Features
Token-Ring Adapter
Features
򔻐򗗠򙳰
Note
Before using this information and the product it supports, be sure to read the general information under “Appendix. Notices”
on page 87.
Fourth Edition (April 2000)
This edition applies to the IBM token-ring adapters.
You can submit comments online to http://www.networking.ibm.com/support/feedback.nsf/docsoverall.
© Copyright International Business Machines Corporation 1998, 1999, 2000. All rights reserved.
US Government Users Restricted Rights – Use, duplication or disclosure restricted by GSA ADP Schedule Contract
with IBM Corp.
Contents
About this manual . . . .
Who should read this manual.
How this manual is organized
Related publications . . . .
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Chapter 1. Introduction . . . . .
Downloads . . . . . . . . . .
CD-ROM for IBM Token-Ring PCI
CD-ROM for other IBM token-ring
Web . . . . . . . . . . .
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© Copyright IBM Corp. 1998, 1999, 2000
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Chapter 2. Remote Program Load . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
PCI token-ring adapter RPL feature . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Supported environments . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Installation and configuration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Setting up your OS/2 LAN Server to support RPL . . . . . . . . .
Setting up your Novell NetWare server to support RPL . . . . . . .
Setting up your Windows NT 4.0 server to support RPL . . . . . . .
Installing the Remoteboot service . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Configuring DOS RPL client network settings . . . . . . . . . . .
Installing DOS files on the Remoteboot server . . . . . . . . . .
Creating Remoteboot configurations for the PCI token-ring adapters . .
Creating a new workstation record automatically . . . . . . . . .
RPL messages . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
DHCP/PXE messages . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Troubleshooting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Bring-up error . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Open error . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Ring status error . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
PC Error . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
IBM Turbo 16/4 Token-Ring PC Card 2 RPL feature . . . . . . . . .
Supported environments . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Installation and configuration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Setting up your Windows NT 4.0 server to support RPL . . . . . . .
Installing the Remoteboot service . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Configuring DOS RPL client network settings . . . . . . . . . . .
Installing DOS files on the Remoteboot server . . . . . . . . . .
Creating Remoteboot configurations for the IBM Turbo 16/4 Token-Ring
Adapter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Creating a new workstation record automatically . . . . . . . . .
RPL messages . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Troubleshooting RPL problems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
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Chapter 3. IBM LAN Client . .
Supported environments . . .
Supported IBM LAN adapters
Supported software . . . .
Supported operating systems
Restrictions for this release .
Overview . . . . . . . . .
Benefits . . . . . . . . .
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Family Adapters
adapters . . .
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DOS conventional memory usage reduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . 33
Installation and configuration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 33
Chapter 4. LAN Adapter Management Agent . . . .
Supported environments . . . . . . . . . . . .
LAN adapters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Operating systems . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Benefits . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
System requirements . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Windows NT, Windows 95, Windows 98, and Windows
requirements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
OS/2 software requirements . . . . . . . . . .
IBM Nways Management Applications . . . . . .
Installation and configuration . . . . . . . . . . .
Windows NT, Windows 95, Windows 98, and Windows
OS/2 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Example scenarios . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Remote DMI . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
MIB browsing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
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Chapter 5. Route Switching . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Supported environments . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
History . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Benefits . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Example scenarios . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
One-armed router . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Managing Route Switching with IBM LAN Adapter Management Agent
System requirements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Installation and configuration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Route Switching parameters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Windows 95, Windows 98, Windows NT, and Windows 2000 . . . .
Novell NetWare server . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
IBM LAN Client . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
OS/2 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
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Chapter 6. Class of Service. . . .
Supported environments . . . . .
Overview . . . . . . . . . . .
Benefits . . . . . . . . . . .
Example scenarios . . . . . . .
Win32 and OS/2 environments . .
Win32 environments . . . . . .
System requirements . . . . . .
Installation and configuration . . . .
CoS for IP parameters . . . . .
Windows 95, Windows 98, Windows
Novell NetWare Server . . . . .
LAN Client . . . . . . . . .
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Chapter 7. Redundant NIC
Supported environments .
Overview . . . . . . .
Benefits . . . . . . .
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IBM Token-Ring Adapter Features
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Example scenarios . . . . . . . .
Managing a Redundant NIC NT server
Quick Failover . . . . . . . . .
Installation and configuration . . . . .
Windows NT . . . . . . . . . .
NetWare . . . . . . . . . . .
Using Redundant NIC software . . .
Messages. . . . . . . . . . . .
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Chapter 8. Tivoli Management Agent .
Supported environments . . . . . .
Overview . . . . . . . . . . . .
Installation and configuration . . . . .
Windows NT . . . . . . . . . .
Windows 95 and Windows 98 . . .
NetWare 3.x . . . . . . . . . .
NetWare 4.x and 5.x . . . . . . .
OS/2 . . . . . . . . . . . .
Windows 3.x . . . . . . . . . .
Activating the Tivoli Management Agent .
Windows NT . . . . . . . . . .
Windows 95 and Windows 98 . . .
NetWare 3.x . . . . . . . . . .
NetWare 4.x and 5.x . . . . . . .
OS/2 . . . . . . . . . . . .
Windows 3.x . . . . . . . . . .
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Chapter 9. Network adapter performance tuning . . . . . . . . . . . 85
Appendix. Notices . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 87
Trademarks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 88
NetWare Network Computing Products from IBM . . . . . . . . . . . . 88
Glossary . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 91
Index . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 103
Contents
v
vi
IBM Token-Ring Adapter Features
About this manual
This manual contains information about installing and configuring the features of
IBM token-ring adapters.
Who should read this manual
This manual is intended for use by network administrators and other end users who
install and configure the features of IBM token-ring adapters.
How this manual is organized
“Chapter 1. Introduction” on page 1 describes where to download the software for
your adapter.
“Chapter 2. Remote Program Load” on page 3 describes the Remote Program Load
(RPL) function for your adapter.
“Chapter 3. IBM LAN Client” on page 31 describes how to install and configure the
IBM LAN Client.
“Chapter 4. LAN Adapter Management Agent” on page 35 describes how to install
and configure the IBM LAN Adapter Management Agent.
“Chapter 5. Route Switching” on page 39 describes how to install and configure
Route Switching.
“Chapter 6. Class of Service” on page 47 describes how to install and configure the
Class of Service (CoS) for IP function.
“Chapter 7. Redundant NIC” on page 55 describes how to install and configure the
Redundant NIC function.
“Chapter 8. Tivoli Management Agent” on page 75 describes how to install and
configure the Tivoli Management Agent.
“Chapter 9. Network adapter performance tuning” on page 85 describes how to get
the best performance from your adapter.
Related publications
Refer to these publications for additional information:
v IBM 16/4 Token-Ring PCI Management Adapter User’s Guide
v IBM Token-Ring PCI Family Adapter User’s Guide
v IBM Turbo 16/4 Token-Ring PC Card 2 User’s Guide
v IBM Token-Ring Network Problem Determination Guide, SX27-3710
v IBM DOS LAN Services and Windows User’s Guide, S10H-9684
v Manuals for Novell IntranetWare Client for DOS and Windows 3.1 and Novell
NetWare Server 4.x
v Manuals for Novell TCP/IP interface
Novell documentation can be obtained by contacting Novell on the Web or by
calling their toll-free number:
© Copyright IBM Corp. 1998, 1999, 2000
vii
http://www.novell.com
1-800-NETWARE (1-800-638-9273)
IBM adapter books and other documentation are available on the IBM Networking
Web site:
http://www.ibm.com/networking
viii
IBM Token-Ring Adapter Features
Chapter 1. Introduction
A local area network (LAN) adapter exists at the intersection of two complex
environments—the computer and the network. The purpose of this manual is to
provide the additional information necessary to extend the function of your
token-ring adapter in the dimensions of the computer and the network.
This manual complements the installation and testing instructions manual or the
user’s guide for your adapter.
Operating efficiently in complicated multi-vendor environments requires a
standards-based solution. The features in this manual are based on industry-wide
standards such as the Intel® Wired for Management Baseline, the DMTF Desktop
Management Interface, and the IETF Next Hop Routing Protocol. These
standards-based solutions create a solid foundation for future enhancements
necessary to keep pace in an ever-changing networked world.
These features take advantage of the increasing processing power in computers
and provide adapter-based solutions in the areas of remote system setup,
manageability, IP switching, class of service, and high availability. These solutions
help your computer and network operate at a higher level of efficiency.
You should be familiar with the computer in which the features will be installed and
the computer’s operating system and network software.
Downloads
You can download the software implementing these features from the adapter
CD-ROM or from the Web.
CD-ROM for IBM Token-Ring PCI Family Adapters
This procedure applies to the following adapters:
v IBM 16/4 Token-Ring PCI Adapter 2
v IBM 16/4 Token-Ring PCI Adapter 2 with Wake on LAN
v IBM High-Speed 100/16/4 Token-Ring PCI Adapter
To download software from the CD-ROM, perform the following steps:
1.
2.
3.
4.
Point your Web browser to x:\web\essmain (where x is your drive letter).
Select the appropriate adapter.
Select Downloads.
Select an operating system to expand its section and then select a download
package.
CD-ROM for other IBM token-ring adapters
This procedure applies to the following adapters:
v IBM Turbo 16/4 Token-Ring PC Card 2
v IBM 16/4 Token-Ring PCI Management Adapter
v IBM 16/4 Token-Ring CardBus Adapter
To download software from the CD-ROM, perform the following steps:
1. Point your Web browser to x:\startcd (where x is your drive letter).
2. Select the appropriate adapter.
© Copyright IBM Corp. 1998, 1999, 2000
1
3. Select Downloads.
4. Select an operating system to expand its section and then select a download
package.
Web
To download software from the Web, perform the following steps:
1. Point your Web browser to http://www.ibm.com/networking/support
2. Select the appropriate adapter from the list of IBM Networking Hardware
products.
3. Select Downloads.
4. Select an operating system to expand its section and then select a download
package.
Select the appropriate adapter from the list of IBM Networking Hardware products
and then select Downloads. Select an operating system to expand its section, and
then select a download package.
2
IBM Token-Ring Adapter Features
Chapter 2. Remote Program Load
This chapter describes the Remote Program Load (RPL) feature.
PCI token-ring adapter RPL feature
If you are using the IBM Turbo 16/4 Token-Ring PC Card 2, see “IBM Turbo 16/4
Token-Ring PC Card 2 RPL feature” on page 22. Otherwise, see the following
information.
Supported environments
RPL is
v IBM
v IBM
v IBM
v IBM
v IBM
v IBM
currently supported on the following adapters:
16/4 Token-Ring PCI Management Adapter
16/4 Token-Ring PCI Adapter 2
16/4 Token-Ring PCI Adapter 2 with Wake on LAN
High-Speed 100/16/4 Token-Ring PCI Adapter
PCI Token-Ring Adapter
PCI Wake on LAN Token-Ring Adapter
The adapter supports RPL from the following servers:
v IBM OS/2® LAN Server Version 3.0
v IBM OS/2 LAN Server Version 4.0
v IBM OS/2 Warp Server
v Novell NetWare 4.11 or 4.2
v Novell NetWare 5.0
v Microsoft® Windows NT® 4.0
Overview
The RPL feature enables an adapter to boot a computer using files that the
computer receives from a LAN server. The computer that requests these files is
referred to as the client computer, and the computer that responds with these files
is referred to as the LAN server. In order for RPL to take place, two things must
occur. First, the RPL feature of the adapter in the client machine initiates the RPL
request. Second, a LAN server responds to the RPL request with the files to bring
up, or boot, the client computer.
The RPL feature supports Dynamic Host Configuration Protocol (DHCP) to remote
boot a computer from a LAN server. In order for DHCP to take place, two things
must occur. First, the DHCP feature of the adapter in the client computer initiates
the DHCP request. Second, a LAN server responds to the DHCP request with the
files to bring up, or boot, the client computer.
The PCI token-ring adapters support DHCP from any server that supports
Attachment A through Attachment G of the Network PC System Design Guidelines,
Version 1.0b-August 5, 1997. You can download this specification from one of the
following sites:.
http://www.microsoft.com/hwdev/netpc.htm
http://developer.intel.com/design/netpc/netpc.pdf
The PCI token-ring adapters also support the Preboot Execution Environment (PXE)
from any server that supports PXE 2.x. You can download the PXE specification
from http://developer.intel.com/ial/wfm/wfmspecs.htm.
The following topics are addressed in this section:
© Copyright IBM Corp. 1998, 1999, 2000
3
v
v
v
v
v
v
“Installation and configuration”
“Setting up your OS/2 LAN Server to support RPL” on page 9
“Setting up your Novell NetWare server to support RPL” on page 10
“Setting up your Windows NT 4.0 server to support RPL” on page 12
“RPL messages” on page 15
“Troubleshooting” on page 19
Installation and configuration
Setting up your client computer to support RPL/DHCP
For the Remote Program Load/Dynamic Host Configuration Protocol (RPL/DHCP)
process to begin, the feature must be enabled on the adapter installed in the client
computer, and the client computer must recognize the RPL/DHCP feature of the
adapter as the first or only bootable device present.
Enabling the RPL/DHCP feature on the adapter
The adapter is shipped with the RPL/DHCP feature enabled. You can ensure that it
is enabled by running the diagnostics and, at the diagnostics test panel, pressing
F5 to view or change the RPL setting.
Making the RPL/DHCP feature the first bootable device
All IBM PCs support RPL, and many IBM-compatible PCs also do. If your computer
is not an IBM PC, refer to your computer’s user’s manual or contact the
manufacturer if you are not sure whether it supports RPL.
On most IBM PCs you can make this adapter the first bootable, or startup, device
by choosing Network as the first startup device in the startup sequence in the
configuration utility (usually you enter the configuration utility by pressing F1 when
the IBM logo and Configuration Utility program symbol appear during the power-on
process). If drive A is the first bootable device, consider making the adapter the
second bootable device. Refer to the user’s manual for your IBM PC if you need
further instructions for altering the startup sequence or entering the configuration
utility.
Many non-IBM machines and some older IBM machines do not have a
configuration utility, or do not allow a choice of a network-bootable device in the
configuration utility. On these machines you can either remove the hard disk or use
the RPLENABL.EXE utility program provided with this adapter in the RPLPKG.EXE
package on the CD-ROM to disable the hard disk as a bootable device. After the
hard disk is disabled as a bootable device, computers that support RPL adapters
will attempt to boot from the network as long as no diskette is in the diskette drive.
Changing the boot protocol
The procedure for changing the boot protocol depends on your adapter’s microcode
level. To determine your adapter’s microcode level, look at the AL- field displayed
on the DHCP/PXE or RPL screen. There are two fields displayed, such as
AL-00001 ALB1BG2.
If the second field has only six digits, or if the seventh digit is ″1″, as shown in the
following examples, the microcode supports PXE 1.
AL-00001 PX10AH
AL-00001 ALB1BG1
If the seventh digit is ″2″, as shown in the following example, the microcode
supports PXE 2.
AL-00001 ALB1BG2
4
IBM Token-Ring Adapter Features
The following adapters ship with PXE 1:
v IBM PCI Wake on LAN Token-Ring Adapter
v IBM 16/4 Token-Ring PCI Adapter 2
v IBM 16/4 Token-Ring PCI Adapter 2 with Wake on LAN
v IBM High-Speed 100/16/4 Token-Ring PCI Adapter
A PXE 2 flash update is available for these adapters at
http://www.ibm.com/networking/support.
For the procedure to change the boot protocol, see “Changing the boot protocol
(PXE 1.x)”.
The IBM 16/4 Token-Ring PCI Management Adapter ships with PXE 2. A PXE 1
flash update is available at http://www.ibm.com/networking/support.
For the procedure to change the boot protocol, see “Changing the boot protocol
(PXE 2.x)” on page 6.
Changing the boot protocol (PXE 1.x)
If the microcode on your adapter is flashed to support PXE 1.x, use the following
procedure to change the boot protocol. If the microcode on your adapter is flashed
to support PXE 2.x, see “Changing the boot protocol (PXE 2.x)” on page 6.
After you select RPL as the first startup, or boot, device you will see a DHCP panel
when your client machine is booting. By default, the adapter will first try DHCP as
the first protocol. Any time before the client has connected to the DHCP server, you
can press Alt+S to switch to RPL. The following figure is an example of the DHCP
panel:
ET-02:15:36
ID-268 0030
BU-0000
AA-0004AC570001
AL-000001 PX10AH
BL-CD0110
RM-C800
OP-0000 16
IBM PCI Token-Ring DHCP
DD-0002
ARDRXRTRAC-8C00 00002000 8820
AE-000 OP-0011
Press ALT-S to switch to RPL
Press ESC to return to BIOS
Ending DHCP
Chapter 2. Remote Program Load
5
ET-02:15:36
ID-268 0030
BU-0000
AA-0004AC570001
AL-000001 PX10AH
BL-CR1.0243
RM-C800
OP-0000 16
IBM PCI Token-Ring RPL
RQ-000F
SFSNRS-2010
PC-0606
AC-8C00 00002000 8820
AE-000 OP-0011
Press ALT-S to switch to DHCP
Press ESC to return to BIOS
Ending RPL
This example shows all of the possible error and status message prefixes. You will
normally not see the error status condition prefixes, such as PC-, unless an error
condition occurs. These error and status messages are described in “RPL
messages” on page 15.
Changing the boot protocol (PXE 2.x)
If the microcode on your adapter is flashed to support PXE 2.x, use the following
procedure to change the boot protocol. If the microcode on your adapter is flashed
to support PXE 1.x, see “Changing the boot protocol (PXE 1.x)” on page 5.
Current operating system software installation programs either require your
attendance in order to enter information in response to system prompts (attended
installation) or do not require your attendance (unattended installation). To
accommodate this mix of attended versus unattended, a menu in the Token Ring
Option ROM is provided to guide you in setting up your Token Ring Option ROM.
You can access the menu at Option ROM initialization time. Use this menu to
change the protocol (RPL or PXE) and the protocol’s behavior if the protocol fails to
reach a boot server of the selected protocol or if the initial bootstrap returns control
to the boot ROM code.
At option ROM initialization time, the following line is displayed:
Token-Ring ROM Initializing......
After the line appears, you have 5 seconds to press Ctrl+S to access the PCI
Token Ring’s boot protocol/protocol failure menu, as shown in the following
example. If you do not press Ctrl+S within five seconds, the PCI token-ring’s option
ROM settings remain unchanged and the system boot continues.
If you press Ctrl+S within five seconds, the following options are displayed:
6
IBM Token-Ring Adapter Features
Token-Ring ROM Initializing......
1 PXE/Local Boot <<<< Current Mode
2 PXE only
3 RPL/Local Boot
4 RPL only
5 Local Boot
ESC-No Change
Note: <<<< Current Mode displayed beside an option indicates the current adapter
setting. If you change the setting, <<<< Current Mode will display next to the
new option the next time you reboot your system.
The options are described in the following table:
Option
Description
1 PXE/Local Boot
Use the PXE protocol. If the PXE protocol fails, or the initial
downloaded bootstrap returns control to the token-ring
adapter’s boot ROM code, the boot ROM code will return
control back to BIOS, and onto the next boot device.
2 PXE only
Use the PXE protocol. If the PXE protocol fails, or the initial
downloaded bootstrap returns control to the token-ring
adapter’s boot ROM code, the boot ROM code will retry the
PXE protocol. This will continue indefinitely.
3 RPL/Local Boot
Use the RPL protocol. If the RPL protocol fails, or the initial
downloaded bootstrap returns control to the token-ring
adapter’s boot ROM code, the boot ROM code will return
control back to BIOS, and onto the next boot device.
4 RPL only
Use the RPL protocol. If the RPL protocol fails, or the initial
downloaded bootstrap returns control to the token-ring
adapter’s boot ROM code, the boot ROM code will retry the
RPL protocol. This will continue indefinitely.
5 Local Boot
This option informs BIOS that this option ROM is not an IPL
device, and therefore the option ROM will not be called to
execute its boot protocol.
ESC
The current boot protocol or protocol failure is unchanged.
Select an option by pressing the option’s number on the number row on your
keyboard or on the numeric keypad (with the NumLock function enabled). The
display confirms your selection.
Remember the following key points:
v The factory default setting is PXE only.
v After you have selected a different option, that option is saved between system
reboots. If the menu prompt times out, the panel associated with this option is
displayed.
v The Ctrl+S function is only for use by the system administrator. This key is not
displayed on any of the panels.
If you select 1 PXE/Local Boot or 2 PXE only, a series of panels appear. The first
panel appears during the initialization and opening of the adapter onto the ring.
Chapter 2. Remote Program Load
7
ET-00:00:00
ID-2460 068
BU-0000
AA-00112233445566
AL-000001 PX14CN2
BL-CS200
RM-C800
OP-0000 0016
PCI Token-Ring PXE
CS200
016Mb
RS-2010
AC/PC-0606
AE-000 OP-0011
The second panel appears after the adapter successfully opens onto the ring and
starts the PXE/DHCP protocol.
PCI Token-Ring PXE
ET-00:00:00
UU-11223344556677889900112233445566
IP-17.17.17.2
DD-0001
SM-255.255.255.0
AR-0002
DHCPSvr-10.10.10.3
DR-0001
Router-17.17.17.8
XR-0001
SR1-0.0.0.0
SR2-0.0.0.0
BINL-10.10.10.5
TFTFTP IP-10.10.10.5
c:\path\filename.ext
Press space bar to suspend NBP download
CS200
016Mb
TFTPGW-17.17.17.8
RS-2010
AC/PC-0606
AE-000 OP-0011
The third panel appears if the boot server has provided a PXE Boot menu giving
you the option of which boot server to use.
8
IBM Token-Ring Adapter Features
ET-00:04:10
Select Boot Server 10
Local Boot
Bootserver 1
Bootserver 2
PCI Token-Ring PXE
IP-17.17.17.2
SM-255.255.255.0
DHCPSvr-10.10.10.3
Router-17.17.17.8
SR1-0.0.0.0
SR2-0.0.0.0
BINL-10.10.10.5
CS200
016Mb
BD-0001
BootSrv-10.10.10.4
TF-0001
TFTP IP-10.10.10.5
TFTPGW-17.17.17.8
c:\path\filename.ext
Press space bar to suspend NBP download 3
BIS-21
RS-2010
AC/PC-0606
AE-000 OP-0011
If you select 3 RPL/Local Boot or 4 RPL only, the following panel appears.
ET-00:15:36
ID-268 0030
BU-0000
AA-0004AC570001
AL-000001 PX14CN2
BL-CS200
RM-C800
OP-0000 0016
RQ-000F
SFSNRS-2010
PC-0606
AC-8C00 00002000 8820
AE-000 OP-0011
PCI Token-Ring RPL
The example panels show all of the possible error and status message prefixes.
You will normally not see the error status condition prefixes, such as PC-, unless an
error condition occurs. These error and status messages are described in “RPL
messages” on page 15.
Setting up your OS/2 LAN Server to support RPL
This manual assumes that you have already set up your OS/2 LAN Server for RPL
and installed the DOS or OS/2 RPL image. If you have not, refer to the OS/2 LAN
Server documentation and install RPL support before installing RPL support for the
adapter on the OS/2 LAN Server. In summary, at this point you should have already
performed the following steps:
1. Installed OS/2 LAN Server DOS or OS/2 RPL support.
2. Run RIPLINST.EXE if you installed OS/2 RPL support, to install an OS/2 RPL
image. The RIPLINST.EXE utility is normally on diskette 7 of the OS/2
installation diskettes. You must use the OS/2 unpack command to unpack the
RIPLINST file before you can run it.
3. Installed any service fix packs required:
v LAN Server 3.0: IP07060 or later
v LAN Server 4.0: IP08152 or later
Chapter 2. Remote Program Load
9
Use the OS/2 syslevel command on your OS/2 LAN Server to check the CSD
level.
4. Run any post-service updates for RPL described in the fix pack IPxxxxx.INF file
(where xxxxx is the fix pack level being applied).
5. Run GETRPL.EXE to update the RPL access profiles. To do this, you must stop
the RPL service and be logged on with administrator authority.
6. Enter net start rpl to start the RPL service.
After these steps are complete, run the following steps on the OS/2 LAN Server to
add RPL support for the adapter:
1. Run x:\RPL\CFGRPL.CMD from the CD-ROM (where x is your CD-ROM drive
letter) or the NDIS Drivers diskette in an OS/2 window.
2. Enter net stop rpl to stop the RPL service.
3. Run GETRPL.EXE to update the RPL access profiles To do this, you must stop
the RPL service and be logged on with administrator authority.
4. Enter net start rpl to start the RPL service.
5. Create an RPL workstation image for each client computer with an adapter
installed. This procedure is described in the LAN Server documentation. For the
Server Record Identifier use:
Client Operating Environment
OS/2 3.0
DOS
Record Identifier
R_230_DTKTRP
R_DTKTRP_NDIS
Setting up your Novell NetWare server to support RPL
1. Power on a NetWare Client machine and log on to the NetWare Server with
supervisor authority.
2. Copy the RPL.NLM file to the NetWare server \SYSTEM directory from the \RPL
directory on the CD-ROM.
3. Copy the _0249.RPL file to the NetWare server \LOGIN directory from the \RPL
directory on the CD-ROM.
4. Generate a bootable client diskette for this adapter, and run the DOSGEN
program located in the \SYSTEM directory on the Novell NetWare Server. For
information on running DOSGEN or for more detailed information on setting up
unique RPL images for specific adapters, refer to the Novell NetWare
documentation.
The following steps are a sample procedure for creating a NetWare Client boot
image:
a. Prepare a bootable DOS diskette. Perform either step 4a1 for a VLM image
or step 4a2 on page 11 for a NETX image:
1) VLM image
Place the following files on the bootable DOS diskette:
LSL.COM
VLM.EXE
REDIR.VLM
PRINT.VLM
NETX.VLM
AUTOEXEC.BAT CONFIG.SYS
NET.CFG
IBMTRPO.EXE
ROUTE.COM
IPXODI.COM
CONN.VLM
SECURITY.VLM NWP.VLM
IPXNCP.VLM
NDS.VLM
FIO.VLM
TRAN.VLM
BIND.VLM
GENERAL.VLM
Your CONFIG.SYS file should have the following statements:
REM Use the DOS= and DEVICE= statements if you want to use high memory and XMS memory.
REM DOS=HIGH
REM DEVICE=A:\HIMEM.SYS
10
IBM Token-Ring Adapter Features
REM DEVICE=A:EMM386.EXE NOEMS
FILES=40
BUFFERS=20
LASTDRIVE=Z
Your AUTOEXEC.BAT file should have the following statements:
PATH A:\
SET NWLANGUAGE=ENGLISH
LSL
IBMTRPO
ROUTE
IPXODI
REM If you issue commands that reload COMMAND.COM,
REM you must also copy COMMAND.COM
REM to the NetWare Server \system directory and
REM uncomment the COMSPEC command statement below.
REM SET COMSPEC=F:\SYSTEM\COMMAND.COM
VLM
LOGIN yourID
2) NETX image
Place the following files on the bootable DOS diskette:
IBMTRPO.EXE AUTOEXEC.BAT LSL.COM
ROUTE.COM
IPXODI.COM
NET.CFG
NETX.EXE
Your AUTOEXEC.BAT should have the following statements:
PATH A:\
LSL
IBMTRPO
ROUTE
IPXODI
REM If you issue commands that reload COMMAND.COM,
REM you must also copy COMMAND.COM
REM to the NetWare Server \system directory and
REM uncomment the COMSPEC command statement below.
REM SET COMSPEC=F:\SYSTEM\COMMAND.COM
NETX
F:
LOGIN yourID
b. Update the diskette with IBMTRPO.EXE from the CD-ROM.
c. Generate the image using DOSGEN (see the Novell documentation for
information regarding creating images and running DOSGEN).
Following is a sample of the NET.CFG file for VLM or NETX clients:
Link Driver IBMTRPO
FRAME TOKEN-RING MSB
DATARATE AUTO
RXBUFFERS 9
TXBUFFERS 1
NetWare DOS Requester
FIRST NETWORK DRIVE = F
NETWARE PROTOCOL = NDS BIND
5. Add the following two lines to the AUTOEXEC.NCF file located in the \SYSTEM
directory on the NetWare Server:
load rpl
bind rpl to <driver>
where <driver> is the token-ring driver loaded on your NetWare Server.
Chapter 2. Remote Program Load
11
Setting up your Windows NT 4.0 server to support RPL
Refer to the chapter on Remoteboot in the Microsoft Windows NT Networking
Guide for the following features:
v Enabling TCP/IP or IPX support or both for your RPL client
v Troubleshooting problems in configuring Remoteboot service
v Configuring memory for MS—DOS RPL clients
v Using the Remoteboot Command Utility (RPLCMD.EXE)
v Using other Remoteboot Features and configuration shortcuts
Installing the Remoteboot service
1. If the DLC and NetBEUI protocols on the server are not already installed, click
Start → Settings → Control Panel.
2. Double-click the Protocol tab and add the protocols.
3. Click the Services tab on the Network Dialog box and add the Remoteboot
service.
4. In the Remoteboot Setup dialog box, make sure that c:\winnt\rpl is the correct
path to install this service.
5. Leave Migrate Remoteboot directory from LAN Manager 2.2 unchecked and
click OK.
6. When prompted, load the NT 4.0 server CD-ROM and access the subdirectories
\i386 and \client\RPL to update the system.
7. Reboot the system to apply the changes.
Configuring DOS RPL client network settings
At a command prompt on the server, change to the c:\winnt\RPL\bblock\netbeui
directory and create a directory named ibmtrp. Within the ibmtrp subdirectory create
a PROTOCOL.INI file that has the following data in it:
[protman]
drivername = protman$
dynamic = yes
priority = netbeui
[netbeui_xif]
drivername = netbeui$
bindings = ibmtrp_nif
names = 6
ncbs = 12
packets = 20
pipeline = 10
sessions = 6
stacksize = 512
lanabase = 0
[xnsnb_xif]
drivername = xnsnb$
bindings = ibmtrp_nif
load = xnsnb[cbr]
lanabase = 1
[xnstp_xif]
drivername = xnstp$
bindings = ibmtrp_nif
load = xnstp[ub]
lanabase = 1
[tcpip_xif]
drivername = TCPIP$
disabledhcp = (TCPIP_NO_DHCP)
12
IBM Token-Ring Adapter Features
ipaddress0 = (TCPIP_ADDRESS)
subnetmask0 = (TCPIP_SUBMASK)
defaultgateway0 = (TCPIP_GATEWAY)
tcpsegmentsize = 1450
tcpwindowsize = 1450
nbsessions = 6
load = tcptsr[c],tinyrfc[c],emsbfr[cr]
unload = "unloadt /notsr[dc]"
bindings = ibmtrp_nif
lanabase = 1
[ipx_xif]
drivername = ipx$
load = ipxmark[u],ipx[u]
unload = ipxrel[c]
bindings = ibmtrp_nif
lanabase = 1
[msdlc_xif]
drivername = msdlc$
bindings = ibmtrp_nif
load = msdlc[ub]
unload = msdlc[u]
[ibmtrp_nif]
drivername = ibmtrp$
MaxTransmits = 2
MaxTxFrameSize = 2048
MinRcvBuffs = 8
RcvBuffSize = 1120
Also, within that same subdirectory ibmtrp create a DOSBB.CNF file that has the
following data in it:
;DOS RPL with IBM PCI Token-Ring Adapter
BASE CCH
RPL BBLOCK\RPLBOOT.SYS
LDR BBLOCK\RPLSTART.COM ˜
DAT BBLOCK\NETBEUI\IBMTRP\PROTOCOL.INI
;DAT BBLOCK\NDIS\IBMTRP\LA1.MSG
DRV BBLOCK\RPLDISK.SYS ˜ ˜
EXE BBLOCK\RPLPRO1.COM ˜ 2 ˜
EXE BBLOCK\I13.COM ˜ ˜ ˜
EXE BBLOCK\RPLBIND2.EXE ˜ ˜
EXE BBLOCK\PROTMAN.EXE ˜ ˜
EXE BBLOCK\RPLBIND1.EXE ˜ ˜
;DRV BBLOCK\IPXNDIS.DOS ˜ ˜ ˜
;DRV BBLOCK\TCPDRV.DOS /IDOS ˜ ˜
EXE BBLOCK\NETBEUI\NETBEUI.EXE ˜ 10 ˜
DRV BBLOCK\NDIS\IBMTRP.DOS /NOMSG 22 ˜
DRV BBLOCK\PROTMAN.DOS /IDOS ˜ M
Go to http://www.ibm.com/networking/support and download the IBM PCI
Token-Ring Adapter driver diskette. Copy the following files from the DOS directory
(a:\dos) to c:\winnt\rpl\bblock\ndis:
IBMTRP.DOS
LA1.MSG
Installing DOS files on the Remoteboot server
The Windows NT 4.0 Server support for RPL does not include the image for IBM
DOS.
Chapter 2. Remote Program Load
13
Note: If the DOS image is already on the server, skip to “Creating Remoteboot
configurations for the PCI token-ring adapters”.
1. Under winnt\rpl\rplfiles\binfiles on the RPL server, create a DOS700 directory.
2. Type net use v:\\servername\rplfiles to connect another computer running
DOS with NDIS 2 networking support to the remoteboot server fplfiles share
folder.
3. Copy all of the DOS files from the DOS client to the v:\binfiles\DOS700
directory as illustrated below as non hidden files:
Copy c:\dos\*.* v:\binfiles\dos700
Attrib -s -h c:\io.sys
Attrib -s -h c:\msdos.sys
Copy c:\io.sys v:\binfiles\dos700
Copy c:\msdos.sys v:\binfiles\dos700
Attrib +s +h c:\io.sys
Attrib +s +h c:\msdos.sys
4. Go to the winnt\rpl\fit directory on the RPL server.
5. Copy DOS622*.FIT to DOS700*.FIT.
6. Edit DOS700*.FIT and change all references of DOS622 to DOS700.
7. Go to the directory winnt\rpl\rplfiles\configs on the RPL server.
8. Create a DOS700 directory.
9. Copy all files and subdirectories from DOS622 to DOS700 (use thexcopy
command with the /s option).
10. Make any custom modifications to the CONFIG.SYS or AUTOEXEC.BAT files.
Creating Remoteboot configurations for the PCI token-ring adapters
From a command prompt on the server, run RPLCMD.EXE. This utility allows you
to add boot block records for the adapter and vendor ID. Use the following
illustration to set up and configure a boot image for your adapter.
c:\> rplcmd
Adapter Boot Config Profile Service Vendor Wksta [Quit]: b
Add Del Enum: a
BootName=DOS700
**rpl client environment**
VendorName=002035 **the first 6 digits of the adapter's hexadecimal MAC address**
BbcFile=bblock\netbeui\ibmtrp\dosbb.cnf
All other parameters are optional
BootComment=DOS 700 IBM PCI TOKEN RING
WindowSize=0
Adapter Boot Config Profile Service Vendor Wksta [Quit]: v
Add Del Enum: a
VendorName=002035
**the first 6 digits of the adapter's hexadecimal MAC address**
VendorComment=DOS 700 IBM PCI TOKEN RING
Adapter Boot Config Profile Service Vendor Wksta [Quit]: c
Add Del Enum: a
ConfigName=DOS700C
BootName=DOS700
DirName=DOS
DirName2=DOS700
FitShared=fits\dos700.fit
FitPersonal=fits\dos700p.fit
All other parameters are optional
ConfigComment=DOS 700 IBM PCI TOKEN RING
DirName3=
DirName4=
** Shown in step 4 below **
Adapter Boot Config Profile Service Vendor Wksta [Quit]: q
14
IBM Token-Ring Adapter Features
Creating a new workstation record automatically
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
10.
11.
Click Start → Settings → Control Panel.
From the Control Panel, select Services.
If the Remoteboot service is not set to automatic, click the Start button.
Click Start → Programs → Administrative Tools →Remoteboot Manager.
On the Remoteboot Manager window menu bar, select Remoteboot → New
Profile from the menu bar.
In the Configuration list box, select DOS 700 IBM PCI TOKEN RING.
Type the name for the profile in the Profile Name field. For example,
TURBOTR1.
On the Remoteboot Manager window menu bar, click Remoteboot → New
Workstation.
On the New Remoteboot Workstation window, type the RPL client IBM PCI
TOKEN RING MAC address in the Adapter ID field.
Type the workstation name in the Wksta Name field. For example,
WORKSTATION1.
Type a brief description (optional). For example, PCI TR IBM DOS 700.
12. Change the password (optional).
13. Select shared or personal (optional).
14. Select PCITR1 DOS 700 IBM PCI TOKEN RING from the Wksta In Profile list
box.
15. Configure the TCP/IP Settings (optional).
16. Click the Add button when done.
RPL messages
ET-00:00:45
Explanation: Elapsed Time. A continuously updated field indicating the elapsed time since the RPL feature gained
control.
ID-268 BBDF
Explanation: Identification. An indication of which adapter is using the RPL feature. 268 indicates a PCI token-ring
adapter. BBDF indicates the PCI bus, device, and function number for the PCI slot in which the adapter is inserted.
BU-0000
Explanation: Bring-Up. This field is displayed as X'0000' if the adapter has been successfully initialized and opened.
If not, a code other than X'0000' is displayed and the field is highlighted. See “Troubleshooting” on page 19.
AA-08005A2B0000
Explanation: Adapter address. The permanently encoded address of the token-ring adapter in your computer. This
address is always 12 hexadecimal characters (6 bytes) long.
AL-000001 PX10AH
Explanation: Adapter Level. The Engineering Change (EC) level of the code on the token-ring adapter.
BL-CD0106
Explanation: BIOS Level (module level). The EC level of the code in the RPL feature.
Chapter 2. Remote Program Load
15
RM-CC00
Explanation: Memory (read-only memory). Segment address in memory where BIOS has placed the RPL ROM.
OP-0000 0004
Explanation: Open Return Code. The first 4 digits are X'0000' and the last 4 digits identify the adapter data rate, if
the adapter has been successfully opened and attached to the network. If not, a code other than X'0000' is displayed
and the field is flashing. See “Troubleshooting” on page 19.
RQ-0001
Explanation: Request Count (FIND Frame Count). The number in hexadecimal of FIND frames that have been
transmitted. An excessive request count indicates that the LAN server is not present, is congested, or is not correctly
configured to RPL this adapter.
SF-0001
Explanation: SEND.FILE.REQUEST Frame Count. The number of SEND.FILE.REQUEST frames that have been
transmitted. An excessive SEND.FILE.REQUEST frame count indicates that the LAN server is not responding after
having been found.
SN-0023
Explanation: File Response Sequence Number. This value is displayed when the LAN server has responded to the
SEND.FILE.REQUEST. It indicates how many times valid FILE.DATA.RESPONSE frames have been received.
RS-0040
Explanation: Ring Status. This field displays a code indicating the status of the network. The field will be highlighted
if the operation cannot continue; it will not be highlighted if processing can continue. See “Troubleshooting” on
page 19.
PC-4020
Explanation: Computer error. This field displays an error code indicating that the adapter has difficulty in functioning
with the computer. In most cases, the panel will be frozen and this field will be highlighted because the adapter cannot
continue. See “Troubleshooting” on page 19.
AC-0040 0000 0000 0000
Explanation: Adapter check. The adapter has detected an internal error and cannot continue. Reboot your computer.
If this problem persists, record the adapter check code, and contact your network administrator.
AE-nnn XX-0011
Explanation: Adapter error. The adapter in your computer could not establish communication with the LAN server.
The nnn indicates the instance number. The reason for this error is indicated by the XX message to the right of
AE-nnn. XX can be either BU or OP. The BU and OP messages are described previously in this section.
16
IBM Token-Ring Adapter Features
DHCP/PXE messages
ET-00:00:45
Explanation: Elapsed Time. A continuously updated field indicating the elapsed time since the RPL feature gained
control.
ID-268 BBDF
Explanation: Identification. An indication of which adapter is using the RPL feature. 268 indicates a PCI token-ring
Adapter. BBDF indicates the PCI bus, device, and function number for the PCI slot in which the adapter is inserted.
BU-0000
Explanation: Bring-Up. This field is displayed as X'0000' if the adapter has been successfully initialized and opened.
If not, a code other than X'0000' is displayed and the field is highlighted. See “Troubleshooting” on page 19.
AA-08005A2B0000
Explanation: Adapter address. The permanently encoded address of the token-ring adapter in your computer. This
address is always 12 hexadecimal characters (6 bytes) long.
AL-000001 PX10AH
Explanation: Adapter level. The Engineering Change (EC) level of the code on the token-ring adapter.
BL-CD0106
Explanation: BIOS level (module level). The EC level of the code in the RPL feature.
RM-CC00
Explanation: Memory (read-only memory). Segment address in memory where BIOS has placed the RPL ROM.
OP-0000 0004
Explanation: Open return code. The first 4 digits are X'0000' and the last 4 digits identify the adapter data rate, if the
adapter has been successfully opened and attached to the network. If not, a code other than X'0000' is displayed and
the field is flashing. See “Troubleshooting” on page 19.
DD-0001
Explanation: DHCP discover count. The number in hexadecimal of DHCP Discover frames that have been
transmitted. The field will be highlighted with a value of 0004 10 if the server is not present, is congested, or is not
currently configured to respond to DHCP messages.
AR-0001
Explanation: ARP request count. The number in hexadecimal of ARP Requests broadcasted onto the network. If the
field is highlighted as XXXX 00, the client received a reply to its ARP request. Check to see if any other machine is
assigned the client’s IP address and check the DHCP server’s DHCP scope of addresses.
DR-0001
Explanation: DHCP request count. The number in hexadecimal of DHCP Request packets transmitted to the DHCP
server/Proxy DHCP server. The field will be highlighted with a value of XXXX 10 if the server is not present, is
congested, or is not correctly configured to respond to DHCP Request messages.
Chapter 2. Remote Program Load
17
XR-0001
Explanation: Extended DHCP request count. The number in hexadecimal of Extended (PXE) DHCP Request
packets transmitted to the Boot Image Negotiation Layer (BINL) server. The field will be highlighted with a value of
XXXX 10 if the server is not present, is congested, or is not correctly configured to respond to Extended (PXE) DHCP
Request messages.
TF-0009
Explanation: TFTP block count. The number in hexadecimal of UDP data packets received during the TFTP of the
initial bootstrap program. The field will be highlighted with a value of XXXX 10, indicating a general timeout, if the
server is not present or is congested. If the field is highlighted with a value of XXXX 3X, check the path and filename
of the initial bootstrap program on the server and check if the server’s TFTP program is active.
RS-0040
Explanation: Ring status. This field displays a code indicating the status of the network. The field will be highlighted
if the operation cannot continue; it will not be highlighted if processing can continue. See “Troubleshooting” on
page 19.
PC-4020
Explanation: Computer error. This field displays an error code indicating that the adapter has difficulty in functioning
with the computer. In most cases, the panel will be frozen and this field will be highlighted because the adapter cannot
continue. See “Troubleshooting” on page 19.
AC-0040 0000 0000 0000
Explanation: Adapter check. The adapter has detected an internal error and cannot continue. Reboot your computer.
If this problem persists, record the adapter check code, and contact your network administrator.
AE-nnn XX-0011
Explanation: Adapter error. The adapter in your computer could not establish communication with the LAN server.
The nnn indicates the instance number. The reason for this error is indicated by the XX message to the right of
AE-nnn. XX can be either BU or OP. The BU and OP messages are described previously in this section.
IP-17.17.17.2
Explanation: This client’s IP address provided by the DHCP server.
SM-255.255.255.0
Explanation: The subnet mask provided by the DHCP server.
DHCPSvr-10.10.10.3
Explanation: IP address of the DHCP server.
Router-17.17.17.8
Explanation: IP address of the router or gateway provided by the DHCP server.
SR1-0.0.0.0
Explanation: IP address of a static route provided by the DHCP server.
18
IBM Token-Ring Adapter Features
SR2-0.0.0.0
Explanation: IP address of a static route provided by the DHCP server.
BINL-10.10.10.5
Explanation: IP address of the Boot Image Negotiation Layer (BINL) service machine.
BD-0001
Explanation: How many boot server requests sent to the boot server.
BootSrv-10.10.10.4
Explanation: IP address of the boot server currently being queried for the initial Network Boot Program (NBP) or the
IP address of the boot server providing the credentials for NBP authentication.
BIS-21
Explanation: A highlighted field indicating a Boot Integrity Services error has occurred.
Select Boot Server 10
Explanation: A list of available boot servers. The prompt is displayed followed by the number of seconds remaining
before the first item in the boot menu is auto-selected. If a number is not present, there is no timeout. Use the up and
down arrow keys to traverse the menu and press enter to select.
TFTP IP-10.10.10.5
Explanation: IP address of the server currently being used to download the initial Network Boot Program (NBP).
TFTPGW-17.17.17.8
Explanation: IP address of the gateway currently being used to download the initial Network Boot Program (NBP).
Troubleshooting
If you do not get the expected results when using an RPL feature on a client
computer, see Table 1 on page 20.
If other computers on the network need problem determination, you might need one
or more of the following documents:
v The operator’s guide for your computer
v The problem determination guide for network-related problems
Chapter 2. Remote Program Load
19
Table 1. Failure indication messages
Failure Indication
Action
The computer’s BASIC panel appears, or the computer
boots to the hard disk or diskette drive.
Perform the steps in
“Installation and
configuration” on page 4.
The BU field on the client computer display panel is
highlighted.
See “Bring-up error”.
The OP field on the client computer display panel is
highlighted.
See “Open error”.
The RS field on the client computer display panel has a
value other than zero (0) and is highlighted.
See “Ring status error” on
page 21.
The PC field on the client computer display panel is
highlighted or is shown with counters not being updated.
See “PC Error” on page 21.
The client computer display panel shows any response that
has not been identified.
Contact your network
administrator.
Bring-up error
The client computer display panel shows that the elapsed time (ET) field has
stopped with only a few seconds of time accumulated, and the bring-up (BU) error
field is highlighted. The RPL feature tried three times and was unable to initialize
the adapter for use. The BU error codes and the action to take are listed in Table 2.
Table 2. Bring-up error causes and actions
BU Error Code
Cause
Action
0020-002F,
0030-003F
A module on the adapter is not
responding correctly.
The adapter appears defective.
Run the diagnostics.
0048
Initialize timeout.
The adapter appears defective.
Run the diagnostics.
All others
Adapter failure
The adapter appears defective.
Run the diagnostics. Contact your
network administrator if problems
persist.
Open error
The open error (OP) field contains an error code. This code might be displayed
normally or flashing.
If the error code is flashing, the RPL feature is trying to open the adapter after an
unsuccessful attempt.
If the problem persists, record the 4 digits of the flashing OP field. Using Open
Error and the Reason Code as the symptom, refer to the IBM Token-Ring Network
Problem Determination Guide to resolve the problem.
Table 3. Open error causes and actions
20
OP Error Code
Cause
Action
0011, 0010
No media attached.
Connect the UTP or STP cable to
the adapter.
IBM Token-Ring Adapter Features
Table 3. Open error causes and actions (continued)
OP Error Code
Cause
Action
002D
A client computer is trying to be the Start your RPL server. If the error
first active computer on a
persists, reboot the client computer.
token-ring network.
All others
Adapter open failure.
Refer to the IBM Token-Ring
Network Problem Determination
Guide.
Ring status error
A ring error was detected when the RPL feature or bootstrap program was
executing. The ring status (RS) error field contains the error code. Locate the error
code in Table 4 to determine the correct action to take. Some values might be
displayed that are a combination of the values listed in the table. The x’s used in
the RS Error Code column can be any hexadecimal number from 0 through F.
Table 4. Ring status error causes and actions
RS Error Code
Cause
Action
Cxxx to Dxxx
v No receive signal was detected.
v The network is beaconing.
v The adapter is transmitting
beacon frames.
Refer to the IBM Token-Ring
Network Problem Determination
Guide.
2000
This adapter has detected a
soft-error condition.
No action required.
08xx
Wire fault. The adapter has
Refer to the IBM Token-Ring
detected a problem in itself or in its Network Problem Determination
lobe.
Guide.
04xx
The adapter detected an internal
hardware error.
Contact your network administrator.
x1xx
Remove received. This adapter
was removed from the network.
Contact your network administrator
for assistance.
0080
Counter overflow. One of the error
log counters has incremented past
256.
Restart the computer.
0040 or 0060
Single station. The adapter has
opened and is the only station on
the network. This bit resets when
another station inserts.
No action is required unless other
stations are known to be operating
on this network. If other stations
are on the network, refer to the
IBM Token-Ring Network Problem
Determination Guide.
0020
Ring recovery. The adapter is
transmitting or receiving claim
token frames.
No action is required.
0004
Full-duplex. The adapter is
operating in full-duplex mode.
No action is required.
All others
Reserved.
Contact your network administrator
for assistance.
PC Error
The RPL feature has detected a problem with either the software or hardware in the
client computer. Retry the operation by restarting the computer at least once. If the
Chapter 2. Remote Program Load
21
problem persists, locate the error code in Table 5 to determine the correct action to
take.
Table 5. PC error causes and actions
PC Error Code
Cause
Action
05xx
An invalid command control block
(CCB) code was issued to the
adapter support subset. xx = the
CCB code.
Check the bootstrap program if it is
user-written. If not, contact your
network administrator for
assistance. Provide the CCB code.
06xx (not
highlighted)
PROGRAM.ALERT frames being
transmitted. The xx portion of the
value represents the alert code.
Restart the computer. If this error
persists, contact your network
administrator for assistance.
00 = Unexpected error
response frame received.
02 = File not found.
04 = Out of memory space.
06 = Memory overrun.
08 = Unexpected DLC status
received.
07xx
The adapter failed a wrap test. xx = The adapter appears defective.
system status block (SSB) return
Run the diagnostics. Contact your
code.
network administrator if problems
persist.
All others
A computer hardware or software
error has occurred.
Perform the computer diagnostic
test procedure or contact your
network administrator for
assistance.
IBM Turbo 16/4 Token-Ring PC Card 2 RPL feature
Supported environments
The IBM Turbo 16/4 Token-Ring PC Card 2 supports RPL from the following
servers:
v IBM OS/2 LAN Server Version 3.0
v IBM OS/2 LAN Server Version 4.0
v IBM OS/2 Warp Server
v Novell NetWare 4.11 or later
v Novell NetWare 5.0
v Microsoft NT Server 4.0 Service Pack 3 or later
Overview
The Remote Program Load (RPL) function enables an adapter to boot a computer
using files that the computer receives from a LAN server. The computer that
requests these files is referred to as the client computer, and the computer that
responds with these files is referred to as the LAN server. In order for RPL to take
place, two things must occur. First, the RPL feature of the adapter in the client
machine initiates the RPL request. Second, a LAN server responds to the RPL
request with the files to bring up, or boot, the client computer.
The following sections are included here:
v “Installation and configuration” on page 23
v “Setting up your Windows NT 4.0 server to support RPL” on page 23
22
IBM Token-Ring Adapter Features
v “Setting up your OS/2 LAN Server to support RPL” on page 9
v “Setting up your Novell NetWare server to support RPL” on page 10
v “RPL messages” on page 27
Installation and configuration
Setting up your client computer to support RPL
For the RPL process to begin, the feature must be enabled on the adapter installed
in the client computer, and the client computer must recognize the RPL feature of
the adapter as the first or only bootable device present.
Enabling the RPL feature on the adapter
The adapter is shipped with the RPL feature enabled. To ensure that it is enabled,
run the diagnostics and, at the diagnostics test panel, press F5 to view or change
the RPL setting.
Making the RPL feature the first bootable device
All IBM PCs support RPL, and many IBM-compatible PCs also do. If your computer
is not an IBM PC, refer to your computer user manual or contact the manufacturer if
you are not sure whether it supports RPL.
On most IBM PCs you can make this adapter the first bootable, or startup, device
by selecting Network as the first startup device in the startup sequence in the
configuration utility (usually you enter the configuration utility by pressing F1 when
the IBM logo and Configuration Utility program symbol appear during the power-on
process). If drive A is the first bootable device, consider making the adapter the
second bootable device. Refer to the user manual for your IBM PC if you need
further instructions for altering the startup sequence or entering the configuration
utility.
After you have successfully selected RPL as the first startup, or bootable, device
you will see an RPL panel when your client computer is booting.
IBM Turbo 16/4 T-Ring PC Card RPL v1.01 (980921)
(C) Copyright 1991-1994 Novell, Inc. All Rights Reserved.
(C) Copyright 1996 IBM Corp. All Rights Reserved.
RPL-ROM-HSM: 200 BU-0000
RPL-ROM-HSM: 201 OP-0000 16
RPL-ROM-ADR:
RPL-ROM-IRQ:
RPL-ROM-MM1:
RPL-ROM-PIO:
0020 3556 6D87
2
D600
0A20
RPL-ROM-FFC: 01
RPL-ROM-SFC: 02
RPL-ROM-SEQ: 01
RPL-ROM-ERR:
This example shows all of the possible error and status message prefixes. You will
normally not see the error status condition prefixes, such as RPL-ROM-ERR, unless an
error condition occurs. These error and status messages are described in “RPL
messages” on page 27.
Setting up your Windows NT 4.0 server to support RPL
Please refer to the chapter on Remoteboot in the Microsoft Windows NT
Networking Guide for the following features:
v Enabling TCP/IP or IPX support or both for your RPL client
Chapter 2. Remote Program Load
23
v
v
v
v
Troubleshooting problems in configuring Remoteboot service
Configuring memory for MS-DOS® RPL clients
Using the Remoteboot Command Utility (RPLCMD.EXE)
Using other Remoteboot Features and configuration shortcuts
Installing the Remoteboot service
1. If the DLC and NetBEUI protocols on the server are not already installed, click
Start → Settings → Control Panel.
2. Double-click the Protocol tab and add the protocols.
3. Click the Services tab on the Network Dialog box and add the Remoteboot
service.
4. In the Remoteboot Setup dialog box, make sure that c:\winnt\rpl is the correct
path to install this service.
5. Leave Migrate Remoteboot directory from LAN Manager 2.2 unchecked and
click OK.
6. When prompted, load the NT 4.0 server CD-ROM and access the subdirectories
\i386 and \client\RPL to update the system.
7. Reboot the system to apply the changes.
Configuring DOS RPL client network settings
At a command prompt on the server, change to the c:\winnt\RPL\bblock\netbeui
directory and create a directory named ibmtokcs. Within the ibmtokcs subdirectory
create a PROTOCOL.INI file that has the following data in it:
Note: Even though the DOS device driver file is called IBMTOKCS, the device
driver is known to the operating system as IBMTOK.
[protman]
drivername = protman$
dynamic = yes
priority = netbeui
[netbeui_xif]
drivername = netbeui$
bindings = ibmtok_nif
names = 6
ncbs = 12
packets = 20
pipeline = 10
sessions = 6
stacksize = 512
lanabase = 0
[xnsnb_xif]
drivername = xnsnb$
bindings = ibmtok_nif
load = xnsnb[cbr]
lanabase = 1
[xnstp_xif]
drivername = xnstp$
bindings = ibmtok_nif
load = xnstp[ub]
lanabase = 1
[tcpip_xif]
drivername = TCPIP$
disabledhcp = (TCPIP_NO_DHCP)
ipaddress0 = (TCPIP_ADDRESS)
subnetmask0 = (TCPIP_SUBMASK)
24
IBM Token-Ring Adapter Features
defaultgateway0 = (TCPIP_GATEWAY)
tcpsegmentsize = 1450
tcpwindowsize = 1450
nbsessions = 6
load = tcptsr[c],tinyrfc[c],emsbfr[cr]
unload = "unloadt /notsr[dc]"
bindings = ibmtok_nif
lanabase = 1
[ipx_xif]
drivername = ipx$
load = ipxmark[u],ipx[u]
unload = ipxrel[c]
bindings = ibmtok_nif
lanabase = 1
[msdlc_xif]
drivername = msdlc$
bindings = ibmtok_nif
load = msdlc[ub]
unload = msdlc[u]
[ibmtok_nif]
drivername = ibmtok$
MaxTransmits = 2
MaxTxFrameSize = 2048
MinRcvBuffs = 8
RcvBuffSize = 1120
Also, within that same subdirectory ibmtokcs create a DOSBB.CNF file that has the
following data in it.
;DOS RPL with IBM Turbo 16/4 Token-Ring Adapter
BASE 1A0H
RPL BBLOCK\RPLBOOT.SYS
LDR BBLOCK\RPLSTART.COM ˜
DAT BBLOCK\NETBEUI\IBMTOKCS\PROTOCOL.INI
;DAT BBLOCK\NDIS\IBMTOKCS\LA1.MSG
DRV BBLOCK\RPLDISK.SYS ˜ ˜ ˜
EXE BBLOCK\RPLPRO1.COM ˜ 2 ˜
EXE BBLOCK\I13.COM ˜ ˜ ˜
EXE BBLOCK\RPLBIND2.EXE ˜ ˜
EXE BBLOCK\PROTMAN.EXE ˜ ˜
EXE BBLOCK\RPLBIND1.EXE ˜ ˜
;DRV BBLOCK\IPXNDIS.DOS ˜ ˜ ˜
;DRV BBLOCK\TCPDRV.DOS /IDOS ˜ ˜
EXE BBLOCK\NETBEUI\NETBEUI.EXE ˜ 10 ˜
DRV BBLOCK\NDIS\IBMTOKCS.DOS
DRV BBLOCK\PROTMAN.DOS /IDOS ˜ M
Go to http://www.ibm.com/networking/support and download the IBM Turbo 16/4
Token-Ring Adapter driver diskette. Copy the following files from the DOS directory
(a:\dos) to c:\winnt\rpl\bblock\ndis:
IBMTOKCS.DOS
LA1.MSG
Installing DOS files on the Remoteboot server
The Windows NT 4.0 Server support for RPL does not include the image for IBM
DOS.
Note: If the DOS image is already on the server, skip to “Creating Remoteboot
configurations for the IBM Turbo 16/4 Token-Ring Adapter” on page 26.
Chapter 2. Remote Program Load
25
1. Under winnt\rpl\rplfiles\binfiles on the RPL server, create a DOS700 directory.
2. Type net use v:\\servername\rplfiles to connect another computer running
DOS with NDIS 2 networking support to the remoteboot server fplfiles share
folder.
3. Copy all of the DOS files from the DOS client to the v:\binfiles\DOS700
directory as illustrated below as non hidden files:
Copy c:\dos\*.* v:\binfiles\dos700
Attrib -s -h c:\io.sys
Attrib -s -h c:\msdos.sys
Copy c:\io.sys v:\binfiles\dos700
Copy c:\msdos.sys v:\binfiles\dos700
Attrib +s +h c:\io.sys
Attrib +s +h c:\msdos.sys
4.
5.
6.
7.
Go to the winnt\rpl\fit directory on the RPL server.
Copy DOS622*.FIT to DOS700*.FIT.
Edit DOS700*.FIT and change all references of DOS622 to DOS700.
Go to the directory winnt\rpl\rplfiles\configs on the RPL server.
8. Create a DOS700 directory.
9. Copy all files and subdirectories from DOS622 to DOS700 (use thexcopy
command with the /s option).
10. Make any custom modifications to the CONFIG.SYS or AUTOEXEC.BAT files.
Creating Remoteboot configurations for the IBM Turbo 16/4
Token-Ring Adapter
From a Windows NT 4.0 Remoteboot server command prompt, run RPLCMD.EXE.
This utility allows you to add boot block records for the adapter and vendor ID.
Follow the illustration below to set up and configure a boot image for your adapter.
c:\> rplcmd
Adapter Boot Config Profile Service Vendor Wksta [Quit]: b
Add Del Enum: a
BootName=DOS700
**rpl client environment**
VendorName=002035 **the first 6 digits of the adapter's hexadecimal MAC address**
BbcFile=BBLOCK\NETBEUI\IBMTOKCS\DOSBB.CNF
All other parameters are optional
BootComment=DOS 700 IBM TURBO 16/4 TOKEN RING
WindowSize=0
Adapter Boot Config Profile Service Vendor Wksta [Quit]: v
Add Del Enum: a
VendorName=002035 **the first 6 digits of the adapter's hexadecimal MAC address**
VendorComment=DOS 700 IBM TURBO 16/4 TOKEN RING
Adapter Boot Config Profile Service Vendor Wksta [Quit]: c
Add Del Enum: a
ConfigName=DOS700C
BootName=DOS700
DirName=DOS
DirName2=
FitShared=fits\dos700.fit
FitPersonal=fits\dos700p.fit
All other parameters are optional
ConfigComment=DOS 700 IBM TURBO 16/4 TOKEN RING
DirName3=
DirName4=
** shown in step 4 below **
Adapter Boot Config Profile Service Vendor Wksta [Quit]: q
26
IBM Token-Ring Adapter Features
Creating a new workstation record automatically
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
10.
11.
Click Start → Settings → Control Panel.
From the Control Panel, select Services.
If the Remoteboot service is not set to automatic, click the Start button.
Click Start → Programs → Administrative Tools →Remoteboot Manager.
On the Remoteboot Manager window menu bar, select Remoteboot → New
Profile from the menu bar.
In the Configuration list box, select DOS 700 IBM TURBO 16/4 TOKEN RING.
Type the name for the profile in the Profile Name field. For example,
TURBOTR1.
On the Remoteboot Manager window menu bar, click Remoteboot → New
Workstation.
On the New Remoteboot Workstation window, type the RPL client IBM TURBO
16/4 TOKEN RING MAC address in the Adapter ID field.
Type the workstation name in the Wksta Name field. For example,
WORKSTATION1.
Type a brief description (optional). For example, TURBO TR IBM DOS 700.
12. Change the password (optional).
13. Select shared or personal (optional).
14. Select TURBOTR1 DOS 700 IBM TURBO 16/4 TOKEN RING from the Wksta
In Profile list box.
15. Configure the TCP/IP Settings (optional).
16. Click the Add button when done.
RPL messages
RPL-ROM-HSM: BU-0000
Explanation: Bring-Up. This field is displayed as X'0000' if the adapter has been successfully initialized. If not, a
code other than X'0000' is displayed and the field is highlighted. See “Troubleshooting RPL problems” on page 28.
RPL-ROM-HSM: OP-0000 16
Explanation: Open Return Code. The first 4 digits are X'0000' and the last 2 digits identify the adapter data rate, if
the adapter has been successfully opened and attached to the network. If not, a code other than X'0000' is displayed
and the field is flashing. See “Troubleshooting RPL problems” on page 28.
RPL-ROM-ADR: 0020 3556 6D87
Explanation: Adapter Address. The permanently encoded address of the token-ring adapter in your computer. This
address is always 12 hexadecimal characters (6 bytes) long.
RPL-ROM-IRQ: 2
Explanation: Interrupt. The system interrupt level that the adapter currently occupies.
RPL-ROM-MM1: D600
Explanation: Memory (read-only memory). Segment address in memory where BIOS has mapped the RPL ROM
code.
Chapter 2. Remote Program Load
27
RPL-ROM-MM2: D800
Explanation: Memory (random-access memory). Segment address in memory where BIOS has mapped the
token-ring adapter’s RAM.
RPL-ROM-PIO: 0A20
Explanation: System I/O address. The I/O address that the adapter currently occupies in the system.
RPL-ROM-FFC: 01
Explanation: Request Count (FIND Frame Count). The number (in hexadecimal) of FIND frames that have been
transmitted. An excessive request count indicates that the LAN server is not present, is congested, or is not correctly
configured to RPL this adapter.
RPL-ROM-SFC: 02
Explanation: SEND.FILE.REQUEST Frame Count. The number of SEND.FILE.REQUEST frames that have been
transmitted. An excessive SEND.FILE.REQUEST frame count indicates that the LAN server is not responding after
having been found.
RPL-ROM-SEQ: 01
Explanation: File Response Sequence Number. This value is displayed when the LAN server has responded to the
SEND.FILE.REQUEST. It indicates how many times valid FILE.DATA.RESPONSE frames have been received.
RPL-ROM-ERR:
Explanation: Computer error. This field displays an error code indicating that the adapter has difficulty in functioning
with the computer. In most cases, the panel will be frozen and this field will be highlighted because the adapter cannot
continue. See “Troubleshooting RPL problems”.
Troubleshooting RPL problems
The following chart is helpful if you do not get the expected results when you use
an RPL feature on a client computer.
If other computers on the network need problem determination, you might need one
or more of the following documents:
v The operator’s guide for your computer
v The problem determination guide for network-related problems
Table 6. Failure indication messages
Failure Indication
Action
The computer’s BASIC panel appears, or the computer
shows a diagram to insert a diskette into the diskette drive,
or boots to the hard disk or diskette drive.
Perform the installation steps
for your adapter.
The BU field on the client computer display panel is not
X'0000'.
See “Bring-up error”.
The OP field on the client computer display panel is not
X'0000'.
See “Open error” on page 29.
The Client computer display panel shows any response that
has not been identified.
Contact your network
administrator.
Bring-up error
The bring-up (BU) field is not X'0000'. The RPL feature is unable to initialize the
adapter for use. The BU error codes and the action to take are listed here:
28
IBM Token-Ring Adapter Features
Table 7. Bring-up error codes
BU Error Code
Cause
Action
0020-002C
A module on the adapter is not
responding correctly.
The adapter appears to be
defective. Run the adapter
diagnostics.
0048
Initialization timeout.
The adapter appears to be
defective. Run the adapter
diagnostics.
All others.
Adapter failure.
The adapter appears to be
defective. Run the adapter
diagnostics. Contact your network
administrator if problems persist.
Open error
The open error (OP) field contains an error code. If the OP field is not X'0000', the
RPL feature is trying to open the adapter after an unsuccessful attempt. If the
problem persists, record the 4 digits of the OP field. Using Open Error and the
Reason Code as the symptom, refer to the IBM Token-Ring Network Problem
Determination Guide to resolve the problem.
Table 8. Open error codes
OP Error Code
Cause
Action
0011, 0010
No media attached.
Connect the cable to the adapter or
to the token-ring concentrator or
both.
002D
The adapter detected that it was
Start your RPL server. If the error
the only adapter present in the ring persists, reboot the client computer.
during the open command it it has
removed itself from the ring.
002E
The adapter could not detect
frames during the open command
and has removed itself from the
ring. This indicates that either the
adapter is running at the wrong
speed and does not have circuitry
to detect it, or there is something
wrong with the access unit or
cabling to which the adapter is
connected.
Connect the cable to the adapter or
to the token-ring concentrator or
both. Check if you are using the
correct cable.
All Others
Adapter open failure.
Refer to the IBM Token-Ring
Network Problem Determination
Guide.
Chapter 2. Remote Program Load
29
30
IBM Token-Ring Adapter Features
Chapter 3. IBM LAN Client
This chapter describes the IBM LAN Client features.
Supported environments
This section lists the adapters, software, and operating systems supported by the
IBM LAN Client.
Supported IBM LAN adapters
IBM LAN Client provides support for the following adapters:
v IBM Token-Ring PCI Family Adapters
– IBM 16/4 Token-Ring PCI Adapter 2
– IBM 16/4 Token-Ring PCI Special
– IBM 16/4 Token-Ring PCI Adapter 2 with Wake on LAN
– IBM High-Speed 100/16/4 Token-Ring PCI Adapter
v PCI Token Ring Adapter
v PCI Wake on LAN® Token Ring Adapter
v Auto LANStreamer® PCI Adapter
v Auto 16/4 Token-Ring ISA Adapter
v Token-Ring 16/4 ISA-16 Adapter
v Token-Ring Auto 16/4 Credit Card Adapter (PCMCIA)
v Auto 16/4 Token-Ring MC Adapter
v Token-Ring 16/4 Adapter/A
v Auto Wake Token-Ring ISA Adapter
v Turbo 16/4 Token-Ring ISA Adapter
v Turbo 16/4 Token-Ring PC Card (PCMCIA)
v Turbo 16/4 Token-Ring PC Card 2
The device driver needed for the adapter to operate with the IBM LAN Client
software is provided on the adapter product CD-ROM. The following drivers are
provided:
v TOKEN.LAN — for ISA, Micro Channel®, and PCMCIA token-ring adapters
v IBMMPCO.LAN — for the Auto LANStreamer PCI Adapter
v IBMTRPO.LAN — for the IBM Token-Ring PCI Family Adapters
The installation program will copy the driver to your workstation hard disk when you
tell it which adapter you will be using. It will also provide the correct load statements
in STARTNET.BAT.
Supported software
IBM LAN Client provides support for the following protocols and client applications:
For DOS 5.0 or later:
v IEEE 802.2
v NetBIOS
v DOS LAN Services 5.x (with IBM Warp Server)
v Novell IntranetWare Client for DOS and Windows 3.1 (with Novell NetWare 2.15c
and later)
v PC3270 Version 4.x
v DCAF (Version 1.3 + CSDs)
v Artisoft LANtastic Version 6.0
© Copyright IBM Corp. 1998, 1999, 2000
31
v Attachmate 3270 Emulation
v LANDP® (If you are using Version 2, make sure that the service level of
LAN.EXE is MS004 or later.)
For Windows 3.1, Windows 3.11, and Windows for Workgroups 3.11:
v IEEE 802.2
v NetBIOS
v
v
v
v
v
v
v
DOS LAN Services 5.x (with IBM Warp Server)
Novell IntranetWare Client for DOS and Windows® 3.1 (with Novell NetWare 4.x)
AS/400® for Windows (Version 4.0, V3R1M0, and V3R1M1)
TCP/IP using Winsock 1.1 or 1.2
PC3270/Windows Version 4.x
Artisoft LANtastic Version 6.0
APPC/Windows
Note: IBM LAN Station Manager cannot be run in the same workstation as IBM
LAN Client.
Supported operating systems
IBM LAN Client supports the following desktop operating systems:
v MS-DOS 5.x and 6.x
v PC-DOS 5.x, 6.x, and 7.0
v Windows 3.1 and 3.11, in enhanced mode
v Windows for Workgroups 3.11
Restrictions for this release
The following restrictions apply for this release of IBM LAN Client:
v IBM LAN Client will operate with only one adapter.
v IBM LAN Client does not support the RPL function.
Overview
IBM LAN Client provides program interfaces to support network application
programs using selected IBM Token-Ring adapters. It allows a DOS/Windows client
workstation to communicate with an IBM LAN Server at Version 3.0, 4.0, and Warp
Server, or with a Novell NetWare Server at Version 2.15c or later, or to use TCP/IP
applications in Windows. (The IBM and Novell client code is included with this
package but, with the exception of PING, TCP/IP applications are not.) In addition,
support is provided for programs written to the NetBIOS or IEEE 802.2 application
programming interfaces.
Benefits
v Requires as little as 4 KB conventional memory. (See “DOS conventional
memory usage reduction” on page 33 for more details.)
v Uses one common environment for concurrent multiple protocols.
v One or more of NetBIOS, IPX, TCP/IP, and IEEE 802.2.
v Does not require shim modules, such as ODINSUP and LANSUP.
v Includes client software for attachment to Novell NetWare Servers or IBM LAN
Servers.
v Includes DOS LAN Services 5.x.
32
IBM Token-Ring Adapter Features
v Includes Novell IntranetWare Client for DOS and Windows 3.1.
v Provides full access to essential NetWare services such as NetWare Directory
Services (NDS).
v Provides improved connection reliability, including the ability to auto-reconnect
open files.
v Provides enhanced large Internet packet (LIP) and packet burst support.
v Includes an installation tool with a graphical user interface (GUI) for easy
installation of client software.
v Includes a command-line version of the installation tool for use by network
administrators who are installing on a large number of workstations.
v Allows the same adapter device driver to be used for client workstations and for
Novell NetWare servers, reducing support complexity.
DOS conventional memory usage reduction
IBM LAN Client minimizes the use of DOS conventional memory for network
communications. With LAN Client, the LAN adapter drivers and protocol stacks no
longer require large amounts of DOS memory. Table 9 shows the memory
requirements LAN Client, compared with existing implementations. This table shows
how much DOS conventional memory is used by LAN Client for three popular
communication protocols, compared with current usage.
Table 9. Memory reduction when using LAN Client
Protocol
Before IBM LAN Client
With IBM LAN Client
IPX
59 KB
5 KB
IEEE 802.2
95 KB
4 KB
NetBIOS
95 KB
4 KB
Installation and configuration
1. Run LCINST.EXE from the root directory of the CD-ROM if you have the IBM
Token-Ring PCI Family Adapter or from the \lanclnt directory if you have the
IBM Turbo 16/4 Token-Ring PC Card 2. You can also run it from the installed
version of LCINST from the LAN Client diskettes or the self-extracting package
file (LCPKG.EXE).
Note: To install LCINST to a hard disk from the LAN Client diskettes, insert
LAN Client diskette 1 in drive A and enter install.
2. Select your software environment from the first IBM LAN Client Installation
panel (DOS, Windows, or Windows for Workgroups).
3. Select your adapter from the IBM LAN Client Adapter Selection panel.
4. Continue to the IBM LAN Client Application and Protocol Selection panel.
5. Select the protocols to install and click OK.
6. Select the tabs on the IBM LAN Client Configuration panel to configure each
protocol.
7. Select Install.
8. Reboot your computer when prompted.
Note: The command line version (LCINSTC.EXE) can also be used to install
IBM LAN Client. For a list of valid parameters that can be used with the
command line version, type lcinstc /h and press Enter.
Chapter 3. IBM LAN Client
33
34
IBM Token-Ring Adapter Features
Chapter 4. LAN Adapter Management Agent
This chapter describes the features of the IBM LAN Adapter Management Agent.
Supported environments
LAN adapters
The IBM LAN Adapter Management Agent supports any IBM LAN adapter with a
device driver for the operating systems listed in the following section. The latest
LAN adapter drivers provide the most manageability of the LAN adapter.
Operating systems
For Windows environments, the Agent requires that Windows NT Workstation or
Windows NT Server Version 3.51 or later, Windows 95, Windows 98, or Windows
2000 be installed on the system. The Agent implements Desktop Management
Interface (DMI) Version 2.0 on Windows NT, Windows 95, Windows 98, and
Windows 2000. Windows environments support SNMP Version 1.
For OS/2 environments, the Agent requires that OS/2 Version 3.0 or later be
installed on the system. The Agent implements DMI version 1.0 on OS/2. OS/2
environments support SNMP Version 2.
Overview
The IBM LAN Adapter Management Agent makes IBM LAN adapters visible to
management applications using industry-standard management techniques. The
Agent provides manageability using either the Simple Network Management
Protocol (SNMP) or the DMI.
SNMP is the most common management-oriented protocol. The IBM LAN Adapter
Management Agent can be coupled with IBM Nways® Management Applications to
remotely manage IBM LAN adapters resident in the Agent’s workstation. The Agent
can generally be managed by any SNMP-compliant management application.
DMI is a programming interface developed by members of the PC industry to bring
management and control to PC systems. DMI browsers, which are supplied in the
Agent package, can also manage other systems using standard communications
protocols. DMI is also used by many workgroup management applications.
The Agent runs on Microsoft Windows NT, Windows 95, Windows 98, Windows
2000, and IBM OS/2 workstations and provides an easy-to-use installation process
for each environment. Management using SNMP and DMI is available for each
operating environment. Some of the attributes provided by the Agent are:
v General: product name, bus information, functional state
v Resources: memory areas, I/O ports, interrupt levels
v Counters: packets and bytes transmitted/received, ring utilization
v Drivers: name, version, specification level
v Addresses: universally administered, locally administered, multicast/functional
v Capabilities: Wake on LAN, auto-sense, full-duplex
v Power management information: wake-up information, power states
v Class of Service: TCP and UDP port range information, priority transmit counters
© Copyright IBM Corp. 1998, 1999, 2000
35
v Route switching: current route switching mode, switched packet counter
v Redundant NIC information: status, failover notification, failover trigger
Benefits
The IBM LAN Adapter Management Agent allows you to manage the LAN adapters
in PC systems.
System requirements
Windows NT, Windows 95, Windows 98, and Windows 2000 software
requirements
Before you can install the SNMP function of the IBM LAN Adapter Management
Agent on Windows platforms, the SNMP Service must already be installed at the
Agent’s station. This is because the Agent needs to add entries to the SNMP
Service registry parameters. The SNMP Service enables a Windows end station to
be administered remotely with an SNMP management tool. The DMI function of the
Agent has no installation prerequisites for Windows NT, Windows 95, Windows 98,
and Windows 2000.
OS/2 software requirements
The Agent requires that TCP/IP for OS/2 Version 3.0 or later be installed on the
OS/2 system.
IBM Nways Management Applications
Web-based device management using Java® technology is provided by coupling the
Agent and IBM Nways Management Applications. A LAN adapter management
application is provided by:
v Nways Workgroup Manager for Windows NT, Version 1.1 or later
v Nways Manager for AIX®, Version 1.2 or later
v Nways Manager for HP-UX, Version 1.2 or later
Installation and configuration
Windows NT, Windows 95, Windows 98, and Windows 2000
To install the IBM LAN Adapter Management Agent, run the SETUP.EXE program
from a diskette, or execute the appropriate self-extracting installation package. The
following major components are installed:
v DMI service provider
v DMI instrumentation for IBM LAN adapters
v SNMP extension agent
v DMI browser application
The DMI service provider and the DMI instrumentation are installed as Windows
Services. On Windows NT, they are originally given a Startup Type of Automatic. On
Windows 95 and Windows 98, they are started in the RunServices registry key. The
DMI service provider has the service name Win32sl. The SNMP extension agent is
used in conjunction with Microsoft’s SNMP extensible agent service to provide a
mapping between SNMP and DMI. The DMI Browser application provided is the
Intel DMI Explorer. The DMI browser application, this document, and a deinstall icon
are contained in the IBM LAN Adapter Management Agent folder.
36
IBM Token-Ring Adapter Features
OS/2
To install the Agent, run the INSTALL.EXE program from the installation media. The
following components are installed:
v DMI service provider
v DMI instrumentation for IBM LAN adapters
v DMI-to-SNMP mapper
v SNMP daemon
v DMI browser application
For OS/2 Version 3.0, the DMI service provider and the DMI instrumentation are
started automatically by commands in CONFIG.SYS. The DMI-to-SNMP mapper
(DMISA.EXE) and SNMP daemon (SNMPD.EXE) start automatically from the
system’s Startup folder. To start the DMI browser, double-click the icon in the IBM
LAN Adapter Management Agent for OS/2 folder.
If you have previously installed the SystemView® Agent for OS/2 on your OS/2
Version 3.0 workstation, some of the SNMP and DMI management components will
already exist. The DMI service provider is started automatically in CONFIG.SYS.
The DMI-to-SNMP mapper (DMISA.EXE) and SNMP daemon (SNMPD.EXE) start
automatically from the System Startup folder. To start the DMI browser, double-click
the icon in the SystemView Agent for OS/2 folder. The DMI instrumentation for IBM
LAN adapters is provided by the INSTALL program and configured to start
automatically from CONFIG.SYS.
For OS/2 Version 4.0, some of the SNMP and DMI management components are
already provided by the base operating system. The DMI service provider is always
running. The DMI-to-SNMP mapper, SNMP daemon, and DMI browser are part of
the System Management Agent folder, in the Utility program folder. The System
Management Agent folder provides separate icons for startup and configuration of
the System Management Agent. The DMI instrumentation for IBM LAN adapters is
provided by the INSTALL program and is configured to start automatically from
CONFIG.SYS.
The IBM LAN Adapter Management Agent for OS/2 folder will always include this
document and a deinstall icon.
If you alter the adapter configuration in your OS/2 system, you can use the MPTS
Configuration program to bind the IBM LAN Adapter Management Agent for OS/2 to
the LAN adapters of your choice. Go into the Adapter and Protocol Configuration
menu and add the IBM LAN Adapter Management Agent for OS/2 for the adapters
that you want to manage.
Example scenarios
Remote DMI
Remote DMI allows the DMI Browser to manage IBM LAN adapters in other PC
systems. Remote DMI exists only with DMI Version 2.0. The DMI Browser must be
started with command line parameters for Remote DMI. The underlying distribution
mechanism for Remote DMI is the Remote Procedure Call Network Service. The
functionality of Remote DMI is contained in the DMI Browser (IDMIEX.EXE) and the
DMI Service Provider (WIN32SL.EXE). To use Remote DMI, configure the Remote
Procedure Call (RPC) Network Service and then start the DMI Browser with the
appropriate command line parameters.
1. Configure RPC Network Services:
Chapter 4. LAN Adapter Management Agent
37
a. Click Start → Settings → Control Panel.
b. From the Control Panel, select Network.
c. Select RPC Configuration and select Properties.
The Properties are:
v Name Service Provider: Select DCE Cell Directory Service.
v Network Address: Provide the host name or IP address of the remote PC
system to be managed.
v Security Service Provider: This can remain Windows NT Security Service.
d. Select OK and then close the Network Panel.
2. Start the DMI Browser and direct it to manage a remote PC system:
a. From a command prompt change to the Agent installation directory.
b. Change to the \bin subdirectory within the Agent install directory.
c. Start a DMI Browser instance. The general syntax of the command is:
idmiex /path "dce│tcpip│hostname"
Some specific examples are:
idmiex /path "dce│tcpip│9.37.233.1"
idmiex /path "dce│tcpip│server99"
Note: The DMI Browser in the Agent pulldown menu will manage the local
system.
MIB browsing
When you use an SNMP-based manager and its MIB browser, the general steps
are:
1. Copy the MACDMI.MIB file from the <install dir>\SNMPMGRS path, to the
appropriate directory on the manager station. The destination directory is most
likely the same location where all the other *.MIB files are located. For example,
when you use NetView® for AIX, this is the /usr/OV/snmp_mibs directory.
2. Load/Install the MACDMI.MIB file into the manager’s MIB database. If you are
using NetView for AIX, start NetView for AIX, select OPTIONS and then the
LOAD/UNLOAD option.
3. View the information provided by the IBM LAN Adapter Management Agent by
traversing the MIB tree and browsing to:
iso.org.dod.internet.private.enterprises.ibm.ibmArchitecture.ibmDmi.
mibsFromMifs.ibmLanAdapter.dmtfGroups
or
1.3.6.1.4.1.2.5.11.1.8.1
38
IBM Token-Ring Adapter Features
Chapter 5. Route Switching
This chapter describes the Route Switching feature of the IBM token-ring adapters.
Supported environments
Windows Windows
NT 3.51, 95, 98,
4.0
2000
Windows
3.x
OS/2
Warp 3.0
and later
Novell
NetWare
Server
IBM 16/4 Token-Ring CardBus
Adapter
Supported Supported
(Windows
NT 4.0
only)
Not
supported
Supported
Not
supported
IBM 16/4 Token-Ring PCI
Management Adapter
Supported Supported
Not
supported
Supported
Supported
IBM High-Speed 100/16/4
Token-Ring PCI Adapter
Supported Supported
Supported
(using
LAN
Client)
Supported
Supported
Supported Not
supported
(client
mode
only)
Not
supported
Not
Supported
Supported
(client
mode
only)
Supported Supported
Not
supported
Not
supported
Supported
IBM 16/4 Token-Ring PCI
Adapter 2
IBM 16/4 Token-Ring PCI
Adapter 2 with Wake on LAN
PCI Token-Ring Adapter
PCI Wake on LAN Token-Ring
Adapter
Turbo 16/4 Token-Ring ISA
Adapter
Auto Wake 16/4 Token-Ring
Network ISA Adapter
Turbo 16/4 Token-Ring PC
Card
Turbo 16/4 Token-Ring PC
Card 2
History
Before the explosive growth in the use of Internet-based protocols, the 80/20 rule
was followed when designing and deploying an IP-based network. This rule stated
that the network should be designed on the assumption that 80% of network traffic
would remain within the same subnet while 20% of network traffic would cross
subnet boundaries. Maintaining the 80/20 rule allowed routers of that time to keep
up with traffic flowing between subnets. With the explosive growth of the use of
HTTP, that is, Web-based intranets and the Internet, the 80/20 rule can no longer
be maintained.
As users jump from server to server on the Web they might jump from subnet to
subnet, requiring almost all network activity to traverse the routers dividing the
subnets. In addition, as network backbone technologies increase in speed, such as
the move to 100-Mbps Token-Ring, the router bottleneck problem becomes even
more of an issue.
© Copyright IBM Corp. 1998, 1999, 2000
39
Campus network architectures have been moving in two fundamental directions.
The first is a continuation of a core networking architecture, with routers moving
data between subnets, and the second is an edge networking architecture such as
the IBM Switched Virtual Networking framework. In the area of performance
improvements, efforts in the core networking model center around improving router
performance, for example the recent interest in media-speed routers. By contrast,
one of the main interests of the edge networking model is based on improving
networking performance by distributing function away from a centralized,
single-point-of-failure device.
Overview
Route Switching is IBM’s approach to IP switching, or Layer 3 switching, that is
actually a hybrid of both models. Route Switching still requires a centralized routing
function in the network in order to provide the many functions that a router provides,
except for the movement of traffic between subnets. With Route Switching, the
traffic movement more closely follows the edge networking model.
The Route Switching feature of the IBM Token-Ring Adapters has been integrated
within the device driver making installation and configuration as simple as upgrading
the device driver. There are two modes of operation for Route Switching: client
mode or peer mode. Client mode is the preferred mode. Route Switching is based
on the Next Hop Routing Protocol (NHRP) standard from the Internet Engineering
Task Force (IETF) and makes use of this standard when operating in either client or
peer mode.
When Route Switching is operating in client mode an IBM Multiprotocol Switching
Services (MSS) Server is required to perform the Route Switching server function.
When in client mode, the enabled IP host issues requests to the IBM MSS Server
for shortcut information for a remote IP host to which it is attempting to
communicate. Once the shortcut information is received by the requesting client,
subsequent traffic to the remote IP host is sent through the shortcut path instead of
through the routed path. When Route Switching is operating in peer mode, the
same request for shortcut information is sent directly through the routers to the
remote IP host. If you install and configure Route Switching for peer mode on the
remote host, the remote host sends a shortcut reply back to the requesting host. In
either case, until the reply is received, the IP traffic will continue to be sent on the
routed path.
In both situations, access control maintained by the router is not compromised. In
the case of client mode, the MSS is also performing the routing function and will
ensure that shortcut information is not supplied for a remote host that is not allowed
to be reached. When in peer mode, the shortcut request goes through the router to
the remote host. Therefore, if the requesting host is not permitted to communicate
with the remote host, the request for a shortcut path will never be received by the
remote host.
Route Switching can also be set to automatic mode. When in automatic mode
Route Switching will initially operate in both client and peer mode. The first reply to
a shortcut request that the host receives will determine the permanent mode of
operation. For example, as soon as the adapter opens, Route Switching will begin
attempting to discover the MSS Servers that exist in the network. At the same time,
if IP traffic is being transmitted that is destined to a remote host not in this subnet,
Route Switching will also begin sending shortcut requests to these remote IP hosts.
40
IBM Token-Ring Adapter Features
If the requesting host receives a server discovery reply from an MSS Server, Route
Switching will transition into client mode. If it receives a reply from a remote IP host,
it will transition into peer mode.
Benefits
Route Switching can greatly improve performance of IP-based communications in
networks with congested routers. The goal of Route Switching is to bypass the
routing functions in an IP-based network without bypassing or undermining the
other functions that a router provides, such as a firewall function and possibly
broadcast containment. If the routers are creating a delay in the communication
between IP hosts, Route Switching will eliminate that delay with just a simple
upgrade of the LAN adapter device driver.
If a network currently has routing functions that are in need of performance
improvements, Route Switching can add life to these routers and extend their
usefulness indefinitely. In other words, with just the simple upgrade of device drivers
for the IBM Token-Ring adapters, huge expenses for new higher performance
routers can be deferred or completely eliminated.
Example scenarios
One-armed router
An environment in which Route Switching can be useful is a premise, or one-armed
router, configuration. In this configuration there is one router at a location managing
a multiple IP subnet network. All IP traffic between hosts on different subnets must
go through this router. In this situation, two workstations might be on the same
physical token ring, but from an IP perspective are configured to be on different IP
subnets. This is very often the case when the two hosts belong to different business
organizations or due simply to when they were installed. In this situation, traffic
between these two workstations must leave one workstation, traverse the network
all the way to the router, through the router, and then back across the network to
the other workstation.
With Route Switching configured for peer mode, only the initial IP packets between
these two hosts will be sent through the router. If in fact the two workstations are on
the same ring, once the Route Switching function in the two workstations exchange
their shortcut information, the traffic will only exist on that ring and will not be
forwarded across any bridging functions. Suddenly, performance between these
workstations is tremendously improved due to the removal of the router from the
communications path. Also, the total number of packets flowing in the network is
greatly reduced as well as the work load on the overburdened router.
Managing Route Switching with IBM LAN Adapter Management Agent
View the following values for the current configuration as well as the current status
of Route Switching while using the IBM LAN Adapter Management Agent.
Route Switching Mode (Win32 only) Indicates the current state of the Route
Switching function.
MSS Server Count Valid when Route Switching is operating in client mode. MSS
Server count indicates the number of MSS Server interfaces that have responded to
the request made by this computer to determine the Route Switching Servers in the
network.
Chapter 5. Route Switching
41
Maximum number of Cache Entries States the maximum number of cache entries
available for use.
Current Number of Active Cache Entries Indicates the number of cache entries
that are currently in use and contain valid shortcut information.
Switched Frame Count Count of the frames which have been sent using shortcut
information when they otherwise would have been sent through a routed path.
Observing this value changing over time indicates that Route Switching is operating.
Peer Holding Time (Win32 only) Valid when Route Switching is operating in peer
or auto mode. Peer holding time indicates the cache entry holding time value which
has been configured. This value is passed by this machine in replies to shortcut
information.
System requirements
v Peer mode
When Route Switching is operating in peer mode there are two requirements.
First, IP hosts communicating with each other must have a Route
Switching-enabled device driver installed and have Route Switching configured to
either peer or auto mode. Second, there must be a Layer 2 path between the IP
subnets.
v Client mode
The client mode of operation is an asymmetric solution in terms of the two IP
hosts communicating. This means that Route Switching Client can be configured
on only one of the two hosts and benefits can be achieved. In order for Route
Switching Client to operate, an IBM MSS properly configured for Route Switching
is required.
For more information about MSS, go to http://www.ibm.com/networking.
Installation and configuration
Installation and configuration information are particular to each adapter and are
explained in the installation guide for your adapter. Go to
http://www.ibm.com/networking and view the installation books for your adapter.
Route Switching parameters
The Route Switching function operates exactly the same way in every environment
and accepts the same parameters in every environment. The following four
parameters are used by the Route Switching function:
Route Switching mode
This parameter defines the mode in which the Route Switching function will operate.
Route Switching can operate in client, peer, and auto modes, or it can be disabled.
In client mode, Route Switching will operate with an IBM MSS Server to provide the
Route Switching function. In this mode of operation, the endstations will make
requests of the server for shortcut information to remote IP hosts with which it is
communicating.
In peer mode, Route Switching will operate without the existence of an IBM MSS
Server. In this mode of operation, the end stations will make requests to the remote
IP hosts to which it is communicating for its shortcut information. This mode of
operation requires both IP host end stations involved in a conversation to have
42
IBM Token-Ring Adapter Features
Route Switching Peer correctly installed and configured in order to operate. When
in peer mode, the IP subnet mask must be passed to the Route Switching function.
In auto mode, Route Switching will initially operate in both modes. This means it will
attempt to find an IBM MSS Server in the network as well as remote IP host end
stations configured with Route Switching Peer. The first positive response it
receives will determine the mode of operation of Route Switching for this end
station.
For example, if an end station begins to operate in auto mode it will begin to
attempt to discover IBM MSS Servers in the network. When IP traffic is transmitted
to remote IP hosts residing on a different subnet, the Route Switching function will
also send a shortcut request to the remote host in order to determine the shortcut
information. If the remote host has configured Route Switching to peer or auto
mode, it will respond to the request. If there are no IBM MSS Servers in the
network, the end station will then enter into peer mode of operation. When in auto
mode, the IP subnet mask must be passed to the Route Switching function.
If the machine is placed into a reduced-power state or is in some way suspended
when configured in auto mode, it will return to auto mode when it returns to full
power. This allows Route Switching to handle the changing of the network while an
end station is not on the network.
Route Switching IP subnet mask
This parameter is required when Route Switching is operating in either peer or auto
mode. It defines the IP subnet mask to which this adapter is connecting. This
parameter is typically determined automatically. The Route Switching IP Subnet
Mask must be in IP dotted-decimal address notation.
Route Switching peer holding time
This parameter is used when Route Switching is operating in either peer or auto
mode. This value defines the amount of time that shortcut information is considered
to be valid by the Route Switching function. When an end station provides its
shortcut information to another requesting end station it includes this value along
with the information. The requesting end station is allowed to use this shortcut
information for this specified amount of time.
Route Switching cache table size
This parameter specifies the maximum number of entries that the Route Switching
function can maintain at any given moment in time.
Each of the following installation and configuration sections assumes that your
adapter is already installed and configured. The following sections define the steps
required to enable Route Switching. If the adapter is not yet installed, refer to the
Installation and Configuration manual for the adapter being used.
Windows 95, Windows 98, Windows NT, and Windows 2000
If you are using a Token-Ring PCI adapter on Windows 95 OSR2, Windows 98,
Windows NT, or Windows 2000, use the instructions in “Token-Ring PCI Adapters
(on Windows 95 OSR2, Windows 98, Windows NT, and Windows 2000)” on
page 44 to set Route Switching parameters.
If you are using the IBM Turbo 16/4 Token-Ring PC Card 2, use the instructions in
“IBM Turbo 16/4 Token-Ring PC Card 2” on page 44 to set Route Switching
parameters.
Chapter 5. Route Switching
43
Otherwise, use the instructions in this section.
To set the Route Switching parameters, perform the following steps:
1. Click Start → Settings → Control Panel.
2. Double-click IBM Token-Ring Adapter.
3. Select the adapter to be configured with Route Switching from the pull-down
window at the top.
4. Click Route Switching.
5. Select Route Switch Mode of Operation in the upper box.
6. If you select either Peer Mode or Auto Mode, the IP Subnet (Network) Number
parameter must be defined. If the Microsoft TCP/IP support is being used, the
correct value for this parameter is automatically calculated and placed in the
value field for this parameter. If this is not the case, then select the value field
for this parameter and type the IP subnet mask for the subnet to which this
adapter is connecting. You must enter this parameter in IP dotted-decimal
notation.
7. Optionally, set the Peer Holding Time and the Cache Table Size to appropriate
values based on the above descriptions.
8. Click OK.
9. Click Close.
10. Reboot the computer to apply the changes.
Token-Ring PCI Adapters (on Windows 95 OSR2, Windows 98,
Windows NT, and Windows 2000)
To set the Route Switching parameters, perform the following steps:
1. Click Start → Settings → Control Panel.
2. Double-click Network.
3. Select Adapters, then IBM Token-Ring PCI Family Adapter, and Properties.
4. Click the Route Switching tab.
5. If you select either Peer Mode or Auto Mode, the IP Subnet (Network) Number
parameter must be defined. If the Microsoft TCP/IP support is being used, the
correct value for this parameter is automatically calculated and placed in the
value field for this parameter. If this is not the case, then select the value field
for this parameter and type the IP subnet mask for the subnet to which this
adapter is connecting. You must enter this parameter in IP dotted-decimal
notation.
6. Optionally, set the Peer Holding Time and the Cache Table Size to appropriate
values based on the above descriptions.
7. Click OK.
8. Click Close.
9. Reboot the computer to apply the changes.
IBM Turbo 16/4 Token-Ring PC Card 2
To
1.
2.
3.
set the Route Switching parameters, perform the following steps:
Click Start → Settings → Control Panel.
Double-click Network.
Select Adapters, then IBM Turbo 16/4 Token-Ring PC Card 2, and
Properties.
4. Click the Route Switching tab.
44
IBM Token-Ring Adapter Features
5. If you select either Peer Mode or Auto Mode, the IP Subnet (Network) Number
parameter must be defined. If the Microsoft TCP/IP support is being used, the
correct value for this parameter is automatically calculated and placed in the
value field for this parameter. If this is not the case, then select the value field
for this parameter and type the IP subnet mask for the subnet to which this
adapter is connecting. You must enter this parameter in IP dotted-decimal
notation.
6. Optionally, set the Peer Holding Time and the Cache Table Size to appropriate
values based on the above descriptions.
7. Click OK.
8. Click Close.
9. Reboot the computer to apply the changes.
Novell NetWare server
To set the Route Switching parameters, perform the following steps:
1. From the NetWare server console, type load install.
2. Select Driver Options.
3. Select Configure Network Drivers.
4. Select Select a driver.
5. Select the appropriate driver from the list of available drivers and press Enter.
6. Select Select/Modify driver parameters and protocols and press Enter.
For Route Switching configuration:
1. Using the arrow keys, move to the Parameters section, select Route Switching
Mode, and press Enter.
2. Select either Client, Peer, or Auto for the parameter value and press Enter.
You will see other Route Switching parameters in the parameter list.
3. Using the arrow keys, select Route Switching Table Size and enter a value
from 16 to 1024.
4. If you selected Auto or Peer in step 2, use the arrow keys to select Route
Switching Holding Time and enter a value from 2 to 20.
5. If you selected Auto or Peer in step 2, use the arrow keys to select Route
Switching Subnet Mask and enter a valid IP subnet address for your network.
IBM LAN Client
To set the Route Switching parameters, perform the following steps:
1. Take one of the following actions:
v If you have a Token-Ring PCI adapter that supports IBM LAN Client, run
LCINST.EXE from the root directory of the adapter CD-ROM.
v If you have the IBM Turbo 16/4 Token-Ring PC Card 2, run LCINST.EXE
from the \LANCLNT directory of the adapter CD-ROM.
v Run LCINST.EXE from the LAN Client diskettes or the self-extracting
package file (LCPKG.EXE).
Note: To install LCINST.EXE to a hard disk from the LAN Client diskettes,
insert LAN Client diskette 1 in drive A and enter install.
2. Select the environment from the first IBM LAN Client Installation panel
(Windows or Windows for Workgroups).
3. Select your adapter from the IBM LAN Client Adapter Selection panel.
Chapter 5. Route Switching
45
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
Continue to the IBM LAN Client Application and Protocol Selection panel.
Select TCP/IP as one of the protocols to install and click OK.
Select the Route Switch tab on the IBM LAN Client Configuration panel.
Check Enable.
Select Auto, Peer, or Client mode.
Note: If you select Auto or Peer, then you must enter an IP Address and a
Subnet Mask on the TCP/IP configuration panel. You cannot enable
DHCP.
9. Select Table Size and Holding Time values.
Note: Holding Time is not valid if you selected client mode.
10. Click Install.
OS/2
To set the Route Switching parameters perform the following steps:
1. Double-click MPTS on the desktop.
2. Click OK.
3. Select LAN Adapters and Protocols and click Configure.
4. Select the name of the adapter in the current configuration section of the
window and click Edit.
5. Scroll down through the configuration parameters until Route Switch Mode is
displayed.
6. Make sure that the cursor is in the data entry portion of this parameter by
either scrolling up or down or by clicking the data entry area.
7. To set the mode of Route Switching, type one of the following values: Client,
Peer, or Auto.
8. Move the cursor to the data entry field for the IP Subnet Mask parameter.
9. Make sure that the cursor is in the data entry portion of this parameter by
either scrolling up or down or by clicking the data entry area.
10. Enter the IP dotted-decimal value for the IP subnet network number to which
this adapter is going to attach.
11. Click OK.
12. Click OK on the right side of the window.
13. Follow the instructions on the panels to exit MPTS.
46
IBM Token-Ring Adapter Features
Chapter 6. Class of Service
This chapter describes the Class of Service (CoS) for IP feature.
Supported environments
CoS for IP is supported for the adapters and operating systems listed in the
following table.
Windows Windows
NT 3.51, 95, 98,
4.0
2000
Windows OS/2
3.x (using Warp 3.0
IBM LAN and later
Client)
Novell
NetWare
Server
(4.11 and
higher)
IBM 16/4 Token-Ring CardBus
Adapter
Supported Supported
(Windows
NT 4.0
only)
Not
supported
Supported
Not
supported
IBM 16/4 Token-Ring PCI
Management Adapter
Supported Supported
Not
supported
Supported
Supported
IBM High-Speed 100/16/4
Token-Ring PCI Adapter
Supported Supported
Supported
Supported
Supported
Supported Supported
Not
supported
Not
supported
Supported
IBM 16/4 Token-Ring PCI
Adapter 2
IBM 16/4 Token-Ring PCI
Adapter 2 with Wake on LAN
PCI Token-Ring Adapter
PCI Wake on LAN Token-Ring
Adapter
Turbo 16/4 Token-Ring PC
Card
Turbo 16/4 Token-Ring PC
Card 2
Special note regarding token-ring PCI adapters
The IBM token-ring PCI adapters are enabled with advanced technology that lets
higher-priority traffic expedite through the adapter, thus preventing this traffic from
being held up behind lower-priority traffic.
The adapter includes multiple transmit paths for use by the device drivers. This
multiple transmit path capability lets the driver pass a high-priority frame to the
adapter and have this frame transmitted before a previously queued normal priority
frame. This eliminates any traffic delays for the high-priority traffic from the moment
the traffic is deemed to be high-priority in the device driver.
This advanced function exists in all IBM token-ring PCI adapters.
© Copyright IBM Corp. 1998, 1999, 2000
47
Overview
The ability to assign relative priorities, or degrees of importance, to traffic as it
traverses a network has existed in token-ring networks since the inception of the
token-ring standard. Unfortunately, there has never been a method to assign the
priorities to the traffic as the frames were transmitted. CoS for IP solves this
problem by allowing network managers to assign priorities to IP traffic transmitted
by an IP host.
Benefits
With the use of CoS for IP, you can categorize your IP traffic on the network and
assign a degree of importance in the network to certain types of IP traffic. This
prevents traffic considered to be of low importance from taking valuable network
bandwidth away from important traffic. The backing up of a server farm or a session
of a computer game will no longer adversely impact the streaming of an educational
video session or a real-time video conference.
CoS for IP makes use of a traffic prioritization mechanism that has always existed
in the token-ring architecture but has never been exploited by higher-layer protocols
and applications. CoS for IP does not rely on any special enablement to the
infrastructure of the network. That is, the switches and bridges of the network do
not necessarily need to know that CoS for IP is being used. Even though the
network is not aware of this traffic prioritization mechanism, CoS for IP allows the
traffic that has been assigned a high priority to maintain this high-priority status from
the time that the traffic enters the network to its final destination.
In addition, CoS for IP does not require new protocol stacks and applications that
are aware of traffic prioritization. In fact, the traffic being treated as high priority is
up to the network manager and does not even have to be multimedia related. If
performing a backup of a server is considered a high priority then this traffic can be
deemed more important by the network manager than other traffic on the network.
Because CoS for IP uses a token-ring mechanism for implementing traffic
prioritization, the best results occur when the traffic that has been given a priority
status is sent through a Layer 2 switched, or bridged, path and travels entirely on
token-ring networks. IBM’s Route Switching function solves this requirement by
establishing the Layer 2 path even when the two end stations reside on different
subnets. With the advent of Web-based networking and intranet-based IP networks,
intersubnet communications is becoming more the normal situation. Route
Switching and CoS for IP work together to resolve growing network performance
problems not just for high-priority traffic but for all traffic in the network.
Example scenarios
CoS for IP can be used to ensure that time-sensitive traffic, such as streaming
audio or video, arrives at the destination computer within the required time. To
make use of CoS for IP, a network manager would determine the protocol and the
port range being used by the server application and configure CoS for IP with these
values on the server. For example, a network manager might have a server running
a RealNetworks streaming audio server application that is sending audio traffic to
clients using UDP port ranges, 26992 through 29040. The network manager would
configure CoS for IP for these values and assign a priority level for this range.
CoS for IP can be managed using LAN Adapter Management Agent. The following
values can be displayed:.
48
IBM Token-Ring Adapter Features
Win32 and OS/2 environments
LAN Adapter Transmit Priority Information Displays the general transmit priority
capabilities of the adapter. For example, this attribute displays the number of
physical transmit channels supported by the adapter hardware.
LAN Adapter Transmit Priority Distribution Shows the frame count and byte
count for each priority level. Displaying these values will indicate the priority at
which traffic is being sent.
Win32 environments
LAN Adapter Class of Service Information Displays the number of port ranges
defined for each protocol.
LAN Adapter Class of Service TCP Port Ranges Displays each of the defined
port ranges for the TCP protocol. Displaying these values will confirm that the port
ranges configured have been accepted and are being used by the CoS for IP
support.
LAN Adapter Class of Service UDP Port Ranges Displays each of the defined
port ranges for the UDP protocol. Displaying these values will confirm that the port
ranges configured have been accepted and are being used by the CoS for IP
support.
System requirements
There are no special requirements for the machines that will make use of CoS for
IP other than having a supported IBM adapter and the correct level of device driver.
CoS for IP makes use of the priority bits defined by the token-ring architecture.
Because of the use of these Layer 2 bit fields, traffic being assigned a
higher-than-normal priority should be traversing only a Layer 2 path in order to
achieve the full effects of CoS for IP. Route Switching complements CoS for IP by
attempting to establish a Layer 2 connection for all IP traffic that would otherwise
traverse Layer 3 devices.
Installation and configuration
Installation and configuration information are particular to each adapter and are
explained in the installation guide for your adapter. Go to
http://www.ibm.com/networking and view the installation books for your adapter.
CoS for IP uses the destination port number of outbound TCP and UDP traffic to
determine the Class of Service, or priority, of the traffic. Once the range of port
numbers used for a particular TCP- or UDP-based application has been
determined, this port range is simply passed to the CoS for IP function within the
device driver through the following configuration parameters.
CoS for IP parameters
CoS for IP is enabled in the device drivers by simply defining one or more TCP or
UDP port ranges. A port range is defined by a starting port value and an ending
port value. Each of these values is inclusive, meaning the port values that make up
a port range include the starting and ending values. For each port range defined,
you must select a priority value from 1 to 6. You can define a maximum of 15 port
Chapter 6. Class of Service
49
ranges for each of the two protocols. When configuring CoS for IP in either the
OS/2 or Novell Server environments, define these port range parameters in the
following format:
v There are a total of five port range parameters, each defining three port ranges
for each of the two protocols.
v The name of each parameter is in the format: TCPPortRange<1..5>
or UDPPortRange<1..5>
v The value of each of these 10 parameters is a character string having the
following format:
ParmValue := <PortRange>[<PortRange><PortRange>]
PortRange := <PortNumber><PortNumber><PriorityValue>
PortNumber := a 4-character hexadecimal value.
PriorityValue := a 1-character value from 1 to 6.
A bridging device in a token-ring network will forward traffic at a priority of 4 when
necessary. If CoS for IP is being used in a network made up of bridges this fact
must be taken into account. It might be necessary to make use of only priorities 5
and 6 when defining port ranges in order to keep the traffic at a higher priority than
the bridged traffic. When the higher-priority traffic travels across a bridging function
the bridge should maintain the frame priority. For example, a network manager has
defined certain UDP traffic to be priority 6 and this traffic is to flow across a number
of bridges as it travels from a server to a client. When this traffic is forwarded onto
subsequent rings by the bridges, the bridges will now forward it with a priority of 6
instead of 4.
Each of the following installation and configuration sections assumes that the
adapter is already installed and configured. The following sections define only the
steps required to enable CoS for IP. If the adapter is not installed, refer to the
installation manual for the adapter you are using.
Windows 95, Windows 98, Windows NT, and Windows 2000
If you are using a token-ring PCI adapter on Windows 95 OSR2, Windows 98,
Windows NT, or Windows 2000, use the instructions in “Token-ring PCI adapters
(on Windows 95 OSR2, Windows 98, Windows NT, and Windows 2000)” on
page 51 to set CoS for IP parameters.
If you are using the IBM Turbo 16/4 Token-Ring PC Card 2, use the instructions in
“IBM Turbo 16/4 Token-Ring PC Card 2” on page 51 to set CoS for IP parameters.
Otherwise, use the instructions in this section.
To set the CoS for IP parameters, perform the following steps:
1. Select Start → Settings → Control Panel.
2. Double-click IBM Token-Ring Adapter.
3. Select the adapter to be configured from the pull-down window at the top.
4. Select Class of Service for IP.
5. Select Add on the right side of the window.
6. Select the appropriate protocol by clicking either TCP or UDP.
7. Select the value field for the Start port value and enter the starting port value
for the port range in decimal notation.
8. Select the value field for the End port value and enter the ending port value for
the port range in decimal notation.
50
IBM Token-Ring Adapter Features
9. Select the priority for this port range by dragging the slider on the right side of
the window.
10. Select OK.
11. Repeat steps 5 through 10 for each port range to be defined.
Note: Class of Service for IP supports a maximum of 15 defined port ranges
for each protocol.
12. Select OK at the bottom of the window.
13. Select Close at the bottom of the window.
14. Reboot your computer to apply the changes.
Token-ring PCI adapters (on Windows 95 OSR2, Windows 98,
Windows NT, and Windows 2000)
To set the CoS for IP parameters, perform the following steps:
1. Select Start → Settings → Control Panel.
2. Double-click Network.
3. Select Adapters, then IBM Token-Ring PCI Family Adapter, and Properties.
4. Select Class of Service tab.
5. Select Add.
6. Select the appropriate protocol by clicking either TCP or UDP.
7. Select the value field for the Start port value and enter the starting port value
for the port range in decimal notation.
8. Select the value field for the End port value and enter the ending port value for
the port range in decimal notation.
9. Select the value field for port range and enter the priority in decimal notation.
10. Select OK.
11. Repeat steps 5 through 10 for each port range to be defined.
Note: Class of Service for IP supports a maximum of 15 defined port ranges
for each protocol.
12. Select OK at the bottom of the window.
13. Select Close at the bottom of the window.
14. Reboot your computer to apply the changes.
IBM Turbo 16/4 Token-Ring PC Card 2
To set the CoS for IP parameters, perform the following steps:
1. Select Start → Settings → Control Panel.
2. Double-click Network.
3. Select Adapters, then IBM Turbo 16/4 Token-Ring PC Card 2, and
Properties.
4. Select Class of Service tab.
5. Select Add.
6. Select the appropriate protocol by clicking either TCP or UDP.
7. Select the value field for the Start port value and enter the starting port value
for the port range in decimal notation.
8. Select the value field for the End port value and enter the ending port value for
the port range in decimal notation.
9. Select the value field for port range and enter the priority in decimal notation.
10. Select OK.
Chapter 6. Class of Service
51
11. Repeat steps 5 through 10 for each port range to be defined.
Note: Class of Service for IP supports a maximum of 15 defined port ranges
for each protocol.
12. Select OK at the bottom of the window.
13. Select Close at the bottom of the window.
14. Reboot your computer to apply the changes.
Novell NetWare Server
To
1.
2.
3.
set the CoS for IP parameters, perform the following steps:
From the NetWare Server console, enter load install.
Select Driver Options.
Select Configure Network Drivers.
4. Select Select a driver.
5. Select the appropriate driver from the list of available drivers and press Enter.
6. Select Select/Modify driver parameters and protocols and press Enter.
For Class of Service configuration:
1. Using the arrow keys, move to the Parameters section, select Class of Service,
and press Enter.
2. Select Enabled from the list and press Enter. You will see another Class of
Service parameter in the parameter list.
3. Using the arrow keys, select Class of Service Set Number and enter a number
from 1 to 16. This will create an indirect reference to a file named
IBMCOSx.CFG, where x is the number you entered. This file contains the Class
of Service keywords and values as defined above. This file can be used by
different adapters in the system.
LAN Client
To set the CoS for IP parameters, perform the following steps:
1. Run LCINST.EXE from the root directory of the CD-ROM if you have the IBM
Token-Ring PCI Family Adapter or from the \LANCLNT directory if you have the
IBM Turbo 16/4 Token-Ring PC Card 2. You can also run it from the LAN Client
diskettes or the self-extracting package file (LCPKG.EXE).
Note: To install LCINST.EXE to a hard disk from the LAN Client diskettes,
insert LAN Client diskette 1 in drive A and enter install.
2. Select the environment from the first IBM LAN Client Installation panel
(Windows or Windows for Workgroups).
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
Select your adapter from the IBM LAN Client Adapter Selection panel.
Continue to the IBM LAN Client Application and Protocol Selection panel.
Select TCP/IP as one of the protocols to install and click OK.
Select the Class of Srv tab on the IBM LAN Client Configuration panel.
Fill in the UDP and TCP Port Ranges to be configured along with the
appropriate Priority value. You can enter a total of 4 port ranges between UDP
and TCP.
8. Click Install.
52
IBM Token-Ring Adapter Features
OS/2
To set the CoS for IP parameters, perform the following steps:
1. Double-click MTPS on the desktop.
2. Click OK.
3. Make sure that LAN Adapters and Protocols is selected and click Configure.
4. Select the Name of the adapter in the current configuration section of the
window and click Edit.
5. Scroll down through the configuration parameters until the TCP or UDP Class
of Service port range parameters are displayed.
6. Make sure that the cursor is in the data entry portion of any one of these
parameters by scrolling up or down or by clicking the data entry area.
7. Define a port range by typing a string that is in the format defined in “CoS for
IP parameters” on page 49.
8. Continue to define any additional port range parameters in the same manner.
9. Click OK.
10. Click OK on the right side of the window.
11. Follow the instructions on the panels to exit MPTS.
Chapter 6. Class of Service
53
54
IBM Token-Ring Adapter Features
Chapter 7. Redundant NIC
This chapter describes the Redundant NIC feature.
Supported environments
Redundant NIC is currently supported on the following adapters:
v IBM 16/4 Token-Ring PCI Management Adapter
v IBM 16/4 Token-Ring PCI Adapter 2
v IBM 16/4 Token-Ring PCI Adapter 2 with Wake on LAN
v IBM High-Speed 100/16/4 Token-Ring PCI Adapter
v IBM PCI Token-Ring Adapter
v IBM PCI Wake on LAN Token-Ring Adapter
The following operating environments are supported:
v Windows NT Server 3.51 and 4.0
v NetWare 4.11, 4.2, and 5.0
Quick Failover, an extension to Redundant NIC, is available for the following
adapter and microcode combinations on Windows NT 4.0 SP5, NetWare 4.11 and
4.2 with IWSP6A and NetWare 5.0 with NW5SP2A.
Adapter
Microcode
IBM
IBM
IBM
IBM
IBM
any
PX15C0CT or later
AL15DAAA or later
HSS2DAB4 or later
PX14D0CS or later
16/4 Token-Ring PCI Management Adapter
16/4 Token-Ring PCI Adapter 2
16/4 Token-Ring PCI Adapter 2 with Wake on LAN
High-Speed 100/16/4 Token-Ring PCI Adapter
PCI Wake on LAN Token-Ring Adapter
For more information about Quick Failover, see “Quick Failover” on page 56.
Overview
The Redundant NIC function provides a high-availability solution for your Windows
NT Server 3.51 and 4.0 or NetWare 4.11, 4.2 and 5.0 server. This function
maintains network connectivity in the event of an adapter- or lobe-related failure.
You can assign a backup adapter to take control of the network connection if the
active adapter fails.
The Redundant NIC function will initiate a failover when a cable fault or a hard error
occurs on the adapter. A failover causes the driver to switch traffic from the active
adapter to the backup adapter. The active and backup roles are traded between the
adapters of the redundant pair.
In many cases, the failover to the backup adapter will occur seamlessly. Due to the
failover latency involved in opening the backup adapter onto the ring, some
protocols might require that sessions be reestablished. In either case, network
connectivity is maintained and server downtime is avoided.
© Copyright IBM Corp. 1998, 1999, 2000
55
Benefits
The Redundant NIC function provides a high-availability solution for your token-ring
connected servers. The goal of Redundant NIC is to maintain network connectivity
in the event of an adapter- or lobe-related failure.
Example scenarios
Managing a Redundant NIC NT server with the Agent
During driver configuration, users can define a Redundant NIC pair. The pair
consists of an active adapter and a backup adapter. The backup adapter will take
over in the event of a failure on the active adapter. These failovers can occur
continually as long as the backup adapter is operational. Redundant NIC is offered
on Windows NT and NetWare server systems. The LAN Adapter Management
Agent can be used to complement the Redundant NIC function on Windows NT.
The Agent will send a DMI indication and SNMP trap upon detecting the completion
of a Redundant NIC failover. The Agent also allows a failover to be initiated via DMI
or SNMP. The Agent also provides the addresses of the active and backup
adapters, a running count of failovers and the status of the backup adapter. The
Nways Management Applications format the contents of the failover SNMP trap into
a clear message.
The combined Redundant NIC and Agent functions should be used on
mission-critical servers, and the Nways Management Applications should be used to
monitor those servers. Redundant NIC provides the continual network connectivity
necessary for the clients using the Windows NT Server. The Agent sends the
failover SNMP trap to the Nways Management Application, or any other
SNMP-based network management application. Once notified of the server failover,
the network administrator can correct the error. For example, the error might be an
accidentally disconnected cable. Once the cable has been reconnected, the network
administrator can then force a failover from the management application and restore
the server’s original adapter configuration.
Quick Failover
Quick Failover (QFO) is an extension to original Redundant NIC. QFO reduces the
failover time from around 30 seconds to less than 10 seconds, and it allows the
primary and secondary adapter pair to be in any PCI slot in the system. QFO is
supported on Windows NT 4.0 SP 5, NetWare (4.11, 4.2) with IWSP6A and
NetWare 5.0 with NW5SP2A.QFO for NetWare also has an enhanced user interface
from the original RNIC for NetWare release. You can find additional information on
NetWare Quick Failover device driver parameters in the ″Novell NetWare Server
driver parameters″ section of the User’s Guide for your adapter.
In addition to having an adapter that supports this feature, you must also have the
proper device driver and microcode. See “Supported environments” on page 55 for
a list of the device drivers and microcode. On Windows NT, if your adapter or
microcode level is different from those listed, the device driver automatically
defaults to the regular Redundant NIC functions.
56
IBM Token-Ring Adapter Features
Installation and configuration
Windows NT
Follow these instructions when setting up a Redundant NIC pair.
1. Ensure that both adapters of a redundant pair are cabled to the same network.
2. Select Control → Panel Network → Adapters and your adapter. Use the
Redundant NIC tab located in Properties for the primary adapters to control your
redundant pairs.
3. You must specify a Locally Administered Address (LAA) for the primary adapter.
The LAA is located in the Basic tab of Properties for the primary adapter.
Redundant NIC usage tips
v It is strongly recommended that you specify a Ring Speed parameter of 16 Mbps
or 4 Mbps instead of Automatic. This will reduce the amount of time needed to
perform a failover.
v Once a redundant pair has been defined, the secondary adapter is not
configurable until the redundancy has been disabled.
v Once a redundant pair has been defined, neither the primary nor the secondary
adapter can be removed until the redundancy has been disabled.
v When a failover occurs, check the cabling of the failed adapter. If it has been
disconnected, reconnect it as soon as possible so that it is ready to function as a
backup.
v The Redundant NIC function is not supported on the Auto LANStreamer PCI
adapter.
Managing Redundant NIC
The LAN Adapter Management Agent Version 1.40 or later allows you to manage
the Redundant NIC operation. In the event of a failover, the Agent sends an SNMP
trap to notify that a failover has occurred. The user can also initiate a failover
through the Agent. For more information about the Agent, see “Chapter 4. LAN
Adapter Management Agent” on page 35. For an example of using the Agent and
Redundant NIC, see “Example scenarios” on page 56.
NetWare
The Redundant NIC function is provided in two pieces: IBMRNIC.NLM and
IBMTRPO.LAN. When a failover from the active to the backup adapter occurs, the
only protocols that can be switched are IP and IPX. Any other protocol information
that is bound to the active adapter will be lost.
Note: The only protocol information that is retained when a failover occurs is what
is bound to the active adapter when the problem occurs. No conflicting
protocols should be bound to the backup adapter. The only exception to this
is when ROUTE.NLM is used. In that case, ROUTE.NLM should be bound to
the active and backup adapters.
Failovers can occur from the active to the backup adapter, and also from the
backup to the active until a good connection is made. If the backup adapter is not
an IBM token-ring PCI adapter, only one automatic failover to the backup is
supported. The Redundant NIC NLM can monitor four pairs at one time.
IBMRNIC.NLM Version 2.53 or later has some new features. Quick Failover, which
allows failovers to occur much more quickly than normal failovers, is a significant
new feature. To take advantage of Quick Failover you must have IBMTRPO.LAN
Chapter 7. Redundant NIC
57
Version 2.46 or later. Additionally, your adapter must be using a microcode version
specified in “Supported environments” on page 55 or later. Use the flash update tool
available from your manufacturer if an adapter microcode update is necessary.
Failback is an additional new feature. Failback causes failovers to occur
automatically when the secondary adapter is active and when it can be determined
that the primary adapter could be active instead. This feature requires you to use
Quick Failover on the primary adapter. Failback is enabled by default, but can be
disabled when a pair is created. In Versions 2.53 or later of IBMRNIC.NLM, a new
user interface allows you to create pairs more easily. This user interface replaces
many of the command line functions used in previous versions of the Redundant
NIC NLM. The user interface provides functions that allow the user to get the
current status of all pairs, cause manual failovers to occur, change the switching
status, create, remove, save and load pairs
Installation of Redundant NIC software
Versions of IBMTRPO.LAN prior to Version 2.14 will not work with the Redundant
NIC capability. To use Quick Failover you need IBMTRPO.LAN Version 2.46 or later
along with an adapter using a microcode version specified in “Supported
environments” on page 55 or later. Each adapter must be plugged into the same
ring on the network for the failover to be completely transparent to the clients
communicating with the server.
The driver communicates adapter failures or cable disconnects to the IBMRNIC.
NLM via the NESL/NEB interface. If ODINEB.NLM loads after the LAN driver, these
messages are never sent to the IBMRNIC NLM by the NESL/NEB subsystem. If the
IBMRNIC.NLM does not failover after a cable disconnect or failure, verify that
ODINEB.NLM is loading before the LAN driver. Make sure that you do not unload
ODINEB.NLM while IBMRNIC.NLM is loaded. ODINEB.NLM lets you unload it at
any time even if other NLMs depend on it to be loaded.
If you use INETCFG.NLM to configure your system, follow the steps in “Installation
using INETCFG.NLM” on page 59 instead of the following INSTALL.NLM section.
Installation using INSTALL.NLM or NWCONFIG.NLM:
1. Install the latest support pack from Novell on your NetWare 4.11, 4.2, or 5.0
Server if the latest support pack is not already installed on your system.
Support packs are available at http://support.novell.com.
2. Install the adapters you would like to pair into a NetWare 4.11, 4.2 or 5.0
Server.
3. Copy IBMRNIC.NLM from the \NOVELL\NETWARE directory on the driver
diskette to SYS:\SYSTEM on the server.
4. Load INSTALL.NLM or NWCONFIG.NLM on the server and proceed to the
section where you install network adapters.
5. Set up the primary adapter. In the Load Software panel, perform the following
steps:
a. Make sure the path for the driver is A:\NOVELL\NETWARE.
b. Copy the new driver (IBMTRPO.LAN) and IBMTRPO.LDI from the diskette.
c. Select protocols. In the Parameters panel, select Standard Failover for
IBMRNIC Failover Mode and make sure the Standby Mode is set to
DISABLED, unless using the ″-backup″ parameter. If your adapter supports
Quick Failover, select Quick Failover and specify the IBMRNIC Failover
Address in the next field. If your adapter does not support Quick Failover,
use the Node Address field to specify the LAA. Set other parameters as
needed.
58
IBM Token-Ring Adapter Features
d. If you do not require failback, make sure it is disabled.
e. Save and load the driver. While it is processing, press Alt+Esc to get to the
Console panel. Choose the slot of the primary adapter.
f. Choose a network number to bind to.
6. Set up the secondary adapter:
a. Choose to load an additional network driver.
b. Do not copy the driver again.
c. Select the same protocols you chose to use with the primary adapter. If you
chose TCP/IP, use a temporary IP address for the secondary adapter. You
must use the same locally administered Node Address specified with the
primary adapter. Set Standby to ENABLED if the secondary adapter is an
IBM Token-Ring PCI Family Adapter and both adapters in the pair are using
Standard Failover mode. If using the IBMRNIC ″-backup″ parameter with a
non IBM token-ring PCI adapter, Standby does not apply. Save and load the
driver.
d. While it is processing, press Alt+Esc to get to the Console panel. When
asked to load another frame type, answer NO.
e. Choose the slot of the secondary adapter.
f. Choose a temporary network number to bind to.
g. Do not load an additional network driver.
7. Exit back to the Console.
8. Edit the AUTOEXEC.NCF file:
a. Before all of the LOAD IBMTRPO statements, insert LOAD ODINEB on a new
line.
b. After all of the BIND statements, add LOAD IBMRNIC PAIR <pairname>
-p<slot#> -s<slot#> and any additional parameters.
See “Setting up a Redundant NIC pair” on page 60 for more information on
IBMRNIC command line parameters.
Note: If the secondary adapter is not an IBM token-ring PCI adapter, the
-backup parameter must be used on the pair line. Also, because the
secondary adapter probably will not support the standby keyword, the
primary adapter must be loaded with the standby keyword.
c. Delete all BIND statements for the secondary adapter.
9. Restart the server to apply the changes.
Note: Double-check your AUTOEXEC.NCF every time that you use the
INSTALL.NLM program. It is possible that the INSTALL.NLM will move or
remove ODINEB.NLM. Make sure that it loads before the network driver
(IBMTRPO.LAN) and that IBMRNIC loads after the network driver.
Installation using INETCFG.NLM:
1. Install the ODI33F.EXE or later patch from Novell if you have a NetWare 4.11
Server.
2. Install the adapters you want to pair into a NetWare 4.11 or 5.0 Server.
3. Copy IBMRNIC.NLM and TOKENTSM.NLM from the \NOVELL\NETWARE
directory on the driver diskette to SYS:\SYSTEM on the server.
4. Load INETCFG.NLM on the server and proceed to the section where you add
a new board. If you are asked whether to use the fast setup method, select
No, use the standard setup method.
Chapter 7. Redundant NIC
59
5. Set up the primary adapter. In the New Board panel, perform the following
steps:
a. Make sure the path for the driver is A:\NOVELL\NETWARE.
b. Choose IBMTRPO from the list.
c. In the Configuration Panel, name the Board, fill in the slot number, and the
node. Standby Mode must be set to DISABLED unless the ″-backup″
parameter is specified. Set other parameters as needed.
d. Save the changes.
6. Set up the secondary adapter:
a. Select IBMTRPO from the list unless a non IBM token-ring PCI adapter is
being used as the secondary adapter. In that case, use the appropriate
driver for the secondary adapter.
b. In the Configuration panel, name the Board (the name must be different
from that of the primary adapter), fill in the slot number, and enter the node
or rnicopen address (must be the same as that of the primary adapter). Set
Standby to ENABLED if the secondary adapter is an IBM token-ring PCI
adapter and both adapters in the pair are using Standard Failover mode. If
using the IBMRNIC ″-backup″ parameter with a non IBM token-ring PCI
adapter, Standby does not apply. Set other parameters as needed.
c. Save the changes.
7. In the Protocols section, select User-specified Protocols, create and name a
temporary protocol and save that information.
8. In the Bindings section, choose binding parameters for the primary adapter as
needed. Bind the User-specified Protocol that you defined in the previous step
to all appropriate frame types of the secondary adapter.
Since the User-specified Protocol that you created does not exist, no protocols
will actually be bound to the secondary adapter. You might notice error
messages that point this out when the server is starting up. These messages
are for information only; no action is required.
9. Exit back to the Console.
10. Edit the AUTOEXEC.NCF file:
v Before the INITSYS.NCF command, add LOAD ODINEB.
v After the INITSYS.NCF command, add LOAD IBMRNIC PAIR <pairname>
-p<slot#> -s<slot#> and any additional parameters.
See “Setting up a Redundant NIC pair”.
Note: If the secondary adapter is not an IBM token-ring PCI adapter, the
-backup parameter must be used on the IBMRNIC pair line. The
primary adapter must also be loaded with the standby keyword.
11. Restart the server to apply the changes.
Note: Double-check your AUTOEXEC.NCF every time you use the
INETCFG.NLM program. It is possible that the INETCFG.NLM will move
or remove ODINEB.NLM. Make sure that it loads before the network
driver (IBMTRPO.LAN) and that IBMRNIC loads after the network driver.
Setting up a Redundant NIC pair
Follow these instructions to prepare IBMRNIC.NLM to monitor your adapter pair.
The Redundant NIC NLM requires that several options be specified in order to
create a pair. You can specify the options to IBMRNIC.NLM when you load the nlm
60
IBM Token-Ring Adapter Features
or on the command line after IBMRNIC.NLM is loaded. To automate the commands
on reboot, add them to your AUTOEXEC.NCF.
To complete the setup, you need the following information:
v The slot number assigned to each adapter. If the secondary adapter is not a PCI
adapter, you need to know the hexadecimal value of the secondary adapter’s I/O
Port or Memory Mapped base I/O address.
v If TCP/IP is bound to your adapter, you need to know your default router’s IP
address.
v You need to select a name for your adapter pair.
v You need to know if Quick Failover is supported and being used on each adapter
and if IBMTRPO.LAN supports it.
Note: If the IBM token-ring PCI adapter driver (IBMTRPO.LAN) is loaded with
the option to enable Quick Failover, the adapter will not become active
until a Redundant NIC pair is made with that adapter. You will not be able
to use that adapter until a pair is made.
To set up a pair when you load the NLM, use the following format:
load ibmrnic pair <pairname> -p<slot#> -s<slot#> | -x<base address>
[-r<ip_address>] [-backup]
If IBMRNIC is already loaded you can set up a pair by using the IBMRNIC
keyword on the system console. Its format is:
ibmrnic pair <pairname> -p<slot#> -s|x<slot#> -r<ip_address>
[-backup]
A description of each parameter follows:
<pairname>
This parameter is required and identifies the Redundant NIC pair. The
pair name must be 12 characters or less. It is case-sensitive. All ASCII
characters are accepted.
-p<slot#>
This parameter is required and tells the NLM the slot number of the IBM
token-ring PCI adapter that you want to be the active adapter initially.
-s<slot#>
This parameter is required if the secondary adapter can be identified by
a slot number. It tells the NLM the slot number of the IBM token-ring PCI
adapter that you want to be the backup adapter initially.
-x<base address>
This parameter is only needed when the -backup keyword is used and
you cannot specify a slot for the secondary adapter. This parameter
specifies the I/O port or the memory mapped address of the secondary
adapter (in hex).
-r<ip_address>
This parameter is optional. It might be needed if you are using TCP/IP on
your active adapter. If you do not load the TOKEN-RING_SNAP frame
type then you do not need this parameter. If you load the
TOKEN-RING_SNAP frame type, you only need this parameter if you
have IP bound and you have a default IP router. If this parameter is not
specified, IP will not know what the default router is after an adapter
failover.
Chapter 7. Redundant NIC
61
-backup
This parameter is optional. It should only be used if your backup adapter
is not an IBM token-ring PCI adapter. If this parameter is used the
primary adapter must load with the standby keyword.
Using Redundant NIC software
The user interface
As stated previously, the ibmrnic command can be used on the system console
after IBMRNIC.NLM is loaded. This command can be used to create a pair and to
get help on creating pairs. A user interface is started on a panel separate from the
System Console that is used to modify your pairs. In versions of the Redundant NIC
NLM prior to Version 2.50 all redundant NIC operations were performed on the
command line. Now, only the pair and help commands are supported. The new user
interface provides all of the other functions along with some extra functions. The
user interface allows you to create, remove, save, and load pairs. You can also
perform manual failovers and change the switching mode. The most recent status
of all configured pairs is always shown on the screen.
Command line functions
ibmrnic help
Enter ibmrnic help to show the valid options for the ibmrnic command.
ibmrnic pair
This command is described in “Setting up a Redundant NIC pair” on page 60.
Redundant NIC utility functions
Create
Press the Insert key to display a form that helps you create a pair. Fill in all of the
fields of the form and select create. The fields are the pair name, the primary slot,
the secondary slot/port, the IP router and failback enable/disable.
Delete
Press the Delete key to remove a pair. A list box with all configured pair names
appears. Select the name of the pair you would like to remove. If more than one
pair exists, there is an entry that you can select to remove all pairs.
Failover
Press the F8 key to cause a failover to occur on a pair that you select. A list box
with all configured pairs appears. When you select a pair from the list, a failover
occurs from the active to the backup on that pair.
Mode
Press the F9 key to change the switching mode of an adapter. Select the pair name
for which you want to change the mode. Then select the new mode for that pair.
Normally the Redundant NIC pair will automatically failover from the active to the
backup if a cable fault or adapter failure is detected. Use this command to change
the mode of the pair so that an automatic failover will not occur. To prevent
automatic failovers from occurring, set the pair to manual mode. In manual mode,
62
IBM Token-Ring Adapter Features
the ibmrnic switch command is the only way to failover from the active to the
backup adapter. Disabled mode will not allow failovers. You can use disabled mode
when performing maintenance on the backup adapter.
Save
Press the F4 key to save the configuration of all of the current pairs to a file. You
must save the configuration to one of the files that is specified in the list box that
appears.
Load
Press the F5 key to load the configuration from a previously saved file and then
select the file you want to use to restore your configuration.
The configuration can also be restored from one of the saved files when
IBMRNIC.NLM initially loads. To do this, specify the number of the file your
configuration was saved to. For example, if the file name is IBMRNIC0.DAT, then to
load IBMRNIC with the configuration stored in IBMRNIC0.DAT you would enter:
load ibmrnic 0
The files operated on by the Save and Load options are located in the sys:/system
directory of the server.
Pair information and adapter information
The status of all pairs is shown in the main portal of the IBMRNIC window. If a pair
is configured the following information will be displayed: the pair name and LAA
(locally administered address), the slots that the primary and secondary adapters
are using, the switching mode of the pair (manual, automatic, or disabled), the
current state of the primary adapter, the current state of the secondary adapter, the
number of failovers that have occurred, and the time the last failover occurred.
Because all of this information can not be shown at one time, you must press the
F1 key to toggle between the pair information and the adapter information.
Note: The terms primary and secondary do not refer to which adapter is currently
active. The primary adapter is initially the active adapter and was configured
by using the -p<<slot#> option on the command line. The secondary adapter
is initially the backup adapter and was referred to by -s<<slot#>
or -x<<hex port#> on the command line.
There are several possible states that apply to an adapter. The possible states are:
operating
This adapter is open and operating. This is the active adapter
standby ready
This adapter is ready for failover if the active adapter fails. This is the
backup adapter.
cable disconnected
The cable was disconnected from this adapter.
error detected
There might be an adapter check error.
opening
The adapter is trying to open.
Chapter 7. Redundant NIC
63
unloaded
One or more logical boards can no longer be located for this adapter.
adapter removed
This adapter was removed from the system.
Using Redundant NIC on a Hot-Plug server
The Redundant NIC NLM can be used in a server that supports PCI Hot-Plug, but
some manual intervention is required to maintain its proper operation. If an adapter
is removed that is part of an IBMRNIC pair, then failovers will no longer occur. If the
active adapter in a pair is removed, then a failover will occur. After a hot-plug
operation has been completed, the adapter driver must be loaded manually. Do not
let HWDETECT.NLM attempt to automatically load the driver for the adapter.
HWDETECT.NLM will not load the driver with the correct parameters needed to get
the Redundant NIC pair operational again.
To perform a failover, perform the following procedure:
1. Make sure that the adapter is not active.
2. Perform the hot-plug operation.
3. Load the driver with the same parameters in which the pair was created.
Note: If the secondary adapter is not an IBM token-ring PCI adapter ,and you
are trying to reload its driver, you might have problems if the driver does
not have an equivalent of the standby parameter.
Examples (taken from a NetWare 4.11 server):
1. AUTOEXEC.NCF of a simple Quick Failover Redundant NIC configuration after
using INSTALL.NLM:
set
set
set
set
set
Time Zone = EST5EDT
Daylight Savings Time Offset = 1:00:00
Start Of Daylight Savings Time = (APRIL SUNDAY FIRST 2:00:00 AM)
End Of Daylight Savings Time = (OCTOBER SUNDAY LAST 2:00:00 AM)
Default Time Server Type = SINGLE
# Note: The Time zone information mentioned above
# should always precede the SERVER name.
set Bindery Context = O=workgroup
file server name NWSRV1
ipx internal net 60990060
# The network environment for this server consists
# of a Token-Ring LAN with only one Frame Type
load tcpip
load odineb
# Primary adapter
LOAD IBMTRPO SLOT=3 RNICOPEN=400010203182 FRAME=TOKEN-RING NAME=IBMTRPO_1_TOK
BIND IPX IBMTRPO_1_TOK NET=ABCD1
# Secondary adapter loaded with the same frame type as the Primary
LOAD IBMTRPO SLOT=2 RNICOPEN=400010203182 FRAME=TOKEN-RING
NAME=IBMTRPO_2_TOK
# Create the Redundant NIC pair with Primary slot=3, and Secondary Slot=2
load ibmrnic pair mypair -p3 -s2
mount all
2. AUTOEXEC.NCF of a complex Redundant NIC configuration after using
INSTALL.NLM:
64
IBM Token-Ring Adapter Features
set Time Zone = EST5EDT
set Daylight Savings Time Offset = 1:00:00
set Start Of Daylight Savings Time = (APRIL SUNDAY FIRST 2:00:00 AM)
set End Of Daylight Savings Time = (OCTOBER SUNDAY LAST 2:00:00 AM)
set Default Time Server Type = SINGLE
# Note: The Time zone information mentioned above
# should always precede the SERVER name.
set Bindery Context = O=workgroup
file server name NWSRV1
ipx internal net 60990060
# The network environment for this server includes both Token-Ring frame
# types, utilizes Source Routing, has an IP network with a default IP gateway,
# and utilizes Route Switching via the IBM 8210
LOAD IPXRTR routing=NLSP
load tcpip
load odineb
# Primary Adapter
LOAD IBMTRPO SLOT=3 NODE=400010203182 RT=C FRAME=TOKEN-RING
NAME=IBMTRPO_1_TOK
BIND IPX IBMTRPO_1_TOK NET=ABCD1
LOAD IBMTRPO SLOT=3 NODE=400010203182 RT=C FRAME=TOKEN-RING_SNAP
NAME=IBMTRPO_1_TSP
BIND IPX IBMTRPO_1_TSP NET=FF1
BIND IP IBMTRPO_1_TSP ADDR=10.20.31.82 MASK=ff.ff.ff.0 GATE=10.20.31.254
# Secondary Adapter with the same frame types as Primary loaded, but no
# bindings
LOAD IBMTRPO SLOT=2 NODE=400010203182 STANDBY RT=C
FRAME=TOKEN-RING NAME=IBMTRPO_2_TOK
LOAD IBMTRPO SLOT=2 NODE=400010203182 STANDBY RT=C
FRAME=TOKEN-RING_SNAP NAME=IBMTRPO_2_TSP
# Create the Redundant NIC pair with the Primary slot=3, the Secondary
# slot=2, and the Default IP gateway=10.20.31.254
load ibmrnic pair mypair -p3 -s2 -r10.20.31.254
# If Source Routing is needed, then route.nlm must be loaded for
# all the logical boards of both the primary and secondary adapter
load route name=ibmtrpo_1_tok rsp=ar time=10
load route name=ibmtrpo_1_tsp rsp=ar time=10
load route name=ibmtrpo_2_tok rsp=ar time=10
load route name=ibmtrpo_2_tsp rsp=ar time=10
mount all
3. AUTOEXEC.NCF of installs with INETCFG (it is the same for both complex and
simple installs):
set Time Zone = EST5EDT
set Daylight Savings Time Offset = 1:00:00
set Start Of Daylight Savings Time = (APRIL SUNDAY FIRST 2:00:00 AM)
set End Of Daylight Savings Time = (OCTOBER SUNDAY LAST 2:00:00 AM)
set Default Time Server Type = SINGLE
# Note: The Time zone information mentioned above
# should always precede the SERVER name.
set Bindery Context = O=workgroup
file server name NWSRV2
ipx internal net 35083DE8
; Network driver LOADs and BINDs are initiated via
; INITSYS.NCF. The actual LOAD and BIND commands
; are contained in INITSYS.NCF and NETINFO.CFG.
; These files are in SYS:ETC.
load odineb
Chapter 7. Redundant NIC
65
sys:etc\initsys.ncf
load ibmrnic pair mypair -p7 -s6
mount all
4. What is displayed if you select View All Commands from INETCFG after a
simple installation:
# The network environment for this server consists
# of a Token-Ring LAN with only one Frame Type
LOAD SNMP
LOAD IBMTRPO NAME=TOK1_TOK FRAME=TOKEN-RING SLOT=7 NODE=400010203181
RXBUFFERS=32 TXBUFFERS=16 DATARATE=AUTO FULLDUPLEX=YES
RTSWENABLE=NO
LOAD IBMTRPO NAME=TOK2_TOK FRAME=TOKEN-RING SLOT=6 NODE=400010203181
RXBUFFERS=32 TXBUFFERS=16 DATARATE=AUTO FULLDUPLEX=YES STANDBY
RTSWENABLE=NO
BIND IPX TOK1_TOK net=abcd1 seq=1
LOAD DUMMY
BIND DUMMY TOK2_TOK
5. What is displayed if you select View All Commands from INETCFG after a
complex installation:
# The network environment for this server includes both Token-Ring frame
# types, utilizes Source Routing, has an IP network with a default IP gateway,
# and utilizes Route Switching via the IBM 8210
LOAD SNMP
LOAD IBMTRPO NAME=TOK1_TOK FRAME=TOKEN-RING SLOT=7 NODE=400010203181
RXBUFFERS=32 TXBUFFERS=16 DATARATE=AUTO FULLDUPLEX=YES
RT=C RTTS=1024
LOAD IBMTRPO NAME=TOK1_TSP FRAME=TOKEN-RING_SNAP SLOT=7 NODE=400010203181
RXBUFFERS=32 TXBUFFERS=16 DATARATE=AUTO FULLDUPLEX=YES
RT=C RTTS=1024
LOAD IBMTRPO NAME=TOK2_TOK FRAME=TOKEN-RING SLOT=6 NODE=400010203181
RXBUFFERS=32 TXBUFFERS=16 DATARATE=AUTO FULLDUPLEX=YES STANDBY
RT=C RTTS=1024
LOAD IBMTRPO NAME=TOK2_TSP FRAME=TOKEN-RING_SNAP SLOT=6 NODE=400010203181
RXBUFFERS=32 TXBUFFERS=16 DATARATE=AUTO FULLDUPLEX=YES
STANDBY RT=C RTTS=1024
LOAD IPXRTR ROUTING=NLSP
BIND IPX TOK1_TOK net=abcd1 seq=1
BIND IPX TOK1_TSP net=ff1 seq=2
LOAD ROUTE NAME=TOK1_TOK RSP=AR TIME=10
LOAD ROUTE NAME=TOK1_TSP RSP=AR TIME=10
LOAD ROUTE NAME=TOK2_TOK RSP=AR TIME=10
LOAD ROUTE NAME=TOK2_TSP RSP=AR TIME=10
LOAD Tcpip RIP=Yes Forward=No
BIND IP TOK1_TSP ARP=Yes Mask=ff.ff.ff.0 Address=10.20.31.81
LOAD DUMMY
BIND DUMMY TOK2_TOK
BIND DUMMY TOK2_TSP
6. AUTOEXEC.NCF of a simple Redundant NIC configuration after using
INSTALL.NLM to configure two pairs (one using a non IBM token-ring PCI
adapter as the secondary adapter):
set Time Zone = EST5EDT
set Daylight Savings Time Offset = 1:00:00
set Start Of Daylight Savings Time = (APRIL SUNDAY FIRST 2:00:00 AM)
set End Of Daylight Savings Time = (OCTOBER SUNDAY LAST 2:00:00 AM)
set Default Time Server Type = SINGLE
# Note: The Time zone information mentioned above
# should always precede the SERVER name.
set Bindery Context = O=workgroup
file server name NWSRV1
ipx internal net 60990060
# The network environment for this server consists
66
IBM Token-Ring Adapter Features
# of a Token-Ring LAN with only one Frame Type
load tcpip
load odineb
# Primary adapter 1
LOAD IBMTRPO SLOT=4 NODE=400000000004 DATARATE=M16 STANDBY FRAME=TOKEN-RING
NAME=IBMTRPO_4_TOK
BIND IPX IBMTRPO_4_TOK NET=1234
#Secondary adapter 1 (notice this adapter is not an IBM PCI Token-Ring
adapter)
LOAD IBMMPCO SLOT=5 NODE=400000000004 DATARATE=16 ENABLEFDX FRAME=TOKEN-RING
NAME=IBMMPCO_5_TOK
# Primary adapter 2
LOAD IBMTRPO SLOT=3 NODE=400010203182 FRAME=TOKEN-RING NAME=IBMTRPO_1_TOK
BIND IPX IBMTRPO_1_TOK NET=ABCD1
# Secondary adapter loaded with the same frame type as the Primary 2
LOAD IBMTRPO SLOT=2 NODE=400010203182 STANDBY FRAME=TOKEN-RING
NAME=IBMTRPO_2_TOK
# Create the Redundant NIC pair with Primary slot=4, and Secondary
# Slot=5 (this pair uses the -backup parameter because the Secondary
# adapter is not an IBM PCI Token-Ring adapter)
load ibmrnic pair bkpair -p4 -s5 -backup
# Create the Redundant NIC pair with Primary slot=3, and Secondary Slot=2
ibmrnic pair mypair -p3 -s2
mount all
Messages
RNIC-100:
FAILED TO ALLOCATE MEMORY FOR LAN BOARDS
Explanation: Your server is not able to allocate memory for IBMRNIC.NLM
User Action: Try unloading NLMs that are not needed or add more memory to the server.
RNIC-101:
FAILED TO REGISTER FOR ONE OR MORE NESL EVENTS.
Explanation: The Redundant NIC NLM was unable to register for some NESL/NEB events. This could prevent the
Redundant NIC pairs from functioning correctly.
User Action: Update MSM.NLM to the latest available level.
RNIC-102:
PAIRING SUCCEEDED
Explanation: A Redundant NIC pair was created successfully and will be monitored for events from the adapters that
make up the pair.
User Action: None.
RNIC-103:
MUST SPECIFY -P AND -S OR -X TO CREATE A REDUNDANT NIC PAIR
Explanation: The Redundant NIC NLM must be told the slot for the primary and secondary adapters when a pair is
created.
User Action: See “Setting up a Redundant NIC pair” on page 60 for information about creating a pair.
RNIC-104:
MUST SPECIFY A NAME FOR A REDUNDANT NIC PAIR
Explanation: Redundant NIC pairs must be given a name for the pairing to be completed.
User Action: Try to create the pair again and specify a pair name.
Chapter 7. Redundant NIC
67
RNIC-105:
PAIR NAME IN USE. CHOOSE ANOTHER NAME.
Explanation: You tried to use an existing pair name for another pair.
User Action: None.
RNIC-106:
THE DEFAULT IP ROUTER ADDRESS THAT WAS SPECIFIED IS INVALID.
Explanation: The default IP router address format that you specified was incorrect.
User Action: Verify the IP address of your router.
RNIC-107:
UNABLE TO GET OPTIONS STRUCTURE MEMORY.
Explanation: There was a problem allocating memory. The server could be out of memory or there could be a
problem with CLIB.NLM.
User Action: Try unloading NLMs that are not needed or add more memory to the server.
RNIC-108:
NO REDUNDANT NIC PAIRS LOADED
Explanation: There are no configured pairs to show at this time.
User Action: None.
RNIC-109:
ERROR READING PAIR INFORMATION FROM FILE
Explanation: Redundant NIC was unable to load one or more pairs from a saved configuration file.
User Action: Try recreating the pairs and resaving the file.
RNIC-110:
ALL PAIRS WERE REMOVED.
Explanation: All Redundant NIC pairings were successfully removed.
User Action: None.
RNIC-111:
INVALID REDUNDANT NIC PAIR NAME
Explanation: The pair name specified with the ibmrnic switch command does not exist.
User Action: Use ibmrnic show to determine the correct name.
RNIC-112:
MANUAL ADAPTER FAILOVER SUCCEEDED
Explanation: An ibmrnic switch command was issued to a Redundant NIC pair and the failover completed
successfully.
User Action: None.
RNIC-113:
INVALID IBMRNIC SWITCH COMMAND
Explanation: The ibmrnic switch command that you specified was not correct.
User Action: Enter ibmrnic help to get help with the ibmrnic command.
RNIC-114:
SWITCH MODE SET TO <MODE>
Explanation: The Redundant NIC switch mode was successfully set to the specified mode.
User Action: None.
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IBM Token-Ring Adapter Features
RNIC-115:
COULD NOT START THREAD TO HANDLE KEYBOARD REQUESTS
Explanation: A new thread failed to start.
User Action: Unload the NLM and reload it. Some memory may need to be freed.
RNIC-116:
<PAIRNAME> UNPAIRED SUCCESSFULLY
Explanation: The Redundant NIC pair <pairname> was removed successfully.
User Action: None.
RNIC-117:
UNKNOWN OR MALFORMED COMMAND
Explanation: You typed in a command that was not valid.
User Action: Type ibmrnic help to get help with the ibmrnic command.
RNIC-118:
ERROR SAVING PAIR INFORMATION TO THE FILE
Explanation: The configuration for the pairs could not be saved.
User Action: Verify that there is space available for new files.
RNIC-119:
THE SETTINGS WERE SAVED TO THE FILE SUCCESSFULLY
Explanation: The current configuration was correctly saved to a file.
User Action: None.
RNIC-120:
USE THE IBMRNIC UTILITY SCREEN TO PERFORM THIS OPERATION
Explanation: Instead of using the console command line, use the NWSNUT interface.
User Action: Try performing the command using the NWSNUT utility.
RNIC-121:
INVALID FILE NUMBER SPECIFIED
Explanation: The file number specified on the command line is invalid.
User Action: Choose a file number from that is valid.
RNIC-122:
THE FAIL BACK FUNCTION COULD NOT BE STARTED
Explanation: The thread that performs the fail back function did not start.
User Action: Unload and then reload IBMRNIC.NLM.
RNIC-123:
THE GRAPHICAL INTERFACE WAS NOT INITIALIZED
Explanation: There was a problem starting the NWSNUT utility for Redundant NIC.
User Action: Try unloading and then reloading IBMRNIC.NLM.
RNIC-124:
CREATING DEFAULT INI FILE
Explanation: A default INI file is being created because the current INI file cannot be found.
User Action: None.
Chapter 7. Redundant NIC
69
RNIC-125:
INVALID FILE FORMAT, USING BUILT IN DEFAULTS
Explanation: The INI file is invalid and will not be used.
User Action: Correct the problem introduced to the INI file or delete it so IBMRNIC can recreate the default file.
RNIC-126:
INVALID VALUE IN INI FILE
Explanation: An entry in the INI file was found to be incorrect.
User Action: Correct any problems in the INI file.
RNIC-127:
COULD NOT START THREAD TO HANDLE COMMAND LINE
Explanation: The thread that processes the IBMRNIC command line did not get started.
User Action: Try unloading and reloading IBMRNIC.NLM.
RNIC-128:
PROBLEM ALLOCATING RESOURCE TAGS
Explanation: There was not enough memory to allocate resource tags for IBMRNIC.NLM.
User Action: Unload and reload IBMRNIC.NLM.
RNIC-200:
UNABLE TO GET PARAMETER STRUCTURE MEMORY
Explanation: Your server is not able to allocate memory for IBMRNIC.NLM.
User Action: Try unloading NLMs that are not needed or add more memory to the server.
RNIC-201:
SETUP FAILED: INVALID COMMAND LINE FORMAT
Explanation: You typed an ibmrnic pair parameter that was not valid.
User Action: Enter ibmrnic help to get help with the ibmrnic command.
RNIC-202:
SETUP FAILED: UNABLE TO GET MEMORY FOR RNIC PROFILE
Explanation: Your server is not able to allocate memory for IBMRNIC.NLM.
User Action: Try unloading NLMs that are not needed or add more memory to the server.
RNIC-203:
SETUP FAILED: PROBLEM INITIALIZING THE ADAPTER PAIR
Explanation: The initialization routine for the pair failed.
User Action: Try creating the pair again.
RNIC-204:
SETUP FAILED: PARAMETERS STRUCTURE IS MISSING
Explanation: There was a problem accessing the parameters structure.
User Action: Try setting up the pair again.
RNIC-205:
SETUP FAILED: FAILED TO FIND ANY LOADED IBM TOKEN-RING BOARDS.
Explanation: The Redundant NIC NLM was not able to find any IBM token-ring boards loaded at this time.
User Action: Load token-ring boards for the primary and secondary adapters.
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IBM Token-Ring Adapter Features
RNIC-206:
SETUP FAILED: PRIMARY ADAPTER NOT FOUND
Explanation: There is no adapter in the slot that you specified as primary.
User Action: Specify the correct slot.
RNIC-207:
SETUP FAILED: COULD NOT ALLOCATE SPACE TO READ THE MSM CONFIG TABLE
Explanation: Problem allocating memory. It is possible that the machine is low on RAM.
User Action: Try unloading NLMs that are not needed or add more memory to the server.
RNIC-208:
SETUP FAILED: PROBLEM READING THE MSM CONFIG TABLE
Explanation: The Config table for the adapter could not be read.
User Action: Make sure that you are using the correct LAN driver.
RNIC-209:
SETUP FAILED: INCORRECT LAN DRIVER VERSION
Explanation: Your LAN driver is too old.
User Action: Use the one that came with the IBMRNIC.NLM diskette or a newer version if one is available.
RNIC-210:
SETUP FAILED: SECONDARY ADAPTER NOT FOUND
Explanation: There is no adapter in the slot that you specified as secondary.
User Action: Specify the correct slot.
RNIC-211:
SETUP FAILED: PRIMARY AND SECONDARY LOGICAL BOARDS DO NOT MATCH
Explanation: The logical boards on the primary adapter do not match the logical boards on the secondary adapter.
User Action: Check the frame types for the primary and secondary adapters. They should match.
RNIC-212:
SETUP FAILED: PRIMARY AND SECONDARY MAC ADDRESSES DO NOT MATCH
Explanation: The same Locally Administered Address must be assigned to each adapter using the node
address=<LAA> command line keyword.
User Action: Set the Locally Administered Address on the primary and secondary adapters to the same address.
RNIC-213:
SETUP FAILED: COULD NOT FIND MLID CONFIG TABLE TO PERFORM ADAPTER STATUS
CHECK
Explanation: There is a problem reading the adapter Config table.
User Action: Try setting up the pair again.
RNIC-214:
SETUP FAILED: THE PRIMARY ADAPTER MUST NOT BE SHUT DOWN
Explanation: The primary adapter must be open in order for Redundant NIC to initialize correctly.
User Action: Specify a primary adapter that is not shut down.
RNIC-215:
SETUP FAILED: THE SECONDARY ADAPTER MUST NOT BE OPEN
Explanation: The secondary adapter must be closed when Redundant NIC is being initialized.
User Action: Specify an adapter that was loaded with the standby keyword.
Chapter 7. Redundant NIC
71
RNIC-216:
SETUP FAILED: THE PRIMARY ADAPTER COULD NOT ACCEPT THE LAA
Explanation: There was a problem setting up the adapter with the Quick Failover feature.
User Action: Make sure the correct level of microcode is on the adapter.
RNIC-217:
SETUP FAILED: COULD NOT SHUT DOWN THE SECONDARY ADAPTER
Explanation: The secondary adapter did not respond to a request to shut down.
User Action: Try setting up the pair again.
RNIC-218:
SETUP FAILED: THE PRIMARY ADAPTER SPECIFIED IS PART OF ANOTHER PAIR
Explanation: The primary adapter you specified is part of another Redundant NIC pair.
User Action: Specify a primary adapter that is not part of a Redundant NIC pair.
RNIC-219:
SETUP FAILED: THE SECONDARY ADAPTER SPECIFIED IS PART OF ANOTHER PAIR
Explanation: The secondary adapter you specified is part of another Redundant NIC pair.
User Action: Specify a secondary adapter that is not part of a Redundant NIC pair.
RNIC-220:
SETUP FAILED: FAILED TO RESET THE PRIMARY ADAPTER
Explanation: The primary adapter could not be reset.
User Action: Attempt to create the pair again.
RNIC-221:
SETUP FAILED: THE PRIMARY ADAPTER DOES NOT SUPPORT QUICK FAILOVER
Explanation: The primary adapter must have newer microcode to support Quick Failover.
User Action: Update the microcode on the adapter or do not load the adapters driver with the RNICOPEN keyword.
RNIC-222:
SETUP FAILED: THE SECONDARY ADAPTER DOES NOT SUPPORT QUICK FAILOVER
Explanation: The secondary adapter must have newer microcode to support Quick Failover.
User Action: Update the microcode on the adapter or do not load the adapters driver with the RNICOPEN keyword.
RNIC-223:
SETUP FAILED: THE PRIMARY AND SECONDARY ADAPTERS MUST NOT BE THE SAME
Explanation: The primary and secondary adapters specified were the same adapter.
User Action: Attempt to create the pair again with two adapters.
RNIC-300:
UNPAIR FAILED: INVALID IBMRNIC PAIR NAME
Explanation: The pair that you tried to remove does not exist.
User Action: Enter ibmrnic show to find the correct pair name of the adapters that you would like to remove.
RNIC-301:
UNPAIR FAILED: COULD NOT REMOVE LINK FROM LIST OF PAIRS
Explanation: There was a problem unpairing the adapters.
User Action: Try to remove the pair again.
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IBM Token-Ring Adapter Features
RNIC-400:
MANUAL ADAPTER FAILOVER UNSUCCESSFUL: THE SWITCHING MODE IS DISABLED.
Explanation: When the switching mode is disabled you cannot initiate a manual failover.
User Action: Set the switching mode to manual or auto.
RNIC-401:
MANUAL ADAPTER FAILOVER UNSUCCESSFUL: THE BACKUP ADAPTER IS NOT ABLE TO
BECOME ACTIVE AT THIS TIME.
Explanation: An attempt was made to failover to the backup adapter. The state of the backup adapter is preventing
it from becoming an active adapter.
User Action: Make sure that the backup adapter is not open.
RNIC-402:
MANUAL ADAPTER FAILOVER UNSUCCESSFUL: SHUTDOWN OF ACTIVE ADAPTER FAILED
Explanation: The active adapter could not be shut down.
User Action: Try issuing a manual failover from the command line.
RNIC-403:
MANUAL ADAPTER FAILOVER UNSUCCESSFUL: FAILED TO ACTIVATE BACKUP ADAPTER.
Explanation: The backup adapter could not be reset.
User Action: Try issuing a manual failover from the command line.
Chapter 7. Redundant NIC
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IBM Token-Ring Adapter Features
Chapter 8. Tivoli Management Agent
This chapter describes the Tivoli® Management Agent (TMA).
Supported environments
The TMA executes independent of the LAN adapter. As long as the adapter has a
device driver for a supported operating system, the TMA will be able to try to
connect to a server.
The TMA packages are provided to support the following operating systems:
v Windows NT
v Windows 95 and Windows 98
v NetWare 3.x
v NetWare 4.x and 5.x
v OS/2
v Windows 3.x
Overview
The Tivoli Management Agent gives you the framework necessary to perform
management operations such as software distribution, inventory, user administration
and distributed monitoring. Instead of software applications sitting on top of the
desktop, the Tivoli Management Agent automatically determines what is needed to
perform a given management operation. If that capability already resides on the
computer, it immediately proceeds with the operation. If not, the Agent downloads
the appropriate software from the server to the desktop with no operator
intervention.
In addition, the Agent downloads newer versions as updates are loaded on the
server.You can gain significant productivity advances with these management
features because Tivoli Management Software is installed only once on the server
with updates performed automatically thereafter.
For more information about Tivoli Systems and Tivoli-Ready™ initiatives, visit the
Tivoli Web site at http://www.tivoli.com
Installation and configuration
To begin the installation, you must first get the installation package. See
“Downloads” on page 1. After you have downloaded the package, execute the
package to expand the files.
Note: NetWare installations must be done from a NetWare client.
Use the procedures in the following sections to configure the TMA.
Windows NT
1. Execute the batch file NTINS.BAT to install TMA.
2. A check will be done for a previously installed TMA.
© Copyright IBM Corp. 1998, 1999, 2000
75
v If an existing TMA is installed on the target machine, NTINS.BAT will abort
without installing. The TMA has a “live upgrade” feature so that any version of
a TMA can join the Tivoli Enterprise and will be automatically upgraded to the
latest version.
v If an existing TMA is not found, NTINS.BAT will automatically install TMA in
the directory c:\tivoli.
3. After the TMA has been installed, use your Web browser to open the file
x:\Tivoli\TivReady\readme.html (where x is your CD-ROM drive) or proceed to
“Windows NT” on page 77 for instructions to activate your Tivoli Management
Agent.
Windows 95 and Windows 98
1. Execute the batch file WIN9XINS.BAT to install TMA.
2. A check will be done for a previously installed TMA.
v If an existing TMA is installed on the target machine, WIN9XINS.BAT will
abort without installing. The TMA has a live upgrade feature so that any
version of a TMA can join the Tivoli Enterprise and will be automatically
upgraded to the latest version.
v If an existing TMA is not found, WIN9XINS.BAT will automatically install TMA
in the directory c:\tivoli.
3. After the TMA has been installed, use your Web browser to open the file
x:\Tivoli\TivReady\readme.html (where x is your CD-ROM drive) or proceed to
“Windows 95 and Windows 98” on page 78 for instructions to activate your Tivoli
Management Agent.
NetWare 3.x
1. Log in to the NetWare server drive (referred to here as drive x).
2. Execute the batch file NW3XINS.BAT to install TMA. Enter the NetWare server
drive letter as a parameter. For example, if x is the server drive letter, at a DOS
prompt, enter the following:
nw3xins x
3. A check will be done for a previously installed TMA.
v If an existing TMA is installed on the target machine, NW3XINS.BAT will abort
without installing. The TMA has a live upgrade feature so that any version of
a TMA can join the Tivoli Enterprise and will be automatically upgraded to the
latest version.
v If an existing TMA is not found, NW3XINS.BAT will automatically install TMA
in the directory x:\tivoli (where x is your drive letter).
4. After the TMA has been installed, use your Web browser to open the file
x:\Tivoli\TivReady\readme.html (where x is your CD-ROM drive) or proceed to
“NetWare 3.x” on page 79 for instructions to activate your Tivoli Management
Agent.
NetWare 4.x and 5.x
1. Log in to the NetWare server drive (referred to here as x).
2. Execute the batch file NW4_5INS.BAT to install TMA. Enter the NetWare server
drive letter as a parameter. For example, if x is the server drive letter, at a DOS
prompt, enter the following:
nw4_5ins x
3. A check will be done for a previously installed TMA.
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IBM Token-Ring Adapter Features
v If an existing TMA is installed on the target machine, NW4_5INS.BAT will
abort without installing. The TMA has a live upgrade feature so that any
version of a TMA can join the Tivoli Enterprise and will be automatically
upgraded to the latest version.
v If an existing TMA is not found, NW4_5INS.BAT will automatically install TMA
in the directory x:\Tivoli.
4. After the TMA has been installed, use your Web browser to open the file
x:\Tivoli\TivReady\readme.html (where x is your CD-ROM drive) or proceed to
“NetWare 4.x and 5.x” on page 80 for instructions to activate your Tivoli
Management Agent.
OS/2
1. Execute the command file OS2INS.CMD from an OS/2 window to install TMA.
2. A check will be done for a previously installed TMA.
v If an existing TMA is installed on the target machine, os2ins.cmd will abort
without installing. The TMA has a live upgrade feature so that any version of
a TMA can join the Tivoli Enterprise and will be automatically upgraded to the
latest version.
v If an existing TMA is not found, OS2INS.CMD will automatically install TMA in
the directory x:\Tivoli.
3. After the TMA has been installed, use your Web browser to open the file
x:\Tivoli\TivReady\readme.html (where x is your CD-ROM drive) or proceed to
“OS/2” on page 81 for instructions to activate your Tivoli Management Agent.
Windows 3.x
1. Execute the batch file WIN3XINS.BAT to install TMA.
2. A check will be done for a previously installed TMA.
v If an existing TMA is installed on the target machine, WIN3XINS.BAT will
abort without installing. The TMA has a live upgrade feature so that any
version of a TMA can join the Tivoli Enterprise and will be automatically
upgraded to the latest version.
v If an existing TMA is not found, WIN3XINS.BAT will automatically install TMA
in the directory x:\Tivoli.
3. After the TMA has been installed, use your Web browser to open the file
x:\Tivoli\TivReady\readme.html (where x is your CD-ROM drive) or proceed to
“Windows 3.x” on page 82 for instructions to activate your Tivoli Management
Agent.
Activating the Tivoli Management Agent
Windows NT
This machine has the Tivoli Management Agent installed in an inactive state.
If you want this machine to become part of your Tivoli Enterprise you will need to
activate or wake up the agent. The Tivoli Enterprise includes a computer with a
gateway that the TMA will need to log in to. As user or system administrator, you
can ensure that the TMA is activated correctly and joins the Tivoli Enterprise by
following the instructions in this section. This process only needs to be performed
once. After this activation, the TMA is running on the machine and is configured to
start and log in to the TMR every time the machine starts.
Chapter 8. Tivoli Management Agent
77
Your installation includes a logon script that can be used to automate the one-time
setup process described in this section. See c:\tivoli\lcf\generic\logontma.bat
The steps in this section can be performed in any order. The first two steps are not
necessary to start the TMA, but are necessary for running of Tivoli methods once
the endpoint joins the TMR.
Start TAP
Activate the Tivoli Authentication Process (TAP): run c:\tivoli\lcf\bin\w32ix86\mrt\wlcftap.exe -a Reboot your computer.
Add Tivoli user and group
Add the Tivoli reserved user (nobody): run c:\tivoli\lcf\bin\w32ix86\mrt\ntconfig.exe -e
Start the Tivoli Management Agent: c:\tivoli\lcf\bin\w32-ix86\mrt\lcfd.exe with
the following options:
Note: Options are case-sensitive.
Option
Function
-C working directory
(Uppercase C) This causes the TMA to change the working
directory to working directory when starting. The value should
always be C:\Tivoli\lcf\dat\1
-i
Installs the TMA as an NT service. This also configures the TMA for
autostart when the computer boots.
If the TMA is started without the -g option the endpoint will immediately broadcast a
message in search of a Tivoli Management Gateway on its subnet. This is not
recommended for most customers. Therefore, please use the following options to specify a
Tivoli Management Gateway.
-g gateway+port
Contacts the specified Tivoli Management Gateway for initial login.
gateway_address is the hostname or IP address of the Tivoli
Management Gateway that the endpoint will log into. port is the
listening port of the gateway.
-p port
Contacts the gateway on the specified port. port is the listening
port of the gateway.
-P port
(Uppercase P) Specifies a local port for use by the TMA. port is
the listening port of the TMA.
To view a Usage statement and see all the options that can be used in starting the
endpoint, run C:\Tivoli\lcf\bin\w32-ix86\mrt\lcfd.exe -s -D?
Add the taskbar icon
Type C:\Tivoli\lcf\bin\w32-ix86\mrt\lcfep.exe -x -i to install the taskbar icon.
To remove, use the -s option.
Windows 95 and Windows 98
This computer has the Tivoli Management Agent installed in an inactive state.
If you want this computer to become part of your Tivoli Enterprise, you will need to
activate or wake up the agent. The Tivoli Enterprise includes a computer with a
gateway where this TMA will log in. As user or system administrator, you can
ensure that the TMA is activated correctly and joins the Tivoli Enterprise by
following the instructions in this section. This process only needs to be performed
78
IBM Token-Ring Adapter Features
once. After this activation, the TMA is running on the computer and is configured to
start and log in to the TMR every time the computer starts.
Your installation includes a logon script that can be used to automate the one-time
setup process described in this section. See c:\Tivoli\lcf\generic\logontma.bat
Start the TMA
To activate the TMA, start LCFD.EXE from the command line using options to
identify the correct gateway (Tivoli Management Gateway). For example, some
companies have one gateway that the whole company logs into, others have many
different choices. The Tivoli Administrator will provide this information.
Start the Tivoli Management Agent
C:\Tivoli\lcf\bin\win95\mrt\lcfd.exe with the following options:
Note: Options are case-sensitive.
Option
Function
-C working directory
(Uppercase C) This causes the TMA to change the working
directory to working directory when starting. The value should
always be C:\Tivoli\lcf\dat\1
If the TMA is started without the -g option the endpoint will immediately broadcast a
message in search of a Tivoli Management Gateway on its subnet. This is not
recommended for most customers. Therefore, please use the following options to specify a
Tivoli Management Gateway.
-g gateway+port
Contacts the specified Tivoli Management Gateway for initial login.
gateway_address is the hostname or IP address of the Tivoli
Management Gateway that the endpoint will log into. port is the
listening port of the gateway.
-p port
Contacts the gateway on the specified port. port is the listening
port of the gateway.
-P port
(Uppercase P) Specifies a local port for use by the TMA. port is
the listening port of the TMA.
To view a Usage statement and see all the options that can be used in starting the
endpoint, run C:\Tivoli\lcf\bn\win95\mrt\lcfd.exe -s -D?
Start the taskbar icon
To activate the taskbar icon you need to start lcfep.exe -x -i
NetWare 3.x
This computer has the Tivoli Management Agent installed in an inactive state.
If you want this computer to become part of your Tivoli Enterprise, you will need to
activate or wake up the agent. The Tivoli Enterprise includes a computer with a
gateway where this TMA will log in. As user or system administrator, you can
ensure that the TMA is activated correctly and joins the Tivoli Enterprise by
following the instructions in this section. This process only needs to be performed
once. After this activation, the TMA is running on the computer and is configured to
start and log in to the TMR every time the computer starts.
Note: Even though the steps in this section are in a certain order, the first step can
be performed at any time. The next step must be performed before the third.
Chapter 8. Tivoli Management Agent
79
Autostart of the TMA
Add the line sys\system\lcf.ncf to your AUTOEXEC.NCF file.
Add command line parameters to lcf.ncf
Add command line parameters to the line that loads LCFD.NLM in
sys:\system\lcf.ncf and sys:\system\tivoli\lcf\1\lcf.ncf. They should include options to
identify the correct gateway (Tivoli Management Gateway). For example, some
companies have one gateway that the whole company logs into. Others have many
different choices. The Tivoli Administrator will provide this information.
Note: Options are case-sensitive.
Option
Function
-C working directory
(Uppercase C) This causes the TMA to change the working
directory to working directory when starting. The value should
always be C:\Tivoli\lcf\dat\1
If the TMA is started without the -g option the endpoint will immediately broadcast a
message in search of a Tivoli Management Gateway on its subnet. This is not
recommended for most customers. Therefore, please use the following options to specify a
Tivoli Management Gateway.
-g gateway+port
Contacts the specified Tivoli Management Gateway for initial login.
gateway_address is the hostname or IP address of the Tivoli
Management Gateway that the endpoint will log into. port is the
listening port of the gateway.
-p port
Contacts the gateway on the specified port. port is the listening
port of the gateway.
-P port
(Uppercase P) Specifies a local port for use by the TMA. port is
the listening port of the TMA.
Start the TMA
Type lcf This will load LCFUTILS.NLM and LCFD.NLM.
Stopping TMA
Type unload lcfd then unload lcfutils
To view a usage statement and see all of the options that can be used in starting
the endpoint, run load sys:\system\Tivoli\lcf\bin\nw3\mrt\lcfd.exe -s -D?
NetWare 4.x and 5.x
This computer has the Tivoli Management Agent installed in an inactive state.
If you want this computer to become part of your Tivoli Enterprise, you will need to
activate or wake up the agent. The Tivoli Enterprise includes a computer with a
gateway where this TMA will log in. As user or system administrator, you can
ensure that the TMA is activated correctly and joins the Tivoli Enterprise by
following the instructions in this section. This process only needs to be performed
once. After this activation, the TMA is running on the computer and is configured to
start and log in to the TMR every time the computer starts.
Note: Even though the steps in this section are in a certain order, the first step can
be performed at any time. The next step must be performed before the third.
Autostart of the TMA
Add the line sys\system\lcf.ncf to your autoexec.ncf file.
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IBM Token-Ring Adapter Features
Add command line parameters to lcf.ncf
Add command line parameters to the line that loads LCFD.NLM in
sys:\system\lcf.ncf and sys:\system\tivoli\lcf\1\lcf.ncf. They should include options to
identify the correct gateway (Tivoli Management Gateway). For example, some
companies have one gateway that the whole company logs into. Others have many
different choices. The Tivoli Administrator will provide this information.
Note: Options are case-sensitive.
Option
Function
-C working directory
(Uppercase C) This causes the TMA to change the working
directory to working directory when starting. The value should
always be C:\Tivoli\lcf\dat\1
If the TMA is started without the -g option the endpoint will immediately broadcast a
message in search of a Tivoli Management Gateway on its subnet. This is not
recommended for most customers. Therefore, please use the following options to specify a
Tivoli Management Gateway.
-g gateway+port
Contacts the specified Tivoli Management Gateway for initial login.
gateway_address is the hostname or IP address of the Tivoli
Management Gateway that the endpoint will log into. port is the
listening port of the gateway.
-p port
Contacts the gateway on the specified port. port is the listening
port of the gateway.
-P port
(Uppercase P) Specifies a local port for use by the TMA. port is
the listening port of the TMA.
Start the TMA
Type lcf This will load LCFUTILS.NLM and LCFD.NLM.
Stopping TMA
Type unload lcfd then unload lcfutils
To view a usage statement and see all of the options that can be used in starting
the endpoint, run load sys:\system\Tivoli\lcf\bin\nw4\mrt\lcfd.exe -s -D?
OS/2
This computer has the Tivoli Management Agent installed in an inactive state.
If you want this computer to become part of your Tivoli Enterprise, you will need to
activate or wake up the agent. The Tivoli Enterprise includes a computer with a
gateway where this TMA will log in. As user or system administrator, you can
ensure that the TMA is activated correctly and joins the Tivoli Enterprise by
following the instructions in this section. This process only needs to be performed
once. After this activation, the TMA is running on the computer and is configured to
start and log in to the TMR every time the computer starts.
Note: Even though the steps in this section are in a certain order, they can be
performed in any order. The first step is not necessary to start the TMA, but
it is necessary for running the TMA after a reboot.
Autostart of the TMA
Add an entry to the Startup Folder to run c:\tivoli\lcf\dat\1\startlcf.exe
Chapter 8. Tivoli Management Agent
81
Start the TMA
Start the LCFD.EXE program from the command line using options to identify the
correct gateway (Tivoli Management Gateway). For example, some companies have
one gateway that the whole company logs into. Others have many different choices.
The Tivoli Administrator will provide this information.
Start the Tivoli Management Agent: C:\Tivoli\lcf\bin\os2-ix86\mrt\lcfd.exe with
the following options:
Note: Options are case-sensitive
Option
Function
-C working directory
(Uppercase C) This causes the TMA to change the working
directory to working directory when starting. The value should
always be C:\Tivoli\lcf\dat\1
If the TMA is started without the -g option the endpoint will immediately broadcast a
message in search of a Tivoli Management Gateway on its subnet. This is not
recommended for most customers. Therefore, please use the following options to specify a
Tivoli Management Gateway.
-g gateway+port
Contacts the specified Tivoli Management Gateway for initial login.
gateway_address is the hostname or IP address of the Tivoli
Management Gateway that the endpoint will log into. port is the
listening port of the gateway.
-p port
Contacts the gateway on the specified port. port is the listening
port of the gateway.
-P port
(Uppercase P) Specifies a local port for use by the TMA. port is
the listening port of the TMA.
To view a Usage statement and see all of the options that can be used in starting
the endpoint, run C:\Tivoli\lcf\bin\os2-ix86\mrt\lcfd.exe -s -D?
Windows 3.x
This computer has the Tivoli Management Agent installed in an inactive state.
If you want this computer to become part of your Tivoli Enterprise, you will need to
activate or wake up the agent. The Tivoli Enterprise includes a computer with a
gateway where this TMA will log in. As user or system administrator, you can
ensure that the TMA is activated correctly and joins the Tivoli Enterprise by
following the instructions in this section. This process only needs to be performed
once. After this activation, the TMA is running on the computer and is configured to
start and log in to the TMR every time the computer starts.
win32s is required to run the TMA
Note: Even though the steps in this section are in a certain order, they can be
performed in any order. The first step is not necessary to start the TMA but is
necessary for running of Tivoli methods once the endpoint joins the TMR.
Autostart of the TMA
Add an entry to the run= entry in the WIN.INI file:
run=c:\tivoli\lcf\dat\1\startlcf.exe
Start the TMA
Start LCFD.EXE from the command line using options to identify the correct
gateway (Tivoli Management Gateway). For example, some companies have one
82
IBM Token-Ring Adapter Features
gateway that the whole company logs into, others have many different choices. The
Tivoli Administrator will provide this information.
Start the Tivoli Management Agent:
C:\Tivoli\lcf\bin\win3x\mrt\lcfd.exe with the following options:
Note: Options are case-sensitive.
Option
Function
-C working directory
(Uppercase C) This causes the TMA to change the working
directory to working directory when starting. The value should
always be C:\Tivoli\lcf\dat\1
If the TMA is started without the -g option the endpoint will immediately broadcast a
message in search of a Tivoli Management Gateway on its subnet. This is not
recommended for most customers. Therefore, please use the following options to specify a
Tivoli Management Gateway.
-g gateway+port
Contacts the specified Tivoli Management Gateway for initial login.
gateway_address is the hostname or IP address of the Tivoli
Management Gateway that the endpoint will log into. port is the
listening port of the gateway.
-p port
Contacts the gateway on the specified port. port is the listening
port of the gateway.
-P port
(Uppercase P) Specifies a local port for use by the TMA. port is
the listening port of the TMA.
To view a Usage statement and see all of the options that can be used in starting
the endpoint, run C:\Tivoli\lcf\bin\win3x\mrt\lcfd.exe -s -D?
Chapter 8. Tivoli Management Agent
83
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IBM Token-Ring Adapter Features
Chapter 9. Network adapter performance tuning
Obtaining the very best performance from a network adapter is not always a simple
task. IBM adapters and their device drivers undergo extensive performance analysis
in order to derive the best default configuration for the majority of possible
configurations in which they are going to be placed. However, each environment
introduces specific characteristics that affect the ability of the adapters and device
driver to achieve the highest performance. IBM adapters and their device drivers
are engineered to allow the user a great amount of flexibility to tune the
performance in their specific environment. This includes not only many
performance-based configuration parameters but also enhanced functions whose
sole purpose is to achieve the highest performance possible, such as Route
Switching and Class of Service for IP.
Tuning network adapters for the very highest performance is such a large topic that
it is best addressed in a separate document. The following URL will take you to an
IBM white paper explaining steps to achieve the best performance from your IBM
adapters for your specific networking environment:
http://www.ibm.com/networking/per/per10.html
© Copyright IBM Corp. 1998, 1999, 2000
85
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IBM Token-Ring Adapter Features
Appendix. Notices
This information was developed for products and services offered in the U.S.A.
IBM may not offer the products, services, or features discussed in this document in
other countries. Consult your local IBM representative for information on the
products and services currently available in your area. Any reference to an IBM
product, program, or service is not intended to state or imply that only that IBM
product, program, or service may be used. Any functionally equivalent product,
program, or service that does not infringe any IBM intellectual property right may be
used instead. However, it is the user’s responsibility to evaluate and verify the
operation of any non-IBM product, program, or service.
IBM may have patents or pending patent applications covering the subject matter in
this document. The furnishing of this document does not give you any license to
these patents. You can send license inquiries, in writing, to:
IBM Director of Licensing
IBM Corporation
North Castle Drive
Armonk, NY 10504-1785
U.S.A.
For license inquiries regarding double-byte (DBCS) information, contact the IBM
Intellectual Property Department in your country or send inquiries, in writing, to:
IBM World Trade Asia Corporation
Licensing
2-31 Roppongi 3-chome, Minato-ku
Tokyo 106, Japan
The following paragraph does not apply to the United Kingdom or any other country
where such provisions are inconsistent with local law: INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS
MACHINES CORPORATION PROVIDES THIS PUBLICATION ″AS IS″ WITHOUT
WARRANTY OF ANY KIND, EITHER EXPRESS OR IMPLIED, INCLUDING, BUT
NOT LIMITED TO, THE IMPLIED WARRANTIES OF NON-INFRINGEMENT,
MERCHANTABILITY, OR FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE. Some states
do not allow disclaimer of express or implied warranties in certain transactions,
therefore, this statement may not apply to you.
This information could include technical inaccuracies or typographical errors.
Changes are periodically made to the information herein; these changes will be
incorporated in new editions of the publication. IBM may make improvements and/or
changes in the product(s) and/or program(s) described in this publication at any
time without notice.
Any references in this information to non-IBM Web sites are provided for
convenience only and do not in any manner serve as an endorsement of those
Web sites. The materials at those Web sites are not part of the materials for this
IBM product and use of those Web sites is at your own risk.
Information concerning non-IBM products was obtained from the suppliers of those
products, their published announcements or other publicly available sources. IBM
has not tested those products and cannot confirm the accuracy of performance,
© Copyright IBM Corp. 1998, 1999, 2000
87
compatibility or any other claims related to non-IBM products. Questions on the
capabilities of non-IBM products should be addressed to the suppliers of those
products.
This information is for planning purposes only. The information herein is subject to
change before the products described become available.
Trademarks
The following terms are trademarks of International Business Machines Corporation
in the United States, other countries, or both:
IBM
AIX
AS/400
CallPath
CICS
LANDP
LANStreamer
Micro Channel
Nways
Operating System/2
OS/2
RS/6000
SystemView
System/370
VTAM
Wake on LAN
Tivoli, NetView, and Tivoli Ready are trademarks of Tivoli Systems Inc. in the United
States, other countries, or both.
Intel is a trademark of Intel Corporation in the United States, other countries, or
both.
Java and all Java-based trademarks are trademarks of Sun Microsystems, Inc. in
the United States, other countries, or both.
Microsoft, Windows, and Windows NT are trademarks of Microsoft Corporation in
the United States, other countries, or both.
UNIX is a registered trademark in the United States, other countries, or both and is
licensed exclusively through X/Open Company Limited.
Other company, product, and service names may be trademarks or service marks
of others.
NetWare Network Computing Products from IBM
The following additional license terms apply to the Novell IntranetWare Client for
DOS and Windows 3.1 code, included with IBM’s LAN Client program. In the event
of any inconsistency between the following terms and the terms of the IBM License
Agreement for Productivity Aids, the following terms shall prevail.
IF YOU DOWNLOAD OR USE THIS PROGRAM YOU AGREE TO THESE TERMS.
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IBM Token-Ring Adapter Features
The IBM program you have licensed may be designed to run in a single computer
system only, or it may contain modules designed to run in multiple computer system
environments. The type of environment that applies is limited by the definitions that
follow:
SINGLE USER PROGRAM means a program which operates on an intelligent
single-user device by which the device acts as a standalone system or a peer
system on a Communications Network
COMMUNICATIONS NETWORK means a computer system which allows a number
of independent computing devices to communicate with each other
NETWORK HOST OR NETWORK SERVER means a single machine on which a
Host program or NLM or VAP operates to provide the host or server resources to
the other machines in a network
HOST PROGRAM means that portion of the NetWare network operating system
that executes on the Network Host or Network Server
CLIENT PROGRAM means that portion of the NetWare network operating system
that executes on the personal workstation
NLM PROGRAM OR VAP PROGRAM means an application program that executes
under control of the NetWare network operating system on the Network Host or
Network Server
DOCUMENTATION means the manual(s) and other printed material packaged by
IBM with the Program
If you have licensed a Host Program, an NLM Program or a VAP Program, and/or
Client Program, you are authorized to 1) use one copy of the Host Program on a
single Network Host or Network Server; 2) use a single copy of an NLM Program or
a VAP Program on a single Network Host or Network Server; and 3) use the Client
Program, and to, without additional charge, reproduce and use copies, subject to
the limitation identified in the Program Documentation, of the Client Program, in
support of the Host Program.
Appendix. Notices
89
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IBM Token-Ring Adapter Features
Glossary
The following symbols are used in this glossary:
v The symbol (A) identifies definitions from the
American National Standard Dictionary for
Information Systems, ANSI X3.172-1990,
copyright 1990 by the American National
Standards Institute (ANSI). Copies can be
purchased from the American National
Standards Institute, 1430 Broadway, New York,
New York 10018.
v The symbol (I) identifies definitions from
published parts of the Information Technology
Vocabulary, developed by Subcommittee 1,
Joint Technical Committee 1, of the
International Organization for Standardization
and the International Electrotechnical
Commission (ISO/IEC JTC1/SC1).
v The symbol (T) identifies definitions from draft
international standards, committee drafts, and
working papers being developed by ISO/IEC
JTC1/SC1.
The following cross-references are used in this
glossary:
Contrast with:
This refers to a term that has an opposed
or substantively different meaning.
Synonym for:
This indicates that the term has the same
meaning as a preferred term, which was
defined in its correct place in the glossary.
Synonymous with:
This is a backward reference from a
defined term to all other terms that have
the same meaning.
See:
This refers the reader to multiple-word
terms that have the same last word.
See also:
This refers the reader to related terms that
have a related, but not synonymous,
meaning.
A
active. (1) Able to communicate on the network. (2)
Operational. (3) Pertaining to a node or device that is
connected or is available for connection to another node
or device. (4) Currently transmitting or receiving.
actual data transfer rate. The average number of
bits, characters, or blocks per unit of time transferred
from a data source and received by a data sink.
adapter. In a communicating device, a circuit card
that, with its associated software and/or microcode,
enables the device to communicate over the network.
adapter address. The hexadecimal digits that identify
an adapter.
address. (1) A character or group of characters that
identifies a register, a particular part of storage, or some
other data source or destination. (A) (2) To refer to a
device or an item of data by its address. (I) (3) In word
processing, the location, identified by an address code,
of a specific section of the recording medium or storage.
(T) (4) A name, label, or number identifying a location in
storage, a device in a system or network, or any other
data source. (5) In data communication, the unique
code assigned to each device or workstation connected
to a network.
Address Resolution Protocol (ARP). A protocol that
dynamically maps between Internet addresses,
baseband adapter addresses, X.25 addresses, and
token-ring adapter addresses on a local area network.
Advanced Program-to-Program Communication
(APPC). (1) The general facility characterizing the LU
6.2 architecture and its various implementations in
products. (2) Sometimes used to refer to the LU 6.2
architecture and its product implementations as a whole,
or to an LU 6.2 product feature in particular, such as an
APPC application program interface.
agent. (1) In the client-server model, the part of the
system that performs information preparation and
exchange on behalf of a client or server application.
See also client-server model and network management
station (NMS). (2) A customer-service person whose job
is to handle outgoing or incoming telephone calls (for
example, an agent in an ACD group).
AIX. Advanced Interactive Executive. See AIX
operating system.
AIX operating system. IBM’s implementation of the
UNIX® operating system. The RS/6000® system, among
others, runs the AIX operating system. See UNIX
operating system.
alert. (1) A message sent to a management services
focal point in a network to identify a problem or an
impending problem. (2) In the NetView and
NETCENTER programs, a high priority event that
warrants immediate attention.
API. Application program interface.
© Copyright IBM Corp. 1998, 1999, 2000
91
APPC. Advanced Program-to-Program
Communication.
application. (1) The use to which an information
processing system is put; for example, a payroll
application, an airline reservation application, a network
application. (2) A collection of software components
used to perform specific types of user-oriented work on
a computer. (3) In the AS/400 system, the collection of
CSP/AE objects that together can be run on the system.
An application consists of a program object, up to five
map group objects (depending on how many different
devices are supported), and any number of table
objects.
application program. (1) A program that is specific to
the solution of an application problem. Synonymous with
application software. (T) (2) A program written for or by
a user that applies to the user’s work, such as a
program that does inventory control or payroll. (3) A
program used to connect and communicate with
stations in a network, enabling users to perform
application-oriented activities. (4) In SDF/CICS®, the
program using the physical maps and symbolic
description maps generated from a source map set.
Note:
Do not use the term application in place of
application program.
application program interface (API). (1) A functional
interface supplied by the operating system or by a
separately orderable licensed program that allows an
application program written in a high-level language to
use specific data or functions of the operating system or
the licensed program. (2) The interface through which
an application program interacts with an access method.
In VTAM® programs, it is the language structure used in
control blocks so that application programs can
reference them and be identified to VTAM.
architecture. A logical structure that encompasses
operating principles including services, functions, and
protocols. See computer architecture, network
architecture, Systems Application Architecture (SAA),
Systems Network Architecture (SNA).
ARP. Address Resolution Protocol.
attach. To make a device a part of a network logically.
Note:
Not to be confused with connect, which implies
physically connecting a device to a network.
attaching device. Any device that is physically
connected to a network and can communicate over the
network. See ring attaching device.
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IBM Token-Ring Adapter Features
attachment. A port or a pair of ports, optionally
including an associated optical bypass, that are
managed as a functional unit. A dual attachment
includes two ports: a port A, and a port B. A single
attachment includes a Port S.
B
backbone. (1) In a local area network multiple-bridge
ring configuration, a high-speed link to which the rings
are connected by means of bridges or routers. A
backbone can be configured as a bus or as a ring. (2)
In a wide area network, a high-speed link to which
nodes or data switching exchanges (DSEs) are
connected.
bandwidth. (1) The difference, expressed in hertz,
between the highest and the lowest frequencies of a
range of frequencies. For example, analog transmission
by recognizable voice telephone requires a bandwidth
of about 3000 hertz (3 kHz). (2) The bandwidth of an
optical link designates the information-carrying capacity
of the link and is related to the maximum bit rate that a
fiber link can support.
Basic Input/Output System (BIOS). Code that
controls basic hardware operations, such as interactions
with diskette drives, hard disk drives, and the keyboard.
binary digit. Synonym for bit.
BIOS. Basic Input/Output System.
bit. Either of the digits 0 or 1 when used in the binary
numeration system. Synonymous with binary digit. (T)
See also byte.
block. A string of data elements recorded or
transmitted as a unit. The element may be characters,
words, or physical records. (T)
bridge. (1) An attaching device that connects two LAN
segments to allow the transfer of information from one
LAN segment to the other. A bridge can connect the
LAN segments directly by network adapters and
software in a single device, or it can connect network
adapters in two separate devices through software and
use of a telecommunications link between the two
adapters. (2) A functional unit that connects two LANs
that use the same logical link control (LLC) procedures
but may use the same or different medium access
control (MAC) procedures. (T) Contrast with gateway
and router.
Note: A bridge connects networks or systems of the
same or similar architectures, whereas a
gateway connects networks or systems of
different architectures.
bridging. The forwarding of a frame from one local
area network segment to another. The destination is
based upon the medium access control (MAC) sublayer
address encoded in the destination address field of the
frame header.
electromagnetic wave or pulse train that may be varied
by a signal bearing information to be transmitted over a
communication system.(T)
broadband local area network. A local area network
(LAN) in which information is encoded, multiplexed, and
transmitted through modulation of carriers. (T)
channel. (1) A path along which signals can be sent,
for example, data channel, output channel. (A) (2) The
portion of a storage medium that is accessible to a
given reading or writing station; for example, track,
band. (A) (3) The portion of a storage medium that is
accessible to a given reading or writing station. (4) In
broadband transmission, a designation of a frequency
band 6 MH wide.
broadcast. (1) Transmission of the same data to all
destinations. (T) (2) Simultaneous transmission of the
same data to more than one destination. A packet
delivery system where a copy of a given packet is given
to all hosts attached to the network. Broadcast can be
implemented in hardware (Ethernet, for example) or
software. Contrast with multicast.
bus. (1) A facility for transferring data between several
devices located between two end points, only one
device being able to transmit at a given moment. (T) (2)
A computer configuration in which processors are
interconnected in series. See also hypercube. (3) A
network configuration in which nodes are interconnected
through a bidirectional transmission medium. (4) One or
more conductors used for transmitting signals or power.
(A)
bypass. (1) To eliminate a station or an access unit
from a ring network by allowing the data to flow in a
path around it. (2) The ability of a station to be optically
isolated from the network while maintaining the integrity
of the ring. (3) The ability of a node to optically isolate
itself from the FDDI network while maintaining the
continuity of the cable plant.
byte. (1) A string that consists of a number of bits,
treated as a unit, and representing a character.(T) (2) A
binary character operated upon as a unit and usually
shorter than a computer word.(A) (3) A group of 8
adjacent binary digits that represent one EBCDIC
character. (4) See n-bit byte. See also bit.
C
cable segment. A section of cable between
components or devices on a network. A segment can
consist of a single patch cable, multiple patch cables
connected together, or a combination of building cable
and patch cables connected together. See LAN
segment, ring segment.
channel-attached. (1) Pertaining to the connection of
devices directly by data channels (I/O channels) to a
computer. (2) Pertaining to devices connected to a
controlling unit by cables rather than by
telecommunication lines. See also local. Contrast with
telecommunication-attached.
claim token. A process whereby one or more stations
bid for the right to initialize the ring.
class of service (CoS). A designation of the transport
network characteristics, such as route security,
transmission priority, and bandwidth, needed for a
particular session. The class of service is derived from a
mode name specified in the Bind by the initiator of a
session.
client. (1) A user. (2) A functional unit that receives
shared services from a server. (T)
client-server. In TCP/IP, the model of interaction in
distributed data processing in which a program at one
site sends a request to a program at another site and
awaits a response. The requesting program is called a
client; the answering program is called a server.
client-server model. A common way to describe
network services and the model user processes
(programs) of those services.
configuration. (1) The manner in which the hardware
and software of an information processing system are
organized and interconnected. (T) (2) The devices and
programs that make up a system, subsystem, or
network. (3) The task of defining the hardware and
software characteristics of a system or subsystem. (4)
See also system configuration.
cache. (1) A special-purpose buffer storage, smaller
and faster than main storage, used to hold a copy of
instructions and data obtained from main storage and
likely to be needed next by the processor.(T) (2) To
place, hide, or store in a cache. An optional part of the
directory database in network nodes where frequently
used directory information can be stored to speed
directory searches.
configuration parameters. Variables in a
configuration definition, the values of which characterize
the relationship of a product, such as a bridge, to other
products in the same network.
carrier. (1) On broadband networks, a continuous
frequency signal that can be modulated with an
information-carrying signal. (2) An electric or
connection. (1) In data communication, an association
established between functional units for conveying
information (I) (A) A logical association between a call
connect. In a LAN, to physically join a cable from a
station to an access unit or network connection point.
Contrast with attach.
Glossary
93
participant (party) and a switch. (2) In Open Systems
Interconnection architecture, an association established
by a given layer between two or more entities of the
next higher layer for the purpose of data transfer. (T) (3)
In SNA, the network path that links two logical units
(LUs) in different nodes to enable them to establish
communications. (4) In X.25 communication, a virtual
circuit between two data terminal equipments (DTEs). A
switched virtual circuit (SVC) connection lasts for the
duration of a call; a permanent virtual circuit (PVC) is a
permanent connection between the DTEs. (5) In TCP/IP,
the path between two protocol applications that provides
reliable data stream delivery service. (6) In Internet, a
connection extends from a TCP application on one
system to a TCP application on another system. (7) The
path between two protocol functions, usually located in
different machines, that provides reliable data delivery
service. (8) A party’s connection represents that party’s
participation in a telephone call.
network, exchange data, and control information with
network higher level protocols and interfaces.
connectivity. (1) The capability of a system or device
to be attached to other systems or devices without
modification. (T) (2) The capability to attach a variety of
functional units without modifying them.
device identifier (ID). An 8-bit identifier that uniquely
identifies a physical I/O device.
D
data rate. See data transfer rate, line data rate.
data segment. A control section of a program which
contains only data. It is usually addressed with its own
hardware segment and offset.
data transfer rate. The average number of bits,
characters, or blocks, per unit time passing between
corresponding equipment in a data transmission system.
(I) See actual data transfer rate, effective transfer rate.
The rate is expressed in bits, characters, or blocks per
second, minute, or hour.
DCE. Data circuit-terminating equipment.
device driver. The code needed to attach and use a
device on a computer or a network.
diagnostics. The process of investigating the cause or
the nature of a condition or problem in a product or
system.
disable. To make nonfunctional.
data circuit-terminating equipment (DCE). In a data
station, the equipment that provides the signal
conversion and coding between the data terminal
equipment (DTE) and the line. (I)
Notes:
1. The DCE can be separate equipment or an integral
part of the DTE or of the intermediate equipment.
disabled. (1) Pertaining to a state of a processing unit
that prevents the occurrence of certain types of
interruptions. (2) Pertaining to the state in which a
transmission control unit or audio response unit cannot
accept incoming calls on a line. (3) Nonoperational or
nonfunctional.
2. A DCE can perform other functions that are usually
performed at the network end of the line.
disk. A round, flat, data medium that is rotated in order
to read or write data. (T) See also diskette.
data link control (DLC). A set of rules used by nodes
on a data link (such as an SDLC link or a token ring) to
accomplish an orderly exchange of information.
diskette. (1) A small magnetic disk enclosed in a
jacket. (T) (2) A thin, flexible magnetic disk and a
semi-rigid protective jacket, in which the disk is
permanently enclosed.
data link control (DLC) layer. (1) In SNA or Open
Systems Interconnection (OSI), the layer that schedules
data transfer over a link between two nodes and
performs error control for the link. Examples of DLC are
synchronous data link control (SDLC) for serial-by-bit
connection and DLC for the System/370® channel.
Note: The DLC layer is usually independent of the
physical transport mechanism and ensures the
integrity of data that reach the higher layers.
(2) See Systems Network Architecture (SNA). (3) See
also logical link control (LLC) sublayer, medium access
control (MAC) sublayer.
data link control (DLC) protocol. The LAN protocol
used to attach a device to and remove a device from
the network. The DLC protocol is also used to send
information onto and receive information from the
diskette drive. The mechanism used to seek, read,
and write data on a diskette.
DLC. Data link control.
dotted decimal notation. The syntactical
representation for a 32-bit integer that consists of four
8-bit numbers written in base 10 with periods (dots)
separating them. It represents IP addresses in the
Internet.
duplex. Pertaining to communication in which data can
be sent and received at the same time. Synonymous
with full-duplex. Contrast with half-duplex.
E
enable. To make functional.
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IBM Token-Ring Adapter Features
enabled. (1) On a LAN, pertaining to an adapter or
device that is active, operational, and able to receive
frames from the network. (2) Pertaining to the state in
which a transmission control unit or an audio response
unit can accept incoming calls on a line.
hard disk. (1) A rigid magnetic disk such as the
internal disks used in the system units of personal
computers and in external hard disk drives.
Synonymous with fixed disk. (2) A rigid disk used in a
hard disk drive.
execute. To perform the actions specified by a
program or a portion of a program. (T)
Note: The term hard disk is also used loosely in the
industry for boards and cartridges containing
microchips or bubble memory that simulate the
operations of a hard disk drive.
F
feature. A part of an IBM product that can be ordered
separately by the customer. See switch feature.
field. On a data medium or a storage, a specified area
used for a particular class of data; for example, a group
of character positions used to enter or display wage
rates on a screen. (T)
file. A named set of records stored or processed as a
unit. (T)
frame. (1) In Open Systems Interconnection
architecture, a data structure pertaining to a particular
area of knowledge and consisting of slots that can
accept the values of specific attributes and from which
inferences can be drawn by appropriate procedural
attachments. Synonymous with schema. (T) (2) A data
structure that consists of fields, predetermined by a
protocol, for the transmission of user data and control
data. The composition of a frame, especially the number
and types of fields, may vary according to the type of
protocol. Synonymous with transmission frame. (T) (3)
The unit of transmission in some local area networks,
including the IBM Token-Ring Network; it includes
delimiters, control characters, information, and checking
characters. (4) In SDLC, the vehicle for every
command, every response, and all information that is
transmitted using SDLC procedures. (5) A packet that is
transmitted over a serial line or LANs. See also packet.
(6) In FDDI, a PDU transmitted between co-operating
MAC entities on a ring, and consisting of a variable
number of octets and control symbols.
full-duplex. Synonym for duplex.
function. (1) A specific purpose of an entity, or its
characteristic action. (A) (2) In data communications, a
machine action such as carriage return or line feed. (A)
(3) In NetView DM, a function is the specification of a
transmission activity on a resource or group of
resources. Functions are grouped into phases. In
CSCM, resources are known as data objects.
H
half-duplex (HDX). In data communication, pertaining
to transmission in only one direction at a time. Contrast
with duplex.
hard error. (1) An error condition on a network that
requires that the network be reconfigured or that the
source of the error be removed before the network can
resume reliable operation. Contrast with soft error. (2)
Synonym for hard failure. (T)
hard failure. An error condition on a network that
requires that the network be reconfigured or that the
source of the error be removed before the network can
resume reliable operation. Synonymous with hard error.
(T)
hardware. All or part of the physical components of an
information processing system, such as computers or
peripheral devices. (T) (A)
hexadecimal. (1) Pertaining to a selection, choice, or
condition that has 16 possible different values or states.
(I) (2) Pertaining to a fixed-radix numeration system,
with radix of 16. (I) (3) Pertaining to a system of
numbers to the base 16; hexadecimal digits range from
0 through 9 and A through F, where A represents 10
and F represents 15.
host. (1) In Internet terminology, an end system. (2) In
interpretive execution mode, the real machine as
opposed to the virtual or interpreted machine (the
guest).
I
I/O. Input/output.
IBM Token-Ring Network. A baseband local area
network with a ring topology that passes tokens from
Token-Ring adapter to Token-Ring adapter.
IEEE. Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers.
initialize. In a LAN, to prepare the adapter (and
adapter support code, if used) for use by an application
program.
input/output (I/O). (1) Pertaining to a device whose
parts can perform an input process and an output
process at the same time. (I) (2) Pertaining to a
functional unit or channel involved in an input process,
output process, or both, concurrently or not, and to the
data involved in such a process.
Glossary
95
Note: The phrase input/output may be used in place of
input/output data, input/output signals, and
input/output process when such a usage is clear
in context.
(3) Pertaining to input, output, or both. (A) (4) Pertaining
to a device, process, or channel involved in data input,
data output, or both.
interface. (1) A shared boundary between two
functional units, defined by functional characteristics,
signal characteristics, or other characteristics, as
appropriate. The concept includes the specification of
the connection of two devices having different functions.
(T) (2) Hardware, software, or both, that links systems,
programs, or devices.
sending station to end a transmission. (4) A means of
passing processing control from one software or
microcode module or routine to another, or of requesting
a particular software, microcode, or hardware function.
IP. Internet Protocol.
IP address. A 32-bit address assigned to devices or
hosts in an IP internet that maps to a physical address.
The IP address is composed of a network and host
portion.
IPX. Internet Packet Exchange.
ISO. International Organization for Standardization.
International Organization for Standardization
(ISO). An organization of national standards bodies
from various countries established to promote
development of standards to facilitate international
exchange of goods and services, and develop
cooperation in intellectual, scientific, technological, and
economic activity.
K
Internet. A worldwide network connecting users
through autonomous networks in industry, education,
government, and research. The Internet network uses
Internet Protocol (IP). The major Internet services
include electronic mail, FTP, telnet, World Wide Web,
and electronic bulletin boards (Usenet). For network
interconnection and routing, and Transmission Control
Protocol (TCP) for end-to-end control. (A)
kilobit (Kb). 1000 binary digits.
Internet address. A 32-bit address assigned to hosts
using TCP/IP. See also TCP/IP.
Internet Engineering Task Force (IETF). One of the
task forces of the Internet Architecture Board (IAB)
responsible for solving short-term engineering needs of
the Internet.
Internet Packet Exchange (IPX). The routing protocol
used to connect Novell’s servers or any workstation or
router that implements IPX with other workstations.
Although similar to TCP/IP, it uses different packet
formats and terminology. See also TCP/IP and Xerox
Network Services (XNS).
Internet Protocol (IP). (1) A protocol that routes data
through a network or interconnected networks. IP acts
as an interface between the higher logical layers and
the physical network. However, this protocol does not
provide error recovery, flow control, or guarantee the
reliability of the physical network. IP is a connectionless
protocol. (2) A protocol used to route data from its
source to its destination in an Internet environment.
interrupt. (1) A suspension of a process, such as
execution of a computer program caused by an external
event, and performed in such a way that the process
can be resumed. (A) (2) To stop a process in such a
way that it can be resumed. (3) In data communication,
to take an action at a receiving station that causes the
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IBM Token-Ring Adapter Features
KB. (1) For processor storage and real and virtual
memory, 1024 bytes. (2) For disk storage capacity and
transmission rates, 1000 bytes.
Kb. Kilobit.
L
LAN. Local area network.
LAN adapter. The circuit card within a communicating
device (such as a personal computer) that, together with
its associated software, enables the device to be
attached to a LAN.
LAN segment. (1) Any portion of a LAN (for example,
a single bus or ring) that can operate independently but
is connected to other parts of the establishment network
via bridges. (2) An entire ring or bus network without
bridges. See cable segment, ring segment.
line data rate. The rate of data transmission over a
telecommunications link.
local area network (LAN). (1) Physical network
technology that transfers data at high speed over short
distances. (2) A network in which a set of devices are
connected to one another for communication and that
can be connected to a larger network. See also token
ring and Ethernet. (3) A computer network located on a
user’s premises within a limited geographical area.
Communication within a local area network is not
subject to external regulations; however, communication
across the LAN boundary may be subject to some form
of regulation. (T) Contrast with wide area network
(WAN) and metropolitan area network (MAN).
logical link control (LLC). (1) The data link control
(DLC) LAN sublayer that provides two types of (DLC)
operation. The first type is connectionless service, which
allows information to be sent and received without
establishing a link. The LLC sublayer does not perform
error recovery or flow control for connectionless service.
The second type is connection-oriented service, which
requires the establishment of a link prior to the
exchange of information. Connection-oriented service
provides sequenced information transfer, flow control,
and error recovery. (2) A sublayer of the OSI link layer
that defines formats and protocols for exchanging
frames between LLC sublayers attached to a local area
network. It has provisions that ensure that error-free,
nonduplicated, properly ordered frames are delivered to
the appropriate data-link user. See also bridge and
medium access control (MAC).
logical link control (LLC) protocol. In a local area
network, the protocol that governs the exchange of
transmission frames between data stations
independently of how the transmission medium is
shared. (T) The LLC protocol was developed by the
IEEE 802 committee and is common to all LAN
standards.
logical link control (LLC) protocol data unit. A unit
of information exchanged between link stations in
different nodes. The LLC protocol data unit contains a
destination service access point (DSAP) address, a
source service access point (SSAP), a control field, and
user data. See logical link control (LLC).
logical link control (LLC) sublayer. One of two
sublayers of the ISO Open Systems Interconnection
data link layer (which corresponds to the SNA data link
control layer), proposed for LANs by the IEEE Project
802 Committee on Local Area Networks and the
European Computer Manufacturers Association (ECMA).
It includes those functions unique to the particular link
control procedures that are associated with the attached
node and are independent of the medium; this allows
different logical link protocols to coexist on the same
network without interfering with each other. The LLC
sublayer uses services provided by the medium access
control (MAC) sublayer and provides services to the
network layer.
M
MAC. Medium access control.
management information base (MIB). A collection of
objects that can be accessed by means of a network
management protocol.
MB. (1) For processor storage and real and virtual
memory, 1,048,576 bytes. (2) For disk storage capacity
and transmission rates, 1,000,000 bytes.
Mb. Megabit.
media access control (MAC). In FDDI, the portion of
the data link layer responsible for scheduling and
routing data transmissions on a shared medium local
area network, for example, an FDDI ring.
medium access control (MAC). (1) The sublayer of
the data link control layer that supports
media-dependent functions and uses the services of the
physical layer to provide services to the logical link
control sublayer. The MAC sublayer includes the
medium-access port. See logical link control (LLC). (2)
For local area networks, the method of determining
which device has access to the transmission medium at
any time.
medium access control (MAC) frame. (1) In the IBM
Token-Ring Network: An address resolution request
frame that has the unique part of a destination address
and an “all rings” address. A sender issues this request
to determine the ring where the destination station is
located and whether the node is active. (2) Response
from an active destination node to the requesting source
node, providing the source node with the complete
address and ring number of the destination node.
medium access control (MAC) procedure. In a local
area network, the part of the protocol that governs
access to the transmission medium independently of the
physical characteristics of the medium, but takes into
account the topological aspects of the network, in order
to enable the exchange of data between data stations.
medium access control (MAC) protocol. (1) In a
local area network, the protocol that governs access to
the transmission medium, taking into account the
topological aspects of the network, in order to enable
the exchange of data between data stations. (T) See
also logical link control protocol. (2) The LAN protocol
sublayer of data link control (DLC) protocol that includes
functions for adapter address recognition, copying of
message units from the physical network, and message
unit format recognition, error detection, and routing
within the processor.
medium access control (MAC) segment. An
individual LAN communicating through the medium
access control (MAC) layer within this network.
medium access control (MAC) service data unit
(MSDU). In a medium access control (MAC) frame, the
logical link control protocol data unit (LPDU) and the
routing information field (if the destination station is
located on a different ring).
medium access control (MAC) sublayer. In a local
area network, the part of the data link layer that applies
a medium access method. The MAC sublayer supports
topology-dependent functions and uses the services of
the physical layer to provide services to the logical link
control sublayer. (T)
medium access control (MAC) subvector. A group
of related fields within a medium access control (MAC)
major vector.
medium access control (MAC) vector. The medium
access control (MAC) frame information field.
Glossary
97
memory. All of the addressable storage space in a
processing unit and other internal storages that is used
to execute instructions. (T)
MIB. (1) Management information base. (2) MIB
module.
N
NetBIOS. Network Basic Input/Output System. An
operating system interface for application programs
used on IBM personal computers that are attached to
the IBM Token-Ring Network. See also BIOS.
network. (1) An arrangement of nodes and connecting
branches. (T) (2) A configuration of data processing
devices and software connected for information
interchange. (3) A signal path connecting input/output
devices to a system. A network can consist of multiple
LAN segments connected together with bridging
products. See ring (network). (4) The interconnection of
two or more subnets. See also Fiber Distributed Data
Interface (FDDI) LAN.
O
operating system (OS). Software that controls the
execution of programs and that may provide services
such as resource allocation, scheduling, input/output
control, and data management. Although operating
systems are predominantly software, partial hardware
implementations are possible. (T)
Operating System/2® (OS/2). A set of programs that
control the operation of high-speed large-memory IBM
personal computers (such as the IBM Personal
System/2 computer, Models 50 and above), providing
multitasking and the ability to address up to 16 MB of
memory. Contrast with IBM Disk Operating System
(DOS).
option. (1) A specification in a statement that can be
used to influence the execution of the statement. (2) A
hardware or software function that can be selected or
enabled as part of a configuration process. (3) A piece
of hardware (such as a network adapter) that can be
installed in a device to modify or enhance device
function.
network address. See Internet address.
OS. Operating system.
network administrator. A person who manages the
use and maintenance of a network.
network architecture. The logical structure and
operating principles of a computer network. (T) See also
systems network architecture (SNA) and Open Systems
Interconnection (OSI) architecture.
Note: The operating principles of a network include
those of services, functions, and protocols.
network identifier (ID). A 1- to 8-byte
customer-selected name or an 8-byte IBM-registered
name that uniquely identifies a specific subnetwork.
network management. The process of planning,
organizing, and controlling a communications-oriented
system.
network management station (NMS). The system
responsible for managing a network or a portion of a
network. The NMS talks to network management
agents, that reside in the managed nodes, by means of
a network management protocol. See also agent.
network manager. A program or group of programs
that is used to monitor, manage, and diagnose the
problems of a network.
network operator. (1) A person or program
responsible for controlling the operation of all or part of
a network. (2) In a multiple-domain network, a person or
program responsible for controlling all domains.
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P
packet. (1) In data communication, a sequence of
binary digits, including data and control signals, that is
transmitted and switched as a composite whole. (I) (2)
Synonymous with data frame. Contrast with frame.
panel. A formatted display of information that appears
on a display screen.
parameter. (1) A variable that is given a constant
value for a specified application and that may denote
the application. (I) (A) (2) An item in a menu or for
which the user specifies a value or for which the system
provides a value when the menu is interpreted. (3) Data
passed between programs or procedures.
path. (1) In a network, any route between any two
nodes. A path may include more than one branch. (T)
(2) The route traversed by the information exchanged
between two attaching devices in a network. (3) The
series of transport network components (path control
and data link control) that are traversed by the
information exchanged between two network accessible
units (NAUs). A path consists of a virtual route and its
route extension, if any. See also explicit route (ER),
route extension (REX) and virtual route (VR).
personal computer (PC). (1) A microcomputer
primarily intended for stand-alone use by an individual.
(T) (2) A desk-top, floor-standing, or portable
microcomputer that usually consists of a system unit, a
display monitor, a keyboard, one or more diskette
drives, internal fixed-disk storage, and an optional
printer. PCs are designed primarily to give independent
computing power to a single user and are inexpensively
priced for purchase by individuals or small businesses.
remote. Pertaining to a system, program, or device
that is accessed through a telecommunication line.
Contrast with local. Synonym for link-attached.
pointer. (1) An identifier that indicates the location of
an item of data. (A) (2) A data element that indicates the
location of another data element. (T) (3) A physical or
symbolic identifier of a unique target.
remote program load. A function provided by adapter
hardware components and software that enables one
computer to load programs and operating systems into
the memory of another computer, without requiring the
use of a diskette or fixed disk at the receiving computer.
port. (1) An access point for data entry or exit. (2) A
connector on a device to which cables for other devices
such as display stations and printers are attached.
Synonymous with socket. (3) The representation of a
physical connection to the link hardware. A port is
sometimes referred to as an adapter, however, there
can be more than one port on an adapter. A single DLC
process can control one or more ports. (4) An
abstraction used by transport protocols to distinguish
among multiple destinations within a host machine. (5)
In FDDI, a PHY entity and a PMD entity in a node,
together creating a PHY/PMD pair, that can connect to
the fiber media and provide one end of a physical
connection with another node.
port number. The identification of an application entity
to the transport service in IP.
return code. (1) A value (usually hexadecimal)
provided by an adapter or a program to indicate the
result of an action, command, or operation. (2) A code
used to influence the execution of succeeding
instructions. (A)
ring attaching device. In a ring network, any device
equipped with an adapter that is physically attached to
the ring.
ring network. (1) A network configuration in which
devices are connected by unidirectional transmission
links to form a closed path. (2) A network in which every
node has exactly two branches connected to it and in
which there are exactly two paths between any two
nodes. (T) See also star/ring network, Token-Ring
network.
POST. Power-on self-test.
power-on self-test (POST). A series of diagnostic
tests that are run automatically by a device when the
power is switched on.
problem determination. The process of determining
the source of a problem; for example, a program
component, a machine failure, telecommunication
facilities, user or contractor-installed programs or
equipment, an environment failure such as a power
loss, or user error.
procedure. A set of instructions that gives a service
representative a step-by-step procedure for tracing a
symptom to the cause of failure.
protocol. (1) A set of semantic and syntactic rules that
determines the behavior of functional units in achieving
communication. (I) (2) In Open Systems Interconnection
architecture, a set of semantic and syntactic rules that
determine the behavior of entities in the same layer in
performing communication functions. (T) (3) In SNA, the
meanings of, and the sequencing rules for, requests
and responses used for managing the network,
transferring data, and synchronizing the states of
network components.
R
read-only memory (ROM). (1) A storage device in
which data, under normal conditions, can only be read.
(T). (2) Memory in which stored data cannot be modified
by the user except under special conditions.
ring segment. A ring segment is any section of a ring
that can be isolated (by unplugging connectors) from
the rest of the ring. A segment can consist of a single
lobe, the cable between access units, or a combination
of cables, lobes, and/or access units. See cable
segment, LAN segment.
ring status. The condition of the ring.
ROM. Read-only memory. (A)
router. (1) A computer that determines that path of
network traffic flow. The path selection is made from
several paths based on information obtained from
specific protocols, algorithms that attempt to identify the
shortest or best path, and other criteria such as metrics
or protocol-specific destination addresses. (2) An
attaching device that connects two LAN segments,
which use similar or different architectures, at the
reference model network layer. Contrast with bridge and
gateway. (3) In OSI terminology, a router is a network
layer intermediate system.
routing. (1) The assignment of the path by which a
message is to reach its destination. (2) In SNA, the
forwarding of a message unit along a particular path
through a network, as determined by parameters carried
in the message unit, such as the destination network
address in a transmission header.
routing protocol. A technique for each router to find
another router and to keep up to date about the best
way to get to every network. Examples of routing
protocols are: Routing Information Protocol (RIP), Hello,
and Open Shortest Path First (OSPF).
Glossary
99
S
segment. (1) In the IBM Token-Ring Network, a
section of cable between components or devices. A
segment can consist of a single patch cable, several
patch cables that are connected, or a combination of
building cable and patch cables that are connected. (2)
The unit of transfer between TCP functions in different
machines. Each segment contains control and data
fields whereby the current byte stream position and
actual data bytes are identified along with a checksum
to validate received data. (3) In an OS/2 program, a
variable-length area of contiguous storage addresses
not exceeding 64 KB. See also data segment, cable
segment, LAN segment, ring segment.
select. The process of choosing a single symbol or
menu item by placing the cursor on it and clicking the
mouse button. To select multiple symbols
simultaneously, press and hold the Shift key down while
clicking on the symbols you want to select.
server. (1) A functional unit that provides shared
services to workstations over a network; for example, a
file server, a print server, a mail server. (T) (2) In a
network, a data station that provides facilities to other
stations; for example, a file server, a print server, a mail
server. (A) (3) A class of adapter in a network node that
performs local processing and does not have any
physical connections to other devices (as do port
adapters and trunk adapters). (4) A device, program, or
code module on a network dedicated to providing a
specific service to a network.
session. (1) In network architecture, for the purpose of
data communication between functional units, all the
activities which take place during the establishment,
maintenance, and release of the connection. (T) (2) A
logical connection between two network accessible units
(NAUs) that can be activated, tailored to provide various
protocols, and deactivated, as requested. Each session
is uniquely identified in a transmission header (TH)
accompanying any transmissions exchanged during the
session. (3) The period of time during which a user of a
terminal can communicate with an interactive system,
usually, elapsed time between logon and logoff.
Simple Network Management Protocol (SNMP). (1)
An IP network management protocol that is used to
monitor routers and attached networks. (2) A
TCP/IP-based protocol for exchanging network
management information and outlining the structure for
communications among network devices. SNMP is an
application layer protocol. Information on devices
managed is defined and stored in the application’s
Management Information Base (MIB).
socket. (1) In the AIX operating system: (a) A unique
host identifier created by the concatenation of a port
identifier with a transmission control protocol/Internet
protocol (TCP/IP) address. (b) A port identifier. (c) A
16-bit port number. (d) A port on a specific host; a
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IBM Token-Ring Adapter Features
communications end point that is accessible through a
protocol family’s addressing mechanism. A socket is
identified by a socket address. See also socket address.
(2) An IP address and port number pairing. (3) In
TCP/IP, the Internet address of the host computer on
which the application runs, and the port number it uses.
A TCP/IP application is identified by its socket. (4)
Synonym for port (2).
switch. (1) On an adapter, a mechanism used to
select a value to enable or disable a configurable option
or feature. (2) In CallPath®, equipment that makes,
breaks, or changes the connections between telephone
lines to establish, terminate, or change a telephone call.
Private branch exchange switches reside on a
customer’s premises, while central office switches
reside within the telephone service provider’s network.
switch feature. A service provided by the switch that
can be invoked by a program or by manual phoneset
activity. “Do not disturb” is an example of a switch
feature.
system. In data processing, a collection of people,
machines, and methods organized to accomplish a set
of specific functions. (I) (A)
system configuration. A process that specifies the
devices and programs that form a particular data
processing system.
T
TCP. Transmission Control Protocol.
TCP/IP. Transmission Control Protocol/Internet
Protocol.
telecommunication-attached. Pertaining to the
attachment of devices by teleprocessing lines to a host
processor. Synonym for remote. Contrast with
channel-attached.
token. (1) In a local area network, the symbol of
authority passed successively from one data station to
another to indicate the station temporarily in control of
the transmission medium. Each data station has an
opportunity to acquire and use the token to control the
medium. A token is a particular message or bit pattern
that signifies permission to transmit. (T) (2) A sequence
of bits passed from one device to another along the
token ring. When the token has data appended to it, it
becomes a frame.
token ring. (1) A network with a ring topology that
passes tokens from one attaching device to another; for
example, the IBM Token-Ring Network. See also local
area network (LAN). (2) A group of interconnected
Token Rings.
token-ring network. (1) A ring network that allows
unidirectional data transmission between data stations,
by a token passing procedure, such that the transmitted
data return to the transmitting station. (T) (2) A network
that uses a ring topology, in which tokens are passed in
a sequence from node to node. A node that is ready to
send can capture the token and insert data for
transmission. (3) A group of interconnected token rings.
Transmission Control Protocol (TCP). (1) A
communications protocol used in Internet and in any
network that follows the U.S. Department of Defense
standards for inter-network protocol. TCP provides a
reliable host-to-host protocol between hosts in
packet-switched communications networks and in
interconnected systems of such networks. It assumes
that the Internet protocol is the underlying protocol. (2)
A transport protocol in the Internet suite of protocols that
provides reliable, connection-oriented, full-duplex data
stream service.
Transmission Control Protocol/Internet Protocol
(TCP/IP). (1) A set of protocols that allow cooperating
computers to share resources across a heterogeneous
network. (2) A set of communication protocols that
support peer-to-peer connectivity functions for both local
and wide area networks.
transmission frame. (1) In data transmission, data
transported from one node to another in a particular
format that can be recognized by the receiving node. In
addition to a data or information field, a frame has some
kind of delimiter that marks its beginning and end and
usually control fields, address information that identifies
the source and destination, and one or more check bits
that allow the receiver to detect any errors that occur
after the sender has transmitted the frame. (2) In
synchronous data link control (SDLC), the vehicle for
every command, every response, and all information
that is transmitted using SDLC procedures. Each frame
begins and ends with a flag. (3) In high level data link
control (HDLC), the sequence of contiguous bits
bracketed by and including opening and closing flag
(01111110) sequences. (4) In a Token-Ring network, a
bit pattern containing data that a station has inserted for
transmission after capturing a token.
transmit. To send information from one place for
reception elsewhere. (A)
U
User Datagram Protocol (UDP). (1) In TCP/IP, a
packet-level protocol built directly on the Internet
Protocol layer. UDP is used for application-to-application
programs between TCP/IP host systems. (2) A transport
protocol in the Internet suite of protocols that provides
unreliable, connectionless datagram service. (3) The
Internet Protocol that enables an application
programmer on one machine or process to send a
datagram to an application program on another machine
or process. UDP uses the internet protocol (IP) to
deliver datagrams.
V
version. A separately licensed program, based on an
existing licensed program, that usually has significant
new code or new function.
W
WAN. Wide area network.
wide area network (WAN). (1) A network that provides
communication services to a geographic area larger
than that served by a local area network or a
metropolitan area network, and that may use or provide
public communication facilities. (T) (2) A data
communications network designed to serve an area of
hundreds or thousands of miles; for example, public and
private packet-switching networks and national
telephone networks. Contrast with local area network
(LAN) and metropolitan area network (MAN).
window. (1) In computer graphics, a predetermined
part of a virtual space. (2) A division of a screen in
which one of several programs being executed
concurrently can display information. (3) One or more
parts of a display screen with visible boundaries in
which information is displayed. (4) See also help
window.
wrap test. A test that checks attachment or control
unit circuitry without checking the mechanism itself by
returning the output of the mechanism as input; for
example, when unrecoverable communication adapter
or machine errors occur, a wrap test can transmit a
specific character pattern to or through the modem in a
loop and then compare the character pattern received
with the pattern transmitted. See also optical wrap.
UDP. User Datagram Protocol.
UNIX operating system. An operating system
developed by Bell Laboratories that features
multiprogramming in a multiuser environment. The UNIX
operating system was originally developed for use on
minicomputers, but has been adapted for mainframes
and microcomputers.
Note: The AIX operating system is IBM’s
implementation of the UNIX operating system.
Glossary
101
102
IBM Token-Ring Adapter Features
Index
C
Q
client setup, RPL/DHCP 4
CONFIG.SYS for RPL 10
Quick Failover
description 56
supported environments
55
D
DOS 31
LAN Services 31
memory usage reduction
R
Redundant NIC
33
benefits 56
description 55
installation 57
supported environments
E
enabling RPL/DHCP
4
related publications
55
vii
Remote Program Load (RPL)
I
client setup 4
description 3
messages 15, 27
overview 3
setting up for OS/2 LAN server
troubleshooting 19, 28
IBM LAN Client 31
installation 31
restrictions 32
L
LAN adapter management agent
LAN Client installation 33
35
M
Route Switching, configuring
RPL/DHCP, enabling
9
39
4
T
messages
DHCP/PXE 17
RPL 15, 27
troubleshooting RPL problems
28
W
N
Windows NT 4.0 Server
Novell NetWare Server 10
RPL, setting up 10
RPL, setting up
12
12
O
OS/2 LAN server
support for RPL
9
© Copyright IBM Corp. 1998, 1999, 2000
103
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