Title: Flu Interview Interview: 35 I:

Title: Flu Interview Interview: 35 I:
Title: Flu Interview
Interview: 35
I: Have you ever heard of the flu?
P: Yes.
I: What can you tell me about it?
P: Well, it starts, it can start like a simple sore throat, body ache, you know, headache,
high fevers. Very contagious especially during children (inaudible). Pretty much can
pass it around throughout the family.
I: Okay, and what do you think is the percent chance that you'll get the flu sometime in
the next year?
P: In the next year, well, with the kids, I will say maybe once a year.
I: You think that you would get it at least once per year?
P: Yes.
I: That's pretty much a 100 percent chance?
P: It's about a 100 percent chance, yes.
I: Okay, and are there any people who are more likely to get the flu than others because
of who they are or what they do?
P: I would say the kids because they're going to school and they're more exposed to
other children.
I: Anybody else?
P: It would be my husband because he, in the weather out there, exposed to the changes
of weather and also a lot of people, so.
I: Are there any people who are less likely to get the flu than others?
P: No, not really.
I: Okay, so what are the different ways in which the flu can be passed on from one
person to another?
P: If, I guess, if one of them sneezes, covers their mouth, don't wash their hands, you
know, touches something else. Somebody else comes in, touches it, or, you know, the
kids being, or the rest of the family being in the same room exposed to the symptoms,
which (inaudible).
I: You mentioned the family being in the same room. Like, how close do someone have
to be to someone else to be able to get the flu from them?
P: I guess it depends. I mean, I don't know. I mean, I would say just within the same
room. I guess, within, I don't know, a few feet, you know, from a distance. It all
depends, I guess, on the person's immune system. Some of them are more likely to get it
than others.
I: Right, and how long do you think—you mentioned someone sneezing, and that
would be a way. How long do you think, like, from the sneeze, the flu would be able to
stay in the air and give someone else the flu?
P: I don't know. Within 24 hours?
I: Okay, and you mentioned that not washing the hands would be, so how, by not
washing the hands, how would someone get the flu like that?
P: Well, by touching. You know, let's say they're playing with a specific toy. They
haven't washed their hands, or they're touching a cup, you know, something, and the
other person touches it, too, and then puts their hand in their mouth or something, you
know. Something where they touch their face or something where there's some sort of
contact, something that they drink from the same cup, you know, something similar to
that.
I: Right, and how long do you think that, on these objects, like a cup, the flu would be
able to stay there and give someone else the flu?
P: I don't know. About a day.
I: Can you get the flu from breathing near a person with flu symptoms?
P: If I'm not mistaken, (inaudible) airborne also, so they—I'm assuming, if you’re very
close to the person, you can, I mean, you're not 100 percent likely to get it, but you are
exposed to it, so there's a possibility that, you know, somebody being near you,
breathing near you, especially because they normally start breathing through their
mouth, the more, I guess, releasing some of the germs that cause the flu.
I: Right, and how far do you think the flu could travel in the air?
P: Oh, my goodness.
I: Just kind of, just like, what is your gut feeling on that, just your best guess?
P: I don't know, 50 feet.
I: Okay, and is there anything a person can do to prevent getting the flu?
P: Well, you can't fully prevent it, but you can get the flu shot, which that will just, if
you do get it, it will minimize the symptoms.
I: Okay, anything else that a person can do to prevent getting the flu?
P: Just, if you're around, if it's flu season, you know, just be very careful with when
washing your hands, you know, being whenever you're, if you're at work, let's say, for
instance, and you have to share equipment, and you know that there are other people
that are doing that. It's just a matter of, you know, keeping clean your hands, and that's
about it. You know.
I: Okay, so we're going to talk about.
P: (Inaudible).
I: I'm sorry?
P: Trying to disinfect the area, you know.
I: Now we're going to talk a little bit about a '1'-to-'7' scale where '1' is 'not at all', and '7'
means 'extremely well'. You mentioned, like, disinfecting the area, like, equipment use
and that kind of thing. How well do you think, on that '1'-to-'7' scale that would protect
a person from getting the flu?
P: I will say, I guess, I don't know, 50 percent chance just at least that you could try to
minimize the opportunity of you getting sick.
I: Right, so on that scale then, the '1' to '7' where '1' would mean 'not at all', and '7'
would mean 'extremely well'?
P: I would say a '5'.
I: Okay, and is disinfecting, is that something that you do to try and protect yourself
from getting the flu?
P: I'm sorry. Say that again.
I: Yes, is disinfecting things, is that something that you do to try and protect yourself
from getting the flu?
P: Absolutely.
I: Are there any circumstances in which you wouldn't do that?
P: I would say '7'.
I: I'm sorry?
P: I would say a '7'.
I: No, I'm saying are there any circumstances in which you wouldn't disinfect?
P: Oh, no, no, no. I don’t think so.
I: Back to that '1'-to-'7' scale, you also mentioned hand washing. How well do you think
hand washing would protect a person from getting the flu?
P: I would say (inaudible).
I: I'm sorry, hello?
P: I would say, on the scale, it would be, I don't know, a '7'.
I: A '7' for hand washing?
P: Yes.
I: Okay, why do you think hand washing is a '7' as far as protecting a person from
getting the flu?
P: Mainly because we are not very conscious about it because with our hands, we touch
everything we eat. Sometimes we might not eat, wash our hands before we eat. All of
that tends together.
I: Right, and is hand washing, is that something that you do to protect yourself from
getting the flu?
P: Absolutely.
I: Are there any circumstances in which you wouldn't wash your hands?
P: No, I'm a hand-washing freak.
I: Okay.
P: Nothing I don't do where I don't wash my hands.
I: Right, okay, all right, and the last one that you mentioned was getting the flu shot. On
that '1'-to-'7' scale, how well do you think getting the flu shot would protect a person
from getting the flu?
P: I'll say an '8'.
I: Okay, and why do you think that that's above the '7', an '8'? Why do you think that's
an '8'?
P: It is kind of like taking a pre-antibiotic. You know, it wouldn't be something that
even companies are willing to pay for more than a disinfecting lotion or anything like
that for the employee to make sure that they're, you know, well enough to continue
going to work. A lot of the companies, employers will pay for it or even bring people to
go ahead to their jobs (inaudible) and administer the flu shot to try to prevent having the
personnel missing because of the flu, so it's kind of vaccination to children. You
vaccinate them to prevent something from happening. It's pretty much, in my eyes,
pretty much the same concept.
I: Right, okay, and is—do you usually get the flu shot?
P: Once a year, yes.
I: Are there any circumstances in which you wouldn't get the flu shot?
P: No.
I: Okay, so we were just talking about how a person can prevent getting the flu. How
about if someone has the flu already? Is there anything that they can do to prevent
giving it to someone else?
P: I would say limiting the amount of contact on the first 24 hours after you have the flu
developed with, you know, limiting the contact with other people. Don’t go out
shopping just because you ended up having the day off. Don't go out and go shopping
because that's just one of, you know—the first 24 hours, they will always tell you. After
that, you can get back to work or back to your normal routine, but just try to limit the
amount of contact you have, and, you know, just be self-conscious of what your items
are. I, personally, whenever I get to have the flu, I ended up. It's my personal choice, of
course, I have paper cups, paper plates, and I'll just toss everything away. Try not to
leave anything, but that's just my personal, like I said, I'm a pretty, hand washing all the
time. I'm always trying to keep an eye on that, so.
I: So, why do you think, you mentioned limited contact for the 24 hours. Why do you
think that 24-hour time frame is important?
P: Well, it's when you're more (susceptic) to be contagious.
I: Okay, and you mentioned the paper plates and using paper cups. On that '1' to '7'
scale, how well do you think doing that would protect someone else from being able to
get the flu?
P: I'll say a '5' or a '6'.
I: Okay, and why do you think '5' or '6' for that?
P: Because you're still leaving it out there. Unless you take out the trash right away,
there is a possibility still, but it's less likely for somebody else to accidentally pick up my
cup and drink from it, one that (inaudible) touched.
I: Right, and the other thing that you mentioned is obviously not (inaudible) your
contact, so how well do you think, on that '1' to '7' scale, not going out to work or class
would protect a sick person from giving the flu to someone else?
P: I'll say '6'.
I: Okay, and why do you think '6' for that?
P: Because if you were there the day before and your symptoms started before, there's a
possibility you already had contact with somebody else and passed it around. I'd say a
'6' because it's highly more likely, let's say, for a child who if you think (inaudible)
sometimes they’re desks are together or very close to each other. That just makes it a
higher possibility for somebody else to get it.
I: Right, and would you stop going out to prevent giving the flu to someone else?
P: Myself? Absolutely, yes.
I: Are there any circumstances in which you would still go to work or class even if you
could give the flu to someone else?
P: I mean, of course, if for whatever reason, I have no sick days or for whatever reason, I
have to excuse myself from work or if I were to have a very important exam where I
couldn't miss it, I would absolutely do it, but if it's something that I cannot avoid, I
would do it.
I: Okay, right. Now, we're going to talk a little bit about the symptoms of the flu. How
long does it take for a person to get symptoms of the flu after they're exposed?
P: I would say one to two days.
I: Okay. Now, how long does it take for a person to get better after getting the flu?
P: I'd say about three to four days. The first day, you feel like crap, and then after that,
it's just kind of trying to get rid of the ache, body ache.
I: Okay, and at what point would you see a doctor if you had symptoms of the flu?
P: I'd say within the first day, personally, myself.
I: Okay, and how soon after someone is first exposed could that person give the flu to
someone else?
P: I'd say within 24 hours. I'm not sure.
I: Okay, and after a person has recovered and has no more symptoms of the flu, could
that person still give the flu to someone else?
P: Actually, I didn’t think you could do that. I don't know. Two to three days?
I: Okay, so during the course of someone's illness of the flu, when is the person most
likely to give the flu to someone else?
P: When is a person more likely?
I: Mm-hmm, right.
P: The first few days, the first day. The first day or two days.
I: Okay, and why is that time when they're more likely to give the flu to someone else?
P: Because most of the time, you're still trying to recognize your symptoms, and a lot of
the time, you haven't seen a physician, so therefore, there is no antibiotics or anything in
their system, so they're more likely to pass it around.
I: Okay, so can people spread the flu if they feel perfectly well?
P: Yes.
I: How about if they feel slightly sick?
P: Yes.
I: Okay. How would you know whether you had the flu?
P: Well, there's got to do with the symptoms. Like I said, normally they're high fevers.
The body ache is one of the first ones. The chills, the sore throat, just, and normally
because you go in, and they say, “Well, no, it’s not strep throat.” A lot of it has to do
with the body ache, body ache, fevers.
I: Okay, and how is having the flu different from having a cold?
P: Okay. A cold, you still feel drained. You still feel tired, but it's, how can I say, it's
intensified. A cold, you can still go on, and you can still perform your work duties, so
you can still be at school. I mean, you'll still be feeling a little sick, but a flu, it completely
hits your body, your entire body so your whole body aches. It hurts terribly.
I: Right. Are there any different kinds of flus?
P: Are there any different kinds of?
I: Of flus?
P: Not that I'm aware of, but I'm sure there is.
I: Okay, all right, so now imagine that you had to take care of someone who was sick
with the flu or a cold. What kinds of things would you need to do for this person that
might bring you into close, physical contact with them?
P: That might bring me into close, physical contact?
I: Mm-hmm.
P: I guess, feeding them, providing them with plenty of fluids, all that sort of stuff.
I: Okay, and do you think feeding them and providing them fluids would put you at
risk for getting sick yourself?
P: Yes.
I: Okay, and is there anything you can do to protect yourself from getting sick while
you were feeding someone that was sick?
P: I mean, you could always use one of those doctor's masks, or, just so you're not
breathing the, whatchamacallit, the virus or however.
I: Okay. Is there anything else you could do to protect yourself?
P: Besides getting the flu shot, I couldn't think of anything else right now.
I: Okay, so is wearing the mask, is that something that you would do to protect yourself
from getting sick?
P: I wouldn't say it all the time, no.
I: Okay, and why wouldn't you do that?
P: Only in circumstances like if the flu has continuously gone around. I don't know if
you've noticed, or it has happened to you in the past, but one of the kids gets sick, and
then it gets to the other, and it just keeps going around. It just keeps going into a big
circle where everybody just keeps getting it over and over, and it just doesn't go away.
Once it starts getting to where it starts going to the rest of the family, then that will be
one of the times that I would do it, but not at the first sign or the first one that gets sick,
no.
I: Okay, and if the doctor told you to keep the sick person totally isolated or separated
from the rest of the people that were living there, would you be able to do that?
P: Okay, I'm sorry. I lost you. Say that again?
I: If the doctor told you to keep the sick person totally isolated or separated from the
rest of the people living there, would you be able to do that?
P: I could.
I: How would you go about doing that?
P: I guess, putting them in a different room.
I: Okay. Have you ever taken care of someone who was sick with the flu or a cold?
P: Yes, my children, myself, my husband.
I: Okay. Have you ever done things like wear the mask that you mentioned earlier, to
protect yourself from getting sick?
P: Yes. Only in circumstances like I mentioned before where it has continuously keep
going around the family.
I: Okay, and did you do anything in addition of what you already mentioned, when
you were taking care of them, to kind of protect yourself from getting sick?
P: No.
I: Okay, all right. Now, we're going to talk a little bit more about hand washing.
P: Okay.
I: Earlier, I asked you how well, if you, washing your hands would help protect you
from getting the flu, but if you had the flu already, on that '1'-to-'7' scale, how well do
you think washing your hands would keep you from spreading it to other people?
P: I'd say a '6'.
I: Okay, and why do you think '6' for that?
P: Because you might be coughing, or you might be wiping your nose, and all of those
germs stay in your hands.
I: Right, and you talked a little bit about this earlier, but can you kind of give me a stepby-step how someone not washing their hands would give people the flu?
P: Well, like I was mentioning just now, somebody sneezing, they normally, basic
instinct is go ahead and cover your mouth, right? You pretty much either, if you're
sneezing, (inaudible) pretty much you're putting all the germs in your hands. You go
ahead and you say hello to somebody else, and that person goes and goes eat without
washing their hands also, so it's just straight passing it through. So, a person who
doesn't wash their hands or they're just blowing their nose because they have a runny
nose, they're congested. All that, it's cycled. The germ itself, alive, you're passing it on so
basically, keeping, washing your hands after you blow your nose or after you sneeze—
very important.
I: Right, and how long do you think the flu would be able to stay on someone's hands?
P: I'd say 24 hours, two days, somewhere around there.
I: Okay, all right. First, we're going to talk about people in general when they wash their
hands, and then we'll talk a little bit about when you wash your own hands. Are there
times or circumstances in which people should wash their hands?
P: Are there times or circumstances where people shouldn't wash their hands?
I: Should wash their hands.
P: Should?
I: Right.
P: I would say before every meal, after every time they use the restroom. If possible,
after you sneeze or cough especially if you're sick.
I: Right. How about any circumstances where people are more likely to wash their
hands?
P: They're more likely to wash their hands?
I: Right.
P: I guess most people tend to wash their hands after they use the restroom.
I: Okay. How about any circumstances where people are less likely to wash their
hands?
P: Before they eat.
I: Okay. Are there any circumstances in which people don't always wash their hands
even though they probably should?
P: Once again, I would have to go with before they eat.
I: Okay, and why do you think people don't wash their hands before they eat?
P: Because they're normally in a rush. You go in, and you pick up, you're working, and
you pick up some fast food to go and on the way, (inaudible) French fries and your
hamburger, and 90 percent of us will head for that snack of French fries to have a
couple, and you just handed the money or your credit card or you just had the change
given back to you, which you just put in your purse. You didn't stop to go wash your
hands.
I: Right.
P: It's an automatic instinct. Everybody's in a rush, so there's very little time to sit down
and get to your place where you're going to eat or whatever.
I: Right, and why do you think that it might be better for people to wash their hands
before they eat?
P: Why do I think it might be better?
I: Yes, why do you think it might be better for people to wash their hands before they
eat?
P: Well, because they will make a difference on their health.
I: Right, okay, and how would it make a difference?
P: Well, you're less likely to get different sort of airborne infections.
I: Okay. Now, I'm switching to when you wash your own hands. At which times or
circumstances should you wash your hands?
P: Under what circumstances?
I: Yes, should you wash your hands?
P: Definitely after you use the restroom, prior to eating, anytime you're cooking. Before
you start cooking, you should wash your hands, and if you touch any poultry or any
meat or any raw meat, you should wash your hands before you head to something else.
If possible, after you gas up. Normally, you know, you get right back into your car.
I: Right, okay.
P: I guess that would sum up for the most important ones.
I: Okay. How about any circumstances where you're more likely to wash your hands?
P: Any circumstances where I'm more likely to wash my hands?
I: Right.
P: Okay. I guess, after you use the restroom and while you're cooking and, I guess,
before you eat.
I: Okay. What are some circumstances where you might be less likely to wash your
hands?
P: Circumstances where I'm less likely to wash my hands, (inaudible) after you gas up.
Get in your car—you don't have a chance to wash your hands. After you go to the
grocery store, you know, and there's the money exchange.
I: Right. Are there any circumstances in which you don't always wash your hands even
though you probably should?
P: Once again, it would be after gas, pumping gas, or after you've been to the store and
you have been exchanging money.
I: Okay, and why do you think, as far as pumping gas and times where you've
exchanged money, it would be good to wash your hands?
P: Number one, because money just travels all over the place. You don't know where it
has been. I mean, so many people touches money and so many people touches the gas
pump, and they might not be worrying about washing their hands before that, so unless
you’re sitting there with a disinfecting wipe before you get to the pump gas or wash
every bill before you use it , you know, those are circumstances. Those are items that
you don’t realize how much dirt they have or how much germs they have, but have you
ever had a come across going to Wal-Mart or any store and happen to see a cashier
wearing the surgical gloves, and it's so black, you can't even believe how dark they are?
It's all that stuff on the money, so.
I: Right, okay, so have you ever heard of any recommendations for the best way of
washing your hands?
P: Well, any antibacterial soap, and, of course, washing your hands thoroughly,
building up the lather for about a minute, and then rinsing off with warm water.
I: Okay, and so you mentioned antibacterial soap, would you say that people usually
use that kind of soap?
P: I guess, nowadays, it's easier for people to use it because a lot of the hand soaps are
antibacterial, and people, it's not something that they have to go dig for. It's most of the
hand soaps are antibacterial.
I: Okay, and would you say that you usually use the antibacterial soap?
P: What soap do we use, you mean?
I: Yes, what kind of soap do you usually use?
P: The hand soap, Dial.
I: Mm-hmm, okay.
P: What is it, that soft, I can't think of (inaudible), let me see. I'm picturing it in my head,
but, you know, Equate, Wal-Mart's brand. They have the antibacterial soap. Also, Dove.
I: Right, so you mentioned lathering up your hands.
P: Uh-huh.
I: Would you say that people usually do that when they wash their hands?
P: Maybe not for long enough as they need to.
I: Okay, and why do you think people don't do it for a long enough time?
P: Because they're in a rush. You feel your hands a little clean, or you think it's clean,
and that's just about it. You move on.
I: Right. Would you say that you usually lather your hands for a long enough time?
P: I'd say I'm cautious enough to (inaudible) at least a minute.
I: Okay, and what might make someone more likely to lather their hands for a long
enough time?
P: What would make somebody lather their hands for longer?
I: What makes, yes, what might make someone more likely to do that?
P: If their hands, if they feel like their hands are really dirty. Like, they touched
something, and it's sticky, and it's not coming off, then people are more likely to spend
more time washing their hands.
I: Right, okay. You'd also mentioned rinsing with warm water. Would you say that
people usually do that?
P: I think, for the most part, people are used to using warm water, yes.
I: Okay, and is that something that you usually do?
P: Yes.
I: Okay, and what might make someone more likely to use the warm water when they
rinse their hands?
P: Okay, say that again?
I: Yes, what might make someone more likely to use warm water when they rinse their
hands?
P: Most of the time and not always, the sinks have the ones, that one knob that you kind
of tilt to the left or to the right, but if you lift it, it goes straight in the middle. When you
put it straight in the middle, it automatically goes warm. Unless you have the two
separate water knobs, most of the time, you automatically lift up the water, and that's
just about it. It automatically comes warm.
I: Okay, so have you ever heard of any recommendations how long to wash your
hands?
P: You know what, I cannot say I haven't, but I can't recall of any. I’ve seen
commercials, you know.
I: Okay, and how long should people wash their hands, do you think?
P: I will say people should wash their hands at least one to two minutes to be lathering
their hands and have the soap. It's kind of like when you rinse your mouth with
Listerine. You have to kind of sit there and just take your time and do it well.
I: Right, and would you say that people, in general, usually wash their hands for one to
two minutes when they wash their hands?
P: No, I don't think so.
I: Okay, and why do you think people don't spend that time?
P: Because, like I mentioned before, people are always in a rush.
I: Right.
P: People don't have the time to sit down and spend two or three minutes, or they don't
think they have the time, so they don't take the time to do it. It's a lot easier to get a half,
you know, feel the soap in your hands, and just kind of rinse it out. That's it.
I: Right. About how many seconds would you guess people normally have their hands
under running water when they wash their hands?
P: About 30 seconds.
I: Okay. Would you say that you usually wash your hands for the one to two minutes?
P: Normally I try to, yes.
I: Okay, and why is that something that you try to do?
P: Because I'm very self-conscious about it.
I: Okay, and what has made you self-conscious about it?
P: Kids, being a mom, having a daycare.
I: Right, okay, and about how many seconds would you guess you normally have your
hand under running water when you're washing your hands?
P: About how many seconds under running water? I would say about 45 seconds or so.
I: Okay, and what might make someone more likely to spend the full one to two
minutes when they wash their hands?
P: Depending on what they got on their hands. If it's something sticky or something that
won't come off, they're more likely to wash more and spend more time on their hands.
I: Okay, and what might make them less likely to spend that full time?
P: What would make them more likely or less likely?
I: Less likely.
P: After (inaudible) went ahead and used the restroom, yes. I guess, and this is just
personal experience, I've seen my husband using the restroom. He's a man, so they feel
like, oh, no big deal. They get out of the restroom, and they're walking out, and they
forget that they need to wash their hands. Maybe women, we're more self-conscious, but
guys sometimes, it's just a quick in-and-out type of thing. It's a lot harder.
I: Right. I have three choices here. Of these three, which is the most important for
preventing the flu when washing your hands: using soap, rubbing your hands together,
or washing your hands for a long enough time?
P: Okay, using soap, washing, rubbing your hands together, and what was the other
one?
I: Or washing them for a long enough time.
P: I guess using soap because there's no point in just putting your hands under water
nonstop, I mean.
I: Right, okay. As far as the other two, rubbing your hands together or washing your
hands for a long enough time, which of those is the least important?
P: Using the water for a long time.
I: Okay, and why is that the least important?
P: Okay, say that again?
I: You said washing them for a long enough time was the least important, so why is that
the least important?
P: That's again not using any soap, and they're not rubbing their hands.
I: Okay, all right. We're almost finished here. This last—well, it's not the last section, but
this section here, I'm going to ask you about some different actions. If you haven't
washed your hands first, could rubbing your nose give you the flu?
P: Yes.
I: Okay, and how would rubbing your nose give you the flu?
P: Because germs are airborne; you're breathing it in.
I: Okay. How about touching the inside of your mouth?
P: Absolutely.
I: Okay, and how does that give you the flu?
P: You’re passing the germ right through your mouth.
I: Okay. How about touching your eyes?
P: I would say yes. You're still having contact with an open part of your body—you see
what I'm saying?—something that carries fluids and all of that.
I: Okay. How about biting the fingernail?
P: Absolutely.
I: And how does that give you the flu?
P: Everything's under those fingernails.
I: Okay. How about touching the inside of your nostril?
P: Yes.
I: Okay, and how does that give you the flu?
P: If you—the fingernail, you know, or your fingers. Your hands being dirty.
I: Okay. How about touching your lips?
P: Yes, because when you tend to, let's say, clean up your lips with your tongue or
something, you know, moist your lips.
I: Right. How about—sorry?
P: I said moist your lips.
I: Right, okay. How about eating a sandwich?
P: If you haven't washed your hands, and you've been in contact, yes.
I: Okay, and how does that give you the flu?
P: I guess I got myself ahead. If you haven't washed your hands, and you've been in
contact with some sort of flu, then you're just passing it right on.
I: Okay. How about shaking hands?
P: Yes.
I: Okay, and how would that give you the flu?
P: Well, let's say (John) is coming down with the symptoms, has been sneezing and goes
ahead and gives you his hand and shakes your hand.
I: Right, okay, so we just talked about a lot of actions there. Do any other actions come
to mind that might give you the flu if you hadn't washed your hands first?
P: No.
I: Okay. You were mentioning this a little bit earlier, but have you heard of other ways
of cleaning your hands without using soap and water?
P: Yes. The antibacterial liquids, the gels.
I: Right, and have you ever used those?
P: Oh, I carry one in my purse at all times.
I: Okay, and where can you buy those?
P: At any place. Any groceries, supercenters, even, you could probably find them at gas
stations.
I: Right, and how do you use those? What's the process of using those?
P: Well, normally, I try to wash my hands and then use it, but if I'm at a situation like,
let's say we took the kids to the zoo, and they've been petting the animals, and they're
thirsty, and they're about to have a sip of water. Before they do that, I will go ahead and
pass around some antibacterial gel just until we can get to the nearest restroom and they
can wash their hands.
I: Right, okay, and how do they, do they just squirt that on? What's the?
P: Yes. Normally it's just a little squirt thing.
I: Okay.
P: About a dime-sized little squirt, and they'll just rub it in their hands until they're
dried.
I: Okay, all right. Have you ever heard of the bird flu or the avian flu?
P: No, I haven't.
I: Okay. Have you ever heard of pandemic flu?
P: No.
I: Okay. This question here, it's a little bit wordy. It's a percent-chance question.
Currently, people usually catch bird flu directly from birds, but in the future, the bird flu
might spread just like the regular flu from person to person. In your opinion, and this is
just an opinion-type question, what is the percent chance that this will happen sometime
during the next three years, that it will start spreading from person to person?
P: I would say a 15 percent chance.
I: Okay, and why do you think a 15 percent chance?
P: Because I believe that, right now, they’re trying to educate more and more people
about the flu, and so I guess I just don’t see it happening. I mean, any more than that.
I: All right, this last set of questions is about you. If anything you don't want to answer,
just say, "Skip it," and we'll go to the next one.
P: Okay.
I: Have you ever been diagnosed with the flu?
P: Yes.
I: About how many times have you been diagnosed?
P: In the last whatever years?
I: Just in general, how many times do you think you've been diagnosed with the flu?
P: I don't know. I would say about 15 times.
I: When was the last time you were diagnosed with the flu?
P: Sometime last year.
I: What were your symptoms when you had the flu?
P: Body ache, fever, sore throat, runny nose.
I: Okay, obviously you're female. Are you Hispanic?
P: Yes.
I: What is your race?
P: I'm Mexican.
I: Do you have any children? I know you mentioned this earlier, but do you have
children?
P: Yes.
I: How many children do you have?
P: Three.
I: How old are they?
P: Sixteen, 14, 5.
I: Do you work with children?
P: Yes.
I: What is the age group that you work with?
P: Toddlers. They're 4-year-olds.
I: Other than what we've discussed already, do you do anything to keep the children
from getting the flu?
P: Spray a lot of Lysol. Also, you know, like, on the toys for the children, just disinfect
them with basic water and Clorox solution.
I: What is your occupation?
P: I'm a daycare provider.
I: All right, we.
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