipment to the World
(End User Revenue In Millions of U.S. Dollars)
Company:
Product:
Region Of Consumption:
Each
Each
World
1987
1988
1989
1990
1991
6.2
7.6
11.6
11.7
11.6
.6
3.6
3.4
3.5
.0
1.9
4.2
3.5
3.8
1.6
8.7
15.4
18.5
19.0
13.2
1991 Rank
62
Enya
Wet Process
LPCVD
PECVD
Total
Insystems
63
Wafer Insp)ection
2.2
9.8
14.3
16.8
13.0
64
Disco
Diffusion
LPCVD
Total
1.5
.0
2.9
.0
3.6
5.8
10.0
.0
.0
2.7
1.5
2.9
3.6
5.8
12.7
5.5
17.5
19.0
16.0
12.3
Amaya
65
APCVD
66
Emcore
Molecular Beam Epitaxy
.0
.0
.0
.0
1.0
MOCVD
5.1
7.0
10.0
11.6
12.2
Total
5.1
7.0
10.0
12.6
12.2
2.0
10.0
12.0
4.4
6.0
SubMicron Systems, Inc.
67
Wet Process
68
Nano-Master (Formerly Micro-Controle)
Critical Dimension
Wafer Insp>ection
Total
.0
.0
2.2
.0
.0
3.1
5.0
5.4
.0
.0
5.3
9.4
11.4
2.0
4.0
9.7
10.9
.0
.0
.1
.1
.0
9.9
8.7
11.2
13.0
10.8
9.9
8.7
11.3
13.1
10.8
.0
.0
.0
10.5
.0
ETE Company, Inc.
69
Wet Process
70
Temescal
Sputtering
Evaporation
Total
71
Etec
Direa Write
Maskmaking
.0
.0
.0
14.0
10.5
Total
.0
,0
.0
24.5
10.5
CContinued)
©1992 Dataquest Incorporated April—Reproduction Prohibited
Wafer Fab Equipment Market Share
5-11
Table 5.1 (Continued)
Each Company's Revenue from Shipments of Semiconductor Wafer Fab Equipment to the World
(End User Revenue in Millions of U.S. Dollars)
Company:
Produa:
Region Of Consumption:
Each
Each
World
1987
1988
1989
1990
1991
Ramco
Dry Strip
72
8.7
9.6
11.0
16.0
10.3
Centrotherm
Diffusion
LPCVD
Total
73
.5
.0
1.0
5.8
8.4
6.7
.0
4.5
4.8
3.1
.5
1.0
10.3
13.2
9.8
Matrix
Dry Strip
74
5.2
7.2
7.0
9.0
7.5
.0
.0
.0
.0
5.2
7.2
7.0
9.0
2.3
9.8
9.7
12.0
7.5
7.0
.0
12.3
1.6
2.0
2.7
2.7
9.7
13.9
14.0
10.2
9.7
3.7
8.5
9.4
8.0
9.1
3.4
6.6
8.5
8.4
8.6
Dry Strip
.0
.8
1.0
1.1
Dry Etch
.0
.0
2.2
.9
2.8
3.4
PECVD
.0
.0
1.0
2.3
3.0
MOCVD
.6
1.0
.6
.8
Total
.6
1.8
4.8
6.8
.9
8.4
8.5
9.4
11.6
8.0
8.2
Dry Etch
Total
CVC Products
Sputtering
Evaporation
Total
75
Universal Plastics
Wet Process
76
Peak Systems
Rapid Thermal Processing
77
Samco
78
S&K Products International
Wet Process
79
80
Holon
.8
4.8
6.1
8.9
8.0
ECR Etch
.0
1.6
2.0
2.4
2.2
ECR CVD
.0
1.6
2.0
2.5
Dry Etch
.0
.0
.0
1.5
4.1
.0
3.2
4.0
3.1
8.0
Critical Dimension
81
Oxford Plasma Technology
Total
1991 Rank
7.8
(ContinuecD
©1992 Dataquest Incorporated April—Reproduction Prohibited
Semiconductor Equipment, Manufacturing, and Materials
5-12
Table 5.1 (Continued)
Each Company's Revenue from Shipments of Semiconductor Wafer Fab Equipment to the World
(End User Revenue In Millions of U.S. Dollars)
Company:
Product:
Region Of Consumption:
Each
Each
World
?87
1988
1989
1990
1991
4.3
4.7
8.2
7.4
7.8
Pokomy
Wet Process
83
TVS, Inc.
Critical Dimension
1.5
6.4
7.2
8.0
7.6
84
Kuwano Electric
Wet Process
1991 Ilank
82
6.3
13.6
9A
9.6
7.1
.0
.3
.0
.0
3.1
.5
6.2
5.3
6.7
7.1
3.1
6.7
5.6
6.7
7.1
7.1
85
Nidek
Critical Dimension
Wafer Inspection
Total
86
Tohokasei
.0
3.3
3.5
10.9
MOCVD
.0
.0
.0
.0
1.5
Molecular Beam Epitaxy
.0
.0
1.8
1.9
.0
.0
1.8
1.9
5.5
7.0
4.9
6.3
6.8
5.6
6.9
7.7
7.0
7.6
6.5
6.5
Wet Process
87
Yamoto Co., Ltd.
Total
88
Nippon Sanso
MOCVD
89
Semifob
Wet Process
90
Leybold-Heraeus
Sputtering
12.0
Evaporation
1.5
.5
1.8
1.5
2.0
13.5
8.3
10.6
9.3
6.4
Wet Process
.0
2.4
2.8
5.1
LPCVD
.0
.0
5.8
5.9
.0
.9
5.0
Total
7.8
8.8
7.8
4.4
91
Toyoko Chemical
.0
MOCVD
.7
1.2
.0
Diffusion
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
8.6
11.0
5.9
Total
.7
3.6
92
Yuasa
Resist PiX)cessing Equip.
3.6
6.0
8.8
7.3
5.9
93
Optical Specialties, Inc.
Critical Dimension
Wafer Inspection
Total
1.3
4.0
5,3
2.3
2.5
4.8
4.7
1.9
5.7
2.0
.3
2.2
.1
6.7
5.8
(Continued)
©1992 Dataquest Incorporated April—Reproduction Prohibited
Wafer Fab Equipment Market Share
5-13
Table 5-1 (Continued)
Each Company's Revenue from Shipments of Semiconductor Wafer Fab Equipment to the World
(End User Revenue In Millions of U.S. Dollars)
Company:
Produa:
Region Of Consumption:
Each
Each
World
1987
1988
1989
1990
1991
1991 Rank
94
Japan Production Engineering
PECVD
4.5
6.5
7.0
8.0
5.6
Musashi
95
Wet Process
1.9
6.7
5.5
1.0
.3
2.1
5.3
.0
.0
.0
.0
5.2
Sputtering
.1
.1
Evaporation
.2
.2
.9
1.2
1.5
3.0
1.8
3.2
.3
2.1
4.5
5.0
4.5
4.8
5.5
5.0
9.0
5.8
3.6
7.5
6.0
5.0
5.0
4.9
.0
9.8
13.5
14.0
10.8
4.9
4.5
1.9
2.4
.4
4.8
.0
.0
2.0
3.0
4.6
.3
.7
.1
.4
.7
7.1
7.2
4.0
3.7
4.4
4.4
5.5
4.8
3.5
.0
.0
3.4
1.7
3.4
.0
.5
.0
96
CFM Technology
Wet Process
97
Intevac
Molecular Beam Epitaxy
98
Denton Vacuum
Total
.3
LPE
99
Silicon Epitaxy
Solitec
100
Resist Processing Equip.
6.2
LPCVD
Total
S a Manufacturing
101
Wet Process
MR Semicon
102
MOCVD
CHA Industries
103
Spunering
Evaporation
6.0
6.3
Total
6.3
7.0
.0
.0
Sapi Equipements
104
Wet Process
105
Advantage Production Technology
Wet Process
.0
.0
106
Amray
Critical Dimension
1.4
2.6
2.1
107
Moore
Silicon Epitaxy
.0
1.0
1.6
3.0
3.3
(ContinuetO
®1992 Dataquest Incorporated April—Reproduction Prohibited
Semiconductor Equipment, Manufacturing, and Materials
5-14
Table 5.1 (Continued)
Each Company's Revenue from Shipments of Semiconductor Wafer Fab Equipment to the World
(End User Revenue in Millions of U.S. Dollars)
Company:
Product:
Region Of Consumption:
Each
Each
World
Fuji Electric
Wet Process
ECR CVD
Total
Hampshire Instruments
X-Ray
Nanometrics
Critical Dimension
Opal
Critical Dimension
AET Addax
RTP
Angstrom Measurements
Critical Dimension
Eiko
Molecular Beam Epitaxy
Nippon EMC
MOCVD
SiScan Systems
Critical Dimension
Topcon
Critical Dimension
BCT Spectrum
LPCVD
CPA
Sputter
Dalton Corporation
Wet Process
Fusion Semiconductor Systems
Dry Strip
Daido Sanso
Molecular Beam Epitaxy
Kurt J. Lesker
Sputtering
Evaporation
Total
1987
1988
1989
1990
1991
.0
2.6
10.7
2.0
2.1
.0
.0
.0
.0
.9
0
2.6
10.7
2.0
3.0
1991 Rank
108
109
.0
1.8
.0
.0
2.4
110
4.2
4.8
3.2
2.3
2.4
111
.0
1.3
2.8
2.4
2.4
112
.0
.0
.0
.0
2.3
113
.0
.0
.3
.0
2.2
1.4
1.2
2.9
2.6
2.2
1.4
1.9
2.2
1.7
2.2
3.0
4.9
5.0
2.0
2.2
.0
.0
.0
.0
2.1
.0
.0
.0
.0
2.0
.0
.0
.0
1.0
2.0
.0
.0
2.6
2.6
1.9
.5
1.0
1.5
1.5
1.9
.0
.0
.0
1.8
1.0
1.0
114
115
116
117
118
119
120
121
122
.0
123
.8
.8
.8
.3
1.1
.3
1.1
.6
.6
.8
1.4
1.6
1.8
CContinued>
©1992 Dataquest Incorporated April—Reproduction Prohibited
Wafer Fab Equipment Market Share
5-15
Table 5.1 (Continued)
Each Company's Revenue from Shipments of Semiconductor Wafer Fab Equipment to the World
(End User Revenue In Millions of U.S. Dollars)
Company:
Produa:
Region Of Consumption:
Each
Each
World
1987
1988
1989
1990
1991
m.FSI
1991 Rank
124
Dry Strip
.0
.0
.0
.0
1.7
Alameda Instruments
Wet Process
125
.0
.0
1.2
.0
1.6
LFE
126
Dry Strip
1.0
1.5
1.7
1.4
1.5
Mattson Technologies
Dry Strip
127
.0
.0
.0
.0
1.5
Process Products
RTP
128
.7
1.0
1.3
1.2
1.5
Shinko Seiki
129
Dry Strip
.0
.0
.0
.0
1.1
Sputtering
.0
.0
.0
.0
A
0
0
0
0
1.5
Total
Sputtered Films
Sputtering
130
1.0
.6
1.0
1.2
1.5
131
Carl Zeiss
Wafer Insp>ection
1.8
1.8
1.4
1.8
1.4
132
Pacific Western
LPCVD
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
2.8
.0
.0
2.5
.0
1.0
APCVD
7.9
.2
6.2
Diffusion
.0
.6
.6
.6
.4
Total
8.1
6.8
3.4
3.1
1.4
PECVD
.0
Process Technology, Ltd.
LPCVD
133
4.3
4.0
2.5
3.0
1.4
Pure Aire Corporation
Wet Process
134
2.4
2.8
3.0
1.3
1.4
135
Athens
Wet Process
1.0
4.0
2.0
4.2
1.2
136
Innotec
Sputtering
2.4
4.2
Evaporation
.0
1.0
.5
.2
Total
2.4
5.2
.7
.8
.7
.4
1.2
.5
1.2
(Continued)
©1992 Dataquest Incorporated April—Reproduction Prohibited
Semiconductor Equipment, Manufacturing, and Materials
5-16
Table 5.1 (Continued)
Each Company's Revenue £rom Shipments of Semiconductor Wafer Fab Equipment to the World
(End User Revenue In Millions of U.S. Dollars)
Company:
Produa:
Region Of Consumption:
Each
Each
World
1987
1988
1989
1990
1991
CVT
1991 Rank
137
MOCVD
1.1
1.6
2.0
2.2
1.0
Jipelec
138
RTP
.0
.0
.0
.7
1.0
Spire
139
MOCVD
1.3
2.1
2.4
1.7
1.0
140
Adv. Film Technology, Inc.
Sputter
.0
.0
.7
*
.8
141
High Temperature Engineering
RTP
.0
.0
.0
.3
.8
Tystar
142
LPCVD
.4
.3
.6
.5
1.4
.9
.5
.8
.7
.7
.0
.0
Diffusion
.0
.0
Total
.0
.0
1.2
1.3
1.3
.8
CVD Equipment
143
MOCVD
Elionix
144
ECR Etch
.3
.3
.3
1.2
.7
1.4
2.5
1.4
1.0
.7
Ryokosha
145
Critical Dimension
146
Wellman Furnaces
LPCVD
.0
.5
.3
.0
.0
Diffusion
2.0
2.5
.5
.2
.5
Total
2.0
3.0
.8
.2
.5
.3
^3^^
.4
.5
.3
.7
.5
.1
.1
.2
.5
.2
Nanosil
147
RTP
148
Ion Tech
Sputtering
149
Poly-Flow Engineering
Wet Process
.5
^
4.4
1.2
2.4
1.5
5.2
.0
11.3
16.0
4.0
.0
.0
ABT Corporation
Critical Dimension
American Semiconductor Equipment Technology
Steppers
(Continued)
©1992 Dataquest Incorporated April—Reproduction Proliibited
Wafer Fab Equipment Market Share
5-17
Table 5.1 (Continued)
Each Company's Revenue from Shipments of Semiconductor Wafer Fab Eqtilpment to the World
(End User Revenue In Millions of U.S. Dollars)
Company:
Produa:
Region Of Consutnption:
Each
Each
World
1989
1990
1987
1988
1991
3.7
.0
13.9
11.0
8.2
7.0
.0
2.9
2.9
5.4
6.5
.0
16.8
13.9
13.6
13.5
.0
7.8
15.0
16.0
14.5
.0
1.6
.0
3.2
.0
9.4
15.0
19.2
3.5
18.0
1991 Rank
Anicon
LPCVD
.0
Balzers
Sputtering
Evaporation
Total
Branson/IPC
Dry Strip
Dry Etch
Total
.0
BTUAJlvac
LPCVD
1.6
.0
Cambridge Instruments
Direa Write
10.0
8.0
Maskmaking
.0
5.0
MOCVD
Total
12.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
3.3
2.7
2.5
.0
.0
.0
13.3
15.7
14.5
.0
.0
.0
1.4
.0
.0
.0
.6
.0
2.8
2.7
.0
2.6
2.7
.0
.0
.0
.4
.5
.0
.0
.0
3.1
5.5
6.4
1.0
.0
.7
.0
.0
.0
.0
1.2
1.1
.0
.0
.0
.1
.2
.0
.0
.0
1.3
1.3
.0
.0
.0
1.0
2.5
Chemitronics
Dry Strip
Chlorine Engineering
Dry Strip
Crystal Specialties
MOCVD
Daiwa Semiconductor
MOCVD
Dexon
Wet Process
EEV
MOCVD
Estek
Wet Process
Wafer Insp>ection
Total
Focus Semiconductor
LPCVD
CCanttnueiO
®1992 Dataquest Incorporated April—Reproduction Prohibited
5-18
Semiconductor Equipment, Manufacturing, and Materials
i
Table 5.1 (Continued)
Each Company's Revenue from Shipments of Semiconductor Wafer Fab Eqiiipment to the World
(End User Revenue In Millions of U.S. Dollars)
Company:
Product:
Region Of Consumption:
Each
Each
World
1987
GCA
Resist Processing Eqp,
Steppers
Dry Etch
Total
Heidelberg Instruments
Critical Dimension
Helmut Seier
LPCVD
Diffusion
Total
Integrated Air Systems
Wet Process
Kyoritsu
Wet Process
Materials Research Corp.
Dry Etch
Sputter
Total
Nanoquest
Critical Dimension
National Electrostatics
Ion Implantation
Perkin-Elmer
Projection
Steppers
Dirert Write
Maskmaking
X-Ray
Dry Etch
MBE
Sputter
Critical Dimension
Total
1988
1989
1990
J991
7.0
5.5
.0
.0
.0
47.4
104.0
.0
.0
.0
4.0
5.0
.0
.0
.0
58.4
114.5
.0
.0
.0
1.6
3.5
.0
.3
.3
.0
.0
.0
.5
.8
.7
.0
.0
.0
1.0
.0
.0
.0
3.0
2.0
.0
.0
2.7
2.5
3.1
.0
4.4
13.0
7.4
.0
.0
23.1
34.0
54.0
.0
.0
27.5
47.0
61.4
.0
.0
.0
.0
17.5
1.8
1.2
4.0
88.0
78.6
44.9
10.2
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
25.2
5.0
9.6
12.8
9.9
.0
27.0
27.0
21.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
2.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
5.0
2.8
.0
.0
3.1
.0
.9
1.0
.0
.0
1.4
.0
.0
90.4
.0
.0
.57.9
2.9
130.0
1991 Rank
(Continued)
i
©1992 Daiaquest Incorporated April—Reproduction Prohibited
Wafer Fab Equipment Market Share
5-19
Table 5.1 (Continued)
Each Company's Revenue from Shipments of Semiconductor Wafer Fab Equipment to the World
(End User Revenue in Millions of U.S. Dollars)
Company:
Produa:
Region Of Consumption:
Each
Each
World
1987
1988
1989
1990
1991
.0
.0
.9
.9
•0
.3
.0
.0
.0
.0
.6
.6
.0
.0
.0
1.2
1.4
.0
Si
JO
.3
.9
1.0
.0
.0
.7
1.2
1.5
1.0
,0
2.3
1.4
3.6
3.2
,0
17.4
.0
.0
.0
.0
LPCVD
8.3
.0
.0
.0
.0
MOCVD
2.9
23.6
1.7
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
1991 R a n k
Rapro
Silicon Epitaxy
Reichert-McBain
Critical Dimension
Seiden Sha
MOCVD
Seiko
MBE
Semco Engineering
MOCVD
Sitesa
RTP
Spectrum CVD
LPCVD
TIEL/Lam
Dry Etch
TEl/Thermco
Diffusion
RTP
Total
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
34.8
1.7
.0
.0
.0
7.0
.0
.0
.0
Thermco
LPCVD
Diffusion
34.9
6.5
60.0
.0
.0
.0
Total
41.9
66.5
.0
.0
.0
LPCVD
4.0
1.5
.0
.0
.0
Diffusion
2.0
2.5
.0
.0
.0
4.0
.0
.0
.0
Thomas Schwonn
MOCVD
Tylan
Total
6.0
Ulvac/BTU
.5
3.5
4.0
6.2
.0
Dii¥usion
1.7
12.3
16.5
.0
Total
2.2
11.5
15.0
16.3
22.7
.0
LPCVD
(Continued)
©1992 Dataquest Incorporated April—Reproduction Prohibited
5-20
Semiconductor Equipment, Manufacturing, and Materials
Table 5.1 (Continued)
Each Company's Revenue from Shipments of Semiconductor Wafer Fab Equipment to the World
(End User Revenue in Millions of U.S. Dollars)
Company:
^M
^B
Each
Product:
Each
Region Of (Donsumption:
World
1987
1988
1989
1990
1991
Critical Dimension
6A
9.8
9.9
.0
.0
Wafer Inspection
4.7
10.4
8.8
.0
.0
11.1
20.2
18.7
.0
.0
17.9
21.0
.0
.0
.0
1991 Rank
Wild Leitz and Wild Leitz Instruments
Total
Vickers Instruments
Critical Dimension
"Wafer feb equipment joint venture activity: TEI/Vatian, Varian/Tel (not included here; please refer to individual entry)
"Wafer fab equipment joint venture activity: Alcan (not included here; please refer to individual entry)
'\Rifer feb equipment joint venture activity: TEI/Varian, Varian/TEL (not included here; please refer to individual entry)
^Former Wafer fab joint venture activity: BTUAJIvac, Ulvac/BTU (not included here; please refer to individual entry)
'Wsfer.feb equipment joint venture activity: Sumitomo/Eaton Nova (not included here; please refer to individual entry)
'Former wafer feb joint venture activity: BTUAJIvac, Ulvac/BTU (not included here; please refer to individual entry)
' ^ ^ e r feb equipment joint venture activity: m'FSI (not included here; please refer to individual entry)
Source: Dataquest (April 1992)
«
©1992 Dataquest Incorporated April—Reproduction Prohibited
Dataquest
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i
0012974
Semiconductor Equipment,
Manufacturing, and Materials
Forecast
Ifl mu [fJM1751 It k ^
M
^
Semiannual Edition
^
oi
QCE
o
o
Semiconductor Equipment, Manufacturing, and Materials
DataQuest'
SEiVIM-SVC-MT-9202
December 28, 1992
Semiconductor Equipment,
Manufacturing, and Materials
Forecast
MarketTrends
Semiannual Edition
Semiconductor Equipment, Manufacturing, and Materials
DataQuesf
SEMM-SVC-MT-9202
December 28, 1992
Published by Dataquest Incorporated
The content of this report represents our interpretation and analjrsis of informatian generally available to the public or
released by knowledgeable individuals in the subject industry, but is not guaranteed as to accuracy or completeness. It does
not contain material provided to us in confidence by our dients.
Printed in the United States of America. All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced, stored in
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microfilming, videotape, or otherwise—^without the prior permission of the publisher.
© 1992 Dataquest Incorporated
December 1992
0014227
Table of Contents . ^ ^ . i ^ ^ ^ - ^ ^ . - ^ . - ^ i i ^ ^ ^ . . ^ . .
Page
1.
2.
3.
4.
Executive Summary: Adjustment to Excess Capacity Nearing Completion, Recovery
in Capital Spending One Year Off
What the Recovery WiU Look Like
Dataquest Perspective
Semiconductor Capital Spending Forecast
Chapter Highlights
Capital Spending Tables
Capital Spending Bumps Along Bottom
United States Leads Recovery
Not AH Segments Participate
Japan Still Struggling
Structural Change for Japanese Industry
Exiropean Spending Doubtful
Prospects Remain Bright in Asia/Pacific
High Growth Prospects Maintained
Dataquest Perspective
Wafer Fab Equipment Forecast
Chapter Highlights
Wafer Fabrication Equipment Forecast
Overcapacity Weighs Down the Equipment Market
Regional Analysis
North America
Japan
Europe
Asia/Pacific-Rest of World
Wafer Fab Equipment Market Trends
Equipment Segments
Dataquest Perspective
Silicon Wafer Forecast
Chapter Highlights
Silicon Forecast Tables
Mixed Reviews for the Uiuted States
Wiimers and Losers
Forward to 1993 and Beyond
Dataquest Perspective
1-1
1-1
1-2
2-1
2-1
2-1
2-4
2-4
2-5
2-5
2-7
2-7
2-8
2-10
2-10
3-1
3-1
3-2
3-2
3-2
3-2
3-6
3-8
3-9
3-10
3-10
3-16
4-1
4-1
4-1
4-2
4-2
4-7
4-7
Table of Contents (Continued)
Japan's Recovery Problematic
End-Use Markets Deteriorate
Forward to 1993
Dataquest Perspective
European Slump
European Company Performance
Foreign Compaiues Lead the Way
Dataquest Perspective
Asia/Pacific Rolls On
Koreans Lead
Other Countries Also Prosper
Dataquest Perspective
5.
Semiconductor Consumption Forecast
Semiconductor Consumption
6. Semiconductor Production Forecast
Semiconductor Production
Appendix A—^Regional Economic Outlook for Our Forecast
The Regional Economic Outlook for Our Forecast (November 1992)
Uiuted States Shaking Off the Recession
The Sun Also Sets
Europe Unravels
England Slides Further
When WiU the Bimdesbank Move?
Asia/Pacific Pushes Ahead
Appendix B—Exchange Rate Definitions
Page
4-7
4-8
4-8
4-9
4-10
4-10
4-11
4-11
4-11
4-12
4-12
4-14
5-1
5-1
6-1
6-1
A-1
A-1
A-1
A-2
A-3
A-3
A-3
A-4
B-1
List of Tables
Table
2-1
Worldwide Capital Spending by Region - Historical, Includes Merchant and Captive
Semiconductor Companies (Millions of U.S. Dollars)
2-2
Worldwide Semiconductor Capital Spending, by Region - Forecast, 1991-1996
(Millions of U.S. Dollars)
2-3
1992 Fab Closings
2-4
Planned European Investments
3-1
Worldwide Wafer Fab Equipment Market, by Region - Historical, 1986-1991
(Millions of U.S. Dollars)
3-2
Worldwide Wafer Fab Equipment Market, by Region - Forecast, 1991-1996
(Millions of U.S. Dollars)
3-3
Worldwide Wafer Fab Equipment Market, by Equipment Type - Historical, 1986-1991
(Millions of U.S. Dollars)
3-4
Worldwide Wafer Fab Equipment Market, by Equipment Type - Forecast, 1991-1996
(Millions of U.S. DoUars)
4-1
Forecast of Captive and Merchant Silicon and Merchant Epitaxial Wafer Consvimption
(Units—Mi11ior\s of Square Inches)
4-2
Forecast of Merchant Epitaxial Wafer Consumption (Units—Millions of Square Inches)
4-3
Forecast of Merchant and Captive Silicon Wafer Consumption (Uruts—Millions
of Square Inches)
4-4
Forecast of Merchant Silicon Wafer Consumption (Units—^Millions of Square Inches)
4-5
Korean Sales of Semiconductors (Millions of U.S. Dollars)
4-6
New Fabs Planned for Asia/Pacific
5-1
Worldwide Semiconductor Consvimption by Region—Historical, Includes Merchant
and Captive Semiconductor Companies (Millions of U.S. Dollars)
5-2
Worldwide Consumption by Region, Merchant Semiconductor Sales Only—^Forecast
(Millions of U.S. Dollars)
6-1
Worldwide Semiconductor Production by Region—Historical, Merchant and Captive
Semiconductor Company Sales (Millions of U.S. Dollars)
6-2
Worldwide Semiconductor Production by Region—Forecast, Merchant and Captive
Semiconductor Company Sales (Millions of U.S. Dollars)
A-1
International Economic Forecasts, GDP/GNP Growth Rates (Percentage)
B-1
Average 1992 Exchange Rates per U.S. Dollar
B-2
Exchange Rates per Dollar for Japanese Yen and ECU: 1985-1991
Page
2-2
2-3
2-6
2-9
3-3
3-4
3-11
3-13
4-3
4-4
4-5
4-6
4-12
4-13
5-2
5-3
6-2
6-3
A-5
B-2
B-2
Chapter 1
Executive Summary: Adjustment to Excess
Capacity Nearing Completion, Recovery
in Capitai Spending One Year Off . ^ . . ^
The end game to the global semiconductor investment downturn that
began in 1990 is under way. Ironically, the final corrective adjustments
are taking place in Japan, the very country that led the investment
boom.
As a result, we expect worldwide semiconductor capital spending and
semiconductor wafer fab equipment sales to bottom in 1993 and then
begin a sustained period of growth through the middle of the decade.
Our forecast has global spending declining 0.1 percent in 1993, and
equipment sales up 1.2 percent.
The adjustments to capital spending that have been imder way over
the last three years are finally bringing semiconductor capacity into
line with demand. The bottom line is that IC manufacturers have cut
the rate at which capacity will grow in the future. Not only are plans
to add new capacity being delayed or canceled, but also device
manufacturers are closing down older fabs.
On a square-inch basis, 1992 actual capacity will be 10 percent less
than originally plaimed for one year ago, and 11 percent less in 1993.
The decreases occurred in all regioi« of the world, but the steepest
cuts occurred in capacity that Japanese companies had planned to
bring online.
The sharp retrenchment in Japanese capital spending is at the center of
the decline in capacity. We estimate that spending in Japan will be
slashed by 29 percent in 1992, and will further decline by 13 percent
in 1993. The United States and Europe are also experiencing slower
growth of installed capacity, though the decline is not nearly as
pronounced as it is in Japan. Plans to add capacity in the Asia/Pacific
region continue to push ahead.
What the Recovery Will Look Like
Dataquest believes that the adjustment to capacity now taking place
will lead to an improvement in the profitability of device makers over
the next several years. Better profitability for device makers is the cornerstone assumption in o\ir forecast of an accelerating capital spending
cycle beginning in 1994.
SEMM-S\/C-l\/rr-9202
©1992 Dataquest Incorporated
December 28,1992
1-2
Semiconductor Equipment, Manufacturing, and IVIaterials
Several other themes are fundamental building blocks of our forecast.
The following paragraphs detail these themes.
The ascension of the Asia/Pacific countries, though not a new idea,
stUl remains at the top of our list of important drivers for capital
spending, equipment purchases, and future sUicon demand. However,
we do believe that a rotation away from the current countries
dominating device production in Asia is under way. This long-term
trend will benefit Chinay India, Malaysia, and Thailand,
Device production in the United States will show considerable
strength, considering the maturation of the U.S. industry. Two forces
are at work here. First, the dominance of U.S. system makers in the
workstation and PC markets will sustain a healthy growth rate for
data processing chips including MPUs, digital signal processing (DSP),
and memory devices. Second, the economic gains being made by
South American coimtries will accelerate the demand for high-tech
equipment. U.S.-based device makers will be one of the major
beneficiaries of this growing demand.
Japanese device makers are expected to de-emphasize market share
and to adopt a more market-driven strategy. Consequently, we do not
expect capital spending, equipment purchases, or silicon demand to
grow at levels seen in the late 1980s. The semiconductor industry in
Japan will be more balanced with domestic demand. Increased emphasis wiU be placed on value-added applications such as RISC-based
MPUs, microcontrollers, and ASIC devices. Though Japan's ownership
of the MOS memory market is over, we expect Japanese companies to
remain key players in this market through alUances.
The path of recovery for the European semiconductor industry is
unclear. It is likely that future growth will continue to hinge on nonEuropean companies, but this dependence is risky considering the
opportunities available to device makers in other regions of the world.
Our forecast assumes that the economies of the region wiU improve in
1994. Domestic European device makere should be a major beneficiary
of an improving economic climate. Even so, the long-term growth of
these companies will be tied to their global competitiveness, which
still lags other world-class device makers,
Dataquest Perspective
Hie recovery we are forecasting for global semiconductor capital
spending and equipment markets is unlikely to achieve the overheated
levels of the last upturn. But strong growth for semiconductors, driven
by an economic recovery in the industrialized nations and a growing
emphasis on semiconductor production in the industrializing nations
of the Far East, is forecast to produce a period of sustained growth for
global semiconductor capital spending through 1996.
Project Analyst: Mark FitzGerald
Contributors: Kunio Achiwa and Charles Boucher
December 28,1992
©1992 Dataquest Incorporated
SEMM-SVC-MT-9202
Chapter 2
Semiconductor Capital Spending
Forecast ^ ^ - ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^
This chapter presents data on worldwide semiconductor capital spending, by region. Capital spending in a region includes spending by all
semiconductor producers with plants in that region. Components of
capital spending are property, plant, and equipment expenditure for
both front- and back-end semiconductor operations.
Chapter Highlights
• Dataquest forecasts modest decline in global semiconductor capital
spending in 1993.
• Japan spending will decline another 13 percent following a slide of
29 percent in 1992. Structural change is tmder way in Japan, which
is moving to a more value-added strategy.
• U.S. spending is expected to show strong growth in 1993. U.S.
spending will be dominated by the $1.6 billion that Intel plans to
invest. The PC boom continues as the driver. We believe that spending will be strong in later years as recovery occiirs in other segments of U.S. industry.
• European spending is forecast to decline for the third year in a row
in 1993. Weak European economies wUl be the biggest problem in
1993. Europe will be heavily dependent on foreign investment.
• Asia/Pacific spending is expected to make modest gains in 1993.
Long-term prospects for high growth rates in Asia/Pacific are still
on track.
Capital Spending Tables
Two tables in this chapter emphasize capital spending. Table 2-1 shows
historical capital spending by region for the years 1985 through 1991.
Table 2-2 shows forecast capital spending by region for the years 1991
through 1996.
Yearly exchange rate variations can have a significant effect on the
1985 through 1992 data in the tables. Appendix B provides a more
complete explanation of the exchange rates used in this document.
SEMM-SVC-MT-9202
©1992 Dataquest Incorporated
December 28,1992
Table 2-1
Worldwide Capital Spending by Region - Historical
Includes Merchant and Captive Semiconductor Companies
(Millions of US. Dollars)
0
I
en
<
o
fS
1986
2,082
1987
2,594
1988
3,434
1989
3,875
1990
4,088
32.4
12.8
4,610
5,473
18.7
5.5
5,425
North America
Percent Growth
Japan
-16.2
-20.8
3,336
1,845
24.6
2,432
Percent Growth
-11.5
-44.7
31.8
89.6
800
765
875
984
-4.4
437
14.4
12.5
Asia/Pacific-ROW
Percent Growth
Worldwide
4.8
534
534
1,060
23.0
7,299
-18.2
5,129
22.2
6,435
98.5
10,088
12,464
-21.5
12,520
Percent Growth
-10.0
-29.7
25.5
56.8
23.6
0.4
Europe
@
1985
2,629
Percent Growth
Source: Dataquest (December 1992)
-0.9
1,211
23.1
1,512
1,905
79.7
1,495
24.9
1
§
Table 2-2
Worldwide Semiconductor Capital Spending, by Region - Forecast, 1991-1996
(Millions of Dollars)
1991
1992
1993
1994
1995
3,851
3,559
4,004
4,328
4,787
-3.8
-7.6
12.5
8.1
10.6
5,636
4,019
3,894
Percent Growth
1.0
-28.7
3,508
-12.7
4,233
8.7
Europe
Percent Growth
1,234
1,087
1,041
-17.5
2,274
63.9
12,995
-11.9
2,319
-4.2
2,417
2.0
10,983
-15.5
4.2
10,970
-0.1
1,143
9.8
2,632
8.9
11,997
North America
Percent Growth
Japan
@
Asia/Pacific-ROW
Percent Growth
i
Worldwide
Percent Growth
Source: Dataquest (December 1992)
o
•a
2.9
11.0
9.4
1,400
22.5
3,118
18.5
13,538
12.9
1
2-4
Semiconductor Equipment, Manufacturing, and Materials
Capital Spending Bumps Aiong Bottom
Worldwide semiconductor capital spending is forecast to decline
0.1 percent in 1993, following a steep decline of 15.5 percent in 1992.
Our previous forecast, issued in August 1992, anticipated a smaU
increase in capital spending in 1993. However, further deterioration of
the fundamentals in the Japanese and European markets and delays of
projects in the Asia/Pacific region have prompted us to lower our
spending forecast for 1993.
CKir longer-term forecast for 1994 through 1996 remains intact. We
believe that spending will bottom in the first half of 1993 and begin a
more sustained expansion through 1996. Even so, we continue to
emphasize that the recovery in spending over our forecast horizon
wiU not mirror the heady growth that followed the last global spending downturn in 1985.
Spurts in capital spending such as the semiconductor industry
experienced from 1987 to 1991 are imHkely to occur without a new
product driver or the opening of new markets such as Qiina or India.
We are cautious about either of these trends driving the demand for
new semiconductor production capacity in the next several years.
In the new product arena, personal commimicators, HDTV, and multimedia will not have much of an impact on device production until
the second half of the decade. As far as new regional market opportunities go, the upsides for new fab facilities are considerable, given
pent-up demand in the imderdeveloped regions of the world. But a
difficult business climate, frail legal systems, and wanting infrastructures all suggest that the growth of a domestic semiconductor industry
in these underdeveloped countries will take time.
United States Leads Recovery
We are forecasting semiconductor capital spending in the United States
to show a respectable recovery in 1993, up 12.5 percent. Fiirthermore,
we anticipate that the rate of growth will accelerate as the U.S. economy shows further improvement toward the middle of the decade.
Device demand in the United States has been strong throughout 1992,
encouraging many device companies to increase their spending plans
for 1993. Companies with devices going into PC applications, diskdrive systems, networking gear, and personal commvmications systems
have had their sales turn up sharply. Major beneficiaries of this trend
are AMD, Intel, and Motorola.
The PC boom in the United States has played an especially important
role in fueling IC demand. AMD, Intel, and Motorola have all
reported better than 20 percent device revenue growth in the last
quarter, largely because of an increase in MPU sales. It is no coincidence that these companies are also increasing capital spending. AMD
has just annotmced a new fab line in Austin, Texas and an expansion
of its facility in Santa Clara, California; Intel has armoimced a $1.6 billion capital investment plan for 1993 targeting expansions at seven of
December 28,1992
©1992 Dataquest Incorporated
SEMM-SVC-MT-9202
Semiconductor Capital Spending Forecast
2-5
its fab lines worldwide, and Motorola is moving ahead to expand its
MOS 11 line and will spend $700 million on its semiconductor operations in 1993.
N o t All Segments Participate
On the other hand, merchant and captive device makers selling into
the mainframe/midrange systems market, auto industry, or military
segment continue to struggle. For example, IBM, Digital Equipment
Corporation, and VLSI Technology are all reporting poor years for
their semiconductor operations. We do not expect these lagging
segments to improve much before 1994, and it is anticipated that
spending by companies targeting these markets will continue to
trail the overall U.S. industry.
Digital may be the notable exception. The company plans a new
fab for building the Alpha RISC microprocessor. However, the level
of spending on this facility will ultimately be determined by the
success of the Alpha AXP line of computers. The jury is still out
on that count.
There are also trends on a micro level preventing more robust
growth in capital spending in the United States, when compared
with previous periods. First, the United States has the oldest semiconductor fab iivfrastructure, and we believe that the rate of fab
closures will continue at a steady pace because of obsolescence {see
Table 2-3). National Semiconductor is an excellent example of this
trend. It has shut down or sold facilities in Salt Lake City, Utah,
PuyaUup, Washington, and Tucson, Arizona. Second, we expect the
rate of investment by foreign companies in U.S. fab capacity to
decrease. The decline in Japanese investment in U.S. fabs wUl be
especially notable. Finally, we believe that U.S. device companies
wUl continue to piirsue high-value-added niche applications concentrating on design and using overseas foundries to manufacture the
devices.
Japan Still Struggling
One only has to look at the flurry of poor quarterly reports coming
out of Japan to tmderstand why semiconductor capital spending in
Japan will continue to decline in 1993. By our estimates, spending wUl
fall 12.7 percent in 1993, following a precipitous drop of 28.7 percent
in 1992.
Across the board, Japanese device makers are reporting miserable
earnings and are scrambling to shore up their balance sheets by cutting spending. A downturn in all the major semiconductor end-use
markets in Japan is causing companies to be more cautious. Data
processing, consumer electronic, auto, and communications applications are all suffering.
Mainframe demand, which is the largest data processing segment
using ICs, has gone negative in 1992, and it is unclear when financial
and manufacturing companies wiU begin buying these systems again.
In PCs, a fierce price war in overseas markets is exposing the vulnerability of Japanese PC makers. Already, U.S. and Taiwanese companies
SEMM-SVC-MT-9202
©1992 Dataquest Incorporated
December 28,1992
Table 2-3
1992 Fab Closings
^
©
Company
Unisys Components Group
Micrel Semiconductor
Motorola
AMD
Signetics (to Close)
Xicor
Hewlett-Packard
LSI Logic (to Close)
Source: Dataquest (December 1992)
B
JQ
CD
5"
8
•a
o
I
§
City
Rancho Bernardo
San Jose
Mesa
Santa Clara
Orem
MUpitas
Palo Alto
Edmonton, ^^tlberta
State
CA
CA
A2
CA
UT
CA
CA
Technology
BIP MOS
DMOS BIP
BIP BICMOS
BIP
BIP
CMOS MOS
CMOS
CMOS
Geome
(Micron
Semiconductor Capital Spending Forecast
2-7
are targeting Japan with their lower-priced machines. This practice is
widely expected to enable them to gain market share at the expense of
the established domestic vendors.
Japanese consimier electronics sales are weak, causing companies to
cut production of semiconductors going into this application. Pressure
on household incomes continues to erode consumer confidence, which
is being translated into reduced consiunption expenditure.
Vehicle sales have fallen on a year-to-year basis for the last 18 months
in a row, with the exception oif June 1992. Reflecting difficulties in the
auto sector, Nissan Motor, Japan's second largest automaker, reported
its first pretax loss since World War II and suspended its dividend for
the first time ever.
The conununicatioris sector is also weak as NTT, Japan's domestic
phone company, has dramatically cut its own capital spending
budgets. As a result, telecom systems are also recording weak sales.
Structural Change for Japanese Industry
The current downturn in Japan is driven by domestic asset deflation and the reversal of the credit cycle of the late 1980s. Stock
prices are more than 50 percent below their peak, and lorban land
prices have fallen about 20 percent. Negative money supply growth
demonstrates the severity of the financial system's capital shortage.
We believe that 1993 is likely to be marked by a softening in the
labor market through further reductions in compensation growth
and cutbacks in regular employment growth. It is likely that the
slower growth in wages is the endgame of an adjustment process
that began in the fall of 1990 with a tightening of monetary policy
by the Bank of Japan.
Consequently, we expect an improved envtroimient for semiconductor capital spending in 1994 and beyond. But the vmbridled spending spree by Japanese companies is not likely to be repeated.
Slower domestic gross national product (GNP) growth, mounting
competitive pressure, and lopsided trade imbalances all suggest that
the scramble for semiconductor market share will no longer be the
driving strategy for Japanese device makers.
European Spending Doubtful
Dataquest is forecasting that semiconductor capital spending in Europe
will continue to slide in 1993. We expect spending to decline another
4.2 percent in 1993, following declines in 1991 and 1992. Our forecast
calls for stronger growth in spending toward the middle of the
decade. Frankly, however, tmcertainty surrounding this back-endloaded forecast is high.
We are assuming that at some point toward the middle of the decade
the European market will become a more enticing region for setting
up manufacturing operations. Eastern Europe, which is directly
SEMM-SVC-MT-9202
©1992 Dataquest Incorporated
December 28,1992
2-8
Semiconductor Equipment, IVIanulacturing, and Materials
responsible for the current economic downturn, may be the key to
growth of the European semiconductor industry over the long term. If
market forces are allowed to take hold in Eastern Europe, then it is
conceivable that a determined and educated engineering work force
with its back against the wall coiold possibly repeat the industrial
revolution recently achieved in Taiwan and Korea.
The problem in the short term is simply the lack of projects. U.S. and
Japanese companies are finishing a roxond of investment in new facilities. Hitachi and Mitsubishi are planning facilities for 1994, but these
investments may well rest on an improved business clknate in Europe
(see Table 2-4). Intel wUl finish equipping its Ireland fab in 1993. Other
than these plans, there is little on the horizon.
Spending by the three largest European device makers also looks
sketchy. Siemens now appears more concerned with having access to
leading-edge device technology through its partnering than actually
setting up manufacturing operations. Philips has dramatically cut its
spending, reflecting the company's tough financial position. An
improvement in spending will most likely be tied to the consumer
electronics business cycle, which remains stalled worldwide.
On a more positive note, France and Italy are ploughing $1 billion in
new capital into semiconductor maker SGS-Thomson. The two governments also are supporting the company's five-year research and
development program, which will cost 5 billion francs ($926 million).
The first payment in the capital increase—$500 million—^will be paid
before December 15, 1992.
The commitment by France and Italy wiU certainly benefit European
capital spending in the near term. 11:16 challenge for SGS-Thomson is
to effectively put this capital to work to shape a globally competitive
company.
Certainly, the patience and funds of these two governments is not
inexhaustible. Moimting deficits in both countries raise questions concerning how long their largess wiU continue. Consequently, we are
cautious in assuming future support at this level.
Prospects Remain Bright in Asia/Pacific
Semiconductor capital spending in Asia/Pacific is expected to increase
by 2.0 percent in 1992 and show a modest improvement of 4.2 percent
in 1993. The growth in spending in 1992 is much lower than our original estimate of 22 percent one year ago.
Device makers including Hjoindai, Goldstar, Charter, and Tech Singapore have pushed out or canceled plans for new fabs. Hyxmdai is just
beginning to order equipment for a 4Mb/16Mb line that we expected
to be finished in 1993. Goldstar delayed plans for its 16Mb line in
Chongju-city. Charter canceled plans for expanding in Singapore.
Finally, Tech Singapore has delayed equipment purchases into 1993.
December 28,1992
©1992 Dataquest Incorporated
SEMM-SVC-MT-9202
g
fS
Table 2-4
Planned European Investments
Company
Country
Device
Technology
Intel
Mietec Alcatel
National Semiconductor
Ireland
Belgium
Scotland
MPU
ASIC
Lin
BiCMOS
CMOS
BIP
SGS-Thomson
France
ASIC
CMOS BiCWCS
United Kingdom
Germany
DRAM
CMOS
DRAM
CMOS
Production Begins 19S|5
Production Begins 1994
@
&
I
Fujitsu
Mitsubishi
NA = Not available
Source: Dataquest (December 1992)
Geome
(Micro
2-10
Semiconductor Equipment, H/lanufecturing, and Materials
Our spending increase estimate of 4.2 percent in 1993 is based on
company spending plans in which we have high confidence. Our
estimates assvmie that Samsung will proceed with a 3,000-wafer-start
expansion at its new 200mm facility and that Goldstar will begin
investing in its Chongju fab to produce 16Mb DRAMs.
However, the final decision to proceed for both companies may swing
on the U.S. government's final policy on DRAM tariffs. The U.S.
Department of Comnierce will make that final decision by March 1993.
We are assuming that the current tariffs will be reduced to the 10 percent range. We anticipate that a favorable outcome will prompt the
Korean companies to open the spending spigot.
High Growth Prospects Maintained
The lirmpy capital spending levels over the last several years in
Asia/Pacific have not dissuaded us about the strong prospects for
growth in this region. The investment in large MOS memory lines
by the Koreans has caused spending to jump and then fall off as
the spending on these projects ramped and then declined.
As we move further into the 1990s, we believe that the growth in
capital spending in Asia/Pacific will outpace growth in the more
established semiconductor producing regions. Taking Japan's lead,
many Asian governments are targeting the semiconductor industry
as a cornerstone of their industrial policy. China, India, Malaysia,
and Thailand are all expected to win a larger share of the spending
in this region.
The sheer size of the semiconductor end-use markets in China and
India suggest that some time out in the future device production in
these countries wiU dwarf the size of the production capacity of
current production-leading Asian nations.
Dataquest Perspective
Dataquest believes that 1993 will be the bottom of the current semiconductor spending cycle. The worldwide decline in spending that
began in the United States and Europe in 1991 and struck with a
vengeance in Japan in 1992 is slowly winding down. We expect device
makers to begin accelerating their rate of spending, following a small
decline in global spending in 1993, as capacity utilization rates and
profitability improve. We believe that this accelerating growth trend is
sustainable through 1996.
The bottom of the current spending cycle marks a fundamental change
in the global semiconductor industry. The spending boom that began
in 1987 and was led by Japan-based companies is over. We do not
believe that spending in Japan will return to the peak level achieved
in 1991 at any time over the next five years.
If one could characterize the last spending cycle in a phrase, it would
most certainly be the domination of Japanese companies. For the next
leg of the capital spending cycle, the scramble for the Asian market is
the theme likely to dominate.
December 28,1992
©1992 Dataquest Incorporated
SEMM-SVC-MT-9202
Chapter 3
Wafer Fab Equipment Forecast
Chapter Highlights
• Worldwide equipment market is down 15.5 percent in 1992.
• The worldwide market wiU be flat in 1993; there will be a moderate
upturn in 1994.
• Solid growth in North America in 1993 will be led by microprocessor manufacturers.
• 1993 spending in Japan wiU continue to slide because of further
weakening of domestic economy.
• Demand in Exirope will remain weak.
• Asia/Pacific spending will increase slightly in 1993 as the region
prepares for the next rovind of expansion.
• Equipment spending growth will be led by multilevel metallization
process equipment.
This chapter presents historical and forecast data on the worldwide
wafer fabrication equipment market, by region and by equipment segment. Equipment spending in a region refers to spending by all
companies—^both domestic and foreign—^within the region.
Yearly exchange rate variations can have a significant effect on 1985
through 1991 data appearing in the tables in this chapter. Appendix B
details the exchange rates used in this document.
Tables in this chapter provide details on the following:
• Table 3-1: Historical market data, by geographic region, for the
years 1986 through 1991
• Table 3-2: Forecast market data, by geographic region, for the years
1991 through 1996
• Table 3-3: Historical data, by equipment segment, for the years 1986
through 1991
• Table 3-4: Forecast data, by equipment segment, for the years 1991
through 1996
SEMM-SVC-MT-9202
©1992 Dataquest Incorporated
December 28,1992
3-2
Semiconductor Equipment, Manufacturing, and Materials
Wafer Fabrication Equipment Forecast
Overcapacity Weighs Down the Equipment Market
The massive capital expenditure from 1988 through 1991 weighed
heavy on the backs of many semiconductor companies in 1992,
dragging equipment sales down 15.5 percent. This drop is significantly larger tfian the 10 percent drop predicted in Dataquest's
midyear forecast, and was exacerbated by major additional capital
spending cuts armounced by most major Japanese semiconductor
companies at the midpoint of their fiscal year at the end of
September, in response to weak semiconductor sales and a lingering
overcapacity problem, particularly 4Mb DRAM fab capacity.
Dataquest's midyear forecast predicted 11 percent growth in 1993,
accelerating to 18 percent in 1994. However, a worsening of the
Japanese economy in 1992, with no obvious signs of recovery in
1993, combined with continued weakness in Europe and a pause
in the Asia/Pacific growth, will be only partially offset by modest
improvement in the U.S. economy. This has caused us to downgrade our 1993 forecast to a 1.2 percent increase in worldwide
wafer fab equipment revenue.
Dataquest believes that 1994 will mark the removal of the recessionary cloaks from both Japan and Europe. We also believe that the
U.S. economy will continue to strengthen, and a restunption of
semiconductor fab capacity growth will occur in the Asia/Pacific
region, triggering a moderate 11.0 percent growth in the worldwide
wafer fab equipment market. The recovery should continue through
1996, driven by expansion of 0.5-micron technology fab capacity
and establishment of 0.35-micron production capacity. It should be
emphasized, however, that Dataquest does not expect a repeat of
the enormous wafer fab equipment revenue growth rates of the late
1980s. The increasing cost of constructing and equipping new wafer
fabrication facilities, coupled with intensifying competition in the
semiconductor product markets, will slow the growth of overall
wafer fab capacity. More semiconductor companies will enter partnerships and strategic alliances to defray the cost of technology
development and investment in manufacturing facilities. Consequently, the compound annual growth rate (CAGR) in wafer fab
equipment revenue from 1991 through 1996 is forecast to be a
restrained 6.1 percent.
Regionai Anaiysis
Table 3-1 shows the historical wafer fab equipment market data, by
geographic region, for the years 1986 through 1991. Table 3-2 contains
ihe forecast market data, by geographic region, for the years 1991
through 1996.
North America
The North American region represents the one bright spot in a
relatively lackluster 1993 wafer fab equipment market; Dataquest
forecasts a solid 12.8 percent growth for the North American wafer
December 28,1992
©1992 Dataquest Incoiporated
SEMM-SVC-MT-9202
o
Table 3-1
Worldwide Wafer Fab Equipment Market, by Region - Historical, 1986-1991
(Millions of U.S. Dollars)
fS
s
1986
1987
1988
1989
1990
1,078
1,106
1,536
1,666
1,597
-14.4
2.6
38.9
8.5
-4.1
japan
1,018
1,278
2,270
2,806
2,987
Percent Growth
Europe
-28.4
25.5
77.7
23.6
6.4
454
528
663
725
768
Percent Growth
-2.7
16.2
25.6
9.5
5.8
Asia/Pacific-ROW
Percent Growth
Worldwide
164
230
519
820
-21.7
2,713
40.6
3,141
125.9
4,988
58.0
6,017
520
-36.6
5,871
Percent Growth
-19.2
15.7
58.8
20.6
-2.4
North America
Percent Growth
®
I
Source: Dataquest (December 1992)
^
3
g"
3
S"
Table 3-2
Worldwide Wafer Fab Equipment Market, by Region - Forecast, 1991-1996
(Millions of U.S. Dollars)
S
North America
Percent Growth
Japan
@
i
g
S
fS
1992
1,536
1,517
1993
1,711
-3.8
3,017
-1.3
2,108
12.8
1,961
1.0
634
-30.1
596
-5.9
-7.0
566
Percent Growth
Europe
Percent Growth
Asia/Pacific-ROW
-17.5
852
Percent Growth
Worldwide
Percent Growth
Source: Dataquest (December 1992)
I
1991
1994
1995
1,948
2,250
13.8
2,103
7.3
629
11.0
15.5
2,328
10.7
770
1,054
1,295
883
-5.0
928
63.9
3.6
5.1
13.5
23.0
6,039
5,104
5,166
5,733
6,643
2.9
-15.5
1.2
11.0
15.9
22.5
Wcifer Fab Equipment Forecast
3-5
fab equipment market in 1993. Semiconductor production in the
United States has grown relatively strongly in 1992, and we expect
this growth to continue. U.S. chip companies are dominant participants in high-value-added IC markets, such as microprocessors,
LAN chip sets, graphics accelerators, fax/modem chip sets, hard
disk controllers, and telecommunications products. Demand is high
for these products because of heated growth in the personal computer, local area network, wireless communications, and mobile
commimications markets, resulting in expanding sales and profits
for semiconductor suppliers that share in those business segments.
Consequently, most of the new fab construction and fab capacity
expansion is occurring at companies such as Intel, AMD, and
Motorola. Intel is equipping a new fab line in Oregon and is
imdertaking a $400 miUion conversion of its six-inch R&D facility
in Santa Clara, California to an eight-inch production facility. It is
expected to annoimce a new $800 million U.S. production facility to
begin construction in 1993. AMD has announced plans to build a
new $700 miUion production fab in Austin, Texas to manufacture
486 microprocessors, which is scheduled for completion in 1994.
Motorola is installing equipment in its MOS 11 facility in Austin.
Unfortimately, not every company has experienced fertile growth
in 1992. IBM, Digital Equipment Corporation, LSI Logic, VLSI
Technology, Cypress Semiconductor, and others struggled. National
Semiconductor and Texas Instruments began to emerge from lengthy
and painful restructuring periods, and are in good shape for
growth in the long term. But they are likely to employ restrained
spending policies in the near term.
The projected growth in 1993 for the wafer fab equipment market
thus is primarily driven by pockets of profitability, and is attenuated by the lingering effects of the last downturn. Dataquest
believes that the U.S. semiconductor commvmity's health will continue to improve as we move toward the middle of the decade,
nurtured by the demand for highly integrated advanced logic
products for the data processing, telecom, and consumer electronics
markets. These markets play to the strengths of the U.S. electronics
industry: high-performance microprocessors and embedded processors; computer-aided design methodology for ASIC and cell-based
ICs; and mixed-signal technology and digital signal processing for
telecom, automotive, and future consumer electronics applications.
Dataquest therefore forecasts the North American region to exhibit
a CAGR from 1991 through 1996 of 11.3 percent.
The year 1992 was pivotal for the North America-based wafer fab
equipment companies—it was the year in which they reversed a
seven-year period of market share erosion. This was partly because
of the precipitous loss of market share experienced by Japanese
equipment companies in 1992—caused by the coUapse of their home
market—which translated to a direct gain in market share by U.S.
equipment companies. However, the U.S. wafer fab eqtiipment
industry is responsible for a large part of the turnaround, owing to
SEMM-S\/C-lvrr-9202
©1992 Dataquest Incorporated
December 28,1992
3-6
Semicondijctor Equipment, Manufacturing, and Materials
improvements in technological capability, equipment productivity,
and reliability. Sematech has also played a major role in helping
U.S. equipment companies develop a strategy for improvement and
to execute that plan. The severe revenue hit taken by the Japanese
equipment companies served to accelerate the tumaroimd in 1992.
U.S. wafer fab equipment organizations should avoid lapsing into
a complacent attitude, however. Their Japanese counterparts will
certainly redouble their efforts to penetrate the North American,
Asia/Pacific, and European regions to offset sales declines in Japan.
Also, it would be shortsighted to discount the Japanese market.
Japan will still lead all regions in wafer fab equipment spending in
spite of the large cutbacks experienced in 1992, and the Japanese
equipment companies will guard their home market aggressively.
Japan
An already poor year for Japanese electrorucs companies took a
catastrophic turn at the midpoint of the Japanese fiscal year. With
industry stalwarts such as Fujitsu, Hitachi, Mitsubishi, NEC, and
Toshiba reporting depressed earnings and even losses, and the
imthinkable concept of layoffs being openly discussed, the capital
spending slide in Japan abruptly broke into a free-fall. As discussed
in Chapter 2, Dataquest revised its 1992 capital spending drop in
Japan downward from 23.5 percent originally predicted in our
midyear forecast to our current projection of a 29 percent downturn. The delayed or canceled fab expansions created a powerful
undertow for the wafer fab equipment suppliers to the Japanese
market. Only the most powerful players managed to keep their
losses to a minimimi in Japan, with lesser companies experiencing
an agonizing drop in revenue. Dataquest estimates that wafer fab
equipment revenue plummeted by 30.1 percent in 1992. The future
is almost imperceptibly brighter: we foresee an additional sUppage
of 7 percent in 1993, before the market finally turns around in
1994. All told, the CAGR for 1991 through 1996 is negative
1.6 percent.
Dataquest does not believe that the ttimaroimd in the Japanese
economy wUl occur in 1993. As pointed out in Chapter 2, the current economic trough is being fueled by domestic asset deflation,
not by a cyclical downturn. Cheap capital ignited the explosive
investment of the late 1980s, but Japan is currently experiencing a
capital shortage. The full extent of the bad debt held by Japan's
banks has not been released, but is estimated to be as high as
¥22 trillion. The stock market and real estate bubbles have burst,
and have probably not completed their downward correction. The
real estate and stock market assets were the source of the massive
capital formation of the late 1980s; with the deflation of both of
these asset bases, the financial system simply does not have the
cash to fund new investment. Private sector demand is predicted
to contract by 1.5 percent in 1993, resulting in net gross national
product (GNP) growth of only 1 percent. Dataquest believes that
the Japanese bubble economy has not completed its correction; the
earliest that a recovery will occur is late 1993, and more likely
in 1994.
December 28,1992
©1992 Dataquest Incorporated
SEMM-SVC-MT-9202
Water Fab Equipment Forecast
3-7
The effect of the deflationary adjustment process on the electrorucs
companies has been profoxmd. Much of the wafer fab capacity
expansion from 1988 through 1991 was for 4Mb DRAM manufacturing capacity. These fabs ran at extremely low utilization rates imtil
recently; 4Mb DRAM demand has strengthened in the last few
months mainly because of the sharp rise in PC sales. However, the
4Mb DRAM market was late in developing, and Dataquest believes
that there is plenty of spare 4Mb DRAM capacity in Japan; it will
not be necessary to expand the existing capacity base unless the
DRAM market sustains its present growth well into 1993. The question is, how long can the current feeding frenzy in the PC market
be sustained?
Even more recently, 4Mb DRAM demand spurted and prices rose
on the basis of the U.S. Department of Commerce's preliminary
antidxmiping ruling against the Korean DRAM manufacturers
and the concomitant tariffs levied on them. Some observers have
even predicted that a DRAM shortage wiQ arise similar to the
1Mb DRAM shortage in the late 1980s. We do not believe that
this will occur. The Korean DRAM suppliers only represent about a
15 percent market share in DRAMs, not a large enough fraction to
create a shortage, especially in light of the overcapacity situation in
Japan. Dataquest believes that any supply perturbations on the part
of the Koreans could easily be absorbed by the Japanese DRAM
suppliers. Dataquest therefore concludes that, although 4Mb DRAM
prices have stabilized, they are unlikely to rise further. And
although Japanese DRAM suppliers should enjoy increased sales
levels in 1993, they will neither stretch their present manufacturing
capacity nor see their profit margins increase to the point where
they can justify further investment.
Dataquest believes that the major Japanese chip producers will
change their product strategies to ease their dependence on commodity MOS memory. This wiU entail conversion of DRAM fabs to
advanced logic and ASIC fabs, and future fabs wUl tend to accommodate more diverse product mixes. This implies that the equipment purchases will incorporate more multilevel metal process
equipment. Equipment buys wiU be made selectively, and in areas
of strategic importance, such as processes that support new product
development, and the addition of some 0.5-micron manufacturing
capacity to prevent massive market share loss in 16Mb DRAMs.
The migration from DRAMs to higher-value-added products wiU
require reduced fab capacity levels, hence a reduced rate of investment in fabs and equipment in the long term. We therefore forecast
that wafer fab equipment spending in Japan will not climb to its
historic high mark, set in 1991, until beyond 1996.
As previously mentioned, 1992 was the year in which U.S.-based
wafer fab equipment companies reversed a lengthy period of worldwide market share erosion. The converse side of that observation is
that Japan-based wafer fab equipment suppliers recorded a loss of
market share after seven consecutive years of market share gain.
This is partially because of the 30.1 percent drop in equipment
SEMM-SVC-MT-9202
©1992 Dataquest Incorporated
December 28,1992
3-8
Semiconductor Equipment, Manufacturing, and IViaterials
revenue in Japan, of which Japanese equipment companies commanded a 64.7 percent market share. However, certain wafer fab
equipment segments performed significantly better than the overall
equipment market, and these segments were associated with multilevel metal process technology, a process area where the Japanese
equipment companies are not strong. Selected pockets of revenue
opportunity were associated with advanced sputtering systems,
metal CVD systems, dielectric and metal etch systems, and intermetal dielectric CVD systems. The Japanese companies were imable
to take advantage of revenue opportunities in these specific areas,
which exacerbated the market share shift in 1992.
Europe
The European wafer fab equipment market had a 17.5 percent drop
in 1991. It is projected to drop 5.9 percent in 1992, and another
5.0 percent in 1993. We do not foresee any growth until 1994, and
the forecast CAGR from 1991 through 1996 is projected at 10.1 percent. This growth is predicated on a strong resurgence in 1994
through 1996. A fair amount of uncertainty underlies this projected
growtti; we are assuming that the European region will attract new
investment when the English, German, and French economies
rebovind. An indigenous semiconductor industry at the very least is
required to support the regional telecommunications infrastructure.
If the European economic commtmity nations can establish a common set of goals and establish a set of policies that truly enables
them to function as a imited body, then the motivation to establish
manufacturing operations within ttie region would be more compelling. Potential opportvmities may also exist in the Eastern European
countries. However, these should be viewed as long-term developments, because these coimtries must stabilize politically and socially
as well as economically before consistent growth can be sustained.
The major semiconductor suppliers in Europe are in a prolonged
spending freeze. Philips is operating at low capacity utilization, and
has no plans to invest beyond baseline maintenance levels. Siemens
also is not planning any major fab capacity expansion. It will invest
some money in the 16Mb DRAM facility in Corbeil-Essormes,
France, jointly built with IBM. Siemens wiU also invest in the joint
256Mb DRAM development project with IBM and Toshiba, although
that investment will be made in the North American region. SGSThomson has pumped moderate levels of cash into its 0.5-micron
fab in France, and the French and Italian governments recently
annoimced a new $1 billion infusion into SGS-Thomson. This will
certainly contribute to wafer fab equipment spending growth in the
region, but SGS-Thomson's long-term strategy, and therefore its
long-term prospects, remain unclear.
Japanese companies have largely curtailed fab investment plans in
Europe because of their own financial problems. Intel will be taking
equipment deliveries in its Ireland fab in 1993, and will represent a
major portion of the equipment spending in the region.
December 28,1992
©1992 Dataquest Incorporated
SEMM-SVC-MT-9202
Wafer Fab Equipment Forecast
3-9
Most of the equipment sales in Europe are from North Americaand Japan-based equipment companies. European wafer fab equipment companies have experienced a steady erosion of market share
in the last few years. From 1987 to 1991, European wafer fab
equipment companies watched their domestic market share slip
from 34 percent to 24.3 percent. Dataquest believes that this loss of
market share will continue tmless the European wafer fab equipment companies pxirsue a strategy of partnering with their key
customers or benefit from government assistance through organizations such as JESSI to aid them in new product definition and
development.
Asia/Pacific-Rest of World
The Asia/Pacific wafer fab equipment market grew at a tepid
3.6 percent in 1992, following torrid growth of 63.9 percent in 1991.
This erratic growth behavior is in part because of the relatively
small nximber of companies and fabs in the region; buying cycles
occur and drive the equipment market growth at high rates, then a
period of stagnation ensues while semiconductor production catches
up with the new capacity. Dataquest believes that some companies
in the Asia/Pacific region have adopted a mildly cautious stance in
regard to continued wafer fab capacity expansion, in light of the
serious problems currently experienced by Japanese companies
partly because of their aggressive capacity expansion a few years
ago. Goldstar has delayed its 16Mb DRAM manufacturing capacity
expansion into 1993. Hyundai is placing equipment orders now for
delivery in 1993, but this production capacity increase is undertaken
to remain even with Goldstar and Samsung, rather than to trigger
a new round of expansion. Tech Semiconductor in Singapore has
pushed out most of its initial equipment deliveries until early 1993,
and Charter Semiconductor canceled plans to build a second fab.
The slowdown in the frenetic capacity expansion cooled the wafer
fab equipment market in 1992. Dataquest expects 1993 to be a relatively quiet year as the companies within the Asia/Pacific region
grow into their manufacturing capacity. We are therefore forecasting
the Asia/Pacific wafer fab equipment market to increase only
5.1 percent in 1993. We do, however, expect a more aggressive
growth pattern to res;ame in 1994 as the demand for 16Mb DRAMs
takes off. Our forecast CAGR from 1991 through 1996 is a robust
15.0 percent for the Asia/Pacific region.
Long-term growth opportimities abovmd in the Asia/Pacific region
in several coiintries. China recently avowed its intent to develop a
strong semiconductor industry as part of its industrialization plan.
India represents a potentially huge market, as it develops an
indigenous semiconductor manufacturing capability. In addition to
these countries, Thailand, Malaysia, the Philippines, and Vietnam
represent opportimities for chip suppliers to set up offshore
manufacturing facilities. As the less industrialized cotmtries in the
region pursue aggressive development of an electronics infrastructure as a centerpiece of their industrial policy, growth prospects for
wafer fab equipment suppliers are potentially enormous.
SEMM-SVC-l\/rr-9202
©1992 Dataquest Incorporated
December 28,1992
3-10
Semiconductor Equipment, iVIanufacturing, and l\/laterials
Wafer Fab Equipment Market Itends
Table 3-3 shows wafer fab equipment market historical data by equipment segment for the years 1986 through 1991. Table 3-4 shows wafer
fab equipment market forecast data by equipment segment for the
years 1991 through 1996.
The semiconductor industry, and by extension the wafer fab equipment industry, is entering a period of modest growth. Dataquest is
forecasting CAGR of only 6.1 percent for 1991 through 1996, after the
furious 17.4 percent CAGR from 1986 through 1991. Dataquest believes
that this is indicative of the maturation of the semiconductor industry
and its wafer fab equipment business. At least for commodity semiconductors, the competitive forces of the marketplace have caused the
manufacturing commimity to shift its strategy from one of aggressive
technology development with the requisite massive levels of investment and short technology life cycle, to one based on low-cost, highproductivity manufacturing operations, extending the useful life of
fabs and equipment as far as possible. Of course, leading-edge technology is important, but it has changed from a competitive advantage
that once differentiated a company to a basic requirement needed just
to participate in the market. Now everyone has the technology. To be
successful, a company must be able to utilize the technology in a lowcost, high-yield manufacturing process.
Equipment Segments
As Table 3-4 shows, Dataquest forecasts stepper revenue growing at a
CAGR of only 5.1 percent from 1991 to 1996, below the overall market
CAGR of 6.1 percent. The overexpansion of 1988 to 1991 was primarily for submicron fab capacity, and most of that fab capacity utilized
i-line stepper technology. Dataquest believes that an abundance of
i-line stepper capacity exists, a surplus that has been amplified by the
improving productivity of the steppers. The next major growth cycle
in stepper shipments will be driven by the tiansition to 0.35-micron
production processes, and Dataquest does not expect that to happen
until the 1995 to 1996 time frame.
Major wafer fab equipment segments forecast to outperform the overall wafer fab equipment markets are dry strip, dry etch, CVD, PVD,
high-voltage ion implant, wafer inspection, and factory automation.
Dry photoresist stripping equipment is forecast to grow at a CAGR of
7.5 percent from 1991 through 1996. Feeding this growth will be the
increasing number of masking steps in advanced semiconductor
manufacturing processes. The market will also grow as new dry strip
technologies displace older processes to address radiation dam.age concerns for reduced gate oxide thickness and reduced defect densities,
particularly for stripping resist after high dose implants.
Dry etch equipment sales will grow at a CAGR of 7.6 percent for the
years 1991 through 1996. Factors responsible for the dry etch equipment market growth are the need for additional etch systems as
single-wafer etch platforms displace batch etch systems, displacement
December 28, 1992
©1992 Dataquest Incoiporated
SEMM-SVC-MT-9202
%
Table 3-3
Worldwide Wafer Fab Equipment Market, by Equipment Type - Historical, 1986-1991 (Millio
1986
1987
1988
1989
1990
2,713
3,141
4,988
6,017
5,871
31
171
25
129
22
363
503
148
921
23
94
1,181
24
93
1,052
Maskmaking Lithography
51
68
62
69
47
Direct-Write Lithography
X-Ray
68
1
67
69
0
6
70
5
76
2
685
791
1,228
1,442
1,295
149
168
253
334
326
161
167
277
377
35
58
307
100
121
400
118
8
533
10
670
13
690
13
441
540
920
1,180
1,221
218
237
260
466
611
717
251
36
302
368
409
86
75
35
68
42
45
74
68
44
World Fab Equipment Market
Lithography
Contact/Proximity
Projection
Steppers
@
Total
Automatic Photoresist
Processing Equipment
Etch and Clean
i
Wet Process
Dry Strip
Dry Etch
Ion Milling
Total
237
8
Deposition
Chemical Vapor Deposition
Physical Vapor Deposition
Silicon Epitaxy
S"
o
Metalorganic CVD
Molecular Beam Epitaxy
CD
3
Total
46
31
66
599
649
81
977
1,173
58
1,296
Table 3-3 (Continued)
Worldwide Wafer Fab Equipment Market, by Equipment Type
Diffusion
Rapid Thermal Processing
Ion Implantation
Medium Current
High Current
High Voltage
Total
©
o
Process Control
CD {Optical & SEM)
Wafer Inspection
Other Process Control
Total
Factory Automation
a
Other Equipment
Total World Fab Equipment
Percent Change
1986
156
16
1987
145
18
1988
296
22
1989
331
25
1990
324
30
55
55
61
107
118
241
131
301
114
250
10
119
18
186
18
377
25
457
370
44
89
42
287
58
286
432
151
101
150
117
355
607
99
130
404
672
195
112
177
210
190
2,713
3,141
4,988
6,017
5,871
-19
16
59
21
-2
374
81
96
Note: Some columns do not add to totals shown because of rounding.
Source: Dataquast (December 1992)
§
fS
Historical, 1986-1991 (Million
7
147
91
368
605
216
g
Table 3-4
Worldwide Wafer Fab Equipment Market, by Equipment Type - Forecast, 1991-1996 (Millions
fS
World Fab Equipment Market
1991
6,040
1992
5,104
1993
5,166
1994
1995
5,733
6,643
Lithography
15
41
11
40
13
40
1,029
15
51
827
837
1,076
Maskmaking Lithography
46
41
46
923
57
Dfrect-Write Lithography
X-Ray
55
51
52
57
73
27
Contact/Proximity
Projection
Steppers
©
73
4
10
10
17
1,224
995
1,002
1,106
1,302
369
296
300
338
392
Wet Process
Dry Strip
405
331
119
332
102
103
367
120
419
140
Dry Etch
705
17
623
10
641
10
711
11
830
13
1,246
1,067
1,085
1,210
1,402
747
664
677
751
877
474
89
51
59
429
56
41
455
46
51
41
46
516
46
46
46
605
47
47
47
1,420
1,240
1,266
1,405
1,621
Total
&
21
68
Automatic Photoresist
Processing Equipment
Etch and Clean
Ion Milling
Total
Deposition
Chemical Vapor Deposition
Physical Vapor Deposition
Silicon Epitaxy
Metalorganic CVD
Molecular Beam Epitaxy
Total
Table 3-4 (Continued)
Worldwide Wafer Fab Equipment Market, by Equipment Type - Forecast, 1991-1996 (Millions
1991
1992
1993
1994
1995
335
276
274
304
352
42
36
36
46
53
Ion Implantation
Medium Current
108
92
93
109
120
High Current
High Voltage
218
18
184
20
181
31
201
46
226
53
343
296
305
355
399
154
128
641
227
77
342
546
194
126
86
140
90
398
124
77
341
193
6,040
158
5,104
5,166
2.9
-15.5
1.2
Diffusion
Rapid Thermal Processing
Total
Process Control
CD (OpHcal & SEM)
Wafer Inspection
Other Process Control
g
Total
Factory Automation
Other Equipment
Total World Fab Equipment
Percentage Change
Note: Some columns may not add to totals shown because of rounding.
Source: Dataquest (December 1992)
%
I
542
196
160
361
573
224
106
412
658
272
172
193
5,733
11.0
6,643
15.9
Water Fab Equipment Forecast
3-15
of older RF diode plasma sources by advanced, low-pressure plasma
sources for 0.5-micron technology and below, and the integration of
dry strip and wet rinse modules with the dry etch chamber, particularly for metal etch systems. The number of dry etch units shipped
wLU also grow because of the need for additional oxide etch and metal
etch capacity as more multilevel metal process capacity is added to
fabs.
The expansion of mvdtilevel metal processing capacity is being driven
by the continuing growth of the advanced logic and ASIC segments of
the worldwide semiconductor industry, and the migration of commodity DRAMs to two-level metal technology for the 16Mb and 4Mb
shrink products. This shift in the pattern of wafer fab equipment shipments is the primary reason behind the relatively high forecast growth
rates for the CVD and PVD equipment segments. Additional process
capacity for intermetal dielectric (IMD) deposition, metal sputter deposition, and CVD metal deposition for contact and via plugs is required
as the average number of metal interconnect levels grows. The tightening design rules enhance the growth of these equipment segments:
The equipment platforms migrate toward single-wafer processes; the
need for contact and via plugs drives the CVD metal market; and the
use of stacked metal structures with barrier metal layers places stringent demands on sputter deposition systems. The restiltant demand
for sophisticated CVD and PVD process tools wiU cause these equipment segments to grow at a CAGR from 1991 through 1996 of 7.5 percent and 9.1 percent, respectively.
Dataquest forecasts very high growth in the high-energy ion implant
equipment segment; a CAGR of 29.9 percent is predicted for the years
1991 through 1996. High-energy ion implant processes can eliminate
the need for the use of epitaxial wafers, whid\ can trim about $100
per wafer from the wafer cost. Judicious use of high-energy implant
steps can also result in the elimination of the well mask and the field
implant masking steps, simplifying the process flow, which wUl pay
dividends in terms of shorter cycle time, reduced processing cost per
wafer, and reduced defect densities. Dataquest believes that semiconductor manufacturers wUl embrace process simplification opportunities
such as those offered by high energy ion implants as they become
increasingly cost-sensitive.
The sales of wafer irispection equipment will also be driven by the
need for reduced manufacturing costs. In-line wafer inspection and
defect identification systems can help reduce costs for a company in
two ways: They can identify defects and thereby help to raise yields,
and they can help identify and eliminate defects quickly, before major
yield problems propagate through the manufacturing line. Such systems can pay for themselves in a short time; the identification and
elimination of a single defect type can represent millions of dollars in
sales to a chip vendor. Dataquest forecasts a 7.7 percent CAGR for
wafer inspection equipment for the years 1991 through 1996.
Factory automation equipment is a segment that market demand may
finally have caught up with. The use of both interbay and intrabay
SEMM-S\/C-MT-9202
©1992 Dataquest Incorporated
December 28,1992
3-16
Semiconductor Equipment, Manufacturing, and IViaterials
factory automation equipment is expected to increase in new fab
construction and existing fab conversions. Minimization of operator
handling can reduce the number of defects added to a wafer, and can
result in a reduction in the number of clean room personnel. Again,
the demand for factory automation equipment will be driven by the
opportunity to improve yields and reduce operating costs. State-of-theart wafer fabs will increase the degree of automation for those reasons.
Consequently, Dataquest projects the CAGR for factory automation
equipment at 8.5 percent for 1991 through 1996.
Dataquest Perspective
The year 1992 was one of transition for the wafer fab equipment
industry. It marked a period of adjustment between the heady growth
of the 1980s in the semiconductor industry and the more conservative
investment strategies that we believe wUl become pervasive in the
1990s and beyond. This change will result in more restrained market
growth. The burgeoning costs of process technology development and
new fab construction have forced the semiconductor community to
become far more selective in its choice of eqtiipment suppliers. The
cost of equipment is rising as the process tools become increasingly
sophisticated, and the penalty is greater if the semiconductor manufacturer selects the wrong tool. Consequently, evaluation of new wafer
fab equipment entails more than running a simple set of trials to
assess the process capability. Whereas once equipment vendors had
only to satisfy the technical requirements of the R&D engineer, they
must now satisfy the needs of the maniifacturing engineer as well.
Equipment attributes such as wafer throughput, machine reliability,
cost of consiimables, scheduled maintenance requirements, and
required internal engineering support are specified and evaluated.
Cost of ownership is now the figure of merit looked to for differentiating wafer fab equipment.
The result of this shift in the attitude of the wafer fab equipment user
is that the relationship between the equipment vendor and the customer is now more important than ever. In the future, the wafer fab
equipment vendors will need to involve their key customers from the
product definition stage through field testing of the machine. Partnering between supplier and user is a trend already under way, and wiU
become a necessity for any successful equipment company.
The wafer fab equipment industry underwent a polarization of sorts
in 1992. Although tiie worldwide equipment market was down
15.5 percent, a few equipment companies enjoyed solid revenue
growth and market share gains. Although there has been a consistent
concentration of power among the top several equipment companies
in the industry, 1992 represented an acceleration of this shifting
balance of power. Dataquest believes that this phenomenon can be
attributed to two primary factors. The first factor is that the comparues
experiencing the greatest success in the last year participated in the
eqviipment segments that showed the strongest performance—
mtiltilevel metallization process equipment, particularly for subnucron
process technology. The other characteristic shared by the most successful organizations in 1992 was that they had a well-established set
December 28, 1992
©1992 Dataquest Incorporated
SEMM-SVC-MT-9202
Wafer Fab Equipment Forecast
3-17
of relationships with their customer base. They were global compaiues,
employing global applications support and service organizations. They
had established positive track records for delivering the complete sviite
of equipment, process, and service. In short, they were able to win the
coiifidence of customers through a combination of enabling technology, low cost of ownership, and first-class support of the tool and
process from order receipt through final acceptance of the machine.
Tlus is the level of interaction with the customer that is an absolute
necessity for success in the wafer fab equipment market of the 1990s.
The rest of the industry will have to engender the same level of
cooperation and trust with its customer base if it expects to be able to
participate in the future.
SEMM-SVC-IVIT-9202
©1992 Dataquest Incorporated
December 28,1992
Chapter 4
Silicon Wafer Forecast ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ »
Chapter Highlights
• Silicon consumption in the United States shows modest growth in
1992, despite a strong upturn in device revenue. The divergence
between silicon demand and device revenue is because of tiie surge
in sales of high-value-added microprocessor parts. A similar trend
is expected in 1993 because PC unit sales are forecast to remain
robust. Silicon wafer unit demand over the longer term will be
modest, when compared with earlier periods.
• Silicon consumption in Japan declined steeply in 1992. It is likely
that the decline in demand hit bottom in the fourth quarter. But
serious problems that face the Japanese semiconductor industry
over the next five years cause us to be more conservative in our
forecast for silicon growth.
• Silicon consumption in Europe is expected to decline further in
1993. If we are correct in our forecast, then imit consumption will
have decreased three years in a row. The only promise for improvement on the horizon Lies with investment being made by foreign
companies.
• Silicon consxunption in Asia/Pacific jumped in 1992. For the first
time, this region's usage of silicon wafers siupassed that of Europe.
Korean device manufacturers' production of DRAMs was the main
driver. The continuation of a healthy investment cycle in front-end
lines bodes well for future silicon demand.
Silicon Forecast Tables
Tables in this chapter include Dataquest's most recent forecasts of
regional unit silicon wafer consumption. Three tables detail unit consiunption in the four major regions of the world, the United States,
Japan, Europe, and Asia/Pacific. Individual forecasts of the major
product segments such as prime, epitaxial, and test and monitor
wafers are included.
Tables in this chapter provide details on the following:
• Table 4-1: Forecast of captive and merchant silicon and merchant
epitaxial wafer consumption
• Table 4-2: Forecast of merchant epitaxial wafer consumption
SEI\/IM-SVC-lvrr-9202
©1992 Dataquest Incorporated
December 28,1992
4-2
Semiconductor Equipment, Manufacturing, and IVIaterials
• Table 4-3: Forecast of merchant and captive silicon wafer
consumption
• Table 4-4: Forecast of merchant silicon wafer consumption
Mixed Reviews for tiie United States
Many semiconductor companies are weathering the stagnant economic
climate hanging over the U.S. economy. Device companies with
products targeting the PC market are benefiting from the 20 to 25 percent imit growth in PCs in 1992. However, not all IC vendors are participating in this upturn. Device makers with products going into the
mainframe/midrange computer markets, consumer applications, and
military applications have reported a range of results for 1992 from
marginally up to significantly down.
We now anticipate that silicon wafer imit demand (nullions of
square inches) in the United States wUl grow 5.0 percent in 1992 (see
Table 4-1). The growth rate for silicon wafers is considerably lower
than the growth rate of U.S. semiconductor revenue as reported by
WSTS, about 15 percent revenue growth in 1992. The difference in
growth rates is because of the increase in high-priced MPU sales in
the overall U.S. revenue mix. Consequently, a higher average selling
price had more of an impact on the 15 percent revenue growth rate
than the increase in imits.
Winners and Losers
Hie primary beneficiaries of this trend are microprocessor makers
AMD, Intel, and Motorola. These three companies' sales of devices
shot ahead this year. In the last quarter alone, all three companies'
revenue jumped in the range of 20 to 25 percent year-to-year.
Epi wafer demand in 1992 has also surged, up 22 percent (see
Table 4-2), since both Intel and AMD buUt their microprocessors
using epi wafers.
The prime, test, and monitor wafer market in the United States
saw much more sedate growth in 1992, up only 2.3 percent (see
Tables 4-3 and 4-4). The growth of this segment reflects the more
modest sales gains made in many of the non-PC-related device
applications. An application particularly hard hit was the mainframe/midrange systems market. Amdahl, Digital Equipment, and
IBM all recorded dismal sales in a year widely heralded to be the
beginning of a cyclic upturn for large system manufacturers. The
weak system market translated into dismal sales for captive device
operations and external chip suppliers selling product into this computer segment.
Consequently, silicon wafer vendors' 1992 performance in the
United States wUl depend heavily on whidi accoxmts they supplied.
For example, the surge in epi demand left OTC, SEH, and Wacker
scrambling to bring up additional ASM epi reactor capacity. These
vendors supply Intel, which has only qualified ASM epi systems to
date. On the other hand, the weak demand for wafers at IBM is
expected to impact vendors such as MEMC, which are primary
suppliers.
December 28, 1992
©1992 Dataquest Incorporated
SEMI\/I-SVC-MT-9202
o
Table 4-1
Forecast of Captive and Merchant Silicon* and Merchant Epitaxial Wafer Consumption
(Units—Millions of Square Inches)
s
United States
Percent Growth
Japan
Percent Growth
Europe
@
i
D
&
1991
1992
1993
1994
1995
611
642
678
728
761
-4.5
1,046
5.4
5.0
957
5.7
995
7.3
1,086
-8.5
200
4.0
197
9.1
217
4.6
1,140
5.0
241
-4.0
-1.5
10.5
11.0
241
274
310
366
18.0
2,509
7.2
Percent Growth
208
-11.7
Asia/Pacific-ROW
194
Percent Growth
Total
7.5
2,059
2,039
14.0
2,145
13.0
2,341
Percent Growth
0.5
-1.0
5.2
9.2
'Includes prime, test, and monitor wafers
Note: Columns may not add to totals shown because of rounding.
Source: Dataquest {December 1992)
2
3
g"
24.0
Table 4-2
Forecast of Merchant Epitaxial Wafer Consumption
(Units—Millions of Square Inches)
United States
Percent Growth
1992
112
1993
126
1994
137
1995
147
4.0
22.0
100
12.5
9.0
103
107
7.0
111
-3.5
21
2.5
24
4.3
4.0
33
38
2.3
8
17.9
240
8.2
16.7
9
16.7
262
35.0
10
11.7
287
9.7
17.0
13
Japan
104
Percent Growth
Europe
11.6
Percent Growth
Asia/Pacific-ROW
I
1991
92
Percent Growth
Total
Percent Growth
20
7.4
7
43.5
222
9
Note: Columns may not add to totals shown because of rounding.
Source: Dataquest (December 1992)
I
n
ro
8.8
27.9
309
7.8
I
Table 4-3
Forecast of Merchant and Captive Silicon* Wafer Consumption
(Units—Millions of Square Inches)
United States
Percent Growth
Japan
Percent Growth
Europe
®
i
I
fS
1991
1992
1993
1994
1995
520
530
553
591
615
-5.9
942
2.0
4.3
893
4.2
6.9
979
4.0
1,029
9.7
5.1
172
185
203
-3.6
7.1
300
13.0
2,054
9.9
353
17.7
2,199
9.1
7.1
4.8
188
857
-9.0
179
-4.6
Percent Growth
Asia/Pacific-ROW
-13.3
188
Percent Growth
6.6
1,837
1,799
265
13.9
1,883
-0.4
-2.1
4.7
Total
Percent Growtli
233
24.0
•Includes prime, test, and monitor wafers
Note: Columns may not add to totals shown because of rounding.
Source: Dataquest (December 1992)
3
S"
Table 4-4
Forecast of Merchant Silicon* Wafer Consumption (Units—Millions of Square Inches)
1991
450
-4.7
1992
460
2.3
1993
483
4.9
1994
521
7.9
1995
545
4.6
902
5.7
817
-9.4
853
4.4
939
10.1
183
174
167
180
989
5.3
198
Percent Growth
-12.4
-4.8
-3.7
7.3
10.2
Asia/Facific-ROW
188
233
265
300
353
Percent Growth
6.6
1,722
24.0
13.9
1,684
-2.2
13.0
1,939
17.7
1,768
2,084
5.0
9.7
7.5
United States
Percent Growth
Japan
Percent Growth
Europe
@
s-
Total
Percent Growth
0.7
•Includes prime, last, and monitor wafers
Note: Cotumrts may not add to totals shown because of rounding.
Source: Dataquest (December 1992)
1
o
S
Silicon Wafer Forecast
4-7
Forward to 1993 and Beyond
Dataquest believes that the U.S. silicon wafer market will continue
to be driven by system applications, especially PCs and workstations, and by network applications. Lower prices will continue to
fuel unit sales of PCs and workstations. In addition, the growth of
graphics-based applications utilizing the power of a new generation
of MPUs will increase the demand for silicon wafers. Finally, in the
commimications segment, the trend to a distributed computing
architecture by many U.S. businesses will remain as a major driver
in device growth.
But in 1993, the PC and workstation business will remain the
primary driver, and silicon wafer demand will again be tied closely
to Hint shipments of these systems. We expect the steady improvement in the U.S. economy over the next several years to gradually
increase the demand for devices in other applications such as auto
and consiamer electronics. We anticipate a more broad-base recovery
in the electronic food chain by 1994. Consequently, we expect silicon usage to grow 7.3 percent in 1994 and to have a 5.8 percent
compound annual growth rate (CAGR) from 1992 to 1996.
Our view on the mainframe/midrange market is that the current
downtvun is a sectilar shift rather than a cyclic shift. Our oarrent
silicon forecast assumes that demand for semiconductors in this
segment will decline over the five-year forecast horizon.
Dataquest Perspective
Dataquest's five-year forecast for silicon is modest when compared
with historical levels. Our silicon forecast mirrors the slower macroeconomic envirormient that we believe the U.S. economy will
experience through 1996.
There are also trends on a micro level contributing to the slower
growth of silicon wafer demand. First, the United States has the
oldest semiconductor fab infrastructure, and we believe that the rate
of fab closures will continue at a steady pace because of obsolescence. Second, we expect the rate of investment by foreign companies in U.S. fab capacity to decrease. The decline in Japanese investment in U.S. fabs will be especially notable. Finally, we believe that
U.S. device companies will continue to pursue high-value-added
niche applications concentrating on design and using overseas
foundries to manufacture the devices.
Japan's Recovery Problematic
The current economic slide in Japan has hit the Japanese electronic
industry hard. Asset deflation in the financial sector of the economy,
both in equities and real estate, has spilled over into the industrial sector. Weak end markets in the computer and consimier segments have
caused device demand to decline sharply, about 10 percent according
to ciirrent WSTS data. We expect silicon usage in 1992 to drop 8.5 percent (see Table 4-1).
SEIVIM-SVC-MT-9202
©1992 Dataquest Incorporated
December 28,1992
4-8
Semiconductor Equipment, Manufacturing, and Materials
End-Use Markets Deteriorate
Miserable business confidence and constrained capital spending
budgets have eroded the demand for computer systems, the largest
end-use application for semiconductors, especially in the mainframe
market. Mill's August production data, the latest as of press time,
show mainframe sales off 23 percent in August year-to-year and
down 22 percent from Jvly. With banks, financial institutions, and
manufacturers aU cutting capital budgets, it is unlikely that this
segment will recover in 1993. PC production was down 1 percent
year-to-year and off 23 percent from July.
In addition, consumer electronic sales have hit the skids as export
market and domestic demand still remain weak. MITI's August
data show most product segments off sharply, including camcorders,
VCRs, TVs, and home appliances. Videodisk players and digital
audio disk players bucked the trend, showing solid growth in
production year-to-year, though not strong enough to offset decHnes
in the other product segments. Inventories of consumer goods continue to increase, though seasonal factors may be at work here.
Forward to 1993
We have decreased our projections for the growth of sUicon wafer
demand in Japan since our forecast one year ago. We now estimate
that silicon demand will grow 6.0 percent CAGR through 1996,
down from the year-ago forecast of 7.8 percent. As the Japanese
economic problems unfold, the impact on the Japanese semiconductor industry is proving more severe than our earlier assumptions
expected.
Our estimate is that silicon demand will edge up slightly in 1993.
Our forecast growth rate is 4.0 percent in 1993, versus a decrease
of 8.5 percent in 1992. Though we believe that the silicon cycle has
bottomed, we cannot identify any major driving factors that wiU
cause demand to botmce back in 1993.
The five major Japanese device companies—Fujitsu, Hitachi,
Mitsubishi, NEC, and Toshiba—are all facing steep declines in
revenue and profits in their infoimation/communications equipment,
consumer electronic goods, and semiconductor groups.
We believe that weak semiconductor demand is because of further
production control by Japanese consiuner electronic manufacturers
and sluggish domestic demand for data processing equipment,
including mainframes and PCs. Furthern\ore, we expect little
improvement in the domestic demand for these goods in 1993.
Siace the lion's share of these five companies' semiconductor sales
are in Japan and a significant portion of these domestic sales are to
their own captive end-use operations, we believe that the major
Japanese semiconductor makers will only see a moderate upturn in
1993. Overseas markets will remain a bright spot for these companies because demand for MOS memory products, 4Mb and 1Mb,
December 28,1992
©1992 Dataquest Incorporated
SEMM-SVC-MT-9202
Silicon Wafer Forecast
4-9
wUl continue to improve. But, because of the relatively small size
of the export market, we do not believe that this opportunity will
completely offset the weak domestic market.
We believe that the structural problems built up in the Japanese
economy will take time to work themselves out. Especially hard hit
by the deflation of assets wiU be capital spending by Japanese businesses. As a result, demand for data processing equipment, including computers and office automation equipment, is expected to lag
over our five-year forecast period. Because this is the largest enduse application for semiconductors in Japan, accoimting for 42 percent of semiconductor usage, we are not optimistic about semiconductor production snapping back.
Consumer applications, which accoimt for 29 percent of semiconductor usage in Japan, also face future challenges. The most immediate
problem is the lack of any major new product driving demand for
semiconductors as the VCR did in the 1980s. Furthermore, shifts in
technology used in consiimer products threaten to disrupt the vertical integration structure of the large Japanese consiimer electronic
companies such as Matsushita and Sony. The key technologies
required for future consumer products such as personal commimicators, multimedia equipment, and HDTV will be software,
microprocessors, and memory devices. Because Japanese companies
lead in only one of these technologies, it is not clear how the
domestic semiconductor industry will benefit as these products
move to market.
External forces that threaten to weaken the demand for silicon
wafers in Japan also are building. Moimting trade surpluses with
the United States and a more protectionist stance by the Clinton
administration may restdt in the United States being more aggressive in pushing for access to the Japanese semiconductor market.
The downturn in the demand for silicon wafers could not have
come at a more awkward time for Japanese wafer vendors. Many
companies have just completed a roimd of investment in 200mm
wafer production lines. As one might well expect, this new capacity
is not being used extensively because many semiconductor companies have put on hold their 200mm fab plans. Prices for the largediameter wafers are under pressure and threaten to prevent companies from earning a return on their investment.
Dataquest Perspective
The uncertainty in the Japanese electronic market has caused us to
be more cautious about the growth of silicon usage. Even so, one
should not underestimate the influence that the Japanese electronics
market has on the global electronics food chain and the semiconductor industry in particular. It is difficult to ignore a market that
wUl process 46 percent of the world's silicon in 1993, by oxir estimates. The sheer size of the electronic market wiU guarantee that
the Japanese semiconductor will remain a dominant force in the
global industry.
SEMM-SVC-MT-9202
©1992 Dataquest Incorporated
December 28,1992
4-10
Semiconductor Equipment, Manufacturing, and Materials
European Slump
Business activity in Europe remains difficiilt. Economic activity in
Germany is falling off, the United Kingdom continues to be in recession, Spain's growth rate is slowing, and Northern Europe is quite
depressed. As we have noted elsewhere, the European economy is
unarguably the biggest drag on silicon demand.
The fact that growth of silicon usage is almost entirely dependent on
investment being made by non-European companies is perhaps the
most alarming trend. Wiih. the completion of ihe Mietec Alcatel facUity
in 1993, there will be no new green-field investment in front-end
production fabs undertaken by domestic European compaivies. If the
semiconductor investment climate in the United States and Japan
remains stagnant, then U.S. and Japanese companies may well rethink
their planned investment in Europe, further cutting into our forecast
growth for European silicon consumption.
A deterioration in European device manufacturers' competitiveness is
also causing us to be more cautious in forecasting silicon wafer usage.
The three largest Europe-based companies—Philips, SGS-Thomson,
and Siemens—continue to lag Asian, Japanese, and U.S. companies in
the design of devices and the development of semiconductor process
technology. The current downturn in capital spending at these companies suggest that the competition issue will not turn around any time
soon.
European Company Perfonnance
Philips has been particularly hard hit by the slowdown in consumer
electronic demand. The company delayed until the end of the year
the introduction of its digital compact cassette player. Even so, we
do not expect this product to generate much demand for semiconductors. (Dther systems under development are HDTV and new
compact disc systems. Introduction of these products is too far off
to have much of an effect on device production for our forecast
period. Philips' early device investment in China over the long
term may be the key to the rejuvenation of this company's semiconductor operations.
Siemens has cut back sharply on the production of semiconductors
in Europe. The company closed three fabs in Germany during 1991
and continued to cut employees in 1992 at its semiconductor operations. The partnership strategy Siemens is now pursuing suggests
that access to leading-edge device technology is more critical than
adding manufacturing capacity. A de-emphasis on maniifacturing
will most certainly result in a decline in silicon wafer demand.
The third major European company, SGS-Thomson, continues to
struggle with profitability problems. The company is moving ahead
with plans to invest in a submicron, 200mm process technology. A
research/pilot line is scheduled for completion in 1993. However,
the French and Italian governments, the primary source of capital
for SGS-Thomson, are struggling to lower their national budget
December 28,1992
©1992 Dataquest Incoiporated
SEMM-SVC-MT-9202
Silicon Wafer Forecast
4-11
deficits. If fiscal conservatism continues to be part of these governments' political agenda, then the governments' continued support of
SGS-Thomson could be threatened.
On a more positive note, telecommunications devices will remain a
strong area for several European companies such as Siemens and
Mietec Alcatel. The underdeveloped communications infrastructure
of the eastern European coxmtries means that telecommimications
gear will remain strong for the remainder of the decade.
Foreign Companies Lead the Way
Our forecast growth for the European sUicdh market, 6.9 percent
CAGR through 1996, is tied closely to spending on new fabs and
expansions of existing facilities by non-European companies such as
Fujitsu, Intel, Mitsubishi, Motorola, NEC, and National Semiconductor. Especially noteworthy is Intel's investment in a new line in
Ireland. We expect epi wafer demand to grow 16 percent in 1993
and surge another 35 percent in 1994, based largely on Intel's
reqtiirements.
Previously, we were more optimistic about Japanese companies
spurring the demand for silicon wafers in Europe. But as domestic
problems in Japan have mounted over the last year, we have
turned more cautious. Only Fujitsu and Mitsubishi are planning
facilities in 1994, and there is even a possibility that these may be
delayed. NEC is spending additional money to expand its facilities
in England, but Dataquest believes that this is tied more closely
with its agreement to make parts for Toshiba, which has decided
not to put a fab in Europe.
Texas Instruments is now ramping its Avezzano, Italy facility,
helped by the upturn in the U.S. memory market. Consequently,
TI's silicon usage should also increase in 1993. National is closing
several bipolar lines in Santa Clara, California and moving production to a new line in Scotland.
Dataquest Perspective
Though the formation of a imified Europe is certainly not the compelling reason for investing in new fabs that many foreign device
makers thought it would be several years ago, we believe that it
may yet prove to be a boon to Europe-based semiconductor
production and to the demand for silicon consumption. Certainly,
the end-use market demand is there. The main problem is that
such an upturn is not on our five-year forecast horizon, which
extends through 1996.
Asia/Pacific Rolls On
The 1992 growth of silicon consumption is surpassing our expectations. Our current estimate is that unit consumption wiU be up 24 percent in 1992, and we are forecasting a further increase of 14 percent
in 1993. The five-year growth rate through 1996 is estimated to be
14.2 percent CAGR, which is twice the growth rate of any other region
in the world.
SEMM-SVC-MT-9202
©1992 Dataquest Incorporated
December 28,1992
4-12
Semiconductor Equipment, IVIanufacturing, and Materials
Koreans Lead
The phenomenal growth in silicon constimption in Asia/Pacific in
1992 is tied directly to the Korean DRAM producers. Revenue for
the semiconductor divisions at the three major Korean device makers shot ahead in 1992 (see Table 4-5). We believe that the global
demand for DRAMs will remain strong through 1993, pushing up
silicon unit demand in Asia/Pacific another 14 percent. A major
uncertainty surrounding our forecast are the recent diimping tariffs
placed on the Korean DRAM vendors.
In spite of the tariffs, major Korean suppliers continue to add
production capacity, but are asking at the same time whether they
can maintain their market share growth by selling at higher prices
forced on them by the U.S. government. Major users, which have a
substantial interest in the eventual outcome in the resolution of this
issue, so far are silent. They all recognize that it was only the
Koreans that limited the Japanese DRAM hegemony that developed
in the late 1980s, but are likewise sympathetic to the interest of
U.S. suppliers.
Our forecast assumes that the Koreans will hold the market share
gains they have won and further penetrate western markets.
However, it is unlikely that the size of the market share gains
achieved in 1992 wiU be repeated in 1993.
Perhaps the biggest obstacle to the long-term growth of the siUcon
wafer market is the strong hand of the Korean economic planners.
The goverrunent has favored the high-technology sector to the
exclusion of other sectors of the economy. This policy has resulted
in a capital spending boom on new semiconductor capacity. But
such a strategy is risky, considering the heavy dependence on
device exports to pay for this investment. In our opiiuon, a more
balanced semiconductor industry in Korea, where end-use applications such as PCs thrived, would be a more solid foundation on
which to build a domestic semiconductor industry.
Other Countries Also Prosper
The new fab lines being built in this region (see Table 4-6) suggest
that the dominance of Korea in this region wiH wane. Fabs constructed in China, Malaysia, Singapore, and Taiwan suggest that
Table 4-5
Korean Sales of Semiconductors
(Millions of U.S. Dollars)
1992
Revenue
1992
Growth Rate (%)
1,173
525
422
130.0
127.0
Samstmg
Goldstar
Hyundai
32.0
Source: Dataquest (December 1992)
December 28, 1992
©1992 Dataquest Incorporated
SEMM-SVC-MT-9202
s
§
@
I
Table 4-6
New Fabs Planned for Asia/Pacific
Year
Planned
Company
Country
Goldstar
South Ko*ea
1993
MOSel/Viteiic CorporaUon
Taiwan
NEC China
Telecom Consumer K B
Semiconductor Complex
China
India
1993
1993
Tech Semiconductor Singapore Ltd.
Singapore
1993
1993
LSI
16Mb DRAM
Wuxi Microelectronics Corporation
China
1993
Telecom ICs
Hitachi
Malaysia
1994
Hua Yue Microelectronics Company
Mimos
China
Malaysia
1994
1994
MOSel/Viteiic Corporation
Samsung
Taiwan
1994
1Mb DRAM 4Mb: V^i/M
NA
NA
16Mb DRAM
South Korea
1994
4Mb 16Mb DRANt
Syntek
Taiwan
Taiwan
1994
NA
SRAM
United Microelectronics
NA = Not available
Source: Dataquest (December 1992)
1994
Products
16Mb DRAM 4Mb SRAM
4Mb DRAM
Geo
(Mi
4-14
Semiconductor Equipment, Manufacturing, and Materials
these countries increasingly will play a more important role in the
growth of the Asia/Pacific semiconductor industry.
Taiwan's market-driven economy is in many respects much healthier
than Korea's. Though its silicon consumption is much smaller than
Korea's, its semiconductor industry is better balanced. Taiwan has a
thriving computer market, which provides device makers a domestic
market for their product. As a result, we forecast silicon demand to
grow at 8.3 percent CAGR through 1996.
However, the real star performer in terms of growth in silicon consumption will be the group of coxmtries that fall imder the rubric
Rest of World (ROW). We estimate that silicon consimiption for this
group will push ahead at a 22.3 percent CAGR. Countries that will
benefit from this growth will be Singapore, Malaysia, India, and
China. Much of the growth in the ROW category will be fueled by
investment and technology transfers from Japanese, U.S., and to a
lesser extent European companies.
Dataquest Perspective
The Asia/Pacific region remains the most vibrant in terms of
growth rates in silicon consumption. However, we do expect some
rotation in the growth of silicon consumption away from the c\Jirent leader, Korea, to those countries just begirming to build their
industrial infrastructures. The ultimate growth opportunities will be
China and India because of the sheer size of the market. But political turmoU, fragile legal systems, and xmderdeveloped infrastructures make the timing of these opportunities difficult to gauge.
December 28,1992
©1992 Dataquest Incorporated
SEMM-SVC-MT-9202
Chapter 5
Semiconductor Consumption Forecast
This chapter presents data on the worldwide semiconductor market by
region. The regional semiconductor market, or regional semiconductor
consiimption, deals with where chips are consumed; this contrasts
with regional semiconductor production, which deals with where chips
are made. The data presented here are for the merchant market and
do not include the value of chips made by captive semiconductor
manufacturers for internal use.
Yearly exchange rate variations can have a significant effect on the
1985 through 1991 data in the following tables. For more information
about the exchange rates used and their effects, refer to Appendix B.
Semiconductor Consumption
Table 5-1 shows the historical regional semiconductor consumption for
the years 1985 through 1991; it also breaks down the merchant market
by nationality of the merchant semiconductor companies. Table 5-2
shows forecast semiconductor consumption by region for the period
from 1991 through 1996.
SEMI\/I-SVC-MT-9202
©1992 Dataquest Incorporated
December 28,1992
I
Table 5-1
Worldwide Semiconductor Consumption by Region—Historical
Includes Merchant and Captive Semiconductor Companies
(Millions of U.S. Dollars)
1985
North America
Percent Growth
B
I
fS
1987
12,858
1988
15,844
1989
17,070
1990
16,540
15.1
23.2
7.7
-3.1
11,855
18.6
14,927
20,772
20,257
45.5
5,587
25.9
39.2
21,491
3.5
6,498
8,491
30.7
5,752
9,498
11.9
10,415
9.7
45.0
6,280
9.2
7,333
16.8
50,859
33.0
54,339
6.8
54,545
0.4
Percent Growth
8,149
NA
Europe
Percent Growth
4,795
NA
Asia/Pacific-ROW
Percent Growth
1,979
NA
2,548
28.8
16.3
3,968
55.7
Worldwide
Percent Growtli
24,341
NA
30,834
26.7
38,251
24.1
Japan
®
9,418
NA
1986
10,844
NA = Not applicable
Source: Dataquest (December 1992)
16.5
1
2
-5.7
1
5
M
!8
Table 5-2
Worldwide Consumption by Region
Merchant Semiconductor Sales Only—forecast
(Millions of U.S. Dollars)
1991
1992
1993
1994
North America
Annual Growth (%)
16,990
2.7
. 22,613
15.6
Japan
Annual Growth (%)
Europe
Annual Growth (%)
22,496
11.1
11,014
5.8
19,564
15.1
20,371
-9.4
11,809
7.2
13,663
15.7
25,456
12.6
25,870
12.6
15,603
14.2
@
Asia/Pacific-ROW
Annual Growth (%)
9,194
25.4
11,181
21.6
13,417
20.0
s-
Worldwide
Annual Growth (%)
59,694
9.4
62,925
5.4
72,668
15.5
Source: Dataquest (December 1992)
f
22,975
12.8
1995
26,127
2.6
2
27,810
7.5
16,493
5.7
2
15,698
17.0
17,692
12.7
1
82,627
13.7
88,122
6.7
9
1
Chapter 6
Semiconductor Production Forecast
This chapter presents data on worldwide seiruconductor production by
region. Semiconductor production is defined by the place where the
wafers are fabricated, and regional semiconductor production includes
all production in the region, including merchant and captive producers
and all foreign producers. For instance. North American semiconductor production includes IBM and Delco fabs as well as Japanese and
European fabs in the United States.
Yearly exchange rate variations can have a significant effect on the
1985 through 1991 data in the following tables. For more information
about the exchange rates used and their effects, refer to Appendix B.
Semiconductor Production
Table 6-1 shows historical semiconductor production for the years 1985
through 1991, and Table 6-2 shows forecast production for the period
from 1991 through 1996.
SEI\/II\/l-SVC-lvrr-9202
©1992 Dataquest Incorporated
December 28,1992
{S
@
I
s
i
Table 6-1
Worldwide Semiconductor Production by Region—Historical
Merchant and Captive Semiconductor Company Sales
(Millions of U.S. Dollars)
Total North America
Percent Growth
Percent Worldwide
Merchant
Captive
Total Japan
Percent Growth
Percent Worldwide
Merchant
Captive
Total Europe
Percent Growth
Percent Worldwide
Merchant
Captive
Total Asia/Pacific-ROW
Percent Growth
Percent Worldwide
Merchant
Captive
Worldwide
Merchant
Percent Growth
Captive
Percent Growth
NA = Not applicable
Source: Dataquest (December 1992)
1985
12,654
NA
46.7
10,411
2,243
10,651
NA
39.3
10,500
151
3,403
NA
12.6
3,024
379
406
NA
1.5
406
NA
27,114
24,341
NA
2,773
NA
1986
14,456
14.2
42.9
12,129
2,327
14,686
37.9
43.5
14,524
162
3,831
12.6
11.4
3,426
405
756
86.2
2.2
756
NA
33,729
30,835
26.7
2,894
4.4
1987
16,712
15.6
40.3
14,116
2,596
19,004
29.4
45.8
18,824
180
4,674
22.0
11.3
4,223
451
1,087
43.8
2.6
1,087
NA
41,477
38,250
24.0
3,227
11.5
1988
20,171
20.7
37.0
17,326
2,845
26,693
40.5
49.0
26,388
305
5,789
23.9
10.6
5,277
512
1,868
71.8
3.4
1,868
NA
54,521
50,859
33.0
3,662
13.5
1989
21,324
5.7
36.8
18,464
2,860
28,429
6.5
49.0
28,119
310
6,290
8.7
10.8
5,782
508
1,974
5.7
3.4
1,974
NA
58,017
54,339
6.8
3,678
0.4
1990
22,789
6.9
39.2
19,959
2,830
26,376
-7.2
45.4
26,069
307
6,780
7.8
11.7
6,307
473
2,210
12.0
3.8
2,210
NA
58,155
54,545
0.4
3,610
-1.8
19
25,1
1
3
22,4
2,6
29,4
1
4
29,1
2
6,0
-1
5,6
4
2,4
1
2,4
N
63,0
59,6
3,3
-
M
§
@
I
i"
Table 6-2
Worldwide Semiconductor Production by Region—Forecast
Merchant and Captive Semiconductor Company Sales
(Millions of U.S. Dollats)
Total North America
Percent Growth
Percent Worldwide
Merchant
Captive
Total Japan
Percent Growth
Percent Total
Merchant
Captive
Total Europe
Percent Growth
Percent Worldwide
Merchant
Captive
Total Asia/Pacific-ROW
Percent Growth
Percent Worldwide
Merchant
Captive
Worldwide
Merchant
Percent Growth
Captive
Percent Growth
NA = Not applicable
Source: Dataquest (December 1992)
1991
1992
1993
1994
25,103
10.2
39.8
22,460
2,643
29,411
11.5
46.7
29,121
290
6,086
-10.2
9.7
5,677
409
2,435
10.2
3.9
2,435
NA
63,036
59,694
9.4
3,342
-7.4
27,695
10.3
41.9
25,170
2,525
29,161
-0.9
44.2
28,946
215
6,294
3.4
9.5
5,915
379
2,895
18.9
4.4
2,895
NA
66,044
62,925
5.4
3,119
-6.7
31,136
12.4
41.1
28,704
2,432
33,734
15.7
44.5
33,500
234
7,018
11.5
9.3
6,613
405
3,851
33.1
5.1
3,851
NA
75,739
72,668
15.5
3,071
-1.5
34,542
10.9
40.3
32,142
2,400
36,193
7.3
42.2
35,943
250
8,631
23.0
10.1
8,180
451
6,362
65.2
7.4
6,362
NA
85,728
82,627
13.7
3,101
1.0
1995
36,063
4.4
39.5
33,663
2,400
38,319
5.9
42.0
38,069
250
9,324
8.0
10.2
8,812
512
7,578
19.1
8.3
7,578
NA
91,284
88,122
6.7
3,162
2.0
Appendix A
Regional Economic Outloolc for Our
Forecast
^^^^^^.^^.^^.^^^.^
This appendix provides a discussion of the macroeconomic factors and
trends affecting the major semiconductor producing regions. The focus
is on the current and future general business environment in these
regions and the assimiptions used in our forecast.
The Regional Economic Outlook for Our Forecast
(November 1992)
Unarguably, the industrialized countries are in a tough spot collectively. As Table A-1 shov/s, the United States is now^ moving out of a
stagnant period of economic weakness, though the recovery is spotty.
The Japanese and European economies continue to slide. The Asian
region remains the bright spot, though demand is not large enough to
puU the rest of the global economy along.
United States Shaking Off the Recession
The seemingly chronic stagnation that has gripped the U.S. economy
for the last three years appears to be breaking. We believe that the
economy will experience modest growth in gross domestic product
(GDP) for the rest of 1992 and into 1993, accompanied by low inflation. GDP growth rates should pick up in 1994 and beyond as foreign
demand for U.S. goods accelerates. Latin America will be an especially
important engine for U.S. growth toward the middle of the decade.
Government data on the U.S. economy continue to be mixed, supporting our thesis that the recovery will be slower in gaining speed when
compared with previous recoveries. Signs of recovery are evident in
the third-quarter GDP, which climbed 2,7 percent after rising only
1.7 percent in the second period. But at the same time, durable goods
orders such as cars and computers declined in September for the third
straight month.
Business profits are up, jiunping $50 biUion in the third quarter. But
job creation remains problematic because businesses aie still cautious
about adding employees. Consequently, the unemployment rate
remains stuck in the 7 percent range.
We continue to emphasize that the main factor preventing more robust
growth for the next several years is the forecast weak rebound in real
SEMM-SVC-MT-9202
©1992 Dataquest Incorporated
December 28,1992
A-2
Semiconductor Equipment, Manufacturing, and Materials
income. The problems with income are attributable to lingering consumer and business debt overhang, weak productivity growth, high
levels of business failures, and weak demographic demand for housing. Wth imit consumer spending having a less than normal recovery,
the rebovmd in industrial productivity is also certain to fall short of
normal historic cyclical proportions.
Unarguably, the signs of recovery are attributable to headway being
made on several of these problems. The loosening of monetary policy
and the resultant decline in interest rates have enabled households
and corporations to refinance their high fixed-rate debt. That
reliquidification process is improving the cash flow and boosting
domestic demand to a degree.
Unfortunately, part of the gain in the domestic economy is being offset
by weak demand in overseas economies. This trend—a modestly
improving domestic economy and a deteriorating trade balance—is an
economic theme that will extend weU into 1993.
Dataquest also expects fiscal pohcy (government spending) to begin to
displace monetary policy (lower interest rates) as the goverrunent's
main tool for stimulating the economy. President-elect Bill Clinton
emphasized throughout the campaign the need for increased investment in the public sector, in addition to incentives (tax credits and tax
cuts) to spur the private sector.
The Sun Also Sets
The notion that the Japanese real economy is experiencing no more
than a nuld adjustment to asset deflation is increasingly undermined
by the flow of statistics out of Japan. GDP in the third calendar
quarter sunk 1.5 percent.
Business confidence is falling and the corporate sector is set to keep
retrenching on capital spending, inventory, and employment fronts.
Coiisumer confidence is also declining as disposable income falls and
jobs become less secure. Overall, we believe that the industrial recession will intensify into calendar 1993 and that there will be an increasing degree of spillover into the sheltered parts of the economy.
The imemployment rate, now at 2.2 percent, is expected to rise as corporations reduce labor costs. We also believe that the growth in wages
will slow, especially wages paid as bonuses. These trends will lower
household income and cause a continued weakness in consumer
expenditure.
External demand is cushioning the impact of the downturn on many
segments of the Japanese economy. The trade surplus with the rest of
the world continues to widen. It is ruiming about U.S.$100 bOlion in
calendar 1992. It is unlikely that any headway will be made to lower
this imbalance in 1993.
The run-up in the trade surplus is because of a collapse of imports
rather than a push by Japanese companies to export. Needless to say,
the lopsided surplus will continue to aggravate relations with foreign
December 28,1992
©1992 Dataquest Incorporated
SEMM-SVC-MT-9202
Regional Economic Outlook for Our Forecast
A-3
countries and is expected to draw a response, especially from the
United States and the European Economic Community, in the form of
increased trade tariffs.
As Dataquest has emphasized for two years, asset deflation is at the
center of Japan's economic problems. A sharp drop in stock prices and
lower real estate values have depressed the reserves available to
Japanese financial institutions. This trend is barring banks from
providing the liquidity to reinvigorate the economy.
On October 14, Federal Reserve Board Chairman Alan Greenspan
pointed out to a group of Japanese bankers that economic recovery
from a steep dedine in the price of financial assets historically has
taken much longer and been more modest than a recovery from a
cyclical downturn. We could not agree more and continue to expect
the Japanese economy to underperform over the next two years.
Europe Unravels
The European economy is expected to be weak through 1993. The
three anchor economies in Western Europe—England, France, and
Germany—are all experiencing economic difficulties.
England Slides Further
It is now quite evident that the spurt in the U.K. economy last
spring was a fleeting phenomenon. It is likely that GDP will be
negative in the fourth quarter, and the prospects into 1993 provide
little hope for much improvement.
The collapse of sterling and Europe's exit from the European
exchange rate mechanism (ERM) on September 16 (Black Wednesday) are the most recent and dramatic symptoms of the malaise
infecting England's economy. Business and consumer confidence was
declining prior to this policy shock. Confidence levels declined even
further following September 16.
We have thrown out our previous assumption that English interest
rates would not move lower until 1993 because of the shift in the
policy on ERM. FaUout from the govenunent's decision on ERM
and political reaction to coal mine closures have persuaded the
government to cut base rates to 8 percent.
In one respect, decoupling from ERM wUl permit England to duck
the bitter medicine the Bundesbank is now administering to the
German economy. But, lower interest rates in England orUy make
the current situation a bit more palatable. Even so, the key problem
facing the EngHsh economy—the downturn in business on the
continent—wiU persist. Therefore, it is unlikely that any improvement in England's economy is sustainable, even with the lower
rates, imtil the upturn in the rest of Europe is vmder way.
When Will the Bundesbank Move?
Our previous estimate that German rates would not move lower
until the middle of 1993 now appears conservative. Because of the
SEMM-SVC-MT-9202
©1992 Dataquest Incorporated
December 28,1992
A-4
Semiconductor Equipment, i\/lanufacturing, and IViaterials
political pressure surroimding the unraveling of ERM and a weaker
economic outlook, the Bundesbank wiU most likely make significant
cuts in rates by the first quarter of 1993.
Even so, the lower rates are likely only to have a muted impact on
the German economy. The burdens of vmification still weigh heavy
on the German economy. The Dun & Bradstreet Corporation has
lowered its expectation for German economic growth in 1993 since
our last forecast.
The weaker economic growth is likely to exacerbate the deteriorating finances of the German government because of substantial tax
revenue loss in 1993. The sizable govenunent deficit is likely to
remain stuck at DM120 billion, or move higher, causing the government to cast about for additional tax revenue to lighten the burden.
Raising additional taxes will crowd out private investment and slow
the recovery.
The deterioration of the economic picture in the Uruted Kingdom
and Germany is slowing economic activity in France. Over the
longer term, France's strengthening competitive position vis-a-vis its
European trading partners wiU be the main driver for a recovery.
An upturn in domestic demand vnU. most likely be slower coming
because the pace of job creation is weak.
Asia/Pacific Pushes Ahead
Most economists continue to forecast the fastest growth in the world
for the Asia/Pacific region. We believe that annual gross national
product (GNP) growth rates over the next five years will range from
5 percent to 8 percent for Hong Kong, Indonesia, Malaysia, Singapore,
South Korea, Taiwan, and Thailand. Moreover, imderdeveloped countries such as Qiina P.R.C., India, and Vietnam increasingly will boost
the economic activity of the Pacific Basin as the decade wears on.
In 1991, many of the Pacific Basin countries suffered from slow worldwide growth because the health of their economies is tied so closely to
exports. Coimtries such as Korea and Singapore, which are heavily
dependent on sales to the West, experienced a deceleration in GNP
growth because of the slow U.S. and Eviropean economies.
But Taiwan's economy was more resilient because it benefited from
strong exports to trading partners in Southeast Asia and China, which
were not impacted by the recession in the West. We believe that the
intraregional trade theme is a trend that will increasingly impact not
orUy Taiwan's economy but also the other industrializing countries in
the region.
The only dark cloud on the horizon is the threat of a slower rate of
investment by Japanese companies because of the financial problems
at home. If the Japanese banking system were to stumble, then the
flow of investment to the Pacific Basin would certairUy suffer. But, this
downside has a low probability.
December 28,1992
©1992 Dataquest Incorporated
SEMM-SVC-MT-9202
A-5
Regional Economic Oirtiool< for Our Forecast
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December 28,1992
I
Table A-1 (Continued)
International Economic Forecasts, GDP/GNP Growth Rates (Percentage)
Country
Currently
In or Near
Recession?
Last
1992/1993
GDP/GNP
Change
Asia/Pacific
Australia
Hong Kong
Indonesia
Japan
©
I
a
Malaysia
New Zealand
Singapore
Soutli Korea
Taiwan
y^
Down
Thailand
Central/Latin America
Argentina
Brazil
Mexico
Venezuela
^
•West Germany prior to 1993, unified Germany data thereafter.
Source: Economic Analysis Department, The Dun & Bradstreet Corporation
</)
m
n
S
1988
1989
1990
1991
1992
1993
3.8
4.4
1.3
-1.2
2.0
3.9
8.3
6.5
2.8
3.2
7.4
4.2
5.8
5.5
6.0
5.6
6.3
7.5
4.8
4.4
2.0
6.5
3.3
9.1
2.9
11.1
8.6
-0.7
9.4
5.3
9.8
0.5
8.2
8.8
-2.1
7.9
2.0
6.0
7.5
2.6
6.5
11.5
7.3
13.2
6.2
7.6
9.0
5.3
7.3
7.0
7.0
7.5
7.0
12.0
10.0
7.9
7.0
6.0
-2.6
-0.1
1.2
-4.5
3.3
3.3
0.4
4.9
4.1
-4.0
4.4
5.0
1.2
3.6
1.3
4.0
2.0
5.0
5.8
-8.9
6.7
9.2
4.0
7.0
6.7
8.4
19
Appendix B
Exchange Rate Definitions
When converting a company's local currency sales into U.S. dollars, or
vice versa, it is important to use the preUminary 1992 exchange rates
in Table B-1. This wiU prevent inconsistencies in the conversion of offshore sales between each company. The preliminary 1992 exchange
rate estimate uses actual exchange rates through September 1992, and
assumes that the September rate applies throughout the months of
October through December. The annual rate is estimated as the arithmetic mean of the 12 monthly rates. Exchange rates for historical years
are available on request.
Table B-2 lists the exchange rates per dollar for Japanese yen and
European currency units (ECUs) for the period from 1985 to 1991.
Exchange rate variations should be kept in mind when interpreting
yearly changes in the 19S5 to 1991 data presented in this booklet.
However, the forecast years (1992 to 1996) are assumed to have
constant exchange rates.
SEMM-SVC-l\/rT-9202
©1992 Dataquest Incorporated
December 28,1992
B-2
Semiconductor Equipment, IVIanufacturing, and IVIaterials
Table B-1
Average 1992 Exchange Rates per U.S. Dollar
U.S.$ Expected
Appreciation (%)
Denmark (Krone)
34.13
5.33
6.39
1992
Estimate
10.68
31.26
5.49
5.87
ECU
Finland (Markka)
0.81
4.04
0.75
4.24
-7.6
5.1
France (Franc)
5.64
5.14
Germany (Mark)
Great Britain (Poimd)
Greece (Drachma)
1.66
0.57
1.52
0.54
-8.8
-8.5
-4.6
181.89
7.77
183.48
7.74
71.71
0.62
27.96
0.57
1,238.93
134.68
1,171.01
125.95
2.75
1.87
6.49
144.02
2.54
1.71
5.99
130.55
1.73
730.90
1.62
784.00
103.81
97.86
-5.7
6.04
5.54
-8.4
Switzerland (Franc)
Taiwan (Dollar)
1.43
26.50
1.36
24.89
-5.2
-6.1
Thailand (Baht)
25.52
25.36
-0.6
1991
Rate
11.67
Country
Austria (Schilling)
Belgium (Franc)
China (Renminbi)
Hong Kong (Dollar)
India (Rupee)
Ireland (Punt)
Italy (Lira)
Japan (Yen)
Malaysia (Ringgit)
Netherlands (Guilder)
Norway (Krone)
Portugal (Escudo)
Singapore (Dollar)
South Korea (Won)
Spain (Peseta)
Sweden (Kroner)
-8.4
-8.4
2.8
-8.2
0.9
-0.4
23.1
-7.9
-5.5
-6.5
-7.8
-8.5
-7.6
-9.4
-6.2
7.3
Source: Dataquest (December 1992)
Table B-2
Exchange Rates per Dollar for Japanese Yen and ECU:
1985-1991
Yen/$
Percent Change
ECU/$
Percent Change
1985
238
1986
167
-30
1987
1988
144
-14
130
-10
1.02
-22
0.87
-15
0.84
-3
1.31
1989
138
1990
1991
144
6
4
135
-6
0.92
10
0.79
-14
0.81
8
Source: Dataquest (December 1992)
December 28,1992
©1992 Dataquest Incorporated
SEIVlM-SVC-MT-9202
DataQuest^
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®1992 Dataquest Incorporated
0014227
Japanese Fab Database
October 28, 1992
Market Statistics
Semiconductor Equipment, Manufacturing,
and Materials
Dataquest
SEMNKSVC-MS-8206
I
Japanese Fab Database
October 28, 1992
Source:
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Market Statistics
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iWanufacturing, and Materiais
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File behind the Market Statistics tab inside the
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I
I
Published by Dataquest Incorporated
The content of this report represents our interpretation and analysis of information generally available to the public or released
by knowledgeable individuals in the subject industry, but is not guaranteed as to accuracy or completeness. It does not contain
material provided to us in confidence by our clients.
Printed in the United States of America. Allrightsreserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced, stored in retrieval
systems, or transmitted, in any form or by any means—mechanical, electronic, photocopying, duplicating, microfilming, videotape, or otherwise—without the prior permission of the publisher.
© 1992 Dataquest Incorporated
October 1992
0013955
i
Japanese Fab Database
Table of Contents
Background
Page
1
Research Methodology
1
General Definitions
Definition of Table Columns
1
1
Table
1.1 Japanese Existing Pilot and Production Fab Lines (Including Fabs Going into Operation
During 1992)
1.2 Japanese Future Pilot and Production Fab Lines Planned Facilities by Year
Note: All tables show estimated data.
Page
4
2^
Japanese
Fab
Database
Background
The material in this document applies to the
Japanese portion of Dataquest's Semiconductor
Equipment, Manufacturing, and Materials service wafer fab database. The wafer fab database is updated on an ongoing basis, employing both primary and secondary research
methodologies. The tables included in this
document highlight both production and pilot
line wafer fabs.
Research Methodology
Dataquest takes a three-pronged approach to
•wafer fab database research. Information is
gained through extensive annual primary
research. This survey work is furdier supplemented with comprehensive secondary
research conducted on an ongoing basis.
The database is updated daily, which allows
Dataquest to provide a snapshot of the markeq>lace at any time. The information gathered
through primary and secondary research is
then furttier supplemented and cross-checked
with Dataquest"s various other information
sources.
Pilot fab: A pilot fab is defined as a wafer
fab capable of fi-ont-end processing less than
1,250 wafers per week (type = P).
Definition of Tahle Colimins
The Products Produced column contains information for seven produa categories. The information in this column can be very detailed,
depending on its availability. The nomendature
used within the seven product groups of the
fab database is as follows, with definitions
where warranted:
• Analog
- UN—^Linear/analog devices
- A/D D/A—Analog-to-digital, digital-toanalog converters
- AUTOMOTIVE—^Dedicated to automobile
applications
- CODEC—Coder/decoder
- INTERFACE—Interface IC
- MESFET (GaAs)-^VIetal Schottky fieldeffect transistor
- MODFET (GaAs)
- MDIODE (GaAs)—Microwave diode
General Definitions
Fab line: A fab line is a processing line in a
dean room that is equipped to do all frontend "wafer processing. Occasionally there are
two separate product-specific fab lines or two
different wafer sizes in a clean room. In this
situation, a dean room will be documented as
two fab lines if the equipment is dedicated to
each wafer size or product line. There can be
many fab lines at one location.
Front-end wafer processing: Front-end wafer
processing is defined as all steps involved
with semiconductor processing, beginning with
initial oxide and ending at wafer probe.
- MEET (GaAs)—Microwave field-effect
transistor
- MODEM—Modulator/demodulator
- MMIC—Monolithic microwave IC
- OP AMP—Operational amplifier
- PWR IC—^Power IC
- REG—Voltage regulator
- SMART PWR—^Smart power
- SWITCHES—Switching device
- TELECOM—^Telecommunications chips
• Memory
- MEM—^Memory
Production fab: A production fab is defined as
a wafer fab capable of front-end processing
more than 1,250 wafers per week ixyp^ - F).
- RAM—Random-access memory
- DRAM—Dynamic RAM
Semicxtnductor Equipment, Manufacturii^ and Materials
- CUSTOM—^Full-custom IC (single user)
- SRAM 4 TR.—^Static RAM uses a
4-transistor cell design
- SRAM 6 TR.—Static RAM uses a
6-transistor cell design
- PLD—^Programmable logic device
• Discrete
- VRAM—\rideo RAM
- DIS—^Discrete
- ROM—Read-only memory
- DIODE
- PROM—^Programmable ROM
- FET—Field-effect transistor
- EPROM—^Ultraviolet erasable PROM
- GTO—Gate turn-off thyristor
- EEPROM or E2—^Electrically erasable
PROM
- HEMT (GaAs)—^High-electron-mobility
transistor
- FERRAM—^Ferroelectric RAM
- MOSFET—MOS-based field-effect transistor
- FLASH—^Flash memory
- PWR TRAN—^Power transistor
- NVMEM—^Nonvolatile memory (ROM,
PROM, EPROM, EEPROM, FERRAM)
- RECTIFIER
- RF—^Radio frequency
- FIFO—^First-in/first-out memory
- SCR—Schottky rectifier
- SPMEM—Other specialty memory (such as
dual-port, shift-register, color lookup)
-
SENSORS
- SST—Small-signal transistor
• Microcomponents
- THYRISTOR
-
- ASSP—Application-specific standard
produa
TRAN—Transistor
- ZENER DIODE
- BIT—Bit slice (subset of MPU functions)
- DSP—^Digital signal processor
•
Optoelectronic
- MCU—Microcontroller unit
-
-
- CCD—Charge-coupled device (imaging)
MPR—^Microperipheral
-
OPTO—Optoelectronic
COUPLERS—^Photocouplers
- MPRCOM—MPR digital communication
(ISDN, LAN, UART, modem)
- lED—^Infrared-emitting diode
- MPU—^Microprocessor unit
- IMAGE SENSOR
- USP—^32-bit list instruction set processor
for AI applications
- LASER (GaP)—Semiconductor laser or
laser IC
- RISC—^Reduced-instruction-set computing
32-bit MPU
- LED—^Light-emitting diode
- PTRAN—^Photo transistor
• Standard logic
- LOG—Standard logic
- SAW—Surface acoustic wave device
- SIT IMAGE SENSOR—Static induction transistor image sensor
• ASIC logic
- ASIC—^Application-specific IC
- ARRAYS—Gate arrays
- CBIC—Cell-based IC
- PDIODE—^Photo diode
The Process Technology column lists four
major types of technologies. This column also
lists a few uncommon technologies along with
available information on levels of metal, type
©1992 Dataquest IrKorporated October—Reproduction Prohibited
Japanese Fab Database
>
of well, and logic stnicture. Definitions of the
nomenclature used in the Process Technology
column are as follows:
- InAs—Indium arsenide
- InP—^Indium phosphide
- InSb—^Indium antimony
• MOS (silicon-based)
- LiNb03—^Lithium niobate
- CMOS—Complementary metal-oxide semiconductor
- MOS—^n-chaimel metal-oxide semiconductor (NMOS) and p-channel metal-oxide
semiconductor (PMOS). (More than
90 percent of the MOS fabs use
n-channel MOS.)
- SOS—Silicon on sapphire
The number in the Minimum linewidth
column represents the minimum linewidth at
the critical mask layers as drawn. This number
is stated in microns and is defined in Dataquesfs fab survey as being available in
production volumes.
- Ml—Single-level metal
- M2—^Double-level metal
- M3—^Triple-level metal
- N-WELL
- P-AX7ELL
The Wafer Size column represents the wafer
diameter expressed colloquially in inches.
However, for wafers greater than 3 inches
in diameter, the colloquial expression is inaccurate. When calculating square inches, the
following approximations are used:
- POLYl—Single-level polysilicon
>
- POLY2—^Double-level polysilicon
Stated Diameter
- POLY3—^Triple-level polysilicon
4 inches (lOOrmn)
5 inches (125niir0
4.922 inches
6 inches (ISOmm)
8 inches (200nui0
5.906 inches
7.87 inches
• BiCMOS (silicon-based)
- BiCMOS—^Bipolar and CMOS combined
on a chip
- BIMOS—Bipolar and MOS combined on a
chip
- ECL I/O—^ECL input/output
- TTL I/O—^TTL input/output
• Bipolar (silicon-based)
- BIP—^Bipolar
- ECL—^Emitter-coupled logic
- TTL—Transistor-transistor logic
- STTL—Schottky TTL
• Gallium arsenide and other compound semiconductor materials
- GaAs—Gallium arsenide
- GaAlAs—Gallium aluminum arsenide
- GaAs on Si—Gallium arsenide on silicon
- GaP-Gallium phosphide
>
- HgCdTe—Mercuric cadmium telluride
Approximate Diameter
3.938 inches
Maximum Wafer Capacity is defined in the fab
survey as the equipment-limited wafer start
capacity per four-week period. Maximum
capacity is not limited by current staffing or
the number of shifts operating, it is limited
only by the installed equipment in the fab and
the complexity of the process it runs.
The Clean Room Class column represents the
level of cleanliness in the cleanest part of the
clean room. This area represents the true
environment to which the wafer is exposed.
The Merchant or Captive column categorizes
each fab line on the tables as one of these
two types. Definitions are as follows:
• A Merchant lab line is a lab line that
produces devices that end up available on
the merchant market.
• A Captive fab line does not sell any of its
devices on the merchant market. All production is consumed by the owner of the fab
line.
©1992 Dataquest Incorporated October-Reproduction Prohibited
Table 1
Japanese Existing Pilot and Production Fab Lines
(Includh^ Fabs Going into Operation During 1992)
City o r
•s
Fab Name
Products Produced
Process
l^hnology
AICHI
HANDA
AUTOMOTIVE
NA
0
0
AICHI
SHINKAWA
AUTOMOTIVE
NA
*0
0
HIRATSUKA-SHI
KANAGAWA
NA
AMORPHOUS IMAGE
SENSORS
GaAs
0
3
CANON
H!RATSUKA-SHI
KANAGAWA
NA
ASIC
CMOS
0
6
CANON DEN5HI
CH(CH]BtJ-SH!
SAITAMA
NA
CCD
MOS
3.00
5
CASIO
HACHlOfl-SHI
TOKYO
NA
ASIC
NA
0
4
CLARION
KOMYAMA-^HI
FUKUSHIMA
NA
SAW CUSTOM
NA
0
4
Ftgi ELECTRIC
MATSUMOTO-SHI
NAGANO
NA
CUSTOM ASSP
CMOS BICMOS BIP
1.00
6
FUJI ELECTRIC
MATSUMOTO-SHT
NAGANO
NA
DIODE PWR THAN
PWR MOSFCT
MOS
2.00
4
FVJl FILM MICRODEVICE
KUROKAWA-GUN
MIYAGI
NA
CCD
CMOS
1.00
6
FIQI JCEROX
SUZUKA-Sfn
MSE
NA
PWR ICs IMAGE
SENSOR LOG
CMOS
3.00
5
FUJITSU
AIZU WAKAMATSU-SHI
FUKUSHIMA
BLDG. 1 #1
ARRAYS LOG
CMOS
1.50
6
FUJITSU
AJZU •WAKAMATSU-SHI
FUKUSHIMA
BUXJ. 1 #2
ARRAYS LOG
CMOS
1,20
6
FUJITSU
AIZU TOIKAMATSU-SHI
FUKUSHIMA
BLDG. 2 #1
ARRAYS CBIC 32-bit
MCU
CMOS
0.70
6
FUJITSU
AIZU WAKAMATSU-SHI
FUKUSHIMA
VLSI 1
DIS A/D D/A
BIP
2.00
5
FUJITSU
AIZU WAKAMATSU-SHI
FUKUSHIMA
VISI 2
256K DRAM SRAM
EPROM MPU
MOS CMOS
1.50
5
FUJITSU
AIZU MFAKAMATSUnSHI
FUKUSHIMA
VISI 3
1Mb DRAM SRAM ROM
CMOS MOS
1.00
6
FUJITSU
MINOKAMO^H!
GIFU
MINOKAMO
PROTOTTPE ICs
CMOS
1.00
FUJITSU
IZAWA-GUN
IWATE
NO. 1
ARRAYS
BIP
1.20
FUJITSU
IZATPA-GUN
IWATE
NO. 2
ROM EPROM
MOS
1.50
FUJITSU
IZATEA-GUN
IWATE
NO. 3
JMb DRAM 4Mb DRAM
CMOS MOS POLY3
0.80
6
6
5
6
FUJITSU
IZAWA-GUN
rWATE
NO. 4
4Mb DRAM iShto
DRAM SRAM ASIC
CMOS MOS POLY3
0,50
6
FUJITSU
KAWASAKI-SHI
KANAGAWA
NA
3D ICs JOSEPHSON
NA
0
5
Company
DtstrM
Prefecture
AISHIN SEIKI
HANDA-SHI
AISHIN SQKI
HEKINAN-SHI
CANON
R
I
II
a
sI
B
I
C
I
Est
Minimum
Wafer
Line Width Diameter
C^iaons) ^tachcs)
SRAM ROM
JUNCTION
FUJITSU
KUWAKATGUN
Mm
NO. 1
ARRAYS
CMOS MOS
1.00
FUJITSU
KUWANA-GUN
Mm
NO. 2
LOG ARRAYS 4Mb
DRAM
CMOS BIP
0.80
6
6
FUJITSU
KUWAKA-GUN
Mm
NO. 3
4Mb DRAM 16Mb
DRAM SRAM MPU
CMOS
0.80
6
FUJITSU
NAKAKOMA-^UN
YAMANASHI
NA
FET UN OPTO HEMT
GaAs
0
3
Table 1 (Continued)
Japanese Existing Pilot and Production Fsb lines
OUndudlng Fabs Going Into Operation During 1992)
Est.
Minimum
Wafer
Line Width Diameter
(Microns) Qnches)
City or
District
Prefecture
Fab Name
HAMAMATSU PHOTONICS
HAMAMATSU-SHI
SHIZUOKA
NA
OPTO
HITACHI
MOBARA-Sm
CMBA
Dl
ASIC MCO EPROM
NA
MOS CMOS
1.50
HITACHI
MOBARA-SM
CHIBA
D2
1Mb DRAM -iMb DRAM
CMOS
0.80
HHACHI
MOBARA-Sm
CMBA
D3
1Mb DRAM '(Mb DRAM
CMOS M2
0.80
HITACHI
TAKASAKI-Sm
GUNMA
NA
256K SRAM 4Mb DRAM
MCU
CMOS BICMOS
0.80
3
5
5
6
6
HITACHI
TAKASAKI-SM
GUNMA
NO. 1
UN EPROM PWR
MOSFET SRAM
BIP MOS CMOS
2.00
5
HITACHI
CHITOSE-SHI
HOKKAIEX)
CHTTOSE
1Mb SRAM -IMb DRAM
MPU
CMOS
0.60
6
HTBVCHI
CHITOSE-SHI
HOKKAIDO
CHTTOSE
CMOS
0.80
6
HITACHI
HITACm-SHI
IBARAKI
NA
4Mb DRAM tMb SRAM
EEPROM ROM
PWR CTO THYRISTEHS
BIP STt8
4.00
5
HITACHI
KATSUTA-Sm
raARAKI
N-2
4Mb DRAM
l ^ t b DRAM
CMOS
0.50
8
HITACHI
KATSUTA-Sm
IBASAKI
NA
1Mb DRAM 4Mb DRfiM
CMOS
0.80
HITACHI
KATSUTA-SM
IBARAKI
Nl-1
4Mb DRAM 1Mb SHAM
CMOS
0.80
6
6
HITACHI
KOMORO-SHI
NAGANO
KOMORO
LASER TELECOM
HITACHI
KODAIHA-SM
TOKYO
DDC
LOG LIN
CMOS
BIP
I
I
HITACHI
KODAIRA-Sm
TOKTO
NA
4<Blt MPU 6-Blt MCU
HITACHI
KODAIRA-Sm
TOKYO
NA
4-bli 8-blt MCU
HITACHI
KODAIRA-SHl
TOKYO
NA
I
HITACHI
KODAIRAJHI
TOKYO
HITACHI
KODAlRA-SHI
HITACHI
NAKAKOMA-GUN
HITACHI
NAKAKOMA-GUN
HITACHI
HITACHI
HITACHI
Company
to
O
I
I
Products Produced
Process
Teclinol<>gy
0
1.50
2.00
3
4
MOS
2.00
4
MOS
1.50
4Mb DRAM
16Mb DRAM
CMOS
0.50
5
6
R&D
MPU SRAM DRAM
ARRAYS CMC
CMOS M2
1.30
TOKYO
R&D
MPU MEM CBIC
CMOS M2
1.20
YAMANASM
IMASUWA
4Mb DRAM 4Mb SRAM
16Mb PROTO DRAM
CMOS
0.60
5
6
YAMANASHI K-2
4Mb DRAM
ItiMb DRAM
CMOS
NAKAKOMA-GUN
YAMANASm
LSI
NA
MOS
3.00
4
NAKAKOMA-GUN
YAMANASHI
NO. K2-1
NA
NA
2.00
NAKAKOMA-GUN
YAMANASHI
NO. K2-2
NA
MOS
2.00
4
5
5
5
6
HITACHI
NAKAKOMA-GUN
YAMANASHI
MOS
NAKAKOMA-GUN
YAMANASHI
NO. K3
NO. K4-1
64K SRAM
HITACHI
MEM MPU LOG
MOS
HITACHI
NAKAKOMA-GUN
YAMANASHI
NO. K4-2
tMb DRAM
CMOS
mm-
1.50
'
2.00
1.00
Table 1 (Continued)
Japanese Existing Pilot and Production Fab Unes
(Including Fabs Going Into Operation During 1992)
Company
c i t y or
Dbtrlct
Prefecture
Fabltatiile
Producti Prodnotd
Technoltqty
HITACHI
NAKAKOMA^UN
YAMANASHI
NO. K4-3
4Mb DRAM 1Mb SEAM
EPROM
CMOS MOS
HONDA
HAGA-OUN:
TOCHIGI
NA
ENG. CONTROL
SENSORS MMIC
GaAs
®
IBM
YASU-GUN
SHIGA
NA
s
4Mb DRAM 16Mb
DRAM
IBM
YASU-GUN
SHIGA
NA
N)
ProccM
^
s
•i
Est
Minimum
Wafer
U n c Width Diameter
(Microns) (Inches)
0.80
0
3
CMOS
0.60
8
ARRAY 1Mb DRAM
MPU ROM
CMOS
1.00
5
IWATSU
HACHIOJI-SHI
TOKYO
NA
NA
CMOS
1.50
5
a
JVC
YOKOSUKA-SHI
KANAGAWA
NA
IK ARRAYS DSP
CUSTOM
CMOS
3.00
3
3
KAWASAKI STML
UTSUNOMTYA-SH!
TOCHIGI
NA
256K SRAM CBIC
ARRAYS
CMOS
0.80
6
KODEN3HI
IJJI-^HI
KYOTO
PLAhTT 3
DIS DIODE TRAM
GaAs GaP
i m SEMICONDUCTOR
NISHTWUa-SHI
HYOGO
NA
16Mb DRAM
^Mb DRAM
CMOS
KYOTO SBivncONDUOOR
KYOTCWHI
KYOTO
NA
LED TRAN IMAGE
SENSOR
„
0
1
ft
a
9
6
5f
0
0
0.50
8
GaAs GaP
0
0
I3
MATSUSHFIA
HIOM-GUN
KAGOSHIMA NA
OPTO I.ED HEMT
GaP MOS
0
0
MATSUSHITA
KYOTO-SHI
KYOTO
LAB
16Mb DRAM
CMOS
0
8
MATSUSHITA
NAGAOKAKYO.SHI
KYOTO
NA
VWR TRAN
BIP
3.00
4
r>
MATSUSHfTA
NAGAOKAKYCMtB
KYOTO
NA
TTL LOG I>^ni TRAN
CUSTOM
MOS
2.00
4
•o
C7.
O
3
Tl
MATSUSHITA
NAGAOKAKYCWHI
KYOTO
NA
TRAN CCD DIODE
MOS
0
5
3
cr
MATSUSHITA
NAGAOKAKYO-SHI
KYOTO
NA
LOG PWR TRAN
CMOS
2.00
4
i
MATSUSHITA
ASAI-SHl
NHGATA
FAB B-3
DRAM SHAM MPU
MOS
2,00
MATSUSHITA
ARAInSHS
NUGATA
FAB C-1
CCD
MOS
1.50
5
4
MATSUSHITA
ASAI-SHI
NIIGATA
FAB C-2
DRAM SRAM MPU ROM
MOS
1.50
5
MATSUSHITA
ARAI-SH3
NHGATA
FAB D
LOG LIN CCD
BIP
3.00
5
MATSUSHFTA
UTSUNOMTEfegBI
TOCHIGI
KIYAHARA
SST DIODE
MOS
0
4
MATSUSHITA
COZU-SHI
TOYAMA
FAB A-1
16-bit MPU ARRAYS
CMOS
1,50
5
MATSUSHHA
II02U-SHI
TOYAMA
FAB A-2
MPU ROM EPROM
EEPROM
MOS
1.50
5
MATSUSHITA
UOZU-SHI
TOYAMA
FAB B
MPU MCU EEPROM
CMOS
1,00
6
MATSUSHITA
UOZU-SM
TOYAMA
FAB C-1
-^Mb DRAM 1Mb DRAM
CMOS
0^
6
CUSTOM
Table 1 (Continued)
Japanese Existing Pilot and Production Fab Lines
(Including Fabs Going Into Operation During 1992)
«
D
Company
City or
District
Prefecture
Fab Name
Products Produced
MATSUSHITA
UOZU-SM
TOYAMA
FAB C-2
16Mb DRAM
64Mb DRAM SRAM
CMOS
MEIDENSHA
NUMAZU-SHI
SHIZUOKA
NA
GTO THYRIETTOR
NA
MtTSUBISHE
SAIJO-SHI
EHIME
A-IF
iMb DRAM
CMOS M2
0.50
5
8
MITSUBISHI
SAIJO-SHI
EHIME
A-2F
4Mb DRAM
CMOS M2
0.50
6
CMOS Ml
1.20
CMOS M2
0,80
5
5
4
6
5
3
8
6
6
SAIJO-SHI
EHIME
B
MITSOBJSHI
SAlJO-SHI
EHIME
C
HFTSUBISHI
FUKUOKA-SHI
FUKUOKA
#1
MITSUBISHI
FUKUOKA-SHI
FUKUOKA
#2
t
MITSUBISHI
TTAMI-SHI
HYOGO
NA
MITSUBISHI
ITAMI-SHI
HYOGO
NA
n
O.
MTTSUBISHi
ITAMI-5HI
HYOGO
R&D
MITSUBISH!
KAMI-GUN
Kocm
S"
•3
n
I
I
i
Process
Technolofcy
0.80
0
ISMb DRAM
MTTSUBISHI
o
Est.
Minimum
Wafer
Line Width Diameter
(Microns) (Inches)
16Mb DRAM
AS[C MCU HPU
S-BTT MCU MPU ASIC
PWH TBAN DIODE
LOG UN A/D D/A DIS
ARRAYS OPTO LASER
PET OPTO HEMT
16Mb DRAM
FAB A (TA-IF) 4Mb DRAM 1Mb SRAM
NA
8-bii MCU l6-bii MCU
MTTSUBISH]
KAMI-GUN
KOCHI
MLTSUBISHI
KIKUCHI-GUN
KUMAMOTO B-IF
MTTSUBISHI
KIKUCHI-GUN
KUMAMOTO B-2F
MTTSUBISHI
KIKUCHI-GUN
KUMAMOTO C-IF
MITSUBISHI
KIKUCHI-GUN
KUMAMOTO C-2F
MITSUMI
ATSUGI-Sm
KANAGAWA
NA
MORimCA Elil^^BiNICS
YOKOHAMA-SHI
KANAGAWA
NA
MOTOROLA
YAMA-GUN
FUKUSHIMA MOS 7
32-bil MCU ASIC
EPROM
ARRAYS
EPROM
1Mb SRAM 1Mb ROM
ARRAYS
BIP
3.00
BIP
2.00
CMOS MOS
2.00
GaAs
0
CMOS
0.35
CMOS
1.00
CMOS
1.00
CMOS
1.50
CMOS
2.00
CMOS
1.50
MOS CMOS
0.80
5
4
5
5
4
0
4
BIP
0
LOG DlS
GaP
0
OPTO
CMOS MOS Ml
1.80
GaAs
0.80
CMOS
0.60
0
6
4
CBIC MCU SRAM ROM
MUKATA
NEC
MAiitMcrpdaiiG
PWR ICs
KYOTO-SHI
FET MMIC
HIGASm HIROSHI
4Mb DRAM SRAM MPU
NEC
IZUMI^HI
KAGOSHIMA NA
BIP GaAs
0.80
NEC
KAWASAKI-SHl
KANAGAWA
NA
UN TELECOM LASER
CMOS MOS
1.40
NEC
SAGAMIHARA-SHI
KANAGAWA
BLDG. UL
ASIC EPROM MCU MPU
CMOS
1.20
NEC
SAGAMIHAItA-SHI
KANAGAWA
G-1
EPROM ASIC MPU MCU
CMOS BICMOS
0.80
MOS
2.00
CMOS MOS
1.40
* f e ROM
4Mb DRAM ASIC MPU
NEC
KUMAMOTO-SHI
KUMAMOTO FAB 3
4Mb ROM
NEC
KUMAMOTO^HI
KUMAMOTO FAB 4
EPROM ROM
ASIC EPROM MCU MPU
6
table 1 (Continued)
Japanese Existing Pilot and Production Fab lines
(Including Fabs Going Into Operation During 1992)
N)
s*
s
>S
o
I
a
Company
City or
DlBtrkt
Prefecture
NEC
KUMAMOTO-SHI
KUMAMOTO FAB 6
NEC
NEC
NEC
NEC
NEC
KUMAMOTO-SHl
OTSU-SW
OTSU-^H!
P«b NMDC
ProdiMita Froduced
Process
Tcchnotogr
Est.
Minimum
Wafer
l i n e Width Diameter
(Microns) (Inches)
1Mb DRAM MPU
ARRAYS
MOS POLY2
KUMAMOTO FAB 7
MCO -IMb DRAM ASIC
CMOS BICMOS
1.00
SHIGA
GaAs
PWR THAN DIS CCD
GaAs
4.00
2
SHIGA
NO. 1
PWR TRAN DIS CCD
BIP
4.00
4
OTSU-SW
SHIGA
NO. 2
LIN CCD
MOS
3.00
4
OTSU-Sm
SHIGA
NO. 3
ARRAYS SRAM 8-bit
CMOS MOS
2.00
5
CMOS
0.80
BIP
300
4
BIP
2.00
CMOS MOS
0.80
CMOS BICMOS
0.80
5
6
6
MPU
NA
2.00
5
OPTO
BIP
0
4
GaAs GaAlAs
1.50
3
CMOS
1.20
5
1,00
6
Mpy
NEC
OTSO-SHI
SHIGA
NO. 4
NEC
NEC
NEC
NEC
TSUBUOKA^HI
YAMAGATA
TSURUOKAW
TSURUOKA-SHI
YAMAGATA
TSURUOKA W
ASA-GUN
YAMAGUCHI PHASE 1
ASA-GUN
YAMAGUCHI PHASE 2
NEC
OTSUKl-SHI
YAMANASHI
NA
NEW JAPAN RADIO
KAMIFUKUOKA-SHI
SAITAMA
NA
NEW JAPAN RADIO
KAMIFUKOOKA-SHI
SAITAMA
NA
NEW JAPAN RADIO
KAMtFUKUOKA-sm
SAITAMA
NA
ARRAYS MCU SRAM
4Mb DRAM
LOG UN DIS
LOG LIN
1Mb DRAM 4Mb DRAM
4Mb DRAM 1Mb SRAM
OP AMP A/D D/A REG
lED FET DIODE
CUSTOM LOG A/D D/A
c
I
a-
i
NEW JAPAN RADIO
KAMIFUKUOKA-SHI
NIHON INTER ELECniONICS HA0ANO-5HI
SAITAMA
NA
OPTO
BIP
0
3
KANAGAWA
NA
OP AMP
BIP
0
3
CMOS
1.00
6
MOS
1.50
5
BIP MOS
300
4
CMOS
0.80
6
CMOS
2.00
4
NA
0.80
6
CMOS
2.00
5
MOSFET DIODE
NIHON SEMICONDUCTOR
TSUKUBA-SHI
IBARAKI
PHASE 1
RECTIFIER
NIPPONDENSO
KABIYA-SH!
Aicm
BLDG. 1
ARRAYS CBIC
LOG CUSTOM MCU
NIPPONDENSO
KARIYA-SHI
AICM
NA
OPTO
DIODE LOG CUSTOM
NIPPON PRECISION CIRC.
NASU-GUN
TOCHIGI
NA
NIPPON PREQSION CIRC.
NASU-GUN
TOCMGI
NA
NIPPON STEEL
3AGAMIHARA-SHI
KANAGAWA
NISSAN
YOKOSUKA-5HI
KANAGAWA
SEMICONDUC- LOG LIN A/D D/A
TOR DEVICE MODEM
RAD CTR.
ASIC
MCU CUSTOM
NA
MCU
A/D D/A DSP LOG
ASSP
Table I CContlnucdJ
Japanese Existing Pilot and Production Fab Lines
(Including Fabs Going Into Operation During 1992)
Est
Minimum
City or
o
fS
Wafer
l i n e Width Diameter
(Microns) (Inches)
Company
District
Prefecture
Fab Name
Products Produced
NKK
AYASE-SHI
KANAGAWA
PHASE 1
1Mb SRAM 4Mb SRAM
NA
MASK ROM RISC
256K SHAM MPU ASIC
NMB SEMICONDUCTOR
TATEYAMA-SHI
CHIBA
Ml
256K DRAM 8-Brr MPU
ASiC
CMOS
1.20
NMB SEMCONDUCrOR
TATEYAMA-SHI
CMBA
M2
1Mb DRAM FLASH
CMOS m
0.80
6
NMB SEMICONDUCTOR
TATEYAMA-SHI
CMBA
M3
4Mb DRAM
CMOS
0.50
6
OKI
KUROKAWA-GUN
MIYAGI
NA
ARRAYS 1Mb DRAM
VRAM LOG
CMOS
0.80
6
OK!
KUROKAWA-GUN
MIYAGI
SI
4Mb DRAM VRAM
CMOS
0.60
CMOS
1.50
@
H*
Process
Technology
0.80
1Mb SRAM
OKI
MTYAZAK-GUN
MIYAZAKI
Ml
DRAM SRAM ARRAYS
MPU
OKI
MIYAZAKI-GUN
MIYAZAKI
M2
OKI
MIYAZAKI-GUN
MIYAZAKI
M3
OKI
HACHIOJI-SHI
TOKYO
V-1
OKI
HACHIOJI-SHI
TOKYO
V-2
OKI
HACHIOJI-SHI
TOKYO
V-3
OLYMPUS
KAMUNA-GUN
NAGANO
NA
DRAM EEPROM ASIC
4Mb DRAM l6hfo
CMOS
1.00
5
CMOS
0.50
6
DRAM 90K ARRAYS
OMRON
KOUKA-GUN
SHIGA
NA
OMRON
KOUKA-GUN
SHIGA
NA
ORIGIN ELECTRIC
OYAMA-SHI
TOCHIGI
NA
PlONEHl VIDEO
KOFU-SHI
YAMANASHI
NA
RICOH
IKEDA-SHI
OSAKA
NA
RICOH
IKEDA-SM
OSAKA
NA
0
3
B!P BICMOS
2.00
4
CMOS BICMQ^
0.30
8
CMOS
3.00
5
BIP Gap
3.00
4
BIP GaP
0
4
BIP
0
4
MOS G3A5
NA
ARRAYS CBIC MPU
16Mb DRAM 64^fb
DRAM
SIT IMAGE SENSOR
OPTO IMAGE SENSOR
OPTO IMAGE SENSOR
TRAN DIODE DIS
CMOS
3.00
5
BICMOS CUOS.
2.00
4
CMOS MOS
1.30
6
CMOS
ARRAYS LOG SAW CCD
ARRAYS ROM PLD LOG
256K
ROM ARRAYS
RICOH
IKEDA-SHI
OSAKA
NA
CBtC
ARRAYS
1.00
6
ROHM
CHIKUGO-SM
FUKUOKA
NA
TRAN DIS
BIP
0
4
ROHM
KYOTO-SHI
KYOTO
NA
MPU LASER MODEM
BIP CaAs
0
4
TRAN LED
ROHM
KYOTO-SHI
KYOTO
NA
MCU ARRAYS SRAM
CMOS BICMOS^
1.20
EEPROM
HOHH
KASAOKA-5HI
OKAYAMA
NA
TRAN DIODE LIN
BIP
0
4
SANKEN
NIIZA-SHI
SAITAMA
NA
PWR THAN DIODE LED
NA
0
3
SANKEN
NnZA-SHI
SAITAMA
NA
PWR TRAN DIODE LED
NA
0
5
Table 1 (Continued)
Japanese Existing Hlot and Production Fab Lines
(Including Fabs Going into Operation During 1992)
Process
Tccluiologf
Est
Minimum
Wafer
Line Width Diameter
(Microns) (Inches)
Company
City or
District
picXiLctitrc
Fab Name
Pfioductil Produced
SANKEN
HIGASHINE-SHl
YAMAGATA
NA
PWR TRAN DIODE LED NA
0
SANSHA
KATStJTA-OUN
OKAYAMA
NA
PWR TRAN PWR
0
5
4
SANYO
ANPACHI-GUN
GIFU
1.00
5
CMOS
1.00
MOS
2.00
5
4
4
6
5
5
6
6
BIP
DIODB
CCD SRAM ARRAYS
CMOS
C8IC ROM
SANYO
SANYO
SANYO
SANYO
SANYO
SANYO
SANYO
SANYO
ANPACHT-GUN
GIFU
G
CCD ARRAY CBJC
OURA-GUN
GUNMA
NA
TRAN DIODE UN
OURA^UN
GUNMA
NA
L!N
OURA-GUN
GUNMA
R&D CENTER
OJIYA-^HI
NIIGATA
A#l
OJIYA^HI
NUGATA
A #2
BIP
2.00
SRAM DRAM
CMOS
0.80
LOG MPU MCU MPR
CMOS
1.20
UN
BIP
2.00
1Mb DRAM 4Mb DRAM
ASIC PID 1Mb SRAM
1&.SIT MPU
CMOS
0.80
CMOS BiCMOS
1.00
16-BlT MCU DSP
4Mb DRAM
CMOS BiCMOS
1,00
OjnCA-^HI
NIIGATA
B #3
OJIYA-SHI
NIIGATA
C #4
SANYO
OJIYA-SHl
NHGATA
C *5
SANYO
TOTTOKI-SHt;
TOTTORI
NA
LASER LED
GaAs GaP
5.00
SEIKO EPSON
SUWA-GUN
NAGANO
BLDG. A
ARRAYS 256K SRAM
CMOS
1.50
3
5
SEIKO EPSON
SUWA-GUN
NAGANO
BLDG. B
CMOS MOS
2.00
4
SEIKO EPSON
SUWA-GUN
NAGANO
BUDG. D
ARRAYS CBIC SRAM
EEPROM
1Mb SRAM ASIC
CMOS BICMOS
0.80
SEIKO EPSON
SAKATA-SHI
YAMAGATA
NA
2WK ARRAYS CB!C
CMOS BICMOS
0.80
6
6
SEIKO INSTRUMENTS
MATSUDO-SHT
CHIBA
BLDG. B
CMOS
2.00
SEIKO INSTRUMENTS
MATSUD&SHI
CMBA
NA
CMOS
1.25
4
6
SHABF
FUKUYAMA-SH]
HIROSHIMA
BLDG. 1
MOS
1.00
5
SHARP
RIKmAMA-SH]
HIROSHIMA
BLDG. 2 #1
CMOS
0.80
6
CMOS
0.80
6
BIP
3-00
4
CMOS MOS
2.00
4
EPROM
1Mb SRAM
TELECOM
SRAM ARRAYS CBiC
EEPRQM
1Mb DRAM SRAM
ARRAYS ROM
1Mb DHAM SRAM ROM
SHARP
FtJKUYAMA-SHI
HIROSHIMA
BLDG. 2 *2
ASIC
4Mb DRAM 16Mb
SHARP
HTA KATSURAGI-GUN
NARA
NA
DRAM ROM ASIC
NA
DIODE TRAN
SHARP
TENRI-SH]
NARA
NO. 1
SHARP
TENRI-SHl
NARA
NO. 2
COUPLERS
LOG UN
OPTO
Table 1 (Continued)
Japanese Existing Pilot and Production Fab Lines
Ctticludlng Fabs Going Into Operation During 1992)
•s
I
i
Est.
Minimum
Wafer
Line Width Diameter
(Microns) (Inches)
Company
City or
District
Prefecture
Fab Name
Products Produced
Process
Technology
SHARP
TENRI-SHI
NARA
NO. 3
ARRAYS CBIC
CMOS MOS BIP
1.20
SHARP
TENtt!-5Hi
NARA
NO. 4
NA
MOS
1.50
SHARP
TENRi-SHI
NARA
TRIAL LINE
ARRAYS
CMOS
0.80
SHARP
YAMATO KORIYAMA-SHI
NARA
NA
LASER LED OPTO
GaAs
0
SHINDENGEN
HONJO-SHl
AMTA
BLDG. 1
DIODE THYRlSrOR
BIP
0
SHINDENGEN
HONJO^SHI
AKITA
BLDG. 2
DIODE THYRISTOR
BIP
0
5
5
6
3
4
5
SHINDENGEN
HANNO-SHI
SAITAMA
NA
DIS UN
BIP
0
4
SHINDENGEN
HANNO-SHI
SAITAMA
NA
PWR MOSFET LIN LOG
MOS BIP
SHINDENGEN
HIGASH[NE-SHI
YAMAGATA
BLDG. 1
THAN DIODE
NA
SHINDENGEN
HIGASHINE-SHI
YAMAGATA
BLDG. 2 MOS CUSTOM
CMOS MOS
SHINDENGEN
HIGASHINE^HI
YAMAGATA
BLDG. 2 DIS.
TRAN DIODE UN
BIP
SONY
KOiCUBLf-SHE
KAGOSHIMA #2
DIS
NA
SONY
KOKUBU-SHI
KOKUBU-SHI
KAGOSHIMA *3
KAGOSHIMA #4
LiN A/D D/A
SONY
SRAM MPU CCD
SONY
KOKUBU-SHI
KAGOSHIMA #6
2.00
5
0
4
2.00
5
0
3.00
5
4
BIP
2.00
4
MOS CMOS
1.30
LOG MEM MPU LIN
DIS OFTO
CMOS BICMOS
0.80
5
6
a
SONY
KOKUBU-SHI
KAGOSHIMA NA
CCD
MOS
1.50
4
9
SONY
ATSUGI-SHI
KANAGAWA
NA
PET LASER CCD HEMT
GaAs
0
>e
SONY
ATSUGI-SHI
KANAGAWA
NA
EEPROM 4Mti VRAM
4Mb SRAM
CMOS
0.80
3
6
I
SONY
ATSUGI-SHI
KANAGAWA
NA
UN
BIP
2.00
4
SONY
ISAHAYA-SHI
NAGASAKI
IG
256K SRAM CCD
CMOS
1.00
SONY
ISAHAYA-SHI
NAGASAKI
2G
CCD 256K SRAM
1Mb SRAM
CMOS
0,80
6
6
SONY
ISAHAYA-SHI
NAGASAKI
3G
1Mb SRAM 4Mb VRAM
CCD
CMOS
0.80
6
STANLEY
HADANO^HI
KANAGAWA
NA
0
AMAGASAK-SHI
HYOGO
NA
LASER LED
4Mb DRAM ARRAYS
NA
SUMITOMO MEOl INDUSTRIES
NA
0.80
4
6
TEXAS INSTRUMENTS
IMA5HIKI-GUN
IBARAKI
MIHO 5
ASSP ASIC MCU DSP
CBIC
MOS
1.00
5
TEXAS INSTRUMENTS
INASHUa^UN
IBARAKI
MIHO 6
1Mb DRAM 4Mb DRAM
ASSP RISC
CMOS "
0.80
6
TEXAS INSTTRUMEOTS
HAYAMI-GUN
OITA
MJI 1
LOG LIN ARRAYS
BIP
1.00
5
TEXAS INSTRUMENTS
HAYAMI-GUN
OITA
HIJI 8
4Mb DRAM
16Mb DRAM
CMOS BICMOS
0.50
8
TEXAS INSraUMEOTS
HATOGAYAnSHI
SAITAMA
HATO
ASIC
CMOS NMOS
1.00
5
I
I
i
h- '
Table 1 (Continued)
Japanese Existing Pilot and Production Fab Lines
(Including Fabs Goln« into Operation During 1992)
Compaoy
City o r
Olatrlct
TOHOKU SEMiCONDUCrOH SENDAI-SUl
E^roccH
Est.
Minimum
l i n e Width
(MlcTOim)
Wafer
Diameter
(tntfteit)
Ptisfecture
Pab N w m e
Products Produced
Tcchnoiooy
MTYAGl
PHASE 1
1Mb DRAM MCU
CMOS
0.80
CMOS BICMOS
0.70
6
ARRAYS
TOHOKU SEMICOPIDUCrC« SENDAi'SHI
S"
MTYAGI
PHASE 2
4Mb DRAM SRAM MPU
ARRAYS
TOKIN
SEr«>AI-SHI
MIYAGI
NA
POWER SIT
BIP
0
3
TOKO
IRUMA-GUN
SAITAMA
NA
A / D D / A TELECOM
BIP
3.50
5
5
DIODE
TOKO
IRUMA^UN
SAITAMA
NA
NA
MOS
3.00
TOREK SEMiqptlplEefOlt
IBARA-SHI
OKAYAMA
NA
NA
CMOS BIP
1.20
5
TOSHIBA
KITA KYUSHU-SHI
Fl«UOKA
KUBIC 1
LASER LED
GaAs
2.00
3
TOSHIBA
KTTA K Y U S H U ^ m
FUKUOKA
KUBIC 2
ASIC OFTO LOG
BICMOS BIP
2.00
5
I
TOSHIBA
KTTA KYUSHU-SHI
FUKUOKA
NA
UN
BIP
3.00
5
TOSHIBA
HIMEJI-SHI
HYOGO
NA
PWR FFT GTO THAN
DiODE
CMOS BIP
1.00
5
TOSHIBA
HIM^JI-SHI
HYOGO
NA
TRAM DIODE
BIP
3.00
4
a
TOSHIBA
NOMI-GUN
ISHIKAWA
NA
DIS
NA
0
5
I
TOSHIBA
KITAKAMI^SHI
IWATE
BUXJ. 1
ARRAYS CBIC MPU
CUSTOM
CMOS
1.50
5
n
"S
TOSHIBA
KITAKAMI-SHI
IMKVTE
BLDG. 2
'JMb ROM
CMOS
l.OO
I
•iMb EEPROM
TOSHIBA
KITAKAMI-sm
ITOVTE
BIDG. 2
AHRAYE CCD
CMOS
1.50
5
TOSHIBA
XTTAKAMI-SHI
IWATE
BLDG.
3
4Mb EPROM ROM
172K ARRAYS
BICMOS CMOS
0.80
5
TOSHIBA
KirAKAMl-^Hl
IWATE
BIDG.
3
ARRAYS CBIC
CMOS BICMOS
0.70
6
TOSHIBA
KAVASAKI-SHI
KANAGAWA
FAB B
4Mb DRAM 16Mb
CMOS
0.50
8
1Mb DRAM 4Mb DRAM
IfiMb DRAM
CMOS
0.80
6
DRAM
TOSHIBA
KAWASAKI-SHI
KANAGAWA
NA
TOSHIBA
KAWASAKI-SHI
KANAGAWA
NA
LOG U N
BIP
2.00
5
TOSHIBA
YOKKAIOD-SHI
Mm
PHASE 1
4Mb DRAM 16Mb
DRAM
CMOS
0.60
8
TOSHIBA
OITA-SHi
orrA
C-1
256K DRAM 1Mb DRAM
CMOS MOS
1.00
5
TOSHIBA
orrA-sHi
OITA
C-2
1Mb DRAM
CMOS
1.00
5
TOSHIBA
OITA-SHI
ortA
C-3 *1
1Mb DRAM
CMOS
1.00
6
TOSHIBA
OITAnSHI
OITA
C-3 * 2
1Mb DRAM
CMOS
1.00
TOSHIBA
OITAnSHI
OITA
C 4 #1
4Mb DRAM 2$6K SRAM
CMOS
0.80
6
6
ASIC
Table 1 (Continued)
Japanese Existing Pilot and Production Fab Lines
(Including Fabs Going into Operation During 1992)
Est
Minlmiun
Wafer
Line Width Diameter
CMfaJOBs) Oncheii)
CcKUfwiy
City or
District
PreafectiMT
I ^
TOSHIBA
OrTA-SHI
OITA
TOSHIBA
OITA-SHI
OITA
TOSHIBA
OITA-SHI
OITA
LSI 2
MPU LOG ROM fiPROM CMOS MOS
1.50
TOSHIBA.
OITA-SHI
OITA
STEP 4
4Mb DRAM 16Mb
DRAM VRAM
NA
0.50
6
4
5
6
«
TOSHIBA coMPoNBrrrs
KIMITSU-SHI
CHIBA
PHASE 1
DIODE RECTIFIER
THYRISTOR
BIP
0
4
I
TOSHIBA COMPOI^ENTS
KIMITSU-SHI
CHIBA
PHASE 2
DIODE RECTIFIEH
THYRISTOR
BIP
0
5
TOYODA AUTOMATIC
IJOOM WORKS
OBU-Sm
AICHI
KYOWA
AUTOMOTIVH
NA
0
0
TOYODA MACHINE WORKS KARIYA-SM
Aicm
HIGASHI
KARIYA
AlTTOMOnVE
NA
0
0
TOYOTA MOTOR
TOYOTA-SHI
Aicm
NA
MCU PWR ICs CUSTOM
CMOS BIP
2.00
UNIZON
ITAMI-SHI
HYOGO
NA
ZENER DIODE REG
ARRAYS
BIP
5
5
YAMAHA
AIRA-GUN
KAGOSHIMA NA
UN ROM CBIC ASSP
MPR
CMOS MOS
1.20
YAMAHA
AIRA-GUN
KAGOSMMA NA
ROM CBIC ASSP
CMOS
0.80
YAMAHA
IWATA-GUN
SHIZUOKA
HE DEV e r a
CBIC LOG
CMOS
0,80
YOKOGAWA IWr
KAMnNA-GUN
NAGANO
NA
TRAN DIODE OPTO
BIP CMOS
3.00
II
a
9
Products P m A m d
PnXKH
Tiscltaologr
CA #2
4Mb DItAM
CMOS
0.80
LSI 1
MPU LOG
MOS
2.00
Nune
5
II
•3
•fl
I
i
NA " Not available
Source: Dataquest (October 1992)
0
6
6
4
Table 2
Japanese Future Pilot and Production Fab Lines
Planned Facilities by Year
Target Date Mi
FadUty
IVoccaa
Facility
TVIK;
to Begin
O p c n t l o n (H
City or D M r i d
Prefecture
iidblN^MB
FtvdiKtj
TechnDloft)^
ASAHI KASa
NOBEOKA-SHI
MIlfAZAKI
NA
ASIC SRAM
CMOS
12/31/93
FUJITSU
AIZU WAKAMATSU-SHI
FUKUSHIMA
BUXJ. 2 # 2
ARRAYS CBIC
CMOS
NA
Company
Production Begins: 1993
324)it MCU
«
I
Ia
f?
E
I
Rjjrrsu
IZAWA-GUN
IWATE
N O . 4-2
16Mb DRAM
CMOS
NA
MATSUSHITA
TONAMI-SHI
TOYAMA
FAB # 1
4Mb & 16Mb
DRAM ASEC
CMOS
06/01/93
NEC
KUMAMOTO-SHI
KUMAMOTO
FAB 8
16Mb DBAM 4Mb
CMOS
04/15/93
MPU MCU
SRAM RISC M p q
NEC
TSURUOKA-SHl
YAMAGATA
TSURUOKA W
ASIC MCU
CMOS
04/01/93
NIHON SEMICOKDUCrOR
TSUKUBA-SHI
IBARAKI
PHASE 2
ARRAYS CBSC
NA
05/01/93
NIPPONDENSO
NUKATA-GUN
AICHI
NA
SHARP
FUKUYAMA-SHl
HIROSHIMA
FAB 3
TOYODA GOSEI
NISHI KASUGAI-GUN
AICHI
NA
MPU 1Mb SRAM
MCU CUSTOM
4Mb SRAM MASK
ROM FLASH
LED
MOS
NA
CMOS
03/01/93
COMPOUND SEMI-
12/31/93
CONDUCTOR
Production Begins: 1994
Fumrsu
NA
MOTOROLA
SENDAI.5HI
MIYAGI
NA
EPROM FLASH
CMOS
F
12/31/94
MOS 10
4Mb DRAM MPU
CMOS
F
04/01/94
NA
CUSTOM
9
I
Production Begins; 1995
KAWASAKI STEEL
UTSUNOMIYA-SHI
TOCHIGI
PHASE 2
SRAM DRAM
ARRAYS
CMOS
F
NEC
HIGASHI HIROSHIMA-SHI
HIROSHIMA
PHASE 2
EPROM
CMOS
F
05/01/95
CMOS BICMOS
F
NA
4Mb DRAM
i
16Mb DRAM
NIHON SEMICONDUCTOR
TSUKUBA-SHI
IBARAKI
PHASE 3
ASIC CBIC MPU
SRAM MPR
NISSAN
NA
NA
NA
CUSTOM
NA
FAT
OKI
MIYAZAKI-GUN
MIYAZAKI
M4
16Mb ORAM
CMOS
F
SANYO
OJIYA-SHI
NHGATA
D #6
16Mb DRAM
CMOS
F
64Mb DRAM
NA
03/31/95
NA
Table 2 (Continued)
Japanese Future Pilot and Production Fab Lines
Planned Facilities by Year
SEIKO EPSON
SUWA-GUN
NAGANO
BUXJ. E
SRAM ARRAYS
Frooess
TcchnaloKr
CMOS BICMOS
TOSHIBA
OlTA-SKl
orrA
STEP 5
NA
NA
F
NA
UTSUNOMtYA^HI
TOCHIGI
PHASE 3
i6Mb DRAM
SRAM ARRAYS
CMOS
F
NA
Compuiy
Cltr or District
Prefecture
Fab Name
Proctocts
Faculty
TVP«
NFAT
E
Target Date Minim
Fadlltjr
li
to Begin
Wid
Operation (Micro
NA
Pioductlon Begins: 1999
KAWASAKI STEEL
I
i
a
O
I
I
I
MA " Not availsfcle
Notes:
F - PtoducUon fab
A - Assembly
T •• Test
N - Nondedicaled foundry
Source; Dauquest (October 1992)
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D0I3»5
I
North American Fab Database
October 27, 1992
IVIaricet Statistics
Semiconductor Equipment, ii/lanufacturing,
and ii/lateriais
DataQuest
SEMM-SVC-MS-9205
North American Fab Database
October 27, 1992
Source:
Dataquest
IVIaricet Statistics
DataQuest'
Semiconductor Equipment,
Manufacturing, and Materiais
SEMM-SVC-MS-9205
File behind the Market Statistics tab inside the
binder labeled Seoiiconductor Equipment,
Manufacturing, and Materials
Published by Dataquest Incorporated
The content of this report represents our interpretation and analysis of information generally available to the public or released
by knowledgeable individuals in the subject industry, but is not guaranteed as to accuracy or completeness. It does not contain
material provided to us in confidence by our clients.
Printed in the United States of America. AH rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced, stored in retrieval
systems, or transmitted, in any form or by any means—mechanical, electronic, photocopying, duplicating, microfilming, videotape, or otherwise—without the prior permission of the publisher.
© 1992 Dataquest Incorporated
October 1992
0013948
A
I
North American Fab Database
Table o f Contents
Page
Background
1
Research Methodology
1
General Definitions
1
Definition of Table Columns
1
Table
1 North American Existing Pilot and Production Fab Lines (Including Fabs Going into
Operation During 1992)
2 North American Future Pilot and Production Fab Lines Plaimed Facilities by Year
Note: All tables show estimated data.
Page
4
yj
North
American
Fab
Background
The material in this document applies to the
North AmericEui portion of Dataquest's Semiconductor Equipment, Manufacturing, and
Materials service wafer fab database. The wafer
fab database is updated on an ongoing basis,
employing both primary and secondary
research methodologies. The tables included in
this document highlight both production and
pilot line wafer fabs.
Research Methodology
Dataquest takes a three-pronged approach to
wafer fab database research. Information is
gained through extensive armual primary
research. This survey work is furdier supplemented with comprehensive secondary
research conducted on an ongoing basis.
The database is updated daily, which allows
Dataquest to provide a snapshot of the marketplace at any time. The information gathered
through primary and secondary research is
then further supplemented and cross-checked
with Dataquest's various other information
sources.
Database
Pilot fab: A pilot fab is defined as a wafer fab
capable of front-end processing less than 1,250
wafers per week (type = P).
Definition of Table Columns
The Products Produced column contains information for seven product categories. The information in this column can be very detailed,
depending on its availability. The nomendature
used within the seven product groups of the
fab database is as follows, with definitions
where •warranted:
• Analog
- UN—^Linear/analog devices
- A/D D/A—Analog-to-digital, digital-toanalog converters
- AUTOMOTIVE—^Dedicated to automobile
applications
- CODEC—Coder/decoder
- INTERFACE—^Interface IC
- MESFET (GaAs)—Metal Schottky fieldeffect transistor
- MODFET (GaAs)
- MDIODE (GaAs)—^Microwave diode
General Definitions
Fab line: A fab line is a processing line in a
dean room that is equipped to do all frontend wafer processing. Occasionally there are
two separate product-specific fab lines or two
different wafer sizes in a clean room. In this
situation, a dean room will be documented as
two fab lines if the equipment is dedicated to
each wafer size or product line. There can be
many fab lines at one location.
Front-end wafer processing: Front-end wafer
processing is defined as all steps involved
with semiconductor processing, beginning with
initial oxide and ending at wafer probe.
Production fab: A production fab is defined as
a wafer fab capable of front-end processing
more than 1,250 wafers per week (type = F).
- MFET (GaAs)—^Microwave field-effed
transistor
- MODEM—Modulator/demodulator
- MMIC—^Monolithic microwave IC
- OP AMP—Operational amplifier
- PWR IC—^Power IC
- REG—Voltage regulator
- S2V1ART PWR—^Smart power
- SWITCHES—Switching device
- TELECOM—Telecommunications chips
• Memory
- MEM—^Memory
- RAM—^Random-access memory
Semiconductor Equipment, Manufacturing, and Materials
- DRAM—^Dynamic RAM
- CUSTOM—^Full-custom IC (single user)
- SRAM 4 TR.—Static RAM uses a
4-transistor cell design
- PLD—^Programmable logic device
- SRAM 6 TR.—Static RAM uses a
6-transistor cell design
• Discrete
- DIS—^Discrete
- VRAM—Video RAM
- DIODE
- ROM—^Read-only memory
- FET—^Field-effect transistor
- PROM—^Programmable ROM
- GTO—Gate turn-off thyristor
- EPROM—Ultraviolet erasable PROM
- HEMT (GaAs)—^High-electron-mobility
transistor
- EEPROM or E2—^Electrically erasable
PROM
- MOSFET—MOS-based field-effert transistor
- FERRAM—^Ferroelectric RAM
- PWR TRAN—^Power transistor
- FLASH—^Flash memory
- RECTIFIER
- NVMEM—^Nonvolatile memory (ROM,
PROM, EPROM, EEPROM, FERRAM)
- RF—^Radio frequency
- FIFO—^First-in/first-out memory
- SCR—Schottky rectifier
- SPMEM—Other specialty memory (such as
dual-port, shift-register, color lookup)
- SENSORS
Micrologic
- THYRISTOR
- SST—Small-signal transistor
- ASSP—Application-specific standard
produa
- BIT—^Bit slice (subset of MPU functions)
- DSP—^Digital signal processor
- MCU—Microcontroller unit
-
MPR—^Microperipheral
TRAN—^Transistor
- ZENER DIODE
•
Optoelectronic
-
OPTO—Optoelectronic
- CCD—Charge-coupled device (imaging)
-
COUPLERS—Photocouplers
- MPRCOM—MPR digital communication
(ISDN, LAN, UART, modem)
- BED—^Infrared-emitting diode
- MPU—^Microprocessor unit
- IMAGE SENSOR
- LISP—^32-bit list instruction set processor
for AI applications
- LASER (GaP)—Semiconductor laser or
laser IC
- RISC—^Reduced-instruction-set computation
32-bit MPU
- LED—^Light-emitting diode
- PDIODE—Photo diode
Standard logic
- PTTIAN—Photo transistor
- SAW—Surface acoustic wave device
- LOG—Standard logic
- SIT IMAGE SENSOR—Static induction transistor image sensor
ASIC logic
- ASIC—^Application-specific IC
- ARRAYS—Gate arrays
- CBIC—Cell-based IC
The Process Technology column lists four
major types of technologies. This column also
lists a few uncommon technologies along with
available information on levels of metal, type
©1992 Dataquest Incorporated October—^Reproduction Prohibited
North American Fab Database
of well, and logic structure. Definitions of the
nomenclature used in the Process Technology
column are as follows:
- InAs—^Indium arsenide
- InP—^Indium phosphide
- InSb—Indium antimony
• MOS (silicon-based)
- LiNb03—^Lithium niobate
- CMOS—Complementary metal-oxide
semiconductor
- MOS—^n-channel metail-oxide semiconductor (NMOS) and p-channel metal-oxide
semiconductor (PMOS). (More than
90 percent of the MOS fabs use
n-charmel MOS.)
- SOS—^Silicon on sapphire
The number in the Minimum Linewidth
column represents the minimum linewidth at
the critical mask layers as drawn. This number
is stated in microns and is defined in Dataquest's fab survey as being available in
production volumes.
- Ml—^Single-level metal
- M2—^Double-level metal
- M3—^Triple-level metal
- N-WELL
- P-WELL
The Wafer Size column represents the wafer
diameter expressed colloquially in inches.
However, for wafers greater than 3 inches
in diameter, the colloquial expression is inaccurate. When calculating square inches, the
following approximations are used:
- POLYl—Single-level polysilicon
- POLY2—^Double-level polysilicon
- POLY3—Triple-level polysilicon
• BiCMOS (silicon-based)
- BiCMOS—Bipolar and CMOS combined
on a chip
- BIMOS—Bipolar and MOS combined on a
chip
- ECL I/O—^ECL input/output
- TTL I/O—^TTL input/output
stated Diameter
4 inches (100mm)
Approximate Diameter
5 inches (125mm)
3.938 inches
4.922 inches
6 inches (150mm)
5.906 inches
8 inches (200mm)
7.87 inches
Wafer Start Capacity is defined in the fab survey as the equipment-limited wafer start capacity per four-week period. Start capacity is not
limited by current staffing or the number of
shifts operating, it is limited only by the
installed equipment in the fab and the complexity of the process it runs.
• Bipolar (silicon-based)
- BIF—^Bipolar
- ECL—^Emitter-coupled logic
The Clean Room Class column represents the
level of cleanliness in the cleanest part of the
dean room. This area represents the true
envirormient to which the w^afer is exposed.
- TTL—Transistor-transistor logic
- STTL—Schotdcy TTL
• Gallium arsenide and other compound semiconductor materials
- GaAs—Gallium arsenide
- GaAlAs—Gallium aluminum arsenide
- GaAs on Si—Gallium arsenide on silicon
- GaP-Gallium phosphide
- HgCdTe—^Mercuric cadmium telluride
The Merchant or Captive column categorizes
each fab line on the tables as one of these
two types. Definitions of the various categories
are as follows:
• A Merchant fab line is a fab line that
produces devices that end up available on
the merchant market.
• A Captive fab line does not sell any of its
devices on the merchant market. All production is consumed by the owner of the fab
line.
©1992 Dataquest Incorporated October—Reproduction Prohibited
Table 1
North American Existing Pilot and Production Fab Lines
(Including Fabs Going into Operation During 1992)
Est.
Minimum
Froceaa
Compiny
City
State
Fab N a m e
Products
Produced
Technolofty
Line Width
(Microns)
lOaiBctcr
ADAMS-RU5SE1L COMPANY
BURLINGTON
MA
NA
MESFET MMIC
Wafer
GaAs
050
3
RAD-HARD
ADVANCED POWER
BEND
OR
NA
POWER MOSFET
MOS
500
4
COLUMBIA
MD
MICROELEC-
ASIC
CMOS
1,20
4
TECHNOLOGY INC,
@
ALLIED SIGNAL AEROSPACE
f-t
I
TRONICS CTR
AJ,PHA INDUSTRIES
WOBURN
MA
NA
RF TRAN UN
GaAs
0.50
2
AMD
AUSTIN
TX
FAB 10
SRAM PLD CUSTOM
CMOS MOS
1,00
5
AMD
AUSTIN
TX
FAB 14
4Mb EPROM FLASH
CMOS
0,80
6
CMOS M2
0,70
6
CMOS
0.50
6
MCU
AMD
AUSTIN
TX
FAB 15
MPRCOM MPU MCU
MPR
AMD
SUNNYVALE
CA
SDC (FAB 17)
2Mb FLASH 4Mb FLASH
4Mb EPROM 1Mb
ANADIGICS INC
WARREN
NJ
NA
OP AMP MMIC
GaAs
0,50
ANALOG DEVICES
SANTA CLARA
CA
NA
U N A / D D / A OP AMP
CMOS HIP
2,00
3
A
ANALOG DEVICES
WILMINGTON
MA
WILMINGTON
U N LOG OP AMP A A )
D / A ASIC DSP
BIP MOS
1,00
i
ARRAYS CBIC MEM
BIP BICMOS
1,00
4
I
a
!?
I
I
I
3
I
a-
i
EPROM
BICMOS
FAB
APPUED MICROCIRCUITS
SAN DIEGO
CA
NA
CORPORATION
ARMY ETDL
FORT MONMOUTH
NJ
NA
NA
NA
0,00
5
AT&T MICROELECTRONtCS
ALLENTOWN
PA
BIC 2
ARRAYS CBIC CUSTOM
BIP
1,00
4
AT&T MICROELECTROrflCS
ALLENTOWN
PA
MOS-2
ASIC LOG
CMOS MOS
1.75
4
AT&T MtCROELECrROt\fICS
LEE'S SUMMIT
MO
NA
DIODE TRANS
BIP
2,00
4
AT&T MICROELECTRONICS
ORLANDO
FL
ORl
2S6K SRAM 1Mb SRAM
CMOS M2
0,80
5
GaAs
0-70
3
BIP CMOS
4,00
4
CBIC ARRAYS
AT&T MICROELECTRONICS
READING
PA
GaAs - I
MIL STD LOG MEM
IIN OPTO
ATSff MICROELECTRONICS
READING
PA
HIGH
OPTO U N POWER IC
VOLTAGE - I
AT&T MICROELECTRONICS
READING
PA
LINEAR - I
U N POWER IC
BIP
1.50
4
ATMEL CORPORATION
COLORADO
CO
FAB 3
EPROM EEPRQM FLASH
ARRAYS PLD
CMOS
0,50
6
3
4
SPRINGS
CUSTOM
AVANTEK
NEWARK
CA
NA
MMIC FET DIS
GaAs
0,00
AVANTEK
SANTA CLARA
CA
NA
MMIC
BIP
0.00
Table 1 (Continued)
North American Existing Pilot and Production Fab Lines
(Including Fahs Going into Operation During 1992)
Est
Minimum
l i n e Width
(Microns)
E
Wafer
Diameter
Company
City
State
Fab Name
Products
Produced
Process
Technology
BALL AEROSPACE
BOULDER
CO
NA
NA
NA
1.20
6
BALL AEROSPACE
BOULDER
CO
NA
Ml
NA
0.00
4
STD AEROSPACE
ICs
to
srpoLAjacs INC.
LOS GATOS
CA
NA
DIS TRA
BIP
0.00
4
BIT
BEAVERTON
OR
NA
DSP
BIP
2.00
4
BURR-BROWN CORPORATION
TUCSON
AZ
NA
HYBRID LIN A / D D/A
BIP
4.00
4
BICMOS BIP
1.60
5
ASIC
CAUFOHNIA MCRODEVICES
TEMPE
AZ
MICRO DIV
PWR LIN MP U ASIC
CMOS
I
a
I
I
I
•s
i
CALOCIC
FREMONT
CA
NA
A / D D/A
BIP MOS
3.00
4
CEI.ERITEK INC.
SAN JOSE
CA
NA
FFT AMP
GaAs
0.00
3
CHERRY SEMICONDUCTOR
EAST GREENWICH
EI
BIPOLAR
ARRAYS DIS CUSTOM
BIP
3.00
3
GaAs
0.70
UN
COMLINEAR
URBANA
IL
NA
MONOUTHIC ICs
HYBRID
COMMODORE SEMICONDUCTORS
NOHHISTOWN
PA
FAB 1
COMMODORE SEMICONDUCIXIKS
NORRISTOWN
PA
FAB 2
COMPENSATED DEVICES
MELROSE
MA
NA
CVPRESS MINNESOTA INC.
BLOOMiNGTON
MN
FAB 3
CYPRESS SEMICONDUCTOR
SAN JOSE
CA
FAB 1
CYPRESS SEMICONDUCTOR
ROUNDROCK
TX
ASIC MEM
ASIC
DIODE ZENER DIODE
SRAM
6^K SRAM LOG MPU
CMOS MOS
2.00
5
CMOS
2.00
BIP
0.00
5
4
CMOS
0.65
6
BIP CMOS
1.20
5
CMOS
0.80
MPR BTT
FAB 2
SRAM P t D RISC MFO
TEXAS INC.
BICMOS
DAILAS SEMICONDUCTOR
DALLAS
TX
FAB 1
SRAM CCD
CMOS
1.20
6
DATA UNEAR
MILPTTAS
CA
FAB 1
OP AMP CBIC CUSTOM
CMOS
4.00
4
DAVID SARNOFF LABS
PRINCETON
NJ
SIUCON IC
AS!C ANALOG
BICMOS SOS
0.90
4
CENTER
DELCO ELECTRONICS
KOKOMO
IN
FAB 1
LOG DISCRETE
BIP
2.00
4
KOKOMO
IN
FAB 2
MCU MPU LOGIC
CMOS NMOS
2.00
5
CORPORATION
DELCO ELECTRONICS
DISCRETE
CORPORATION
DELCO ELECTRONICS
BICMOS
KOKOMO
IN
FAB 3
ASIC MFU UNEAR
CMOS BIP
1.30
5
HUDSON
MA
FAB 1
ARRAYS CUSTOM MPU
LOG
BIP MOS
TTL
2.50
4
HUDSON
MA
FAB 2
CUSTOM
CMOS M2
1.20
5
CORPORATION
DICrrAL EQUIPMENT
CORPORATION
DIcrrAL EQUIPMENT
CORPORATION
(
Table 1 (Continued)
North American Existing Pilot and Production Fab Lines
(Including Fabs Going Into Operation During 1992)
Est.
E
Minimum
Products
Process
Company
CJ(y
State
Fab Name
Produced
T«:hnology
DIGITAL EQUIPMEOT
HUDSON
MA
FAB 3
MPU MPR CBIC
Line Width
Wafer
OMJcrons)
Diameter
CMOS MOS
1.20
5
CMOS
1.50
6
BIP
2.00
4
BIP CMOS
300
4
CUSTOM
COftPORATION
DIGITAL EQtJ]PMDe>fr
CORPORATION
HUDSON
DIONICS INC.
WESTBURY
MA
PILOT
MPU MCU MPR CBIC
CUSTOM
NY
NA
PWR DIS OPTO
HYBRID
ECi SEMICONDUCTOR
SANTA CLARA
CA
NA
ARRAYS CBIC CUST
U N DIS
B
•§
BICMOS
E G a c REnCON
SUNNYVALE
CA
NA
DN
CMOS MOS
2.50
4
EG&C VACTEC
ST. LOUIS
MO
NA
PDiODE PTHAN
BIP
6.00
3
ELANTEC
MILPnAS
CA
NA
OP AMP
BIP
5.00
3
I
EXAfl
SUNNYVALE
CA
KIFER PLANT
CUSTOM ASIC
BIP
3.00
4
EXEL
SAN JOSE
CA
NA
64K EEPROM PLD
CMOS BIP
1.30
5
Q.
FEI MJCHOWAVB 1(1115,;:
SUNNYVALE
CA
1
DIODE OPTO
RAD-HARD
GaAs
1.00
2
FOXSORO I C t
SAN JOSE
CA
NA
DTS PRESSURE
SENSORS
BIP
3.00
3
FREQUENCY SOURCES
CHELMSFORD
MA
NA
DIODE MMC
BIP
0.00
3
FUJITSU
GRESHAM
OR
NA
1Mb DRAM
CMOS
0.80
GE
UTICA
NY
NA
UN
GaAs
0.00
6
3
4
o
SRAM MCM
O
f)
s
S"
a
GE ELECIEONICS l A B
SYRACUSE
NY
MATERLVL
NA
NA
0.00
o
GE ELECTRONICS l A B
SYRACUSE
NY
MMIC FAB
MMIC
GaAs
0.50
3
3
GENERAl DYNAMICS
FORT WORTH
TX
NA
NA
MOS
0.00
4
I
GENERAL SEMICONDUCCSR
TEMPE
AZ
NA
DIODE
BIP
25.00
3
GEMNUM CORP.
BURLINGTON,
CN
NA
OP AMP
BIP
6.00
3
g;
a
GERMANIUM POWER DEWCES
ANDOVER
MA
NA
OPTO DIS
NA
0,00
3
GI
HICKSVILLE
NY
NA
PWR SCR
BIP
0,00
4
COULD
POCATELLO
ID
NA
ARRAYS CBIC EEPROM
CMOS
1.50
5
0,00
4
mtaS^SBUX
OhfTARIO
UN
BICMOS
M2
HANSCORN AFB
LEXINGTON
MA
NA
CUSTOM MIL STD
BIP CMOS
MOS
HARRIS CORP.
MELBOURNE
FL
VHSIC
64K SRAM 256K SRAM
CMOS
0.80
4
HARRIS SEMICONDUCKW
FINDLAY
OH
FAB 1 & 2
16K SRAM LOG
CMOS SOS
3-00
4
C
(4
Table 1 (Continued)
North American Existing Pilot and Production Fab Lines
(Including Fabs Going Into Operation During 1992)
Products
Produced
FroccsB
Technology
BIMOS
CMOS
MOS
Est
Minimum
line Width
CMicrtms)
Wafer
Diameter
Company
City
State
Fab Name
HARRIS SEMICONDUCrOR
FINDIAY
OH
FAB 3 & 4
DSP LOG UN MEM
MIL STD
HARRIS SEMICOtflJUCrOR
nNDLAY
OH
FAB 5
DSP MPR ASIC Mil
STD
CMOS
N-WELL
M2
1.20
HARRIS SEMICONDUCTOR
MELBOURNE
FL
54E (FAB A)
SRAM PROM UN ALL
ASIC
BIP CMOS
BICMOS
3.00
4
HABJUS SEMICONDUCTOR
MELBOURNE
FL
FAB 51
(FAB D)
UN
BIP MOS
BICMOS
3.00
4
HARRIS SEMICONDUCTOR
MELBOURNE
FL
FAB 54W
(FAB C)
236 MPU CBIC SRAM
PROM
CMOS BIP
1.80
4
HARRIS SEMICONDUCTOR
MILPrrAS
MOUNTAINTOP
CA
PA
GAAS
GAAS FET MMIC
HARRIS SEMICONDUCTOR
FAB 1 POWER
BIPOLAR
OPTO DIS
GaAs M2 M3
BIP Ml
0.25
15.00
3
4
HARRIS SEMICONDUCTOR
MOUNTAINrOP
PA
FAB 2 POWER
MOS
PWR DIS
MOS Ml
POLYl
3.00
5
HARRIS SEMICONDUCTOR
MOUNTAINTOP
PA
DIS
MOS Ml
POLYl
2.00
6
5
FAB 3 POWER
MOS
KiUUltS SEMICONDUCTOR
RESEARCH
TRIANGLE PARK
NC
RTP FAB
ARRAYS CBtC CUSTOM
64K SRAM 8K SRAM
CMOS
IPOLY
1.00
4
c
HEWLETT PACKARD
CORVALUS
OR
4-INCH
CBIC
CMOS
1.00
4
HEWICTT PACKARD
CORVALLtS
OR
6-INCH
ASIC MPR DSP
CMOS M3
0.80
6
KSC MPU ASIC MIL
CMOS
BIPOLAR
0.80
4
©
D
I
a
9
a
s
1
1
1.50
HEWIBTT PACKARD
FORT COLUNS
CO
4-INCH
HEWLETT PACKARD
SAN JOSE
CA
BIPOLAR
•niAN
GaAs
0.50
2
HEWLETT PACKARD
SAN JOSE
CA
DIODE
DIODE
BIP
3.00
2
HEWLETT PACKARD
SAN JOSE
CA
OED
OPTO
GaAs
5.00
3
HEW1£TT PACKARD
SANTA CLARA
CA
NA
LOG ASIC
BIP
1.50
3
0.00
2
sro
HEWLETT PACKARD
SAOTA ROSA
CA
NA
DISC ASIC
GaAs
HEWLETT PACKARD
SANTA ROSA
CA
NA
DIS COtJrPI^HS
BIP
0.00
2
HIEACHI
IpyiNG
TX
PHASE 1
MPU MCO Z56K SRAM
1Mb DRAM 4Mb
DRAM
CMOS
0.80
6
HOLT INTEGRATED CIRCUTTS
IKVINE
CA
NA
OP AMP EEPROM LOG
ASIC
CMOS MOS
2,50
4
HONEYWELL MICROSWTTCH
FREEPOKT
n.
NA
DIS
BIP
3.00
4
Table 1 (Continued)
North American Existing Pilot and Production Fab lines
(Including Fabs Going Into Operation During 1992)
II
p.
K
Process
TechnoI(»([y
OPTO
OPTO PRESSURE
SENSORS
BIP GaAs
500
3
TX
MICRO SWITCH
ANALOG OPTO GaAs
BIP GaAs
300
4
MN
VHSIC
MIL STD CUSTOM
BIP CMOS
1.25
4
CA
HTC
MIL STD OPTO ASIC
LFN
BICMOS
CMOS
MOS
1.50
4
City
State
Fab Mame
HONEYWELL OPTO DIV.
RICHARDSON
TX
HONEYWEU OPTOELECTRONICS
RICHARDSON
HONEYWELL S C U D STATE
PLYMOUTH
HUGHES
CARLSBAD
HUGHES
NEWPORT BEACS:
CA
FAB 2
ASIC LIN
CMOS
3.00
4
HUGHES
NEWPORT BEAjfflJ'
CA
FAB 3
ASIC
CMOS
2.00
4
HUGHES
TOKRANCE
CA
NA
DIS
GaA5
0.00
2
HUGHES
TORRANCE
CA
NA
MM!C
GaAs
0.50
3
IBM
EAST n S H H L L
NY
NA
NA
NA
0.80
8
IBM
ESSEX JUNCTION
VT
1Mb DRAM
CMOS
1.00
8
IBM
ESSEX JUNCTION
VT
BLDG. 963
BLDG. 970
16Mb DRAM
CMOS
0,00
8
IBM
ESSEX JUNCTION
VT
1Mb DRAM
CMOS
1.00
8
IBM
HOPEWELL
JUNCTION
NY
BLDG. 973
ASTCA.OG
LOG PROCESS
VERIFICATION
BIP CMOS
0.80
8
IBM
HOPEWELL
NY
ASTC/MEM
MEM PROCESS
VERIFICATION
CMOS
0.80
8
JUNCTION
a
I
E
cr
a
Wafer
Diameter
Es
Products
Produced
Company
K)
R
Est
Mtnlmiun
Unc Width
(Microns)
IBM
HOPEWELL
JUNCTION
NY
BLDG. 323
ARRAYS LOG
BIP
1.50
5
IBM
HOPEWELL
NY
BLDG. 323
CPU CUSTOM
BIP
1.50
5
NY
BLDG. 323
ARRAYS LOG
BIP
1.50
5
JUNCTiON
IBM
HOPEWELL
JUNCTION
IBM
MANASSAS
VA
VHSIC
MPU MIL
MOS
0.50
IC SENSORS
MILPTTAS
CA
NA
OlS
BIP
3.00
IDT
SALINAS
CA
FAB 2
FAST 16K *iK 25fiK
SRAM
CMOS
1.00
5
4
5
IDT
SAWTJi CLARA
CA
FAB 3
SRAM MPU RISC LOGIC
BICMOS
CMOS
0,80
6
IMP
SAN JOSE
CA
NA
CBIC CUSTOM UN
BICMOS
CMOS
MOS
1,20
5
INSTITUTE FOR TECH, DVLPMI^
KANSAS CFTY
MO
NA
NA
NA
0.00
INTEGRATED CIRCUIT WORKS
SAN JOSE
CA
NA
3-3 VOtT SRAM
CMOS
BICMOS
0,80
5
6
ItTTEl
ALOHA
OR
FAB 4
LOG
CMOS MOS
1.50
4
C
(4w
Table 1 (Continued)
North American Existing Pilot and Production Fab Lines
(Including Fabs Going into Operation During 1992)
K)
D
II
s
i
I
Wafer
ir
Process
Technolofjy
FAB 5 ( D l )
486 MPU LOG 64K
SRAM
CMOS
BICMOS
0.80
6
AZ
FAB 6
MCU EPROM
CMOS MOS
1.00
NM
FAB 7
EPROM MPU
CMOS MOS
1.00
RIO RANCHO
NM
FAB 9
386 MPU 486 MPU
CMOS
0.80
6
6
6
SANTA CLARA
CA
D2
486 MPU 586 MPU
BICMOS
0.50
8
INTL. HECriFIER
EL SEGUNDO
CA
PPD4
PWR ICs MOSFET SCR
CMOS MOS
5.00
4
INTL. HECnnER
RANCHO
CA
HEXFET
PWR ICs MOSFET
CMOS MOS
5.00
5
City
State
Fab N a m e
INTTEL
ALOHA
OR
irjTEL
CHANDLER
INTEL
RIO RANCHO
INTEL
INTEL
it
CALIFORNIA
TIT
ROANOKE
VA
DARPA
U N DIS MIL STD
GaAs
0.00
ITT
SHELTON
cr
NA
CUSTOM
CMOS MOS
1.50
3
4
JOHN RUKB MFC.
EVERETT
WA
NA
ASIC
CMOS
2.00
4
1.50
4
BICMOS
KODAK
ROCHESTER
NY
NA
IMAGING ARRAYS CBIC
CUST.
BIP CMOS
MOS
KULFTE
LEONIA
NJ
NA
DIS
BIP
3.00
4
LAWRENCE LIVERMORE LABS
LIVERMORE
CA
NA
NA
NA
0.25
LINEAR TECHNOLOGY
MIlPrTAS
CA
FAB 1
U N INTERFACE A / D
BIP CMOS
BICMOS
3.00
6
4
UNEAR TECHNOLOGY
MILPITAS
CA
FAB 2
UN
BIP CMOS
2.00
D/A
Ia
E
Products
Produced
Company
•g
I
Est.
Minimum
Line W i d t h
BICMOS
UTTON MICROWAVE
SAN JOSE
CA
NA
FETAMP
GaAs
0,00
UTTON S O U D STATE
SANTA CLARA
CA
NA
MMIC CCD
GaAs
0.50
LOCKHEED
SUNNYVALE
CA
U3
ASIC MIL STD
CMOS
1.50
BICMOS
0.50
RAD-HARD
LSI LOGIC
SANTA CLARA
CA
R&D PILOT
UNE
LUCAS NOVASENSOR
FREMONT
CA
NA
ARRAYS CBIC MCU
MPU
St BABSO PRESSURE
CMOS
BIP
2.00
SENSORS
M/A<X5M
BURUNGTON
MA
NA
MMIC DIODE TRAN
GaAs MOS
0.30
WA-COM
BURUNGTON
MA
NA
NA
NA
0.00
M/A-COM
LOWELL
MA
ADV, SEMICONDUCTOR
MMIC
GaAs
0.25
MAGNAVOX
FORT WAYNE
IN
NA
ARRAYS CBIC HYBRID
CMOS
5.00
MARTIN MARIETTA
ORLANDO
FL
NA
UN
GaAs
0.00
MARTIN MARIEITA
ORLANDO
R
VLSI PLT
AEROSPACE CBIC
ARRAYS
CMOS
1.25
C
Table 1 (Continued)
North American Existing Pilot and Production Fab lines
(Including I-'abs Going Into Operation During 1992)
Est
Minimum
Unetfldth
CMlcrons)
Wafer
Plametcr
2,00
5
BIP
2.50
4
BICMOS M2
1.00
5
Company
City
State
Tab Name
Products
Produced
Process
Technology
MASS. MICROELECTRONICS
WESTBOROUGH
MA
ICFF
ASIC
MOS
E
BICMOS
CENTER
M2
@
MATSUSHITA
PUYALLUP
WA
NA
ARRAYS
MATSUSHITA
PUYALLUP
WA
NA
64K 256K
rtiit'Miit
ECL
B
•g
MATSUSHITA
PUYAUUP
WA
NA
1Mb DRAM
CMOS
0.80
6
MAXIM IWTEGHATED PRODUCTS
SUNNYVALE
CA
NA
OP AMPS A / D D/A
CMOS
3.00
4
MCDONNELL DOUGLAS
HUNTINGTON
BEACH
CA
3"PILOT
4K 16K SRAM 6K
GaAs
1.00
3
HUNTINGTON
CA
DVIPMNT
MPU LOG ASIC DIS
GaAs
1.00
3
CA
NA
U N CUSTOM
BICMOS
4.00
3
MCDONNELL DOUGLAS
ARRAY MPO
BEACH
1
I
O
MICRO POWER SYSTEMS
SANTA CLARA
CMOS BIP
MICRO QUALTTY
GARLAND
TX
NA
RECTIFIER MULTIPLIER
BIP
0.00
4
12.00
SEMICONDUCTOR
MICRO SEMI
TORRANCE
CA
NA
MIL STD DIS
BIP
S"
MICRO-CIRCUIT ENG
WEST PALM BEACH
FL
NA
CUSTOM
MOS
4.00
3
4
MICRD-REL
TEMPE
AZ
NA
ASIC HI-REL
BIP CMOS
3.00
4
X)
MICROCHIF TECHNOLOGY
CHANDLER
AZ
FAB B
EEPROM 8-bit MPU
MOS
5.00
3
MICROCHIP TECHNOLOGY
CHANDLER
AZ
FAB C
MPU 51IK PROM 256K
CMOS MOS
1.20
5
CMOS MOS
2.50
4
CMOS MOS
1.20
6
CMOS
0.50
6
CMOS
0.80
NA
0.00
6
4
MOS
5.00
4
GaAs
0.50
2
CMOS
1.20
4
CMOS
0.90
CMOS MOS
1.00
5
4
n
O
EEPROM
MICROCHIP TECHNOLOGY
CHANDLER
AZ
FAB E
Ifrblt MPU EEPROM
DSP ROM
MICRON TECHNOLOGY
BOISE
ID
FAB 1
MICRON TBOINOLOGY
BOISE
ID
FAB 2
MICRON TECHNOLOGY
BOISE
ID
D-
I
256K DRAM
DRAM 2%K
1Mb
SRAM
1Mb DRAM 256K SRAM
FAB 3
M3CROPAC INDUSTRIES
GAHIAND
TX
NA
MJCROSEMI CORP.
BROOMFIELD
CO
NA
VRAM
1Mb DRAM
MIL STD OPTO
HYBRID
S C H O m C V DIODE
MICROWAVE TECH.
FREMONT
CA
NA
MITEL SEMICONDUCTOR
BROMONT,
QUEBEC
CN
FAB 1
MITSUBISH!
NORTH DURHAM
NC
NA
MOTOROLA
AUSTIN
TX
MOS 2
RECTIFER
MMIC AMP FET
TELECOM A/D
1Mb DRAM
LOG MPU A / D
D/A
(4
Table 1 (Continued)
North American Existing Pilot and Production Fab lines
(Including Fabs Going Into Operation During 1992)
Company
city
State
Fab Name
Products
Produced
Process
Technology
E
Est
Minimum
Une Width
(Microns)
Wafer
Diameter
MOTOROIA
AUSTIN
TX
MOS 3
MCU
CMOS MOS
1.50
4
MOTOROU
AUSTIN
TX
MOS 8
MCU SRAM DSP LIN
RISC A/D
CMOS M2
0.65
5
MOTOROIA
MESA
AZ
BIPOLAR 1
TELECOM OP AMP
ALTTOMOTrVE
BIP BICMOS
3.00
4
MOTOROIA
MESA
AZ
BIPOLAR 2
FAST PROM LOG STTL
BIP ECL TTL
2.50
MOTOROIA
MESA
AZ
BIPOLAR 3
ARRAYS FAST PROM
STTL
BIP BICMOS
M3
1.25
4
4
MOTOROIA
MESA
AZ
MOS 5
MCU
CMOS MOS
1.00
MOTOROIA
MESA
AZ
MOS 6
ASIC
BICMOS M2
CMOS
0.80
5
6
MOTOROIA
OAKHILL
TX
MOS 11
SRAM DSP MiCU >iiiQ
CMOS
BICMOS
0.80
8
H
a
MOTOROIA
PHOENIX
AZ
PHOENIX
POWER
PWR TRAN
BIP
10.00
5
9
MOTOROIA
PHOENIX
AZ
RF POWER
FR PWR
BIP
1.25
MOTOROIA
PHOENIX
AZ
TMOS FAB
MOSFET SMART PWR
BIP
3.00
4
6
J
MOTOROIA
PHOENIX
AZ
ZENER/
RECTIFIER
ZENER DIODE
RECTIFIER
BIP
10.00
4
«
I
1
-3
I
I
MOTOROIA
TEMPE
AZ
CS-1 PHASE 1
ANALOG RF
GAAS
0.35
4
NATIONAL SEMICONDUCTOR
ARLINGTON
TX
CMOS 1
ARRAYS MCU EEPROM
MPRCOM
CMOS M2
POLYl
1.50
6
HAT10NA1, SEMICONDUCrOR
SANTA CLARA
CA
FRC (FAIRCHILD RES.)
ASIC
CMOS
0.55
6
NATIONAL SEMICONDUCIOH
SANTA CLARA
CA
SFC (BIPLOG 5)
PROM ARRAYS MPR
BICMOS BIP
M3
1.50
5
[RATIONAL SEMtCONDlICTOR
SOUTH PORTLAND
ME
BIPOLAR
LOG
BIP TTL ECL
M2
2.50
4
NATIONAL SBMICONOUCrOR
SOUTH PORTLAND
ME
CMOS
LOG ARRAY
CMOS M2
POLYl
1.00
5
NATIONAL SEMICONDUCTOR
WEST JORDAN
ur
MOS 3
1Mb EPROM MPU
SRAM ARRAYS
CMOS
0.80
6
NATL. SECUHTTY ADMIN.
FORT MEADE
MD
NA
CUSTOM MILSTD
BIP CMOS
MOS
1.00
6
NATL SECURTTY ADMIN.
FORT MEADE
MD
NA
MIL STD
CMOS
0.80
6
NAVAL OCEAN SYS. CTEL
NCR
SAN DIEGO
CA
CO
NA
NA
NA
0.00
4
FAB 1
ASSJCCS CUSTOM
CMOS
1.00
4
COLORADO
SPRINGS
C
(4
Table 1 (Continued)
North American Existing Pilot and Production Fab lines
(Including Fabs Going Into Operation During 1992)
Est.
Minimum
l i n e Width
CMlcfona)
Es
Company
aty
State
Fab NWDC
Products
Produced
Process
Technology
NCR
COLORADO
SPRINGS
CO
FAB 2
CBIC MPU LOG/S^SM
CMOS
0.95
NCR
FORT COLUNS
CO
FT. COLUNS
MPU LOG ASIC
CMOS MOS
1.50
4
NEC
ROSEVILLE
CA
K-LINE
256K SRAM 25fiK
DRAM ASIC MCO
NMOS CMOS
1.00
5
Wafer
Diameter
NEC
ROSEVJLLE
CA
M-UNE
^Mb DRAM
CMOS
0.60
NOBTHEBN TELEGOM
NEPEAN, ONTAiaO
CN
MOD4
CBIC CUSTOM
MOS
0.00
NORTHERN TELECOM
SAN DIEGO
CA
RB
ASIC
3.00
I
CMOS
BICMOS
MOS
6
6
A
OPTEK TECHNOLOGY INC.
CARROLLTON
TX
FAB 1
MIL STD PWR ICs
MOS
0.00
4
o
OPTEK TECHNOLOGY INC.
CARROIITON
TX
FAB 2
MIL STD PWR 1C5
MOS
0.00
5
I
OPTO DIODE
NEWBURY PARK
CA
NA
OPTO DIODE
GaAs
0.00
0
ORBIT SENacONDUCTOR INC.
SUNNYVALE
CA
NA
lOGIC ARRAYS
CMOS BIP
1.20
4
PARADIGM TECHNOLOGY INC.
SAN JOSE
CA
NA
256K 1Mb SRAM FAST
SHAM
CMOS M2
POLY2
1.00
5
PERFORMANCE SEMICONDUCTOR
SUNNYVALE
CA
FAB 1
SRAM ARRAYS MIPS
RISC MPU
CMOS
1.00
6
PERFORMANCE SEMICONDUCTOR
SUNNYVALE
CA
FAB 2
SRAM MPU ASIC
BICMOS
CMOS
0.70
6
POWEREX
AUBURN
NY
NA
DIS SCR DIODE
THYRIjrOR
BIP
10.00
3
POWEREX
AUBURN
NY
NA
DIS SCR DIODE
THYRISTOR
BIP
10.00
3
POWEREX
YOUNGWOOD
PA
POW BIPO
DIODE PWR TRAJSr
THYRISTOR
BIP
0.00
3
to
•s
H
a
O
n
S
I
cr
I
PRECISION MONO.
SANTA CLARA
CA
FAB 1
ASIC
CMOS
3.00
4
PRECISION MONO.
SANTA CLARA
CA
FAB 2
CUSTOM
BIP
2.50
4
RAMTRON
COLORADO
SPRINGS
CO
NA
256K FRAM
CMOS M2
1.00
6
4
4
4
3
3
5
3
RAYTHEON
MOUNTAIN VIEW
CA
DIS TRAN
DIS TRAN SST
BIP
5.00
RAYTHEON
MOUmAIN VIEW
CA
UNEAR
UN ASIC
BIP
5.00
RAYTHEON
MOUf^AiN VicVi'
CA
LSI ARAY
20K ARRAYS
BIP CMOS
1.00
RAYTHEON
WALTHAM
MA
NA
MMIC
GaAs
0.00
RAYTHEON MICROELECT.
ANDOVER
MA
GaAs
NA
GaAs
0.50
RAYTHEON MICROELECT.
ANDOVER
MA
NA
ARRAYS CUSTOM
CMOS
0.90
RAYTHEON SMDO
NOHTHBOSOUGH
MA
NA
MMIC PWR MESFET
GaAs
0.50
C
(4
Table 1 (Continued)
North American Existing Pilot and Production Fab Lines
(Including Fafas Going Into Operation During 1992)
Products
Est
Minimum
l i n e Width
(Microns)
E
Wafer
Diameter
Company
City
State
Fab Name
Ptoduccd
Process
Technology
ROCitWELL
NEWBURY PARK
CA
DARPA
MESFET HBT MEM
GaAs
ROCKWELL
NEWPORT BEACH
CA
FAB 1
MODEM TELECOM
CMOS MOS
2.00
4
ROCKWELL
NEWPORT BEACH
CA
FAB 4
TELECOM INTERFACE
CMOS MOS
2.00
4
aOHM
SUNNYVALE
CA
PILOT
U N ARRAYS
BIP
0.00
4
SANDERS ASSOCIATES
NASHUA
NH
GaAs
U N MMIC
GaAs
0.50
3
SANDUL NATIONAL LABS
ALBUQUERQUE
NM
RHIC-I
MPU LOG SRAM ASIC
CMOS
1.50
4
SANTA BARBABA SSCH.
GOLETA
CA
SBRC
MILSTD INFRARED
HgCdTe InSb
0.00
4
BIP
7.00
3
BIP
3.00
4
BIP
0.00
2
0.70
ASIC
DETECl'OR
SEMICOA
COSTA MESA
CA
NA
SEMTECH CORPORATIO*^
CORPUS CHRIST!
TX
NA
SEMTECH C O R P O R A T I O N :
NEWBURY PARK:
CA
NA
SENSOR SOLID STATE
QUAKERTOWN
PA
NA
CUSTOM HI-REL PWR
PHOTO
SENSYM
SUNNYVALE
CA
NA
SGS-THOMSON
CAKROUTON
TX
FAB 4
ANALOG
RECTIFIER ZENER
DIODE
CUSTOM DIS SENSORS
SI CUSTOM U N
MOS
4.00
3
BIP CMOS
3.00
4
CMOS MOS
2.00
4
CMOS M2
0.70
6
SENSORS
SGS-THOMSON
CARROLLTON
TX
SffiMENS
CUPERTINO
CA
NA
SIERRA
SAN JOSE
CA
NA
SIERRA S E M I C O N D p l E a ^
SAN JOSE
CA
NA
SIGNETICS
ALBUQUERQUE
NM
FAB 2 2
FAB 6
ARRAYS CBIC SRAM
MCU MPR
1Mb SRAM ARRAYS
256K DRAM
GaAs MOS
0.00
0
I £ D COUPLERS OPTO
CMOS
1.50
CBIC CUSTOM U N
NA
0.80
NA
CMOS
1.50
5
6
4
1.00
6
EPROM MPU MCU
SJGNETICS
ALBUQUERQUE
NM
FAB 23
CBtC PLD
356K
1Mb EPROM 8-Ht
MCU
SIONEnCS
SUNNYVALE
CA
FAB 1
M2
U N SMART PWR OP
BICMOS
CMOS
BICMOS
NMOS
BIP
250
AMPS
S m C O N GENERAL SE^JI0ON
GABDEN GROVE
CA
NA
U N ASIC
BIP BICMOS
4.00
4
SILICON SYSTEMS (TDK)
SANTA CRUZ
CA
FAB U
ASIC
BIP CMOS
2.00
SILICON SYSTEMS CTDK)
S A W A CRUZ
CA
FAB n i
MPR ASIC A / D D / A
CMOS
BICMOS
0.80
4
6
SILICON SYSTEMS Cn>K)
TUSTIN
CA
FAB 1
CUSTOM TELECOM
BIP CMOS
SlUCON TRANSISTOR
CHELMSFORD
MA
NA
MIL STD DIS PWR
BIP
BIP
2.00
10.00
4
4
(4
Table 1 (Continued)
North American Existing Pilot and Production Fab Lines
(Including Fabs Going into Operation During 1992)
Est.
Minimum
l i n e Width
(Mlcrotu;)
Es
Fab Name
Products
{•toduccd
CA
FAB 2
SMART PWR A / D D / A
CMOS
3.00
CA
FAB 3
PWE SMART PWR
CMOS
1.50
CO
NA
ADV. MEM EEPROM
CMOS
1.00
6
6
SAN JOSE
CA
NA
ASiC
BIP
5.00
4
SOUD POWER CO.
FARMINGDALE
NY
NA
PWR TRAM
BIP
20.00
2
SOLID STATE DEVICES
LA MIRADA
CA
NA
HI-REL CUSTOM
BIP
0.00
4
Company
City
SmCONIX lNCORPOflATEt>
SANTA CLASA
slLlco^f^x INCORPORATED
SANIA CLARA
SIMTEK COBPOHA-noN
COLORADO
SIPEX
State
rtocoi
Tcchnolaxy
Wafer
Diameter
4
SPRINGS
f
SOLITRON
RIVIERA BEACH-
FL
NA
PWR i ^ T HYBRID
BIP
0.00
4
SONY
SAN AWrONlO
TX
FAB 11
PLD
CMOS
1.50
5
SO^fY
SAN AKFONIO
TX
FAB 12
256K SBAM 1Mb SHAM
CMOS
0.80
6
3
LOG
BICMOS
SPECTEA DIODE LABS
SAN JOSE
CA
NA
LASER DIODE
GaAs GaAIAs
0.00
SPECniO U B S O I U G H E ^
SYLMAR
CA
NA
SOLAR CELL ARRAYS
NA
0.00
4
S PRAGUE (ALLEGRO)
WILLOW GROVE
PA
NA
SRAM ROM PROM
CMOS
2.20
SPHAGUE (ALLEGRO)
WORCESTER
MA
NA
CUSTOM DIS
BICMOS BIP
4.00
4
4
STANDARD MICROSYSTEMS
HAUPPAUGE
NY
NA
CUSTOM CBIC
CMOS MOS
1.25
SUPERTEX
SUNNYVALE
CA
NA
PWR Ftrr AA> D / A
CMOS MOS
5.00
4
4
I
SYNERGY SEMICONDUCTOR
SANTA CLARA
CA
FAB 1
VERY FAST 4K 16K
BIP ECL
1.50
4
I
I
TANDEM
CUPERTINO
CA
MOS 1 LAB
ASIC ARRAYS
BIP CMOS
1.10
4
TECCOR Et^CT
IRVING
TX
NA
LOG
BIP
5.00
TECCOR ELECT
IRVING
TX
NA
THYRISTOR
NA
0.00
TECTRONDt
BEAVEHTON
OR
BIPOLAR
OP AMP A / D
BIP
1.50
3
0
4
4
I
n
a
&
CUSTOM
a-
i
SRAM
AmUeici
CUSTOM
TEKTRONIX
BSAVERTON
OR
CCD
CCD A / D D/A
CMOS
1.50
TELCOM DEVICES
NEWBURY PARK;
CA
NA
PDIODE LED
GaAs
0.00
1
TELEDYNE CRYSTALONICS
CAMBRIDGE
MA
NA
CAP REG DIODE
BIP CMOS
3.00
4
TELEDYNE MICROELECnrRONICS
LOS ANGELES
CA
NA
Ht-REL HYBRID & A / D
BIP
0.00
GaAs
0.50
BIP BICMOS
0.00
HYBRID
D/A
TELEDYNE MICROWAVE
MOUNTAIN VIEW
CA
GaAs
TELEDYNE SEMICONDUCTOR
MOUNTAIN VIEW
CA
NA
TEJOS INSTRUMENTS
DALLAS
TX
DUN2
TEXAS INSraUMENTS
DALLAS
TX
DLOGIC
PET
POWER ICs POWER
MOSFET
UN
AS5P DRAM
3
4
CMOS
CMOS BIP
1.00
MOS CMOS
0.80
4
4
C
(4w
Table 1 (Continned)
North American Existing Pilot and Production Fab Lines
(Including Fabs Going Into Operation During 1992)
Est
Minimum
Line Width
(Microns)
Company
citr
State
Fab N a m e
Products
Produced
Pr<x:ess
Technology
TEXAS INSTRUMENTS
DALLAS
TX
DMOS 4.1
2 5 6 K 1Mb DRAM SRAM
CMOS
0.80
0.25
Es
Wafer
Diameter
DSP
O
P
TEXAS INSTRUMEOT'S
DALLAS
TX
MICROWAVE
SRAM MPU ASIC
GaAs M2
TEXAS INSTRUMENTS
HOUSTON
TX
ADV BIP5
ADV BIP ASSP ASIC
BIP CMOS
1.00
TEXAS mSTRUMEOTS
LUBBOCK
TX
LMOS
EPHOM LOGIC ASSP
NMOS CMOS
0.80
TEXAS INSTRUMENTS
SHERMAN
TX
SGPL
LOG MPH
BIP TTL
1.00
TEXAS INSTRUMENTS
SHERMAN
TX
SGPL
ADV SCHOTTKY
BIP
2.00
TRIQUJNT
BEAVERTON
OR
NA
MMIC U N OPTO CB[C
ARRAYS
GaAs
0.70
TRW
MANHATTAN
CA
NA
UN TRAN FWR TRAN
HYBRTt
MOS
0.00
CA
Dl
U N TRAN PWa TRAN
BIP CMOS
1.50
4
VHSIC MIL STD
FERRAM
CMOS MOS
0.50
4
BEACH
I
Ia
5
TRW
REDONDO BEACH
HYBRD
TKW
REDONDO BEACH
CA
Dl
TRW
REDONDO BEACH
CA
NA
RF PWR
GaAs
0.50
TRW SYSTEMS
LA JOLLA
CA
NA
A / D D/A MULTIPLIERS
CMOS BIP
0.00
3
4
UNITRODE
MERRIMACK
NH
NA
U N SMART PWR
BIP
5.00
4
CUSTOM
t
I
I
UNITRODE
WATERTOWN
MA
NA
HYBRID DIS
BIP
0.00
4
UNIVERSAL SEMIcatn^yi^iOR
SAN JOSE
CA
NA
U N ARRAYS RAM
EPROM
CMOS MOS
1.50
4
UTMC
COLORADO
SPRINGS
CO
UTMC
RISC MPU ARRAYS MIL
BIP CMOS
1.20
5
VITESSE SEMICONDUare»l;
CAMARILLO
CA
NA
CUSTOM ARRAYS 4K
SRAM IK SRAM l6K
SRAM TELE
GaAs
0.60
4
VLSI TECHNOLOGY
SAN ANTONIO
TX
MODULE A
ARRAYS CBIC MPU
CMOS
t.OO
6
CMOS M3
0.80
6
5
6
STD
MPR
VLSI TECHNOLOGY
SAN ANTONIO
TX
MODULE B
ARRAYS CBIC MPU
MPR
VIS[ TECHNOLOGY
SAN JOSE
CA
SAN JOSE
PID ARRAYS CBIC MPR
CMOS MOS
1.00
WESTERN DIGITAL
IRVINE
CA
SPECTRUM LSI
CUSTOM
CMOS M2
0.90
WESTINGHOUSE
BALTIMORE
MD
GaAs
MMIC
GaAs
0.00
3
WESmNGHOUSE
BALTIMORE
MD
LSI
ASIC OPTO U N MIL
STD
BIP CMOS
MOS
300
4
BiCMOS
C
(4
Tabic 1 (Continued)
Nortli American Existing Pilot and Production Fab Unes
(Including Fabs Going into Operation During 1992)
s*
Ro
I
n
a
I
4
^
I
Est.
Minimum
Line Width
(Microns)
Es
{•roduct*
Produced
Vroctat
VLSI
ASIC OPTO LIN MIL
STD
BIP CMOS
MOS
1.00
PA
R&D CEOTER
NA
GaAs
0.00
0
CA
FAB 1
PLD CUSTOM
CMOS NMOS
2.00
4
CA
PHASE 2
1Mb EEPROM
CMOS M2
POLY2
0.70
6
ELK GROVE
IL
HVSR
HIGH-VOLT DIODE
TRIODE
BIP
20.00
2
ZILOG
NAMPA
ID
MODULE 1
Z80 Z8000 16*it MPU
NMOS
1.50
4
ZILOG
NAMPA
ID
MODULE 2
2 8 0 , 0 0 0 MPU MCU
CUSTOM
CMOS NMOS
BICMOS
0.65
5
Company
City
State
Fab Name
WESTINGHOUSE
BALTIMORE
MD
WESTINGHOUSE
CHURCHttL
XEROX
EL SEGUNDO
XICOR
MILPrTAS
ZENITH MICROCIRCUIT
Source; Dataquest (October 1992)
Technology
Wafer
DlametcTr
4
C
(•i
Table 2
North American Future Pilot and Production Fab Lines
Planned Facilities by Year
Target
Date
Facility
to Begin
Operation
City
State
Fab Name
Products
Pcocess
Technology
Faculty
Type
CRAY BESBiVtiCH
CHIPPEWA FALLS
WI
MA
ARRAYS
BICMOS CMOS
P
HEWLETT WiCKAfiD
PALO ALTO
CA
NA
NA
CMOS M3 BiCMOS
RP
HITACHI
IRVING
TX
PHASE 2
CBIC 16Mb
DRAM -IMb
SRAM
CMOS BICMOS
F
INTEL
ALOHA
OR
DIA
586 MPU
CMOS
RP
05/01/93
NATIONAL SHiHCONDUCrOR
ASLINGTOW
TX
FAB 2
NA
CMOS
FN
06/01/93
AMD
AUSTIN
TX
FAB 25
MA
FAB 6
NA
CMOS M3
NA
HUDSON
NA
MCU ALPHA
F
DIGITAL EQUIPMENT CORPORATION
F
NA
OKI
TUALATIN
OR
NA
ASIC DRAM
NA
FAT
NA
V15I TECHNOLOGY
SAN ANTONIO
TX
MODULE C
ARRAYS CBIC
SRAM MPU
CMOS M3
F
NA
AUSTIN (OAK HILL)
TX
MOS 11
SRAM, MPU,
CMOS BICMOS
NA
Company
Produdion Bejjirt(tt 1993
«
n
NA
02/01/93
NA
h-4
I
I
Production Beginsi 1994
a
9
PnxiucUon Begins: 1995
MOTOROLA
I
II
MCU
7SIO0
NAMPA
ID
MODULE 3
NA
NA
MA
SAN ANTONIO
TX
MODULE D
ARRAYS CBIC
CMOS M3
NA
Ptoduciion Beginsi 1996
VLSI TECHNOLOGY
SRAM MPU
NA - Not Available
Source: Dataquest (October 1992)
Min
Geo
(Mic
DataQuest
Dataquest Research and Sales Offices:
Dataquest Incorporated
1290 Ridder Parii Drive
San Jose, California 95131-2398
United States
Plione: 01-408-437-8000
Facsimile: 01-408-437-0292
Dataquest Germaqy
In der Sohneithohl 17
6242 Kronberg 2
Germany
Phone: 49-6173/61685
Facsimile: 49-6173/67901
Dataquest Incorporated
Dataquest/Ledgeway
550 Gochituate Road
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0013948
i
European Fab Database
October 19, 1992
Market Statistics
DataQuest
Semiconductor Equipment, Manufacturing,
and Materials
SEMM-SVC-MS^9203
)
European Fab Database
October 19, 1992
Source:
Dataquest
>
Market Statistics
DataQuest'
I
Semiconductor Equipment,
Manufacturing, and Materials
SEMM-SVC-MS-9203
File behind the Market Statistics tab inside
the binder labeled Semiconductor
Equipment, Manufacturit^, and Materials
i
i
Published by Dataquest Incorporated
The content of this report represents our interpretation and analysis of information generally available to the public or released
by knowledgeable individuals in the subject industry, but is not guaranteed as to accuracy or completeness. It does not contain
material provided to us in confidence by our clients.
Printed in the United States of America. AH rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced, stored in retrieval
systems, or transmitted, in any form or by any means—mechanical, electronic, photocopying, duplicating, microfilming, videotape, or otherwise—without the prior permission of the publisher.
© 1992 Dataquest Incorporated
Oaober 1992
0013903
European Fab Database
Table of Contents
Page
Background
1
Research Methodology
1
General Definitions
1
Definition of Table Columns
1
Table
Page
1 European Existing Pilot and Production Fab Lines (Including Fabs Going into Operation
During 1992)
4
2 European Future Pilot and Production Fab Lines Planned Facilities by Year
8
Note: All tables show estimated data.
European
Fab
Database
Background
The material in this document applies to the
European portion of Dataquest's Semiconductor
Equipment, Manufacturing, and Materials service wafer fab database. Information pertaining
to Eastern Europe and Israel has also been
included in this document because of the
close ties between these markets. The wafer
fab database is updated on an ongoing basis,
employing both primary and secondary
research methodologies. The tables included in
this document highlight both production and
pilot line wafer fabs.
Research Methodology
Dataquest takes a three-pronged approach to
wafer fab database research. Information is
gained through extensive annual primary
research. This survey work is furdier supplemented with comprehensive secondary
research conducted on an ongoing basis. The
database is updated daily, which allows Dataquest to be able to provide a snapshot of the
marketplace at any time. The information
gathered through primary and secondary
research is then further supplemented and
cross-checked with Dataquest's various other
information sources.
Pilot fab: A pilot fab is defined as a wafer
fab capable of front-end processing less than
1,250 wafers per week (type = P).
Definition of Table Columns
The Products Produced column contains information for seven product categories. The information in this column can be very detailed,
depending on its availability. The nomenclature
used within the seven product groups of the
fab database is as follows, with definitions
where warranted:
• Analog
- UN—^Linear/analog devices
- A/D D/A—^Analog-to-digital, digital-toanalog converters
- AUTOMOTTVE—^Dedicated to automobile
applications
- CODEC—Coder/decoder
- INTERFACE—^Interface IC
- MESFET (GaAs)—Metal Schottky fieldeffect transistor
- MODFET (GaAs)
- MDIODE (GaAs)—^Microwave diode
General Definitions
Fab line: A fab line is a processing line in a
clean room that is equipped to do all frontend w^afer processing. Occasionally there are
two separate product-specific fab lines or two
different wafer sizes in a clean room. In this
situation, a dean room will be documented as
two fab lines if the equipment is dedicated to
each w^afer size or product line. There can be
many fab lines at one location.
Front-end wafer processing: Front-end wafer
processing is defined as all steps involved
with semiconductor processing, begirming with
initial oxide and ending at wafer probe.
Production fab: A production fab is defined as
a wafer fab capable of front-end processing
more than 1,250 wafers per week (type = F).
- MEET (GaAs)—^Microwave field-effea
transistor
- MODEM—^Modulator/demodulator
- MMIC—^Monolithic microwave IC
- OP AMP—Operational amplifier
- PWR IC—Power IC
- REG—Voltage regulator
- SMART PWR—Smart power
- SWITCHES—Switching device
- TELECOM—^Telecommunications chips
• Memory
- MEM—^Memory
- RAM—^Random-access memory
Semiconductor Equipment, Manufacturing, and Materials
- DRAM—^Dynamic RAM
- CUSTOM—^Full-custom IC (single user)
- SRAM 4 TR.—Static RAM uses a
4-transistor cell design
- PLD—^Programmable logic device
- SRAM 6 TR.—^Static RAM uses a
6-transistor cell design
• Discrete
- DIS—^Discrete
- VRAM—Video RAM
-
- ROM—^Read-only memory
DIODE
- FET—^Field-effect transistor
- PROM—^Programmable ROM
- GTO—Gate turn-off thyristor
- EPROM—^Ultraviolet erasable PROM
- HEMT (GaAs)—^High-electron-mobility
transistor
- EEPROM or E2—^Electrically erasable
PROM
- MOSFET—^OS-based field-effect transistor
- FERRAM—^Ferroelectric RAM
- PWR TRAN—^Power transistor
- FLASH—^Flash memorv-
- RECTIFIER
- NVMEM—^Nonvolatile memor\- (ROM,
PROM, EPROM, EEPROM. FERRAM)
- RF—^Radio frequency
- FIFO—^First-in/first-out memor>-
- SCR—Schottky rectifier
- SPMEM—Other speciairv- memory (such as
dual-port, shift-register, color lookup)
-
SENSORS
- SST—Small-signal transistor
- IHYRISTOR
• Micrologic
- TRAN—^Transistor
- ASSP—^Application-specific standard
product
- BIT—^Bit slice (subset of MPU functions)
- DSP—^Digital signal processor
- ZENER DIODE
•
Optoelectronic
-
OPTO—Optoelectronic
- MCU—^Microcontroller unit
-
MPR—^Microperipheral
- MPRCOM—^MPR digital communication
(ISDN, LAN, UART, modem)
- MPU—^Microprocessor unit
- LISP—^32-bit list instruction set processor
for AI applications
- RISC—Reduced-instruction-set computation
32-bit MPU
• CCD—Charge-coupled device (imaging)
-
COUPLERS—^Photocouplers
- lED—^Infrared-emitting diode
- IMAGE SENSOR
- LASER (GaP)—^Semiconductor laser or
laser IC
- LED—^Light-emitting diode
- PDIODE—^Photo diode
• Standard logic
- PTRAN—^Photo transistor
- LOG—Standard logic
- SAW—Surface acoustic -wave device
- SIT IMAGE SENSOR—Static induction transistor image sensor
• ASIC logic
- ASIC—Application-specific IC
- ARRAYS—Gate arrays
- CBIC—Cell-based IC
i
The Process Technology colunm lists four
major types of technologies. This column also
lists a few uncommon technologies along with
©1992 Dataquest Incorporated October—Reproduction Prohibited
i
European Fab Database
>
available information on levels of metal, type
of well, and logic structure. Definitions of the
nomenclature used in the Process Technology
column are as follows:
- HgCdTe—^Mercuric cadmium telluride
- InAs—^Indium arsenide
- InP—^Indium phosphide
- InSb—^Indium antimony
• MOS (silicon-based)
- LiNb03—^Lithium niobate
- CMOS—Complementary metal-oxide
semiconductor
- MOS—^n-charmel metal-oxide semiconductor (NMOS) and p-charmel metal-oxide
semiconductor (PMOS) (More than
90 percent of the MOS fabs use
n-channel MOS.)
- Ml—Single-level metal
- M2—^Double-level metal
- M3—^Triple-level metal
- N-WELL
- P-WELL
- SOS—Silicon on sapphire
The number in the Minimum Linewidth
column represents the minimum linewidth at
the critical mask layers as drawn. This number
is stated in microns and is defined in Dataquest's fab survey as being available in
production volumes.
The Wafer Size column represents the wafer
diameter expressed colloquially in inches.
However, for wafers greater than 3 inches in
diameter, the colloquial expression is inaccurate. When calculating square inches, the
foUowing approximations are used:
- POLYl—Single-level polysilicon
- POLY2—^Double-level polysilicon
- POLY3—Triple-level polysilicon
>
• BiCMOS (silicon-based)
- BiCMOS—^Bipolar and CMOS combined
on a chip
- BIMOS—^Bipolar and MOS combined on a
chip
- ECL I/O—ECL input/output
- TTL I/O—TTL input/output
Approximate Diameter
3.938 inches
4.922 inches
5.906 inches
7.87 inches
Wafer Start Capacity is defined in the fab survey as the equipment-limited wafer start capacity per four-week period. Start capacity is not
limited by current staffing or the number of
shifts operating, it is limited only by the
inistalled equipment in the fab and the complexity of Xhe process it runs.
The Clean Room Class column represents the
level of cleanliness in the cleanest part of the
clean room. This area represents the true
environment to Avhich the wafer is exposed.
• Bipolar (silicon-based)
-
Stated Diameter
4 inches (lOOmm)
5 inches (125nim)
6 inches Cl50mm)
8 inches C200mm)
BIP—Bipolar
- ECL—^Emitter-coupled logic
- TTL—^Transistor-transistor logic
- S m ^ - S c h o t t k y TTL
• Gallium arsenide and other compound semiconductor materials
- GaAs—Gallium arsenide
- GaAlAs—Gallium aluminum arsenide
t
- GaAs on Si—Gallium arsenide on silicon
- GaP-Gallium phosphide
The Merchant or Captive column categorizes
each fab line on the tables as one of these
two types. Definitions of the various categories
are as follows:
• A Merchant fab line is a fab line that
produces devices that end u p available on
the merchant market.
• A Captive fab line does not sell any of its
devices on the merchant market. All production is consumed by the owner of the fab
line.
©1992 Dataquest Incorporated October—^Reproduction Prohibited
Table 1
European Existing Pilot and Production Fab lines
(Including Fabs Going Into OperatlQa During 1992)
Est
Est Max.
Mlalmum
Wafer Cle
Capacity Roo
Line
Wafcf
(4wk/(Squa
Width
(Microns) tMaiBtter
Month)
Fe
Procetc
City
Pab N a m e
P r o d u c t s )Nb4ni$nL
Technokwr
ABB SEMICONDUCTOR
LENSBURG
JAJIFALLA.
NA
NA
DIS
ABB-HAFO AB
ASIC U N
ABB-iXYS SEMICONDUCTOR
UMPERTHEEM
ABB-KYS
DIS DIODE
AEG AG (DAIMLER BENZ)
UIM
ULM RSCH
3D ICs fflm-WAVE OPTO
ANALOG DEVICES
UMEBICK
NA
U N A D / D A TELECOM
ANSALDO TRASPOHTI
GENOA
UNITA
PWR DIS
ASCOM MICROELECTRONICS
BEVAK
MADRID
ATMOS/ELPOL
WARSAW
AUSTMA MIKROSVSTEME GmbH
UNTERPREMSTATTEN
3
BANEASA SA, OPRS)
BUCHAREST
o
Brr&D TECHNOLOGIES
IPSWICH, SUFFOLK
0
1.50
500
0
1.00
2.00
6.00
1.00
2.00
0.80
0
1.00
320
35,5
DIGITAL EQUIPMENT
SOUTH QUEENSFERRY
NA
NA
NA
NA
NA
NA
NA
ARRAYS CUSTOM
AT&T MICHOELECTRONICS
BIP
BIP CMOS
BIP
GaAs MOS
CMOS BICM^;
BIP IM
BIP
CMOS M2
NA
CMOS BICM^
BIP
MPU FPU LOG ALPHA
CMOS M3
0.75
3,000
28,0
ELMOS GmbH
DORTMUND
NA
ASIC
FAB 3
1.50
2.00
15,0
NEUCHATEL
CMOS
NA
4,000
EM MICROELECTRONICS-
4,200
18,2
ERICSSON
KALMAR
NA
PWR DIS
92,0
ES2/MTD
CBIC ARRAYS CUSTOM
0
0.80
25,000
ROUSSET CEDEX
BIP
CMOS M2
4
ES2 EUROPEAN SILICON
STRUCTURES S.A.
5
1,500
12,9
Fujrreu
NEWTON AYCLIFFE
PHASE 1
•(Mb DRAM ASIC
NA
LIN MPU ARRAYS SRAM
CtlST
0.80
1.50
45,0
LINCOLN
CMOS
CMOS MOS
5,600
GEC PLESSEY SEMICONDUCTOR
13,000
12,0
GEC PLESSEY SF^0CONDUCTOR
LINCOLN
Ia
ROBOROl'GH
GEC PLESSEY SEMICONDUCTOR
SWINDON
a
OEC PLF^EY SEMICONDUCTOR
SWINDON
CEhERAL INSTRUMENTS
CRICIOADE
HITACHI
LANDSHUT
HMT
BRUGG
HUGHES MICROELECTRONICS
GLENROTHES
NA
NA
NA
NA
NA
NA
NA
NA
THVRISTOn
GEC PLESSEY SEMICONDUCTOR
BIP SOS
CMOS NMOS M3
BIP
BIP
BIP
NA
MOS
CMOS MOS
0
070
500
3.00
0
0.80
0
300
BIP
CMOS MOS
CMOS
BIP
BIP
BIP
2.00
1.00
0
0
0
2.00
Company
«
I
Ina
s
•8
I
I
•0
CBIC CUSTOM
A5IC
ASIC
THYRISTOR DIODE U N
OPTO LASER
ifj^
0
3,000
12,9
10,000
8,0
0
20,000
30,0
6,000
4,000
21,5
8,400
30,0
0
15,000
32,0
0
CORPORATION
MARIN S.A.
MIL STD 883
ASIC DSP TI-I.F.COM
DIODES DIS UN
UN
DiS
•IMb DRAM 1Mb SRAM:
CONSUMES ICs
ARRAYS CBIC EPROM
0
6,000
19,9
12,000
29,0
14,000
10,000
16,000
15,000
15,0
6,400
28,0
CUSTOM
IBM
CO RBEIL-ESSONNES
IBM
CQRBE3L-ESSONNES
IBM
COKBE[L-ESSO^fNES
IBM
HANNOVER
IBM
SINDELFINGEN
IBM
3INDELFINGEN
NA
NA
NA
NA
NA
NA
ARRAYS U N CUSTOM
Z56K DRAM 64 K SRAM
1Mb DRAM
DIS
PWR DIS HYBRID
ARRAYS
40,000
50,
25,000
25,0
7,000
20,000
20,000
15,000
20,
Tabic I (Continued)
European Existing Pilot and Production Fab lines
(Including Fabs Going Into OperaUon During 1992)
Company
IBM
City
SINDELFINGEN
SINDEIFINGEN
Fab Name
NA
NA
IMEC
INST. SaENCE ft TECH:
INTEL
INTL RECTIFIER
INTL fiECniTER
ISKRA
ISOCOM
ITALt^L
ITT
!TT
ITT
LUCAS
MATDA MH5 SJL
SINDELFINGEN
CORBE!I^ESSOMNt!a<
BA^fEASA
NA
LEUVEN
THENTO
JERUSALEM
TURIN
TURIN
TRBOVIJE
HAJtTLEPOqit;
ROME
FREIBURG
FREIBURG
FREIBURG
s u r r o N co(Lt;«S0ip
NANTES
NA
NA
NA
NA
NA
NA
FAB 8
BORGARO
VENARLA
NA
NA
NA
NA
NA
NA
NA
FAB I
MICROELECT.-MARIN
MICROELECTRONlCA SA.
MICROELECTRONICS^-IME LTD,
MARIN
BANEASA
SOFIA
NA
NA
NA
HPU
CUSTOM
16 Ml) DRAM
OPTO UN
16K DRAM, 64K DRAM
NA
CCD
J86 MPU 7S6 MPO
RECIJFIER THYRISTOR
RECTIFIER THVM3TOR
DIS
OFIO
NA
PWR TRAN DIS
DSP NVMEM CUSTOM
DiS CUSTOM
PWR DIS
256K SRAM MCU RISC
MPI ASIC UN
CUSTOM
MPU 16K DRAM
UN
MICROELECTRONICS—IME LTD,
SOFIA
NA
UN
MICRONAS INC.
MiETEC ALCATEL
ESPOO
OUDENAARDE
NA
FAB 1
CUSTOM GBECr^iW^
MOTOROU
MOTOROU
MOTOROU
EAST KaBRIDE
EAST KILBRIDE
TOULOi;SE
MOS 1
MOS 9
BIPOLAR 4
MOTOROU
TOULOUSE
MOTOROU
TOULOUSE
MTG CTHESYS GmbH)
ERFURT
TOULOUSE
POWER
TOULOUSE DIS
RECTIFIER
ASIC
NA
!BM
D
»EJ
I
9
c
I
IBM
IBM/SlENfflK?
ICCE
ICi.
Products Produced
1Mb DRAM 4Mb DRAM
25 SK DRAM SRAM DSP
TJ
II
O.
UN cBic castci/i
MCU LOG
SRAM 1Mb DRAM tmjTELECOM OP AM^Hiea
AUTO
P'WR TRAN
Process
Technology
CMOS
MOS
BIP
CMOS
BIP
NA
CMOS M2
CMOS
CMOS
NA
NA
BIP
GaAs
GaAs
BIP MOS
CMOS MOS
BIP
GaAs
CMOS BiCMOS
M2
NA
MOS
CMOS BICMOS
MOS
CMOS BICMOS
MOS
CMOS M2
MOS CMOS
BICMOS
CMOS MOS Ml
CMOS M2
BIP
Est
Est. Max.
Minimum
Wafer Cle
Une
Capacity Ro
Width
Wafer
(4wk/ (Squ
(Microns) Diameter
Month)
Fe
20,000 45,
8
0.80
25,000 20,
5
1.50
1.50
5
0.80
0
8
0
0
0
4
0.80
6
0
4
4
0
0
0.70
0
0
0
0
500
3
0
0
4
5.00
5
4
0
0
0.70
5
1.20
15,000
12,000
0
0
0
10,000
21,000
15,000
10,000
5,000
0
0
42,000
21,500
16,500
0
10,500
20,
24,
13,
54
21
0
4
0
2.00
0
1
10,000
0
2,000
2.00
5
9,000
2.00
4
4,000
12
1.00
4
15,000
21
3.00
4
43,200
25
0.80
6
22,000
34
2.00
4
25.000
22
BIP
10.00
5
12,000
8
BIP
0
4
3,600
5
CMOS BICMOS
0
6
0
Table I (Continued)
European Existing Pilot and Production Fab Lines
(IncludUig Fabs Going Into Operation During 1992)
Est Max.
Est
Minimum
line
Proc«$
Products Produced
Technology
Wafer
Width
(Micron*)
[Mameter
Wafer
Cle
Capacity Roo
(4wk/(S<]ua
Fe
Month)
NATIONAL SEMICONDUCTOR
GREENOCK
Fab Name
4.1
LOG U N
CMOS Ml
2.50
4
25,000
NATIONAL SEMICONDUCTOR
GREENOCK
6"
LAN
HIP M2
2.00
6
21,000
18,7
NATIONAL SEMICONDUCTOR
GREENOCK
LINEAR 4"
UN
BIP Ml M2
5.00
4
37,000
10,0
NATIONAL SEMICONDUCTOR
MIGDAL HAEMEK
NA
MPU MCU MPR DSP
CMOS M2 POLYl
0 70
6
5,500
18,0
Compuiy
City
ARRAYS CUSTOM
NEC
LIVINGSTON, WEST
PHASE 1
1Mb DRAM -IMb DRAM
CMOS M2 W
0 70
s
9,000
19,5
LOTHLAM
NEC
LIVINGSTON. WEST
LOTHL\N
PHASE 2
4Mb DRAM 256K SRAM
MCU ASIC
CMOS
OW)
(.
9.000
19,5
NUOVA MISTRAL S.P.A.
SERMONETA (LATINA)
NA
ZENEK DIODR DIODES
NA
300
-t
15,000
10,7
SST
PHFLIPS
CAEN
NA
CONSUMER ICS
BIPOLAR
1.50
5
18,000
PHIUPS
HAMBURG
CONSUMER
CON
BtP
1.20
5
18,000
PHILIPS
HAMSUiiO
DISCRETE
D!S
BIP
2.00
4
22,000
21,5
PHIUPS
HAMBURG
NA
e-BIT MCU IS-BIT MCU
EEPROM ASI
CMOS NMOS W
M2
1.00
5
12,500
32,2
PHILIPS
HA2ELGHOVE,
BIPOLAR
TRAN DIODE RECTIFIER
BIP
10.00
4
45,000
19,3
3.00
4
10,000
11,8
23,4
16,1
STOCKPORT
CHESHIRE
POWERMOS DIODE SMART PWR
MOS IM
PHIUPS
HAZELGROVE,
STOCKPORT
PHIUPS
NIJMEGEN
NA
100
CMOS
3.00
4
26,000
PHILIPS
NIJMEGEN
NA
SRAM CON
CMOS NMOS M2
0.80
6
8,400
PHILIPS
MJMEGEN
NA
DIS
MOS SICMOS BIP
1.50
5
20,000
PHILIPS
NyMEGEN
NA
PWB DIS DIODES
NA
0.70
4
0
12,9
PHILIPS
STADSKANAAL
NA
RECTIFIER
BIP M3
0
4
70,000
32,2
12,
CHF^HIRE
PHIUPS BTC
CAEN
NA
TRAN
NA
5.00
5
12,000
ROBERT BOSCH
REUTUNGEN
RtW/FAW
U N DIS CUISTOK
BIP BICMOS
3.00
4
20,000
SEAGATE MICROELECTRONICS
LIVINGSTON
NA
UN
BEP M2
3.00
4
5,000
SEMEFAB
GLENROTHES
NA
U N DIS OPTO
BIP CMOS MOS
4.00
4
2,000
SEMKRON
NURNBERG
NA
DIS
BIP
0
5
10,000
SGS-THOMSON
ACHATE C M L U j i
FAB 9
64K 256K 1Mb EPROM
CMOS M2
0.70
6
28,000
39,3
16,
22,
PLD U N ARRA
SGS-THOMSON
CATANU
NA
DIS
NA
3.00
5
34,000
SGS-THOMSON
CATANIA
NA
LOG U N CUSTOM
CMOS
3.00
4
21,000
SGS-THOMSON
cofrrALErro
NA
MPU
CMOS
0
5
0
SGS-THOMSON
GRENOBLE
NA
U N PWR IC CUSTOM
BIP CMOS
1.50
4
20,000
SGS-THOMSON
RENNBS
NA
UN
BIP M2
5.00
5
16,000
21,
Table 1 (Continued)
European Existing Pilot and Production Fab lines
(including Fabs Going Into Operation During 1992)
B
-s
I
a
a
I
I
Ia
s
I
Process
Technology
Company
SGS-THOMSON
City
ROUSSET
Fab Name
MODULE 5
SGS-THOMSON
SGS-THOMSON
SIEMENS
SIEMENS
SIEMENS
TAG
TELEFUNKEN
TOURS
TOURS
REGENSBURG
VILIACH
VILLACH
ZURICH
ECmNG
MESA
PLANAR
MEGA 1
VILLACH 1
VILLACH 2
NA
NA
TELEFUNKEN ElECtiBXiJ^
TEXET
T!
Ti
Tl
HEILBRONN
NICE
AVEZZANO
BEDFORD
FREISING
NA
NA
Products Produced
EPROM EEPROM MPU
MCU
DIS
DIS
1Mb DRAM 4Mb DRAM
TELECOM
LOG
DIS
LOG MPU MO) ARRAYS
CUST
CUSTOM UN DIS MCU
DIS
PHASE 1
PWR FAB
FRSI
4Mb DRAM ASSP CBIC
PWR DIS
UN ASSP LOG
Tl
TQMl
VAISAIA
VEB HAiBUHTERWERK
VEB ROEHRENWERK
FREiSING
TORUN
VANTAA
FRSI
NA
NA
NA
NA
CBIC LIN ASSP LOG
DIS
UN
NA
TRAN
BIP CMOS
BICMOS
CMOS BICMOS
NA
CMOS
NA
NA
SENSOR CClpI
NA
DIS
DIS DtODB jaa.
BIP
BIP MOS
VEB WERK FUER
FERNSEHELEtCTRONK
WESTCODE SEMICONDUCTOR
ZETEX
NA - Not available
Source: DaUquest (October 1992)
FRANKFURT (ODER)
NEUHAUS AM
RENNWEG
BERUNNA
O BER3CHOENEWEIDE
CHIPPENHAM
NA
OLDHAM
NA
CMOS MOS
NA
NA
CMOS
BIPOLAR
MOS
NA
CMOS
BIP MOS CMOS
NA
CMOS
BIP
Est.
Est. Max.
Minimum
Wafer Cle
Line
Capacity Roo
Width
Wafer
(4Trk/ (Squa
(Microns) Diameter
Month)
Pe
22,000 33,3
5
1.50
20.00
5.00
0.80
2.00
0.80
0
3.00
4
4
1.00
0
0.05
3.00
0.60
4
4
0.80
0
5.00
0
0
0
1.50
6
4
5
3
4
60,000
15,000
28,000
26,000
20,000
10,000
24,000
48,
24,7
26,6
3,
43,0
5
25,000
10,000
9,200
24,000
19,300
5
10,000
17,
0
0
200
6
4
3
6
10,000
0
0
10,000
10,000
25,
78,
9,
10,
26,
Table 2
European Future Pilot and Production Fab lines
Planned Facilities by Year
Company
aty
Fab
Name
LEDOJP, COUNTY KILDAHE
PtlK^a
Faculty
Producu
lechaoli^Cr
FAB 10
486 MPU
586 MPU
BICMOS
F
Est
Target Date Minimum
Facility to
Line
Wa
Begin Geometry
S
Operation (Hlcrona) Cinch
Production Begins: 1993
INTEL
OUDENAARDE
FAB 2
ASIC
CMOS M2 POLY2
FAT
NATIONAL SEMICONDUCTOR
OREENOCK
LINEAR
UN
BIP
F
SGS-THOMSON
CROILSS
PHASE 1
ASIC
CMOS BICMOS
RP
FUJITSU
NEWTON ATfOIFFE
PHASE 2
16Mb DRAM
CMOS
MITSUBISHI
ALSDORF
NA
4Mb ORAM
16Mb DRAM
CMOS
• NDETEC ALCATEL
N)
1
I
I
?
n
•O
I
i
NA
0,50
0.50
NA
0
06/01/93
0.50
F
NA
0.50
F
NA
0.80
Producttpn Begins: 19?i
NA - Not Available
Source: Dataquest (October 1992)
Dataquest
i
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0013903
n
i
Asia/PacifiC'*Rest of World
Fab Database
October 26,1992
Market Statistics
DataQuest
Semiconductor Equipment, A/lanufacturing,
and IHateriais
^MM-SVC-MS^gZIM
Asia/Pacific-Rest of World
Fab Database
October 26, 1992
Source:
Dataquest
Market Statistics
Dataqyest'
Semiconductor Equipment,
Manufacturing, and Materials
SEMM-SVC-MS-9204
File behind the Market Statistics tab inside the
binder labeled Semiconductor Eqiiipment,
Manufacturiog, and Materials
Published by Dataquest Incorporated
The content of this report represents our interpretation and analysis of information generally available to the public or released
by knowledgeable individuals in the subject industry, but is not guaranteed as to accuracy or completeness. It does not contain
material provided to us in confidence by our clients.
Printed in the United States of America. All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced, stored in retrieval
systems, or transmitted, in any form or by any means—mechanical, electronic, photocopying, duplicating, microfilming, videotape, or otherwise—without the prior permission of the publisher.
© 1992 Dataquest Incorporated
October 1992
0013920
i
Asia/Pacific-Rest of World Fab Database
Table o f Contents
Page
Background
1
Research Methodology
1
General Definitions
1
Definition of Table Columns
1
Table
1 Asia/Pacific-ROW Existing Pilot and Production Fab Lines (Including Fabs Going into
Operation During 1992)
2 Asia/Pacific-Rest of World Future Pilot and Production Fab Lines Planned Facilities
by Year
Note: All tables show estimated data.
Page
4
8
Asia/Pacific-Rest
Database
of World Fab
Background
The material in this document applies to the
Asia/Pacific-Rest of World CROW) portion of
Dataquesfs Semiconductor Equipment,
Manufacturing, and Materials service wafer fab
database. The wafer fab database is updated
on an ongoing basis, employing both primary
and secondary research methodologies. The
tables included in this document highlight both
production and pilot line w^afer fabs.
Research Methodology
Dataquest takes a three-pronged approach to
wafer fab database research. Information is
gained through extensive annual primary
research. This survey work is furdier supplemented with comprehensive secondary
research conducted on an ongoing basis.
The database is updated daily, which allows
Dataquest to provide a snapshot of the marketplace at any time. The information gathered
through primary and secondary research is
then further supplemented and cross-checked
with Dataquesfs various other information
sources.
Pilot fab: A pilot fab is defined as a wafer
fab capable of front-end processing less than
1,250 wafers per week (type = P).
Definition of Table Columns
The Products Produced column contains information for seven product categories. The information in this column can be very detailed,
depending on its availability. The nomenclature
used within the seven product groups of the
fab database is as follows, with definitions
where warranted:
• Analog
- LIN—^Linear/analog devices
- A/D D/A—Analog-to-digital, digital-toanalog converters
- AUTOMOTIVE—^Dedicated to automobile
applications
- CODEC—Coder/decoder
- INTERFACE—^Interface IC
- MESFET (GaAs)—Metal Schottky fieldeffect transistor
- MODFET (GaAs)
General Definitions
- MDIODE (GaAs)—Microwave diode
Fab line: A fab line is a processing line in a
clean room that is equipped to do all frontend wafer processing. Occasionally there are
two separate product-specific fab lines or two
different wafer sizes in a dean room. In this
situation, a dean room will be documented as
two fab lines if the equipment is dedicated to
each wafer size or product line. There can be
many fab lines at one location.
- MEET (GaAs)—^Microwave field-effect
transistor
Front-end wafer processing: Front-end wafer
processing is defined as all steps involved
w^ith semiconductor processing, beginning with
initial oxide and ending at wafer probe.
Production fab: A production fab is defined as
a wafer fab capable of firont-end processing
more than 1,250 wafers per week (type = F).
- MODEM—^Modulator/demodulator
- MMIC—Monolithic microwave IC
- OP AMP—Operational amplifier
- PWR IC—Power IC
- REG—Voltage regulator
- SMART PWR—^Smart power
- SWITCHES—^Switching device
- TELECOM—^Telecommunications chips
• Memory
- MEM—^Memory
Semiconductor Equipment, Manufacturing, and Materials
- RAM—^Random-access memory
- CBIC—Cell-based IC
- DRAM—Dynamic RAM
- CUSTOM—Full-custom IC (single user)
- SRAM 4 TR.—Static RAM uses a
4-transistor cell design
- PLD—^Programmable logic device
- SRAM 6 TR.—Static RAM uses a
6-transistor ceU design
• Discrete
-
- VRAM—Video RAM
DIS—Discrete
- DIODE
- ROM—^Read-only memory
- FET—^Field-effect transistor
- PROM—^Programmable ROM
- GTO—Gate turn-off thyristor
- EPROM—^Ultraviolet erasable PROM
- HEMT (GaAs)—^High-electron-mobility
transistor
- EEPROM or E2—^Electrically erasable
PROM
- MOSFET—MOS-based field-effect transistor
- FERRAM—^Ferroelectric RAM
- PWR TRAN—^Power transistor
- FLASH—^Flash memory
- RECTIFIER
- NVMEM—^Nonvolatile memory (ROM,
PROM, EPROM, EEPROM, FERRAM)
- RF—^Radio frequency
- SCR—Schottky rectifier
- FIFO—^First-in/first-out memory
- SENSORS
- SPMEM—Other specialty memory (such as
dual-port, shift-register, color lookup)
- SST—Small-signal transistor
- THYRISTOR
• Micrologic
- TRAN—^Transistor
- ASSP—Application-specific standard
product
- BIT—^Bit slice (subset of MPU functions)
- DSP—^Digital signal processor
- MCU—Microcontroller imit
-
(
MPR—^Microperipheral
i
- ZENER DIODE
•
Optoelectronic
-
OPTO—Optoelectronic
- CCD—Charge-coupled device (imaging)
-
COUPLERS—^Photocouplers
- MPRCOM—^MPR digital communication
(ISDN, LAN, UART, modem)
- lED—^Infrared-emitting diode
- MPU—Microprocessor unit
- IMAGE SENSOR
- USP—^32-bit list instruction set processor
for AI applications
- LASER (GaP)—Semiconductor laser or
laser IC
- RISC—^Reduced-instruction-set computation
32-bit MPU
- LED—^Light-emitting diode
- PDIODE—Photo diode
- PTRAN—Photo transistor
• Standard logic
- SAW—Surface acoustic wave device
- LOG—Standard logic
- SIT IMAGE SENSOR—^Static induction transistor image sensor
• ASIC logic
- ASIC—^Application-specific IC
- ARRAYS—Gate arrays
The Process Technology column lists four
major types of technologies. This column also
lists a few uncommon technologies along with
©1992 Dataquest Incorporated October—Reproduction Prohibited
i
Asia/Padfic-Rest of World Fab Database
available information on levels of metal, type
of well, and logic structure. Definitions of the
nomenclature used in the Process Technology
column are as follows:
- HgCdTe—Mercuric cadmium telluride
- InAs—^Indium arsenide
- InP—^Indium phosphide
- InSb—^Indiimi antimony
• MOS (silicon-based)
- LiNb03—^Lithium niobate
- CMOS—Complementary metal-oxide
semiconductor
- MOS—^n-channel metal-oxide semiconductor (NMOS) and p-channel metal-oxide
semiconduaor (PMOS). (More than
90 percent of the MOS fabs use
n-chaimel MOS.)
- Ml—^Single-level metal
- M2—^Double-level metal
- M3—^Triple-level metal
- N-WELL
- P-WELL
- SOS—Silicon on sapphire
The number in the Minimum Linewidth
column represents the minimum linewidth at
the critical mask layers as drawn. This number
is stated in microns and is defined in Dataquesf s fab survey as being available in
production volumes.
The Wafer Size column represents the wafer
diameter expressed colloquially in inches.
However, for wafers greater than 3 inches in
diameter, the colloquial expression is inaccurate. When calculating square inches, the
following approximations are used:
- POLYl—^Single-level polysilicon
- POLY2—^Double-level polysilicon
- POLY3—^Triple-level polysilicon
• BiCMOS (silicon-based)
- BiCMOS—^Bipolar and CMOS combined
on a chip
- BIMOS—Bipolar and MOS combined on
a chip
- ECL I/O—^ECL input/output
- TTL I/O—^TTL input/output
• Bipolar (silicon-based)
-
BIP—^Bipolar
- ECL—^Emitter-coupled logic
- TTL—^Transistor-transistor logic
- STTL—Schottky TTX
• Gallium arsenide and other compound semiconductor materials
- GaAs—Gallium arsenide
- GaAlAs—Gallium aluminum arsenide
-
GaAs on Si—Gallium arsenide on silicon
- GaP-Gallium phosphide
Stated DJameter
4 inches (100mm)
5 indies (125mm)
6 inches (150mm)
8 inches (200mm)
Approximate Diaineter
3.938 inches
4.922 inches
5.906 inches
7.87 inches
Wafer Start Capacity is defined in the fab survey as the equipment-limited wafer start capacity per four--week period. Start capacity is not
limited by current staffing or the number of
shifts operating, it is limited only by the
installed equipment in the fab and the complexity of the process it runs.
The Clean Room Qass column represents the
level of cleanliness in the cleanest part of the
d e a n room. This area represents the true
environment to which the wafer is exposed.
The Merchant or Captive column categorizes
each fab line on the tables as one of these
two types. Definitions of the various categories
are as follows:
• A Merchant fab line is a fab line that
produces devices that end u p available on
the merchant market.
• A Captive fab line does not sell any of its
devices on the merchant market. All production is consumed by the owner of the fab
line.
©1992 Dataquest Incoqx)rated October—Reproduction Proliibited
Table 1
Asla/Paclflc-ROW Existing Pilot and Production Fab Lines
(Including Fabs Gok^ into Operation During 1992)
Eat.
Minimum
Company
aty
ADVANCED MICROELECTRONICS HSIN CHU
ProceiM
TfaJmofair
Fab Name
FAS I
NA
CMOS
l i n e Width
(Mlcrona)
Wafer
WMwetcf
2,00
Est. Max.
Wafer
Capacity
Room
(Gross)
(4wk/
Month)
(Square
Feet)
10.000
PRODUCT
w
I
a
6
3
3
AMAlGANfATED WIRELESS
SYDNEY
NA
ASIC
CMOS
1.50
BEUING NO. 2
BEIJING
NA
INTERFACE IC
BIP TIL
5.00
BEIJING N 0 . 3
BEUING
NA
LOG TRANS LIN
CMOS MOS
5.00
NA
5.00
NA
5.00
NA
5.00
NA
4.00
CMOS
2.40
NA
0.00
3
4
4
0
0
CMOS MOS
1.20
6
NA
0.00
10,000
7,000
10,000
15,000
0
0
0
MEM WATCH
BEUING NO. 5
BEIJING
NA
BEIJING NO.a78
BEIJING
NA
BEIJING TUBE FACTdJOl^
BEIJING
NA
BEL
BANGALORE
NA
BELLING IC CO.
SHANGHAI
NA
BHARAT EIECTHOMCS
BANGALORE
N/M
CHARTERED SEM(C»NDUCrOR
SINGAPORE
Fab 1
OP AMP LOG
10.000
PWR THAN
DIS
DIS
DIS
DIS
ASIC U N
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
15,000
20,000
8,000
10,000
10,000
EEPROM
COmiNENTAL DEVICES
DELHI
NA
DIS DIODE
TRAN PWR
DAEWOO
GURO-DONG,
BIPOLAR U N E
UN
BIP
3.00
9,000
MOS UNE
CUSTOM
CMOS MOS
1.70
9,000
!
SCR
SEOUL
I
I
o*
i
DAEWOO
GURO-DONG,
SEOUL
DONG OUANG PIANT
BEUING
NA
LOG MPU
BIP TTL
5,00
ELECT, COMPONENTS INDIA
HYDERABAD
NA
DIS CONSUMER
BIP
0,00
EPISiL TECHNOLOGIES INC.
HSiN CHU
NA
LiN
BICMOS
300
FINE MICROELECTRONICS
HS!N CHU
NA
OPTO TRAN
NA
0.00
FUCHOU
FUCHOU
NA
NA
NA
500
GENERAL INSTRUMEWTS
HSi TIEN CTIY
NA
PWR DIS
BIP
0,00
GOLDSTAR
CHoNGju-crry,
PHASE 1
1Mb DRAM 4Mb
CMOS MOS
GOLDSTAR
CHONGJU-CTTY,
CHOONGBUK
PHASE 2
4Mb DRAM
MOS CMOS
GOLDSTAR
GUMF-CTTY,
KYUNGBUK
GUMI BIPOLAR
UN
GOLDSTAR
GUMl-CITV',
KYUNGBUK
GUMI MOS
SRAM DRAM
3
3
15,000
0
0
12,000
5,380
10,000
5,000
ICs
CKOONGBUK
0.80
5
3
3
3
6
30,000
0
0
0
0
0.70
6
30,000
0
BIP TTL
3,00
4
25,000
0
CMOS MOS
1.50
5
15,000
0
4,000
12,000
DRAM
M2 POLY3
Table 1 (Continued)
Asla/Paciflc-ROW Existing Pilot and Production Fab Lines
<Includlng Pabs Going Into Operation During 1992)
O
I
s
c
s.
s
I
Company
City
Fab NiM^t
Products
Produced
Process
Teeluiolosy
Est
Minimum
Line Width
(Microns)
Wafer
Diameter
Est. Max.
Wafer
Room
Capacity (Gross)
(4wk/ (Square
Month)
Feet)
HARBIN FACTORY
HARBIN
NA
TRAN
NA
500
3
10,000
0
HOLTEK
HSIN CHU
NA
ASIC LIN
CMOS
2,00
TAI PO
NA
MPU UN ASIC
LOG SRAM
ROM
CMOS MOS
0.00
10,000
8,000
0
HUA KG ELECTRONICS
5
4
HUAION MICROELECTRONICS
HSIN CHU
FAB 1
ROM TELECOM
CONSUMER
MPU
CMOS MOS
1.00
HYUNDAI
ICHUN,
KYUNGKI-DO
FAB I-A
PLD EEPROM
16K SRAM
CMOS MOS
1.20
5
15,000
0
HYUNDAI
ICHUN,
KYUNGKI-DO
FAB I-B
236K DRAM
356K SRAM
MOS CMOS
1.00
5
8,000
0
HYUNDAI
ICHUN,
KYUNGKI-DO
FAB n
1Mb DRAM 1Mb
SRAM
CMOS MOS
0.80
6
25,000
0
HYUNDAI
ICHUN,
KYUNGKI-DO
FAB m - A
4Mb DRAM
CMOS MOS
0.80
6
20,000
0
HYUNDAI
ICHUN,
KYUNGKI-DO
FAB m - B
4Mb DRAM 16Mb CMOS
DRAM
0.60
6
20,000
0
INDIAN TELEPHONE
BANGALORE
NA
DIS
BIP
0.00
0
JERUSAIEM
FAB 8
MPU
CMOS
1.00
21,000
24,000
jiNAli Nu.i
JINAN
NA
LOG OP AMP
NA
5.00
10,000
0
JINAN NO. 2
JINAN
NA
IK SRAM 4K
DRAM
MOS
5.00
3
6
3
3
12,000
INTEL
8,000
0
KOREAN ELECTRONIC CO.
GUMl-CnY,
KYUNGBUK
BIPOLAR UNE 1
LIN
B[P
2.50
4
20,000
0
KOREAN ELECTRONIC CO.
GUNfl-CITY,
KYUNGBUK
BIPOLAR UNE 2
CUSTOM
BIP
1.50
5
10,000
0
UAONING FACTORY
JINZHOU
NA
TRAN
NA
5.00
3
12,000
0
MACRONDt INC,
HSIN CHU
FAB 1
EPROM FLASH
4Mb ROM
MOS
0.80
6
8,000
53,800
MIN MACHINERY INDUSTRY
NA
NA
LOG PWHTRAN
MOS
5,00
3
5,000
0
MOSEL-VTTELIC CORPORATION
TAI PO, N.T.
FAB 1
UN 356K mAM
16KSRAM
CMOS
1.50
4
14,000
10,000
MOTOROU
SEREMBAN
ISMF
PWR TRAN DIS
SST
BIP
aoo
4
8,000
6,000
NAINA SEMICONDUCTORS
HALDWANI
NA
DIODES
NA
0,00
0
0
0
0
30,000
Table 1 (Continued)
Asia/PacUlc-ROW Existing Pilot and Production Fab Lines
(Including Fabs Going into Operation During 1992)
«
-g
Compatiy
aty
Fab NtUDC
Products
Produced
TechnolDgy
NATIONAL SEMICONDUCTOR
MIGDAL HAEMEK
NA
MPU MCU MPR
CMOS M2
DSP ARRAYS
CUSTOM
POLYl
9
5
I
§
Room
Minimum
l i n e Width
Wafer
Capacity
(4wk/
(Gross)
(Square
itMIcrons)
Diameter
Month)
Feet)
0.70
5,500
18,000
10,000
SHANGHAI
NA
LIN DlGiTAL iC
FOR T.V.
CMOS BIP
0.00
PHOTRONICS
NA
NA
OPTO
NA
0.00
3
10,000
0
QIANMEN SEMICONDUCTOR
BEIJING
NA
DIG WATCH IC
NA
5.00
3
10,000
0
RAMAX
MELBOURNE-
NA
FERRAM
CMOS GaAs
0.00
0
0
0
RO, SEMICONDUCrORS
TAI PO
NA
MEM MPU LOG
UNTRAN
CMOS
0.00
4
4,000
0
FACTORY
RECTRON LTB.
TAIPEI
NO, 1
DIS
NA
0.00
2
90,000
0
SAMSUNG
BUCHON-CITY,
KYUNGKl-DO
BIPOLAR U N H
UN
BIP
3.00
4
25,000
0
SAMSUNG
BUCHON-CnY,
MOS UNG
MPU MCU LOG
CMOS MOS
2.00
5
20,000
0
MOS 1
64K DRAM
MOS CMOS
1.50
4
35,000
0
MOS 2
25SK DRAM
CMOS MOS
1.20
6
35,000
0
MOS 3
1Mb DRAM
MOS CMOS
0.80
6
35,000
0
KTUNGja-DO
SAMSUNG
HHIUNG-UP,
KYUNGKI-DO
SAMSUNG
KIHEUNG-UP,
KYUNGKI-DO
•3
a
Est. Max.
Wafer
PHILIPS
R
I
PlPOCSS*
Est
SAMSUNG
HHEUNG-UP,
KYUNGKI-DO
SAMSUNG
MOS 4
4Mb DRAM
CMOS
0.60
6
30,000
0
I
KtHBUNG-UF,
KYUNGKI-DO
SAMSUNG
KIHEUNG-LIP,
MOS 5
16Mb DRAM
CMOS
0.50
8
6,000
0
cr
SGS-THOMSON
ANG MO KIO
BIPOLAR UNEAR
OP /kMP
TEKCOM
BIP MOS
0.00
5
20,000
0
SGS-THOMSON
ANG MO KIO
BIPOLAR POWER
PWRTRAN
BIP MOS
0.00
5
20,000
0
SGS-THOMSON
ANG MO KJO
NMOS & CMOS
NA
CMOS
0,00
5
20,000
0
SHANGHAI MICRCJ.. R&D
SHANGHAI
MA
NA
NA
0.00
0
0
0
SHANGHAI N O , 5
SHANGHAI
NA
8080 MPU LOG
MEM Lm DIS
CMOS
500
3
10,000
0
SHANGHAI N 0 ^ 3 3 1
SHANGHAI
NA
OP AMP PWR
THAN
BIP TTL
5.00
3
4,000
0
a
KYUNGKI-DO
CENTER
Table l (Continued)
Asla/Paclfic-ROW Existing Pilot and Production Fab Lines
(Including Fabs Going into Operation During 1992)
Products
Produced
Froccts
Technology
NA
OP AMP PWR
TRAN DIS
BIP TTL
CMOS
NA
BIP
Company
qty
Fab Name
SHANGHAI PHIUPS NO.?
SHANGHAI
SHthDDENGEN
NA
NA
THAN DIODES
SID MICROELECTROmcS
CONTAGEM
NA
UN PWR TRAN
SID MICROELECTRONICS
CONTAGEM
NA
SOUTH AFRJCAN
MICROELECTRONICS
PRETORU
NA
SOUTH AFRJCAN
PRETORIA
NA
SPIC ELECTRONICS
GUINDY, MADiUS
NA
SU2HOU PLAI^
SUZHOU
Est.
Minimum
U n e Width
(Mfcronaj
Est Max.
Wafer
Wafer
Diameter
5.00
Room
Capacity (Gross)
(4wk/ (Square
Feet)
Month)
10.000
5,380
0.00
0
0
30.00
12,000
15,000
CMOS
2.00
13,000
15,000
BIP
5.00
10,000
0
CMOS
3.00
10,000
0
PHOTO VOLTA3C NA
DIS
3.00
15,000
0
NA
LOG OPTO
CONSUMER
BIP TTL
MOS
0.00
0
0
CMOS
0.80
25,000
45,000
BIP ECL
5.00
14,000
0
CMOS
5.00
10,000
0
CMOS M2
1.00
14,000
7,637
0.80
25,000
40,000
SST PWR ICs
O
•§
i
H
MICROELECTRONICS
PWR ICs
A/D D/A
TELECOM
A/D D/A
TELECOM
a
S
K
TVACER
HSIN CHU
FAB 1
4Mb DRAM
TJAN GUANC FACFOii^
SHAOXING
NA
LOG
I
Ia
TIANJIN NO,l
TUNJIN
NA
TSMC
HSIN CHU
FAB 1
§
13
I
i
TTL
AUDIO IC
MEM MICRO
LOG
TSMC
HSIN CHU
FAB 2-A
SRAM EPROM
2POLY
CMOS
LOO LIN
TSMC
HSIN CHU
FAB 2-B
UNITED MICROELECTRONICS
HSIN CHU
FAB 1
SRAM
SRAM MCU UN
CMOS
0.80
6
4,000
40,000
CMOS MOS
1.50
4
45,000
0
0.80
6
18,000
30,000
0.60
6
3,000
15,000
M2
UNTTED MICROELECTRONICS
UNTTED MICROELECTRONICS
HSIN CHU
HSIN CHU
FAB Z-A
FAB 2-B
^Mb ROM
EPROM
CMOS MOS
1Mb SRAM ^Mb
CMOS
M2
ROM EPROM
WIN BOND
HSIN CHU
FAB I
SRAM ROM MPU
CMOS MOS
1.00
0
HSIN CHU
FAB 2
SRAM MPU
CMOS M2
0.80
5
6
20,000
WINBOND
8,000
0
WUXI MICROELECTRONICS
WUH JIANH SU
NA
TRAN DIODES
MOS
5.00
4
15,000
0
NA
5.0O
CORPORATION
XlAN
YANHE RADIO FACTOKT
NA - Not available
Source: Dataquest (October 1992)
UN LOG MEM
NA
UN LOG
7.000
Table 2
Asla/PaciAc-Rest of World Future Pilot and Production Fab Lines
Planned Facilities by Year
Company
City
Cab
Name
Products
Process
IJe^itolggy
Target
Est
Date Minimum
Faculty
Line
Wafer
Facility
to Begin Geometry
Size
Type
Opetatloti (mlcwms) (Inches)
Production Begins; 1993
GOLDSTAR
PHASE 3
16Mb DRAM
4Mb SRAM
CMOS
NA
0.50
8
FAB 1
4Mb DRAM
CMOS MOS
F
TELECOM
CMOS
F
08/01/93
NA
0.60
6
6
NA
11/01/91
3.00
6
CMOS
03/01/93
0.60
8
02/01/91
3.00
NA
0.00
6
1.00
6
NEC CHINA
CHONGJU-ClTlf,
CHOONGBUK
HSIN CHU
SEUING
SEMICONDUCTOR COMPLEX
NAGAR-CHANDIGARH NA
TECH SEMICONDUCTOR SINGAPORE
LTD.
NA
NA
WUm MICROELECTRONICS
CORPORATION
WUXI
NA
TELECOM ICS
MOS
HrrAon
PENANG
NA
1Mb DRAM
4Mb DRAM
CMOS
F
HUA YUE MCROELECTOONICS CO.
LTD.
SKAOMNG
NA
NA
CMOS
F
MOSet/VlTELIC CORPORATION
HSIN CHU
FAB 2
16Mb DRAM
CMOS MOS
F
NA
0.50
8
SAMSUNG
KIHEUNG-UP,
KYUNGKl-DO
FAB 6
4Mb 16Mb DRAM CMOS
F
06/OV93
0.60
8
STOTEK
HSIN CHU
NA
NA
NA
F
NA
0.00
6
UNITED MICROELECTRONICS
HSIN CHU
FAB 3
SRAM
NA
F
NA
0.00
S
Mosei/vrreuc CORPORATION
NA
2.00
CONSUMER ICS
•g
a
o
I
a
a
I
§
I
LSI
16Mb DRAM
Production Begins; 199*
NA •" Not available
Source; Dataquest (October 1992)
v^im
DataQuest
i
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i
Semiconductor Equipment,
Manufacturing, and Materials
Forecast
m
ren
Semiannual Edition
Semiconductor Equipment, ilflanufacturing, and Materials
DataQuest®
SEMM-SVC-MT-9201
August 17,1992
Semiconductor Equipment,
Manufacturing, and Materials
Forecast
MarketTrends
Semiannual Edition
Semiconductor Equipment, Manufacturing, and Materials
®
DataQUeSt
SEMM-SVC-MT-9201
August 17,1992
Semiconductor Equipment, Manufacturing,
and Materials MarketTrends is a report published twice
a year by Dataquest. The report focuses on key semiconductor industry forecasts including semiconductor capital spending, wafer fabrication equipment, silicon wafer consumption, device production and device consumption. An accompanying discussion of the critical issues that w e believe
will drive future industry developments both from a micro and macro viewpoint is also included.
Particular emphasis is paid to individual regional trends.
A more comprehensive discussion of historical trends in the wafer fab equipment market is
included in another Dataquest MarketTrends report entitled Wafer Fab Equipment Market 1991
in Review. The historical equipment report complements the equipment forecast chapter contained
in this report for those readers interested in more details on the semiconductor capital equipment
market.
Published by Dataquest Incorporated
The content of this report represents our interpretation and analysis of information generally available to the public or released
by knowledgeable individuals in the subject industry, but is not guaranteed as to accuracy or completeness. It does not contain
material provided to us in confidence by our clients.
Printed in the United States of America. All rights reserved. No jjart of this publication may be reproduced, stored in retrieval
systems, or transmitted, in any form or by any means—mechanical, electronic, photocopying, duplicating, microfilming, videotape, or othenvise—without the prior permission of the publisher.
© 1992 Dataquest Incorporated
August 1992
Table of Contents
^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^.
Page
1.
2.
3.
4.
Executive Summary: More Moderate Growth
Semiconductor Capital Spending Forecast
Chapter Highlights
Capital Spending Forecast
Semiconductor Capital Spending Forecast: A Secular Change for the Market
Worst-Case Scenario Unfolds for Japanese Semiconductor Capital Spending
U.S. Spending Pulled Down by Japanese Companies' Cuts
Europe Expected to Decline through 1993
Korean Companies Place Some Big Bets
Conclusions
Wafer Fab Equipment Forecast
Chapter Highlights
Wafer Fab Equipment Forecast: 1992 Market Decline Followed by Modest Growth
Assumptions behind Oui Forecast
Wafer Fab Equipment Meirkets
Dataquest Perspective
Silicon Wafer Forecast
Chapter Highlights
U.S. Market Pulse
Recap 1991
Forward to 1992
U.S. Silicon Market Conclusions
Japanese Market Pulse
Recap 1991
Forward to 1992
Japanese Silicon Market Conclusions
European Market Pulse
Recap 1991
Forward to 1992
European Silicon Market Conclusions
Asia/Pacific Market Pulse
Recap 1991
Forward to 1992
Asia/Pacific Silicon Market Conclusions
1-1
2-1
2-1
2-1
2-1
2-4
2-5
2-6
2-6
2-7
3-1
3-1
3-1
3-6
3-7
3-8
4-1
4-1
4-1
4-1
4-3
4-5
4-5
4-5
4-6
4-7
4-7
4-7
4-8
4-9
4-9
4-9
4-10
4-12
Table of Contents (Continued)
5.
Semiconductor Consumption Forecast
Semiconductor Consumption
6. Semiconductor Production Forecast
Semiconductor Production
Appendix A—^Regional Economic Outlook for Oiu" Forecast
The Regional Economic Outlook for Our Forecast
North America
Japan
Europe
Asia/Pacific
Appendix B—^Exchange Rates
Page
5-1
5-1
6-1
6-1
A-1
A-1
A-1
A-2
A-3
A-3
B-1
List of Tables
Table
2-1
2-2
2-3
3-1
3-2
4-1
4-2
4-3
4-4
4-5
5-1
5-2
6-1
6-2
A-1
B-1
^^..^^^^.^^^^^..^^^^-^.
Page
Worldwide Capital Spending by Region - Historical, Includes Merchant and Captive
Semiconductor Companies
Worldwide Capital Spending by Region - Forecast, Includes Merchant and Captive
Semiconductor Companies
Estimated 1991 and 1992 Calendar Year Top 10 Rankings for Semiconductor Capital
Spending
Worldwide Wafer Fab Equipment Market - Historical, 1986-1991
Worldwide Wafer Fab Equipment Market - Forecast, 1991-1996
Forecast of Captive and Merchant Silicon and Merchant Epitaxial Wafers
Forecast of Merchant Epitaxial Wafer Consumption by Region
Forecast of Captive and Merchant Silicon Wafer Consumption by Region
Forecast of 200mm Wafer Consumption by Region
Asia/Pacific ROW Forecast Silicon Wafer Consumption
Worldwide Semiconductor Consumption by Region—^Historical, Includes Merchant
and Captive Semiconductor Companies
Worldwide Consumption by Region, Merchant Semiconductor Sales Only—^Forecast
Worldwide Semiconductor Production by Region—^Historical, Merchant and Captive
Semiconductor Company Sales
Worldwide Semiconductor Production by Region—^Forecast, Merchant and Captive
Semiconductor Company Sales
International Economic Forecasts, GDP/GNF Growth Rates
Exchange Rates per Dollar for Japanese Yen and ECU: 1985-1991
2-2
2-3
2-4
3-2
3-4
4-2
4-2
4-3
4-5
4-11
5-2
5-3
6-2
6-3
A-5
B-1
Chapter 1
Executive Summary:
More Moderate Growth
The semiconductor industry is passing from adolescence to a more
mature stage. The incredible surge in semiconductor investment that
took place from 1986 to 1991 is waning. Spurts in growth such as the
industry experienced over the last six years are less likely to occur
without new product drivers or the opening of new markets.
Dataquest believes that the end of the Japan-led boom marks a major
turning point for the global semiconductor industry. Worldwide fiveyear growth rates in semiconductor production, capital spending,
wafer fab equipment purchases, and silicon wafer consumption wiU
decelerate from historical double-digit growth to single-digit levels.
Since 1986, semiconductor companies have dramatically increased their
level of investment in new plants and equipment. The level of investment in 1991 was almost three times the investment level in 1986.
Dataquest does not believe that the investment growth rate of the past
five years is sustainable. We believe that capital spending will decline
9.5 percent worldwide in 1992.
The surge in capital spending over the past five years was largely
attributed to an exceptionally strong investment boom in Japan, which
was fueled by cheap money and double-digit growth in the global PC
market. The spending binge has left several segments of the semiconductor industry with excess semiconductor fab capacity. With excess
capacity hanging over the market, there is little opportunity to raise
chip prices. Consequently, semiconductor company profits are being
squeezed and capital spending budgets cut.
We expect a weak environment for capital spending to persist through
1993. Japanese companies, which accoimt for 44 percent of worldwide
capital spending, will cut their spending 24 percent in 1992. Japanese
banks have difficult financial challenges because of asset deflation,
and these problems are spilling over into the manufacturing sector of
the economy in the form of tighter lending policies. We expect the
problems in Japan to persist into next year, resulting in only a moderate semiconductor capital spending upturn in 1993.
On the other hand, growth in semiconductor device production is
expected to bottom in 1992 and begin picking up steam in 1993. Production is tied very closely to a global recovery, which we believe will
SEMM-S\/C-MT-€201
©1992 Dataquest Incoiporated
August 17, 1992
1-2
Semiconductor
Equipment,
Manufacturing,
and Materials
be weak in 1992 and well under way in 1993. However, Dataquest
does not see any single product on the horizon that will boost IC
demand as the PC did following the 1985 recession. Nor do we expect
the demand for ICs in emerging markets such as Eastern Europe,
China, or India to have much of an impact on global production over
the next several years.
Therefore, we are forecasting semiconductor device production to
grow at a 9.2 percent conipound annual growth rate (CAGR) through
1996. This growth rate is well below the 13.1 percent CAGR achieved
over the last five years and reflects the slower growth environment for
the entire semiconductor industry.
Project Analyst: Mark FitzGerald
Contributors: Peggy Marie Wood and Rebecca Burr
August 17, 1992
©1992 DaJaquest InconxMated
SEMM-SVC-MT-fl201
Chapter 2
Semiconductor Capital Spending
Forecast ^ ^ ^ ^ — ^ ^ ^ . . ^
Chapter Highlights
• Worldwide capital spending down 9.5 percent in 1992
• Downtiun led by sharp cuts by Japanese companies
• Korean companies push ahead with aggressive spending
• Modest spending cuts in the United States
• Spending in Europe continues to decline
• Dataquest forecasts modest worldwide upturn in 1993
This section presents data on worldwide semiconductor capital spending by region. Capital spending in a region includes spending by all
semiconductor producers in that region^ including spending by merchant and captive producers as well as foreign producers. For instance,
capital spending in North America includes spending by Delco, IBM,
and Japanese and European semiconductor coDntpanies building wafer
fabrication, assembly, and test facilities in the United States.
Yearly exchange rate variations can have a significant effect on the
1985 through 1991 data in the following tables. Appendix B provides
a more complete explanation of the exchange rates used in this
dociunent.
Capital Spending Forecast
Table 2-1 shows historical capital spending for the years 1985 through
1991, and Table 2-2 shows forecast spending for the period from 1991
through 1996. Table 2-3 shows the rankings for semiconductor capital
spending for the top 10 companies.
Semiconductor Capital Spending Forecast: A Secular
Change for the Market
Worldwide semiconductor capital spending is expected to decline
9.5 percent in 1992 (see Table 2-2) largely because of severe cuts in
spending by Japanese companies. Dataquest believes that 1992 will
mark the bottom of the spending cycle. However, we are only forecasting moderate growth in spending in 1993. Moreover, the five-year
worldwide compoimd annual growth rate for spending through 1996
is estimated to be 6.9 percent (see Table 2-2). This rate is at an historic
SEMM-SVC-MT-gzoi
©1992 Dataquest Incorporated
August 17, 1992
I
Table 2-1
^
"^
«
Worldwide Capital Spending by Region - Historical
Includes Merchant and Captive Semiconductor Companies
(Millions of U.S. Dollars)
North America
Percent Growth
Japan
Percent Growth
Europe
Percent Growth
I
Asia-Pacific/ROW
Percent Growth
Worldwide
Percent Growth
Source: Dataquest (August 1992)
?
1985
1986
2,629
-16.2
2,082
-20.8
3;336
-11.5
800
1,845
-44.7
765
4.8
534
-4.4
437
23.0
7,299
-10.0
-18.2
5,129
-29.7
1987
2,594
1988
3,434
32.4
1989
3,875
12.8
5.5
31.8
875
4,610
89.6
984
5,473
18.7
1,211
5,425
-0.9
1,512
14.4
534
22.2
6,435
25.5
12.5
1,060
98.5
10,088
56.8
23.1
1,905
79.7
12,464
23.6
24.9
1,495
-21.5
12,520
0.4
24.6
2,432
1990
4,088
3
5
1
2
12
i
Table 2-2
Worldwide Capital Spending by Region - Forecast
Includes Merchant and Captive Semiconductor Companies
(Millions of U.S. Dollars)
North America
Percent Growth
1992
3,851
3,559
-5.8
-7.6
4,312
Japan
5,636
Percent Growth
Europe
3.9
1,234
-18.4
2,274
52.1
Percent Growth
Asia/Pacific-ROW
Percent Growth
Worldwide
Percent Growth
Source: Dataquest (August 1992)
a
1991
12,995
3.8
-23.5
1,087
-11.9
2,808
23.5
11,765
-9.5
1993
3,754
1994
4,344
5.5
15.7
4,601
61
5,107
1,011
-7.0
2,676
-4.7
12,042
2.4
11.0
1,110
9.8
2,914
8.9
13,475
11.9
1995
4,883
12.4
5
5,551
8.7
6
1,359
22.5
3,138
in
14,932
10.8
1
2-4
Semiconductor Equipment, Manuliacturing, and Materials
Table 2-3
Estimated 1991 and 1992 Calendar Year Top 10
Rankings for Semiconductor Capital Spending
(Millions of U.S. Dollars)
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
Intel
Fujitsu
Samsung
NEC
Toshiba
Motorola
Hitachi
Mitsubishi
Goldstar
Sony
Matsushita
1991
Rank
2
1
8
4
3
•5
7
6
11
9
10
1992
1991 Rank
1
948.0
2
1,147.2
530.0
3
752.2
4
789.3
673.0
646.0
664.5
410.0
519.8
462.6
1992
1,000.0
769.6
730.0
654.2
Percentage
Change
5.5
-32.9
37.7
-13.0
654.2
550.0
-17.1
-18.3
500.3
461.8
380.0
365.6
344.8
-22.6
-30.5
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
-7.3
-29.7
-25.5
Source: Dataquest (August 1992)
low (see Table 2-1) and is caused in the short term by weak global
economic conditions and an overhang in production capacity. Over the
longer term, the slower growth scenario is attributable to weaker
growth in the global economy and uncertainty about the emergence of
a high-octane semiconductor appUcation.
Worst-Case Scenario Unfolds for Japanese
Semiconductor Capital Spending
Our recent survey of Japanese device makers reveals that capital
spending on new plant and equipment will drop 24 percent in
1992. Sharp cuts in spending can be attributed to several factors,
including a large production capacity overhang caused by the boom
in spending in the late 1980s, weak domestic and export markets,
and moiuiting trade friction with Western countries.
The vertically integrated Japanese computer makers will make on
average the smallest cuts in semiconductor capital spending in 1992.
Even so, we expect companies such as Fujitsu, NEC, and Toshiba to
cut spending leveb 13 to 30 percent (see Table 2-3). These companies face a weak domestic economic environment and poor returns
on their 4Mb DRAM investment. Dataquest estimates tihat Japanese
4Mb lines are running at 60 to 65 percent capacity utilization.
The slow adoption of the 4Mb DRAM and an anticipated slow
ramp up of the 16Mb DRAM has caused the computer makers to
turn cautious on capital spending. In addition, Korean DRAM vendors are continuing to win a larger share of the market, thus
adding to the competitive pressures in the memory segment.
August 17, 1992
©1992 Dataquest Incoqiorated
SEMM-SVC-Krr-9201
Semiconductor Capital Spending Forecast
2-5
Weak domestic consxuner demand and weak export markets have
prompted the large vertically integrated consumer electronic companies to deeply cut their spending on their semiconductor operations.
Consumer electronic equipment inventories continue to mount,
although companies such as Sony and Matsushita are doing a better job at managing the problem than they were at the beginning
of the year. However, shrinking profit margins and quarterly losses
suggest that capital spending by constmier electronic companies will
not snap back in 1993.
Japanese steel companies such as Kawasaki Steel and NKK, which
were late entrants to the semiconductor game, are in a more
precarious position. In a scramble to diversify beyond the declining steel industry, the largest steel companies in Japan made
investments in the semiconductor business in the late 1980s.
Dataquest beheves that the production capacity brought on by the
steel companies is currently running at less than 50 percent capacity
utilization. Moreover, Japanese steel companies will face serious
problems filling those factories if the weak economic environment
persists because steel companies do not have a captive market for
their devices.
Many Japanese companies announced delays in 200mm line investment plans late in 1991. Japanese companies have not earned a
return on their 4Mb investment, and their strategy to achieve this
retiun is to postpone the next round of investment in 16Mb lines.
However, because of the severity of capital spending cuts in 1992,
we now expect that some of these delayed lines will not be built
at all.
Japanese spending on advanced semiconductor lines in the United
States and Europe is also expected to decline. Though Japanese
companies have completed most of their "green-field" investment in
offshore fabs, many capacity additions to these faciUties are not
expected to proceed anytime soon.
U.S. Spending Pulled Down by Japanese
Companies' Cuts
Capital spending in the United States will decline by 7.6 percent in
1992. The largest fall-off will be experienced by Japanese companies
spending in the United States, from more than $400 million in 1991
to less than $200 million in 1992. This precipitous drop will be
attributed to the completion of some major green-field projects by
Japanese companies such as Fujitsu and NEC.
Spending by U.S. companies in the United States will be down
slightly in 1992. Investment in new^ microprocessor lines by Intel,
E>igital Equipment Corporation, and Hewlett-Packard will prevent
capital spending from decreasing steeply. Intel is building a new
development line in Oregon and is converting its R&D line in
Santa Clara, California to 200mm. There also are rumors that Intel
SEMM-SVC-MT-9201
©1992 Dataquest Incorporated
August 17, 1992
2-6
Semiconductor Equipment, IVIanufacturing, and IVIaterials
has selected Austin, Texas as a site for a new green-field facility, on
which construction will begin either at the end of the year or the
beginning of 1993. Both Digital and HP are commercializing their
RISC microprocessor technology and are investing in fabs to ramp
device production.
Other new fab activity not in the MPU area includes National
Semiconductor's expansion in Arlington, Texas and AT&T's new
line in Orlando, Florida. IBM is also refurbishing buildings 322 and
323 in East Fishkill, New York.
Europe Expected to Decline through 1993
Capital spending in Europe is forecast to dedine 11.9 percent in
1992 and sink another 7 percent in 1993. The bleak outlook for
spending is based on steep cuts by European companies and cutbacks by Japanese companies that have recently completed a round
of investment in new fabs. The situation would be much worse if
it were not for the major projects being undertaken by IBM in
France and Intel in Ireland.
However, Intel will complete the lion's share of its spending in
1992, leaving only the IBM project as the main driver for spending
in 1993. Consequently, we are expecting 1993 to be a down year as
well. Dataquest is more optimistic for 1994 and beyond because we
expect the European economy to begin benefiting from unification.
Even so, the timing on this upturn is still very speculative.
Korean Companies Place Some Big Bets
Dataquest believes that the Asia/Pacific region will be the one
bright spot in terms of semiconductor capital spending in 1992. We
are forecasting that spending will leap ahead 23.5 percent. The
Korean chaebols (conglomerates) wiU account for the bulk of that
spending. Investment in Korean fabs is expected to climb to
U.S.$1.8 billion in 1992.
In the short term, with excess worldwide DRAM capacity, the gamble for the Korean companies rests on the strength and timing of
the recovery in the U.S. and European economies. If the Western
economies have a strong recovery over the next several years,
DRAM demand will grow quickly and the Korean companies may
exit the recession with more market share than they had prior to
the recession. Toshiba pursued a similar strategy in the 1985 recession with the 1Mb DRAM and was very successful. On the other
hand, if the Western economies limp out of recession and there is
only moderate growth in DRAM demand, then these investments
are not expected to pay off financially.
There is a more fundamental problem for the chaebols over the
longer term. History has shown that the health of a company's
commodity semiconductor operations cannot rest on merchant
sales of devices alone, but is increasingly dependent on captive
operations using those devices.
August
17, 1992
©1992
Dataquest
IncorporatBd
SEMM-SVC-MT-fl201
Semiconductor Capital Spending Forecast
*
2-7
Yet, Korean electronic products are losing their competitive edge.
Increases in wages are driving up the prices of Korean electronic
products; at the same time, their quality still lags behind high-end
Japanese and U.S. products. On the low end, developing countries
such as Qiina and Thailand, with much lower labor costs, axe
grabbing market share.
Dataquest believes that Asia/Padfic investment will decline 4.7 percent in 1993 as the three large Korean companies complete the current round of investment in 4Mb and 16Mb lines. However, we
expect Asia/Padfic to remain the fastest-growing region in terms of
capital spending. Much of the growth in capital spending will occiu*
outside of Korea, which now dominates the semiconductor industry
in the region. As countries such as China and India develop, we
believe that semiconductor production capabiUty will be a key
strategy in building their industrial infrastructiue.
Conclusions
Capital spending growth rates are expected to decline from the
double-digit compound annual growth rates of the late 1980s to
single-digit growth over the next five years. The biggest change in
spending levels will happen in Japan as companies adjust to a more
restricted capital environment. U.S. spending, on the other hand, will
benefit from the region's strong position in the microprocessor market,
although we do not expect capital spending levels to achieve the
growth rates of the past decade. European spending will remain in a
downward spiral through 1993, though we expect unification to kick
life back into this market toward the middle of the decade. And finally, the Asia/Padfic region is expected to remain the star performer in
terms of spending, although we strongly believe that there will be a
rotation away from the cvurent countries that dominate the capital
spending roster in this region.
SEMM-SVC-MT-S201
©1992 Dataquest Inconxxated
August 17, 1992
Chapter 3
Wafer Fab Equipment Forecast ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ i
Chapter Highlights
• Equipment market down 10 percent in 1992
• Moderate upturn in 1993; strong bounce in 1994
• Equipment prices move higher, forcing vendors to compete on cost
of ownership
• CVD, PVD, and dry-etch thin-fikn markets outperform other
categories
This section presents historical and forecast data on the worldwide
wafer fabrication equipment market. Table 3-1 presents the historical
data by equipment category for the years 1986 through 1991, and
Table 3-2 shows forecast data by category for the years 1991 through
19%.
Yearly exchange rate variations can have a significant effect on the
1985 through 1991 data in the following tables. For more information
about the exchange rates used and their effects, refer to Appendix B.
Wafer Fab Equipment Forecast: 1992 IMarlcet Decline
Followed by Modest Growth
The go-for-broke capital spending spree of the late 1980s has left
excess capacity hanging like a dark cloud over the semiconductor
industry. A 2 percent dedine in wafer fab equipment spending in
1990, followed by only 3 percent growth in 1991, clearly reflected the
beginning of a capital spending slowdown. This year, however, many
semiconductor manufacturers have slammed on the brakes and cut
capital investment to such an extent that on a worldwide basis we
anticipate a 10 percent dedine in wafer fab equipment demand.
Dataquest evaluates its five-year forecast for wafer fabrication equipment demand about every six months. The midyear forecast outlook
presented here does not substantially differ from that published at the
end of 1991, at which time we anticipated an 8 percent decline in 1992
wafer fab equipment demand. As compared with our November 1991
forecast, we have moderated our expectations for growth in 1993 and
1994 downward by several percentage points. This modification is in
SEMM-SVC-MT-9201
©1992 Dabquest Incoiporated
August 17, 1992
Table 3-1
Worldwide Wafer Fab Equipment Market •• Historical, 1986-1991
(Millions of U.S. Dollars)
1986
World Fab Equipmeni: Market
2,713
1987
3,141
1988
1989
1990
4,988
6,017
5,871
22
148
921
23
94
1,181
24
93
1,052
62
69
6
1,228
69
70
47
76
2
1,295
253
5
1,442
334
277
377
121
670
13
1,180
400
118
690
13
1,221
Lithography
@
Contact/Proximity
Projection
Steppers
31
171
363
Maskmaking Lithography
Direct-Write Lithography
51
68
1
685
149
X-Ray
sn
Total
Automatic Photoresist ProcefflSirtg Equipment
25
129
503
68
67
0
791
168
326
Etch and Clean
Wet Process
Dry Strip
Dry Etch
161
35
237
167
58
307
Ion Milling
Total
Deposition
8
441
8
540
100
533
10
920
218
237
260
251
466
302
611
368
717
409
Silicon Epitaxy
Metalorganic CVD
46
36
31
35
86
42
75
45
68
44
Molecular Beam Epitaxy
66
68
74
599
649
81
977
58
1,296
Chemical Vapor Eteposition
Physical Vapor Deposition
Total
1,173
i
Table 3-1 (Continued)
Worldwide Wafer Fab Equipment Market - Historical, 1986-1991
(Millions of U.S. Dollars)
Diffusion
1986
156
1987
145
1988
296
16
18
22
55
61
118
241
Rapid Thermal Processing
1989
331
25
1990
324
30
Ion Implantation
Medium Current
High Current
147
107
18
186
44
42
287
374
89
58
286
432
151
101
355
607
150
117
404
672
Factory Automation
81
99
130
195
91
368
605
216
Other Equipment
96
112
177
210
189
2,713
3,141
-19
16
4,988
59
6,017
21
5,871
-2
CD (Optical & SEM)
Wafer Inspection
Other Process Control
Total
Total World Fab Equipment
Percent Change
Note: Some columns do not add to totals shown because of rounding.
Source: Dataquest (August 1992)
i
114
250
7
55
10
119
High Voltage
Total
Process Control
i
131
301
25
457
18
377
370
g
Table 3-2
Worldwide Wafer Fab Equipment Market - Forecast, 1991-1996
(Millions of U.S. Dollars)
World Fab Equipment Modcet
Lithography
Contact/Proximity
Projection
Steppers
Maskmaking Lithography
Direct-Write Lithography
i
s
I
X-Ray
Total
Automatic Photoresist Processing Equipment
Etch and Qean
Wet Process
Dry Strip
Dry Etch
Ion Milling
Total
Deposition
Chemical Vapor Deposition
Physical Vapor Deposition
Sibcon Epitaxy
Metalorganic CVD
i
Molecular Beam Epitaxy
Total
1991
6,040
1993
6,036
1994
1995
7,145
8,218
16
57
1,035
63
69
20
15
62
1,200
76
86
38
14
67
1,380
91
97
53
1,260
363
1,477
430
1,702
490
355
105
640
14
390
115
710
16
465
135
850
17
530
155
990
19
1,114
1,231
1,467
1,694
680
450
60
45
52
755
495
53
50
57
900
585
68
60
63
1,045
1,287
1,410
1,676
1,919
1992
5,431
21
17
68
1,029
55
925
46
51
55
4
1,224
369
59
405
119
705
17
1,246
747
474
89
51
59
1,420
10
1,117
330
680
60
67
67
i
Table 3-2 (Continued)
Worldwide Wafer Fab Equipment Market Forecast, 1991-1996
(Millions of U.S. Dollars)
Diffusion
Rapid Thermal Processing
Ion Implantation
Medium Current
1991
335
1992
288
1993
325
1994
380
42
40
48
58
108
92
106
126
146
265
303
48
497
High Current
218
189
High Voltage
Total
Process Control
18
22
216
35
343
303
357
43
434
154
90
398
641
227
193
135
82
365
582
200
170
146
91
400
637
220
185
172
106
475
753
255
215
198
124
540
862
290
245
6,040
5,431
6,036
7,145
8,218
3
-10
11
18
15
CD (OpHcal & SEM)
Wafer Inspection
Other Process Control
Total
Factory Automation
Other Equipment
Total World Fab Equipment
Percent Change
Note: Soma columns do not add to totals shown because of rounding.
Source: Dataquest (August 1992)
i
1995
445
74
9
3-6
Semiconductor Equipment, Manufacturing, and iViateriaJs
response to our decidedly conservative position on the industry, which
we believe wUl continue to suffer from the problems of excess submicron capacity and weak global macroeconomic conditions.
Assumptions behind Our Forecast
In our November 1991 forecast for wafer fabrication equipment, we
presented four assumptions that constituted the foundation of our
five-year equipment forecast. Those assimiptions are reviewed in the
following paragraphs.
Macroeconomic
Assumptions
Our assumptions today regarding global macroeconomic conditioi\s
remain consistent with our view six months ago. The global economy is clearly weaker in 1992 than it was in 1991. The Japanese
and German economies are decelerating, the U.K. economy continues to have difficulties shaking off its recession, and the U.S.
economy has entered a period of very weak recovery. Both the
Japanese and European economies are expected to pick up in 1993,
but we beheve that, as with the U.S. economy, these recoveries wUl
be modest. We expect all major regions of the world to return to
healthy GNP growth in the 1994 through 1996 time frame.
Shifts in the Semiconductor Device Product Mix
Pataquest is forecasting that the combined MOB micro and MOS
logic categories in the device revenue product mix will continue
to increase as a percentage of the total market. MOS micro, the
fastest-growing segment of the worldwide IC market, is being
driven increasingly by system-on-a-chip ultralarge-acale integration
(ULSI) trends and the adoption of application-spedfic standard
product chip set solutions for many end-use markets. The high
value-added, design-intensive nature of certain MOS micro segments, such as microprocessors and microperipherals, translates to
higher average selling prices (ASPs) and lower unit voliunes relative to the DRAM market. We do note that recent competitive market forces in the microprocessor arena are driving prices down.
However, microprocessors have yet to achieve the status of comimodity pricing that characterizes the DRAM marketplace.
Programmable logic devices, a subset of MOS logic, axe similar to
microcomponents in that they also represent high value-added, lowvolume manufacturing, which requires prop>ortionately less wafer
fab equipment than DRAMs. Shifts in ttie semiconductor device
product mix toward MOS micro and MOS logic segments characterized by high value-added, low-volume manufacturing will contribute to lower fabrication equipment unit demand and thus deceleration in the long-term growth rate for the wafer fab equipment
market.
Cost of Process Development and Advanced
Manufacturing
Escalates
We beheve that our premise still holds true that the rising cost of
advanced technology is driving a number of semiconductor companies to pursue joint-development and/or manufacturing pacts as a
August 17, 1992
©1992 Dataquest Incorporated
SEMM-SVC-Mr-9201
Vifefer Fab Equipment Forecast
3-7
strategy to control both the costs and risks associated with
advanced technology development. We believe that such jointdevelopment and manufacturing strategies and shared foundry
facilities between semiconductor manufacturers will contribute to
a smaller number of megafabs being built in the future.
Increased Wafer Fab Equipment
Productivity
We maintain our position that wafer fab equipment will continue to
get more expensive, reflecting the increasingly sophisticated technical requirements of advanced submicron manufacturing. In response
to demands from semiconductor manufacturers for increased equipment productivity to offset higher equipment prices, wafer fab
equipment companies will continue to aggressively compete on
eqtiipment cost of ownership. Increased equipment productivity will
contribute to overall lower equipment imit demand. For example,
the newer models of steppers have significantly improved wafer
throughput as compared with tools available several years ago.
Stepper manufacturers today offer leading-edge machines with
throughput on the order of 60 wafers per hour, with some tools
achieving 80-plus wafer-per-hour processing capability. This improvemient in productivity has a direct impact of stepper imit demand
and is a key consideration in our forecast for steppers over the
next five years.
For the reasons cited, revenue growth in the wafer fab equipment
market primarily will reflect escalating ASPs of advanced equipment
technology. For a number of wafer fab equipment categories, unit
demand in 1996 is expected to be essentially flat relative to shipment levels in 1991.
Wafer Fab Equipment Markets
As the semiconductor industry continues to push into the submicron era, process complexity and fabrication technology requirements continue to increase dramatically. Lithography, deposition,
and etch/clean equipment continue to be the technology drivers
that fuel the wafer fabrication equipment industry's growth (see
Tables 3-1 and 3-2).
Dataquest anticipates i-line technology to dominate the stepper
product mix for new system shipments between 1991 and 1996.
I-line will be the stepper technology of choice as advanced microprocessor and ASIC designs push below O.S-micron geometries.
Advanced resolution techniques, such as phase shift masks and
newly announced illumination modification techniques, push i-line
resolution to the 0.35-micron regime with improved depth of focus.
Although such techniques are suited only for highly repetitive
device patterns such as memory products, conventional i-Une lens
systems are available that provide sub-0.5-micron lithographic capability regardless of the device pattern being printed. We expect
excimer/deep-UV systems to continue to gradually increase as a
percentage of new stepper shipments over the forecast period as
SEMM-SVC-MT-9201
©1992 Dataquest Incoipoiated
August 17, 1992
3-8
Semiconductor
Equipment, Manufacturing, and Materials
device manufacturers pursue research and development programs
for 64Mb and 256Mb DRAM processing.
The adoption of double-level metal technology for the 16Mb DRAM
generation, together with the rapid move toward triple- and even
four-level metal for MOS microprocessor and ASIC devices, will
continue to push the CVD, PVD, and dry etch thin films markets
to outperform the overall wafer fab equipment market. The dry
etch equipment market will experience healthy growth because of
the triple factors of increased dry etch process steps, complex new
plasma source technologies, and rapid ASP increase caused by the
need for tighter process control at sub-0.5 micron geometries.
In addition to the well-established low temperature, plasmaenhanced CVD reactor market, the thermal CVD market (including
metal CVD and thermally driven atmospheric and low-pressiu«
CVD) will experience healthy growth over the next five years
because of the continuing need for planarized device topology. New
organic CVD precursor sources will lead to precisely tailored metal
and dielectric CVD films that exactly satisfy specific device topology
requirements. Concurrently, new advances in PVD technology such
as advanced barrier metallization, laser reflow, and planarization of
sputtered aluminum will lend impetus to grovrth in the PVD market. Sputter equipment continues to offer excellent step coverage
capability at a very attractive cost of ownership.
Dataquest Perspective
One significant trend we expect for the wafer fab equipment industry
over the next five years will be the growth in the semiconductor
manufacturing base in Asia/Padfic. Dataquesf s capital spending estimates for 1991 show that Asia/Pacific represented about 12 percent of
total worldwide capital spending. We are forecasting that in 1996 this
region of the world will represent 22 percent of semiconductor capital
investment and will gain its share of the capital spending pie at the
expense of all other regions. This significant increase in capital spending activity in Asia/Padfic will translate to a substantially larger portion of worldwide wafer fab equipment expenditure in the futiue.
Asia/Pacific represents a significant market opportunity for wafer
fabrication equipment companies because the barriers to entry for
doing business in this regional market are fairly low. The cost structure for establishing local operations and providing service and support personnel is lower than in other regions of the world. U.S. and
European companies benefit from dose historical ties to the countries
of Asia/Padfic, and English is widely spoken throughout the region.
Japanese wafer fab equipment companies have already aggressively
targeted the Asia/Padfic region, and in 1991 they garnered an increase
in regional market share of more than 10 percentage points. Several
factors are behind their successful market penetration, including the
relative proximity of Japanese companies to fabs in Asia/Pacific, their
advanced technology product offerings focused on high-volume
August 17, 1992
©1992 Dataquest Incofporated
SEMM-S\/C-MT-9201
Wafer Fab Equipment Forecast
^
manufacturing, and the significant emphasis that Japanese vendors
place on customer support. These factors have allowed Japanese
equipment companies to expand their presence from a mere 10 percent
share of the Asia/Pacific market in 1982 to more than 50 percent share
last year.
Although some larger companies, such as Applied Materials, Lam, and
Varian, have already established a direct presence in Asia/Pacific,
many smaller wafer fab equipment companies use representatives and
distributors to sell and support their products. We bdieve that more
and more wafer fab equipment companies will need to have a local
presence in order to stay close to their customers and effectively compete in this high-growth regional market.
SEMM-SVC-MT-%01
©1992 Dabquest Incoiporated
August 17, 1992
Chapter 4
Silicon Wafer Forecast ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ .
Chapter Highlights
• The U.S. semiconductor industry is shaking off the recession. But
for those that have been in the business a while, the recovery in
silicon demand won't be anything to write home about.
• Silicon demand continues to deteriorate in Japan and the unnerving
aspect is that the decline is accelerating. We expect the bottom of
the silicon cycle in Japan to hit in late simuner.
• Last year was so bad, Eiuvpean silicon demand had nowhere to go
but up. But Dataquest remains positive about the long-term
prospects for European Silicon demand.
• Asia/Pacific demand steams ahead, but there are some icebergs out
there that could make the voyage rough.
U.S. Marlcet Pulse
Recap 1991
The 1991 U.S. silicon market began on a weak note because of the
Middle East crisis. Wafer demand picked u p following the conclusion of the war and growth was moderate through May 1991. But
as the industry moved into the summer months, typically a slow
season for semiconductor manufacturers, wafer demand began
declining more precipitously than could be explained by seasonal
factors. The fourth quarter saw this summer decline turn into a
full-fledged rout and the fall turned out to be the worst quarter of
1991.
At the end of the year, it was apparent that silicon consumption
had experienced its first negative growth since 1986. Dataquesfs
market siuvey indicates that the total U.S. silicon market declined
4.5 percent in 1991 (see Table 4-1). Epitaxial wafers increased
4.0 percent (see Table 4-2), and prime, test, and monitor wafers
decreased 5.9 percent (see Table 4-3).
Wafer demand dropped off at most semiconductor companies as
business uncertainty, weak employment statistics, and plummeting
consumer confidence stalled the economic recovery. Particularly hard
hit were those device makers with sales tied to large mainframe
computers, midrange computers, and military applications. Companies such as IBM, Texas Instruments, Digital Equipment Corporation, and Harris cut way back on their purchase of wafers at the
end of 1991.
SEMM-SVC-MT-9201
©1992 Dataquest Incorporated
August 17, 1992
4-2
Semiconductor Equipment, IVIanutacturing, and IVIateriais
Table 4-1
Forecast of Captive and Merchant Silicon* and
Merchant Epitaxial Wafers
(Units—Millions of Square Inches)
United States
Percentage Growth
Japan
Percentage Growth
Europe
Percentage Growth
Asia/Padfic-ROW
Percentage Growth
Total
1991
611
-4.5
1992 1993
642
5.0
689
7.3
1994
1995
746
8.2
789
5.8
5-Year
CAGR
1996
(%)
6.2
824
4.6
1,046 1,012 1,081 1,161 1,239 1,319
5.4 -3.2
7.4
6.7
6.5
6.9
208 213 227 246 267 296
-11.7
7.0
8.0
8.8 10.5
2.3
194 218 248 283 316 353
15 12.2 13.6 14.3 11.6 11.8
2,059 2,085 2,245 2,436 2,611 2,793
7.2
7.0
0.5
1.2
7:7
8.5
4.8
7.3
12.7
6.3
'Includes prime, test, and monitor wafers
Source: Dataquest (August 1992)
Table 4-2
Forecast of Merchant Epitaxial Wafer Consumption by
Region (Units—^Millions of Square Inches)
United States
Percentage Growth
Japan
Percentage Growth
Europe
Percentage Growth
Asia/Padfic-ROW
Percentage Growth
Total
1991 1992 1993
111
99
92
8.0 11.8
4.0
104 106 118
2.3 11.5
11.6
21
26
20
5.4 21.5
7.4
8
7
9
43.5 17.9 16.7
222 234 264
5.4 12.7
8.7
5-Year
CAGR
1994 1995 1996
(%)
8.4
123 130 137
11.4
5.0
5.8
124 128 133
5.0
5.2
4.0
2.5
36
12.1
30
33
9.0
16.4
9.0
17
20.6
13
10
11.7 27.9 30.0
7.7
288 304 322
9.1
5.5
6.1
Source: Dataquest (August 1992)
The turmoil in the PC industry because of pricing pressures did
not slow down the demand for semiconductors in this segment.
The real strength in the PC industry appeared to come from MOS
logic and analog devices with workstations, high-end 486DX-based
August 17, 1992
©1992 Dataquest Incorporated
Sa/IM-SVO-MT-9201
4-3
Silicon Wafer Forecast
Table 4-3
Forecast of Captive and Merchant Silicon* Wafer Consumption by Region (Units—^Millions of Square Inches)
United States
Percentage Growth
Japan
Percentage Growth
Europe
Percentage Growth
Asia/Padfic-ROW
Percentage Growth
Total
5-Year
CAGR
1995 1996
(%)
5.8
658 688
4.5
5.8
4.7
1,111 1,186
7.2
6.7
6.7
234 260
1991 1992 1993 1994
520 543 578 622
7.6
6.4
4.5
-5.9
942 906 963 1,037
in
6.3
4.8 -3.8
188 191 201 215
8.8 10.8
6.9
5.4
1.9
-13.3
188 210 239 273 303 336
6.6 12.0 13.5 14.4 11.0 11.0
1,837 1,850 1,981 2,148 2,307 2,470
7.4
8.4
0.7
-0.4
7.1
7.1
12.4
6.1
'Includes prime, test, and monitor wafers
Source: Dataquest (August 1992)
PCs, and low-end 386SX-based notebook PCs being the major driving forces. In fact, we believe that the collapse of desktop PC
prices has slowed the decline in PC unit growth rates since more
affordable machines zire now on the market.
The weak market for semiconductors in 1991 and a fab overcapacity problem is prompting many companies to close marginal fabs.
AMD, Intel, Seeq, and Western Digital have closed fabs or
announced closings in 1991. Dataquest expects this trend to continue into 1992 with National already announcing the closiu^e of
three California lines. Oiu- new silicon wafer forecast reflects this
decrease in wafer start capacity, which is primarily in fabs running
smaller-diameter wafers.
Forward to 1992
The first quarter of 1992 has seen wafer demand improve along
with the rest of the U.S. economy. Dataquesf s 1992 forecast calls
for total silicon consumption to increase 5.0 percent; epi wafers by
8.0 percent; and prime, test, and monitor wafers by 4.5 percent.
Nevertheless, these growth rates are very moderate by historical
levels, especially for a postrecession year, which typically resvdts in
a surge in demand.
The strength of the recovery in the U.S. economy hinges on the
consumer, who accounts for two-thirds of the U.S. gross domestic
product. However, we believe that consumer spending will be
modest because of the cloudy outlook for decent consumer income
growth. We expect income to pick u p moderately as the econom.y
recovers. Rapid growth remains imlikely. The absence of fiscal
SEMM-SVC-MT-3201
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Dataquest Incorporated
August 17, 1992
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Semiconductor Equipment, Manulacturfng, and Materials
stimulus (remember those big federal deficits), the slowdown in
growth abroad—^which will limit the growth of U.S. exports—^and
the reluctance of U.S. companies to hire new workers aU should
cap the rate of income gains in 1992 and keep the U.S. consumer
cautious.
The U.S. Federal Reserve Board's discount rate cut in December
1991 laid the groundwork for a stronger first quarter. For the third
consecutive month, both bookings and billings of semiconductors in
April hit record highs.
Not surprisingly, semiconductor companies have reported firstquarter 1992 financials that look very good. Motorola's semiconductor revenue leaped 20.7 percent in the first quarter on a year-toyear comparison; the company's just-reported semiconductor revenue
totaled $1.1 biUion. AMD's microprocessor revenue (45 percent of
total) was up 24 percent quarter to quarter, driven by 386SX and
386DX sales. Other AMD revenue (55 percent of total) was up
3.5 percent quarter to quarter.
These very bullish trends have caused us to raise our midyear forecast for silicon slightly. Even so, we are still cautious about 1992
semiconductor production in the United States, because the firstquarter burst in semiconductor ordering is largely attributable to
inventory replenishment. Semiconductor distributor resales and orders have been strong—some of which is accounted for by seasonal
factors.
On the other hand, OEM business, a much stronger indicator of a
recovery, is firming but not as strong as distribution. Furthermore,
over the last six years the annual book-to-bill has peaked in April
four times and once in March and May. This historic trend may
suggest that the industry has seen the strongest growth of the year
in the first half. Until the OEM business gives a more positive
signal, we wiQ stick with our current forecast.
We also expect the U.S. 200inm market to be u p moderately in
1992 (see Table 4-4). Intel is moving aggressively on 200mm projects
at its Aloha, Oregon and Santa Qara, California sites, which will
increase its demand mostly for test and monitor wafers. We are
also more positive about wafer demand at IBM and have increased
our epi forecast. On a negative note. Motorola's MOS 11 line is
ramping very slowly.
On the 200mm supply side, we expect intensified Japanese competition in the United States because of the delays in the ramp of the
Japanese 200mm market. Much of the 200mm wafer production
capacity installed in Japan will now be searching for international
markets.
August 17, 1992
©1992 Dalaquest Incoipoiated
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Silicon Wfetfer Forecast
Table 4-4
Forecast of 200mm Wafer Consumption by Region
(Millions of Units)
United States
Japan
Europe
Asia/Padfic-ROW
Total
1991
0.5
0.3
0.2
0.1
1.1
1992
0.6
0.4
0.2
0.1
1.4
1993
0.8
0.6
0.3
0.2
1.9
1994
1.2
2.4
0.4
0.4
4.3
1995
1.4
3.3
0.7
0.6
6.0
1996
1.8
3.5
0.8
0.6
6.7
5 Year
CAGR
(%)
30.2
61.9
34.7
56.1
44.9
Source: Dataquest (August 1992}
U.S. Silicon Market Conclusions
All in all, we expect U.S. wafer demand to be tepid in 1992. It is
this climate that has historically produced fierce pricing pressures in
the industry and we do not expect 1992 to be an exception to the
rale. The distinguishing factor for successful wafer vendors in 1992
may be the quality of their customer base, as the rising tides of
recovery are not expected to raise all boats.
Japanese Market Pulse
R e c a p 1991
The demand for silicon in Japan was robust through the first half
of 1991. However, consumption began to fall off in the fotirth
quarter, and total consumption of silicon wafers in Japan grew
5.4 percent in 1991. The strongest demand was in epitaxial wafers,
which grew 11.6 percent, pushed ahead by the power module
market. The demand for prime, test, and monitor wafers grew
4.8 percent.
For most of 1991, Japan's economy appeared to have escaped the
grip of recession that slowed Western economies. The Middle East
crisis proved to be more of a political hot potato than a stumbling
block for Japanese industry. Oil prices fluctuated widely before and
diuing the crisis, causing a great deal of concern for Japanese
industry. But with the successful conclusion of the crisis, the threat
of higher oil prices faded and the unprecedented expansion of the
Japanese economy appeared on track.
However, by summer the first cracks in the Japanese expansion
could be seen. The Bank of Japan's tight monetary policy was having its intended effect on the excesses of the bubble economy. Real
estate prices had collapsed, even if banks and investment companies
failed to recognize the lower valuations. The stock market had
fallen by more than a third from its historical peak, and consumer
confidence was beginning to wane.
SEMM-SVC-MT-9201
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Semiconductor
Equipment,
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and Materials
For the semiconductor industry, concern began to mount as electronic equipment inventories continued to build. Many companies
had expected the Western export markets to shake off the recession
and soak up the growing inventory of consumer products. But
Christmas season demand fell short of the mark as consumer confidence sank to new lows in the West.
In addition, deflation in the Japanese real estate sector and the
decline of Japanese equities kicked the wind out of Japanese business. Companies that depended on the growth of equities or real
estate to prop up their balance sheets quickly found that the rules
of the game had changed. Retained earnings derived from operating
profits would now be required to sustain growth, but earnings in
the current environment were difficult to generate. Something had
to give and it was capital spending.
By the fourth calendar quarter Japanese companies began to cut
their FY1991 capital spending. The cuts particularly hit computer
and office equipment purchases, which exacerbated the already high
electronic equipment inventory levels. During SEMICON/Japan in
December 1991, it was quite evident to many silicon wafer vendors
that 1992 was going to be a down year—^the first since 1986.
Forward to 1992
Nearly halfway through calendar year 1992, there appears little
chance that Japanese silicon demand will turn u p sharply. Industrial
production dropped a seasonally adjusted 2.8 percent in March
from February, and fell 5.3 percent compared with levels of a year
ago. March was the sixth consecutive month in which production
fell on a year-over-year basis. Worse yet, these declines are accelerating. From November through March, production registered successive year-over-year declines of 1.0, 1.9, 4.0, 4.6, and 5.3 percent. For
the entire first quarter, output plunged an adjusted 3.2 percent.
For April, the Ministry of International Trade and Industry (Mill)
forecast a 0.9 percent decline in industrial output. M i l l has
described the outiook for industrial production as "considerably
severe," saying that Japan is likely to see output drop in the
second quarter of 1992.
On the positive side, Japanese electronic equipment manufacturers
are cutting back production and are continuing to bring inventories
into line. Inventories had been building u p through January 1992
and have since been declining. From a fundamental point of view,
this means that Japanese electronic manufacturers are turning the
comer. Silicon demand, which has been down sharply in the first
calendar quarter of 1992, is expected to bottom in summer and see
modest growth in the second half of the year. Even so, demand in
1992 is expected to shrink 3.2 percent year-to-year.
Over the longer term, there is a chance that the downturn will
impact Japanese semiconductor production more severely than other
sectors of industry for two reasons. First, we expect trade friction
caused by mounting trade deficits to aggravate the already weak
August 17, 1992
©1992 Dataquest Incorporated
SEMM-SVC-MT-9201
Silicon V\fetfer Forecast
4-7
export picture for semiconductors. Because Japan is a net exporter
of devices, the mounting trade deficit with the United States, and
especially Europe, is reigniting the call for protectionist measures. It
is possible that this problem will haunt the Japanese semiconductor
industry well past 1992 and cause slower growth in silicon demand
once the general economy turns up.
Second, there is some risk that the downturn in capital spending is
the beginning of a structural change in the Japanese semiconductor
industry. Early in the last decade Japanese companies made a conscious decision to pursue the commodity memory market. It was a
strategy that proved very successful because of the PC boom and
abdication of the memory market by U.S. companies.
However, the Achilles heel of this strategy is becoming apparent.
Squeezed from below by low-cost Asian memory producers and
from above by the increasingly fragmented application-specific
nature of the MOS microcomponents and MOS logic makers in the
United States, Japanese device companies are scrambling for a strategy. Complicating their dilemma is the large capacity they have
installed and the slower adoption of the advanced memory
products in end-use applications.
These problems threaten the long-term growth of the Japanese
silicon market, and consequently we have lowered our five-year
compound annual growth rate for silicon in Japan to 4.8 percent.
We have also cut back oiu' growth rate for 200mm wafer constomption in Japan. Many Japanese companies continue to push out their
plans for adding 200mm capacity, and it is now likely that some of
these fabs will not be biiilt at all. We expect capital spending on
200mm lines to pick u p in the fourth quarter of 1992 at reduced
levels. Based on this timing, we are forecasting 200mm wafer
demand to grow rapidly in 1994.
Japanese Silicon Market Conclusions
Japan will remain the largest market for silicon. However, structural
problems threaten to derail the historical growth this market has
enjoyed over the last 10 years. The dilemma for the Japanese semiconductor industry would be resolved if there was a surge in
demand for consumer electronics, which would soak u p the excess
capacity in the electronic food chain. But slower economic growth
in the industrialized nations emd the lack of any product driving
device demand has caused us to be more cautious about the Japanese silicon market.
European Market Pulse
R e c a p 1991
The demand for silicon in Europe started out on a weak note in
1991 and got worse. Sihcon consumption declined 11.7 percent in
1991, the worst year on record since the 1985 recession. The
domestic Eiuopean companies whose semiconductor programs
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Semiconductor Equipment, Manufacturing, and l\Aaterials
were suffering deep losses closed facilities and cut production,
accounting for the lion's share of the decline in silicon demand.
In addition, slower silicon demand at transplant fabs hurt the
demand for silicon. Texas Instruments' Avezzano, Italy line
experienced delays and the ramp of the fab, beginning in the fell
of 1991, was slow because of the global downturn in TI's business.
The weak market for the 4Mb DRAM also caused Japanese operations such as NEC and Fujitsu to cut their silicon usage.
The European economy was arguably the biggest drag on silicon
demand. At the beginning of 1991 only the United Kingdom was
in recession, but as the year groimd on the other Western European
economies began to decelerate. Higher interest rates were the main
culprit.
The true cost of German unification gradually became apparent to
the Boira government over the course of the year. In response to
the inflationary pressures of unification, the Bundesbank pursued a
tight monetary poUcy, driving interest rates to the h i g h ^ t levels in
the European community. These high rates rippled across the rest
of Europe because the currencies of other European conununity
members are tied to the deutsche mark.
As a result, growth rates in most countries declined and the slower
growth had a deleterious impact on the entire electronic food chain
in Europe, including silicon.
Forward to 1992
The decline in 1991 sihcon consumption was more severe than we
had forecast. Consequently, we are revising our growth rate for
1992. At the beginning of the year we had estimated that silicon
consumption would shrink 2.8 percent in 1992. However, because of
the steep decline in 1991, we now expect consumption in 1992 to
grow 3.2 percent.
It looks as if European silicon consimiption has hit bottom and
may eke out sUght gains in 1992. We are encouraged by the
improving signs in the economy, which will benefit industrial production. The headway made by the Bundesbank on inflation is at
the top of the list. Consumer price inflation eased to 4.5 percent in
April from 4.8 percent in March. The March inflation rate probably
represents a peak, and we expect inflation to decline through most
of 1992. A dear trend on inflation is one of several developments
the Bundesbank will look for before easing monetary policy.
If German rates begin falling in the second half of 1992, then we
would expect a moderately strong upturn in indtistrial production
and silicon demand in 1993. As we look further out to the middle
of the decade, we believe that Eastern Europe will become more of
a positive factor in driving semiconductor demand.
If this were to happen, then it is reasonable to expect additional
investment in new fab capacity, which would drive the demand for
August 17, 1992
©1992 Dabquest Incorporated
SEMM-SVC-Mr-€201
Silicon Wafer iijrecast
4^
siUcon higher. But it is necessary to emphasize that the timing of
this trend on silicon demand is very speculative today.
European Silicon Market Conclusions
We remain positive about the long-term prospects for European silicon demand, even if we are less sure of its timing. Europe
accotinted for 17 percent of the worldwide semiconductor consumption in 1991 and 12.3 percent of the production. It is a net importer
of devices. The European Community (EC) is expected to try to
close this gap by encouraging additional investment in domestic
production.
Though the formation of a unified Europe in 1992 is certainly not
the compelling reason for investing in new fabs that many people
thought it would be several years ago, we believe that it may yet
prove to be a boon to European device production. Western Europe
will certainly be a imified market larger than the United States, as
has been well advertised by the EC. But more important, we
believe, will be the Etu-opean commimities' access and cultural ties
to Eastern Europe and the former Soviet states. As these regions
begin to develop, we expect Western European semiconductor
production to benefit.
Asia/Pacific Market Pulse
Recap 1991
The 1991 growth of silicon consumption in Asia/Pacific fell below
our expectations. Demand posted a respectable 7.5 percent growth,
though down from the historic double-digit growth rates. The
deceleration can be attributed to recession in the Western economies, which this region's semiconductor manufecturers rely on for
the export of devices.
Also contributing to the single-digit growth rate was the inventory
buildup of wafers that took place in fall 1990. Several large Korean
semiconductor device makers purchased large inventories at that
time because the supply of silicon was tight. These inventories were
then carried over into 1991, resulting in lower purchases of wafers,
which did not reflect the actual production starts.
Even so, growth in Asia/Pacific silicon demand was the highest in
the world. The region is highly leveraged on DRAM production
and continues to make inroads into the major Western markets.
Samsung, the largest device vendor in Asia/Pacific, increased market share in the flat U.S. market largely because of stronger penetration of the 1Mb market.
The primary silicon consuming countries—^Korea, Taiwan, Hong
Kong, and Singapore—sustained strong growth rates in 1991. The
growth was fueled by a strong construction sector and a surge of
internal consumption and exports to other Asian countries,
Korea's gross national product expanded by 8.6 percent last year.
However, the strong growth hides some serious problems. Korea's
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Semiconductor Equipment, Manu^cturing, and i\^aterials
trade deficit worsened, the won lost ground against other major
currencies, and inflation stubbornly hovered in the 10 percent
range. In addition, the European Community began investigating
allegations that Korean companies were dumping DRAMS.
Taiwan's economy showed the most resilience among the four
tigers. GNP is estimated to have grown 7.2 percent in 1991. The
trade surplus widened to U.S.$15.3 bUlion. Many of Taiwan's industries benefited from strong exports to trading partners in Southeast
Asia and China, which were not impacted by the recession in the
West.
The export of electronic equipment did increase 4.7 percent to
U.S.$7.8 billion, which is respectable considering the downturn in
the worldwide computer industry. One industrial segment that saw
its weak exports to the West offeet by strong sales to other countries within Southeast Asia was Taiwan's low-cost clone manufacturers. As a result, silicon consumption held up throughout the year.
Tratds in Hong Kong and Singapore have a very small effect on
the Asia/Pacific silicon cyde. Hong Kong's economy is increasingly
tied to the economic boom under way in the southern provinces of
China, especially Guangdong- Hong Kong's GNP grew 3.9 percent
in 1991.
Singapore, on the other hand, is tied much more closely to the
United States; 21 percent of its nonoil exports go to the United
States. In 1991 Singapore's GNP grew 6.5 percent. Both countries
are increasing their participation in the PC done and disk drive
industry. We believe that the rate of investment in semiconductor
fabs to support these system businesses also will increase.
Forward to 1992
Silicon consumption in Asia/Pacific is expected to pick up in 1992,
benefiting from the stronger demand in the United States for semiconductors. We are estimating that the Asia/Fadfic consumptiDn of
silicon will grow 12.4 percent in 1992. Capital investment in fabs
continues at a breakneck pace, which bodes well for strong wafer
demand over the next several years. Oiur five-year CAGR for
Asia/Pacific silicon consumption is 12.4 percent.
The lion's share of the current capital spending on new fabs is
taking place in Korea. This spending trend will benefit silicon
constmiption over the next several yeare. We are forecasting Korea
consumption of silicon to grow 11.4 percent CAGR through 1996
(see Table 4-5).
But it is unlikely that the boom in capital spending can be maintained. It is becoming increasingly more difficult to maintain the
huge capital outlays for new fabs with local interest rates in the
17 percent range and Korean equity prices tumbling. Even the overseas markets are backing away from Korean paper as Samsung
realized recentiy when its convertible bond offering received a
dully reception in the Euromarkets.
August 17, 1992
©1992 Dataquest Incoipotated
SEMM-SVC-Mr-9201
4-11
Silicon \Naier Forecast
Table 4-5
Asia/Pacific ROW Forecast Silicon Wafer Consumption
(Millions of Square Inches)
1991
Total Prime,
Test, and
Monitor Wafers
Korea
Taiwan
ROW
Total Epitaxial
Wafers
Total Silicon
1992 1993 1994
1995
CAGR (%)
1996 1991-1996
187.8 210.3 238.7 273.1 303.2 336.5
126.0 137.0 157.0 180.0 199.0 216.0
39.0 48.0 52.0 55.0 57.0 58.0
22.8 25.3 29.7 38.1 47.2 62.5
6.6
194
7.8
218
9.1
248
10.1
283
13.0
316
16.9
353
12.4
11.4
8.3
22.3
20.6
12.7
Source: Deitaquest (August 1992)
Korean electronic products are also losing their competitive edge.
They lack the brand awareness and quality of Japanese and U.S.
products and are no longer cost competitive with products coming
out of Southeast Asia and China. In addition, the semiconductor
industry is increasingly feeling the heat from trade friction. Micron
Technology has just filed diunping charges against the major
Korean DRAM makers, and Japanese companies are being more
aggressive in negotiating ro37alty payments for intellectual property
rights.
Perhaps the biggest detriment to the long-term growth of the
Korean economy is the strong hand of the Korean economic planners. The government is favoring the high-technology sector with
preferential rates for borrowing to the exclusion of other sectors of
the economy. This policy has resulted in a capital spending boom
on new semiconductor plants. But it is questionable whether
exports and the local markets can absorb this capacity. Consequently we expect the capital iavestment boom to peak either this
year or next.
Taiw^an's market-driven economy is in many respects much healthier
than is Korea's. Though its silicon consumption is much smaller
than Korea's, its semiconductor industry is better balanced. Taiwan
has a thriving computer market, which provides device makers a
domestic market for their product. As a result we forecast silicon
demand to grow at 8.3 percent over the next five years.
However, the real star performer in terms of growth in silicon consumption will be the group of countries that fall iinder the rubric
rest of world (ROW). We estimate that silicon consumption for this
group will push ahead at a 22.3 percent CAGR. Countries that will
b e n ^ t from this growth are Hong Kong, Singapore, China, and the
SEMM-SVC-MT-9201
©1992
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Incoiporatecl
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Semiconductor Equipment, Manufacturing, and l\^aterials
newly industrializing nations in the Pacific rim such as Thailand
and Malaysia. Much of the growth in the ROW category will be
fueled by investment and technology transfers from Japanese and to
a lesser extent, U.S.-based companies.
Asia/Pacific Silicon Market Conclusions
The Asia/Pacific region remains the most vibrant in terms of
growth rates in silicon consumption. However, we do expect some
rotation in the growth of silicon consumption away from the current leaders within the region to those countries just beginning to
build their industrial infrastructure. The ultimate growth opportunities will be China and India because of the sheer size of the markets. But political turmoil, fragile legal systems, and underdeveloped
infrastructures make the timing of these opportunities difficult to
gauge.
August 17, 1992
©1992 Dataquest Incorporated
SEMM-SVC-MT-4201
Chapter 5
Semiconductor Consumption Forecast
This section presents data on the worldwide semiconductor market by
region. The regional semiconductor market, or regional semiconductor
consumption, deals with where chips are consumed; this contrasts
with regional semiconductor production, which deals with where chips
are made. The data presented here are for the merchant market and
do not include the value of chips made by captive semiconductor
manufacturers for internal use.
Yearly exchange rate variations can have a significant effect on the
1985 through 1991 data in the following tables. For more information
a:bout the exchange rates used and their effects, refer to Appendix B.
Semiconductor Consumption
Table 5-1 shows the historical regional semiconductor consumption for
the years 1985 through 1991; it also breaks down the merchant market
by nationality of the merchant semiconductor companies. Table 5-2
shows forecast semiconductor consiunption by region for the period
from 1991 through 1996.
SEMIVt-SVC-MT-gzoi
©1992 Dataquest Inconxwatsd
August 17, 1992
E
Table 5-1
Worldwide Semiconductor Consumption by Region—Historical
Includes Merchant ajul^^Biptlve Semiconductor Companies
(Millions of U.S. Dollars)
North America
Percent Growth
Japan
Percent Growth
Europe
Percent Growth
Asia-Padfic/ROW
Percent Growth
Worldwide
1 Percent Growth
NA ° Not applicable
Source: Dataquest (August 1992)
i
1985
9,418
NA
8,149
NA
4,795
NA
1,979
NA
24,341
NA
1986
10,844
15.1
11,855
45.5
5,587
16.5
2,548
28.8
30,834
26.7
1987
12,858
18.6
14,927
25.9
6,498
16.3
3,968
55.7
38,251
24.1
1988
15,844
23.2
20,772
39.2
8,491
30.7
5,752
45.0
50,859
33.0
1989
17,070
1990
16,540
1
16,
in
-3.1
20,257
22
21,491
3.5
9,498
11.9
6,280
9.2
54,339
6.8
-5n
10,415
9.7
11
7333
16.8
54,545
0.4
9
59
Table 5-2
Worldwide Consumption by Region
Merchant Semiconductor Sales Only—^l^orecast
(Millions of U.S. Dollars)
North America
Percent Growth
1991
16,990
2.7
1992
19,564
22,496
11.1
11,014
Percent Growth
Asia/Pacific-ROW
Percent Growth
20^57
-5.7
10,415
9.7
7,333
16.8
5.8
9,194
25.4
15.1
20,371
-9.4
11,809
7.2
11,181
21.6
Worldwide
Percent Growth
54,545
0.4
59,694
9.4
62,925
4.5
Japan
Percent Growth
Europe
Source: Dataquest (August 1992)
i
1990
16^40
-3.1
1993
1994
22,613
15.6
22,975
12.8
13,663
15.7
13,417
20.0
25,456
12.6
25,870
12.6
15,603
14.2
15,698
17.0
72,668
15.6
82,627
14.0
1995
26,127
1
27
2.6
27,810
7.5
16,493
5.7
17,692
12.7
29
88,122
94
6.7
17
19
Chapter 6
Semiconductor Production Forecast
This section presents data on worldwide semiconductor production by
region. Semiconductor production is defined by the place where the
wafers are fabricated, and regional semiconductor production includes
all production in the region, including merchant and captive producers
and all foreign producers. For instance. North American semiconductor production includes IBM and Delco fabs as well as Japanese and
European fabs in the United States.
Yearly exchange rate variations can have a significant effect on the
1985 through 1991 data in the following tables. For more information
about the exchange rates used and their effects, refer to Appendix B.
Semiconductor Production
Table 6-1 shows historical semiconductor production for the years 1985
through 1991, and Table 6-2 shows forecast production for the period
from 1991 through 1996.
SEMM-SVC-MT-g201
©1992 Dabquest Incoipoiated
August 17, 1992
Table 6-1
Worldwide Semiconductor Production by Region—Historical
Merchant and Captive Semiconductor Company Sales
(Millions of U.S. Dollars)
s
?
Total North America
Percent Growth
Percer\t Worldwide
Merchant
Captive
Total Japan
Percent Growth
Percent Worldvride
Merchant
Captive
Total Europe
Percent Growth
Percent Worldwi^
Merchant
Captive
Total Asia/Pacific-ROW
Percent Growth
Percent Worldwide
Merchant
Captive
Worldwide
Merchant
Percent Growtti
Captive
Percent Growth
NA " Not applicable
Source: Dataquest (August 1992)
1985
12,654
NA
46.7
10,411
2,243
10,651
NA
39.3
10,500
151
3,403
NA
12.6
3,024
379
406
NA
1.5
406
NA
27,114
24,341
NA
2,773
NA
1986
14,456
14.2
42.9
12,129
2,327
14,686
37.9
43.5
14,524
162
3,831
12.6
11.4
3,426
405
756
86.2
2.2
756
NA
33,729
30,835
26.7
2,894
4.4
1987
16,712
15.6
40.3
14,116
2,596
19,004
29.4
45.8
18,824
180
4,674
22.0
11.3
4,223
451
1,087
43.8
2.6
1,087
NA
41,477
38,250
24.0
3,227
11.5
1988
20,171
20.7
37.0
17,326
2,845
26,693
40.5
49.0
26,388
305
5,789
23.9
10.6
5,277
512
1,868
71.8
3.4
1,868
NA
54,521
50,859
33.0
3,662
13.5
1989
21,324
5.7
36.8
18,464
2,860
28,429
6.5
49.0
28,119
310
6,290
8.7
10.8
5,782
508
1,974
5.7
3.4
1,974
NA
58,017
54,339
6.8
3,678
0.4
1990
22,789
6.9
39.2
19,959
2,830
26,376
-7.2
45.4
26,069
307
6,780
7.8
11.7
6,307
473
2,210
12.0
3.8
2,210
NA
58,155
54,545
0.4
3,610
-1.8
2
2
2
2
6
5
i
Table 6-2
Worldwide Semiconductor Production by Region—Forecast
Merchant and Captive Semiconductor Company Sales
(Millions of U.S. Dollars)
Total North America
Percent Growth
Percent Worldwide
Merchant
Captive
Total Japan
Percent Growth
Percent Total
Merchant
Captive
Total Europe
Percent Growth
Percent Worldwide
Merchant
Captive
Total Asia/Pacific-ROW
Percent Growth
Percent Worldwide
Merchant
Captive
Worldwide
Merchant
Percent Growth
Captive
Percent Growth
NA - Not applicable
Source: Dataquest (August 1992)
1991
25,103
10.2
39.8
22,460
2,643
29,411
11.5
46.7
29,121
290
6,086
-10.2
9.7
5,677
409
2,435
10.2
3.9
2,435
NA
63,036
59,694
9.4
3,342
-7.4
1992
27,695
10.3
41.9
25,170
2,525
29,161
-0.9
44.2
28,946
215
6,294
3.4
9.5
5,915
379
2,895
18.9
4.4
2,895
NA
66,044
62,925
5.4
3,119
-6.7
1993
31,136
12.4
41.1
28,704
2,432
33,734
15.7
44.5
33,500
234
7/318
11.5
9.3
6,613
405
3,851
33.1
5.1
3,851
NA
75,739
72,668
15.5
3,071
-1.5
1994
34,542
10.9
40.3
32,142
2,400
36,193
7.3
42.2
35,943
250
8,631
23.0
10.1
8,180
451
6,362
65.2
7.4
6,362
NA
85,728
82,627
13.7
3,101
1.0
1995
36,063
4.4
39.5
33,663
2,400
38,319
5.9
42.0
38,069
250
9,324
8.0
10.2
8,812
512
7,578
19.1
8.3
7,578
NA
91,284
88,122
6.7
3,162
2.0
Appendix A
Regional Economic Outlooic for Our
Forecast ^ . . ^ ^ . ^ ^ . - ^ ^ . . ^
This appendix provides a discussion of the macroeconomic factors and
trends affecting the major semiconductor consuming and producing
regions. The focus is on the current and future general business
envirorunents in these regions and the assumptions used in our
forecast.
The Regional Economic Outlooic for Our Forecast
North America
The North American economy is moving into an extended period
of slow growth following the heated expansion of the 1980s. We
believe that the recovery will be subpar when compared with
previous recoveries. U.S. Gross Domestic Product (GDP) is not
expected to grow much higher than 2.6 percent between 1992
and 1996 (see Table A-1).
The main factor preventing more robust growth is the forecasted
weak rebound in real income. The problems with income are
attributable to lingering consvmier and business debt overhang,
weak productivity growth, high levels of business failures, weak
demographic demand for housing, and the lack of fiscal stimulus.
With unit consumer spending having a less than normal recovery,
the rebound in industrial production is also certain to fall short of
normal historic cyclical proportions.
Though domestic demand will be moderate, we beUeve that the
export picture will continue to improve, Latin America is expected
to become a key driver for the U.S. high-technology sector. Exports
to these countries have almost doubled over the last two years. If
the North American Free Trade Agreement is passed later this year,
Mexico could easily exceed Japan as the second-largest customer of
the United States by 1994.
The continued growth of exports is contingent on the ability of
companies to invest in new plants and equipment. The U.S. Federal
Reserve's easing monetary policies are helping. We believe that the
Fed can maintain an accommodating policy through the first half of
1993. There will likely be a moderate firming of interest rates in
the second half of 1993 as the economy picks u p speed.
SEMM-SVC-MT-9201
©1992 Dabquest Incorporated
August 17, 1992
A-2
Semiconductor Equipment, Manulacturing, and Materials
However, the fiscal budget deficit, which is expected to widen to
about 6 percent of gross domestic product, threatens to crowd out
private investment. The budget deficit continues to deteriorate, and
the U.S. Government's dainLi on the savings of the country continue
to rise. We are assuming that Washington will take measiues to
arrest the growth of the deficit over the next several years, though
such an assumption has proved overly optimistic to date.
Japan
The Japanese economy is undergoing a fundamental shift. Very
strong growth in the money supply during the second half of the
1980s fueled an unprecedented capital spending binge. Capital
spending for all industries as a percent of GNP peaked in 1989 at
23.5 percent, which is unparalleled when compared with any other
period in post-World War II history.
Dataquest believes that the rate of GDP growth will be slower over
the next five years. We expect Japanese GDP growth to bottom in
1992 at 2 percent. We are forecasting a moderate rate of growth in
GDP over the next five years, rising to 4 percent by 1995. However, these growth rates will be well below the 5 to 6 percent
range of GDP growth experienced in the later half of the 1980s.
Perhaps, the biggest problem facing Japanese electronic manufacturers is the imwinding of the Japanese financial machine that funded
the years of growth. Asset deflation has hit the Japanese banking
sector hard. The bank's capital base has declined because of the fall
in stock prices. At the same time, declining land prices are eroding
the collateral for outstanding loans. As a result, banks have turned
cautious on lending. It is a cycle that could take a long time to
work out.
Though the financial problems add a great deal of downside imcertainty to our forecast, other indicators point to a stronger outcome.
Inflation is well under control and will allow real disposable
income to expand. Consequently, the Japanese consumer will remain
a strong link in the economy.
Also, the recovery in the United States and the continued expansion of the Pacific Rim countries are good signs for Japanese
exports. We expect large trade and current account surpluses to
continue in Japan. This trend is a doubled-edged sword. In the
short term, exports for Japanese industry will deaden the impact of
decreasing industrial production However, the growing surpluses
over the long term will add to trade friction problems.
The current environment is difficult for the Japanese economy. It is
very likely that the banks have not faced up to all their problems
and therefore the financial uncertainties are very high. Capital
spending, which has been the main economic engine for the economy, will certainly not snap back. But external surpluses and domestic consumption should enable Japanese GDP to continue growing
at moderate levels.
August 17, 1992
©1992 Dataquest InccHporaled
SB«M-SVC-MT-«201
Appendix /^r-Regional Economic Outlook for Our Forecast
PrZ
Europe
The European economy, driven largely by Germany, will see weak
growth in 1992. We expect GDP in Germany to grow only 1.1 percent in 1992. Despite negative growth last year, growth in the
United Kingdom wiU be 0.5 percent, while growth in France will
be 2.1 percent.
Germany, the main engine for the Eiuopean economy, continues to
struggle with problems associated with unification. Inflation is stuck
in the 4.5 percent range, forcing the Bundesbank to hold the line
on interest rates. Because the other European currencies are tied to
the deutsche mark, interest rates throughout Europe remain stubborrdy high.
Wages in eastern Germany will converge to western Germanjr's
standards by 1995. Consequently, w e expect that the ability of
German companies to compete will deteriorate because productivity
gains will not keep up with cost increases.
In the United Kingdom, evidence of a post-election recovery is still
very thin. Inflation is subsiding. We do not believe that inflation
will be much of a problem for the foreseeable future. Even with
the gains on inflation, interest rates remain high. We do expect a
significant move lower next year, assuming that German short rates
are falling by then. The main problem for the United Kingdom is
the deteriorating trade figures, fueled by the increase in domestic
demand as the economy emerges from recession.
France avoided recession in 1991 and is moderately improving in
1992. The moderate recovery expected among its Eiu"opean trading
partners and a strengthening competitive position vis-a-vis these
partners will improve the export picture. But an upturn in domestic
demand will most likely be slower coming because the pace of job
creation is weak. A fiscal stimulus is unlikely because the government continues to target a lower budget deficit.
Over the long term, we are forecasting moderate growth for
Western European countries. The central and northern countries are
expected to grow in the 2 to 3 percent range. Portugal and Spain,
which are less developed than most of their Western European
neighbors, are forecast to grow slightly faster, in the 3 to 4 percent
range. We believe that Eastern Europe will not have much of an
impact on Western European GNP growth until the second half of
the 1990s, if then.
Asia/Pacific
Most economists continue to forecast the fastest growth in the
world for the Asia/Pacific region. We beHeve that annual GDP
growth rates over the next five years will range from 5 percent to
8 percent for Hong Kong, Indonesia, Malaj^ia, Singapore, South
Korea, Taiwan, and Thailand. Moreover, underdeveloped countries
such as the People's Republic of China, India, and Vietnam will
SEMM-SVC-MT-^201
®1992 Dataquest Incorporated
August 17, 1992
A-4
Semiconductor
Equipment, Manufacturing, and Materials
increasingly boost the economic activity of the Pacific basin as the
decade wears on.
In 1991, many of the Pacific basin countries suffered from slow
worldwide growth because the health of their economies is tied
so closely to exports. Countries such as Korea and Singapore,
which are heavily dependent on sales to the West, experienced a
deceleration in GDP growth because of the slow U.S. and Eiut)j)ean
economies.
But Taiwan's economy was more resilient. It benefited from strong
exports to trading partners in Southeast Asia and China, which
were not affected by the recession in the West. We believe that the
intraregional trade theme is a trend that will increasingly impact
not only Taiwan's economy but also the economies of other industrializing countries in the region.
The only dark cloud on the horizon is the threat of a slower rate
of investment by Japanese companies because of the financial
problems at home. If the Japanese banking system were to sttimble,
then the flow of investment to the Pacific basin would certainly
suffer. But this downside has a low probability.
August 17, 1992
©1992 Dataquest Incofporated
SEMM-SVC-MT-9201
A-5
Appendix A—Regional Economic Outlook for Our Forecast
o
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SEMM-SVC-MT-9201
©1992 Dataquest Incorporated
August 17, 1992
Table A-1 (Continued)
International Economic Forecasts
GDP/GNP Growth Rates
Currently in or
Near Recession
Asia/Padfic
Australia
Last 1992-1993
GDP/GNP
Change
Down
Japan
Down
Malaysia
"ms
Up
Down
South Korea
Taiwan
Down
Thailand
Central/Latin America
Argentina
Brazil
Me>cico
Venezuela
1989
1990
1991
1992
1993
3.6
4.3
2.7
1.3
2.8
-2.0
3.9
3.4
7.5
7.4
5.3
9.8
1.1
5.8
4.4
8.8
2.5
5.1
6.0
3.3
7.5
-0.2
6.7
2.0
7.9
1.7
6.6
8.4
7.3
7.9
70.0
7.0
4.0
4.6
-1.9
4.3
9.2
4.9
8.3
6.5
Hong kong
Indon^ia
New Zealand
Singapore
1988
y^
6.3
9.1
-1.4
11.1
4.8
8.6
1.2
9.2
11.5
7.3
13.2
6.2
7.4
12.0
-2.6
-4.5
0.4
-0.1
1.3
5.8
3.3
2.9
-8.9
-4.1
3.9
5.7
'West Germany prior to 1993, unified Germany data therafter.
Source: Dataquest (July 1992), Economic Analysis Department, The Dun & Bradstreet Corporation
S
8.3
9.0
4.9
10.0
1.6
4.5
4.0
5.0
6.5
2.6
7.0
7.0
7.5
9.0
4.1
3.0
5.0
7.0
Appendix B
Exchange Rates
Table B-1 Usts the exchange rates per dollar for Japanese yen and
European currency units (ECUs) for the period from 1985 to 1991.
Exchange rate variations should be kept in mind when interpreting
yearly changes in the 1985 to 1991 data presented in this booklet.
However, the forecast years (1992 to 1996) are assumed to have
constant exchange rates.
Table B-1
Exchange Rates per Dollar for Japanese Yen and ECU:
1985-1991
Yen/$
Percent Change
ECU/$
Percent Change
1985
238
1986
167
-30
1987
144
-14
1988
130
-10
1989
138
6
1990
144
4
1991
135
-6
1.31
1.02
-22
0.87
-15
0.84
-3
0.92
10
0.79
-14
0.81
8
Source: Dataquest (August 1992)
SEMM-SVC-MT-^SOI
©1992
Dataquest
Incoipocated
August 17, 1992
DataQuest'
aamipaiiyof
The Dun & Bradstred Corporation
Dataquest Incoiporated
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United States
Phone: 01-408-437-8000
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©1992 Dataquest Incorporated
0013473
Wafer Fabrication Equipment
1991 IViarl(et in Review
MarketTrends
Semiconductor Equipment, iVIanufacturing, and iVlateriais
_.
.
,«,
DataQUCSt
SEMMS-SVC-MT-92AA
July 20,1992
Published try Dataquest Incorporated
The content of this report represents our interpretation and analysis of information generally available to the public or released
by knowledgeable individuals in the subject industry, but is not guaranteed as to accuracy or completeness. It does not contain
material provided to us in confidence by our clients.
Printed in the United States of America. Allrightsreserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced, stored in retrieval
systems, or transmitted, in any form or by any means—mechanical, electronic, photocopying, duplicating, microfilniing, videotape, or otherwise—without die prior permission of the publisher.
© 1992 Dataquest Incorporated
July 1992
Table of Contents
Page
1.
2.
3.
4.
Executive Summary
Regional Market Trends
Equipment Segment Trends
Regional Gsmpany Market Share Trends
1991 Top 10 Wafer Fab Equipment Suppliers
Introduction
Scope of This Report
Dataquesfs Wafer Fab Equipment Forecast
Overview of the 1991 Wafer Fab Equipment Market
—
1991 Wafer Fab Equipment Market in Review
1991 Market Highlights
An "All-in-One" Summary Snapshot of the 1991 Wafer Fabrication Equipment Market
Slide in U.S. Company Share Slows in 1991: Wafer Fab Equipment Market by
Company Ownership
Changes in Regional Market Share
Japanese Companies
North American Companies
Etuopean Companies
Dataquest Conclusions
Lithography Market Trends
The 1-Line Lifeline: 1991 Stepper Market in Review
Regional Markets and Ownership
Stepper Market Highlights of 1991
Company Rankings
„
Nikon
Canon
Hitachi
ASM Lithography
Ultratech
GCA
SVG Lithography
Dataquest Conclxisions
Track Triumvirate Prevails: 1991 Automatic Photoresist Processing Equipment
Market in Review
Regional Markets and Ownership
1-1
1-1
1-1
1-3
1-4
2-1
2-1
2-3
3-1
3-2
3-2
3-5
3-8
3-8
3-9
3-10
3-10
3-11
4-1
4-2
4-2
4-2
4-3
4-3
4-4
4-5
4-5
4-6
4-6
4-6
4-7
4-8
4-9
Table of Contents (Continued)
Page
5.
&
Company Rankings
TEL and Varian/TEL
Dainippon Screen
Silicon Valley Group
Dataquest Conclusions
Etch and Qean Market Trends
Wet Processing Sales Stall in 1991: 1991 Wet Process Equipment Market in Review
Regional Markets and Ownership
Company Rankings
..„..
1991 Market Highlights
Carrierless Wet Stations
Tokyo Electron Enters the Wet Process Market
FSI Enters the Japanese Market
,
Megasonic Cleaner Market Experiences High Growth
Facilities Expai\sions
Dataquest Conclusions
Jockeying for Position in a Tight Race for Market Leadership: 1991 Dry Etch
Equipment Market in Review
Regional Markets and Ownership
Company Rankings
Applied Materials
Lam Research
TEL and Varian/TEL
Hitachi
Dataquest Conclusions
Deposition Market Trends
Technical Irmovation Continues to Drive Market Growth: 1991 CVD Equipment
Market in Review
Regional CVD Equipment Market and Ownership
CVD Equipment Company Rankings
Applied Materials
ASM International
Novellus
Kokusai Electric and TEL
Watkins-Johnson
Genus
Alcan Technology (Canon)
4-10
4-10
4-11
4-11
4-12
5-1
5-2
5-2
5-3
5-3
5-3
5-3
5-5
5-6
5-6
5-6
5-7
5-7
5-7
5-8
5-9
5-10
5-10
5-10
6-1
6-2
6-2
6-2
6-2
6-4
6-4
6-5
6-5
6-5
6-6
Table of Contents (Continued)
Page
7.
Silicon Valley Group
Dataquest Conclusions
Multilevel Metal Mania: 1991 Sputter Equipment Market in Review
Regional Markets and Ownership
Company Rankings
Anelva
Varian.
„
Materials Research Corporation (MRC)/Sony
Applied Materials
Ulvac
„
Dataquest Conclusions
Japan Saves the Epi Equipment Market: 1991 Silicon Epitaxy Equipment Market
in Review
Regional Markets and Ownership
Epi Wafer Applications
Japanese Drivers
Company Rankings
Dataquest Conclusions
Diffusion and Ion Implantation Market Trends
Vertical Turf Wars: 1991 Diffusion Equipment Market in Review
Regional Markets and Ownership
Company Rankings
Tokyo Electron
Kokusai Electric
Silicon Valley Group
Dataquest Conclusions
Riding the Roller Coaster: 1991 Ion Implantation Market in Review
Regional Markets and Ownership
'.
Company Rankings
Varian and TEL/Varian
Eaton and Sumitomo/Eaton Nova
Nissin Electric
Applied Materials
Genus
Ulvac
Hitachi
Dataquest Conclusions
„
6-6
6-6
6-7
6-7
6-8
6-8
6-9
6-9
6-10
6-10
6-10
6-11
6-11
6-12
6-12
6-13
6-14
7-1
7-2
7-2
7-3
7-4
7-4
7-4
7-4
7-6
7-6
7-7
7-8
7-8
7-9
7-9
7-9
7^9
7-10
7-10
Table of Contents (Continued)
Page
8.
Process Control Market Trends
8-1
CD Market Growth Bolstered by SEM Preference: 1991 Optical CD and CD SEM
Equipment Markets in Review
8-2
Regional Markets and Ownership
8-2
Company Rankings
8-4
Relatively Few Companies Offer both Optical CD and CD SEM Equipment
8-4
The Growing Presence of Dedicated Overlay Tools in the Optical CD Product Mix.... 8-6
Make Note of a Newcomer to the CD SEM Arena
8-7
Dataquest Conclusions
8-7
New Players, New Products in Advanced Defect Inspection: 1991 Wafer Inspection
Equipment Market in Review
8-9
Regioital Markets and Ownership
8-9
Company Rankings
8-11
KLA Instruments
8-11
Nikon
8-11
Insystems
8-12
Hitachi
8-12
Dataquest Conclusions
8-12
Appendix A—Introduction to the Wafer Fab Equipment Database
A-1
Introduction
A-1
Market
A-1
Conventions
A-3
Exchange Rates
A-3
Equipment Companies
A-3
Notes on Market Share
A-7
Appendix B—^Wafer Fab Equipment—^Summary Data by Category
B-1
Appendix C—^Wafer Fab Equipment—Company Shares by Category
C-1
List of Tables
Table
Page
1-1
1991 Top 10 Wafer Fab Equipment Company Ranking
1-4
3-1
Summary Regional and Ownership Market Statistics of the 1991 Wafer Fabrication
Equipment Market
~
_
3-6
3-2
Changes in Regional Company Market Share in the 1991 Wafer Fab Equipment
Market........
„
3-9
4-1
1991 Worldwide Stepper Company Ranking
4-4
4-2
1991 Automatic Photoresist Processing Equipment Company Rimking
4-10
5-1
1991 Worldwide Wet Process Equipment Company Ranking
5-4
5-2
Relative Comparison of Key Features for Conventional and Carrierless 200mm Wet
Stations
5-5
5-3
New Planned Manufactiuing Facilities for Wet Process Equipment Suppliers
5-6
5-4
1991 Worldwide Dry Etch Equipment Company Ranking
5-8
6-1
1991 Worldwide CVD Equipment Company Ranking
6-3
6-2
1991 Worldwide Sputtering Equipment Company Ranking
6-9
6-3
1991 Worldwide Silicon Epitaxy Equipment Company Ranking
6-13
7-1
1991 Worldwide Diffusion Equipment Company Ranking
7-3
7-2
1991 Worldwide Ion Implantation Equipment Company Ranking
7-8
8-1
1991 Worldwide CD Equipment Company Ranking
8-5
8-2
1991 Worldwide Wafer Inspection Equipment Company Ranking
8-10
A-1
Wafer Fab Equipment Categories
A-2
A-2
Wafer Fab Equipment Companies
A-4
A-3
Summary of Mergers and Acquisitions Incorporated in the Wafer Fab Equipment
Database
A-8
B-1
Revenue from Shipments of Wafer Fab Equipment into Each Region
B-2
B-2
Each Regional Company Base's Revenue from Shipments of Wafer Fab Eqmpment to
the World
B-8
C-1
Each Company's Revenue from Shipments of Lithography Equipment to the World by
Equipment Category
C-2
C-2
Each Company's Revenue from Shipments of Automatic Photoresist Processing
Equipment (Track) to the World
C-4
C-3
Each Company's Revenue from Shipments of Wet Process Equipment to the World
C-5
C-4
Each Companjr's Revenue from Shipments of Dry Strip Equipment to the World
_ C-8
C-5
Each Company's Revenue from Shipments of Dry Etch Equipment to the World
C-9
C-6
Each Company's Revenue from Shipments of Chemical Vapor Deposition Equipment
to the World
C-10
Q-7
Each Compan5r's Revenue from Shipments of Ph)rsical Vapor Deposition Equipment
to the World
C-13
List of Tables (Continued)
Table
C-8
Each Companjr's Revenue from Shipments of Silicon Epitaxy Equipment to the
World
C-9
Each Companj^s Revenue from Shipments of Metalot;ganic CVD Equipment to the
World
C-10 Each Com.pany's Revenue from Shipments of Molecular Beam Epitaxy Equipment
to the World
C-11 Each Company's Revenue from Shipments of Diffusion Furnace Equipment to the
World
C-12 Each Company's Revenue from Shipments of Rapid Thermal Processing Equipment
to the World
C-13 Each Company's Revenue from Shipments of Ion Implantation Equipment to the
World
C-14 Each Companj^s Revenue from Shipments of Optical CD and CD SEM Equipment
to the World
:
C-15 Each Compan3^s Revenue from Shipments of Wafer Inspection Equipment to
the World
Page
C-15
C-16
C-17
C-18
C-20
C-21
C-22
C-24
m
List of Figures
Figure
1-1
1991 Regional Wafer Fab Equipment Markets
1-2
1991 Worldwide Wafer Fabrication Equipment Market by Major Segment
1-3
Worldwide Market Share of Regional Companies for Key Equipment Segments,
1982-1991
3-1
1991 Regional Wafer Fab Equipment Markets
3-2
Worldwide Market Share of Regional Companies for Key Equipment Segments,
1982-1991
4-1
1991 Stepper Regional Markets and Ownership
4-2
1991 Regional Automatic Photoresist Processing Equipment Markets and Ownership
5-1
1991 Wet Process Equipment Regional Markets and Ownership
5-2
1991 Dry Etch Regional Markets and Ownership
6-1
1991 CVD Regional Markets and Ownership
6-2
1991 Regional Sputtering Equipment Markets and Ownership
6-3
1991 SUicon Epitaxy Equipment Regional Markets and Ownership
7-1
1991 Regional Diffusion Markets and Ownership
7-2
1991 Regional Ion Implantation Equipment Markets and Ownership
8-1
1991 CD SEM Equipment Regional Markets and Ownership
8-2
1991 Optical CD Eqmpment Regional Markets and Ownership
8-3
1991 Wafer Inspection Equipment Regional Markets and Ownership
Page
1-2
1-2
1-3
3-2
3-8
4-2
4-9
5-2
5-7
6-1
"..6-8
6-11
7-2
7-7
8-3
8-4
8-9
vi
•
Chapter 1
Executive Summary
This MarketTrends report focuses on the 1991 worldwide wafer fabrication equipment market and presents Dataquesf s analysis of the
general trends in the marketplace and those specific technology issues
and company activities that characterize the market for each major
segment of wafer fab equipment. Dataquesf s research and analysis of
the 1991 wafer fabrication equipment market led to the conclusions
discussed in the following paragraphs.
Regional Market Ik-ends
In 1991, the worldwide market for wafer fab equipment was $6.04 billion, up 3 percent from its 1990 level of $5.87 billion. Japan and North
America both experienced a sluggish market enviroiunent in 1991,
with growth of 1 percent and a decline of 4 percent, respectively, ixoia
1990 levels. Substantially weaker business conditions in Europe contributed to a 17 percent decline for that region's wafer fab equipment
spending in 1991. The one bright spot in worldwide wafer fab activities in 1991 was Asia/Pacific-ROW, which grew a healthy 64 percent
from its 1990 level. Figure 1-1 presents the regional wafer fab equipment markets by percentage share for 1991. Even with its sluggish
market environment in 1991, Japan still accounted for 50 percent of
the worldwide wafer fab equipment market.
#
Equipment Segment 'h'ends
The three major segments of the wafer fab equipment market are
lithography, deposition, and etch and dean equipment. These three
segments represented more than 70 percent of total equipment sf>ending in 1991 (see Figure 1-2). Lithography equipment provides the critical patterning technology necessary to produce smaller and smaller
device features on advanced semiconductor chips. Deposition equipment represents the key technology enabler for depositing thin films
of insulating and conducting materials to produce the increasingly
complex chip interconnect structures. Etch and clean equipment is
used to selectively remove different films and materials from the
wafer or to remove particulate contamination so as to maintain an
ultraclean processing surface. These three segments of equipment represent not only the largest segments of the market but also the most
technologically sophisticated equipment used to fabricate advanced
semiconductor devices.
Although the wafer fab equipment market is becoming more and
more global, it is not entirely homogeneous with respect to equipment
SEMM-SVC-MT-92AA
®1992 Dataquest Incorporated
July 20,1992
Semiconductor Equipment, Manutaicturing, and Materials
1-2
Figure 1-1
1991 Regional Wafer Fab Equipment Markets (Millions of Dollars)
•
Europe —
(11%)
$634 Millbn
Asia/PacificROW
—
(14%)
$852 Million
Total = 6.04 Billion
oaoooui
Source: Dataquest (July 1992)
^jfe
^^
Figure 1-2
1991 Worldwide Wafer Fabrication Equipment Market by Major Segment
Ion Implantation (6%)
Diffusion/RTP (6%) Factory Automation/ Other Equipment (6%)
'Includes track equipment
Total = $ 6 . 0 4 Billion
G200030S
Source: Dataquest (July 1992)
July 20,1992
©1992 Dataquest Incofporalad
SEMM-S\/C-Mr-g2AA
1-3
Executive Summaiy
usage. Wafer fab equipment demand in Japan represented 50 p>ercent
of the worldwide wafer fab equipment market in 1991. However,
semiconductor manufacturers in Japan accounted for more than
50 percent of worldwide demand for several categories of equipment.
Such variations in equipment demand can occur on a regional basis
because of a concentration of activity in a specific region or because of
a specific manufacturing philosophy that favors a given type of tool
technology. An especially strong domestic suppJier base in a given tool
technology can also influence the regional market djrnamics for a
specific equipment segment. For the majority of equipment segments,
however, regional demand trends for individual segments of equipment are fairly similar to the percentage share represented by each of
the total regional wafer fab equipment markets.
•
Regional Company Market Share Ik'enils
Trends in regional company market share are a perennial topic of
interest in the semiconductor industry, be it for devices, equipment, or
materials. Figure 1-3 shows that the steady increase in market share by
Japanese companies throughout the 1980s was mirrored by a similar
Figure 1-3
Worldwide Market Share of Regional Companies for Key Equipment Segments,
1982-1991 (Percentage of Revenue in Dollars)
Percentage
60-
^
50403020101
1982
1
1983
1
1984
1
1985
I
1986
1
1987
1
1988
1
1989
1
1990
-•—
Japanese Company Share
—^r- European Company Share
—•—
North American Company Share
-4—
1991
Joint Venture Company Share
Note: Wafer fab equipment segments include lithography, automatic photoresist, processing equipment, wet processing,
dry etch, dry strip, deposition, diffusion, rapid thermal processing, ion implantation, critical dimension, and wafer
inspection tools.
Source: Dataquest (July 1992)
SEMM-SVC-MT-92AA
02000192
©1992 Dataquest Incorporaiad
July 20.1992
Semiconductor Equipment, Manufiacturing, and Materials
1-4
loss in share by North American companies for key segments of w^afer
processing equipment. Although North American companies still lost
market share last year, the pattern of market share erosion appears to
have slowed somewhat in 1991.
Japanese wafer fab equipment companies increased their share of the
1991 worldwide market to 53 percent at the expense of both Eviropean
and North American wafer fab equipment manufacturers. Japanese
companies gained share in the 1991 world market because increased
penetration in both the North American and Asia/Padfic-ROW markets more than compensated for lost share in Europe and their home
market of Japan. Exactly opposite of the trend observed in Japanese
company share. North American companies gained market share position in Japan and Europe, and lost share in Asia/Pacific and their
home market of the United States. Overall, North American company
share declined half a percentage point to about 35 percent, a noticeably smaller decline than the average 3 percentage point decline
observed throughout the 1980s. European company share declined
by more than a percentage point to about 8 percent on a worldwide
basis, while joint venture companies essentially maintained their 1990
share level with about 4 percent of the worldwide market in 1991.
1991 Top 10 Wafer Fab Equipment Suppliers
Table 1-1 identifies the top 10 suppliers of wafer fobrication equipment
in 1991. Seven of the top ten companies are Japanese while the other
Table 1-1
1991 Top 10 Wafer Fab Equipment Company Ranking
(Revenue in Millions of Dollars)
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
Nikon
Applied Materials
Tokyo Electron Ltd.
Hitachi
Canon
Varian
Silicon Valley Group
Anelva
Kokusai Electric
Dainippon Screen
Total
Total Market
Percentage Top 10
557
493
397
328
292
181
180
155
138
138
2,859
6/)39
47
Note: Revenue estimates reflect the major categories of wafer fabrication equipment
Including littiography, automatic photoresist processing equipment (track), etch and dean,
deposition, diffusion, rapid thermal processing, ion implantation, optical CD and CD SEM
tools, and wafer inspection equipment. Revenue associated wHh service and spares Is
not included.
Source: Dataquest (July 1992)
July 20,1992
®1992 Dataquest IncorporatBd
SEMM-SVC-IMT-92AA
Executive Summaiy
1-5
three companies are based in the United States. Together, these ten
companies supplied 47 percent of the worldwide demand for wafer
fab equipment in 1991.
Project Manager: Peggy Marie Wood
Contributors: Kunio Achiwa, Mark FitzGerald, Krishna Shankar
SEMM-SVC-Mr-«2AA
(S)1992 Dabquest Incorpoiatad
July 20,1992
Chapter 2
Introduction
. ^ . - . i ^ — ^ . . ^ . . ^
Scope of This Report
In its research of the wafer fabrication equipment industry, Dataquest
tracks the worldwide activities of more than 150 con\panies that participate in 40 different segments of front-end wafer fab equipment,
OUT MarketTrends report presents a discussion of the significant trends
and issues that characterized the 1991 wafer i^biication equipment
environment. The report is divided into a series of chapters that focus
on both general industry trends as well as equipment-specific issues.
In Chapter 3, regional market and ownership trends are discussed for
the wafer fab equipment industry as a whole. In Chapters 4 through 8,
an analysis of 1991 regional market and ownership trends and a discussion of the activities of key companies participating in the market
are presented for specific segments of equipment. These segments
include the following:
• Steppers
• Automatic photoresist processing equipment
• Wet process
• Dry etch
• Chemical vapor deposition (CVD)
• Sputter equipment
• Silicon epitaxial reactors
• Diffusion furnaces
• Ion implantation equipment
• Critical dimension measurement systems
• Wafer inspection equipment
Three appendixes at the conclusion of the report present detailed
historical worldwide market statistics by segment of wafer fabrication
equipment. These historical market statistics cover the three-year
period from 1989 through 1991 and as background information are
meant to supplement the analysis and discussion presented in the
body of the report. Dataquesf s estimates of individual company
SEMM-SVC-MT-42AA
®1992 Dataquest Incorporated
July 20,1992
2-2
Semiconductor Equipment, Manufacturing, and Materials
worldwide revenue by year by equipment segment are presented
in Appendix C for the 35 equipment segments identified as follows:
Lithography
Contact/Proximity
Projection Aligners
Steppers
Direct-Write Lithography
Maskmaking Lithography
X-Ray
Automatic Photoresist Processing Equipment
Etch and Qean
Wet Process
Integrated Wet Stations
Manual Wet Benches
Rinsers/Dryers
Add Processors
Megasonic Cleaners
Dry Strip
Diy Etch
Deposition
Qiemical Vapor Deposition
lUbeCVD
Horizontal LPCVD
Vertical LPCVD
Horizontal PECVD
NontubeCVD
LPCVD
PECVD
APCVD
ECRCVD
Physical Vapor Deposition (PVD)
Sputter
Evaporation
Silicon Epitaxy
Metalorganic CVD
Moleciilar Beam Epitaxy
Dii^sion
Horizontal Tube Di^sion
Vertical Tube Diffusion
Rapid Thermal Processing (RTP)
Ion Implantation
Medium Current
High Cxurent
High Voltage
July 20,1992
®1992 Dataquest IxopoialBd
SEMM-SVC-Mr-92AA
Introduction
2-3
Critical Dimension (CD)
Optical CD
CDSEM
Wafer Inspection
Dataquest's Wafer Fab Equipment Forecast
The focus of this Market Trends report is a histoncal perspective of
recent activities in the wafer fab equipment industry. Twice a year
Dataquest also evaluates the anticipated future demand for wafer
fabrication equipment. Our five-year forecast of wafer fab equipment demand by equipment segment is contained within a second
MarketlhEnds report that discusses the economic and market drivers
that underlie future demand throughout the semiconductor industry.
The report. Semiconductor Equipment, Manufacturing, and Materials
Forecast, focuses on several key semiconductor industry forecasts
including semiconductor device consumption, semiconductor device
production, capital spending, wafer fabrication equipment, and silicon
wafer consumption. Our report of key semiconductor industry forecasts complements the detailed market share and historical perspective
of the wafer fab equipment industry presented within this report.
Please contact Dataquest for further information on this as well as
other reports that focus on activities in the semiconductor industry.
SEMM-SVC-MT-92M
®1992 Dataquest Incofpoatsd
July 20,1992
Chapter 3
Overview of the 1991 Wafer Fab
Equipment IMaricet . . ^ ^ ^ - ^
The material in this section focuses on the 1991 wafer fab equipment market.
1991 Wafer Fab Equipment Market in Review
The wafer fab equipnxent market is decidedly in a slump. This
section discusses several key characteristics of the wafer fab
equipment market in 1991.
An "All-in-One" Summary Snapshot of the 1991 Wafer
Fabrication Equipment Market
The wafer fabrication equipment market is not a single homogeneous
entity but rather is made up of a large number of individual equipment segments. In order to simplify a complex and fragmented market, this section presents summary regional and ownership market
statistics for each of the key segments of the wafer iah equipment
market in 1991.
Slide in U.S. Company Share Slows in 1991: Wafer Fab
Equipment Market by Company Ownership
Trends in regional company market share are a perennial topic of
interest in the semiconductor industry, be it for devices, equipment,
or materials. This section examines several of the underlying reasons
for the changes in regional company market share for wafer fab
equipment in 1991.
SEMM-SVC-MT-92AA
©1992 Dataquest Incorporatsd
July 20,1992
Semiconductor Equipment, Manufacturing, and Materials
3-2
1991 Wafer Fab Equipment Market in Review
In 1991, the worldwide market for wafer fab equipment was $6.04 billion, up 3 percent from its 1990 level of $5.87 billion. Japan and North
America each experienced a sluggish market environment in 1991,
with growth of 1 percent and a decline of 4 percent, respectively, from
1990 levels. Substantially weaker business conditions in Eiuope contributed to a 17 percent dedine for that region's wafer fab equipment
spending in 1991. The one bright spot in worldwide wafer fab activities in 1991 was Asia/Padfic-ROW, which grew a healthy 64 percent
from its 1990 level. Figure 3-1 presents the regional wafer fab equipment markets by percentage share for 1991. Even with its sluggish
market environment in 1991, Japan still accounted for 50 percent of
the worldwide wafer fab equipment market.
The wafer hb equipment market is decidedly in a slump. The market
declined 2 percent in 1990 and was followed by only modest 3 percent
growth in 1991. We expect the 1992 market, fed by a significant slowdown in the latter half of 1991, to be weaker yet and experience a
decline of 8 percent from its 1991 level.
1991 Market Highlights
The following paragraphs detail several key characteristics of the
wafer fab equipment market in 1991.
#
Figxire 3-1
1991 Regional Wafer Fab Equipment Markets (Millions of Dollars)
Europe —
(11%)
$634 Million
Asia/PacificROW
—
(14%)
$852 Million
T o t a l » 6 . 0 4 Billion
Source: Dataquest (July 1992)
July 20,1992
G2000141
®1992 Dataquest Incorpoialed
SEMM-SVC-MT-42AA
Overview of the 1991 Vtefer Fab Equipment Martet
3-3
The mood of cautious optimism expressed by wafer fab equipment
manufacturers at SEMICON/West in May 1991 turned to frank pessimism in the latter half of the year as the wafer fab equipment
industry fell victim to the weakening condition of the world's
major economies. The Japanese and German economies began to
decelerate while the U.S. and U.K. economies remained finnly
entrenched under their mantles of recessioit The weakening macroeconomic climate had a significant impact on the capital spending
plans of the world's semiconductor manufacturers. Many equipment
companies saw orders being pushed out by as much as several
quarters while some new^ business was canceled altogether.
One major factor that influenced the flat equipment market in
Japan in 1991 was a growing concern regarding the profit pressures,
overcapacity, and end-market uncertainty associated with the 4Mb
and 16Mb DRAM. These concerns, coupled with the weakening
macroeconomic climate in Japan, r^ulted in 16 of the 24 existing or
planned 200inm fab lines being downsized or delayed. By the end
of 1991, only 38 percent of the originally planned 20Qmm capacity
had come ordine. These large DRAM facilities require significant
equipment expenditure, thus the reduced capacity additions for
ZOOaan fabs took a toll on the Japanese equipment market
The European wafer fab equipment market was the weakest
regional market in 1991. Much of the hype associated with the
economic unification of Europe in 1992 had led to expectations
that semiconductor companies would make significant investment
in new fabs in order to meet local content rules. The anticipated
growth spurt in the years prior to 1992 fizzled miserably. The Euix?pean wafer fab equipment market grew only a modest 9 percent in
1989, followed by a mere 6 percent in 1990. The market declined
17 percent last year.
Asia/Pacific, growing an impressive 64 percent over its 1990 level,
was a hotbed of activity for wafer fab equipment companies in
1991. Semiconductor manufacturers in Asia/Pacific are on an
aggressive campaign to gain market share in DRAMs and other
advanced semiconductor devices and thus are adding the necessary
capacity to support this strategy. However, it is important to place
the feverish 1991 market growth in perspective. This same equipment market suffered a decline of 37 percent just one year prior.
These roller coaster market dynamics highlight the ^ c t that, with
only a few mapr semiconductor companies in this region, a change
in plans for just a handful of fabs can swing market growth wildly
in either direction.
To add to the competitive quagmire in the wafer fab equipment
industry, it is now clear that the Korean government is beginning
to nurture its own embryonic domestic equipment industry to complement its strategy in semiconductors and silicon. Oearly, the
potential of a new kid on the block won't have any impact on
wafer fab equipment market dynamics in the short term, but it
does contribute a whole new dimension to the future competitive
market envirotunent for wafer fab equipment.
SEMM-SVC-MT-42AA
©1992 Dataquest Incoipooted
July 20,1992
3rA
Semiconductor Equipment, Manufacturing, and Materials
The market environment for wafer fab equipment companies has
probably never been tougher. Companies must cope with the presence of significant global competitors and the ever-escalating costs
of advanced technology development on top of sluggish market
conditions that have prevailed for more than two years. The companies that successfully emerge from this downturn in the industry
with new product offerings and an increased emphasis on cost of
ownership and aftersale service and support will be well positioned
to take advantage of future growth opportunities in the wafer fab
equipment market.
July 20,1992
®1992 Dataquest IncopotalBd
SEMM-SVC-MT-92AA
Overview of the 1991 Wafer Fab Equipmwit Market
3-5
An "All-in-One^' Summary Snapshot of the 1991 Wafer
Fabrication Equipment Maricet
Dataquesf s research of the wafer fabrication equipment market tracks
the activities of more than 150 companies that participate in 40 different segments of the front-end equipment market. We have designed
Table 3-1 to be an easy-to-use reference for sumnciary market statistics
of the 1991 wafer fabrication equipment market. Table 3-1 also reports
our estimates of the 1991 worldwide markets for key segments of
equipment and the percentage change of the size of each market relative to its 1990 level. The table also presents the percentage share for
each market segment by region and by regional supplier.
Although the wafer fab equipment market is becoming more and
more global, it is not entirely homogeneous with respect to eqmpment
usage. Wafer fab equipment demand in Japan represented 50 percent
of the worldwide wafer fab equipment market in 1991. However,
semiconductor manufacturers in Japan accounted for 63 percent of
worldwide CD SEM equipment demand, 65 percent of worldwide
maskmaking equipment demand, and 83 percent of the 1991
worldwide demand for ECK etch equipment.
These variations in equipment demand can occur on a regional basis
because of a concentration of activity in a specific region, such as
maskmaking in Japan, or because of a specific manufacturing philosophy that favors a given type of tool technology, such as the preference
by Japanese device manufacturers for CD SEM rather than optical CD
systems. An especially strong domestic supplier base in a given tool
technology can also influence the regional market dynamics for a
specific equipment segment. Japanese companies account for 98 percent of the worldwide ECR etch equipment market, and thus, it is no
surprise that sertuconductor manufacturers in Japan ptmdiase a disproportionately larger amount of this equipment because of their proximity to this strong domestic vendor base. Overall, though. Table 3-1
shows that for the majority of wafer fab equipment categories,
regional trends for individual segments of equipment are quite similar
to the percentage share represented by each of the regional wafer fab
equipment markets.
•
SEMM-SVC-MT-92AA
©1992 Dataquest Incorpofated
July 20,1992
.s
Table 3-1
Summary Regional and Ownership Market Statistics of the 1991 Wafer
Fabrication Equipment Market (Millions of Dollars)
Equipment
Contact/Proximity
Projection Aligners
Steppers
Direct-Write
Maskmaking
X-Ray
Total Lithography
Automatic Photoresist
Processing Equipment
I
^
Wet Processing
Dry Etch
ECR Etch
Dry Strip
Total Etch and Qean
Horizontal Tube CVD
Vertical Tube CVD
Nontube CVD
Total CVD
Sputter
Evaporation
Silicon Epitaxy
MOCVD
MBE
Totcil Deposition
1991
World ($)
21
68
1,029
55
46
4
i;224
Percentage Regional Markets
(%)
AsiaChange
Pacific/
North
from
ROW
Japan Europe
America
1990
16
34
38
13
-13
22
11
22
-27
45
15
9
27
-2
49
9
-27
13
64
13
8
7
65
21
-3
0
0
43
57
163
15
10
50
26
-5
Percentage Reg
North
American Japanes
Comps. Comps
3
0
6
31
82
11
8
0
3
56
57
7
13
369
13
30
49
9
12
28
6
405
567
138
119
1,229
85
192
471
747
438
36
89
51
59
1,420
1
-2
23
1
2
-27
34
3
4
22
-26
30
16
2
10
26
51
43
83
52
51
38
57
48
49
50
37
52
45
51
49
9
13
4
8
10
17
6
11
10
9
14
12
18
18
11
15
15
10
13
14
19
20
12
15
14
9
8
10
14
14
30
63
0
33
42
21
13
80
56
37
30
40
36
9
46
6
3
9
5
5
1
7
1
2
5
3
2
3
4
3
3a
3
27
25
26
17
28
25
27
40
28
27
18
26
f
Table 3-1 (Continued)
Summary Regional and Ownership Market Statistics of the 1991 Wafer
Fabrication Equipment Market (Millions of Dollars)
Percentage Regional Markets
Equipment
Horizontal E>iffusion
Vertical Uiffusion
Total Ditfusion
North
American Japanese
Comps. Comps.
38
44
19
72
26
61
42
41
44
34
17
5
85
7
Medium Current Implant
High Current Implant
High Voltage Implant
Total Implant
108
218
18
343
-5
-13
159
-7
15
18
16
17
55
59
65
58
13
12
19
13
17
11
0
12
53
55
83
56
36
10
17
19
59
94
90
1
8
-1
33
19
29
33
63
46
22
6
17
12
13
7
65
14
45
21
86
42
5^05
2
25
50
11
14
35
53
17
398
227
193
28
8
5
2
23
30
16
25
42
45
58
50
13
11
10
11
23
14
16
14
NA
NA
NA
NA
NA
NA
NA
NA
6,040
3
25
50
11
14
NA
NA
Subtotal Wafer Pab B ^ ^
Macro Categories
Ion Milling
Other Process Control
Factory Automation
Other Equipment
Total Wafer Fab
Equipment
.8
Japan Europe
34
16
54
7
46
11
AsiaPacific/
ROW
22
18
19
Rapid Thermal Processing
Optical CD*
CDSEM
Wafer Inspection
I
1991
World ($)
135
200
335
(%)
Change
North
from
America
1990
27
-18
21
25
24
3
Percentage Regio
NA - Not applicable
'Includes dedlcsded registration measurement tools.
Percentage figures for regional markets and ownership may not add to 100 percent because of rounding.
Source: Dataquest (July 1992)
3-8
Semiconductor Equipment, Manufacturing, and Materials
Slide in U.S. Company Sliare Slows In 1991: Wafer Fab
Equipment HAarket by Company Ownership
Itends in regional company market share are a perennial topic of
interest in the semiconductor industry, be it for devices, equipment, or
materials. Rgure 3-2 shows that the steady increase in market share by
Japanese companies throughout the 1980s was mirrored by a similar
loss in share by North American companies for key segments of wafer
processing equipment. Although North American companies still lost
market share last year, the pattern of market share erosion appears to
have slowed somewhat in 1991. In this section we examine severed of
the underljong reasons for the changes in regional company market
share in 1991.
Changes in Regional Market Share
Japanese wafer fab equipment companies increased their share of
the worldwide market to 53 percent at the expense of both European and North American wafer fab equipment manufacturers in
1991 (see Table 3-2). European com.pany share declined by more
Figure 3-2
Worldwide Market Share of Regional Companies for Key Equipment Segments,
1982-1991 (Percentage of Revenue in Dollars)
Percentage
60504030-
n
•
*
2010*
1
1982
1
1983
A
1
1984
^^
1
1985
1
1986
1
1987
1
1988
1
1989
1
1990
1991
-•—
Japanese Company Share
—A-
European Company Share
—•—
North American Company Share
—•—
Joint Venture Company Share
Note: Wafer fab equipment segments include lithography, automatic photoresist, processing equipment, wet processing,
dry etch, dry strip, deposition, diffusion, rapid thermal processing, ion implantation, cntical dimension, and wafer
Inspection tools.
Source; Dataquest (July 1992)
July 20,1992
G20001S2
®1992 Dataquest IncorpoiatBd
SEMM-SVC-MT-42M
3^
Overview of the 1991 V\^er Fab Equipment l\^arl<Bt
Table 3-2
Changes in Regional Company Market Share in the
1991 Wafer Fab Equipment Market
(Percentage Dollar Revenue)
Changes in Regional Company
Share as Compared with 1990
Region
North American
Companies
Japanese
Companies
European
Companies
Joint Venture
Companies
Total
1991
World
Asia/
North
Share
Pacific(%) America Japan Europe ROW World
35.4
-4.6
2.8
5.4
-9.4
-0.5
53.1
3.8
-1.5
-2.5
10.5
1.9
7.8
-0.4
-0.2
-4.1
-1.8
-1.3
3.7
100.0
1.3
-1.0
1.2
0.6
-0.1
Source: Dataquest (July 1992)
than a percentage point to about 8 percent, while U.S. company
share declined half of a percentage point to about 35 percent
Joint venture companies (the majority of which are joint ventures
between U.S. and Japanese corporations) essentially maintained their
1990 share level with about 4 percent of the worldwide market in
1991.
Japanese Companies
In 1991, Japanese companies gained share in the world market
because increased penetration in both the North American and
Asia/Padfic-ROW markets generated enough of a balance to compensate for lost share in Europe and their home market of Japan.
The gain in market share in North America was due primarily to
increased sales of lithography equipment into a market that was
actually experiencing an overall decline in wafer fab equipment
sales. The Asia/PaciSc region was a hotbed of activity in 1991
and Japanese companies enjoyed particularly strong revenue
growth, more than doubling their sales from the prior jrear. Revenue increases were noted in every major category of wafer fab
equipment- Through this higher sales volume, Japanese companies
garnered an increase of more than 10 percentage points in share
to achieve an overall position of 53 percent share in this region of
the world.
The relative proximity of Japanese companies to semiconductor fabs
in Asia/Pacific, coupled witii advanced technology product otferings
focused on high-voliune manufacturing, and the significant emphasis
SEMM-SVC-MT-42AA
®1992 Dataquest Incorporated
July 20,1992
3-10
Semiconductor Equipment, Manufacturing, and Materials
that Japanese vendors place on customer support have allowed the
Japanese equipment industry to grow its presence in this market
from 10 percent share in 1982 to a dominant position of 53 percent
in 1991. During this same time span. North American companies'
share dropped from 78 percent to 36 percent share.
North American Companies
1
The worldwide market share of North American companies declined
only a half of a percentage point in 1991, in contrast to the average 3 percentage point dedine observed throughout the 1980s.
Exactly opposite of the trend observed in Japanese company share,
North American companies gained market share position in Japan
and Eiuope, and lost share in Asia/Pacific and their home market
of the United States. The gain in wafer fab equipment market share
in Japan has garnered much interest in light of the market access
disputes and trade friction that currently characterize U.S./Japanese
relations. While the total Japanese equipment market experienced
only modest growth of 1 percent in 1991, North American companies increased their sales in Japem by 19 percent This increased
sales activity covered a broad number of equipment categories
including lithography, CVD, PVD, silicon epitaxy, ion implantation,
and rapid thermal processing equipment.
Dataquest believes that North American company share gains in the
Japanese market in the categories of CVD and PVD equipment are
of particular interest. The Japanese semiconductor industry is currently diversifying its manufocturing product mix away from the
heavily dominated high-voliune DRAM maniifactuiing to include
more ASIC and advanced logic products. DRAM manufacturing is
driven to a significant extent by trends in advanced lithography.
ASIC and advanced logic products, however, are strongly designdependent on multilevel metallization, which is achieved through
the advanced thin film processing techniques of CVD and PVD
equipment. In contrast, it is only at the 4Mb DRAM shrink that
double-level metal even begins to be used in DRAM manufacturing.
North American companies have held a traditionally strong market
position in advanced CVD and PVD processing equipment, and
thus have benefited from this shift in manufacturing strategy with
increased market penetration in Japan.
Although an increase in North American company share gain in
Japan in 1991 is certainly laudable, it must be noted that North
American companies also lost almost 5 percentage points of share
in their home market and more than 9 percentage points of share
in Asia/Pacific. In both of these regions. North American company
share was lost while Japanese company share continued to grow.
European C o m p a n i e s
Eiuopean companies lost market share in every regional market in
1991. On a worldwide basis, European company revenue declined
in every major category of wafer tah eqmpment with the exception
of silicon epitaxy and track equipment. Dataquest believes that
European companies, in particular, fell victim to the depressed
July 20,1992
®1992 Dataquest Incotporalsd
SEMM-SVC-MT-92AA
Overview of the 1991 V\^er Fab Equipment Marl<et
3-11
equipment enviroiunent in their home market of Europe, which
declined by 17 percent in 1991. Throughout the 1980s, the European
market on average accounted for about 44 percent of total Eim>pean equipment company revenue. However, in 1991, the home
market represented only 33 percent of total European equipment
company business as total European company revenue plunged
30 percent from its 1990 level.
Another important component in the loss of share for the European
companies is the relatively small sales level of wafer fab equipment
companies as compared with their North American and Japanese
counterparts. According to Dataquest estimates, only the three
largest European wafer fab equipment companies in 1991—^ASM
International, ASM Lithography, and E.T. Electrotech—achieved
worldwide wafer fab equipment sales in excess of $20 million. It is
very difficult for companies with a small revenue base to stave oH
the triple foes of a sluggish business environment, increased competition, and escalating R&D costs, while coping with an increasingly
global and increasingly demanding customer base.
Dataquest Conclusions
Shifts in regional company market share grab both headlines and
the attention of industry politicos. We believe that when evaluating
the regional company share trends it is important to keep in mind
that 1991 was a fairly sluggish year for the wafer fab equipment
industry. Overall growth achieved only 3 percent, preceded by a
2 percent decline the year before. While we have noted some
interesting changes in regional company market share for 1991, we
caution that a single year does not necessarily define a trend. What
is more important in establishing long-term market positioning and
dominance is not just how companies fare when times are slow, but
also the ability of companies to catch the tiger by the tail and ride
out the next upswing in market growth.
SEMM-SVC-MT-€2AA
©1992 Dataquest Incorporatsd
July 20,1992
Chapter 4
Lithography Market Trends
The material in this section focuses on lithography market trends.
The 1-Line Lifeline: 1991 Stepper Market in Review
I-line steppers became the dominant tool choice for new system purchases in 1991. While total stepper shipments declined, revenue was
buoyed by the higher average selling price of advanced i-line systems.
Track Triumvirate Prevails: 1991 Automatic
Photoresist
Processing Equipment Market in Review
The worldwide market for automatic photoresist processing equipment (track) was $369 million in 1991, up 13 percent from its 1990
level. This article highlights some of the key trends behind the healthy
growth in last year's market and discusses the activities of the top
three players that have continued their decade-long position of
dominance in the worldwide track arena.
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®1992 Dataquest Incorporatad
July 20,1932
4-2
Semiconductor Equipment, Manufacturing, and Materials
The l-Lfne Lifeline: 1991 Stepper Market In Review
I-line steppers became the dominant tool choice for new purchases in
1991. Total stepper unit shipments to semiconductor manufacturers
were 679 units in 1991, down 12 percent from the 1990 level of 771.
Buoyed by the higher average selling price of advanced i-line sj^tems,
worldwide stepper revenue was $1.03 billion in 1991, reflecting a
decline of a mere 2 percentage points from its 1990 level of $1.05 billion. This section presents the significant trends and highlights of the
1991 stepper equipment market.
Regional Markets and Ownership
Figure 4-1 presents the worldwide 1991 stepper unit market segmented by region and ownership. As with other major categories
of front-end processing equipment market, Japan continued its role
as the largest regional market, accounting for almost half of 1991
stepper shipments. The Japanese stepper companies continued their
dominance of the 1991 stepper market, accounting for more than
80 percent of worldwide ^pments.
Stepper Market Highlights of 1991
Several key Actors characterized the world of stepper lithography
in 1991. I-line steppers continued to command a larger and larger
portion of the stepper technology product mix. These tools constituted 21 percent of the stepper product mix in 1989 and
Figure 4-1
1991 Stepper Regional Markets and Ownership
Ownership
Markets
X
1
j<^^ Europe
\
(9%)
/ A s i a / \ (60)
f Pacific- \
ROW
\
(16%)
\
(107)
\
V
\
European Companies
(6%)
\
(40)
^ ^
North American Companies-y^ \
(12%)
/
\
\
^^^^
\
Japan
(48%)
(330)
North America I
(27%)
\
(182)
\
B
m
f
Total Units = 679
V
\
\
Japanese Companies
(82%)
(560)
B
#
jM
Total Units = 679
Source: Dataquest (July 1992)
July 20.1992
/
02000193
®1992 Dataquest IncoiporalBd
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Lithography Market Trends
4-3
36 percent in 1990, but by last year had increased their share to
60 percent of total system shipments. I-line steppers are the predominant lithography tool choice for products with line geometries
in the sub-0.8 micron regime, including such devices as 4Mb and
16Mb DRAMs as well as advanced ASIC and logic chips. The
development of semiconductor phase shift mask technology and
recently announced advanced stepper illtunination techniques, both
of which are optimized for highly repetitive device patterns, holds
promise for extending the capabilities of i-hne lithography to the
0.35-micron regime.
The phase shift mask fever that took hold of the industry in 1990
continued into 1991. The challenges associated with phase shift
mask inspection and repair still remained formidable, however. At
the end of 1991, Nikon and Canon announced new i-line stepper
illumination techniques, dubbed SHRINC and QUEST, respectively,
that achieve the benei&ts of phase shifting on the wafer without
having to use a mask as the source of the phase-shifting pattern.
These new techmques, targeted at the 64Mb DRAM generation, provide some breathing room for development work to continue on
phase shift mask inspection/repair technology for latter generations
of DRAMs and other highly repetitive device product ^milies. At
the same time, Nikon and Canon benefit by being well-positioned
with their new i-line techniques to offer an alternative lithographic
approach to 64Mb DRAM device manufacturers.
Finally, 1991 can clearly be named the year of the wide-field lens.
The industry saw a veritable explosion of wide-field lens product
ofierings. A total of 15 new wide-field i-line and excimer lenses
were introduced by stepper manufacturers ASM Lithography,
Canon, GCA, Hitachi, Nikon, and Ultratech. Wide-field lens capability to accommodate more die per exposure field, as well as the
large die size associated with advanced device designs, is a key
competitive feature of today's advanced stepper systems.
Company Rankings
Table 4-1 presents the worldwide company rankings for stepper
unit shipments in 1991. In addition. Table 4-1 includes the percentage split by technology for each company's stepper shipment
product mix in 1991.
Nikon
In 1991, Nikon continued to maintain its leadership position in the
stepper market, a position it has held since 1984. Nikon's worldwide unit shipments totaled 350 units, down about 9 percent from
its 1990 shipment level of 384. One key factor that began to affect
Nikon's business activities toward the end of 1991 was the decision
by many Japanese manufacturers to downsize or delay their capacity plans for 200mm fabs in Japan. The majority of these planned
or existing 200mm fabs are slated for 4Mb and 16Mb DRAM
devices. This slowdown in DRAM equipment purchases will have
significant impact on Nikon, more so than any other stepper
manufacturer, because of Nikon's traditionally strong position in
supplying DRAM facilities.
SEMM-SVC-Mr-«2AA
©1992 Dafaquest Incorporated
July 20,1992
44
Semiconductor Equipment, Manufacturing, and Materials
Table 4-1
1991 Worldwide Stepper Company Ranking
(Unit Shipments)
Company
Nikon
Canon
Piitachi
ASM Lithography
Ultratech
GCA
SVG Lithography
Total
Units
350
145
65
40
40
31
8
679
Share
(%)
51
21
10
6
6
5
1
100
Percent Stepper Technology
Mix
Exdmer/
Ix
g-line i-line deep-UV
66
3
0
31
50
41
9
0
100
0
0
0
87
5
0
8
0
0 100
0
19
58
23
0
100
0
0
0
28
60
6
6
Source: Dataquest (July 1992)
Nikon experienced a decline of stepper shipments in all regions of
the world with the exception of the United States, where there was
partictilarly healthy growth. Dataquest estimates that Nikon's shipments reached 80 units in 1991, up from 56 imits the year before.
Of particular note for Nikon in 1991 was the shift in the compan)^s product mix toward i-line stepper systems. Nikon shipped its
first i-line tools in 1989, a year in which i-line constituted only
10 percent of the compan5^s product mix. In just two years, i-line
has grown to represent two-thirds of Nikon's worldwide stepper
shipments. As mentioned earlier, an important event for Nikon in
1991 was its annotmcement of its new advanced illumination technique for i-line steppers that allows DRAM manufacturers to
achieve some of the benefits of phase shift masks while eliminating the problems associated with mask inspection/repair technology.
Canon
Dataquest estimates that Canon's 1991 stepper imit shipments were
145 units, down about 3 percent from its 1990 level of 150 imits.
This decline for Canon is smaller than that experienced by Nikon
because Canon's customer base includes a laige number of ASIC
and advanced logic manufacturers, and thus Canon has been somewhat more immime from the slowdown in DRAM fab activities.
Last year marked the first year of significant shipments of Canon's
first i-line product offering, the FPA-2000i. The success of that product offering allowed Canon to rapidly grow i-line steppers to about
40 percent of its product mix. As mentioned earlier, another significant event for Canon last yeear was its announcement of a new
advanced illumination technique for i-line steppers that, like Nikon's
technique, provides 64Mb DRAM manufacturers with a lithographic
alternative to using phase shift masks.
July 20,1992
®1992 Dataquest IncoipotatBd
SEMM-SVC-Mr-92AA
Uthography Martet Trends
4;^
Hitachi
Hitachi ranked third in worldwide stepper shipments in 1991 with
65 imits, down from 84 units in 1990. Historically, Hitachi's shipments have been concentrated in Japan. However, Dataquest
believes that the company shipped a substantial portion of its total
1991 stepper shipments to Goldstar in Korea. The Hitachi and Goldstar organizations have had long-standing relationships in the consumer electronics arena since the 1950s. As part of a semiconductor
agreement in 1989, Goldstar acquired the rights to Hitachi's 1Mb
and 4Mb DRAM technology in return for a variable portion of its
DRAM output going to Hitachi. Hitachi uses this output from
Goldstar to balance the capacity utilization of its Japanese DRAM
lines against overall market demand. Some industry watchers speculate that Goldstar's purchase of Hitachi steppers is somehow tied to
the DRAM technology agreement. However, Dataquest notes that
this is not entirely supported by the facts, since Hitachi's own
semiconductor operations do not exdtisively rely on Piitachi steppers for use in their manufacturing facilities. Hitachi's stepper
activity in Korea may mark the beginning of a significant shift in
the compemy's marketing strategy to expand its customer base
beyond a handful of Japanese device manufacturers and internal
operations at some of tixe Hitachi semiconductor facilities.
ASM Lithography (ASML)
ASM Lithography shipped a total of 40 units in 1991, down from
58 the prior year. The U.S. market continued to be the largest
regional market for ASML in 1991, representing about 58 percent of
total system shipments. However, for the first time, shipments to
Asia/Pacific moved ahead of ASML's stepper shipments to Europe.
Dataquest believes that this decline for ASML in its home market
was due to a severely depressed stepper market in Europe last
year (total European stepper shipments of 60 units compared with
95 units the year before) coupled with ASML's aggressive marketing
strategy to increase its penetration in the Asia/Pacific market, in
particular, Taiwan. ASML has yet to ship any steppers to Japan.
However, Dataquest believes that the company is actively laying
the groundwork for future business activities in that regioiL
The major event for ASML in 1991 was the introduction of a major
new product family of steppers at SEMICON/West in May. The
PAS 5500 stepper family, which includes three wide-field i-line and
one wide-field excimer stepper, has been designed in a modular
fashion so that the steppers can be easily upgraded with new illumination systems, lenses, reticle transfer systems, wafer transport
systems, and other elements as technology advances the definition
of state-of-the-art lithography. Other system components such as the
machine frame, lens platform and exposure stage, alignment system,
internal dean room enviroiunent, and image sensor and calibration
remain the same throughout the 5500 family. This modular design
approach effectively addresses one of the hot issues among semiconductor manufacturers today: controlling the cost of ownership
of todaj^s wafer fab equipment.
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®1992 Dataquest IncorpoiatBd
July 20,1992
4-6
Semiconductor Equipment, Manufacturing, and Materials
Ultratech
Ultratech was the only stepper manufacturer to enjoy increased urdt
shipments in 1991. The compan/s shipments totaled 40 units, up
6x)m 34 tmits the year before. The company's 1991 imit shipments
included 9 sj^tems to Japan, representing Uie majority of the total
of 12 units shipped by non-Japanese stepper companies to this
region. After all of the uncertainty that plagued Ultratech in 1990,
including possible consolidation with sister company GCA, a failed
management buyout prop>osfil, and dwindling employee morale,
1991 was definitely a turnaround year for the company. A new
management team with solid experience in the wafer ^b equipment
industry was put in place, and a strong marketing campaign was
launched to promote the companjr's "trailing edge" marketing
strategy for Ix mix-and-match lithography. Outside the semiconductor arena, the company also began to aggressively promote its position as a leader in providing lithography solutions for the thin film
head manufacturing enviroiunent.
GCA
GCA's stepper shipments totaled 31 units in 1991, down from
52 systems in 1990. The United States remains the largest regional
market for the company, accounting for more than 80 percent of
system shipments last year. GCA was the first vendor to begin
i-line stepper shipments back in the mid-1980s, and today the company's product mix still largely reflects its participation in that market segment. However, it is important to note that GCA has placed
significant emphasis on its exdmer laser product offerings. As
shown in Table 1, almost one-fourth of GCA's product mix is in
the excimer area, the highest percentage of any vendor currently
offering excimer laser steppers. Dataquest believes that the goal of
the companj^s current emphasis on excimer lithography is to establish an early foothold in this advanced stepper segment and to use
this product offering as part of the company's long-term strategy to
regain its former market presence in the highly competitive stepper
arena. GCA introduced its long-awaited XLS family of steppers at
SEMICON/West in May 1991. This family of products, developed in
conjunction with SEMATECH, includes three i-line and two excimer
stepper product offerings.
SVG Lithography (SVGL)
SVG Lithograph)^s shipments of its Micrascan 90 product totaled
8 luiits in 1991. Shipments in 1991 included two units to Eiuope
and two units to Japan, one of which was the highly publicized
shipment to Toshiba in early 1991. In 1991, IBM continued to be
SVGUs major customer for the Micrascan. V\^th the exception of
the Toshiba shipment, Dataquest believes that all other luiits were
sent to IBM facilities including Corbeil-Essonnes, France, and Yasu,
Japan. Much of SVGL's activities in 1991 were taken up with
development of its new advanced Micrascan tool, which will be
introduced at SEMICON/West in June 1992. The product acceptance
of the new advanced Micrascan system by device manufacturers
other than IBM is absolutely key to SVGL's long-term competitive
position in the marketplace.
July 20,1992
©1992 Dataquest InnxpoiaiBd
SEMM-SVC-MT-92AA
Lithography Market Trends
4-7
Dataquest Conclusions
The worldwide stepper market was 679 imits in 1991, down
almost 30 f>ercent from the peak year of 1989 when 954 units were
shipped to the world's semiconductor manufacturers. The revenue
decline (down 13 percent) was not nearly as precipitous because of
the ever-escalating average selling price (ASP) of advanced stepper
s}^tems. Factors driving increasing stepper prices include new
sources, new wide-field lens capability, and new alignment systems.
Stepper ASP grew at a staggering compoimd annual growth rate
(CAGR) of 16.8 percent between 1985 and 1990, and Dataquest
anticipates that it will continue to increase at a rate of 12 to
13 percent CAGR between 1990 and 1995. Technology has always
been king in lithography, but the 1990s will see cost of ownership
emerge as technology's consort sharing the throne as an equal
partner in future lithography buying decisions.
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©1992 Dataquest Incorporated
July 20,1992
4^
Semiconductor Equipment, Manufacturing, and Materials
l ^ c k 'h'iumvirate Prevails: 1991 Automatic Piiotoresist
Processing Equipment Niaricet in Review
The worldwide market for automatic photoresist processing equipment
(track) was $369 million in 1991, up 13 percent from its 1990 level of
$326 million. This healthy growth rate is of significance in light of the
fact that the track equipment market is closely tied to purchases of
lithography equipment, whose market declined 5 percent last year.
This section highlights some of the key trends behind the healthy
growth in last year's market and discusses the actiAdties of the top
three players, who have continued their decade-long position of
dominance in the worldwide track arena.
Dataquest attributes the healthy growth rate in the 1991 track market
to several factors. First, we believe that the average selling price (ASP)
associated with a given track system increased at an accelerated pace
last year. From a market research perspective, reliable information on
track unit shipments is diffioilt to gather—^the definition of what constitutes a unit of track equipment varies from vendor to vendor
because of the modular and cxistom nature of a given customer's
requirement. However, it is dear that track manufacturers are including more and more advanced modules and subsystems on their
leading-edge product offerings, including vertical hot plates, randomaccess robotics, environmentally controlled chambers, and improved
chemical dispense nozzles with sophisticated fluid volume controllers.
In addition, continued emphasis is being placed on achieving tighter
particle control throughout the entire trade system. All of these elements are essential in order to achieve the same physical, chemical,
and temporal environment for every wafer being processed. These
factors all directly contribute to a higher ASP for track equipment.
In addition, Dataquest believes that a significant level of replacement
systems was purchased for volume production lines and advanced
R&D facilities last year. This is because the newer advanced track
tools available in just the last few years have undergone substantial
improvements rdative to many tools ciurently in the installed base.
These older tools at volume production lines and R&D facilities are
not particularly well-suited for the advanced processing requirements
of devices such as 16Mb DRAMs. Not only do the newer track systems provide improved process performance but random-access systems can typically save from 25 to 30 percent on floor space. This
reduction in footprint directly impacts cost of ownership and has
contributed to an acceleration in the replacement activity in track.
Finally, the sluggish DRAM market has led many manufacturers
to shift their product strategy from DRAMs to ASICs and other
advanced logic products. As a result, we speculate that the market
opportunity for standalone track systems last year expanded at a
faster pace than might have otherwise been expected if DRAM activity
had not been so slow. Standalone track systems provide an additional
level of process flexibility that is well-suited for ASIC manufacturing.
That flexibility typicaUy is not required for high-volume DRAM
manufactiuing where the track system is directly interfaced to the
lithography tool.
July 20,1992
®1992 Dataquest Inccxporated
SEMM-SV(>-MT-92AA
4-9
Lithography Market Trends
Regional Markets and Ownership
Figure 4-2 presents the worldwide 1991 track market segmented by
region and ownership. As with other major categories of front-end
processing equipment market, Japan represented the largest regional
market for track equipment, accoimting for 49 percent of world
demand in 1991. Japanese companies continued to hold a particularly strong position in the track market with 62 percent share last
year. This dominant share position in the world market in large
part is attributed to the fact that the Japanese track companies have
"owned" their home market of Japan, accoimting for more than
98 percent share of the market every year since 1985. In 1991, only
one non-Japanese track vendor had sales in Japan and that was
Machine Technology (MTI). Dataquest believes that MTI's business
activity in this region was directly related to the shipment of two
SVG Lithography Micrascem step-and-scan tools to customers in
Japan. (To date MTI has been the primary supplier of track systems
interfaced to Micrascan tools worldwide.) In addition to dominating
the largest regional market for track eqtiipment, Japanese companies
have also been focused on expanding export activities over the last
several years, either by going direct, through representatives and
distributors, or through joint-venture activity.
Figure 4-2
1991 Regional Automatic Photoresist Processing Equipment Markets
and Ownership
Markets
Asia-Pacific/ROW
$44.4(12%)
Ownership
European
Ck)mpanies
jojpi Venture Companies
I
$171 (50/,)
$18.9(5%)
Totai» $368.6 Million
Total := $368.6 Million
Source: Dataquest (July 1992}
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®1992 Dataquest IncorpoiatBd
July 20,1992
Semiconductor Equipment, Manufeicturing, and Materials
4-10
Company Rankings
Table 4-2 presents the worldwide company rankings for the track
equipmait market in 1991. In order to better illustrate the influence
and market positioning of companies providing the same track
product offerings, we have combined the revenue of Tokyo Electron
Ltd. (TEL) with its joint venture partner, Varian/TEL. This joint
venture, established in 1989, is spedficeilly focused on providing
track, diffusion, and etch products from TEL in Japan to semiconductor manufacturers in the United States and Europe. The Varian/
TEL joint venture is supported by the sales, marketing, and service
organization of Varian.
•
Please note that Dataquesf s estimates of the track equipment market include only those systems used in semiconductor device fabrication. Many of these same track companies supply systems that
are used in other applications, such as compact disk coating and
flat panel display manufacturing. We have excluded any such
revenue associated with these nonsemiconductor manu^ctuiing
activities.
TEL and Varian/TEL
TEL and Vanan/TEL claimed the No. 1 ranking in the track equipment market in 1991 with $143 million in revenue and 39 percent
share of the world market. The combined activities of TEL and Varian/TEL have maintained this ranking since 1987. TEL was the first
company to introduce a random-access track sjrstem, the Mark 11,
back in 1987. The company has continued to capitalize on that
Table 4-2
1991 Automatic Photoresist Processing Equipment
Company Ranking (Revenue in Millions of Dollars)
Company
TEL and Varian/TEL
Dainippon Screen
Silicon Valley Group
Machine Technology
Convac
Tazmo
Semiconductor Systems Inc.
Canon
Yuasa
Solitec
F5I International
Eaton
Worldwide Market Total
Revenue
143.3
69.5
48.9
26.6
18.9
15.2
14.0
12.3
5.9
4.9
4.8
4.3
368.6
Share (%)
38.9
18.9
13.3
7.2
5.1
4.1
3.8
3.3
1.6
1.3
1.3
1.2
100.0
Note: No revenue associated with spares and service is included.
Source: Dataquest (Juiy 1992)
July 20,1992
®1992 Dataquest Iraxxporalad
SEMM-SVC-MT-92AA
Lithography Market Trends
4-11
early lead in advanced track systems. Its leading-edge product
offering today is the Mark V.
The TEL and Varian/TEL operations have established a significant
presence in all regions of the world. Dataquest estimates that TEL's
1991 share of the Japanese market was 55 percent and that the
company accounted for 64 percent of the Asia/Pacific market last
year. Varian/TEL, which has only been shipping track systems since
1989, garnered 23 percent share of the European market in 1991.
Varian/TEL's share of the North American market last year was
only 8 percent, but this relatively small position in the United
States is not unreasonable considering that there exist a niunber
of North American suppliers with well-entrenched positions in their
home market.
Dainippon Screen (DNS)
Dainippon Screen ranked second in the 1991 track equipment market with sales of $70 million and 19 percent share of the world
market. The company has continued to emphasize its export activities, and in 1991 track revenue from customers outside of Japan
accounted for about one-foiuth of total sales. DNS was delayed in
introducing a random-access track system and as a consequence
sufiered a loss in worldwide market share in 1990. However, in
1991, the company regained a percentage point of share as sales of
its random-access D-SPIN 60A system became a larger portion of
the company's total product mix. In addition, Dataquest believes
that DNS' gain in market share was in part attributed to the company's new developer solution nozzle (dubbed "soft impact nozzle")
that can reduce dispense volumes of developer chemicals from
lOOcc to 35cc for 2(K)mm wafer processing. The new nozzle also
provides improved process uniformity.
Silicon Valley Group (SVG)
SVG ranked third in the 1991 track market with $49 million in
sales. The company has suffered a decline in market share over the
years because it has been unsuccessful in breaking into the world's
largest regional market, Japan, and luis had to face increasing levels
of competition from Japanese competitors in the other parts of the
world, including its home market of the United States. In 1987,
SVG accounted for 20 percent of the worldwide track market.
Five years later (1991), this market share position had eroded to
13 percent.
SVG still holds its No. 1 ranking in North America and garnered
34 percent share in its home market last year. An important component of SVG's 1991 North American revenue came from shipments to Motorola's MOS-11 facility. SVG's major advanced product
offering is its 90 Series, a random-access track system introduced at
SEMICON/West in May 1990. Dataquest estimates that the 90 Series
product line accoimted for about half of SVG's total track revenue
in 1991.
•
SEMM-SVC-MT-42AA
©1992 Dataquest Incoiporatad
July 20,1992
4-12
Semiconductor Equipment, Manufacturing, and Materials
Dataquest Conclusions
The top three players in the track market—^TEL (including Varian/
TEL), Dainippon Screen, and Silicon Valley Group—have dominated
the track market throughout the 1980s. In 1982, they accoimted for
a combined share of 52 percent, which by last year had increased
to a combined share of 72 percent. Ten other companies split the
remaining 18 percent of the 1991 market. Qearly, the combination
of advanced tedmology and random-access product offerings coupled with sufficient critical mass to support a global customer base
have been key to the success of these larger players.
The midsize track players such as Machine Technology and Convac
have advanced product offerings but will need to expand their
global presence if they ever hope to gain membership to the upper
echelons of the track market. The smaller track companies face a
significant challenge in developing their long-term strategy for success in this marketplace. Some companies, such as FSI International
with its Tl-designed Polaris system, are aggressively marketing an
advanced product offering designed to go head-to-head with the
big guys. Other smaller players, however, may well be relegated to
pursue noncompetitive niche applications or remain content with a
single-region marketing focus for their business activities. The three
major players in Has marketplace show no sign of abdicating their
positions of leadership laxytime sooiu
July 20,1992
®1992 Dataquest IncocpoiatBd
SEMM-SVC-Mr-g2AA
Chapter 5
Etch and Clean Market Trends
The material in this section focuses on etch and clean market trends.
Wet Processing Sales Stall in 1991:1991 Wet Process Equipment
Market in Review
The total Wet processing equipment market tracked with wafer fab
equipment demand, which was basically flat in 1991, although there
were individual segments of wet process equipment that bucked the
trend.
Jockeying for Position in a Tight Race for Market Leadership:
1991 Dry Etch Equipment Market in Review
The worldwide dry etch market grew a modest 2 percent in 1991 to
reach a size of $705 million. The dry etch competitive arena appears
to be a wide-open race for market leadership as the key contenders
narrow the difference between their market share positions.
SEMM-SVC-MT-Q2AA
®1992 Dabquest Incoipoialad
July 20,1992
Semiconductor Equipment, Manufacturing, and Materials
5-2
Wet Processing Sales Stall in 1991:1991 Wet Process
Equipment Market In Review
The worldwide wet process equipment market was $405 million in
1991, essentially flat with respect to its level the prior year. This section presents the significant highlights of the 1991 wet process equipment market with a focus on new technology trends and company
activities.
Regional Markets and Ownership
Figure 5-1 shows the worldwide 1991 wet process equipment market segmented by region and ownership. Japan, with 51 percent
($205 million), continued to represent the largest wet process equipment market, though spending in Japan for wet process equipment
last year dedined sharply by 17 percent from its 1990 level of
$246 million. The Japan wet process equipment market was active
in the first half of 1991 because of a large backlog of orders from
the prior year coupled with long lead times, on the order of six to
eight months. However, a drastic reduction in shipments of wet
process systems in the second half of the j^ear led to the precipitous decline in wet process equipment sales in Japan for the year
as a whole.
The North American market for wet process grew a record 41 percent from $75 million in 1990 to almost $106 million in 1991. The
Figure 5-1
1991 Wet Process Equipment Regional Markets and Ownership
Marl<ets
Owners flip
Europe (8%)
European Companies (3%)
Total = $405.0 Million
Source: Dataquest (July 1992)
July 20,1992
Total = $405.0 Million
G£OOQ30e
01992 Dataquest IncoporatBd
SEMM-S\/(>-MT-92AA
Etch and Clean Market Trends
5-3
tremendous growth in North American sales is largely attributable
to increased spending on integrated wet systems. U.S. device makers are beginning to aggressively adopt the more expensive automated wet sjrstems though automated systems still lag the degree
of penetration achieved in Japsm.
Company Rankings
Table 5-1 presents the worldwide company rankings for the wet
process equipment market. Company revenue for wet process
equipment is further segmented into the categories of integrated
wet systems, manual wet benches, rinser/dryers, add processors,
and megasonic deaners.
1991 Market H i g h l i g h t s
Carrierless Wet Stations
One signiticemt trend in the wet processing equipment arena has
been development of carrierless wet stations. A carrierless system
removes the wafers from the cassette prior to processing. In 1991,
200mm carrierless wet stations for 16Mb DRAM applications were
introduced by many equipment manufacturers: Dainippon Screen,
Dan Sdence, Fuji Qectric, Kuwano, Shimada, SubMicron Systems,
and Sugai. One feature offered by all the carrierless systems is
the elimination of chemical carryover and wafer contamination
associated with the carrier. This makes these wet stations the
most advanced deaning systems available to satisfy the strict
specifications that must be achieved in 16Mb DRAM processing.
The 200mm carrierless system has the same footprint as the corresponding 150mm wet station system with carriers, and thus
achieves a very compact size even while processing the largerdiameter wafers. Another advantage of the carrierless systems is
a significant reduction of chemical consumption. Table 5-2 summarizes several of the key featiues of 200mm carrierless wet
stations compared with conventional 200mm systems. The price
of carrierless wet stations in Japan ranges from ¥100 million to
¥200 million ($770,000 to $1.5 million). In addition to the companies
identified, Sankyo Engineering is developing a carrierless system.
Tokyo Electron Enters the YJet Process Market
Historically, Tokyo Electron's (TEL) activity in the wet process market has been confined to the marketing of Semitool's acid processors and Sugai's wet stations. Strong growth in the wet processing
equipment market (24.8 percent CAGR between 1987 and 1991),
however, encouraged TEL to terminate its marketing agreement
with Sugai and to build its own manufacturing facility. Wet
processing equipment produd offerings further establish TEL as
one of the few players in the industry to provide one-stop shop>ping with a broad and diverse produd mix of wafer fabrication
equipment.
^
In addition to its desire to explore new market opportunities,
there are several other key reasons for TEL entering the wet
process equipment. Dataquest believes that TEL may have sensed
SEMM-SVC-MT-92AA
01992 Dabquest Incoiporatad
July 20,1992
Semiconductor Equipment, Manulacturing, and Materials
54
Table 5-1
1991 Worldwide Wet Process Equipment Company
Ranking (Millions of Dollars)
MegaIntegrated Manual
sonic
Acid
Wet RJnseis/
Wet
(%) Stations Benches Dryeta Processors Cleaners
Share
Revenue
Companies
Daiiuppon
663
Screen
Kaijo
33.1
Sankyo
Engineering
32.7
Sugai
32.6
FSI
International
21.8
Santa Clara
20.2
Plastics
19.8
Dan Science
18.6
Shimada
15.0
Maruwa
14.9
Verteq
12.1
Semitool
Submicron
12.0
Systems Inc.
Enya
11.6
10.9
ETE
Universal
9.1
Plastics
8.2
S&K Products
Pokomy
7.8
7.1
Toho Kasei
Kuwano
7.1
Electric
Semifab
65
Tokyo Election
5.6
Musashi
55
CFM
Technology
53
saManufacturing
Sapi
Equipments
Advantage
Production
Fuji Electric
Others
Total
Percentage
of Total
16.4
8.2
40.9
29.9
0
0
0
0.9
115
0
14.1
Z3
8.1
8.0
27.4
31.4
Z6
1.2
Z7
0
0
0
0
0
5.4
0
0
3.7
16.8
1.3
5.0
4.9
4.6
3.7
3.7
3.0
195
14.9
13.4
8.1
1.7
0
0.7
4.4
0
6.9
0
0
0
05
0
0
6.0
9.4
0
0
0
0
0
27
0
0
5.2
0
72
0
3.0
2.9
2.7
12.0
10.7
10.4
0
0.9
05
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
22
2.0
1.9
1.8
55
0
6.6
5.2
3.6
0
1.2
1.2
0
72
0
0.7
0
0
0
0
0
1.0
0
0
1.8
1.6
1.4
1.4
7.1
3.0
5.6
4.1
0
35
0
0.7
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0.7
0
0
0
0
1.3
5.3
0
0
0
0
4.8
1.2
4.8
0
0
0
0
3S
0.9
ZO
15
0
0
0
3.4
2.1
72
405.0
0.8
03
1.8
100.0
0
Zl
33
274.9
0
0
0.9
29.8
0
0
0.2
315
3.4
0
2.8
37.9
0
0
0
31.1
68
7
8
9
8
100
Note: No revenue associatad with spares and service inciuded
Source: Dataquest (July 1992)
July 20,1992
®1992 Dataquest Incorporaied
SBm-&f&-m-92M
5-5
Etch and Clean Market Trends
Table 5-2
Relative Comparison of Key Features for Conventional
and Camerless 200mm Wet Stations
Wafers per Batch
Footprint
Chemical Tank Capacity
QDR* Tank Capacity
"Kansportation lime between Baths
Conventional
200mm
System
50
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
Cairierless
200mm
System
50
0.70
0.53
0.68
0.45
*QDR • Quick Dumper Rinse
Source: Dataquest (July 1992)
a technological limitation in Sugai's wet station capaUlities for
production of 16Mb and more advanced DRAMs. In addition, TEL
has the second-largest share in the world vertical thermal reactor
(VTR) market, and it is key that the company develop its own
prediffusion clean system to be used in-line with its VTR products.
The impact of TEL's decision to terminate its relationship with
Sugai is already becoming apparent. \N^th the loss of its major distributor, Sugai slipped from second place in the 1990 worldwide
wet process equipment market to fourth position in 1991.
FSI Enters the Japanese Market
FSI International, a major supplier of wet processing equipment,
recently entered the Japanese market through an alliance with
Mitsui Corporation. The new entity formed from this alliance is
named m-FSI. Under this arrangement, Mitsui's subsidiary. Chlorine
Engineering, becomes one division of m-FSI and will continue to
market ozone ashers for photoresist stripping applications. The joint
venture also plans to manufacture and distribute FSI's surface
conditioning products in Japan.
FSI is a leading manufacturer of hydrofluoric (HF) acid vapor phase
cleaning systems. These systems are particularly effective in preventing organic as well as inorganic contaminants and particles from
depositing on an activated silicon surfece. The main application for
vapor phase cleaning is the removal of native oxide. FSI's entry to
the Japanese market, the major DRAM production base, is a key
strategic move for the company because the removal of native
oxide becomes critical as the oxide film becomes thinner in
advanced DRAM fabrication. Dataquest believes that future vapor
phase systems will be clustered with CVD equipment. However,
current equipment is designed to carry out the rinsing/drying
process under an atmosphere of nitrogen gas.
SEMM-SVC-MT-92M
®1992 Dataquest Incorporated
July 20,1992
5-6
Semiconductor Equipment, Manutacturing, and IVIaterials
Megasonic Cleaner Market Experiences High Growth
As design rules enter into a submicron level, the allowance for the
depth of focus has reduced, thus incre2ising the need for removing
particles on both sides of silicon wafers by mechanical means. This
has driven the megasonic cleaner market, especially scrubber S3rstems, to grow at an accelerated pace the last five years from a
$4 million level in 1987 to $31 million in 1991, reflecting compoimd
annual growth exceeding 60 percent.
Facilities Expansions
Rapid growth of the wet process equipment market coupled with
increasing system complexity has caused the production capability
of wet process equipment suppliers to fall short of demand. Dataquest believes that many suppliers had to give up orders during
1989 and 1990 because of capacity shortages in their own fodlities.
As shown in Table 5-3, severiil mantifocturers have rushed to build
new facilities in order to attain sufficient capacity to meet the
demands of semiconductor manufacturers.
Dataquest Conclusions
Although today's current carrierless wet processing systems are
suited for the 0.5-micron process for 16Mb DRAM production,
64Mb DRAM production with line geometries of 0.3 microns will
require the control of 0.03-micron particles. The control and cleaning
of 0.3-micron particles is further complicated by the fact that the
number of particles increases by geometrical progression inversely
proportional to the particle size. Furthermore, the smaller the particle size, the stronger the particle's adherence to the wafer surface,
thus making it more difficult to remove. Contact holes of
0.3-micron size have a high aspect ratio and thus will also require
a more sophisticated cleaning process. As gate oxide and capacitor
dielectric films become thinner Obelow lOnm), native oxide films
will need to be removed completely. Because a limited number of
existing wet process manufacturers provide such advanced cleaning
technologies, Dataquest expects the wet processing equipment
industry to rapidly migrate toward clearer product differentiation.
Table 5-3
New Planned Manufacturing Facilities for Wet Process
Equipment Suppliers
Companies
Dainippon Screen
Dan Science
Sankyo Engineering
Shimada
Tokyo Electron
New Plant Completion
Location
Date
Shiga
Q4/92
Q3/92
Tokyo
Q2/91
Qita
Q3/92
Shizuoka
Q3/92
Saga
Land
(sq. m)
26,200
3,518
8,440
7,410
104,482
Floor
Space
(sq. m)
19,900
4,196
2,877
NA
13,100
NA - Not available
Source: Dataquest (July 1992)
July 20,1992
®1992 Dataquest Incorporated
SEMM-SVC-Mr-92AA
5-7
Etch and Clean Market Trends
Jockeying for Position in a Tigiit Race for iVIaricet
Leadersliip: 1991 Dry Etcli Equipment Maricet in Review
The worldwide 1991 dry etch equipment market grew a modest 2 percent to reach a size of $705 million. The growth in the dry etch market
was roughly on peu- with the 1991 growth in the overall wafer fob
equipment market. This section highlights the key trends in the 1991
dry etch equipment market.
Regional Markets and Ownership
Figure 5-2 shows the worldwide 1991 dry etch market segmented
by region and ownership. Japan, with 51 percent ($357 million),
continued to represent the single largest diy etch equipment market. North American companies, with 51 percent share ($356 million), continued to cling on to a leadership position in the global
dry etch business.
Company Rankings
Table 5-4 highlights the dry etch company rankings based on the
worldwide 1991 market. The table also identifies the various dry
etch market segment activities for each company.
Figure 5-2
1991 Dry Etch Regional Markets and Ownership
Ownership
Markets
Joint Ventures
(2%)
($17)
Asia/
Pacific- /
ROW f
(13%) j
($97)/
European Companies (3%)
($18)
\
\
(11%)
($78)
Japanese
Companies
(44%)
($313)
Japan
North America I
(25%)
1
.
($173)
(51%)
($357)
North American
Companies
(51%)
1
($356)
/
Total» $705 Million
Total = $705 Million
GaoooiM
Source: Dataquest (July 1992)
SEMU-S\/C-MT-92AA
1
1
®1992 Dataquest IncorpoFated
July 20,1992
5-8
Semiconductor Equipment, Manufacturing, and Materials
Table 5-4
1991 Worldwide Dry Etch Equipment Company
Ranking (Revenue in Millions of Dollars)
Company
Applied Materials
LAM Research
TEL & Varian/TEL
120.9
Hitachi
115.2
Tegal
Drytek
29.0
25.0
Anelva
Sumitomo Metals
22.3
15.4
Tokyo Ohka Kogyo
Shibaura Engineering
Works
Plasma-Therm
E.T. Electrotech
MRC (Sony)
Oxford Plasma
Technology
Ulvac
Alcan Technology
(Canon)
Gasonics
Others
15.3
Worldwide
Market Total
Market
Segment
RIE, MERIE
RF plasma, RIE
RF plasma, RIE,
MERIE
17.2
Microwave/ECR,
RIE
16.3
RF plasma, RIE,
4.1
triode
3.5 RIE, triode
Microwave/ECR,
3.2
REE
2.2 Microwave/ECR
Microwave/ECR,
2.2
RF plasma
Market
Revenue Share (%)
21.9
154.0
18.0
127.1
14.1
13.8
12.0
9.6
2.0
2.0
1.7
1.4
RIE
RF plasma, RIE
RIE, triode
MERIE
6.3
6.2
0.9
0.9
Microwave/ECR
RIE
5.6
5.0
7.9
0.8
0.7
1.0
RF plasma, RIE
RF plasma
704.7
100.0
•
Note: Spares and service are not Included.
Source: Dataquest (July 1992)
Applied Materials
Applied Materials, with 21.9 percent ($154 million) of the market,
managed to retain its leadership position. The company, however,
lost market share on a worldwide basis by almost 4 percentage
points tjetween 1990 and 1991, AppUed's late transition to singlewafer dry etch technology, together with the inabihty of the P5000
ma^etically enhanced RIE technology to crack the all important
single-wafer oxide etch market, were significant factors in the
July 20,1992
®1992 Dataquest IncoipoialBd
SEMM-SVC-MT-92AA
Etch and Clean Market Trends
#
5-9
erosion of Applied's dry etch market share. Vigorous global
competition from Hitachi, Lam Research, and Tokyo Electron
Limited (TEL) further weakened Applied's dry etch market
position.
On the positive side. Applied has recently begun to focus on
executing on its strengths in the single-wafer P5000 metal etch,
polydde etch, and silicon trench etch market. Applied's cash-cow
8000 Series hexode batch systems continue to be a market share
and profit leader in 4-inch through 6-inch metal and dielectric etch
applications. Continuous improvemients to the hexode etch technology such as improved automation, molecular backside helium cooling, and enhanced process chemistry extended the range of applicability for the hexode sjrstem. Dataquest believes that Applied has
new advanced plasma etch source technologies under development
that will transition the company to single-wafer dry etch solutions
for the crucial dielectric etch market.
The benefits of continuous improvement in the P5000 mainframe
performance and reliability that evolved into the Mark-U version
also have had a positive effect on Applied's recent dry etch market
performance. The success of the P5000 CVD and dry etch family
illustrates the economies of scale in |7erformance improvement and
cost reduction that can be gained by delinking process chamber
development from mainframe development. Applied, which recently
began signaling its intentions to migrate to a new mainframe for
dry etch and CVD applications, will continue to adopt the same
successful unified mainframe strategy for future thin film
applications.
Lam Research
Lam Research, with 18 percent ($127 million) of the market,
represented the most dramatic market success story of 1991. Lam
picked up almost 5 percentage points of market share from 1990 to
1991. Lam's Rainbow platform continued to pick up multiple, largevolume orders at leading global device fabs. The strengths of the
Rainbow system in the dielectric and polycide etch market, together
with the system's proven reliability and simple architecture, enabled
it to pick up incremental market share. Lam's growing participation
in the Japanese market through Sumitomo Metals and its traditional
strengths in the Asia/Pacific market allowed the company to
outperform the overall 1991 dry etch market.
On the cautionary side. Lam will encounter increased competition
from new advanced-source dry etch systems. Lam's future success
depends upon successful execution in the Rainbow migration path
for sub-0.5 micron applications together with the development of
the new Alliance duster tool platform and inductively coupled
plasma source technology based on the IBM license. Lam has also
positively benefited from the incredible Samsimg-driven Asia/Pacific
expansion in 1991. However, future Asia/Pacific business growth
will depend upon the success of the Korean majors in the 4Mb/
16Mb DRAM business. Lam needs to rapidly build up its applications and joint-development customer capabilities in Japan in order
SEMM-SVC-Mr-92M
©1992 Dataquest InnHpoiatecl
July 20,1992
5-10
Semiconductor Equipment, Manufacturing, and Materials
to gather firsthand information on the all-important Japanese dry
etch market. Lam will need to weave a synergistic strategy that
uses Sumitomo Metals' network in Japan while allowing Lam direct
access to development efforts in JapaiL
TTL and Varian/TEL
The TEL and Varian/TEL dry etch products accounted for 17.2 percent ($121 million) of the 1991 market. TEL continues to excel in
delivering incrementally improved, cost-effective dry etch solutions
that address the dielectric and polydde market segments. TEL is
also successfully developing a market for its advanced magnetron
etcher for sub-0.5 micron applications, TEL's extensive customer
support network capability in Japan and Asia/Pacific, together with
its U.S./EuTopean market presence through Varian/TEL, positions
the company well in retaining its lead in the dry etch market.
However, we caution that TBL's large dependence on the domestic
Japanese market could be a negative factor given the current
recessionary woes and capital spending freeze in Japan.
Hitachi
Hitachi, with 16.3 percent ($115 million) gained significant market
share in 1991. Hitachi continued to excel in the metal etch market
using its landmark microwave/ECR technology. The company's
unique approach combining single-wafer dry etch, dry strip, and
wet dean into the same platfotm has proven to be very successful
in the Japanese metal etch and polysilicon gate etch market. Hitachi
has effectively filled the void left in the market by the absence of a
cost-effective single-wafer metal etch process. Dataquest believes that
Hitachi will continue to expand its product portfolio to address the
important dielectric etch market segment, Hitachi also appears to be
focused on globalizu^ its capital equipment business in order to
stay dose to its increasingly globalized customers.
Dataquest Conclusions
The worldwide dry etch equipment market showed modest growth
in 1991 to reach $705 million in size. The dry etch competitive
arena appears to be a wide-open race for market leadership as the
key contenders narrow the difference between their market shiare
positions. A plethora of plasma source technologies are being pursued in the quest for sub-0.5 micron dry etch dominance. Focused,
new source companies such as Hasma Materials Technology could
reshape the dry etch technology landscape by offering value-added
building block solutions. Future dry etch equipment companies may
become value-added process integrators that provide enabling,
global solutions to their semiconductor customers.
July 20,1992
©1992 Dataquest Incoporated
SEMM-SVC-Mr-«2AA
Semiconductor Equipment, Manufacturing, and Materials
6-2
Technical Innovation Continues to Drive ll/larket Growth:
11991 CVD Equipment ll/larket In Review
The worldwide CVD equipment market grew 4 percent in 1991 and
represented a $747 million market. This article presents the significant
highlights of the 1991 CVD equipment market.
Regional CVD Equipment Market and Ownership
Figiue 6-1 shows the worldwide 1991 CVD equipment market
segmented by region and ownership. Japan, with 50 percent of
the worldwide CVD market, continued its role as the largest
regional market. However, North American companies continued
their dominance of the 1991 CVD market, capturing 56 percent
of the worldwide $747 million total.
CVD Equipment Company Rankings
Table 6-1 lists the worldwide 1991 CVD equipment company market
ranking, together with the market segment activities.
Applied Materials
Applied Materials, with 29.2 percent of the 1991 market, retained
its position as the market leader. Applied's dielectric PECVD reactor
business continued its strong thrust into intermetal dielectric and
passivation applications. Applied has focused on designing its lowtemperature TEOS-based oxide process into multiple applications
within multilevel interconnect processes at leading device company
fabs. The move toward double-level interconnect 16Mb DRAM
Figure 6-1
1991 CVD Regional Markets and Ownership
Markets
Ownership
Europe (10%)
$76 Million
Joint Ventures
(5%)
$36 Million
Asia/Pacific-ROW
(15%)
$113 Million.
European
Companies (13%)
$97 Million
Total = $ 7 4 7 Million
G2000142
Source; Dataquest (July 1992)
July 20,1992
Total = $ 7 4 7 Million
©1992 Dataquest IncoiporatBd
SEMM-SVC-Mr-«2M
Table 6-1
1991 Worldwide CVD Equipment Company Ranking (Revenue in Millions of Dollars)
Company
Applied Materials
ASM International
Novellus Systems Inc.
Kokusai Electric
Tokyo Electron Ltd.
Watkins Johnson
Genus
Alcan Technology
(Canon)
Silicon Valley Grcnflip
E,T. ElectiDtech
Ulvac
Amaya
BTU International
Vaiian/TEL
Others
Worldwide
Market Total
Horizontal
LPCVD
Tube
0
7.9
0
1.6
7.1
0
0
26.8
25.8
20
18.3
12.3
10.5
9.6
55.8
3.6
3.5
2.7
2.4
1.6
1.4
1.3
7.5
0
9.3
0
5.3
0
6
1.9
4.8
0
16.5
0
5
0
4.5
7:1
20.3
747.4
100.0
43.9
191.6
Note: Spates and service are not included
Source: Dataquest (Juiy 1992)
%
.8
Vertical
LPCVD Horizontal
Tube
PECVD
0
0
40
22.6
0
0
0
62
0
53
0
0
0
0
CVD Market
Revenue
% Share
29.2
218.4
9.4
70.5
9.3
69.7
8.5
63.6
8.4
62.8
6.5
48.5
4.7
34.8
Reactor
APCVD
Reactor
LPCVD
0
0
0
0
0
48.5
0
32
0
5.7
0
2.7
0
34.8
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
1
26.8
0
0
0
12.3
0
0
4.3
0
0
0
8
0
0
0
6.7
41
91.9
89.9
&4
Semiconductor Equipment, Manufeicturing, and Materials
has allowed Applied to address a progressively larger total available market. Applied's metal CVD business, which addresses the
tungsten and tungsten silidde interconnect market, also showed
healthy growth in 1991.
Dataquest believes that Applied's CVD marketing strategy is currently focused on lowering cost of ownership across the board in
its huge installed base of P5000 CVD sj^tems. The combination of
Applied's traditional strengths in process development, together
witii its stronger focus on user economics issues, positions the
company well for growth in the CVD market.
ASM International
ASM International, with $70.5 million in 1991 CVD revenue, captaxed 9.4 percent of the market. Although ASM International's
traditional horizontal PECVD tube bxisiness has shown signs of
decline in the last two years, the company is attempting to reposition itself as a leading supplier of vertical LPCVD tubes, vertical
LPCVD tube-based cluster tools, and PECVD single-wafer reactors.
ASM International has been particularly successful in Japan with its
6- and 8-inch horizontal PECVD tube and its new vertical LPCVD
tube for poly and thermal nitride applications.
ASM International faces its biggest challenges in the next few
years as it attempts to crack the high-growth reactor CVD market
and the vertical LPCVD tube market against entrenched rivals that
forged into the market earlier. The company is betting that its
small-batch and large-batch vertical tube loadlocked cluster tools
will find market acceptance in emerging integrated applications
such as integrated gate-stack formation and predean/oxidation/
diffusion applications.
Novellus
Novellus, with $69.7 million in 1991 CVD systems revenue, captured 9.3 percent of the market. Novellus continues to penetrate
the low-temperatiire silane-based and TEOS-based oxide market
using its elegant Concept-One system architecture. Novellus' marketing strategy, which emphasizes low cost of ownership coupled with
advanced film qualities, has been very successful in wiiming largevoltune, multiple orders from several global device manufeicturers.
Novellus was also very effective in continuing its penetration of the
crucial Japanese market.
Dataquest believes that Novellus has elected to pursue a long-term
policy of direct participation in the Japanese market through the
establishment of a comprehensive customer support, applications,
and development facility in Japan. Novellus continued ite efforts
toward penetrating the metal CVD market with the Concept-One-W
system. The success of Novellus in the metal CVD market will play
a crucial determining role in the companj^s efforts toward penetrating the integrated intercoimect applications market on the new
CVD/PVD Concept-Two hybrid platform.
July 20,1992
©1992 Dataquest IncoiporalBd
SEMM-SV&-MT-92AA
Deposition l\Aarket Trends
&5
Dataquest also notes that dry etch technology is conspicuous by its
absence in the Novellus product portfolio. We predict that Novelltis
will speedily acquire dry etch tedmology capability either through
an acquisition, alliance, or internal development efforts. In the era
of integrated thin films applications, the lines between deposition
and etdi technologies are rapidly blurring. Only companies that
offer a complete, global, best-of-breed solution can sustain growth
and profitability. Novellus has recently been putting a new management team in place that will transition it from a single-product,
regionally focused company into a multiproduct, global capital
equipment company.
Kokusai Electric and TEL
Kokusai Electric and Tokyo Electron Ltd. (TEL) continue their
dominance of the vertical LPCVD tube business. Both companies
have been extremely successful in delivering high-performance,
production-worthy platforms for poly, thermal nitride, and tmdoped
high-temperature oxide applications in 4Mb/16Mb DRAM applications. Both companies recently introduced loadlocked 8-inch vertical
thermal reactors (VTRs) targeted at integrated thermal processes
such as gate-stack formation, capacitor formation, and predean/
diffiision/oxidatioru
Because of significant value-added automation, process-control, and
defect-reduction features, both companies have been able to obtain
premium market prices for their VTRs, which can range in price
from $300,000 to $600,000 per tube. TEL is aggressively marketing
its VTRs globally through the Varian/TEL joint ventiue in the
United States and Europe, and by itself in Asia/Pacific. Kokusai
Electric recently bought a majority stake in BTU International's
Bruce Systems division and hopes to gain from BTU Intematioital's
installed base, ciistomer support/service, and process-control
software expertise.
Watkins-Johnson
Watkins-Johnson, with 6.5 percent of the worldwide CVD market,
continued its dominant position in the APCVD market. The company is attempting to diversify beyond its traditional silane-based
BPSG premetal dielectric business. By offering TEOS/ozone lowtemperature conformal dielectric solutions, the company hopes to
parlay its core APCVD technology into the larger, potentially more
lucrative intermetal dielectric market.
Dataquest believes that Watkins-Johnson will vigorously attempt to
carry over its production worthiness, APCVD simplicity, and low
cost of ownership advantages into the intermetal dielectric market.
•
Genus
Genus, with 4.7 percent of the 1991 CVD market, retained its position as the market leader in the LPCVD-based tungsten silidde
market. However, Genus experienced significant competition from
companies such as AppUed Materials and Novellus in the blanket
tungsten CVD segment.
SEMM-SVC-MT-92M
®1992 Dabquest Incoipoiatad
JU|y 20,1992
6-6
Semiconductor Equipment, Manufiacturing, and ly/laterials
Dataquest believes that Genus will continue to focus on developing advanced films such as high-temperature dichlorosUane silicide
ODCS silidde) and CVD titanium nitride. Genus continues its strong
links with key customers such as IBM in the blanket tungsten CVD
market. Genus faces the challenge of fending off larger, bettercapitalized competitors such as Applied and Novellus in the highvoltime blanket tungsten and tungsten silidde market. The company
must simultaneously channel its limited resources wisely toward the
development of leapfrog films such as CVD titanium nitride, CVD
copper, and EKZS tungsten silidde.
Alcan Technology (Canon)
Alcan Technology (Canon), with almost $27 million in 1991 revenue,
nearly doubled its CVD product revenue based on its pioneering
TEOS/ozone APCVD technology. Its low temperature APCVD
technology represents a signiScant challenge to the hitherto
unchallenged PECVD technology dominance of the lucrative
intermetal CVD film market.
Dataquest believes that other leading CVD companies will focus on
development of TEOS/ozone APCVD intermetal dielectric solutions
that will compete with Alcan in the CVD market.
Silicon Valley Group
Silicon Valley Group, with almost $26 million (3.5 percent) of the
market, continues its focus on the vertical LPCVD tube business.
The company won several significant 8-inch VTR orders in 1991.
With BTU International's diminished position within the wafer fobrication equipment business, SVG remains as the last U.S. partidpant
of significant size in the VTR business.
Dataquest believes that SVG is poised to continue its quest for
market share gain in the LPCVD VTR market through development of the advanced vertical processor (AVP) family of dusterlike
loadlocked tube products.
Dataquest Conclusions
The $747 million 1991 CVD equipment market represented one of
the few growth spots in an otherwise lackluster wafer fabrication
equipment market. Technology-driven market segntents such as
metal CVD, LPCVD VTR tubes, and TEOS/ozone APCVD continued
to influence the growth of the CVD market. New CVD market
players in areas such as APCVD and LPCVD VTR products may
challenge the traditional dominance of the PECVD dielectric reactor
companies. PECVD reactor companies, in turn, are scrambling to
diversify their process applications into high-growth segments such
as metal CVD, polysilicon LPCVD, and TEOS/ozone APCVD films.
We expect the technology displacements to continue driving significant shifts in the quest for global CVD equipment market share.
July 20,1992
©1992 Dataquest InrorporalBd
SEMM-SVC-Mr-92M
Deposition !\/larket Trends
6-7
Multilevel Metel Mania: 1991 Sputter Equipment Market
in Review
•
The 1991 physical vapor deposition (PVD) market represented a bright
spot in an ottierwise lackluster wafer fab equipment market. The PVD
market grew by 16 percent from $408 million in 1990 to $474 million
in 1991. The sputtering equipment segment, which constitutes 93 percent of the 1991 PVD market, grew dramatically by 22 percent from
$359 million in 1990 to $438 million in 1991.
Steep increases in sputtering equipment average selling prices (ASPs),
together with enhanced imit demand for miiltilevel interconnect applications in advanced 4Mb DRAMs and microprocessor/ASIC devices,
were responsible for robust growth in the 1991 sputtering equipment
market. In contrast, the mature evaporation equipment market, which
represents only 7 percent of the 1991 PVD market, actually declined
24 percent in 1991.
Regional Markets and Ownership
Figure 6-2 shows the worldwide 1991 sputtering equipment market
segmented by region and ownership. Japan, with 50 percent
($219 million) of the 1991 sputtering market, represented the largest
regional market. In 1991, semiconductor capital investment in Japan
was focused on 150mm and 200mm advanced 4Mb DRAM shrink
production and 16Mb DRAM pilot line productioiL Japan-based
semiconductor manufacturers attempted to leapfrog competitive
advances from lower-cost Korean DRAM producers such as Samsung by rapidly migrating to high-speed, premitun DRAM products
that were implemented in double-level metal. Japan-based ^bs also
focused on more flexibility and ASIC/microprocessor/memory
multiproduct capability. The new focus on interconnect technologydriven products stimulated the expansion of the high-end flexible,
cluster-tool sputtering equipment market in Japan.
The vigorous expansion of 4Mb DRAM and advanced logic fabs in
Korea and Taiwan also stimulated the growth of the Asia/Pacific
sputtering equipment market. Companies such as Samsung migrated
to double-level metal versions of their shrink 4Mb DRAM production. In general, the migration from single- to double-level metal in
the Japanese and Asia/Pacific markets stimulated the growth of the
worldwide sputtering equipment market. Companies such as Digital
Equipment Corporation, IBM, Intel, Motorola, and Texas Instruments
migrated to triple-level metal for their advanced microprocessor and
VLSI logic devices, thus sustaining the demand for advanced
cluster-tool-based sputtering equipment in the North American market. The lack of major interconnect-intensive device production in
Europe, coupled with overall anemic demand for wafer fab equipment, resulted in a generally weak European sputtering equipment
market in 1991.
Japanese companies, with 59 percent ($259 million) of the worldwide market, retained their leadership position in the sputtering
equipment market. North American companies, with 37 percent
SEMM-SVC-MT-92AA
(91992 Dataquest Incorporated
July 20,1992
Semiconductor Equipment, Manufacturing, and Materials
fr«
Figure 6-2
1991 Regional Sputtering Equipment Markets and Ownership
Markets
Ownership
Asia-Pacific/ROW
$62 (14%)
Europe
Europe $16 (4%)
^
jT
$38 -V'^^V
(9%) 7
\ ^
1
\
\
Japan
$219(50%)
\
1
North
America
$119(27%)
/
/
1
1
Total = $438 Million
North
America
$163
(37%)
\
\
\
/
Japanese
Companies
$259 (59%)
%
B
|
Total = $438 Million
Source: Dataquest (July 1992)
G2000682
($163 million) of the market, gained market share in 1991 at the
expense of European equipment companies. Applied Materials, a
newcomer to the market, augmented the North American company
group performance because of its strong showing in the 1991 sputtering equipment market. The transfer of the Europe-based Balzers
PVD business to the Japan-based MRC/Sony business favorably
impacted the 1991 Japanese sputter com.pany group performance.
Company Rankings
Table 6-2 ranks the 1991 worldwide sputtering equipment
companies.
Anelva
Anelva, with 26.2 percent of the market, retained its leadership
position. Anelva's strong position in the large Japanese market,
together with its experience in isolated-chamber H/HN/aluminum
alloy sputtering applications on its popular Series 1051 cluster tool,
has enabled the company to remain the top player in sputter systems. Dataquest believes, however, that Anelva will need to globalize its operations at an accelerated pace in order to overcome its
excessive dependence on the Japanese market.
July 20.1992
©1992 Dataquest Incorporated
SEMM-SVC-MT-92AA
m
M
Deposition Market Trends
Table 6-2
1991 Worldwide Sputtering Equipment Company
Ranking (Revenue in Millions of Dollars)
Company
Anelva
Vaiian
MRC (Sony)
Applied Materials
Ulvac
E.T. Electrotech
CVC Products
Leybold-Heraeus
Shibaura Engineering Works
CPA
Novellus Systems, Inc.
Denton Vacuimi
Sputtered Films
Others
Worldwide Market Total
Revenue
114.5
90.9
84.5
55
54.5
12
7
4.4
4
2
1.8
1.8
1.5
3.8
437.7
Market
Share (%)
26.2
20.8
19.3
12.6
12.5
2.7
1.6
1.0
0.9
0.5
0.4
0.4
0.3
0.9
100.0
Note: Spares and service are not Included.
Source: Dataquest (July 1992)
Varian
Varian, with 20.8 percent, retained its No. 2 position in the market.
Varian continued to aggressively penetrate the market with its
advanced M2000 duster-tool system for submicron device applications. Varian's strong presence in Asia/Pacific allowed it to capitalize on the 1991 boomi in that regioiu The step-coverage enhancement provided by the Quantum source, togetiier with Varian's
pioneering efforts in collimation-based step-coverage enhancements,
allowed the company to secure design wins at several major 4Mb
DRAM production/16Mb DRAM pilot lines. Varian also continues
to benefit from its cash-cow Series 3000 multichamber tool that
cost-effectively addresses more mature device fab applications and
capacity expansion programs.
Materials Research Corporation (MRQ/Sony
MRC/Sony, with 19.3 percent of the market, ranked third in the
worldwide sputtering equipment market in 1991. MRC/Sony continued to proliferate applications for its successful Eclipse systeras
with enhancements such as improved throughputs, enhanced stepcoverage, low-damage soft predeans, loadlock options, and particlereduction kits. MRC/Sonj^s acquisition of the Balzers Qusterline
sputtering family and its integration into the new Galaxy openarchitectiu^ duster tool will allow MRC/Sony to address future
SEMM-SVC-MT-92AA
®1992 Dataquest Inccnporatad
July 20.1992
6-10
Semiconductor Equipment, Manufacturing, and Materials
needs of sub-0.5-micron devices. MRC/Sony's prior acquisition of
the BCT/Spectrum metal CVD business also positions the company
well in offering integrated PVD/CVD interconnect solutions on its
Galaxy duster tool.
Applied Materials
Applied Materials, a newcomer to the sputtering equipment market,
demonstrated meteoric success in rapidly gaining 12.6 percent of
the 1991 market. The companj^s flagship Endura duster tool was
very successful in capturing several key design wins at leading
20Clttun submicron device fabs. Dataquest attributes the phenomenal
success of the Endura system to Applied's emphasis on exceptional
reliability, low-partide performance, global customer support, process
support, and migration path to integrated metal CVD/PVD solutions. Dataquest expects Applied to face intense competition in subsequent PVD market battles as competitive flexible duster tools
that offer staged, high-vacuum capability for 200mm submicron
applications bdt the market.
Ulvac
Ulvac accoimted for 12.5 percent of the 1991 sputtering equipment
market. Ulvac continued to market its flagship MLX-3000 clustertool sputtering S)^tem for isolated chamb^ sputtering applications.
Ulvac is also bringing new duster tools to market that address the
integrated metal CVD/PVD/dry etch applications market. Ulvac
will attempt to integrate its pioneering selective tungsten CVD and
soft plasma predean technologies with its sputtering film capabilities in order to offer a complete intercormect solution to its customers. Ulvac is also aggressively globalizing its operations in
order to minimize its overdependence on key DRAM-driven
Japanese customers such as Toshiba.
Dataquest Conclusions
TJie worldwide sputtering equipment market represented a bright
spot in the 1991 wafer fab equipment market, posting aggressive
growth of 22 percent. The market was driven by the accelerated
conversion to double-level metal 4Mb DRAM shrink products and
the continuing trend in microprocessor/VLSI logic devices toward
triple- and quadruple-level metal. New entrants to the sputtering
equipment market such as Novellus, together with the growing
dominance of newly established players such as Applied Materials,
may completely recast the balance of [rower in the sputtering
equipment market. Incumbent market leaders such as Anelva,
MRC/Sony, Ulvac, and Varian will fiercely defend their entrenched
positions. A shakeout may be coming in the crowded sputtering
equipment market.
July 20,1992
©1992 Dataquest IncoporalBd
SEMM-S\/C-Mr-g2AA
•
6-11
Deposition Mari<et Trends
Japan Saves the Epi Equipment Maricet: 1991 Siiicon
Epitaxy Equipment Maricet in Review
The worldwide silicon epitaxial reactor market was $89 million in
1991, up 30 percent from its 1990 level of $68 million. The sales of epi
equipment pushed ahead in 1991 because of strong sales in Japan and
to a lesser extent Asia/Pacific. The traditionally strong North American market declined precipitously and the European market struggled
to keep its head above water.
Regional Markets and Ownership
Figure 6-3 presents the worldwide 1991 silicon epitaxial equipment
market segmented by region and company ownership. Surprisingly
strong demand in Japan buoyed worldwide epitaxial equipment
sales in what was a lackluster year in most regions of the world.
Resilient epi equipment sales in Japan last year totaled $46.1 million, up from $18 million in 1990. The Asia/Pacific market was
$6.7 and also saw strong growth albeit on a very small base. The
North American market achieved a level of $24.8 million last year,
which represented a significant decline of 30 percent relative to
its 1990 level, while the European market was essentially flat at
Figure 6-3
1991 Silicon Epitaxy Equipment Regional Markets and Ownership
Ownership
Markets
•
Asia/Pacific-ROW
$6.7 (8%)
Europe
$11.0 (12%)
Total = $88.6 Million
Total = $88.6 Million
Source: Dataquest (July 1992}
SEMM-SVC-MT-42AA
02000701
®1992 Dataquest Incorporated
July 20,1992
6-12
Semiconductor Equipment, Manufacturing, and Materials
$11 million. North American and European epi companies, with
almost equal share, dominate the market.
In Japan, several of the large merchant silicon companies put new
capacity in place. Major projects included the construction of a
Chitose line by Mitsubishi Metal and capacity increases by Toshiba
Ceramics and Shin-Etsu Handotai at the Tokuyama Ceramics (subsidiary) and Isobe plants, respectively. Other capacity increases in
Japan were at Osaka Titanium's Saga plant and Komatsu Electronic
Metals' Nagasaki plant. The only significant epi capacity addition
outside of Japan was for Wacker Chemitronic's Wasserburg plant in
Germany.
Epi Wafer Applications
Discrete and bipolar devices are the major application in the Japanese market. Chi the other hand, merchant epitaxial wafers are
largely iised for CMOS devices in the United States. Intel and
Motorola use them for microprocessors, IBM for DRAMs, and
Texas Instruments (TD for MOS devices.
The relatively small demand for CMOS epi wafers in the Japanese
market is because Japanese companies have designed aroiuid epi
films. Unlike IBM, which produces DRAMs for captive use, Japanese DRAM makers face intensive price competition and cannot
afford to use epitaxial wafers, which cost two to three times the
cost of silicon substrate.
Epi wafers, however, are required for bipolar devices. Epi films are
used to form btuied/diffused layers for the purpose of decreasing
collector resistance. In MOS processing, the improved crystal structure of epi films prevents latchup and soft errors caused by alpha
rays. In CCD applications, epi films provide improved gettering and
uniformity, and in discrete applications, epi films are used solely for
achieving film imiformity.
Japanese Drivers
The healthy growth of the Japanese epi equipment market last.year
can be attributed to several factors. The fostest growing application
for epi films in Japan is the power IC market. The trend toward
high-voltage and large-current IC designs is being driven by the
increased performance and size reductions in consumer, information,
and communications equipment.
The other major applications for epi films are insulated gate bipolar
transistors (IGBTs), switching devices, and inverters, vrhich control
the speed of AC motors by varying the current frequency. From the
equipment vendors' point of view, IGBT devices may be the largest
application in terms of the number or reactors required because
these devices require very thick epi films in the range of 100 to
150 microns. A relatively large amount of equipment is needed
because of low throughput caused by the longer processing time
required to grow a thick film.
July 20,1992
©1992 Dataquest Ixoporated
SEMM-SVC-Mr-92AA
Deposition Maricet Trends
6-13
On the CMOS side, Dataquest does not expect Japanese DRAM
maniifacturers to migrate to epi films until at least the 256Mb
DRAM generation. As mentioned earlier, the cost remains prohibitively high for merchant DRAM applications. Japanese device companies have emphasized that they could only justify the use of epi
wafers in current DRAM generations at a price 30 percent above
that of prime wafer prices.
Another factor delaying the use of epitaxial wafers in DRAM
applications is the use of high-eneigy ion implantation technology.
Mitsubishi Electric has pioneered this application. The process is
designed to improve latchup characteristics and soft error resistance
by forming retrograde wells by ion implantation. Although the
same effect can be achieved by using epitaxial wafers, ion implantation has the added benefit of reducing wafer processing by two
mask steps. Of course, there is the additional expense of purchasing
the implanter, which costs on the order of $3 million.
Company Rankings
As shown in Table 6-3, two companies—^Applied Materials and
ASM Epitaxy—dominate the worldwide epi equipment market. Both
companies showed strong growth in year-to-year sales last year, imd
the combined sales of the two companies accounted for 70 percent
of the worldwide epi eqmpment sales.
Applied Materials' strength in epi equipment goes back to the
begiiuung of the company. Epi equipment was the first process
equipment offered by Applied Materials. The workhorses of their
product line today are the 7800 and 7700 series reactors. Both
systems are barrel reactors. Applied is also working on a
multichamber single-wafer system.
ASM Epitaxy quickly rose to prominence with the introduction of
its Epsilon I system in the late 1980s. The Epsilon I was the first
single-wafer epi reactor offered in the market. The company has
Table 6-3
1991 Worldwide Silicon Epitaxy Equipment Company
Ranking (Millions of Dollars)
Company
Applied Materials
ASM Epitaxy
Toshiba Machine
Kokusai Electric
LPE
Moore
Total
Revenue
32.0
29.9
12.5
5.9
5.0
3.3
88.6
% Share
36.1
33.8
14.1
6.7
5.6
3.7
100.0
Note: Spares and service not included
Source: Dataquest (Juiy 1992)
•
SEIMiM-SVC-MT-«2AA
01992 Dataquest Incorporalad
July 20,1992
6-14
Semiconductor Equipment, I\tonu1iacturing, and Materials
since introduced another version of the reactor Epsilon as well as a
poly reactor called Paragon. The fast ramp of ASM Epitaxy's sales
is a barometer of the demand for single-wafer reactors in the
CMOS aiul BiCMOS epi markets, which require very thin epi films.
Toshiba Machine and Kokusai are the next largest vendors of epi
equipment. Toshiba's $12.5 million seiles in 1991 are largely captive;
the company is the major supplier to Toshiba Ceramics, a sister
company involved in the production of silicon and epi wafers.
Kokusai, also a Japanese vendor, offers a pancake-type epi reactor.
Kokusai's technology is older but ironically it may prove to be better suited for the high-growth onarket segment of thick film epi
applications.
Dataquest Conclusions
The epi equipment market is relatively mature. Its fortunes are tied
very closely to existing applications and epi wafer capacity expansions. Because of the high cost of epi wafers, device makers are
very reluctant to adopt epi films in any designs other than those
that absolutely require it. This trend is preventing the market from
growing much beyond the $100 million level.
July 20,1992
®1992 Dataquest IncorporatBd
SEMM-SV&-MT-42AA
Chapter 7
Diffusion and Ion Implantation Market
Trends ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ - ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ - ^ ^
The material in this section focuses on diffusion and ion implantation market
trends.
Vertical Turf Wars: 1991 Diffusion Equipment Market in Review
The worldwide diffusion equipment market grew modestly by 3 percent to $335 million in 1991. The market is now dominated by vertical
thennal reactor (VTR) technology with vertical tube systems accounting for 60 percent of 1991 diffusion market revenue. The top three
players in VTR technology already claim more than a 70 percent share
in this briskly growing market segment.
Riding the Roller Coaster: 1991 Ion Implantation Market in
Review
The worldwide market for ion implantation equipment declined 7 percent in 1991 to a level of $343 million. This was the most significant
revenue decline for any major category of wafer fab equipment,
excluding those mature segments currently being phased out in ^vor
of newer technologies. Qearly, the roller coaster ride that traditionally
has characterized ion implantation equipment market dynamics still
appeared to be holding true last year.
SEMM-SVC-MT-g2AA
(E)1992 Dabquest Incorpoated
July 20,1992
7-2
Semiconductor Equipment, Manufacturing, and Materials
Vertical Turi Wars: 1991 Diffusion Equipment llflarlcet
in Review
The worldwide diffusion equipment market grew modestly by 3 percent to $335 million in 1991. Steep increases in di^sion tube average
selling prices (ASPs) were the main contributing factor for the slight
market growth. Dataquest includes diffusion, wet/dry oxidation,
anneal, implant drive-in, and BPSG reflow processes within the diffusion equipment market applications. The categories of low-pressure
tube CVD and horizontal plasma-enhanced tube CVD market are not
included within the diffusion market, but rather are included in Dataquesf s estimates of the CVD equipment market. This section highlights the growth dynamics of the vertical- and horizontal-tube
diffusion market.
Regional Markets and Ownership
Figure 7-1 shows the worldwide diffusion equipment market, segmented by region and ownership. Japan, with 46 percent ($154 million) in 1991, has represented the largest regional diffusion equipment market over the last few years. The Asia/Pacific market grew
rapidly in 1991 to 19 percent ($65 million) of worldwide demand.
Figure 7-1
1991 Regional Diffusion Markets and Ownership
Ownership
Markets
European
Companies
Joint Venture
Companies
$13(3%)
$29 (9%)
Total = $335 Million
Source: Dataquest (July 1992}
July 20,1992
Total = $335 Million
G£000«S4
®1992 Dataquest Incorporded
SEMM-SVC-Mr-«2AA
Diffusion and Ion Implantatbn Martlet Trends
7-3
Japanese equipment companies also dominate ownership of the
di^usion market: In 1991, they accounted for 61 percent share
($204 million) of the worldwide market. Japanese diffusion equipment companies are significant exporters of advanced di^sion
tube equipment, especially in the category of vertical thermal
reactor (VTR) tube products. North American companies captured
27 percent ($89 million) of the 1991 worldwide dii^sion market
Company Rankings
Table 7-1 presents the worldwide company rankings for the
horizontal and vertical diffusion equipment market. Dataquest notes
that sales of vertical diffusion equipment have grown rapidly and
now comprise 60 percent ($2CX} million) of the 1991 worldwide
diffusion market of $335 million. The horizontal diffusion equipment
market is in a state of rapid decline. These S3'stems are being
implemented only in mature fab expansions and noncritical applications. Vertical di^sion furnaces have the advantages of easier
Table 7-1
1991 Worldwide Diffusion Equipment Company
Ranking (Revenue in Millions of Dollars)
Company
Tokyo Electron Ltd.
Kokusai Electric
Silicon Valley Group
ASM International
BTU International
Varian/TEL
Ulvac
Koyo Lindberg
Disco
Gasonics
Shinko Electric
Centrotherm
Semitherm
General Signal Thinfihn
Wellman Furnaces
Tystar
Pacific Western
Worldwide
Market Total
•
Revenue
92.7
68.1
54.0
21.7
19.0
13.8
13.0
12.6
10.0
8.7
7.4
6.7
3.0
Market
Share Horizontal
Vertical
(%) Diffusion Diffusion
27.7
37.0
55.7
20.3
5.6
62.5
16.1
28.0
26.0
6.5
11.7
10.0
5.7
13.0
6.0
4.1
5.7
8.1
3.9
10.4
2.6
3.8
5.9
6.7
3.0
0
10.0
2.6
8.7
0
2.2
0
7.4
2.0
6.7
0
0.9
0
3.0
3.0
0.5
0.5
0.4
0.9
0.1
0.1
0.1
1.0
0.5
0.5
0.4
2.0
0
0
0
335.1
100.0
135.1
200.0
Note: Spares and service are not included.
Source: Dataquest (July 1992)
SEMM-SVC-MT-42AA
®1992 Dabquest tncoipoiated
July 20,1992
7A
Semiconductor Equipment, Manufeicturing, and l\^aterials
automation, improved uniformity across 200mm wafers, tighter
process control, and lower defect levels compared with horizontal
diffusion furnaces. The downside to vertical furnace products is
their higher ASP, which reflects more value-added automation and
process control features. Tokyo Electron (TEL)
TEL, with 27.7 percent of the 1991 market, retained its leadership
position. TEL's vertical diffusion tube shipments comprised 60 percent of the companjr's total diffusion revenue. TEL also has a
mature cash-cow portfolio of horizontal diffusion furnace products
that account for the remaining 40 percent of its diffusion business.
TEL continues to offer evolutionary improvements to its diffiision
product line, such as enhanced automation, loadlocks, clustered
VTR products, and in situ pre-cleans. Dataquest believes that TEL's
strategy of offering value-added process featiu%s will enable it to
continue its premium pricing policy as competition intensifies in
the VTR business.
Kokusai Electric
Kokusai Electric, with 20.3 percent, captured the No. 2 position in
the diffusion equipment market in 1991. Kokusai Electric's diffusion
shipments are much more heavily skewed toward vertical furnaces:
more than 90 percent of the compan)r's diffusion revenue was
obtained from vertical furnaces. Kokusai Electric's recent majority
investment position within the Bruce Technologies front-end furnace
division of 6TU International is aimed at globalizing Kokusai's technology and obtaining rapid access to the installed base of BTU
International's furnaces in North America and Europe. Kokusai Electric will also benefit from Bruce Technologies' expertise in process
control and auton\ation software. Dataquest believes that Kokusai
Electric and TEL are caught up in a fierce battle for market
supremacy within the lai^e, technologically demanding Japanese
diffusion market.
#
Silicon Valley Group (SVG)
SVG, with 16.1 percent of the 1991 market, is the third-largest supplier of diffusion equipment in the world. SVG is in the midst of a
major product transition from its horizontal furnace product line to
its newer VTR product family. The company has been quite successful in ramping up its VTR shipments. SVG's VTR diffusion business
is now almost at the same level as its older horizontal furnace
business. Dataquest believes that SVG is also in the final stages
of development for its advanced vertical processor family for
sub-0.5 micron diffusion applications. V\^th BTU International's
exit from the diffusion equipment business, SVG is the last major
U.S. diffusion equipment company.
Dataquest Conclusions
The worldwide diffusion equipment market grew modestly to
$335 million in 1991. Japanese diffusion equipment companies,
which pioneered the adoption of VTR technology, own a major portion (61 percent) of the market. The diffusion equipment market ifi
July 20,1992
©1992 Dataquest Incorporalad
SEMM-SVC-MT-42M
•
Diffusion and Ion Implantation Market Trends
7-5
now dominated by VTR technology with VTR tube systems, which
account for 60 percent of 1991 diffusion market revenue. Horizontal
diffusion furnace companies that were caught off guard by the
rapid shift to VTR technology are undergoing painful restructuring
in order to stay in the diffusion business. The standardization of
diffusion VTR product feattues may make it difficult for new companies to recoup their investment in development of advanced VTR
products as commodity product pricing and margin erosion
practices invade the hitherto lucrative VTR turf.
SEMM-SVCHVn'-«2AA
®1992 DataquBSt Incoipocated
July 20,1992
7-6
Semiconductor Equipfnent, Manufacturing, and Materials
Riding tlie Roller Coaster: 1991 Ion Implantation Market
in Review
The dynamics of the ion implantation equipment market can be compared to an amusement park roller coaster ride complete with thrilling
heights and gut-wrenching depths. Plagued by an overall sluggish
capital spending environment, the worldwide implant equipment market last year was $343 million, down 7 percent from its 1990 level of
$370 million. Clearly, this percentage change was relatively modest
when compared with the peak year of 1988 when the market grew
103 percent. Nor was last year's decline as severe as 1986 when ion
implantation equipment revenue plummeted 60 percent. Fundamentally, the im.plant market is driven l ^ capacity demands rather than technological innovation and this has contributed to a nuirket environment
characterized by sharp surges and subsequent drop-offs in activity.
Both medium- and high-ciurent tools sufi^ered a decline in shipment
levels and revenue in 1991. Unit shipments for medium- and highcurrent implanters tumbled 19 percent and 18 percent, respectively.
The corresponding decline in medium- and high-ourent implant market revenue was minimized by increasing average selling prices (ASPs)
as newer advanced systems became a larger portion of the total product mix. The medium-current implant market was about $108 million
in 1991, down 5 percent from the previous year's level of $114 million,
while the high-current implant market dropped to $218 million, a
decline of 13 percent from its 1990 level of $250 million.
The high-voltage implant market experienced a significant increase in
revenue last year, growing from about $7 million in 1990 to almost
$18 million in 1991. However, one must keep in mind that this category of equipment represents only a small, niche segment. Unit shipments last year totaled only six systems as compared with three the
year prior. A hefty increase in average selling price from $2.3 million
to $2.9 million accounted for a significant portion of the revenue
increase for high-voltage implanters in 1991.
Regional Markets and Ownership
Figtu« 7-2 presents the worldwide 1991 ion implantation equipment
market segmented by region and ownership. Japan, with 58 percent
share of the world market, continues its dominant position in the
marketplace, driven by its need to equip advanced high-volume
maniifacturing focilities. North American companies, however, continue to hold their dominant position in all three segments of the
implant market and together command 56 percent worldwide market share. Fiuther influence of U.S. company technology in the
implant market is also evident in the success of the two U.S./
Japanese joint ventiue companies, TEL/Vaiian and Sumitonio/EatOn
Nova, much of whose technology historically has flowed from their
U.S. partner companies. In 1991, these joint ventiue companies
represented 26 percent share of the worldwide implant market. The
implant market is unlike most other segments of the wafer fab
equipment industry because Japanese companies hold a relatively
small minority position with only 18 percent share. This market
share level has held essentially constant for the last three years.
July 20,1992
©1992 Dataquest Incoporalad
SEMM-SVD-^/^^•«2AA
7-7
Diffusion and Ion Implantation Market Trends
Figiire 7-2
1991 Regional Ion Implantation Equipment Markets and Ownership
Ownership
Markets
Asia-Pacific/ROW
$41.2(12%)
Total = $343.2 Million
Total = $343.2 Million
Source: Dataquest (July 1992)
G2000eB3
Company Rankings
Table 7-2 presents the worldwide company rankings for the ion
implantation equipment market in 1991, along with worldwide company revenue by
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