Toshiba Magnia 3135R Server

Toshiba Magnia 3135R Server
2
™
Magnia
Toshiba
3135R
User’s Guide
Important Numbers for Future Reference
Print out this page and record your computer serial number and part number here for
future reference. If you are running Windows NT ® or Windows ® 2000, also record the
Microsoft ® operating system product key number. These numbers are located on labels
that are affixed to your computer and are easily accessible prior to setup.
Serial number: __ __ __ __ __ __ __ __ __
Part number: SYU__ __ __ __U-__ __ __ __ __ __
Microsoft Operating System Product Key Number:
____________________________________
BIOS version:____________________________________
The BIOS version appears on screen during system boot
Contacting Toshiba
If you need assistance:
❖ www.support.toshiba.com
Download the latest drivers, view detailed installation instructions, and access the
latest server information.
❖ InTouch sm Center
Calling within the United States (800) 457-7777
Calling from outside the United States (949) 859-4273
For troubleshooting information, see If Something Goes Wrong on page 155.
TOSHIBA
SV135-0201M1
3
Model: Toshiba Magnia 3135R
FCC Notice
This equipment has been tested and found to comply with the limits for a Class A digital device, pursuant to Part 15 of
the FCC Rules. These limits are designed to provide reasonable protection against harmful interference when the
equipment is operated in a commercial environment.
This equipment generates, uses, and can radiate radio frequency energy and, if not installed and used in accordance
with the instructions, may cause harmful interference to radio communications. Operation of this equipment in a
residential area is likely to cause interference, in which case the user will be required to correct the interference at his
own expense.
NOTE: Only peripherals complying with the FCC Class A limits may be attached to this computer. Shielded
cables must be used between the external devices and the computer’s parallel port, PS/2™ keyboard port, PS/
2 mouse port, USB port, serial port 1 and 2, and monitor port. Changes or modifications made to this
equipment not expressly approved by Toshiba, or parties authorized by Toshiba, could void the user’s authority
to operate the equipment.
This device complies with Part 15 of the FCC Rules. Operation is subject to the following two conditions:
❖
This device may not cause harmful interference in a commercial area.
❖
This device must accept any interference received, including interference that may cause undesired operation.
Contact: Toshiba America Information Systems, Inc.
9740 Irvine Blvd.
Irvine, CA 92618-1697
(949) 583-3000
4
EU-Declaration of Conformity
TOSHIBA
EU Declaration of Conformity
EU Übereinstimmungserklärung
Déclaration de conformité UE
Declaración de conformidad de la UE
Dichiarazione di conformità UE
EU Försäkran om Överensstämmelse
Toshiba declares that the product: Toshiba Magnia 3135R (SYU3709U-RXXXX) conforms to the following standards:
Toshiba erklärt, daß das Produkt: Toshiba Magnia 3135R (SYU3709U-RXXXX) folgenden Normen entspricht:
Toshiba déclarent que le produit cité ci-dessous: Toshiba Magnia 3135R (SYU3709U-RXXXX) est conformé aux normes suivantes:
Toshiba declaran que el producto: Toshiba Magnia 3135R (SYU3709U-RXXXX) cumple los siguientes estándares:
Toshiba dichiara, che il prodotto: Toshiba Magnia 3135R (SYU3709U-RXXXX) è conforme alle seguenti norme:
Toshiba intygar att produkten: Toshiba Toshiba Magnia 3135R (SYU3709U-RXXXX) överensstämmer med föijande normer:
Supplementary Information:
“The product complies with the requirements of the Low Voltage Directive 73/23/EEC and the EMC
Directive 89/336/EEC.”
Weitere Informationen:
“Das Produkt entspricht den Anforderungen der Niederspannungs-Richtlinie 73/23/EG und der EMCRichtlinie 89/336/EG.”
Informations complémentaires:
“Ce produit est conforme aux exigences de la directive sur les basses tensions 73/23/CEE et de la
directive EMC 89/336/CEE.”
Información complementaria:
“El Producto cumple los requisitos de baja tensión de la Directiva 73/23/CEE y la Directiva EMC 89/
336/CEE.”
Ulteriori informazioni:
“Il prodotto é conforme ai requisiti della direttiva sulla bassa tensione 73/23/EG e la direttiva EMC 89/
336/EG.”
Ytteligare information:
“Produkten uppfyller kraven enligt lägspänningsdirektiver 73/23/EEC och EMC-direktiv 89/336/EEC.”
EMC-emission:
EN50081-1
EN55022
EN61000-3-2
EN61000-3-3
1992
1994
1995
1995
Residential, commercial & Light Industry
Class B (Domestic environment)
230V/AC, 50Hz
230V/AC, 50Hz
EMC-immunity
EN55024
EN61000-4-2
EN61000-4-3
EN61000-4-4
EN61000-4-5
EN61000-4-6
EN61000-4-11
1998
1995
1998
1995
1995
1997
1994
Residential, commercial & Light Industry
DO:8kV, AD:15kV
3V/m, 80-1000MHz, 1kHz 80% AM
AC-line: 1kV, Signal-line: 0.5kV, f:5kHz, Polarity: +/AC-line: 1kV/2kV, Polarity: +/3Ve.m.f, 0.15-80MHz, 80% AM
30% 500ms, 100% 10ms, >95% 5000ms
Safety:
EN60950
A1
A2
A3
A4
A11
1992
1993
1993
1995
1997
1997
This product is carrying the CE-Mark in accordance with the related European Directives. Responsible for CE-Marking
is Toshiba Europe, Hammfeldamm 8, 41460 Neuss, Germany.
5
CD-ROM Safety Instruction
The CD-ROM drive employs a laser system. To ensure proper use of this product, please read the CD-ROM instruction
manual carefully and retain for future reference. Should the unit ever require maintenance, contact an authorized
service location. Use of controls, adjustments, or performance of procedures other than those specified may result in
hazardous radiation exposure. To prevent direct exposure to the laser beam, do not try to open the enclosure.
Location of the Required Label
CLASS 1 LASER
PRODUCT TO IEC 60825-1
LASER KLASSE 1
NACH IEC 60825-1
CAUTION: This appliance contains a laser system and is classified as a “CLASS 1
LASER PRODUCT.” To use this model properly, read the instruction manual carefully
and keep it for your future reference. In case of any trouble with this model, please
contact your nearest “AUTHORIZED service station.” To prevent direct exposure to the
laser beam, do not try to open the enclosure.
CLASS 1 LASER PRODUCT
LASER KLASSE 1
Use of controls or adjustments or performance of procedures other than those
specified in the owner’s manual may result in hazardous radiation exposure.
Copyright
This guide is copyrighted by Toshiba America Information Systems, Inc. with all rights reserved. Under the copyright
laws, this guide cannot be reproduced in any form without the prior written permission of Toshiba. No patent liability is
assumed, however, with respect to the use of the information contained herein.
©2001 by Toshiba America Information Systems, Inc. All rights reserved.
6
Export Administration Regulation
This document contains technical data that may be controlled under the U.S. Export Administration Regulations and
may be subject to the approval of the U.S. Department of Commerce prior to export. Any export, directly or indirectly, in
contravention of the U.S. Export Administration Regulations is prohibited.
Disclaimer
The information contained in this manual, including but not limited to any instructions, descriptions, and product
specifications, is subject to change without notice.
TOSHIBA CORPORATION AND TOSHIBA AMERICA INFORMATION SYSTEMS, INC. (TOSHIBA) PROVIDE NO
WARRANTY WITH REGARD TO THIS MANUAL OR ANY OTHER INFORMATION CONTAINED HEREIN AND
HEREBY EXPRESSLY DISCLAIM ANY IMPLIED WARRANTIES OF MERCHANTABILITY OR FITNESS FOR ANY
PARTICULAR PURPOSE WITH REGARD TO ANY OF THE FOREGOING. TOSHIBA ASSUMES NO LIABILITY
FOR ANY DAMAGES INCURRED DIRECTLY OR INDIRECTLY FROM ANY TECHNICAL OR TYPOGRAPHICAL
ERRORS OR OMISSIONS CONTAINED HEREIN. IN NO EVENT SHALL TOSHIBA BE LIABLE FOR ANY
INCIDENTAL, CONSEQUENTIAL, SPECIAL, OR EXEMPLARY DAMAGES, WHETHER BASED ON TORT,
CONTRACT, OR OTHERWISE, ARISING OUT OF OR IN CONNECTION WITH THIS MANUAL OR ANY OTHER
INFORMATION CONTAINED HEREIN OR THE USE THEREOF.
Some states do not allow the exclusion of incidental or consequential damages so the above limitation or exclusion
may not apply to you.
Trademarks
Magnia is a trademark and InTouch is a service mark of Toshiba America Information Systems, Inc.
Intel, Pentium, and LANDesk are registered trademarks of Intel Corporation.
PS/2 is a trademark of International Business Machines Corporation.
Microsoft, its logos, MS-DOS, Windows, and Windows NT, and MS are registered trademarks of Microsoft Corporation.
Ethernet is a registered trademark of Xerox, Inc.
EZ-SCSI and SCSISelect are registered trademarks of Adaptec, Inc.
NetWare is a registered trademark of Novell Corporation.
“Acrobat® Reader Copyright © 1987-1999 Adobe Systems Incorporated. All rights reserved. Adobe, the Adobe logo,
Acrobat, and the Acrobat logo are trademarks of Adobe Systems Incorporated.”
Other product names and trademarks belong to the individual companies concerned.
7
Table of Contents
About This Guide.......................................................................................
Other Documentation and Software ..........................................................
Safety Icons...............................................................................................
Other Icons.......................................................................................
Service Options .........................................................................................
Maintenance Contracts .............................................................................
Cleaning the Server...................................................................................
Setting Up Your Work Environment...........................................................
Developing Good Work Habits .........................................................
Arranging Your Work Area ...............................................................
Seating and Posture.........................................................................
Using Your Arms and Wrists ............................................................
14
15
15
16
16
16
16
16
17
17
18
18
Chapter 1: Getting Started.................................................................. 19
Make Sure You Have Everything............................................................... 19
Installing Optional Internal Devices ........................................................... 19
Environmental Considerations .................................................................. 19
General Environmental Considerations ........................................... 19
Environmental Considerations for Rack Mount Models............... 21
Power Requirements ................................................................................. 21
Front Panel................................................................................................ 22
Toshiba Magnia 3135R Mounted in a Rack ................................ 22
Controls and Indicators .................................................................... 23
Operation Buttons........................................................................ 23
System and HDD Status Indicators ............................................. 24
Determining Network Communication Status (NIC LEDs) .......... 25
Device Bays................................................................................. 25
CD-ROM Drive ............................................................................ 25
Floppy Disk Drive ........................................................................ 26
Cooling Fan Unit........................................................................................ 27
Rear Panel ....................................................................................... 28
Identifying the AC Power Connector and I/O Signal Ports .......... 28
Using USB-Compliant Devices.................................................... 29
Inside the Server ....................................................................................... 29
8
Motherboard..................................................................................... 30
CPU Sockets.................................................................................... 30
Internal Battery................................................................................. 30
Memory Bank ................................................................................... 30
Expansion Slots ............................................................................... 30
Cabling the Server Board ............................................................ 31
Connecting Peripheral Devices ................................................... 33
Installing the Server in a Rack................................................................... 34
Choosing a Location ........................................................................ 34
Structural Considerations ............................................................ 34
Environmental Considerations..................................................... 34
Power Considerations ...................................................................... 35
Preparing the Rack.................................................................................... 35
Selecting a Location for the Server in the Rack ............................... 36
Equipment Mounting Guidelines ...................................................... 36
Stabilizing the Rack ................................................................................... 37
Free-Standing Stabilizers ................................................................. 37
Secured Stabilizers .......................................................................... 37
Recommended Tools ....................................................................... 38
Toshiba-Supplied Hardware Items .............................................. 38
Installing the Rail Rack and Mounting the Server ..................................... 39
Connecting AC Power ............................................................................... 43
Installation Checklist ........................................................................ 43
Power Consumption Checklist ......................................................... 44
Turning on the Server................................................................................ 45
Power-On Self Test (POST) ...................................................................... 45
Booting the Server..................................................................................... 46
Starting the Server From the Floppy Disk Drive............................... 46
Starting the Server From the CD-ROM Drive................................... 46
Starting the Server From the Hard Disk Drive.................................. 46
BIOS Setup ............................................................................................... 47
Turning Off the Server ............................................................................... 47
Performing a Normal Shutdown ....................................................... 47
Chapter 2: Connecting Hardware Devices ......................................... 48
9
Contents ...................................................................................... 48
Installing Optional Devices ........................................................................ 49
Before You Start ............................................................................... 49
Selecting a Workplace................................................................. 49
Working Safely ............................................................................ 50
Maintenance Overview.............................................................................. 50
Working on Rack Mounted Servers ................................................. 51
Sliding the Server From the Rack................................................ 52
Sliding the Server into the Rack .................................................. 52
Removing and Replacing the Server Access Cover ................................. 53
Removing the Access Cover............................................................ 53
Replacing the Access Cover ............................................................ 54
Cooling Fans ............................................................................................. 54
Removing and Replacing a System Fan.......................................... 54
Removing a System Fan ............................................................. 54
Replacing a System Fan ............................................................ 55
Memory Modules....................................................................................... 56
Memory Expansion Considerations ............................................ 56
Installing Memory Modules.......................................................... 58
Removing a Memory Module ........................................................... 60
CPU Modules ............................................................................................ 61
Installing a Second Processor.......................................................... 61
Removing a Processor..................................................................... 67
Installing Hard Drives ................................................................................ 68
Internal Battery .......................................................................................... 69
Replacing the Internal Battery.......................................................... 71
Peripheral Devices .................................................................................... 72
Floppy Diskette Drive (FDD) ............................................................ 72
Removing the Diskette Drive ....................................................... 72
Reinstalling the Diskette Drive..................................................... 72
Removing and Replacing the CD-ROM Drive.................................. 73
Removing a CD-ROM Drive ........................................................ 73
Replacing a CD-ROM Drive ........................................................ 73
Small Computer Systems Interface (SCSI) ............................................... 74
Internal Hard Disk Drives (HDD) ...................................................... 74
Detecting the SCSI Device (SAF-TE) .............................................. 74
10
Terminating SCSI Devices ............................................................... 74
Downgraded Server Operation ........................................................ 75
RAID 0 - Disk Striping.................................................................. 75
RAID 1 - Disk Mirroring................................................................ 75
RAID 5 - Disk Striping With Distributed Parity ............................. 76
RAID 10 - Disk Striping and Disk Mirroring ................................. 76
RAID Failures................................................................................... 76
Striping Configuration Failure (RAID 0) ....................................... 76
Mirrored Drive RAID Configuration Failure (RAID 1)................... 77
Parity RAID Configuration Failure (RAID 5) ................................ 77
If the Server Does Not Have a RAID Controller .......................... 77
Expansion Cards ....................................................................................... 78
Restrictions on PCI Expansion Cards .............................................. 78
Installing Add-in Cards ..................................................................... 79
Installing a RAID Controller.............................................................. 81
Chapter 3: System Configuration Setup............................................. 82
Hot Keys.................................................................................................... 82
Power-On Self Test (POST) ...................................................................... 83
BIOS Setup Utility...................................................................................... 84
Starting the BIOS Setup Utility ......................................................... 84
BIOS Setup Utility Menu Options ................................................ 85
BIOS Setup Utility Keyboard Commands .................................... 85
Changing BIOS Settings .................................................................. 85
BIOS Settings................................................................................... 86
Main Menu.................................................................................. 86
Advanced Menu........................................................................... 87
Security Menu.............................................................................. 90
System Menu............................................................................... 91
Boot Menu ................................................................................... 92
Exit Menu..................................................................................... 93
Upgrading the BIOS ......................................................................... 93
Using the Adaptec SCSI Utility.................................................................. 94
Starting the SCSI Utility.................................................................... 94
Menu Configuration.......................................................................... 94
SCSI Utility Keyboard Commands ................................................... 95
Changing SCSI Device Settings ...................................................... 95
11
Setting Devices ................................................................................ 95
Chapter 4: Hardware Diagnostics ...................................................... 98
About the Diagnostics Utility...................................................................... 98
Starting Hardware Diagnostics .................................................................. 98
Starting up Using the Diskette.......................................................... 98
Diagnostic Options .................................................................................... 99
01. Diagnostic Test...................................................................... 99
02. Running Test ......................................................................... 99
03. Log Utilities ............................................................................ 99
04. System Configuration ............................................................ 99
99. Exit......................................................................................... 99
01. Diagnostic Test .................................................................................. 100
01. Diagnostic Test Menu Test Items ............................................. 100
01. Memory Test........................................................................ 100
02. Keyboard Test ..................................................................... 105
03. Display Test......................................................................... 108
04. Floppy Disk Test.................................................................. 111
05. Printer Test .......................................................................... 114
06. SCSI HDD Test ................................................................... 115
07. NPX Test ............................................................................. 118
08. Cache Test .......................................................................... 120
09. SCSI Test ............................................................................ 124
10. CD-ROM Test...................................................................... 125
11. SAF-TE Test........................................................................ 128
12. SMC Test............................................................................. 129
02. Running Test ..................................................................................... 132
03. Log Utilities........................................................................................ 134
Log Utilities screen headings ......................................................... 134
Key Operation for Log Utilities................................................... 138
System Configuration Display ................................................................. 139
System Information ........................................................................ 139
SCSI Devices ................................................................................. 141
System Configuration Information.................................................. 141
MAIN Chassis............................................................................ 141
Chapter 5: Software Installation ....................................................... 142
Startup ..................................................................................................... 142
12
Creating Floppy Diskettes for Drivers and Utilities......................... 142
Windows NT Server 4.0 .......................................................................... 143
Installing Drivers............................................................................. 144
Onboard SCSI Controller ............................................................... 144
Express 500 RAID Controller ......................................................... 144
RAID Controller .............................................................................. 145
Onboard Network Adapter ............................................................. 145
After Windows NT 4.0 is installed .................................................. 146
Service Pack.............................................................................. 146
Video Driver............................................................................... 146
Other steps to take .................................................................... 146
Optional Software........................................................................... 147
Re-Installing Adapter Drivers ......................................................... 147
Onboard SCSI Controller........................................................... 147
Intel Pro100NT Driver................................................................ 148
Windows 2000 Server ............................................................................. 149
Express 500 RAID Controller ......................................................... 149
Installing Toshiba Display Power Save Driver................................ 150
After Windows 2000 Server is installed.......................................... 150
Installing Netware.................................................................................... 151
Motherboard settings ..................................................................... 151
Floppy disk preparation.................................................................. 151
Manually installing NetWare 5.1..................................................... 151
Selecting the driver.................................................................... 151
Selecting a RAID Controller driver............................................. 151
Selecting a SCSI Controller driver............................................. 152
Selecting the RAID Controller driver .............................................. 153
Selecting a Network Adapter driver ........................................... 154
Post installation procedures ........................................................... 154
Setup the RAID Controller Utility ............................................... 154
Chapter 6: If Something Goes Wrong .............................................. 155
Identifying a Problem...............................................................................
Startup Sequence....................................................................................
Error Checking ...............................................................................
Startup Problems............................................................................
155
156
156
156
13
Application Software Problems ...............................................................
After the System Has Been Running Correctly ..............................
Common Hardware Problems .................................................................
The Power Indicator Does Not Light ..............................................
The Screen is Blank .......................................................................
Characters are Distorted or Do Not Display Properly ....................
The FDD Activity Indicator Does Not Light.....................................
The FDD Activity Indicator is Always On........................................
The HDD Status Indicators Do Not Light........................................
The HDD Does Not Respond.........................................................
CD-ROM Drive Status Indicator Does Not Light ............................
Before Calling for Service........................................................................
Toshiba Technical Support ......................................................................
Appendix A: Specifications ..............................................................
Appendix B: Interface ......................................................................
Appendix C: Jumper Settings ..........................................................
Appendix D: Unit Logs .....................................................................
Appendix E: Rack Template ............................................................
157
158
158
158
159
159
159
160
160
160
160
160
161
162
170
173
178
181
About This Guide
14
Introduction
Thank you for purchasing the Toshiba Magnia 3135R server, which combines high
performance with great flexibility.
❖ The Toshiba Magnia 3135R is designed around the ServerWorks® ServerSet III LE
(FSB 133 MHz).
❖ The 3135R supports up to two Intel ® Pentium III processors.
❖ Flex PCI riser card with one 64 bit/66 MHz slot and one 32 bit/33 MHz slot provide
add-in board capability.
❖ The integrated onboard video controller has 4MB of video memory.
❖ The 3135R comes with an integrated onboard Network Interface Controller (NIC),
using an Intel ® 82559 single chip PCI LAN controller for 10 or 100 Mbps TX Fast
Ethernet networks.
❖ Thermal/voltage monitoring and error handling are provided.
❖ Front panel controls and indicators (LEDs) are present for system operation.
❖ The 3135R includes an onboard SCSI controller with Adaptec AIC-7899 supporting
onboard Ultra160 and Ultra-wide SCSI Interfaces.
❖ Memory is expandable from 128 MB to 4GB using registered DIMMs.
About This Guide
This guide introduces the features of the Toshiba Magnia 3135R server and explains how
to set up, configure, and maintain the server. Before using your Toshiba server, refer to
this guide to gain an overall understanding of operating procedures and safety
precautions.
Other Documentation and Software
15
Other Documentation and Software
In addition to this user’s guide, Toshiba provides a system CD that contains:
❖ The Safety Instruction Guide for Toshiba Servers, which contains general safety
information.
Toshiba also provides you with:
❖ A Toshiba Magnia™ 3135R Quick Start Card, which identifies the major server
components, and provides a quick reference on connection, setup, and system
configuration information.
❖ Warranty information
Safety Icons
Read and understand all safety instructions before attempting to use your Toshiba
Magnia 3135R server.
This guide contains the safety instructions that must be observed in order to avoid
personal injury or damage to your server. The safety instructions have been classified
according to the seriousness of the risk, and the following icons highlight these
instructions.
DANGER: This icon indicates the existence of a hazard that could result in death or
serious bodily injury if the safety instruction is not observed.
CAUTION: This icon indicates the existence of a hazard that could result in damage
to equipment or property if the safety instruction is not observed. A caution also
indicates a potential loss of data.
WARNING: This icon indicates the existence of a hazard that could result in bodily
injury if the safety instruction is not observed.
NOTE: This icon indicates information that relates to the safe operation of the
equipment or related items.
It is extremely important to follow basic safety practices are followed when installing and
maintaining the system.
Service Options
16
Other Icons
Additional icons highlight other helpful or educational information:
TECHNICAL NOTE: This icon highlights technical information about the server.
HINT: This icon denotes helpful hints and tips.
DEFINITION: This icon indicates the definition of a term used in the text.
Service Options
Toshiba offers a full line of service options built around its warranty programs. For
registration information refer to the warranty and service material included with the
server, or go to our web site at: http://www.support.toshiba.com.
Maintenance Contracts
Periodic maintenance and inspection is essential to keeping the server fully operational
and assuring its safe use. Toshiba recommends taking out a maintenance contract with
an authorized Toshiba Magnia service provider.
Cleaning the Server
If the server’s exterior case is dirty or stained, clean it with a soft cloth. If necessary,
moisten the cloth with water. Never use harsh chemicals to clean the server.
Setting Up Your Work Environment
You can work more comfortably and efficiently by thoughtfully organizing your work
space. Developing good work habits is the best way to avoid strain and stress to your
hands, back, neck and eyes.
WARNING: Using the computer keyboard incorrectly may result in discomfort and
possible injury. If your hands, wrists, and/or arms bother you while typing, stop
using the computer and rest. If the discomfort persists, consult a physician.
Setting Up Your Work Environment
17
Developing Good Work Habits
The key to avoiding discomfort or injury from repetitive strain is to vary your activities. If
possible, schedule a variety of tasks into your working day. Finding ways to break up the
routine can reduce stress and improve your efficiency.
❖ Take pauses from typing.
❖ Take short breaks to change position, stretch your muscles, and rest your eyes. A two
or three minute break every half hour is more effective than one long break after
several hours.
❖ Stretch spontaneously throughout the day to reduce tension.
❖ Avoid performing repetitive activities for long periods. Intersperse repetitive activities
with other tasks.
❖ Look away from the computer every 15 minutes or so to reduce eye strain, and focus
your eyes on a distant object for 30 seconds.
Arranging Your Work Area
Carefully planned placement of your computer and desktop tools can help you avoid
stress-related injuries and help you work more efficiently. Adjusting the lighting can make
it easier to see your work and reduce eye strain.
❖ Place the keyboard on a flat surface, directly in front of you, at a comfortable distance.
When you use the keyboard, your arms and hands should be in a relaxed position
with your forearms parallel to the floor. You should be able to type without twisting
your body or neck.
❖ Place the monitor so that its top is at eye level. If you wear bifocal or progressive
lenses, position the monitor slightly lower.
❖ Set your paper holder at the same distance as the screen. If possible, adjust the
holder so that the paper is at the same height as the screen.
❖ Position the monitor so that sunlight or bright indoor lighting does not reflect off the
screen. Use tinted windows or shades to reduce glare.
❖ Adjust the screen to avoid reflections and glare.
❖ Avoid placing the monitor in front of a bright light that could shine directly in your eyes.
❖ If possible, use soft, indirect lighting in your computer work area.
Setting Up Your Work Environment
18
Seating and Posture
Correct posture and computer placement
When using the computer, sit comfortably. Proper seating is a primary factor in reducing
strain.
❖ Position your chair so that the keyboard is at or slightly below the level of your elbow.
You should be able to type comfortably with your shoulders relaxed.
❖ Position your knees should be slightly higher than your hips. If necessary, use a
footrest to raise the level of your knees and ease the pressure on the back of your
thighs.
❖ Adjust the back of your chair so that it supports the lower curve of your spine. If
necessary, use a cushion to provide extra back support.
❖ Sit with your back straight so that your knees, hips and elbows form approximately
90-degree angles when you work. Do not slump forward or lean back too far.
Using Your Arms and Wrists
Regular attention to your work habits can make your time at the computer more
productive.
❖ Keep your wrists straight while typing. If necessary, adjust the keyboard and chair
height to keep wrists straight.
❖ Avoid resting on your wrists while typing.
❖ Use a light touch on the keys and mouse.
❖ Avoid bending, arching, or twisting your wrists. Keep them in a relaxed, neutral
position while typing.
❖ Exercise your hands, wrists and arms several times during the day to improve
circulation.
19
Chapter 1
Getting Started
This chapter provides a detailed description of the server and the environmental
conditions in which it is designed to operate.
Make Sure You Have Everything
Unpack the boxes and check the contents against your purchase order. If the server
contains optional devices, those components will also be listed. If any items are missing
or damaged, notify your Toshiba representative immediately.
Installing Optional Internal Devices
Install all optional devices before setting up the server. The installation and configuration
procedures described in this guide require specific technical knowledge and experience.
If you have no experience installing and removing computer hardware devices, or if the
job seems difficult, consult an authorized Toshiba Magnia service provider. Toshiba
assumes no liability for damages if you install and remove optional devices yourself.
Environmental Considerations
This section lists precautionary measures that should be followed when setting up rackmounted Toshiba Magnia 3135R servers.
General Environmental Considerations
❖ Install the server in a clean, dust-free and well-ventilated place.
❖ Install the server on a level and steady surface.
❖ Never install the server upside down.
Getting Started
Environmental Considerations
20
❖ Never install the server in any of the following places:
-
Where it will be exposed to direct sunlight
-
Where it will be exposed to vibration or shock
-
Near any devices that generate a strong magnetic field or produce radio
frequency noise such as a radio, TV, large motor or loudspeaker
-
Where the temperature and humidity change constantly; for example, near an airconditioning vent, fan, heater or heat source
-
Near liquids or corrosive chemicals
If debris or liquid gets in the server, shut it down immediately by turning the power button
Off and unplugging the power cable from the AC outlet. Do not turn the server back on.
Contact an authorized Toshiba Magnia service provider immediately.
Operate the server under the following temperature and humidity conditions:
Ambient temperature:
The operating temperature of the server, when installed in an equipment rack,
must not go below 5 °C (41 °F) or rise above 32 °C (89 °F).
Relative humidity:
30% to 80% Rh (no condensation)
CAUTION: Avoid exposing the server to condensation during use and storage.
Condensation can corrode server components and short-circuit its electrical circuits
if the unit is on.
Ventilation:
The equipment rack must provide sufficient airflow to the front of the server to
maintain proper cooling. It must also include ventilation sufficient to exhaust a
maximum of 1,500 BTU per hour for each server. The rack selected and the
ventilation provided must be suitable to the environment in which the server is
used.
To avoid damage from condensation when the room temperature is too high or too low,
wait about an hour before turning the server on. The delay allows the server to adjust to
the ambient room conditions.
Getting Started
Power Requirements
21
Environmental Considerations for Rack Mount Models
NOTE: Installing a Toshiba Magnia 3135R in a rack requires special knowledge and
skills. Toshiba recommends that you contact an authorized Toshiba Magnia service
provider.
In addition to the general environmental considerations, keep these additional points in
mind:
❖ Use the optional Toshiba rack and rack mounting kit to install a rack model server.
❖ Provide sufficient airflow to the server to maintain proper cooling. Allow 51 inches
(130 cm) of clearance in front of, and 24 inches (60 cm) behind the rack.
For more information on environmental considerations for a rack-mounted server, see
Environmental Considerations on page 34 and Selecting a Location for the Server in the
Rack on page 36.
Power Requirements
The power supply unit has maximum current ratings of 4.6 amperes with input voltages
of 100-200 volts (at 50/60 Hz), or 2.3 amperes with input voltages of 200-240 volts (at 50/
60 Hz), with 10 amp over-current protective circuits.
Before plugging the power cable into a wall outlet, make sure that the AC power source
and the over-current protector (circuit breaker current rating) are sufficient to handle the
requirements of the server and its connected peripheral devices.
The current rating of the server is 4 amps. To ensure a continuous supply of power to the
server, Toshiba recommends the use of an uninterruptible power supply (UPS).
WARNING: To ensure proper grounding of the server and avoid a possible fire
hazard, use the power cable provided with the server.
If you have questions about the wiring of your AC power source, consult an authorized
Toshiba Magnia service provider.
Getting Started
Front Panel
22
Front Panel
Floppy Drive
CD-ROM Drive
Drive Bays
Controls & Indicators
Front Panel
The front panel provides protection for, and access to, the controls and indicators, as well
as the drive bays containing the hard disk drive (HDD), the CD-ROM drive, and a floppy
disk drive (FDD).
Toshiba Magnia 3135R Mounted in a Rack
Rack Mounted Server
Getting Started
Front Panel
23
Controls and Indicators
The front panel contains four operation control buttons and seven system indicator LEDs.
Operation Buttons
Power Button
Sleep Button
Reset Button
NMI Button
Operation buttons
Power button - Press this button to power-down the server. Placing the server in
security mode disables the power button. To power-down the server while it is in secure
mode, the user must have shutdown rights. To reactivate the power button, enter your
user password.
TECHNICAL NOTE: The procedure for shutting down the server depends on the
operating system installed on the server. For more information on turning the server
on and off, see Turning on the Server on page 45.
Sleep button - Toggles the server between normal operation mode and power-saving
mode (sleep mode). Placing the server in secure mode disables the sleep button. To
place the server in sleep mode while in secure mode, you must have sleep rights. To
reactivate the sleep button, enter your user password.
Reset button - Restarts the server. Placing the server in security mode disables the
Reset button. To re-enable the Reset button, enter your user password.
CAUTION: To avoid data loss or corruption, never use the Reset button while the
activity indicator on the floppy disk drive, CD-ROM drive, or hard disk drive is on.
NMI button - This is a system control button, to be used by authorized Toshiba Service
personnel only.
Getting Started
Front Panel
System and HDD Status Indicators
NIC Activity LED
Fail LED
Power LED
Disk Activity/Fail LEDs
HDD 0
HDD 1
HDD 2
HDD 3
System indicators
The following table describes the operation of the system indicators.
Indicator
Power
NIC Activity
System Fail
Disk Activity/Fail
(0)
Disk Activity/Fail
(1)
Disk Activity/Fail
(2)
Status
Description
Off
System power off
Green
Server is running normally
Flashing Green
ACPI standby mode
Off
No LAN activity
Green
Network Interface Controller active
Off
Normal
Amber
System Failed
Flashing Amber
System warning
Off
No power supplied to SCSI drive
Green
SCSI drive active
Amber
SCSI drive failed
Off
No power supplied to SCSI drive
Green
SCSI drive active
Amber
SCSI drive failed
Off
No power supplied to SCSI drive
Green
SCSI drive active
Amber
SCSI drive failed
24
Getting Started
Front Panel
Indicator
Disk Activity/Fail
(3)
Status
25
Description
Off
No power supplied to SCSI drive
Green
SCSI drive active
Amber
SCSI drive failed
Determining Network Communication Status (NIC LEDs)
LED Color
LED On
LED Blinking
LED Off
Amber
100-Mbps network
connection
N/A
10-Mbps network
connection
Green
Linked to network,
no network traffic
Linked to network,
sending or
receiving data
Not linked to
network
Device Bays
The Toshiba Magnia 3135R supports five device bays. Four are "Hot Swap" bays,
supporting up to four Hard Disk Drives. The other device bay contains a Floppy Disk
Drive and a Slim CD-ROM.
CD-ROM Drive
CD-ROM eject button
Manual eject pinhole
CD-ROM activity LED
Front View of CD-ROM buttons and indicator
Manual eject pinhole - Use to manually release the disc tray if it does not open when
you press the eject button while the server is on. To release the disc tray, insert a slender
object, such as a straightened paper clip, through the pinhole and press gently.
CAUTION: To avoid damage to the CD-ROM drive when manually ejecting a
compact disc, turn off the server before manually opening the disc tray. Never use
pointed objects to release the disc tray. The object could break and damage the
drive. Always remember to remove the CD whenever the drive is not in use.
Getting Started
Front Panel
Activity indicator - Illuminates when the CD-ROM is being accessed.
Eject button - Used to open and close the disc tray.
TECHNICAL NOTE: Be sure to verify that any CD is inserted flatly into the drive tray
to avoid damaging the media when the tray closes.
CAUTION: To avoid damaging the CD-ROM drive, never press the eject button
while the status indicator is on.
Floppy Disk Drive
The FDD supports 3.5-inch, double-density (720-KB), and high-density (1.44-MB)
diskettes.
Activity
indicator
Eject
button
Activity indicator - Illuminates whenever the floppy disk drive reads or writes data.
Eject button - Releases the diskette from the drive.
CAUTION: To avoid losing or corrupting data stored on the diskette, never press the
eject button while the FDD indicator is on. Always remove the diskette from the
floppy disk drive whenever the drive is not in use.
26
Getting Started
Cooling Fan Unit
27
Cooling Fan Unit
To regulate the temperature inside the server, theToshiba Magnia 3135R is equipped
with the following cooling fans:
❖ Two 80mm system fans mounted in the middle of the chassis
❖ Power Supply fan internal to the power supply
❖ One CPU fan mounted on each processor
Removal and replacement of a system fan is easily accomplished by powering the
system down, removing the top cover, and removing the fan assembly. There is also a
cooling fan internal to the power supply.
Getting Started
Cooling Fan Unit
28
Rear Panel
Identifying the AC Power Connector and I/O Signal Ports
This section provides a description of the server’s AC power connector and I/O ports. It
also provides information on connecting peripheral devices to the server.
TECHNICAL NOTE: The output voltages from the I/O connectors on the back of the
server do not exceed 12V.
COM 1
COM 2
USB Connectors
Rear panel connections
Getting Started
Inside the Server
Using USB-Compliant Devices
TECHNICAL NOTE: Before connecting a USB-compatible device, check whether
the operating system installed on your server supports the USB standard.
Keep in mind the following considerations
❖ A USB-compatible keyboard or mouse cannot be used with BIOS setup or the
Hardware Diagnostics Program.
❖ Windows NT 4.0 and Novell NetWare do not support the USB standard.
TECHNICAL NOTE: The BIOS installed in the Magnia 3135R does not support PS/
2 emulation when using a USB keyboard.
Inside the Server
CPU socket
DIMM sockets
HDD bays
Cooling fan assembly
CD/FDD bay
Power supply unit
Motherboard
Top View of major system components
29
Getting Started
Inside the Server
30
Motherboard
The motherboard contains two CPU sockets, four DIMM sockets, and two PCI expansion
card slots on the riser board.
CPU Sockets
The Toshiba Magnia 3135R contains two CPU sockets. For instructions on installing and
removing a processor, see CPU Modules on page 61.
Internal Battery
The lithium battery on the server board powers the real-time clock (RTC) for up to 5
years in the absence of power. When the battery starts to weaken, it loses voltage and
the server settings stored in CMOS RAM in the RTC (for example, the date and time)
may be wrong. For instructions on replacing the RTC battery, see Replacing the Internal
Battery on page 71.
Memory Bank
The memory bank contains four slots, supporting installation of up to four memory
modules. For system memory upgrade information, see Memory Modules on page 56.
Expansion Slots
The Toshiba Magnia 3135R supports the addition of two PCI cards. Both PCI slots are
located on the riser card which has two full-length standard PCI connectors
CAUTION: Do not use any expansion slots on the server board
Getting Started
Inside the Server
Cabling the Server Board
1
Route the power cable on the board side of the fan as shown in the following
illustration. Wrap the clamp around the cable and secure it to one of the unused
standoffs.
Routing the Power Cable
2
Connect the cable shipped with the server board to the bottom connector (A).
3
Connect the diskette drive data cable (B).
4
Connect the CD-ROM data cable (C).
A
B
C
A
B
C
Connecting the front panel board cables
31
Getting Started
5
Inside the Server
32
If not already connected, connect the SCSI cable.
Connecting the SCSI cable
6
Connect the power cables (A) and the server board AUX connector (B).
7
Connect the diskette drive cable (C).
8
Connect the power cables for fan 1 to the FAN2A connector and fan 2 to the FAN3A
connector (D).
9
Connect the front panel cable (E).
10 Connect the SCSI connector from the hot swap cable to SCSI connector P8 (F).
11 Connect the chassis intrusion switch cable to pins 3-4 of connector 1L4 (G).
12 Connect the CD-ROM IDE cable (H).
A
C
B
(E) Front panel connector
D
H
F
SCSI connector P9
G
2
1L4
4
6
8 10 12
3
5
7
SCSI connector P8
1
9
11
Connecting cables to the server board (see Jumper Settings on page 173 for details on jumper settings)
Getting Started
Inside the Server
33
Connecting Peripheral Devices
1
Make sure that the server, and all connected peripheral devices, are turned off and
that their power cables are not plugged into an AC outlet.
2
Using the proper interface cable, connect each peripheral device to an appropriate
connector on the server. If the plug on the interface cable has thumbscrews, tighten
the thumbscrews sufficiently to secure the cable.
3
Plug the power cables from the server and peripheral devices into AC outlets. Make
sure all peripheral devices are properly connected before turning on the server.
Getting Started
Installing the Server in a Rack
34
Installing the Server in a Rack
This section contains information and instructions on installing the server in a rack.
Choosing a Location
Choose an appropriate location for the server that is structurally and environmentally
suitable for the equipment.
Structural Considerations
Make sure the floor or supporting surface can support the weight of the rack when fully
loaded. In addition, make sure that the distance from the surface supporting the rack to
the ceiling is sufficient to allow air to flow freely. Ensure that there is enough space
around the rack to allow for server installation and maintenance.
Environmental Considerations
Install the rack on a level surface in a clean, dust-free, and well-ventilated environment.
The area should be free from:
❖ Direct sunlight
❖ Vibration
❖ Liquids and corrosive chemicals
❖ Equipment that generates a strong electromagnetic field, such as large motors or
speaker phones
❖ Rapid changes in temperature or humidity and sources of temperature change such
as air conditioner vents, fans, or heaters
❖ Extreme heat, cold, or humidity. Adhere to the following temperature and humidity
guidelines:
Temperature: 50 to 89 degrees F (10 to 32 degrees C)
Relative humidity: 40% to 80% (non-condensation)
If the ambient temperature is too high or too low, wait about an hour after the temperature
is within operational range before using the server.
CAUTION: To prevent damage to equipment, keep the rack and server free from
condensation during use and storage.
Getting Started
Preparing the Rack
35
Also, make sure that there is sufficient unrestricted airflow around the rack to ensure
proper cooling of the server components mounted in the rack.
The recommended clearances are:
Front:
51 inches
(130 cm)
Rear:
24 inches
(60 cm)
Overhead:
13 inches
(34 cm)
Power Considerations
There are three ways to supply power to the equipment installed in the rack:
❖ Connect the AC cables from the equipment directly to an AC outlet. Make sure that
the necessary number of outlets are within reach of the power cables.
❖ Install an optional AC power strip in the rack and connect the installed equipment to
the power strip. The AC power strip should comply to NEMA L5-15P (3-prong
straight, 115V/15A) specifications. If you connect your rack equipment in this manner,
make sure that the total current requirement of the equipment is less than 15 amps.
❖ Install an Uninterruptible Power Supply (UPS) in the rack. Make sure that you have a
sufficient number of UPS units to handle the expected equipment load.
WARNING: To avoid electrical shock or fire, always use a grounded 115V AC outlet
or power strip to provide electrical power to rack components.
Even though some racks do not require a dedicated ground, depending on the
environment, a separate ground may be necessary.
Preparing the Rack
Decide what equipment will be mounted in the rack and where each device will be
installed. Your rack configuration may include a monitor tray, one or more servers, a
keyboard drawer, and a UPS.
DANGER: To prevent the rack from becoming unstable and top heavy, install
components in the rack from the bottom up. Install the heavier components as close
to the bottom of the rack as possible.
Getting Started
Preparing the Rack
Selecting a Location for the Server in the Rack
The following illustration shows the distance between the narrow-pitch spaces on a
standard 19-inch rack. For a full-size template of the rack-mount units, see Using the
Template on page 181.
14.3 mm (0.56 inches)
15.9 mm (0.63 inches)
1U
= 44.5 mm
= 1.75 inches
14.3 mm (0.56 inches)
1U height on a 19-inch rail
DEFINITION: A “U” is a unit of vertical rack space. "1U" is defined as the distance
between two narrow-pitch spaces on a 19-inch vertical rail.
Equipment Mounting Guidelines
Follow these guidelines when mounting equipment:
❖ Make sure there is adequate room for all devices and cabling.
❖ Calculate the total weight and the power requirements of the components prior to
installation.
❖ Mount equipment starting at the bottom of the rack moving upward. To increase
stability, mount the heaviest components as close to the bottom of the rack as
possible. Unused space should be at the top of the rack.
36
Getting Started
Stabilizing the Rack
37
Stabilizing the Rack
WARNING: To prevent the rack from tipping forward under normal conditions, use
stabilizers to secure the rack. Depending on the equipment mounted in the rack and
the location of each component, the rack may become unstable if the stabilizers are
not installed. Stabilizers are not designed to withstand unusual stresses, such as
those that may be caused by an earthquake.
Typically, stabilizers can be installed two ways, with varying levels of stability:
❖ Free-standing stabilizers
❖ Anchored stabilizers (secured to the floor)
Free-Standing Stabilizers
Front and rear stabilizers should be installed to reduce the possibility of the rack tipping
over while equipment is accessed for service. Additional optional side stabilizers can be
installed to widen the footprint of the rack and reduce the possibility of the rack tipping
over under adverse conditions.
Secured Stabilizers
Stabilizers can be installed and then bolted to the floor, permanently securing the rack in
place. To ensure that the rack is secured properly, consult or commission a licensed
contractor to perform the work.
Getting Started
Stabilizing the Rack
Recommended Tools
To mount components in a rack, Toshiba suggests that you have these tools:
Tool
Use
Small and large Phillips
screwdrivers
To tighten M3, M4, and M6 mounting hardware screws
Small and large flat-blade
screwdriver
To install and remove screws on the installed components
Multimeter
To check wiring continuity
Antistatic wrist strap
To protect sensitive electronics
Toshiba-Supplied Hardware Items
The following table lists the hardware items that Toshiba provides with your server.
Hardware item
Qty
Use
M5 x 12 screw
12
Use to secure the base rail to the
rack’s vertical rails.
M5 star washer
8
Use to secure the base rail to the
rack’s vertical rails.
M5 flat washer
8
Use to secure the base rail to the
rack’s vertical rails.
Inside Rail
2
Chassis Rail: attaches to 3135R
chassis (one left, one right).
Outer and Middle Rail
Piece
2
Rack rail: attach to rack mounts.
Chassis rail slides into this rail (one
left, one right).
Front & Rear Rail Bracket
Pair
2
Rack-to-Rail connecting bracket
pairs (left front/right front, left rear/
right rear)
Nutbar
4
Rack-to-Rail Nutbar: connects rackto-rail connecting brackets to the
rack.
38
Getting Started
Installing the Rail Rack and Mounting the Server
39
Installing the Rail Rack and Mounting the Server
The Toshiba Magnia 3135R is delivered with a rail kit for rack mounting in a four-post
network server cabinet. If your cabinet is not of this general type, you will have to
purchase a separate rail kit that is designed for use with your cabinet.
Follow these steps to install the rail kit and place your system into the cabinet.
1
Assemble tools and miscellaneous parts.
2
Remove the inside piece (C in Figure Step 2) from both sides of the rail system. To
remove an inside piece of the rail system, slide the part as far out as you can. This
action reveals a brass colored finger tab (D in Figure Step 2) that when depressed
allows you to completely separate the inside rail piece from the outer (A in Figure
Step 2) and middle (B in Figure Step 2) rail pieces.
D
D
A
Figure: Step 2
B
C
Getting Started
3
Installing the Rail Rack and Mounting the Server
40
Align each inside rail (A in Figure Step 3) to a side of the chassis. Be sure that the
flat end of the inside rail is toward the front of the chassis and that the brass colored
finger tab (D in Figure Step 3) is facing outward. With the holes in the chassis (C in
Figure Step 3) aligned with the holes in the rail, fasten the rail using the largest
screws (B in Figure Step 3) supplied with the rail kit.
C
D
A
B
Figure: Step 3
4
Locate the front and rear rail brackets for one side of the rail kit. One pair (A and B in
Figure Step 4) exists for each side of the cabinet rack.
A
Figure: Step 4
B
Getting Started
5
Installing the Rail Rack and Mounting the Server
41
Attach all four rail brackets to the cabinet rack. Be sure that the sharper angled side
of each bracket is facing up (C in Figure Step 5). Use eight mounting screws
provided by the manufacturer of the cabinet rack. In the illustration to the right, the
left photo (A in Figure Step 5) shows the left-front bracket attached to the cabinet,
while the right photo (B in Figure Step 5) shows the left-rear bracket. (The illustration
shows the rails inside the brackets. You should not have the rails attached inside the
brackets yet.)
C
B
A
Figure: Step 5
6
Attach the system side rail outer pieces (total of two) to the rail brackets you installed
in step 5. To attach the front part of an outer piece to a rail bracket, you must reveal
the access hole (A in Figure Step 6) by sliding the innermost piece toward the back.
Once you see the access hole, align it with the slot in the rail bracket in order to
secure the bolt. Do not tighten the nut and bolt until you have aligned the rear portion
of the rail system (see Step 7).
C
A
FIgure: Step 6
B
Getting Started
7
Installing the Rail Rack and Mounting the Server
42
To attach the rear part of the rail system to the rear rail bracket (A in Figure Step 7),
slide the rail system within the rail brackets so that you can place a bolt through the
hole in the rail (B in Figure Step 7) and into the rail bracket slot. Loosely tighten the
bolt and nut. You should be able to slide the entire rail system back and forth in the
rail brackets. When you have centered the rails in the bracket, tighten the fastening
bolts and nuts.
C
A
B
Figure: Step 7
8
Extend the right and left rails so they fully extend in front of the cabinet rack. The rail
system is now ready to receive the chassis.
Figure: Step 8
Getting Started
9
Connecting AC Power
43
Lift the chassis with the front facing you and carefully guide the inner rail (A in Figure
Step 9), which is mounted to the chassis system, into the outer pieces (B in Figure
Step 9) that you attached in previous steps. Gently move the system evenly towards
the rear of the cabinet. Be sure to depress the brass colored finger tabs located in
the center of each inner side rail piece as you slide the chassis back.
A
B
Figure: Step 9
With the chassis fully inserted into the cabinet rack, you can easily access both the front
and rear of the system.
Connecting AC Power
Before connecting the server to a power source, proceed through the following checklist
to assure that your server has been completely and correctly connected.
Installation Checklist
❖ Are all cables correctly and tightly connected and secured?
❖ Is the system power cord properly connected to the system and plugged into a NEMA
5-15R outlet for 100-120 V.
❖ Is AC power available at the wall outlet?
❖ Are the processors or processor termination board fully seated in their slots on the
server board?
❖ Are all add-in PCI boards fully seated in their slots on the riser card?
❖ Are all switches and jumper settings on the server board set correctly?
Getting Started
Connecting AC Power
44
❖ Are all jumper and switch settings on add-in boards and peripheral devices set
correctly? To check these settings, refer to the manufacturer’s documentation. If
applicable, ensure that there are no conflicts. For example, two add-in boards sharing
the same interrupt.
❖ Are all SDRAM DIMMs installed correctly?
❖ Are all peripheral devices installed correctly?
❖ Are all integrated components from the tested components lists? Check the tested
memory, and chassis lists, as well as the supported hardware and operating system
list on the Toshiba Customer Support Web site at http://www.toshiba.support.com.
Power Consumption Checklist
Before connecting the server to an AC outlet, make sure the power source has sufficient
current capacity to satisfy the power requirements of the server system. If the system’s
power consumption exceeds the capacity of the power source, the server can be
damaged.
❖ Always connect the server to a grounded AC outlet.
❖ Never connect the server to the same AC outlet as an appliance that has a high
power consumption or that generates electrical noise, such as an air conditioner or
photocopier.
HINT: Use a UPS to avoid losing data when an unexpected power failure occurs.
To connect the server to an AC power source:
1
Plug the power cable into the connector on the back of the server.
2
Plug the power cable into an AC outlet or, preferably, the power output connector of
a UPS.
WARNING: Be sure to use the power cable supplied with the server. Using another
power cable could create a fire hazard.
Getting Started
Turning on the Server
45
Turning on the Server
TECHNICAL NOTE: Always allow at least 10 seconds to elapse between turning
the server off and turning it back on again. If the server is turned on before 10
seconds have elapsed, the server might malfunction.
1
Check that all the peripheral devices, such as the monitor, keyboard, and mouse, are
properly connected to the server.
2
Check that all power cables are connected to grounded AC outlets or a UPS.
3
Turn on the monitor.
4
Press the power button.
The power indicator light is green.
Power-On Self Test (POST)
Pressing the power button turns on the server and starts the power-on self test (POST).
The POST is a self-diagnosing function that automatically executes each time the server
starts. The motherboard, microprocessor, memory, keyboard, and some peripheral
devices connected to the server are automatically checked by the POST. During the
memory test, the POST accesses and tests the server memory and then displays the
amount of system memory on the screen.
Depending on how the server is configured, following the POST a message similar to the
following appears on the screen:
Press F2 to enter SETUP
Pressing the F2 key starts the BIOS setup utility. If you don’t press F2, system startup
continues.
If the POST detects an error, depending on the error condition, one of the following
events occurs:
❖ A buzzer sounds (beep code) during testing.
❖ An error code and message appear after the POST completes.
Getting Started
Booting the Server
46
Booting the Server
You can boot the server from any of the following devices:
❖ Removable Devices (including Floppy Disk Drive)
❖ CD-ROM
❖ Hard disk drive (HDD)
Starting the Server From the Floppy Disk Drive
1
Make sure that the CD-ROM drive is empty.
2
Press the Power button to start the server.
3
Immediately after pressing the power button, place a bootable floppy into the floppy
drive.
Starting the Server From the CD-ROM Drive
1
Make sure that the floppy disk drive is empty.
2
Press the Power button to start the server.
3
Immediately after pressing the Power button, place a bootable floppy into the floppy
drive.
Starting the Server From the Hard Disk Drive
If the operating system is installed on the server, you can start the server from the hard
disk drive.To start the server, check the floppy disk drive and the CD-ROM drive to make
sure they are empty and then press the power button to start the server.
HINT: The eject button will only open the CD-ROM drive’s disc tray when power is
supplied to the server.
Getting Started
BIOS Setup
47
BIOS Setup
The server’s system setup can be changed using the BIOS Setup utility. You can make
changes to the BIOS Setup even if an operating system has not been installed on the
server. The system settings you enter are written in the CMOS and flash memory and
take effect when you restart the server. BIOS settings are used for reference during the
POST.
If the server hardware doesn’t support the values you enter, an appropriate error
message appears on the screen when the POST routine is complete. If this occurs,
change the setting using either the BIOS Setup Utility.
Turning Off the Server
The procedure for turning off the server depends on the operating system installed on
the server. Always perform a normal shutdown when turning off the server.
Performing a Normal Shutdown
Turn off the server using the following method:
1
Shut down the operating system. For instructions, refer to the user’s guide that came
with your operating system.
2
Press the Power button to shut down the system.
TECHNICAL NOTE: If the server is turned on through the Wake On LAN function
and turned off again before the Windows NT LAN driver is loaded, a startup fault
may occur the next time you attempt to start the server using the Wake On LAN
function. If this occurs, disconnect and then reconnect the power cable from the AC
outlet.
48
Chapter 2
Connecting Hardware
Devices
This chapter contains information and instructions on installing and removing optional
devices.
Contents
Installing Optional Devices ......................................................................... 49
Before You Start ................................................................................ 49
Maintenance Overview............................................................................... 50
Working on Rack Mounted Servers .................................................. 51
Removing and Replacing the Server Access Cover................................... 53
Removing the Access Cover ............................................................. 53
Replacing the Access Cover ............................................................. 54
Cooling Fans .............................................................................................. 54
Removing and Replacing a System Fan ........................................... 54
Memory Modules........................................................................................ 56
Removing a Memory Module ............................................................ 60
CPU Modules ............................................................................................. 61
Installing a Second Processor........................................................... 61
Removing a Processor...................................................................... 67
Installing Hard Drives ................................................................................. 68
Internal Battery........................................................................................... 69
Replacing the Internal Battery........................................................... 71
Peripheral Devices ..................................................................................... 72
Floppy Diskette Drive (FDD) ............................................................. 72
Removing and Replacing the CD-ROM Drive ................................... 73
Internal Hard Disk Drives (HDD) ....................................................... 74
Connecting Hardware Devices
Installing Optional Devices
49
Small Computer Systems Interface (SCSI) ................................................ 74
Detecting the SCSI Device (SAF-TE) ............................................... 74
Terminating SCSI Devices ................................................................ 74
Downgraded Server Operation ......................................................... 75
RAID Failures ............................................................................................. 76
Expansion Cards ........................................................................................ 78
Restrictions on PCI Expansion Cards ............................................... 78
Installing Add-in Cards ...................................................................... 79
Installing a RAID Controller............................................................... 81
Installing a RAID Controller............................................................... 81
Installing Optional Devices
Before You Start
Before installing an optional device, read the manufacturer’s instructions and the
installation instructions in this manual. The procedures described in this chapter require
specific technical knowledge and experience. If you have not installed or removed
optional devices, or if the job seems difficult, consult an authorized Toshiba Magnia
service provider. Toshiba assumes no liability for damages if you install and/or remove
optional devices yourself.
DANGER: Some parts carry high voltages and are dangerous.To avoid electric
shock, shut down the server and disconnect the power cable before performing any
server maintenance.
Selecting a Workplace
Before performing server maintenance, select a workplace that is as free of dust as
possible, and also consider the following:
❖ The ambient temperature and relative humidity should range between 50°F to 89°F
(10°C to 32°C) and 30% to 80%. Avoid exposing the server to sharp temperature
fluctuations that could cause condensation.
❖ Never install or remove devices in a static-inducing environment (on a carpet, for
example). Electronic devices can fail if they are exposed to electrostatic discharge
(ESD).
Connecting Hardware Devices
Maintenance Overview
50
Working Safely
CAUTION: Internal server components can be seriously damaged by static
electricity. Wear a wrist or heel ground cable to discharge static electricity carried on
your body. If such equipment is not available, touch a grounded metal object to
discharge static electricity before working on sensitive electronic components.
Once you remove a device from its antistatic package, if necessary, place the
antistatic package and the device on a flat, grounded surface. Store the antistatic
package for future use.
To prevent static build-up, never drag the server when moving it.
❖ Make sure you read and understand the instructions and precautions in this guide
before performing server maintenance.
❖ Perform the steps in each procedure in the order written.
❖ Before disconnecting any cables, check their positions to make sure you reconnect
them correctly.
❖ Check cable connectors for broken or bent pins. If a cable connector has screws,
tighten the screws when securing the cable.
❖ If a failure occurs, consult your authorized Toshiba Magnia service provider.
WARNING: To avoid electric shock, never operate the server with the access cover
removed.
Maintenance Overview
WARNING: Never disassemble the server more than described in this manual.
Failure to observe this precaution could result in electric shock, cause a system
fault, or void your warranty.
When performing maintenance on the server, follow these general steps:
1
Carefully read the precautions mentioned previously in this chapter. See Installing
Optional Devices on page 49.
2
If the server is running, shut down the operating system, turn off all the peripheral
devices connected to the server, then press and hold the Power Button to turn off the
server. For more information, see Turning Off the Server on page 47.
3
Unplug the power cable from the AC outlet or UPS, then disconnect all signal cables
connected to the I/O connectors on the back of the server.
Connecting Hardware Devices
Maintenance Overview
4
Remove the server access cover. See Removing the Access Cover on page 53.
5
Perform the required maintenance.
51
CAUTION: Make sure that components handled during system maintenance are
properly installed and connections are securely seated. Also check that no tools or
hardware items are left inside the server.
6
Reinstall the server’s access cover. See Replacing the Access Cover on page 54.
7
Reconnect all signal cables.
8
Press the Power Button to turn on the server, then run any required system checks.
Some optional devices require you to reconfigure the server’s software, change jumper,
and/or DIP switch settings before the device can be used.
In addition to the instructions in this chapter, refer to the manufacturer’s user manuals for
the devices you are installing/removing.
Working on Rack Mounted Servers
Read the following warnings before performing maintenance on a rack-mounted server.
Failure to adhere to these warnings can result in serious injury and/or damage to
equipment.
❖ Never attempt to install or remove a server by yourself. At least two people are
required to install a server. Be particularly careful when installing a server near the
top of a rack or in a location that requires you to lift the server higher than chest level.
❖ Never slide the server and another unit (such as an extension disk unit) out of the
rack at the same time. Extending more than one device from the rack might cause it
to become unstable.
❖ Never place additional weight or apply a continuous excessive load to a server or
other unit that is extended from the rack. Such a load may damage the rack’s rails or
cause the rack to become unstable.
❖ Never lean objects against the rack and do not lean against it. The rack might
become unstable and cause serious injury.
❖ When working at high locations around the rack, never lean ladders directly against
the rack or against units installed in the rack. The installed units may be damaged, or
the rack might become unstable and tip over, causing injury.
Connecting Hardware Devices
Maintenance Overview
52
Sliding the Server From the Rack
CAUTION: If the rack contains additional servers that are currently in use, be
careful not to touch the hard disk drive eject lever or AC switch on those servers.
1
Make sure that the cables connected to the server are long enough to allow the
server to be extended from the rack. If the cables are too short, disconnect them to
avoid damaging the cables or the server.
2
Loosen the two thumbscrews securing the server to the rack.
3
Grasp the handles on the server’s front panel, then carefully slide the server from
the rack.
4
Continue sliding the server from the rack until the rail latches lock the server in its
fully-extended position.
Sliding the server from the rack
5
To ensure that the server is locked in position, using light pressure, try to slide the
server back into the rack.
Sliding the Server into the Rack
1
Press the rail latches inward to release the server from its locked position then slide
the server into the rack.
2
Tighten the two thumbscrews on the front panel to secure the server to the rack.
3
Reconnect any cables that were disconnected from the server.
Connecting Hardware Devices
Removing and Replacing the Server Access Cover
Removing and Replacing the Server Access Cover
This section provides instructions for removing and replacing the access cover on
Toshiba Magnia 3135R servers.
Removing the Access Cover
1
If the server is powered on, shut down the operating system.
2
Press and hold the Power button to power-down the server.
3
Disconnect the server from the AC power source.
4
Unplug the display cable, keyboard cable, and any other peripheral device cables
connected to the server.
5
Loosen the two thumbscrews securing the server to the rack.
6
Grasp the handles on both sides of the server and slowly pull the server from the
rack. Latches on both rack rails stop the server when it reaches its fully extended
position. Make sure the latches lock, preventing the server from sliding back.
7
Loosen the three thumb-screws on the rear of the system.
8
Pull the cover back and remove it from the chassis.
Removing cover thumb-screws on back of server
53
Connecting Hardware Devices
Cooling Fans
54
Replacing the Access Cover
1
Position the access cover on the server carefully so that it does not pinch any
internal cables then slide the panel toward the front of the server.
2
Tighten the three screws on the rear of the chassis.
3
Press the latches on the rails to release the server from its extended position then
slide the server into the rack.
WARNING: To avoid injury, when sliding the server into the rack, be careful not to
catch your fingers in the rails.
4
Tighten the two thumbscrews to secure the server to the rack.
5
Connect the display and keyboard cables, and any other peripheral device cables,
that you disconnected.
6
Connect the server to an AC power source.
Cooling Fans
To regulate the temperature inside the server, the Toshiba Magnia 3135R is equipped
with the following cooling fans:
❖ Two 80mm system fans mounted in the middle of the chassis
❖ Power Supply fan internal to the power supply
❖ One CPU fan mounted on each processor
Removing and Replacing a System Fan
This section provides instructions for removing and replacing a system fan in a Toshiba
Magnia 3135R server.
Removing a System Fan
1
If the server is in operation, shut it down and remove the access cover. For
instructions on all three tasks, see Removing the Access Cover in Maintenance
Overview on page 50.
DANGER: Removing a cooling fan while the server is on could result in electric
shock, and shorten the service life of the fan and the server.
Connecting Hardware Devices
Cooling Fans
55
2
Unplug the two fan cables from the server board. The cable for fan #1 goes to
connector FAN2A, and the cable for fan #2 goes to FAN3A.
3
Press the tabs on both sides of the inoperative fan and lift it out of the fan assembly.
Replacing a System Fan
1
Insert the new fan into the fan assembly, making sure that the flow and rotation
arrows on the fan point correctly.
2
Plug the fan cables back into the connectors on the server board.
3
Reinstall the access cover, reconnect all signal and power cables, then turn on the
server. For instructions, read Maintenance Overview on page 50.
Connecting Hardware Devices
Memory Modules
56
Memory Modules
The server contains four memory module slots. Memory is partitioned as four banks of
SDRAM DIMMs with each bank providing 72 bits of non-interleaved memory (64-bit main
memory plus ECC).
Memory is expandable from 128 MB to 4 GB using registered Dual In-line Memory
Modules. You can install one SDRAM DIMM with Error-Correcting Control (ECC) in each
slot. System memory is available in 128 MB, 256 MB, 512 MB, and 1 GB modules.
CAUTION: If you are unsure about removing, replacing, or expanding memory, call
your authorized Toshiba Service Representative. Using the wrong memory module,
or the wrong combination of modules could result in damage to equipment.
Memory Expansion Considerations
The server only supports Registered ECC PC/133-compliant SDRAM.
Slot 1
Slot 2
Slot 3
Slot 4
Total Capacity
1024
1024
1024
1024
4096
512
1024
1024
1024
3584
256
1024
1024
1024
3328
128
1024
1024
1024
3200
1024
1024
1024
-
3072
512
512
1024
1024
3072
512
1024
1024
-
2560
512
512
512
1024
2560
256
256
1024
1024
2560
256
1024
1024
-
2304
128
128
1024
1024
2304
128
1024
1024
-
2176
1024
1024
-
-
2048
512
512
1024
-
2048
512
512
512
512
2048
256
512
512
512
1792
256
256
256
1024
1792
128
512
512
512
1664
512
1042
-
-
1536
512
512
512
-
1536
256
256
1024
-
1536
256
256
512
512
1536
Connecting Hardware Devices
Memory Modules
Slot 1
Slot 2
Slot 3
Slot 4
Total Capacity
128
128
128
1024
1408
256
1024
-
-
1280
256
512
512
-
1280
256
256
256
512
1280
128
128
1024
-
1280
128
128
512
512
1280
128
512
512
-
1152
128
1024
-
-
1152
1024
-
-
-
1024
512
512
-
-
1024
256
256
512
-
1024
256
256
256
256
1024
128
256
256
256
896
128
128
128
512
896
128
128
256
256
768
128
128
512
-
768
256
256
256
-
768
256
512
-
-
768
128
128
128
256
640
128
256
256
-
640
128
512
-
-
640
512
-
-
-
512
256
256
-
-
512
128
128
256
-
512
128
128
128
128
512
128
128
128
-
384
128
256
-
-
384
256
-
-
-
256
128
128
-
-
256
128
-
-
-
128
57
Connecting Hardware Devices
Memory Modules
58
Installing Memory Modules
When upgrading system memory, place the first memory module in the lowest numbered
memory slot of slots 1 through 4. If the memory modules are of different capacities, place
them in order of increasing capacity, installing the memory module with the smallest
capacity in slot 1.
4
3
2
1
Memory slots
WARNING: Never perform disassembly procedures that are not described in this
manual. Never install or remove memory modules immediately after turning off the
server. To avoid burn injuries, wait for the heat around the memory modules to
dissipate.
CAUTION: Installing a memory module while the server is on could cause damage
to the server or the memory module.
Memory modules can be seriously damaged by static electricity. Wear a wrist or
heel ground cable to discharge static electricity carried on your body. If such
equipment is not available, touch a grounded metal object to discharge static
electricity before working with sensitive electronic components.
Mixing dissimilar metals may cause later memory failures resulting in data
corruption. Install DIMMs with gold-plated edge connectors in gold-plated sockets
only.
Connecting Hardware Devices
Memory Modules
59
1
If the server is in operation, shut it down and remove the access cover. For
instructions, see Removing the Access Cover on page 53.
2
Holding the DIMM by its edges only, remove it from its anti-static package.
3
Orient the DIMM so that the two notches on the bottom edge align with the keyed
socket.
Installing memory modules
4
Insert the bottom edge of the DIMM into the socket and press down firmly on the
DIMM until it seats correctly.
5
Gently push the plastic ejector levers on the socket ends to the upright position.
6
Repeat steps 2 through 5 to install each DIMM.
7
Ensure that no cables are protruding from the server chassis and then replace the
server cover.
8
Connect all external cables and the power cord to the server.
9
Turn on the monitor and then the server.
Connecting Hardware Devices
Memory Modules
60
Removing a Memory Module
1
If the server is in operation, shut it down then remove the access cover. For detailed
instructions, read the Maintenance Overview on page 50.
CAUTION: Removing a memory module while the server is on could cause damage
to the server or the memory module.
Memory modules can be seriously damaged by static electricity. Wear a wrist or
heel ground cable to discharge static electricity carried on your body. If such
equipment is not available, touch a grounded metal object to discharge static
electricity before working on sensitive electronic components.
Mixing dissimilar metals may cause memory failures resulting in data corruption.
Install DIMMs with gold-plated edge connectors in gold-plated sockets only.
2
Observe the safety and ESD precautions discussed earlier in this chapter.
3
Remove the server cover.
4
Gently push the plastic ejector lever out and down to eject a DIMM from its socket.
5
Hold the DIMM by its edges, being careful not to touch its components or gold edge
connectors. Carefully lift it away from the socket and store it in an antistatic package.
6
Repeat steps 4 and 5 to remove additional DIMMs as necessary.
7
Replace the server cover.
8
Connect all external cables and the power cord to the server.
9
Turn on the monitor and then the server.
Connecting Hardware Devices
CPU Modules
61
CPU Modules
The Toshiba Magnia 3135R server supports dual-CPU configurations allowing you to
install an additional processor to increase system performance.
The base Toshiba Magnia 3135R server is configured with a single CPU module with a
specified frequency (clock speed) and cache size. If you are upgrading your server to a
dual-CPU configuration, you must install CPU modules with the same speed, cache size,
and connector technology.
The server supports up to two Intel® Pentium III processors (with 133 MHz system bus).
If you are installing two processors, make sure they are the same speed, voltage, and
stepping.
Installing a Second Processor
WARNING: Never disassemble the server beyond what is described in this manual.
Failure to observe this precaution could result in electric shock, cause a system
fault, or void your warranty.
Never install or remove CPU modules immediately after turning off the server. To
avoid burn injuries, wait for the heat around the CPU modules to dissipate.
CAUTION: Be sure your server is compatible with a newer, faster processor. If you
are adding a second processor, be sure it is compatible with the first processor.
1
If the server is in operation, shut it down then remove the access cover. For detailed
instructions, refer to the Maintenance Overview on page 50.
CAUTION: Installing a CPU module while the server is ON could cause damage to
the server or the CPU module.
CPU modules can be seriously damaged by static electricity. Wear a wrist or heel
ground cable to discharge static electricity carried on your body. If such equipment
is not available, touch a grounded metal object to discharge static electricity before
working with sensitive electronic components.
2
Observe the safety and ESD precautions at the beginning of this chapter and the
additional cautions given here.
Connecting Hardware Devices
3
CPU Modules
Remove the new processor from its anti-static package and place it on a grounded,
static-free surface or conductive foam pad.
HINT: Servers shipped with a single CPU module have a termination module
installed in the secondary CPU slot.
4
Raise the socket locking lever.
Raise the locking lever
5
62
Remove the terminator.
Removing the terminator
Connecting Hardware Devices
6
63
Align the processor pins with the socket. Be sure to note the processor speed so you
can correctly set the jumpers.
CAUTION: Do not force the CPU into the socket or it can be damaged.
Inserting the processor
7
CPU Modules
Lower the locking lever to the locked position.
Lowering the locking lever
Connecting Hardware Devices
8
CPU Modules
64
Remove the thermal grease protection cover from the heat sink, and place the fan
heat sink on top of the processor.
Placing the heatsink
9
Attach the fan heat sink clip to the processor socket. Attach the side away from the
fan cable first, and using a screw driver, attach the remaining side.
A
B
Attaching the heatsink
Connecting Hardware Devices
CPU Modules
10 Connect the processor fan cable.
P36
P12
Connecting the processor fan
11 Configure the speed jumpers.
2
4
6
8 10 12
5E1
1
3
5
7
9
11
Processor clock speed jumpers
CPU
Speed
Pins
1-2
Pins
3-4
733
Pins
5-6
X
866
X
1000
X
X
Pins
7-8
Pins
9-10
Pins
11-12
65
Connecting Hardware Devices
CPU Modules
CAUTION: If you install only one processor in a system, it must go into the primary
connector (closest to the PCI slots). With a single-processor configuration, you
must install a termination board and termination latch assembly in the empty
secondary connector to ensure proper operation of your system. A termination
board is provided with your system.
12 If you are installing two processors, you must install a voltage regulator module
(VRM) as shown below, and secure it with the locking tabs.
Primary CPU socket
Secondary CPU socket
C
B
A
Installing a VRM
13 Reinstall the access cover, reconnect all signal and power cables.
14 Press the Power button to turn on the server.
TECHNICAL NOTE: If the server is running Windows NT, you may need to reinstall
and/or configure Windows NT to support a dual-processor configuration. For more
information, refer to your operating system documentation.
CPU modules with different cache sizes or clock speeds cannot be used together.
When you add a CPU module, make sure that it is the same speed as the existing
CPU module.
66
Connecting Hardware Devices
CPU Modules
67
Removing a Processor
1
Observe the safety and ESD precautions at the beginning of this chapter and the
additional cautions given here. If the processor has a fan heat sink, disconnect the
power wire from the connector on the server board.
2
As you work, place boards and processors on a grounded, static free surface or
conductive foam pad.
3
Unplug the heat sink fan.
4
Detach the heat sink clip and remove the heatsink from the processor.
5
Raise the socket locking lever and remove the processor.
6
Place the processor in a piece of conductive foam and store in an anti-static
package.
7
Replace the terminator.
Replacing the terminator
Connecting Hardware Devices
Installing Hard Drives
68
Installing Hard Drives
The Magnia 3135R server has four hot-swappable hard drive bays. Your server may or
may not include a hard drive depending upon your purchase options. An initial, or
additional hard drive may be added using the following steps.
1
Remove the drive carrier(s) from the drive bays by unclipping the retention lever on
the right side of the handle (Step 1 below). Pull the retention lever toward you until
the tab end (B) of the lever is free of the housing slot (A). Pull the drive carrier
forward and out of the housing.
A
B
Step 1: Removing the hard drive carrier from the chassis
2
Release the air baffle (B) by removing the four screws (A) from the drive carrier/drive
slide track.
Step 2: Removing the air baffles
3
Remove the hard drive from its protective wrapper and place it on an anti-static
surface.
Connecting Hardware Devices
Internal Battery
69
4
Set any jumpers and/or switches on the drive according to the drive manufacturer’s
instructions.
5
Align the drive holes (Step 5) to the holes in the drive carrier slide track (C), insert
the screws that you previously removed (Step 2), and attach the carrier (B) to the
drive (A). Make sure that the connector end of the drive (E) is facing the back of the
carrier and the drive top is facing upward before inserting the screws.
E
A
B
D
C
Step 5: Attaching the drive to the carrier
6
Slide the carrier/drive into the server chassis with the retention mechanism extended
in the open position, then push the arm toward the front of the chassis until the lever
tab clicks and the chassis slot indicating that it is closed.
Step 6: Inserting the carrier/drive into the drive bays
Internal Battery
The lithium battery on the server board powers the real time clock (RTC) for up to 10
years in the absence of power. When the battery starts to weaken, it loses voltage, and
Connecting Hardware Devices
Internal Battery
70
the server settings stored in CMOS RAM in the RTC (for example, the date and time)
might be wrong. Contact your customer service representative or dealer for a list of
approved devices.
WARNING: The danger of explosion exists if battery is incorrectly replaced.
Replace only with the same or equivalent type of battery recommended by the
equipment manufacturer. Discard used batteries according to the battery
manufacturer’s instructions.
Observe the following guidelines when replacing the battery:
❖ Do not charge, disassemble, or remove the battery electrode.
❖ Do not incinerate the battery or expose it to excessive heat.
❖ Store the battery in a cool dry place.
❖ When disposing of the battery, adhere to company policy and local government rules
and regulations.
❖ Fit the battery with the electrodes (+/-) correctly oriented. Otherwise you risk causing
heat, an explosion, or a fire.
❖ To ensure proper system operation, replace the battery with one of the same type.
Connecting Hardware Devices
Internal Battery
71
Replacing the Internal Battery
1
Observe the safety and ESD precautions at the beginning of this chapter, and the
additional cautions given here.
2
Remove the server access cover.
3
Insert the tip of a small flat bladed screwdriver, or equivalent, under the tab in the
plastic retainer.
4
Gently push down on the screwdriver to lift the battery.
5
Remove the battery from its socket.
6
Dispose of the battery according to local ordinance.
7
Remove the new lithium battery from its package and, being careful to observe the
correct polarity, insert it in the battery socket
.
Removing the battery
8
Reinstall the plastic retainer on the battery socket.
9
Reinstall any expansion cards you removed.
10 Reinstall the access cover, reconnect all signal and power cables, then turn on the
server. For instructions, read the Maintenance Overview on page 50.
Connecting Hardware Devices
Peripheral Devices
72
Peripheral Devices
The Toshiba Magnia 3135R server is delivered with a Floppy Diskette Drive and a CDROM Drive installed in the front section of the server.
Floppy Diskette Drive (FDD)
Removing the Diskette Drive
1
Observe the safety and ESD precautions at the beginning of this chapter.
2
Disconnect the power and signal cables from the diskette drive. The connectors are
keyed for ease in reconnecting them to the drive.
3
Remove and save the screws that secure the diskette drive carrier to the front of the
chassis.
4
Slide the drive carrier out the front of the chassis.
5
Remove and save the screws from the sides of the drive carrier.
6
Pull the drive out of the carrier and place the drive in an anti-static protective
wrapper if you are not reinstalling it.
Reinstalling the Diskette Drive
1
Remove the new 3.5-inch diskette drive from its protective wrapper and place it
component-side up on an anti-static surface.
2
Install the drive into the drive carrier and secure it with the screws that you removed.
3
Slide the drive carrier through the front of the chassis.
4
Secure the drive carrier to the front of the chassis with the screws you removed
earlier.
5
Connect the signal and power cables to the drive according to the manufacturer’s
specifications.
Connecting Hardware Devices
Peripheral Devices
73
Removing and Replacing the CD-ROM Drive
Removing a CD-ROM Drive
1
Remove the diskette drive housing as outlined in “Removing the Diskette Drive."
2
Remove the three screws holding the drive to the chassis.
3
Disconnect the power and data cables from the drive.
4
Slide the drive tray out of the front of the chassis.
5
Remove the CD-ROM from the CD-ROM tray.
6
If you are not re-installing the same drive, place the drive in an anti-static protective
wrapper.
7
Re-install the diskette drive housing as outlined in "Installing the Diskette Drive."
Replacing a CD-ROM Drive
1
Remove the new CD-ROM drive from its protective wrapper and place it on an antistatic surface.
2
Set any jumpers and/or switches on the drive according to the drive manufacturer’s
instructions.
3
Attach the CD-ROM drive to the CD-ROM tray using the mounting screws supplied
with the system.
4
Slide the slim-line CD-ROM tray into the CD-ROM bay.
5
Connect the CD-ROM IDE cable and power cables to the connector at the back of
the CD tray.
6
Reinstall the diskette drive as outlined in the section “Re-Installing the Diskette
Drive.”
7
Insert the recessed retention screws through the access holes in the top of the drive
bay housing.
8
Insert the retention screw on the front of the chassis.
Connecting Hardware Devices
Small Computer Systems Interface (SCSI)
74
Small Computer Systems Interface (SCSI)
Internal Hard Disk Drives (HDD)
The Toshiba Magnia 3135R has four SCSI HDD bays.
Each internal bay is assigned a unique SCSI address starting with Bay 1 (SCSI ID=0) for
the top bay in the drive cage.
For example:
0
1
2
3
❖ Bay 1 = SCSI ID 0
❖ Bay 3 = SCSI ID 2
❖ Bay 2 = SCSI ID 1
❖ Bay 4 = SCSI ID 3
When adding a hard disk drive to the server, always position the drive(s) sequentially,
beginning with the first vacant drive bay with the lowest available SCSI ID.
Detecting the SCSI Device (SAF-TE)
SAF-TE communicates its status to a software agent resident in the server through a
SCSI bus, and then sends out an appropriate notification. This notification includes:
❖ Presence of a device
❖ Status of a device bay slot
DEFINITION: SAF-TE (SCSI Accessed Fault Tolerant Enclosure) is a standardized
alert detection and status reporting system using SCSI as the underlying transport
mechanism.
Terminating SCSI Devices
The SCSI bus is terminated on the server board with active terminators that cannot be
disabled. The onboard device must always be at one end of the bus.
TECHNICAL NOTE: Make sure to route the SCSI cable so that it does not come in
contact with the fan assembly.
Connecting Hardware Devices
Small Computer Systems Interface (SCSI)
75
The device at the end of the cable must be terminated. LVDS devices generally do not
have termination capabilities. Non-LVDS devices generally are terminated through a
jumper or resistor pack. If your device does not have a termination jumper or resistor
pack, you must add a terminator to the end of the cable.
The hot-swap backplane in the Magnia 3135R system provides termination for the LVD
SCSI bus.
Downgraded Server Operation
If your server is equipped with a RAID controller for data redundancy and one of the hard
disk drives in the array fails, the system will go into a "downgraded operational state" and
continue to run. If, in addition, the server has a specified spare hard disk drive (hot spare)
in reserve, the server can run in a "downgraded operational state" with up to two failed
hard disk drives.
The MegaRAID® controller installed in Toshiba Magnia 3135R servers supports the
following standard RAID levels:
❖ RAID 0 (Striping)
❖ RAID 1 (Disk Mirroring)
❖ RAID 5 (Disk Striping with Distributed Parity)
❖ RAID 10 (Mirroring and Disk Striping)
RAID 0 - Disk Striping
Striping, also referred to as a Stripe set, chains multiple drives into a single logical
storage unit. Striping partitions each drive’s storage space into stripes, or data chunks,
may be as small as one sector (512 bytes) or as large as several megabytes. The stripes
are interleaved so that the combined storage space of the array comprises alternate
stripes from each hard disk drive. The end result is an even distribution of storage space
across the entire set of drives in the array.
The type of operating system installed on the server determines whether large or small
stripes are used in the array. Although disk striping fully utilizes I/O system capability and
improves overall disk performance, it does not provide for data redundancy.
RAID 1 - Disk Mirroring
Data written to one hard disk drive is simultaneously written to another hard disk drive. If
one disk fails, the other disk can be used to run the system and reconstruct the failed
disk. Since the disk is mirrored, it does not matter if one on them fails because both disks
contain the same data at all times. Either disk can act as the operational disk. This level
provides 100% redundancy because each drive in the system is duplicated. This type of
array is used for read-intensive, fault tolerant required configurations. Two or more disks
are required to configure this type of RAID level.
Connecting Hardware Devices
Small Computer Systems Interface (SCSI)
76
RAID 5 - Disk Striping With Distributed Parity
Uses parity to generate redundancy data from two or more parent data sets. Parity
storage is rotated or distributed through the stripe of the disk array. Parity storage
provides an advantage for applications that require high read-request rates with low
write-request rates such as transaction processing, office automation, and online
customer service because parity generation can slow down write operations
considerably. Three or more disks are required to configure this type of RAID level.
To enable automatic recovery of a faulty disk array, you must specify the spare device in
the RAID configuration. If a drive fails, the RAID controller will automatically initiate a
recovery sequence, bringing the spare device into service. For more information, refer to
the user’s guide that came with your RAID controller.
RAID 10 - Disk Striping and Disk Mirroring
RAID 10 is a combination of RAID 0 and RAID 1. RAID 10 has mirrored drives. RAID 10
breaks up data into smaller blocks, and then stripes the blocks of data to each RAID 1
raid set. Each RAID 1 raid set duplicates its data to its other drive. The size of each block
is determined by the stripe size parameter, which is set during the creation of the RAID
set. RAID 10 can sustain one to four drive failures while maintaining data integrity, if each
failed disk is in a different RAID 1 array.
RAID 10 works best for data storage that must have 100% redundancy of mirrored
arrays, and that also needs the enhanced I/O performance of RAID 0 (striped arrays).
RAID 10 works well for medium-sized databases or any environment that requires a
higher degree of fault tolerance and moderate-to-medium capacity. RAID 10 provides
both high data transfer rates and complex data redundancy. RAID 10 requires twice as
many drives as all other RAID levels except RAID 1(Minimum number of drives is 4: 2
Disk Striping and Mirroring).
RAID Failures
This section describes how the RAID configuration responds when a component failure
occurs.
The number of hard disk drives that can fail without affecting system operation depends
on the RAID configuration of your server. If a hard disk drive fails, replace it as quickly as
possible and rebuild the disk array.
Striping Configuration Failure (RAID 0)
A striping hard disk drive fault represents a critical RAID failure. To recover from a
striping failure, replace the failed drive, then completely rebuild the RAID array, and
restore the data from backup.
Connecting Hardware Devices
Small Computer Systems Interface (SCSI)
77
Mirrored Drive RAID Configuration Failure (RAID 1)
When a hard disk drive fails in a mirrored array, the system takes the sub-mirror the drive
is a part of, off-line. The system routes all data access to the remaining sub-mirror until
the failed drive is either hot-swapped or repaired. The performance of a degraded
mirrored RAID 1 is equal to the performance rendered by the remaining hard disk drive.
Parity RAID Configuration Failure (RAID 5)
The data in a RAID 5 array is kept in an encoded format and distributed across the
number of independent drives in the array. Consequently, write operations on a parity
RAID array are slightly slower. This is true even if the parity RAID is functioning normally.
When a hard disk drive in a parity RAID fails, every other hard disk drive in the array is
needed to recover the failed hard disk drives data and to complete the repair operation.
TECHNICAL NOTE: If your server is equipped with a RAID controller, but Power
Console (Windows NT) and MegaRAID Manager (NetWare) are not installed, you
can replace a faulty hard disk drive while the server is running, but you won’t be
able to recover (rebuild) the disk array.
If the Server Does Not Have a RAID Controller
If the server is not configured with a RAID controller, the status indicator of each hard
disk drive will not be able to display which drive is faulty.
The server’s four hard disk drive bays are hot-swappable, allowing you to remove any
drive while the server is running. However, removing a critical system drive or a data
drive that is routinely accessed by system applications and/or users may cause a severe
system failure if the drive is removed while the server is running.
CAUTION: Use extreme caution when removing a hard disk drive. To avoid a severe
system failure, while the server is running never attempt to replace a critical system
drive (i.e., the drive with on which the Windows NT Partition is stored) or data drive
that is routinely accessed by system applications and/or users.
Connecting Hardware Devices
Expansion Cards
78
Expansion Cards
You can only add two PCI cards to the Magnia 3135R, which are located on a riser card
installed in slots 5 and 6 of the main board. Do not use any expansion slots on the
server board.
32-bit PCI slot
64-bit PCI slot
Riser card with 2 expansion slots
Restrictions on PCI Expansion Cards
In some cases, a memory module cannot be replaced due to interference with an
optional card installed in a PCI slot. When this happens, remove the optional card, then
replace the memory module.
Connecting Hardware Devices
Expansion Cards
79
Installing Add-in Cards
1
Remove the expansion slot cover for the slot you wish to use by removing the
thumbscrew (B) holding the cover retention bracket (A) to the chassis.
2
Remove the bracket from the chassis.
B
A
C
Step 1: Removing the expansion slot cover
3
Remove the expansion slot cover (C in Step 1) for the slot you wish to use.
4
Remove the add-in board from its protective wrapper. Set jumpers or switches
according to the manufacturer’s instructions.
5
Hold the board by its top edge or upper corners. Firmly press it into an open
expansion slot on the riser board. The tapered foot of the board-retaining bracket
must fit into the mating slot in the expansion slot frame. Install the board component
side DOWN.
Connecting Hardware Devices
6
B
80
Align the rounded notch in the retaining bracket (B in Step 5) with the threaded hole
in the frame. The bracket fits the space that was occupied by the slot cover.
A
Step 5: Installing the add-in card
7
Expansion Cards
Install the cover retention bracket and thumbscrew.
Connecting Hardware Devices
Expansion Cards
81
Installing a RAID Controller
1
If the server is in operation, shut it down then remove the access cover. For detailed
instructions, read the Maintenance Overview on page 50.
CAUTION: Installing the RAID controller while the power is on may damage the
server and the RAID controller.
2
Disconnect the SCSI cable from the motherboard.
CAUTION: To avoid damaging the SCSI cable, grasp the cable connector when
disconnecting the cable.
3
Lift the card support on the bottom PCI slot and remove the expansion slot cover.
4
Connect the SCSI cable to the SCSI connector on the RAID controller and connect
the SCSI cable to channel 1 when installing a RAID card that has two internal hard
disk drive connectors. For more information, refer to the user’s guide that came with
the RAID controller.
5
Reinstall the access cover, reconnect all signal and power cables, then turn on the
server. For instructions, read the Maintenance Overview on page 50.
6
Install the configuration software for the RAID card, then set up the disk array
(RAID). For instructions, refer to the user’s guide that came with the RAID controller.
82
Chapter 3
System Configuration
Setup
This chapter describes the Power-On Self Test (POST) and server configuration utilities.
The table below describes each of the utilities.
Utility
Description and brief procedure
Page
BIOS Setup
If the system does not have a diskette drive, or if the
drive is disabled or misconfigured, use Setup to enable
it. Or, you can move the CMOS jumper on the server
board from the default setting (protect CMOS memory)
to the Clear setting; this will allow most server
configurations to boot.
84
BIOS Update Utility
Use to update the BIOS or recover from a corrupted
BIOS update.
93
Using the Adaptec
SCSI Utility
Use to configure or view the settings of the SCSI host
adapters and onboard SCSI devices in the server.
94
Hot Keys
To do this
Press these keys
Clear memory and reload the operating
systemthis is a system reset
<Ctrl+Alt+Del>
Secure the system immediately
<Ctrl+Alt>+hot key (Set the hot-key combination
with the BIOS System Setup Utility.)
System Configuration Setup
Power-On Self Test (POST)
83
Power-On Self Test (POST)
Each time you turn on the system, POST starts running. POST checks the server board,
processor, memory, keyboard, and most installed peripheral devices. During the memory
test, POST displays the amount of memory that it is able to access and test. The length
of time needed to test memory depends on the amount of memory installed. POST is
stored in flash memory.
1
Turn on the video monitor and server. After a few seconds, POST begins to run.
2
After the memory test, the following screen prompts and messages appear until
POST has completed running or until you press <F2>:
Press <F2> key if you want to run SETUP
NOTE: "Press <F12> to Network" refers to machines that need to boot from a
network source. If you are unsure, contact your system administrator.
3
During peripheral device detection, the following message appears:
Press <Ctrl><A> to enter SCSI Utility
4
Press <Ctrl+A> if there are SCSI devices installed. When the utility starts, follow the
instructions displayed to configure the onboard SCSI host adapter settings and to
run the SCSI utilities. Also, see Using the Adaptec SCSI Utility on page 94. If you do
not enter the SCSI utility, the boot process continues.
5
Press <Esc> during POST to display a boot menu when POST finishes. From this
menu you can choose the boot device or enter BIOS Setup.
If you have a RAID card, the BIOS and drivers are initiated at this point in the
process. If you want to configure the card, press <Ctrl>+<M>.
After POST is finished, the system beeps once.
System Configuration Setup
BIOS Setup Utility
84
What appears on the screen after this depends on whether you have an operating
system (OS) loaded and, if so, which one. If the system halts before POST has
completed running, the system beeps indicating a fatal system error that requires
immediate attention.
If POST can display a message on the screen, the system beeps twice as the
message appears.
BIOS Setup Utility
The BIOS Setup Utility is a menu-driven utility program that allows you to view and
change basic motherboard settings.
Starting the BIOS Setup Utility
The BIOS screen appears when you start the server.
Phoenix BIOS 4.0 Release 6.0
Copyright 1985-2000 Phoenix Technologies
Ltd., All Rights Reserved
STL20+0.86B.XXXX.XXX.XXXXXXXXXX
STL2+ Production Release XX.X
Intel(R) Pentium (R) III Processor XXX MHz
XXXXXXXX Extended Memory ECC Initialized
XXXXXXXX Extended Memory Passed
0256K Cache SRAM Passed
System BIOS Shadowed
Video BIOS Shadowed
UMB upper limit segment address : XXXX
Keyboard Detected
Mouse initialized
Press <F2> to enter SETUP
To start the BIOS Setup Utility, press the F2 key immediately after the BIOS screen
appears. The message “Entering Setup...” appears on the screen. After the system
completes the Power-On-Self-Test (POST), the BIOS Setup Utility is loaded.
If F2 is not pressed, the operating system is loaded after the Power-On-Self-Test (POST)
sequence is completed.
System Configuration Setup
BIOS Setup Utility
85
BIOS Setup Utility Menu Options
The BIOS Setup Utility includes the following six menu options:
Main
Sets the system date and time, floppy disk drive parameters, and other data
Advanced
Sets details of hardware data such as serial port/parallel port parameters
Security
Registers, changes, and deletes passwords, and sets security mode
Server
Sets data on system management
Boot
Sets the boot sequence for the devices that can be booted
Exit
Exits the BIOS Setup Utility
BIOS Setup Utility Keyboard Commands
<F1>
Displays Help
<Esc>
Returns control to the previous screen mode
<Enter>
Specifies a menu or data item
¦
Returns control to the previous data item
Ø
Advances control to the next data item
←
→
Specifies a menu
F9
Resets all data settings to default values (except for the
passwords)
F10
Saves data settings and exits the BIOS Setup Utility
Changing BIOS Settings
To change BIOS settings, follow these steps:
1
Move the black bar to the desired item using the arrow keys <↑> <↓>.
2
Press the <Enter> key.
The submenu corresponding to the selected item appears.
3
Set the value for the selected item.
4
Press the <Esc> key to exit the submenu.
5
After modifying all necessary data, save the modifications by pressing F10 and then
pressing the <Enter> key.
System Configuration Setup
BIOS Setup Utility
86
BIOS Settings
This section describes the settings available in the various BIOS Setup Utility menus.
Main Menu
System Time:
System Date:
[XX:XX:XX]
[XX/XX/XXXX]
Diskette A:
Diskette B:
[1.44/1.25MB 3 1/2"]
[Disable]
Hard Disk Pre-Delay:
>Primary IDE Master
>Primary IDE Slave
[Disable]
[CD-ROM]
[None]
>Processor
Language:
[English(US)]
System Time/System Date
Enter the system date and time.
Diskette A/Diskette B
Displays the type of connected floppy disk drive. Do not change this setting.
Hard Disk Pre-Delay
Sets a hard disk pre-delay.
Primary IDE Master/Primary IDE Slave
Displays the type of connected CD-ROM drive. Do not change this setting.
Processor Settings
Displays information about the system processor(s).
Processor Speed Setting
Displays the operating frequency of the CPU. You cannot set the CPU speed with
this utility.
Processor 1 Type:
Displays the primary processor type.
Cache RAM
Displays the ID and cache size of the primary mounted CPU.
System Configuration Setup
BIOS Setup Utility
87
Processor 2 Type:
Displays the secondary processor type.
Cache RAM
Displays the ID and cache size of the secondary mounted CPU.
Processor #1 Status: Normal
Displays the status of the primary processor.
Processor #2 Status: None
Displays the status of the secondary processor.
Clear Processor Errors: Enter
Allows you to clear processor errors.
Processor Error Pause: Enabled
Specifies whether to enable or disable a processor pause when an error occurs.
Processor Serial Number: Disabled
Specifies whether the function corresponding to the serial number of the processor
is enabled or disabled. To change the setting from “Disabled” to “Enabled,” you must
clear the setting using the hardware setup switch. For more information, refer to
Appendix C: Jumper Settings on page 173.
Language
Specifies the language to be used for the system BIOS. Do not change this setting.
Advanced Menu
This section describes the advanced settings available in the various BIOS Setup Utility
menus.
Memory Reconfiguration
>Peripheral Configuration
>PCI Device
>Option ROM
>Numlock
Reset Configuration Data:
Installed O/S:
[No]
[Other]
System Configuration Setup
BIOS Setup Utility
Memory Configuration
The following submenu appears:
System Memory
Displays available system memory.
Extended Memory
Displays system extended memory.
DIMM Group #1 Status: Normal
Displays the status of DIMM group #1.
DIMM Group #2 - #4 Status: None
Displays the status of DIMM groups #2 - #4.
Clears DIMM Errors
Sets the clear DIMM errors feature.
DIMM Error Pause: Enabled
Specifies whether to enable or disable the DIMM error pause feature.
Peripheral Configuration
The following submenu appears:
Serial Port 1: 3F8, IRQ4
Sets the I/O port address and interrupt level for Serial Port 1.
Serial Port 2: 2F8, IRQ3
Sets the I/O port address and interrupt level for Serial Port 2.
Parallel port:378, IRQ7
Sets the I/O port address and interrupt level for the parallel port.
Parallel Mode: Output Only
Sets the operation mode for the serial port; select “Output Only.”
Diskette Controller: Enabled
Sets whether the built-in floppy disk controller is to be enabled or disabled.
88
System Configuration Setup
Mouse: Auto Detect
Do not change this setting.
SCSI Controller: Enabled
Do not change this setting.
LAN Controller: Enabled
Do not change this setting.
VGA Controller: Enabled
Do not change this setting.
USB Controller: Disabled
Sets the USB controller.
PCI Device
Sets up PCI devices. Do not change these settings.
Option ROM
Sets ROM for onboard SCSI, LAN and PCI slots 1-6.
Numlock
Sets keyboard click and repeat rates.
Reset Configuration Data
Do not change this setting.
Installed O/S
Do not change this setting.
BIOS Setup Utility
89
System Configuration Setup
BIOS Setup Utility
90
Security Menu
This section describes the security settings available in the BIOS Setup Utility.
Supervisor Password is:
User Password is:
Set Supervisor Password
Set User Password
Password on Boot:
Fixed Disk Boot Sector:
Diskette Access:
Secure Mode
Clear
Clear
[Enter]
[Enter]
[Disabled]
[Normal]
[User]
Power Switch Mask:
Option Rom Menu Mask:
[Unmasked]
[Unmasked]
Set Supervisor Password
Allows Supervisor Password to be registered, changed, and/or deleted.
Set User Password
Allows User Password to be registered, changed, and/or deleted.
HINT: For security reasons, the passwords do not appear on the screen. If you
forget the passwords, shut down the server and clear the passwords. For more
information, refer to Appendix C.
Password on Boot: Disabled
Specifies whether or not a password input request message is to be displayed when
starting the operating system.
Fixed Disk Boot Sector: Normal
Do not change this setting.
Diskette Access: User
Do not change this setting.
Secure Mode
Sets the key for placing the system in Secure mode. To activate "Secure Mode" and
its sub-menu, you must set both the Supervisor and User passwords. Once in
Secure mode, the system ignores keyboard and mouse operations until you enter
the User Password from the keyboard.
System Configuration Setup
BIOS Setup Utility
Power Switch Mask
Do not change this setting.
Option ROM Menu Mask
Do not change this setting.
System Menu
This section describes the server settings available in the BIOS Setup Utility.
>Wake on Events
AC-LINK:
Error Log Initialization:
>Console Redirection
[Last State]
[Enter]
Assert NMI on PERR
[Enabled]
Wake on Events
Select this option to display a submenu allowing you to set the following options:
Wake on LAN
Specifices whether the Wake on LAN option is enabled or disabled.
Wake on Ring
Specifies whether the Wake on Ring option is enabled or disabled.
AC-LINK: Last State
Set the procedure and the system will follow if the AC power is interrupted.
Error Log Initialization
Initializes the Error Log when you press enter.
Console Redirection
Sets console redirection data. Select this option to display the submenu shown
below. Do not change the settings.
Serial Port Address: Disabled
Baud Rate: 19.2K
Flow Control:XON/XOFF
Console Connection: Direct
91
System Configuration Setup
BIOS Setup Utility
92
Assert NMI on PERR: Enabled
Enables or disables the detection of PCI bus system errors (PERR signal: PERR).
Boot Menu
This section describes the Boot options available in the BIOS Setup Utility. This menu
allows you to set the sequence in which the operating system searches devices for the
boot files. Do not change these settings.
Boot-time Diagnostic Screen
[Enabled]
>Boot Device Priority
>Hard Drive
>Removable Devices
Boot-time Diagnostic Screen: Enabled
Specifies whether the POST screen mode is enabled or disabled during the system
boot. Do not change this setting.
Boot Device Priority
Specifies the device from which the operating system is to be booted.
Hard Drive
Specifies the hard disk drive from which the operating system is to be booted per
BBS.
Removable Devices
Specifies the boot sequence for the floppy disk drive and other removable storage
devices.
System Configuration Setup
BIOS Setup Utility
93
Exit Menu
Save Change & Exit
Exit Without Saving Changes
Get Default Value
Load Previous Value
Save Changes
Save Change & Exit
Saves changes and restarts the system. Performs the same function as pressing
the F10 key.
Exit Without Saving Changes
Discards all recent configuration changes, then restarts the server. When you select
this item, the system displays the confirmation request message "Configuration has
not been saved! Save before exiting?" Select No.
Get Default Value
Resets all setup options to their default values, except for passwords. Performs the
same function as pressing the F9 key.
Load Previous Value
Resets all setup options to the previous saved values.
Save Changes
Saves changes.
Upgrading the BIOS
For information and procedures on upgrading the BIOS, please refer to the Toshiba web
site at www.support.toshiba.com.
System Configuration Setup
Using the Adaptec SCSI Utility
94
Using the Adaptec SCSI Utility
The onboard SCSI controller and any preinstalled SCSI devices are set up prior to
shipping. Use the Onboard SCSI Utility when you add or replace a SCSI device in the
device bay or need to confirm its configuration settings.
Starting the SCSI Utility
When the server is turned on or restarted, the monitor displays the onboard SCSI BIOS
initialize message shown below. The display differs based on the type of SCSI device
installed in the server.
Adaptec AIC-7899 SCSI BIOS vX.XX
(C)1998 Adaptec, Inc. All Rights Reserved.
<<Press <Ctrl> <A> for SCSISelect(TM)
Utility!>>>
Ch A,
IBM DDYS-T36950M
TOSHIBA SMC3.0
SCSI ID : 0
ULTRA2-LVD
SCSI ID : 6
ULTRA2-LVD
Ch B, SCSI ID : X XXXXXXX
When the settings are correct, the SCSI ID and device name of the SCSI device
connected to the onboard SCSI controller appear on the screen. To start the SCSI Utility,
after the message “Press <Ctrl>+<A> for SCSI Select (TM) Utility!” appears on the
screen, press the <Ctrl>+<A> keys.
Menu Configuration
When the SCSI Utility starts, the monitor enters the following main menu display mode:
Adaptec AIC-7896 < SCSISelect (TM) > Utility vX.XX
You have an AIC-7899
SCSI host adapter in your system. Move
the cursor to the bus : device: channel of
the one to be configured and
press <Enter>.
<F5>-Toggle color/monochrome
00:04:A
00:04:B
Arrow keys to move cursor, <Enter> to select option,
<Esc> to exit (*=default)
System Configuration Setup
Using the Adaptec SCSI Utility
95
Selecting 00:04:A or 00:04:B in this mode changes the display to the device setting
screen mode. The server has two on-board SCSI controllers and under its standard
configuration (without an added RAID controller), the internal hard disk drive and the
SCA Hot Swap Back Plane are connected to the controllers. Only use the “Configure/
View Host Adapter Setting” when the server is in the device setting screen mode. Do not
modify the “SCSI Disk Utilities” setting.
SCSI Utility Keyboard Commands
<Esc>
Returns control to the previous screen mode
<Enter>
Specifies a data item
<↑>
Returns control to the previous data item
<↓>
Advances control to the next data item
Changing SCSI Device Settings
1
Using the arrow keys (↑ ↓), select the desired item then press the <Enter> key.
The submenu or selection menu corresponding to the selected item appears.
2
Make any necessary changes then save the changes.
3
Select Exit this Menu to exit the submenu.
Setting Devices
Place the system in device setting screen mode then select Configure/View Host
Adapter Setting to display the Adaptec Utility screen.
❖ Host Adapter SCSI ID: 7
Specifies the SCSI ID of the SCSI host adapter. Do not change this setting.
❖ SCSI Parity Checking: Enabled
Controls whether the host adapter performs parity checks and scans for normal data
transfer through the SCSI bus.
❖ Host Adapter SCSI Termination: Enabled
Specifies whether the SCSI bus is to be terminated using the SCSI host adapter. Do
not change this setting.
❖ Boot Device Options
Specifies the SCSI device from which the system is to be booted.
System Configuration Setup
Using the Adaptec SCSI Utility
96
Boot Channel: A First
Selects the SCSI controller which boots the system. Do not change this setting.
Boot SCSI ID: 0
Selects the SCSI ID of the device which boots the system. Do not change this
setting.
Boot LUN Number: 0
Selects the LUN of the device which boots the system. Do not change this setting.
SCSI Device Configuration
Specifies detailed configuration information for each SCSI device (SCSI ID).
Sync Transfer Rate (MB/Sec): 160
Specifies the maximum synchronous transfer rate of the onboard SCSI controller.
Initiate Wide Negotiation: Yes
Set this item to Yes to specify Wide SCSI (16 bit data width).
Enable Disconnection: Yes
Set this item to Yes to make the adapter activate the disconnect/reconnect
function and permit multiple-command processing.
Send Start Unit Command: Yes
Specifies whether a start unit command is to be sent from the adapter to start the
SCSI device.
Enable Write-Back Cache: N/C
Specifies whether to use the write-back cache.
BIOS Multiple LUN Support: No
Specifies whether logical unit numbers are supported.
Include in BIOS Scan: Yes
Specifies whether the device is to be scanned when SCSI BIOS starts.
Advanced Configuration Options
Sets up detailed data on the SCSI controller.
System Configuration Setup
Using the Adaptec SCSI Utility
97
Reset SCSI Bus at IC Initialization: Enabled
Specifies whether or not to reset the SCSI bus during the SCSI controller resetting
process.
Display <Ctrl><A> Message During BIOS Initialization: Enabled
Sets data to be displayed in the SCSI Utility startup message.
Extended BIOS Translation for DOS Drive > 1Gbyte: Enabled
Specifies whether extended BIOS is to be enabled or disabled for a DOS drive
with a disk capacity exceeding 1 GB.
Verbose/Silent Mode: Verbose
Controls the data displayed during startup.
Host Adapter BIOS: Enabled
Enables or disables the Host SCSI Adapter BIOS.
Support Removable Disks Under BIOS as Fixed Disks: Boot Only
Specifies whether removable disks are to be supported under SCSI BIOS.
BIOS Support for Bootable CD-ROM: Enabled
Enables or disables startup from the CD-ROM drive.
BIOS Support for Int13 Extensions: Enabled
Enables or disables Int13 Extension.
Hardware Diagnostics
About the Diagnostics Utility
98
Chapter 4
Hardware Diagnostics
About the Diagnostics Utility
Hardware (HW) Diagnostics starts a diagnostics test of the server hardware devices. You
can select a single device or a combination of devices to test.
Use the HW Diagnostics Program to:
❖ Check for normal server operation
❖ Check for normal operation of optional devices
❖ Diagnose failures
Not all failures can be detected by the HW Diagnostics Program. You can also use the
System Setup Utilities and check the error log for problems detected by the system
board.
Starting Hardware Diagnostics
There are two ways to start the Hardware Diagnostic Program:
❖ From a diskette you first create using Create Floppy Disks in the Utilities menu
❖ From the Software Hardware Diagnostics Program stored in the Utility Partition (if you
set up the Utility Partition at installation)
Starting up Using the Diskette
If the server is running, shut it down and turn it off.
1
Insert the HW Diagnostics diskette (you first create the diskette using Create
Floppy Disks in the Utilities menu).
2
Turn on the server.
3
Select number 2, HW Diagnostics from the boot menu.
HW Diagnostics starts.
Hardware Diagnostics
Diagnostic Options
99
NOTE: To exit the HW Diagnostics program while in the Utility Partition, select Main
Menu – Exit, then turn off the server.
Diagnostic Options
Press any key on the initial screen of the Toshiba HW Diagnostics Program and the main
HW Diagnostics menu appears. Use the arrow buttons to select an item, then press
Enter.
01. Diagnostic Test
Tests hardware.
02. Running Test
Automatically executes the diagnostics tests in a user-defined sequence.
03. Log Utilities
Displays error information.
04. System Configuration
Displays the system configuration.
99. Exit
Terminates the HW Diagnostics Program, then the server reboots and the Software
Menu appears.
Hardware Diagnostics
01. Diagnostic Test
100
01. Diagnostic Test
1
From the Diagnostic menu screen, select 01. DIAGNOSTIC TEST.
To return to the Main menu, select 99 or pres the Esc key.
The Diagnostic Test menu contains all of the hardware tests for the Magnia 3135R. To
select a test, use the arrow keys to highlight the test then press Enter. Press Esc to
return to the previous menu or 99 to return to the Diagnostics menu.
01. Diagnostic Test Menu Test Items
The 01. Diagnostic Test menu consists of 12 tests.
01. Memory Test
Tests the memory found in the 3135R.
1
Use the arrow keys to highlight 01. Memory Test on the Diagnostic Test menu.
2
Press Enter.
The following screen displays:
3
Using the arrow keys, select one of the following Memory tests.
Hardware Diagnostics
01. Diagnostic Test
101
❖ 01. Conventional memory
Writes data to conventional memory (0 to 640 KB), then reads the new data and
compares the result with the test data.
When this Memory test is selected, the following screen displays:
Use the arrow keys to select the following:
- 01. Go to Test
Starts the test. To stop, press Ctrl + Break.
- 02. Test Loop
Press Enter to toggle between YES and NO.
YES increments the pass counter each time the test cycle ends and restarts the test
cycle.
NO returns the subtest menu to the Main menu after the test is completed.
- 03. Error Stop
Press Enter to toggle between YES and NO.
YES increments the pass counter each time the test cycle ends and restarts the test
cycle.
NO returns the subtest menu to the Main menu after the test is completed.
Hardware Diagnostics
01. Diagnostic Test
102
❖ 02. Expansion memory
Writes constant data to the expansion memory (1024 KB and greater) then reads
the data and compares it to the test data.
When this Memory test is selected, the following screen displays:
Use the arrow keys to select the following:
- 01. Go to Test
Starts the test. To stop, press Ctrl + Break.
- 02. Test Loop
Press Enter to toggle between YES and NO.
YES increments the pass counter each time the test cycle ends and restarts the test
cycle.
NO returns the subtest menu to the Main menu after the test is completed.
- 03. Error Stop
Press Enter to toggle between YES and NO.
YES increments the pass counter each time the test cycle ends and restarts the test
cycle.
NO returns the subtest menu to the Main menu after the test is completed.
Hardware Diagnostics
01. Diagnostic Test
103
❖ 03. RAM Refresh
Writes test data to the memory, then reads the data after one refresh cycle,
comparing the data with the test data.
When this memory test is selected, the following screen displays:
Use the arrow keys to select the following:
- 01. Go to Test
Starts the test. To stop, press Ctrl + Break.
- 02. Test Loop
Press Enter to toggle between YES and NO.
YES increments the pass counter each time the test cycle ends and restarts the test
cycle.
NO returns the subtest menu to the Main menu after the test is completed.
- 03. Error Stop
Press Enter to toggle between YES and NO.
YES increments the pass counter each time the test cycle ends and restarts the test
cycle.
NO returns the subtest menu to the Main menu after the test is completed.
Hardware Diagnostics
01. Diagnostic Test
104
❖ 04. Stress test
Writes data to the protected mode memory (from 1 MB to maximum), then reads the
data and compress it with the write data.
When this Memory test is selected, the following screen displays:
Use the arrow keys to select the following:
- 01. Go to Test
Starts the test. To stop, press Ctrl + Break.
- 02. Test Loop
Press Enter to toggle between YES and NO.
YES increments the pass counter each time the test cycle ends and restarts the test
cycle.
NO returns the subtest menu to the Main menu after the test is completed.
- 03. Error Stop
Press Enter to toggle between YES and NO.
YES increments the pass counter each time the test cycle ends and restarts the test
cycle.
NO returns the subtest menu to the Main menu after the test is completed.
NOTE: 02. EXPANSION MEMORY, 03. RAM REFRESH and 04. STRESS TEST
may take several hours to complete, depending on the amount of memory to test.
Hardware Diagnostics
01. Diagnostic Test
105
02. Keyboard Test
Tests the computer keyboard and mouse.
1
Use the arrow keys to highlight 02. Keyboard Test on the Diagnostic Test menu.
2
Press Enter.
The following screen displays:
3
Using the arrow keys, select one of the following Keyboard tests.
❖ 01. Pressed key display
This test checks the function of the keyboard. The keyboard layout is drawn on the
display. When any key is pressed, the corresponding key appears on the display.
Pressing and holding a key enables the auto-repeat function causing the key’s
displayed character to blink.
When this Keyboard test is selected, the following screen displays:
Use the arrow keys to select the following:
- 01. Go to Test
Starts the test. To stop, press Ctrl + Break.
Hardware Diagnostics
01. Diagnostic Test
106
- 02. Test Loop
Press Enter to toggle between YES and NO.
YES increments the pass counter each time the test cycle ends and restarts the test
cycle.
NO returns the subtest menu to the Main menu after the test is completed.
- 03. Error Stop
Press Enter to toggle between YES and NO.
YES increments the pass counter each time the test cycle ends and restarts the test
cycle.
NO returns the subtest menu to the Main menu after the test is completed.
- 04. Keyboard Type
Press Enter to select the keyboard type.
❖ 02. Keyboard LED on
The system flashes the Num Lock, CapsLock, and Scroll Lock LEDs.
When this Keyboard test is selected, the following screen displays:
Use the arrow keys to select the following:
- 01. Go to Test
Starts the test. To stop, press Ctrl + Break.
- 02. Test Loop
Press Enter to toggle between YES and NO.
YES increments the pass counter each time the test cycle ends and restarts the test
cycle.
NO returns the subtest menu to the Main menu after the test is completed.
Hardware Diagnostics
01. Diagnostic Test
107
- 03. Error Stop
Press Enter to toggle between YES and NO.
YES increments the pass counter each time the test cycle ends and restarts the test
cycle.
NO returns the subtest menu to the Main menu after the test is completed.
- 04. Keyboard Type
Press Enter to select the keyboard type.
❖ 03. PS/2 mouse
This subtest checks for a connected PS/2 mouse.
When this Keyboard test is selected, the following screen displays:
Use the arrow keys to select the following:
- 01. Go to Test
Starts the test. To stop, press Ctrl + Break.
- 02. Test Loop
Press Enter to toggle between YES and NO.
YES increments the pass counter each time the test cycle ends and restarts the test
cycle.
NO returns the subtest menu to the Main menu after the test is completed.
- 03. Error Stop
Press Enter to toggle between YES and NO.
YES increments the pass counter each time the test cycle ends and restarts the test
cycle.
NO returns the subtest menu to the Main menu after the test is completed.
Hardware Diagnostics
01. Diagnostic Test
03. Display Test
Tests the function of the display.
1
Use the arrow keys to highlight 03. Display Test on the Diagnostic Test menu.
2
Press Enter.
The following screen displays:
3
Using the arrow keys, select one of the following Display tests.
❖ 01. VRAM test
Verifies the video RAM can read, write and copy data.
When this Display test is selected, the following screen displays:
Use the arrow keys to select the following:
- 01. Go to Test
Starts the test. To stop, press Ctrl + Break.
- 02. Test Loop
Press Enter to toggle between YES and NO.
108
Hardware Diagnostics
01. Diagnostic Test
109
YES increments the pass counter each time the test cycle ends and restarts the test
cycle.
NO returns the subtest menu to the Main menu after the test is completed.
- 03. Error Stop
Press Enter to toggle between YES and NO.
YES increments the pass counter each time the test cycle ends and restarts the test
cycle.
NO returns the subtest menu to the Main menu after the test is completed.
❖ 02. 640 x 480 Mode display
Verifies the VRAM can display data in 640 x 480 mode.
When this Display test is selected, the following screen displays:
Use the arrow keys to select the following:
- 01. Go to Test
Starts the test. To stop, press Ctrl + Break.
Hardware Diagnostics
01. Diagnostic Test
110
- 02. Test Loop
Press Enter to toggle between YES and NO.
YES increments the pass counter each time the test cycle ends and restarts the test
cycle.
NO returns the subtest menu to the Main menu after the test is completed.
- 03. Error Stop
Press Enter to toggle between YES and NO.
YES increments the pass counter each time the test cycle ends and restarts the test
cycle.
NO returns the subtest menu to the Main menu after the test is completed.
❖ 03. 1024 x 768 Mode display
Verifies the VRAM can display data in 1024 x 768 mode.
When this Display test is selected, the following screen displays:
Use the arrow keys to select the following:
- 01. Go to Test
Starts the test. To stop, press Ctrl + Break.
- 02. Test Loop
Press Enter to toggle between YES and NO.
YES increments the pass counter each time the test cycle ends and restarts the test
cycle.
NO returns the subtest menu to the Main menu after the test is completed.
Hardware Diagnostics
01. Diagnostic Test
111
- 03. Error Stop
Press Enter to toggle between YES and NO.
YES increments the pass counter each time the test cycle ends and restarts the test
cycle.
NO returns the subtest menu to the Main menu after the test is completed.
04. Floppy Disk Test
HINT: Before running the floppy disk test, insert a formatted diskette. Any contents
on the diskette will be erased.
Tests the floppy disk drive.
1
Use the arrow keys to highlight 04. Floppy Disk Test on the Diagnostic Test menu.
2
Press Enter.
The following screen displays:
3
Using the arrow keys, select one of the following Floppy Disk tests.
❖ 01. Sequential address read
Tests that all of the tracks on the floppy disk are readable in sequence from the
specified start point to the end.
Hardware Diagnostics
01. Diagnostic Test
112
When this Floppy Disk test is selected, the following screen displays:
Use the arrow keys to select the following:
- 01. Go to Test
Starts the test. To stop, press Ctrl + Break.
- 02. Test Loop
Press Enter to toggle between YES and NO.
YES increments the pass counter each time the test cycle ends and restarts the test
cycle.
NO returns the subtest menu to the Main menu after the test is completed.
- 03. Error Stop
Press Enter to toggle between YES and NO.
YES increments the pass counter each time the test cycle ends and restarts the test
cycle.
NO returns the subtest menu to the Main menu after the test is completed.
- Test Drive Number
Press Enter to select the drive number where the floppy disk is inserted.
- Media Type
Press Enter to select the format type of the diskette.
- Test Start Track Number
Press Enter to select the first track number for the test.
Hardware Diagnostics
01. Diagnostic Test
113
❖ 02. Random address data W/R/C
Verifies the floppy disk is read, write and copy capable in random access from a
specified start point.
When this Floppy Disk test is selected, the following screen displays:
Use the arrow keys to select the following:
- 01. Go to Test
Starts the test. To stop, press Ctrl + Break.
- 02. Test Loop
Press Enter to toggle between YES and NO.
YES increments the pass counter each time the test cycle ends and restarts the test
cycle.
NO returns the subtest menu to the Main menu after the test is completed.
- 03. Error Stop
Press Enter to toggle between YES and NO.
YES increments the pass counter each time the test cycle ends and restarts the test
cycle.
NO returns the subtest menu to the Main menu after the test is completed.
- Test Drive Number
Press Enter to select the drive number where the floppy disk is inserted.
- Media Type
Press Enter to select the format type of the diskette.
- Test Start Track Number
Press Enter to select the first track number for the test.
Hardware Diagnostics
01. Diagnostic Test
114
NOTE: When the HW Diagnostics program has been started from the diskette,
replace the diskette for the test with the HW Diagnostics Program diskette after
testing.
05. Printer Test
Tests the operation of the printer port.
1
Use the arrow keys to highlight 05. Printer Test on the Diagnostic Test menu.
2
Press Enter.
The following screen displays:
3
Using the arrow keys, select the Printer test.
❖ 01. Print Ripple pattern
Prints characters for codes 20h through 7Eh line-by-line while shifting one character
to the left at the beginning of each new line.
When the Printer test is selected, the following screen displays:
Use the arrow keys to select the following:
Hardware Diagnostics
01. Diagnostic Test
115
- 01. Go to Test
Starts the test. To stop, press Ctrl + Break.
- 02. Test Loop
Press Enter to toggle between YES and NO.
YES increments the pass counter each time the test cycle ends and restarts the test
cycle.
NO returns the subtest menu to the Main menu after the test is completed.
- 03. Error Stop
Press Enter to toggle between YES and NO.
YES increments the pass counter each time the test cycle ends and restarts the test
cycle.
NO returns the subtest menu to the Main menu after the test is completed.
NOTE: An ESC / P-compatible printer must be connected to the system to run this
test.
06. SCSI HDD Test
Checks the HDDs connected to the SCSI-Bus.
1
Use the arrow keys to highlight 06. SCSI HDD Test on the Diagnostic Test menu.
2
Press Enter.
The following screen displays:
Hardware Diagnostics
3
01. Diagnostic Test
116
Using the arrow keys, select one of the following SCSI HDD tests.
❖ 01. Sequential address read
Sequentially reads all blocks on the specified HDD, starting at block 0.
When this SCSI HDD test is selected, the following screen displays:
Use the arrow keys to select the following:
- 01. Go to Test
Starts the test. To stop, press Ctrl + Break.
- 02. Test Loop
Press Enter to toggle between YES and NO.
YES increments the pass counter each time the test cycle ends and restarts the test
cycle.
NO returns the subtest menu to the Main menu after the test is completed.
- 03. Error Stop
Press Enter to toggle between YES and NO.
YES increments the pass counter each time the test cycle ends and restarts the test
cycle.
NO returns the subtest menu to the Main menu after the test is completed.
- Host ID number
Press Enter to select the HDD to be tested. Choose ALL to test all HDDs connected
to the server.
- SCSI ID number
Press Enter to select the SCSI ID to test.
Hardware Diagnostics
01. Diagnostic Test
117
- Channel number
Press Enter to select the channel number to test.
❖ 02. Connection
Reads the logical sector at the end of the specified HDD to verify if the drive is
connected or not.
When this SCSI HDD test is selected, the following screen displays:
Use the arrow keys to select the following:
- 01. Go to Test
Starts the test. To stop, press Ctrl + Break.
- 02. Test Loop
Press Enter to toggle between YES and NO.
YES increments the pass counter each time the test cycle ends and restarts the test
cycle.
NO returns the subtest menu to the Main menu after the test is completed.
- 03. Error Stop
Press Enter to toggle between YES and NO.
YES increments the pass counter each time the test cycle ends and restarts the test
cycle.
NO returns the subtest menu to the Main menu after the test is completed.
Hardware Diagnostics
01. Diagnostic Test
118
- Host ID number
Press Enter to select the HDD to be tested. Choose ALL to test all HDDs connected
to the server.
- SCSI ID number
Press Enter to select the SCSI ID to test.
- Channel number
Press Enter to select the channel number to test.
NOTE: The 01. SEQUENTIAL ADDRESS READ TEST checks all areas of the hard
disk drive. If several hard disk drives are mounted, the test may take a few hours if
ALL is selected for the Host ID number option.
07. NPX Test
Tests the computer’s floating data processing unit functions.
1
Use the arrow keys to highlight 07. NPX Test on the Diagnostic Test menu.
2
Press Enter.
The following screen displays:
Hardware Diagnostics
3
01. Diagnostic Test
119
Using the arrow keys, select the following NPX test.
❖ 01. NPX test
Checks the addition and multiplication functions of the coprocessor.
When this NPX test is selected, the following screen displays:
Use the arrow keys to select the following:
- 01. Go to Test
Starts the test. To stop, press Ctrl + Break.
- 02. Test Loop
Press Enter to toggle between YES and NO.
YES increments the pass counter each time the test cycle ends and restarts the test
cycle.
NO returns the subtest menu to the Main menu after the test is completed.
- 03. Error Stop
Press Enter to toggle between YES and NO.
YES increments the pass counter each time the test cycle ends and restarts the test
cycle.
NO returns the subtest menu to the Main menu after the test is completed.
Hardware Diagnostics
01. Diagnostic Test
120
08. Cache Test
Tests the function of the cache memory.
1
Use the arrow keys to highlight 08. Cache Memory Test on the Diagnostic Test
menu.
2
Press Enter.
The following screen displays:
3
Using the arrow keys, select one of the following Cache tests.
❖ 01. Constant data test
Sends data to the cache, verifies it is there, reads it and then compares it to the test
data.
When this Cache test is selected, the following screen displays:
Use the arrow keys to select the following:
- 01. Go to Test
Starts the test. To stop, press Ctrl + Break.
Hardware Diagnostics
01. Diagnostic Test
121
- 02. Test Loop
Press Enter to toggle between YES and NO.
YES increments the pass counter each time the test cycle ends and restarts the test
cycle.
NO returns the subtest menu to the Main menu after the test is completed.
- 03. Error Stop
Press Enter to toggle between YES and NO.
YES increments the pass counter each time the test cycle ends and restarts the test
cycle.
NO returns the subtest menu to the Main menu after the test is completed.
❖ 02. Address pattern test
Sends data to the a specific cache memory address to verify the functionality of the
address.
When this Cache test is selected, the following screen displays:
Use the arrow keys to select the following:
- 01. Go to Test
Starts the test. To stop, press Ctrl + Break.
- 02. Test Loop
Press Enter to toggle between YES and NO.
YES increments the pass counter each time the test cycle ends and restarts the test
cycle.
NO returns the subtest menu to the Main menu after the test is completed.
- 03. Error Stop
Press Enter to toggle between YES and NO.
Hardware Diagnostics
01. Diagnostic Test
122
YES increments the pass counter each time the test cycle ends and restarts the test
cycle.
NO returns the subtest menu to the Main menu after the test is completed.
❖ 03. Increment/Decrement test
Sends data to the cache to verify increment and decrement data.
When this Cache test is selected, the following screen displays:
Use the arrow keys to select the following:
- 01. Go to Test
Starts the test. To stop, press Ctrl + Break.
- 02. Test Loop
Press Enter to toggle between YES and NO.
YES increments the pass counter each time the test cycle ends and restarts the test
cycle.
NO returns the subtest menu to the Main menu after the test is completed.
- 03. Error Stop
Press Enter to toggle between YES and NO.
YES increments the pass counter each time the test cycle ends and restarts the test
cycle.
NO returns the subtest menu to the Main menu after the test is completed.
Hardware Diagnostics
01. Diagnostic Test
123
❖ 04. Caching data test
Sends invalid data to the cache to verify that the cache controller recognizes it as
invalid.
When this Cache test is selected, the following screen displays:
Use the arrow keys to select the following:
- 01. Go to Test
Starts the test. To stop, press Ctrl + Break.
- 02. Test Loop
Press Enter to toggle between YES and NO.
YES increments the pass counter each time the test cycle ends and restarts the test
cycle.
NO returns the subtest menu to the Main menu after the test is completed.
- 03. Error Stop
Press Enter to toggle between YES and NO.
YES increments the pass counter each time the test cycle ends and restarts the test
cycle.
NO returns the subtest menu to the Main menu after the test is completed.
Hardware Diagnostics
01. Diagnostic Test
124
09. SCSI Test
Tests the SCSI devices connected to the server.
1
Use the arrow keys to highlight 09. SCSI Test menu on the Diagnostic Test menu.
2
Press Enter.
The following screen displays:
3
Using the arrow keys, select the SCSI test.
❖ 01. Inquiry
Checks the status of the selected SCSI device(s).
When this SCSI test is selected, the following screen displays:
Use the arrow keys to select the following:
- 01. Go to Test
Starts the test. To stop, press Ctrl + Break.
- 02. Test Loop
Press Enter to toggle between YES and NO.
Hardware Diagnostics
01. Diagnostic Test
125
YES increments the pass counter each time the test cycle ends and restarts the test
cycle.
NO returns the subtest menu to the Main menu after the test is completed.
- 03. Error Stop
Press Enter to toggle between YES and NO.
YES increments the pass counter each time the test cycle ends and restarts the test
cycle.
NO returns the subtest menu to the Main menu after the test is completed.
- Host ID number
Press Enter to select the device to be tested. Choose ALL to test all SCSI devices
connected to the server.
- SCSI ID number
Press Enter to select the SCSI device to test.
- Channel number
Press Enter to select the channel number of the SCSI device to test.
10. CD-ROM Test
Tests the computer’s CD-ROM functions.
1
Use the arrow keys to highlight 10. CD-ROM Test on the Diagnostic Test menu.
2
Press Enter.
The following screen displays:
Hardware Diagnostics
3
01. Diagnostic Test
126
Using the arrow keys, select one of the following CD-ROM tests.
❖ 01 Sequential address read
Tests that all of the tracks on the CD-ROM are readable in sequence.
When this CD-ROM test is selected, the following screen displays:
Use the arrow keys to select the following:
- 01. Go to Test
Starts the test. To stop, press Ctrl + Break.
- 02. Test Loop
Press Enter to toggle between YES and NO.
YES increments the pass counter each time the test cycle ends and restarts the test
cycle.
NO returns the subtest menu to the Main menu after the test is completed.
- 03. Error Stop
Press Enter to toggle between YES and NO.
YES increments the pass counter each time the test cycle ends and restarts the test
cycle.
NO returns the subtest menu to the Main menu after the test is completed.
Hardware Diagnostics
01. Diagnostic Test
127
❖ 02. Random address read
Verifies the floppy disk is read capable when randomly accessed.
When this CD-ROM test is selected, the following screen displays:
Use the arrow keys to select the following:
- 01. Go to Test
Starts the test. To stop, press Ctrl + Break.
- 02. Test Loop
Press Enter to toggle between YES and NO.
YES increments the pass counter each time the test cycle ends and restarts the test
cycle.
NO returns the subtest menu to the Main menu after the test is completed.
- 03. Error Stop
Press Enter to toggle between YES and NO.
YES increments the pass counter each time the test cycle ends and restarts the test
cycle.
NO returns the subtest menu to the Main menu after the test is completed.
Hardware Diagnostics
01. Diagnostic Test
11. SAF-TE Test
Tests the SCSI drive bay.
1
Use the arrow keys to highlight 11. SAF-TE Test on the Diagnostic Test menu.
2
Press Enter.
The following screen displays:
3
Using the arrow keys, select the SAF-TE test.
❖ 01. SAF-TE test
Detects the SAF-TE controller and checks the operation by flashing the LED for
each hard disk drive.
When the SAF-TE test is selected, the following screen displays:
Use the arrow keys to select the following:
- 01. Go to Test
Starts the test. To stop, press Ctrl + Break.
- 02. Test Loop
Press Enter to toggle between YES and NO.
128
Hardware Diagnostics
01. Diagnostic Test
129
YES increments the pass counter each time the test cycle ends and restarts the test
cycle.
NO returns the subtest menu to the Main menu after the test is completed.
- 03. Error Stop
Press Enter to toggle between YES and NO.
YES increments the pass counter each time the test cycle ends and restarts the test
cycle.
NO returns the subtest menu to the Main menu after the test is completed.
12. SMC Test
Tests server management controller.
1
Use the arrow keys to highlight 12. SMC Test on the Diagnostic Test menu.
2
Press Enter.
The following screen displays:
3
Using the arrow keys, select one of the following SMC tests.
❖ 01. Self&Sensor test
Checks the server management controller’s chassis intrusion system, voltage
regulation, temperature regulation, and fan speed
Hardware Diagnostics
01. Diagnostic Test
130
When this SMC test is selected, the following screen displays:
Use the arrow keys to select the following:
- 01. Go to Test
Starts the test. To stop, press Ctrl + Break.
- 02. Test Loop
Press Enter to toggle between YES and NO.
YES increments the pass counter each time the test cycle ends and restarts the test
cycle.
NO returns the subtest menu to the Main menu after the test is completed.
- 03. Error Stop
Press Enter to toggle between YES and NO.
YES increments the pass counter each time the test cycle ends and restarts the test
cycle.
NO returns the subtest menu to the Main menu after the test is completed.
❖ 02. Front Panel test
Verifies the functions of the sever management controller’s front panel LEDs and
buttons.
Hardware Diagnostics
01. Diagnostic Test
131
When this SMC test is selected, the following screen displays:
Use the arrow keys to select the following:
- 01. Go to Test
Starts the test. To stop, press Ctrl + Break.
- 02. Test Loop
Press Enter to toggle between YES and NO.
YES increments the pass counter each time the test cycle ends and restarts the test
cycle.
NO returns the subtest menu to the Main menu after the test is completed.
- 03. Error Stop
Press Enter to toggle between YES and NO.
YES increments the pass counter each time the test cycle ends and restarts the test
cycle.
NO returns the subtest menu to the Main menu after the test is completed.
Hardware Diagnostics
02. Running Test
132
02. Running Test
02. Running Test allows the tests found in the 01. Diagnostic Test menu to be run singly
or in groups.
1
Use the arrow keys to highlight 02. Running Test on the Diagnostic Menu.
2
Press Enter.
The following screen displays:
3
Use the arrow keys to select the following:
❖ 01. Go to Test
Starts the test. To stop, press Ctrl + Break.
❖ 02. Test ITEM EDIT
Selects the test(s) to be run from 02. Running Test.
a
Use the arrow key to highlight Test ITEM EDIT.
b
Press Enter.
The following screen displays:
Hardware Diagnostics
c
Use the arrow keys to highlight the desired test.
d
Press the Tab key for further instructions.
02. Running Test
❖ 03. Finish BUZZER sound
Sounds a beep when the server finishes the Running Test.
Notes: The running test setup is not saved on the HW Diagnostics disk. If you rerun
the HW Diagnostics program, reselect your options.
Do not execute Running Test by selecting only the Cache test.
The 02. Keyboard Test needs keyboard input, which the test stops and waits for. If
you want tests to run without input or stops, do not select the 02. Keyboard Test.
When selected tests complete, the following results appear on the screen:
OK
No error has been detected.
Failed
An error has been detected or the test has been stopped by a
user.
NOTE: To check the error log, select 03. LOG UTILITIES from the main test menu.
If the test has been halted, the test results are not displayed.
133
Hardware Diagnostics
03. Log Utilities
134
03. Log Utilities
Records error information generated while a test is in progress, storing the results in
RAM. You can then store the data on a diskette or output the data to a printer.
NOTE: Print or save test results before selecting any other options or the
information will be lost.
If the power switch is turned off, log utilities information is be lost.
To view the Log Utilities screen:
1
Use the arrow keys to highlight 03. Log Utilities on the Diagnostics Menu.
2
Press Enter.
The following screen displays:
Log Utilities screen headings
❖ xxxxx ERRORS
Displays the number of errors.
❖ CNT
Displays the order of occurrence of the error.
Hardware Diagnostics
03. Log Utilities
❖ TEST
Displays the abbreviation of the test
MEMORY TEST
RAM
NPX TEST
NPX
KEYBOARD TEST
KBD
CACHE MEMORY TEST
CAH
DISPLAY TEST
CRT
SCSI TEST
SCS
FLOPPY DISK TEST
FDD
CD-ROM TEST
CDR
PRINTER TEST
PRT
SAF-TE TEST
SAF
SCSI DISK TEST
HDD
SMC TEST
SMC
❖ Pass
Displays the pass count of the test with errors.
❖ STS
Displays the error status. See samples below:
Memory Test (RAM) Error Log
Status
Error name
Meaning
01
PARITY ERROR
Parity error
02
PROTECTED MODE NOT CHANGE ERROR
The shift to the protected
mode failed
FF
DATA COMPARE ERROR
Data comparing error
Keyboard Test (KBD) Error Log
Status
Error name
Meaning
01
CLOCK LINE ERROR L
Clock line error (LOW)
02
CLOCK LINE ERROR H
Clock line error (HIGH)
03
DATA LINE ERROR L
Data line error (LOW)
04
DATA LINE ERROR H
Data line error (HIGH)
07
INTERFACE ERROR
Interface error
08
RESENDING ERROR
Sending/receiving error
09
ID ERROR
ID error
FF
DATA COMPARE ERROR
Data comparing error
Display Test (CRT) Error Log
Status
Error name
Meaning
FF
DATA COMPARE ERROR
Data comparing error
135
Hardware Diagnostics
03. Log Utilities
Floppy Disk Test (FDD) Error Log
Status
Error name
Meaning
01
BAD COMMAND ERROR
Bad command error
02
ADDRESS MARK NOT FOUND
The address mark has not been
found
03
WRITE PROTECTED
Floppy disk is write-protected
04
RECORD NOT FOUND
The record has not been found
06
MEDIA CHANGE LINE ERROR
The media change line is bad
08
DMA OVERRUN ERROR
DMA OVERRUN occurred
09
DMA BOUNDARY ERROR
DMA BOUDARY occurred
10
CRC ERROR
CRC check error
20
FDC ERROR
FDC error
40
SEEK ERROR
Floppy disk seek error
Printer Test (PRT) Error Log
Status
Error name
Meaning
01
TIME OUT
Time out of printer control
SCSI HDD Tests (HDD)
Status
Error name
Meaning
01
CHECK CONDITION OR BAD
COMMAND
Bad command error
03
DRIVE SELECTION FAILED
ID selection error
04
TARGET DRIVE BUSY
The target drive is busy
05
SCSI BUS TIME OUT
Time out error of SCSI bus
09
DMA BOUNDARY ERROR
DMA BOUNDARY occurred
0D
COMMAND TERMINATED
A command terminated
0E
QUEUE FULL
Command queue is full
80
NO SENSE
The sense data is invalid
81
RECOVERED ERROR
The execution of the command
has correctly finished because
of recovery treatment.
82
NOT READY
The condition does not satisfy
the command execution
83
MEDIUM ERROR
An error occurred because of
medium failure
84
HARDWARE ERROR
A fatal error occurred during
command execution
85
ILLEGAL REQUEST
CBD is illegal
136
Hardware Diagnostics
03. Log Utilities
86
UNIT ATTENTION
The function of hard disk drive
has been changed
87
DATA PROTECT
Data protection error
89
VENDOR UNIQUE
A unique error of disk maker
8A
COPY ABORTED
Halt of COPY command
8B
ABORTED COMMAND
The execution of a command is
correctly stopped
8C
EQUAL
The search data command’s
comparing result is satisfied
8E
MIS COMPARE
Comparing command error
E0
STATUS ERROR
Status error
F0
OTHER ERROR
Other errors
FE
NO DRIVE ERROR
The target drive has not been
found
FF
DATA COMPARE ERROR
Data comparing error
N* Definition of information details (DETAILS = AA BB CC DD EEEE FFFF)
AA: Channel number host number of the connected hard disk.
BB: Driver completion status
CC: ASPI status
DD: Host status
EEEE: Sense data
FFFF: Sense code
NPX TEST (NPX) Error Log
Status
Error name
Meaning
01
NO CO-PROCESSOR
Co-processor recognition error
02
CONTROL WORD ERROR
Set control word error
03
STATUS WORD ERROR
Status word error
04
BUS ERROR
BUS error
05
ADDITION ERROR
Addition test error
06
MULTIPLICATION ERROR
Multiplication test error
07
EXCEPTION ERROR
Exception error
137
Hardware Diagnostics
03. Log Utilities
138
Cache Memory Tests (CAH) Error Log
Status
Error name
Meaning
01
MEMORY PARITY ERROR
Memory parity error
02
PROTECT MODE ERROR
The shift to the protected mode failed.
03
CACHING ERROR
An error occurred on the cache system.
FF
DATA COMPARE ERROR
Data comparing error
SAF-TE test (SAF) Error Log
Status
Error name
Meaning
01
SAF-TE TEST ERROR
SAF-TE controller has not been detected.
❖ ADDR
Displays the address where the error occurred.
❖ WD
Displays the write-data at the occurrence of the error.
❖ RD
Displays the read-data at the occurrence of the error.
❖ Error Name / Details Status
Displays the error name and details. See STS above, on page 135.
Key Operation for Log Utilities
To scroll the error log screen or to save and to clear the error log information, use the
following keys:
↓ key: scrolls to the next page.
↑ key: scrolls to the previous page.
Esc key: finishes the error log screen and returns to the main menu.
1 key: clears the error log information.
2 key: prints out the error log information.
3 key: reads the error log information saved on the floppy disk.
4 key: saves the error log information on the floppy disk.
Press Tab to see this list.
Hardware Diagnostics
System Configuration Display
139
NOTE: When the error log information is cleared with the key operation above, the
error information recorded on the diskette is also cleared.
System Configuration Display
When you select 04.System Configuration on the Diagnostics Menu, system information,
SCSI device information and SMC information dislays on screen.
You may use the following keys to access information on 04. System Configuration
screens:
↑ ↓ : Select
Move the cursor to the connected device to check the detailed
information.
Tab: Change
Changes to each information tab.
Esc: Escape
Terminates SYSTEM CONFIGURATION DISPLAY.
System Information
BIOS VER
BIOS version of the system motherboard
VIDEO INFORMATION
Amount of video RAM and the vendor information
CONVENTIONAL
MEMORY
Amount of conventional memory
EXPANSION MEMORY
Amount of expansion memory
FLOPPY DISK DRIVE(S)
The number of floppy disk drives
PS/2 MOUSE
The number of PS/2 mice
RS-232C ADAPTER
The number of COM ports
PRINTER ADAPTER
The number of printer ports
LAN ADAPTER
LAN adapter type
CPU
The number of CPUs (family, model, and stepping number)
SCSI HOST ADAPTER
The name of the SCSI host adapter
SCSI DEVICES
HDD
The number of hard disks
CMT
The number of CMT devices
SAF-FE
The number of SAF-TE drives
CD
The number of CD-ROM drives
MO
The number of MO devices
Others
The number of other SCSI devices
IDE CD-ROM DRIVE
The number of CD-ROM drives
AMS
Not supported
SMC REVISION
Hardware Diagnostics
System Configuration Display
SMC
Current version of the SMC
DMC0
Current version of the DMC0
DMC1
Current version of the DMC1
NPSS
Not supported
NPSS1
The number of power supply 1
NPSS2
The number of power supply 2
NPSS3
The number of power supply 3
140
Hardware Diagnostics
System Configuration Display
141
SCSI Devices
The host and channel numbers are listed across the top of the screen, and the SCSI ID
numbers are shown on the left. The SCSI devices are displayed under each channel.
You may use the arrow keys to select a particular device. Additional information is then
displayed at the bottom of the screen.
System Configuration Information
The System Configuration Information screen shows revision information for the
management devices on the server and the expansion disk units.
MAIN Chassis
Displays the versions of BMC, SMC, DMCO, and DMC1 installed on the server.
If the item is not installed on the server, it is displayed as NON.
Software Installation
Startup
142
Chapter 5
Software Installation
Before you can use the server, you need to install an operating system. During
installation, you will need to provide adapter drivers designed specifically for the OS.
After installation is complete, you may need to install updated drivers or utility programs
to help manage the server. This document will help you prepare the correct drivers for
the operating systems supported by Toshiba.
NOTE: This document assumes you have a basic understanding of the installation
process for a variety of operating systems. The items in the CD-ROM:\Software
folder are included to use as repair or recovery files, not for use during the
installation of your operating system. Please refer to task specific documents
provided in the Magnia 3135R User’s Guide and your optional equipment for
detailed information.
Startup
The server can start from a bootable CD-ROM, the hard disk with an operating system
installed, or a bootable floppy diskette. Please refer to the root readme.txt file for
instructions on creating a bootable floppy diskette that will access the CD-ROM drive.
Creating Floppy Diskettes for Drivers and Utilities
Create floppy disks that contain the drivers and utilities necessary to operate your server.
Follow these steps to create the floppy disks for the drivers you need:
❖ On any computer with DOS, insert the Magnia 3135R CD-ROM into the CD drive.
❖ At a DOS prompt, change to the CD drive (i.e., d: <Enter>).
❖ Change to the <CD-ROM>:\Images (i.e., cd images) folder where you will find the
following disk images:
Software Installation
Windows NT Server 4.0
1
ADA02.img = Adaptec 7899 NT/9x
1 Disk
2
ADA03.img = Adaptec 7899 Netware
1 Disk
3
AMINT.img = MegaRAID Drivers & Utility NT4
1 Disk
4
AMIW2K.img = MegaRAID Drivers & Utility W2K
1 Disk
5
AMINWDOS.img = MegaRAID Drivers & Utilities NW/
DOS
1 Disk
6
IDECD.img = CD-ROM (IDE) DOS
1 Disk
7
INT02.img = Intel Pro/100NT
1 Disk
8
INT03.img = Intel Pro/100 NW
1 Disk
9
RAGE2C.img = ATI Rage IIc Video Driver
1 Disk
10
TOS03.img = Toshiba HW Diagnostics
1 Disk
11
TOS07.img = Toshiba Display Power Save
1 Disk
143
❖ Insert a formatted floppy disk into the dloppy drive a:.
❖ At the prompt, type fdimg -w <filename.img> a
❖ Insert additional disks as needed for multiple disk sets.
❖ Create a label for each set and apply to the floppy disks.
Windows NT Server 4.0
NOTE: Always connect a PS/2 mouse as your keyboard may not work with a serial
mouse.
You will need to provide driver diskettes for the on-board and optional equipment
during the installation of Windows NT 4.0. Please refer to Installing Drivers below.
If you have more than 1.7 GB of memory, Windows NT 4.0 cannot be properly
installed. To install Windows NT 4.0:
1 Reduce the installed memory to less than 1.7 GB.
2 Install Windows NT.
3 Update Windows NT with Microsoft’s Service Pack 6a or later.
4 Shut down the system and reinstall your additional memory.
Prepare your server’s system configuration and RAID array (if the optional RAID adapter
is installed) before starting the operating system installation. Refer to the Magnia 3135R
User’s Guide for detailed instructions on configuring the server.
Software Installation
Windows NT Server 4.0
144
You can install Windows NT Server 4.0 from a Windows 4.0 NT diskette set or the
Microsoft CD-ROM using F6 (the preferred method) when "Setup is inspecting your
computer’s hardware configuration" is displayed. Please refer to the installation
documentation for details.
Installing Drivers
Prepare the following disks:
ADA02.img = Adaptec 7899 NT/9x
AMINT.img = MegaRAID Drivers & Utilities NT 4.0
INT02.img = Intel Pro/100 NT
The following information is from screens displayed when you press F6 during the CDROM boot process and you have created the appropriate driver diskettes.
Onboard SCSI Controller
To select the driver for the onboard SCSI controller:
1
Select S=Specify Additional Device.
2
Select Other (disk provided by hardware maker necessary).
3
Insert the diskette labeled Adaptec 7899 Family Manager Set (NT 4.0) into the
diskette drive, and press Enter.
4
When a list of drivers appears on the screen, select Adaptec Ultra160 Family PCI
SCSI Controller (NT 4.0).
5
Continue the installation as instructed on the screen.
Express 500 RAID Controller
To select the driver for the RAID controller:
1
Press F6 when the following message appears on the DOS screen: "Setup is
inspecting your computer's hardware configuration."
2
When the message "Specify additional SCSI adapters" is displayed, elect
S=Specify Additional Device.
3
Select Other.
4
Insert the diskette labeled "MegaRAID NT" (supplied with the RAID Controller or
created from the Create Floppy Disks utility) and press Enter.
Software Installation
Windows NT Server 4.0
5
When a list of drivers appears on the screen, select "MEGARAID NT 4.0 RAID
Driver".
6
Follow the screen prompts to finish the installation.
145
NOTE: If the RAID Controller is installed on the server, be sure to install the Power
Console Plus application after installing Windows NT Server 4.0. For more detailed
information see the RAID Controller user's guide.
RAID Controller
To select the driver for the optional MegaRAID adapter card:
1
Select S=Specify Additional Device.
2
Select Other (disk provided by hardware manufacturer necessary).
3
Insert the diskette labeled AMI Drivers & Utilities into the diskette drive and press
enter.
4
When a list of drivers appears on the screen, select MegaRAID NT SCSI Driver.
5
Follow the on-screen instructions to complete the installation.
TECHNICAL NOTE: A RAID management utility, Power Console Plus needs to be
installed and is included on the Magnia 3135R Software and Documentation CD.
For installation and usage details, refer to the MegaRAID User’s Manual.
Onboard Network Adapter
To install the onboard network adapter:
1
At the Installing Windows NT Networking menu, select Wired to the Network.
2
Select Next.
3
Choose IIS or Not.
4
Select Start Search where NT will find an Intel 82557 driver (this driver does not
work and must be replaced).
5
Unselect it and click on Select from List.
6
From the driver selection menu, select Have Disk.
7
Insert the diskette labeled Intel EtherExpress Pro 100+ Server Adapter Drivers
(v3.1) into the diskette drive and press Enter.
Software Installation
Windows NT Server 4.0
8
Select Intel Pro Adapter from the menu.
9
Select Next to continue the installation as instructed on screen.
146
After Windows NT 4.0 is installed
After installing the operating system, take the following steps:
Service Pack
Install Service Pack 6a, available from the Microsoft Web site.
Video Driver
You must change the video driver from the retail driver included in the Windows NT CDROM to the original video driver included in the Magnia 3135R Software and
Documentation CD.
After installing the operating system:
1
Start Windows NT 4.0, and log in with Administrator or its equivalent.
2
Click Start, Settings, Control Panel, and then Display to start the Properties page.
3
From the Settings tab, click Change in the Display type.
4
Insert the Magnia 3135R Software and Documentation CD into the CD-ROM drive,
or the floppy diskette created above into the floppy drive.
5
Select Have Disk.
6
Enter <CD-ROM>:\Software\Video\ or A:\.
7
Select ATI Rage IIC.
8
After it has loaded, restart the system before you test or make any changes to the
video properties.
9
If you reinstall the Service Pack, please reinstall the video driver.
Other steps to take
1
Set up network TCP/IP if necessary. For the instructions, refer to the Windows NT
Server manual or online Help.
2
Add SNMP Service into the network.
3
In Windows NT Server, open the Control Panel and select Network, Service.
4
Select the Add tab, find and select SNMP Service. For detailed instructions, refer to
the Windows NT Server manual or online help.
Software Installation
5
Windows NT Server 4.0
147
Install the software for the MegaRAID adapter (if used). For installation instructions,
refer to the MegaRAID User’s Manual. Be sure to install the MegaRAID SNMP
option.
Optional Software
Depending on the options you wish to use, please see the documentation for various
utility programs that may help manage your server. We have provided the following
software:
1
AMI MegaRAID Power Console Plus
2
Intel Server Control
3
Adobe Acrobat Reader 4.0 (for viewing files in PDF format)
4
Toshiba Hardware Diagnostic program (refer to the Magnia 3135R User’s Guide for
details)
Re-Installing Adapter Drivers
If it should become necessary to re-install the drivers to recover a corrupted file or repair
your system and you do not have the floppy disks, the on-board and optional drivers are
available on the Magnia 3135R Software and Documentation CD.
From the Software folder, please refer to the documentation in the respective driver
folders for installation instructions.
For the drivers listed below, we have provided special instructions to reload them from
the CD:
Onboard SCSI Controller
1
Select Control Panel from Settings on the Windows Start button.
2
Double-click the SCSI Adapters icon.
3
Select the Drivers tab.
4
Click the Add button.
5
When the Install Driver dialog displays, click the Have Disk... button.
6
Click Browse.
7
Find the Adaptec NT drivers in the \Software\AIC7899\Disk1\NT4\ directory.
8
Select Adaptec 29160(N), 39160, AHA-3960D, AIC-7892/7899 Ultra160 PCI SCSI
Controller (NT 4.0).
Software Installation
9
Windows NT Server 4.0
148
Restart your machine as instructed.
NOTE: It is necessary to reinstall Service Pack 6a when the installation is complete.
Intel Pro100NT Driver
1
Select Control Panel from Settings on the Windows Start button.
2
Double-click the Network icon.
3
Select the Adapters tab.
4
Select Intel 82559 Fast Ethernet LAN on Motherboard.
5
Click Remove.
6
When the Warning dialog displays, click Yes.
7
When the Setup dialog displays, click No.
8
Click Close, then click Yes to restart the system.
9
After restarting, repeat steps 1-3.
10 Click Add.
11 When the Select Network Adapter dialog displays, click the Have Disk... button.
12 When the Insert Disk dialog displays, type the path to the Intel Pro Adapter driver.
Substitute your CD-ROMs drive letter for Z: Z:\Software\Pro100\Pro100NT\
13 The Select OEM Option dialog should display with only one available driver. Select
Intel PRO Adapter and click OK.
14 The Intel Pro100 82559 driver should be listed in the Network properties. Close the
control panel.
15 Configure the network settings as required by your network environment.
16 Restart your machine when prompted.
NOTE: It is necessary to reinstall Service Pack 6a when the installation is complete.
Software Installation
Windows 2000 Server
149
Windows 2000 Server
At the time of publication, the drivers on the Microsoft Windows 2000 Server installation
CD were the latest drivers available for the hardware supplied with the Magnia 3135R
Server with the exception of the MegaRAID driver for the optional Express 500 RAID
card.
To setup your server’s hardware configuration, please refer to the Magnia 3135R User’s
Guide, available in the \Docs folder on the Magnia 3135R Software and Documentation
CD.
Please plan and initiate the Microsoft Windows 2000 Server installation using the
documentation that came with the installation CD.
Express 500 RAID Controller
To select the driver for the RAID controller:
1
Press F6 when the following Setup message appears on the DOS screen: "Setup is
inspecting your computer's hardware configuration."
2
When the message "Specify additional SCSI adapters" is displayed, select
S=Specify Additional Device.
3
Highlight "Other" on the next screen, and insert the floppy disk labeled "MegaRAID
W2K".
4
Press Enter.
5
When a list of drivers appears on the screen, select "MegaRAID Express 500;
Enterprise 1600; Elite 1600 RAID Controller Driver" and press Enter.
6
Follow the screen prompts to finish the installation.
NOTE: If the RAID Controller is installed on the server, be sure to install the Power
Console Plus application after installing Windows 2000 Server. For more detailed
information see the RAID Controller user's guide.
Software Installation
Windows 2000 Server
150
Installing Toshiba Display Power Save Driver
You must install the Toshiba Display Power Save Driver after installing Windows 2000 on
your Toshiba server.
The drivers for other Toshiba supported adapter cards are available on the Microsoft
Windows 2000 Setup CD-ROM and do not require additional steps to be taken to be
installed.
To install the Toshiba Display Power Save Driver:
1
Log on as Administrator or its equivalent.
2
Insert the floppy disk labeled Toshiba Display Power Save Driver or from the
\SOFTWARE\TDPSV on the Magnia 3135R Software and Documentation CD.
3
Run setup.exe, or using the floppy, click Start, Run, type a:\setup and press Enter.
4
Reboot the system after the driver is installed.
After Windows 2000 Server is installed
Depending on the options you wish to use, please see the documentation for the various
utility programs that may be of help managing your server. We have provided the
following software:
❖ AMI MegaRAID Power Console Plus
❖ Intel Server Control Utility
❖ Adobe Acrobat Reader 4.0 (for viewing files in a PDF format)
❖ Toshiba Hardware Diagnostic program (refer to the Magnia 3135R User’s Guide for
details)
Software Installation
Installing Netware
151
Installing Netware
NOTE: At the time the system was released, NetWare was not fully tested.
Motherboard settings
Check the settings of the motherboard.
❖ Start the BIOS Setup Utility.
❖ Select PNP/PCI Configuration and make sure the following is set correctly:
Plug and Play Aware O/S: NO
Floppy disk preparation
To install NetWare, you need to create the following driver diskettes:
NOTE: See the README.TXT file at the root of the CD-ROM for details on how to
use the FDIMG.EXE file to create driver diskettes.
❖ Adaptec 7899 Family Manager Set v.1.10.
Manually installing NetWare 5.1
Selecting the driver
When the NetWare 5.1 installation starts, it detects the SCSI controller and the network
adapter, and automatically assigns drivers contained on the NetWare CD-ROM.
Selecting a RAID Controller driver
The NetWare 5.1 installation program currently installs the correct drivers for the AMI
MegaRAID Express 500 RAID card. Attempting to update the default drivers with those
provided on the Magnia 3135R Software and Documentation CD-ROM may result in
unreliable server behavior.
Complete the installation by following the on-screen instructions.
Software Installation
Installing Netware
152
Selecting a SCSI Controller driver
If the installer detects a SCSI controller, the following menu appears:
The following drivers were detected for this server. Add,
change or delete device drivers as needed.
Device types
Platform Support Module:
Driver names
MPS14
HotPlug Support Module:
(optional)
Storage adapters
IDEATA, IDEATA
options
_Continue
_Modify
1
Move the cursor to "Storage adapters" on the menu shown above with the arrow
keys, and press Enter.
2
Set the floppy disk labeled "Ultra160 for Netware" in the floppy disk drive, and select
"Add an unlisted driver <Ins>" by pressing the Insert key twice.
3
Press Enter to retrieve drivers contained on the floppy disk.
The following drivers are added to the screen above. (Two drivers are added
because the Onboard SCSI has two channels.)
|| ADPT160M.HAM ||
|| ADPT160M.HAM ||
4
Select "Return to driver summary" and press Enter.
5
Select _Continue and complete the installation by following the on-screen
instructions.
Software Installation
Installing Netware
153
Selecting the RAID Controller driver
1
Select the Onboard SCSI Controller as instructed above.
2
Move the cursor to "Storage adapters" on the menu shown above with the arrow
keys, and press Enter.
3
Set the floppy disk labeled "MegaRAID NW/DOS" in the floppy disk drive, and select
"Add an unlisted driver <Ins>" by pressing the Insert key twice.
4
Press F3 to designate the directory on the floppy disk as A:\Netware and press Enter
to retrieve drivers contained on the floppy disk.
The following drivers are added to the screen above.
|| MEGA4_XX.HAM || AMI MegaRAID XXX Adapter
5
||
Select "Return to driver summary" and press Enter and proceed with the
installation.
NOTE: See the README.TXT file at the root of the CD-ROM for details on how to
use the FDIMG.EXE file to create driver diskettes.
Software Installation
Installing Netware
154
Selecting a Network Adapter driver
If the installer detects the network adapter, the following screen appears:
The following drivers were detected for this server. Add,
change or delete device drivers as needed.
Device types
Storage Devices:
Driver names
IDECD, SCSIND
Network boards:
CE100B
NetWare loadable modules
(optional)
options
_Continue
_Modify
Select _Continue and complete the installation by following the on-screen instructions.
Post installation procedures
Setup the RAID Controller Utility
If a RAID controller is connected to the server, be sure to set up the MegaRAID Manager
after installing NetWare. If the MegaRAID Manager is not set up, the system cannot be
recovered from disk trouble during operation.
For details, refer to the MegaRAID Software Guide.
155
Chapter 6
If Something Goes
Wrong
This chapter helps you identify problems that may occur while your server is in use and
suggests solutions.
Identifying a Problem
To isolate a failure, it may be necessary to disconnect all peripheral devices connected to
the server, except the keyboard and the monitor.
1
If a critical fault condition exists or you are disconnecting peripheral devices
connected to the server, shut down the operating system and power off the server
and peripherals.
CAUTION: Do not disconnect server cables and/or any connected peripheral
devices while the server is on. Disconnecting these cables and/or devices while the
server is on can cause irreparable damage to the server and peripherals.
2
Make certain that the server and monitor power cords are connected correctly to
grounded AC outlets.
3
Check that the keyboard and the monitor are connected correctly to the server.
4
Turn on the monitor and adjust the brightness and contrast levels to two-thirds or
more of their maximum values.
5
Make sure the floppy disk drive is empty.
6
Press the Power button to turn on the server.
The server starts running and the Power indicator light isgreen. If the power indicator
does not turn green, see The Power Indicator Does Not Light on page 158.
If Something Goes Wrong
7
Startup Sequence
156
After the server starts, check the operation of the POST. The POST detects error
conditions and determines whether the problem is caused by the motherboard, the
keyboard, or an inappropriate setup.
HINT: If the server stops before completing the POST, a fatal system error has
occurred and you must take immediate action. Write down any error message that
appears on the screen and take note of the tones generated by the speaker (such
as a “beep” code). This information will be very useful if you need to contact
Toshiba for assistance or service.
8
Make sure that the FDD indicator on the floppy disk drive comes on when the drive is
accessed. If the lamp does not light properly, see The FDD Activity Indicator Does
Not Light on page 159.
9
Make sure that the status indicators on each hard disk drive and/or SCSI device light
correctly.
10 If RAID controllers are installed in the server, perform RAID configuration damage
checks using the POST. When the server starts, the monitor displays the prompt
appropriate for the operating system. If the prompt does not appear on screen, see
Startup Problems on page 156.
Startup Sequence
This section addresses problems which may occur during startup.
Error Checking
When the server starts, the POST executes and checks the motherboard, the memory,
the keyboard, and other devices. If the POST detects an error, it displays an error
message on the screen. An alarm sounds (beeps) continuously if the error was detected
prior to displaying the POST window.
Startup Problems
If an error occurs during the server startup, check the following:
❖ Is the power cable connected correctly to an appropriately grounded AC power
outlet?
❖ After pressing the Power button, did the power on indicator turn green?
❖ Are all cables connected correctly and securely?
❖ Are the PCI expansion cards installed correctly?
If Something Goes Wrong
Application Software Problems
157
❖ Are all switch settings, including jumper settings, for the expansion cards and
peripheral devices set correctly? Refer to the user(s) guide(s) for the expansion
card(s) and peripheral devices for more information.
❖ Are the hard disk drives connected correctly?
❖ Are the format and settings for any added hard disk drives correct?
❖ Are the device drivers installed correctly?
❖ Are the environmental conditions appropriate for the server (ambient temperature,
relative humidity)?
❖ Is the operating system loaded correctly and in normal operation?
❖ Is the rack’s KVM switchbox set to select the server?
Application Software Problems
In general, if you have any problems with application software, check the following:
❖ Does the system meet the minimum hardware requirements for the software? See
the software documentation.
❖ Is the software an authorized copy? Unauthorized copies often do not work. Refer
to the software operating manual.
❖ If you are running the software from a diskette, is it a good copy?
❖ If you are running the software from a CD-ROM, is the disc scratched or dirty?
❖ If you are running the software from a hard disk drive, is the software correctly
installed? Were all necessary procedures followed and files installed?
❖ Is the software set up correctly?
❖ Is the software being used correctly?
❖ Are the correct device drivers installed?
❖ Is the software correctly configured for the system?
❖ Are you using the software correctly?
If you are unable to resolve the problem, contact the software manufacturer’s technical
support representative.
If Something Goes Wrong
Common Hardware Problems
158
After the System Has Been Running Correctly
Once the software has been running successfully, if a problem arises that you suspect is
a software problem, check the following:
❖ Are you running the software from a diskette? Try a different diskette to determine
if the problem still occurs.
❖ Are you running the software from a CD-ROM? Try a different disc to see if the
problem still occurs.
❖ Are you running the software from a hard disk drive? Try running it from a diskette.
If the software runs correctly, there may be a problem with the hard disk drive or
the recorded data files. Try reinstalling the software on the hard disk.
❖ Have you installed all of the necessary files?
❖ Are the problems you are experiencing intermittent? There may be a loose cable,
a marginal power supply, dirt in the keyboard (if keyboard input is incorrect), or
some other random component failure.
❖ Do you suspect that a transient voltage spike occurred, or did you experience a
power outage, or brownout? Reload the software and try running it again.
(Symptoms of voltage spikes include a flickering video display, unexpected system
reboots, and the system not responding to user commands.)
NOTE: If you are getting random errors in your data files, they may be getting
corrupted by voltage spikes on your power line. If you are experiencing any of the
above symptoms that might indicate voltage spikes on the power line, install a surge
suppressor between the power outlet and the system power cord.
Common Hardware Problems
This section lists some common problems and their solutions. If you are unable to
resolve the problem, contact an authorized Toshiba Magnia service provider or your
sales office.
The Power Indicator Does Not Light
❖ Is the server connected to an appropriately grounded AC power outlet?
❖ Is the indicator on the Power Supply unit on? Is the server operating normally? If
so, the power indicator is probably faulty.
If Something Goes Wrong
Common Hardware Problems
159
The Screen is Blank
❖ Is the keyboard connected correctly?
❖ Is the keyboard functioning correctly? If the keyboard is locked, restart the system.
❖ Are the monitor’s signal and power cables connected correctly?
❖ Is the monitor turned on?
❖ Are the monitor’s brightness and contrast levels set correctly?
❖ Are the monitor’s switches set correctly?
❖ Is the onboard video controller enabled?
❖ Is the system in secure mode?
❖ When Windows NT is used, is the screen resolution and synchronization
frequency supported by the monitor? Start the server in VGA mode to check for
normal operation.
❖ Is the KVM switchbox set to select the server?
Characters are Distorted or Do Not Display Properly
❖ Is the monitor adjusted to appropriate brightness and contrast levels? Refer to the
monitor manual.
❖ Are the monitor’s signal and power cables correctly installed?
❖ When Windows NT is used, is the screen resolution and synchronization
frequency supported by the monitor? Start the server in VGA mode to check for
normal operation.
The FDD Activity Indicator Does Not Light
❖ Are the floppy disk drive’s signal and power cables connected correctly?
❖ Are all relevant switches and jumpers on the floppy disk drive set correctly?
❖ Is the floppy disk drive configured correctly?
NOTE: When you are using the onboard diskette controller, you must use the BIOS Setup
menu to make sure that Onboard Floppy is set to Enabled.
If Something Goes Wrong
Before Calling for Service
160
The FDD Activity Indicator is Always On
❖ Is the floppy disk drive’s signal cable connected correctly?
The HDD Status Indicators Do Not Light
❖ Is the power connector for the hard disk drive(s) connected?
❖ Is the SCSI cable connected correctly to the SCSI controller?
❖ Are the hard disk drives mounted correctly?
❖ Is the hard disk drive configured correctly?
❖ If you are using RAID controllers, is the RAID configuration set correctly?
NOTE: The front panel hard disk LED indicates IDE and SCSI device activity. This LED
does NOT display CD-ROM activity.
The HDD Does Not Respond
As a system requirement, internal hard disk drives are not started at power up. Problems
may arise if a third-party SCSI controller fails to send a Start Unit command during the
SCSI ROM boot. Therefore, SCSI BIOS defaults must be set to start all hard disk drives
during ROM load. This modification is required for all Adaptec RAID controllers. To
configure the SCSI BIOS, refer to the RAID controller user guide.
CD-ROM Drive Status Indicator Does Not Light
❖ Are the CD-ROM drive’s signal and power cables connected correctly?
❖ Are all relevant switches and jumpers on the CD-ROM drive set correctly?
❖ Is the CD-ROM drive configured correctly?
❖ Is the onboard IDE controller enabled?
Before Calling for Service
If you cannot solve the problem yourself, confirm and record the following information
before contacting Toshiba Technical Support:
❖ Server model number and serial number (located on the rear of the server)
❖ List of hardware and software components installed in the server
❖ Brief statement of the problem
❖ How frequently the problem occurs
If Something Goes Wrong
Toshiba Technical Support
161
❖ Environment in which the problem occurred
❖ Method of simulating the problem
Toshiba Technical Support
If you need assistance:
❖ www.support.toshiba.com
Download the latest drivers, view detailed installation instructions, and access the latest
server information.
❖ InTouch sm Center
Calling within the United States (800) 457-7777
Calling from outside the United States (949) 859-4273
162
Appendix A:
Specifications
This appendix describes the Toshiba Magnia 3135R specifications and build-to-order
(BTO) options available at the time this user’s guide was published. The most current
specifications and BTO options are available on the Toshiba America Information
Systems’ web site at www.support.toshiba.com .
The following information applies to the Toshiba Magnia 3135R unless otherwise stated.
Model specifications
PLATFORM
SERIES NAME
PART NUMBER
PROCESSOR
Processor Types
Processor Socket Type
Processor speeds
Available processor speeds
Integrated Coprocessor
Processor Cache (L1) Capacity
Bus Speed
LEVEL 2 (L2) CACHE
Capacity
Cacheable Main Memory Area
SYSTEM BOARD
Form Factor
Chipset
Down Components
I/O Controller
Graphics Controller
SCSI Controller
MAGNIA 3135R
As Listed: See Configuration Page
Intel Pentium III
FC-PGA
733 MHz, 866 MHz, 1GHz
Yes
32KB
133 MHz
256KB
2 GB
Server AT
ServerWorks ServerSet III LE
National PC97317VUL
ATI RAGE IIC
Adaptec AIC-7899
SYSTEM ARCHITECTURE
PCI BUS: (V2.2): (32-Bit, 33 MHz, 64-Bit, 66 MHz)
Intelligent I/O (I20)
HARDWARE MONITORING
(DMI ASIC)
BMC (Baseboard Management Controller)
163
MEMORY
Type
Available Standard Configurations
Maximum
ECC/Parity Support
Data Bus Width
Local Clock Bus Speed
Socket type (arranged in banks of 4)
BIOS (1 MB FLASH EEPROM)
Standard features supported
Special features supported
ECC Registered SDRAM
128 MB
4.0 GB
ECC
72 bit (64 Bit-ECC) address width = 12 bit
133 MHz
168-pin DIMM
Standard PCI-BIOS services, Plug and Play, DMI
Security, Multiple-speed processor support, SMP support,
Fault resilient booting (FRB) Logging of critical events,
Server management features, CMOS configuration RAM
defaults, Multiple language support, Defective DIMM
detection and re-mapping, Automatic detection of video
adapters, PCI BIOS interface, Option ROM shadowing,
System information reporting, ECC support, SMI support,
User-supplied BIOS support, L2 cache support, IPmI
support, Memory sizing, boot drive sequencing, resource
allocation support
SERVER MANAGEMENT
SUPPORTED FUNCTIONS
EXTERNAL INTERFACES
9-Pin Serial
25-Pin Parallel
15-Pin RGB (SVGA video)
Mouse Port (PS/2)
104 Keyboard (PS/2)
USB port
RJ-45 NIC connector
AC IN (Standard 3 prong)
VIDEO
Video Memory: SGRAM
Data Bus width
Speed
Graphic Controller
Local Bus support
Controller Chip
Plug & Play compliant
BitBLT Engine
Two
One
One
One
One
Two
One
One
4MB
32 Bit
33 Mhz
No
ATI RAGE IIC
Yes
Yes
SUPPORTED VIDEO RESOLUTIONS
(Non-Interlaced unless otherwise specified)
640x480
800x600
1024x768
1152x864
1280x1024
Colors
8bpp, 16bpp, 24bpp, 32bpp
8bpp, 16bpp, 24bpp, 32bpp
8bpp, 16bpp, 24bpp, 32bpp
8bpp, 16bpp, 24bpp, 32bpp
8bpp, 16bpp, 24bpp
Freq (Hz)
60,72,75,85
56,60,70,72,75,85
60,70,72,75,85
60,70,75,80,85
60
164
INTERNAL SCSI CONTROLLER
Chipset
Channels
Local Bus support
SCSI support
SCSI Data Transfer Rate
On PCI
SCSI Channel
Adaptec (AIC-7899)
2 ch
Yes
Ultra 160/ultra wide SCSI
160 MB/s
133 MB/s
160 MB/s
ETHERNET SUPPORT
Chipset
Support Network
AFT/ALB Support
Wake-On-LAN™ Support
Port
Intel 82559
100 Base-TX/10 BaseT
Yes
Yes
RJ45
EXPANSION BAY
Internal
3.5"
5.25"
TOTAL
AVAILABLE
CONFIGURED
0
0
4
0
0
0
TOTAL
2/0
0
0
AVAILABLE
2
0
0
CONFIGURED
0
0
0
Hot Swappable Front Access HDD Bays
EXPANSION SLOTS
PCI: Full-Length/Half-Length
ISA: Full-Length
PCI/ISA Shared: Full-Length
POWER SUPPLY (275 W)
Input (Voltage/Frequency)
Hot pluggable/Hot Spare
Lockable
Load sharing
Redundant Power supply option
Standard
Maximum
SUPPORTED SAFETY STANDARDS
US/Canada
Europe
100 - 240V 50/60 Hz
No
No
No
No support
UL, CSA, EMI FCC Part 15, Class B
EN 60950, CE Mark, EU 60950 2nd Ed, +A1, +A2, +A3,
+A11
COOLING FANS
Standard
Variable Speed Fan Control
Redundant Option
5 (with processor fans)
No
No
SECURITY
Hardware
Password Support
Keyboard/Mouse Lock
Miscellaneous
No
Yes
No
No
DIMENSIONS
Measurements
Weight
3.46" (88mm) H x 18.90" (435mm) W x 24.10" (575mm)
55 lbs. (21Kg)
165
CERTIFIED SOFTWARE:
BUNDLED SOFTWARE: Red Hat Linux
COMPLIANCE
EMC-emission:
EN50081-1
EN55022
EN61000-3-2
EN61000-3-3
1992
1994
1995
1995
Residential, commercial & Light Industry
Class B (Domestic environment)
230V/AC, 50Hz
230V/AC, 50Hz
EMC-immunity:
EN55024
EN61000-4-2
EN61000-4-3
EN61000-4-4
EN61000-4-5
EN61000-4-6
EN61000-4-11
1998
1995
1998
1995
1995
1997
1994
Residential, commercial & Light Industry
DO:8kV, AD:15kV
3V/m, 80-1000MHz, 1kHz 80% AM
EN60950
A1
A2
A3
A4
A11
1992
1993
1993
1995
1997
1997
Safety:
AC-line: 1kV, Signal-line: 0.5kV, f:5kHz, Polarity: +/-
AC-line: 1kV/2kV, Polarity: +/3Ve.m.f, 0.15-80MHz, 80% AM
30% 500ms, 100% 10ms, >95% 5000ms
WARRANTY
Standard 3 year parts and labor on site, next day delivery
ENVIRONMENTAL SPECIFICATIONS
Temperature:
Relative Humidity:
41° - 89° F (15° - 32° C)
30% - 80% Rh
166
COMPONENT
STORAGE
FDD
Form Factor
Height
HDD Options (9.0 GB)
Part Number
Form Factor
Height
Interface (All Models)
Buffer
Hot swappable
Certifications
HDD Options (18 GB)
Part Number
Form Factor
Height
Interface (All Models)
Buffer
Hot swappable
Certifications
HDD Options (36 GB)
Part Number
Form Factor
Height
Interface (All Models)
Buffer
Hot swappable
Certifications
720 KB / 1.44 MB
3.5"
1"
DDYS-T09170M (10,000 rpm)
3.5"
1"
Fast-Wide SCSI1, Ultra-Wide SCSI, Ultra2-Wide SCSI,
Ultra160 SCSI
4096 KB
Yes
SMART, SCA2
DDYS-T18350M (10,000 rpm)
3.5"
1"
Fast-Wide SCSI1, Ultra-Wide SCSI, Ultra2-Wide SCSI,
Ultra160 SCSI
4096 KB
Yes
SMART, SCA2
DDYS-T36950M (10,000 rpm)
3.5"
1"
Fast-Wide SCSI1, Ultra-Wide SCSI, Ultra2-Wide SCSI,
Ultra160 SCSI
4096 KB
Yes
SMART, SCA2
167
RAID Controller Options
Toshiba Part Number
Processor type
I20 Ready
Local Bus support
Burst Data Transfer Rate
Standard cache
Memory Type
Memory slots
Tone generator and speaker
Size
SCSI specifications
SCSI Controller
SCSI support
Data Transfer (SCSI channel)
Intel i960RP 32bit RISC Processor 100 MHz
PCI V2.2 Bus Master with Burst Data Transfer rate of
132 MB/sec
32 MB
168 pin Industry Standard DIMMs
1
Down (for system error warnings)
Half-length PCI footprint (6.875" x 4.2")
Qlogic ISP10160A
Fast/Wide SCSI2, Ultra2/Wide SCSI, Ultra160 SCSI
Max 160 MB/sec
SCSI Bus
Devices per channel (max)
SCSI channels
RAID levels supported
SCSI connector
Multi-threading
Physical drive support
Logical drive support
Fault Tolerance
Fault Bus support
Auto Detection of Failed HDD
Rebuild
Hot spare support
Serial interface
CD-ROM
Type
CD-ROM speed
Interface
Buffer
Random Access Time
Sustained Data Transfer Rate
Supported Disk Formats
SE(Single Ended) SCSI Bus with Active Termination
LVD (Low Voltage Differential) SCSI Bus with Active
Termination (Multi Mode)
Up to 15 wide type Devices or Up to 7 Fast type Devices
1
0, 1, 5, 10, and 50
68 pin Internal High Density Connector for 16 bit
Devices: 1 ch: 1
68 pin External Ultra High Density Connector for 8 or 16 bit
Devices: 1 ch: 1
Multi-Threading of up to 255 Commands Simultaneously
Max 8 Physical Drives per 1 Physical Array
8 Logical Drives per MegaRAID Controller*
*In the case of RAID 10 or 50, Logical Drives is spanning RAID 1 or 5
Yes (SAF-TE)
Yes
Multiple Rebuilds and Consistency Checks with
Transparent and User Definable Priority
Yes
1 (9 pin, RS-232C Compliant)
Internal
24X
EIDE/ATAPI
128 KB
110 ms
3,600 KB/sec
CD-R/RW, CD-DA, CD-ROM/XA, Video-CD, CD-I,
Multisession Photo CD, CD-EXTRA
168
KEYBOARD
95-key keyboard
Windows 95 support
3.5mm Travel
12 dedicated function keys
Numeric keypad
Keyboard tilt
Scroll Lock, CapsLock, NumLock
Indicators
Rack Keyboard Option
No
No
No
No
No
No
No
No
POINTING DEVICE
PS/2 Trackball
(on keyboard)
Yes: 2 button with 6’ cable
169
Interrupt levels
IRQ
Device
0
Interval timer
1
Keyboard buffer full
2
Cascade interrupt from slave PIC
3
Onboard serial port B (COM2) - Only for “Enabled”
4
Onboard serial port A (COM1) - Only for “Enabled”
5
Onboard network adapter, USB
6
Onboard floppy disk controller
7
Parallel port LPT1 (Only for “Enabled”)
8
Real-time clock (RTC)
9
ACPI
10
Usable (may be used by the on-board SCSI controller, if RAID controller is
mounted.)
11
Onboard SCSI controller (or RAID controller if mounted)
12
Onboard PS/2 mouse port
13
Math coprocessor
14
IDE controller
15
Usable (may be used by the on-board SCSI controller, if RAID controller is
mounted.)
Assigning PCI device IDs
During setup of PCI expansion cards and system setup of each onboard PCI device, you
will want to assign a unique device number to distinguish between devices that share the
same name. The following table provides a list of available PCI slots, and device
numbers of the onboard devices.
Slot
1
Bus number
Device number
Onboard SCSI controller
0
C
Onboard network adapter
0
E
PCI-5 (on riser)
A1
4
The bus number changes to 2 or 3 depending on the device connected to the PCI bus 0.
170
Appendix B: Interface
1
2
23
24
STL2 Server Board
Pin
Signal
Pin
Signal
1
Power LED Anode
13
Power Switch (GND)
2
Reserved
14
NIC Activity LED Cathode
3
Key
15
Reset Switch (Low True)
4
Fan Fault LED Anode
16
Reserved
5
Power LED Cathode
17
Reset Switch (GND)
6
Fan Fault LED Cathode
18
Reserved
7
Hard Drive Activity LED Anode
19
ACPI Sleep Switch (Low True)
8
Power Fault LED Anode
20
Chassis Intrusion
9
Hard Drive Activity LED Cathode
21
ACPI Sleep Switch (GND)
10
Power Fault LED Cathode
22
Reserved
11
Power Switch (Low True)
23
NMI to CPU Switch (Low True)
12
NIC Activity LED Anode
24
Reserved
171
Main Power Connector
Pin
Signal
Pin
Signal
1
+3.3V
13
+3.3V
2
+3.3V
14
-12V
3
COM
15
COM
4
+5V
16
PS_ON
5
COM
17
COM
6
+5V
18
COM
7
COM
19
COM
8
PWR_OK
20
-5V
9
+5VSB
21
+5V
10
+12V
22
+5V
12
+3.3V
24
COM
Fan Interface
P29 (Fan 3A)
P27 (Fan 2A)
Fan connectors
The server board has five 3-pin fan connectors that are shrouded and keyed. Two are
located next to the processor sockets (one for each processor). Each is intended to be
used for a tachometer fan heat sink.
CAUTION: Fan connectors 2A and 2B can not be used simultaneously. If you plug
fans into both connectors, the fans will not operate correctly.
172
Pin
Signal
1
GND
2
+12V
3
Fan sensor
173
Appendix C: Jumper
Settings
2
4
6
8
1J15
1
3
Jumper Locations
2
10 12
5
7
9
11
1L4
4
6
8
10 12
3
5
7
9
1
11
174
Jumper Name
Pins (default in bold)
What it Does at System Reset
CMOS Clear
1-2
If jumpered, the CMOS settings
will be cleared on the next reset.
These pins should not be
jumpered for normal operation.
Password Disable
3-4
If jumpered, the password will be
cleared on the next reset. These
pins should not be jumpered for
normal operation.
Reserved
5-6
Reserved. These pins should not
be jumpered for normal operation.
Reserved
7-8
Reserved. These pins should not
be jumpered for normal operation.
Reserved
9-10
If these pins are jumpered, the
system will attempt BIOS
recovery. These pins should not
be jumpered for normal operation.
Reserved
11-12
Reserved. These pins should be
jumpered for normal operation.
FRB3
1-2
If these pins are jumpered, FRB is
disabled.
Front Cover
Chassis Intrusion
Sensor
3-4
This is an alternate connector for
the chassis intrusion switch. The
preferred connector are pins 1-2
on block 6A.
Reserved
5-6
Reserved. These pins should be
jumpered for normal operation.
Reserved
7-8
Reserved. These pins should not
be jumpered for normal operation.
Reserved
9-10
Reserved. These pins should not
be jumpered for normal operation.
Reserved
11-12
Reserved. These pins should not
be jumpered for normal operation.
Pins 9-11 should be jumpered for
normal operation.
Jumper (1J15)
Jumper (1L4)
175
General Procedure to Change Jumper Setting
The following short procedure for changing a configuration setting is the same for most of
the jumper functions:
1
Observe the safety and ESD precautions at the beginning of this manual.
2
Turn off all connected peripherals, turn off system power, and disconnect the AC
power cord.
3
Remove the cover. You do not need to remove the server board from the chassis,
and you probably do not need to remove any add-in boards.
4
Locate the configuration jumpers at the edge of the server board toward the front of
the system.
5
Move the jumper to pins specified for the desired setting.
6
Reinstall the cover, connect the power cord, and turn on the system for the change
to take effect.
7
You may need to repeat these steps to move the jumper back to its original setting,
depending on the jumper function.
CMOS Jumper
The jumper at pins 1 and 2 controls whether settings stored in CMOS nonvolatile
memory (NVRAM) are retained during a system reset.
Use the following procedure to restore the system’s CMOS and RTC to default values:
1
See “General Procedure to Change Jumper Setting” above.
2
Short the CMOS jumper on 1 and 2 (the Clear CMOS memory position).
3
Reinstall the cover for your safety and connect the power cord to the system.
4
Turn the system on. Wait for POST to complete and for the messages “NVRAM
cleared by jumper” and “Press F2 to enter Setup” to appear. This automatically
reprograms CMOS and RTC to their default settings.
5
Enter Setup and make any changes necessary (for example, changing the boot
device). Press F10 to save the new Setup configuration and exit Setup.
6
Turn the system off and disconnect the power cord from the system.
7
Remove the cover.
8
Remove the jumper from pin 1 and 2 (the Protect CMOS memory position).
9
Reinstall the cover and connect the power cord to the system.
176
10 Run the BIOS Setup to verify the correct settings (see Chapter 3).
Password Jumper
The jumper at pins 3 and 4 controls whether the user and administrative passwords are
retained or cleared during a system reset.
Use the following procedure to clear the current password and then enter a new one:
1
See “General Procedure to Change Jumper Setting” above.
2
Short the Password jumper on 3 and 4.
3
Reinstall the cover for your safety and connect the power cord to the system.
4
Turn the system on and wait for POST to complete. This automatically clears the
password.
5
Turn off the system and disconnect the power cord.
6
Remove the cover.
7
Remove the jumper from pin 3 and 4.
8
Reinstall the cover and connect the power cord to the system.
FRB Timer Enable Jumper
The jumper at pins 1 and 2 controls the FRB timers.
Use the following procedure to disable the FRB timer:
1
See “General Procedure to Change Jumper Setting” above.
2
Remove the cover.
3
If the FRB Timer enable jumper is shorted on Pin 1 and 2, the FRB timer is disabled.
4
Reinstall the cover for your safety and connect the power cord to the system.
5
Turn the system on and wait for POST to complete.
Chassis Intrusion Detection Jumper
The chassis contains an alarm switch that sends a notification signal to the server
management software if a cover is removed.
Use the following procedure to connect the chassis:
1
See “General Procedure to Change Jumper Setting” above.
2
Remove the cover.
177
3
Connect the chassis intrusion switch cable to Pin 3-4 of connector 1L4(G) on the
server board.
4
Reinstall the cover for your safety and connect the power cord to the system.
5
Turn the system on and wait for POST to complete.
178
Appendix D: Unit Logs
Basic System Configuration
Item
Maker/Model No./Type No.
Serial Number
Date installed
System
Server board
Primary processor
speed and cache
Secondary
processor speed
and cache
Video display
Keyboard
Mouse
Diskette Drive A
CD-ROM drive
Hard disk drive 1
Hard disk drive 2
Hard disk drive 3
Hard disk drive 4
RAID
NIC
Current Usage
Do not exceed a combined power output of 167 watts for the +5 and +3.3-volt outputs.
179
The PCI slots on the server board are rated at a maximum of 5 amperes per slot. The
maximum power allowed for each slot is 20 watts at +5 volts. The average current usage
per slot should not exceed 3.0 amperes per slot (that is 15 watts).
The cooling efficiency varies per slot; therefore, ensure that adequate cooling is available
in the target slot, especially in an expansion slot drawing more than 2.0 amperes.
Calculating Power Consumption
The total combined wattage for the system configuration must be less than the output of
the power supply. Use the two worksheets in this section to calculate the power used by
the server boards. For current and voltage requirements for add-in boards and
peripherals, see your vendor documents.
Worksheet for Calculating DC Power Usage
1
List the current for each board and device in the appropriate voltage level column.
2
Add the currents in each column then go to the next worksheet.
Current (Maximum) at Voltage Level:
Device
+3.3 V
+5 V
–5 V
+12 V
–12 V
Server board
1.0 A
8.0 A
0.1 A
1.1 A
0.4 A
Primary processor
Secondary processor
(if present)
Terminator card, if no
second processor
1.6 A
Memory (four 128-MB
DIMMs)
1.8 A
0.3 A
PCI slot 1
PCI slot 2
1st 3.5-inch hard disk drive
2nd 3.5-inch hard disk
drive
3rd 3.5-inch hard disk
drive
4th 3.5-inch hard disk drive
Current (Maximum) at Voltage Level:
3.5-inch diskette drive
CD-ROM drive
Cooling fan 1
.300
180
Cooling fan 2
.300
Total current
Worksheet for Calculating Total Combined Power
1
From the previous worksheet, enter the total current for each column.
2
Multiply the voltage by the total current to get the total wattage for each voltage level.
3
Add the total wattage for each voltage level to arrive at a total combined power
usage on the power supply.
Voltage Level and Total Current
(V X A = W)
Total Watts for
Each Voltage Level
(+3.3 V) X (______ A)
________ W
(+5 V) X (______ A)
________ W
(–5 V) X (______ A)
________ W
(+12 V) X (______ A)
________ W
(–12 V) X (______ A)
________ W
Total combined wattage
________ W
181
Appendix E: Rack
Template
Using the Template
To use this template, simply print out the template page, but be sure not to use the
Acrobat option of "shrink to page" when printing. This template needs to be printed at the
actual size that it is in this guide.
The Rack Template may be found on the following page.
182
Front Rails
Rear Rails
Rear Rails
Front Rails
4U
4U
12
12
11
11
9
7"
(4U)
Cut along dotted line
3U
Cut along dotted line
10
10
3U
9
7"
(4U)
8
8
7
7
6
6
2U
2U
Rail Screw
1 3/4" (1U)
F
F
1U
3/8"
1/8"
3
Cut along dotted line
4
Front Panel
Screw
F
Cut along dotted line
1/4"
1 3/4" (1U)
1/4"
3/8"
1/8"
4
3
F
F
1
Base Line
Base Line
1U
183
Glossary
TECHNICAL NOTE: Some features defined in this glossary may not be available on
your computer.
Acronyms
A:
Amps
AC:
Alternating Current
ACPI:
Advanced Configuration Power Interface
AFT:
Adapter Fault Tolerance
ALB:
Adapter Load Balancing
ANSI:
American National Standards Institute
APM:
Advanced Power Management
ASCII:
American Standard Code for Information Interchange
ASD:
Automatic Shutdown
ATAPI:
Advanced Technology Attachment Packet Interface
AVI:
Audio Video Interleaved
BIOS:
Basic Input/Output System
BPS:
Bits per Second
CD-ROM: Compact Disc Read-Only Memory
CFG:
Configuration
CHS:
Cylinder Head Sector
CMOS:
Complementary Metal-Oxide Semiconductor
COM1:
Communications Port 1 (serial port)
184
COM2:
Communications Port 2 (serial port)
CPS:
Characters Per Second
CPU:
Central Processing Unit
CRC:
Cyclic Redundancy Check
CRT:
Cathode Ray Tube
CTS:
Clear To Send
DC:
Direct Current
DCD:
Data Carrier Detect
DDS:
Disk Drive Subsystem
DIMM:
Dual Inline Memory Module
DIP:
Dual In-line Package
DMA:
Direct Memory Access
DOS:
Disk Operating System
DPI:
Dots per Inch
DPMS:
Display Power Management Support
DRAM:
Dynamic Random Access Memory
DSP:
Digital Signal Processor
DSR:
Data Set Ready
DTR:
Data Terminal Ready
DVD:
Digital Versatile Disc
ECC:
Error-Correcting Code
ECP:
Enhanced Capabilities Port
EEPROM: Electrically Erasable Programmable Read Only Memory
185
EDO RAM: Enhanced Data Output Random Access Memory
EIDE:
Enhanced Integrated Drive Electronics
EISA:
Extended Industry Standard Architecture
EMP:
Emergency Management Port
EPP:
Enhanced Parallel Port
ESCD:
Extended System Configuration Data
ESD:
Electrostatic Discharge
FAT:
File Allocation Table
FCC:
Federal Communications Commission
FDC:
Floppy Disk Controller
FIR:
Fast Infrared
FPS:
Frames per Second
FTP:
File Transfer Protocol
GB:
Gigabyte
GND:
Ground
GUI:
Graphical User Interface
HDD:
Hard Disk Drive
HTML:
HyperText Markup Language
Hz:
Hertz
IEEE:
Institute of Electrical and Electronic Engineers
I2O:
Intelligent Input/Output
I/O:
Input/Output
IR:
Infrared
186
IrDA:
Infrared Data Association
IRQ:
Interrupt Request
ISA:
Industry Standard Architecture
ISDN:
Integrated Services Digital Network
KB:
Kilobyte
KBD:
Keyboard
Kbps:
Kilobits per second
LAN:
Local Area Network
LBA:
Logical Block Addressing
LCD:
Liquid Crystal Display
LDSM:
LAN Desk Server Manager
LED:
Light-Emitting Diode
LFB:
Linear Frame Buffer
LPT1:
Line Printer Port 1 (parallel port)
LSI:
Large Scale Integration
MB:
Megabyte
Mbps:
Megabits per second
MIDI:
Musical Instrument Digital Interface
MIPS:
Millions of Instructions Per Second
MMX:
Multimedia Extensions
MO:
Magneto-Optical
MPEG:
Movie Pictures Expert Group
MPU:
Microprocessor Unit
187
MS-DOS: Microsoft Disk Operating System
NIC:
Network Interface Controller
NLM:
Network Loadable Module
NMI:
Non-Maskable Interrupt
NPX:
Numerical Processor eXtension
PCI:
Peripheral Component Interconnect
PIO:
Programmed Input/Output
POST:
Power-On Self Test
PnP:
Plug and Play
P-P:
Peak to Peak
RAID:
Redundant Array of Independent Disks
RAM:
Random Access Memory
RFI:
Radio Frequency Interference
RGB:
Red, Green, Blue
ROM:
Read-Only Memory
RTC:
Real-Time Clock
RTS:
Request To Send
RXD:
Received Data
SCSI:
Small Computer Systems Interface
SDRAM: Synchronous Dynamic Random Access Memory
SEL:
System Event Log
SIMM:
Single Inline Memory Module
SMC:
System Management Card
188
SMP:
Symmetric Multiprocessing
SPB:
Synchronous Pipeline Burst (cache)
SST:
Server Setup Tool
SSU:
System Setup Utility
SVGA:
Super Video Graphics Adapter
TSR:
Terminate and Stay Resident
TXD:
Transmitted Data
UART:
Universal Asynchronous Receiver/Transmitter
URL:
Universal Resource Locator
UPS:
Uninterruptable Power Supply
USB:
Universal Serial Bus
V:
Volts
VRM:
Voltage Regulator Module
VGA:
Video Graphics Adapter
VRAM:
Video Random Access Memory
WAN:
Wide Area Network
WOL:
Wake on LAN
WWW:
World Wide Web
189
A
adapter: A device that provides a compatible connection between two units. For
example, the computer’s built-in display adapter takes information from the
computer and translates it into images on the screen. An adapter can take a
number of forms, from a microprocessor to a simple connector. An intelligent
adapter (one that is capable of doing some processing) may also be called a
controller.
address: 1) A number that identifies the location of information, such as the name of a file
or a value for processing, in a computer system or network. A device may use
a specific memory address to transfer information to and from the computer.
See also hexadecimal. 2) A series of characters that identifies the location of a
user’s electronic mailbox.
Advanced Power Management: An industry standard for monitoring and conserving
power consumption, particularly on battery-operated portable computers.
Advanced SCSI Programming Interface (ASPI). A standard governing how devices on
multiple SCSI channels interact with each other and with the rest of the
system.
allocate: To assign space or resources for a specific task. This is often used to refer to
memory or disk space.
alphanumeric: Consisting of numbers, symbols and letters you can type or print.
alternating current (AC): Electric current that reverses its direction at regular intervals.
This type of power is usually supplied to residential and commercial wall
outlets.
American National Standards Institute (ANSI) character set: The set of characters
available in Microsoft Windows (or other operating systems). The character set
includes letters, numbers, symbols and foreign language characters.
190
American Standard Code for Information Interchange (ASCII): A set of binary codes that
represent the most commonly used letters, numbers and symbols. The
standard ASCII set consists of 128 codes (for 7-bit characters). Most PCs use
an extended set of 256 codes (for 8-bit characters). See also binary.
analog: A continuous electrical signal that can vary in frequency and amplitude. In video,
frequency corresponds to resolution and amplitude to brightness. In sound,
frequency is a measure of pitch and amplitude and represents volume. Analog
data must be converted to digital data for input to computers.
animation: A technique of imparting motion to items, either drawings or inert objects.
application: A computer program that you use to perform tasks of a specific type.
Applications include word processors, spreadsheets and database
management systems. See also program.
array: 1) A table of values that a program treats as a single unit. 2) A set of hard disk
drives that are linked together to provide a very large amount of data storage.
asynchronous: A type of data transmission in which information is sent at variable time
intervals. To indicate when a transmitted character begins and ends, it is
preceded by a start bit and followed by an optional parity bit and one or two
stop bits. See also synchronous.
audio: Audio (sound) frequencies for multimedia systems range from 15 Hz to 20,000 Hz.
Audio includes voice, music, sound effects, and ambient sound.
audio mixing: Creating a custom audio track from several different sources using a
sound-mixing device.
audio stream: Frames of compressed audio.
authoring: The process of writing, editing, and assembling a multimedia program on a
personal computer using a multimedia authoring program.
191
authoring program: A software development environment used to create multimedia
applications that reduce complex instructions to simple user tasks such as
menu selection, mouse manipulation or typing. Such programs enable
communicators to develop interactive courseware or presentations on
personal computers without extensive programming knowledge.
AUTOEXEC.BAT: A batch file containing MS-DOS commands that the computer
performs every time you start or restart it. For example, it contains commands
that load the Windows operating system. See also batch file.
AVI (Audio Video Interleaved): Microsoft Corporation’s trade name for synchronization
and digital compression of video and audio signals.
B
backup: A copy of a file, usually on removable disk or tape, kept in case the original is
lost or damaged. It’s a good idea to keep backup copies of all your important
files.
bandwidth: The amount of data that can be transmitted per second over a
communications channel. Bandwidth is measured in bits per second (bps) for
digital devices and in cycles per second (cps) for analog devices.
base memory: See conventional memory.
basic input/output system (BIOS): A set of basic computer instructions in read-only
memory (ROM). The CPU’s BIOS contains the information the computer
needs to perform such tasks as determining the amount of memory, checking
for the presence of devices, and loading the operating system. Some system
components have their own BIOS.
batch file: A file, ending with a .BAT extension, containing MS-DOS commands that you
can perform together, rather than typing them one at a time. Batch files are
useful if you have a series of MS-DOS commands that you need to type fairly
often. For example, you could use a batch file for the commands needed to log
on to a network. See also AUTOEXEC.BAT.
192
baud (baud rate): The speed at which communications devices such as printers,
terminals, and modems transmit information. Information travels as a series of
electronic signals. The baud rate measures the rate of change in these
signals. This is not necessarily the same as bits per second, although the two
are related. It is named for Emil Baudot, a pioneer in printing telegraphy. See
also bits per second.
binary: The base-two number system, in which the only digits are 0 and 1. This system is
used in computers since it can be implemented as a series of electronic
signals that are either off (0) or on (1). From right to left, the digits in a binary
number have the values 1 2 4 8 16 and so on. For example, the binary
number 101 is equivalent to the decimal number 5. If you need to convert
numbers from binary to decimal or vice versa, many pocket calculators and
calculation programs can do the work for you. See also decimal.
bit: A binary digit. The basic unit of information used by the computer, a bit may be either
1 or 0. While an individual bit cannot contain a significant amount of
information, by combining bits into larger units, such as bytes (a group of eight
connected bits), your computer can deal with huge blocks of data. See also
byte.
bitmap: A graphic composed of dots or pixels. It is usually created by a drawing package,
a screen capture utility or a scanner.
bits per second (BPS): A way of measuring the speed at which information is passed
between two devices. This is the basic measure used in modem
communications. This is similar, but not identical, to the baud rate. See also
baud.
board: Short for printed circuit board. A thin card containing chips and other electronic
components connected by metallic lines etched into the surface. Most of the
basic components of a computer, such as the BIOS and memory are
contained on one board, called the motherboard. A computer may contain
additional boards, called daughterboards, that provide specific functions
beyond those on the motherboard.
193
boot: To start the computer. There are two types of boot. Turning on the power is called a
cold boot. Restarting the computer by pressing Ctrl + Alt + Del or the restart
button is called a warm boot. The term boot originates from bootstrap program
(as in pulling itself up by its bootstraps), a program that loads and initializes the
operating system.
boot disk controller: The controller for the disk drive that the BIOS uses to load the
operating system. By default, this is the controller for the primary floppy disk
drive (A:). If you designate another disk drive as the boot drive, its controller
becomes the boot disk controller.
boot priority (startup sequence): The order in which the computer searches its disk
drives to locate the startup files. Under the standard boot priority, a computer
looks for the startup files in the floppy disk drive before checking the primary
hard disk.
briefcase: A Windows 95/98 and NT feature that allows you to update multiple versions
of a file located on different computers.
buffer: An area of memory where information is held until it can be processed. Buffers
are frequently used to compensate for the fact that some parts of the system
are faster than others. For example, the computer sends information to a
printer much faster than even the fastest printer can handle it. A print buffer
stores printer information, enabling the computer to continue with other tasks.
As the printer prints a page, it looks in the buffer to see what to do next.
bus: An electrical circuit that connects the microprocessor with other parts of the
computer, such as the video adapter, disk drives and ports. It is the highway
along which data flows from one device to another. See also local bus.
bus speed: The speed at which the central processing unit (CPU) communicates with the
other elements of the computer. For example, the speed at which data moves
between the CPU and the serial ports.
194
byte: A sequence of eight bits. A byte is the smallest addressable unit of data. Each byte
represents an integer up to 255 in decimal (11111111 in binary, or FF in
hexadecimal), or a character (such as a letter, numeral, or other symbol). See
also binary, bit, gigabyte, hexadecimal, kilobyte, megabyte.
C
cache: An area of very fast memory in which frequently used or recently accessed
information is duplicated for quick retrieval. Accessing data from cache is
faster than accessing it from system RAM. See also disk cache.
cache buffer: A block of memory in a file server used as temporary storage for data being
transferred to and from a workstation. File server performance is greatly
increased with cache buffers which allow workstations to access data from
memory rather than disk.
capacity: The amount of information that can be stored in a computer’s memory or on a
storage device such as a hard disk, diskette, or CD-ROM. Capacity is usually
measured in terms of kilobytes (KB), megabytes (MB) or gigabytes (GB). See
also gigabyte, kilobyte, megabyte.
CD (Compact Disc): Audio format in which sound is digitally encoded on a 12 cm disc.
An optical laser encodes and decodes the digital data to produce exceptionally
pure sound. It’s durable, portable and has random access.
CD-ROM (Compact Disc Read Only Memory): A high-capacity (approximately 600 MB)
storage medium that uses laser optics instead of magnetic means for reading
data. The system can read data from these discs, but cannot write data to the
discs.
central processing unit (CPU): The chips where all the computing takes place. The CPU
is often referred to as the “brain” of the computer. It takes information from
outside sources, such as memory or keyboard input, processes it and sends
the results to another device that uses the information.
195
channel: 1) A path for passing information between devices in a computer system. 2) In
communications, a means of transferring information in analog or digital form.
It may consist of a physical link such as a cable or it may use infrared, radio or
optical transmission.
character: Any letter, number or symbol you can use on the computer. Some characters
are non-printing characters, such as a paragraph break in a word-processing
program. A character occupies one byte of computer storage.
chassis: A metal frame on which computer components are mounted. Typically a server
has a main chassis, containing the motherboard and other standard
components, to which a number of additional chassis containing optional
components can be connected.
chip: A small piece of silicon containing computer logic and circuits for processing,
memory, input/output and/or control functions. Chips are mounted on printed
circuit boards.
choose: To use the mouse or keyboard to select a menu item, a button or an icon.
click: To press and release a mouse button. In Windows, refers to the left mouse button,
unless otherwise stated.
client: 1) A program that requests a service from another program. 2) In a network, a
computer that accesses shared resources provided by the server. See client/
server.
client/server: A network architecture in which processing is divided between the
workstations (which are fully functional personal computers) and the server.
The workstations handle user interaction (front-end processing) while the
server handles centralized functions such as database management and print
spooling.
cold boot: See boot.
COM1 and COM2: Names that the operating system gives the computer’s serial ports to
distinguish between them.
196
commands: Instructions that tell a computer and its devices what to do. You can enter
commands individually, using the keyboard or pointing device, or combine
them into macros or programs. See also macro, program.
communications: The means by which a computer sends data to and receives data from
another computer or device.
compatibility: The ability of two computers, programs and/or devices to operate together.
For example, if you install a modem that is not compatible with your computer,
the modem will not work.
component: A part of the computer system. Many components are combined to create
the whole system.
compression: The translation of data (video, audio, digital or a combination) to a more
compact form for storage or transmission. In computer terms, files are
compressed by removing repetitive and blank characters. Depending on the
type of file, this can result in a size reduction of over 90%. Modems use
compression to reduce the amount of time needed to send or receive a file.
computer system: A central processing unit with its associated devices, such as disk
drives, keyboard and screen, and essential software such as the operating
system and device drivers.
configuration: 1) The set of components in a computer system (such as memory, printers
and disk drives). 2) How parts of the system are set up. For example, the
configuration of the serial port includes the baud rate, parity, data bits and stop
bits.
configuration (.CFG) file: A file that contains the operating specifications and attributes of
a device or program, or contains information about a file or user. For an
expansion board, it provides such information as switch settings, interrupts,
DMA, I/O ports, and system memory.
197
controller: An electronic device that automatically operates a unit or regulates a process.
For example, the computer’s built-in disk drive controller takes information from
the computer and translates it into a form usable by the hard drive. Unlike an
adapter, which in its simplest form can be hardware only, a controller always
includes firmware or software. A controller can take a number of forms, such
as a chip on the motherboard or an add-in board. See also adapter, firmware,
hardware, software.
conventional memory: The first 640 KB of random access memory (RAM) where the
operating system runs programs and stores information. Also called base
memory.
cursor: A symbol that indicates the current position on the screen. The shape of the
cursor varies, depending on the program you’re using and what you’re doing.
D
data: Information that a computer can process. The word “data” is actually plural for
“datum,” meaning a single piece of information.
data bits: A data communications parameter controlling the number of bits used to
represent a character. If data bits = 7, the computer can generate 128 unique
characters, if data bits = 8, the computer can generate 256 unique characters.
decimal: The base-ten numbering system normally used by people. Computers, in
contrast, generally use binary or hexadecimal numbering systems. See also
binary, hexadecimal.
default: Values or options selected by the processor, a controller or a program when you
do not specify a setting. For example, a preset value in a dialog box.
delete: To remove information. Examples are removing a line of text from within a
program or removing files from a disk or other storage device. Synonymous
with erase.
deselect: To remove highlighting from text, such as an item in a list or menu, or to remove
handles from graphical objects.
198
device: A component attached to the computer. Internal devices are mounted on the
chassis. External devices are connected to the computer via a port.
device driver: A program that controls the operation of a specific device such as the
screen, CD-ROM drive or printer. The operating system loads many device
drivers when you turn the computer on.
diagnostic tools: Tools used to help solve installation and configuration problems. The
Toshiba Server Setup Tool and System Setup Utility are examples of
diagnostic tools.
dialog box: 1) A box requesting information. Typically it contains a combination of
buttons, lists and text-entry boxes. 2) A box containing a message. It may tell
you that a process has completed successfully. Alternatively, it may be a
warning that the computer cannot do what you asked or that obeying your
instructions may destroy data. This second type of dialog box is also called a
message box.
digital: Data expressed in discrete numerical units according to a predetermined code. In
computing, data are expressed in binary code--an electronic pulse or no pulse,
either “on” or “off.” Voice and video, which usually originate in analog form, can
be converted to digital signals. Voice is converted using pulse code modulation
(PCM) to 64 Kbit/s.
digital signal processor (DSP): A chip designed for high-speed data manipulation and
widely used in communications and data control applications. Sound boards
use DSPs to handle various sound formats and filters. Modems use DSPs to
handle modulation protocols.
DIMM: Dual Inline Memory Module. A unit of RAM used for memory expansion.
DIP switch: A set of tiny toggle switches built into a dual in-line package, which is
mounted directly on a circuit board. The switches may be rocker-style or
sliders. In both cases, the tip of a pen or pencil is required to flip the switch on
or off.
199
Direct Memory Access (DMA): A dedicated channel which bypasses the Central
Processing Unit (CPU) and enables a device to access memory directly. If two
devices use the same DMA channel, the data required by one device
overwrites the data required by the other--this is one type of hardware conflict.
To resolve the conflict, you must reassign one of the devices to a vacant DMA
channel.
directory: See folder.
disable: To turn a computer option off. In a menu or dialog box, a disabled option appears
dim (or “grayed out”) and clicking it has no effect. See also enable.
disc: An optical storage medium for computer information. It consists of a shiny, nonmagnetic metal platter on which information is recorded and read back using
laser technology. See also CD-ROM.
disk: 1) The general term for any circular platter that can store computer information. 2) A
magnetic storage medium, such as a hard disk or diskette. It consists of a
platter or set of platters coated with a magnetic material and enclosed inside a
protective case. See also CD-ROM, hard disk, diskette.
disk cache: A technique that speeds up processing. Each time your application receives
data from a disk, a special program stores the data in a reserved area of
memory (RAM). When the application next requests data, it looks for it first in
the disk cache. Since reading from and writing to memory is quicker than using
a disk drive, this can considerably improve system performance.
disk drive: The device that reads and writes information and programs on a diskette or
hard disk. It rotates the disk at high speed past one or more read/write heads.
diskette: A thin, flexible diskette in a protective jacket that stores magnetically encoded
information. Diskettes can be removed from the computer and come in two
sizes: 5.25-inch and 3.5-inch. The server uses 3.5-inch diskettes.
disk mirroring: A technique in which the contents of a hard disk are duplicated on other
hard disk(s) to protect against data loss. Any changes made to the contents of
the original disk are simultaneously applied to the other disk(s).
200
disk striping: The spreading of data over multiple hard disks to improve performance. The
technique combines a set of partitions (which must all be the same size)
residing on separate disks into a single volume which the operating system
treats as a logical drive. All the partitions can be accessed at once, greatly
increasing data throughput. Disk striping does not inherently provide fault
tolerance or error checking. It is used in conjunction with other techniques,
such as disk mirroring.
display: A computer screen.
document: 1) A file containing a report, letter, user guide, etc. 2) In Windows 95,
Windows 98 or Windows NT, any file that contains the information you are
working on. See also file.
documentation: The set of manuals and/or other instructions written for the users of a
computer system or program. Computer system documentation typically
includes procedural and tutorial information as well as descriptions of system
functions.
double-click: To press and release the mouse button rapidly twice without moving the
mouse. In Windows, refers to the left mouse button, unless otherwise stated.
double-density diskette: A diskette that holds up to 360 KB (5.25-inch) or 720 KB (3.5inch) of information.
download: 1) To receive a file from another computer through a modem. 2) To transmit
font data from the computer to a printer. See also upload.
dpi: Dots per inch. The number of ink dots printed per linear inch. For example, a printer
specification of 300 x 300 dpi means that the printer can make 300 dots per
inch both vertically and horizontally.
drag: To hold down the mouse button while moving the cursor. Refers to the left mouse
button, unless otherwise stated.
driver: See device driver.
201
dual in-line package (DIP): A standard for packaging integrated circuits by enclosing
them in a rectangle of ceramic or plastic with downward-pointing connection
pins.
DSP: A digital signal processor is a chip designed for real-time applications. DSP
techniques are used in PC processors as well as media engines. For example,
some high-end notebooks use a DSP chip to provide Sound Blaster emulation
as well as 28.8 modem support.
duplex: The method used to transmit data in both directions between two devices.
Synonymous with full duplex. See also half duplex, full duplex.
E
EISA: Extended ISA, an expansion bus design which maintains compatibility with ISA but
provides a 32-bit data path and additional features. It provides much faster
data throughput than ISA and is used in high performance servers.
emulation: A technique in which a device or program imitates another device or program.
enable: To turn on a computer option.
erase: See delete.
error-correcting code: Code designed for transmission of electronic data, that encodes
data in such a way that transmission errors may be detected and corrected by
examination of the encoded data on the receiving end. Error-correcting code is
used in most modem and in some RAM. In the latter case, circuitry is used that
generates checksums to correct errors greater than one bit.
escape: 1) To cancel the task currently in progress. 2) A code (ASCII code 27, generated
by the ESC key) telling the computer that what follows are commands, not
data. Used with peripheral devices such as printers and modems.
202
Ethernet: A local area network (LAN) standard for hardware, communications and
cabling. It links network nodes in a bus topology using coaxial cable, or in a
star topology using fiber-optic cable or twisted-pair cable. Normally, all nodes
share the total bandwidth, which is 10 Mbps (Ethernet), 100 Mbps (Fast
Ethernet) or 1000 Mbps (Gigabit Ethernet). With switched Ethernet, each
sender and receiver pair have the full bandwidth.
execute: To perform a command or run a program.
executable file: A computer program that is ready to run. Application programs and batch
files are examples of executable files. Names of executable files usually end
with a .BAT, .COM or .EXE extension.
extended memory: Memory beyond 1MB. Windows 95/98 and NT, OS/2 and some MSDOS programs use extended memory.
extension: See file name extension.
external device: Any device connected to a port on your computer. Examples of external
devices are printers, tape backup units, and scanners.
F
faceplate: A protective cover that can be removed to permit the installation of an
additional device.
file: A collection of related information (such as the information required for a program or
document) saved on disk with a unique name. See also document.
file allocation table (FAT): The section of a disk that keeps track of the location of files
stored on the disk.
file name: A set of characters that uniquely identifies a file within its folder or directory. It
consists of two parts: the actual name and the file name extension. In
Windows for Workgroups and DOS, the first part of the name is limited to eight
characters. In Windows 95, Windows 98 and Windows NT, a file name can be
up to 255 characters. See also file name extension.
203
file name extension: The characters at the end of a file name, starting with a period. They
indicate the type of file. In Windows and DOS, extensions consist of three
characters apart from the period. Examples are .EXE for program files, .HLP
for help files, .BMP for bitmap files, .INI for initialization files.
firewall: A security system that prevents computers in an organization’s network from
communicating directly with computers outside the network. It consists of a
computer system which controls access to the organization’s network and
routes incoming and outgoing messages. See also proxy server.
firmware: Software permanently stored in read-only memory in the CPU or in a device
controller. You can update the information by replacing the ROM or
reprogramming flash ROM.
flash ROM: A type of non-volatile memory that you can reprogram with software supplied
by the device manufacturer. It allows you to upgrade the server or controllers
without replacing the ROM.
folder (also called directory): Part of the organizational structure that allows the operating
system to locate files (documents). Each folder holds a number of related files
and folders (subdirectories).
font: A complete set of characters of one design and size, used to display information on
the screen or output it to a printer.
format: To prepare a blank disk for use with the computer’s operating system. Formatting
creates a structure on the disk so that the operating system can write
information to the disk or read information from the disk.
frame: An individual picture in film and video. Film has 24 fps. Video has 30 fps. With the
SMPTE time code, each video frame has a unique address. On a videodisc, a
frame is a block of coherent information (a picture, block of text, etc.). A
videodisc contains 54,000 frames, each with a unique address.
full duplex: A type of data transmission in which data flows between two devices in both
directions simultaneously. See also half duplex.
204
full-motion video: 1) Video sequences or systems that provide the number of images per
second to result in the illusion of smooth motion. 2) The rate of standard video
signals in the U.S. (30 frames per second) and in Europe (25 frames per
second).
function keys: The keys labeled F1 through F12. They are located above the
alphanumeric keys on the keyboard. Their function is determined by the
operating system and/or individual programs.
G
gigabyte (GB): A unit of data storage equal to 1,073,741,824 bytes (1024 x 1024 x 1024
bytes). See also byte.
graphics: Information presented as drawings, pictures or other images, such as charts or
graphs.
ground: A conductor to which all components of an electric circuit are connected. It is
connected to the earth and is the point of reference for voltages in the circuit.
GUI (Graphical User Interface): A user interface that uses a mouse and a bit-mapped
graphics display to make basic computer operations substantially easier for the
user. Standard features include message boxes, a clipboard, dialog boxes,
scroll boxes, WYSIWYG (what-you-see-is-what-you-get) on-screen page
presentation and multiple on-screen windows.
H
half duplex: A type of data transmission in which data flows between two devices in one
direction at a time. See also full duplex.
handles: Eight small boxes that appear around a graphical object when you select it. You
can use the handles to change the size and shape of the object. Dragging the
middle handle on one side of an object stretches or shrinks the object in that
direction, changing its shape as well as its size. Dragging a corner handle
makes the object larger or smaller while preserving its shape.
205
hard disk: A storage device composed of a rigid platter or platters that store information
magnetically. Hard disks hold much more information than diskettes and are
used for the long-term storage of programs and data. The primary (or only)
hard disk in a personal computer is usually fixed, but some computers have
secondary hard disks that are removable. In a server, all hard disks may be
removable. By default, the primary hard disk is referred to as drive C.
hardware: The physical, electronic and mechanical components of a computer system,
including devices such as a screen, disk drive, printer, mouse and processor.
hexadecimal: The base-16 numbering system used by programmers to represent binary
numbers. Digits above 9 are represented by letters (the 15 digits are 1, 2, 3, 4,
5, 6, 7, 8, 9, A, B, C, D, E and F). Two hexadecimal digits are equivalent to the
eight bits in a byte. For example, F1 in hexadecimal is equivalent to 11110001
in binary. See also binary, decimal.
high-density diskette: A diskette that holds 1.2 MB (5.25-inch) or 1.44 MB (3.5-inch) of
information.
hot-swappable drives: Drives that you can install or remove without using screws or
cables and without powering down the server.
hub: A central connecting device in a network that joins communications lines together in
a star configuration. A switching hub also routes messages and packets
among the computers connected to the network.
hypermedia: A method of providing multiple connected pathways through a body of
information, allowing users to jump easily from a topic to related or
supplementary material, which may be text, graphics, audio, images or video.
HyperText Markup Language (HTML): A special coding scheme used to prepare text and
graphics for access over the World Wide Web.
I
icon: A small picture that represents a function, file, or program.
206
Industry Standard Architecture (ISA): An expansion bus design that provides a 16-bit
data path with 16-bit and 8-bit slots. A 16-bit expansion board can use two
adjacent 8-bit slots. See also EISA.
infrared port: A port that allows data to be transferred by infrared signals instead of a
cable. It works on the same principle as a remote control for a television set.
input: Information received by a computer from a storage device such as a disk, or an
input device such as the keyboard.
input/output (I/O): Input and output are two of the three functions that computers perform
(the other is processing). Input/Output describes the interrelated tasks of
providing information to the computer and providing the results of processing
to users. I/O devices include keyboards (input) and printers (output). A disk
drive is both an input and an output device, since it can both provide
information to the computer and receive information from the computer.
instruction: A statement in a computer program that performs a particular function or
task.
Integrated Services Digital Network (ISDN): A world-wide communications network for
delivering telephone and data services. It uses two types of communications
channel: a B channel which carries voice, graphics and data at 64 Kbps, and a
D channel which carries control information for signalling at 16 Kbps. A basic
ISDN installation typically provides two B channels and one D channel.
Intelligent Input/Output (I2O): A standard for offloading input and output to an auxiliary
processor. The auxiliary processor (I/O processor) manages the data transfer
while the CPU does something else.
interface: A connection between two parts of a system that lets them work together.
There are different types of interface: 1) Elements such as the graphics
design, prompts and menus of a program allow you to interact with the
program. These elements make up the user interface. 2) A physical connection
between one system or device and another so that information can be
exchanged.
207
interlaced: A method of refreshing a computer screen, in which only every other line of
pixels is refreshed. Interlaced monitors take two passes to create a complete
screen image.
Internet: The collection of computers located throughout the world that are connected
over telephone lines to provide electronic mail and other services.
Intranet: World Wide Web pages designed to serve a limited group of people, such as
the employees of a particular company. Users must enter a password to
access the information provided.
K
keyboard: The device you use to type information into the computer. Each key on the
keyboard is a switch that is activated when you press it. The switch sends a
specific code, representing the character printed on the key, to the processor.
keyboard shortcut: A key or combination of keys you use to perform a task instead of
using a pointing device, such as a mouse.
kilobyte (KB): A unit of data storage equal to 1024 bytes. Although kilo means 1000, for
computers it refers to 1024, or 2 raised to the 10th power. See also byte.
L
laser disc: Reflective-optical videodisc, recorded and read by laser light.
legacy device: 1) A peripheral device or card that does not have Plug and Play capability
built into it. 2) In networking, a device that is designed to work with proprietary
communication protocols instead of conforming to open standards.
light-emitting diode: A semiconductor device that emits light when it receives an electric
current. Used for indicators like disk activity lights.
liquid crystal display (LCD): A type of display that uses a liquid substance between two
transparent electrode panels. By selectively turning the electrodes on and off,
the LCD creates the images you see on the screen.
load: To move information from a storage device (such as a CD-ROM) into memory,
making it available to the computer for processing.
208
local bus: A type of bus that connects devices directly to the microprocessor. Because
there are no wires between the CPU and the device, information is passed at a
much greater speed than through the system bus. See also bus.
logical drive: A section of a disk that is recognized by the operating system as a separate
disk drive. A system’s logical drives may differ from its physical drives. For
example, a single hard disk drive may be partitioned into two or more logical
drives.
M
macro: A named sequence of instructions within a programming language or application.
A macro may be predefined in the language or application, or you may define
your own macros for procedures you use frequently. The macro name enables
you to call up the sequence of instructions when you need them.
main board: See motherboard.
math coprocessor: A special processor that performs arithmetic calculations on
exponential numbers. Since a computer’s main processor calculates with
integers, a math coprocessor can greatly improve system speed if you work
with large spreadsheets or some graphics programs. Some processor chips
include a built-in math coprocessor.
megabyte (MB): A unit of data storage equal to 1024 KB. Although mega means million,
one megabyte is actually 1,048,576 bytes (1024 x 1024 bytes).
memory: Chips the computer uses for temporary information storage. Information in
memory is available to the computer for processing. Two types of memory are
Random Access Memory (RAM) and Read-Only Memory (ROM). See
Random Access Memory and Read-Only Memory.
menu: A list of options on the screen, from which you can choose.
microphone: An input device that converts sound into electronic signals that can be
recorded or amplified.
209
microprocessor: A single integrated circuit (“chip”) that executes instructions, and
monitors and controls functions. One such chip forms the Central Processing
Unit (CPU) of a computer.
MIDI (Musical Instrument Digital Interface): A standard for connecting musical
instruments, synthesizers and computers. The MIDI standard provides a way
of translating music into a form computers can use, and vice versa.
MIPS (Millions of Instructions Per Second): A means of measuring a computer processor’s
performance.
mode: An operational state or method of operation, for example, Sleep Mode.
modem: A device for transmitting computer information over telephone lines. A modem
converts (modulates) digital information for transmission and also converts
(demodulates) information it receives back to digital format. Many modems
also interpret and execute commands received from the computer.
monitor: An external device that uses rows and columns of pixels to display
alphanumeric characters or graphical images. A cathode ray tube (CRT) is a
common type of monitor.
motherboard: The main printed circuit board in the computer. It contains the processor
chip, memory and other major system components. Sometimes called the
main board.
MPC (Multimedia PC): A specification developed by Tandy and Microsoft for the
minimum platform capable of running multimedia software. PCs carrying the
MPC logo can run any software that also displays the MPC logo.
MPEG (Motion Picture Experts Group): Proposed universal standard for the conversion
of analog video images to a digital format. MPEG is a working committee
under the auspices of the International Standards Organization (ISO) that is
attempting to define standards for digital compression/decompression of
motion video/audio for use in computer systems. Its first priority is to develop
methods for encoding video within the 1.5 Mbit/second CD-ROM data rate. As
an evolving standard, MPEG-2 extends MPEG compression and
decompression capabilities.
210
multimedia: A combination of two or more elements, such as sound, animation and video
in a computer program or presentation. Multimedia programs, which require
huge amounts of storage space, have become very popular with the wide
availability of CD-ROM drives.
multiprocessing: The simultaneous execution of different programs or of different parts of
the same program by two or more CPUs installed in the same computer.
multitasking: A technique in which the computer runs one program for a short time and
then switches to the next program. Because people’s sense of time is much
slower than the computer’s speed, the programs seem to run simultaneously.
N
network: A collection of interconnected, individually controlled computers, together with
the hardware and software used to connect them. A network allows users to
share data and peripheral devices, such as printers, and to exchange
electronic mail.
Network Interface Controller (NIC): A controller that acts as the communications
interface between a personal computer and a network.
Netware Loadable Module (NLM): A program you load and unload while the server is
running. Four types of NLMs exist: management utilities and server application
modules, disk drivers, LAN drivers, and name space NLMs.
non-interlaced: A method of refreshing a computer screen, in which each pixel of every
line is refreshed as the electron beam scans across and down the screen.
non-system disk: A disk for storing programs and files that cannot be used to start the
computer. See system disk.
non-volatile memory: Memory that retains data in the absence of an external power
source.
O
off line: Not currently connected to or under the control of the computer. Used to refer to
equipment such as disk drives and printers.
211
on line: A functional state in which a device is ready to receive or transmit information.
online: Available through the computer. Online may refer to information on the hard disk,
such as online documentation or online help, or a connection, through a
modem, to another computer or the Internet.
online spare: A hard disk drive used in disk mirroring and other fault tolerance techniques
to replace a failed drive without user intervention.
orphaned partitions: These occur in disk mirroring when the drive containing the master
partition fails. If a drive containing a duplicate partition fails, the system marks
the master partition as unmirrored.
operating system: A set of programs that controls how the computer works. Operating
system functions include creating programs and data files, and controlling the
flow of information between the processor, memory and devices. Examples of
operating systems used by computers are MS-DOS, Windows 95 and Novell
NetWare.
operating system disks: The disks containing the operating system. Also known as
system disks.
output: The results of a computer operation. Familiar forms of output are information 1)
printed on paper, 2) displayed on a screen, 3) sent through the serial port or
internal modem, or 4) stored on disk. See also input/output (I/O).
P
palette: In some programs, a palette is a collection of drawing tools, brush widths, line
widths, and colors. In other programs, the palette determines the number of
colors that can be displayed on the screen.
parallel: Two or more processes or events that can happen at the same time without
interfering with each other.
parallel interface: A type of information exchange that simultaneously transmits all the
bits representing a character. It uses a separate line for each data bit in a byte.
In contrast, a serial interface transmits characters along a single data line one
bit at a time, making it much slower than a parallel interface.
212
parity: A method in serial communications of making sure that the information received is
the same as the information that was sent. It consists of adding an error
detection bit to a group of data bits, making the sum of the bits either odd or
even. When you’re using a modem to connect to another computer, you can
set parity to none, odd or even. In general, you should set parity to none,
unless you’re requested to do otherwise.
password: A unique string of characters used to identify a specific user or group of users
for security purposes. A password prevents unauthorized use of the computer.
path (full path): The unique identifier for a file consisting of the file name preceded by the
drive, the top-level directory or folder and any lower-level directories or folders.
peripheral devices: Computer devices other than the CPU and memory. A peripheral
device may be internal (inside the case), or external (outside the case).
Peripheral Component Interface (PCI): A local bus that provides a high-speed data path
between the CPU and up to 10 peripheral devices. It supports both
multiplexing and the Plug and Play standard. In a Pentium PC, there is
generally a mix of PCI and ISA expansion slots or PCI and EISA expansion
slots.
pixel: A picture element. The smallest dot that can be produced on a screen or printer.
Plug and Play: A design standard that hardware manufacturers use to produce devices
that can be configured automatically (provided you use Windows 95 or
Windows 98).
pointing device: Any device, such as a mouse or trackball, that enables you to move the
cursor on the screen.
port: A socket on the computer where you plug in a cable for connection to a network or
a peripheral device. It provides the electrical connection through which the
computer sends and receives information. Standard ports include parallel and
serial ports.
power on features: Features the server updates whenever it is turned on, such as date,
time and the Num Lock key state.
213
Power On Self Test (POST): A set of routines that are stored in ROM and performed
when you start or reset a computer. They test system components such as the
processor(s), memory, disk drives, mouse and keyboard to make sure they are
connected and working correctly.
power up: To turn on a computer, or any peripheral device that has its own power supply.
processor: See central processing unit.
program: A set of instructions that tells the computer what to do. Programs call for
information (input), which is entered at the keyboard or by means of a pointing
device, or obtained from a file. The computer processes the data, according to
the instructions in the program, and sends the results to a device such as a
screen, a printer or a disk. See also application, macro, utility.
prompt: An audible or visible signal, such as a beep or a screen message, that tells you
that you need to do something or that a process is complete. See also system
prompt.
properties: Windows 95, Windows 98 and Windows NT treat windows, icons,
applications, disk drives, documents, folders, modems, and printers as selfcontained objects. Each object has its own properties, such as the object’s
name, size, position on-screen, and color. You can change an object’s
properties using the Properties dialog box. See Windows Help for more
information on changing properties.
protocol: A set of rules and conventions that makes it possible to transfer information
between computers. If you’re transmitting a file, both modems must use the
same protocol—just as two people talking on the telephone must speak the
same language to communicate effectively.
214
proxy server: 1) An application that forms part of a firewall by breaking the connection
between the sender and receiver. It intercepts requests for information,
decides whether they should be fulfilled and passes them on to an internal
server. It therefore prevents outsiders from obtaining internal addresses and
details about a private network. Also called proxy. 2) A server that stores
frequently requested data, such as popular Web pages, to reduce network (or
Internet) access.
R
radio frequency interference (RFI): All computer equipment generates radio frequency
signals. The FCC regulates the amount of RFI a computing device can leak
past its shielding. A Class A device is sufficient for office use. Class B is a
more stringent classification applying to equipment for home use. Toshiba
desktop and notebook computers are Class B devices, Toshiba servers are Class A.
radio frequency interference (RFI) shield: A metal shield enclosing the printed circuit
boards of the printer or computer to prevent interference with radio and TV
reception.
random access memory (RAM): High-speed memory which holds a copy of the
operating system, any currently executing programs, and any information
undergoing processing. RAM is volatile, which means that all information in
RAM is lost when its power supply is turned off.
read-only memory (ROM): A type of memory which the computer can access but cannot
change. It contains information that controls the computer’s basic operation.
ROM is non-volatile memory, which means that the information stored in ROM
is permanent—it is not lost when you turn off the computer.
real time: An operating mode in which data is received, processed, and the results
returned immediately.
reboot: See boot, restart.
215
Redundant Array of Independent Disks (RAID): A group of hard disks that are managed
as a unit to provide increased performance and various levels of error recovery
and fault tolerance. The technique can be implemented in software using
standard disk controllers, or it can be designed into the disk controller itself.
Registry: The central information database for Windows 95/98 or Windows NT. It holds
hardware-specific information and stores configuration details for programs,
reducing the need for initialization (.INI) files.
remapping: Redefining a computer component. For example, remapping the keyboard
refers to assigning a new symbol or letter for some or all of the keys.
remote console: An input/output device that consists of a keyboard and monitor and is
physically separate from the computer to which it is connected.
removable disk: A disk that can be removed from the computer and used to transfer files
to another computer or to hold backup copies. Diskettes are an obvious
example, but removable hard disks are available. In addition, there are high
capacity removable disks which only work in proprietary drives.
resolution: A measure of the sharpness of the images that can be produced by a printer
or displayed on a screen. For a printer, resolution is expressed in dots per inch
(dpi). For a screen, it is expressed as the number of pixels available
horizontally and vertically.
restart: Resetting a computer without turning it off (also called “warm boot” or “soft
reset”). To restart the computer while it is on, press Ctrl + Alt + Del or press the
reset button. In Windows 95/98 and Windows NT, you can also use the Restart
option on the Shut Down menu. See also boot.
resources: 1) Any part of a computer system or network that can be allocated to a
program. Examples are printers and disk drives. 2) Data channels and storage
areas that can be allocated to devices. Examples of these system resources
are memory, interrupt request (IRQ) lines, direct memory access (DMA)
channels, and port addresses. On the server, you use the Toshiba System
Setup Tool to configure system resources.
216
riser card: An expansion card that is used to physically extend a slot for a chip or card in
a fully-loaded computer to make room to plug it in. It may also refer to a card
that contains several slots used in low-profile, space-saving cabinets. The
cards are plugged into the riser card and reside parallel with the motherboard.
RJ-11: A modular telephone connector used on most telephone networks and directconnect modems.
RJ-45: (Registered Jack-45) A telephone connector that holds up to eight wires. RJ-45
plugs and sockets are used in 10BaseT Ethernet and Token Ring Type 1
devices.
root directory: The directory on a disk at the “top” of the directory (or folder) structure. All
subdirectories (folders) on the disk connect directly or indirectly to the root
directory. In MS-DOS, the root directory on drive C is referred to as C:\.
router: A device that routes data packets from one local area network (LAN) or wide area
network (WAN) to another.
RS232-C: The standard defining control, data and status signals for cables allowing
asynchronous communication with computers, printers, and other peripheral
devices.
S
SCSI channel: A standard communications protocol for external and internal device
expansion, such as hard drives, tape drives, and CD-ROM drives.
SCSI ID: A unique identifier assigned to each SCSI device connected to a SCSI bus. The
ID number defines the device address and determines the device priority on
the bus. ID 7 (SCSI controller) is the highest priority; ID 0 is the lowest.
select: To highlight text or display handles around graphics.
serial: The handling of data bits one after the other.
serial communications: A communications technique that uses as few as two
interconnecting wires to send bits one after another.
217
serial interface: An interface between systems or system components in which
information is transmitted sequentially, one bit at a time. The transmitted bits
are reassembled at the receiving component. A modem uses a serial interface.
serial port: A communications port (COM1 or COM2) to which you can connect a serial
device, such as a modem, a mouse or a serial printer.
server: A computer or program that provides information or shared resources in
response to external requests. For example, a file server stores on its hard
disks the programs and data files for all the workstations in a local area
network (LAN).
session: The time during which a program is running. For example, an MS-DOS session
under Windows is the time during which you execute MS-DOS commands or
run an MS-DOS program.
shortcut: 1) A feature of Windows 95/98 and Windows NT that allows you to use an icon
to open folders and documents and their associated programs, to start
programs directly or to move from folder to folder. 2) A keyboard shortcut.
SIMM: Single In-line Memory Module. A unit of RAM used for memory expansion.
Small Computer Systems Interface (SCSI): A standard interface providing an expansion
bus for connecting devices such as disk drives to a computer. You can connect
up to seven SCSI devices to a single SCSI port.
software: The computer programs or instructions that tell the hardware what tasks to
perform. The general classes of software are operating systems, applications
and utilities.
Stand by: A feature in Windows 98 that, like Windows 95’s Suspend command or
Toshiba’s Resume Mode, allows you to turn off the computer without exiting
your applications and to continue from where you left off when you turn on the
computer again.
stop bit: In asynchronous serial communications, one or more bits indicating the end of a
block of characters.
218
synchronous: Having a constant time interval between successive bits, characters or
events. Synchronous data transmission requires both the sending and
receiving devices to use special synchronizing characters to correct variations
in timing between the devices. See also asynchronous.
system disk: A diskette that contains the operating system files that are needed to start
the computer. Any physical diskette can be formatted as a system disk. A
system disk is also called a bootable disk.
system prompt: In MS-DOS mode, one or more characters that indicate that the
operating system is ready for you to enter a command. You can enter an
operating-system command or start a program from a system prompt.
System Configuration Information file (.SCI): This file allows you to create a backup of
the configuration and store it. You will be able to restore the system
configuration from the .SCI file.
striping: See disk striping.
swap area: An area of hard disk that acts as an extension of RAM. Programs, or parts of
programs, that are in active use but currently in a waiting state can be shifted
to this area (swapped out) so that others can run in RAM. It is a form of virtual
memory. Also called a swap file.
T
terminate-and-stay-resident (TSR): A type of program, also called memory resident, that
stays in memory even when you aren’t using it.
terminator: A hardware item that must be installed in the last device connected to a bus
to control noise and prevent the signal from oscillating.
token ring: A type of LAN that uses the token-passing access method with a ring
topology.
tracks: One of several concentric rings on a diskette or hard disk that defines a distinct
area of data storage. Tracks are encoded on the disk during formatting.
219
U
Uninterruptible Power Supply (UPS): A device connected between a piece of electrical
equipment, such as a computer system, and the AC power source to protect
against transient power conditions and short-term power outages. A UPS unit
contains a power-level sensor and a battery. If the sensor detects a loss of
power, it switches over to the battery giving you time to save data and close
down the system.
upload: To send a file to another computer through a modem. See also download.
utility: A computer program that lets you modify how certain aspects of your computer
function. Utilities differ from applications because you don’t use them to do real
work—they just make your life easier. Different utilities manage fonts,
compress files and check for viruses.
V
volatile memory: Random Access Memory (RAM) that is capable of storing information
only as long as the computer is turned on.
W
Wake on LAN (WOL): The Wake on LAN function turns on the server when the client PC
sends the necessary code.
warm boot: Restarting the computer without turning it off. See also boot, restart.
.WAV file: Digital audio uses computer-based technology to record, handle and recreate
sound. Digital audio systems sample the waveform at fixed time intervals and
reduce the sound to a sequence of numbers. When you play back a digital
waveform or . WAV file, the software transforms the numeric data back into its
original acoustic waveform.
window: A portion of the screen that can display its own application or document.
wizard: A helpful online tutor that guides you through common procedures or processes,
as in hardware wizard.
220
World Wide Web: The international network of home pages linked together over the
Internet by hypertext jumps. A user of the WWW can jump from page to page
regardless of the location of each page.
write protection: A safeguard that physically prevents you from deleting the information
on a diskette or other storage media. 3.5-inch diskettes have a small square
hole with a plastic tab. To protect information on the diskette, slide this tab to
uncover the hole.
Z
zoom: A feature in many applications that makes an object on the screen smaller or
larger.
221
222
Index
basic system configuration 145
battery 31, 71
bays 26
BIOS settings 85
BIOS Setup Utility 84
advanced menu 87
BIOS setup 48
boot menu 92
changing settings 85
exit menu 93
keyboard commands 84
main menu 85
options 84
recommended server settings 91
security menu 90
server menu 91
upgrading 93
blank screen 126
boot block write protect jumper 143
booting the server 47
changing SCSI device settings 95
changing the number of CPUs 97
character distortion 126
characters do not display properly 126
chassis intrusion detection jumper 144
checklist
before calling for service 127
installation 44
power consumption 45
problem solving 122
cleaning the server 17
CMOS jumper 141
common hardware problem
CD-ROM drive status indicator 127
characters do not display properly 126
distorted characters 126
FDD activity indicator 126
HDD not responding 127
HDD status indicator 127
power indicator 125
screen is blank 126
common hardware problems 125
connecting AC power 44
connecting peripheral devices 34
connector, AC power 29
contacting Toshiba 2
controls and indicators
front panel 23
HDD 28
operation buttons 24
cooling fans 27, 55
CPU modules 61
CPU slots 30
C
D
cabling the server board 32
calculating power consumption 146
CD-ROM 26
CD-ROM drive status indicator 127
CD-ROM drive, starting the server from the 47
change jumper setting 141
devices
installing 50
optional 50
SCSI 74
USB-compliant 29
downgraded server operation 75
A
AC power connector 29
AC power, connecting 44
Adaptec SCSI utility, using the 94
application software problems 124
assiging PCI deivce IDs 135
available PCI device slots 135
B
223
drives 26
CD-ROM 26
floppy disk 27
E
environmental considerations 20, 35
equipment mounting guidelines 37
ergonomics 17, 18, 19
choosing a location 35
environmental considerations 35
selecting a workplace 50
working safely 51
error checking 123
Error Log details
saving 117
expansion cards 78
installing 79
PCI 78
expansion slots 31
F
fan interface 137
fans
cooling 55
location 27
removing and replacing a system fan 55
fault-monitoring functions
changing the number of CPUs 97
sensor-based 97
FDD activity indicator 126
floppy disk drive 27
FRB timer enable jumper 144
free-standing stabilizers 38
front panel
controls and indicators 23
H
hard disk drive, starting the server from the 47
hard disk drives, internal 74
hard drives
installing 68
Hardware Diagnostic options 99
Hardware Diagnostics
error log screen 117
error logs 116
saving error log information 117
Hardware Diagnostics Program 98
running the 01. Diagnostic Test 100
starting 98
Hardware Diagnostics Test
using the 02. Running Test 101
hardware installation 50
hardware problems, common 125
hardware, supplied 39
HDD 74
HDD not responding 127
HDD status indicators 28, 127
hot keys 83
hot swap bays 26, 68
I
I/O connectors 29
icons
caution 16
danger 16
definition 17
definitions 16
note 16
other 17
warning 16
installation
expansion card 79
hard drives 68
memory module 57
power requirements 22
procedures 20, 40
processor 61
rack model 22
RAID controller 81
rail rack 40
server in a rack 35
installation checklist 44
installing a RAID Controller 81
224
installing optional devices 50
interface
fan 137
interfaces 136
internal battery 31, 71
internal hard disk drives 74
interrupt levels 135
IRQ
Interrupt levels 135
interrupt levels 135
setting levels 80
J
jumper
boot block write protect 143
changing setting 141
chassis intrusion detection 144
CMOS 141
FRB timer enable 144
password 142
recovery boot 142
jumper settings 139
K
key operation
Log Utilities 117
keyboard commands
SCSI utility 95
hard drive removal and replacement 68
internal battery removal and replacement
71
memory module removal and replacement
57
overview 51
server removal and replacment 53
memory
expansion considerations 57
installing memory modules 57
memory bank 31
memory modules 57
module
CPU 61
memory 57
motherboard 30
mounting guidelines
power considerations 36
preparing the rack 36
stabilizing the rack 38
mounting the server 40
N
Network Communication Status 26
NMI button 24
normal shutdown 48
O
L
onboard SCSI utility 94
optional internal devices 20
Log Utilities 116
Log Utilities key operation 117
P
M
main power connector 137
maintenance
access cover removal and replacement 54
CD-ROM drive removal and replacement
72
cooling fan removal and replacement 55
CPU removal and replacement 61
expansion card replacement 78
password jumper 142
PCI device
assigning IDs 135
slots available 135
peripheral devices
connecting 34
perparing the rack 36
POST 46, 83
power
booting the server 47
225
button 24
calculating consumption 146
calculating DC power usage 146
calculating total combined power 147
connecting AC power 44
consumption checklist 45
current usage 145
grounding 45
installation checklist 44
main power connector 137
Power-On Self Test (POST) 46, 83
requirements 22
turning off the server 48
turning on the server 46
power considerations 36
power indicator problem 125
power supply rating 22
problem solving 122
application software problems 124
checklist 122
common hardware problems 125
error checking 123
startup problems 123
Toshiba Technical Support 128
processors
installing 61
R
rack template 148
RAID
disk mirroring 75
disk striping 75
disk striping and disk mirroring 76
disk striping with distributed parity 75
RAID controller, installing a 81
RAID failures 76
rail rack, installing 40
rear panel 29
recovery boot jumper 142
remove
access cover 54
CD-ROM drive 72
fans 27
processor 67
server from the rack 53
system fan 55
replace
access cover 55
CD-ROM Drive 73
expansion card 79
fans 27
internal battery 71
server in the rack 53
system fan 56
reset button 24
Running Test
adding test items 103
default list 102
deleting test items 103
executing 104
selecting items 103
test items and error log details 105
S
safety
icons 16
instructions 16
Safety Instruction Guide for Toshiba Servers
16
SCSI devices
detecting 74
internal hard disk drives 74
settings 95
system information 120
terminating 74
SCSI utility
add or replace a SCSI device 94
keyboard commands 95
main menu 94
onboard 94
using the Adaptec SCSI utility 94
secured stabilizers 38
226
sensor data setup tool 97
server
booting 47
cleaning 17
illustrated 30
mounting 40
selecting a location in the rack 37
starting from the CD-ROM drive 47
starting from the hard disk drive 47
turning off 48
turning on 46
server board, cabling the 32
server rating 22
server, inside the 30
server, installing in a rack 35
service 17
maintenance contracts 17
options 17
setup utility, BIOS 48
sleep mode 24
slots
CPU 30
expansion 31
small computer systems interface (SCSI) 74
specifications, Toshiba Magnia 3135R 129
stabilizers
free-standing 38
secured 38
stabilizing the rack 38
startup problems 123
status
network communication 26
support 2
system
configuration log 145
indicators 25
system CD
Safety Instrction Guide for Toshiba Servers
Toshiba Magnia 3135R Quick Start
Card 16
System Configuration Display 118
system control button 24
system indicators 25
system information 119
T
Technical Support 128
temperature and humidity conditions 21
template, rack 148
tools 39
Toshiba Magnia™ 3135R Quick Start Card 16
troubleshooting
application software 124
common hardware problems 125
problem solving checklist 122
procedure 122
startup sequence 123
turning on the server 46
U
uninterruptible power supply 36
unit logs 145
upgrading the BIOS 93
UPS 36
USB support 29
USB-compatible device 29
utilities
Adaptec SCSI utility 82
BIOS setup 82
system setup 82
V
ventilation 21
voltage output, connectors 29
W
work habits 18
227
Was this manual useful for you? yes no
Thank you for your participation!

* Your assessment is very important for improving the work of artificial intelligence, which forms the content of this project

Download PDF

advertisement