i

i
i
ii
This page has been inten onally le blank
THE NEW CAPITAL REGION OF ANDHRA PRADESH I THE CAPITAL REGION PLAN REPORT
CONTENTS
PREFACE
VII
ACKNOWLEDGMENTS
IX
EXECUTIVE SUMMARY
XIII
INTRODUCTION
1
1.1
1.2
1.3
1.4
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
3
1.5
PROJECT ORGANIZATION & SCHEDULE
PROJECT DELIVERABLES
BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE
METHODOLOGY
1.4.1
DATA COLLECTION
1.4.2
SITE VISIT
1.4.3
MEETINGS WITH OFFICIALS
1.4.4
TRAINING WORKSHOPS
1.4.5
DATA ANALYSIS
1.4.6
URBAN SUSTAINABILITY FRAMEWORK USF
1.4.7
VISION FORMULATION
1.4.8
REGIONAL STRUCTURE PLAN
ORGANIZATION OF THE REPORT
REGIONAL CONTEXT ANALYSIS
2.1 NATIONAL CONTEXT 6
2.1.1 UPCOMING NATIONAL PROJECTS
2.2 ANDHRA PRADESH STATE
2.2.1 BIFURCATION
2.2.2 ANDHRA PRADESH ADVANTAGE
2.2.3 REGIONAL CONTEXT
2.3 CAPITAL REGION
2.3.1 CRDA ACT
2.3.2 CAPITAL REGION
2.3.3 CAPITAL CITY
2.3.4 DEVELOPMENT HISTORY
2.3.5 EXISTING SITE CONTEXT
5
2.3.6 DEVELOPMENT DENSITY
2.4 KEY CITIES, TOWNS AND VILLAGES IN CAPITAL REGION
2.4.1 ENVIRONMENT
2.4.2 HERITAGE AND TOURISM
2.4.3 CONSTRAINTS AND CHALLENGES
2.4.4 ASSETS AND OPPORTUNITIES
6
7
7
7
8
9
9
9
10
11
12
13
13
14
16
20
22
24
EXISTING TRANSPORT AND
27
INFRASTRUCTURE ANALYSIS
27
3.1
28
28
29
31
33
34
36
37
38
39
40
41
42
43
44
45
3.2
GENERAL REVIEW
3.1.1
ANDHRA PRADESH INFRASTRUCTURE
3.1.2
ROAD NETWORK
3.1.3
RAILWAY NETWORK
3.1.4
AVIATION
3.1.5
WATER TRANSPORT
3.1.6
PUBLIC TRANSPORT
3.1.7
NON MOTORIZED TRANSPORT
3.1.8
KEY TRANSPORT ISSUES AND OPPORTUNITIES
INFRASTRUCTURE
3.2.1
WATER SUPPLY
3.2.2
WASTE WATER
3.2.3
STORM WATER
3.2.4
SOLID WASTE
3.2.5
POWER SUPPLY
3.2.6
KEY INFRASTRUCTURE ISSUES AND OPPORTUNITIES
DIMENSIONS OF GROWTH
47
4.1 REVIEW OF EXISTING SOCIO ECONOMIC INFORMATION
4.1.1 REGIONAL CONTEXT
4.1.2 CAPITAL REGION OVERVIEW
4.2 REVIEW OF EXISTING SOCIO ECONOMIC INFORMATION
4.2.1 ECONOMIC AND SOCIO DEMOGRAPHIC PROFILE
4.2.2 SPATIAL ECONOMIC POSITIONING
4.3 REGIONAL ECONOMIC ANALYSIS
4.3.1 REGIONAL ECONOMIC POSITIONING OF CAPITAL REGION
4.3.2 POSSIBLE FUTURE ECONOMIC DRIVERS FOR AP CAPITAL REGION
4.4 REGIONAL ECONOMIC ANALYSIS
4.4.1 CRITICAL PARAMETERS FOR ECONOMIC PRIORITIZATION
4.4.2 ANALYSIS OF INDUSTRIAL STATISTICAL
4.4.3 PERCEPTION STUDY
4.4.4 OPPORTUNITY ASSESSMENT FOR IDENTIFIED ECONOMIC USES
4.4.5 FOOD AND BEVERAGE SECTOR
4.4.6 TEXTILE INDUSTRY
4.4.7 NON METALLIC MINERAL PRODUCTS
4.4.8 AUTO AND AUTO COMPONENTS SECTOR
4.4.9 RUBBER AND PLASTIC INDUSTRY
4.4.10 PHARMACEUTICAL INDUSTRY
4.4.11 ELECTRONICS INDUSTRY
4.4.12 BASIC AND FABRICATED METAL INDUSTRY
4.4.13 TOURISM
4.4.14 AEROSPACE SECTOR
4.4.15 IT/ITES INDUSTRY
4.4.16 AQUACULTURE INDUSTRY
4.4.17 LOGISTICS INDUSTRY
4.4.18 INDUSTRY OPPORTUNITY MATRIX CAPITAL REGION
48
48
50
51
51
53
55
55
55
56
56
56
56
57
57
58
59
59
60
61
62
63
64
65
66
67
68
69
iii
iv
4.5 BENCHMARKING OF CAPITAL CITIES
4.5.1 HYDERABAD URBAN AGGLOMERATION
4.5.2 BENGALURU URBAN AGGLOMERATION
70
70
71
URBAN SUSTAINABILITY AND VISION FOR THE CAPITAL REGION
73
5.1
74
75
75
76
76
78
5.2
5.3
5.4
URBAN SUSTAINABILITY FRAMEWORK
5.1.1
KEY SUSTAINABILITY ISSUES IN CAPITAL REGION
5.1.2
SUSTAINABILITY FRAMEWORK
VISION
GOALS
STRATEGIES
DEVELOPMENT STRATEGY AND CONCEPT PLAN FOR CAPITAL REGION
81
6.1 REGIONAL GROWTH STRATEGY
6.1.1 CONCEPT DIRECTION
6.1.2 STRATEGIES FOR CAPITAL REGION CONCEPT PLAN
6.2 CAPITAL REGION CONCEPT PLAN
6.3 ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT STRATEGY FOR CAPITAL REGION
6.3.1 CONCEPT DEVELOPMENT
6.3.2 ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT STRATEGY
6.3.3 ECONOMIC CLUSTERS AND PRELIMINARY SECTORS
6.4 BROAD DEMOGRAPHIC PROJECTIONS
6.5 BROAD WORKFORCE PROJECTIONS
6.5.1 BROAD WORKFORCE PROJECTIONS
6.6 POPULATION DISTRIBUTION
6.7 KEY STRATEGIES AND CONCEPTS
6.7.1 TRANSPORT STRATEGIES
6.7.2 WATER SUPPLY
6.7.3 POWER GENERATION
6.8 ACTION PLANS
6.9 THE WAY FORWARD
83
83
84
86
88
88
89
90
91
92
92
92
94
94
98
100
101
103
APPENDIX
XIX
THE NEW CAPITAL REGION OF ANDHRA PRADESH I THE CAPITAL REGION PLAN REPORT
LIST OF FIGURES
FIG.2.1 PROPOSED TRANSPORT AND INFRASTRUCTURE PROJECTS IN INDIA
FIG.2.2 ANDHRA PRADESH POST BIFURCATION ADVANTAGE
FIG.2.3 CENTRALLY LOCATED CAPITAL REGION
FIG.2.4 ANDHRA PRADESH KEY TRANSPORT CONNECTIONS
FIG.2.5 CAPITAL REGION WITH MANDAL BOUNDARIES AND CAPITAL CITY BOUNDARY
FIG.2.6 CAPITAL REGION BOUNDARY WITHIN KRISHNA AND GUNTUR DISTRICT
FIG.2.7 PLANTATIONS AT THULLUR MANDAL
FIG.2.8 VGTM_ ZONAL DEVELOPMENT PLAN PROPOSED LAND USE PLAN FOR YEAR 2021.
FIG.2.9 CAPITAL REGION_ EXISTING LAND COVER
FIG.2.10 CAPITAL REGION_ EXISTING SETTLEMENT HIERARCHY
FIG.2.11 CAPITAL REGION_EXISTING WETLANDS, FORESTS AND BIO DIVERSITY
FIG.2.12 CAPITAL REGION_WATER RESOUCES
FIG.2.13 CAPITAL REGION_HERITAGE AND TOURISM
FIG.2.14 CAPITAL REGION_ENVIRONMENT CONSTRAINTS AND CHALLENGES
FIG.2.15 CAPITAL REGION_URBAN CONSTRAINTS AND CHALLENGES
FIG.2.16 CAPITAL REGION_ENVIRONMENTAL ASSETS AND OPPORTUNITIES
FIG.2.17 CAPITAL REGION_URBAN ASSETS AND OPPORTUNITIES
FIG.3.1 EXISTING ROADS IN THE CAPITAL REGION
FIG.3.2 NATIONAL ECONOMIC CORRIDOR THROUGH ANDHRA PRADESH
FIG.3.3 EXISTING RAIL NETWORK AND RAILWAYS IN CAPITAL REGION
FIG.3.4 TOTAL FREIGHT TRAFFIC MOVED BY RAIL INDIAN RAILWAYS, 2013
FIG.3.5 EXISTING AND PLANNED DFC
FIG.3.6 EXISTING AIRPORTS IN THE VICINITY OF THE CAPITAL REGION
FIG.3.7 NATIONAL WATERWAY AND AIR PORT WITHIN CAPITAL REGION
FIG.3.8 PORTS IN THE VICINITY OF THE CAPITAL REGION
FIG.3.9 BRTS IN VIJAYAWADA PHASE 1 THE MUNICIPAL CORPORATION OF VIJAYAWADA, 2014
FIG.3.10 MODAL SHARE IN CITIES OF DIFFERENT SIZES IN INDIA INTERNATIONAL TRANSPORT
FORUM, 2011
FIG.3.11 KRISHNA RIVER, ITS TRIBUTARIES AND CANAL SYSTEMS, AND WATER SUPPLY SOURCES
FIG.3.12 EXISTING SEWAGE TREATMENT PLANT LOCATIONS IN CAPITAL REGION
FIG.3.13 FLOOD MAP OF CAPITAL REGION
FIG.3.14 LOCATION OF KNOWN SOLD WASTE FACILITIES IN CAPITAL REGION
FIG.3.15 LOCATION OF THERMAL POWER PLANTS IN ANDHRA PRADESH AND TELANGANA
FIG.4.1 STRATEGIC LOCATION OF THE STATE
FIG.4.2 REGIONAL CONTEXT SHOWING KEY NATURAL RESOURCES, EXISTING INDUSTRIAL
ACTIVITIES & INDUSTRIAL CLUSTERS
FIG.4.3 AIRPORT, PORT & RAILWAY INFRASTRUCTURE
FIG.4.4 GUNTUR DISTRICT ECONOMY
FIG.4.5 GUNTUR DISTRICT DEMOGRAPHIC OVERVIEW
FIG.4.6 GUNTUR DISTRICT ECONOMIC COMPOSITION
FIG.4.7 GUNTUR DISTRICT EMPLOYEE DISTRIBUTION
FIG.4.8 GUNTUR SENIOR SECONDARY RESULTS
FIG.4.9 KRISHNA DISTRICT ECONOMIC COMPOSITION
FIG.4.10 KRISHNA DISTRICT ECONOMY
FIG.4.11 KRISHNA DISTRICT DEMOGRAPHIC OVERVIEW
FIG.4.12 KRISHNA DISTRICT EMPLOYEE DISTRIBUTION
FIG.4.13 DATA SOURCE
FIG.4.14 SPATIAL SPREAD OF CAPITAL REGION
6
7
8
8
9
9
10
11
12
13
16
18
20
22
23
24
25
29
30
31
31
32
33
34
35
36
37
40
41
42
43
44
48
49
50
51
51
51
51
52
52
52
52
53
53
53
FIG.4.15 KEY ECONOMIC ACTIVITY
FIG.4.16 KRISHNA DISTRICT SENIOR SECONDARY SCHOOL RESULTS
FIG.4.17 HAPPY SCHOOL STUDENTS AT CRICKET ACADEMY IN AMARAVATHI TOWNSHIP
FIG.4.18 VECTOR 1
FIG.4.19 VECTOR 2
FIG.4.20 REGIONAL ECONOMIC POSITIONING
FIG.4.21 POTENTIAL ECONOMIC DRIVERS FOR CAPITAL REGION
FIG.4.22 CRITICAL PARAMETER ANALYSED TO EVALUATE THE ECONOMIC PRIORITIZATION
FIG.4.23 DATA SOURCE
FIG.4.24 INDUSTRY INTERACTIONS BREAK UP
FIG.4.25 SAMPLE LIST OF INTERACTED INDUSTRIES
FIG.4.26 OPPORTUNITY ASSESSMENT FOR CAPITAL REGION FOOD & BEVERAGE
FIG.4.27 OPPORTUNITY ASSESSMENT FOR CAPITAL REGION TEXTILE
FIG.4.28 OPPORTUNITY ASSESSMENT FOR CAPITAL REGION NON METALLIC MINERALS
FIG.4.29 OPPORTUNITY ASSESSMENT FOR CAPITAL REGION AUTO AND AUTO COMPONENTS
FIG.4.30 OPPORTUNITY ASSESSMENT FOR CAPITAL REGION RUBBER AND PLASTICS INDUSTRY
FIG.4.31 OPPORTUNITY ASSESSMENT FOR CAPITAL REGION PHARMACEUTICAL INDUSTRY
FIG.4.32 OPPORTUNITY ASSESSMENT FOR CAPITAL REGION ELECTRONICS INDUSTRY
FIG.4.33 OPPORTUNITY ASSESSMENT FOR CAPITAL REGION BASIC AND FABRICATED METAL
INDUSTRY
FIG.4.34 OPPORTUNITY ASSESSMENT FOR CAPITAL REGION TOURISM
FIG.4.35 OPPORTUNITY ASSESSMENT FOR CAPITAL REGION AEROSPACE SECTOR
FIG.4.36 OPPORTUNITY ASSESSMENT FOR CAPITAL REGION IT/ITES INDUSTRY
FIG.4.37 OPPORTUNITY ASSESSMENT FOR CAPITAL REGION AQUACULTURE INDUSTRY
FIG.4.38 OPPORTUNITY ASSESSMENT FOR CAPITAL REGION LOGISTICS INDUSTRY
FIG.4.39 INDUSTRY OPPORTUNITY MATRIX
FIG.4.40 HYDERABAD URBAN AGGLOMERATION
FIG.4.41 HYDERABAD ECONOMIC POSITIONING
FIG.4.42 HYDERABAD EVOLUTION
FIG.4.43 CLUSTER BASED DEVELOPMENT HYDERABAD
FIG.4.44 INDUSTRY CLUSTERS
FIG.4.45 HYDERABAD ECONOMY
FIG.4.47 CLUSTER BASED DEVELOPMENT BENGALURU
FIG.4.46 ECONOMIC POSITIONING OF BENGALURU
FIG.4.51 INDUSTRY CLUSTERS
FIG.4.48 BENGALURU ECONOMY
FIG.4.49 BENGALURU EVOLUTION
FIG.4.50 BENGALURU ECONOMIC POSITIONING
FIG.5.1 URBAN SUSTAINABILITY FRAMEWORK
FIG.6.1 CAPITAL REGION _ RADIAL CORRIDOR GROWTH STRATEGY PLAN
FIG.6.2 CAPITAL REGION CONCEPT PLAN
FIG.6.3 DEVELOPMENT CORRIDORS OF CAPITAL REGION
FIG.6.4 ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT STRATEGY FOR CAPITAL REGION
FIG.6.5 ECONOMIC GROWTH FRAMEWORK
FIG.6.6 CAPITAL REGION_PRELIMINARY CLUSTERIZATION OF SECTORS
FIG.6.7 METHODOLOGY ADOPTED FOR WORKFORCE PROJECTIONS
FIG.6.8 CAPITAL REGION_PROJECTED POPULATION DISTRIBUTION _YEAR 2035
93
53
53
53
54
54
55
55
56
56
57
57
58
58
59
59
60
61
62
63
64
65
66
67
68
69
70
70
70
71
71
71
71
71
72
72
72
72
74
83
86
87
88
89
90
92
v
vi
FIG.6.9 CAPITAL REGION_PROJECTED POPULATION GROWTH
FIG.6.10 CAPITAL REGION_PROJECTED DENSITY
FIG.6.11 PROPOSED CONCEPT FOR REGIONAL TRANSPORT NETWORK
FIG.6.12 POTENTIAL NATIONAL WATERWAY TRANSPORT AND FREIGHT HUBS
FIG.6.13 PROPOSED HIGH SPEED RAIL AND DEDICATED FREIGHT CORRIDORS
FIG.6.14 PROPOSED CONCEPT FOR REGIONAL RAIL / PUBLIC TRANSPORT NETWORK
THE NEW CAPITAL REGION OF ANDHRA PRADESH I THE CAPITAL REGION PLAN REPORT
93
93
94
95
96
97
LIST OF TABLES
TABLE 2.1 CAPITAL REGION MANDALS IN GUNTUR AND KRISHNA DISTRICT
TABLE 2.2 EXISTING LAND COVER
TABLE 2.3 DEVELOPMENT DENSITY IN KEY CITIES/TOWNS
TABLE 3.1 EXISTING ROAD LENGTHS BY TYPE IN CAPITAL REGION
TABLE 3.2 STATUS OF FREIGHT CORRIDORS IN 2014
TABLE 3.3 EXISTING WATER WORKS IN CAPITAL REGION
TABLE 3.4 EXISTING SEWAGE TREATMENT PLANT CAPACITY IN CAPITAL REGION
TABLE 3.5 EXISTING POWER PLANT AND CAPACITY IN ANDHRA PRADESH
TABLE 4.1 DISTRICT TOURIST FLOW_2013
TABLE 6.1 CAPITAL REGION_PRELIMINARY CLUSTERIZATION OF SECTORS
TABLE 6.2 SUMMARY OF WORKFORCE PROJECTIONS FOR CAPITAL REGION
10
12
13
29
32
40
41
44
64
91
92
PREFACE
PÙʹ›‘ã Bƒ‘»¦ÙÊçė
Andhra Pradesh is building a new
Capital City following the bifurca on
of the state in February 2014. The new
city is located between Vijayawada
and Guntur and it is envisaged to be a
world class Capital City for the people
of Andhra Pradesh.
PÙʹ›‘ã S‘Ê֛ ƒÄ— CÊÃîÝÝ®ÊĮĦ
On 08 December 2014, the
governments of Singapore and Andhra
Pradesh signed a Memorandum of
Understanding to collaborate on the
master planning and development of
the new Andhra Pradesh Capital City.
The Memorandum of Understanding
was signed between the Infrastructure
Corpora on of Andhra Pradesh and
Interna onal Enterprise (IE) Singapore
and witnessed by Chief Minister of
Andhra Pradesh, Nara Chandrababu
Naidu and Singapore’s Second Minister
for Trade and Industry of Singapore, S.
Iswaran.
The Centre for Liveable Ci es and
Singapore Coopera on Enterprise
have also provided their exper se
and assistance in master planning and
development of Andhra Pradesh’s
ins tu onal capacity in urban
governance and related areas through
training programmes for AP officials
responsible for the development of the
Capital City.
Mangalagiri Town from Sri Panakala Narasimha Swamy Temple
Surbana Interna onal Consultants
and Jurong Consultants Pte Ltd were
appointed by the Singapore government
to undertake the master planning for
the Andhra Pradesh Capital City Project.
This project comprises of the following
milestones:
CƒÖ®ãƒ½ R›¦®ÊÄ P½ƒÄ
- To set the planning direc on and
strategies for the Capital Region of
Andhra Pradesh.
CƒÖ®ãƒ½ C®ãù MƒÝã›Ù P½ƒÄ
- To prepare a detailed Master plan for
the new Capital City of Andhra Pradesh.
S››— D›ò›½ÊÖÛÄã MƒÝã›Ù P½ƒÄ
- To prepare Urban Design and
development control guidelines for the
first sec on of the Capital City
CÊÃÖ½›ã®ÊÄ Ê¥ 㫛 F®ÙÝã M®½›ÝãÊě
The Capital Region Plan aims to
provide a regional master plan that
would provide a guide for the future
development of the Capital Region
Area and the new city.
The comple on of the Capital Region
Plan on 30 March 2015 marks the
achievement of the first milestone for
the Singapore-Andhra Pradesh Capital
City Project collabora on.
This document contains the Capital
Region Plan for Andhra Pradesh.
vii
viii
This page has been inten onally le blank
THE NEW CAPITAL REGION OF ANDHRA PRADESH I THE CAPITAL REGION PLAN REPORT
ACKNOWLEDGMENTS
ix
We would like to acknowledge and thank the following individuals and organiza ons for their invaluable insights
and contribu ons towards the prepara on of the “Capital Region Plan Report.”
Andhra Pradesh Government Officers
Giridhar Aramane, IAS, Principal Secretary to Government, Municipal Administra on &
Urban Development Department
Srikant Nagulapalli, IAS, Commissioner, Andhra Pradesh Capital Region Development
Authority, Vijayawada
Pothireddy Thimma Reddy, Director of Town & Country Planning
Dr. Pamu Panddu Runga Rao, Enginnering in Chief, Public Health
Avula Suresh, Addi onal Director, Town Planning
Local Body/ Police Officials within Capital Region
Ganeshan Veerapandian, IAS , Municipal Commissioner, Vijayawada
Dr. Sreedhar Cherukuri, I.A.S., Joint Collector, Guntur & incharge Municipal
Commissioner, Guntur
Prabhala Gopinadh, Municipal Commissioner, Tenali
A.B.Venkateswara Rao, IPS, Commissioner of Police, Vijayawada
P.H.D. Ramakrishna, IPS, Superintendent of Police, Guntur
Officials from CRDA
Ravi Ramakrishna Rao, Head Planning, CRDA
Veepanagandla Ramudu, Planner, CRDA
Rikkala Srinivasa Reddy, Divisional Forest Officer, AP CRDA, Vijayawada
G.A.Suryanarayana, P.S. to Commissioner, CRDA, Vijayawada
Gullapalli Nageswara Rao, Planning Officer, CRDA, Vijayawada
Bathula Sesha Srinivasa Rao, Execu ve Engineer, CRDA, Vijayawada
D. Mallikharjuna Rao, Administra ve Officer, CRDA, Vijayawada
Bandla Siva Sankar Prasad, I.F.S., Member Secretary, AP Pollu on Control Board, Hyderabad.
Dr.A. Nageswara Rao, Scien st-E, AP State Applica on Centre, Hyderabad
T. Narendra Babu, Scien st-E, AP State Applica on Centre, Hyderabad
Dr. G. Prasada Rao, Scien st-E, AP State Applica on Centre, Hyderabad
Dr. G. Kumaraswami, Team Leader, AP State Applica on Centre, Hyderabad
Dr. P. Eswaramma, Team Leader, AP State Applica on Centre, Hyderabad
A farmer si ng outside his neighbour’s house in Neerukonda Village.
x
This page has been inten onally le blank
THE NEW CAPITAL REGION OF ANDHRA PRADESH I THE CAPITAL REGION PLAN REPORT
xi
EXECUTIVE SUMMARY
xii
The new Andhra Pradesh state is envisioning to build a new Capital City, close to Vijayawada
and Guntur. Shri. N Chandrababu Naidu, the chief Minister of Andhra Pradesh and his officials
aspire to build a world class Capital City; the glowing pride for all the people of Andhra
Pradesh.
The development of the New Capital City will be on a green field site of approximately 212 sq
km located centrally within the Capital Region. The Capital Region comprises of 7,420 sq.km.
straddling on both sides of the Krishna River in both Krishna and Guntur Districts. The Capital
Region is well connected to the surrounding economic hubs by air , rail, road, and ports.
3.31 MI JOBS
11 MI POP
2035
THE VISION
‘PEOPLE’S CAPITAL OF ANDHRA PRADESH’
YEAR X BEYOND 2050
20 MI POP
2050
5.6 MI JOBS
13.5 MI POP
The opportuni es and the success of the new Capital City will indefinitely bring in tremendous
pressure on it’s developments and infrastructure in the long run. Hence, the Capital City
cannot func on in isola on. The proposed Industrial Corridor, Port development, Na onal
Waterway and other upcoming projects will change the dynamics of the en re State and the
Capital Region to a large extent.
Tapping onto these upcoming projects, building on the inherent strength of the exis ng ci es
and integra ng future poten al developments translates the vision into a ‘radial corridor
development’ structure for the Region
LEGEND
Capital Region _ Radial Corridor Growth Strategy Plan
THE NEW CAPITAL REGION OF ANDHRA PRADESH I THE CAPITAL REGION PLAN REPORT
To achieve the medium and long term vision for
Capital Region, a set of goals covering 6 cri cal
sectors of development is proposed. These key
goals will guide the physical planning for the
Region.
2
1
xiii
3
4
5
6
Jobs & Homes
World Class
Quality
Iden ty &
Efficient Resource
Clean &
for all
Infrastructure
Living
Heritage
Management
Green
www
w.ttheesin
ngapo
orep
pro
omisee.sgg
• Promote high-value added
agriculture and agro-based
industries
• Opportuni es to upgrade skills
• Knowledge based high-tech
industries
• Increase home ownership
• Provide sufficient affordable
housing to cater to the needful
• Slum free city; Industrial
phasing;
• Favourable Policy framework
www.taxisingapore.com
• State of art public transport
• High percentage of modal
share using public transport
• World class Interna onal
Airport
• Reserve transit corridors
• Highly efficient road network
• Na onal Waterway for trade
• High Speed Railway
• Easy transfer between different
modes of transport
pixshark.com
• Flood control techniques
• “Reduce, Recycle and Reuse”
• Waste
management
and
disposal systems
• Smart grid
• Renewable energy
• U lize flood management
methods also for recrea on
• Green cer fica on of projects
• Awareness
on
efficient
resource management
en.wikipedia.org
• Network of parks and greens
by integra ng the village ponds
• Access to park for every ci zen
within easy walking distance
• Produc ve use of natural
features on the site without
damaging them
• Waterfront along Krishna river
for public use
• Mandatory reserved Green
• Reserve high value agriculture
land
• City si ng within the water
and greens
www.smtwastebrokers.com.au
• Public transit within walking
distance
• Neighbourhood
center
ameni es
• Universal access for all ages
• Health care facili es at
affordable costs
• Live, Work, Learn and Play
• Ease of commute within
30 minutes from origin to
des na on
www.panoramio.com
• Preserve historic and culturally
important sites
• Promote culture and heritage
for locals and tourism
• Establish a unique iden ty
• Integrate the exis ng villages
• Strategic loca ons to come
together and organize cultural
ac vi es
• Tourism circuit linking heritage
features and new nodes
xiv
Using the Concept Direc on and
the key development strategies, the
Proposed Capital Region Concept Plan
is as follows:
A M›¦ƒ C®ãù ƒÄ— ‘›Äãك½ Ö½ƒÄĮĦ
ƒÙ›ƒ
The New Capital City and Vijayawada
will grow as twin ci es in the future
due to their close proximity. The
diverse economy of the two ci es will
compliment each other and ul mately
emerge as a Mega City
D›ò›½ÊÖÛÄã Ê¥ R›¦®Êă½ ‘›Äã›ÙÝ
Seven exis ng Urban centres within a
radius of 30-45kms from the Capital City
are iden fied as second- er commercial
centres a er the main central business
district. These Regional Centres will
decentralize the func ons and services
of the Capital City , helping to alleviate
conges on there and to bring the
workplace closer to peoples’ homes.
High Speed Rail and Waterway 4 are
integrated in the Regional Structure
Plan.
ÖÙÊ㛑㛗 ƒ¦Ù®‘ç½ãçك½ þÊěÝ
In-order to protect the prime fer le
lands and to build on the agro based
economy of the region; certain zones
are iden fied as protected agricultural
zones. These zones only allow a limited
range of other uses that will not
facilitate urbaniza on.
CÊÄݛÙòƒã®ÊÄ Ê¥ Nƒãçك½ AٛƒÝ ƒÄ—
«›Ù®ãƒ¦›
The Region’s rich heritage and
environmentally sensi ve areas are
earmarked as conserva on areas.
LEGEND
D›ò›½ÊÖÛÄã CÊÙÙ®—ÊÙÝ
Development Corridors connect the
Capital City and the Regional Centres.
The development Corridors provide
opportunity for linear developments
with Special Use Developments such
as clean industries, Infrastructure
projects, logis cs based ac vi es are
allowed along these corridors.
B›ãã›Ù R›¦®Êă½ CÊÄě‘ã®ò®ãù
A radial network with well spaced
highways, Expressways and Transport
Corridors cater to smooth city travel
and fast connec ons within the Capital
Region. The upcoming na onal Projects
i.e. . Dedicated Freight Corridor
along East Coast Economic Corridor,
THE NEW CAPITAL REGION OF ANDHRA PRADESH I THE CAPITAL REGION PLAN REPORT
Capital Region Concept Plan
1
Young devotees at Sri Panakala Narasimha Swamy Temple, Mangalagiri.
INTRODUCTION
1.1 PROJECT ORGANIZA
TION & SCHEDULE
2
Surbana & Jurong together form the
Project Management Team (PMT). The
project is spread over 6 months under
3 stages and 7 Ac vi es.
Repor ng of ac vi es such as site
visits, kick-off seminar , Deliverables
and meline, Finalized project tasks &
scope with schedule of trainings and
Site Visits.
• Stage 1: Dra Capital Region Plan
Report. (Progress Report)
Stage 1 : Capital Region Plan :
• Ac vity 1: Data Inventory, Analysis
and Incep on
• Ac vity 2: Regional Context analysis,
Economic posi oning and SocioDemographic Study
• Ac vity 3: Visioning, Programming
and Structure Plan
Stage 2: Capital City Master Plan:
• Ac vity
4:
Concept
Master
Plan, Transporta on Plan and
Infrastructure Plan
• Ac vity 5: Zoning Plan for new
Capital City.
Stage 3: Seed Development Master
Plan:
• Ac vity 6: Urban Design Proposal for
Seed Development
• Ac vity 7: Development Guidelines
for Seed Development
1.2 PROJECT
BLES
DELIVERA
The deliverables for each stage are
• Stage 2: Dra Capital City Master Plan
and Zoning Plan Report (Progress
Report)
• Stage 3: Seed Development Master
Plan Report (Final Report)
1.3 BACKGROUND
PURPOSE
AND
Having completed the data collec on,
site visit, incep on seminar and
training for the Andhra Pradesh officials
as part of Stage 1: Capital Region Plan,
the Project Management Team has duly
completed the analysis of the data and
developed a vision for the project. The
analysis and vision forms the basis of
this report and marks the end of Stage
1 of the project.
Presented below is the list of progress
and final reports due for this project:
1. Incep on Report (submi ed)
2. Dra Stage 1 Report (current report)
3. Dra Stage 2 Report
4. Stage 3 Report (Final Report including
updates from Stage 1 and 2)
Stage 1: Incep on report
The key components of the report
are Inventory of the Data collected,
THE NEW CAPITAL REGION OF ANDHRA PRADESH I THE CAPITAL REGION PLAN REPORT
1.4 METHODOLOGY
1.4.1 D
C
Surbana and Jurong teams collected
the necessary data from the Andhra
Pradesh agencies during the period
of December 2014 and January 2015.
Using this data the teams filtered
out specific relevant data that can
be applied in the development of the
Capital Region Plan. The data was
received in several formats including
GIS, Autocad, Excel sheets and hard
copy reports.
1.4.2 S
V
In January 2015, Surbana and Jurong
teams undertook a 2 day elaborate site
visit to get a first hand feel of the site and
surroundings. The team also interacted
with local people to understand their
concerns and issues to be considered
during the forma on of the master
plan. All this informa on was u lized in
the site analysis and forma on of the
plans as explained below.
1.4.3 M
O
Several mee ngs were held during the
team’s stay in Hyderabad that included
CRDA officials and Dr. P. Narayana,
Minister of Municipal Administra on
& Urban Development, Urban Water
Supply and Urban Planning for Andhra
Pradesh. The team from SIngapore
included officials from
Surbana
Interna onal Consultants Pte Ltd
(Surbana), JURONG Consultants Pte Ltd
(Jurong), Centre for Livable Ci es (CLC),
Ministry of Trade and Industry (MTI),
Singapore Coopera on Enterprise (SCE)
and Interna onal Enterprise (IE).
1.4.4 T
W
A delega on of 23 Andhra Pradesh
officials a ended the APLUGP (Andhra
Pradesh Leaders in Urban Governance
Programme) organized by CLC in
Singapore from 19th to 24th January.
Surbana and Jurong teams were ac vely
involved throughout this workshop.
Surbana and Jurong presented and
discussed the progress of the Master
Plan with the delega on members
to get their insights and views on the
ideas being considered.
1.4.5 D
A
Parallel to this, planners from
Surbana and Jurong were analyzing
the relevant data received from the
Andhra Pradesh agencies. The analysis
included understanding of physical
site features such as hills, rivers,
canals, forests, drains, etc., along
with an understanding of the sociodemographic and economic profile of
the Capital Region.
1.4.6 U
F
S
(USF)
Establishing the USF is the most cri cal
step preceding the Vision as this guides
the Goals and Strategies. It lays out the
Key Performance Indicators to address
the social, economic and environmental
issues specific to the focus area.
1.4.7 V
F
Using the understanding of all of the
above, combined with the feedback
from the Andhra Pradesh officials
during the APLUGP, the planners from
Surbana and Jurong calibrated the
appropriate Vision and strategies for
development for both the Capital
Region and the Capital City.
1.4.8 R
S
P
A er having understood the poten al
opportuni es and constraints within
the Capital Region, Surbana and Jurong
developed a Regional Structure Plan for
the Capital Region. This plan lays out a
strategy for future growth within the
Capital Region that will compliment the
Capital City development in the short
and long term.
1.5 ORGANIZATION OF THE
REPORT
In addi on to this introductory chapter,
the report consists of the following
chapters:
Chapter 2: Regional Context Analysis
This chapter broadly reviews the
exis ng context of the Capital Region
at a Na onal and State Level. It
determines Capital Region’s role
with respect to it’s central loca on
in Andhra Pradesh and integra on
with upcoming Na onal Projects. It
analyzes the exis ng assets and issues
as well as the physical constraints and
opportuni es within Capital Region.
The key sectors undertaken for this
analysis are popula on and density,
land cover, tourism , heritage and
environment, This sec on also presents
an overview of past planning ini a ves
and an analysis of exis ng land use.
Chapter 3: Exis ng Transport and
Infrastructure Analysis.
This chapter consists of two parts.
Broad Transport analysis for the Capital
Region includes road, rail , water and
air network. Broad Infrastructure
analysis will cover water supply, waste
and storm water management system,
power supply, and waste disposal.
Chapter 4: Dimensions of Growth
3
This chapter summarizes the key
findings of the exis ng regional
socioeconomic analysis. The Capital City
and Region are benchmarked with other
Indian Capital Ci es to analyse growth
trajectory, key growth drivers and the
consequent impact on popula on and
expansion of the metropolitan region/
urban agglomera on. Based on the
above Economic Development Strategy
for Capital region broad demographic
Projec ons are developed.
Chapter. 5: Development Vision
This chapter presents the sustainability
framework proposed for the Capital
Region based on it’s economic, social
and environmental issues. Sustainability
targets and KPI’s are then set to enable
it’s sustainability in the long run.
Chapter 6: Development Strategy and
Concept Plan for the Capital Region
This chapter presents the specific
strategies to achieve the proposed goals
explained in the preceding chapter.
The strategies are further translated
into a Structure Plan demonstra ng
the development of growth areas and
focus sectors.
4
This page has been inten onally le blank
THE NEW CAPITAL REGION OF ANDHRA PRADESH I THE CAPITAL REGION PLAN REPORT
2
5
REGIONAL CONTEXT ANALYSIS
This chapter broadly reviews the regional context of Andhra Pradesh. Capital Region’s
loca on at the heart of Andhra Pradesh and proximity with the nearby big ci es; se ng the
Capital Region’s intrinsic role as the new Gateway of East India and also as an access to the
Mekong Region. Air, Rail, Road and water connec vity of the Capital region with the nearest
landlocked ci es; give Capital Region the key advantage with trade poten al. To be a key
player in the region, improvements to infrastructure will help Capital Region to realize its
highest poten al. A study of the ac vi es around the Region reveals the opportunity for the
Capital Region to be a central node in the region.
This chapter covers the following topics broadly:
1 Upcoming Na onal Projects
2 Regional Advantage Post Bifurca on
3 Regional Connec vity
4 Analysis with respect to landcover, key ci es, environment and heritage
5 Constraints and Opportuni es
Workers loading bananas from the fields
2.1 NATIONAL CONTEXT
6
2.1.1 UPCOMING NA
TIONAL PROJECTS
›ƒÝ㠑ʃÝ㠛‘ÊÄÊî‘ ‘ÊÙÙ®—ÊÙ
The Government of India is developing
Industrial Corridors across India as
global manufacturing and investment
des na ons. These corridors are
expected to drive the manufacturing
growth in India within the next decade.
These economic/Industrial corridors
will result in new manufacturing ci es,
logis c hubs and residen al townships
with dedicated freight corridors.
The proposed East Coast Economic
Corridor runs along the coast of Andhra
Pradesh (along NH5); and through
the proposed Capital City Region.
This corridor not just connects indian
economic clusters but also helps unlock
the poten al of Mekong countries by
removing constraints and bo lenecks to
growth. Currently Asian Development
Bank (ADB) is carrying out analy cal
work on this corridor. The first phase
is envisioned from Visakhapatnam to
Chennai. Many smart Industrial ci es
and Investment Regions are in pipeline
in this region.
Fig.2.1 illustrates the Proposed Na oanl
Projects that impact the development
in the Capital Region Area.
—›—®‘ƒã›— ¥Ù›®¦«ã ‘ÊÙÙ®—ÊÙ
Dedicated Freight Corridor Corpora on
of India Ltd. (DFCCIL) has plans for a
dedicated Freight Corridor along the
East Coast Economic Corridor which is
expected to be func onal by the end
of the decade. The large agricultural
produce and the many ports along the
coastline; will facilitate in posi oning
Andhra Pradesh as the gateway for
Inland transac ons.
«®¦« Ý֛›— ك®½
High Speed Rail Corpora on of
India (HSRC) has plans to support
the golden quadrilateral corridors
with the proposed project ‘Diamond
Quadrilateral of high speed rail
network’. The speeds for these trains
is 300-350 km/hour; and connects the
four key ci es - Delhi, Mumbai, Chennai
and Kolkata.
The
Kolkata
Chennai
network
passes through the Capital Region.
This reinforces faster and quicker
connec ons to key ci es in the country.
Nƒã®Êă½ óƒã›ÙóƒùÝ
The Indland Waterways Authority of
India has proposals for development
and regula on of Inland Waterways
for shipping and naviga on. Na onal
waterway 4 with a length of 1095km is
currently under development.
This inland waterway plays a crucial role
in transpor ng the agricultural produce,
fer lizers, mber and paper products
from Guntur and Krishna Districts to
the ci es along the Waterway from
Kakinada in the north to Chennai and
Pondicherry in the South.
THE NEW CAPITAL REGION OF ANDHRA PRADESH I THE CAPITAL REGION PLAN REPORT
Fig.2.1 Proposed Transport and Infrastructure projects in India, Source - DFCCIL, HSRC,
2.2 ANDHRA
PRADESH
STATE
2.2.1 BIFURCATION
•
Post bifurca on of erstwhile United
Andhra Pradesh into Telangana and
Andhra Pradesh; the challenge for
Andhra Pradesh is to create a new
capital in ten years me. Not just a
capital city, the new state will now
have to maximise it’s poten al to
establish itself as a ‘growth centre’.
For this to happen Andhra Pradesh
will need to relook at it’s policies and
zones earmarked for crea ng industrial
and IT clusters to let these enterprises
flourish.
•
2.2.2 This sec on gives a very brief snapshot
of the the economic and infrastructure
advantage Andhra Pradesh has over
Telangana Region. Detailed Economic
and Infrastructure studies are explained
in the following chapters. A few key
advantages1 for Andhra Pradesh are as
highlighted in Fig.2.2 and listed below.
• The state has well distributed and
established economic generators
func oning as Regional hubs. The
three key hubs are Visakhapatnam,
Vijayawada and Tirupa .
• It is a leading Agricultural State;
also known as the ‘Rice bowl of
Fig.2.2 Andhra Pradesh - Post bifurca on Advantage
•
1
Source - India Brand Equity
Founda on Aug 2014; Andhra Pradesh
Sta s cal Abstract-May 2014
•
•
India’ supported by major irriga on
projects.
It is home to various global and
na onal Pharmaceu cal companies.
The state has huge oil and natural
gas reserves.
It is a leading exporter of marine
Products, Agri and Processed Foods
The state government is planning
to set up Informa on Technology
Investment Regions (ITIR) in
Visakhapatnam, Anantapur and
Chi oor districts.
It has emerged as a Tex le processing
centre in the recent years.
• The state is in the process of se ng
up two Na onal Investment and
Manufacturing Zones in Chi oor and
Prakasam districts. The upcoming
PCPIR in the region is expected to
boost refining, petrochemicals and
chemical industries.
• The state is planning smart ci es
development
and
suppor ng
this ini a ve with University and
Ins tu on development.
• Religious places and a long 973 km
coastline makes Andhra Pradesh an
ideal place as a holiday des na on.
• Today,
Andhra
Pradesh
has
infrastructure surplus with state-ofthe-art seaports at Krishnapatnam,
Kakinada and Visakhapatnam, four
airports at Tirupa , Vijayawada,
Rajahmundry and Visakhapatnam;
and well distributed Industrial Parks.
7
2.2.3 8
½Ê‘ƒã®ÊÄ
‘ÊÄě‘ã®ò®ãù
India’s key economy genera ng ci es
namely Chennai, Bangalore, Hyderabad,
Visakhapatnam and Jagdalpur all lie
within a radius of 300-400 km. Proximity
and new opportuni es offered with
regard to the new capital city will a ract
skilled and talented human resources
from these ci es.
With respect to connec vity the new
Capital Region is very well connected
through rail, road and air to key
economic powerhouses in the region.
Andhra Pradesh has a long coastline
with two of the country’s biggest ports
Visakhapatnam and Chennai (Tamil
Nadu) located in the northern end
and southern end respec vely. The
Capital Region with it’s new port at
Machilipatnam lies right in the centre
of the state. Machilipatnam port has a
great poten al for inland trade centre for
hinterland ci es including Hyderabad.
Not just in the region, the Capital Region
lies centrally along the whole of the
eastern coast; opening room to establish
G
’
itself as the new ‘E
I
.
The Capital Region is served by
Gannavaram Domes c Airport. There
are plans to upgrade Gannavaram
to Interna onal Airport. There are 4
Interna onal Airports in the nearby
periphery and the nearest one is
Hyderabad Interna onal Airport.
Andhra Pradesh currently has one
major Port at Visakhapatnam . Other
than Visakhapatnam, the state has five
more opera onal ports, seven ports
are under development and three are
proposed to be developed. With three
ports under development near Capital
region, many jobs open up in the
region.
NH 5, NH7, NH18 and NH9 run across
the state and connect it to other key
ci es in the country. A direct connec on
with Bangalore city could however
boost the region’s trade further. The
alignment of the proposed East Coast
Economic corridor is s ll under study.
The state is well connected through
the rail network connec ng all thirteen
districts. The government also has
planned to set up a high speed train
between Hyderabad and the new
capital city to ease traffic movement
between the two states.
Fig.2.3 Centrally located Capital Region
THE NEW CAPITAL REGION OF ANDHRA PRADESH I THE CAPITAL REGION PLAN REPORT
Fig.2.4 Andhra Pradesh - Key Transport Connec ons
2.3 CAPITAL REGION
2.3.1 CRDA ACT
The Andhra Pradesh Capital Region
Development Authority Act (CRDA),
2014 has come into force on 30
December, 2014. The Act declares
the provision of New Capital Area
for the state of Andhra Pradesh and
establishment of a development
authority for the purpose of Planning,
coordina on, execu on, supervision,
financing, funding and for promo ng
and securing the planned development
of the Capital Region. It further
LEGEND
undertakes the construc on of the
new capital region development
area,undertaking the construc on of
the new capital and managing and
supervising urban services in the new
capital.
2.3.2 CAPITAL REGION
The Capital Region Area is erstwhile
VGTM
(Vijayawada-Guntur-TenaliMangalagiri)
plus
se lements
approximately within 50km radius The
Capital Region encompasses a total
area of 7,420 sq km and is spread
almost equally in both Krishna and
Guntur districts. It covers 18 mandals
fully and 11 mandals par ally in Guntur
district. While, in Krishna district it
covers 15 mandals fully and 14 mandals
par ally.
Table 2.1 illustrates the Mandal
boundaries in the Capital Region.
Fig.2.5 Capital Region with Mandal Boundaries and Capital City Boundary
Fig.2.6 Capital Region Boundary within Krishna and Guntur District
9
2.3.3 CAPITAL CITY
Table 2.1 Capital Region Mandals in Guntur and Krishna District (Source - GIS Database from CRDA)
10
CƒÖ®ãƒ½ R›¦®ÊÄ MƒÄ—ƒ½Ý-GçÄãçÙ —®ÝãÙ®‘ã
SN . M
S
.
20
P
P
137
9
G
.
21
P
P
111
10
I
P
213
11
K
2
F
41
F
173
1
A
F
213
22
S
2
A
F
125
23
T
F
79
12
K
F
108
3
A
175
24
T
F
193
13
M
F
39
4
B
5
C
6
D
7
E
8
G
9
P
P
P
187
38
25
T
F
127
14
M
F
134
26
T
F
181
15
M
F
132
27
T
F
105
16
N
F
163
176
28
V
F
118
17
N
F
67
F
190
29
V
F
103
18
N
K
F
120
19
P
10
K
F
117
20
11
K
.
12
M
F
134
1
A
F
13
M
F
134
2
B
F
14
M
P
49
3
C
15
N
P
61
4
C
16
P
F
110
5
G.K
17
P
F
140
6
G
18
P
P
28
7
G
19
P
P
123
8
G
P
P
99
72
P
107
P
210
P
100
P
P
123
21
P
P
95
224
22
P
P
79
200
23
P
F
14
P
67
24
T
F
115
P
225
25
U
F
147
F
263
26
V
F
201
F
207
27
V
(
)
F
151
83
28
V
(
)
F
57
78
29
V
F
83
CƒÖ®ãƒ½ R›¦®ÊÄ MƒÄ—ƒ½Ý-Kٮݫ㠗®ÝãÙ®‘ã
SN . M
THE NEW CAPITAL REGION OF ANDHRA PRADESH I THE CAPITAL REGION PLAN REPORT
2
P
S
P
F
.
2
The loca on chosen for the Capital City
is 12 km away from Vijayawada and
20 km from Guntur. It falls in Thullur,
Mangalagiri, Tadepalli mandals of
Guntur District; Ibrahimpatnam and
Vijayawada Rural mandals of Krishna
District; with an area of 212 sq.km.
approximately.
Ini ally the Capital City boundary
was limited to Guntur District. The
planning team analysed the earlier
chosen site and suggested considering
development on both sides of Krishna
River for a comprehensive riverfront
development strategy. This allows
for controlled development in the
waterfront villages in Krishna District;
that face the new Business District and
waterfront Capitol Complex located
right across the river.
Please refer to Fig.2.5 for Capital City
loca on within Capital Region.
Fig.2.7 Planta ons at Thullur Mandal
2.3.4 DEVELOPMENT HISTORY
The Government of Andhra Pradesh
cons tuted
the
VGTM
Urban
Development Authority in 1978 under
A.P. Urban Areas (Devt.) Act of 1975 for
a development Area of 1665 sq.kms.
This development area cons ted
the four fast growing urban areas
of Vijayawada, Guntur, Tenali and
Mangalagiri and 150 villages around
these towns falling in both Krishna and
Guntur Districts.
The boundary was later extended to
1955 sq.kms. in the year 1988 due
to rapid urbaniza on. The expanded
development area then cons tuted 30
lakh popula on; extending in 39 more
Villages. A masterplan was prepared as
an outline development plan.
ZÊă½ D›ò›½ÊÖÛÄã P½ƒÄÝ
LAND COVER DISTRIBUTION IN VGTM BOUNDARY
In 2006, Andhra Pradesh Government
prepared Zonal Development Plans
for the en re VGTM area of 1954.61
sq.km. The plans came into opera on
in 2007.
The
Zonal
Development
Plans
cons tute the proposed Land Use
Plans and Zoning Regula ons for all
zones; based on projec ons for the
year 2021. The main aspects taken
into considera on are demographic,
economic and Environmental profile,
Land Use Pa ern, Economic and
Social Infrastructure,
traffic and
transporta on, Urban Governance,
Municipal Finance, Heritage and
Fig.2.8 VGTM_ Zonal Development Plan- Proposed Land Use Plan for Year 2021. Source - VGTM Zonal Development Plans
Tourism and sectorwise issues and
solu ons.
11
1
Vision for the Key Urban Centres is as
follows:
Vision for Vijayawada City
‘A na onal level transport node; Sub
na onal commercial and service center;
Tourism and cultural heritage center;
An educa onal, professional and
knowledge hub - as a Knowledge city’
Vision for Guntur City
‘Vision I - Interna onal Trade and
Commerce and industrial hub; and
center of educa onal ins tutes of
world order, and providing good living
environment to its surrounding areas’
‘Vision II - Guntur as regional service
Centre for neighbouring towns and
villages by providing world class
infrastructure and maintaining clean
environment’
Vision for Mangalagiri Town
‘Growth point with small and medium
scale secondary sectors in regional raw
materials while conserving the heritage
and historical value unique to the town’
The proposals from the Zonal
Development Plans are integrated
in the Capital Regioan Strategy Plan.
However, with the development of
the Capital City within the VGTM
boundary; these proposals need to
be reconsidered to accommodate the
new developments, infrastructure and
the excess popula on migra on from
surrounding regions.
1
Zonal Development Plans, VGTM
UDA- 2007
2.3.5 EXISTING SITE CONTEXT
12
›ø®Ýã®Ä¦ ½ƒÄ— ‘Êò›Ù
When comparing the proposed Land
Use Plan for VGTM for 2021 against
the exis ng Land Use Plan of 2014 to
see the extent of achievement of the
former plan, it is observed that the
Urbaniza on outside Vijayawada and
Guntur has not taken place, while
density within the ci es con nued to
go up at a fast rate1.
• Only 7% of the Capital Region area
is classified under forest and water
bodies. Most of the forest cover is
over the Kondaveedu, Kondapalli,
1
Zonal Development Plans, VGTM
UDA- 2007
Table 2.2 Exis ng Land Cover
Ko uru and other small hills.
The forest cover near the urban
Areas is deple ng rapidly due to
encroachments.
• A sizable 81% of the land is under
agricultural use,
which offers
tremendous opportuni es for high
value agro based economy.
• The region has some Industrial Base
but mostly in the primary sector. It
is sca ered near Ibrahimpatnam,
Vijayawada, Guntur. Quarrying
ac vi es are found near Kondapalli
and Kondaveedu Forest.
• Most of the Capital Region land
in Krishna District is occupied by
hills , forests and prime agriculture
land (more than two seasons) that
needs to be protected. This directs
urbaniza on and future expansion
towards Guntur District.
S.NÊ. LƒÄ— Uݛ LƒÄ— CÊò›Ù
1 Agriculture -Aquaculture,Crop Land, Fallow and
Aٛƒ (Hƒ)
599,397
%
80.91
4,932
45,739
30,747
0.67
6.17
4.15
10,746
49,153
78
740,792
1.45
6.64
0.01
100.00
Planta on
2
3
4
5
6
7
Built Up _Industrial and Mining
Built Up_ Rural and Urban
Forest _Deciduous,Forest Planta on, Scrub Forest
and Tree Clad area
Wasteland_Barren and Scrubland
Water bodies-Canal/Drain/Reservoir/Tanks
Wetlands-Inland Natural
Total
LEGEND
Fig.2.9 Capital Region_ Exis ng Land Cover Source - GIS Database_CRDA
THE NEW CAPITAL REGION OF ANDHRA PRADESH I THE CAPITAL REGION PLAN REPORT
2.3.6 As per URDPFI guidelines the exis ng
hierarchy of se lements within Capital
region is as follows• 1 Metropolitan – Vijayawada
• 1 Large City – Guntur
• 9 Medium Towns - Tenali, Gudivada,
Mangalagiri, Gollapudi, Tadepalli,
Ponnur,
Nuzvid,
Sa enapalle,
Kannuru
• 291 Small Towns and Villages
Fig.2.10 illustrates the development
trend in the Capital Region. The
following are some key observa ons:
• With a large industrial and
Commercial base, the popula on
of Vijayawada City has increased
rapidly. This popula on is absorbed
by the neighbouring suburbs like
Gollapudi and Tadepalli which have
grown into medium sized towns.
• Areas near Guntur City have also
grown into Small towns.
• A higher percentage of se lements
especially medium sized towns like
Gudivada, Tenali and Ponnur are
located in the Delta Region.
• The Capital Region clearly shows
linear development along the
transport corrdiors with key nodes.
• The gross density of the capital
Region is 735 p/sq.km. However the
gross urban density for Vijayawada
is around 18,000 p/sq.km. which
is above the desirable norm.
Vijayawada ‘s urban agglomera on
already reached it’s projected
popula on of 16.4 lakh by the year
2021 in just 7 years (Year 2014) .
Such density, if compared with other
highly populated Asian ci es such
as Seoul and Singapore, stands out
excep onally. To slow down the
seemingly unstoppable densifica on
of the urban area due to the imminent
popula on increase, alterna ve
decentraliza on strategies will have
to be explored and enforced.
Table 2.3 Development Density in Key Ci es/Towns Source - Census 2011
City/Town
Vijayawada (Urban)
Area
56.70
Popula on
1,048,240
density (p/sq.km.)
18,908
Guntur
45.71
651,382
11,201
Tenali
Mangalagiri
15.11
10.49
164,649
0.087
10,258
8,294
LEGEND
Fig.2.10 Capital Region_ Exis ng Se lement Hierarchy
Source - GIS Database_CRDA
13
2.4 KEY CITIES, TOWNS AND VILLAGES IN CAPITAL REGION
14
Prakasam Barrage at Vijayawada
Chili Yard at Guntur
College at Tenali
Mangalagiri temple
V®¹ƒùƒóƒ—ƒ is the largest city in the Capital Region;
It is a Commercial and a trading hub, Tourist
Des na on, Transport Node and an Educa on
Hub. The popula on has increased by 3 mes in
the last three decades partly due to the rise in
migrant popula on from rural areas.
GçÄãçÙ is the second largest city in the region. It
serves as a marke ng centre for chillies, tobacco
and co on and an important educa onal centre.
The City is also popular for its processing industries
for rice pulses and oil seeds. Tourism and industrial
estates are other major economy.
T›Äƒ½® is the third largest city; important
commercial and Transport Centre in the region.
Marke ng Centre for agricultural products from
its rich agricultural hinterland; export Centre for
paddy and rice and is popular for its Mills, dairy
and processing factories.
MƒÄ¦ƒ½ƒ¦®Ù® is an important pilgrimage
centre, popular for handloom weaving units and
agriculture. The town is strategically located
between the three biggest ci es in the region.
Popula on expected to be 0.22 mi from the current
0.1 mi by the year 2021.
Undavalli caves at Tadepalle
Island Centre at Ponnur
Tƒ—›Öƒ½½› is a leading supplier of vegetables, fruits
and farm products to Vijayawada. Three villages Undavalli, Penumaka and Kolanakonda are famous
for historical importance. Development pressure
leading to many development layouts both
approved and unapproved; loss of river bank.
PÊÄÄçÙ town is the headquarters of Ponnur
mandal, situated on Guntur-Chirala State Highway.
The town is famous for Sri Sakshi Bhavanarayana
Swamy Temple and Sri Sahasralingeswara Swamy
Temple. Thousands of people arrive to watch the
annual fes val at Sri Sakshi Bhavanarayana Swamy
Temple.
NTR Stadium at Gudivada
G痮򃗃, also called the temple town is the
mandal headquarters with more than 100,000
inhabitants. It lies as a junc on for Vijayawada,
Machilipatnam, Nuzvid and Eluru. Gudivada is
popular for its Buddhist Stupas, jain Relics and
Hindu Temple. The town has fer le agricultural
lands for paddy cul va on.
Sri Ayyapaswamy temple at Gollapudi
Gʽ½ƒÖ痮 is perceived as the gateway of Vijayawada
city due to its close proximity. It is located along
NH5 with Industrial base at Rayanapadu. Great
Poten al to absorb demographic and economic
pressures of Vijayawada city.
THE NEW CAPITAL REGION OF ANDHRA PRADESH I THE CAPITAL REGION PLAN REPORT
15
Mangoes being loaded into rakes at Nuzvid railway sta on
ZP High School at Sa enapalle
Vishwa shan Public School at Vuyyuru
Agricultural Fields near Nandigama
Nçþò®— is historic fort City; It is well known for
its mangoes, which are exported world wide.
Agriculture is the main economy of the area.
With respect to industries, few seasonal mango
pulp canning factories are located here. It is an
Educa onal Centre for the neighbouring areas
with many Public Schools and IIIT Campus.
Sƒãã›ÄƒÖƒ½½› is a town 35km away from Guntur. It
is slowly developing as a business hub. Two mini
Hydel power projects and a mini thermal power
plant are being set up in the area. There are many
schools and colleges in this town.
VçùùçÙç town has very fer le lands and the
economy is majorly agriculture based. It is served
by good irriga on system. KCP sugar factory is
considered the country’s biggest and best; is
located here. The town is known for its educa onal
ins tutes and temples.
NƒÄ—®¦ƒÃƒ is 48 km north of Vijayawada; is
famous for the temples which had a great history
for years. The river Muneru flows in the outer part
of the village with agriculture fields around it.
Many IT professionals come from this town.
Kondapalli Toys made out of wood from Kondapalli Forest
Vijayawada Thermal Power Sta on at Ibrahimpatnam
Domes c Airport at Gannavaram
World famous Buddhist Stupa at Amaravathi
KÊė›Öƒ½½®- located 20kms from Vijayawada, is a
popular tourist des na on for its reserve forest,
fort and toys. It is also the heavy Industries suburb
of Vijayawada with bo ling , oil storage and power
plants. BG railway line caters to both passenger
and goods transporta on.
IÙƒ«®Ãփãăà town is 17 kms away from
Vijayawada City. The town is popular for its Dr
Narla Tata Rao Thermal Power Sta on, Railway
Wagon Workshop at Rayanapadu (4km away). The
town has educa onal ins tu ons and residen al
quarters for employees of the power plant.
At GƒÄăòƒÙƒÃ, an world war II Army airfield
was converted into civilian airport in 2003; rapid
sporadic growth took place since 2011 a er the
airport services expanded. Tremendous pressure
with the new airport expansion to interna onal
status.
AÃكòƒã«® is historic town with great touris c
significance; from being a capital city in the past
to its temples, buddhist Stupas, Ancient Art
and Amaravathi School. The town is a center of
pilgrimage to both Hindus and Buddhists, a racts
visitors throughout the year.
16
2.4.1 ENVIRONMENT
¥ÊٛÝãÙù ƒÄ— ®Ê—®ò›ÙÝ®ãù
Capital region is bound by a number of
natural features mainly the Krishna river
and its rivulets, Kondapalle, Ko uru,
Mangalagiri and Tadepalle Reserve
Forest and hills.
Most of the hills are primarily reserved
Forest areas spread in Nandigama,
Vijayawada, Nuzvid , Gannavaram and
Yedlapadu. The region has a forest
cover of around 30,500 hectares.The
world famous Kondapalli toys are
manufactured from a light wood called
‘Ponuku’ found in Kondapalli hills.
Prominant trees in these forests are
pterocarpus, Terminalia, Anogeissus
and Logustroeinai and Casuarina.
Kondapalli Forest is also famous for
its medicinal plants used by the ethnic
people.
«®½½Ý ¥ÊٛÝãÝ
Krishna District is divided into upland
and delta zones; the delta region offers
fer le land for agriculture towards the
coastline. The uplands consist of the
Kondapalli hill range that runs between
Nandigama and Vijayawada with a
length of about 24 km. Other hills of
some historic importance and religious
associa on are Jammalavoidurgam,
Mogalrajapuram and Indrakiladri hills.
In Guntur District the Nallamalai hill
ranges that form part of the Eastern
Ghats; lie in the western part of the
district .
The famous Ethipothala water falls are
located in these ranges, near Macherla.
Kondaveedu and Venkatayapalem
ranges are prominant hills in the Capital
Region. Few small to medium sized hills
like the pedamadduru, Nidumukkala
hill forest and Mangalagiri surround the
capital city offering good scenic views
of the region. Gu konda, Mangalagiri
Undavalli are hills of religious
significance.
LEGEND
Fig.2.11 Capital Region_Exis ng Wetlands, Forests and Bio Diversity Source - GIS Database_CRDA
THE NEW CAPITAL REGION OF ANDHRA PRADESH I THE CAPITAL REGION PLAN REPORT
17
Fly Ash Pond near Kondapalli Hill at Trilochanapuram
WATER RESOURCES
18
The coastal belt consists of fer le plains
in the Krishna delta region. Krishna is
the major perennial river dividing the
two districts. It flows through rela vely
flat terrain and carries a substan al
amount of sediment during the
monsoon season. It turns sharply southeastwards and joins the sea 80 km
away from Vijayawada, at Hamsaladivi
and Nachugunta in Krishna district.
Muneru, Budameru, Guntur Channel,
Guntur Branch Canal are other smaller
rivulets in the Capital Region.
Capital Region has three major basins.
The Central Krishna Basin, basin formed
by rivers between Krishna and Godavari
and third sub basin from rivers between
Krishna and Pennar river.
The capital city area has abundant
water supply. In certain areas,
groundwater is available at about 3050 feet depending on the season.
Key Issues
• Sand is quarried from Krishna and
Muneru River for construc on
purposes.
• With the absence of drainage
system in villages; the villages are
characterized with uncared open
drains and waste is dumped into
them with later join the river network
• The canals traversing through ci es
are dumped with soild waste, people
wash clothes alongside and defecate
in the canals; resul ng in polluted
water system.
Around 50,000 hectares of area is
covered in canals, reservoirs, tanks
and rivers that irrigate almost 580,000
hectares of Agricultural Land.
LEGEND
Fig.2.12 Capital Region_Water Resouces
THE NEW CAPITAL REGION OF ANDHRA PRADESH I THE CAPITAL REGION PLAN REPORT
Source - GIS Database_CRDA
19
River Krishna ; looking towards Kondapalli Hill
20
2.4.2 ăãçك½ ½ƒÄ—Ý‘ƒÖ›Ý
Krishna and Guntur districts offer a
lot of sites of heritage and cultural
significance. The culture of Krishna
district is mostly tradi onal in rural
places and moderately modern in
Vijayawada. It is also famous as the
birthplace for Indian classical dance
named kuchipudi. Guntur District has
a dams and waterfalls along Krishna
River in the nallamalla ranges and
many Buddist and Hindu temples.
Most of these key heritage and cultural
des na ons fall in the Capital Region.
Forests Reserve, Krishna Waterfront
and the islands within the river offer a
great poten al for tourism within the
Capital Region. The Andhra Pradesh
Tourism Board has many new tourism
projects planned within the Capital
region; However most of these projects
are stalled. A few are listed below:
• Mega tourism circuit at Kondapalli
and Ibrahimpatnam
• Water Sports facili es at Bhavani
Island
• Proposed ropeway project from
Kanaka
Durga
temple
atop
Indrakeeladri and a designated place
near Seetammavari Padalu
«›Ù®ãƒ¦› ¥›ƒãçٛÝ
Key temples in the Capital Region are • In Guntur District - Sri Agasteswara
Temple,
Sree
Ramanamma
Kshethram - Maravathi heritage
place, Nallapadu temples, Lam,
Pedakakani
(malleshwaraswami
temple,) Pondugula and Undavalli
Caves, Pothuru Village (ankireddy
palem Zone)
• In Krishna District - The district
authority has planned a temple
tourism circuit star ng from
Hamsaladeevi near the confluence of
the river and the Sea and connec ng
Sri Ramalingeswara Swamy temple
and Kalakshetram at Kuchipudi,
Sri Venugoplaswamy temple at
Movva, Sri Maha Vishnu temple at
Srikakulam, and Buddhist sthupa
at Ghanatasala, Challapalli kota, Sri
Subrahmanyeswara swamy temple
at Mopidevi, Sri Durganageswara
swamy temple at Pedakallepalli, and
Sri Venugopala swamy temple at
Hamsaladeevi.
LEGEND
THE NEW CAPITAL REGION OF ANDHRA PRADESH I THE CAPITAL REGION PLAN REPORT
Fig.2.13 Capital Region_Heritage and Tourism
Kondapalli Fort
Amaravathi
Undavalli Caves
Gandhi Hill
Krishna Barrage ,credit :Amar Raavi
Challapalli Fort
Kanaka Durga Temple
Bha prolu
Nanda Lakshmi Narasimha Swamy temple
Temple at Nallapadu
There are a few other important
tourism places ou sde the Capital
Region that a ract a lot of tourists.
• Kolleru lake, is one of the largest
fresh water lakes in India is 70
km away from Vijayawada. Many
birds such as Siberian crane, ibis,
and painted storks migrate here in
winter. It is also a major des na on
for tourists.
• The Srisailam and Nagarjuna sagar
Dam (world’s largest masonry dam)
in Guntur District.
• Manginapudi Beach is popular
amongst domes c travellers.
Capital Region does not have specific
urban conserva on guidelines for the
historic precincts. Many of the heritage
assets within Capital region are not well
maintained and heritage conserva on
efforts are mostly focused on holding
the buildings/temples intact neglec ng
the whole built environment.
Capital Region offers great tourism
poten al on all fronts - Heritage,
Recrea onal, Religious and Natural
Features. The lack of solid infrastructure
is s ll a major constraint for tourism
in this region. Connec vity and
accommoda on capaci es must be
improved to expect more arrivals, with
an integrated tourism strategy and
proper pricing.
An external strategy could focus on the
following ac ons:
• State and District Tourism Strategy
to capitalize and promote the unique
offerings.
• Interna onal trade and tourism fairs
• Expanded Air services agreements.
21
An internal strategy could focus on the
following developments :
• Hotel And Catering School
• Hotel Development
• Resorts, Other A rac ons
• Improve Airport Facili es
• Tourism investment policies and
incen ves for hotel and resort
development
• A culture of tourism service with
be er training through a na onal hotel
& catering school
2.4.3 ‘«ƒ½½›Ä¦›Ý ƒÄ— ‘ÊÄÝãك®ÄãÝ
• The
agricultural
land
area
downstream Parakasam barrage
bound by NH5 is well irrigated with
two and three season crops. This
area needs to be protected from
encroachments and urbanisa on.
• The hills are typically characterized
by steep slopes; Encroachment and
erosion are a major environmental
issue.
• The forest cover in the region is
reducing due to quarrying ac vi es
and encroachments. The challenge
would be to protect the forests and
ini ate afforestata on in selected
areas. 4% of the land falls under
forests and hills.
Industrializa on, rapid urban growth,
migra on and lack of stringent laws to
monitor resource u liza on have resulted in degrada on of environment
in the urban areas. Key challenges
and constraints are categorized under
environmental and Urban; and they
are as below.
EÄò®ÙÊÄÛÄヽ
• Stringent planning measures need
to be taken for areas that fall under
high risk flood zone. Most of the
islands of Krishna river and the valley
area in Krishna District fall under
this category; comprises 7% of the
Capital Region.
• The presence of the extensive
network of canals, rivers and
waterbodies in the Capital Region
necessitates a sustainable water
management program to enrich the
agricultural produce. Around 7% of
the area is protected water bodies.
Fig.2.14 Capital Region_Environment Constraints and Challenges
URBAN - Key issues and Constraints
within the exis ng urban areas
• The northern and southern sides
of the river are connected at only
two places near Vijayawada causing
heavy conges on and air pollu on
in Vijayawada. More adequate north
south linkages are need to be built to
relieve conges on.
• Most developed urban se lements
lie in the eastern part of the region
due to agricultural opportuni es
in this area. The challenge here is
to allow for development but at
the same me protect the prime
agricultural lands.
• The hill ranges across the northern
side pose a constraint in connec ng
the iden fied key ci es seamlessly.
Alternate route need to be iden fied.
Fig.2.15 Capital Region_Urban Constraints and Challenges
• Vijayawada City faces heavy traffic
conges on and pollu on issues
due to inadequate roads and
infrastructure
provision.
With
the new Capital City located right
next to Vijayawada; there is a high
probability of borrowing these
problems into the Capital City even
before the new city is developed.
Major redevelopment strategies
need to be ini ated with regard to
Infrastructure upgrada on in the
surrounding areas.
23
2.4.4 -
›Äò®ÙÊÄÛÄヽ
• A large part of land within the CRDA
boundary is flat land and falls under
low to medium risk flood hazard;
The Region’s planned growth areas
should consider these areas.
• The Krishna river cu ng across the
region offers a riverfront stretching
130km. This offers an opportunity
to provide open public spaces with
waterfront facili es and commercial
ac vi es; leading to vibrant and eco
friendly communi es.
• A seamless network of green and
blue spaces for public leisure
connec ng all the natural assets
could be planned while securing the
protec on of the same.
• The Kondapalli Reserve Forest,
Ko uru Reserve Forest , Kondaveedu
Range, Krishna River, Bhavani and
other islands in Krishna River offer
poten al for a vast eco tourism
circuit; This circuit could be linked
with the beaches along Krishna and
Guntur district’s coastline.
• The region offers a safe and
conducive environment for tourism
& business.
Fig.2.16 Capital Region_Environmental Assets and Opportuni es
çِƒÄ - There is no denying that the
upcoming East Coast Economic Corridor passing through the region will
boost the region’s economy incredibly.
• The two na onal highways NH5
and NH 214 will con nue to be the
backbone of the region as growth
corridors. NH9 will play a key role
in logis cs connec ng the current
capital Hyderabad to this region and
further down to the port;
• New high-tech industrial belt can
be developed close to the airport
with advantage of access to the new
Machilipatnam port. The designated
new
seaport
and
proposed
Gannavaram interna onal Airport
open up immense opportuni es
for new employment centers near
Gudivada and Gannavaram areas.
Fig.2.17 Capital Region_Urban Assets and Opportuni es
• A new road link connec ng the new
Capital City with the rayalaseema
region and further down to
Bangalore could strengthen the
region’s connec vity.
• The proposal for High Speed rail
connec ng
Visakhapatnam
to
Chennai; offers the advantage of
loca ng a terminus within the new
capital city. (More details of the
same are provided in Chapter 3)
• With the Capital City’s loca on
in close proximity to Vijayawada,
Tadepalli and Mangalagiri; the
planners foresee many advantages.
More in terms of available workforce
from these ci es.
• Capital
Region
also
holds
tremendous unexploited tourism
poten al in specialized areas such
as cultural tourism and tradi onal
arts. ‘Temple Tourism’ in par cular
could be magnified in the region;
with planned state of the art ‘temple
town’ promo ng telugu culture. This
could be sited close to Amaravathi
town.
26
This page has been inten onally le blank
THE NEW CAPITAL REGION OF ANDHRA PRADESH I THE CAPITAL REGION PLAN REPORT
3
EXISTING TRANSPORT AND
INFRASTRUCTURE ANALYSIS
This chapter reviews the exis ng condi ons, future projects and
key issues of transporta on and infrastructure in the Capital Region.
The chapter covers the following:
Transport
• Roads
• Rail
• Avia on
• Water Transport
• Public Transport
• Non-motorized Transport
Infrastructure
• Water Supply
• Waste Water
• Storm Water
• Solid Waste
• Power Supply
View of the railway bridge over the Krishna River from Barrage
3.1 GENERAL REVIEW
28
3.1.1 ANDHRA PRADESH
INFRASTRUCTURE
In the state of Andhra Pradesh, the high
growth due to economic liberaliza on
has resulted in significant movement of
goods and people, which in turn created
problems such as conges on, pollu on
and overburden and deteriora on of
exis ng infrastructure.
A mul -pronged approach is needed
to ensure that the economic growth
and urbaniza on does not lead to
further deteriora on in mobility and
accessibility in urban areas, while
providing new infrastructure where
necessary.
In 2001, the State Government enacted
the Andhra Pradesh Infrastructure
Development Enabling Act (APIDEA),
providing a regulatory framework for
a rac ng private sector investment
and Foreign Direct Investment (FDI)
into the infrastructure sector.
The framework enables the State
Government to enable and encourage
the private sector to invest in the
development and maintenance the
infrastructure in the State of Andhra
Pradesh.
Infrastructure development is therefore
well-supported by legisla on, however
key strategies need to be developed to
encourage such investments.
Prakasam Barrage
THE NEW CAPITAL REGION OF ANDHRA PRADESH I THE CAPITAL REGION PLAN REPORT
Photo Credit: Adarsh Gupta K.
3.1.2 R
E
C
Road transporta on is the dominant
mode of travel in India. In 2012, roads
carried approximately 85% of the
country’s passenger traffic and 65% of
its freight. Roads form the backbone
of public transport and connec vity to
other modes such as ports and airports.
About 40% of road traffic in India is
carried by Na onal Highways, however
they only account for 2% of the
country’s road network. India has a
na onal highway density comparable
to that of United States, however
most highways in India are narrow and
congested.
LEGEND
More than 7% of the country’s na onal
highway (3144km) is located in Andhra
Pradesh1. Two vital na onal highways,
NH5 and NH9, intersect at Vijayawada,
the current business capital of Andhra
Pradesh.
Fig.3.1 illustrates the Exis ng Roads in
the Capital Region .
NH5 connects the Capital Region with
the two industrial centers of Chennai
and Kolkata, whilst the NH9 connects
the Capital Region with Hyderabad and
Machilipatnam Port. Several large ci es
and towns in the Capital Region, such
as Guntur, Gannavaram, Mangalagiri
and Nandigama are also located along
these two Na onal Highways.
High traffic demand is expected along
the Na onal Highways, as they are the
only roads that connect the Capital
Region with other commercial centers.
The Krishna River separates the Capital
Region into two parts. Presently the
two-lane Prakasam Barrage road and
the NH5 are the only highways across
the Krishna River in the Capital Region,
and are heavily congested.
1 Andhra Pradesh State Sta s cal Abstract,
Planning Department, 2014
Table 3.1 Exis ng Road Lengths (by type) in Capital Region
Fig.3.1 Exis ng Roads in the Capital Region
Road Type
Length(km)
Percentage
Na onal Highway
1863
14%
State Highway
435
3%
District Road
3176
23%
Village Road
5532
40%
Other
2672
20%
29
30
State Roads link ci es in Guntur district,
i.e. Guntur and Tenali, however State
Roads are not prevalent in Krishna
district due to few major se lements.
Major district roads and local roads
play a large role in connec ng smaller
villages in the Capital Region.
Development of rural roads in the
Capital Region has been done mainly
through the Prime Minister Rural Roads
Scheme, which aimed to build allweather single lane, paved asphalted
roads to connect all habita ons with
a popula on of 500 or above (250 or
above for hilly areas).
The roads were of indifferent quality
constructed by unskilled labour. As
the objec ve of the programme was
provision of sustenance support to the
rural people, the technical standards of
asset quality were not insisted upon. As
a result, roads constructed under the
scheme were o en not durable2.
The Na onal Highways Development
Project (NHDP), managed by the
Na onal Highways Authority of India
(NHAI), is upgrading, rehabilita ng and
widening major highways in India.
The Golden Quadrilateral project,
which is one of the keystone projects of
the NHDP, also includes the upgrading
of NH5 from Kolkata to Chennai via
Andhra Pradesh. This was completed in
2013.
2 India Infrastructure Report 2007
The NHDP is currently upgrading and
improving the Na onal Highways linking
other ci es to the Golden Quadrilateral
to improve road connec vity and
accessibility (Refer to Chapter 2).
• Poor road quality and under-funded
exis ng road maintenance leading to
deteriora on of roads
The East Coast Economic Corridor
(ECEC) links Kolkata to Chennai via
Andhra Pradesh as shown in Fig.3.2. In
compliance of the commitment made
by the Central Government in the
Andhra Pradesh Reorganiza on Act,
2014, Asian Development Bank will
focus on the Vizag - Chennai Sec on in
the first phase of the study3. The Capital
Region is expected to benefit from the
development of the ECEC.
The expansion of Na onal Highways
and State Roads are expected to
alleviate traffic conges on, however
there is need to study projected
demand in considera on of the new
Capital City. Its central loca on makes
it an ideal distribu on hub to Chennai,
Visakhapatnam and Hyderabad.
Several state governments have been
implemen ng a number of state
highway projects since 2000. By 2010,
state highway projects worth $1.7 billion
had been completed, and an addi onal
$11.4 billion worth of projects were
under implementa on. The state
government of Andhra Pradesh had
implemented the construc on of 1230
km of state highways as of 2010.
K
I
• Heavy traffic conges on due to
insufficient lane capacity
• Connec ons in the Capital Region
depend on two Na onal Highways
• Conges on at Prakasam Barrage due
to high traffic demand across the
Krishna River
O
A comprehensive regional network
of Na onal Highway-level roads
are required to ensure that road
capacity is sufficient to support the
projected growth. Bypass roads can be
introduced to relieve conges on in the
future Capital City and to allow bypass
traffic to circulate around the region
unimpeded.
A new road hierarchy (high capacity
urban roads) will be introduced as
an intermediary. Road hierarchy and
cross-sec ons are crucial to safeguard
land reserves necessary for the road
network. Long term strategic plans
can help to safeguard these reserves,
and iden fy key alignments for
development.
Fig.3.2 Na onal Economic Corridor through Andhra Pradesh; Alignment not confirmed
3 Investment opportuni es in Corridors, NIMZ
and Cluster under IIUS, 2014
NH5 at Mangalagiri
THE NEW CAPITAL REGION OF ANDHRA PRADESH I THE CAPITAL REGION PLAN REPORT
3.1.3 R
E
C
Indian railways provide an important
mode of transport in India, transpor ng
over 24 million passengers and more
than 2 million tonnes of freight daily.
The Indian rail network connects more
than 7,000 sta ons over a total route
length of more than 65,000 km and
track length of about 115,000 km.
Vijayawada Junc on, one of the busiest
railway sta ons in India. More than
250 express and 150 freight trains pass
through it daily. It serves over 50 million
passengers per year.
LEGEND
Andhra Pradesh has 5,046 km of railway
network. It plays a significant role in
boos ng the economy of the state,
alongside developing the industrial and
the tourism sectors. All the districts
in the state are connected by rail. The
Capital Region has 2 major sta ons in
Vijayawada and Guntur. (Fig.3.3)
Two major commu ng lines, JammuDelhi-Kanyakumar, which connects
northern and southern India, and the
Kolkata-Kanyakumar, which connects
eastern and southern India, both
intersect at Vijayawada Junc on
Sta on1.
Overall freight movement by rail in
India has grown by 35% between
2002 and 2006 and has been growing
by 5.8% annually to 2013 (Fig.3.4). To
support the growth, the Ministry of
Railways is construc ng new Dedicated
Freight Corridors (DFC) to increase
in produc vity and reduce in freight
transporta on cost.
1 Approach to the 12th Five Year Plan of
Andhra Pradesh, Centre for Economic and
Social Studies, 2012
800
600
400
200
0
2004
Fig.3.3 Exis ng Rail Network and Railways in Capital Region
2005
2006
2007
2008
2009
2010
Fig.3.4 Total Freight Traffic moved by Rail (Indian Railways, 2013)
2011
2012
2013
31
32
Two corridors have been constructed
(Eastern and Western Corridors), with
four addi onal Dedicated Freight
Corridors being planned (Refer to
Chapter 2).
The East Coast Corridor and North
South Corridor iden fied intersect at
Vijayawada. Machilipatnam Port is also
connected to the Capital Region by
rail, as shown in Fig.3.5. These freight
corridors may introduce a significant
por on of freight through-traffic, which
may add to conges on at Vijayawada
Junc on.
The railway lines are undergoing
standardiza on, and the Indian
Railways are currently upgrading the
rail tracks and conver ng the exis ng
narrow gauge and meter gauge lines to
broad gauge under Project Unigauge.
The Ministry of Railway plans to
increase rail capacity by doubling and
electrifying 14,000 km of the exis ng
and poten al overcrowded lines. Key
rail sec ons with planned upgrades
which benefit the state of Andhra
Pradesh are:
• Vijayawada-Gudivada-BhimavaramNidadavolu
• Gudivada-Machilipatnam, and
• Bhimavaram-Narsapur
The electrifica on of the Vijayawada Machilipatnam port will also increase
freight capacity, therefore suppor ng
the Capital Region’s role in the Industrial
Corridor.
Indian Railways also plans to improve
the exis ng conven onal lines to semi-
high speed rail handling speeds of up
to 160 km/h, and are proposing highspeed rail on new tracks with improved
technology. The Indian Ministry of
Railways’ white-paper “Vision 2020”
proposed six poten al high-speed rail
corridors (HSR) connec ng commercial,
tourist, and pilgrimage hubs (Refer
Sec on 2.1.1 in Chapter 2).
The main High Speed Rail Corridor
which would benefit the Andhra
Pradesh Capital Region is the
Hyderabad - Chennai High-Speed
Passenger Corridor, which passes
through Vijayawada.
Commu ng and freight traffic at
Vijayawada Junc on is expected to grow
significantly due to the development of
the new Capital Region.
As the sole rail crossing of Krishna River,
conges on is currently occurring at
Vijayawada Sta on, with delays of up
to 90 minutes . The sta on is running
at capacity, and will not be able to
accommodate future growth.
K
I
• Development of dedicated freight
corridors may introduce significant
freight through-traffic at Vijayawada
Junc on
• Conges on at Vijayawada Junc on
• Introduc on of High-speed rail
• Need to separate freight and
passenger traffic
• Need for addi onal rail crossing
along Krishna River to alleviate
pressure on Vijayawada Sta on
THE NEW CAPITAL REGION OF ANDHRA PRADESH I THE CAPITAL REGION PLAN REPORT
O
The provision of a bypass freight corridor
would help to remove freight throughtraffic from Vijayawada Junc on. This
can help Vijayawada Junc on improve
capacity for commuter traffic to and
from the Capital City. These new
corridors should provide alterna ves to
the exis ng crossing points across River
Krishna to help alleviate the pressure
on the exis ng crossing.
Transport/Logis cs Hubs can also be
introduced in the fringes of the new
Capital City, so that commuter traffic
can be dispersed without travelling to
Vijayawada Junc on first.
The High-Speed Rail sta on can also
be located within the new Capital
City instead of Vijayawada Junc on,
therefore improving the capacity of the
sta on.
Fig.3.5 Exis ng and Planned DFC
Table 3.2 Status of Freight Corridors in 2014
Route
Dedicated Freight Corridor
Length
(km)
Status
1483
Approved in Rail Budget 2014-15
1839
Approved in Rail Budget 2014-15
Western Dedicated Freight Corridor
Dadri
Eastern Dedicated Freight Corridor
Ludhiana
TerminaƟon
Point
JNPT, Nava
Sheva
Dankuni
East-West Dedicated Freight Corridor
Kolkata
Mumbai
2000
Planned
North-South Dedicated Freight Corridor
Delhi
Chennai
2173
Planned
East Coast Dedicated Freight Corridor
Kharagpur
Vijayawada
1100
Planned
South-West Dedicated Freight Corridor
Chennai
Goa
890
Planned
Start Point
3.1.4 AVIATION
E
C
Increase in air traffic in India over the
last decade has placed a heavy strain
on the country’s major airports.
Andhra Pradesh is well-connected to
the avia on network via 1 interna onal
airport and 5 domes c airports.
There are also 3 interna onal airports
in the adjacent states to Andhra
Pradesh,namely Chennai, Bangalore
and Hyderabad (Fig.3.6).
The closest airport to the Capital Region
is Vijayawada Airport (IATA: VGA), 18
km east of Vijayawada. It is a mid-sized
domes c airport and is currently served
by four regular airlines with eight daily
scheduled flights. Freight usage at the
airport is currently limited.
Recent upgrades to the airport include
a runway extension (2,285m), and
acquisi on of 169 hectares of land for
future expansion, bringing its total area
to 400 hectares.
The Airports Authority of India (AAI)
is currently developing and making
infrastructural improvements to the
Vijayawada Airport to accommodate
future increase in air traffic. There are
plans to increase the length of the
runway to 3,200m, improve exis ng
facili es, security and opera ons and
construc on of a new runway for
domes c services. 1.
Fig.3.6 Exis ng Airports in the vicinity of the Capital Region
1 Deccan Chronicle, 2014
Freight logis cs is not a primary use
of the exis ng airport, however the
industrializa on of Andhra Pradesh may
increase freight share in the airport.
Vijayawada Airport is approximately 25
minutes away from Vijayawada by car,
30 minutes by train.
K
I
• Small land area may limit future
airport expansion
• Inadequate facili es to handle
freight
• Infrequent public transport services
to and from Vijayawada, and other
neighbouring ci es
O
Addi onal land may be reserved
for future expansion in the strategic
plans. By doing so, runways capable of
receiving larger planes may be built,
therefore enabling interna onal flights
from Europe and the US.
Freight logis cs facili es can be
developed to accommodate cargo
growth in the airport.
The airport can also be developed
as a transport/logis cs hub, in order
to support be er public transport
connec vity to nearby towns and the
new Capital City.
33
3.1.5 WATER TRANSPORT
34
E
C
Despite India’s high density of rivers
and canals, inland water transporta on
remains largely undeveloped. The
total cargo transported by the inland
waterways was just 0.1% of the total
inland waterways traffic in India,
compared to 21% for United States.
There is poten al growth in the use of
the canals for moving freight cargo. The
Inland Waterways Authority of India
(IWAI) has undertaken several projects
to develop five Na onal Waterways
(Refer Sec on 2.1.1 in Chapter 2),
where Na onal Waterway 4 (Fig.3.10)
runs through the Capital Region of
Andhra Pradesh1.
The waterway connects KakinadaPuducherry canals with Godavari
and Krishna rivers and will provide a
vital link for transpor ng agricultural
products and industrial goods between
rural areas and urban centers. It also
connects the sea ports of Kakinada,
Krishnapatnam, Ennore and Chennai
and will facilitate inland import and
export of cargo. The Na onal Waterway
4 is expected to transport 11 million
tonne cargo per annum.
Krishna River is not navigable; its
primary purpose is to provide water for
irriga on. It is fed by seasonal monsoon
rains, and therefore its flow undergoes
great fluctua on during the year,
limi ng its usefulness for irriga on and
transporta on.
LEGEND
Na onal Waterway 4 is expected to
form the backbone of water transport
in the Capital Region.
1
2012
Inland Waterways Authority of India,
Visakhapatnam Port
THE NEW CAPITAL REGION OF ANDHRA PRADESH I THE CAPITAL REGION PLAN REPORT
Fig.3.7 Na onal Waterway and Air port within Capital Region
The Capital City is located at the key
intersec on of Na onal Waterway 4
and therefore is suitable for intermodal
transport development.
In addi on, Andhra Pradesh has 13 sea
ports, along its coast line, and has the
second-highest cargo-handling port
in India. Visakhapatnam port (Fig.3.8)
handled 67 million tonnes of freight in
2011-12.
Machilipatnam Port is a re-established
port located at a distance of 72 km to
the east of Vijayawada2. It is intended
for freight transport to Vijayawada
and Hyderabad. It is currently linked to
Vijayawada by rail. An extension may
also be implemented to connect the
Capital Region of Andhra Pradesh to
this port.
2 Department of Ports, Government of Andhra
Pradesh, 2011
Fig.3.8 Ports in the vicinity of the Capital Region
Koneru center, the business center of Machilipatnam
K
I
• Lack of strategies to u lize the underdeveloped canals and rivers
• Need to strengthen link between
road, rail and water transport
O
The establishment of the Na onal
Waterways provides an opportunity for
the Capital Region to develop a waterroad/rail freight hubs.
There is poten al for the freight traffic
to be transported via canal to the
Capital City, and then transferred to
Machilipatnam for export, and viceversa.
The use of transport/logis cs hubs to
maximize mode transfer from water to
rail or road can be done where these
intersect.
35
3.1.6 PUBLIC TRANSPORT
K
E
• Conges on due to exis ng public
transport systems may hinder efforts
to successfully implement a BRTS
system
• Need to introduce other modes of
public transporta on such as mass
transit and light rail
• Need for an integrated public
transporta on plan for the region to
link Capital City and Regional Centers
C
Public transport is the pre-dominant
mode of motorized local travel in ci es
in Andhra Pradesh. This comes in the
form of bus, auto and cycle rickshaws.
These modes play a significant role in
exis ng road conges on.
The Andhra Pradesh State Road
Transport
Corpora on
(APSRTC)
runs thousands of buses connec ng
different parts of the state. APSRTC
operates in all ci es and towns of
Andhra Pradesh and also operates from
and to the neighbouring states, such as
to Chennai, Hyderabad and Bangalore.
APSRTC serves about 14 million
passengers every day.
In addi on, the Bus Rapid Transit System
(BRTS), which has been successfully
launched in Indian ci es like Delhi,
Pune, Ahmedabad, and interna onally
in Curi ba, Bogota, and Mexico, was
launched in Vijayawada in 2008. Six
BRTS corridors were proposed. Phase 1,
as shown in Fig.3.9 is near comple on
and has a total length of 15.5 km.
The BRTS was planned before the
considera on of the new Capital City,
and therefore there is opportunity to
expand and/or incorporate the BRTS
to the new Capital City, as well as to
satellite ci es in the Capital Region.
I
O
Obsolete public transport systems such
as cycle rickshaws need to be phased
out. By doing so, exis ng conges on
may be reduced, thereby easing the
implementa on of BRTS.
Mass transit systems will be required
in the long run to meet the projected
public transport demand.
A comprehensive Public Transporta on
Plan needs to be prepared to guide the
planning and development of public
transport both at the regional and city
level.
Transport hubs integra ng these
modes (BRTS, mass transit) with the
other modes such as rail and roads can
be established around the Capital City
to ease modal transfer.
There is currently no integrated public
transporta on plan for the Andhra
Pradesh Region.
Fig.3.9 BRTS in Vijayawada Phase 1 (The Municipal Corpora on of Vijayawada, 2014)
3.1.7 NON MOTORIZED
TRANSPORT
Modal share (%) vs. different city size in India
(International Transport Forum, 2011)
100%
E
C
90%
Non-Motorized Transport (NMT) modal
share in the ci es in India is the highest
among all transport modes. Fig 3.14
shows that walking is the predominant
mode for ci es with popula on
less than 2 million; however public
transport share is higher for ci es with
popula on larger than 2 million.
80%
Modal Share
70%
60%
50%
40%
30%
20%
10%
0%
0.05-0.1
0.1-0.5
0.5-1.0
1.0-2.0
2.0-5.0
>5.0
City Population (millions)
Walk
Cycle
Rickshaw
Intermediate Public Transport
Public Transport
Cars
Motorised Two Wheelers
Fig.3.10 Modal Share in Ci es of Different Sizes in India (Interna onal Transport Forum,
2011)
Exis ng Pedestrian Infrastructure in Vijayawada
Dedicated non-motorized transport
facili es are not prevalent in the
exis ng road infrastructure. Footpaths
and pedestrian crossings are provided
only in some of the urban areas.
A Wilbur Smith study for the Ministry of
Urban Development has found that in
most of the ci es in India, less than 30%
of the roads have pedestrian footpaths.
As a result, many pedestrians currently
walk along the road, while cyclists share
the same road space as motorized
vehicles.
Overflowing Footpath on Bandar Road in Vijayawada
The current engineering guidelines
for pedestrian facili es do not meet
the needs of pedestrians. Pedestrian
and cycling network plans have not
been produced for any city in Andhra
Pradesh.
In a recent joint study of University
of Michigan and Indian Ins tute of
Technology, Delhi, shows that in
India, road traffic fatali es have been
increasing at about 8% annually for
the last ten years. In Andhra Pradesh,
pedestrians and cyclists accidents were
the highest in 2006 and 2007. 1
There is need to develop road design
guidelines that cater not only for
vehicular traffic, but for NMT traffic too.
There is also low awareness of
pedestrian safety in Andhra Pradesh.
There is need to promote pedestrian
and cyclist safety, while providing
road infrastructure with be er safety
features.
1
Transporta on Research Board , 2010
K
I
• Traffic-related deaths are high
• Pedestrian and cycling links are not
readily available city-wide
• No integra on plans with other
transport networks
• Need for campaigns and promo on
of NMT
• Need to provide NMT safety features
in new road design
O
In the new Capital City plan, greenfield
condi ons allow the design of NMTfriendly cross-sec ons which can be
reproduced in the Capital Region.
A pedestrian and cycling network
plan is to be produced at City-level
to safeguard road reserves where
necessary.
In addi on, integra on with other
modes of transport (i.e. rail and
public transport) can be provided by
building NMT infrastructure along the
infrastructure, for example cycle racks
at bus sta ons etc.
3.1.8 KEY TRANSPORT ISSUES AND OPPORTUNITIES
38
Transport
Key Issues
OpportuniƟes
• Heavy traffic conges on due to insufficient lane capacity
• Connec ons within and outside the Capital Region depend solely on the two Na onal
Highways
• Conges on at Prakasam Barrage due to high traffic demand across the Krishna River
• Poor road quality and under-funded exis ng road maintenance leading to deteriora on of
roads
• Capital City’s central loca on is ideal as a distribu on hub to Chennai, Visakhapatnam
and Hyderabad
• Bypass roads to be introduced to relieve conges on in the future Capital City and to
allow bypass traffic to circulate around the region unimpeded
• Greenfield site allows adop on and implementa on of comprehensive road hierarchy
and controls in plot access
• Long term strategic plans to help safeguard road reserves, and iden fy key alignments
for development
• Development of dedicated freight corridors may introduce significant freight throughtraffic at Vijayawada Junc on
• Conges on at Vijayawada Junc on
• Introduc on of High-speed rail
• Need to separate freight and passenger traffic
• Need for addi onal rail crossing along Krishna River to alleviate pressure on Vijayawada
Sta on
• The provision of a bypass freight corridor to remove freight through-traffic from
Vijayawada Junc on
• New rail corridors crossing Krishna River to provide alterna ves to the exis ng
crossing
• Transport Hubs to be introduced to disperse commuter traffic
• The High-Speed Rail sta on to be located within the new Capital City
• Small land area may limit future airport expansion
• Inadequate facili es to handle freight logis cs
• Infrequent public transport services to and from Vijayawada, and other neighbouring ci es
• Addi onal land may be reserved for future expansion in the strategic plans
• Freight logis cs facili es may also be developed to accommodate cargo growth
• The airport may be developed as a transport hub to support be er public transport
connec vity to nearby towns and the new Capital City.
Water Transport
• Lack of strategies to u lize the under-developed shallow canals and rivers
• Need to strengthen link between road, rail and water transport
• Seasonal river flow
• Capital Region to develop a water-road/rail freight hubs.
• Freight traffic to be transported via canal to the Capital City and then by rail to sea
• Long-term strategic plans to encourage inland water transporta on to relieve the
busy road and rail network
Public Transport
• Conges on due to exis ng public transport systems may hinder efforts to successfully
implement a BRTS system
• Need to launch other modern modes of public transporta on such as urban mass rapid
transit and light rail
• Need for an integrated public transporta on plan for the region to link Capital City and
Regional Centers
• Phasing out of obsolete public transport systems such as cycle rickshaws
• A comprehensive Public Transporta on Plan to be prepared to guide the planning and
development of public transport both at the regional and city level
• Mass transit systems to be planned to meet the projected public transport demand
•
•
•
•
• Design of NMT-friendly cross-sec ons in future road network
• A pedestrian and cycling network plan to be produced at City-level to safeguard road
reserves where necessary
• Integra on with other modes of transport (i.e. rail and public transport) can be
provided by building NMT infrastructure
Roads
Rail
AviaƟon
Non-motorized Transport
Pedestrian and cycling links are not readily available city-wide;
No integra on plans of NMT with other transport networks;
Need for campaigns and promo on of NMT
Need to provide NMT safety features in new road design
THE NEW CAPITAL REGION OF ANDHRA PRADESH I THE CAPITAL REGION PLAN REPORT
3.2 INFRASTRUCTURE
39
The following documenta on have
been reviewed to understand the
exis ng condi ons and key issues in
Andhra Pradesh Capital Region:• Na onal Disaster Management
Guidelines: Management of Flood
• Report of Working Group on Flooding
Management and Region Specific
Issues FOR XII Plan
• Na onal Rural Drinking Water
Programme
• District Level Household and Facility
Survey 2007-2008
• Vijayawada City Development Plan
• Guntur City Development Plan 2006
While many of the issues have been
iden fied in these studies, there is
no central authority to manage and
implement the strategies iden fied in
these documents.
As previously iden fied, the Andhra
Pradesh Infrastructure Development
Enabling Act has provided a framework
to funding for these projects, however
due to lack of focus many programmes
may not be ini ated. Addi onally there
are opportuni es to obtain benefits
for several aspects via a combined
development plan, for example the
Na onal Waterways development
plans can also be developed as part of
the Flood Management Plan, as well
as the Water Supply plan, by means of
deten on basins etc.
Krishna River during monsoon
3.2.1 WATER SUPPLY
from Krishna River.
Vijayawada city.
•
40
E
C
W
Water supply is a state responsibility.
There are three authori es sharing
this responsibility for Andhra Pradesh
Capital Region (Capital Region)
currently:• Guntur
Municipal
Corpora on
(GMC), which supplies potable
water to the Guntur city and two
rural se lements Kori padu and
Pedakakani and part of surrounding
villages as delineated by VGTM
Urban Development Authority
(VGTMUDA).
• Vijayawada Municipal Corpora on
(VMC), which supplies potable
water to the Vijayawada city and the
surrounding villages.
• Ministry of Drinking Water and
Sanita on, which is in charge of the
rural areas within Capital Region.
W
:
There are two main water sources in
Capital Region as follows:
• Surface Water - Krishna River was
dammed up to create the Prakasam
barrage and the associated canals,
such as Buckingham Canal and
Bandar Canal.
• Ground Water - Ground water is
commonly used in the upland areas
in Guntur District. Most of the places
in Guntur and Krishna Districts
depend on Krishna River for their
drinking water demand. As pointed
out in Vijayawada City Development
Plan, only 26% of water is ground
water while the rest are extracted
S
Capital Region has a general water
network for urban areas such as Guntur
city and Vijayawada city, consists
of water treatment plants, service
reservoirs, pumping sta ons and water
pipelines.
The piped water supply network
is inadequate in Capital Region. As
reported in the City Development Plan
of both Guntur and Vijayawada, water
network covers 88% of Vijayawada
city area and 77% of Guntur city.
Surrounding zones only have 30%
network coverage. Although the water
supply network coverage is more than
75% in urban areas, only 27 % of the
city households are connected to piped
water supply network.
A er primary treatment at source,
surface water is pumped into the
service reservoirs and water tanks.
Ground water extracted from the bore
wells is pumped into the Over Head
Tanks (OHT) directly.
W
Quality of the water supplied by the
VMC is maintained as per specifica ons
of CPHEEO manual as reported in the
Vijayawada City Development Plan.
Portable water supplied by GMC are
treated through chlorina on plants and
tested by the Chloroscope apparatus at
random places everyday, as reported in
the Guntur City Development Plan. The
water quality of the rest areas in Capital
Region is unknown.
LEGEND
K
The high un-accounted water loss is
25% in Guntur and 40% in Vijayawada,
and up to 50% in rural township. These
water loss are mostly caused by illegal
tapping, leaking pipes due to aging
water infrastructure and unrecorded
usage as some houses are not installed
with bulk meter. Portable water supply
dura on varies from one hour to 24
hours a day. Situa on of rural areas
is even worse. The uncovered area is
being supplied through water tankers,
or u lize boreholes, canal water, river
water etc, for their water supply.
There are 4 recorded Water Treatment
Plants (WTP) in Capital Region, build
next to their sources. All WTPs mainly
serve the urban area of Guntur city and
THE NEW CAPITAL REGION OF ANDHRA PRADESH I THE CAPITAL REGION PLAN REPORT
• Lack of comprehensive master plan
in Water Supply Scheme for Capital
Region to implement.
• Lack of water supply network
distribu on in rural areas.
• High un-accounted water loss, 2540% in the urban area and up to 50%
in rural township.
• Inadequate water supply distribu on.
The supply dura on varies from one
hour to 24 hours a day.
• High level of illegal connec ons
Fig.3.11 Krishna River, its Tributaries and Canal Systems, and Water Supply Sources
Table 3.3 Exis ng Water Works in Capital Region
No.
Name
Source
Capacity
(MGD)
Capacity
(MLD)
Owner
1
KL Rao Head
Water Works
Krishna River
29
131.8
VMC
2
Ramalingeshwar
Nagar
Krishna River
10
45.5
VMC
3
Takkellapadu Plant
gravity filtra on plant
Guntur Channel
10
45.5
GMC
4
Sangam Jagarlamudi
Rapid gravity
filtra on plant
Kommamur
Canal
6
27.3
GMC
3.2.2 WASTE WATER
E
C
S
Base on the Household Facility Survey
2007-20008, in Andhra Pradesh State,
38.4% households have access to
sanita on facili es, including improved
source of sanita on, flush toilets not
collected by sewers/sep c pits/ twin
pits, pits without slab and dry toilets.
The rest 61.6% have no toilet and take
the use of open space. Households in
Capital Region has a be er accessibility
compare to the state, 52.2% household
in Guntur district and 60.3% household
in Krishna district have the access to
sanita on facili es.
U
G
(UGD)
D
transferred through open drains to the
nearest water bodies directly. Open
drains were designed to carry storm
water and no separa on is provided for
the sewage and storm water. Untreated
sewerage poses a major risk to human
health since it contains waterborne
pathogens that can cause serious
illness. Therefore, an integrated master
plan of sewerage treatment network is
required in Capital Region.
O
M
Aging sewerage infrastructures, such
as pipe incrusta on and pumping
corrosion, have been stated in the City
Development Report of Vijayawada. It
is not reported any authority is taking
charge the maintenance of open drains.
K
I
Table 3.4 Exis ng Sewage Treatment Plant Capacity in Capital Region
• No comprehensive master plan in
UGD scheme for Capital Region to
implement.
• Suddapalli Donka STP is reaching its
life span but no new STP is proposed
to serve the GMC areas alterna vely.
• Less than 40% of city area is covered
by UDG system.
• Less than 15% of households can
access to the sewerage connec on.
• Not enough STP’s are provided to
treat the total generated sewerage.
• Poten al risks to human health
caused by untreated sewage.
• Lack of maintenance for UGD and
open drains.
No.
LocaƟon of STP
Capacity (MLD)
Owner
1
Azithsinghnagar
27.27
VMC
2
Autonagar
10
VMC
3
Ramalingeswara
Nagar
10
VMC
4
Poornanandampet
14
VMC
5
Suddapalli Donka
34
GMC
S
There is an exis ng UGD network in
urban areas of Capital Region designed
to collect the sewerage. However, the
UGD network distribu on is insufficient
as it only covers par ally in the urban
area. In Guntur city, only 22% of the
city area and 32% popula on is served
by the exis ng UGD sewerage system.
Within the UGD coverage area, only
13% households are connected to
sewerage network. In Vijayawada, 40%
of the city area is connected the exis ng
UGD sewerage system while only 10%
households can access to sewerage
connec on (City Development Plan).
In the areas without UGD, the sanita on
is being maintained though individual
sep c tanks and open drains. Most
of the waste water disposal is being
S
T
P
(STP)
There are 5 recorded STP’s opera ng
in Capital Region. VMC managed four
STP’s with a total capacity of 61.27 MLD.
GMC owns and manages the Sudapalli
Donka STP with capacity of 34 MLD. This
STP has become almost defunct and the
effluent standards a er this plant are
not as per standards and this plant is to
be revamped immediately. Reported in
the Vijayawada City Development Plan,
the total sewage genera on in VMC is
es mated to be 148MLD, less than half
sewage is treated properly. There is a
necessity to commission addi onal STP
to treat the remaining sewage before
disposal.
LEGEND
Fig.3.12 Exis ng Sewage Treatment Plant Loca ons in Capital Region
41
42
3.2.3 STORM WATER
F
A
As reported by the Na onal Disaster
Management department, Capital
Region is vulnerable to heavy rains and
floods. Flood prone areas are iden fied
in Fig.3.13. 7% area in Capital Region
is highly prone to flood, 31% is prone
to flood and 43% is moderately prone
to flood. By analyzing the moderate
to high risk flooding areas in Capital
Region, the factors that cause flooding
are heavy rainfall, rise in river level,
dal water and problems of canals and
drains. Cyclone is also a factor, but it
occurs at very low frequency.
R
Rainfall varies considerably across
the Andhra Pradesh. Annual rainfall
of Capital Region ranges from 800
to 1200 mm. In Guntur district, the
average rainfall is 830 mm, experienced
mostly by both southwest monsoon
and the retrea ng monsoon. Annual
rainfall in Krishna district is 1028 mm,
mainly contributed by the southwest
monsoon.
D
N
Capital Region is located at the
downstream of the Krishna Basin. The
catchment basin forms part of the
Krishna River catchment area. There are
several irriga on canals flowing across
Capital Region from the Krishna River,
such as Buckingham Canal, Eluru Canal,
Ryves Canal, Bandar Canal, among
others. These water canals contribute
in draining the surface run-off, and
are referred as the major drainage
networks in Capital Region.
Primi ve open drains and shallow
ditches are used to carry storm water
in both rural and urban areas of
Capital Region. However, they are
currently also used as sewers which
collect the waste water disposal. No
segrega on is provided for sewage and
storm water, except in some city areas
where underground drainage exists.
The polluted storm water discharge is
threatening the water quality of water
bodies as well as the surrounding
environment.
E
P
A
F
M
Different methods have been adopted
to reduce the flood losses and protect
the flood plains. However, the current
condi on of integrated storm water
management is unknown. Regarding
to the Report of Working Group on
Flooding Management, these measures
can be classified as engineering method
and non-engineering method.
1. Engineering methods, which are
used in flood protec on. It does not
reduce the total flood volume but
reduce spilling.
The exis ng Prakasam Barrage
stretches 1223.5 m across the Krishna
River connec ng Krishna districts and
Guntur district. This Barrage not only
helps irriga ng over 1.2 million acres of
land, but also acts as a forecast sta on
in terms of flooding control.
Nagarjuna Sagar Dam is an upstream
THE NEW CAPITAL REGION OF ANDHRA PRADESH I THE CAPITAL REGION PLAN REPORT
dam of Krishna River, located outside
the Capital Region. Nagarjuna Sagar
Dam has an associated reservoir
located 21km downstream, namely
Nagarjuna Sagar tail pond. These two
upstream dams can be used as flood
control structure to control the total
volume flow into Capital Region. Large
amount of water can be stored at
upstream dams during periods of high
discharges in the river and released
a er the cri cal high flow condi on is
over.
N
G
D
F
M
M
This guideline is published by Na onal
Disaster
Management
Authority
and Government of India in January
2008. It sets a direc on to minimize
vulnerability to floods and consequent
loss of lives, livelihood systems,
property and damage to infrastructure
and public u li es.
2. Non-engineering methods, which are
used to mi gate the flood damage.
In India, flood forecas ng and warning
is entrusted with the Central Water
Commission (CWC). Krishna river
systems have 3 Level Forecas ng
sta ons and 6 Inflow Forecas ng
sta ons, all issued by CWC. The Level
forecasts help the rela ve agencies
in deciding mi ga ng methods, such
as evacua on of people and shi ing
people to safer loca ons. The Inflow
Forecas ng is used in op mum
opera on of reservoirs. It is also used
to ensure adequate storage in the
reservoirs for mee ng demand during
non-monsoon period.
Apart from CWC, Andhra Pradesh State
owns a Flood Unit, which prepares
rainfall maps and basin-wise volume
es ma on within the state during
monsoon period.
LEGEND
Fig.3.13 Flood Map of Capital Region
K
I
• Lack of integrated storm water
management
and
centralized
coordina on in the storm water
drainage along Krishna River.
• Lack of proper storm water drainage
network in both urban and rural
area.
• No separa on between sewage and
storm water in the areas without
underground waste water drainage.
• Insufficient open drains and canals in
the flood prone area
3.2.4 SOLID WASTE
E
W
C
G
The City Development plans for
Vijayawada and Guntur reports a waste
collec on efficiency of over 87% in
urban areas. 604.2 tons of solid waste
is generated everyday. In Guntur city,
350 tons/d of solid waste is generated.
The waste genera on rate is about
600 gms/cap./day. Around 70% of the
urban solid waste is bio-degradable.
The remaining of waste a er extrac ng
the recyclable por on is disposed to
open dump yard. Bio-degradable waste
is transferred to rela ve industries for
manure and power genera on.
W
LEGEND
Fig.3.14 Loca on of known Sold Waste facili es in Capital Region
C
The waste is collected from dust bins,
street sweeping, cleaning of drains, and
transfer through tricycles to reinforced
concrete bins. Further transporta on
through tractors and dumper placers
to the dumping yards located outside
the city. The VMC has handed over the
collec on of solid waste in hilly areas to
private par es in the city, i.e. DWACUA
and CMEY.
W
D
Currently there is no landfill site
in opera on in Capital Region. The
collected solid waste is dumped at
villages on the fringes despite s ff
opposi on from the local residents.
These dumping yards locate at
Jakkampudi, Ajithsingh Nagar and
Pathapadu1. It may cause serious health
problems and groundwater pollu on
where the dumping yard is not treated
properly.
Solid waste facili es were used to
handle the municipal solid waste for
a me. However, they were stopped
due to both financial and technical
issue. These facili es are listed in the
following, and current condi ons are
unknown.
• Genera on of Organic Manure
Using Municipal Solid Waste (MSW)
by Excel Industries Ltd - Excel plant
was established in the year 1995
for manufacturing organic manure
from municipal solid wastes. VMC
used to transfer around 125 tons/
day of waste to this plant, which was
converted into organic manure. The
compost plant can generate 30-40
tons of organic manure per day.
• 6MW Power Genera on with MSW
by Shriram Energy Systems Limited
- The treatment plant operated by
Shriram Energy Systems used to
handle 225 tons/d. the solid waste
was converted to RDF pellets which
then loaded on to the boiler for
burning along with other fuels to
generate 6MW of power per day.
• Bio-Methana on Plant - 20 tons/
day of vegetable waste and
slaughterhouse waste is processed
for Methane Gas and power
genera on at this Bio- Methana on
Plant.
F
P
Solid Waste Management is one of the
top priori es of the Government of
Andhra Pradesh. The Commissioner &
Director of Municipal Administra on
has submi ed a dra Strategy on
Andhra Pradesh Integrated Municipal
Solid Waste Management, 2014 for
approval.
This document outlines the strategies
to be adopted by the Government to
manage solid waste, and includes a
framework such as 5Rs Hierarchy of
Waste Management (Reduce, Reuse,
Recycle, Recover and Remove) as the
main approach to manage waste
K
I
• Lack of solid waste facili es serving
the Capital Region.
• Poten al contamina on of ground
water from non- engineering
dumping yard.
• Inefficient collec on and disposal in
rural areas.
• Lack of rural waste genera on data.
43
3.2.5 POWER SUPPLY
44
E
A
P
P
S
S
The state of Andhra Pradesh is located
in the southern part of India and forms
a major cons tuent of the southern
grid.
Major electricity genera on are via
thermal and the hydro power plants,
operated by Andhra Pradesh Power
Genera on Company (APGENCO).
In 2013, Andhra Pradesh was the fourth
largest power genera ng state in the
country and also had the largest hydro
power genera on capacity in India
At present, Andhra Pradesh has a total
installed power genera on capacity
of 16,817 MW from all the sources.
Of these, 11,771 MW is from thermal,
3,737 MW is from Hydro, 1,036 MW is
from Renewable energy sources and
276 MW is from Nuclear.
Private players also have considerable
presence in Andhra Pradesh. Private
power plants opera ng in the state
use transmission lines managed by
Andhra Pradesh Transmission Company
(APTRANCO) that looks a er the
transmission of electricity in the state.
The power generated by all power
plants in Andhra Pradesh is being fed to
the Southern Grid, which is accessible
to all states linked to the grid.
The ins tu onal structure of the
electricity sector in Andhra Pradesh
can be categorized into four main
domains i.e. Regula on, Genera on,
Transmission and Distribu on.
In Andhra Pradesh, Andhra Pradesh
Electricity Regulatory Commission
(APERC) look a er regula on related
ma ers, APGENCO is engaged in power
genera on, APTRANCO is mainly
responsible for transmission and
there are four electricity distribu on
companies, Eastern Power Distribu on
Corpora on of AP Ltd , Southern
Power Distribu on Corpora on of
AP Ltd, Central Power Distribu on
Corpora on of AP Ltd and Northern
Power Distribu on Corpora on of AP
Ltd managing distribu on in four zones.
of the State.
The major transmission lines in India
are 500kV (HVDC), 765kV, 400kV,
220kV, 132kV. The local distribu on
lines are 11kV and 33kV.
F
P
There are 25 planned power genera on
projects in Andhra Pradesh, with
capacity ranging from 70MW to
4000MW to serve the region and the
surrounding states.
K
The key issues of power sector are as
follows:
• Increase in installed genera on
capacity was not commensurate
with the increase in demand.
• Plant Load Factor of thermal sta ons
was decreased to 78% by FY 201314 leading to frequent outages
par cularly during monsoon season.
• Loss of power genera on due to low
coal stock in Thermal Power Plants
• Improper
maintenance
of
Distribu on Infrastructure such as
Substa ons. Feeders, Distribu on
Transformers, Poles and Wires.
• Untapped renewable energy sector
LEGEND
Fig.3.15 Loca on of Thermal Power Plants in Andhra Pradesh and Telangana
Table 3.5 indicates the exis ng thermal
power plant at Andhra Pradesh.
Table 3.5 Exis ng Power Plant and Capacity in Andhra Pradesh
Power StaƟon
LocaƟon
District
Capacity (MW)
Ramagundam B TPS
Kothagudem TPS
Kothagudem V Stage TPS
Dr Narla Tatarao TPS
Rayalassema TPS
Kaka ya TPS
Ramagundam STPS
Simhadri STPS
Ramagundam
Paloncha
Paloncha
Ibrahimpatnam
Cuddapah
Chelpur
Jyothi Nagar
Simhadri
Karimnagar
Khammam
Khammam
Krishna
YSR Kadapa
Warangal
Karimnagar
Visakhapatnam
62.5
720
500
1760
840
500
2600
1000
THE NEW CAPITAL REGION OF ANDHRA PRADESH I THE CAPITAL REGION PLAN REPORT
Kaka ya Thermal Power Plant, Andhra Pradesh
3.2.6 KEY INFRASTRUCTURE ISSUES AND OPPORTUNITIES
Key Issues
OpportuniƟes
Water Supply
• Lack of comprehensive master plan in Water Supply Scheme for Capital Region to
implement.
• Lack of water supply network distribu on in rural areas.
• High un-accounted water loss, 25-40% in the urban area and up to 50% in rural
township.
• Inadequate water supply distribu on. The supply dura on varies from one hour to 24
hours a day.
• High level of illegal connec ons
• An integrated water supply scheme for Capital Region, including water conserva on
and water demand management strategies.
• Opportunity for expansion and upgrading of water supply infrastructure, to enhance
the water supply network, and to reduce high un-accounted water losses in the new
capital.
• Introduce alterna ve water sources, including treated waste water effluent and storm
water from rainwater harves ng.
Waste water
• No comprehensive master plan in UGD scheme for Capital Region to implement.
• Suddapallis Donka STP is reaching its life span but no new STP is proposed to serve the
GMC areas alterna vely.
• Less than 40% of city area is covered by UDG system.
• Less than 15% of households can access to the sewerage connec on.
• Not enough STP’s are provided to treat the total generated sewerage.
• Poten al risks to human health caused by untreated sewage.
• Lack of maintenance for UGD and open drains.
Storm Water
• Unknown condi on of integrated storm water management and centralized
coordina on in the storm water drainage planning amongst Guntur district and Krishna
district.
• Lack of proper storm water drainage network in both urban and rural area.
• Poten al water pollu on caused by polluted discharge since no separa on between
sewage and storm water in the areas without UGD.
• Insufficient open drains and canals in the flood prone areas.
• Opportunity for improving and expanding drainage network, including provide
roadside drains for all roads and enhance the opera on and maintenance for all canals.
• Use of the Flood Protec on Zone concept, green buffer such as grass land and
woodland should be provided at the banks of the exis ng water bodies.
• Implement the Na onal Disaster Management Guideline of Flood Management, to
minimize the vulnerability to floods.
• Develop the Water Sensi ve Urban Design (WSUD), to achieve a sustainable storm
water system.
Solid Waste
•
•
•
•
• Implement the framework Andhra Pradesh Integrated Municipal Solid Waste
Management, including the hierarchy of waste management (5R: reduce, reuse,
recycle, recover and remove).
• Opportunity to iden fy proper landfill site base on the ETZ concept in the Landuse
Master plan.
Power Supply
Lack of solid waste facili es serving the Capital Region.
Poten al contamina on of ground water from non- engineering dumping yard.
Inefficient collec on and disposal in rural areas.
Lack of rural waste genera on data.
• Increase in installed genera on capacity was not commensurate with the increase in
demand.
• Plant Load Factor of thermal sta ons was decreased to 78% by FY 2013-14 leading to
frequent outages par cularly during monsoon season.
• Loss of power genera on due to low coal stock in Thermal Power Plants
• Improper maintenance of Distribu on Infrastructure such as Substa ons. Feeders,
Distribu on Transformers, Poles and Wires.
• Untapped renewable energy sector
• Opportunity for expansion and upgrading the exis ng waste water collec on
infrastructures, to provide sufficient sanita on facili es and STP’s in both rural and
urban areas.
• Introduce the concept of Environmental Treatment Zone (ETZ), isolate and treat all
the unwanted waste far from the residen al area and minimize contact between the
residents and the waste.
• Opportunity to develop renewable energy in the region
• Solid Waste Management integra on by developing biofuels etc in the ETZ
• Introduce renewable energy power supply to the rural areas
45
46
This page has been inten onally le blank
THE NEW CAPITAL REGION OF ANDHRA PRADESH I THE CAPITAL REGION PLAN REPORT
4
DIMENSIONS OF GROWTH
The economic development and socio-demographic strategy for a
specific region would involve integra ng the current strengths of
the region viz. exis ng economic ac vity levels, socio-demographic
indicators, connec vity and linkages, natural resources, etc. with
the overall vision of developing the region into a sustainable urban/
economic center.
In view of this, a detailed review of the influence region (viz. Andhra
Pradesh state) and the Capital Region has been undertaken to
understand the current economic and demographic scenario, economic
posi oning, key natural resources and raw materials present, industrial
ac vity, infrastructure and key ini a ves proposed under the AP
Reorganiza on Act, etc. This chapter is divided into the following sub
sec ons:
1. Review of Exis ng Socio-Economic Informa on;
2. Regional Economic Analysis;
3. Benchmarking of Capital Ci es;
4. Economic Development Strategy for Capital Region;
5. Broad Demographic Projec ons.
School Kids near Vijayawada
4.1 REVIEW OF EXISTING SOCIO ECONOMIC INFORMATION
48
4.1.1 REGIONAL CONTEXT
Andhra Pradesh Overview
Located in the south-eastern part of
the country, Andhra Pradesh state is
bordered by Odisha & Chha sgarh
on the North, Telangana & Karnataka
on the west, Tamil Nadu towards the
south and Bay of Bengal on the east.
The new state of Andhra Pradesh is
spread across an area of approximately
160,200 square kilometers and divided
into 13 districts with a total popula on
base of approximately 49 million
(2011).
Andhra Pradesh is endowed with a
variety of geographic features such as
Eastern Ghats, Nallamala Forest and
the state is fed by Krishna and Godavari
rivers. The state boasts of vast arable
fer le land and rich endowments of
natural resources such as asbestos,
coal, limestone, granite, bauxite,
gypsum, manganese, etc. Some of the
major urban centers in the Andhra
Pradesh state include Visakhapatnam,
Vijayawada, Tirupa , Guntur and
Nellore.
Regional ConnecƟvity
Andhra Pradesh state is characterized
by excellent intra and inter-state
connec vity through road viz. NH-5
(part of Golden Quadrilateral) & NH9, domes c & interna onal airports,
extensive railway network and 5
opera onal sea ports.
The state is very well connected to
the regional and na onal economic
hubs such as Hyderabad, Chennai,
Visakhapatnam, Bengaluru, Mumbai,
etc. via these transit nodes
Fig.4.1 highlights the strategic loca onal
advantages of the state in context of
the region.
The loca on of the state along the
eastern coast and its proximity to
various economic hubs in the region
have the poten al to be the eastern
gateway of India (like Mumbai which is
the western gateway of India) with the
Capital Region being located centrally
to all the regional economic hubs.
Economic Scenario
As discussed in the preceding sec on,
the state has vast arable land and
it accounts for a large agricultural
produc on in the country. It has
abundant availability of mineral
resources geographically spread over
all the 13 districts of the state.
Fig.4.2 highlights the geographical
spread of the state, the key natural
resources, exis ng industrial ac vity
and a few notable industrial clusters.
Fig.4.1 Strategic loca on of the State
THE NEW CAPITAL REGION OF ANDHRA PRADESH I THE CAPITAL REGION PLAN REPORT
As highlighted before, the abundant
availability of various raw materials
(agricultural produce, minerals, etc.),
biggest natural gas reserves (viz. KG
basin near Kakinada) and exis ng
industrial eco-system, etc. provides
significant opportuni es for the
state to evolve as one of the most
prominent industrial hubs in the
country by aggressively expanding into
the downstream ac vi es of already
established industrial ac vi es such
Food processing, Tex le, Automo ve,
non-metallic mineral products, etc.
Key iniƟaƟves proposed under AP
ReorganizaƟon Act 2014
The future economic development of
the region is influenced by the inherent
strengths of the region as well as
the key economic ini a ves already
proposed in the influence region. In
this context, we have undertaken an
assessment of the key economic/
infrastructure ini a ves proposed
in the AP Reorganiza on Act, which
could be leveraged while developing
an economic strategy framework for
the state. Some of the key ini a ves
proposed include:
InformaƟon Technology Investment
Regions (ITIR) ~ the government has
proposed investments worth INR
450,000 million to develop 9,000 acres
as ITIR region. The regions are expected
to employ 0.4 million people once it’s
fully opera onal by 2038.
Fig.4.2 Regional Context showing key natural resources, exis ng industrial ac vi es & industrial clusters
NaƟonal
Investment
and
Manufacturing Zone (NIMZ) ~ as part
of the Act, two NIMZs have also been
proposed at Prakasam and Chi or
districts which are to be developed
on a land area of approximately 5,000
Ha and 6,000 Ha respec vely. The two
proposed manufacturing zones are
expected to witness an investment
of INR 300,000 million and will be
able to generate an employment of
approximately 0.3 million.
Establishment of a new port at
Durgarajapatnam ~ A new sea port at
Durgarajapatnam in Nellore district is
proposed to be developed by central
Government on a land area of approx.
2,035 ha. Land acquisi on for the new
port is currently under progress.
Expansion of exisƟng Airports ~ Current
domes c airports of Visakhapatnam,
Vijayawada and Tirupa are expected
to upgraded to interna onal airports.
Integrated Steel Plant at Cuddapah
~ The government has envisaged
development of an integrated steel
plant in Cuddapah with the produc on
capacity of 5 million tons. Total
investment outlay for the project will
be INR 200,000 million. It is expected
to generate an employment of
approximately 10,000 people. Land
acquisi on for the en re project is
currently in progress.
49
50
EducaƟon infrastructure ~ The State
was also promised se ng up of several
renowned ins tu ons such as IIT, IIM,
NIIT, AIIMS, Petroleum university,
Agricultural university, etc. ~ expected
to aid the economic growth of the
region, by providing required skill set to
employable popula on.
Visakhapatnam – Chennai Industrial
Corridor ~ Asian Development Bank is
expected to provide a financial assistance
of approximately INR 150,000 million
to develop the Visakhapatnam-Chennai
industrial corridor proposed by the
Central government. Visakhapatnam,
Kakinada, Machilipatnam and Tirupa
have been iden fied as the key nodes
on the aforesaid industrial corridor.
Apart from the ci es men oned
above, the industrial corridor will pass
through ci es such as Rajahmundry,
Vijayawada, Guntur, Nellore, Gudur,
etc. The industrial corridor is expected
to generate a manufacturing output
of approximately INR 3,000 billion by
2025.
Development of Metro Rail Facility
~ The Andhra Pradesh government
has announced development of 2
metro rail networks in Vijayawada and
Visakhapatnam. Vijayawada-GunturTenali-Mangalagiri metro rail (VGTM) is
expected to have 4 corridors covering
approximately 50 kilometers in phase
1.
4.1.2 CAPITAL REGION
OVERVIEW
The Capital region (Capital Region)
is spread over parts of Krishna and
Guntur districts and covers a total area
of approx.7,420 sq. km. The capital
region comprises of 291 small villages,
9 medium towns, 1 large city & 1
metropolitan city. It has a total current
popula on of approx. 5.8 million.
The economy of the region is primarily
driven by agricultural and services
sectors (viz. trading, construc on,
hospitality). Some of the major crops
grown in the region include paddy,
jowar, co on, chili, sugarcane, etc.
The capital region is strategically
located centrally to the 2 major urban
agglomera ons viz. Vijayawada and
Guntur. Further, the region has a strong
network of transport infrastructure
via rail (Vijayawada and Guntur ci es
have major railway sta ons), roads (the
NH-5 and the NH- 9 passes through the
region), and a domes c airport near
Vijayawada city (proposed interna onal
airport). Further, the capital region
is located at a distance of approx. 27
km from the proposed sea port in
Machilipatnam, which is expected to
handle a cargo capacity of 17 million
tonnes.
Fig.4.3 Airport, Port & Railway Infrastructure
THE NEW CAPITAL REGION OF ANDHRA PRADESH I THE CAPITAL REGION PLAN REPORT
4.2 REVIEW OF EXISTING
SOCIO ECONOMIC IN
FORMATION
4.2.1 ECONOMIC AND SOCIO
DEMOGRAPHIC PROFILE
GçÄãçÙ D®ÝãÙ®‘ã E‘ÊÄÊî‘ PÙÊ¥®½›
Guntur district is one of the largest
districts in the state. 84% of the district
domes c product (DDP) of Guntur
district is cons tuted by the services
and agriculture segments.
Fig.4.4 Guntur District Economy
Fig.4.6 Guntur District Economic Composi on
Source: Directorate of Economics & Sta s cs
Source: Directorate of Economics & Sta s cs
The district is home to various
agricultural commodi es viz. Chili
(Guntur houses the largest chili market
in the country), paddy, tobacco, co on,
and minerals such as limestone,
quartz, copper, lead, etc. Guntur
district is regarded as one of the major
agricultural and tex le hub of India.
E‘ÊÄÊî‘ CÊÃÖÊÝ®ã®ÊÄ – GçÄãçÙ D®ÝãÙ®‘ã
As men oned above, primary and
ter ary sectors have been the dominant
sectors contribu ng to the DDP of
Guntur district. The ter ary sector
contributed approximately 55% to the
total DDP in 2012-13. Addi onally,
the primary sector (primarily led by
produc on of chilies, co on, tobacco,
etc.) has contributed 29% to the overall
DDP in 2012-13.
Further, in terms of contribu on by
the sub-segments, agriculture segment
has been the largest contributor to the
overall primary sector.
Fig.4.5 Guntur District Demographic Overview
Fig.4.7 Guntur District Employee Distribu on
Source: Directorate of Economics & Sta s cs
Source: Directorate of Economics & Sta s cs
In the secondary sector, construc on
and manufacturing have been the
major contributors with a contribu on
of approximately 83%. However,
even distribu on has been witnessed
amongst the sub-segments of the
ter ary sector.
D›Ãʦك֫®‘ Oò›Ùò®›ó ~ GçÄãçÙ D®ÝãÙ®‘ã
Guntur is regarded as the second
largest district in the state of Andhra
Pradesh in terms of popula on figures
(4.88 million as of 2011).
Agriculture based industries such as
Food & Beverages, Tobacco and Tex les
are providing extensive employment
opportuni es to the worker popula on
in the district.
In terms of educa onal scenario of
the district, significant improvement
has been witnessed in the overall
number of students appearing for the
senior secondary examina on from
approximately 37,000 students in the
year 2007 to about 46,000 in 2012.
Addi onally, the pass percentage has
witnessed a tremendous increase from
73% in 2007 to approximately 91% in
2012.
The pie-chart on the le highlights the
age-group classifica on, wherein the
majority of the popula on is observed
to be concentrated in the age group
of 15-59 (cons tu ng approximately
65% of the total popula on of Guntur
district in 2011). Further, 17% of the
total popula on falls under the agegroup of 5-14. These trends highlight
the significant employable popula on
that the region will be able to supply
going forward.
51
52
In terms of educa onal scenario of
the district, significant improvement
has been witnessed in the overall
number of students appearing for the
senior secondary examina on from
approximately 37,000 students in the
year 2007 to about 46,000 in 2012.
Addi onally, the pass percentage has
witnessed a tremendous increase from
73% in 2007 to approximately 91% in
2012.
Kٮݫă D®ÝãÙ®‘ã E‘ÊÄÊî‘ PÙÊ¥®½›
Krishna district, which is located
towards the north of Guntur district,
is one of the highly developed districts
in the state. Services and Agriculture
are regarded as the most important
ac vi es of the district. Approximately
86% of the district domes c product is
cons tuted by the above men oned
segments.
Further, the district is characterized
by presence of rich variety of soils due
to which agriculture has emerged as
an important occupa on. The district
also has rich mineral base including
limestone, chromite, iron ore, mica,
etc.
E‘ÊÄÊî‘ CÊÃÖÊÝ®ã®ÊÄ
As men oned above, primary and
ter ary sectors have been the dominant
sectors contribu ng to the GDP growth
of Krishna district. The ter ary sector
contributed approximately 58% to the
total DDP in 2012-13. Addi onally,
primary sector (primarily led by
produc on of paddy) has contributed
28% to the overall DDP in 2012-13.
Further, in terms of contribu on by
the sub-segments, agriculture segment
has been the largest contributor to the
overall primary sector. In the secondary
sector, construc on and manufacturing
have been the major contributors with
a contribu on of approximately 80%.
However, even distribu on has been
witnessed amongst the sub-segments
of the ter ary sector.
Senior Secondary Results ~ Total number of
Students
50,000
40,000
40,949
38,904
37,770
46,351
44,625
42,253
Contribution to GDDP (2012-13) – INR 267,480 Mn
42,273
36,893
35,342
58%
31,455
30,000
28%
40,750
14%
27,908
20,000
10,000
0
Primary Sector
2007
2008
2009
2010
Students Appeared
2011
Secondary Sector
Tertiary Sector
2012
Students Passed
Fig.4.8 Guntur Senior Secondary Results
Fig.4.10 Krishna District Economy
Source: Directorate of Economics & Sta s cs
Source: Directorate of Economics & Sta s cs
D›Ãʦك֫®‘ Oò›Ùò®›ó
Fig.4.11 highlights the age-group
classifica on, wherein the majority
of the popula on is observed to be
concentrated in the age group of 1559 (cons tu ng approximately 66% of
the total popula on of Guntur district
in 2011). Further, 17% of the total
popula on falls under the age-group
of 5-14. These trends highlight the
significant employable popula on that
the region will be able to supply going
forward.
Composition of GDDP – 2012-13
74,210 Mn
38,730 Mn
THE NEW CAPITAL REGION OF ANDHRA PRADESH I THE CAPITAL REGION PLAN REPORT
154,540 Mn
10%
100%
7%
17%
20%
80%
38%
42%
22%
60%
40%
2%
23%
66%
24%
41%
14%
20%
33%
18%
3%
0%
Primary Sector
Agriculture based industries such as
Food & Beverages and Tex les are
providing
extensive
employment
opportuni es to the worker popula on
in the district as depicted in Fig.4.12
Population by Age- Group (2011) – 4.5 Million
Secondary Sector
Agriculture
Forestry
Mining
Construction
Trade Services
Banking & Communication
Public Administration & Other Services
20%
Tertiary Sector
Livestock
Fishery
Utilities
Manufacturing
Transport
Real Estate
0-4
5-14
15-59
60+
Fig.4.9 Krishna District Economic Composi on
Fig.4.11 Krishna District Demographic Overview
Source: Directorate of Economics & Sta s cs
Source: Directorate of Economics & Sta s cs
No. of Workers
(2011)
Name of Industry
%
Value
Food & Beverages
16,219
Tobacco Products
41
Textiles
2,891
Leather Products
944
Wood Products
1,122
Paper Products & Printing
2,139
Refined Petroleum
Products
474
Chemical Products
1,743
Rubber & Plastic Products
919
Non-metallic Minerals
2,101
Basic & Fabricated Metals
3,371
Total
31,964
Fig.4.12 Krishna District Employee Distribu on
Senior Secondary Results ~ Total number of Students
51%
0%
9%
3%
4%
7%
60000
1%
5%
3%
7%
11%
100%
20000
50000
43,649
41,295
40,124
37,093
40000
49,069
46,820
45,151
50,944
30000
10000
0
2008
2009
2010
Students Appeared
2011
Students Passed
Fig.4.16 Krishna District Senior Secondary School Results
Source: Directorate of Economics & Sta s cs
Source: Directorate of Economics & Sta s cs
Data Sources
Publica ons
Descrip on
Directorate of Economics and Sta s cs Handbook of Sta s cs 2011; Guntur Popula on by Age group, Industry wise number of
District & Krishna District
workers, Number of students
District Domes c Product of Andhra District Domes c Product (DDP), Break up of District
Pradesh (2004-05 – 2011)
Domes c Product
Fig.4.13 Data Source
Nuzivid
Nandigama
5
6
City
Popula on
Vijayawada
1.5
Key Economic Ac vity
Regional Economic hub ~
Trading, hospitality, retail
Vijayawada
1
2
Mangalagiri
0.07
Handloom Industry (Sarees)
Guntur
0.65
Red Chilly Export, cot-
In terms of educa onal scenario
of the Krishna district, significant
improvement has been witnessed in the
overall number of students appearing
for the senior secondary examina on
from approximately 45,000 students in
the year 2008 to about 51,000 in 2011.
Addi onally, the pass percentage has
witnessed a marginal increase from
82% in 2008 to approximately 86% in
2011.
Key data sources collated and analyzed
For the purpose of undertaking the
economic and socio-demographic
analysis of the Capital Region, we have
collated and analyzed various data
sources. The key data collated and
analyzed has been presented in Fig.4.14
4.2.2 SPATIAL ECONOMIC POSITIONING
53
Based on the detailed mapping of the
region, it was understood that the
Capital Region is located on either sides
of river Krishna with various urban
nodes forming part of the region.
Further, a detailed assessment of
these urban nodes and the corridors
leading to these nodes reveals a
certain character a ached to them in
terms of raw material present, type
of industrial ac vity in the region and
other geographical features, etc.
The exhibit (Fig.4.15) highlights the
spa al spread of the Capital Region and
the economic posi oning of various
urban nodes in the region.
In addi on, the study team undertook
a detailed mapping of each of the
corridors connec ng the urban centers
within the Capital Region to iden fy and
understand the economic drivers for
each of these nodes, which are cri cal
to establish an appropriate posi oning
strategy for the region.
Gudivada
7
Mangalagiri
Further, considerable employment has
been witnessed in the Non-Metallic
Minerals industry (7%) and Metals
(11%) primarily due to the presence
of limestone, chromite and iron ore
deposits.
ton spinning/ginning
Guntur
3
Tenali
4
Tenali
0.16
Trade & Agriculture
Nandigama/
0.04
Industrial clusters (power,
Kondapalli
pharma, plas cs, chemical, etc.)
Nuzivid
0.06
Mango Exports
Gudivada
0.12
Aquaculture, Food processing
AP Capital Region
Fig.4.14 Spa al spread of Capital Region Source: JURONG Research
Fig.4.15 Key economic ac vity
Fig.4.17 Happy school students at Cricket Academy in Amaravathi Township
54
Key Vectors – Capital Region Vector 1:
Vijayawada-Guntur-Tenali (southern
vector)
The vector is primarily characterized
by agricultural, sporadic industrial and
ins tu onal ac vity. Guntur city is
the major urban agglomera on in the
vector, which is known for its large
Chili yard and educa on infrastructure.
The city is also the administra ve
headquarters of the district. It is also
the key transit point for various parts
of the district. The Mangalagiri-Tenali
vector also has a creek passing along
the main arterial road rendering the
scenic view of the vector. The vector
Vector 2: Nandigama– Nuzvid –
Gudivada (northern vector)
The vector is characterized by the
presence of prominent ac vity nodes
including
Vijayawada,
Gudivada,
Nuzivid, Nandigama, etc. Vijayawada,
the second largest city in the state is
located in the vector. The city is widely
known for its trading ac vi es viz.
agricultural trading, transporta on,
automo ve, retail, etc.
has good intra city connec vity through
road and rail connec vity.
Fig.4.18 highlights the
character of vector 1.
economic
Vijayawada
Key
Industries
F&B, Textile
Key
Minerals
Sand, Granite,
Gravel
VNS RMC
Ultra Tech RMC
NRI Hospital
Agrigold Haailand
CRDA
Snapshot
N
Key Agro
Produce
Sugarcane, Fruits,
Fish
Key
Industries
F&B, Aquaculture,
Power, Auto
Components,
Pharmaceutical
Coca Cola
N
W
E
Guntur
Mirchi Yard
Kamakshi Cold storage
NSL Garments
Krishna Prasad Cold
Storage
Cold Storages
Others
Jersey Milk
CRDA
RD
APHM
Engineering
HIL
Non Metallic
Nifty Labs, ORC
labs, Kekule, Orch
Pharmaceutica
l
Hindustan Food
Products
F&B
Spices Park
Eastern Condiments
Delta Sugar
Lanco power
NSL Textiles
Edlapadu
NKR Textiles
Road Network
Water Canal
Railway Line
Figure 19: Vector 1
Source ~ JURONG Research
Fig.4.18 Vector 1 Source: JURONG Research
THE NEW CAPITAL REGION OF ANDHRA PRADESH I THE CAPITAL REGION PLAN REPORT
Plastic
Navata Transport
Logistics
VRL Transport
Logistics
SR Auto
Auto
components
Godrej Agrovet
APPM Ltd
Model Dairy
Best Price
Aquaculture Production
Ponnur
Ruchi Soya
Vijayawada
Autonagar industrial cluster
Jayalakshmi Spinning
mills
NG Fertiliser
NTTP
L&T Infocity
VD Polymers,
Lorvens, Bhavana
Rahamankhan Tobacco
Pearl Beverages
Tenali
Sneha Foods
Hanuman
Jn
Vijayanag Polymer
CCI Products
Amulya Enterprises
Textile Cluster
Industrial
CPF Pvt. Ltd
Kondapalli industrial cluster
Acharya Nagarjuna
University
S
N
Priya Foods
IJM Raintree
Cold Storage
Cluster
Textile
Nuzivid
Mulpuri Feeds
Mangalgiri
Mirchi, Cotton
Fig.4.19 highlights the key economic
character of the vector
The vector has good inter-city
connec vity through road and rail. The
domes c airport is also located in the
vector.
VECTOR 1 - SNAPSHOT
Key Agro
Produce
The vector is primarily characterized
by
agricultural
and
sporadic
industrial ac vity. The exis ng
ac vity is characterized by power,
auto components, pharmaceu cal,
aquaculture and F&B industries.
Further, the vector comprises of
established industrial clusters such as
Kondapalli Industrial cluster, Autonagar
Industrial cluster, etc.
Mulpuri Fisheries
Gannaram Airport
N
W
E
Kanakadurga Agro Oil
S
Priya Foods
Gudivada
KCP Sugar
F&B
Figure 20: Vector 2
Source ~ JURONG Research
Fig.4.19 Vector 2 Source: JURONG Research
Industrial
Others
Aquaculture
Road Network
Railway Line
•
•
•
•
Common capital for
Telangana & AP
IT/ITeS hub
Bulk Drug capital of India
Established Biotech/Aerospace eco-system
Largest city in Andhra Pradesh
Largest sea port on east coast
Significant manufacturing
activity in petro chemical,
steel, pharma, etc.
• Nascent IT/ITeS activity
•
•
•
Hyderabad
Rajahmundry
Key advantages of CRDA vis-à-vis
other regions of AP
• Skilled manpower
• Adequate drinking water
• Significant food produce
• Central location to all parts of AP
• Excellent transportation network
• Existing social infrastructure in
urban centers
• Existing Agriculture production
• Existing Manufacturing strenghts
•
•
•
•
Vijayawada & Guntur are the
largest cities in CRDA
• Hub for major food production
• Significant Textile
manufacturing
• Education hub
•
Hinterland Sectors
(AP State & Regional
Synergies)
Agro & Food
Processing
•
•
•
Guntur
E
S
Chemicals and
Region)
Krishnapatnam
Chennai
• Capital of Tamilnadu state
• Manufacturing hub of India
• Significant Auto and
electronics manufacturing
• Considerable IT exports
Source: JURONG Research
Sunrise Sectors
(Global & India Growth)
Non-Metallic
Products
Prod
duc
u ts
Administrative
sectors
Demand Pull
Sectors
(Government
Bureaucracy)
(Synergies from other
India growth regions)
ƒ
Secretariat
ƒ
Assembly
ƒ
Courts &
Electronics/Hardware
tribunals
Head quarters of
key Govt.
Textile
Logistics
departments
Housing for
Assembly
Food & Beverages
members &
Tourism, Leisure &
Film City
bureaucrats
Pharma/Bio-tech
W
Capital
Region
AP CRDA
PCPIR (Petroleum,
Bengaluru
ƒ
Aquaculture
Temple town
Significant floating
pilgrim population
Established education
hub
Tirupati
ƒ
Textile & Garment
Manufacturing
N
Petrochemicals Investment
Capital of Karnataka state
IT/ITeS hub of India
Aerospace/defence hub
Established electronics ecosystem
Fig.4.20 Regional Economic Posi oning
Kakinada
nada
• PCPIR
• Fertilizer
manufacturing
Vijayawada
4.3 REGIONAL ECONOMIC
ANALYSIS
Vizag
Rubber & Plastics
ƒ
Public facilities
such as housing,
hospitals, etc.
IT/ITES
Engineering
Fig.4.21 Poten al Economic Drivers for Capital Region Source: JURONG Research
Aerospace/
Defense
4.3.1 REGIONAL ECONOM
IC POSITIONING OF
CAPITAL REGION
The Capital Region is located in proximity
to some of the major economic nodes in
the region such as Hyderabad, Chennai,
Bengaluru, Visakhapatnam, Tirupa ,
etc. Further, these economic hubs are
characterized by unique economic
posi oning that defines the key guiding
principles of economic development in
these regions.
Fig.4.20 highlights the economic
posi oning of these hubs and the
advantages of the Capital Region visà-vis the other urban centers in the
region that have the poten al to define
the economic posi oning of the Capital
Region going forward.
As highlighted in Fig.4.20, the key
advantages of the capital region include
its adequate availability of skilled
workforce (viz. Engineering, F&B, IT/
ITeS, Tex le, etc.), rich agriculture
produc on (viz. paddy, chilies, jowar,
sugarcane, co on, etc.), central
loca on to major economic centers,
availability of drinking water to cater to
growing needs of urban agglomera on
and excellent transporta on network.
4.3.2 POSSIBLE FUTURE
ECONOMIC DRIV
ERS FOR AP CAP
ITAL REGION
The key findings from the preceding
modules have been analyzed to iden fy
the poten al future economic drivers
for the capital region. While doing
so, various factors such as hinterland
synergies, domes c & export demand,
upcoming industry opportuni es and
Govt. policy push, etc. have been
analyzed in detail.
Based on preliminary assessment, the
future economic drivers for the capital
region could be broadly divided into 4
categories:
• Hinterland Sectors – This category
comprises of sectors which have
high hinterland synergies in terms
of raw material availability, basic
infrastructure, upstream/downstream
network, etc.
• Sunrise Sectors – This category
includes the industrial sectors exhibi ng
strong growth prospects at India as well
as global level.
• AdministraƟve Sectors – Development
of capital region necessitates the
development of administra ve facili es
for func oning of the Government
thereby triggering the economic
development of the region
• Demand pull sectors - This category
comprises of sectors witnessing higher
growth in the other regions of India,
thereby offering opportuni es for the
region
55
4.4 REGIONAL ECONOMIC
ANALYSIS
4.4.2 ANALYSIS OF INDUSTRIAL STATISTICAL
4.4.1 CRITICAL PARAMETERS FOR ECONOMIC PRIORITIZATION
The economic data pertaining to the
iden fied industrial/economic clusters
has been analyzed to iden fy the high
growth poten al sectors for the capital
region. This has been achieved through
a weighted average ra ng of the
sectors at a global, India and regional
level using a priori za on matrix for
the parameters listed above.
Reflective of core production competencies
Representative of expansion opportunities
56
The preliminary category of economic
ac vi es iden fied as part of the above
module have been analyzed in detail
in terms of understanding the various
parameters such as industry output, key
growth trends, employment genera on
poten al, FDI, export poten al, etc. to
arrive at most promising industrial and
economic uses for the capital region.
Fig.4.22
highlights
the
cri cal
parameters analyzed to evaluate
the high poten al sectors that could
priori ze the economic development in
the region.
Further, to comprehend the industry
dynamics and to evaluate the
opportunity for the Capital Region,
various modules of studies have been
undertaken including:
• Analysis of economic data pertaining
to various industrial segments
• Stakeholder mee ngs (industrial
occupants, industrial associa ons,
Govt. Authori es) to gauge inputs on
the outlook for the sectors
• Opportunity assessment for industry
at India, state and the region level
through primary and secondary
research
The key data sources that have been
u lized to undertake this module are
as highlighted in the Fig.4.23
HISTORICAL & FUTURE INDUSTRY PERFORMANCE
As part of this module, mee ngs
with key stakeholders have been
undertaken to gauge their inputs on
industry growth drivers, raw material
availability,
upstream/downstream
network in region, Govt. policy push
and the future outlook for the sector,
etc., which are the cri cal parameters
that drive the industrial development
ac vity in a region.
Employment
THE NEW CAPITAL REGION OF ANDHRA PRADESH I THE CAPITAL REGION PLAN REPORT
Identification of
Prominent Industry SubSegments
Exports /
Imports
JOB CREATION
Over 40 interac ons have already
been undertaken and more mee ngs
are currently being undertaken to
obtain comprehensive feedback on the
poten al industrial and economic uses
for the capital region.
Reflective of high growth
industries
Production
TRADE OPPORTUNITIES
4.4.3 PERCEPTION STUDY
Direct and telephonic survey conducted
across Govt. En es, manufacturing
establishments, tourism operators,
entertainment & Film city operator,
Economic Service sector units, etc. to
obtain qualita ve feedback.
GLOBAL, INDIA & AP MARKET
Reflective of demand for
specific sub-segments
through exports / imports
Growth
INVESTMENT
FDI /
Investments
Reflective of Investment trends Æ
Direct correlation with future
investment opportunities
Reflective of amount of
employment Æ opportunities of
employment generation
Fig.4.22 Cri cal parameter analysed to evaluate the economic priori za on
Data Sources
Global Industrial Database
Publisher
Descrip on
United Na onal Industrial Develop- Value of Output, Exports, Imports, etc.
ment Organiza on (UNIDO)
Industrial Database (India)
Annual Survey of Industries (ASI)
Value of Output, Investments, Employment, Number of Factories, etc.
Industrial Database (Andhra Pradesh)
Annual Survey of Industries (ASI)
Value of Output, Number of Factories,
Number of Employees, etc.
Fig.4.23 Data Source
Industrial Interactions Break-up ~ Over
35 Interactions Conducted*
F&B
Prominent companies
Aricent
Technology
Ashok Leyland
Delta Sugars
Engineering
Non Metallic Mineral
Products
Priya Foods
Bharath Textiles
Model Diary
Governmental
Departments
Pharmaceuticals
Alstom
Sandvik
Gati
Mulpuri Fishers
KCP Cements
Bayer
Textiles
Packaging
The break-up of mee ngs undertaken
across industrial clusters and some of
the prominent en es met thus far are
presented in Fig.4.24
4.4.4 OPPORTUNITY ASSESSMENT FOR IDENTIFIED
ECONOMIC USES
A detailed analysis of iden fied industrial
segments has been undertaken to
understand the opportunity for the
sector at a Capital Region level. The
following sec ons highlight the key
dynamics and outlook of these sectors
for the region.
Chemicals
Fig.4.24 Industry interac ons break up
Fig.4.25 Sample list of interacted industries
4.4.5 FOOD AND BEVERAGE SECTOR
India is a richly endowed agricultural
na on. It has nearly a tenth of world’s
arable land and a fi h of word’s irrigated
land. India is the world’s second largest
producer of food next to China. The
food processing industry is one of the
largest industries in India and ranks fi h
in terms of produc on, consump on
and exports. As per the industry
es mates, the sector has es mated
market size of USD 40 billion in FY13
and is further expected to expand at
a CAGR of 11 per cent by 2018. The
industry contributed approximately
9.8 % to India’s manufacturing GDP in
2013.
The F&B industry is characterized as
one of the largest industries in the AP
state by value of output and growth.
Andhra Pradesh is endowed with a wide
range of raw materials such as rice,
sugarcane, jowar, mangoes, chilies,
etc. to name a few. India’s largest food
park (Srini Food Park), spread across
147 acres is located in Chi or district.
Over the years, the state is increasingly
witnessing the interest from global
conglomerates that are keen to invest
and partner with the state to promote
an integrated food processing ecosystem in the state. Some of such key
ini a ves announced in the sector
include: Walmart’s MOU with Govt. to
buy & market 100 agricultural products
from Andhra Pradesh and PepsiCo’s
recent approval for establishing Mango
Pulp extrac on plants in Krishna,
Chi or, East & West Godavari districts.
57
Dynamics of Capital Region – F&B
58
Guntur district is famous for Chilies
which witnesses a huge demand from
all over the world. The capital region
is also well known for its rice, pulses
and sugarcane produc on. The region
is also famous for its mangoes exports
grown in and Nuzivid town. However,
the current F&B ac vity in the region is
primarily concentrated in the upstream
ac vi es (viz. cul va on, harves ng,
fermenta on, etc.) with the limited
value add produc on. This presents
significant opportuni es for the
sector to expand into the downstream
ac vi es such as processing, freezing,
packaging and marke ng the products
directly to retailers or end users.
4.4.6 TEXTILE INDUSTRY
Andhra Pradesh is the 3rd largest
producer of co on in the country with
over 5 Million bales and over 17 lakh
acres of land being u lized for co on
produc on. 60% of the co on
produc on in the state is contributed
by Guntur (Capital Region) and
Prakasam districts while the remaining
is contributed by Vizianagaram and
East Godavari. The state has over 150
spinning mills present in the region,
albeit, primarily involved in the basic
midstream ac vi es such as spinning
and ginning. Some of the prominent
Companies involved in the tex le
manufacturing ac vi es in the state
include NSL Tex le, Gokaldas Exports,
Loyal Tex les, etc.
GROWTH DRIVERS
•
•
•
•
Rich agricultural produc on and dis nct raw material base
Growing domes c & export demand
Growth in organized retail is expected to boost the F&B sector
AP Government has iden fied F&B as a thrust sector and & announced se ng up of food parks in all districts
KEY CHALLENGES
• Highly unorganized and fragmented sector ~ dominated by small and micro enterprises
• Currently, the value addi on in the segment is limited ~ industry to acquire technology and train work force to
be able to expand into the downstream ac vi es
O
C
R
Dùăî‘Ý Ê¥ CƒÖ®ãƒ½ R›¦®ÊÄ T›ø㮽›
Fig.4.26 Opportunity Assessment for Capital Region – Food & Beverage
India is the one of the world’s largest
producers of tex les and garments.
The key aspects that have transformed
India into a key sourcing hub include
abundant availability of raw materials
such as co on, wool, silk and jute as well
as skilled workforce. India is the world’s
second largest exporter of tex les
and garments. As per the industry
es mates, the sector contributes about
14% to industrial produc on, 4% to
the gross domes c product (GDP), and
27% to the country’s foreign exchange
inflows. The size of the Tex le industry
was es mated to be USD 89 billion in
2011 and is expected to reach USD 223
billion by 2021.
The region is characterized by
significant produc on of co on.
However, the exis ng manufacturing
ac vity is primarily engaged in basic
ac vi es such as spinning & weaving
with negligible ac vity being witnessed
in the value added produc on.
GROWTH DRIVERS
• Growing urbaniza on, expansion of retail market, changing consumer lifestyle along with favorable Government
ini a ves are expected to have a posi ve impact on the growth of the industry
• Availability of significant raw material and skilled workforce
• Govt. policy push ~ se ng up of Tex le Clusters, 100% FDI, IPDS scheme, welfare schemes for weavers, etc.
KEY CHALLENGES
• Compe on from exis ng tex le hubs of India
• Cheaper imported products will be a deterrent for domes c companies to be compe
O
C
Fig.4.27 Opportunity Assessment for Capital Region – Tex le
THE NEW CAPITAL REGION OF ANDHRA PRADESH I THE CAPITAL REGION PLAN REPORT
R
ve
4.4.7 NON METALLIC MINERAL PRODUCTS
GROWTH DRIVERS
• Significant growth in construc on ac vity owing to development of infrastructure, smart ci es, etc.
• Rich base of non-metallic minerals in the region
• Poten al to expand into the downstream manufacturing ac vi es
KEY CHALLENGES
• Dearth of skilled workforce to enable the downstream expansion of the industry
• Compe on from neighboring states such as Telangana, Odisha which have a be er ecosystem for the industry
O
C
R
59
The non-metallic mineral products
industry bears a direct correla on with
infrastructure development through
the provision of primary materials
required to undertake building and
construc on ac vity. India is endowed
with rich mineral deposits and produces
87 minerals including 4 fuel minerals,
10 metallic minerals, 47 non-metallic
minerals, 3 atomic minerals and 23
minor minerals.
Andhra Pradesh state has rich mineral
base including manganese, limestone,
mica, stea te, copper, graphite etc. The
state stands 2nd in the mica deposits
and produc on in the country and
contains 44% of the limestone reserves
in the country.
Fig.4.28 Opportunity Assessment for Capital Region – Non Metallic Minerals
Dùăî‘Ý Ê¥ CƒÖ®ãƒ½ R›¦®ÊÄ
GROWTH DRIVERS
• Rising income levels together with increasing propensity to spend & easy availability of credit
• The region has abundant number of engineering and ITI colleges to support the manpower requirements of the
industry which is one of the key driving factors for the sector
• Proximity to major ports and established auto cluster in Chennai
• AP Govt. policy push to a ract major auto companies to set up manufacturing units in the state
KEY CHALLENGES
• Significant compe on from the established hubs such as Chennai, Manesar, Pune, etc.
• Lack of exis ng eco-system and skilled work force
O
C
R
Fig.4.29 Opportunity Assessment for Capital Region – Auto and Auto Components
4.4.8 AUTO AND AUTO
COMPONENTS SECTOR
The region has abundant availability
non-metallic mineral deposits such as
limestone, stowing sand, silica sand,
granite, etc. Further, the Capital Region is
currently characterized by the presence
of cement manufacturing units, stone
crushing units, RMC plants, etc.,
primarily suppor ng the construc on/
building ac vity in urban areas such
as Vijayawada and Guntur. However,
the growing urbaniza on coupled
with the thrust on the infrastructure
development and construc on ac vity
in the Capital Region is expected to
provide significant opportuni es for the
region to expand into the downstream
ac vi es of the sector.
The automobile industry is one of India’s
major sectors; accoun ng for 22%
of the country’s manufacturing GDP.
The Indian auto industry, comprising
passenger cars, two-wheelers, threewheelers and commercial vehicles,
is the seventh-largest in the world.
India has emerged as the economic
powerhouse of growth over the last
decade in the automo ve sector. The
key hubs for automo ve manufacturing
in India include Delhi-GurgaonFaridabad in the north, MumbaiPune-Nashik- Aurangabad in the
west, Chennai-Bengaluru-Hosur in the
south and Jamshedpur-Kolkata in the
east. The automo ve manufacturing
industry in Andhra Pradesh is currently
at an emerging stage and is expected
to witness robust growth owing to
the increasing demand in the region
and due to its advantages such as
availability of raw materials, good
port infrastructure for imports and its
proximity to the exis ng automo ve
Hub in Chennai.
Dùăî‘Ý Ê¥ CƒÖ®ãƒ½ R›¦®ÊÄ
The automo ve industrial ac vity in the
Capital Region is currently characterized
by an opera onal auto component
cluster in Vijayawada. It was one of the
first in the country to be developed
exclusively for the automobile servicing
trade. In addi on to the majority of
the servicing units, the Vijayawada
autonagar cluster also has few smallmedium scale manufacturing units.
60
However the cluster has failed to
develop into an integrated component
manufacturing cluster owing to highly
heterogeneous nature of products and
services, use of outdated technology,
inadequate tes ng facili es and small
scale of opera ons etc.
4.4.9 RUBBER AND PLASTIC INDUSTRY
The rubber and plas cs industry is the
12th largest industry in terms of value
of output in the country. India is the
world’s largest producer and the third
largest consumer of natural rubber.
India’s Rubber produc on varies
between 6 and 7 lakh tonnes annually
with a turnover of INR 12,000 million.
Most of the rubber is consumed by
the tyre industry which accounts for
almost 52% of the total demand. Indian
plas cs sector has been es mated to
be at a market size of approx. USD 25
billion in 2012 and expected to reach
USD 30 billion by year 2015. India is
the third largest consumer of plas c
products (outputs), behind China and
the US. The sector is currently a highly
fragmented (approx. 75% unorganized)
and is characterized by high pollu on
and low profitability margins and high
level of compe on.
The rubber and plas c industry in
Andhra Pradesh is characterized by a
highly fragmented industry structure
with a large number of small-medium
scale players opera ng in the segment
with wide range of products, primarily
suppor ng the overall manufacturing
sector.
GROWTH DRIVERS
• An cipated growth of manufacturing industry in the region
• Significant growth of popula on in the region over the next 10-15 years ~ to trigger the consumer demand
• PCPIR development in proximity to Capital Region ~ ensures availability of raw material
KEY CHALLENGES
Dùăî‘Ý Ê¥ CƒÖ®ãƒ½ R›¦®ÊÄ
The region has limited manufacturing
ac vity in the rubber and plas cs
industry and the exis ng ac vity in the
region is dominated by micro and small
enterprises. However, the development
of PCPIR (Petroleum, Chemical and
Petrochemical Investment Region)
region in proximity to Capital Region
is likely to have a posi ve effect on
the sector in the region and would
facilitate increased raw material
availability for the sector. The sector
would also benefit from growth in enduser industries like food processing,
tex les, pharmaceu cal, etc., which are
iden fied as thrust sectors in Andhra
Pradesh.
THE NEW CAPITAL REGION OF ANDHRA PRADESH I THE CAPITAL REGION PLAN REPORT
• High pollu ng nature of the industry ~ plas cs banned for consumer use
• Highly unorganized and fragmented sector
• Fluctua ons in raw material cost would impact profitability
O
C
R
Fig.4.30 Opportunity Assessment for Capital Region – Rubber and Plas cs Industry
4.4.10 PHARMACEUTI
CAL INDUSTRY
GROWTH DRIVERS
• Increasing per capita income together with changing lifestyles resul ng in higher incidence of lifestyle-related
diseases
• Establishment of PCPIR region in Andhra Pradesh ~ characterizes the raw material availability
• Increasing government expenditure on healthcare through various schemes like (CGHS), Na onal Programme
for Healthcare of the Elderly (NPHCE), Rashtriya Arogya Nidhi (RAN) and Janani Suraksha Yojana (JSY)
KEY CHALLENGES
• High pollu ng nature of the industry
• Hurdles in environmental & regulatory approvals for new clearances
• Absence of eco-system in the region
O
C
R
Fig.4.31 Opportunity Assessment for Capital Region – Pharmaceu cal Industry
The Indian pharmaceu cals sector
is es mated to have a market size of
approx. USD 12 billion as of FY13, with
a compounded annual growth rate
of approx. 10% during 2005 -13. The
Indian pharmaceu cals market ranks
third by volume and 14th by value
globally; and contributes to approx.
10% of the total global produc on. The
sector in India is expected to grow at a
CAGR of 14% over the years 2014-18.
Large popula on, increasing income
and healthcare expenditure levels in
the country would augment growth
of the domes c market. Exports from
India cons tute approx. 40% of the
total turnover of the sector in the
country. The country has witnessed
significant FDI and other outsourced
ac vi es in the sector, illustra ng the
increasing demand for generics from
export markets. Further, there is global
opportunity for increasing generics
market due to patent expira on of major
high-value drugs. The Government of
India ini ated policies and tax breaks
on R&D which would further enhance
the growth of the Sector.
The pharmaceu cal industry in Andhra
Pradesh is a nascent industry in
terms of contribu on to the overall
manufacturing industry in the state.
Jawaharlal Nehru Pharma City
located in Visakhapatnam is the only
exis ng large scale Pharmaceu cal
cluster in the state which is designed
to accommodate 120 companies.
However, the large coast line, major
ports and PCPIR hub, etc. are expected
to provide the much needed fillip to the
growth of the industry.
Dùăî‘Ý Ê¥ CƒÖ®ãƒ½ R›¦®ÊÄ
The region has seen limited
manufacturing
ac vity
in
the
pharmaceu cal
industry
and
the exis ng ac vity is primarily
characterized by sporadic ac vity in
Kondapalli industrial estate
61
62
4.4.11 ELECTRONICS INDUSTRY
Dùăî‘Ý Ê¥ CƒÖ®ãƒ½ R›¦®ÊÄ
GROWTH DRIVERS
Indian electronics industry produc on
accounts for only 1-1.5% of the global
electronics hardware produc on of USD
1.75 trillion. However, the demand in
the Indian market is rapidly growing and
investments are flowing in to augment
domes c manufacturing capacity. As
per the es mates of Department of
Electronics & Informa on Technology
(DEITY), Ministry of Communica ons
& Informa on Technology, GOI, the
demand in the Indian electronics
market is expected to touch USD 400
bn in FY20 from the market size of USD
69.6 bn in FY12.
The region has witnessed limited
ac vity in the electronic industry
and is currently characterized small
scale units such as Incap capacitors.
The industry is highly fragmented
and unorganized in nature. However,
the industry in the state is poised for
higher growth given the state’s new
a rac ve electronics policy, increasing
demand and infrastructure subsidy for
the manufacturers from the central
Government
• Rising income levels together with increasing propensity to spend, easy availability of credit
• Increasing digi za on and larger investments by the government is driving the demand for the electronics sector
in India
• Iden fied as the thrust sector by the central and state government
The electronics industry in Andhra
Pradesh has witnessed limited
produc on levels and is primarily
characterized
by
small
scale
manufacturing units. Sri City, in
Chi oor district is one of the prominent
centers for electronic manufacturing
in the state and comprises of a few
SME electronic manufacturing units.
Further, the promoters of the park in
associa on with ELCINA (Electronic
Industries Associa on of India) have
already no fied 100 acres under EMC
scheme.
THE NEW CAPITAL REGION OF ANDHRA PRADESH I THE CAPITAL REGION PLAN REPORT
KEY CHALLENGES
• Over dependence on imports- Currently 40-45% of domes c demand is serviced by imports from countries like
china, Taiwan etc.
• Inadequate infrastructure and lack of ecosystem- limited infrastructure and poor supply chain management are
restric ng the product reach
O
C
R
Fig.4.32 Opportunity Assessment for Capital Region – Electronics Industry
GROWTH DRIVERS
• Se ng up of PCPIR in Andhra Pradesh
• Emerging engineering ac vity, growing infrastructure investments and growth in automo ve sector to boost the
overall ac vity in the subject region.
• Good transporta on network helps in easy procurement of raw materials to the industries
KEY CHALLENGES
•
•
•
•
Lack of infrastructural facili es will be a deterrent to a ract new investments
Limited scope for the fabrica on ac vi es as there is negligible steel produc on in proximity to the subject region
Compe on from neighboring clusters
Falling commodity prices globally
O
C
R
Fig.4.33 Opportunity Assessment for Capital Region – Basic and Fabricated Metal Industry
4.4.12 BASIC AND FAB
RICATED MET
AL INDUSTRY
The metal sector in India is almost a
century old, and exhibits significant
economic
importance
due
to
rising demand by sectors such
as infrastructure, real estate and
automobiles. India ranks 4th globally
in terms of iron ore produc on and is
the largest producer of so iron in the
world. It is also the 4th largest steel
producing country in the world with
a produc on of 81 million tons. The
market size of the industry is expected
to grow from USD 58 Billion in 2011 to
approx. USD 95 Billion in 2016.
The Industry in Andhra Pradesh
is currently at a nascent stage
of development with negligible
produc on ac vity across the value
chain. The industry in Andhra Pradesh
is fragmented in nature owing to the
dominance by small & unorganized
players which manufacture low value
added products. However availability
of raw materials and overall an cipated
growth of the economy are expected to
drive the demand for the industry.
Dùăî‘Ý Ê¥ CƒÖ®ãƒ½ R›¦®ÊÄ
The region has witnessed limited
ac vity in the metal industry. It is
characterized by sporadic ac vity in
Kondapalli and Autonagar industrial
estates. The region is dominated by
micro and small enterprises.
63
4.4.13 TOURISM
64
Andhra Pradesh is characterized as the
top 10 states of the country in terms
of domes c tourist inflow, accoun ng
to 98 million tourists in 2013. The
state con nued to witness increase
in domes c tourist arrivals in the
last few years and is regarded as the
domicile for all types of tourism such as
pilgrimage tourism, heritage tourism,
adventure tourism, cultural tourism,
beach tourism, etc.
Table 4.1 District Tourist Flow_2013
Name of District
GROWTH DRIVERS
Domes c Tourist Inflow (million) – 2013
Chi oor
36.23
East Godavari
11.25
Krishna
10.41
Guntur
2.48
Remaining
Districts
37.63
• New capital forma on will put the region on the na onal/interna onal map, offering its opportunity to harness
the poten al of the region
• The scenic loca ons of Capital Region viz. Bhavani islands, Undavalli caves, Amaravathi Buddhist template, etc.
• Increasing middle class disposable income and expenditure towards tourism & leisure
• Tourism sector is iden fied as thrust sectors by state and central governments.
KEY CHALLENGES
• Terrorist a acks, poli cal unrest, crime against women regarded as the major dampeners among tourists.
• Regulatory issues in terms of Visa arrivals for more countries, delay in tourism related projects, etc.
• Status of the industry as real estate and limited funding avenues from funding ins tu ons
Dùăî‘Ý Ê¥ CƒÖ®ãƒ½ R›¦®ÊÄ
The popular tourist places in Vijayawada
are Undavalli Caves, Mogalarajapuram
Caves, Prakasam Barrage, Bhavani
Island, Victoria Museum, Kondapalli
Fort, Gandhi Hill, etc. Located between
Krishna & Godavari delta, Kolleru Lake
is characterized as the largest fresh
water lake in India. The region has also
several Buddhist se lements such as
Amaravathi.
Total
O
C
98
Fig.4.34 Opportunity Assessment for Capital Region – Tourism
The districts with the highest tourist
flow in the state is highlighted in Table
4.1.
THE NEW CAPITAL REGION OF ANDHRA PRADESH I THE CAPITAL REGION PLAN REPORT
R
GROWTH DRIVERS
• Growth in civil avia on & military spending
• Low man-hour cost base in India
• Increase in FDI limit to 49% & offset policy
KEY CHALLENGES
• Lack of exis ng aerospace eco – system in the state and the region
• Current lack of aerospace grade sub-assembly and raw material contributes to the lack of eco system for the
industry
• S ff compe on from other Aerospace parks in India viz. Hyderabad & Bengaluru
O
C
Fig.4.35 Opportunity Assessment for Capital Region – Aerospace Sector
R
4.4.14 AEROSPACE SECTOR
Dùăî‘Ý Ê¥ CƒÖ®ãƒ½ R›¦®ÊÄ
The Indian aerospace industry has
historically been dominated by large
Public Sector Undertakings (PSUs). The
aerospace market in India primarily
comprises the commercial or civilian
and the military sectors. In addi on
to this, space research and satellites
forms another cluster completely
administered by the Government of
India. In the present scenario defense
related manufacturers in India are
limited and clustered around Bangalore,
Hyderabad and Nagpur. The residual
state of Andhra Pradesh has negligible
presence of aerospace and allied
industries, although the state is home
to one of the large rocket launching
sta ons in the country viz. SHAR.
The Capital Region currently comprises
negligible manufacturing ac vity in the
Aerospace segment. However, various
Government ini a ves such as increase
in FDI cap to 49%, Defense offset policy
manda ng 30% local sourcing, etc. are
expected to drive the growth of the
industry over the long term horizon.
65
66
4.4.15 IT/IT S INDUSTRY
Dùăî‘Ý Ê¥ CƒÖ®ãƒ½ R›¦®ÊÄ
GROWTH DRIVERS
The Indian IT/ITeS industry has been one
of the great success stories of modern
India and has helped the country
transform from an agriculture based
economy to knowledge based economy.
The contribu on of the sector to India’s
GDP has increased from a paltry 1.2%
in 1998 to an impressive 8.1% in 2014.
The industry turnover stood at USD
118 Billion in FY-14 and is expected to
double by the year 2020.
The region is characterized by negligible ac vity in the IT/ITeS sector.
Vijayawada city has an opera onal IT
SEZ developed jointly by APIIC and L&T
near Gannavaram airport. The revenue
from Vijayawada was around INR 1,150
million during years 2012-13. However,
the sector is expected to witness
gradual rise over the medium to long
term with a number of sustained
ini a ves currently being undertaken
by the state government.
• Adequate availability of skilled manpower
• Physical infrastructure ~ excellent connec vity via road, rail and air to key loca ons in India viz. Hyderabad,
Chennai, Vishakhapatnam and Bengaluru
• Availability of social and support infrastructure including schools, hospitals, shopping centers, entertainment
avenues etc. in the urban centers of Vijayawada and Guntur
IT/ITeS sector in Andhra Pradesh is
currently emerging with ci es such as
Vishakhapatnam, Tirupa witnessing
increased investments by the private
companies. The total revenues from
these ci es were INR 16,280 million for
the year 2012-2013, which contributed
0.4% to the na onal revenues. Further,
the pro-ac ve steps taken by the state
Government in terms of announcing
an ambi ous IT policy outlining
various incen ves and benefits to
companies, upgrada on of airports
and other infrastructure developments,
and emergence of ci es such as
Visakhapatnam as the smart ci es to
catapult the demand for the sector and
a ract major investments.
THE NEW CAPITAL REGION OF ANDHRA PRADESH I THE CAPITAL REGION PLAN REPORT
KEY CHALLENGES
• Significant compe on from established IT hubs like Hyderabad, Chennai, Bangalore
• High land prices can be a deterrent for se ng up new IT units
O
C
Fig.4.36 Opportunity Assessment for Capital Region – IT/ITeS Industry
R
4.4.16 AQUACULTURE
INDUSTRY
GROWTH DRIVERS
• Proximity to natural resources resul ng in lower logis cs cost
• MPEDA to invest INR 46,250 million in the state over the next 5 years on infrastructure (viz. cold chains, etc.)
• Govt. incen ves such as diesel subsidies for 1,500 boats, insurance for 6.5 lakh fishermen, etc.
KEY CHALLENGES
• S ff compe on from other states such as Orissa, West Bengal, Tamil Nadu, etc.
• Dras c climate changes affec ng quality of produce
• Sector primarily unorganized with small and medium sized producers
O
C
Fig.4.37 Opportunity Assessment for Capital Region – Aquaculture Industry
R
India is the second largest country in
Aquaculture produc on in the world.
It contributes nearly 5% of the world’s
total fish produc on and approx. 8 10% of total aquaculture produc on.
Seafood exports contribute approx.
3.32% of the country’s total exports
employing 15 million people. India’s
long coastline of 7,500 km is the key
to the aquaculture produc on. The top
5 leading fish/aquaculture producer
states in India are Andhra Pradesh,
Karnataka, West Bengal, Tamil Nadu
and Gujarat. The major importers of
India’s seafood are Japan, EU, USA,
Australia and Middle East.
Andhra Pradesh is the largest producer
of fish in India with a produc on
of 17.68 tonnes of fish annually. It
contributes to 2/3rd of marine exports
from India. Geographical advantages
such as 972 kilometer long coastline
(spanning across 7 districts), 4,120
km of riverine area, 60 reservoirs,
0.5 million ha of brackish waters, etc.
are enabling the quality and reliable
produc on in the state. The state has
witnessed conversion of over 1 lakh
acres of agricultural land converted into
aquaculture sites during the last.
Dùăî‘Ý Ê¥ CƒÖ®ãƒ½ R›¦®ÊÄ
The region is characterized by significant ac vity in aquaculture industry.
It is geographically endowed as it is
located in close proximity to lakes and
rivers viz. Krishna, Kolleru lake, Pulicat
lake, etc. Favorable clima c condi ons
are the other major reason for quality
of aquaculture produce in the region.
The key growth drivers and challenges
for the industry are as highlighted in
the exhibit beside:
67
68
4.4.17 LOGISTICS INDUSTRY
Dùăî‘Ý Ê¥ CƒÖ®ãƒ½ R›¦®ÊÄ
GROWTH DRIVERS
The demand for logis cs services in
India has largely been fuelled by the
growth of the manufacturing sector in
India and the growth of industry can
be regarded as a proxy to the overall
economic growth in India. As per the
industry es mates, the Indian logis cs
industry was valued at an es mated
USD 130 billion in 2012-13. It was
es mated to have grown at a CAGR of
over 16 per cent over the last five years.
The transport infrastructure in the state
is well established. It is well connected by
all modes of transport viz. air, road, rail
& sea. Further, the state has numerous
cold chains and warehouses owned by
private operators & the warehousing
corpora ons that cater to the exis ng
agricultural/ food processing industry.
However, the Government proposals
to set up various logis cs clusters in
the state are expected to trigger the
development of organized logis cs
clusters in the state.
The logis cs ac vity in the Capital
Region is characterized by cold
chains and small scale unorganized
warehouses suppor ng the agricultural
produc on in the region. The region
currently lacks any large scale
warehousing development. However,
the region possesses excellent
connec vity to regional economic
hubs via road, rail and air. This wellestablished transporta on
network coupled with the an cipated
growth in manufacturing ac vi es in
sectors such as F&B, Tex les, etc. are
expected to drive the growth of the
sector over the medium term horizon.
• Introduc on of GST is likely to bring in investments by large players in warehousing space
• Increase in FDI limit to 100% along with 10 year Tax holiday in Port sector can enable the state and the region to
enhance its a rac veness
• Envisaged growth in the overall manufacturing & organized retail business
• Development of inland waterways on Krishna river and the other creeks in the region would enable the posi oning
of the region as mul -model logis cs hub
KEY CHALLENGES
• Lower economies of scale due to high fragmenta on of industry
• Infrastructural bo lenecks
• Significant compe on from already established ci es such as Vizag, Chennai. etc.
O
C
Fig.4.38 Opportunity Assessment for Capital Region – Logis cs Industry
THE NEW CAPITAL REGION OF ANDHRA PRADESH I THE CAPITAL REGION PLAN REPORT
R
Industry Segment
Opportunity for Capital Region
Short-Medium Term
Medium to
Term
Key Growth Drivers
Long
Food & beverage products (Agro Processing)
Largest sector in the state (27% share in the overall output – 2008-11)
Aquaculture
Exis ng eco-system, favorable climate condi ons & fresh water sources
Tex le Industry
Abundant availability of raw materials – Substan al export demand
Non-Metallic Mineral Products
Downstream opportuni es in the short-medium term due to raw
material availability and growth in construc on industry
Auto & Auto Components
Government thrust and an cipated demand growth in the region
Rubber & Plas cs
Strong inter – industry linkages; primarily as a support industry
Pharmaceu cals
Hinterland synergies; bordering a large pharma hub; Establishment of PCPIR region to propel growth
Electronics Industry
Government thrust, presence of adequate power and manpower
Basic & Fabricate Metal Industry
Downstream opportuni es in the short-medium term due to raw material availability
Tourism
Govt. thrust & places of cultural and religious importance
Aerospace / Defense
Emphasis on the industry by both Central & State govt.
Logis cs
IT / ITeS
Fig.4.39 Industry Opportunity Matrix
Direct synergies with the overall industrial ac vity in the region
Presence of skilled manpower, Govt. thrust
4.4.18 INDUSTRY OPPOR
TUNITY MATRIX
CAPITAL REGION
The findings from the above modules
viz. industrial sta s cal assessment,
opportunity assessment and the
stakeholder interac ons have been
analyzed in detail to arrive at the
outlook for the iden fied industrial/
economic uses that have the poten al
to trigger the economic development
within the Capital Region over the
short-medium term and long term.
69
4.5 BENCHMARKING OF CAPITAL CITIES
70
Benchmarking has been undertaken
of select prominent state capitals
which have evolved as economic
powerhouses in the country. The
objec ve of the benchmarking exercise
is to understand the growth trajectory
of these ci es, key growth drivers and
the consequent impact on popula on
and the expansion of the metropolitan
region/urban agglomera on. At this
stage of the study, the ci es chosen for
the purpose of benchmarking include
Hyderabad & Bangalore.
4.5.1 HYDERABAD URBAN
AGGLOMERATION
Hyderabad Metropolitan Region, with
an area of 7,257 sq. km is the sixth
largest urban agglomera on in India.
The city has established itself as an
important hub for knowledge based
sectors (viz. IT / ITeS and bio-tech)
and high-value add manufacturing
sectors (viz. pharma, aerospace etc.).
The growth of the city has been aided
by excellent physical infrastructure
ini a ves such as the PVNR Elevated
Expressway, Outer Ring Road, MMTS,
and the under construc on Metro Rail
EvoluƟon of the city
The economy of the city has evolved
over me with the se ng up of
Industrial zones in 1930’s to emergence
of Pharmaceu cal sector in the 1970’s.
Late 1990’s saw emergence of IT sector
with establishment of Cyber Towers in
1998, which was considered to be
the trigger point that catapulted
the economic growth of the city to
the next level and led to significant
urbaniza on. The impact of the city has
spread to parts of neighboring districts
of Ranga Reddy, Medak, Nalgonda &
Mahabubnagar.
Fig.4.41 highlights the growth trajectory
of the Hyderabad over the last 10-15 ye
ars:
E‘ÊÄÊî‘ PÊÝ®ã®ÊĮĦ
HYDERABAD LAND USE
PLAN 2031
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
Area: 3,065 Sq.km
Population : 6.47 Mn
GDDP (INR Crores) : 34,347 (2006)
Key economic sectors:
Pharmaceutical, IT/ITES, R&D
Figure 27: Hyderabad Urban Agglomeration
Fig.4.40 Hyderabad Urban Agglomera on
Fig.4.42 highlights the economic
posi oning of the Hyderabad city and
the pillars on which the development
of the city rests:
C½çÝã›Ù ƒÝ›— D›ò›½ÊÖÛÄã
The primary growth drivers for
economic development and the key
economic clusters in the city have
been analyzed to understand the
pa ern of economic development and
Clusteriza on techniques adopted in
planning the region.
THE NEW CAPITAL REGION OF ANDHRA PRADESH I THE CAPITAL REGION PLAN REPORT
Area* : 2,555 Sq.km
Population : 5.74 Mn (2001)
GDDP^ (INR Crores) : 16,963 (2001)
Key economic sectors: Manufacturing,
Pharmaceutical
7 Years Later ~
Year 2005
Figure 28: Hyderabad Evolution
The economic posi oning of Hyderabad
city is primarily defined by superior
basic and industrial infrastructure as
well as the established eco-system for
knowledge based sectors such as IT/
ITeS, Bio-tech and Pharmaceu cal.
Fig.4.43 highlighted alongside depicts
the key economic clusters and their
geographical spread around the
Hyderabad city.
Trigger Point ~
Year 1998
Fig.4.41 Hyderabad Economic Posi oning
Fig.4.42 Hyderabad Evolu on
12 Years Later ~
Year 2011
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
Area: 5600 Sq.km
Population : 7.74 Mn
GDDP (INR Crores) : 85,790 (2011)
Key
economic
sectors:
Pharmaceutical, IT/ITES, R&D
Metropolitan region expanded to 7,228
Sq.km in 2013
Fig.4.45 besides highlights various
clusters, prevailing industrial ac vity
and the key companies driving growth
in these clusters:
Hù—›Ùƒƒ— E‘ÊÄÊÃù
Fig.4.43 Cluster Based development
Hyderabad
Fig.4.46 Economic Posi oning of Bengaluru
Cluster
Industry
Prominent companies
Cluster 1
Services Cluster
Microso , Wipro, Accenture, Google, Infosys, TCS, IBM, Cognizant
Cluster 2
Pharma Cluster
Aurobindo Pharma, Dr. Reddy’s Laboratories, Neuland Pharma, Gland Pharma
Cluster 3
Genome Valley
Dupont, Shanta Biotech, Biological-E, Bharat Biotech, Uni Sankyo, Lonza, Vimta Labs
Cluster 4
Aerospace/Defence/
TAS, Lockheed Mar n, Sikorsky, Astra Microwave, HCL, Tata Communica ons
Electronics
Fig.4.44 Industry Clusters
Bangalore
Intl’ Airport
(BIA)
North
The GDP of Hyderabad urban
agglomera on has grown at a CGAR of
16% over the last 10 years. The growth
in the GDP is primarily cons tuted by
the ter ary sector dominated by IT/ITeS
industry.
The popula on in the urban
agglomera on has also grown at a
CAGR of 3% over the last 10 year me
horizon.
4.5.2 BENGALURU URBAN
AGGLOMERATION
Bengaluru is the fi h largest urban
agglomera on in India with a covered
area of approx. 8,000 sq km. It is
nicknamed ‘Silicon Valley of India’,
because of its role as the na on’s leading
IT exporter. Bangalore is also known as
the intellectual capital of India, due to
the presence of prominent educa onal
ins tu ons such as IISC, IIM, NLSIU. The
growth of the city has been supported
by various infrastructure ini a ves such
as the Outer Ring Road, Peripheral Ring
Road, Airport Expressway and Metro
projects.
the Karnataka Government. The trigger
points that paved the way for the
development of the city can be traced
to the se ng up of STPI in 1991 and
the development of Export promo on
industrial park (EPIP) in Whitefield
region during the period 1994-96. The
turn of the millennium witnessed the
new age IT companies entering into the
city making it the hub for many IT/ITeS
companies in India.
Fig.4.49 highlights the growth trajectory
of the Bengaluru agglomera on over
the last 15 - 20 years:
E‘ÊÄÊî‘ PÊÝ®ã®ÊĮĦ
The economic posi oning of Bengaluru
city is primarily defined by the crea on
of industrial investment regions and
significant investments in the educa on
infrastructure and basic infrastructure.
Fig.4.50 highlights the economic
posi oning of the Bengaluru city and
the pillars on which the development
of the city rests:
C½çÝã›Ù BƒÝ›— D›ò›½ÊÖÛÄã
The primary growth drivers for
economic development and the key
economic clusters in the city have
been analyzed to understand the
pa ern of economic development and
Clusteriza on techniques adopted in
planning the region.
EEast
st
Whitefiel
d
Southeast
South
So
Electronic
City
Fig.4.45 Hyderabad Economy
Fig.4.47 Cluster based development - Bengaluru
Eòʽçã®ÊÄ Ê¥ 㫛 ‘®ãù
The seeds of growth of Bengaluru
were laid by the Central government
investments into the public sector
industries such as BEL, HAL, ISRO, HMT.
The roots of IT revolu on in the country
were laid in the late 1970’s with the
establishment of Electronics City by
Fig.4.47 highlighted alongside depict
the key economic clusters and their
geographical spread around the
Bengaluru city.
71
Gross District Domestic Product of Bangalore at Current Prices (INR
Crores)
CAGR
(1999 -2012) ~
17.51%
180,000
160,000
140,000
Trigger Point ~
Year 1996
80,000
60,000
40,000
146,299
100,000
174,309
120,000
131,135
The GDP of Bengaluru urban
agglomera on has witnessed a CGAR
growth rate of 17% over the last
12 years. The growth in the GDP is
primarily cons tuted by the ter ary
sector, which is dominated by IT/ITeS
and services industry.
113,445
B›Ä¦ƒ½çÙç E‘ÊÄÊÃù
Population
11 year
CAGR ~ 3%
200,000
100,971
72
Fig.4.51 besides highlights various
clusters, prevailing industrial ac vity
and the key companies driving growth
in these clusters:
20,000
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
Area: 421 Sq.Km (2003)
Population : 8.4 Mn (2001)
GDDP^ (INR Crores): 26,350 (2001)
Key economic sectors: Electronics,
Defense
11 Years Later ~
Year 2007
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
Area:* 1,306 Sq.km
Population : 9.88 Mn (2007)
GDDP (INR Crores): 1,00,971 (2008)
Key economic sectors: IT/ITES,
Biotechnology
0
The popula on in the urban
agglomera on has also grown by 3%
CAGR over the last 10-12 year me
horizon.
Cluster
Cluster 1
Industry
2007-08
2008-09
2009-10
2010-11
2011-12
Fig.4.48 Bengaluru Economy
* Metropolitan Region
^ Bangalore District (Urban & Rural) and Ramnagara District
Fig.4.49 Bengaluru Evolu on
Prominent companies
Hardware Park, Aerospace, IT/ Wipro Actuators, Amada, Shell Global Research Center, IBM, Nokia
ITES
Siemens, Alcatel Lucent, Tyco Electronics
Cluster 2
IT/ITES
Wipro, Hical Technologies, Cisco, Accenture, Honeywell
Cluster 3
Bidadi
Industrial Parks promoted by KIADB~ Toyota
Cluster 4
Defence & Aerospace
HAL, NAL, ISRO
Cluster 5
Electronic City
Infosys, BHEL, Siemens, 3M, GE, Tech Mahindra, Biocon
Fig.4.51 Industry Clusters
THE NEW CAPITAL REGION OF ANDHRA PRADESH I THE CAPITAL REGION PLAN REPORT
Fig.4.50 Bengaluru Economic Posi oning
20 Years Later ~
Year 2015
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
Area*: 8006 Sq. Km
Population : 11.1 Mn (2011)
GDDP (INR Crores): 1,46,299 (2011)
Key economic sectors:
IT/ITES, Biotechnology, Aerospace, &
Defense, Electronics
5
URBAN SUSTAINABILITY AND
VISION FOR THE CAPITAL REGION
This chapter establishes Urban Sustainability Framework to address the
pressing issues rela ng to environment, social and economic governance and
ensure long-term sustainable development of the Capital Region and City.
The Vision is a collec ve outcome of various planning area studies, sustainability
analysis and understanding of stakeholders aspira ons for the enduring
development of the Capital Region and City
The chapter covers the following topics:
1. Urban Sustainability Framework
2. Development Vision for Capital Region and City
3. Development Goals, Objec ves & Strategies
4. Benchmarking & City Comparison
People from the Capital Region, looking forward to a great ,liveable and an inclusive Capital City
5.1 URBAN SUSTAINABILITY FRAMEWORK
74
As part of the overall planning process,
an Urban Sustainability Framework is
established to provide guiding principles
and overarching parameters for the
subsequent planning processes that
will ensure the long term sustainability
of the Capital Region and City.
Though sustainability issues may differ
from city to city or from region to region
and are unique to a par cular city or
region based on its past experiences,
it can be concluded that the main
sustainability issues are generally
revolving around these 6 key areas.
The most cri cal components in city
development that may affect the long
term sustainability of the city will
be explained as to how they can be
addressed consistently in all stages and
all aspects of city planning.
Besides iden fying key sustainability
issues, the framework will also set
the sustainability targets and Key
Performance Indicators (KPI’s) for
the city’s long term development.
The sustainability targets form the
overarching parameters to be achieved
through the implementa on of the
master plan in the next 20 and 40 years.
In establishing the framework, a
“Targeted Approach” is adopted with
iden fica on of 6 specific sustainability
areas to be examined. This approach
was developed by Surbana based on
the past planning experiences; it helps
urban planners to iden fy the context
specific issues of the city, following
the broad guidance of the 6 areas of
concerns as shown in the following
diagram.
Fig.5.1 Urban Sustainability Framework
THE NEW CAPITAL REGION OF ANDHRA PRADESH I THE CAPITAL REGION PLAN REPORT
5.1.1 KEY SUSTAINABILITY
ISSUES IN CAPITAL
REGION
Several important issues have been
iden fied that need to be addressed
in terms of sustainability. Surbana
and Jurong teams have priori zed the
following 6 issues that will transform in
to the Goals of the Master Plan.
5.1.2 SUSTAINABILITY FRAMEWORK
75
Key Issues
Exis ng Condi on and Poten al
Crea ng Jobs
This issue is directly related to Economic Sustainability of the New Capital Region • Generate jobs to sustain a popula on of 9-12 million
and City. In order to a ract people to come to this New Capital City, they must be
people in the Capital Region
able to find employment. The exis ng poten al of Agro-based industries needs to be • Generate knowledge based and high-tech jobs
capitalized upon for this purpose.
to sustain a popula on of about 2 million people
within the Capital City
A rac ng Investments
The Capital City is to be developed on a greenfield site. Therefore, a rac ng • Iden fy key strategic projects that will form part
investments to kick-start development and sustaining the same in the long run is a
of the ini al phases of developments in order to
bigger challenge. The employment generators need to carefully proposed to balance
a ract investments both locally and globally.
the needs of the locals and also to a ract global investors.
Housing
Housing provision has been a key concern throughout India for a long me. Most • Target minimum 50% affordable housing to cater to
of the supply of housing is catered to the High Income Group, whereas most of the
Low and Medium Income group
demand for housing is in the Low and Medium Income Group people. Government • Ensure strict planning and construc on standards at
needs to devise strategies to develop affordable housing for the vast majority of
par with global norms to ensure quality of housing
people that are not being considered at the moment.
Nature and Environment
The Capital Region is blessed with a rich array of natural and environmental features. • Preserve all natural features and enhance their
These include the Krishna River, Kondapalli Reserved Forest, Mangalagiri Reserved
characters
Forest, Tadepalli Reserved Forest among others. In addi on to this there are several • Plan strategically to cause minimum disturbance to
canals and river tributaries that pass through the Capital City area and need to be
high value agriculture land
carefully considered in the planning. A large por on of the land in the Capital Region
is very rich in agriculture. This land should be strategically preserved for farming
wherever plausible.
Floods
The Capital Region is also prone to floods. Management of the flood waters, especially • Design a sustainable flood management system
within the Capital City will be one of the key considera ons in the planning.
• U lize exis ng canals and water-bodies
Heritage
Several heritage and cultural features fall within the Capital Region. A few of these • Develop a heritage tourism circuit to connect all
heritage sites
include Amaravathi, Undavalli caves, Kondapalli Fort, etc. It becomes very cri cal to
protect these features and also integrate them in the planning. A comprehensive • Allocate necessary facili es to compliment the
tourism at these heritage sites
strategy to develop a heritage tourism circuit needs to be considered both at Capital
City and Capital Region levels.
1. Crea ng Jobs
2. A rac ng investments
3. Provision of good quality housing
4. Nature and Environment
5. Flood Management
6. Heritage & Culture
Targets/KPI’s
5.2 VISION
76
5.3 GOALS
People’s Capital of Andhra Pradesh
The New Capital of Andhra Pradesh
global quality of life standards to
is envisioned to be the pioneer
offer high levels of convenience to
Smart City of India. It aims to be
people of all ages. The proposal
World Class and at par with the
will capitalize on the rich heritage
standards set forth by countries
possessed by the region and u lize
such as Singapore. The new capital
it to create a unique iden ty for
will be an economic powerhouse
the new capital. Sustainability and
that will create a range of jobs
efficient management of resources
2
1
Jobs & Homes
for all
www.thesingaporepromise.sg
for exis ng resident villagers by
will form another important pillar
upgrading their skills, as well as
of this new capital. It will be sup-
high-tech and knowledge based
ported by maintaining the clean
industry jobs to be globally compet-
and green character that the site
i ve. Housing will be at the core of
currently demonstrates by mimick-
its planning and will aim to provide
ing these ideas in to the new capital
affordable and quality homes to all
master plan.
4
3
World Class
Infrastructure
www.taxisingapore.com
5
Iden ty &
Heritage
Quality Living
pixshark.com
6
Efficient
Resource
Management
Clean & Green
its residents. It will demonstrate
en.wikipedia.org
THE NEW CAPITAL REGION OF ANDHRA PRADESH I THE CAPITAL REGION PLAN REPORT
www.smtwastebrokers.com.au
www.panoramio.com
Quality of Life Essentials
77
The Capital City aims to provide all the Life essen als listed below.
Health
Educa on
Prosperity
Community
Physical Condi on
Sense of physical and
emo onal security
for individual as well
as the family.
Physical and mental
wellbeing of the
residents and visitors.
A chance to receive
high quality educa on
for all incomes,
abili es and ages.
An opportunity to
develop a fulfilling career
that allows growth,
self-sufficiency and
wealth genera on.
Natural sense of belonging
to the community,
sharing common
interests and working
collec vely to achieve
universal objec ves.
The condi on of the
built and the natural
environment.
Housing
Public Services
Mobility
Environment
Recrea on
Culture
Ameni es
Op ons of quality
residences that will
provide shelter and
safety to the residents.
Services provided by the
government and their
allies such as u li es,
sanita on, infrastructure
and its maintenance.
Providing convenient
op ons to access
employment, housing and
ameni es through public
and private transport.
The factors that affect the
state of the surroundings
in which people,
animals or plants live.
Places that give an
opportunity to refresh
the strength and spirits
of people and encourage
social interac on.
Ac vi es and events that
showcase the cultural
composi on of the place.
Facili es that are within
easy reach and provide
for services, materials,
entertainment and
other daily necessi es.
Definitions
Safety
Source: Detroit Future City, Detroit Strategic Framework Plan, December 2012
5.4 STRATEGIES
78
2
1
World Class
Infrastructure
Jobs & Homes for all
Strategies:
Strategies:
sairam-jobopportuniƟesinthemarket.blogspot.com
www.volunteerinindia.com
• Promote high-value added agriculture and agrobased industries
• Build state of art public transport both for Capital
Region and Capital City
• Create opportuni es for exis ng dwellers to
upgrade skills
• Encourage high percentage of modal share using
public transport
• Introduce a mix of knowledge based high-tech
industries to a ract investments
• Develop a world class Interna onal Airport to
serve the Capital Region
• Encourage home ownership to create a sense of
iden ty for ci zens
• Plan for a long term 2050 horizon and reserve
transit corridors where necessary
• Provide sufficient affordable housing to cater to
the needful
www.trekearth.com
• Develop a highly efficient road network at par
with interna onal standards
• Strategize a slum free city through careful
planning
• Capitalize on the opportunity to use Na onal
Waterway for trade
• Phase out industries strategically for long term
sustained growth
• High Speed Railway to have a sta on in the
Capital City
•
• Plan strategically to allow easy transfer between
different modes of transport
• Create a favourable policy framework to
implement and support the Capital City
development
www.getnews.co.za
THE NEW CAPITAL REGION OF ANDHRA PRADESH I THE CAPITAL REGION PLAN REPORT
www.aurecongroup.com
infra3-hƩpwww.zunewallpaper.com
3
79
4
Efficient Resource
Management
Clean & Green
Strategies:
Strategies:
www.wm.com
www.geƟntravel.com
• Adopt efficient flood control techniques and
protect most waterways in the city
• Create a network of parks and greens by
integra ng the village ponds
• Promote “Reduce, Recycle and Reuse”
• Ensure access to park for every ci zen within
easy walking distance
• Establish state of art waste management and
disposal systems across the city
• Make produc ve use of natural features on the
site without damaging them
• Develop a smart grid in the city for efficient
management of power and energy
• Encourage use of renewable energy to maximum
extent possible
• Reserve most of the waterfront along Krishna
river for public use
intercongreen.com
• Mandate retaining the green network reserved
in the Capital City Plan
• Integrate the storm water drainage system with
the exis ng canal and village tank network and
u lize for flood management and recrea on
• Reserve high value agriculture land as no
development zone wherever possible
• Encourage cer fica on of projects using global
standards such IGBC and LEED
• U lize the natural features such as forest and
hills to create a regional green network.
• Create awareness among the residents on
the importance and role of ci zens in efficient
resource management
• Create an image of city si ng within the water
and greens
thewannabescienƟst.com
www.opengreenmap.org
keepitrealtors.blogspot.com
80
5
6
Quality Living
Iden ty & Heritage
Strategies:
Strategies:
knowledgeempowered.com
www.indiantravels.com
• Ensure public transit is within easy walking
distance for all
• Preserve all historic and culturally important
sites
• Convenience of neighbourhood center ameni es
within walking distance
• Promote culture and heritage for locals and
tourism
• Safe environment with universal access for all
ages
• Compliment adjacent ci es, at the same me
establish a unique iden ty
• Provide opportuni es for learning and enhancing
careers within the Capital City and Region
• Integrate the exis ng villages as a vital
component of city development
• Provide excellent health care facili es at
affordable costs within easy reach
www.bauersit.com
• Ensure ample opportuni es to live, work, learn
and play
• Development nodes within the city that reflect
the culture of the State and region.
www.deccanchronicle.com
• Dedicate strategic loca ons that will allow
people to come together and organize cultural
ac vi es
• Ensure ease of commute within 30 minutes from
origin to des na on with Capital City
• Create a tourism circuit that links all the exis ng
heritage features and new nodes created in the
city
imgarcade.com
THE NEW CAPITAL REGION OF ANDHRA PRADESH I THE CAPITAL REGION PLAN REPORT
en.wikipedia.org
6
81
DEVELOPMENT STRATEGY AND
CONCEPT PLAN FOR CAPITAL REGION
Based on the regional context analysis, exis ng condi ons analysis
and the socioeconomic study; a regional growth strategy is developed
and discussed with the stakeholders. This strategy will guide the broad
land use requirements and physical planning catering to the projected
popula on and economic growth by 2035 and Year X (beyond year
2050). This chapter also presents Concept plan illustra ng the planning
scenario for the region.
This chapter is divided into the following sub-sec ons:
1 Regional Growth Strategy
2 Capital Region Concept Plan
3 Transporta on Concept
4 Infrastructure Concept
5 The Way Forward
Sunset near Mandadam Village
82
This page has been inten onally le blank
View of Thullur, Tadepalle , Mandadam and Mangalagiri Mandal from Kondapalli Fort
THE NEW CAPITAL REGION OF ANDHRA PRADESH I THE CAPITAL REGION PLAN REPORT
6.1 REGIONAL
STRATEGY
GROWTH
A long term direc on is cri cal to
accomplish the proposed Vision, Goals
and Regional development strategies
for the Capital Region. This long term
direc on is guided by key strategies
and concept direc on that will guide
the transforma on of the Capital City.
6.1.1 CONCEPT DIRECTION
The analysis of the Capital Region lead
the planners and stakeholders together
to two conclusions. They are:
• The opportuni es and the success of
the new Capital City will indefinitely
bring in tremendous pressure on it’s
developments and infrastructure in
the long run. Hence, the Capital City
cannot func on in isola on.
• The proposed Industrial Corridor,
Port development,
Na onal
Waterway and other upcoming
projects will change the dynamics
of the en re State and the Capital
Region to a large extent.
An cipa ng the afore men oned
scenario and processing the inherent
strengths of the exis ng ci es, the
proposed structure for the Capital
region is radial corridor development.
Key aspects are as follows:
• The Capital Region is divided into
eight Planning Areas. A Central
Planning Area with the Capital
City and seven Planning Areas
surrounding it.
• The Capital City together with
Vijayawada and Mangalagiri will
grow as Mega City, with Capital
City and Vijayawada as twin Ci es,
contained within the Inner Ring
Road. Each Planning area is iden fied
with a key city that will func on as a
‘Regional Centre’ with employment
genera on clusters.
• These
Regional
Centres
are
connected to the Capital City through
seven
development
corridors/
economic growth corridors.
• The seven economic growth corridors
and the respec ve Regional Centres
are-
83
LEGEND
Fig.6.1 Capital Region _ Radial Corridor Growth Strategy Plan
84
-To Visakhapatnam (NH5) via Gannavaram
-To Machilipatnam (NH9) via Gudivada
-To Hyderabad via Nandigama
-To Chennai (NH5) via Guntur
-To Chennai (NH214A) via Tenali
-To Bangalore via Amaravathi and Sa enapalle
-To Jagdalpur via Nuzivid
• The Regional Centres are further connected to
each other with the Outer Ring Road.
• The na onal High Speed Rail proposal has been
integrated in the Capital Region and realigned as
per the vision and goals of the region. Addi onal
new connec on to Bangalore has also been
incorporated.
• The upcoming Dedicated Freight Corridor
proposals from the East Coast Economic
Corridor and the Delhi Vijayawada Industrial
Corridor have been integrated as per the
planned economic posi oning of the Region.
• Water Logis c Hubs along the upcoming
Na onal waterway 4 are proposed.
• The prime fer le agricultural land
and
planta ons are zoned as Agricultural Protec on
Zone 1. All agriculture land beyond the proposed
Outer Ring Road and outside the urbanizable
boundary of the regional centres is zoned for
protec on under Agricultural Protec on Zone
2. Other than agricultural land zoning various
implementa on strategies have been tested
around the world to protect the farmlands from
development pressure. A few case studies are
illustrated in the Appendix sec on.
• Land is earmarked for the City’s future expansion
towards the City’s west.
• The forests, hills, rivers , all water bodies and
other natural features are protected under
conserva on areas.
6.1.2 STRATEGIES FOR CAPITAL
REGION CONCEPT PLAN
TÊ ÖÊÝ®ã®ÊÄ CƒÖ®ãƒ½ R›¦®ÊÄ ƒÝ ƒ ¦ÙÊóã«
‘›Äãٛ ó®ã« ›Ø烽 ÊÖÖÊÙãçÄ®ãù ãÊ ƒ½½
TÊ PÙÊÃÊ㛠ٛ¦®Êă½ CÊÄě‘ã®ò®ãù ƒÄ—
TكÄÝ®ã OÙ®›Ä㛗 D›ò›½ÊÖÛÄã (TOD)
The regional growth strategy represents collec ve
vision as to how the region will accommodate
13.5 million people and over 5.6 mi jobs that are
expected to be generated in the Capital Region by
the year 2050.
• Establish the new capital city as Administra ve
and Financial hub with high tech business parks
to a ract people to new jobs.
• Iden fy Guntur, Tenali, Gannavaram, Gudivada,
Nuzivid, Nandigama and Sa enapalle as
Regional Centres with exclusive employment
genera ng clusters.
• Allocate more high-value added agriculture
and agro-based industries along the proposed
Dedicated Freight Corridor; Near Gudivada,
Tenali and Guntur.
• Strengthen the exis ng economic generators
and inject various new game changers for
a diverse economy. Key new sectors are
electronics / hardware, logis cs, leisure & film
city and aerospace / defense.
• Create an a rac ve des na on to live, work,
play and create a place for all ages.
• Target minimum 50% affordable housing to
cater to low and medium Income groups.
• Revitalize and redevelop exis ng se lements
• Develop a comprehensive highway network,
high capacity safe urban roads across the
Region.
• Develop a world class airport in Gannavaram to
meet the demand of the projected popula on;
plan Gannavaram as a future metropolis.
• Reserve land for future airport close to Kaza and
NH5.
• Reserve a corridor for the upcoming high speed
rail and propose a terminus in the Capital City.
• Reserve Corridor for the Dedicated Freight
Corridor along proposed East Coast Economic
Corridor with logis c hubs at Gudivada, Vuyyuru
and Tenali.
• Develop logis cs hub at Tenali and Gannavaram
along the proposed Na onal Waterway
4; develop suppor ng road and industrial
infrastructure along this corridor.
• Use extensive green corridors along the
waterways to establish walking, jogging and
bicycle routes in the city.
Jobs and Homes
for All
World Class
Infrastructure
The Regional Growth Strategy
focuses on
transla ng the vision, goals and objec ves
established in the previous chapter into
developable landuse parameters. These landuse
parameters will guide future development of the
Capital Region and support efficient provision
of transporta on, regional infrastructure and
community services. It promotes ci es that
are socially, economically and environmentally
healthy and makes efficient use of public facili es,
services, land and other resources.
People’s Capital
THE NEW CAPITAL REGION OF ANDHRA PRADESH I THE CAPITAL REGION PLAN REPORT
TÊ ›¥¥›‘ã®ò›½ù Ã㦛 ƒÄ— ®ÃÖÙÊò› ®Ä¥ÙƒÝãÙç‘ãçٛ ÖÙÊò®Ý®ÊÄ
TÊ ÖٛݛÙò› 㫛 ›Ä‘«ƒÄã®Ä¦ ăãçٛ ƒÄ—
®Ê—®ò›ÙÝ®ãù
TÊ Ê¥¥›Ù ƒ¥¥Êٗƒ½› ƒÄ— Ø烽®ãù ½®ò®Ä¦
›Äò®ÙÊÄÛÄã ¥ÊÙ ƒ½½
TÊ ÖٛݛÙò› çِƒÄ «›Ù®ãƒ¦›, PÙÊÃÊã›
TÊçÙ®Ýà ƒÄ— ‘Ù›ƒã› óƒã›Ù¥ÙÊÄã ®—›Äã®ãù
85
• Integrate storm water drainage system with the
exis ng canal and village tank network for flood
management and recrea on purposes.
• Establish state of art waste management and
disposal systems across the city.
• Consolidate and reserve land for future
infrastructure needs.
• Develop smart grid in the city for efficient
management of power and energy.
• Encourage use of renewable energy.
• Give incen ves for green building construc on
prac ces.
• Protect and integrate nature with parks and
open spaces
• Employ innova ve and resource efficient
infrastructure for a healthy built environment
• Develop electronic database for re cula on
infrastructure to facilitate the opera on and
maintenance of the network.
• Conserve the exis ng forest cover and hills
under protected zones.
• Reserve high value agriculture land under
agricultural protec on zone.
• Create a seamless network of parks and greens
by integra ng the village ponds, natural features,
canal network and water bodies.
• Develop a standard for hierarchy of park systems
namely neighbourhood parks, Town Parks, and
Regional Parks that are distributed across the
region.
• Reserve most of the waterfront along Krishna
river for public use.
• Mandate retaining the green network reserved
in the Capital City Plan.
• Plan the capital city using water sustainable
urban design guidelines.
• Create modern planned residen al townships in
the capital city.
• Provide a range of mixed residen al choices
especially near the growth centers.
• Revitalize and redevelop exis ng high and low
density informal se lements .
• Ensure access to various ameni es and open
green space network.
• Plan residen al developments close to
employment centres where people make a
compe ve salary and have a plethora of op ons
for entertainment and outdoor ac vi es.
• Develop heritage and conserva on strategy
Plan for the Region.
• Incorporate a tourism circuit catering to
various interests - Temple Tourism, Nature and
Adventure Tourism.
• Create unique waterfront iden ty through the
New Capital City.
• Tourism & theme based (Film City) developments
to be undertaken to enhance the image of the
region from an interna onal perspec ve.
• Promote region’s unique tradi onal arts and
engage ci zens in its promo ng local lifestyle
and culture.
Efficient Resource
Management
Clean & Green
Quality Living
Iden ty & Heritage
image creadit -pinnamraj79
6.2 CAPITAL REGION
CONCEPT PLAN
86
Using the concept direc on and the key
development strategies, the Proposed
Capital Region Concept Plan is as
follows:
A M›¦ƒ C®ãù ó®ã«®Ä 㫛 ‘›Äãك½
Ö½ƒÄĮĦ ƒÙ›ƒ
• These Regional Centres will be
connected through suburban rail and
an outer ring road. The proposed
Regional Centres are Guntur, Tenali,
Gudivada, Sa enapalle, Nandigama,
Nuzivid and Gannavaram.
• The urban boundary for these
Regional Centres is limited within
the respec ve mandal boundaries.
D›ò›½ÊÖÛÄã CÊÙÙ®—ÊÙÝ
• The proposal restructures the Capital
Region into Eight Planning Areas
by combining the exis ng mandal
boundaries. Fig.6.8 illustrates the
Planning Areas in detail.
• The Capital City,
along with
Vijayawada and Mangalagiri are
expected to grow as twin ci es and
later emerge as a ‘mega city’. The
growth of the ‘mega city’ is contained
within the inner ring road that passes
through the Central Planning Area.
• Various business parks and Industrial
Clusters will serve the employment
needs within the Central Planning
Area.
• The Regional Centres fall within a
radius of 30 to 45km from the Capital
City and are connected to the Capital
City through development corridors.
Special Use Developments such
as clean industries, Infrastructure
LEGEND
D›ò›½ÊÖÛÄã Ê¥ R›¦®Êă½ ‘›ÄãٛÝ
• The proposal iden fies an already
established city/town as a Regional
Centre within each of the seven
surrounding planning areas.
• These Regional Centres will serve
as commercial and employment
nodes. The clustering of industries is
discussed in detail in sec on “6.3.3
Economic Clusters and Preliminary
Sectors”. The Regional Centres will
host regional level public facili es for
health, educa onal, civic, religious,
sports and recrea on.
THE NEW CAPITAL REGION OF ANDHRA PRADESH I THE CAPITAL REGION PLAN REPORT
Fig.6.2 Capital Region Concept Plan
projects and logis cs based ac vi es
are allowed along these corridors
subjected to CRDA’s Approval.
B›ãã›Ù R›¦®Êă½ CÊÄě‘ã®ò®ãù
• A radial network with well spaced
highways, expressways and transport
corridors cater to smooth city travel
and fast connec ons within the
Capital Region.
• The high capacity urban roads
are designed to cater to both fast
inter region connec ons and as
alterna ve bypass to heavy good
vehicles traveling across the country.
• Suburban Rail, Mass Rapid Transit
MRT), and Bus Rapid Transit(BRT)
are proposed as Intercity & Intra-city
Public Transport Systems.
• A new Dedicated Freight Corridor
(DFC) for the delivery of cargo and
a High-Speed Rail (HSR) line for
passengers would both pass through
the Capital Region; making the
Capital City a ‘Gateway Hub’. The
corridor reserved for high speed
rail is subject to change as per the
proposals from the Government of
India.
• The Na onal Waterway 4 will play
a key role for trade and logis cs.
Waterlogis cs Hubs are integrated
with Transport Hubs for convenient
movement of passengers and goods.
Fig.6.3 Development Corridors of Capital Region
It includes fer le lands, exis ng
planta ons, and aquaculture areas.
This zone provides the opportunity
to protect the exisƟng agricultural /
rural land use acƟviƟes to be intact,
and only allow a limited range of
other uses that will not facilitate
urbanizaƟon.
• Agricultural land outside the Outer
ring road is zoned as Agriculture
Protec on Zone 2. This zone acts as a
green belt (the region’s green lungs)
and also restricts development
beyond the outer ring road.
Recrea onal developments that help
preserve nature are allowed in this
zone.
• Land is reserved for the City’s
Expansion in the future. The zone
is marked as agriculture area and
developments will be allowed
only when the proposed city
reaches it’s development limits. All
developments in this area will be
subject to CRDA’s approval. This zone
is around 475 sq.km.
CÊÄݛÙòƒã®ÊÄ Ê¥ Nƒãçك½ AٛƒÝ ƒÄ—
«›Ù®ãƒ¦› ZÊěÝ
ÖÙÊ㛑㛗 ƒ¦Ù®‘ç½ãçك½ þÊěÝ
The Region’s rich heritage and
environmentally sensi ve areas are
earmarked as conserva on areas.
A tourism circuit and heritage
conserva on plan will be developed by
CRDA to priori ze developments in the
region.
• Agricultural land is zoned under two
categories. Agriculture Protec on
Zone 1 is protected agricultural land.
Fig.6.3 illustrates the development
corridors and connec vity with key
ci es in the Region.
87
88
6.3 ECONOMIC DEVELOP
MENT STRATEGY FOR
CAPITAL REGION
6.3.1 CONCEPT
DEVELOPMENT
The key findings and recommenda ons
of the above modules have been
cri cally analyzed to formulate the
preliminary economic development
strategy for the capital region. In our
opinion, the successful economic
development framework of a region
should be guided by certain key
principles which define the strategy
that seeks to build on the strengths
and the latent opportuni es present in
the region. The key guiding principles
iden fied for the overall development
concept for the capital region are as
discussed in Fig.6.4
These principles when systema cally
planned and implemented successfully
possess the poten al to transform the
economic development of the region
from a resource based manufacturing
economy to a capital intensive
manufacturing led region and gradually
gaining prominence as a regional
economic hub.
Fig.6.4 Economic Development Strategy for Capital Region
THE NEW CAPITAL REGION OF ANDHRA PRADESH I THE
H E CAPITAL
C A PI
CA
PITA
TALL REGION
TA
REEGI
GION
O PLAN
ON
P LA
L N REPORT
R EPO
RE
P O RT
PORT
PO
6.3.2 ECONOMIC
DEVELOPMENT
STRATEGY
The capital region is a planned city
and therefore it has the opportunity
to integrate the cri cal parameters
of economic and urban development
planning to evolve as the self-sustaining
urban agglomera on with state of the
art infrastructure for living and doing
business.
In view of the above, the economic
development strategy for the capital
region should take into account the key
aspects highlighted in Fig.6.5
The economic development strategy
of the capital region that seeks to
capitalize on the hinterland synergies,
latent opportuni es in the established
industrial segments supported by
the development of Government
administra ve facili es, infrastructure
development and pro-ac ve policy
ini a ves to promote investment in
the region would transform the region
into one of the prominent urban
agglomera on in the country over the
next 10-15 years.
Fig.6.5 Economic Growth Framework
89
90
6.3.3 E
P
C
Key iden fied Industrial Sectors
S
Based on the opportuni es iden fied
as a part of the industry assessment
sec on and considering the inherent
strengths of various urban nodes
situated within the Capital Region and
the exis ng industrial eco-system,
a preliminary Clusteriza on of the
iden fied high poten al industrial/
economic drivers has been undertaken.
The Clusteriza on of these sectors with
respect to various urban nodes would
provide insights to the spa al urban
planning within the CRDA region.
Food and Beverages
Tex le
Non metallic Minerals
Auto and Auto Components
Rubber and Plas cs
Pharmaceu cal Industry
Electronics
Basic and Fabricated Metals
Tourism
Aerospace
Logis cs
IT/ITes
Aquaculture
Fig.6.6 highlights the preliminary
Clusteriza on of various iden fied
industrial/economic drivers in the
Capital Region:
• Industry focus/clusteriza on based
on hinterland synergies
• Focus of Hi Tech, High Value add
economic ac vi es at Capital City
• Heavier Industrial clusters at the
periphery of the Region
• Logis cs City at the connec ng
transport corridors
• Support Industrial Cluster hub
LEGEND
Fig.6.6 Capital Region_Preliminary Clusteriza on of Sectors
THE NEW CAPITAL REGION OF ANDHRA PRADESH I THE CAPITAL REGION PLAN REPORT
9 Assessment of historical population trends of Guntur & Krishna districts and compute
Analysis of
Population Trends
Forecasting CRDA
Population based on
organic growth
Step 2
(a)
9 Forecasting of current CRDA population on the basis of organic growth witnessed by
Guntur & Krishna districts
Step 3
Benchmarking key
capital cities to assess
the population growth
9 Benchmarking of key capital cities to assess the historical population growth trends
witnessed in these urban areas ~ represents the population growth witnessed on account
of economic development of the region
Step 4
Forecasting CRDA
Population for
incremental growth
anticipated
(b)
Assess the inmigration population
from the influence
region
(c)
9 Forecasting of current CRDA population (based on the incremental growth rates achieved
by key capital cities such as Bengaluru & Hyderabad) taking into consideration the
significant economic growth anticipated in the region
Step 5
9 Identify the urban areas in the influence region and forecast population growth based on
decadal growth rates; assess the share of the forecasted population which is expected to
migrate to CRDA for potential opportunities
Compute the overall
forecasted population
6.4 BROAD DEMOGRAPHIC PROJECTIONS
decadal growth rates exhibited
Step 6
(a+b+c) 9 Compute the total estimated population utilizing the organic growth, anticipated
economic growth and the migration population
The proposed Capital Region would
be expected to witness significant
popula on growth over the next few
decades, due to the development
of capital city and other economic
developments that have the poten al
to create considerable direct and
indirect employment in the region.
In view of this, we have undertaken
a broad es mate of popula on
projec ons for 2 me horizons of 10
and 20 years.
The broad popula on projec ons at
this stage of the study are primarily
based on the benchmarking of key
other capital ci es and the an cipated
growth of the capital region over the
next 20 years.
9 Assessment of District Domestic Product (DDP) & Population trends of Guntur & Krishna
districts; establish the historical growth / decadal rates exhibited
Table 6.1 Capital Region_Preliminary Clusteriza on of Sectors
Step 2
Assessment GDP &
population for CRDA
9 Apportionment of appropriate shares to the total DDP of Guntur & Krishna districts to
Step 3
9 Benchmark key capital cities (Hyderabad, Bengaluru) to assess the historical GDP growth
achieved by these cities and the movement of per capita contribution to GDP
Step 4
(a)
9 Computation of per capita contribution to GDP for CRDA region by dividing the total GDP
(a/b)
Scenario 1
(Based on growth achieved
by key Capital Ci es)
8.23
11
13.5
Scenario 2
(Based on an cipated economic growth in Capital Region)
17.71
8.88
10.2
Krishna & Guntur; the GDP growth rates achieved by key benchmarked cities is kept in
perspective for forecasting the GDP growth
Step 5
(b)
Total Projected Popula on in Capital
(In Million)
2025
2035
2050
9 Forecast the GDP growth rate of CRDA based on the historical growth rate of DDP for
by the total current population of CRDA region; historical growth trends & dynamics of
benchmarked cities to be utilized for forecasting the per capita contribution
Step 6
Compute the
population of CRDA
Parameters
arrive at the GDP numbers for CRDA region; derive the total population of CRDA
Assessment of GDP
& population growth
for key cities
Projection of per
capital contribution
to GDP
The findings of the popula on
projec ons from the above 2
methodologies are presented in the
table below:
Step 1
Analysis of DDP &
Population for
Krishna/Guntur
Projection of GDP of
CRDA
We have adopted 2 techniques for
es ma ng the popula on in the capital
region over the next 20 years. The
exhibit beside highlights the broad
methodologies employed to es mate
the popula on in the region.
9 Derivation of total population of CRDA region by dividing the projected GDP by projected
per capita contribution to GDP for a time horizon of 10 & 20 years
91
6.5 BROAD WORKFORCE
PROJECTIONS
92
6.5.1 BROAD WORKFORCE
PROJECTIONS
The an cipated economic development
in the capital region necessitates
the need for incremental workforce
addi on to the exis ng workforce in
the region. Therefore, an overview of
the exis ng workforce in the region
has been undertaken to understand
the total workforce in the region, key
sectors contribu ng to majority of the
jobs and the incremental workforce
addi on expected over a me horizon
of 35 years.
An assessment of the exis ng workforce
sta s cs indicates that the capital
region and the capital city have a total
exis ng workforce of approx. 2.15 mn
and 0.11 mn respec vely. Further,
majority of the exis ng workforce
(approx. 70%) in the capital region
and the capital city was observed to
be cons tuted by workers employed
in services, manufacturing and Govt.
machinery. In addi on, it was observed
that about 20% of the workers are
employed in cul va on and agriculture
whereas the remaining workforce was
observed to be employed in household
industry.
The dynamics of the exis ng workforce,
the trends observed in the workforce
par cipa on ra o and the popula on
projec ons undertaken in the above
module have been u lized to es mate
the broad workforce addi on in the
capital region by year 2050.
The exhibits alongside highlights the
methodology adopted for workforce
projec ons and the summary of key
findings of workforce projec ons.
6.6 POPULATION DISTRIBU
TION
The projected Popula on of 11mi
by the Year 2035 is planned for and
distributed across the Capital Region as
follows:
H®¦« D›ÄÝ®ãù P½ƒÄĮĦ AٛƒÝ:
The Central Planning Area with
the Capital City, Vijayawada and
Mangalagiri urban agglomera on will
be developed as High Density Compact
Neighbourhood with an average gross
density of 5000 p/sq.km.
M›—®çà D›ÄÝ®ãù P½ƒÄĮĦ AٛƒÝ
The Southern, South East and Eastern
Planning Areas will be developed as
medium density Areas with defini ve
‘No development Zone’ boundaries to
protect the fer le agriculture land.
Fig.6.7 Methodology adopted for workforce projec ons
LÊó D›ÄÝ®ãù P½ƒÄĮĦ AٛƒÝ
The South West, Western, Northern
and North East Planning Areas are
expected to develop in the later phases
with Low density Developments.
THE NEW CAPITAL REGION OF ANDHRA PRADESH I THE CAPITAL REGION PLAN REPORT
Table 6.2 Summary of Workforce projec ons for Capital Region
Parameters
2015
Exis ng Workforce
in Capital Region*
(in million)
2.17
Organic Growth Model
2050
Incremental Workforce by 2050
3.31
1.14
Economic Growth Model
2015
2050
Incremental Workforce by 2050
2.23
5.68
3.44
Exis ng Popula on Year 2011
Projected Popula on Year 2035
Fig.6.9 Capital Region_Projected Popula on Growth
Planning Area Density
Fig.6.10 Capital Region_Projected Density
LEGEND
Fig.6.8 Capital Region_Projected Popula on Distribu on _Year 2035
93
94
6.7 KEY STRATEGIES AND
CONCEPTS
6.7.1 T
R
R
C
B
Currently, the Capital Region’s road
transporta on depends heavily on
the two busy na onal highways NH9
and NH5. As these two highways
intersect at Vijayawada, they congest
the Vijayawada city centre. Throughtraffic travels through the city with no
alterna ves around Vijayawada.
To relieve the exis ng condi on,
Vijayawada Bypass (VB), Inner ring
road (IRR) and Outer ring road (ORR)
are proposed.
The Inner ring road forms a complete
closed loop around the Capital City,
ac ng as an expressway. This is
supplemented by the Vijayawada
Bypass. The bypass will be constructed
at the same me as part of the Seed
Capital so that it can act as a catalyst
for development.
One end of the VB is close to the
airport city at Gannavaram, providing
a fast route from the city centre to the
airport, and the other end intersects
with the NH9, diverging the traffic from
NH9 to the VB. The VB is connected to
the Outer ring road and the Capital City
centre through radial roads.
The VB may be constructed as a highcapacity urban road, with the op on to
upgrade to an expressway in the future.
The reserve for the expressway is to be
safeguarded for future expansion.
The Outer ring road is envisioned to be a
larger orbital connec ng the periphery
urban centres such as Guntur, Tenali
and Gudivada.
LEGEND
The VB is closer to the Capital City and
forms a semi-circle shape through the
towns along the city fringe. This semiexpressway serves as a relief road to
the traffic volume through the city
centre and across the Krishna River to
Vijayawada and the airport.
Fig.6.11 Proposed Concept for Regional Transport Network
THE NEW CAPITAL REGION OF ANDHRA PRADESH I THE CAPITAL REGION PLAN REPORT
Upon implementa on of the ORR,
traffic among these ci es and towns
has an alterna ve choice of express
route other than the NH9 and NH5.
Furthermore, these large ci es and
towns are connected to the Capital City
through radial roads.
Traffic from ci es further away from
the Capital City such as Hyderabad to
the new Machilipatnam Port or from
Visakhapatnam to Chennai could go
around the Capital City via the ORR,
avoiding the busy sec ons of NH9 and
NH5 that pass through the Capital City.
The airport city at Gannavaram can also
be reached from the industrial centres
directly through the ORR. Moreover,
the ORR provides two more route
choices to cross the Krishna River.
Construc on of the ORR is expected
to take place in two phases. The first
phase is the expressway construc on
between the exis ng NH9 to NH5. The
northern sec on is to be built a er the
traffic volume from NH9 west to NH5
north achieves sufficient
sufficient mass.
LEGEND
Fig.6.12 Poten al Na onal Waterway Transport and Water Logis c Hubs
The construc on of the ORR and VB
can be done in sec ons as and when
required, as long as the construc on
requirements are standardized. By
doing so, a standard cross-sec on can
be maintained.
W
T
H
The Na onal Waterway 4 runs along
Buckingham Canal, Krishna River, and
Eluru Canal within the Capital Region.
These waterways are navigable, and
therefore has poten al for freight
movement.
Prakasam Barrage is the mee ng point
for the three major waterways, and
therefore has poten al as a water
transporta on hub.
In addi on, Gannavaram and Tenali
are also located along the Na onal
Waterway, and therefore are also
poten al transporta on hubs linking
water transporta on to rail, air and
road.
95
96
Types of cargo which can be carried
via the Waterway are coal, rice, food
grains, cement, fer lizer and other
bulk cargo. This can significantly reduce
transporta on costs for low-yield and
non-perishable goods.
The poten al of the waterways for
people movement was studied,
however was found to be less relevant
due to the availability of rail and
road transport within Tenali and
Gannavaram.
D
F
C
The new Dedicated Freight Corridor
(DFC) for the delivery of cargo and a
High-Speed Rail line for the passengers
would both pass through the Capital
City and thus make the city a Gateway
hub.
The proposed DFC runs between
Chennai and Visakhapatnam along the
coastal corridor.
There is poten al for the DFC to be
expanded significantly due to the
presence of upcoming and exis ng ports
such as Bapatla and Machilipatnam.
Hyderabad may also u lize the exis ng
rail links through the Capital Region.
H
S
R
T
There are currently plans to build
a high speed rail connec on from
Hyderabad to Chennai via Vijayawada.
It is proposed that the High Speed
Rail stop runs through the Capital City
instead of through Vijayawada Junc on
so that rail traffic to Vijayawada can be
reduced.
There is also opportunity to expand
the high-speed rail northeast-wards
to Visakhapatnam, and therefore the
alignment may provide an opportunity
to provide a second high-speed rail
sta on near the Airport.
The provision of the expansion towards
Visakhapatnam
may
therefore
encourage growth along the DFC.
By providing a stop at Gannavaram,
the HSR may also contribute to air
traffic movements to Gannavaram
Interna onal Airport.
LEGEND
The increased u liza on of sea ports
for industry can also vitalize the Capital
Region as an industrial des na on, as
shown in the previous sec ons. The
key economic and industrial sectors
can benefit from direct access to these
seaports via rail and roads.
In addi on, freight from Hyderabad is
expected to u lize Machilipatnam via
rail and NH9. As such, the DFC from
THE NEW CAPITAL REGION OF ANDHRA PRADESH I THE CAPITAL REGION PLAN REPORT
Fig.6.13 Proposed High Speed Rail and Dedicated Freight Corridors
M
-
T
H
A transport hub is proposed inside the
Capital City where Mass Rapid Transit
(MRT) terminal, bus terminal, railway
sta on and parking all located at the
same loca on. Thereby, the transi ons
between these modes of transporta on
can be done at the transport hub.
A new poten al East-West highway
would connect the new Machilipatnam
Port and the Capital City. Increased
traffic will be expected at the two
places and makes them the poten al
transport hubs.
LEGEND
I
T
I
-
P
97
Inside the Capital City, a Mass Rapid
Transit (MRT) network is proposed
to ensure that all the commercial
area, residen al area and business
centers in the city are accessible by
MRT. This system also has a poten al
to be extended and connect the
Capital City with Vijayawada. Within
each of the other large ci es such as
Vijayawada, Guntur and Tenali, Bus
rapid transit (BRT) network would be
implemented. At the intercity scale,
express bus services would provide fast
connec on between ci es, while rural
bus services would serve the villages
outside the Capital City and the other
industrial centers. Currently, ci es
are also linked by scheduled railway
services. In the future, addi onal lines
will be introduced between the ci es
and express services will be provided
between the Capital City and the other
ci es.
S
T
S
Road networks are the key infrastructure
where investment can be made to
support sustainable transport systems.
Road infrastructure should be allocated
for public transport, pedestrians and
cyclists. As part of the Master Plan,
transport corridors will be designed
with these in mind. Dedicated lanes for
BRT, cyclists and pedestrian should be
reserved within the ci es while none
of these lanes is needed for intercity
roads.
Fig.6.14 Proposed Concept for Regional Rail / Public Transport Network
6.7.2 W
98
S
Objec ve: Adequate water resource for
sustainable future development
S
• Se ng up of a centralized ins tu on
to manage water supply sector in
Capital Region;
• U lizing alterna ve water sources;
• Reduc on of water wastage; and
• Enhance the exis ng water bodies
P
1. Se ng up of a centralized ins tu on
to manage water supply sector in
Capital Region
Capital Region has to set up a
centralized ins tu on that will comprise
representa ves of all the stakeholders.
This ins tu on will review the na onal
water policy and implement relevant
policy within Capital Region. Its du es
should also include planning and se ng
up fund alloca on for future water
supply project and managing all service
providers. Current service provider,
Guntur Municipal Corpora on (GMC)
and Vijayawada Municipal Corpora on
(VMC), will con nue taking charge of
the opera on and maintaining of new
developed urban areas and exis ng
se lement.
2. Water supply augmenta on by
u lizing alterna ve water sources
There are two alterna ve water sources
in Capital Region that have not been
fully u lized, they are waste water and
storm water.
Wastewater can be treated and reused
for non potable use. The treatment
level required is dependent on the
quality of the waste water collected
and its intended end use. Currently,
only 10% waste water of Capital Region
is collected and treated in Sewerage
Treatment Plant. The treated effluent
is discharged to nearest water bodies
and none of them have been reused.
If the en re Capital Region is covered
by sewers, it would generate significant
amount of treated water, which would
be an alterna ve water source.
Storm-water
harves ng
presents
poten al for non-potable uses since
the annual rainfall of Capital Region is
in a range from 800 to 1200 mm. There
are various methods to collect rain
water, such as tank storage for small
catchment and reten on pond for big
catchment.
3. Reduc on of water wastage
Water wastage is mainly caused by
water leakage and excessive by the end
users. Water leakage can be reduced
through opera on & maintenance
of the water supply network such
as pressure management and leak
detec on. Preventa ve maintenance
along with network rehabilita on
strategies, provide an opportunity
to prolong the lifespan of exis ng
infrastructure and improve system
performance with regards to water
leakage.
An electronic database must be set up
for all bulk water infrastructure and
THE NEW CAPITAL REGION OF ANDHRA PRADESH I THE CAPITAL REGION PLAN REPORT
re cula on infrastructure to facilitate
the opera on and maintenance of the
network. It should be structured under
ins tu onal status, asset assessment.
Meter readings can be recorded in an
electronic format for ease of reference.
Water wastage by end users can be
managed by installa on of water
efficient fi ngs, implementa on of
progressive water tariff based on
consump on volume and educa on
program on how to save water.
WƒÝ㛠Wƒã›Ù
Objec ve: Provide totally sani zed,
healthy, and sustainable waste water
management system.
S
• Increase access to sanita on facili es
• Provide sufficient STP facili es in all
urban/rural areas
• Introduce
the
concept
of
Environmental Treatment Zone (ETZ)
• Stop the discharge of untreated
waste water into the open drains
and water bodies
• Reuse of the treated waste water
effluent
Eco-friendly Sewage Treatment Plant (Organica)
P
4. Increase access to sanita on facili es
This target can be achieved by
upgrading and expanding the exis ng
sanita on facili es and construc ng
new ones for areas without any
sanita on
facili es.
Appropriate
sanita on type would be proposed
based on the exis ng topography and
future land use. For new developed
Membrane Filtra on Module for Water Treatment Plant
urban areas, sufficient sewage network
would be provided. For the remaining
rural areas, maintenance and opera on
regime would be provided for sep c
tanks.
5. Provide sufficient STP facili es in all
urban areas
Constructed Wetlands
By considering the exis ng sewage
treatment infrastructures, there is not
enough sewerage treatment capacity
provision to serve the en re region of
Capital Region. The proposed STW’s
shall be located at the low lying areas
with road access and proximity to the
exis ng water bodies. The current
waste water treatment system can
be improved by introducing more
advanced water treatment technology
such
as
membrane
filtra on
technology. The main advantages of
membrane filtra on technology are
listed as follows:
• Low space requirement;
• Higher quality of treated water; and
• Easy to modify and upgrade by
modules based on the requirement.
7. Stop the discharge of untreated
waste water into the open drains
and water bodies
Strict enforcement of the law and
regula on coupled with increased
access to sanita on facili es and
sufficient STPs are necessary to stop the
prac ce of discharging untreated waste
water into the open drains and water
bodies. Effluent discharge standard
should be introduced in Capital Region
in case to control the water quality.
SãÊÙà Wƒã›Ù
Objec ve: Provide flood protec on
to new developments and exis ng
se lements
The proposed STPs will be located
within the Environmental Treatment
Zone (ETZ) together with solid waste
and storm water treatment system. ETZ
is the integrated waste management
concept. The ideal of ETZ is to isolate
and treat all the unwanted waste far
from the residen al area and minimize
the contact between the residents and
the waste.
Vegetates Swales in Residen al Area (Puget Sound, WA Ac on Team)
10. Implement Water Sensi ve Urban
Design (WSUD)
S
• Provide Flood Protec on Zones (FPZ)
• Improve and expand drainage
network
• Implement Water Sensi ve Urban
Design (SUDS)
P
8. Flood Protec on Zones
6. Introduce
the
concept
of
Environmental Treatment Zone (ETZ)
The current drainage network in Capital
Region consists of conven onal open
drains and irriga on canals. Some
canals are polluted and accumulate
sediment due to lack of maintenance.
As part of the Na onal Disaster
Management Guidelines for Floods,
roadside drains should be provided
for all roads to collect and discharge
the storm water properly to mi gate
the flooding problem. Meanwhile,
opera on and maintenance of canals
should be provided for all canals,
together with revamping of the sanded
up canals.
Green Buffer such as grass land and
woodland should be provided at the
banks of the exis ng rivers and canals
in Capital Region. The green buffer
has several important advantages, for
example:
• Protec ng soils from erosion;
• Slowing down the speed of water
flow rate; and
• Protec ng water quality
9. Improve
network
and
expand
drainage
Capital Region of Capital Region is
located on a flood plain. To achieve
a sustainable storm water system, it
is essen al to introduce the Water
Sensi ve Urban Design (WSUD). WSUD
is different from the conven onal
urban storm water runoff management
system. Key principles of WSUD system
are listed as follows:
• Protec ng and improving the water
quality of water draining from urban
environments into creeks, rivers and
wetland;
• Restoring the urban water balance by
maximizing the reuse of storm water,
recycled water and grey water;
• Conserving water resources through
reuse and system efficiency;
• Integra ng storm water treatment
into the landscape so that it offers
mul ple benefits such as improved
water quality , wildlife habitat,
recrea on and open public space;
and
99
100
• Reducing peak flows and runoff
from the urban environment
simultaneously
providing
for
infiltra on
and
groundwater
recharge
The technique of WSUD includes:
• The use of water-efficient appliances
to reduce potable water use;
• Grey water reuse as an alternate
source of water to conserve potable
supplies;
• Deten on, rather than rapid
conveyance of storm-water;
• Reuse, storage and infiltra on of
storm water, instead of drainage
system augmenta on; and
• Use of vegeta on for storm-water
filtering purposes;
By implemen ng WSUD, it will help to:
• Reduce potable water demand;
• Incorporate the use of water efficient
appliances and fi ngs;
• Adopt a fit-for-purpose approach
to the use of poten al alterna ve
sources of water such as rainwater;
and
• Minimize wastewater genera on
and treatment of wastewater to a
standard suitable for effluent reuse
and/or release to receiving waters.
WƒÝ㛠MƒÄƒ¦›Ã›Äã
Objec ve: Develop an economic and
sustainable solid waste management
system
S
• Iden fy Proper Landfill Site for Solid
Waste Proposal
• Introduce the hierarchy of waste
management (5R) to Capital Region
• Provide General Waste Educa on,
Awareness and Training Program
P
11. Iden fy Proper Landfill Site for
Solid Waste Proposal
Suitable sites for landfill need to be
iden fied in Capital Region to reduce
improper solid waste disposal. Solid
waste treatment facili es should be
allocated nearby the landfill site to
provide an appropriate and efficient
solid waste treatment cycle.
12. Introduce the hierarchy of waste
management (5R) to Capital Region
power genera on. This can be built
within the ETZs at a local level.
13. Provide General Waste Educa on,
Awareness and Training.
Development and implementa on of
solid waste awareness and educa on
plan for both the municipality staff and
public is an essen al part to enhance
the overall Solid Waste Management..
The training course for the municipality
staff should include various aspects
such as solid waste collec on and
transporta on, solid waste treatment,
management of solid waste collectors,
occupa onal hazards, etc. This will
equip the staff with the right exper se
to handle solid waste management
properly and safely. Awareness
program for the public should include
ps to reduce, reuse and recycle waste
and importance, health and hygiene
knowledge, etc.
6.7.3 P
5R stands for Reduce, Reuse, Recycle,
Recover and Remove. This framework
is proposed by Government of
Andhra Pradesh to improve the solid
waste treatment system. It forms the
hierarchy of the en re system; aim to
promote waste reduc on by using less
resource and energy, resource reuse by
extending the lifespan of resource and
u lizing waste and increasing ra o of
recyclable materials against the total
waste.
There is opportunity to recover energy
via Waste to Energy (WTE) incinera on
plants which can be used to supplement
THE NEW CAPITAL REGION OF ANDHRA PRADESH I THE CAPITAL REGION PLAN REPORT
Power supply system consists of
genera on,
transmission,
and
distribu on system. Electricity is
generated at power sta ons from
various natural resources such as coal,
natural gas, hydro, solar, geothermal
and wind. The power sta ons produce
electricity in large quan es where
economies of scale can be achieved.
For this planning, it is assumed that
power genera on plants (Type,
loca on and size) shall be taken care
by the government (either through
construc on of new power plants/ or
imported by the neighboring countries)
and sufficient power shall be delivered
to development area when needed.
P
The electricity transmission network
refers to the pylons, wires and
substa ons that make up the na onal
grid. Power sta ons are located at
or close to the fuel resource which
is o en a considerable distance
from where the major demand for
electricity is located. Large quan es
of electricity are therefore transported
over the transmission network to major
substa ons located in key areas. Supply
may also come from power sta ons in
other states via interconnectors which
link the transmission systems.
High voltages are needed for the
economic transport of large quan es
of electricity but these voltages are
far too high for customers to use. The
transmission voltages are reduced in
several stages, ini ally in substa ons,
by transformers. The substa ons also
contain switchgear which controls the
flow of electricity between substa ons
and into the distribu on network.
As the bulk supply of electricity is
divided into smaller quan es, the
voltage can be lowered. The result
is a large network of power lines,
all opera ng at different voltages
according to how much electricity they
have to carry, bringing electricity closer
and closer to where customers want
to use it and then delivering it literally
to their door at an appropriate supply
voltage.
For planning purposes, it is assumed
that access to the electricity is 100%
for the planned development area.
Maximum demand shall be based on
development data given by planner.
The proposed transmission substa ons
and transmission system (756kV,
400kV, 220kV, 132kV) shall be based
on es mated maximum demand of the
serving area / phasing.
P
D
The local substa ons supply the
distribu on system which is a network
of high voltage (11kv or 33kv) and low
voltage (LV) (less than 600V) feeders.
These feeders could be overhead
power lines or underground cables.
Distribu on
transformers
reduce
high voltage to low voltage for use
within households, shops, businesses,
factories, hospitals, schools, etc.
Distribu on system at the local area
can only be carried out during the
detail design stage, hence will not be
discussed here.
6.8 ACTION PLANS
Ac ons plans are the priority steps to be taken by
the Capital Region Development Authority (CRDA)
to implement the Capital Region Plan. These
ac ons plans are mainly to engage the respec ve
third party stakeholders/authori es to ini ate
Na onal/State/District level projects and reserve
land for the same in a planned manner. These
ac on plans are an addi on to the extensive policy
framework and ins tu onal set up being taken up
parallelly by CRDA.
ACTION PLAN 1
MƒÝã›Ù P½ƒÄÝ ¥ÊÙ F®ÙÝ㠃ė S›‘Êė T®›Ù
C®ã®›Ý: To do Detailed Land Use Master Plans for
the Regional Centres. To iden fy development
boundaries and contain the urbaniza on within
the boundaries and prevent urban sprawl.
ACTION PLAN 2
Sãك㛦®‘ LƒÄ— BƒÄ»®Ä¦: To reserve and
protect the land along Na onal Highway 5 and
Na onal Highway 9 for Economic Development.
ACTION PLAN 3
D›ãƒ®½›— IėçÝãÙ®ƒ½ Sãç—ù ¥ÊÙ F®ÙÝ㠃ė
S›‘Êė T®›Ù C®ã®›Ý: To do detailed industrial
master plans for the second er ci es and protect
sufficient land at strategic loca ons.
ACTION PLAN 4
R®¦«ã Ê¥ Wƒù PÙÊ㛑ã®ÊÄ: To conduct de-
ACTION PLAN 5
Sç UِƒÄ Rƒ®½ N›ãóÊÙ»Ý: To ini ate di-
ACTION PLAN 6
H®¦« S֛›— Rƒ®½ A½®¦ÄÛÄã: To ini ate
ACTION PLAN 7
D›—®‘ƒã›— Fٛ®¦«ã CÊÙÙ®—ÊÙ A½®¦ÄÛÄã To
tailed study for the Outer Ring Road and inner
ring alignment, phasing and strategy for Land
acquisi on.
alogue with the Indian Railways for strategic
connec ons between Tenali, Gudivada, Nuzvid,
Nandigama and Sa enapalle.
dialogue with the HSRC of India on the possible
realignment and the loca on of sta ons in Capital
City and Gannavaram Airport
ini ate dialogue with the DFC authority of India
on the possible realignment and the loca on of
Logis c Sta ons in Tenali and Gudivada
101
102
ACTION PLAN 8
IÄ㛦ك㛗 TكÄÝÖÊÙã HçÝ: To ini ate di-
ACTION PLAN 9
WƒÝ㛠ãÊ Eě٦ù TٛƒãÛÄã S®ã›: To ini ate
alogue and development models for the development of Integrated Transport hubs with retail,
commercial, recrea on and other public facili es
detailed study on the viability of the Waste to Energy (WTE) plants and protec on of sufficient land
at strategic loca ons.
ACTION PLAN 12
EÄò®ÙÊÄÛÄヽ½ù S›ÄÝ®ã®ò› Aٛƒ PÙÊ㛑ã®ÊÄ: To ini ate detailed study on the rivers , trib-
ACTION PLAN 13
CʃÝヽ R›¦ç½ƒã®ÊÄ ZÊě ¥ÊÙ Ù®ò›Ù: To im-
ACTION PLAN 14
AÃ›Ä®ã®›Ý ƒÄ— P琽®‘ Fƒ‘®½®ã®›Ý: To prepare
ACTION PLAN 15
Cç½ãçك½, R›½®¦®ÊçÝ ƒÄ— H›Ù®ãƒ¦› S®ã›Ý: To
plement the ‘No development’ zone in rural areas;
however speak to the authori es to discard the
rule in the City Core to enable to develop an ac ve
river waterfront.
a facility provision standards template and implement it in all the township plans within the Capital
Region.
iden fy and protect Cultural, Religious and Heritage sites as AP State Heritage Monuments
utaries and hills and restore them from Urbanizaon and also zone them as protected zones
THE NEW CAPITAL REGION OF ANDHRA PRADESH I THE CAPITAL REGION PLAN REPORT
ACTION PLAN 10
S›óƒ¦› TٛƒãÛÄ㠃ė Wƒã›Ù TٛƒãÛÄã
P½ƒÄã S®ã›Ý: To ini ate detailed study on the STP
and WTP plants loca on and safeguard sufficient
land at strategic loca ons.
ACTION PLAN 11
A¦Ù®‘ç½ãçٛ LƒÄ— PÙÊ㛑ã®ÊÄ: To legally
zone the fer le agricultural lands as conserved areas and protect them from urbaniza on
A
P
16
TÊçÙ®Ýà MƒÝã›Ù P½ƒÄÝ: To ini ate a detailed
Tourism Master Plans to integrate the Cultural,
Religious and Heritage Sites and other tourism
spots within the capital region and beyond.
103
6.9 THE WAY FORWARD
The Capital Region Concept Plan sets the macro
planning direc ons and the regional structure
of the Capital Region. This plan will help divert
investments phase wise in an organized manner.
This concept, however, is not cast in stone; the
plan will be reviewed by the CRDA every 5 - 20
years to incorporate the market dynamics into
the Regional Plan if deemed necessary.
The Stage 2 of the project will involve Planning
of the Capital City defining specific planning
parameters such as popula on projec ons
for the capital city plan, se ng KPI’s for the
Capital City, individual land use quantum and
loca ons, development densi es, schema c
Infrastructure and Transporta on Plan and
Zoning Plan.
View of Pedemadduru Hill from Nelapadu Water Tank
104
This page has been inten onally le blank
THE NEW CAPITAL REGION OF ANDHRA PRADESH I THE CAPITAL REGION PLAN REPORT
GLOSSARY
xv
Capital Region Plan: The Capital Region
Plan is a strategic plan and that guides
the region’s development over the
next 40-50 years. Reviewed every ten
years, the Concept Plan ensures that
there is sufficient land to meet longterm popula on and economic growth
needs while providing a good quality
living environment for the people
Capital City Master Plan: The Capital
City Master Plan (MP) is the statutory
land use plan which will guide the
Capital City development in the medium
term over the next 10 to 15 years. It is
reviewed every five years and translates
the broad long-term strategies of the
Concept Plan into detailed plans to
guide the development of land and
property. The Master Plan shows the
permissible land use and density for
developments in the Capital City.
Regional Centre : is a second- er
commercial zone a er the main
central business district in the Capital
City. Regional Centres are meant to
decentralize the func ons and services
of the Capital City , helping to alleviate
conges on there and to bring the
workplace closer to peoples’ homes.
Regional centres primarily serve people
in each region, with people from other
regions as a secondary concern. These
regional centres contain a collec on
of shopping malls, markets, Office,
recrea onal, health and other forms of
commercial facili es.
Economic Growth corridor : Economic
Growth corridor connect economic
agents along a defined geography.
They provide important connec ons
between economic nodes or hubs
that are usually centered in urban
landscapes. They do not stand alone,
as their role in regional economic
development can be comprehended
only in terms of the network effects
that they induce’ - source -ADB Working
Paper Series on Regional Economic
Integra on
Planning Area: Few mandal boundaries
are integrated into one Planning Area.
This boundary is for administraƟve
purpose as opposed to electoral
divisions. Dividing the Capital Region into
these smaller Planning Areas assists in
easy implementaƟon and management
of resources. Each Planning Area is
idenƟfied with a Regional Centre as its
focused Economic Hub.
Agricultural Protec on Zone : This zone
provides the opportunity to protect
the exisƟng agricultural / rural land use
acƟviƟes to be intact, and only allow a
limited range of other uses that will not
facilitate urbanizaƟon.
Land for Future Expansion : This zone
provides the opportunity to reserve
the land for future urbanizaƟon;
Development on this land would be
permissible only when the Capital
City / Regional Centre reaches its
development limit.
The Glossary sec on will be updated sequen ally a er each stage
View from the Canal Road looking at Kaleswara Rao Market Main Bus Stop, Vijayawada
xvi
THE NEW CAPITAL REGION OF ANDHRA PRADESH I THE CAPITAL REGION PLAN REPORT
xvii
APPENDIX
Men at work.
B
xviii
B
C
For the next stage of planning of the
Capital City; few ci es are studied for
benchmarking. The criteria used to
select the benchmarked ci es were as
follows:
• Waterfront ci es
• Greenfield planned ci es
• Global as well as local ci es
A compara ve analysis of these
ci es will help be er understand the
strategies adopted that created the
kind of ci es they are today.
Following 4 Interna onal ci es
have been studied for the purpose
men oned above:
1. Washington DC, USA
2. Canberra, Australia
3. Brasilia, Brazil
4. Putrajaya, Malaysia
The key take aways from these capital
ci es are:
Grand Ceremonial Civic axis as the main
feature of the city
Physical features like hills & river
influence the axis posi on and
orienta on and thus dominate the City
planning.
The City Center and the Capital complex
are combined together either parallelly
to the axis or as a nodal development
adjacent to each other.
The site of Canberra was selected for
the loca on of the na on's capital in
1908 as a compromise between rivals
Sydney and Melbourne, Australia's
two largest ci es. It is unusual among
Australian ci es, being an en rely
planned city outside of any state,
similar to Washington, D.C. in the
United States or Brasilia in Brazil.
In 1791, President Washington
commissioned Pierre (Peter) Charles
L'Enfant, a French-born architect
and city planner, to design the new
capital. The L'Enfant Plan featured
broad streets and avenues radia ng
out from rectangles, providing room
for open space and landscaping.
He based his design on plans of ci es
such as Paris, Amsterdam, Karlsruhe,
and Milan brought from Europe by
Thomas Jefferson in 1788. L'Enfant's
design also envisioned a garden-lined
"grand avenue" approximately 1 mile
(1.6 km) in length and 400 feet (120
m) wide in the area that is now the
Na onal Mall.
en.wikipedia.org
Washington DC, USA
Popula on: Approx. 660,000
Area: Approx. 177 sq.km.
Brasília was planned and developed
by Lúcio Costa and Oscar Niemeyer
in 1956 in order to move the capital
from Rio de Janeiro to a more central
loca on. The landscape architect
was Roberto Burle Marx. The city's
design divides it into numbered
blocks as well as sectors for specified
ac vi es, such as the Hotel Sector,
the Banking Sector and the Embassy
Sector. Brasília was chosen as a
UNESCO World Heritage Site due to
its modernist architecture.
The city has a unique status in Brazil,
as it is an administra ve division
rather than a legal municipality like
other ci es in Brazil.
THE NEW CAPITAL REGION OF ANDHRA PRADESH I THE CAPITAL REGION PLAN REPORT
The Chicago architects Walter Burley
Griffin and Marion Mahony Griffin
was selected and construc on
commenced in 1913. The city's
design was influenced by the garden
city movement and incorporates
significant areas of natural vegeta on
that have earned Canberra the tle of
the "bush capital".
www.audrc.org
Canberra, Australia
Popula on: Approx. 360,000
Area: Approx. 815 sq.km.
Putrajaya, planned as a garden and
intelligent city, 38% of the area
is reserved for green spaces by
emphasising the enhancement of
natural landscape. A network of open
spaces and wide boulevards were
incorporated to the plan.
Construc on began in August 1995 and
it was Malaysia's biggest project and
one of Southeast Asia's largest with
es mated final cost of US$ 8.1 billion.
The en re project was designed and
constructed by Malaysian companies
with only 10% of the materials
imported.
brasilll.com
www.tnnegypt.com
Brasilia, Brazil
Putrajaya, Malaysia
Popula on: Approx. 2,860,000
Area: Approx. 5,802 sq.km.
Popula on: Approx. 70,000
Area: Approx. 49 sq.km.
Among the Indian examples, following
state capital were studied.
1. Chandigarh, India
2. Jaipur, India
3. Naya Raipur, India
4. Gandhinagar, India
The key take aways from these capital
ci es are:
Some of the different func ons of the
Capital City are Civic core comprising
of the Assembly, Secratariate & High
Court; State Government & Ins tu onal
buildings; Central business district;
Business Parks, Government housing
and University.
The Civic core sums up to approximately
3 sq km area while the Central Business
District measures between 1 to 2 sq
km.
The average city block size is
approximately 0.8 in width to 1.2km in
length.
The green connectors are where
maximum public ameni es are located.
The construc on of Jaipur started
in 1727. It took around four years to
complete the major palaces, roads
and square.
Chandigarh, also known as The
City Beau ful, is a city and a union
territory in the northern part of India
that serves as the capital of the states
of Haryana and Punjab.
The city of Chandigarh was the
first planned city in India postindependence in 1947 and is known
interna onally for its urban design.
The master plan of the city was
prepared by Le Corbusier, transformed
from an earlier plan by the American
planner Albert Mayer. Most of the
government buildings and housing
in the city, however, is designed by
the Chandigarh Capital Project Team
headed by Pierre Jeanneret, Jane
Drew and Maxwell Fry.
agingmodernism.wordpress.com
Chandigarh
The city was built following the
principles of Shilpa Shastra, the
science of Indian Architecture. The
city was divided into nine blocks, two
of which contain the state buildings
and palaces, with the remaining
seven allo ed to the public. Huge
for fica on walls were built, along
with seven strong gates. For the me,
during the regime of Sawai Ram Singh,
the whole city was painted pink to
welcome Edward, Prince of Wales.
Today, avenues remain painted in pink,
giving Jaipur a dis nc ve appearance.
Popula on: Approx. 1,050,000
Area: Approx. 114 sq.km.
While venturing to prepare the
development plan for Naya Raipur,
basic studies were made in the
form of a secondary survey of data
on Chandigarh (the first capital of
independent India) and Raipur, the
elder sister and the most important
“organic” metropolis in the region.
With a popula on of 5.6 lakh, the Naya
Raipur City is expected to generate
approximately 2.2 lakh jobs, with an
assumed workforce par cipa on rate
of 40%. The high standards of physical
and social infrastructure adopted for
the city will be able to cope with the
maximum capacity of the city.
xix
besƩoddlertoys.eu
Jaipur
Popula on: Approx. 6,700,000
Area: Approx. 645 sq.km.
The character of a plan for a new city
is influenced by various factors, such
as the regional se ng, site condi ons,
dominant func on etc. Func onally,
Gandhinagar was to be the capital
city of Gujarat. The new city would
predominantly be the administra ve
centre of the state and consequently
may acquire many important cultural,
civic and allied func ons. Ini ally, the
principal employer in the city would be
the state government and as such, the
design popula on was based on the
government employment structure.
In 1965 the city was planned for a
popula on of 150,000.
nayaraipur.gov.in
www.swasƟkrealbiz.com
Naya Raipur
Gandhinagar
Popula on: Approx. 2,860,000
Area: Approx. 5,802 sq.km.
Popula on: Approx. 196,000
Area: Approx. 177 sq.km.
Capital Region_ Projected Popula on Distribu on and Density
xx
Planning
Area
No. of Mandals
Area
E x i s t i n g P r o j e c t e d Density
(sq.km.) Popula on
Popula on (p/sq.km.)
(Year 2011) (Year 2035)
Central
7
Mangalagiri, Thullur, Tadepalli, Ibrahimpatnam,
Vijayawada (Urban), Vijayawada (Rural) and
Penamaluru
Southern
11
Eastern
South East
854
1760790
4,250,000
4,977
Chilakaluripet, Edlapadu, Guntur, Medikonduru,
Nadendla, Pedakakani, Pedanandipadu,
Phirangipuram, Prathipadu, Tadikonda, Va cherukuru
1266
1281334
2,180,000
1,721
14
Challapalle, Ghantasala, Gudivada, Gudlavalleru,
Kankipadu, Mopidevi, Movva, Mudinepalle,
Nandivada, Pamarru, Pamidimukkala, Pedaparupudi,
Thotlavalluru and Vuyyuru
1072
689394
1,190,000
1,110
16
Amruthalur, Bha prolu, Chebrolu, Herukupalle,
Duggirala, Kakumanu, Karlapalem, Kollipara, Kollur,
Nagaram, Pi alavanipalem, Ponnur, Repalle, Tenali,
Tsundur, Vemuru
1159
859101
1,370,000
1,182
South West 7
Amaravathi, Atchampet, Bellamkonda,
Muppalla, Pedakurapadu, Sa enapalle
Krosuru,
897
379427
590,000
658
Northern
6
Agiripalle, G.konduru, Musunuru, Mylavaram, Nuzvid,
Reddigudem
837
318026
530,000
633
Western
5
Chandarlapadu,
Kanchikacherla,
Penuganchiprolu, Veerullapadu
788
295939
500,000
635
North East
3
Bapulapadu, Gannavaram, Unguturu
534
226272
420,000
787
Nandigama,
THE NEW CAPITAL REGION OF ANDHRA PRADESH I THE CAPITAL REGION PLAN REPORT
AGRICULTURAL
ZONE
PROTECTION
WORLD WIDE CASE EXAMPLES
A major concern that most of the
agricultural ci es face today is the
development of agricultural land.
Agriculture Land is being converted into
housing developments and commercial
estates at an alarming rate. To combat
this irreparable lost of agricultural
land various countries have adopted
suitable strategies. A few of them are
listed below.
Keys reasons for conver ng agricultural
land to other land uses are:
• Increased Demand on Land
• Agricultural Business Reali es dependant on nature, government’s
policies and farmer’s ability.
• Other Government Policies- Tax
policies such as tax abatements
for industry, capital gains taxes,
and income tax deduc ons for
homeowners encourage land use
conversion.
Key reasons to protect Agricultural land
• Sustain Quality of Life
• Protect prime fer le lands for food
produc on
• Protect Natural Resources Wellmanaged
agriculture
land
protects soil and water resources
and can prevent flooding.
CASE EXAMPLE 1 - UNITED STATES
OF AMERICA
This sec on discusses implementa on
policies being used throughout the U.S.
to protect agricultural lands.1
PURCHASE OF DEVELOPMENT
RIGHTS
A Purchase of Development Rights
(PDR) program is a voluntary and
compensatory farmland protec on
technique.
PDR
programs
pay
farmland owners to permanently
restrict development on their land,
offering liquid assets to farmers who
are o en land rich and cash poor.
PDR programs are some mes known
also as “Purchase of Agricultural
Conserva on Easements” (PACE). PDR
programs offer a more planned approach
to protec ng agricultural lands while
giving landowners incen ves to keep
property in agricultural uses.
- 20 out of 50 states in the USA have
some sort of PDR Programme.
Communi es can benefit from TDR
programs because they are paid for by
the private marketplace and promote
commercial and residen al growth
close to public services. The greatest
advantages of TDR programs include
permanent
protec on,
voluntary
par cipa on, channeling development
to preferred loca ons, and monetary
benefits to farmers. However, these
programs can be quite complicated,
and the availability of suitable parcels
of land to receive the development is a
prerequisite
- 14 out of 50 states in the USA had
legisla on that allowed the use of
Transfer of Development Rights (TDR)
TRANSFER OF DEVELOPMENT
RIGHTS
TDR programs allow the transfer of
development rights from one parcel
of land (sending parcel) to another
(receiving parcel). The sending parcel
is then permanently protected by a
conserva on easement. This shi in
land uses allows locally designated
growth areas to receive the growth
while protec ng agricultural lands.
AGRICULTURAL LAND ZONING
Agricultural zoning refers to local zoning
ordinances that designate and protect
areas or zones. Other land uses in these
areas are discouraged. Zoning is widely
used. However, there are problems
associated with this method of
agricultural land protec on. Zoning
is rarely permanent. Variances and
rezoning occur on a regular basis, thus
zoning offers li le hope of a las ng
solu on.
Zoning is a regulatory measure that
can reduce (or raise) property values.
Wherever lines are drawn on a map,
disputes arise over fairness. This creates
conflict between property rights and
public benefit.
- 24 out of 50 states have Agricultural
Zoning
1
Source - Purdue University
Coopera ve Extension Service- Agricultural
Land Protec on in Indiana- h p://www.agcom.
purdue.edu/AgCom/Pubs/menu.htm
1-888-EXT-INFO
AGRICULTURAL DISTRICTS
Agricultural Districts are voluntary
programs designa ng special areas for
agricultural use only. In exchange for
enrollment in the program, farmers
receive benefits that vary from
state to state. Agricultural District
programs offer a way for community
and agriculture to cooperate in the
protec on of agricultural lands. Farmers
can take advantage of a package of
benefits that may include tax incen ves,
cost sharing for approved agricultural
prac ces, etc. The community benefits
through a rela vely low cost program
that is completely voluntary, thus
raising fewer fairness issues.
On the downside, these programs
are o en very easy to withdraw
from and so do li le to permanently
protect agricultural land. Finally,
these programs most o en appeal to
landowners whose land is probably not
threatened by development anyway.
Landowners normally will keep their
land in an Agricultural District un l it
becomes so valuable that the economic
advantages of withdrawing outweigh
the economic advantages of con nuing
in the program.
By 1997, 16 states had enacted
Agricultural District laws.
AGRICULTURAL TAX INCENTIVES
Tax breaks are widely used throughout
the U.S. to provide financial incen ves
to farmers and owners of agricultural
lands. Taxes paid on agricultural lands
are assessed at a lower rate than the
market value assessed on other land.
Circuit breaker programs allow relief
of property taxes that exceed a certain
percentage of a farmer’s income. Other
tax incen ve programs for agricultural
landowners allow farmers to take
credits against state income taxes for
investment in approved agricultural
produc on prac ces. Property tax
exemp ons for newly constructed or
reconstructed farm structures and
buildings are allowed in some states.
These solu ons for protec ng
agricultural lands usually lack enough
incen ve for farmers to ini ate, or they
are short lived. Land speculators could
easily use these programs to benefit
un l land becomes more valuable.
RIGHTͳTOͳFARM LAWS
Every state in the U.S. has enacted
right-to-farm laws. These laws
strengthen the legal posi on of
farmers who are sued for private
nuisance and protect farmers from
an -nuisance
ordinances
and
unreasonable controls on farm
opera ons. Such laws provide farm
families with a sense of security and
reassurance that farming is a valued and
accepted ac vity in their community.
The disadvantage is that they do not
offer many incen ves by themselves
to keep agricultural lands from
conversion to residen al or commercial
development.
xxi
CASE EXAMPLE 2
OREGON
LAND USE ZONING PLANS1
xxii
Since 1973, Oregon has maintained
a strong statewide program for land
use planning with a set of established
goals. Local governments do the
planning and administer most of the
land use regula ons and the state sets
the standards for such planning. The
resul ng mosaic of state-approved
local comprehensive plans covers all of
Oregon.
LOCAL COMPREHENSIVE PLANS
A local comprehensive plan guides a
community’s land use, conserva on
of natural resources, economic
development, and public services.
REVIEW OF LOCAL PLANS
Because local comprehensive plans
must be consistent with the statewide
planning goals, plans are reviewed
by the state’s Land Conserva on and
Development Commission (LCDC)
MAPPED REPRESENTATIONS
The adjacent figure - Map 18 depicts
LCDC’s
summary
classifica on
of the zoning. As these zoning
classifica ons are developed at the
county and metropolitan levels, zoning
classifica ons vary from county to
county. All coun es have “exclusive
farm use” (EFU) categories. Maps 19,
20, 21 and 22 depict finer subdivisions
of the summary zoning categories
shown on Map 18.
1
Source - Willame e River Basin Atlas
2nd Edi on - D. Richey J. Goicochea Duclos
THE NEW CAPITAL REGION OF ANDHRA PRADESH I THE CAPITAL REGION PLAN REPORT
CASE EXAMPLE 3 NM ESTABLISHED 1958
Area
160,000 hectares, 395,368 acres
Major
• There should be recrea on areas near great ci es
Objec ves/
• Produc ve agricultural land should not be surrendered to urban uses
Vision
• Water catchment areas and recrea on areas should not be given over to urban uses
Agricultural
• In the Randstad region, 80% of land is used for range of agricultural ac vi es including cul va ng under glass,
Features
bulb growing and large-scale arable farming
• Also supports dairy farming
• Contains peat meadows, low polders, dunes and flood plains
Natural Features
Highly scenic; Dykes, ditches, ponds; river landscapes, peat lands and drained lakes
Governance
Considered more of a planning concept than a legal en ty, the Fourth Report on Spa al Development in the
Netherlands gave the Green Heart the status of ‘Na onal
Landscape’ and a policy document was created to protect and promote the area’s openness and landscape
iden ty
The policy involves development of the landscape, development of nature and cultural values, and restric on of
urban sprawl. Although strictly a planning
policy, it is strongly supported by the Netherlands government
The Green Heart Pla orm is responsible for implemen ng policy rela ng to the Green Heart. It is made up of
representa ves of the four government ministries, the Randstad provinces, the four major ci es in the Randstad
ring, other municipali es, water boards and interest groups
Greatest Threat
• Housing and development pressures on open spaces
• Construc on of new roads and railway lines
• Recrea onal space is in short supply
• Struggle to protect agricultural land
Recent Ac vity
• Although the Green Heart con nues to be a na onal planning policy concept, local governments now have
more discre on in deciding where to build and which restric ons to li
• Netherlands government has iden fied the Green Heart as part of its response to climate change
Bo om Line
While the Green Heart remains in need of con nued protec on, be er condi ons have been created there and
it is viewed as a significant and valuable part of the
source_ h p://dx.doi.org/10.4236/nr.2012.33015 Published Online September 2012 (h p://www.SciRP.
org/journal/nr)
Randstad region, with its diverse func ons of agriculture, recrea on, and water and nature management
xxiii
CASE EXAMPLE 4 ONTARIO GREENBELT ESTABLISHED 2005
xxiv
Area
728,000 hectares, 1.8 million acres
Major
To safeguard the quality of life in the Golden Horseshoe in an cipa on of con nuing popula on growth and
Objec ves/
urbaniza on
Vision
Agricultural
• Prime agricultural land
Features
• Specialty-crop land
Natural Features
Natural heritage – forests, wetlands, rivers, lakes, etc, Water-resource systems,
Indigenous species,
Ecosystems
Governance
• Greenbelt Act, 2005 – gives the provincial Cabinet the authority to establish a Greenbelt Plan and to
establish a Greenbelt Council to give advice to the Minister of Municipal Affairs and Housing
• Both government and non-governmental bodies involved
• Plan reviewed every ten years
• Municipali es have role – must ensure decisions and official plans conform with the Greenbelt Plan
Greatest Threat
• Highways and secondary roads
• Other Infrastructure
• Aggregate extrac on
Recent Ac vity
• Ontario government has worked to prevent planned or proposed development in a number of sensi ve
areas in the Greenbelt
• Broad range of programs to support farming, tourism and recrea on introduced
• Ontario government extended the environmental protec on in the Rouge River Watershed in Richmond
Hill
• Efforts underway to extend Greenbelt protec on to addi onal land in adjacent municipali es
Bo om Line
Very strong legal protec on rela ve to greenbelts studied and covers a large area – it measures 11 mes the
size of the City of Toronto and is larger than Prince Edward Island
Has had strong support from the public, the provincial government and municipali es, and many other
stakeholders over its first five years of life
Greenbelt has remained strong in its prominence and ability to be sustainable
THE NEW CAPITAL REGION OF ANDHRA PRADESH I THE CAPITAL REGION PLAN REPORT
source_ Wri en and researched by the Canadian Ins tute for Environmental Law and Policy
Maureen Carter-Whitney & Thomas C. Esakin
CASE EXAMPLE 5 COPENHAGEN FINGER PLAN ESTABLISHED 1947
Area
10,900 hectares, 26,923 acres
Major
Develop an urban region that would be well served by public transport, allow residents to have good access
Objec ves/
to green spaces close to here they live, and protect the open countryside from being lost to urban sprawl
Vision
Agricultural
No specific protec on for agricultural landscapes, and farming has been in significant decline
Features
Natural Features
Forests, lakes and coasts
Governance
• Copenhagen’s Finger Plan has legal status in Denmark’s Planning Act
• The Finger Plan regulates urban development by requiring that the green wedges, the protected land
interspersed between ‘fingers’ of urban development, are reserved for non-urban recrea onal use
• Na onal government establishes the criteria used to divide the Greater Copenhagen area for planning
purposes, and defines the overall principles for planning
• Municipali es have responsibility for regula ng land use in their towns and countryside, and planning to
protect natural areas. Municipal plans set out a development strategy to provide a framework for more
detailed local planning
• Plans for urban development must consider opportuni es to strengthen public transport
Greatest Threat
• Opposi on to protec ons in the Finger Plan comes from municipali es that border the green wedges and
are limited in their ability to develop those greenfields
• Municipali es outside of the finger town that have large amounts of agricultural land may wish to expand
their urban developments into those areas
Recent Ac vity
• The Finger Plan 2007 is the current na onal planning direc ve for Greater Copenhagen
• 2007 changes to Denmark’s Planning Act gave the Finger Plan legal authority and abolished the regional
authority that had existed, transferring planning powers to the municipali es in the Copenhagen Region
Bo om Line
• There con nues to be pressure for urban development such as new residen al areas throughout Greater
Copenhagen, including open areas in the urban fringe, but proper implementa on of the Finger Plan should
ensure that development is located in the exis ng finger zones
Source: Spa al Planning in Denmark by the Ministry of the Environment, Denmark, 2007.
xxv
CASE EXAMPLE 6 PORTLAND METRO URBAN GROWTH BOUNDARY ESTABLISHED 1979
xxvi
Area
102,953 hectares, 254,403 acres
Major
To protect farms and forests from urban sprawl and to promote the efficient use of land, public facili es and
Objec ves/
services inside the boundary as well as to promote development and re-development of buildings and
Vision
land in the urban core to help the downtown thrive economically
Agricultural
•
Features
• Fer le agricultural land and forests; crops include nuts, berries, hops, wine grapes, mint, grass seed and nursery
Shares similar values with Ontario
and landscape plants
Natural Features
Parks and forests, Hiking trails
Governance
• The Urban Growth Boundary (UGB) was put in place as part of Oregon’s statewide land use planning program
implemented through Senate Bill 100 in May 1973
• A erwards, a number of ini a ves were undertaken to weaken the Bill but they were defeated and the UGB
was established in 1979
• UGB reviewed every five years
• State and local governments work together - state lays out framework for protec on and local governments are
required to make planning decisions within that framework
• Non-governmental organiza ons have a role, including the Audubon Society of Portland and 1000 Friends of
Oregon
Greatest Threat
• Development pressures despite a desire to combat urban sprawl and encourage sustainable transporta on
• Struggle to protect agricultural land
Recent Ac vity
Source_h p://courses.umass.edu/greenurb/2006/amerolli/UGB.jpg
• In September 2009, the Metro government completed the most recent capacity analysis, which indicated that it
may be necessary to add a small amount of land to the UGB so it has enough capacity for growth
• The capacity analysis report recommends that the Portland region manage the UGB in a manner that protects
farm and forest lands, supports a strong economy, and maintains strong communi es
• Local governments in the Portland region have developed programs to promote a regional food economy
Bo om Line
• Need to ensure adequate land for urban growth must be balanced against protec ng natural and agricultural
lands
Source_h p://courses.umass.edu/greenurb/2006/amerolli/2040.jpg
THE NEW CAPITAL REGION OF ANDHRA PRADESH I THE CAPITAL REGION PLAN REPORT
CASE EXAMPLE 7 SÃO PAULO CITY GREEN BELT BIOSPHERE RESERVE ESTABLISHED 1994
Area
1,760,311 hectares, 4,347,968 acres in total [UNESCO Biosphere Reserve includes the urban area. Area of
the Green Belt minus urban area is 1,540,032 hectares, 3,803,879 acres]
Major
• Crea on of a UNESCO Biosphere Reserve to protect natural heritage and environmentally sensi ve lands
Objec ves/
• Preserva on of biodiversity
Vision
• Build public awareness about the significance and vulnerability of the ecosystem services in the Green Belt
Agricultural
Organic produc on and agriculture in peri-urban areas
Features
Natural Features
• Ecosystem contains tropical rain forest, 20 species of monkeys, fungi and many species of parrots and other
birds
• Types of vegeta on other than forest are natural fields, shoal and mangrove
Governance
• The São Paulo City Green Belt Biosphere Reserve was established through UNESCO’s Man and the Biosphere
program
• A number of documents govern the GBBR, including: a Management System; a State of São Paulo Bylaw that
provides rules and procedures for the green belt and related agencies; and a GBBR Ac on Plan that guides
ac vi es in the Green Belt
• A Management Council has been established to create policies for the GBBR. The Forest Ins tute develops
programs to implement them
Source_ h p://www.fauser.com.br/ihhf/imagens/rbcvcsp.jpg
Greatest Threat
• Urban growth and real estate specula on due to rapid urban growth
Recent Ac vity
• Farmers in the Green Belt have formed organiza ons to cer fy organic food and built rela onships with
restaurants in the city
• The Youth Eco-job Training Program provides eco-job training in sustainable agriculture and tourism
• The Forest Ins tute has ini ated programs that address environmental protec on, including a voluntary carbon
neutraliza on market to support reforesta on
Bo om Line
• As a major city in one of the primary BRIC (Brazil, Russia, India, China) emerging economies, São Paulo faces
more complex challenges and greater social inequi es than the other greenbelts studied here
• Programs in the Green Belt have sought to address the landscape transforma on caused by urban sprawl with
programs that encourage the conserva on of vital natural features and ecological services, as well as cultural
heritage and agricultural resources
xxvii
xxviii
THE NEW CAPITAL REGION OF ANDHRA PRADESH I THE CAPITAL REGION PLAN REPORT
Was this manual useful for you? yes no
Thank you for your participation!

* Your assessment is very important for improving the work of artificial intelligence, which forms the content of this project

Download PDF

advertisement